Carolinabirds
Received From Subject
11/16/18 4:04 pm Nathan Gatto (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Forsyth County CBC 1/5/19
11/16/18 1:51 pm Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...> Common Goldeneye
11/16/18 1:08 pm james poling (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Rusty Blackbird, Swannanoa, NC
11/16/18 9:48 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Scope comparison
11/16/18 8:42 am Kyle Kittelberger (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Wintering birds
11/16/18 8:12 am Edith Tatum (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Wintering birds
11/16/18 7:55 am Edith Tatum (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Purple finch
11/16/18 7:41 am Brian B (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Falls lake loon-less
11/15/18 4:50 pm Kyle Kittelberger (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Falls Lake- Rolling View, 11/15: Loon Fallout, Swans
11/15/18 4:02 pm Eric Harrold (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Allison Woods World Falconry Day
11/15/18 3:08 pm Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Cullowhee martin
11/15/18 2:07 pm Eric Harrold (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Mt. Jefferson & Upper Yadkin CBCs
11/15/18 1:58 pm Derb Carter <derbc...> RE: Cullowhee martin
11/15/18 1:41 pm Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Cullowhee martin
11/15/18 1:08 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Cullowhee martin
11/15/18 12:58 pm Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Cullowhee martin
11/15/18 12:50 pm Jeremy Hyman <jhyman...> Re: Cullowhee martin
11/15/18 10:51 am Derb Carter <derbc...> Cullowhee martin
11/15/18 9:12 am Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Roseate Spoonbills on James IS, SC
11/15/18 8:54 am Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Pine Siskin
11/15/18 8:54 am Kyle Kittelberger (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Purple Finches- Raleigh, 11/15
11/15/18 6:24 am JOHN ECKSTINE (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Pine Siskens visiting Hanahan SC
11/15/18 3:40 am Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Purple Finch & Pine Siskins
11/14/18 10:24 pm Rbakelaar (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Martin specimen
11/14/18 6:51 pm Jeremy Hyman <jhyman...> Martin species in Cullowhee, NC
11/14/18 4:43 pm Kyle Kittelberger (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Falls Lake- Rolling View, 11/14: COMMON LOON Fallout
11/14/18 2:31 pm Cindy Pirson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Red breasted nuthatch and juncos
11/14/18 8:51 am Paula Jeannet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Red-breasted Nuthatch
11/14/18 8:16 am Jesse Pope (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Grandfather CBC, December 21st
11/14/18 7:12 am John Ennis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> FOS DE Juncos at Ft Fisher
11/14/18 5:37 am <scaudell...> bald eagle and evening grosbeaks
11/13/18 5:38 pm Kevin Metcalf (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Black Scoters - Mtn. Island Lake 11/13
11/13/18 2:26 pm Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> 2 more Mountain Christmas Bird Counts
11/13/18 10:51 am Will Cook <cwcook...> Re: Request Needed...Jay Chandler
11/13/18 10:13 am Jay Chandler <jccjr56...> Request Needed...Jay Chandler
11/13/18 10:03 am M Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Fancy Gap, VA
11/13/18 9:58 am M Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Fancy Gap, VA
11/13/18 9:29 am Gretchen Schramm (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Blue-headed Vireo
11/13/18 9:20 am Chris Clarke (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> FOS (Slate-colored) Junco
11/13/18 8:31 am ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Mature bald eagle Hatteras island
11/13/18 7:25 am Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Jordan Lake (NC) CBC
11/13/18 6:16 am Corey, Ed <ed.corey...> They're on the way! -- Evening Grosbeak in VA - 11Nov2018
11/13/18 3:42 am Gretchen Schramm (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fancy Gap, VA
11/12/18 5:13 pm KC Foggin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Nuthatch
11/12/18 4:58 pm Mary Bridges <maryhuot...> Nuthatch
11/12/18 1:50 pm Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> eBird Trip Summary - Granville Co
11/12/18 12:32 pm Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...> First of season birds
11/11/18 3:15 pm John Fussell <jofuss...> Bar-tailed Godwit and Long-billed Curlew at east Shackleford Banks, NC
11/11/18 2:08 pm jcox3222 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Romney Street Charleston
11/11/18 1:37 pm Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fox sparrow, Coinjock, NC
11/11/18 11:10 am oksanaduck (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> All 3 Nuthatches
11/11/18 10:30 am oksanaduck (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Pine Siskin Numbers Increasing
11/11/18 9:49 am Thomas Krakauer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Scientists Discover A Rare Bird That's A Hybrid Of Three Different Species
11/11/18 7:16 am Bert Fisher (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> FOS Junco in Hillsborough
11/11/18 3:07 am Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Nine Common Ravens, Rockingham County, NC
11/11/18 2:17 am Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Huntington Beach SP - Roseate Spoonbills, Saltmarsh Sparrows, Red Knots, Merlin, 100s of Black Skimmers
11/10/18 6:02 pm Judy Halleron (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> purple finch & pine siskins
11/10/18 5:21 pm Tom Baxter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Franklins gull today at Fort Fisher Federal Point/rocks
11/10/18 3:55 pm Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Good and late birds on Hatteras Island
11/10/18 2:42 pm jcox3222 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Evening grosbeaks
11/10/18 12:41 pm Derb Carter <derbc...> Mattamuskeet birds
11/10/18 7:27 am Rob G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Evening Grosbeak
11/10/18 7:01 am James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> White-winged Dove still present, Mount Pleasant, SC
11/10/18 5:28 am Edith Tatum (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Evening Grosbeak
11/10/18 4:53 am Will Cook <cwcook...> Fwd: Egret in question
11/9/18 6:02 pm <Rubberhead...> <rubberhead...> Re: Could this be the year?
11/9/18 5:09 pm Ann Truesdale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Donnelley WMA - Colleton Co, SC - white pelicans and spoonbills
11/9/18 1:51 pm Wayne K. Forsythe <wforsythe...> Possible, Evening Grosbeak Sightings
11/9/18 12:38 pm James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> White-winged Dove, Mount Pleasant, SC
11/9/18 10:51 am DPratt14 <DPratt14...> Fwd: Watauga County egret
11/9/18 8:22 am Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...> Henderson Cty, NC
11/9/18 8:07 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: FW: Watauga County egret
11/9/18 7:41 am Will Cook <cwcook...> Re: FW: Watauga County egret
11/9/18 6:10 am bruce young (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Chapel hill bird club trip Sunday
11/9/18 5:59 am Nate Swick <nswick...> Re: FW: Watauga County egret
11/8/18 7:09 pm Will Cook <cwcook...> Re: Could this be the year?
11/8/18 6:54 pm Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> eBird Trip Summary - for 11/08/2018
11/8/18 6:25 pm Clyde Sorenson <sorenson...> Re: Falls Lake- Rolling View, 11/8
11/8/18 6:22 pm <badgerboy...> Re: Weird egret in Watauga Co.
11/8/18 4:05 pm Kyle Kittelberger (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Falls Lake- Rolling View, 11/8
11/8/18 1:58 pm Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Could this be the year?
11/8/18 1:46 pm Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Could this be the year?
11/8/18 1:00 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Could this be the year?
11/8/18 12:29 pm Steve Compton <scompton1251...> Re: Spartanburg SC CBC
11/8/18 12:27 pm Steve Compton <scompton1251...> Re: Could this be the year?
11/8/18 12:08 pm \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Could this be the year?
11/8/18 11:00 am David Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Spartanburg SC CBC
11/8/18 9:26 am Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Pine Siskin Numbers Increasing
11/8/18 9:14 am David Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: FW: Watauga County egret
11/7/18 9:08 pm Matt Janson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: FW: Watauga County egret
11/7/18 7:32 pm <mtove...> FW: Watauga County egret
11/7/18 12:45 pm Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Watauga County egret
11/7/18 11:34 am Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Watauga County egret
11/7/18 11:25 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Watauga County egret
11/7/18 11:13 am <badgerboy...> Re: Watauga County egret
11/7/18 8:52 am Derb Carter <derbc...> Watauga County egret
11/6/18 1:32 pm <badgerboy...> Re: Cattle Egret Watauga County Deep Gap area
11/6/18 1:15 pm Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Patriot's Point--being developed?
11/6/18 9:23 am Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Raleigh CBC is December 15
11/6/18 8:58 am Paula Jeannet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: American Kestrel
11/6/18 8:41 am Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> American Kestrel
11/6/18 8:31 am <badgerboy...> Cattle Egret Watauga County Deep Gap area
11/6/18 7:51 am \Brian O'Shea\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Raleigh CBC is December 15
11/5/18 4:58 pm Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Alligator River NWR CBC
11/5/18 4:55 pm Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bodie/Pea Christmas Count
11/5/18 4:05 pm JOHN Cox (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Patriots Point developent
11/5/18 2:02 pm Jelmer Poelstra (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fw: Black-headed Gull at Mason Inlet, New Hanover Co, NC
11/5/18 12:24 pm Patricia Tice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hummingbird in Raleigh! Red-breasted nuthatch and Phoebe
11/4/18 5:11 pm Jack Rogers <jack...> Patriot's Point--being developed?
11/4/18 4:55 pm Kyle Kittelberger (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Falls Lake- Rolling View 11/4
11/4/18 3:54 pm EASTMAN, CAROLINE <EASTMAN...> RE: It's official! Fayetteville Woodpeckers
11/4/18 3:22 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> It's official! Fayetteville Woodpeckers
11/4/18 2:45 pm james poling (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lark Sparrow, Warren Wilson College, Swannanoa, NC.
11/4/18 11:31 am Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> More Buncombe County, NC birds
11/4/18 11:23 am Bert Fisher (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Pine Siskin and Yellow-rumped Warbler in Hillsborough
11/4/18 6:43 am JILL MIDGETT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bluebird pair visiting nestbox
11/4/18 5:42 am <hilton...> <hilton...> Hilton Pond 08/01/18 (Mammals Galore Around Hilton Pond)
11/3/18 2:40 pm patty Gmail (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> An article on Worlds first Bird Friendly arena
11/3/18 2:04 pm \Herbert, Teri Lynn\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> French film with BIRDS!
11/3/18 12:04 pm Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Pine Siskins
11/3/18 10:08 am Derb Carter <derbc...> Cave Seallows Ft Fisher
11/3/18 8:17 am Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...> Lake Julian/Buncombe Cty., NC
11/3/18 7:49 am bruce young (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> CHBC trip to new hope impoundment
11/3/18 5:28 am Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Coinjock & Pea Island NWR, NC
11/3/18 4:41 am Kent (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lower Saluda CBC Dec. 29- Columbia SC
11/3/18 3:20 am Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Kitty Hawk Christmas Bird Count Dec 15
11/2/18 5:49 pm Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: confusing fall warbler for a so-so birder
11/2/18 5:13 pm Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: confusing fall warbler for a so-so birder
11/2/18 4:40 pm Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> confusing fall warbler for a so-so birder
11/2/18 3:24 pm andrew thornton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Apparent large flock of Franklin's Gulls at Ecusta Pond, Transylvania Co NC
11/2/18 3:15 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Apparent large flock of Franklin's Gulls at Ecusta Pond, Transylvania Co NC
11/2/18 2:49 pm Jelmer Poelstra (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Apparent large flock of Franklin's Gulls at Ecusta Pond, Transylvania Co NC
11/2/18 10:40 am Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Covey of quail crosses farm path
11/2/18 6:57 am Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Baird's SP at Warren Wilson ? NC
11/2/18 6:35 am Ben Ringer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Purple Finches
11/1/18 6:39 pm <badgerboy...> Brookshire Park Boone HCAS bird walk Saturday 8AM
11/1/18 1:35 pm ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Unusual bird - very late for here
11/1/18 1:33 pm Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Purple Finch Numbers Building
11/1/18 1:25 pm Jessie Dale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> purple finch
11/1/18 8:14 am Aaron Steed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Baird’s Sandpiper, Warren Wilson College
11/1/18 7:36 am \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Late fall migrants in northern Watauga County, NC; 1 November 2018
10/31/18 6:45 am FRANK LAWKINS (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Clay Colored Sparrow
10/30/18 5:26 pm william haddad (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> A Yellow-rumped Warbler Experience
10/30/18 2:34 pm Sherri Carpenter <sherric...> Purple finches
10/30/18 10:45 am \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lingering Blackpoll Warbler still present in Watauga County, NC; 30 October 2018
10/29/18 5:13 pm Aaron Given (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Pale “Solitary” Vireo - Kiawah Island, SC
10/29/18 4:57 pm Birding Poet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: clay colored sparrow at Points Point
10/29/18 4:36 pm jcox3222 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: clay colored sparrow at Points Point
10/29/18 2:38 pm james poling (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Surf Scoter, Owen Park, Swannanoa, NC today
10/29/18 1:22 pm Ron Clark <waxwing...> Sunset Beach Night-herons
10/29/18 10:12 am Birding Poet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Clay-colored Sparrow at Patriots Point
10/29/18 8:40 am Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Clay-colored Sparrow at Patriots Point
10/29/18 8:16 am Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: FOS YB Sapsuckers Sunday
10/29/18 5:35 am Bill Majoros, Ph.D. <william.majoros...> Good weekend birding around Durham
10/29/18 5:05 am John Ennis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> FOS YB Sapsuckers Sunday
10/28/18 4:32 pm Alan Gamache <bird...> Rusty Blackbird, New Bern, nc
10/28/18 9:19 am Sharyn Caudell <scaudell...> FOSB junco and red breasted nuthatch
10/27/18 7:02 pm Peter Stangel <peter...> Awesome Birding - Huntington Beach State Park, SC
10/27/18 4:21 pm Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Purple Swamphen - invasive predator
10/27/18 2:21 pm Cornell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Swamphen
10/27/18 1:48 pm Derb Carter <derbc...> Swamphen
10/27/18 1:20 pm Steve Compton <scompton1251...> Re: Purple Swamphen now named as Gray-headed Swamphen
10/27/18 1:08 pm DPratt14 <DPratt14...> Purple Swamphen variation and taxonomy
10/27/18 12:26 pm Steve Shultz <sshultz...> Lake Mattamuskeet Trip Dec 1-2 - Carolina Bird Club
10/27/18 5:37 am Thea and Mark Sinclair (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> purple finches
10/27/18 5:20 am Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Purple Finches
10/26/18 7:09 pm Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Purple Swamphen now named as Gray-headed Swamphen
10/26/18 7:00 pm David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Purple Swamphen now named as Gray-headed Swamphen
10/26/18 3:55 pm David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Purple Swamphen, Bulls Island, Cape Romain NWR
10/26/18 3:10 pm John Ennis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: [External] FT Fisher Yesterday
10/26/18 8:16 am Helms, J <j.chris.helms...> RE: [External] FT Fisher Yesterday
10/26/18 5:20 am John Ennis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> FT Fisher Yesterday
10/25/18 6:32 pm <susan...> Mattamuskeet CBC
10/25/18 3:05 pm Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> rcki and ybsa
10/25/18 2:47 pm Bert Fisher (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Wood Thrush in Hillsborough
10/25/18 5:02 am Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Red-breasted nuthatch, Coinjock, NC
10/25/18 4:51 am ncdarrylin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Unsubscribe
10/25/18 4:41 am Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Purple Finch
10/24/18 4:33 pm Mike Judd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> unsubscribe
10/24/18 3:38 pm Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Red-breasted Nuthatch
10/24/18 1:03 pm Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Santee Bird Walk November 3 - request not to wear bright colors
10/24/18 9:18 am Hilda Flamholtz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: birding the Anderson Regional Airport, SC
10/24/18 8:32 am Bert Fisher (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Cerulean Warbler in Hillsborough
10/24/18 8:09 am Birding Poet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: birding the Anderson Regional Airport, SC
10/24/18 7:59 am Steve Patterson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> birding the Anderson Regional Airport, SC
10/23/18 5:50 pm Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Christmas BIrd Counts
10/23/18 2:21 pm WALTER KENT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Purple Finch
10/23/18 11:47 am \Herbert, Teri Lynn\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Free Birding journals
10/22/18 5:11 pm Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Vesper Sparrow, Purp. Finch, Nelson's Sp. - Pea Island, Dare, NC
10/22/18 3:32 pm Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> More info on Kirtland's Warbler in Duck, NC
10/22/18 1:12 pm ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Eastern Phoebe 2018-2019
10/22/18 11:01 am \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Interesting sightings from northern Watauga County, NC—Oct 22, 2018
10/22/18 10:07 am Judi Durr (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Purple finches
10/22/18 8:54 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: October 2017 report of Kirtland's Warbler in Duck , NC
10/21/18 6:18 pm Peter Stangel <peter...> Snake Safety for Birders
10/21/18 5:14 pm Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> October 2017 report of Kirtland's Warbler in Duck , NC
10/21/18 12:45 pm WALTER KENT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> purple finches
10/21/18 6:43 am Corey, Ed <ed.corey...> RE: [External] hudsonian godwit at north pond salt marsh trail - 4 pm EDT
10/20/18 1:22 pm Kevin Hudson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> hudsonian godwit at north pond salt marsh trail - 4 pm EDT
10/20/18 10:38 am Peter Stangel <peter...> Phinizy Swamp Warbler Wave
10/20/18 10:37 am Peter Stangel <peter...> Warbler Wave at Phinizy Swamp
10/20/18 10:34 am Will Cook <cwcook...> Messages not getting through
10/19/18 1:42 pm Will Cook <cwcook...> Re: Politics in Carolina Birds....
10/19/18 1:08 pm Kurt Frieders <gwb_rules...> Re: Politics in Carolina Birds....
10/19/18 10:01 am Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Marsh Wren - no
10/19/18 9:26 am Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Politics on Carolina Bird
10/19/18 9:25 am Steve Compton <scompton1251...> Re: Politics on Carolina Bird
10/19/18 8:54 am Bill Guion (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Politics on Carolina Bird
10/19/18 6:48 am John Scavetto <jscavetto...> Re: Politics on Carolina Bird
10/19/18 6:14 am \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Watauga County migrants this morning, 19 October 2018
10/19/18 4:59 am Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Gray-cheeked T & RB Grosbeak - Outer Banks, NC
10/19/18 4:20 am Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Politics on Carolina Bird
10/18/18 8:03 pm Loren Hintz <ldhintz...> Birding spots on US 70 east
10/18/18 7:15 pm Cherrie Sneed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Fort Lamar Heritage Preserve now an Ebird Hotspot
10/18/18 7:01 pm Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...> Political postings on this list serve
10/18/18 6:35 pm Caroline Harvey (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Politics on Carolina Bird
10/18/18 3:31 pm Steve Johnson <stevejohnson2...> thrushes near Santee, SC on 18 October
10/18/18 3:04 pm Bert Fisher (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Return (?) of Rose-breasted Grosbeak
10/18/18 11:57 am Daniel Kaplan (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lincoln's Sparrow in Durham
10/18/18 5:45 am \Koches, Jennifer\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: Proposed threatened listing of eastern Black Rail
10/18/18 4:55 am Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Dare County/ Buxton Hummingbirds update
10/17/18 10:35 am ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Dare County/ Buxton Hummingbirds update
10/17/18 9:54 am Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: When Donald Trump tries to fix man-made climate change, will birders vote for him?
10/17/18 9:51 am Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Proposed threatened listing of eastern Black Rail
10/17/18 9:20 am Joe0910 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: When Donald Trump tries to fix man-made climate change, will birders vote for him?
10/17/18 9:07 am Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> When Donald Trump tries to fix man-made climate change, will birders vote for him?
10/17/18 8:48 am Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hurricanes and birds and global warming
10/17/18 8:12 am James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Fort Lamar Heritage Preserve now an Ebird Hotspot
10/17/18 8:08 am Brian B (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Dare county
10/17/18 7:17 am Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Fort Lamar Heritage Preserve now an Ebird Hotspot
10/17/18 5:15 am Bill Majoros, Ph.D. <william.majoros...> Good weekend birding around Durham
10/17/18 4:30 am Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fort Lamar Heritage Preserve now an Ebird Hotspot
 
Back to top
Date: 11/16/18 4:04 pm
From: Nathan Gatto (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Forsyth County CBC 1/5/19
Carolina Birders,
We are going to have the Forsyth County Christmas Bird Count on January
5th, 2019. This date is a bit later than we have done the past few years.
If you would like to participate with our count, please let me know. Feel
free to contact me via email.

Best Regards,
--
Nathan Gatto
Forsyth Audubon
Winston-Salem, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/16/18 1:51 pm
From: Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...>
Subject: Common Goldeneye
Folks,
Ron Selvey reported 3 Common Goldeneyes at Lake Osceola in Henderson Cty. at about 12:30 PM this date. I observed these birds at about 2:00 PM!
Wayne


Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 11/16/18 1:08 pm
From: james poling (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Rusty Blackbird, Swannanoa, NC
I found several Rusty Blackbirds in the fields at Warren Wilson College, Swannanoa, NC today.




James Poling
624 Azalea Avenue
Black Mountain, NC 28711 USA
<james.poling...> <mailto:<james.poling...>
www.jamesnewtonpoling.com <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.jamesnewtonpoling.com_&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=23R2YdQN4wfoAxZfcRpeqg-3a0-S7iDUbjgzfKoDygo&s=dDI4UY1waXNJLY2AticNHcCVztm9vIqBOhcbzyx3td8&e=>
828-707-7413





 

Back to top
Date: 11/16/18 9:48 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Scope comparison
Since optics queries are a recurring thing on the list I thought I would summarize a test I did with a bevy of scopes just now. If you don’t care, you know where the delete button is.

The lineup:

Swarowski AT-80 with 20-60 zoom eyepiece, 80mm objective maybe 15 years old.
Kowa TSN 774 with 25-60 zoom eyepiece, 77mm objective 5 years old
Kowa 554 with 15-45 zoom eyepiece, 55mm objective, new
Vortex Razor HD with 22-48 zoom eyepiece, 65mm objective, new
Bushnell (spacemaster type) with 15-45x eyepiece, 60mm objective 15-20 years old.

We set up a couple fresh dollar bills in the shade (dollar bills have about 17 different font sizes and patterns, good for fine comparisons) and some pastel colored small things and lined the scopes up 45 yards away or so.

Results: the two big scopes up top killed the competition, and between them the newer Kowa was the nicer, sharper one. That’s the most important result because the Kowa is mine. :-)

Next tier was the other three scopes, and I would rank them
Kowa 554
Vortex Razor HD
Bushnell
But the differences were not as great as I expected, and in one case were in a different direction than I expected. I thought the old Bushnell would be WAY worse than the brand new Kowa and Vortex, but the Bushnell was quite sharp, only a small step down. I expected the bigger Vortex to be great, partly because I have heard good things about that scope, and it’s significantly bigger, but it had noticeable chromatic aberration at high contrast (orange/purple fringing), and it didn’t seem sharper or brighter or better at seeing colors than the Kowa, which is MUCH tinier. I had even kind of expected the new Razor might be sharper than the old Swarowski, but no, size won out in that comparison.

So I’m happy for the results. For our purposes, I the little Kowa is great, the Vortex is also fine but a lot bulkier, and in a pinch the Bushnell would even do. We’re doing a lot of work with scopes on window mounts - small is good. But I can’t really love a scope like the Razor that has noticeable flaws like the color fringing, even if I will use it (gladly). I had the same issue with some Vortex 10x binocs I bought recently. Fine, sharp, but I don’t love them (they also have color fringing in bright contrasty situations like a backlit bird on a wire). If I really cared I would repeat the test on a dim cloudy twilight, where the small Kowa might show weakness, but that’s too much effort and I have the answers I need.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC


 

Back to top
Date: 11/16/18 8:42 am
From: Kyle Kittelberger (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Wintering birds
At my house, the 3 Purple Finches (1 male, 2 female/immature) continue this morning, with the latter two almost continuously feeding. While I was outside filling up seed just now, I heard a few Red-breasted Nuthatches tooting in the trees, such a lovely sound! Waiting for them to come down and feed on the suet. I've only seen a single Junco on and off.
Cheers,Kyle KittelbergerRaleigh, NC
On Friday, November 16, 2018, 11:12:08 AM EST, Edith Tatum <carolinabirds...> wrote:

I just put out my homemade lard, peanut butter and cornmeal suet.  My Pine Warbler and Eastern Bluebirds found it immediately.  Chipping and White-throated Sparrows as ell as Juncos are feeding on the seeds I pit on the ground.  All is well in my yard.
Edith Tatum
Durham

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 11/16/18 8:12 am
From: Edith Tatum (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Wintering birds
I just put out my homemade lard, peanut butter and cornmeal suet. My Pine Warbler and Eastern Bluebirds found it immediately. Chipping and White-throated Sparrows as ell as Juncos are feeding on the seeds I pit on the ground. All is well in my yard.
Edith Tatum
Durham

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 11/16/18 7:55 am
From: Edith Tatum (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Purple finch
I just saw a female Purple Finch in my yard.
The first PuFi for long time.
Edith Tatum
Durham NC
Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 11/16/18 7:41 am
From: Brian B (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Falls lake loon-less
Made very brief stops at rollingview and then sandling, zero loons right now! This is typical for large loon flocks here, the big numbers leave quick, especially with this turbidity. Though i was more interested in the possible pacific, which may or may not have left with the flock.

I walked the shore looking for martins and hoopoes but no luck.

Horned grebe and some smattering of ducks and ubiquitous cormorants.

Brian Bockhahn
Durham NC
 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/18 4:50 pm
From: Kyle Kittelberger (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Falls Lake- Rolling View, 11/15: Loon Fallout, Swans
Hi everyone,
The massive Common Loon fallout continues at Falls Lake. I returned to Rolling View this evening to see how today's rainy weather might have affected the birds, especially the loons. I was hoping that the rain would have prevented all those loons from moving on, and it certainly did... What a spectacle it was, I smashed yesterday's record with a truly astounding 819 COMMON LOONS!!! This was a very meticulous count that took me almost an hour of tallying, all of these loons were seen from the direction of the main swim beach; there were no loons when I arrived in the back section of the lake. Due to how high the water is from all of the flooding (I believe higher than after Hurricane Florence, heard there is a chance they might close Rolling View), I spent a good chunk of my time scoping from a spot in the forest with a good vantage point of the lake. A good chunk of the loons were close to the Sandling Beach shore, with a handful of rafts closer to the middle of the lake, but a scope is necessary; all the birds were spread out from the cove to the area in front of shelter 5 at Sandling. While I recorded 819, I believe there may have been another one or two hundred birds out there (so possible there were 1000 loons out there) including birds that were past the heat shimmer that I was not able to count. 
I did have a single interesting loon that I am leaving as loon sp. This bird was the only loon that I saw fly in and land on the water, and it remained by itself for the rest of the duration of my stay. It seemed to have a paler uniform gray neck (whereas the Commons have a pretty dark gray, almost black neck). This loon also had possible hints of chinstrap, but this was tough to see with the rainy, gray weather conditions), and the bill was held straight out. The bird looked like a good potential candidate for Pacific Loon, but it was a tough call. 
Other than loons, I had two TUNDRA SWANS, a great bird for Falls Lake. These were close to Sandling Beach on the opposite shore. I had a raft of Ring-necked Ducks that seemed to keep flying from one spot to the next as they popped up in my view several times. Perhaps there were more than one group of Ring-neckeds out there. There was also a huge movement of cormorants, I estimated at least 1200; there was a continuous stream of birds for almost an hour. 

Below is the list of water birds that I had; here is my eBird list too: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S49959503&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=hK8hsuT4vpHgf9RqWktdKteyxmXr32rWHbzz2b5-wN8&s=72j7-IIF7BYd6DJ1aK-aGVsLdizztGW38h0ETkGdCVo&e=.
Canada Goose- 11
TUNDRA SWAN- 2Gadwall- 2Ring-necked Duck- 15duck sp.- 10 (possible more RNDU but very far away)Pied-billed Grebe- 18Horned Grebe- 10Bonaparte's GullRing-billed GullCOMMON LOON- 819+LOON SP.- 1 possible PacificDouble-crested Cormorant- 1200

Hope everyone that has an inland lake nearby is checking the waters for loons! Best to enjoy this massive loon fallout while it still lasts.
Cheers,Kyle KittelbergerRaleigh, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/18 4:02 pm
From: Eric Harrold (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Allison Woods World Falconry Day
If you would be interested in an opportunity to see or photograph some
falconry raptors up close, you may come to Allison Woods near Statesville
this Saturday (11/17) between 10 and 2 for the World Falconry Day event
sponsored by the North Carolina Falconers Guild. Please check the link for
details.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.allisonwoodsoutdoorlearningcenter.com_world-2Dfalconry-2Dday&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=rwnS1NwtEeYCbHMIz7k2Pjx6DNow9dVAoCxPdIOjvec&s=pzpt1_g9289VtYLaRxdnL-tKF7OW-T7dbY8_0L9L4n0&e=

Eric Harrold
Hays, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/18 3:08 pm
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Cullowhee martin
Another slightly more outlandish possibility is Brown-throated Martin
(formerly known as Plain Martin).

If I were in East Africa or Southern Africa and Jeremy’s Martin flew by, I
would call it a Brown-throated Martin.

If only to eliminate it as a possibility, tomorrow I will email some
African experts about Brown-throated Martin measurements.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

On Thursday, November 15, 2018, Derb Carter <derbc...> wrote:

> So much for measuring by photographs. That could change things. Below
> are listed reported wing chord measurements in Birds of North and Middle
> America (or Neotropical Birds Online if not in the former) in order for
> males and females of each species (longest avg to shortest with reported
> range).
>
>
>
> Male Purple 146.3 139-153
>
> Male Carib 143.5 134-149
>
> Male Cuban 142.5 140-145
>
> Female Purple 142.3 136-147
>
> Female Cuban 140.0
>
> Female Carib 140.0 135.5-148
>
> MaleSinaloa 136.7 136-138
>
> Cullowhee 135.0
>
>
>
> From these measurements, Sinaloa is obviously back in play. Wing chord is
> below the average of all three species (no measurements for female
> Sinaloa), very close to male Sinaloa (would expect female to be slightly
> shorter), and actually shorter than all reported measurements for Caribbean
> or Cuban except one male Caribbean. Also very close to shortest female
> Caribbean and no range reported for female Cuban. But 135 is notably below
> the averages for Cuban and Caribbean.
>
>
>
> Derb Carter
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* Jeremy Hyman [mailto:<jhyman...>]
> *Sent:* Thursday, November 15, 2018 3:50 PM
> *To:* <carolinabirds...>; Derb Carter
> *Subject:* Re: Cullowhee martin
>
>
>
> Hi Folks,
>
> The wing chord of the bird is 135mm. Let me know if anyone wants to know
> any other measurements or see other photos. I think it will be a few days
> before someone from the museum picks it up.
>
> -Jeremy
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> *From:* <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...>
> on behalf of Derb Carter <derbc...>
> *Sent:* Thursday, November 15, 2018 1:50 PM
> *To:* <carolinabirds...>
> *Subject:* Cullowhee martin
>
>
>
> I have a fair amount of experience with all the Progne martins in the
> Americas, except Galapagos. I think the bird found, photographed, and
> posted in the CBC gallery is almost certainly either a Cuban, Caribbean, or
> Sinaloa Martin, any of which would be an extraordinary record. Female
> plumages of these species are very similar. My limited experience with
> Sinaloa was years ago when it was considered a subspecies of Purple.
> Sinaloa is quite rare within its range in western Mexico, which is much
> more remote from western NC. It is smaller than the other two. This is
> imprecise from the photos, but my estimate of the wing chord in the
> specimen is 142-143 mm which is outside the reported range for Sinaloa of
> 136-138 mm, and within the range 134-149 and close to the mean 143.5 of
> Caribbean (I could not find measurements for Cuban).
>
>
>
> I compared the posted photos to some photos I took of Cuban Martins on
> recent trips and it is generally identical to some in the photos. This
> does not, however, eliminate Caribbean because in female plumage it is
> essentially identical to Cuban (male Caribbeans are white below; male
> Cubans solid blue/purple). I checked some references that say the white
> below is more restricted on Caribbean than on Cuban, but in looking at
> photos of both species I really see little difference. One thing I did
> notice in photos of each species is the undertail covert of female
> Caribbean is always pure white, while the undertail covert of many but not
> all Cuban seems to have a few dark feathers. I have not seen this
> mentioned in guides. The Cullowhee bird has a pure white undertail.
>
>
>
> Hopefully further investigation will reveal the identification, but my
> guess from the photos is either Caribbean or Cuban.
>
>
>
> Derb Carter
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/18 2:07 pm
From: Eric Harrold (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mt. Jefferson & Upper Yadkin CBCs
Folks,

It's that time of year again, as others have already pointed out. While it
looks as though I will have "sufficient" coverage for these counts, I'm
always willing to have more folks come on board. The Upper Yadkin count has
areas that lack in coverage in the southern portion of the circle along the
Wilkes-Alexander Co line. The date for Mt. Jeff is December 14th and the
Upper Yadkin date is January 3rd. Thanks in advance to anyone willing and
able to participate.

Eric Harrold
Hays, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/18 1:58 pm
From: Derb Carter <derbc...>
Subject: RE: Cullowhee martin
So much for measuring by photographs. That could change things. Below are listed reported wing chord measurements in Birds of North and Middle America (or Neotropical Birds Online if not in the former) in order for males and females of each species (longest avg to shortest with reported range).

Male Purple 146.3 139-153
Male Carib 143.5 134-149
Male Cuban 142.5 140-145
Female Purple 142.3 136-147
Female Cuban 140.0
Female Carib 140.0 135.5-148
MaleSinaloa 136.7 136-138
Cullowhee 135.0

From these measurements, Sinaloa is obviously back in play. Wing chord is below the average of all three species (no measurements for female Sinaloa), very close to male Sinaloa (would expect female to be slightly shorter), and actually shorter than all reported measurements for Caribbean or Cuban except one male Caribbean. Also very close to shortest female Caribbean and no range reported for female Cuban. But 135 is notably below the averages for Cuban and Caribbean.

Derb Carter


From: Jeremy Hyman [mailto:<jhyman...>]
Sent: Thursday, November 15, 2018 3:50 PM
To: <carolinabirds...>; Derb Carter
Subject: Re: Cullowhee martin


Hi Folks,

The wing chord of the bird is 135mm. Let me know if anyone wants to know any other measurements or see other photos. I think it will be a few days before someone from the museum picks it up.

-Jeremy

________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...><mailto:<carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...><mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>> on behalf of Derb Carter <derbc...><mailto:<derbc...>>
Sent: Thursday, November 15, 2018 1:50 PM
To: <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>
Subject: Cullowhee martin


I have a fair amount of experience with all the Progne martins in the Americas, except Galapagos. I think the bird found, photographed, and posted in the CBC gallery is almost certainly either a Cuban, Caribbean, or Sinaloa Martin, any of which would be an extraordinary record. Female plumages of these species are very similar. My limited experience with Sinaloa was years ago when it was considered a subspecies of Purple. Sinaloa is quite rare within its range in western Mexico, which is much more remote from western NC. It is smaller than the other two. This is imprecise from the photos, but my estimate of the wing chord in the specimen is 142-143 mm which is outside the reported range for Sinaloa of 136-138 mm, and within the range 134-149 and close to the mean 143.5 of Caribbean (I could not find measurements for Cuban).



I compared the posted photos to some photos I took of Cuban Martins on recent trips and it is generally identical to some in the photos. This does not, however, eliminate Caribbean because in female plumage it is essentially identical to Cuban (male Caribbeans are white below; male Cubans solid blue/purple). I checked some references that say the white below is more restricted on Caribbean than on Cuban, but in looking at photos of both species I really see little difference. One thing I did notice in photos of each species is the undertail covert of female Caribbean is always pure white, while the undertail covert of many but not all Cuban seems to have a few dark feathers. I have not seen this mentioned in guides. The Cullowhee bird has a pure white undertail.



Hopefully further investigation will reveal the identification, but my guess from the photos is either Caribbean or Cuban.



Derb Carter

 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/18 1:41 pm
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Cullowhee martin
As sometimes happens with phone photos, there was some ambiguity about which way was up. I think I have them all right way up now. I also uploaded them at double the resolution that I normally use.

Kent Fiala

On 11/15/2018 4:07 PM, Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> Jeremy:
>
> Thanks for uploading the 4 photos onto the CBC Photo Gallery.  Can you or Kent rotate the 3rd photo 180 degrees? That one, and I think #2 and maybe #4, were uploaded upside down -- at least the ruler is upside down.  But, I'm getting dizzy trying to see the underside of the bird (#3) in normal view -- head at the top of the photo and tail at the bottom.
>
> Thanks.
>
> Harry LeGrand
>
> On Thu, Nov 15, 2018 at 3:50 PM Jeremy Hyman <jhyman...> <mailto:<jhyman...>> wrote:
>
> Hi Folks,
>
> The wing chord of the bird is 135mm. Let me know if anyone wants to know any other measurements or see other photos. I think it will be a few days before someone from the museum picks it up.
>
> -Jeremy
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> *From:* <carolinabirds-request...> <mailto:<carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> <mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>> on behalf of Derb Carter <derbc...> <mailto:<derbc...>>
> *Sent:* Thursday, November 15, 2018 1:50 PM
> *To:* <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>
> *Subject:* Cullowhee martin
>
> I have a fair amount of experience with all the Progne martins in the Americas, except Galapagos.    I think the bird found, photographed, and posted in the CBC gallery is almost certainly either a Cuban, Caribbean, or Sinaloa Martin, any of which would be an extraordinary record.  Female plumages of these species are very similar.  My limited experience with Sinaloa was years ago when it was considered a subspecies of Purple.  Sinaloa is quite rare within its range in western Mexico, which is much more remote from western NC.  It is smaller than the other two.  This is imprecise from the photos, but my estimate of the wing chord in the specimen is 142-143 mm which is outside the reported range for Sinaloa of 136-138 mm, and within the range 134-149 and close to the mean 143.5 of Caribbean (I could not find measurements for Cuban).
>
> I compared the posted photos to some photos I took of Cuban Martins on recent trips and it is generally identical to some in the photos.  This does not, however, eliminate Caribbean  because in female plumage it is essentially identical to Cuban (male Caribbeans are white below; male Cubans solid blue/purple).  I checked some references that say the white below is more restricted on Caribbean than on Cuban, but in looking at photos of both species I really see little difference.  One thing I did notice in photos of each species is the undertail covert of female Caribbean is always pure white, while the undertail covert of many but not all Cuban seems to have a few dark feathers.  I have not seen this mentioned in guides.  The Cullowhee bird has a pure white undertail.
>
> Hopefully further investigation will reveal the identification, but my guess from the photos is either Caribbean or Cuban.
>
> Derb Carter
>


 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/18 1:08 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Cullowhee martin
Jeremy:

Thanks for uploading the 4 photos onto the CBC Photo Gallery. Can you or
Kent rotate the 3rd photo 180 degrees? That one, and I think #2 and maybe
#4, were uploaded upside down -- at least the ruler is upside down. But,
I'm getting dizzy trying to see the underside of the bird (#3) in normal
view -- head at the top of the photo and tail at the bottom.

Thanks.

Harry LeGrand

On Thu, Nov 15, 2018 at 3:50 PM Jeremy Hyman <jhyman...> wrote:

> Hi Folks,
>
> The wing chord of the bird is 135mm. Let me know if anyone wants to know
> any other measurements or see other photos. I think it will be a few days
> before someone from the museum picks it up.
>
> -Jeremy
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...>
> on behalf of Derb Carter <derbc...>
> *Sent:* Thursday, November 15, 2018 1:50 PM
> *To:* <carolinabirds...>
> *Subject:* Cullowhee martin
>
>
> I have a fair amount of experience with all the Progne martins in the
> Americas, except Galapagos. I think the bird found, photographed, and
> posted in the CBC gallery is almost certainly either a Cuban, Caribbean, or
> Sinaloa Martin, any of which would be an extraordinary record. Female
> plumages of these species are very similar. My limited experience with
> Sinaloa was years ago when it was considered a subspecies of Purple.
> Sinaloa is quite rare within its range in western Mexico, which is much
> more remote from western NC. It is smaller than the other two. This is
> imprecise from the photos, but my estimate of the wing chord in the
> specimen is 142-143 mm which is outside the reported range for Sinaloa of
> 136-138 mm, and within the range 134-149 and close to the mean 143.5 of
> Caribbean (I could not find measurements for Cuban).
>
>
>
> I compared the posted photos to some photos I took of Cuban Martins on
> recent trips and it is generally identical to some in the photos. This
> does not, however, eliminate Caribbean because in female plumage it is
> essentially identical to Cuban (male Caribbeans are white below; male
> Cubans solid blue/purple). I checked some references that say the white
> below is more restricted on Caribbean than on Cuban, but in looking at
> photos of both species I really see little difference. One thing I did
> notice in photos of each species is the undertail covert of female
> Caribbean is always pure white, while the undertail covert of many but not
> all Cuban seems to have a few dark feathers. I have not seen this
> mentioned in guides. The Cullowhee bird has a pure white undertail.
>
>
>
> Hopefully further investigation will reveal the identification, but my
> guess from the photos is either Caribbean or Cuban.
>
>
>
> Derb Carter
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/18 12:58 pm
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Cullowhee martin
One nice thing is that with the specimen in hand, it may be possible eventually to determine the ID through genetic markers, even if females are not distinguishable by morphology. As always with genetic markers, it’s not magic - you can’t say “check the DNA to be sure!” There may or may not be known and measurable genetic differences, but even if there are not now, there may be eventually, and preserving tissue for eventual DNA work should be routine for a natural history museum.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

On Nov 15, 2018, at 1:50 PM, Derb Carter <derbc...><mailto:<derbc...>> wrote:

I have a fair amount of experience with all the Progne martins in the Americas, except Galapagos. I think the bird found, photographed, and posted in the CBC gallery is almost certainly either a Cuban, Caribbean, or Sinaloa Martin, any of which would be an extraordinary record. Female plumages of these species are very similar. My limited experience with Sinaloa was years ago when it was considered a subspecies of Purple. Sinaloa is quite rare within its range in western Mexico, which is much more remote from western NC. It is smaller than the other two. This is imprecise from the photos, but my estimate of the wing chord in the specimen is 142-143 mm which is outside the reported range for Sinaloa of 136-138 mm, and within the range 134-149 and close to the mean 143.5 of Caribbean (I could not find measurements for Cuban).

I compared the posted photos to some photos I took of Cuban Martins on recent trips and it is generally identical to some in the photos. This does not, however, eliminate Caribbean because in female plumage it is essentially identical to Cuban (male Caribbeans are white below; male Cubans solid blue/purple). I checked some references that say the white below is more restricted on Caribbean than on Cuban, but in looking at photos of both species I really see little difference. One thing I did notice in photos of each species is the undertail covert of female Caribbean is always pure white, while the undertail covert of many but not all Cuban seems to have a few dark feathers. I have not seen this mentioned in guides. The Cullowhee bird has a pure white undertail.

Hopefully further investigation will reveal the identification, but my guess from the photos is either Caribbean or Cuban.

Derb Carter

 

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Date: 11/15/18 12:50 pm
From: Jeremy Hyman <jhyman...>
Subject: Re: Cullowhee martin
Hi Folks,

The wing chord of the bird is 135mm. Let me know if anyone wants to know any other measurements or see other photos. I think it will be a few days before someone from the museum picks it up.

-Jeremy


________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Derb Carter <derbc...>
Sent: Thursday, November 15, 2018 1:50 PM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Cullowhee martin


I have a fair amount of experience with all the Progne martins in the Americas, except Galapagos. I think the bird found, photographed, and posted in the CBC gallery is almost certainly either a Cuban, Caribbean, or Sinaloa Martin, any of which would be an extraordinary record. Female plumages of these species are very similar. My limited experience with Sinaloa was years ago when it was considered a subspecies of Purple. Sinaloa is quite rare within its range in western Mexico, which is much more remote from western NC. It is smaller than the other two. This is imprecise from the photos, but my estimate of the wing chord in the specimen is 142-143 mm which is outside the reported range for Sinaloa of 136-138 mm, and within the range 134-149 and close to the mean 143.5 of Caribbean (I could not find measurements for Cuban).



I compared the posted photos to some photos I took of Cuban Martins on recent trips and it is generally identical to some in the photos. This does not, however, eliminate Caribbean because in female plumage it is essentially identical to Cuban (male Caribbeans are white below; male Cubans solid blue/purple). I checked some references that say the white below is more restricted on Caribbean than on Cuban, but in looking at photos of both species I really see little difference. One thing I did notice in photos of each species is the undertail covert of female Caribbean is always pure white, while the undertail covert of many but not all Cuban seems to have a few dark feathers. I have not seen this mentioned in guides. The Cullowhee bird has a pure white undertail.



Hopefully further investigation will reveal the identification, but my guess from the photos is either Caribbean or Cuban.



Derb Carter

 

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Date: 11/15/18 10:51 am
From: Derb Carter <derbc...>
Subject: Cullowhee martin
I have a fair amount of experience with all the Progne martins in the Americas, except Galapagos. I think the bird found, photographed, and posted in the CBC gallery is almost certainly either a Cuban, Caribbean, or Sinaloa Martin, any of which would be an extraordinary record. Female plumages of these species are very similar. My limited experience with Sinaloa was years ago when it was considered a subspecies of Purple. Sinaloa is quite rare within its range in western Mexico, which is much more remote from western NC. It is smaller than the other two. This is imprecise from the photos, but my estimate of the wing chord in the specimen is 142-143 mm which is outside the reported range for Sinaloa of 136-138 mm, and within the range 134-149 and close to the mean 143.5 of Caribbean (I could not find measurements for Cuban).

I compared the posted photos to some photos I took of Cuban Martins on recent trips and it is generally identical to some in the photos. This does not, however, eliminate Caribbean because in female plumage it is essentially identical to Cuban (male Caribbeans are white below; male Cubans solid blue/purple). I checked some references that say the white below is more restricted on Caribbean than on Cuban, but in looking at photos of both species I really see little difference. One thing I did notice in photos of each species is the undertail covert of female Caribbean is always pure white, while the undertail covert of many but not all Cuban seems to have a few dark feathers. I have not seen this mentioned in guides. The Cullowhee bird has a pure white undertail.

Hopefully further investigation will reveal the identification, but my guess from the photos is either Caribbean or Cuban.

Derb Carter

 

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Date: 11/15/18 9:12 am
From: Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Roseate Spoonbills on James IS, SC
All,

I had 3 Roseate Spoonbills at the Bayview Farms pool and Cabana Ebird
hotspot, on James Is, SC this morning. They are all roosting on the island
in the middle of the lake.

Dennis

--
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>

 

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Date: 11/15/18 8:54 am
From: Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Pine Siskin
One Pine Siskin at my feeder this morning in central Orange County.
Will the hordes be soon to follow?

--
Norm Budnitz
Orange County
North Carolina
 

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Date: 11/15/18 8:54 am
From: Kyle Kittelberger (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Purple Finches- Raleigh, 11/15
Hey everyone,
I've had 3 total Purple Finches visiting the feeders so far this morning, one male and two females/immatures. Our first feeder Purple Finch appeared yesterday. Lots of finches in general this morning, especially goldfinches. This rainy weather certainly has all the birds very active. 
Cheers,Kyle KittelbergerRaleigh, NC
 

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Date: 11/15/18 6:24 am
From: JOHN ECKSTINE (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Pine Siskens visiting Hanahan SC
Our number of gold finches has continued to climb this week to about a dozen (last year only saw a grouping of three towards end of winter) and yesterday they were joined by about a half dozen or so Pine Siskens. Both are back in good numbers this morning on thistle and sunflower heart feeders.


Also, one lone adult Baltimore Oriole showed up about two weeks ago (reported around here earlier in late October) and we saw a 2nd adult male yesterday. Two years ago a flock of 6 showed up on Christmas Day and stayed for the winter. Last year, a flock of three, arriving around Christmas Day and stayed throughout. We'll see if more come visit and stay.


Pat and Jack Eckstine

Goose Creek Reservoir

Hanahan, SC



 

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Date: 11/15/18 3:40 am
From: Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Purple Finch & Pine Siskins
Greetings all

If anyone needs to add either Purple Finches or Pine Siskins to their VA List you are more than welcome to come visit my feeders in South Boston VA.

I am only an hour drive from Durham coming up 501 N

I had 20 Siskins yesterday and I did have 10 P Finches the other week but only 3 during the day yesterday off and on at times.

My contact info is below

From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>

 

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Date: 11/14/18 10:24 pm
From: Rbakelaar (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Martin specimen
All,
>
> What an interesting specimen.......Appears to be too small for a Purple by almost 1 inch on average, assuming that the bird is about 7 inches based on the ruler in the photos. Plumage appears inconsistent as well. Could it be a Caribbean? White underparts with undertail coverts that extend to the central retrices? Doesn't appear to be Brown-chested or Southern Martin. I suppose Gray-breasted or Cuban might also be possibilities?
>
> Interested on what the group's collective opinions are on this bird.
>
> Ryan
>
> Ryan Bakelaar
> Durham, NC

 

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Date: 11/14/18 6:51 pm
From: Jeremy Hyman <jhyman...>
Subject: Martin species in Cullowhee, NC
Hello all,
This afternoon in Cullowhee, NC I found a dead bird that appears to me a Martin (genus Progne), but as of yet, the exact species in unclear. Photos have been posted on the Carolina Bird Club webpage.
- Jeremy
Jeremy Hyman
Professor and Assistant Department Chair
Department of Biology
Western Carolina University
Office: NS 115
828 227 3657


 

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Date: 11/14/18 4:43 pm
From: Kyle Kittelberger (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Falls Lake- Rolling View, 11/14: COMMON LOON Fallout
Hi everyone,
Scoped the waters of Falls Lake this evening at Rolling View, Falls Lake. Last time I was here with good conditions was last Friday, when I had 155 Common Loons and 3 very late Tree Swallows. The weather conditions, especially the wind looked pretty good leading into this evening, so was hoping for a lot of birds at Rolling View. But I was not prepared for the sight that awaited me, a massive loon fallout. I counted 677 COMMON LOONS!!! And that was an under-count total, there were probably 800 plus loons on the water. There were some birds too far to count, past the heat shimmer; and then there were the dozens of loons that were coming in to roost on the water as the sun was setting, I certainly missed many. Most of these birds were seen from the main swim beach area and in front of the now closed dock, the lake is very flooded so I had to stand much further back than normal; only about 30 birds were in the back cove/section of the lake, scoping from the picnic table area past the swim beach on the left at the end of the road. I can only imagine how many birds were actually out there, just unbelievable, truly amazing. I believe this is a count record for Common Loons in the Piedmont. For all the loons that were close enough to get details, I was checking for any yellow bills but nothing stood out.
Other than loons, I had another late TREE SWALLOW. A lone bird hugging the shore, flying back and forth in front of the picnic table at the end. There were a lot of ducks on the water, but these were too far to see, were lost in the heat shimmer, or the light was too low to get any important details. 
Below is the list of notable birds from Rolling View this evening:
Wood Duck- 2Mallard- 4Scaup sp.- 50duck sp.- 250Pied-billed Grebe- 20Horned Grebe- 16American Coot- 20Bonaparte's Gull- 300Ring-billed Gull- 30Herring Gull- 3COMMON LOON- 677+Double-crested Cormorant- 30Bald Eagle- 2TREE SWALLOW- 1

Happy birding,
Kyle Kittelberger
Raleigh, NC
 

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Date: 11/14/18 2:31 pm
From: Cindy Pirson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Red breasted nuthatch and juncos
I am a half hour north of Charlotte nc. Yesterday saw my first 2 juncos in the yard, and today my first red breasted nuthatch. My feeders have been loaded with the usual goldfinches, tufted titmouse, carolina wrens and chickadees, my regular one eyed brown thrasher, red bellied woodpecker, house finches, eastern mockingbird, and a half dozen bluebirds Had lone female purple finch as well today. No appearance yet of the large flock of pine siskens that empty my feeders daily all winter but expect them anytime now! A male kestrel walked around under one of the feeders today, but appeared to be poking around for insects in the leaves..- Cindy Pirson

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 11/14/18 8:51 am
From: Paula Jeannet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Red-breasted Nuthatch
I’ve had a Red-breasted Nuthatch visiting my feeder this morning, in the
company of the usual titmice, wrens, chickadees, and White-breasted NH.
Still no juncos.

Paula
Chapel Hill (Durham Cty)

 

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Date: 11/14/18 8:16 am
From: Jesse Pope (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Grandfather CBC, December 21st
C’birders,

The Grandfather CBC will be held on Friday, December 21st. The count day will beginning at midnight, and run through 11:59pm, if anyone is interested in owling. Also, we keep track of any count week birds of interest in the count circle, which runs December 16-23.

Please let me know if you want to participate, and I will assign you to a route and provide the necessary materials. We have several long-standing route leaders, so most of the routes are covered but we can always use additional eyes and ears to assist.

We will treat all participants to lunch at Mildred’s Grill on Grandfather Mountain at 1:00pm for a mid-day tally and planning for afternoon birding.

The Museum feeders are always a treat in the winter, and finch numbers are on the rise with Pine Siskins and Purple Finches at the feeders daily. Like many others, we are eagerly anticipating the possibility of seeing an Evening Grosbeak, Common Redpoll, White-winged Crossbill or some other eruptive surprise this winter!

Most respectfully,


Jesse Pope


President and Executive Director
Grandfather Mountain Stewardship Foundation
P.O. Box 129
Linville, NC 28646
(C) 828-260-6980
(W) 828-733-2013
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 11/14/18 7:12 am
From: John Ennis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: FOS DE Juncos at Ft Fisher
Last weekend was light for migrating birds for me...except for good numbers of Yellow-rumpled and Palm...also one Merlin...

Best birds were 2 FOS Dark-eyed Juncos near the aquarium...

John Ennis
Wilmington, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 11/14/18 5:37 am
From: <scaudell...>
Subject: bald eagle and evening grosbeaks
No, not sighted together! I also saw the bald eagle on Hatteras Island
yesterday. The last time I saw evening grosbeaks was 1992 when a small
flock of 8-10 flew through my back yard.
Sharyn Caudell


 

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Date: 11/13/18 5:38 pm
From: Kevin Metcalf (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Black Scoters - Mtn. Island Lake 11/13
There were three Black Scoters (one male, two female) on Mountain Island
Lake today, north of Latta Plantation Nature Preserve. I would think
there is a decent chance the weather will keep them around tonight.
Latta was closed today for deer management, but will be open
tomorrow.
The scoters were associating with four mergansers - I believe all were
Red-breasted, but their heads were tucked in and viewing conditions
were not great. They were drifting west from the Mecklenburg side into
the Gaston County side.
Also saw four Ringneck Ducks today in Mecklenburg County.
Kevin MetcalfHuntersville, NC
 

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Date: 11/13/18 2:26 pm
From: Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: 2 more Mountain Christmas Bird Counts
Folks

The Henderson County Christmas Bird Count will be held on Saturday 15
December with the Buncombe CBC being on Saturday December 29. The contact
folks are as follows:
Henderson County - Kevin Burke - <Birdingburke...>
Buncombe County - Tom Tribble - <Tntribble...>

If you would like to join either of the counts, please contact the
appropriate coordinators.
Thanks
Simon

Simon RB Thompson

Ventures Birding Tours
www.birdventures.com <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.birdventures.com&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=uSz5z41-bQe8qzhHqbuyzWujxaowR-WmYXzZfuIQK18&s=ZZjzeGw5OtkEBxrk1eDd9c_v4sNjYh64wVppXck_B48&e=>

Please use the Ventures e-mail (<Venturesbirding...>) to contact the
Ventures office - thanks!

 

Back to top
Date: 11/13/18 10:51 am
From: Will Cook <cwcook...>
Subject: Re: Request Needed...Jay Chandler
Sorry about this scam email that came through Carolinabirds. I've
taken this email address off the list.

On 11/13/2018 1:12 PM, Jay Chandler wrote:

How are you? I need a favor from you.

I need to get a Gamestop Gift Card for my Nephew, Its his birthday but i can't do this now because I'm currently traveling.Can you get it from any store around you? I'll pay back as soon as i am back. Kindly let me know if you can handle this.

Thanks,
Jay Chandler
Hemingway, SC

--
Will Cook - Durham, NC www.carolinanature.com
 

Back to top
Date: 11/13/18 10:13 am
From: Jay Chandler <jccjr56...>
Subject: Request Needed...Jay Chandler
How are you? I need a favor from you.

I need to get a Gamestop Gift Card for my Nephew, Its his birthday but i can't do this now because I'm currently traveling.Can you get it from any store around you? I'll pay back as soon as i am back. Kindly let me know if you can handle this.

Thanks,
Jay Chandler
Hemingway, SC
 

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Date: 11/13/18 10:03 am
From: M Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Fancy Gap, VA
Hi Gretchen, I am interested as a participant if you make this happen. Thanks, Mae Howell, 919-580-8330<tel:919-580-8330>,<hareboro...><mailto:%<20hareboro...>


Powered by Cricket Wireless

------ Original message------
From: Gretchen Schramm
Date: Tue, Nov 13, 2018 6:42 AM
To: Carolinabirds Listserve;
Cc:
Subject:Fancy Gap, VA

I am on the Board of Directors for Cape Fear Audubon Society and recently spent a weekend in a great 'cabin' in Fancy Gap, VA. It's right off the Blue Ridge Parkway.

I would like to plan an outing for our group in (probably) May or June of next year and wondered if there are any 'local experts' out there who would care to join us? It would be great to have someone knowledgeable about that area to guide us to the best hotspots for a weekend.

Please contact me off-line if you are interested. <gretchenschramm7...><mailto:<gretchenschramm7...>. Thank you!

Gretchen
Wilmington, NC

 

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Date: 11/13/18 9:58 am
From: M Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Fancy Gap, VA
Hi Gretchen, I am interested as a participant if you make this happen. Thanks, Mae Howell, 919-580-8330<tel:919-580-8330>, <hareboro...><mailto:%<20hareboro...>

Powered by Cricket Wireless

------ Original message------
From: Gretchen Schramm
Date: Tue, Nov 13, 2018 6:42 AM
To: Carolinabirds Listserve;
Cc:
Subject:Fancy Gap, VA

I am on the Board of Directors for Cape Fear Audubon Society and recently spent a weekend in a great 'cabin' in Fancy Gap, VA. It's right off the Blue Ridge Parkway.

I would like to plan an outing for our group in (probably) May or June of next year and wondered if there are any 'local experts' out there who would care to join us? It would be great to have someone knowledgeable about that area to guide us to the best hotspots for a weekend.

Please contact me off-line if you are interested. <gretchenschramm7...><mailto:<gretchenschramm7...>. Thank you!

Gretchen
Wilmington, NC

 

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Date: 11/13/18 9:29 am
From: Gretchen Schramm (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Blue-headed Vireo
Just had a blue-headed vireo (first ever) in my garden this morning, along
with a couple of goldfinches and yesterday a (first ever) house wren, as
well as a pine warbler and ruby-crowned kinglet. White-throated sparrows
are everywhere. Things are hoppin'!

Gretchen
Wilmington, NC

 

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Date: 11/13/18 9:20 am
From: Chris Clarke (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: FOS (Slate-colored) Junco
Had my first Junco of the year this morning near my feeder. Now looking
for the Kinglets and the annual tyrant Myrtle Warbler.

Chris Clarke
Apex, NC

 

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Date: 11/13/18 8:31 am
From: ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mature bald eagle Hatteras island
Hwy 12
Between Avon and Salvo

About 3/4 mile south of mile post 52

Landing on utility pole right beside the highway

--
Ask me about my upcoming book - a photo essay of North American and
Caribbean Hummingbirds!

Ann Maddock
<am.hummingbird.photos...>
Hatteras Island, NC

 

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Date: 11/13/18 7:25 am
From: Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Jordan Lake (NC) CBC
The Jordan Lake CBC will be December 30th this year. Interested in
counting? Let me know. More information can be found here:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.newhopeaudubon.org_get-2Doutdoors_bird-2Dcounts_jordan-2Dlake-2Dchristmas-2Dbird-2Dcount_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=TXgvxaTAA1XcXvm6f16FnjaA2fA64VCfV7zrc-my_0I&s=VrRwl9NWcaP0W9paPwVHwhLzuEnxhhGsmk-82ZRGFsw&e=

--
Norm Budnitz
Orange County
North Carolina
 

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Date: 11/13/18 6:16 am
From: Corey, Ed <ed.corey...>
Subject: They're on the way! -- Evening Grosbeak in VA - 11Nov2018
Folks,

Returning from a birding trip to Maryland on Sunday, Andrew Thornton, Jacob Farmer, and I stopped by the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel rest stop, in hopes of picking up a few VA birds. The highlight at this stop was a very cooperative female Evening Grosbeak, which first perched a medium distance from us, then flew and perched 20 feet over our heads! This location is roughly 40 miles from the NC border, so keep your eyes open and your feeders filled! Please see our checklist below:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S49868063&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=4ljBOTVyuquha0_3H7ymuuy35IHK6ksvgUZ3Gpfr558&s=ofnAjNdSnUIR4aBshrxv0RXgOE4DyiAQllp3Obo58Ac&e=

Good birding!

Ed Corey
Inventory Biologist, NC Division of Parks and Recreation
NC Dept. of Natural and Cultural Resources
919 841 4037 Office
919 208 7864 Mobile
<Ed.Corey...><mailto:<Ed.Corey...>

12700 Bayleaf Church Road | Raleigh, North Carolina 27614

Email correspondence to and from this address is subject to the North Carolina Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.


 

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Date: 11/13/18 3:42 am
From: Gretchen Schramm (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fancy Gap, VA
I am on the Board of Directors for Cape Fear Audubon Society and recently
spent a weekend in a great 'cabin' in Fancy Gap, VA. It's right off the
Blue Ridge Parkway.

I would like to plan an outing for our group in (probably) May or June of
next year and wondered if there are any 'local experts' out there who would
care to join us? It would be great to have someone knowledgeable about
that area to guide us to the best hotspots for a weekend.

Please contact me off-line if you are interested.
<gretchenschramm7...> Thank you!

Gretchen
Wilmington, NC

 

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Date: 11/12/18 5:13 pm
From: KC Foggin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Nuthatch
I had one last week. First one since their irruptive year in 2012.
K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

Take nothing but pictures,
Leave nothing but footprints
Kill nothing but time

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages


On Mon, Nov 12, 2018 at 7:58 PM Mary Bridges <maryhuot...> wrote:

> A Red Breasted Nuthatch came to the feeders on Friday a.m. Not a
> frequent visitor. In 2005 we had one who visited regularly from
> mid-January to early March, and then in 2013, we had two who visited from
> January through March, so this is an early surprise. Just in time for
> Project Feeder Watch count on Sat. and Sun. Usually my first couple of
> counts are pretty low, but there were lots of birds for this one. Seven
> Baltimore Orioles. On the lookout for Siskins and Purple Finches.
>
> Mary Bridges
> Goldsboro, NC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/12/18 4:58 pm
From: Mary Bridges <maryhuot...>
Subject: Nuthatch
A Red Breasted Nuthatch came to the feeders on Friday a.m. Not a frequent visitor. In 2005 we had one who visited regularly from mid-January to early March, and then in 2013, we had two who visited from January through March, so this is an early surprise. Just in time for Project Feeder Watch count on Sat. and Sun. Usually my first couple of counts are pretty low, but there were lots of birds for this one. Seven Baltimore Orioles. On the lookout for Siskins and Purple Finches.

Mary Bridges
Goldsboro, NC
 

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Date: 11/12/18 1:50 pm
From: Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: eBird Trip Summary - Granville Co
Greetings all:

I really wasn’t planning on going Birding today especially since I didn’t feel the good late yesterday afternoon but got up at 0400 and around 0530 decided to go out today and go to Granville and Warren Counties around Kerr Lake.

After I saw that the forecast was for rain by midday I decided to just stay in Granville County and see if I couldn’t reach 100 species for my County list.

Since I was already at 97 you would think that that should be a done deal. Dream on.

My first stop was Grassy Creek Park and with the good luck I had in Durham County last Thursday I was hope for the same.

The only ducks were 2 f Hooded Merganser and one PB Grebe.

The best bird there was a late BG Gnatcatcher that didn’t even show up as RARE on eBird and surprisingly was my first for the Hotspot for me. There were no loons or H Grebes and so far no new County Birds so I drove down to Lake Devin in Oxford and I started on the road that cuts part of the lake from view and my first new bird a N Harrier flew up working the fields to my left.

Just as I was about get into my car bird number two a Raven was heard and seen.

At the boat ramp and picnic shelter on the edge of the woods were Song, WT and Field Sparrows and a lone Swamp Sparrow jumped up for bird number 3 for 100 species. I had a small group of RW Blackbirds for bird number 4 and I saw a M Hooded Merganser and a M Bufflehead for bird number 5 ending the day at 102 Species for Granville County.

I checked nearby ponds and went back to Grassy Creek on the way home hoping to find Mallards and Wood Ducks but no luck.


eBird Checklist Summary for: Nov 12, 2018

Number of Checklists: 6
Number of Taxa: 49

Checklists included in this summary:
(1): Grassy Creek Park
Date: Nov 12, 2018 at 7:15 AM
(2): 9319–9495 Dave Winston Rd, Bullock US-NC (36.5242,-78.6117)
Date: Nov 12, 2018 at 9:30 AM
(3): Lake Devin--Lake Devin Rd. Park Area
Date: Nov 12, 2018 at 11:05 AM
(4): 2907–2941 Hallie Burnette Rd, Oxford US-NC (36.2973,-78.6385)
Date: Nov 12, 2018 at 1:26 PM
(5): 5601–5699 Burnette Rd, Oxford US-NC (36.2982,-78.6302)
Date: Nov 12, 2018 at 1:30 PM
(6): 3018–3062 Lake Devin Rd, Oxford US-NC (36.3002,-78.6169)
Date: Nov 12, 2018 at 1:43 PM

2 Canada Goose -- (1)
1 Bufflehead -- (3)
3 Hooded Merganser -- (1),(3)
5 Pied-billed Grebe -- (1),(3)
44 Mourning Dove -- (3),(4)
1 American Coot -- (3)
5 Bonaparte's Gull -- (1)
38 Ring-billed Gull -- (1),(3)
13 Double-crested Cormorant -- (1),(3)
9 Great Blue Heron (Blue form) -- (1),(3)
1 Northern Harrier -- (3)
1 Bald Eagle -- (1)
1 Red-shouldered Hawk -- (2)
1 Red-tailed Hawk -- (2)
3 Belted Kingfisher -- (1),(3)
1 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker -- (1)
2 Red-headed Woodpecker -- (1)
7 Red-bellied Woodpecker -- (1),(3)
2 Downy Woodpecker -- (1),(3)
1 Pileated Woodpecker -- (3)
12 Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) -- (1),(2),(3)
2 American Kestrel -- (3),(5)
4 Eastern Phoebe -- (1),(3)
17 Blue Jay -- (1),(2),(3)
27 American Crow -- (1),(2),(3)
1 Common Raven -- (3)
2 Carolina Chickadee -- (1)
6 Tufted Titmouse -- (1),(3)
2 Red-breasted Nuthatch -- (1),(3)
1 Brown Creeper -- (1)
6 Carolina Wren -- (1),(2),(3)
1 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher -- (1)
4 Golden-crowned Kinglet -- (1),(3)
7 Ruby-crowned Kinglet -- (1),(3)
30 Eastern Bluebird -- (1),(2),(3)
4 Hermit Thrush -- (1),(3)
1 American Robin -- (3)
50 European Starling -- (2)
14 American Goldfinch -- (1),(3)
30 Chipping Sparrow -- (2)
5 Field Sparrow -- (3)
10 White-throated Sparrow -- (1),(3)
11 Song Sparrow -- (1),(3)
1 Swamp Sparrow -- (3)
7 Eastern Towhee -- (3)
38 Red-winged Blackbird -- (3),(6)
2 Common Grackle -- (2)
6 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) -- (3)
4 Northern Cardinal -- (1),(3)

This trip summary was created using the eBird app for iPhone and iPad.
See eBird for more information.


From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>


 

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Date: 11/12/18 12:32 pm
From: Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...>
Subject: First of season birds
Last Saturday, the 10th, was my first day for FeederWatch.  For several weeks prior, I rarely saw species other than mourning doves.  That day I had four FOS birds:  3 American Goldfinches, a male Baltimore Oriole, 6 Chipping Sparrows and a single female Red-Winged Blackbird. Frank HamiltonCharleston, SC
 

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Date: 11/11/18 3:15 pm
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: Bar-tailed Godwit and Long-billed Curlew at east Shackleford Banks, NC
For a few hours today, four of us (Chandra Biggerstaff, Steve Howell,
Suzanne Wheatcraft, and I) birded east Shackleford Banks. When we arrived
it was peak high tide and the wind was brisk northerly, good conditions for
pushing shorebirds to the ocean (bight) side of the island.

We saw the Bar-tailed Godwit and Long-billed Curlew (both of which Jamie
Adams saw yesterday). Wow--this is certainly the same Bar-tailed Godwit
that has been here the two previous winters. Would love to know where it
spends the summer.

Other highlights were 4 Wilson's Plovers, at least 8 Piping Plovers, 5 Red
Knots, and 82 Lesser Black-backed Gulls (a nice count for Carteret).

Our post-birding seafood was extra good today!

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC


 

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Date: 11/11/18 2:08 pm
From: jcox3222 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Romney Street Charleston
I birdied the old Romney Street landfill on Saturday morning. It was pretty slow but I did find a vesper sparrow . It was feeding on the ground and perching in a low tree at the first intersection to the left of the entrance gate.
John Cox
Mount Pleasant SC

Sent from XFINITY Connect Mobile App

 

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Date: 11/11/18 1:37 pm
From: Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fox sparrow, Coinjock, NC
We had one fox sparrow show up today, eating millet. This is our earliest
record of one, since 1993. Most of our fox sparrow visits are in Jan and
Feb. Also today, 2 pair of wood ducks showed up on our back woodland pond.
The red-breasted nuthatch continues, taking shelled peanuts and black oil
sunflower seeds. We spotted our FOS sapsucker today in the woods. One
winter goldfinch on the sunflower seeds also.

And of course, our zillions of house finches. No purples yet.

Linda Ward
Skip Hancock
Coinjock, NC

 

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Date: 11/11/18 11:10 am
From: oksanaduck (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: All 3 Nuthatches
I started my Project Feederwatch count yesterday.  Today I have seen White- breasted, Brown-headed and Red-breasted nuthatches.Patty TiceRaleigh, NCSent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 

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Date: 11/11/18 10:30 am
From: oksanaduck (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Pine Siskin Numbers Increasing
I have seen 2 Pine Siskins in the past few days.Patty TiceRaleighSent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: "Dwayne Martin(via carolinabirds Mailing List)" <carolinabirds...> Date: 11/8/18 12:26 PM (GMT-05:00) To: <Carolinabirds...>, FBC-Birds <FBC-Birds...> Subject: Pine Siskin Numbers Increasing While we have only had a couple fly over Pine Siskins here at Riverbend Park, John Sutton, the ranger at Bakers Mtn Park in SW Catawba Co, called to report over 100 Pine Siskins at the feeders there.  We had a flock of 14 fly over and briefly land at Dusty Ridge Access area on Lake Hickory this morning. Dwayne*************J. Dwayne MartinHickory, <NCredxbill...> Catawba County Park RangerRiverbend Park - Conover, <NCjdmartin...>://www.catawbacountync.gov/depts/parks/http://www.weatherlink.com/user/riverbendpark
 

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Date: 11/11/18 9:49 am
From: Thomas Krakauer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Scientists Discover A Rare Bird That's A Hybrid Of Three Different Species

Boy, do we have to better observers.

This is fascinating.

Tom Krakauer
Durham, NC


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.forbes.com_sites_grrlscientist_2018_11_09_rare-2Dthree-2Dspecies-2Dhybrid-2Dbird-2Ddiscovered_&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=HFb0BHj6rTaTBwTT2bnzZJE2Oyd8Yp6cnj29DqxYQ3g&s=O45pe3rNPWwmsjZcoBtPRlqj3rQ-nQtky7ztwg11Qwk&e=


Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 11/11/18 7:16 am
From: Bert Fisher (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: FOS Junco in Hillsborough
Had our FOS Junco at Vireo Lane this morning. So far just a single bird.

Happy birding.

Bert Fisher
Hillsborough, NC

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 11/11/18 3:07 am
From: Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Nine Common Ravens, Rockingham County, NC
While visiting the new Dan River Game Land yesterday before sunrise I had a
group of nine Common Ravens fly over. I heard them coming and crouched by
the roadside (they tend to avoid humans) and recorded. Five appeared
first, then another, and another, followed up by two more. I have included
a recording in my eBird checklist. After the birds pass, you can still
hear various vocalizations, including knocking calls, "behind" all the Song
Sparrows. They probably represent a group of young, unmated birds.

I also find interesting the singing of Song Sparrows at dawn. The "songs"
are pretty random and at time crude. I wonder if these are first year
males practicing for spring, or perhaps birds from an area with a different
song than I am used to hearing.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S49822830&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=can_JY1U3kLyjtUK3VmbztZG8anojkIySVv4VfsDn5M&s=F1USMhFvR_ztvM-AkUCnycyCESDXZydBtbFRqVUq4Ww&e=

Marty Wall
Eden, NC

 

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Date: 11/11/18 2:17 am
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Huntington Beach SP - Roseate Spoonbills, Saltmarsh Sparrows, Red Knots, Merlin, 100s of Black Skimmers
There were 12 Roseate Spoonbills feeding with about triple that number of
Wood Storks when I drove past Mullet Pond first thing Saturday morning at
Huntington Beach State Park in Murrells Inlet, SC.

Other highlights included Saltmarsh and Seaside Sparrows (pushed near /
into the jetty rocks at high tide), Red Knots (one flagged - green ‘EAV),
hundreds of Black Skimmers flying north over the ocean at dawn to roost on
the sandbar across Murrells Inlet), tens of thousands of Black Scoters
heading south (some flicks looked like black smoke drifting low over the
water), hundreds of Northern Gannets feeding, and a couple of nice Warbler
/ mixed insectivore flocks.

I have some Saltmarsh Sparrow photos on my Flickr page:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_offshorebirder2&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=-ipDNvYgo2aiwWGFFizqHxD_klNBixTRLHcspN6OZkQ&s=U6gtSzXovSt2qSEOE3FpQZxOPqR2OxbcGFTB5_qBCU4&e=

flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2

The hurricane damage, especially to Wax Myrtles (wind) and pine trees
(salt) was sad to see. So was the former oldfield habitat in the south
of the park, which is now paved and covered in RV hookup lots (and RVs and
camper vehicles). So was the widespread erosion near the base of the jetty
- the former term colony area is 2/3 gone.

Each year the habitat at HBSP is more degraded - some unavoidably to Mother
Nature, some through neglect, and some through intentional alterations /
development. One improvement was that saltwater inundation from the
hurricane killed the phragmites and typha in the ocean ponds.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

 

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Date: 11/10/18 6:02 pm
From: Judy Halleron (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: purple finch & pine siskins


We have had at our feeders both Purple Finch & Pine Siskins for about a month. They may be here for a few days, disappear for a day, and then return. Previous years we were lucky to see one Purple Finch a season and it was usually a female or young. Now, some days there are 10 or more feeding at a time. Waiting and looking for those elusive Evening Grosbeaks!

Judy Halleron
Cherokee County
Marble, NC


 

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Date: 11/10/18 5:21 pm
From: Tom Baxter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Franklins gull today at Fort Fisher Federal Point/rocks
I only arrived to the WILMINGTON area yesterday and had no way of getting
the word out sooner. I am just here to help with hurricane clean up for
about a month. I attempted to get the word out through Facebook on my phone
since I am camping and don’t have a real internet connection. I do not know
what the status of it’s presence is, it was not on the dock when I left.
Photos here:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S49829201&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=e9gsMfRyH-ZwEKyGtZ20cLakBuTbq8Kk3vWYPSHUQt0&s=HlbwsOAs_12HrsRH789b0kUu23DQexTgvljBSzlYVMg&e=

Some other good birds of note today from Mason Inlet include flyover
American Pipit, Bonaparte’s Gull, Piping Plover, Western Sandpiper and
several Nelson’s Sparrows of both Atlantic and Interior race.

Good Birding,
Tom Baxter of Cape May, NJ

--
Tom Baxter

 

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Date: 11/10/18 3:55 pm
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Good and late birds on Hatteras Island
Several of us went birding this morning, starting in Rodanthe and ending up
at ramp 49 in Hatteras. Best expected birds were a Common Gallinule and
about 75 Red Knots (Ramp 49). We also relocated the Eared Grebe in the Salt
Pond near Cape Point.

Late were 2-3 Blackpolls, a Northern Waterthrush, a Bobolink and a
Semipalmated Sandpiper.

If you are visiting the Outer Banks tomorrow, be aware that there is a
marathon happening and that traffic at times will be one-way through Manteo.

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

 

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Date: 11/10/18 2:42 pm
From: jcox3222 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Evening grosbeaks
I haven’t seen any in Coastal South Carolina since a flock of a couple of hundred birds descended on McClellanville in 1976 for about a week.
John Cox
Mount Pleasant SC

Sent from XFINITY Connect Mobile App

 

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Date: 11/10/18 12:41 pm
From: Derb Carter <derbc...>
Subject: Mattamuskeet birds
One cackling goose with Canadas along the causeway. No interesting warblers on the causeway only yellow-romped, orange-crowned, yellowthroat and a gnatcatcher.

Derb Carter

 

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Date: 11/10/18 7:27 am
From: Rob G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Evening Grosbeak
More EVGR memories I moved here in 1981 and had plenty at my apt. deck in Durham, and in 82 plenty again at my new deck in Chapel Hill thought little of it since I came from central Illinois where they were routine (enjoyable, but annoying the way they cleaned out a feeder). Then it was at least a decade before I saw another an injured window strike turned in to the local Animal Protection Society!

Back in those early days, Purple Finches were a common visitor here too, and House Finches a rarer find and in last 10 years Ive seen more winter hummingbirds than Evening Grosbeaks times definitely change!


On a different note, what's the word on Crossbills this season? We had that one breakout year (I recall) for them in the Piedmont, maybe 25??? yrs. ago.


-- Rob Gluck...... Carrboro, NC......


________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Edith Tatum <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Saturday, November 10, 2018 8:27 AM
To: Carolinabirds
Subject: Evening Grosbeak

My last sighting of a lone Evening Grosbeak was February 3, 1996 at Eno River State Park.
Edith Tatum
Durham, NC

Sent from my iPhone

 

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Date: 11/10/18 7:01 am
From: James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: White-winged Dove still present, Mount Pleasant, SC
The White-winged Dove returned to my yard and feeders about 830am, perched
in trees then to ground feeding, to platform feeder, now perched in tree
above feeders. Several other birders have been by to see it successfully.

Craig Watson and Pam Ford
Mount Pleassnt, SC

 

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Date: 11/10/18 5:28 am
From: Edith Tatum (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Evening Grosbeak
My last sighting of a lone Evening Grosbeak was February 3, 1996 at Eno River State Park.
Edith Tatum
Durham, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 11/10/18 4:53 am
From: Will Cook <cwcook...>
Subject: Fwd: Egret in question
This was intended for Carolinabirds...

Will Cook - Durham, NC

-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: Egret in question
Date: Sat, 10 Nov 2018 09:52:59 +0530
From: Edmund LeGrand <edmundlegrand...><mailto:<edmundlegrand...>






I’m in Sri Lanka now where the three egrets are common, and the consensus of the two professional guides is Cattle Egret. Uditha Hettige said to note the heavy chin, as typical of Cattle Egret.

Ed LeGrand
Crossville, TN
 

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Date: 11/9/18 6:02 pm
From: <Rubberhead...> <rubberhead...>
Subject: Re: Could this be the year?
I hate to brag but I grew up in Moncks Corner and between when I first
started really being aware of birds (1979ish) and 1993 I wintered a flock of
about 100 Eveening Grosbeaks every year. I used to fuss about the amount of
sunflower seeds they'd go through - I was young and money wasn't free.

Without the internet or not really knowing any other birders, I thought it
was normal. I remember seeing a few in the Francis Marion during turkey
season so that just validated that they were regular winter residents.

They left, probably around 1994-95 and I haven't seen one since. I'd love
to add them to my Photographic Life List.

Stephen Thomas
Fort Mill, SC


----- Original Message -----
From: "Will Cook" <cwcook...>
To: <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Thursday, November 08, 2018 10:05 PM
Subject: Re: Could this be the year?


> On the Chapel Hill CBC, the first record of Evening Grosbeak was of 40 in
> 1959 (our first CBC was in 1923). Peak year was 1980 with 590,
> outnumbering American Goldfinch. Last one (1) was 2004, plus a count week
> bird in 2012.
>
> When present, Evening Grosbeaks often linger late into spring. On the
> Chapel Hill Spring Bird Count, our first record was of 8 in 1952, the
> first year of the count. Peak was 137 in 1982, last one was 1 in 1998.
>
> Probably wishful thinking, but you might want to stock up on sunflower
> seed - they're greedy pigs!
>
> Will Cook - Durham, NC
>
> On 11/8/2018 4:46 PM, Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
> wrote:
>> I just looked at our records for the Jordan Lake (NC) Christmas Count.
>> The last time we had Evening Grosbeaks (10 of them) on the count was
>> in December, 2003. Prior to that, we had them on about 70% of the
>> counts going all the way back to 1977, when the count began. In
>> January, 2000, we had 131, but usually we recorded numbers in double
>> digits. In January, 1982, we had 254.
>> On Thu, Nov 8, 2018 at 4:00 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...>
>> wrote:
>>>
>>> As a second reminder, if you have never heard one before, you really
>>> need to play the call recording on your bird app(s), or go to You Tube
>>> or XenoCanto to listen to bird calls -- now. Your first one, if this
>>> winter, will likely be heard only, calling overhead. For example, I
>>> have HEARD Pine Siskin and Purple Finch in Wake County this fall but
>>> have yet to see one. The call sounds a lot like a Flicker call to me,
>>> but one syllabled -- TEER!. So -- you need to do more than just study
>>> paintings, photos, and videos of Evening Grosbeaks if you have never
>>> seen/heard it before. Learn and know the call note(s)!
>>>
>>> Harry LeGrand
>>>
>>> PS -- As with Merrill, I have seen and heard hundreds or thousands of
>>> them in NC, and I have probably banded about 50 of them. The deep V
>>> marks on my fingers have healed over time! But, it has also been 15-20
>>> years for me as well for getting one in NC.
>>>
>>> On Thu, Nov 8, 2018 at 3:08 PM "J. Merrill Lynch"
>>> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Birders,
>>>>
>>>> Some of you probably weren’t even born yet when evening grosbeaks were
>>>> annual winter visitors to the Carolinas, often in large numbers. The
>>>> last ones I recall seeing in NC were in Apex (where I lived at the
>>>> time) back in the mid-late ‘90’s.
>>>>
>>>> Since then the irruptions in our area have essentially ended and the
>>>> species has declined significantly across much of its primarily
>>>> Canadian breeding grounds.
>>>>
>>>> There are indications that this winter has potential for at least a few
>>>> birds to make it to our area. There have already been a number of
>>>> reports in the northeast as far south as Maryland.
>>>>
>>>> So keep your eyes and ears open!
>>>>
>>>> Merrill
>>>>
>>>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.allaboutbirds.org_this-2Dcould-2Dbe-2Dthe-2Dwinter-2Dyou-2Dget-2Devening-2Dgrosbeaks-2Dat-2Dyour-2Dfeeder_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=_gokesi2wxqy6kMsPvUvb-LxgbAFeRDC-4wMRUORMu8&s=tbvZwF1IRsoS_o5dwN9qsDNT8YZN2uigyiruS8fYhFM&e=
>>>>
>>>> Merrill Lynch
>>>> Echo Valley Farm
>>>> Watauga County, NC
>>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>
>>
>


 

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Date: 11/9/18 5:09 pm
From: Ann Truesdale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Donnelley WMA - Colleton Co, SC - white pelicans and spoonbills
Visited Donnelley WMA today. Generally rather quiet there, but Fishburne
Pond is full of birds -- over 100 Am White Pelicans and ~25 Roseate
Spoonbills. Also woodstorks, egrets, ibis present. A few hundred ducks
in the far back, difficult to identify due to distance and heat waves,
but shovelers, wigeon, gadwall, and others. The impoundments behind the
office also had some activity - lots of Wood Ducks flying and a male Am
Kestrel. And butterbutts are here in full force.

--
Ann Truesdale
<anntrue...>
Meggett, Charleston Co, SC
 

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Date: 11/9/18 1:51 pm
From: Wayne K. Forsythe <wforsythe...>
Subject: Possible, Evening Grosbeak Sightings
Folks,
Relating to the recent forcast for Evening Grosbeaks. I have been living in western NC for 32 years, During this time, I have seen this species in in the Balsam Grove area of Transylvania Cty., twice; April 9, 2000- 9 birds Feb. 2, 2002-2 birds
The last sighting I am aware of, was in Bryson City, up in Swain Cty. in April of 2013- 8 birds were coming to a feeder for several days!
Let's hope for the best, it is possible!
Wayne
Wayne K. Forsythe
16 Colonial Way
Hendersonville, N. C. 28791
wforsytheATmorrisbb.net
 

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Date: 11/9/18 12:38 pm
From: James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: White-winged Dove, Mount Pleasant, SC
I've had a White-winged Dove visit my feeders today. I first noticed it
about 1130am perched in a tree above the feeders, a short time later it was
on the ground feeding, then returned to the perch where it slept and
preened, then flew off, and returned shortly thereafter to a nearby tree.
The bird has flown to trees to the house next door to me. If anyone would
like to come to my house and try for the bird please send me an email
privately. I hope it returns and will certainly be looking out for it.
Several other birds have already been by to see it, eBird checklists with
photos are being submitted.

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

--

*Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul - and sings the
tunes without the words - and never stops at all.*

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

 

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Date: 11/9/18 10:51 am
From: DPratt14 <DPratt14...>
Subject: Fwd: Watauga County egret


Begin forwarded message:

> From: DPratt14 <DPratt14...>
> Date: November 8, 2018 5:39:41 PM EST
> To: <carolinabirds-request...>
> Subject: Watauga County egret
>
> Hello birders:
>
> I finally had a chance to look at the photos of the Watauga white egret, fully expecting to find something more likely than an Intermediate Egret. But, by golly, as soon as I looked at the first picture, I realized this WAS, indeed, such a great rarity. I had planned to send an email about this bird either way because I am probably one of the few Carolina birders with sufficient field experience with Little, Cattle, Intermediate, and Great egrets together (in Micronesia, where they all winter) to have a good feel for the "jizz" of an Intermediate. Even when seen together, these species can be very confusing, and Great/Intermediates seen flying at a distance, when there is no size reference, are a tough call. Perched, they are less problematic. The Hawaii Bird Records Committee (HBRC), of which I am a member, recently analyzed exactly the same ID problem involving a bird on Midway Atoll in November 2013. I will share some of what I submitted to that committee, but also see their report, just published earlier this year in Western Birds (2018, Vol. 49, No. 1; lead article). And further, I recently have been studying ID points for the white egrets as I work on the revision of my old "Field Guide to the Birds of Hawaii and the Tropical Pacific", which seems particularly in need of updating with regard to these species.
>
> The following points are edited, often extensively, from notes I submitted to the HBRC:
>
> 1. The best field mark to separate Great and Intermediate Egret is how far back the gape, or commissure, extends. In Intermediate, the gape point almost always extends to the rear edge of the eye, and sometimes appears to curl upward a bit around the back of the eye. The actual end point is usually indistinct because it is obscured by puffy feathers surrounding it. In contrast, the point of the gape extends well behind the eye in Great Egrets, and usually angles downward slightly behind the eye. The gape point is quite conspicuous and sharp in Great, not obscured by feathers as is often the case in Intermediate, so if you have any question about it, the bird is probably an Intermediate.
>
> 2. There is enough variation in bill shape and size in both species to make this virtually useless as an absolute field character, but extreme birds are quite obvious to observers familiar with them.
>
> 3. Intermediate Egrets look round-headed compared to Greats because of their more abrupt forehead angle , but that can disappear in certain postures. Intermediate always has a "sweet" look, unlike the "fierce" (to use the term some Asian commentators have used) look of Great Egret. I don't think it is a matter of the size of the eye as much as a combination of the size of the eye relative to the bill and the forehead angle. Great Egrets NEVER, apparently, show the rounded head shape of Intermediate. The line of the forehead continues almost straight back from the base of the bill, giving the whole head a dagger shape.
>
> 4. The size of the bird is a critical factor. The name intermediate is misleading because Intermediate Egret is only slightly larger than either a Cattle Egret or Little/Snowy Egret, but is MUCH smaller than a Great Egret. That said, an isolated Intermediate Egret with nothing for a size comparison can look a lot like a Great. I do double-takes all the time in Micronesia.
>
> 5. I had long thought that Great Egrets were the only ones with a noticeable kink in the neck. But it turns out that Intermediate Egrets can show a similar kink (although they usually don't), somewhat less pronounced than that of a Great. [I don't think this character was mentioned with regard to the Watauga bird.]
>
> 6. The overall proportions of Great and Intermediate differ a lot. Greats are very leggy, with a long snakey neck. Intermediates are much more gracile, with shorter neck and legs. In flight, the protruding legs on a Great will be about the same length as the rest of the bird (with neck folded), but they are shorter than the rest in Intermediate. This feature is really hard to judge in isolated individuals.
>
> 7. Soft part colors can be helpful depending on geography. Intermediate Egrets in nonbreeding plumage have orange-yellow bills with narrow black tips, and apple-green facial skin. Asian Great Egrets (subsp. modesta) have almost exactly the same colors, but "American" Egrets have more lemon-yellow bills, with a dark line down the culmen rather than a black tip. The Watauga bird clearly matches Intermediate and differs from local Great Egrets.
>
> I am convinced that this bird in an Intermediate Egret (aka Plumed Egret, Yellow-billed Egret). The only thing that bothers me is the gray leg color. I have never seen this color on an Intermediate Egret, but my experience is entirely with E. Asian subspecies. I looked at illustrations of African Intermediates, and their leg colors differ, but are never gray as far as I can tell. That exhausts the possibilities, so I think we just have to consider this bird a little off in leg color. The legs to me look "ashy" the way we talk about human skin when it is very dry, so the color might look right if the legs were wet. Regardless, everything else points strongly to Intermediate Egret for the Watauga bird. It may not be a first for the AOS area, but it's the first for continental North America. Let's hope it turns up again on some nearby pond.
>
> Doug Pratt
> Cary, NC
>
>

"How terribly strange to be seventy." -Paul Simon, "Old Friends" 1968

H. Douglas Pratt, Ph. D.
Ornithologist, illustrator, musician
1205 Selwyn Lane
Cary, NC 27511

Research Curator of Birds, Emeritus
North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
11 West Jones Street
Raleigh NC 27601

Phone 919-379-1679
Cell phone 919-270-0857 (for travel use only)

Website: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.hdouglaspratt.com_index.html&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=I2yrz7Y4Cqs6H5ce2AvJyCuYKBu8j8bylPTkU93OQXs&s=AbqrE8Q1hZcVr7lZLja3Ct4WpoAfqTu9BFPe6Er7J4g&e=









 

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Date: 11/9/18 8:22 am
From: Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...>
Subject: Henderson Cty, NC

Folks,
At 10:30 am, I found and photographed an adult Herring Gull on Butler Bridge Road in Henderson Cty. The bird is on the north side of the road between Jeffress Rd. and the bridge. It is in a large puddle along with some Mallards! This is a very good bird for Henderson Cty!
Wayne

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 11/9/18 8:07 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: FW: Watauga County egret
I think we can all disregard the bogus/phony report that someone who has
named herself as "Anne Hinga" -- get it? -- put on eBird earlier today of
the "Intermediate Egret" back at the pond in Watauga County. According to
"Anne"'s bio on eBird -- she lives here in Wake County in Morrisville, a
long way from Watauga County -- the bold is mine:

"I'm a retired CPA and proud grandmother of three exuberant *spirits.* I
fancy myself an *extra-sensory* birder with a knack for *channeling birds'
energies and auras* to aid in identification. I can be found looking for
birds at known *spiritual portals* in the Triangle such as Mason Farm, Mid
Pines Road, and the parking lot of any Bojangles."

I think we can agree now that: 1. the bird is gone, 2. the bird was a
Great Egret, and 3. Anne Hinga is indeed a spiritual birder who can conjure
up any bird she wants, anywhere, at any time. I don't think eBird is a
place to deliberately enter bogus reports, and I doubt Cornell University
is either.

Harry LeGrand

On Fri, Nov 9, 2018 at 10:40 AM Will Cook <cwcook...> wrote:

> There is some discussion in the facebook group "Advanced Bird ID"
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_groups_357272384368972_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=eQt4Nimp8wD1DEGUgRR2pOTbbALjTQJ0sq9khZ5aUxk&s=1V8Ng1y8R7x85iRmGCGSnOBeQN1Z-gTiy750ucfnXX0&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_groups_357272384368972_&d=DwMDaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=gc7gFZF-jOo3R10EM8TtDOyFehCxQ-fwe8lip7EvTs8&s=Yh1v6mwu5uGpSomg8Thg7G8UU7nDFxrWD3X79KYTTqM&e=>
> (scroll down a few posts). Replies so far:
>
> Alex Lin-Moore - Having spent part of the last summer comparing Great vs.
> Intermediate in Japan almost daily (admittedly my only experience with
> Intermediate), I don't see anything inconsistent with Great here. In
> Intermediate (when in profile), the greenish facial skin extends all the
> way to the forehead, whereas in Great, the facial skin is more restricted
> and usually ends before the lower part of the bill appears. In the 4th
> picture on the eBird checklist, it's also evident that the gape extends
> well past the eye, which as you say is a distinguishing feature for Great
> vs. Intermediate. Both of these features tend to give Intermediate a more
> Little Blue-like facial appearance, while Great is of course more Great
> Blue-like in shape. Aside from "why would an East/Southeast Asian heron
> appear in the mountains of NC" (I know Great Knot has showed up there
> before, but you can't really compare their breeding ranges or migration
> patterns), these facial features, as well as the overall bulkiness of bill
> and body, in my opinion comfortably rule out Intermediate in favor of Great.
>
> Forest Jarvis - It's inconsistent in the pics whether or not the gape
> extends past the eye, but I see more evidence that it does rather than
> doesn't. The neck also looks too large and kinked for Intermediate, though
> I'd need to see it with the next extended to be sure. If I were to see this
> in the Philippines, I'd be pretty comfortable calling it a Great Egret.
>
> Shane Brown - The bill isn't too short and thick if you look at all the
> angles in the google gallery above. It's just that most of the photos are
> giving us angles that foreshorten the bill. Underestimating head angle (vs.
> perpendicular) and skewing the bill impression is maybe the biggest ID
> pitfall of all time? I've seen about 45 degrees mistaken for nearly
> perpendicular.
>
> Will Cook - Durham, NC (who knows nothing about Intermediate Egrets)
> On 11/9/2018 8:58 AM, Nate Swick wrote:
>
> This looks like a bog standard Great Egret to me. We are getting a load of
> foreshortening in most of these photos making the bill look shorter than it
> is. The gape is, at best, inconclusive.
>
> More, the first 3 photos in the Google Drive show as close to a full
> profile as we can get, and in those photos it looks like it's packing a
> normal-sized Great Egret bill on a normal-shaped (flat) Great Egret head.
>
> This is a very tough ID even in the best of times. If places where I have
> been where both are present, birders often have to just let the ID go. And
> that's when you *know* that Intermediate is possible, or even likely--not
> many many thousands of miles and two continents away.
>
> Nate Swick
> GSO, NC
>
> On Thu, Nov 8, 2018 at 12:14 PM David Campbell <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> As an added complication,
>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.hbw.com_species_intermediate-2Degret-2Dardea-2Dintermedia&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=eQt4Nimp8wD1DEGUgRR2pOTbbALjTQJ0sq9khZ5aUxk&s=gmT7WTt9SBTm6g6Rqss--UQ3F7NOLLYQPfhcAte-Wqs&e=
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.hbw.com_species_intermediate-2Degret-2Dardea-2Dintermedia&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=J7BQsAGwtiuG-gW-XPngF_htCCN5o04KFpEdFjZY3B8&s=NlKgTazXYph963puTRSPsbQ7m3vi9gZwbne31T1wyAc&e=>
>> separates the Asian, African, and Australian "Intermediate" Egrets into
>> different species, chiefly differing in breeding colors.
>>
>> On Thu, Nov 8, 2018 at 12:08 AM Matt Janson <carolinabirds...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Mike et. al,
>>> I want to point out that there is in fact a fall record for Intermediate
>>> Egret in North America, also from the Western Aleutians, 28 September 2010
>>> on Shemya; the bird was a first-year and ultimately collected. This report,
>>> along with a nice side-by-side illustration comparing Intermediate and
>>> Great Egrets, can be found in Rare Birds of North America by Howell,
>>> Lewington, & Russell.
>>> Best Regards,
>>> Matt Janson
>>> Ithaca, NY
>>>
>>> On Wed, Nov 7, 2018 at 10:32 PM <mtove...> wrote:
>>>
>>>> I’ve looked at the pics and also have some experience with Intermediate
>>>> Egrets (Philippines, Hong Kong).
>>>>
>>>> My concern is that based on the photos, the mouth gape seems to extend
>>>> beyond the center of the eye. Granted the bird's head is tucked down so
>>>> it's hard to tell if this is real or an artifact. But in all the pics
>>>> (where the head is in focus and visible), I consistently see what appears
>>>> to be a “crease” that continues as an extension of the mouth gape past the
>>>> center of the eye. I’m not certain either way, but it does give me pause.
>>>>
>>>> Regards other marks: I don’t believe that neck position/shape is a
>>>> completely reliable field mark as it's behaviorally presented and birds can
>>>> do things that are atypical (not that this was offered as a field mark).
>>>> The gray legs and dark-tipped bill are consistent with the ID but for me at
>>>> least, these “other marks” (and more – e.g., bill length/shape, head shape,
>>>> etc.) are more useful to single out birds for careful scrutiny than confirm
>>>> an ID. For me at least, I wasn’t comfortable with the ID if I didn’t see
>>>> the mouth gape which is consistently touted as THE definitive field mark.
>>>> Even where Intermediate Egrets were common (along with Greats), I recall
>>>> hedging on the IDs of many.
>>>>
>>>> According to National Geographic Guide to Birds (6th edition), there is
>>>> a single record of a moribund Intermediate Egret from Buldir Is., Alaska
>>>> (western Aleutians), May 2006. Other than that, I’m unaware of any other
>>>> records from North America and similarly I’m unaware of any fall records.
>>>> Given that level of rarity, I would hope everyone is VERY sure that there’s
>>>> no possible way this bird isn't a “funny” Great Egret and the rest isn’t a
>>>> lot of enthusiastic wishful thinking. I know it’s tough but personally, I’d
>>>> rather not ID a bird as a rarity (and be wrong) than the other way around.
>>>> Obviously, it would be great if the bird could be refound and carefully
>>>> scrutinized for definitive evidence one way or the other.
>>>>
>>>> Mike Tove
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Matthew D. Janson
>>> 28270 NC
>>> (704)-845-6030
>>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Dr. David Campbell
>> Associate Professor, Geology
>> Department of Natural Sciences
>> Box 7270
>> Gardner-Webb University
>> Boiling Springs NC 28017
>>
>
>
> --
> The ABA Blog
> blog.aba.org
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__blog.aba.org_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=cgLTryoFBd81OeuJy-_g7GRq9rOuBB6EO8X_1mqVkGs&s=oqquqZxzccEt4F8wpAs23GOCFhHwce06tzFzM37Suk4&e=>
> American Birding Podcast
> blog.aba.org/aba-podcast
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__blog.aba.org_aba-2Dpodcast&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=cgLTryoFBd81OeuJy-_g7GRq9rOuBB6EO8X_1mqVkGs&s=70_Epv3mOeShmWmtD_6msfMvMFRT4r4_9qGCIhPm1R4&e=>
> American Birding Association
>
>
>
> --
> Will Cook - Durham, NCwww.carolinanature.com <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.carolinanature.com&d=DwMDaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=gc7gFZF-jOo3R10EM8TtDOyFehCxQ-fwe8lip7EvTs8&s=QZY_ldKiC8wWby4lIEh8fc4DNQkKCl1-KXy1ctg9Q-k&e=>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/9/18 7:41 am
From: Will Cook <cwcook...>
Subject: Re: FW: Watauga County egret
There is some discussion in the facebook group "Advanced Bird ID"

https://www.facebook.com/groups/357272384368972/ (scroll down a few
posts). Replies so far:

Alex Lin-Moore - Having spent part of the last summer comparing Great
vs. Intermediate in Japan almost daily (admittedly my only experience
with Intermediate), I don't see anything inconsistent with Great here.
In Intermediate (when in profile), the greenish facial skin extends
all the way to the forehead, whereas in Great, the facial skin is more
restricted and usually ends before the lower part of the bill appears.
In the 4th picture on the eBird checklist, it's also evident that the
gape extends well past the eye, which as you say is a distinguishing
feature for Great vs. Intermediate. Both of these features tend to
give Intermediate a more Little Blue-like facial appearance, while
Great is of course more Great Blue-like in shape. Aside from "why
would an East/Southeast Asian heron appear in the mountains of NC" (I
know Great Knot has showed up there before, but you can't really
compare their breeding ranges or migration patterns), these facial
features, as well as the overall bulkiness of bill and body, in my
opinion comfortably rule out Intermediate in favor of Great.

Forest Jarvis - It's inconsistent in the pics whether or not the gape
extends past the eye, but I see more evidence that it does rather than
doesn't. The neck also looks too large and kinked for Intermediate,
though I'd need to see it with the next extended to be sure. If I were
to see this in the Philippines, I'd be pretty comfortable calling it a
Great Egret.

Shane Brown - The bill isn't too short and thick if you look at all
the angles in the google gallery above. It's just that most of the
photos are giving us angles that foreshorten the bill. Underestimating
head angle (vs. perpendicular) and skewing the bill impression is
maybe the biggest ID pitfall of all time? I've seen about 45 degrees
mistaken for nearly perpendicular.

Will Cook - Durham, NC (who knows nothing about Intermediate Egrets)

On 11/9/2018 8:58 AM, Nate Swick wrote:

This looks like a bog standard Great Egret to me. We are getting a
load of foreshortening in most of these photos making the bill look
shorter than it is. The gape is, at best, inconclusive.

More, the first 3 photos in the Google Drive show as close to a full
profile as we can get, and in those photos it looks like it's packing
a normal-sized Great Egret bill on a normal-shaped (flat) Great Egret
head.

This is a very tough ID even in the best of times. If places where I
have been where both are present, birders often have to just let the
ID go. And that's when you *know* that Intermediate is possible, or
even likely--not many many thousands of miles and two continents
away.

Nate Swick
GSO, NC
On Thu, Nov 8, 2018 at 12:14 PM David Campbell <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

As an added complication,
https://www.hbw.com/species/intermediate-egret-ardea-intermedia
separates the Asian, African, and Australian "Intermediate" Egrets
into different species, chiefly differing in breeding colors.

On Thu, Nov 8, 2018 at 12:08 AM Matt Janson <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

Mike et. al, I want to point out that there is in fact a fall
record for Intermediate Egret in North America, also from the
Western Aleutians, 28 September 2010 on Shemya; the bird was a
first-year and ultimately collected. This report, along with a
nice side-by-side illustration comparing Intermediate and
Great Egrets, can be found in Rare Birds of North America by
Howell, Lewington, & Russell. Best Regards,Matt JansonIthaca,
NY
On Wed, Nov 7, 2018 at 10:32 PM <mtove...> wrote:

I’ve looked at the pics and also have some experience
with Intermediate Egrets (Philippines, Hong Kong).

My concern is that based on the photos, the mouth gape
seems to extend beyond the center of the eye. Granted the
bird's head is tucked down so it's hard to tell if this is
real or an artifact. But in all the pics (where the head
is in focus and visible), I consistently see what appears
to be a “crease” that continues as an extension of the
mouth gape past the center of the eye. I’m not certain
either way, but it does give me pause.

Regards other marks: I don’t believe that neck
position/shape is a completely reliable field mark as it's
behaviorally presented and birds can do things that are
atypical (not that this was offered as a field mark). The
gray legs and dark-tipped bill are consistent with the ID
but for me at least, these “other marks” (and more –
e.g., bill length/shape, head shape, etc.) are more useful
to single out birds for careful scrutiny than confirm an
ID. For me at least, I wasn’t comfortable with the ID if
I didn’t see the mouth gape which is consistently touted
as THE definitive field mark. Even where Intermediate
Egrets were common (along with Greats), I recall hedging
on the IDs of many.

According to National Geographic Guide to Birds (6th
edition), there is a single record of a moribund
Intermediate Egret from Buldir Is., Alaska (western
Aleutians), May 2006. Other than that, I’m unaware of
any other records from North America and similarly I’m
unaware of any fall records. Given that level of rarity, I
would hope everyone is VERY sure that there’s no
possible way this bird isn't a “funny” Great Egret and
the rest isn’t a lot of enthusiastic wishful thinking. I
know it’s tough but personally, I’d rather not ID a
bird as a rarity (and be wrong) than the other way around.
Obviously, it would be great if the bird could be refound
and carefully scrutinized for definitive evidence one way
or the other.

Mike Tove




--
Matthew D. Janson 28270 NC(704)-845-6030



--
Dr. David CampbellAssociate Professor, GeologyDepartment of
Natural SciencesBox 7270Gardner-Webb UniversityBoiling Springs NC
28017



--
The ABA Blog
blog.aba.org American Birding Podcastblog.aba.org/aba-podcast
American Birding Association



--
Will Cook - Durham, NC www.carolinanature.com
 

Back to top
Date: 11/9/18 6:10 am
From: bruce young (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Chapel hill bird club trip Sunday
For hunting reasons, this week's CHBC trip will be Sunday. We will be going to the Flat River impoundment by Falls Lake. Meet in the parking lot by the impoundment at 7:30 and be ready for ducks, blackbirds, and all the sparrows you could ever want to see! For directions, you can reply to me or check out Will Cook's website. https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__tbg.carolinanature.com_flatriver.html&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=cEFPBND4XE2gJvsmhv9_eMCCiYJgi4-s7WHliZSs3tA&s=i5XFvf9D1_6OxO1azrvAr2f8TCVQpUiVjY_Z7roPnYo&e=

Bruce <Youngbyoung715...>, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 11/9/18 5:59 am
From: Nate Swick <nswick...>
Subject: Re: FW: Watauga County egret
This looks like a bog standard Great Egret to me. We are getting a load of
foreshortening in most of these photos making the bill look shorter than it
is. The gape is, at best, inconclusive.

More, the first 3 photos in the Google Drive show as close to a full
profile as we can get, and in those photos it looks like it's packing a
normal-sized Great Egret bill on a normal-shaped (flat) Great Egret head.

This is a very tough ID even in the best of times. If places where I have
been where both are present, birders often have to just let the ID go. And
that's when you *know* that Intermediate is possible, or even likely--not
many many thousands of miles and two continents away.

Nate Swick
GSO, NC

On Thu, Nov 8, 2018 at 12:14 PM David Campbell <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> As an added complication,
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.hbw.com_species_intermediate-2Degret-2Dardea-2Dintermedia&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=cgLTryoFBd81OeuJy-_g7GRq9rOuBB6EO8X_1mqVkGs&s=yWzLprBnCljGazQN2eiTrQs-MvnkbuLW6zYQdX-A6Og&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.hbw.com_species_intermediate-2Degret-2Dardea-2Dintermedia&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=J7BQsAGwtiuG-gW-XPngF_htCCN5o04KFpEdFjZY3B8&s=NlKgTazXYph963puTRSPsbQ7m3vi9gZwbne31T1wyAc&e=>
> separates the Asian, African, and Australian "Intermediate" Egrets into
> different species, chiefly differing in breeding colors.
>
> On Thu, Nov 8, 2018 at 12:08 AM Matt Janson <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> Mike et. al,
>> I want to point out that there is in fact a fall record for Intermediate
>> Egret in North America, also from the Western Aleutians, 28 September 2010
>> on Shemya; the bird was a first-year and ultimately collected. This report,
>> along with a nice side-by-side illustration comparing Intermediate and
>> Great Egrets, can be found in Rare Birds of North America by Howell,
>> Lewington, & Russell.
>> Best Regards,
>> Matt Janson
>> Ithaca, NY
>>
>> On Wed, Nov 7, 2018 at 10:32 PM <mtove...> wrote:
>>
>>> I’ve looked at the pics and also have some experience with Intermediate
>>> Egrets (Philippines, Hong Kong).
>>>
>>> My concern is that based on the photos, the mouth gape seems to extend
>>> beyond the center of the eye. Granted the bird's head is tucked down so
>>> it's hard to tell if this is real or an artifact. But in all the pics
>>> (where the head is in focus and visible), I consistently see what appears
>>> to be a “crease” that continues as an extension of the mouth gape past the
>>> center of the eye. I’m not certain either way, but it does give me pause.
>>>
>>> Regards other marks: I don’t believe that neck position/shape is a
>>> completely reliable field mark as it's behaviorally presented and birds can
>>> do things that are atypical (not that this was offered as a field mark).
>>> The gray legs and dark-tipped bill are consistent with the ID but for me at
>>> least, these “other marks” (and more – e.g., bill length/shape, head shape,
>>> etc.) are more useful to single out birds for careful scrutiny than confirm
>>> an ID. For me at least, I wasn’t comfortable with the ID if I didn’t see
>>> the mouth gape which is consistently touted as THE definitive field mark.
>>> Even where Intermediate Egrets were common (along with Greats), I recall
>>> hedging on the IDs of many.
>>>
>>> According to National Geographic Guide to Birds (6th edition), there is
>>> a single record of a moribund Intermediate Egret from Buldir Is., Alaska
>>> (western Aleutians), May 2006. Other than that, I’m unaware of any other
>>> records from North America and similarly I’m unaware of any fall records.
>>> Given that level of rarity, I would hope everyone is VERY sure that there’s
>>> no possible way this bird isn't a “funny” Great Egret and the rest isn’t a
>>> lot of enthusiastic wishful thinking. I know it’s tough but personally, I’d
>>> rather not ID a bird as a rarity (and be wrong) than the other way around.
>>> Obviously, it would be great if the bird could be refound and carefully
>>> scrutinized for definitive evidence one way or the other.
>>>
>>> Mike Tove
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>> --
>> Matthew D. Janson
>> 28270 NC
>> (704)-845-6030
>>
>
>
> --
> Dr. David Campbell
> Associate Professor, Geology
> Department of Natural Sciences
> Box 7270
> Gardner-Webb University
> Boiling Springs NC 28017
>


--
The ABA Blog
blog.aba.org
American Birding Podcast
blog.aba.org/aba-podcast
American Birding Association

 

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Date: 11/8/18 7:09 pm
From: Will Cook <cwcook...>
Subject: Re: Could this be the year?
On the Chapel Hill CBC, the first record of Evening Grosbeak was of 40
in 1959 (our first CBC was in 1923). Peak year was 1980 with 590,
outnumbering American Goldfinch. Last one (1) was 2004, plus a count
week bird in 2012.

When present, Evening Grosbeaks often linger late into spring. On the
Chapel Hill Spring Bird Count, our first record was of 8 in 1952, the
first year of the count. Peak was 137 in 1982, last one was 1 in 1998.

Probably wishful thinking, but you might want to stock up on sunflower
seed - they're greedy pigs!

Will Cook - Durham, NC

On 11/8/2018 4:46 PM, Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> I just looked at our records for the Jordan Lake (NC) Christmas Count.
> The last time we had Evening Grosbeaks (10 of them) on the count was
> in December, 2003. Prior to that, we had them on about 70% of the
> counts going all the way back to 1977, when the count began. In
> January, 2000, we had 131, but usually we recorded numbers in double
> digits. In January, 1982, we had 254.
> On Thu, Nov 8, 2018 at 4:00 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> As a second reminder, if you have never heard one before, you really need to play the call recording on your bird app(s), or go to You Tube or XenoCanto to listen to bird calls -- now. Your first one, if this winter, will likely be heard only, calling overhead. For example, I have HEARD Pine Siskin and Purple Finch in Wake County this fall but have yet to see one. The call sounds a lot like a Flicker call to me, but one syllabled -- TEER!. So -- you need to do more than just study paintings, photos, and videos of Evening Grosbeaks if you have never seen/heard it before. Learn and know the call note(s)!
>>
>> Harry LeGrand
>>
>> PS -- As with Merrill, I have seen and heard hundreds or thousands of them in NC, and I have probably banded about 50 of them. The deep V marks on my fingers have healed over time! But, it has also been 15-20 years for me as well for getting one in NC.
>>
>> On Thu, Nov 8, 2018 at 3:08 PM "J. Merrill Lynch" <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Birders,
>>>
>>> Some of you probably weren’t even born yet when evening grosbeaks were annual winter visitors to the Carolinas, often in large numbers. The last ones I recall seeing in NC were in Apex (where I lived at the time) back in the mid-late ‘90’s.
>>>
>>> Since then the irruptions in our area have essentially ended and the species has declined significantly across much of its primarily Canadian breeding grounds.
>>>
>>> There are indications that this winter has potential for at least a few birds to make it to our area. There have already been a number of reports in the northeast as far south as Maryland.
>>>
>>> So keep your eyes and ears open!
>>>
>>> Merrill
>>>
>>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.allaboutbirds.org_this-2Dcould-2Dbe-2Dthe-2Dwinter-2Dyou-2Dget-2Devening-2Dgrosbeaks-2Dat-2Dyour-2Dfeeder_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=_gokesi2wxqy6kMsPvUvb-LxgbAFeRDC-4wMRUORMu8&s=tbvZwF1IRsoS_o5dwN9qsDNT8YZN2uigyiruS8fYhFM&e=
>>>
>>> Merrill Lynch
>>> Echo Valley Farm
>>> Watauga County, NC
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 11/8/18 6:54 pm
From: Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: eBird Trip Summary - for 11/08/2018
Greetings all

This morning I drove down to Falls Lake to bird at Rolling View in Durham Co and at Beaversam Reservoir in Wake Co.

Birds of note was finding all three Nuthatches with the RB at both locations with hearing my first at Rolling just as I was putting on my boots for the first bird of the day. Boy the RB at Beaverdam was not as easy. I found WB and later BH and I found a GC and RC Kinglet but no RB Nuthatches.

I had given up on finding one and was driving out of the park and went I saw a road on the right that I hadn’t yet birded yet so I gave it a try and parked at the third picnic shelter on the left and after parking I heard one as I got out of the car. I walked down the road a little ways and I got to hear it much better.

I got a Cooper’s at Rolling View as well as an Osprey and a SS at Beaverdam along with Osprey which could have been the same one from Rolling View and an adult Bald Eagle.

There was a nice little mix of ducks and coots at Rolling View but none at Beaverdam.

The big disappointment for the day was that Sandling Beach was locked up and posted No Trespassing, I really wanted to bird there.

At the end of the day I added 14 species for my Durham Co list now at 104 and 5 species for Wake Co now at 68.

It was a nice day considering on what is suppose to arrive for the next day or two.

Good Birding Always

jeffblalock
eBird Checklist Summary for: Nov 8, 2018

Number of Checklists: 2
Number of Taxa: 44

Checklists included in this summary:
(1): Falls Lake--Rolling View
Date: Nov 8, 2018 at 7:15 AM
(2): Falls Lake--Beaverdam Reservoir
Date: Nov 8, 2018 at 12:50 PM

11 Canada Goose -- (1)
10 Gadwall -- (1)
2 Ring-necked Duck -- (1)
15 Greater/Lesser Scaup -- (1)
3 Bufflehead -- (1)
12 Ruddy Duck -- (1)
5 Pied-billed Grebe -- (1),(2)
4 Horned Grebe -- (1)
55 American Coot -- (1)
75 Bonaparte's Gull -- (1),(2)
167 Ring-billed Gull -- (1),(2)
4 Common Loon -- (1)
30 Double-crested Cormorant -- (1)
4 Great Blue Heron (Blue form) -- (1),(2)
6 Black Vulture -- (1)
12 Turkey Vulture -- (1),(2)
2 Osprey -- (1),(2)
1 Sharp-shinned Hawk -- (2)
1 Cooper's Hawk -- (1)
1 Bald Eagle -- (2)
2 Belted Kingfisher -- (1),(2)
1 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker -- (2)
6 Red-bellied Woodpecker -- (1),(2)
3 Downy Woodpecker -- (1),(2)
1 Hairy Woodpecker -- (2)
5 Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) -- (1),(2)
7 American Crow -- (1),(2)
5 Carolina Chickadee -- (1),(2)
7 Tufted Titmouse -- (1),(2)
4 Red-breasted Nuthatch -- (1),(2)
1 White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern) -- (2)
4 Brown-headed Nuthatch -- (1),(2)
1 Brown Creeper -- (1)
2 Carolina Wren -- (1)
2 Golden-crowned Kinglet -- (2)
6 Ruby-crowned Kinglet -- (1),(2)
5 Eastern Bluebird -- (1),(2)
3 Hermit Thrush -- (1),(2)
7 American Goldfinch -- (1),(2)
50 Chipping Sparrow -- (1),(2)
4 Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) -- (1)
1 Eastern Towhee -- (1)
3 Pine Warbler -- (2)
2 Northern Cardinal -- (1)

This trip summary was created using the eBird app for iPhone and iPad.
See eBird for more information.


From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>


 

Back to top
Date: 11/8/18 6:25 pm
From: Clyde Sorenson <sorenson...>
Subject: Re: Falls Lake- Rolling View, 11/8
Kyle et al.: Your scaup numbers are interesting to me. 30 years ago, not
long after the lake was filled, for several years a flock of several
hundred to perhaps a thousand would show up on the lake for a week or two
near the first of December. We hunted them for several years, and their
appearance was almost like clockwork. I moved out west in 1989; when I
returned to NC in '96, that phenomenon apparently had ended.

On a related note- the New Hope Gamelands (now the bottom of Jordan Lake)
held sometimes astounding numbers of ducks before the lake, especially
after much of it had been cleared but before it was flooded. I remember one
snowy evening on a flooded oxbow when a couple hundred black ducks and
mallards landed all around us (we just watched in awe). There were far more
ducks in those bottomlands then than there ever have been on the lake...

And lots of short-eared owls, too!

Clyde Sorenson
Clayton and Raleigh, NC

On Thu, Nov 8, 2018 at 7:04 PM, Kyle Kittelberger <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Hey everyone,
>
> Always interesting to see how diversity and numbers of waterfowl fluctuate
> in the same week at Falls Lake. There is clearly a big movement of Common
> Loons occurring right now inland, I only had 6 a few days ago and this
> evening there were 99!! Horned Grebe numbers have dropped, as have numbers
> for Gadwall. Scaup numbers are up though, and now there are a handful of
> Greaters in the mix. Otherwise, the other notable addition was American
> Coot, with two rafts at different parts of the lake. Nothing of note among
> the gulls. Did have a Great Horned Owl calling though, nice to hear.
>
> Below are the list of birds I had from both swim beaches this evening at
> Rolling View.
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S49763494&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=uPyz4K4xqcmZikui51qgE6WCsaZIcgiHqMEDwlTanSc&s=qJ3Jeo-T76393aqG3W_HO9oSIfLA5q8_ew2HJD6IwGs&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S49763494&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=9goXhHBLPChWECRoG%203HgScHaKgEMhop6Spzk9zUj8zg&s=NvjhDwAKkAE7jHSLuAhIS8J-VAI1UXHWLkwJyroJNl4&e=>
>
>
> Northern Shoveler- 3
> Gadwall- 3
> American Wigeon- 3
> Mallard- 2
> Greater Scaup- 5
> Lesser Scaup- 20
> Bufflehead- 2
> Ruddy Duck- 12
> Pied-billed Grebe- 58
> Horned Grebe- 19
> American Coot- 76
> Bonaparte's Gull
> Ring-billed Gull
> Common Loon- 99
> Double-crested Cormorant- 28
>
>
> Cheers,
> Kyle Kittelberger
> Raleigh, NC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/8/18 6:22 pm
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Re: Weird egret in Watauga Co.
The comments by one respondent that the only other Intermediate Egret to
have occurred on the continent "was collected" gave me pause.

Perhaps it would be better for the bird not to be reported. Personally
I'd hate to bring about its death even tangentially.

Anyone that wants to see the summary of all my own observations and
thoughts can go to my updated ebird checklist.

I had some awesome close looks at a gorgeous Rusty Blackbird today at
the Boone Greenway.

Thanks, and good birding. Guy

Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 11/8/18 4:05 pm
From: Kyle Kittelberger (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Falls Lake- Rolling View, 11/8
Hey everyone,
Always interesting to see how diversity and numbers of waterfowl fluctuate in the same week at Falls Lake. There is clearly a big movement of Common Loons occurring right now inland, I only had 6 a few days ago and this evening there were 99!! Horned Grebe numbers have dropped, as have numbers for Gadwall. Scaup numbers are up though, and now there are a handful of Greaters in the mix. Otherwise, the other notable addition was American Coot, with two rafts at different parts of the lake. Nothing of note among the gulls. Did have a Great Horned Owl calling though, nice to hear. 
Below are the list of birds I had from both swim beaches this evening at Rolling View.https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S49763494&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=9goXhHBLPChWECRoG3HgScHaKgEMhop6Spzk9zUj8zg&s=NvjhDwAKkAE7jHSLuAhIS8J-VAI1UXHWLkwJyroJNl4&e=


Northern Shoveler- 3Gadwall- 3American Wigeon- 3Mallard- 2Greater Scaup- 5Lesser Scaup- 20Bufflehead- 2Ruddy Duck- 12Pied-billed Grebe- 58Horned Grebe- 19American Coot- 76Bonaparte's GullRing-billed GullCommon Loon- 99Double-crested Cormorant- 28

Cheers,Kyle KittelbergerRaleigh, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 11/8/18 1:58 pm
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Could this be the year?
It's interesting that Evening Grosbeaks were nearly unknown in the Carolinas until around 1950. It seems that the irruption years of the second half of the 20th century may have been an anomaly, and we've now returned to the history pattern of scarcity.

Kent Fiala


 

Back to top
Date: 11/8/18 1:46 pm
From: Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Could this be the year?
I just looked at our records for the Jordan Lake (NC) Christmas Count.
The last time we had Evening Grosbeaks (10 of them) on the count was
in December, 2003. Prior to that, we had them on about 70% of the
counts going all the way back to 1977, when the count began. In
January, 2000, we had 131, but usually we recorded numbers in double
digits. In January, 1982, we had 254.
On Thu, Nov 8, 2018 at 4:00 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> As a second reminder, if you have never heard one before, you really need to play the call recording on your bird app(s), or go to You Tube or XenoCanto to listen to bird calls -- now. Your first one, if this winter, will likely be heard only, calling overhead. For example, I have HEARD Pine Siskin and Purple Finch in Wake County this fall but have yet to see one. The call sounds a lot like a Flicker call to me, but one syllabled -- TEER!. So -- you need to do more than just study paintings, photos, and videos of Evening Grosbeaks if you have never seen/heard it before. Learn and know the call note(s)!
>
> Harry LeGrand
>
> PS -- As with Merrill, I have seen and heard hundreds or thousands of them in NC, and I have probably banded about 50 of them. The deep V marks on my fingers have healed over time! But, it has also been 15-20 years for me as well for getting one in NC.
>
> On Thu, Nov 8, 2018 at 3:08 PM "J. Merrill Lynch" <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> Birders,
>>
>> Some of you probably weren’t even born yet when evening grosbeaks were annual winter visitors to the Carolinas, often in large numbers. The last ones I recall seeing in NC were in Apex (where I lived at the time) back in the mid-late ‘90’s.
>>
>> Since then the irruptions in our area have essentially ended and the species has declined significantly across much of its primarily Canadian breeding grounds.
>>
>> There are indications that this winter has potential for at least a few birds to make it to our area. There have already been a number of reports in the northeast as far south as Maryland.
>>
>> So keep your eyes and ears open!
>>
>> Merrill
>>
>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.allaboutbirds.org_this-2Dcould-2Dbe-2Dthe-2Dwinter-2Dyou-2Dget-2Devening-2Dgrosbeaks-2Dat-2Dyour-2Dfeeder_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=_gokesi2wxqy6kMsPvUvb-LxgbAFeRDC-4wMRUORMu8&s=tbvZwF1IRsoS_o5dwN9qsDNT8YZN2uigyiruS8fYhFM&e=
>>
>> Merrill Lynch
>> Echo Valley Farm
>> Watauga County, NC
>> Sent from my iPhone



--
Norm Budnitz
Orange County
North Carolina
 

Back to top
Date: 11/8/18 1:00 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Could this be the year?
As a second reminder, if you have never heard one before, you really need
to play the call recording on your bird app(s), or go to You Tube or
XenoCanto to listen to bird calls -- now. Your first one, if this winter,
will likely be heard only, calling overhead. For example, I have HEARD
Pine Siskin and Purple Finch in Wake County this fall but have yet to see
one. The call sounds a lot like a Flicker call to me, but one syllabled --
TEER!. So -- you need to do more than just study paintings, photos, and
videos of Evening Grosbeaks if you have never seen/heard it before. * Learn
and know the call note(s)!*

Harry LeGrand

PS -- As with Merrill, I have seen and heard hundreds or thousands of them
in NC, and I have probably banded about 50 of them. The deep V marks on my
fingers have healed over time! But, it has also been 15-20 years for me as
well for getting one in NC.

On Thu, Nov 8, 2018 at 3:08 PM "J. Merrill Lynch" <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Birders,
>
> Some of you probably weren’t even born yet when evening grosbeaks were
> annual winter visitors to the Carolinas, often in large numbers. The last
> ones I recall seeing in NC were in Apex (where I lived at the time) back in
> the mid-late ‘90’s.
>
> Since then the irruptions in our area have essentially ended and the
> species has declined significantly across much of its primarily Canadian
> breeding grounds.
>
> There are indications that this winter has potential for at least a few
> birds to make it to our area. There have already been a number of reports
> in the northeast as far south as Maryland.
>
> So keep your eyes and ears open!
>
> Merrill
>
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.allaboutbirds.org_this-2Dcould-2Dbe-2Dthe-2Dwinter-2Dyou-2Dget-2Devening-2Dgrosbeaks-2Dat-2Dyour-2Dfeeder_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=knw070uBz314REA5D13-a-d454jJ4giofeLXM7oSIXM&s=PzgDX7Xe2eLEQe2b47oT6HYHFFTYvupgkusjAnOtV8c&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.allaboutbirds.org_this-2Dcould-2Dbe-2Dthe-2Dwinter-2Dyou-2Dget-2Devening-2Dgrosbeaks-2Dat-2Dyour-2Dfeeder_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=R_feABdoUCJSKTL1KA6XDkbKT2v2TRVpB1lmX2Ys_lE&s=_wjOV0jL4wjlZdan59jmrwrPmOh6kjLd2i7Jz54kAe4&e=>
>
> Merrill Lynch
> Echo Valley Farm
> Watauga County, NC
> Sent from my iPhone
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/8/18 12:29 pm
From: Steve Compton <scompton1251...>
Subject: Re: Spartanburg SC CBC
David,
Darn. Out of town that day. I am very disappointed.
Steve Compton
Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE DroidOn 8 Nov 2018 1:53 pm, David Campbell
<carolinabirds...> wrote:

The Spartanburg, SC CBC is planned for Friday, 28 December.
Contact Lyle Campbell <LCAMPBELL...> for details on
participating.

--
Dr. David CampbellAssociate Professor, GeologyDepartment of
Natural SciencesBox 7270Gardner-Webb UniversityBoiling Springs NC
28017
 

Back to top
Date: 11/8/18 12:27 pm
From: Steve Compton <scompton1251...>
Subject: Re: Could this be the year?
Merrill,
I think I have only seen Evening Grosbeaks in SC once: in a Christmas
bird count in Mount Pleasant. About 1980.
Steve Compton Greenville,SC
Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE DroidOn 8 Nov 2018 3:07 pm, "J. Merrill
Lynch" <carolinabirds...> wrote:

Birders,
Some of you probably weren’t even born yet when evening
grosbeaks were annual winter visitors to the Carolinas, often in
large numbers. The last ones I recall seeing in NC were in Apex
(where I lived at the time) back in the mid-late ‘90’s.
Since then the irruptions in our area have essentially ended and
the species has declined significantly across much of its
primarily Canadian breeding grounds.
There are indications that this winter has potential for at least
a few birds to make it to our area. There have already been a
number of reports in the northeast as far south as Maryland.
So keep your eyes and ears open!
Merrill
https://www.allaboutbirds.org/this-could-be-the-winter-you-get-evening-grosbeaks-at-your-feeder/

Merrill LynchEcho Valley FarmWatauga County, NCSent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 11/8/18 12:08 pm
From: \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Could this be the year?
Birders,

Some of you probably weren’t even born yet when evening grosbeaks were annual winter visitors to the Carolinas, often in large numbers. The last ones I recall seeing in NC were in Apex (where I lived at the time) back in the mid-late ‘90’s.

Since then the irruptions in our area have essentially ended and the species has declined significantly across much of its primarily Canadian breeding grounds.

There are indications that this winter has potential for at least a few birds to make it to our area. There have already been a number of reports in the northeast as far south as Maryland.

So keep your eyes and ears open!

Merrill

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.allaboutbirds.org_this-2Dcould-2Dbe-2Dthe-2Dwinter-2Dyou-2Dget-2Devening-2Dgrosbeaks-2Dat-2Dyour-2Dfeeder_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=R_feABdoUCJSKTL1KA6XDkbKT2v2TRVpB1lmX2Ys_lE&s=_wjOV0jL4wjlZdan59jmrwrPmOh6kjLd2i7Jz54kAe4&e=

Merrill Lynch
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 11/8/18 11:00 am
From: David Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Spartanburg SC CBC
The Spartanburg, SC CBC is planned for Friday, 28 December. Contact Lyle
Campbell <LCAMPBELL...> for details on participating.

--
Dr. David Campbell
Associate Professor, Geology
Department of Natural Sciences
Box 7270
Gardner-Webb University
Boiling Springs NC 28017

 

Back to top
Date: 11/8/18 9:26 am
From: Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Pine Siskin Numbers Increasing
While we have only had a couple fly over Pine Siskins here at Riverbend
Park, John Sutton, the ranger at Bakers Mtn Park in SW Catawba Co, called
to report over 100 Pine Siskins at the feeders there. We had a flock of 14
fly over and briefly land at Dusty Ridge Access area on Lake Hickory this
morning.


Dwayne
*************
J. Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
<redxbill...>


Catawba County Park Ranger
Riverbend Park - Conover, NC
<jdmartin...>
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.catawbacountync.gov_depts_parks_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JD0aulq4R9cLrMeWc5LQKGztxsKQIIgwfH_59_KeNC8&s=2Km8IrOuJxhwYs71KOovHR0lMOIDfNQsmwS2pZNNwsk&e=
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.weatherlink.com_user_riverbendpark&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JD0aulq4R9cLrMeWc5LQKGztxsKQIIgwfH_59_KeNC8&s=pJy64Zh4NFuABl8F3W3VD7T46dWPkq7cY27jHZfg3o0&e=

 

Back to top
Date: 11/8/18 9:14 am
From: David Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: FW: Watauga County egret
As an added complication,
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.hbw.com_species_intermediate-2Degret-2Dardea-2Dintermedia&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=J7BQsAGwtiuG-gW-XPngF_htCCN5o04KFpEdFjZY3B8&s=NlKgTazXYph963puTRSPsbQ7m3vi9gZwbne31T1wyAc&e= separates
the Asian, African, and Australian "Intermediate" Egrets into different
species, chiefly differing in breeding colors.

On Thu, Nov 8, 2018 at 12:08 AM Matt Janson <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Mike et. al,
> I want to point out that there is in fact a fall record for Intermediate
> Egret in North America, also from the Western Aleutians, 28 September 2010
> on Shemya; the bird was a first-year and ultimately collected. This report,
> along with a nice side-by-side illustration comparing Intermediate and
> Great Egrets, can be found in Rare Birds of North America by Howell,
> Lewington, & Russell.
> Best Regards,
> Matt Janson
> Ithaca, NY
>
> On Wed, Nov 7, 2018 at 10:32 PM <mtove...> wrote:
>
>> I’ve looked at the pics and also have some experience with Intermediate
>> Egrets (Philippines, Hong Kong).
>>
>> My concern is that based on the photos, the mouth gape seems to extend
>> beyond the center of the eye. Granted the bird's head is tucked down so
>> it's hard to tell if this is real or an artifact. But in all the pics
>> (where the head is in focus and visible), I consistently see what appears
>> to be a “crease” that continues as an extension of the mouth gape past the
>> center of the eye. I’m not certain either way, but it does give me pause.
>>
>> Regards other marks: I don’t believe that neck position/shape is a
>> completely reliable field mark as it's behaviorally presented and birds can
>> do things that are atypical (not that this was offered as a field mark).
>> The gray legs and dark-tipped bill are consistent with the ID but for me at
>> least, these “other marks” (and more – e.g., bill length/shape, head shape,
>> etc.) are more useful to single out birds for careful scrutiny than confirm
>> an ID. For me at least, I wasn’t comfortable with the ID if I didn’t see
>> the mouth gape which is consistently touted as THE definitive field mark.
>> Even where Intermediate Egrets were common (along with Greats), I recall
>> hedging on the IDs of many.
>>
>> According to National Geographic Guide to Birds (6th edition), there is a
>> single record of a moribund Intermediate Egret from Buldir Is., Alaska
>> (western Aleutians), May 2006. Other than that, I’m unaware of any other
>> records from North America and similarly I’m unaware of any fall records.
>> Given that level of rarity, I would hope everyone is VERY sure that there’s
>> no possible way this bird isn't a “funny” Great Egret and the rest isn’t a
>> lot of enthusiastic wishful thinking. I know it’s tough but personally, I’d
>> rather not ID a bird as a rarity (and be wrong) than the other way around.
>> Obviously, it would be great if the bird could be refound and carefully
>> scrutinized for definitive evidence one way or the other.
>>
>> Mike Tove
>>
>>
>>
>
> --
> Matthew D. Janson
> 28270 NC
> (704)-845-6030
>


--
Dr. David Campbell
Associate Professor, Geology
Department of Natural Sciences
Box 7270
Gardner-Webb University
Boiling Springs NC 28017

 

Back to top
Date: 11/7/18 9:08 pm
From: Matt Janson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: FW: Watauga County egret
Mike et. al,
I want to point out that there is in fact a fall record for Intermediate
Egret in North America, also from the Western Aleutians, 28 September 2010
on Shemya; the bird was a first-year and ultimately collected. This report,
along with a nice side-by-side illustration comparing Intermediate and
Great Egrets, can be found in Rare Birds of North America by Howell,
Lewington, & Russell.
Best Regards,
Matt Janson
Ithaca, NY

On Wed, Nov 7, 2018 at 10:32 PM <mtove...> wrote:

> I’ve looked at the pics and also have some experience with Intermediate
> Egrets (Philippines, Hong Kong).
>
> My concern is that based on the photos, the mouth gape seems to extend
> beyond the center of the eye. Granted the bird's head is tucked down so
> it's hard to tell if this is real or an artifact. But in all the pics
> (where the head is in focus and visible), I consistently see what appears
> to be a “crease” that continues as an extension of the mouth gape past the
> center of the eye. I’m not certain either way, but it does give me pause.
>
> Regards other marks: I don’t believe that neck position/shape is a
> completely reliable field mark as it's behaviorally presented and birds can
> do things that are atypical (not that this was offered as a field mark).
> The gray legs and dark-tipped bill are consistent with the ID but for me at
> least, these “other marks” (and more – e.g., bill length/shape, head shape,
> etc.) are more useful to single out birds for careful scrutiny than confirm
> an ID. For me at least, I wasn’t comfortable with the ID if I didn’t see
> the mouth gape which is consistently touted as THE definitive field mark.
> Even where Intermediate Egrets were common (along with Greats), I recall
> hedging on the IDs of many.
>
> According to National Geographic Guide to Birds (6th edition), there is a
> single record of a moribund Intermediate Egret from Buldir Is., Alaska
> (western Aleutians), May 2006. Other than that, I’m unaware of any other
> records from North America and similarly I’m unaware of any fall records.
> Given that level of rarity, I would hope everyone is VERY sure that there’s
> no possible way this bird isn't a “funny” Great Egret and the rest isn’t a
> lot of enthusiastic wishful thinking. I know it’s tough but personally, I’d
> rather not ID a bird as a rarity (and be wrong) than the other way around.
> Obviously, it would be great if the bird could be refound and carefully
> scrutinized for definitive evidence one way or the other.
>
> Mike Tove
>
>
>

--
Matthew D. Janson
28270 NC
(704)-845-6030

 

Back to top
Date: 11/7/18 7:32 pm
From: <mtove...>
Subject: FW: Watauga County egret
I’ve looked at the pics and also have some experience with Intermediate Egrets (Philippines, Hong Kong).

My concern is that based on the photos, the mouth gape seems to extend beyond the center of the eye. Granted the bird's head is tucked down so it's hard to tell if this is real or an artifact. But in all the pics (where the head is in focus and visible), I consistently see what appears to be a “crease” that continues as an extension of the mouth gape past the center of the eye. I’m not certain either way, but it does give me pause.

Regards other marks: I don’t believe that neck position/shape is a completely reliable field mark as it's behaviorally presented and birds can do things that are atypical (not that this was offered as a field mark). The gray legs and dark-tipped bill are consistent with the ID but for me at least, these “other marks” (and more – e.g., bill length/shape, head shape, etc.) are more useful to single out birds for careful scrutiny than confirm an ID. For me at least, I wasn’t comfortable with the ID if I didn’t see the mouth gape which is consistently touted as THE definitive field mark. Even where Intermediate Egrets were common (along with Greats), I recall hedging on the IDs of many.

According to National Geographic Guide to Birds (6th edition), there is a single record of a moribund Intermediate Egret from Buldir Is., Alaska (western Aleutians), May 2006. Other than that, I’m unaware of any other records from North America and similarly I’m unaware of any fall records. Given that level of rarity, I would hope everyone is VERY sure that there’s no possible way this bird isn't a “funny” Great Egret and the rest isn’t a lot of enthusiastic wishful thinking. I know it’s tough but personally, I’d rather not ID a bird as a rarity (and be wrong) than the other way around. Obviously, it would be great if the bird could be refound and carefully scrutinized for definitive evidence one way or the other.

Mike Tove





 

Back to top
Date: 11/7/18 12:45 pm
From: Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Watauga County egret
I have just looked through the various photos I have taken of
Intermediate Egrets in Kenya, Thailand, and Australia. The gape in my
photos always stops below the eye and looks just like the gape in the
Watauga bird. When I compare them to the Great Egret photos I have
from NC and Kenya, there is clearly a difference. The gape in the
latter species always extend behind the eye, though not always the
same distance.

The problem is that I have seen so many Great Egrets in NC without
having really looked closely at their gapes that I have no sense of
the variability they might show. So I took a quick look through a
dozen or so photos of October/November Great Egrets on the Carolina
Bird Club website. All the ones that are clear enough show gapes
extending well behind the eye.

The Intermediate ID looks possible!

Norm

On Wed, Nov 7, 2018 at 2:34 PM Nate Dias <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Wow.
>
> The leg length alone clearly eliminates Cattle Egret.
>
> I have experience with Intermediate Egret (AKA Yellow-billed Egret)
> from organizing multiple birding safaris to Kenya.
>
> To my eye, nothing in the photos looks out of place for an
> Intermediate Egret transitioning from/into breeding plumage. It has
> all-gray legs and remnants/beginnings of greenish lores. And as Derb
> says, the gape could be interpreted as ending just below the eye -
> although the angle of the photos introduces potential foreshortening
> issues.
>
> To say for 100% certain, I would like to see the bird with neck
> extended, preferably a shot of it walking. And some kind of size
> comparison would be ideal. I haven't looked through each and every
> photo, but they do not seem to show if the bird's neck is
> comparatively long and thin like a Great Egret, or shorter and thicker
> like an Intermediate Egret.
>
> But I think the bird is likely an Intermediate Egret. I do not
> think it is a Great Egret, nor a Cattle Egret, nor a Snowy Egret, nor
> an immature Little Blue Heron, nor a Western Reef Heron. Not much
> else is left besides Intermediate that fits the bill.
>
> Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
>
> On Wed, Nov 7, 2018 at 11:52 AM Derb Carter <derbc...> wrote:
> >
> > Some of us have been discussing the white egret found and well-photographed yesterday in Watauga County by Guy McGrane (photos on ebird checklist). It was initially identified as a Cattle Egret and then a Great Egret. After the photos were posted, Jeff Pippen first asked how to eliminate Intermediate Egret, other than it would be an extraordinary record for this South Asia/African species (although it is migratory – and it is also out of place especially this time of year in Watauga County). Some, including me, who have looked at the photos carefully, note that it just does not look right for a Great Egret: bill is stout and wrong shape for Great, bill color not exactly right for Great, legs gray instead of black, and another important field mark I will get to in a minute. You cannot tell size from the photos with nothing to compare, but the observer initially described it as small thinking it was a Cattle Egret. Intermediate Egrets, as the name implies, are between Great and Little/Snowy in size. I have seen many in Asia where it is common and identifiable by size alone. Field guides discuss a key field mark to distinguish Great from Intermediate, and Guy has provided good photos to work with. The gape of the bill of Intermediate Egret extends back to below the eye, while the gape of Great Egret extends well beyond the eye. This is a very obvious and consistent field mark in searching photos of both species, and diagramed in the Wikipedia entry on Intermediate Egret if you are interested in checking this out. To my eye, the gape of the bill in the Watauga egret in all the photos in the series stops below the eye, suggesting it may be an Intermediate Egret. But the posture of the bird in the photos and feathering may obscure the gape, but I lean to it not being obscured and extending only to below the eye. Intermediate Egret would of course be an extraordinary record for NC and the eastern US. I have not even had a chance to look at North American records, but I seem to recall there are records for Alaska. At this point, I just wanted to get this information out while we continue to puzzle over the photos, and especially invite any with experience with Intermediate Egret to weigh in. And thanks to Guy for the excellent photos.
> >
> >
> >
> > Derb Carter



--
Norm Budnitz
Orange County
North Carolina
 

Back to top
Date: 11/7/18 11:34 am
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Watauga County egret
Wow.

The leg length alone clearly eliminates Cattle Egret.

I have experience with Intermediate Egret (AKA Yellow-billed Egret)
from organizing multiple birding safaris to Kenya.

To my eye, nothing in the photos looks out of place for an
Intermediate Egret transitioning from/into breeding plumage. It has
all-gray legs and remnants/beginnings of greenish lores. And as Derb
says, the gape could be interpreted as ending just below the eye -
although the angle of the photos introduces potential foreshortening
issues.

To say for 100% certain, I would like to see the bird with neck
extended, preferably a shot of it walking. And some kind of size
comparison would be ideal. I haven't looked through each and every
photo, but they do not seem to show if the bird's neck is
comparatively long and thin like a Great Egret, or shorter and thicker
like an Intermediate Egret.

But I think the bird is likely an Intermediate Egret. I do not
think it is a Great Egret, nor a Cattle Egret, nor a Snowy Egret, nor
an immature Little Blue Heron, nor a Western Reef Heron. Not much
else is left besides Intermediate that fits the bill.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

On Wed, Nov 7, 2018 at 11:52 AM Derb Carter <derbc...> wrote:
>
> Some of us have been discussing the white egret found and well-photographed yesterday in Watauga County by Guy McGrane (photos on ebird checklist). It was initially identified as a Cattle Egret and then a Great Egret. After the photos were posted, Jeff Pippen first asked how to eliminate Intermediate Egret, other than it would be an extraordinary record for this South Asia/African species (although it is migratory – and it is also out of place especially this time of year in Watauga County). Some, including me, who have looked at the photos carefully, note that it just does not look right for a Great Egret: bill is stout and wrong shape for Great, bill color not exactly right for Great, legs gray instead of black, and another important field mark I will get to in a minute. You cannot tell size from the photos with nothing to compare, but the observer initially described it as small thinking it was a Cattle Egret. Intermediate Egrets, as the name implies, are between Great and Little/Snowy in size. I have seen many in Asia where it is common and identifiable by size alone. Field guides discuss a key field mark to distinguish Great from Intermediate, and Guy has provided good photos to work with. The gape of the bill of Intermediate Egret extends back to below the eye, while the gape of Great Egret extends well beyond the eye. This is a very obvious and consistent field mark in searching photos of both species, and diagramed in the Wikipedia entry on Intermediate Egret if you are interested in checking this out. To my eye, the gape of the bill in the Watauga egret in all the photos in the series stops below the eye, suggesting it may be an Intermediate Egret. But the posture of the bird in the photos and feathering may obscure the gape, but I lean to it not being obscured and extending only to below the eye. Intermediate Egret would of course be an extraordinary record for NC and the eastern US. I have not even had a chance to look at North American records, but I seem to recall there are records for Alaska. At this point, I just wanted to get this information out while we continue to puzzle over the photos, and especially invite any with experience with Intermediate Egret to weigh in. And thanks to Guy for the excellent photos.
>
>
>
> Derb Carter
 

Back to top
Date: 11/7/18 11:25 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Watauga County egret
Guy,

Terrific documentation, and putting all your photos up on google drive for everyone to view is a model of how to do this rarity thing. I have not gone to the reference books like Derb, but it occurs to me that there is one more piece of evidence that is still accessible even if the bird is gone. If the perch where the bird was is at all accessible, you could put a ruler up there and photograph it from the same spot as the original photographs (recreating, say, IMG_1674 or IMG_1714 where the bird’s full height is clear). If size is an important field mark, that could be key.

Note: I’m not asking you to do this! I appreciate what you’ve done so far. I just know how much energy people put into rarity identification, and that might be a way to prove/disprove the ID.

Chris

On Nov 7, 2018, at 2:12 PM, <badgerboy...><mailto:<badgerboy...> wrote:


I am sorry to say there is no sign of the bird today at this small pond. I initially reacted to the suggestion of an African/Asian species with great skepticism and tried to find anything about this bird which could rule out Intermediate Egret. After going through all the 61 pictures that I had on my camera, all the marks I could see actually seemed to favor Intermediate over either Great or Cattle Egret.

So I'm posting a link here to a google drive folder with ALL the pictures and I hope someone can find a way to eliminate what sounds like a bizarre possibility. Here's the link:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__drive.google.com_drive_folders_1naEyUUghkrhdeOyiHZN8EUIJgPYlJh55-3Fusp-3Dsharing&d=DwIGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=jJAShVViglyiAFd4JN6IU68eaWmk-CZ3mQS3G7arG3U&s=DH7vmYjTGCCs6HRaOkWJs2amB4ww3hkFM88H7ksdZxc&e=<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com_-3Furl-3Dhttps-253A-252F-252Furldefense.proofpoint.com-252Fv2-252Furl-253Fu-253Dhttps-2D3A-5F-5Fdrive.google.com-5Fdrive-5Ffolders-5F1naEyUUghkrhdeOyiHZN8EUIJgPYlJh55-2D3Fusp-2D3Dsharing-2526d-253DDwMD-2Dg-2526c-253DimBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj-5FgZ4adc-2526r-253DymRCw6Q-2DsBitug-5FrdeO1Tokz-2DI-5FSX2LQN2-5FOcvlal9U-2526m-253DWZpvV9OEr9qBf-2DBNJ-5FP0XgSBosSFJz8648llk-5FPdwKM-2526s-253DjsMlnb9A2ENzNpWf8UmB9Ofv9yUgrWuIbDTz7UvW5So-2526e-253D-26data-3D02-257C01-257CChill-2540coastal.edu-257C4b543e4c22f24c9662c108d644e51e90-257Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797-257C0-257C0-257C636772148220188161-26sdata-3D5265HQK54-252Ft8Su28AFEoH-252B1B8TFoQvqlmBJgTzkosjo-253D-26reserved-3D0&d=DwIGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=jJAShVViglyiAFd4JN6IU68eaWmk-CZ3mQS3G7arG3U&s=sKEsEaMFUBRfdTQxNVOZE9RNC_k8v1kWG11X93-MqPo&e=>

Before the suggestion of Intermediate came up (I had never before heard of the species), Al Olson and I were fairly perplexed by the features of this bird as we studied it carefully in the scope from about 200 feet away. We carefully looked at the gape area of the bill and the structure of the head and bill while holding the sibley book in our hands, and we kept on going back and forth on whether the bird was a Great or Cattle Egret. We had very good looks for long periods from different angles of the rearward extent of the bill, and it never in any view protruded behind the eye. After long viewing the bird with its head tucked, Al finally saw it stretch its neck and preen fro a short time and he said it looked too long to be a Cattle Egret. I didn't see that however as I was distracted by something else at the time.

Sorry for the long post, Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC

On 11/7/2018 11:41 AM, Derb Carter wrote:
Some of us have been discussing the white egret found and well-photographed yesterday in Watauga County by Guy McGrane (photos on ebird checklist). It was initially identified as a Cattle Egret and then a Great Egret. After the photos were posted, Jeff Pippen first asked how to eliminate Intermediate Egret, other than it would be an extraordinary record for this South Asia/African species (although it is migratory – and it is also out of place especially this time of year in Watauga County). Some, including me, who have looked at the photos carefully, note that it just does not look right for a Great Egret: bill is stout and wrong shape for Great, bill color not exactly right for Great, legs gray instead of black, and another important field mark I will get to in a minute. You cannot tell size from the photos with nothing to compare, but the observer initially described it as small thinking it was a Cattle Egret. Intermediate Egrets, as the name implies, are between Great and Little/Snowy in size. I have seen many in Asia where it is common and identifiable by size alone. Field guides discuss a key field mark to distinguish Great from Intermediate, and Guy has provided good photos to work with. The gape of the bill of Intermediate Egret extends back to below the eye, while the gape of Great Egret extends well beyond the eye. This is a very obvious and consistent field mark in searching photos of both species, and diagramed in the Wikipedia entry on Intermediate Egret if you are interested in checking this out. To my eye, the gape of the bill in the Watauga egret in all the photos in the series stops below the eye, suggesting it may be an Intermediate Egret. But the posture of the bird in the photos and feathering may obscure the gape, but I lean to it not being obscured and extending only to below the eye. Intermediate Egret would of course be an extraordinary record for NC and the eastern US. I have not even had a chance to look at North American records, but I seem to recall there are records for Alaska. At this point, I just wanted to get this information out while we continue to puzzle over the photos, and especially invite any with experience with Intermediate Egret to weigh in. And thanks to Guy for the excellent photos.

Derb Carter




 

Back to top
Date: 11/7/18 11:13 am
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Re: Watauga County egret
I am sorry to say there is no sign of the bird today at this small pond.
I initially reacted to the suggestion of an African/Asian species with
great skepticism and tried to find anything about this bird which could
rule out Intermediate Egret. After going through all the 61 pictures
that I had on my camera, all the marks I could see actually seemed to
favor Intermediate over either Great or Cattle Egret.

So I'm posting a link here to a google drive folder with ALL the
pictures and I hope someone can find a way to eliminate what sounds like
a bizarre possibility. Here's the link:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__drive.google.com_drive_folders_1naEyUUghkrhdeOyiHZN8EUIJgPYlJh55-3Fusp-3Dsharing&d=DwID-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=WZpvV9OEr9qBf-BNJ_P0XgSBosSFJz8648llk_PdwKM&s=jsMlnb9A2ENzNpWf8UmB9Ofv9yUgrWuIbDTz7UvW5So&e=

Before the suggestion of Intermediate came up (I had never before heard
of the species), Al Olson and I were fairly perplexed by the features of
this bird as we studied it carefully in the scope from about 200 feet
away. We carefully looked at the gape area of the bill and the structure
of the head and bill while holding the sibley book in our hands, and we
kept on going back and forth on whether the bird was a Great or Cattle
Egret. We had very good looks for long periods from different angles of
the rearward extent of the bill, and it never in any view protruded
behind the eye. After long viewing the bird with its head tucked, Al
finally saw it stretch its neck and preen fro a short time and he said
it looked too long to be a Cattle Egret. I didn't see that however as I
was distracted by something else at the time.

Sorry for the long post, Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC


On 11/7/2018 11:41 AM, Derb Carter wrote:
>
> Some of us have been discussing the white egret found and
> well-photographed yesterday in Watauga County by Guy McGrane (photos
> on ebird checklist). It was initially identified as a Cattle Egret
> and then a Great Egret. After the photos were posted, Jeff Pippen
> first asked how to eliminate Intermediate Egret, other than it would
> be an extraordinary record for this South Asia/African species
> (although it is migratory and it is also out of place especially
> this time of year in Watauga County). Some, including me, who have
> looked at the photos carefully, note that it just does not look right
> for a Great Egret: bill is stout and wrong shape for Great, bill color
> not exactly right for Great, legs gray instead of black, and another
> important field mark I will get to in a minute. You cannot tell size
> from the photos with nothing to compare, but the observer initially
> described it as small thinking it was a Cattle Egret. Intermediate
> Egrets, as the name implies, are between Great and Little/Snowy in
> size. I have seen many in Asia where it is common and identifiable by
> size alone. Field guides discuss a key field mark to distinguish Great
> from Intermediate, and Guy has provided good photos to work with. The
> gape of the bill of Intermediate Egret extends back to below the eye,
> while the gape of Great Egret extends well beyond the eye. This is a
> very obvious and consistent field mark in searching photos of both
> species, and diagramed in the Wikipedia entry on Intermediate Egret if
> you are interested in checking this out. To my eye, the gape of the
> bill in the Watauga egret in all the photos in the series stops below
> the eye, suggesting it may be an Intermediate Egret. But the posture
> of the bird in the photos and feathering may obscure the gape, but I
> lean to it not being obscured and extending only to below the eye.
> Intermediate Egret would of course be an extraordinary record for NC
> and the eastern US. I have not even had a chance to look at North
> American records, but I seem to recall there are records for Alaska.
> At this point, I just wanted to get this information out while we
> continue to puzzle over the photos, and especially invite any with
> experience with Intermediate Egret to weigh in. And thanks to Guy for
> the excellent photos.
>
> Derb Carter
>


 

Back to top
Date: 11/7/18 8:52 am
From: Derb Carter <derbc...>
Subject: Watauga County egret
Some of us have been discussing the white egret found and well-photographed yesterday in Watauga County by Guy McGrane (photos on ebird checklist). It was initially identified as a Cattle Egret and then a Great Egret. After the photos were posted, Jeff Pippen first asked how to eliminate Intermediate Egret, other than it would be an extraordinary record for this South Asia/African species (although it is migratory - and it is also out of place especially this time of year in Watauga County). Some, including me, who have looked at the photos carefully, note that it just does not look right for a Great Egret: bill is stout and wrong shape for Great, bill color not exactly right for Great, legs gray instead of black, and another important field mark I will get to in a minute. You cannot tell size from the photos with nothing to compare, but the observer initially described it as small thinking it was a Cattle Egret. Intermediate Egrets, as the name implies, are between Great and Little/Snowy in size. I have seen many in Asia where it is common and identifiable by size alone. Field guides discuss a key field mark to distinguish Great from Intermediate, and Guy has provided good photos to work with. The gape of the bill of Intermediate Egret extends back to below the eye, while the gape of Great Egret extends well beyond the eye. This is a very obvious and consistent field mark in searching photos of both species, and diagramed in the Wikipedia entry on Intermediate Egret if you are interested in checking this out. To my eye, the gape of the bill in the Watauga egret in all the photos in the series stops below the eye, suggesting it may be an Intermediate Egret. But the posture of the bird in the photos and feathering may obscure the gape, but I lean to it not being obscured and extending only to below the eye. Intermediate Egret would of course be an extraordinary record for NC and the eastern US. I have not even had a chance to look at North American records, but I seem to recall there are records for Alaska. At this point, I just wanted to get this information out while we continue to puzzle over the photos, and especially invite any with experience with Intermediate Egret to weigh in. And thanks to Guy for the excellent photos.

Derb Carter

 

Back to top
Date: 11/6/18 1:32 pm
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Re: Cattle Egret Watauga County Deep Gap area
After going back and watching the bird through the scope for a while the
bird stretched out its neck which was too long for Cattle Egret. So I
changed the report to a Great Egret which is also quite unusual for the
date and place, but not quite as strange as the Cattle Egret. Thanks to
Jelmer Poelstra for providing timely feedback and Al Olson for getting a
second pair of eyes on the bird.

Sorry for the confusion,  Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC


On 11/6/2018 11:30 AM, <badgerboy...> wrote:
> Just saw a Cattle Egret while walking the dog on the little pond at
> Birdseye View on Ben Miller Rd. in Deep Gap, Watauga County. This
> appears to be only the 2nd report of that species for the county, and
> first since the 1970's, and also for the entire High Country region,
> consisting of Alleghany, Ashe, Watauga, and Avery Counties.
>
> This strong front with southerly winds, appears to have blown a few
> unusual birds into the mountains as a flock of 5 Great Egrets was
> reported yesterday from the county, also very unusual for this time of
> year.
>
> Anyone can see pictures of the Cattle Egret on my ebird checklist at:
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S49716621&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=uf9xkHalhQkgQxzk8edb-BEUfjl31-bxS9Y5tlKMAbI&s=8RiJ6oqsGVaju9Zd76VulGY4MH9W886yHrdYtRGX4mg&e=
>
>
> Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC
>
>
>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 11/6/18 1:15 pm
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Patriot's Point--being developed?
This is old news and has been fought over for decades.

For the edification of newcomers: the conservation easement that SC DNR
holds on the wooded area (that the nature trail runs through) is not
permanent and expires soon. The Patriots Point Development Authority has
long said it will not renew the easement when it expires. The PPDA is
desperate for money to keep their rustbucket ships from falling apart and
polluting Charleston Harbor. They do not care about preserving habitat -
they want MONEY. The US Navy is still laughing at sticking the state of
SC with millions of dollars in required maintenance of the USS Yorktown.

Back in the 1980s folks like Dana Beach and Jane Lareau of the Coastal
Conservation League (with area birders like Will Post and Dennis Forsythe)
tried very hard to get the conservation easement made permanent and to
preserve some habitat instead of developing every available inch of
Patriots Point. It was a long, big fight over many years but essentially
the good guys lost.

Several years ago, there was even a move to turn the Patriots Point Golf
Course into a housing subdivision. There was another fight over this,
since Land and Water Conservation Fund money had helped pay for the golf
course and it's not supposed to be developed. This and people in the
Bayview subdivision in Mt. Pleasant making a LOT of noise managed to stop
that development.

Around 6 (or 7?) years ago, the Patriots Point Development Authority tried
to bully SC DNR (a fellow state agency) into dropping the conservation
easement before its term expired. This was when the PPDA was badly in debt
to the state over the $9 million they borrowed to repair the USS Laffey.
Fortunately, SC DNR held firm.

Back at the time, I recall ducking out of a Black Rail Working Group
meeting at Savannah NWR to join a conference call between folks like Dana
Beach, SC DNR Director Alvin Taylor, and others to discuss options. The
best that could be done was DNR holding on to the easement until its legal
expiration. Bottom line: nobody can force the PPDA to renew the
conservation easement, despite over 30 years of trying.

People are welcome to make a last-minute public outcry, but that has been
done for decades and failed. Sad but true.

If people want to get on board a more feasible option for protecting bird
habitat along Charleston Harbor, they should get on board with the regional
park Mark Sandford and others are working to create at the south tip of
Daniel Island.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.postandcourier.com_news_u-2Ds-2Drep-2Dmark-2Dsanford-2D&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=7myE-GY_oi5_lgGTqSE3oKJrj3UmeSfIVoYtwJgaz7Y&s=OANbJGaQR6O3J5ozN-O7CkrZaIyjCx5MZaAG049jbx0&e=
renews-push-to-create-the/article_8b753a5e-94d8-11e8-95a7-a3e396ebf633.html

postandcourier.com/news/u-s-rep-mark-sanford-renews-push-
to-create-the/article_8b753a5e-94d8-11e8-95a7-a3e396ebf633.html

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC


On Sun, Nov 4, 2018 at 8:11 PM Jack Rogers <jack...> wrote:
>
> C-birders,
> A recent letter to the editor in the Moultrie News (read it here), speaks
about the possible development of the wooded portion of Patriot's Point in
Mt Pleasant, SC. However, the writer of the letter fails to cite a source
for his claim. Can anyone comment or provide incite on this possibility?
> Thanks,
> Jack Rogers
>
> --
> Jack Rogers
> LSU Museum of Natural Science
> Baton Rouge, Louisiana/Mt Pleasant, SC
> My Flickr page

 

Back to top
Date: 11/6/18 9:23 am
From: Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Raleigh CBC is December 15
Hi Brian,

I've never done the Raleigh CBC, but would like to join the effort. Please
assign me to any area that needs coverage, or to any team open to new
members.

Thanks,
Eddie Owens
Cary NC

On Tue, Nov 6, 2018, 10:51 AM "Brian O'Shea" <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> The Raleigh Christmas Count will be held on Saturday, December 15. After
> 20+ years, John Connors is stepping down as compiler and has passed the job
> to me - so please contact me if you are interested in participating. If
> you are a regular site leader for this count, I'll be contacting you soon.
>
> Brian O'Shea
> NC Museum of Natural Sciences
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/6/18 8:58 am
From: Paula Jeannet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: American Kestrel
What was the approximate location, please?
Paula

On Tue, Nov 6, 2018 at 11:41 AM Helen Kalevas <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Saw a Kestrel near Hillsborough, NC yesterday, flying over a large field
> then perch on a phone wire. I didn't realize their numbers were declining
> so thought I'd pass it along.
> Helen
>
>
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.avg.com_email-2Dsignature-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=z4qEqB6303jrXczxHSm6hF1fA6AUDCygEn_7L2PPP2s&s=xZ0R1k1YX484vYv2DhN9YhDHU-wYnLOjWS5-D085InM&e=> Virus-free.
> www.avg.com
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.avg.com_email-2Dsignature-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=z4qEqB6303jrXczxHSm6hF1fA6AUDCygEn_7L2PPP2s&s=xZ0R1k1YX484vYv2DhN9YhDHU-wYnLOjWS5-D085InM&e=>
> <#m_-5486617731287662737_DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/6/18 8:41 am
From: Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: American Kestrel
Saw a Kestrel near Hillsborough, NC yesterday, flying over a large field
then perch on a phone wire. I didn't realize their numbers were declining
so thought I'd pass it along.
Helen

<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.avg.com_email-2Dsignature-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=z4qEqB6303jrXczxHSm6hF1fA6AUDCygEn_7L2PPP2s&s=xZ0R1k1YX484vYv2DhN9YhDHU-wYnLOjWS5-D085InM&e=>
Virus-free.
www.avg.com
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.avg.com_email-2Dsignature-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=z4qEqB6303jrXczxHSm6hF1fA6AUDCygEn_7L2PPP2s&s=xZ0R1k1YX484vYv2DhN9YhDHU-wYnLOjWS5-D085InM&e=>
<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/6/18 8:31 am
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Cattle Egret Watauga County Deep Gap area
Just saw a Cattle Egret while walking the dog on the little pond at
Birdseye View on Ben Miller Rd. in Deep Gap, Watauga County. This
appears to be only the 2nd report of that species for the county, and
first since the 1970's, and also for the entire High Country region,
consisting of Alleghany, Ashe, Watauga, and Avery Counties.

This strong front with southerly winds, appears to have blown a few
unusual birds into the mountains as a flock of 5 Great Egrets was
reported yesterday from the county, also very unusual for this time of year.

Anyone can see pictures of the Cattle Egret on my ebird checklist at:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S49716621&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=uf9xkHalhQkgQxzk8edb-BEUfjl31-bxS9Y5tlKMAbI&s=8RiJ6oqsGVaju9Zd76VulGY4MH9W886yHrdYtRGX4mg&e=

Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 11/6/18 7:51 am
From: \Brian O'Shea\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Raleigh CBC is December 15
Hi all,

The Raleigh Christmas Count will be held on Saturday, December 15. After
20+ years, John Connors is stepping down as compiler and has passed the job
to me - so please contact me if you are interested in participating. If
you are a regular site leader for this count, I'll be contacting you soon.

Brian O'Shea
NC Museum of Natural Sciences

 

Back to top
Date: 11/5/18 4:58 pm
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Alligator River NWR CBC
The Alligator River NWR Christmas Bird Count will be held this year, as
usual, on December 30, which is a Sunday. I hope all of the regulars will
help out again and if anyone new wants to join in, please let me know.

Thanks,

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC
252-261-6903

 

Back to top
Date: 11/5/18 4:55 pm
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bodie/Pea Christmas Count
The Bodie/Pea Christmas Count will be held on December 28, as usual, the
day after the Hatteras Count. Al Hooks and I are assuming compilation
duties from Paul Sykes, beginning this year. Hopefully, all of the regulars
will return to help again (I'll be contacting you soon), and if anyone new
would like to help please let me know.

Thanks,

Jeff Lewis
252-216-6336

 

Back to top
Date: 11/5/18 4:05 pm
From: JOHN Cox (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Patriots Point developent
Based on all the survey lines and that the SCDNR easement apparently isn't being renewed, it would appear that what little birding area that is left will not be so much longer.


John Cox

Mt. Pleasant, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/5/18 2:02 pm
From: Jelmer Poelstra (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fw: Black-headed Gull at Mason Inlet, New Hanover Co, NC
Hi all,

Jamie Adams is currently seeing a Black-headed Gull at Mason Inlet at the
north end of Wrightsville Beach in New Hanover Co, NC. (I'm posting this
because his phone won't let him post it himself.)

Good birding,

Jelmer Poelstra
Chapel Hill

--
Jelmer Poelstra
311 Biological Sciences Building, Biology Department
Duke University Durham, NC
Email: <jelmerpoelstra...> / <jelmer.poelstra...>
Phone: (+1) 919-260-8253

 

Back to top
Date: 11/5/18 12:24 pm
From: Patricia Tice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hummingbird in Raleigh! Red-breasted nuthatch and Phoebe
This morning I was surprised to see a hummingbird on one of my feeders. I
only saw the green back before it flew away, so have no idea what kind it
was. Stay tuned!

Last Sunday I saw a Red-breasted nuthatch, the first in several years. It
was at the sunflower heart feeder constantly this morning.

Also last Sunday saw an Eastern Phoebe, maybe the first one in my yard in
24 yrs. I have seen them in the neighborhood, but not in my yard.

Patty Tice
Raleigh, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/4/18 5:11 pm
From: Jack Rogers <jack...>
Subject: Patriot's Point--being developed?
C-birders,
A recent letter to the editor in the Moultrie News (read it here
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.moultrienews.com_opinion_letters-2Dto-2Dthe-2Deditor_article-5F76e25342-2Dd795-2D11e8-2Db14f-2D437474f567a6.html-3Ffbclid-3DIwAR0EMjIRb9z8gjKgwlFmLG2hBa5vDJDr6jrGSw0AT-5F9RU35NJfJYrRi0ob4&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=pevxapAs9xtpJ2wheEjyByqTE_a-fabUZgtMzruc9TE&s=r4vFcJ5tETY3In706Gr_oXgnF_SiUn2hdbWbLMnF0pQ&e=>),
speaks about the possible development of the wooded portion of Patriot's
Point in Mt Pleasant, SC. However, the writer of the letter fails to cite
a source for his claim. Can anyone comment or provide incite on this
possibility?
Thanks,
Jack Rogers

--
Jack Rogers
LSU Museum of Natural Science
Baton Rouge, Louisiana/Mt Pleasant, SC
My Flickr page <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_90726323-40N05_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=pevxapAs9xtpJ2wheEjyByqTE_a-fabUZgtMzruc9TE&s=ZAFQkNgqefvU5i-knp-QqfbULwycATQWOfuklTjlBWg&e=>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/4/18 4:55 pm
From: Kyle Kittelberger (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Falls Lake- Rolling View 11/4
Hey everyone,
I spent the evening scoping Falls Lake from Rolling View (from both the main and smaller beaches) to see if there were any notable gulls with semi-black heads. None of those, but had a decent array of waterfowl and others on the water, especially for the lake in early November. Below are the waterbirds I recorded:
Canada Goose- 13Northern Shoveler- 2Gadwall- 46American Wigeon- 8Lesser Scaup- 12Bufflehead- 1 female hanging with scaupRuddy Duck- 8Pied-billed Grebe- 58Horned Grebe- 25Bonaparte's GullRing-billed GullHerring GullCommon Loon- 6

Cheers,Kyle KittelbergerRaleigh, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 11/4/18 3:54 pm
From: EASTMAN, CAROLINE <EASTMAN...>
Subject: RE: It's official! Fayetteville Woodpeckers
If the University of South Carolina can manage with [Game]Cocks, Fayetteville can manage with [Wood]Peckers. Interesting that these are both bird mascots.

Caroline Eastman
Columbia, SC
________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> [<carolinabirds-request...>] on behalf of Harry LeGrand [<carolinabirds...>]
Sent: Sunday, November 04, 2018 6:21 PM
To: carolinabirds listserve; Harry LeGrand
Subject: It's official! Fayetteville Woodpeckers

Just announced! The Red-cockaded Woodpecker just gave its name to the new minor league baseball team based in Fayetteville. Because the RCW is an Endangered species and is numerous at Fort Bragg, this species is quite well known in Fayetteville and Cumberland County.

Yep -- for better or worse -- the team name will often be shortened to just "Peckers". I fear for the worse.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.milb.com_milb_news_new-2Dfayetteville-2Dteam-2Dunveils-2Dwoodpeckers-2Dname-2Dlogos_c-2D300116060&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=8SgodTanxT-mIBk_aNDLuneNQio63kEyvJIenERQ2Hk&s=8s8jDcbK1psUsnakRx0U-cGclWCB-UtRUUhR9y_a86c&e=<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.milb.com_milb_news_new-2Dfayetteville-2Dteam-2Dunveils-2Dwoodpeckers-2Dname-2Dlogos_c-2D300116060&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=k2LX4K2CevDE-iGZfuU6XaQUPN0S1TQfjz3qkwQzUcM&s=m0eCrtVkjcfOTR5rInVWeq7B4lnKfRfcUDwKVlNfUSw&e=>.

 

Back to top
Date: 11/4/18 3:22 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: It's official! Fayetteville Woodpeckers
Just announced! The Red-cockaded Woodpecker just gave its name to the new
minor league baseball team based in Fayetteville. Because the RCW is an
Endangered species and is numerous at Fort Bragg, this species is quite
well known in Fayetteville and Cumberland County.

Yep -- for better or worse -- the team name will often be shortened to just
"Peckers". I fear for the worse.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.milb.com_milb_news_new-2Dfayetteville-2Dteam-2Dunveils-2Dwoodpeckers-2Dname-2Dlogos_c-2D300116060&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=k2LX4K2CevDE-iGZfuU6XaQUPN0S1TQfjz3qkwQzUcM&s=m0eCrtVkjcfOTR5rInVWeq7B4lnKfRfcUDwKVlNfUSw&e=
.

 

Back to top
Date: 11/4/18 2:45 pm
From: james poling (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lark Sparrow, Warren Wilson College, Swannanoa, NC.
Bob Butler observed a Lark Sparrow and by the end of the day more than a dozen birders had seen the bird. It was found along the water-filled ditch in the second field and in the pig lots at the Warren Wilson College farm if you are walking from Owen Park in Swannanoa, Buncombe County, NC, Other photographers have pictures coming. Jim Poling




James Poling
624 Azalea Avenue
Black Mountain, NC 28711 USA
<james.poling...> <mailto:<james.poling...>
www.jamesnewtonpoling.com <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.jamesnewtonpoling.com_&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=h_8vSc4UsrTYAhlkYa43CKG_vucrgeQS3syozVdkf-U&s=TZ3jNeMIW-mwKbCGS8EMJ82GJKA_EfJa7DovM4g62OQ&e=>
828-707-7413




 

Back to top
Date: 11/4/18 11:31 am
From: Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: More Buncombe County, NC birds
Folks
The crazy week continues here in the NC Mountains. Here is the chronology
so far:

October 29: Surf Scoter - Charles D Owen Park (Tim Carstens)
November 1: Baird's Sandpiper - Warren-Wilson College (Aaron Steed, Simon
Thompson and Jay Wherley)
November 2: Dunlin - Warren-Wilson College (Jamie Adams)
November 3: Black Scoter - Lake Julian (Wayne Forsythe)
November 4: Lark Sparrow - Warren-Wilson College (Bob Butler)

With a good supporting cast of Vesper Sparrow, Nashville and TN Warblers
etc. The shorebirds are still present as of today.
What's next I wonder.......
Simon

Simon RB Thompson

Ventures Birding Tours
www.birdventures.com <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.birdventures.com&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=whSZcvsB6SR1KDEc52n5dhIk-Z9UXSXiQzgxv_CKQx0&s=bWvJND8o7XBpI9vFt3vdtyw2Onj9kyM8aEAP2hv-B7M&e=>

Please use the Ventures e-mail (<Venturesbirding...>) to contact the
Ventures office - thanks!

 

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Date: 11/4/18 11:23 am
From: Bert Fisher (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Pine Siskin and Yellow-rumped Warbler in Hillsborough
Had our FOS yellow-rumped warblers (about a dozen) and pine siskins (at least three) at Vireo Lane today. Yellow-rumps showed up first thing this morning and the siskins this afternoon.

Happy birding.

Bert Fisher
Hillsborough, NC

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 11/4/18 6:43 am
From: JILL MIDGETT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bluebird pair visiting nestbox
A male bluebird began checking out the box in my yard on 10/31. A female
arrived on 11/01. They visit each morning, pair bonding in and out of the
box.

I watched the fall flock near my home starting 9/17. Pairs began checking
the box in March this year. 3 pairs (different females) nested/fledged thru
late July.

Everything I can find on Bluebird nesting, says it ends in August.

Is this bonding behavior common in late Fall/November?

Thank you,

Jill Midgett
Charleston, SC

 

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Date: 11/4/18 5:42 am
From: <hilton...> <hilton...>
Subject: Hilton Pond 08/01/18 (Mammals Galore Around Hilton Pond)
Although we're behind on our Hilton Pond reports and apologize for it, we do want to bring you up to date on local happenings and late summer bird banding results—including Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. To that end we've just posted installment #677 of "This Week at Hilton Pond" for 1-31 August 2018. It's all about a trio of mammal species we encountered at or near the Center—one of which is historically rare for our locale. The photo essay is at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.hiltonpond.org_ThisWeek180801.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=npx7Qov1jFz2khjlxiSivkXSB5oPyUEakFgrkoBHwVM&s=zto4QkOhAX24AJzG6-vUzhiZ0Oo7KHfTgi3BEje3jus&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.hiltonpond.org_ThisWeek180801.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=npx7Qov1jFz2khjlxiSivkXSB5oPyUEakFgrkoBHwVM&s=zto4QkOhAX24AJzG6-vUzhiZ0Oo7KHfTgi3BEje3jus&e=>

Included in the write-up is a link to a surprisingly long list of all mammals observed at Hilton Pond Center since 1982.

As always we provide a list of birds banded and recaptured during the period, plus miscellaneous nature notes and acknowledgement of folks who contributed in support of the Center's work during the period.

Happy Nature Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.facebook.com_HiltonPond&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=npx7Qov1jFz2khjlxiSivkXSB5oPyUEakFgrkoBHwVM&s=fBicMckhCRCK_ACZ_4SVYhaZZVtctsrTPHqHPNXDTp4&e= for timely updates on nature topics,
and for info about hummingbirds at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.facebook.com_rubythroats&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=npx7Qov1jFz2khjlxiSivkXSB5oPyUEakFgrkoBHwVM&s=v4WLqrJwpzTT3ONj2Bi1r7SpTT0HPv0_pqpZ-JZrLOg&e=

Follow us on Twitter @hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and education for students of all ages.

"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the sunset." BHjr.

============


 

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Date: 11/3/18 2:40 pm
From: patty Gmail (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: An article on Worlds first Bird Friendly arena
Just saw this and wanted to share. Major props to those involved in this awesome conservation project.

Patty Masten
Charlotte NC

By Birding News on October 31, 2018 0 Comments

Milwaukee Bucks’ New Stadium is Bird-Friendly

Fiserv Forum in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Photo by Getty Images.
Source: American Bird Conservancy

The Milwaukee Bucks have achieved a first with their new arena: Fiserv Forum will be the world’s first bird-friendly sports and entertainment arena, upon completion of the Bucks’ application for LEED Silver® certification.

This is a significant victory for bird conservation because up to 1 billion birds die annually after colliding with glass in the United States. Scientists estimate that this staggering total likely accounts for 5 to 10 percent of the birds in the United States and contributes to ongoing declines in bird populations across North America.

Addressing collisions is vitally important not only because of the inherent value of birds, but also because birds reduce pest populations, pollinate plants, disperse seeds, provide other natural services, and captivate tens of millions of Americans with their beauty and fascinating behavior.

“The Milwaukee Bucks’ bold decision to build the world’s first bird-friendly arena speaks volumes about the ownership’s character, concern for the environment, and desire to be a part of a green community,” said Bird City Wisconsin’s former director Bryan Lenz, who recently joined the staff of American Bird Conservancy (ABC) as its Collisions Campaign Manager. “The Bucks stepped up for birds in a way that no sports franchise ever has. Hopefully the team’s message, that designing with birds in mind is an achievable goal, will set Fiserv Forum up as a model for arenas, stadiums, and all other buildings for years to come.”

The 17,500-seat Fiserv Forum is located in the heart of Milwaukee, which is a Bird City Wisconsin community. The arena was designed to achieve the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) program’s Bird Collision Deterrence credit, which was created in partnership with ABC.

“Bird City Wisconsin came to us three years ago to educate us on migration and best practices,” said Milwaukee Bucks President Peter Feigin. “We were able to integrate many of their suggestions in the design phase of the project.”

Buildings that achieve the Bird Collision Deterrence credit address the primary reasons that birds collide with buildings: reflective and see-through glass and lighting that disorients birds during their nocturnal spring and fall migrations. Wisconsin Humane Society will also work with the Bucks to monitor Fiserv Forum for collisions, following a plan designed in partnership with Bird City Wisconsin and ABC.

“When glass or other glass-like materials are employed in venue design, it’s vital to balance insulation and reflectivity to create an ideal environment both inside and out, for people and for local wildlife,” said Heather Stewart, Senior Associate at Populous, the architectural design firm used for Fiserv Forum. “We are proud to hear that other sports venues are looking toward Fiserv Forum as the new standard for bird-friendly design around the globe.”

Bird City Wisconsin first approached the Bucks about a bird-friendly arena in mid-2015. This community conservation organization, a program of Milwaukee Audubon Society, recognizes communities for bird-focused conservation and education actions that help create a healthy environment both for birds and people. Bird City Wisconsin works tirelessly to help the 109 Bird City communities across Wisconsin do all they can to further bird conservation.

A number of organizations played critical roles in the construction of the world’s first bird-friendly arena, including Bucks’ leadership, Populous, CAA ICON, Bird City Wisconsin, ABC, Eppstein Uhen, Mortenson, M-E Engineers, France Sustainable Solutions, and HNTB. All of the partners finished the design process with newfound knowledge on how to build and operate buildings with birds in mind—knowledge that they will carry to future projects.

“So many sports teams use animals and birds as mascots; this approach just makes perfect sense for them,” said Michael Parr, President of ABC. “Surely no sports teams want to kill wild birds at their facilities. The Bucks are showing the way. I am betting some good karma will head their way for this in coming seasons!”

Fiserv Forum includes many other efforts that demonstrate that Bucks’ ownership is serious about reducing the team’s environmental footprint. Among these are landscaping with native plants, operations that avoid use of straws and other petroleum products, a composting program, and low-flow toilets. Fiserv Forum was also built using high-recycled content, regionally sourced materials, and low-emission products that help provide healthy indoor air quality for staff and guests.

During the upcoming season, the Bucks will provide online information about their LEED/Green Initiatives and offer LEED/Green tours of Fiserv Forum.

“The Milwaukee Bucks have demonstrated outstanding conservation leadership and shown that it is possible to build a world-class facility with birds in mind,” Lenz said. “We hope that their example will inspire others to take action.”

ABC is dedicated to conserving birds and their habitats throughout the Americas, with an emphasis on achieving results and working in partnership. One of ABC’s main goals is to eliminate threats to birds, including collisions with buildings and other infrastructure. ABC has contributed to making facilities safer for birds nationwide, from partnering to develop the Bird Collision Deterrence LEED credit to working on the Federal Bird-Safe Buildings Act that has been introduced in both the House (H.R. 2542) and Senate (S. 1920) in the U.S. Congress. ABC has also helped individual organizations, such as Northwestern University and Key West International Airport, make their buildings safe for birds.

Collisions at homes and low-rise buildings combined account for the majority of U.S. bird-glass collisions — and they can be prevented. To learn how you can apply attractive, inexpensive treatments to your windows to reduce the threat that they pose to birds, visitwww.birdsmartglass.org.

###

About American Bird Conservancy

American Bird Conservancy is dedicated to conserving birds and their habitats throughout the Americas. With an emphasis on achieving results and working in partnership, we take on the greatest problems facing birds today, innovating and building on rapid advancements in science to halt extinctions, protect habitats, eliminate threats, and build capacity for bird conservation. Find us on abcbirds.org, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter (@abcbirds).

About Bird City Wisconsin

Bird City Wisconsin, a program of Milwaukee Audubon Society, recognizes Wisconsin municipalities for the conservation and education activities that make their communities healthy for both birds and people. Bird City also offers High Flyer recognition for communities that go above and beyond in their conservation and education programs. To date, 109 communities have been recognized as Bird Cities, while 23 communities have qualified for High Flyer status. Find us at birdcitywisconsin.org and on Facebook.

About Fiserv Forum

Fiserv Forum is a preeminent sports and entertainment arena in downtown Milwaukee that opened on Aug. 26, 2018. Designed by Populous, Eppstein Uhen Architects, and HNTB, the venue offers incomparable sightlines, customer service, technology, and amenities. Fiserv Forum includes 17,500 seats for basketball and up to 18,000 for concerts, with 34 luxury suites and three clubs. The new venue hosts a diverse variety of events, including the Milwaukee Bucks, Marquette University men’s basketball, major concerts, family shows, and other sports and entertainment events. Founding Partners for Fiserv Forum include BMO Harris Bank, Froedtert & the Medical College of Wisconsin, Johnson Controls, and Miller Brewing Company.

For more information on Fiserv Forum, visit: fiservforum.com.



Sent from IPad
 

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Date: 11/3/18 2:04 pm
From: \Herbert, Teri Lynn\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: French film with BIRDS!
I just watched a French film called The School of Life, (L’ecole buissonniere) 2017, directed by Nicolas Vanier. It was wonderful, filmed in the Sologne and had many many beautiful birds – but I didn’t know any other than the pheasants and herons/egrets. There were small birds – warblers? and several others. Anyone else see this film? I’d love to know what they were! I’d recommend it! English subtitles.

Teri Lynn




-------------------------------------------------------------------------
This message was secured via TLS by MUSC.
 

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Date: 11/3/18 12:04 pm
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Pine Siskins
Let the show begin! Half dozen in back yard now.

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 11/3/18 10:08 am
From: Derb Carter <derbc...>
Subject: Cave Seallows Ft Fisher
Three Cave Swallows with 6 somewhat late Barn Swallows at Fort Fisher early afternoon.

Derb Carter
 

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Date: 11/3/18 8:17 am
From: Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...>
Subject: Lake Julian/Buncombe Cty., NC
Folks,
At 10:45 am this date, there are 4 BLACK SCOTERS at Lake Julian. They were originally way out on the lake, but a kayaker flushed them and they landed very close to the picnic shelter. I had close scope views and took pictures, into the sun, but I believe I may have one or two pics that are diagnostic. All 4 ducks were overall dark Brn/blk with lighter cheeks and obvious, dark caps that ran from the base of the bill to back of neck and came down to the eye. This is only my 2nd mountain sighting of this species, in 32 years of mountain birding!
Wayne

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 11/3/18 7:49 am
From: bruce young (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: CHBC trip to new hope impoundment
The Chapel Hill Bird Club's trip to the new hope impoundment in Durham this morning was a success if you like woodpeckers. We had a clean sweep of the non-cockaded NC woodpeckers including (conservatively) 20% of the world population of Red-headeds. Other highlights included a late Cape May Warbler and a very late Yellow-billed Cuckoo. But the piece of resistance was a pair of Red-breasted Nuthatches, of which the male was possible the prettiest of the species I have ever seen; his entire undersides were a rich reddish-brown. A nice morning for a walk. 
Bruce YoungDurham <NCbyoung715...>
 

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Date: 11/3/18 5:28 am
From: Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Coinjock & Pea Island NWR, NC
Today and yesterday (Nov. 2, 3) we've had a red-breasted nuthatch coming to
our shelled peanut feeder. Looks like a male with a fairly bright red
breast. On Wed, Oct 31 we also saw a red-breasted nuthatch at Pea Island
along the "tunnel" walk from the visitor's center to the overlook platform.

Also on Oct. 31, we sighted a yellow-billled cuckoo in the shrubs around
the new platform overlooking South Pond at Pea Island. Great looks at white
pelicans all over North Pond and South Pond. A few tundra swans were
present. Avocets, marbled godwits and skimmers in N. Pond.

Our warbler visiitors here in Coinjock have been scarce this fall...male &
female redstarts, black and white, parula, and one blackpoll.

We're off to fight the winds at Pea Island again today.

Linda Ward
Skip Hancock
Coinjock, NC

 

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Date: 11/3/18 4:41 am
From: Kent (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lower Saluda CBC Dec. 29- Columbia SC
The Lower Saluda CBC will be held on Saturday December 29th. This is in the Lake Murray area of Columbia SC.
The main area will be at Saluda Shoals Park.
Please contact me in advance if interested in participating.
Let me know of any questions

R Kent Bedenbaugh
Compiler
Columbia SC
<Rkbbirder...>
803.463.5872
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 11/3/18 3:20 am
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Kitty Hawk Christmas Bird Count Dec 15
Greetings,

The Kitty Hawk Christmas Bird Count is scheduled for Saturday, December 15,
2018. Please contact me if you wish to help this year.

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/2/18 5:49 pm
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: confusing fall warbler for a so-so birder
I'm calling this a Cape May warbler based on a comparison of my notes to
this suggestion by several responders -- thank you for bringing this other
species to my attention. First there was that really obvious oval of olive
color on the lower back. A couple of bird ID sites I reviewed (can't
recall if Audubon or Cornell) do note that this warbler is fond of conifers
even in migration and often forages in eastern red cedars when off its
breeding range of spruces. Species behavior notes for this bird include
foraging behavior of hanging upside down at the ends of conifer tips which
is much like what I noted above. The lack of yellow undertail coverts
seems like a miss for even a pretty dull palm warbler, especially since
this bird was turning around and visible from lots of angles. The low-key
dull breast streaking on a pale background is consistent, as well as the
lack of much facial markings, only a dark smallish eye, with Audubon ID
website photo of a dull female (in a juniperus virginiana as it happened).
If someone wants to discuss further or provide counterarguments, I am
interested in hearing those.

Thank you to all those who brought CM warbler to my attention. So far I
have had no other species suggestions. I certainly would not have gone
looking at that on my own so it was most helpful.

Betsy Kane
Washington, N.C.

On Fri, Nov 2, 2018 at 7:40 PM Betsy Kane <oldurbanist...> wrote:

> Last weekend (Oct 27 or 28) I had a bland little warbler foraging in a
> medium-sized eastern red cedar tree in the yard here in Little Washington
> on the Pamlico. I had just a few glimpses of it (and only one quick look
> through the binocs) before it took off, but got a decent look at two field
> marks in particular:
>
> - multiple thin dull streaks on a very light breast
> - had one good dorsal view of the bird showing an overall dull color but
> with a good sized olive green patch on the lower back to rump (not really a
> "patch", as the oval of olive green blended into the rather dull gray or
> dun-gray rest of the back of the bird)
>
> The other "field mark" in terms of behavior: This bird went rather
> variously among the foliage of the cedar tree, turning sideways and around,
> moving frequently and in variously angled poses. About 15 feet up most of
> the time. Active, for a warbler, but not excessively active like a
> kinglet. And seemed to be after something(s) tucked away all inside and
> about the cedar tree.
>
> The rest of the bird was just pretty dull. I thought it was just pale
> underneath, but didn't get a good look at the undertail coverts. And the
> head and face, blandish, all I got was a somewhat dark small eye & if any
> facial markings, they were not strong.
>
> I guess it could be a dull version of palm warbler. Is there anything
> else I should be looking at?
>
> Betsy Kane
> Washington, N.C.
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/2/18 5:13 pm
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: confusing fall warbler for a so-so birder
A number of folks have replied to suggest Cape May warbler, dull version.

Guess I need to spend more time looking out the back door! Or keep the
binoculars closer to hand.

Betsy

On Fri, Nov 2, 2018 at 7:40 PM Betsy Kane <oldurbanist...> wrote:

> Last weekend (Oct 27 or 28) I had a bland little warbler foraging in a
> medium-sized eastern red cedar tree in the yard here in Little Washington
> on the Pamlico. I had just a few glimpses of it (and only one quick look
> through the binocs) before it took off, but got a decent look at two field
> marks in particular:
>
> - multiple thin dull streaks on a very light breast
> - had one good dorsal view of the bird showing an overall dull color but
> with a good sized olive green patch on the lower back to rump (not really a
> "patch", as the oval of olive green blended into the rather dull gray or
> dun-gray rest of the back of the bird)
>
> The other "field mark" in terms of behavior: This bird went rather
> variously among the foliage of the cedar tree, turning sideways and around,
> moving frequently and in variously angled poses. About 15 feet up most of
> the time. Active, for a warbler, but not excessively active like a
> kinglet. And seemed to be after something(s) tucked away all inside and
> about the cedar tree.
>
> The rest of the bird was just pretty dull. I thought it was just pale
> underneath, but didn't get a good look at the undertail coverts. And the
> head and face, blandish, all I got was a somewhat dark small eye & if any
> facial markings, they were not strong.
>
> I guess it could be a dull version of palm warbler. Is there anything
> else I should be looking at?
>
> Betsy Kane
> Washington, N.C.
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/2/18 4:40 pm
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: confusing fall warbler for a so-so birder
Last weekend (Oct 27 or 28) I had a bland little warbler foraging in a
medium-sized eastern red cedar tree in the yard here in Little Washington
on the Pamlico. I had just a few glimpses of it (and only one quick look
through the binocs) before it took off, but got a decent look at two field
marks in particular:

- multiple thin dull streaks on a very light breast
- had one good dorsal view of the bird showing an overall dull color but
with a good sized olive green patch on the lower back to rump (not really a
"patch", as the oval of olive green blended into the rather dull gray or
dun-gray rest of the back of the bird)

The other "field mark" in terms of behavior: This bird went rather
variously among the foliage of the cedar tree, turning sideways and around,
moving frequently and in variously angled poses. About 15 feet up most of
the time. Active, for a warbler, but not excessively active like a
kinglet. And seemed to be after something(s) tucked away all inside and
about the cedar tree.

The rest of the bird was just pretty dull. I thought it was just pale
underneath, but didn't get a good look at the undertail coverts. And the
head and face, blandish, all I got was a somewhat dark small eye & if any
facial markings, they were not strong.

I guess it could be a dull version of palm warbler. Is there anything else
I should be looking at?

Betsy Kane
Washington, N.C.

 

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Date: 11/2/18 3:24 pm
From: andrew thornton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Apparent large flock of Franklin's Gulls at Ecusta Pond, Transylvania Co NC
Awesome record!

That's not how ebird works, for good reason. I don't think anyone would
want reviewers changing the species of their observations. However, I'm
sure after contacting the observer they will correct it and then it will be
accepted.

Andrew Thornton
Julian, NC

On Fri, Nov 2, 2018, 6:14 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> I agree with Jelmer. Franklin's Gulls are fairly late southbound migrants
> thru the middle of the continent, such as the latter part of October and
> into November. This has been a very strong frontal system with many
> thunderstorms in states to our west. These bird almost certainly were
> pushed eastward by this very unsettled weather. There would not be that
> many Laughing Gulls in the mountains now -- no hurricane or tropical storm
> activity. That would be much more of a shock there and now than Franklin's
> Gulls.
>
> Yes, the previous state record is 7 -- also from the southern mountains,
> and also in the first 10 days of November -- a parallel indeed.
>
> It does look like I can make out a bit of a white band near the wingtips
> of one or two birds. I hope the eBird editors can correct this to 37
> Franklin's Gulls, and then accept that -- rather than simply rejecting a
> photo report of 37 Laughing Gulls.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> author/editor of the Birds of North Carolina website
>
> On Fri, Nov 2, 2018 at 5:49 PM Jelmer Poelstra <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> Hi all,
>>
>> A flock of 37 gulls reported as Laughing Gulls at Ecusta
>> Pond, Transylvania Co, NC, appear to be Franklin's Gulls, as far as I can
>> see from the one (distant) picture at
>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S49624904&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=A8NjLVvp3qu-ULTPfPKp0_e89FEIdQZdzT1eNIkJMUw&s=9t7662MujKX8zIT-97DpA1wVs8AbRr0kFWnodcaKzMk&e=
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S49624904&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=lwaiR3LkCNcfAFF7mDglYCzMwrsGSKigh4JXXW0Zi4A&s=ndc5yRm143kNKRsGsABIsD-yPvc3BvbOH88xPhYhHfw&e=>
>> .
>>
>> Thought I would get the word out as people close by may still be able to
>> chase them.
>>
>> If confirmed, an unprecedented number for North Carolina? The high count
>> in Ebird is 7 on Nov 9, 2008.
>>
>> Good birding,
>>
>> Jelmer Poelstra
>> Chapel Hill
>>
>> --
>> Jelmer Poelstra
>> 311 Biological Sciences Building, Biology Department
>> Duke University Durham, NC
>> Email: <jelmerpoelstra...> / <jelmer.poelstra...>
>> Phone: (+1) 919-260-8253
>>
>

 

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Date: 11/2/18 3:15 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Apparent large flock of Franklin's Gulls at Ecusta Pond, Transylvania Co NC
I agree with Jelmer. Franklin's Gulls are fairly late southbound migrants
thru the middle of the continent, such as the latter part of October and
into November. This has been a very strong frontal system with many
thunderstorms in states to our west. These bird almost certainly were
pushed eastward by this very unsettled weather. There would not be that
many Laughing Gulls in the mountains now -- no hurricane or tropical storm
activity. That would be much more of a shock there and now than Franklin's
Gulls.

Yes, the previous state record is 7 -- also from the southern mountains,
and also in the first 10 days of November -- a parallel indeed.

It does look like I can make out a bit of a white band near the wingtips of
one or two birds. I hope the eBird editors can correct this to 37
Franklin's Gulls, and then accept that -- rather than simply rejecting a
photo report of 37 Laughing Gulls.

Harry LeGrand
author/editor of the Birds of North Carolina website

On Fri, Nov 2, 2018 at 5:49 PM Jelmer Poelstra <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> A flock of 37 gulls reported as Laughing Gulls at Ecusta
> Pond, Transylvania Co, NC, appear to be Franklin's Gulls, as far as I can
> see from the one (distant) picture at
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S49624904&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JvXMMnT_-rpNQf1iV1Ve42DdVjcchVYNFXLyw8pKGas&s=uOmBOclb2tw9xxRrhIRq1Gzs323wsioOo1gr6v3hpI0&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S49624904&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=lwaiR3LkCNcfAFF7mDglYCzMwrsGSKigh4JXXW0Zi4A&s=ndc5yRm143kNKRsGsABIsD-yPvc3BvbOH88xPhYhHfw&e=>
> .
>
> Thought I would get the word out as people close by may still be able to
> chase them.
>
> If confirmed, an unprecedented number for North Carolina? The high count
> in Ebird is 7 on Nov 9, 2008.
>
> Good birding,
>
> Jelmer Poelstra
> Chapel Hill
>
> --
> Jelmer Poelstra
> 311 Biological Sciences Building, Biology Department
> Duke University Durham, NC
> Email: <jelmerpoelstra...> / <jelmer.poelstra...>
> Phone: (+1) 919-260-8253
>

 

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Date: 11/2/18 2:49 pm
From: Jelmer Poelstra (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Apparent large flock of Franklin's Gulls at Ecusta Pond, Transylvania Co NC
Hi all,

A flock of 37 gulls reported as Laughing Gulls at Ecusta Pond, Transylvania
Co, NC, appear to be Franklin's Gulls, as far as I can see from the one
(distant) picture at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S49624904&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=lwaiR3LkCNcfAFF7mDglYCzMwrsGSKigh4JXXW0Zi4A&s=ndc5yRm143kNKRsGsABIsD-yPvc3BvbOH88xPhYhHfw&e=.

Thought I would get the word out as people close by may still be able to
chase them.

If confirmed, an unprecedented number for North Carolina? The high count in
Ebird is 7 on Nov 9, 2008.

Good birding,

Jelmer Poelstra
Chapel Hill

--
Jelmer Poelstra
311 Biological Sciences Building, Biology Department
Duke University Durham, NC
Email: <jelmerpoelstra...> / <jelmer.poelstra...>
Phone: (+1) 919-260-8253

 

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Date: 11/2/18 10:40 am
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Covey of quail crosses farm path
Around 1240 PM I was driving to the road to drop composted organic matter that I had cleaned out from a sump, when I started seeing one, two three... quail? Thought it had to be mockers (7+ with short tails?) or, when some more flew up, doves.
They started flying at about 100 feet distance, and probably crossed the paved road to a cotton field backed by a cutover cut 2 years ago. (Looked so small because my 25 day old broilers are so much bigger.)
Perhaps my listening to the radio on earmuffs is why I had not heard these birds in the last few weeks they may have been here. Maybe I need to try broadcasting the covey call eve and dawn.
In the years I have been here, we regularly have a male(or two or three) singing within earshot, but this was a shock.

Notice I did not post this as "Great view of cool rare birds."

Everybody who reads Carolinabirds would prefer descriptive titles.
It really helps one use the delete button or just skip over a post one does not want tot read.
Both those who think politics, religion and birder sociology are out of bounds, and those crazy enough to tell what they think relates to birding and birds' needs--I think all would prefer that.







Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

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Date: 11/2/18 6:57 am
From: Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Baird's SP at Warren Wilson ? NC
Hello all,

If someone refinds it this morning or looks but doesn’t find it, I would appreciate an update. Will chase if still around.

Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC
 

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Date: 11/2/18 6:35 am
From: Ben Ringer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Purple Finches
For the last several days we have been seeing Purple Finches at our
feeders. Yesterday we counted at least 10. Several males but mostly
females. We have never had this many at once & staying this long. It's a
real treat. Hope they stay for the winter.


Ben Ringer

--
Ben Ringer
Hendersonville, NC.

 

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Date: 11/1/18 6:39 pm
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Brookshire Park Boone HCAS bird walk Saturday 8AM
We'll have the opportunity to see how a massive streambank stabilization
project is affecting the ecosystems and birds of the park this week as
Brushy Fork Environmental consulting is right in the middle of major
earthworks resetting ecological succession and intended to decrease bank
erosion.

We meet at the main parking lot at 8 AM as usual and this walk is free
and open to anyone.

Guy McGrane. Deep Gap, NC


 

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Date: 11/1/18 1:35 pm
From: ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Unusual bird - very late for here
I observed an unusual bird for this location and time of year- yellow
billed cuckoo.
We usually only see them in the breeding season and as an occasional
migrant in September.

Got a very good look at with binoculars at about 30 feet away.
--
Ask me about my upcoming book - a photo essay of North American and
Caribbean Hummingbirds!

Ann Maddock
<am.hummingbird.photos...>
Hatteras Island, NC

 

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Date: 11/1/18 1:33 pm
From: Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Purple Finch Numbers Building
We had over 50 Purple Finches on and around the feeders today at Riverbend
Park (northern Catawba Co). The numbers seem to be building every day. The
first week of November is normally when we hit our peak numbers during
Purple Finch winters. Here is a photo I took this morning showing some of
the Purple Finches.
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_gallery_Martin_pufi-5F8.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=BEoihvJutLA0j_yn62l2PaIWGpQV9cYUl1alDU_uaQE&s=-Pbg8RCqk8VezXuMWuDzzWn-IjpF9iBnPbGI_VC8gsg&e=


Dwayne
*************
J. Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
<redxbill...>


Catawba County Park Ranger
Riverbend Park - Conover, NC
<jdmartin...>
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.catawbacountync.gov_depts_parks_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=BEoihvJutLA0j_yn62l2PaIWGpQV9cYUl1alDU_uaQE&s=4eJnDDukwMRf30Gxtq8uzRpAUFCmQm217I1sBVQydWk&e=
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.weatherlink.com_user_riverbendpark&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=BEoihvJutLA0j_yn62l2PaIWGpQV9cYUl1alDU_uaQE&s=xnf2n8N6BUxNjVeBF3VG0ODHzc-ZP2jmo-Zs07eaatQ&e=

 

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Date: 11/1/18 1:25 pm
From: Jessie Dale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: purple finch
i have one female purple finch hanging around my feeders this afternoon.

jessie dale
linville, nc
avery county
 

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Date: 11/1/18 8:14 am
From: Aaron Steed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Baird’s Sandpiper, Warren Wilson College
Hi everyone,

Simon Thompson, Jay Wherley and I just had a very late Baird’s Sandpiper in
amongst the Killdeer at Warren Wilson. This is the first big, mostly bare
field you get to while walking over from Owen Park.

This could be a county first for Buncombe, but I’m sure someone else could
verify this. There are certainly no records on eBird! Will be sure to post
any good photos to eBird and Cbirds.

Good sparrow selection continues here as well, including Lincoln’s. Also a
few warblers still around including Tennessee, Nashville, and Common
Yellowthroat.

Aaron Steed
Ventures Birding Tours
Asheville, NC


--
Aaron Steed
Ventures Birding Tours
Asheville, NC

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=OQ7cXZmkKL8qz-obL9DXeWONXRT5gUURv97wjJ2K9h8&s=vxaS1m67o-32IM57sjhKUSWEGYjoYU2QH_Vh3XG8VNc&e=

 

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Date: 11/1/18 7:36 am
From: \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Late fall migrants in northern Watauga County, NC; 1 November 2018
Birders,

I had an immature magnolia warbler and a Swainson’s thrush on my morning walk on my property located at 3,400 feet elevation in northern Watauga County. I have had migrant hermit thrushes the past several weeks but this is the first Swainson’s since Oct 21—at the time my latest fall record. My first November records for both species in 10 years birding almost daily at this location.

Complete list below:

Echo Valley Farm
Nov 1, 2018
8:00 AM
Traveling
0.75 miles
90 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.8.1 Build 4

4 Red-tailed Hawk
2 Red-bellied Woodpecker
1 Downy Woodpecker
1 Hairy Woodpecker
1 Pileated Woodpecker
1 Eastern Phoebe
2 Blue Jay
10 American Crow
4 Common Raven
6 Carolina Chickadee
2 Tufted Titmouse
4 White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern)
2 Winter Wren
2 Carolina Wren
8 Golden-crowned Kinglet
5 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
7 Eastern Bluebird (Eastern)
1 Swainson's Thrush (Olive-backed) -- One was observed perched and on the ground in medic hardwood forest. Uniform olive gray upperparts including tail, buffy eyering, buffy throat with dark spots clearly seen. My latest fall record in ten years living here.
66 American Robin
29 Purple Finch (Eastern) -- Several flocks up to a dozen individuals flying overhead
2 American Goldfinch
2 Field Sparrow
1 Fox Sparrow (Red)
1 Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored)
4 Song Sparrow
1 Eastern Towhee (Red-eyed)
1 Magnolia Warbler -- Immature seen very well in blackberry thicket near my house. White wing-bars, yellow underparts and rump with grayish breast band and black streaking on sides. Under tail white with black tip. Unmistakable. The latest record for my property in ten years living here.
1 Palm Warbler (Yellow)

Number of Taxa: 28


Merrill Lynch
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 10/31/18 6:45 am
From: FRANK LAWKINS (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Clay Colored Sparrow
It is still at Huntington Beach State Park 


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone

 

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Date: 10/30/18 5:26 pm
From: william haddad (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: A Yellow-rumped Warbler Experience

At the cabin, feeder birds include Cardinals. Juncos, Towhees, Titmice, Nuthatches, Goldfinches and Chickadees. Often these have recently attracted other birds such as four types of Woodpeckers (including Sapsuckers), Kinglets, Robins, B. H. Vireos and Yellow-rumped Warblers. A couple of days ago (Oct. 28), while trying to feed Chickadees from my hand, a Yellow-rumped Warbler landed above on a post and then came down to land on my extended arm about at my elbow and stayed there for a few seconds as I remained stationary. An exciting experience! Today had some Chickadees feed from my hand – Titmice and Nuthatches would come close but wait while I spilled the bird food on the level feeder to the side of my hand – being more cautious.

A question for birders in the high country who, unlike me, stay the Winter. Do recognizable Black-capped Chickadees migrate down here in the Winter and come to feeders? Not the few native Black-caps in the few pockets toward the end of the Blue Ridge Parkway.

Bill Haddad
Spruce Pine, N.C.

Sent from Mail for Windows 10



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.avast.com_antivirus&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=RQp5yaALtV_6artoufEAPjuBcD2N3P3E2YU5iZSyS9M&s=DXaGFn0H3OyjcUqpheS26858Sk3_wDrc_JjbkaIZL38&e=

 

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Date: 10/30/18 2:34 pm
From: Sherri Carpenter <sherric...>
Subject: Purple finches
I saw a pair of purple finches in the backyard trees this morning. While we
were sitting on the back (screened-in) porch tonight, from about 4:20 to
5:15 or so, we had SEVERAL purple finches come in to the sunflower seed tube
feeders. At one point, there were six female/immatures and one male in
sight. I believe we had at least two adult males. That is more than I am
used to seeing at one time. Interestingly, the evening started with several
house finches (as usual) at the feeders and in the bushes, but once the
purples arrived in force, the house finches moved out farther from the
porch.

Sherri Carpenter
Roxboro, NC

 

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Date: 10/30/18 10:45 am
From: \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lingering Blackpoll Warbler still present in Watauga County, NC; 30 October 2018
Birders,

The immature Blackpoll Warbler I reported on 22 October is still being seen almost daily at my property located at 3,400’ elevation in northern Watauga County.

Today, I watched it foraging very low to the ground along the forest edge feeding on caterpillars (with a heavy frost on the ground!). With the exception of blue-headed vireos, most of the neotropical migrants left my patch of woods about 3 weeks ago. Which makes this warbler’s late arrival and continuing presence an interesting anomaly.

Merrill Lynch
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 10/29/18 5:13 pm
From: Aaron Given (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Pale “Solitary” Vireo - Kiawah Island, SC
We banded a pale Solitary Vireo yesterday on Kiawah Island, SC. I would appreciate any feedback from people who are familiar with both Blue-headed Vireo and Cassins Vireo. The bird was obviously paler than a standard Blue-headed Vireo but maybe not so much for a drab juvenile Blue-headed Vireo.

Thanks in advance for any insight you might be able to provide.

Photos and more information can be found in the link below.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__kiawahislandbanding.blogspot.com_2018_10_interesting-2Dsolitary-2Dvireo.html-3Fm-3D1&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M5ONAvDNglre05oelymZHDPoJkltR9yuxep3FAbZ82s&s=Hws8LksTtMGV2dUubzYTwOqqnjZQrHnLsIBYEjWO174&e=

Aaron Given
Charleston, SC


 

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Date: 10/29/18 4:57 pm
From: Birding Poet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: clay colored sparrow at Points Point
I went out around 2:00 pm and didn’t see it. A single Palm Warbler and lots
of Catbirds were about it for me.

On Mon, Oct 29, 2018 at 7:36 PM jcox3222 <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> I had good views of it for about 5-10 minutes after Nathan left at around
> 1200. It was then flushed by a passing car and I lost it. Last seen by me
> at about 1210.
>
> John Cox
> Mount Pleasant
>
> Sent from XFINITY Connect Mobile App
>
--
~Tracee 843/425-7630

 

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Date: 10/29/18 4:36 pm
From: jcox3222 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: clay colored sparrow at Points Point
I had good views of it for about 5-10 minutes after Nathan left at around 1200. It was then flushed by a passing car and I lost it. Last seen by me at about 1210.

John Cox
Mount Pleasant

Sent from XFINITY Connect Mobile App

 

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Date: 10/29/18 2:38 pm
From: james poling (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Surf Scoter, Owen Park, Swannanoa, NC today
Surf Scoter, Owen Park, Swannanoa, NC today, 4:00pm




James Poling
624 Azalea Avenue
Black Mountain, NC 28711 USA
<james.poling...> <mailto:<james.poling...>
www.jamesnewtonpoling.com <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.jamesnewtonpoling.com_&d=DwICAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=21XWky68ISzV8OFzKJxqQIs8YAYvBDIAOkIs7FM1PMg&s=SitnAQnQtCn2QzHH_ryMPhdVSmkFNEIvKrYgboLWyQE&e=>
828-707-7413





 

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Date: 10/29/18 1:22 pm
From: Ron Clark <waxwing...>
Subject: Sunset Beach Night-herons
I counted 34 Black-crowned today at Twin Lakes. That’s at least 15 more than I’ve seen there before.

Ron Clark
Kings Mtn. NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 10/29/18 10:12 am
From: Birding Poet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Clay-colored Sparrow at Patriots Point
Anyone know if it's been seen since?

I'm heading over now.

On Mon, Oct 29, 2018 at 11:40 AM Nate Dias <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> I just found a Clay-colored Sparrow at Patriots Point in Mount Pleasant,
> SC. I kept eyes on the bird for 15 minutes waiting for John Cox to arrive.
>
> The bird is at the power line right of way beside the pump house -
> diagonally across from the sparrow field.
>
> We noted the thin malar stripe, unstreaked gray collar and brownish wash
> on the upper beast.
>
> It just flew over to the tangle beside the pump house.
>
> Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
>


--
Peace & Light,

Tracee Clapper
843-425-7630

 

Back to top
Date: 10/29/18 8:40 am
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Clay-colored Sparrow at Patriots Point
I just found a Clay-colored Sparrow at Patriots Point in Mount Pleasant,
SC. I kept eyes on the bird for 15 minutes waiting for John Cox to arrive.

The bird is at the power line right of way beside the pump house -
diagonally across from the sparrow field.

We noted the thin malar stripe, unstreaked gray collar and brownish wash on
the upper beast.

It just flew over to the tangle beside the pump house.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

 

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Date: 10/29/18 8:16 am
From: Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: FOS YB Sapsuckers Sunday
FOS white-throated sparrow singing in Southern Pines, NC yesterday.
Helen Kalevas

On Mon, Oct 29, 2018 at 8:04 AM John Ennis <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Yesterday was a good day for woodpeckers & great weather at Holly Shelter
> Game Land...I had 4 FOS YB Sapsuckers and 5 Red-cockaded Woodpeckers +
> other species...
>
> Two Monarchs and also two Pearl Crescents...
>
> Still nice fall wildflowers...this was my first post-Flo trip there and NC
> Wildlife Resources has done a great job of cleanup and ensuring safety of
> Game Land...Lodge Road was gated near the waterfowl impoundments...not sure
> condition of New Road so you may not be able to cross the game land using
> it and Lodge Road...
>
> John Ennis
> Wilmington NC
>
> Sent from my iPhone

 

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Date: 10/29/18 5:35 am
From: Bill Majoros, Ph.D. <william.majoros...>
Subject: Good weekend birding around Durham
The birding was good Saturday at Eno Rover SP (Few's Ford), Sandy Creek city park, and Butner Gamelands (Brickhouse Road), and noticeably slower Sunday.

I was happy to see the male kestrel at Butner Gamelands again, though the bird had moved further down Brickouse Rd to the power lines near the lake.

Orange-crowned warbler (ID'ed by birder Don at Sandy Creek)
Yellow breasted chats (2: Few's Ford & Butner Gamelands)
Palm warblers (2: Sandy Creek & Butner Gamelands)
Cape May warbler (Sandy Creek)
Pine warblers
Yellow-rumped warblers (many)
FOS Dark-eyed junco (Butner Gamelands)
Purple finch

House finches
Indigo bunting (Butner Gamelands)
A. goldfinch
Golden-crowned kinglet
Ruby-crowned kinglets
American kestrel
Great egret
Great blue heron
Tree swallows
Chimney swifts
Cedar waxwings
White-throated sparrows
Song sparrows
Chipping sparrows
Red-headed woodpecker
Red-bellied woodpecker
Yellow-bellied sapsucker
Downy woodpecker
Northern flickers (many)
Blue jays (many)
Red-winged blackbirds (flock)
Brown-headed cowbird
Rufous-sided towhees
Red-tailed hawk
Red-shouldered hawk
Barred owl
Belted kingfisher
E. Phobe
Bonaparte's gull
Unidentified tern
Wood ducks
Double-crested cormorants
Canada geese
Robins (many)
E. Bluebirds (many)
Carolina wrens
N. Mockingbird
N. Cardinals
E. Starlings
Chickadees & titmice

---
Bill Majoros, Ph.D.
Durham, NC
ThirdBirdFromTheSun.com



 

Back to top
Date: 10/29/18 5:05 am
From: John Ennis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: FOS YB Sapsuckers Sunday
Yesterday was a good day for woodpeckers & great weather at Holly Shelter Game Land...I had 4 FOS YB Sapsuckers and 5 Red-cockaded Woodpeckers + other species...

Two Monarchs and also two Pearl Crescents...

Still nice fall wildflowers...this was my first post-Flo trip there and NC Wildlife Resources has done a great job of cleanup and ensuring safety of Game Land...Lodge Road was gated near the waterfowl impoundments...not sure condition of New Road so you may not be able to cross the game land using it and Lodge Road...

John Ennis
Wilmington NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 10/28/18 4:32 pm
From: Alan Gamache <bird...>
Subject: Rusty Blackbird, New Bern, nc
Late this afternoon, went birding over at Glenburnie Park. Got two good
birds,up on the hill,a male Golden-crowned Kinglet and a bit later just
beyond the dog park at that short grass muddy area a very early for the
season Rusty Blackbird.

Al Gamache
New Bern, NC

 

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Date: 10/28/18 9:19 am
From: Sharyn Caudell <scaudell...>
Subject: FOSB junco and red breasted nuthatch
This morning on my feeder in Durham, I had the first red-breasted
nuthatch and first junco of the season.

Sharyn Caudell


 

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Date: 10/27/18 7:02 pm
From: Peter Stangel <peter...>
Subject: Awesome Birding - Huntington Beach State Park, SC
With these nice winds, I suspect everyone had good birding today. Huntington Beach State Park was certainly rockin'.

The day started with several Gray Catbirds and small flocks of migrating Blue Jays. A couple hundred Tree Swallows hung overhead, suspended in the stiff winds. Five Bald Eagles were in view simultaneously.

Then it got interesting. A quarter mile short of the north beach parking lot, where the pine mortality has created an open space on the main road, the magic started. A bright green Tennessee Warbler was feeding at eye level in a cedar. Several Blue-Gray Gnatcatchers materialized. A Blackpoll Warbler was foraging in low shrubs, providing nice views of yellow feet. A Red-breasted Nuthatch appeared. An adult male Scarlet Tanager, with a greenish-yellow body and highly contrasting jet black wings, was in view for 5 minutes, foraging in low branches. A Cape May Warbler popped up. Then a female Black-throated Blue Warbler came into view. A Magnolia Warbler appeared. An Eastern Phoebe flicked its tail. A Yellow-bellied Sapsucker rocketed by. And then a flock of about 35 White Pelicans appeared overhead. To top it all off, Frank Lawkins showed up!

Birding was so good I decide to walk up to the jetty. There was a modest seabird migration: a few skeins of Black Scoters, including one flock of >100 birds; a few Red-throated Loons winging by; and several flocks of south-bound Double-crested Cormorants.

The Least Tern nesting area had a couple hundred roosting Dunlin and maybe 75 Semi-palmated Plovers. Walking back on the dune path I flushed a couple sparrows into a cedar. One was a beautiful, immature Clay-colored and the other a Field. There was an empty Modelo can in the path and I stuck it on the end of a branch in the sparrow tree to help others find these birds. You can't miss it. Back on the beach, there were six Red Knots foraging at waters' edge.

After a siesta, my wife and I walked the beach down to the end of south Litchfield. On the sandbars between Litchfield and Pawley's there were dozens of Black Skimmers and numerous Royal, Caspian, Sandwich, and Forster's Terns. There were small rafts of Black Scoters a couple hundred yards offshore. Through 8.5X binoculars you could tell they were blackish ducks, but not much more. Then, just before sunset, the sun burst forth. The breakers illuminated like florescent bulbs. The sun hit the yellow-orange knobs on the bills of the male scoters and they looked like patches of pumpkins on the ocean. Hundreds of Laughing Gulls winged by in small flocks, headed toward the sandbars. The sky will filled with clouds of multiple textures, shapes and colors.

How blessed are we to be birders??

Peter Stangel, Aiken, SC
Subscribe for free to The Birding Wire-weekly news about birds, birding, and bird conservation: Birdingwire.com.

 

Back to top
Date: 10/27/18 4:21 pm
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Purple Swamphen - invasive predator
I hope the refuge staff eliminates the Purple swamphen, since it is a
non-native, invasive species that feeds on rail chicks, ducklings,
shorebird chicks, bird and reptile eggs, etc.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 10/27/18 2:21 pm
From: Cornell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Swamphen
In my experience with the species in Florida, I can confirm that there is a decent range of head colors present in the population there. Among the individuals I have photographed are phenotypes ranging from pure Gray-headed to what could potentially be construed as intermediate between that species and what today is referred to as Western Swamphen (Porphyrio porphyrio) of the Mediterranean basin (though the specifics are speculation on my part). A similar darker and more contrasty phenotype is apparently also exhibited by members of the Gray-headed group from the Caucasus region of west-central Asia, for what it’s worth.

Furthermore, the Florida population was subject to a decently thorough analysis shortly after its establishment (Pranty, Bill, Kim Schnitzius, Kevin Schnitzius, and Helen W. Lovell. 2000. Discovery, distribution, and origin of the purple swamphen (Porphyrio porphyrio) in Florida.' Florida Field Naturalist 28: 1–11) in which possible sources of origin are discussed. The authors were able to locate two separate nearby aviculturists who stocked the species, and though the exact taxonomic assignments to subspecies group of the captive stocks in question were apparently not made available at the time, the article mentions that even at this early date some individuals in the feral population exhibited plumage characteristics (namely blue heads and more saturated neck and body plumage) outside of the phenotype we have come to expect of the Gray-headed group. My interpretation of this information is that the founding population had some plumage variability from the very beginning, which may well have been augmented through interbreeding with later escapees that exhibited non Gray-headed phenotypes irrespective of their exact geographic origins.

In summary, I’m not certain we can point to a really bright individual and say with confidence that it came from somewhere other than the feral Florida population. That being said, only by knowing the exact genetics of this individual can we make anything of it more than speculation.

Cheers,

- Reid

> On Oct 27, 2018, at 4:47 PM, Derb Carter <derbc...> wrote:
>
> Caveat that I have not researched the various Swamphens. The Gray-headed is the one reported from Florida, and as the name says is supposed to have a gray head. There are dozens of photos of Swamphens in Florida on ebird checklists. If you scan them head color in adults with red bills ranges from mostly gray to some gray to light blue to deep blue. Check it out if you are interested on ebird checklists for the hotspot: storm water treatment area 5/6 Hendry County Florida. Be sure to get to the photo of reported Gray-headed Swamphens on November 18, 2017 with a deep blue head and no gray. Again, I don't what this means, only what I see in photos.
>
> Derb Carter

 

Back to top
Date: 10/27/18 1:48 pm
From: Derb Carter <derbc...>
Subject: Swamphen
Caveat that I have not researched the various Swamphens. The Gray-headed is the one reported from Florida, and as the name says is supposed to have a gray head. There are dozens of photos of Swamphens in Florida on ebird checklists. If you scan them head color in adults with red bills ranges from mostly gray to some gray to light blue to deep blue. Check it out if you are interested on ebird checklists for the hotspot: storm water treatment area 5/6 Hendry County Florida. Be sure to get to the photo of reported Gray-headed Swamphens on November 18, 2017 with a deep blue head and no gray. Again, I don't what this means, only what I see in photos.

Derb Carter
 

Back to top
Date: 10/27/18 1:20 pm
From: Steve Compton <scompton1251...>
Subject: Re: Purple Swamphen now named as Gray-headed Swamphen
Kent,
Thanks! In preparing for our trip to Southern Florida last year I had
a tough time figuring out what to call this species. We easily found
one in a Kendall shopping center in sight of I-95. Of course, Richard
Hayes and I were guided by local expert Larry Manfredi. What a weird
report! What is this species, that I assumed to be sedentary, doing in
SC? I guess it might stay around for a while, like the recent Kiskadee
or more distant Snail Kite.
Steve ComptonGreenville, SC


Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE DroidOn 26 Oct 2018 10:08 pm, Kent Fiala
<carolinabirds...> wrote:

In 2015, the Clements checklist (used by eBird) split Purple
Swamphen world-wide into 6 species. Of the 6, Gray-headed Swamphen
is the main one in Florida (although I think I may have heard
mention of other species also being possible). The American
Ornithological Society has not recognized this split, and their
checklist (used by the ABA and Carolina Bird Club) retains the
species as Purple Swamphen.

Kent Fiala

On 10/26/2018 10:00 PM, David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing
List) wrote:

Fri 26 Oct 2018
All,
In reference to my report of a Purple Swamphen, I've learned
that the species has been renamed to Gray-headed Swamphen. My
Sibley app uses PUSW and that was my in-the-field reference. I
have submitted my eBird checklist with a couple of pics of a
Gray-headed Swamphen. See: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49481275
Regards,
David McLeanCharleston, SC

--
David C. McLean, Jr.
DCMcLean AT gmail DOT com
 

Back to top
Date: 10/27/18 1:08 pm
From: DPratt14 <DPratt14...>
Subject: Purple Swamphen variation and taxonomy
Hi birders:

The Purple Swamphen reported and well-described from Bull's Island is almost certainly an escape from captivity, and not a true vagrant. The swamphens naturalized in FL, and countable for ABA lists, have gray heads and necks (hence the name if you accept the split), not glossy blue as described for the SC bird.

Doug Pratt
Cary, NC



 

Back to top
Date: 10/27/18 12:26 pm
From: Steve Shultz <sshultz...>
Subject: Lake Mattamuskeet Trip Dec 1-2 - Carolina Bird Club
We had a recent cancellation that opens three spots on the upcoming field trip to Lake Mattamuskeet/Mattamuskeet NWR in Hyde Co, NC the weekend of December 1-2. If you would like to go, this is your chance! Details below.

Lake Mattamuskeet, North Carolina’s largest natural lake, shines as one of the Atlantic flyway’s most impressive sites for wintering waterfowl. Literally tens of thousands of ducks, geese, and swans make Mattamuskeet their winter home. And early December is prime time to visit and enjoy the spectacle. In addition to waterfowl, the National Wildlife Refuge provides excellent overall birding and nature observation opportunities. From sparrows to lingering warblers, wintering hummingbirds to waders, this trip promises a rich and varied list of species. We plan to visit various areas on the refuge and travel to nearby hotspots.



Sound like fun? Act quickly as space on this Bonus Trip is limited to 12 participants. This smaller group makes individualized interaction with the trip leaders easier and allows us to help you with identifying any of those “confusing little brown jobs”.



Logistics:

This trip visits Mattamuskeet NWR and surrounding areas on December 1st and 2nd. We will depart from the visitor center at the refuge at 7 a.m. Saturday and Sunday with a full day of birding on Saturday and a half day on Sunday. Registration cost is $25. You must be a member of the Carolina Bird Club to attend, but you may join at the same time as you register if you are currently not a member. Participants are responsible for lodging, meals, and transportation. All levels of birding experience are welcome.



Environmental hazards are few, and annoying insects are not usually problematic, but bring weather appropriate clothing and note that food service may be somewhat limited in Hyde County. Registered participants will receive a detailed FAQ with suggestions on lodging and food.



To Register:

Contact Steve Shultz for a reserved slot and a registration form. If your plans should change after registration, refunds are available through November 15th. After November 15th refunds are available if we can fill your slot.



Steve Shultz

sshultz at nc.rr.com

919-629-7226

 

Back to top
Date: 10/27/18 5:37 am
From: Thea and Mark Sinclair (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: purple finches
We currently have 25 purple finches on our feeder. They are voraciously
eating the black oil seeds. First time we have had them at our house.
Thea Sinclair
Hickory, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 10/27/18 5:20 am
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Purple Finches
I have four males devouring black oil right now in backyard.

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 10/26/18 7:09 pm
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Purple Swamphen now named as Gray-headed Swamphen
In 2015, the Clements checklist (used by eBird) split Purple Swamphen world-wide into 6 species. Of the 6, Gray-headed Swamphen is the main one in Florida (although I think I may have heard mention of other species also being possible). The American Ornithological Society has not recognized this split, and their checklist (used by the ABA and Carolina Bird Club) retains the species as Purple Swamphen.

Kent Fiala

On 10/26/2018 10:00 PM, David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> Fri 26 Oct 2018
>
> All,
>
>    In reference to my report of a Purple Swamphen, I've learned that the species has been renamed to Gray-headed Swamphen. My Sibley app uses PUSW and that was my in-the-field reference. I have submitted my eBird checklist with a couple of pics of a Gray-headed Swamphen. See: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S49481275&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=2oTSL2mqje82uxCcejK-ZRBGanWRSmbQI47jAPWResc&s=RI-jWj0Gzgl0o-JKozozKZ5QfrT-hdQNZrEJQ-2PqKw&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S49481275&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Wb38PpyFXsVpghOMOYoaAsUumActcum58ebb8LDtIjg&s=lMRA9zwnwuAfNaUf1wJWt27qMmhZuy_hquJMKg9owuI&e=>
>
> Regards,
>
> David McLean
> Charleston, SC
>
> --
> David C. McLean, Jr.
> DCMcLean AT gmail DOT com


 

Back to top
Date: 10/26/18 7:00 pm
From: David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Purple Swamphen now named as Gray-headed Swamphen
Fri 26 Oct 2018

All,

In reference to my report of a Purple Swamphen, I've learned that the
species has been renamed to Gray-headed Swamphen. My Sibley app uses PUSW
and that was my in-the-field reference. I have submitted my eBird checklist
with a couple of pics of a Gray-headed Swamphen. See:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S49481275&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Wb38PpyFXsVpghOMOYoaAsUumActcum58ebb8LDtIjg&s=lMRA9zwnwuAfNaUf1wJWt27qMmhZuy_hquJMKg9owuI&e=

Regards,

David McLean
Charleston, SC

--
David C. McLean, Jr.
DCMcLean AT gmail DOT com

 

Back to top
Date: 10/26/18 3:55 pm
From: David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Purple Swamphen, Bulls Island, Cape Romain NWR
Fri 26 Oct 2018

All,

Cynthia Worthington and I today found a Purple Swamphen (PUSW) on Bulls
Island, Cape Romain NWR, Charleston County, SC. This individual had
"electric" blue plumage on head and neck gradually changing to a darker
blue plumage color on the body; it had a bright red to red-orange shield
and big bill; and it was pumping its tail.

We saw the PUSW on Alligator Alley at Pool 2 looking into Jack's Creek.
The bird was only 40 m to 50 m off of the dike in the green grasses on the
right looking into Jack's and was near the grass edge along the open water
of Jack's. It was in the immediate company of several Common Gallinules. We
were able to get a few diagnostic digiscope photographs of the bird through
the grasses but no really clear, unobstructed photos.

Beyond the Purple Swamphen the birding on Bulls today was pretty good.
Ducks have begun returning to the island, shorebirds were in high numbers
on both the North Beach and in the saltwater marsh oceanfront at Jack's
Creek, and the woodland birds were fairly abundant.

FYI, Coastal Expeditions (CEX) operates the Bulls Island ferry on
regular ferry service on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays with
departures from Garris Landing at 9:00 AM and 12:30 PM. CEX will accept
reservations for the ferry, maybe even prefer them; when you arrive at
Garris, walk to the end of the dock to board the ferry and pay the ferryman
on board. Tell them you're chasing the Purple Swamphen!

Good birding,

David McLean
Charleston, SC

--
David C. McLean, Jr.
DCMcLean AT gmail DOT com

 

Back to top
Date: 10/26/18 3:10 pm
From: John Ennis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: [External] FT Fisher Yesterday
Good to know...thanks...

I understand that the Brunswick spraying had to do with spraying for gypsy moths but I have not heard an update of those efforts...

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 26, 2018, at 11:16 AM, Helms, J <j.chris.helms...> wrote:
>
> John,
> Not only has the park not increased its mosquito spraying, the park has never done any mosquito spraying here to my knowledge. It's simply not in the State Park philosophy.
> Mosquito control measures in the area are done by New Hanover Co. and to my knowledge they only spray along the roads outside of the park. Apparently some aerial spraying was done by Brunswick Co, but I'm not aware of any done over the park or if the flights extended across the river to New Hanover County.
>
> Chris Helms
> Carolina Beach State Park
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> On Behalf Of John Ennis
> Sent: Friday, October 26, 2018 8:20 AM
> To: <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: [External] FT Fisher Yesterday
>
> CAUTION: External email. Do not click links or open attachments unless verified. Send all suspicious email as an attachment to Report Spam.<mailto:<report.spam...>
>
>
> Fairly slow day but I got there a little late...best numbers were Northern Flickers and Gray Catbirds...
>
> My best observation was FOS Yellow-rumpled Warbler at aquarium...also 3 Marbled Godwits and 10+ dowitcher(sp) at Federal Point where it was high tide...good number of monarchs had overnighted near the point...Common Buckeyes & Fiery Skippers at Carolina Beach State Park...
>
> Have not observed the migrating warblers, thrushes, and other species at CBSP like in the good old days...almost non-existent...maybe it’s just me or maybe the Park has greatly increased their mosquito spraying...???
>
> John Ennis
> Wilmington NC
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 10/26/18 8:16 am
From: Helms, J <j.chris.helms...>
Subject: RE: [External] FT Fisher Yesterday
John,
Not only has the park not increased its mosquito spraying, the park has never done any mosquito spraying here to my knowledge. It's simply not in the State Park philosophy.
Mosquito control measures in the area are done by New Hanover Co. and to my knowledge they only spray along the roads outside of the park. Apparently some aerial spraying was done by Brunswick Co, but I'm not aware of any done over the park or if the flights extended across the river to New Hanover County.

Chris Helms
Carolina Beach State Park

-----Original Message-----
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> On Behalf Of John Ennis
Sent: Friday, October 26, 2018 8:20 AM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: [External] FT Fisher Yesterday

CAUTION: External email. Do not click links or open attachments unless verified. Send all suspicious email as an attachment to Report Spam.<mailto:<report.spam...>


Fairly slow day but I got there a little late...best numbers were Northern Flickers and Gray Catbirds...

My best observation was FOS Yellow-rumpled Warbler at aquarium...also 3 Marbled Godwits and 10+ dowitcher(sp) at Federal Point where it was high tide...good number of monarchs had overnighted near the point...Common Buckeyes & Fiery Skippers at Carolina Beach State Park...

Have not observed the migrating warblers, thrushes, and other species at CBSP like in the good old days...almost non-existent...maybe it’s just me or maybe the Park has greatly increased their mosquito spraying...???

John Ennis
Wilmington NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 10/26/18 5:20 am
From: John Ennis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: FT Fisher Yesterday
Fairly slow day but I got there a little late...best numbers were Northern Flickers and Gray Catbirds...

My best observation was FOS Yellow-rumpled Warbler at aquarium...also 3 Marbled Godwits and 10+ dowitcher(sp) at Federal Point where it was high tide...good number of monarchs had overnighted near the point...Common Buckeyes & Fiery Skippers at Carolina Beach State Park...

Have not observed the migrating warblers, thrushes, and other species at CBSP like in the good old days...almost non-existent...maybe it’s just me or maybe the Park has greatly increased their mosquito spraying...???

John Ennis
Wilmington NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 10/25/18 6:32 pm
From: <susan...>
Subject: Mattamuskeet CBC
Dear All,

We are looking for volunteers for this year's Christmas Bird Count in
Hyde Co. NC. As always the count will be held on December 29th-- a
Saturday.

Although we have a dedicated core of several people, we likely will not
have enough to cover the circle. Some of the area is on the F&WS
refuge-- but the bulk of it is not. There is a mix of private land and
state game land involved. A good bit of the private land is
agricultural. Although we have some access to walk portions of a few
tracts, birding from the (rural) roads is involved in a good bit of the
area.

Diversity can be quite good and historically a number of rarities have
been found in count day. Regardless, one can expect to see large
numbers of individuals-- no matter what section of the circle one
happens to be covering!

If you are interested or have questions, please let me know ASAP--

Susan Campbell, Compiler
Southern Pines, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 10/25/18 3:05 pm
From: Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: rcki and ybsa
Had my first of season ruby-crowned kinglet and yellow-bellied sapsucker
just now.
Helen
On the Little River near Hillsborough, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 10/25/18 2:47 pm
From: Bert Fisher (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Wood Thrush in Hillsborough
At 9:00 this morning, we had a very late wood thrush at Vireo Lane. The thrush was in the company of a robin, with both birds at a water feature at the same time. Haven't seen either bird again.

Happy birding.

Bert Fisher
Hillsborough, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 10/25/18 5:02 am
From: Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Red-breasted nuthatch, Coinjock, NC
On Wed, Oct 24 a red-breasted nuthatch was sighted twice taking safflower
seed from our feeding area. Three peanut feeders were promplty put out in
hopes of keeping it around. So far no sighting this a.m. Interesting choice
of seed, since a couple of years ago we had a white-breasted nuthatch who
preferred safflower to any other food, including shelled peanuts.

Linda Ward
Coinjock, NC

 

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Date: 10/25/18 4:51 am
From: ncdarrylin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Darrylin Smith Hampstead, NC 


Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
Get the new AOL app: mail.mobile.aol.com
 

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Date: 10/25/18 4:41 am
From: Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Purple Finch
I just had a Purple Finch on my sunflower feeder. This is a new yard bird for our new home in Cornelius, NC.

Anne Olsen
Cornelius, NC


Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 10/24/18 4:33 pm
From: Mike Judd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: unsubscribe
unsubscribe

--
Mike Judd
Brevard, NC

 

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Date: 10/24/18 3:38 pm
From: Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Red-breasted Nuthatch
Red-breasted Nuthatch in my yard in central Orange County, NC, today.
Could this be the start of something big?

--
Norm Budnitz
Orange County
North Carolina
 

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Date: 10/24/18 1:03 pm
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Santee Bird Walk November 3 - request not to wear bright colors
For folks coming on the final fall bird walk November 3 at Santee NWR -
please do not wear white or bright colored clothing.

We will be trying to get looks at some skulking birds for the group and as
the famous saying goes - good birders don’t wear white. Or pink, orange,
etc.

It’s always better to wear brown or green or tan - or optimally:
camouflage matched to the habitat.

Thanks,

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 10/24/18 9:18 am
From: Hilda Flamholtz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: birding the Anderson Regional Airport, SC
I was thinking that Steve's great write up should go on the Carolina Bird
Club website where we have write-ups for birding sites in each state.
(Birding Resources/South Carolina)

Hilda Flamholtz
Columbia, SC

On Wed, Oct 24, 2018 at 11:36 AM Birding Poet <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> That’s great for anyone in that area!
>
> I very much wish a detailed report like this one was available for all of
> our SC hotspots; I often check e-Bird to figure out where to go for what I
> want to see, but then end up entirely unsure of exactly where in the area
> to go. Some are obvious, others not so much. Maybe something like an
> updated edition of Robin Carter’s ‘Finding Birds in SC’?
>
> If anyone has grant $$ to give me so I can quit my job and get this done
> for us, I’m all in!!
>
> On Wed, Oct 24, 2018 at 10:59 AM Steve Patterson <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> The Anderson Airport became an eBird hotspot in July, and it has shown
>> good potential for bird diversity over those few months. Two or three
>> people have requested information about where to go on the airport property
>> to look for birds, so here is a basic guide to navigating the place.
>>
>> These are the areas being utilized to find birds so far:
>>
>>
>> *Entrance Road and Parking Lot* - From Anderson, take Whitner Street (SC
>> 24) west of town and look for the airport entrance on the left. You can
>> start birding as soon as you enter the entrance road, pulling over to scan
>> fields and study fence birds. There is a curb, but a margin lane is enough
>> to get out of the slight traffic you might encounter. Once you reach the
>> parking area, pick a space in long-term parking or park closer to the
>> building. There is no fee for parking. Check power lines and palmetto
>> trees for birds.
>>
>> *Runways* - You can scope the runways from outside the fence or walk
>> through the terminal building to a patio area. This is where Horned Larks
>> and Killdeer are usually found. Airport personnel have become accustomed
>> to the presence of birders and are very friendly.
>>
>> *Upper Field and Wood Edges* - If you choose to park in the small
>> long-term parking section, directly in front of you will be a grassy field
>> that rolls down to a hardwood strip surrounding a small creek. Walk the
>> fields and along the woods. There is also a utility cut that takes you to
>> (and over) the creek.
>>
>> *Lower Field and Wood Edges* - Again from the long-term parking spots,
>> you will notice a small gravel and dirt road to your left. Walk this road
>> to a gap in the tree line. Follow the road through the gap and you are in
>> the Lower Field. This field contains the radio-controlled airplane club
>> runway and staging shelter. It is a large area with hardwood margins on
>> all all sides except the upper edge where a long fence provides bird
>> perches and birder views into otherwise inaccessible parts of the airport
>> property.
>>
>> *Sewer Line* - At the same place the aforementioned gap enters the Lower
>> Field, there is a recently-cleared rough path to your right. It goes
>> through vegetation that follows the sewer line. The path takes you all the
>> way down to the Lower Sewer Line. (When cleared, I thought this would
>> become a fantastic spot for migrating birds, but it has not lived up to
>> expectation, yet.)
>>
>> *Brushy Transition to Lower Sewer Line *- If you keep to the right on
>> the road that takes you into the Lower Field, you will eventually come to a
>> brushy transition zone. Bird this road to the bottom, which will deposit
>> you into a larger clearing that is the Lower Sewer Line.
>>
>> *Lower Sewer Line and Power Line Cut* - When you enter the Lower Sewer
>> Line, you can walk right or left, and both have been productive for birds.
>> To the right is the creek. To the left is a long avenue that comes
>> parallel with a power line clearing.
>>
>>
>> If you have questions about any of this, please be in touch. I hope many
>> people will be able to enjoy the birding there and add to the knowledge of
>> how bird species are using the property.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Steve Patterson
>> Anderson, SC
>>
> --
> ~Tracee 843/425-7630
>

 

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Date: 10/24/18 8:32 am
From: Bert Fisher (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Cerulean Warbler in Hillsborough
To my surprise, and delight, I just had an adult male cerulean warbler here at Vireo Lane. The bird was foraging low in a carolina buckthorn. Though this beautiful warbler gave great looks, unfortunately, it didn't stick around long enough for me to grab a photo.

Happy birding.

Bert Fisher
Hillsborough, NC

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 10/24/18 8:09 am
From: Birding Poet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: birding the Anderson Regional Airport, SC
That’s great for anyone in that area!

I very much wish a detailed report like this one was available for all of
our SC hotspots; I often check e-Bird to figure out where to go for what I
want to see, but then end up entirely unsure of exactly where in the area
to go. Some are obvious, others not so much. Maybe something like an
updated edition of Robin Carter’s ‘Finding Birds in SC’?

If anyone has grant $$ to give me so I can quit my job and get this done
for us, I’m all in!!

On Wed, Oct 24, 2018 at 10:59 AM Steve Patterson <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> The Anderson Airport became an eBird hotspot in July, and it has shown
> good potential for bird diversity over those few months. Two or three
> people have requested information about where to go on the airport property
> to look for birds, so here is a basic guide to navigating the place.
>
> These are the areas being utilized to find birds so far:
>
>
> *Entrance Road and Parking Lot* - From Anderson, take Whitner Street (SC
> 24) west of town and look for the airport entrance on the left. You can
> start birding as soon as you enter the entrance road, pulling over to scan
> fields and study fence birds. There is a curb, but a margin lane is enough
> to get out of the slight traffic you might encounter. Once you reach the
> parking area, pick a space in long-term parking or park closer to the
> building. There is no fee for parking. Check power lines and palmetto
> trees for birds.
>
> *Runways* - You can scope the runways from outside the fence or walk
> through the terminal building to a patio area. This is where Horned Larks
> and Killdeer are usually found. Airport personnel have become accustomed
> to the presence of birders and are very friendly.
>
> *Upper Field and Wood Edges* - If you choose to park in the small
> long-term parking section, directly in front of you will be a grassy field
> that rolls down to a hardwood strip surrounding a small creek. Walk the
> fields and along the woods. There is also a utility cut that takes you to
> (and over) the creek.
>
> *Lower Field and Wood Edges* - Again from the long-term parking spots,
> you will notice a small gravel and dirt road to your left. Walk this road
> to a gap in the tree line. Follow the road through the gap and you are in
> the Lower Field. This field contains the radio-controlled airplane club
> runway and staging shelter. It is a large area with hardwood margins on
> all all sides except the upper edge where a long fence provides bird
> perches and birder views into otherwise inaccessible parts of the airport
> property.
>
> *Sewer Line* - At the same place the aforementioned gap enters the Lower
> Field, there is a recently-cleared rough path to your right. It goes
> through vegetation that follows the sewer line. The path takes you all the
> way down to the Lower Sewer Line. (When cleared, I thought this would
> become a fantastic spot for migrating birds, but it has not lived up to
> expectation, yet.)
>
> *Brushy Transition to Lower Sewer Line *- If you keep to the right on the
> road that takes you into the Lower Field, you will eventually come to a
> brushy transition zone. Bird this road to the bottom, which will deposit
> you into a larger clearing that is the Lower Sewer Line.
>
> *Lower Sewer Line and Power Line Cut* - When you enter the Lower Sewer
> Line, you can walk right or left, and both have been productive for birds.
> To the right is the creek. To the left is a long avenue that comes
> parallel with a power line clearing.
>
>
> If you have questions about any of this, please be in touch. I hope many
> people will be able to enjoy the birding there and add to the knowledge of
> how bird species are using the property.
>
>
>
>
> Steve Patterson
> Anderson, SC
>
--
~Tracee 843/425-7630

 

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Date: 10/24/18 7:59 am
From: Steve Patterson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: birding the Anderson Regional Airport, SC
The Anderson Airport became an eBird hotspot in July, and it has shown good potential for bird diversity over those few months.   Two or three people have requested information about where to go on the airport property to look for birds, so here is a basic guide to navigating the place.
These are the areas being utilized to find birds so far:

Entrance Road and Parking Lot - From Anderson, take Whitner Street (SC 24) west of town and look for the airport entrance on the left.  You can start birding as soon as you enter the entrance road, pulling over to scan fields and study fence birds.  There is a curb, but a margin lane is enough to get out of the slight traffic you might encounter.  Once you reach the parking area, pick a space in long-term parking or park closer to the building.  There is no fee for parking.  Check power lines and palmetto trees for birds.  
Runways - You can scope the runways from outside the fence or walk through the terminal building to a patio area.  This is where Horned Larks and Killdeer are usually found.  Airport personnel have become accustomed to the presence of birders and are very friendly.  
Upper Field and Wood Edges - If you choose to park in the small long-term parking section, directly in front of you will be a grassy field that rolls down to a hardwood strip surrounding a small creek.  Walk the fields and along the woods.  There is also a utility cut that takes you to (and over) the creek.
Lower Field and Wood Edges - Again from the long-term parking spots, you will notice a small gravel and dirt road to your left.  Walk this road to a gap in the tree line.  Follow the road through the gap and you are in the Lower Field.  This field contains the radio-controlled airplane club runway and staging shelter.  It is a large area with hardwood margins on all all sides except the upper edge where a long fence provides bird perches and birder views into otherwise inaccessible parts of the airport property.  
Sewer Line - At the same place the aforementioned gap enters the Lower Field, there is a recently-cleared rough path to your right. It goes through vegetation that follows the sewer line.  The path takes you all the way down to the Lower Sewer Line.  (When cleared, I thought this would become a fantastic spot for migrating birds, but it has not lived up to expectation, yet.)  
Brushy Transition to Lower Sewer Line - If you keep to the right on the road that takes you into the Lower Field, you will eventually come to a brushy transition zone.  Bird this road to the bottom, which will deposit you into a larger clearing that is the Lower Sewer Line.
Lower Sewer Line and Power Line Cut - When you enter the Lower Sewer Line, you can walk right or left, and both have been productive for birds.  To the right is the creek.  To the left is a long avenue that comes parallel with a power line clearing.  

If you have questions about any of this, please be in touch.  I hope many people will be able to enjoy the birding there and add to the knowledge of how bird species are using the property.  



Steve PattersonAnderson, SC
 

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Date: 10/23/18 5:50 pm
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Christmas BIrd Counts
It's that time of year again--people are starting to list their Christmas Bird Count dates at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_christmas_&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=16CwqKhglq8F39q4VXgNJVIAamvRc3kBMx0aAldPcz4&s=hQS5c3s-lKQcW8X_rcue7NiEbm5rpSSoxYQldDM31co&e=

Just a reminder that if you are a count organizer, you can list your date there too, or you can send it to me and I will add it.

--
Kent Fiala

 

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Date: 10/23/18 2:21 pm
From: WALTER KENT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Purple Finch
Had more than 15 on my feeder today here in Lenoir N.C.                                                          Walt Kent                                                          Lenoir N.C.
 

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Date: 10/23/18 11:47 am
From: \Herbert, Teri Lynn\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Free Birding journals
This time not as an attachment:
Available from Sheila Baldridge, <baldridge...><mailto:<baldridge...>
Contact her directly if you are interested in any of them:

American Birds

Vol. 42 no. 1 1987
45 no. 3,5 1991
46 no. 3,5 1992
47 no. 2,3 1993

American Birds – Christmas Bird Count

No. 102-109 2001-2009 + 2010 - 2011

Auk

Vol. 113 no. 4 1996
117 2000
118 2001
119 2002
120 2003
121 2004
122 2005
123 2006
124 no. 1 2007
125 2008
126 no. 3,4 2009
127 no. 1,3,4 2010
128 2011
129 no. 1 2012

Birding

Vol. 16 no. 6 1984
Vol. 18 – 26 1986 – 1994 Complete
Vol. 27 no. 2-6 1995
Vol. 28 No. 1,3,4,5,6 1996
Vol. 29 – 31 1997 – 1999 Complete
Vol. 32 no, 2-6 2000
Vol. 33 no. 2-6 2001
Vol. 34 no. 1-4 2002
Vol. 35 2003 Complete
Vol 36 no. 2-6 2004
Vol. 37 2005 Complete
Vol. 38 no. 1, 3 -6 2006
Vol. 39 no. 1,2,6 2007
Vol. 40 no. 1-5 2008


British Birds

Vol. 80 no. 7 July 1987
81 no. 1-12 1988
82 no. 1-8 1989
83 no. 3-10 1990
84 no. 1 1991
86 no. 4,5,6 1993
90 no.5, 6-9 1997
91 1998
92 no. 2,3,4 1999
93 2000
94 2001
95 2002


96 no. 1,2 2003

California Birds

Vol. 1 – 3 1970-1972 Complete
(continues as Western Birds)

Journal of Raptor Research

Vol. 22 – 28 1988-1994 Complete
Vol.29 no. 1,3,4 1995
Vol. 30 1996 Complete

Vol 31 – 32 missing
Vol 33 1999 Complete
Vol.34 2000 Complete
Vol. 35 missing
Vol. 36 – 41 2002 – 2007 complete
Vol. 42 missing
Vol. 43 no. 3,4 2009
Vol. 44 no. 2,3,4 2010
Vol. 45 2011

Living Bird

2nd Annual 1963
9th Annual 1970
12th Annual 1973
14th Annual 1975
15th Annual 1976
16th Annual 1977
17th Annual 1978
18th Annual 1979-1980

Marine Mammal Science

Vol. 1 1985
Vol. 19 2003
Vol. 22 nos. 1-3 2006
Vol. 23 2007
Vol. 24 no. 4 2008
Vol. 25 nos. 1-2 2009

North American Birds

Vol. 53 no. 4 1999
Vol. 54 2000 Complete
Vol. 55 no. 1,2,3 2001
Vol. 56 no. 3,4 2002
Vol. 57 no. 1,4 2004
Vol. 58 2004 Complete
Vol. 59 2005/6 Complete
Vol. 60 2007 Complete
Vol. 61 2008 Complete
Vol. 62 no. 1 2008

Pacific Seabirds Group Bulletin

Vol. 1 – Vol. 22 1974 – 1995 Complete
Vol. 23 no. 2 1996
Vol. 24 no. 2 1997
Vol. 25 1998 Complete
Vol. 26 1999 Complete
Vol. 27 missing
Vol. 28 no. 1 2001
Vol. 29 2002 Complete
Vol. 30 no. 1 2003
Vol. 31 no. 2 2004
Vol. 32 2005 Complete
Vol. 33 no. 1 2006
Vol. 34 no. 1 2007
Vol. 35 2008 Complete
Vol. 36 no. 2 2009
Vol. 37 no. 1 2010

Western Birds

Vol. 4 – 43 1973 – 2012 Complete





-------------------------------------------------------------------------
This message was secured via TLS by MUSC.
 

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Date: 10/22/18 5:11 pm
From: Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Vesper Sparrow, Purp. Finch, Nelson's Sp. - Pea Island, Dare, NC
Good (Great) Evening,

After 5 years of serious birding, it's getting harder and harder for me to
find "Life Birds" in Dare County, NC. Yet, great friends, persistence, a
good eye and "dumb luck," have been paying off. This morning, with the
help of Mike Gosselin and Audrey Whitlock, I was able to locate a Vesper
Sparrow near, and on, the rock jetty at Pea Island National Wildlife
Refuge. It was exciting to quickly identify the sparrow by the white
eye-ring, get photos, watch it feed through a scope and share in the
excitement with Mike. High fives and smiles were abundant.

Then, a marshy area where "reeds" (mixed marsh vegetation) grew right next
to the jetty produced 3 Nelson's Sparrows, 1 Saltmarsh Sparrow and 1
Seaside Sparrow. In fact, they were all in very close proximity feeding on
seeds.

Afterwards, Purple Finches caught my eye. Certainly not common on the
beach. I was able to find and follow 5 Purple Finches as they flew from
dune crest to dune crest in search of bugs and seeds. In fact, I was able
to get photos of them eating Sea Oats.

Finally, I got to see my one of very few Tennessee Warblers that vacations
to the beach each Fall (marked rare on eBird.org). It was in some
Goldenrod associating with a Cape May Warbler and a Palm Warbler.

What a fantastic crisp Fall morning birding underneath sunny skies!

--
Jim Gould
Southern Shores, NC

 

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Date: 10/22/18 3:32 pm
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: More info on Kirtland's Warbler in Duck, NC
Concerning the Oct 3, 2017 Kirtland's Warbler seen in Duck, NC, it was seen
and photographed by Joyce Edwards and Pat Draisey of Manteo. They observed
it from Oct 2 until Oct 5, in approximately the same location along the
boardwalk. When I finish this email I will add their photos to the CBC
website photo gallery.

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

 

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Date: 10/22/18 1:12 pm
From: ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Eastern Phoebe 2018-2019
Our resident wintering flycatcher species is the Eastern Phoebe. And today,
right on schedule, he or she is here!
For each of the past four winters, an Eastern Phoebe shows up on October
23, and spends the winter in the yard, departing in April.

No idea if it is the same bird as it is not banded but it is an interesting
observation either way.
--
Ask me about my upcoming book - a photo essay of North American and
Caribbean Hummingbirds!

Ann Maddock
<am.hummingbird.photos...>
Hatteras Island, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 10/22/18 11:01 am
From: \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Interesting sightings from northern Watauga County, NC—Oct 22, 2018
Birders,

I had a first year Blackpoll Warbler today on my property in northern Watauga County. Only the second or third one I’ve seen here in the fall (in 10 years) and quite late too.

Also first of the season Purple Finch and Hermit Thrush.

Complete list follows.

Good birding,

Merrill Lynch

Echo Valley Farm
Oct 22, 2018
12:00 PM
Traveling
0.75 miles
90 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.8.1 Build 4

3 Wood Duck -- 1 male and 2 females flushed from small pond on my property.
2 Mourning Dove
1 Turkey Vulture
1 Red-tailed Hawk
1 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
2 Red-bellied Woodpecker
3 Downy Woodpecker
1 Hairy Woodpecker
2 Pileated Woodpecker
5 Blue-headed Vireo -- At least 2 birds singing.
7 Blue Jay
5 American Crow
1 Common Raven
4 Carolina Chickadee
4 Tufted Titmouse
5 White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern)
2 Carolina Wren
2 Golden-crowned Kinglet
2 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
1 Hermit Thrush -- First of the season for my property.
3 American Robin
2 European Starling
1 Cedar Waxwing
4 Purple Finch (Eastern) -- First of the season for my property.
2 American Goldfinch
4 Field Sparrow
1 Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored)
5 Song Sparrow
1 Eastern Towhee (Red-eyed)
1 Blackpoll Warbler -- A rare fall migrant at my location and somewhat late. Seen very well at close range as it foraged fairly low to ground with small group of kinglets. Close enough to see bright yellow legs and feet! Wingbars, whitish undertail coverts, pale yellowish breast with indistinct streaking.

Number of Taxa: 30


Merrill Lynch
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 10/22/18 10:07 am
From: Judi Durr (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Purple finches
Have a lovely pair at my feeder now. FOS
Judi Durr
Mocksville, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 10/22/18 8:54 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: October 2017 report of Kirtland's Warbler in Duck , NC
Jeff and others:

Usually in a situation like this -- a non-birder taking a photo(s) that
really needs to go onto the CBC Photo Gallery, the best idea is for you
(Jeff) to get her permission to upload the photos yourself. You have done
this 100 times or more and you know how to do this and are familiar with
the website. You have the photos, and if you know the date, location,
etc., you should be all set -- if you have her permission. I've seen a
number of occasions where the photographer fails to upload photos,
generally because they are not a birder. And, yes, I have uploaded photos
for others who aren't birders.

This is a first Coastal report in NC for Kirtland's Warbler -- well,
technically, I don't consider second-hand comments a "report" yet -- and
there is no convincing record at all from the entire Coastal Plain.

We'll keep checking the Photo Gallery from time to time today to see if the
photos are there. This sounds way too important to let it slide for more
than a day or two.

Harry LeGrand
NC Bird Records Committee (non-voting member)

On Sun, Oct 21, 2018 at 8:14 PM Jeff Lewis <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> I was shown photos today of a Kirtland's Warbler that was seen and well
> photographed at the Duck, NC boardwalk on October 3, 2017. The observer was
> a friend of mine, Joyce Edwards. She is not a birder (yet!) and was not
> aware of the ID, and thus, the rare status of the bird. I have passed the
> (awesome) photos around to a several birders. Joyce is going to post them
> to the Carolina Bird Club photo gallery. The bird is very similar to the
> one seen a couple of weeks ago at Ridge Junction - maybe even more heavily
> streaked underneath.
>
> Jeff Lewis
> Manteo, NC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 10/21/18 6:18 pm
From: Peter Stangel <peter...>
Subject: Snake Safety for Birders
While birding the wetlands at Silver Bluff Audubon Sanctuary in Jackson, SC, and at nearby Phinizy Swamp in Augusta, GA, last weekend, I encountered several nice cottonmouth snakes basking on the trail. Beautiful snakes. Since I was "looking up" for birds, I nearly stepped on one. The snake's reaction afforded me the opportunity to get a good look at its "cotton mouth!" This experience prompted me to reach out to renowned herpetologist Whit Gibbons, of the University of Georgia's Savannah River Ecology Lab, for some guidance on snake safety for birders.

His guidance appears in the latest issue of The Birding Wire:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.birdingwire.com_releases_14426a68-2D0ff6-2D4ac6-2D8d93-2D9c05f44fa7d9_&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=xweJOQxB9qu8TJqngNvVzv5qv8dG0xpx5ZsOxkmJSmI&s=mKczUGkMcnuY_SiDxNWtSUY51Sro36idizYPhI7-JZA&e=

Whit often addresses bird issues in his weekly newspaper columns on ecology, which are well worth the read. In today's Aiken Standard newspaper he humorously describes what his grandson called an "owl attack": https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.aikenstandard.com_lifestyle_ecoviews-2Dan-2Dowl-2Dattack-2Dis-2Dmemorable_article-5Fc1d29b62-2Dd1b1-2D11e8-2D801a-2D03e0c68ed196.html&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=xweJOQxB9qu8TJqngNvVzv5qv8dG0xpx5ZsOxkmJSmI&s=2uTn8ymSgqTS-gPEv5qJAHWphwAQ7TiIDbTujZGbQGk&e=

What has some very nice snake and other reptile and amphibian natural history guides that are excellent if you'd like to learn more about these creatures.

Peter Stangel
[/var/folders/fn/q2_zqlpj40sgzlzt5p714ppm0000gp/T/com.microsoft.Outlook/WebArchiveCopyPasteTempFiles/<cidimage001.png...>]


 

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Date: 10/21/18 5:14 pm
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: October 2017 report of Kirtland's Warbler in Duck , NC
I was shown photos today of a Kirtland's Warbler that was seen and well
photographed at the Duck, NC boardwalk on October 3, 2017. The observer was
a friend of mine, Joyce Edwards. She is not a birder (yet!) and was not
aware of the ID, and thus, the rare status of the bird. I have passed the
(awesome) photos around to a several birders. Joyce is going to post them
to the Carolina Bird Club photo gallery. The bird is very similar to the
one seen a couple of weeks ago at Ridge Junction - maybe even more heavily
streaked underneath.

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 10/21/18 12:45 pm
From: WALTER KENT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: purple finches
Had 5 Purple finches  on my feeder here in Caldwell County yesterday. They were back today.                                                          Walt Kent                                                           Lenoir N.C.
 

Back to top
Date: 10/21/18 6:43 am
From: Corey, Ed <ed.corey...>
Subject: RE: [External] hudsonian godwit at north pond salt marsh trail - 4 pm EDT
This was likely a different bird than then one seen by Jeff Pippen and company in the morning. Jeff Lewis was following this bird south down the beach when I saw a bird from the Photo Blind at around 9am. I had thought this might be one of the continuing birds, but was told by Harry LeGrand that those birds hadn’t been seen for a while.

Still, a great bird!

Ed Corey
Inventory Biologist, NC Division of Parks and Recreation
NC Dept. of Natural and Cultural Resources
919 841 4037 Office
919 208 7864 Mobile
<Ed.Corey...><mailto:<Ed.Corey...>

12700 Bayleaf Church Road | Raleigh, North Carolina 27614

Email correspondence to and from this address is subject to the North Carolina Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.

From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> On Behalf Of Kevin Hudson
Sent: Saturday, October 20, 2018 4:22 PM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: [External] hudsonian godwit at north pond salt marsh trail - 4 pm EDT

CAUTION: External email. Do not click links or open attachments unless verified. Send all suspicious email as an attachment to Report Spam.<mailto:<report.spam...>

Seen on beach this morning - i know lots of folks w wings over water were chasing it earlier.

kevin hudson
raleigh NC

 

Back to top
Date: 10/20/18 1:22 pm
From: Kevin Hudson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: hudsonian godwit at north pond salt marsh trail - 4 pm EDT
Seen on beach this morning - i know lots of folks w wings over water were
chasing it earlier.

kevin hudson
raleigh NC

 

Back to top
Date: 10/20/18 10:38 am
From: Peter Stangel <peter...>
Subject: Phinizy Swamp Warbler Wave
It was a magical morning with warblers today at Phinizy Swamp in Augusta, just across the River from South Carolina. Most of the action was on the trail around the Equalization Pond. This trail is elevated about 15' and is bordered by second growth hardwoods as well as tall pines and hardwoods. Had 13 species and spectacular eye-level or lower views.

At the far end of the pond, where the dirt road leads to the water treatment plant, there is a small Bradford pear maybe 20' tall. Its leaves have turned dark. At one point, I had five Cape Mays, 2 Parulas, 1 Tennesse, 1 Magnolia, and a Red-winged Blackbird simultaneously in view.

Full list: Black-and-white (3), Tennessee (2), Common Yellowthroat (5), American Redstart (5), Cape May (6, at least), Parula (10), Magnolia (4), Bay-breast (1), Blackpoll (1-amazing views; could even see yellow feet), Blackburnian (1), Palm (20+), Pine (6), Myrtle (5). I wish the Phinizy bird photographers had been with me-they would have been in heaven.

Peter Stangel-Aiken, SC
Subscribe for free to The Birding Wire, the weekly news service about birds, birding, and conservation: birdingwire.com



 

Back to top
Date: 10/20/18 10:37 am
From: Peter Stangel <peter...>
Subject: Warbler Wave at Phinizy Swamp
It was a magical morning with warblers today at Phinizy Swamp in Augusta, just across the River from South Carolina. Most of the action was on the trail around the Equalization Pond. This trail is elevated about 15' and is bordered by second growth hardwoods as well as tall pines and hardwoods. Had 13 species and spectacular eye-level or lower views.

At the far end of the pond, where the dirt road leads to the water treatment plant, there is a small Bradford pear maybe 20' tall. Its leaves have turned dark. At one point, I had five Cape Mays, 2 Parulas, 1 Tennesse, 1 Magnolia, and a Red-winged Blackbird simultaneously in view.

Full list: Black-and-white (3), Tennessee (2), Common Yellowthroat (5), American Redstart (5), Cape May (6, at least), Parula (10), Magnolia (4), Bay-breast (1), Blackpoll (1-amazing views; could even see yellow feet), Blackburnian (1), Palm (20+), Pine (6), Myrtle (5). I wish the Phinizy bird photographers had been with me-they would have been in heaven.

Peter Stangel-Aiken, SC
Subscribe for free to The Birding Wire, the weekly news service about birds, birding, and conservation: birdingwire.com



 

Back to top
Date: 10/20/18 10:34 am
From: Will Cook <cwcook...>
Subject: Messages not getting through
There seems to have been a problem with some messages not going through
to Carolinabirds yesterday/today. If you send one that disappeared into
the ether, please try again.

--
Will Cook - Durham, NC
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__carolinanature.com_&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=559OvyaaI6C_jCQeEVXwpSDynBlGWKxhdnloEG0STZM&s=X4Zlevg3BTIhdIZTmtVf77mYIA6k5JUuBlsPwkUJhfM&e=
 

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Date: 10/19/18 1:42 pm
From: Will Cook <cwcook...>
Subject: Re: Politics in Carolina Birds....
Please no discussion of politics on Carolinabirds unless it's something directly related to birds or birding. And we would also appreciate a stop to the "Amen" messages that don't add anything. If you would like to discuss politics, please find a more appropriate forum or create your own.

Posting Guidlines

When sending messages to Carolinabirds, please:

Only post messages with subject matter that relates directly to birds and birding in the Carolinas. Try to avoid discussing related subjects such as hunting, cats, politics, and general conservation issues. While these are important topics, there are many newsgroups and other forums where these can be discussed. Carolinabirds needs to maintain its focus for it to remain useful.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.carolinanature.com_birds_cbirds.html&d=DwIGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=pkvODtm3yKkA2A-J-i3I7MgDseyh4bSSfG1vibqnhEA&s=8P3p9OJ8YHxwV5O85Jll5uBNu8KpBhc4FpjE8VyA4K0&e=

People who continue may lose their posting privileges.

Thanks for keeping Carolinabirds friendly - and please don't feed the trolls!

Will Cook - <Carolinabirds-owner...><mailto:<Carolinabirds-owner...>

--
Will Cook - Durham, NC
www.carolinanature.com<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.carolinanature.com&d=DwIGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=pkvODtm3yKkA2A-J-i3I7MgDseyh4bSSfG1vibqnhEA&s=l34H8Lz9tmBwZDyUn2BzPKRiyxfCShdENJopoKdR_ag&e=>


 

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Date: 10/19/18 1:08 pm
From: Kurt Frieders <gwb_rules...>
Subject: Re: Politics in Carolina Birds....
Amen to those that have had enough of the recent politics on Carolina Birds. It really hasn’t been politics, it has simply been Trump bashing. I don’t get why a small subset of left wing birders would want to alienate over half of the population. Both of the Carolinas went for Trump. North Carolina by 4, and South Carolina by 15. It seems their Trump bashing should be saved for MSNBC and the Huffington Post. Whether you like the president or not, politics should be kept off of a website about birds. That appears to be something the left is incapable of doing.


Kurt Frieders
Myrtle Beach

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 10/19/18 10:01 am
From: Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Marsh Wren - no
This morning I checked Clark’s Creek Nature Preserve for the Marsh Wren. Although I could not find the wren, birding was good. Cape May Warblers, Palm Warblers, a RC Kinglet, and Meadowlarks were some of the good birds I saw this morning. A link to the complete list is below.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S49295655&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=lh0LixtoJU4wCDlUWSDHhTf7qeLIgbxwOcgFcZX4lzQ&s=rKPpB506ewqEi8UDIyoVIcPPnyW2Yslu41EnqGHkgs8&e=

Anne



Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 10/19/18 9:26 am
From: Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Politics on Carolina Bird
I am sure that information would be available from other sources w/o the
need to put it on Carolinabirds.

Dennis Forsythe
Charleston, SC

On Fri, Oct 19, 2018 at 11:54 AM Bill Guion <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> I suspect that most of us agree with this sentiment, but then I also
> suspect that most of us won't agree on what "political views" are. And that
> is the problem with a guideline such as "don't discuss political issues
> here".
>
> To be really absurd, suppose an individual wanted to buy the Great Smokey
> Mountains and bar access to any part of it other than the Blue Ridge
> Parkway. Surely birders would want to know about that, and what better
> place to make that known than Carolina Birds. Is that political? Where are
> the politics?
>
> If, instead of an individual, the North Carolina legislature wanted to do
> the same thing. Would it then be political because it is a legislature
> rather than an individual? Does the action change meaning because of the
> person(s) behind the action?
>
> I'm just trying to point out the difficulty in defining what a political
> issue is. Be careful here.
>
> -----===== Bill =====-----
>
> > On Oct 18, 2018, at 9:34 PM, Caroline Harvey (via carolinabirds Mailing
> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> >
> > I am tired of using this excellent birding service to voice political
> views.
> > Take it to Facebook!
> > Please could the moderator take appropriate action. This is not the
> first time for some of these offenders.
> >
> > Simon. Harvey
> > Simpsonville, SC
> > --
> > Caroline and Simon Harvey
> > Simpsonville, SC
>
> --
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>

 

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Date: 10/19/18 9:25 am
From: Steve Compton <scompton1251...>
Subject: Re: Politics on Carolina Bird
Folks,

I think Bill makes a good point. I avoid partisan politics on this forum, but I have noticed that most of the objections to "political" postings come from our more conservative folks. In the birding community we must advocate for the environment, so certain political postings are appropriate and inevitable. There is a fine line here of consideration, civility, and taste. But censoring all postings because they make a few uncomfortable would go too far. If we grow complacent about the environment, we will lose it.

Steve Compton
Greenville, SC

Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
On 19 Oct 2018 11:53 am, Bill Guion <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I suspect that most of us agree with this sentiment, but then I also suspect that most of us won't agree on what "political views" are. And that is the problem with a guideline such as "don't discuss political issues here".
>
> To be really absurd, suppose an individual wanted to buy the Great Smokey Mountains and bar access to any part of it other than the Blue Ridge Parkway. Surely birders would want to know about that, and what better place to make that known than Carolina Birds. Is that political? Where are the politics?
>
> If, instead of an individual, the North Carolina legislature wanted to do the same thing. Would it then be political because it is a legislature rather than an individual? Does the action change meaning because of the person(s) behind the action?
>
> I'm just trying to point out the difficulty in defining what a political issue is. Be careful here.
>
>      -----===== Bill =====-----
>
> > On Oct 18, 2018, at 9:34 PM, Caroline Harvey (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> >
> > I am tired of using this excellent birding service to voice political views.
> > Take it to Facebook!
> > Please could the moderator take appropriate action.  This is not the first time for some of these offenders.
> >
> > Simon. Harvey
> > Simpsonville, SC
> > --
> > Caroline and Simon Harvey
> > Simpsonville, SC
>
 

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Date: 10/19/18 8:54 am
From: Bill Guion (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Politics on Carolina Bird
I suspect that most of us agree with this sentiment, but then I also suspect that most of us won't agree on what "political views" are. And that is the problem with a guideline such as "don't discuss political issues here".

To be really absurd, suppose an individual wanted to buy the Great Smokey Mountains and bar access to any part of it other than the Blue Ridge Parkway. Surely birders would want to know about that, and what better place to make that known than Carolina Birds. Is that political? Where are the politics?

If, instead of an individual, the North Carolina legislature wanted to do the same thing. Would it then be political because it is a legislature rather than an individual? Does the action change meaning because of the person(s) behind the action?

I'm just trying to point out the difficulty in defining what a political issue is. Be careful here.

-----===== Bill =====-----

> On Oct 18, 2018, at 9:34 PM, Caroline Harvey (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I am tired of using this excellent birding service to voice political views.
> Take it to Facebook!
> Please could the moderator take appropriate action. This is not the first time for some of these offenders.
>
> Simon. Harvey
> Simpsonville, SC
> --
> Caroline and Simon Harvey
> Simpsonville, SC

 

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Date: 10/19/18 6:48 am
From: John Scavetto <jscavetto...>
Subject: Re: Politics on Carolina Bird
Amen!

John Scavetto
Charlotte, NC
704-989-6763-C
^---^
(@ @)
v
( _ ^ ( _ )
" " \\

Sent from my IPhone 6S


> On Oct 19, 2018, at 7:19 AM, Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Amen!
>
> Dennis Forsythe
>
>> On Thu, Oct 18, 2018 at 9:35 PM Caroline Harvey <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>> I am tired of using this excellent birding service to voice political views.
>> Take it to Facebook!
>> Please could the moderator take appropriate action. This is not the first time for some of these offenders.
>>
>> Simon. Harvey
>> Simpsonville, SC
>> --
>> Caroline and Simon Harvey
>> Simpsonville, SC
>
>
> --
> Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
> South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
> South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
> Emeritus Professor of Biology
> The Citadel
> 171 Moultrie St,
> Charleston, SC 29409
> 843.795.3996-home
> 843.953.7264-fax
> 843.708.1605-cell
> <dennis.forsythe...>

 

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Date: 10/19/18 6:14 am
From: \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Watauga County migrants this morning, 19 October 2018
Birders,

I had a few interesting migrants on my morning walk around my property located at 3,400 ft elevation in northern Watauga County.

White-eyed Vireo: first year bird seen well in a thicket. This is a rare migrant at my place. I’ve seen about a half dozen in ten years of birding here and this is my latest fall record by over a month.

Gray-cheeked Thrush: Nice view of a single bird flushed up from the ground. My first sighting this fall (average several/year during fall migration).

Very noteworthy was a Common Nighthawk seen on 17 October flying over my house at around 2 pm. My latest record (and first October record) in over 50 years of birding in North Carolina.

My eBird list for today follows:



Echo Valley Farm
Oct 19, 2018
7:45 AM
Traveling
0.75 miles
60 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.8.1 Build 4

1 Red-tailed Hawk
1 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
2 Red-bellied Woodpecker
1 Downy Woodpecker
1 Hairy Woodpecker
1 Pileated Woodpecker
1 Eastern Phoebe
1 White-eyed Vireo
2 Blue-headed Vireo
2 Blue Jay
6 American Crow
2 Common Raven
3 Carolina Chickadee
4 Tufted Titmouse
3 White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern)
2 Carolina Wren
2 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
3 Eastern Bluebird (Eastern)
1 Gray-cheeked Thrush
2 American Robin
1 Gray Catbird
2 American Goldfinch
2 Field Sparrow
1 Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored)
2 White-throated Sparrow
1 Song Sparrow
1 Swamp Sparrow
2 Eastern Towhee (Red-eyed)
1 Northern Cardinal
1 Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Number of Taxa: 30


Merrill Lynch
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 10/19/18 4:59 am
From: Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Gray-cheeked T & RB Grosbeak - Outer Banks, NC
Good Morning,

I just witnessed 2 Gray-cheeked Thrushes side by side at my backyard
cascading bird baths! These elusive dull Thrushes have been brightening
the past three days in my yard in Southern Shores, NC. In addition, and in
close proximity, was a juvenile (dull) Rose-breasted Grosbeak. It too came
to my bird bath.

Also, yesterday afternoon I got to see an Ovenbird walking in my yard and
was surprised when it picked up a sunflower seed to eat. Cool... and
unusual?

So great to bird in the dim morning light on a crisp day with a cup of
coffee in hand.

Yes!

Jim Gould
Southern Shores, NC

 

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Date: 10/19/18 4:20 am
From: Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Politics on Carolina Bird
Amen!

Dennis Forsythe

On Thu, Oct 18, 2018 at 9:35 PM Caroline Harvey <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> I am tired of using this excellent birding service to voice political
> views.
> Take it to Facebook!
> Please could the moderator take appropriate action. This is not the first
> time for some of these offenders.
>
> Simon. Harvey
> Simpsonville, SC
> --
> Caroline and Simon Harvey
> Simpsonville, SC
>


--
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>

 

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Date: 10/18/18 8:03 pm
From: Loren Hintz <ldhintz...>
Subject: Birding spots on US 70 east
I took a quick drive East today 10/18 to visit some ebird HotSpots near US 70. There were lots of piles of junk removed from homes and some spots near rivers were still closed. At Oriental I saw on Yellow-bellied Sapsucker and a number of Palm Warblers. On the water laughing gulls, cormorants and one loon. From Loren Hintz Chapel Hill, NC
 

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Date: 10/18/18 7:15 pm
From: Cherrie Sneed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Fort Lamar Heritage Preserve now an Ebird Hotspot
Dennis,

I used the new Hotspot name today and found a few birds at Fort Lamar. The
best was a Red-breasted Nuthatch.

Thanks,
Cherrie

On Wed, Oct 17, 2018 at 7:31 AM Dennis Forsythe <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> All,
>
> After Craig and Pam's great experience at Fort Lamar HP on James Is, I
> requested and Derrick made the site an Ebird Hot Spot.
>
> Dennis
>
> --
> Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
> South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
> South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
> Emeritus Professor of Biology
> The Citadel
> 171 Moultrie St,
> Charleston, SC 29409
> 843.795.3996-home
> 843.953.7264-fax
> 843.708.1605-cell
> <dennis.forsythe...>
>


--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
*Cherrie & Dan Sneed*
Meggett, SC
St. Paul's Parish
Southern Coastal Charleston County
&
Robbinsville, NC
Snowbird Mountains
Graham County

 

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Date: 10/18/18 7:01 pm
From: Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...>
Subject: Political postings on this list serve

Folks,
I agree 100% with Mr. Harvey’s previous post. As a long time member of this list, as I recall, we are not to post issues concerning politics or personal political views. Unfortunately, a few members continually insist on violating these rules. Will, I think it’s time to enforce the rules that you have set forth!
Respectfully,
Wayne K. Forsythe
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 10/18/18 6:35 pm
From: Caroline Harvey (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Politics on Carolina Bird
I am tired of using this excellent birding service to voice political views.
Take it to Facebook!
Please could the moderator take appropriate action. This is not the first
time for some of these offenders.

Simon. Harvey
Simpsonville, SC
--
Caroline and Simon Harvey
Simpsonville, SC

 

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Date: 10/18/18 3:31 pm
From: Steve Johnson <stevejohnson2...>
Subject: thrushes near Santee, SC on 18 October
Hello birders,
We found some interesting thrushes today near Santee.

A total of 4 Wood Thrushes were at Santee NWR, Pine Island Unit. They were in two separate pairs, and each pair was co-located with a Swainson's Thrush, convenient for comparisons. This was flagged "rare" by eBird, I presume because it's late for them.

At Audubon's Francis Beidler Forest Sanctuary, we ran into a Gray-Cheeked Thrush right in front of their visitor center. 95% certain on the ID, but will post pictures later to confirm.

Good birding,
Steve Johnson
visiting SC today
normally found roosting near Fairfax, Virginia


 

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Date: 10/18/18 3:04 pm
From: Bert Fisher (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Return (?) of Rose-breasted Grosbeak
After 25 consecutive days (September 20 - October 14) with at least one
rose-breasted grosbeak (high count of 5) at Vireo Lane, we thought they
were gone for this year. Was therefore surprised, and pleased, to see one
on the fountain at 5:30pm today. This was a young male, and not a bird that
had been seen previously.

On the flip side, have been pleased to see the return of ruby-crowned
kinglets, having seen them the past two days. I guess there is no getting
around that... winter is coming.

Happy birding.

Bert Fisher
Hillsborough, NC

 

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Date: 10/18/18 11:57 am
From: Daniel Kaplan (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lincoln's Sparrow in Durham
Hello all,

I found a Lincoln's at noon today in the Ellerbe Creek Watershed
Association's Beaver Marsh Preserve (behind Compare Foods off Alston Ave
just north of I-85.)

My eBird list with a photo is here:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S49273146&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=f3B_03H0PVXNcIdgGPbaVFsc4eLa61BUZOwjSea5-0M&s=3yumw7dD28-jmc6eRPDWU0TGRmX-VIxH5TfndHchzbw&e=

This would be a needle-in-haystack twitch involving walking some distance
atop a sewer pipe from which side trips are problematic. It's a great spot
though - there was a Rusty Blackbird back there as well.
Feel free to e-mail me offline if anyone wants directions.

Dan Kaplan
Durham

 

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Date: 10/18/18 5:45 am
From: \Koches, Jennifer\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: Proposed threatened listing of eastern Black Rail
Good morning -

Wanted to make sure and remind folks that official comments on this
proposed listing need to be submitted on regulations.gov at:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.regulations.gov_docket-3FD-3DFWS-2DR4-2DES-2D2018-2D0057&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=1CCCQddPXWoPC-7u6F7ucgHaXESZR90Zq9cAS4IE198&s=jPRsbHV6oILu63T-YajLeexhfHCL-NOQcDOkFDYopfk&e=

Additionally, here is the direct link to the Species Status Assessment
Report that many of you may find of interest:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ecos.fws.gov_ServCat_DownloadFile_154242&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=1CCCQddPXWoPC-7u6F7ucgHaXESZR90Zq9cAS4IE198&s=We8jGZZMDF4d6P5OQGMG2lCLqKGpEY7carmlwg9MyHk&e=

Happy to help with any questions!!

Jennifer Muller Koches, Public Affairs Specialist
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
South Carolina Field Office



On Wed, Oct 17, 2018 at 12:51 PM, Frank Enders <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> I searched the internet a few weeks ago.
> The "eastern" Black Rail is everything east of the Rockies. There are
> many records of this species west of the Mississippi, reported in birdlines
> and not in eBird. There are many NWRs which do not allow people to survey
> at night for Black Rails, more records not available.
> Maybe the problem is that the "eastern" Black Rails is not going down the
> tubes in the central US. If you look at the work by the Center For
> Conservation Biology in Williamsburg, you will see the coastal birds ARE in
> very bad shape (though I wonder if anybody has looked at the marshes
> bordering the Choptank River in Maryland---which only had e-Bird records on
> the north side, at a seep from a water treatment plant.)
> What I recently saw in Colfax County, NM was a promising marsh, and then a
> local birder posted Black Rail from the area. Many reservoirs in the west
> have seeps/drainage where Black Rails are found by "hotshot birders", just
> as records in the east are available in Clemson, SC, Raleigh, NC area, and
> Blacksburg, VA area, i.e., the birds is found where birders are active.
> The many alkali lakes in the west may have potential habitat. I believe
> O'Brien with another (now at Cornell) recorded many Black Rails flying
> north near the Gulf Coast in spring; there are salt areas inland which are
> known to have breeding Black Rails, and the species simply is using
> ephemeral habitat which is often not surveyed. (In peninsular Florida, an
> inland salt marsh was key to finding nests.)
> The birds in California have lost habitat (south S.F. Bay). And use
> habitat with woody stuff as well as the open Salicornia-type and shortgrass
> marsh areas. But, not only has a population been discovered near
> Marysville in oak parkland, but a population is also described between that
> and the salt marshes of S.F. Bay (in Sacramento delta).
> I do not know what to think of a map showing the species between the Coast
> Range and the Sierras, except to repeat what I said above about the species
> in the Great Plains: the species probably finds seeps from irrigation and
> definitely there are records from Salton Sea---and how does that not
> connect with the breeders where the Colorado River dries up near Mexico?
> How that map got on the internet, and I had not noticed actual records of
> calling birds except for Salton, I do not know.
>
> If the endangered listing brought money and studies, that would have to be
> OK, but the ESA is a lot like many laws passed by Congress but not funded.
> I have this nagging feeling that the biologists in state and federal
> agencies are part of the problem. It may be that they are not properly
> funded, nor properly supervised, just not motivated to do things which
> might put their "careers" at risk. All of us are time-servers,
> wage-slaves. I am out here working for 40 years just to make ends meet.
> Talk is cheap.
>
> A new ESA, which stops focussing on nitty gritty legal issues (which are,
> in fact, sometimes significant) and started actually putting out contracts
> for private groups to recover species might work better. You cannot get
> money for what is needed by just cutting taxes and giving money to a
> military-industrial complex which is just as incompetent as the rest of
> us. This goes back to the poor governance of the USA.
> (Maybe I should be hopeful that reduced taxes will give birders/scientists
> enough money to do the work themselves?)
>
> A broken record: if we started requiring sewage to be run through a marsh
> (tertiary treatment), we would have a lot of grass and sedge as rail
> habitat (plus cleaner waterways--two birds with one stone).
>
> Also, who raises Black Rails in captivity? I know captive-reared Bobwhite
> have not worked out so well, to bolster their populations, but who really
> knows? At least, captive-reared Black Rails released with radio
> transmitters might give us very interesting data to understand the species.
>
>
>
>
> Frank Enders, Halifax, NC
> ------------------------------
> *From:* <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...>
> on behalf of David Campbell <carolinabirds...>
> *Sent:* Friday, October 5, 2018 1:09 PM
> *To:* Carolina Birds
> *Subject:* Proposed threatened listing of eastern Black Rail
>
> There is a proposal to list the eastern subspecies of Black Rail as
> threatened. Among other topics, they want feedback on possible impacts of
> overattention by bird listers. My guess is that the number of people who
> are careless about their impact, yet are willing to hang out all night in a
> marsh in hopes of adding a species, are relatively few, but that's my guess
> - some of you have a much better idea of the situation.
> *https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.fws.gov_southeast_wildlife_birds_eastern-2Dblack-2Drail_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=1CCCQddPXWoPC-7u6F7ucgHaXESZR90Zq9cAS4IE198&s=wIlB7d7gBKpU-dYS1yZppkS3kPT1kWkFcUB8yPP9hd8&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.fws.gov_southeast_wildlife_birds_eastern-2Dblack-2Drail_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=0-Vn1e1yu0__C05ArkeBsy4WD4ObFlUWpSjWaIXBA3g&s=1RtOBF-CxPDMtNZxPEKMz1WrxFsx_9Vvg7Qn9_3fPp0&e=>
> *
>
> --
> Dr. David Campbell
> Associate Professor, Geology
> Department of Natural Sciences
> Box 7270
> Gardner-Webb University
> Boiling Springs NC 28017
>



--

 

Back to top
Date: 10/18/18 4:55 am
From: Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Dare County/ Buxton Hummingbirds update
where are you


On Wed, Oct 17, 2018 at 1:35 PM ann maddock <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Hi folks
>
> People have been inquiring lately as to the numbers of Ruby-throated
> Himmingbirdswe are seeing in the yard lately.
>
> While early October did not produce the large numbers ( upwards of 30 per
> day) that we normally see during fall hummingbird migration ( which, for
> our location is October), we still had our resident ( from summer) two
> adult males, two adult females, at least one hatch year female and three
> hatch year males. These are still here.
>
> However, with the latest cold front last night, activity has picked up.
> At 5 of the 8 feeders, this morning there were at least two and sometimes
> three at a time arguing and bickering over the feeders. Very little use of
> the numerous flowers- they want the feeders which is usually indicative of
> migrants arriving or getting ready to leave. On last count a little while
> ago there were 14 here.
>
> With WOW banding here on Friday by Susan Campbell, and another cold front
> the night before going down to 64, hopefully there will e done happy people
> to see Susan band a hummingbird!
>
>
> --
> Ask me about my upcoming book - a photo essay of North American and
> Caribbean Hummingbirds!
>
> Ann Maddock
> <am.hummingbird.photos...>
> Hatteras Island, NC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 10/17/18 10:35 am
From: ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Dare County/ Buxton Hummingbirds update
Hi folks

People have been inquiring lately as to the numbers of Ruby-throated
Himmingbirdswe are seeing in the yard lately.

While early October did not produce the large numbers ( upwards of 30 per
day) that we normally see during fall hummingbird migration ( which, for
our location is October), we still had our resident ( from summer) two
adult males, two adult females, at least one hatch year female and three
hatch year males. These are still here.

However, with the latest cold front last night, activity has picked up. At
5 of the 8 feeders, this morning there were at least two and sometimes
three at a time arguing and bickering over the feeders. Very little use of
the numerous flowers- they want the feeders which is usually indicative of
migrants arriving or getting ready to leave. On last count a little while
ago there were 14 here.

With WOW banding here on Friday by Susan Campbell, and another cold front
the night before going down to 64, hopefully there will e done happy people
to see Susan band a hummingbird!


--
Ask me about my upcoming book - a photo essay of North American and
Caribbean Hummingbirds!

Ann Maddock
<am.hummingbird.photos...>
Hatteras Island, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 10/17/18 9:54 am
From: Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: When Donald Trump tries to fix man-made climate change, will birders vote for him?
With the ESA and MBTA drawing their last breathes, the EPA trying to reduce the Hg rules for stack emissions, and the proposed increase in “safe levels” of radiation exposure, I do not think politics can really be ignored if we want birds to be around. Apologies in advance.

Parkin Hunter
Columbia, SC, Garden City Beach and Ridgeway, SC

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 17, 2018, at 12:19 PM, Joe0910 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> How about we leave politics out of the forum? There’s several items I take exception to in your commentary, however, that’s not to be unexpected with any political matter these days.
> Any fall outs today??
>
>
> Sent from ProtonMail Mobile
>
>
>> On Wed, Oct 17, 2018 at 12:07 PM, Frank Enders <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>> A few days ago it occurred to me that Donald Trump may well try to promote his brand of politicians by addressing climate change. So, now he has said there is something there. Maybe he is just trying to pour oil on troubled waters, just trying to reduce voter turnout.
>>
>> Man-made climate change is a big issue for birders. When I told my wife I might vote for Trump if he got off the mark, she began to threaten me.
>> Are we birders going to take "yes" for an answer if Trump starts to change his evil ways? Or will we simply think he is again scamming us? Or, are we going to say he is going in the direction we want, if he starts to reverse stuff he has said and done which has not been appropriate for a decent tomorrow for all of us?
>> I guess I am foolishly hopeful that he is now realizing he needs to do what needs to be done. I hardly care just how we clean up our environment and our future.
>>
>> The latest hurricanes and more disasters are needed for people, especially people living privileged insulated lives to to realize what needs to be done. (Consider the history of gross air and water pollution in the US, and the amelioration we have seen.)
>> I know that some of the people will never "get with the program", but with enough untoward consequences, we may get enough of our "opponents" to join us to have a reasonable chance to fix this mess up.
>>
>> Again, I think Betsy Kane's concerns are reasonable, if overwrought. And, I think/hope the silver lining is that our so-called leaders (politicians including Trump) may be starting to realize reality and perhaps will get on board to do what needs to be done.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 10/17/18 9:51 am
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Proposed threatened listing of eastern Black Rail
I searched the internet a few weeks ago.
The "eastern" Black Rail is everything east of the Rockies. There are many records of this species west of the Mississippi, reported in birdlines and not in eBird. There are many NWRs which do not allow people to survey at night for Black Rails, more records not available.
Maybe the problem is that the "eastern" Black Rails is not going down the tubes in the central US. If you look at the work by the Center For Conservation Biology in Williamsburg, you will see the coastal birds ARE in very bad shape (though I wonder if anybody has looked at the marshes bordering the Choptank River in Maryland---which only had e-Bird records on the north side, at a seep from a water treatment plant.)
What I recently saw in Colfax County, NM was a promising marsh, and then a local birder posted Black Rail from the area. Many reservoirs in the west have seeps/drainage where Black Rails are found by "hotshot birders", just as records in the east are available in Clemson, SC, Raleigh, NC area, and Blacksburg, VA area, i.e., the birds is found where birders are active. The many alkali lakes in the west may have potential habitat. I believe O'Brien with another (now at Cornell) recorded many Black Rails flying north near the Gulf Coast in spring; there are salt areas inland which are known to have breeding Black Rails, and the species simply is using ephemeral habitat which is often not surveyed. (In peninsular Florida, an inland salt marsh was key to finding nests.)
The birds in California have lost habitat (south S.F. Bay). And use habitat with woody stuff as well as the open Salicornia-type and shortgrass marsh areas. But, not only has a population been discovered near Marysville in oak parkland, but a population is also described between that and the salt marshes of S.F. Bay (in Sacramento delta).
I do not know what to think of a map showing the species between the Coast Range and the Sierras, except to repeat what I said above about the species in the Great Plains: the species probably finds seeps from irrigation and definitely there are records from Salton Sea---and how does that not
connect with the breeders where the Colorado River dries up near Mexico? How that map got on the internet, and I had not noticed actual records of calling birds except for Salton, I do not know.

If the endangered listing brought money and studies, that would have to be OK, but the ESA is a lot like many laws passed by Congress but not funded. I have this nagging feeling that the biologists in state and federal agencies are part of the problem. It may be that they are not properly funded, nor properly supervised, just not motivated to do things which might put their "careers" at risk. All of us are time-servers, wage-slaves. I am out here working for 40 years just to make ends meet. Talk is cheap.

A new ESA, which stops focussing on nitty gritty legal issues (which are, in fact, sometimes significant) and started actually putting out contracts for private groups to recover species might work better. You cannot get money for what is needed by just cutting taxes and giving money to a military-industrial complex which is just as incompetent as the rest of us. This goes back to the poor governance of the USA.
(Maybe I should be hopeful that reduced taxes will give birders/scientists enough money to do the work themselves?)

A broken record: if we started requiring sewage to be run through a marsh (tertiary treatment), we would have a lot of grass and sedge as rail habitat (plus cleaner waterways--two birds with one stone).

Also, who raises Black Rails in captivity? I know captive-reared Bobwhite have not worked out so well, to bolster their populations, but who really knows? At least, captive-reared Black Rails released with radio transmitters might give us very interesting data to understand the species.




Frank Enders, Halifax, NC
________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of David Campbell <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Friday, October 5, 2018 1:09 PM
To: Carolina Birds
Subject: Proposed threatened listing of eastern Black Rail

There is a proposal to list the eastern subspecies of Black Rail as threatened. Among other topics, they want feedback on possible impacts of overattention by bird listers. My guess is that the number of people who are careless about their impact, yet are willing to hang out all night in a marsh in hopes of adding a species, are relatively few, but that's my guess - some of you have a much better idea of the situation.
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.fws.gov_southeast_wildlife_birds_eastern-2Dblack-2Drail_&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=opbcZpHpU_-YGplm72lwPWLWH-xIzSc3VsznikHmAcM&s=DbE61FOtd1yQ6jRY4OsgQV4Fp8uksWu9EuwKmeKP7Kw&e=<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.fws.gov_southeast_wildlife_birds_eastern-2Dblack-2Drail_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=0-Vn1e1yu0__C05ArkeBsy4WD4ObFlUWpSjWaIXBA3g&s=1RtOBF-CxPDMtNZxPEKMz1WrxFsx_9Vvg7Qn9_3fPp0&e=>

--
Dr. David Campbell
Associate Professor, Geology
Department of Natural Sciences
Box 7270
Gardner-Webb University
Boiling Springs NC 28017

 

Back to top
Date: 10/17/18 9:20 am
From: Joe0910 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: When Donald Trump tries to fix man-made climate change, will birders vote for him?
How about we leave politics out of the forum? There’s several items I take exception to in your commentary, however, that’s not to be unexpected with any political matter these days.
Any fall outs today??

Sent from ProtonMail Mobile

On Wed, Oct 17, 2018 at 12:07 PM, Frank Enders <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> A few days ago it occurred to me that Donald Trump may well try to promote his brand of politicians by addressing climate change. So, now he has said there is something there. Maybe he is just trying to pour oil on troubled waters, just trying to reduce voter turnout.
>
> Man-made climate change is a big issue for birders. When I told my wife I might vote for Trump if he got off the mark, she began to threaten me.
> Are we birders going to take "yes" for an answer if Trump starts to change his evil ways? Or will we simply think he is again scamming us? Or, are we going to say he is going in the direction we want, if he starts to reverse stuff he has said and done which has not been appropriate for a decent tomorrow for all of us?
> I guess I am foolishly hopeful that he is now realizing he needs to do what needs to be done. I hardly care just how we clean up our environment and our future.
>
> The latest hurricanes and more disasters are needed for people, especially people living privileged insulated lives to to realize what needs to be done. (Consider the history of gross air and water pollution in the US, and the amelioration we have seen.)
> I know that some of the people will never "get with the program", but with enough untoward consequences, we may get enough of our "opponents" to join us to have a reasonable chance to fix this mess up.
>
> Again, I think Betsy Kane's concerns are reasonable, if overwrought. And, I think/hope the silver lining is that our so-called leaders (politicians including Trump) may be starting to realize reality and perhaps will get on board to do what needs to be done.
>
> Frank Enders, Halifax, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 10/17/18 9:07 am
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: When Donald Trump tries to fix man-made climate change, will birders vote for him?
A few days ago it occurred to me that Donald Trump may well try to promote his brand of politicians by addressing climate change. So, now he has said there is something there. Maybe he is just trying to pour oil on troubled waters, just trying to reduce voter turnout.

Man-made climate change is a big issue for birders. When I told my wife I might vote for Trump if he got off the mark, she began to threaten me.
Are we birders going to take "yes" for an answer if Trump starts to change his evil ways? Or will we simply think he is again scamming us? Or, are we going to say he is going in the direction we want, if he starts to reverse stuff he has said and done which has not been appropriate for a decent tomorrow for all of us?
I guess I am foolishly hopeful that he is now realizing he needs to do what needs to be done. I hardly care just how we clean up our environment and our future.

The latest hurricanes and more disasters are needed for people, especially people living privileged insulated lives to to realize what needs to be done. (Consider the history of gross air and water pollution in the US, and the amelioration we have seen.)
I know that some of the people will never "get with the program", but with enough untoward consequences, we may get enough of our "opponents" to join us to have a reasonable chance to fix this mess up.

Again, I think Betsy Kane's concerns are reasonable, if overwrought. And, I think/hope the silver lining is that our so-called leaders (politicians including Trump) may be starting to realize reality and perhaps will get on board to do what needs to be done.






Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 10/17/18 8:48 am
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hurricanes and birds and global warming
Metaphorically, we all need need to take a chill pill. Canada's legalization of pot suggests a way. Or, slow and steady pressure.

Seriously, let everybody, especially our self-promoting politicians, take a deep breath and relax.

After the hurricanes in the West Indies, plant and animal life came back quickly. Impressive localized damages, or even slight, continued damage is just the symptom we need to cure.

The problem, as Ms. Kane pointed out, is not in the natural world, but the unnatural world and the failure of voters, the political system and so forth.

I should stop right here.

[For example, New Bern lacks a gauge on the Neuse, which might give warnings of a wind or tide-generated flood. The gauges are upstream--i.e., record AFTER the floods!
Another example, Ms. Kane and my daughter live 10 feet above sea level. Not enough for the so-called 500-year floods which occur every decade now. Are the realtors required to provide (insert into the deed?) information on major repairs done to properties (say one fourth the assessed value)? Could any voters or politicians get such a requirement into law, against the super-duper realtor lobbies? Are buyers to expect "moral" property owners to inform them of actual history of flood/storm damage?
Why don't we just stop all development below 50 foot (30?) elevation? I was surprised to read parts of Wilmington are 35 feet above sea level. Why didn't the city fathers act on the facts?

It is pushing on a rope.
It is illegal to buy votes, but give money, anonymously even, and you will get to buy votes. (How is it even possible that we allow lawbreakers to live?)
It is unresponsive government. It is a war on poverty which never was prosecuted to victory.
It is whitewash and greenwash.
It is a two party system which disenfranchises the majority of voters. Choose red meat or white. Choose death or taxes.
It is no easy way to recall a politician--we should forget the details of impeachment. Just put it to a vote after a petition.
It is choosing self-promoting people as candidates, instead of just randomly choosing from the population; randomly chosen officials probably could do a hell of a lot better than the so-called (self-)elected officials.
It is a failed state, this USA. We talk about others, failed states (Congo, Somalia, Saudi Arabia, etc.) but they are merely bad in comparison to our failed state,and we (and Europe, and the rulers of those worse countries) have helped make them fail.
The only thing is, our imperialism (and genocide, thieving from native Americans and blacks) and "respect" for money/property, has made the US so rich that the poor of the world realize they are better off as wage-slaves here than in their impoverished s___-hole countries. (Yes, they are s___-hole countries, but how did they get that way?)

Now I will take a deep breath, and go back to my own immorality and criminality, just as we all do. Seriously, we neem major surgery to this country, but bit by bit. Hopefully, as in my next post, there is a way, which requires enough damage and loss to get the public's attention.]


Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 10/17/18 8:12 am
From: James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Fort Lamar Heritage Preserve now an Ebird Hotspot
The name of the hotspot south of Charleston on Rantowles Creek where the
Roseate Spoonbills are usually found is called Waldon Road.

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC


On Wed, Oct 17, 2018 at 10:07 AM Pamela Ford <robinlikesong...>
wrote:

> Thanks Dennis!
> Craig Watson and I have moved our eBird lists over to the Hotspot, I
> encourage others to do so.
> Also, the Southern Charleston, Rantowles, Roseate Spoonbill roosting
> site, is also a Hotspot now if fellow birders could move their lists over
> there too.
> Thanks
> Pam Ford
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Oct 17, 2018, at 7:29 AM, Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing
> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> All,
>
> After Craig and Pam's great experience at Fort Lamar HP on James Is, I
> requested and Derrick made the site an Ebird Hot Spot.
>
> Dennis
>
> --
> Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
> South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
> South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
> Emeritus Professor of Biology
> The Citadel
> 171 Moultrie St,
> Charleston, SC 29409
> 843.795.3996-home
> 843.953.7264-fax
> 843.708.1605-cell
> <dennis.forsythe...>
>
>

--

*Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul - and sings the
tunes without the words - and never stops at all.*

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 10/17/18 8:08 am
From: Brian B (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Dare county
Yesterday's big day with 8 excited people tallied 125 sp. there was a clay colored sparrow with field and sav sparrow at pea island n dike. Eurasian wigeon at n pond by blind. No rare plover and missed the white rumped someone else had that morning. Rose breasted grosbeak on roanoke island was a nice surprise. As was a gray cheeked thrush nfc at bodie that all heard! Seaside and nelsons about ten feet away at Oregon inlet marina anchor was photographicly amazing! Howling red wolves were nice with an owl hat trick at alligator river.

In between rain today at jockeys ridge soundside just found another clay colored with several field sparrow including one with white wings. Pics of both. Hope todays trips fare well and find much.

Brian Bockhahn
Durham NC
 

Back to top
Date: 10/17/18 7:17 am
From: Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Fort Lamar Heritage Preserve now an Ebird Hotspot
Thanks Dennis!
Craig Watson and I have moved our eBird lists over to the Hotspot, I encourage others to do so.
Also, the Southern Charleston, Rantowles, Roseate Spoonbill roosting site, is also a Hotspot now if fellow birders could move their lists over there too.
Thanks
Pam Ford

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 17, 2018, at 7:29 AM, Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> All,
>
> After Craig and Pam's great experience at Fort Lamar HP on James Is, I requested and Derrick made the site an Ebird Hot Spot.
>
> Dennis
>
> --
> Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
> South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
> South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
> Emeritus Professor of Biology
> The Citadel
> 171 Moultrie St,
> Charleston, SC 29409
> 843.795.3996-home
> 843.953.7264-fax
> 843.708.1605-cell
> <dennis.forsythe...>

 

Back to top
Date: 10/17/18 5:15 am
From: Bill Majoros, Ph.D. <william.majoros...>
Subject: Good weekend birding around Durham
The cold front this past weekend reduced the mosquitoes enough that I was able to do some birding finally. There was a lot of bird activity throughout the day both Sat & Sun.

I was happy to see a Kestrel at the Butner Gamelands Depot on Brickhouse Road again. I haven't seen one there in several years.

Locations: Eno River SP, Brumley Nature Preserve, Sandy Creek City Park, Butner Depot, Northgate City Park

FOS White-throated sparrow
FOS Sapsuckers
FOS Golden-crowned kinglet
Cape May warblers (2)
Red-eyed vireo
Blue-headed vireo
Many Yellow-rumped warblers
American Kestrel
Common Yellowthroats
Many Pine warblers
Indigo buntings
Many blue jays
Many Northern flickers
Many phobes
Many Eastern bluebirds
Red-headed woodpecker
Red-bellied woodpecker
Pileated woodpecker
Downy woodpecker
Chimney swifts
Cooper's hawk
Chipping sparrow
Song sparrow
Rufous-sided towhees
Brown Thrasher
Many Northern Cardinals
Carolina wren
Chickadees & Titmice
House sparrows
Mockingbird
Canada geese
Mourning dove
Belted kingfisher
Catbird
White-breasted nuthatch
American robins

---

Bill Majoros, Ph.D.
Durham, NC
ThirdBirdFromTheSun.com

 

Back to top
Date: 10/17/18 4:30 am
From: Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fort Lamar Heritage Preserve now an Ebird Hotspot
All,

After Craig and Pam's great experience at Fort Lamar HP on James Is, I
requested and Derrick made the site an Ebird Hot Spot.

Dennis

--
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>

 

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