Carolinabirds
Received From Subject
5/28/20 6:08 pm Kyle Kittelberger (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> White-winged Tern info & Ramp 45 Ocean Watching
5/28/20 5:48 pm Bill Hilton Jr. <hilton...> Hilton Pond 05/16/20 (Another Fallen Tree)
5/28/20 4:34 pm Clyde Sorenson <sorenson...> Re: White-winged Tern
5/28/20 4:32 pm Derb Carter <derbc...> White-winged Tern
5/28/20 4:22 pm Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: birding ideas for unusual times
5/28/20 4:08 pm klinnlebing (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: White winged Tern
5/28/20 3:58 pm Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> White-winged Tern- Hatteras
5/28/20 3:53 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: WHITE-WINGED TERN reported from Hatteras
5/28/20 2:36 pm FISCHER DAVID (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: WHITE-WINGED TERN reported from Hatteras
5/28/20 10:38 am Daniel Kaplan (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Parasitic Jaeger - Emerald Isle
5/28/20 10:26 am Derb Carter <derbc...> White winged Tern
5/28/20 10:05 am Steven Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> White-winged Tern
5/28/20 7:28 am Bradley Dalton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: What's a Brown-headed Nuthatch doing in the Northern Mountains?
5/28/20 7:22 am Bradley Dalton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: What's a Brown-headed Nuthatch doing in the Northern Mountains?
5/28/20 7:14 am Judy Halleron (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: Brown-headed Nuthatch
5/28/20 7:04 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: WHITE-WINGED TERN reported from Hatteras
5/28/20 6:02 am Anita Huffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: What's a Brown-headed Nuthatch doing in the Northern Mountains?
5/28/20 5:59 am Beth Schultz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> unsubscribe
5/28/20 5:29 am Fischer David (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: WHITE-WINGED TERN reported from Hatteras
5/28/20 5:19 am Kyle Kittelberger (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> WHITE-WINGED TERN reported from Hatteras
5/28/20 5:18 am Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: What's a Brown-headed Nuthatch doing in the Northern Mountains?
5/28/20 5:17 am Jane Gantt (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: What's a Brown-headed Nuthatch doing in the Northern Mountains?
5/28/20 4:01 am Anita Huffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: What's a Brown-headed Nuthatch doing in the Northern Mountains?
5/28/20 3:54 am Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: What's a Brown-headed Nuthatch doing in the Northern Mountains?
5/27/20 7:09 pm Anita Huffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: What's a Brown-headed Nuthatch doing in the Northern Mountains?
5/27/20 6:22 pm Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: What's a Brown-headed Nuthatch doing in the Northern Mountains?
5/27/20 6:20 pm <badgerboy...> What's a Brown-headed Nuthatch doing in the Northern Mountains?
5/27/20 2:15 pm Taylor Piephoff (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Magnificent frigatebirs Ocean Isle Beach NC
5/27/20 11:49 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Another week, another tropical storm
5/26/20 4:38 pm Daniel Kaplan (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: [External] Pomarine Jaeger -,Emerald Isle, NC
5/26/20 3:48 pm Corey, Ed <ed.corey...> Black-bellied Whistling Ducks -- Hyde County
5/26/20 3:33 pm Corey, Ed <ed.corey...> RE: [External] Pomarine Jaeger -,Emerald Isle, NC
5/26/20 2:13 pm Daniel Kaplan (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Pomarine Jaeger -,Emerald Isle, NC
5/26/20 5:43 am Peter Perlman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
5/26/20 5:40 am Corey, Ed <ed.corey...> RE: [External] VOA site- Beaufort Co NC
5/26/20 5:11 am Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> VOA site- Beaufort Co NC
5/26/20 3:13 am \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Black-billed Cuckoo in Halifax County, NC
5/25/20 10:12 am Shannon Conners (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Possible sighting of peregrine falcon in Cary NC
5/25/20 9:57 am Karen LORENZO (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Flat River Waterfowl Impoundments -- 25May2020
5/25/20 6:46 am Corey, Ed <ed.corey...> Flat River Waterfowl Impoundments -- 25May2020
5/24/20 4:59 pm Steve <sshultz...> Re: Lake Crabtree shorebirds (the few, the proud)
5/24/20 4:38 pm Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Lake Crabtree shorebirds (the few, the proud)
5/24/20 9:58 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bird song ID requested
5/23/20 5:30 pm John Haire (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bird song ID requested
5/23/20 3:06 pm Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bird song ID requested
5/23/20 2:08 pm John Haire (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bird song ID requested
5/23/20 9:48 am Ron <waxwing...> Turkey stories
5/23/20 9:21 am Corey, Ed <ed.corey...> RE: [External] Black-bellied Whistling Ducks - Alligator River NWR
5/23/20 9:10 am marion clark (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: My first posting - hope it's "worthy"
5/23/20 9:07 am Corey, Ed <ed.corey...> Black-bellied Whistling Ducks - Alligator River NWR
5/23/20 7:40 am scompton1251 <scompton1251...> Swallow-tailed Nest
5/23/20 6:36 am Corey, Ed <ed.corey...> Lake Crabtree Play Fields 23May2020
5/22/20 3:52 pm <pittsjam...> <pittsjam...> Re: My first posting - hope it's "worthy"
5/22/20 1:14 pm JOHN Cox (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Suprer sod Orangeburg
5/22/20 11:34 am Fischer David (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Least Bittern continues at Flat Rock - Lake Crabtree shorebird show
5/22/20 11:09 am Joe Donahue <joe_donahue...> Re: Least Bittern continues at Flat Rock - Lake Crabtree shorebird show
5/22/20 10:04 am Fischer David (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Least Bittern continues at Flat Rock - Lake Crabtree shorebird show
5/22/20 9:44 am whoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Wood Storks, Columbus Co., N C
5/22/20 9:43 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lake Crabtree shorebirds (the few, the proud)
5/22/20 9:25 am Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Chasing inland storm birds and Buckhorn Reservoir
5/22/20 8:12 am Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Sod Farm
5/22/20 7:49 am Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fwd: Sod Farm
5/22/20 7:42 am william haddad (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: My first posting - hope it's "worthy"
5/22/20 7:32 am william haddad (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: My first posting - hope it's "worthy"
5/22/20 6:59 am Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc
5/22/20 6:37 am Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Herring Gull- Lake Crabtree
5/22/20 6:34 am David Hart <david.hart...> Re: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc
5/22/20 6:14 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: FW: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc
5/22/20 6:11 am Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: FW: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc
5/22/20 5:45 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> FW: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc
5/22/20 5:31 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc
5/22/20 4:52 am Matt Lawing (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Canada warbler at sandy creek Durham
5/22/20 12:28 am Peggy Helms (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> My first posting - hope it's "worthy"
5/21/20 8:23 pm Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Buckhorn Reservoir had Black terns, Caspian tern, Common Loon and Bank Swallows
5/21/20 7:42 pm Steve Patterson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Red-necked Phalarope in Townville
5/21/20 6:26 pm Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc
5/21/20 6:22 pm Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc
5/21/20 3:06 pm Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Arctic Tern- Guilford Co NC
5/21/20 3:00 pm Bkelley232 <Bkelley232...> Please unsubscribe me
5/21/20 2:55 pm Bill Hilton Jr. <hilton...> Hilton Pond 05/01/20 (Birds of Early May)
5/21/20 1:22 pm \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lake Crabtree shorebirds - pm update
5/21/20 11:10 am Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Arctic Tern, Oak Hollow Lake
5/21/20 10:49 am andrew thornton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Arctic Tern, Oak Hollow Lake
5/21/20 8:43 am Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lake Crabtree
5/21/20 7:50 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Lake Crabtree birding
5/21/20 5:57 am Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Mid Pine shorebirds
5/21/20 5:19 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lake Crabtree birding
5/21/20 3:39 am John Fussell <jofuss...> aberrant Dickcissel song recording
5/20/20 6:11 pm scompton1251 <scompton1251...> Re: Hooper Lane
5/20/20 10:13 am wolfpackdeans <wolfpackdeans...> Red-necked Grebe
5/20/20 9:41 am JOHN Cox (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Hooper Lane
5/20/20 9:35 am Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: no more nighthawks
5/20/20 9:12 am Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Jordan Lake Bird Counts, Part 2--Woodpeckers
5/20/20 8:34 am Kelly Davis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: no more nighthawks
5/20/20 8:05 am Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Blackpoll Warbler in Raleigh on Saturday
5/20/20 8:05 am EASTMAN, CAROLINE <EASTMAN...> Re: no more nighthawks
5/20/20 7:50 am <scompton1251...> Re: no more nighthawks
5/20/20 7:44 am John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: no more nighthawks
5/20/20 7:34 am Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: no more nighthawks
5/20/20 7:19 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: no more nighthawks
5/20/20 7:15 am oksanaduck (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Blackpoll Warbler in Raleigh on Saturday
5/20/20 7:14 am Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: no more nighthawks
5/20/20 6:47 am Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: no more nighthawks
5/20/20 6:43 am Ron <waxwing...> Re: no more nighthawks
5/20/20 6:18 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> no more nighthawks
5/20/20 6:08 am Carol Chelette (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Documentary on eagles
5/20/20 5:29 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: [External] Lake Crabtree
5/20/20 5:12 am Corey, Ed <ed.corey...> RE: [External] Lake Crabtree
5/20/20 4:30 am Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lake Crabtree
5/19/20 3:49 pm \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lake Crabtree shorebirds - pm update
5/19/20 2:05 pm Steve Patterson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Hooper Lane Henderson County, NC
5/19/20 12:40 pm Peter Vankevich (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Red Knots on Ocracoke
5/19/20 12:35 pm scompton1251 <scompton1251...> Re: Hooper Lane Henderson County, NC
5/19/20 12:30 pm Ron <waxwing...> Re: Hooper Lane Henderson County, NC
5/19/20 12:17 pm Matt Janson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Hooper Lane Henderson County, NC
5/19/20 12:07 pm Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...> Hooper Lane Henderson County, NC
5/19/20 11:54 am Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Yard birds- Raleigh Nc
5/19/20 9:48 am Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Lake Crabtree Willet
5/19/20 9:45 am Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Lake Crabtree Willet
5/19/20 9:44 am Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Lake Crabtree Willet
5/19/20 9:21 am Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lake Crabtree Willet
5/19/20 7:22 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: Dunlin, Crabtree
5/19/20 7:09 am Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Whimbrel have left Crabtree
5/19/20 6:32 am Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Black tern, crabtree
5/19/20 6:10 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Dunlin, Crabtree
5/19/20 5:58 am Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Dunlin, Crabtree
5/19/20 5:51 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lake Crabtree, NC, birds -
5/19/20 5:51 am Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Whimbrel, Crabtree Southport
5/18/20 5:53 pm Matt Lawing (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Least bittern at Flat River
5/18/20 12:19 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Possible nestings of Peregrine Falcon and Common Merganser in nw. NC
5/18/20 10:12 am John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Mississippi Kite near downtown Raleigh
5/17/20 1:54 pm Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Connecticut Warbler - Greenville, SC
5/17/20 9:32 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Loggerhead shrikes, SE Raleigh
5/17/20 8:12 am Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lake Lynn has a white barnyard Graylag Goose...not a rare Snow Goose. Wake county NC
5/16/20 3:28 pm Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Western NC- BRP birding
5/16/20 6:37 am anntrue (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Edisto Nature Trail, Colleton Co SC
5/16/20 5:44 am Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Loggerhead shrikes, SE Raleigh
5/16/20 4:42 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Dickcissel at Flat River impoundment, Durham Co.
5/16/20 4:28 am Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Guilford Co. NC Dickcissel
5/15/20 4:14 pm Linda Allman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Scissor-tailed flycatcher?
5/15/20 2:20 pm Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Kirtland’s Warbler today?
5/14/20 6:37 pm Stacy and Natalie Barbour (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Shorebirds at Lake Crabtree, Raleigh NC
5/14/20 10:58 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Shorebirds at Lake Crabtree, Raleigh NC
5/14/20 4:36 am Steven Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Kirtland’s Warbler
5/14/20 12:44 am william haddad (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Kirtland's Warbler -- singing! -- today in Watauga Co., NC
5/13/20 7:36 pm <badgerboy...> Re: Kirtland's Warbler -- singing! -- today in Watauga Co., NC
5/13/20 7:24 pm Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Kirtland's Warbler -- singing! -- today in Watauga Co., NC
5/13/20 7:14 pm Karen LORENZO (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Kirtland's Warbler -- singing! -- today in Watauga Co., NC
5/13/20 7:00 pm scompton1251 <scompton1251...> Re: Kirtland's Warbler -- singing! -- today in Watauga Co., NC
5/13/20 5:28 pm Derek Aldrich (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Kirtland's Warbler -- singing! -- today in Watauga Co., NC
5/13/20 4:06 pm David Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Shrike family
5/13/20 3:24 pm Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> territorial Yellow Warblers?, Bobolinks - Wake Co., NC
5/13/20 3:05 pm Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Kirtland's Warbler -- singing! -- today in Watauga Co., NC
5/13/20 3:02 pm Dennis Kent <dkjtk...> RE: Charlotte birds
5/13/20 3:00 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Kirtland's Warbler -- singing! -- today in Watauga Co., NC
5/13/20 2:36 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Charlotte birds
5/13/20 2:08 pm Ron <waxwing...> Charlotte birds
5/13/20 9:21 am jim.capel (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Chapel Hill Bird Club Meeting (Zoom Links missing from original email)
5/13/20 8:02 am Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Swainson’s warbler
5/12/20 2:33 pm Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Falls Lake spring bird count results
5/12/20 2:32 pm Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Kerr Lake spring bird count results
5/12/20 1:51 pm jim.capel (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Chapel Hill Bird Club Meeting - Monday 5/18 (Zoom) - Kent Fiala
5/12/20 1:40 pm David Hart <david.hart...> Roseate Tern, Wilson's Phalarope at Wrightsville Beach
5/12/20 5:14 am Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> eBird list with Swainson’s song
5/11/20 6:35 pm M Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> re: second-hand report Spartanburg County, SC Scissor-tailed flycatcher
5/11/20 5:29 pm Beth Garver (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Migrating Osprey
5/11/20 1:17 pm Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> rockingham county NC sbc results
5/11/20 1:15 pm Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Durham SBC results
5/11/20 9:04 am John Fussell <jofuss...> aberrant Dickcissel song
5/11/20 8:52 am John Fussell <jofuss...> Re: {Disarmed} Bronzed Grackle in Wake Co NC
5/11/20 7:18 am Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Swainson’s warbler
5/10/20 11:07 pm hdpratt (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bronzed Grackle in Wake Co NC
5/10/20 6:28 pm Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Warbler ID solved - Swainson’s Warbler
5/10/20 4:10 pm nicholas Flanders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Anhinga, etc., Gates Co., NC, 5/10/20
5/10/20 4:06 pm Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> eBird -- 1117 Erins Way Ln, Raleigh US-NC 35.96060, -78.63005 -- May 10, 2020
5/10/20 3:44 pm Ron <waxwing...> ST flycatchers
5/10/20 3:40 pm Ron <waxwing...> SC Scissor-tailed Flycatchers
5/10/20 12:42 pm Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Pea Island NWR, NC
5/10/20 9:38 am Michael Cheves (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Croatan NF Jones/Craven Cty, NC (FOS Indigo Buntings and Y-b Chats)
5/10/20 7:05 am Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Gray-cheeked and other thrushes, Garner NC
5/10/20 4:58 am sheryl mcnair (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bird song ID app
5/10/20 4:32 am Claire Herzog (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bird song ID app
5/10/20 4:16 am Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> WILSON’S WARBLER - Frontyard
5/9/20 5:32 pm Karen LORENZO (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bird song ID app
5/9/20 4:50 pm Gary Gmail (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bird song ID app
5/9/20 4:23 pm Daniel Hannon (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bird song ID app
5/9/20 8:49 am Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Old Bynum Bridge- Chatham Co NC
5/9/20 4:40 am Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bird song ID app
5/8/20 4:52 pm Bill Hilton Jr. <hilton...> Hilton Pond 04/16/20 (Birds of Late April)
5/8/20 2:37 pm Monroe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Swallows River Bend Park Catawba County
5/8/20 2:34 pm John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Murderous Fish Crows
5/8/20 11:26 am Peter Stangel <peter...> Phantastic Phinizy Swamp, Augusta, GA
5/8/20 9:02 am Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Wake Co Nc birds
5/8/20 8:08 am Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Wake Co Nc birds
5/7/20 7:57 pm Michael Cheves (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> New Bern, NC, today (migrants and a county lifer)
5/7/20 12:19 pm <badgerboy...> Mixed flock of Bobolinks at North Wilkesboro
5/7/20 9:04 am Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: what's the deal with Common Grackles??
5/7/20 7:14 am Matt Curran <mcurran1...> Crow behavior question
5/7/20 6:54 am Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Crabtree Creek Wetlands- Raleigh NC
5/7/20 6:08 am John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: what's the deal with Common Grackles??
5/7/20 5:26 am John Fussell <jofuss...> what's the deal with Common Grackles??
5/7/20 5:09 am Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Crabtree Creek Wetlands- Raleigh NC
5/7/20 2:25 am Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> L.Shrikes continue: 3 prs @ R.Rap.theater
5/7/20 1:32 am Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Wake County Swainson's Warbler--as Orchard Oriole territoriality?
5/6/20 1:57 pm Will Cook <cwcook...> Black-bellied Whistling Ducks in Hillsborough, NC
5/6/20 12:29 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Blue-winged Teal breeding in Macon County, NC!
5/6/20 8:30 am Gail Lankford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Nashville warbler
5/5/20 5:11 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Blue-winged Teal breeding in Macon County, NC!
5/5/20 4:58 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Blue-winged Teal breeding in Macon County, NC!
5/5/20 3:50 pm \Gilbert S. Grant\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Mississippi Kite in New Hanover County,NC
5/5/20 1:45 pm Cherrie Sneed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Crossbills at feeder - Jackson Co. NC
5/5/20 1:10 pm Thea and Mark Sinclair (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bobolinks in Catawba County
5/5/20 12:36 pm Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Crabtree Creek Wetlands W of Raleigh Blvd, Wake Co NC- Wilson’s Warbler, Warbling Vireo
5/5/20 10:29 am Tim Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Crossbills at feeder - Jackson Co. NC
5/5/20 8:38 am Jan Hansen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Glossy Ibis in Orange County
5/5/20 6:30 am Jay Pitocchelli (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Request for assistance – song recordings of migrating MourningWarblers
5/4/20 7:48 pm Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bronzed Cowbird report NC
5/4/20 8:46 am Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> a historical look at the Jordan Lake Bird Counts--Part 1
5/3/20 2:41 pm Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Wake County Swainson's Warblers
5/3/20 12:38 pm Michael Gamble (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Wake County Swainson's Warblers
5/3/20 11:09 am Matt Lawing (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Swallow Tailed Kite at Jordan Lake
5/3/20 10:31 am John Ennis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Holly Shelter This Morning
5/3/20 8:56 am Margaret McGuinn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Swallow Tailed Kite at Jordan Lake
5/3/20 8:53 am steve stevens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Swallow Tailed Kite at Jordan Lake
5/3/20 8:25 am Fischer David (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Wake County Swainson's Warblers
5/2/20 6:19 pm whoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: ADV: Mississippi kites in Mt Pleasant
5/2/20 5:59 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Wake County Swainson's Warblers
5/2/20 4:51 pm Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Watauga Co. NC
5/2/20 4:50 pm Bradley Dalton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Oriole Photo in South Carolina Wildlife
5/2/20 4:26 pm The Gaston Gang (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Oriole Photo in South Carolina Wildlife
5/2/20 4:24 pm Cherrie Sneed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Oriole Photo in South Carolina Wildlife
5/2/20 4:02 pm Bradley Dalton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Oriole Photo in South Carolina Wildlife
5/2/20 3:41 pm Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> American White Pelicans Fly Over -- Riverbend Park
5/2/20 11:10 am Peggy Schachte (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Mississippi kites in Mt Pleasant
5/2/20 9:32 am Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> L. Shrike observations
5/2/20 8:22 am Kevin Metcalf (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Probable Bicknell's Thrush - Bladen County NC
5/2/20 7:44 am Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Wells W. Cooke died March 30, 1916--migration dates for Bent's L. H.
5/1/20 1:48 pm Fischer David (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Wake County Swainson's Warblers
5/1/20 8:14 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Yellow Rail, Mecklenburg County
5/1/20 6:56 am Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Black-whiskered Vireo in Duck, NC
5/1/20 6:39 am <badgerboy...> VA rail Boone Greenway
5/1/20 6:22 am Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Wake County Swainson's Warblers
5/1/20 4:43 am Steve Patterson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> migrants in Abbeville County, SC
4/30/20 5:25 pm Don Stuart (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Yellow Rail, Mecklenburg County
4/30/20 3:59 pm Matt Janson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Yellow Rail, Mecklenburg County
4/30/20 11:12 am Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: Another Warbler - Greenville, SC
4/30/20 9:35 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Another Warbler - Greenville, SC
4/30/20 9:13 am Judy Halleron (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Birds of Western NC
4/30/20 9:03 am Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Another Warbler - Greenville, SC
4/30/20 6:45 am Andy Smith <andrew.w.smith...> Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Carrboro, NC
4/29/20 7:44 pm <badgerboy...> Re: Conway, SC - Please post the source of the migration maps.
4/29/20 1:09 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Probable Bicknell's Thrush - Bladen County NC
4/29/20 1:07 pm Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Another mystery bird
4/29/20 1:03 pm Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Yet another mystery bird
4/29/20 1:00 pm Fuz Sanderson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Another mystery bird
4/29/20 12:51 pm Fuz Sanderson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Yet another mystery bird
4/29/20 12:42 pm Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Yet another mystery bird
4/29/20 12:32 pm Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Yet another mystery bird
4/29/20 12:17 pm Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Another mystery bird
4/29/20 11:58 am andrew thornton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Probable Bicknell's Thrush - Bladen County NC
4/29/20 11:55 am <pittsjam...> <pittsjam...> Another mystery bird
4/29/20 11:08 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Probable Bicknell's Thrush - Bladen County NC
4/29/20 10:57 am Susan Campbell <susan...> Re: Mystery Warbler #2
4/29/20 10:53 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Mystery Warbler #2
4/29/20 10:41 am Daniel Hannon (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Mystery Warbler #2
4/29/20 10:06 am Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Mystery (Warbler?) - Greenville Co., SC
4/29/20 9:25 am Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Ruby-throated Hummingbird Nest Building
4/29/20 8:59 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Conway, SC - Please post the source of the migration maps.
4/29/20 8:53 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Conway, SC - Please post the source of the migration maps.
4/29/20 8:48 am <badgerboy...> Re: Conway, SC - Please post the source of the migration maps.
4/29/20 7:18 am alhooks13 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Warbler Identification
4/29/20 6:53 am John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> NCSU Ag fields-MidPines
4/29/20 6:34 am William Warfel <bwarfel...> Re: Warbler Identification
4/29/20 5:18 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Conway, SC - Please post the source of the migration maps.
4/29/20 4:49 am Maggie Strickland (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Conway, SC - Please post the source of the migration maps.
4/29/20 4:42 am Christine Stoughton-Root (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Conway, SC - Please post the source of the migration maps.
4/29/20 3:11 am Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Conway, SC - Please post the source of the migration maps.
4/28/20 7:34 pm Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Conway, SC
4/28/20 4:42 pm Erinn Szarek (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Conway, SC
4/28/20 3:25 pm Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Yard birds- Raleigh NC
4/28/20 2:25 pm Judy Halleron (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Cherohala Skyway birds
4/28/20 2:24 pm Derb Carter <derbc...> Probable Bicknell's Thrush - Bladen County NC
4/28/20 12:32 pm Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Rose-breasted Grosbeak on James Is, SC
4/28/20 11:30 am Thea and Mark Sinclair (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Cerulean and other warblers, Rattlesnake Lodge Trail, Buncombe Co
4/28/20 11:22 am Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Pee Dee NWR- NC
4/28/20 9:00 am Cherrie Sneed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: AllendaleKites
4/28/20 8:58 am Cherrie Sneed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> AllendaleKites
4/28/20 8:17 am Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> White Deer Park, 15 warbler species
 
Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 6:08 pm
From: Kyle Kittelberger (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: White-winged Tern info & Ramp 45 Ocean Watching
Hi everyone,
What a great day for birding on the Outer Banks around Hatteras! The WHITE-WINGED TERN was a really nice consolation prize for today's pelagic trip being canceled due to weather, in handsome plumage no less!  Glad that so many people were able to see it today. It seems this bird has been present in the area since at least Monday, so chances are that it has taken a liking to the Salt Pond and surrounding environs. Ed Corey and I spent much of the afternoon birding around the Cape Point area, making several passes throughout the afternoon to the Salt Pond to observe the White-winged. Between our initial observation this morning and the several passes this afternoon, we probably spent several hours overall observing the White-winged today. I therefore thought it might be helpful to share some tips for others that are coming down tomorrow to search for it. 
Your best chance of observing this tern is from the road/ramp (44); however, note that per park regulations, you're not allowed to actually park on the ramp, so either park past the ramp (if you have an off road permit) or before the flooded parking lot near the fish cleaning center. I recommend using your binoculars first and then your scope. The bird spends a majority of its time foraging on the opposite shore of the Salt Pond, going back and forth. It does however on occasion make its way over to the pond edge right in front of the ramp, allowing for amazing and close views. The tern does disappear however for stretches of time, so if it is still around tomorrow and you don't initially see it from the ramp, just wait a bit and keep scanning the entirety of the opposite edge of the pond. Ed and I also had the White-winged flying over the pond near the fish cleaning area, heading towards the lighthouse before making its way back to the Salt Pond, so be sure to check this area quickly on your way up to the Salt Pond. Throughout parts of the afternoon, the White-winged was associating with a juvenile Black Tern. Ed and I also had an adult Black Tern from the beach, so just be mindful that both pond tern species are currently present. 
Other than the White-winged Tern, Ed and I had some pretty impressive ocean watching this afternoon thanks to the strong winds from the beach just off of ramp 45. In about an hour and a half, we had: 155 CORY'S SHEARWATER, 7 SOOTY SHEARWATER, 1 AUDUBON'S/MANX SHEARWATER, and 81 WILSON'S STORM-PETRELS, many of these quite close to the beach moving through the surf. Mike Gosselin additionally had a GREAT SHEARWATER from the beach, so lots of seabirds moving through! Ed and I also had a lovely ROSEATE TERN fly past us while we were on the beach; others reported 1 or 2 Roseates throughout the day at various spots. 
Good birding,Kyle Kittelberger
 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 5:48 pm
From: Bill Hilton Jr. <hilton...>
Subject: Hilton Pond 05/16/20 (Another Fallen Tree)
Followers of "This Week at Hilton Pond" know an Easter weekend storm toppled a giant oak tree that substantially changed local habitats. Well, guess what? ANOTHER powerful wind on 22 May brought down a Black Walnut--this time on the roof of our old farmhouse. To learn about this latest calamity--and for photos and info on Southern Catalpas and Yellow Warblers--please visit our latest installment #721 for 16-22 May 2020. It's at https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek200516.html__;!!OToaGQ!7vmdPpAvpsgqwaefEmB5kJrmu9HcAaS79kBo_ow1TsXBfsl_ZbeLlwrzjWzbXIgiPnc$

As always we include lists of all birds banded or recaptured during the period, plus an acknowledgment of recent supporters of the Center.

Happy (Stormy) Nature Watching!

BILL

==========

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond__;!!OToaGQ!7vmdPpAvpsgqwaefEmB5kJrmu9HcAaS79kBo_ow1TsXBfsl_ZbeLlwrzjWzbuqBqs1k$ for timely updates on nature topics,
and for info about hummingbirds at https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats__;!!OToaGQ!7vmdPpAvpsgqwaefEmB5kJrmu9HcAaS79kBo_ow1TsXBfsl_ZbeLlwrzjWzbqeqjp9Q$

Follow us on Twitter @hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and education for students of all ages.

"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the sunset." BHjr.

============


 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 4:34 pm
From: Clyde Sorenson <sorenson...>
Subject: Re: White-winged Tern
Please, please, continue updates if bird sticks one more day!

Clyde Sorenson
Clayton and Raleigh, NC

On Thu, May 28, 2020 at 7:32 PM Derb Carter <derbc...> wrote:

> Thanks to everyone for passing on updates. Watched the tern for a couple
> hours 5-7 as it worked the perimeter of the pond, making two close passes.
> Striking bird.
>
> Derb Carter
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 4:32 pm
From: Derb Carter <derbc...>
Subject: White-winged Tern
Thanks to everyone for passing on updates. Watched the tern for a couple hours 5-7 as it worked the perimeter of the pond, making two close passes. Striking bird.

Derb Carter

 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 4:22 pm
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: birding ideas for unusual times
Hello, birding friends!

An update to say I've been enjoying the heck out of building the bar charts
and species lists for little-visited eBird hotspots around my county, and
to evangelize you to consider doing it too!

Can I recommend this hobby highly enough? No, I cannot!

Just take a look at an example of a local hotspot where I'm working at
building the species list, and you can see how a basic weekly bar chart is
emerging from nothingness:
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/barchart?r=L10277027&yr=all&m=__;!!OToaGQ!5Sn0CZ_hXaySoXabJseK1jztbSrCUR-Rc8jh53BIs9AenbEKqFCkDisa0hvKo7uBblg$

Not only is it super-cool to see the signals and patterns emerge from the
data void, but also (LISTER ALERT!) you too can get the superficial delight
of seeing your name next to the "First Seen" sixty-two or how-ever-many
species for the underbirded hotspot!

It's a shallow yet enticing behavioral reinforcement! A dopamine hit that
keeps my spirits up, and a habit that brings a welcome weekly structure and
routine to an unusual time! You should try it!

Satisfy your basest competitive urges, save gas on long trips, play it safe
close to home during an epidemic -- all the while building up the data sets
for under-birded sites in your vicinity!

But wait, there's more! -- Even more delightful than claiming "FIRST!" is
the pleasure of seeing that another birder has found and visited "my"
hotspot. I notice that my new county hotspots such as Mason's Landing,
Bonner Point, and Wade's Point were found on eBird and visited by
out-of-town or local birders in recent months, who were only the second or
third birders ever to post there!

If you will be coming to Beaufort County for such well-known destinations
such as VOA Beargrass, Goose Creek State Park, or the Bayview-Aurora Ferry
-- or passing through our county on your way to visit famous Pungo,
Mattamuskeet, or Alligator River -- then I invite you to make a side trip
to one of those lesser-known "light blue" hotspots!

Help it take the next step to become a "light green" hotspot. Or beyond!
Three-digit species list, here we come!!

Ah, those wonderful light-blue map markers, where an empty digital honor
roll awaits, upon which you can inscribe your name for all eBird eternity!

If you can't make it to this beautiful area, an even better option is to
find a light blue hotspot near you and bird the crap out of it -- until
it, too, has a year-round weekly bar chart, and a "respectable" species
list -- with your name listed as the first finder, for all time!

And a third, even more exciting option also awaits!: You can have more fun
for less money than you ever imagined, all the while joyfully *not*
catching the coronavirus, by studying your county or region online for
hidden publicly-accessible sites (such as boat ramps, city- or county-owned
properties, and parks not known for birding), paying an exploratory visit
to them, then suggesting them as new hotspots in eBird.

Over the last 18 or so months, I have enjoyed helping to DOUBLE the number
of hotspots in Beaufort County from just 10 to 21. I was able to add at
least nine new sites, by:
- poring late at night over online county tax maps to find publicly-owned
land!
- finding and visiting several Wildlife Commission boat ramps!
- checking out known public sites such as our historic cemetery and city
parks! and
- exploring smaller state roads that dead-end conveniently at water's edge
or in rural areas, where the end of the right-of-way provides a safe place
for observation!
You can do the same, especially in an under-birded county!

Here's the list of our county hotspots today:
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/region/US-NC-013/hotspots__;!!OToaGQ!5Sn0CZ_hXaySoXabJseK1jztbSrCUR-Rc8jh53BIs9AenbEKqFCkDisa0hvK0ombxNs$
Many thanks to excellent eBird volunteer Shelley Rutkin for her work in
reviewing and approving these new hotspots!

I'd be thrilled to see more visitors to any of these, but especially to the
"light blue" ones where only a few dozen species have been listed --
remember, these under-birded sites often have WAY more species present, and
those species are yours to find and list!

Happy birding!

Betsy Kane
Washington, N.C.
(Beaufort County)



On Wed, Mar 18, 2020 at 11:54 AM Betsy Kane <oldurbanist...> wrote:

> Hi, birding friends -- I have a couple of ideas that might help as we try
> to keep ourselves occupied, structured, and sane during these most
> "interesting" times.
>
> 1. eBird is full of hotspots that are under-birded. .
>
> Why not find an under-birded hotspot near you, and help add data by
> checklisting there? Then go back again and again, and help build a
> consistent, comprehensive dataset over time.
>
> A lot of people are limiting long trips, so as not to expose themselves to
> additional risks or having to make extra shopping excursions, etc. So it's
> a great time to find a nearby hotspot that you might not ordinarily
> consider a great birding location, and help build the dataset for it.
>
> On the eBird website, it says that suburban and urban hotspots are
> typically under-birded. For most of us, helping build these datasets is
> going to be more useful to researchers than twitching the great wild areas
> for the sake of our own life lists (as wonderful as that can be).
>
> 2. Another idea is to locate a hotspot whose bar chart is incomplete, and
> try to help fill out the missing weeks with a checklist, as the calendar
> ticks along.
>
> 3. Read up on fieldcraft and birding ethics, or take some song quizzes
> online. Or have a buddy open the bird guide, and call out warblers to you
> and have you mimic their songs.
>
> 4. Explore the eBird learning pages so you can become a better user, or
> sign up for eBird if you've not had a chance to try it. A couple of years
> on eBird have been so helpful in improving my own birding. I could go on
> at length about that, but not now!
>
> While activities and travel are curtailed, just think of the opportunities
> afforded to us by the birds themselves, not constrained by airports or
> closures -- flying thousands of miles in another glorious spring of the
> year.
>
> Enjoy getting outside and letting your mind and spirit travel with the
> birds while we are so constrained close to home.
>
> Happy spring birding,
> Betsy Kane
> Washington, N.C.
>
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 4:08 pm
From: klinnlebing (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: White winged Tern
As of 3:15 pm on 5/28/20, the white-winged tern was still present at the salt pond, Cape Hatteras. It was working the grassy area between the ramp 44 road and the salt pond--foraging with a black tern.

Sent from my iPad

> On May 28, 2020, at 1:26 PM, Derb Carter <derbc...> wrote:
>
> I would appreciate any updates on the white winged tern even negative as like SpaceX yesterday might abort the mission.
>
> Derb Carter
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> Of3:15
 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 3:58 pm
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: White-winged Tern- Hatteras
Continues as of now.

Ryan

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 3:53 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: WHITE-WINGED TERN reported from Hatteras
Dave,

Thanks for uploading your photos from Tuesday to the Carolina Bird Club
Photo Gallery. Easier/quicker for everyone to see the photos there, not to
mention documenting the species on the CBC website. Awesome photos!

Sometimes something GOOD happens when one of Brian's pelagic trips get
cancelled -- as today! I recall hanging around the dock in Hatteras years
ago, getting the "no go" call, and several of us high-tailing it ALL the
way to Chincoteague NWR in coastal VA -- to see our lifer Little Egret!

Harry LeGrand

On Thu, May 28, 2020 at 5:35 PM FISCHER DAVID <fdavid21...> wrote:

> I just got home in Cary. What a fantastic trip.
>
> I can certainly upload my photos from Tuesday on to the CBC web site. I
> got some more today but I don’t know yet the quality.
>
> Victor and Rueben deserve the main credit for the discovery. I didn’t id
> it as WWTE until after I received word via Ed’s text message of their
> report. But as soon as I saw that text it clicked in my mind that the
> “BLTE” I saw and photographed must have really been the WWTE. So I
> immediately looked again at my photos and compared them to the Nat Geo
> field guide, and sure enough it was a WWTE. A bit embarrassing to not have
> recognized it right away, but at least I have the photos and most
> importantly, the bird stayed around for others to go and see.
>
> Dave
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On May 28, 2020, at 10:04 AM, Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr...> wrote:
>
> 
> Finally!! It took until 2020 for NC to finally get a first documented
> report of White-winged Tern! It has been on the Provisional List since
> 1994, with only a single sight record (accepted) for it. So, acceptance of
> the photos (Dave has several really nice ones on his eBird report) by the
> NC Bird Records Committee (at the end of the year) will place it on the
> Official List. (Virginia has had a LOT of records for it over the years,
> as have MD and DE).
>
> Now -- who gets credit for it? I consider Victor and Ruben Stoll as the
> finders, even though it was photographed 2 days earlier. That photo record
> documents it, but of course Dave admitted that it was called a Black Tern
> at the time. So -- I personally give ALL 3 as documenting the report.
>
> Can someone -- Dave? -- fill out a Carolina Bird Club Rare Bird Report
> form? The Committee always wants some descriptive text to go along with
> other forms of documentation.
>
> Good luck in chasing the bird. Harder now with COVID, like wanting to
> fill a car with birders, but not recommended.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> NCBRC, non-voting member
>
>
>
>
>
> On Thu, May 28, 2020 at 8:29 AM Fischer David <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> Unknowling, I photographed this bird on Tuesday (5/26). Thought it was
>> the prettiest black tern I'd ever see. Photos uploaded to my edited ebird
>> report at attached link.
>>
>> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S69674031__;!!OToaGQ!4Zgsd8eBm_wjYDl-GQm9FnzNdzMGQ7HPUfC8NSdARHZM1v-5xe-NtOza9HTQ-KtpdWo$
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S69674031__;!!OToaGQ!80Hbfb6tJ2UPDDPqskTF3tk8dVWgO-A5WhiT7af1vtSBCez_IAqJ7TM2vElQL6-rK0k$>
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Kyle Kittelberger <carolinabirds...>
>> To: Carolina Birds <carolinabirds...>
>> Sent: Thu, May 28, 2020 8:19 am
>> Subject: WHITE-WINGED TERN reported from Hatteras
>>
>> Hi everyone,
>>
>> Just getting the word out, but a WHITE-WINGED TERN was just reported at
>> Cape Hatteras by Victor and Ru ben Stoll doing laps around the Salt Pond. A
>> picture was taken.
>>
>> Several of us are heading over there now.
>>
>> Cheers,
>> Kyle Kittelberger
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 2:36 pm
From: FISCHER DAVID (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: WHITE-WINGED TERN reported from Hatteras
I just got home in Cary. What a fantastic trip.

I can certainly upload my photos from Tuesday on to the CBC web site. I got some more today but I don’t know yet the quality.

Victor and Rueben deserve the main credit for the discovery. I didn’t id it as WWTE until after I received word via Ed’s text message of their report. But as soon as I saw that text it clicked in my mind that the “BLTE” I saw and photographed must have really been the WWTE. So I immediately looked again at my photos and compared them to the Nat Geo field guide, and sure enough it was a WWTE. A bit embarrassing to not have recognized it right away, but at least I have the photos and most importantly, the bird stayed around for others to go and see.

Dave


Sent from my iPhone

> On May 28, 2020, at 10:04 AM, Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr...> wrote:
>
> 
> Finally!! It took until 2020 for NC to finally get a first documented report of White-winged Tern! It has been on the Provisional List since 1994, with only a single sight record (accepted) for it. So, acceptance of the photos (Dave has several really nice ones on his eBird report) by the NC Bird Records Committee (at the end of the year) will place it on the Official List. (Virginia has had a LOT of records for it over the years, as have MD and DE).
>
> Now -- who gets credit for it? I consider Victor and Ruben Stoll as the finders, even though it was photographed 2 days earlier. That photo record documents it, but of course Dave admitted that it was called a Black Tern at the time. So -- I personally give ALL 3 as documenting the report.
>
> Can someone -- Dave? -- fill out a Carolina Bird Club Rare Bird Report form? The Committee always wants some descriptive text to go along with other forms of documentation.
>
> Good luck in chasing the bird. Harder now with COVID, like wanting to fill a car with birders, but not recommended.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> NCBRC, non-voting member
>
>
>
>
>
>> On Thu, May 28, 2020 at 8:29 AM Fischer David <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>> Unknowling, I photographed this bird on Tuesday (5/26). Thought it was the prettiest black tern I'd ever see. Photos uploaded to my edited ebird report at attached link.
>>
>> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S69674031__;!!OToaGQ!6s85LI-B78GarHrdixmBC57CqpQrVjjU_i9g6tEKPQlQgOlytMSJunTd1bKzAJb0Zpw$
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Kyle Kittelberger <carolinabirds...>
>> To: Carolina Birds <carolinabirds...>
>> Sent: Thu, May 28, 2020 8:19 am
>> Subject: WHITE-WINGED TERN reported from Hatteras
>>
>> Hi everyone,
>>
>> Just getting the word out, but a WHITE-WINGED TERN was just reported at Cape Hatteras by Victor and Ru ben Stoll doing laps around the Salt Pond. A picture was taken.
>>
>> Several of us are heading over there now.
>>
>> Cheers,
>> Kyle Kittelberger

 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 10:38 am
From: Daniel Kaplan (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Parasitic Jaeger - Emerald Isle
The jaegers keep coming - Parasitic flew by eastbound about 30 minutes ago.
Had camera ready this time. Ebird entry with photos here:

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S69757244__;!!OToaGQ!_y_7cfDmDeEbYf8X3zhA825CupURn1wItuGLCkFZcxkKL8ByuGmFlXy_Fs1sIO_fjFM$

Someone else found and photographed the Pomarine on the beach yesterday:

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S69740953__;!!OToaGQ!_y_7cfDmDeEbYf8X3zhA825CupURn1wItuGLCkFZcxkKL8ByuGmFlXy_Fs1sxOUthL4$

Dan Kaplan
Durham usually

 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 10:26 am
From: Derb Carter <derbc...>
Subject: White winged Tern
I would appreciate any updates on the white winged tern even negative as like SpaceX yesterday might abort the mission.

Derb Carter

Sent from my iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 10:05 am
From: Steven Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: White-winged Tern
Just got home from long Dare county trip. Tuesday I spent the entire day
birding the point and salt pond at Hatteras. Saw a Roseate Tern at the
point and spent the afternoon at the salt pond looking for Gull-billed Tern
and a Black Tern. I saw and photographed the White-winged Tern and listed
it as Black Tern with out looking at my photos until I got home. David
Fischer saw me photographing what I thought at the time was one heck of a
beautiful Black Tern. Will be changing my listing to White-winged Tern and
adding photos. The bad news is that I still need a Black Tern!

 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 7:28 am
From: Bradley Dalton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: What's a Brown-headed Nuthatch doing in the Northern Mountains?
I think I just pulled the reply-all fail when I meant to send that message just to you. Oh well.

Brad Dalton

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 28, 2020, at 6:54 AM, Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 7:22 am
From: Bradley Dalton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: What's a Brown-headed Nuthatch doing in the Northern Mountains?
Hahahahaha!!!

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 28, 2020, at 6:54 AM, Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 7:14 am
From: Judy Halleron (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Brown-headed Nuthatch
We see them at our feeders all summer. Our property is about 1500 ft elev near the NC Nantahala mountains. Our daughter in Collegedale, TN has them all year at her feeders.

Judy Halleron
Marble, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 7:04 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: WHITE-WINGED TERN reported from Hatteras
Finally!! It took until 2020 for NC to finally get a first documented
report of White-winged Tern! It has been on the Provisional List since
1994, with only a single sight record (accepted) for it. So, acceptance of
the photos (Dave has several really nice ones on his eBird report) by the
NC Bird Records Committee (at the end of the year) will place it on the
Official List. (Virginia has had a LOT of records for it over the years,
as have MD and DE).

Now -- who gets credit for it? I consider Victor and Ruben Stoll as the
finders, even though it was photographed 2 days earlier. That photo record
documents it, but of course Dave admitted that it was called a Black Tern
at the time. So -- I personally give ALL 3 as documenting the report.

Can someone -- Dave? -- fill out a Carolina Bird Club Rare Bird Report
form? The Committee always wants some descriptive text to go along with
other forms of documentation.

Good luck in chasing the bird. Harder now with COVID, like wanting to fill
a car with birders, but not recommended.

Harry LeGrand
NCBRC, non-voting member





On Thu, May 28, 2020 at 8:29 AM Fischer David <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Unknowling, I photographed this bird on Tuesday (5/26). Thought it was
> the prettiest black tern I'd ever see. Photos uploaded to my edited ebird
> report at attached link.
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S69674031__;!!OToaGQ!87uCtIatdMXiZCZfjUtC_0UGLSZ3sgH7dO5VxJ7kQVptqlAgDTxRYaCTfMRKyo6dh_M$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S69674031__;!!OToaGQ!80Hbfb6tJ2UPDDPqskTF3tk8dVWgO-A5WhiT7af1vtSBCez_IAqJ7TM2vElQL6-rK0k$>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Kyle Kittelberger <carolinabirds...>
> To: Carolina Birds <carolinabirds...>
> Sent: Thu, May 28, 2020 8:19 am
> Subject: WHITE-WINGED TERN reported from Hatteras
>
> Hi everyone,
>
> Just getting the word out, but a WHITE-WINGED TERN was just reported at
> Cape Hatteras by Victor and Ru ben Stoll doing laps around the Salt Pond. A
> picture was taken.
>
> Several of us are heading over there now.
>
> Cheers,
> Kyle Kittelberger
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 6:02 am
From: Anita Huffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: What's a Brown-headed Nuthatch doing in the Northern Mountains?
Thank you all for your replies to my question abot the range of the
Brown-headed Nuthatch.
Anita Huffman
Rugby, Va
Grayson County

On 5/28/20 7:00 AM, Anita Huffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> I do know about it and have lists on it but my Internet is SO slow that
> I never have time to list any now or check on anything. Sometimes my
> download speed is 0.4. I someone could share the range, I would
> appreciate it.
> Anita
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 5:59 am
From: Beth Schultz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: unsubscribe
--
Beth Wylie Schultz

 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 5:29 am
From: Fischer David (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: WHITE-WINGED TERN reported from Hatteras
Unknowling, I photographed this bird on Tuesday (5/26).  Thought it was the prettiest black tern I'd ever see.  Photos uploaded to my edited ebird report at attached link.
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S69674031__;!!OToaGQ!80Hbfb6tJ2UPDDPqskTF3tk8dVWgO-A5WhiT7af1vtSBCez_IAqJ7TM2vElQL6-rK0k$


-----Original Message-----
From: Kyle Kittelberger <carolinabirds...>
To: Carolina Birds <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Thu, May 28, 2020 8:19 am
Subject: WHITE-WINGED TERN reported from Hatteras

Hi everyone,
Just getting the word out, but a WHITE-WINGED TERN was just reported at Cape Hatteras by Victor and Ruben Stoll doing laps around the Salt Pond. A picture was taken.
Several of us are heading over there now.
Cheers,Kyle Kittelberger
 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 5:19 am
From: Kyle Kittelberger (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: WHITE-WINGED TERN reported from Hatteras
Hi everyone,
Just getting the word out, but a WHITE-WINGED TERN was just reported at Cape Hatteras by Victor and Ruben Stoll doing laps around the Salt Pond. A picture was taken.
Several of us are heading over there now.
Cheers,Kyle Kittelberger
 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 5:18 am
From: Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: What's a Brown-headed Nuthatch doing in the Northern Mountains?
Pretty much all the way to the lower escarpment north through Wilkes County
and south to just north of Asheville then throughout the southern mountains
where they have expanded greatly over the last 20 years or so.


Dwayne
*************
J. Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
<redxbill...>


Catawba County Park Ranger
Riverbend Park - Conover, NC
<jdmartin...>
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.catawbacountync.gov/depts/parks/__;!!OToaGQ!7z4A7zU0_Q6Cw8kff_sIJXDporW9T-4AtGAg2xx_E4OmftW9M7vNpG7Ns79r2C6yHhQ$
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.weatherlink.com/user/riverbendpark__;!!OToaGQ!7z4A7zU0_Q6Cw8kff_sIJXDporW9T-4AtGAg2xx_E4OmftW9M7vNpG7Ns79rf2akKs0$



On Thu, May 28, 2020 at 7:01 AM Anita Huffman <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> I do know about it and have lists on it but my Internet is SO slow that
> I never have time to list any now or check on anything. Sometimes my
> download speed is 0.4. I someone could share the range, I would
> appreciate it.
> Anita
>
> On 5/28/20 6:54 AM, Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> > Does everybody know about eBird?
> >
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/map/bnhnut__;!!OToaGQ!6Oupoe-3jja6W3XeTSUkgiqO2z2FT6bBxGqdK2LlB_Zs6TolaOsz8lAOs2gX7fk1zs8$
> >
> > Kent Fiala
> >
> > On 5/27/2020 10:09 PM, Anita Huffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
> > wrote:
> >> How far North is their normal range now? I have seen them in Lenoir,
> >> NC. (Caldwell County).
> >>
> >> Anita Huffman
> >> Rugby, Va
> >> Grayson County
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 5:17 am
From: Jane Gantt (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: What's a Brown-headed Nuthatch doing in the Northern Mountains?
We found them at Broughton Reservoir which is now part of South Mountain State Park.
Jane

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 28, 2020, at 7:01 AM, Anita Huffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I do know about it and have lists on it but my Internet is SO slow that I never have time to list any now or check on anything. Sometimes my download speed is 0.4. I someone could share the range, I would appreciate it.
> Anita
>
>> On 5/28/20 6:54 AM, Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
>> Does everybody know about eBird? https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/map/bnhnut__;!!OToaGQ!6Oupoe-3jja6W3XeTSUkgiqO2z2FT6bBxGqdK2LlB_Zs6TolaOsz8lAOs2gX7fk1zs8$ Kent Fiala
>>> On 5/27/2020 10:09 PM, Anita Huffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
>>> How far North is their normal range now? I have seen them in Lenoir, NC. (Caldwell County).
>>>
>>> Anita Huffman
>>> Rugby, Va
>>> Grayson County
 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 4:01 am
From: Anita Huffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: What's a Brown-headed Nuthatch doing in the Northern Mountains?
I do know about it and have lists on it but my Internet is SO slow that
I never have time to list any now or check on anything. Sometimes my
download speed is 0.4. I someone could share the range, I would
appreciate it.
Anita

On 5/28/20 6:54 AM, Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> Does everybody know about eBird?
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/map/bnhnut__;!!OToaGQ!6Oupoe-3jja6W3XeTSUkgiqO2z2FT6bBxGqdK2LlB_Zs6TolaOsz8lAOs2gX7fk1zs8$
>
> Kent Fiala
>
> On 5/27/2020 10:09 PM, Anita Huffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
> wrote:
>> How far North is their normal range now? I have seen them in Lenoir,
>> NC. (Caldwell County).
>>
>> Anita Huffman
>> Rugby, Va
>> Grayson County
 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 3:54 am
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: What's a Brown-headed Nuthatch doing in the Northern Mountains?
Does everybody know about eBird? https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/map/bnhnut__;!!OToaGQ!6Oupoe-3jja6W3XeTSUkgiqO2z2FT6bBxGqdK2LlB_Zs6TolaOsz8lAOs2gX7fk1zs8$

Kent Fiala

On 5/27/2020 10:09 PM, Anita Huffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> How far North is their normal range now? I have seen them in Lenoir, NC. (Caldwell County).
>
> Anita Huffman
> Rugby, Va
> Grayson County
>
> On 5/27/20 9:18 PM, <badgerboy...> wrote:
>> Yesterday a Brown-headed Nuthatch showed up at feeders near the Boone Greenway, and its been seen and photographed by several today. Birds of NC states that the species is "non-migratory", but does that mean there are NO seasonal movements at all? Could this bird have been blown this far from its normal range by the storm? (We didn't really have any wind up hear yesterday or the day before). This is the first well-documented report I've found for Watauga Co., though there are a few undocumented and/or heard-only reports from the area.
>>
>> Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC
>>
>>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/27/20 7:09 pm
From: Anita Huffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: What's a Brown-headed Nuthatch doing in the Northern Mountains?
How far North is their normal range now? I have seen them in Lenoir, NC.
(Caldwell County).

Anita Huffman
Rugby, Va
Grayson County

On 5/27/20 9:18 PM, <badgerboy...> wrote:
> Yesterday a Brown-headed Nuthatch showed up at feeders near the Boone
> Greenway, and its been seen and photographed by several today. Birds of
> NC states that the species is "non-migratory", but does that mean there
> are NO seasonal movements at all? Could this bird have been blown this
> far from its normal range by the storm? (We didn't really have any wind
> up hear yesterday or the day before). This is the first well-documented
> report I've found for Watauga Co., though there are a few undocumented
> and/or heard-only reports from the area.
>
> Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC
>
>

--
The perfect perennial at affordable prices!
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.laurelhillnursery.com__;!!OToaGQ!6hk3AZRbw1lbaUqO1gS3c3s6_oi4ZIfAGiEnsxyW6rtDOiAQZr18pNp-M2z0NX-lOWQ$
 

Back to top
Date: 5/27/20 6:22 pm
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: What's a Brown-headed Nuthatch doing in the Northern Mountains?
There is a record of one Brown-headed Nuthatch in Nebraska.

Kent Fiala

On 5/27/2020 9:18 PM, <badgerboy...> wrote:
> Yesterday a Brown-headed Nuthatch showed up at feeders near the Boone Greenway, and its been seen and photographed by several today. Birds of NC states that the species is "non-migratory", but does that mean there are NO seasonal movements at all? Could this bird have been blown this far from its normal range by the storm? (We didn't really have any wind up hear yesterday or the day before). This is the first well-documented report I've found for Watauga Co., though there are a few undocumented and/or heard-only reports from the area.
>
> Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/27/20 6:20 pm
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: What's a Brown-headed Nuthatch doing in the Northern Mountains?
Yesterday a Brown-headed Nuthatch showed up at feeders near the Boone
Greenway, and its been seen and photographed by several today. Birds of
NC states that the species is "non-migratory", but does that mean there
are NO seasonal movements at all? Could this bird have been blown this
far from its normal range by the storm? (We didn't really have any wind
up hear yesterday or the day before). This is the first well-documented
report I've found for Watauga Co., though there are a few undocumented
and/or heard-only reports from the area.

Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 5/27/20 2:15 pm
From: Taylor Piephoff (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Magnificent frigatebirs Ocean Isle Beach NC
Just now. Low over the beach. Immature bird. Headed towards Holden Beach.

Taylor Piephoff
Matthews, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 5/27/20 11:49 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Another week, another tropical storm
No sighting information follows, so feel free to delete.

Waking up today it looks like a "surprise" tropical storm is making its way through the Carolinas. This one came onshore in SC and is working toward the innards of both states.

Like Arthur, Bertha did not form in a really juicy area for putting birds onshore, but its arrival at the tail end of migration could put a few birds down (though there are fewer and fewer of those left).

Might be worth checking the margins of the flooded water bodies over the next day or two for shorebirds.

I've seen a few reports of pelagic birds seen from shore today, but since that is not that rare the last week of May, hard to tell if the two are related.

Steve Shultz
Reporting from the soggy Apex NC
(ask me about my upcoming crop of mushrooms!)


 

Back to top
Date: 5/26/20 4:38 pm
From: Daniel Kaplan (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: [External] Pomarine Jaeger -,Emerald Isle, NC
Cool - vector is right. I’m guessing it’s not there anymore.
This was definitely a light adult. I got on it too late for a frontal view though.

Dan Kaplan
Durham (isolating at the beach this week)

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 26, 2020, at 6:33 PM, Corey, Ed <ed.corey...> wrote:
>
> 
> Rangers at Hammocks Beach had one resting on Bear Island this morning. The bird had a relatively unmarked breast and throat, from the pictures I saw.
>
> Ed Corey
> Raleigh, NC
>
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy Tablet
>
>
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Daniel Kaplan <carolinabirds...>
> Date: 5/26/20 5:13 PM (GMT-05:00)
> To: Carolinabirds <Carolinabirds...>
> Subject: [External] Pomarine Jaeger -,Emerald Isle, NC
>
> CAUTION: External email. Do not click links or open attachments unless you verify. Send all suspicious email as an attachment to <report.spam...><mailto:<report.spam...>
>
>
> Just flew by low just off the beach eastbound- in case anyone is watching in that direction- we’re near the Indian beach end of town
>
> Dan Kaplan
> Durham
>
> Sent from my iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 5/26/20 3:48 pm
From: Corey, Ed <ed.corey...>
Subject: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks -- Hyde County
While checking the woods and fields along Outfall Canal Road (near Gull Rock Game Land) this morning, I looked up to see two Black-bellied Whistling Ducks flying South towards the sound. They disappeared quickly, but I was able to get definitive looks, with the big white patches on the upper wing.

Good birding!

Ed Corey
Raleigh, NC

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy Tablet


 

Back to top
Date: 5/26/20 3:33 pm
From: Corey, Ed <ed.corey...>
Subject: RE: [External] Pomarine Jaeger -,Emerald Isle, NC
Rangers at Hammocks Beach had one resting on Bear Island this morning. The bird had a relatively unmarked breast and throat, from the pictures I saw.

Ed Corey
Raleigh, NC

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy Tablet



-------- Original message --------
From: Daniel Kaplan <carolinabirds...>
Date: 5/26/20 5:13 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: Carolinabirds <Carolinabirds...>
Subject: [External] Pomarine Jaeger -,Emerald Isle, NC

CAUTION: External email. Do not click links or open attachments unless you verify. Send all suspicious email as an attachment to <report.spam...><mailto:<report.spam...>


Just flew by low just off the beach eastbound- in case anyone is watching in that direction- were near the Indian beach end of town

Dan Kaplan
Durham

Sent from my iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 5/26/20 2:13 pm
From: Daniel Kaplan (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Pomarine Jaeger -,Emerald Isle, NC
Just flew by low just off the beach eastbound- in case anyone is watching in that direction- we’re near the Indian beach end of town

Dan Kaplan
Durham

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/26/20 5:43 am
From: Peter Perlman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject:
--
Peter Perlman, MSW, LCSW, IHC
Clinical Social Worker, Psychotherapist
Certified Integrative Health Coach
211 Providence Rd., Chapel Hill, NC 27514
Phone: (919) 286-1736

 

Back to top
Date: 5/26/20 5:40 am
From: Corey, Ed <ed.corey...>
Subject: RE: [External] VOA site- Beaufort Co NC
Trevor Sleight, who visits the site regularly, mentioned he's had as many as 26 this Spring.

Ed Corey
Raleigh, NC

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone



-------- Original message --------
From: Ryan Justice <carolinabirds...>
Date: 5/26/20 8:11 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: [External] VOA site- Beaufort Co NC

CAUTION: External email. Do not click links or open attachments unless you verify. Send all suspicious email as an attachment to <report.spam...><mailto:<report.spam...>


At least 6 Henslows Sparrows singing in the fields. Likely many more. Apparently been a good year for them.

Ryan

Sent from my iPhone

 

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Date: 5/26/20 5:11 am
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: VOA site- Beaufort Co NC
At least 6 Henslow’s Sparrows singing in the fields. Likely many more. Apparently been a good year for them.

Ryan

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/26/20 3:13 am
From: \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Black-billed Cuckoo in Halifax County, NC
Birders, I had a black-billed cuckoo calling off and on all day yesterday at my farm near Ringwood, Halifax County, NC. I hear him calling again today in the same place. It’s in the edge of a ten-year pine plantation. Probably a late migrant but you never know with this species. I also heard a couple of yellow-billeds.

My full list plus a recording of the cuckoo can be found here:

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S69609792__;!!OToaGQ!7nk9Q4evPi2xCvvUQDirdKZfJ9yVGBcxdaDp-r67AEyg92mYpNta-341pJgmXtfBYBE$

Merrill Lynch
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/25/20 10:12 am
From: Shannon Conners (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Possible sighting of peregrine falcon in Cary NC
My son and I saw a large bird sitting in one of the tallest trees near the
intersection of Prices Fork Rd and Queensdale Drive in Cary NC near the
Tobacco Trail on 5/24/20 at 6:55 am.
We saw it fly across the street to another tree and the birds in it were
going crazy squawking at it. It looked more like a peregrine falcon than
any of the other NC raptors we could find online, with a black head, white
chest and grey-brown wings.

We saw one had been spotted in Raleigh in January when we searched for
sightings online. We have two pictures but could not attach them here after
trying several times to reduce the size to fit under the limit.
Unfortunately we didn’t get a picture of it flying! It was huge and fast.

I saw a turkey vulture sitting at that same corner the morning before. The
tall tree seems to be a popular vantage point for large birds as there are
some thick and bare tree branches near the top. There are a lot of small
birds living nearby so lots to hunt, I guess!

Shannon

 

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Date: 5/25/20 9:57 am
From: Karen LORENZO (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Flat River Waterfowl Impoundments -- 25May2020
Same... Got a capture of the warbler though not a great one.

On Mon, May 25, 2020, 9:46 AM Corey, Ed <ed.corey...> wrote:

> A lot of people had a similar destination in mind this morning, as close
> to twenty people were searching the roads and impoundments. Highlights for
> me were hearing the two continuing Least Bitterns, seeing a flyover
> American Bittern, and getting to watch a late male Magnolia Warbler
> briefly. Others may report other notable finds later today.
>
> Good birding!
>
> Ed Corey
> Raleigh, NC
>
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>
>

 

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Date: 5/25/20 6:46 am
From: Corey, Ed <ed.corey...>
Subject: Flat River Waterfowl Impoundments -- 25May2020
A lot of people had a similar destination in mind this morning, as close to twenty people were searching the roads and impoundments. Highlights for me were hearing the two continuing Least Bitterns, seeing a flyover American Bittern, and getting to watch a late male Magnolia Warbler briefly. Others may report other notable finds later today.

Good birding!

Ed Corey
Raleigh, NC

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


 

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Date: 5/24/20 4:59 pm
From: Steve <sshultz...>
Subject: Re: Lake Crabtree shorebirds (the few, the proud)
Sure!
Shorebirds seem to spend about the least amount of time on the breeding grounds as they possibly can!

The first southbound birds may be found around the first of July. The dogma that is that these are failed breeders.

Whatever the case may be, fans of fall migration don’t have to wait long!

Steve Shultz
Apex NC

> On May 24, 2020, at 7:38 PM, Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> 
> >>Now set the timer for about 6 weeks for the first southbound birds!<<
>
> Oh, you can't just leave *that* there! Details .. for those of us who are wondering ..
>
> Betsy Kane
> Washington, N.C.
>
>> On Fri, May 22, 2020 at 12:43 PM "Shultz, Steven" <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>> With clearing weather come more chances for our friendly shorebirds to continue on their journey north. Hormones are, after all, calling. So many fewer birds than yesterday, but still some red letter species hanging out.
>>
>>
>>
>> But the sunshine makes for much better viewing and photography, and numbers of folks took advantage of the opportunity for both, especially with the birds being, at times, just a few dozen feet away.
>>
>>
>>
>> Greater Yellowlegs – 1. No doubt on this fella. Grayish base to bill, rather pedestrian feeding style. Sleeping happily with the ducks.
>>
>> Red-necked Phalarope – 4. These little girls were putting on a great show, spinning in the sun just in front of the crowd. Nice.
>>
>> White-rumped Sandpiper – 1. Just gorgeous. Rusty cap and back contrasting nicely with gray and black feathering. Just sublime.
>>
>> Semipalmated Sandpiper – 3. Must have missed the bus that all the others caught.
>>
>> Spotted Sandpiper – 8. Bobbing, rocking, and trying to stay out of the way of the thrashing grass carp sloshing around in ankle deep water.
>>
>>
>>
>> A nice likely last hurrah for our northbound shorebirds, at least here in the flatlands. Now set the timer for about 6 weeks for the first southbound birds!
>>
>>
>>
>> Steve Shultz
>>
>> Apex NC
>>
>>

 

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Date: 5/24/20 4:38 pm
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Lake Crabtree shorebirds (the few, the proud)
>>Now set the timer for about 6 weeks for the first southbound birds!<<

Oh, you can't just leave *that* there! Details .. for those of us who are
wondering ..

Betsy Kane
Washington, N.C.

On Fri, May 22, 2020 at 12:43 PM "Shultz, Steven" <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> With clearing weather come more chances for our friendly shorebirds to
> continue on their journey north. Hormones are, after all, calling. So many
> fewer birds than yesterday, but still some red letter species hanging out.
>
>
>
> But the sunshine makes for much better viewing and photography, and
> numbers of folks took advantage of the opportunity for both, especially
> with the birds being, at times, just a few dozen feet away.
>
>
>
> Greater Yellowlegs – 1. No doubt on this fella. Grayish base to bill,
> rather pedestrian feeding style. Sleeping happily with the ducks.
>
> Red-necked Phalarope – 4. These little girls were putting on a great
> show, spinning in the sun just in front of the crowd. Nice.
>
> White-rumped Sandpiper – 1. Just gorgeous. Rusty cap and back
> contrasting nicely with gray and black feathering. Just sublime.
>
> Semipalmated Sandpiper – 3. Must have missed the bus that all the others
> caught.
>
> Spotted Sandpiper – 8. Bobbing, rocking, and trying to stay out of the
> way of the thrashing grass carp sloshing around in ankle deep water.
>
>
>
> A nice likely last hurrah for our northbound shorebirds, at least here in
> the flatlands. Now set the timer for about 6 weeks for the first
> southbound birds!
>
>
>
> Steve Shultz
>
> Apex NC
>
>
>

 

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Date: 5/24/20 9:58 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bird song ID requested
I got a couple questions privately about my use of the term plastic song, so I thought I’d put the reply on the whole list since there seems to be some interest:

Young songbirds go through stages, usually labeled subsong, plastic song and finally crystallized adult song. Subsong is very similar to babbling in a human toddler. Plastic has some of the structure of adult song but is still dweeby sounding. John Haire’s recording was kind of on the border of the two. Most birds only go through the preliminary stages once (and most birds have the same repertoire of songs their whole adult life), but some species of birds that add new songs each year will, each spring, drop back into plastic song as they learn to perform their new songs.

here’s a link to an online text entry on bird song https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.nature.com/scitable/knowledge/library/the-development-of-birdsong-16133266/__;!!OToaGQ!7RVaNOgJMpTfZStjIu0hqvhm4CQBzfwbdZm5prz9SDYn82WWszyHKXQxv5Drl3p8Fbk$

and a clip from it;

Sensorimotor Phase

At the beginning of the sensorimotor phase, young birds first produce generic, variable, and quiet vocalizations called subsong, which is similar to human baby babbling (Brenowitz et al. 1997). They then produce louder, more structured songs called plastic songs, which are still variable but contain some elements of the tutor song. Songs finally crystallize to stable stereotyped songs that are similar to the songs they memorized. During the sensorimotor phase, birds need to hear their own vocalization in order to develop normal songs. If juveniles are deafened after the sensory phase but before the sensorimotor phase, they develop aberrant songs (Konishi 1965).


Chris Hill
Conway, SC

 

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Date: 5/23/20 5:30 pm
From: John Haire (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bird song ID requested
Got about 10 good responses like this with interesting comments. Most
votes seem to be for a wren, especially a young Carolina Wren "learning"
to sing.  So it appears I was stumped by the most numerous bird in the
county!  Always something to learn in this hobby.  Thanks to all.

Good birding --

John Haire

W-S


On 5/23/2020 6:05 PM, Christopher Hill wrote:
> John,
>
> That’s plastic song by some young songbird. run-on, jumbled, warbled, all those are characteristics of plastic song even when the adult song is discrete, stereotyped, concise. I’m not sure which species you have there, could be song sparrow? I can’t figure it out. But it’s some youngster, probably of a common local species. And by youngster I mean one hatched last year, not this year. It’s late for a bird to still be in plastic song (so maybe it’s a migrant that’s going to breed up north?).
>
> Chris Hill
> Conway, SC
>> On May 23, 2020, at 5:08 PM, John Haire <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.
>>
>> I heard a bird vocalization I did not recognize this morning at Salem Lake, kind of a high-pitched run-on jumbled warble. It could be something locally unusual, or just a normal bird singing something different. I never got eyes on the bird, but a cell phone recording is on this ebird checklist. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
>>
>> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https*3A*2F*2Furldefense.com*2Fv3*2F__https*3A*2F*2Febird.org*2Fchecklist*2FS69496227__*3B!!OToaGQ!7zt1ZqjnUl1pgJH6pInAYwG89uP7R4_mDcQL8esicysJnlpKu3mtEs0akLNftuLI8UM*24&amp;data=02*7C01*7Cchill*40coastal.edu*7C243728e1b2c444cebd9b08d7ff5d7847*7Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797*7C0*7C0*7C637258649236014476&amp;sdata=Lgf0wE3zeOWS44kokGWkZw9xIU61HBZcnnNYWEVM6S4*3D&amp;reserved=0__;JSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUl!!OToaGQ!6Sty6c5MEwV362IuTGdAkA5rAXsGbGj5Em5kRwdqCZ8TGdtUtN6xSaKR8C707XHFqg8$
>> Good birding ---
>>
>> John Haire
>>
>> Winston-Salem
>>
 

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Date: 5/23/20 3:06 pm
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bird song ID requested
John,

That’s plastic song by some young songbird. run-on, jumbled, warbled, all those are characteristics of plastic song even when the adult song is discrete, stereotyped, concise. I’m not sure which species you have there, could be song sparrow? I can’t figure it out. But it’s some youngster, probably of a common local species. And by youngster I mean one hatched last year, not this year. It’s late for a bird to still be in plastic song (so maybe it’s a migrant that’s going to breed up north?).

Chris Hill
Conway, SC
> On May 23, 2020, at 5:08 PM, John Haire <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.
>
> I heard a bird vocalization I did not recognize this morning at Salem Lake, kind of a high-pitched run-on jumbled warble. It could be something locally unusual, or just a normal bird singing something different. I never got eyes on the bird, but a cell phone recording is on this ebird checklist. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https*3A*2F*2Furldefense.com*2Fv3*2F__https*3A*2F*2Febird.org*2Fchecklist*2FS69496227__*3B!!OToaGQ!7zt1ZqjnUl1pgJH6pInAYwG89uP7R4_mDcQL8esicysJnlpKu3mtEs0akLNftuLI8UM*24&amp;data=02*7C01*7Cchill*40coastal.edu*7C243728e1b2c444cebd9b08d7ff5d7847*7Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797*7C0*7C0*7C637258649236014476&amp;sdata=Lgf0wE3zeOWS44kokGWkZw9xIU61HBZcnnNYWEVM6S4*3D&amp;reserved=0__;JSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUl!!OToaGQ!-3-WV7TV5MdybeBXg9fIKtOe7CHGKRKaY6TV2PPEGgNVzZD5X44YctDrbyvT2GPKBQ8$
> Good birding ---
>
> John Haire
>
> Winston-Salem
>

 

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Date: 5/23/20 2:08 pm
From: John Haire (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bird song ID requested
I heard a bird vocalization I did not recognize this morning at Salem
Lake, kind of a high-pitched run-on jumbled warble.  It could be
something locally unusual, or just a normal bird singing something
different.  I never got eyes on the bird, but a cell phone recording is
on this ebird checklist.  Any suggestions would be appreciated.

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S69496227__;!!OToaGQ!7zt1ZqjnUl1pgJH6pInAYwG89uP7R4_mDcQL8esicysJnlpKu3mtEs0akLNftuLI8UM$

Good birding ---

John Haire

Winston-Salem

 

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Date: 5/23/20 9:48 am
From: Ron <waxwing...>
Subject: Turkey stories
Reading the cardinal story, I remembered a turkey learning session. Some
years ago, we had a hen raising babies in our field and yard. We counted
almost daily as the young went from 11 down to 3. At that point they were
over half-grown and flighted, so could get off the ground at night and be
safer. Once, in the yard, they were together when the hen walked off 80-100
feet. The three stayed in a triangle facing out. After a minute or so, she
walked back and they left together. I guess it was training to watch for
predators.

A funny story about them. Some weeks later, when the young were almost
full-sized, a Cooper’s Hawk came swooping in low toward them. The hen saw it
and ran its way. The hawk did a U-turn and got out of there. Needless to
say, it was a juvenile. I’m not sure what the plans were with a grown
turkey, maybe thinking it would eat for a month!

Ron Clark
Kings Mtn. NC

 

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Date: 5/23/20 9:21 am
From: Corey, Ed <ed.corey...>
Subject: RE: [External] Black-bellied Whistling Ducks - Alligator River NWR
Al Hooks has relocated 5 of these birds, off of Long Curve Road. Location is roughly 35.81613, -75.82574, for those interested in trying to relocate them.

Ed Corey
Inventory Biologist, NC Division of Parks and Recreation
NC Dept. of Natural and Cultural Resources
919 841 4037 Office
919 208 7864 Mobile
<Ed.Corey...><mailto:<Ed.Corey...>

12700 Bayleaf Church Road | Raleigh, North Carolina 27614

#StayStrongNC
Learn more @ nc.gov/covid19

And don't forget your Ws! Wear. Wait. Wash.
WEAR a face covering.
WAIT 6 feet apart from other people.
WASH your hands often.

Email correspondence to and from this address is subject to the North Carolina Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.

From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> On Behalf Of Corey, Ed
Sent: Saturday, May 23, 2020 12:08 PM
To: carolinabirds <carolinabirds...>
Subject: [External] Black-bellied Whistling Ducks - Alligator River NWR

CAUTION: External email. Do not click links or open attachments unless you verify. Send all suspicious email as an attachment to <report.spam...><mailto:<report.spam...>

This morning, the "US Fish and Wildlife Service in North Carolina" posted a report of 8 whistling ducks from the Wildlife Drive at Alligator River, complete with pictures. They were last seen around Long Curve Road. If anyone is in the area, it might be worth looking for these birds.

Good birding!

Ed Corey
Inventory Biologist, NC Division of Parks and Recreation
NC Dept. of Natural and Cultural Resources
919 841 4037 Office
919 208 7864 Mobile
<Ed.Corey...><mailto:<Ed.Corey...>

12700 Bayleaf Church Road | Raleigh, North Carolina 27614

#StayStrongNC
Learn more @ nc.gov/covid19

And don't forget your Ws! Wear. Wait. Wash.
WEAR a face covering.
WAIT 6 feet apart from other people.
WASH your hands often.

Email correspondence to and from this address is subject to the North Carolina Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.


 

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Date: 5/23/20 9:10 am
From: marion clark (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: My first posting - hope it's "worthy"
Peggy,

Ditto and thanks to Irvin! This is a very articulate description of
comparative bird behavior which is really helpful in learning. What a
great way to spend time during a pandemic. I look forward to meeting you at
a future CBC meeting!

Marion Clark, Lexington, SC

On Fri, May 22, 2020 at 6:52 PM <pittsjam...> <
<pittsjam...> wrote:

> Peggy,
> I enjoyed reading your "first post"!
>
> Irvin Pitts
> Lexington, SC
>
> ------------------------------
> *From: *"Carolinabirds Listserve" <carolinabirds...>
> *To: *"Carolinabirds Listserve" <carolinabirds...>
> *Sent: *Friday, May 22, 2020 3:27:27 AM
> *Subject: *My first posting - hope it's "worthy"
>
> Like most backyard birders, I have some cardinals that are regulars
> morning and evening. I was late tending to my platform feeder this morning
> and there was a cardinal hovering by the window to let me know this. I've
> seen hummingbirds do that but not a cardinal. Not wanting to upset one of
> my best customer, I immediately took care of the feeder. The next time I
> looked, the whole family was there. Today was th e day to teach the young
> birds how to eat seed on their own and where to find an easy meal. The
> begging quivering of the young ones lasted only a short time before they
> were all surrounding the pile of fresh seed. Then his attention turned
> toward the female cardinal sitting on the sidelines and he fed her some
> seed as well. There were also etiquette/survival lessons to be learned: who
> goes first, when to retreat to a corner of the large platform, when to
> leave the vicinity (for a few minutes) I believe that these were all
> normal behaviors, but all very special to see. It was even more
> heart-warning to be sought-after for the big day for this bird family.
> Peggy Helms
> In the middle of nowhere, near Bentonville, NC
>
>

--
Please note my new email address:
<twhopeferryrd...>

 

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Date: 5/23/20 9:07 am
From: Corey, Ed <ed.corey...>
Subject: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks - Alligator River NWR
This morning, the "US Fish and Wildlife Service in North Carolina" posted a report of 8 whistling ducks from the Wildlife Drive at Alligator River, complete with pictures. They were last seen around Long Curve Road. If anyone is in the area, it might be worth looking for these birds.

Good birding!

Ed Corey
Inventory Biologist, NC Division of Parks and Recreation
NC Dept. of Natural and Cultural Resources
919 841 4037 Office
919 208 7864 Mobile
<Ed.Corey...><mailto:<Ed.Corey...>

12700 Bayleaf Church Road | Raleigh, North Carolina 27614

#StayStrongNC
Learn more @ nc.gov/covid19

And don't forget your Ws! Wear. Wait. Wash.
WEAR a face covering.
WAIT 6 feet apart from other people.
WASH your hands often.

Email correspondence to and from this address is subject to the North Carolina Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.


 

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Date: 5/23/20 7:40 am
From: scompton1251 <scompton1251...>
Subject: Swallow-tailed Nest
Just located a probable Swallow-tailed Kite nest 1.5 north of Cottageville Fire and Rescue on Round O Road. 3 kites interacting over trees near field. As I drove under that site I heard their call, which I do not think I have heard before.Steve ComptonVisiting from Greenville. SCSent from my Verizon LG Smartphone
 

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Date: 5/23/20 6:36 am
From: Corey, Ed <ed.corey...>
Subject: Lake Crabtree Play Fields 23May2020
Several folks were there as the park opened to scope the flooded play fields at Lake Crabtree this morning. The water has receded from the lawn by about half, but there were still a few shorebirds around:

1 White-rumped Sandpiper (continuing)
~10 Semipalmated Sandpipers
4+ Spotted Sandpipers
3 Killdeer

A little after 8, a non-breeding Cattle Egret flew in, and moved towards the lakeshore. It was still visible at 9.

Good birding!

Ed Corey
Inventory Biologist, NC Division of Parks and Recreation
NC Dept. of Natural and Cultural Resources
919 841 4037 Office
919 208 7864 Mobile
<Ed.Corey...><mailto:<Ed.Corey...>

12700 Bayleaf Church Road | Raleigh, North Carolina 27614

#StayStrongNC
Learn more @ nc.gov/covid19

And don't forget your Ws! Wear. Wait. Wash.
WEAR a face covering.
WAIT 6 feet apart from other people.
WASH your hands often.

Email correspondence to and from this address is subject to the North Carolina Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.


 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 3:52 pm
From: <pittsjam...> <pittsjam...>
Subject: Re: My first posting - hope it's "worthy"
Peggy,
I enjoyed reading your "first post"!

Irvin Pitts
Lexington, SC


From: "Carolinabirds Listserve" <carolinabirds...>
To: "Carolinabirds Listserve" <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Friday, May 22, 2020 3:27:27 AM
Subject: My first posting - hope it's "worthy"

Like most backyard birders, I have some cardinals that are regulars morning and evening. I was late tending to my platform feeder this morning and there was a cardinal hovering by the window to let me know this. I've seen hummingbirds do that but not a cardinal. Not wanting to upset one of my best customer, I immediately took care of the feeder. The next time I looked, the whole family was there. Today was the day to teach the young birds how to eat seed on their own and where to find an easy meal. The begging quivering of the young ones lasted only a short time before they were all surrounding the pile of fresh seed. Then his attention turned toward the female cardinal sitting on the sidelines and he fed her some seed as well. There were also etiquette/survival lessons to be learned: who goes first, when to retreat to a corner of the large platform, when to leave the vicinity (for a few minutes) I believe that these were all normal behaviors, but all very special to see. It was even
more heart-warning to be sought-after for the big day for this bird family.
Peggy Helms
In the middle of nowhere, near Bentonville, NC


 

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Date: 5/22/20 1:14 pm
From: JOHN Cox (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Suprer sod Orangeburg
Glad to hear that I was misinformed when I called them earlier this week.
John Cox
Mount Pleasant
 

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Date: 5/22/20 11:34 am
From: Fischer David (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Least Bittern continues at Flat Rock - Lake Crabtree shorebird show
I was wondering if there might be two, but I wasn't certain.  
Dave


-----Original Message-----
From: Joe Donahue <joe_donahue...>
To: carolinabirds <carolinabirds...>; Fischer David <fdavid21...>
Sent: Fri, May 22, 2020 2:09 pm
Subject: Re: Least Bittern continues at Flat Rock - Lake Crabtree shorebird show

while at Flat river a little later than you were, we determined that there were two Least Bitterns calling from the first impoundment.  But like you had to be satisfied with just hearing them.
On Friday, May 22, 2020, 01:04:31 PM EDT, Fischer David <carolinabirds...> wrote:

I birded the Flat River impoundment first thing this morning and heard Least Bittern calling more or less continually from 6:45 am to 7:45 am.  It was at the first impoundment and seemed to be toward the right hand side as you walk in (south side), but I could hear the call from every side of the impoundment as I walked around it.  However, in spite of much scanning, I never saw the bird.  While I was there I heard the 3-note call of a Greater Yellowlegs, looked up and saw one flying over.  
I then headed over to Crabtree Lake and the birds were putting on a very nice show at the flooded grass field to the delight of a sizable crowd of birders.  The 4 Norther n, er... Red-necked Phalaropes were spinning around in the water less than 100 feet away, and a White-rumped Sandpiper walked along the water's edge even closer.  At one point, a Least, and Semipal were on either side of it, giving us a great comparison of size, shape and coloration in good light!  And yes, a Greater Yellowlegs was again present, along with at least 8 Spotted Sandpipers.  In addition, there were several Great Blue Herons chowing down on the fish trapped in the shallows, and dozens of mallards, including one or two hens with downy chicks.  Quite a spectacle.  
I didn't see any terns or gulls flying around, but I didn't venture over by the boat ramp or dam.  Several photos are included in my ebird report:  https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S69459191__;!!OToaGQ!9T8iNFPk_A5CcG3wKIzWpgftV7278zQwHQpo0RnwXDBfUL03_QW6d8TaCwAw1GOCnnM$
Dave FischerCary


 

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Date: 5/22/20 11:09 am
From: Joe Donahue <joe_donahue...>
Subject: Re: Least Bittern continues at Flat Rock - Lake Crabtree shorebird show
while at Flat river a little later than you were, we determined that there were two Least Bitterns calling from the first impoundment.  But like you had to be satisfied with just hearing them.
On Friday, May 22, 2020, 01:04:31 PM EDT, Fischer David <carolinabirds...> wrote:

I birded the Flat River impoundment first thing this morning and heard Least Bittern calling more or less continually from 6:45 am to 7:45 am.  It was at the first impoundment and seemed to be toward the right hand side as you walk in (south side), but I could hear the call from every side of the impoundment as I walked around it.  However, in spite of much scanning, I never saw the bird.  While I was there I heard the 3-note call of a Greater Yellowlegs, looked up and saw one flying over.  
I then headed over to Crabtree Lake and the birds were putting on a very nice show at the flooded grass field to the delight of a sizable crowd of birders.  The 4 Norther n, er... Red-necked Phalaropes were spinning around in the water less than 100 feet away, and a White-rumped Sandpiper walked along the water's edge even closer.  At one point, a Least, and Semipal were on either side of it, giving us a great comparison of size, shape and coloration in good light!  And yes, a Greater Yellowlegs was again present, along with at least 8 Spotted Sandpipers.  In addition, there were several Great Blue Herons chowing down on the fish trapped in the shallows, and dozens of mallards, including one or two hens with downy chicks.  Quite a spectacle.  
I didn't see any terns or gulls flying around, but I didn't venture over by the boat ramp or dam.  Several photos are included in my ebird report:  https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S69459191__;!!OToaGQ!-j1QpTF2TvD9qkAxQ25xa3mLKaisXfvLExje87L9jdS9Vl64tlJMhAMWtzrfT19le54$
Dave FischerCary


 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 10:04 am
From: Fischer David (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Least Bittern continues at Flat Rock - Lake Crabtree shorebird show
I birded the Flat River impoundment first thing this morning and heard Least Bittern calling more or less continually from 6:45 am to 7:45 am.  It was at the first impoundment and seemed to be toward the right hand side as you walk in (south side), but I could hear the call from every side of the impoundment as I walked around it.  However, in spite of much scanning, I never saw the bird.  While I was there I heard the 3-note call of a Greater Yellowlegs, looked up and saw one flying over.  
I then headed over to Crabtree Lake and the birds were putting on a very nice show at the flooded grass field to the delight of a sizable crowd of birders.  The 4 Northern, er... Red-necked Phalaropes were spinning around in the water less than 100 feet away, and a White-rumped Sandpiper walked along the water's edge even closer.  At one point, a Least, and Semipal were on either side of it, giving us a great comparison of size, shape and coloration in good light!  And yes, a Greater Yellowlegs was again present, along with at least 8 Spotted Sandpipers.  In addition, there were several Great Blue Herons chowing down on the fish trapped in the shallows, and dozens of mallards, including one or two hens with downy chicks.  Quite a spectacle.  
I didn't see any terns or gulls flying around, but I didn't venture over by the boat ramp or dam.  Several photos are included in my ebird report:  https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S69459191__;!!OToaGQ!-ZM8TI0liRK71z3YZEcMUimUSWsbU_RVaALI5w_slIcA27hqO2SGhYjnDv42DcDFRJ4$
Dave FischerCary


 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 9:44 am
From: whoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Wood Storks, Columbus Co., N C
2 adult Wood Storks were soaring above rte 130 approx 15mi s. Of Whiteville.This is on the west edge  of the tract of swamp forest extending sw from Lake Waccamaw.Wayne HoffmanWilmingtonSent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 9:43 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lake Crabtree shorebirds (the few, the proud)
With clearing weather come more chances for our friendly shorebirds to continue on their journey north. Hormones are, after all, calling. So many fewer birds than yesterday, but still some red letter species hanging out.

But the sunshine makes for much better viewing and photography, and numbers of folks took advantage of the opportunity for both, especially with the birds being, at times, just a few dozen feet away.

Greater Yellowlegs - 1. No doubt on this fella. Grayish base to bill, rather pedestrian feeding style. Sleeping happily with the ducks.
Red-necked Phalarope - 4. These little girls were putting on a great show, spinning in the sun just in front of the crowd. Nice.
White-rumped Sandpiper - 1. Just gorgeous. Rusty cap and back contrasting nicely with gray and black feathering. Just sublime.
Semipalmated Sandpiper - 3. Must have missed the bus that all the others caught.
Spotted Sandpiper - 8. Bobbing, rocking, and trying to stay out of the way of the thrashing grass carp sloshing around in ankle deep water.

A nice likely last hurrah for our northbound shorebirds, at least here in the flatlands. Now set the timer for about 6 weeks for the first southbound birds!

Steve Shultz
Apex NC


 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 9:25 am
From: Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Chasing inland storm birds and Buckhorn Reservoir
I have never seen it stated here, but a tip I got from Ricky Davis via
Steve Howell is that you have to arrive at Buckhorn before the rain event
stops. The coastal birds blown inland leave as soon as the weather starts
to improve. This was evident at Buckhorn Reservoir today. Yesterday while
it was raining there were 300-500 martins, swallows, swifts, etc.. This
morning I saw two barn swallows and one chimney swift. So don't make a
trip there on the day after a storm.

Ann Brice
*Wilson, NC*

 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 8:12 am
From: Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Sod Farm
Sorry,

She is referring the the Orangeburg SC Supersod Farm.

Dennis

On Fri, May 22, 2020 at 10:55 AM Lynn Erla Beegle <optmystc1...>
wrote:

> This great news, Dr. Forsythe. But which sod farm is she talking about?
> There's no mention of the name or location, other than SC. There's a sod
> farm up here in NC near Hendersonville that has closed its land (hotspot I
> think is called Hooper Lane) due to too many wandering pedestrians, dogs,
> strollers,and birders.
>
> Thanks for passing on the info to carolina birds.
> L Erla Beegle
> Raleigh NC (very far from whichever sod farm this is).
>
> On Fri, May 22, 2020 at 10:49 AM Dennis Forsythe <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> ---------- Forwarded message ---------
>> From: Martha R. Burleson <mburleson...>
>> Date: Fri, May 22, 2020 at 8:57 AM
>> Subject: RE: Sod Farm
>> To: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe...>, John T. Helmke <
>> <jhelmke...>
>>
>>
>> The office and shop are semi-closed due to COVID, but we haven’t closed
>> the farm roads to birders. Please let everyone know that they are
>> welcome.
>>
>>
>>
>> Sorry for the misinformation!
>>
>> Martha Burleson
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from Mail
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986__;!!OToaGQ!9TlJG2ygrP0a1gTEuv9OKqjuoQtRY69oB5xHyNqGvkYR3NQWB3vn9cHBQZPDu3rrQ_s$>
>> for Windows 10
>>
>>
>>
>> *From: *Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe...>
>> *Sent: *Friday, May 22, 2020 8:48 AM
>> *To: *Martha R. Burleson <mburleson...>
>> *Subject: *Sod Farm
>>
>>
>>
>> Hi Martha,
>>
>>
>>
>> I understand the farm is closed to all visitors; I hope bad behavior by
>> visiting birds was not the cause. Keep safe .
>>
>>
>>
>> Best regards,
>>
>>
>>
>> Dennis
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>> Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
>>
>> South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
>>
>> South Carolina eButterfly reviewer
>>
>> Emeritus Professor of Biology
>>
>> The Citadel
>>
>> 171 Moultrie St,
>> Charleston, SC 29409
>> 843.795.3996-home
>> 843.953.7264-fax
>> 843.708.1605-cell
>> <dennis.forsythe...>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
>> South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
>> South Carolina eButterfly reviewer
>> Emeritus Professor of Biology
>> The Citadel
>> 171 Moultrie St,
>> Charleston, SC 29409
>> 843.795.3996-home
>> 843.953.7264-fax
>> 843.708.1605-cell
>> <dennis.forsythe...>
>>
>

--
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
South Carolina eButterfly reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 7:49 am
From: Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fwd: Sod Farm
---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Martha R. Burleson <mburleson...>
Date: Fri, May 22, 2020 at 8:57 AM
Subject: RE: Sod Farm
To: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe...>, John T. Helmke <
<jhelmke...>


The office and shop are semi-closed due to COVID, but we haven’t closed
the farm roads to birders. Please let everyone know that they are
welcome.



Sorry for the misinformation!

Martha Burleson



Sent from Mail <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986__;!!OToaGQ!9TlJG2ygrP0a1gTEuv9OKqjuoQtRY69oB5xHyNqGvkYR3NQWB3vn9cHBQZPDu3rrQ_s$ > for Windows
10



*From: *Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe...>
*Sent: *Friday, May 22, 2020 8:48 AM
*To: *Martha R. Burleson <mburleson...>
*Subject: *Sod Farm



Hi Martha,



I understand the farm is closed to all visitors; I hope bad behavior by
visiting birds was not the cause. Keep safe .



Best regards,



Dennis


--

Dennis M. Forsythe PhD

South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor

South Carolina eButterfly reviewer

Emeritus Professor of Biology

The Citadel

171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>




--
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
South Carolina eButterfly reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 7:42 am
From: william haddad (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: My first posting - hope it's "worthy"
Peggy,

A very good first post. Both e-bird and list serves such as Carolina
birds serve good purposes - The list serves more in the realm of describing
bird behavior, the environment in the area (including other forms of flora
and fauna present) and the enjoyment of the birding experience. ( Sorry for
the immediately preceding post with just Peggy's name - I hit the wrong
key! )

Bill Haddad
Spruce Pine, N.C.

On Fri, May 22, 2020 at 9:32 AM william haddad <photobill9...> wrote:

> Peggy,
>
> A
>
> On Fri, May 22, 2020 at 2:28 AM Peggy Helms <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> Like most backyard birders, I have some cardinals that are regulars
>> morning and evening. I was late tending to my platform feeder this morning
>> and there was a cardinal hovering by the window to let me know this. I've
>> seen hummingbirds do that but not a cardinal. Not wanting to upset one of
>> my best customer, I immediately took care of the feeder. The next time I
>> looked, the whole family was there. Today was the day to teach the young
>> birds how to eat seed on their own and where to find an easy meal. The
>> begging quivering of the young ones lasted only a short time before they
>> were all surrounding the pile of fresh seed. Then his attention turned
>> toward the female cardinal sitting on the sidelines and he fed her some
>> seed as well. There were also etiquette/survival lessons to be learned: who
>> goes first, when to retreat to a corner of the large platform, when to
>> leave the vicinity (for a few minutes) I believe that these were all
>> normal behaviors, but all very special to see. It was even more
>> heart-warning to be sought-after for the big day for this bird family.
>> Peggy Helms
>> In the middle of nowhere, near Bentonville, NC
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 7:32 am
From: william haddad (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: My first posting - hope it's "worthy"
Peggy,

A

On Fri, May 22, 2020 at 2:28 AM Peggy Helms <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Like most backyard birders, I have some cardinals that are regulars
> morning and evening. I was late tending to my platform feeder this morning
> and there was a cardinal hovering by the window to let me know this. I've
> seen hummingbirds do that but not a cardinal. Not wanting to upset one of
> my best customer, I immediately took care of the feeder. The next time I
> looked, the whole family was there. Today was the day to teach the young
> birds how to eat seed on their own and where to find an easy meal. The
> begging quivering of the young ones lasted only a short time before they
> were all surrounding the pile of fresh seed. Then his attention turned
> toward the female cardinal sitting on the sidelines and he fed her some
> seed as well. There were also etiquette/survival lessons to be learned: who
> goes first, when to retreat to a corner of the large platform, when to
> leave the vicinity (for a few minutes) I believe that these were all
> normal behaviors, but all very special to see. It was even more
> heart-warning to be sought-after for the big day for this bird family.
> Peggy Helms
> In the middle of nowhere, near Bentonville, NC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 6:59 am
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc
Sounds like an oversight. I'll look into it when I get home. I always
appreciate having things like that brought to my attention.

On Fri, May 22, 2020, 09:34 David Hart <david.hart...> wrote:

> I reported it as Lesser too, and am glad to be corrected.
>
>
>
> Kent, I’m curious why eBird (which, ironically enough, currently features
> a photo of a Lesser Yellowlegs on its homepage) offers “Greater/Lesser
> Yellowlegs” as an option for Lake Crabtree Park, but not either “Greater
> Yellowlegs” or “Lesser Yellowlegs.”
>
>
>
> Dave Hart
>
> Chapel Hill, NC
>
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------
>
> On behalf of the Duke Health community, we thank you for your support and
> interest. Many have asked how they can help Duke Health as it addresses the
> COVID-19 crisis. Gifts made to the COVID-19 Response Fund
> <https://giving.dukehealth.org/covid-19-support> will be used to address
> the needs of Duke Health patients and caregivers impacted by COVID-19, to
> enhance our researchers’ efforts to develop and test new tools to combat
> the virus, and to support emerging areas of greatest need. Gifts may be
> made to the Duke Student Assistance Fund
> <https://giving.duke.edu/student-assistance> to support Duke University
> students impacted by COVID-19. A Duke-Durham Fund
> <https://community.duke.edu/give/?utm_source=bm23&utm_medium=email&utm_term=Duke-Durham+Fund&utm_content=1185113&utm_campaign=FY20:+Duke+Student+Assistance+Fund-VPrice-1> has
> also been established to assist local area non-profits, small businesses,
> and community-based organizations. To stay updated on Duke’s response to
> COVID-19, please visit: coronavirus.duke.edu.
>
>
>
> Currently, the Duke Health Development and Alumni Affairs staff members
> are working remotely to help reduce the rate of spread of COVID-19. We
> appreciate your patience if it takes longer than usual for us to respond.
> Please contact me via email or cell phone.
>
>
>
> Dave Hart
>
> Public Relations Specialist, Senior
>
> Duke Health Development and Alumni Affairs
>
> 919-385-3196 office
>
> 919-360-4062 cell
>
> <david.hart...>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From: *<carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Kent Fiala <
> <carolinabirds...>
> *Reply-To: *Kent Fiala <kent.fiala...>
> *Date: *Friday, May 22, 2020 at 9:10 AM
> *To: *"Shultz, Steven" <Steven.Shultz...>
> *Cc: *carolinabirds <carolinabirds...>
> *Subject: *Re: FW: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc
>
>
>
> eBird review is occasionally good for something.
>
>
>
> On Fri, May 22, 2020, 08:45 "Shultz, Steven" <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
> Ryan Justice, a stellar shorebirder, and Ed Corey, you might know him as a
> leader on offshore pelagic trips, are both at the park now and are seeing a
> greater. So if we presume the same bird, and probably no reason not to,
> looks like I was mistaken!
>
> Steve Shultz
> Apex NC
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Shultz, Steven
> Sent: Friday, May 22, 2020 8:31 AM
> To: <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: RE: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc
>
> I was one of the folks in the lesser camp. I wanted the bird to be
> greater since I lack that on my year list (Covid you know, such a bummer to
> those wanting to get out!), so I really tried!
>
> I first noted the feeding style, which was dainty and consisted of
> multiple shallow jabs from a steadily walking bird. Greater tends to act
> like a Tricolored Heron or Reddish Egret. Somewhat frantic and not
> altogether sane. More plover-like in that it is run and poke, run and
> poke. Lessers are the Jaguar-driving country gentlemen to the Midland
> steelworker that might be driving a Ford Cortina.
>
> But behavior is just that.
>
> Greater shows a subtly bicolored bill, with greyish coloration at the
> base of the bill. Lesser is all dark from base to tip. This is the first
> place that I look on a yellowlegs sp. I saw a bill with no graduation in
> color from base to tip.
>
> This bird definitely towered over the others, but I've often noticed that
> when viewing through optics, relative size can be misleading. Scanning
> peeps at magnification and then coming to a larger shorebird can be
> jarring. To wit, when scanning the semi-peeps yesterday in order to get a
> count, I came across a spotted in bad light with the head tucked under.
> The bird looked huge! Then I realized it was just another spottie...
>
> Steve Shultz
> Apex NC
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:
> <carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Ryan Justice
> Sent: Thursday, May 21, 2020 9:26 PM
> To: Kent Fiala
> Cc: carolinabirds
> Subject: Re: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc
>
> This email is from an external source - exercise caution regarding links
> and attachments.
>
>
> I stopped by the park around 7:45 PM and saw a single yellowlegs, which to
> me, looked like Lesser. The bill wasn’t curved upwards, but size was
> difficult to judge. Maybe there was a Greater there earlier that was then
> replaced by a Lesser?
>
> Btw, the 4 Phalaropes were still present, as well as 6-7 Common Terns over
> the lake.
>
> Ryan Justice
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On May 21, 2020, at 9:22 PM, Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> >
> > Lake Crabtree County Park in Wake County, NC, was heavily birded today,
> due to an influx of shorebirds and other species to the flooding lake,
> including several rarities such as Red-necked Phalarope. Throughout the
> day, 20 separate eBird checklists (so far) each reported a single
> yellowlegs. Of these, 14 reported a single Greater Yellowlegs and no Lesser
> Yellowlegs. The other 6 reported a single Lesser Yellowlegs and no Greater
> Yellowlegs. The reports of Lesser are mostly later in the day than the
> reports of Greater, but there is some overlap in times, without anyone
> actually reporting both species. I saw the Greater myself, towering over
> nearby Killdeer, and it was photographed. Does anyone have photographic
> evidence that a Lesser was actually present?
> >
> > I don't actually keep track, but I'm sure that today was a
> record-shattering day for me as an eBird reviewer. From just one hotspot
> alone, Lake Crabtree County Park, I have (so far) reviewed 102 reports of
> rare species or high counts.
> >
> > --
> > Kent Fiala
> >
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 6:37 am
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Herring Gull- Lake Crabtree
I figured this was of note, as I hadn’t seen one reported yet. Flying around near dam.

Ryan

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 6:34 am
From: David Hart <david.hart...>
Subject: Re: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc
I reported it as Lesser too, and am glad to be corrected.

Kent, I’m curious why eBird (which, ironically enough, currently features a photo of a Lesser Yellowlegs on its homepage) offers “Greater/Lesser Yellowlegs” as an option for Lake Crabtree Park, but not either “Greater Yellowlegs” or “Lesser Yellowlegs.”

Dave Hart
Chapel Hill, NC


----------------------------
On behalf of the Duke Health community, we thank you for your support and interest. Many have asked how they can help Duke Health as it addresses the COVID-19 crisis. Gifts made to the COVID-19 Response Fund<https://giving.dukehealth.org/covid-19-support> will be used to address the needs of Duke Health patients and caregivers impacted by COVID-19, to enhance our researchers’ efforts to develop and test new tools to combat the virus, and to support emerging areas of greatest need. Gifts may be made to the Duke Student Assistance Fund<https://giving.duke.edu/student-assistance> to support Duke University students impacted by COVID-19. A Duke-Durham Fund<https://community.duke.edu/give/?utm_source=bm23&utm_medium=email&utm_term=Duke-Durham+Fund&utm_content=1185113&utm_campaign=FY20:+Duke+Student+Assistance+Fund-VPrice-1> has also been established to assist local area non-profits, small businesses, and community-based organizations. To stay updated on Duke’s response to COVID-19, please visit: coronavirus.duke.edu<https://coronavirus.duke.edu/>.

Currently, the Duke Health Development and Alumni Affairs staff members are working remotely to help reduce the rate of spread of COVID-19. We appreciate your patience if it takes longer than usual for us to respond. Please contact me via email or cell phone.

Dave Hart
Public Relations Specialist, Senior
Duke Health Development and Alumni Affairs
919-385-3196 office
919-360-4062 cell
<david.hart...><mailto:<david.hart...>



From: <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Kent Fiala <carolinabirds...>
Reply-To: Kent Fiala <kent.fiala...>
Date: Friday, May 22, 2020 at 9:10 AM
To: "Shultz, Steven" <Steven.Shultz...>
Cc: carolinabirds <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: FW: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc

eBird review is occasionally good for something.

On Fri, May 22, 2020, 08:45 "Shultz, Steven" <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
Ryan Justice, a stellar shorebirder, and Ed Corey, you might know him as a leader on offshore pelagic trips, are both at the park now and are seeing a greater. So if we presume the same bird, and probably no reason not to, looks like I was mistaken!

Steve Shultz
Apex NC


-----Original Message-----
From: Shultz, Steven
Sent: Friday, May 22, 2020 8:31 AM
To: <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc

I was one of the folks in the lesser camp. I wanted the bird to be greater since I lack that on my year list (Covid you know, such a bummer to those wanting to get out!), so I really tried!

I first noted the feeding style, which was dainty and consisted of multiple shallow jabs from a steadily walking bird. Greater tends to act like a Tricolored Heron or Reddish Egret. Somewhat frantic and not altogether sane. More plover-like in that it is run and poke, run and poke. Lessers are the Jaguar-driving country gentlemen to the Midland steelworker that might be driving a Ford Cortina.

But behavior is just that.

Greater shows a subtly bicolored bill, with greyish coloration at the base of the bill. Lesser is all dark from base to tip. This is the first place that I look on a yellowlegs sp. I saw a bill with no graduation in color from base to tip.

This bird definitely towered over the others, but I've often noticed that when viewing through optics, relative size can be misleading. Scanning peeps at magnification and then coming to a larger shorebird can be jarring. To wit, when scanning the semi-peeps yesterday in order to get a count, I came across a spotted in bad light with the head tucked under. The bird looked huge! Then I realized it was just another spottie...

Steve Shultz
Apex NC

-----Original Message-----
From: <carolinabirds-request...><mailto:<carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...><mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Ryan Justice
Sent: Thursday, May 21, 2020 9:26 PM
To: Kent Fiala
Cc: carolinabirds
Subject: Re: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc

This email is from an external source - exercise caution regarding links and attachments.


I stopped by the park around 7:45 PM and saw a single yellowlegs, which to me, looked like Lesser. The bill wasn’t curved upwards, but size was difficult to judge. Maybe there was a Greater there earlier that was then replaced by a Lesser?

Btw, the 4 Phalaropes were still present, as well as 6-7 Common Terns over the lake.

Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 21, 2020, at 9:22 PM, Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
>
> Lake Crabtree County Park in Wake County, NC, was heavily birded today, due to an influx of shorebirds and other species to the flooding lake, including several rarities such as Red-necked Phalarope. Throughout the day, 20 separate eBird checklists (so far) each reported a single yellowlegs. Of these, 14 reported a single Greater Yellowlegs and no Lesser Yellowlegs. The other 6 reported a single Lesser Yellowlegs and no Greater Yellowlegs. The reports of Lesser are mostly later in the day than the reports of Greater, but there is some overlap in times, without anyone actually reporting both species. I saw the Greater myself, towering over nearby Killdeer, and it was photographed. Does anyone have photographic evidence that a Lesser was actually present?
>
> I don't actually keep track, but I'm sure that today was a record-shattering day for me as an eBird reviewer. From just one hotspot alone, Lake Crabtree County Park, I have (so far) reviewed 102 reports of rare species or high counts.
>
> --
> Kent Fiala
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 6:14 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: FW: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc
Right!? It’s fun to really get in and look at something, especially when you are wrong. Mistakes make for learning! We are looking at pictures of the bird now and that bill sure looks short for a greater, but maybe a male? Certainly the barring points to greater. And Ryan and Ed are more than solid.

Steve Shultz
Apex NC

From: Kent Fiala [mailto:<kent.fiala...>]
Sent: Friday, May 22, 2020 9:10 AM
To: Shultz, Steven
Cc: carolinabirds
Subject: Re: FW: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc

This email is from an external source - exercise caution regarding links and attachments.

eBird review is occasionally good for something.

On Fri, May 22, 2020, 08:45 "Shultz, Steven" <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
Ryan Justice, a stellar shorebirder, and Ed Corey, you might know him as a leader on offshore pelagic trips, are both at the park now and are seeing a greater. So if we presume the same bird, and probably no reason not to, looks like I was mistaken!

Steve Shultz
Apex NC


-----Original Message-----
From: Shultz, Steven
Sent: Friday, May 22, 2020 8:31 AM
To: <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc

I was one of the folks in the lesser camp. I wanted the bird to be greater since I lack that on my year list (Covid you know, such a bummer to those wanting to get out!), so I really tried!

I first noted the feeding style, which was dainty and consisted of multiple shallow jabs from a steadily walking bird. Greater tends to act like a Tricolored Heron or Reddish Egret. Somewhat frantic and not altogether sane. More plover-like in that it is run and poke, run and poke. Lessers are the Jaguar-driving country gentlemen to the Midland steelworker that might be driving a Ford Cortina.

But behavior is just that.

Greater shows a subtly bicolored bill, with greyish coloration at the base of the bill. Lesser is all dark from base to tip. This is the first place that I look on a yellowlegs sp. I saw a bill with no graduation in color from base to tip.

This bird definitely towered over the others, but I've often noticed that when viewing through optics, relative size can be misleading. Scanning peeps at magnification and then coming to a larger shorebird can be jarring. To wit, when scanning the semi-peeps yesterday in order to get a count, I came across a spotted in bad light with the head tucked under. The bird looked huge! Then I realized it was just another spottie...

Steve Shultz
Apex NC

-----Original Message-----
From: <carolinabirds-request...><mailto:<carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...><mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Ryan Justice
Sent: Thursday, May 21, 2020 9:26 PM
To: Kent Fiala
Cc: carolinabirds
Subject: Re: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc

This email is from an external source - exercise caution regarding links and attachments.


I stopped by the park around 7:45 PM and saw a single yellowlegs, which to me, looked like Lesser. The bill wasn’t curved upwards, but size was difficult to judge. Maybe there was a Greater there earlier that was then replaced by a Lesser?

Btw, the 4 Phalaropes were still present, as well as 6-7 Common Terns over the lake.

Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 21, 2020, at 9:22 PM, Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
>
> Lake Crabtree County Park in Wake County, NC, was heavily birded today, due to an influx of shorebirds and other species to the flooding lake, including several rarities such as Red-necked Phalarope. Throughout the day, 20 separate eBird checklists (so far) each reported a single yellowlegs. Of these, 14 reported a single Greater Yellowlegs and no Lesser Yellowlegs. The other 6 reported a single Lesser Yellowlegs and no Greater Yellowlegs. The reports of Lesser are mostly later in the day than the reports of Greater, but there is some overlap in times, without anyone actually reporting both species. I saw the Greater myself, towering over nearby Killdeer, and it was photographed. Does anyone have photographic evidence that a Lesser was actually present?
>
> I don't actually keep track, but I'm sure that today was a record-shattering day for me as an eBird reviewer. From just one hotspot alone, Lake Crabtree County Park, I have (so far) reviewed 102 reports of rare species or high counts.
>
> --
> Kent Fiala
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 6:11 am
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: FW: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc
eBird review is occasionally good for something.

On Fri, May 22, 2020, 08:45 "Shultz, Steven" <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Ryan Justice, a stellar shorebirder, and Ed Corey, you might know him as a
> leader on offshore pelagic trips, are both at the park now and are seeing a
> greater. So if we presume the same bird, and probably no reason not to,
> looks like I was mistaken!
>
> Steve Shultz
> Apex NC
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Shultz, Steven
> Sent: Friday, May 22, 2020 8:31 AM
> To: <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: RE: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc
>
> I was one of the folks in the lesser camp. I wanted the bird to be
> greater since I lack that on my year list (Covid you know, such a bummer to
> those wanting to get out!), so I really tried!
>
> I first noted the feeding style, which was dainty and consisted of
> multiple shallow jabs from a steadily walking bird. Greater tends to act
> like a Tricolored Heron or Reddish Egret. Somewhat frantic and not
> altogether sane. More plover-like in that it is run and poke, run and
> poke. Lessers are the Jaguar-driving country gentlemen to the Midland
> steelworker that might be driving a Ford Cortina.
>
> But behavior is just that.
>
> Greater shows a subtly bicolored bill, with greyish coloration at the
> base of the bill. Lesser is all dark from base to tip. This is the first
> place that I look on a yellowlegs sp. I saw a bill with no graduation in
> color from base to tip.
>
> This bird definitely towered over the others, but I've often noticed that
> when viewing through optics, relative size can be misleading. Scanning
> peeps at magnification and then coming to a larger shorebird can be
> jarring. To wit, when scanning the semi-peeps yesterday in order to get a
> count, I came across a spotted in bad light with the head tucked under.
> The bird looked huge! Then I realized it was just another spottie...
>
> Steve Shultz
> Apex NC
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:
> <carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Ryan Justice
> Sent: Thursday, May 21, 2020 9:26 PM
> To: Kent Fiala
> Cc: carolinabirds
> Subject: Re: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc
>
> This email is from an external source - exercise caution regarding links
> and attachments.
>
>
> I stopped by the park around 7:45 PM and saw a single yellowlegs, which to
> me, looked like Lesser. The bill wasn’t curved upwards, but size was
> difficult to judge. Maybe there was a Greater there earlier that was then
> replaced by a Lesser?
>
> Btw, the 4 Phalaropes were still present, as well as 6-7 Common Terns over
> the lake.
>
> Ryan Justice
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On May 21, 2020, at 9:22 PM, Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> >
> > Lake Crabtree County Park in Wake County, NC, was heavily birded today,
> due to an influx of shorebirds and other species to the flooding lake,
> including several rarities such as Red-necked Phalarope. Throughout the
> day, 20 separate eBird checklists (so far) each reported a single
> yellowlegs. Of these, 14 reported a single Greater Yellowlegs and no Lesser
> Yellowlegs. The other 6 reported a single Lesser Yellowlegs and no Greater
> Yellowlegs. The reports of Lesser are mostly later in the day than the
> reports of Greater, but there is some overlap in times, without anyone
> actually reporting both species. I saw the Greater myself, towering over
> nearby Killdeer, and it was photographed. Does anyone have photographic
> evidence that a Lesser was actually present?
> >
> > I don't actually keep track, but I'm sure that today was a
> record-shattering day for me as an eBird reviewer. From just one hotspot
> alone, Lake Crabtree County Park, I have (so far) reviewed 102 reports of
> rare species or high counts.
> >
> > --
> > Kent Fiala
> >
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 5:45 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: FW: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc
Ryan Justice, a stellar shorebirder, and Ed Corey, you might know him as a leader on offshore pelagic trips, are both at the park now and are seeing a greater. So if we presume the same bird, and probably no reason not to, looks like I was mistaken!

Steve Shultz
Apex NC


-----Original Message-----
From: Shultz, Steven
Sent: Friday, May 22, 2020 8:31 AM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc

I was one of the folks in the lesser camp. I wanted the bird to be greater since I lack that on my year list (Covid you know, such a bummer to those wanting to get out!), so I really tried!

I first noted the feeding style, which was dainty and consisted of multiple shallow jabs from a steadily walking bird. Greater tends to act like a Tricolored Heron or Reddish Egret. Somewhat frantic and not altogether sane. More plover-like in that it is run and poke, run and poke. Lessers are the Jaguar-driving country gentlemen to the Midland steelworker that might be driving a Ford Cortina.

But behavior is just that.

Greater shows a subtly bicolored bill, with greyish coloration at the base of the bill. Lesser is all dark from base to tip. This is the first place that I look on a yellowlegs sp. I saw a bill with no graduation in color from base to tip.

This bird definitely towered over the others, but I've often noticed that when viewing through optics, relative size can be misleading. Scanning peeps at magnification and then coming to a larger shorebird can be jarring. To wit, when scanning the semi-peeps yesterday in order to get a count, I came across a spotted in bad light with the head tucked under. The bird looked huge! Then I realized it was just another spottie...

Steve Shultz
Apex NC

-----Original Message-----
From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Ryan Justice
Sent: Thursday, May 21, 2020 9:26 PM
To: Kent Fiala
Cc: carolinabirds
Subject: Re: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc

This email is from an external source - exercise caution regarding links and attachments.


I stopped by the park around 7:45 PM and saw a single yellowlegs, which to me, looked like Lesser. The bill wasn’t curved upwards, but size was difficult to judge. Maybe there was a Greater there earlier that was then replaced by a Lesser?

Btw, the 4 Phalaropes were still present, as well as 6-7 Common Terns over the lake.

Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 21, 2020, at 9:22 PM, Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Lake Crabtree County Park in Wake County, NC, was heavily birded today, due to an influx of shorebirds and other species to the flooding lake, including several rarities such as Red-necked Phalarope. Throughout the day, 20 separate eBird checklists (so far) each reported a single yellowlegs. Of these, 14 reported a single Greater Yellowlegs and no Lesser Yellowlegs. The other 6 reported a single Lesser Yellowlegs and no Greater Yellowlegs. The reports of Lesser are mostly later in the day than the reports of Greater, but there is some overlap in times, without anyone actually reporting both species. I saw the Greater myself, towering over nearby Killdeer, and it was photographed. Does anyone have photographic evidence that a Lesser was actually present?
>
> I don't actually keep track, but I'm sure that today was a record-shattering day for me as an eBird reviewer. From just one hotspot alone, Lake Crabtree County Park, I have (so far) reviewed 102 reports of rare species or high counts.
>
> --
> Kent Fiala
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 5:31 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc
I was one of the folks in the lesser camp. I wanted the bird to be greater since I lack that on my year list (Covid you know, such a bummer to those wanting to get out!), so I really tried!

I first noted the feeding style, which was dainty and consisted of multiple shallow jabs from a steadily walking bird. Greater tends to act like a Tricolored Heron or Reddish Egret. Somewhat frantic and not altogether sane. More plover-like in that it is run and poke, run and poke. Lessers are the Jaguar-driving country gentlemen to the Midland steelworker that might be driving a Ford Cortina.

But behavior is just that.

Greater shows a subtly bicolored bill, with greyish coloration at the base of the bill. Lesser is all dark from base to tip. This is the first place that I look on a yellowlegs sp. I saw a bill with no graduation in color from base to tip.

This bird definitely towered over the others, but I've often noticed that when viewing through optics, relative size can be misleading. Scanning peeps at magnification and then coming to a larger shorebird can be jarring. To wit, when scanning the semi-peeps yesterday in order to get a count, I came across a spotted in bad light with the head tucked under. The bird looked huge! Then I realized it was just another spottie...

Steve Shultz
Apex NC

-----Original Message-----
From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Ryan Justice
Sent: Thursday, May 21, 2020 9:26 PM
To: Kent Fiala
Cc: carolinabirds
Subject: Re: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc

This email is from an external source - exercise caution regarding links and attachments.


I stopped by the park around 7:45 PM and saw a single yellowlegs, which to me, looked like Lesser. The bill wasn’t curved upwards, but size was difficult to judge. Maybe there was a Greater there earlier that was then replaced by a Lesser?

Btw, the 4 Phalaropes were still present, as well as 6-7 Common Terns over the lake.

Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 21, 2020, at 9:22 PM, Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Lake Crabtree County Park in Wake County, NC, was heavily birded today, due to an influx of shorebirds and other species to the flooding lake, including several rarities such as Red-necked Phalarope. Throughout the day, 20 separate eBird checklists (so far) each reported a single yellowlegs. Of these, 14 reported a single Greater Yellowlegs and no Lesser Yellowlegs. The other 6 reported a single Lesser Yellowlegs and no Greater Yellowlegs. The reports of Lesser are mostly later in the day than the reports of Greater, but there is some overlap in times, without anyone actually reporting both species. I saw the Greater myself, towering over nearby Killdeer, and it was photographed. Does anyone have photographic evidence that a Lesser was actually present?
>
> I don't actually keep track, but I'm sure that today was a record-shattering day for me as an eBird reviewer. From just one hotspot alone, Lake Crabtree County Park, I have (so far) reviewed 102 reports of rare species or high counts.
>
> --
> Kent Fiala
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 4:52 am
From: Matt Lawing (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Canada warbler at sandy creek Durham
20 yards down the path to the left of the big pond.

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 12:28 am
From: Peggy Helms (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: My first posting - hope it's "worthy"
Like most backyard birders, I have some cardinals that are regulars
morning and evening. I was late tending to my platform feeder this morning
and there was a cardinal hovering by the window to let me know this. I've
seen hummingbirds do that but not a cardinal. Not wanting to upset one of
my best customer, I immediately took care of the feeder. The next time I
looked, the whole family was there. Today was the day to teach the young
birds how to eat seed on their own and where to find an easy meal. The
begging quivering of the young ones lasted only a short time before they
were all surrounding the pile of fresh seed. Then his attention turned
toward the female cardinal sitting on the sidelines and he fed her some
seed as well. There were also etiquette/survival lessons to be learned: who
goes first, when to retreat to a corner of the large platform, when to
leave the vicinity (for a few minutes) I believe that these were all
normal behaviors, but all very special to see. It was even more
heart-warning to be sought-after for the big day for this bird family.
Peggy Helms
In the middle of nowhere, near Bentonville, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/20 8:23 pm
From: Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Buckhorn Reservoir had Black terns, Caspian tern, Common Loon and Bank Swallows
Around noon it was still raining and there was a Caspian tern and three
smaller white terns too distant to identify as well as a common loon in
non-breeding plumage. What I counted to be about 300 swallows viewable
from the boat ramps turned out to be a large number of chimney swifts and
purple martins. There were some barn swallows and bank swallows. After
counting at the boat ramp, I went to the opposite shore and counted from
the end of Johnson Farm Rd. That's where I saw the three black terns, west
of the boat ramp area. From that position, I verified that most of the
things flying on that side of the lake were purple martins.

I saw a red-breasted merganser at the boat ramp yesterday and checked some
earlier ebird lists and saw that it had been there a couple of days before
, also at the boat ramp. It was in non-breeding plumage also.

I am not aware of any mudflats at Buckhorn so no shorebirds to report.

Ann Brice
Wilson, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/20 7:42 pm
From: Steve Patterson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Red-necked Phalarope in Townville
Birders,
Thursday, May 21, a Red-necked Phalarope was found and photographed at Dobbins Farm in Townville.  It was on the second (lower) pond on McAdams Road.  If searching for this bird, please remember to respect the active farming operation and park away from the cattle feed troughs.  Please also make room for traffic to pass unimpeded.  Let's help the community appreciate our presence.
Details and photographs can be found in Thursday's eBird reports of the location.


Steve PattersonAnderson, SC
 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/20 6:26 pm
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc
I stopped by the park around 7:45 PM and saw a single yellowlegs, which to me, looked like Lesser. The bill wasn’t curved upwards, but size was difficult to judge. Maybe there was a Greater there earlier that was then replaced by a Lesser?

Btw, the 4 Phalaropes were still present, as well as 6-7 Common Terns over the lake.

Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 21, 2020, at 9:22 PM, Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Lake Crabtree County Park in Wake County, NC, was heavily birded today, due to an influx of shorebirds and other species to the flooding lake, including several rarities such as Red-necked Phalarope. Throughout the day, 20 separate eBird checklists (so far) each reported a single yellowlegs. Of these, 14 reported a single Greater Yellowlegs and no Lesser Yellowlegs. The other 6 reported a single Lesser Yellowlegs and no Greater Yellowlegs. The reports of Lesser are mostly later in the day than the reports of Greater, but there is some overlap in times, without anyone actually reporting both species. I saw the Greater myself, towering over nearby Killdeer, and it was photographed. Does anyone have photographic evidence that a Lesser was actually present?
>
> I don't actually keep track, but I'm sure that today was a record-shattering day for me as an eBird reviewer. From just one hotspot alone, Lake Crabtree County Park, I have (so far) reviewed 102 reports of rare species or high counts.
>
> --
> Kent Fiala
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/20 6:22 pm
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lake Crabtree County Park today--yellowlegs, etc
Lake Crabtree County Park in Wake County, NC, was heavily birded today, due to an influx of shorebirds and other species to the flooding lake, including several rarities such as Red-necked Phalarope. Throughout the day, 20 separate eBird checklists (so far) each reported a single yellowlegs. Of these, 14 reported a single Greater Yellowlegs and no Lesser Yellowlegs. The other 6 reported a single Lesser Yellowlegs and no Greater Yellowlegs. The reports of Lesser are mostly later in the day than the reports of Greater, but there is some overlap in times, without anyone actually reporting both species. I saw the Greater myself, towering over nearby Killdeer, and it was photographed. Does anyone have photographic evidence that a Lesser was actually present?

I don't actually keep track, but I'm sure that today was a record-shattering day for me as an eBird reviewer. From just one hotspot alone, Lake Crabtree County Park, I have (so far) reviewed 102 reports of rare species or high counts.

--
Kent Fiala

 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/20 3:06 pm
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Arctic Tern- Guilford Co NC
Bird continues. Seen well on dock by several of us from Festival Park. Hunting over the lake now.

Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/21/20 3:00 pm
From: Bkelley232 <Bkelley232...>
Subject: Please unsubscribe me
Thank you,Brenda KelleySent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/20 2:55 pm
From: Bill Hilton Jr. <hilton...>
Subject: Hilton Pond 05/01/20 (Birds of Early May)
Our "This Week at Hilton Pond” photo essay for 1-15 May 2020 includes close-ups of colorful spring warblers and tanagers and bluebirds (among many others), plus words of encouragement about low numbers of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. To view installment #720, please visit https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek200501.html__;!!OToaGQ!9J_0oWrVpA6QCpiHoOd_Ai-w2Hmabo3Bps1w-7o8SpXLSHqxCENdmb7fYtg0elu8ddg$ and pass it along to others.

As always, we include a list of birds banded and recaptured, with acknowledgment of recent supporters of the Center's programs.

Happy (Spring) Nature Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond__;!!OToaGQ!9J_0oWrVpA6QCpiHoOd_Ai-w2Hmabo3Bps1w-7o8SpXLSHqxCENdmb7fYtg0y-654sQ$ for timely updates on nature topics,
and for info about hummingbirds at https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats__;!!OToaGQ!9J_0oWrVpA6QCpiHoOd_Ai-w2Hmabo3Bps1w-7o8SpXLSHqxCENdmb7fYtg03HI0rIs$

Follow us on Twitter @hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and education for students of all ages.

"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the sunset." BHjr.

============


 

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Date: 5/21/20 1:22 pm
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lake Crabtree shorebirds - pm update
For those that prefer to not see their shorebirds a quarter of a mile away through a telescope (in which the bird is still about the apparent size of a grain of rice) you are in luck! That nasty mudflat is now resting comfortably below the water's surface, and the former residents are now happily relocated to a much more convenient venue. One could even sit in the comfort of their own (or recently stolen) car and watch phalaropes spin and peeps peep. Or stand outside in the rain with the rest of us.

About 3:45 the following were mostly staying out of trouble:

Red-necked Phalarope - 4
Semipalmated Sandpiper - 44
Least Sandpiper - 6
Spotted Sandpiper - 11
Lesser Yellowlegs - 1
Semipalmated Plover - 1

Out over the lake, 1 Caspian Tern and 3 Common Terns (sorry Arctic fans) appeared and disappeared in the mist. The gray backs of the COTEs just about perfectly matched the gray sky, so they are a bit harder to spot than might be expected for an otherwise white bird.

For those without the convenience of the Google, Lake Crabtree is near RDU airport, on Aviation Parkway, mile south of I40. The aforementioned venue is the first parking lot on the right after entering the park. The "closed" sign pertains to bopping around in the field, not stopping to act the voyeur with shorebirds.

Steve Shultz
Apex NC


 

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Date: 5/21/20 11:10 am
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Arctic Tern, Oak Hollow Lake
I’m leaving now. If anybody gets there in the next hour and a half, could you send an update? Might save me (and others) part of the drive.

Thanks,
Ryan

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 21, 2020, at 1:49 PM, andrew thornton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> 
> Hey everyone, after getting home and reviewing photos and getting some opinions, I realized one of the terns from this morning at Oak Hollow was an Arctic Tern. Sounds like several people are on there way out there now, the viewing is best from North Overlook, which you can find, along with photos of the bird, in the ebird list here: https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S69413475__;!!OToaGQ!_e5YCIsji_qIjnq8__K90Q2jOsRCirkWSd8xJMG0TyUuFZKo3IdSY2NmY-Iy1g97W40$
>
> Andrew Thornton
> Julian, NC

 

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Date: 5/21/20 10:49 am
From: andrew thornton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Arctic Tern, Oak Hollow Lake
Hey everyone, after getting home and reviewing photos and getting some
opinions, I realized one of the terns from this morning at Oak Hollow was
an Arctic Tern. Sounds like several people are on there way out there now,
the viewing is best from North Overlook, which you can find, along with
photos of the bird, in the ebird list here:
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S69413475__;!!OToaGQ!-1f6GJh7ZDBS8JMcjT1Gy6EeuFaxav7UhNv8C30lHnDiQvLtNlMafjyoHAAW9CXMVsU$

Andrew Thornton
Julian, NC

 

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Date: 5/21/20 8:43 am
From: Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lake Crabtree

There are 4 red-necked phalaropes on the flooded field, with semi and least sandpipers, semi plover, and lesser yellowlegs.  A flock of 6 common terns is flying around lake.

Marc Ribaudo

 

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Date: 5/21/20 7:50 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Lake Crabtree birding

Several of us did go to the dam this morning. Did see 8 Semi P, 3 Leasts, and many Semi Sandpipers and a few Killdeers at that spot. Gotta walk up the grassy knoll to see them along the flooded path south of the dam. We also saw a Black Tern flying over the lake, near the dam; in breeding plumage.

Harry LeGrand



Sent from my iPhone

> On May 21, 2020, at 8:18 AM, Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr...> wrote:
>
> The lake is now into the lawn at the park. Lots of shoreline there. One Red-necked Phalarope here along with many Semi and a Few Leasts. Lots of Spotteds, a few Semi Plovers and Killdeers. No Dunlins or larger sandpipers. Lots of swallows over the lawn. Southport nothing and flooded.
>
> Eddie Owens said he had 9 Semi plovers at the south end of the dam. Water into the grass there. One Caspian.
>
> Harry LeGrand
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/20 5:57 am
From: Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mid Pine shorebirds

Semi Plovers and Least Sandpipers in field north of pecan grove.

Marc Ribaudo

 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/20 5:19 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lake Crabtree birding
The lake is now into the lawn at the park. Lots of shoreline there. One Red-necked Phalarope here along with many Semi and a Few Leasts. Lots of Spotteds, a few Semi Plovers and Killdeers. No Dunlins or larger sandpipers. Lots of swallows over the lawn. Southport nothing and flooded.

Eddie Owens said he had 9 Semi plovers at the south end of the dam. Water into the grass there. One Caspian.

Harry LeGrand

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/20 3:39 am
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: aberrant Dickcissel song recording
Steve Howell has loaded a recording of the aberrant Dickcissel song to our
North River Preserve list (Carteret County) for Sunday, 17 May.

I'd be interested if anyone has heard a similar Dickcissel song.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 6:11 pm
From: scompton1251 <scompton1251...>
Subject: Re: Hooper Lane
Not surprising that all Supersod farms closed. The late Robin Carter first cultivated a relationship with the Orangeburg, SC farm, published a checklist of birds found there, and set an example of responsible behavior. I was one of many who enjoyed birding there on a number of ocassions, recording several life records. With few exceptions birders behaved well at the SC farm, as I imagine they did in NC. It is some consolation to note that it was not birders who caused this difficulty. I can appreciate that the closure must exclude all non-farm.activity, as there is no way to police the large property. A sad day.Steve ComptonGreenville, SCSent from my Verizon LG Smartphone------ Original message------From: JOHN CoxDate: Wed, May 20, 2020 12:41 PMTo: carolinabirds;Cc: Subject:Re: Hooper Lane

I just called Super Sod in Orangeburg SC. They are now closed to birders. Presumably one can still bird from public roads that traverse their farms, but access to farm roads is closed.



John Cox


Mount Pleasant, SC


 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 10:13 am
From: wolfpackdeans <wolfpackdeans...>
Subject: Red-necked Grebe
1 at wtp in Goldsboro NC. 2 Common Loons, 7 Dunlin.
Eric Dean112 Armstrong DrGoldsboro NC


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 9:41 am
From: JOHN Cox (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Hooper Lane
I just called Super Sod in Orangeburg SC. They are now closed to birders. Presumably one can still bird from public roads that traverse their farms, but access to farm roads is closed.
John Cox
Mount Pleasant, SC
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 9:35 am
From: Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: no more nighthawks
Birds of the World has this to say about distraction displays for Common
Nighthawks:

Seven types of responses described for distraction displays of an
individual when flushed from the nest (Gramza 1967
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/comnig/cur/references*REF8056__;Iw!!OToaGQ!7kytXb4LAgiPp6KCiXjB7o3JEPmqXBiRU8VLYEZXxlS9rp9OKzs58Qjel0w1qT1Vtp8$ >):
leaves field of vision, flies about nest area, settles in sight of
intruder, settles in sight of intruder and droops wings, settles in sight
of intruder and holds wings outstretched, settles in sight with
outstretched wings and lunges toward intruder, or does not flush (*n* = 11
nests). Shortest flushing distances and responses of maximum
conspicuousness occur at and shortly after hatching. Brooding birds flush
toward and settle in areas to sides of and behind intruder. Parents do not
flush easily (2–4 m; RMB), probably relying on cryptic coloration to elude
detection.

If you subscribe to the site, here's the link:
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/comnig/cur/behavior*sex__;Iw!!OToaGQ!7kytXb4LAgiPp6KCiXjB7o3JEPmqXBiRU8VLYEZXxlS9rp9OKzs58Qjel0w1SSX0uWQ$

On Wed, May 20, 2020 at 10:14 AM Kevin Kubach <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Chris et al.,
>
> Thanks for this interesting discussion on Nighthawks. I don't have
> extensive experience with them, but I wanted to share an observation. On
> the several occasions I have visited the Aiken Gopher Tortoise Heritage
> Preserve in Aiken Co., SC (at various times from spring through summer), I
> have seen multiple Nighthawks in various phases of their breeding cycle.
> This is a tract managed for what I would describe as a longleaf pine
> "scrubland"--not the classic longleaf-wiregrass savanna, but open longleaf
> with a scrubbier, sandier floor. It still supports Red-cockaded Woodpeckers
> and Bachman's Sparrows--the longleaf associates. Nighthawks seem to thrive
> there. Last week I observed an adult pair with what appeared to be a
> juvenile (I would appreciate any thoughts based on the photos and
> observations as described in my checklist, here:
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68992572__;!!OToaGQ!7kytXb4LAgiPp6KCiXjB7o3JEPmqXBiRU8VLYEZXxlS9rp9OKzs58Qjel0w1gQttuaA$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68992572__;!!OToaGQ!4pHgrIRmv6oBlkAvLKaPcON0kASj7DDCKvjbOec_qml1w1eOXTGzyctDF3OIDAvPEUI$>
> ).
>
> Are Nighthawks perhaps one of the many species dependent in part, in the
> southeast, on the open landscapes provided by longleaf savannas, which we
> all know have been reduced to a tiny fraction of their previous extent?
>
> Kevin Kubach
> Greenville, SC
>
> On Wed, May 20, 2020 at 9:47 AM Parkin Hunter <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> I have been wondering about the loss of rock roofs also. There are almost
>> none at Garden City now. When my father built my house in 1962 they were
>> everywhere (I am an offender.) The dock next to me had a flat, rock roof
>> that the birds used to break things open. Gone now.
>>
>> Parkin Hunter
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
>>
>> > On May 20, 2020, at 9:18 AM, Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds
>> Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>> >
>> > I’ve been living in Conway, SC near Coastal Carolina University since
>> 1999 and every spring the nighthawks come back, and by late April, when I
>> take my ornithology class on an all day field trip, I always hear the
>> nighthawks calling over campus as I wait for the students to show up for
>> the 7 am van ride to the coast. In the evenings I hear them over our house
>> and when we go for walks, and at the local Food Lion parking lot. But not
>> this year. They never showed up, for the first time I can remember. Maybe
>> it’s that a gravel rooftop they nested on was upgraded to rubber membrane
>> and they couldn’t find a nearby replacement, or maybe it’s a small local
>> piece of the overall decline in nightjars and in aerial insectivores
>> generally, but even though I’m not yet sure it’s a permanent, I thought I
>> would note the disappearance here.
>> >
>> > Chris Hill
>> > Conway, SC
>>
>

--
Norm Budnitz
Orange County
North Carolina

 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 9:12 am
From: Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Jordan Lake Bird Counts, Part 2--Woodpeckers
I have just published Part 2 of my series of articles looking at our data
for the past 40+ years. This one focuses on Woodpeckers. Here's the link:

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.newhopeaudubon.org/blog/jordan-lake-bird-counts-part-2-woodpeckers/__;!!OToaGQ!94ndvm1pW8dqG2EvPZXnx_kjttxnZZGYdv6GBtftmYGqCZTFHBhknt-c6lXmv8c2ef4$


More to come as I find the time.

--
Norm Budnitz
Orange County
North Carolina

 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 8:34 am
From: Kelly Davis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: no more nighthawks
Hello,

Common nighthawks here in Hyde Co. as usual. See and hear them from late
April through early summer (unsure where they nest) and then again in late
July when they feed above the soybean fields. Last summer I was delighted
to watch them feeding in early evenings above my blooming pollinator beds
(not sure if they're beds or small meadows - scattered plantings about 0.1
- 0.2 acre each). One of my favorite birds.

Kelly Davis
Swan Quarter, NC



On Wed, May 20, 2020 at 10:50 AM <scompton1251...> wrote:

>
> Birders,
>
> I found Common Nighthawk in their usual location downtown Greenville,SC a
> few days ago. They are easily found along Main Street all summer long here.
> I will monitor to see if there might be a decline as the summer progresses.
>
> Steve Compton
> Greenville,SC
>
> -----------------------------------------
> From: "Kevin Kubach" (via carolinabirds Mailing List)"
> To: "Parkin Hunter"
> Cc: "Christopher Hill", "Carolinabirds"
> Sent: Wednesday May 20 2020 8:14:22AM
> Subject: Re: no more nighthawks
>
> Chris et al.,
>
> Thanks for this interesting discussion on Nighthawks. I don't have
> extensive experience with them, but I wanted to share an observation. On
> the several occasions I have visited the Aiken Gopher Tortoise Heritage
> Preserve in Aiken Co., SC (at various times from spring through summer), I
> have seen multiple Nighthawks in various phases of their breeding cycle.
> This is a tract managed for what I would describe as a longleaf pine
> "scrubland"--not the classic longleaf-wiregrass savanna, but open longleaf
> with a scrubbier, sandier floor. It still supports Red-cockaded Woodpeckers
> and Bachman's Sparrows--the longleaf associates. Nighthawks seem to thrive
> there. Last week I observed an adult pair with what appeared to be a
> juvenile (I would appreciate any thoughts based on the photos and
> observations as described in my checklist, here:
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68992572__;!!OToaGQ!4pHgrIRmv6oBlkAvLKaPcON0kASj7DDCKvjbOec_qml1w1eOXTGzyctDF3OIDAvPEUI$>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68992572__;!!OToaGQ!6y82VcJS9j5YG0bmLGIw0GvGTFLG95Gi5elG-WJqfErQAr6nmC9U9ygtTB_6lmkmQh8$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68992572__;!!OToaGQ!9qSj-JMJZs4aFM65oRUP1uWNyypaIx00_tbKfh88gWDCFeR3mq0o_4N0la-sd4zaWCI$>
> ).
>
> Are Nighthawks perhaps one of the many species dependent in part, in the
> southeast, on the open landscapes provided by longleaf savannas, which we
> all know have been reduced to a tiny fraction of their previous extent?
>
> Kevin Kubach
> Greenville, SC
>
> On Wed, May 20, 2020 at 9:47 AM Parkin Hunter <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> I have been wondering about the loss of rock roofs also. There are almost
>> none at Garden City now. When my father built my house in 1962 they were
>> everywhere (I am an offender.) The dock next to me had a flat, rock roof
>> that the birds used to break things open. Gone now.
>>
>> Parkin Hunter
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
>>
>> > On May 20, 2020, at 9:18 AM, Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds
>> Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>> >
>> > I’ve been living in Conway, SC near Coastal Carolina University since
>> 1999 and every spring the nighthawks come back, and by late April, when I
>> take my ornithology class on an all day field trip, I always hear the
>> nighthawks calling over campus as I wait for the students to show up for
>> the 7 am van ride to the coast. In the evenings I hear them over our house
>> and when we go for walks, and at the local Food Lion parking lot. But not
>> this year. They never showed up, for the first time I can remember. Maybe
>> it’s that a gravel rooftop they nested on was upgraded to rubber membrane
>> and they couldn’t find a nearby replacement, or maybe it’s a small local
>> piece of the overall decline in nightjars and in aerial insectivores
>> generally, but even though I’m not yet sure it’s a permanent, I thought I
>> would note the disappearance here.
>> >
>> > Chris Hill
>> > Conway, SC
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 8:05 am
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Blackpoll Warbler in Raleigh on Saturday
That's interesting. I also heard one in my neighborhood in Little
Washington on Saturday afternoon. Within a block of the north side of the
Pamlico River. Scattered tall trees and open yards in the historic
district.

I used to hear one every May when I worked at home from an apartment in
downtown Raleigh and had my office window open, which looked over a large
area with mature hardwood trees in a lawn. It would sing there for several
days in May, multiple years in a row, and that's how I learned the
Blackpoll Warbler.

Betsy Kane
Washington, N.C.

On Wed, May 20, 2020 at 10:15 AM oksanaduck <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Saturday afternoon I saw my first ever Blackpoll Warbler sitting in the
> shadow of our car on the driveway. It was hot that day and he looked
> exhausted and seemed to be panting. After reading about their usually
> non-stop 1,800 mile migration to Canada from Puerto Rico or northern South
> America, I understood why he looked that way! It gave me the opportunity
> to get a good picture! I didn't see him again after those few minutes.
> Patty Tice
> Raleigh NC
>
>
>
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 8:05 am
From: EASTMAN, CAROLINE <EASTMAN...>
Subject: Re: no more nighthawks
There were LOTS of nighthawks at Carolina Sandhills NWR on Sunday. It was hard to keep track of them.

Caroline Eastman
Columbia SC

________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of <scompton1251...> <scompton1251...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 20, 2020 10:50 AM
To: 'Kevin Kubach' <kmkubach...>
Cc: 'Parkin Hunter' <parkinhunterbirds...>; 'Christopher Hill' <Chill...>; 'Carolinabirds' <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: no more nighthawks


Birders,

I found Common Nighthawk in their usual location downtown Greenville,SC a few days ago. They are easily found along Main Street all summer long here. I will monitor to see if there might be a decline as the summer progresses.

Steve Compton
Greenville,SC

-----------------------------------------

From: "Kevin Kubach" (via carolinabirds Mailing List)"
To: "Parkin Hunter"
Cc: "Christopher Hill", "Carolinabirds"
Sent: Wednesday May 20 2020 8:14:22AM
Subject: Re: no more nighthawks

Chris et al.,

Thanks for this interesting discussion on Nighthawks. I don't have extensive experience with them, but I wanted to share an observation. On the several occasions I have visited the Aiken Gopher Tortoise Heritage Preserve in Aiken Co., SC (at various times from spring through summer), I have seen multiple Nighthawks in various phases of their breeding cycle. This is a tract managed for what I would describe as a longleaf pine "scrubland"--not the classic longleaf-wiregrass savanna, but open longleaf with a scrubbier, sandier floor. It still supports Red-cockaded Woodpeckers and Bachman's Sparrows--the longleaf associates. Nighthawks seem to thrive there. Last week I observed an adult pair with what appeared to be a juvenile (I would appreciate any thoughts based on the photos and observations as described in my checklist, here: <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://protect2.fireeye.com/v1/url?k=2667ab2a-780c5b25-2667e5eb-86899d2d4e5d-ac261380a67051f5&q=1&e=e36ed3e5-3861-4549-ba05-c5c16f962e18&u=https*3A*2F*2Furldefense.com*2Fv3*2F__https*3A*2F*2Febird.org*2Fchecklist*2FS68992572__*3B*21*21OToaGQ*214pHgrIRmv6oBlkAvLKaPcON0kASj7DDCKvjbOec_qml1w1eOXTGzyctDF3OIDAvPEUI*24__;JSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUl!!OToaGQ!4BroVbzUipJHUZ1LUneMPv0gAMiaB4uiccAeAu-bbZiausbG3WBjEv9KJsWbNwhEdqk$ > https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68992572__;!!OToaGQ!4BroVbzUipJHUZ1LUneMPv0gAMiaB4uiccAeAu-bbZiausbG3WBjEv9KJsWbw-15MvQ$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://protect2.fireeye.com/v1/url?k=f3590217-ad32f218-f3594cd6-86899d2d4e5d-a4e20027b7beb60d&q=1&e=e36ed3e5-3861-4549-ba05-c5c16f962e18&u=https*3A*2F*2Furldefense.com*2Fv3*2F__https*3A*2F*2Febird.org*2Fchecklist*2FS68992572__*3B*21*21OToaGQ*219qSj-JMJZs4aFM65oRUP1uWNyypaIx00_tbKfh88gWDCFeR3mq0o_4N0la-sd4zaWCI*24__;JSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUl!!OToaGQ!4BroVbzUipJHUZ1LUneMPv0gAMiaB4uiccAeAu-bbZiausbG3WBjEv9KJsWbSzzkkYc$ >).

Are Nighthawks perhaps one of the many species dependent in part, in the southeast, on the open landscapes provided by longleaf savannas, which we all know have been reduced to a tiny fraction of their previous extent?

Kevin Kubach
Greenville, SC

On Wed, May 20, 2020 at 9:47 AM Parkin Hunter <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
I have been wondering about the loss of rock roofs also. There are almost none at Garden City now. When my father built my house in 1962 they were everywhere (I am an offender.) The dock next to me had a flat, rock roof that the birds used to break things open. Gone now.

Parkin Hunter

Sent from my iPad

> On May 20, 2020, at 9:18 AM, Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
>
> I’ve been living in Conway, SC near Coastal Carolina University since 1999 and every spring the nighthawks come back, and by late April, when I take my ornithology class on an all day field trip, I always hear the nighthawks calling over campus as I wait for the students to show up for the 7 am van ride to the coast. In the evenings I hear them over our house and when we go for walks, and at the local Food Lion parking lot. But not this year. They never showed up, for the first time I can remember. Maybe it’s that a gravel rooftop they nested on was upgraded to rubber membrane and they couldn’t find a nearby replacement, or maybe it’s a small local piece of the overall decline in nightjars and in aerial insectivores generally, but even though I’m not yet sure it’s a permanent, I thought I would note the disappearance here.
>
> Chris Hill
> Conway, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 7:50 am
From: <scompton1251...>
Subject: Re: no more nighthawks

Birders,
I found Common Nighthawk in their usual location downtown
Greenville,SC a few days ago. They are easily found along Main Street
all summer long here. I will monitor to see if there might be a
decline as the summer progresses.
Steve ComptonGreenville,SC

-----------------------------------------From: "Kevin Kubach" (via
carolinabirds Mailing List)"
To: "Parkin Hunter"
Cc: "Christopher Hill", "Carolinabirds"
Sent: Wednesday May 20 2020 8:14:22AM
Subject: Re: no more nighthawks

Chris et al.,
Thanks for this interesting discussion on Nighthawks. I don't have
extensive experience with them, but I wanted to share an observation.
On the several occasions I have visited the Aiken Gopher Tortoise
Heritage Preserve in Aiken Co., SC (at various times from spring
through summer), I have seen multiple Nighthawks in various phases of
their breeding cycle. This is a tract managed for what I would
describe as a longleaf pine "scrubland"--not the classic
longleaf-wiregrass savanna, but open longleaf with a scrubbier,
sandier floor. It still supports Red-cockaded Woodpeckers and
Bachman's Sparrows--the longleaf associates. Nighthawks seem to thrive
there. Last week I observed an adult pair with what appeared to be a
juvenile (I would appreciate any thoughts based on the photos and
observations as described in my checklist, here:
[1]https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68992572__;!!OToaGQ!9qSj-JMJZs4aFM65oRUP1uWNyypaIx00_tbKfh88gWDCFeR3mq0o_4N0la-sd4zaWCI$ [2]).
Are Nighthawks perhaps one of the many species dependent in part, in
the southeast, on the open landscapes provided by longleaf savannas,
which we all know have been reduced to a tiny fraction of their
previous extent?
Kevin KubachGreenville, SC
On Wed, May 20, 2020 at 9:47 AM Parkin Hunter wrote:
I have been wondering about the loss of rock roofs also. There are
almost none at Garden City now. When my father built my house in 1962
they were everywhere (I am an offender.) The dock next to me had a
flat, rock roof that the birds used to break things open. Gone now.

Parkin Hunter

Sent from my iPad

> On May 20, 2020, at 9:18 AM, Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds
Mailing List) wrote:
>
> I’ve been living in Conway, SC near Coastal Carolina
University since 1999 and every spring the nighthawks come back, and
by late April, when I take my ornithology class on an all day field
trip, I always hear the nighthawks calling over campus as I wait for
the students to show up for the 7 am van ride to the coast. In the
evenings I hear them over our house and when we go for walks, and at
the local Food Lion parking lot. But not this year. They never showed
up, for the first time I can remember. Maybe it’s that a gravel
rooftop they nested on was upgraded to rubber membrane and they
couldn’t find a nearby replacement, or maybe it’s a small local
piece of the overall decline in nightjars and in aerial insectivores
generally, but even though I’m not yet sure it’s a permanent, I
thought I would note the disappearance here.
>
> Chris Hill
> Conway, SC


Links:
------
[1]
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68992572__;!!OToaGQ!4pHgrIRmv6oBlkAvLKaPcON0kASj7DDCKvjbOec_qml1w1eOXTGzyctDF3OIDAvPEUI__DOLLAR_SYMBOL__
[2] https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68992572__;!!OToaGQ!9qSj-JMJZs4aFM65oRUP1uWNyypaIx00_tbKfh88gWDCFeR3mq0o_4N0la-sd4zaWCI$
[3] mailto:<carolinabirds...>
[4] mailto:<carolinabirds...>


 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 7:44 am
From: John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: no more nighthawks
Common Nighthawks seem to have disappeared as a breeding species in
Raleigh, North Carolina. Twenty years ago we used to consistently find them
flying over downtown Raleigh at several locations during the summer, but we
have not seen them for at least the last five years. There are still a
number of flat-roofed buildings with gravel, including those where we
suspect they were nesting (based on observation of courtship displays), so
nesting opportunities doesn't seem to be the problem. Fewer insects,
possibly; but some of us suspect increased predation from an increasing
population of Cooper's Hawk and Fish Crow in the urban setting might have
done them in. But who knows?
The sound of nighthawks used to be a part of the experience of dining out
on a summer's evening. You don't know what you've got til its gone. Sad.
John Connors
Raleigh, NC

On Wed, May 20, 2020 at 10:19 AM Christopher Hill <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Kevin,
>
> I’m no nighthawk expert, but it seems much more likely you saw an adult
> doing a distraction display than a juvenile (why would a juvenile do that?
> But adult ground nesters of many groups do distraction displays.).
>
> I think sandy areas whether associated with coastal dunes or open longleaf
> are native nesting habitats here. Gravel rooftops are manmade substitutes
> for bare sand, for nighthawks and least terns and kildeer and, in Great
> Britain, Oystercatchers. Those three habitats are where I hear and see
> nighthawks (urban places with gravel roofs, coastal islands, occasionally
> in longleaf).
>
> Chris Hill
> Conway, SC
>
> On May 20, 2020, at 10:14 AM, Kevin Kubach <kmkubach...> wrote:
>
> CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise
> caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown
> senders.
> Chris et al.,
>
> Thanks for this interesting discussion on Nighthawks. I don't have
> extensive experience with them, but I wanted to share an observation. On
> the several occasions I have visited the Aiken Gopher Tortoise Heritage
> Preserve in Aiken Co., SC (at various times from spring through summer), I
> have seen multiple Nighthawks in various phases of their breeding cycle.
> This is a tract managed for what I would describe as a longleaf pine
> "scrubland"--not the classic longleaf-wiregrass savanna, but open longleaf
> with a scrubbier, sandier floor. It still supports Red-cockaded Woodpeckers
> and Bachman's Sparrows--the longleaf associates. Nighthawks seem to thrive
> there. Last week I observed an adult pair with what appeared to be a
> juvenile (I would appreciate any thoughts based on the photos and
> observations as described in my checklist, here:
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68992572__;!!OToaGQ!9QMVQW4lBGAjGcfESn-6jjoO3Mdo9xeUAik62pHq6JrD23uEOKNN50V_L1KTK0ph-G8$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https*3A*2F*2Febird.org*2Fchecklist*2FS68992572&data=02*7C01*7Cchill*40coastal.edu*7C914e31a66a404e5f652308d7fcc8036e*7Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797*7C0*7C0*7C637255808294853142&sdata=JG86FItuZeB8tFBCEdLZXZ82*2Fv8oO0ndEUCcJxFeEO4*3D&reserved=0__;JSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUl!!OToaGQ!7OaV-KeukPKvhG2Wcsi9LULizbCvumVWE_qMDY7QY4WJuyT7GWdd_B9mcmiLyExoEu0$>
> ).
>
> Are Nighthawks perhaps one of the many species dependent in part, in the
> southeast, on the open landscapes provided by longleaf savannas, which we
> all know have been reduced to a tiny fraction of their previous extent?
>
> Kevin Kubach
> Greenville, SC
>
> On Wed, May 20, 2020 at 9:47 AM Parkin Hunter <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> I have been wondering about the loss of rock roofs also. There are almost
>> none at Garden City now. When my father built my house in 1962 they were
>> everywhere (I am an offender.) The dock next to me had a flat, rock roof
>> that the birds used to break things open. Gone now.
>>
>> Parkin Hunter
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
>>
>> > On May 20, 2020, at 9:18 AM, Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds
>> Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>> >
>> > I’ve been living in Conway, SC near Coastal Carolina University since
>> 1999 and every spring the nighthawks come back, and by late April, when I
>> take my ornithology class on an all day field trip, I always hear the
>> nighthawks calling over campus as I wait for the students to show up for
>> the 7 am van ride to the coast. In the evenings I hear them over our house
>> and when we go for walks, and at the local Food Lion parking lot. But not
>> this year. They never showed up, for the first time I can remember. Maybe
>> it’s that a gravel rooftop they nested on was upgraded to rubber membrane
>> and they couldn’t find a nearby replacement, or maybe it’s a small local
>> piece of the overall decline in nightjars and in aerial insectivores
>> generally, but even though I’m not yet sure it’s a permanent, I thought I
>> would note the disappearance here.
>> >
>> > Chris Hill
>> > Conway, SC
>>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 7:34 am
From: Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: no more nighthawks
Thanks, Chris. An adult using distraction was my first impression and my
other theory, but the thing that threw me off was that the other two adults
appeared to be tightly associated with the bird I flushed on the ground.
Before and after I flushed the ground bird, the adults were associating
with that particular area when they had thousands of acres of other
appropriate habitat to use. They were already flying around that particular
spot, perching in the pines and giving what I now perceive as alarm calls
(heard in the recordings...not the "wheer" calls but the others?); after I
flushed the other bird, they continued to stay nearby, calling and
perching, and even "zeroing in" on the flushed bird several minutes later
after it had flown about 75 yards away to a different spot. I don't know
what kind of social networks Nighthawks form, but maybe they just didn't
like me threatening their buddy?

I haven't had a chance to research their breeding cycle to see if the
timing even makes sense for that to have been a juvenile; nor have I been
able to determine this by its plumage (nor qualified...just a fish guy who
really likes birds).

Kevin

On Wed, May 20, 2020 at 10:18 AM Christopher Hill <Chill...> wrote:

> Kevin,
>
> I’m no nighthawk expert, but it seems much more likely you saw an adult
> doing a distraction display than a juvenile (why would a juvenile do that?
> But adult ground nesters of many groups do distraction displays.).
>
> I think sandy areas whether associated with coastal dunes or open longleaf
> are native nesting habitats here. Gravel rooftops are manmade substitutes
> for bare sand, for nighthawks and least terns and kildeer and, in Great
> Britain, Oystercatchers. Those three habitats are where I hear and see
> nighthawks (urban places with gravel roofs, coastal islands, occasionally
> in longleaf).
>
> Chris Hill
> Conway, SC
>
> On May 20, 2020, at 10:14 AM, Kevin Kubach <kmkubach...> wrote:
>
> CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise
> caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown
> senders.
> Chris et al.,
>
> Thanks for this interesting discussion on Nighthawks. I don't have
> extensive experience with them, but I wanted to share an observation. On
> the several occasions I have visited the Aiken Gopher Tortoise Heritage
> Preserve in Aiken Co., SC (at various times from spring through summer), I
> have seen multiple Nighthawks in various phases of their breeding cycle.
> This is a tract managed for what I would describe as a longleaf pine
> "scrubland"--not the classic longleaf-wiregrass savanna, but open longleaf
> with a scrubbier, sandier floor. It still supports Red-cockaded Woodpeckers
> and Bachman's Sparrows--the longleaf associates. Nighthawks seem to thrive
> there. Last week I observed an adult pair with what appeared to be a
> juvenile (I would appreciate any thoughts based on the photos and
> observations as described in my checklist, here:
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68992572__;!!OToaGQ!7CiSQC7m-opSkBx2iktuIWxvCWIa9pmS66fVkN1ZgTOZ8lCQ0qdKtx3fv5JLTaH8lTo$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https*3A*2F*2Febird.org*2Fchecklist*2FS68992572&data=02*7C01*7Cchill*40coastal.edu*7C914e31a66a404e5f652308d7fcc8036e*7Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797*7C0*7C0*7C637255808294853142&sdata=JG86FItuZeB8tFBCEdLZXZ82*2Fv8oO0ndEUCcJxFeEO4*3D&reserved=0__;JSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUl!!OToaGQ!7CiSQC7m-opSkBx2iktuIWxvCWIa9pmS66fVkN1ZgTOZ8lCQ0qdKtx3fv5JLt0Ojiyo$ >
> ).
>
> Are Nighthawks perhaps one of the many species dependent in part, in the
> southeast, on the open landscapes provided by longleaf savannas, which we
> all know have been reduced to a tiny fraction of their previous extent?
>
> Kevin Kubach
> Greenville, SC
>
> On Wed, May 20, 2020 at 9:47 AM Parkin Hunter <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> I have been wondering about the loss of rock roofs also. There are almost
>> none at Garden City now. When my father built my house in 1962 they were
>> everywhere (I am an offender.) The dock next to me had a flat, rock roof
>> that the birds used to break things open. Gone now.
>>
>> Parkin Hunter
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
>>
>> > On May 20, 2020, at 9:18 AM, Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds
>> Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>> >
>> > I’ve been living in Conway, SC near Coastal Carolina University since
>> 1999 and every spring the nighthawks come back, and by late April, when I
>> take my ornithology class on an all day field trip, I always hear the
>> nighthawks calling over campus as I wait for the students to show up for
>> the 7 am van ride to the coast. In the evenings I hear them over our house
>> and when we go for walks, and at the local Food Lion parking lot. But not
>> this year. They never showed up, for the first time I can remember. Maybe
>> it’s that a gravel rooftop they nested on was upgraded to rubber membrane
>> and they couldn’t find a nearby replacement, or maybe it’s a small local
>> piece of the overall decline in nightjars and in aerial insectivores
>> generally, but even though I’m not yet sure it’s a permanent, I thought I
>> would note the disappearance here.
>> >
>> > Chris Hill
>> > Conway, SC
>>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 7:19 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: no more nighthawks
Kevin,

I’m no nighthawk expert, but it seems much more likely you saw an adult doing a distraction display than a juvenile (why would a juvenile do that? But adult ground nesters of many groups do distraction displays.).

I think sandy areas whether associated with coastal dunes or open longleaf are native nesting habitats here. Gravel rooftops are manmade substitutes for bare sand, for nighthawks and least terns and kildeer and, in Great Britain, Oystercatchers. Those three habitats are where I hear and see nighthawks (urban places with gravel roofs, coastal islands, occasionally in longleaf).

Chris Hill
Conway, SC
On May 20, 2020, at 10:14 AM, Kevin Kubach <kmkubach...><mailto:<kmkubach...>> wrote:


CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.

Chris et al.,

Thanks for this interesting discussion on Nighthawks. I don't have extensive experience with them, but I wanted to share an observation. On the several occasions I have visited the Aiken Gopher Tortoise Heritage Preserve in Aiken Co., SC (at various times from spring through summer), I have seen multiple Nighthawks in various phases of their breeding cycle. This is a tract managed for what I would describe as a longleaf pine "scrubland"--not the classic longleaf-wiregrass savanna, but open longleaf with a scrubbier, sandier floor. It still supports Red-cockaded Woodpeckers and Bachman's Sparrows--the longleaf associates. Nighthawks seem to thrive there. Last week I observed an adult pair with what appeared to be a juvenile (I would appreciate any thoughts based on the photos and observations as described in my checklist, here: https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68992572__;!!OToaGQ!7OaV-KeukPKvhG2Wcsi9LULizbCvumVWE_qMDY7QY4WJuyT7GWdd_B9mcmiLYcR23oc$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https*3A*2F*2Febird.org*2Fchecklist*2FS68992572&data=02*7C01*7Cchill*40coastal.edu*7C914e31a66a404e5f652308d7fcc8036e*7Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797*7C0*7C0*7C637255808294853142&sdata=JG86FItuZeB8tFBCEdLZXZ82*2Fv8oO0ndEUCcJxFeEO4*3D&reserved=0__;JSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUl!!OToaGQ!7OaV-KeukPKvhG2Wcsi9LULizbCvumVWE_qMDY7QY4WJuyT7GWdd_B9mcmiLyExoEu0$ >).

Are Nighthawks perhaps one of the many species dependent in part, in the southeast, on the open landscapes provided by longleaf savannas, which we all know have been reduced to a tiny fraction of their previous extent?

Kevin Kubach
Greenville, SC

On Wed, May 20, 2020 at 9:47 AM Parkin Hunter <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
I have been wondering about the loss of rock roofs also. There are almost none at Garden City now. When my father built my house in 1962 they were everywhere (I am an offender.) The dock next to me had a flat, rock roof that the birds used to break things open. Gone now.

Parkin Hunter

Sent from my iPad

> On May 20, 2020, at 9:18 AM, Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
>
> I’ve been living in Conway, SC near Coastal Carolina University since 1999 and every spring the nighthawks come back, and by late April, when I take my ornithology class on an all day field trip, I always hear the nighthawks calling over campus as I wait for the students to show up for the 7 am van ride to the coast. In the evenings I hear them over our house and when we go for walks, and at the local Food Lion parking lot. But not this year. They never showed up, for the first time I can remember. Maybe it’s that a gravel rooftop they nested on was upgraded to rubber membrane and they couldn’t find a nearby replacement, or maybe it’s a small local piece of the overall decline in nightjars and in aerial insectivores generally, but even though I’m not yet sure it’s a permanent, I thought I would note the disappearance here.
>
> Chris Hill
> Conway, SC


 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 7:15 am
From: oksanaduck (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Blackpoll Warbler in Raleigh on Saturday
Saturday afternoon I saw my first ever Blackpoll Warbler sitting in the shadow of our car on the driveway.  It was hot that day and he looked exhausted and seemed to be panting.  After reading about their usually non-stop 1,800 mile migration to Canada from Puerto Rico or northern South America, I understood why he looked that way!  It gave me the opportunity to get a good picture! I didn't see him again after those few minutes.Patty TiceRaleigh NCSent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 7:14 am
From: Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: no more nighthawks
Chris et al.,

Thanks for this interesting discussion on Nighthawks. I don't have
extensive experience with them, but I wanted to share an observation. On
the several occasions I have visited the Aiken Gopher Tortoise Heritage
Preserve in Aiken Co., SC (at various times from spring through summer), I
have seen multiple Nighthawks in various phases of their breeding cycle.
This is a tract managed for what I would describe as a longleaf pine
"scrubland"--not the classic longleaf-wiregrass savanna, but open longleaf
with a scrubbier, sandier floor. It still supports Red-cockaded Woodpeckers
and Bachman's Sparrows--the longleaf associates. Nighthawks seem to thrive
there. Last week I observed an adult pair with what appeared to be a
juvenile (I would appreciate any thoughts based on the photos and
observations as described in my checklist, here:
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68992572__;!!OToaGQ!4pHgrIRmv6oBlkAvLKaPcON0kASj7DDCKvjbOec_qml1w1eOXTGzyctDF3OIDAvPEUI$ ).

Are Nighthawks perhaps one of the many species dependent in part, in the
southeast, on the open landscapes provided by longleaf savannas, which we
all know have been reduced to a tiny fraction of their previous extent?

Kevin Kubach
Greenville, SC

On Wed, May 20, 2020 at 9:47 AM Parkin Hunter <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> I have been wondering about the loss of rock roofs also. There are almost
> none at Garden City now. When my father built my house in 1962 they were
> everywhere (I am an offender.) The dock next to me had a flat, rock roof
> that the birds used to break things open. Gone now.
>
> Parkin Hunter
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> > On May 20, 2020, at 9:18 AM, Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing
> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> >
> > I’ve been living in Conway, SC near Coastal Carolina University since
> 1999 and every spring the nighthawks come back, and by late April, when I
> take my ornithology class on an all day field trip, I always hear the
> nighthawks calling over campus as I wait for the students to show up for
> the 7 am van ride to the coast. In the evenings I hear them over our house
> and when we go for walks, and at the local Food Lion parking lot. But not
> this year. They never showed up, for the first time I can remember. Maybe
> it’s that a gravel rooftop they nested on was upgraded to rubber membrane
> and they couldn’t find a nearby replacement, or maybe it’s a small local
> piece of the overall decline in nightjars and in aerial insectivores
> generally, but even though I’m not yet sure it’s a permanent, I thought I
> would note the disappearance here.
> >
> > Chris Hill
> > Conway, SC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 6:47 am
From: Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: no more nighthawks
I have been wondering about the loss of rock roofs also. There are almost none at Garden City now. When my father built my house in 1962 they were everywhere (I am an offender.) The dock next to me had a flat, rock roof that the birds used to break things open. Gone now.

Parkin Hunter

Sent from my iPad

> On May 20, 2020, at 9:18 AM, Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I’ve been living in Conway, SC near Coastal Carolina University since 1999 and every spring the nighthawks come back, and by late April, when I take my ornithology class on an all day field trip, I always hear the nighthawks calling over campus as I wait for the students to show up for the 7 am van ride to the coast. In the evenings I hear them over our house and when we go for walks, and at the local Food Lion parking lot. But not this year. They never showed up, for the first time I can remember. Maybe it’s that a gravel rooftop they nested on was upgraded to rubber membrane and they couldn’t find a nearby replacement, or maybe it’s a small local piece of the overall decline in nightjars and in aerial insectivores generally, but even though I’m not yet sure it’s a permanent, I thought I would note the disappearance here.
>
> Chris Hill
> Conway, SC
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 6:43 am
From: Ron <waxwing...>
Subject: Re: no more nighthawks
I read somewhere that the eastern subspecies is in decline, for reasons
unknown. They seem to be tougher to find around the Charlotte area also.

Ron Clark
Kings Mtn. NC





-----Original Message-----
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
Sent: Wednesday, May 20, 2020 9:17 AM
To: Carolinabirds
Subject: no more nighthawks

I’ve been living in Conway, SC near Coastal Carolina University since 1999
and every spring the nighthawks come back, and by late April, when I take my
ornithology class on an all day field trip, I always hear the nighthawks
calling over campus as I wait for the students to show up for the 7 am van
ride to the coast. In the evenings I hear them over our house and when we
go for walks, and at the local Food Lion parking lot. But not this year.
They never showed up, for the first time I can remember. Maybe it’s that a
gravel rooftop they nested on was upgraded to rubber membrane and they
couldn’t find a nearby replacement, or maybe it’s a small local piece of the
overall decline in nightjars and in aerial insectivores generally, but even
though I’m not yet sure it’s a permanent, I thought I would note the
disappearance here.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 6:18 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: no more nighthawks
I’ve been living in Conway, SC near Coastal Carolina University since 1999 and every spring the nighthawks come back, and by late April, when I take my ornithology class on an all day field trip, I always hear the nighthawks calling over campus as I wait for the students to show up for the 7 am van ride to the coast. In the evenings I hear them over our house and when we go for walks, and at the local Food Lion parking lot. But not this year. They never showed up, for the first time I can remember. Maybe it’s that a gravel rooftop they nested on was upgraded to rubber membrane and they couldn’t find a nearby replacement, or maybe it’s a small local piece of the overall decline in nightjars and in aerial insectivores generally, but even though I’m not yet sure it’s a permanent, I thought I would note the disappearance here.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 6:08 am
From: Carol Chelette (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Documentary on eagles
There will be what looks to be an interesting show about eagles tonight at
9:00 on PBS.

Carol Chelette
Durham, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 5:29 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: [External] Lake Crabtree
Black Tern flying over lake now, Caspian Tern near island. Two Common Loons still on the lake. 830.

Harry LeGrand

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 20, 2020, at 8:11 AM, Corey, Ed <ed.corey...> wrote:
>
> I had a flock of 8 Red-necked Phalaropes fly towards the dam, including one in winter plumage. I was unable to relocate them. Loads of swallows at the dam, including at least one Bank Swallow.
>
> Ed Corey
> Raleigh, NC
>
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>
>
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Marc Ribaudo <carolinabirds...>
> Date: 5/20/20 7:30 AM (GMT-05:00)
> To: <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: [External] Lake Crabtree
>
> CAUTION: External email. Do not click links or open attachments unless you verify. Send all suspicious email as an attachment to <report.spam...>
>
> FYI the mudflats are much reduced in size pretty and shorebirds are few. 1-2 red-necked phalarope, 4 dunlin, a few semi and least sandpipers.
>
> Marc Ribaudo
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 5:12 am
From: Corey, Ed <ed.corey...>
Subject: RE: [External] Lake Crabtree
I had a flock of 8 Red-necked Phalaropes fly towards the dam, including one in winter plumage. I was unable to relocate them. Loads of swallows at the dam, including at least one Bank Swallow.

Ed Corey
Raleigh, NC

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone



-------- Original message --------
From: Marc Ribaudo <carolinabirds...>
Date: 5/20/20 7:30 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: [External] Lake Crabtree

CAUTION: External email. Do not click links or open attachments unless you verify. Send all suspicious email as an attachment to <report.spam...><mailto:<report.spam...>


FYI the mudflats are much reduced in size pretty and shorebirds are few. 1-2 red-necked phalarope, 4 dunlin, a few semi and least sandpipers.

Marc Ribaudo

 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 4:30 am
From: Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lake Crabtree

FYI the mudflats are much reduced in size pretty and shorebirds are few.  1-2 red-necked phalarope, 4 dunlin, a few semi and least sandpipers.

Marc Ribaudo

 

Back to top
Date: 5/19/20 3:49 pm
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lake Crabtree shorebirds - pm update
After a pretty chaotic morning with inbound and outbound flights, things seem to have settled down a bit at the shallow end of old Lake Crabtree (30 years of age this year!!)

This evening about 6 pm we noted the following on the delta mudflat:

Red-necked Phalarope - 4 (all males)
Dunlin - 47 (numbers earlier in the day varied from about 50-65 depending on the observer, the birds spend time on both sides of the island, so not all in view at once)
Semipalmated Sandpiper - about 20. Fog forming, so visibility not as good as earlier
Semipalmated Plover - 1
Almost certainly Least Sandpipers as well, but with the wind and fog, did not spend too much time with the peeps.

Bank, Barn, Cliff and Rough-winged Swallows

In case folks get tired of looking at shorebirds, 2 basic-plumaged Common Loons floated and dove out on the lake.

A Spotted Sandpiper kept the rental canoes company over by the observation tower.

No birds noted on the floodplain (still not enough rain to create much habitat there).

Steve Shultz
Apex NC


 

Back to top
Date: 5/19/20 2:05 pm
From: Steve Patterson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Hooper Lane Henderson County, NC
Wow, Wayne, that's hard to hear.  Sad news.  Thank you for your information to the group and your advocacy.  

Steve PattersonAnderson, SC


-----Original Message-----
From: Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...>
To: Carolina Birds <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Tue, May 19, 2020 3:07 pm
Subject: Hooper Lane Henderson County, NC

    Folks, effective immediately, Super Sod  has closed the farm to all folks except employees. David the head man, called me this am to give me the bad news. He said some management changes at Corporate and a new insurance co. has resulted in the changes!
      David assured me that birders up our way, have never been a problem. But recently, folks have been out there jogging, biking, women with baby carriages, etc. have been using the farm. This greatly increases the liability issues and cause for concern! They have also had some liability issues in South Carolina. No Trespassing signs will be going up in the very near future.
    We can continue to bird from the county roads only. Please respect their wishes!
I have a very good relationship with management and hope to be able to work something out for us in the near future.
  Wayne 

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/19/20 12:40 pm
From: Peter Vankevich (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Red Knots on Ocracoke
Last Thursday (May 14, 2020) while surveying several miles of Ocracoke
beach, I estimated there were at least one thousand Red Knots. They were
feeding in several large flocks. I pass this on since I've been reading how
scarce they are in Delaware Bay. Apparently, in addition to the
excessive harvesting from years' past, according to one news source
from New Jersey, the cool water has kept the horseshoe crabs from
spawning.
Hopefully, they are finding a lot of sustenance on the Outer Banks that
will help them on their long journey north.
/Peter Vankevich

 

Back to top
Date: 5/19/20 12:35 pm
From: scompton1251 <scompton1251...>
Subject: Re: Hooper Lane Henderson County, NC
So, does this mean the SC Super Sod farm in Orangeburg is closing to birders as well? Steve ComptonGreenville, SCSent from my Verizon LG Smartphone------ Original message------From: Wayne ForsytheDate: Tue, May 19, 2020 3:07 PMTo: Carolina Birds;Cc: Subject:Hooper Lane Henderson County, NC Folks, effective immediately, Super Sod has closed the farm to all folks except employees. David the head man, called me this am to give me the bad news. He said some management changes at Corporate and a new insurance co. has resulted in the changes!
David assured me that birders up our way, have never been a problem. But recently, folks have been out there jogging, biking, women with baby carriages, etc. have been using the farm. This greatly increases the liability issues and cause for concern! They have also had some liability issues in South Carolina. No Trespassing signs will be going up in the very near future.
We can continue to bird from the county roads only. Please
respect their wishes!
I have a very good relationship with management and hope to be able to work something out for us in the near future.
Wayne

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/19/20 12:30 pm
From: Ron <waxwing...>
Subject: Re: Hooper Lane Henderson County, NC
The one outside of Hendersonville is right beside the park, so it’s too convenient for folks to just keep going. Maybe Orangeburg, without a nearby park, will be different, hopefully.

Ron Clark
Kings Mtn. NC




From: Matt Janson (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
Sent: Tuesday, May 19, 2020 3:17 PM
To: Wayne Forsythe
Cc: Carolina Birds
Subject: Re: Hooper Lane Henderson County, NC

Wayne,
Do you know if this also affects the Super Sod farm in Orangeburg, SC? They have always been amenable and friendly when I call ahead of time at that location to give them a heads up about birding there.
Thanks,
Matt Janson
Charlotte, NC

On Tue, May 19, 2020 at 3:07 PM Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...> wrote:

Folks, effective immediately, Super Sod has closed the farm to all folks except employees. David the head man, called me this am to give me the bad news. He said some management changes at Corporate and a new insurance co. has resulted in the changes!
David assured me that birders up our way, have never been a problem. But recently, folks have been out there jogging, biking, women with baby carriages, etc. have been using the farm. This greatly increases the liability issues and cause for concern! They have also had some liability issues in South Carolina. No Trespassing signs will be going up in the very near future.
We can continue to bird from the county roads only. Please respect their wishes!
I have a very good relationship with management and hope to be able to work something out for us in the near future.
Wayne

Sent from my iPhone


--

Matthew D. Janson
28270 NC
(704)-845-6030
 

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Date: 5/19/20 12:17 pm
From: Matt Janson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Hooper Lane Henderson County, NC
Wayne,
Do you know if this also affects the Super Sod farm in Orangeburg, SC? They
have always been amenable and friendly when I call ahead of time at that
location to give them a heads up about birding there.
Thanks,
Matt Janson
Charlotte, NC

On Tue, May 19, 2020 at 3:07 PM Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...>
wrote:

> Folks, effective immediately, Super Sod has closed the farm to all
> folks except employees. David the head man, called me this am to give me
> the bad news. He said some management changes at Corporate and a new
> insurance co. has resulted in the changes!
> David assured me that birders up our way, have never been a problem.
> But recently, folks have been out there jogging, biking, women with baby
> carriages, etc. have been using the farm. This greatly increases the
> liability issues and cause for concern! They have also had some liability
> issues in South Carolina. No Trespassing signs will be going up in the very
> near future.
> We can continue to bird from the county roads only. Please respect
> their wishes!
> I have a very good relationship with management and hope to be able to
> work something out for us in the near future.
> Wayne
>
> Sent from my iPhone



--
Matthew D. Janson
28270 NC
(704)-845-6030

 

Back to top
Date: 5/19/20 12:07 pm
From: Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...>
Subject: Hooper Lane Henderson County, NC
Folks, effective immediately, Super Sod has closed the farm to all folks except employees. David the head man, called me this am to give me the bad news. He said some management changes at Corporate and a new insurance co. has resulted in the changes!
David assured me that birders up our way, have never been a problem. But recently, folks have been out there jogging, biking, women with baby carriages, etc. have been using the farm. This greatly increases the liability issues and cause for concern! They have also had some liability issues in South Carolina. No Trespassing signs will be going up in the very near future.
We can continue to bird from the county roads only. Please respect their wishes!
I have a very good relationship with management and hope to be able to work something out for us in the near future.
Wayne

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/19/20 11:54 am
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Yard birds- Raleigh Nc
Inspired by Lake Crabtree, I checked the flats on our lake to see if any new shorebirds arrived. Sure enough...

Semipalmated Sp- 2
Least Sp- 4
Spotted Sp- 1

The first two are new for the yard.

Ryan Justice


Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/19/20 9:48 am
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Lake Crabtree Willet
I apologize. Apparently I can’t count. 3 Phalaropes.

Ryan

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 19, 2020, at 12:44 PM, Ryan Justice <blackburnian151...> wrote:
>
> Make that two Phalaropes
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On May 19, 2020, at 12:43 PM, Ryan Justice <blackburnian151...> wrote:
>>
>> Red-necked Phalarope in with the Dunlins on the flat.
>>
>> Ryan Justice
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>>> On May 19, 2020, at 12:21 PM, Ryan Justice <blackburnian151...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Just flew over play area. Bank Swallows as well.
>>>
>>> Ryan Justice
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/19/20 9:45 am
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Lake Crabtree Willet
Make that two Phalaropes

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 19, 2020, at 12:43 PM, Ryan Justice <blackburnian151...> wrote:
>
> Red-necked Phalarope in with the Dunlins on the flat.
>
> Ryan Justice
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On May 19, 2020, at 12:21 PM, Ryan Justice <blackburnian151...> wrote:
>>
>> Just flew over play area. Bank Swallows as well.
>>
>> Ryan Justice
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/19/20 9:44 am
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Lake Crabtree Willet
Red-necked Phalarope in with the Dunlins on the flat.

Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 19, 2020, at 12:21 PM, Ryan Justice <blackburnian151...> wrote:
>
> Just flew over play area. Bank Swallows as well.
>
> Ryan Justice
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/19/20 9:21 am
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lake Crabtree Willet
Just flew over play area. Bank Swallows as well.

Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/19/20 7:22 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Dunlin, Crabtree
As Harry said, things are dynamic out there.

Recall that shorebirds will and do migrate during the day, the weather is not as big a deal to them as might be considered, and the local Bald Eagle loves to fly over occasionally and scare up most of the birds. Some come back, others don’t. About 9:55 all the birds lifted up, and while the Dunlin (about 58 I believe) came back, the Whimbrel left. The 11 visible on the flat were joined by 2 more in the air (not sure if they came up from somewhere else or were simply flying by, they were higher than the group of 11) for a total of 13.

The Common Tern was nowhere to be seen, but a Black Tern stopped by.

Possibly as impressive as the shorebirds was the flock of swallows. All of the normally occurring species (Bank, Cliff, Rough-winged, Barn, Tree) were about, with decent (for Wake) numbers of Bank.

As the rain continues, the flat will probably become submerged, after which activity might move to the floodplain/open play area if enough puddles form.

Checking my notes, I see that my last Whimbrel in Wake was on almost the same date! That one was 5/20, so this may well be the *right* week for Whimbrels coming through.

Steve Shultz
Apex NC

From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Harry LeGrand
Sent: Tuesday, May 19, 2020 9:10 AM
To: Marc Ribaudo; <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Dunlin, Crabtree

This email is from an external source - exercise caution regarding links and attachments.

Birds are obviously coming and going into the lake this morning. The Dunlins were certainly not there in the hour I was there. And the Whimbrels were not there or visible the first 30 minutes I was there.

Don’t assume these birds will stay there all day, and certainly new things can drop down later in the day, as there will be squalls much of the day.

Harry LeGrand
Sent from my iPhone

On May 19, 2020, at 8:57 AM, Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

24 dunlin on flats

Marc Ribaudo
 

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Date: 5/19/20 7:09 am
From: Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Whimbrel have left Crabtree



 

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Date: 5/19/20 6:32 am
From: Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Black tern, crabtree

Flying near boat house

Marc Ribaudo

 

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Date: 5/19/20 6:10 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Dunlin, Crabtree
Birds are obviously coming and going into the lake this morning. The Dunlins were certainly not there in the hour I was there. And the Whimbrels were not there or visible the first 30 minutes I was there.

Don’t assume these birds will stay there all day, and certainly new things can drop down later in the day, as there will be squalls much of the day.

Harry LeGrand

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 19, 2020, at 8:57 AM, Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> 24 dunlin on flats
>
> Marc Ribaudo
>

 

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Date: 5/19/20 5:58 am
From: Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Dunlin, Crabtree

24 dunlin on flats

Marc Ribaudo

 

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Date: 5/19/20 5:51 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lake Crabtree, NC, birds -
I stopped by Lake Crabtree, Wake Co., NC, before 7 am, and 3 other folks
were already there. It indeed was very unsettled, some bouts of angled
rain, winds NE at about 15-20 -- son or Arthur, even though this mess is
from a stalled cold front.

I managed to see an apparent Arctic Tern flying off the island around 715,
a minute after the others left, but it flew out of the lake, as it was not
seen again. It had a white forehead, and the typical short-front shape and
long tail, but details of the wing coloration were tough to see. And, I
couldn't see the bill shape, etc., so it will have to go as a probable.
After a while, a whirling flock of WHIMBRELS flew around, and finally after
Ann Stinely arrived, they settled down -- 11 in all!! Another tern came
from somewhere, this one with a solid black cap, landed near the Whimbrels,
and was a Common Tern.

The Black-bellied Plover was not there. Other shorebirds at the island were:
Semipalmated Plover 5-6 but nary a Killdeer
Greater Yellowlegs 1
Spotted Sandpiper 4-5
Least Sandpiper maybe 15
Semipalmated Sandpiper 50 or more -- everywhere.

I cannot swear to any Western Sandpipers. People will certainly continue
to report one or two, but I wonder; they should be gone northwest by now.
No White-rumpeds. I managed to see Barn, Tree, Rough-winged, and Cliff
swallows.


Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

 

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Date: 5/19/20 5:51 am
From: Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Whimbrel, Crabtree Southport

11 whimbrel on flats.

Marc Ribaudo

 

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Date: 5/18/20 5:53 pm
From: Matt Lawing (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Least bittern at Flat River
Heard from back of first impoundment in the impoundment around 815 pm. Audio posted to ebird.

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/18/20 12:19 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Possible nestings of Peregrine Falcon and Common Merganser in nw. NC
I just got this sent to me by Beth Brinson. Neither is conclusive
breeding, but possibles:

I birded the Alleghany Access of New River State Park yesterday (5-17) and
had a Peregrine Falcon sitting at an old raven's nest on the big rock face
along the river. He remained there for the couple of hours that we checked
on him. ....

Further up river I had a Common Merganser female fly into a cavity in a
large sycamore--another possible nesting occurrence.

-----------------------

Harry LeGrand

 

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Date: 5/18/20 10:12 am
From: John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mississippi Kite near downtown Raleigh
Hi All.
For three days in a row a few birders in the Mordecai neighborhood just
north of downtown Raleigh have reported seeing a Mississippi Kite. Today
was my turn. The bird was seen soaring above the neighborhood, going
nowhere fast. It circled a few times, but mostly kept its nose to the wind
and just hovered and soared for a good 15 minutes before I finally lost
sight of it.
A few years back I noticed and reported on two kites that frequented our
downtown neighborhood, but don't know if they ever nested. Will keep my
eyes in the sky for this one.
John Connors
Raleigh, NC

 

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Date: 5/17/20 1:54 pm
From: Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Connecticut Warbler - Greenville, SC
Good Afternoon. On Monday, May 11, I heard then briefly saw a Connecticut
Warbler along an unnamed stream in suburban Greenville, SC. The bird was
singing in a boggy, grassy floodplain area with willows and I was able to
get a recording before it took off (recording in eBird list):
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68855276__;!!OToaGQ!8cJBdTZxYh6fXpi2_tx80GEvarEgjcSjMQDVdfNZIKejDrchAwml86vldE8ec4Yyigk$ . Despite considerable effort that
morning and in subsequent days, the bird was not located again.

Good Birding,

Kevin Kubach
Greenville, SC

 

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Date: 5/17/20 9:32 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Loggerhead shrikes, SE Raleigh

To add to what Marc had yesterday —
Lori Arent and I watched a singing Loggerhead Shrike this morning near the Point Church, south of Raleigh, on a phone line. It was last seen in the grove of trees south of the church. This is not far from where I had a singing bird in March, but it moved on. I fear this one could move on as well, though John Connors had 1-2 in this area last summer.

Shrike is a rare bird now in most of the Piedmont. As it is not yet an eBird write-in for Wake County, we’ll report them here.

Only one Mississippi Kite this morning along Mid-Pines Road; the flock from last week seems to have gone, but at least the species is still present and presumed nesting above Yates Pond.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 16, 2020, at 8:44 AM, Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I found 2 Loggerhead Shrikes on Brackpenny Rd in SE Raleigh this morning. I found one at the same spot last June, so likely nesting nearby.
>
> Marc Ribaudo
>

 

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Date: 5/17/20 8:12 am
From: Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lake Lynn has a white barnyard Graylag Goose...not a rare Snow Goose. Wake county NC
I just saw an alert for a reported Snow Goose at Lake Lynn in Wake County,
NC. I think the observer is mistaken. Lake Lynn has a white barnyard
Graylag Goose...not a rare Snow Goose. Another birdwatcher made the same
mistake months ago but never corrected his list. Ebird hid the species
report.
LynnErla Beegle
Raleigh NC

 

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Date: 5/16/20 3:28 pm
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Western NC- BRP birding
Got on the parkway at Ben Miller/421 with the intention of heading S all the way down to the area N of Asheville for Cerulean Warbler, only to find it closed just S of Mt Mitchell due to a rock slide. We took Curtis Creek down the mountain as an alternate. Frustrating, but still good birding along the way.

Highlights:

- Black-billed Cuckoo seen and heard at Boone’s Trace Overlook
- classic mountain birds like raven, RB Nuthatch, Winter Wren, BW Hawk, GC Kinglet, and a couple of singing Hermit Thrushes
- Hairy WP nest in the parking lot at Trout Lake
- 14 warbler sp. including: Ovenbird (21), Black-and-white (11), Swainson’s (1), Kentucky (1), Yellowthroat (4), Hooded (10), Redstart (5), Parula (5), Bay-breasted (1), Blackburnian (2), Chestnut-sided (10), BTB (16), BTG (29), Canada (1)

Happy birding,
Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/16/20 6:37 am
From: anntrue (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Edisto Nature Trail, Colleton Co SC
Now open. You will need your bug spray.

Ann

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/16/20 5:44 am
From: Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Loggerhead shrikes, SE Raleigh

I found 2 Loggerhead Shrikes on Brackpenny Rd in SE Raleigh this morning.  I found one at the same spot last June, so likely nesting nearby.

Marc Ribaudo

 

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Date: 5/16/20 4:42 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Dickcissel at Flat River impoundment, Durham Co.
A male Dickcissel under the powerline back of the first impoundment; but not singing. 730 am. Probably a migrant.

Harry LeGrand



Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/16/20 4:28 am
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Guilford Co. NC Dickcissel
Male and female Dickcissel seen at the culvert on County Farm Rd, just S of Howerton Rd.

22ish Bobolinks and several Grasshopper Sparrows as well.

Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/15/20 4:14 pm
From: Linda Allman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Scissor-tailed flycatcher?
Has anyone seen the flycatcher recently?

 

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Date: 5/15/20 2:20 pm
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Kirtland’s Warbler today?
Anybody look today? And for anyone who has seen it, where was it within Meat Camp?

Ryan

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/14/20 6:37 pm
From: Stacy and Natalie Barbour (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Shorebirds at Lake Crabtree, Raleigh NC
All these birds (except a Stilt Sandpiper) were still present this evening when we departed just before 8:00pm. Numbers varied a bit, but one White-rumped Sandpiper showed well. Afternoon or early evening light is best for viewing from the shoreline on bright days at this location and a scope is a necessity.

Stacy and Natalie Barbour
Raleigh
> 
> Some traffic on the NC RBA text tool this morning that I wanted to cross-pollinate to this list. While nothing rare per se, there are a good number of shorebirds, mainly peeps, at the shallow end of Lake Crabtree today. Hopefully they will stick around for a little while. (Folks may recall that our passerine migrants generally stay put during the day and migrate at night, shorebirds have no qualms about bailing mid-afternoon)
>
> Present at 12:30
>
> Western Sandpiper – at least 1
> Semipalmated Sandpiper – 3-4
> Least Sandpiper – 20+
> White-rumped Sandpiper – 1
> Lesser Yellowlegs – 1
> Solitary Sandpiper – 4ish
> Spotted Sandpiper – 2
> Semipalmated Plover – 1
>
> A Stilt Sandpiper was reported at about 10:30, but not visible at 12:30. Birds can and do walk around the back side of the delta island there, and are thus out of view, so patience, or at least more time than I had before my next Zoom meeting, might reward.
>
> Best,
> Steve Shultz
> Apex, NC
>

 

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Date: 5/14/20 10:58 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Shorebirds at Lake Crabtree, Raleigh NC
Some traffic on the NC RBA text tool this morning that I wanted to cross-pollinate to this list. While nothing rare per se, there are a good number of shorebirds, mainly peeps, at the shallow end of Lake Crabtree today. Hopefully they will stick around for a little while. (Folks may recall that our passerine migrants generally stay put during the day and migrate at night, shorebirds have no qualms about bailing mid-afternoon)

Present at 12:30

Western Sandpiper - at least 1
Semipalmated Sandpiper - 3-4
Least Sandpiper - 20+
White-rumped Sandpiper - 1
Lesser Yellowlegs - 1
Solitary Sandpiper - 4ish
Spotted Sandpiper - 2
Semipalmated Plover - 1

A Stilt Sandpiper was reported at about 10:30, but not visible at 12:30. Birds can and do walk around the back side of the delta island there, and are thus out of view, so patience, or at least more time than I had before my next Zoom meeting, might reward.

Best,
Steve Shultz
Apex, NC


 

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Date: 5/14/20 4:36 am
From: Steven Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Kirtland’s Warbler
The Kirtland’s Warbler is still present this morning. Weather is nice, but
rain later today. Bird seen close and some songs. Steve Howell and Patty
Masten

 

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Date: 5/14/20 12:44 am
From: william haddad (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Kirtland's Warbler -- singing! -- today in Watauga Co., NC
Quick, let's get some Jack Pines to plant in N.C.!! Seriously, though, a
good find - even greater because it was vocalizing!

Bill Haddad
Spruce Pine, N.C..


On Wed, May 13, 2020 at 9:36 PM <badgerboy...> wrote:

> If anyone goes to see this bird please remember that it is a very rare and
> endangered species, so playing tapes should be avoided as well as any
> harassment. Also note the boardwalks are in very poor shape and some are
> flagged as closed--these should NOT be crossed.
>
> Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC
> On 5/13/2020 6:04 PM, Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
>
> This should work.
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.facebook.com/katiekatejeane/videos/pcb.10222052611452714/10222052575291810/?type=3&theater__;!!OToaGQ!-0XFWY4kwFjR_4eF2X7edAkbMCYnL0Y7ArMyBPdh8wqLBSLX5Js9j04C8iAE7765OXg$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.facebook.com/katiekatejeane/videos/pcb.10222052611452714/10222052575291810/?type=3&theater__;!!OToaGQ!7lZgXp7tQDsAQGnT7uCg6dMY1jmBJpLdOvAJ4R27ngFjMC5rNYIviItaKK-8nubTnDs$>
>
> Dwayne
> *************
> J. Dwayne Martin
> Hickory, NC
> <redxbill...>
>
>
> Catawba County Park Ranger
> Riverbend Park - Conover, NC
> <jdmartin...>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.catawbacountync.gov/depts/parks/__;!!OToaGQ!-0XFWY4kwFjR_4eF2X7edAkbMCYnL0Y7ArMyBPdh8wqLBSLX5Js9j04C8iAExt8d7JU$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.catawbacountync.gov/depts/parks/__;!!OToaGQ!7lZgXp7tQDsAQGnT7uCg6dMY1jmBJpLdOvAJ4R27ngFjMC5rNYIviItaKK-8CGxzZKo$>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.weatherlink.com/user/riverbendpark__;!!OToaGQ!-0XFWY4kwFjR_4eF2X7edAkbMCYnL0Y7ArMyBPdh8wqLBSLX5Js9j04C8iAEEd4pYhQ$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.weatherlink.com/user/riverbendpark__;!!OToaGQ!7lZgXp7tQDsAQGnT7uCg6dMY1jmBJpLdOvAJ4R27ngFjMC5rNYIviItaKK-88RZ86hU$>
>
>
>
> On Wed, May 13, 2020 at 6:00 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> The first known record of a Kirtland's Warbler singing in NC was made
>> today -- and video has been uploaded to Facebook Carolina Rare Birds. Ed
>> Corey and I have already played the video, and indeed it is! Katie
>> Griffith has created an eBird list, but that does not have an audio
>> recording --in fact, all recordings on eBird are down the last few days
>> (Cornell issue, I think). Someone may know how to share the Facebook link
>> here, if so -- can you share that? (Note-- you cannot see colors on the
>> bird, but you can see the tail wagging and hear numerous songs.)
>>
>> This is just the SECOND spring report of Kirtland's for NC, but the other
>> was a non-vocal bird.
>>
>> Harry LeGrand
>> Birds of North Carolina website editor
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/20 7:36 pm
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Re: Kirtland's Warbler -- singing! -- today in Watauga Co., NC
If anyone goes to see this bird please remember that it is a very rare
and endangered species, so playing tapes should be avoided as well as
any harassment. Also note the boardwalks are in very poor shape and some
are flagged as closed--these should NOT be crossed.

Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC

On 5/13/2020 6:04 PM, Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> This should work.
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.facebook.com/katiekatejeane/videos/pcb.10222052611452714/10222052575291810/?type=3&theater__;!!OToaGQ!_RTgxHI4QWHkqBcfqhpkJuzdo-Cvv07knzZZy2aoLoYSa-sKV5-lkZ0OreXMunBuY_M$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.facebook.com/katiekatejeane/videos/pcb.10222052611452714/10222052575291810/?type=3&theater__;!!OToaGQ!7lZgXp7tQDsAQGnT7uCg6dMY1jmBJpLdOvAJ4R27ngFjMC5rNYIviItaKK-8nubTnDs$>
>
> Dwayne
> *************
> J. Dwayne Martin
> Hickory, NC
> <redxbill...> <mailto:<redxbill...>
>
>
> Catawba County Park Ranger
> Riverbend Park - Conover, NC
> <jdmartin...> <mailto:<jdmartin...>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.catawbacountync.gov/depts/parks/__;!!OToaGQ!_RTgxHI4QWHkqBcfqhpkJuzdo-Cvv07knzZZy2aoLoYSa-sKV5-lkZ0OreXM5h_EcXg$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.catawbacountync.gov/depts/parks/__;!!OToaGQ!7lZgXp7tQDsAQGnT7uCg6dMY1jmBJpLdOvAJ4R27ngFjMC5rNYIviItaKK-8CGxzZKo$>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.weatherlink.com/user/riverbendpark__;!!OToaGQ!_RTgxHI4QWHkqBcfqhpkJuzdo-Cvv07knzZZy2aoLoYSa-sKV5-lkZ0OreXMPSRi7Pc$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.weatherlink.com/user/riverbendpark__;!!OToaGQ!7lZgXp7tQDsAQGnT7uCg6dMY1jmBJpLdOvAJ4R27ngFjMC5rNYIviItaKK-88RZ86hU$>
>
>
>
> On Wed, May 13, 2020 at 6:00 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...>
> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
>
> The first known record of a Kirtland's Warbler singing in NC was
> made today -- and video has been uploaded to Facebook Carolina
> Rare Birds.  Ed Corey and I have already played the video, and
> indeed it is!  Katie Griffith has created an eBird list, but that
> does not have an audio recording --in fact, all recordings on
> eBird are down the last few days (Cornell issue, I think). 
> Someone may know how to share the Facebook link here, if so -- can
> you share that?   (Note-- you cannot see colors on the bird, but
> you can see the tail wagging and hear numerous songs.)
>
> This is just the SECOND spring report of Kirtland's for NC, but
> the other was a non-vocal bird.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Birds of North Carolina website editor
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/20 7:24 pm
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Kirtland's Warbler -- singing! -- today in Watauga Co., NC
It was at Meat Camp Environmental Studies Area, N of Boone.

Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 13, 2020, at 10:14 PM, Karen LORENZO (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> 
> Do we know Where in the County?
>
>> On Wed, May 13, 2020, 6:00 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>> The first known record of a Kirtland's Warbler singing in NC was made today -- and video has been uploaded to Facebook Carolina Rare Birds. Ed Corey and I have already played the video, and indeed it is! Katie Griffith has created an eBird list, but that does not have an audio recording --in fact, all recordings on eBird are down the last few days (Cornell issue, I think). Someone may know how to share the Facebook link here, if so -- can you share that? (Note-- you cannot see colors on the bird, but you can see the tail wagging and hear numerous songs.)
>>
>> This is just the SECOND spring report of Kirtland's for NC, but the other was a non-vocal bird.
>>
>> Harry LeGrand
>> Birds of North Carolina website editor

 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/20 7:14 pm
From: Karen LORENZO (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Kirtland's Warbler -- singing! -- today in Watauga Co., NC
Do we know Where in the County?

On Wed, May 13, 2020, 6:00 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> The first known record of a Kirtland's Warbler singing in NC was made
> today -- and video has been uploaded to Facebook Carolina Rare Birds. Ed
> Corey and I have already played the video, and indeed it is! Katie
> Griffith has created an eBird list, but that does not have an audio
> recording --in fact, all recordings on eBird are down the last few days
> (Cornell issue, I think). Someone may know how to share the Facebook link
> here, if so -- can you share that? (Note-- you cannot see colors on the
> bird, but you can see the tail wagging and hear numerous songs.)
>
> This is just the SECOND spring report of Kirtland's for NC, but the other
> was a non-vocal bird.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Birds of North Carolina website editor
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/20 7:00 pm
From: scompton1251 <scompton1251...>
Subject: Re: Kirtland's Warbler -- singing! -- today in Watauga Co., NC
Awesome. Ranging much higher than the Mount Mitchell bird, perhaps due to the lack of taller trees on that site. Steve ComptonGreenville, SCSent from my Verizon LG Smartphone------ Original message------From: Derek AldrichDate: Wed, May 13, 2020 8:28 PMTo: Dwayne Martin;Cc: Harry LeGrand;carolinabirds listserve;Subject:Re: Kirtland's Warbler -- singing! -- today in Watauga Co., NCre the audio on ebird: They just imported a huge chunk of audio this past weekend so the system is playing catch up currently. Very nice sighting though. Derek AldrichSC Ebird Hotspot AdminOn Wed, May 13, 2020 at 6:05 PM Dwayne Martin <carolinabirds...> wrote:This should work.  https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.facebook.com/katiekatejeane/videos/pcb.10222052611452714/10222052575291810/?type=3&theaterDwayne**LJ__;KioqKioqKioqKioqKg!!OToaGQ!_gRQXNHyvBOf7bAPEsTG58ND_VrjImYWuw-SuCo-irnD7EJ8PD0PbDg7tnWowbwchts$ . Dwayne MartinHickory, <NCredxbill...> Catawba County Park RangerRiverbend Park - Conover,
<NCjdmartin...>://www.catawbacountync.gov/depts/parks/http://www.weatherlink.com/user/riverbendparkOn Wed, May 13, 2020 at 6:00 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...> wrote:The first known record of a Kirtland's Warbler singing in NC was made today -- and video has been uploaded to Facebook Carolina Rare Birds.  Ed Corey and I have already played the video, and indeed it is!  Katie Griffith has created an eBird list, but that does not have an audio recording --in fact, all recordings on eBird are down the last few days (Cornell issue, I think).  Someone may know how to share the Facebook link here, if so -- can you share that?   (Note-- you cannot see colors on the bird, but you can see the tail wagging and hear numerous songs.)This is just the SECOND spring report of Kirtland's for NC, but the other was a non-vocal bird.    Harry LeGrandBirds of North Carolina website editor



 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/20 5:28 pm
From: Derek Aldrich (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Kirtland's Warbler -- singing! -- today in Watauga Co., NC
re the audio on ebird: They just imported a huge chunk of audio this past
weekend so the system is playing catch up currently.
Very nice sighting though.
Derek Aldrich
SC Ebird Hotspot Admin

On Wed, May 13, 2020 at 6:05 PM Dwayne Martin <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> This should work.
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.facebook.com/katiekatejeane/videos/pcb.10222052611452714/10222052575291810/?type=3&theater__;!!OToaGQ!89FfZhpoNmzVWRwYKv8Ha8GRcq0EYFD13XdQSLPP73lOU2d3xLbd2sKPSiSMqWF5TvA$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.facebook.com/katiekatejeane/videos/pcb.10222052611452714/10222052575291810/?type=3&theater__;!!OToaGQ!7lZgXp7tQDsAQGnT7uCg6dMY1jmBJpLdOvAJ4R27ngFjMC5rNYIviItaKK-8nubTnDs$>
>
> Dwayne
> *************
> J. Dwayne Martin
> Hickory, NC
> <redxbill...>
>
>
> Catawba County Park Ranger
> Riverbend Park - Conover, NC
> <jdmartin...>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.catawbacountync.gov/depts/parks/__;!!OToaGQ!89FfZhpoNmzVWRwYKv8Ha8GRcq0EYFD13XdQSLPP73lOU2d3xLbd2sKPSiSMR03A8gM$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.catawbacountync.gov/depts/parks/__;!!OToaGQ!7lZgXp7tQDsAQGnT7uCg6dMY1jmBJpLdOvAJ4R27ngFjMC5rNYIviItaKK-8CGxzZKo$>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.weatherlink.com/user/riverbendpark__;!!OToaGQ!89FfZhpoNmzVWRwYKv8Ha8GRcq0EYFD13XdQSLPP73lOU2d3xLbd2sKPSiSMEC-ht7o$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.weatherlink.com/user/riverbendpark__;!!OToaGQ!7lZgXp7tQDsAQGnT7uCg6dMY1jmBJpLdOvAJ4R27ngFjMC5rNYIviItaKK-88RZ86hU$>
>
>
>
> On Wed, May 13, 2020 at 6:00 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> The first known record of a Kirtland's Warbler singing in NC was made
>> today -- and video has been uploaded to Facebook Carolina Rare Birds. Ed
>> Corey and I have already played the video, and indeed it is! Katie
>> Griffith has created an eBird list, but that does not have an audio
>> recording --in fact, all recordings on eBird are down the last few days
>> (Cornell issue, I think). Someone may know how to share the Facebook link
>> here, if so -- can you share that? (Note-- you cannot see colors on the
>> bird, but you can see the tail wagging and hear numerous songs.)
>>
>> This is just the SECOND spring report of Kirtland's for NC, but the other
>> was a non-vocal bird.
>>
>> Harry LeGrand
>> Birds of North Carolina website editor
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/20 4:06 pm
From: David Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Shrike family
In addition to a good variety of migrants, on the Cherokee County (SC)
spring count last Saturday, Timothy Campbell and I found a family of five
shrikes as we tried to get a closer view of some bobolinks. The shrikes
were much more cooperative than the bobolinks, actually. On Prince Road, a
short road cutting the corner between Mill Gin Road and SR 11-162.

--
Dr. David Campbell
Associate Professor, Geology
Department of Natural Sciences
Box 7270
Gardner-Webb University
Boiling Springs NC 28017

 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/20 3:24 pm
From: Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: territorial Yellow Warblers?, Bobolinks - Wake Co., NC
I birded Mid Pines and Inwood Roads this morning. On Mid Pines I heard and saw 2 singing Yellow Warblers, one at the pond and a second, south of the road in the willows on the west side of the stream. These are the same 2 spots I had Yellow Warblers on 25 April, 18 days ago. I realize that the cool spring we have had so far is making some migrants linger but, even so, given the length of time they have been present I wonder if these 2 birds have set up territories. In both cases, the birds are in appropriate habitat.
On Inwood Rd, I stopped when I heard Bobolinks singing behind the “Compost” building. Initially I thought there were about 30 birds when a group flew up briefly from the tall grasses. Then a harrier came by and a very large group, I estimated at least 125 birds (perhaps as many as 150), flushed. Most were females, males were no more than 10% of the group. This is by far the most Bobolinks I have seen in North Carolina.

Good Birding!
Rob Rybczynski
Cary, NC




 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/20 3:05 pm
From: Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Kirtland's Warbler -- singing! -- today in Watauga Co., NC
This should work.
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.facebook.com/katiekatejeane/videos/pcb.10222052611452714/10222052575291810/?type=3&theater__;!!OToaGQ!7lZgXp7tQDsAQGnT7uCg6dMY1jmBJpLdOvAJ4R27ngFjMC5rNYIviItaKK-8nubTnDs$

Dwayne
*************
J. Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
<redxbill...>


Catawba County Park Ranger
Riverbend Park - Conover, NC
<jdmartin...>
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.catawbacountync.gov/depts/parks/__;!!OToaGQ!7lZgXp7tQDsAQGnT7uCg6dMY1jmBJpLdOvAJ4R27ngFjMC5rNYIviItaKK-8CGxzZKo$
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.weatherlink.com/user/riverbendpark__;!!OToaGQ!7lZgXp7tQDsAQGnT7uCg6dMY1jmBJpLdOvAJ4R27ngFjMC5rNYIviItaKK-88RZ86hU$



On Wed, May 13, 2020 at 6:00 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> The first known record of a Kirtland's Warbler singing in NC was made
> today -- and video has been uploaded to Facebook Carolina Rare Birds. Ed
> Corey and I have already played the video, and indeed it is! Katie
> Griffith has created an eBird list, but that does not have an audio
> recording --in fact, all recordings on eBird are down the last few days
> (Cornell issue, I think). Someone may know how to share the Facebook link
> here, if so -- can you share that? (Note-- you cannot see colors on the
> bird, but you can see the tail wagging and hear numerous songs.)
>
> This is just the SECOND spring report of Kirtland's for NC, but the other
> was a non-vocal bird.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Birds of North Carolina website editor
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/20 3:02 pm
From: Dennis Kent <dkjtk...>
Subject: RE: Charlotte birds
Dont forget Western Tanager, Lark Sparrow. Shrike, Horned Lark, Cerulean and Swainson's Warbler.Dennis KentIndian TrailSent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.
-------- Original message --------From: Ron <waxwing...> Date: 5/13/20 5:08 PM (GMT-05:00) To: <Carolinabirds...> Subject: Charlotte birds Black-billed Cuckoo – two have been found in the last couple of weeks, one at Latta Park and one at Ribbonwalk Nature Preserve. Two evenings ago, one was found near McDowell Prairie in the south end of Mecklenburg County and seen until yesterday evening. This morning, two were seen inside the prairie. It’s possible the one just mentioned was one of those this morning, about 3/4 mile away from the other sighting. So, there have been four, maybe five, seen in Charlotte. Some/most years none are seen.Bay-breasted Warbler – typically easier in the fall, but still not very many. Quite a few have been seen this migration. Four were noted in Latta Park on Sunday, I had two and Jeff Lemon texted about a pair at the same time, so different birds. This is the second time for that many at Latta. They have been seen regularly at other sites. Most springs I don’t see any.Bobolink – usually some seen each spring. This migration, many were seen at several sites. An estimate at one place was 100 birds.Add to this: singing Alder Flycatcher, Yellow Rail (seen by a few, but missed by many, including me), Cattle Egret and an early-March Henslow’s Sparrow. Some of this could be attributed to the current times. Maybe more folks are out birding due to cancelled travel, jobs on hold, or just plain stir crazy from hanging around the house. Whatever the reason, it’s been great.On the flip side.Yellow-rumped Warbler – numbers seem to be down. Typically numerous (too many?) so you have to look through them to find another species. Someone noted that the numbers were down over the winter also, which I hadn’t thought about (I’m afraid that I tend to ignore them).Ron ClarkKings Mtn. NC
 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/20 3:00 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Kirtland's Warbler -- singing! -- today in Watauga Co., NC
The first known record of a Kirtland's Warbler singing in NC was made today
-- and video has been uploaded to Facebook Carolina Rare Birds. Ed Corey
and I have already played the video, and indeed it is! Katie Griffith has
created an eBird list, but that does not have an audio recording --in fact,
all recordings on eBird are down the last few days (Cornell issue, I
think). Someone may know how to share the Facebook link here, if so -- can
you share that? (Note-- you cannot see colors on the bird, but you can
see the tail wagging and hear numerous songs.)

This is just the SECOND spring report of Kirtland's for NC, but the other
was a non-vocal bird.

Harry LeGrand
Birds of North Carolina website editor

 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/20 2:36 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Charlotte birds
Ron,

You have half of the equation right: more birders afield due to the COVID
putting more folks out of work, etc. And the other half is the remarkable
and unseasonable cool weather from late April to today -- many days at
least 10 degrees below normal. These cold to cool nights are slowing down
the migration, especially as winds at night have mostly been from the N,
NW,or W -- pushing birds eastward of their usual flight paths -- plus
likely forcing longer stay-overs on the ground. The WORST case -- a
terrible spring for migrants -- is one with above normal temperatures, and
the winds (at night when most migrants are flying) are from the S or SW.
Seems like with global warming in recent years, we are getting more and
more of those warm springs where 1) the bulk of the migrants stay to our
west, and 2) the migrants quickly move through the Carolinas (though still
need 2-3 days on the ground for feeding and resting) and with those S winds
make longer nighttime flights as well

Today, in Chatham County, my birding group of 4 managed 20 species of
warblers! -- the most I have had in one day this spring, and one of my
best for diversity ever in spring. And, we failed on the Tennessee Warbler
seen by another. I did get my first Canada Warbler of the season, and my
first sighting this spring -- finally -- of Bay-breasted Warbler.

Note that only the mountains seem to be getting the forcedown or a bunch of
scarce shorebird species. And, there is still another 2 weeks of
additional migration time for northbound shorebirds, though we need some
nighttime storms to put things down. It's been terribly slow east of the
mountains for them -- few mudflats and truly wet and flooded fields here.

Of course, after tomorrow, with high temps well up into the 80s (above
normal), the songbird migration will speed up and probably come to a quick
end.

Keep hoping for some nighttime winds from the NW or W, or some nighttime
storms, if you want some more fallouts!!

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Wed, May 13, 2020 at 5:08 PM Ron <waxwing...> wrote:

> Black-billed Cuckoo – two have been found in the last couple of weeks, one
> at Latta Park and one at Ribbonwalk Nature Preserve. Two evenings ago, one
> was found near McDowell Prairie in the south end of Mecklenburg County and
> seen until yesterday evening. This morning, two were seen inside the
> prairie. It’s possible the one just mentioned was one of those this
> morning,
> about 3/4 mile away from the other sighting. So, there have been four,
> maybe
> five, seen in Charlotte. Some/most years none are seen.
>
> Bay-breasted Warbler – typically easier in the fall, but still not very
> many. Quite a few have been seen this migration. Four were noted in Latta
> Park on Sunday, I had two and Jeff Lemon texted about a pair at the same
> time, so different birds. This is the second time for that many at Latta.
> They have been seen regularly at other sites. Most springs I don’t see any.
>
> Bobolink – usually some seen each spring. This migration, many were seen
> at
> several sites. An estimate at one place was 100 birds.
>
> Add to this: singing Alder Flycatcher, Yellow Rail (seen by a few, but
> missed by many, including me), Cattle Egret and an early-March Henslow’s
> Sparrow. Some of this could be attributed to the current times. Maybe more
> folks are out birding due to cancelled travel, jobs on hold, or just plain
> stir crazy from hanging around the house. Whatever the reason, it’s been
> great.
>
> On the flip side.
> Yellow-rumped Warbler – numbers seem to be down. Typically numerous (too
> many?) so you have to look through them to find another species. Someone
> noted that the numbers were down over the winter also, which I hadn’t
> thought about (I’m afraid that I tend to ignore them).
>
> Ron Clark
> Kings Mtn. NC
>
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/20 2:08 pm
From: Ron <waxwing...>
Subject: Charlotte birds
Black-billed Cuckoo – two have been found in the last couple of weeks, one
at Latta Park and one at Ribbonwalk Nature Preserve. Two evenings ago, one
was found near McDowell Prairie in the south end of Mecklenburg County and
seen until yesterday evening. This morning, two were seen inside the
prairie. It’s possible the one just mentioned was one of those this morning,
about 3/4 mile away from the other sighting. So, there have been four, maybe
five, seen in Charlotte. Some/most years none are seen.

Bay-breasted Warbler – typically easier in the fall, but still not very
many. Quite a few have been seen this migration. Four were noted in Latta
Park on Sunday, I had two and Jeff Lemon texted about a pair at the same
time, so different birds. This is the second time for that many at Latta.
They have been seen regularly at other sites. Most springs I don’t see any.

Bobolink – usually some seen each spring. This migration, many were seen at
several sites. An estimate at one place was 100 birds.

Add to this: singing Alder Flycatcher, Yellow Rail (seen by a few, but
missed by many, including me), Cattle Egret and an early-March Henslow’s
Sparrow. Some of this could be attributed to the current times. Maybe more
folks are out birding due to cancelled travel, jobs on hold, or just plain
stir crazy from hanging around the house. Whatever the reason, it’s been
great.

On the flip side.
Yellow-rumped Warbler – numbers seem to be down. Typically numerous (too
many?) so you have to look through them to find another species. Someone
noted that the numbers were down over the winter also, which I hadn’t
thought about (I’m afraid that I tend to ignore them).

Ron Clark
Kings Mtn. NC




 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/20 9:21 am
From: jim.capel (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Chapel Hill Bird Club Meeting (Zoom Links missing from original email)
Meeting Monday 5/18 at 7:30 – Kent Fiala on eBird

Registration: https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUpc--grDMuHNyxIxPloJsAOkPs5tiIKSXd__;!!OToaGQ!9H1g_cMsV5UrrhV0oBaSwGyADvzspLbX4s0v33DMSnMKLJ7DnyUIgM3SwePzKl5n8vM$

Zoom tutorial: https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/201362193-How-Do-I-Join-A-Meeting-__;!!OToaGQ!9H1g_cMsV5UrrhV0oBaSwGyADvzspLbX4s0v33DMSnMKLJ7DnyUIgM3SwePzpyBbj14$

Download Zoom App prior to meeting: https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://zoom.us/download__;!!OToaGQ!9H1g_cMsV5UrrhV0oBaSwGyADvzspLbX4s0v33DMSnMKLJ7DnyUIgM3SwePzUze12lk$
 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/20 8:02 am
From: Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Swainson’s warbler
Just heard and saw the warbler. Flew across path. Caldwell station creek greenway. About 2.25 miles just south of small wooden bridge

Anne Olsen


Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/12/20 2:33 pm
From: Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Falls Lake spring bird count results
The 17th Falls Lake Spring Bird Count was held on April 27, 2020 under
mostly clear skies, moderate winds and temperatures ranging from 48-68. 22
observers in 15 parties and one feeder counter tallied our second highest
126 species (average 114, high 130) and our highest total of 5770 total
birds (average 4004).



Most numerous birds were 420 Double Crested Cormorant, 297 Ring-billed Gull
and 242 Northern Cardinal.



FIRST RECORDS: a whopping 3 Sedge wren in a field at Olive Grove game
lands and a Lincoln’s Sparrow in a field at the north end of Beaverdam
Lake, check those fields wow! A count week Marsh Wren was new for the
spring checklist, same spot as the Sedge Wren and all were photographed!



OTHER GOODIES: two parties had Cape May Warbler (2nd count record). Kpark
in the lower lake had our 2nd Gray-cheeked Thrush and a count week Greater
Yellowlegs (2nd). Two parties had Common Raven (3rd record). Bank
Swallow, Blue-winged Warbler, Veery, Bobolink and Baltimore Oriole were
also found.



MISSES: Nothing off A-list but we missed Sharp-shinned Hawk, Caspian Tern,
Whip-poor-will and Common Nighthawk.



Many thanks to everyone who volunteered to count!



Mark your calendars for Falls Lake

Fall count 9/11/2020

Christmas Count 1/4/2021

Spring Count 4/27/2021


--
Brian Bockhahn
<birdranger248...>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/12/20 2:32 pm
From: Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Kerr Lake spring bird count results
The 17th Kerr Lake Spring Bird Count was held on April 28, 2020 under
cloudy skies, light winds and temperatures 38-62. 12 observers in 7
parties tallied 125 species (average 119) and 4,567 birds (average 3916)
led by 565 Double-crested Cormorant, 265 Ring-billed Gull and 211
Yellow-rumped Warbler.



NEW TO SPRING CHECKLIST: Sora from Dick Cross WMA, Loggerhead Shrike from
Palmer Springs.



OTHER GOODIES: Rarity list was well represented with Blue-winged Teal,
Ring-necked Duck, Red-breasted Merganser, Red-throated Loon (3 years
straight), Pied-billed Grebe, American Kestrel, American Woodcock, Horned
Lark, Marsh Wren (3rd) and Veery.



MISSES: Coopers Hawk, Solitary Sandpiper, HAIRY WOODPECKER (1ST miss),
Black-throated Green Warbler, Savannah Sparrow and Baltimore Oriole.



Many thanks to everyone who volunteered to count!



Mark your calendars for Kerr Lake

Fall count Sep 10, 2020

Christmas Count January 5, 2021

Spring count April 28, 2021


--
Brian Bockhahn
<birdranger248...>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/12/20 1:51 pm
From: jim.capel (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Chapel Hill Bird Club Meeting - Monday 5/18 (Zoom) - Kent Fiala
Chapel Hill Bird Club Meeting will be held Monday, May 18, 2020 via Zoom.


Please register at the link below to attend the meeting by zoom.



Zoom lines will be open at 7:15pm and meeting will begin at 7:30pm. If you are unsure how to use Zoom, please look at the tutorial and dial in early in order to ensure you have the correct settings on your device. Please make sure you keep your audio muted during the meeting unless you would like to ask a question.



Meeting Introduction: Mary Kay Robinson: President of Chapel Hill Bird Club



Speaker and Topic: Kent Fiala-Getting the most out of eBird



Talk Description: This talk will introduce some of the nuts and bolts of eBird, and will reveal the hidden world of the eBird reviewer. After the presentation, Kent will do “ask me anything about eBird” so bring your questions. What have you always wanted to know about eBird?



Kent has been birding for 59 years. He's a past President and Vice-President of the Chapel Hill Bird Club, and also leads field trips for New Hope Audubon. He manages the Carolina Bird Club website and is the eBird reviewer for the Piedmont of North Carolina.



Please watch the presentation on a computer, not on a phone, as you will need to see small details on computer screens.



You are invited to a Zoom meeting.
When: May 18, 2020 07:15 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Register in advance for this meeting:
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUpc--grDMuHNyxIxPloJsAOkPs5tiIKSXd__;!!OToaGQ!9rE4LisZEuIi-GLwSlUg0W1iS5h7l-cva_2PRd1eDICNGtp_LJtVpUUiL3eYEVS2P7w$

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.



Here is a tutorial on how to join a zoom meeting. You do not need to create an account, but you will need to download the Zoom app prior to the meeting on the device you will be using. You can do so here.



 

Back to top
Date: 5/12/20 1:40 pm
From: David Hart <david.hart...>
Subject: Roseate Tern, Wilson's Phalarope at Wrightsville Beach
There was a Roseate Tern among a crowd of other terns, gulls, pelicans, and cormorants on a sandbar in the inlet at Mason Inlet Waterbird Management Area at the north end of Wrightsville Beach this morning.

Also had a Wilson’s Phalarope in the marsh.

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68915377__;!!OToaGQ!7sERmgbNaAR-Z_XSdEhwyjLHqrlapkjQWNHoCNWAUtv06fGXIe4ELmyA9qWeWiR6554$

Dave Hart
Chapel Hill


 

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Date: 5/12/20 5:14 am
From: Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: eBird list with Swainson’s song
The recordings I attached to my eBird list from 5/08/20 have been processed by eBird and are now available. I included the link to the checklist below. When I re-found it yesterday, I listened for it between mile marker 1 and mike marker 1.75. When I heard it singing, I waited for about 15 minutes before it finally came into view.

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68632790__;!!OToaGQ!8sOUODmobM-3nCZhNVbwWL_wR5YMvzRoH0cKvtY9hdg3ch0XhiZ400UO0YKfVbAhFTg$

Happy birding.
Anne Olsen
Caldwell Station Creek Greenway
Cornelius, NC


Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 5/11/20 6:35 pm
From: M Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: re: second-hand report Spartanburg County, SC Scissor-tailed flycatcher
Hello,

The May 2 Spartanburg County, SC spring bird count had a Scissor-tailed
flycatcher photograph taken at a place labeled as "Pearson Farm airport",
on Thompson Creek Rd., near Boiling Springs South Carolina.

I do not know if birders need to stay at the road or whether they can get
permission to enter the "Pearson Farm airport" property.

Other birders have seen the bird and posted to ebird since the original
sighting.

There has also been a report of Scissor-tailed flycatcher at the Bryant
Park ball field location on Bryant Rd where the species was present last
summer.

Bryant Park ball field and the "Pearson Farm airport" are close enough that
these sightings might be one pair of flycatchers.

Matthew Campbell

 

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Date: 5/11/20 5:29 pm
From: Beth Garver (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Migrating Osprey
Today I was treated to an adult Osprey as he was catching an updraft above
my neighborhood in Stokesdale, NC. Totally unexpected!

Beth Garver
Stokesdale, NC
Guilford County
--
Sent from Gmail Mobile

 

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Date: 5/11/20 1:17 pm
From: Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: rockingham county NC sbc results
The 8th Rockingham County Spring Bird Count was held on Thursday April 30,
2020. Overnight and dawn was heavy rain and flash flooding, the rest of
the day was cloudy with temperatures from 58-68. 7 observers in 4 parties
tallied a record high 124 species (average 112, previous high 118) and
2,343 birds (average 1,874). Totals were led by 109 Northern Cardinal, 99
Mourning Dove and 98 American Robin. Additional bird seen during count
week: Eastern Wood-pewee, Blue-winged Warbler, American Redstart and Rusty
Blackbird.



FIRST COUNT RECORDS: a single Semipalmated Plover was on a farm pond at
first light off Ledbetter Road, and I cannot believe it took 8 years to
finally get a Chestnut-sided Warbler, and by two parties!



Other goodies include two parties with two different Bald Eagles for 2nd
count record (now nesting in area), our 2nd Black-billed Cuckoo in
Waterfalls territory, 2nd Bank Swallow over Mayo Mountain ponds, 2nd
Gray-cheeked Thrush on Mayo Mountain loop trail, 2nd Cerulean Warbler in
Waterfalls territory, 2nd Swamp Sparrow in Airport section and 2nd
Baltimore Oriole at Mayo Mountain ponds.



3rd Lesser Yellowlegs in Stoneville area, 3rd Least Sandpiper on Ledbetter
Road, 3rd Least Flycatcher around Mayo Mountain ponds, 3rd Cliff Swallow
and three parties with our 3rd Ruby-crowned Kinglets.



MISSES: Sharp-shinned Hawk, Eastern Screech-owl and Blackpoll Warbler.



A side note, instead of the rare dragonfly, on the summit if ceddar
mountain I was able to record video/audio of a pair of Mountain Chorus
Frogs! In NC this species is only known from Cherokee county, NC, further
evidence of this unique county!!!!



Many thanks to everyone who volunteered to count!



Mark your calendars

Fall migration count September 9, 2020

Christmas Count December 23, 2020


--
Brian Bockhahn
<birdranger248...>

 

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Date: 5/11/20 1:15 pm
From: Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Durham SBC results
The Durham Spring Bird Count was held on Sunday April 26, 2020 under mostly
clear skies, light winds and mild temperatures 54-74. One for the record
books we had record high 24 observers in 14 parties tallied 138 species
(average 117) and 7912 total birds (4,445) led by 941 Double-crested
Cormorant, 308 Northern Cardinal and 260 Red-eyed Vireo.



Highlights were many, new to the new spring checklist were calling Virginia
Rail (4th record) in Little River section, Snowy Egret (2nd) at the Ellerbe
Creek mouth area, Mississippi Kite (3rd) over a backyard near the Eno
River, Warbling Vireo along Panther Creek/hickory hill (1st), Gray-cheeked
Thrush at Eno River boat ramp (1st, but several around this season), and 1
Sedge Wren (3rd) at Flat River Waterfowl Impoundment.



We lit up the “rarer” list with several, admittedly I need to update this
old checklist format and put these on the expected side! Bonaparte’s Gull
(3 parties and pretty plumage), Herring Gull , Red-breasted Merganser (2
parties), Common Loon (4 parties), American Bittern, Northern Harrier (3
parties), Merlin (2 parties), Greater Yellowlegs, Chuck-wills-widow, Bank
Swallow (2 parties), Magnolia, Cape May and Blackburnian Warblers,
Rose-breasted Grosbeak (4 parties), Bobolink (2 parties), Rusty Blackbird
and Baltimore Oriole (3 parties).



MISSES: for the second year in a row we missed Rock Pigeon, I checked all
bridges even. And I wont be greedy, but other species shamelessly
undetected this year Hooded Merganser, Northern Bobwhite, American Woodcock
and White-crowned Sparrow.



Many thanks to everyone who volunteered to count!



Mark your calendars for the Durham Christmas Bird Count Dec 20, 2020 and
spring bird count April 25, 2021!


--
Brian Bockhahn
<birdranger248...>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/20 9:04 am
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: aberrant Dickcissel song
On Sunday, I heard a Dickcissel singing what I would consider to be a very
atypical song.

This was at the North River Preserve in Carteret County.

The song was like an abbreviated Blue Grosbeak song, and it had almost
nothing of the insect-like quality of a typical Dickcissel song. In fact, I
had assumed it was a Blue Grosbeak and was about to move on when I spotted
the Dickcissel. I watched it giving the song to convince myself that it was
indeed the singer.

There was a total of 6 singing Dickcissels at the preserve Sunday.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/20 8:52 am
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: Re: {Disarmed} Bronzed Grackle in Wake Co NC
Large numbers of grackles in fields near Bayboro on the Pamlico Co CBC (on 17 Dec 2019) looked like classic "Bronzed Grackles" to me.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC
----- Original Message -----
From: hdpratt (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
To: Listserve Carolinabirds
Sent: Monday, May 11, 2020 2:05 AM
Subject: {Disarmed} Bronzed Grackle in Wake Co NC


Hi birders:


I had a striking Common Grackle at my feeders in Cary, Wake Co., NC this afternoon. It was what used to be called the “Bronzed” Grackle when it was considered a separate species. Bronzed and Purple grackles were lumped as the Common Grackle in the 1950s when it was found that there is gene flow between them over a broad front that runs roughly from Pa to LA, as I recall. The Bronzed is a stunning bird with a shiny blue head sharply set off from a brassy bronze back. Birds of the Carolinas says it is a "transient, mostly in the western counties", and Wake Co. seems pretty far east. I have lived at this address for 14 years and have only seen purple grackles before, so this bird really stood out.


Doug Pratt
Cary NC




"Some people have been kind enough to call me a fine artist. I've always called myself an illustrator. I'm not sure what the difference is." - Norman Rockwell


H. Douglas Pratt, Ph. D.
Ornithologist, illustrator, musician
1205 Selwyn Lane
Cary, NC 27511


Research Curator of Birds, Emeritus
North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
11 West Jones Street
Raleigh NC 27601


Phone 919-379-1679
Cell phone 919-270-0857 (for travel use only)


Website: MailScanner has detected a possible fraud attempt from "urldefense.com" claiming to be https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!-PvJmaoVFRRwIdUV7riIdmD57mwAZbFHkhkPnbQyOXTpp8jrZRYghqAkK9jnCl2YPn8$


















--
This message has been scanned for viruses and
dangerous content by MailScanner, and is
believed to be clean.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/20 7:18 am
From: Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Swainson’s warbler
Just got a good look at the swainson’s. Past the 1 mile marker on right Caldwell station creek greenway

Anne Olsen
Cornelius NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/10/20 11:07 pm
From: hdpratt (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bronzed Grackle in Wake Co NC
Hi birders:

I had a striking Common Grackle at my feeders in Cary, Wake Co., NC this afternoon. It was what used to be called the “Bronzed” Grackle when it was considered a separate species. Bronzed and Purple grackles were lumped as the Common Grackle in the 1950s when it was found that there is gene flow between them over a broad front that runs roughly from Pa to LA, as I recall. The Bronzed is a stunning bird with a shiny blue head sharply set off from a brassy bronze back. Birds of the Carolinas says it is a "transient, mostly in the western counties", and Wake Co. seems pretty far east. I have lived at this address for 14 years and have only seen purple grackles before, so this bird really stood out.

Doug Pratt
Cary NC


"Some people have been kind enough to call me a fine artist. I've always called myself an illustrator. I'm not sure what the difference is." - Norman Rockwell

H. Douglas Pratt, Ph. D.
Ornithologist, illustrator, musician
1205 Selwyn Lane
Cary, NC 27511

Research Curator of Birds, Emeritus
North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
11 West Jones Street
Raleigh NC 27601

Phone 919-379-1679
Cell phone 919-270-0857 (for travel use only)

Website: https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/index.html__;!!OToaGQ!5bymC-76cq0TaLyByUbDiJLGkt_A1-hDhyshE2mZuP9KgFYofogUlPksnmtEgyPTFCM$










 

Back to top
Date: 5/10/20 6:28 pm
From: Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Warbler ID solved - Swainson’s Warbler
Thanks to everyone for suggestions for apps to use to help identify bird and for help and verification of final ID. The checklist for Caldwell Station Creek Greenway, May 8th, has been updated (link below) with audio files attached. I could not see the bird since the vegetation in that area is so thick. It is a wooded area with a small stream running through it. The bird was heard between mile marker 1 and 1 1/2. The song was short and very consistent with a fairly long pause between songs. My first thought was a Redstart but, when I compared what I heard with the song of the Redstart, it was not quite the same. The song does match every recording of a Swainson’s Warbler that I listened to.

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68632790__;!!OToaGQ!4LYQ3A7IvLU7JK7Mswf849dI6JetEVbtkqTfcx7G1yOAVdzet4r2U1mnMN6xyc7ood0$

Thanks again to all of you for your help.
Anne
Cornelius, NC


Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 5/10/20 4:10 pm
From: nicholas Flanders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Anhinga, etc., Gates Co., NC, 5/10/20
Notable this morning at Merchant's Millpond State Park in Gates Co., NC was an Anhinga soaring high overhead near the dam. Migrants in that same part of the park included several Veery and Black-throated Blue Warblers.

A quick drive through Dowry Rd. in Chowan Swamp Game Land in early afternoon yielded a chipping Swainson's Warbler that came in to pishing for nice looks.

Nick Flanders
Portsmouth, VA

 

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Date: 5/10/20 4:06 pm
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: eBird -- 1117 Erins Way Ln, Raleigh US-NC 35.96060, -78.63005 -- May 10, 2020
What a day of birding the yard. I saw 46 species which is probably my record in the spring for one day. My record is 51 in October but that’s to be expected in these parts.
It’s been so nice waking up to Swainson Thrushes, Veerys, and RB Grosbeaks singing for the past several mornings.
Of course the Wilson’s Warbler was the best bird (27 warblers now for the yard) but every bird was a treasure.
I hope everyone had a great day.

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC

1117 Erins Way Ln, Raleigh US-NC 35.96060, -78.63005
May 10, 2020
5:33 AM
Stationary
805 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 2.0.13 Build 2.0.122

4 Mourning Dove
2 Chimney Swift
1 Great Blue Heron
1 Black Vulture
2 Turkey Vulture
3 Red-shouldered Hawk
2 Red-tailed Hawk
1 Barred Owl
3 Red-bellied Woodpecker
4 Downy Woodpecker
1 Hairy Woodpecker
1 Pileated Woodpecker
1 Eastern Wood-Pewee
2 Great Crested Flycatcher
1 Yellow-throated Vireo
2 Red-eyed Vireo
4 Blue Jay
8 American Crow
4 Fish Crow
4 Carolina Chickadee
4 Tufted Titmouse
3 White-breasted Nuthatch
3 Brown-headed Nuthatch
2 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
2 Carolina Wren
1 Gray Catbird
4 Eastern Bluebird
1 Veery
2 Swainson's Thrush
12 Cedar Waxwing
5 House Finch
3 American Goldfinch
4 Chipping Sparrow
1 White-throated Sparrow
1 Eastern Towhee
3 Brown-headed Cowbird
1 Ovenbird
1 Black-and-white Warbler
1 Northern Parula
1 Black-throated Blue Warbler
3 Pine Warbler
1 Wilson's Warbler -- Heard and now seeing up close. Black cap and mostly yellow with greenish tint. Dainty bird.
2 Summer Tanager
2 Scarlet Tanager
5 Northern Cardinal
3 Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Number of Taxa: 46


Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/10/20 3:44 pm
From: Ron <waxwing...>
Subject: ST flycatchers
I forgot to include this.

They are back and in exactly the same nesting spot, on the power pole at the
top of the hill by the concrete parking area.

Ron Clark
Kings Mtn. NC

 

Back to top
Date: 5/10/20 3:40 pm
From: Ron <waxwing...>
Subject: SC Scissor-tailed Flycatchers
My friend, Christy Hill, who found the flycatchers last year says they are
back.

Farm Camp Rd, Cowpens US-SC 35.06229, -81.78142

Ron Clark
Kings Mtn. NC

 

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Date: 5/10/20 12:42 pm
From: Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Pea Island NWR, NC
From the blind on North Pond we found a single piping plover associating
with many semi-palmated plovers. Also black skimmers, an oyster catcher,
abundant dunlin, abundant least terns flying over back and forth to nesting
colony. Also a tri-colored heron in full breeding plumage with white
plumes.

Found two bobolink in brushy field at north end of N. Pond, both female.

Linda Ward
Skip Hancock
Coinjock, NC

 

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Date: 5/10/20 9:38 am
From: Michael Cheves (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Croatan NF Jones/Craven Cty, NC (FOS Indigo Buntings and Y-b Chats)
Greetings all! This is a rather lengthy entry. I apologize in advance to those who favor brevity. I took a slow drive on County Line Rd. this morning, ca. 6:30am. I drove about a mile in, starting from the Jones Cty end. These are "Weyerhaeuser birds", to be completely honest. Indigo Buntings have landed in good numbers here, FOS for me, and at least a half-dozen singing the familiar 2-syllable pattern, and I believe the volume on this species is way past 11. No less than four Yellow-breasted Chats were heard along this stretch, which is more than I've ever actually laid eyes upon in my life, total! Speaking of eyes, one of those Chats spent about a minute perched on an open limb, singing its song, and craning its neck in a manner such as I have never seen any other bird move, and I was fortunate enough to have my camera operating and able to push the right button at the right time. A pair of Wood Ducks flying over, an immature plumage Red-shouldered Hawk perched on a snag, and a ver
y generous performance by a bold Eastern Towhee topped off this list. Ca. 7:30am: Crossing the county line into Jones Cty and Croatan NF territory, the soundscape at the Island Creek Walk hotspot was overflowing with bird song. I heard the shrill voice of the Red-headed woodpecker before I even shut my car off. Other notable parking lot birds were Acadian Flycatcher, and one of my all-time favorites, the Wood Thrush. The most abundant species on this walk were Northern Parulas and Red-eyed Vireos (I tried, unsuccessfully, to pick out a Yellow-throated Vireo song). At one point during the Island Creek walk, I had an unusual encounter with a Prothonotary Warbler that was signing a new (to me) variation of his song. I have a recording of it, which I plan to attach to the eBird report (if it would be relevant, or if anyone wishes, I can put the spectrogram on the CBC photo gallery). Instead of "sweet-sweet-sweet-sweet" all on one pitch, he sang a bit longer and went to a lower pitch in
the second "half" of his song. Maybe it's not that unusual, but it was new to me, so I was enraptured by this mystery for a few fleeting moments. The drive back home took me right by the pastures at Marion Dr. in New Bern (behind the airport), so I stopped over there to get an Eastern Meadowlark perched on a post, in full song, an idyllic scene. One last itch to scratch, the pond on Thurman Rd. across from Harris Teeter, just off Hwy-70E. Could it possibly hold a Great Blue Heron, or even a Green Heron? Nope! However, I happily witnessed a vengeful pair of Eastern Kingbirds chasing a Fish Crow (I'm used to seeing this with the other Kingbird species, the "Mock"-Kingbird!), and heard a strange, somewhat familiar sound, which sounded almost like a "peeper" frog, but was "bird" enough to hone in on-- uh oh! I almost missed my second male Blue Grosbeak of the season. Whew! Happy Mother's Day to all the mothers, human and bird alike. Perfect weather for birding today here in eastern NC!
Michael Cheves New Bern, NC
 

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Date: 5/10/20 7:05 am
From: Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Gray-cheeked and other thrushes, Garner NC
The past two mornings have been good ones for thrushes in Garner, Wake Co.  Yesterday at White Deer Park I had 10 Swainson's and 2 Veeries.  When I got home I found 4 Swainson's and 4 Veeries in the woods behind my house.  This morning a short walk behind the house yielded 3 Swainson's and a Gray-cheeked.
Marc RibaudoGarner
 

Back to top
Date: 5/10/20 4:58 am
From: sheryl mcnair (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bird song ID app
There’s an app called Smartbird id. I haven’t used it, but it looks like it’s free & says it does what you want. Also, supposedly BurdGenie, $3.99 does that. Bird not burd. But at first it was pretty basic, don’t know if it’s progressed.

Sheryl

> On May 10, 2020, at 7:33 AM, Claire Herzog (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Both iBirdPro & Sibley's apps have sounds along with pictures and
> data. Very useful in the field.
>
>> On Sat, May 9, 2020 at 8:31 PM Karen LORENZO <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> Its Called BirdNET app
>> Sounds
>>
>>> On Sat, May 9, 2020, 7:40 AM Anne Olsen <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>>
>>> I have a recording of a bird, most likely a warbler, that I would like to identify. I recorded it with my iPhone. I am fairly certain that I know what it is but would like to make sure since I could not find the bird. Would someone recommend an app which identifies bird songs taken via iPhone.
>>>
>>> Please reply off list.
>>> Thank you.
>>>
>>> Anne Olsen
>>> Cornelius, NC
>>>
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPad

 

Back to top
Date: 5/10/20 4:32 am
From: Claire Herzog (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bird song ID app
Both iBirdPro & Sibley's apps have sounds along with pictures and
data. Very useful in the field.

On Sat, May 9, 2020 at 8:31 PM Karen LORENZO <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Its Called BirdNET app
> Sounds
>
> On Sat, May 9, 2020, 7:40 AM Anne Olsen <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> I have a recording of a bird, most likely a warbler, that I would like to identify. I recorded it with my iPhone. I am fairly certain that I know what it is but would like to make sure since I could not find the bird. Would someone recommend an app which identifies bird songs taken via iPhone.
>>
>> Please reply off list.
>> Thank you.
>>
>> Anne Olsen
>> Cornelius, NC
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
 

Back to top
Date: 5/10/20 4:16 am
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: WILSON’S WARBLER - Frontyard
Bird number 132 for this piece of heaven by Falls Lake.
Happy Mother’s Day to the moms out there.
Make it a great day.

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/9/20 5:32 pm
From: Karen LORENZO (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bird song ID app
Its Called BirdNET app
Sounds

On Sat, May 9, 2020, 7:40 AM Anne Olsen <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> I have a recording of a bird, most likely a warbler, that I would like to
> identify. I recorded it with my iPhone. I am fairly certain that I know
> what it is but would like to make sure since I could not find the bird.
> Would someone recommend an app which identifies bird songs taken via iPhone.
>
> Please reply off list.
> Thank you.
>
> Anne Olsen
> Cornelius, NC
>
>
> Sent from my iPad

 

Back to top
Date: 5/9/20 4:50 pm
From: Gary Gmail (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bird song ID app
Anne, Go to the website Xeno Canto xenocanto.com. Gary

Gary Harbour
23 Hardy Ridge Way
Travelers Rest, South Carolina 29690
+1 864 354 8300
gharbour@gmail. com

> On May 9, 2020, at 7:23 PM, Daniel Hannon (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> 
>
> Anne,
>
> I can’t recommend a bird ID app, but you could create an eBird checklist, add the recording to the checklist online after the checklist has been uploaded, and submit the eBird checklist link to CBC. I for one would be happy to try and help.
>
> Dan Hannon
>
>> On Sat, May 9, 2020 at 7:40 AM Anne Olsen <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>> I have a recording of a bird, most likely a warbler, that I would like to identify. I recorded it with my iPhone. I am fairly certain that I know what it is but would like to make sure since I could not find the bird. Would someone recommend an app which identifies bird songs taken via iPhone.
>>
>> Please reply off list.
>> Thank you.
>>
>> Anne Olsen
>> Cornelius, NC
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPad

 

Back to top
Date: 5/9/20 4:23 pm
From: Daniel Hannon (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bird song ID app
Anne,

I can’t recommend a bird ID app, but you could create an eBird checklist,
add the recording to the checklist online after the checklist has been
uploaded, and submit the eBird checklist link to CBC. I for one would be
happy to try and help.

Dan Hannon

On Sat, May 9, 2020 at 7:40 AM Anne Olsen <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> I have a recording of a bird, most likely a warbler, that I would like to
> identify. I recorded it with my iPhone. I am fairly certain that I know
> what it is but would like to make sure since I could not find the bird.
> Would someone recommend an app which identifies bird songs taken via iPhone.
>
> Please reply off list.
> Thank you.
>
> Anne Olsen
> Cornelius, NC
>
>
> Sent from my iPad

 

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Date: 5/9/20 8:49 am
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Old Bynum Bridge- Chatham Co NC
Around 20 observers enjoyed excellent migration birding along the Haw River this morning at Bynum Bridge (I also birded a little south of the bridge).

Non-warbler highlights were Swainson’s Thrush, Scarlet Tanager, and Rose-breasted Grosbeak.

But the warblers stole the show. I saw 18 sp but know that I missed a couple.

Ovenbird- 6
LA Waterthrush- 4
Northern Waterthrush- 1
Black-and-white- 8
Prothonotary- 3
Yellowthroat- 5
Hooded- 5
Redstart- 8
Parula- 19
Cape May- 2
Magnolia- 2
Bay-breasted- 2
Yellow- 2
Blackpoll- 5
Black-throated Blue- 7
Yellow-rumped- 10
Yellow-throated- 3
Wilson’s- 1

Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/9/20 4:40 am
From: Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bird song ID app
I have a recording of a bird, most likely a warbler, that I would like to identify. I recorded it with my iPhone. I am fairly certain that I know what it is but would like to make sure since I could not find the bird. Would someone recommend an app which identifies bird songs taken via iPhone.

Please reply off list.
Thank you.

Anne Olsen
Cornelius, NC


Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 5/8/20 4:52 pm
From: Bill Hilton Jr. <hilton...>
Subject: Hilton Pond 04/16/20 (Birds of Late April)
"This Week at Hilton Pond" for 16-30 Apr 2020 includes 20+ close-ups and candids of colorful spring warblers and hummingbirds (among many others) and includes some thoughts about this year's "invasion" of Rose-breasted Grosbeaks. To view photo essay #719, please visit https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek200416.html__;!!OToaGQ!5tQayTTmoWq9-kpX1E2K9HMR777SMlbNnsEK-g5ahyR20KHvavo6PitcLL-bW5Y3JgI$ and pass it along to others.

As always, we include a list of birds banded and recaptured (some rather old), plus acknowledgment of recent supporters of the Center's programs.

Happy (Spring) Nature Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond__;!!OToaGQ!5tQayTTmoWq9-kpX1E2K9HMR777SMlbNnsEK-g5ahyR20KHvavo6PitcLL-bznjXO5U$ for timely updates on nature topics,
and for info about hummingbirds at https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats__;!!OToaGQ!5tQayTTmoWq9-kpX1E2K9HMR777SMlbNnsEK-g5ahyR20KHvavo6PitcLL-bbgdUyko$

Follow us on Twitter @hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and education for students of all ages.

"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the sunset." BHjr.

============


 

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Date: 5/8/20 2:37 pm
From: Monroe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Swallows River Bend Park Catawba County
With the cold air and heavy cloudy conditions the swallows are actively feeding over the river. This is not an uncommon occurrence at the River in the spring with cool and cloudy conditions. This afternoon thousands of swallows observed from the park platform at the River. All expected species: barn tree cliff and rough winged. Sometimes but not today bank. I’m always looking for bank.

Monroe Pannell
Conover
Catawba County NC
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/8/20 2:34 pm
From: John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Murderous Fish Crows
Hi All. OK, that header is a little harsh. What follows is a little
grotesque, so the feint of heart should not read on.

So a pair of Fish Crows has adopted my bird bath as their killing pool. In
the last three days I have found the dismembered carcasses of eight
nestling birds, along with some pieces of bread. I've caught the culprits
at the bath once. Maybe it wouldn't be so bad if they would eat their
victims, but they seem to just eat parts. These poor nestlings apparently
came from three nests. I couldn't ID species but there were clear size
differences each day. This afternoon there were four unfeathered nestlings,
and the head of a larger one, and only one of the smaller nestlings was
partly eaten. Quite the waste. I've emptied the bird bath- don't really
want to encourage them.

Maybe a decade ago I had a similar experience with a nesting pair of Fish
Crow that fixated on the same bird bath. They would wash victims but then
fly off with the remains to feed their own young. An occasional leg or head
would be left in the bath water. That kept up until one day I heard them
screeching bloody murder. I grabbed binoculars and looked up in the
neighbor's pine where they had their nest. A Red-tailed Hawk was
dismembering their own nestlings.

Don't know how this macabre scene will end. Stay tuned.
John Connors
Raleigh, NC

 

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Date: 5/8/20 11:26 am
From: Peter Stangel <peter...>
Subject: Phantastic Phinizy Swamp, Augusta, GA
Phinizy Swamp Nature Park (Richmond County) was superb this morning. Walking from the parking lot to the Equalization Pond, Gip Young and I encountered:

-A flock of about 40 mostly female Bobolinks in the wetlands cells adjacent to the trail;
-Ospreys carrying fresh branches to their nest on top of the windshear tower;
-Lots of sandpipers (for Phinizy) on the boom at the equalization pond (maybe 18" wide and 100' long) and associated algal mat: Spotted (20) and Solitary Sandpipers (15), Lesser Yellowlegs (11), and one Least. Close-range views and nice comparisons between Solitary and Lesser;
-A wonderful flock of aerial insectivores over the pond: dozens of Barn and Rough-winged Swallows, at least a couple Bank, Tree, and Cliff Swallows, and numerous swifts;
-Excellent eye-level views of Blackpoll (at least 6-8, could have been 12) and Cape May (a dozen or more with all plumage variations) Warblers, Northern Parulas, and a stunning male Prothonotary;
-Black-throated Blue and Yellow-throated Warblers, Northern and Louisiana Waterthrushes, American Redstarts, and Common Yellowthroats;
-All the regulars: Painted and Indigo Buntings, Anhingas, Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, etc.
It's worth the trip!


Peter Stangel
Aiken, SC


 

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Date: 5/8/20 9:02 am
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Wake Co Nc birds
Up to 6 MIKI.

20 Bobolinks on Chi Rd.

Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 8, 2020, at 11:07 AM, Ryan Justice <blackburnian151...> wrote:
>
> Swainson’s Warbler continued this morning at Mial Plantation. Not a ton of migrants about, but did have lots of Black-throated Blue and one Blackpoll Warbler, plus Veery.
>
> Currently watching three Mississippi Kites hunting over the fields at the 90 on Mid Pines Rd.
>
> Ryan Justice
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/8/20 8:08 am
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Wake Co Nc birds
Swainson’s Warbler continued this morning at Mial Plantation. Not a ton of migrants about, but did have lots of Black-throated Blue and one Blackpoll Warbler, plus Veery.

Currently watching three Mississippi Kites hunting over the fields at the 90 on Mid Pines Rd.

Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/7/20 7:57 pm
From: Michael Cheves (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: New Bern, NC, today (migrants and a county lifer)
I located two migrating species in downtown New Bern today, a singing male Yellow Warbler, and a Spotted Sandpiper. They were both behind the History Center building on South Front St, a small restored wetlands habitat. Both species are regulars at the site during migration. It's always a treat to hear the Yellow Warbler. Back in my home neighborhood of Taberna (Hwy-70E by the Dunkin Donuts), a county-lifer male Orchard Oriole was singing persistently from the canopy. A short hike later, I found a spot that gave me an open look at him on his high perch... Very beautiful, and a pleasant voice as well! Michael Cheves New Bern, NC
 

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Date: 5/7/20 12:19 pm
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Mixed flock of Bobolinks at North Wilkesboro
Yesterday at Memorial Park along the Yadkin River Greenway in Wilkes
Co., there was a fairly large, very noisy flock of Bobolinks in a field
of tall grass. The flock was probably around 30 birds, apparently of
both sexes, as when they popped up out of the grass only about half were
in adult male plumage, the others looked like winter or female birds.

Birds of NC states that Bobolinks migrate in single sex flocks, so I'm
wondering how common it is for people to see these large, mixed, raucous
flocks during migration? I've only ever seen small flocks of quiet birds
that were obvious migrants. And the breeding flocks I've seen have been
much smaller and more sedate than these were.

Guy McGrane


 

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Date: 5/7/20 9:04 am
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: what's the deal with Common Grackles??
I have noticed that it seems I only see grackles that are flying overhead on long-distance trips. I never see them where they are coming from or where they are going to.

Kent Fiala


 

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Date: 5/7/20 7:14 am
From: Matt Curran <mcurran1...>
Subject: Crow behavior question
Is it unusual for a crow to attack/harass a great blue heron in flight?



Yesterday AM I stepped outside to get some air and noticed a GBH flying by
at about 150 feet. As it passed, I saw a crow fly in and harass it. It
only lasted a second, but I had never seen it before.



Don't think it was a fish crow.



Thanks,
Matt Curran




 

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Date: 5/7/20 6:54 am
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Crabtree Creek Wetlands- Raleigh NC
Wilson’s Warbler still present as well

RYAN

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 7, 2020, at 8:08 AM, Ryan Justice <blackburnian151...> wrote:
>
> Willow Flycatcher present and calling at the gazebo. Warbling Vireo heard as well. Cooperative Prothonotary and Yellow Warblers too.
>
> Ryan Justice
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/7/20 6:08 am
From: John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: what's the deal with Common Grackles??
Hi John.
I can't speak for the Carteret County Common Grackles but here in Raleigh
they frequently forage in wetlands during nesting season taking all sorts
of small protein meals from there back to their nestlings. I remember once,
when I worked at a nature park, I had a bucket full of tadpoles, dragonfly
nymphs and gambusia for use with a 5th grade class. I met the students at
their bus and when we walked back to the pond shore a few grackles flew
from the bucket. They had eaten every critter. A friend who was fishing at
the Falls Lake dam said he watched grackles catching small fish and
tadpoles from pools among the rocks at that site.

But in urban and suburban Raleigh Common Grackle colonies are mostly in
tall, thick hedge rows, quite often in Photinia. There is a colony
adjoining the parking lot at the Hillsborough Street YMCA, and another in
the medium of Capital Boulevard about 1 mile north of downtown, and another
in the hedges of the Governor's mansion. There always seem to be members of
the colony around to repel Fish Crows and other nest predators while much
of the colony forages at some distant wetland. It would be nice to track
where these birds forage- that would answer some of your questions.

Of course, I haven't done a formal study, but this is my best guess of what
I see around here.
JC

On Thu, May 7, 2020 at 8:26 AM John Fussell <jofuss...> wrote:

> Throughout spring and early summer, Common Grackles are common in the
> upland
> maritime forest and interlying swales of swamp forest and shrub swamps in
> the Theodore Roosevelt Natural Area (Bogue Banks, Carteret County). It
> seems that some are always within hearing or sight. And, usually when I
> pish to bring some in closer, often 50 or more will almost immediately
> move
> in to protest loudly.
>
> I never see any nests. I confess that I haven't looked real hard for
> them,
> but I do look some, and in many of these habitat structures I would think
> that any nests would be easy to spot.
>
> Are there typically non-breeding bands of Common Grackles that habitually
> wander around without nesting? What's the deal here? Has anyone else
> experienced this phenomenon? Does anyone have any answers?
>
> I might add that this is something I've noticed every spring and early
> summer that I've spent time in this park.
>
> I will add that this same situation exists with Red-winged Blackbirds, but
> to a much lesser extent.
>
>
> John Fussell
> Morehead City, NC
>
>

 

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Date: 5/7/20 5:26 am
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: what's the deal with Common Grackles??
Throughout spring and early summer, Common Grackles are common in the upland
maritime forest and interlying swales of swamp forest and shrub swamps in
the Theodore Roosevelt Natural Area (Bogue Banks, Carteret County). It
seems that some are always within hearing or sight. And, usually when I
pish to bring some in closer, often 50 or more will almost immediately move
in to protest loudly.

I never see any nests. I confess that I haven't looked real hard for them,
but I do look some, and in many of these habitat structures I would think
that any nests would be easy to spot.

Are there typically non-breeding bands of Common Grackles that habitually
wander around without nesting? What's the deal here? Has anyone else
experienced this phenomenon? Does anyone have any answers?

I might add that this is something I've noticed every spring and early
summer that I've spent time in this park.

I will add that this same situation exists with Red-winged Blackbirds, but
to a much lesser extent.


John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

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Date: 5/7/20 5:09 am
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Crabtree Creek Wetlands- Raleigh NC
Willow Flycatcher present and calling at the gazebo. Warbling Vireo heard as well. Cooperative Prothonotary and Yellow Warblers too.

Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/7/20 2:25 am
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: L.Shrikes continue: 3 prs @ R.Rap.theater
Since April 30, no shrike seen at Ridgecrest Road.

Poplar Lane nest occupied at times,and almost every driveby bagged a sighting. Curiously not even one shrike to be seen at noon on 5/6, but the pair at 1PM. The female on nest, the male within sight of her.
It would seem the probability of spotting a shrike goes up when there is a nest (duh),but the pair keeping company elsewhere can lead to a miss.

Due to a walk through the magic forest for the grandchild on 5/3, there seem to be 2-3 pairs of shrikes at that prime (under painfully slow development) real estate which is the Roanoke Rapids theater site (a "Hail Mary pass" or boondoggle burdening the RR taxpayers). This has largely grown up to good habitat for (winter) harrier (no Short-ear yet) and Prairie Warbler, meadowlark, etc.
Shrikes were here before RR annexed the land from Weldon, and traffic is not just minimal, but also slow--less roadkill expected. Protection from high-speed traffic may be significant for this species.
Two broods of Killdeer were using the parking lots on 5/3. And large white Red-tailed Hawk chicks were present on the east side in one of the tallest adjoining trees---that would seem to explain why I saw a Red-tail almost every trip earlier in spring (again,duh,but nice to see the downy chicks).

Supposed 3 pairs:
There are two shrikes along the power lines southeast, as one pulls off NC 125 into the theater property; no nest, but the birds may really be in the trailer court southeast,off the property.
A single shrike, seen only once, 5/6, is about 0.2 miles straight north. It also perhaps nests off the property near adjacent trailers. Or, it may be related to the several unused shrike nests seen in plantings of Bradford pear just west of this straight road which goes to Wallace Fork Road and the RV park. A shrike or two have been seen there for several years, but with disappointingly low probabilities--probably hiding at the trailer homes!
The third supposed pair is in front of the theater. Birds seen both 5/3 and 5/6. Nest may be in 50' magnolias or in scrub (plum, post oak, poison ivy, blackberry, etc.) between theater and I-95.
There is a barbed wire fence separating the theater from I-95. I won't drive 20 mph on I-95 to check,but someday one may see a shrike on that fence.

A singing Song Sparrow just south of the property is in usual habitat for the isolated Roanoke Rapids population; extensive azalea plantings This bird is perhaps the only one east of I-95 here. The isolated Emporia,VA population straddles I-95. There, the outlying bird on Low Ground Road was miles from town, but with azaleas.

I cannot speak to shrikes just across the Virginia border. Used to be one near Barley. With global warming, why not more up there?

I AM heartened by so many shrikes at theater, after fearing for the "now you seem them, now you don't" shrikes of Halifax County, NC.

Frank Enders, Halifax, NC


 

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Date: 5/7/20 1:32 am
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Wake County Swainson's Warbler--as Orchard Oriole territoriality?
As I remember them, Swainson's along Roanoke River "gallery forest" below Weldon are well spaced, but several audible from one spot in river is not unusual.

I have been (too) sloppy in keeping records of birds here, but Orchard Orioles this spring show what is discussed in this thread.

First arrival was actually an immature bird. Two total birds arrived, but only one seen. Nothing the next day, then two singers, heard only.

The fourth day was pandemonium. 2 and 3 bird chases with much high intensity call notes (all now adult males). Not much song. I even asked myself why one oriole was blue, a Blue Grosbeak male,but he was only slightly involved in the confusion which lasted several hours. I guessed there were 10-15 male orioles involved. Hard to tell, with chases lasting hundreds of feet,but no significant physical contact seen (unlike Chipping Sparrows).

The next day quieter, with subsequent days sorting out the usual 8-10 males just singing on these 5.97 acres.

I figured several explanations. Perhaps a migrant flock which then broke up and spread elsewhere locally or farther north. Perhaps the birds were trying to be at the east-facing slope where most of the action occurred (the broiler house dug down some 10 feet from the field to the west)--insect activity had to start at the warmest site.

Never had seen such action in 40 years here. But, I am not always up at dawn,and often work otherwise.

Females have since arrived. And, as persons commenting on the warbler describe, intense initial aggression precedes normal breeding/nesting.



Frank Enders, Halifax, NC


Do naturalists who study cold-blooded animals value the (warmer) sunsets more than students of (warm-blooded) birds? (One of whom regularly here impugns the character of those who are not out at dawn.)

 

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Date: 5/6/20 1:57 pm
From: Will Cook <cwcook...>
Subject: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks in Hillsborough, NC
I just got a phone call from Dr. Roy MacDonald at the Hillsborough
Veterinary Clinic - he reported a flock of 7 Black-bellied Whistling
Ducks have been present all day at the pond next to the Orange County
SportsPlex. Looks like the coordinates are 36.060903, -79.078218

Will Cook - Durham, NC



 

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Date: 5/6/20 12:29 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Blue-winged Teal breeding in Macon County, NC!
I got no further comments -- and thus considering that May 5 might well be
quite early for a pair of Blue-winged Teal to have produced a successful
brood, especially in the mountains -- but not so for overwintering/resident
species like Mallard and Wood Duck -- I think it best to consider the
report as unconfirmed and the chicks seen and photographed represent those
two latter species until proven otherwise.

Harry LeGrand

On Tue, May 5, 2020 at 8:10 PM Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr...> wrote:

> Now that I am looking at her 2 photos on her eBird list:
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68455561__;!!OToaGQ!8_gienA2g7tIotKi0H_eJX0D_PvytUpvO1atImKKQZgdPUyWvhqY-oPW5mKPVZRlBWM$
>
> The first photo shows a female Mallard with several chicks, as some Anas
> species. These could be Mallard chicks, or possibly Blue-winged Teal
> chicks. I've looked at images on Google, and I can't be sure. The second
> photo does show a male Blue-winged Teal, but the chick in the photo seems
> to be that of a Wood Duck. Barbara did say there was a brood of Wood Ducks
> in the same wetland.
>
> Thus, can Barbara or others try to confirm nesting by Blue-winged Teal
> here? Thanks.
>
> Harry LeGrand
>
>
>
>
>
> On Tue, May 5, 2020 at 7:58 PM Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr...> wrote:
>
>> Barbara McRae e-mailed me today, with 2 photos (that cannot be attached),
>> that she had been seeing adult Blue-winged Teals at a wetland near the
>> Little Tennessee River in Macon County. Today, she photographed a female
>> with 7 ducklings, and also the adult male. I hope she uploads photos to the
>> CBC Photo Gallery, or to an eBird list. If not, I have forwarded the
>> message to Josh Southern, for the Chat Briefs for the Files.
>>
>> This I think is a first confirmed nesting of Blue-winged Teal in NC in a
>> decade or more, and a first for the mountains. It used to nest
>> occasionally on the Outer Banks. However, a few "fluke" breeding records
>> have been noted in both Carolinas in the last 40 years (from the Chat
>> database):
>>
>> Davis, Ricky. 2003. Briefs for the files. Chat 67:148–155
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/issues/2003/v67n4briefs_summer_2003.pdf__;!!OToaGQ!8_gienA2g7tIotKi0H_eJX0D_PvytUpvO1atImKKQZgdPUyWvhqY-oPW5mKPVltHXtU$ >
>> (All dates Summer 2003, unless otherwise noted)
>> BLUE-WINGED TEAL: A noteworthy nesting record came from the Savannah
>> Spoil Site, SC this summer with two different broods of Blue-winged Teal, a
>> species found breeding in the state only a handful of times. A female with
>> eight young was seen June 13 and a female with two young was found June 27
>> (Steve Calver).
>>
>> Davis, Ricky. 1998. Briefs for the files. Chat 62:187–199
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/issues/1998/v62n4briefs_spring_1998.pdf__;!!OToaGQ!8_gienA2g7tIotKi0H_eJX0D_PvytUpvO1atImKKQZgdPUyWvhqY-oPW5mKPSJfasUE$ >
>> (All Dates Spring 1998)
>> BLUE-WINGED TEAL: A first Forsyth County, NC, breeding record was
>> established when a pair was at a nest with four eggs during late April
>> (Ramona Snavely et. al.) They were seen to abandon the eggs, and
>> surprisingly Mallards and Canada Geese were seen incubating the eggs later!
>> Another first local breeding record was of a female with three young near
>> Pauline, SC, May 8 (Lyle Campbell).
>>
>> LeGrand, Harry E., Jr.. 1983. Briefs for the files. Chat 47:26–32
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/issues/1983/v47n1briefs_spring_summer_1982.pdf__;!!OToaGQ!8_gienA2g7tIotKi0H_eJX0D_PvytUpvO1atImKKQZgdPUyWvhqY-oPW5mKPySW-Xnw$ >
>> (All dates 1982)
>> BLUE-WINGED TEAL: Perhaps the first breeding record for inland North
>> Carolina was established at Beaverdam Reservoir on 12 June, when Dick Brame
>> flushed a female with seven young.
>>
>> Legrand, Harry E., Jr.. 1981. Briefs for the files. Chat 45:19–24
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/issues/1981/v45n1briefs_summer_1980.pdf__;!!OToaGQ!8_gienA2g7tIotKi0H_eJX0D_PvytUpvO1atImKKQZgdPUyWvhqY-oPW5mKPrBUhvtk$ >
>> (All dates 1980 unless otherwise indicated)
>> BLUE-WINGED TEAL: A nesting of this species was noted near Fairplay,
>> Anderson County, S.C., during the summer (fide Stanlee Miller), and John
>> Fussell had a nesting record (five young plus adults) at Brant Island, in
>> Fort Macon State Park, N.C., in June. A male was unusual at Huntington
>> Beach State Park, S.C., on 12 June (P.J. Crutchfield, Kevin Mason), and
>> seven were very early at Jordan Reservoir on 2 July (Bob Lewis).
>>
>>
>> Harry LeGrand
>> Raleigh
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/20 8:30 am
From: Gail Lankford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Nashville warbler
Yesterday, May 5, I had a singing Nashville warbler in our yard twice in
the afternoon, next to our porch. I watched it sing and graze in a
Chestnut Oak just leafing out. Had close eye level looks at one point. Had
a Worm-eating in the same tree at same time around 4:00.
This is our second Nashville in 12 years, but our other one was in
September below the house in a brushy area that no longer exists. This is
the only through-migrant we have had so far this spring. All other birds
are our usual year round (22) and migrant (16) nesters. We are at 3200'.
Gail Lankford
Weaverville NC
Buncombe County

 

Back to top
Date: 5/5/20 5:11 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Blue-winged Teal breeding in Macon County, NC!
Now that I am looking at her 2 photos on her eBird list:

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68455561__;!!OToaGQ!9bvpxs_SNmueUi14FHHAxXecTCUqzlRJvdkmFO1wleqjHA7KniWxONhP7cGu1RMV7B0$

The first photo shows a female Mallard with several chicks, as some Anas
species. These could be Mallard chicks, or possibly Blue-winged Teal
chicks. I've looked at images on Google, and I can't be sure. The second
photo does show a male Blue-winged Teal, but the chick in the photo seems
to be that of a Wood Duck. Barbara did say there was a brood of Wood Ducks
in the same wetland.

Thus, can Barbara or others try to confirm nesting by Blue-winged Teal
here? Thanks.

Harry LeGrand





On Tue, May 5, 2020 at 7:58 PM Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr...> wrote:

> Barbara McRae e-mailed me today, with 2 photos (that cannot be attached),
> that she had been seeing adult Blue-winged Teals at a wetland near the
> Little Tennessee River in Macon County. Today, she photographed a female
> with 7 ducklings, and also the adult male. I hope she uploads photos to the
> CBC Photo Gallery, or to an eBird list. If not, I have forwarded the
> message to Josh Southern, for the Chat Briefs for the Files.
>
> This I think is a first confirmed nesting of Blue-winged Teal in NC in a
> decade or more, and a first for the mountains. It used to nest
> occasionally on the Outer Banks. However, a few "fluke" breeding records
> have been noted in both Carolinas in the last 40 years (from the Chat
> database):
>
> Davis, Ricky. 2003. Briefs for the files. Chat 67:148–155
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/issues/2003/v67n4briefs_summer_2003.pdf__;!!OToaGQ!9bvpxs_SNmueUi14FHHAxXecTCUqzlRJvdkmFO1wleqjHA7KniWxONhP7cGuFlToGOA$ >
> (All dates Summer 2003, unless otherwise noted)
> BLUE-WINGED TEAL: A noteworthy nesting record came from the Savannah Spoil
> Site, SC this summer with two different broods of Blue-winged Teal, a
> species found breeding in the state only a handful of times. A female with
> eight young was seen June 13 and a female with two young was found June 27
> (Steve Calver).
>
> Davis, Ricky. 1998. Briefs for the files. Chat 62:187–199
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/issues/1998/v62n4briefs_spring_1998.pdf__;!!OToaGQ!9bvpxs_SNmueUi14FHHAxXecTCUqzlRJvdkmFO1wleqjHA7KniWxONhP7cGuLiSREo8$ >
> (All Dates Spring 1998)
> BLUE-WINGED TEAL: A first Forsyth County, NC, breeding record was
> established when a pair was at a nest with four eggs during late April
> (Ramona Snavely et. al.) They were seen to abandon the eggs, and
> surprisingly Mallards and Canada Geese were seen incubating the eggs later!
> Another first local breeding record was of a female with three young near
> Pauline, SC, May 8 (Lyle Campbell).
>
> LeGrand, Harry E., Jr.. 1983. Briefs for the files. Chat 47:26–32
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/issues/1983/v47n1briefs_spring_summer_1982.pdf__;!!OToaGQ!9bvpxs_SNmueUi14FHHAxXecTCUqzlRJvdkmFO1wleqjHA7KniWxONhP7cGut-_X3u4$ >
> (All dates 1982)
> BLUE-WINGED TEAL: Perhaps the first breeding record for inland North
> Carolina was established at Beaverdam Reservoir on 12 June, when Dick Brame
> flushed a female with seven young.
>
> Legrand, Harry E., Jr.. 1981. Briefs for the files. Chat 45:19–24
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/issues/1981/v45n1briefs_summer_1980.pdf__;!!OToaGQ!9bvpxs_SNmueUi14FHHAxXecTCUqzlRJvdkmFO1wleqjHA7KniWxONhP7cGunWqRHO4$ >
> (All dates 1980 unless otherwise indicated)
> BLUE-WINGED TEAL: A nesting of this species was noted near Fairplay,
> Anderson County, S.C., during the summer (fide Stanlee Miller), and John
> Fussell had a nesting record (five young plus adults) at Brant Island, in
> Fort Macon State Park, N.C., in June. A male was unusual at Huntington
> Beach State Park, S.C., on 12 June (P.J. Crutchfield, Kevin Mason), and
> seven were very early at Jordan Reservoir on 2 July (Bob Lewis).
>
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/5/20 4:58 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Blue-winged Teal breeding in Macon County, NC!
Barbara McRae e-mailed me today, with 2 photos (that cannot be attached),
that she had been seeing adult Blue-winged Teals at a wetland near the
Little Tennessee River in Macon County. Today, she photographed a female
with 7 ducklings, and also the adult male. I hope she uploads photos to the
CBC Photo Gallery, or to an eBird list. If not, I have forwarded the
message to Josh Southern, for the Chat Briefs for the Files.

This I think is a first confirmed nesting of Blue-winged Teal in NC in a
decade or more, and a first for the mountains. It used to nest
occasionally on the Outer Banks. However, a few "fluke" breeding records
have been noted in both Carolinas in the last 40 years (from the Chat
database):

Davis, Ricky. 2003. Briefs for the files. Chat 67:148–155
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/issues/2003/v67n4briefs_summer_2003.pdf__;!!OToaGQ!4TvHPY5dICSptzIrE4YuDfS8VRCVbm4USXZONAcg-ZherSKm04_1a8Js7V_5RjqBqXs$ >
(All dates Summer 2003, unless otherwise noted)
BLUE-WINGED TEAL: A noteworthy nesting record came from the Savannah Spoil
Site, SC this summer with two different broods of Blue-winged Teal, a
species found breeding in the state only a handful of times. A female with
eight young was seen June 13 and a female with two young was found June 27
(Steve Calver).

Davis, Ricky. 1998. Briefs for the files. Chat 62:187–199
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/issues/1998/v62n4briefs_spring_1998.pdf__;!!OToaGQ!4TvHPY5dICSptzIrE4YuDfS8VRCVbm4USXZONAcg-ZherSKm04_1a8Js7V_5L5-y2IU$ >
(All Dates Spring 1998)
BLUE-WINGED TEAL: A first Forsyth County, NC, breeding record was
established when a pair was at a nest with four eggs during late April
(Ramona Snavely et. al.) They were seen to abandon the eggs, and
surprisingly Mallards and Canada Geese were seen incubating the eggs later!
Another first local breeding record was of a female with three young near
Pauline, SC, May 8 (Lyle Campbell).

LeGrand, Harry E., Jr.. 1983. Briefs for the files. Chat 47:26–32
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/issues/1983/v47n1briefs_spring_summer_1982.pdf__;!!OToaGQ!4TvHPY5dICSptzIrE4YuDfS8VRCVbm4USXZONAcg-ZherSKm04_1a8Js7V_5Hu0VOyc$ >
(All dates 1982)
BLUE-WINGED TEAL: Perhaps the first breeding record for inland North
Carolina was established at Beaverdam Reservoir on 12 June, when Dick Brame
flushed a female with seven young.

Legrand, Harry E., Jr.. 1981. Briefs for the files. Chat 45:19–24
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/issues/1981/v45n1briefs_summer_1980.pdf__;!!OToaGQ!4TvHPY5dICSptzIrE4YuDfS8VRCVbm4USXZONAcg-ZherSKm04_1a8Js7V_5c4J5J28$ >
(All dates 1980 unless otherwise indicated)
BLUE-WINGED TEAL: A nesting of this species was noted near Fairplay,
Anderson County, S.C., during the summer (fide Stanlee Miller), and John
Fussell had a nesting record (five young plus adults) at Brant Island, in
Fort Macon State Park, N.C., in June. A male was unusual at Huntington
Beach State Park, S.C., on 12 June (P.J. Crutchfield, Kevin Mason), and
seven were very early at Jordan Reservoir on 2 July (Bob Lewis).


Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

 

Back to top
Date: 5/5/20 3:50 pm
From: \Gilbert S. Grant\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mississippi Kite in New Hanover County,NC
We just watched our first of season adult Mississippi Kite capture and
eat a dragonfly in the Wrightsboro area near Wilmington.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/5/20 1:45 pm
From: Cherrie Sneed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Crossbills at feeder - Jackson Co. NC
Tim,

Congratulations! What a treat to have so many Red Crossbills visit your
feeders.

It has been a while but we hosted a pair one year and a single immature
another year in Graham County, NC. We are always looking.

Cherrie

On Tue, May 5, 2020 at 1:29 PM Tim Lewis <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> There was a surprise visit by a flock of Red Crossbills at noon today. A
> first here as far as we know but they did act they weren’t new to feeders.
> The visit lasted only 15 minutes.
>
>
>
> We live at 2,400’ so we certainly don’t expect them since they have so
> many high elevation options nearby.
>
>
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/gallery/Tim_Lewis/recr.html__;!!OToaGQ!_9kvjHDwuY2YxrSIZXIcZVATX7QJ78jl_xDkGK_iLLz4breFJp3aFnY0x7a8hH5jsyg$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/gallery/Tim_Lewis/recr.html__;%21%21OToaGQ%217fUpFw1O4hZ3tZzoZWt6YhFpaqMyTIPgEkvLPcgDmy0dpnoXlZmmev6CXvQ2n1MzNDI$>
>
>
>
> Tim Lewis
>
> Jackson Co. NC
>
>
>
>
>


--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

*Cherrie & Dan Sneed*
Prosperity, SC
Newberry CO

 

Back to top
Date: 5/5/20 1:10 pm
From: Thea and Mark Sinclair (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bobolinks in Catawba County
While looking for a grasshopper sparrow in a field along Penley Blvd near
the Catawba River in Claremont, we were very surprised to see two bobolinks
hop up on a fence post right along the road. It was the first time we had
seen one in Catawba County. We also enjoyed singing male and female
Baltimore orioles and an Eastern wood-pewee in the same area.
Thea Sinclair
Hickory, NC

 

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Date: 5/5/20 12:36 pm
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Crabtree Creek Wetlands W of Raleigh Blvd, Wake Co NC- Wilson’s Warbler, Warbling Vireo
Wilson’s Warbler and Warbling Vireo continue this afternoon. Northern Waterthrush as well.

Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/5/20 10:29 am
From: Tim Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Crossbills at feeder - Jackson Co. NC
There was a surprise visit by a flock of Red Crossbills at noon today. A first here as far as we know but they did act they werent new to feeders. The visit lasted only 15 minutes.

We live at 2,400 so we certainly dont expect them since they have so many high elevation options nearby.

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/gallery/Tim_Lewis/recr.html__;!!OToaGQ!7fUpFw1O4hZ3tZzoZWt6YhFpaqMyTIPgEkvLPcgDmy0dpnoXlZmmev6CXvQ2n1MzNDI$

Tim Lewis
Jackson Co. NC



 

Back to top
Date: 5/5/20 8:38 am
From: Jan Hansen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Glossy Ibis in Orange County
I just had 6 Glossy Ibis flyover the wetland area just before the ford over Morgan Creek at Mason a Farm in Chapel Hill.

Jan Hansen
Chapel Hill NC
919-259-9423
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.otusasiotours.com__;!!OToaGQ!5s0rH1wW22l2W_RX1Rpr-dryd0JxjrR8OVeF2EcfOS7ntdLjRAgU_WWCos4AROxaeog$

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/5/20 6:30 am
From: Jay Pitocchelli (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Request for assistance – song recordings of migrating MourningWarblers
Request for assistance – song recordings of migrating Mourning Warblers



I am once again writing to request your help and record Mourning Warbler
songs from spring migrants. It is year 6 of my research using birdsong to
study migratory connectivity of Mourning Warbler song populations. Our lab
is interested in whether different song populations of the Mourning Warbler
(Western, Eastern, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland) migrate together or
separately to their respective breeding areas. Here is a link to the
latest map with previous years’ results based on recordings from over 100
birders.



https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?hl=en&mid=1voXjBhvHZ0nwAv93_OBC_vCPuxQ&ll=38.892516009880424*2C-85.09712735&z=5__;JQ!!OToaGQ!66cKg_HY0CQnlJ12xTmpk2hNPQjcYRxV_5xryMb2YDaxSh86eDCWE85e6ki5t3fUurY$



Preliminary results from the map indicate that 1) Western song populations
are separating out from the rest of the pack and migrating throughout the
mid-western states directly to the Prairie Provinces, 2) Eastern, Nova
Scotia and Newfoundland song populations are migrating together along the
Appalachian Mountains, 3) Nova Scotia and Newfoundland song populations are
beginning to hug the Atlantic coast in New Jersey and New York.



We are in need of recordings from more mid-western states, eastern Colorado
and the New England coast. All you need is a smartphone with a voice
recording app and some luck. Videos with recordings are also helpful. The
web page link below describes the project and how to make recordings on
your Smartphone in more detail. Please send song recordings to the
Mourning Warbler Sound Lab (jpitocch AT anselm.edu).



https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://mowasongmapper.weebly.com/__;!!OToaGQ!66cKg_HY0CQnlJ12xTmpk2hNPQjcYRxV_5xryMb2YDaxSh86eDCWE85e6ki56nwO2lI$



There is also a link to a spring 2017 National Audubon Society story on
this research.



Audubon Society reporting

https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.audubon.org/magazine/spring-2017/this-guy-mapping-how-warblers-migrate-just__;!!OToaGQ!66cKg_HY0CQnlJ12xTmpk2hNPQjcYRxV_5xryMb2YDaxSh86eDCWE85e6ki5QCTYdBU$



I would really appreciate your help and contributions this year to this
Citizens Science Project.



Dr. Jay Pitocchelli

Chair, Biology Department

Saint Anselm College

Manchester, NH 03102

 

Back to top
Date: 5/4/20 7:48 pm
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bronzed Cowbird report NC
It appears the second Bronzed Cowbird of the year has shown up in a Craven County yard. Photos on eBird. I doubt the observer will want visitors during a pandemic, but a noteworthy find nonetheless.

Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/4/20 8:46 am
From: Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: a historical look at the Jordan Lake Bird Counts--Part 1
Unfortunately, we were unable to do our annual Jordan Lake Spring Bird
Count. So, I've been busy writing blog posts for New Hope Audubon,
exploring the data we have collected for the past 40+ years. In the first
article, I have described our process and some of the history of the count,
and then I have discussed the data for a few bird species, particularly
those most closely tied to the lake. In future articles in this series
I'll look at other species, paying particular attention to those whose
numbers have increased and, more ominously, those whose numbers have
decreased.

Here's the link to the first article:
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.newhopeaudubon.org/blog/jordan-lake-bird-counts-part-1/__;!!OToaGQ!5za9Cmknq7cxCgIHmSVGDHpev2odtrAQv6ZmLpbSZT3GMkMHhEwzlTlTIrIW1UYRCg4$

--
Norm Budnitz
Orange County
North Carolina

 

Back to top
Date: 5/3/20 2:41 pm
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Wake County Swainson's Warblers
On May 2, Harry LeGrand said the following: " One Swainson's is
seldom if ever going to be within hearing range of another, at least
certainly not within about 75-100 yards, as in the case here."

-- I cannot speak to Swainson's Warbler habits in the North Carolina
Piedmont, but that statement is most untrue if applied to Swainson's
Warblers in Lowcountry South Carolina. Especially early in their
breeding season before the pecking order gets worked out.

I have seen (and heard) two males chase each other NUMEROUS times and
have seen well-spaced "conga lines" of 3 and once 4 birds in prime
sought-after habitat.

In the mountains, I have also seen two male Swainson's Warblers fairly
close to each other - facing off and working on territorial boundaries
in thickets along the Green River in Polk County, NC.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2


"These days I prefer to hunt with a camera. A good photograph demands
more skill from the hunter, better nerves and more patience than the
rifle shot." -- Bror Blixen


On Sat, May 2, 2020 at 8:59 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I am seeing a few reports on eBird of TWO Swainson's Warblers singing along the Neuse today. I was there this morning, hearing and seeing the SINGLE singing bird as our group headed downriver around 745, and again just the one bird coming back around 1030. The other bird singing at bridges 288 and 289 is a Louisiana Waterthrush, not a second Swainson's. (I note a few of these lists don't even list Louisiana Waterthrush; today, there were about 4-5 singing LA Waterthrushes along the greenway for about 2 miles downriver of the parking lot; but just one Swainson's Warbler.)
>
> Swainson's Warbler are very strongly territorial and charge a song of another bird, as witnessed by the many times over the years I and others have played tapes. So, if there ever were a second singing bird within hearing range of another, one would have driven off the other immediately. One Swainson's is seldom if ever going to be within hearing range of another, at least certainly not within about 75-100 yards, as in the case here.
>
> So -- eBird editors, there is/was only ONE singing Swainson's Warbler along this trail today (May 2). Of course, there could be a female nearby, but there are not TWO singing birds within earshot of each other. That probably also applies to yesterday's report of 2 singing birds as well.
>
> But -- yes, there IS indeed a Swainson's Warbler there, singing very close to the greenway trail, and you might well be able to see him without the use of a tape. He is clearly on territory. Thanks to Eddie Owens for finding and reporting the bird yesterday.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
> On Fri, May 1, 2020 at 9:22 AM Eddie Owens <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> I did some early morning birding before work, visiting in the southeastern part of the county, parking at Mial Plantation Rd parking lot (it's an eBird hotspot), and hiking to the Johnston Co. line. My target bird was Swainson's Warbler. eBird tools indicated this might be a good place and time for that bird.
>>
>> I encountered at least two birds, possibly a third one (but it was so far up a tributary in the woods, I couldn't hear it well). Location details for the birds are in my report:
>> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68174645__;!!OToaGQ!7Kl0SzCBQP4Xgi2eRX8Zgl0Wa-b6x-pfaMkOpl788LeOuY9OX9hQD-CBrqlAmw2IeGA$ . I think they might hang around for a day or two.
>>
>> Happy Birding,
>> Eddie Owens
>> Cary, NC



--
 

Back to top
Date: 5/3/20 12:38 pm
From: Michael Gamble (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Wake County Swainson's Warblers
Hi,

I am unfamiliar with the area that these Swainson's warblers were seen but
I can give some information based on my years of field experience with
warblers. I ran a spring migration banding station in Louisiana where we
had 5 male Swainson's warblers on territory at my site. They were all
within 75 yards or less of each other and they would sometimes chase each
other, but most of the time they would just countersing with each other.
Based on Swainson's warblers we repeatedly caught, there were at least 8
males on territory within 100 yards. It's not true that highly territorial
warbler species will not be seen together.

I've also worked extensively with golden-cheeked warblers (another highly
territorial warbler species) in central Texas for the last 5 years. My main
fieldwork was territory monitoring, target netting, and color banding
individuals. Depending on the quality and availability of good habitat, you
can have several golden-cheeked warbler males within what you would think
could be one birds' territory. We would also have areas with multiple
territories that would overlap and the males would not drive each other
off. They will usually just countersing with one another on their territory
boundaries without actually chasing them away (this could be as close as 10
meters apart). They sometimes will fight and chase each other off if one
gets too close but then they will return to their territories and
countersing close by. There are also some males that aren't as aggressive
and will only countersing. When target netting, there are males we play
playback under and they never respond throughout the whole season so not
all males will react to another male singing nearby.

Just thought I'd provide some additional information.

Michael Gamble
Charleston, SC


On Sat, May 2, 2020, 7:59 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> I am seeing a few reports on eBird of TWO Swainson's Warblers singing
> along the Neuse today. I was there this morning, hearing and seeing the
> SINGLE singing bird as our group headed downriver around 745, and again
> just the one bird coming back around 1030. The other bird singing at
> bridges 288 and 289 is a Louisiana Waterthrush, not a second Swainson's.
> (I note a few of these lists don't even list Louisiana Waterthrush; today,
> there were about 4-5 singing LA Waterthrushes along the greenway for about
> 2 miles downriver of the parking lot; but just one Swainson's Warbler.)
>
> Swainson's Warbler are very strongly territorial and charge a song of
> another bird, as witnessed by the many times over the years I and others
> have played tapes. So, if there ever were a second singing bird within
> hearing range of another, one would have driven off the other
> immediately. One Swainson's is seldom if ever going to be within hearing
> range of another, at least certainly not within about 75-100 yards, as in
> the case here.
>
> So -- eBird editors, there is/was only ONE singing Swainson's Warbler
> along this trail today (May 2). Of course, there could be a female nearby,
> but there are not TWO singing birds within earshot of each other. That
> probably also applies to yesterday's report of 2 singing birds as well.
>
> But -- yes, there IS indeed a Swainson's Warbler there, singing very close
> to the greenway trail, and you might well be able to see him without the
> use of a tape. He is clearly on territory. Thanks to Eddie Owens for
> finding and reporting the bird yesterday.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
> On Fri, May 1, 2020 at 9:22 AM Eddie Owens <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
>> I did some early morning birding before work, visiting in the
>> southeastern part of the county, parking at Mial Plantation Rd parking lot
>> (it's an eBird hotspot), and hiking to the Johnston Co. line. My target
>> bird was Swainson's Warbler. eBird tools indicated this might be a good
>> place and time for that bird.
>>
>> I encountered at least two birds, possibly a third one (but it was so far
>> up a tributary in the woods, I couldn't hear it well). Location details for
>> the birds are in my report:
>> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68174645__;!!OToaGQ!4Lb2aVHdx3Nahbk1MWm6baBpUNWsS1rESepOC8JbLglLvC6EyOv7-pEsWSGVmrczuvU$
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68174645__;!!OToaGQ!-mznbKP2xAzBLbNmosCLV60OlsXfMWcUIG_PweCzBdS1qOnoTBgJkBIBKdAPgKBmEm8$>.
>> I think they might hang around for a day or two.
>>
>> Happy Birding,
>> Eddie Owens
>> Cary, NC
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/3/20 11:09 am
From: Matt Lawing (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Swallow Tailed Kite at Jordan Lake
Went looking at 751 bridge. Couldn’t find there.

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 3, 2020, at 11:56 AM, Margaret McGuinn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> 
> And we saw one this morning (9:30) from just off the Bynum Bridge.
>
> Margaret McGuinn
>
>> On Sun, May 3, 2020 at 11:53 AM steve stevens <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>> Seen circling over intersection of Lystra/Big Woods Rd. Southeast of the intersection over deforested area. Seen at 1145am from kayak in Jordan Lake.
>>
>> Approximate location:
>> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://maps.app.goo.gl/VjtbXwYUiL1Kf8sR8__;!!OToaGQ!8jVMUztM289esnJgfI1LYoI4K2vx2SEuwtDlq1t1MuwM2NzB19Y76CwAAG9Bk2ZklP0$

 

Back to top
Date: 5/3/20 10:31 am
From: John Ennis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Holly Shelter This Morning
Many Great Crested Flycatchers...saw 4...

Heard at least 4 Bachman’s Sparrows...saw 1

4 Red-headed Woodpeckers plus 3 Red-cockaded Woodpeckers

Common Yellowthroat heard 1

Only FOY was Eastern Kingbird

John Ennis
Wilmington NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/3/20 8:56 am
From: Margaret McGuinn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Swallow Tailed Kite at Jordan Lake
And we saw one this morning (9:30) from just off the Bynum Bridge.

Margaret McGuinn

On Sun, May 3, 2020 at 11:53 AM steve stevens <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Seen circling over intersection of Lystra/Big Woods Rd. Southeast of the
> intersection over deforested area. Seen at 1145am from kayak in Jordan
> Lake.
>
> Approximate location:
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://maps.app.goo.gl/VjtbXwYUiL1Kf8sR8__;!!OToaGQ!-oBUH-g_i-_FZmzi1MvLdqpvuc3CfJzAbMkUJiMsAqCK3fxpFPX9FpknPOuJUXDnBas$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://maps.app.goo.gl/VjtbXwYUiL1Kf8sR8__;!!OToaGQ!7gLdQYIeQuNvGMrGHJ4QW0ClwQbniokgw3Cswa6lU83gxlkAE7X2O-CS1y6u7ETZvJM$>
>

 

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Date: 5/3/20 8:53 am
From: steve stevens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Swallow Tailed Kite at Jordan Lake
Seen circling over intersection of Lystra/Big Woods Rd. Southeast of the
intersection over deforested area. Seen at 1145am from kayak in Jordan
Lake.

Approximate location:
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://maps.app.goo.gl/VjtbXwYUiL1Kf8sR8__;!!OToaGQ!7gLdQYIeQuNvGMrGHJ4QW0ClwQbniokgw3Cswa6lU83gxlkAE7X2O-CS1y6u7ETZvJM$

 

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Date: 5/3/20 8:25 am
From: Fischer David (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Wake County Swainson's Warblers
Harry, you make a good point that these birds are highly territorial and two males normally aren't seen together.  I did think I heard 2 different singing males on May 1.  Now I'm wondering if I only heard one.  But what I know for sure is 2 different Swainson's warblers flew back and forth across the path just past bridge 288.  One singing male cooperated for photos (https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68199249__;!!OToaGQ!5VcGA7qJ9qqW23PNvgA7svWskMlqF964KINMD_IXDcIOrz5nabwK7-PLPnsluzrPK-M$ ).  The second bird may have been a female.  I've amended my ebird report to indicate a record of 2 SWWA, one of which was a singing male.  
Dave Fischer


-----Original Message-----
From: Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...>
To: Eddie Owens <birdingbanjoman...>
Cc: carolinabirds listserve <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Sat, May 2, 2020 8:59 pm
Subject: Re: Wake County Swainson's Warblers

I am seeing a few reports on eBird of TWO Swainson's Warblers singing along the Neuse today.  I was there this morning, hearing and seeing the SINGLE singing bird as our group headed downriver around 745, and again just the one bird coming back around 1030.  The other bird singing at bridges 288 and 289 is a Louisiana Waterthrush, not a second Swainson's.   (I note a few of these lists don't even list Louisiana Waterthrush; today, there were about 4-5 singing LA Waterthrushes along the greenway for about 2 miles downriver of the parking lot; but just one Swainson's Warbler.)

Swainson's Warbler are very strongly territorial and charge a song of another bird, as witnessed by the many times over the years I and others have played tapes.  So, if there ever were a second singing bird within hearing range of another, one would have driven off the other immediately.   One Swainson's is seldom if ever going to be within hearing range of another, at least certainly not within about 75-100 yards, as in the case here.

So -- eBird editors, there is/was only ONE singing Swainson's Warbler along this trail today (May 2).  Of course, there could be a female nearby, but there are not TWO singing birds within earshot of each other.  That probably also applies to yesterday's report of 2 singing birds as well.

But -- yes, there IS indeed a Swainson's Warbler there, singing very close to the greenway trail, and you might well be able to see him without the use of a tape.  He is clearly on territory.  Thanks to Eddie Owens for finding and reporting the bird yesterday.

Harry LeGrandRaleigh

On Fri, May 1, 2020 at 9:22 AM Eddie Owens <carolinabirds...> wrote:

I did some early morning birding before work, visiting in the southeastern part of the county, parking at Mial Plantation Rd parking lot (it's an eBird hotspot), and hiking to the Johnston Co. line. My target bird was Swainson's Warbler. eBird tools indicated this might be a good place and time for that bird. 
I encountered at least two birds, possibly a third one (but it was so far up a tributary in the woods, I couldn't hear it well). Location details for the birds are in my report:https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68174645__;!!OToaGQ!5VcGA7qJ9qqW23PNvgA7svWskMlqF964KINMD_IXDcIOrz5nabwK7-PLPnsl5zXXJ8g$ . I think they might hang around for a day or two.

Happy Birding,Eddie OwensCary, NC

 

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Date: 5/2/20 6:19 pm
From: whoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: ADV: Mississippi kites in Mt Pleasant
Hi -

I had a group of about 30 along HWY 421 in Pender County today around 11:30. The location is 1 mile south of Malpass Corner, or 10+ miles SW of Burgaw. One Swallow-tailed Kite joined them. They were milling around 20' -100' above farmland, some plowed and some with last year's stubble.

Wayne


From: "carolinabirds" <carolinabirds...>
To: "carolinabirds" <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Saturday, May 2, 2020 2:10:18 PM
Subject: ADV: Mississippi kites in Mt Pleasant

Just had a great drive by view of a small flock of Mississippi kites feeding over fields at Boone Hall Farms in Mt Pleasant. Guessing 8-10 kites total.

Sent from my iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 5/2/20 5:59 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Wake County Swainson's Warblers
I am seeing a few reports on eBird of TWO Swainson's Warblers singing along
the Neuse today. I was there this morning, hearing and seeing the SINGLE
singing bird as our group headed downriver around 745, and again just the
one bird coming back around 1030. The other bird singing at bridges 288
and 289 is a Louisiana Waterthrush, not a second Swainson's. (I note a
few of these lists don't even list Louisiana Waterthrush; today, there were
about 4-5 singing LA Waterthrushes along the greenway for about 2 miles
downriver of the parking lot; but just one Swainson's Warbler.)

Swainson's Warbler are very strongly territorial and charge a song of
another bird, as witnessed by the many times over the years I and others
have played tapes. So, if there ever were a second singing bird within
hearing range of another, one would have driven off the other
immediately. One Swainson's is seldom if ever going to be within hearing
range of another, at least certainly not within about 75-100 yards, as in
the case here.

So -- eBird editors, there is/was only ONE singing Swainson's Warbler along
this trail today (May 2). Of course, there could be a female nearby, but
there are not TWO singing birds within earshot of each other. That
probably also applies to yesterday's report of 2 singing birds as well.

But -- yes, there IS indeed a Swainson's Warbler there, singing very close
to the greenway trail, and you might well be able to see him without the
use of a tape. He is clearly on territory. Thanks to Eddie Owens for
finding and reporting the bird yesterday.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Fri, May 1, 2020 at 9:22 AM Eddie Owens <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> I did some early morning birding before work, visiting in the
> southeastern part of the county, parking at Mial Plantation Rd parking lot
> (it's an eBird hotspot), and hiking to the Johnston Co. line. My target
> bird was Swainson's Warbler. eBird tools indicated this might be a good
> place and time for that bird.
>
> I encountered at least two birds, possibly a third one (but it was so far
> up a tributary in the woods, I couldn't hear it well). Location details for
> the birds are in my report:
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68174645__;!!OToaGQ!9legjNqziW1Nh2etPv0hVXqOsMYDfgwWHn7xAJ4QFp4jZabtAWMtQNUc3QpkPvPHOB0$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68174645__;!!OToaGQ!-mznbKP2xAzBLbNmosCLV60OlsXfMWcUIG_PweCzBdS1qOnoTBgJkBIBKdAPgKBmEm8$>.
> I think they might hang around for a day or two.
>
> Happy Birding,
> Eddie Owens
> Cary, NC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/2/20 4:51 pm
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Watauga Co. NC
Spent the day birding around Watauga Co. Nothing too special, but a good day to be outside and got some yearbirds out of the way.

-Virginia Rail and Sora at Boone Greenway
- lots of Solitary and Spotted Sp, plus a few Least Sp and a Lesser Yellowlegs
- double digit Least Flycatchers on Rich Mtn Rd
- huge numbers of BH vireo
- raven, RB Nuthatch, Veery for high elevation birds
- Vesper Sparrow on the bald at Rich Mtn Rd
- Bobolink at usual spot on Bamboo Rd
- Golden-winged Warbler N of Elk Knob SP, plus all the regular breeders like Yellow, Canada, Chestnut-sided, etc
- Scarlet Tanager and RB Grosbeak

Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/2/20 4:50 pm
From: Bradley Dalton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Oriole Photo in South Carolina Wildlife
All,

The latest issue of South Carolina Wildlife recently showed up, and as I was flipping through it, I saw a photo of an oriole that I didn’t immediately recognize. The photo was also labeled rather generically as “oriole.” When looking at Sibley, this looks an awful lot like an Audubon’s Oriole. Can anyone verify this ID for me?

South Carolina Wildlife is an outstanding magazine, cover to cover, and I really encourage everyone to help support our department of natural resources by subscribing to it. If this is an Audubon’s Oriole, it would be a first state record, which would obviously require some looking into. Otherwise (and the more likely explanation) it was just a stock photo, which is an error I would not expect from them.

Thanks,

Brad Dalton
Greenville, SC





Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/2/20 4:26 pm
From: The Gaston Gang (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Oriole Photo in South Carolina Wildlife
Never have seen an Orchard Oriole but the male Baltimore Orioles that came
to my feeder were a much more vivid orange.

Edna Gaston,
Fuquay-Varina, NC

On Sat, May 2, 2020 at 7:01 PM Bradley Dalton <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> All,
>
> The latest issue of South Carolina Wildlife recently showed up, and as I
> was flipping through it, I saw a photo of an oriole that I didn’t
> immediately recognize. The photo was also labeled rather generically as
> “oriole.” When looking at Sibley, this looks an awful lot like an
> Audubon’s Oriole. Can anyone verify this ID for me?
>
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/71980638@N04/49847702241/in/dateposted-public/__;!!OToaGQ!9J4V05Cm0zd8XG8n_VU6gPGrKOI5qqMIa9W6xFrpGX-A0oPr0oDoV57QwIxUjZNhn8U$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/71980638@N04/49847702241/in/dateposted-public/__;!!OToaGQ!5CvXk61F69n7IKcua2uXT_rVC3VrQnFOLZVq_kc1-M6dg55aMBaS9a32DwA5hEl8kn4$>
>
> South Carolina Wildlife is an outstanding magazine, cover to cover, and I
> really encourage everyone to help support our department of natural
> resources by subscribing to it. If this is an Audubon’s Oriole, it would be
> a first state record, which would obviously require some looking into.
> Otherwise (and the more likely explanation) it was just a stock photo,
> which is an error I would not expect from them.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Brad Dalton
> Greenville, SC
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/2/20 4:24 pm
From: Cherrie Sneed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Oriole Photo in South Carolina Wildlife
Brad,

I saw it also and thought it unprofessional to post a photo with "oriole"
as the title. It looks exactly like an Audubon's Oriole. The bird is
sitting in a mossy tree. Often credit is given to the photographer but not
in this case. The segment is attributed to Joey Frazier, editor of
SCWMagazine. It is definitely worth investigating. I know the
photographers and will ask where the photo was taken.

Cherrie

On Sat, May 2, 2020 at 7:02 PM Bradley Dalton <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> All,
>
> The latest issue of South Carolina Wildlife recently showed up, and as I
> was flipping through it, I saw a photo of an oriole that I didn’t
> immediately recognize. The photo was also labeled rather generically as
> “oriole.” When looking at Sibley, this looks an awful lot like an
> Audubon’s Oriole. Can anyone verify this ID for me?
>
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/71980638@N04/49847702241/in/dateposted-public/__;!!OToaGQ!4M24JhsFkuRibheolLey5E-eLy9EDArPakuszb16JqSiwaIQO0GhDiIiVLXNzylAyIo$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/71980638@N04/49847702241/in/dateposted-public/__;%21%21OToaGQ%215CvXk61F69n7IKcua2uXT_rVC3VrQnFOLZVq_kc1-M6dg55aMBaS9a32DwA5hEl8kn4$>
>
> South Carolina Wildlife is an outstanding magazine, cover to cover, and I
> really encourage everyone to help support our department of natural
> resources by subscribing to it. If this is an Audubon’s Oriole, it would be
> a first state record, which would obviously require some looking into.
> Otherwise (and the more likely explanation) it was just a stock photo,
> which is an error I would not expect from them.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Brad Dalton
> Greenville, SC
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>


--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

*Cherrie & Dan Sneed*
Prosperity, SC
Newberry CO

 

Back to top
Date: 5/2/20 4:02 pm
From: Bradley Dalton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Oriole Photo in South Carolina Wildlife
All,

The latest issue of South Carolina Wildlife recently showed up, and as I was flipping through it, I saw a photo of an oriole that I didn’t immediately recognize. The photo was also labeled rather generically as “oriole.” When looking at Sibley, this looks an awful lot like an Audubon’s Oriole. Can anyone verify this ID for me?

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/71980638@N04/49847702241/in/dateposted-public/__;!!OToaGQ!5CvXk61F69n7IKcua2uXT_rVC3VrQnFOLZVq_kc1-M6dg55aMBaS9a32DwA5hEl8kn4$

South Carolina Wildlife is an outstanding magazine, cover to cover, and I really encourage everyone to help support our department of natural resources by subscribing to it. If this is an Audubon’s Oriole, it would be a first state record, which would obviously require some looking into. Otherwise (and the more likely explanation) it was just a stock photo, which is an error I would not expect from them.

Thanks,

Brad Dalton
Greenville, SC



Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/2/20 3:41 pm
From: Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: American White Pelicans Fly Over -- Riverbend Park
We had 19 American White Pelicans fly by the office at Riverbend Park
(northern Catawba Co) this evening. This makes the 5th record of this
species for the park, 3 spring records and 2 fall records.


Dwayne
*************
J. Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
<redxbill...>


Catawba County Park Ranger
Riverbend Park - Conover, NC
<jdmartin...>
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.catawbacountync.gov/depts/parks/__;!!OToaGQ!6JpOnMONOW3ihH05nbj-TYOMLuPXnAbZ55mcOiyx78k2Qh8aIrApwJYpB7Vwfm6NbyU$
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.weatherlink.com/user/riverbendpark__;!!OToaGQ!6JpOnMONOW3ihH05nbj-TYOMLuPXnAbZ55mcOiyx78k2Qh8aIrApwJYpB7VwmfE7V28$

 

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Date: 5/2/20 11:10 am
From: Peggy Schachte (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mississippi kites in Mt Pleasant
Just had a great drive by view of a small flock of Mississippi kites feeding over fields at Boone Hall Farms in Mt Pleasant. Guessing 8-10 kites total.

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/2/20 9:32 am
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: L. Shrike observations
There are a number of shrikes to be seen near Poplar Lane and Hickory (Darlington electric substation).

I drive through the area regularly, the back way to Roanoke Rapids, to see these shrikes. The probability I can spot a shrike, when the bird is present on immediately prior and subsequent trips ranges from about .2 to .6. Perhaps the birds get farther back (to a horse pasture about 0.15 miles back from road?), or perhaps are within a dense bush. But, it is a disappointing commentary on my ability to observe what should be an obvious perching bird.
But, I today noted on eBird that Betsy Kane in Washington,NC seems to have noted shrike only on about half her trips to a cemetery (which should be a very circumscribed location, plus her probably walking the area--as opposed to my drivebys.)

HOW ABOUT THE SHRIKE REPORTS FROM SOUTH RALEIGH (Lake Wheeler?)--are the numerous Wake County birders having even worse probabilities of spotting the (presumably? resident) shrike/s there.

Also,how far do shrike pairs move after a failed nesting?
Last summer the shrike pair near the substation evidently took up about 0.2 miles south, at a small (1.5 acre?) sheep/goat pasture, but then were not to be found.
But, talking to a resident some 0.25 miles west of the substation, where I thought there was perhaps an additional pair, I was enlightened. Maybe the same pair tried to renest (0.5 miles by road,or less by hypotenuse through woodland) in 2019. One of the young was caught by a cat but the resident rescued the rest.

This year a single shrike wintered at the intersection (Poplar/Hickory), but at times I found "it" 0.6 miles ne along Aurelian Springs Road and even saw "it" flying 100 yards between sites. Never two birds in one day. Sometimes with a kestrel perched on lines between sites--makes one wonder about interactions. Shrike may use the more open areas (cotton fields with power lines) which kestrel frequented, but more often areas with some shrubs. And shrike not near kestrel.

About April 27 I noted a shrike nest (no birds) in the northmost tree at the doublewide just east of the intersection. At 6', where a lowermost lateral branch had been pruned to reduce a "witch's broom". A nest in previous years had been seen up about 15'.
A day later I actually exited my car and found no bird on the nest.
But, on April 30, I noted a bird at the nest plus a second perched nearby. Perhaps a second bird had arrived the previous week and built the nest but not observed by me.
The single shrike through the winter often perched on a cargo trailer next to this home. (The sheriff's deputy's home nextdoor north was also a regular location.)

To top this off, on my way home I saw a shrike come off the wires on RIdgecrest Road west of I-95, about three miles from the nest,and perch in a 60' tree where it was not visible with 10x bins. This has a horse pasture and had shrike(s) in previous years. Only about 0.3 miles from my home (where I have occasionally noted perched, flyover or even singing single shrikes.

There may be several pairs of shrikes at the Poplar/Hickory location, but I have doubts due to the sequence of observations and apparent renestings which suggest movements of about a half mile.



Connections with the Ridgecrest Road site or the Gregory Farm Road/airport road site (few miles southeast) may exist, but would seem to represent two additional possible pairs in recent years. A multiflora rose hedge and a grape arbor along Ridgecrest Road, both now removed,used to be regular spots for this species in past decades (as on CBCs).



Similarly mystifying are the several shrike nests to be seen in Bradford pears at parking lots of the Roanoke Rapids theater east of I-95 off NC125. This is 5 miles north of Poplar/Hickory. One day thought I saw 3-4 shrikes scattered about there, but not since. Made me question my sanity, but I am told shrikes are more regular at the east side of that property, where numerous residences provide shrubs and trees where shrikes might "hide".



Observations for decades of shrikes along NC33 in Edgecombe County (on the way to Greenville), near Draughan, and also on the north end of Greenville (along US264
x NC33) are congruent with the persistently "seen today, likely not tomorrow" character of this species at the northern edge of its current range


Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

I do not have time for e-mail. Nor, I think, do you. Try calling 252-308-3443---good luck with that.

 

Back to top
Date: 5/2/20 8:22 am
From: Kevin Metcalf (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Probable Bicknell's Thrush - Bladen County NC
A couple notes about dealing with Bickell's vs. Gray-cheeked. I'm sure
many birders have had the experience of playing a call note or song of
a species, and get a strong reaction from other species that happen to
be in the area - not just the target species. So, although the thrush
in question seemed to be curious or react to the Bicknell's call note,
it might have also reacted to different thrush call notes. We can only
guess at this point. If confronted with a similar situation as Derb
(an enviable one), it might be useful to not only play a Bicknell's
call note but a Gray-cheeked as well just to observe the comparitive
reactions. I have seen this "reacted to the song, or call note",
offered many times to support an ID of difficult birds. Although it is
interesting to note the bird's reaction, if you don't try other call
notes, it doesn't tell as everything it could have. Mentioning this
just for fodder, for birders in the future who might be confronted
with a similar situation.
Regarding the migration route of Bicknell's, there are records of
Bicknell's in migration in other states further west than the coastal
plain of the Carolinas. So I guess I don't put as much weight into
location within the state as some North Carolina birders do. I do
understand the desire to grasp at whatever one thinks might support an
ID when dealing with a difficult species. The most likely confusion
between Bicknell's and Gray-cheeked comes from the smaller, slightly
browner subspecies of Gray-cheeked (C. m. minimus) at the eastern end
of the Gray-cheeked range. Those actually breed further East than
Bicknell's, so the question is whether they would tend also Eastward
in their passage through North Carolina. Also, the wintering ranges of
Bicknell's might not be fully understood. I believe they have been
banded in Central America, where they are not "supposed" to be.
This is not intended to take away from a good potential find, but
offer some different perspectives. I have had a similar situation with
a possible Bicknell's in North Carolina, and I didn't have the
electcronics with me to do any call notes or take a photo, so Derb did
one better in even trying a call note.
A frustrating species species pair!
Kevin MetcalfHuntersville, NC


-----Original Message-----

From: Harry LeGrand
Sent: Apr 29, 2020 4:08 PM
To: andrew thornton
Cc: Derb Carter , carolinabirds
Subject: Re: Probable Bicknell's Thrush - Bladen County NC

I just checked the CBC website's The Chat online database, for
Bicknell's Thrush. Though these aren't from Wake Forest
University, here is what it has for the NC Piedmont -- possibly
what Andrew is referring to:

Southern, Josh. 2014. Briefs for the files. Chat 78:17–39 (All
dates Fall 2013, unless otherwise noted)
Bicknell's Thrush: Nocturnal flight calls were heard in the
pre-dawn hours at Falls Lake, Wake Co, NC, during the Fall Bird
Count, 17 Sep (Brian Bockhahn) and at Hanging Rock SP, Stokes Co,
NC, 24 Sep (Bockhahn). Some birders question whether or not
nocturnal flight calls can accurately identify the species.

Southern, Josh. 2012. Briefs for the files. Chat 76:19–38 (All
dates Fall 2011, unless otherwise noted)
Bicknell's Thrush: Possible sightings included one seen and heard
calling at Ribbonwalk Nature Preserve, Mecklenburg Co, NC, 17 Sep
(Kevin Metcalf); one photographed after hitting a window in
Raleigh, NC, 4 Oct (Sharon Smart); and one photographed on Roanoke
Island, NC, 21 Oct (Jeff Lewis). Bicknell's Thrush is very
difficult to identify in the field, and these reports represent
only possible sightings.

Davis, Ricky. 1997. Briefs for the files. Chat 61:57–68 (All
dates spring 1996)
BICKNELL'S THRUSH: An individual of this newly-recognized species
was seen and heard in Durham, NC, on the late date of May 26 (Len
& Esther Pardue). Observers need to be aware that the field marks
for this form are still being worked out and that all Gray-cheeked
types need to be studied closely in great detail.

------------------------------------------------------

What I will do on the Birds of North Carolina website is pretty
much quote the material presented here -- for the NC Piedmont.
Note, however, that the only records confirmed in NC are banding
records (with various measurements) from Weymouth Woods and Howell
Woods in the Coastal Plain, and a specimen record (old) from the
Coastal Plain also.

If someone knows of other reports of Bicknell's -- probables or
not -- reported in the literature -- such as any WFU flight call
reports -- let us know. Thanks.

Harry LeGrand



On Wed, Apr 29, 2020 at 2:56 PM andrew thornton <andrew.k.thornton...>
wrote:

I think it's an interesting report. The only part that
continues to confuse me is the assumption that Gray-cheeked
would be rare in the coastal plain. I lived on the Northeast
coast of Florida for about six years, and while I tallied
literally thousands of Grey-cheeked, we never had a
Bicknell's, despite numerous observers on the alert. I'm not
saying Bicknell's don't occur both there and here, but I can
say with a great degree of confidence that Gray-cheeked are by
no means rare, uncommon, or even unusual on the Southeast
Atlantic coast.
I believe there are several night flight call recording
studies that have recorded Bicknell's in the Piedmont, if
memory serves I think Wake Forest University had numerous.
Not an in hand specimen, but recorded night flight call is
probably about as good as you can get without it.

I'm glad people are always on the lookout for them. I'm sure
they are underreported, although caution with the
identification is highly warranted.
Andrew ThorntonJulian, NC
On Wed, Apr 29, 2020, 2:08 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

As no one has commented on Derb's report, I will -- and
add my strong support. Bicknell's Thrush seems to migrate
"solely" thru the Carolinas in the Coastal Plain, as it
breeds in New England and south into the NY Catskills --
and winters in the West Indies. All of the confirmed
records for NC -- specimen and banding -- are from the
Coastal Plain, including the Sandhills. I've looked at
several photos of "Gray-cheeked" (and often ones suspected
of being Bicknell's) from the coast and Coastal Plain and
have little trouble considering them as Bicknell's --
though of course 100% proof is likely impossible.

Gray-cheeked is a Trans-Gulf migrant, mainly, meaning that
most Carolina records are for the mountains, then less so
into the Piedmont, and very rarely in the Coastal Plain.
However, you must keep in mind the total population sizes
of these 2 species: Gray-cheekeds number into the
millions, and Bicknell's perhaps 100 times less than
that. Thus, both species would be considered as "rare" in
the Coastal Plain, but for different reasons.
The fact that the bird responded vigorously to the
Bicknell's call is fine, but Derb didn't play the calls of
Gray-cheeked, which are similar. I suspect it might have
responded to them as well, but -- I can't say.

As for a records committee vote, I was a voting member of
the NC Bird Records Committee in the past, and a
non-voting member now. It was not possible to get
sightings or even photos accepted, though that might only
be one or two attempts. Nonetheless, there are enough
Coastal Plain records, in my view, for it not needing
review by the Committee. I don't believe Derb submitted
an eBird list, so whether it would have been accepted or
not is a moot point. However, I WOULD (and we all would)
be curious to know how many Bicknell's reports on eBird in
the Carolinas have been submitted, and of those how many
were accepted (if any), and if any had photos, etc. (I
queried eBird for Bicknell's Thrush and NC, and it showed
only Howell Woods and Weymouth Woods -- places where birds
have been banded. Have other Bicknell's been reported at
all in NC? If so, is it implied that this species will
not be accepted with a banding or specimen record?)

As there are NO known record of Bicknell's Thrush -- at
least specimen or banding record -- from the NC Piedmont
or Mountain regions, I would encourage NC BRC review of a
few reports from these areas, if and where they may come
forth. I also encourage Josh Southern to include this
report in The Chat Briefs for the Files, of course using
Derb's own word -- "probable" -- as a qualifier, for a
sight report. Thankfully, he provides a lengthy
description and behavior comments (above).

I fear that a lot of information about Bicknell's Thrush
migration will be lost if the acceptance level for this
species -- by whatever committee, listserve, etc -- is
only with specimens or banding records.

Harry LeGrandauthor/editor of the Birds of North Carolina
website

On Tue, Apr 28, 2020 at 5:24 PM Derb Carter <derbc...>
wrote:

This morning I had sustained and close looks at a
thrush I am fairly confident was a Bicknell's. Any
field identification of a Bicknell's away from its
small breeding range in the Adirondacks or winter
range on Hispaniola comes with an instant footnote
that it is very difficult - some even say impossible -
to distinguish Bicknell's from Gray-cheeked in the
field. If I was not able to observe the bird this
morning with binoculars for 30 minutes, as close as
ten feet, I would just pass it off as a
Gray-cheeked/Bicknell's. But I was able to see well
all the field marks suggested to distinguish
Bicknell's - again understanding the differences are
slight - and some behavior suggestive of Bicknell's.

The bird was on an upland bluff along the Black River,
foraging on leaf covered ground around an opening in
deciduous forest. The boldly spotted breast, gray
face, and grayish flanks immediately said it was a
Gray-cheeked type, and when it moved into a patch of
sunlight, I was struck by the warm brown tones above
especially the rump and tail. At this point I tried
to observe it as closely as possible, creeping up to
at times within 10-15 feet as it foraged on the
ground. It was overall a warmer brown compared to the
usual cold gray brown of Gray-cheeked. This was
especially noticeable on the tail, not the very
contrasting brighter almost reddish brown tail of a
Hermit Thrush, but a warmer brown than the rest of the
upper parts.

I then tried to recall all the suggested field marks
for distinguishing Bicknell's. It appeared on the
small side compared to my recollections of
Gray-cheeked - although I have not seen nearly as many
Gray-cheeked in recent years compared to decades ago -
and slight differences in size can be challenging
without direct comparison. Primary projection
appeared short, and I have now looked at several
photos and projection appears to better match
Bicknell's than the longer primary projection of
Gray-cheeked. I carefully observed the extent of
yellow on the lower mandible, recalling an article
suggesting that as a possible distinguishing field
mark. I estimated the basal two-thirds at least of
the lower mandible was yellow, which is consistent
with the article suggesting the more extensive yellow
on the lower mandible of Bicknell's as a character.

After observing for half an hour, I decided to play
some call notes and see if it might call, as notes of
the two species are somewhat different. I backed away
some distance and played a couple of Bicknell's call
notes and it immediately flew toward me, halving the
distance and perching momentarily on a log looking for
the source of the call, before flying back into a
thicket. After a pause, I played the call note and it
again flew directly in perching in a sapling before
again retreating onto a thicket. It never called, but
was very responsive to Bicknell's call notes.

Finally, the fact the observation was in the lower
Coastal Plain is consistent with Bicknell's, with most
confirmed records in the Coastal Plain, which would be
consistent with a migratory route from Hispaniola to
upstate NY and Vermont.

In sum, if Bicknell's can be identified in the field I
am fairly confident it was a Bicknell's and not a
Gray-cheeked. This is based on a combination of all
the field marks and other observations discussed
above, all consistent with Bicknell's. I thought I
would provide all these details for others with who
may confront this challenging identification.

Derb Carter
 

Back to top
Date: 5/2/20 7:44 am
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Wells W. Cooke died March 30, 1916--migration dates for Bent's L. H.






With so many comments on migrants in Carolinabirds, I (unnaturally) looked into dates/places for Yellow Rail on Ebird. Found the father of cooperative records of migration, a man who had a wide range of productive work. Died too soon, just after being shown swans in DC, of pneumonia; strangely, that winter had a doubling of illness and deaths from the "grip"(pe).---I wonder if that was a preview of the 1918 Spanish flu. Who knows? And who knows which birders/ornithologists/naturalists are now dying too soon.

Search online for his impressive obituary by Palmer on SORA. Then follow the trail of obits of Palmer (started and restarted Audubon and National Audubon, plus wildlife laws), which was written by a man who then died in Chapel Hill (of all places) after retiring from work on insects, all three men having worked with the Biological Survey (Fish and Wildlife Service). (Wikipedia provides shorter versions than obits in The Auk, the Cooke obit quite detailed, almost a biography.)

How did the agriculture and birdwatching groups work together from 1880 to 1950 back then? The bird people the handmaidens of the farming lobby?
Continual emphasis on all the weed seeds and insects eaten by birds.
Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

I do not have time for e-mail. Nor, I think, do you. Try calling 252-308-3443---good luck with that.

 

Back to top
Date: 5/1/20 1:48 pm
From: Fischer David (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Wake County Swainson's Warblers
Thanks to Eddie's excellent directions, I was able to find two singing male Swainson's Warblers along the Neuse River Trail about 0.8 mi NE of the Mial Plantation Road parking lot.  The birds were both around bridges 288 and 289 (which are just a short distance from one another.  One of them posed nicely for photos - see my ebird reporthttps://ebird.org/checklist/S68199249
Also found a FOY Magnolia Warbler along the path.  I also had a FOY Swainson's Thrush this morning (at Mason Farm in Chapel Hill), so naturally I'm now looking the hawk that would give me a Swainson's trifecta.  
Dave FischerCary, NC

-----Original Message-----
From: Eddie Owens <carolinabirds...>
To: carolinabirds listserve <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Fri, May 1, 2020 9:22 am
Subject: Wake County Swainson's Warblers

I did some early morning birding before work, visiting in the southeastern part of the county, parking at Mial Plantation Rd parking lot (it's an eBird hotspot), and hiking to the Johnston Co. line. My target bird was Swainson's Warbler. eBird tools indicated this might be a good place and time for that bird. 
I encountered at least two birds, possibly a third one (but it was so far up a tributary in the woods, I couldn't hear it well). Location details for the birds are in my report:https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68174645__;!!OToaGQ!7jHOkyUrycQSRahB3zWHQBTi7v963doqCL9blUrD50k79IwAVhfuAPoh0vzYJ8d4thU$ . I think they might hang around for a day or two.

Happy Birding,Eddie OwensCary, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 5/1/20 8:14 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Yellow Rail, Mecklenburg County
Congrats to both of you. That is completely insane. Huge respect for Martina’s reflexes with the camera!

Chris Hill
Conway, SC
On Apr 30, 2020, at 6:58 PM, Matt Janson <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:


CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.

Hello C-birders,
This morning I decided to check a nearby field (formerly part of the Charlotte Golf Links) that has been graded for development into townhomes, condos, strip malls, what have you, all things that of course we already have in abundance here in Mecklenburg County. For now some grass has been growing in this area and there are several puddles that have been attracting some locally interesting shorebirds (for the Piedmont) such as Greater Yellowlegs, Least Sandpiper, and Pectoral Sandpiper. With last night's storm I decided to walk around in the field area today and at about 6:55 am was extremely surprised to flush a Yellow Rail out of some very short grass and saw it land about 40 feet away in some taller grass. The white in the secondaries immediately gave the bird away and I have seen hundreds of Yellow Rails in flight in Louisiana thanks to my role as a festival facilitator at the annual Yellow Rails & Rice Festival in Jennings. The rail flushed perhaps an hour later again in the presence of several other local birders (where we practiced safe social distancing). Martina Nordstrand incredibly got a photograph of the bird in flight during this flush (!!!!), which can be seen here on our eBird checklist: Link<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https*3A*2F*2Furldefense.com*2Fv3*2F__https*3A*2F*2Febird.org*2Fchecklist*2FS68097281__*3B!!OToaGQ!5x6dvkVr2ekKk8ivlMMIS-ufbpe88hAW4xDvDJmYH_VhisYBOHic70Wb-A4MwSjpelU*24&data=02*7C01*7Cchill*40coastal.edu*7C57e475e23289414b7cca08d7ed5a208b*7Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797*7C0*7C0*7C637238843686473662&sdata=LBFhSLr2qeoj8z59K1wSK70ckyxby4j3mQ1PasCuxu8*3D&reserved=0__;JSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUl!!OToaGQ!83THMAxEi-RNLHlRusM47BHkGz1v-Mu2lwyEEg4gSPSPxWvhtXV-WWDOFkR3nvr2NyI$ >.
Certainly a noteworthy record for the Piedmont, if not the state.
Happy (and safe) Birding!
Matt Janson
Charlotte, NC



 

Back to top
Date: 5/1/20 6:56 am
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Black-whiskered Vireo in Duck, NC
Found a singing Black-whiskered Vireo in Duck this morning. It was in the
same location as last year's Townsend's Warbler, just north of the gravel
parking lot, in the oaks. Followed it for at least an hour and got some
photos and recorded the song (with lots of car traffic included). I'll post
some photos to the Carolina Bird Club photo gallery sometime today.

Unfortunately, Dare County is still closed to non-residents.

Jeff Lewis
Southern Shores, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 5/1/20 6:39 am
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: VA rail Boone Greenway
Several members of HCAS got very close-range views of a gorgeous
Virginia Rail at the Boone Greenway, created wetlands at Clawson-Burnley
park yesterday. The bird was at the very far end of the main pool,
skulking under some dense bushes by the waterline. We even got to see it
catch and eat a small snake!

Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 5/1/20 6:22 am
From: Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Wake County Swainson's Warblers
I did some early morning birding before work, visiting in the
southeastern part of the county, parking at Mial Plantation Rd parking lot
(it's an eBird hotspot), and hiking to the Johnston Co. line. My target
bird was Swainson's Warbler. eBird tools indicated this might be a good
place and time for that bird.

I encountered at least two birds, possibly a third one (but it was so far
up a tributary in the woods, I couldn't hear it well). Location details for
the birds are in my report:
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68174645__;!!OToaGQ!-mznbKP2xAzBLbNmosCLV60OlsXfMWcUIG_PweCzBdS1qOnoTBgJkBIBKdAPgKBmEm8$ . I think they might hang around for a
day or two.

Happy Birding,
Eddie Owens
Cary, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 5/1/20 4:43 am
From: Steve Patterson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: migrants in Abbeville County, SC
I spent some time in underbirded Abbeville County yesterday afternoon.  At the Felkel Boat Landing and Tom Young Bridge eBird hotspot, there were 4 Willets and 6 Forster's Terns...very cool.  A Bank Swallow also put in a brief appearance.
At the same location a little later, Matthew Campbell added Caspian Tern to the collection.  
If you're ever driving from Iva to Plum Branch, come on by!



Steve PattersonAnderson, SC
 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/20 5:25 pm
From: Don Stuart (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Yellow Rail, Mecklenburg County
What a fantastic find!
Don

Sent from my iPad

> On Apr 30, 2020, at 6:59 PM, Matt Janson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> 
> Hello C-birders,
> This morning I decided to check a nearby field (formerly part of the Charlotte Golf Links) that has been graded for development into townhomes, condos, strip malls, what have you, all things that of course we already have in abundance here in Mecklenburg County. For now some grass has been growing in this area and there are several puddles that have been attracting some locally interesting shorebirds (for the Piedmont) such as Greater Yellowlegs, Least Sandpiper, and Pectoral Sandpiper. With last night's storm I decided to walk around in the field area today and at about 6:55 am was extremely surprised to flush a Yellow Rail out of some very short grass and saw it land about 40 feet away in some taller grass. The white in the secondaries immediately gave the bird away and I have seen hundreds of Yellow Rails in flight in Louisiana thanks to my role as a festival facilitator at the annual Yellow Rails & Rice Festival in Jennings. The rail flushed perhaps an hour later again in the presence of several other local birders (where we practiced safe social distancing). Martina Nordstrand incredibly got a photograph of the bird in flight during this flush (!!!!), which can be seen here on our eBird checklist: Link.
> Certainly a noteworthy record for the Piedmont, if not the state.
> Happy (and safe) Birding!
> Matt Janson
> Charlotte, NC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/20 3:59 pm
From: Matt Janson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Yellow Rail, Mecklenburg County
Hello C-birders,
This morning I decided to check a nearby field (formerly part of the
Charlotte Golf Links) that has been graded for development into townhomes,
condos, strip malls, what have you, all things that of course we already
have in abundance here in Mecklenburg County. For now some grass has been
growing in this area and there are several puddles that have been
attracting some locally interesting shorebirds (for the Piedmont) such as
Greater Yellowlegs, Least Sandpiper, and Pectoral Sandpiper. With last
night's storm I decided to walk around in the field area today and at about
6:55 am was extremely surprised to flush a Yellow Rail out of some very
short grass and saw it land about 40 feet away in some taller grass. The
white in the secondaries immediately gave the bird away and I have seen
hundreds of Yellow Rails in flight in Louisiana thanks to my role as a
festival facilitator at the annual Yellow Rails & Rice Festival in
Jennings. The rail flushed perhaps an hour later again in the presence of
several other local birders (where we practiced safe social distancing).
Martina Nordstrand incredibly got a photograph of the bird in flight during
this flush (!!!!), which can be seen here on our eBird checklist: Link
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68097281__;!!OToaGQ!5x6dvkVr2ekKk8ivlMMIS-ufbpe88hAW4xDvDJmYH_VhisYBOHic70Wb-A4MwSjpelU$ >.
Certainly a noteworthy record for the Piedmont, if not the state.
Happy (and safe) Birding!
Matt Janson
Charlotte, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/20 11:12 am
From: Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Another Warbler - Greenville, SC

I agree with Harry.  Sound like Blackburnian.

Marc Ribaudo
On Thursday, April 30, 2020 Kevin Kubach <kmkubach...> wrote:
Birders,
Thanks to everyone who provided feedback on my post yesterday. The consensus was Tennessee Warbler.
Here is another one from the same outing. I only caught a glimpse of this bird (no details) as it worked through the top of a treeline. It is listed as "warbler sp." and the song is the main sequence heard at 0:01, 0:08, 0:16, 0:23, 0:28 and 0:44.
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68022429__;!!OToaGQ!-AFcU8oufLqSloMDi5qMFHpBUeJ7KTNjJKiUCD-YGPQrRibeGtzgp4lzdqIQGW6f8Ek$   

Thanks,
Kevin KubachGreenville, SC
 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/20 9:35 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Another Warbler - Greenville, SC
Sounds somewhat like a Blackburnian Warbler -- high, thin song, with 2-3
higher notes (very high) at the end. Not a typical song, but quality is
fine for it.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Thu, Apr 30, 2020 at 12:03 PM Kevin Kubach <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Birders,
>
> Thanks to everyone who provided feedback on my post yesterday. The
> consensus was Tennessee Warbler.
>
> Here is another one from the same outing. I only caught a glimpse of this
> bird (no details) as it worked through the top of a treeline. It is listed
> as "warbler sp." and the song is the main sequence heard at 0:01, 0:08,
> 0:16, 0:23, 0:28 and 0:44.
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68022429__;!!OToaGQ!5PTbgZtnFwkfxtxPoZpGiaH8fp_Cxzib60QZI6Rq-vma3d__BDRE3-tyXB42AmjDrU0$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68022429__;!!OToaGQ!4UuOIgHiKoZNd_0AltoqYpLvnmVmL9SYzo4hVG_olptD4grluEZ2ZKBAnrdZx8KHuLc$>
>
>
> Thanks,
>
> Kevin Kubach
> Greenville, SC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/20 9:13 am
From: Judy Halleron (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Birds of Western NC
A beautiful pair of Baltimore Orioles showed up this morning - haven't seen them in a few years. I put out oranges and hope they will stay. Also many Rose-breasted Grosbeaks - at least 6-7 males and 5-6 females. A few male Blue Grosbeaks have come through - this mornings did not know how to eat from a feeder, finally found seed on the ground. The one 2 days ago gorged himself at the mixed seed feeder for 30 minutes! A few male Indigo Buntings have arrived, still looking for the females.

Happy birding!

Judy Halleron
Marble, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/20 9:03 am
From: Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Another Warbler - Greenville, SC
Birders,

Thanks to everyone who provided feedback on my post yesterday. The
consensus was Tennessee Warbler.

Here is another one from the same outing. I only caught a glimpse of this
bird (no details) as it worked through the top of a treeline. It is listed
as "warbler sp." and the song is the main sequence heard at 0:01, 0:08,
0:16, 0:23, 0:28 and 0:44.

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68022429__;!!OToaGQ!4UuOIgHiKoZNd_0AltoqYpLvnmVmL9SYzo4hVG_olptD4grluEZ2ZKBAnrdZx8KHuLc$

Thanks,

Kevin Kubach
Greenville, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/20 6:45 am
From: Andy Smith <andrew.w.smith...>
Subject: Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Carrboro, NC
Just had a beautiful male at our feeders. Stunning bird!

Andy Smith (Carrboro, NC)

 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/20 7:44 pm
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Re: Conway, SC - Please post the source of the migration maps.
So I just have one question:those circles or blooms that show up on the
radar--are they just some sort of artifact like of dew reflection or are
they supposed to be birds in the air? If so then (another question) why
do they only show up around the stations?

Sorry to ask here but all the links on these radar pages that were
supposed to explain this stuff are no longer working, at least the ones
I could find.

Guy McGrane, Deep Gap

On 4/29/2020 11:47 AM, <badgerboy...> wrote:
>
> I looked at this page and I have to sheepishly admit that I could make
> nothing of it. Chris, or anyone else, can you please give a short
> summary of what it means, and how to figure out if migrating birds are
> likely to come to earth in a particular place?
>
> Thanks, Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC
>
> On 4/29/2020 8:17 AM, Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing
> List) wrote:
>> My favorite is this page.
>>
>> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.pauljhurtado.com/US_Composite_Radar/__;!!OToaGQ!6BSQ4ZMObjgrZBCkusdE2VgNBG8kBT0oAOSQ7ktRohiY4FM9LnPiMbWt07NKgBVSa-s$
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.pauljhurtado.com/US_Composite_Radar/__;!!OToaGQ!_0GkxrCvaC7i3i8fGfSw4q-HH_ExUOyjR1DtYSmcvHYcpuV1VrSjP7Z0vZvOjbVQp78$>
>>
>> It’s not forward looking - it shows current radar, and archives past
>> nights if you want them.  But you can check it any time and see all
>> sorts of real time detail (for example, by the time most people go to
>> bed you can click on it and see what “takeoff” looked like, or you
>> can look at it before you head out in the field in the morning and
>> get excited).  Scroll down to the link that says
>>
>> *Permanent Link for current day (6pm-6pm EDT):*
>>
>> Chris Hill
>> Conway, SC
>>
>>> On Apr 29, 2020, at 7:48 AM, Maggie Strickland
>>> <gallinasviejas...> <mailto:<gallinasviejas...>> wrote:
>>>
>>> CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization.
>>> Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links,
>>> especially from unknown senders.
>>>
>>> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://birdcast.info__;!!OToaGQ!6BSQ4ZMObjgrZBCkusdE2VgNBG8kBT0oAOSQ7ktRohiY4FM9LnPiMbWt07NK2GcerwE$
>>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https*3A*2F*2Fbirdcast.info*2F&data=02*7C01*7Cchill*40coastal.edu*7Ce370b68af959452237c308d7ec334644*7Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797*7C0*7C1*7C637237577278477761&sdata=NUL1ypAPmcNKhq*2BafrIEp2YkVKLqn722NQGIa42EnbU*3D&reserved=0__;JSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSU!!OToaGQ!_0GkxrCvaC7i3i8fGfSw4q-HH_ExUOyjR1DtYSmcvHYcpuV1VrSjP7Z0vZvOm8rMWuc$>
>>>
>>> On Wed, Apr 29, 2020 at 7:41 AM Christine Stoughton-Root
>>> <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
>>>
>>> BirdCast.com
>>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://BirdCast.com__;!!OToaGQ!_0GkxrCvaC7i3i8fGfSw4q-HH_ExUOyjR1DtYSmcvHYcpuV1VrSjP7Z0vZvOLSDTJc0$>
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPad
>>>
>>>> On Apr 29, 2020, at 6:11 AM, Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds
>>>> Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
>>>> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Thanks.
>>>>
>>>> Parkin Hunter
>>>> Ridgeway and Garden City Beach SC
>>>> Sent from my iPad
>>>>
>>>>> On Apr 28, 2020, at 10:34 PM, Christopher Hill (via
>>>>> carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
>>>>> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>  Erinn,
>>>>>
>>>>> According to the map I saw, your best bet would be Kentucky. :-)
>>>>>
>>>>> Sorry, dark humor there in part because in Spring during these
>>>>> big migration waves our part of SC often seems to be the one
>>>>> place in the whole eastern half of the continent that refuses
>>>>> to light up.
>>>>>
>>>>> Good luck tomorrow. John Hutchens and I birded Punchbowl
>>>>> Landing road this morning and it was fantastic, although
>>>>> actual passage migrants were very very few.
>>>>>
>>>>> Chris Hill
>>>>> Also in Conway.
>>>>>
>>>>>> On Apr 28, 2020, at 7:41 PM, Erinn Szarek
>>>>>> <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>> CAUTION: This email originated from outside your
>>>>>> organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or
>>>>>> clicking links, especially from unknown senders.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> No doubt everyone has seen the migration forecast tonight,
>>>>>> there is a huge influx of birds coming in tonight. I'm in
>>>>>> Conway, SC, any suggestions for my best placement for
>>>>>> tomorrow morning to catch the migration?
>>>>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/20 1:09 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Probable Bicknell's Thrush - Bladen County NC
I just checked the CBC website's *The Chat* online database, for Bicknell's
Thrush. Though these aren't from Wake Forest University, here is what it
has for the NC Piedmont -- possibly what Andrew is referring to:

Southern, Josh. 2014. Briefs for the files. Chat 78:17–39
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/issues/2014/v78n1briefs_fall_2013.pdf__;!!OToaGQ!4dRTc-yKN6ziVwqkyTOr87ju3OJOBAHTbhRTb2ApF-FMao1vR62A85hzvYRbt-t6-Vc$ >
(All dates Fall 2013, unless otherwise noted)
Bicknell's Thrush: Nocturnal flight calls were heard in the pre-dawn hours
at Falls Lake, Wake Co, NC, during the Fall Bird Count, 17 Sep (Brian
Bockhahn) and at Hanging Rock SP, Stokes Co, NC, 24 Sep (Bockhahn). Some
birders question whether or not nocturnal flight calls can accurately
identify the species.

Southern, Josh. 2012. Briefs for the files. Chat 76:19–38
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/issues/2012/v76n1briefs_fall_2011.pdf__;!!OToaGQ!4dRTc-yKN6ziVwqkyTOr87ju3OJOBAHTbhRTb2ApF-FMao1vR62A85hzvYRbVWRWdRA$ >
(All dates Fall 2011, unless otherwise noted)
Bicknell's Thrush: Possible sightings included one seen and heard calling
at Ribbonwalk Nature Preserve, Mecklenburg Co, NC, 17 Sep (Kevin Metcalf);
one photographed after hitting a window in Raleigh, NC, 4 Oct (Sharon
Smart); and one photographed on Roanoke Island, NC, 21 Oct (Jeff Lewis).
Bicknell's Thrush is very difficult to identify in the field, and these
reports represent only possible sightings.

Davis, Ricky. 1997. Briefs for the files. Chat 61:57–68
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/chat/issues/1997/v61n1briefs_spring_1996.pdf__;!!OToaGQ!4dRTc-yKN6ziVwqkyTOr87ju3OJOBAHTbhRTb2ApF-FMao1vR62A85hzvYRbfGWB1GI$ >
(All dates spring 1996)
BICKNELL'S THRUSH: An individual of this newly-recognized species was seen
and heard in Durham, NC, on the late date of May 26 (Len & Esther Pardue).
Observers need to be aware that the field marks for this form are still
being worked out and that all Gray-cheeked types need to be studied closely
in great detail.

------------------------------------------------------

What I will do on the *Birds of North Carolina* website is pretty much
quote the material presented here -- for the NC Piedmont. Note, however,
that the only records confirmed in NC are banding records (with various
measurements) from Weymouth Woods and Howell Woods in the Coastal Plain,
and a specimen record (old) from the Coastal Plain also.

If someone knows of other reports of Bicknell's -- probables or not --
reported in the literature -- such as any WFU flight call reports -- let us
know. Thanks.

Harry LeGrand



On Wed, Apr 29, 2020 at 2:56 PM andrew thornton <andrew.k.thornton...>
wrote:

> I think it's an interesting report. The only part that continues to
> confuse me is the assumption that Gray-cheeked would be rare in the coastal
> plain. I lived on the Northeast coast of Florida for about six years, and
> while I tallied literally thousands of Grey-cheeked, we never had a
> Bicknell's, despite numerous observers on the alert. I'm not saying
> Bicknell's don't occur both there and here, but I can say with a great
> degree of confidence that Gray-cheeked are by no means rare, uncommon, or
> even unusual on the Southeast Atlantic coast.
>
> I believe there are several night flight call recording studies that have
> recorded Bicknell's in the Piedmont, if memory serves I think Wake Forest
> University had numerous. Not an in hand specimen, but recorded night
> flight call is probably about as good as you can get without it.
>
> I'm glad people are always on the lookout for them. I'm sure they are
> underreported, although caution with the identification is highly warranted.
>
> Andrew Thornton
> Julian, NC
>
> On Wed, Apr 29, 2020, 2:08 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> As no one has commented on Derb's report, I will -- and add my strong
>> support. Bicknell's Thrush seems to migrate "solely" thru the Carolinas in
>> the Coastal Plain, as it breeds in New England and south into the NY
>> Catskills -- and winters in the West Indies. All of the confirmed records
>> for NC -- specimen and banding -- are from the Coastal Plain, including the
>> Sandhills. I've looked at several photos of "Gray-cheeked" (and often ones
>> suspected of being Bicknell's) from the coast and Coastal Plain and have
>> little trouble considering them as Bicknell's -- though of course 100%
>> proof is likely impossible.
>>
>> Gray-cheeked is a Trans-Gulf migrant, mainly, meaning that most Carolina
>> records are for the mountains, then less so into the Piedmont, and very
>> rarely in the Coastal Plain. However, you must keep in mind the total
>> population sizes of these 2 species: Gray-cheekeds number into the
>> millions, and Bicknell's perhaps 100 times less than that. Thus, both
>> species would be considered as "rare" in the Coastal Plain, but for
>> different reasons.
>>
>> The fact that the bird responded vigorously to the Bicknell's call is
>> fine, but Derb didn't play the calls of Gray-cheeked, which are similar. I
>> suspect it might have responded to them as well, but -- I can't say.
>>
>> As for a records committee vote, I was a voting member of the NC Bird
>> Records Committee in the past, and a non-voting member now. It was not
>> possible to get sightings or even photos accepted, though that might only
>> be one or two attempts. Nonetheless, there are enough Coastal Plain
>> records, in my view, for it not needing review by the Committee. I don't
>> believe Derb submitted an eBird list, so whether it would have been
>> accepted or not is a moot point. However, I WOULD (and we all would) be
>> curious to know how many Bicknell's reports on eBird in the Carolinas have
>> been submitted, and of those how many were accepted (if any), and if any
>> had photos, etc. (I queried eBird for Bicknell's Thrush and NC, and it
>> showed only Howell Woods and Weymouth Woods -- places where birds have been
>> banded. Have other Bicknell's been reported at all in NC? If so, is it
>> implied that this species will not be accepted with a banding or specimen
>> record?)
>>
>> As there are NO known record of Bicknell's Thrush -- at least specimen or
>> banding record -- from the NC Piedmont or Mountain regions, I would
>> encourage NC BRC review of a few reports from these areas, if and where
>> they may come forth. I also encourage Josh Southern to include this report
>> in The Chat Briefs for the Files, of course using Derb's own word --
>> "probable" -- as a qualifier, for a sight report. Thankfully, he provides
>> a lengthy description and behavior comments (above).
>>
>> I fear that a lot of information about Bicknell's Thrush migration will
>> be lost if the acceptance level for this species -- by whatever committee,
>> listserve, etc -- is only with specimens or banding records.
>>
>> Harry LeGrand
>> author/editor of the Birds of North Carolina website
>>
>> On Tue, Apr 28, 2020 at 5:24 PM Derb Carter <derbc...> wrote:
>>
>>> This morning I had sustained and close looks at a thrush I am fairly
>>> confident was a Bicknell's. Any field identification of a Bicknell's away
>>> from its small breeding range in the Adirondacks or winter range on
>>> Hispaniola comes with an instant footnote that it is very difficult - some
>>> even say impossible - to distinguish Bicknell's from Gray-cheeked in the
>>> field. If I was not able to observe the bird this morning with binoculars
>>> for 30 minutes, as close as ten feet, I would just pass it off as a
>>> Gray-cheeked/Bicknell's. But I was able to see well all the field marks
>>> suggested to distinguish Bicknell's - again understanding the differences
>>> are slight - and some behavior suggestive of Bicknell's.
>>>
>>> The bird was on an upland bluff along the Black River, foraging on leaf
>>> covered ground around an opening in deciduous forest. The boldly spotted
>>> breast, gray face, and grayish flanks immediately said it was a
>>> Gray-cheeked type, and when it moved into a patch of sunlight, I was struck
>>> by the warm brown tones above especially the rump and tail. At this point
>>> I tried to observe it as closely as possible, creeping up to at times
>>> within 10-15 feet as it foraged on the ground. It was overall a warmer
>>> brown compared to the usual cold gray brown of Gray-cheeked. This was
>>> especially noticeable on the tail, not the very contrasting brighter almost
>>> reddish brown tail of a Hermit Thrush, but a warmer brown than the rest of
>>> the upper parts.
>>>
>>> I then tried to recall all the suggested field marks for distinguishing
>>> Bicknell's. It appeared on the small side compared to my recollections of
>>> Gray-cheeked - although I have not seen nearly as many Gray-cheeked in
>>> recent years compared to decades ago - and slight differences in size can
>>> be challenging without direct comparison. Primary projection appeared
>>> short, and I have now looked at several photos and projection appears to
>>> better match Bicknell's than the longer primary projection of
>>> Gray-cheeked. I carefully observed the extent of yellow on the lower
>>> mandible, recalling an article suggesting that as a possible distinguishing
>>> field mark. I estimated the basal two-thirds at least of the lower
>>> mandible was yellow, which is consistent with the article suggesting the
>>> more extensive yellow on the lower mandible of Bicknell's as a character.
>>>
>>> After observing for half an hour, I decided to play some call notes and
>>> see if it might call, as notes of the two species are somewhat different.
>>> I backed away some distance and played a couple of Bicknell's call notes
>>> and it immediately flew toward me, halving the distance and perching
>>> momentarily on a log looking for the source of the call, before flying back
>>> into a thicket. After a pause, I played the call note and it again flew
>>> directly in perching in a sapling before again retreating onto a thicket.
>>> It never called, but was very responsive to Bicknell's call notes.
>>>
>>> Finally, the fact the observation was in the lower Coastal Plain is
>>> consistent with Bicknell's, with most confirmed records in the Coastal
>>> Plain, which would be consistent with a migratory route from Hispaniola to
>>> upstate NY and Vermont.
>>>
>>> In sum, if Bicknell's can be identified in the field I am fairly
>>> confident it was a Bicknell's and not a Gray-cheeked. This is based on a
>>> combination of all the field marks and other observations discussed above,
>>> all consistent with Bicknell's. I thought I would provide all these
>>> details for others with who may confront this challenging identification.
>>>
>>> Derb Carter
>>>
>>>

 

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Date: 4/29/20 1:07 pm
From: Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Another mystery bird
Fuz
I don't think so. Sounds more like a somewhat distant Blue Grosbeak, along
with Titmice and Cardinals
Simon

Simon RB Thompson

Ventures Birding Tours
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.birdventures.com__;!!OToaGQ!6c0O9U4FV6vPlf3gGte2PCPSoVrnW0jOPTziwV8oqcqorIRxNxrPnLZiog8K-TacEPA$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.birdventures.com__;!!OToaGQ!6c0O9U4FV6vPlf3gGte2PCPSoVrnW0jOPTziwV8oqcqorIRxNxrPnLZiog8K-TacEPA$ >

Please use the Ventures e-mail (<Venturesbirding...>) to contact the
Ventures office - thanks!



On Wed, Apr 29, 2020 at 8:59 PM Fuz Sanderson <fuz.sanderson...>
wrote:

> Are we also hearing Warbling Vireo in the background? Volume up.
>
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.piedmontearthskillsgathering.com/__;!!OToaGQ!6c0O9U4FV6vPlf3gGte2PCPSoVrnW0jOPTziwV8oqcqorIRxNxrPnLZiog8KsPFvPzk$
>
>
> "With learning a skill comes self-confidence, and with that self
> confidence we become a more fully alive human being"
> - Darry Wood
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Wed, Apr 29, 2020 at 3:17 PM Simon Thompson <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> Hi Irvin
>> That's tough, but I would lean towards a weak version of Prothonotary.
>> The cadence is correct, but the tone is not.
>> That's all I can think of right now
>> Simon
>>
>> Simon RB Thompson
>>
>> Ventures Birding Tours
>> https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.birdventures.com__;!!OToaGQ!6c0O9U4FV6vPlf3gGte2PCPSoVrnW0jOPTziwV8oqcqorIRxNxrPnLZiog8K-TacEPA$
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.birdventures.com__;!!OToaGQ!_VZ7DXhoKiljRVhRCzB-mpJP8jd1iUy1J__VJdx00xWejtcvEgoTBbcaE1IDoBR39Fg$>
>>
>> Please use the Ventures e-mail (<Venturesbirding...>) to contact
>> the Ventures office - thanks!
>>
>>
>>
>> On Wed, Apr 29, 2020 at 7:55 PM <pittsjam...> <
>> <pittsjam...> wrote:
>>
>>> Hello,
>>> here is another "name that tune" bird. I heard this bird yesterday
>>> singing from woodland edge habitat with vine tangles near the nature trail
>>> parking lot at Santee NWR Bluff Unit. I could never locate it visually!
>>> Initially, I was leaning towards a variant Nashville Warbler, but now not
>>> so sure. I hear lots of variations during migration but this one has me
>>> stumped. Any thoughts?
>>>
>>> The mystery bird songs are at the bottom of my checklist under
>>> passerines. Thanks.
>>>
>>> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S67996660__;!!OToaGQ!6c0O9U4FV6vPlf3gGte2PCPSoVrnW0jOPTziwV8oqcqorIRxNxrPnLZiog8K4HZvm-8$
>>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S67996660__;!!OToaGQ!5X98ccjD1l7gPuMAelkRZ3GW6AQRqxg1MNFITi-EpFfuO2fHMBgqo8VcJBq0TP3O9AU$>
>>>
>>>
>>> Irvin Pitts
>>> Lexington, SC
>>>
>>>

 

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Date: 4/29/20 1:03 pm
From: Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Yet another mystery bird
Hooded Warbler- just one warming up I guess!!
I remember chasing one down and finding a Chestnut-side doing a classic
Hooded. They do it just to play with us and keep us honest!!
Simon

Simon RB Thompson

Ventures Birding Tours
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.birdventures.com__;!!OToaGQ!5T23APO5j6A_b7MhyHKkNt6srMGw2K7Bg2di2l1Jh4wsQGsesIziYawEoPgTI41oGjs$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.birdventures.com__;!!OToaGQ!5T23APO5j6A_b7MhyHKkNt6srMGw2K7Bg2di2l1Jh4wsQGsesIziYawEoPgTI41oGjs$ >

Please use the Ventures e-mail (<Venturesbirding...>) to contact the
Ventures office - thanks!



On Wed, Apr 29, 2020 at 8:32 PM Kent Fiala <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Hey, I will play too. What is this unseen bird?
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/228006021__;!!OToaGQ!-DC-o3pjD_5Mfll3X_93yGw5l7jJTfe72_tZctS7KfW4fHQ5tep-lIxUXoeFdDdnZ4U$
>
> Kent Fiala
>
>
>

 

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Date: 4/29/20 1:00 pm
From: Fuz Sanderson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Another mystery bird
Are we also hearing Warbling Vireo in the background? Volume up.


https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.piedmontearthskillsgathering.com/__;!!OToaGQ!7xGhO3sqdR8fOiYVU37ISZbfIs4dAQXawOLxtfGYZdgx5DQSu6xPZTnnCaj0X1AlNgI$


"With learning a skill comes self-confidence, and with that self confidence
we become a more fully alive human being"
- Darry Wood







On Wed, Apr 29, 2020 at 3:17 PM Simon Thompson <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Hi Irvin
> That's tough, but I would lean towards a weak version of Prothonotary. The
> cadence is correct, but the tone is not.
> That's all I can think of right now
> Simon
>
> Simon RB Thompson
>
> Ventures Birding Tours
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.birdventures.com__;!!OToaGQ!7xGhO3sqdR8fOiYVU37ISZbfIs4dAQXawOLxtfGYZdgx5DQSu6xPZTnnCaj01JpqTGI$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.birdventures.com__;!!OToaGQ!_VZ7DXhoKiljRVhRCzB-mpJP8jd1iUy1J__VJdx00xWejtcvEgoTBbcaE1IDoBR39Fg$>
>
> Please use the Ventures e-mail (<Venturesbirding...>) to contact the
> Ventures office - thanks!
>
>
>
> On Wed, Apr 29, 2020 at 7:55 PM <pittsjam...> <
> <pittsjam...> wrote:
>
>> Hello,
>> here is another "name that tune" bird. I heard this bird yesterday
>> singing from woodland edge habitat with vine tangles near the nature trail
>> parking lot at Santee NWR Bluff Unit. I could never locate it visually!
>> Initially, I was leaning towards a variant Nashville Warbler, but now not
>> so sure. I hear lots of variations during migration but this one has me
>> stumped. Any thoughts?
>>
>> The mystery bird songs are at the bottom of my checklist under
>> passerines. Thanks.
>>
>> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S67996660__;!!OToaGQ!7xGhO3sqdR8fOiYVU37ISZbfIs4dAQXawOLxtfGYZdgx5DQSu6xPZTnnCaj0-18etvg$
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S67996660__;!!OToaGQ!5X98ccjD1l7gPuMAelkRZ3GW6AQRqxg1MNFITi-EpFfuO2fHMBgqo8VcJBq0TP3O9AU$>
>>
>>
>> Irvin Pitts
>> Lexington, SC
>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/20 12:51 pm
From: Fuz Sanderson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Yet another mystery bird
I agree with Norm. I've chased down Hooded Warblers pulling this prank.


https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.piedmontearthskillsgathering.com/__;!!OToaGQ!4BqSGnqz5laV4rAlb02ucozXekHtz2MChFbJMF9v2Oncf1jP6uUH2X0wAhpxe2CqdP4$


"With learning a skill comes self-confidence, and with that self confidence
we become a more fully alive human being"
- Darry Wood







On Wed, Apr 29, 2020 at 3:42 PM Norman Budnitz <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> The timbre suggests Hooded Warbler. Perhaps a first-year male just
> learning the ropes.
>
> On Wed, Apr 29, 2020 at 3:32 PM Kent Fiala <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
>> Hey, I will play too. What is this unseen bird?
>> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/228006021__;!!OToaGQ!-DC-o3pjD_5Mfll3X_93yGw5l7jJTfe72_tZctS7KfW4fHQ5tep-lIxUXoeFdDdnZ4U$
>>
>> Kent Fiala
>>
>>
>>
>
> --
> Norm Budnitz
> Orange County
> North Carolina
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/20 12:42 pm
From: Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Yet another mystery bird
The timbre suggests Hooded Warbler. Perhaps a first-year male just
learning the ropes.

On Wed, Apr 29, 2020 at 3:32 PM Kent Fiala <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Hey, I will play too. What is this unseen bird?
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/228006021__;!!OToaGQ!-DC-o3pjD_5Mfll3X_93yGw5l7jJTfe72_tZctS7KfW4fHQ5tep-lIxUXoeFdDdnZ4U$
>
> Kent Fiala
>
>
>

--
Norm Budnitz
Orange County
North Carolina

 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/20 12:32 pm
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Yet another mystery bird
Hey, I will play too. What is this unseen bird? https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/228006021__;!!OToaGQ!-DC-o3pjD_5Mfll3X_93yGw5l7jJTfe72_tZctS7KfW4fHQ5tep-lIxUXoeFdDdnZ4U$

Kent Fiala


 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/20 12:17 pm
From: Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Another mystery bird
Hi Irvin
That's tough, but I would lean towards a weak version of Prothonotary. The
cadence is correct, but the tone is not.
That's all I can think of right now
Simon

Simon RB Thompson

Ventures Birding Tours
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.birdventures.com__;!!OToaGQ!_VZ7DXhoKiljRVhRCzB-mpJP8jd1iUy1J__VJdx00xWejtcvEgoTBbcaE1IDoBR39Fg$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.birdventures.com__;!!OToaGQ!_VZ7DXhoKiljRVhRCzB-mpJP8jd1iUy1J__VJdx00xWejtcvEgoTBbcaE1IDoBR39Fg$ >

Please use the Ventures e-mail (<Venturesbirding...>) to contact the
Ventures office - thanks!



On Wed, Apr 29, 2020 at 7:55 PM <pittsjam...> <
<pittsjam...> wrote:

> Hello,
> here is another "name that tune" bird. I heard this bird yesterday singing
> from woodland edge habitat with vine tangles near the nature trail parking
> lot at Santee NWR Bluff Unit. I could never locate it visually! Initially,
> I was leaning towards a variant Nashville Warbler, but now not so sure. I
> hear lots of variations during migration but this one has me stumped. Any
> thoughts?
>
> The mystery bird songs are at the bottom of my checklist under
> passerines. Thanks.
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S67996660__;!!OToaGQ!_VZ7DXhoKiljRVhRCzB-mpJP8jd1iUy1J__VJdx00xWejtcvEgoTBbcaE1IDdKzZCko$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S67996660__;!!OToaGQ!5X98ccjD1l7gPuMAelkRZ3GW6AQRqxg1MNFITi-EpFfuO2fHMBgqo8VcJBq0TP3O9AU$>
>
>
> Irvin Pitts
> Lexington, SC
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/20 11:58 am
From: andrew thornton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Probable Bicknell's Thrush - Bladen County NC
I think it's an interesting report. The only part that continues to
confuse me is the assumption that Gray-cheeked would be rare in the coastal
plain. I lived on the Northeast coast of Florida for about six years, and
while I tallied literally thousands of Grey-cheeked, we never had a
Bicknell's, despite numerous observers on the alert. I'm not saying
Bicknell's don't occur both there and here, but I can say with a great
degree of confidence that Gray-cheeked are by no means rare, uncommon, or
even unusual on the Southeast Atlantic coast.

I believe there are several night flight call recording studies that have
recorded Bicknell's in the Piedmont, if memory serves I think Wake Forest
University had numerous. Not an in hand specimen, but recorded night
flight call is probably about as good as you can get without it.

I'm glad people are always on the lookout for them. I'm sure they are
underreported, although caution with the identification is highly warranted.

Andrew Thornton
Julian, NC

On Wed, Apr 29, 2020, 2:08 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> As no one has commented on Derb's report, I will -- and add my strong
> support. Bicknell's Thrush seems to migrate "solely" thru the Carolinas in
> the Coastal Plain, as it breeds in New England and south into the NY
> Catskills -- and winters in the West Indies. All of the confirmed records
> for NC -- specimen and banding -- are from the Coastal Plain, including the
> Sandhills. I've looked at several photos of "Gray-cheeked" (and often ones
> suspected of being Bicknell's) from the coast and Coastal Plain and have
> little trouble considering them as Bicknell's -- though of course 100%
> proof is likely impossible.
>
> Gray-cheeked is a Trans-Gulf migrant, mainly, meaning that most Carolina
> records are for the mountains, then less so into the Piedmont, and very
> rarely in the Coastal Plain. However, you must keep in mind the total
> population sizes of these 2 species: Gray-cheekeds number into the
> millions, and Bicknell's perhaps 100 times less than that. Thus, both
> species would be considered as "rare" in the Coastal Plain, but for
> different reasons.
>
> The fact that the bird responded vigorously to the Bicknell's call is
> fine, but Derb didn't play the calls of Gray-cheeked, which are similar. I
> suspect it might have responded to them as well, but -- I can't say.
>
> As for a records committee vote, I was a voting member of the NC Bird
> Records Committee in the past, and a non-voting member now. It was not
> possible to get sightings or even photos accepted, though that might only
> be one or two attempts. Nonetheless, there are enough Coastal Plain
> records, in my view, for it not needing review by the Committee. I don't
> believe Derb submitted an eBird list, so whether it would have been
> accepted or not is a moot point. However, I WOULD (and we all would) be
> curious to know how many Bicknell's reports on eBird in the Carolinas have
> been submitted, and of those how many were accepted (if any), and if any
> had photos, etc. (I queried eBird for Bicknell's Thrush and NC, and it
> showed only Howell Woods and Weymouth Woods -- places where birds have been
> banded. Have other Bicknell's been reported at all in NC? If so, is it
> implied that this species will not be accepted with a banding or specimen
> record?)
>
> As there are NO known record of Bicknell's Thrush -- at least specimen or
> banding record -- from the NC Piedmont or Mountain regions, I would
> encourage NC BRC review of a few reports from these areas, if and where
> they may come forth. I also encourage Josh Southern to include this report
> in The Chat Briefs for the Files, of course using Derb's own word --
> "probable" -- as a qualifier, for a sight report. Thankfully, he provides
> a lengthy description and behavior comments (above).
>
> I fear that a lot of information about Bicknell's Thrush migration will be
> lost if the acceptance level for this species -- by whatever committee,
> listserve, etc -- is only with specimens or banding records.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> author/editor of the Birds of North Carolina website
>
> On Tue, Apr 28, 2020 at 5:24 PM Derb Carter <derbc...> wrote:
>
>> This morning I had sustained and close looks at a thrush I am fairly
>> confident was a Bicknell's. Any field identification of a Bicknell's away
>> from its small breeding range in the Adirondacks or winter range on
>> Hispaniola comes with an instant footnote that it is very difficult - some
>> even say impossible - to distinguish Bicknell's from Gray-cheeked in the
>> field. If I was not able to observe the bird this morning with binoculars
>> for 30 minutes, as close as ten feet, I would just pass it off as a
>> Gray-cheeked/Bicknell's. But I was able to see well all the field marks
>> suggested to distinguish Bicknell's - again understanding the differences
>> are slight - and some behavior suggestive of Bicknell's.
>>
>> The bird was on an upland bluff along the Black River, foraging on leaf
>> covered ground around an opening in deciduous forest. The boldly spotted
>> breast, gray face, and grayish flanks immediately said it was a
>> Gray-cheeked type, and when it moved into a patch of sunlight, I was struck
>> by the warm brown tones above especially the rump and tail. At this point
>> I tried to observe it as closely as possible, creeping up to at times
>> within 10-15 feet as it foraged on the ground. It was overall a warmer
>> brown compared to the usual cold gray brown of Gray-cheeked. This was
>> especially noticeable on the tail, not the very contrasting brighter almost
>> reddish brown tail of a Hermit Thrush, but a warmer brown than the rest of
>> the upper parts.
>>
>> I then tried to recall all the suggested field marks for distinguishing
>> Bicknell's. It appeared on the small side compared to my recollections of
>> Gray-cheeked - although I have not seen nearly as many Gray-cheeked in
>> recent years compared to decades ago - and slight differences in size can
>> be challenging without direct comparison. Primary projection appeared
>> short, and I have now looked at several photos and projection appears to
>> better match Bicknell's than the longer primary projection of
>> Gray-cheeked. I carefully observed the extent of yellow on the lower
>> mandible, recalling an article suggesting that as a possible distinguishing
>> field mark. I estimated the basal two-thirds at least of the lower
>> mandible was yellow, which is consistent with the article suggesting the
>> more extensive yellow on the lower mandible of Bicknell's as a character.
>>
>> After observing for half an hour, I decided to play some call notes and
>> see if it might call, as notes of the two species are somewhat different.
>> I backed away some distance and played a couple of Bicknell's call notes
>> and it immediately flew toward me, halving the distance and perching
>> momentarily on a log looking for the source of the call, before flying back
>> into a thicket. After a pause, I played the call note and it again flew
>> directly in perching in a sapling before again retreating onto a thicket.
>> It never called, but was very responsive to Bicknell's call notes.
>>
>> Finally, the fact the observation was in the lower Coastal Plain is
>> consistent with Bicknell's, with most confirmed records in the Coastal
>> Plain, which would be consistent with a migratory route from Hispaniola to
>> upstate NY and Vermont.
>>
>> In sum, if Bicknell's can be identified in the field I am fairly
>> confident it was a Bicknell's and not a Gray-cheeked. This is based on a
>> combination of all the field marks and other observations discussed above,
>> all consistent with Bicknell's. I thought I would provide all these
>> details for others with who may confront this challenging identification.
>>
>> Derb Carter
>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/20 11:55 am
From: <pittsjam...> <pittsjam...>
Subject: Another mystery bird
Hello,
here is another "name that tune" bird. I heard this bird yesterday singing from woodland edge habitat with vine tangles near the nature trail parking lot at Santee NWR Bluff Unit. I could never locate it visually! Initially, I was leaning towards a variant Nashville Warbler, but now not so sure. I hear lots of variations during migration but this one has me stumped. Any thoughts?

The mystery bird songs are at the bottom of my checklist under passerines. Thanks.

[ https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S67996660__;!!OToaGQ!5X98ccjD1l7gPuMAelkRZ3GW6AQRqxg1MNFITi-EpFfuO2fHMBgqo8VcJBq0TP3O9AU$ | https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S67996660__;!!OToaGQ!5X98ccjD1l7gPuMAelkRZ3GW6AQRqxg1MNFITi-EpFfuO2fHMBgqo8VcJBq0TP3O9AU$ ]


Irvin Pitts
Lexington, SC


 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/20 11:08 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Probable Bicknell's Thrush - Bladen County NC
As no one has commented on Derb's report, I will -- and add my strong
support. Bicknell's Thrush seems to migrate "solely" thru the Carolinas in
the Coastal Plain, as it breeds in New England and south into the NY
Catskills -- and winters in the West Indies. All of the confirmed records
for NC -- specimen and banding -- are from the Coastal Plain, including the
Sandhills. I've looked at several photos of "Gray-cheeked" (and often ones
suspected of being Bicknell's) from the coast and Coastal Plain and have
little trouble considering them as Bicknell's -- though of course 100%
proof is likely impossible.

Gray-cheeked is a Trans-Gulf migrant, mainly, meaning that most Carolina
records are for the mountains, then less so into the Piedmont, and very
rarely in the Coastal Plain. However, you must keep in mind the total
population sizes of these 2 species: Gray-cheekeds number into the
millions, and Bicknell's perhaps 100 times less than that. Thus, both
species would be considered as "rare" in the Coastal Plain, but for
different reasons.

The fact that the bird responded vigorously to the Bicknell's call is fine,
but Derb didn't play the calls of Gray-cheeked, which are similar. I
suspect it might have responded to them as well, but -- I can't say.

As for a records committee vote, I was a voting member of the NC Bird
Records Committee in the past, and a non-voting member now. It was not
possible to get sightings or even photos accepted, though that might only
be one or two attempts. Nonetheless, there are enough Coastal Plain
records, in my view, for it not needing review by the Committee. I don't
believe Derb submitted an eBird list, so whether it would have been
accepted or not is a moot point. However, I WOULD (and we all would) be
curious to know how many Bicknell's reports on eBird in the Carolinas have
been submitted, and of those how many were accepted (if any), and if any
had photos, etc. (I queried eBird for Bicknell's Thrush and NC, and it
showed only Howell Woods and Weymouth Woods -- places where birds have been
banded. Have other Bicknell's been reported at all in NC? If so, is it
implied that this species will not be accepted with a banding or specimen
record?)

As there are NO known record of Bicknell's Thrush -- at least specimen or
banding record -- from the NC Piedmont or Mountain regions, I would
encourage NC BRC review of a few reports from these areas, if and where
they may come forth. I also encourage Josh Southern to include this report
in The Chat Briefs for the Files, of course using Derb's own word --
"probable" -- as a qualifier, for a sight report. Thankfully, he provides
a lengthy description and behavior comments (above).

I fear that a lot of information about Bicknell's Thrush migration will be
lost if the acceptance level for this species -- by whatever committee,
listserve, etc -- is only with specimens or banding records.

Harry LeGrand
author/editor of the Birds of North Carolina website

On Tue, Apr 28, 2020 at 5:24 PM Derb Carter <derbc...> wrote:

> This morning I had sustained and close looks at a thrush I am fairly
> confident was a Bicknell's. Any field identification of a Bicknell's away
> from its small breeding range in the Adirondacks or winter range on
> Hispaniola comes with an instant footnote that it is very difficult - some
> even say impossible - to distinguish Bicknell's from Gray-cheeked in the
> field. If I was not able to observe the bird this morning with binoculars
> for 30 minutes, as close as ten feet, I would just pass it off as a
> Gray-cheeked/Bicknell's. But I was able to see well all the field marks
> suggested to distinguish Bicknell's - again understanding the differences
> are slight - and some behavior suggestive of Bicknell's.
>
> The bird was on an upland bluff along the Black River, foraging on leaf
> covered ground around an opening in deciduous forest. The boldly spotted
> breast, gray face, and grayish flanks immediately said it was a
> Gray-cheeked type, and when it moved into a patch of sunlight, I was struck
> by the warm brown tones above especially the rump and tail. At this point
> I tried to observe it as closely as possible, creeping up to at times
> within 10-15 feet as it foraged on the ground. It was overall a warmer
> brown compared to the usual cold gray brown of Gray-cheeked. This was
> especially noticeable on the tail, not the very contrasting brighter almost
> reddish brown tail of a Hermit Thrush, but a warmer brown than the rest of
> the upper parts.
>
> I then tried to recall all the suggested field marks for distinguishing
> Bicknell's. It appeared on the small side compared to my recollections of
> Gray-cheeked - although I have not seen nearly as many Gray-cheeked in
> recent years compared to decades ago - and slight differences in size can
> be challenging without direct comparison. Primary projection appeared
> short, and I have now looked at several photos and projection appears to
> better match Bicknell's than the longer primary projection of
> Gray-cheeked. I carefully observed the extent of yellow on the lower
> mandible, recalling an article suggesting that as a possible distinguishing
> field mark. I estimated the basal two-thirds at least of the lower
> mandible was yellow, which is consistent with the article suggesting the
> more extensive yellow on the lower mandible of Bicknell's as a character.
>
> After observing for half an hour, I decided to play some call notes and
> see if it might call, as notes of the two species are somewhat different.
> I backed away some distance and played a couple of Bicknell's call notes
> and it immediately flew toward me, halving the distance and perching
> momentarily on a log looking for the source of the call, before flying back
> into a thicket. After a pause, I played the call note and it again flew
> directly in perching in a sapling before again retreating onto a thicket.
> It never called, but was very responsive to Bicknell's call notes.
>
> Finally, the fact the observation was in the lower Coastal Plain is
> consistent with Bicknell's, with most confirmed records in the Coastal
> Plain, which would be consistent with a migratory route from Hispaniola to
> upstate NY and Vermont.
>
> In sum, if Bicknell's can be identified in the field I am fairly confident
> it was a Bicknell's and not a Gray-cheeked. This is based on a combination
> of all the field marks and other observations discussed above, all
> consistent with Bicknell's. I thought I would provide all these details
> for others with who may confront this challenging identification.
>
> Derb Carter
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/20 10:57 am
From: Susan Campbell <susan...>
Subject: Re: Mystery Warbler #2
Apologies. That reply was not meant for the list.

Susan

Get Outlook for Android<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://aka.ms/ghei36__;!!OToaGQ!-7jKwajWMEgN4RYdwV__81qWDC9pQVzLm7D4N0DK5PtwdhH1_eelt9TsCd4A3KWeaGk$ >

________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Christopher Hill <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Wednesday, April 29, 2020 1:52:30 PM
To: Daniel Hannon <hannond131...>
Cc: Carolinabirds <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Mystery Warbler #2

I can hear a titmouse, I think an ovenbird, and no buzzy warbler at all.

By the way, as has been discussed here before, bird abbreviations are not as useful as names, and BTGW might mean Black-throated Green Warbler to YOU, but it is not the conventional banding code and I looked at it and went to Black-throated Gray Warbler? because I read emails that cover more than just the Carolinas. One persons RTH is a Red-tailed Hawk, another persons RTH is a Ruby-throated Hummer, but if you spell out the words nobody gets confused.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

On Apr 29, 2020, at 1:40 PM, Daniel Hannon <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:


CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.

Birders,

I heard the bird in the file attached to the checklist (below) singing in my backyard last week. I live in a moderately developed area right on the border of west Raleigh and Cary, and although I do occasionally get some interesting migrants (BTGW & BHVI) in my neighborhood, this bird evades me both in determination by ear, and in locating with my binos.

I apologize for the quality of the phone recording. There is a titmouse Peter-peter-peter almost drowning out the song/call of the bird in question. I would describe the bird in question as saying zee-zee-zoo-wee. Any feedback you could provide would be appreciated. Thanks!

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68038279__;!!OToaGQ!-7jKwajWMEgN4RYdwV__81qWDC9pQVzLm7D4N0DK5PtwdhH1_eelt9TsCd4A01Ox6ks$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https*3A*2F*2Furldefense.com*2Fv3*2F__https*3A*2F*2Febird.org*2Fchecklist*2FS68038279__*3B!!OToaGQ!5fHa3hcTC3eTMQI3_R5vwROJtM5H4IMIFbPLAhOentkABanny8ksialYU_r8pQrAyYE*24&data=02*7C01*7Cchill*40coastal.edu*7C50a1bb37bc23458ef10408d7ec64857a*7Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797*7C0*7C0*7C637237788802763834&sdata=AhyHZbCm15KgAvw58ran*2B3oat*2Fa80VqUO*2BSuefhdD5M*3D&reserved=0__;JSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUl!!OToaGQ!7ikw0uvmhlMIXZJBV2y-PpTcSQAhKSiJVOJkN8JAguwn8mqgiUuX58GCpPazYgCSpvI$>

Dan Hannon



 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/20 10:53 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Mystery Warbler #2
I can hear a titmouse, I think an ovenbird, and no buzzy warbler at all.

By the way, as has been discussed here before, bird abbreviations are not as useful as names, and “BTGW” might mean Black-throated Green Warbler to YOU, but it is not the conventional banding code and I looked at it and went to “Black-throated Gray Warbler?” because I read emails that cover more than just the Carolinas. One person’s RTH is a Red-tailed Hawk, another person’s RTH is a Ruby-throated Hummer, but if you spell out the words nobody gets confused.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

On Apr 29, 2020, at 1:40 PM, Daniel Hannon <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:


CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.

Birders,

I heard the bird in the file attached to the checklist (below) singing in my backyard last week. I live in a moderately developed area right on the border of west Raleigh and Cary, and although I do occasionally get some interesting migrants (BTGW & BHVI) in my neighborhood, this bird evades me both in determination by ear, and in locating with my binos.

I apologize for the quality of the phone recording. There is a titmouse “Peter-peter-peter” almost drowning out the song/call of the bird in question. I would describe the bird in question as saying “zee-zee-zoo-wee.” Any feedback you could provide would be appreciated. Thanks!

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68038279__;!!OToaGQ!7ikw0uvmhlMIXZJBV2y-PpTcSQAhKSiJVOJkN8JAguwn8mqgiUuX58GCpPazZPAwF-I$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https*3A*2F*2Furldefense.com*2Fv3*2F__https*3A*2F*2Febird.org*2Fchecklist*2FS68038279__*3B!!OToaGQ!5fHa3hcTC3eTMQI3_R5vwROJtM5H4IMIFbPLAhOentkABanny8ksialYU_r8pQrAyYE*24&data=02*7C01*7Cchill*40coastal.edu*7C50a1bb37bc23458ef10408d7ec64857a*7Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797*7C0*7C0*7C637237788802763834&sdata=AhyHZbCm15KgAvw58ran*2B3oat*2Fa80VqUO*2BSuefhdD5M*3D&reserved=0__;JSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUl!!OToaGQ!7ikw0uvmhlMIXZJBV2y-PpTcSQAhKSiJVOJkN8JAguwn8mqgiUuX58GCpPazYgCSpvI$ >

Dan Hannon



 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/20 10:41 am
From: Daniel Hannon (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mystery Warbler #2
Birders,


I heard the bird in the file attached to the checklist (below) singing in
my backyard last week. I live in a moderately developed area right on the
border of west Raleigh and Cary, and although I do occasionally get some
interesting migrants (BTGW & BHVI) in my neighborhood, this bird evades me
both in determination by ear, and in locating with my binos.


I apologize for the quality of the phone recording. There is a titmouse
“Peter-peter-peter” almost drowning out the song/call of the bird in
question. I would describe the bird in question as saying
“zee-zee-zoo-wee.” Any feedback you could provide would be appreciated.
Thanks!


https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68038279__;!!OToaGQ!5fHa3hcTC3eTMQI3_R5vwROJtM5H4IMIFbPLAhOentkABanny8ksialYU_r8pQrAyYE$

Dan Hannon

 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/20 10:06 am
From: Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mystery (Warbler?) - Greenville Co., SC
Birders,

I recorded a bird this morning in some willows along a boggy creek corridor
in Greenville County (upstate), SC. The sound in question is the
high-pitched, rapid-fire squeaky sequence spaced out through the recording.
I had a challenging, very backlit view of a warbler-sized and -shaped
job, and that's about all I can offer on the appearance.

Here is the recording in my eBird list (see "passerine sp." at the bottom):
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68022429__;!!OToaGQ!52dyYckTjUucvegPKeHOqWL02GmnMAYdPRmN0yO6Hg6emKu6G5uI-teM3hbM68zQiVI$

Thanks in advance for any insight. Whatever this is, I'll have to file it
in my brain as the bird that sounds like a Canada Warbler on helium.

Kevin Kubach
Greenville, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/20 9:25 am
From: Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Ruby-throated Hummingbird Nest Building
This morning while birding on Barrett Mountain in southern Alexander
County, a female Ruby-throated Hummingbird caught my attention when flying
to a branch on a Tulip Poplar. She landed on a half built nest that she
was working on. This was the first Rudy-throated Hummingbird nest I have
ever found. Here are a few videos I took posted on my eBird report from
the morning. https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S68021293__;!!OToaGQ!4i0OKZx4WyanYrSKSa1J_j7TFRrbHVc_Dely71KV1mKmopy6aIQvf2UhquhUkImgLas$


Dwayne
*************
J. Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
<redxbill...>


Catawba County Park Ranger
Riverbend Park - Conover, NC
<jdmartin...>
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.catawbacountync.gov/depts/parks/__;!!OToaGQ!4i0OKZx4WyanYrSKSa1J_j7TFRrbHVc_Dely71KV1mKmopy6aIQvf2UhquhUgs3Y9Ao$
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.weatherlink.com/user/riverbendpark__;!!OToaGQ!4i0OKZx4WyanYrSKSa1J_j7TFRrbHVc_Dely71KV1mKmopy6aIQvf2UhquhUAXiBzoc$

 

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Date: 4/29/20 8:59 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Conway, SC - Please post the source of the migration maps.
Contrary winds will shut down the spigot. Forgot to mention that.

If you want to know where the birds are going to land you have to ask them, I guess. :-)


On Apr 29, 2020, at 11:52 AM, Christopher Hill <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:


CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.

Guy,

There are dozens of cool patterns.

Blue is lots of birds. Green is LOTS of birds.
the rings are individual radar stations.
Rainstorms look as they do on your local news channel.
The link runs noon to noon. You will see blue rings blossoming just after sunset in a wave from east to west.
Some radar stations in the southwest have parts of their “field” blocked out by mountains.
If you watch the texas gulf coast in April you can see transgulf migrants arriving at weird times from Mexico. Also Florida has different patterns from the rest of the east.

Hope that’s enough of a primer.

CH
Conway

On Apr 29, 2020, at 11:47 AM, <badgerboy...><mailto:<badgerboy...> wrote:


CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.

I looked at this page and I have to sheepishly admit that I could make nothing of it. Chris, or anyone else, can you please give a short summary of what it means, and how to figure out if migrating birds are likely to come to earth in a particular place?

Thanks, Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC

On 4/29/2020 8:17 AM, Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
My favorite is this page.

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.pauljhurtado.com/US_Composite_Radar/__;!!OToaGQ!_RglFnkmb9G5DWjnPDYmB4W4plSjyNylTWXbdgbz_6P5UgeB6h4GhpoZeFlUfZpMxig$ <https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Furldefense.com%2Fv3%2F__https%3A%2F%2Fnam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com%2F%3Furl%3Dhttps*3A*2F*2Furldefense.com*2Fv3*2F__https*3A*2F*2Fwww.pauljhurtado.com*2FUS_Composite_Radar*2F__*3B!!OToaGQ!_0GkxrCvaC7i3i8fGfSw4q-HH_ExUOyjR1DtYSmcvHYcpuV1VrSjP7Z0vZvOjbVQp78*24%26data%3D02*7C01*7Cchill*40coastal.edu*7Cce60c8d29f8746730ac108d7ec54c239*7Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797*7C0*7C0*7C637237721100140777%26sdata%3DHaXB6P905C3*2BlvtepDjFE4cfD*2BRBFBECLriO3gTD1jU*3D%26reserved%3D0__%3BJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSU!!OToaGQ!8OhKfnMVsvZZCol-P_b85pvDzSRY_10HqQB6dPiuqz4iE3WzMAj1CHsSS5H4WdNMyYk%24&data=02%7C01%<7Cchill...>%7Ca540b320d1cb4b01aab008d7ec556b5a%7Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797%7C0%7C0%7C637237723936830345&sdata=8LkTi0pVgB5xGkfw0I8Bl7g8P%2FW7K2Al8IYAiNkQFHM%3D&reserved=0>

It’s not forward looking - it shows current radar, and archives past nights if you want them. But you can check it any time and see all sorts of real time detail (for example, by the time most people go to bed you can click on it and see what “takeoff” looked like, or you can look at it before you head out in the field in the morning and get excited). Scroll down to the link that says

Permanent Link for current day (6pm-6pm EDT):

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

On Apr 29, 2020, at 7:48 AM, Maggie Strickland <gallinasviejas...><mailto:<gallinasviejas...>> wrote:


CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.

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On Wed, Apr 29, 2020 at 7:41 AM Christine Stoughton-Root <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
BirdCast.com<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https*3A*2F*2Furldefense.com*2Fv3*2F__https*3A*2F*2Fnam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com*2F*3Furl*3Dhttps*3A*2F*2Furldefense.com*2Fv3*2F__http*3A*2F*2FBirdCast.com__*3B!!OToaGQ!_0GkxrCvaC7i3i8fGfSw4q-HH_ExUOyjR1DtYSmcvHYcpuV1VrSjP7Z0vZvOLSDTJc0*24*26data*3D02*7C01*7Cchill*40coastal.edu*7Cce60c8d29f8746730ac108d7ec54c239*7Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797*7C0*7C0*7C637237721100150757*26sdata*3Dpatkv9a9YGZMuYwaU3TlWyr9EuAhyTTu9Bq65*2BtgStU*3D*26reserved*3D0__*3BJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSU!!OToaGQ!8OhKfnMVsvZZCol-P_b85pvDzSRY_10HqQB6dPiuqz4iE3WzMAj1CHsSS5H41ADaQ6Q*24&data=02*7C01*7Cchill*40coastal.edu*7Ca540b320d1cb4b01aab008d7ec556b5a*7Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797*7C0*7C0*7C637237723936840337&sdata=bxFxcehgEnMRj1xQuStbcAoszShoPGtoqATOCTnUk5I*3D&reserved=0__;JSUlJSUlJSUlJSUqKioqKioqKioqJSUqKioqKioqKiUlKiolJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUl!!OToaGQ!_RglFnkmb9G5DWjnPDYmB4W4plSjyNylTWXbdgbz_6P5UgeB6h4GhpoZeFlU43855mU$ >

Sent from my iPad

On Apr 29, 2020, at 6:11 AM, Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

Thanks.

Parkin Hunter
Ridgeway and Garden City Beach SC
Sent from my iPad

On Apr 28, 2020, at 10:34 PM, Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

 Erinn,

According to the map I saw, your best bet would be Kentucky. :-)

Sorry, dark humor there in part because in Spring during these big migration waves our part of SC often seems to be the one place in the whole eastern half of the continent that refuses to light up.

Good luck tomorrow. John Hutchens and I birded Punchbowl Landing road this morning and it was fantastic, although actual passage migrants were very very few.

Chris Hill
Also in Conway.

On Apr 28, 2020, at 7:41 PM, Erinn Szarek <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:


CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.

No doubt everyone has seen the migration forecast tonight, there is a huge influx of birds coming in tonight. I'm in Conway, SC, any suggestions for my best placement for tomorrow morning to catch the migration?





 

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Date: 4/29/20 8:53 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Conway, SC - Please post the source of the migration maps.
Guy,

There are dozens of cool patterns.

Blue is lots of birds. Green is LOTS of birds.
the rings are individual radar stations.
Rainstorms look as they do on your local news channel.
The link runs noon to noon. You will see blue rings blossoming just after sunset in a wave from east to west.
Some radar stations in the southwest have parts of their “field” blocked out by mountains.
If you watch the texas gulf coast in April you can see transgulf migrants arriving at weird times from Mexico. Also Florida has different patterns from the rest of the east.

Hope that’s enough of a primer.

CH
Conway

On Apr 29, 2020, at 11:47 AM, <badgerboy...><mailto:<badgerboy...> wrote:


CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.

I looked at this page and I have to sheepishly admit that I could make nothing of it. Chris, or anyone else, can you please give a short summary of what it means, and how to figure out if migrating birds are likely to come to earth in a particular place?

Thanks, Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC

On 4/29/2020 8:17 AM, Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
My favorite is this page.

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.pauljhurtado.com/US_Composite_Radar/__;!!OToaGQ!8OhKfnMVsvZZCol-P_b85pvDzSRY_10HqQB6dPiuqz4iE3WzMAj1CHsSS5H4msryREA$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https*3A*2F*2Furldefense.com*2Fv3*2F__https*3A*2F*2Fwww.pauljhurtado.com*2FUS_Composite_Radar*2F__*3B!!OToaGQ!_0GkxrCvaC7i3i8fGfSw4q-HH_ExUOyjR1DtYSmcvHYcpuV1VrSjP7Z0vZvOjbVQp78*24&data=02*7C01*7Cchill*40coastal.edu*7Cce60c8d29f8746730ac108d7ec54c239*7Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797*7C0*7C0*7C637237721100140777&sdata=HaXB6P905C3*2BlvtepDjFE4cfD*2BRBFBECLriO3gTD1jU*3D&reserved=0__;JSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSU!!OToaGQ!8OhKfnMVsvZZCol-P_b85pvDzSRY_10HqQB6dPiuqz4iE3WzMAj1CHsSS5H4WdNMyYk$ >

It’s not forward looking - it shows current radar, and archives past nights if you want them. But you can check it any time and see all sorts of real time detail (for example, by the time most people go to bed you can click on it and see what “takeoff” looked like, or you can look at it before you head out in the field in the morning and get excited). Scroll down to the link that says

Permanent Link for current day (6pm-6pm EDT):

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

On Apr 29, 2020, at 7:48 AM, Maggie Strickland <gallinasviejas...><mailto:<gallinasviejas...>> wrote:


CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.

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On Wed, Apr 29, 2020 at 7:41 AM Christine Stoughton-Root <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
BirdCast.com<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https*3A*2F*2Furldefense.com*2Fv3*2F__http*3A*2F*2FBirdCast.com__*3B!!OToaGQ!_0GkxrCvaC7i3i8fGfSw4q-HH_ExUOyjR1DtYSmcvHYcpuV1VrSjP7Z0vZvOLSDTJc0*24&data=02*7C01*7Cchill*40coastal.edu*7Cce60c8d29f8746730ac108d7ec54c239*7Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797*7C0*7C0*7C637237721100150757&sdata=patkv9a9YGZMuYwaU3TlWyr9EuAhyTTu9Bq65*2BtgStU*3D&reserved=0__;JSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSU!!OToaGQ!8OhKfnMVsvZZCol-P_b85pvDzSRY_10HqQB6dPiuqz4iE3WzMAj1CHsSS5H41ADaQ6Q$ >

Sent from my iPad

On Apr 29, 2020, at 6:11 AM, Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

Thanks.

Parkin Hunter
Ridgeway and Garden City Beach SC
Sent from my iPad

On Apr 28, 2020, at 10:34 PM, Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

 Erinn,

According to the map I saw, your best bet would be Kentucky. :-)

Sorry, dark humor there in part because in Spring during these big migration waves our part of SC often seems to be the one place in the whole eastern half of the continent that refuses to light up.

Good luck tomorrow. John Hutchens and I birded Punchbowl Landing road this morning and it was fantastic, although actual passage migrants were very very few.

Chris Hill
Also in Conway.

On Apr 28, 2020, at 7:41 PM, Erinn Szarek <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:


CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.

No doubt everyone has seen the migration forecast tonight, there is a huge influx of birds coming in tonight. I'm in Conway, SC, any suggestions for my best placement for tomorrow morning to catch the migration?




 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/20 8:48 am
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Re: Conway, SC - Please post the source of the migration maps.
I looked at this page and I have to sheepishly admit that I could make
nothing of it. Chris, or anyone else, can you please give a short
summary of what it means, and how to figure out if migrating birds are
likely to come to earth in a particular place?

Thanks, Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC

On 4/29/2020 8:17 AM, Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
wrote:
> My favorite is this page.
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.pauljhurtado.com/US_Composite_Radar/__;!!OToaGQ!5OEPf8AqKOqFUeu6rHaesJE-QIuzSQlN-DEjkIxZWqiRhaq63Yqg6K8seqQeLtwu-UQ$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.pauljhurtado.com/US_Composite_Radar/__;!!OToaGQ!_0GkxrCvaC7i3i8fGfSw4q-HH_ExUOyjR1DtYSmcvHYcpuV1VrSjP7Z0vZvOjbVQp78$>
>
> It’s not forward looking - it shows current radar, and archives past
> nights if you want them.  But you can check it any time and see all
> sorts of real time detail (for example, by the time most people go to
> bed you can click on it and see what “takeoff” looked like, or you can
> look at it before you head out in the field in the morning and get
> excited).  Scroll down to the link that says
>
> *Permanent Link for current day (6pm-6pm EDT):*
>
> Chris Hill
> Conway, SC
>
>> On Apr 29, 2020, at 7:48 AM, Maggie Strickland
>> <gallinasviejas...> <mailto:<gallinasviejas...>> wrote:
>>
>> CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization.
>> Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links,
>> especially from unknown senders.
>>
>> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://birdcast.info__;!!OToaGQ!5OEPf8AqKOqFUeu6rHaesJE-QIuzSQlN-DEjkIxZWqiRhaq63Yqg6K8seqQezuG-aDY$
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https*3A*2F*2Fbirdcast.info*2F&data=02*7C01*7Cchill*40coastal.edu*7Ce370b68af959452237c308d7ec334644*7Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797*7C0*7C1*7C637237577278477761&sdata=NUL1ypAPmcNKhq*2BafrIEp2YkVKLqn722NQGIa42EnbU*3D&reserved=0__;JSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSU!!OToaGQ!_0GkxrCvaC7i3i8fGfSw4q-HH_ExUOyjR1DtYSmcvHYcpuV1VrSjP7Z0vZvOm8rMWuc$>
>>
>> On Wed, Apr 29, 2020 at 7:41 AM Christine Stoughton-Root
>> <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
>>
>> BirdCast.com
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://BirdCast.com__;!!OToaGQ!_0GkxrCvaC7i3i8fGfSw4q-HH_ExUOyjR1DtYSmcvHYcpuV1VrSjP7Z0vZvOLSDTJc0$>
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
>>
>>> On Apr 29, 2020, at 6:11 AM, Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds
>>> Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
>>> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
>>>
>>> Thanks.
>>>
>>> Parkin Hunter
>>> Ridgeway and Garden City Beach SC
>>> Sent from my iPad
>>>
>>>> On Apr 28, 2020, at 10:34 PM, Christopher Hill (via
>>>> carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
>>>> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>  Erinn,
>>>>
>>>> According to the map I saw, your best bet would be Kentucky. :-)
>>>>
>>>> Sorry, dark humor there in part because in Spring during these
>>>> big migration waves our part of SC often seems to be the one
>>>> place in the whole eastern half of the continent that refuses
>>>> to light up.
>>>>
>>>> Good luck tomorrow. John Hutchens and I birded Punchbowl
>>>> Landing road this morning and it was fantastic, although actual
>>>> passage migrants were very very few.
>>>>
>>>> Chris Hill
>>>> Also in Conway.
>>>>
>>>>> On Apr 28, 2020, at 7:41 PM, Erinn Szarek
>>>>> <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization.
>>>>> Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links,
>>>>> especially from unknown senders.
>>>>>
>>>>> No doubt everyone has seen the migration forecast tonight,
>>>>> there is a huge influx of birds coming in tonight. I'm in
>>>>> Conway, SC, any suggestions for my best placement for tomorrow
>>>>> morning to catch the migration?
>>>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/20 7:18 am
From: alhooks13 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Warbler Identification
The spectogram matches up most closely with a Swainson's Warbler - the Type
A1 song from Stephenson's Warbler Guide.

On Wed, Apr 29, 2020 at 9:34 AM William Warfel <bwarfel...> wrote:

> Thanks to Len Kopka, Ann Brice, g57462, Kevin Kubach, Steve Shultz,
> Karyl Gabriel, and KG for your help with my warbler song identification.
> There were four votes for Swainson's Warbler, two for Louisiana
> Waterthrush, and one for Yellow-throated Warbler. My initial thought was
> Yellow-throated Warbler, but after receiving this input and comparing my
> recording with those of known birds, I too feel that this is Swainson's
> Warbler. However, I welcome confirmation or criticism of this conclusion.
>
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/223791781__;!!OToaGQ!5jBe4JxSdga6xNjq8E4DG5Dn6VGLI1PqAKnC-ecLmPOMBW-2JOcFP9FT1J_crG1v7Os$
>
> William Warfel
>
> Fayetteville, NC
>
>
> On 4/16/2020 11:22 AM, William Warfel wrote:
> > Warbler songs can be, and are usually, confusing to me. I think my
> > initial impression of this bird's identity was incorrect, as I
> > expected it to be high in the treetops, but was instead low in the
> > thickets along the Cape Fear River in Cumberland County. Can someone
> > help me?
> >
> >
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S67234080__;!!OToaGQ!5jBe4JxSdga6xNjq8E4DG5Dn6VGLI1PqAKnC-ecLmPOMBW-2JOcFP9FT1J_cethwAnk$
>
> > William Warfel
> >
> > Fayetteville, NC
> >
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/20 6:53 am
From: John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: NCSU Ag fields-MidPines
Hi All. Yesterday I visited Mid-Pines Road at NCSU Ag fields and spoke to a
staffer installing a No Parking sign at the dog leg bend in the road.
They recently had problems with birders repeatedly parking in front of the
gates accessing the farm fields- this was especially problematic last week
when people came out to look for the Upland Sandpiper. He said they are
trying to accommodate the interest of birders coming to the ag lands but
farming operations must come first.
Please be considerate and respectful of the needs of the people working the
farms, or we will risk losing access to the last great farm complex near
the heart of Raleigh. Don't park in front of, or block, tractor access to
any gated entrance. Those tractors have wide attachments behind them!
On another note, sadly, the farmers were busy harvesting the winter wheat
and I only saw one forlorn Bobolink atop a snag looking over a recently
harvested field.
John Connors
Raleigh, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/20 6:34 am
From: William Warfel <bwarfel...>
Subject: Re: Warbler Identification
Thanks to Len Kopka, Ann Brice, g57462, Kevin Kubach, Steve Shultz,
Karyl Gabriel, and KG for your help with my warbler song identification.
There were four votes for Swainson's Warbler, two for Louisiana
Waterthrush, and one for Yellow-throated Warbler. My initial thought was
Yellow-throated Warbler, but after receiving this input and comparing my
recording with those of known birds, I too feel that this is Swainson's
Warbler. However, I welcome confirmation or criticism of this conclusion.

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/223791781__;!!OToaGQ!5jBe4JxSdga6xNjq8E4DG5Dn6VGLI1PqAKnC-ecLmPOMBW-2JOcFP9FT1J_crG1v7Os$

William Warfel

Fayetteville, NC


On 4/16/2020 11:22 AM, William Warfel wrote:
> Warbler songs can be, and are usually, confusing to me.  I think my
> initial impression of this bird's identity was incorrect, as I
> expected it to be high in the treetops, but was instead low in the
> thickets along the Cape Fear River in Cumberland County. Can someone
> help me?
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S67234080__;!!OToaGQ!5jBe4JxSdga6xNjq8E4DG5Dn6VGLI1PqAKnC-ecLmPOMBW-2JOcFP9FT1J_cethwAnk$

> William Warfel
>
> Fayetteville, NC
>
 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/20 5:18 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Conway, SC - Please post the source of the migration maps.
My favorite is this page.

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.pauljhurtado.com/US_Composite_Radar/__;!!OToaGQ!_0GkxrCvaC7i3i8fGfSw4q-HH_ExUOyjR1DtYSmcvHYcpuV1VrSjP7Z0vZvOjbVQp78$

It’s not forward looking - it shows current radar, and archives past nights if you want them. But you can check it any time and see all sorts of real time detail (for example, by the time most people go to bed you can click on it and see what “takeoff” looked like, or you can look at it before you head out in the field in the morning and get excited). Scroll down to the link that says

Permanent Link for current day (6pm-6pm EDT):

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

On Apr 29, 2020, at 7:48 AM, Maggie Strickland <gallinasviejas...><mailto:<gallinasviejas...>> wrote:


CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://birdcast.info__;!!OToaGQ!_0GkxrCvaC7i3i8fGfSw4q-HH_ExUOyjR1DtYSmcvHYcpuV1VrSjP7Z0vZvOkt6MSWo$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https*3A*2F*2Fbirdcast.info*2F&data=02*7C01*7Cchill*40coastal.edu*7Ce370b68af959452237c308d7ec334644*7Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797*7C0*7C1*7C637237577278477761&sdata=NUL1ypAPmcNKhq*2BafrIEp2YkVKLqn722NQGIa42EnbU*3D&reserved=0__;JSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSU!!OToaGQ!_0GkxrCvaC7i3i8fGfSw4q-HH_ExUOyjR1DtYSmcvHYcpuV1VrSjP7Z0vZvOm8rMWuc$ >

On Wed, Apr 29, 2020 at 7:41 AM Christine Stoughton-Root <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
BirdCast.com<https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://BirdCast.com__;!!OToaGQ!_0GkxrCvaC7i3i8fGfSw4q-HH_ExUOyjR1DtYSmcvHYcpuV1VrSjP7Z0vZvOLSDTJc0$ >

Sent from my iPad

On Apr 29, 2020, at 6:11 AM, Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

Thanks.

Parkin Hunter
Ridgeway and Garden City Beach SC
Sent from my iPad

On Apr 28, 2020, at 10:34 PM, Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

 Erinn,

According to the map I saw, your best bet would be Kentucky. :-)

Sorry, dark humor there in part because in Spring during these big migration waves our part of SC often seems to be the one place in the whole eastern half of the continent that refuses to light up.

Good luck tomorrow. John Hutchens and I birded Punchbowl Landing road this morning and it was fantastic, although actual passage migrants were very very few.

Chris Hill
Also in Conway.

On Apr 28, 2020, at 7:41 PM, Erinn Szarek <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:


CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.

No doubt everyone has seen the migration forecast tonight, there is a huge influx of birds coming in tonight. I'm in Conway, SC, any suggestions for my best placement for tomorrow morning to catch the migration?



 

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Date: 4/29/20 4:49 am
From: Maggie Strickland (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Conway, SC - Please post the source of the migration maps.
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://birdcast.info__;!!OToaGQ!4DfePN9gMPQ8KWqlQEwhw1bhjP9h7drixw77vl__rr-yL6YmRllYUOtpPMwHQvFMxfA$

On Wed, Apr 29, 2020 at 7:41 AM Christine Stoughton-Root <
<carolinabirds...> wrote:

> BirdCast.com
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> On Apr 29, 2020, at 6:11 AM, Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds Mailing
> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Thanks.
>
> Parkin Hunter
> Ridgeway and Garden City Beach SC
> Sent from my iPad
>
> On Apr 28, 2020, at 10:34 PM, Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing
> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
>  Erinn,
>
> According to the map I saw, your best bet would be Kentucky. :-)
>
> Sorry, dark humor there in part because in Spring during these big
> migration waves our part of SC often seems to be the one place in the whole
> eastern half of the continent that refuses to light up.
>
> Good luck tomorrow. John Hutchens and I birded Punchbowl Landing road
> this morning and it was fantastic, although actual passage migrants were
> very very few.
>
> Chris Hill
> Also in Conway.
>
> On Apr 28, 2020, at 7:41 PM, Erinn Szarek <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise
> caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown
> senders.
> No doubt everyone has seen the migration forecast tonight, there is a huge
> influx of birds coming in tonight. I'm in Conway, SC, any suggestions for
> my best placement for tomorrow morning to catch the migration?
>
>
>

 

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Date: 4/29/20 4:42 am
From: Christine Stoughton-Root (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Conway, SC - Please post the source of the migration maps.
BirdCast.com

Sent from my iPad

>> On Apr 29, 2020, at 6:11 AM, Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> Thanks.
>
> Parkin Hunter
> Ridgeway and Garden City Beach SC
> Sent from my iPad
>
>>> On Apr 28, 2020, at 10:34 PM, Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>  Erinn,
>>
>> According to the map I saw, your best bet would be Kentucky. :-)
>>
>> Sorry, dark humor there in part because in Spring during these big migration waves our part of SC often seems to be the one place in the whole eastern half of the continent that refuses to light up.
>>
>> Good luck tomorrow. John Hutchens and I birded Punchbowl Landing road this morning and it was fantastic, although actual passage migrants were very very few.
>>
>> Chris Hill
>> Also in Conway.
>>
>>> On Apr 28, 2020, at 7:41 PM, Erinn Szarek <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>>
>>> CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.
>>>
>>> No doubt everyone has seen the migration forecast tonight, there is a huge influx of birds coming in tonight. I'm in Conway, SC, any suggestions for my best placement for tomorrow morning to catch the migration?

 

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Date: 4/29/20 3:11 am
From: Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Conway, SC - Please post the source of the migration maps.
Thanks.

Parkin Hunter
Ridgeway and Garden City Beach SC
Sent from my iPad

> On Apr 28, 2020, at 10:34 PM, Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
>  Erinn,
>
> According to the map I saw, your best bet would be Kentucky. :-)
>
> Sorry, dark humor there in part because in Spring during these big migration waves our part of SC often seems to be the one place in the whole eastern half of the continent that refuses to light up.
>
> Good luck tomorrow. John Hutchens and I birded Punchbowl Landing road this morning and it was fantastic, although actual passage migrants were very very few.
>
> Chris Hill
> Also in Conway.
>
>> On Apr 28, 2020, at 7:41 PM, Erinn Szarek <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.
>>
>> No doubt everyone has seen the migration forecast tonight, there is a huge influx of birds coming in tonight. I'm in Conway, SC, any suggestions for my best placement for tomorrow morning to catch the migration?
>

 

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Date: 4/28/20 7:34 pm
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Conway, SC
Erinn,

According to the map I saw, your best bet would be Kentucky. :-)

Sorry, dark humor there in part because in Spring during these big migration waves our part of SC often seems to be the one place in the whole eastern half of the continent that refuses to light up.

Good luck tomorrow. John Hutchens and I birded Punchbowl Landing road this morning and it was fantastic, although actual passage migrants were very very few.

Chris Hill
Also in Conway.

On Apr 28, 2020, at 7:41 PM, Erinn Szarek <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:


CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.

No doubt everyone has seen the migration forecast tonight, there is a huge influx of birds coming in tonight. I'm in Conway, SC, any suggestions for my best placement for tomorrow morning to catch the migration?


 

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Date: 4/28/20 4:42 pm
From: Erinn Szarek (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Conway, SC
No doubt everyone has seen the migration forecast tonight, there is a huge influx of birds coming in tonight. I'm in Conway, SC, any suggestions for my best placement for tomorrow morning to catch the migration?
 

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Date: 4/28/20 3:25 pm
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Yard birds- Raleigh NC
Decided to check the lake and flats this afternoon and I was rewarded.

7-8 Solitary Sandpipers
1 Spotted Sandpiper (finally! usually have them before Solitary)
Several Green Herons
And most surprisingly a drake Blue-winged Teal, a first for the yard

Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 4/28/20 2:25 pm
From: Judy Halleron (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Cherohala Skyway birds
We packed a lunch and birded the NC end of the Cherohala Skyway. At the upper elevations the trees were bare of leaves and birds. Birding was best at mid-level. We saw:
Broad-Winged Hawk
Downy Woodpecker
Red-eyed Vireo
Blue-headed Vireo
Hooded Warbler (heard only)
Junco
Goldfinch
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Blue Grosbeak
American Crow
Cardinals everywhere
Blue Jays
The temperature was in the high 50's in upper elevations (some snow visible), and upper 70's in the lower. A good day to be out of the house birding!


Judy Halleron
Marble, NC


 

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Date: 4/28/20 2:24 pm
From: Derb Carter <derbc...>
Subject: Probable Bicknell's Thrush - Bladen County NC
This morning I had sustained and close looks at a thrush I am fairly confident was a Bicknell's. Any field identification of a Bicknell's away from its small breeding range in the Adirondacks or winter range on Hispaniola comes with an instant footnote that it is very difficult - some even say impossible - to distinguish Bicknell's from Gray-cheeked in the field. If I was not able to observe the bird this morning with binoculars for 30 minutes, as close as ten feet, I would just pass it off as a Gray-cheeked/Bicknell's. But I was able to see well all the field marks suggested to distinguish Bicknell's - again understanding the differences are slight - and some behavior suggestive of Bicknell's.

The bird was on an upland bluff along the Black River, foraging on leaf covered ground around an opening in deciduous forest. The boldly spotted breast, gray face, and grayish flanks immediately said it was a Gray-cheeked type, and when it moved into a patch of sunlight, I was struck by the warm brown tones above especially the rump and tail. At this point I tried to observe it as closely as possible, creeping up to at times within 10-15 feet as it foraged on the ground. It was overall a warmer brown compared to the usual cold gray brown of Gray-cheeked. This was especially noticeable on the tail, not the very contrasting brighter almost reddish brown tail of a Hermit Thrush, but a warmer brown than the rest of the upper parts.

I then tried to recall all the suggested field marks for distinguishing Bicknell's. It appeared on the small side compared to my recollections of Gray-cheeked - although I have not seen nearly as many Gray-cheeked in recent years compared to decades ago - and slight differences in size can be challenging without direct comparison. Primary projection appeared short, and I have now looked at several photos and projection appears to better match Bicknell's than the longer primary projection of Gray-cheeked. I carefully observed the extent of yellow on the lower mandible, recalling an article suggesting that as a possible distinguishing field mark. I estimated the basal two-thirds at least of the lower mandible was yellow, which is consistent with the article suggesting the more extensive yellow on the lower mandible of Bicknell's as a character.

After observing for half an hour, I decided to play some call notes and see if it might call, as notes of the two species are somewhat different. I backed away some distance and played a couple of Bicknell's call notes and it immediately flew toward me, halving the distance and perching momentarily on a log looking for the source of the call, before flying back into a thicket. After a pause, I played the call note and it again flew directly in perching in a sapling before again retreating onto a thicket. It never called, but was very responsive to Bicknell's call notes.

Finally, the fact the observation was in the lower Coastal Plain is consistent with Bicknell's, with most confirmed records in the Coastal Plain, which would be consistent with a migratory route from Hispaniola to upstate NY and Vermont.

In sum, if Bicknell's can be identified in the field I am fairly confident it was a Bicknell's and not a Gray-cheeked. This is based on a combination of all the field marks and other observations discussed above, all consistent with Bicknell's. I thought I would provide all these details for others with who may confront this challenging identification.

Derb Carter

 

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Date: 4/28/20 12:32 pm
From: Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Rose-breasted Grosbeak on James Is, SC
All,

Donna and I were honored to be visited by a male Rose-breasted Grosbeak at
our feeder in the Eastwood section of James Is, SC just a little while ago.!

Dennis

--
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>

 

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Date: 4/28/20 11:30 am
From: Thea and Mark Sinclair (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Cerulean and other warblers, Rattlesnake Lodge Trail, Buncombe Co
We had a good morning seeing several singing cerulean warblers, as well as
ovenbird, black-throated green, many blackburnian, hooded warblers and
scarlet tanagers. The leaves are just coming out on the trees and the
birds were singing, making for easier spotting. Also, the ceruleans were
lower on the trail than in past years, even down around the split-railed
switchbacks. The parkway ends right after the turnoff for Ox Creek Rd, so
the trail is accessible via the parkway, then Ox Creek Rd.
Thea Sinclair
Hickory, NC

 

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Date: 4/28/20 11:22 am
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Pee Dee NWR- NC
Didn’t get to Pee Dee until about 9:30 but activity was still good.

60+ species including...

- Bobwhite
- FOY cuckoos
- lots of Red-headed Woodpeckers
- good numbers of pewees, Acadian Flycatchers, and kingbirds
- lots of White and Red-eyed Vireos
- Orchard Orioles and Summer Tanagers
- 15 warblers: Ovenbird, LA Waterthrush, Black-and-white (30), Prothonotary, Swainson’s, Kentucky, Yellowthroat, Hooded, redstart, Parula, Black-throated Blue, Pine, Yellow-throated, Prairie, and Chat (still a warbler to me)

Both the Swainson’s and Kentucky showed well. 2 Swainson’s on Griffin Rd, one Kentucky at the canoe launch, and another at the start of Leak Ferry Rd.

Ryan Justice


Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 4/28/20 9:00 am
From: Cherrie Sneed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: AllendaleKites
I forgot the checklist for the kites.

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S67967831__;!!OToaGQ!9cAzlnqROsngBFocSEAnV94geGh5ZgUthSyL2bF2Ga4SfZkT-7vT7laM5eOPzezpOjM$

Cherrie

Cherrie & Dan Sneed
Stockman Road
Prosperity, SC
Newberry Co.

> On Apr 28, 2020, at 11:57 AM, Cherrie Sneed <sneedcb...> wrote:
>

 

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Date: 4/28/20 8:58 am
From: Cherrie Sneed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: AllendaleKites
Hi Birders,

Here in Allendale I have viewed an estimated 100 Mississippi kites and 19 Swallowtail kites. If you read the notes on the checklist below it explains where they are.

When I left at noon they had drifted off and not a one was seen.

Yesterday in late afternoon there were a few Swallowtails and almost 30 Mississippis. My son had told me about seeing the large numbers around 11am yesterday.

Good times distance birding,
Cherrie



Cherrie & Dan Sneed
Stockman Road
Prosperity, SC
Newberry Co.
 

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Date: 4/28/20 8:17 am
From: Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: White Deer Park, 15 warbler species
It was a good morning at White Deer Park in Garner, Wake Co.  Lots of warbler activity starting at sunup.  I found 15 species, including Blackpoll, Cape May, Blue-winged (2), Worm-eating (2), and Northern Waterthrush (2).  Catbirds have arrived there in a big way, and I saw/heard veery, hermit thrush, pewee, and rose-breasted grosbeak.
Marc Ribaudo
 

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