Carolinabirds
Received From Subject
12/4/21 7:47 pm Jeffrey Pippen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Durham Christmas Bird Count Sun Dec 19, 2021
12/4/21 6:34 pm Steve <sshultz...> Pea Island
12/4/21 5:45 pm Stewart Gibeau <sgibeau...> Re: Fabulous day at Pea Isaland
12/4/21 11:52 am Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Regional summaries Re: 121st CBC summary
12/4/21 8:16 am Daniel Kaplan (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Durham Christmas Bird Count Sun Dec 19, 2021
12/3/21 3:08 pm Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> 121st CBC summary
12/3/21 1:48 pm Steve <sshultz...> Cackling Goose - Beasley Rd.
12/3/21 9:49 am John Fussell <jofuss...> Blackpoll Warbler in Carteret County, NC on 24 November
12/1/21 2:47 pm Wayne Hoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Seawatch at Johnny Mercer Pier; strange gull
12/1/21 2:02 pm KEN LIPSHY (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Fabulous day at Pea Isaland
12/1/21 1:56 pm James Hancock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fabulous day at Pea Isaland
11/30/21 7:20 pm Jeff Pippen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Outer Banks field trip this weekend - 1 opening
11/30/21 6:12 pm Stewart Gibeau <sgibeau...> Re: Outer Banks field trip this weekend - 1 opening
11/30/21 5:17 pm Jeff Pippen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Durham Christmas Bird Count Sun Dec 19, 2021
11/29/21 7:52 pm Derb Carter <dcarter...> Lesser Nighthawk, New Hanover Co NC
11/29/21 7:09 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Belated report of Lesser Nighthawk from Figure Eight Island, NC
11/29/21 3:25 pm Steve <sshultz...> Re: Outer Banks field trip this weekend - 1 opening
11/29/21 2:28 pm Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Yellow-billed Cuckoo in Sneads Ferry,NC
11/29/21 2:24 pm Steve <sshultz...> Re: Outer Banks field trip this weekend - 1 opening
11/29/21 2:16 pm Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Outer Banks field trip this weekend - 1 opening
11/29/21 1:07 pm \gilbert grant\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Yellow-billed Cuckoo in Sneads Ferry,NC
11/29/21 9:53 am <hilton...> <hilton...> Hilton Pond 11/01/21 (Uncommon Birds and Old Birds)
11/29/21 9:41 am <sshultz...> Outer Banks field trip this weekend - 1 opening
11/29/21 7:27 am Debbie shetterly (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Long-tailed duck
11/29/21 6:47 am F Wilkinson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Yellow-rumped Warbler begging from Carolina Chickadee
11/27/21 12:39 pm Rob G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hawk oddity
11/27/21 8:24 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Empidonax
11/27/21 6:18 am Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Purple Finch
11/27/21 5:01 am Erinn Szarek (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Empidonax
11/26/21 1:42 pm Wayne Hoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Brewer's Duck (Mallard X Gadwall hybrid) at Ashley HS pond.
11/26/21 11:26 am whoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Possible Brewer's Duck at Ashley HS Pond, New Hanover Co.
11/26/21 11:23 am kiviat (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Birds nesting in knotweed
11/26/21 7:33 am Michael Fogleman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Where are all the birds?
11/26/21 7:23 am <badgerboy...> Re: Where are all the birds?
11/26/21 6:43 am Edna Gaston (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Where are all the birds?
11/26/21 6:43 am John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Where are all the birds?
11/26/21 6:27 am Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Where are all the birds?
11/26/21 6:19 am Peter Boyer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Where are all the birds?
11/26/21 6:08 am John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Where are all the birds?
11/26/21 5:06 am Carol Reigle <cr1234...> Re: Where are all the birds?
11/26/21 12:45 am Doug Pratt <dpratt14...> Re: Where are all the birds?
11/25/21 7:52 pm Jeff Pippen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Where are all the birds?
11/25/21 7:27 pm Doug Pratt <dpratt14...> Where are all the birds?
11/25/21 11:27 am Eastman, Caroline <EASTMAN...> RE: Apparent Hammond’s Flycatcher in SC
11/25/21 11:13 am Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Apparent Hammond’s Flycatcher in SC
11/25/21 10:50 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Apparent Hammond’s Flycatcher in SC
11/25/21 10:49 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Apparent Hammond’s Flycatcher in SC
11/25/21 10:34 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Apparent Hammond’s Flycatcher in SC
11/25/21 8:12 am David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Too many birds to count on Bulls Island, Charleston Co, SC
11/24/21 1:15 pm Steve <sshultz...> Ross's Geese - Wake NC
11/24/21 8:39 am Paul Serridge (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> HUGO at Litchfield-by-the-Sea, Pawleys Island, Georgetown County, SC
11/22/21 3:18 pm <hilton...> <hilton...> Hilton Pond 10/11/21 (What's In A Bird Name?)
11/22/21 7:06 am Bogey <bogey...> Re: Hudsonian Godwit in Litchfield-by-the-Sea, Pawleys Island, Georgetown County, SC
11/22/21 6:14 am Paul Serridge (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hudsonian Godwit in Litchfield-by-the-Sea, Pawleys Island, Georgetown County, SC
11/20/21 12:49 pm Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> TUNDRA SWAN at Capital Hills Drive, Raleigh, Wake County, NC
11/20/21 12:08 pm Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> How to find stuff in The Chat
11/20/21 10:42 am TAYLOR PIEPHOFF (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Franklin’s gull
11/20/21 7:37 am Doug Hughes (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Franklin’s gull at Ocean Isle Beach NC
11/20/21 6:39 am Paul Serridge (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hudsonian Godwit in Georgetown County SC
11/19/21 6:50 pm TAYLOR PIEPHOFF (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Franklin’s gull at Ocean Isle Beach NC
11/18/21 3:40 pm Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: All of The Chat is online
11/18/21 3:17 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: All of The Chat is online
11/18/21 2:55 pm Michael Fogleman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: All of The Chat is online
11/18/21 12:52 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: All of The Chat is online
11/18/21 8:50 am Eastman, Caroline <EASTMAN...> RE: RFI finding Bar-tailed Godwit Kiawah
11/18/21 8:29 am scompton1251 <scompton1251...> RFI finding Bar-tailed Godwit Kiawah
11/18/21 7:58 am KEN LIPSHY (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: All of The Chat is online
11/18/21 6:31 am Robert Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: All of The Chat is online
11/18/21 5:56 am nan dewire (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> CHBC monthly meeting
11/18/21 5:47 am Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> All of The Chat is online
11/17/21 8:07 pm Peter Vankevich (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> White-winged Dove on Ocracoke
11/17/21 5:16 am Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Dowitcher plumage stages: correction
11/17/21 4:09 am Edmund LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Dowitcher plumage stages: correction
11/16/21 4:30 pm Edmund LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Dowitcher confusion confession
11/16/21 9:31 am Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...> FOS Bird Sightings at My Home
11/15/21 11:28 am Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Dowitcher and Peep ID assistance
11/15/21 10:06 am Robert Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Dowitcher and Peep ID assistance
11/15/21 9:42 am \gilbert grant\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Re: Dowitcher and Peep ID assistance
11/15/21 8:40 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Dowitcher and Peep ID assistance
11/15/21 8:12 am Robert McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Dowitcher and Peep ID assistance
11/15/21 7:29 am Jeffrey Turner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Dowitcher and Peep ID assistance
11/15/21 7:15 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Dowitcher and Peep ID assistance
11/15/21 6:21 am Jeffrey Turner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Dowitcher and Peep ID assistance
11/14/21 3:49 pm Maria De Bruyn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Found: memory card at Mid Pines Rd Wake County
11/14/21 12:35 pm Michael Cheves (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Snow Goose, Washington County, NC Creswell Pond, Nov. 10th
11/13/21 5:35 am Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Red-breasted Nuthatch - Backyard
11/12/21 6:30 am Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Possible American Pipit
11/8/21 8:55 am whoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Dickcissel at Ft. Fisher boat Landing.
11/7/21 6:06 am Sharyn Caudell <scaudell...> Clarification on juncos
11/7/21 5:35 am Sharyn Caudell <scaudell...> FOS juncos
11/6/21 7:15 am Eric Dean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Eared Grebes
11/5/21 10:43 am Eric Dean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Eared Grebes
11/5/21 6:25 am Susan Campbell <susan...> Winter Hummers
11/5/21 5:35 am Peter Vankevich (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Scissor-tailed Flycatcher on Ocracoke
 
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Date: 12/4/21 7:47 pm
From: Jeffrey Pippen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Durham Christmas Bird Count Sun Dec 19, 2021
Sorry to hear it, Dan, but thanks for letting us know. Happy Holidays!

--
Sent from phone
Jeffrey S. Pippen
Durham, NC
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.jeffpippen.com__;!!OToaGQ!5Y2TAMzoVoNgE3MIYeWFpNBE8_4T81MRgL4eiwLidT4wZed_UHoHk3vZqYZ7zO_XawM$


> On Dec 4, 2021, at 11:15 AM, Daniel Kaplan <danmaxkaplan...> wrote:
>
> Hi Jeff & Jacob
> Unfortunately I’ll have to sit this one out
> Dan
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>>> On Nov 30, 2021, at 8:17 PM, Jeff Pippen <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>>
>> Birders,
>>
>> The annual Durham CBC will be Sunday 19 Dec 2021.
>>
>> If you are interested and able to participate, please let me and Jacob Socolar (copied) know!
>>
>> For more info, here’s the link:
>>
>> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.jeffpippen.com/birds/durhamcbc.htm__;!!OToaGQ!5Y2TAMzoVoNgE3MIYeWFpNBE8_4T81MRgL4eiwLidT4wZed_UHoHk3vZqYZ7SeDEKbA$
>>
>> Cheers,
>> Jeff
>> --
>> Jeffrey S. Pippen
>> Durham, NC
>> https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.jeffpippen.com/__;!!OToaGQ!5Y2TAMzoVoNgE3MIYeWFpNBE8_4T81MRgL4eiwLidT4wZed_UHoHk3vZqYZ7dh5vbxI$
>>

 

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Date: 12/4/21 6:34 pm
From: Steve <sshultz...>
Subject: Pea Island
A great day on the Banks with a dozen great birders from the Carolina Bird Club.
Weather was incredible for December on the Outer Banks of Dare County NC with temps of 55-72 degrees with winds light and variable. That doesn’t happen right??
Highlights included Audubon’s Warbler, Purple Sandpiper, American Bittern and a Clapper Rail (on the sand (!)) at Oregon Inlet, Great Cormorant on the boiler at Pea, Hudsonian Godwit and Eurasian Wigeon at the South Pond platform, and Nelson’s, Saltmarsh, and Seaside Sparrow plus Sora at Split Pea.
Impoundments are full of waterfowl and the new fishing pier/birding observatory at Oregon Inlet is open, providing a new way to scope the inlet.
It’s a great time to be on the coast!
If you have not signed up for the CBC winter weekend in January, don’t hesitate!

Steve Shultz
Kill Devil Hills, NC
 

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Date: 12/4/21 5:45 pm
From: Stewart Gibeau <sgibeau...>
Subject: Re: Fabulous day at Pea Isaland
I was there earlier this week too. We had two American Bitterns there too.

Get Outlook for iOS<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://aka.ms/o0ukef__;!!OToaGQ!6E5ClqusKnMEKAfsDqlU_-lACSi_Mazr2kyMKOjl2C8q-mZUSAPZ3kZq0vZFcex5H-0$ >
________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of KEN LIPSHY <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Wednesday, December 1, 2021 5:01:57 PM
To: James Hancock <jamespiano...>
Cc: <carolinabirds...> <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Fabulous day at Pea Isaland

Thanks for this skip!
This is an excellent post for me since i have to live vicariously from others post due to little time to get away.
I had a mental image of standing at Pea Island - one of my favorite spots to just forget all my work worries!
And your description of the three raptors in the air allowed for a brief reprieve from my other responsibilities.

Thanks so much!


Kenneth A. Lipshy
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://Www.crisismanagementleadership.com__;!!OToaGQ!8qadhf3upX7HuY_F8XBi4aPlDH4-35M0npkMbGBLyZaDn80p0MVVfdfXlGkPETDx0w0$
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://Www.crisislead.blogspot.com__;!!OToaGQ!8qadhf3upX7HuY_F8XBi4aPlDH4-35M0npkMbGBLyZaDn80p0MVVfdfXlGkPdEzGGOI$

> On Dec 1, 2021, at 4:56 PM, James Hancock <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> This is my first post to Carolina birds. My late wife Linda Ward always took care of this until her death in October this year; so please excuse any etiquette mistakes.
> Today was perfect—sunny about 60 degrees, no wind. The show in North and South ponds was on full display with thousands of redheads, tundra swans, and other ducks, along with at least 50 white pelicans.
> However the best was at the north end of the north pond. The little pond next to the parking lot had more in it than I’d ever seen:
> Cormorant, black duck, snowy egret, white ibis, 10 hooded mergansers (three males), and a clapper rail! If you know this pond, you know this was a lot to see.
> When I turned around from the pond, a peregrine flew up from the South over the viewing platform, then turned around and went back over North pond again, dive bombing a Herring gull.
> Then it came back over the viewing platform and started circling, catching a thermal. As I watched it circle, an immature bald eagle also started catching the same thermal. Then a Harrier also started catching the thermal. At one point I had all three in my binoculars at once!
> The Harrier left, but the Peregrine and the eagle kept circling higher. Then the Peregrine started going at the eagle, repeatedly dive bombing it as both were circling on the thermal. This went on for at least 15 minutes before the Peregrine got bored and went East over the dunes to the ocean and I lost it.
> What a day—-nothing really rare, but quite wonderful just to be there.
> Skip Hancock

 

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Date: 12/4/21 11:52 am
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Regional summaries Re: 121st CBC summary
The regional summaries did not seem to have a link on the main summary web
page, but they are here:

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.audubon.org/121st-christmas-bird-count-alphabetical-index-regional-summaries__;!!OToaGQ!9w7M57iLWm4V_nwXPVG9BxNoIKMfY1KWwZi0wP_tdJOiVmg5Lga5nS8wH6APJaBISMA$

Thanks to Dennis Forsythe for sharing the web link.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

On Fri, Dec 3, 2021 at 6:07 PM Nate Dias <offshorebirder...> wrote:

> For those who have not read it yet, the summary of last year's Christmas
> Bird Count results is available online. It was an interesting count season:
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.audubon.org/news/121st-christmas-bird-count-summary__;!!OToaGQ!9w7M57iLWm4V_nwXPVG9BxNoIKMfY1KWwZi0wP_tdJOiVmg5Lga5nS8wH6APyX-lHkE$
> audubon.org/news/121st-christmas-bird-count-summary
>
> The ranking of CBCs by number of species is here:
>
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://nas-national-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/file-attachments/article/table_3_121st_150_species_0.pdf__;!!OToaGQ!9w7M57iLWm4V_nwXPVG9BxNoIKMfY1KWwZi0wP_tdJOiVmg5Lga5nS8wH6APsqCRYwU$
>
> nas-national-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/file-attachments/article/table_3_121st_150_species_0.pdf
>
> McClellanville was again the top CBC east of the Mississippi, in terms of
> number of species. Only 18 CBCs in Texas and California were ahead of us.
>
> Winyah Bay was 25th overall and besides McClellanville, only Texas and
> California counts beat them.
>
> Wilmington was 33rd and was barely edged out by Alafia Banks, Florida and
> West Galveston Island, Texas.
>
> Morehead City and Litchfield-Pawleys were close behind.
>
> The past few years, Florida counts seem to have faded a bit in the number
> of species reported. Counts like West Pasco / New Port Richey used to put
> up formidable numbers...
>
> Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
>
> --
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2/__;!!OToaGQ!9w7M57iLWm4V_nwXPVG9BxNoIKMfY1KWwZi0wP_tdJOiVmg5Lga5nS8wH6APT4KegX0$
> flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2
>
> "These days I prefer to hunt with a camera. A good photograph demands
> more skill from the hunter, better nerves and more patience than the rifle
> shot." -- Bror Blixen
>

 

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Date: 12/4/21 8:16 am
From: Daniel Kaplan (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Durham Christmas Bird Count Sun Dec 19, 2021
Hi Jeff & Jacob
Unfortunately I’ll have to sit this one out
Dan

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 30, 2021, at 8:17 PM, Jeff Pippen <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Birders,
>
> The annual Durham CBC will be Sunday 19 Dec 2021.
>
> If you are interested and able to participate, please let me and Jacob Socolar (copied) know!
>
> For more info, here’s the link:
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.jeffpippen.com/birds/durhamcbc.htm__;!!OToaGQ!8tPAbdOkPOqYvwjfEldo0uL2mL1yROGgdjIqd58lsxmg3kVOYa10q3hNr1G33ZohAMw$
>
> Cheers,
> Jeff
> --
> Jeffrey S. Pippen
> Durham, NC
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.jeffpippen.com/__;!!OToaGQ!8tPAbdOkPOqYvwjfEldo0uL2mL1yROGgdjIqd58lsxmg3kVOYa10q3hNr1G3oD60onY$
>

 

Back to top
Date: 12/3/21 3:08 pm
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: 121st CBC summary
For those who have not read it yet, the summary of last year's Christmas
Bird Count results is available online. It was an interesting count season:

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.audubon.org/news/121st-christmas-bird-count-summary__;!!OToaGQ!6cH2WHkSKgQ0ndaXWnD3s1B8c3v_-hVixz-AOyeWWzAWmDTTOJlZo4ydHeMk3ANidAc$
audubon.org/news/121st-christmas-bird-count-summary

The ranking of CBCs by number of species is here:

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://nas-national-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/file-attachments/article/table_3_121st_150_species_0.pdf__;!!OToaGQ!6cH2WHkSKgQ0ndaXWnD3s1B8c3v_-hVixz-AOyeWWzAWmDTTOJlZo4ydHeMkVnNmRRA$
nas-national-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/file-attachments/article/table_3_121st_150_species_0.pdf

McClellanville was again the top CBC east of the Mississippi, in terms of
number of species. Only 18 CBCs in Texas and California were ahead of us.

Winyah Bay was 25th overall and besides McClellanville, only Texas and
California counts beat them.

Wilmington was 33rd and was barely edged out by Alafia Banks, Florida and
West Galveston Island, Texas.

Morehead City and Litchfield-Pawleys were close behind.

The past few years, Florida counts seem to have faded a bit in the number
of species reported. Counts like West Pasco / New Port Richey used to put
up formidable numbers...

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

--
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2/__;!!OToaGQ!6cH2WHkSKgQ0ndaXWnD3s1B8c3v_-hVixz-AOyeWWzAWmDTTOJlZo4ydHeMkVI6Mgvs$
flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2

"These days I prefer to hunt with a camera. A good photograph demands more
skill from the hunter, better nerves and more patience than the rifle
shot." -- Bror Blixen

 

Back to top
Date: 12/3/21 1:48 pm
From: Steve <sshultz...>
Subject: Cackling Goose - Beasley Rd.
For folks headed to or from the Banks this weekend, a lot of activity at Beasley Road (mm 448-ish on HWY64)
Several hundred swans and at least one Richardson’s Cackling Goose with the resident and migrant Canada’s.

Also noticed this when entering the eBird list. Apparently a new feature rolling out.

Join us for a free eBird Trip Reports webinar on Tuesday, 14 December from 12-1pm Eastern (US). Members of Team eBird will demonstrate the exciting new features of eBird Trip Reports, plus additional free resources to help you prepare for your next birding adventure.
Register for the free eBird Trip Reports webinar here.



Steve Shultz
On the road again
 

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Date: 12/3/21 9:49 am
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: Blackpoll Warbler in Carteret County, NC on 24 November
Recently I received several photos of a Blackpoll Warbler at the North River
Preserve (Carteret County, NC) on 24 November, taken by photographer-birder
Doug Racine.

I urged him to post some on "sightings" at the Carolina Bird Club website.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

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Date: 12/1/21 2:47 pm
From: Wayne Hoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Seawatch at Johnny Mercer Pier; strange gull
Hi -
1/2
I did a very informal seawatch for 2 hours mid-day today (Dec. 1) from the Johnny Mercer Pier, Wrightsville Beach.

The ocean was quite calm and the sky was mostly clear but part of the time with scattered high cloud wisps.

Few birds were feeding inshore, but there was a pretty good southward movement beyond the pier. A few hundred Brown Pelicans passed. all southbound, and mostly in groups gliding low over the water. Gulls were moving south at a rate averaging 10/minute, These were primarily Herring Gulls and Laughing Gulls, with a sprinkling of Great Black-backed, Lesser Black-backed, and Ring-billed. The great majority were immatures.

Other birds present included a few Common Loons on the water, a very few Double-crested Cormorants, and well offshore, a dozen or so Northern Gannets.

The most interesting bird was a "white-winged" gull. This was a large bulky first-cycle bird, with all white primaries and secondaries, some brown smudging on the belly, and widely spaced but distinct barring on the under-tail coverts. Overall it looked like a first-cycle Glaucous Gull EXCEPT for its heavy, completely black bill. The forehead was shallowly sloped back; that, the heaviness of the bill, and the overall robust build were wrong for Iceland Gull. I played with the idea it might be a leucistic Great-black-backed Gull, but the under-tail pattern was wrong for that. I have a lot of experience with (mostly immature) Glaucous Gulls from the Pacific Coast. This bird seemed more heavily built and the bill was all wrong. On the Pacific Coast it probably would have been called a Glaucous X Glaucous-winged Gull hybrid. But that combination is hardly plausible on the Atlantic Coast. Most of the Glaucous Gulls wintering on the Pacific Coast are of the Alaskan subspecies barrovianus a
nd are a bit smaller and more gracile and thinner-billed than Atlantic and Asian subspecies, so some of the aspects that seemed off to me might be subspecific differences.

One last feature: Glaucous-gulls appear to have small eyes relative to head size, and this bird did not give that appearance.

So, I am left thinking maybe it is a hybrid, but I do not have any confidence in naming the other parent.

Wayne

 

Back to top
Date: 12/1/21 2:02 pm
From: KEN LIPSHY (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Fabulous day at Pea Isaland
Thanks for this skip!
This is an excellent post for me since i have to live vicariously from others post due to little time to get away.
I had a mental image of standing at Pea Island - one of my favorite spots to just forget all my work worries!
And your description of the three raptors in the air allowed for a brief reprieve from my other responsibilities.

Thanks so much!


Kenneth A. Lipshy
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://Www.crisismanagementleadership.com__;!!OToaGQ!8qadhf3upX7HuY_F8XBi4aPlDH4-35M0npkMbGBLyZaDn80p0MVVfdfXlGkPETDx0w0$
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://Www.crisislead.blogspot.com__;!!OToaGQ!8qadhf3upX7HuY_F8XBi4aPlDH4-35M0npkMbGBLyZaDn80p0MVVfdfXlGkPdEzGGOI$

> On Dec 1, 2021, at 4:56 PM, James Hancock <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> This is my first post to Carolina birds. My late wife Linda Ward always took care of this until her death in October this year; so please excuse any etiquette mistakes.
> Today was perfect—sunny about 60 degrees, no wind. The show in North and South ponds was on full display with thousands of redheads, tundra swans, and other ducks, along with at least 50 white pelicans.
> However the best was at the north end of the north pond. The little pond next to the parking lot had more in it than I’d ever seen:
> Cormorant, black duck, snowy egret, white ibis, 10 hooded mergansers (three males), and a clapper rail! If you know this pond, you know this was a lot to see.
> When I turned around from the pond, a peregrine flew up from the South over the viewing platform, then turned around and went back over North pond again, dive bombing a Herring gull.
> Then it came back over the viewing platform and started circling, catching a thermal. As I watched it circle, an immature bald eagle also started catching the same thermal. Then a Harrier also started catching the thermal. At one point I had all three in my binoculars at once!
> The Harrier left, but the Peregrine and the eagle kept circling higher. Then the Peregrine started going at the eagle, repeatedly dive bombing it as both were circling on the thermal. This went on for at least 15 minutes before the Peregrine got bored and went East over the dunes to the ocean and I lost it.
> What a day—-nothing really rare, but quite wonderful just to be there.
> Skip Hancock
 

Back to top
Date: 12/1/21 1:56 pm
From: James Hancock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fabulous day at Pea Isaland
This is my first post to Carolina birds. My late wife Linda Ward always took care of this until her death in October this year; so please excuse any etiquette mistakes.
Today was perfect—sunny about 60 degrees, no wind. The show in North and South ponds was on full display with thousands of redheads, tundra swans, and other ducks, along with at least 50 white pelicans.
However the best was at the north end of the north pond. The little pond next to the parking lot had more in it than I’d ever seen:
Cormorant, black duck, snowy egret, white ibis, 10 hooded mergansers (three males), and a clapper rail! If you know this pond, you know this was a lot to see.
When I turned around from the pond, a peregrine flew up from the South over the viewing platform, then turned around and went back over North pond again, dive bombing a Herring gull.
Then it came back over the viewing platform and started circling, catching a thermal. As I watched it circle, an immature bald eagle also started catching the same thermal. Then a Harrier also started catching the thermal. At one point I had all three in my binoculars at once!
The Harrier left, but the Peregrine and the eagle kept circling higher. Then the Peregrine started going at the eagle, repeatedly dive bombing it as both were circling on the thermal. This went on for at least 15 minutes before the Peregrine got bored and went East over the dunes to the ocean and I lost it.
What a day—-nothing really rare, but quite wonderful just to be there.
Skip Hancock
 

Back to top
Date: 11/30/21 7:20 pm
From: Jeff Pippen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Outer Banks field trip this weekend - 1 opening
Hey Stu,

If you are referring to there as Cape Point where Brian reported many good birds, the answer is yes. Many of us have gotten there many times over the years using two legs you can walk out there, and theres no fee!

Cheers,
Jeff
--
Jeffrey S. Pippen
Durham, NC
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.jeffpippen.com/__;!!OToaGQ!_u7UQ_FAZRrin1Hkm_HTl8hlGWJW63DdfMSB2nHdc8j_X2VVNPjmIfZRcV-3m60Nzg0$

> On Nov 30, 2021, at 9:11 PM, Stewart Gibeau <sgibeau...> wrote:
>
> Can you get there other than by 4WD?
>
> Stu
>
> Get Outlook for iOS <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://aka.ms/o0ukef__;!!OToaGQ!78AovyZ3kYXICHF6-Bbj5IK0FysVEh8R1zYWWqrZaRqEo8bPKaA9aaPXtj5Pjq1IISg$>
> From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Brian Patteson <carolinabirds...>
> Sent: Monday, November 29, 2021 5:16:05 PM
> To: <sshultz...> <sshultz...>
> Cc: <carolinabirds...> <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: Re: Outer Banks field trip this weekend - 1 opening
>
> Cape Point has had some good stuff the last couple of days. Pomarine and Parasitic Jaegers, a couple of Iceland Gulls, a nice adult California Gull, and a Brown Booby all seen there.
>
> Brian Patteson
> Hatteras, NC
>
>> On Nov 29, 2021, at 12:41 PM, <sshultz...> <mailto:<sshultz...>> <sshultz...> <mailto:<sshultz...>> wrote:
>>
>> Happy Cyber Monday!
>> Hope you are getting all the great deals.
>>
>> Here is one more to consider. I have one opening that came up for this weekends Carolina Bird Club field trip to the Outer Banks (NC). The weather looks good, at least this far out, so if you would like to go, please review the details at the link below and let me know ASAP. Of course, you must be a CBC member to attend, but you can always sign up for membership at the same time as you register.
>>
>> Outer Banks December 2021 (carolinabirdclub.org) <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/Trips/OBX2021.html__;!!OToaGQ!8FjXwBDEhlIwJVvf-JdzhbrbHt3ZdZ7hQb6lJsFaudTtHHG91qzPXNwGzH_dDgUUH5w$>
>>
>>
>> Early December not your cup of tea? An opportunity to bird similar areas, albeit at a different time of the season and with different expectations, is open to all.
>> For information on the CBCs winter meeting in mid-January, visit CBC Winter 2022 (carolinabirdclub.org) <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/meetings/2022/OBX/__;!!OToaGQ!8FjXwBDEhlIwJVvf-JdzhbrbHt3ZdZ7hQb6lJsFaudTtHHG91qzPXNwGzH_djYxN6UA$>
>>
>> Best,
>> Steve Shultz
>> Apex NC
>


 

Back to top
Date: 11/30/21 6:12 pm
From: Stewart Gibeau <sgibeau...>
Subject: Re: Outer Banks field trip this weekend - 1 opening
Can you get there other than by 4WD?

Stu

Get Outlook for iOS<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://aka.ms/o0ukef__;!!OToaGQ!78AovyZ3kYXICHF6-Bbj5IK0FysVEh8R1zYWWqrZaRqEo8bPKaA9aaPXtj5Pjq1IISg$ >
________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Brian Patteson <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Monday, November 29, 2021 5:16:05 PM
To: <sshultz...> <sshultz...>
Cc: <carolinabirds...> <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Outer Banks field trip this weekend - 1 opening

Cape Point has had some good stuff the last couple of days. Pomarine and Parasitic Jaegers, a couple of Iceland Gulls, a nice adult California Gull, and a Brown Booby all seen there.

Brian Patteson
Hatteras, NC

On Nov 29, 2021, at 12:41 PM, <sshultz...><mailto:<sshultz...>> <sshultz...><mailto:<sshultz...>> wrote:

Happy Cyber Monday!
Hope you are getting all the great deals.

Here is one more to consider. I have one opening that came up for this weekends Carolina Bird Club field trip to the Outer Banks (NC). The weather looks good, at least this far out, so if you would like to go, please review the details at the link below and let me know ASAP. Of course, you must be a CBC member to attend, but you can always sign up for membership at the same time as you register.

Outer Banks December 2021 (carolinabirdclub.org)<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/Trips/OBX2021.html__;!!OToaGQ!8FjXwBDEhlIwJVvf-JdzhbrbHt3ZdZ7hQb6lJsFaudTtHHG91qzPXNwGzH_dDgUUH5w$>


Early December not your cup of tea? An opportunity to bird similar areas, albeit at a different time of the season and with different expectations, is open to all.
For information on the CBCs winter meeting in mid-January, visit CBC Winter 2022 (carolinabirdclub.org)<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/meetings/2022/OBX/__;!!OToaGQ!8FjXwBDEhlIwJVvf-JdzhbrbHt3ZdZ7hQb6lJsFaudTtHHG91qzPXNwGzH_djYxN6UA$>

Best,
Steve Shultz
Apex NC


 

Back to top
Date: 11/30/21 5:17 pm
From: Jeff Pippen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Durham Christmas Bird Count Sun Dec 19, 2021
Birders,

The annual Durham CBC will be Sunday 19 Dec 2021.

If you are interested and able to participate, please let me and Jacob Socolar (copied) know!

For more info, here’s the link:

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.jeffpippen.com/birds/durhamcbc.htm__;!!OToaGQ!_A8Nws_pyzOon2kiH4MW7wF33o8IV9DBBTE2tKajts2lTjjtobztlHrPO6rSAfPy4Kg$

Cheers,
Jeff
--
Jeffrey S. Pippen
Durham, NC
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.jeffpippen.com/__;!!OToaGQ!_A8Nws_pyzOon2kiH4MW7wF33o8IV9DBBTE2tKajts2lTjjtobztlHrPO6rSYUQb8zI$


 

Back to top
Date: 11/29/21 7:52 pm
From: Derb Carter <dcarter...>
Subject: Lesser Nighthawk, New Hanover Co NC
At dusk (approximately 5:30) on November 25, I drove across the bridge to Figure 8 Island (New Hanover County) and onto the causeway. I noticed a bird ahead with a low and erratic flight crossing the road and flying along the grassy shoulders. When closer, I could tell it was a nightjar and by the white patches on the outer wings a nighthawk. Knowing it could be either an extremely late Common Nighthawk or possibly a Lesser Nighthawk, I immediately worked to get better looks and determine the wing shape and position of the white wing patches, recalling these are key to distinguishing the two species.
The straight causeway has grassy margins with scattered small live oaks and clumps of wax myrtle extending on both sides 50-75 feet to salt marsh. The nighthawk would circle low into the grassy margins, fly across the road to the other side, circle around and fly back across the road. Because it was on the narrow causeway it was within view at all times for approximately 4-5 minutes covering one quarter mile.
Flight was buoyant and fluttering with twists and turns mostly from just above the ground up to 3-4 feet, at no time above 8 feet. As it moved steadily toward the island and I would creep up to intercept it as it crossed the road several times as close as 15 feet affording excellent views in the high beams even in the growing darkness.
The white wing patches were obvious even at a distance. The patches started at the front of the outer wing and crossed evenly, narrowing to a rear edge short of the rear edge of the wing. My impression was the patches were close to the wing tip but that is hard to judge with nothing to compare. As we observed the bird, my wife and I settled on the white wing patches being about 2/3 of the distance from the bend in the front of the wing to the wing tip. The wings seemed overall not quite as slender as Common Nighthawk and came to a blunt not sharp point at the wingtips. Below was a warm buffy color with fine bars and streaks, darker head, and white on the throat. The warm buffy color extended well out the underside of the wings. Upperparts appeared darker mottled gray and brown with some hints of the buffy color. The tail was long and narrow, streaked blackish and brown with a narrow white band crossing the tail short of the tip.
As we approached the island, it flew behind a large clump of myrtle and disappeared. We slowly drove the causeway 3-4 more times and did not see it again. When we arrived at the house, I jotted down some notes and consulted some field guides and online references and photos. These all supported my conclusion that it was a Lesser Nighthawk. Reasons follow:

1. The white wing patches were closer to the wing tip than the white wing patches on Common Nighthawk. Although this can be difficult to determine on a single bird with nothing to compare, our estimate that the white patches were about 2/3 of the distance from the bend in the front of the wing to the tip fits Lesser. References supported by photos place the white patch on Common about half way between the 'wrist" and the tip of the wing.
2. The wings appeared overall less slender than Common Nighthawk and came to a blunt not sharply pointed tip, consistent with Lesser.
3. I was struck when observing the bird how warm buffy it was below and under the wings. This was striking when it banked a couple of times flying very close in the headlights. Common Nighthawks breed on the island and I see them often, and they are more cold gray and white with brownish bars and streaks below, not extensive warm buffy. Several references mention the buffy coloration of Lesser below and extending on the undersides of the wings, and this can be seen in photos.
4. It foraged at or just above ground level for the entire time we observed it. Common Nighthawks generally fly higher to forage. I have seen Commons swoop down to water or close to the ground but not stay this low this long when they are flying and foraging. While not alone distinguishing, several references note that Lesser characteristically flies and forages low to the ground, and Commons typically fly and forage higher.
5. At this time of year in NC, Lesser may be as or more likely than Common. Commons are generally gone from NC by the end of September or early October. Ebird has one report of Common Nighthawk in the entire eastern US during this November, one heard in Alabama on November 11. Some Lessers move east and winter on the Gulf Coast and Florida every year, with up to 20 reported from one site in Florida. Four Lessers were reported from Florida on November 24 and one on November 26. The one NC record of Lesser was collected in Carteret County on December 8, 1998.
I looked for the nighthawk at dawn and dusk the following (past) three days, hoping to get photographs and perhaps figure out how others might see it, but have not seen it again.
Derb Carter
Chapel Hill, NC




 

Back to top
Date: 11/29/21 7:09 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Belated report of Lesser Nighthawk from Figure Eight Island, NC
Those of you who are on GroupMe's NC Rare Bird Alert may have seen Derb
Carter's message today, about Lesser Nighthawk on Nov. 25 at Figure Eight
Island. Though he DID e-mail me and about 2 others the next day, because
Figure Eight is a private "gated" island (gatehouse) and entry requires
permission from a landowner, he did not post for a few days owing to the
inaccessibility of the location to the public. And, he has not seen it in
the several days since.

After I saw the GroupMe message, I was curious to see if he filled out an
eBird report. Yes, he did, with quite a few details/description, as this
is a sight report; the only other NC record was one found dead in December
1998 in Carteret County. Thus, this is the first report of a live Lesser
Nighthawk in the Carolinas (as it is not on the SC list shown on the CBC
website).

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S98263674__;!!OToaGQ!_GDMfFLtZxs92SVvFos0uOxCyDWi31hWijcnYXd9lVDDN_YMft2bHKPJzGtWVhfsTQ0$

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

 

Back to top
Date: 11/29/21 3:25 pm
From: Steve <sshultz...>
Subject: Re: Outer Banks field trip this weekend - 1 opening
The slot for this weekend has been filled, but the Winter meeting is wide open for registration!

Thanks…

Steve Shultz


> On Nov 29, 2021, at 12:41 PM, <Sshultz...> wrote:
>
> 
> Happy Cyber Monday!
> Hope you are getting all the great deals.
>
> Here is one more to consider. I have one opening that came up for this weekend’s Carolina Bird Club field trip to the Outer Banks (NC). The weather looks good, at least this far out, so if you would like to go, please review the details at the link below and let me know ASAP. Of course, you must be a CBC member to attend, but you can always sign up for membership at the same time as you register.
>
> Outer Banks December 2021 (carolinabirdclub.org)
>
>
> Early December not your cup of tea? An opportunity to bird similar areas, albeit at a different time of the season and with different expectations, is open to all.
> For information on the CBC’s winter meeting in mid-January, visit CBC Winter 2022 (carolinabirdclub.org)
>
> Best,
> Steve Shultz
> Apex NC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/29/21 2:28 pm
From: Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Yellow-billed Cuckoo in Sneads Ferry,NC
Re: the fresh (evidence) of a late Yellow-billed Cuckoo in Sneads
Ferry NC on 2021-11-29:

Speaking of late, Marc Ribaudo noted in the NC Bird Atlas on ebird
that a Yellow-billed Cuckoo was feeding young on 2021-09-26 in Raleigh
NC (Anderson Point Park area)! The list <
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/atlasnc/checklist/S95200400__;!!OToaGQ!58NCpdWA0ay5nY4X_XR3LLOp-mzUA7ZVz7p_FGryJQ_qroqW98s2BN4fIvYMas9rzro$ > includes a photo of
the adult and a juvenile cuckoo. I suppose a late breeder (end of
September) may turn into a late migrant (end of November).
Lynn Erla Beegle
Raleigh NC



On Mon, Nov 29, 2021 at 4:23 PM "gilbert grant" <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
>
> I found the fresh remains (tail and one wing)of a Yellow-billed Cuckoo in my
> front yard today (likely what was left of an accipiter meal) in Sneads Ferry,
> Onslow County, NC. A rather late record for this species.
>
> Gilbert S. Grant
> Sneads Ferry, NC
>
 

Back to top
Date: 11/29/21 2:24 pm
From: Steve <sshultz...>
Subject: Re: Outer Banks field trip this weekend - 1 opening
Nice! Thanks for the 411. I wonder if that was the same booby from Virginia Beach?

Steve Shultz


> On Nov 29, 2021, at 5:16 PM, Brian Patteson <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Cape Point has had some good stuff the last couple of days. Pomarine and Parasitic Jaegers, a couple of Iceland Gulls, a nice adult California Gull, and a Brown Booby all seen there.
>
> Brian Patteson
> Hatteras, NC
>
>> On Nov 29, 2021, at 12:41 PM, <sshultz...> <sshultz...> wrote:
>>
>> Happy Cyber Monday!
>> Hope you are getting all the great deals.
>>
>> Here is one more to consider. I have one opening that came up for this weekend’s Carolina Bird Club field trip to the Outer Banks (NC). The weather looks good, at least this far out, so if you would like to go, please review the details at the link below and let me know ASAP. Of course, you must be a CBC member to attend, but you can always sign up for membership at the same time as you register.
>>
>> Outer Banks December 2021 (carolinabirdclub.org)
>>
>>
>> Early December not your cup of tea? An opportunity to bird similar areas, albeit at a different time of the season and with different expectations, is open to all.
>> For information on the CBC’s winter meeting in mid-January, visit CBC Winter 2022 (carolinabirdclub.org)
>>
>> Best,
>> Steve Shultz
>> Apex NC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/29/21 2:16 pm
From: Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Outer Banks field trip this weekend - 1 opening
Cape Point has had some good stuff the last couple of days. Pomarine and Parasitic Jaegers, a couple of Iceland Gulls, a nice adult California Gull, and a Brown Booby all seen there.

Brian Patteson
Hatteras, NC

> On Nov 29, 2021, at 12:41 PM, <sshultz...> <sshultz...> wrote:
>
> Happy Cyber Monday!
> Hope you are getting all the great deals.
>
> Here is one more to consider. I have one opening that came up for this weekend’s Carolina Bird Club field trip to the Outer Banks (NC). The weather looks good, at least this far out, so if you would like to go, please review the details at the link below and let me know ASAP. Of course, you must be a CBC member to attend, but you can always sign up for membership at the same time as you register.
>
> Outer Banks December 2021 (carolinabirdclub.org) <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/Trips/OBX2021.html__;!!OToaGQ!8FjXwBDEhlIwJVvf-JdzhbrbHt3ZdZ7hQb6lJsFaudTtHHG91qzPXNwGzH_dDgUUH5w$>
>
>
> Early December not your cup of tea? An opportunity to bird similar areas, albeit at a different time of the season and with different expectations, is open to all.
> For information on the CBC’s winter meeting in mid-January, visit CBC Winter 2022 (carolinabirdclub.org) <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/meetings/2022/OBX/__;!!OToaGQ!8FjXwBDEhlIwJVvf-JdzhbrbHt3ZdZ7hQb6lJsFaudTtHHG91qzPXNwGzH_djYxN6UA$>
>
> Best,
> Steve Shultz
> Apex NC


 

Back to top
Date: 11/29/21 1:07 pm
From: \gilbert grant\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Yellow-billed Cuckoo in Sneads Ferry,NC

I found the fresh remains (tail and one wing)of a Yellow-billed Cuckoo in my
front yard today (likely what was left of an accipiter meal) in Sneads Ferry,
Onslow County, NC. A rather late record for this species.

Gilbert S. Grant
Sneads Ferry, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/29/21 9:53 am
From: <hilton...> <hilton...>
Subject: Hilton Pond 11/01/21 (Uncommon Birds and Old Birds)
Sometimes we uncommonly band such common birds as Field Sparrows, and sometimes we recapture old birds banded long ago. The 757th installment of "This Week at Hilton Pond (York SC USA) deals with such matters--plus some "giant" leaves from a Tulip Tree. Read about it all in our photo essay for 1-21 November 2021 at https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek211101.html__;!!OToaGQ!-WQgihOgEOyMYQ2JPvhvngDQ_KoZDC49BUO8ruGTNshMO1xXHXiVcq7SWSxDSEikru8$

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond__;!!OToaGQ!-WQgihOgEOyMYQ2JPvhvngDQ_KoZDC49BUO8ruGTNshMO1xXHXiVcq7SWSxDwpcOQOc$ for timely updates on nature topics,
and for info about hummingbirds at https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats__;!!OToaGQ!-WQgihOgEOyMYQ2JPvhvngDQ_KoZDC49BUO8ruGTNshMO1xXHXiVcq7SWSxDdeiZ0fA$

Follow us on Twitter @hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and education for students of all ages.

"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the sunset." BHjr.

============


 

Back to top
Date: 11/29/21 9:41 am
From: <sshultz...>
Subject: Outer Banks field trip this weekend - 1 opening
Happy Cyber Monday!

Hope you are getting all the great deals.



Here is one more to consider. I have one opening that came up for this
weekend's Carolina Bird Club field trip to the Outer Banks (NC). The
weather looks good, at least this far out, so if you would like to go,
please review the details at the link below and let me know ASAP. Of
course, you must be a CBC member to attend, but you can always sign up for
membership at the same time as you register.



Outer Banks December 2021 (carolinabirdclub.org)
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/Trips/OBX2021.html__;!!OToaGQ!8FjXwBDEhlIwJVvf-JdzhbrbHt3ZdZ7hQb6lJsFaudTtHHG91qzPXNwGzH_dDgUUH5w$ >





Early December not your cup of tea? An opportunity to bird similar areas,
albeit at a different time of the season and with different expectations, is
open to all.

For information on the CBC's winter meeting in mid-January, visit CBC Winter
2022 (carolinabirdclub.org)
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/meetings/2022/OBX/__;!!OToaGQ!8FjXwBDEhlIwJVvf-JdzhbrbHt3ZdZ7hQb6lJsFaudTtHHG91qzPXNwGzH_djYxN6UA$ >



Best,

Steve Shultz

Apex NC


 

Back to top
Date: 11/29/21 7:27 am
From: Debbie shetterly (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Long-tailed duck
Has anyone seen these at Lake Townsend in the last couple days?

Debbie Shetterly

 

Back to top
Date: 11/29/21 6:47 am
From: F Wilkinson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Yellow-rumped Warbler begging from Carolina Chickadee
Just wanted to report this behavior and see if anyone had an explanation or
similar experience. Last winter at Oak Island I observed on my deck feeder
a Yellow-rumped Warbler following a Carolina Chickadee and, I assume,
begging for food. It would follow the chickadee place to place and flutter
it’s wings like a baby bird begging for food. It was relentless in
shadowing this chickadee for weeks. I never saw the Chickadee engage with
it in anyway.

Now it is back and doing the very same thing. I cannot be certain it is the
same Chickadee but it must surely be the same Yellow-rumped. Clearly it is
capable of feeding itself. Is there perhaps another reason for this
behavior? It just now displaced the Chickadee at the feeder, but that is
rare. Usually it sits on a nearby vine fluttering its wings while the
chickadee is selecting seed then it follows the chickadee. Or if it flies
down at the chickadee and the chickadee flies away it follows the chickadee.

An interesting mystery to me and fun to watch but I do feel sorry for the
harassed Chickadee!

Fleeta Chauvigne
--
Fleeta

 

Back to top
Date: 11/27/21 12:39 pm
From: Rob G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hawk oddity
a bit surprised to look out my window this afternoon and see a (juv.) Cooper's Hawk sitting calmly atop the hood of my car (not even a birdfeeder very nearby); we have plenty of Coops in the area but I can't recall ever seeing one sit on a car top. When I approached him snapping pics, he flew up into nearby Maple tree (where he's still perched) offering even better looks from apt. window.

-- Rob Gluck.... Carrboro, NC.....


 

Back to top
Date: 11/27/21 8:24 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Empidonax
I met up with Erinn when she was on the way out and I was on the way back, but will share with the rest of you that the bird was showing well from 905-1005 am.

I’m not sure if the exact location has been posted on C’birds yet, but the bird is consistently seen just before the 1.5 mile marker on the path that goes around “lake” Busbee, in a willow thicket across the wet ditch from a wooden bench that is on your right. Plus or minus 30 yards or less from that bench, on the pond side, is where I have had all my sightings.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

On Nov 27, 2021, at 8:00 AM, Erinn Szarek <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:


CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.

Any sightings of the empidonax this morning at busbee?
Erinn Szarek

 

Back to top
Date: 11/27/21 6:18 am
From: Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Purple Finch
I just had a Purple Finch in my yard. This is the first for the year.

Anne Olsen
Cornelius, NC


Sent from my iPad
 

Back to top
Date: 11/27/21 5:01 am
From: Erinn Szarek (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Empidonax
 Any sightings of the empidonax this morning at busbee?Erinn Szarek
 

Back to top
Date: 11/26/21 1:42 pm
From: Wayne Hoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Brewer's Duck (Mallard X Gadwall hybrid) at Ashley HS pond.
The bird was on the pond near the private runway, NE of the Highschool football field. It was swimming with several Mallards. A few Gadwalls and American Wigeons were also present elsewhere on the pond (also Pied-billed Grebes and Canada Geese).

Now that I am home and have checked some references, I consider this identification confirmed. The bird looks a lot like an eclipse-plumage Mallard drake, except for the head pattern. The head has a Mallard-like yellow bill, a green crown and central nape, and a pale tan cheek transitioning to gray posteriorly. This cheek patch is divided by a narrow blackish bar. This bar is vertical, but bowed back a bit in the middle. The forehead is mottled dark and tan.

The bird has the reddish chest of a Mallard, but no white neck ring, instead the neck is grayish with numerous tiny dark spots, like that of a Gadwall. The flanks and back are generally pale but darker than those of the adjacent Mallards. The bird does show some upward curl of the upper tail coverts, but less than the adjacent drake Mallards. The bird seemed a hair smaller than the Mallard drakes, but very similar.

I have numerous photos, and am willing to email a few to anyone who wishes to see them.

Wayne Hoffman
Wilmington

 

Back to top
Date: 11/26/21 11:26 am
From: whoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Possible Brewer's Duck at Ashley HS Pond, New Hanover Co.
Drake, looks like a scruffy Mallard drake, but has pale tan cheek.[Brewer'sDuck is Mallard X Gadwall hybrid.]Wayne Hoffman Wilmington Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 

Back to top
Date: 11/26/21 11:23 am
From: kiviat (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Birds nesting in knotweed
Seeking bird nests in knotweed

Knotweed (Japanese knotweed, giant knotweed, Bohemian knotweed) is a non-
native, shrub-like, pest plant that is widely distributed across the U.S. and
southern Canada, and growing in large patches in some areas.
I have documented 50 bird nests in knotweed in the northeastern states, and
other observers have
documented knotweed nests in those states and several other states and
provinces. As yet, I have no nest records from the Carolinas. Many Carolinas
knotweed occurrences are shown here
https://www.eddmaps.org/distribution/viewmap.cfm?sub=19655 and there are many
occurrences
that have not been mapped.

Nests have been found in knotweed stands of all sizes, down to only a square
meter. Nests are
commonly about 1.5 meters above the ground in knotweed 2-3 m tall; however,
nests can be
higher or lower, even on the ground. Nests are usually easy to see in winter
after leaf fall.

If you find a nest in knotweed, please take photographs of the stand showing
the nest, and
closeups of the nest from various angles. I hope to receive your observations
by the end of
January. If you’re interested in collecting more data about a nest let me know
and I’ll send the
data sheet I use. My main concern is to obtain nest records from additional
states and provinces,
as I believe the phenomenon is very widespread. My two aims are to better
understand the
wildlife using non-native plants, and to alert managers to bird nesting
in knotweed so they can either treat (cut, spray, etc.) outside the bird
breeding season, or check
carefully for nests prior to treatment. I’m coauthoring a paper about bird
nests in knotweed.

Thank you for considering my request for assistance!

Stay well,
Erik

Erik Kiviat <kiviat...>
Hudsonia
845-758-7273
 

Back to top
Date: 11/26/21 7:33 am
From: Michael Fogleman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Where are all the birds?
Doug,

You mentioned hot pepper suet - is it the C&S brand? The birds have barely
touched it in my yard in the past two months and usually it goes pretty
quickly. Like after a month almost the entire cake is still there. I'm
thinking we got a bad batch. My other feeders are going at a more normal
rate.

I will say that I was also wondering where all the birds are lately, but
with the colder temperatures things have started to pick back up again.
I've only been feeding the birds for 1.5 years so I don't really know
what's "normal" yet.

Michael Fogleman
Cary, NC


On Fri, Nov 26, 2021 at 3:45 AM Doug Pratt <dpratt14...> wrote:

> I could cry, too, Wendy, but at least I know I am not the only one with
> this problem. I live in the woods on the edge of a greenway, with nothing
> between me and the creek below but trees. One of those trees is a tall
> pine that houses a nest that has been used in successive years by
> Red-shouldered Hawks, Red-tailed Hawks, and Barred Owls, and we have always
> had feral cats, so there has been no sudden appearance of a predator in the
> neighborhood, as some suggested, and we still have diurnal squirrels and
> nocturnal raccoons in good numbers. Your recent bird tally (or lack
> thereof) sounds a lot like mine. I bought two dozen suet blocks (laced
> with red pepper to keep off the raccoons; the birds have always eaten them
> in the past) at the end of August, thinking they might last a month. I
> still have about a third of them, and I, too, have had to replace some
> moldy ones. Last week, I did see a couple of Pine Warblers (and I live
> under pine trees) for the first time since summer, but they haven’t
> returned. I saw two FOS juncos last week, and a single R-c Kinglet, but
> neither has repeated. I still have one pair of wrens, but normally we
> would have many more. My neighbor across the street has a very productive
> bluebird box (double brooded this year), and he asked me 3 days ago where
> the bluebirds had gone.
>
> When I first started noticing this phenomenon, I attributed it to the
> existence of so much wild food this year, as Kirk G. suggested, but now
> that the weather is getting cold, the birds, both seedeaters and
> insectivores, still are not here. It doesn’t make any sense, and I am a
> veteran bird feeder like yourself, not to mention that I’m also an
> ornithologist!
>
> Doug Pratt
> Cary, NC
>
>
> On Nov 25, 2021, at 11:44 PM, <wenbirdy...> wrote:
>
> Hey Doug ---
> So glad you asked.... never have I seen such a dearth of birds and
> really, all of a sudden! I went from a feast to a famine in less than one
> week's time at the end of summer! Hard to explain!! Besides missing the
> calls of White-throated Sparrows returning at the end of October, and
> seeing the usual resident suspects just vanish, it seemed like as if by
> magic, the constant visitors of Mourning Doves, Blue Jays, Cardinals, Brown
> Thrashers, Carolina Wrens, and Woodpeckers just disappeared with the
> migration of my fave Catbirds.... I don't even hear my resident Barreds! I
> know not to expect songs as prolific and constant this time of year, but
> I'm not seeing nor hearing the Fall and Winter migrators this year like
> others. I've lived in this house for many years, and this seems very
> unusual to me.... seeds are going down slowly, with Cardinals and House
> Finches doing most of the damage and occasional chickadees and titmice,
> Carolina Wrens (and B-h and w-b nuthatches), but not like in the past, and
> the suet sits untouched mostly.... in 4 cages; where I've always had to
> replenish it more than often, it now gets moldy and needs discarding. I
> could cry....[image: Disappointed relieved]
> I have kept bird journals for many years.... this one is quite thin
> for this time of year! It's indeed concerning.... I do hope it's an
> anomaly!
> Thanks for your post!
> Wendy
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Wendy Kaplan
> Charlotte, NC (SouthPark area)
> <wenbirdy...>
>
> Sent from one of many avoidance technologies
>
> "When elephants fight, it is the grass that suffers." -- Old African Saying
>
> "Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored." -- Aldous Huxley
>
> "Even when the bird is walking, we know that it has wings." -- Victor Hugo
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Doug Pratt <dpratt14...>
> To: Carolinabirds Listserve <carolinabirds...>
> Sent: Thu, Nov 25, 2021 10:27 pm
> Subject: Where are all the birds?
>
> Hi Everyone:
>
> I hope someone on this list can solve a serious problem at my bird
> feeders: no birds. Since late summer, I have had fewer and fewer visitors
> to my bird feeders, to the point that now there are almost none. That goes
> for mixed seed feeders, black oil sunflower feeders, and suet blocks. The
> seed levels in feeders have not dropped significantly since I cleaned them
> out and replenished them last week, which I do regularly. Normally this
> time of year I can’t keep the feeders stocked, with nuthatches and titmice
> carrying the sunflower seeds away, and woodpeckers of several species
> eating 1-2 suet blocks/week. I normally have a wide variety of visitors
> including cardinals, Chipping Sparrows, House Finches, goldfinches, Blue
> Jays, bluebirds, both resident nuthatches, Pine Warblers, Carolina Wrens,
> Downy, Hairy, and Red-bellied woodpeckers, flickers, Mourning Doves,
> chickadees, towhees, etc., all year-round residents of the area; others
> come and go seasonally. I have been feeding birds for many hears, and have
> not changed anything about my methods. My bird-feeding neighbors in the
> Kildare Farm section of Cary NC have also noticed the lack of visitors and
> asked me about it.
>
> This situation has me really worried. Is it just a local phenomenon? I
> hope so. My neighbor who regularly has flying squirrels has not seen them
> lately, either. It also seems there are fewer birds than usual in nearby
> parks where I walk regularly, although I have not heard any alarm bells in
> birding circles.
>
> Doug Pratt
> Cary, NC
>
> "Some people have been kind enough to call me a fine artist. I've always
> called myself an illustrator. I'm not sure what the difference is." -
> Norman Rockwell
>
> H. Douglas Pratt, Ph. D.
> Ornithologist, illustrator, musician
> 1205 Selwyn Lane
> Cary, NC 27511
>
> Research Curator of Birds, Emeritus
> North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
> 11 West Jones Street
> Raleigh NC 27601
>
> Phone 919-379-1679
> Cell phone 919-270-0857 (for travel use only)
>
> Website: https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!7ta44N0E4ZRNel1S_lu0wY13uHoO_-alf65lA4k0YGI6LTbT-tPXQfHxNoqDtzE6lCA$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!4Q6oetGmvFEnaW7JjWNkdqvYZbIK6l-9o18uaNygL1aNGKXts0vsZ4h41erS_PJV0mc$>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> "Some people have been kind enough to call me a fine artist. I've always
> called myself an illustrator. I'm not sure what the difference is." -
> Norman Rockwell
>
> H. Douglas Pratt, Ph. D.
> Ornithologist, illustrator, musician
> 1205 Selwyn Lane
> Cary, NC 27511
>
> Research Curator of Birds, Emeritus
> North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
> 11 West Jones Street
> Raleigh NC 27601
>
> Phone 919-379-1679
> Cell phone 919-270-0857 (for travel use only)
>
> Website: https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!7ta44N0E4ZRNel1S_lu0wY13uHoO_-alf65lA4k0YGI6LTbT-tPXQfHxNoqDtzE6lCA$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!72ZMx0IPukhoJE4LwoJBw1KmSoapmfhdR4Dceq97j-fqCoPc5_42pjvc1Z71eUCEzds$>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/26/21 7:23 am
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Re: Where are all the birds?
This ties in well with the large-scale observation of bird declines
across North America we've all heard about.

Seems like what people really want to know is how they can support birds
in their yards and local areas, and residential land is becoming so
dominant a land use, that this question becomes even more important.

Nature is not rocket science--its easy to understand at its core. Boost
natural production by less slashing, stripping, crushing, plowing,
poisoning, burning;  and more feeding and seeding.

I've done this everywhere I've lived and had good results. Non-birding
neighbors can sometimes agree that the benefits of clean air, pure
water, flood control, fertile soils, carbon absorption and long-term
storage, and wildlife support are worthwhile.

Can birders become leaders in the movement to restore residential lands?

Guy McGrane, Boone NC



 

Back to top
Date: 11/26/21 6:43 am
From: Edna Gaston (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Where are all the birds?
Good Morning, I agree with John's assessment. My marigolds were still
beautiful until late this week. I had zinnias until a week or so ago. I
think there is enough "natural" food available the birds are still
enjoying it, especially since they had to find it while bird feeders were
removed. I am hopeful that once cold weather comes and stays our birds will
return.

Edna Gaston
Fuquay-Varina, NC

On Fri, Nov 26, 2021 at 9:08 AM John Connors <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Hi Everyone.
> Honestly, I wouldn't panic just yet. The weather has been unseasonably
> warm, and dry, this fall. There are plenty of natural food sources still
> available; in fact, here in downtown Raleigh we haven't had a killing frost
> yet. So there are still insects available, and plenty of native seeds.
> Finches and Chickadees are busy storing pine and sweetgum seeds now. If in
> a month birds don't show up regularly at your feeders, then let's talk.
>
> In my downtown yard I scatter lots of mixed seed on the ground and have
> 10-20 Mourning Doves visiting regularly; also at least 15 White-throated
> Sparrow, a couple of juncos, a song sparrow, the resident towhees, and
> thrashers, and half a dozen cardinals. Chickadees, titmice, both species of
> nuthatch and House Finch are taking seed from my hanging feeders on
> occasion. The suet feeders haven't attracted much yet. But I expect to
> double the numbers of sparrow, cardinal and have Goldfinch at the hanging
> feeders, and RCKinglet, PIne and Yellow-rumped Warbler and woodpeckers at
> the suet once it gets cold. The kinglet, Pine Warbler and woodpeckers are
> seen most days in the yard, they are just not ready for the suet yet.
>
> The other factor that can influence local bird activity is the presence of
> a predator, particularly an avian predator like a Cooper's Hawk. When they
> take up residence near a feeder the locals take notice, and that poses a
> difficult dilemma.
>
> The one feeder species I am worried about is the Dark-eyed Junco. Their
> numbers do seem to have dropped steadily over the past decade, both at my
> feeders and on my field excursions.
> I share the concerns for bird populations expressed by many of you, but
> remain hopeful that the lack of most songbird species at your feeders is a
> temporary thing.
> John Connors
> Raleigh, NC
>
>
> On Fri, Nov 26, 2021 at 8:06 AM Carol Reigle <cr1234...> wrote:
>
>> I live in Morehead City and have noticed and worried about the lack of
>> birds this year—the same customary yard birds that you are missing. Nine
>> chipping sparrows, 1 occasional titmouse and junco, 1 downy, 2 chickadees,
>> etc.
>> In the past this area was the winter mother-lode of yellow-rumped
>> warblers and they were uncountable on my CBC route. Hedgerows swarmed with
>> them. In the last 3 years I would get below 100 on the entire route.
>> Thankfully this year I again have a small flock flitting through the pines
>> in my yard.
>>
>> I am 80 and have birded for decades, though no expert. I never thought
>> I’d see this in my lifetime.
>>
>> It is very worrisome for humanity.
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On Nov 26, 2021, at 3:45 AM, Doug Pratt <dpratt14...> wrote:
>>
>> I could cry, too, Wendy, but at least I know I am not the only one with
>> this problem. I live in the woods on the edge of a greenway, with nothing
>> between me and the creek below but trees. One of those trees is a tall
>> pine that houses a nest that has been used in successive years by
>> Red-shouldered Hawks, Red-tailed Hawks, and Barred Owls, and we have always
>> had feral cats, so there has been no sudden appearance of a predator in the
>> neighborhood, as some suggested, and we still have diurnal squirrels and
>> nocturnal raccoons in good numbers. Your recent bird tally (or lack
>> thereof) sounds a lot like mine. I bought two dozen suet blocks (laced
>> with red pepper to keep off the raccoons; the birds have always eaten them
>> in the past) at the end of August, thinking they might last a month. I
>> still have about a third of them, and I, too, have had to replace some
>> moldy ones. Last week, I did see a couple of Pine Warblers (and I live
>> under pine trees) for the first time since summer, but they haven’t
>> returned. I saw two FOS juncos last week, and a single R-c Kinglet, but
>> neither has repeated. I still have one pair of wrens, but normally we
>> would have many more. My neighbor across the street has a very productive
>> bluebird box (double brooded this year), and he asked me 3 days ago where
>> the bluebirds had gone.
>>
>> When I first started noticing this phenomenon, I attributed it to the
>> existence of so much wild food this year, as Kirk G. suggested, but now
>> that the weather is getting cold, the birds, both seedeaters and
>> insectivores, still are not here. It doesn’t make any sense, and I am a
>> veteran bird feeder like yourself, not to mention that I’m also an
>> ornithologist!
>>
>> Doug Pratt
>> Cary, NC
>>
>>
>> On Nov 25, 2021, at 11:44 PM, <wenbirdy...> wrote:
>>
>> Hey Doug ---
>> So glad you asked.... never have I seen such a dearth of birds and
>> really, all of a sudden! I went from a feast to a famine in less than one
>> week's time at the end of summer! Hard to explain!! Besides missing the
>> calls of White-throated Sparrows returning at the end of October, and
>> seeing the usual resident suspects just vanish, it seemed like as if by
>> magic, the constant visitors of Mourning Doves, Blue Jays, Cardinals, Brown
>> Thrashers, Carolina Wrens, and Woodpeckers just disappeared with the
>> migration of my fave Catbirds.... I don't even hear my resident Barreds! I
>> know not to expect songs as prolific and constant this time of year, but
>> I'm not seeing nor hearing the Fall and Winter migrators this year like
>> others. I've lived in this house for many years, and this seems very
>> unusual to me.... seeds are going down slowly, with Cardinals and House
>> Finches doing most of the damage and occasional chickadees and titmice,
>> Carolina Wrens (and B-h and w-b nuthatches), but not like in the past, and
>> the suet sits untouched mostly.... in 4 cages; where I've always had to
>> replenish it more than often, it now gets moldy and needs discarding. I
>> could cry....[image: Disappointed relieved]
>> I have kept bird journals for many years.... this one is quite thin
>> for this time of year! It's indeed concerning.... I do hope it's an
>> anomaly!
>> Thanks for your post!
>> Wendy
>>
>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>> Wendy Kaplan
>> Charlotte, NC (SouthPark area)
>> <wenbirdy...>
>>
>> Sent from one of many avoidance technologies
>>
>> "When elephants fight, it is the grass that suffers." -- Old African
>> Saying
>>
>> "Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored." -- Aldous Huxley
>>
>> "Even when the bird is walking, we know that it has wings." -- Victor
>> Hugo
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Doug Pratt <dpratt14...>
>> To: Carolinabirds Listserve <carolinabirds...>
>> Sent: Thu, Nov 25, 2021 10:27 pm
>> Subject: Where are all the birds?
>>
>> Hi Everyone:
>>
>> I hope someone on this list can solve a serious problem at my bird
>> feeders: no birds. Since late summer, I have had fewer and fewer visitors
>> to my bird feeders, to the point that now there are almost none. That goes
>> for mixed seed feeders, black oil sunflower feeders, and suet blocks. The
>> seed levels in feeders have not dropped significantly since I cleaned them
>> out and replenished them last week, which I do regularly. Normally this
>> time of year I can’t keep the feeders stocked, with nuthatches and titmice
>> carrying the sunflower seeds away, and woodpeckers of several species
>> eating 1-2 suet blocks/week. I normally have a wide variety of visitors
>> including cardinals, Chipping Sparrows, House Finches, goldfinches, Blue
>> Jays, bluebirds, both resident nuthatches, Pine Warblers, Carolina Wrens,
>> Downy, Hairy, and Red-bellied woodpeckers, flickers, Mourning Doves,
>> chickadees, towhees, etc., all year-round residents of the area; others
>> come and go seasonally. I have been feeding birds for many hears, and have
>> not changed anything about my methods. My bird-feeding neighbors in the
>> Kildare Farm section of Cary NC have also noticed the lack of visitors and
>> asked me about it.
>>
>> This situation has me really worried. Is it just a local phenomenon? I
>> hope so. My neighbor who regularly has flying squirrels has not seen them
>> lately, either. It also seems there are fewer birds than usual in nearby
>> parks where I walk regularly, although I have not heard any alarm bells in
>> birding circles.
>>
>> Doug Pratt
>> Cary, NC
>>
>> "Some people have been kind enough to call me a fine artist. I've always
>> called myself an illustrator. I'm not sure what the difference is." -
>> Norman Rockwell
>>
>> H. Douglas Pratt, Ph. D.
>> Ornithologist, illustrator, musician
>> 1205 Selwyn Lane
>> Cary, NC 27511
>>
>> Research Curator of Birds, Emeritus
>> North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
>> 11 West Jones Street
>> Raleigh NC 27601
>>
>> Phone 919-379-1679
>> Cell phone 919-270-0857 (for travel use only)
>>
>> Website: https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!95lSJEjsVthwpK1wxux13QguLeKlsL38LcRRoLI6QhlOK1UUk_oDmMbf9GVWA6nFisE$
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!4Q6oetGmvFEnaW7JjWNkdqvYZbIK6l-9o18uaNygL1aNGKXts0vsZ4h41erS_PJV0mc$>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> "Some people have been kind enough to call me a fine artist. I've always
>> called myself an illustrator. I'm not sure what the difference is." -
>> Norman Rockwell
>>
>> H. Douglas Pratt, Ph. D.
>> Ornithologist, illustrator, musician
>> 1205 Selwyn Lane
>> Cary, NC 27511
>>
>> Research Curator of Birds, Emeritus
>> North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
>> 11 West Jones Street
>> Raleigh NC 27601
>>
>> Phone 919-379-1679
>> Cell phone 919-270-0857 (for travel use only)
>>
>> Website: https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!95lSJEjsVthwpK1wxux13QguLeKlsL38LcRRoLI6QhlOK1UUk_oDmMbf9GVWA6nFisE$
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!72ZMx0IPukhoJE4LwoJBw1KmSoapmfhdR4Dceq97j-fqCoPc5_42pjvc1Z71eUCEzds$>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/26/21 6:43 am
From: John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Where are all the birds?
Norm, it is so helpful to be able to plot that data set instantaneously. I
am afraid we will never again see the diversity and abundance of birds that
we enjoyed in the late 1970s and early 1980s, but these data do allow us to
look at trends in the more recent decades. There are causes for concern,
and some trends are hard to explain...but some species are actually
increasing in abundance, like Chipping Sparrow- which actually appreciate
the suburbanization of the Triangle.
And ,as luck would have it, I just returned from a walk around the block
and noticed the junco flock in my yard has grown to 8 birds, but instead of
feeding on the millet I had scattered on the ground most were on the roof
of my house feeding on pine seeds which had gotten stuck on the wet
shingles.
JC

On Fri, Nov 26, 2021 at 9:27 AM Norman Budnitz <nbudnitz...> wrote:

> To get a sense of species abundance in previous years, you can check out
> graphs of the Jordan Lake Christmas and spring bird counts. No data for
> this Christmas CBC yet, of course.
>
> Follow this link, scroll down a bit, enter a species (or two for comparing
> species), choose spring and/or Christmas, and generate a graph or graphs.
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.newhopeaudubon.org/get-outdoors/bird-counts/bird-count-charts/__;!!OToaGQ!8AdpZnNqdcjmbFDLddED-SW2kzorUPX0nkN8-Iq_p4mTSUTbOYffS8RoAR5GtXE-5Mo$
>
> I just did this for juncos, and there does seem to be a bit of a decline
> in the past decade.
>
>
> On Fri, Nov 26, 2021 at 9:08 AM John Connors <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> Hi Everyone.
>> Honestly, I wouldn't panic just yet. The weather has been unseasonably
>> warm, and dry, this fall. There are plenty of natural food sources still
>> available; in fact, here in downtown Raleigh we haven't had a killing frost
>> yet. So there are still insects available, and plenty of native seeds.
>> Finches and Chickadees are busy storing pine and sweetgum seeds now. If in
>> a month birds don't show up regularly at your feeders, then let's talk.
>>
>> In my downtown yard I scatter lots of mixed seed on the ground and have
>> 10-20 Mourning Doves visiting regularly; also at least 15 White-throated
>> Sparrow, a couple of juncos, a song sparrow, the resident towhees, and
>> thrashers, and half a dozen cardinals. Chickadees, titmice, both species of
>> nuthatch and House Finch are taking seed from my hanging feeders on
>> occasion. The suet feeders haven't attracted much yet. But I expect to
>> double the numbers of sparrow, cardinal and have Goldfinch at the hanging
>> feeders, and RCKinglet, PIne and Yellow-rumped Warbler and woodpeckers at
>> the suet once it gets cold. The kinglet, Pine Warbler and woodpeckers are
>> seen most days in the yard, they are just not ready for the suet yet.
>>
>> The other factor that can influence local bird activity is the presence
>> of a predator, particularly an avian predator like a Cooper's Hawk. When
>> they take up residence near a feeder the locals take notice, and that poses
>> a difficult dilemma.
>>
>> The one feeder species I am worried about is the Dark-eyed Junco. Their
>> numbers do seem to have dropped steadily over the past decade, both at my
>> feeders and on my field excursions.
>> I share the concerns for bird populations expressed by many of you, but
>> remain hopeful that the lack of most songbird species at your feeders is a
>> temporary thing.
>> John Connors
>> Raleigh, NC
>>
>>
>> On Fri, Nov 26, 2021 at 8:06 AM Carol Reigle <cr1234...> wrote:
>>
>>> I live in Morehead City and have noticed and worried about the lack of
>>> birds this year—the same customary yard birds that you are missing. Nine
>>> chipping sparrows, 1 occasional titmouse and junco, 1 downy, 2 chickadees,
>>> etc.
>>> In the past this area was the winter mother-lode of yellow-rumped
>>> warblers and they were uncountable on my CBC route. Hedgerows swarmed with
>>> them. In the last 3 years I would get below 100 on the entire route.
>>> Thankfully this year I again have a small flock flitting through the pines
>>> in my yard.
>>>
>>> I am 80 and have birded for decades, though no expert. I never thought
>>> I’d see this in my lifetime.
>>>
>>> It is very worrisome for humanity.
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>
>>> On Nov 26, 2021, at 3:45 AM, Doug Pratt <dpratt14...> wrote:
>>>
>>> I could cry, too, Wendy, but at least I know I am not the only one with
>>> this problem. I live in the woods on the edge of a greenway, with nothing
>>> between me and the creek below but trees. One of those trees is a tall
>>> pine that houses a nest that has been used in successive years by
>>> Red-shouldered Hawks, Red-tailed Hawks, and Barred Owls, and we have always
>>> had feral cats, so there has been no sudden appearance of a predator in the
>>> neighborhood, as some suggested, and we still have diurnal squirrels and
>>> nocturnal raccoons in good numbers. Your recent bird tally (or lack
>>> thereof) sounds a lot like mine. I bought two dozen suet blocks (laced
>>> with red pepper to keep off the raccoons; the birds have always eaten them
>>> in the past) at the end of August, thinking they might last a month. I
>>> still have about a third of them, and I, too, have had to replace some
>>> moldy ones. Last week, I did see a couple of Pine Warblers (and I live
>>> under pine trees) for the first time since summer, but they haven’t
>>> returned. I saw two FOS juncos last week, and a single R-c Kinglet, but
>>> neither has repeated. I still have one pair of wrens, but normally we
>>> would have many more. My neighbor across the street has a very productive
>>> bluebird box (double brooded this year), and he asked me 3 days ago where
>>> the bluebirds had gone.
>>>
>>> When I first started noticing this phenomenon, I attributed it to the
>>> existence of so much wild food this year, as Kirk G. suggested, but now
>>> that the weather is getting cold, the birds, both seedeaters and
>>> insectivores, still are not here. It doesn’t make any sense, and I am a
>>> veteran bird feeder like yourself, not to mention that I’m also an
>>> ornithologist!
>>>
>>> Doug Pratt
>>> Cary, NC
>>>
>>>
>>> On Nov 25, 2021, at 11:44 PM, <wenbirdy...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Hey Doug ---
>>> So glad you asked.... never have I seen such a dearth of birds and
>>> really, all of a sudden! I went from a feast to a famine in less than one
>>> week's time at the end of summer! Hard to explain!! Besides missing the
>>> calls of White-throated Sparrows returning at the end of October, and
>>> seeing the usual resident suspects just vanish, it seemed like as if by
>>> magic, the constant visitors of Mourning Doves, Blue Jays, Cardinals, Brown
>>> Thrashers, Carolina Wrens, and Woodpeckers just disappeared with the
>>> migration of my fave Catbirds.... I don't even hear my resident Barreds! I
>>> know not to expect songs as prolific and constant this time of year, but
>>> I'm not seeing nor hearing the Fall and Winter migrators this year like
>>> others. I've lived in this house for many years, and this seems very
>>> unusual to me.... seeds are going down slowly, with Cardinals and House
>>> Finches doing most of the damage and occasional chickadees and titmice,
>>> Carolina Wrens (and B-h and w-b nuthatches), but not like in the past, and
>>> the suet sits untouched mostly.... in 4 cages; where I've always had to
>>> replenish it more than often, it now gets moldy and needs discarding. I
>>> could cry....[image: Disappointed relieved]
>>> I have kept bird journals for many years.... this one is quite
>>> thin for this time of year! It's indeed concerning.... I do hope it's
>>> an anomaly!
>>> Thanks for your post!
>>> Wendy
>>>
>>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>>> Wendy Kaplan
>>> Charlotte, NC (SouthPark area)
>>> <wenbirdy...>
>>>
>>> Sent from one of many avoidance technologies
>>>
>>> "When elephants fight, it is the grass that suffers." -- Old African
>>> Saying
>>>
>>> "Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored." -- Aldous Huxley
>>>
>>> "Even when the bird is walking, we know that it has wings." -- Victor
>>> Hugo
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: Doug Pratt <dpratt14...>
>>> To: Carolinabirds Listserve <carolinabirds...>
>>> Sent: Thu, Nov 25, 2021 10:27 pm
>>> Subject: Where are all the birds?
>>>
>>> Hi Everyone:
>>>
>>> I hope someone on this list can solve a serious problem at my bird
>>> feeders: no birds. Since late summer, I have had fewer and fewer visitors
>>> to my bird feeders, to the point that now there are almost none. That goes
>>> for mixed seed feeders, black oil sunflower feeders, and suet blocks. The
>>> seed levels in feeders have not dropped significantly since I cleaned them
>>> out and replenished them last week, which I do regularly. Normally this
>>> time of year I can’t keep the feeders stocked, with nuthatches and titmice
>>> carrying the sunflower seeds away, and woodpeckers of several species
>>> eating 1-2 suet blocks/week. I normally have a wide variety of visitors
>>> including cardinals, Chipping Sparrows, House Finches, goldfinches, Blue
>>> Jays, bluebirds, both resident nuthatches, Pine Warblers, Carolina Wrens,
>>> Downy, Hairy, and Red-bellied woodpeckers, flickers, Mourning Doves,
>>> chickadees, towhees, etc., all year-round residents of the area; others
>>> come and go seasonally. I have been feeding birds for many hears, and have
>>> not changed anything about my methods. My bird-feeding neighbors in the
>>> Kildare Farm section of Cary NC have also noticed the lack of visitors and
>>> asked me about it.
>>>
>>> This situation has me really worried. Is it just a local phenomenon? I
>>> hope so. My neighbor who regularly has flying squirrels has not seen them
>>> lately, either. It also seems there are fewer birds than usual in nearby
>>> parks where I walk regularly, although I have not heard any alarm bells in
>>> birding circles.
>>>
>>> Doug Pratt
>>> Cary, NC
>>>
>>> "Some people have been kind enough to call me a fine artist. I've always
>>> called myself an illustrator. I'm not sure what the difference is." -
>>> Norman Rockwell
>>>
>>> H. Douglas Pratt, Ph. D.
>>> Ornithologist, illustrator, musician
>>> 1205 Selwyn Lane
>>> Cary, NC 27511
>>>
>>> Research Curator of Birds, Emeritus
>>> North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
>>> 11 West Jones Street
>>> Raleigh NC 27601
>>>
>>> Phone 919-379-1679
>>> Cell phone 919-270-0857 (for travel use only)
>>>
>>> Website: https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!8AdpZnNqdcjmbFDLddED-SW2kzorUPX0nkN8-Iq_p4mTSUTbOYffS8RoAR5GymMzxYo$
>>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!4Q6oetGmvFEnaW7JjWNkdqvYZbIK6l-9o18uaNygL1aNGKXts0vsZ4h41erS_PJV0mc$>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> "Some people have been kind enough to call me a fine artist. I've always
>>> called myself an illustrator. I'm not sure what the difference is." -
>>> Norman Rockwell
>>>
>>> H. Douglas Pratt, Ph. D.
>>> Ornithologist, illustrator, musician
>>> 1205 Selwyn Lane
>>> Cary, NC 27511
>>>
>>> Research Curator of Birds, Emeritus
>>> North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
>>> 11 West Jones Street
>>> Raleigh NC 27601
>>>
>>> Phone 919-379-1679
>>> Cell phone 919-270-0857 (for travel use only)
>>>
>>> Website: https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!8AdpZnNqdcjmbFDLddED-SW2kzorUPX0nkN8-Iq_p4mTSUTbOYffS8RoAR5GymMzxYo$
>>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!72ZMx0IPukhoJE4LwoJBw1KmSoapmfhdR4Dceq97j-fqCoPc5_42pjvc1Z71eUCEzds$>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>
> --
> Norm Budnitz
> Orange County
> North Carolina
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/26/21 6:27 am
From: Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Where are all the birds?
To get a sense of species abundance in previous years, you can check out
graphs of the Jordan Lake Christmas and spring bird counts. No data for
this Christmas CBC yet, of course.

Follow this link, scroll down a bit, enter a species (or two for comparing
species), choose spring and/or Christmas, and generate a graph or graphs.

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.newhopeaudubon.org/get-outdoors/bird-counts/bird-count-charts/__;!!OToaGQ!43jspQW2KjqLylPM9kXYIrJ88aW0R2q1-GiTouerbJb3IjzRYDvV5RAXiZNfWz3q14A$

I just did this for juncos, and there does seem to be a bit of a decline in
the past decade.


On Fri, Nov 26, 2021 at 9:08 AM John Connors <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Hi Everyone.
> Honestly, I wouldn't panic just yet. The weather has been unseasonably
> warm, and dry, this fall. There are plenty of natural food sources still
> available; in fact, here in downtown Raleigh we haven't had a killing frost
> yet. So there are still insects available, and plenty of native seeds.
> Finches and Chickadees are busy storing pine and sweetgum seeds now. If in
> a month birds don't show up regularly at your feeders, then let's talk.
>
> In my downtown yard I scatter lots of mixed seed on the ground and have
> 10-20 Mourning Doves visiting regularly; also at least 15 White-throated
> Sparrow, a couple of juncos, a song sparrow, the resident towhees, and
> thrashers, and half a dozen cardinals. Chickadees, titmice, both species of
> nuthatch and House Finch are taking seed from my hanging feeders on
> occasion. The suet feeders haven't attracted much yet. But I expect to
> double the numbers of sparrow, cardinal and have Goldfinch at the hanging
> feeders, and RCKinglet, PIne and Yellow-rumped Warbler and woodpeckers at
> the suet once it gets cold. The kinglet, Pine Warbler and woodpeckers are
> seen most days in the yard, they are just not ready for the suet yet.
>
> The other factor that can influence local bird activity is the presence of
> a predator, particularly an avian predator like a Cooper's Hawk. When they
> take up residence near a feeder the locals take notice, and that poses a
> difficult dilemma.
>
> The one feeder species I am worried about is the Dark-eyed Junco. Their
> numbers do seem to have dropped steadily over the past decade, both at my
> feeders and on my field excursions.
> I share the concerns for bird populations expressed by many of you, but
> remain hopeful that the lack of most songbird species at your feeders is a
> temporary thing.
> John Connors
> Raleigh, NC
>
>
> On Fri, Nov 26, 2021 at 8:06 AM Carol Reigle <cr1234...> wrote:
>
>> I live in Morehead City and have noticed and worried about the lack of
>> birds this year—the same customary yard birds that you are missing. Nine
>> chipping sparrows, 1 occasional titmouse and junco, 1 downy, 2 chickadees,
>> etc.
>> In the past this area was the winter mother-lode of yellow-rumped
>> warblers and they were uncountable on my CBC route. Hedgerows swarmed with
>> them. In the last 3 years I would get below 100 on the entire route.
>> Thankfully this year I again have a small flock flitting through the pines
>> in my yard.
>>
>> I am 80 and have birded for decades, though no expert. I never thought
>> I’d see this in my lifetime.
>>
>> It is very worrisome for humanity.
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On Nov 26, 2021, at 3:45 AM, Doug Pratt <dpratt14...> wrote:
>>
>> I could cry, too, Wendy, but at least I know I am not the only one with
>> this problem. I live in the woods on the edge of a greenway, with nothing
>> between me and the creek below but trees. One of those trees is a tall
>> pine that houses a nest that has been used in successive years by
>> Red-shouldered Hawks, Red-tailed Hawks, and Barred Owls, and we have always
>> had feral cats, so there has been no sudden appearance of a predator in the
>> neighborhood, as some suggested, and we still have diurnal squirrels and
>> nocturnal raccoons in good numbers. Your recent bird tally (or lack
>> thereof) sounds a lot like mine. I bought two dozen suet blocks (laced
>> with red pepper to keep off the raccoons; the birds have always eaten them
>> in the past) at the end of August, thinking they might last a month. I
>> still have about a third of them, and I, too, have had to replace some
>> moldy ones. Last week, I did see a couple of Pine Warblers (and I live
>> under pine trees) for the first time since summer, but they haven’t
>> returned. I saw two FOS juncos last week, and a single R-c Kinglet, but
>> neither has repeated. I still have one pair of wrens, but normally we
>> would have many more. My neighbor across the street has a very productive
>> bluebird box (double brooded this year), and he asked me 3 days ago where
>> the bluebirds had gone.
>>
>> When I first started noticing this phenomenon, I attributed it to the
>> existence of so much wild food this year, as Kirk G. suggested, but now
>> that the weather is getting cold, the birds, both seedeaters and
>> insectivores, still are not here. It doesn’t make any sense, and I am a
>> veteran bird feeder like yourself, not to mention that I’m also an
>> ornithologist!
>>
>> Doug Pratt
>> Cary, NC
>>
>>
>> On Nov 25, 2021, at 11:44 PM, <wenbirdy...> wrote:
>>
>> Hey Doug ---
>> So glad you asked.... never have I seen such a dearth of birds and
>> really, all of a sudden! I went from a feast to a famine in less than one
>> week's time at the end of summer! Hard to explain!! Besides missing the
>> calls of White-throated Sparrows returning at the end of October, and
>> seeing the usual resident suspects just vanish, it seemed like as if by
>> magic, the constant visitors of Mourning Doves, Blue Jays, Cardinals, Brown
>> Thrashers, Carolina Wrens, and Woodpeckers just disappeared with the
>> migration of my fave Catbirds.... I don't even hear my resident Barreds! I
>> know not to expect songs as prolific and constant this time of year, but
>> I'm not seeing nor hearing the Fall and Winter migrators this year like
>> others. I've lived in this house for many years, and this seems very
>> unusual to me.... seeds are going down slowly, with Cardinals and House
>> Finches doing most of the damage and occasional chickadees and titmice,
>> Carolina Wrens (and B-h and w-b nuthatches), but not like in the past, and
>> the suet sits untouched mostly.... in 4 cages; where I've always had to
>> replenish it more than often, it now gets moldy and needs discarding. I
>> could cry....[image: Disappointed relieved]
>> I have kept bird journals for many years.... this one is quite thin
>> for this time of year! It's indeed concerning.... I do hope it's an
>> anomaly!
>> Thanks for your post!
>> Wendy
>>
>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>> Wendy Kaplan
>> Charlotte, NC (SouthPark area)
>> <wenbirdy...>
>>
>> Sent from one of many avoidance technologies
>>
>> "When elephants fight, it is the grass that suffers." -- Old African
>> Saying
>>
>> "Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored." -- Aldous Huxley
>>
>> "Even when the bird is walking, we know that it has wings." -- Victor
>> Hugo
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Doug Pratt <dpratt14...>
>> To: Carolinabirds Listserve <carolinabirds...>
>> Sent: Thu, Nov 25, 2021 10:27 pm
>> Subject: Where are all the birds?
>>
>> Hi Everyone:
>>
>> I hope someone on this list can solve a serious problem at my bird
>> feeders: no birds. Since late summer, I have had fewer and fewer visitors
>> to my bird feeders, to the point that now there are almost none. That goes
>> for mixed seed feeders, black oil sunflower feeders, and suet blocks. The
>> seed levels in feeders have not dropped significantly since I cleaned them
>> out and replenished them last week, which I do regularly. Normally this
>> time of year I can’t keep the feeders stocked, with nuthatches and titmice
>> carrying the sunflower seeds away, and woodpeckers of several species
>> eating 1-2 suet blocks/week. I normally have a wide variety of visitors
>> including cardinals, Chipping Sparrows, House Finches, goldfinches, Blue
>> Jays, bluebirds, both resident nuthatches, Pine Warblers, Carolina Wrens,
>> Downy, Hairy, and Red-bellied woodpeckers, flickers, Mourning Doves,
>> chickadees, towhees, etc., all year-round residents of the area; others
>> come and go seasonally. I have been feeding birds for many hears, and have
>> not changed anything about my methods. My bird-feeding neighbors in the
>> Kildare Farm section of Cary NC have also noticed the lack of visitors and
>> asked me about it.
>>
>> This situation has me really worried. Is it just a local phenomenon? I
>> hope so. My neighbor who regularly has flying squirrels has not seen them
>> lately, either. It also seems there are fewer birds than usual in nearby
>> parks where I walk regularly, although I have not heard any alarm bells in
>> birding circles.
>>
>> Doug Pratt
>> Cary, NC
>>
>> "Some people have been kind enough to call me a fine artist. I've always
>> called myself an illustrator. I'm not sure what the difference is." -
>> Norman Rockwell
>>
>> H. Douglas Pratt, Ph. D.
>> Ornithologist, illustrator, musician
>> 1205 Selwyn Lane
>> Cary, NC 27511
>>
>> Research Curator of Birds, Emeritus
>> North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
>> 11 West Jones Street
>> Raleigh NC 27601
>>
>> Phone 919-379-1679
>> Cell phone 919-270-0857 (for travel use only)
>>
>> Website: https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!43jspQW2KjqLylPM9kXYIrJ88aW0R2q1-GiTouerbJb3IjzRYDvV5RAXiZNfthsfbpA$
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!4Q6oetGmvFEnaW7JjWNkdqvYZbIK6l-9o18uaNygL1aNGKXts0vsZ4h41erS_PJV0mc$>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> "Some people have been kind enough to call me a fine artist. I've always
>> called myself an illustrator. I'm not sure what the difference is." -
>> Norman Rockwell
>>
>> H. Douglas Pratt, Ph. D.
>> Ornithologist, illustrator, musician
>> 1205 Selwyn Lane
>> Cary, NC 27511
>>
>> Research Curator of Birds, Emeritus
>> North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
>> 11 West Jones Street
>> Raleigh NC 27601
>>
>> Phone 919-379-1679
>> Cell phone 919-270-0857 (for travel use only)
>>
>> Website: https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!43jspQW2KjqLylPM9kXYIrJ88aW0R2q1-GiTouerbJb3IjzRYDvV5RAXiZNfthsfbpA$
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!72ZMx0IPukhoJE4LwoJBw1KmSoapmfhdR4Dceq97j-fqCoPc5_42pjvc1Z71eUCEzds$>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>

--
Norm Budnitz
Orange County
North Carolina

 

Back to top
Date: 11/26/21 6:19 am
From: Peter Boyer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Where are all the birds?
I also have noticed fewer birds at my feeders than I would expect. I feel
concerned as well. But, I am in agreement with John that anecdotal feeder
numbers are probably not the most reliable source of data on this topic. :)

What is a better source of data?

Thanks,
Peter

On Fri, Nov 26, 2021, 9:08 AM John Connors <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Hi Everyone.
> Honestly, I wouldn't panic just yet. The weather has been unseasonably
> warm, and dry, this fall. There are plenty of natural food sources still
> available; in fact, here in downtown Raleigh we haven't had a killing frost
> yet. So there are still insects available, and plenty of native seeds.
> Finches and Chickadees are busy storing pine and sweetgum seeds now. If in
> a month birds don't show up regularly at your feeders, then let's talk.
>
> In my downtown yard I scatter lots of mixed seed on the ground and have
> 10-20 Mourning Doves visiting regularly; also at least 15 White-throated
> Sparrow, a couple of juncos, a song sparrow, the resident towhees, and
> thrashers, and half a dozen cardinals. Chickadees, titmice, both species of
> nuthatch and House Finch are taking seed from my hanging feeders on
> occasion. The suet feeders haven't attracted much yet. But I expect to
> double the numbers of sparrow, cardinal and have Goldfinch at the hanging
> feeders, and RCKinglet, PIne and Yellow-rumped Warbler and woodpeckers at
> the suet once it gets cold. The kinglet, Pine Warbler and woodpeckers are
> seen most days in the yard, they are just not ready for the suet yet.
>
> The other factor that can influence local bird activity is the presence of
> a predator, particularly an avian predator like a Cooper's Hawk. When they
> take up residence near a feeder the locals take notice, and that poses a
> difficult dilemma.
>
> The one feeder species I am worried about is the Dark-eyed Junco. Their
> numbers do seem to have dropped steadily over the past decade, both at my
> feeders and on my field excursions.
> I share the concerns for bird populations expressed by many of you, but
> remain hopeful that the lack of most songbird species at your feeders is a
> temporary thing.
> John Connors
> Raleigh, NC
>
>
> On Fri, Nov 26, 2021 at 8:06 AM Carol Reigle <cr1234...> wrote:
>
>> I live in Morehead City and have noticed and worried about the lack of
>> birds this year—the same customary yard birds that you are missing. Nine
>> chipping sparrows, 1 occasional titmouse and junco, 1 downy, 2 chickadees,
>> etc.
>> In the past this area was the winter mother-lode of yellow-rumped
>> warblers and they were uncountable on my CBC route. Hedgerows swarmed with
>> them. In the last 3 years I would get below 100 on the entire route.
>> Thankfully this year I again have a small flock flitting through the pines
>> in my yard.
>>
>> I am 80 and have birded for decades, though no expert. I never thought
>> I’d see this in my lifetime.
>>
>> It is very worrisome for humanity.
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On Nov 26, 2021, at 3:45 AM, Doug Pratt <dpratt14...> wrote:
>>
>> I could cry, too, Wendy, but at least I know I am not the only one with
>> this problem. I live in the woods on the edge of a greenway, with nothing
>> between me and the creek below but trees. One of those trees is a tall
>> pine that houses a nest that has been used in successive years by
>> Red-shouldered Hawks, Red-tailed Hawks, and Barred Owls, and we have always
>> had feral cats, so there has been no sudden appearance of a predator in the
>> neighborhood, as some suggested, and we still have diurnal squirrels and
>> nocturnal raccoons in good numbers. Your recent bird tally (or lack
>> thereof) sounds a lot like mine. I bought two dozen suet blocks (laced
>> with red pepper to keep off the raccoons; the birds have always eaten them
>> in the past) at the end of August, thinking they might last a month. I
>> still have about a third of them, and I, too, have had to replace some
>> moldy ones. Last week, I did see a couple of Pine Warblers (and I live
>> under pine trees) for the first time since summer, but they haven’t
>> returned. I saw two FOS juncos last week, and a single R-c Kinglet, but
>> neither has repeated. I still have one pair of wrens, but normally we
>> would have many more. My neighbor across the street has a very productive
>> bluebird box (double brooded this year), and he asked me 3 days ago where
>> the bluebirds had gone.
>>
>> When I first started noticing this phenomenon, I attributed it to the
>> existence of so much wild food this year, as Kirk G. suggested, but now
>> that the weather is getting cold, the birds, both seedeaters and
>> insectivores, still are not here. It doesn’t make any sense, and I am a
>> veteran bird feeder like yourself, not to mention that I’m also an
>> ornithologist!
>>
>> Doug Pratt
>> Cary, NC
>>
>>
>> On Nov 25, 2021, at 11:44 PM, <wenbirdy...> wrote:
>>
>> Hey Doug ---
>> So glad you asked.... never have I seen such a dearth of birds and
>> really, all of a sudden! I went from a feast to a famine in less than one
>> week's time at the end of summer! Hard to explain!! Besides missing the
>> calls of White-throated Sparrows returning at the end of October, and
>> seeing the usual resident suspects just vanish, it seemed like as if by
>> magic, the constant visitors of Mourning Doves, Blue Jays, Cardinals, Brown
>> Thrashers, Carolina Wrens, and Woodpeckers just disappeared with the
>> migration of my fave Catbirds.... I don't even hear my resident Barreds! I
>> know not to expect songs as prolific and constant this time of year, but
>> I'm not seeing nor hearing the Fall and Winter migrators this year like
>> others. I've lived in this house for many years, and this seems very
>> unusual to me.... seeds are going down slowly, with Cardinals and House
>> Finches doing most of the damage and occasional chickadees and titmice,
>> Carolina Wrens (and B-h and w-b nuthatches), but not like in the past, and
>> the suet sits untouched mostly.... in 4 cages; where I've always had to
>> replenish it more than often, it now gets moldy and needs discarding. I
>> could cry....[image: Disappointed relieved]
>> I have kept bird journals for many years.... this one is quite thin
>> for this time of year! It's indeed concerning.... I do hope it's an
>> anomaly!
>> Thanks for your post!
>> Wendy
>>
>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>> Wendy Kaplan
>> Charlotte, NC (SouthPark area)
>> <wenbirdy...>
>>
>> Sent from one of many avoidance technologies
>>
>> "When elephants fight, it is the grass that suffers." -- Old African
>> Saying
>>
>> "Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored." -- Aldous Huxley
>>
>> "Even when the bird is walking, we know that it has wings." -- Victor
>> Hugo
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Doug Pratt <dpratt14...>
>> To: Carolinabirds Listserve <carolinabirds...>
>> Sent: Thu, Nov 25, 2021 10:27 pm
>> Subject: Where are all the birds?
>>
>> Hi Everyone:
>>
>> I hope someone on this list can solve a serious problem at my bird
>> feeders: no birds. Since late summer, I have had fewer and fewer visitors
>> to my bird feeders, to the point that now there are almost none. That goes
>> for mixed seed feeders, black oil sunflower feeders, and suet blocks. The
>> seed levels in feeders have not dropped significantly since I cleaned them
>> out and replenished them last week, which I do regularly. Normally this
>> time of year I can’t keep the feeders stocked, with nuthatches and titmice
>> carrying the sunflower seeds away, and woodpeckers of several species
>> eating 1-2 suet blocks/week. I normally have a wide variety of visitors
>> including cardinals, Chipping Sparrows, House Finches, goldfinches, Blue
>> Jays, bluebirds, both resident nuthatches, Pine Warblers, Carolina Wrens,
>> Downy, Hairy, and Red-bellied woodpeckers, flickers, Mourning Doves,
>> chickadees, towhees, etc., all year-round residents of the area; others
>> come and go seasonally. I have been feeding birds for many hears, and have
>> not changed anything about my methods. My bird-feeding neighbors in the
>> Kildare Farm section of Cary NC have also noticed the lack of visitors and
>> asked me about it.
>>
>> This situation has me really worried. Is it just a local phenomenon? I
>> hope so. My neighbor who regularly has flying squirrels has not seen them
>> lately, either. It also seems there are fewer birds than usual in nearby
>> parks where I walk regularly, although I have not heard any alarm bells in
>> birding circles.
>>
>> Doug Pratt
>> Cary, NC
>>
>> "Some people have been kind enough to call me a fine artist. I've always
>> called myself an illustrator. I'm not sure what the difference is." -
>> Norman Rockwell
>>
>> H. Douglas Pratt, Ph. D.
>> Ornithologist, illustrator, musician
>> 1205 Selwyn Lane
>> Cary, NC 27511
>>
>> Research Curator of Birds, Emeritus
>> North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
>> 11 West Jones Street
>> Raleigh NC 27601
>>
>> Phone 919-379-1679
>> Cell phone 919-270-0857 (for travel use only)
>>
>> Website: https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!51i3EfykEh39a1nt7jwK85XRuzkwx6kIhNl0BbEZHrkrsLlLixrKjqYKtoH4Po-tKrk$
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!4Q6oetGmvFEnaW7JjWNkdqvYZbIK6l-9o18uaNygL1aNGKXts0vsZ4h41erS_PJV0mc$>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> "Some people have been kind enough to call me a fine artist. I've always
>> called myself an illustrator. I'm not sure what the difference is." -
>> Norman Rockwell
>>
>> H. Douglas Pratt, Ph. D.
>> Ornithologist, illustrator, musician
>> 1205 Selwyn Lane
>> Cary, NC 27511
>>
>> Research Curator of Birds, Emeritus
>> North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
>> 11 West Jones Street
>> Raleigh NC 27601
>>
>> Phone 919-379-1679
>> Cell phone 919-270-0857 (for travel use only)
>>
>> Website: https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!51i3EfykEh39a1nt7jwK85XRuzkwx6kIhNl0BbEZHrkrsLlLixrKjqYKtoH4Po-tKrk$
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!72ZMx0IPukhoJE4LwoJBw1KmSoapmfhdR4Dceq97j-fqCoPc5_42pjvc1Z71eUCEzds$>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/26/21 6:08 am
From: John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Where are all the birds?
Hi Everyone.
Honestly, I wouldn't panic just yet. The weather has been unseasonably
warm, and dry, this fall. There are plenty of natural food sources still
available; in fact, here in downtown Raleigh we haven't had a killing frost
yet. So there are still insects available, and plenty of native seeds.
Finches and Chickadees are busy storing pine and sweetgum seeds now. If in
a month birds don't show up regularly at your feeders, then let's talk.

In my downtown yard I scatter lots of mixed seed on the ground and have
10-20 Mourning Doves visiting regularly; also at least 15 White-throated
Sparrow, a couple of juncos, a song sparrow, the resident towhees, and
thrashers, and half a dozen cardinals. Chickadees, titmice, both species of
nuthatch and House Finch are taking seed from my hanging feeders on
occasion. The suet feeders haven't attracted much yet. But I expect to
double the numbers of sparrow, cardinal and have Goldfinch at the hanging
feeders, and RCKinglet, PIne and Yellow-rumped Warbler and woodpeckers at
the suet once it gets cold. The kinglet, Pine Warbler and woodpeckers are
seen most days in the yard, they are just not ready for the suet yet.

The other factor that can influence local bird activity is the presence of
a predator, particularly an avian predator like a Cooper's Hawk. When they
take up residence near a feeder the locals take notice, and that poses a
difficult dilemma.

The one feeder species I am worried about is the Dark-eyed Junco. Their
numbers do seem to have dropped steadily over the past decade, both at my
feeders and on my field excursions.
I share the concerns for bird populations expressed by many of you, but
remain hopeful that the lack of most songbird species at your feeders is a
temporary thing.
John Connors
Raleigh, NC


On Fri, Nov 26, 2021 at 8:06 AM Carol Reigle <cr1234...> wrote:

> I live in Morehead City and have noticed and worried about the lack of
> birds this year—the same customary yard birds that you are missing. Nine
> chipping sparrows, 1 occasional titmouse and junco, 1 downy, 2 chickadees,
> etc.
> In the past this area was the winter mother-lode of yellow-rumped warblers
> and they were uncountable on my CBC route. Hedgerows swarmed with them. In
> the last 3 years I would get below 100 on the entire route. Thankfully
> this year I again have a small flock flitting through the pines in my yard.
>
> I am 80 and have birded for decades, though no expert. I never thought
> I’d see this in my lifetime.
>
> It is very worrisome for humanity.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Nov 26, 2021, at 3:45 AM, Doug Pratt <dpratt14...> wrote:
>
> I could cry, too, Wendy, but at least I know I am not the only one with
> this problem. I live in the woods on the edge of a greenway, with nothing
> between me and the creek below but trees. One of those trees is a tall
> pine that houses a nest that has been used in successive years by
> Red-shouldered Hawks, Red-tailed Hawks, and Barred Owls, and we have always
> had feral cats, so there has been no sudden appearance of a predator in the
> neighborhood, as some suggested, and we still have diurnal squirrels and
> nocturnal raccoons in good numbers. Your recent bird tally (or lack
> thereof) sounds a lot like mine. I bought two dozen suet blocks (laced
> with red pepper to keep off the raccoons; the birds have always eaten them
> in the past) at the end of August, thinking they might last a month. I
> still have about a third of them, and I, too, have had to replace some
> moldy ones. Last week, I did see a couple of Pine Warblers (and I live
> under pine trees) for the first time since summer, but they haven’t
> returned. I saw two FOS juncos last week, and a single R-c Kinglet, but
> neither has repeated. I still have one pair of wrens, but normally we
> would have many more. My neighbor across the street has a very productive
> bluebird box (double brooded this year), and he asked me 3 days ago where
> the bluebirds had gone.
>
> When I first started noticing this phenomenon, I attributed it to the
> existence of so much wild food this year, as Kirk G. suggested, but now
> that the weather is getting cold, the birds, both seedeaters and
> insectivores, still are not here. It doesn’t make any sense, and I am a
> veteran bird feeder like yourself, not to mention that I’m also an
> ornithologist!
>
> Doug Pratt
> Cary, NC
>
>
> On Nov 25, 2021, at 11:44 PM, <wenbirdy...> wrote:
>
> Hey Doug ---
> So glad you asked.... never have I seen such a dearth of birds and
> really, all of a sudden! I went from a feast to a famine in less than one
> week's time at the end of summer! Hard to explain!! Besides missing the
> calls of White-throated Sparrows returning at the end of October, and
> seeing the usual resident suspects just vanish, it seemed like as if by
> magic, the constant visitors of Mourning Doves, Blue Jays, Cardinals, Brown
> Thrashers, Carolina Wrens, and Woodpeckers just disappeared with the
> migration of my fave Catbirds.... I don't even hear my resident Barreds! I
> know not to expect songs as prolific and constant this time of year, but
> I'm not seeing nor hearing the Fall and Winter migrators this year like
> others. I've lived in this house for many years, and this seems very
> unusual to me.... seeds are going down slowly, with Cardinals and House
> Finches doing most of the damage and occasional chickadees and titmice,
> Carolina Wrens (and B-h and w-b nuthatches), but not like in the past, and
> the suet sits untouched mostly.... in 4 cages; where I've always had to
> replenish it more than often, it now gets moldy and needs discarding. I
> could cry....[image: Disappointed relieved]
> I have kept bird journals for many years.... this one is quite thin
> for this time of year! It's indeed concerning.... I do hope it's an
> anomaly!
> Thanks for your post!
> Wendy
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Wendy Kaplan
> Charlotte, NC (SouthPark area)
> <wenbirdy...>
>
> Sent from one of many avoidance technologies
>
> "When elephants fight, it is the grass that suffers." -- Old African Saying
>
> "Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored." -- Aldous Huxley
>
> "Even when the bird is walking, we know that it has wings." -- Victor Hugo
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Doug Pratt <dpratt14...>
> To: Carolinabirds Listserve <carolinabirds...>
> Sent: Thu, Nov 25, 2021 10:27 pm
> Subject: Where are all the birds?
>
> Hi Everyone:
>
> I hope someone on this list can solve a serious problem at my bird
> feeders: no birds. Since late summer, I have had fewer and fewer visitors
> to my bird feeders, to the point that now there are almost none. That goes
> for mixed seed feeders, black oil sunflower feeders, and suet blocks. The
> seed levels in feeders have not dropped significantly since I cleaned them
> out and replenished them last week, which I do regularly. Normally this
> time of year I can’t keep the feeders stocked, with nuthatches and titmice
> carrying the sunflower seeds away, and woodpeckers of several species
> eating 1-2 suet blocks/week. I normally have a wide variety of visitors
> including cardinals, Chipping Sparrows, House Finches, goldfinches, Blue
> Jays, bluebirds, both resident nuthatches, Pine Warblers, Carolina Wrens,
> Downy, Hairy, and Red-bellied woodpeckers, flickers, Mourning Doves,
> chickadees, towhees, etc., all year-round residents of the area; others
> come and go seasonally. I have been feeding birds for many hears, and have
> not changed anything about my methods. My bird-feeding neighbors in the
> Kildare Farm section of Cary NC have also noticed the lack of visitors and
> asked me about it.
>
> This situation has me really worried. Is it just a local phenomenon? I
> hope so. My neighbor who regularly has flying squirrels has not seen them
> lately, either. It also seems there are fewer birds than usual in nearby
> parks where I walk regularly, although I have not heard any alarm bells in
> birding circles.
>
> Doug Pratt
> Cary, NC
>
> "Some people have been kind enough to call me a fine artist. I've always
> called myself an illustrator. I'm not sure what the difference is." -
> Norman Rockwell
>
> H. Douglas Pratt, Ph. D.
> Ornithologist, illustrator, musician
> 1205 Selwyn Lane
> Cary, NC 27511
>
> Research Curator of Birds, Emeritus
> North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
> 11 West Jones Street
> Raleigh NC 27601
>
> Phone 919-379-1679
> Cell phone 919-270-0857 (for travel use only)
>
> Website: https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!5ZqZ-sVg6b88CQiWL0UxJpntHyCl7-7NYQLnvKpdBFpYrtQWG50lj1S-qNWnIdEsk9g$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!4Q6oetGmvFEnaW7JjWNkdqvYZbIK6l-9o18uaNygL1aNGKXts0vsZ4h41erS_PJV0mc$>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> "Some people have been kind enough to call me a fine artist. I've always
> called myself an illustrator. I'm not sure what the difference is." -
> Norman Rockwell
>
> H. Douglas Pratt, Ph. D.
> Ornithologist, illustrator, musician
> 1205 Selwyn Lane
> Cary, NC 27511
>
> Research Curator of Birds, Emeritus
> North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
> 11 West Jones Street
> Raleigh NC 27601
>
> Phone 919-379-1679
> Cell phone 919-270-0857 (for travel use only)
>
> Website: https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!5ZqZ-sVg6b88CQiWL0UxJpntHyCl7-7NYQLnvKpdBFpYrtQWG50lj1S-qNWnIdEsk9g$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!72ZMx0IPukhoJE4LwoJBw1KmSoapmfhdR4Dceq97j-fqCoPc5_42pjvc1Z71eUCEzds$>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/26/21 5:06 am
From: Carol Reigle <cr1234...>
Subject: Re: Where are all the birds?
I live in Morehead City and have noticed and worried about the lack of birds this year—the same customary yard birds that you are missing. Nine chipping sparrows, 1 occasional titmouse and junco, 1 downy, 2 chickadees, etc.
In the past this area was the winter mother-lode of yellow-rumped warblers and they were uncountable on my CBC route. Hedgerows swarmed with them. In the last 3 years I would get below 100 on the entire route. Thankfully this year I again have a small flock flitting through the pines in my yard.

I am 80 and have birded for decades, though no expert. I never thought I’d see this in my lifetime.

It is very worrisome for humanity.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 26, 2021, at 3:45 AM, Doug Pratt <dpratt14...> wrote:
>
> I could cry, too, Wendy, but at least I know I am not the only one with this problem. I live in the woods on the edge of a greenway, with nothing between me and the creek below but trees. One of those trees is a tall pine that houses a nest that has been used in successive years by Red-shouldered Hawks, Red-tailed Hawks, and Barred Owls, and we have always had feral cats, so there has been no sudden appearance of a predator in the neighborhood, as some suggested, and we still have diurnal squirrels and nocturnal raccoons in good numbers. Your recent bird tally (or lack thereof) sounds a lot like mine. I bought two dozen suet blocks (laced with red pepper to keep off the raccoons; the birds have always eaten them in the past) at the end of August, thinking they might last a month. I still have about a third of them, and I, too, have had to replace some moldy ones. Last week, I did see a couple of Pine Warblers (and I live under pine trees) for the first time since summer, but they haven’t returned. I saw two FOS juncos last week, and a single R-c Kinglet, but neither has repeated. I still have one pair of wrens, but normally we would have many more. My neighbor across the street has a very productive bluebird box (double brooded this year), and he asked me 3 days ago where the bluebirds had gone.
>
> When I first started noticing this phenomenon, I attributed it to the existence of so much wild food this year, as Kirk G. suggested, but now that the weather is getting cold, the birds, both seedeaters and insectivores, still are not here. It doesn’t make any sense, and I am a veteran bird feeder like yourself, not to mention that I’m also an ornithologist!
>
> Doug Pratt
> Cary, NC
>
>
>> On Nov 25, 2021, at 11:44 PM, <wenbirdy...> wrote:
>>
>> Hey Doug ---
>> So glad you asked.... never have I seen such a dearth of birds and really, all of a sudden! I went from a feast to a famine in less than one week's time at the end of summer! Hard to explain!! Besides missing the calls of White-throated Sparrows returning at the end of October, and seeing the usual resident suspects just vanish, it seemed like as if by magic, the constant visitors of Mourning Doves, Blue Jays, Cardinals, Brown Thrashers, Carolina Wrens, and Woodpeckers just disappeared with the migration of my fave Catbirds.... I don't even hear my resident Barreds! I know not to expect songs as prolific and constant this time of year, but I'm not seeing nor hearing the Fall and Winter migrators this year like others. I've lived in this house for many years, and this seems very unusual to me.... seeds are going down slowly, with Cardinals and House Finches doing most of the damage and occasional chickadees and titmice, Carolina Wrens (and B-h and w-b nuthatches), but not like in the past, and the suet sits untouched mostly.... in 4 cages; where I've always had to replenish it more than often, it now gets moldy and needs discarding. I could cry....
>> I have kept bird journals for many years.... this one is quite thin for this time of year! It's indeed concerning.... I do hope it's an anomaly!
>> Thanks for your post!
>> Wendy
>>
>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>> Wendy Kaplan
>> Charlotte, NC (SouthPark area)
>> <wenbirdy...>
>>
>> Sent from one of many avoidance technologies
>>
>> "When elephants fight, it is the grass that suffers." -- Old African Saying
>>
>> "Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored." -- Aldous Huxley
>>
>> "Even when the bird is walking, we know that it has wings." -- Victor Hugo
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Doug Pratt <dpratt14...>
>> To: Carolinabirds Listserve <carolinabirds...>
>> Sent: Thu, Nov 25, 2021 10:27 pm
>> Subject: Where are all the birds?
>>
>> Hi Everyone:
>>
>> I hope someone on this list can solve a serious problem at my bird feeders: no birds. Since late summer, I have had fewer and fewer visitors to my bird feeders, to the point that now there are almost none. That goes for mixed seed feeders, black oil sunflower feeders, and suet blocks. The seed levels in feeders have not dropped significantly since I cleaned them out and replenished them last week, which I do regularly. Normally this time of year I can’t keep the feeders stocked, with nuthatches and titmice carrying the sunflower seeds away, and woodpeckers of several species eating 1-2 suet blocks/week. I normally have a wide variety of visitors including cardinals, Chipping Sparrows, House Finches, goldfinches, Blue Jays, bluebirds, both resident nuthatches, Pine Warblers, Carolina Wrens, Downy, Hairy, and Red-bellied woodpeckers, flickers, Mourning Doves, chickadees, towhees, etc., all year-round residents of the area; others come and go seasonally. I have been feeding birds for many hears, and have not changed anything about my methods. My bird-feeding neighbors in the Kildare Farm section of Cary NC have also noticed the lack of visitors and asked me about it.
>>
>> This situation has me really worried. Is it just a local phenomenon? I hope so. My neighbor who regularly has flying squirrels has not seen them lately, either. It also seems there are fewer birds than usual in nearby parks where I walk regularly, although I have not heard any alarm bells in birding circles.
>>
>> Doug Pratt
>> Cary, NC
>>
>> "Some people have been kind enough to call me a fine artist. I've always called myself an illustrator. I'm not sure what the difference is." - Norman Rockwell
>>
>> H. Douglas Pratt, Ph. D.
>> Ornithologist, illustrator, musician
>> 1205 Selwyn Lane
>> Cary, NC 27511
>>
>> Research Curator of Birds, Emeritus
>> North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
>> 11 West Jones Street
>> Raleigh NC 27601
>>
>> Phone 919-379-1679
>> Cell phone 919-270-0857 (for travel use only)
>>
>> Website: https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!4So8efhMpHAec8mYwIw4W1Lqh036Vi50OEeIMOKto2_8oYMz-CCtS8zEV-usjPFtyHI$
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
> "Some people have been kind enough to call me a fine artist. I've always called myself an illustrator. I'm not sure what the difference is." - Norman Rockwell
>
> H. Douglas Pratt, Ph. D.
> Ornithologist, illustrator, musician
> 1205 Selwyn Lane
> Cary, NC 27511
>
> Research Curator of Birds, Emeritus
> North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
> 11 West Jones Street
> Raleigh NC 27601
>
> Phone 919-379-1679
> Cell phone 919-270-0857 (for travel use only)
>
> Website: https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!4So8efhMpHAec8mYwIw4W1Lqh036Vi50OEeIMOKto2_8oYMz-CCtS8zEV-usjPFtyHI$
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/26/21 12:45 am
From: Doug Pratt <dpratt14...>
Subject: Re: Where are all the birds?
I could cry, too, Wendy, but at least I know I am not the only one with this problem. I live in the woods on the edge of a greenway, with nothing between me and the creek below but trees. One of those trees is a tall pine that houses a nest that has been used in successive years by Red-shouldered Hawks, Red-tailed Hawks, and Barred Owls, and we have always had feral cats, so there has been no sudden appearance of a predator in the neighborhood, as some suggested, and we still have diurnal squirrels and nocturnal raccoons in good numbers. Your recent bird tally (or lack thereof) sounds a lot like mine. I bought two dozen suet blocks (laced with red pepper to keep off the raccoons; the birds have always eaten them in the past) at the end of August, thinking they might last a month. I still have about a third of them, and I, too, have had to replace some moldy ones. Last week, I did see a couple of Pine Warblers (and I live under pine trees) for the first time since summer, but they haven’t returned. I saw two FOS juncos last week, and a single R-c Kinglet, but neither has repeated. I still have one pair of wrens, but normally we would have many more. My neighbor across the street has a very productive bluebird box (double brooded this year), and he asked me 3 days ago where the bluebirds had gone.

When I first started noticing this phenomenon, I attributed it to the existence of so much wild food this year, as Kirk G. suggested, but now that the weather is getting cold, the birds, both seedeaters and insectivores, still are not here. It doesn’t make any sense, and I am a veteran bird feeder like yourself, not to mention that I’m also an ornithologist!

Doug Pratt
Cary, NC


> On Nov 25, 2021, at 11:44 PM, <wenbirdy...> wrote:
>
> Hey Doug ---
> So glad you asked.... never have I seen such a dearth of birds and really, all of a sudden! I went from a feast to a famine in less than one week's time at the end of summer! Hard to explain!! Besides missing the calls of White-throated Sparrows returning at the end of October, and seeing the usual resident suspects just vanish, it seemed like as if by magic, the constant visitors of Mourning Doves, Blue Jays, Cardinals, Brown Thrashers, Carolina Wrens, and Woodpeckers just disappeared with the migration of my fave Catbirds.... I don't even hear my resident Barreds! I know not to expect songs as prolific and constant this time of year, but I'm not seeing nor hearing the Fall and Winter migrators this year like others. I've lived in this house for many years, and this seems very unusual to me.... seeds are going down slowly, with Cardinals and House Finches doing most of the damage and occasional chickadees and titmice, Carolina Wrens (and B-h and w-b nuthatches), but not like in the past, and the suet sits untouched mostly.... in 4 cages; where I've always had to replenish it more than often, it now gets moldy and needs discarding. I could cry....
> I have kept bird journals for many years.... this one is quite thin for this time of year! It's indeed concerning.... I do hope it's an anomaly!
> Thanks for your post!
> Wendy
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Wendy Kaplan
> Charlotte, NC (SouthPark area)
> <wenbirdy...> <mailto:<wenbirdy...>
>
> Sent from one of many avoidance technologies
>
> "When elephants fight, it is the grass that suffers." -- Old African Saying
>
> "Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored." -- Aldous Huxley
>
> "Even when the bird is walking, we know that it has wings." -- Victor Hugo
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Doug Pratt <dpratt14...>
> To: Carolinabirds Listserve <carolinabirds...>
> Sent: Thu, Nov 25, 2021 10:27 pm
> Subject: Where are all the birds?
>
> Hi Everyone:
>
> I hope someone on this list can solve a serious problem at my bird feeders: no birds. Since late summer, I have had fewer and fewer visitors to my bird feeders, to the point that now there are almost none. That goes for mixed seed feeders, black oil sunflower feeders, and suet blocks. The seed levels in feeders have not dropped significantly since I cleaned them out and replenished them last week, which I do regularly. Normally this time of year I can’t keep the feeders stocked, with nuthatches and titmice carrying the sunflower seeds away, and woodpeckers of several species eating 1-2 suet blocks/week. I normally have a wide variety of visitors including cardinals, Chipping Sparrows, House Finches, goldfinches, Blue Jays, bluebirds, both resident nuthatches, Pine Warblers, Carolina Wrens, Downy, Hairy, and Red-bellied woodpeckers, flickers, Mourning Doves, chickadees, towhees, etc., all year-round residents of the area; others come and go seasonally. I have been feeding birds for many hears, and have not changed anything about my methods. My bird-feeding neighbors in the Kildare Farm section of Cary NC have also noticed the lack of visitors and asked me about it.
>
> This situation has me really worried. Is it just a local phenomenon? I hope so. My neighbor who regularly has flying squirrels has not seen them lately, either. It also seems there are fewer birds than usual in nearby parks where I walk regularly, although I have not heard any alarm bells in birding circles.
>
> Doug Pratt
> Cary, NC
>
> "Some people have been kind enough to call me a fine artist. I've always called myself an illustrator. I'm not sure what the difference is." - Norman Rockwell
>
> H. Douglas Pratt, Ph. D.
> Ornithologist, illustrator, musician
> 1205 Selwyn Lane
> Cary, NC 27511
>
> Research Curator of Birds, Emeritus
> North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
> 11 West Jones Street
> Raleigh NC 27601
>
> Phone 919-379-1679
> Cell phone 919-270-0857 (for travel use only)
>
> Website: https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!72ZMx0IPukhoJE4LwoJBw1KmSoapmfhdR4Dceq97j-fqCoPc5_42pjvc1Z71eUCEzds$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!4Q6oetGmvFEnaW7JjWNkdqvYZbIK6l-9o18uaNygL1aNGKXts0vsZ4h41erS_PJV0mc$>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

"Some people have been kind enough to call me a fine artist. I've always called myself an illustrator. I'm not sure what the difference is." - Norman Rockwell

H. Douglas Pratt, Ph. D.
Ornithologist, illustrator, musician
1205 Selwyn Lane
Cary, NC 27511

Research Curator of Birds, Emeritus
North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
11 West Jones Street
Raleigh NC 27601

Phone 919-379-1679
Cell phone 919-270-0857 (for travel use only)

Website: https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!72ZMx0IPukhoJE4LwoJBw1KmSoapmfhdR4Dceq97j-fqCoPc5_42pjvc1Z71eUCEzds$










 

Back to top
Date: 11/25/21 7:52 pm
From: Jeff Pippen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Where are all the birds?
Hey Doug,

Here in Mebane, my bird feeder usage is pretty much business as usual. House Finches, House Sparrows, mockingbird, Downy Woodpecker, chicks and tits, juncos, Chipping Sparrows, White-throats, cardinals…the usual suspects. All I feed is black oil sunflower and p-nut suet. And the nearest patch of trees is a hundred meters away or so. Life in suburbia…

Cheers,
Jeff
--
Jeffrey S. Pippen
Mebane and Durham, NC
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.jeffpippen.com/__;!!OToaGQ!_j02tWlVIraYy_YLLDGmkX91Q7jcFNIKS5LAWc5wfj6weWAJVHbC1Ys1T-ZsB8zpdco$

> On Nov 25, 2021, at 10:27 PM, Doug Pratt <dpratt14...> wrote:
>
> Hi Everyone:
>
> I hope someone on this list can solve a serious problem at my bird feeders: no birds. Since late summer, I have had fewer and fewer visitors to my bird feeders, to the point that now there are almost none. That goes for mixed seed feeders, black oil sunflower feeders, and suet blocks. The seed levels in feeders have not dropped significantly since I cleaned them out and replenished them last week, which I do regularly. Normally this time of year I can’t keep the feeders stocked, with nuthatches and titmice carrying the sunflower seeds away, and woodpeckers of several species eating 1-2 suet blocks/week. I normally have a wide variety of visitors including cardinals, Chipping Sparrows, House Finches, goldfinches, Blue Jays, bluebirds, both resident nuthatches, Pine Warblers, Carolina Wrens, Downy, Hairy, and Red-bellied woodpeckers, flickers, Mourning Doves, chickadees, towhees, etc., all year-round residents of the area; others come and go seasonally. I have been feeding birds for many hears, and have not changed anything about my methods. My bird-feeding neighbors in the Kildare Farm section of Cary NC have also noticed the lack of visitors and asked me about it.
>
> This situation has me really worried. Is it just a local phenomenon? I hope so. My neighbor who regularly has flying squirrels has not seen them lately, either. It also seems there are fewer birds than usual in nearby parks where I walk regularly, although I have not heard any alarm bells in birding circles.
>
> Doug Pratt
> Cary, NC
>
> "Some people have been kind enough to call me a fine artist. I've always called myself an illustrator. I'm not sure what the difference is." - Norman Rockwell
>
> H. Douglas Pratt, Ph. D.
> Ornithologist, illustrator, musician
> 1205 Selwyn Lane
> Cary, NC 27511
>
> Research Curator of Birds, Emeritus
> North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
> 11 West Jones Street
> Raleigh NC 27601
>
> Phone 919-379-1679
> Cell phone 919-270-0857 (for travel use only)
>
> Website: https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!_j02tWlVIraYy_YLLDGmkX91Q7jcFNIKS5LAWc5wfj6weWAJVHbC1Ys1T-ZsQGcFqUI$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!4Q6oetGmvFEnaW7JjWNkdqvYZbIK6l-9o18uaNygL1aNGKXts0vsZ4h41erS_PJV0mc$>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 11/25/21 7:27 pm
From: Doug Pratt <dpratt14...>
Subject: Where are all the birds?
Hi Everyone:

I hope someone on this list can solve a serious problem at my bird feeders: no birds. Since late summer, I have had fewer and fewer visitors to my bird feeders, to the point that now there are almost none. That goes for mixed seed feeders, black oil sunflower feeders, and suet blocks. The seed levels in feeders have not dropped significantly since I cleaned them out and replenished them last week, which I do regularly. Normally this time of year I can’t keep the feeders stocked, with nuthatches and titmice carrying the sunflower seeds away, and woodpeckers of several species eating 1-2 suet blocks/week. I normally have a wide variety of visitors including cardinals, Chipping Sparrows, House Finches, goldfinches, Blue Jays, bluebirds, both resident nuthatches, Pine Warblers, Carolina Wrens, Downy, Hairy, and Red-bellied woodpeckers, flickers, Mourning Doves, chickadees, towhees, etc., all year-round residents of the area; others come and go seasonally. I have been feeding birds for many hears, and have not changed anything about my methods. My bird-feeding neighbors in the Kildare Farm section of Cary NC have also noticed the lack of visitors and asked me about it.

This situation has me really worried. Is it just a local phenomenon? I hope so. My neighbor who regularly has flying squirrels has not seen them lately, either. It also seems there are fewer birds than usual in nearby parks where I walk regularly, although I have not heard any alarm bells in birding circles.

Doug Pratt
Cary, NC

"Some people have been kind enough to call me a fine artist. I've always called myself an illustrator. I'm not sure what the difference is." - Norman Rockwell

H. Douglas Pratt, Ph. D.
Ornithologist, illustrator, musician
1205 Selwyn Lane
Cary, NC 27511

Research Curator of Birds, Emeritus
North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
11 West Jones Street
Raleigh NC 27601

Phone 919-379-1679
Cell phone 919-270-0857 (for travel use only)

Website: https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!4Q6oetGmvFEnaW7JjWNkdqvYZbIK6l-9o18uaNygL1aNGKXts0vsZ4h41erS_PJV0mc$










 

Back to top
Date: 11/25/21 11:27 am
From: Eastman, Caroline <EASTMAN...>
Subject: RE: Apparent Hammond’s Flycatcher in SC
Years ago there was a mystery winter Empidonax at Congaree National Park. There was a lot of speculation on ID, including possibly Hammonds. People, especially Robin Carter, kept a close watch on the bird. It hung around all winter and finally started to sing. Yellow-bellied! [I think I remember the species correctly.] It did not look as much like a Hammonds as the one at Lake Busbee.

Caroline Eastman
Columbia, SC

Sent from Mail<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986__;!!OToaGQ!-DwdmFOQoMbLOhzRncFOpNs-RbAEH1-oamdwzS_yT31yZbR62gpawgz-2yaxw7Yq5AM$ > for Windows

From: Christopher Hill<mailto:<carolinabirds...>
Sent: Thursday, November 25, 2021 1:50 PM
To: Christopher Hill<mailto:<Chill...>
Cc: <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Apparent Hammonds Flycatcher in SC

omitted my full signature on that last post:

Chris Hill
Conway, SC


On Nov 25, 2021, at 1:48 PM, Christopher Hill <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.
Harry,

Thanks for posting this. First clues it might be a Hammonds came with the first photos yesterday. People not on Facebook can see photos of the bird on my ebird list here: https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S98023066__;!!OToaGQ!-DwdmFOQoMbLOhzRncFOpNs-RbAEH1-oamdwzS_yT31yZbR62gpawgz-2yaxjBvtrsk$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://protect2.fireeye.com/v1/url?k=81be6121-de2559c8-81be2fe0-86ddff148056-2bd7c3c9e566a76b&q=1&e=5c595841-9420-4d87-b2fd-5f42b9794755&u=https*3A*2F*2Furldefense.com*2Fv3*2F__https*3A*2F*2Fnam11.safelinks.protection.outlook.com*2F*3Furl*3Dhttps*2A3A*2A2F*2A2Furldefense.com*2A2Fv3*2A2F__https*2A3A*2A2F*2A2Febird.org*2A2Fchecklist*2A2FS98023066__*2A3B*21*21OToaGQ*216rEl1oLOD9rVTn5G94ebT_SUWu2SKJbmAtuPRTvhtn-7vsoR1B7DZyIGAxyOa774LdE*2A24*26data*3D04*2A7C01*2A7Cchill*2A40coastal.edu*2A7C25fcd7be2b9e405019f008d9b04441c9*2A7Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797*2A7C0*2A7C0*2A7C637734629493281716*2A7CUnknown*2A7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0*2A3D*2A7C3000*26sdata*3DvMzXaskQDwRJ8Twer9Pxxb*2A2B2hfXZkqkZIOlu8ws6PYA*2A3D*26reserved*3D0__*3BJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSU*21*21OToaGQ*21_0gAwOzmnXIWxFklEQYjHxtN17FkRhSl6oGT3IzYhJI-DrQyV-3DhhlZrIHRbcoulq0*24__;JSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUl!!OToaGQ!-DwdmFOQoMbLOhzRncFOpNs-RbAEH1-oamdwzS_yT31yZbR62gpawgz-2yaxfwstwx0$ >

C


On Nov 25, 2021, at 1:33 PM, Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.

Im looking at Facebook Carolina Rare Birds, and Chris Hill recently posted a bunch of photos taken yesterday I think, of a silent Empidonax at Lake Busbee in Conway. Found by Steve and Barb Thomas and Paul Serridge.

Youll need to see the Facebook group message and photos for more info. Surprised not to have seen any previous mention on this listserve, and as it has not had a name put on it, doesnt show up on eBird rarity listing yet.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

PS -/ agree that the marks do look like a Hammonds to me as well. Especially having recently studied the numerous photos of the N.C. bird on the CBC PHoto Gallery.


Sent from my iPhone




 

Back to top
Date: 11/25/21 11:13 am
From: Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Apparent Hammond’s Flycatcher in SC
All,

I vaguely remember a recent sighting of a Least Flycatcher at Lake Busbee
but do not see the record anywhere.

.Dennis

On Thu, Nov 25, 2021 at 1:50 PM Christopher Hill <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> omitted my full signature on that last post:
>
> Chris Hill
> Conway, SC
>
> On Nov 25, 2021, at 1:48 PM, Christopher Hill <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
> CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise
> caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown
> senders.
> Harry,
>
> Thanks for posting this. First clues it might be a Hammonds came with the
> first photos yesterday. People not on Facebook can see photos of the bird
> on my ebird list here: https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S98023066__;!!OToaGQ!9I4yP9VwyD-_bGjneMDKxWUZuFLdbshFWWq5hqmFnjYCCYbD8sKwYm_OjjZtXVYy3uA$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://nam11.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https*3A*2F*2Furldefense.com*2Fv3*2F__https*3A*2F*2Febird.org*2Fchecklist*2FS98023066__*3B!!OToaGQ!6rEl1oLOD9rVTn5G94ebT_SUWu2SKJbmAtuPRTvhtn-7vsoR1B7DZyIGAxyOa774LdE*24&data=04*7C01*7Cchill*40coastal.edu*7C25fcd7be2b9e405019f008d9b04441c9*7Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797*7C0*7C0*7C637734629493281716*7CUnknown*7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0*3D*7C3000&sdata=vMzXaskQDwRJ8Twer9Pxxb*2B2hfXZkqkZIOlu8ws6PYA*3D&reserved=0__;JSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSU!!OToaGQ!_0gAwOzmnXIWxFklEQYjHxtN17FkRhSl6oGT3IzYhJI-DrQyV-3DhhlZrIHRbcoulq0$>
>
> C
>
> On Nov 25, 2021, at 1:33 PM, Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise
> caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown
> senders.
>
> I’m looking at Facebook Carolina Rare Birds, and Chris Hill recently
> posted a bunch of photos taken yesterday I think, of a silent Empidonax at
> Lake Busbee in Conway. Found by Steve and Barb Thomas and Paul Serridge.
>
> You’ll need to see the Facebook group message and photos for more info.
> Surprised not to have seen any previous mention on this listserve, and as
> it has not had a name put on it, doesn’t show up on eBird rarity listing
> yet.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
> PS -/ agree that the marks do look like a Hammonds to me as well.
> Especially having recently studied the numerous photos of the N.C. bird on
> the CBC PHoto Gallery.
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
>
>

--
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
South Carolina eButterfly reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/25/21 10:50 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Apparent Hammond’s Flycatcher in SC
omitted my full signature on that last post:

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

On Nov 25, 2021, at 1:48 PM, Christopher Hill <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:


CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.

Harry,

Thanks for posting this. First clues it might be a Hammonds came with the first photos yesterday. People not on Facebook can see photos of the bird on my ebird list here: https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S98023066__;!!OToaGQ!_0gAwOzmnXIWxFklEQYjHxtN17FkRhSl6oGT3IzYhJI-DrQyV-3DhhlZrIHRsUkAzeA$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://nam11.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https*3A*2F*2Furldefense.com*2Fv3*2F__https*3A*2F*2Febird.org*2Fchecklist*2FS98023066__*3B!!OToaGQ!6rEl1oLOD9rVTn5G94ebT_SUWu2SKJbmAtuPRTvhtn-7vsoR1B7DZyIGAxyOa774LdE*24&data=04*7C01*7Cchill*40coastal.edu*7C25fcd7be2b9e405019f008d9b04441c9*7Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797*7C0*7C0*7C637734629493281716*7CUnknown*7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0*3D*7C3000&sdata=vMzXaskQDwRJ8Twer9Pxxb*2B2hfXZkqkZIOlu8ws6PYA*3D&reserved=0__;JSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSU!!OToaGQ!_0gAwOzmnXIWxFklEQYjHxtN17FkRhSl6oGT3IzYhJI-DrQyV-3DhhlZrIHRbcoulq0$ >

C

On Nov 25, 2021, at 1:33 PM, Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.

I’m looking at Facebook Carolina Rare Birds, and Chris Hill recently posted a bunch of photos taken yesterday I think, of a silent Empidonax at Lake Busbee in Conway. Found by Steve and Barb Thomas and Paul Serridge.

You’ll need to see the Facebook group message and photos for more info. Surprised not to have seen any previous mention on this listserve, and as it has not had a name put on it, doesn’t show up on eBird rarity listing yet.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

PS -/ agree that the marks do look like a Hammonds to me as well. Especially having recently studied the numerous photos of the N.C. bird on the CBC PHoto Gallery.


Sent from my iPhone



 

Back to top
Date: 11/25/21 10:49 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Apparent Hammond’s Flycatcher in SC
Harry,

Thanks for posting this. First clues it might be a Hammonds came with the first photos yesterday. People not on Facebook can see photos of the bird on my ebird list here: https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S98023066__;!!OToaGQ!6rEl1oLOD9rVTn5G94ebT_SUWu2SKJbmAtuPRTvhtn-7vsoR1B7DZyIGAxyOa774LdE$

C

On Nov 25, 2021, at 1:33 PM, Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.

I’m looking at Facebook Carolina Rare Birds, and Chris Hill recently posted a bunch of photos taken yesterday I think, of a silent Empidonax at Lake Busbee in Conway. Found by Steve and Barb Thomas and Paul Serridge.

You’ll need to see the Facebook group message and photos for more info. Surprised not to have seen any previous mention on this listserve, and as it has not had a name put on it, doesn’t show up on eBird rarity listing yet.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

PS -/ agree that the marks do look like a Hammonds to me as well. Especially having recently studied the numerous photos of the N.C. bird on the CBC PHoto Gallery.


Sent from my iPhone


 

Back to top
Date: 11/25/21 10:34 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Apparent Hammond’s Flycatcher in SC
I’m looking at Facebook Carolina Rare Birds, and Chris Hill recently posted a bunch of photos taken yesterday I think, of a silent Empidonax at Lake Busbee in Conway. Found by Steve and Barb Thomas and Paul Serridge.

You’ll need to see the Facebook group message and photos for more info. Surprised not to have seen any previous mention on this listserve, and as it has not had a name put on it, doesn’t show up on eBird rarity listing yet.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

PS -/ agree that the marks do look like a Hammonds to me as well. Especially having recently studied the numerous photos of the N.C. bird on the CBC PHoto Gallery.


Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 11/25/21 8:12 am
From: David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Too many birds to count on Bulls Island, Charleston Co, SC
Th 25 Nov 2021

All,

Yesterday's waterfowl/shorebird survey on Bulls Island, Cape Romain NWR,
Charleston Co, SC, found TOO MANY BIRDS TO COUNT! I've posted a brief
description on my BirdingBulls blog and invite you to read about the ducks
(and other birds) in Jack's Creek and Upper Summerhouse Pond at:

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://birdingbulls.blogspot.com__;!!OToaGQ!4I1NVZr1qFBjP5YIPpgTj9jk-dpKb2D0pIUKwZ1DQ8mQK2OvIqRlelqKETsRMcPh4Kc$

Happy Thanksgiving to all, and good birding!

Regards,

David McLean
Charleston, SC



--
David C. McLean, Jr.
DCMcLean AT gmail DOT com

 

Back to top
Date: 11/24/21 1:15 pm
From: Steve <sshultz...>
Subject: Ross's Geese - Wake NC

> Happy Thanksgiving to all!
>
> A pair of Ross’s Geese are frequenting the Mid-Pines Road/Lake Wheeler area south of Raleigh (Wake) NC. The pair have been found most reliably in a small farm pond behind the church at 3700 Lake Wheeler Drive. This is the same location where a Snow Goose was reported a week or so ago.
>
>
>
> There is no readily available public parking when the birds are at the pond, although when in fields, they might be seen from Mid-Pines Road. Despite the lack of public parking, birders have stopped briefly in the parking lot of the church, and although there is no clear permission to do so, this does not seem to have created an issue.
>
>
>
> Birders have also been stopping on the private road behind the church that leads to one of the cattle barns, but I would suggest that this should be avoided. For various reasons the public are not permitted on university farm property, and while viewing the pond briefly from the road behind the church may or may not result in a visit from the occasionally patrolling University police, driving and parking on the road are more likely to create issues.
>
>
>
> Birders might also try the fallow fields along Mid-Pines Road for Horned Lark, American Pipet, and the recently reported, but irregularly seen, Lapland Longspur that has been associating with the pipits.
>
>
>
> Steven Shultz
>
> Ross’s Free Apex NC (it rhymes!)

 

Back to top
Date: 11/24/21 8:39 am
From: Paul Serridge (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: HUGO at Litchfield-by-the-Sea, Pawleys Island, Georgetown County, SC
I had 2 (yes TWO!) Hudsonian Godwits in view at the same time around 10.30
this morning.
They were foraging close together in the shallow water in the marsh to the
southwest of Heron Marsh Lake.
Both were in non-breeding plumage.
After a while they both flew towards the southwest corner of the marsh and
I lost them.

Paul Serridge
Greenville, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/22/21 3:18 pm
From: <hilton...> <hilton...>
Subject: Hilton Pond 10/11/21 (What's In A Bird Name?)
We're running late, but here's our "This Week at Hilton Pond" photo essay for 11-31 Oct 2021. It's about what to call birds, migratory species (such as this solitary Blue-headed Vireo), the fall shuffle, and some defects in birds we've captured. See what's been happening here in York SC USA through Installment #756 at https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek211011.html__;!!OToaGQ!9UPpCEopHwND5I5PbAyoxy-KwUAPr6C8Wxjd97bVUzXw40EV11dXYo37RIgUu7tB6OI$

As always we include lists of all birds banded or recaptured during the period.

Happy Nature Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond__;!!OToaGQ!9UPpCEopHwND5I5PbAyoxy-KwUAPr6C8Wxjd97bVUzXw40EV11dXYo37RIgUgjECR4w$ for timely updates on nature topics,
and for info about hummingbirds at https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats__;!!OToaGQ!9UPpCEopHwND5I5PbAyoxy-KwUAPr6C8Wxjd97bVUzXw40EV11dXYo37RIgUyGlsC4I$

Follow us on Twitter @hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and education for students of all ages.

"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the sunset." BHjr.

============


 

Back to top
Date: 11/22/21 7:06 am
From: Bogey <bogey...>
Subject: Re: Hudsonian Godwit in Litchfield-by-the-Sea, Pawleys Island, Georgetown County, SC
Another gated community?


Jerry Kerschner
Pawleys Island, SC

From: Paul Serridge (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
Sent: Monday, November 22, 2021 9:13 AM
To: Carolina Birds ; GCBC
Subject: Hudsonian Godwit in Litchfield-by-the-Sea, Pawleys Island, Georgetown County, SC

The bird was back at 9 a.m. foraging in shallow water in Marsh just south of Heron Marsh Lake.

Paul Serridge
Greenville, SC
 

Back to top
Date: 11/22/21 6:14 am
From: Paul Serridge (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hudsonian Godwit in Litchfield-by-the-Sea, Pawleys Island, Georgetown County, SC
The bird was back at 9 a.m. foraging in shallow water in Marsh just south
of Heron Marsh Lake.

Paul Serridge
Greenville, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/20/21 12:49 pm
From: Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: TUNDRA SWAN at Capital Hills Drive, Raleigh, Wake County, NC
TUNDRA SWAN at Capital Hills Drive, Raleigh, Wake County, NC
From Capital Blvd turn west onto Durant Road, left onto Capital Hills
Drive, enter first parking lot and park on south end. The three wetlands
(retention ponds) are visible from the parking area, or walk down the
gravel path for a better view. The TUNDRA SWAN was among four other
waterfowl species in the longest pond (parallels Capital Hills Drive on the
west side). Photos on ebird checklist
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/atlasnc/checklist/S97823848__;!!OToaGQ!4P5Bf8jS1VJNc2u1Ixjnh9u_qh7dl9CNnESxS44VmFeWA3c6qhGtTZEjaf8FaEOLaaY$
I saw the bird about noon today, Saturday November 20, 2021.
Lynn Erla Beegle
Raleigh, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/20/21 12:08 pm
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: How to find stuff in The Chat
As a followup to my announcement about The Chat being entirely online, because searching for information in The Chat, especially older issues, is not entirely straightforward, I've written up a page on how to search The Chat. It's at https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/search.html__;!!OToaGQ!60gYLTjVEoB-5yp0rPcw3_5kI1Xtpm8Vy64gElX2TOyt8AgMsKzuQWDgaIsnLpLaKnY$

--
Kent Fiala

 

Back to top
Date: 11/20/21 10:42 am
From: TAYLOR PIEPHOFF (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Franklin’s gull
Still present 12:50 pm . Seen in back corner of closest pond to entrance road.

Taylor Piephoff
Matthews, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 11/20/21 7:37 am
From: Doug Hughes (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Franklin’s gull at Ocean Isle Beach NC
Franklin’s Gull - yes

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 19, 2021, at 9:50 PM, TAYLOR PIEPHOFF <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I was checking some Brunswick County NC hotspots lists on eBird and noticed a well-photographed Franklin’s gull from the OIB Wastewater Reclamation Facility from 11/17. Apparently the bird has been present since at least 11/15, reported as laughing gull and Bonaparte’s gull. Doesn’t appear anyone has checked the site since then. Hopefully folks doing a NC Big Year or those keeping a county list can benefit.
> The latest reporter is not on this group so I am posting. I am headed there tomorrow for the week and will check in the pm.
>
> Taylor Piephoff
> Matthews, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 11/20/21 6:39 am
From: Paul Serridge (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hudsonian Godwit in Georgetown County SC
A single Hudsonian Godwit was in the marsh adjacent to Heron Marsh Lake in
Litchfield-by-the-Sea this morning.
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S97813868__;!!OToaGQ!6B28mJTKoFzKhKRyawiebnENugrK2Tl9t-6nIANpAN2DiD9mCb4wiCf2OBipwPJI_Yc$
A rare bird report will be submitted.

Paul Serridge
Greenville SC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/19/21 6:50 pm
From: TAYLOR PIEPHOFF (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Franklin’s gull at Ocean Isle Beach NC
I was checking some Brunswick County NC hotspots lists on eBird and noticed a well-photographed Franklin’s gull from the OIB Wastewater Reclamation Facility from 11/17. Apparently the bird has been present since at least 11/15, reported as laughing gull and Bonaparte’s gull. Doesn’t appear anyone has checked the site since then. Hopefully folks doing a NC Big Year or those keeping a county list can benefit.
The latest reporter is not on this group so I am posting. I am headed there tomorrow for the week and will check in the pm.

Taylor Piephoff
Matthews, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 11/18/21 3:40 pm
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: All of The Chat is online
I've thought a bit about picking out articles to feature on the web site from time to time, but I haven't chosen any yet. It's interesting to read old accounts of Evening Grosbeak irruptions in the middle 20th century. It's especially interesting to me that apparently there was never a major flight that reached as far south as the Carolinas until the 1950s. It's also interesting to read the old reports of Pine Grosbeaks as far south as Charleston and to try to guess whether the observers really made correct identification or not. There are some surprising distributional firsts, such as first swallow nesting that Harry mentioned. The very first issue of The Chat reported Raleigh's first record of Ring-billed Gull in 1932. A bit of interesting trivia is that Covid-19 is not the first thing that caused CBC meetings to be cancelled. Several meetings were cancelled during World War II due to travel restrictions.

Kent Fiala

On 11/18/2021 5:54 PM, Michael Fogleman wrote:
> Kent,
>
> Do you have any favorite articles that we should check out? You must've read a ton of them!
>
> Michael
>
>
> On Thu, Nov 18, 2021 at 3:52 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Yes, I agree, a huge help to us!  As I am the author of the _Birds of North Carolina_ website, which Kent "hosts" on the CBC website, this will allow me to go back into the older Chats that I currently do not have, to get more info if I need it.
>
> And, for you folks, you can finally now see the details on some of the older records for which the live link on a species account brings you (still) "Issues of The Chat for volume # are not yet online, sorry".  For example, you can now read the account (General Field Note) on the 2nd (and still last!) Western Meadowlark report in the state, from 1968.  On the species account, the reference is _Chat _32:104-05. So, now you can go to the CBC website's _Chat_ tab, then to the Table of Contents 1937-current tab, and then look for Volume 32, which is in the 4th row of choices. There are always 4 issues per year, so you may have to click on more than one issue to make sure you have pages 104-105.  But, then you see the page on the BHL website, which you will need to enlarge a few times to read!  You will find the bird was found by Lee Jones (who decades later wrote the Birds of Belize field guide), and later seen and heard by a handful of others, including me (not listed there).
>
> I don't know if Kent is able to make the older live links work on the BNC website, but as these older records are now available via the CBC website and the _Chat_ link, that will get you to the record.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
> On Thu, Nov 18, 2021 at 8:47 AM Kent Fiala <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> At long last, all issues of The Chat from 1937 to the present are accessible from the Carolina Bird Club web site. They can be accessed via https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/__;!!OToaGQ!8H_YPw4DW_PDmSLENVtFzis4wxcvV4p6Lfrw464tQblgl_LtP1yioAWMzF63i3UPb-8$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/__;!!OToaGQ!82lGvzkF9B_7NjNy4N3wUEPaZc7jhq5xf6FRoDCmSeSi0a-JjWRs-UoOgi-NpElUjrs$>. (Access to the two most recent calendar years is restricted to CBC members.)
>
> Chat issues currently online come from three sources. From 2003 to present (19 years already!), we have the original files from which the Chat issue was published. From 1970 through 2002 we have issues that I scanned. If you have any experience with doing optical character recognition, you know that it is highly prone to error. Think auto-correct or voice recognition on your phone, but much much worse. The reason that my scanning project moved so slowly and eventually stalled is that I was painstakingly proofreading and correcting the OCR results, which was very time-consuming and ultimately exhausting.
>
> In the meantime, the Biodiversity Heritage Library is digitizing the world of natural history and has scanned the entire series of The Chat and put it online. These scans have not been proofed and in places the OCR is badly garbled, which is bad for search but good enough for most purposes, so I have decided just to use the BHL scans from 1937 through 1969 to complete our series. In my opinion, the Biodiversity Heritage Library is not the most user-friendly website so for easier access I have hooked their pages into the table of contents structure that I have already set up on the CBC site, which you can find at https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/issues/__;!!OToaGQ!8H_YPw4DW_PDmSLENVtFzis4wxcvV4p6Lfrw464tQblgl_LtP1yioAWMzF631cW2A6M$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/issues/__;!!OToaGQ!82lGvzkF9B_7NjNy4N3wUEPaZc7jhq5xf6FRoDCmSeSi0a-JjWRs-UoOgi-NXloKGJI$>. You can go here to find any issue no matter its source.
>
> The issues that reside on the Carolina Bird Club site as pdf files (i.e., issues from 1970 to present) are indexed by Google and other search engines. The Biodiversity Heritage Library appears not to be searchable by Google. It does however have its own search, which seems to be workable, although again, not the most user-friendly. You just need to remember that you have to go to a separate place to search The Chat prior to 1970.
>
> These issues are a great resource for researching old records or any aspect of the history of birding in the Carolinas, or just for browsing.
>
> --
> Kent Fiala
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/18/21 3:17 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: All of The Chat is online
I really find interesting some of those old annotated county bird lists. Check out the Wake County list that Bob Hader wrote in the September 1969 issue. No Falls or Jordan lakes back then. Jay Carter wrote an annotated NC Sandhills list in the December 1971 Chat. Heck, coming up it’s 50th anniversary next month!

And, back then Chat published all of the numerous totals for Spring and Christmas bird counts. Back then, setting up the type for such huge tables was difficult and fairly expensive. Chat no longer has such lists in full — just prose summaries.

Lots of fun reading back in the day — like a field note on Barn Swallows nesting in Johnston County, NC. Woo!

Harry LeGrand

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 18, 2021, at 5:54 PM, Michael Fogleman <fogleman...> wrote:
>
> 
> Kent,
>
> Do you have any favorite articles that we should check out? You must've read a ton of them!
>
> Michael
>
>
>> On Thu, Nov 18, 2021 at 3:52 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>> Yes, I agree, a huge help to us! As I am the author of the Birds of North Carolina website, which Kent "hosts" on the CBC website, this will allow me to go back into the older Chats that I currently do not have, to get more info if I need it.
>>
>> And, for you folks, you can finally now see the details on some of the older records for which the live link on a species account brings you (still) "Issues of The Chat for volume # are not yet online, sorry". For example, you can now read the account (General Field Note) on the 2nd (and still last!) Western Meadowlark report in the state, from 1968. On the species account, the reference is Chat 32:104-05. So, now you can go to the CBC website's Chat tab, then to the Table of Contents 1937-current tab, and then look for Volume 32, which is in the 4th row of choices. There are always 4 issues per year, so you may have to click on more than one issue to make sure you have pages 104-105. But, then you see the page on the BHL website, which you will need to enlarge a few times to read! You will find the bird was found by Lee Jones (who decades later wrote the Birds of Belize field guide), and later seen and heard by a handful of others, including me (not listed there).
>>
>> I don't know if Kent is able to make the older live links work on the BNC website, but as these older records are now available via the CBC website and the Chat link, that will get you to the record.
>>
>> Harry LeGrand
>> Raleigh
>>
>>> On Thu, Nov 18, 2021 at 8:47 AM Kent Fiala <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>> At long last, all issues of The Chat from 1937 to the present are accessible from the Carolina Bird Club web site. They can be accessed via https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/__;!!OToaGQ!-z7DkfZ4afv5BT7-iEgsgrjROx2UJUIaRHxRHrl8Ej_n4zEKwla7WPAHnmUQyYPMyvY$ . (Access to the two most recent calendar years is restricted to CBC members.)
>>>
>>> Chat issues currently online come from three sources. From 2003 to present (19 years already!), we have the original files from which the Chat issue was published. From 1970 through 2002 we have issues that I scanned. If you have any experience with doing optical character recognition, you know that it is highly prone to error. Think auto-correct or voice recognition on your phone, but much much worse. The reason that my scanning project moved so slowly and eventually stalled is that I was painstakingly proofreading and correcting the OCR results, which was very time-consuming and ultimately exhausting.
>>>
>>> In the meantime, the Biodiversity Heritage Library is digitizing the world of natural history and has scanned the entire series of The Chat and put it online. These scans have not been proofed and in places the OCR is badly garbled, which is bad for search but good enough for most purposes, so I have decided just to use the BHL scans from 1937 through 1969 to complete our series. In my opinion, the Biodiversity Heritage Library is not the most user-friendly website so for easier access I have hooked their pages into the table of contents structure that I have already set up on the CBC site, which you can find at https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/issues/__;!!OToaGQ!-z7DkfZ4afv5BT7-iEgsgrjROx2UJUIaRHxRHrl8Ej_n4zEKwla7WPAHnmUQNiAX72I$ . You can go here to find any issue no matter its source.
>>>
>>> The issues that reside on the Carolina Bird Club site as pdf files (i.e., issues from 1970 to present) are indexed by Google and other search engines. The Biodiversity Heritage Library appears not to be searchable by Google. It does however have its own search, which seems to be workable, although again, not the most user-friendly. You just need to remember that you have to go to a separate place to search The Chat prior to 1970.
>>>
>>> These issues are a great resource for researching old records or any aspect of the history of birding in the Carolinas, or just for browsing.
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Kent Fiala

 

Back to top
Date: 11/18/21 2:55 pm
From: Michael Fogleman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: All of The Chat is online
Kent,

Do you have any favorite articles that we should check out? You must've
read a ton of them!

Michael


On Thu, Nov 18, 2021 at 3:52 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Yes, I agree, a huge help to us! As I am the author of the *Birds of
> North Carolina* website, which Kent "hosts" on the CBC website, this will
> allow me to go back into the older Chats that I currently do not have, to
> get more info if I need it.
>
> And, for you folks, you can finally now see the details on some of the
> older records for which the live link on a species account brings you
> (still) "Issues of The Chat for volume # are not yet online, sorry". For
> example, you can now read the account (General Field Note) on the 2nd (and
> still last!) Western Meadowlark report in the state, from 1968. On the
> species account, the reference is *Chat *32:104-05. So, now you can go
> to the CBC website's *Chat* tab, then to the Table of Contents
> 1937-current tab, and then look for Volume 32, which is in the 4th row of
> choices. There are always 4 issues per year, so you may have to click on
> more than one issue to make sure you have pages 104-105. But, then you see
> the page on the BHL website, which you will need to enlarge a few times to
> read! You will find the bird was found by Lee Jones (who decades later
> wrote the Birds of Belize field guide), and later seen and heard by a
> handful of others, including me (not listed there).
>
> I don't know if Kent is able to make the older live links work on the BNC
> website, but as these older records are now available via the CBC website
> and the *Chat* link, that will get you to the record.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
> On Thu, Nov 18, 2021 at 8:47 AM Kent Fiala <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
>> At long last, all issues of The Chat from 1937 to the present are
>> accessible from the Carolina Bird Club web site. They can be accessed via
>> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/__;!!OToaGQ!_XLBavp5KuvJmLWxTq7Ze3IY8Rf7Dl0hjDEQxRXcLNkCCtAvAv9vT_BslXmjXETMOhA$
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/__;!!OToaGQ!82lGvzkF9B_7NjNy4N3wUEPaZc7jhq5xf6FRoDCmSeSi0a-JjWRs-UoOgi-NpElUjrs$>.
>> (Access to the two most recent calendar years is restricted to CBC members.)
>>
>> Chat issues currently online come from three sources. From 2003 to
>> present (19 years already!), we have the original files from which the Chat
>> issue was published. From 1970 through 2002 we have issues that I scanned.
>> If you have any experience with doing optical character recognition, you
>> know that it is highly prone to error. Think auto-correct or voice
>> recognition on your phone, but much much worse. The reason that my scanning
>> project moved so slowly and eventually stalled is that I was painstakingly
>> proofreading and correcting the OCR results, which was very time-consuming
>> and ultimately exhausting.
>>
>> In the meantime, the Biodiversity Heritage Library is digitizing the
>> world of natural history and has scanned the entire series of The Chat and
>> put it online. These scans have not been proofed and in places the OCR is
>> badly garbled, which is bad for search but good enough for most purposes,
>> so I have decided just to use the BHL scans from 1937 through 1969 to
>> complete our series. In my opinion, the Biodiversity Heritage Library is
>> not the most user-friendly website so for easier access I have hooked their
>> pages into the table of contents structure that I have already set up on
>> the CBC site, which you can find at
>> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/issues/__;!!OToaGQ!_XLBavp5KuvJmLWxTq7Ze3IY8Rf7Dl0hjDEQxRXcLNkCCtAvAv9vT_BslXmjBBB6_eM$
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/issues/__;!!OToaGQ!82lGvzkF9B_7NjNy4N3wUEPaZc7jhq5xf6FRoDCmSeSi0a-JjWRs-UoOgi-NXloKGJI$>.
>> You can go here to find any issue no matter its source.
>>
>> The issues that reside on the Carolina Bird Club site as pdf files (i.e.,
>> issues from 1970 to present) are indexed by Google and other search
>> engines. The Biodiversity Heritage Library appears not to be searchable by
>> Google. It does however have its own search, which seems to be workable,
>> although again, not the most user-friendly. You just need to remember that
>> you have to go to a separate place to search The Chat prior to 1970.
>>
>> These issues are a great resource for researching old records or any
>> aspect of the history of birding in the Carolinas, or just for browsing.
>>
>> --
>> Kent Fiala
>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/18/21 12:52 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: All of The Chat is online
Yes, I agree, a huge help to us! As I am the author of the *Birds of North
Carolina* website, which Kent "hosts" on the CBC website, this will allow
me to go back into the older Chats that I currently do not have, to get
more info if I need it.

And, for you folks, you can finally now see the details on some of the
older records for which the live link on a species account brings you
(still) "Issues of The Chat for volume # are not yet online, sorry". For
example, you can now read the account (General Field Note) on the 2nd (and
still last!) Western Meadowlark report in the state, from 1968. On the
species account, the reference is *Chat *32:104-05. So, now you can go to
the CBC website's *Chat* tab, then to the Table of Contents 1937-current
tab, and then look for Volume 32, which is in the 4th row of choices.
There are always 4 issues per year, so you may have to click on more than
one issue to make sure you have pages 104-105. But, then you see the page
on the BHL website, which you will need to enlarge a few times to read!
You will find the bird was found by Lee Jones (who decades later wrote the
Birds of Belize field guide), and later seen and heard by a handful of
others, including me (not listed there).

I don't know if Kent is able to make the older live links work on the BNC
website, but as these older records are now available via the CBC website
and the *Chat* link, that will get you to the record.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Thu, Nov 18, 2021 at 8:47 AM Kent Fiala <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> At long last, all issues of The Chat from 1937 to the present are
> accessible from the Carolina Bird Club web site. They can be accessed via
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/__;!!OToaGQ!4YhxwBNNc4mT1yWXDuggjbrc-wn54VVaPX45XjbHBQA28zEmsh4or5lxDR7_cANRxCs$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/__;!!OToaGQ!82lGvzkF9B_7NjNy4N3wUEPaZc7jhq5xf6FRoDCmSeSi0a-JjWRs-UoOgi-NpElUjrs$>.
> (Access to the two most recent calendar years is restricted to CBC members.)
>
> Chat issues currently online come from three sources. From 2003 to present
> (19 years already!), we have the original files from which the Chat issue
> was published. From 1970 through 2002 we have issues that I scanned. If you
> have any experience with doing optical character recognition, you know that
> it is highly prone to error. Think auto-correct or voice recognition on
> your phone, but much much worse. The reason that my scanning project moved
> so slowly and eventually stalled is that I was painstakingly proofreading
> and correcting the OCR results, which was very time-consuming and
> ultimately exhausting.
>
> In the meantime, the Biodiversity Heritage Library is digitizing the world
> of natural history and has scanned the entire series of The Chat and put it
> online. These scans have not been proofed and in places the OCR is badly
> garbled, which is bad for search but good enough for most purposes, so I
> have decided just to use the BHL scans from 1937 through 1969 to complete
> our series. In my opinion, the Biodiversity Heritage Library is not the
> most user-friendly website so for easier access I have hooked their pages
> into the table of contents structure that I have already set up on the CBC
> site, which you can find at https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/issues/__;!!OToaGQ!4YhxwBNNc4mT1yWXDuggjbrc-wn54VVaPX45XjbHBQA28zEmsh4or5lxDR7_mqavbfA$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/issues/__;!!OToaGQ!82lGvzkF9B_7NjNy4N3wUEPaZc7jhq5xf6FRoDCmSeSi0a-JjWRs-UoOgi-NXloKGJI$>.
> You can go here to find any issue no matter its source.
>
> The issues that reside on the Carolina Bird Club site as pdf files (i.e.,
> issues from 1970 to present) are indexed by Google and other search
> engines. The Biodiversity Heritage Library appears not to be searchable by
> Google. It does however have its own search, which seems to be workable,
> although again, not the most user-friendly. You just need to remember that
> you have to go to a separate place to search The Chat prior to 1970.
>
> These issues are a great resource for researching old records or any
> aspect of the history of birding in the Carolinas, or just for browsing.
>
> --
> Kent Fiala
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/18/21 8:50 am
From: Eastman, Caroline <EASTMAN...>
Subject: RE: RFI finding Bar-tailed Godwit Kiawah
The godwit has been most often reported from the lagoon near the practice range. I found it further out towards the point. If you dont see it in the usual lagoon, persist and check out nearby areas. I stayed overnight at The Sanctuary, which allowed me access to the area. Good luck! Its a cool bird.

Caroline Eastman
Columbia, SC

Sent from Mail<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986__;!!OToaGQ!8rIcR93F0EFYuhA2IxA5impBVx62-6Xy0qWE7Jr-cAFHHl13XFBiQWLicByX1zyXC6o$ > for Windows

From: scompton1251<mailto:<scompton1251...>
Sent: Thursday, November 18, 2021 11:29 AM
To: <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>
Subject: RFI finding Bar-tailed Godwit Kiawah

Birders,

Although the Bar-tailed Godwit may have moved on, I will be in the area Friday and Saturday 11/25 and 26. I am familiar with the area near the Ocean Course. I request advice on the best way to get there. I have no special entre' onto that section of the island.

Thanks,
Steve Compton
Greenville, SC
843-709-2554<tel:843-709-2554>
<scompton1251...><mailto:<scompton1251...>

Sent from my Verizon LG Smartphone


 

Back to top
Date: 11/18/21 8:29 am
From: scompton1251 <scompton1251...>
Subject: RFI finding Bar-tailed Godwit Kiawah
Birders,Although the Bar-tailed Godwit may have moved on, I will be in the area Friday and Saturday 11/25 and 26. I am familiar with the area near the Ocean Course. I request advice on the best way to get there. I have no special entre' onto that section of the island.Thanks,Steve ComptonGreenville, <SC843-709-2554scompton1251...> from my Verizon LG Smartphone
 

Back to top
Date: 11/18/21 7:58 am
From: KEN LIPSHY (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: All of The Chat is online
Wow! What an effort!
Kudos to your persistency !


Kenneth A. Lipshy
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://Www.crisismanagementleadership.com__;!!OToaGQ!-Er-COinIm7cVXm_kNZU-IhD6WgdZHoDlMa14xxnxMkJtU7aPNjEggyqo-4U-6OpN9A$
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://Www.crisislead.blogspot.com__;!!OToaGQ!-Er-COinIm7cVXm_kNZU-IhD6WgdZHoDlMa14xxnxMkJtU7aPNjEggyqo-4UnQTlVF0$

> On Nov 18, 2021, at 9:31 AM, Robert Lewis <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Thank you Kent! Great work.
>
> Bob Lewis
> Durham NC
>
>
>
>
> On Thursday, November 18, 2021, 08:47:59 AM EST, Kent Fiala <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
>
>
>
> At long last, all issues of The Chat from 1937 to the present are accessible from the Carolina Bird Club web site. They can be accessed via https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/__;!!OToaGQ!-jxY8oC5fx6wmiTtEG76DY3hoTnOj17rCioSw0RfW5u6ZaPx9yWhosmWlB-NvkP_9sg$ . (Access to the two most recent calendar years is restricted to CBC members.)
>
> Chat issues currently online come from three sources. From 2003 to present (19 years already!), we have the original files from which the Chat issue was published. From 1970 through 2002 we have issues that I scanned. If you have any experience with doing optical character recognition, you know that it is highly prone to error. Think auto-correct or voice recognition on your phone, but much much worse. The reason that my scanning project moved so slowly and eventually stalled is that I was painstakingly proofreading and correcting the OCR results, which was very time-consuming and ultimately exhausting.
>
> In the meantime, the Biodiversity Heritage Library is digitizing the world of natural history and has scanned the entire series of The Chat and put it online. These scans have not been proofed and in places the OCR is badly garbled, which is bad for search but good enough for most purposes, so I have decided just to use the BHL scans from 1937 through 1969 to complete our series. In my opinion, the Biodiversity Heritage Library is not the most user-friendly website so for easier access I have hooked their pages into the table of contents structure that I have already set up on the CBC site, which you can find at https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/issues/__;!!OToaGQ!-jxY8oC5fx6wmiTtEG76DY3hoTnOj17rCioSw0RfW5u6ZaPx9yWhosmWlB-N8DczJPY$ . You can go here to find any issue no matter its source.
>
> The issues that reside on the Carolina Bird Club site as pdf files (i.e., issues from 1970 to present) are indexed by Google and other search engines. The Biodiversity Heritage Library appears not to be searchable by Google. It does however have its own search, which seems to be workable, although again, not the most user-friendly. You just need to remember that you have to go to a separate place to search The Chat prior to 1970.
>
> These issues are a great resource for researching old records or any aspect of the history of birding in the Carolinas, or just for browsing.
>
>
> --
> Kent Fiala
>
 

Back to top
Date: 11/18/21 6:31 am
From: Robert Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: All of The Chat is online
Thank you Kent!  Great work.

Bob Lewis
Durham NC




On Thursday, November 18, 2021, 08:47:59 AM EST, Kent Fiala <carolinabirds...> wrote:




At long last, all issues of The Chat from 1937 to the present are accessible from the Carolina Bird Club web site. They can be accessed via https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/__;!!OToaGQ!-jxY8oC5fx6wmiTtEG76DY3hoTnOj17rCioSw0RfW5u6ZaPx9yWhosmWlB-NvkP_9sg$ . (Access to the two most recent calendar years is restricted to CBC members.)

Chat issues currently online come from three sources. From 2003 to present (19 years already!), we have the original files from which the Chat issue was published. From 1970 through 2002 we have issues that I scanned. If you have any experience with doing optical character recognition, you know that it is highly prone to error. Think auto-correct or voice recognition on your phone, but much much worse. The reason that my scanning project moved so slowly and eventually stalled is that I was painstakingly proofreading and correcting the OCR results, which was very time-consuming and ultimately exhausting.

In the meantime, the Biodiversity Heritage Library is digitizing the world of natural history and has scanned the entire series of The Chat and put it online. These scans have not been proofed and in places the OCR is badly garbled, which is bad for search but good enough for most purposes, so I have decided just to use the BHL scans from 1937 through 1969 to complete our series. In my opinion, the Biodiversity Heritage Library is not the most user-friendly website so for easier access I have hooked their pages into the table of contents structure that I have already set up on the CBC site, which you can find at https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/issues/__;!!OToaGQ!-jxY8oC5fx6wmiTtEG76DY3hoTnOj17rCioSw0RfW5u6ZaPx9yWhosmWlB-N8DczJPY$ . You can go here to find any issue no matter its source.

The issues that reside on the Carolina Bird Club site as pdf files (i.e., issues from 1970 to present) are indexed by Google and other search engines. The Biodiversity Heritage Library appears not to be searchable by Google. It does however have its own search, which seems to be workable, although again, not the most user-friendly. You just need to remember that you have to go to a separate place to search The Chat prior to 1970.

These issues are a great resource for researching old records or any aspect of the history of birding in the Carolinas, or just for browsing.


--
Kent Fiala

 

Back to top
Date: 11/18/21 5:56 am
From: nan dewire (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: CHBC monthly meeting
Here is the info on the next meeting.

 CHBC monthly meeting

Join the Chapel Hill Bird Club on Monday, November 22, via Zoom to hear Rachael Mady of ​the Cornell Lab of Ornithology discuss the Battling Birds of Panama project. Zoom lines open at 7:15, and the meeting begins at 7:30. Ms. Mady was the project leader for Cornell’s Bird Cam Lab. She and other researchers at Cornell worked with citizen scientists to study the behavior of birds visiting feeders at a lodge in Panama using bird cam videos. Learn how the investigation helped them better understand social dominance hierarchy and aggression in the various species that used the feeders.


When: Nov 22, 2021 07:15 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)



Register in advance for this meeting:



https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUuf-mqpzkqG9Gk2W9QG-48Ch0OTcqjUy9h__;!!OToaGQ!_DQtxxhzO6iqp7lH5xGyQGMQy8jWKVNxVNDDowiT1o-mpK0ANE-R4l4KnTp6ZZrXooU$



After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting



 

Back to top
Date: 11/18/21 5:47 am
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: All of The Chat is online
At long last, all issues of The Chat from 1937 to the present are accessible from the Carolina Bird Club web site. They can be accessed via https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/__;!!OToaGQ!82lGvzkF9B_7NjNy4N3wUEPaZc7jhq5xf6FRoDCmSeSi0a-JjWRs-UoOgi-NpElUjrs$ . (Access to the two most recent calendar years is restricted to CBC members.)

Chat issues currently online come from three sources. From 2003 to present (19 years already!), we have the original files from which the Chat issue was published. From 1970 through 2002 we have issues that I scanned. If you have any experience with doing optical character recognition, you know that it is highly prone to error. Think auto-correct or voice recognition on your phone, but much much worse. The reason that my scanning project moved so slowly and eventually stalled is that I was painstakingly proofreading and correcting the OCR results, which was very time-consuming and ultimately exhausting.

In the meantime, the Biodiversity Heritage Library is digitizing the world of natural history and has scanned the entire series of The Chat and put it online. These scans have not been proofed and in places the OCR is badly garbled, which is bad for search but good enough for most purposes, so I have decided just to use the BHL scans from 1937 through 1969 to complete our series. In my opinion, the Biodiversity Heritage Library is not the most user-friendly website so for easier access I have hooked their pages into the table of contents structure that I have already set up on the CBC site, which you can find at https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/issues/__;!!OToaGQ!82lGvzkF9B_7NjNy4N3wUEPaZc7jhq5xf6FRoDCmSeSi0a-JjWRs-UoOgi-NXloKGJI$ . You can go here to find any issue no matter its source.

The issues that reside on the Carolina Bird Club site as pdf files (i.e., issues from 1970 to present) are indexed by Google and other search engines. The Biodiversity Heritage Library appears not to be searchable by Google. It does however have its own search, which seems to be workable, although again, not the most user-friendly. You just need to remember that you have to go to a separate place to search The Chat prior to 1970.

These issues are a great resource for researching old records or any aspect of the history of birding in the Carolinas, or just for browsing.

--
Kent Fiala

 

Back to top
Date: 11/17/21 8:07 pm
From: Peter Vankevich (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: White-winged Dove on Ocracoke
A White-winged Dove made an appearance at a bird feeder on Ocracoke, Nov.
16, 2021.
It was photographed.
Regards,
/Peter Vankevich

 

Back to top
Date: 11/17/21 5:16 am
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Dowitcher plumage stages: correction
Rather than "Juvenal" - an even more accurate term would be "first cycle"
or "undergoing preformative molt". I was also reminded that my reference
to 'first-winter' birds has a northern hemisphere bias when I re-read Peter
Pyle's portion of this article:

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.birdpop.org/docs/pubs/Floyd_and_Pyle_2021_Plumage_Variation_in_Dowitchers.pdf__;!!OToaGQ!5YXsoABvSBc5acMPeAJXiD7PWTeBlbB-JlZwfUOHUrDR3tYGmhrTcZVaJe96X3DeB9k$

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

--
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2/__;!!OToaGQ!5YXsoABvSBc5acMPeAJXiD7PWTeBlbB-JlZwfUOHUrDR3tYGmhrTcZVaJe96t0looyE$


"These days I prefer to hunt with a camera. A good photograph demands more
skill from the hunter, better nerves and more patience than the rifle
shot." -- Bror Blixen

On Wed, Nov 17, 2021 at 7:09 AM Edmund LeGrand <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Chris Hill pointed out that “it’s not accurate to say 2 age x 2 seasonal
> plumages = 4. It’s more accurate to say there are 3 plumages: Alternate,
> Basic, and Juvenal. There’s not a noticeably different first basic from
> adult basic.” Thanks!
>
> Edmund LeGrand
> Hume, VA
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/17/21 4:09 am
From: Edmund LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Dowitcher plumage stages: correction
Chris Hill pointed out that “it’s not accurate to say 2 age x 2 seasonal
plumages = 4. It’s more accurate to say there are 3 plumages: Alternate,
Basic, and Juvenal. There’s not a noticeably different first basic from
adult basic.” Thanks!

Edmund LeGrand
Hume, VA

 

Back to top
Date: 11/16/21 4:30 pm
From: Edmund LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Dowitcher confusion confession
I enjoyed the discussion of dowitcher identification, or lack of
identification. I appreciated Harry LeGrand’s comments, which pretty much
ignored plumage characteristics, going instead on calls, habitat, season,
and bill length for the extremes. I suspect I even gave him my “technique”:
if it seems like a Stilt Sandpiper, it’s Short-billed; if you can mistake
it for a godwit, it’s Long-billed (but if it looks just like a dowitcher,
you’re out of luck). Thanks to Bob Lewis for the definitive article in
Birding (2006) ,
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.aba.org/birding_archive_files/v38n5p34.pdf__;!!OToaGQ!-vnPzjEzTKH0RdG0Ut22TxfbvETHxlPKVk9VAmh5krlCqW06cY1Zv4OxHbKs7Wqxt3c$

which I had tried to read when it first came out. Today, I put a lot of
time into it again, carefully checking the numerous “tends to be” field
marks against the photos and not being able to see most of them. I almost
quantified the problem I’ve always had with using dowitcher plumage for
identification. For Short-billed Dowitcher there are 3 subspecies x 2 age
plumages (adult vs juvenile) x 2 feather ages (fresh vs worn) x 2 seasonal
plumages (alternate/breeding vs basic/winter) = 24 plumage types.
Long-billed Dowitcher, without subspecies, is simpler with only 8 plumage
types. But this straightforward but mindboggling comparison gets blurry
when considering all degrees of molt, not to mention whatever individual
variation there may be!

More to the point, I was birding the freshwater impoundments at Bombay Hook
in Delaware in August and October and felt embarrassed by my confusion at
the dowitcher profusion. Both times I heard some keets and heard twittering
and saw some birds with really long bills (i.e., at least some were
Long-billed). A few Short-bills were found by my criteria. With lots of
yellowlegs around too, the tu-tu-tu calls can be hard to attribute to the
birds making them, and, as Harry wrote, Short-bills are usually silent
(i.e, not flying). In eBird, details were needed for listing Long-billed
Dowitchers, as rarities or as for listing more than a few individuals; but
large numbers of Short-billed could be entered without comment. Both times
I checked quite a few eBird lists from people who had been there the
previous day, and everyone was putting down Short-billed, BUT no one gave
their criteria for the ID! At the time, I thought they knew something about
ID that I didn’t; now I presume that most people simply presumed
Short-billed. (Yes, Dowitcher sp. is an option.) Just now, I checked the
eBird descriptions of the two dowitchers and found them quite useful (at
least understandable), but was generally unable to confirm many of the
photos they show as identified as each.


Edmund LeGrand

formerly Raleigh, now Hume, VA

 

Back to top
Date: 11/16/21 9:31 am
From: Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...>
Subject: FOS Bird Sightings at My Home
Several FOS sightings have occurred so far this month:11/01  Yellow-rump Warbler11/08  Chipping Sparrow11/11  Baltimore Oriole & Eastern Phoebe* (seen, but not previously recorded in FeederWatch)
11/13  Yellow-throated Warbler* (Last recorded January 2017)
*  Rare sightings

Frank HamiltonCharleston, SC


 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/21 11:28 am
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Dowitcher and Peep ID assistance
That article Bob Lewis referenced is the gold standard in Dowitcher
identification.

When scanning Dowitchers on fall+winter shorebird surveys, CBCs, etc. -
besides listening for vocalizations, the quick field mark I look for is the
presence of continual gray barring from the sides of the breast down the
flanks towards the sides of the undertail. If present, it is a good
indication of Long-billed Dowitcher, though other field marks to confirm
are desirable. If there is a non-continuous pattern of small gray
chevrons, that is an indication of Short-billed Dowitcher, though other
field marks to confirm are desirable .

One complication is that first-winter Long-billed Dowitchers have breaks in
the barring and the barring is kind of wavy and can look like a pattern of
chevrons.

In terms of supporting field marks - the loral angle mentioned in the
article can be very difficult to assess in the field. Dowitchers are
usually feeding or sleeping which make judging the loral angle nearly
impossible.

The much wider supercilium in front of the eye of a Short-billed Dowitcher
is a good field mark - Long-billed Dowitchers' supercilium is more constant
in width and narrower in front of the eye.

And as Chris Hill says, the width of dark versus white in the barring of
the uppertail is a good field mark (in both alternate and basic plumage).

All this being said, the LB/SB Dowitcher photos in Jefferey's checklist are
tricky.

- The one with two Dowitchers shows few field marks since one bird is
giving a butt view and the other's face+bill are submerged. I could be
convinced the one with the submerged face is a first-winter Long-billed
Dowitcher but am not prepared to call an ID either way for sure.

- The first photo seems OK for Long-billed since the dark in the barring on
the uppertail is wider than the white portions and the weak continual
barring on the flanks might indicate a first-winter bird. The supercilium
does not flare very wide in front of the eye but it does seem a little
front-heavy which bothers me a little. But I would lean Long-billed for
that one.

- The third photo makes it difficult to judge much about the
face/lores/supercilium and the glare from the sun on the water makes the
barring difficult to assess fully. And the uppertail barring is not
visible.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

--
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2/__;!!OToaGQ!-4t4VxyUfMHEszTSk5etS0V9hSr11J5buxxNTADoyA3pzjqm4MV_3_FZQapgDWBfOiU$


"These days I prefer to hunt with a camera. A good photograph demands more
skill from the hunter, better nerves and more patience than the rifle
shot." -- Bror Blixen


On Mon, Nov 15, 2021 at 1:06 PM Robert Lewis <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> There's a good dowitcher article from 2006:
>
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.aba.org/birding_archive_files/v38n5p34.pdf__;!!OToaGQ!-vnPzjEzTKH0RdG0Ut22TxfbvETHxlPKVk9VAmh5krlCqW06cY1Zv4OxHbKs7Wqxt3c$
>
> Bob Lewis
> Durham NC
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Monday, November 15, 2021, 12:42:41 PM EST, gilbert grant <
> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
>
>
>
> Micou Browne and I had a LBD specimen from Raleigh that we had the ID
> confirmed by Roxie Laybourne at the USNM back in the late 60’s or 1970. She
> relied heavily on the tail banding pattern for the ID.
> Gilbert S. Grant
> Sneads Ferry, NC
>
> ------ Original Message ------
> Received: 11:40 AM EST, 11/15/2021
> From:
> "Christopher Hill" (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <
> <carolinabirds...>
> To: Robert McLean <tmclean1090...> Cc:
> Jeffrey Turner <jeffturner09...>, Harry LeGrand
> <hlegrandjr...>, carolinabirds listserve <
> <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: Re: Dowitcher and Peep ID assistance
>
> I’m no dowitcher guru. One field mark that I almost never hear about any
> more is tail pattern, but tail pattern is often visible in photos. The
> difference is: SB with about equal width white and black barring, LB with
> black bars much wider than white. I know there is variation and can be
> overlap. In the first phot of the bird labeled SB/LB in the ebird list,
> the
> tail seems to fall clearly in the Long-billed pattern.
>
> I am actually interested in feedback from those who feel this is
> unreliable.
> I see there’s an article by Alvaro Jaramillo in 1991 that I should look up,
> but probably things have progressed since then…
>
> Chris Hill
> Conway, SC
>
> On Nov 15, 2021, at 11:09 AM, Robert McLean > wrote:
>
>
> CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise
> caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown
> senders.
>
> Hi Jeff,
>
> Nice list and some great photos. Sedge Wren is spectacular.
>
>
> Harry makes some great comments. Yet my preference is to ID the dowitchers
> primarily by sound. The windy squeak or peep of the Long- billed is
> distinctive as is the tu-tu-tu of the Short-billed.
>
> Regards,
>
> Taylor McLean
> Towson, MD
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Nov 15, 2021, at 10:29 AM, Jeffrey Turner > wrote:
>
> 
> Thanks, Harry. I didn't know that about their water preference. Per the
> habitat specification, the dowitchers were seen in the large pond SE of the
> ferry. I would assume that this pond is either freshwater or slightly
> brackish
> from high floods, but that is just a guess.
> Sincerely,
> Jeff Turner
> CLT
>
> On Mon, Nov 15, 2021 at 10:13 AM Harry LeGrand > wrote:
> I see your list is from the Cedar Island Ferry Terminal, and the
> combination
> of birds on it, plus the habitats there, have both salt water shores and
> fresh
> pools/ponds. So -- that will confuse us trying to sort out some
> shorebirds,
> as we don't have that info here.
>
> The two smaller birds look like Dunlins. Dunlin at this time of year has a
> smooth grayish back without obvious pale feather margins. Westerns and
> other
> peep should show pale feather edging on the back and wings, more streaky or
> scalloped.
>
> Dowitchers are VERY tricky on the ground, without knowledge of the habitat
> and
> water salinity. Long-billed are almost ALWAYS at fresh to slightly
> brackish
> pools. They simply avoid salt water, tidal places, etc. -- though of
> course
> there are a very few exceptions. Short-billeds can be in both
> fresh/brackish
> pools and of course are well known on tidal mudflats. But, as the weather
> gets colder, such as by November, SBD normally moves to feed in salt water,
> such as tidal flats. And, LBD is a notably late fall migrant, so often
> does
> not appear in coastal NC until October, and by November can be widespread
> in
> fresh water. Normally, I try to ID them by habitat and of course voice.
> SBD
> calls ONLY when flying -- the familiar "tu-tu-tu" type of yellowlegs call.
> LBD can call BOTH while perched and in flight -- the characteristic "peep"
> that sounds like a baby chicken. Also, in a flock of LBD, at least some
> bids
> have such a long enough bill that I might think I have a small godwit,
> like a
> Bar-tailed or a Hudsonian. A flock of SBD reminds me a bit of Stilt
> Sandpipers, or maybe even Dunlins if at a distance. I never get a small
> godwit feel with SBD.
>
> That being said, on November 13, at your site, if in a pool/pond, I would
> start with the assumption that ALL of your dowitchers are LBD, and try to
> work
> from that. Those -- if any -- along the shorelines of the sound I would
> start
> with SBD. Only a good handful of experts across North America might be
> comfortable ID-ing perched dowitchers from your photos! Certainly not me,
> though the more hunched back should be LBD as you said. Bill length does
> help, but that is for longer or shorter ones than the norm! The middle
> 50-70%
> of the bills are tough to call by that alone. Yes, it sure looks like you
> do
> have both species there, but can't comment further without knowing the
> specific habitats where each photo was taken.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
> On Mon, Nov 15, 2021 at 9:20 AM Jeffrey Turner > wrote:
> Hello,
> I was able to get out and do some coastal birding this weekend. I found
> some
> dowitchers and peeps that I would appreciate feedback on their IDs. The
> list
> is below.
>
> The peep I think is either a Dunlin or a Western Sandpiper. The Westerns I
> have seen usually have a more noticeably clearer breast (rather than
> grayish).
> The bill to me seems not quite as long as a Dunlin, but maybe that is
> because
> it is a juvenile? The back appears blurry gray, and there are a few reddish
> feathers on its shoulders. I'm leaning towards a Dunlin, but any tips on
> how
> to distinguish the two?
>
> The dowitcher photos are divided as to how I think they should be IDed.
> For
> the Long-Billed, the underwing pattern is whiter and more separated than I
> think a S-B would have; a few of the birds have considerably longer bills.
> Some pictures show a decent profile shot to look at the loral angle,
> although
> if the head is turned at all the angle is skewed. I've heard the
> supercilium
> on the LB is straighter, and a white chin/throat is more visible on one
> species. Some of the birds show some of the lower flank pattern that is
> more
> clearly chevroned, which I think points to SB. Some of the birds (like the
> one
> with the wing up) has a shorter bill than I'd expect but maybe it is like
> the
> peep and its bill is still growing? I've also heard that a LB looks more
> like
> a football with a hunched back but that isn't clearly visible to me in
> these
> photos. The SB bill is supposed to droop more than the LB. Are there
> other
> field marks you recommend or that I can go on?
>
> Any tips, suggestions, or corrections would be appreciated. Thanks.
>
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S97571374__;!!OToaGQ!_SwYjxNqQak58-_mUVW6IBl-dya6PCtO1GmoNxoe9Xd1NyR-SLGEqOipkiRi_67W1aQ$
>
>
> Sincerely,
> Jeff Turner
> Charlotte (Meck. Co.)
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/21 10:06 am
From: Robert Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Dowitcher and Peep ID assistance
There's a good dowitcher article from 2006:

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.aba.org/birding_archive_files/v38n5p34.pdf__;!!OToaGQ!-vnPzjEzTKH0RdG0Ut22TxfbvETHxlPKVk9VAmh5krlCqW06cY1Zv4OxHbKs7Wqxt3c$

Bob Lewis
Durham NC






On Monday, November 15, 2021, 12:42:41 PM EST, gilbert grant <carolinabirds...> wrote:




Micou Browne and I had a LBD specimen from Raleigh that we had the ID
confirmed by Roxie Laybourne at the USNM back in the late 60’s or 1970. She
relied heavily on the tail banding pattern for the ID.
Gilbert S. Grant
Sneads Ferry, NC

------ Original Message ------
Received: 11:40 AM EST, 11/15/2021
From:
"Christopher Hill" (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
To: Robert McLean <tmclean1090...> Cc:
Jeffrey Turner <jeffturner09...>,        Harry LeGrand
<hlegrandjr...>,        carolinabirds listserve <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Dowitcher and Peep ID assistance

I’m no dowitcher guru.  One field mark that I almost never hear about any
more is tail pattern, but tail pattern is often visible in photos.  The
difference is: SB with about equal width white and black barring, LB with
black bars much wider than white.  I know there is variation and can be
overlap.  In the first phot of the bird labeled SB/LB in the ebird list, the
tail seems to fall clearly in the Long-billed pattern.

I am actually interested in feedback from those who feel this is unreliable.
I see there’s an article by Alvaro Jaramillo in 1991 that I should look up,
but probably things have progressed since then…

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

On Nov 15, 2021, at 11:09 AM, Robert McLean > wrote:


CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise
caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown
senders.

Hi Jeff,

Nice list and some great photos. Sedge Wren is spectacular.


Harry makes some great comments. Yet my preference is to ID the dowitchers
primarily by sound. The windy squeak or peep of the Long- billed is
distinctive as is the tu-tu-tu of the Short-billed.

Regards,

Taylor McLean
Towson, MD

Sent from my iPhone

On Nov 15, 2021, at 10:29 AM, Jeffrey Turner > wrote:


Thanks, Harry. I didn't know that about their water preference. Per the
habitat specification, the dowitchers were seen in the large pond SE of the
ferry. I would assume that this pond is either freshwater or slightly brackish
from high floods, but that is just a guess.
Sincerely,
Jeff Turner
CLT

On Mon, Nov 15, 2021 at 10:13 AM Harry LeGrand > wrote:
I see your list is from the Cedar Island Ferry Terminal, and the combination
of birds on it, plus the habitats there, have both salt water shores and fresh
pools/ponds.  So -- that will confuse us trying to sort out some shorebirds,
as we don't have that info here.

The two smaller birds look like Dunlins.  Dunlin at this time of year has a
smooth grayish back without obvious pale feather margins.  Westerns and other
peep should show pale feather edging on the back and wings, more streaky or
scalloped.

Dowitchers are VERY tricky on the ground, without knowledge of the habitat and
water salinity.  Long-billed are almost ALWAYS at fresh to slightly brackish
pools.  They simply avoid salt water, tidal places, etc.  -- though of course
there are a very few exceptions.  Short-billeds can be in both fresh/brackish
pools and of course are well known on tidal mudflats.  But, as the weather
gets colder, such as by November, SBD normally moves to feed in salt water,
such as tidal flats.  And, LBD is a notably late fall migrant, so often does
not appear in coastal NC until October, and by November can be widespread in
fresh water.  Normally, I try to ID them by habitat and of course voice.  SBD
calls ONLY when flying -- the familiar "tu-tu-tu" type of yellowlegs call.
LBD can call BOTH while perched and in flight -- the characteristic "peep"
that sounds like a baby chicken.  Also, in a flock of LBD, at least some bids
have such a long enough bill that I might think I have a small godwit, like a
Bar-tailed or a Hudsonian.  A flock of SBD reminds me a bit of Stilt
Sandpipers, or maybe even Dunlins if at a distance.  I never get a small
godwit feel with SBD.

That being said, on November 13, at your site, if in a pool/pond, I would
start with the assumption that ALL of your dowitchers are LBD, and try to work
from that.  Those -- if any -- along the shorelines of the sound I would start
with SBD.  Only a good handful of experts across North America might be
comfortable ID-ing perched dowitchers from your photos!  Certainly not me,
though the more hunched back should be LBD as you said.  Bill length does
help, but that is for longer or shorter ones than the norm!  The middle 50-70%
of the bills are tough to call by that alone.  Yes, it sure looks like you do
have both species there, but can't comment further without knowing the
specific habitats where each photo was taken.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Mon, Nov 15, 2021 at 9:20 AM Jeffrey Turner > wrote:
Hello,
I was able to get out and do some coastal birding this weekend. I found some
dowitchers and peeps that I would appreciate feedback on their IDs.  The list
is below.

The peep I think is either a Dunlin or a Western Sandpiper.  The Westerns I
have seen usually have a more noticeably clearer breast (rather than grayish).
The bill to me seems not quite as long as a Dunlin, but maybe that is because
it is a juvenile? The back appears blurry gray, and there are a few reddish
feathers on its shoulders. I'm leaning towards a Dunlin, but any tips on how
to distinguish the two?

The dowitcher photos are divided as to how I think they should be IDed.  For
the Long-Billed, the underwing pattern is whiter and more separated than I
think a S-B would have; a few of the birds have considerably longer bills.
Some pictures show a decent profile shot to look at the loral angle, although
if the head is turned at all the angle is skewed.  I've heard the supercilium
on the LB is straighter, and a white chin/throat is more visible on one
species.  Some of the birds show some of the lower flank pattern that is more
clearly chevroned, which I think points to SB. Some of the birds (like the one
with the wing up) has a shorter bill than I'd expect but maybe it is like the
peep and its bill is still growing?  I've also heard that a LB looks more like
a football with a hunched back but that isn't clearly visible to me in these
photos.  The SB bill is supposed to droop more than the LB.  Are there other
field marks you recommend or that I can go on?

Any tips, suggestions, or corrections would be appreciated. Thanks.

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S97571374__;!!OToaGQ!_SwYjxNqQak58-_mUVW6IBl-dya6PCtO1GmoNxoe9Xd1NyR-SLGEqOipkiRi_67W1aQ$


Sincerely,
Jeff Turner
Charlotte (Meck. Co.)




 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/21 9:42 am
From: \gilbert grant\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Re: Dowitcher and Peep ID assistance
Micou Browne and I had a LBD specimen from Raleigh that we had the ID
confirmed by Roxie Laybourne at the USNM back in the late 60’s or 1970. She
relied heavily on the tail banding pattern for the ID.
Gilbert S. Grant
Sneads Ferry, NC

------ Original Message ------
Received: 11:40 AM EST, 11/15/2021
From:
"Christopher Hill" (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
To: Robert McLean <tmclean1090...> Cc:
Jeffrey Turner <jeffturner09...>,        Harry LeGrand
<hlegrandjr...>,        carolinabirds listserve <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Dowitcher and Peep ID assistance

I’m no dowitcher guru. One field mark that I almost never hear about any
more is tail pattern, but tail pattern is often visible in photos. The
difference is: SB with about equal width white and black barring, LB with
black bars much wider than white. I know there is variation and can be
overlap. In the first phot of the bird labeled SB/LB in the ebird list, the
tail seems to fall clearly in the Long-billed pattern.

I am actually interested in feedback from those who feel this is unreliable.
I see there’s an article by Alvaro Jaramillo in 1991 that I should look up,
but probably things have progressed since then…

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

On Nov 15, 2021, at 11:09 AM, Robert McLean > wrote:


CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise
caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown
senders.

Hi Jeff,

Nice list and some great photos. Sedge Wren is spectacular.


Harry makes some great comments. Yet my preference is to ID the dowitchers
primarily by sound. The windy squeak or peep of the Long- billed is
distinctive as is the tu-tu-tu of the Short-billed.

Regards,

Taylor McLean
Towson, MD

Sent from my iPhone

On Nov 15, 2021, at 10:29 AM, Jeffrey Turner > wrote:


Thanks, Harry. I didn't know that about their water preference. Per the
habitat specification, the dowitchers were seen in the large pond SE of the
ferry. I would assume that this pond is either freshwater or slightly brackish
from high floods, but that is just a guess.
Sincerely,
Jeff Turner
CLT

On Mon, Nov 15, 2021 at 10:13 AM Harry LeGrand > wrote:
I see your list is from the Cedar Island Ferry Terminal, and the combination
of birds on it, plus the habitats there, have both salt water shores and fresh
pools/ponds. So -- that will confuse us trying to sort out some shorebirds,
as we don't have that info here.

The two smaller birds look like Dunlins. Dunlin at this time of year has a
smooth grayish back without obvious pale feather margins. Westerns and other
peep should show pale feather edging on the back and wings, more streaky or
scalloped.

Dowitchers are VERY tricky on the ground, without knowledge of the habitat and
water salinity. Long-billed are almost ALWAYS at fresh to slightly brackish
pools. They simply avoid salt water, tidal places, etc. -- though of course
there are a very few exceptions. Short-billeds can be in both fresh/brackish
pools and of course are well known on tidal mudflats. But, as the weather
gets colder, such as by November, SBD normally moves to feed in salt water,
such as tidal flats. And, LBD is a notably late fall migrant, so often does
not appear in coastal NC until October, and by November can be widespread in
fresh water. Normally, I try to ID them by habitat and of course voice. SBD
calls ONLY when flying -- the familiar "tu-tu-tu" type of yellowlegs call.
LBD can call BOTH while perched and in flight -- the characteristic "peep"
that sounds like a baby chicken. Also, in a flock of LBD, at least some bids
have such a long enough bill that I might think I have a small godwit, like a
Bar-tailed or a Hudsonian. A flock of SBD reminds me a bit of Stilt
Sandpipers, or maybe even Dunlins if at a distance. I never get a small
godwit feel with SBD.

That being said, on November 13, at your site, if in a pool/pond, I would
start with the assumption that ALL of your dowitchers are LBD, and try to work
from that. Those -- if any -- along the shorelines of the sound I would start
with SBD. Only a good handful of experts across North America might be
comfortable ID-ing perched dowitchers from your photos! Certainly not me,
though the more hunched back should be LBD as you said. Bill length does
help, but that is for longer or shorter ones than the norm! The middle 50-70%
of the bills are tough to call by that alone. Yes, it sure looks like you do
have both species there, but can't comment further without knowing the
specific habitats where each photo was taken.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Mon, Nov 15, 2021 at 9:20 AM Jeffrey Turner > wrote:
Hello,
I was able to get out and do some coastal birding this weekend. I found some
dowitchers and peeps that I would appreciate feedback on their IDs. The list
is below.

The peep I think is either a Dunlin or a Western Sandpiper. The Westerns I
have seen usually have a more noticeably clearer breast (rather than grayish).
The bill to me seems not quite as long as a Dunlin, but maybe that is because
it is a juvenile? The back appears blurry gray, and there are a few reddish
feathers on its shoulders. I'm leaning towards a Dunlin, but any tips on how
to distinguish the two?

The dowitcher photos are divided as to how I think they should be IDed. For
the Long-Billed, the underwing pattern is whiter and more separated than I
think a S-B would have; a few of the birds have considerably longer bills.
Some pictures show a decent profile shot to look at the loral angle, although
if the head is turned at all the angle is skewed. I've heard the supercilium
on the LB is straighter, and a white chin/throat is more visible on one
species. Some of the birds show some of the lower flank pattern that is more
clearly chevroned, which I think points to SB. Some of the birds (like the one
with the wing up) has a shorter bill than I'd expect but maybe it is like the
peep and its bill is still growing? I've also heard that a LB looks more like
a football with a hunched back but that isn't clearly visible to me in these
photos. The SB bill is supposed to droop more than the LB. Are there other
field marks you recommend or that I can go on?

Any tips, suggestions, or corrections would be appreciated. Thanks.

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S97571374__;!!OToaGQ!_SwYjxNqQak58-_mUVW6IBl-dya6PCtO1GmoNxoe9Xd1NyR-SLGEqOipkiRi_67W1aQ$


Sincerely,
Jeff Turner
Charlotte (Meck. Co.)




 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/21 8:40 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Dowitcher and Peep ID assistance
I’m no dowitcher guru. One field mark that I almost never hear about any more is tail pattern, but tail pattern is often visible in photos. The difference is: SB with about equal width white and black barring, LB with black bars much wider than white. I know there is variation and can be overlap. In the first phot of the bird labeled SB/LB in the ebird list, the tail seems to fall clearly in the Long-billed pattern.

I am actually interested in feedback from those who feel this is unreliable. I see there’s an article by Alvaro Jaramillo in 1991 that I should look up, but probably things have progressed since then…

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

On Nov 15, 2021, at 11:09 AM, Robert McLean <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:


CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.

Hi Jeff,

Nice list and some great photos. Sedge Wren is spectacular.


Harry makes some great comments. Yet my preference is to ID the dowitchers primarily by sound. The windy squeak or peep of the Long- billed is distinctive as is the tu-tu-tu of the Short-billed.

Regards,

Taylor McLean
Towson, MD

Sent from my iPhone

On Nov 15, 2021, at 10:29 AM, Jeffrey Turner <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:


Thanks, Harry. I didn't know that about their water preference. Per the habitat specification, the dowitchers were seen in the large pond SE of the ferry. I would assume that this pond is either freshwater or slightly brackish from high floods, but that is just a guess.
Sincerely,
Jeff Turner
CLT

On Mon, Nov 15, 2021 at 10:13 AM Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr...><mailto:<hlegrandjr...>> wrote:
I see your list is from the Cedar Island Ferry Terminal, and the combination of birds on it, plus the habitats there, have both salt water shores and fresh pools/ponds. So -- that will confuse us trying to sort out some shorebirds, as we don't have that info here.

The two smaller birds look like Dunlins. Dunlin at this time of year has a smooth grayish back without obvious pale feather margins. Westerns and other peep should show pale feather edging on the back and wings, more streaky or scalloped.

Dowitchers are VERY tricky on the ground, without knowledge of the habitat and water salinity. Long-billed are almost ALWAYS at fresh to slightly brackish pools. They simply avoid salt water, tidal places, etc. -- though of course there are a very few exceptions. Short-billeds can be in both fresh/brackish pools and of course are well known on tidal mudflats. But, as the weather gets colder, such as by November, SBD normally moves to feed in salt water, such as tidal flats. And, LBD is a notably late fall migrant, so often does not appear in coastal NC until October, and by November can be widespread in fresh water. Normally, I try to ID them by habitat and of course voice. SBD calls ONLY when flying -- the familiar "tu-tu-tu" type of yellowlegs call. LBD can call BOTH while perched and in flight -- the characteristic "peep" that sounds like a baby chicken. Also, in a flock of LBD, at least some bids have such a long enough bill that I might think I have a small godwit, like a Bar-tailed or a Hudsonian. A flock of SBD reminds me a bit of Stilt Sandpipers, or maybe even Dunlins if at a distance. I never get a small godwit feel with SBD.

That being said, on November 13, at your site, if in a pool/pond, I would start with the assumption that ALL of your dowitchers are LBD, and try to work from that. Those -- if any -- along the shorelines of the sound I would start with SBD. Only a good handful of experts across North America might be comfortable ID-ing perched dowitchers from your photos! Certainly not me, though the more hunched back should be LBD as you said. Bill length does help, but that is for longer or shorter ones than the norm! The middle 50-70% of the bills are tough to call by that alone. Yes, it sure looks like you do have both species there, but can't comment further without knowing the specific habitats where each photo was taken.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Mon, Nov 15, 2021 at 9:20 AM Jeffrey Turner <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
Hello,
I was able to get out and do some coastal birding this weekend. I found some dowitchers and peeps that I would appreciate feedback on their IDs. The list is below.

The peep I think is either a Dunlin or a Western Sandpiper. The Westerns I have seen usually have a more noticeably clearer breast (rather than grayish). The bill to me seems not quite as long as a Dunlin, but maybe that is because it is a juvenile? The back appears blurry gray, and there are a few reddish feathers on its shoulders. I'm leaning towards a Dunlin, but any tips on how to distinguish the two?

The dowitcher photos are divided as to how I think they should be IDed. For the Long-Billed, the underwing pattern is whiter and more separated than I think a S-B would have; a few of the birds have considerably longer bills. Some pictures show a decent profile shot to look at the loral angle, although if the head is turned at all the angle is skewed. I've heard the supercilium on the LB is straighter, and a white chin/throat is more visible on one species. Some of the birds show some of the lower flank pattern that is more clearly chevroned, which I think points to SB. Some of the birds (like the one with the wing up) has a shorter bill than I'd expect but maybe it is like the peep and its bill is still growing? I've also heard that a LB looks more like a football with a hunched back but that isn't clearly visible to me in these photos. The SB bill is supposed to droop more than the LB. Are there other field marks you recommend or that I can go on?

Any tips, suggestions, or corrections would be appreciated. Thanks.

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S97571374__;!!OToaGQ!_SwYjxNqQak58-_mUVW6IBl-dya6PCtO1GmoNxoe9Xd1NyR-SLGEqOipkiRi_67W1aQ$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://nam11.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https*3A*2F*2Furldefense.com*2Fv3*2F__https*3A*2F*2Febird.org*2Fchecklist*2FS97571374__*3B!!OToaGQ!7kQG--ocfv1eweldgJp0-gzMSSGwBho3OkHPmcw2nSUfAVvqBWVO6pv3qc4HeJ83Ygc*24&data=04*7C01*7Cchill*40coastal.edu*7C7b80fd6a18734fe1a77c08d9a852b1e6*7Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797*7C0*7C0*7C637725895409149867*7CUnknown*7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0*3D*7C3000&sdata=AbYMWaIHXM3js5dei3GCEhYDHGcl9OKbuO9hjv4LsxY*3D&reserved=0__;JSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJQ!!OToaGQ!_SwYjxNqQak58-_mUVW6IBl-dya6PCtO1GmoNxoe9Xd1NyR-SLGEqOipkiRi2Eo5KQw$ >

Sincerely,
Jeff Turner
Charlotte (Meck. Co.)


 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/21 8:12 am
From: Robert McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Dowitcher and Peep ID assistance
Hi Jeff,

Nice list and some great photos. Sedge Wren is spectacular.


Harry makes some great comments. Yet my preference is to ID the dowitchers primarily by sound. The windy squeak or peep of the Long- billed is distinctive as is the tu-tu-tu of the Short-billed.

Regards,

Taylor McLean
Towson, MD

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 15, 2021, at 10:29 AM, Jeffrey Turner <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> 
> Thanks, Harry. I didn't know that about their water preference. Per the habitat specification, the dowitchers were seen in the large pond SE of the ferry. I would assume that this pond is either freshwater or slightly brackish from high floods, but that is just a guess.
> Sincerely,
> Jeff Turner
> CLT
>
>> On Mon, Nov 15, 2021 at 10:13 AM Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr...> wrote:
>> I see your list is from the Cedar Island Ferry Terminal, and the combination of birds on it, plus the habitats there, have both salt water shores and fresh pools/ponds. So -- that will confuse us trying to sort out some shorebirds, as we don't have that info here.
>>
>> The two smaller birds look like Dunlins. Dunlin at this time of year has a smooth grayish back without obvious pale feather margins. Westerns and other peep should show pale feather edging on the back and wings, more streaky or scalloped.
>>
>> Dowitchers are VERY tricky on the ground, without knowledge of the habitat and water salinity. Long-billed are almost ALWAYS at fresh to slightly brackish pools. They simply avoid salt water, tidal places, etc. -- though of course there are a very few exceptions. Short-billeds can be in both fresh/brackish pools and of course are well known on tidal mudflats. But, as the weather gets colder, such as by November, SBD normally moves to feed in salt water, such as tidal flats. And, LBD is a notably late fall migrant, so often does not appear in coastal NC until October, and by November can be widespread in fresh water. Normally, I try to ID them by habitat and of course voice. SBD calls ONLY when flying -- the familiar "tu-tu-tu" type of yellowlegs call. LBD can call BOTH while perched and in flight -- the characteristic "peep" that sounds like a baby chicken. Also, in a flock of LBD, at least some bids have such a long enough bill that I might think I have a small godwit, like a Bar-tailed or a Hudsonian. A flock of SBD reminds me a bit of Stilt Sandpipers, or maybe even Dunlins if at a distance. I never get a small godwit feel with SBD.
>>
>> That being said, on November 13, at your site, if in a pool/pond, I would start with the assumption that ALL of your dowitchers are LBD, and try to work from that. Those -- if any -- along the shorelines of the sound I would start with SBD. Only a good handful of experts across North America might be comfortable ID-ing perched dowitchers from your photos! Certainly not me, though the more hunched back should be LBD as you said. Bill length does help, but that is for longer or shorter ones than the norm! The middle 50-70% of the bills are tough to call by that alone. Yes, it sure looks like you do have both species there, but can't comment further without knowing the specific habitats where each photo was taken.
>>
>> Harry LeGrand
>> Raleigh
>>
>>> On Mon, Nov 15, 2021 at 9:20 AM Jeffrey Turner <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>> Hello,
>>> I was able to get out and do some coastal birding this weekend. I found some dowitchers and peeps that I would appreciate feedback on their IDs. The list is below.
>>>
>>> The peep I think is either a Dunlin or a Western Sandpiper. The Westerns I have seen usually have a more noticeably clearer breast (rather than grayish). The bill to me seems not quite as long as a Dunlin, but maybe that is because it is a juvenile? The back appears blurry gray, and there are a few reddish feathers on its shoulders. I'm leaning towards a Dunlin, but any tips on how to distinguish the two?
>>>
>>> The dowitcher photos are divided as to how I think they should be IDed. For the Long-Billed, the underwing pattern is whiter and more separated than I think a S-B would have; a few of the birds have considerably longer bills. Some pictures show a decent profile shot to look at the loral angle, although if the head is turned at all the angle is skewed. I've heard the supercilium on the LB is straighter, and a white chin/throat is more visible on one species. Some of the birds show some of the lower flank pattern that is more clearly chevroned, which I think points to SB. Some of the birds (like the one with the wing up) has a shorter bill than I'd expect but maybe it is like the peep and its bill is still growing? I've also heard that a LB looks more like a football with a hunched back but that isn't clearly visible to me in these photos. The SB bill is supposed to droop more than the LB. Are there other field marks you recommend or that I can go on?
>>>
>>> Any tips, suggestions, or corrections would be appreciated. Thanks.
>>>
>>> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S97571374__;!!OToaGQ!7e-J57U1wSpuv2LdLuhW9_wbmF9a1ZnALqOdC2KvgJ5mW20LcYOq0V7qdZzI_Y1tbFY$
>>>
>>> Sincerely,
>>> Jeff Turner
>>> Charlotte (Meck. Co.)

 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/21 7:29 am
From: Jeffrey Turner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Dowitcher and Peep ID assistance
Thanks, Harry. I didn't know that about their water preference. Per the
habitat specification, the dowitchers were seen in the large pond SE of the
ferry. I would assume that this pond is either freshwater or slightly
brackish from high floods, but that is just a guess.
Sincerely,
Jeff Turner
CLT

On Mon, Nov 15, 2021 at 10:13 AM Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr...> wrote:

> I see your list is from the Cedar Island Ferry Terminal, and the
> combination of birds on it, plus the habitats there, have both salt water
> shores and fresh pools/ponds. So -- that will confuse us trying to sort
> out some shorebirds, as we don't have that info here.
>
> The two smaller birds look like Dunlins. Dunlin at this time of year has
> a smooth grayish back without obvious pale feather margins. Westerns and
> other peep should show pale feather edging on the back and wings, more
> streaky or scalloped.
>
> Dowitchers are VERY tricky on the ground, without knowledge of the habitat
> and water salinity. Long-billed are almost ALWAYS at fresh to slightly
> brackish pools. They simply avoid salt water, tidal places, etc. --
> though of course there are a very few exceptions. Short-billeds can be in
> both fresh/brackish pools and of course are well known on tidal mudflats.
> But, as the weather gets colder, such as by November, SBD normally moves to
> feed in salt water, such as tidal flats. And, LBD is a notably late fall
> migrant, so often does not appear in coastal NC until October, and by
> November can be widespread in fresh water. Normally, I try to ID them by
> habitat and of course voice. SBD calls ONLY when flying -- the familiar
> "tu-tu-tu" type of yellowlegs call. LBD can call BOTH while perched and in
> flight -- the characteristic "peep" that sounds like a baby chicken. Also,
> in a flock of LBD, at least some bids have such a long enough bill that I
> might think I have a small godwit, like a Bar-tailed or a Hudsonian. A
> flock of SBD reminds me a bit of Stilt Sandpipers, or maybe even Dunlins if
> at a distance. I never get a small godwit feel with SBD.
>
> That being said, on November 13, at your site, * if in a pool/pond*, I
> would start with the assumption that ALL of your dowitchers are LBD, and
> try to work from that. Those -- if any -- along the shorelines of the
> sound I would start with SBD. Only a good handful of experts across North
> America might be comfortable ID-ing perched dowitchers from your photos!
> Certainly not me, though the more hunched back should be LBD as you said.
> Bill length does help, but that is for longer or shorter ones than the
> norm! The middle 50-70% of the bills are tough to call by that alone.
> Yes, it sure looks like you do have both species there, but can't comment
> further without knowing the specific habitats where each photo was taken.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
> On Mon, Nov 15, 2021 at 9:20 AM Jeffrey Turner <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> Hello,
>> I was able to get out and do some coastal birding this weekend. I found
>> some dowitchers and peeps that I would appreciate feedback on their IDs.
>> The list is below.
>>
>> The peep I think is either a Dunlin or a Western Sandpiper. The Westerns
>> I have seen usually have a more noticeably clearer breast (rather than
>> grayish). The bill to me seems not quite as long as a Dunlin, but maybe
>> that is because it is a juvenile? The back appears blurry gray, and there
>> are a few reddish feathers on its shoulders. I'm leaning towards a Dunlin,
>> but any tips on how to distinguish the two?
>>
>> The dowitcher photos are divided as to how I think they should be IDed.
>> For the Long-Billed, the underwing pattern is whiter and more separated
>> than I think a S-B would have; a few of the birds have considerably longer
>> bills. Some pictures show a decent profile shot to look at the loral angle,
>> although if the head is turned at all the angle is skewed. I've heard the
>> supercilium on the LB is straighter, and a white chin/throat is more
>> visible on one species. Some of the birds show some of the lower flank
>> pattern that is more clearly chevroned, which I think points to SB. Some of
>> the birds (like the one with the wing up) has a shorter bill than I'd
>> expect but maybe it is like the peep and its bill is still growing? I've
>> also heard that a LB looks more like a football with a hunched back but
>> that isn't clearly visible to me in these photos. The SB bill is supposed
>> to droop more than the LB. Are there other field marks you recommend or
>> that I can go on?
>>
>> Any tips, suggestions, or corrections would be appreciated. Thanks.
>>
>> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S97571374__;!!OToaGQ!8olT22vocMFVDx6_BOKf80NFXGzcasRGyM-jGlLvX85gBYq4biKMGylrtUR8Nj64fZM$
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S97571374__;!!OToaGQ!7kQG--ocfv1eweldgJp0-gzMSSGwBho3OkHPmcw2nSUfAVvqBWVO6pv3qc4HeJ83Ygc$>
>>
>> Sincerely,
>> Jeff Turner
>> Charlotte (Meck. Co.)
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/21 7:15 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Dowitcher and Peep ID assistance
I see your list is from the Cedar Island Ferry Terminal, and the
combination of birds on it, plus the habitats there, have both salt water
shores and fresh pools/ponds. So -- that will confuse us trying to sort
out some shorebirds, as we don't have that info here.

The two smaller birds look like Dunlins. Dunlin at this time of year has a
smooth grayish back without obvious pale feather margins. Westerns and
other peep should show pale feather edging on the back and wings, more
streaky or scalloped.

Dowitchers are VERY tricky on the ground, without knowledge of the habitat
and water salinity. Long-billed are almost ALWAYS at fresh to slightly
brackish pools. They simply avoid salt water, tidal places, etc. --
though of course there are a very few exceptions. Short-billeds can be in
both fresh/brackish pools and of course are well known on tidal mudflats.
But, as the weather gets colder, such as by November, SBD normally moves to
feed in salt water, such as tidal flats. And, LBD is a notably late fall
migrant, so often does not appear in coastal NC until October, and by
November can be widespread in fresh water. Normally, I try to ID them by
habitat and of course voice. SBD calls ONLY when flying -- the familiar
"tu-tu-tu" type of yellowlegs call. LBD can call BOTH while perched and in
flight -- the characteristic "peep" that sounds like a baby chicken. Also,
in a flock of LBD, at least some bids have such a long enough bill that I
might think I have a small godwit, like a Bar-tailed or a Hudsonian. A
flock of SBD reminds me a bit of Stilt Sandpipers, or maybe even Dunlins if
at a distance. I never get a small godwit feel with SBD.

That being said, on November 13, at your site, * if in a pool/pond*, I
would start with the assumption that ALL of your dowitchers are LBD, and
try to work from that. Those -- if any -- along the shorelines of the
sound I would start with SBD. Only a good handful of experts across North
America might be comfortable ID-ing perched dowitchers from your photos!
Certainly not me, though the more hunched back should be LBD as you said.
Bill length does help, but that is for longer or shorter ones than the
norm! The middle 50-70% of the bills are tough to call by that alone.
Yes, it sure looks like you do have both species there, but can't comment
further without knowing the specific habitats where each photo was taken.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Mon, Nov 15, 2021 at 9:20 AM Jeffrey Turner <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Hello,
> I was able to get out and do some coastal birding this weekend. I found
> some dowitchers and peeps that I would appreciate feedback on their IDs.
> The list is below.
>
> The peep I think is either a Dunlin or a Western Sandpiper. The Westerns
> I have seen usually have a more noticeably clearer breast (rather than
> grayish). The bill to me seems not quite as long as a Dunlin, but maybe
> that is because it is a juvenile? The back appears blurry gray, and there
> are a few reddish feathers on its shoulders. I'm leaning towards a Dunlin,
> but any tips on how to distinguish the two?
>
> The dowitcher photos are divided as to how I think they should be IDed.
> For the Long-Billed, the underwing pattern is whiter and more separated
> than I think a S-B would have; a few of the birds have considerably longer
> bills. Some pictures show a decent profile shot to look at the loral angle,
> although if the head is turned at all the angle is skewed. I've heard the
> supercilium on the LB is straighter, and a white chin/throat is more
> visible on one species. Some of the birds show some of the lower flank
> pattern that is more clearly chevroned, which I think points to SB. Some of
> the birds (like the one with the wing up) has a shorter bill than I'd
> expect but maybe it is like the peep and its bill is still growing? I've
> also heard that a LB looks more like a football with a hunched back but
> that isn't clearly visible to me in these photos. The SB bill is supposed
> to droop more than the LB. Are there other field marks you recommend or
> that I can go on?
>
> Any tips, suggestions, or corrections would be appreciated. Thanks.
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S97571374__;!!OToaGQ!95pmTWu6DFg3QJDjUyEAu82vBI-xQ0drKGV6XUGPgeO_sT1pUaXeT9q2yShLvdh-Z0Y$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S97571374__;!!OToaGQ!7kQG--ocfv1eweldgJp0-gzMSSGwBho3OkHPmcw2nSUfAVvqBWVO6pv3qc4HeJ83Ygc$>
>
> Sincerely,
> Jeff Turner
> Charlotte (Meck. Co.)
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/21 6:21 am
From: Jeffrey Turner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Dowitcher and Peep ID assistance
Hello,
I was able to get out and do some coastal birding this weekend. I found
some dowitchers and peeps that I would appreciate feedback on their IDs.
The list is below.

The peep I think is either a Dunlin or a Western Sandpiper. The Westerns I
have seen usually have a more noticeably clearer breast (rather than
grayish). The bill to me seems not quite as long as a Dunlin, but maybe
that is because it is a juvenile? The back appears blurry gray, and there
are a few reddish feathers on its shoulders. I'm leaning towards a Dunlin,
but any tips on how to distinguish the two?

The dowitcher photos are divided as to how I think they should be IDed.
For the Long-Billed, the underwing pattern is whiter and more separated
than I think a S-B would have; a few of the birds have considerably longer
bills. Some pictures show a decent profile shot to look at the loral angle,
although if the head is turned at all the angle is skewed. I've heard the
supercilium on the LB is straighter, and a white chin/throat is more
visible on one species. Some of the birds show some of the lower flank
pattern that is more clearly chevroned, which I think points to SB. Some of
the birds (like the one with the wing up) has a shorter bill than I'd
expect but maybe it is like the peep and its bill is still growing? I've
also heard that a LB looks more like a football with a hunched back but
that isn't clearly visible to me in these photos. The SB bill is supposed
to droop more than the LB. Are there other field marks you recommend or
that I can go on?

Any tips, suggestions, or corrections would be appreciated. Thanks.

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S97571374__;!!OToaGQ!7kQG--ocfv1eweldgJp0-gzMSSGwBho3OkHPmcw2nSUfAVvqBWVO6pv3qc4HeJ83Ygc$

Sincerely,
Jeff Turner
Charlotte (Meck. Co.)

 

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Date: 11/14/21 3:49 pm
From: Maria De Bruyn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Found: memory card at Mid Pines Rd Wake County
Today we found a SanDisk Ultra Plus 64 GB memory card on the ground at the corner of Mid Pines Rd in Wake County (where the road bends at the field where the horned larks are usually found). If this is yours, you can email me: <maria_debruyn...>

 
 

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Date: 11/14/21 12:35 pm
From: Michael Cheves (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Snow Goose, Washington County, NC Creswell Pond, Nov. 10th

On Nov. 10, 2021, approx. 12:15 PM, the Lower Neuse Bird Club made a stop in Washington County, NC, at the pond beside US-64E, shortly past Creswell ("County Line Pond (Washington Cty)" on eBird Hotspots). Two days prior to our visit, Nov. 8th, there had been a report on eBird (now confirmed) of a Ross's Goose at this pond.
 
Amongst a flock of 100+ Canada Goose, we easily picked out a smaller, almost entirely white Goose with a wedge-shaped head. Though I myself had some difficulty in discerning the presence of a "grin patch" on the bill in my scope, the photo I attached to my eBird report (CBC photo gallery as well) confirms that we saw a Snow Goose on Nov. 10th.
 
My eBird report, Nov. 10, Washington County, NC:
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/atlasnc/checklist/S97397642__;!!OToaGQ!-YPPx6bk4_Vvd7FoduboFbkPoe31QG5Di1wPC7W01EJ7Wr4Jg_XbLwcwFNJNvbjFn2s$
 
CBC gallery:
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/gallery/Cheves/sngo.html__;!!OToaGQ!-YPPx6bk4_Vvd7FoduboFbkPoe31QG5Di1wPC7W01EJ7Wr4Jg_XbLwcwFNJNr_Nb-fM$
 
Michael Cheves
New Bern, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/13/21 5:35 am
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Red-breasted Nuthatch - Backyard
Looking at the beautiful bird as we speak.

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 11/12/21 6:30 am
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Possible American Pipit
For birders near Little Washington and Beaufort County: last evening Merlin
Sound ID highlighted American Pipit in the messy field at the northeast
corner of Oakdale Cemetery. I was unable to locate the bird visually
before dusk fell, nor could I personally confirm the sound ID. Might be
worth going after.

The cemetery is a good place to bird in general with lots of different
habitats, from a baldcypress pond to messy fields and messy wooded edges,
plus large mature hardwoods with lots of holes in them.

I’ve had wood duck, bobwhite, and reliably shrikes (breeding) and plenty of
red-headed woodpeckers.

The shrikes perch in a wonderfully macabre way on old headstones, waiting
for burrowing moles to surface. Good photo op!

Would love some birders to visit and build the checklists for this place!

Betsy Kane
Washington, N.C.

 

Back to top
Date: 11/8/21 8:55 am
From: whoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Dickcissel at Ft. Fisher boat Landing.
Immature.Warning:  King Tide now and 6" +water over the road just past Ferry Terminal.Wayne Hoffman Wilmington Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 

Back to top
Date: 11/7/21 6:06 am
From: Sharyn Caudell <scaudell...>
Subject: Clarification on juncos
Thank you, JBM, for pointing out that I didn't complete ID what I saw.  
A pair of Dark eyed Juncos

Sharyn

 

Back to top
Date: 11/7/21 5:35 am
From: Sharyn Caudell <scaudell...>
Subject: FOS juncos
Saw a pair on Sunday in SW Durham

Sharyn Caudell

 

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Date: 11/6/21 7:15 am
From: Eric Dean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Eared Grebes

Birds were still present 10:15 this am.
Eric


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

 

Back to top
Date: 11/5/21 10:43 am
From: Eric Dean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Eared Grebes
Hello birders,
Today at the Wayne Co waste treatment plant there were 2 Eared Grebes. Also saw 2 Black Ducks, the first I've seen here in 10 years (they used to be regular). A couple of dowitchers were present among the shorebirds, but way too far to ID as to sp.
Eric

Eric & Celia Dean
112 Armstrong Dr
Goldsboro NC 27530
<azornc...>
919-736-7264 home
Sept in Depoe Bay OR
Mar-May & Oct in Tucson AZ
919-920-1542 mobile

 

Back to top
Date: 11/5/21 6:25 am
From: Susan Campbell <susan...>
Subject: Winter Hummers
Hello All!

Yes-- it that time again: winter hummingbird season. And the reports are coming in. With the cooler weather, I expect to hear from more folks in the days ahead.

Maybe some of you already are aware that a banded adult female Rufous Hummingbird has been back in Catawba Co. since August. A presumably banded adult male returned this week here in Wake Co. as well. And female Rufous have been banded this week in Sparta and outside of Asheville.

So please be sure to watch your feeder for activity--and let me know if you see a hummer any time between now and mid-March. Unless you live along the coast, odds are you will be hosting a westerner. Last year we had multiple Black-chinneds and an Allen's as well as a bunch of Rufous around the state. I am really looking forward to seeing who turns up in the Carolinas this winter!

Susan Campbell
Apex, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/5/21 5:35 am
From: Peter Vankevich (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher on Ocracoke
A Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was seen at the NPS campground on Ocracoke
Island by Lee Kimball and Tucker Scully, Thursday morning, Nov. 4, 2021. A
subsequent search a few hours later in high winds and Friday morning failed
to find it. A poor quality cell phone photo at least provided documentation.
Regards, /Peter Vankevich

 

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