NFLbirds
Received From Subject
7/3/20 9:58 am WILLIAM PHELAN <wmjphelan...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> Re: [nflbirds] fall migrants
7/3/20 9:29 am John Murphy <southmoonunder...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> [nflbirds] fall migrants
7/2/20 1:11 pm 'anhinga' <anhinga...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> [nflbirds] SMNWR, 7-2, terns
6/27/20 3:13 pm 'Galveston Ornithological Society' <galornsoc...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> RE: [nflbirds] MIKI flock
6/27/20 12:45 pm Don Morrow <donaldcmorrow...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> Re: [nflbirds] MIKI flock
6/27/20 12:36 pm Don Morrow <donaldcmorrow...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> Re: [nflbirds] Limpkin SMNWR
6/27/20 10:35 am 'Michael Hill' <mchill7...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> [nflbirds] Limpkin SMNWR
6/27/20 10:28 am 'Michael Hill' <mchill7...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> [nflbirds] MIKI flock
6/26/20 6:20 pm Don Morrow <donaldcmorrow...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> [nflbirds] SMNWR -- Friday Morning
6/22/20 12:35 pm Harry Hooper <sn_egret...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> [nflbirds] S. end of Lake Miccosukee
6/18/20 4:24 am Don Morrow <donaldcmorrow...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> [nflbirds] Great American Outdoors Act
6/16/20 2:12 pm 'Galveston Ornithological Society' <galornsoc...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> RE: [nflbirds] Frogs
6/16/20 1:20 pm 'Cavanagh, Jim' <jim.cavanagh...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> [nflbirds] Frogs
6/15/20 2:51 pm Don Morrow <donaldcmorrow...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> [nflbirds] SMNWR--- Monday Morning
6/14/20 3:55 pm 'anhinga' <anhinga...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> [nflbirds] Nat Geo article on flamingo color
6/14/20 4:42 am 'anhinga' <anhinga...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> [nflbirds] flamingo photo series
6/13/20 5:04 pm 'anhinga' <anhinga...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> RE: [nflbirds] SMNWR - Am Flamingo color
6/13/20 4:44 pm 'Galveston Ornithological Society' <galornsoc...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> RE: [nflbirds] SMNWR - Am Flamingo color
6/13/20 3:50 pm 'anhinga' <anhinga...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> Re: [nflbirds] SMNWR - Am Flamingo color
6/13/20 3:36 pm Kim Forehand-van der Linde <kim...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> Re: [nflbirds] SMNWR - Am Flamingo color
6/13/20 3:17 pm 'anhinga' <anhinga...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> [nflbirds] SMNWR - Am Flamingo color
6/11/20 8:24 pm Harry Hooper <sn_egret...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> [nflbirds] escape from home
6/11/20 12:59 pm Don Morrow <donaldcmorrow...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> [nflbirds] SMNWR -- Thursday morning
6/9/20 10:49 am 'Galveston Ornithological Society' <galornsoc...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> RE: [nflbirds] Migrating Purple Martins
6/9/20 9:52 am dee wilder <dwilder_32301...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> Re: [nflbirds] Late Spring White Pelicans
6/9/20 7:10 am '<dotrobbins...>' <dotrobbins...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> Re: [nflbirds] Late Spring White Pelicans
6/9/20 6:32 am 'anhinga' <anhinga...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> [nflbirds] Late Spring White Pelicans
6/8/20 5:03 pm Dean and Sally <dsjue...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> Re: [nflbirds] SMNWR, 6/8
6/8/20 1:32 pm 'anhinga' <anhinga...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> [nflbirds] SMNWR, 6/8
6/8/20 8:29 am Harry Hooper <sn_egret...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> [nflbirds] St. Marks NWR yesterday
6/7/20 9:11 am 'Lucy and Bob Duncan' <robertaduncan...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> [nflbirds] Storm update
 
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Date: 7/3/20 9:58 am
From: WILLIAM PHELAN <wmjphelan...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: Re: [nflbirds] fall migrants
At St Mark's this morning, I saw a flock of 45+ Willets arriving together on the salt flats near lighthouse.
Fall migrants?
Bill Phelan

(o,o)
/)_)
" "

> On 07/03/2020 12:29 PM John Murphy <southmoonunder...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> The first local fall migrants have shown up here at Alligator Pt. Almost like clockwork, I can count on Belted kingfishers to return the week of Independence Day. This year was no exception as the first was observed yesterday (07/02). Kingfishers are usually the longest lingering non-breeders (not including certain non-breeding shorebirds, larids & waders which may not migrate at all) arriving in July and departing in May.
>
> Today (07/03) I observed a Black-and-white warbler in my yard. Typically one of the earliest returning fall migrants.
>
> John Murphy
> Alligator Pt, FL
>
>
>
>

 

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Date: 7/3/20 9:29 am
From: John Murphy <southmoonunder...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: [nflbirds] fall migrants
The first local fall migrants have shown up here at Alligator Pt. Almost like clockwork, I can count on Belted kingfishers to return the week of Independence Day. This year was no exception as the first was observed yesterday (07/02). Kingfishers are usually the longest lingering non-breeders (not including certain non-breeding shorebirds, larids & waders which may not migrate at all) arriving in July and departing in May.

Today (07/03) I observed a Black-and-white warbler in my yard. Typically one of the earliest returning fall migrants.

John Murphy
Alligator Pt, FL

 

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Date: 7/2/20 1:11 pm
From: 'anhinga' <anhinga...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: [nflbirds] SMNWR, 7-2, terns
Birding for a few hours today, beginning about 10 am. Seven species of tern, locations below. Whiffed on Caspian

Double bridges - heard frequently and finally got a good look at Acadian Flycatcher, Prothonotary seen by Cyndi

Tram Rd (105) - Blue Grosbeak (thanks to the alert from Don Morrow)

Stony Bayou #1 - at least 20 Marbled Godwits, Least and Gull-billed Terns, S-b Dowitchers, Wilson's Plovers, Black Skimmers, Reddish Egrets (one white, one dark)

East River Pool - two Black Terns, one breeding and one non-breeding plumage, Least Bitterns

Lighthouse flats - at least 15 Common Tern, and also Sandwich, Royal, and Forster's, Oystercatchers, Whimbrel, Turnstones, Willet

Lighthouse Pool - Two adult Black-necked Stilts with two 3/4 sized young in NE corner

Matt Johnstone



 

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Date: 6/27/20 3:13 pm
From: 'Galveston Ornithological Society' <galornsoc...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: RE: [nflbirds] MIKI flock
Michael, it would be instructive to note the adult/juvenile ratio in that
flock. In Texas, I have seen flocks of MIKIs, and others of STKIs, before
the migration season. I'd bet a nickel 2/3s of your birds were streaked
(juvies), like a family or two out for a fly. But they were far too late for
spring migrants and far too early for fall (more like August). In case
anyone wonders, I believe they are more likely trans-Gulf in spring than
fall. From mid August to mid October we get scads of them (STKIs late July
through mid Sept).



BTW, while they certainly eat cicadas, insects are a low protein diet, and I
strongly suspect they also snatch anoles and Broad-headed Skinks (males) out
of the canopy. Curiously, females don't ascend to the tops of the canopy.



Jim, bored out of my mind in Galveston.



_____

From: <nflbirds...> [mailto:<nflbirds...>] On Behalf
Of Don Morrow <donaldcmorrow...> [nflbirds]
Sent: Saturday, June 27, 2020 2:46 PM
To: Michael Hill
Cc: NFLBirds
Subject: Re: [nflbirds] MIKI flock





I checked Birds of the World and there was a note that indicated MIKIs form
post-breeding flocks before migrating. It noted most migration starting in
mid-August and going circum-Gulf through Texas and Mexico. Pranty notes that
some MIKIs apparently island hop, as they are seen in small numbers heading
South from the keys.



My local birds are still in family groups.




Don Morrow

<donaldcmorrow...> <mailto:<donaldcmorow...>

Tallahassee, FL





On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 1:28 PM 'Michael Hill' <mchill7...>
[nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> wrote:



Yesterday around noon, a broad-winged hawk buzzed by our sliding glass door.
We went outside to see over a dozen Mississippi kites soaring over the oaks.
They were not hunting at tree level, but quite high. We have a few nesting
in our neighborhood, and a banner year for cicadas. I thought it was
awfully early for them to begin migration? Michael Hill Tallahassee




 

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Date: 6/27/20 12:45 pm
From: Don Morrow <donaldcmorrow...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: Re: [nflbirds] MIKI flock
I checked *Birds of the World* and there was a note that indicated MIKIs
form post-breeding flocks before migrating. It noted most migration
starting in mid-August and going circum-Gulf through Texas and Mexico.
Pranty notes that some MIKIs apparently island hop, as they are seen in
small numbers heading South from the keys.

My local birds are still in family groups.

Don Morrow
<donaldcmorrow...> <donaldcmorow...>
Tallahassee, FL


On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 1:28 PM 'Michael Hill' <mchill7...>
[nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> wrote:

>
>
> Yesterday around noon, a broad-winged hawk buzzed by our sliding glass
> door. We went outside to see over a dozen Mississippi kites soaring over
> the oaks. They were not hunting at tree level, but quite high. We have a
> few nesting in our neighborhood, and a banner year for cicadas. I thought
> it was awfully early for them to begin migration? Michael Hill Tallahassee
>
>
>

 

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Date: 6/27/20 12:36 pm
From: Don Morrow <donaldcmorrow...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: Re: [nflbirds] Limpkin SMNWR
Very cool! Most Limpkin sightings at the refuge are clustered in April and
September. They have been seen at the Double Bridges before.

The Prothonotaries should be incubating now. The male guards and the female
does the incubation, usually on and off, but may be in the box for up to an
hour before taking a break.

Don Morrow
<donaldcmorrow...> <donaldcmorow...>
Tallahassee, FL


On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 1:35 PM 'Michael Hill' <mchill7...>
[nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> wrote:

>
>
> Today, we went to check on the prothonotary warbler box at the north
> bridge in the Refuge. We were treated to the male singing, but no comings
> and goings into the box of either sex. A large 8’ alligator swam up to us
> blowing bubbles, and looking for a handout. I heard a cluck on the bridge
> concrete slopes and walked over to the south side of the north bridge. A
> limpkin was foraging below. It flushed and my daughter snapped a few
> identifiable pictures. There were no snail eggs (native or otherwise)
> nearby. Michael Hill, Tallahassee
>
>
>

 

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Date: 6/27/20 10:35 am
From: 'Michael Hill' <mchill7...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: [nflbirds] Limpkin SMNWR
Today, we went to check on the prothonotary warbler box at the north bridge
in the Refuge. We were treated to the male singing, but no comings and
goings into the box of either sex. A large 8' alligator swam up to us
blowing bubbles, and looking for a handout. I heard a cluck on the bridge
concrete slopes and walked over to the south side of the north bridge. A
limpkin was foraging below. It flushed and my daughter snapped a few
identifiable pictures. There were no snail eggs (native or otherwise)
nearby. Michael Hill, Tallahassee


 

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Date: 6/27/20 10:28 am
From: 'Michael Hill' <mchill7...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: [nflbirds] MIKI flock
Yesterday around noon, a broad-winged hawk buzzed by our sliding glass door.
We went outside to see over a dozen Mississippi kites soaring over the oaks.
They were not hunting at tree level, but quite high. We have a few nesting
in our neighborhood, and a banner year for cicadas. I thought it was
awfully early for them to begin migration? Michael Hill Tallahassee


 

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Date: 6/26/20 6:20 pm
From: Don Morrow <donaldcmorrow...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: [nflbirds] SMNWR -- Friday Morning
It was cold and dark this morning at St. Marks NWR as I waited for sunrise
on the levee at Stony Bayou II. Everything was black and gray under the
shroud of a low-hanging fog layer mixed with Saharan dust and a bit of
smoke from a controlled burn. A low background of Pig Frog grunts was
occasionally broken by the tinhorn tooting of Green Tree Frogs. Night birds
were quiet with the exception of a few squawking Black Crowned Night Herons
flying somewhere in the dark.

The dawn didn’t break. The blacks turned gray and the grays morphed into a
dirty white in the East. Eventually color broke through. Sawgrass marsh
turned green with a floating ocher cap of developing seed heads. Duckweed
covered canals gleamed a brilliant lime green in the predawn light.

All calendars are arbitrary. For me June is the end of the birding year at
St. Marks. The June/July break is as close as you can get to a point where
Spring migration is over and Fall migration hasn’t started. I’m out for a
year end shorebird survey trying to follow my usual route around the
interior ponds.

By mid-June North-bound shorebirds have passed through. In late June you
have a handful of local breeders like Willets and Wilson’s Plovers, plus
oversummering nonbreeders like Semipalmated Plovers and Short-billed
Dowitchers. It’s a time to look for the first returning shorebirds. They
will be adults in breeding plumage, failed and early nesters on their way
South.

It’s a dreary morning. The sun doesn’t show up until 7:30 am, a pale white
circle high in the Eastern grayness. The ponds are flooded from the recent
rains, concentrating the shorebirds and making it easy to survey them. Most
of the shorebirds are on Stony Bayou I and on the salt flats. I eventually
tally 179 birds of eleven species. Pretty typical for this time of year.
There are a few surprises. Fourteen yearling Marbled Godwits that usually
summer in South Florida. A breeding plumage Dunlin that was probably too
ill to migrate. Semipalmated Sandpiper numbers have ticked up, possibly
indicating returning migrants. A breeding plumage Short-billed Dowitcher
may be a Fall migrant returning from James Bay in Canada.

There are cool things too. A pair of Blue-winged Teal and a calling Black
Rail. June is the month when dispersing Roseate Spoonbills and Reddish
Egrets show up from South Florida and they are out on Stony Bayou I. There
are lots of Orchard Orioles about and Seaside Sparrows are still displaying
in the salt marshes.

It’s the end of the birding year, but if you look closely you can see the
promise of things to come. Green berries of Fox Grape, Green Brier,
Peppervine and Swamp Dogwood are ripening. Elderberry and Cabbage Palm are
in flower. They will all provide food for Fall migrants as they begin to
move through in July.

It’s hot and it’s going to get hotter. There are bugs out, but there always
have been bugs in Summer along the Gulf coast. Come down to your refuge and
watch Summer unfold.
You can always take a shower when you get home.

Don Morrow
<donaldcmorrow...> <donaldcmorow...>
Tallahassee, FL

 

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Date: 6/22/20 12:35 pm
From: Harry Hooper <sn_egret...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: [nflbirds] S. end of Lake Miccosukee
Afternoon nfbirders,
With a quiet morning at home, we decided to do a little close to home birding.  We revisited the boardwalk at U.S. 90 on the south end of Lake Miccosukee, a 20 minutes drive from home. Kowning that the heat of the day could be an issue, we birded the lake between 0910am and 1040am. Again we were surprised that the bugs were nill to none.  A beautiful morning, initially clear skies with a temperature in the upper 70s  F and when we left, partly cloudy with tempertures nearing the mid 80s F.   Within the first 20 to 30 minutes we tallied 15 species.  The Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks were active making it somewhat difficult to get a good count as they moved between cypress stands. We counted at least 10 individuals.  A cool sight was to watch 12 anhingas circling and rising in a morning thermal.  Rapors included, Mississippi and Swallow-tailed kites and Red-shouldered Hawk.  Barn Swallows were actively feeding all around us.The Button Bush on the boardwalk was active with small skippers, several Silver-spotted Skippers and a brillantly yellow Tiger Swallowtail. Also found a Hoary Edge in the parking area, a new life butterfly!
Species seen at the boardwalk this morning included:* Black-bellied Whistling-Duck:  10* Wood Stork: 1* Anhinga: 12* Great Blue Heron: 1* Great Egret: 4* Little Blue Heron: 2 adults* Cattle Egret: 4* Black Vulture: 1* Turkey Vulture: 2* Swallow-tailed Kite: 1* Mississippi Kite: 1* Red-shouldered Hawk: 2* Common Gallinule: 9;  Adults 4, chicks 5* Crow ssp: 1* Barn Swallow: 16 +* Tufted Titmouse: 1* Carolina Wren:  2* Prothonotary Warbler: 1 * Common Yellowthroat: 1 heard* Northern Cardinal: 2 males* Red-winged Blackbird: 2 males* Boat-tailed Grackle: 2
This location is a nice out of the way birding spot with a decent variety birds.  If you visit, be sure to bring a scope. You will need it.
Harry HooperTallahassee, Florida
 

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Date: 6/18/20 4:24 am
From: Don Morrow <donaldcmorrow...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: [nflbirds] Great American Outdoors Act
I watched the news last night and saw a story about Senate passage of the
Great American Outdoors Act. A decade in the making, this law will provide
significant funding for deferred maintenance of public lands, but most
importantly will provide full and dedicated funding for the Land and Water
Conservation Fund (LWCF). The bill passed with overwhelming bipartisan
support 73-25. Rubio voted yes; Scott voted no. It now goes to the House of
Representatives for their consideration starting on June 29th. Their
approval is necessary for the bill’s passage.

LWCF has been the main source of federal land acquisition funding since its
passage in 1964. The idea was simple. Offshore oil and gas resources belong
to the American people. When they are sold, we should dedicate a portion of
the receipts to acquire public land. For over fifty-five years LWCF helped
to provide funds for national parks, forests, wilderness areas and
historical sites. Through its state-side grant program it has provided
funding for state parks, forests and for local government acquisitions of
urban parks and playgrounds. The original LWCF legislation had a funding
sunset date. Unless reauthorized, LWCF’s funding would lapse.

It was not reauthorized.

The Great American Outdoors Act now gives us a second chance to provide
funding for the LWCF program. If you want to protect bird habitat and
provide places to go birding, contact your local US representative and urge
him or her to support this bill. (
https://www.house.gov/representatives/find-your-representative).

I spent over thirty years working on land acquisition projects for the
Trust for Public Land. I have seen first-hand the power and effect of LWCF
funding. The only problem that I had with that news story I saw last night
was that it said a quarter of US lands belong to the US government. That’s
not true.

They belong to us.
Don Morrow
<donaldcmorrow...> <donaldcmorow...>
Tallahassee, FL

 

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Date: 6/16/20 2:12 pm
From: 'Galveston Ornithological Society' <galornsoc...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: RE: [nflbirds] Frogs
Little Blues are a little bit different from other ciconiiforms in several
ways. You have put your finger on one of them. As a largely inland breeder
they get more exposure to freshwater groups of vertebrates and their
dependency on fishes may be as much as <50%. They also enjoy tadpoles,
larval salamanders, frogs, toads (yuk), small snakes and lizards and even a
fairly high number of crayfish (arthropods, not vertebrates).



This is not unprecedented, as Great Blues and Great Egrets often work dry
fields for rodents, and sadly, small snakes. :-(



I will also mention that size is not the only factor in swallowing time.
Treefrogs, with their suction cups, will hang on to the heron's bill, often
for several grueling minutes.



Ribbon, Garter and Water Snakes rely on frogs for well north of 50% of their
diet.



Jim in hot Galveston



_____

From: <nflbirds...> [mailto:<nflbirds...>] On Behalf
Of 'Cavanagh, Jim' <jim.cavanagh...> [nflbirds]
Sent: Tuesday, June 16, 2020 3:20 PM
To: <nflbirds...>
Subject: [nflbirds] Frogs





Little Blue Herons are nesting in a nearby small pond. Two evenings ago one
was hunting around 8:30 PM. It caught a medium sized frog and swallowed it
in 20 seconds. It then caught a large frog which took 2 minutes to swallow.
It then headed for the nest.



Jim Cavanagh

Tallahassee




 

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Date: 6/16/20 1:20 pm
From: 'Cavanagh, Jim' <jim.cavanagh...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: [nflbirds] Frogs
Little Blue Herons are nesting in a nearby small pond. Two evenings ago one was hunting around 8:30 PM. It caught a medium sized frog and swallowed it in 20 seconds. It then caught a large frog which took 2 minutes to swallow.. It then headed for the nest.

Jim Cavanagh
Tallahassee

 

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Date: 6/15/20 2:51 pm
From: Don Morrow <donaldcmorrow...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: [nflbirds] SMNWR--- Monday Morning
I headed down to St. Marks NWR this morning for a little recreational
birding. It was a cool morning for mid-June. There was a fat crescent moon
and, with no clouds to play with, a calm and muted sunrise.

I had chosen to watch the dawn flight from the Double Dikes at Lighthouse
Road. Hundreds of Red-winged Blackbirds and Boat-tailed Grackles boiled out
of the marshes, all heading out to the West to hunt for food. The heron
rookery at the North end of East River Pool produced a single Anhinga. That
rookery started declining prior to Hurricane Michael. It used to have
herons, egrets and ibis in the low hundreds.

Stony Bayou I had Roseate Spoonbills, Reddish Egrets and the usual
dowitchers and plovers. I also noted fourteen Marbled Godwit and a single
Whimbrel. There were Least Terns and a lone Black Tern.

I swung down to the Lighthouse, but didn’t find much. So, I decided to head
for the Double Bridges.

I parked my car and began to walk slowly, watching and listening. By now
most of the refuge’s Summer breeders have young out and are noticeably
quieter. I found Northern Parula and Blue Gray Gnatcatchers and could hear
an Acadian Flycatcher calling. Nearing the second bridge I followed the
sound of a Yellow-Throated Vireo and saw a pair feeding low in the canopy.

Then I noticed a bird moving fast and low over the North Fork of the East
River. I walked over to the edge of the bridge and saw a streak of yellow
fly into the nest box sitting on top of a pole. It was a Prothonotary
Warbler bringing nesting material into the box.

Prothonotary Warblers are one of two species of cavity-nesting warblers in
the US. The other, Lucy’s Warbler, inhabits mesquite desert in the
Southwest. One of the refuge volunteers, Michael Hill, built two nest boxes
and set them up this Spring near the two bridges. Prothonotary Warblers are
known to use nest boxes when they are available.

Prothonotary Warblers return to St. Marks in March and are usually nesting
by April. This late nesting attempt may be a renesting due to a failed
first attempt, but Prothonotaries have been known to have second broods.

Male birds start the nest, but the female completes it. I watched as the
drabber female made repeated trips to the nest box carrying bits of
vegetation. The more brightly colored male sat on an overhanging branch. It
will take a few more days for her to complete the nest, after which they’ll
ignore it for a few days. Then, over several days the female will enter the
nest box in the morning and lay an egg before leaving. Late nestings
usually have four eggs. When the last egg is laid, she’ll start incubating
and in about two weeks the young will hatch.

If you want to see Prothonotary Warblers, they should be starting to feed
young in early July. Both parents will be coming in with insects for about
ten days until the young birds fledge and leave the nest box. This will be
a good opportunity to observe them and you should be able to do so without
disturbing them. There is a six-foot alligator that hangs out there. It
will keep you from getting too close. Stay on the roadway and you and the
warblers will both be fine.
The nest site is located at the Northmost of the two Double Bridges. After
you pass the Visitors Center drive about 0.4 miles and park just before the
first at-grade bridge. The nest box will be on the right side of the road.
Please park safely and observe social distancing if other people are
present.

Don Morrow
<donaldcmorrow...> <donaldcmorow...>
Tallahassee, FL

 

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Date: 6/14/20 3:55 pm
From: 'anhinga' <anhinga...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: [nflbirds] Nat Geo article on flamingo color
The following was forwarded to me by Florentina. The link is about social bonds in flamingos, the pasted article is about preening and color in Greater Flamingos (from which American Flamingo is a fairly recent split) and its findings seem to align with what seems to be going on with the St Marks bird.

Hi Matt and Cyndi
I read the dialogue about the flamingo's plumage and found an article in National Geographic that might be of interest. I also thought you might enjoy the article on the recent study about their society. After reading it, our lonesome friend garnered my sympathy.

https://www.sciencefocus.com/nature/flamingos-make-long-lasting-friendships-same-sex-bonds-and-married-couplings/?utm_campaign=Flamingos+make+long+lasting+friendships%2C+same+sex+bonds+and+%E2%80%98married%E2%80%99+couplings&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=AppleNews

National Geographic article copied and pasted below

PUBLISHED November 10, 2010

There's a reason why flamingos are so pretty in pink: The birds apply "makeup" to impress mates, a new study says.
Scientists had long assumed that flamingo feathers change color only when the plumage becomes faded by the sun or unintentionally stained by organic materials.

But while studying greater flamingos at the Doñana Biological Research Station in Spain, ornithologist Juan Amat realized that something else was going on.

"We noticed that immediately after chicks were hatching, [adult] flamingos lost their pink color," he said. (See wading-bird pictures.)

Adults later regained their famous pink plumage, "yet they were not moulting, so we wondered if there was something cosmetic to consider."

Flamingos: Beyond the Pale

To examine this hypothesis, the researchers studied seasonal variations in flamingo color at three wetlands in Spain. The team also monitored the birds' breeding, feather maintenance, and courtship activities.

(See National Geographic's backyard bird identifier.)

Using telescopes, the scientists assigned each flamingo a color value based on a scale of one to three, ranging from very pale to vibrant pink.

The team found that the color values dropped from an average of 1.7 in February—the height of the mating season—to an average of 1.0 in May, June, July, August, and September, when the birds were looking after hatchlings. In October the values leapt up again, to 1.6.

Flamingos, like all birds, produce oil in glands near their tails. Birds daub this oil onto their feathers with their beaks.

The oil is well known to improve the longevity of feathers and keep them waterproof. But Amat suspected that the flamingos might also be using the substance for coloration.

Flamingos get their color from compounds called carotenoids, which the birds absorb from their diets of algae and small crustaceans.

Flamingo feathers already contain some carotenoids. But, based on samples collected from captive flamingos, Amat and colleagues found that the oil is especially rich in the compounds.

Flamingos In Fine Feather

Both male and female birds increased their oil-daubing behavior during the mating season, the team noted.

In general, the deeper the pink, the more attractive the bird—so the flamingos were likely applying the oil like makeup to make themselves more desirable, he said.

(Related: "Flashier Great Tits Produce Stronger Sperm, Bird Study Shows.")

"We were so excited to discover this," Amat said.

"Other birds, like the bearded vulture, are known to take mud baths that leave their feathers tinged with color. We now need to go and look at these species to see if they are applying cosmetics just like the flamingos do."

The flamingo-makeup study appeared online October 23 in the journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology.



 

Back to top
Date: 6/14/20 4:42 am
From: 'anhinga' <anhinga...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: [nflbirds] flamingo photo series
Karen Willes sent me a series of photos of the flamingo taken since its arrival Oct. 18. Unfortunately, the flamingo's habit of being distant on East River Pool makes it difficult to get a definitive sense of its color history. Still, photographic evidence, as well as comments made by several birders earlier this year, supports that the bird is not as richly colored now as it was a couple of months ago; it is most notable on the neck.

After looking at the photos, thinking about this more, and a quick shave with Occam's Razor, my guess is what I am now seeing (or think I am seeing) has nothing to do with carotenoids in the diet, but is simply a matter of feather fade. I would guess body feather molt would precede breeding season, and at this time of year the bird's feathers are getting old.

It still seems a possibility that post-Michael declining salinity in the pools could affect carotenoid availability, but now is probably not the time to figure that out. If this bird sticks around another year, maybe early Spring 2021 will show something. Following is a link to the origin of the phrase "in the pink". If you sew, it also is related to "pinking shears".

https://grammarist.com/idiom/in-the-pink/#:~:text=The%20expression%20in%20the%20pink,not%20refer%20to%20a%20color.&text=The%20word%20pink%20is%20derived,appearance%20of%20the%20dianthus%20flower.



 

Back to top
Date: 6/13/20 5:04 pm
From: 'anhinga' <anhinga...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: RE: [nflbirds] SMNWR - Am Flamingo color
I suppose the bird could stay quite healthy without carotenoids in its diet.. Not as pink, which would affect its breeding prospects and contribution to the Am Flam gene pool, but since there are no potential partners, pinkness probably isn't too important (photographers may disagree).
Following is a link to an article about pinkness. A different species, and the SMNWR bird doesn't have anyone to fight with anyway.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/06/200607195010.htm

----------------------------------------
From: "'Galveston Ornithological Society' <galornsoc...> [nflbirds]" <nflbirds-noreply...>
Sent: 6/13/20 7:44 PM
To: <anhinga...>, "'Kim Forehand-van der Linde'" <kim...>
Cc: <nflbirds...>
Subject: RE: [nflbirds] SMNWR - Am Flamingo color


From having taught marine biology a million years ago, I seem to remember that possible carotene available increases with light, which is to say, NOW.



I think it’s entirely possible that the bird could eventually deteriorate in its health, just like the three Brown Boobies present here in Galveston for over a year.



Good luck to a great bird!



Jim

Galveston


----------------------------------------

From: <nflbirds...> [mailto:<nflbirds...>] On Behalf Of 'anhinga' <anhinga...> [nflbirds]
Sent: Saturday, June 13, 2020 5:50 PM
To: Kim Forehand-van der Linde
Cc: <nflbirds...>
Subject: Re: [nflbirds] SMNWR - Am Flamingo color





Yes, I understand that, but wonder if anyone has any insight as to why this bird was so richly colored for a few months prior to its apparent transition into a plumage that seems to me the grayest since it arrived in 2018. It was definitely getting the carotenoids previously.

This bird arrived shortly after hurricane Michael when all the pools received a huge dose of saltwater. Could the gradual shift to lower salinity in the pools have changed the carotenoid availability?



----------------------------------------

From: "Kim Forehand-van der Linde <kim...> [nflbirds]" <nflbirds-noreply...>
Sent: 6/13/20 6:36 PM
To: <anhinga...>
Cc: <nflbirds...>
Subject: Re: [nflbirds] SMNWR - Am Flamingo color



If the birds mold out grayer, it means it does not get enough
carotenoids in its food. This is an issue with captive birds who need a
special diet to keep their colors. Without that diet, they ,old into
gray animals.

Kim

On 2020-06-13 18:17, 'anhinga' <anhinga...> [nflbirds] wrote:
> I've become a bit jaded about the flamingo, shame on me, so maybe I
> haven't been paying as close attention to this remarkable bird as I
> should. Yesterday, on Stony Bayou #1, it was providing closer and more
> convenient views than it has since its first arrival. Earlier this
> year, the flamingo had developed rich and vibrant color; yesterday and
> on Wednesday, the bird appeared grayer and less saturated than in the
> recent past. Initially, I attributed this to light conditions, but
> having viewed the bird on two days with different light aspect, I'm
> convinced it is getting paler. Also, recent photos sent to me by Karen
> Willes shows plumage that appears to be in molt. Also, the bird seemed
> to be preening more than usual yesterday.
>
> Steve Howell declares flamingo molt to be poorly understood; I'll take
> his word for it. The pink in flamingos is dependent on carotenoids in
> their diet as the feathers are developing. So, to any aquatic
> biology/chemical limnology folks out there, is there a seasonal
> fluctuation in carotenoid compounds in north Florida in the sort of
> food a filter feeding flamingo uses? Matt
>
>
>
> Links:
> ------
> [1]
> https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/nflbirds/conversations/messages/11425;_ylc=X3oDMTJxdmVxOGMyBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzM3MTYzNDMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1Nzg3BG1zZ0lkAzExNDI1BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA3JwbHkEc3RpbWUDMTU5MjA4NjYyNw--?act=reply&messageNum=11425
> [2]
> https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/nflbirds/conversations/newtopic;_ylc=X3oDMTJlY3R1ODZyBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzM3MTYzNDMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1Nzg3BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA250cGMEc3RpbWUDMTU5MjA4NjYyNw--
> [3]
> https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/nflbirds/conversations/topics/11425;_ylc=X3oDMTM2c2cyZnFyBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzM3MTYzNDMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1Nzg3BG1zZ0lkAzExNDI1BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA3Z0cGMEc3RpbWUDMTU5MjA4NjYyNwR0cGNJZAMxMTQyNQ--
> [4]
> https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/nflbirds/info;_ylc=X3oDMTJlOThiZmk2BF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzM3MTYzNDMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1Nzg3BHNlYwN2dGwEc2xrA3ZnaHAEc3RpbWUDMTU5MjA4NjYyNw--
> [5]
> https://groups.yahoo.com/neo;_ylc=X3oDMTJka3MxNWg4BF9TAzk3NDc2NTkwBGdycElkAzM3MTYzNDMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1Nzg3BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA2dmcARzdGltZQMxNTkyMDg2NjI3
> [6] https://info.yahoo.com/privacy/us/yahoo/groups/details.html
> [7] https://info.yahoo.com/legal/us/yahoo/utos/terms/





 

Back to top
Date: 6/13/20 4:44 pm
From: 'Galveston Ornithological Society' <galornsoc...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: RE: [nflbirds] SMNWR - Am Flamingo color
From having taught marine biology a million years ago, I seem to remember
that possible carotene available increases with light, which is to say, NOW.



I think it's entirely possible that the bird could eventually deteriorate in
its health, just like the three Brown Boobies present here in Galveston for
over a year.



Good luck to a great bird!



Jim

Galveston



_____

From: <nflbirds...> [mailto:<nflbirds...>] On Behalf
Of 'anhinga' <anhinga...> [nflbirds]
Sent: Saturday, June 13, 2020 5:50 PM
To: Kim Forehand-van der Linde
Cc: <nflbirds...>
Subject: Re: [nflbirds] SMNWR - Am Flamingo color





Yes, I understand that, but wonder if anyone has any insight as to why this
bird was so richly colored for a few months prior to its apparent transition
into a plumage that seems to me the grayest since it arrived in 2018. It was
definitely getting the carotenoids previously.

This bird arrived shortly after hurricane Michael when all the pools
received a huge dose of saltwater. Could the gradual shift to lower salinity
in the pools have changed the carotenoid availability?



_____

From: "Kim Forehand-van der Linde <kim...> [nflbirds]"
<nflbirds-noreply...>
Sent: 6/13/20 6:36 PM
To: <anhinga...>
Cc: <nflbirds...>
Subject: Re: [nflbirds] SMNWR - Am Flamingo color



If the birds mold out grayer, it means it does not get enough
carotenoids in its food. This is an issue with captive birds who need a
special diet to keep their colors. Without that diet, they ,old into
gray animals.

Kim

On 2020-06-13 18:17, 'anhinga' <anhinga...> [nflbirds] wrote:
> I've become a bit jaded about the flamingo, shame on me, so maybe I
> haven't been paying as close attention to this remarkable bird as I
> should. Yesterday, on Stony Bayou #1, it was providing closer and more
> convenient views than it has since its first arrival. Earlier this
> year, the flamingo had developed rich and vibrant color; yesterday and
> on Wednesday, the bird appeared grayer and less saturated than in the
> recent past. Initially, I attributed this to light conditions, but
> having viewed the bird on two days with different light aspect, I'm
> convinced it is getting paler. Also, recent photos sent to me by Karen
> Willes shows plumage that appears to be in molt. Also, the bird seemed
> to be preening more than usual yesterday.
>
> Steve Howell declares flamingo molt to be poorly understood; I'll take
> his word for it. The pink in flamingos is dependent on carotenoids in
> their diet as the feathers are developing. So, to any aquatic
> biology/chemical limnology folks out there, is there a seasonal
> fluctuation in carotenoid compounds in north Florida in the sort of
> food a filter feeding flamingo uses? Matt
>
>
>
> Links:
> ------
> [1]
>
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/nflbirds/conversations/messages/11425;_y
lc=X3oDMTJxdmVxOGMyBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzM3MTYzNDMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1N
zg3BG1zZ0lkAzExNDI1BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA3JwbHkEc3RpbWUDMTU5MjA4NjYyNw--?act=repl
y
<https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/nflbirds/conversations/messages/11425;_
ylc=X3oDMTJxdmVxOGMyBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzM3MTYzNDMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1
Nzg3BG1zZ0lkAzExNDI1BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA3JwbHkEc3RpbWUDMTU5MjA4NjYyNw--?act=rep
ly&messageNum=11425> &messageNum=11425
> [2]
>
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/nflbirds/conversations/newtopic;_ylc=X3o
DMTJlY3R1ODZyBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzM3MTYzNDMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1Nzg3BHN
lYwNmdHIEc2xrA250cGMEc3RpbWUDMTU5MjA4NjYyNw--
> [3]
>
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/nflbirds/conversations/topics/11425;_ylc
=X3oDMTM2c2cyZnFyBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzM3MTYzNDMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1Nzg
3BG1zZ0lkAzExNDI1BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA3Z0cGMEc3RpbWUDMTU5MjA4NjYyNwR0cGNJZAMxMTQ
yNQ--
> [4]
>
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/nflbirds/info;_ylc=X3oDMTJlOThiZmk2BF9TA
zk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzM3MTYzNDMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1Nzg3BHNlYwN2dGwEc2xrA3Zna
HAEc3RpbWUDMTU5MjA4NjYyNw--
> [5]
>
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo;_ylc=X3oDMTJka3MxNWg4BF9TAzk3NDc2NTkwBGdycElkAz
M3MTYzNDMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1Nzg3BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA2dmcARzdGltZQMxNTkyMDg2Nj
I3
> [6] https://info.yahoo.com/privacy/us/yahoo/groups/details.html
> [7] https://info.yahoo.com/legal/us/yahoo/utos/terms/




 

Back to top
Date: 6/13/20 3:50 pm
From: 'anhinga' <anhinga...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: Re: [nflbirds] SMNWR - Am Flamingo color
Yes, I understand that, but wonder if anyone has any insight as to why this bird was so richly colored for a few months prior to its apparent transition into a plumage that seems to me the grayest since it arrived in 2018. It was definitely getting the carotenoids previously.
This bird arrived shortly after hurricane Michael when all the pools received a huge dose of saltwater. Could the gradual shift to lower salinity in the pools have changed the carotenoid availability?

----------------------------------------
From: "Kim Forehand-van der Linde <kim...> [nflbirds]" <nflbirds-noreply...>
Sent: 6/13/20 6:36 PM
To: <anhinga...>
Cc: <nflbirds...>
Subject: Re: [nflbirds] SMNWR - Am Flamingo color


If the birds mold out grayer, it means it does not get enough
carotenoids in its food. This is an issue with captive birds who need a
special diet to keep their colors. Without that diet, they ,old into
gray animals.

Kim

On 2020-06-13 18:17, 'anhinga' <anhinga...> [nflbirds] wrote:
> I've become a bit jaded about the flamingo, shame on me, so maybe I
> haven't been paying as close attention to this remarkable bird as I
> should. Yesterday, on Stony Bayou #1, it was providing closer and more
> convenient views than it has since its first arrival. Earlier this
> year, the flamingo had developed rich and vibrant color; yesterday and
> on Wednesday, the bird appeared grayer and less saturated than in the
> recent past. Initially, I attributed this to light conditions, but
> having viewed the bird on two days with different light aspect, I'm
> convinced it is getting paler. Also, recent photos sent to me by Karen
> Willes shows plumage that appears to be in molt. Also, the bird seemed
> to be preening more than usual yesterday.
>
> Steve Howell declares flamingo molt to be poorly understood; I'll take
> his word for it. The pink in flamingos is dependent on carotenoids in
> their diet as the feathers are developing. So, to any aquatic
> biology/chemical limnology folks out there, is there a seasonal
> fluctuation in carotenoid compounds in north Florida in the sort of
> food a filter feeding flamingo uses? Matt
>
>
>
> Links:
> ------
> [1]
> https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/nflbirds/conversations/messages/11425;_ylc=X3oDMTJxdmVxOGMyBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzM3MTYzNDMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1Nzg3BG1zZ0lkAzExNDI1BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA3JwbHkEc3RpbWUDMTU5MjA4NjYyNw--?act=reply&messageNum=11425
> [2]
> https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/nflbirds/conversations/newtopic;_ylc=X3oDMTJlY3R1ODZyBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzM3MTYzNDMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1Nzg3BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA250cGMEc3RpbWUDMTU5MjA4NjYyNw--
> [3]
> https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/nflbirds/conversations/topics/11425;_ylc=X3oDMTM2c2cyZnFyBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzM3MTYzNDMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1Nzg3BG1zZ0lkAzExNDI1BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA3Z0cGMEc3RpbWUDMTU5MjA4NjYyNwR0cGNJZAMxMTQyNQ--
> [4]
> https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/nflbirds/info;_ylc=X3oDMTJlOThiZmk2BF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzM3MTYzNDMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1Nzg3BHNlYwN2dGwEc2xrA3ZnaHAEc3RpbWUDMTU5MjA4NjYyNw--
> [5]
> https://groups.yahoo.com/neo;_ylc=X3oDMTJka3MxNWg4BF9TAzk3NDc2NTkwBGdycElkAzM3MTYzNDMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1Nzg3BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA2dmcARzdGltZQMxNTkyMDg2NjI3
> [6] https://info.yahoo.com/privacy/us/yahoo/groups/details.html
> [7] https://info.yahoo.com/legal/us/yahoo/utos/terms/





 

Back to top
Date: 6/13/20 3:36 pm
From: Kim Forehand-van der Linde <kim...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: Re: [nflbirds] SMNWR - Am Flamingo color
If the birds mold out grayer, it means it does not get enough
carotenoids in its food. This is an issue with captive birds who need a
special diet to keep their colors. Without that diet, they ,old into
gray animals.

Kim




On 2020-06-13 18:17, 'anhinga' <anhinga...> [nflbirds] wrote:
> I've become a bit jaded about the flamingo, shame on me, so maybe I
> haven't been paying as close attention to this remarkable bird as I
> should. Yesterday, on Stony Bayou #1, it was providing closer and more
> convenient views than it has since its first arrival. Earlier this
> year, the flamingo had developed rich and vibrant color; yesterday and
> on Wednesday, the bird appeared grayer and less saturated than in the
> recent past. Initially, I attributed this to light conditions, but
> having viewed the bird on two days with different light aspect, I'm
> convinced it is getting paler. Also, recent photos sent to me by Karen
> Willes shows plumage that appears to be in molt. Also, the bird seemed
> to be preening more than usual yesterday.
>
> Steve Howell declares flamingo molt to be poorly understood; I'll take
> his word for it. The pink in flamingos is dependent on carotenoids in
> their diet as the feathers are developing. So, to any aquatic
> biology/chemical limnology folks out there, is there a seasonal
> fluctuation in carotenoid compounds in north Florida in the sort of
> food a filter feeding flamingo uses? Matt
>
>
>
> Links:
> ------
> [1]
> https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/nflbirds/conversations/messages/11425;_ylc=X3oDMTJxdmVxOGMyBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzM3MTYzNDMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1Nzg3BG1zZ0lkAzExNDI1BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA3JwbHkEc3RpbWUDMTU5MjA4NjYyNw--?act=reply&messageNum=11425
> [2]
> https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/nflbirds/conversations/newtopic;_ylc=X3oDMTJlY3R1ODZyBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzM3MTYzNDMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1Nzg3BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA250cGMEc3RpbWUDMTU5MjA4NjYyNw--
> [3]
> https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/nflbirds/conversations/topics/11425;_ylc=X3oDMTM2c2cyZnFyBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzM3MTYzNDMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1Nzg3BG1zZ0lkAzExNDI1BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA3Z0cGMEc3RpbWUDMTU5MjA4NjYyNwR0cGNJZAMxMTQyNQ--
> [4]
> https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/nflbirds/info;_ylc=X3oDMTJlOThiZmk2BF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzM3MTYzNDMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1Nzg3BHNlYwN2dGwEc2xrA3ZnaHAEc3RpbWUDMTU5MjA4NjYyNw--
> [5]
> https://groups.yahoo.com/neo;_ylc=X3oDMTJka3MxNWg4BF9TAzk3NDc2NTkwBGdycElkAzM3MTYzNDMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1Nzg3BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA2dmcARzdGltZQMxNTkyMDg2NjI3
> [6] https://info.yahoo.com/privacy/us/yahoo/groups/details.html
> [7] https://info.yahoo.com/legal/us/yahoo/utos/terms/



------------------------------------
Posted by: Kim Forehand-van der Linde <kim...>
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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Back to top
Date: 6/13/20 3:17 pm
From: 'anhinga' <anhinga...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: [nflbirds] SMNWR - Am Flamingo color
I've become a bit jaded about the flamingo, shame on me, so maybe I haven't been paying as close attention to this remarkable bird as I should. Yesterday, on Stony Bayou #1, it was providing closer and more convenient views than it has since its first arrival. Earlier this year, the flamingo had developed rich and vibrant color; yesterday and on Wednesday, the bird appeared grayer and less saturated than in the recent past. Initially, I attributed this to light conditions, but having viewed the bird on two days with different light aspect, I'm convinced it is getting paler. Also, recent photos sent to me by Karen Willes shows plumage that appears to be in molt. Also, the bird seemed to be preening more than usual yesterday.

Steve Howell declares flamingo molt to be poorly understood; I'll take his word for it. The pink in flamingos is dependent on carotenoids in their diet as the feathers are developing. So, to any aquatic biology/chemical limnology folks out there, is there a seasonal fluctuation in carotenoid compounds in north Florida in the sort of food a filter feeding flamingo uses? Matt



 

Back to top
Date: 6/11/20 8:24 pm
From: Harry Hooper <sn_egret...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: [nflbirds] escape from home
Evening nflbirders,
Plenty to keep us busy at home.  But with the nice weather, we needed an escape from the "new normal" and close to home.  Grabbed our binocs, scope and camera and headed first to the small boardwalk at the south end of Lake Miccosukee adjacent to U.S. Hyw 90. Its been 5 or more years since we had birded that boardwalk that provides a great observation platform of the lower end of the lake.  We birded the boardwalk for just over an hour, 1205 to 1310 hrs.  Amazingly, with the humidity and heat, not a mosquito, deer fly or other biting insect was noted.  Not expecting much in the way of birding in the middle of the day, we discovered reasonably good birding from the boardwalk, 15 species total.  Nice finds were 3 black-bellied whistling ducks, 2 wood ducks and 4 soaring Mississippi Kites. 
Birds seen or heard:* Black-bellied Whistling Ducks: 4* Wood Ducks: 2 (male & female)* Anhinga: 1 male* Great Blue Heron: 3* Great Egret: 3* Little Blue Heron: 6  (4 white phase imm., 2 adults)* Green Heron: 2* Mississippi Kite: 4* Common Gallinule: 5* Crow ssp:  1 not calling* Barn Swallow: 30 + flying from under the highway bridge* Prothonotary Warbler:  1 * Northern Parula: 1* Northern Cardinal: 1* Red-winged Blackbird: 2 
In addition to birds at the boardwalk, we were able to obtain nice close-up photos of Tiger Swallowtail - male and intermediate female, Gulf Frit, Common Buckeye, Silver-spotted Skipper, and Whirlabout Skipper feeding on the flowers of a large buttonbush adjacent to the boardwalk and a Little Yellow and Sleepy Orange puddling in the parking area.
Then off to Letchworth-Love Archaeological State Park, a park neither of us had visited in the past.   With the exception of the park ranger chain-sawing a large fallen limb, we were the only humans present. Time visited: 1240-1430 hrs.  Birds seen or heard at Letchworth-Love included:* Swallow-tailed Kite: 1* Mississippi Kite: 1* Red-tailed Hawk: 1 adult* Common Ground-Dove: 1* Yellow-billed Cuckoo: 1* Red-bellied Woodpecker: 1* Downy Woodpecker: 2* Blue-gray Gnatcatcher: 1* Eastern Bluebird: 3 recently fledged juvs.* Eastern Towhee: 1* Summer Tanager: 1* Northern Cardinal: 2 males* Orchard Oriole: 1 female
Overall, not a bad get away and not far from home.
Take care and be safe during these troubling times.
Harry HooperTallahassee
 

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Date: 6/11/20 12:59 pm
From: Don Morrow <donaldcmorrow...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: [nflbirds] SMNWR -- Thursday morning
June is not the buggiest month or the muggiest month at St. Marks NWR, but
it gets honorable mention in both categories. June is also the low point
of the year for bird diversity and numbers. Winter ducks and most of the
shorebirds are long gone. However, if you are willing to step outside and
immerse yourself in the early Summer heat there is still plenty to
experience.

I started the morning on the North levee of Stony Bayou II. The frog chorus
from the marshes was deafening. Pig Frogs, Leopard Frogs and Green Tree
Frogs drowned out any hope of hearing birds. The sky was mostly clear and
there was a fat half moon riding high above me. As I was scanning the
horizon for nighthawks, I saw a shining spot just above the Eastern
horizon. I ran back to my car, pulled out my scope and found that I was
looking at a thin crescent Venus. It was a good omen for the day.

I was out to do my early June shorebird survey. Migrant shorebirds
typically pass through by mid-June and I was expecting low numbers of
mostly local breeders and oversummering yearling shorebirds. A few species
like Black-bellied and Semipalmated Plover don’t migrate in their first
year. It’s easy to pick them out. They retain their winter plumage. My
numbers today were what I expected. A ninety percent drop in shorebird
numbers over the last month. The only migrant shorebirds that I found among
the 173 shorebirds that I counted were eight Semipalmated Sandpipers and a
Dunlin, all in breeding plumage.

Cristóbal’s rains flooded the marshes and interior ponds at St.. Marks. Our
nesting Wilson’s Plovers had already fledged their young and weren’t
affected. A hatchling Wilson’s Plover can start walking within two hours
and these plovers had no trouble moving upslope. Most of the nesting Least
Terns were on higher ground and seem to have done well. However, I only
know of one Black-necked Stilt nest that wasn’t flooded this season.. A pair
on Lighthouse Pool fledged early. Three of their four chicks survived
Cristóbal.

A few other notable things. The tern show at St. Marks continues. I had
Least, Black, Gull-billed and Caspian Terns on Stony Bayou I and Royal,
Forster’s and Sandwich Terns on the Lighthouse Flats along with a few Black
Skimmers. The American Flamingo has moved to Stony Bayou I and is easily
visible from Lighthouse Road. You don’t even have to get out of your car to
see it. Lastly, as I was scanning the salt flats for shorebirds, I saw a
small herd of four otters galloping along. They have an ungainly gait that
makes them seem as though they are part slinky. If you keep looking,
there’s always something new to see.

It was hot and a little buggy, but it’s June. If you are willing to endure
a little sweat and a few bug bites you can come down to the refuge and
experience the recurring miracle of a June day at St. Marks.
Don Morrow
<donaldcmorrow...> <donaldcmorow...>
Tallahassee, FL

 

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Date: 6/9/20 10:49 am
From: 'Galveston Ornithological Society' <galornsoc...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: RE: [nflbirds] Migrating Purple Martins
When I taught in Apalachicola around 1980, I used to see martins lining up
on the huge guy-wires around sunset in late May, after they had disappeared
for a couple weeks in mid May. I suspected at the time (and reported) they
were fall migrants.


Jim S.

Galveston



_____

From: <nflbirds...> [mailto:<nflbirds...>] On Behalf
Of 'Lucy and Bob Duncan' <robertaduncan...> [nflbirds]
Sent: Tuesday, June 9, 2020 12:23 PM
To: <ALbirds...>; <nflbirds...>
Subject: [nflbirds] Migrating Purple Martins





Hi all,



Yesterday around sundown Lucy and I were sitting on our beachfront admiring
the sunset when it seemed out of nowhere there were Martins flying all
around the area, some low, some high, milling around and obviously feeding.
As far as we can tell in the fading light, they were all males. We counted
about 25 birds. There are only two Martin houses around our neighborhood and
these young have not fledged yet, so that could not account for these birds.
These had to be migrating. Coming or going?? Martins are known to migrate
north from winter quarters in the Amazon Basin headed for the northern US
well into summer (Birds of North America). In fall, the main thrust south
occurs starting in late July, but some birds move very early. Henry M.
Stevenson (The Birdlife of Florida, 1994) noted a flight of 50 at Mobile Bay
as early as 29 May and they were found at the Tortugas as early as 8 June
and 500 were noted in the Upper Keys on 21 June.



So was this a case of very early migration south or birds just arriving?
They did coincide with TS Cristobal and winds were strong S all day
yesterday. My guess is that they were moving north from the tropics,
especially since they appeared to be all males. They were not present this
a.m. I will never know the answer to that, but that's what makes birding so
interesting.



Bob Duncan

Gulf Breeze, FL




 

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Date: 6/9/20 9:52 am
From: dee wilder <dwilder_32301...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: Re: [nflbirds] Late Spring White Pelicans
So interesting! Thanks for this.Dee
On Tuesday, June 9, 2020, 10:10:24 AM EDT, '<dotrobbins...>' <dotrobbins...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...> wrote:

 

Yes, your conclusion is correct.  Some young White Pelicans, too young to breed, opt not to make the journey to the northern breeding grounds.  Instead, they hang around in flocks  during the summer.  Pretty smart! Dotty RobbinsHigh Springs 

---------- Original Message ----------
From: "'anhinga' <anhinga...> [nflbirds]" <nflbirds-noreply...>
To: "<nflbirds...>" <nflbirds...>
Subject: [nflbirds] Late Spring White Pelicans
Date: Tue, 09 Jun 2020 13:32:10 GMT


 
 For those who peruse eBird checklists from Wakulla County, Kathleen Coates posed the question "from where do all the young, late Spring White Pelicans come?" I have wondered about the same matter - where could an altricial species that takes three months to fledge hatch and get in flight condition to get to St. Marks in May or June? So, I pull out my copy of "Molt" by Steve Howell and my v.1 of "Handbook of North American Birds" (copyright 1962), on the hunch that these less than adult White Pelicans are not hatch year birds, but maybe 10 month old birds that are still working their way towards adult plumage.  Although published 38 years later, "Molt" agrees with the older book that molt in White Pelicans is not well understood, but the thinking has not changed that first breeding does not occur for 3-5 years. The older book describes a "first winter" plumage, the description of which would match the May and June young birds at St. Marks; Howell states "Ages look different, and adult plumage is attained in 3 or 4 cycles".  I do not have any resources that differentiate the various appearances of sub-adult birds. After reading the above, and also looking at the distribution of eBird sightings for White Pelicans in May-June, I'm guessing the young, late Spring White Pelicans are not hatch year birds, but sub-adults that fledged last year or even earlier. Not having to breed allows this age group to wander to wherever provides suitable resources. I would be interested in comments from anyone with insight on this issue.  I think I had made the error of thinking like a small bird, something I have to get over. Matt
 

 

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Date: 6/9/20 7:10 am
From: '<dotrobbins...>' <dotrobbins...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: Re: [nflbirds] Late Spring White Pelicans
Yes, your conclusion is correct. Some young White Pelicans, too young to breed, opt not to make the journey to the northern breeding grounds. Instead, they hang around in flocks during the summer. Pretty smart! Dotty RobbinsHigh Springs

---------- Original Message ----------
From: "'anhinga' <anhinga...> [nflbirds]" <nflbirds-noreply...>
To: "<nflbirds...>" <nflbirds...>
Subject: [nflbirds] Late Spring White Pelicans
Date: Tue, 09 Jun 2020 13:32:10 GMT



For those who peruse eBird checklists from Wakulla County, Kathleen Coates posed the question "from where do all the young, late Spring White Pelicans come?" I have wondered about the same matter - where could an altricial species that takes three months to fledge hatch and get in flight condition to get to St. Marks in May or June? So, I pull out my copy of "Molt" by Steve Howell and my v.1 of "Handbook of North American Birds" (copyright 1962), on the hunch that these less than adult White Pelicans are not hatch year birds, but maybe 10 month old birds that are still working their way towards adult plumage. Although published 38 years later, "Molt" agrees with the older book that molt in White Pelicans is not well understood, but the thinking has not changed that first breeding does not occur for 3-5 years. The older book describes a "first winter" plumage, the description of which would match the May and June young birds at St. Marks; Howell states "Ages look different, and adult plumage is attained in 3 or 4 cycles". I do not have any resources that differentiate the various appearances of sub-adult birds. After reading the above, and also looking at the distribution of eBird sightings for White Pelicans in May-June, I'm guessing the young, late Spring White Pelicans are not hatch year birds, but sub-adults that fledged last year or even earlier. Not having to breed allows this age group to wander to wherever provides suitable resources. I would be interested in comments from anyone with insight on this issue. I think I had made the error of thinking like a small bird, something I have to get over. Matt

 

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Date: 6/9/20 6:32 am
From: 'anhinga' <anhinga...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: [nflbirds] Late Spring White Pelicans


For those who peruse eBird checklists from Wakulla County, Kathleen Coates posed the question "from where do all the young, late Spring White Pelicans come?" I have wondered about the same matter - where could an altricial species that takes three months to fledge hatch and get in flight condition to get to St. Marks in May or June? So, I pull out my copy of "Molt" by Steve Howell and my v.1 of "Handbook of North American Birds" (copyright 1962), on the hunch that these less than adult White Pelicans are not hatch year birds, but maybe 10 month old birds that are still working their way towards adult plumage.

Although published 38 years later, "Molt" agrees with the older book that molt in White Pelicans is not well understood, but the thinking has not changed that first breeding does not occur for 3-5 years. The older book describes a "first winter" plumage, the description of which would match the May and June young birds at St. Marks; Howell states "Ages look different, and adult plumage is attained in 3 or 4 cycles". I do not have any resources that differentiate the various appearances of sub-adult birds.

After reading the above, and also looking at the distribution of eBird sightings for White Pelicans in May-June, I'm guessing the young, late Spring White Pelicans are not hatch year birds, but sub-adults that fledged last year or even earlier. Not having to breed allows this age group to wander to wherever provides suitable resources. I would be interested in comments from anyone with insight on this issue.

I think I had made the error of thinking like a small bird, something I have to get over. Matt



 

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Date: 6/8/20 5:03 pm
From: Dean and Sally <dsjue...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: Re: [nflbirds] SMNWR, 6/8
We had three Caspians at Stony Bayou #1 late morning before Matt and Cindi came, so we had all the expected tern species today at St. Marks.

At 3:00 PM, we also had a male Magnificent Frigatebird circling over the lighthouse.

Best,
Dean and Sally


From: "'anhinga' <anhinga...> [nflbirds]" <nflbirds-noreply...>
To: "North Florida Birds" <nflbirds...>
Sent: Monday, June 8, 2020 4:11:54 PM
Subject: [nflbirds] SMNWR, 6/8




Cyndi and I visited the refuge from about 0945-1400 today, not expecting, but hoping an unusual offshore species might be wandering post Cristobal. Fortunately, St Marks has much more to offer than strays from tropical storms..

Several inches of rain has changed where the birds are best found. The water levels inside all the pools are up considerably, and the south winds and very high tides are flooding the salt marshes.

The number of birds in Lighthouse Pool has dropped sharply, however, two young B-n Stilts can still be found with some effort in the NE corner; look for an adult being aggressive toward other birds to zero in on the location of the young.

The salt flats behind the lighthouse had resting terns and gulls, including one Common Tern and a couple of Sandwich. Also watch for Clapper Rails running out in the open and listen for the females calling, presumably for young (which we missed, but others have been seeing). Seaside Sparrows were popping up and singing. A Least Bittern made an unusually high and long flight over the salt marsh.

Stony Bayou #1 was the hotspot today. Unfortunately, the rain and tides pushed the water so high that many Least Terns that remained on nest may have been washed out; this also happened last year. The Wilson's Plover chicks were far enough along that they probably just scampered or swam to high ground; certainly plenty of that species, young and adult to be seen today. A walk out the south double dike gave the best viewing - the birds were concentrated on the north shore (thanks to Sally and Dean for convincing us to walk the levee). In non-taxonomic order (IOW, how I remember things as I type): Am. Flamingo, 25 White Pelicans (all or most hatch year birds), 20 Black-necked Stilts in one resting flock, 10 Marbled Godwit, two White-rumped Sandpipers, a Dunlin, Semi-sands, S-b Dowitchers, Gr-Yellowlegs, Wilson's, Semi-palm, and Bl-bellied Plover, Willet, two Reddish Egret (one each white and normal morph), a Black Tern, four Gull-billed Tern, Bl. Skimmers, male Greater Scaup.

Seven species of tern today (eight if you believe Skimmers are terns), but couldn't find a Caspian.

Be aware that the levee between SB #1 and SB #2 is closed to entry due to construction; I believe some of the outer levee may also be closed, so you may want to call the refuge if you are planning a bike ride.

Harry Hooper raised an interesting point about the extensive silt fence (almost all of it incorrectly installed, btw) creating a barrier to wildlife. In addition to that along Lighthouse Road, a lot of silt fence is installed at the water's edge on the NE corner of SB #1 that effectively cuts off the open sand flats from the cover of the adjacent wetlands.

Matt








 

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Date: 6/8/20 1:32 pm
From: 'anhinga' <anhinga...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: [nflbirds] SMNWR, 6/8
Cyndi and I visited the refuge from about 0945-1400 today, not expecting, but hoping an unusual offshore species might be wandering post Cristobal. Fortunately, St Marks has much more to offer than strays from tropical storms..

Several inches of rain has changed where the birds are best found. The water levels inside all the pools are up considerably, and the south winds and very high tides are flooding the salt marshes.

The number of birds in Lighthouse Pool has dropped sharply, however, two young B-n Stilts can still be found with some effort in the NE corner; look for an adult being aggressive toward other birds to zero in on the location of the young.

The salt flats behind the lighthouse had resting terns and gulls, including one Common Tern and a couple of Sandwich. Also watch for Clapper Rails running out in the open and listen for the females calling, presumably for young (which we missed, but others have been seeing). Seaside Sparrows were popping up and singing. A Least Bittern made an unusually high and long flight over the salt marsh.

Stony Bayou #1 was the hotspot today. Unfortunately, the rain and tides pushed the water so high that many Least Terns that remained on nest may have been washed out; this also happened last year. The Wilson's Plover chicks were far enough along that they probably just scampered or swam to high ground; certainly plenty of that species, young and adult to be seen today. A walk out the south double dike gave the best viewing - the birds were concentrated on the north shore (thanks to Sally and Dean for convincing us to walk the levee). In non-taxonomic order (IOW, how I remember things as I type): Am. Flamingo, 25 White Pelicans (all or most hatch year birds), 20 Black-necked Stilts in one resting flock, 10 Marbled Godwit, two White-rumped Sandpipers, a Dunlin, Semi-sands, S-b Dowitchers, Gr-Yellowlegs, Wilson's, Semi-palm, and Bl-bellied Plover, Willet, two Reddish Egret (one each white and normal morph), a Black Tern, four Gull-billed Tern, Bl. Skimmers, male Greater Scaup.

Seven species of tern today (eight if you believe Skimmers are terns), but couldn't find a Caspian.

Be aware that the levee between SB #1 and SB #2 is closed to entry due to construction; I believe some of the outer levee may also be closed, so you may want to call the refuge if you are planning a bike ride.

Harry Hooper raised an interesting point about the extensive silt fence (almost all of it incorrectly installed, btw) creating a barrier to wildlife. In addition to that along Lighthouse Road, a lot of silt fence is installed at the water's edge on the NE corner of SB #1 that effectively cuts off the open sand flats from the cover of the adjacent wetlands.

Matt



 

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Date: 6/8/20 8:29 am
From: Harry Hooper <sn_egret...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: [nflbirds] St. Marks NWR yesterday
Good morning nflbirders,
With what we initially observed as rains clearing, we decided to head to the refuge arriving around 1230hrs.  Our goal was the expectation of southeast to south steady winds averaging greater than 15mph with higher gusts (based on projected wind maps).  Therefore, we attempted to avoid stops until we reached the lighthouse.  But a few stops were made, the flamingo was observed at the east end of Mounds Pool No: 1 and East River Pool was Barn Swallow territory as they at times rested on the T-pier.  
Arriving at the lighthouse around 1300hrs, we were surprised to see that the waters at the lighthouse and up to a half mile offshore appeared nearly flat.  So much for hoping for a frigatebird or other offshore specialty..  But despite the weak tidal surge, the marshes were flooded and that produced two occurrences of "on-road" clapper rails with adults walking the centerline of the road and their pairs of young hugging the vegetated road edges.  The silt fencing that is in place did appear to cause issues for these birds to reach the water's edge for safety when a vehicle was present, mine included.  The youngsters of the second family of rails were calling just off the road near our car when the adult returned running toward our Outback.  We proceeded to back up a bit to give the adult and chicks a chance to reunite.  Another adult clapper rail with three chicks was observed at the entrance to the Cedar Point Trail, crossing from the marsh to the boat basin.  
The intersection of Lighthouse and boat ramp roads produced an adult Dunlin in breeding plumage acting somewhat confused as to its intentions.   The bird appeared uninjured and was able to walk easily but had no intention to go airborne. My assumption was that due to no exposed flats or feeding areas and possible exhaustion due to the weather, the bird acted as it did.  With three vehicles at the intersection and all heading to the boat ramp area, that added additional concerns for the bird. But on return 10 minutes later, the bird had move on, hopefully to safer digs.
We also spotted a "disheveled Great-horned Owl with what appeared to be a 3 to 4 foot rat snake perched in the pines on the west side of Lighthouse Road about 0.8 miles northeast of the lighthouse.  Initially we thought the bird was injured as we saw 2 or 3 primary feathers of the left wing hanging oddly below the body.  But eventually the bird flew with snake in talons out to the north end of the pine island that contains the eagle nest.  Flight was normal so we could safely assume the bird was healthy. 
And later in the afternoon, the winds did pick up offshore as did the rains..  So back on the road to our home.  
Be safe in these troubled times!
Harry HooperTallahassee

 

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Date: 6/7/20 9:11 am
From: 'Lucy and Bob Duncan' <robertaduncan...> [nflbirds] <nflbirds-noreply...>
Subject: [nflbirds] Storm update
Hi all,



Lucy and I jumped the gun since it was not raining and went out to our
pelagic watch place, Ft. Pickens entrance. Surf was roiling with a wind E to
ESE 25 - 30 mph. We were there from about 9:30 to 10:00 a.m. No pelagics.
Only a handful of gulls. The road into Ft. Pickens was closed and the water
was coming over it from the Gulf. Nesting birds and turtles are taking a
hit. High tide is occurring about now (11 a.m.).



Tomorrow we will try again if possible, with a better chance for birds.
Winds should be still strong but more SE or S but rain squalls may still be
a factor.



Bob Duncan


 

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