Carolinabirds
Received From Subject
3/24/19 7:04 am Robert Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Golden-crowned Sparrows in the East this winter
3/24/19 4:59 am jcox3222 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: HBSP
3/23/19 10:39 am Keith E. Camburn <kcamburn...> NC Bar-tailed Godwit
3/23/19 5:31 am Stewart Gibeau <sgibeau...> HBSP
3/23/19 1:37 am Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> 300 R-b., 1 Herring Gull at Buckhorn Res. 2 PM 3/22/19
3/22/19 12:57 pm Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Great crested Flycatcher
3/22/19 12:31 pm Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Orchard Orioles in western Charleston
3/22/19 11:54 am <bird...> Yellow-throated Vireo, Craven County
3/20/19 3:30 pm Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Who's the Sapsucker?
3/20/19 2:41 pm Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Even more Purple FInches, plus a siskin at feeder.
3/20/19 2:32 pm Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Black and White Warbler, Monday 3/18/19, Reports all across state.
3/20/19 1:08 pm John Fussell <jofuss...> Indigo Bunting in Carteret County
3/20/19 8:39 am moribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Howell Woods warblers and other migrants
3/20/19 7:36 am Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Blue-grey Gnatcatcher - Outer Banks
3/20/19 6:50 am Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Waterthrush, New Arrivals and Us
3/20/19 6:01 am Charlotte Goedsche <goedsche...> Re: Waterthrush, New Arrivals and Us
3/19/19 1:34 pm jim.capel (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Chapel Hill Bird Club Meeting – Monday 3/25 – Birds of Yellowstone – Mike Dunn
3/19/19 6:04 am Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Brown Booby in Dare County
3/19/19 5:34 am moribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Louisiania waterthrush, Garner
3/19/19 5:12 am Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Pine Siskin
3/18/19 4:11 pm Miskiewicz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Great egret in Angier
3/18/19 12:31 pm Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Red-breasted Nuthatch- Raleigh
3/18/19 8:11 am Corey, Ed <ed.corey...> Save the Date!! -- Hanging Rock State Park Bio-Blitz - June 1st (2nd) 8am - 8am
3/17/19 9:04 pm Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...> First hummingbird of the season
3/17/19 1:51 pm Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> bird walk at historic Moorefields, Hillsborough, NC, May 11
3/17/19 1:45 pm Rob G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Cornucopia of Cruising Cormorants
3/17/19 9:33 am moribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Yates Mill, Mid Pines Rd; horned lark, American pipit, gnatcatcher
3/17/19 8:13 am Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> November black rat snake caught two well-fledged House Finches
3/17/19 8:07 am Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> 8 Purple FInches
3/17/19 5:09 am Charlotte Goedsche <goedsche...> Waterthrush, New Arrivals, and Us
3/17/19 4:31 am Bill Majoros, Ph.D. <william.majoros...> Black-and-white warbler in Durham
3/16/19 10:46 am \Michael Cheves\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Louisiana Waterthrush / New Bern, NC
3/15/19 10:55 am Ricky Davis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Annual Plea for Observers wanting to do NC BBS Routes
3/15/19 8:35 am <susan...> Sounds of Spring in the Sandhills
3/15/19 7:53 am Edith Tatum (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Brown Thrasher
3/15/19 7:37 am Mark Alt <malt...> New to NC, looking for shorebirds
3/15/19 5:28 am Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Louisiana Waterthrush
3/14/19 3:40 pm Irvin Pitts <pittsjam...> Re: American Bittern, Anderson SC
3/14/19 3:25 pm Steve Patterson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> American Bittern, Anderson SC
3/14/19 9:29 am Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> White Pelicans
3/14/19 8:48 am Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> White Pelicans May have left
3/14/19 8:09 am Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Eastern whip-poor-will in Halifax County, NC
3/14/19 5:31 am Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> White Pelicans at Rolling View
3/14/19 5:13 am <brian...> Re: [External] White pelicans at falls lake durham county
3/14/19 5:01 am \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Eastern whip-poor-will in Halifax County, NC
3/13/19 7:11 pm Corey, Ed <ed.corey...> Re: [External] White pelicans at falls lake durham county
3/13/19 4:09 pm M Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> FOY Purple Martins
3/13/19 3:55 pm Sheryl McNair (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Louisiana Waterthrush / New Bern, NC
3/13/19 3:47 pm Beth Layton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: White pelicans at falls lake durham county
3/13/19 3:25 pm Brian B (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> White pelicans at falls lake durham county
3/13/19 2:01 pm <bird...> Louisiana Waterthrush / New Bern, NC
3/13/19 9:49 am Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: RETURN of Osprey - Outer Banks
3/13/19 9:38 am ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RETURN of osprey pair :)
3/13/19 9:35 am ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> CORRECTION. RED SHOULDERED HAWKS
3/13/19 9:22 am ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Red tailed hawks migrating
3/12/19 8:19 pm Lewis Burke (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Eastern whippoorwill
3/12/19 6:14 pm Craig Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bear Island Swans
3/12/19 6:01 pm EASTMAN, CAROLINE <EASTMAN...> Bear Island Swans
3/12/19 11:38 am Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Common Mergs near Creswell
3/12/19 10:12 am moribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Howell Woods, white-eyed vireo, yellow-throated warbler
3/11/19 5:30 pm Rob G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bill Thompson III
3/10/19 6:02 pm Craig Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> No Trumpeter Swan, Bear Island WMA, SC
3/10/19 10:07 am jim.capel (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> American Bittern in Durham Co - Jim Capel
3/10/19 7:09 am moribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fwd: eBird Report - Lake Benson, Mar 10, 2019
3/10/19 5:30 am Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> NSWO - Brad Dolak
3/10/19 5:24 am Craig Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Thanks for posting to Carolinabirds Re: Bear Island WMA, SC, No Trumpeter Swan, 92 species
3/10/19 4:48 am Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Thanks for posting to Carolinabirds Re: Bear Island WMA, SC, No Trumpeter Swan, 92 species
3/9/19 6:31 pm Craig Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bear Island WMA, SC, No Trumpeter Swan, 92 species
3/9/19 1:59 pm Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Common Mergs near Creswell
3/9/19 12:59 pm John Bloomfield (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Greater White-fronted Geese at SNWR
3/9/19 12:10 pm Caroline Harvey (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Greenville Co. - Yellow-throated Warbler
3/9/19 11:03 am <hilton...> <hilton...> Hilton Pond 02/13/19 (Whither The Winter Finches?)
3/8/19 8:09 am Kimberlie Dewey (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Franklin Co NC - 03/07/2019
3/8/19 7:35 am moribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> White Deer Park and Lake Benson, Garner
3/8/19 6:56 am David Schroder (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Raleigh Western Tanager
3/8/19 6:51 am william haddad (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Kinglet and sapsucker
3/8/19 6:24 am Maria De Bruyn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Kinglet and sapsucker
3/8/19 5:33 am Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Franklin Co NC - 03/07/2019
3/8/19 5:14 am Miskiewicz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Kinglet and sapsucker
3/8/19 4:55 am Wayne Hoffman <whoffman...> Re: Kinglet and sapsucker
3/8/19 4:28 am Stewart Gibeau <sgibeau...> Re: Kinglet and sapsucker
3/8/19 4:23 am F Wilkinson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Kinglet and sapsucker
3/8/19 3:37 am \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Kinglet and sapsucker
3/8/19 3:29 am Maria De Bruyn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Kinglet and sapsucker
3/8/19 2:53 am Gretchen Schramm (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Kinglet and Sapsucker
3/7/19 1:00 pm Edith Tatum (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> This and that
3/6/19 3:10 pm Steve Ritt (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Request for late-date reports of Harbinger GCSP
3/6/19 6:49 am Shelley Rutkin <shelleyr...> eBird hotspot for February Wake Co. Long-tailed Duck
3/5/19 9:54 am Josh Southern (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Call for Winter '18-'19 reports for the "Briefs for the Files"
3/4/19 5:49 am jcox3222 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Sullivan’s Island Station 28
3/1/19 2:17 pm Brenda <bhiles919...> Fwd: Helping others learn about birds at the County Farm
2/28/19 6:51 pm nicholas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Anhingas continue near Kinston, 2/28/19
2/27/19 9:50 am \Michael S. Cheves\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Update on New Bern Wood Storks
2/27/19 8:48 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Iceland Gull on Ocracoke Feb 27, 2019
2/27/19 8:24 am Peter Vankevich (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Iceland Gull on Ocracoke Feb 27, 2019
2/27/19 7:44 am scompton1251 <scompton1251...> RFI: Colorado "Chicken trips"
2/27/19 7:40 am <badgerboy...> Avery co. birds
2/27/19 6:43 am Jessie Dale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> bald eagle, linville
2/27/19 3:07 am John Fussell <jofuss...> harrier "attending" a coyote
2/26/19 7:34 pm Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Chasing after GWF Goose
2/26/19 3:16 pm Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> JUST Graylag Goose (domestic) at Lake Lynn in Wake Co NC - NOT a rare goose!
2/26/19 12:38 pm Edith Tatum (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Cackling Geese
2/26/19 10:56 am Stephen Thomas <rubberhead...> Help with a bird right off of I95 in Santee, SC
2/26/19 5:08 am Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fox Sparrow and Purple Finch
2/25/19 12:19 pm Derb Carter <derbc...> Snow Goose flocks
2/25/19 11:54 am Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Snow geese, Currituck County, NC
2/24/19 2:53 pm Ruth Grissom <ruthgrissom...> Baltimore Oriole
2/23/19 6:04 pm Peter Stangel <peter...> Bear Island WMA, SC Shorebird Extravaganza
2/23/19 4:17 pm Wayne Hoffman <whoffman...> Wrightsville Beach today
2/23/19 12:40 pm \Michael S. Cheves\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Wood Storks in New Bern, NC
2/23/19 6:36 am Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Ducks Moving -- Lake Hickory
 
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Date: 3/24/19 7:04 am
From: Robert Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Golden-crowned Sparrows in the East this winter
This winter there were two Golden-crowned Sparrows in the East that were cooperative and seen by many birders.  One was in Harbinger NC and the other was in Downsville NY.  (They may be more; I don't know.)
I was fortunate to photograph both.  I've put up a web page with some photos.  The NC bird had a bolder malar stripe.
Golden-crowned Sparrows in NY and NC

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Golden-crowned Sparrows in NY and NC


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Bob LewisSleepy Hollow NY

 

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Date: 3/24/19 4:59 am
From: jcox3222 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: HBSP
I have not heard of any recent birding reports from HBSP.
John Cox
Mount Pleasant SC

Sent from XFINITY Connect Mobile App

 

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Date: 3/23/19 10:39 am
From: Keith E. Camburn <kcamburn...>
Subject: NC Bar-tailed Godwit
Bar-tailed Godwit showing nicely on Shackleford Banks this afternoon (Saturday, March 23rd).  
Keith Camburn 

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 3/23/19 5:31 am
From: Stewart Gibeau <sgibeau...>
Subject: HBSP
I’m going to Huntington Beach State Park next week. Anyone know of anything new or notable I should keep an eye out for?

Stu Gibeau
Black Mountain, NC


 

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Date: 3/23/19 1:37 am
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: 300 R-b., 1 Herring Gull at Buckhorn Res. 2 PM 3/22/19
Mostly seem foraging in high winds. Herring a first-year on boat ramp.

Hundreds of LBBG reported in Pennsylvania Ebird at reservoirs (Spruce Run, etc.), often flying in during late afternoon. More often usual scattering. One report noted three with radio transmitters.






Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

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Date: 3/22/19 12:57 pm
From: Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Great crested Flycatcher
We had 2 Great Crested Flycatcher this am in Eastwood James Is
--
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>

 

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Date: 3/22/19 12:31 pm
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Orchard Orioles in western Charleston
My mother reported that three immature male Orchard Orioles visited some of
her Crossvine and Coral Honeysuckle vines this morning. Then she got to
watch one at close range while it rested in a Camellia sasanqua out the
window of the house-blind. But once again, the Orchard Orioles did not use
/ figure out the grape jelly that Baltimore Orioles were eating nearby.

I went by on my lunch break and saw two Blue-headed Vireos, one of which
was constantly singing. Interesting mix of wintering and summering birds
today. Both overwintering Ruby-throated Hummingbirds (individually
recognizable) and new migrant arrivals (the first females) are present and
jousting for resources.

Myrtle Warblers are trying to dominate the suet (between woodpeckers) but
made way for Mr. Pine Warbler. I did not see the overwintering
Orange-crowned Warbler but it might still be around.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC


--
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_offshorebirder2_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=P9vgQyXJlLg_2ukMb2UozMsHXu0vmBkzhP-iGKHXA3A&s=4kQDmrIcAXeqZ_WOIfa-vVFzsYbKdu1hJb56Vp9svm0&e=


"These days I prefer to hunt with a camera. A good photograph demands more
skill from the hunter, better nerves and more patience than the rifle
shot." -- Bror Blixen

 

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Date: 3/22/19 11:54 am
From: <bird...>
Subject: Yellow-throated Vireo, Craven County
Out to the Croatan N.F. this morning. East end of County Line Road
approaching the bridge. several Black-and-white Warblers, surprise bird
was the Yellow-throated Vireo.

Al Gamache
New Bern, NC
 

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Date: 3/20/19 3:30 pm
From: Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Who's the Sapsucker?
I have been away from email for a bit, so just saw the messages about
kinglets feeding at sapsucker wells. I planted a couple of sugar maples in
my yard in central North Carolina, and they are tapped every winter by one
or more Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers. The link below ( I have shared this
before on carolinabirds) goes to an album I have created with photos of
many other species who I have seen feeding at the wells. Enjoy.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__goo.gl_photos_cT41DAANwGHzuCm97&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Sh-Fm_9NQpkaRy7QyzfzuX16e-g483-Zl_u7V9ey-BA&s=9ZbL99Fo-bxT2QuCTPxT6BRhvO0dcXbO80r_UvREd-U&e=

--
Norm Budnitz
Orange County
North Carolina

 

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Date: 3/20/19 2:41 pm
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Even more Purple FInches, plus a siskin at feeder.
First 6 PUFI on Sunday. (One adult male.)
Monday 18th, 6 (one male plumage).
Tuesday 19th, 4 (one male plumage---but seems several birds singing--im males?)
Wednesday 20th,10 (3 male plumage, some singing) plus a siskin.

I doubt I missed the siskin all these days, but it is hard to count the birds on the trays and perched in trees, plus moving back and forth.
Every day I am putting out several pounds of sunflower sees, and I try to replenish through the day, but I do not have time to be on top of things all the time. Best to count the birds around 7:10 AM, when they seem to get their first fillup of seeds;

I thought the numbers were to go down, not up!

Frank Enders, Halifax, NC


































Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

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Date: 3/20/19 2:32 pm
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Black and White Warbler, Monday 3/18/19, Reports all across state.
Reports on Ebird. Must be migrants, but I had not birded this spot, se corner of Gregory's Pond, which fronts on Grapevine Road, during winter..
Bird was low in (mostly willows and undergrowth with 4 Myrtle Warblers, etc.
I used to woder how people picked up these warblers in winter (or now, with no leaves yet), but the bird's color pattern was just so obvious (beautiful, as one Ebird reporter described), with the sun behind me. A momentary view and could not pish the bird up, afterward.






Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

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Date: 3/20/19 1:08 pm
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: Indigo Bunting in Carteret County
I just received a photo of an Indigo Bunting (first-spring male) at a feeder
in Carteret County. It was at the Straits community (mainland near Harkers
Island).

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

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Date: 3/20/19 8:39 am
From: moribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Howell Woods warblers and other migrants
Despite the cloudy, cool weather I found 6 species of warblers at Howell Woods near Smithfield.  These included black-and-white (1), palm (1), common yellowthroat (4), pine (many), yellow-throated (5), and yellow-rumped (4).  I also saw 3 blue-headed vireos and 7 blue-gray gnatcatchers.  Along Devil's Racetrack Road I saw a loggerhead shrike on a wire.
Marc RibaudoGarner, NC 
 

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Date: 3/20/19 7:36 am
From: Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Blue-grey Gnatcatcher - Outer Banks
Good morning,

I heard and saw my first-of-the-season and year, Blue-grey Gnatcatcher
yesterday afternoon in Southern Shores, NC. Spring is now officially
underway!

Bring on the migrants!!

Jim Gould
Southern Shores, NC

 

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Date: 3/20/19 6:50 am
From: Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Waterthrush, New Arrivals and Us
Well put, Charlotte! Thanks for this post, hope all take this advise
seriously.
Helen

On Wed, Mar 20, 2019 at 9:01 AM Charlotte Goedsche <goedsche...>
wrote:

> A few more points about use of playback, i.e., playing recordings of
> bird song in order to lure birds, i.e., birding by phone.
>
> I don't want to engage in a debate about how harmful playback can be when
> used in which circumstances on which birds. But there are some facts
> birders should be aware of if tempted to use playback themselves:
>
> As global warming continues, songbirds are generally arriving later on
> their breeding grounds than the local insects they have relied on for eons
> to fatten up after migration and to feed their chicks, so making their
> living is now harder for the birds we enjoy in the spring.
>
> Migratory songbirds tend to sing very little after first arriving on their
> breeding grounds. They've had a rough journey and need to focus on resting
> up and foraging to re-gain the weight they've lost during migration. Let's
> give them some time to recuperate.
>
> Birds at popular birding sites are much more likely to be the focus of
> playback than are birds in remote areas rarely visited by birders. The same
> goes for birds that have been posted on listservs. Repeated playback is, of
> course, that much harder on a bird.
>
> Many birders treasure the peace and quiet they find in nature when
> watching and looking for birds. This peace is rudely interrupted when the
> song of an elusive American Redstart turns out to be coming from a smart
> phone belonging to another birder.
>
> Use of playback is forbidden on the Blue Ridge Parkway and at a number of
> other public sites. Last spring I was stopped and questioned by a ranger
> while recording birds on the Parkway (without using playback, by the way.)
>
> Good birding to all.
>
> Charlotte Goedsche
> Central Minnesota, formerly of Asheville, NC
> --
> Charlotte L. Goedsche
>

 

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Date: 3/20/19 6:01 am
From: Charlotte Goedsche <goedsche...>
Subject: Re: Waterthrush, New Arrivals and Us
A few more points about use of playback, i.e., playing recordings of bird
song in order to lure birds, i.e., birding by phone.

I don't want to engage in a debate about how harmful playback can be when
used in which circumstances on which birds. But there are some facts
birders should be aware of if tempted to use playback themselves:

As global warming continues, songbirds are generally arriving later on
their breeding grounds than the local insects they have relied on for eons
to fatten up after migration and to feed their chicks, so making their
living is now harder for the birds we enjoy in the spring.

Migratory songbirds tend to sing very little after first arriving on their
breeding grounds. They've had a rough journey and need to focus on resting
up and foraging to re-gain the weight they've lost during migration. Let's
give them some time to recuperate.

Birds at popular birding sites are much more likely to be the focus of
playback than are birds in remote areas rarely visited by birders. The same
goes for birds that have been posted on listservs. Repeated playback is, of
course, that much harder on a bird.

Many birders treasure the peace and quiet they find in nature when watching
and looking for birds. This peace is rudely interrupted when the song of an
elusive American Redstart turns out to be coming from a smart phone
belonging to another birder.

Use of playback is forbidden on the Blue Ridge Parkway and at a number of
other public sites. Last spring I was stopped and questioned by a ranger
while recording birds on the Parkway (without using playback, by the way.)

Good birding to all.

Charlotte Goedsche
Central Minnesota, formerly of Asheville, NC
--
Charlotte L. Goedsche

 

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Date: 3/19/19 1:34 pm
From: jim.capel (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Chapel Hill Bird Club Meeting – Monday 3/25 – Birds of Yellowstone – Mike Dunn
The Chapel Hill Bird Club will hold its regular monthly meeting on Monday, March 25th at 7:30 p.m. at Binkley Baptist Church in Chapel Hill, NC. The featured speaker is naturalist Mike Dunn of the NC Botanical Garden, who will present on “Birds of Yellowstone.” Join Mike as he shares stories and photos of his many observations witnessed on numerous trips to America’s first national park.

Admission is free and the public is invited. Come at 7:15 p.m. for light refreshments.

Location: Binkley Baptist Church, 1712 Willow Dr., Chapel Hill, NC
Website: chbc.carolinanature.com
 

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Date: 3/19/19 6:04 am
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Brown Booby in Dare County
An adult brown booby was photographed by NPS folks yesterday out on the beach on Bodie Island, ramp 4, across from the Oregon Inlet Marina. A search of the area in late afternoon revealed lots of fresh dog tracks and no booby. Way out and too the south was a big flock of gannets, so it could have been with them - who knows? March 18, 2019, Dare County.

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 3/19/19 5:34 am
From: moribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Louisiania waterthrush, Garner
A Louisiana waterthrush was singing in the vicinity of Swift Creek in Garner, north of the gas line right-of-way that crosses Cleveland School Rd.
Marc RibaudoGarner
 

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Date: 3/19/19 5:12 am
From: Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Pine Siskin
I just had a Pine Siskin at my feeder.
Cornelius NC

Anne Olsen

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 3/18/19 4:11 pm
From: Miskiewicz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Great egret in Angier
While out today I spotted a great egret on Johnson Pond in Angier. A
belted kingfisher was also flying back and forth across the pond and
perching in the trees.

So fun!

So thankful for this site and all your contributions.

Kimberly Miskiewicz
Newbie birder
Raleigh

 

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Date: 3/18/19 12:31 pm
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Red-breasted Nuthatch- Raleigh
Had my first RB Nuthatch in the yard this afternoon. First one here in years. Also have several Pine Siskins remaining.

Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 3/18/19 8:11 am
From: Corey, Ed <ed.corey...>
Subject: Save the Date!! -- Hanging Rock State Park Bio-Blitz - June 1st (2nd) 8am - 8am
On Saturday, June 1st , 2019, the NC Division of Parks and Recreation will be hosting a 24-hour bio-blitz at the diverse and picturesque Hanging Rock State Park, in Stokes County. Participants will meet at 8am at the park Visitor's Center. Many of you have likely participated in bio-blitzes before, but for those who haven't, please refer to this website: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__wiki.laptop.org_go_BioBlitz-5Fguide&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=mbqQeGRKdvKJjNc3RSd5l9W5IAxdt998hQR03VSweT8&s=kmlYG3OKdeNFXZ_chMaIxoVrJk1Ew1z8NB5ZcqI3YBU&e=



Ranging from dry rocky walls to rich aquatic systems, Hanging Rock State Park hosts a wide range of communities and organismal assemblages! Piedmont species meet with mountain species in this large expanse of protected area. To learn more about Hanging Rock SP, visit: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.ncparks.gov_hanging-2Drock-2Dstate-2Dpark&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=mbqQeGRKdvKJjNc3RSd5l9W5IAxdt998hQR03VSweT8&s=i8FqElXDQ6SPLnMXFyn6wbs490WoCLviiQi4yJwHx8U&e=



Our goals for this effort will be: 1) to increase our knowledge and understanding of flora and fauna at the park; 2) to update existing species records, and 3) to continue to refine the model for future bio-blitzes within our division. We are trying to pull experts from many different taxonomic groups, ranging from moths, to mammals, to myxomycota!



To add to the enticement, our division will offer a 24-hour exemption from our usual research requirement (known as a Research Activity Permit). If a researcher participates in the bio-blitz, we will waive the need for a Research Activity Permit, as long as ALL species identified are reported to the park by December 31st; final disposition will be up to the researcher. We will have limited housing/camping available on a first-come/first-served basis.



At this time, please take a look at your calendars, and let me know if: A) you're interested and available to participate; B) you would be willing to serve as a taxonomic group leader (helping to wrangle other experts in your particular field); and C) if you know of someone not currently on our list of experts who should be contacted.



Thanks for your time! Please email me if you have any questions.



Ed


Ed Corey
Inventory Biologist, NC Division of Parks and Recreation
NC Dept. of Natural and Cultural Resources
919 841 4037 Office
919 208 7864 Mobile
<Ed.Corey...><mailto:<Ed.Corey...>

12700 Bayleaf Church Road | Raleigh, North Carolina 27614

Email correspondence to and from this address is subject to the North Carolina Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.


 

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Date: 3/17/19 9:04 pm
From: Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...>
Subject: First hummingbird of the season
I set out two nectar feeders on 10 March in anticipation of the northward migration.  Today, while doing my FeederWatch count, a male ruby-throat landed on the feeder outside my kitchen window.  There were three sightings, but I couldn't tell if there were three different birds or the same one making multiple visits to fuel up for the next leg of its journey.

Frank Hamilton
Charleston, SC

 

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Date: 3/17/19 1:51 pm
From: Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: bird walk at historic Moorefields, Hillsborough, NC, May 11
2019 WILD BIRD WALK with HELEN KALEVAS

*Date/Time*
Date(s) - 05/11/2019
*8:00 am - 10:00 am*

*Location*
Moorefields <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__moorefields.org_locations_moorefields_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=5Staj2QklO173-f2Ag2bcwKWAcNEv2FhNe8hWKlAxLQ&s=VLddWyBm84ht1KHauuO5R2yEjRJxXU3W40lEuDQeuxw&e=> - 2201
Moorefields Rd, Hillsborough, NC 27278

*Categories*

- Bird Identification Walk
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__moorefields.org_events_categories_bird-2Didentification-2Dwalk_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=5Staj2QklO173-f2Ag2bcwKWAcNEv2FhNe8hWKlAxLQ&s=PXYn3jMKy7L-GpGlARJVB60rnNuDM7Pu542ctlBF_xc&e=>

Please join us at Moorefields for an early morning Birding Walk on
Saturday, May 11,this year’s *International Migratory Bird Day*! This fun
hike of introductory Bird Identification for all ages will explore both
woods and open fields, so be prepared for insects and wear shoes
appropriate to cover uneven terrain. Don’t forget binoculars!

We will be guided by Helen Kalevas, who has a Master of Science Degree in
Biology with emphasis on Avian Ecology. She has over 20 years of experience
in university level teaching and research in ornithology and bird ecology,
including bird diet and endangered species, from Arizona to North Carolina.

At the hike, a $5 donation is suggested. All Contributions to Friends of
Moorefields <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__moorefields.org_get-2Dinvolved_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=5Staj2QklO173-f2Ag2bcwKWAcNEv2FhNe8hWKlAxLQ&s=bxH69qn2XmoT03pNAXY4bR_xbcVPr9J8OF5UCyg5iYo&e=> help us offer events
like this.

Thanks so much, and we’ll see you there!

Rain date - May 12

Questions - call Helen Kalevas: 919-732-5439

 

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Date: 3/17/19 1:45 pm
From: Rob G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Cornucopia of Cruising Cormorants
there were 40 Cormorants on the golf ponds off Pinehurst Dr. this afternoon in Chapel Hill... can't recall ever seeing that many there before.

-- Rob Gluck.... Carrboro, NC.....

 

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Date: 3/17/19 9:33 am
From: moribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Yates Mill, Mid Pines Rd; horned lark, American pipit, gnatcatcher
I birded Mid Pines Rd and Yates Mill in Wake County this morning.  Mid Pines yielded a nice mix of grassland species, including horned lark, American pipit, savannah sparrow, eastern meadowlark, and American kestrel.  Other notables were 2 bufflehead on the small pond, a noisy flock of purple finches in the trees at the wet area, and pine siskin.  I walked the streamside trail at Yates Mill and saw/heard blue-gray gnatcatcher, winter wren, brown creeper, both kinglets, red-headed woodpecker, hermit thrush, 2 ospreys, Cooper's hawk and tree swallow.  A quick stop at Lake Wheeler on the way home yielded 2 shovelers and a pied-billed grebe.  I tallied 66 species in all.
Marc RibaudoGarner, NC
 

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Date: 3/17/19 8:13 am
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: November black rat snake caught two well-fledged House Finches
During the last warm spell in November, I opened a 4' long Black Rat Snake in a shed they frquent, to find two well-fledged House FInches (female or immature).

I found it remarkable the snake could capture the second finch after taking the first, as I imagined the first bird must have been roosting close by the other, and the fluttering when struck might have flushed the second bird. When I try to grab roosting birds, they typically cry out and flutter, and nearby birds move some distance, but who knows what happened. I do not.






Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

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Date: 3/17/19 8:07 am
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: 8 Purple FInches
Surprised to find 8 PUFi, half males this morning. Barely able to hear at 15'. Checked thru scope, with only one distant House FInch.

Only started feeding (sunflower seeds) in three-layer platform feeder three weeks ago. Feeder is on opposite side of defunct feeder where I had dozens of PUFI each winter for several years as I then fed through the winter.

May have been here for some days, and ignored bcause I could hear HOFI singing and calling most days. I have high-frequency hearing loss and simply getting deafer by the month. That I wear earmuffs to reduce damage to my ears, now (and listen to--too loud?--classical music) does not help me find birds


Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

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Date: 3/17/19 5:09 am
From: Charlotte Goedsche <goedsche...>
Subject: Waterthrush, New Arrivals, and Us
One Louisiana Waterthrush has successfully made the journey from its winter
site south of the border and is still resting up in the dark woods before
dawn. It has a a hard day ahead of it, for it will need to forage like
crazy to replenish the fat it lost on its flight over the Gulf. Then, for
nothing but personal enjoyment, someone grabs their smart phone and tries
to disrupt the bird's sleep with a song which the waterthrush can only
assume is the voice of a threatening male of its own species.

The phone may be smart, but the birder isn't.

Please, folks, use your common sense when attempting to lure birds to you
in exchange for a check mark or a photo.

Better yet, try birding the old-fashioned way and rely on your own skill
and knowledge of birds' habits. It's more sporting, more challenging, and
really fun!

Good non-electronic birding to you all.

Charlotte Goedsche
Central Minnesota, formerly of Asheville, NC

--
Charlotte L. Goedsche

 

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Date: 3/17/19 4:31 am
From: Bill Majoros, Ph.D. <william.majoros...>
Subject: Black-and-white warbler in Durham

I saw a black-and-white warbler at Sandy Creek city park in Durham yesterday morning. I watched the bird for several minutes. There were also a number of yellow-rumped warblers and several pine warblers.

---
William Majoros, PhD
Durham, NC
ThirdBirdFromTheSun.com







 

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Date: 3/16/19 10:46 am
From: \Michael Cheves\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Louisiana Waterthrush / New Bern, NC
Greetings,
Louisiana Waterthrush continues this morning! I arrived at the LOWA site
pre-dawn (took the service road from Catfish Lake Rd to Tebo hoping for
owls, but had zero luck as usual). One of the first birds I heard calling
was a Winter Wren, but almost no light at this time. About 7:00 AM I heard
the distant call of what I was fairly sure was Louisiana Waterthrush, but
had no success luring him out from the deep woods. 7:29 my definitive FOS
Yellow-throated Warbler added its voice to the dawn chorus. 7:40, I was
close to giving up, when the Waterthrush started sounding off closer to me.
Again I played the call on iBird, and that Louisiana Waterthrush flushed
right out and sang continuously for 20 minutes. Long wait, but very much
worth it!

Effort having been rewarded, I drove County Line Rd. back up to my
neighborhood for a quick stop at the local nature park near Brice's Creek,
which is a good spot for Yellow-throated Warbler. During the drive, I saw a
mixed flock of Black and Turkey Vulture, and also an Osprey. At the
neighborhood park, I was succcessful in locating my 2nd YTWA for the day.
Photographs of both LOWA and YTWA have been added to my gallery on the CBC
site.

Michael Cheves
New Bern, NC

----- Original Message -----
From: <bird...>
To: <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Wednesday, March 13, 2019 5:00 PM
Subject: Louisiana Waterthrush / New Bern, NC


> Out at Tebo road this morning, checking for Springtime birds. Had a
> Louisiana Waterthrush, White-eyed Vireo, and several Yellow-throated
> Warblers.
>
> Al Gamache
> New Bern, NC

 

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Date: 3/15/19 10:55 am
From: Ricky Davis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Annual Plea for Observers wanting to do NC BBS Routes
Hi Folks

This is my annual plea, looking for Observers to take up a Breeding
Bird Survey (BBS) Route! Currently there are 7 Routes Vacant and in
need of an Observer.

The BBS is run by the Patuxent Wildlife Reserch Center, under the
USGS. The program started in 1966 and continues with several thousand
Routes conducted each year in North America. North Carolina has 90
Routes spread across the state, and 7 are currently needing someone to
take them on! Basically each Route is a roadside survey conducted
once a year each late Spring/early Summer (late May to mid June) and
consists of 50 3-minute point counts every half mile over a 24.5 mile
route. The Route starts one/half hour before official Sunrise and will
generally take between 4 and 5 hours. All birds seen or heard are
counted at each stop. The results are then entered online and
materials returned to the BBS office.

There are several requirements for Observers. First and foremost is
that the Observer must be familiar with the songs and calls of all the
species normally found along the Route. Generally 70-80% of the birds
recorded will by ear, so you need to know the sounds well. Also you
need to have good to average hearing for obvious reasons! Also you
will need to obviously have a vehicle to conduct the Route. Some
Observers have an Assistant do the driving, but many do it all
themselves. Also the BBS office prefers that an Observer commit to at
least 3 years running, for statistical analysis purposes. Many
Observers have been running "their" BBS Routes for many years! Also if
you are a new Observer, you will be required to take a brief online
instructional course before conducting your Route.

The Vacant Routes are:

011 Kinston - Starts just west of Kinston, runs southerly and ends
near Pink Hill (Lenoir County).

215 Biscoe - Starts near Biscoe (Montgomery County), runs northward
and ends in southern Randolph County.

302 Siloam - Starts in southern Surry County, runs southerly and ends
near the Yadkin-Davie Counties line.

309 McGinnis Crossroad - Starts in southwest Rutherford County, runs
eastward and ends in southern Cleveland County.

315 Bethel - Starts near Raeford (Hoke County), runs southeasterly and
ends near Lumberton (Robeson County).

905 Dismal Swamp - Starts and ends within the Dismal Swamp NWR in the
area south of the Virginia Line.

906 Waterville - Starts at the town of Waterville (Haywood County),
runs northeasterly and ends in Madison County.

I have been running BBS Routes for a long time (this year will be my
45th year!) and I still look forward to doing them each year. It is a
great way to keep track of the changes in the bird life of an area,
and is an important contribution to Citizen Science!

So if you are interested in taking on one (or more!) Routes, please contact me!

Thanks, later, Ricky

Ricky Davis
NC BBS Coordinator
608 Smallwood drive
Rocky Mount, NC 27804

252-903-8545
252-443-0276
<RJDNC...>
<rdnc13...>
 

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Date: 3/15/19 8:35 am
From: <susan...>
Subject: Sounds of Spring in the Sandhills
All,

I was pleasantly surprised by the sounds of Blue-gray Gnatcatchers here
by the creek yesterday afternoon.

This morning, I was greeted by the first singing Yellow-throated Warbler
of the season as I stepped outside.

Definitely early dates for me here in the piney woods....

Susan Campbell
Southern Pines, NC

 

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Date: 3/15/19 7:53 am
From: Edith Tatum (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Brown Thrasher
A Brown Thrasher has been advertising for a mate. A sure sign of spring.
Edith Tatum
Durham NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 3/15/19 7:37 am
From: Mark Alt <malt...>
Subject: New to NC, looking for shorebirds
Hello all,

I am new to North Carolina and the birds down here, but want to get out Saturday to the coast and see a bunch of shorebirds. Can anyone give me clear directions on where to go? A little on me, I was on the Board of the Minnesota Ornithologist's Union for 15 years, and served as their President for a while. If anyone is getting out Saturday and wants a tagalong, please let me know where to meet you.

Good birding,

Mark Alt
Hertford County
<markaltpsu...><mailto:<markaltpsu...>




 

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Date: 3/15/19 5:28 am
From: Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Louisiana Waterthrush
Heard my first Louisiana Waterthrush this morning on the Little River
outside of Hillsborough, NC.
Helen

 

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Date: 3/14/19 3:40 pm
From: Irvin Pitts <pittsjam...>
Subject: Re: American Bittern, Anderson SC
I also had an American Bittern giving its song today at the Bluff Unit of Santee NWR in Clarendon County. I included a snippet of audio with my e-bird report. It is truly a bizarre performance! I've not been to Rocky River nature park but understand its a good place to find bitterns.

Irvin Pitts
Lexington, SC


From: "Carolinabirds Listserve" <carolinabirds...>
To: "Carolinabirds Listserve" <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 6:25:19 PM
Subject: American Bittern, Anderson SC

An American Bittern was performing its song for several minutes while I stopped by Rocky River Nature Park late this afternoon. Four Northern Rough-winged Swallows were flying around, too.



Steve Patterson
Anderson, SC


 

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Date: 3/14/19 3:25 pm
From: Steve Patterson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: American Bittern, Anderson SC
An American Bittern was performing its song for several minutes while I stopped by Rocky River Nature Park late this afternoon.  Four Northern Rough-winged Swallows were flying around, too.


Steve PattersonAnderson, SC
 

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Date: 3/14/19 9:29 am
From: Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: White Pelicans
Just check the beach area at Rolling View and the W Pelicans have returned but all the way over to the other side of the lake but can be seen with binoculars but a scope is better.

From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>

 

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Date: 3/14/19 8:48 am
From: Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: White Pelicans May have left
Greetings all
At Rolling View SP in Durham Co with three other birders watched the White Pelicans circle around climbing higher and higher and then lost them around 1045 hrs.

David Ranney and I check other places to see if we could see them but no luck

From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>

 

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Date: 3/14/19 8:09 am
From: Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Eastern whip-poor-will in Halifax County, NC
Thanks for the report. Also had one calling in Fants Grove WMA near
Clemson, SC this morning (Upstate SC at about 700'). This is anywhere from
1-2 weeks earlier than the arrival dates here over the past few years.

Kevin Kubach
Clemson/Greenville, SC

On Thu, Mar 14, 2019 at 8:01 AM "J. Merrill Lynch" <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Birders, had my first-of-season whip this morning. Only called a dozen
> times or so but good enough! I think this is my earliest record by almost
> 2 weeks for this site—usually get them around 28-30 March.
>
> By the way, I’ve recorded whips here (as breeding residents) annually
> since 1963! The exact location is Norman Road about 2 miles SW of
> Ringwood, Halifax County, NC. 200’ elevation on the Fall Zone
> (Piedmont/Coastal Plain).
>
> Merrill Lynch
> Echo Valley Farm
> Watauga County, NC
> Sent from my iPhone

 

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Date: 3/14/19 5:31 am
From: Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: White Pelicans at Rolling View
The White Pelicans can still be seen from Rolling View at the beach area about half mile out

If parks in Wake County are open you may see them from there as well.

From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>

 

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Date: 3/14/19 5:13 am
From: <brian...>
Subject: Re: [External] White pelicans at falls lake durham county
Nine White Pelicans continuing off swim beach at Rollingview SRA. Almost on the other side of lake, too far for photo, but once boats get active maybe they will come closer into the cove.
Brian Murphy
Durham, NC
On Mar 13, 2019, 10:11 PM -0400, Corey, Ed <ed.corey...>, wrote:
>
> The nine pelicans were last seen paddling towards the swim beach cove at Rollingview at dusk.  If you're able to get out first thing in the morning, you may get a look at them.  I'll add pics to my eBird checklist tomorrow.
>
> Ed Corey
> Raleigh, NC
>
>
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Brian B <carolinabirds...>
> Date: 3/13/19 18:24 (GMT-05:00)
> To: <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: [External] White pelicans at falls lake durham county
>
> CAUTION: External email. Do not click links or open attachments unless you verify. Send all suspicious email as an attachment to <report.spam...><mailto:<report.spam...>
>
>
> A ranger just sent me a photo of 8 white pelicans seen now on water at rolling view recreation area beach near boat ramp. Durham county.
>
> Brian Bockhahn
> Durham NC

 

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Date: 3/14/19 5:01 am
From: \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Eastern whip-poor-will in Halifax County, NC
Birders, had my first-of-season whip this morning. Only called a dozen times or so but good enough! I think this is my earliest record by almost 2 weeks for this site—usually get them around 28-30 March.

By the way, I’ve recorded whips here (as breeding residents) annually since 1963! The exact location is Norman Road about 2 miles SW of Ringwood, Halifax County, NC. 200’ elevation on the Fall Zone (Piedmont/Coastal Plain).

Merrill Lynch
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 3/13/19 7:11 pm
From: Corey, Ed <ed.corey...>
Subject: Re: [External] White pelicans at falls lake durham county

The nine pelicans were last seen paddling towards the swim beach cove at Rollingview at dusk. If you're able to get out first thing in the morning, you may get a look at them. I'll add pics to my eBird checklist tomorrow.

Ed Corey
Raleigh, NC


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Brian B <carolinabirds...>
Date: 3/13/19 18:24 (GMT-05:00)
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: [External] White pelicans at falls lake durham county

CAUTION: External email. Do not click links or open attachments unless you verify. Send all suspicious email as an attachment to <report.spam...><mailto:<report.spam...>


A ranger just sent me a photo of 8 white pelicans seen now on water at rolling view recreation area beach near boat ramp. Durham county.

Brian Bockhahn
Durham NC

 

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Date: 3/13/19 4:09 pm
From: M Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: FOY Purple Martins

My Purple Martins are back. Heard and seen today. Several glimpses of probable PM's in past two weeks. No doubt about it today. They're back!

Mae Howell
Goldsboro, NC
Powered by Cricket Wireless

 

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Date: 3/13/19 3:55 pm
From: Sheryl McNair (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Louisiana Waterthrush / New Bern, NC
And Christine & I had Yellow-throated Warblers, White-eyed Vireo, Blue-gray Gnatcatchers & Purple Martins in Pamlico County.

Sheryl

On Wednesday, March 13, 2019, 5:01:25 PM EDT, <bird...> wrote:

Out at Tebo road this morning, checking for Springtime birds. Had a
Louisiana Waterthrush, White-eyed Vireo, and several Yellow-throated
Warblers.

Al Gamache
New Bern, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 3/13/19 3:47 pm
From: Beth Layton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: White pelicans at falls lake durham county
I meant to hit reply all!
There are also white pelicans at High Rock Lake near the dam. Such a lovely
sight!


On Wed, Mar 13, 2019 at 6:24 PM Brian B <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> A ranger just sent me a photo of 8 white pelicans seen now on water at
> rolling view recreation area beach near boat ramp. Durham county.
>
> Brian Bockhahn
> Durham NC



--
Beth Dixon Layton

 

Back to top
Date: 3/13/19 3:25 pm
From: Brian B (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: White pelicans at falls lake durham county
A ranger just sent me a photo of 8 white pelicans seen now on water at rolling view recreation area beach near boat ramp. Durham county.

Brian Bockhahn
Durham NC
 

Back to top
Date: 3/13/19 2:01 pm
From: <bird...>
Subject: Louisiana Waterthrush / New Bern, NC
Out at Tebo road this morning, checking for Springtime birds. Had a
Louisiana Waterthrush, White-eyed Vireo, and several Yellow-throated
Warblers.

Al Gamache
New Bern, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 3/13/19 9:49 am
From: Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: RETURN of Osprey - Outer Banks
Ann and All,

I saw my first Osprey of the Spring eating a fish in Duck, NC this morning
around 9 am.

Jim Gould
Southern Shores, NC

On Wed, Mar 13, 2019, 12:38 PM ann maddock <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> For the last seven years, ospreys that use a best behind the house have
> returned in March
> • four years they have returned on the exact same date
> • the other three years they have returned within a span of three days
>
> --
> Ask me about my upcoming book - a photo essay of North American and
> Caribbean Hummingbirds!
>
> Ann Maddock
> <am.hummingbird.photos...>
> Hatteras Island, NC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/13/19 9:38 am
From: ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RETURN of osprey pair :)
For the last seven years, ospreys that use a best behind the house have
returned in March
• four years they have returned on the exact same date
• the other three years they have returned within a span of three days

--
Ask me about my upcoming book - a photo essay of North American and
Caribbean Hummingbirds!

Ann Maddock
<am.hummingbird.photos...>
Hatteras Island, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 3/13/19 9:35 am
From: ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: CORRECTION. RED SHOULDERED HAWKS
Oops. Red Shouldered hawks

We had two nesting here a few early springs ago



On Wed, Mar 13, 2019 at 12:22 PM ann maddock <
<am.hummingbird.photos...> wrote:

> Just had 7 red tailed hawks over the house and perched in the pines,
> calling and moving northward
> --
> Ask me about my upcoming book - a photo essay of North American and
> Caribbean Hummingbirds!
>
> Ann Maddock
> <am.hummingbird.photos...>
> Hatteras Island, NC
>
--
Ask me about my upcoming book - a photo essay of North American and
Caribbean Hummingbirds!

Ann Maddock
<am.hummingbird.photos...>
Hatteras Island, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 3/13/19 9:22 am
From: ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Red tailed hawks migrating
Just had 7 red tailed hawks over the house and perched in the pines,
calling and moving northward
--
Ask me about my upcoming book - a photo essay of North American and
Caribbean Hummingbirds!

Ann Maddock
<am.hummingbird.photos...>
Hatteras Island, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 3/12/19 8:19 pm
From: Lewis Burke (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Eastern whippoorwill
Heard my first one for the year at about 8 pm tonite in Saluda County, SC

Lewis Burke

 

Back to top
Date: 3/12/19 6:14 pm
From: Craig Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bear Island Swans
When Pam Ford and I were there this past weekend, swans flew in from the
west to roost in Sarah's Pond late in the day. I can't walk due to
crutches, but swans have been known to use the west side of Bennett's Point
Rd. and the western impoundments of the management area, which requires
quite a bit of walking. One group on Sunday checked Mid Pond, where the
campground and picnic tables are, but there are plenty of areas further out
toward the river that may be holding the swans, and I would encourage folks
to walk back there. Maps are available at the kiosk and the names of the
impoundments are Bluff, Shanty, River Rice, and Flasher Pond. These areas
are underbirded and often hold great numbers of shorebirds during drawdown.

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

On Tue, Mar 12, 2019 at 9:01 PM EASTMAN, CAROLINE <EASTMAN...>
wrote:

> I spent about 40 minutes this afternoon watching 13 swans resting on
> Sarah's Pond; I was on the road between Lower Hog and Sarah's Ponds. This
> is an activity right up there with watching paint dry, except they did
> sometimes stick their heads up. They were too far away for recognizable
> photographs, especially in the white blob poses. One was somewhat larger,
> grayer, and had a longer sharper bill with no yellow in evidence. It might
> have been the Trumpeter. I encourage people to keep checking for this
> bird. There are so many fantastic birds at Bear Island right now that a
> trip is well worth the time even without it.
>
> Caroline Eastman
> Columbia, SC
>


--

*Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul - and sings the
tunes without the words - and never stops at all.*

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 3/12/19 6:01 pm
From: EASTMAN, CAROLINE <EASTMAN...>
Subject: Bear Island Swans
I spent about 40 minutes this afternoon watching 13 swans resting on Sarah's Pond; I was on the road between Lower Hog and Sarah's Ponds. This is an activity right up there with watching paint dry, except they did sometimes stick their heads up. They were too far away for recognizable photographs, especially in the white blob poses. One was somewhat larger, grayer, and had a longer sharper bill with no yellow in evidence. It might have been the Trumpeter. I encourage people to keep checking for this bird. There are so many fantastic birds at Bear Island right now that a trip is well worth the time even without it.

Caroline Eastman
Columbia, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 3/12/19 11:38 am
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Common Mergs near Creswell
Peter,

Do you have any target species?

Jeff

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 9, 2019, at 4:59 PM, Jeff Lewis <jlewisbirds...> wrote:
>
> 17 Common Mergansers in the second lake east of Creswell, along 64. One nice adult male!
>
> Jeff Lewis
> Manteo, NC
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 3/12/19 10:12 am
From: moribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Howell Woods, white-eyed vireo, yellow-throated warbler
I visited Howell Woods Environmental Center for the first time this morning.  Quite a place.  I spent about 3.5 hours there and tallied 50 species.  Highlights were a yellow-throated warbler singing near the parking lot from one of the smaller pines, a white-eyed vireo along the BW Wells trail, American kestrel, winter wren, and brown creeper.  
Marc RibaudoGarner
 

Back to top
Date: 3/11/19 5:30 pm
From: Rob G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bill Thompson III
Not strictly a Carolinabirds topic, but anyone who knows of Bill Thompson III (through his books, podcast, tours, or Bird Watchers Digest) will want to read his recent update (Mar. 5) since his December diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. It is beautifully-written, full of wisdom, love, fortitude for the time he has remaining (...may we all contemplate our own ends, when the time comes, with such clear vision!):

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.caringbridge.org_visit_bt3updates&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=ReCV_IV2hDdxE9YPefYTeV8rwwZFrzTMeFm3Cx5wQdo&s=aHrObqNMsqiwmuqEJSM0Bug3F99GTqvxNHeCPYJ4WFk&e=


-- Rob Gluck.... Carrboro, NC.......




 

Back to top
Date: 3/10/19 6:02 pm
From: Craig Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: No Trumpeter Swan, Bear Island WMA, SC
Many birders spent the better of the day looking for the Trumpeter Swan at
Bear Island WMA with no luck. There are still huge numbers of shorebirds
including a few dozen Stilt Sandpipers and Long-billed Dowitchers, 16
species of shorebirds. Tundra Swans are still present and over 200 American
White Pelicans flew in late in the day.

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 3/10/19 10:07 am
From: jim.capel (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: American Bittern in Durham Co - Jim Capel
Heard an American Bittern sounding off several times at the Flat River Waterfowl Impoundment this morning (3/10) in Durham County, NC. Bird was heard from somewhere in the grassy center of the first loop. Area is surrounded by a watery moat and grass is quite high - was never able to spot the bird.
 

Back to top
Date: 3/10/19 7:09 am
From: moribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Lake Benson, Mar 10, 2019
Lake Benson had a nice mix of waterfowl this morning.  This included large flocks of lesser scaup and ring-necked ducks, 3 red-breasted mergansers (a male and 2 females), ruddy ducks, American wigeon, gadwall, wood duck, mallard, and hooded merganser.  A large flock of coots was also present, as well as pied-billed grebes.  I had my FOS osprey, and a Cooper's hawk appeared to be defending a territory in the pines beyond the far parking lot.  A complete list of what I saw is below.
Marc RibaudoGarner

Lake Benson, Wake, North Carolina, US
Mar 10, 2019 8:23 AM - 9:30 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.4 mile(s)
52 species

Canada Goose  20
Wood Duck  6
Gadwall  1
American Wigeon  2
Mallard  4
Ring-necked Duck  56
Lesser Scaup  60
Hooded Merganser  2
Red-breasted Merganser  3
Ruddy Duck  14
Pied-billed Grebe  4
Mourning Dove  2
American Coot  38
Killdeer  4
Ring-billed Gull  2
Double-crested Cormorant  6
Great Blue Heron  4
Osprey  1
Cooper's Hawk  1
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  3
Downy Woodpecker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  1
Eastern Phoebe  2
Blue Jay  2
American Crow  3
Fish Crow  1
Carolina Chickadee  4
Tufted Titmouse  6
Brown-headed Nuthatch  4
Winter Wren  1
Carolina Wren  4
Golden-crowned Kinglet  2
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  2
Eastern Bluebird  2
American Robin  50
Brown Thrasher  1
Northern Mockingbird  1
European Starling  1
House Finch  2
Chipping Sparrow  8
Dark-eyed Junco  10
White-throated Sparrow  2
Song Sparrow  3
Red-winged Blackbird  15
Brown-headed Cowbird  20
Rusty Blackbird  25
Common Grackle  2
Pine Warbler  10
Yellow-rumped Warbler  2
Northern Cardinal  4

View this checklist online at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S53663625&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=PDqVgZpSN0W22ZsrPa7Zby1gfNUstt7dtnwuRmPLvCc&s=UpvCQqTsx_0iiuV65MQvrnrbA8qjUNpFGCJi3S7Htqo&e=

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_home&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=PDqVgZpSN0W22ZsrPa7Zby1gfNUstt7dtnwuRmPLvCc&s=8TEVIr2BWc54gv-hinuXu60aHqrd8MlBLH1ob4DNw30&e=)

 

Back to top
Date: 3/10/19 5:30 am
From: Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: NSWO - Brad Dolak
If Brad Dolak is on the list please contact me direct and if someone knows him please forward this to him

Thank you.

May God Bless and Keep you

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 3/10/19 5:24 am
From: Craig Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Thanks for posting to Carolinabirds Re: Bear Island WMA, SC, No Trumpeter Swan, 92 species
Hopefully if it is relocated today the word will get out quickly as I'm
sure there are a lot of folks interested to see this bird. I was surprised
that there were really no birders there looking for it yesterday, in fact
there were only three checklists from there yesterday and not actively
looking for the swan. I found out through the eBird Rare Bird Alert and
saw photos on the checklists.

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

On Sun, Mar 10, 2019 at 7:48 AM Nate Dias <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Thanks for posting the news of a Trumpeter Swan to the Listserv Craig.
>
> Apparently the group that saw it the day before did not bother to do so.
>
> Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
>
> On Saturday, March 9, 2019, Craig Watson <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
>> Pam Ford and I visited Bear Island WMA near Bennett's Point, SC today in
>> search of the reported Trumpeter Swan observed in Sarah's Pond. When we
>> arrived no swans were in the pond, so we birded therefor a while (lots of
>> shorebirds including Stilt Sandpipers and a few Long-billed Dowitchers) and
>> then we roamed Bear Island looking for swans in hopes of finding the
>> Trumpeter. We tallied 92 species without trying to hard, and I'm on
>> crutches so I was confined to the car, roadside birding and very short
>> walks. Bear has been very birdy lately with over 100 species being seen
>> regularly. The female Common Goldeneye is still present in Larvae Pond near
>> Pecan Trees area, and almost 50 Roseate Spoonbills were in Mosquito Pond.
>> Hundreds of American Avocets were all over the area, but Mary's Pond at the
>> entrance held about 3000 shorebirds, most of the usual shorebirds this time
>> of year. Shorebird numbers were huge, we had 14 species of over 3000
>> birds, they were in almost every impoundment, but Mary's Pond, Little Hog
>> Island, and Sarah's Pond held the most. We went back to Sarah's Pond and a
>> few Tundra Swans had moved in and by dark 53 had moved into the pond near
>> the dike, but no Trumpeter Swan was with these birds. American White
>> Pelicans were abundant.
>>
>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S53651452&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=ebhQrbg4M-z0DlPZVo4Q5Odx_M0ydGAypQzUk5V8YME&s=L_kM8ZFuT7Wcnr4tSmTvvbO3Hyr16sgOEE5tlfLfQow&e=
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S53651452&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=aeIz4CmfdI4AYFZkKf-qR32yQkrPrAXiEnFOjNQAYe8&s=voW5qq5osNgaX3tiJFEPtItQCgpPHOV8TS9WXuwjxkE&e=>
>>
>> *Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul - and sings the
>> tunes without the words - and never stops at all.*
>>
>> Craig Watson
>> Mount Pleasant, SC
>>
>
>
> --
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_offshorebirder2_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=ebhQrbg4M-z0DlPZVo4Q5Odx_M0ydGAypQzUk5V8YME&s=nkWXU9O5rYvQff8M0oRwJI0SLl8dbo8lO9HsMDRAbXE&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_offshorebirder2_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=q0wCABA2U7QcDKLr3OSVm_UgHD_ibxButBYpCKhTnC0&s=-nP8JKDNV4sF8KY9ARePQxTXQ2ydwI5jwvpkegSidus&e=>
>
>
> "These days I prefer to hunt with a camera. A good photograph demands
> more skill from the hunter, better nerves and more patience than the rifle
> shot." -- Bror Blixen
>


--

*Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul - and sings the
tunes without the words - and never stops at all.*

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 3/10/19 4:48 am
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Thanks for posting to Carolinabirds Re: Bear Island WMA, SC, No Trumpeter Swan, 92 species
Thanks for posting the news of a Trumpeter Swan to the Listserv Craig.

Apparently the group that saw it the day before did not bother to do so.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

On Saturday, March 9, 2019, Craig Watson <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Pam Ford and I visited Bear Island WMA near Bennett's Point, SC today in
> search of the reported Trumpeter Swan observed in Sarah's Pond. When we
> arrived no swans were in the pond, so we birded therefor a while (lots of
> shorebirds including Stilt Sandpipers and a few Long-billed Dowitchers) and
> then we roamed Bear Island looking for swans in hopes of finding the
> Trumpeter. We tallied 92 species without trying to hard, and I'm on
> crutches so I was confined to the car, roadside birding and very short
> walks. Bear has been very birdy lately with over 100 species being seen
> regularly. The female Common Goldeneye is still present in Larvae Pond near
> Pecan Trees area, and almost 50 Roseate Spoonbills were in Mosquito Pond.
> Hundreds of American Avocets were all over the area, but Mary's Pond at the
> entrance held about 3000 shorebirds, most of the usual shorebirds this time
> of year. Shorebird numbers were huge, we had 14 species of over 3000
> birds, they were in almost every impoundment, but Mary's Pond, Little Hog
> Island, and Sarah's Pond held the most. We went back to Sarah's Pond and a
> few Tundra Swans had moved in and by dark 53 had moved into the pond near
> the dike, but no Trumpeter Swan was with these birds. American White
> Pelicans were abundant.
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S53651452&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=q0wCABA2U7QcDKLr3OSVm_UgHD_ibxButBYpCKhTnC0&s=M5bEqfKj5ocK6H2pb3wfk9iinjF1pxrqIFhlQ16kuBQ&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S53651452&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=aeIz4CmfdI4AYFZkKf-qR32yQkrPrAXiEnFOjNQAYe8&s=voW5qq5osNgaX3tiJFEPtItQCgpPHOV8TS9WXuwjxkE&e=>
>
> *Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul - and sings the
> tunes without the words - and never stops at all.*
>
> Craig Watson
> Mount Pleasant, SC
>


--
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_offshorebirder2_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=q0wCABA2U7QcDKLr3OSVm_UgHD_ibxButBYpCKhTnC0&s=-nP8JKDNV4sF8KY9ARePQxTXQ2ydwI5jwvpkegSidus&e=


"These days I prefer to hunt with a camera. A good photograph demands more
skill from the hunter, better nerves and more patience than the rifle
shot." -- Bror Blixen

 

Back to top
Date: 3/9/19 6:31 pm
From: Craig Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bear Island WMA, SC, No Trumpeter Swan, 92 species
Pam Ford and I visited Bear Island WMA near Bennett's Point, SC today in
search of the reported Trumpeter Swan observed in Sarah's Pond. When we
arrived no swans were in the pond, so we birded therefor a while (lots of
shorebirds including Stilt Sandpipers and a few Long-billed Dowitchers) and
then we roamed Bear Island looking for swans in hopes of finding the
Trumpeter. We tallied 92 species without trying to hard, and I'm on
crutches so I was confined to the car, roadside birding and very short
walks. Bear has been very birdy lately with over 100 species being seen
regularly. The female Common Goldeneye is still present in Larvae Pond near
Pecan Trees area, and almost 50 Roseate Spoonbills were in Mosquito Pond.
Hundreds of American Avocets were all over the area, but Mary's Pond at the
entrance held about 3000 shorebirds, most of the usual shorebirds this time
of year. Shorebird numbers were huge, we had 14 species of over 3000
birds, they were in almost every impoundment, but Mary's Pond, Little Hog
Island, and Sarah's Pond held the most. We went back to Sarah's Pond and a
few Tundra Swans had moved in and by dark 53 had moved into the pond near
the dike, but no Trumpeter Swan was with these birds. American White
Pelicans were abundant.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S53651452&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=aeIz4CmfdI4AYFZkKf-qR32yQkrPrAXiEnFOjNQAYe8&s=voW5qq5osNgaX3tiJFEPtItQCgpPHOV8TS9WXuwjxkE&e=

*Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul - and sings the
tunes without the words - and never stops at all.*

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 3/9/19 1:59 pm
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Common Mergs near Creswell
17 Common Mergansers in the second lake east of Creswell, along 64. One nice adult male!

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 3/9/19 12:59 pm
From: John Bloomfield (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Greater White-fronted Geese at SNWR
Three Greater White-fronted Geese continuing today on the SNWR Wildlife Drive. The birds were spotted at the far end of a pond approximately 1.25 miles into the drive, just beyond where a large group of Glossy Ibises have been foraging. Scope view all but necessary; photos on eBird.
 

Back to top
Date: 3/9/19 12:10 pm
From: Caroline Harvey (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Greenville Co. - Yellow-throated Warbler
Good to see eating the suet in my yard this afteroon. A little early for
the upstate.

Simon C. Harvey
Simpsonville, SC
--
Caroline and Simon Harvey
Simpsonville, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 3/9/19 11:03 am
From: <hilton...> <hilton...>
Subject: Hilton Pond 02/13/19 (Whither The Winter Finches?)
For most of February, Hilton Pond Center was inundated not only by rain but by Purple Finches. The rain continued, but our finches were suddenly gone--a mystery we investigate in installment #688 of "This Week at Hilton Pond." As a bonus we offer lots of images to help you age and sex migratory PUFI at your feeders, and to differentiate them from House Finches that likely are year-round residents.

As always we include tallies of all birds banded or recaptured during the period, plus miscellaneous nature notes and acknowledgment of recent contributors to Hilton Pond Center.

To view the photo essay for 13-28 Feb 2019, please see https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.hiltonpond.org_ThisWeek190213.html&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=UacMv9zttRiW0-Cp4-RJDKBjJSAjCC3P9P-DEUnt2LY&s=NdV-PSFhIXGRuaJ1s87oZb3x6MaIVeRJBI9c9AlVK4Y&e=

Happy Nature Watching,

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.facebook.com_HiltonPond&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=UacMv9zttRiW0-Cp4-RJDKBjJSAjCC3P9P-DEUnt2LY&s=pCVRDZYBPbrja0lh026EErgcTiGyLrTAsE-D8Ela0aY&e= for timely updates on nature topics,
and for info about hummingbirds at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.facebook.com_rubythroats&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=UacMv9zttRiW0-Cp4-RJDKBjJSAjCC3P9P-DEUnt2LY&s=40w66Br_4LmjlUKFLsFs2C0LM7VefLgPsq3b0Qm0-u8&e=

Follow us on Twitter @hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and education for students of all ages.

"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the sunset." BHjr.

============


 

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Date: 3/8/19 8:09 am
From: Kimberlie Dewey (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Franklin Co NC - 03/07/2019
Hi Jeff,

Could you explain where exactly you saw the American Woodock at Joyner Park? This species has never been recorded at Joyner before, and since I only live a couple of miles away I thought I'd go check it out.

Thanks,
Kimberlie Dewey

________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Jeffrey Blalock <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Friday, March 8, 2019 8:33 AM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Franklin Co NC - 03/07/2019

Greetings all

Yesterday I made my first foray into Franklin Co getting 45 Species for the day.

The two most unusual finds for the day was an American Woodcock at Joyner Park which was on the dirt Nature Trail just before the trail splits. It was on the left side of the trail in leaf litter so I didnt see it until it took flight and flew about 30 feet before coming back down just over a little ridge.
I got a great look as it flew through the open woods. I didnt follow it as there was no need to bother it.

My second nice find of the day was a Blue-Headed Vireo just as I was about to finish birding at River Bend Park.

From there I went to the Dehart Botanical Gardens and walked the entire Waterfall Loop Trail and then walked around the pond as much as I could. One area was wet and too wide to get around so I walked the dike that divides the pond into two parts.

Before returning home I checked out the Airport and from the grass on the back of the back door of the office I scanned the airport hoping to see some hawks but no luck.

The manager there told me about the county property across the road that is up for sale and so I walked down a dirt road to a pond and added at last Mockingbirds for my list. Was beginning to worry there.

The three eBird Hotspots were great but there is a problem with the location on River Bend Park and I hope to get that solve.

Cant wait for spring Warblers and Im going to return again.


eBird Checklist Summary for: Mar 7, 2019 at 9:00 AM to Mar 7, 2019 at 5:00 PM

Number of Checklists: 9
Number of Taxa: 45

Checklists included in this summary:
(1): 4383 NC 39 Hwy N, Louisburg US-NC (36.1965,-78.2961)
Date: Mar 7, 2019 at 9:00 AM
(2): Joyner Park
Date: Mar 7, 2019 at 9:25 AM
(3): River Bend Park
Date: Mar 7, 2019 at 11:05 AM
(4): Glenn-Chris Lake Louisburg US-NC (36.0271,-78.3538)
Date: Mar 7, 2019 at 1:20 PM
(5): Dehart Botanical Gardens
Date: Mar 7, 2019 at 1:32 PM
(6): Dehart Botanical Gardens
Date: Mar 7, 2019 at 2:50 PM
(7): Triangle North Executive Airport, Louisburg US-NC (36.0213,-78.3343)
Date: Mar 7, 2019 at 3:25 PM
(8): 421441 Airport Rd, Louisburg US-NC (36.0258,-78.3332)
Date: Mar 7, 2019 at 3:55 PM
(9): Triangle North Executive Airport, Louisburg US-NC (36.0213,-78.3343)
Date: Mar 7, 2019 at 4:50 PM

20 Canada Goose -- (4)
2 Mallard -- (4)
47 Mourning Dove -- (1),(8)
1 Rock Pigeon (9)
5 Killdeer -- (7),(8)
1 American Woodcock -- (2)
1 Great Blue Heron (Blue form) -- (9)
3 Black Vulture -- (1),(2),(3)
8 Turkey Vulture -- (2),(3),(6),(7)
1 Sharp-shinned Hawk -- (3)
1 Red-shouldered Hawk -- (5)
1 Barred Owl -- (5)
2 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker -- (3),(5)
5 Red-bellied Woodpecker -- (2),(3),(8)
3 Downy Woodpecker -- (2),(3)
3 Pileated Woodpecker -- (3),(8)
3 Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) -- (2),(3),(8)
1 Eastern Phoebe -- (8)
1 Blue-headed Vireo -- (3)
7 Blue Jay (1)
16 American Crow -- (2),(3),(4),(7),(8)
4 Carolina Chickadee -- (2),(3),(5)
6 Tufted Titmouse -- (2),(3),(5)
2 White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern) -- (2)
7 Brown-headed Nuthatch -- (2),(3)
2 Brown Creeper -- (2)
3 Winter Wren -- (3),(5),(8)
10 Carolina Wren -- (2),(3),(4),(5),(6)
2 Golden-crowned Kinglet -- (3),(5)
3 Ruby-crowned Kinglet -- (2),(3)
8 Eastern Bluebird -- (2),(3),(7),(8)
1 Hermit Thrush -- (2)
111 American Robin -- (1),(2),(3),(4)
2 Northern Mockingbird -- (8)
13 European Starling -- (1),(4),(8)
11 American Goldfinch -- (3),(4),(5)
3 Chipping Sparrow -- (3),(8)
1 Fox Sparrow -- (5)
65 Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) -- (3),(6),(8)
16 White-throated Sparrow -- (2),(3),(8)
20 Song Sparrow -- (3),(5),(6),(7),(8)
1 Eastern Towhee -- (2)
6 Pine Warbler -- (2),(3),(8)
1 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) -- (3)
16 Northern Cardinal -- (2),(3),(5),(6),(8)

This trip summary was created using the eBird app for iPhone and iPad.
See eBird<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__help.ebird.org_customer_portal_articles_1848031-2Debird-2Dmobile-2Dapps-2Doverview&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=la5YsYBKGHj8s62BZz6rFKq77bCsdG_oFilUThKrJfI&s=7bLCKDtppdTOBpYwV6HV8rVSGhd-vnYPCygm8yWxkpo&e=> for more information.

God Bless and Good Birding Always
Jeff Blalock

Sent from my iPhone

[https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ipmcdn.avast.com_images_icons_icon-2Denvelope-2Dtick-2Dround-2Dorange-2Danimated-2Dno-2Drepeat-2Dv1.gif&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=L0A97FvNP39axnVRoEOOrLuJ2V7GqOrfLhfmX24stR4&s=Ox7YtQgKE-6Bi3BQIi74EBOvg6UVCfXm6bXVCvsTfmY&e=]<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.avast.com_sig-2Demail-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail-26utm-5Fterm-3Dicon&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=L0A97FvNP39axnVRoEOOrLuJ2V7GqOrfLhfmX24stR4&s=ddSp1AAwgDCVkigWK1pbtmQgptCM58GvYCSbKuambJ0&e=> Virus-free. www.avast.com<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.avast.com_sig-2Demail-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail-26utm-5Fterm-3Dlink&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=L0A97FvNP39axnVRoEOOrLuJ2V7GqOrfLhfmX24stR4&s=B0CdcwRiMzmkUbesIeQu9ytJKXT0ladm-efbO5cwhes&e=>

 

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Date: 3/8/19 7:35 am
From: moribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: White Deer Park and Lake Benson, Garner
I just moved to Garner from northern Virginia, and was excited to explore local parks for the first time.  This morning I visited White Deer Park and Lake Benson Park in Garner.  I tallied 60 species between the two spots.  Nothing I saw was flagged by e-bird so I don't know what may have been unusual, but here are my highlights.  At White Deer Park two barred owls were serenading each other beyond the nature center in a grove of pines.  Winter visitors were well represented with purple finch, pine siskin, both kinglets, creeper, yellow-bellied sapsucker, yellow-rumped warbler, and winter wren.  The meadow contained a large flock of chipping sparrows, and a brown-headed nuthatch flew out of a bluebird house.  At Lake Benson I saw pied-billed grebe, Canada goose, wood duck, mallard, gadwall, American wigeon, ring-necked duck, bufflehead, and ruddy duck on the lake.  The large field along the entrance drive contained a large blackbird flock which I was surprised to find consisted mostly of rusty blackbirds (about 60), along with a number of cowbirds and a single grackle.  Other highlights were hermit thrush, sapsucker, phoebe, kingfisher, creeper, and both kinglets.
Marc RibaudoGarner
 

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Date: 3/8/19 6:56 am
From: David Schroder (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Raleigh Western Tanager
Is this bird still there? If so, my understanding is that it’s at a private
residence. Does anyone know if they allow visitors?

Thanks,
David

 

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Date: 3/8/19 6:51 am
From: william haddad (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Kinglet and sapsucker
I have observed butterflies partaking at these digs in Florida,
particularly Red Admirals.

Bill Haddad
Palm Bay, Fl.
On Mar 8, 2019 3:30 AM, "Maria De Bruyn" <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Gretchen,
>
> Thanks for posting your observation about the kinglet and sapsucker. I
> observed this behavior several times at Brumley Nature Preserve starting in
> December and had remarked on it to a friend because I hadn't expected it.
> l. I did not see the kinglets actually sip from the sapsucker sap holes but
> they did follow the sapsucker around. I thought maybe they were hoping the
> drilling and sap would attract insects.
>
> Maria de Bruyn
>
>

 

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Date: 3/8/19 6:24 am
From: Maria De Bruyn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Kinglet and sapsucker
Thanks for the observations. I had seen other birds at sapsucker sap holes before. It was the behavior of the ruby-crowned kinglets following the sapsuckers from tree to tree that I had not seen before. Have others seen other species of birds following the sapsuckers around as they drink from the holes?
Maria  

 

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Date: 3/8/19 5:33 am
From: Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Franklin Co NC - 03/07/2019
Greetings all

Yesterday I made my first foray into Franklin Co getting 45 Species for the day.

The two most unusual finds for the day was an American Woodcock at Joyner Park which was on the dirt Nature Trail just before the trail splits. It was on the left side of the trail in leaf litter so I didn’t see it until it took flight and flew about 30 feet before coming back down just over a little ridge.
I got a great look as it flew through the open woods. I didn’t follow it as there was no need to bother it.

My second nice find of the day was a Blue-Headed Vireo just as I was about to finish birding at River Bend Park.

From there I went to the Dehart Botanical Gardens and walked the entire Waterfall Loop Trail and then walked around the pond as much as I could. One area was wet and too wide to get around so I walked the dike that divides the pond into two parts.

Before returning home I checked out the Airport and from the grass on the back of the back door of the office I scanned the airport hoping to see some hawks but no luck.

The manager there told me about the county property across the road that is up for sale and so I walked down a dirt road to a pond and added at last Mockingbirds for my list. Was beginning to worry there.

The three eBird Hotspots were great but there is a problem with the location on River Bend Park and I hope to get that solve.

Can’t wait for spring Warblers and I’m going to return again.


eBird Checklist Summary for: Mar 7, 2019 at 9:00 AM to Mar 7, 2019 at 5:00 PM

Number of Checklists: 9
Number of Taxa: 45

Checklists included in this summary:
(1): 4383 NC 39 Hwy N, Louisburg US-NC (36.1965,-78.2961)
Date: Mar 7, 2019 at 9:00 AM
(2): Joyner Park
Date: Mar 7, 2019 at 9:25 AM
(3): River Bend Park
Date: Mar 7, 2019 at 11:05 AM
(4): Glenn-Chris Lake Louisburg US-NC (36.0271,-78.3538)
Date: Mar 7, 2019 at 1:20 PM
(5): Dehart Botanical Gardens
Date: Mar 7, 2019 at 1:32 PM
(6): Dehart Botanical Gardens
Date: Mar 7, 2019 at 2:50 PM
(7): Triangle North Executive Airport, Louisburg US-NC (36.0213,-78.3343)
Date: Mar 7, 2019 at 3:25 PM
(8): 421–441 Airport Rd, Louisburg US-NC (36.0258,-78.3332)
Date: Mar 7, 2019 at 3:55 PM
(9): Triangle North Executive Airport, Louisburg US-NC (36.0213,-78.3343)
Date: Mar 7, 2019 at 4:50 PM

20 Canada Goose -- (4)
2 Mallard -- (4)
47 Mourning Dove -- (1),(8)
1 Rock Pigeon (9)
5 Killdeer -- (7),(8)
1 American Woodcock -- (2)
1 Great Blue Heron (Blue form) -- (9)
3 Black Vulture -- (1),(2),(3)
8 Turkey Vulture -- (2),(3),(6),(7)
1 Sharp-shinned Hawk -- (3)
1 Red-shouldered Hawk -- (5)
1 Barred Owl -- (5)
2 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker -- (3),(5)
5 Red-bellied Woodpecker -- (2),(3),(8)
3 Downy Woodpecker -- (2),(3)
3 Pileated Woodpecker -- (3),(8)
3 Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) -- (2),(3),(8)
1 Eastern Phoebe -- (8)
1 Blue-headed Vireo -- (3)
7 Blue Jay (1)
16 American Crow -- (2),(3),(4),(7),(8)
4 Carolina Chickadee -- (2),(3),(5)
6 Tufted Titmouse -- (2),(3),(5)
2 White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern) -- (2)
7 Brown-headed Nuthatch -- (2),(3)
2 Brown Creeper -- (2)
3 Winter Wren -- (3),(5),(8)
10 Carolina Wren -- (2),(3),(4),(5),(6)
2 Golden-crowned Kinglet -- (3),(5)
3 Ruby-crowned Kinglet -- (2),(3)
8 Eastern Bluebird -- (2),(3),(7),(8)
1 Hermit Thrush -- (2)
111 American Robin -- (1),(2),(3),(4)
2 Northern Mockingbird -- (8)
13 European Starling -- (1),(4),(8)
11 American Goldfinch -- (3),(4),(5)
3 Chipping Sparrow -- (3),(8)
1 Fox Sparrow -- (5)
65 Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) -- (3),(6),(8)
16 White-throated Sparrow -- (2),(3),(8)
20 Song Sparrow -- (3),(5),(6),(7),(8)
1 Eastern Towhee -- (2)
6 Pine Warbler -- (2),(3),(8)
1 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) -- (3)
16 Northern Cardinal -- (2),(3),(5),(6),(8)

This trip summary was created using the eBird app for iPhone and iPad.
See eBird for more information.

God Bless and Good Birding Always
Jeff Blalock

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 3/8/19 5:14 am
From: Miskiewicz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Kinglet and sapsucker
I have had a yellow-bellied sapsucker as a regular visitor for months on a
false Cypress tree (the red bellied and Downey come also). And a Ruby
kinglet showed up the middle of February, but went to the suet, not the
tree. Easier feeding, I suppose.

The tree has about a dozen straight, thin trunks and it is covered with
holes. I have seen wrens and nuthatches on the tree trunks, but did not
notice if they were feeding. It looked like they were making their way to
the suet. But I will have to watch closer.

Thanks for all the posts here with so much valuable information!

Kimberly Miskiewicz
Newbie birder!

 

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Date: 3/8/19 4:55 am
From: Wayne Hoffman <whoffman...>
Subject: Re: Kinglet and sapsucker
Hi - 

In December and January a sapsucker was regular in mu backyard near Wilmngton, and Yellow-rumped Warblers regularly visited its sap wells in a weeping willow.  I think this is fairly common behavior for quite a few small insectivorous birds.

Wayne
On 3/8/2019 6:30:15 AM, Maria De Bruyn <carolinabirds...> wrote:
Gretchen, 

Thanks for posting your observation about the kinglet and sapsucker. I observed this behavior several times at Brumley Nature Preserve starting in December and had remarked on it to a friend because I hadn't expected it. l. I did not see the kinglets actually sip from the sapsucker sap holes but they did follow the sapsucker around. I thought maybe they were hoping the drilling and sap would attract insects.

Maria de Bruyn
 
 

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Date: 3/8/19 4:28 am
From: Stewart Gibeau <sgibeau...>
Subject: Re: Kinglet and sapsucker
In David Attenborough’s Life of Birds series they said other birds get more sap from a sapsucker well than the sapsuckers do. Hummingbirds especially like them

Stu Gibeau
Black Mountain, NC
 

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Date: 3/8/19 4:23 am
From: F Wilkinson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Kinglet and sapsucker
A group of us saw a ruby crowned kinglet spend a good deal of time visiting
the holes drilled by a sapsucker at Airlie gardens in Wilmington earlier
this year. There were folks present who had seen this behavior before and
found it fairly common as well.



On Fri, Mar 8, 2019 at 6:37 AM "J. Merrill Lynch" <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> I think this is fairly common behavior and not just kinglets. I tap sugar
> maples for syrup (often sharing the trees with sapsuckers!) and I’ve seen
> chickadees and titmice come to both my taps and to sapsucker wells in
> search of insects, and also to drink the sap. A number of moths, flies, etc
> are attracted to the wells, particularly in the late winter when the maples
> start pumping sap.
>
> Merrill Lynch
> Echo Valley Farm
> Watauga County, NC
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Mar 8, 2019, at 6:29 AM, Maria De Bruyn (via carolinabirds Mailing
> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Gretchen,
>
> Thanks for posting your observation about the kinglet and sapsucker. I
> observed this behavior several times at Brumley Nature Preserve starting in
> December and had remarked on it to a friend because I hadn't expected it.
> l. I did not see the kinglets actually sip from the sapsucker sap holes but
> they did follow the sapsucker around. I thought maybe they were hoping the
> drilling and sap would attract insects.
>
> Maria de Bruyn
>
>
> --
Fleeta
Sent from my iPad, so probably full of mistweaks!!

 

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Date: 3/8/19 3:37 am
From: \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Kinglet and sapsucker
I think this is fairly common behavior and not just kinglets. I tap sugar maples for syrup (often sharing the trees with sapsuckers!) and I’ve seen chickadees and titmice come to both my taps and to sapsucker wells in search of insects, and also to drink the sap. A number of moths, flies, etc are attracted to the wells, particularly in the late winter when the maples start pumping sap.

Merrill Lynch
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 8, 2019, at 6:29 AM, Maria De Bruyn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Gretchen,
>
> Thanks for posting your observation about the kinglet and sapsucker. I observed this behavior several times at Brumley Nature Preserve starting in December and had remarked on it to a friend because I hadn't expected it. l. I did not see the kinglets actually sip from the sapsucker sap holes but they did follow the sapsucker around. I thought maybe they were hoping the drilling and sap would attract insects.
>
> Maria de Bruyn
>

 

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Date: 3/8/19 3:29 am
From: Maria De Bruyn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Kinglet and sapsucker
Gretchen, 
Thanks for posting your observation about the kinglet and sapsucker. I observed this behavior several times at Brumley Nature Preserve starting in December and had remarked on it to a friend because I hadn't expected it. l. I did not see the kinglets actually sip from the sapsucker sap holes but they did follow the sapsucker around. I thought maybe they were hoping the drilling and sap would attract insects.
Maria de Bruyn 
 

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Date: 3/8/19 2:53 am
From: Gretchen Schramm (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Kinglet and Sapsucker
I have a Yellow-breasted Sapsucker who has been a regular visitor for weeks
to a pittosporum shrub in my garden, drilling lines of holes in the bark.

Recently I noticed a Ruby-crowned Kinglet was also visiting the shrub,
presumably to take advantage of the Sapsucker's work.

Yesterday I saw the Sapsucker fly into a water oak next to the shrub, and
right behind was the Kinglet. When the Sapsucker flew across the street,
the Kinglet followed.

Is this 'typical' behavior? That a Kinglet would be 'tracking' the
Sapsucker in order to collect food?

Gretchen
Wilmington, NC

 

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Date: 3/7/19 1:00 pm
From: Edith Tatum (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: This and that
Yesterday coming home from work I saw a Gull, Ringbill I suppose, oust a crow from a street light. It nipped and pecked until out of sight. I’ve never seen a Gull be aggressive toward another species.
My first Red-breasted Nuthatch was on my feeder. The first in many years.
Edith Tatum
Durham, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 3/6/19 3:10 pm
From: Steve Ritt (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Request for late-date reports of Harbinger GCSP
Josh’s request for winter reports reminds me to ask folks if they could please post upcoming reports of the Golden-crowned Sparrow in Harbinger, NC. It’s likely to be departing over the next few weeks, and I’d be very interested to hear when the last date is, as I probably won’t be around to check. The last report I know of is from 16 February, but there have been hardly any reports posted on here at all, despite hundreds of birders having chased this bird.

I’d also be interested in hearing of any behaviors folks observed of this bird, such as eating Eleagnus flowers and privet berries, or sleeping in the Eleagnus hedge. Thanks to everyone for keeping the staff at the GetGo happy and obliging to visiting birders!

Steve Ritt
Harbinger, NC / San Diego, CA

 

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Date: 3/6/19 6:49 am
From: Shelley Rutkin <shelleyr...>
Subject: eBird hotspot for February Wake Co. Long-tailed Duck
My apologies to those of you who have already seen this on Facebook (and
thanks to you who have already merged your locations), but I wanted to get
this info out to everyone.

Last month's Wake County Long-tailed Duck is old news now, but I was flying
home from China while many of you were chasing this bird. I apologize for
not getting an eBird hotspot approved in a timely manner, but we have one
now. If you reported this bird to eBird, please change your checklist to use
the hotspot or merge your personal location with the hotspot.

If your personal location is very near the pin for the hotspot, you may not
see it when using the merge function. First try zooming all the way in. If
that does not display the hotspot, use the move tool to place your personal
location pin some random distance away and save it there (temporarily). With
the pin at some distance, you will then see the hotspot and be able to merge
your personal location.

It will benefit eBird by consolidating these locations. Thank you!

Shelley Rutkin
NC eBird Hotspot Editor


 

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Date: 3/5/19 9:54 am
From: Josh Southern (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Call for Winter '18-'19 reports for the "Briefs for the Files"
Dear Carolinabirders,

It's now time to submit your winter season (December 1st 2018 through
February 28th 2019) reports of noteworthy NC/SC bird sightings for the
"Briefs for the Files" section of "The Chat."

If you already posted your sighting to carolinabirds or submitted a
checklist to ebird, then it is not necessary to send me a separate report.

I'm most interested in reports of very rare species, very late or very
early migrants, species in extremely unusual habitat, incredibly high
counts, and nesting well outside of typical range. With all reports, please
include the bird's full common name (no abbreviations please), the name(s)
of the observer(s), the date(s), the location (including the county, if
known), and an attached photograph (if available). For very rare or
hard-to-identify species, please include a written description if not
attaching a photograph. For the most unusual sightings, I may ask you to
fill out a Rare Bird Report Form for submission to the state's Bird Records
Committee.

Please email your report to me at <joshsouthern79...> by the end of
February. If you send your report as an attached document, please also "cut
and paste" it into the body of the email.

Thanks and Good Birding,
Josh Southern
Holly Springs, NC

 

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Date: 3/4/19 5:49 am
From: jcox3222 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Sullivan’s Island Station 28
Good numbers of shorebirds, terms, gulls and skimmers roosting at Station 28 last evening.

Black skimmers - 75
Forester’s terms - 100 (most in breeding plumage)
Laughing gulls - 50 ( most in breeding plumage)
Ring - billed gulls - 35
American oystercatchers- 20
Semipalmated plover - 350
Ruddy turnstone - 85
Sanderling - 150
Black bellied plover - 1

John Cox
Mount Pleasant SC

Sent from XFINITY Connect Mobile App

 

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Date: 3/1/19 2:17 pm
From: Brenda <bhiles919...>
Subject: Fwd: Helping others learn about birds at the County Farm

If any birders from Alamance or Guilford County can help, please contact Anne Cassebaum at <cassebau...>
>
> County Farm birders,
> I am writing to you because I have gotten the go ahead from Dustin McLean who oversees the Guilford County Farm to experiment with having public birdwatching sessions there this spring.
>
> Would you or someone you know be willing to show up from 8-10am on the third Saturday of the month this spring to tell anyone who comes to the Farm about what you see and hear. You will be part of a pair.
>
> Dustin McLean said that he would have a staff person at the Farm at that time. The session would take place around the two ponds and parking lot near the County Farm buildings.
>
> Remember this is a pilot, and I welcome your suggestions. To get things moving, I have picked a time and day for March, April, May and June. I am hoping we will resume in September, October and November. We need eight people to start.
>
> I would list the event in the Times News and the News and Record. We will cancel if the weather is bad.
>
> Can you help? Know someone else who could? Please respond as pairs or individuals if you can be there on any of these dates:
> March 16
> April 20
> May 18
> June 15
>
> Please spread the word to others who might be interested. And thank you for any help you can give this project and for your support of the Farm, a hot spot for birds.
> Anne
> Anne Cassebaum
>
> P.L.A.C.E. - Public Lands for Agricultural and Community Enrichment
>
> [336] 449 6843

 

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Date: 2/28/19 6:51 pm
From: nicholas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Anhingas continue near Kinston, 2/28/19
Two Anhingas were in the pond off Earl Tyndall Rd. directly across SR 11 from the Kinston Boating Access Area this afternoon, 2/28/19. Thanks to those who reported them at this site previously in ebird.

Nick Flanders
Portsmouth, VA

 

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Date: 2/27/19 9:50 am
From: \Michael S. Cheves\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Update on New Bern Wood Storks
Update on the reported Wood Storks at the Civil War Battlefield trail in
New Bern, NC. On both Sunday 2/24 and Monday 2/25, they were observed
foraging in the waters near Redan #3 between 5:45 PM-6:15 PM, after
which they took off flying N/NW along the creek (literally, into the
sunset from my vantage point).

I tried Tuesday evening 2/26, same time and place, and missed on the
Wood Storks. Today around noon, I spent a few minutes walking the trails
(bare eyes only, didn't have my bins with me) and saw only Canada Geese,
Great Egret, a few Wood Ducks (might not be as scarce as I previously
thought), and Mallards. No sign of Wood Storks roosting or foraging
anywhere.

The Wood Storks appeared to be young birds, and not knowing anything
about their migration habits, I would expect them to be odd migrants
that made a wrong turn on their way to their natural breeding habitat.
If anyone would guide my thoughts in a more appropriate direction,
please feel free to correct me. I will keep trying for these storks as I
am able, at least for the remainder of this week. Best of luck to any
birders in the area who want to try to see if the storks are still
lingering at the Battlefield park. The coming spring should be an
interesting season for this ~30 acre patch.

Michael Cheves
New Bern, NC
 

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Date: 2/27/19 8:48 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Iceland Gull on Ocracoke Feb 27, 2019
I swung by the Horry County landfill this morning, and lot of Laughing Gulls down here in Conway SC have fully black heads. I didn’t do a count, but maybe 10-20%, fully black, with a bunch of mid-molt gray-heads, and quite a few still looking wintry. Things are changing fast this time of year.

Spring seems to be when we get a pulse of adult Lesser Black-backs here at the landfill. I think I saw about 10 full adults, one third-year and no first or second cycles. That’s not a lot in absolute numbers, but LBBGs made up a greater proportion of the gull flock, and the predominance of adults was noticeable.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

On Feb 27, 2019, at 11:25 AM, Peter Vankevich <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

Amidst a flock of mixed gulls and a few Forster's Terns was an Iceland Gull this morning (Feb. 27, 2019). One Laughing Gull was almost in full breeding plumage. They all flew off before I could get a photo. I'll try again tomorrow. Offshore, at least a mile away, was a shrimp boat with lots of gulls flying around it.
/Peter Vankevich

 

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Date: 2/27/19 8:24 am
From: Peter Vankevich (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Iceland Gull on Ocracoke Feb 27, 2019
Amidst a flock of mixed gulls and a few Forster's Terns was an Iceland Gull
this morning (Feb. 27, 2019). One Laughing Gull was almost in full breeding
plumage. They all flew off before I could get a photo. I'll try again
tomorrow. Offshore, at least a mile away, was a shrimp boat with lots of
gulls flying around it.
/Peter Vankevich

 

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Date: 2/27/19 7:44 am
From: scompton1251 <scompton1251...>
Subject: RFI: Colorado "Chicken trips"
Birders,Thinking about a Colorado "Chicken trip" in 2020. Please share recommendations/ reviews for tours and leaders to me offline.Thanks,Steve ComptonGreenville, <SCscompton1251...> from my Verizon LG Smartphone
 

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Date: 2/27/19 7:40 am
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Avery co. birds
Hi Jesse,

I saw your message about the Eagle on Cbirds and thanks for posting.

I'm in the High Country Audubon Society and we try to keep track of
birds in the 5 county region which includes Avery Co. It sounds like you
may have lots of knowledge about bird occurrence in that county and I
wonder whether you might be willing to share what you know?

If so please contact me.

Thanks, Guy McGrane


 

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Date: 2/27/19 6:43 am
From: Jessie Dale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: bald eagle, linville
there was an adult bald eagle munching on roadkill on hwy 105 between linville and GFCo. this morning around 9:30.

jessie dale
linville, nc
 

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Date: 2/27/19 3:07 am
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: harrier "attending" a coyote
On Sunday, several of us watched a Northern Harrier "attending" a coyote.
This was at the North River Preserve in Carteret County. (Actually the
harrier and coyote were on the adjacent Open Grounds Farm--we were watching
from a high stockpile of soil.) The harrier was obviously following the
coyote, alternately making short flights and landing on the ground nearby
(one time it looked uncomfortably close). We assume that it was watching
for small mammals that might be flushed by the coyote.

A couple of years ago, we also witnessed a harrier closely attending a
coyote. That was in the same area as Sunday's observation (same harrier?).

Perhaps others have witnessed this same behavior in the Carolinas?

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

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Date: 2/26/19 7:34 pm
From: Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Chasing after GWF Goose
Greetings all

Today I chased after the Greater White-Fronted Goose in Guilford Co today and struck out on seeing it.

However it wasn’t a total loss I ran into Clyde Atkins a Birder that I haven’t seen since April 1990 when we were on a trip to Idaho with Field Guide where were saw Great Gray Owl, Great Horned Owl, Long-eared and Short-eared Owl and Western Screech-Owl.

Besides the owls we saw plenty of waterfowl, raptors, Greater Sage Grouse and Sharp-tailed Grouse and plenty of other birds as well.

It was nice to see him and catch up with stories of our lives and birding adventures.
We exchanged numbers and plan to keep in touch.

Yesterday chased after two birds that I needed for my NC Life List and got both of them but the most exciting thing of all was getting a Raven for Person County in Roxboro perched atop a pole and in Durham Co flying along beside us as we drove down the road and finally hearing one in Wake Co.

My friend with me was enjoying a great day Birding adding a few species to his NC Life List as well but was really happy finding frogs and turtles and some of them Rare in NC. He entered his sightings into iNaturalist with pictures.

We went to Umstead and Crabtree Lakes looking for ducks but didn’t find many and on the way home I went by a location where I saw 3 Canvasback Ducks on Friday but they were gone.

By now it was 1815 hrs and he had a drive over an hour once we reach my house but I asked him was he up to stopping and trying for an American Woodcock since we were so close to the time that they should be flying around and calling and he said of course, so we stopped at a location that looked good and within a few minutes we heard once in the distance and it was a great way to end a beautiful day.

From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>

 

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Date: 2/26/19 3:16 pm
From: Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: JUST Graylag Goose (domestic) at Lake Lynn in Wake Co NC - NOT a rare goose!
Just a quick note so no one rushes to Lake Lynn in Raleigh, Wake
County, NC on a wild goose chase, due to the "Rare Bird Alert" message
that went out today:
The "7 Greater White-fronted Goose" reported February 26 at Lake Lynn
by someone on ebird are simply domestic goose (closest match is
domestic Graylag Goose).
I've seen that flock there many, many times: nine gray ones and one white one.
Ebird will send UNCONFIRMED sightings so that birders do not miss a
true rare bird due to the delay... but it can lead to false alarms.
So rest assured, checklist https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S53169295&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=CieepOolUc5OiEpjpDheQWVVOjyUW631pYgX82yIMKw&s=QjyZPbdXAJcMDXFpCloE-IvAjo8jJ6Xs6dk_I5RSEss&e=
is incorrect.
Easy mistake to make but always consider a domestic waterfowl as an
alternative to a rare waterfowl.
L Erla Beegle
Raleigh, NC
 

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Date: 2/26/19 12:38 pm
From: Edith Tatum (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Cackling Geese
I went with Peggy Maslow to see the Cackling Geese on Howerton Road. We ran into Mr. Blalock from South Boston , Virginia!
We did see two Cackling Geese! Another bird on my NC list.
Edith Tatum

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 2/26/19 10:56 am
From: Stephen Thomas <rubberhead...>
Subject: Help with a bird right off of I95 in Santee, SC
I can't get there myself but a semi-birding friend has a duck in the pond inside the interchange between I95 and Hwy 301 in Santee, SC. He's pretty sure it's not a ring-necked duck but it does have a black back and he suspects Tufted Duck or a hybrid. If someone is near this location with the right equipment can check it would be great - I'm in Fort Mill and just can't make it down myself.


Put this address into Google Earth for a pin on the location.

N33 27 51 W80 28 45

Stephen Thomas (the Other)
Fort Mill, SC
eight-oh-three 372 872 nine.

 

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Date: 2/26/19 5:08 am
From: Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fox Sparrow and Purple Finch
Nice yard birds this morning - one Fox Sparrow and two Purple Finches (male & female). I seldom see these birds since our house is in a subdivision.

Cornelius, NC

Anne Olsen


Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 2/25/19 12:19 pm
From: Derb Carter <derbc...>
Subject: Snow Goose flocks
If you are checking the Snow Goose flocks beginning to work their way north be alert for Ross's and other rarities. Last year about this time a Pink-footed Goose was photographed in a large Snow Goose flock that showed up in Maryland.

Derb Carter


 

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Date: 2/25/19 11:54 am
From: Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Snow geese, Currituck County, NC
The annual movement of snow geese thru Currituck County has started.
Yesterday, we saw about 1000, 1500 snow geese in Jarvisburg. A few days
ago thousands were seen further north, in Moyock. For those traveling to
and from the Outer Banks along 168/158 be sure to view the stubble corn
fields on either side as you go. Jarvisburg fields, especially behind the
Cotton Gin, are often filled with snow geese this time of year, through
much of March. Yesterday, they were slightly south of the Cotton Gin, on
the opposite side of the highway. We often find blue phase among them, and
sometimes Ross's.

Linda Ward
Skip Hancock,
Coinjock, NC

 

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Date: 2/24/19 2:53 pm
From: Ruth Grissom <ruthgrissom...>
Subject: Baltimore Oriole
A brilliant male, in a neighbor’s backyard in Dilworth today.

Spring is near.
Ruth Ann

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 2/23/19 6:04 pm
From: Peter Stangel <peter...>
Subject: Bear Island WMA, SC Shorebird Extravaganza
Bear Island Wildlife Management Area was teeming with shorebirds today. It's well worth the trip!

Lower Tank Hill Pond had 7 Marbled Godwits and a smattering of other species. The Upper Pine Island/Mosquito Ponds had hundreds of Lesser Yellowlegs, along with Greater Yellowlegs, Dunlins, Least Sandpipers, Dowitchers, Killdeers, American Avocets, and Wilson's Snipes. Long-legged waders were abundant, with ~100 Roseate Spoonbills and more than 100 Glossy Ibis.

The real fun was at Lower Hog Island Pond. There were 1,000+ shorebirds there, including about 220 Avocets, ~600 Dunlin, a hundred or more Dowitchers, about 20 Stilt Sandpipers, and more yellowlegs.

Bring a scope and bug repellent and enjoy!

Peter Stangel
Aiken, SC


 

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Date: 2/23/19 4:17 pm
From: Wayne Hoffman <whoffman...>
Subject: Wrightsville Beach today
In a brief visit this afternoon to the SW end of the island I saw a couple of birds of interest.

a drake and a hen Long-tailed Duck we on the water out to the south. toward the near-side jetty.

Great Cormorant - 1 on the 3-piling marker  with the green sign labeled "1", across the ICW north of the sw tip of the island.  It was distant, but much closer than the cormorants out on the jetty.

Wayne Hoffman
Wilmington
 

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Date: 2/23/19 12:40 pm
From: \Michael S. Cheves\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Wood Storks in New Bern, NC
Two Wood Storks have been at the Civil War Battlefield Park just off Hwy
70 in New Bern, NC. This is an eBird hotspot in Craven County. There are
several "redans" or overlooks that offer views into the creek/swamp
area, and the birds have been observed roosting and feeding anywhere
from redan 3 to redan 6.

Photos from my original sighting on Feb. 20 are in the CBC gallery. The
pair were relocated again on Feb. 21. I was out of town yesterday and
unable to try for them, but today I saw one perched in a snag close to
redan 3. It took off flying west over the swamp, and I lost it in the trees.

There has also been a male Pintail in the swamp recently, but I was
unable to locate him today. The number of Mallards has increased
significantly in the past few months. Last year, this was a great
location for Wood Ducks, but they are scarce right now. There is a lot
of old growth, and the woodpeckers love it.

Trails at the battlefield are easy hiking, but some of the bridges on
the trail are very slippery in wet conditions.

Michael Cheves
New Bern, NC
 

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Date: 2/23/19 6:36 am
From: Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Ducks Moving -- Lake Hickory
Ducks are on the move today. I've had between 800 and 1000 ducks on Lake
Hickory this morning. Mostly both Scaup species with Ring-necked and
Redheads mixed in. A few dabbling ducks mixed in too.--
Dwayne
*************
Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
<redxbill...>

 

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