Carolinabirds
Received From Subject
6/10/24 2:19 pm <badgerboy...> 36th Call, NC Breeding Bird Survey (Wilkes Co.)
6/5/24 9:39 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Call for Spring season (March through May) bird reports for Chat Briefs
6/4/24 4:58 am Jeremy Wrenn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Cliff Swallows nesting under highway overpasses
6/4/24 4:35 am Jacob Clark (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Cliff Swallows nesting under highway overpasses
6/3/24 12:51 pm Harry Wilson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Cliff Swallows nesting under highway overpasses
6/3/24 11:57 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Cliff Swallows nesting under highway overpasses
6/3/24 11:25 am Trevor Sleight (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Cliff Swallows nesting under highway overpasses
6/3/24 11:11 am <sshultz...> Registration Open for WOW 2024
6/3/24 9:02 am Jacob Clark (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Cliff Swallows nesting under highway overpasses
6/3/24 8:19 am <sshultz...> CBC Sandhills Bonus Trip A Success
6/2/24 1:16 pm Wayne Hoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fort Macon Shiny Cowbird
5/31/24 12:30 pm Karen Bearden (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Mississippi Kites at Shelley Lake!
5/30/24 10:59 am Diane Williams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fwd: Large jaeger fort macon
5/30/24 10:15 am Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Large jaeger fort macon
5/30/24 7:55 am David Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Large jaeger fort macon
5/29/24 1:45 pm Sophia Cox (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Raven misinformation--help
5/29/24 12:21 pm Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Feather ID help
5/29/24 11:40 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Feather ID help
5/29/24 11:38 am Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Feather ID help
5/29/24 8:40 am Sophia Cox (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Raven misinformation--help
5/29/24 8:06 am \Benjamin Hargett\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Raven misinformation--help
5/29/24 7:24 am Sophia Cox (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Raven misinformation--help
5/28/24 8:33 am David Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Large jaeger fort macon
5/28/24 7:34 am Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Back again this year Re: Urban Loggerhead Shrikes in North Charleston
5/22/24 9:42 am Will Cook (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Fwd: bird sighting
5/21/24 6:52 am <badgerboy...> Newly fledged birds
5/21/24 6:38 am Will Cook (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fwd: bird sighting
5/20/24 5:44 am <sshultz...> Hudsonian Godwit (flown) - New Hanover Cty, NC 5/19
5/19/24 10:09 am Craig Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Black-whiskered Vireo, Sullivan's Island, SC
5/18/24 10:54 am Rob G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Night vision bins?
5/18/24 9:20 am Kay Grinnell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: [External] Re: Night vision bins?
5/18/24 8:48 am John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: [External] Re: Night vision bins?
5/18/24 8:25 am Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Jordan Lake (NC) Spring Bird Count
5/18/24 7:35 am \Corey, Ed\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: [External] Re: Night vision bins?
5/18/24 7:03 am Robert McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Night vision bins?
5/18/24 7:02 am Nathan (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Night vision bins?
5/18/24 6:42 am Michelle Dyer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Night vision bins?
5/17/24 11:05 am Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Keeping squirrels away from feeders
5/17/24 9:04 am Michael Fogleman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Keeping squirrels away from feeders
5/17/24 9:01 am Robert Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Keeping squirrels away from feeders
5/17/24 7:56 am Sophia Cox (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Keeping squirrels away from feeders
5/16/24 4:35 pm Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Falls Lake Thrush Tease
5/15/24 11:28 am \Roger Shaw\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Chapel Hill Bird Club Meeting – 5/20 – Birds of Taiwan — David and Judy Smith
5/14/24 9:42 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Butterflies of North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and Georgia book announcement
5/14/24 9:31 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Butterflies of North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and Georgia book announcement
5/13/24 4:33 pm Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Api apps
5/13/24 4:02 pm Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: recent opinions on mid range binocs for birding?
5/13/24 3:57 pm Will Cook <cwcook...> Re: UNSUBSCRIBE
5/13/24 3:41 pm Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> how to unsubscribe from carolinabirds
5/13/24 3:07 pm Steve <sshultz...> Re: RFI: locations with emerging Periodic Cicadas
5/13/24 3:06 pm Steve <sshultz...> Re: UNSUBSCRIBE
5/13/24 2:56 pm Jessica Gryglewicz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> UNSUBSCRIBE
5/13/24 2:46 pm bev2495 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> UNSUBSCRIBE
5/13/24 2:38 pm Bernie Carr (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: recent opinions on mid range binocs for birding?
5/13/24 2:34 pm Clyde Sorenson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: RFI: locations with emerging Periodic Cicadas
5/13/24 2:02 pm Jessica Gryglewicz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Unsubscribe
5/13/24 1:58 pm Sally Robertson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: RFI: locations with emerging Periodic Cicadas
5/13/24 12:20 pm \Corey, Ed\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: [External] recent opinions on mid range binocs for birding?
5/13/24 12:14 pm John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: RFI: locations with emerging Periodic Cicadas
5/13/24 12:08 pm \Herbert, Teri Lynn\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> recent opinions on mid range binocs for birding?
5/13/24 10:55 am Lynda Haake (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: RFI: locations with emerging Periodic Cicadas
5/13/24 4:26 am Erinn Szarek (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Api apps
 
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Date: 6/10/24 2:19 pm
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: 36th Call, NC Breeding Bird Survey (Wilkes Co.)
The 36th BBS named "Call NC", in Wilkes Co. in northwestern NC, was done
yesterday on a great day, later and cooler than usual. Results are
below. Found were 777 birds of 58 species, about normal for both, with
the most abundant birds being Cliff Swallow, Mourning Doves, Crow,
Starling and Cardinal. Missing  Pewees, Great Crested Flycatchers, and
Kingbirds, this year, continued a trend seeing lower abundance overall
of the flycatchers.

Guy (McGrane, Boone NC)

Canada Goose    1
Mourning Dove    83    Record high (25 at one stop, prev 73)
Yellow-billed Cuckoo    1
Chimney Swift    10
Great Blue Heron    2    Record high (prev 1)
Sharp-shinned Hawk    1    Third year of 36
Cooper's Hawk    1
Red-shouldered Hawk    6    Record high (prev 5, avg 1, longterm increase)
Red-bellied Woodpecker    18
Downy Woodpecker    1
Pileated Woodpecker    7    Record high (prev 6, avg 1)
Great Crested Flycatcher    0    Disappearing on route
Eastern Kingbird    0    Bad flycatcher day all around
Eastern Wood-pewee    0    Continued disappointingly low numbers
Acadian Flycatcher    3
Eastern Phoebe    6
White-eyed Vireo    2
Yellow-throated Vireo    4
Red-eyed Vireo    28
Blue Jay    13
American Crow    61    Ties record high (avg 36)
Fish Crow    4
Tree Swallow    2
Northern Rough-winged Swallow    5
Purple Martin    0    Martin houses on route all gone
Barn Swallow    4
Cliff Swallow    91    Record high (75 at one site, prev 50)
Carolina Chickadee    1    Continued very low numbers
Tufted Titmouse    27
White-breasted Nuthatch    9    Record high (prev 7, avg 2)
House Wren    2
Carolina Wren    42
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher    1
Eastern Bluebird    28
Wood Thrush    19
American Robin    20
Gray Catbird    7
Brown Thrasher    7
Northern Mockingbird    29
European Starling    61
House Sparrow    2
House Finch    5
American Goldfinch    14    Record high (prev 13, avg 5)
Chipping Sparrow    9
Field Sparrow    4
Song Sparrow    9
Eastern Towhee    10
Yellow-breasted Chat    2
Eastern Meadowlark    5
Red-winged Blackbird    2
Brown-headed Cowbird    13
Common Grackle    12
Black-and-white Warbler    1    Count first, about time!
Common Yellowthroat    6
Hooded Warbler    1
American Redstart    1    2nd count record
Pine Warbler    2
Yellow-throated Warbler    1    4th count record
Prairie Warbler    1
Scarlet Tanager    0    Mystifying absence
Northern Cardinal    53
Blue Grosbeak    5
Indigo Bunting    12


 

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Date: 6/5/24 9:39 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Call for Spring season (March through May) bird reports for Chat Briefs
As Steve Shultz mentioned here a few days or a week ago, noteworthy bird
reports from North and South Carolina from March, April, and May should be
sent to me now -- by about June 20 at the latest.

Most (90-95%) of you already submit your observations on eBird reports, and
the rare species ("write-ins") show up on the CBC Sightings page, staying
there for a week. So, if you have submitted eBird reports, I will pick up
the accepted rarities from the eBird website -- going down the checklist of
nearly 500 species(!) one at a time and gleaning the most notable ones from
the species maps. Thus, nearly all of you need to do nothing -- but keep
on birding!

But, I often don't glean reports from carolinabirds when reported at the
time, and thus if you have notable spring reports not already on eBird
lists, please send me the information now (e-mail address is listed
above).. I also do glean a few records from various Facebook sites, but
for the most part it is the eBird database that I peruse in writing Briefs
for the Files, for *The Chat.* I took over from Josh Southern, who did a
masterful job for 10 or more years; the Winter Season was my first report.

Keep reporting your notable sightings from the Carolinas! Have a great
short but HOT summer season (June and July).

Harry LeGrand
Chat Briefs for the Files editor

 

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Date: 6/4/24 4:58 am
From: Jeremy Wrenn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Cliff Swallows nesting under highway overpasses
Well I certainly learned a lot!

--Jeremy Wrenn

On Tue, Jun 4, 2024, 7:35 AM Jacob Clark <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Thanks all for the input. Glad to hear Cliff swallows are generally doing
> well.
>
> On Mon, Jun 3, 2024 at 3:51 PM Harry Wilson <wilson.harry.e...>
> wrote:
>
>> When my wife and I walked the Neuse River Trail, we often saw the birds
>> nesting under the 540 and US64 overpasses.
>>
>> On Mon, Jun 3, 2024 at 2:57 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> I'll edit the text tonight. Yes, a bit outdated. I update the various
>>> provinces with notable records from Chat Briefs, but intro material that I
>>> wrote 15 years ago can easily get outdated!
>>>
>>> Please mostly disregard the green county map. That was someone's else's
>>> idea, they are long out of birding, and it is not my job to update it. I
>>> do try to check the county submissions to the website, and approve them.
>>> But that would not account for the many white counties that should be green
>>> because no one goes through eBird and populates the green county map.
>>>
>>> I will update the red-dot generalized breeding range map at the bottom
>>> of the account.
>>>
>>> Harry LeGrand
>>> Birds of North Carolina website, primary author/editor
>>>
>>> On Mon, Jun 3, 2024 at 2:25 PM Trevor Sleight <carolinabirds...>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Hi Jacob,
>>>>
>>>> I believe it’s just outdated information. It’s not just Craven county
>>>> but across the coastal plain gradually they are being found at bridges
>>>> further and further east. There’s been some found at the Beaufort/Hyde
>>>> County line bridge this year. Beaufort, Jones and Lenoir Counties could all
>>>> be green on the map now if my memory serves and depending on where the
>>>> county line is on the Williamston Roanoke River Bridge then Bertie could be
>>>> green as well.
>>>>
>>>> Best
>>>> Trevor Sleight
>>>> Greenville, NC
>>>>
>>>> On Jun 3, 2024, at 12:02, Jacob Clark <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Hello,
>>>> Would Cliff Swallows nesting under highway overpasses be significant?
>>>> The only reason I ask is because the article for NC Birds says that Cliff
>>>> Swallows are not known to nest under overpasses in NC:
>>>>
>>>> https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://ncbirds.carolinabirdclub.org/view.php?species_id=387*:*:text=Summer*20resident*2C*20with*20migratory*20movements,to*20uncommon*20as*20a*20migrant__;I34lJSUlJSUlJSU!!OToaGQ!pLXBi3Zionk0AS5khR36YQrqcfrp1bNegceZ0Yn1CJicMmNrIXYj2ksxex34pSi08D3-HX0qB6H2b_9quiy_5W5jeQ$ .
>>>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://ncbirds.carolinabirdclub.org/view.php?species_id=387*:*:text=Summer*20resident*2C*20with*20migratory*20movements,to*20uncommon*20as*20a*20migrant.__;I34lJSUlJSUlJSU!!OToaGQ!oO-ZcZAQYd7J-NJ5CQ9HEpYiebd4OunFYG8fMMMHXFpMtYeM7T-8Q1S8eNgi9IChydiYr5hZ70wWmcVYcfR75hpK$>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> They nest in multiple locations in craven county under highway
>>>> overpasses, most notably, there is a site with around 40 nests at this
>>>> location in New Bern: 35.12682° N, 77.13371° W.
>>>>
>>>>
>>
>> --
>> Harry Wilson
>> Zebulon, NC
>>
>

 

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Date: 6/4/24 4:35 am
From: Jacob Clark (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Cliff Swallows nesting under highway overpasses
Thanks all for the input. Glad to hear Cliff swallows are generally doing
well.

On Mon, Jun 3, 2024 at 3:51 PM Harry Wilson <wilson.harry.e...>
wrote:

> When my wife and I walked the Neuse River Trail, we often saw the birds
> nesting under the 540 and US64 overpasses.
>
> On Mon, Jun 3, 2024 at 2:57 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> I'll edit the text tonight. Yes, a bit outdated. I update the various
>> provinces with notable records from Chat Briefs, but intro material that I
>> wrote 15 years ago can easily get outdated!
>>
>> Please mostly disregard the green county map. That was someone's else's
>> idea, they are long out of birding, and it is not my job to update it. I
>> do try to check the county submissions to the website, and approve them.
>> But that would not account for the many white counties that should be green
>> because no one goes through eBird and populates the green county map.
>>
>> I will update the red-dot generalized breeding range map at the bottom
>> of the account.
>>
>> Harry LeGrand
>> Birds of North Carolina website, primary author/editor
>>
>> On Mon, Jun 3, 2024 at 2:25 PM Trevor Sleight <carolinabirds...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Hi Jacob,
>>>
>>> I believe it’s just outdated information. It’s not just Craven county
>>> but across the coastal plain gradually they are being found at bridges
>>> further and further east. There’s been some found at the Beaufort/Hyde
>>> County line bridge this year. Beaufort, Jones and Lenoir Counties could all
>>> be green on the map now if my memory serves and depending on where the
>>> county line is on the Williamston Roanoke River Bridge then Bertie could be
>>> green as well.
>>>
>>> Best
>>> Trevor Sleight
>>> Greenville, NC
>>>
>>> On Jun 3, 2024, at 12:02, Jacob Clark <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Hello,
>>> Would Cliff Swallows nesting under highway overpasses be significant?
>>> The only reason I ask is because the article for NC Birds says that Cliff
>>> Swallows are not known to nest under overpasses in NC:
>>>
>>> https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://ncbirds.carolinabirdclub.org/view.php?species_id=387*:*:text=Summer*20resident*2C*20with*20migratory*20movements,to*20uncommon*20as*20a*20migrant__;I34lJSUlJSUlJSU!!OToaGQ!p9XU7Kv1l-1H98dF2u0JAR0sT2f6upVFL1hELTXNY_f63r-30P_QerGtlQ0YQjy1ksmIo2Eyoq2vsCZOty3k0Z96$ .
>>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://ncbirds.carolinabirdclub.org/view.php?species_id=387*:*:text=Summer*20resident*2C*20with*20migratory*20movements,to*20uncommon*20as*20a*20migrant.__;I34lJSUlJSUlJSU!!OToaGQ!oO-ZcZAQYd7J-NJ5CQ9HEpYiebd4OunFYG8fMMMHXFpMtYeM7T-8Q1S8eNgi9IChydiYr5hZ70wWmcVYcfR75hpK$>
>>>
>>>
>>> They nest in multiple locations in craven county under highway
>>> overpasses, most notably, there is a site with around 40 nests at this
>>> location in New Bern: 35.12682° N, 77.13371° W.
>>>
>>>
>
> --
> Harry Wilson
> Zebulon, NC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/3/24 12:51 pm
From: Harry Wilson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Cliff Swallows nesting under highway overpasses
When my wife and I walked the Neuse River Trail, we often saw the birds
nesting under the 540 and US64 overpasses.

On Mon, Jun 3, 2024 at 2:57 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> I'll edit the text tonight. Yes, a bit outdated. I update the various
> provinces with notable records from Chat Briefs, but intro material that I
> wrote 15 years ago can easily get outdated!
>
> Please mostly disregard the green county map. That was someone's else's
> idea, they are long out of birding, and it is not my job to update it. I
> do try to check the county submissions to the website, and approve them.
> But that would not account for the many white counties that should be green
> because no one goes through eBird and populates the green county map.
>
> I will update the red-dot generalized breeding range map at the bottom of
> the account.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Birds of North Carolina website, primary author/editor
>
> On Mon, Jun 3, 2024 at 2:25 PM Trevor Sleight <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> Hi Jacob,
>>
>> I believe it’s just outdated information. It’s not just Craven county but
>> across the coastal plain gradually they are being found at bridges further
>> and further east. There’s been some found at the Beaufort/Hyde County line
>> bridge this year. Beaufort, Jones and Lenoir Counties could all be green on
>> the map now if my memory serves and depending on where the county line is
>> on the Williamston Roanoke River Bridge then Bertie could be green as well.
>>
>> Best
>> Trevor Sleight
>> Greenville, NC
>>
>> On Jun 3, 2024, at 12:02, Jacob Clark <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> Hello,
>> Would Cliff Swallows nesting under highway overpasses be significant? The
>> only reason I ask is because the article for NC Birds says that Cliff
>> Swallows are not known to nest under overpasses in NC:
>>
>> https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://ncbirds.carolinabirdclub.org/view.php?species_id=387*:*:text=Summer*20resident*2C*20with*20migratory*20movements,to*20uncommon*20as*20a*20migrant__;I34lJSUlJSUlJSU!!OToaGQ!tWGWynjDQYKq_wu4oyMM_fS42qDTgqMFCQ5CLdKQxPQI-ebosjfPz7a-u1Lw9Q2GdAvdj0LUQ0ib00ssbBdTNyjovGcf$ .
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://ncbirds.carolinabirdclub.org/view.php?species_id=387*:*:text=Summer*20resident*2C*20with*20migratory*20movements,to*20uncommon*20as*20a*20migrant.__;I34lJSUlJSUlJSU!!OToaGQ!oO-ZcZAQYd7J-NJ5CQ9HEpYiebd4OunFYG8fMMMHXFpMtYeM7T-8Q1S8eNgi9IChydiYr5hZ70wWmcVYcfR75hpK$>
>>
>>
>> They nest in multiple locations in craven county under highway
>> overpasses, most notably, there is a site with around 40 nests at this
>> location in New Bern: 35.12682° N, 77.13371° W.
>>
>>

--
Harry Wilson
Zebulon, NC

 

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Date: 6/3/24 11:57 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Cliff Swallows nesting under highway overpasses
I'll edit the text tonight. Yes, a bit outdated. I update the various
provinces with notable records from Chat Briefs, but intro material that I
wrote 15 years ago can easily get outdated!

Please mostly disregard the green county map. That was someone's else's
idea, they are long out of birding, and it is not my job to update it. I
do try to check the county submissions to the website, and approve them.
But that would not account for the many white counties that should be green
because no one goes through eBird and populates the green county map.

I will update the red-dot generalized breeding range map at the bottom of
the account.

Harry LeGrand
Birds of North Carolina website, primary author/editor

On Mon, Jun 3, 2024 at 2:25 PM Trevor Sleight <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Hi Jacob,
>
> I believe it’s just outdated information. It’s not just Craven county but
> across the coastal plain gradually they are being found at bridges further
> and further east. There’s been some found at the Beaufort/Hyde County line
> bridge this year. Beaufort, Jones and Lenoir Counties could all be green on
> the map now if my memory serves and depending on where the county line is
> on the Williamston Roanoke River Bridge then Bertie could be green as well.
>
> Best
> Trevor Sleight
> Greenville, NC
>
> On Jun 3, 2024, at 12:02, Jacob Clark <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Hello,
> Would Cliff Swallows nesting under highway overpasses be significant? The
> only reason I ask is because the article for NC Birds says that Cliff
> Swallows are not known to nest under overpasses in NC:
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://ncbirds.carolinabirdclub.org/view.php?species_id=387*:*:text=Summer*20resident*2C*20with*20migratory*20movements,to*20uncommon*20as*20a*20migrant__;I34lJSUlJSUlJSU!!OToaGQ!qsVQzpY2qQxaCbrU86XTapU9IbgOIKYvydDNAqIVqDToq3kvElqeepok_RKeZj162JwBauUdGqCCdnDymyYQAWo$ .
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://ncbirds.carolinabirdclub.org/view.php?species_id=387*:*:text=Summer*20resident*2C*20with*20migratory*20movements,to*20uncommon*20as*20a*20migrant.__;I34lJSUlJSUlJSU!!OToaGQ!oO-ZcZAQYd7J-NJ5CQ9HEpYiebd4OunFYG8fMMMHXFpMtYeM7T-8Q1S8eNgi9IChydiYr5hZ70wWmcVYcfR75hpK$>
>
>
> They nest in multiple locations in craven county under highway overpasses,
> most notably, there is a site with around 40 nests at this location in New
> Bern: 35.12682° N, 77.13371° W.
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/3/24 11:25 am
From: Trevor Sleight (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Cliff Swallows nesting under highway overpasses
 

Back to top
Date: 6/3/24 11:11 am
From: <sshultz...>
Subject: Registration Open for WOW 2024
Registration is now open for the 2024 Wings Over Water birding and wildlife
festival on North Carolina's beautiful Outer Banks. The main event runs
October 22-27 with "Encore" the weekend of December 6-8.



This year's special guest and keynote speaker is Kenn Kaufman (who probably
needs little, if any, introduction).



Encore trips often sell out quickly, as does the chance to bird with Kenn*,
so head on over to Wings Over Water Wildlife Festival - Wildlife Tours,
Nature Education <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.wingsoverwater.org/__;!!OToaGQ!s6fl0s40QHb1EYoouSjP29aUdmvvv_tPpThIH3xakNhw7y1T4bjnsyLlpSjLPpdzoCkprv7o41ROZNPLNwU$ > while the selection is
greatest and reserve your favorite full and/or half day trips.



Not only are the trips attractively priced (very attractively compared with
some locations/venues) but funds exclusively support the non-profit Coastal
Wildlife Refuge Society, which in turn supports your national wildlife
refuges.



*note that birding with Kenn K and the keynote speech are only available
during the main event in October.



Best,

Steve Shultz

Apex, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 6/3/24 9:02 am
From: Jacob Clark (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Cliff Swallows nesting under highway overpasses
Hello,
Would Cliff Swallows nesting under highway overpasses be significant? The
only reason I ask is because the article for NC Birds says that Cliff
Swallows are not known to nest under overpasses in NC:
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://ncbirds.carolinabirdclub.org/view.php?species_id=387*:*:text=Summer*20resident*2C*20with*20migratory*20movements,to*20uncommon*20as*20a*20migrant__;I34lJSUlJSUlJSU!!OToaGQ!oO-ZcZAQYd7J-NJ5CQ9HEpYiebd4OunFYG8fMMMHXFpMtYeM7T-8Q1S8eNgi9IChydiYr5hZ70wWmcVYcfyywwXM$ .


They nest in multiple locations in craven county under highway overpasses,
most notably, there is a site with around 40 nests at this location in New
Bern: 35.12682° N, 77.13371° W.

 

Back to top
Date: 6/3/24 8:19 am
From: <sshultz...>
Subject: CBC Sandhills Bonus Trip A Success
On the rare occasion that one awakens to a dewpoint of 47 degrees on June 1
in eastern North Carolina, one might expect brilliantly comfortable weather.
And if that person happens to be standing at Weymouth Woods State Park in
Southern Pines, they might also expect to enjoy rare flora and fauna
associated with the Carolina Sandhills. Habitat dominated by, and managed
for, Longleaf Pine and wiregrass (Aristida stricta) that harbors
Red-cockaded Woodpecker, Bachman's Sparrow and more.

Members of the Carolina Bird Club did just that, enjoyed exploring Weymouth
Woods, Moore County "horse country", publicly accessible edges of Ft.
Liberty, the Sandhills Game Land, McKinney fish hatchery and more during the
second (annual?) early summer bonus field trip to the Carolina Sandhills.

Once introductions occurred and ground rules established (few, mainly
consisting of "have a good time", "ask lots of questions", and "don't fall
in") the group set out to find that rarest of the Southeastern woodpeckers,
Red-cockaded. And while the pair that nested within sight of the visitor
center fledged young the week prior, we successfully located the family
unit, with prolonged views of "feeding the babies". Bachman's Sparrow proved
more challenging, so the group moved to the visitor center to enjoy a
hummingbird banding demonstration, with lucky participants releasing their
"very own" tiny bird after all participated in the weighing and measuring
process.

After lunch it was time to find that sparrow, the one that can hardly be
found outside of breeding season when it sings its beautiful song from among
patches of wiregrass and hopeful oaks (which probably won't be spewing
acorns anytime soon, as this habitat requires frequent burning to maintain
the sparrows, woodpeckers, and other residents of longleaf pine savannah).
Three to four songsters serenaded, with one sitting conveniently close by
for an extended photo opportunity. Nearby canebreaks provided the chance to
enjoy the area's breeding warblers, vireos, and cuckoos, while groups of
woodpeckers foraged on the (slight) ridge above.

Sandhills sand might reasonably be thought of as leftover dune and beach
from times with higher sea level, but most believe that the white, fast
draining soil originated as outwash from mighty glaciers to the north,
molded into low dunes and ridges by furious winds that blow across a lightly
vegetated outwash plain.

But thoughts of soil history were largely pushed aside by tasty food and
beverage at Belle Tree Tavern, where the group collected to discuss the day
and nosh on bits and morsels before discussing plans for the evening.

Yes, while almost dark, the birding was not over quite yet, as the
opportunity to look and listen for nightbirds beckoned. Common Nighthawks
started the show well before dark, "peenting" and booming over the pines.
They had to share the sky with low-flying Blackhawk and Apache helicopters
(these aluminum birds not being countable on our eBird checklists). Once
darkness settled in, Chuck-wills-widow took over, with one bird providing
fine views and a life look for many.

Sunday dawned with a dewpoint of 56, still quite amazing for what is often
the hottest part of the state, allowing for comfortable exploration of the
Sandhills Game Land. Red-cockaded Woodpeckers picked and pecked through the
pines, Bachman's Sparrow sang, warblers along Drowning Creek sat briefly for
identification and categorization, and folks had the unusual opportunity to
view and photograph Red-headed Woodpecker and Orchard Oriole sharing the
same couple of twigs. We hoped to hear bobwhite and did one better by seeing
a male flutter across a field to peek out from thick hedgerow vegetation.

The trip ended after a tour of McKinney fish hatchery in Richmond County.
Here the highlights were up in the air, well above rows of shallow, square
catfish ponds. Bald Eagle and Osprey (not the aluminum kind) vied for air
superiority while Mississippi Kites escorted an interloping Red-shouldered
Hawk out of their personal space, and then perched nearby for all to ogle.

A species countdown led to a round of "best birds of the weekend" (though we
agree that all birds are "the best".) And while this year's edition of the
CBC Sandhills Bonus Trip is in the books, it's not to early to start
thinking about next year! Bookmark the Carolina Bird Club website The
Carolina Bird Club <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/__;!!OToaGQ!ulUYOmAkKQMJJh8a-45CNcRTRlwbes3_k3qfC6Wk4P1_iRMNLROcKADIBGikSByQ6AaGtX1eVOLmOviPmkk$ > for updates on
future outings, including the upcoming fall meeting.



Steve Shultz
Apex NC




 

Back to top
Date: 6/2/24 1:16 pm
From: Wayne Hoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fort Macon Shiny Cowbird
Hi -

I am a bit surprised tha5t this bird is not getting more attention.

The first mention I saw was on the "Recent Notable Sightings" website:

Martin Wall reported in on Friday (May 31) and included very satisfactory photos.

That website had only one report Yesterday (Roger Shaw).

Both found the bird at the feeders on the lawn on the northwest side of the Visitor Center building nest to the fort.

As of a few minutes ago, no reports have appeared for today on that website, however it was present this morning (June 2).

I visited this morning, expecting to see a bunch of people watching for it. I arrived at 8:05 and found only one birder waiting. At about 8:09 the bird appeared, and perched for a few minutes in the shrubs above the feeders, then dropped to the ground, and fed there with a few grackles. All the birds left at about 8:14. I remained until about 8:30, but did not see it again.

It is an adult male, and extremely iridescent - really deserves the name Shiny.

Wayne Hoffman







 

Back to top
Date: 5/31/24 12:30 pm
From: Karen Bearden (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mississippi Kites at Shelley Lake!
Howdy!

Forgot to share last night! Was SOOO excited to see two Mississippi Kites soaring high above the lake at Shelley Lake in Raleigh about 5 pm yesterday!

They quickly soared higher and flew east. That was our first sighting in our almost 27 years living near Shelley Lake.

The Bald Eagles returned for the 7th year at Shelley Lake and 2 eaglets successfully fledged.

Happy birding!

Peace and love for our beautiful Earth, Karen
 

Back to top
Date: 5/30/24 10:59 am
From: Diane Williams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fwd: Large jaeger fort macon
 

Back to top
Date: 5/30/24 10:15 am
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Large jaeger fort macon
It's easy to get confused over terminology. As far as I know, there is not any thing that is called "Carolina Birds". There is carolinabirds, this mailing list, spelled in one word. Then there is the Carolina Bird Club which is not connected in any with with carolinabirds. Anyway, what David apparently means here is that he posted his photo in the Carolina Bird Club photo gallery. The URL is https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/gallery/Timothy_Campbell/poja.html__;!!OToaGQ!oDpAeOaQPyZ7g-M7F1m4y7Vu9OKf2s0jfQqKX5Q06Sw4KR7wgi8QCAZJPJcYRigA14ojFQ8tEyXjuG1viN4Yw94$

Kent Fiala

On 5/30/2024 10:54 AM, David Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> Just posted to Carolina Birds the photo I got with my phone.  Others had better cameras, so hopefully better pictures will be on the way.
>
> --
> Dr. David Campbell
> Professor, Geology
> Department of Natural Sciences
> 110 S Main St, #7270
> Gardner-Webb University
> Boiling Springs NC 28017


 

Back to top
Date: 5/30/24 7:55 am
From: David Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Large jaeger fort macon
Just posted to Carolina Birds the photo I got with my phone. Others had
better cameras, so hopefully better pictures will be on the way.

--
Dr. David Campbell
Professor, Geology
Department of Natural Sciences
110 S Main St, #7270
Gardner-Webb University
Boiling Springs NC 28017

 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/24 1:45 pm
From: Sophia Cox (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Raven misinformation--help
Thank you for your help with this! I appreciate it.

Best,
Sophie

Get Outlook for iOS<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://aka.ms/o0ukef__;!!OToaGQ!qJQQGZsh-KpM_MRqfYU3fXtNL1xllzPq9xDOliVFEP43fF9lF-mFBVDWnjh_GF1MhNqsIJ_NcW3ZOYJnssoLBlQ$ >
________________________________
From: Timothy J Lee <tlee...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 29, 2024 4:06 PM
To: Sophia Cox <sophiatcox...>; Benjamin Hargett <hargettbenjamin...>; Len Kopka <Lenkopka...>
Cc: GCBC <gcbirdclub...>; Kathryn R Gompers <kgompers...>
Subject: RE: Raven misinformation--help

Sophie,

The SC Trails website has been corrected and we have contacted the other two websites. If you find other errors or have questions, pleas feel free to email directly at <tlee...><mailto:<tlee...>

Thank you again for letting us know,
Tim

Tim Lee
Interpretive Ranger/Naturalist, Mountain Bridge Wilderness Area
South Carolina Department of Parks, Recreation &Tourism
8155 Geer Hwy
Cleveland, SC 29635
864-836-6115, Caesars Head State Park
864-836-3647 Jones Gap State Park
SCPRT.com
SouthCarolinaParks.com

[cid:<image001.jpg...>]<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://discoversouthcarolina.com/__;!!OToaGQ!qJQQGZsh-KpM_MRqfYU3fXtNL1xllzPq9xDOliVFEP43fF9lF-mFBVDWnjh_GF1MhNqsIJ_NcW3ZOYJnYkPCMBw$ >


______________________________________________________________________________________

[jg logo][ca 1 logo]



From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> On Behalf Of Sophia Cox
Sent: Wednesday, May 29, 2024 11:40 AM
To: Benjamin Hargett <hargettbenjamin...>; Len Kopka <Lenkopka...>
Cc: GCBC <gcbirdclub...>; carolinabirds <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Raven misinformation--help

Thank you all for your suggestions and internet sleuthing. I sent an email to the naturalists and website domain owner you mentioned.

Best,
Sophie

On Wed, May 29, 2024 at 11:06 AM Benjamin Hargett <hargettbenjamin...><mailto:<hargettbenjamin...>> wrote:
You can sometimes find contact information based on the domain. https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://lookup.icann.org/en/lookup__;!!OToaGQ!qJQQGZsh-KpM_MRqfYU3fXtNL1xllzPq9xDOliVFEP43fF9lF-mFBVDWnjh_GF1MhNqsIJ_NcW3ZOYJnJi2naJ4$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https:/lookup.icann.org/en/lookup__;!!OToaGQ!rvU8NNPFEEJoL5x0LtimfNGNWhbqgvsLLaaVa1ti2MpKL4AS0fJDePiNW5nbDgDMTQsF9n8ZepTePQDrIOqXTtk$>

Looks like the domain belongs to: <kcrawford...><mailto:<kcrawford...>

Benjamin


On Wed, May 29, 2024 at 10:23 AM, Sophia Cox <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
Good morning, all.

I recently came across this website<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https:/www.sctrails.net/trails/trail/raven-cliff-falls__;!!OToaGQ!uN5cn_-UodTIDW7Qd2AlO1FwyVvfN0hhMw3m_oNEVcBIn_JnYuUiK-zo7libOv3BcoYnLBlWQ4uw2s3sv8AChiM$> about Raven Cliff Falls in South Carolina. It claims the trail "was named for the ravens that breed in the high cliffs forming the falls. Over 150 species of ravens have been identified in this region."

There are not 150 species of raven in the entire world. As far as I can tell, there are about 10<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https:/www.britannica.com/animal/raven__;!!OToaGQ!uN5cn_-UodTIDW7Qd2AlO1FwyVvfN0hhMw3m_oNEVcBIn_JnYuUiK-zo7libOv3BcoYnLBlWQ4uw2s3sOd8DGMI$> raven species in total, only 2 of which live in North America<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https:/www.birds-of-north-america.net/ravens.html__;!!OToaGQ!uN5cn_-UodTIDW7Qd2AlO1FwyVvfN0hhMw3m_oNEVcBIn_JnYuUiK-zo7libOv3BcoYnLBlWQ4uw2s3sFOUF8y4$> and only 1 of which can be found in South Carolina<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https:/www.dnr.sc.gov/swap/supplemental/birds/commonraven2015.pdf__;!!OToaGQ!uN5cn_-UodTIDW7Qd2AlO1FwyVvfN0hhMw3m_oNEVcBIn_JnYuUiK-zo7libOv3BcoYnLBlWQ4uw2s3sfaYNJPI$>.

I'm sure this was simply a mistake, though I don't know what the authors of the SC Trails website intended to say--150 total bird species recorded on that trail? 150 pairs of breeding ravens?

At least two other<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https:/upcountrysc.com/listing-details/cleveland/raven-cliff-falls/45317434/__;!!OToaGQ!uN5cn_-UodTIDW7Qd2AlO1FwyVvfN0hhMw3m_oNEVcBIn_JnYuUiK-zo7libOv3BcoYnLBlWQ4uw2s3s__rSdJM$> websites<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https:/sweptawaytoday.com/2017/11/26/a-fall-hike-to-raven-cliff-falls/__;!!OToaGQ!uN5cn_-UodTIDW7Qd2AlO1FwyVvfN0hhMw3m_oNEVcBIn_JnYuUiK-zo7libOv3BcoYnLBlWQ4uw2s3sY50JON8$> echo the same false information.

I tried to find contact information to alert sctrails.net<https://urldefense.com/v3/__http:/sctrails.net__;!!OToaGQ!uN5cn_-UodTIDW7Qd2AlO1FwyVvfN0hhMw3m_oNEVcBIn_JnYuUiK-zo7libOv3BcoYnLBlWQ4uw2s3sKT_4-d4$> to the problem, but I couldn't find a way to contact them. From their About page, it sounds like any trail "owners" can make updates, so perhaps there is not a central owner of the site I can reach out to.

A minor issue in the grand scheme of things, I know, but I find myself preoccupied by it. If anyone knows who I might write to, please let me know. Many websites are very willing to correct errors, but I can't find contact information for this website.

Good birding,
Sophie



 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/24 12:21 pm
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Feather ID help
Thanks Chris - much appreciated.

On Wed, May 29, 2024 at 2:40 PM Christopher Hill <Chill...> wrote:

> Great Horned Owl.
>
> Chris Hill, Ph.D.
> Professor
> Biology Department
> Coastal Carolina University
> Office: Science2 207H
> (843) 349-2567
> email: <chill...>
>
> On May 29, 2024, at 2:38 PM, Nate Dias <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise
> caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown
> senders.
> My mother found this feather in her back yard last week - she lives next
> to the salt marsh on the western edge of Charleston, South Carolina. It
> is about 7.75 inches long.
>
> Anyone know what it is? It seems like an owl feather to me.
>
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder/53754696197/in/dateposted-public/lightbox/__;!!OToaGQ!qZj14NAWIN4CvTb_N8y9gagPryDab8-_kM8Bt4s7913BkOgdkdkjb9-NX7Gbe_v4jV2p25UYhBDxp0je6rSyvkQ8HXNe$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder/53754696197/in/dateposted-public/lightbox/__;!!OToaGQ!ty-Heo-s74P_MMexOUX_eRPbtY5D5VyLknSuozDoKuFLGsyc_tv7B312TERejLZUv3Z3g_IVIV-F1xfZR1kM4Fnzt51R$>
>
> Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
>
> --
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2/__;!!OToaGQ!qZj14NAWIN4CvTb_N8y9gagPryDab8-_kM8Bt4s7913BkOgdkdkjb9-NX7Gbe_v4jV2p25UYhBDxp0je6rSyvrfudzMo$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2/__;!!OToaGQ!ty-Heo-s74P_MMexOUX_eRPbtY5D5VyLknSuozDoKuFLGsyc_tv7B312TERejLZUv3Z3g_IVIV-F1xfZR1kM4CM1shUE$>
>
> "These days I prefer to hunt with a camera. A good photograph demands
> more skill from the hunter, better nerves and more patience than the rifle
> shot." -- Bror Blixen
>
>
>

--
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2/__;!!OToaGQ!qZj14NAWIN4CvTb_N8y9gagPryDab8-_kM8Bt4s7913BkOgdkdkjb9-NX7Gbe_v4jV2p25UYhBDxp0je6rSyvrfudzMo$

"These days I prefer to hunt with a camera. A good photograph demands more
skill from the hunter, better nerves and more patience than the rifle
shot." -- Bror Blixen

 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/24 11:40 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Feather ID help
Great Horned Owl.

Chris Hill, Ph.D.
Professor
Biology Department
Coastal Carolina University
Office: Science2 207H
(843) 349-2567
email: <chill...>

> On May 29, 2024, at 2:38 PM, Nate Dias <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.
>
> My mother found this feather in her back yard last week - she lives next to the salt marsh on the western edge of Charleston, South Carolina. It is about 7.75 inches long.
>
> Anyone know what it is? It seems like an owl feather to me.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder/53754696197/in/dateposted-public/lightbox/ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder/53754696197/in/dateposted-public/lightbox/__;!!OToaGQ!ty-Heo-s74P_MMexOUX_eRPbtY5D5VyLknSuozDoKuFLGsyc_tv7B312TERejLZUv3Z3g_IVIV-F1xfZR1kM4Fnzt51R$>
>
> Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
>
> --
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2/ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2/__;!!OToaGQ!ty-Heo-s74P_MMexOUX_eRPbtY5D5VyLknSuozDoKuFLGsyc_tv7B312TERejLZUv3Z3g_IVIV-F1xfZR1kM4CM1shUE$>
>
> "These days I prefer to hunt with a camera. A good photograph demands more skill from the hunter, better nerves and more patience than the rifle shot." -- Bror Blixen
>


 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/24 11:38 am
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Feather ID help
My mother found this feather in her back yard last week - she lives next to
the salt marsh on the western edge of Charleston, South Carolina. It is
about 7.75 inches long.

Anyone know what it is? It seems like an owl feather to me.

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder/53754696197/in/dateposted-public/lightbox/__;!!OToaGQ!ty-Heo-s74P_MMexOUX_eRPbtY5D5VyLknSuozDoKuFLGsyc_tv7B312TERejLZUv3Z3g_IVIV-F1xfZR1kM4Fnzt51R$

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

--
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2/__;!!OToaGQ!ty-Heo-s74P_MMexOUX_eRPbtY5D5VyLknSuozDoKuFLGsyc_tv7B312TERejLZUv3Z3g_IVIV-F1xfZR1kM4CM1shUE$

"These days I prefer to hunt with a camera. A good photograph demands more
skill from the hunter, better nerves and more patience than the rifle
shot." -- Bror Blixen

 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/24 8:40 am
From: Sophia Cox (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Raven misinformation--help
Thank you all for your suggestions and internet sleuthing. I sent an email
to the naturalists and website domain owner you mentioned.

Best,
Sophie

On Wed, May 29, 2024 at 11:06 AM Benjamin Hargett <hargettbenjamin...>
wrote:

> You can sometimes find contact information based on the domain.
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://lookup.icann.org/en/lookup__;!!OToaGQ!rvU8NNPFEEJoL5x0LtimfNGNWhbqgvsLLaaVa1ti2MpKL4AS0fJDePiNW5nbDgDMTQsF9n8ZepTePQDrIOqXTtk$
>
> Looks like the domain belongs to: <kcrawford...>
>
> Benjamin
>
>
> On Wed, May 29, 2024 at 10:23 AM, Sophia Cox <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> Good morning, all.
>>
>> I recently came across this website
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.sctrails.net/trails/trail/raven-cliff-falls__;!!OToaGQ!uN5cn_-UodTIDW7Qd2AlO1FwyVvfN0hhMw3m_oNEVcBIn_JnYuUiK-zo7libOv3BcoYnLBlWQ4uw2s3sv8AChiM$>
>> about Raven Cliff Falls in South Carolina. It claims the trail "was named
>> for the ravens that breed in the high cliffs forming the falls. Over 150
>> species of ravens have been identified in this region."
>>
>> There are not 150 species of raven in the entire world. As far as I can
>> tell, there are about 10
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.britannica.com/animal/raven__;!!OToaGQ!uN5cn_-UodTIDW7Qd2AlO1FwyVvfN0hhMw3m_oNEVcBIn_JnYuUiK-zo7libOv3BcoYnLBlWQ4uw2s3sOd8DGMI$> raven
>> species in total, only 2 of which live in North America
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.birds-of-north-america.net/ravens.html__;!!OToaGQ!uN5cn_-UodTIDW7Qd2AlO1FwyVvfN0hhMw3m_oNEVcBIn_JnYuUiK-zo7libOv3BcoYnLBlWQ4uw2s3sFOUF8y4$>
>> and only 1 of which can be found in South Carolina
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.dnr.sc.gov/swap/supplemental/birds/commonraven2015.pdf__;!!OToaGQ!uN5cn_-UodTIDW7Qd2AlO1FwyVvfN0hhMw3m_oNEVcBIn_JnYuUiK-zo7libOv3BcoYnLBlWQ4uw2s3sfaYNJPI$>
>> .
>>
>> I'm sure this was simply a mistake, though I don't know what the authors
>> of the SC Trails website intended to say--150 total bird species recorded
>> on that trail? 150 pairs of breeding ravens?
>>
>> At least two other
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://upcountrysc.com/listing-details/cleveland/raven-cliff-falls/45317434/__;!!OToaGQ!uN5cn_-UodTIDW7Qd2AlO1FwyVvfN0hhMw3m_oNEVcBIn_JnYuUiK-zo7libOv3BcoYnLBlWQ4uw2s3s__rSdJM$>
>> websites
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://sweptawaytoday.com/2017/11/26/a-fall-hike-to-raven-cliff-falls/__;!!OToaGQ!uN5cn_-UodTIDW7Qd2AlO1FwyVvfN0hhMw3m_oNEVcBIn_JnYuUiK-zo7libOv3BcoYnLBlWQ4uw2s3sY50JON8$>
>> echo the same false information.
>>
>> I tried to find contact information to alert sctrails.net
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://sctrails.net__;!!OToaGQ!uN5cn_-UodTIDW7Qd2AlO1FwyVvfN0hhMw3m_oNEVcBIn_JnYuUiK-zo7libOv3BcoYnLBlWQ4uw2s3sKT_4-d4$>
>> to the problem, but I couldn't find a way to contact them. From their About
>> page, it sounds like any trail "owners" can make updates, so perhaps there
>> is not a central owner of the site I can reach out to.
>>
>> A minor issue in the grand scheme of things, I know, but I find myself
>> preoccupied by it. If anyone knows who I might write to, please let me
>> know. Many websites are very willing to correct errors, but I can't find
>> contact information for this website.
>>
>> Good birding,
>> Sophie
>>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/24 8:06 am
From: \Benjamin Hargett\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Raven misinformation--help
You can sometimes find contact information based on the domain. https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://lookup.icann.org/en/lookup__;!!OToaGQ!rFbNNUEexbWAGnnMp-BR4PlqSoKbjUSLz4RgbupAa4eoKVo8LRu16uf_SBvOOpWpWWRHCQcRFJyyGMaB-vMXuKrsm2JWIw$

Looks like the domain belongs to: <kcrawford...>

Benjamin

On Wed, May 29, 2024 at 10:23 AM, Sophia Cox < <carolinabirds...> > wrote:

>
> Good morning, all.
>
>
> I recently came across this website (
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.sctrails.net/trails/trail/raven-cliff-falls__;!!OToaGQ!uN5cn_-UodTIDW7Qd2AlO1FwyVvfN0hhMw3m_oNEVcBIn_JnYuUiK-zo7libOv3BcoYnLBlWQ4uw2s3sv8AChiM$
> ) about Raven Cliff Falls in South Carolina. It claims the trail "was named
> for the ravens that breed in the high cliffs forming the falls. Over 150
> species of ravens have been identified in this region."
>
>
>
> There are not 150 species of raven in the entire world. As far as I can
> tell, there are about 10 (
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.britannica.com/animal/raven__;!!OToaGQ!uN5cn_-UodTIDW7Qd2AlO1FwyVvfN0hhMw3m_oNEVcBIn_JnYuUiK-zo7libOv3BcoYnLBlWQ4uw2s3sOd8DGMI$
> ) raven species in total, only 2 of which live in North America (
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.birds-of-north-america.net/ravens.html__;!!OToaGQ!uN5cn_-UodTIDW7Qd2AlO1FwyVvfN0hhMw3m_oNEVcBIn_JnYuUiK-zo7libOv3BcoYnLBlWQ4uw2s3sFOUF8y4$
> ) and only 1 of which can be found in South Carolina (
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.dnr.sc.gov/swap/supplemental/birds/commonraven2015.pdf__;!!OToaGQ!uN5cn_-UodTIDW7Qd2AlO1FwyVvfN0hhMw3m_oNEVcBIn_JnYuUiK-zo7libOv3BcoYnLBlWQ4uw2s3sfaYNJPI$
> ).
>
>
>
> I'm sure this was simply a mistake, though I don't know what the authors
> of the SC Trails website intended to say--150 total bird species recorded
> on that trail? 150 pairs of breeding ravens?
>
>
>
> At least two other (
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://upcountrysc.com/listing-details/cleveland/raven-cliff-falls/45317434/__;!!OToaGQ!uN5cn_-UodTIDW7Qd2AlO1FwyVvfN0hhMw3m_oNEVcBIn_JnYuUiK-zo7libOv3BcoYnLBlWQ4uw2s3s__rSdJM$
> ) websites (
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://sweptawaytoday.com/2017/11/26/a-fall-hike-to-raven-cliff-falls/__;!!OToaGQ!uN5cn_-UodTIDW7Qd2AlO1FwyVvfN0hhMw3m_oNEVcBIn_JnYuUiK-zo7libOv3BcoYnLBlWQ4uw2s3sY50JON8$
> ) echo the same false information.
>
>
>
> I tried to find contact information to alert sctrails. net (
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://sctrails.net__;!!OToaGQ!uN5cn_-UodTIDW7Qd2AlO1FwyVvfN0hhMw3m_oNEVcBIn_JnYuUiK-zo7libOv3BcoYnLBlWQ4uw2s3sKT_4-d4$
> ) to the problem, but I couldn't find a way to contact them. From their
> About page, it sounds like any trail "owners" can make updates, so perhaps
> there is not a central owner of the site I can reach out to.
>
>
>
> A minor issue in the grand scheme of things, I know, but I find myself
> preoccupied by it. If anyone knows who I might write to, please let me
> know. Many websites are very willing to correct errors, but I can't find
> contact information for this website.
>
>
>
> Good birding,
>
> Sophie
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/24 7:24 am
From: Sophia Cox (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Raven misinformation--help
Good morning, all.

I recently came across this website
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.sctrails.net/trails/trail/raven-cliff-falls__;!!OToaGQ!uN5cn_-UodTIDW7Qd2AlO1FwyVvfN0hhMw3m_oNEVcBIn_JnYuUiK-zo7libOv3BcoYnLBlWQ4uw2s3sv8AChiM$ > about Raven Cliff
Falls in South Carolina. It claims the trail "was named for the ravens that
breed in the high cliffs forming the falls. Over 150 species of ravens have
been identified in this region."

There are not 150 species of raven in the entire world. As far as I can
tell, there are about 10 <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.britannica.com/animal/raven__;!!OToaGQ!uN5cn_-UodTIDW7Qd2AlO1FwyVvfN0hhMw3m_oNEVcBIn_JnYuUiK-zo7libOv3BcoYnLBlWQ4uw2s3sOd8DGMI$ > raven
species in total, only 2 of which live in North America
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.birds-of-north-america.net/ravens.html__;!!OToaGQ!uN5cn_-UodTIDW7Qd2AlO1FwyVvfN0hhMw3m_oNEVcBIn_JnYuUiK-zo7libOv3BcoYnLBlWQ4uw2s3sFOUF8y4$ > and only 1 of which
can be found in South Carolina
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.dnr.sc.gov/swap/supplemental/birds/commonraven2015.pdf__;!!OToaGQ!uN5cn_-UodTIDW7Qd2AlO1FwyVvfN0hhMw3m_oNEVcBIn_JnYuUiK-zo7libOv3BcoYnLBlWQ4uw2s3sfaYNJPI$ >.

I'm sure this was simply a mistake, though I don't know what the authors of
the SC Trails website intended to say--150 total bird species recorded on
that trail? 150 pairs of breeding ravens?

At least two other
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://upcountrysc.com/listing-details/cleveland/raven-cliff-falls/45317434/__;!!OToaGQ!uN5cn_-UodTIDW7Qd2AlO1FwyVvfN0hhMw3m_oNEVcBIn_JnYuUiK-zo7libOv3BcoYnLBlWQ4uw2s3s__rSdJM$ >
websites
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://sweptawaytoday.com/2017/11/26/a-fall-hike-to-raven-cliff-falls/__;!!OToaGQ!uN5cn_-UodTIDW7Qd2AlO1FwyVvfN0hhMw3m_oNEVcBIn_JnYuUiK-zo7libOv3BcoYnLBlWQ4uw2s3sY50JON8$ >
echo the same false information.

I tried to find contact information to alert sctrails.net to the problem,
but I couldn't find a way to contact them. From their About page, it sounds
like any trail "owners" can make updates, so perhaps there is not a central
owner of the site I can reach out to.

A minor issue in the grand scheme of things, I know, but I find myself
preoccupied by it. If anyone knows who I might write to, please let me
know. Many websites are very willing to correct errors, but I can't find
contact information for this website.

Good birding,
Sophie

 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/24 8:33 am
From: David Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Large jaeger fort macon
Taking photos, it is resting on the beach just e of swimming area.

--
Dr. David Campbell
Professor, Geology
Department of Natural Sciences
110 S Main St, #7270
Gardner-Webb University
Boiling Springs NC 28017

 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/24 7:34 am
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Back again this year Re: Urban Loggerhead Shrikes in North Charleston
The Loggerhead Shrikes are back again this year in the grassy Dominion
Energy complex at the corner of Leeds Ave and Azalea Drive in North
Charleston, SC. I have been seeing two birds regularly and they were
both present this morning.

I hope I get to see them feeding fledglings like last year.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

--
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2/__;!!OToaGQ!oNMhQFtcgP9oTuHYMUCulBdgawyV0sN2tv8BzyJzg8WhlMaxBU2vr-BcxWOMGwd6z9-wk9Mh3KvDDgkxcruaxMLXVPS4$

"These days I prefer to hunt with a camera. A good photograph demands more
skill from the hunter, better nerves and more patience than the rifle
shot." -- Bror Blixen


On Thu, May 11, 2023 at 12:25 PM Nate Dias <offshorebirder...> wrote:

> Over the past 3 weeks I have been enjoying "drive by" Loggerhead Shrike
> sightings in the grassy areas of the Dominion Energy complex at the corner
> of Leeds Ave and Azalea Drive in North Charleston, SC.
>
> For a while I was seeing one Shrike, but a couple of times in the past
> week I have seen them perched near each other. I suspect/hope they are
> setting up shop to nest there.
>
> I had seen breeding Shrikes for years not far from there, in a grassy
> field behind the BB&T at the corner of Dorchester Road and West Montague
> Ave. I saw them feeding fledglings more than once, in different years.
> Sadly that site has been destroyed and is a staging area for equipment
> preparing to build the new airport road. Perhaps those shrikes have
> shifted the mile or so to the Dominion Energy location.
>
> Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
>
> --
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2/__;!!OToaGQ!oNMhQFtcgP9oTuHYMUCulBdgawyV0sN2tv8BzyJzg8WhlMaxBU2vr-BcxWOMGwd6z9-wk9Mh3KvDDgkxcruaxMLXVPS4$
>
> "These days I prefer to hunt with a camera. A good photograph demands
> more skill from the hunter, better nerves and more patience than the rifle
> shot." -- Bror Blixen
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/24 9:42 am
From: Will Cook (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Fwd: bird sighting
Update - bird identified as a Great-crested Flycatcher...


Hello again,

With the help of Craig Watson, I now think it was more likely to be a
great-crested flycatcher. Thank you,

Bridget


On 5/21/2024 9:37 AM, Will Cook (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
wrote:

See below - might be good for a local birder to confirm.
Will Cook - Durham NC
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Bridget <carolinabirds-request...>
Date: May 21, 2024 9:25 AM
Subject: bird sighting
To: <carolinabirds-owner...>
Cc:

Hello, I'm not sure who would want to know this, but I had a
tropical kingbird in my yard yesterday. It hung out long
enough for me to confirm the ID, and I'm excited because I
haven't seen one before. I'm at 1345 Bresee Street,
Charleston, SC 29412.Thank you, Bridget
<_____________________bridgetlussier...>
843-270-7882



--
Charles W. (Will) Cook
Nicholas School of the Environment
Division of Environmental Science & Policy
Box 90328, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708
 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/24 6:52 am
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Newly fledged birds
There are a couple amusing pictures of a newly fledged Red-winged
Blackbird at the Boone Greenway, from the other day, in my ebird
checklist here <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/atlasnc/checklist/S176143781__;!!OToaGQ!v0C4M9Ii7J9mlFhEwTFIUc1dVdr5uaC-EzsOpBuN2TWEpjj3RGm8YK3slET5MigsYUz6QOmUmtwiQuiTN3Sxlz0$ >.

Everyone is encouraged to submit sightings like this to the NC Bird
Atlas portal on ebird. This is a typical example of using the "FL" code,
for recently FLedged young.

Guy

Guy McGrane, Boone, NC



 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/24 6:38 am
From: Will Cook (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fwd: bird sighting
See below - might be good for a local birder to confirm.

Will Cook - Durham NC
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Bridget <carolinabirds-request...>
Date: May 21, 2024 9:25 AM
Subject: bird sighting
To: <carolinabirds-owner...>
Cc:

Hello,
I'm not sure who would want to know this, but I had a tropical kingbird in my yard yesterday. It hung out long enough for me to confirm the ID, and I'm excited because I haven't seen one before. I'm at 1345 Bresee Street, Charleston, SC 29412.
Thank you,
Bridget
_____________________
<bridgetlussier...><mailto:<bridgetlussier...>
843-270-7882




 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/24 5:44 am
From: <sshultz...>
Subject: Hudsonian Godwit (flown) - New Hanover Cty, NC 5/19
Happy Moon-day out there in Birdville. Hope you had a splendid weekend!



I’m taking a moment our of your day to note the presence yesterday of a dapper, and fairly rare, shorebird at Ft. Fisher, New Hanover County, NC. The bird is a Hudsonian Godwit, which is always nice in the state, but usually found during fall migration along the coast. At that season, HUGO probably approaches annual, and may be most likely to be found in the Pea Island area along the Outer Banks. There are scattered inland “fall” records, some associated with summer/fall tropical systems, with one mountain record*.



However, the bird is quite a bit rarer as a spring passage migrant. Based on review of eBird*, this is about the 7th report (some reports had multiple birds) and the first in almost ten years (the most recent report I could find, two birds on 5/11/15 by Smithson and Lane was from the same location!) The report prior to that may have been in 2006. So a “decade bird” 😊



The bird was feeding in a shallow pool (a few feet above the level of the nearby river, maybe rainwater?) at the north base of “The Rocks”, the breakwater extending south from Ft. Fisher to Zeke’s Island. I don’t carry a camera while birding (and technically, this was not birding since was with the kid on a fishing trip, but when in Rome…) but fortunately Kevin Markham was in the area and did have a camera. So far as I know, we were the only folks to document the bird (well, I pointed it out to some fort visitors who asked what I was looking at, but honestly, they did not really care) as it appears to have spooked, due to a low-flying Turkey Vulture is my understanding, and was not relocated.



By this point I was nearing a spot in Carolina Beach where, I am told, one might hope to catch a “Rainwater Killifish”. And while none of those were procured, the kid did catch a “Dalmation” mosquitofish, that, while not a separate species, is a color morph he had not caught before, and a Sheepshead Minnow, which was only his second catch. So he was happy. I watched on from the balcony of a nearby beach grill with a Birdsong IPA, which seemed appropriate.



*A quick note on eBird, “reports”, and “records”. I purposefully differentiated between the terms report and record, as reports are, well just that. Records have some type of confirmation. If rare enough (not the case here), then by a bird records committee. If not that rare, but still “rare”, by an eBird reviewer. My review of HUGO records was limited to playing around in eBird. But not all good reports of rare birds are in eBird.



One reason this could happen is that whenever a submission to eBird requires notes (i.e. flags in yellow) it is considered “unconfirmed” until an eBird reviewer “confirms” the report, which then becomes a record in eBird. eBird reviewers are volunteers, have busy lives, and may not always have time to pursue reports that they feel they might need to get more information on in order to confirm. So there are cases where valid reports never become records for the simple fact that they were never “confirmed” in eBird (and not rare enough to be voted on by a BRC).



And it is not really easy to see if a rare bird you reported was “confirmed”. My understanding is that the only way to do this** is to look on the species range map in eBird and see if your bird is shown (which may happen anywhere from hours to days after the submission of the checklist). If so, it was confirmed. If not, it was not (or has not been yet).



We realized this when producing the most recent Briefs for the Files in The Chat, which relies heavily on records from eBird. Several good sightings by reliable birders (or during fieldtrips with groups) which had been submitted to eBird where not reflected, and none of the observers had received any feedback or request for confirmation to help validate the sightings. The presumption is that the eBird reviewer either felt that the reports were not valid and that they did not need to reach out to the observer for details, or simply did not get around to confirming the sighting.



I say all this not to try and besmirch any of the wonderful volunteers who help make eBird the powerful tool that it is (it is a big job and the pay is absolutely zero), but as awareness so that reports that might otherwise be overlooked (i.e. not in eBird) can be documented (i.e. in The Chat if applicable). Every three months the editor of Briefs for the Files sends out a collective request for sightings from the prior season. But in reality, most folks let eBird speak for them, and this usually works. But if you had a rare or out of place bird that was not rare enough to warrant BRC review, you may want to check and see if it was “confirmed” and if not, send details to Dr. LeGrand for potential publication in The Chat.



**You can see a list of recently reported eBird rarities (with confirmed/not yet confirmed designation) on the CBC website at Recent notable sightings from eBird (carolinabirdclub.org) <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/sightings/__;!!OToaGQ!u-uFbGZu2rkNUDbtViUxGq3YGv2tAT40ztuCkqw9fO_iM4Ah_SHa9ilzFVjvjbmDBXSYlfdizqFIqaxqDKo$ > . Reports are the most recent several days for each state. Thanks to Kent Fiala (also an eBird reviewer extraordinaire) for this helpful tool!



Have a great week!


Steve Shultz
Apex NC


 

Back to top
Date: 5/19/24 10:09 am
From: Craig Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Black-whiskered Vireo, Sullivan's Island, SC
A Black-whiskered vireo was found today on Sullivan's Island, SC and seems
to be hanging out around the 16th beach access and the entrance to the
Sullivan's Island Nature Trail. Elizabeth Anderegg heard this bird from
near the SPAWAR Bldg. and followed it into the Nature Trail area,
eventually making its way to near the intersection of 16th and the
trailhead. Apparently it was heard even earlier by some folks doing some
bird banding at the banding station. Matt Johnson found the bird,
photographed it, and sent the word out via the GroupMe rare bird alert and
several birders made their way to that location. When Pam and I arrived
the bird was quiet and then began singing again, which Matt Johnson
detected, and we went to the area of the singing and found the bird. At
least a dozen birders were able to hear and see the bird. Here are the
coordinates: 32.7563486, -79.8524312.

Sarah Diaz banded a Black-whiskered Vireo in this area at the end of April
of this year, but this bird is not banded, so this is a different
individual.



--

*"to live will be an awfully big adventure" - Peter Pan*

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 5/18/24 10:54 am
From: Rob G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Night vision bins?
FWIW, assuming it's a Barred Owl, our most common one, they ought be out with their new owlets right about now, and they generally are perched (often sleeping) out in the open during the day and early evening, offering excellent views, even if behind foliage or branches (you may find the wonderful owlets nearby as well). Try taking a walk around your yard or nearby woods looking up... but ALSO looking down for owl pellets or white droppings!

-- Rob Gluck.... Carrboro, NC.


________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Michelle Dyer <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Saturday, May 18, 2024 9:41 AM
To: <Carolinabirds...> <Carolinabirds...>
Subject: Night vision bins?

I have heard an owl in my yard a few times. Do y'all have any recommendations for good night vision binoculars? Id love to try to get my eyes on the owl!

 

Back to top
Date: 5/18/24 9:20 am
From: Kay Grinnell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: [External] Re: Night vision bins?
 

Back to top
Date: 5/18/24 8:48 am
From: John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: [External] Re: Night vision bins?
Hmm. Is there an ethical way to spotlight nocturnal birds? I'm not saying I
haven't participated but on those occasions when I've used a spotlight, I
always sensed it wasn't helpful for the bird. JC

On Sat, May 18, 2024 at 10:35 AM "Corey, Ed" <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> I'm sure that folks who are spotlighting for owls and other nocturnal
> species are doing so ethically, so I won't go too far down that path. For
> thermal or infrared options, these can get pricey pretty quickly,
> especially for something with good picture/video clarity. Most of the
> higher quality ones are $1500+. For a cheaper alternative, you might
> consider the Xinfrared T2 Pro, at around $400 (great for the budding
> hobbyist, and plugs into your phone's charging port). There are obviously
> limitations to a product like this, but it may help you locate your local
> owl.
>
> Ed Corey
> Inventory Biologist
> NC Division of Parks and Recreation
> NC Department of Natural and Cultural Resources
>
> Office: 919-841-4037
> Mobile: 919-208-7864
> <Ed.Corey...>
> Yorkshire Center
> 12700 Bayleaf Church Road
> Raleigh, NC 27614
> Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | YouTube | LinkedIn
> Email correspondence to and from this address is subject to the North
> Carolina Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> On
> Behalf Of Robert McLean
> Sent: Saturday, May 18, 2024 10:03 AM
> To: Michelle Dyer <madyer8...>
> Cc: <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: [External] Re: Night vision bins?
>
> CAUTION: External email. Do not click links or open attachments unless
> verified. Report suspicious emails with the Report Message button located
> on your Outlook menu bar on the Home tab.
>
>
> Hi Michelle,
> Let me throw you a curve ball.
> An excellent flashlight for night birding is now sold by Ledlenser.
> The flashlight I bought is:
> The P7R Ledlenser (80.00). It is medium sized and fairly light. it really
> lights things up things at night for a good distance. You will be amazed.
>
> This flashlight was recommended by a birder I know who goes on these
> incredible birding trips around the world. The guides for these trips
> professional birders, extremely knowledgeable and one of the guides
> recommends Ledlenser flashlights for night birding.
>
> Good birding!
>
> Taylor
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On May 18, 2024, at 9:42 AM, Michelle Dyer <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
> >
> > I have heard an owl in my yard a few times. Do y'all have any
> recommendations for good night vision binoculars? I’d love to try to get my
> eyes on the owl!
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/18/24 8:25 am
From: Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Jordan Lake (NC) Spring Bird Count
Jordan Lake Spring Bird Count 2024



The major influence on our May 5, 2024, Jordan Lake Spring Bird Count was
the intermittent rain (mostly light, but sometimes heavy). Luckily,
temperatures were mild, ranging from 67° to 77°F and the winds were calm.
The sky was overcast all day.



Forty (40) observers in 23 parties participated (our 10-year averages are
47 and 23, respectively). We tallied 5,919 individual birds (avg. 8,127)
in 116 species (avg. 117) in 96 party hours (avg. 122). So, although we had
*fewer* observers counting for *fewer* hours and reported *fewer* overall
numbers of individual birds, we still managed to find a typical diversity
of species. That shows how our dedicated observers can still do the job!



We missed a few species that we normally find in at least 5 out of the last
10 years—Ruby-crowned Kinglet, House Wren, House Sparrow, Veery, Baltimore
Oriole, Magnolia Warbler, Chestnut-sided Warbler, and Palm Warbler.
However, we made up for those misses by finding some unusual species for
our spring counts:



· Red-breasted Merganser—7 found by 2 parties (Rick Payne and Noah
Rokoske)

· Horned Grebe—3 found by 2 parties (Roger Shaw, Carolyn McAllaster,
Jennifer Maher and Josh Southern, Sterling Southern, Doug Pratt)

· Least Sandpiper—4 found by 2 parties (Rick Payne and Marc Ribaudo)

· Little Blue Heron—5 found by 1 party (Mark Owens, Andrew Wilson,
Rouse Wilson, Joe Zellers), last documented in 1999!

· Great Egret—1 found by 1 party (Ted Smith)

· Brown Creeper—2 found by Todd Bishop, last documented in 1978!

· Worm-eating Warbler—2 found by 2 parties (Kerry and Trish
MacPherson and Noah Rokoske)

· Cape May Warbler—1 found by 1 party (Mark Owens, Andrew Wilson,
Rouse Wilson, Joe Zellers)



Given the weather and relatively low numbers of individual birds, it is not
surprising that we did not set any new records for any species.



Noah Rokoske found 78 species in the area on the west side of the Jordan
Lake Dam, while Tom Driscoll reported 70 species in the area covering
Hank's Chapel Rd to Gum Springs Rd.



If you would like to see a spreadsheet of this count and a cumulative
spreadsheet of all our counts, please visit the Bird Counts page on the New
Hope Audubon website at:
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.newhopeaudubon.org/get-outdoors/bird-counts/__;!!OToaGQ!pC1I1O4H3ytAGcPizKH6GCVpN3ra1kMwJKv14rdfdMQFHiGgw7csg4h5xn2y4-Rd5CSOa-iKxkIpn2fjvJ98$



Norm Budnitz, compiler.

--
Norm Budnitz
Chapel Hill
North Carolina

 

Back to top
Date: 5/18/24 7:35 am
From: \Corey, Ed\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: [External] Re: Night vision bins?
I'm sure that folks who are spotlighting for owls and other nocturnal species are doing so ethically, so I won't go too far down that path. For thermal or infrared options, these can get pricey pretty quickly, especially for something with good picture/video clarity. Most of the higher quality ones are $1500+. For a cheaper alternative, you might consider the Xinfrared T2 Pro, at around $400 (great for the budding hobbyist, and plugs into your phone's charging port). There are obviously limitations to a product like this, but it may help you locate your local owl.

Ed Corey
Inventory Biologist
NC Division of Parks and Recreation
NC Department of Natural and Cultural Resources

Office: 919-841-4037
Mobile: 919-208-7864
<Ed.Corey...>
Yorkshire Center
12700 Bayleaf Church Road
Raleigh, NC 27614
Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | YouTube | LinkedIn
Email correspondence to and from this address is subject to the North Carolina Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.

-----Original Message-----
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> On Behalf Of Robert McLean
Sent: Saturday, May 18, 2024 10:03 AM
To: Michelle Dyer <madyer8...>
Cc: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: [External] Re: Night vision bins?

CAUTION: External email. Do not click links or open attachments unless verified. Report suspicious emails with the Report Message button located on your Outlook menu bar on the Home tab.


Hi Michelle,
Let me throw you a curve ball.
An excellent flashlight for night birding is now sold by Ledlenser.
The flashlight I bought is:
The P7R Ledlenser (80.00). It is medium sized and fairly light. it really lights things up things at night for a good distance. You will be amazed.

This flashlight was recommended by a birder I know who goes on these incredible birding trips around the world. The guides for these trips professional birders, extremely knowledgeable and one of the guides recommends Ledlenser flashlights for night birding.

Good birding!

Taylor

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 18, 2024, at 9:42 AM, Michelle Dyer <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I have heard an owl in my yard a few times. Do y'all have any recommendations for good night vision binoculars? I’d love to try to get my eyes on the owl!
 

Back to top
Date: 5/18/24 7:03 am
From: Robert McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Night vision bins?
Hi Michelle,
Let me throw you a curve ball.
An excellent flashlight for night birding is now sold by Ledlenser.
The flashlight I bought is:
The P7R Ledlenser (80.00). It is medium sized and fairly light. it really lights things up things at night for a good distance. You will be amazed.

This flashlight was recommended by a birder I know who goes on these incredible birding trips around the world. The guides for these trips professional birders, extremely knowledgeable and one of the guides recommends Ledlenser flashlights for night birding.

Good birding!

Taylor

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 18, 2024, at 9:42 AM, Michelle Dyer <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I have heard an owl in my yard a few times. Do y'all have any recommendations for good night vision binoculars? I’d love to try to get my eyes on the owl!

 

Back to top
Date: 5/18/24 7:02 am
From: Nathan (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Night vision bins?
I use the Zeiss DTI 4, it’s a thermal scope.
Nathan Gatto
(336) 416-3182


> On May 18, 2024, at 9:42 AM, Michelle Dyer <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I have heard an owl in my yard a few times. Do y'all have any recommendations for good night vision binoculars? I’d love to try to get my eyes on the owl!

 

Back to top
Date: 5/18/24 6:42 am
From: Michelle Dyer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Night vision bins?
I have heard an owl in my yard a few times. Do y'all have any
recommendations for good night vision binoculars? I’d love to try to get my
eyes on the owl!

 

Back to top
Date: 5/17/24 11:05 am
From: Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Keeping squirrels away from feeders
Switch to safflower seed. Rodents cannot digest it and birds prefer it.
Good on tray feeders for cardinals doves and fledglings or in regular tube
feeders.
I have one chipmunk that likes safflower but no gray squirrels touch it.
Lynn Erla Beegle Raleigh NC


On Fri, May 17, 2024, 12:03 PM Michael Fogleman <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> A baffle on a pole works as long as the squirrel can't jump from a nearby
> object.
>
> I have a few of these in my backyard and the squirrels can't get past them:
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0010QD5QO?th=1__;!!OToaGQ!u_G9Xf2_KcKpzke6VVCwUxCHprUXi-tUyor9xMdNbQ-2lkr-Bfa9xVuJwXijR8JU9ut7owvYyBzCToW_R_8I4Q$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0010QD5QO?th=1__;!!OToaGQ!vS44LTyik3asJlyTGIzxo_Kgy0e3qFIw37rUpee2FdGwLUJ0mfYPjZ8NFHogdJevi2vCqwm-zW-y2qOgjL9d$>
>
> Michael
>
>
> On Fri, May 17, 2024 at 10:56 AM Sophia Cox <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> Good morning, all.
>>
>> Fortunately, our own feeders are not usually plagued by squirrels—our
>> “squirrel-proof” feeders really are close to squirrel-proof. But my
>> grandmother in Rhode Island keeps calling me, increasingly frantic, because
>> “the piggy squirrels gobble up the birdseed.” She lives alone and gets
>> great joy from watching the birds, but the squirrels are driving her crazy
>> when they empty her seed.
>>
>> We sent her a supposedly squirrel-proof feeder, and she has it hanging
>> from a pole attached to her deck railing, but she says it does nothing.
>> “They hang from their little back toesies and they eat it. They’re carnival
>> squirrels and there’s a whole colony. And your grandmother is not paranoid.
>> She is in her right mind. But she is going out of her mind.”
>>
>> She’s also tried cayenne pepper (and some more unusual strategies like
>> putting plastic red lizards and wind chimes out in the hope of scaring away
>> the squirrels). She has considered sitting outside all day with a water gun
>> to squirt at them but says she doesn’t have time for that.
>>
>> I have run out of suggestions for her and thought I’d see if anyone else
>> has ideas.
>>
>> Meanwhile, I’ve been watching a male bluebird feed his newly fledged
>> young at my bird feeders here in Clemson. Happy birding, all!
>>
>> Best,
>> Sophie
>>
>> Get Outlook for iOS
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://aka.ms/o0ukef__;!!OToaGQ!pO28_nu6_moBwXWDdwxelxowzRdWPnshAZitSfF4bC_2p8nJtFqTcEPzd-vh4X2ZHenlEsfE55eN4Cp1v2Kh8_4$>
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/17/24 9:04 am
From: Michael Fogleman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Keeping squirrels away from feeders
A baffle on a pole works as long as the squirrel can't jump from a nearby
object.

I have a few of these in my backyard and the squirrels can't get past them:

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0010QD5QO?th=1__;!!OToaGQ!vS44LTyik3asJlyTGIzxo_Kgy0e3qFIw37rUpee2FdGwLUJ0mfYPjZ8NFHogdJevi2vCqwm-zW-y2qOgjL9d$

Michael


On Fri, May 17, 2024 at 10:56 AM Sophia Cox <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Good morning, all.
>
> Fortunately, our own feeders are not usually plagued by squirrels—our
> “squirrel-proof” feeders really are close to squirrel-proof. But my
> grandmother in Rhode Island keeps calling me, increasingly frantic, because
> “the piggy squirrels gobble up the birdseed.” She lives alone and gets
> great joy from watching the birds, but the squirrels are driving her crazy
> when they empty her seed.
>
> We sent her a supposedly squirrel-proof feeder, and she has it hanging
> from a pole attached to her deck railing, but she says it does nothing.
> “They hang from their little back toesies and they eat it. They’re carnival
> squirrels and there’s a whole colony. And your grandmother is not paranoid.
> She is in her right mind. But she is going out of her mind.”
>
> She’s also tried cayenne pepper (and some more unusual strategies like
> putting plastic red lizards and wind chimes out in the hope of scaring away
> the squirrels). She has considered sitting outside all day with a water gun
> to squirt at them but says she doesn’t have time for that.
>
> I have run out of suggestions for her and thought I’d see if anyone else
> has ideas.
>
> Meanwhile, I’ve been watching a male bluebird feed his newly fledged young
> at my bird feeders here in Clemson. Happy birding, all!
>
> Best,
> Sophie
>
> Get Outlook for iOS
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://aka.ms/o0ukef__;!!OToaGQ!pO28_nu6_moBwXWDdwxelxowzRdWPnshAZitSfF4bC_2p8nJtFqTcEPzd-vh4X2ZHenlEsfE55eN4Cp1v2Kh8_4$>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/17/24 9:01 am
From: Robert Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Keeping squirrels away from feeders
Use a metal baffle.  They work perfectly for me. 

Bob Lewis
Durham NC


https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.walmart.com/ip/12-14-16-18-Inches-Wrap-Around-Squirrel-Guard-Rotatable-Easy-Assembly-Anti-rust-Weather-proof-Food-Gardening-Tool-Protecting-Bird-Feeder-Baffle-Backy/1202019719?wmlspartner=wlpa&selectedSellerId=101211295&<gclsrc...>&&adid=222222222271202019719_101211295_161775106759_21302090392&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=c&wl3=699684381294&wl4=pla-2305885448596&wl5=9009671&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&wl9=pla&wl10=648563132&wl11=online&wl12=1202019719_101211295&veh=sem&gad_source=1&gclid=Cj0KCQjwgJyyBhCGARIsAK8LVLPijyh43nFEbKFCpa0LXrxb-_VyENeKE-7nbgVOFkUjeC5Eu4vZkeEaAhBAEALw_wcB__;!!OToaGQ!sJe2IjcYAHY7_rOZKOtR3YbcmtGH1GpMjjq6zje-KGRgCkEgCR2F350e_ZRtbKCh4_rl1Qh2DkEJxn6ON-8$






On Friday, May 17, 2024 at 10:56:40 AM EDT, Sophia Cox" (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:



Good morning, all.



Fortunately, our own feeders are not usually plagued by squirrels—our “squirrel-proof” feeders really are close to squirrel-proof. But my grandmother in Rhode Island keeps calling me, increasingly frantic, because “the piggy squirrels gobble up the birdseed.” She lives alone and gets great joy from watching the birds, but the squirrels are driving her crazy when they empty her seed.




We sent her a supposedly squirrel-proof feeder, and she has it hanging from a pole attached to her deck railing, but she says it does nothing. “They hang from their little back toesies and they eat it. They’re carnival squirrels and there’s a whole colony. And your grandmother is not paranoid. She is in her right mind. But she is going out of her mind.”




She’s also tried cayenne pepper (and some more unusual strategies like putting plastic red lizards and wind chimes out in the hope of scaring away the squirrels). She has considered sitting outside all day with a water gun to squirt at them but says she doesn’t have time for that.




I have run out of suggestions for her and thought I’d see if anyone else has ideas.




Meanwhile, I’ve been watching a male bluebird feed his newly fledged young at my bird feeders here in Clemson. Happy birding, all!




Best,

Sophie




Get Outlook for iOS



 

Back to top
Date: 5/17/24 7:56 am
From: Sophia Cox (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Keeping squirrels away from feeders
Good morning, all.

Fortunately, our own feeders are not usually plagued by squirrelsour squirrel-proof feeders really are close to squirrel-proof. But my grandmother in Rhode Island keeps calling me, increasingly frantic, because the piggy squirrels gobble up the birdseed. She lives alone and gets great joy from watching the birds, but the squirrels are driving her crazy when they empty her seed.

We sent her a supposedly squirrel-proof feeder, and she has it hanging from a pole attached to her deck railing, but she says it does nothing. They hang from their little back toesies and they eat it. Theyre carnival squirrels and theres a whole colony. And your grandmother is not paranoid. She is in her right mind. But she is going out of her mind.

Shes also tried cayenne pepper (and some more unusual strategies like putting plastic red lizards and wind chimes out in the hope of scaring away the squirrels). She has considered sitting outside all day with a water gun to squirt at them but says she doesnt have time for that.

I have run out of suggestions for her and thought Id see if anyone else has ideas.

Meanwhile, Ive been watching a male bluebird feed his newly fledged young at my bird feeders here in Clemson. Happy birding, all!

Best,
Sophie

Get Outlook for iOS<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://aka.ms/o0ukef__;!!OToaGQ!pO28_nu6_moBwXWDdwxelxowzRdWPnshAZitSfF4bC_2p8nJtFqTcEPzd-vh4X2ZHenlEsfE55eN4Cp1v2Kh8_4$ >

 

Back to top
Date: 5/16/24 4:35 pm
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Falls Lake Thrush Tease
I’ve had a couple of thrush photos sent to me recently and a few of you have asked am I going to do the GRAY-CHEEKED PROGRAM again this year. Well… I have had a Swainsons singing and showing off here all week, and Ryan and Tony don’t give me an option, so let’s do it!
We have penciled in October 5-13. This is NOT an email to request reservations but only to get this on your calendar’s if you’re interested. I will send out the invitation email on August 1.
Enjoy or put up with the summer months and i’ll reach out in August.

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC (watching the Canes)

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/24 11:28 am
From: \Roger Shaw\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Chapel Hill Bird Club Meeting – 5/20 – Birds of Taiwan — David and Judy Smith
The Chapel Hill Bird Club is holding its monthly meeting on Monday, May 20th
at 7:30 p.m. This meeting will be in-person with a Zoom option available –
registration link below. Come at 7:15 for refreshments. Location is the
lounge in Olin T. Binkley Baptist Church, 1712 Willow Drive, Chapel Hill, NC.

Taiwan (Republic of China) is a prosperous, friendly island nation located
about 100 miles from its larger neighbor on the mainland. Political issues
aside, it’s an easy country to visit, and the thirty-one endemic bird species
were a big attraction for our long-time members David and Judy Smith, who
spent almost two weeks there in 2023. Join them for a tour of Taiwan’s birds
and sights and our last meeting of the season.

The Bird Club will also hold elections for next season’s officers during the
May meeting.

In addition, this will be your chance to ask “Ask Kent” anything about eBird.
Kent Fiala will answer one eBird question, to be drawn from a hat. Come
prepared to submit a question. Zoom attendees will also have the opportunity
to submit a question in the Chatbox.

Register in advance for this meeting:

https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZcrd-qhrjIvH91j3mCjRuo8QUiDviP7YE-5

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing
information about joining the meeting.


Best regards,

Roger Shaw
<roger.w.shaw...>
Chapel Hill, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 5/14/24 9:42 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Butterflies of North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and Georgia book announcement
What a great looking book! Congratulations to all involved!

I kept clicking until I got to the view inside, which was great but also be ready for the left-right confusion: what you see on the left is the map and photos for the previous species. So I'm looking at pages 59 (map and photos of Appalachian Swallowtail) on the left, while on the right is the text account for Dainty Sulphur. You'd think book publishers would understand how book pages are laid out and set up their pdf viewer with that in mind, but never mind that, it sill looks like a wonderful reference.

Chris Hill, Ph.D.
Professor
Biology Department
Coastal Carolina University
Office: Science2 207H
(843) 349-2567
email: <chill...>

> On May 14, 2024, at 12:30 PM, Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.
>
> Fellow birders and butterfliers (as many of you birders are also into butterflies),
>
> Harry LeGrand, Jeff Pippen, Derb Carter, and Pierre Howard are excited to announce the pre-sale of the brand new UNC Press book titled Butterflies of North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and Georgia: A Field Guide, expected to hit bookshelves in June or July!
>
> In addition to having introductory text on butterfly biology, habitats, observing/photographing, etc., the book will feature ALL butterfly species known to have occurred in the region. Each regularly occurring species will have a two-page spread (species account) with text (identification, similar species, distribution, abundance, flight period, larval and nectar plants, and miscellaneous helpful comments) on the left-hand page. The right-hand page will feature photos, county distribution map, and a special Key Field Marks highlight box.
>
> As a special bonus, you can receive a 30% discount by entering the promo code “01SOCIAL30” (without the quotes) at the following UNC Press webpage:
>
> https://uncpress.org/book/9781469678566/butterflies-of-north-carolina-south-carolina-virginia-and-georgia/ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://uncpress.org/book/9781469678566/butterflies-of-north-carolina-south-carolina-virginia-and-georgia/__;!!OToaGQ!sUHqnVdmMK7SO_kuLXoM0AqdZkp3cwZHFkYRHkS39rdSDosnZcQZD6z18oH0WGM64GeZX9MVD_EBLmz1zM501GI$>
>
> NOTE: the link has a View Inside, so you can view up to 138 pages of this 456-page book. However, the facing pages on the View Inside are backwards, so that the left page is really a right-side page in the book; a given species has its species account on the left page and the facing page in the book, on the right, are the photos, map, and field marks. The quality of the photos on the View Inside are likely not as sharp as will be seen in the book -- hopefully!
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh


 

Back to top
Date: 5/14/24 9:31 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Butterflies of North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and Georgia book announcement
Fellow birders and butterfliers (as many of you birders are also into
butterflies),

Harry LeGrand, Jeff Pippen, Derb Carter, and Pierre Howard are excited to
announce the pre-sale of the brand new UNC Press book titled *Butterflies
of North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and Georgia: A Field Guide*,
expected to hit bookshelves in June or July!

In addition to having introductory text on butterfly biology, habitats,
observing/photographing, etc., the book will feature ALL butterfly species
known to have occurred in the region. Each regularly occurring species will
have a two-page spread (species account) with text (identification, similar
species, distribution, abundance, flight period, larval and nectar plants,
and miscellaneous helpful comments) on the left-hand page. The right-hand
page will feature photos, county distribution map, and a special Key Field
Marks highlight box.

As a special bonus, you can receive a *30% discount by entering the promo
code “01SOCIAL30” *(without the quotes) at the following UNC Press webpage:

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://uncpress.org/book/9781469678566/butterflies-of-north-carolina-south-carolina-virginia-and-georgia/__;!!OToaGQ!sUHqnVdmMK7SO_kuLXoM0AqdZkp3cwZHFkYRHkS39rdSDosnZcQZD6z18oH0WGM64GeZX9MVD_EBLmz1zM501GI$


NOTE: the link has a View Inside, so you can view up to 138 pages of this
456-page book. However, the facing pages on the View Inside are backwards,
so that the left page is really a right-side page in the book; a given
species has its species account on the left page and the facing page in the
book, on the right, are the photos, map, and field marks. The quality of
the photos on the View Inside are likely not as sharp as will be seen in
the book -- hopefully!

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/24 4:33 pm
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Api apps
Go to https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/alerts__;!!OToaGQ!rJZqldlfJqXKMJYI5fbdPwWJjkqWSxSvgXPBKS5T2JNOQyAttuyzPrih-5EYEsfbOut1yQXiM22_Oc2zv-jsUYI$ , fill in the form under "Needs Alerts", and click "Subscribe".

For year list needs check "This year only" but for life list needs leave it unchecked.

Once you've subscribed, look under "My Alerts" at the top and for the alert you have just subscribed to, click "Change" and then select "hourly" instead of daily.

Kent Fiala

On 5/13/2024 7:25 AM, Erinn Szarek (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> Is there a service or application that will put your needs list every hour? I would like a push notification or email if someone submitted a list today. I know I can just refresh ebird and look, but I still I am asking.
> Erinn
>
> Yahoo Mail: Search, Organize, Conquer <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://mail.onelink.me/107872968?pid=NativePlacement&c=Global_Acquisition_YMktg_315_EmailSignatureGrowth_YahooMail:Search,Organize,Conquer&af_sub1=Acquisition&af_sub2=Global_YMktg&af_sub3=&af_sub4=100000945&af_sub5=OrganizeConquer__Static___;!!OToaGQ!vQwaymPlZDm3DHBVsVgLifNGoroAvExAzH7iC3dRrml9YHqk36CtCGwx7sLaHCflVI2DoyvMvZhPSOiUfIB8A44vkA$>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/24 4:02 pm
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: recent opinions on mid range binocs for birding?
To the original poster, you can also send your Nikons back to the company for repair. They're very good about that. Though you'd be without binocs until they got back.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

> On May 13, 2024, at 5:38 PM, Bernie Carr <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.
>
> Vortex has a lifetime guarantee. I have used the Diamondbacks and they are a decent binocular. We had a pair of Celestron binoculars, many years ago. They were not that great. Perhaps, they have improved. Good luck with whatever you choose.
>
> Bernie Carr
>
> On May 13, 2024 3:08 PM, "Herbert, Teri Lynn" <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> My Nikon Monarchs broke this weekend (lens eye cup) and I read this is quite common. They are only 13 years old, so am very disappointed. I can always use my dad’s 1940s binoculars, which still are great! but they are a bit heavy…
>
> I’ve read reviews and narrowed it down to
>
> Celestron Trailseeker ED
>
> and
>
> Vortex Diamondback HD.
>
> What are your opinions and have either of these gotten broken for you? I need something that will last 20 years…(probably more than my age allows, but am planning on a long life, haha).
>
> You can reply just to me if desired, not to the list.
>
> Thank you all very much!!
>
> Teri Lynn
>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/24 3:57 pm
From: Will Cook <cwcook...>
Subject: Re: UNSUBSCRIBE
Wow, good memory, Steve! We haven't been on majordomo since 2003.
Please see instructions and guidelines at

https://www.carolinanature.com/birds/cbirds.html

If you lose this link, please just Google <carolinabirds...>
To unsubscribe, send a message to <sympa...> with this text in the
body of the message (leave the subject line blank):
unsubscribe carolinabirds
Let me know if you have trouble.
Will Cook - Durham, NC <Carolinabirds-request...>


On May 13, 2024 6:06 PM, Steve <sshultz...> wrote:

Unless it’s changed, to unsubscribe, you must send an email to
<majordomo...> from your subscribed address with the word
unsubscribe in the subject line. Someone please correct me if I am
wrong. Sending a message to Carolinabirds with an unsubscribe
request will not accomplish the goal.
Steve Shultz

On May 13, 2024, at 5:56 PM, Jessica Gryglewicz
<carolinabirds...> if I am wrong. edu> wrote:

Please unsubscribe <jlgrygle...>
On Mon, May 13, 2024 at 5:46 PM bev2495 <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

Please unsubscribe <bev2495...>

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Date: 5/13/24 3:41 pm
From: Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: how to unsubscribe from carolinabirds
I think Steve is remembering another email system. To unsubscribe
you need to send an email to: <sympa...>
In the BODY of the email, should be this one line command: unsubscribe
carolinabirds

--
Ann Brice

*First Wilson Properties, Real Estate Broker, GRI
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<ann.brice...>
cell: 252 373-0326
office: 252 237-9900
fax: 252 243-9600

 

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Date: 5/13/24 3:07 pm
From: Steve <sshultz...>
Subject: Re: RFI: locations with emerging Periodic Cicadas
 

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Date: 5/13/24 3:06 pm
From: Steve <sshultz...>
Subject: Re: UNSUBSCRIBE
 

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Date: 5/13/24 2:56 pm
From: Jessica Gryglewicz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: UNSUBSCRIBE
Please unsubscribe <jlgrygle...>

On Mon, May 13, 2024 at 5:46 PM bev2495 <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Please unsubscribe <bev2495...>
>
>
>
> Thank you
>

 

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Date: 5/13/24 2:46 pm
From: bev2495 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: UNSUBSCRIBE
Please unsubscribe <bev2495...> <mailto:<bev2495...>



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Date: 5/13/24 2:38 pm
From: Bernie Carr (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: recent opinions on mid range binocs for birding?
Vortex has a lifetime guarantee. I have used the Diamondbacks and they
are a decent binocular. We had a pair of Celestron binoculars, many
years ago. They were not that great. Perhaps, they have improved. Good
luck with whatever you choose.
Bernie Carr
On May 13, 2024 3:08 PM, "Herbert, Teri Lynn" <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

My Nikon Monarchs broke this weekend (lens eye cup) and I read
this is quite common. They are only 13 years old, so am very
disappointed. I can always use my dad’s 1940s binoculars, which
still are great! but they are a bit heavy…

I’ve read reviews and narrowed it down to

Celestron Trailseeker ED

and

Vortex Diamondback HD.

What are your opinions and have either of these gotten broken for
you? I need something that will last 20 years…(probably more
than my age allows, but am planning on a long life, haha).

You can reply just to me if desired, not to the list.

Thank you all very much!!

Teri Lynn
 

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Date: 5/13/24 2:34 pm
From: Clyde Sorenson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: RFI: locations with emerging Periodic Cicadas
All of the birds that can are gorging themselves on them. Some may be
tiring of the steady diet...

Clyde Sorenson
Clayton and Raleigh, NC


On Mon, May 13, 2024 at 4:58 PM Sally Robertson <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> I’ve been meaning to ask the list about this. My bird seed and suet have
> been moving much slower lately and I wondered if the birds are eating
> cicadas instead. There have been a lot of cicadas here since late April.
> The birds I've seen with cicadas so far (1 each) are Carolina wren,
> cardinal and red-eyed vireo.
>
> Sally Robertson
> Carrboro, NC
> ______________________
> Sally Robertson
> 919-817-9805
> <sallyerobertson57...>
>
> --------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: Wayne Hoffman <whoffman...>
> To: carolinabirds <carolinabirds...>
> Cc:
> Bcc:
> Date: Sat, 11 May 2024 07:26:18 -0400 (EDT)
> Subject: RFI: locations with emerging Periodic Cicadas
> Hi -
>
> I am looking for locations where large numbers of the Brood XIX Cicadas
> are emerging, I would like to see whether any birds are feeding on them.
> Places with both cicadas and Mississippi Kites would be awesome.
>
> Thanks
>
> Wayne Hoffman
> Wilmington
>

 

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Date: 5/13/24 2:02 pm
From: Jessica Gryglewicz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe

 

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Date: 5/13/24 1:58 pm
From: Sally Robertson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: RFI: locations with emerging Periodic Cicadas
I’ve been meaning to ask the list about this. My bird seed and suet have
been moving much slower lately and I wondered if the birds are eating
cicadas instead. There have been a lot of cicadas here since late April.
The birds I've seen with cicadas so far (1 each) are Carolina wren,
cardinal and red-eyed vireo.

Sally Robertson
Carrboro, NC
______________________
Sally Robertson
919-817-9805
<sallyerobertson57...>

--------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Wayne Hoffman <whoffman...>
To: carolinabirds <carolinabirds...>
Cc:
Bcc:
Date: Sat, 11 May 2024 07:26:18 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: RFI: locations with emerging Periodic Cicadas
Hi -

I am looking for locations where large numbers of the Brood XIX Cicadas are
emerging, I would like to see whether any birds are feeding on them.
Places with both cicadas and Mississippi Kites would be awesome.

Thanks

Wayne Hoffman
Wilmington

 

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Date: 5/13/24 12:20 pm
From: \Corey, Ed\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: [External] recent opinions on mid range binocs for birding?
Teri,

I’ve used Vortex optics for work for 12 years now (Razor scope, Viper and Diamondback binoculars), and love them, for the durability, but also for their no-questions-asked lifetime warranty when accidents inevitably happen. I’ve had things come back repaired (or replaced with new optics) in as little as 2 weeks before. Not as sure of Celestron’s customer service, but I can HIGHLY recommend Vortex.

Ed Corey
Inventory Biologist
NC Division of Parks and Recreation
NC Department of Natural and Cultural Resources<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.ncdcr.gov/__;!!OToaGQ!vLN1uFev66T3r-Wo2JULBEvOPzJy8CDY9eHlUW04yRdjX8oorbCM5R6pl6ngmOQ-VRZZ--pqBwsYnpou2Hi3QpIe$ >
[Text Description automatically generated]
Office: 919-841-4037
Mobile: 919-208-7864
<Ed.Corey...>
Yorkshire Center
12700 Bayleaf Church Road
Raleigh, NC 27614
Twitter<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://twitter.com/ncculture__;!!OToaGQ!vLN1uFev66T3r-Wo2JULBEvOPzJy8CDY9eHlUW04yRdjX8oorbCM5R6pl6ngmOQ-VRZZ--pqBwsYnpou2HGi7pWy$ > | Facebook<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.facebook.com/NorthCarolinaCulture__;!!OToaGQ!vLN1uFev66T3r-Wo2JULBEvOPzJy8CDY9eHlUW04yRdjX8oorbCM5R6pl6ngmOQ-VRZZ--pqBwsYnpou2JBklax4$ > | Instagram<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.instagram.com/ncculture/__;!!OToaGQ!vLN1uFev66T3r-Wo2JULBEvOPzJy8CDY9eHlUW04yRdjX8oorbCM5R6pl6ngmOQ-VRZZ--pqBwsYnpou2Hln3dO3$ > | YouTube<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLfbnzwVhIdW10LIEnzUY2Q__;!!OToaGQ!vLN1uFev66T3r-Wo2JULBEvOPzJy8CDY9eHlUW04yRdjX8oorbCM5R6pl6ngmOQ-VRZZ--pqBwsYnpou2ESNlEXL$ > | LinkedIn<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.linkedin.com/company/north-carolina-department-of-cultural-resources__;!!OToaGQ!vLN1uFev66T3r-Wo2JULBEvOPzJy8CDY9eHlUW04yRdjX8oorbCM5R6pl6ngmOQ-VRZZ--pqBwsYnpou2Iuu4yBe$ >
Email correspondence to and from this address is subject to the North Carolina Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.

From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> On Behalf Of "Herbert, Teri Lynn"
Sent: Monday, May 13, 2024 3:08 PM
To: Carolinabirds <carolinabirds...>
Subject: [External] recent opinions on mid range binocs for birding?

CAUTION: External email. Do not click links or open attachments unless verified. Report suspicious emails with the Report Message button located on your Outlook menu bar on the Home tab.

My Nikon Monarchs broke this weekend (lens eye cup) and I read this is quite common. They are only 13 years old, so am very disappointed. I can always use my dad’s 1940s binoculars, which still are great! but they are a bit heavy…
I’ve read reviews and narrowed it down to
Celestron Trailseeker ED
and
Vortex Diamondback HD.
What are your opinions and have either of these gotten broken for you? I need something that will last 20 years…(probably more than my age allows, but am planning on a long life, haha).
You can reply just to me if desired, not to the list.
Thank you all very much!!
Teri Lynn

 

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Date: 5/13/24 12:14 pm
From: John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: RFI: locations with emerging Periodic Cicadas
I visited Lake Crabtree County Park today in west Raleigh/Morrisville and
there are still a good number of cicadas calling but as Michael suggested
there are alot of carcasses and obviously spent but living cicadas along
many of the trails. The sound emanating from the myriads in the treetops is
otherworldly.
JC

On Mon, May 13, 2024 at 1:55 PM Lynda Haake <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> I have witnessed Carolina Chickadees and Cardinals feasting on them. FYI.
>
> Lynda
> Sent from my iPad
>
> On May 11, 2024, at 12:50 PM, Michael Fogleman <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
> 
> Birds are definitely feeding on them.
>
> I have a camera in a bluebird box in my backyard. Mom's in there
> incubating and dad has been bringing mostly spiders and cicadas for her to
> eat. Here's a video showing several cicada feedings:
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.michaelfogleman.com/static/bluebird-cicadas.mp4__;!!OToaGQ!urv-ke021xCcM999nOea8YbiVmiqiIR-YPOltevrRXijPipzXQnzLhTcbTyj8nUW3OZhq-bZ-Or0XaSZlt3QrAAI9A$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.michaelfogleman.com/static/bluebird-cicadas.mp4__;!!OToaGQ!oR7jJ7mMzEUMX_lQKwQJPlKVuQ0AQAzrfizNxFZbz-Y2-ymPsFMLxmOjuQ7Zg9yH9xLo0BsgIrCv1GS-jaWx$>
>
> Last night, I saw some screech owl nestlings get their first food delivery
> of the evening from dad, and of course it was a cicada (this was at Harris
> Lake County Park):
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.michaelfogleman.com/static/screech-owl-cicada.mp4__;!!OToaGQ!urv-ke021xCcM999nOea8YbiVmiqiIR-YPOltevrRXijPipzXQnzLhTcbTyj8nUW3OZhq-bZ-Or0XaSZlt283EGE9Q$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.michaelfogleman.com/static/screech-owl-cicada.mp4__;!!OToaGQ!oR7jJ7mMzEUMX_lQKwQJPlKVuQ0AQAzrfizNxFZbz-Y2-ymPsFMLxmOjuQ7Zg9yH9xLo0BsgIrCv1E6H4fA7$>
>
> Cicada numbers there seem pretty high. I measured their noise at 75 dB
> with an app on my phone a few days ago.
>
> I also saw a Red-winged Blackbird eat one at Sandy Creek Park in Durham.
>
> You better hurry up though, it looks like the cicadas are starting to die
> off naturally now, at least here in the Triangle.
>
> Michael Fogleman
> Cary, NC
>
>
> On Sat, May 11, 2024 at 7:26 AM Wayne Hoffman <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> Hi -
>>
>> I am looking for locations where large numbers of the Brood XIX Cicadas
>> are emerging, I would like to see whether any birds are feeding on them.
>> Places with both cicadas and Mississippi Kites would be awesome.
>>
>> Thanks
>>
>> Wayne Hoffman
>> Wilmington
>>
>>

 

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Date: 5/13/24 12:08 pm
From: \Herbert, Teri Lynn\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: recent opinions on mid range binocs for birding?
My Nikon Monarchs broke this weekend (lens eye cup) and I read this is quite common. They are only 13 years old, so am very disappointed. I can always use my dad’s 1940s binoculars, which still are great! but they are a bit heavy…
I’ve read reviews and narrowed it down to
Celestron Trailseeker ED
and
Vortex Diamondback HD.
What are your opinions and have either of these gotten broken for you? I need something that will last 20 years…(probably more than my age allows, but am planning on a long life, haha).
You can reply just to me if desired, not to the list.
Thank you all very much!!
Teri Lynn
 

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Date: 5/13/24 10:55 am
From: Lynda Haake (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: RFI: locations with emerging Periodic Cicadas
 

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Date: 5/13/24 4:26 am
From: Erinn Szarek (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Api apps
Is there a service or application that will put your needs list every hour? I would like a push notification or email if someone submitted a list today. I know I can just refresh ebird and look, but I still I am asking. Erinn 

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