Carolinabirds
Received From Subject
2/17/18 4:40 pm David Weesner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Really good birds
2/17/18 12:34 pm \J. Anderson\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Pilot Mountain, NC CBC Results
2/17/18 11:29 am Steve Compton <scompton1251...> Tufted Duck relocated BullsIsland
2/17/18 11:05 am Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Greater White-fronted Geese
2/17/18 10:49 am Birding Poet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Long-tailed Ducks?
2/17/18 10:33 am Birding Poet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Long-tailed Ducks?
2/17/18 6:43 am Jacob Farmer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Black-legged Kittiwake - Wrightsville Beach - NC
2/17/18 5:07 am \kathy <khart123...>\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Common goldeneye
2/16/18 8:59 pm Cherrie Sneed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Common Goldeneyes, Ridgeville, SC
2/16/18 4:21 pm David Weesner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> North Topsail Beach, New River inlet
2/16/18 7:36 am \Johnson, Matthew\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: Common Goldeneyes, Ridgeville, SC
2/15/18 8:11 pm David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> VESPER Sparrows (lots) - Donnelley WMA, SC
2/15/18 5:41 pm Sam Cooper <dmcooper2...> Eared Grebe - Craven County, NC
2/15/18 4:24 pm David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bear Island WMA
2/15/18 2:22 pm Keith McCullough (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> eBird and the GBBC for South Carolina
2/15/18 12:06 pm WALTER KENT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Ross's Goose
2/14/18 11:29 am Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Golden Eagle on Alligator Refuge
2/14/18 9:27 am Alan Gamache <bird...> Common Merganser / New Bern NC
2/14/18 7:07 am <jkestner...> Looking for local guide
2/14/18 7:04 am Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> OBX next week
2/14/18 5:23 am jcox3222 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re great kiskadee
2/13/18 6:23 pm David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Great Kiskadee at Bear Island WMA, SC?????
2/13/18 5:56 pm Eric Harrold (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Wilkes/Yadkin waterfowl today
2/13/18 5:44 pm Kay Grinnell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Peregrine Falcon - Hilton Head Update
2/13/18 4:26 pm Paul Heitmann (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Peregrine Falcon - Hilton Head Update
2/13/18 12:05 pm <scompton1251...> RE: New posting to Birding Bulls about rare Eurasian duck, a Tufted Duck
2/13/18 6:47 am Paul Heitmann (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Peregrine Falcon - February 12, 2018 - Hilton Head Island, SC
2/12/18 4:08 pm Loren Hintz <ldhintz...> Woodcocks at Mason Farm, Chapel Hill
2/12/18 3:22 pm Eric Harrold (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Canvasback, Tree Swallows in Boomer
2/12/18 1:32 pm Karen Lebing (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Thick-billed murre
2/12/18 10:30 am <hilton...> Hilton Pond 11/01/17 (Late Fall Migrants)
2/11/18 7:48 pm Travis Knowles <hyrax...> Razorbill at Huntington Beach State Park, SC
2/11/18 5:03 pm Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lake Crabtree birds today
2/11/18 4:55 pm Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Feb. 10 Pelagic Report
2/11/18 3:18 pm Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> False claim of SC high count for Short-eared Owls
2/11/18 1:12 pm Robert Snowden (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Thick-billed Murre, Kure Beach
2/11/18 12:21 pm Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Tufted Duck still present at Bulls Island
2/11/18 11:20 am Robert Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Rough-legged Hawk
2/11/18 9:00 am Birding Poet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Reddish Egret Pitt St. Mount Pleasant, SC
2/11/18 8:24 am Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Rough-legged Hawk
2/11/18 7:39 am James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Reddish Egret Pitt St. Mount Pleasant, SC
2/10/18 4:21 pm Christine Stoughton-Root (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Mattamuskeet
2/10/18 1:55 pm Steve Compton <scompton1251...> Re: GOLDEN EAGLE @ Seabrook Island, SC
2/10/18 10:59 am David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> GOLDEN EAGLE @ Seabrook Island, SC
2/10/18 4:49 am Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Mattamuskeet and other birds
2/9/18 3:06 pm Jelmer Poelstra (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Rough-legged Hawk still at AR, no luck with Snowy Owl
2/9/18 1:56 pm David Disher (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Red-billed Tropicbird
2/9/18 1:30 pm Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Birding Clark's Creeek Nature Preserve
2/9/18 11:49 am Karen Lebing (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Snowy Owl
2/9/18 10:17 am Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Snowy Owl on Pea island
2/9/18 5:44 am Ritch Lilly <ritch...> Eurasian Wigeon and Bachman's Sparrows at SCR
2/9/18 5:17 am Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fox Sparrow
2/9/18 4:22 am Robert Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Alligator River, NC, February 8, hawks
2/8/18 12:18 pm cindy daudelin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Pine Siskins Iredell County
2/8/18 9:29 am Alan Gamache <bird...> Pine Siskins / New Bern, NC
2/8/18 6:27 am Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Dovekie at Wrightsville Beach, NC
2/8/18 6:04 am James Poling (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> First of the Season Pine Siskins at our feeders in the backyard, Black Mountain, NC
2/8/18 5:10 am Jeff Blalock <jcbabirder...> National Audubon Society Bird Apps
2/7/18 10:59 am David Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> DSLR Birdingwatching Setup For Sale
2/6/18 4:00 pm John Fussell <jofuss...> a Henslow's Sparrow search
2/6/18 12:54 pm James Poling (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> American Black Duck, Owen Park, Swannanoa, NC. today
2/6/18 8:54 am Keith McCullough (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Red-shafted Flicker, Johns Island, SC
2/6/18 8:49 am David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Red-shafted Flicker, Johns Island, SC
2/6/18 7:56 am Keith McCullough (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Red-shafted Flicker, Johns Island, SC
2/6/18 7:27 am <kde...> Re: Red-shafted Flicker, Johns Island, SC
2/6/18 6:53 am Steve Compton <scompton1251...> Re: Red-shafted Flicker, Johns Island, SC
2/6/18 6:39 am David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Red-shafted Flicker, Johns Island, SC
2/5/18 2:59 pm David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> New posting to Birding Bulls about rare Eurasian duck, a Tufted Duck
2/5/18 9:27 am Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Tufted Duck on Bulls not seen today
2/5/18 9:26 am Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> new ebird iphone mobile version includes distance and tracks where you walked
2/5/18 9:18 am Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> No Rough-legged Hawk ARNWR.
2/5/18 8:37 am Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Feb. 3 Pelagic Birding off Hatteras
2/5/18 7:40 am Chris Feeney (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Tufted Duck on Bulls not seen today
2/5/18 4:08 am Jeff Blalock <jcbabirder...> Fwd: [Va-bird] eBird Trip Summary -- Trip
2/4/18 4:16 pm Caroline Harvey (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Simpsonville, SC - RUSTY BLACKBIRDS
2/4/18 2:24 pm Ron & ann <rashahid...> Common Goldeneyes, Ridgeville, SC
2/4/18 12:00 pm Alan Gamache <bird...> Eurasian Wigeon, Mattamuskeet
2/4/18 11:14 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Tufted Duck on Bulls not seen today
2/4/18 11:08 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Tufted Duck on Bulls not seen today
2/4/18 10:50 am Jacob Farmer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Rough-legged Hawk - ARNWR - Dare Co - Yes
2/4/18 10:45 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Tufted Duck on Bulls not seen today
2/4/18 10:37 am Jack Rogers <jack...> Re: Tufted Duck on Bulls not seen today
2/4/18 10:30 am Jack Rogers <jack...> Re: Tufted Duck on Bulls not seen today
2/4/18 10:00 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Tufted Duck on Bulls not seen today
2/3/18 6:50 pm Sam Cooper <dmcooper2...> lower Cape Fear River grebes & goldeneyes
2/3/18 6:26 pm Clyde Sorenson <sorenson...> Awesome day at Mattamuskeet and Pungo
2/3/18 6:06 pm Ricky Davis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Good birds in E. N.C. today
2/3/18 6:00 pm David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Tufted Duck on Bulls not seen today
2/3/18 1:21 pm ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Update on ruby throated hummingbirds on Hatteras
2/3/18 9:19 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lake Crabtree, NC, waterbirds picking back up
2/3/18 8:48 am Greg Massey <gmassey001...> 5,000 Ring-necked Ducks
2/3/18 8:11 am Wayne K. Forsythe <wforsythe...> A first fior me!
2/3/18 3:49 am Cherrie Sneed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> MaleCommonGoldeneyes_RidgevillePond_DorchesterCoSC
2/2/18 5:08 pm David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Tufted Duck found on Jack's Creek, Bulls Island, Cape Romain NWR
2/2/18 4:58 pm \kathy <khart123...>\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Alaska birding
2/2/18 4:47 pm Ric Porter <ric...> Re: Article on the impact of feeding birds
2/2/18 3:46 pm David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Tufted Duck, Bulls Island, Cape Romain NWR
2/2/18 3:46 pm David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Tufted Duck, Bulls Island, Cape Romain NWR
2/2/18 1:41 pm \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hurricanes and birds
2/2/18 1:27 pm Jerry <bogey...> Re: Pungo Lake road conditions?
2/2/18 1:11 pm Jacob Farmer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Rough-legged Hawk - Alligator River NWR - Dare County NC
2/2/18 10:31 am Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Beaufort, NC Sandhill Cranes singing and dancing and the new bypass
2/2/18 8:58 am Steve Compton <scompton1251...> Re: Tufted Duck on Bulls Island, Cape Romain NWR
2/2/18 8:54 am James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Tufted Duck on Bulls Island, Cape Romain NWR
2/2/18 8:01 am landaujr (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Pungo Lake road conditions?
2/2/18 6:45 am Jennifer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Article on the impact of feeding birds
2/1/18 7:00 pm Clyde Sorenson <sorenson...> Pungo road conditions?
2/1/18 12:36 pm <badgerboy...> Brookshire Park Bird Walk Saturday 8AM Boone NC
2/1/18 10:08 am Jennifer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fwd: Woodcock program, Harris Lake County Park, Wake County
2/1/18 7:14 am Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...> Hummingbirds wintering in Carolinas
1/31/18 2:31 pm Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Nice loon flight today but few auks
1/31/18 2:27 pm Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Small bird mortality in NC salt marsh during harsh winters
1/31/18 2:05 pm Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Small bird mortality in NC salt marsh during harsh winters
1/31/18 2:00 pm Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Small bird mortality in NC salt marsh during harsh winters
1/31/18 10:01 am The Gaston Gang (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Super Bowl
1/31/18 9:59 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Small bird mortality in NC salt marsh during harsh winters
1/31/18 9:41 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: Small bird mortality in NC salt marsh during harsh winters
1/31/18 9:10 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Small bird mortality in NC salt marsh during harsh winters
1/31/18 7:53 am Lena Gallitano <lbg...> Re: Do feeders keep hummingbirds from migrating south in the fall?
1/31/18 6:48 am David Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Do feeders keep hummingbirds from migrating south in the fall?
1/31/18 5:11 am Gilbert Grant (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Small bird mortality in NC salt marsh during harsh winters
1/30/18 6:48 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Do feeders keep hummingbirds from migrating south in the fall?
1/30/18 6:13 pm Ron <waxwing...> Re: Enders' note and concern plus Ohio Snowy Owls
1/30/18 5:14 pm John Fussell <jofuss...> Do feeders keep hummingbirds from migrating south in the fall?
1/30/18 2:41 pm Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Pine Siskin, Cary NC
1/30/18 12:11 pm Patty Masten (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Enders' note and concern plus Ohio Snowy Owls
1/30/18 11:54 am Mike Turner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Enders' note and concern plus Ohio Snowy Owls
1/30/18 11:45 am Patty Masten (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Enders' note and concern plus Ohio Snowy Owls
1/30/18 11:41 am Ron <waxwing...> Re: Enders' note and concern plus Ohio Snowy Owls
1/30/18 10:20 am Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> >12,000 Razorbills @ Cape Hatteras
1/30/18 7:27 am <ruthgrissom...> Re: Enders' note and concern plus Ohio Snowy Owls
1/30/18 6:58 am Loren Hintz <ldhintz...> Enders' note and concern plus Ohio Snowy Owls
1/30/18 6:44 am Keith McCullough (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Oriole Schedule
1/30/18 6:19 am Clyde Sorenson <sorenson...> What goes around, comes around...
1/30/18 4:25 am Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Oriole Schedule
1/29/18 7:30 pm Krystyna 00 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Sexual harassment. Perhaps too offensive.
1/29/18 6:49 pm Jack Rogers <jack...> Re: Sexual harassment. Perhaps too offensive.
1/29/18 6:40 pm Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...> Re: Sexual harassment. Perhaps too offensive.
1/29/18 6:08 pm Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Sexual harassment. Perhaps too offensive.
1/29/18 4:44 pm Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RR WalMart House Sparrow roost disappears---pest control?
1/29/18 9:20 am Ginny Alfano (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Jack Rogers Dickcissel Post
1/29/18 9:15 am Robert Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Jan. 27 "Pelagic" Trip From Hatteras
1/29/18 8:57 am Ginny Alfano (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> In response to Jack Rogers post, I am camping at Myrtle Beach State Park (site 154 - kitty corner to the Nature Center). The female Dickcissel has been at my feeders everyday for about three weeks. I've also had a female Baltimore Oriole coming to my suet
1/29/18 8:19 am James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Immature Mute Swan Pitt St. Causeway, Mount Pleasant, SC
1/29/18 7:25 am Ron <waxwing...> Re: Pine Siskins Alleghany County
1/29/18 7:05 am Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Razorbills - Dare County, NC Jennette's Pier
1/28/18 4:07 pm Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Jan. 27 "Pelagic" Trip From Hatteras
1/28/18 2:30 pm Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> OBX - Lake Mattamuskeet this Weekend
1/28/18 12:02 pm Ron <waxwing...> Re: Dickcissel-Myrtle Beach SP, Horry co., SC
1/28/18 11:26 am Jack Rogers <jack...> Dickcissel-Myrtle Beach SP, Horry co., SC
1/28/18 8:05 am Lucas Bobay (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Glaucous Gull, Cape Point
1/27/18 4:22 pm Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> 3 Short-eared Owls, Long-billed Curlews, 100s of Marbled Godwits, White Pelicans - Cape Romain NWR
1/27/18 2:50 pm \kathy <khart123...>\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> American woodcock
1/27/18 7:58 am Monty <mec...> Re: Pine Siskins Alleghany County
1/27/18 7:50 am <brbirders...> Pine Siskins Alleghany County
1/27/18 6:12 am <jkestner...> Re: Need a guide in the Outer Banks area.
1/27/18 6:07 am <jkestner...> Need a guide in the Outer Banks area.
1/26/18 7:32 pm Janet & Richard Paulette (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> High Country Audubon newsletter
1/26/18 6:48 am Ben Ringer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Pine Siskin
1/26/18 6:45 am Ben Ringer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Pine Siskin
1/26/18 6:38 am Ben Ringer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Pine Siskin
1/25/18 6:34 pm \Mark McShane\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> King Eider - 2nd Ave Pier, Myrtle Beach SC - 1/13/2018 - Video Post
1/25/18 12:54 pm pjmarkham (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Request for Information
1/25/18 8:49 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: USS North Carolina
1/25/18 7:52 am David Schroder (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> USS North Carolina
1/24/18 7:03 pm Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Something I've never, ever seen before
1/24/18 6:20 pm \Elizabeth Wilkins/vanMontfrans\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Red-necked Grebe, Cape Hatteras
1/24/18 4:32 pm KC Foggin <KCFoggin...> Something I've never, ever seen before
1/24/18 9:06 am Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Space on this weekend's pelagic trip
1/24/18 8:41 am Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Glaucous Gull at Cape Hatteras
1/23/18 3:42 pm WALTER KENT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Ross's Goose
1/22/18 2:07 pm Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Proper channels for reporting Re: Hawks being shot and killed
1/22/18 11:21 am Helms, J <j.chris.helms...> Red-throated Loon at Carolina Beach SP
1/22/18 10:40 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Hawks being shot and killed
1/22/18 10:19 am Helmut Mueller <helmutmueller...> Re: Hawks being shot and killed
1/22/18 9:46 am Will Cook <cwcook...> Fwd: Thick-billed Murre killed by GBBG
1/22/18 9:43 am JILL MIDGETT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Hawks being shot and killed
1/22/18 9:32 am Weiskotten, Kurt <kweiskotten...> Re: Hawks being shot and killed
1/22/18 9:15 am \Millis, Tracy\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: Hawks being shot and killed
1/22/18 8:53 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Hawks being shot and killed
1/22/18 8:49 am Fred Burggraf (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Pine Warbler
1/22/18 8:31 am Kevin Hudson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Long Tailed Duck, wake county nc, hwy 50 beaver dam
1/22/18 8:26 am KEN LIPSHY (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Hawks being shot and killed
1/22/18 8:03 am <scompton1251...> RE: Hawks being shot and killed
1/22/18 7:53 am Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Hawks being shot and killed
1/22/18 7:25 am \Herbert, Teri Lynn\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hawks being shot and killed
1/21/18 6:08 pm Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Razorbills at Cape Point
1/21/18 5:35 pm Bruce Smithson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Ft. Fisher birds this p.m. (New Hanover Cty., NC)
1/21/18 2:52 pm Derb Carter <derbc...> Wrightsville Beach area birds
1/21/18 2:23 pm Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Glaucous Gull, Iceland Gull, Long-tailed Duck - HBSP
1/21/18 11:16 am Robert Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: White-fronted geese at Beasley
1/21/18 10:38 am ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bald Eagle-Hatteras Island
1/21/18 9:41 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Long-tailed Duck at Beaverdam Reservoir, NC
1/21/18 9:14 am Sherry Lane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Thick-billed Murre at Masonboro Inlet
1/21/18 8:47 am Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Two Ross"s Geese Tyrell County, NC
1/21/18 8:31 am Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Razorbills and Manx Shearwaters at Cape Hatteras
1/21/18 8:05 am Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> White-fronted geese at Beasley
1/21/18 5:31 am Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Glaucous Gull at Murrell’s Inlet now
1/21/18 5:25 am rdnc13 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Thick-billed Murre at Coquina Beach
1/20/18 1:44 pm Thea and Mark Sinclair (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> American bittern,Lake Connestee Nature Park, Greenville,SC
1/20/18 6:28 am Lewis Burke (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Eiders
1/19/18 6:50 pm <badgerboy...> Swainson's Hawk Alligator River--milltail road
1/19/18 4:17 pm nicholas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> red-cockaded woodpeckers in Currituck Co. NC, 1/16/2018
1/19/18 3:51 pm Taylor Piephoff (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Charlotte NC Bullock's oriole
1/19/18 3:20 pm piephofft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Charlotte NC Bullock's oriole
1/19/18 1:07 pm KC Foggin <KCFoggin...> Re: Spam
1/19/18 12:32 pm Stu Gibeau <sgibeau...> Spam
1/19/18 7:35 am bruce young (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Chapel Hill Bird Club trip Sunday
1/18/18 9:51 am WALTER KENT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> bird feeders
1/18/18 8:51 am Beth Garver (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bring in your birdfeeders tonight (but be careful)
1/18/18 8:13 am Tracee Clapper (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bring in your birdfeeders tonight (but be careful)
1/18/18 7:54 am Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bring in your birdfeeders tonight (but be careful)
1/18/18 7:46 am Beth Garver (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bring in your birdfeeders tonight (but be careful)
1/18/18 7:27 am Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: rfi vermillion flycatcher
1/18/18 7:10 am Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> rfi vermillion flycatcher
1/18/18 6:17 am Stu Gibeau <sgibeau...> Re: Bring in your birdfeeders tonight (but be careful)
 
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Date: 2/17/18 4:40 pm
From: David Weesner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Really good birds
Started off this morning at Wrightsville Beach with Razorbills and Juv. Black-l. Kittiwake. Thanks Jamie and Sam.Then I went to Lake Crabtree County Park and got 1female Common Merganser. Next to Jodan Lake SRA  ( during a heavy mist) found 1 Red-n. Green and 1Lesser black Gull.A pretty  good day!!Dave Wessner Wilmington, NC
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 2/17/18 12:34 pm
From: \J. Anderson\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Pilot Mountain, NC CBC Results
Pilot Mountain CBC was conducted on 2 January, 2018 for the 3rd year!
Braving the cold, a total of 12 participants in 6 parties tallied 69
species and 3679 individuals, with one count week species added.

Seemingly due to open-water freezing conditions throughout the mid-Atlantic
we had our most diverse waterfowl year yet! Most local ponds were
completely frozen, but the Yadkin River was still running strong and served
to concentrate our waterfowl diversity. Highlights (for this count)
included a Merganser hat-trick (Common and Red-breasted, a first for our
CBC), Northern Pintail, Gadwall, and Redhead as a count week bird, also a
high-count of 50 Eastern Meadowlark and 1154 American Robin.

Notable misses included Brown Thrasher, Grey Catbird, and overall blackbird
diversity (Eastern Meadowlark only)

Please feel free to join us for the Spring Count on May 2, 2018 - email me
for details.


Happy birding,

--
Jesse Anderson
Pinnacle, NC

 

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Date: 2/17/18 11:29 am
From: Steve Compton <scompton1251...>
Subject: Tufted Duck relocated BullsIsland
Tufted Duck relocated today Bulls Island,SC

Steve Compton




Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
 

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Date: 2/17/18 11:05 am
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Greater White-fronted Geese
Scoped the large Canada flock only once in the misty rain and had 11 white-fronted Geese in one group. This is at the Beasley Road exit off 64 in Washington County. 2 pm , 27feb.
Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 2/17/18 10:49 am
From: Birding Poet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Long-tailed Ducks?
Long-taileds were with Ruddy Ducks, not Bufflehead, please pardon my
mistype.

On Sat, Feb 17, 2018 at 1:32 PM Birding Poet <tracee.clapper...>
wrote:

> Pond across from Randolph Trucking in Ridgeville has a pair of other
> ducks, besides the Bufflehead and Goldeoneyes. Appears to be very similar
> to Long-tailed Duck, which e-Bird says is rare. Description: Two diving
> ducks, smaller than goldeneye, white eyering, white ‘stripe’ from the
> forehead down the back of their neck, tip of bill is pale, black patch on
> side of cheek going down to shoulder, chest is white going back past the
> shoulder, black wings. Observed for 30 minutes, have multiple photos that
> someone else took with a real camera. Will submit photos to e-Bird later
> this afternoon.
> --
> ~Tracee 843/425-7630
>
--
~Tracee 843/425-7630

 

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Date: 2/17/18 10:33 am
From: Birding Poet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Long-tailed Ducks?
Pond across from Randolph Trucking in Ridgeville has a pair of other ducks,
besides the Bufflehead and Goldeoneyes. Appears to be very similar to
Long-tailed Duck, which e-Bird says is rare. Description: Two diving ducks,
smaller than goldeneye, white eyering, white ‘stripe’ from the forehead
down the back of their neck, tip of bill is pale, black patch on side of
cheek going down to shoulder, chest is white going back past the shoulder,
black wings. Observed for 30 minutes, have multiple photos that someone
else took with a real camera. Will submit photos to e-Bird later this
afternoon.
--
~Tracee 843/425-7630

 

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Date: 2/17/18 6:43 am
From: Jacob Farmer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Black-legged Kittiwake - Wrightsville Beach - NC
Jamie Adams is continuing to have some email issues but he wanted me to get
the word out about a Black-legged Kittiwake he has at Raleigh Street just
south of Johnnie Mercer's Pier. It's a first winter/juvenile bird.

That's all the info I have at this time.

Jacob Farmer
Raleigh, NC

 

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Date: 2/17/18 5:07 am
From: \kathy <khart123...>\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Common goldeneye
Still present and seen in large pond on Hwy 27 across from Randolf Trucking. Easily seen with bins.
Kathy Hart
Moncks Corner, SC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 2/16/18 8:59 pm
From: Cherrie Sneed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Common Goldeneyes, Ridgeville, SC
Hi Birders,

There are two businesses across from the large pond. The business nearest
I-26 if you are coming in that direction is where the ducks are hanging out
right now. That business has a small grassy area on either side of the
gate that is safe to pull into and not impede traffic from the business.
Hwy 28 at that location is narrow and heavily traveled.

I stopped today with only my binoculars and could not be sure I was seeing
the Common Goldeneyes. All the ducks were at the back of the large pond.
I could see flashes of white but that could have been Bufflehead All this
to say that if you have a scope it would be wise to take it. They have
been seen close to the road, but not today when I was there.

I'm so glad that Matthew can report them for the GBYBC!

Cherrie


On Fri, Feb 16, 2018 at 10:35 AM, "Johnson, Matthew" <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:

> Hi All,
>
> The two male Common Goldeneyes first reported by Cherrie Sneed, and then
> found again by Ann Shahid, were still present this morning at the large
> pond off of Hwy 27 near Ridgeville. Please note Cherrie and Ann's message
> about safely parking across the road from this pond.
>
> Good birding,
>
> Matt Johnson
> Summerville, SC
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:carolinabirds-request@
> duke.edu] On Behalf Of Ron & ann
> Sent: Sunday, February 4, 2018 5:28 PM
> To: <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: Common Goldeneyes, Ridgeville, SC
>
> The two male Common Goldeneyes that Cherrie Sneed reported were still
> present today.
> They were closer to the road than reported, so very easy to see. They were
> very comfortably feeding.
> Please follow her directions about parking across the road.
> Ann Shahid
> Ridgeville, SC
>



--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
*Cherrie & Dan Sneed*
Meggett, SC
St. Paul's Parish
Southern Coastal Charleston County
&
Robbinsville, NC
Snowbird Mountains
Graham County

 

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Date: 2/16/18 4:21 pm
From: David Weesner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: North Topsail Beach, New River inlet
We had our Wild Bird& Garden field trip this morning to New River Inlet. We had lots of shorebirds including 1 Red Knot. I was very suprised to see 1 Black Skimmer. I don't think I have seen them in Feb. before. He or she was very early or very late.Dave WessnerWilmington, NC

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 2/16/18 7:36 am
From: \Johnson, Matthew\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Common Goldeneyes, Ridgeville, SC
Hi All,

The two male Common Goldeneyes first reported by Cherrie Sneed, and then found again by Ann Shahid, were still present this morning at the large pond off of Hwy 27 near Ridgeville. Please note Cherrie and Ann's message about safely parking across the road from this pond.

Good birding,

Matt Johnson
Summerville, SC


-----Original Message-----
From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Ron & ann
Sent: Sunday, February 4, 2018 5:28 PM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Common Goldeneyes, Ridgeville, SC

The two male Common Goldeneyes that Cherrie Sneed reported were still present today.
They were closer to the road than reported, so very easy to see. They were very comfortably feeding.
 Please follow her directions about parking across the road.
Ann Shahid
Ridgeville, SC
 

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Date: 2/15/18 8:11 pm
From: David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: VESPER Sparrows (lots) - Donnelley WMA, SC
Hi folks,
After Bear Island, we swung by Donnelley for a couple of hours. Nothing to spectacular to report except that we saw a great number of VESPER SPARROWS. The conservative count was 30, but they may have pushed upwards of 45.
We got great looks at them in the stubble field on the left side of the road after you pass the restroom and continue towards the lodge. They were all found within 100ft of the forest, on the ground, then they flushed in to the trees and stayed perched in full view for a few minutes. Great views of the white eye ring and framed auriculars, and on a few the chestnut lesser coverts.
We definitely counted 30, but saw 45 or more Sparrows flush and fly in the same direction before we left, and I don't know whether the other 15 were Vesper or not.
I feel I only hear of small groups of 1-5 Vesper Sparrows at one time. Is this large a flock common or unusual?
Anyway, thought some of you might like to chase these birds down to see for yourself.
Happy Birding,
David

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 2/15/18 5:41 pm
From: Sam Cooper <dmcooper2...>
Subject: Eared Grebe - Craven County, NC
...based on photo in eBird checklist from yesterday at Glenburnie Quarry near New Bern.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S42754266&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=CjPslgfvVGiGMzjQQ7JuQ7dohw_T5rF_dtsPyZZmIZQ&s=YfuIb8-gpN6of5zn6LEXjVgcHR4oJYBflWfYVN7NfQ0&e=

Sam Cooper
Wilmington, NC

____________________________________________________________
After Weeks Of Rumors, Joanna Gaines Comes Clean
risingstarnewspaper.com
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__thirdpartyoffers.juno.com_TGL3141_5a8636641010936636041st02duc&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=CjPslgfvVGiGMzjQQ7JuQ7dohw_T5rF_dtsPyZZmIZQ&s=qqz_a2qF-L29bCKzFXwR-mloYzHGB55eG1NzRzNGK7s&e=
 

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Date: 2/15/18 4:24 pm
From: David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bear Island WMA
Hi folks,
I had a wonderful time Birding Bear Island wth fellow Seabrook Islanders today. Water was high everywhere, so apart from a ton of Avocets, and a few Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs, and 6 Snipe, there were no shorebirds to find.
Perhaps we missed the impoundment, but we didn't find any Spoonbills.
There were a good number of Gadwall, Am. Wigeon (and the one continuing Eurasian Wigeon - across Bennetts Point Road from the Mary's Pond), N. Shovelers, Green-winged and Blue-winged Teal.
Tundra swans put on a show, but we didn't get there till around 7:30, so I suspect the vast majority of swans had already left to forage.

The road loop was closed near the kiskadee, and we had some folks unable to walk great distances, so we didn't search for it.

Happy Birding,
David


Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 2/15/18 2:22 pm
From: Keith McCullough (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: eBird and the GBBC for South Carolina
SC birders,

I’d like to give a heads up in advance of the Great Backyard Bird Count Feb. 16-19 which once again is conducted through eBird. You may find during the count period that eBird is flagging things as rare more than normal. Some filters are being temporarily tightened in an attempt to catch some common mistakes that happen with new birders. Purple Finch, Pine Siskin, White-crowned Sparrow, Fox Sparrow are all examples but there are likely others. This could make the eBird Rare Bird Alert look a little crazy for a few days, but it is helpful to catch these on the front end. This is a great annual event that welcomes so many new people to birding and eBird. Thanks for your patience with this as we sift through these records. If prompted, a quick comment or two about important field marks will help reviewers and is always good practice!

Good birding to ya.

Keith McCullough
Charleston, SC
 

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Date: 2/15/18 12:06 pm
From: WALTER KENT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Ross's Goose
The goose is back at the Broyhill Walking Park in Lenoir N.C.
Walt Kent
Lenoir N.C.

 

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Date: 2/14/18 11:29 am
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Golden Eagle on Alligator Refuge
Sorry for the late post. While searching and finding the Rough-legged Hawk on Sunday, I spotted a high-flying Golden Eagle. It was observed from Long Curve Road, near the borrow pit.

I thought someone else had already posted it.

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 2/14/18 9:27 am
From: Alan Gamache <bird...>
Subject: Common Merganser / New Bern NC
A female Common Merganser at Lawson Creek Park. I was out this morning doing some local birding in downtown New Bern: starting at Union Point Park, History Museum, Lawson Creek Park, etc..

As I was approaching Lawson Creek, I thought to myself, no sense in stopping here, wont see anything here Ive not already seen. Oh whatever, I might as well. Drove up to the first set of boat ramps, There it was!! I wasnt on the bird all that long as it gradually swam onto the backside of a patch of marsh grass. Common Merganser / New Bern = Whoopee!

By the way, the solo male Northern Pintail is still hanging around with the Mallards at Union Point Park.

Al Gamache
New Bern, NC
 

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Date: 2/14/18 7:07 am
From: <jkestner...>
Subject: Looking for local guide
Hi all,

We will have a party of three visiting North Carolina in a couple of weeks and are looking for a local birder to show us the hot spots in the area of Pine Knoll Shores. I have spoken to Jim Gould, but discovered that he is located too far from where we will be.

Our plan is to bird for half a day on March first or second.

Is there someone available on either of those days to guide us around the area? Appreciate a response!

Judy Kestner
Cor[us Christi, TX
361-387-7329

 

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Date: 2/14/18 7:04 am
From: Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: OBX next week
I'm going to Nags Head to bird Outer Banks next week. I know to go to
Janette's pier, Pea Island and Cape Hatteras.
I was told to go to Oregon Inlet but last time I was there, I couldn't
figure out where to park because of all the construction. Please advise.
And if anyone has any other hot tips please do tell. Like is the Snowy Owl
still around and where.
Cheers, Helen

--
Helen Kalevas
Near Hillsborough, NC

 

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Date: 2/14/18 5:23 am
From: jcox3222 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re great kiskadee
I saw the bird during the ACE Basin Christmas count on December 31 at the intersection of TiTi and Upper Pine Island Roads. It has been reported since the re-opening of Bear Island to the general public on February 9.
John Cox
Mount Pleasant

Sent from XFINITY Connect Mobile App

 

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Date: 2/13/18 6:23 pm
From: David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Great Kiskadee at Bear Island WMA, SC?????
Hi Folks,
I am leading a birding trip to Bear Island WMA on Thursday, and noted that
someone recorded a Great Kiskadee calling off of TiTi Road just before the
Pecan tree road. Has anyone followed up on this sighting? Has it been
relocated?
Thanks,
David

 

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Date: 2/13/18 5:56 pm
From: Eric Harrold (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Wilkes/Yadkin waterfowl today
Near the intersection of Old Hwy 421 and Dennyville Rd in the edge of
Wilkes County on a roadside farm pond, there were a 4 American Widgeon
along with a dozen or so Green-winged Teal in the company of some less
interesting Mallards.

In Yadkin County, at Yadking Memorial Park there were 10+Redheads and about
the same number of Lesser Scaup.

Eric Harrold
Hays, NC

 

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Date: 2/13/18 5:44 pm
From: Kay Grinnell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Peregrine Falcon - Hilton Head Update
Paul,
Thanks for your post.  You helped me learn something new...I was also not aware that peregrine falcons are commonly seen on HHI this time of the year.  
I encourage your continued posts...and the opportunity for us to learn new birding facts!
KayHHP
Kay Grinnell
<kaytgrinnell...>
843 597-3633 cell

On Wednesday, February 14, 2018, 1:26:11 PM GMT+13, Paul Heitmann <carolinabirds...> wrote:

Everyone,
Yesterday, I posted a comment about observing a Peregrine Falcon, which in my 18 years of living on Hilton Head, I had never observed one in the area.  I felt as though it was a significant bird sighting so I posted it on listserve.  Much to my surprise, a fellow birder pointed out my error and Peregrine Falcons are quite common this time of year in the inlets of South Carolina and I should be more careful with my wording.  I apologize to the group for my error in believing this was a unique sighting.  I will try and be more careful in my future posts.
Paul
 

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Date: 2/13/18 4:26 pm
From: Paul Heitmann (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Peregrine Falcon - Hilton Head Update
Everyone,

Yesterday, I posted a comment about observing a Peregrine Falcon, which in
my 18 years of living on Hilton Head, I had never observed one in the
area. I felt as though it was a significant bird sighting so I posted it
on listserve. Much to my surprise, a fellow birder pointed out my error
and Peregrine Falcons are quite common this time of year in the inlets of
South Carolina and I should be more careful with my wording. I apologize
to the group for my error in believing this was a unique sighting. I will
try and be more careful in my future posts.

Paul

 

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Date: 2/13/18 12:05 pm
From: <scompton1251...>
Subject: RE: New posting to Birding Bulls about rare Eurasian duck, a Tufted Duck


David and birders,

Richard Hayes and I plan to visit Bull's Island this Saturday to
search for the Tufted Duck at Jack's Creek. Anyone welcome to join us.
the more scopes, the better! it would be an ABA and state bird
(obviously) for both of us. I have seen it in the UK.

Where is it being seen exactly?

Thanks,

Steve Compton

Greenville, SC

-----------------------------------------From: "David McLean" (via
carolinabirds Mailing List)"
To: "carolinabirds"
Cc:
Sent: 05-Feb-2018 22:59:17 +0000
Subject: New posting to Birding Bulls about rare Eurasian duck, a
Tufted Duck

M 5 Feb 2018
All,
I have a new posting to my Birding Bulls blog describing our
observation of a rare Eurasian visitor on the island, a Tufted Duck. I
invite you to read about this unexpected finding and see a few photos
of the Tufted Duck.
Regards,
David McLean Charleston, SC

--
David C. McLean, Jr.
DCMcLean AT gmail DOT com

 

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Date: 2/13/18 6:47 am
From: Paul Heitmann (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Peregrine Falcon - February 12, 2018 - Hilton Head Island, SC
Yesterday, I saw my 2nd sighting of a Peregrine Falcon on the high wire
towers between Bluffton, SC and Hilton Head Island, SC. I feel as though
this is a significant sighting as I can only find a dozen or less sightings
of Peregrine Falcon's over the past 10 years near Hilton Head Island.

When traveling from Bluffton to Hilton Head, look north as you cross the
first bridge, also known as the Karl Bowers Bridge. Look at the high wire
towers just as you approach the entrance to Pinkney Island NWR. Typically
you will see Bald Eagles but lately the Peregrine Falcon has been there in
the afternoon.

Pull into the CC Haig Jr. Boat Launch on the right side of the road and you
will be able to see one of the high wire tower from the parking area. The
Peregrine Falcon may be seen from there.

Both of my sightings have been between 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM.

 

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Date: 2/12/18 4:08 pm
From: Loren Hintz <ldhintz...>
Subject: Woodcocks at Mason Farm, Chapel Hill
arriving at 5:44 PM during a cold windy drizzle looking for American Woodcocks,  I first heard buzz call 6:14 while raining; last call at 6:25 when stopped raining; 1st 3 fields after right branch of trail. I heard one individual per field for a total count of 3. They did not seem to be doing their flights just their ground buzz call. From Loren Hintz Chapel Hill, NC
 

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Date: 2/12/18 3:22 pm
From: Eric Harrold (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Canvasback, Tree Swallows in Boomer
Stopped by YMCA Camp Harrison's Lake Broyhill to see what all was still
around. Had 7 Lesser Scaup, 30+Bufflehead, a pair of Wood Ducks, numerous
Ruddy Ducks and Pied-billed Grebes, a handful of Mallards, and a female
Canvasback. Saw my first Tree Swallows of the year. Was kind of surprised
to see them this early...

Eric Harrold
Hays, NC

 

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Date: 2/12/18 1:32 pm
From: Karen Lebing (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Thick-billed murre
Walking the beach in Rodanthe, NC, February 12, 2018, I found a dead
thick-billed murre. I tried to send a picture with this email, but it is
too big. I did not recover the dead bird because I didn't know who to give
it to. If there's someone on this list that uses recovered birds for
research, please let me know so that in the future, I can save a specimen.

If you want a picture, you can see the Carolina Rare Bird Facebook page, or
email me and I'll send you a picture.

Karen Lebing

 

Back to top
Date: 2/12/18 10:30 am
From: <hilton...>
Subject: Hilton Pond 11/01/17 (Late Fall Migrants)
I'm rolling now on those belated installments of "This Week at Hilton Pond," so the write-up for 1-30 Nov 2017 is ready for your perusal. It's mostly about late fall migrant birds encountered last November at the Center, including a very old sparrow with unusual growths on its face and some waxless Cedar Waxwings. There are also notes about the possible demise of that pesky duckweed and some late-leafing Trumpet Creeper.

As always, a list of all birds banded or recaptured is included, along with acknowledgements of recent gifts to Hilton Pond Center. To view edition #663, just click on this link and let us know what you think: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.hiltonpond.org_ThisWeek171101.html&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JPCf7xXRL89Zn77gHia2u-wnG9BXVjwR0JJzz6IiN8o&s=uWMLqR4U_nw_1xFN85U8WYgo10UGI6P-5PJJKXfxfhg&e=

Happy Nature Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.facebook.com_HiltonPond&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JPCf7xXRL89Zn77gHia2u-wnG9BXVjwR0JJzz6IiN8o&s=HFPTkfwyRR-gwKPdenITHSaxAnF_2D-NM4Fwq5CRpZE&e= for timely updates on nature topics,
and for info about hummingbirds at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.facebook.com_rubythroats&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JPCf7xXRL89Zn77gHia2u-wnG9BXVjwR0JJzz6IiN8o&s=I4e7g3L0l62NcGhD8FESg67gCbC5XrO_Pm-t9hgyVKs&e=

Follow us on Twitter @hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and education for students of all ages.

"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the sunset." BHjr.

============


 

Back to top
Date: 2/11/18 7:48 pm
From: Travis Knowles <hyrax...>
Subject: Razorbill at Huntington Beach State Park, SC
Today (Sunday, Feb 11) Norma Salcedo and I took our vertebrate zoology
students to Huntington Beach State Park. Total bird diversity and
abundance was pretty low. In the afternoon we walked out to the jetty
and saw a raft of horned grebes, good numbers of ruddy turnstones, and
plenty of Bonaparte's gulls. Not a loon to be seen. The best bird of the
day was an adult razorbill, near the end of the jetty on the north side
(between the two jetties). It swam by very closely, giving everyone an
excellent look.

Travis Knowles
Francis Marion University / Biology
Florence SC

 

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Date: 2/11/18 5:03 pm
From: Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lake Crabtree birds today
I stopped by the lake twice today, once in the morning in the park, and
once in the evening from the Southport access. Not sure if the gusty winds
had anything to do with it but there was a nice variety and large number of
birds (this evening especially) including:

Ruddy Ducks
Green-winged Teals
Ring-Necked Ducks
Scaups
Buffleheads
4 Redheads
2 Horned Grebes (and lots of Pied-billed Grebes)
~20 Red-breasted Mergansers
3-4 Common Merganser (females)
An estimated 900 Ring-billed Gulls in one long raft, including:
5 immature Herring Gulls and
1 Lesser Black-backed Gull that stood out like a sore thumb

Eddie Owens
Cary NC

 

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Date: 2/11/18 4:55 pm
From: Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Feb. 10 Pelagic Report
It’s probably not quite right to call these winter boat trips pelagics because most of the birds are not very far out, but we will stick with it for now. We were supposed to run a trip from Hatteras on Saturday, but the forecast made it seem unlikely, so I made arrangements to dock the boat in Wanchese, and we ran our trip out from Oregon Inlet where there was less wind and sea. It’s usually harder to get out from there in winter, but this weekend was one of those exceptions.

We actually ended up traveling as far south as we could manage in the south swell, but along the way we found several Common Murres out past Wimble Shoals. I hoped we might see a couple but I was not expecting to see over a dozen. There were possibly even more, but the sea conditions made it tough to spot them from any distance, and most of the large alcids were diving quite a bit. Most of our time was spent in 45 to 50 degree water, but we made it down to some warmer water- close to 60 degrees. There was quite a bit of life between Wimble Shoals and the warmer water, and except for Red Phalarope, we found pretty much all the target birds for winter. Altogether we saw over 1500 birds of about 20 species, but the many of these were target species of interest:

Black-capped Petrel-2
Northern Fulmar- 21
Sooty Shearwater- 2
Manx Shearwater- 8
Great Skua- 2 maybe 3
Black-legged Kittiwake- 5- all im.
Little Gull- 4 ad.
Dovekie- 16
Atlantic Puffin- 17
Common Murre- 13
Thick-billed Murre- 1
Murre sp- 2
Razorbill- 700 (actual count)
Large alcid sp- 11

This is the third winter boat trip that we have run in as many weeks, and so far all of them have found good numbers and diversity of seabirds. We have trips planned for the next couple of weekends, so I’m hoping the trend continues.

To read a trip report and see photos from the day, check out the Seabirding blog: seabirding.blogspot.com

To see our schedule of trips for 2018, go to our main website- www.seabirding.com/

Dates are posted through spring and summer dates will be added soon.

Brian Patteson
Hatteras, NC
 

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Date: 2/11/18 3:18 pm
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: False claim of SC high count for Short-eared Owls
It was brought to my attention that Jack Rogers claimed a new SC high
count of 4 Short-eared Owls last weekend:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_gallery_Rogers_seow.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=ru8FAiBoiIJyK0its0XA0ONjQ13HQaxa4zbeyb6_Rnw&s=GqxZ-03oMjyIwWla4q01yjJgkU-pAGJ5yL8PUXx_hME&e=

carolinabirdclub.org/gallery/Rogers/seow.html

-- This is untrue.

A few examples:

Six Short-eared Owls were sighted on Daniel Island, SC on January 6, 1972.

Sandy Sprunt wrote of "Five or six flushed at once from crest of a
high dune on Long Island [Beaufort County] today" on January 23, 1931.

And four Short-eared Owls is not unprecedented - one more example:
four were seen repeatedly in the winter of 1955-56 at the Savannah
River Site.


* Once again: eBird is a SUBSET of the entire record - treating it as
the complete story is a mistake.


Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
 

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Date: 2/11/18 1:12 pm
From: Robert Snowden (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Thick-billed Murre, Kure Beach
I'm a few hours late with this, but earlier this afternoon I had good looks at a THICK-BILLED MURRE from the Kure Beach Pier. I took a few photos that I will eventually attach to an ebird checklist. The bird was actively swimming just past the wave break, and then eventually took off and flew elsewhere. I'm not sure if this bird will still be around, but it continues the trend of interesting alcids along the coast.  
Happy birding,
Robert
 

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Date: 2/11/18 12:21 pm
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Tufted Duck still present at Bulls Island
John Cox and I are looking at it now in the spot where it was first
discovered.

 

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Date: 2/11/18 11:20 am
From: Robert Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Rough-legged Hawk
Four of us saw the bird several times between about 12:45 and 1:45.

Bob lewis

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 11, 2018, at 11:24 AM, Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Rough-legged still present about 2/3 down Miltail Rd.
>
> But that wasn’t even the highlight as we had 3 Red Wolves offer prolonged scope views in the middle of one of the fields. What a treat.
>
> Ryan Justice
>
> Sent from my iPhone

 

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Date: 2/11/18 9:00 am
From: Birding Poet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Reddish Egret Pitt St. Mount Pleasant, SC
Still there at noon - on the dock on the east side, near the outermost end.

On Sun, Feb 11, 2018 at 10:39 AM James Watson <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Present now at low tide between causeway and first dock, dark morph
> juvenile. Photos.
>
> Craig Watson
> Mount Pleasant, SC
>
--
~Tracee 843/425-7630

 

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Date: 2/11/18 8:24 am
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Rough-legged Hawk
Rough-legged still present about 2/3 down Miltail Rd.

But that wasn’t even the highlight as we had 3 Red Wolves offer prolonged scope views in the middle of one of the fields. What a treat.

Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 2/11/18 7:39 am
From: James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Reddish Egret Pitt St. Mount Pleasant, SC
Present now at low tide between causeway and first dock, dark morph
juvenile. Photos.

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

 

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Date: 2/10/18 4:21 pm
From: Christine Stoughton-Root (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mattamuskeet
Common (Eurasian) Teal still present on Wildlife Drive. Seen today around 12:30 from the first observation deck as you leave the gift shop.
Christine Stoughton-Root

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 2/10/18 1:55 pm
From: Steve Compton <scompton1251...>
Subject: Re: GOLDEN EAGLE @ Seabrook Island, SC
Immature and adult Golden Eagles reported in SC the past few weeks. Since
I have never seen one in SC that seems like a lot! I will be looking
up for one on the coast next weekend.
Steve ComptonGreenville, SC
Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE DroidOn 10 Feb 2018 1:58 pm, David Gardner
<carolinabirds...> wrote:

Hi folks,While birding with 15 naturalists from Mountain Trail
Outdoor School, we all saw an adult GOLDEN EAGLE fly over the
marsh. We all saw it for over a minute and everyone was able to
see the key features: chocolate brown all over, except for golden
shoulders and nape. No white at all. Large eagle with smaller head
than Bald Eagle.This may be the same adult I saw about 4 weeks ago
from same location.Keep you eyes to the skies.Happy Birding,David
Director of Environmental Education St. Christopher Camp &
Conference CenterSeabrook Island, SC

Sent from my iPhone
Begin forwarded message:

From: <ebird-checklist...>
Date: February 10, 2018 at 1:54:07 PM EST
To: <davidgardner14...>
Subject: eBird Report - St. Christopher Camp and Conference
Center, Feb 10, 2018

St. Christopher Camp and Conference Center, Charleston, South
Carolina, US
Feb 10, 2018 10:20 AM - 12:10 PM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
29 species

Bufflehead 3
Red-breasted Merganser 16
Common Loon 1
Horned Grebe 2
Wood Stork 1
Double-crested Cormorant 1
American White Pelican 6
Brown Pelican 8
Great Blu e Heron 1
Great Egret 2
Golden Eagle 1 David ID'd then got everyone else on the bird
and all confirmed these features:
Large raptor, chocolate brown all over except noticeably
golden shoulders and nape of neck. No white visible anywhere
on body.
Bird was seen flapping then gliding, flapping then gliding for
about 1minute as it flew east over the saltmarsh and towards
the Seabrook Island Golf Courses.
Same adult as four weeks ago?
American Oystercatcher 3
Bonaparte's Gull 8
Forster's Tern 6
Red-bellied Woodpecker 4
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 1
Pileated Woodpecker 1
Eastern Phoebe 1
American Crow 6
Carolina Chickadee 6
Tufted Titmouse 9
Carolina Wren 2
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 3
American Robin 10
Pine Warbler 3
Yellow-rumped Warbler 22
Chipping Sparrow 6
Northern Cardinal 5
Red-winged Blackbird 1

View this checklist online at
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42643963

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
 

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Date: 2/10/18 10:59 am
From: David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: GOLDEN EAGLE @ Seabrook Island, SC
Hi folks,
While birding with 15 naturalists from Mountain Trail Outdoor School, we all saw an adult GOLDEN EAGLE fly over the marsh. We all saw it for over a minute and everyone was able to see the key features: chocolate brown all over, except for golden shoulders and nape. No white at all. Large eagle with smaller head than Bald Eagle.
This may be the same adult I saw about 4 weeks ago from same location.
Keep you eyes to the skies.
Happy Birding,
David

Director of Environmental Education
St. Christopher Camp & Conference Center
Seabrook Island, SC

Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: <ebird-checklist...>
> Date: February 10, 2018 at 1:54:07 PM EST
> To: <davidgardner14...>
> Subject: eBird Report - St. Christopher Camp and Conference Center, Feb 10, 2018
>
> St. Christopher Camp and Conference Center, Charleston, South Carolina, US
> Feb 10, 2018 10:20 AM - 12:10 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 2.0 mile(s)
> 29 species
>
> Bufflehead 3
> Red-breasted Merganser 16
> Common Loon 1
> Horned Grebe 2
> Wood Stork 1
> Double-crested Cormorant 1
> American White Pelican 6
> Brown Pelican 8
> Great Blue Heron 1
> Great Egret 2
> Golden Eagle 1 David ID'd then got everyone else on the bird and all confirmed these features:
> Large raptor, chocolate brown all over except noticeably golden shoulders and nape of neck. No white visible anywhere on body.
> Bird was seen flapping then gliding, flapping then gliding for about 1minute as it flew east over the saltmarsh and towards the Seabrook Island Golf Courses.
> Same adult as four weeks ago?
> American Oystercatcher 3
> Bonaparte's Gull 8
> Forster's Tern 6
> Red-bellied Woodpecker 4
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 1
> Pileated Woodpecker 1
> Eastern Phoebe 1
> American Crow 6
> Carolina Chickadee 6
> Tufted Titmouse 9
> Carolina Wren 2
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet 3
> American Robin 10
> Pine Warbler 3
> Yellow-rumped Warbler 22
> Chipping Sparrow 6
> Northern Cardinal 5
> Red-winged Blackbird 1
>
> View this checklist online at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S42643963&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=iGdkP2VsVbLeLzTWq7-OeF0CFlnKcJKIRXosTvyurFc&s=_4mwFSkFIKV1_-w8ey6Z3hxeK7d59F_mtGsA2NbhxqY&e=
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=iGdkP2VsVbLeLzTWq7-OeF0CFlnKcJKIRXosTvyurFc&s=QOnfIJTkx8nB7jixu9S-yGQdvRYA_T-g50aa7qQwdRE&e= )

 

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Date: 2/10/18 4:49 am
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mattamuskeet and other birds
Stopped by Wildlife Drive at Mattamuskeet briefly on Thursday morning (8
Feb) and relocated the Common (Eurasian) Teal and a couple of Eurasian
Wigeon. Also found a "storm wigeon." I've never seen so many Rind-necked
Ducks in all my life! While there, I received a report of a single
Trumpeter Swan from the day before, and also a report of a Northern Goshawk
(adult) seen near the far end of Pat's Road at Pocosin Lakes Refuge a few
days earlier.

Stopped by the Brewer's Blackbird site near Lake Landing and they were
there waiting, about 9 or 10 of them.

Yesterday, 9 Feb, I found a pair of Common Mergansers in the pond along
Highway 64 just east of Creswell. Nice to see an adult male!

Then stopped by Alligator River and found one Short-eared Owl.

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

 

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Date: 2/9/18 3:06 pm
From: Jelmer Poelstra (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Rough-legged Hawk still at AR, no luck with Snowy Owl
Hi all,

Jan Hansen and I briefly birded Alligator River (Dare, NC) this afternoon
from 14:45 and almost immediately saw the 1st winter (2nd cy) Rough-legged
Hawk above the fields east of Milltail Rd, and later soaring and crossing
the road westwards at altitude. We also saw the leucistic Red-tailed Hawk
off Milltail Rd but no Swainson's Hawks there or off Long Curve Rd.

We then headed for the Snowy Owl that was reported near the Old Coast Guard
Station on Pea Island. We walked around the fenced area and along the jetty
from 16:40 until dark, but there was no sign of the owl.

Good birding,

Jelmer Poelstra
Chapel Hill

 

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Date: 2/9/18 1:56 pm
From: David Disher (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Red-billed Tropicbird
While birding from Jennette's Pier, Hop Hopkins, Susan Disher and I
observed a Red-billed Tropicbird flying north to south about 75 yards off
the pier around 3 pm. Distant photos obtained. Birders south of Nags Head
should be on the look out!

David and Susan Disher, Hop Hopkins
Nags Head

 

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Date: 2/9/18 1:30 pm
From: Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Birding Clark's Creeek Nature Preserve
This morning I had a good morning birding Clark's Creek Nature Preserve in
Mecklenburg County, NC. The highlights were watching a Kestrel sitting on
top of a snag in a dead tree eating a small animal. It was too far away to
identify the critter. I also saw a Winter Wren after trying for about 15
minutes before I could see it clearly enough for a positive ID. The
Meadowlarks were in spring dress and singing.

My eBird checklist is online at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S42622763&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=QzePpfnBULrHu2QudocwIvCorZ7RZ00jyoPVLyS8FKA&s=22U4Rllc3Lc3kUSvNEF_sX1_X3L-b979A-Pv3LsQIzA&e=

Anne Olsen
Cornelius, NC

 

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Date: 2/9/18 11:49 am
From: Karen Lebing (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Snowy Owl
I found a snowy owl on the beach off the Oregon Inlet, Bonner Bridge south
jetty, NC, February 9, 2018. It was in the protected, fenced area east of
the old Coast Guard station. It flew a couple of times, staying within the
fencing, and seemed skittish while I walked from the jetty beach towards
the Coast Guard station. I have some long-shot photos of it because I did
not want to scare it any more than I already had. I observed it from 9:30
a.m. to about 10:00, and left it on the west side of the fenced area. It
seemed healthy but did not like me being in the area. I have submitted the
long-shot photos to Carolina Rare Bird facebook page.

 

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Date: 2/9/18 10:17 am
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Snowy Owl on Pea island
A snowy owl was seen near the old coast guard station on Pea Island this morning. I did see a photo. That's all I know.
Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 2/9/18 5:44 am
From: Ritch Lilly <ritch...>
Subject: Eurasian Wigeon and Bachman's Sparrows at SCR
A male Eurasian Wigeon was seen at Santee Coastal Reserve yesterday
afternoon. (A location map is available if it's of interest.) There were
also two Bachman's Sparrows heard signing while a third was seen along the
main entrance road into SCR just two to three hundred feet inside the
check-in station.

Ritch Lilly

Murrells Inlet, SC

ritch (at) sc.rr.com






 

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Date: 2/9/18 5:17 am
From: Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fox Sparrow
I just had a Fox Sparrow feeding in my yard. That was a nice surprise.

Anne Olsen
Cornelius, NC

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 2/9/18 4:22 am
From: Robert Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Alligator River, NC, February 8, hawks
I looked for recently reported hawks on Milltail and Long Curve Roads from about noon to 3:30.

It was cold with a biting north wind.  There were birds, but they mostly stayed far away, too far for photography.  The exception was the leucistic Red-tail, which I photographed and posted elsewhere.  That bird is quite predictable, often perching in trees about here 35.839180, -75.859492, and soaring to the east.
I saw no Rough-legs.
I saw an adult Swainson's soaring rather high to the east of Milltail.
Bob LewisSleepy Hollow NY

 

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Date: 2/8/18 12:18 pm
From: cindy daudelin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Pine Siskins Iredell County
This is my first winter in NC (from Buffalo NY), so don't know if this is usual for this area, but I am in Iredell County, about 30 mins north of Charlotte. I don't believe they nest here and will probably head north in the spring, but my feeders have been inundated by many dozens of pine siskins for months now - I am filling my platform feeders 2x/day and they are still empty at end of day. The sound of their twittering is very loud and I have to wave my arms so they will leave the feeders when I go out to refill. My yard backs up to Lake Norman State Park, so it is a very wooded area, although my yard has open spaces.
Here are some of the other birds I am seeing daily in my yard and enjoying greatly: Hermit thrush (just one regular), house finches (many), eastern bluebird (about a dozen; also like to pick in the gutters on the house), goldfinch (a couple dozen), brown headed nuthatch (seen once in a while), phoebe (seen just a couple of times, going around all our family room windows), cardinal (about 8 daily), eastern mockingbird (2), Carolina wren (4), wild turkey (6), Carolina chickadee (about 8 daily), blue jays (8), crow family of 7, a male and female red-bellied, several downy woodpeckers, and I'm sure I'm forgetting some. A couple pileated woodpeckers fly over morning and evening. Great horned owl hoots every night.  
Not bird-related, but the other night we had a smaller raccoon under the birdfeeder,  back to back with an opossum, both munching away. At one point, the opossum put its nose into the raccoons back for a sniff, and then they sat together for quite a while, both seemingly completely unbothered by the close proximity of the other. Guess there was enough seed for both!
I am putting out black oil sunflower seed, finch mix seed, shelled peanut mix, those round peanut suet balls, and mealworms. I have a couple tube feeders up, a couple small platform feeders, and a large hanging bag of thistle seed. I am really looking forward to spring migration and seeing what birds come through! Won't be long now.  - Cindy Pirson
 

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Date: 2/8/18 9:29 am
From: Alan Gamache <bird...>
Subject: Pine Siskins / New Bern, NC
James Poling of Black Mountain, NC reports of FOS Pine Siskins.
I just have had my FOS Pine Siskins at my feeder, a pair both on February 7 & 8.

Al Gamache
New Bern, NC
 

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Date: 2/8/18 6:27 am
From: Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Dovekie at Wrightsville Beach, NC
I had a Dovekie fishing and moving north from Johhny Mercer’s pier this morning at first light. Small alcid with stubby bill. A Razorbill nearby for comparison.

It did not stay long but I bet there are more around. Could be a good winter for Alcids based on the numbers we had on the Hatteras pelagic last weekend. Keep your eyes peeled. Maybe something really rare will show up. I see Maryland has a Black Guillemot and last year an Ancient Murrelet was found off Virginia I think.

Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC

 

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Date: 2/8/18 6:04 am
From: James Poling (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: First of the Season Pine Siskins at our feeders in the backyard, Black Mountain, NC
First of the Season Pine Siskins at our feeders in the backyard, Black Mountain, NC


James Poling, Black Mountain, Buncombe Co, NC
<james.poling...>





 

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Date: 2/8/18 5:10 am
From: Jeff Blalock <jcbabirder...>
Subject: National Audubon Society Bird Apps
Greeting all.

Last week I contacted the developers of the National Audubon apps that I had that needed their iOS updated to work only to find out that they were removed from the app stores and are no longer supported and that you couldn’t get a refund because the money was paid to the developers of the apps. I had 4 of these apps of which some I had just purchased months before they were removed from the marketplace.

That’s the bad news, the good news is that now all of the Audubon Bird apps will be continued to be supported and Best news of all is that now they are FREE.

I have the Audubon Owls app but since it is now free I went ahead and downloaded the Audubon Bird app of North America. Once you download the app you will need to also download the pictures and sounds to be able to use it without WiFi. That means when you are out Birding and want to look up a bird or it’s songs then you will need to do the download and do it while you are connected to WiFi. It takes a while but not too long.

Even if you already have a Bird app already it doesn’t hurt to have a backup for a second opinion and extra songs and calls.

Good Birding

From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-572-8619 Home
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>






 

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Date: 2/7/18 10:59 am
From: David Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: DSLR Birdingwatching Setup For Sale
Hey all,

I'm selling my Canon 7D + 100-400mm setup. Both are the Mark I versions,
but the 100-400mm lens is still one heck of a lens. If you're interested,
please contact me off list and we can hammer out a deal!

Thanks,

David Howell
Raleigh, NC

 

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Date: 2/6/18 4:00 pm
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: a Henslow's Sparrow search
Four of us (Marty Wall, Steve Howell, Jack Fennell, and I) spent all morning
Sunday (4 February) on a search for Henslow's Sparrows, at Millis Road
Savanna, Croatan National Forest, Carteret County.

We walked abreast, most of the time through the wetter, thicker grass cover
portion of the savanna. We walked a total of about four miles, according to
Marty's app (and I would say it sure felt like we walked that far). The
savanna is in excellent condition now, because of a prescribed burn last
summer.

We flushed one bird that was likely a Henslow's. We flushed it twice, but,
unfortunately, we never got a good look at it to be sure. We did not see
any other Henslow's candidates. We also flushed about 55 Swamp Sparrows.
We also had 5 Bachman's Sparrows, but 4 of those were first located by
calls.

I think about the Henslow's contrast between this year and the winter of
1980-1981 at the savanna. Habitat at the savanna that winter was also
excellent (because of a June burn, started by a military operation), and it
was fairly easy to flush one or more Henslow's on each visit. I estimated
that there were at least 15 Henslow's at the savanna that winter, and my
notes record that "Queenie" (my parents' dog) flushed 7 birds in 20 minutes
one day in March.

I guess the big difference between this year and the winter of 1980-1981
probably reflects the general decline in the population of the species,
especially in the more northeastern portion of the range. Or perhaps it is
just luck, with more birds finding the savanna in the fall of 1980 than
found it last fall.

Incidentally, John Voigt and I flushed several Henslow's in a power line
corridor in pine savanna habitat at Camp Lejeune a few winters ago. That
area had been burned the previous spring.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 2/6/18 12:54 pm
From: James Poling (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: American Black Duck, Owen Park, Swannanoa, NC. today
American Black Duck, Owen Park, Swannanoa, NC. today





James Poling, Black Mountain, Buncombe Co, NC
<james.poling...>





 

Back to top
Date: 2/6/18 8:54 am
From: Keith McCullough (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Red-shafted Flicker, Johns Island, SC
What I meant to say was that it is much more likely this was the Yellow-shafted subspecies whose diet caused the presence of red/orange. I should have been more specific! I believe the red pigment in the wings of the Red-shafted subspecies is due to diet as well.

Keith McCullough
Charleston, SC

> On Feb 6, 2018, at 10:55 AM, Keith McCullough <flatpickit...> wrote:
>
> I agree that it is much more likely that this pigment came from its diet. This article from last year has more:
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__news.nationalgeographic.com_2016_10_birds-2Dchange-2Dcolors-2Dflickers-2Dhoneysuckles_&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=ZCP754jbSa_fL6KQeQ5PEzDiUu-l_9pIUHlL_R1OhzU&s=01-cV3zTHE8JnODYR2rXtx1Xzy2QITjKeccxKimd-7U&e=
>
> Keith McCullough
> Charleston, SC
>
>
>> On Feb 6, 2018, at 10:27 AM, <kde...> wrote:
>>
>>
>> I will point out that the color of underwings and tail are not reliable
>> field marks for distinguishing the two forms as otherwise "normal" eastern
>> "Yellow-shafted" Flickers can have orange to reddish-orange color here.
>> The key is to look at head pattern.
>>
>> In fact, I saw one in my neighborhood in Knoxville, TN just this morning
>> with bright reddish orange where it should be yellow but with normal head
>> pattern for a female "yellow-shafted". I think last I read, this is
>> believed to be related to diet similar to the orange tips on some waxwing
>> tails and yellow or orange House Finches.
>>
>> For what it's worth, I recently spent just over a year living in central
>> WA where it seems a lot of the easter/western pairs come to meet. I have
>> photos of red- and yellow-shafted flickers in the same tree, and there's a
>> LOT of cross-breeding and integrades between the two forms. Head pattern
>> is the key to look for.
>>
>> Dean Edwards
>> Knoxville, TN
>>
>>
>>
>>> On Tue, 6 Feb 2018, Steve Compton wrote:
>>>
>>> David,
>>>
>>> Yes, I would note this subspecies in any eBird report or any other reporting. In my 39 years of birding in SC I don't recall ever seeing one. I have seen a lot of them out west and they are dramatically different. As you may know, they were once separate species. Maybe they will go the way of the "Northern Oriole" and be separated again one day.
>>>
>>> Steve Compton
>>> Greenville, SC
>>>
>>> Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
>>>> On 6 Feb 2018 9:39 am, David Gardner <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Hi Folks,
>>>> I'm not sure if this is note-worthy or not. It just happens to be the first time I've noticed this subspecies here in SC. Anyway, I was driving to work and saw a Flicker fly up from the roadside and fly about 100yards to a nearby group of trees. It was clearly a flicker with undulating flight and bright white rump. But what stood out as unusual was the color of the underwings. Bright orange-red. Reminiscent of the underside of a Ground Dove.
>>>> I did not see the malar Stripe or other facial features to help cinch the ID, but thought you would all like to know.
>>>> Here is where I saw it...
>>>>
>>>> 32?38'49.4"N 80?07'51.3"W
>>>>
>>>> Happy Birding,
>>>> David
>>>>
>>>> Sent from my iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 2/6/18 8:49 am
From: David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Red-shafted Flicker, Johns Island, SC
Well, I have learned something new, and Keith and Aaron, please disregard my latest ebird list for review. I will remove that incidental sighting.
Happy Birding,
David

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 6, 2018, at 10:55 AM, Keith McCullough <flatpickit...> wrote:
>
> I agree that it is much more likely that this pigment came from its diet. This article from last year has more:
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__news.nationalgeographic.com_2016_10_birds-2Dchange-2Dcolors-2Dflickers-2Dhoneysuckles_&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=09DnK0vtkYGQMU_cm82SLt__wlqWuW82zmgXTNIPpuI&s=iX_3-XPe7S5VyikdgEAoDQlvVxZCxOlI1D9AxUZ70Hw&e=
>
> Keith McCullough
> Charleston, SC
>
>
>> On Feb 6, 2018, at 10:27 AM, <kde...> wrote:
>>
>>
>> I will point out that the color of underwings and tail are not reliable
>> field marks for distinguishing the two forms as otherwise "normal" eastern
>> "Yellow-shafted" Flickers can have orange to reddish-orange color here.
>> The key is to look at head pattern.
>>
>> In fact, I saw one in my neighborhood in Knoxville, TN just this morning
>> with bright reddish orange where it should be yellow but with normal head
>> pattern for a female "yellow-shafted". I think last I read, this is
>> believed to be related to diet similar to the orange tips on some waxwing
>> tails and yellow or orange House Finches.
>>
>> For what it's worth, I recently spent just over a year living in central
>> WA where it seems a lot of the easter/western pairs come to meet. I have
>> photos of red- and yellow-shafted flickers in the same tree, and there's a
>> LOT of cross-breeding and integrades between the two forms. Head pattern
>> is the key to look for.
>>
>> Dean Edwards
>> Knoxville, TN
>>
>>
>>
>>> On Tue, 6 Feb 2018, Steve Compton wrote:
>>>
>>> David,
>>>
>>> Yes, I would note this subspecies in any eBird report or any other reporting. In my 39 years of birding in SC I don't recall ever seeing one. I have seen a lot of them out west and they are dramatically different. As you may know, they were once separate species. Maybe they will go the way of the "Northern Oriole" and be separated again one day.
>>>
>>> Steve Compton
>>> Greenville, SC
>>>
>>> Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
>>>> On 6 Feb 2018 9:39 am, David Gardner <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Hi Folks,
>>>> I'm not sure if this is note-worthy or not. It just happens to be the first time I've noticed this subspecies here in SC. Anyway, I was driving to work and saw a Flicker fly up from the roadside and fly about 100yards to a nearby group of trees. It was clearly a flicker with undulating flight and bright white rump. But what stood out as unusual was the color of the underwings. Bright orange-red. Reminiscent of the underside of a Ground Dove.
>>>> I did not see the malar Stripe or other facial features to help cinch the ID, but thought you would all like to know.
>>>> Here is where I saw it...
>>>>
>>>> 32?38'49.4"N 80?07'51.3"W
>>>>
>>>> Happy Birding,
>>>> David
>>>>
>>>> Sent from my iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 2/6/18 7:56 am
From: Keith McCullough (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Red-shafted Flicker, Johns Island, SC
I agree that it is much more likely that this pigment came from its diet. This article from last year has more:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__news.nationalgeographic.com_2016_10_birds-2Dchange-2Dcolors-2Dflickers-2Dhoneysuckles_&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Kil21wqCauvwwejaZT3BosyXKz0L7T-sop46-bqjVrA&s=Xw1aUzo-Q-P1EXvx5SF1Ua1JcPR2payPYsEXa8UNfCo&e=

Keith McCullough
Charleston, SC


> On Feb 6, 2018, at 10:27 AM, <kde...> wrote:
>
>
> I will point out that the color of underwings and tail are not reliable
> field marks for distinguishing the two forms as otherwise "normal" eastern
> "Yellow-shafted" Flickers can have orange to reddish-orange color here.
> The key is to look at head pattern.
>
> In fact, I saw one in my neighborhood in Knoxville, TN just this morning
> with bright reddish orange where it should be yellow but with normal head
> pattern for a female "yellow-shafted". I think last I read, this is
> believed to be related to diet similar to the orange tips on some waxwing
> tails and yellow or orange House Finches.
>
> For what it's worth, I recently spent just over a year living in central
> WA where it seems a lot of the easter/western pairs come to meet. I have
> photos of red- and yellow-shafted flickers in the same tree, and there's a
> LOT of cross-breeding and integrades between the two forms. Head pattern
> is the key to look for.
>
> Dean Edwards
> Knoxville, TN
>
>
>
>> On Tue, 6 Feb 2018, Steve Compton wrote:
>>
>> David,
>>
>> Yes, I would note this subspecies in any eBird report or any other reporting. In my 39 years of birding in SC I don't recall ever seeing one. I have seen a lot of them out west and they are dramatically different. As you may know, they were once separate species. Maybe they will go the way of the "Northern Oriole" and be separated again one day.
>>
>> Steve Compton
>> Greenville, SC
>>
>> Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
>>> On 6 Feb 2018 9:39 am, David Gardner <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Hi Folks,
>>> I'm not sure if this is note-worthy or not. It just happens to be the first time I've noticed this subspecies here in SC. Anyway, I was driving to work and saw a Flicker fly up from the roadside and fly about 100yards to a nearby group of trees. It was clearly a flicker with undulating flight and bright white rump. But what stood out as unusual was the color of the underwings. Bright orange-red. Reminiscent of the underside of a Ground Dove.
>>> I did not see the malar Stripe or other facial features to help cinch the ID, but thought you would all like to know.
>>> Here is where I saw it...
>>>
>>> 32?38'49.4"N 80?07'51.3"W
>>>
>>> Happy Birding,
>>> David
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 2/6/18 7:27 am
From: <kde...>
Subject: Re: Red-shafted Flicker, Johns Island, SC

I will point out that the color of underwings and tail are not reliable
field marks for distinguishing the two forms as otherwise "normal" eastern
"Yellow-shafted" Flickers can have orange to reddish-orange color here.
The key is to look at head pattern.

In fact, I saw one in my neighborhood in Knoxville, TN just this morning
with bright reddish orange where it should be yellow but with normal head
pattern for a female "yellow-shafted". I think last I read, this is
believed to be related to diet similar to the orange tips on some waxwing
tails and yellow or orange House Finches.

For what it's worth, I recently spent just over a year living in central
WA where it seems a lot of the easter/western pairs come to meet. I have
photos of red- and yellow-shafted flickers in the same tree, and there's a
LOT of cross-breeding and integrades between the two forms. Head pattern
is the key to look for.

Dean Edwards
Knoxville, TN



On Tue, 6 Feb 2018, Steve Compton wrote:

> David,
>
> Yes, I would note this subspecies in any eBird report or any other reporting. In my 39 years of birding in SC I don't recall ever seeing one. I have seen a lot of them out west and they are dramatically different. As you may know, they were once separate species. Maybe they will go the way of the "Northern Oriole" and be separated again one day.
>
> Steve Compton
> Greenville, SC
>
> Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
> On 6 Feb 2018 9:39 am, David Gardner <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> >
> > Hi Folks,
> > I'm not sure if this is note-worthy or not. It just happens to be the first time I've noticed this subspecies here in SC. Anyway, I was driving to work and saw a Flicker fly up from the roadside and fly about 100yards to a nearby group of trees. It was clearly a flicker with undulating flight and bright white rump. But what stood out as unusual was the color of the underwings. Bright orange-red. Reminiscent of the underside of a Ground Dove.
> > I did not see the malar Stripe or other facial features to help cinch the ID, but thought you would all like to know.
> > Here is where I saw it...
> >
> > 32?38'49.4"N 80?07'51.3"W
> >
> > Happy Birding,
> > David
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 2/6/18 6:53 am
From: Steve Compton <scompton1251...>
Subject: Re: Red-shafted Flicker, Johns Island, SC
David,

Yes, I would note this subspecies in any eBird report or any other reporting. In my 39 years of birding in SC I don't recall ever seeing one. I have seen a lot of them out west and they are dramatically different. As you may know, they were once separate species. Maybe they will go the way of the "Northern Oriole" and be separated again one day.

Steve Compton
Greenville, SC

Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
On 6 Feb 2018 9:39 am, David Gardner <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Hi Folks,
> I'm not sure if this is note-worthy or not. It just happens to be the first time I've noticed this subspecies here in SC. Anyway, I was driving to work and saw a Flicker fly up from the roadside and fly about 100yards to a nearby group of trees. It was clearly a flicker with undulating flight and bright white rump. But what stood out as unusual was the color of the underwings. Bright orange-red. Reminiscent of the underside of a Ground Dove.
> I did not see the malar Stripe or other facial features to help cinch the ID, but thought you would all like to know.
> Here is where I saw it...
>
> 32°38'49.4"N 80°07'51.3"W
>
> Happy Birding,
> David
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 2/6/18 6:39 am
From: David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Red-shafted Flicker, Johns Island, SC
Hi Folks,
I'm not sure if this is note-worthy or not. It just happens to be the first time I've noticed this subspecies here in SC. Anyway, I was driving to work and saw a Flicker fly up from the roadside and fly about 100yards to a nearby group of trees. It was clearly a flicker with undulating flight and bright white rump. But what stood out as unusual was the color of the underwings. Bright orange-red. Reminiscent of the underside of a Ground Dove.
I did not see the malar Stripe or other facial features to help cinch the ID, but thought you would all like to know.
Here is where I saw it...

32°38'49.4"N 80°07'51.3"W

Happy Birding,
David

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 2/5/18 2:59 pm
From: David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: New posting to Birding Bulls about rare Eurasian duck, a Tufted Duck
M 5 Feb 2018

All,

I have a new posting to my Birding Bulls blog describing our observation
of a rare Eurasian visitor on the island, a Tufted Duck. I invite you to
read about this unexpected finding and see a few photos of the Tufted Duck.

Regards,

David McLean
Charleston, SC

--
David C. McLean, Jr.
DCMcLean AT gmail DOT com

 

Back to top
Date: 2/5/18 9:27 am
From: Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Tufted Duck on Bulls not seen today
I agree with Chris Feeney having seen a number of Tufted Ducks in Nome and
vicinity and in Europe I see nothing in the photos that is inconsistent
with a pure male Tufted Duck

Dennis Forsythe

On Mon, Feb 5, 2018 at 10:40 AM Chris Feeney <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Having seen a number of Tufted Ducks in Newfoundland and on Adak I
> can tell you that weather conditions and lighting can make the color
> of the birds vary quite a bit as Dr. Hill pointed out. The SC photos
> taken were from a distance and in poor light. I can't see anything
> from those photos that would not make it a Tufted Duck. Again, I am
> not part of the committee making the decision and do hope better
> photos can be taken. That said, I hope the Facebook comments were
> made by a person that has seen a number of these birds in multiple
> lighting situations (like I have) at a distance (in Adak like I have)
> or almost stepping on them at Quidi Vidi Lake in St. John's
> Newfoundland (like I have) and not just making an arm-chair judgement
> based on the photos and a field guide.
>
> Chris Feeney
> Martinez, GA
>
> On 2/4/18, Christopher Hill <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> > I admit that my previous post was a “Do as I say, not as I do” comment -
> I’m
> > bad at sketching, probably ordinary at writing descriptions and I don’t
> > carry a smart phone so unless I have an additional voice recorder with
> me, I
> > can’t do voice recording. I’m sure many of the readers do much better
> than
> > I. But I do carry a field notebook 95% of the time when birding and will
> > write descriptions for significant records or birds I am uncertain of in
> the
> > field *while I’m looking at them.* And I’m on the SC bird records
> committee
> > so I especially appreciate it when others supply good descriptions.
> >
> > Chris Hill
> > Conway, SC
>
--
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/5/18 9:26 am
From: Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: new ebird iphone mobile version includes distance and tracks where you walked
I updated my ebird app on my iphone this weekend and was initially pleased
to find that it now calculates the distance you walk. However, It also
keeps a track of where you have walked; while that is interesting to me, I
am not sure that I want that data uploaded and stored. I couldn't find any
settings relative to this behavior. I guess I could deny location services
to the app in my iphone settings but then the distance calculator wouldn't
work.

Does anyone know if this data is being uploaded and stored? The track
doesn't show on the internet version of ebird yet.


Ann Brice
Wilson, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 2/5/18 9:18 am
From: Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: No Rough-legged Hawk ARNWR.
This morning, Feb. 5, I Searched for four hours and did 30 miles on the
Alligator River NWR in Dare County, NC. I was looking for the Rough-Legged
Hawk seen by dozens yesterday, and came up "empty handed." All of the
miles were put on Milltail and Long Curves Roads.

BiG BUmmer, but that's birding I guess.

Fortunately, I got to see:

1 Swainson's Hawk sitting on dirt mound at beginning of Long Curve and then
soaring with Red-Tailed Hawks along Milltail, close to Sawyer Road
intersection.

1 Leucistic Red-Tailed Hawk which was perched in pines on SW Side of
Milltail, then soaring (including kiting) with the other Red-Tailed Hawks

1 Peregrine Falcon flying high speed from Milltail westward down Sawyer
Road

1 Bobcat!!





Jim Gould
Southern Shores, NC

Sent from my mobile device.

 

Back to top
Date: 2/5/18 8:37 am
From: Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Feb. 3 Pelagic Birding off Hatteras
We ran a pelagic birding charter from Hatteras on Saturday Feb. 3. Nathan and Sarah Gatto recruited some birders from Forsyth County and other parts of North Carolina for a trip with us aboard the Stormy Petrel II. It was a great day for a winter boat trip. Altogether we saw over 5000 birds. The most abundant birds were Razorbill and Red-throated Loon. We also saw several hundred Bonaparte’s Gulls. We went a little father out to sea than last week, but we did not have to venture as far north because there was an extensive area of cold water south of Diamond Shoals. We found the edge of the Gulf Stream less than 20 nautical miles out and there was a good diversity of birds on a sharp temperature break there. Here’s a list of the “target birds” we found:

Northern Fulmar- 8
Manx Shearwater- 20
Red Phalarope- 1
Great Skua- 2
Dovekie- 25
Razorbill- 2515
Atlantic Puffin- 5
Black-legged Kittiwake- 1 im.
Little Gull- 2 ad.

We also saw several dozen Bottlenose Dolphins, one Humpback Whale, and four Loggerhead Turtles.

There is a trip report with photos on the Seabirding Blog: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__seabirding.blogspot.com_2018_02_saturday-2Dfebruary-2D3-2D2018-2Dby-2Dbrian.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=98Sb4eGly2QWv0C2FocUuAzx5bNkhNUXd6B-m-IiOt8&s=ar6Re65_39438UniYoJh6Cvtvqmxlwhs0ILj_TYfNwI&e=

We have open trips planned for the next three weekends: www.seabirding.com/

Brian Patteson
Hatteras, NC
www.seabirding.com


 

Back to top
Date: 2/5/18 7:40 am
From: Chris Feeney (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Tufted Duck on Bulls not seen today
Having seen a number of Tufted Ducks in Newfoundland and on Adak I
can tell you that weather conditions and lighting can make the color
of the birds vary quite a bit as Dr. Hill pointed out. The SC photos
taken were from a distance and in poor light. I can't see anything
from those photos that would not make it a Tufted Duck. Again, I am
not part of the committee making the decision and do hope better
photos can be taken. That said, I hope the Facebook comments were
made by a person that has seen a number of these birds in multiple
lighting situations (like I have) at a distance (in Adak like I have)
or almost stepping on them at Quidi Vidi Lake in St. John's
Newfoundland (like I have) and not just making an arm-chair judgement
based on the photos and a field guide.

Chris Feeney
Martinez, GA

On 2/4/18, Christopher Hill <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> I admit that my previous post was a “Do as I say, not as I do” comment - I’m
> bad at sketching, probably ordinary at writing descriptions and I don’t
> carry a smart phone so unless I have an additional voice recorder with me, I
> can’t do voice recording. I’m sure many of the readers do much better than
> I. But I do carry a field notebook 95% of the time when birding and will
> write descriptions for significant records or birds I am uncertain of in the
> field *while I’m looking at them.* And I’m on the SC bird records committee
> so I especially appreciate it when others supply good descriptions.
>
> Chris Hill
> Conway, SC
 

Back to top
Date: 2/5/18 4:08 am
From: Jeff Blalock <jcbabirder...>
Subject: Fwd: [Va-bird] eBird Trip Summary -- Trip
Greetings all

I spent this weekend Birding in the Great State of North Carolina starting early Thursday and ended midday Sunday with the Virginia Society of Ornithology on their annual trip to the Outer Banks.

The birding was great and only a little cold on Saturday and the rain held off on Sunday until it was time to head for home.

Following is a combined list of locations and species.

From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-572-8619 Home
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>


Begin forwarded message:

> From: Jeff Blalock via va-bird <va-bird...>
> Date: February 4, 2018 at 11:37:03 PM EST
> To: VA-BIRD <va-bird...>
> Subject: [Va-bird] eBird Trip Summary -- Trip
> Reply-To: Jeff Blalock <jcbabirder...>
>
> Greetings all
>
> Following is summary of my eBird Trip Reports using the eBird App on iPhone.
>
>
> jeffblalock
> eBird Checklist Summary for: Feb 1, 2018 at 5:00 AM to Feb 4, 2018 at 2:00 PM
>
> Number of Checklists: 19
> Number of Taxa: 109
>
> Checklists included in this summary:
> (1): Mackay Island NWR
> Date: Feb 1, 2018 at 8:35 AM
> (2): Mackay Island NWR
> Date: Feb 1, 2018 at 1:15 PM
> (3): Knotts Island US-NC (36.4841,-75.9258)
> Date: Feb 1, 2018 at 1:20 PM
> (4): Comfort Inn South - Nags Head US-NC (35.9064,-75.5945)
> Date: Feb 1, 2018 at 4:15 PM
> (5): 9163 Caratoke Hwy, Point Harbor US-NC (36.0801,-75.7920)
> Date: Feb 1, 2018 at 3:35 PM
> (6): Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, Stumpy Point US-NC (35.7138,-75.7684)
> Date: Feb 2, 2018 at 7:17 AM
> (7): Alligator River NWR--Wildlife Drive
> Date: Feb 2, 2018 at 4:45 PM
> (8): Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge, Engelhard US-NC (35.5072,-76.0631)
> Date: Feb 2, 2018 at 8:20 AM
> (9): Comfort Inn South - Nags Head US-NC (35.9064,-75.5945)
> Date: Feb 3, 2018 at 7:00 AM
> (10): Oregon Inlet Fishing Center
> Date: Feb 3, 2018 at 8:20 AM
> (11): Nags Head--Jennette's Pier
> Date: Feb 3, 2018 at 1:15 PM
> (12): Pea Island NWR--Visitor Center Beach Crossover
> Date: Feb 3, 2018 at 10:30 AM
> (13): Pea Island NWR
> Date: Feb 3, 2018 at 9:40 AM
> (14): Bodie Island Lighthouse & Pond
> Date: Feb 3, 2018 at 3:10 PM
> (15): US Highway 64 E, Columbia US-NC (35.9303,-76.1846)
> Date: Feb 4, 2018 at 1:55 PM
> (16): Alligator River NWR--Wildlife Drive
> Date: Feb 4, 2018 at 6:45 AM
> (17): Pea Island NWR
> Date: Feb 3, 2018 at 11:33 AM
> (18): Hwy 264 - Near Lake Landing
> Date: Feb 2, 2018 at 8:10 AM
> (19): NC-94, Columbia US-NC
> Date: Feb 2, 2018 at 3:35 PM
>
> 3000 Snow Goose -- (1)
> 1535 Canada Goose -- (1),(8)
> 1046 Tundra Swan -- (1),(7),(8),(12),(14),(16),(19)
> 1 Wood Duck -- (8)
> 120 Blue-winged Teal -- (8),(14)
> 325 Northern Shoveler -- (8),(12),(13),(14),(16)
> 425 Gadwall -- (1),(7),(8),(14),(16)
> 1 Eurasian Wigeon -- (10)
> 212 American Wigeon -- (1),(8),(10),(12)
> 287 Mallard -- (1),(7),(8),(16)
> 244 American Black Duck -- (1),(7),(8),(12),(13),(16)
> 520 Northern Pintail -- (1),(7),(8),(12),(14),(16)
> 200 Green-winged Teal -- (8),(13),(14),(16)
> 10 Canvasback -- (12)
> 115 Redhead -- (12),(14)
> 54 Ring-necked Duck -- (8),(12)
> 2 Lesser Scaup -- (12),(14)
> 26 Black Scoter -- (9),(11)
> 2 Long-tailed Duck -- (11)
> 12 Bufflehead -- (1),(10),(12)
> 27 Hooded Merganser -- (1),(8),(12),(16)
> 50 Red-breasted Merganser -- (9),(11)
> 60 Ruddy Duck -- (8),(12),(14),(16)
> 10 Wild Turkey -- (19)
> 20 Red-throated Loon -- (11)
> 30 Common Loon -- (4),(11)
> 4 Pied-billed Grebe -- (7),(12),(16)
> 11 Horned Grebe -- (9),(11)
> 1 Eared Grebe -- (11)
> 56 Northern Gannet -- (4),(9),(11)
> 54 Double-crested Cormorant -- (1),(10),(11),(12),(16)
> 20 American White Pelican -- (13)
> 1 Brown Pelican -- (13)
> 2 American Bittern -- (14),(19)
> 3 Great Blue Heron -- (8)
> 6 Great Blue Heron (Blue form) -- (1),(7),(13)
> 2 Great Egret -- (8)
> 9 Black-crowned Night-Heron -- (8),(10)
> 7 White Ibis -- (1),(12),(13)
> 8 Black Vulture -- (16)
> 62 Turkey Vulture -- (1),(8),(16),(19)
> 25 Northern Harrier -- (1),(7),(8),(13),(14),(16)
> 1 Cooper's Hawk -- (5)
> 8 Bald Eagle -- (1),(8),(16)
> 1 Red-shouldered Hawk -- (8)
> 5 Red-tailed Hawk -- (7),(8),(16)
> 1 Rough-legged Hawk -- (16)
> 400 American Coot -- (8)
> 30 American Avocet -- (13)
> 2 Black-bellied Plover -- (16)
> 6 Killdeer -- (16)
> 5 Dunlin -- (16)
> 3 Wilson's Snipe -- (1),(8)
> 4 Greater Yellowlegs -- (16)
> 10 Lesser Yellowlegs -- (1),(7),(16)
> 2 Dovekie -- (11)
> 4 Razorbill -- (11)
> 3 Bonaparte's Gull -- (8)
> 37 Ring-billed Gull -- (1),(4),(8),(9),(11),(16)
> 8 Herring Gull -- (4),(9)
> 10 Great Black-backed Gull -- (1),(4),(9),(11)
> 50 Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) -- (11)
> 8 Mourning Dove -- (16),(17),(19)
> 2 Great Horned Owl -- (8),(10)
> 3 Belted Kingfisher -- (6),(16),(19)
> 5 Red-bellied Woodpecker -- (1),(8),(18)
> 1 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker -- (18)
> 3 Downy Woodpecker -- (1),(8)
> 2 Hairy Woodpecker -- (1),(8)
> 2 Northern Flicker -- (16)
> 2 Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) -- (8)
> 2 Pileated Woodpecker -- (16),(18)
> 2 American Kestrel -- (16),(19)
> 1 Peregrine Falcon -- (16)
> 2 Eastern Phoebe -- (8)
> 1 Blue-headed Vireo -- (2)
> 1 Blue Jay -- (3)
> 85 American Crow -- (1),(8),(15)
> 4 Carolina Chickadee -- (1),(8)
> 3 Tufted Titmouse -- (1),(8)
> 6 Brown-headed Nuthatch -- (1),(8)
> 2 Winter Wren -- (8)
> 12 Carolina Wren -- (1),(8),(10),(16),(18)
> 1 Golden-crowned Kinglet -- (8)
> 3 Ruby-crowned Kinglet -- (8),(16)
> 8 Eastern Bluebird -- (3),(8),(18)
> 409 American Robin -- (3),(6),(8),(10),(16),(19)
> 1 Gray Catbird -- (8)
> 4 Northern Mockingbird -- (1),(3),(8),(17)
> 370 European Starling -- (3),(10),(19)
> 12 Cedar Waxwing -- (10)
> 1 Orange-crowned Warbler -- (16)
> 3 Pine Warbler -- (8)
> 19 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) -- (1),(8),(10)
> 35 Chipping Sparrow -- (8)
> 1 Fox Sparrow -- (8)
> 7 White-throated Sparrow -- (1),(8)
> 2 Savannah Sparrow -- (13)
> 11 Song Sparrow -- (1),(8),(16)
> 8 Swamp Sparrow -- (1),(8)
> 1 Eastern Towhee -- (8)
> 8 Northern Cardinal -- (1),(8),(16)
> 12 Eastern Meadowlark -- (1),(7),(16)
> 72 Red-winged Blackbird -- (1),(8),(13),(16)
> 30 Brown-headed Cowbird -- (3)
> 40 Common Grackle -- (3),(4)
> 40 Boat-tailed Grackle -- (4)
> 5 House Finch -- (3)
> 8 American Goldfinch -- (8),(16)
>
> This trip summary was created using the eBird app for iPhone and iPad.
> See eBird for more information.
>
>
> From my iPhone
>
> May God Bless and Keep You
>
> Jeff Blalock
> 103 Elizabeth Court
> South Boston VA 24592
> 434-572-8619 Home
> 434-470-4352 Cell
> <jcbabirder...>
>
>
>
>
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as <jcbabirder...> If you wish to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__mailman.listserve.com_listmanager_listinfo_va-2Dbird&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=6f9vKC_FWMn2SqLc5X29mbZU71ywRQwQ-XBgVt6tzV4&s=i8fEkvshc30Srdons4YEYCew08XBoY08b0L4dtlSBdY&e= ***
>




 

Back to top
Date: 2/4/18 4:16 pm
From: Caroline Harvey (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Simpsonville, SC - RUSTY BLACKBIRDS
A late afternoon drive after the rain produced a large flock of Rusty
Blackbirds at the intersection of Bethany and Clear Springs Rd.
The birds were alternating between two large trees and the ground. It was
tough to count but I estimate between 350 and 450 Rusties with one Red
winged Blackbird and no grackles.

Simon C. Harvey
Simpsonville, SC

--
Caroline and Simon Harvey
Simpsonville, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 2/4/18 2:24 pm
From: Ron & ann <rashahid...>
Subject: Common Goldeneyes, Ridgeville, SC
The two male Common Goldeneyes that Cherrie Sneed reported were still
present today.
They were closer to the road than reported, so very easy to see. They
were very comfortably feeding.
 Please follow her directions about parking across the road.
Ann Shahid
Ridgeville, SC
 

Back to top
Date: 2/4/18 12:00 pm
From: Alan Gamache <bird...>
Subject: Eurasian Wigeon, Mattamuskeet
Wanting to increase my list of ducks for the calendar year of 2018, I decided to take
a quick (?) trip to Mattamuskeet (Saturday 3 Feb. 2018) with my target bird (also my favorite duck) being the Blue-winged Teal.

While I was able to add a few waterfowl species: Northern Pintail, American Black Duck, Green-winged Teal, I completely struck out on the Blue-winged. So now needing to console myself a bit, I drove up the causeway to the observation deck area, and was able to get an Orange-crowned Warbler. Thank the lord for that!

But I still felt compelled and soon had returned to the marsh (Wildlife Drive). I stopped by that tiny blind on the west edge of the marsh, desperate to get the Blue-winged. While ever so tediously scanning through scads upon scads of ducks, I come across a Eurasian Wigeon
(male). Wow, I just got myself a second consolation bird!

Unfortunately, the Blue-winged Teal will have wait for another day. It was a fine afternoon, and a trip total of 49 species.

Al Gamache
New Bern, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 2/4/18 11:14 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Tufted Duck on Bulls not seen today
I admit that my previous post was a “Do as I say, not as I do” comment - I’m bad at sketching, probably ordinary at writing descriptions and I don’t carry a smart phone so unless I have an additional voice recorder with me, I can’t do voice recording. I’m sure many of the readers do much better than I. But I do carry a field notebook 95% of the time when birding and will write descriptions for significant records or birds I am uncertain of in the field *while I’m looking at them.* And I’m on the SC bird records committee so I especially appreciate it when others supply good descriptions.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC
 

Back to top
Date: 2/4/18 11:08 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Tufted Duck on Bulls not seen today
I’m glad Jack brought my attention to that thread on facebook. I put a note there which I will paste below.

Although these days you hear a lot of “photos or it didn’t happen,” and granted I see details in my own (good) photos that I failed to notice in the field, this is a reminder that there are some places where photos do not substitute for real-time descriptions (done while watching the birds). The two complement each other, and since most people carry a phone that can act as a voice recorder, it’s a good idea to just dictate a thorough description while your eyes are on the bird.

My comment on the ID thread:

I'm also glad you brought that up, Martin<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_martin.reid.142-3Ffref-3Dgc-26dti-3D444762565584392-26hc-5Flocation-3Dufi&d=DwIGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=sV7QhPc0Wqb2YxULjDn9c2DxwhGYbmIrmIxRi-VmmYg&s=TeceurEReobVOu33Z_riJxMBVs1xX-jsTy3Jrbkgs9c&e= >, and that pattern does show in most of the photos. I have a hard time putting too much faith in that pattern, though. The distant, grainy photos could easily create photo artifacts. In the first photo I see that there are two scaup to the right with heads tucked that also have anomalous light upper borders to pale flank areas. Not exactly the same as the appearance of the alleged TUDU, but possibly the same effect. The photos have a definite "paint by numbers" vibe as though there were only 5 shades of gray available, which could make that "border" look more apparent in what was really a solid white flank lit from above.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

On Feb 4, 2018, at 1:36 PM, Jack Rogers <jack...><mailto:<jack...>> wrote:

In fact, one birder on the ABA RBA Facebook page, Martin Reid, is already calling this bird a hybrid:
"The flanks on the presumed TUDU are not white, but very pale grayish, such that there is a thin whiter line separating the flanks from the black upperparts and undertail coverts. This is wrong for pure TUDU, which has pure white underparts that lack any paler line where the flanks meet the upperparts (rarely some can have darker imm. flank feathers, but this creates the opposite effect whereby a darker line is present between the black upperparts and the white underparts). The one pic with the head raised in not very helpful, but suggests to me a less-than-classic TUDU head shape.
I lean towards this being a hybrid TUDUxRNDU."
I have no experience with neither Tufted Duck nor any of the hybrids. Just passing along this info for those who refuse to use "that loathsome platform".

Jack Rogers
Mt Pleasant, SC

On Sun, Feb 4, 2018 at 1:29 PM, Jack Rogers <jack...><mailto:<jack...>> wrote:
I'm obviously not one of the reviewers, but considering the bird is:
1) An ABA rarity (Code 3)
2) A state first
3) A Carolinas second (only other record is the 2009 Winston-Salem bird, as I'm sure many of you know)
4) From a species well known to hybridize with several other species (Tufted x Scaup, in particular, can be a hard ID)
I think that perhaps a little time might bode well for accuracy purposes (not saying I don't believe that this bird in particular is indeed a Tufted Duck. David is a great birder for finding this bird!). Not to mention the other birds throughout the state needing to be reviewed. It's a tough job! Kudos to em.

Jack Rogers
Mt Pleasant, SC

On Sun, Feb 4, 2018 at 1:00 PM, Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
Question to you South Carolina folks: Why has the record of Tufted Duck, with 10 excellent and confirming photographs on the eBird report, not yet been accepted by eBird -- yet all of the other Bulls Island rare birds for the same day (Feb. 2) and yesterday have been accepted? This has been done intentionally, but why? If I were the observers/photographers .....

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh



On Sat, Feb 3, 2018 at 8:59 PM, David McLean <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
Sat 3 Feb 2018

All,

I was back on Bulls Island today on a field trip with the Charleston Natural History Society. Along with a few other birders chasing the Tufted Duck reported from Jack's Creek yesterday, we had numerous scopes looking for the one Tufted Duck among a raft of 1600 Lesser Scaup and Ruddy Ducks but came up empty. I feel that we had a better than even chance of seeing the Tufted Duck had it been there in that large raft.

When we were watching the Tufted Duck yesterday, Friday, it behaved as though it was right at home. It was resting among many other ducks, was interacting with those others as though it was just another Lesser Scaup, and appeared well settled. Jack's is a big impoundment with many large open areas that the LESC seem to favor, and we were unable to look into most of those other areas today. The Tufted Duck could have easily been in another area of Jack's. Hopefully if will be re-sighted by others in the next few days.

Regards,

David McLean
Charleston, SC

--
David C. McLean, Jr.
DCMcLean AT gmail DOT com




--
Jack Rogers
Mt Pleasant, SC
My Flickr page<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com_-3Furl-3Dhttps-253A-252F-252Furldefense.proofpoint.com-252Fv2-252Furl-253Fu-253Dhttp-2D3A-5F-5Fwww.flickr.com-5Fphotos-5F90726323-2D40N05-5F-2526d-253DDwMFaQ-2526c-253DimBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj-5FgZ4adc-2526r-253DymRCw6Q-2DsBitug-5FrdeO1Tokz-2DI-5FSX2LQN2-5FOcvlal9U-2526m-253D7n5jTGUbJvzkaePN-2DDuKoJtCw3dgkZhth5hHVaImGz0-2526s-253DdvMnpA5DT272f-2DDZaMiykXW-5FIn6utzioraPxxBDKDDI-2526e-253D-26data-3D02-257C01-257CChill-2540coastal.edu-257C38091d62ac864f73d30e08d56bfe5f81-257C53afb770a5e243eabec693bdba22205d-257C0-257C0-257C636533662637494559-26sdata-3DSv4NPGK1maU83eai7kkGhyntRl-252FimOfTVPICdA92zPk-253D-26reserved-3D0&d=DwIGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=sV7QhPc0Wqb2YxULjDn9c2DxwhGYbmIrmIxRi-VmmYg&s=lOljhfQt8tHemwkDqHvRK9AhqgCNLH1_x06ytuXAHUY&e= >



--
Jack Rogers
Mt Pleasant, SC
My Flickr page<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com_-3Furl-3Dhttps-253A-252F-252Furldefense.proofpoint.com-252Fv2-252Furl-253Fu-253Dhttp-2D3A-5F-5Fwww.flickr.com-5Fphotos-5F90726323-2D40N05-5F-2526d-253DDwMFaQ-2526c-253DimBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj-5FgZ4adc-2526r-253DymRCw6Q-2DsBitug-5FrdeO1Tokz-2DI-5FSX2LQN2-5FOcvlal9U-2526m-253D7n5jTGUbJvzkaePN-2DDuKoJtCw3dgkZhth5hHVaImGz0-2526s-253DdvMnpA5DT272f-2DDZaMiykXW-5FIn6utzioraPxxBDKDDI-2526e-253D-26data-3D02-257C01-257CChill-2540coastal.edu-257C38091d62ac864f73d30e08d56bfe5f81-257C53afb770a5e243eabec693bdba22205d-257C0-257C0-257C636533662637494559-26sdata-3DSv4NPGK1maU83eai7kkGhyntRl-252FimOfTVPICdA92zPk-253D-26reserved-3D0&d=DwIGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=sV7QhPc0Wqb2YxULjDn9c2DxwhGYbmIrmIxRi-VmmYg&s=lOljhfQt8tHemwkDqHvRK9AhqgCNLH1_x06ytuXAHUY&e= >


 

Back to top
Date: 2/4/18 10:50 am
From: Jacob Farmer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Rough-legged Hawk - ARNWR - Dare Co - Yes
Ed Corey, Nathan Gatto, Sarah Gatto and I had the Rough-legged Hawk in the
fields across from the maintenance shed around noon today.

It was last seen landing on the ground at the far side of the field just
out of sight to enjoy it's freshly caught rodent prey.

Regards,

Jacob Farmer
Raleigh, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 2/4/18 10:45 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Tufted Duck on Bulls not seen today
Good point. At least, Google has a number of photos of hybrid Tufted x
Ring-necked duck -- so you may be able to compare the SC bird with those.

That probably explains why it has not been accepted.

Harry LeGrand


On Sun, Feb 4, 2018 at 1:36 PM, Jack Rogers <jack...> wrote:

> In fact, one birder on the ABA RBA Facebook page, Martin Reid, is already
> calling this bird a hybrid:
> "The flanks on the presumed TUDU are not white, but very pale grayish,
> such that there is a thin whiter line separating the flanks from the black
> upperparts and undertail coverts. This is wrong for pure TUDU, which has
> pure white underparts that lack any paler line where the flanks meet the
> upperparts (rarely some can have darker imm. flank feathers, but this
> creates the opposite effect whereby a darker line is present between the
> black upperparts and the white underparts). The one pic with the head
> raised in not very helpful, but suggests to me a less-than-classic TUDU
> head shape.
> I lean towards this being a hybrid TUDUxRNDU."
> I have no experience with neither Tufted Duck nor any of the hybrids.
> Just passing along this info for those who refuse to use "that loathsome
> platform".
>
> Jack Rogers
> Mt Pleasant, SC
>
> On Sun, Feb 4, 2018 at 1:29 PM, Jack Rogers <jack...> wrote:
>
>> I'm obviously not one of the reviewers, but considering the bird is:
>> 1) An ABA rarity (Code 3)
>> 2) A state first
>> 3) A Carolinas second (only other record is the 2009 Winston-Salem bird,
>> as I'm sure many of you know)
>> 4) From a species well known to hybridize with several other species
>> (Tufted x Scaup, in particular, can be a hard ID)
>> I think that perhaps a little time might bode well for accuracy purposes
>> (not saying I don't believe that this bird in particular is indeed a Tufted
>> Duck. David is a great birder for finding this bird!). Not to mention the
>> other birds throughout the state needing to be reviewed. It's a tough
>> job! Kudos to em.
>>
>> Jack Rogers
>> Mt Pleasant, SC
>>
>> On Sun, Feb 4, 2018 at 1:00 PM, Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Question to you South Carolina folks: Why has the record of Tufted
>>> Duck, with 10 excellent and confirming photographs on the eBird report, not
>>> yet been accepted by eBird -- yet all of the other Bulls Island rare birds
>>> for the same day (Feb. 2) and yesterday have been accepted? This has been
>>> done intentionally, but why? If I were the observers/photographers .....
>>>
>>> Harry LeGrand
>>> Raleigh
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On Sat, Feb 3, 2018 at 8:59 PM, David McLean <carolinabirds...>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Sat 3 Feb 2018
>>>>
>>>> All,
>>>>
>>>> I was back on Bulls Island today on a field trip with the Charleston
>>>> Natural History Society. Along with a few other birders chasing the Tufted
>>>> Duck reported from Jack's Creek yesterday, we had numerous scopes looking
>>>> for the one Tufted Duck among a raft of 1600 Lesser Scaup and Ruddy Ducks
>>>> but came up empty. I feel that we had a better than even chance of seeing
>>>> the Tufted Duck had it been there in that large raft.
>>>>
>>>> When we were watching the Tufted Duck yesterday, Friday, it behaved
>>>> as though it was right at home. It was resting among many other ducks, was
>>>> interacting with those others as though it was just another Lesser Scaup,
>>>> and appeared well settled. Jack's is a big impoundment with many large open
>>>> areas that the LESC seem to favor, and we were unable to look into most of
>>>> those other areas today. The Tufted Duck could have easily been in another
>>>> area of Jack's. Hopefully if will be re-sighted by others in the next few
>>>> days.
>>>>
>>>> Regards,
>>>>
>>>> David McLean
>>>> Charleston, SC
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> David C. McLean, Jr.
>>>> DCMcLean AT gmail DOT com
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Jack Rogers
>> Mt Pleasant, SC
>> My Flickr page <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_90726323-40N05_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Pr1vK8tsJmIfHNP__gEWd_3CG0e9LpCEkdZZTYpzXao&s=SGsTHMapMQkZq2k-6oZZ-z-j6acUb3HoSIyieUb-vvs&e= >
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Jack Rogers
> Mt Pleasant, SC
> My Flickr page <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_90726323-40N05_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Pr1vK8tsJmIfHNP__gEWd_3CG0e9LpCEkdZZTYpzXao&s=SGsTHMapMQkZq2k-6oZZ-z-j6acUb3HoSIyieUb-vvs&e= >
>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/4/18 10:37 am
From: Jack Rogers <jack...>
Subject: Re: Tufted Duck on Bulls not seen today
In fact, one birder on the ABA RBA Facebook page, Martin Reid, is already
calling this bird a hybrid:
"The flanks on the presumed TUDU are not white, but very pale grayish, such
that there is a thin whiter line separating the flanks from the black
upperparts and undertail coverts. This is wrong for pure TUDU, which has
pure white underparts that lack any paler line where the flanks meet the
upperparts (rarely some can have darker imm. flank feathers, but this
creates the opposite effect whereby a darker line is present between the
black upperparts and the white underparts). The one pic with the head
raised in not very helpful, but suggests to me a less-than-classic TUDU
head shape.
I lean towards this being a hybrid TUDUxRNDU."
I have no experience with neither Tufted Duck nor any of the hybrids. Just
passing along this info for those who refuse to use "that loathsome
platform".

Jack Rogers
Mt Pleasant, SC

On Sun, Feb 4, 2018 at 1:29 PM, Jack Rogers <jack...> wrote:

> I'm obviously not one of the reviewers, but considering the bird is:
> 1) An ABA rarity (Code 3)
> 2) A state first
> 3) A Carolinas second (only other record is the 2009 Winston-Salem bird,
> as I'm sure many of you know)
> 4) From a species well known to hybridize with several other species
> (Tufted x Scaup, in particular, can be a hard ID)
> I think that perhaps a little time might bode well for accuracy purposes
> (not saying I don't believe that this bird in particular is indeed a Tufted
> Duck. David is a great birder for finding this bird!). Not to mention the
> other birds throughout the state needing to be reviewed. It's a tough
> job! Kudos to em.
>
> Jack Rogers
> Mt Pleasant, SC
>
> On Sun, Feb 4, 2018 at 1:00 PM, Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> Question to you South Carolina folks: Why has the record of Tufted Duck,
>> with 10 excellent and confirming photographs on the eBird report, not yet
>> been accepted by eBird -- yet all of the other Bulls Island rare birds for
>> the same day (Feb. 2) and yesterday have been accepted? This has been done
>> intentionally, but why? If I were the observers/photographers .....
>>
>> Harry LeGrand
>> Raleigh
>>
>>
>>
>> On Sat, Feb 3, 2018 at 8:59 PM, David McLean <carolinabirds...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Sat 3 Feb 2018
>>>
>>> All,
>>>
>>> I was back on Bulls Island today on a field trip with the Charleston
>>> Natural History Society. Along with a few other birders chasing the Tufted
>>> Duck reported from Jack's Creek yesterday, we had numerous scopes looking
>>> for the one Tufted Duck among a raft of 1600 Lesser Scaup and Ruddy Ducks
>>> but came up empty. I feel that we had a better than even chance of seeing
>>> the Tufted Duck had it been there in that large raft.
>>>
>>> When we were watching the Tufted Duck yesterday, Friday, it behaved
>>> as though it was right at home. It was resting among many other ducks, was
>>> interacting with those others as though it was just another Lesser Scaup,
>>> and appeared well settled. Jack's is a big impoundment with many large open
>>> areas that the LESC seem to favor, and we were unable to look into most of
>>> those other areas today. The Tufted Duck could have easily been in another
>>> area of Jack's. Hopefully if will be re-sighted by others in the next few
>>> days.
>>>
>>> Regards,
>>>
>>> David McLean
>>> Charleston, SC
>>>
>>> --
>>> David C. McLean, Jr.
>>> DCMcLean AT gmail DOT com
>>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> Jack Rogers
> Mt Pleasant, SC
> My Flickr page <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_90726323-40N05_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=7n5jTGUbJvzkaePN-DuKoJtCw3dgkZhth5hHVaImGz0&s=dvMnpA5DT272f-DZaMiykXW_In6utzioraPxxBDKDDI&e= >
>



--
Jack Rogers
Mt Pleasant, SC
My Flickr page <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_90726323-40N05_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=7n5jTGUbJvzkaePN-DuKoJtCw3dgkZhth5hHVaImGz0&s=dvMnpA5DT272f-DZaMiykXW_In6utzioraPxxBDKDDI&e= >

 

Back to top
Date: 2/4/18 10:30 am
From: Jack Rogers <jack...>
Subject: Re: Tufted Duck on Bulls not seen today
I'm obviously not one of the reviewers, but considering the bird is:
1) An ABA rarity (Code 3)
2) A state first
3) A Carolinas second (only other record is the 2009 Winston-Salem bird, as
I'm sure many of you know)
4) From a species well known to hybridize with several other species
(Tufted x Scaup, in particular, can be a hard ID)
I think that perhaps a little time might bode well for accuracy purposes
(not saying I don't believe that this bird in particular is indeed a Tufted
Duck. David is a great birder for finding this bird!). Not to mention the
other birds throughout the state needing to be reviewed. It's a tough
job! Kudos to em.

Jack Rogers
Mt Pleasant, SC

On Sun, Feb 4, 2018 at 1:00 PM, Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Question to you South Carolina folks: Why has the record of Tufted Duck,
> with 10 excellent and confirming photographs on the eBird report, not yet
> been accepted by eBird -- yet all of the other Bulls Island rare birds for
> the same day (Feb. 2) and yesterday have been accepted? This has been done
> intentionally, but why? If I were the observers/photographers .....
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
>
>
> On Sat, Feb 3, 2018 at 8:59 PM, David McLean <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> Sat 3 Feb 2018
>>
>> All,
>>
>> I was back on Bulls Island today on a field trip with the Charleston
>> Natural History Society. Along with a few other birders chasing the Tufted
>> Duck reported from Jack's Creek yesterday, we had numerous scopes looking
>> for the one Tufted Duck among a raft of 1600 Lesser Scaup and Ruddy Ducks
>> but came up empty. I feel that we had a better than even chance of seeing
>> the Tufted Duck had it been there in that large raft.
>>
>> When we were watching the Tufted Duck yesterday, Friday, it behaved as
>> though it was right at home. It was resting among many other ducks, was
>> interacting with those others as though it was just another Lesser Scaup,
>> and appeared well settled. Jack's is a big impoundment with many large open
>> areas that the LESC seem to favor, and we were unable to look into most of
>> those other areas today. The Tufted Duck could have easily been in another
>> area of Jack's. Hopefully if will be re-sighted by others in the next few
>> days.
>>
>> Regards,
>>
>> David McLean
>> Charleston, SC
>>
>> --
>> David C. McLean, Jr.
>> DCMcLean AT gmail DOT com
>>
>
>


--
Jack Rogers
Mt Pleasant, SC
My Flickr page <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_90726323-40N05_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Rlmg863rz8rOTueAGNi4GR5Lymty3bMiabbUPv2cETQ&s=y9HQH629RNPZO2FT4lRwpWcwjpVrnFj-s_hp4HTHxnI&e= >

 

Back to top
Date: 2/4/18 10:00 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Tufted Duck on Bulls not seen today
Question to you South Carolina folks: Why has the record of Tufted Duck,
with 10 excellent and confirming photographs on the eBird report, not yet
been accepted by eBird -- yet all of the other Bulls Island rare birds for
the same day (Feb. 2) and yesterday have been accepted? This has been done
intentionally, but why? If I were the observers/photographers .....

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh



On Sat, Feb 3, 2018 at 8:59 PM, David McLean <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Sat 3 Feb 2018
>
> All,
>
> I was back on Bulls Island today on a field trip with the Charleston
> Natural History Society. Along with a few other birders chasing the Tufted
> Duck reported from Jack's Creek yesterday, we had numerous scopes looking
> for the one Tufted Duck among a raft of 1600 Lesser Scaup and Ruddy Ducks
> but came up empty. I feel that we had a better than even chance of seeing
> the Tufted Duck had it been there in that large raft.
>
> When we were watching the Tufted Duck yesterday, Friday, it behaved as
> though it was right at home. It was resting among many other ducks, was
> interacting with those others as though it was just another Lesser Scaup,
> and appeared well settled. Jack's is a big impoundment with many large open
> areas that the LESC seem to favor, and we were unable to look into most of
> those other areas today. The Tufted Duck could have easily been in another
> area of Jack's. Hopefully if will be re-sighted by others in the next few
> days.
>
> Regards,
>
> David McLean
> Charleston, SC
>
> --
> David C. McLean, Jr.
> DCMcLean AT gmail DOT com
>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/3/18 6:50 pm
From: Sam Cooper <dmcooper2...>
Subject: lower Cape Fear River grebes & goldeneyes
Lots of waterfowl in the lower Cape Fear River at Ft. Fisher (New Hanover County, NC) this morning including four grebe species. Eared from the historic site/museum area, Red-necked from the Air Force recreation area, and at least 25 Common Goldeneyes, including 4 adult drakes. Long-distance views of most, requiring good light, calm river conditions, and a good scope.

Sam Cooper
Wilmington, NC
____________________________________________________________
How To Remove Eye Bags & Lip Lines Fast (Watch)
Fit Mom Daily
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__thirdpartyoffers.juno.com_TGL3141_5a76748d1861748c636dst01duc&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=wAH6-5h6MZs79KS7RgT0cQV4u7KIBhG2o7WfGG1CZe0&s=mzoI-aS9gowJyqiqSNrdNh3TX-9hHieRyH6_eL1LZg4&e=
 

Back to top
Date: 2/3/18 6:26 pm
From: Clyde Sorenson <sorenson...>
Subject: Awesome day at Mattamuskeet and Pungo
All- I took a group from my academic department at NCSU to the coastal
refuges today. First to Mattamuskeet, where we saw the huge numbers of
ducks on the entrance impoundment. We found two of Ricky's Eurasian wigeon,
and I got a picture of a drake COMMON TEAL (will try to send this to CBC
photo pages). We also saw an otter at Lake Landing. The swan and snow goose
show at Pungo at sunset today was incredible. We didn't see the sandhills
but didn't journey to the corner impoundment, either. Completely satisfying
day, though.

Clyde Sorenson
Clayton and Raleigh, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 2/3/18 6:06 pm
From: Ricky Davis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Good birds in E. N.C. today
Hi Folks

Decided to look for some of the good birds in eastern N.C. that have been previously reported (Hyde, Dare, Tyrrell, Washington counties) today. Started at Pungo and found the three Sandhills Cranes with the Tundra Swans at the impoundment on the sw. corner of the lake. Next went to the entrance impoundment at Lake Mattamuskeet and found 3 Eurasian Wigeon. By the way, there are more waterfowl there right now than I have ever seen! It is wall-to-wall birds! Next went to check on the Brewer’s Blackbirds at the horse pen on Gum Swamp Road and found 6 (3 males, 3 females). Then went to Alligator River Refuge to look for hawks. I first drove onto Link Road (off of Long Curve Road) to get a good vantage point for most of the fields — wrong decision — got the car stuck in a big mud puddle! Some extraordinarily nice folks from VA helped me try to get the car out, but to no avail. They finally went to get a rope, but ran across a Refuge guy with a winch. 1.5 hours later I was on the move, so did the hawk watching from Milltail and Long Curve Roads the rest of the time! First bird of interest was the adult Swainson’s Hawk at some distance to the east from Milltail. Then the light phase Rough-legged Hawk appeared much closer to Milltail and not too far from the maintenance buildings. Then while searching for the leucistic Red-tailed Hawk (to no avail), I saw a hawk sitting on the big dirt mound at the borrow pit on Long Curve Rd. It was an immature Swainson’s! It got up and flew around quite close for excellent looks! On the way home stopped at the Beasley Rd. Pond field and found 6 Snow Geese (4 white, 2 Blue), 2 Ross’s Geese, and one Cackling Goose. The Ross’s were seen in flight and on the ground while the Cackling was only picked out in flight. Could not pick out the White-fronteds that have been with this big Canada Goose flock previously.

What a day!

Later, Ricky

Ricky Davis
Rocky Mount, NC

Sent from my iPad
 

Back to top
Date: 2/3/18 6:00 pm
From: David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Tufted Duck on Bulls not seen today
Sat 3 Feb 2018

All,

I was back on Bulls Island today on a field trip with the Charleston
Natural History Society. Along with a few other birders chasing the Tufted
Duck reported from Jack's Creek yesterday, we had numerous scopes looking
for the one Tufted Duck among a raft of 1600 Lesser Scaup and Ruddy Ducks
but came up empty. I feel that we had a better than even chance of seeing
the Tufted Duck had it been there in that large raft.

When we were watching the Tufted Duck yesterday, Friday, it behaved as
though it was right at home. It was resting among many other ducks, was
interacting with those others as though it was just another Lesser Scaup,
and appeared well settled. Jack's is a big impoundment with many large open
areas that the LESC seem to favor, and we were unable to look into most of
those other areas today. The Tufted Duck could have easily been in another
area of Jack's. Hopefully if will be re-sighted by others in the next few
days.

Regards,

David McLean
Charleston, SC

--
David C. McLean, Jr.
DCMcLean AT gmail DOT com

 

Back to top
Date: 2/3/18 1:21 pm
From: ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Update on ruby throated hummingbirds on Hatteras
Hi Everyone

After those bitterly cold 10 days ( Jan. 2-12) gale winds, 3” rain and then
ice and 3” snow... followed by five more days of gale winds when the temps
were in the teens...

You may recall I sighted a few the immediate morning after the storm hit,
and then it dropped to no sightings for many days
By Jan. 18 I had 7 uniquely identifiable hummers using the feeders: two
adult males (one banded ), two females ( one banded), and three young
males. Prior to the storm we had a banded male and female but I cant
confirm if these were the same birds yet.

It is amazing they are here.



--
Ann Maddock <am.hummingbird.photos...> Hatteras Island, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 2/3/18 9:19 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lake Crabtree, NC, waterbirds picking back up
It is interesting reading the various three lists for Lake Crabtree, Wake
County (county park, dam, and Southport side) to see what has been seen on
this lake in the past two days. What I and a few others of us saw today is
completely different -- almost like a different lake! If the four birders
with scopes attempting to see the waterfowl from the dock steps instead of
the tower had come up there with me, at my suggesting, they would not have
missed the birds they did. They refused to come up; "too cold" up
there. Is there a word for "fear of towers"? Towerphobia?

The renewed cold weather has brought a lot of ducks in, mainly dabbling
ducks, and also a lot of mud from recent rains. Here is what I had today,
with all 3 sites combined here:

Canada Goose 15
Mallard 100 big push of wild birds
NORTHERN PINTAIL 1+ male; seen in flight with Mallards, flushed by a
*#*#* kayaker
Gadwall 30
Green-winged Teal 60 mostly at the Southport island
Ring-necked Duck 2 low
Lesser Scaup 5-6 low; were most at Brier Creek Reservoir?
Greater Scaup 10 or more great looks at several males from the dam;
first time I've had more Greaters than Lessers here
Red-breasted Merganser 15 continuing, with many males in the group
COMMON MERGANSER 2 females; one female has been here for many weeks
Hooded Merganser 120
Ruddy Duck 9
Pied-billed Grebe 10
Double-crested Cormorant 125 they were essentially missing during the
Deep Freeze
Great Blue Heron 35 everywhere rimming the lake
Ring-billed Gull 150
Herring Gull 3 first winter birds
Killdeer 4
Bald Eagle 1 adult
Belted Kingfisher 1

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

 

Back to top
Date: 2/3/18 8:48 am
From: Greg Massey <gmassey001...>
Subject: 5,000 Ring-necked Ducks

I know that it is not unusual to find concentrations of Ring-necked Ducks in the thousands in various locations throughout the US, but to find 5,000+ at one location is a rare treat for SE North Carolina. Yesterday, I observed this number in Camp Pretty Pond Lake, at the edge of Boiling Spring, NC, near Southport. Quite a spectacle. What was so obvious is that no other ducks, except 4 Mallards, were observed in the group.

Greg Massey
Leland,NC 28451
 

Back to top
Date: 2/3/18 8:11 am
From: Wayne K. Forsythe <wforsythe...>
Subject: A first fior me!
Folks,
Just looked out the window and saw a male Robin on my platform feeder, eating suet! When the weather gets cold and inclement weather is expected, I place a block of peanut suet in the center of the platform. This tends to attract Bluebirds for a free meal that don't usually come to my feeders otherwise.
Wayne
Wayne K. Forsythe
16 Colonial Way
Hendersonville, N. C. 28791
wforsytheATmorrisbb.net
 

Back to top
Date: 2/3/18 3:49 am
From: Cherrie Sneed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: MaleCommonGoldeneyes_RidgevillePond_DorchesterCoSC
Hi Birders,

Late yesterday afternoon there were two beautiful male Common Goldeneyes on
the larger of two private ponds on Ridgeville Road (Hwy 27) in Ridgeville,
SC. Thanks to Aija Konrad for spotting them.

The owner is protective of his property so if you go please stay on the
shoulder of the road. Beware of the large trucks driving by also. The
afternoon sun was pretty brutal, but the white on the ducks and the bold
whilte cheek patch stood out.

Checklist: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S42441755&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=bnyL1LW9DmqO4NCkaSlPJjhSeBEUDMlPak4hhsR4iic&s=jUUXTu9evuvgZelD4UWiqyKYTscxrWCLZvNxWKc23dk&e=

Cherrie

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
*Cherrie & Dan Sneed*
Meggett, SC
St. Paul's Parish
Southern Coastal Charleston County
&
Robbinsville, NC
Snowbird Mountains
Graham County

 

Back to top
Date: 2/2/18 5:08 pm
From: David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Tufted Duck found on Jack's Creek, Bulls Island, Cape Romain NWR
Fri 2 Feb 2018

All,

David Youndblood and I found a Tufted Duck calmly hanging out with a
raft of Lesser Scaup and Ruddy Ducks on Jack's Creek, Bulls Island, Cape
Romain NWR, Charleston County, SC.

We had just arrived at the Old Fort on the back (bay) side of Jack's
Creek about 9:30 AM and were scoping the ducks from afar before walking
further out into the open. This scaup-sized duck had a very dark head, very
dark butt, and very dark back and had a bright-white side below folded
wings; the line of demarcation between the dark and white plumage was
razor-sharp. It was floating with it's head tucked between it's wings. It's
yellow eye showed well. Then we saw a distinct feather tuft. That made for
an easy ID as it turned out.

We spent two hours scoping this duck, taking digiscope and digital
camera pictures (which we fully expect to be absolutely diagnostic). We
were joined briefly by Sarah Dawsey (the Cape Romain Refuge Manager) and a
couple of alligator sleuths (who were there pulling several dead alligators
and performing necropsies). The Tufted Duck spent most of it's time resting
with it's bill tucked and keeping company with the LESC and RUDU. The duck
was at sufficient distance that a spotting scope was absolutely needed to
confirm the ID; we could see the duck with binoculars but couldn't see
details sufficiently to ID without scopes. Best field marks to look for to
pick out this one duck among the raft of ducks was the very dark
head/back/butt contrasting sharply with bright white sides. Once located
this way the bird's tuft was easily seen, even with it's head tucked.

Just as an FYI, the regular ferry service to Bulls runs Saturday only
departing from Garris Landing at 10:00 AM. No advance registration
required, just board and pay the ferryman.

We will post a fuller description and some photographs with our eBird
checklist later this evening.

Regards,

David McLean
Charleston, SC

--
David C. McLean, Jr.
DCMcLean AT gmail DOT com

 

Back to top
Date: 2/2/18 4:58 pm
From: \kathy <khart123...>\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Alaska birding
Hello fellow birders,
I am going on an Alaskan cruise June 23-30 with stops in Juneau, Ketchikan, Skagway, and Victoria, BC. I would appreciate any birding suggestions or contacts regarding these ports-of-call.

Thanks,
Kathy Hart
<Kathy21265...>

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 2/2/18 4:47 pm
From: Ric Porter <ric...>
Subject: Re: Article on the impact of feeding birds
I found this a very interesting read. However it raises more questions than it answers.


From: "carolinabirds" <carolinabirds...>
To: "carolinabirds" <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Friday, February 2, 2018 9:44:40 AM
Subject: Article on the impact of feeding birds

This is an interesting and entertaining look at how bird feeders may (or may not) impact birds. From the perspective of someone feeding them from their 25th floor high-rise no less!

[ https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.theatlantic.com_science_archive_2018_01_urban-2Dbirds-2Dare-2Devolving-2Dto-2Dbe-2Dfed_551120_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=icsvP3NjgP7JPnGFxnjiNSpITzjiQgv2lf3iuRiRW5Q&s=4Aqv6jytIwy2gjHp2OZ3ZqCsgmhFVPHYIG6a1Bp9Ixw&e= | https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.theatlantic.com_science_archive_2018_01_urban-2Dbirds-2Dare-2Devolving-2Dto-2Dbe-2Dfed_551120_&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=sFbWR2B8wkEoJ1UAqVOoZgd5yyLTxFHBdO3DFEAM8u8&s=U1WddTH2TXWyq47j6rzT_B4vX0VoSn8p0DZlMb1ZdF4&e= ]

Enjoy,

Jennifer Horton
Simpsonville, SC


 

Back to top
Date: 2/2/18 3:46 pm
From: David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Tufted Duck, Bulls Island, Cape Romain NWR
F 2 Feb 2018

All,

David Youngblood and I are looking at a Tufted Duck from the Old Fort, Jack’s Creek, Bulls Island, Cape Romain NWR, Charleston Co. Full description, including (hopefully) documentary photographs will follow later today.

Regards,

David McLean
Charleston, SC

David C. McLean, Jr.
dcmclean AT gmail DOT com
 

Back to top
Date: 2/2/18 3:46 pm
From: David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Tufted Duck, Bulls Island, Cape Romain NWR
Fri 2 Feb 2018

All,

David Youngblood and I are watching a Tufted Duck in Jack’s Creek from the Old Fort, Bulls Island, Cape Romain NWR, Charleston County. Descriptions and photos will follow later today.

Regards,

David McLean
Charleston, SC

David C. McLean, Jr.
dcmclean AT gmail DOT com
 

Back to top
Date: 2/2/18 1:41 pm
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hurricanes and birds
Sorry, no specific Carolina sightings with this note. That pesky "need for a job" requiring me to stay indoors, but I did note with interest this little piece on the effects of hurricanes and birds, especially island birds. Thought it might be of interest to some.
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.straightdope.com_columns_read_9213_what-2Dhappens-2Dto-2Dbirds-2Dduring-2Da-2Dhurricane_&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=holAwTLp4EdM-_ySS8IWZ_770Ht0KXYtolrhWV3RlHw&s=AdTak5F97V9rC4RHCn-SDzOYsyXdetRBQdK7ZREjXzw&e=
I'm not saying that everything there is gospel, but raises some salient points.

If you find yourself wanting to bird vicariously this weekend, check out the Carolina Bird Club website for a report on the recently completed field trip to central and western Panama. We notched just over 300 species in mid-January.
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_Trips_reports_Panama2018.html&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=holAwTLp4EdM-_ySS8IWZ_770Ht0KXYtolrhWV3RlHw&s=pI99CSTmP2_WYUYl14MnnZVrL6aHYoFO8sa3i-Ws3kc&e=

It's also not too early to being making plans for the CBC Spring Meeting April 27-28 in Flat Rock, NC. This meeting features special guest speaker Julie Zickefoose, well-known writer, artist and bird naturalist. Info at:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_meetings_2018_FlatRock_&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=holAwTLp4EdM-_ySS8IWZ_770Ht0KXYtolrhWV3RlHw&s=mUpeLU5Wds3sJcDX2qUB8e617OEsW9zMocHrADm1CwM&e=

Suspecting there will be more "eagle sightings" than usual this weekend :),
Steve Shultz
Apex, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 2/2/18 1:27 pm
From: Jerry <bogey...>
Subject: Re: Pungo Lake road conditions?
Pat’s Road/Charles Kuralt trail. I drove last week on the dirt road until I came to
the right turn on the trail. A warning sign says that part of the road “may be impassible under
wet conditions. It was! Had to double back. Plenty of Tundras in the waters and many were exiting
for whereever they go. The Snow Geese were out in the fields and nowhere to be seen.
Bottom line: if it has recently rained: Drive with caution..... and then go straight to the car wash.


Jerry Kerschner
Pawleys Island SC

From: landaujr (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
Sent: Friday, February 2, 2018 11:00 AM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Pungo Lake road conditions?

My wife Karen & I visited Pungo Lake for the first time yesterday (2/1) in our humble Chevy Cruze.

Picking up a refuge map at the information kiosk, we were able to drive to the “Pungo Lake Platform” with little difficulty. Plenty of Tundra Swans and distant Snow Geese but strong winds that challenged the scope. We weren’t confident about the looks of the road over to “Pungo Lake Observation Point” or the warning sign, and so we re-traced our steps back out (Hyde Park Road?) to the Refuge Road. We drove part way out the “D-Canal Road” with little difficulty. We spent the rest of our time enjoying the Tundras off of Pat’s Road and trying without success to find a Yellow-Headed Blackbird among the thousands of Red-winged Blackbirds.

A more muscular, higher clearance vehicle might inspire more confidence.



Happy trails,



Jim Landau

landaujrATgmail.com

Beaufort, NC

 

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Date: 2/2/18 1:11 pm
From: Jacob Farmer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Rough-legged Hawk - Alligator River NWR - Dare County NC
Jamie Adams called to report that he just had and photographed a
Rough-legged Hawk off Miltail Road in Alligator River NWR. He is currently
attempting to relocate the bird.

That's all the details that I have at this time.

Regards,


Jacob Farmer
Raleigh, NC

 

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Date: 2/2/18 10:31 am
From: Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Beaufort, NC Sandhill Cranes singing and dancing and the new bypass
Hi Carolina Birders,

The new Hwy 70 Beaufort bypass opened last Sunday. As many of you know,
the bypass runs behind the corn field where the Sandhill Cranes spend a lot
of time. I was wondering how they would react to the new traffic. I did
not see them on Monday, January 29. On January 30, I saw them fly over
heading west while I was sitting at one of the new traffic lights along the
bypass, on my way to check on them. They appeared to be coming from the
corn field. On Wednesday, January 31, I drove the bypass several times
going from place to place and did not see them until 8:54 AM. I drove
around to Hwy 101 and viewed them with a scope as I have done many times in
the past. This morning, Friday, February 2, as I was returning to Beaufort
heading west along the bypass, I saw them not too far from the road.
Traffic was light (no cars near me at the time), so I pulled to the
shoulder and watched them. I was thrilled to see and hear them dancing and
vocalizing! I snapped a few quick photos through my open window. I then
tried to record the vocalizations, but traffic picked up and by the time it
cleared the cranes had stopped. It appears they have adjusted to the new
traffic running close to one of their daytime hangouts.

Marty Wall
Beaufort, NC

eBird checklist with photos of dancing cranes

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S42432619&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=E4RpS_aOeNNxDzEgWnOFPUBZM1UHL5ORJFetx-vu290&s=b5sqmqI2SBXFdaDHbEVVL6jTH4ri4RY8GMzRz-nccu8&e=

 

Back to top
Date: 2/2/18 8:58 am
From: Steve Compton <scompton1251...>
Subject: Re: Tufted Duck on Bulls Island, Cape Romain NWR
Craig,.
My goodness. Quite a duck year. That may be a state record bird.I
predict good business for Coastal Expeditions.
Steve ComptonPlanning a trip to Bull's Island for next weekend in
Greenville, SC

Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE DroidOn 2 Feb 2018 11:54 am, James Watson
<carolinabirds...> wrote:

David McClean just contacted me to say he is looking at a Tufted
Duck in Jack's Creek on Bulls Island, Cape Romain National
Wildlife Refuge, in Awendaw, South Carolina. No details, he
simply asked me to pass this on to the listserv.

--

Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul - and
sings the tunes without the words - and never stops at all.
Craig WatsonMount Pleasant, SC
 

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Date: 2/2/18 8:54 am
From: James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Tufted Duck on Bulls Island, Cape Romain NWR
David McClean just contacted me to say he is looking at a Tufted Duck in
Jack's Creek on Bulls Island, Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, in
Awendaw, South Carolina. No details, he simply asked me to pass this on to
the listserv.

--

*Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul - and sings the
tunes without the words - and never stops at all.*

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 2/2/18 8:01 am
From: landaujr (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Pungo Lake road conditions?
My wife Karen & I visited Pungo Lake for the first time yesterday (2/1) in
our humble Chevy Cruze.

Picking up a refuge map at the information kiosk, we were able to drive to
the "Pungo Lake Platform" with little difficulty. Plenty of Tundra Swans and
distant Snow Geese but strong winds that challenged the scope. We weren't
confident about the looks of the road over to "Pungo Lake Observation Point"
or the warning sign, and so we re-traced our steps back out (Hyde Park
Road?) to the Refuge Road. We drove part way out the "D-Canal Road" with
little difficulty. We spent the rest of our time enjoying the Tundras off of
Pat's Road and trying without success to find a Yellow-Headed Blackbird
among the thousands of Red-winged Blackbirds.

A more muscular, higher clearance vehicle might inspire more confidence.



Happy trails,



Jim Landau

landaujrATgmail.com

Beaufort, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 2/2/18 6:45 am
From: Jennifer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Article on the impact of feeding birds
This is an interesting and entertaining look at how bird feeders may (or
may not) impact birds. From the perspective of someone feeding them from
their 25th floor high-rise no less!

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.theatlantic.com_science_archive_2018_01_urban-2Dbirds-2Dare-2Devolving-2Dto-2Dbe-2Dfed_551120_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=icsvP3NjgP7JPnGFxnjiNSpITzjiQgv2lf3iuRiRW5Q&s=4Aqv6jytIwy2gjHp2OZ3ZqCsgmhFVPHYIG6a1Bp9Ixw&e=

Enjoy,

Jennifer Horton
Simpsonville, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 2/1/18 7:00 pm
From: Clyde Sorenson <sorenson...>
Subject: Pungo road conditions?
Anyone have any insight in to the road conditions on the wildlife drive at
Pungo?

Thanks,

Clyde Sorenson
Clayton and Raleigh, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 2/1/18 12:36 pm
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Brookshire Park Bird Walk Saturday 8AM Boone NC
HCAS' monthly bird walk at Brookshire Park in Boone is this Saturday at
8AM. All are welcome to this free walk in the floodplain of the New
River about 2 miles east of Boone just off US421.

Cold temperatures in the mid teens are forecast with very light winds,
so bundle up and join us for some winter birding in the NC mountains.

Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 2/1/18 10:08 am
From: Jennifer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fwd: Woodcock program, Harris Lake County Park, Wake County
Thought some people on here might be interested in this event.

Jennifer Horton
Simpsonville, SC

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: <Alden.Early...>
Date: Wed, Jan 31, 2018 at 4:16 PM
Subject: [NC-EE] Woodcock program, Harris Lake County Park, Wake County


Join us on a wagon ride to look for Woodcocks in the park. Although very
small, this bird takes "making a good impression" to new heights! The males
will take to the air and put on a dazzling performance of spins and spirals
to impress a mate. If we're lucky, our group will encounter this cool
spectacle just before sunset and we will be able to enjoy it as long as the
light lasts. We will be travelling along the back roads of the park to an
open field. Be prepared to wear plenty of layers and bring a blanket!

Saturday, February 17; 5:30 - 7 p.m.
919-387-4342 <(919)%20387-4342>
Harris Lake County Park
2112 County Park Drive, New Hill, NC
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__maps.google.com_-3Fq-3D2112-2BCounty-2BPark-2BDrive-2C-2BNew-2BHill-2C-2BNC-25C2-25A0-2B27562-26entry-3Dgmail-26source-3Dg&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=2MOEcMN94TSp9tjlqAnpJJH0y4B268h7PYQJC-BRBeg&s=NJ7xKd0y5dFRFqy63EI0iz2YrkiuolcmPzwdqmJOFBc&e= >
27562
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__maps.google.com_-3Fq-3D2112-2BCounty-2BPark-2BDrive-2C-2BNew-2BHill-2C-2BNC-25C2-25A0-2B27562-26entry-3Dgmail-26source-3Dg&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=2MOEcMN94TSp9tjlqAnpJJH0y4B268h7PYQJC-BRBeg&s=NJ7xKd0y5dFRFqy63EI0iz2YrkiuolcmPzwdqmJOFBc&e= >
Meet at the wagon near the Playground
Free for Great Backyard Bird Count

Register here: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__apm.activecommunities.com_wakeparks_Activity-5F&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=2MOEcMN94TSp9tjlqAnpJJH0y4B268h7PYQJC-BRBeg&s=HXcjNx3nIx2Q8-NOcl9XU8fO_-HMEteLz2e-THa4Xnc&e=
Search/2650

Alden Early
Park Technician of Programs
Harris Lake County Park/ American Tobacco Trail
2112 County Park Drive, New Hill, N.C.
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__maps.google.com_-3Fq-3D2112-2BCounty-2BPark-2BDrive-2C-2BNew-2BHill-2C-2BN.C.-25C2-25A0-25C2-25A027562-26entry-3Dgmail-26source-3Dg&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=2MOEcMN94TSp9tjlqAnpJJH0y4B268h7PYQJC-BRBeg&s=e2uCNmPetCGGHWbJBw2RT80DvCj8mbfWJSI8CLqju3w&e= >
27562
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__maps.google.com_-3Fq-3D2112-2BCounty-2BPark-2BDrive-2C-2BNew-2BHill-2C-2BN.C.-25C2-25A0-25C2-25A027562-26entry-3Dgmail-26source-3Dg&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=2MOEcMN94TSp9tjlqAnpJJH0y4B268h7PYQJC-BRBeg&s=e2uCNmPetCGGHWbJBw2RT80DvCj8mbfWJSI8CLqju3w&e= >
Office Phone: 919-387-4341 <(919)%20387-4341>
Mobile Phone: 919-669-6958 <(919)%20669-6958>
Email: <alden.early...>

_______________________________________________
This message was posted on the NC-EE email list.

 

Back to top
Date: 2/1/18 7:14 am
From: Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...>
Subject: Hummingbirds wintering in Carolinas
Recently, there have been posts about hummingbirds seen in winter.  I've also seen a 2014 episode of SCETV's "Expeditions" show where the host, Dr. Patrick McMillan, stated Rufous hummingbirds had become so prevalent they are now considered as winter visitors in the Carolinas.  I've never seen this bird locally and am wondering if I should put out a nectar feeder.  Has this bird been seen in or around Charleston, SC and the lowcountry?  The same goes for wintering Ruby-throats.  Thank you in advance to anyone who can address my questions.
 Frank HamiltonCharleston, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 1/31/18 2:31 pm
From: Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Nice loon flight today but few auks
I checked Cape Point this morning and there were a lot of birds moving, but today it was Red-throated Loons. They were going by at a good clip early this morning. Many were distant, but there was a steady eastbound flight ranging from 50 to 150 a minute for quite a while. There were more close birds later in the morning. There were comparatively few Razorbills today: I saw less then 100 in time I was there. Conditions have changed, and it was dirty water as far south as I could see. Yesterday there was some clear looking water a mile or more out. This is not unusual after a long period of north wind and the associated down shore current it helps generate. In a day’s time the water at the weather buoy- 20 miles out- dropped from over 66 degrees to the low 40s. In the past, such an incursion of cold water has been good for finding other alcids a few miles out. Some might remember the CBC boat trip in 2011 when we had hundreds of Dovekies and quite a few puffins. There were also a few murres around that winter, but it was tough to find them because there were so many birds to look at. There is still 60 some degree water well inshore to the east of Cape Lookout. This means the alcids should pile up here for a while.

Brian Patteson
Hatteras, NC
 

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Date: 1/31/18 2:27 pm
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Small bird mortality in NC salt marsh during harsh winters
Chris,

I'm not sure the Marsh Wrens were necessarily wintering birds. But
good point on the 'Saltmarsh' Sparrows - I missed that Seasides were
not involved.

I do still think that temporary relocation from the degraded habitat
is a possible explanation of their absence - rather than total
mortality.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

On Wed, Jan 31, 2018 at 5:04 PM, Christopher Hill <Chill...> wrote:
>
> On Jan 31, 2018, at 5:00 PM, Nate Dias <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Populations returning to normal levels from "zero" after only 2 years
> would seem to argue against total mortality.
>
>
> This actually seems quite plausible. These are wintering birds. If one
> stretch of marshes in the wintering range is emptied out of wintering birds,
> new birds *should* repopulate it the next winter if it’s good habitat
> (assuming that there isn’t huge amounts of surplus wintering habitat). Even
> though banding studies have shown pretty ridiculous site-faithfulness in
> winter, there are new young birds being hatched every year looking for
> places to winter.
>
> Chris Hill
> Conway, SC
 

Back to top
Date: 1/31/18 2:05 pm
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Small bird mortality in NC salt marsh during harsh winters

On Jan 31, 2018, at 5:00 PM, Nate Dias <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

Populations returning to normal levels from "zero" after only 2 years
would seem to argue against total mortality.

This actually seems quite plausible. These are wintering birds. If one stretch of marshes in the wintering range is emptied out of wintering birds, new birds *should* repopulate it the next winter if it’s good habitat (assuming that there isn’t huge amounts of surplus wintering habitat). Even though banding studies have shown pretty ridiculous site-faithfulness in winter, there are new young birds being hatched every year looking for places to winter.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC
 

Back to top
Date: 1/31/18 2:00 pm
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Small bird mortality in NC salt marsh during harsh winters
Based on what Gilbert said, I think concluding that "all the marsh
sparrows and Marsh Wrens died" is a bit of a stretch.

Populations returning to normal levels from "zero" after only 2 years
would seem to argue against total mortality.

Who's to say they didn't temporarily relocate to a nearby marsh with
less storm damage? Or a more extensive marsh where degraded habitat
could still provide enough food and cover.

Who's to say they didn't abscond to Georgia or Florida and return
after a few weeks or months? etc.

Eventually geolocators or other technology might answer this question
with accuracy.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

On Wed, Jan 31, 2018 at 8:06 AM, Gilbert Grant <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I was conducting bird surveys in a 14 hectare marsh (mostly Spartina and Juncus) near Surf City, NC, for 4 winters during the late 1980’s. The blizzard of 1989 that John Fussell referred to deposited a record 38 cm of snow in the area on 22-23 December 1989. Temperatures remained below freezing from 22-26 December with the extreme low of -19 C recorded in nearby Jacksonville during this time. Populations of both Sharp-tailed Sparrows (before AOU split this species) and Marsh Wrens plummeted to zero in this marsh and did not recover over the remaining winter months. However, populations returned to normal levels by 1991. In case anyone is interested Bill Kirby-Smith and I published a note on this in the Journal of the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society 108(3):145-148, 1992. I did not encounter any dead individuals of these species which was not surprising due to their small size and the dense marsh vegetation.
>
> Gilbert S. Grant
> Sneads Ferry ,NC
> Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 1/31/18 10:01 am
From: The Gaston Gang (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Super Bowl
This is not local but is of interest and concern to bird watchers

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.usatoday.com_story_sports_columnist_josh-2Dpeter_2018_01_30_site-2Dsuper-2Dbowl-2D2018-2Ddeath-2Dtrap-2Dbirds-2Deagles-2Dpatriots-2Dus-2Dbank-2Dstadium_1079934001_-3Fcsp-3Dsports&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=tOXt58VJBqNjOTI5RoJvn8fA8scG8ScK3p-QuNnHEl8&s=-SKVe4se6RQRQF2yLeDEZRkP4COB47q4cLbVVNeI-WU&e=

Edna Gaston
Hyco Lake

 

Back to top
Date: 1/31/18 9:59 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Small bird mortality in NC salt marsh during harsh winters
I note with some interest that there were birders in the CBC meeting area
who saw some nice birds that were not reported at the CBC meeting countdown
on Saturday night.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Wed, Jan 31, 2018 at 12:41 PM, "Shultz, Steven" <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> I tromped through the marsh at Ft. Fisher last weekend during the CBC
> winter meeting. Went out about a hundred yards, and then back along a
> slightly different route. Kicked up 2 Seaside, 3 Sedge Wren, and 3
> sharptail sp. that would not perch up for species-specific identification.
>
> This is pretty much "normal" based on my efforts at the same spot over
> different years. I'll also note that the tide was low, which is not the
> most productive for looking at marsh sparrows/wrens.
>
> I looked on eBird to see if there appeared to be any significant
> difference in reports of Saltmarsh Sparrow for January 2018 vs. 2017 and
> 2016. 2016 had the fewest reports in NC, with 2017 and 2018 being about
> the same. Saltmarshs are wintering on Cape Cod, which I presume to have a
> more severe winter (and winters in general) than here, but without apparent
> reduction in presence (i.e. eBird shows pretty consistent sightings in
> January year over year).
>
> So not sure that I'm convinced that the marsh sparrows were taken out in
> one fell swoop, but certainly an interesting conversation.
>
> Steve Shultz
> Apex, NC
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:carolinabirds-request@
> duke.edu] On Behalf Of Christopher Hill
> Sent: Wednesday, January 31, 2018 12:10 PM
> To: Gilbert Grant
> Cc: <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: Re: Small bird mortality in NC salt marsh during harsh winters
>
> Gilbert,
>
> Before the storm, how common were the sparrows and wrens in the marsh?
> Were any other species, such as Clapper Rails, affected?
>
> Chris Hill
> Conway, SC
>
> > On Jan 31, 2018, at 8:06 AM, Gilbert Grant <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
> >
> >
> > I was conducting bird surveys in a 14 hectare marsh (mostly Spartina and
> Juncus) near Surf City, NC, for 4 winters during the late 1980’s. The
> blizzard of 1989 that John Fussell referred to deposited a record 38 cm of
> snow in the area on 22-23 December 1989. Temperatures remained below
> freezing from 22-26 December with the extreme low of -19 C recorded in
> nearby Jacksonville during this time. Populations of both Sharp-tailed
> Sparrows (before AOU split this species) and Marsh Wrens plummeted to zero
> in this marsh and did not recover over the remaining winter months.
> However, populations returned to normal levels by 1991. In case anyone is
> interested Bill Kirby-Smith and I published a note on this in the Journal
> of the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society 108(3):145-148, 1992. I did not
> encounter any dead individuals of these species which was not surprising
> due to their small size and the dense marsh vegetation.
> >
> > Gilbert S. Grant
> > Sneads Ferry ,NC
> > Sent from my iPhone
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/31/18 9:41 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Small bird mortality in NC salt marsh during harsh winters
I tromped through the marsh at Ft. Fisher last weekend during the CBC winter meeting. Went out about a hundred yards, and then back along a slightly different route. Kicked up 2 Seaside, 3 Sedge Wren, and 3 sharptail sp. that would not perch up for species-specific identification.

This is pretty much "normal" based on my efforts at the same spot over different years. I'll also note that the tide was low, which is not the most productive for looking at marsh sparrows/wrens.

I looked on eBird to see if there appeared to be any significant difference in reports of Saltmarsh Sparrow for January 2018 vs. 2017 and 2016. 2016 had the fewest reports in NC, with 2017 and 2018 being about the same. Saltmarshs are wintering on Cape Cod, which I presume to have a more severe winter (and winters in general) than here, but without apparent reduction in presence (i.e. eBird shows pretty consistent sightings in January year over year).

So not sure that I'm convinced that the marsh sparrows were taken out in one fell swoop, but certainly an interesting conversation.

Steve Shultz
Apex, NC


-----Original Message-----
From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Christopher Hill
Sent: Wednesday, January 31, 2018 12:10 PM
To: Gilbert Grant
Cc: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Small bird mortality in NC salt marsh during harsh winters

Gilbert,

Before the storm, how common were the sparrows and wrens in the marsh? Were any other species, such as Clapper Rails, affected?

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

> On Jan 31, 2018, at 8:06 AM, Gilbert Grant <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
>
> I was conducting bird surveys in a 14 hectare marsh (mostly Spartina and Juncus) near Surf City, NC, for 4 winters during the late 1980’s. The blizzard of 1989 that John Fussell referred to deposited a record 38 cm of snow in the area on 22-23 December 1989. Temperatures remained below freezing from 22-26 December with the extreme low of -19 C recorded in nearby Jacksonville during this time. Populations of both Sharp-tailed Sparrows (before AOU split this species) and Marsh Wrens plummeted to zero in this marsh and did not recover over the remaining winter months. However, populations returned to normal levels by 1991. In case anyone is interested Bill Kirby-Smith and I published a note on this in the Journal of the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society 108(3):145-148, 1992. I did not encounter any dead individuals of these species which was not surprising due to their small size and the dense marsh vegetation.
>
> Gilbert S. Grant
> Sneads Ferry ,NC
> Sent from my iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 1/31/18 9:10 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Small bird mortality in NC salt marsh during harsh winters
Gilbert,

Before the storm, how common were the sparrows and wrens in the marsh? Were any other species, such as Clapper Rails, affected?

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

> On Jan 31, 2018, at 8:06 AM, Gilbert Grant <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
>
> I was conducting bird surveys in a 14 hectare marsh (mostly Spartina and Juncus) near Surf City, NC, for 4 winters during the late 1980’s. The blizzard of 1989 that John Fussell referred to deposited a record 38 cm of snow in the area on 22-23 December 1989. Temperatures remained below freezing from 22-26 December with the extreme low of -19 C recorded in nearby Jacksonville during this time. Populations of both Sharp-tailed Sparrows (before AOU split this species) and Marsh Wrens plummeted to zero in this marsh and did not recover over the remaining winter months. However, populations returned to normal levels by 1991. In case anyone is interested Bill Kirby-Smith and I published a note on this in the Journal of the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society 108(3):145-148, 1992. I did not encounter any dead individuals of these species which was not surprising due to their small size and the dense marsh vegetation.
>
> Gilbert S. Grant
> Sneads Ferry ,NC
> Sent from my iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 1/31/18 7:53 am
From: Lena Gallitano <lbg...>
Subject: Re: Do feeders keep hummingbirds from migrating south in the fall?
Good morning Carolinabirders,

John and Harry have some very good points about wintering birds that enjoy
our feeders. I'd like to add to John's comments about micro-climates.

Take a look at this plant hardiness map for a comparison from 1990 to
2015. https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.arborday.org_media_map-5Fchange.cfm&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=FDmbULeJAni0JY2Lgh5Mydp0jrDfw812_4Snxi4fQnw&s=NiKEiCpRxg2cgKCte7v4QEaWs-c3IHmcOSiuzXk_KUM&e=

With even a small average change in temperature, I expect more birds are
able to find micro-climates, especially next to our buildings that offer
them just a few degrees of protection that will help them survive. We know
our native plants also offer greater food sources of larvae and bugs than
exotics. It would be interesting to compare habitat of the wintering birds
to see what native plants are in the area.

On one of our very cold days, I saw a Ruby-crowned Kinglet searching for
insects in the bark of one of our native trees. Maybe I've not been
observant enough to see that behavior before but they are typically
flitting from branch to branch when I've seen them. Now I wonder if this
observation was on the south and warmer side of the tree.

Many of you know I've had Baltimore Orioles in my yard since I began
Project Feeder Watch in 2003. That was the first time I had ever seen an
oriole in my yard. It was on the ground at a seed feeder but then flew up
to a saucer shaped hummingbird feeder I had neglected to bring inside.
There are sasanqua camellias in the neighbors yard and I've seen them at
the white flowers but never the pink. So what has kept them coming to my
yard? The grape jelly that I usually put out after I see the fist one in
the fall, the warmer winters or the habitat? A combination of all three?

I agree with Harry that we will not influence any global populations with
our feeders. I would suggest, however, that if we all work to protect
habitat on a large scale and on a small scale in our yards with more native
plants, we will offer our bird species a better opportunity to survive for
future generations.

Happy birding,

Lena Gallitano
Raleigh, NC



On Tue, Jan 30, 2018 at 9:46 PM, Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> John brings up some good points, just as Tom Quay, who I am presuming John
> is referring to with the Baltimore Oriole comment (and who was also my
> major professor) did about that species. But, regardless of whether John
> is right or wrong, we are dealing with a very tiny percentage of the entire
> world's population of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds -- maybe 200 in NC in
> winter versus a total population of 20,000,000 (as reported on Wikipedia).
> By my calculation, that represents .00001 % Even if I am off by one
> decimal place, so what? We are dealing with such a minuscule part of the
> global population that it doesn't matter if they all survive or die;most
> have died. Of course, we don't like it when they die, but this Deep Freeze
> in NC isn't going to impact the global population.
>
> Ditto for Baltimore Orioles. Even if only 10% of the usual number were to
> survive this winter as compared with other winters, we are still talking
> about a very tiny percentage of the global population, most of which are
> hopefully "happily" wintering where they should be in the tropics.
>
> Now, take a more serious example or two. The species that regularly
> winter in NC and SC, where NC and SC form a moderate part of the range, are
> of great concern if they survive or fail to survive the winter. At the
> recent CBC meeting in Wrightsville Beach, there was nary a sighting of
> Seaside, Sharp-tailed, or Nelson's sparrows. It wasn't completely due to
> lack of effort. The Deep Freeze heavily damaged the wintering bird
> populations in our salt and brackish marshes. The sparrows did not make
> it, for the most part. I would estimate that 70-80% of our 3 marsh species
> have succumbed to the weather so far. This could make a considerable
> impact on the global population of these three species. Thankfully, many
> more of these are wintering to our south, so the majority hopefully will
> survive the winter elsewhere. Likewise, more than half of the Winter
> Wrens, Ruby-crowned Kinglets, and some other songbirds have also not made
> it, and we are not yet into February. For these more inland species, their
> loss won't affect the global populations as much, as they winter over a
> larger area than do coastal sparrows.
>
> My conclusion on this - -go ahead and keep feeding hummingbirds and
> orioles in winter. Enjoy them while you can. Even if you are
> "un-naturally" holding them farther north than they should be, you are not
> impacting the global population, as over 99% of the individuals of these
> species are wintering in the tropics. This does not answer John's questions
> about whether the feeding is keeping hummers from moving south. That would
> take some serious research, I suspect, and folks who live at the coast like
> John, especially for over 50 years of observation, would be better to
> answer that than I can, in Raleigh. I am looking at the estimated numbers
> here and how this particular winter -- *the most devastating to our
> wintering landbirds than any of the over 50 that I can remembe*r -- might
> affect global populations.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
>
>
>
> On Tue, Jan 30, 2018 at 8:14 PM, John Fussell <jofuss...> wrote:
>
>> Recently on this listserv there was a bit of discussion about whether
>> feeders keep hummingbirds from migrating south in the fall. This
>> discussion was prompted by reports, including mine, of mortality/apparent
>> mortality of hummingbirds in eastern North Carolina during the persistent
>> cold in early January.
>>
>> I doubt that feeders keep hummers from going south in fall, at least to
>> any significant extent.
>>
>> Every winter, especially in early winter, birders find many individuals
>> of many species of landbirds that did not go south to "where they should
>> be". These are birds of varying sensitivities to cold or to lack of food
>> due to cold. Most are insectivorous; they do not use feeders. They
>> include warblers and many other species. Many of these birds will not
>> survive the winter, especially if there are periods of severe cold and/or
>> icy weather. Perhaps the most unfortunate of these birds that did not "go
>> far enough south" are those that really screw up, and actually go northward
>> in the fall, ending up in places like Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, where
>> they are certainly doomed. A large percentage, probably a majority, of
>> these "lost" birds are immatures. (I wonder if immature males
>> predominate--am thinking of the human analogy!)
>>
>> I looked back through old Chat magazines recently to check on my memory.
>> Hummingbirds, presumably almost all Ruby-throateds, were occasionally
>> spotted in early winter well before there were any feeders being maintained
>> in winter--in fact, to the best my knowledge, back when very few persons
>> maintained hummingbird feeders at any season. For instance, in my county
>> of Carteret there were four reports (at four different sites) of hummers in
>> early to mid-winter (early December to mid-January) in 1979-1980. Again,
>> these birds were not here because of any feeders. Some of you old-timers
>> may remember that particular winter. It was very mild in December and
>> through most of January (I remember the flowers where I was staying in late
>> January), but then we went into a deep freeze in February, topped off by a
>> snowstorm at the beginning of March. During that winter I think that many
>> hummers could have survived without a feeder through most of January, but
>> would have been doomed later on.
>>
>> However, I do think it is likely that we are sustaining a wintering
>> population of hummingbirds that is occurring somewhat farther north than
>> where it would survive without feeders. I am not saying that we are
>> keeping individual birds from migrating south, but that perhaps by keeping
>> birds with a genetic tendency to not migrate farther south in winter from
>> perishing, we are allowing such birds to survive and reproduce, thus
>> contributing to this more northerly wintering population. In this regard,
>> I think back to the first wintering birds at feeders in my area (I think it
>> was in the late 1980's/early 1990's). We were arguing a lot about what
>> species they were, in part because we had heard so much from Gulf Coast
>> birders about how our birds could NOT be Ruby-throateds, but also because
>> those first wintering birds at feeders were almost exclusively immature
>> birds--we did not see any adult males which would have helped us identify
>> them more confidently.
>>
>> If we are maintaining a more northerly wintering population, is that
>> good, bad, or neutral? Might there be an intense winter storm some year
>> that will eventually wipe out most of this wintering population (such as
>> the "blizzard" of December 1989--I can't believe a single hummer could have
>> survived that weather here). Or will such events become increasingly less
>> likely in a warming world (although some research suggests that a warming
>> Arctic leads to wilder kinks in the jet stream, resulting in some invasions
>> of very cold air into the eastern Unitied States, like the recent cold).
>> Anyway, the cold in early January was statistically a very rare event,
>> especially in terms of its persistence. As I've said earlier on this
>> listserv (I think I have anyway), I have had wintering hummers in my yard
>> since 2002-2003. I think the only hummers that have died here during this
>> period other than the ones this year were two (of eight birds) in January
>> 2003. The conditions then were actually more severe than this winter, but
>> they did not last as long.
>>
>> Another comment I have is if one thinks that hummingbird feeders keep
>> hummers from going south, shouldn't we also be concerned about plants that
>> flower in winter, most of which are exotic planted (and invasive) species
>> like sasanqua and elaeagnus, although there are native ones like coral
>> honeysuckle. I have seen hummers in winter that were associated with thick
>> growths of elaeagnus that were nowhere close to any feeders. And how about
>> those relatively cozy micro-climate situations, many of which are man-made,
>> although there are some natural ones too. I remember one mid-December day
>> watching a Ruby-throated that was going after swarms of tiny flying insects
>> over a relatively warm south-facing slope (on a dredge island). And there
>> was a coral honeysuckle plant with numerous flowers at that same site.
>>
>> Something I do feel very strongly about: If someone has been feeding
>> hummingbirds in winter such that the birds are really tied to that
>> particular yard, I think they have an obligation to keep those feeders
>> maintained throughout the winter, but especially in really cold, severe
>> weather. When conditions get really bad, and the birds are really
>> stressed, they will not have the luxury of making a long flight. I feel
>> that this is especially the case for people like me, who do not live close
>> to any other feeders.
>>
>> And, a final comment: I remember when I was in college being told (by my
>> major professor) that beginning about 1950 feeders had kept Baltimore
>> Orioles from migrating south to Central America. Do we think that is
>> really true? Or is more likely that orioles that did not migrate south to
>> "where they should have gone" found feeders, which enhanced their
>> survival. I think the latter is more likely.
>>
>> Susan Campbell and Ann Maddock may want to make some comments about my
>> thoughts, especially in regard to the degree that Ruby-throateds might
>> survive in witner without feeders. I do think that for my area--Carteret
>> County--hummers would not be able to survive throughout an average winter,
>> although they might (and obviously have) survive well into a typical
>> December, and into January of some years.
>>
>> John Fussell
>> Morehead City, NC
>>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/31/18 6:48 am
From: David Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Do feeders keep hummingbirds from migrating south in the fall?
Caged migratory birds, supplied with plenty of food, will still
instinctively head in the appropriate direction, so lack or presence of
food probably isn't a major cue.

 

Back to top
Date: 1/31/18 5:11 am
From: Gilbert Grant (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Small bird mortality in NC salt marsh during harsh winters

I was conducting bird surveys in a 14 hectare marsh (mostly Spartina and Juncus) near Surf City, NC, for 4 winters during the late 1980’s. The blizzard of 1989 that John Fussell referred to deposited a record 38 cm of snow in the area on 22-23 December 1989. Temperatures remained below freezing from 22-26 December with the extreme low of -19 C recorded in nearby Jacksonville during this time. Populations of both Sharp-tailed Sparrows (before AOU split this species) and Marsh Wrens plummeted to zero in this marsh and did not recover over the remaining winter months. However, populations returned to normal levels by 1991. In case anyone is interested Bill Kirby-Smith and I published a note on this in the Journal of the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society 108(3):145-148, 1992. I did not encounter any dead individuals of these species which was not surprising due to their small size and the dense marsh vegetation.

Gilbert S. Grant
Sneads Ferry ,NC
Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/18 6:48 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Do feeders keep hummingbirds from migrating south in the fall?
John brings up some good points, just as Tom Quay, who I am presuming John
is referring to with the Baltimore Oriole comment (and who was also my
major professor) did about that species. But, regardless of whether John
is right or wrong, we are dealing with a very tiny percentage of the entire
world's population of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds -- maybe 200 in NC in
winter versus a total population of 20,000,000 (as reported on Wikipedia).
By my calculation, that represents .00001 % Even if I am off by one
decimal place, so what? We are dealing with such a minuscule part of the
global population that it doesn't matter if they all survive or die;most
have died. Of course, we don't like it when they die, but this Deep Freeze
in NC isn't going to impact the global population.

Ditto for Baltimore Orioles. Even if only 10% of the usual number were to
survive this winter as compared with other winters, we are still talking
about a very tiny percentage of the global population, most of which are
hopefully "happily" wintering where they should be in the tropics.

Now, take a more serious example or two. The species that regularly winter
in NC and SC, where NC and SC form a moderate part of the range, are of
great concern if they survive or fail to survive the winter. At the recent
CBC meeting in Wrightsville Beach, there was nary a sighting of Seaside,
Sharp-tailed, or Nelson's sparrows. It wasn't completely due to lack of
effort. The Deep Freeze heavily damaged the wintering bird populations in
our salt and brackish marshes. The sparrows did not make it, for the most
part. I would estimate that 70-80% of our 3 marsh species have succumbed to
the weather so far. This could make a considerable impact on the global
population of these three species. Thankfully, many more of these are
wintering to our south, so the majority hopefully will survive the winter
elsewhere. Likewise, more than half of the Winter Wrens, Ruby-crowned
Kinglets, and some other songbirds have also not made it, and we are not
yet into February. For these more inland species, their loss won't affect
the global populations as much, as they winter over a larger area than do
coastal sparrows.

My conclusion on this - -go ahead and keep feeding hummingbirds and orioles
in winter. Enjoy them while you can. Even if you are "un-naturally"
holding them farther north than they should be, you are not impacting the
global population, as over 99% of the individuals of these species are
wintering in the tropics. This does not answer John's questions about
whether the feeding is keeping hummers from moving south. That would take
some serious research, I suspect, and folks who live at the coast like
John, especially for over 50 years of observation, would be better to
answer that than I can, in Raleigh. I am looking at the estimated numbers
here and how this particular winter -- *the most devastating to our
wintering landbirds than any of the over 50 that I can remembe*r -- might
affect global populations.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh




On Tue, Jan 30, 2018 at 8:14 PM, John Fussell <jofuss...> wrote:

> Recently on this listserv there was a bit of discussion about whether
> feeders keep hummingbirds from migrating south in the fall. This
> discussion was prompted by reports, including mine, of mortality/apparent
> mortality of hummingbirds in eastern North Carolina during the persistent
> cold in early January.
>
> I doubt that feeders keep hummers from going south in fall, at least to
> any significant extent.
>
> Every winter, especially in early winter, birders find many individuals of
> many species of landbirds that did not go south to "where they should be".
> These are birds of varying sensitivities to cold or to lack of food due to
> cold. Most are insectivorous; they do not use feeders. They include
> warblers and many other species. Many of these birds will not survive the
> winter, especially if there are periods of severe cold and/or icy weather.
> Perhaps the most unfortunate of these birds that did not "go far enough
> south" are those that really screw up, and actually go northward in the
> fall, ending up in places like Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, where they are
> certainly doomed. A large percentage, probably a majority, of these "lost"
> birds are immatures. (I wonder if immature males predominate--am thinking
> of the human analogy!)
>
> I looked back through old Chat magazines recently to check on my memory.
> Hummingbirds, presumably almost all Ruby-throateds, were occasionally
> spotted in early winter well before there were any feeders being maintained
> in winter--in fact, to the best my knowledge, back when very few persons
> maintained hummingbird feeders at any season. For instance, in my county
> of Carteret there were four reports (at four different sites) of hummers in
> early to mid-winter (early December to mid-January) in 1979-1980. Again,
> these birds were not here because of any feeders. Some of you old-timers
> may remember that particular winter. It was very mild in December and
> through most of January (I remember the flowers where I was staying in late
> January), but then we went into a deep freeze in February, topped off by a
> snowstorm at the beginning of March. During that winter I think that many
> hummers could have survived without a feeder through most of January, but
> would have been doomed later on.
>
> However, I do think it is likely that we are sustaining a wintering
> population of hummingbirds that is occurring somewhat farther north than
> where it would survive without feeders. I am not saying that we are
> keeping individual birds from migrating south, but that perhaps by keeping
> birds with a genetic tendency to not migrate farther south in winter from
> perishing, we are allowing such birds to survive and reproduce, thus
> contributing to this more northerly wintering population. In this regard,
> I think back to the first wintering birds at feeders in my area (I think it
> was in the late 1980's/early 1990's). We were arguing a lot about what
> species they were, in part because we had heard so much from Gulf Coast
> birders about how our birds could NOT be Ruby-throateds, but also because
> those first wintering birds at feeders were almost exclusively immature
> birds--we did not see any adult males which would have helped us identify
> them more confidently.
>
> If we are maintaining a more northerly wintering population, is that good,
> bad, or neutral? Might there be an intense winter storm some year that
> will eventually wipe out most of this wintering population (such as the
> "blizzard" of December 1989--I can't believe a single hummer could have
> survived that weather here). Or will such events become increasingly less
> likely in a warming world (although some research suggests that a warming
> Arctic leads to wilder kinks in the jet stream, resulting in some invasions
> of very cold air into the eastern Unitied States, like the recent cold).
> Anyway, the cold in early January was statistically a very rare event,
> especially in terms of its persistence. As I've said earlier on this
> listserv (I think I have anyway), I have had wintering hummers in my yard
> since 2002-2003. I think the only hummers that have died here during this
> period other than the ones this year were two (of eight birds) in January
> 2003. The conditions then were actually more severe than this winter, but
> they did not last as long.
>
> Another comment I have is if one thinks that hummingbird feeders keep
> hummers from going south, shouldn't we also be concerned about plants that
> flower in winter, most of which are exotic planted (and invasive) species
> like sasanqua and elaeagnus, although there are native ones like coral
> honeysuckle. I have seen hummers in winter that were associated with thick
> growths of elaeagnus that were nowhere close to any feeders. And how about
> those relatively cozy micro-climate situations, many of which are man-made,
> although there are some natural ones too. I remember one mid-December day
> watching a Ruby-throated that was going after swarms of tiny flying insects
> over a relatively warm south-facing slope (on a dredge island). And there
> was a coral honeysuckle plant with numerous flowers at that same site.
>
> Something I do feel very strongly about: If someone has been feeding
> hummingbirds in winter such that the birds are really tied to that
> particular yard, I think they have an obligation to keep those feeders
> maintained throughout the winter, but especially in really cold, severe
> weather. When conditions get really bad, and the birds are really
> stressed, they will not have the luxury of making a long flight. I feel
> that this is especially the case for people like me, who do not live close
> to any other feeders.
>
> And, a final comment: I remember when I was in college being told (by my
> major professor) that beginning about 1950 feeders had kept Baltimore
> Orioles from migrating south to Central America. Do we think that is
> really true? Or is more likely that orioles that did not migrate south to
> "where they should have gone" found feeders, which enhanced their
> survival. I think the latter is more likely.
>
> Susan Campbell and Ann Maddock may want to make some comments about my
> thoughts, especially in regard to the degree that Ruby-throateds might
> survive in witner without feeders. I do think that for my area--Carteret
> County--hummers would not be able to survive throughout an average winter,
> although they might (and obviously have) survive well into a typical
> December, and into January of some years.
>
> John Fussell
> Morehead City, NC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/18 6:13 pm
From: Ron <waxwing...>
Subject: Re: Enders' note and concern plus Ohio Snowy Owls
I was told today that two offers have been made to fly it north. I don’t know if it’s a special flight. Vermont was decided, which makes me think the planes were going there already.

Ron Clark
Kings Mtn. NC



From: Mike Turner
Sent: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 2:54 PM
To: Patty Masten
Cc: Ron ; <ruthgrissom...> ; Loren Hintz ; Carolinabirds
Subject: Re: Enders' note and concern plus Ohio Snowy Owls

Interesting thread, and thank you for the updates on Snowy Owls in the Carolinas. When you say a Snowy Owl is being flown to Vermont/Minnesota on a private plane, do you mean that it is a hitchhiker (e.g., there is already a plane flying to these areas and the owl is along for the ride), or do you mean that this owl is a special delivery, and a private plane is making a trip solely to drop off an owl? Thanks.


Mike Turner

Winston-Salem, NC




On Tue, Jan 30, 2018 at 2:45 PM, Patty Masten <mailto:carolinabirds@dukeedu> wrote:

I had heard a private plane to Minnesota area. Did they change and Are they flying him to Vermont now instead?




Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 30, 2018, at 2:41 PM, Ron <waxwing...> wrote:


The owl from the Greensboro area will be flown soon to Vermont for release, in a private plane, no less.

Ron Clark
Kings Mtn. NC




From: <ruthgrissom...>
Sent: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 10:27 AM
To: Loren Hintz
Cc: Carolinabirds
Subject: Re: Enders' note and concern plus Ohio Snowy Owls

Yes, two have been treated at the Carolina Raptor Center — a female found near Pee Dee National Wildlife Refuge on Dec 4 (who unfortunately did not survive) and a male found at Piedmont Triad airport less than 2 weeks later. He is doing well and awaiting release. Go to CRC’s website, blog or Facebook page to see beautiful videos of him in the flight cage.


Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 30, 2018, at 9:56 AM, Loren Hintz <ldhintz...> wrote:


Mr. Enders voiced a concern about past sexual harassment in the wildlife management academic community. Since this list serve reaches birders it also reaches many people in the fish and wildlife community. I think it was appropriate for the concern to be raised and I hope people who know more will act. On a completely different note I just returned from a visit to Ohio. Most of the northern counties in Ohio have Snowy Owls. I saw one 1/28 in Wayne County, Ohio. Are any reaching NC?

From Loren Hintz Chapel Hill, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/18 5:14 pm
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: Do feeders keep hummingbirds from migrating south in the fall?
Recently on this listserv there was a bit of discussion about whether
feeders keep hummingbirds from migrating south in the fall. This discussion
was prompted by reports, including mine, of mortality/apparent mortality of
hummingbirds in eastern North Carolina during the persistent cold in early
January.

I doubt that feeders keep hummers from going south in fall, at least to any
significant extent.

Every winter, especially in early winter, birders find many individuals of
many species of landbirds that did not go south to "where they should be".
These are birds of varying sensitivities to cold or to lack of food due to
cold. Most are insectivorous; they do not use feeders. They include
warblers and many other species. Many of these birds will not survive the
winter, especially if there are periods of severe cold and/or icy weather.
Perhaps the most unfortunate of these birds that did not "go far enough
south" are those that really screw up, and actually go northward in the
fall, ending up in places like Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, where they are
certainly doomed. A large percentage, probably a majority, of these "lost"
birds are immatures. (I wonder if immature males predominate--am thinking
of the human analogy!)

I looked back through old Chat magazines recently to check on my memory.
Hummingbirds, presumably almost all Ruby-throateds, were occasionally
spotted in early winter well before there were any feeders being maintained
in winter--in fact, to the best my knowledge, back when very few persons
maintained hummingbird feeders at any season. For instance, in my county of
Carteret there were four reports (at four different sites) of hummers in
early to mid-winter (early December to mid-January) in 1979-1980. Again,
these birds were not here because of any feeders. Some of you old-timers
may remember that particular winter. It was very mild in December and
through most of January (I remember the flowers where I was staying in late
January), but then we went into a deep freeze in February, topped off by a
snowstorm at the beginning of March. During that winter I think that many
hummers could have survived without a feeder through most of January, but
would have been doomed later on.

However, I do think it is likely that we are sustaining a wintering
population of hummingbirds that is occurring somewhat farther north than
where it would survive without feeders. I am not saying that we are keeping
individual birds from migrating south, but that perhaps by keeping birds
with a genetic tendency to not migrate farther south in winter from
perishing, we are allowing such birds to survive and reproduce, thus
contributing to this more northerly wintering population. In this regard, I
think back to the first wintering birds at feeders in my area (I think it
was in the late 1980's/early 1990's). We were arguing a lot about what
species they were, in part because we had heard so much from Gulf Coast
birders about how our birds could NOT be Ruby-throateds, but also because
those first wintering birds at feeders were almost exclusively immature
birds--we did not see any adult males which would have helped us identify
them more confidently.

If we are maintaining a more northerly wintering population, is that good,
bad, or neutral? Might there be an intense winter storm some year that will
eventually wipe out most of this wintering population (such as the
"blizzard" of December 1989--I can't believe a single hummer could have
survived that weather here). Or will such events become increasingly less
likely in a warming world (although some research suggests that a warming
Arctic leads to wilder kinks in the jet stream, resulting in some invasions
of very cold air into the eastern Unitied States, like the recent cold).
Anyway, the cold in early January was statistically a very rare event,
especially in terms of its persistence. As I've said earlier on this
listserv (I think I have anyway), I have had wintering hummers in my yard
since 2002-2003. I think the only hummers that have died here during this
period other than the ones this year were two (of eight birds) in January
2003. The conditions then were actually more severe than this winter, but
they did not last as long.

Another comment I have is if one thinks that hummingbird feeders keep
hummers from going south, shouldn't we also be concerned about plants that
flower in winter, most of which are exotic planted (and invasive) species
like sasanqua and elaeagnus, although there are native ones like coral
honeysuckle. I have seen hummers in winter that were associated with thick
growths of elaeagnus that were nowhere close to any feeders. And how about
those relatively cozy micro-climate situations, many of which are man-made,
although there are some natural ones too. I remember one mid-December day
watching a Ruby-throated that was going after swarms of tiny flying insects
over a relatively warm south-facing slope (on a dredge island). And there
was a coral honeysuckle plant with numerous flowers at that same site.

Something I do feel very strongly about: If someone has been feeding
hummingbirds in winter such that the birds are really tied to that
particular yard, I think they have an obligation to keep those feeders
maintained throughout the winter, but especially in really cold, severe
weather. When conditions get really bad, and the birds are really stressed,
they will not have the luxury of making a long flight. I feel that this is
especially the case for people like me, who do not live close to any other
feeders.

And, a final comment: I remember when I was in college being told (by my
major professor) that beginning about 1950 feeders had kept Baltimore
Orioles from migrating south to Central America. Do we think that is really
true? Or is more likely that orioles that did not migrate south to "where
they should have gone" found feeders, which enhanced their survival. I
think the latter is more likely.

Susan Campbell and Ann Maddock may want to make some comments about my
thoughts, especially in regard to the degree that Ruby-throateds might
survive in witner without feeders. I do think that for my area--Carteret
County--hummers would not be able to survive throughout an average winter,
although they might (and obviously have) survive well into a typical
December, and into January of some years.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/18 2:41 pm
From: Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Pine Siskin, Cary NC
As Kent Fiala posted about 2 weeks ago, Pine Siskin records in the Triangle area this winter have been few. It was surprise then, this morning, to see a single Pine Siskin on a feeder in my backyard. The bird was with 2 goldfinches and they stayed less than a minute. I saw several goldfinches again later in the day but no siskin.

Good Birding!
Bob Rybczynski
Cary, NC



 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/18 12:11 pm
From: Patty Masten (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Enders' note and concern plus Ohio Snowy Owls
Many people have volunteered their private plane to take the snowy owl up north.



Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 30, 2018, at 2:54 PM, Mike Turner <wmike.turner...> wrote:
>
> Interesting thread, and thank you for the updates on Snowy Owls in the Carolinas. When you say a Snowy Owl is being flown to Vermont/Minnesota on a private plane, do you mean that it is a hitchhiker (e.g., there is already a plane flying to these areas and the owl is along for the ride), or do you mean that this owl is a special delivery, and a private plane is making a trip solely to drop off an owl? Thanks.
>
> Mike Turner
> Winston-Salem, NC
>
>
>> On Tue, Jan 30, 2018 at 2:45 PM, Patty Masten <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>> I had heard a private plane to Minnesota area. Did they change and Are they flying him to Vermont now instead?
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>> On Jan 30, 2018, at 2:41 PM, Ron <waxwing...> wrote:
>>>
>>> The owl from the Greensboro area will be flown soon to Vermont for release, in a private plane, no less.
>>>
>>> Ron Clark
>>> Kings Mtn. NC
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> From: <ruthgrissom...>
>>> Sent: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 10:27 AM
>>> To: Loren Hintz
>>> Cc: Carolinabirds
>>> Subject: Re: Enders' note and concern plus Ohio Snowy Owls
>>>
>>> Yes, two have been treated at the Carolina Raptor Center — a female found near Pee Dee National Wildlife Refuge on Dec 4 (who unfortunately did not survive) and a male found at Piedmont Triad airport less than 2 weeks later. He is doing well and awaiting release. Go to CRC’s website, blog or Facebook page to see beautiful videos of him in the flight cage.
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>
>>>> On Jan 30, 2018, at 9:56 AM, Loren Hintz <ldhintz...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Mr. Enders voiced a concern about past sexual harassment in the wildlife management academic community. Since this list serve reaches birders it also reaches many people in the fish and wildlife community. I think it was appropriate for the concern to be raised and I hope people who know more will act. On a completely different note I just returned from a visit to Ohio. Most of the northern counties in Ohio have Snowy Owls. I saw one 1/28 in Wayne County, Ohio. Are any reaching NC?
>>>>
>>>> From Loren Hintz Chapel Hill, NC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/18 11:54 am
From: Mike Turner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Enders' note and concern plus Ohio Snowy Owls
Interesting thread, and thank you for the updates on Snowy Owls in the
Carolinas. When you say a Snowy Owl is being flown to Vermont/Minnesota on
a private plane, do you mean that it is a hitchhiker (e.g., there is
already a plane flying to these areas and the owl is along for the ride),
or do you mean that this owl is a special delivery, and a private plane is
making a trip solely to drop off an owl? Thanks.

Mike Turner
Winston-Salem, NC


On Tue, Jan 30, 2018 at 2:45 PM, Patty Masten <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> I had heard a private plane to Minnesota area. Did they change and Are
> they flying him to Vermont now instead?
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jan 30, 2018, at 2:41 PM, Ron <waxwing...> wrote:
>
> The owl from the Greensboro area will be flown soon to Vermont for
> release, in a private plane, no less.
>
> Ron Clark
> Kings Mtn. NC
>
>
>
>
> *From:* <ruthgrissom...>
> *Sent:* Tuesday, January 30, 2018 10:27 AM
> *To:* Loren Hintz <ldhintz...>
> *Cc:* Carolinabirds <carolinabirds...>
> *Subject:* Re: Enders' note and concern plus Ohio Snowy Owls
>
> Yes, two have been treated at the Carolina Raptor Center — a female found
> near Pee Dee National Wildlife Refuge on Dec 4 (who unfortunately did not
> survive) and a male found at Piedmont Triad airport less than 2 weeks
> later. He is doing well and awaiting release. Go to CRC’s website, blog or
> Facebook page to see beautiful videos of him in the flight cage.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jan 30, 2018, at 9:56 AM, Loren Hintz <ldhintz...> wrote:
>
> Mr. Enders voiced a concern about past sexual harassment in the wildlife
> management academic community. Since this list serve reaches birders it
> also reaches many people in the fish and wildlife community. I think it was
> appropriate for the concern to be raised and I hope people who know more
> will act. On a completely different note I just returned from a visit to
> Ohio. Most of the northern counties in Ohio have Snowy Owls. I saw one 1/28
> in Wayne County, Ohio. Are any reaching NC?
>
> From Loren Hintz Chapel Hill, NC
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/18 11:45 am
From: Patty Masten (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Enders' note and concern plus Ohio Snowy Owls
I had heard a private plane to Minnesota area. Did they change and Are they flying him to Vermont now instead?



Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 30, 2018, at 2:41 PM, Ron <waxwing...> wrote:
>
> The owl from the Greensboro area will be flown soon to Vermont for release, in a private plane, no less.
>
> Ron Clark
> Kings Mtn. NC
>
>
>
>
> From: <ruthgrissom...>
> Sent: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 10:27 AM
> To: Loren Hintz
> Cc: Carolinabirds
> Subject: Re: Enders' note and concern plus Ohio Snowy Owls
>
> Yes, two have been treated at the Carolina Raptor Center — a female found near Pee Dee National Wildlife Refuge on Dec 4 (who unfortunately did not survive) and a male found at Piedmont Triad airport less than 2 weeks later. He is doing well and awaiting release. Go to CRC’s website, blog or Facebook page to see beautiful videos of him in the flight cage.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Jan 30, 2018, at 9:56 AM, Loren Hintz <ldhintz...> wrote:
>>
>> Mr. Enders voiced a concern about past sexual harassment in the wildlife management academic community. Since this list serve reaches birders it also reaches many people in the fish and wildlife community. I think it was appropriate for the concern to be raised and I hope people who know more will act. On a completely different note I just returned from a visit to Ohio. Most of the northern counties in Ohio have Snowy Owls. I saw one 1/28 in Wayne County, Ohio. Are any reaching NC?
>>
>> From Loren Hintz Chapel Hill, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/18 11:41 am
From: Ron <waxwing...>
Subject: Re: Enders' note and concern plus Ohio Snowy Owls
The owl from the Greensboro area will be flown soon to Vermont for release, in a private plane, no less.

Ron Clark
Kings Mtn. NC




From: <ruthgrissom...>
Sent: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 10:27 AM
To: Loren Hintz
Cc: Carolinabirds
Subject: Re: Enders' note and concern plus Ohio Snowy Owls

Yes, two have been treated at the Carolina Raptor Center — a female found near Pee Dee National Wildlife Refuge on Dec 4 (who unfortunately did not survive) and a male found at Piedmont Triad airport less than 2 weeks later. He is doing well and awaiting release. Go to CRC’s website, blog or Facebook page to see beautiful videos of him in the flight cage.


Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 30, 2018, at 9:56 AM, Loren Hintz <ldhintz...> wrote:


Mr. Enders voiced a concern about past sexual harassment in the wildlife management academic community. Since this list serve reaches birders it also reaches many people in the fish and wildlife community. I think it was appropriate for the concern to be raised and I hope people who know more will act. On a completely different note I just returned from a visit to Ohio. Most of the northern counties in Ohio have Snowy Owls. I saw one 1/28 in Wayne County, Ohio. Are any reaching NC?

From Loren Hintz Chapel Hill, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/18 10:20 am
From: Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: >12,000 Razorbills @ Cape Hatteras
I was curious to see what was going on with Razorbills inshore, so I drove out to Cape Point this morning. As soon as I got there, it was obvious that numbers have increased. There was a steady movement of auks headed east or southeast off the south beach. I watched it for maybe all but 15 minutes out of 140 minutes, and periodically checked the rate of birds going by. It ranged from maybe 60 birds a minute to over 400 birds a minute, but most of the time seemed to be about 100 a minute. I figured at least 12,000 auks passed during the time I was there between 0900 and 1120. It was partly to mostly cloudy with NW winds at 20 to 30 knots.

There was also a steady procession of Red-throated Loons, but not nearly as many of them as there were auks. There were several Horned Grebes on the water and I saw one Red-necked Grebe with them.

Brian Patteson
Hatteras, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/18 7:27 am
From: <ruthgrissom...>
Subject: Re: Enders' note and concern plus Ohio Snowy Owls
Yes, two have been treated at the Carolina Raptor Center — a female found near Pee Dee National Wildlife Refuge on Dec 4 (who unfortunately did not survive) and a male found at Piedmont Triad airport less than 2 weeks later. He is doing well and awaiting release. Go to CRC’s website, blog or Facebook page to see beautiful videos of him in the flight cage.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 30, 2018, at 9:56 AM, Loren Hintz <ldhintz...> wrote:
>
> Mr. Enders voiced a concern about past sexual harassment in the wildlife management academic community. Since this list serve reaches birders it also reaches many people in the fish and wildlife community. I think it was appropriate for the concern to be raised and I hope people who know more will act. On a completely different note I just returned from a visit to Ohio. Most of the northern counties in Ohio have Snowy Owls. I saw one 1/28 in Wayne County, Ohio. Are any reaching NC?
>
> From Loren Hintz Chapel Hill, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/18 6:58 am
From: Loren Hintz <ldhintz...>
Subject: Enders' note and concern plus Ohio Snowy Owls
Mr. Enders voiced a concern about past sexual harassment in the wildlife management academic community. Since this list serve reaches birders it also reaches many people in the fish and wildlife community. I think it was appropriate for the concern to be raised and I hope people who know more will act. On a completely different note I just returned from a visit to Ohio. Most of the northern counties in Ohio have Snowy Owls. I saw one 1/28 in Wayne County, Ohio. Are any reaching NC? From Loren Hintz Chapel Hill, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/18 6:44 am
From: Keith McCullough (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Oriole Schedule
Also, it would be great if those who are able to visit could try to capture a sharp dorsal photo of its spread wing. Baltimore and Bullock’s have different molt strategies, and this could be a valuable piece of evidence.


Keith McCullough
Charleston, SC

> On Jan 30, 2018, at 7:24 AM, Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> All,
>
> Because the oriole's host other commitments visiting the oriole in Mt Pleasant is unavailable Friday and Saturday of this week.
>
> Dennis
>
> --
> Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
> South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
> South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
> Emeritus Professor of Biology
> The Citadel
> 171 Moultrie St,
> Charleston, SC 29409
> 843.795.3996-home
> 843.953.7264-fax
> 843.708.1605-cell
> <dennis.forsythe...> <mailto:<dennis.forsythe...>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/18 6:19 am
From: Clyde Sorenson <sorenson...>
Subject: What goes around, comes around...
On the way in to work this morning, I saw a raven dive-bombing a turkey
vulture (near the rock quarry on Auburn-Knightdale Road in SE Wake County).
As soon as the turkey vulture scooted, a crow started dive-bombing the
raven. And so it goes...

Clyde Sorenson
Clayton and Raleigh, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/18 4:25 am
From: Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Oriole Schedule
All,

Because the oriole's host other commitments visiting the oriole in Mt
Pleasant is unavailable Friday and Saturday of this week.

Dennis

--
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/29/18 7:30 pm
From: Krystyna 00 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Sexual harassment. Perhaps too offensive.
"This e-mail list serves as a forum to discuss wild birds, birders, and birding in the Carolinas, including rare birds, bird finding, bird identification, bird behavior, backyard birding, trip reports, bird counts, and bird club information."





Sent from my Galaxy Tab A


-------- Original message --------
From: Jack Rogers <jack...>
Date: 1/29/18 9:49 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...>
Cc: Frank Enders <fkenders...>, Carolina Birds <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Sexual harassment. Perhaps too offensive.

I'll have no comment as to the relevance of the "rant", but if anyone else was curious like me, it came in at 1252 words (6847 characters).

On Mon, Jan 29, 2018 at 9:39 PM, Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...><mailto:<wforsythe...>> wrote:
My, my, could someone please tell me what in the hell Mr. Enders rant, has to do with birds and or the Carolinabirds listserv? Surely, at the very least, this post is not appropriate for this venue!
Respectfully,
Wayne

Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 29, 2018, at 9:07 PM, Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:


I am a bit afraid to bring this up.

But, when I heard that a professor who used to grope women's breasts on campus actually got a secretary fired from the university, since she punched him out in the elevator when he assaulted her, I have had a bee in my bonnet.

I knew, almost firsthand, that he groped a grad student's wife, also, but, like the Protestant theologian, I wasn't a woman, and I was not close to these women, so I thought it was none of my business. It continues to rankle me that there are memorials to people who assaulted women.



A dean told me, some months ago, that the school did not wish to take the opportunity of an award in the groper's name away from field biologists. I myself, were I a university official, would not take "blood money", or would give it back. But, as I already said, I had not put any money into the funds; I had really wondered about the plaudits laid on the groper online. And, the Wildlife Resources Commission, which has an award in the name of the groper, made no reply to my phone call.

I know I am not the only person who was aware of this abuse, but I am fairly slow, AND powerless.

But, I merely had contempt for a man who was not going below the belt (so, not as bad as the Michigan State University problem), and I actually felt sad for the young men who probably were subsequently treated badly by the young women (who would trust men, given the abuse?).


The issue that rankles is getting an abused woman fired, for defending her own honor. I have lived in poverty in spite of all my education. Jobs, money, are very important to me, more so than my honor.

The firing incident was described to me by a female professor, now about 98 years old, and the issue sneaks up to the surface of my brain whenever, as so frequently happens, in the last year, another abuser is outed.


I thought about asking the one person I know had contributed funds, but I do not know him firsthand, and he is around 90 now.

I have always thought that the evil people as well as the good, all are universally saved by the God so many worship (with no repentance needed--this is an omnipotent, good God). And, the evil so many people do does not always live to be known after their deaths.


What has held me back was, first, that, in general, college professors were simply not getting in trouble for molesting students. And, second, that I have had such a visceral disgust and anger at the worthless research and execrable behavior of this individual, that I figured I not only was too angry to be rational, but also would be condemned for bringing something up which most people did not want to hear, let alone have to clean up.

And, third, the professor who informed me of the retaliatory firing was not one of my favorites, another reason I was not up and at 'em earlier. I disliked her hard attitude. But, she was an early campaigner for equal pay and opportunity for women in higher education, and the experiences my one daughter had at work and elsewhere probably helped drive me to this. The professor is, I am sure, a very reliable source. My own wife has described a professor in a school of education who took each of his female student teachers out to dinner---she just did not go too dinner.


I also thought "let he who is without sin cast the first stone", and that I also engaged in sexist assaults, but that was when I was 11 or 12, not 40 to 60 years old. Maybe the miscreant I am describing was eventually ashamed of and regretted his behavior, as I do (actually, for both his and my behavior).

The homosexual assaults and harassment which I suffered as a young man were, mercifully, not much to write about; but, the fact is, young men that hitch-hike are more vulnerable, and could be blamed for their own misfortunes, so much more than female students and secretaries in a university.

It may be sexist to write that last sentence, but I hardly care. It does not harm anybody if a man customarily walks on the roadway side of the sidewalk used by a woman, and men should defend women, since men typically are physically stronger.

I both care and do not care. Others, more influential or conerned than I might do something about it. What to do?


For me, the best outcome would be for people to get together and make contributions to the Wildlife Resources Commission and the university to substitute for the "dirty money" honoring what has to be called a dirty person. Provided the institutions would agree to such.


When Dr. Nassar of MSU was described by the judge as "devious", I had that twinge of recognition of the typical behavior of the crooked uxorious professor, which contributed to my longheld disgust.


If people want to forgive me, they might want to remember my beloved mother. After World War II, in Germany, the same man was the gauleiter who had told my mother that he could have my Catholic mother disappear, "and nobody would know anything about it". But, my mother also got her payback when she was loaded on the last boat out of Genoa, and described as a Jew. (She had not only had the temerity to tell the gauleiter that Germany was a democracy and her father had a right to be charged or released from jail, but she had also urged the Jews in her hometown to leave now, before the Nazis killed them all.)

Just another brick in the wall, and probably both men, like so many in history, have simply gotten away with crimes.

But, history, meaning NC birding history, is not the past--it is not even over. What to do?

I am old and tired, too busy to feed birds this winter, or to go out birding. That might be my problem. Not enough fun. I have always wanted to improve things, continuous quality improvement. But, I also agree that conservatives want to repeat old mistakes, while liberals wish to make new mistakes.

This matter of "awards" in the name of an evil groper is very much like the issue of statues and streets in the name of slaveholders. Calling such problems "controversial" does not help. Even the uproar about the holocaust has not stopped Rwanda, Yugoslavia, Syria and Myanmar. We cannot stop major problems, but, perhaps there is some solution for smaller problems.
It will be up to women to decide how offensive the awards are, just as it has to be up to people of color to decide how offensive historical figures have today become.

Talk about "controversial" stuff! Wish we had talked, decades ago, but I do like to sweep stuff under the carpet. I guess those involved would rather talk about what they enjoy, and ignore the dirt.

My apologies if I am offensive in any way, now, or in the past or future. Hopefully our problems will be less, in the future.

I am just asking if others had not noticed the problem. (Whenever people in Germany and Austria say they did not know, I always wonder how my mother noticed?)

Frank Enders, Halifax, NC



--
Jack Rogers
Mt Pleasant, SC
My Flickr page<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com_-3Furl-3Dhttps-253A-252F-252Furldefense.proofpoint.com-252Fv2-252Furl-253Fu-253Dhttp-2D3A-5F-5Fwww.flickr.com-5Fphotos-5F90726323-2D40N05-5F-2526d-253DDwMFaQ-2526c-253DimBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj-5FgZ4adc-2526r-253DymRCw6Q-2DsBitug-5FrdeO1Tokz-2DI-5FSX2LQN2-5FOcvlal9U-2526m-253DUBDfSPcI194rhfQadrqCFxcrfvM8fq3xV0BrL2C31IM-2526s-253DvZUGM5jrLdUB0G48J35C1Sb9m-5FrYM8kN6wiBFCPHYZE-2526e-253D-26data-3D02-257C01-257C-257Ca5805539af284920d9d608d5678c1f4b-257C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa-257C1-257C0-257C636528773870061214-26sdata-3Dap3K1a62UN-252B1b6dj2w-252Bm2fRHikcselWhQ7v7HfgDv9o-253D-26reserved-3D0&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=KETjJm119lO6JtZ8SsBhPC-eMvgKPmxFqj8O5m-ph8Y&s=wBATIGtffKRhE6HcVNA1eCMSLUi1lovuOP_uSYrM664&e= >

 

Back to top
Date: 1/29/18 6:49 pm
From: Jack Rogers <jack...>
Subject: Re: Sexual harassment. Perhaps too offensive.
I'll have no comment as to the relevance of the "rant", but if anyone else
was curious like me, it came in at 1252 words (6847 characters).

On Mon, Jan 29, 2018 at 9:39 PM, Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...>
wrote:

> My, my, could someone please tell me what in the hell Mr. Enders rant, has
> to do with birds and or the Carolinabirds listserv? Surely, at the very
> least, this post is not appropriate for this venue!
> Respectfully,
> Wayne
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jan 29, 2018, at 9:07 PM, Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I am a bit afraid to bring this up.
>
> But, when I heard that a professor who used to grope women's breasts on
> campus actually got a secretary fired from the university, since she
> punched him out in the elevator when he assaulted her, I have had a bee in
> my bonnet.
>
> I knew, almost firsthand, that he groped a grad student's wife, also, but,
> like the Protestant theologian, I wasn't a woman, and I was not close to
> these women, so I thought it was none of my business. It continues to
> rankle me that there are memorials to people who assaulted women.
>
>
>
> A dean told me, some months ago, that the school did not wish to take the
> opportunity of an award in the groper's name away from field biologists. I
> myself, were I a university official, would not take "blood money", or
> would give it back. But, as I already said, I had not put any money into
> the funds; I had really wondered about the plaudits laid on the groper
> online. And, the Wildlife Resources Commission, which has an award in the
> name of the groper, made no reply to my phone call.
>
> I know I am not the only person who was aware of this abuse, but I am
> fairly slow, AND powerless.
>
> But, I merely had contempt for a man who was not going below the belt (so,
> not as bad as the Michigan State University problem), and I actually felt
> sad for the young men who probably were subsequently treated badly by the
> young women (who would trust men, given the abuse?).
>
>
> The issue that rankles is getting an abused woman fired, for defending her
> own honor. I have lived in poverty in spite of all my education. Jobs,
> money, are very important to me, more so than my honor.
>
> The firing incident was described to me by a female professor, now about
> 98 years old, and the issue sneaks up to the surface of my brain whenever,
> as so frequently happens, in the last year, another abuser is outed.
>
>
> I thought about asking the one person I know had contributed funds, but I
> do not know him firsthand, and he is around 90 now.
>
> I have always thought that the evil people as well as the good, all are
> universally saved by the God so many worship (with no repentance
> needed--this is an omnipotent, good God). And, the evil so many people do
> does not always live to be known after their deaths.
>
>
> What has held me back was, first, that, in general, college professors
> were simply not getting in trouble for molesting students. And, second,
> that I have had such a visceral disgust and anger at the worthless research
> and execrable behavior of this individual, that I figured I not only was
> too angry to be rational, but also would be condemned for bringing
> something up which most people did not want to hear, let alone have to
> clean up.
>
> And, third, the professor who informed me of the retaliatory firing was
> not one of my favorites, another reason I was not up and at 'em earlier. I
> disliked her hard attitude. But, she was an early campaigner for equal pay
> and opportunity for women in higher education, and the experiences my one
> daughter had at work and elsewhere probably helped drive me to this. The
> professor is, I am sure, a very reliable source. My own wife has described
> a professor in a school of education who took each of his female student
> teachers out to dinner---she just did not go too dinner.
>
>
> I also thought "let he who is without sin cast the first stone", and that
> I also engaged in sexist assaults, but that was when I was 11 or 12, not 40
> to 60 years old. Maybe the miscreant I am describing was eventually
> ashamed of and regretted his behavior, as I do (actually, for both his and
> my behavior).
>
> The homosexual assaults and harassment which I suffered as a young man
> were, mercifully, not much to write about; but, the fact is, young men
> that hitch-hike are more vulnerable, and could be blamed for their own
> misfortunes, so much more than female students and secretaries in a
> university.
>
> It may be sexist to write that last sentence, but I hardly care. It does
> not harm anybody if a man customarily walks on the roadway side of the
> sidewalk used by a woman, and men should defend women, since men typically
> are physically stronger.
>
> I both care and do not care. Others, more influential or conerned than I
> might do something about it. What to do?
>
>
> For me, the best outcome would be for people to get together and make
> contributions to the Wildlife Resources Commission and the university to
> substitute for the "dirty money" honoring what has to be called a dirty
> person. Provided the institutions would agree to such.
>
>
> When Dr. Nassar of MSU was described by the judge as "devious", I had that
> twinge of recognition of the typical behavior of the crooked
> uxorious professor, which contributed to my longheld disgust.
>
>
> If people want to forgive me, they might want to remember my beloved
> mother. After World War II, in Germany, the same man was the gauleiter who
> had told my mother that he could have my Catholic mother disappear, "and
> nobody would know anything about it". But, my mother also got her payback
> when she was loaded on the last boat out of Genoa, and described as a Jew.
> (She had not only had the temerity to tell the gauleiter that Germany was a
> democracy and her father had a right to be charged or released from jail,
> but she had also urged the Jews in her hometown to leave now, before the
> Nazis killed them all.)
>
> Just another brick in the wall, and probably both men, like so many in
> history, have simply gotten away with crimes.
>
> But, history, meaning NC birding history, is not the past--it is not
> even over. What to do?
>
> I am old and tired, too busy to feed birds this winter, or to go out
> birding. That might be my problem. Not enough fun. I have always wanted to
> improve things, continuous quality improvement. But, I also agree that
> conservatives want to repeat old mistakes, while liberals wish to make new
> mistakes.
>
> This matter of "awards" in the name of an evil groper is very much like
> the issue of statues and streets in the name of slaveholders. Calling such
> problems "controversial" does not help. Even the uproar about the
> holocaust has not stopped Rwanda, Yugoslavia, Syria and Myanmar. We cannot
> stop major problems, but, perhaps there is some solution for smaller
> problems.
> It will be up to women to decide how offensive the awards are, just as it
> has to be up to people of color to decide how offensive historical figures
> have today become.
>
> Talk about "controversial" stuff! Wish we had talked, decades ago, but I
> do like to sweep stuff under the carpet. I guess those involved would
> rather talk about what they enjoy, and ignore the dirt.
>
> My apologies if I am offensive in any way, now, or in the past or future.
> Hopefully our problems will be less, in the future.
>
> I am just asking if others had not noticed the problem. (Whenever people
> in Germany and Austria say they did not know, I always wonder how my mother
> noticed?)
>
> Frank Enders, Halifax, NC
>
>


--
Jack Rogers
Mt Pleasant, SC
My Flickr page <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_90726323-40N05_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=UBDfSPcI194rhfQadrqCFxcrfvM8fq3xV0BrL2C31IM&s=vZUGM5jrLdUB0G48J35C1Sb9m_rYM8kN6wiBFCPHYZE&e= >

 

Back to top
Date: 1/29/18 6:40 pm
From: Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...>
Subject: Re: Sexual harassment. Perhaps too offensive.
My, my, could someone please tell me what in the hell Mr. Enders rant, has to do with birds and or the Carolinabirds listserv? Surely, at the very least, this post is not appropriate for this venue!
Respectfully,
Wayne

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 29, 2018, at 9:07 PM, Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I am a bit afraid to bring this up.
> But, when I heard that a professor who used to grope women's breasts on campus actually got a secretary fired from the university, since she punched him out in the elevator when he assaulted her, I have had a bee in my bonnet.
> I knew, almost firsthand, that he groped a grad student's wife, also, but, like the Protestant theologian, I wasn't a woman, and I was not close to these women, so I thought it was none of my business. It continues to rankle me that there are memorials to people who assaulted women.
>
> A dean told me, some months ago, that the school did not wish to take the opportunity of an award in the groper's name away from field biologists. I myself, were I a university official, would not take "blood money", or would give it back. But, as I already said, I had not put any money into the funds; I had really wondered about the plaudits laid on the groper online. And, the Wildlife Resources Commission, which has an award in the name of the groper, made no reply to my phone call.
> I know I am not the only person who was aware of this abuse, but I am fairly slow, AND powerless.
> But, I merely had contempt for a man who was not going below the belt (so, not as bad as the Michigan State University problem), and I actually felt sad for the young men who probably were subsequently treated badly by the young women (who would trust men, given the abuse?).
>
> The issue that rankles is getting an abused woman fired, for defending her own honor. I have lived in poverty in spite of all my education. Jobs, money, are very important to me, more so than my honor.
> The firing incident was described to me by a female professor, now about 98 years old, and the issue sneaks up to the surface of my brain whenever, as so frequently happens, in the last year, another abuser is outed.
>
> I thought about asking the one person I know had contributed funds, but I do not know him firsthand, and he is around 90 now.
> I have always thought that the evil people as well as the good, all are universally saved by the God so many worship (with no repentance needed--this is an omnipotent, good God). And, the evil so many people do does not always live to be known after their deaths.
>
> What has held me back was, first, that, in general, college professors were simply not getting in trouble for molesting students. And, second, that I have had such a visceral disgust and anger at the worthless research and execrable behavior of this individual, that I figured I not only was too angry to be rational, but also would be condemned for bringing something up which most people did not want to hear, let alone have to clean up.
> And, third, the professor who informed me of the retaliatory firing was not one of my favorites, another reason I was not up and at 'em earlier. I disliked her hard attitude. But, she was an early campaigner for equal pay and opportunity for women in higher education, and the experiences my one daughter had at work and elsewhere probably helped drive me to this. The professor is, I am sure, a very reliable source. My own wife has described a professor in a school of education who took each of his female student teachers out to dinner---she just did not go too dinner.
>
> I also thought "let he who is without sin cast the first stone", and that I also engaged in sexist assaults, but that was when I was 11 or 12, not 40 to 60 years old. Maybe the miscreant I am describing was eventually ashamed of and regretted his behavior, as I do (actually, for both his and my behavior).
> The homosexual assaults and harassment which I suffered as a young man were, mercifully, not much to write about; but, the fact is, young men that hitch-hike are more vulnerable, and could be blamed for their own misfortunes, so much more than female students and secretaries in a university.
> It may be sexist to write that last sentence, but I hardly care. It does not harm anybody if a man customarily walks on the roadway side of the sidewalk used by a woman, and men should defend women, since men typically are physically stronger.
> I both care and do not care. Others, more influential or conerned than I might do something about it. What to do?
>
> For me, the best outcome would be for people to get together and make contributions to the Wildlife Resources Commission and the university to substitute for the "dirty money" honoring what has to be called a dirty person. Provided the institutions would agree to such.
>
> When Dr. Nassar of MSU was described by the judge as "devious", I had that twinge of recognition of the typical behavior of the crooked uxorious professor, which contributed to my longheld disgust.
>
> If people want to forgive me, they might want to remember my beloved mother. After World War II, in Germany, the same man was the gauleiter who had told my mother that he could have my Catholic mother disappear, "and nobody would know anything about it". But, my mother also got her payback when she was loaded on the last boat out of Genoa, and described as a Jew. (She had not only had the temerity to tell the gauleiter that Germany was a democracy and her father had a right to be charged or released from jail, but she had also urged the Jews in her hometown to leave now, before the Nazis killed them all.)
> Just another brick in the wall, and probably both men, like so many in history, have simply gotten away with crimes.
>
> But, history, meaning NC birding history, is not the past--it is not even over. What to do?
>
> I am old and tired, too busy to feed birds this winter, or to go out birding. That might be my problem. Not enough fun. I have always wanted to improve things, continuous quality improvement. But, I also agree that conservatives want to repeat old mistakes, while liberals wish to make new mistakes.
>
> This matter of "awards" in the name of an evil groper is very much like the issue of statues and streets in the name of slaveholders. Calling such problems "controversial" does not help. Even the uproar about the holocaust has not stopped Rwanda, Yugoslavia, Syria and Myanmar. We cannot stop major problems, but, perhaps there is some solution for smaller problems.
> It will be up to women to decide how offensive the awards are, just as it has to be up to people of color to decide how offensive historical figures have today become.
>
> Talk about "controversial" stuff! Wish we had talked, decades ago, but I do like to sweep stuff under the carpet. I guess those involved would rather talk about what they enjoy, and ignore the dirt.
>
> My apologies if I am offensive in any way, now, or in the past or future. Hopefully our problems will be less, in the future.
>
> I am just asking if others had not noticed the problem. (Whenever people in Germany and Austria say they did not know, I always wonder how my mother noticed?)
>
> Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 1/29/18 6:08 pm
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Sexual harassment. Perhaps too offensive.
I am a bit afraid to bring this up.

But, when I heard that a professor who used to grope women's breasts on campus actually got a secretary fired from the university, since she punched him out in the elevator when he assaulted her, I have had a bee in my bonnet.

I knew, almost firsthand, that he groped a grad student's wife, also, but, like the Protestant theologian, I wasn't a woman, and I was not close to these women, so I thought it was none of my business. It continues to rankle me that there are memorials to people who assaulted women.



A dean told me, some months ago, that the school did not wish to take the opportunity of an award in the groper's name away from field biologists. I myself, were I a university official, would not take "blood money", or would give it back. But, as I already said, I had not put any money into the funds; I had really wondered about the plaudits laid on the groper online. And, the Wildlife Resources Commission, which has an award in the name of the groper, made no reply to my phone call.

I know I am not the only person who was aware of this abuse, but I am fairly slow, AND powerless.

But, I merely had contempt for a man who was not going below the belt (so, not as bad as the Michigan State University problem), and I actually felt sad for the young men who probably were subsequently treated badly by the young women (who would trust men, given the abuse?).


The issue that rankles is getting an abused woman fired, for defending her own honor. I have lived in poverty in spite of all my education. Jobs, money, are very important to me, more so than my honor.

The firing incident was described to me by a female professor, now about 98 years old, and the issue sneaks up to the surface of my brain whenever, as so frequently happens, in the last year, another abuser is outed.


I thought about asking the one person I know had contributed funds, but I do not know him firsthand, and he is around 90 now.

I have always thought that the evil people as well as the good, all are universally saved by the God so many worship (with no repentance needed--this is an omnipotent, good God). And, the evil so many people do does not always live to be known after their deaths.


What has held me back was, first, that, in general, college professors were simply not getting in trouble for molesting students. And, second, that I have had such a visceral disgust and anger at the worthless research and execrable behavior of this individual, that I figured I not only was too angry to be rational, but also would be condemned for bringing something up which most people did not want to hear, let alone have to clean up.

And, third, the professor who informed me of the retaliatory firing was not one of my favorites, another reason I was not up and at 'em earlier. I disliked her hard attitude. But, she was an early campaigner for equal pay and opportunity for women in higher education, and the experiences my one daughter had at work and elsewhere probably helped drive me to this. The professor is, I am sure, a very reliable source. My own wife has described a professor in a school of education who took each of his female student teachers out to dinner---she just did not go too dinner.


I also thought "let he who is without sin cast the first stone", and that I also engaged in sexist assaults, but that was when I was 11 or 12, not 40 to 60 years old. Maybe the miscreant I am describing was eventually ashamed of and regretted his behavior, as I do (actually, for both his and my behavior).

The homosexual assaults and harassment which I suffered as a young man were, mercifully, not much to write about; but, the fact is, young men that hitch-hike are more vulnerable, and could be blamed for their own misfortunes, so much more than female students and secretaries in a university.

It may be sexist to write that last sentence, but I hardly care. It does not harm anybody if a man customarily walks on the roadway side of the sidewalk used by a woman, and men should defend women, since men typically are physically stronger.

I both care and do not care. Others, more influential or conerned than I might do something about it. What to do?


For me, the best outcome would be for people to get together and make contributions to the Wildlife Resources Commission and the university to substitute for the "dirty money" honoring what has to be called a dirty person. Provided the institutions would agree to such.


When Dr. Nassar of MSU was described by the judge as "devious", I had that twinge of recognition of the typical behavior of the crooked uxorious professor, which contributed to my longheld disgust.


If people want to forgive me, they might want to remember my beloved mother. After World War II, in Germany, the same man was the gauleiter who had told my mother that he could have my Catholic mother disappear, "and nobody would know anything about it". But, my mother also got her payback when she was loaded on the last boat out of Genoa, and described as a Jew. (She had not only had the temerity to tell the gauleiter that Germany was a democracy and her father had a right to be charged or released from jail, but she had also urged the Jews in her hometown to leave now, before the Nazis killed them all.)

Just another brick in the wall, and probably both men, like so many in history, have simply gotten away with crimes.

But, history, meaning NC birding history, is not the past--it is not even over. What to do?

I am old and tired, too busy to feed birds this winter, or to go out birding. That might be my problem. Not enough fun. I have always wanted to improve things, continuous quality improvement. But, I also agree that conservatives want to repeat old mistakes, while liberals wish to make new mistakes.

This matter of "awards" in the name of an evil groper is very much like the issue of statues and streets in the name of slaveholders. Calling such problems "controversial" does not help. Even the uproar about the holocaust has not stopped Rwanda, Yugoslavia, Syria and Myanmar. We cannot stop major problems, but, perhaps there is some solution for smaller problems.
It will be up to women to decide how offensive the awards are, just as it has to be up to people of color to decide how offensive historical figures have today become.

Talk about "controversial" stuff! Wish we had talked, decades ago, but I do like to sweep stuff under the carpet. I guess those involved would rather talk about what they enjoy, and ignore the dirt.

My apologies if I am offensive in any way, now, or in the past or future. Hopefully our problems will be less, in the future.

I am just asking if others had not noticed the problem. (Whenever people in Germany and Austria say they did not know, I always wonder how my mother noticed?)

Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 1/29/18 4:44 pm
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RR WalMart House Sparrow roost disappears---pest control?
There used to be a fairly pleasant House Sparrow roost in the trees (oaks, now some 20' tall) nearest WalMart in Roanoke Rapids. Would build in the fall, and with shorter daylengths was evident when shopping in evening. Sometimes I would try to flush the birds to count them,up to several score.

About 4-8 weeks ago I noticed there were no more.


I suspect pest control (such as spraying soap water at night). But, what do I know.


Anybody else noticed such?






Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 1/29/18 9:20 am
From: Ginny Alfano (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Jack Rogers Dickcissel Post
I have been camping at Myrtle Beach State Park in site 154 for the month of
January. It has been such a privilege to see the female Dickcissel at my
feeders everyday for about three weeks. I also have a beautiful female
Baltimore Oriole coming in daily for suet. My site is kitty corner to the
Nature Center which is why I'm fortunate enough to have these birds along
with many others. It has been a dream birding spot for me. I will only be
here for two more days, so if anyone is looking for either or both of these
birds, I'm sure they will be at the Nature Center for their food at all
times after I go.

As an aside, I truly appreciate your very active listserve. Ours at home in
central and northern NY rarely see activity. The other day, someone said
it's because everyone is using e-bird instead. Personally, I would much
rather use the listserve then spend my time searching through e-bird.

If anyone can advise me, I would like to post a couple of photos of these
birds, but I'm not sure where I should do that. Thank you in advance to
anyone who can help!



*Ginny AlfanoCleveland, NY*

 

Back to top
Date: 1/29/18 9:15 am
From: Robert Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Jan. 27 "Pelagic" Trip From Hatteras
I sent in a check for February 10.  Maybe you'll get it today?  Looking forward to it.
How many gulls are hanging around Hatteras Point?
Are you familiar with Island Cruisers in Salvo?  I might want to rent a jeep.

BL



On Sunday, January 28, 2018, 7:07:09 PM EST, Brian Patteson <carolinabirds...> wrote:

We had an excellent boat trip from Hatteras yesterday. To call it a pelagic trip might be a stretch because we only had to go about 12 miles out. The weather was mild with light southerly winds, but there was a nice cold water cul-de-sac on Diamond Shoals, so we had a good variety of winter seabirds. The highlight was several close encounters with Great Skuas, which are scarce but regular here. These skuas are generally not as approachable as South Polars, so to see them like we did yesterday was quite nice. We also had good numbers of Razorbills, several Atlantic Puffins, 3 species of shearwaters- including over 20 Manx Shearwaters, and several fulmars and kittiwakes. An adult Iceland Gull made a brief appearance during the afternoon.

To see photos from the trip and to read the trip report, go to the Seabirding Blog- seabirding.blogspot.com

We have several trips planned for February and space is available on all of them at this time.

Go to the main Seabirding website for the schedule and terms- www.seabirding.com

You can also give me a call to discuss trips and find out more about what to expect: 252-986-1363

Thanks,

Brian Patteson
Hatteras, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 1/29/18 8:57 am
From: Ginny Alfano (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: In response to Jack Rogers post, I am camping at Myrtle Beach State Park (site 154 - kitty corner to the Nature Center). The female Dickcissel has been at my feeders everyday for about three weeks. I've also had a female Baltimore Oriole coming to my suet
*Ginny AlfanoCleveland, NY*

*"I think that I cannot preserve my health and spirits, unless I spend four
hours a day at least — and it is commonly more than that — sauntering
through the woods and over the hills and fields, absolutely free from all
worldly engagements. " *
*Henry David Thoreau *

 

Back to top
Date: 1/29/18 8:19 am
From: James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Immature Mute Swan Pitt St. Causeway, Mount Pleasant, SC
I observed and photographed an immature Mute Swan this morning at Pitt St.
Causeway. It was in the water at the pedestrian park and then swam toward
Shem Creek beyond the first dock, and I moved over to Middle St. and shot
some more photos, and then it swam back toward Pitt St. where it was
sitting near the oyster restoration project with a few Hooded Mergansers.
My daughter Shelley sent me a few distant pics of two swans near Daniel
Island in the river last week, and the last I heard there was only one swan
remaining there near the mouth of Clouter Creek. One local resident said
this bird had been there a few days, mostly active in early morning.
Photographs are in the eBird checklist. It's the first swan I've seen in
the Pitt St. area in the 29 years I've lived here.

--

*Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul - and sings the
tunes without the words - and never stops at all.*

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 1/29/18 7:25 am
From: Ron <waxwing...>
Subject: Re: Pine Siskins Alleghany County
We’re up to 26, at last count, in Gaston County, southern Piedmont, next to Crowder’s Mtn. State Park.

Ron Clark
Kings Mtn. NC





From: Monty
Sent: Saturday, January 27, 2018 10:57 AM
To: James Keighton
Cc: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Pine Siskins Alleghany County

Jim,

We had a dozen or so last week @ our house down here in western Wilkes @ 1100ft-first of the season other than one or two passing thru.

Monty

On Jan 27, 2018, at 10:50 AM, <brbirders...> wrote:

After seeing occasionally only 2 or 3 siskins at a time at our feeders in the last two months, we now have over a dozen Pine Siskins daily at our feeders for this last week. Always wonderful. May they stay for the rest of the winter!

Jim and Alice Keighton
Sparta, Alleghany County, near MP 235 Blue Ridge Parkway

 

Back to top
Date: 1/29/18 7:05 am
From: Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Razorbills - Dare County, NC Jennette's Pier
Hello,

Just spent 45 minutes at Jennette's Pier and saw 7 Razorbills, two of which
were feeding about 15 yards from the beach and 15 yards from the pier. I
got some video and photos. For video, check out YouTube and search for
Outer Banks Bird Tours - Razorbills . But, you gotta give me a few hours
to get the clips up.

Jim Gould

Sent from my mobile device.

 

Back to top
Date: 1/28/18 4:07 pm
From: Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Jan. 27 "Pelagic" Trip From Hatteras
We had an excellent boat trip from Hatteras yesterday. To call it a pelagic trip might be a stretch because we only had to go about 12 miles out. The weather was mild with light southerly winds, but there was a nice cold water cul-de-sac on Diamond Shoals, so we had a good variety of winter seabirds. The highlight was several close encounters with Great Skuas, which are scarce but regular here. These skuas are generally not as approachable as South Polars, so to see them like we did yesterday was quite nice. We also had good numbers of Razorbills, several Atlantic Puffins, 3 species of shearwaters- including over 20 Manx Shearwaters, and several fulmars and kittiwakes. An adult Iceland Gull made a brief appearance during the afternoon.

To see photos from the trip and to read the trip report, go to the Seabirding Blog- seabirding.blogspot.com

We have several trips planned for February and space is available on all of them at this time.

Go to the main Seabirding website for the schedule and terms- www.seabirding.com

You can also give me a call to discuss trips and find out more about what to expect: 252-986-1363

Thanks,

Brian Patteson
Hatteras, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 1/28/18 2:30 pm
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: OBX - Lake Mattamuskeet this Weekend
All,

I was probably one of the few who didn't trek down to Wilmington this
weekend, but I did have a wonderful 1 1/2 day trip down east. It's been a
long time since I have been on Jeannette's Pier (Nags Head) at the end of
January and it was 62 degrees, and hardly any wind at all. Ten years ago I
could have waterskied on the ocean. I typically do Mattamuskeet on
Saturday, and do a quick 1/2 day at the Pea Island area of the banks, but
with a forecast of rain on Sunday, I switched the plan, and headed for pier.
A few of my favorite highlights are below:

At Beasley Rd (off Hwy. 64 east) I had four geese species (*Greater
White-fronted, Ross's, Snow, and Canada)*
I've never seen so many Canadas in my life in one place, so I was kinda
hoping for a couple of other goodies. I didn't stay forever, but I saw
three GWF Geese, and a couple each of the Ross's and Snows.

At Jennette's Pier I had 25+ *Razorbills*, with one close to the shore and
almost directly under the pier. It was very cool to see it swim under the
water! Powerful wings for sure.
*Horned Grebes *were way too many to count, and I saw two Scoter species
out of the three. White-winged wasn't seen. Both the *Common Loon
*and *Red=throated
Loon*
were close to the pier, and there was hardly any surf, so close views was
easy.

Bodie Island had a very large group of *Redheads*, and a couple of very
cooperative *Virginia Rails. *South Pond had 20+ *Canvasbacks *which was
very cool. I had *Wood Ducks *in the back at River Road at Alligator NWR,
but the best bird was the recently seen *Leucistic Red-tailed Hawk*. I've
never seen one before, and this bird was simply gorgeous. I have several
photos on my phone, and I will cherish them for a long time.

At Lake Mattmuskeet I had *Brewer's Blackbirds *across the street from Lake
Landing again, as well the most *Blue-winged Teal (6) *I've ever seen
there. They were seen at the beginning of Wildlife Drive. *Ring-necked
Ducks *gave me 18 species of ducks for the weekend, which I considered
above average.

It always good to me to see a *Merlin *and I had two around Hyde County. I
came away with 80 species for the short trip, and the weather was mostly
fantastic. I got up watch Roger Federer win his 20th major championship at
3:30 am (not on purpose), and you can imagine how fatigued I am currently.
But sleep is overrated, so onward I go!

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 1/28/18 12:02 pm
From: Ron <waxwing...>
Subject: Re: Dickcissel-Myrtle Beach SP, Horry co., SC
The Eider was there early Thursday, around 8:00, 75 feet to left of pier. Later that day, someday said they had an unidentified “duck” just out of scope range for ID. They thought it could have been the Eider.

Ron Clark
Kings Mtn. NC




From: Jack Rogers
Sent: Sunday, January 28, 2018 2:25 PM
To: Carolinabirds Listserve
Subject: Dickcissel-Myrtle Beach SP, Horry co., SC

C-birders,
Matt Janson and I just saw the continuing Dickcissel at the Myrtle Beach SP. I'd wager it a first winter female. It was hanging out around the feeders at the nature center and would sometimes scratch around the ground at the picnic tables between the center and the campground.
We did not see the Common Eider today, and when I was here Thursday I did not have it either.
Jack Rogers
Mt Pleasant, SC


--

Jack Rogers
Mt Pleasant, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 1/28/18 11:26 am
From: Jack Rogers <jack...>
Subject: Dickcissel-Myrtle Beach SP, Horry co., SC
C-birders,
Matt Janson and I just saw the continuing Dickcissel at the Myrtle Beach
SP. I'd wager it a first winter female. It was hanging out around the
feeders at the nature center and would sometimes scratch around the ground
at the picnic tables between the center and the campground.
We did not see the Common Eider today, and when I was here Thursday I did
not have it either.
Jack Rogers
Mt Pleasant, SC


--

Jack Rogers
Mt Pleasant, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 1/28/18 8:05 am
From: Lucas Bobay (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Glaucous Gull, Cape Point
Ed Corey and I had an adult Glaucous Gull at Cape Point in Dare County this
morning. We had a first-cycle Iceland Gull there on Friday.

Lucas Bobay
Raleigh

 

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Date: 1/27/18 4:22 pm
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: 3 Short-eared Owls, Long-billed Curlews, 100s of Marbled Godwits, White Pelicans - Cape Romain NWR
John Cox and I enjoyed THREE Short-eared Owls in one spot this
afternoon on a remote island in Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge.

One was a single/loner; two stuck very closely together in friendly
fashion and seemed for all the world like a mated pair. I uploaded
some cloudy-day photos of the Short-eared Owls on my Flickr page:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_offshorebirder2_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=4KarVhTNkZJ25DTeGj_31iXbszkUiX9Hyco6MViA7vo&s=UfdVsiAs-AjY1UFoIEXioMKeZhm8ggHarh1GRV52ODk&e=

flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2

We also had two Long-billed Curlews in what seems to be their new
favorite spot - not in their former haunts around Key Inlet. A few
White Pelicans were on a sandbar/shell rake in Bulls Bay.

Sea Ducks were bouncing around Bulls Bay and the ocean - plenty of
Scoters, some Lesser Scaup, what I think were some Long-tailed Ducks
and lots of Bufflehead, mergansers, etc.

We came upon a nice high tide roost of shorebirds on expansive oyster
reefs near the mouth of Graham Creek. There were about 500 Marbled
Godwits packed tight, probably twice that many Short-billed Dowitchers
and close to 4500 Dunlin. Plenty of American Oystercatchers and a few
dozen Willet were also present. Lesser numbers of Ruddy Turnstones
were also scattered about.

We were almost back to the hill before we saw our first Bald Eagle for
the day.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
 

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Date: 1/27/18 2:50 pm
From: \kathy <khart123...>\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: American woodcock
I had my first American Woodcock sighting in my back yard today. It was actively feeding in a wooded margin not particularly bothered by me watching it from about 10 feet away!
Happy birding,
Kathy Hart
Moncks Corner, SC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 1/27/18 7:58 am
From: Monty <mec...>
Subject: Re: Pine Siskins Alleghany County
Jim,

We had a dozen or so last week @ our house down here in western Wilkes @ 1100ft-first of the season other than one or two passing thru.

Monty

> On Jan 27, 2018, at 10:50 AM, <brbirders...> wrote:
>
> After seeing occasionally only 2 or 3 siskins at a time at our feeders in the last two months, we now have over a dozen Pine Siskins daily at our feeders for this last week. Always wonderful. May they stay for the rest of the winter!
>
> Jim and Alice Keighton
> Sparta, Alleghany County, near MP 235 Blue Ridge Parkway


 

Back to top
Date: 1/27/18 7:50 am
From: <brbirders...>
Subject: Pine Siskins Alleghany County
After seeing occasionally only 2 or 3 siskins at a time at our feeders in the last two months, we now have over a dozen Pine Siskins daily at our feeders for this last week. Always wonderful. May they stay for the rest of the winter!

Jim and Alice Keighton
Sparta, Alleghany County, near MP 235 Blue Ridge Parkway
 

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Date: 1/27/18 6:12 am
From: <jkestner...>
Subject: Re: Need a guide in the Outer Banks area.
Sorry -- forgot to include my name!

Judy Kestner, Corpus Christi, TX


---- <jkestner...> wrote:

=============
My sister, brother-in-law and I will travel to the Outer Banks for some
birding between Feb. 1 and 4. Is there a list of people who act as guides in
that area? I live in Texas, my sister and hubby are from Vermont.

 

Back to top
Date: 1/27/18 6:07 am
From: <jkestner...>
Subject: Need a guide in the Outer Banks area.
My sister, brother-in-law and I will travel to the Outer Banks for some
birding between Feb. 1 and 4. Is there a list of people who act as guides in
that area? I live in Texas, my sister and hubby are from Vermont.
 

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Date: 1/26/18 7:32 pm
From: Janet & Richard Paulette (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: High Country Audubon newsletter
Please click on this link for the Feb/Mar/Apr 2018 newsletter of High
Country Audubon Society.

http://www.highcountryaudubon.org/images/HCHoots_Feb-Mar-April-2018.pdf

Janet Paulette
Deep Gap, NC

Virus-free. www.avast.com
 

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Date: 1/26/18 6:48 am
From: Ben Ringer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Pine Siskin
We saw our first PINE SISKIN of the year at our feeder this morning.


Ben Ringer
Hendersonville, - NC.

 

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Date: 1/26/18 6:45 am
From: Ben Ringer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Pine Siskin
We saw our first PINE SISKIN of the year at our feeder this morning.


Ben Ringer
Hendersonville,NC.

 

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Date: 1/26/18 6:38 am
From: Ben Ringer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Pine Siskin
Saw our first PINE SISKIN of the year at our feeder this morning.


Ben Ringer

 

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Date: 1/25/18 6:34 pm
From: \Mark McShane\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: King Eider - 2nd Ave Pier, Myrtle Beach SC - 1/13/2018 - Video Post
Hi All,

Thought that some might enjoy seeing some video clips of the female King
Eider, mostly foraging, at the 2nd Ave Pier in Myrtle Beach. I was able to
add some brief handheld phonescoped video clips to my eBird checklist,
instructions for downloading and playing the raw Apple MOV video files are
also in the checklist, and the video clips are available directly on Flickr as
well per info there. I set these up to run at half speed but I think that
Flickr only knows to run them at full speed. Apple QuickTime can run them
natively at half speed which is kind of cool.

The eBird checklist:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41871884

Thanks to all who have reported and posted this really great bird for the 7
southeastern-most states (#466)!

Good Birding All!

Mark

Mark McShane
Lawrenceville, Gwinnett County, Georgia
www.neargareport.com
 

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Date: 1/25/18 12:54 pm
From: pjmarkham (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Request for Information
All,


I will be traveling to the lower rio grande valley area of Texas in March. If anyone has recommendations of bird books, guide books, places to bird I would be grateful to hear what they are. Any other comments/suggestions will be appreciated. Off list replies please.


All the best,


Patrick Markham
Summerville, SC

 

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Date: 1/25/18 8:49 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: USS North Carolina
The marsh is on the right side of the entry road as you approach the ship’s parking lot, so not impacted by open/close hours.

Note that while there are “good” King Rails here (presumably) many (most?) of the big rails there now appear to be either Clapper or intergrades (i.e. “Cling” Rails).

Steve Shultz
Apex NC
From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of David Schroder
Sent: Thursday, January 25, 2018 10:51 AM
To: BC Bird Forum Forum
Subject: USS North Carolina

I’ve read that the USS North Carolina in Wilmington ia a good place to hear/see King Rails. I know that the website says the ship is open from 8a-4p, which are not exactly prime rail hours. Is it possible to bird the ship area when it’s not open, or would 8am when it opens be my best bet?

Thanks in advance,
David Schroder
 

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Date: 1/25/18 7:52 am
From: David Schroder (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: USS North Carolina
I’ve read that the USS North Carolina in Wilmington ia a good place to
hear/see King Rails. I know that the website says the ship is open from
8a-4p, which are not exactly prime rail hours. Is it possible to bird the
ship area when it’s not open, or would 8am when it opens be my best bet?

Thanks in advance,
David Schroder

 

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Date: 1/24/18 7:03 pm
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Something I've never, ever seen before
KC,

I’ve never seen that in my life, except once in a photo someone posted, and I was sure the photo was faked. But it wasn’t - it was at a huge chicken farm of some sort in New York, and hawks gathered there in ridiculous numbers, like 10 in one tree and another 5 in the tree next to it.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

On Jan 24, 2018, at 7:31 PM, KC Foggin <KCFoggin...><mailto:<KCFoggin...>> wrote:

Was stopped in a long traffic line on 544 this a.m. and noticed a bunch of large birds all flying to this one tree. As I grabbed my bins, I was shocked to see so many Red-tail Hawks together. I had no idea they traveled like that. I now know that it is called a “cast of Hawks” Most seemed to be adults but there were quite a few immatures. When I say a large amount, I had to stop counting at 22 cause the traffic was on the move. Truly a first for me. Do they usually do this in the winter months or has anyone else come across this?

K.C.

Take nothing but pictures,
Leave nothing but footprints
Kill nothing but time

K.C. Foggin
Socastee,Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.birdforum.net&d=DwIGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Ro0P09MRR0Iwd7Z4JJpY1bAn-aUlYMki26qxpH4Zy-I&s=r1T0C60QbfK_sPOubNaLD4nRobNFlqgjpomynxjDvho&e= >

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20




 

Back to top
Date: 1/24/18 6:20 pm
From: \Elizabeth Wilkins/vanMontfrans\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Red-necked Grebe, Cape Hatteras
Carolina birders,

We were pleased to find the continuing Red-necked Grebe at the Salt Pond at
Cape Hatteras this morning - in the small cove at the end of the short
soggy trail off of ramp 44. We also had an added bonus of two American
Pipits and four warbler species (Orange-crowned, Palm, Common Yellowthroat
and Yellow-rumped). Alas, we did not locate the Glaucous Gull seen by
Brian P. at Cape Point, but there were so many gulls to pick through that
we could have overlooked it.
Nice day out there!

Elizabeth Wilkins
Jacques van Montfrans
Yorktown, VA and Frisco, NC
www.loonslanding.info
pw: loonrise

 

Back to top
Date: 1/24/18 4:32 pm
From: KC Foggin <KCFoggin...>
Subject: Something I've never, ever seen before
Was stopped in a long traffic line on 544 this a.m. and noticed a bunch of large birds all flying to this one tree. As I grabbed my bins, I was shocked to see so many Red-tail Hawks together. I had no idea they traveled like that. I now know that it is called a “cast of Hawks” Most seemed to be adults but there were quite a few immatures. When I say a large amount, I had to stop counting at 22 cause the traffic was on the move. Truly a first for me. Do they usually do this in the winter months or has anyone else come across this?

K.C.

Take nothing but pictures,
Leave nothing but footprints
Kill nothing but time

K.C. Foggin
Socastee,Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20



 

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Date: 1/24/18 9:06 am
From: Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Space on this weekend's pelagic trip
I wanted to let everyone know that we still have space for more birders on this weekend’s boat trip from Hatteras. This will be our first trip of the year, and since December we have seen the arrival of many Razorbills and a few Manx Shearwaters (noted from the beach.) Our December trip also had a Great Skua and two Iceland Gulls. Over the years, we have seen Great Skuas on about 60% of our winter trips from Hatteras. The water is quite a bit cooler now than it was a few weeks ago, especially north of the Cape, so I am hoping there could be some Dovekies and puffins lurking offshore. Compared to spring and summer, these trips are much closer to shore, and we encounter many more birds altogether. Right now there are many hundreds of Razorbills, loons, and Bonaparte’s Gulls in the near shore waters. We have often found Little Gull on these boat trips since we began doing them in the mid 1990s. These trips are also great for bird photography, including the chance to get photos of diving gannets.

After this weekend, we have birding trips going from Hatteras every weekend in February, weather permitting. The trip on Feb. 3 is a charter, but they are open to having a few people from outside their group join the trip.

These are all day trips offshore aboard a sea kindly 56’ boat. Our boat is inspected annually by the USCG and we have been operating these trips for many years.

For more info about our trips, see www.seabirding.com/ <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.seabirding.com_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=qRO_kAz7ZTSXvoDixVfaQNMrvlJyG-QOPeC1Fa2nOQg&s=WQXN1jIRBBjMxJNJzdmFztFKskGUR_SEUBdB-RSGY5k&e= >

I can also be reached at (252) 986-1363, and I am happy to answer questions about the trips.

Thanks,

Brian Patteson
Hatteras, NC

 

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Date: 1/24/18 8:41 am
From: Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Glaucous Gull at Cape Hatteras
I made a quick trip out to check Cape Point this morning. On my way back from seeing 100 or so Razorbills and a Manx Shearwater, I stumbled upon this young Glaucous Gull resting on the beach with other gulls. I also saw a Red-necked Grebe on the ocean from the north beach just opposite the Salt Pond.

Brian Patteson
Hatteras, NC
 

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Date: 1/23/18 3:42 pm
From: WALTER KENT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Ross's Goose
The Ross's Goose continues to hang out at The Broyhill Walking Park in Lenoir N.C. It is very tame and pics can be made from 20 feet.
Walt Kent
Lenoir N.C.

 

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Date: 1/22/18 2:07 pm
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Proper channels for reporting Re: Hawks being shot and killed
I disagree with Parkin's suggestion - contacting DNR board members
about an individual violation would be counterproductive and
inefficient.

* The proper channel for reporting game law and natural resource
violations you witness in South Carolina is SC DNR Law Enforcement's
24-hour hotline: 1-800-922-5431

The hotline is part of Operation Game Thief:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.dnr.sc.gov_law_OGT.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=aaFRTKr3ZcHAFQy545PUgFmGt_jPjCJY1sM6qzu6ask&s=6FJUV6zMF_cM43-SVIFrAja5bVt6ZL4q5hOVX9no7Mc&e=

You can report tips on violations anonymously if you wish to protect
your identity.

And someone shooting Hawks needs to be reported!

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

On Mon, Jan 22, 2018 at 10:53 AM, Parkin Hunter <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Email SCDNR board members and get some enforcement sent there.
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.dnr.sc.gov_admin_board.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=aaFRTKr3ZcHAFQy545PUgFmGt_jPjCJY1sM6qzu6ask&s=EHOAHsSK-av_UPT5XnnKEQBUnKTvdp6v4EyYzflcGH4&e=
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jan 22, 2018, at 10:23 AM, "\"Herbert wrote:
>
>
> I know it is illegal to kill birds of prey. I met some people living out
> in the country this weekend whose chickens are being taken by the red
> tailed hawks; they are free range chickens, so are out and about all the
> time. This is in Georgetown County near Williamsburg County. They stated
> that they have shot several red tails in the past few weeks to try and
> save their chickens. But there are still hawks taking the chickens. (I
> saw, heard two while there).
>
> I suggested keeping chickens penned, getting a Great Pyrenees dog (like
> my goat farm lady uses to protect her chickens, which are penned). I also
> pointed out that killing hawks was illegal, but it didn¹t seem to bother
> them. I was quite distraught.
> I don¹t know the names of farmers, but what can be done about this?
>
> Thanks for any advice.
>
> Teri Lynn
> back in Charleston now
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> This message was secured via TLS by MUSC.
>
 

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Date: 1/22/18 11:21 am
From: Helms, J <j.chris.helms...>
Subject: Red-throated Loon at Carolina Beach SP
A Red-throated Loon was observed this morning on the Cape Fear River very near the Carolina Beach State Park shoreline this morning. Hung around pretty close all morning.
Great Horned Owl nest near the Flytrap Trail parking area at the end of Nature Trail Lane was relocated on Saturday. Nest is along Sugarloaf Trail and high up in the crotch of a loblolly pine, off the trail toward a wet, swampy area. Apparent female was deep in the nest, possibly brooding eggs, w/ the male nearby on an adjacent pine limb.

We'd ask that folks that wish to visit the site, maintain a distance by staying on the trail, and please do not approach the actual tree trunk. In no way, shape or fashion should folks tap or beat on the tree or otherwise disturb, aggravate or molest this nesting pair.

Chris Helms, Park Superintendent
Carolina Beach State Park
Carolina Beach, NC



 

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Date: 1/22/18 10:40 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Hawks being shot and killed
I was once playing softball on a dirt field in Puerto Rico, with a chicken or two wandering around, and a Peregrine Falcon came in and went after one of the chickens. Didn’t get it.

But still, it’s usually Cooper’s.

I wonder how much of the decline in band recoveries is due to fewer hawks being shot, and how much is due to the people who shoot them no longer reporting the bands.

One more anecdote I have shared here before - I salvage birds to skin and stuff for the teaching collection here at Coastal Carolina University. I once picked up a very freshly car-killed adult Cooper’s. When I was skinning it I discovered it had bird shot embedded in its breast muscle (healed, encapsulated). So it had been shot, survived that, and then eventually got hit by a car. Humans.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC


> On Jan 22, 2018, at 1:15 PM, Helmut Mueller <helmutmueller...> wrote:
>
> In my many years of banding hawks & owls, I recall twice finding chicken remains in red-tail nests & several cases of nests above an area in which chickens roamed. We also banded a lot of Red-tails trapped during fall migration & in the 1950’s, ca 10% of the Red-tails were recovered in the first year, with almost all being shot. In the 1990’s less than 1% were recovered in the first year after banding. I attribute this to the educational effects of TV & rehab centers. I also no of 2 cases of Cooper’s nesting in a woods where chickens frequented. Those of you who are on the CBC field trip to Cuba will remember a Gundlach’s Hawk nest in a wood frequented by chickens. The species is a very close relative of the Cooper’s. I also remember a Wilson Ornithological Society Meeting where a chicken farmer told me of his bird feeder, on which he placed his dead chickens & they were taken by Red-tails.
>
> Helmut C. Mueller
> Professor Emeritus
> Department of Biology and Curriculum in Ecology
> University of North Carolina
> Chapel Hill, NC 27599
> 919-942-4937
> <hmueller...>
>
>
>
>> On Jan 22, 2018, at 12:31 PM, Weiskotten, Kurt <kweiskotten...> wrote:
>>
>> Here in NY, I have raised free range chickens for 10 years. They are kept in a coop or fenced yard when no one is home.
>> The vast majority of my chicken loss has been from Coopers Hawks. Of course I have plenty of bird feeders that bring them around more often, but hey hawks need to eat too! Red tails abound as well, but they have never taken a chicken, although I'm sure they do elsewhere. Occasionally, a grey fox gets one, and rarely a coyote. But I would never shoot a hawk - it is after all against the law - without a permit. If these people are raising chickens as a living and for income then they should pursue the nuisance predator route. Otherwise hawk kills are part of owning chickens.
>>
>> Sent from my Verizon LG Smartphone
>>
>> ------ Original message------
>> From: Millis, Tracy
>> Date: Mon, Jan 22, 2018 12:15 PM
>> To: <carolinabirds...>;
>> Cc:
>> Subject:RE: Hawks being shot and killed
>>
>> I wouldn’t be surprised if coyotes were the major culprit in the disappearances of the farmer’s chickens, not hawks.
>>
>> Tracy L. Millis
>> Chapel Hill, NC
>>
>> From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Christopher Hill
>> Sent: Monday, January 22, 2018 11:52 AM
>> To: birds <carolinabirds...>
>> Subject: Re: Hawks being shot and killed
>>
>> Also, for what it’s worth, it’s often Cooper’s Hawks taking the chickens. The Cooper’s Hawks, appear, grab one, take off, as Cooper’s Hawks are wont to do. The chicken owners see a Red-tail and shoot it because they’re big and obvious. But not always the guilty party, in fact usually not.
>>
>> Chris Hill
>> Conway, SC
>>
>> On Jan 22, 2018, at 11:02 AM, <scompton1251...> wrote:
>>
>> Teri Lynn,
>>
>> Studies done in the 30's showed that Red-tailed Hawks and other birds of prey are a net benefit to domestic fowl, as they prefer rodents and control rodent populations that prey on eggs. While law enforcement can be used as a last resort the better method is to provide the farmer with education.
>> The Clemson Extension agent could be helpful.
>>
>> Steve Compton
>> Greenville, SC
>>
>> -----------------------------------------
>> From: "Herbert, Teri Lynn" (via carolinabirds Mailing List)"
>> To: "Carolinabirds Listserve"
>> Cc:
>> Sent: 22-Jan-2018 15:25:39 +0000
>> Subject: Hawks being shot and killed
>>
>>
>> I know it is illegal to kill birds of prey. I met some people living out
>> in the country this weekend whose chickens are being taken by the red
>> tailed hawks; they are free range chickens, so are out and about all the
>> time. This is in Georgetown County near Williamsburg County. They stated
>> that they have shot several red tails in the past few weeks to try and
>> save their chickens. But there are still hawks taking the chickens. (I
>> saw, heard two while there).
>>
>> I suggested keeping chickens penned, getting a Great Pyrenees dog (like
>> my goat farm lady uses to protect her chickens, which are penned). I also
>> pointed out that killing hawks was illegal, but it didn¹t seem to bother
>> them. I was quite distraught.
>> I don¹t know the names of farmers, but what can be done about this?
>>
>> Thanks for any advice.
>>
>> Teri Lynn
>> back in Charleston now
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> This message was secured via TLS by MUSC.
>>
>>
>>
>> This communication and any attachments are intended only for the use of the individual or entity named as the addressee. It may contain information which is privileged and/or confidential under applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient or such recipient's employee or agent, you are hereby notified that any dissemination, copy or disclosure of this communication is strictly prohibited and to notify the sender immediately.
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/22/18 10:19 am
From: Helmut Mueller <helmutmueller...>
Subject: Re: Hawks being shot and killed
In my many years of banding hawks & owls, I recall twice finding chicken remains in red-tail nests & several cases of nests above an area in which chickens roamed. We also banded a lot of Red-tails trapped during fall migration & in the 1950s, ca 10% of the Red-tails were recovered in the first year, with almost all being shot. In the 1990s less than 1% were recovered in the first year after banding. I attribute this to the educational effects of TV & rehab centers. I also no of 2 cases of Coopers nesting in a woods where chickens frequented. Those of you who are on the CBC field trip to Cuba will remember a Gundlachs Hawk nest in a wood frequented by chickens. The species is a very close relative of the Coopers. I also remember a Wilson Ornithological Society Meeting where a chicken farmer told me of his bird feeder, on which he placed his dead chickens & they were taken by Red-tails.

Helmut C. Mueller
Professor Emeritus
Department of Biology and Curriculum in Ecology
University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill, NC 27599
919-942-4937
<hmueller...>



> On Jan 22, 2018, at 12:31 PM, Weiskotten, Kurt <kweiskotten...> wrote:
>
> Here in NY, I have raised free range chickens for 10 years. They are kept in a coop or fenced yard when no one is home.
> The vast majority of my chicken loss has been from Coopers Hawks. Of course I have plenty of bird feeders that bring them around more often, but hey hawks need to eat too! Red tails abound as well, but they have never taken a chicken, although I'm sure they do elsewhere. Occasionally, a grey fox gets one, and rarely a coyote. But I would never shoot a hawk - it is after all against the law - without a permit. If these people are raising chickens as a living and for income then they should pursue the nuisance predator route. Otherwise hawk kills are part of owning chickens.
>
> Sent from my Verizon LG Smartphone
>
> ------ Original message------
> From: Millis, Tracy
> Date: Mon, Jan 22, 2018 12:15 PM
> To: <carolinabirds...>;
> Cc:
> Subject:RE: Hawks being shot and killed
>
> I wouldnt be surprised if coyotes were the major culprit in the disappearances of the farmers chickens, not hawks.
>
> Tracy L. Millis
> Chapel Hill, NC
>
> From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Christopher Hill
> Sent: Monday, January 22, 2018 11:52 AM
> To: birds <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: Re: Hawks being shot and killed
>
> Also, for what its worth, its often Coopers Hawks taking the chickens. The Coopers Hawks, appear, grab one, take off, as Coopers Hawks are wont to do. The chicken owners see a Red-tail and shoot it because theyre big and obvious. But not always the guilty party, in fact usually not.
>
> Chris Hill
> Conway, SC
>
> On Jan 22, 2018, at 11:02 AM, <scompton1251...> wrote:
>
> Teri Lynn,
>
> Studies done in the 30's showed that Red-tailed Hawks and other birds of prey are a net benefit to domestic fowl, as they prefer rodents and control rodent populations that prey on eggs. While law enforcement can be used as a last resort the better method is to provide the farmer with education.
> The Clemson Extension agent could be helpful.
>
> Steve Compton
> Greenville, SC
>
> -----------------------------------------
> From: "Herbert, Teri Lynn" (via carolinabirds Mailing List)"
> To: "Carolinabirds Listserve"
> Cc:
> Sent: 22-Jan-2018 15:25:39 +0000
> Subject: Hawks being shot and killed
>
>
> I know it is illegal to kill birds of prey. I met some people living out
> in the country this weekend whose chickens are being taken by the red
> tailed hawks; they are free range chickens, so are out and about all the
> time. This is in Georgetown County near Williamsburg County. They stated
> that they have shot several red tails in the past few weeks to try and
> save their chickens. But there are still hawks taking the chickens. (I
> saw, heard two while there).
>
> I suggested keeping chickens penned, getting a Great Pyrenees dog (like
> my goat farm lady uses to protect her chickens, which are penned). I also
> pointed out that killing hawks was illegal, but it didnt seem to bother
> them. I was quite distraught.
> I dont know the names of farmers, but what can be done about this?
>
> Thanks for any advice.
>
> Teri Lynn
> back in Charleston now
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> This message was secured via TLS by MUSC.
>
>
>
> This communication and any attachments are intended only for the use of the individual or entity named as the addressee. It may contain information which is privileged and/or confidential under applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient or such recipient's employee or agent, you are hereby notified that any dissemination, copy or disclosure of this communication is strictly prohibited and to notify the sender immediately.

 

Back to top
Date: 1/22/18 9:46 am
From: Will Cook <cwcook...>
Subject: Fwd: Thick-billed Murre killed by GBBG
-------- Forwarded Message --------
From: Jamie Adams <jadamsbirds...>
Subject: Thick-billed Murre killed by GBBG
Date: January 22, 2018 at 11:26:58 AM EST
To: <carolinabirds...>

Hello birders,

Same Cooper and I re-found the Thick-billed Murre north of the jetty at
Masonboro Inlet this morning and it looked ok but just floating around
and not fishing. Then it started flailing around one of its wings and
attracted a bunch of gulls. A Great Black-backed Gull finished it off
and it floated slowly belly up towards the jetty.

We obtained photos of the ordeal.

Sorry to say it is dead.

Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC

-------- Forwarded Message Ends --------

Will Cook - Durham, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 1/22/18 9:43 am
From: JILL MIDGETT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Hawks being shot and killed
Don't disagree with any of this as I have friends in several states with
these problems. There are many predators (birds, mammals, snakes) of birds
raised on your land.

Just stating that if you're worried that raptors are being killed, (and it
happens) the U.S. Fish & Wildlife enforces the Federal Migratory Bird Act.
You can also contact county sherrif.

Jill
Charleston, SC


On Monday, January 22, 2018, Weiskotten, Kurt <kweiskotten...>
wrote:

> Here in NY, I have raised free range chickens for 10 years. They are kept
> in a coop or fenced yard when no one is home.
> The vast majority of my chicken loss has been from Coopers Hawks. Of
> course I have plenty of bird feeders that bring them around more often, but
> hey hawks need to eat too! Red tails abound as well, but they have never
> taken a chicken, although I'm sure they do elsewhere. Occasionally, a grey
> fox gets one, and rarely a coyote. But I would never shoot a hawk - it is
> after all against the law - without a permit. If these people are raising
> chickens as a living and for income then they should pursue the nuisance
> predator route. Otherwise hawk kills are part of owning chickens.
>
> *Sent from my Verizon LG Smartphone*
>
> ------ Original message------
> *From: *Millis, Tracy
> *Date: *Mon, Jan 22, 2018 12:15 PM
> *To: *<carolinabirds...>;
> *Cc: *
> *Subject:*RE: Hawks being shot and killed
>
> I wouldn’t be surprised if coyotes were the major culprit in the
> disappearances of the farmer’s chickens, not hawks.
>
>
>
> Tracy L. Millis
> Chapel Hill, NC
>
>
>
> *From:* <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:carolinabirds-request@
> duke.edu] *On Behalf Of *Christopher Hill
> *Sent:* Monday, January 22, 2018 11:52 AM
> *To:* birds <carolinabirds...>
> *Subject:* Re: Hawks being shot and killed
>
>
>
> Also, for what it’s worth, it’s often Cooper’s Hawks taking the chickens.
> The Cooper’s Hawks, appear, grab one, take off, as Cooper’s Hawks are wont
> to do. The chicken owners see a Red-tail and shoot it because they’re big
> and obvious. But not always the guilty party, in fact usually not.
>
>
>
> Chris Hill
>
> Conway, SC
>
>
>
> On Jan 22, 2018, at 11:02 AM, <scompton1251...> wrote:
>
>
>
> Teri Lynn,
>
>
>
> Studies done in the 30's showed that Red-tailed Hawks and other birds of
> prey are a net benefit to domestic fowl, as they prefer rodents and control
> rodent populations that prey on eggs. While law enforcement can be used as
> a last resort the better method is to provide the farmer with education.
>
> The Clemson Extension agent could be helpful.
>
>
>
> Steve Compton
>
> Greenville, SC
>
> -----------------------------------------
>
> From: "Herbert, Teri Lynn" (via carolinabirds Mailing List)"
> To: "Carolinabirds Listserve"
> Cc:
> Sent: 22-Jan-2018 15:25:39 +0000
> Subject: Hawks being shot and killed
>
>
> I know it is illegal to kill birds of prey. I met some people living out
> in the country this weekend whose chickens are being taken by the red
> tailed hawks; they are free range chickens, so are out and about all the
> time. This is in Georgetown County near Williamsburg County. They stated
> that they have shot several red tails in the past few weeks to try and
> save their chickens. But there are still hawks taking the chickens. (I
> saw, heard two while there).
>
> I suggested keeping chickens penned, getting a Great Pyrenees dog (like
> my goat farm lady uses to protect her chickens, which are penned). I also
> pointed out that killing hawks was illegal, but it didn¹t seem to bother
> them. I was quite distraught.
> I don¹t know the names of farmers, but what can be done about this?
>
> Thanks for any advice.
>
> Teri Lynn
> back in Charleston now
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> This message was secured via TLS by MUSC.
>
>
>
> This communication and any attachments are intended only for the use of
> the individual or entity named as the addressee. It may contain information
> which is privileged and/or confidential under applicable law. If you are
> not the intended recipient or such recipient's employee or agent, you are
> hereby notified that any dissemination, copy or disclosure of this
> communication is strictly prohibited and to notify the sender immediately.
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/22/18 9:32 am
From: Weiskotten, Kurt <kweiskotten...>
Subject: Re: Hawks being shot and killed
Here in NY, I have raised free range chickens for 10 years. They are kept in a coop or fenced yard when no one is home.
The vast majority of my chicken loss has been from Coopers Hawks. Of course I have plenty of bird feeders that bring them around more often, but hey hawks need to eat too! Red tails abound as well, but they have never taken a chicken, although I'm sure they do elsewhere. Occasionally, a grey fox gets one, and rarely a coyote. But I would never shoot a hawk - it is after all against the law - without a permit. If these people are raising chickens as a living and for income then they should pursue the nuisance predator route. Otherwise hawk kills are part of owning chickens.

Sent from my Verizon LG Smartphone

------ Original message------
From: Millis, Tracy
Date: Mon, Jan 22, 2018 12:15 PM
To: <carolinabirds...>;
Cc:
Subject:RE: Hawks being shot and killed

I wouldnt be surprised if coyotes were the major culprit in the disappearances of the farmers chickens, not hawks.

Tracy L. Millis
Chapel Hill, NC

From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Christopher Hill
Sent: Monday, January 22, 2018 11:52 AM
To: birds <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Hawks being shot and killed

Also, for what its worth, its often Coopers Hawks taking the chickens. The Coopers Hawks, appear, grab one, take off, as Coopers Hawks are wont to do. The chicken owners see a Red-tail and shoot it because theyre big and obvious. But not always the guilty party, in fact usually not.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

On Jan 22, 2018, at 11:02 AM, <scompton1251...><mailto:<scompton1251...> wrote:

Teri Lynn,

Studies done in the 30's showed that Red-tailed Hawks and other birds of prey are a net benefit to domestic fowl, as they prefer rodents and control rodent populations that prey on eggs. While law enforcement can be used as a last resort the better method is to provide the farmer with education.
The Clemson Extension agent could be helpful.

Steve Compton
Greenville, SC
-----------------------------------------
From: "Herbert, Teri Lynn" (via carolinabirds Mailing List)"
To: "Carolinabirds Listserve"
Cc:
Sent: 22-Jan-2018 15:25:39 +0000
Subject: Hawks being shot and killed


I know it is illegal to kill birds of prey. I met some people living out
in the country this weekend whose chickens are being taken by the red
tailed hawks; they are free range chickens, so are out and about all the
time. This is in Georgetown County near Williamsburg County. They stated
that they have shot several red tails in the past few weeks to try and
save their chickens. But there are still hawks taking the chickens. (I
saw, heard two while there).

I suggested keeping chickens penned, getting a Great Pyrenees dog (like
my goat farm lady uses to protect her chickens, which are penned). I also
pointed out that killing hawks was illegal, but it didnt seem to bother
them. I was quite distraught.
I dont know the names of farmers, but what can be done about this?

Thanks for any advice.

Teri Lynn
back in Charleston now







-------------------------------------------------------------------------
This message was secured via TLS by MUSC.



This communication and any attachments are intended only for the use of the individual or entity named as the addressee. It may contain information which is privileged and/or confidential under applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient or such recipient's employee or agent, you are hereby notified that any dissemination, copy or disclosure of this communication is strictly prohibited and to notify the sender immediately.

 

Back to top
Date: 1/22/18 9:15 am
From: \Millis, Tracy\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Hawks being shot and killed
I wouldn’t be surprised if coyotes were the major culprit in the disappearances of the farmer’s chickens, not hawks.

Tracy L. Millis
Chapel Hill, NC

From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Christopher Hill
Sent: Monday, January 22, 2018 11:52 AM
To: birds <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Hawks being shot and killed

Also, for what it’s worth, it’s often Cooper’s Hawks taking the chickens. The Cooper’s Hawks, appear, grab one, take off, as Cooper’s Hawks are wont to do. The chicken owners see a Red-tail and shoot it because they’re big and obvious. But not always the guilty party, in fact usually not.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

On Jan 22, 2018, at 11:02 AM, <scompton1251...><mailto:<scompton1251...> wrote:

Teri Lynn,

Studies done in the 30's showed that Red-tailed Hawks and other birds of prey are a net benefit to domestic fowl, as they prefer rodents and control rodent populations that prey on eggs. While law enforcement can be used as a last resort the better method is to provide the farmer with education.
The Clemson Extension agent could be helpful.

Steve Compton
Greenville, SC
-----------------------------------------
From: "Herbert, Teri Lynn" (via carolinabirds Mailing List)"
To: "Carolinabirds Listserve"
Cc:
Sent: 22-Jan-2018 15:25:39 +0000
Subject: Hawks being shot and killed


I know it is illegal to kill birds of prey. I met some people living out
in the country this weekend whose chickens are being taken by the red
tailed hawks; they are free range chickens, so are out and about all the
time. This is in Georgetown County near Williamsburg County. They stated
that they have shot several red tails in the past few weeks to try and
save their chickens. But there are still hawks taking the chickens. (I
saw, heard two while there).

I suggested keeping chickens penned, getting a Great Pyrenees dog (like
my goat farm lady uses to protect her chickens, which are penned). I also
pointed out that killing hawks was illegal, but it didn¹t seem to bother
them. I was quite distraught.
I don¹t know the names of farmers, but what can be done about this?

Thanks for any advice.

Teri Lynn
back in Charleston now







-------------------------------------------------------------------------
This message was secured via TLS by MUSC.



 

Back to top
Date: 1/22/18 8:53 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Hawks being shot and killed
Also, for what it’s worth, it’s often Cooper’s Hawks taking the chickens. The Cooper’s Hawks, appear, grab one, take off, as Cooper’s Hawks are wont to do. The chicken owners see a Red-tail and shoot it because they’re big and obvious. But not always the guilty party, in fact usually not.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

On Jan 22, 2018, at 11:02 AM, <scompton1251...><mailto:<scompton1251...> wrote:


Teri Lynn,


Studies done in the 30's showed that Red-tailed Hawks and other birds of prey are a net benefit to domestic fowl, as they prefer rodents and control rodent populations that prey on eggs. While law enforcement can be used as a last resort the better method is to provide the farmer with education.

The Clemson Extension agent could be helpful.


Steve Compton

Greenville, SC


-----------------------------------------

From: "Herbert, Teri Lynn" (via carolinabirds Mailing List)"
To: "Carolinabirds Listserve"
Cc:
Sent: 22-Jan-2018 15:25:39 +0000
Subject: Hawks being shot and killed


I know it is illegal to kill birds of prey. I met some people living out
in the country this weekend whose chickens are being taken by the red
tailed hawks; they are free range chickens, so are out and about all the
time. This is in Georgetown County near Williamsburg County. They stated
that they have shot several red tails in the past few weeks to try and
save their chickens. But there are still hawks taking the chickens. (I
saw, heard two while there).

I suggested keeping chickens penned, getting a Great Pyrenees dog (like
my goat farm lady uses to protect her chickens, which are penned). I also
pointed out that killing hawks was illegal, but it didn¹t seem to bother
them. I was quite distraught.
I don¹t know the names of farmers, but what can be done about this?

Thanks for any advice.

Teri Lynn
back in Charleston now







-------------------------------------------------------------------------
This message was secured via TLS by MUSC.


 

Back to top
Date: 1/22/18 8:49 am
From: Fred Burggraf (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Pine Warbler
I've had luck this winter with a product called Bark Butter....a mix of
peanut butter and suet that you spread on trees. The Pine Warbler has been
a regular visitor this season; this picture was taken today, so the good
news is that the cold of last night didn't claim this bird. You can see a
little bit of the Bark Butter on the tree behind the bird's head. I got my
supply at a nearby Wild Bird center. Other birds that have have enjoyed
this treat include Red-bellied Woodpecker, Brown-headed Nuthatch and overly
greedy Common Crows.

Fred Burggraf
Murrells Inlet, SC
Georgetown Co.

On Tue, Jan 16, 2018 at 11:34 AM, Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...>
wrote:

> In what has been an annual appearance, I spotted a Pine Warbler feeding on
> the suet in one of my woodpecker logs (lengths of fallen tree limbs with
> bored holes for suet). My last sighting was during my 4-5 February 2017
> FeederWatch count.
>
> Frank Hamilton
> Charleston, SC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/22/18 8:31 am
From: Kevin Hudson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Long Tailed Duck, wake county nc, hwy 50 beaver dam
As of 11:30 am, the duck is still here - visible from beach @ beaver dam
hot spot

Kevin Hudson
Raleigh NC

 

Back to top
Date: 1/22/18 8:26 am
From: KEN LIPSHY (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Hawks being shot and killed
Interesting... several years back Audubon had an article titled “killing hawks” about the California roller pigeon aficionados killing owls falcons and hawks and lack of any enforcement — seems to be a common concern. Not sure how we educate citizens about the importance of these species.


Kenneth A. Lipshy
Www.crisismanagementleadership.com<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__Www.crisismanagementleadership.com&d=DwIGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=OlgXfQwqSidxIYTu7jhuiIEmd_DsUixn8ydpX_UJQ08&s=AdBxzRz5XDvXl-ZIP7l9mM--mAAUXuSPiP7Sqpmk8Fc&e= >
Www.crisislead.blogspot.com<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__Www.crisislead.blogspot.com&d=DwIGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=OlgXfQwqSidxIYTu7jhuiIEmd_DsUixn8ydpX_UJQ08&s=J818m_UgWipZRu7vmCOIsPlrhwIb_KV1jrjoDzYt7tI&e= >

On Jan 22, 2018, at 10:54 AM, Parkin Hunter <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:


Email SCDNR board members and get some enforcement sent there.


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.dnr.sc.gov_admin_board.html&d=DwIGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=OlgXfQwqSidxIYTu7jhuiIEmd_DsUixn8ydpX_UJQ08&s=1pzjgDte_5PDXx5Yi2uCpOz-IWZ_EEJPwIuzO6iwVlk&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.dnr.sc.gov_admin_board.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=cOp50TEozvGKaBMFX5_o2BEVxvawm8LCiBcFfgN87xA&s=lfpSM6yGn6PCiKrSoMHNlLFNkAiT5nW0wSJy0C9f47U&e=>


Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 22, 2018, at 10:23 AM, "\"Herbert wrote:


I know it is illegal to kill birds of prey. I met some people living out
in the country this weekend whose chickens are being taken by the red
tailed hawks; they are free range chickens, so are out and about all the
time. This is in Georgetown County near Williamsburg County. They stated
that they have shot several red tails in the past few weeks to try and
save their chickens. But there are still hawks taking the chickens. (I
saw, heard two while there).

I suggested keeping chickens penned, getting a Great Pyrenees dog (like
my goat farm lady uses to protect her chickens, which are penned). I also
pointed out that killing hawks was illegal, but it didn¹t seem to bother
them. I was quite distraught.
I don¹t know the names of farmers, but what can be done about this?

Thanks for any advice.

Teri Lynn
back in Charleston now







-------------------------------------------------------------------------
This message was secured via TLS by MUSC.


 

Back to top
Date: 1/22/18 8:03 am
From: <scompton1251...>
Subject: RE: Hawks being shot and killed


Teri Lynn,

Studies done in the 30's showed that Red-tailed Hawks and other birds
of prey are a net benefit to domestic fowl, as they prefer rodents and
control rodent populations that prey on eggs. While law enforcement
can be used as a last resort the better method is to provide the
farmer with education.

The Clemson Extension agent could be helpful.

Steve Compton

Greenville, SC

-----------------------------------------From: "Herbert, Teri Lynn"
(via carolinabirds Mailing List)"
To: "Carolinabirds Listserve"
Cc:
Sent: 22-Jan-2018 15:25:39 +0000
Subject: Hawks being shot and killed

I know it is illegal to kill birds of prey. I met some people living
out
in the country this weekend whose chickens are being taken by the red
tailed hawks; they are free range chickens, so are out and about all
the
time. This is in Georgetown County near Williamsburg County. They
stated
that they have shot several red tails in the past few weeks to try
and
save their chickens. But there are still hawks taking the chickens.
(I
saw, heard two while there).

I suggested keeping chickens penned, getting a Great Pyrenees dog
(like
my goat farm lady uses to protect her chickens, which are penned). I
also
pointed out that killing hawks was illegal, but it didn¹t seem to
bother
them. I was quite distraught.
I don¹t know the names of farmers, but what can be done about this?

Thanks for any advice.

Teri Lynn
back in Charleston now

-------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Date: 1/22/18 7:53 am
From: Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Hawks being shot and killed

Email SCDNR board members and get some enforcement sent there.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.dnr.sc.gov_admin_board.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=cOp50TEozvGKaBMFX5_o2BEVxvawm8LCiBcFfgN87xA&s=lfpSM6yGn6PCiKrSoMHNlLFNkAiT5nW0wSJy0C9f47U&e=

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 22, 2018, at 10:23 AM, "\"Herbert wrote:
>
>
> I know it is illegal to kill birds of prey. I met some people living out
> in the country this weekend whose chickens are being taken by the red
> tailed hawks; they are free range chickens, so are out and about all the
> time. This is in Georgetown County near Williamsburg County. They stated
> that they have shot several red tails in the past few weeks to try and
> save their chickens. But there are still hawks taking the chickens. (I
> saw, heard two while there).
>
> I suggested keeping chickens penned, getting a Great Pyrenees dog (like
> my goat farm lady uses to protect her chickens, which are penned). I also
> pointed out that killing hawks was illegal, but it didn¹t seem to bother
> them. I was quite distraught.
> I don¹t know the names of farmers, but what can be done about this?
>
> Thanks for any advice.
>
> Teri Lynn
> back in Charleston now
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> This message was secured via TLS by MUSC.
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/22/18 7:25 am
From: \Herbert, Teri Lynn\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hawks being shot and killed

I know it is illegal to kill birds of prey. I met some people living out
in the country this weekend whose chickens are being taken by the red
tailed hawks; they are free range chickens, so are out and about all the
time. This is in Georgetown County near Williamsburg County. They stated
that they have shot several red tails in the past few weeks to try and
save their chickens. But there are still hawks taking the chickens. (I
saw, heard two while there).

I suggested keeping chickens penned, getting a Great Pyrenees dog (like
my goat farm lady uses to protect her chickens, which are penned). I also
pointed out that killing hawks was illegal, but it didnt seem to bother
them. I was quite distraught.
I dont know the names of farmers, but what can be done about this?

Thanks for any advice.

Teri Lynn
back in Charleston now







-------------------------------------------------------------------------
This message was secured via TLS by MUSC.

 

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Date: 1/21/18 6:08 pm
From: Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Razorbills at Cape Point
I should mention that the Razorbill flights I have seen at Cape Hatteras the last two days were a morning event. There have been very few auks flying during the afternoon and the birds that are sitting around are mostly very far away from the shore. This is typical and we often see the same schedule of Razorbill flight activity on our boat trips.

Brian Patteson
Hatteras, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 1/21/18 5:35 pm
From: Bruce Smithson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Ft. Fisher birds this p.m. (New Hanover Cty., NC)




Checked out the east side of the lower Cape Fear River from the Ft. Fisher Air Force Rec. Area pier. Other than a couple dozen Double Crested Cormorants resting on some rotted old pier pilings, there wasn't much to see....3 Killdeer on the lawn leading to the pier and a Song Sparrow at the water's edge at the beginning of the pier.

Walking out the pier I noted 2 Yellow-rumped Warblers resting on the wooden railing. From the end of the pier I spotted 3 Horned Grebes feeding to the North in the river. But a 100 yards to the Southwest I stumbled upon a nice Eared Grebe preening and then continuing to dive and feed.

From there I proceeded south to the coquina rock outcropping east of the Ocean Dunes Condominiums. I was pleased to see the tide was down and the rocks were exposed. On the rocks were 3 or 4 dozen Sanderlings, 3 Willets and 1 Dunlin foraging in the algae and barnacles et al for sustenance. On the ocean side of the rocks were a dozen White Winged Scoters in every plumage but breeding; they were diving, snoozing, and preening. They were accompanied by 8 Buffleheads, more males than femmes.

A very pleasant afternoon what with a surprise Eared Grebe and a raft of White-winged Scoters in plumages that were new to me.

Bruce Smithson
Wilmington, NC




 

Back to top
Date: 1/21/18 2:52 pm
From: Derb Carter <derbc...>
Subject: Wrightsville Beach area birds
Some interesting birds around Wrightsville Beach today. Hopefully some will stick around for the CBC meeting this weekend.

Common Eider - female Mercers Pier
Long-tailed Ducks - one each at Masonboro Inlet, Mercers Pier, Oceanic Pier
White-winged Scoter - 12 Masonboro Inlet
Thick- billed Murre - found by Sherry Lane, south Wrightsville
Black-headed Gull - Mason Inlet
Piping Plover - Mason Inlet
Ipswich Sparrows - 3 Rich Inlet
Eurasian Collared Dove - third I have seen on Figure 8 Island

Derb Carter


 

Back to top
Date: 1/21/18 2:23 pm
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Glaucous Gull, Iceland Gull, Long-tailed Duck - HBSP
John Cox and I had some good birding early this morning on the beach
and at the jetty at Huntington Beach State Park.

Best bird was what looked like a 1st cycle GLAUCOUS GULL. We scoped
it on the beach, on the water, and in the air as it flushed
occasionally from the young Bald Eagle that kept putting in
appearances. Eventually it flew out to sea, turned north and flew
back in towards a feeding swarm of gulls north of the north jetty. We
got a few other birders on it before we lost track of it but it seemed
to be hanging around Murrells Inlet.

I put a few photos of the Glaucous Gull on my Flickr page:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_offshorebirder2_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=4k06az-_T-aAtds1VjbuTFHuxhnKfHUO3VSGRCDr7TI&s=bPV4Zbe7QWKRrf2ZqBqm_4znj5zA1Hj63m0Dzmq3VvI&e=

flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2

I got a brief look across the inlet at the ICELAND GULL from last
weekend - then it went behind a rise and got blocked by a Pelican and
some gulls. I never saw it again after a couple of eagle flushings
and boat disturbances flushed the gulls repeatedly.

We also saw all 3 scoter species and a single Long-tailed Duck.
Horned Grebe numbers are increasing, and we saw good numbers of
Northern Gannets feeding. Most of the loons were Common Loons but I
saw a couple of Red-throated north of the north jetty. Out on the
ocean large skeins of scoters were flying north - it was nice to see
them veer well around the duck hunters looking obvious in the calm
waters.

* There are still a lot of dead and cold-stunned fish and other
organisms in the water and on the shore around Murrells Inlet. So
getting there early and spending time watching the comings and goings
to the gull roost is a good strategy.

The 'getting there early' part is really important. By 9:30 the show
was over and the best birding was from 7:30-9.

Mullet Pond was very quiet coming and going.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
 

Back to top
Date: 1/21/18 11:16 am
From: Robert Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: White-fronted geese at Beasley
Hi,
   When you go there, do you drive south past the "no trespassing" sign?  I was afraid to in late December.
BL



On Sunday, January 21, 2018, 11:05:57 AM EST, Jeff Lewis <carolinabirds...> wrote:

Ten just now at Beasley road exit along 64. Lots of Canada geese and a few snows.
Jeff Lewis
Manteo nc

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 1/21/18 10:38 am
From: ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bald Eagle-Hatteras Island
At Canadian Hole near Kite Point, on ground eating a catch
--
Ann Maddock <am.hummingbird.photos...> Hatteras Island, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 1/21/18 9:41 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Long-tailed Duck at Beaverdam Reservoir, NC
Finally, I saw a LONG-TAILED DUCK on a Triangle lake this winter. The
first bird, yes, first bird, I got the scope on at Beaverdam Reservoir
north of Raleigh was a female Long-tailed Duck, by herself near the dam on
the far side of the lake. Otherwise, there has been an increase in COMMON
GOLDENEYES -- I don't believe I have ever seen as many as EIGHT on a lake
in the Triangle. There were 3 females with the continuing male, and then
about 4 more females scattered amid the large Hooded Merganser flock. The
female COMMON MERGANSER continues, but just one. And also continuing since
before the snow are the 2 male REDHEADS and a mix of many each of Greater
and Lesser Scaups (but nary a Ring-necked Duck). Here is my eBird list of
waterbirds, which includes birds from Beaverdam Recreation Area and Old
Weaver Trail. NOTE -- the nice weather meant that a few boats were
starting to get out on the lake, flushing some birds, so ....
Mallard 1
Redhead 2 males; same birds as before snow
Greater Scaup 20
Lesser Scaup 30
Greater/Lesser Scaup 30
Long-tailed Duck 1 New to the lake this winter. Female seen fairly
close to the dam, by herself. White head with large brown-black patch below
and behind the eye. Black back but with much white on the sides.
Bufflehead 40
Common Goldeneye 8 One male and several females, continuing since
before snow. Now several more females are present. Saw 3 females together
with the male, then 3-5 scattered elsewhere in the big Hooded Merg flock. I
settled on 7 females. Rounded brown head with yellow eye seen well on all.
Hooded Merganser 350 Continuing large flock. As many as 1000 or more
in past few weeks.
Common Merganser 1 continuing female from before snow
Ruddy Duck 1
Pied-billed Grebe 12 most south of the bridge
Double-crested Cormorant 1
Great Blue Heron 8
Bald Eagle 1 adult
Killdeer 1
Bonaparte's Gull 1 first since the Deep Freeze
Ring-billed Gull 75
Belted Kingfisher 1

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

 

Back to top
Date: 1/21/18 9:14 am
From: Sherry Lane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Thick-billed Murre at Masonboro Inlet
Presently looking at a Thick-billed Murre off the north jetty of Masoboro Inlet.

Sherry Lane
Wilmington, NC


Sent from my iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 1/21/18 8:47 am
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Two Ross"s Geese Tyrell County, NC
Two Ross's Geese in flock of Canada Geese in a Tyrell County field along 64.
Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 1/21/18 8:31 am
From: Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Razorbills and Manx Shearwaters at Cape Hatteras
I’ve been seeing good numbers of Razorbills at Cape Point the last couple of mornings. Today was a little better than yesterday, with at least 300 seen. Many of these were eastbound and gave good scope looks coming by the tip of the point. I also saw a single Manx Shearwater and one small alcid, presumably a Dovekie. I had another Manx here Friday afternoon. There have been many Red-throated Loons here the last three days. They were going by yesterday morning at 50 or more a minute for at least an hour and today there were more sparse, but still hundreds. I also saw a single Red-necked Grebe flying southbound from the north side of the point this morning. There are modest numbers of Boneys around, and there were a few flocks of scoters, mostly Blacks, all on the move south or west.

Brian Patteson
Hatteras, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 1/21/18 8:05 am
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: White-fronted geese at Beasley
Ten just now at Beasley road exit along 64. Lots of Canada geese and a few snows.
Jeff Lewis
Manteo nc

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 1/21/18 5:31 am
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Glaucous Gull at Murrell’s Inlet now
John Cox and I are looking at a Glaucous Gull roosting on the Garden City
Beach side of Murrell’s Inlet, SC. It is quite evident in a scope and I
got some documentary photos.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 1/21/18 5:25 am
From: rdnc13 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Thick-billed Murre at Coquina Beach
From Coquina Beach overlook, at around 7:30 had a Thick-billed Murre swimming with Razorbills about 100 yards off the beach! Water is very smooth giving great looks at ocean birds right now.
Later, Ricky

Ricky Davis
Rocky Mount, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 1/20/18 1:44 pm
From: Thea and Mark Sinclair (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: American bittern,Lake Connestee Nature Park, Greenville,SC
Had good looks at the American bittern in South Bay at 145 pm today. It
was on the sandbar directly across from the observation deck. It passed in
front of a great blue heron,then vanished into the reeds. We tried
relocating it from various vantage points,but no luck.
Thea Sinclair
Hickkory,NC

 

Back to top
Date: 1/20/18 6:28 am
From: Lewis Burke (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Eiders
The king eider was still at the second ave pier in Myrtle beach yesterday
as was the common at Myrtle Beach State Park. There was a long tailed duck
at Huntington Beach state park,and a common goldeneye was reported but not
seen by me.

Lewis burke

 

Back to top
Date: 1/19/18 6:50 pm
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Swainson's Hawk Alligator River--milltail road
A Swainson's hawk was seen from the milltail road ebird hotspot from
about 4:30 to dark today, at Alligator River Refuge in Dare county. The
bird was apparently a different bird than the juvenile reported last
month during a CBC, as this bird appeared to be an adult light phase
bird, unless its plumage matured in the intervening month.
Unfortunately, the distance was too far too get clear pictures, but we
got fairly good views through a swarovski scope of the dark reddish
bibb, whitish throat and whitish forehead of the bird, which was perched
in the treetops at the far end of the field to the east of the road.

While there, we also saw several short-eared owls, interacting with
several harriers. Overall, a really fun stop.

Guy McGrane, writing from Manteo, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 1/19/18 4:17 pm
From: nicholas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: red-cockaded woodpeckers in Currituck Co. NC, 1/16/2018
While working in North River Game Land by boat on 1/16 I heard at least 3 Red-cockaded Woodpeckers along the western shoreline of Taylor Bay in Currituck Co.


Nick Flanders

Portsmouth, VA

 

Back to top
Date: 1/19/18 3:51 pm
From: Taylor Piephoff (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Charlotte NC Bullock's oriole
Birders,
I forgot to mention that Carole would like folks to show up after 8:30 am.

Taylor Piephoff
Matthews, NC

> On Jan 19, 2018, at 6:19 PM, <piephofft...> wrote:
>
> Birders,
> A Bullock's oriole is being seen at a feeder in south Charlotte, NC. The host is excited about this bird, and is glad for interested birders to come by to look.
> The host is Carolyn Outwater, address 1319 Greylyn Dr. Park on the street, being careful to avoid wheels on grass of neighbors. When you arrive, walk up the driveway and enter the back yard thru the iron gate. The feeders can be viewed from the covered porch once you get into the back yard.
> This bird is cooperative, not particularly skittish, and tends to stay around for a while when it makes feeder visits. It has been present for a couple of days.
>
> Contact me if you have any further questions about access. I will post some pics taken by the host on the CBC Gallery tonight once she picks out the ones she wants to be shared.
> Hopefully the warming weather will not turn this bird feeder-shy.
>
> Taylor Piephoff
> Matthews, NC
> <PiephoffT...>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/19/18 3:20 pm
From: piephofft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Charlotte NC Bullock's oriole

Birders,
A Bullock's oriole is being seen at a feeder in south Charlotte, NC. The host is excited about this bird, and is glad for interested birders to come by to look.
The host is Carolyn Outwater, address 1319 Greylyn Dr. Park on the street, being careful to avoid wheels on grass of neighbors. When you arrive, walk up the driveway and enter the back yard thru the iron gate. The feeders can be viewed from the covered porch once you get into the back yard.
This bird is cooperative, not particularly skittish, and tends to stay around for a while when it makes feeder visits. It has been present for a couple of days.

Contact me if you have any further questions about access. I will post some pics taken by the host on the CBC Gallery tonight once she picks out the ones she wants to be shared.
Hopefully the warming weather will not turn this bird feeder-shy.

Taylor Piephoff
Matthews, NC
<PiephoffT...>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/19/18 1:07 pm
From: KC Foggin <KCFoggin...>
Subject: Re: Spam
All I know, is that for the last two weeks I have been bombarded with spam.

K.C.

Take nothing but pictures,
Leave nothing but footprints
Kill nothing but time

.K.C. Foggin
Socastee,Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20




From: Stu Gibeau
Sent: Friday, January 19, 2018 3:32 PM
To: Carolina birds
Subject: Spam

Did anyone else get an solicitation email from Mary Erickson? I think she’s skimming addresses from the list.

That’s the second person to try that. I’m sure it’s written in the rules to not do that.

Stu Gibeau
Black Mountain


 

Back to top
Date: 1/19/18 12:32 pm
From: Stu Gibeau <sgibeau...>
Subject: Spam
Did anyone else get an solicitation email from Mary Erickson? I think she’s skimming addresses from the list.

That’s the second person to try that. I’m sure it’s written in the rules to not do that.

Stu Gibeau
Black Mountain


 

Back to top
Date: 1/19/18 7:35 am
From: bruce young (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Chapel Hill Bird Club trip Sunday
Bob R is in Panama this week looking for Trogons and Motmots and Hummingbirds and more Tanagers than you can shake a stick at, so i have been asked to lead the trip this week. For snow and hunter reasons, i have decided to move the walk to Sunday so that we can visit the ever exciting Brickhouse road in Durham. We will meet at the last parking lot on the left just before the gate at 8:00. Feel free to email me for more details. I have also attached the Triangle Birder's Guide page for information. FWIW: I'm betting we don't see a Trogon.
Triangle Birder's Guide: Brickhouse Road


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| | |

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Triangle Birder's Guide: Brickhouse Road


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|




Bruce (don't call me Brice) <Youngbyoung715...> NC
 

Back to top
Date: 1/18/18 9:51 am
From: WALTER KENT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: bird feeders
I have several feeders out and the only one I bring in is suet feeder that the raccoons pull down and empty. Some of my feeders are under an overhang and some are not. The birds have been swarming to all. 21 species yesterday and 23 today. 19 cardinals at one time. Best birds are aPileated Woodpecker, a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker and Yellow-rumped Warbler. The Warbler and the Sapsucker come to the grape jelly only.
Walt Kent
Lenoir N.C.

 

Back to top
Date: 1/18/18 8:51 am
From: Beth Garver (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bring in your birdfeeders tonight (but be careful)
That's a good one.

On Thu, Jan 18, 2018 at 11:12 AM Tracee Clapper <tracee.clapper...>
wrote:

> My mockingbird is the first creature, besides my own children, that has
> led me to consider owning a gun.
>
>
> On Thu, Jan 18, 2018 at 10:54 AM Brian Pendergraft <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> How many feeders do you have up? Can you separate any and make the
>> buzzard work harder at defending? Other than shooting it, which of course
>> is not an option, they can be mean. Their favorite foods are suet and
>> peanut butter or peanuts but they don’t eat a lot of black oil. They will
>> be it’s not their favorite.
>> I have multiple feeding stations and I provide an abundance of foods so
>> my one bird typically doesn’t get too aggressive.
>>
>> Good luck.
>>
>> Brian Pendergraft
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On Jan 18, 2018, at 10:45 AM, Beth Garver (via carolinabirds Mailing
>> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> I have a very territorial mockingbird!! It won't let any other birds
>> come to my feeders. Very frustrating!! Any suggestions?
>>
>> Beth Garver
>> Stokesdale, NC
>> Guilford County
>>
>>
>> On Thu, Jan 18, 2018 at 9:16 AM Stu Gibeau <sgibeau...> wrote:
>>
>>> It hasn’t been above 20 at my house in 3 days. No wet snow here. Just 4
>>> inches of powdery snow. One feeder has an overhanging cover the other one
>>> is hanging on the covered side of the deck. Of course I have to bring mine
>>> in every night due to a hungry raccoon.
>>>
>>> Stu
>>>
>>>
>>> On Jan 17, 2018, at 21:11, Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing
>>> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>>
>>> A gentle reminder:
>>> Please bring in your birdfeeders tonight.
>>> The wet, heavy snow will freeze and harden and clog your feeders if
>>> you leave them out tonight (in most areas of the Carolinas). This is
>>> especially true of the thistle feeders. Prop the feeders up in a
>>> bathtub or bucket or your recycling container, dry them off, and hang
>>> them outside in the morning. Your birds will appreciate this.
>>> But be careful: no slipping on the ice, please.
>>> And birds get thirsty so give them some water tomorrow morning.
>>> Let's hope we get that promised thaw Thursday afternoon!
>>> Good birding to you, even if it is 'just' watching your birdfeeders
>>> L Erla Beegle, Raleigh NC
>>>
>>> --
>> The Heavens declare the Glory of God!
>> Beth Garver
>> Guilford County, NC
>>
>> --
> ~Tracee 843/425-7630
>
--
The Heavens declare the Glory of God!
Beth Garver
Guilford County, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 1/18/18 8:13 am
From: Tracee Clapper (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bring in your birdfeeders tonight (but be careful)
My mockingbird is the first creature, besides my own children, that has led
me to consider owning a gun.


On Thu, Jan 18, 2018 at 10:54 AM Brian Pendergraft <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> How many feeders do you have up? Can you separate any and make the
> buzzard work harder at defending? Other than shooting it, which of course
> is not an option, they can be mean. Their favorite foods are suet and
> peanut butter or peanuts but they don’t eat a lot of black oil. They will
> be it’s not their favorite.
> I have multiple feeding stations and I provide an abundance of foods so my
> one bird typically doesn’t get too aggressive.
>
> Good luck.
>
> Brian Pendergraft
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jan 18, 2018, at 10:45 AM, Beth Garver (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I have a very territorial mockingbird!! It won't let any other birds come
> to my feeders. Very frustrating!! Any suggestions?
>
> Beth Garver
> Stokesdale, NC
> Guilford County
>
>
> On Thu, Jan 18, 2018 at 9:16 AM Stu Gibeau <sgibeau...> wrote:
>
>> It hasn’t been above 20 at my house in 3 days. No wet snow here. Just 4
>> inches of powdery snow. One feeder has an overhanging cover the other one
>> is hanging on the covered side of the deck. Of course I have to bring mine
>> in every night due to a hungry raccoon.
>>
>> Stu
>>
>>
>> On Jan 17, 2018, at 21:11, Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing
>> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> A gentle reminder:
>> Please bring in your birdfeeders tonight.
>> The wet, heavy snow will freeze and harden and clog your feeders if
>> you leave them out tonight (in most areas of the Carolinas). This is
>> especially true of the thistle feeders. Prop the feeders up in a
>> bathtub or bucket or your recycling container, dry them off, and hang
>> them outside in the morning. Your birds will appreciate this.
>> But be careful: no slipping on the ice, please.
>> And birds get thirsty so give them some water tomorrow morning.
>> Let's hope we get that promised thaw Thursday afternoon!
>> Good birding to you, even if it is 'just' watching your birdfeeders
>> L Erla Beegle, Raleigh NC
>>
>> --
> The Heavens declare the Glory of God!
> Beth Garver
> Guilford County, NC
>
> --
~Tracee 843/425-7630

 

Back to top
Date: 1/18/18 7:54 am
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bring in your birdfeeders tonight (but be careful)
How many feeders do you have up? Can you separate any and make the buzzard work harder at defending? Other than shooting it, which of course is not an option, they can be mean. Their favorite foods are suet and peanut butter or peanuts but they don’t eat a lot of black oil. They will be it’s not their favorite.
I have multiple feeding stations and I provide an abundance of foods so my one bird typically doesn’t get too aggressive.

Good luck.

Brian Pendergraft

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 18, 2018, at 10:45 AM, Beth Garver (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I have a very territorial mockingbird!! It won't let any other birds come to my feeders. Very frustrating!! Any suggestions?
>
> Beth Garver
> Stokesdale, NC
> Guilford County
>
>
>> On Thu, Jan 18, 2018 at 9:16 AM Stu Gibeau <sgibeau...> wrote:
>> It hasn’t been above 20 at my house in 3 days. No wet snow here. Just 4 inches of powdery snow. One feeder has an overhanging cover the other one is hanging on the covered side of the deck. Of course I have to bring mine in every night due to a hungry raccoon.
>>
>> Stu
>>
>>
>> On Jan 17, 2018, at 21:11, Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> A gentle reminder:
>> Please bring in your birdfeeders tonight.
>> The wet, heavy snow will freeze and harden and clog your feeders if
>> you leave them out tonight (in most areas of the Carolinas). This is
>> especially true of the thistle feeders. Prop the feeders up in a
>> bathtub or bucket or your recycling container, dry them off, and hang
>> them outside in the morning. Your birds will appreciate this.
>> But be careful: no slipping on the ice, please.
>> And birds get thirsty so give them some water tomorrow morning.
>> Let's hope we get that promised thaw Thursday afternoon!
>> Good birding to you, even if it is 'just' watching your birdfeeders
>> L Erla Beegle, Raleigh NC
>>
>
> --
> The Heavens declare the Glory of God!
> Beth Garver
> Guilford County, NC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/18/18 7:46 am
From: Beth Garver (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bring in your birdfeeders tonight (but be careful)
I have a very territorial mockingbird!! It won't let any other birds come
to my feeders. Very frustrating!! Any suggestions?

Beth Garver
Stokesdale, NC
Guilford County


On Thu, Jan 18, 2018 at 9:16 AM Stu Gibeau <sgibeau...> wrote:

> It hasn’t been above 20 at my house in 3 days. No wet snow here. Just 4
> inches of powdery snow. One feeder has an overhanging cover the other one
> is hanging on the covered side of the deck. Of course I have to bring mine
> in every night due to a hungry raccoon.
>
> Stu
>
>
> On Jan 17, 2018, at 21:11, Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing
> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> A gentle reminder:
> Please bring in your birdfeeders tonight.
> The wet, heavy snow will freeze and harden and clog your feeders if
> you leave them out tonight (in most areas of the Carolinas). This is
> especially true of the thistle feeders. Prop the feeders up in a
> bathtub or bucket or your recycling container, dry them off, and hang
> them outside in the morning. Your birds will appreciate this.
> But be careful: no slipping on the ice, please.
> And birds get thirsty so give them some water tomorrow morning.
> Let's hope we get that promised thaw Thursday afternoon!
> Good birding to you, even if it is 'just' watching your birdfeeders
> L Erla Beegle, Raleigh NC
>
> --
The Heavens declare the Glory of God!
Beth Garver
Guilford County, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 1/18/18 7:27 am
From: Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: rfi vermillion flycatcher
Ed Blitch, Craig Watson and I looked on Saturday, we did not relocate it.
Pam Ford
Charleston

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 18, 2018, at 10:09 AM, Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Any recent information on the georgetown vermillion flycatcher ?
>
> Dennis
> --
> Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
> South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
> South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
> Emeritus Professor of Biology
> The Citadel
> 171 Moultrie St,
> Charleston, SC 29409
> 843.795.3996-home
> 843.953.7264-fax
> 843.708.1605-cell
> <dennis.forsythe...>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/18/18 7:10 am
From: Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: rfi vermillion flycatcher
Any recent information on the georgetown vermillion flycatcher ?

Dennis
--
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
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Date: 1/18/18 6:17 am
From: Stu Gibeau <sgibeau...>
Subject: Re: Bring in your birdfeeders tonight (but be careful)
It hasn’t been above 20 at my house in 3 days. No wet snow here. Just 4 inches of powdery snow. One feeder has an overhanging cover the other one is hanging on the covered side of the deck. Of course I have to bring mine in every night due to a hungry raccoon.

Stu


On Jan 17, 2018, at 21:11, Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:

A gentle reminder:
Please bring in your birdfeeders tonight.
The wet, heavy snow will freeze and harden and clog your feeders if
you leave them out tonight (in most areas of the Carolinas). This is
especially true of the thistle feeders. Prop the feeders up in a
bathtub or bucket or your recycling container, dry them off, and hang
them outside in the morning. Your birds will appreciate this.
But be careful: no slipping on the ice, please.
And birds get thirsty so give them some water tomorrow morning.
Let's hope we get that promised thaw Thursday afternoon!
Good birding to you, even if it is 'just' watching your birdfeeders
L Erla Beegle, Raleigh NC

 

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