Carolinabirds
Received From Subject
9/23/17 4:05 pm Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Duck, NC migrants
9/23/17 3:02 pm David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Cliff Swallow @ Seabrook Island, SC
9/23/17 9:13 am \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Good morning for migrants in northern Watauga Co., NC
9/22/17 6:32 pm John Fussell <jofuss...> Buff-breasted Sandpiper at Rachel Carson Reserve, NC
9/22/17 4:54 pm Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> I95/NC33 Nash County Turf Farm details of several recent trips
9/22/17 4:26 pm Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Early Ring-n. Duck plus Hooded Merg. Sept 18 and 19
9/22/17 4:22 pm Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: [Va-bird] Goshawk in Annandale, Fairfax County
9/22/17 4:13 pm Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: [Va-bird] large Cowbird flock, Fairfax County 21 September
9/22/17 1:44 pm David Weesner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Ruff and Buff-b. Sandpiper
9/22/17 12:55 pm Thomas Driscoll (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Red-breasted nuthatch
9/22/17 12:35 pm Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Roseate Spoonbill & Wood Stork - NOPE - Jordan Lake
9/22/17 12:23 pm Deane Paul (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Red-breasted nuthatch
9/22/17 10:25 am \Jim Capel\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Chapel Hill Bird Club - Mon. 9/25 - Birds of Cuba - Kent Fiala
9/22/17 9:56 am Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: La Moye Park
9/22/17 9:40 am Sylvia Stanat <sylvia...> Red-breasted nuthatch
9/22/17 9:02 am Will Cook <cwcook...> Re: Spoonbill Jordan Lake?
9/22/17 8:57 am Corey, Ed <ed.corey...> Reminder - Carolina Beach SP Bio-Blitz! September 30th (Starting at 8am)
9/22/17 7:34 am Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Spoonbill Jordan Lake?
9/21/17 10:41 pm Russ Oates (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Follow up #1 on "Important conservation issues" (August 23 posting)
9/21/17 5:27 pm Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Roanoke Island migrants
9/21/17 5:23 pm Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> White-winged Dove at Pea Island
9/21/17 4:05 pm Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: La Moye Park
9/21/17 3:40 pm Buddy Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Painted Buntings
9/21/17 3:32 pm Buddy Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Painted Buntings PABU
9/21/17 3:32 pm Peter Quadarella (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> La Moye Park
9/21/17 12:34 pm Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Winter Finch Forecast 2017-2018
9/21/17 9:10 am Will Cook <cwcook...> Re: Mason farm -where's the best spot?
9/21/17 8:31 am Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Mason Farm - found it
9/21/17 8:24 am Will Cook <cwcook...> Re: Mason farm -where's the best spot?
9/21/17 7:09 am Brian Patteson <patteson1...> Re: thrush flight calls and kerr lake jaeger
9/21/17 7:08 am Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Mason farm -where's the best spot?
9/21/17 6:39 am Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Flight calls - migrating thrushes?
9/21/17 6:20 am Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> thrush flight calls and kerr lake jaeger
9/21/17 5:51 am Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Thrush flight calls
9/21/17 5:17 am John Fussell <jfuss...> Ruff and Buff-breasted Sandpiper at Beaufort NC still present Wednesday evening
9/20/17 9:13 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Clapper Rail found dead in Raleigh, NC
9/20/17 5:38 am Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> A Few Thrushes Around....
9/19/17 4:55 pm Jeannie Kraus (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fwd: Ruff in Carteret County, NC
9/19/17 4:52 pm A Bryan <nshrike...> Ruff in Carteret County
9/19/17 3:00 pm \Adams, Jamie\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Ruff in Carteret County, NC
9/19/17 12:58 pm Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Jordan Lake: Spoonbill and Wood Stork
9/19/17 11:36 am Pam Diamond (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Need help now at location for spoonbill
9/19/17 6:06 am Audrey (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Baird"S Sandpiper continues at Oregon Inlet Fishing Center, Dare Cty NC
9/19/17 5:44 am <susan...> Call for help at Wings Over Water
9/18/17 6:54 pm Rich Boyd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Carteret County Ruff continues
9/18/17 5:07 pm Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Carteret County Ruff continues
9/18/17 4:59 pm william haddad (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Belated report on Sat. birding at Hefner Gap
9/18/17 4:14 pm Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lake Wheeler shorebirds
9/18/17 2:03 pm Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> BAIRD'S Sandpiper - Oregon Inlet FC, Dare County, NC
9/18/17 1:28 pm Will Cook <cwcook...> Jordan Lake fall count mudflats birds; Chapel Hill spring count results
9/18/17 9:23 am David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> New posting to Birding Bulls blog: Piping Plovers and white morph Reddish Egret reports pre-Irma
9/18/17 9:07 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Carolina Bird Club Blue Ridge Parkway trip 9/16-17
9/18/17 5:59 am Audrey (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Baird's Sandpiper Oregon Inlet Marina Dare Cty nc
9/17/17 5:53 pm Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> 2 Am Golden Plovers still at Nash County sod farm at dark (7:35PM)
9/17/17 12:16 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Ruff/Reeve and Buff-breasted Sandpiper near Beaufort NC
9/17/17 10:20 am John Fussell <jofuss...> Ruff/Reeve and Buff-breasted Sandpiper near Beaufort NC
9/17/17 8:37 am Matt Spangler (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Spoonbill at Jordan Lake again--Morgan Creek
9/17/17 8:08 am Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Slow morning in Duck, NC yields Nashville Warbler, YB Chat
9/17/17 8:03 am \Adams, Jamie\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Masonboro Island Jaegers, NC
9/17/17 6:42 am Andy Harrison (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Clay-colored Sparrow at Patriot's Point
9/16/17 5:28 pm EASTMAN, CAROLINE <EASTMAN...> RE: Non-boat access Re: SC: AMERICAN FLAMINGO at Cape Romain NWR
9/16/17 3:41 pm Jesse Pope (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Grandfather Mountain Hawkwatch: 523 raptors today.
9/16/17 2:46 pm Marilyn Westphal <mjwestph...> Ridge Junction - Blue Ridge Parkway (mp355.2)
9/16/17 8:54 am Henry Link <linkh...> Greensboro Sabine's Gulls- No
9/16/17 7:03 am Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Non-boat access Re: SC: AMERICAN FLAMINGO at Cape Romain NWR
9/16/17 5:44 am Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bridled or Sooty Tern Wing...
9/16/17 5:15 am Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Sabine's Gulls and H. Godwits-- benefit from global warming?
9/16/17 5:10 am Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Scores of Cliff Swallow nests under I-95 Roanoke River bridge
9/16/17 5:00 am Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Loggerhead Shrike back along Mid-Pines Rd., south of Raleigh
9/15/17 8:53 pm David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bridled or Sooty Tern Wing...
9/15/17 5:24 pm Brian Patteson <patteson1...> Sabine's Gulls At Cape Hatteras
9/15/17 4:57 pm \Adams, Jamie\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: SABINE'S GULLS at Lake Townsend, Guilford Co
9/15/17 1:12 pm Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Non-boat access Re: SC: AMERICAN FLAMINGO at Cape Romain NWR
9/15/17 12:56 pm Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: SC: AMERICAN FLAMINGO at Cape Romain NWR
9/15/17 12:45 pm Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Flight calls - migrating thrushes?
9/15/17 12:31 pm Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: SC: AMERICAN FLAMINGO at Cape Romain NWR
9/15/17 12:21 pm Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: SC: AMERICAN FLAMINGO at Cape Romain NWR
9/15/17 12:19 pm Christopher Hill <Chill...> Re: SC: AMERICAN FLAMINGO at Cape Romain NWR
9/15/17 12:15 pm Nate Swick <nswick...> SC: AMERICAN FLAMINGO at Cape Romain NWR
9/15/17 11:55 am Tracee Clapper (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: how to see a barn owl
9/15/17 11:55 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: how to see a barn owl
9/15/17 11:26 am Bill Rhodes (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: how to see a barn owl
9/15/17 11:18 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: Hurricane Irma- Birds
9/15/17 11:13 am Nathan Gatto (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hurricane Irma- Birds
9/15/17 11:10 am Matt Wangerin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: SABINE'S GULLS at Lake Townsend, Guilford Co
9/15/17 11:00 am Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: SABINE'S GULLS at Lake Townsend, Guilford Co
9/15/17 10:48 am Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Birdwalk this Saturday at Charles D Owen Park, Swannanoa, NC
9/15/17 8:55 am Derek Aldrich (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Yellow-legged Gull report in Dare Co., NC from Sept. 8
9/15/17 8:47 am Brian Patteson <patteson1...> Re: Yellow-legged Gull report in Dare Co., NC from Sept. 8
9/15/17 8:32 am Nate Swick <nswick...> NC: SABINE'S GULLS at Lake Townsend, Guilford Co
9/15/17 8:28 am Christopher Hill <Chill...> Re: Yellow-legged Gull report in Dare Co., NC from Sept. 8
9/15/17 7:53 am Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Yellow-legged Gull report in Dare Co., NC from Sept. 8
9/15/17 7:37 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Yellow-legged Gull report in Dare Co., NC from Sept. 8
9/15/17 7:32 am Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> how to see a barn owl
9/15/17 5:45 am Will Cook <cwcook...> Re: Donde estan my messages/emails
9/14/17 5:49 pm Nathan Dias <dias...> Santee NWR bird walk this Saturday and good scouting report
9/14/17 5:19 pm <wforsythe...> Jackson Park today
9/14/17 5:12 pm \Jeff Lemons\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lake Norman Sooty Tern
9/14/17 2:04 pm Ron <waxwing...> NC Greater Pewee song
9/14/17 12:22 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Donde estan my messages/emails
9/14/17 12:20 pm Will Cook <cwcook...> Re: Flight calls - migrating thrushes?
9/14/17 9:45 am Mary Tennessee (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Donde estan my messages/emails
9/14/17 7:41 am Ben Ringer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Jackson Park
9/14/17 7:08 am Kevin Hudson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> glossy ibis @ lake crabtree, wake nc appear to be gone
9/14/17 3:59 am Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> FOS - Swainson's Thrush
9/14/17 3:54 am Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Flight calls - migrating thrushes?
9/14/17 3:41 am Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...> Found item
9/13/17 5:56 pm Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Glossy Ibis @ Lake Crabtree this evening
9/13/17 4:12 pm ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Buxton Hummingbirds- banding, and Wings Over Water
9/13/17 2:35 pm Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hooper Lane, Henderson County, NC 9/13/17
9/13/17 10:55 am \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Probable yellow-bellied flycatcher in Watauga Co., NC
9/13/17 10:48 am Ron <waxwing...> Ribbonwalk Nature Preserve, Charlotte
9/13/17 10:31 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Hudsonian godwits @ Lake Wheeler, Wake NC appear to be gone
9/13/17 10:24 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Hudsonian godwits @ Lake Wheeler, Wake NC appear to be gone
9/13/17 8:34 am Brian Patteson <patteson1...> Sabine's Gull at Cape Hatteras
9/13/17 8:04 am Kevin Hudson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hudsonian godwits @ Lake Wheeler, Wake NC appear to be gone
9/13/17 6:56 am FRANK LAWKINS (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Noddy
9/13/17 5:48 am Scott Hartley (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Juvenile brown booby
9/13/17 5:32 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Wings Over Water - October 17-22 - Eastern North Carolina
9/13/17 5:23 am Mike Judd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Hooper Lane strikes again! 9/12/17
9/12/17 7:49 pm Robert Rowan Meehan (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Brown Noddy - Oak Island, NC
9/12/17 6:50 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
9/12/17 6:50 pm Kyle Kittelberger (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
9/12/17 6:25 pm Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hooper Lane strikes again! 9/12/17
9/12/17 5:52 pm \Jeff Lemons\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lake Norman Storm Birds
9/12/17 5:24 pm Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Vandemark Turf: two visits, only 1 peep now, 13 Killdeer noon, 57 3P
9/12/17 5:10 pm Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> House Finches chowing down on ash seeds for last two weeks
9/12/17 5:07 pm Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Loggerhead Shrike back along Mid-Pines Rd., south of Raleigh
9/12/17 4:53 pm Stacy and Natalie Barbour (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lake Wheeler Hudsonian Godwits flew- Phalarope present
9/12/17 4:26 pm Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hanging Rock hawk watch volunteers needed
9/12/17 3:54 pm Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Sooty Tern at Lake Julian, Asheville, NC - 9/12/17
9/12/17 2:31 pm Irvin Pitts <pittsjam...> RE: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
9/12/17 2:25 pm jcox3222 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Orangeburg sod farms 9/12/17
9/12/17 1:34 pm Paul Glass <pag...> RE: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
9/12/17 1:33 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Loggerhead Shrike back along Mid-Pines Rd., south of Raleigh
9/12/17 1:24 pm Gardb (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> unsubscribe
9/12/17 1:22 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
9/12/17 1:07 pm Brian Patteson <patteson1...> Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
9/12/17 12:57 pm Paul Glass <pag...> RE: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
9/12/17 12:33 pm Brian Patteson <patteson1...> Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
9/12/17 12:17 pm Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
9/12/17 12:13 pm Steve Compton <scompton1251...> Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
9/12/17 11:41 am Kyle Kittelberger (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
9/12/17 10:04 am bruce young (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Hudsonian Godwits
9/12/17 9:54 am Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hudsonian Godwits
9/12/17 9:34 am Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Sooty Tern?
9/12/17 9:32 am Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Shorebirds at Hooper Lane, Henderson County, NC
9/12/17 9:28 am Will Cook <cwcook...> Re: BROWN NODDY at Huntington Beach State Park, SC
9/12/17 8:57 am Lucas Bobay (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
9/12/17 8:22 am Will Cook <cwcook...> BROWN NODDY at Huntington Beach State Park, SC
9/12/17 7:49 am Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: Red-necked Phalaropes. Fort Fisher, NC - GONE NOW
9/12/17 6:33 am Irvin Pitts <pittsjam...> Sooty Tern - Lake Murray
9/12/17 4:39 am Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Red-necked Phalaropes. Fort Fisher, NC
9/11/17 4:20 pm David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> SOOTY TERNS on Seabrook Island, SC
9/11/17 10:43 am Clifton Avery (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Yellow-bellied Flycatcher in Buncombe County
9/11/17 10:04 am Mike Judd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fwd: eBird Report - Brevard Hike & Bike Path--Hospital Fields, Sep 11, 2017
9/11/17 9:17 am \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Warblers on the move this morning in Watauga Co., NC
9/11/17 8:38 am <annbailes...> Swarming Swallows at Dobbins Farm Ponds
9/10/17 8:01 pm Suzanne (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bird sightings list form
9/10/17 5:31 pm Greg Massey <gmassey001...> Large Numbers of Black Terns at Fort Fisher Spit --Sept. 06, 2017
9/10/17 4:36 pm Aaron Steed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Olive-sided Flycatcher, Beaver Lake, Asheville
9/10/17 2:58 pm Jay Wherley (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Mourning Warbler - Asheville / Beaver Lake Bird Sanctuary
9/10/17 1:36 pm Will Cook <cwcook...> Fwd: Mississippi Kites Blue Ridge Pkwy MP 235 Alleghany Co.
9/10/17 11:18 am Me (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lark Sparrow continues Fort Macon SP
9/10/17 8:40 am Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Duck, NC birds today
9/10/17 6:22 am Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Clay-colored Sparrow, Patriots Point, Charleston, SC
9/10/17 5:06 am John Fussell <jofuss...> Black Rail in Carteret County, NC
9/10/17 3:59 am Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Wood Thrush - Dogwoods
9/9/17 6:16 pm Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Jackson Park, Hendersonville, NC Birdwalk today
9/9/17 5:32 pm Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Nash Vandemark Turf-early AM White-rump, 28 peep---Mills RIver sounds better!
9/9/17 5:18 pm Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> OBX migrants today
9/9/17 8:32 am Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Decent Morning - Yard Stuff
9/9/17 6:58 am Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Decent Morning - Yard Stuff
9/8/17 5:02 pm Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Nash Vandemark turf--nothing rare, 15-30 peep
9/8/17 3:10 pm william haddad (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> This morning at Hefner Gap and the Orchard Road
9/8/17 12:59 pm Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> fall bird counts coming up
9/8/17 12:47 pm Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> any Morrow Mountain state park, NC birders
9/8/17 8:26 am Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Jackson Park, Hendersonville Bird Walk this Saturday
9/8/17 5:17 am Jelmer Poelstra (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Buff-breasted Sandpiper at Jordan Lake
9/7/17 7:34 pm Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Nash Co. Turf Farm 6 Buff-breasted S. hustle around and leave? some peep
9/7/17 2:34 pm james poling (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Birds at Hooper Lane, Mills River, NC
9/6/17 6:06 pm <badgerboy...> Fwd: Bluebird presentation at Wilkes County Library Sept. 21
9/6/17 4:56 pm M Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> re: Pitt Street, Mt. Pleasant, SC
9/6/17 4:50 pm Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Nash Co. Turf farm, Aug 25, Sep.6--not much, just changes in Killdeer##
9/6/17 11:48 am Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> More Hooper Lane, Henderson County, NC Shorebirds
9/5/17 4:18 pm <wforsythe...> Jackson Park, Henderson Cty., NC
9/5/17 2:34 pm DPratt14 <dpratt14...> Nighthawks in Yadkin R. Valley
9/5/17 12:42 pm \James.poling\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Mississippi Kite. eBird -- Irma's Produce Fields -- Sep 5, 2017
9/5/17 12:07 pm Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Ridge Junction and future trips
9/5/17 5:33 am William Majoros <william.majoros...> good labor day birding at Few's Ford, Eno River State Park
9/5/17 4:39 am Chris Canfield (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Common Nighthawks. eBird -- US-NC-Black Mountain-510 NC-9 Ingles parking lot -- Sep 4, 2017
9/4/17 4:49 pm \James.poling\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Common Nighthawks. eBird -- US-NC-Black Mountain-510 NC-9 Ingles parking lot -- Sep 4, 2017
9/4/17 6:33 am Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Busy Yard This Morning
9/3/17 9:12 pm Ricky Davis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> New Hope Creek, Jordan Lake
9/3/17 12:22 pm Ron <waxwing...> Southern Piedmont migrants
9/3/17 10:27 am william haddad (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Nashville Warbler and other Migrants at Hefner Gap this morning
9/3/17 8:56 am Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lake Wheeler: Wood Stork
9/3/17 7:45 am Tim Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Confusion about Hooper Lane shorebirds, and worrisome eBird filter
9/3/17 4:16 am Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Backyard Numbers are Impressive
9/3/17 3:55 am Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> FOS - Veery
9/2/17 8:11 pm Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...> Re: Confusion about Hooper Lane shorebirds, and worrisome eBird filter
9/2/17 6:33 pm Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Confusion about Hooper Lane shorebirds, and worrisome eBird filter
9/2/17 6:24 pm Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Confusion about Hooper Lane shorebirds, and worrisome eBird filter
9/2/17 5:12 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Confusion about Hooper Lane shorebirds, and worrisome eBird filter
9/2/17 3:26 pm Ricky Davis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> I-95/NC 33 Sod Farm
9/2/17 11:24 am Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> American Golden plovers
9/2/17 9:37 am <brian...> L. Crabtree - WR Sandpiper, Laughing Gull, Oriole
9/2/17 8:38 am Caroline Gilmore (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Outdoors writers wanted
9/2/17 7:30 am Herbert, Teri Lynn <herbertl...> Re: camera SD card?
9/2/17 7:26 am Peter Quadarella (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Black-necked stilt
9/2/17 12:30 am M Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: binoculars
9/1/17 6:06 pm Christopher Hill <Chill...> Re: binoculars
9/1/17 5:51 pm steve stevens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> binoculars
9/1/17 1:17 pm james poling (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Shorebirds at Hooper Lane, Mills River, NC
9/1/17 9:05 am Mark Kosiewski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Baird's
8/31/17 7:21 pm Gale VerHague (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Attempted Hummingbird Predation
8/31/17 6:50 pm <susan...> RE: Attempted Hummingbird Predation
8/31/17 6:37 pm David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Attempted Hummingbird Predation
8/31/17 6:03 pm <badgerboy...> Brookshire Park Boone Bird walk Saturday 8AM
8/31/17 2:09 pm ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Attempted Hummingbird Predation
8/31/17 1:30 pm Claire Herzog (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Henderson Cty., NC
8/31/17 1:27 pm Tracee Clapper (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Henderson Cty., NC
8/31/17 1:16 pm Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Migrating Nighthawks
8/31/17 12:47 pm Christine Stoughton-Root (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Pamlico Cty
8/31/17 12:01 pm David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Attempted Hummingbird Predation
8/31/17 10:46 am Claire Herzog (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Henderson Cty., NC
8/31/17 10:34 am Claire Herzog (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Henderson Cty., NC
8/31/17 9:29 am Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> hummers battle over taillight, NC
8/31/17 7:03 am Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...> Henderson Cty., NC
8/31/17 4:57 am andrew thornton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Swainson's Warbler, Greensboro
8/30/17 5:46 pm <badgerboy...> Massive Nighthawk movement at Deep Gap
8/30/17 5:04 pm Me (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Black-necked stilt
8/30/17 4:34 pm Peter Quadarella (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Black-necked stilt
8/30/17 11:22 am jackpateck (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Migration starting
8/30/17 9:13 am Josh Southern (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lake Wheeler (Wake, NC) update
8/30/17 6:19 am Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bodie Island, NC
8/30/17 4:50 am <brbirders...> nighthawks Blue Ridge Pkwy 235 Alleghany Co
8/29/17 8:59 pm Ricky Davis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Nash County Turf Farm
8/29/17 3:03 pm Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Migrating Nighthawks
8/29/17 11:09 am james poling (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Mississippi Kites at Old Fort, NC
8/29/17 9:25 am Greg Massey <gmassey001...> Re: bird observation during the eclipse
8/29/17 3:24 am Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> LAUGHING GULL at Lake Crabtree (Southport marsh end); update on WOOD STORK at Lake Wheeler (marshes), Wake Co NC
8/28/17 6:18 pm John Fussell <jofuss...> bird observation during the eclipse
8/28/17 2:36 pm Fred Burggraf (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Duplicate "Bird Life & Behavior" book by Sibley
8/28/17 10:09 am Steve Compton <scompton1251...> Re: Bicycle birding
8/28/17 7:48 am Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bicycle birding
8/28/17 7:39 am Mary Tennessee (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bicycle birding
8/28/17 6:55 am Lucas Bobay (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Wood Stork at Lake Wheeler, Wake Co (8/27)
8/28/17 4:04 am David Shuford <deshuford1...> Re: Eclipse Report
8/27/17 2:36 pm nicholas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> American Golden-Plover, Nash Co. NC, 8/27/2017
8/27/17 1:07 pm Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Update on Blue wings
8/27/17 12:51 pm Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> BLUE-WINGED WARBLER - Backyard
8/27/17 8:48 am Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> AviSys taxonomy update
8/27/17 5:28 am Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Buff-Breasted Sandpiper, Sod Farm, Orangeburg SC
8/27/17 3:09 am Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bicycle birding
8/26/17 4:08 pm John Fussell <jofuss...> Buff-breasted Sandpiper
8/26/17 3:52 pm Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER - Backyard
8/26/17 10:41 am David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Reddish Egret, WHITE MORPH continues on Bulls Island
8/25/17 5:42 pm David Weesner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lots of Shorebirds at Fort Fisher Spit
8/25/17 2:53 pm David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Small fall-out after storm yesterday: Seabrook, SC
8/25/17 2:29 pm Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Chestnut-sided Warbler - FOS
8/25/17 5:56 am bruce young (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> upper Jordan lake
8/25/17 5:28 am Dennis Burnette <deburnette...> Re: Important Conservation Issues - Consider Audubon
8/25/17 4:36 am Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Early Fall Stuff - Backyard
8/24/17 6:23 pm Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Four Upland Sandpipers at Beaufort, NC Airport
8/24/17 5:59 pm John Grego <jrgrego...> Tagged Piping Plover info from Harbor Island
8/24/17 4:31 pm <eric...> Little Blue Heron - Yadkin Memorial Park
8/24/17 12:20 pm william haddad (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Blue-winged Warbler and other birds at "The Orchard " Road
8/24/17 10:15 am Mike Judd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Important conservation issues
8/24/17 9:38 am Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Important conservation issues
8/24/17 6:49 am james poling (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Mississippi Kites, Old Fort, NC
8/24/17 6:26 am Tim Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Swallow-tailed Kite - Smokies
8/24/17 5:30 am Russ Oates (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Important conservation issues
 
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Date: 9/23/17 4:05 pm
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Duck, NC migrants
Birded the Duck, NC boardwalk this morning and again this afternoon with
several birding friends. Had a total of 13 warbler species, with best ones
being 1 or 2 Chestnut-sided Warblers, a Nashville Warbler and a
Worm-eating. Other birds included a Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Eastern Phoebe,
EWPewees, Red-eyed Vireos, 5 Merlin and 1 Peregrine Falcon.

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

 

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Date: 9/23/17 3:02 pm
From: David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Cliff Swallow @ Seabrook Island, SC
Hi Folks,
The title says it all. Just went Birding for 45m and got a great treat. Saw my first Cliff Swallow for St. Christopher Camp & Conference Center.
Dark throat and pale rump was very easy to pick out.
Other nice treat was first of migration season Yellow Warbler.
Happy Birding,
David

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/23/17 9:13 am
From: \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Good morning for migrants in northern Watauga Co., NC
Birders,

Had 2 Lincoln Sparrows on my walk this morning, first of the season, and a white-eyed vireo--a local rarity--only the second or third record for my property in 10 years of birding here. Complete list reported to eBird in link below. Plus 42 monarchs, all flying high to the west and southwest--almost all invisible to the naked eye.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S39345594&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=CQD36EIt6sYAHjmz5CmPzSqUgG1Spv5-Uno6lw5rL_s&s=voJ7_Pak5LBM7M0KLxMiEeEgzwVQyEMCOwHvrC2zKZE&e=

J. Merrill Lynch
Conservation Biologist
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/22/17 6:32 pm
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: Buff-breasted Sandpiper at Rachel Carson Reserve, NC
Today, during a shorebird census, I saw a juvenile Buff-breasted Sandpiper
at the Rachel Carson Reserve, Beaufort Inlet, NC.

The species is rare at this site, where virtually all shorebird habitat
consists of intertidal flats. In fact, this is only the second one I've
seen there, the first being a month ago. (I assume today's bird was a
different bird, but perhaps not.)

Other observations include 11 Piping Plovers and 11 Wilson's Plovers. One
of the Piping Plovers had a green flag with white engraving on the upper
left leg and a blue band (or flag?) on the upper right leg.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

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Date: 9/22/17 4:54 pm
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: I95/NC33 Nash County Turf Farm details of several recent trips
Sep. 16 I got in too late but heard a few Killdeer.

17th 7:24-8:35 A,6:53-7:35P; 18th 6:57-7:36A;

20th 6:45-7:19P.


Best: 2 adult A. Golden Plover 7:15-7:35P on 17th. With group of Killdeer on dead grass (flew there from green turf).


20th: 4-5 unknown shorebirds at end (too dark), perhaps Buffies?? On brown grass west.

I made these visits thinking Killdeer roosted at this site, but, each evening I had lowest counts. Peak of 92 AM 17th, low of 12 20th PM.

Meadowlarks increased from 1 (prior visit) to 3, then 5 in same field near west.

Crows in AM, gone in PM visits. Starlings always in far east.

Buffy reddish coyote around 8AM on 17th. Seemed to be checking the tall vegetation (several drainage ditches, one big west to northeast). Also unhurriedly observed me, probably because I had the radio with Morning Edition news on behind me. It probably came across NC 33 near the interstate.

Curiously, I did not see much on the abandoned golf course to the south. Partly due to not studiously scoping it (also too much woody vegetation to see well down there, a few Killdeer heard going there.

Few if any Horned Larks on these trips, the most being 2 across the east in a plowed field on the 20th; I did fairly carefully scope the peep location out from Shiloh Church, where larks had mingled with peep on earlier trips.
And no peep. GBH in field 17th PM. No hawks these trips.

As big as this turf farm is (backs on Fishing Creek, way back --mile?) one could easily miss shorebirds, though the green grass in back seems unattractive to most shorebirds. When there is brown grass and recently harvested sites in the back, it will be very frustrating to id shorebirds here.

At night, there are some small lights on the irrigation line ends, probably only when the water is pumped out, as it was every evening. way back north. This watering of seeded plots has to be good for some shorebirds.

But, apparently earthworms are a problem for turf farms, which try to "control" them, as the worm castings can foul the delicate mowers used. What other pesticides are used is not known, though there are many labelled for grubs, etc.

Could turf farms be stopovers for migrant shorebirds where we can easily see them, but not places where shorebirds can put on much weight?

Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

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Date: 9/22/17 4:26 pm
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Early Ring-n. Duck plus Hooded Merg. Sept 18 and 19
On pond. The first day, the duck seemed scruffy, but second sighting plumage OK. The female (imm male?) had a bunch of white streaking on side.

The second day, 80 Canada Geese present, plus two Pied-b. Grebes (which might be very young birds, maybe just looked small in the scope, diving in very shallow water)


Very early for Ring-neck, as per VA yellow boo.k.






Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

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Date: 9/22/17 4:22 pm
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Goshawk in Annandale, Fairfax County
As Mike Tove consistently says, it is hard to be sure of Goshawk sightings.


But, when a birder says he sees goshawk every 30 years, it is time to think. It is not like he has an itchy id finger.


Somehow this rare species filters into the coastal area of NC every year. While the main push of goshawks at the northern hawkwatches is November-December, people need to be on the lookout for this species now.


In trees near water. The goshawks I have seen in NC were around water, though my purported sightings are of flying birds.





Frank Enders, Halifax, NC


________________________________
From: va-bird <va-bird-bounces+fkenders=<hotmail.com...> on behalf of Stephen Eccles via va-bird <va-bird...>
Sent: Friday, September 15, 2017 4:24 PM
To: VA Ornithological Society listserve
Subject: [Va-bird] Goshawk in Annandale, Fairfax County

At 10 am this morning, there was an immature Northern Goshawk perched atop
a dead tree, alongside Accotink Creek, in Wakefield Park, Annandale,
Fiarfax County. It could be seen from the main trail, about 200 yards south
of Americana Park (which is just south of Little River Turnpike).

Only the second time I have seen this species in Virginia - the previous
one was also an immature, also perched in a dead tree, also alongside
water, in the old Claude Moore farm, about 30 years ago.

Stephen Eccles
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as <fkenders...> If you wish to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__mailman.listserve.com_listmanager_listinfo_va-2Dbird&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=EoWsCdZazyzfgWUEgNFRDsW0LFCKWAfvI4Rb_uF41z4&s=qKR86CuSHy7FanUp4PlUCXspMtFoRtxrdcFXDqXxYPs&e= ***

 

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Date: 9/22/17 4:13 pm
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] large Cowbird flock, Fairfax County 21 September
On September 20, I was looking for the odd shrike here and there, only to encounter a stream of bunches of cowbirds flying low southwest (4 PM) over Grapevine Road near airport road into a herd of cattle.

More than 150 cowbirds, and only cowbirds, as this post by Stephen Johnson described in grass the next day in Fairfax County (Chantilly) VA.

As he said, no other "blackbird" species, and a big number, probably migrants.


I had thought "Wow, that is a lot of local cowbirds gathered together." But, I think he is right, migrants. Now.






Frank Enders, Halifax, NC


________________________________
From: va-bird <va-bird-bounces+fkenders=<hotmail.com...> on behalf of Stephen Johnson via va-bird <va-bird...>
Sent: Thursday, September 21, 2017 8:46 PM
To: VA-Bird
Subject: [Va-bird] large Cowbird flock, Fairfax County 21 September


Fall migration brings many surprises. Today at the Cub Run RECenter (Chantilly, Fairfax county) I found a single flock of over 200 Brown-headed Cowbirds. It was unusual for 2 reasons.

One, eBird flagged it for the large number, and I'm not surprised. I was amazed to see them all in one place. Well actually two places. Half were in a grass strip separating parking lot lanes; and the other were maybe 40 meters away, in grass at the edge of the lot.

I studied the flock carefully, and that brought up reason #2. There was not a single member of any other species, in either half of the flock. I'm used to seeing big migrating groups of mixed Starlings and Cowbirds, and often there's some Grackles, and/or a few Red-winged Blackbirds. Here's the checklist. The Starlings listed were not part of this flock.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S39322405&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=VADmo3J3FA1b8S3-re51HfQOia7W211jDAsiP--6ozk&s=GanlcbBI506zmDVuaL_umwsk8VybwFUC-1EqyGj2vfg&e=

I have been seeing lots of young and adult Starlings recently, and ditto Grackles, so I'm pretty familiar with them; so I'm sure I was not seeing any of them in this flock. Very unusual in my experience, a pure-species Cowbird flock. The count is conservative - there were at least 250, maybe 300 birds present.

Steve Johnson
Fairfax, Virginia



*** You are subscribed to va-bird as <fkenders...> If you wish to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__mailman.listserve.com_listmanager_listinfo_va-2Dbird&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=VADmo3J3FA1b8S3-re51HfQOia7W211jDAsiP--6ozk&s=Xjy3ILU9lPN85wXX_kfsHek9jkgRTjprxU2Qzz4pIfg&e= ***

 

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Date: 9/22/17 1:44 pm
From: David Weesner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Ruff and Buff-b. Sandpiper
I got the Ruff and Buff-b. Sandpiper this morning on Tanglewood Rd. Near the golf course in Carteret Co. just north of Beaufort.It looks like that area where the birds were will have houses on it soon. Both birds seemed to be eating flying bugs.Dave WessnerWilmington, NC

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 9/22/17 12:55 pm
From: Thomas Driscoll (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Red-breasted nuthatch
Wow!


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone


On Friday, September 22, 2017, 3:22 PM, Deane Paul <carolinabirds...> wrote:

How cool! We'll have to come see them

> On Sep 22, 2017, at 12:40 PM, Sylvia Stanat <sylvia...> wrote:
>
> Yesterday and this morning I had red-breasted nuthatches at my feeder in Chapel Hill.  Hoping that they stay through the winter.  Didn’t have them last year.




 

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Date: 9/22/17 12:35 pm
From: Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Roseate Spoonbill & Wood Stork - NOPE - Jordan Lake
Good Afternoon Everyone,

This was all between 9 AM - 1 PM

Thanks to all those who aided me in my unsuccessful quest for the Roseate
Spoonbill and Wood Stork seen in the Morgan Creek mudflats or the New Hope
Creek mudflats. I can say with certainty that missing the birds wasn't for
my lack of trying. After a failed first attempt at the New Hope Creek
side, I returned to the sandy "railroad spur point area, " and wait for
about 45 minutes to see if the birds would fly in. After no success, I
made my fourth trip underneath the power lines to the gravel road at
Transis Camp Rd. I must say, I have never seen so many Blue Grosbeaks and
Indigo Buntings in one spot! There must have been 50 of each species on
the > 1 mile grassy, brushy and flower-filled hike to the New Hope Creek
Side.

Then, I got word that the birds may be located in the New Hope Game Lands
at the southern end of Transis Camp Road. So, I drove down to the parking
area in front of the official sign for the game lands, and started another
long hike. After following a nicely cut grass trail, I took the first
overgrown trail fork to the right (marked with a decomposing plastic
bottle). After getting slammed by some spider webs, I grabbed a large
stick to clear the way. I pushed on through the dense woods and uneven
terrain for approximately .75 miles and made it to the western finger of
the lake, or the Morgan Creek area (say steve schultz). The water was very
low, and while there were Great Egrets, Great Blue Herons and a pair of
Bald Eagles, the Wood Stork and Spoonbill were no where to be found. I
spent about an hour at this location exploring and walking the banks.

Overall, I figure i walked about 8 miles this morning, and gained a new
appreciation for all those who bird these spots frequently. These are not
easy spots to get to, but those who make the journey could be rewarded with
surprises beyond belief (hence Spoonbill and Wood Stork). I realize now
that we definitely got it easy on the Outer Banks, and I shouldn't ever
take it for granted.

OH, and how about those massive freshwater clams on the banks of the Morgan
Creek side? Some of the bivalves were 2 inches bigger than the palm of my
hand! I believe they are called Pyganodon grandis and are a relative
harmless exotic species (Thanks Ed Corey).

OH OH, and i saw my first fruiting Euonymus americanus or "Strawberry Bush
/ Heart's-a-bustin Bush!!!

BIG DAY, good birds.

--
Jim Gould
Southern Shores, NC

 

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Date: 9/22/17 12:23 pm
From: Deane Paul (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Red-breasted nuthatch
How cool! We'll have to come see them

> On Sep 22, 2017, at 12:40 PM, Sylvia Stanat <sylvia...> wrote:
>
> Yesterday and this morning I had red-breasted nuthatches at my feeder in Chapel Hill. Hoping that they stay through the winter. Didn’t have them last year.
 

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Date: 9/22/17 10:25 am
From: \Jim Capel\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Chapel Hill Bird Club - Mon. 9/25 - Birds of Cuba - Kent Fiala
The Chapel Hill Bird Club will hold its regular monthly meeting on Monday, September 25, at 7:30 pm at Binkley Baptist Church in Chapel Hill. The featured speaker will be Kent Fiala who will talk about a Birding Tour of Cuba. Dr. Fiala was among a group of 12 birders from the Carolina Bird Club who toured Cuba early this year. The group saw 147 bird species including 24 of the Cuban endemics, Cuba's national bird - the Cuban Trogon, and the world's smallest bird - the Bee Hummingbird. Also seen were an additional 24 species that are endemic to the West Indies, such as the Great Lizard-Cuckoo and flamingos. The group also visited Che Guevara's hideout, the Bay of Pigs, and Hemingway's favorite bars. Kent will share photos from the trips.



Admission is free and the public is invited.



Location: Binkley Baptist Church, 1712 Willow Dr. Chapel Hill



Contact: Jim Capel, <jim.capel...>


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Date: 9/22/17 9:56 am
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: La Moye Park
I took a look at our (NCDOT) Bike/Ped Plan for Hookerton, as this is the
only plan we have on file in Greene County.

Hookerton is on the banks of Contentnea Creek. The plan map does show
some trails north of Contentnea Creek as publicly accessible.

Another couple of (potential) public locations for birding are some
proposed shared-use paths (a.k.a. greenways) in three locations on the
proposed bike/ped network for the town.

There is also a public place called "Hookerton Recreation Park" east of the
town limits, which is one of the termini of a proposed shared-use path. I
don't know what kind of park this is -- could be just soccer fields, but at
least it is a public park.

The map I am looking at is Exhibit 4.4 just before p. 61 of the plan. See
the plan document online at
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__connect.ncdot.gov_municipalities_PlanningGrants_Documents_Hookerton-2520Bike-2520and-2520Ped-2520Plan.pdf&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=ycZ6FylzJkhGh5J80VNiT5Pax6jqJ1kYOjgvtNQPfj4&s=Uw3F-r2aw7mRdKYgZOKMtoMyTnpfT6X2puN6f_M5hUA&e=

Just offering this info as a starting point as Ann noted, in case helpful
to someone trying to find a place to bird in Greene County.

Betsy Kane
Raleigh



On Thu, Sep 21, 2017 at 7:04 PM, Ann Brice <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> I have gone there several times. Greene County has the lowest species
> count of any county in NC (91). When we were being encouraged to bird in
> other counties, I made it a point to try to find places to bird in Greene
> County. It has been a challenge to find any public space. The boat ramps
> are about the only public space I could find. The boat ramp in Snow Hill
> has a bigger land area. I took a kayak and birded from the creek last time
> and had pretty good luck.
>
> I think the number of species is so low because, as near as I can
> determine, there are no large bodies of water in the county.
>
> I didn't submit it as a hotspot but if you are not familiar with the area,
> it may be helpful to someone trying to find a place to bird.
>
> Ann Brice
> Wilson, NC
>
> On Thu, Sep 21, 2017 at 6:31 PM, Peter Quadarella <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> Has anyone been to the ebird hotspot "La Moye Park" in Greene County,
>> NC? Either I missed something while there today or it is completely
>> overgrown with kudzu and other vegetation - so not much of a hotspot
>> anymore.
>>
>> Peter Quadarella,
>> Weddington, NC
>>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/22/17 9:40 am
From: Sylvia Stanat <sylvia...>
Subject: Red-breasted nuthatch
Yesterday and this morning I had red-breasted nuthatches at my feeder in Chapel Hill. Hoping that they stay through the winter. Didn’t have them last year.
 

Back to top
Date: 9/22/17 9:02 am
From: Will Cook <cwcook...>
Subject: Re: Spoonbill Jordan Lake?
The Jordan Lake Roseate Spoonbill was discovered there, but hasn't
been seen there for a while. The most recent location is the Morgan
Creek mudflats, where Matt Spangler (re)discovered it on Sept. 17 (see
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39234214 ).

Derek Hudgins relocated it the next day and posted directions on ebird
(see below). It seems that the gate is open here so you might be able
to save some hiking - anyone know the gate situation?

Roseate Spoonbill 1 20 Sep 2017 Derek Hudgins

Likely continuing first county record, refound by Matt Spangler. Large
pink and white shorebird.

Directions: On Transis Camp Rd., you can park at the first gate (which
is where the GPS coordinates here (http://tbg.carolinanature.com/morgan.html)
recommend parking). I parked here and walked a bit over a mile down
the road (see Mason Point Peninsula checklists). Go past the second
gate (also open today, which has a small parking area on the other
side of the gate but no billboard) to the third gate. Here there is a
billboard for the Jordan Game Land and a map, and a parking area if
you drove this portion. Continue past the third gate until you see
what is now a freshly mowed trail that used to be railroad tracks on
the right. Follow this path until you see a trail coming off it to the
right; the entrance is marked by a white jug on a tree at about
eyelevel. Follow this and stick to the overgrown road; it will take
you to the lakeshore and dump you immediately across from where I had
the spoonbill. This is north of the hotspot pin. Bring a scope
(needed), and use it to clear out spiderwebs on your way down. From
the first gate, it is about 1.5-2 miles out to the flats, then the
same distance back. If the gates are open and you park at the third
gate with the billboard, it may be slightly over half a mile of
forested trails to the lake's edge, plus the trip back and whatever
lakedge walking you do.


On 9/22/2017 10:33 AM, Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:

I'm going to sit on the "railroad spur" Sandy point area. Is
this where I should be looking at Jordan Lake?
Any help is appreciated.
Thanks

Jim Gould

Sent from my mobile device.


--
Will Cook - Durham, NC www.carolinanature.com
 

Back to top
Date: 9/22/17 8:57 am
From: Corey, Ed <ed.corey...>
Subject: Reminder - Carolina Beach SP Bio-Blitz! September 30th (Starting at 8am)
To all,



Just a friendly reminder that on Saturday, September 30th, 2017, the NC Division of Parks and Recreation will be hosting its TENTH (!!) Bio-Blitz at Carolina Beach State Park, in New Hanover County. Many of you have likely participated in bio-blitzes before, but for those who haven't, please refer to this website: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__wiki.laptop.org_go_BioBlitz-5Fguide&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=dSHyFE0sjLfoDDnaXkkWvghSiLmedZX6f6CmCPR7m8g&s=HaCxE5cqGepf1K1Nm_QgXv0L38zkQ2kbJ4gIww8LOWg&e=



Though not our largest park, Carolina Beach State Park boasts a large list of rare and unusual plants and animals. Unique ecosystems such as limesink ponds and coastal variants of longleaf pine forests provide the backdrop for the amazing diversity found here. Add to that its being bounded by the Cape Fear River and Snow's Cut, and the potential for adding species skyrockets!



Our goals for this effort will be: 1) to increase our knowledge and understanding of flora and fauna at the park; 2) to update existing species records, and 3) to continue to refine the model for future bio-blitzes within our division. We are trying to pull experts from many different taxonomic groups, ranging from moths, to mammals, to myxomycota!



Thanks for your time! Please email me if you have any questions.

Ed Corey
Inventory Biologist, NC Division of Parks and Recreation
NC Dept. of Natural and Cultural Resources
919 841 4037 Office
919 208 7864 Work Cell
<Ed.Corey...>

12700 Bayleaf Church Road | Raleigh, North Carolina 27614

Email correspondence to and from this address is subject to the
North Carolina Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.
_____________________________________________________________


 

Back to top
Date: 9/22/17 7:34 am
From: Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Spoonbill Jordan Lake?
I'm going to sit on the "railroad spur" Sandy point area. Is this where I
should be looking at Jordan Lake?

Any help is appreciated.

Thanks

Jim Gould

Sent from my mobile device.

 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/17 10:41 pm
From: Russ Oates (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Follow up #1 on "Important conservation issues" (August 23 posting)
Betsy Kane, Maggie Strickland, Dennis Burnette, et al,

Thank you very much for your interest in these conservation issues!

In response to your request for contact information, I am excerpting some
information from my earlier email *that relates to an issue that is in play
right now.* I'm sad to say I learned tonight that the initial public
comment period (to the Bureau of Land Management) on a different issue, the
threat to the Teshekpuk Lake Goose Molting Area, closed on September 7. I
will let you know if I learn of any future opportunities to comment on
this. I will try to keep abreast of the other issues and let you know when
and whom to contact.

The current issue:

*Issue:* Opening the Coastal Plain (commonly referred to as the “1002 {ten
oh two} area”) of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) to oil
exploration and development.

*Desired outcome:* Stop the current administrative action. Ultimately, we
should protect the entire Coastal Plain area of Arctic National Wildlife
Refuge with wilderness designation.

*Status:* The Secretary of Interior has sent a memorandum the the Acting
Director of the US Fish and Wildlife Service instructing him to rescind the
regulations prohibiting further oil exploration on the coastal plain of the
Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The Acting Director, in turn, has
instructed the Alaska Regional Director to amend the regulations to allow
for the resumption of exploration. This is the first step in the process.
Congress will have to pass a law opening the Refuge to actual oil
development. Thus, this action can and should be fought in the Department
of Interior and the US Congress. *Calls or letters to the Secretary of
Interior should occur now. *Calls to your US Senators (NC: Thom Tillis
202-224-6342 <%28202%29%20224-6342>, Richard Burr 202-224-3154
<%28202%29%20224-3154>, SC: Lindsay Graham 202-224-5972
<%28202%29%20224-5972>*, *Tim Scott 202-224-6121 <%28202%29%20224-6121>)
should be made when the legislation is before the Senate. I will notify
you when this occurs if I learn about it in time.

*Background:* (Key points in *bold* below) The coastal plain portion of
ANWR is approximately 1.5 million acres in size, and represents about 5% of
the coastal plain north of the Brooks Range. Most of the 95% not within
the Refuge is already open for oil exploration and development. Why would
it hurt to develop the coastal plain portion of the Refuge? The coastal
plain is *the* calving area for the 150,000-strong Porcupine Caribou Herd,
a herd that is key to the coastal plain ecosystem and a vitally important
subsistence resource for the Gwichin Athabascan Indians that live south of
the Brooks Range in Alaska and Yukon Territories (where this caribou herd
winters). The herd concentrates on the Arctic coastal plain during a mass
birthing in late June/early July, and the cows tend to their young and try
to protect them from a whole host of predators (brown bears, wolves,
wolverines, and Golden Eagles converge for this annual feast.) The caribou
are also an important subsistence resource (second to bowhead whales) for
the Inupiat Eskimos of the Alaska North Slope. Despite the deliberate
misrepresentations of the affected area (particularly by former Secretary
of Interior under George W. Bush) and research done on caribou response to
oil pipelines (by multiple pro-development administrations), a prominent
caribou researcher told me that *pregnant female caribou and females with
calves stay away from oil pipelines (based on work done in the Prudhoe Bay
area). A spider web of pipelines connecting production wells, and
associated structures and airfields, would likely cause the abandonment of
the calving area and have dire long-term consequences for the herd and
associated predator populations (not to mention the subsistence hunters).
The coastal plain is also an important migration area for Yellow-billed
Loons (Endangered Species Act Candidate Species) and nesting and migration
habitat for a host of different shorebird species (for example:
Buff-breasted Sandpiper, Black-bellied Plover, American Golden Plover,
Semipalmated Plover, Pectoral Sandpiper, Semi-palmated Sandpiper,
Long-billed Dowitcher, Stilt Sandpiper, Red and Red-necked Phalaropes,
Bar-tailed Godwit, and Baird’s Sandpiper.) The coastal plain is important
in some years for as many as 350,000 Lesser Snow Geese (that nested in a
western Canada colony) to fatten on sedge rhizomes before migrating south.
*
*Bottom line: Oil development on the coastal plain of the Arctic National
Wildlife Refuge would be very detrimental to the calving area of the
Porcupine Caribou Herd. This herd is vital to the coastal plain ecosystem
and thus must be protected as mandated by the Refuge enacting legislation.*



I agree with much of what Dennis Burnette said about Audubon. Audubon's
(and I never worked for them either) National Office and both of their
State Offices that I have worked with (Alaska for decades and only very
recently NC), are top notch. Audubon Alaska, who I partnered with
frequently when I was working for USFWS, had (and still has) truly
outstanding leadership and very talented staff. I credit them with playing
a crucial role in protecting the Teshekpuk Lake Goose Molting Area. They
continue to provide timely alerts on pending legislation and Executive
Branch actions and do a great job of describing the issues. You can Google
Audubon Alaska for more complete information.

We are now in a time when the threats to conservation (and to the survival
of life on Earth) are being initiated, encouraged, and enabled by THE MOST
HOSTILE ADMINISTRATION BY FAR that I have ever seen! As the Cabinet
members gain their footing and reveal their policies, and the
anti-environment measures in developing legislation in the US Congress come
to light, we find ourselves with an Administration that has no inkling of
the implications of what they are doing. They appear to feel no
responsibility for future generations or for the health of the planet. I
think we have to fight for our children and grandchildren. That is why I
am doing this.

I thank you (as do my 2 children and 2 grandchildren) for anything you can
do to help.

Russ Oates
Burnsville, NC



--
*Conserve wild things, protect wild places.*

to Carolinabirds

[image: Description: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__mail.google.com_mail_u_0_images_cleardot.gif&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=r1VmkKiKdKr96s7tdMnfmVjv_84nCEMZ3LqzmXm2RgA&s=CSf00UkonzTvQ_h34nhcVqrPeeZrBBAF_HFr0-hnkSU&e= ]

National Audubon Society sends out Action Alerts on issues that affect
birds and wildlife habitats. The alerts usually summarize the issues and
suggest steps members can take. One of the cool things about Audubon is
that the enormous national membership spans the whole political spectrum.
There are state Audubon offices both in North Carolina and South Carolina
that send out alerts of more regional interest. Joining National Audubon
automatically confers membership in a local chapter, if there is one
nearby. (There are 9 chapters in North Carolina and 6 in South Carolina.)
Even if there isn’t a chapter nearby, a national member still can get
action alerts and be active in conservation. Membership is only $20 a year.
The National Audubon Society website is https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.audubon.org_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=r1VmkKiKdKr96s7tdMnfmVjv_84nCEMZ3LqzmXm2RgA&s=wWwQM8j2OoNtoU1diu8Bz_KRoFy-92OcgmbF4an7cbc&e= ; click on
“Conservation” to see a pull down menu describing all the good work Audubon
is doing. Audubon NC and Audubon SC are very active in conservation at a
more local level. The websites are https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__nc.audubon.org_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=r1VmkKiKdKr96s7tdMnfmVjv_84nCEMZ3LqzmXm2RgA&s=Ho2IgkiB6Vc0NFFpLF0_N5PtGfvZdrR_Gzh_npopd4I&e= and
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__sc.audubon.org_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=r1VmkKiKdKr96s7tdMnfmVjv_84nCEMZ3LqzmXm2RgA&s=NwCPqyM_V6NQzJxAem1zM0M0gLLvV1FZlQrOyzmRAEM&e= . The websites have a wealth of information about
conservation activities in each state. Clicking on the words under the
banners will provide a quick tour of what’s going on.



By the way, I don’t work for Audubon, I’m just an active member of my local
chapter.



Dennis

--

Dennis Burnette

Greensboro, NC

Guilford County

<deburnette...>



*From: *<carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Carolinabirds
<carolinabirds...>
du <carolinabirds...>>
*Reply-To: *Betsy Kane <oldurbanist...>
*Date: *Thursday, August 24, 2017 at 12:37 PM
*To: *Russ Oates <rmoates54...>
*Cc: *Maggie Strickland <gallinasviejas...>, Carolinabirds <
<carolinabirds...>
*Subject: *Re: Important conservation issues



Russ,



Thank you for these details. I want to take action, but I don't have time
to dig deep into the issues or figure out the process from scratch, as I am
committed to other efforts. Would it be possible for you to advise, or can
someone you k now advise, on specific actions to be taken when the time is
right? I would be extremely grateful and ready to call or submit comments
if I could know 1) what to say (very briefly) 2) when to say it, and 3)
who to say it to.



Betsy Kane

Raleigh



On Thu, Aug 24, 2017 at 8:30 AM, Russ Oates <carolinabirds...> wrote:

Maggie,

Thank you for your response. You are absolutely right about the EPA. I
was remiss in omitting the EPA from my comments on "Continuity of Executive
Branch Natural Resource Management." Administrator Pruitt is intent on
destroying the agency. His efforts to remove science from the dec ision
making process are dumbfounding. We should prepare for deadly smog and
burning rivers....the clock is turning back to the 1950s.

Truly overwhelming...

Russ



On Thu, Aug 24, 2017 at 7:46 AM, Maggie Strickland <gallinasviejas...>
wrote:

Russ,

Thank you so much for this clear and specific information. While most of my
recent contacts with our senators and representatives has concerned other
matters, I am horrified at the sweeping changes at the EPA. The wholesale
retreat from preservation and conservation is so disheartening. I promise I
will take action on these issues.



Sincerely,

Maggie Strickland

Harmony, Maine






On Wed, Aug 23, 2017 at 8:39 PM, Russ Oates <carolinabirds...> wrote:

CBC Members,



There are several nationally or internationally important bird-related
issues in Alaska that are currently approaching decision points in the
Congress and/or the Executive Branch. Given the anti-conservation
statements and actions of the current Administration and the likely
willingness by the Congress to follow suit, I am asking you to review these
issues and to consider contacting the appropriate Executive Branch agencies
and especially your US Congressional delegation to encourage them to act on
the side of responsible conservation. Many of these issues will be decided
in the US Senate. Currently-proposed legislation and executive actions
will cause irreparable damage to Important Bird Areas. Much is at stake.



A significant proportion of members from both parties in Congress are
conservationists at heart but the Republicans will be under severe pressure
to roll back environmental protections nationwide. We only need 3
Republican senators to vote against an ill-advised development project or
management action to block it, so your calls or letters to your US
Congressional Delegation could be crucial.



Alaska is a hugely-important nesting area for birds from all four North
American flyways (especially Pacific and Central) as well as the East
Asia/Australasia and East Asia/East Africa flyways. Bird band reports
(returns) have shown that some of the Tundra Swans and at least 4 species
of ducks that breed in Alaska also spend the winter in NC. Although I
couldn’t easily check banding data for other species, AK and NC share at
least 16 species of shorebirds. Also, Alaska has historically been a safe
haven for species depleted elsewhere in their ranges (for example: Bald
Eagles, Trumpeter Swans, Peregrine Falcons) and for many years provided
eggs and/or young to the lower 48 states for restoration.



I present each issue by identifying it, followed by the desired outcome.
This will be followed by a brief explanation of what’s at stake and why
there is an issue. If you need more information, you can Google Audubon
Alaska or the names of the locations of concern.



*ISSUES:*



1) *Issue:* Beaufort/Chukchi Sea (off the north shore of Alaska) offshore
petroleum drilling.

*Desired outcome:* Block offshore development in Chukchi and Beaufort
seas.



I know of no oil spill anywhere in an area of broken or solid ice cover on
marine water that was effectively cleaned up or even contained. *Current
spill clean up technology doesn’t work in ice-choked waters. * Historically,
ice has been present in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas more than 200 days
per year. In addition to the threats to whales, seals, and polar bears, an
offshore or nearshore spill occurring in late winter or early spring poses
a tremendous threat to at least 2 million spring-migrating Long-tailed
Ducks and King and Common eiders. Also threatened would be Endangered
Species Act (ESA)-listed “Threatened” Spectacled and Steller’s eiders (the
entire North American breeding population of Steller’s Eiders) and ESA
listed “Warranted But Precluded” Yellow-billed Loon. Large numbers of many
species of shorebirds, gulls, terns, and jaegers would be at risk from
floating oil and oiled shorelines. Here is the nightmare scenario: We
know that essentially all of the bird species mentioned move to northern
breeding grounds as early in spring as conditions will allow. These birds
fly north along the Bering Sea coastline and turn east into the Chukchi,
using any open water patches to rest and feed while enroute to their
breeding grounds in arctic Alaska and Canada. If a spill occurs at an
offshore rig or seabed pipeline in late winter or early spring, the
floating portion of the spill could be waiting as a death trap there for
the migrating birds. This could affect tens to hundreds of thousands of
birds and there could be no way to stop the spill, clean up the spill, or
rescue birds. There is clearly potential for population level impacts on
several species (at a minimum: King Eider, Spectacled Eider, Steller’s
Eider, Common Eider, Yellow-billed Loon).



2) *Issue:* Opening the Teshekpuk Lake Goose Molting area to oil
development. *Desired outcome:* Maintain the moratorium on development of
this area.



Teshekpuk Lake, the second-largest lake in Alaska, is located within the
23.5 million acre National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska (NPRA, administered by
Bureau of Land Management), and sits about 15 miles south of the western
Beaufort Sea coastline (175 miles west of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge).
The 200+ lakes loosely clustered between Teshekpuk Lake and the coastline
constitute the largest arctic goose molting resort in North America,
supporting multiple species of flightless molting birds (Mid-continent
White-fronted Geese, Pacific Black Brant, Lesser Snow Geese, and Cackling
Geese) for several critical months each summer. Frequently, up to 100,000
geese molt in these lakes. During the annual wing molt, these birds are
exceptionally sensitive to disturbance, and an on-the-ground research
scientist during the 1970s reported birds reacting (avoidance behavior) to
a person walking across the board-flat tundra at a distance of one mile.
With that high level of sensitivity, it’s no wonder that the geese picked
one of the most remote locations in Alaska to undergo the 2-3 week
flightless period. The area appeared to be secure from large-scale
disturbance until winter seismic work revealed the possibility of extensive
oil deposits directly under the molting area. I have seen a detailed
proposed development scenario prepared by the petroleum industry that I
strongly believe would result in the complete abandonment of the molting
area. Over the years, scientists (from government and conservation
organizations) have successfully defended this important molting area
against several industry and pro-development administration attempts to
open it for oil development. I credit Audubon Alaska with leading the
effort that resulted in the latest stay of execution. During the Obama
Administration, a ten-year moratorium on development was instituted in this
area to protect the geese, shorebirds and the 60,000-head Teshekpuk Lake
Caribou Herd’s calving area. Due to the intense pressure from the current
administration to open currently closed areas of Alaska to petroleum
development, it is very likely that the moratorium will be cancelled.



3) *Issue:* Opening the Coastal Plain (commonly referred to as the “1002
{ten oh two} area”) of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) to oil
exploration and development.

*Desired outcome:* Protect the entire Coastal Plain area of Arctic National
Wildlife Refuge with wilderness designation.



The coastal plain portion of ANWR is approximately 1.5 million acres in
size, and represents about 5% of the coastal plain north of the Brooks
Range. *Virtually all of the 95% not within the Refuge is already open for
oil exploration and development. * Giving this relatively small area
Wilderness status would permanently protect a complete arctic ecosystem
from the shoreline on the Beaufort Sea coastline, south across the coastal
plain, through the foothills and the north slope of the Brooks Range (it’s
all tundra from the divide north to the Beaufort Sea), and sweeping down
the south slope to the boreal forests and the northern floodplain of the
Yukon River. Most of this area looks as it has for thousands of years, and
it is ecologically complete and intact with a full suite of life including
a complex of top-level predators. Why would it hurt to develop the coastal
plain portion? The coastal plain is *the* calving area for the
150,000-strong Porcupine Caribou Herd, a herd that is a vitally important
subsistence resource for the Gwichin Athabascan Indians that live south of
the Brooks Range in Alaska and Yukon Territories (where the caribou herd
winters). The herd concentrates on the coastal plain during a mass
birthing in late June/early July, and the cows tend to their young and try
to protect them from a whole host of predators (brown bears, wolves,
wolverines, and Golden Eagles converge for this annual feast.) The caribou
are also an important subsistence resource (second to bowhead whales) for
the Inupiat Eskimos of the Alaska North Slope. Despite the deliberate
misrepresentations of the affected area (particularly by former Secretary
of Interior under George W. Bush) and research done on caribou response to
oil pipelines (by multiple pro-development administrations), a prominent
caribou researcher told me that pregnant females and females with calves
stay away from oil pipelines (based on work done in the Prudhoe Bay area).
A spider web of pipelines connecting production wells, and associated
structures and airfields, would likely have dire long-term consequences for
the herd and associated predator populations (not to mention the
subsistence hunters). The coastal plain is also an important migration
area for Yellow-billed Loons and nesting and migration habitat for a host
of different shorebird species (for example: Buff-breasted Sandpiper,
Black-bellied Plover, American Golden Plover, Semipalmated Plover, Pectoral
Sandpiper, Semi-palmated Sandpiper, Long-billed Dowitcher, Stilt Sandpiper,
Red and Red-necked Phalaropes, Bar-tailed Godwit, and Baird’s Sandpiper.)
The coastal plain is important in some years for as many as 350,000 Lesser
Snow Geese (that nested in a western Canada colony) to fatten on sedge
rhizomes before migrating south.



4) *Issue:* Approval of the Pebble Mine.

*Desired outcome:* Maintain the EPA position protecting the area from
mining and provide permanent protection to the watershed.



Pebble is a massive mining project proposed for Alaska state lands in the
middle of the watershed containing the spawning area of the largest sockeye
salmon stock in the world (and the other 4 species of salmon as well). In
addition, sockeye hatchlings live 1-2 years in connected lakes until they
are large enough to go out to sea. Roughly half of the world’s wild-caught
salmon comes from Bristol Bay. If developed, the mine will be the largest
mine in North America and the highly toxic tailings will be stored behind
the largest earthen dam in the world (over 700 feet tall and several miles
long.) This is a seismically active area, and independent scientists doubt
whether the dam would survive a major earthquake on the order of the one
that severely damaged Anchorage and several other southcentral Alaska
coastal communities in 1964. Needless to say, the failure of this dam would
be catastrophic for the salmon and potentially for the many species of
marine birds (including Emperor Geese and ESA listed Steller’s Eiders) that
use Bristol Bay as a foraging area during migration.) After extensive
investigations, this area was declared by the EPA to be too valuable and
vulnerable to mine, but the Trump administration resurrected the project.
If you like to eat wild salmon or support sustainable management of wild
salmon, you have a dog in this fight. Please, take a moment to check out
this web site: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.savebristolbay.org_home_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=r1VmkKiKdKr96s7tdMnfmVjv_84nCEMZ3LqzmXm2RgA&s=l_Dr91gRGl0L6p0ruG7gA4Ny7Gbaa3CrqpUeaWXJZw0&e=
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.savebristolbay.org_home_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=7EO4BVk-XJ7NwcinUfmYJ6IqVyRpdxRLrIOCGxsI31Q&s=UivxUYuxxj67rL43Q6khgMRE3p-5W3cZUbqTdOKj7ls&e=>



5) *Issue:* The State National Forest Management Act of 2017 (SNFMA) and
the Alaska Mental Health Trust Land Transfer Act (AMHT).

*Desired outcome:* Defeat both bills.



SNFMA, (HR 232, sponsored by Rep. Don Young of Alaska) was introduced in
January of this year. I don’t understand all of the details, but I read
the text and this is my take: While there are some specific Alaska
provisions, much of the bill applies to all states and national forests in
North and South Carolina could be profoundly affected. As written, this
bill would allow each state to select up to 2,000,000 acres of National
Forest within their respective state boundaries for transfer to state
ownership and management with the mandate to supply the needs of all wood
processing operations in the state. Potentially, 100% of NC’s 1.255
million acres of National Forest could be transferred to the state. This
legislation would also permit mining in the “former” national forests.



AMHT, sponsored by Senator Lisa Murkowski, has been developed in the Senate
to the point that it can be added as a rider to another, more urgent bill.
The bill is intended to allow the transfer of old growth acreage to private
(Alaska Native) corporations in exchange for their corporate-owned
logged-over areas. This will facilitate the rapid destruction of the
magnificent old growth trees, some of which are more than 1,000 years old.



The Alaska congressional delegation has, for decades, done everything in
their power to open up the remaining old growth trees of the magnificent
Tongass National Forest to logging. Only 3% of the Tongass is old growth,
so we must act now to save it.



6) *Issue:* Building a road to the village of King Cove through the
Designated Wilderness portion of Izembek National Wildlife Refuge.

*Desired outcome*: Prevent the road from being built.



Izembek National Wildlife Refuge, one of Alaska’s oldest refuges, is the
principal fall staging area for essentially 100% of the Pacific Black Brant
population. The area is also a vital staging area for Emperor Geese, which
winter to the west on the Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands and breed
almost exclusively to the north on the Yukon Delta National Wildlife
Refuge. Izembek lagoon provides lush eelgrass beds that allow the brant
to accumulate huge amounts of body fat (nearly doubling their weight)
necessary to enable the birds to survive the 60+ hour direct flight to
overwintering areas principally in the bays of the Pacific coast of Baja
and mainland Mexico. Most of the historic wintering areas on the west coast
of the Lower 48 states have been destroyed or dramatically reduced by
dredging and other development.



Never since the passage of the Wilderness Act in 1964 has a designated
Wilderness Area been compromised for the purpose of road construction. A
federal Judge ruled in 2015 in favor of the Department of Interior’s
decision to deny permission for construction of the road. The US House of
Representatives recently passed legislation that would open the area to
road construction. This bill sets a very dangerous precedent by
potentially opening the door to road construction in Wilderness Areas
nationwide. *The bill now goes to the Senate where we will have our final
chance to defeat it.* Please contact your US Senators and encourage them
to protect the Refuge.



Read more at the following site:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__l.facebook.com_l.php-3Fu-3Dhttp-253A-252F-252Fbit.ly-252F2vyb6j&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=r1VmkKiKdKr96s7tdMnfmVjv_84nCEMZ3LqzmXm2RgA&s=Y4l8eg_q-TP1HiZ2Bv1FtZBVT7FV8BBtKcUHmnGzV3U&e=
U&h=ATMupmgV-v_gK4pynARMjWZyRCHtlXoqa7HSyzJ7Eavxean6O-cr04Ho
hyVXHZ_oF7nxNLuA34P3lHvMs55XcmyuWsxwFL30mx32Pkg_QoLMSrT5MESK
ygZxJ5oqNn1lyGzfHnR37nhUVShgv23woUDpVuyhOmuUCZtb0MhUtBu8GzaU
XLsOStYb3xPBORlIrV6NCdt30E7sS2WX4NTdCTOG99wIOm0DyrRNOAMCSHnLUVn1wDC28--kUtg
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__l.facebook.com_l.php-3Fu-3Dhttp-253A-252F-252Fbit.ly-252F2vyb6jU-26h-3DATMupmgV-2Dv-5FgK4pynARMjWZyRCHtlXoqa7HSyzJ7Eavxean6O-2Dcr04HohyVXHZ-5FoF7nxNLuA34P3lHvMs55XcmyuWsxwFL30mx32Pkg-5FQoLMSrT5MESKygZxJ5oqNn1lyGzfHnR37nhUVShgv23woUDpVuyhOmuUCZtb0MhUtBu8GzaUXLsOStYb3xPBORlIrV6NCdt30E7sS2WX4NTdCTOG99wIOm0DyrRNOAMCSHnLUVn1wDC28-2D-2DkUtg&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U%20&m=7EO4BVk-XJ7Nwcin>



7) *Issue:* Climate change.

*Desired outcome:* The US fully engages in the Paris Climate Change
Accords.



Alaska is home to vast amounts of glacial ice, sea ice, and permafrost. If
these melt, and they certainly are melting at this point, they will make a
huge contribution to a warming climate. The threat of melting permafrost
is probably least known by the public. When permafrost melts, it releases
not only carbon dioxide the but also large amounts of methane (molecule for
molecule, far more problematic than carbon dioxide.) The consequences of
extensive permafrost melting across the northern hemisphere are unthinkable.



8) *Issue:* Continuity of Executive Branch Natural Resource Management.

*Desired Outcome:* Full funding for natural resource conservation functions
for Department of Interior (especially US Fish and Wildlife Service, US
National Park Service, and Bureau of Land Management) Department of
Agriculture (US Forest Service and the Farm Bill) and Department of Energy;
cessation of the “reshuffling” of senior leadership positions among
agencies; retain the designations of the National Monuments currently under
“review” by Secretary of the Interior Zinke.



In my recent summer trip to Alaska to visit family, I visited with former
colleagues from the US Fish and Wildlife Service and learned that the
President’s budget as well as statements and actions by the top
administrators in EPA, Energy, and Interior send clear signals of a desire
to significantly damage or eliminate important federal conservation
programs. Interior Secretary Zinke has engaged in a policy of shuffling
occupants of senior leadership positions, removing leaders from areas of
expertise and placing them in positions in other agencies that do not
relate to their experience or training. Clearly, the intent is to cripple
the agencies at the top, create chaos, and stop them from conducting and
disseminating scientifically rigorous science that is inconvenient to the
Administration’s ideology. The extent of this effort is beyond anything I
saw in my 31 year federal career.



I regret the great length of this post. These are incredibly difficult
times. There is so much at stake! Thank you for any help that you can
provide!



Russ Oates (USFWS Alaska, Retired)

Burnsville, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/17 5:27 pm
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Roanoke Island migrants
After picking up several species at home this morning, I birded the north
end of Roanoke Island this afternoon after work for two hours. Found the
following: American Redstart-55, Northern Parula-9, Palm Warbler-11,
Magnolia-1, Common Yellowthroat-1, Yellow-throated Warbler-1 or 2,
Black-and-white-6, Yellow Warbler-2, Pine Warbler-1, Ovenbird-1, Red-eyed
Vireo-15, White-eyed Vireo-1, PHILADELPHIA VIREO-1, Merlin-1, Eastern
Wood-pewee-1.

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/17 5:23 pm
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: White-winged Dove at Pea Island
Yesterday a bunch of us birded the old Coast Guard Station during the
preferred NW winds. Had a fairly good amount of birds, best of which were 1
Clay-colored Sparrow and 1 White-winged Dove. Among other species, we also
had a Dickcissel, good numbers of Baltimore Orioles, Cedar Waxwings,
Bobolinks, lots of flickers, and 7 species of warblers, all common.

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/17 4:05 pm
From: Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: La Moye Park
I have gone there several times. Greene County has the lowest species
count of any county in NC (91). When we were being encouraged to bird in
other counties, I made it a point to try to find places to bird in Greene
County. It has been a challenge to find any public space. The boat ramps
are about the only public space I could find. The boat ramp in Snow Hill
has a bigger land area. I took a kayak and birded from the creek last time
and had pretty good luck.

I think the number of species is so low because, as near as I can
determine, there are no large bodies of water in the county.

I didn't submit it as a hotspot but if you are not familiar with the area,
it may be helpful to someone trying to find a place to bird.

Ann Brice
Wilson, NC

On Thu, Sep 21, 2017 at 6:31 PM, Peter Quadarella <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Has anyone been to the ebird hotspot "La Moye Park" in Greene County, NC?
> Either I missed something while there today or it is completely overgrown
> with kudzu and other vegetation - so not much of a hotspot anymore.
>
> Peter Quadarella,
> Weddington, NC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/17 3:40 pm
From: Buddy Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Painted Buntings
As a follow up to my last email,
another male PABU just appeared at the feeder.
The earlier male was almost through his molt an this male was a bright shiny one.
It does no get much better. 😊

Buddy Campbell
Ladys Island
Beaufort, SC
 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/17 3:32 pm
From: Buddy Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Painted Buntings PABU
All
Right now I have four green Painted Buntings at our millet feeder. Moments earlier I had a male and a female that was banded here five years ago.
Not sure if this is the latest I have seen them here, but I feel quite confident that this is the most I have seen here this late in September.

Buddy Campbell
Ladys Island
Beaufort, SC
 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/17 3:32 pm
From: Peter Quadarella (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: La Moye Park
Has anyone been to the ebird hotspot "La Moye Park" in Greene County, NC?
Either I missed something while there today or it is completely overgrown
with kudzu and other vegetation - so not much of a hotspot anymore.

Peter Quadarella,
Weddington, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/17 12:34 pm
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Winter Finch Forecast 2017-2018
Ron Pittaway just released his famous Winter Finch Forecast for 2017-2018.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__jeaniron.ca_2017_wff17.htm&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=2bS1jZC3N8BtOB5z8YxCPWEyHQA_wgVapSO8IMxe8SE&s=hd9z0CMqnvqoBwTcgPP3plht3AJUmbyYdCMik5uth_Q&e=

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/17 9:10 am
From: Will Cook <cwcook...>
Subject: Re: Mason farm -where's the best spot?
Testing sending this again to see if I can get around the stupid Duke
email system rewriting all links as gobbeldygook.

-----

Jim, it sounds like you're at the nearby NC Botanical Garden, not
Mason Farm. The entrance to Mason Farm is a little tricky to find -
see the map I made at

http://tbg.carolinanature.com/masonfarm.html

The entrance is at coordinates 35.895202 W, -79.021995 E

https://www.google.com/maps/?q=35.895202,-79.021995

Good birding,

Will


On 9/21/2017 10:08 AM, Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:

I'm at mason farm now in Chapel Hill. Where should I go? Is the
only entrance by the Garden center?
Feel free to call,

Jim Gould804-731-1353

Sent from my mobile device.


--
Will Cook - Durham, NC www.carolinanature.com
 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/17 8:31 am
From: Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mason Farm - found it
THANKS FOR ALL THE HELP.

Jim Gould

Sent from my mobile device.

 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/17 8:24 am
From: Will Cook <cwcook...>
Subject: Re: Mason farm -where's the best spot?
Jim, it sounds like you're at the nearby NC Botanical Garden, not Mason
Farm. The entrance to Mason Farm is a little tricky to find - see the
map I made at

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__tbg.carolinanature.com_masonfarm.html&d=DwIDaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=VyGX3E80754O2MBRSiUclcCTUUx90PnJsy5zP-5mFj0&s=7-D3snFKVpcza7Ut-wZ7qVMlyc1omWCO5p6wXewDfJg&e=

The entrance is at coordinates 35.895202 W, -79.021995 E

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps_-3Fq-3D35.895202-2C-2D79.021995&d=DwIDaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=VyGX3E80754O2MBRSiUclcCTUUx90PnJsy5zP-5mFj0&s=VdOC5nuIDUL1DFW-YaYZG_CO2-hGqGwoNd0aa0YvLH0&e=

Good birding,

Will


On 9/21/2017 10:08 AM, Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> I'm at mason farm now in Chapel Hill.  Where should I go? Is the only
> entrance by the Garden center?
>
> Feel free to call,
>
> Jim Gould
> 804-731-1353
>
> Sent from my mobile device.

--
Will Cook - Durham, NC
www.carolinanature.com

 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/17 7:09 am
From: Brian Patteson <patteson1...>
Subject: Re: thrush flight calls and kerr lake jaeger
Hi Brian,

I saw some pics of the jaeger last night on Facebook. Looks like a Parasitic. FWIW it would be a month or so early to expect juvenile Pom at this latitude.

Brian Patteson
Hatteras, NC

> On Sep 21, 2017, at 9:19 AM, Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Oh my gosh, yes I meant to type summer tanager not scarlet tanager giving the picky-tuck. Typo, can't get anything past you folks =) I have in previous years heard scarlet giving call and song during NFC watches, and rose breasted grosbeak too, what fun!!!
>
> Oh and on kerr lake count yesterday I found a jaeger from palmer point on the va side, either pomarine or parasitic, a really tough light juvenile, my blurry distant photos don't help much. It was seen again by va birders later in the day so maybe they got better images. It was close to the state line at one point, so almost on my warren county list, could maybe see from Kimball pt. Possibly the same bird seen from Staunton River park last week, storm blown.
>
> --
> Brian Bockhahn
> <birdranger248...> <mailto:<birdranger248...>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/17 7:08 am
From: Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mason farm -where's the best spot?
I'm at mason farm now in Chapel Hill. Where should I go? Is the only
entrance by the Garden center?

Feel free to call,

Jim Gould
804-731-1353

Sent from my mobile device.

 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/17 6:39 am
From: Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Flight calls - migrating thrushes?
Thank you Brian for this valuable link. The comparison vocalizations were very helpful. Craig Watson and I used the link to listen to pre-dawn birds last weekend and we were able to distinguish Veery and Swainson's Thrush. The link is not only a spectrogram but a vocalization that you can hear if you touch the screen. Not sure if folks were aware. Thanks!
Pam Ford
Charleston

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 15, 2017, at 3:44 PM, Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Several lost links, but found this link with a nice comparison of the thrushes: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.nightmigrants.com_main_page-5Fspecies-5Fcalls-5Fthrush-5Fcomparison-5Fpage.html&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=OxS1vNe3-TzKe8FeQetLXJzXE-QxiVqisR-Tcc5SPOY&s=XSKOkyhSIGaJF4xlN8WhZFBj1aETwsveeNXrRyrAmCk&e=
>
> I listen in advance and try to study up, but most nights my ears need to tune up, so on a good night with multiple species I may miss the first few, but then it's quite easy to start to compare. A musical ear makes the distinction easier, and younger ears hear further.
>
> Some speculations, so feel free to lambast me: I tend to hear more towards dawn, I guess as they are flying lower preparing for landfall. Though the other day I did have an increase before and during a light rain band, and a couple even did drop into trees and continued calling. The higher in elevation, or further west in nc the higher the number of veery. Hermit thrushes won't start until later sep as the other species start to decrease, same thing happens with migratory sparrows, when the white-throated sparrows arrive in Oct they really arrive!!!
>
> Sep 14, 2017 at Mayo River state park Rockingham county, fairly typical for the site, numbers conservative.
>
> 5-6am
> 1 swainsons
> 2 wood
> 1 dickcissel
>
> 6-615
> 7 swainsons
> 9 veery
> 5 wood
> 1 warbler sp
>
> 615-630
> 8 swainsons
> 32 veery
> 12 wood
> 1 chipping sparrow
> 1 warbler sp
>
> 630-645
> 4 veery
> 3 wood
>
>
>
> --
> Brian Bockhahn
> <birdranger248...>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/17 6:20 am
From: Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: thrush flight calls and kerr lake jaeger
Oh my gosh, yes I meant to type summer tanager not scarlet tanager giving
the picky-tuck. Typo, can't get anything past you folks =) I have in
previous years heard scarlet giving call and song during NFC watches, and
rose breasted grosbeak too, what fun!!!

Oh and on kerr lake count yesterday I found a jaeger from palmer point on
the va side, either pomarine or parasitic, a really tough light juvenile,
my blurry distant photos don't help much. It was seen again by va birders
later in the day so maybe they got better images. It was close to the
state line at one point, so almost on my warren county list, could maybe
see from Kimball pt. Possibly the same bird seen from Staunton River park
last week, storm blown.

--
Brian Bockhahn
<birdranger248...>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/17 5:51 am
From: Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Thrush flight calls
Since several folks inquired, here are the last couple counts. I didnt'
have my snow disc/parabolic dish this time but still heard a ton of calls.
I have tried full moon birding and yesterday tried to look straight up with
bins in hope to see waves of birds, but I only saw bats. Hard to get the
focus correct on whatever column of air these thrushes are using. Heading
to hanging rock for some hawk counts, will try to get a few nights in up
there. I need to start earlier as the data below show a clear pre dawn
peak, which does exist but not that drastic I believe.

Sep 18 Falls Lake Sandling Beach, mostly mixed pine forest along lake shore

545-6
1 wood
1 swainsons

6-615
20 wood
5 swainsons
2 veery
1 gray cheeked
1 warbler sp

615-630
25 wood
20 swainsons
8 veery
2 gray cheeked
1 scarlet tanager giving picky-tuck and then full song, in flight and in
the dark!

630-645
1 wood
2 swainsons

Sep 20 Kerr Lake, mixed forest along lake

6-615
3 wood thrush
1 swainsons thrush

615-630
29 wood
42 swainsons
6 veery
1 gray cheeked

630-645
13 wood
31 swainsons
4 veery

--
Brian Bockhahn
<birdranger248...>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/17 5:17 am
From: John Fussell <jfuss...>
Subject: Ruff and Buff-breasted Sandpiper at Beaufort NC still present Wednesday evening
Martha Mayo and I saw the Ruff and the Buff-breasted Sandpiper at the
Beaufort Club golf course about 6pm Wednesday.

As usual, they were close to each other much of the time.

They were still at the very south end of the course, along the newly paved
section of road.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 9/20/17 9:13 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Clapper Rail found dead in Raleigh, NC
I just got this message from Brian O'Shea, the Curator of Birds at the N.C.
Museum of Natural Sciences collections:

"Jeff Beane just handed me a roadkilled Clapper Rail he picked up on Monday
(18 Sept) on Reedy Creek Rd., between Blue Ridge and Edwards Mill. I have
entered it into our freezer log and given it a catalog number (NCSM 25372)."

Sadly, quite a few of our inland records of this coastal species are of
moribund birds from roads and the bases of skyscrapers. We do know that it
migrates at night over inland portions of the Carolinas. Whether this
bird's location can be attributed to Irma, as opposed to migrating
southward from the Northeast, isn't known yet; however, as there are a
number of subspecies of Clapper Rails, it might be informative to know if
subspecific identity can be determined. If a FL or other southern-state
subspecies, it would have been brought north by the hurricane. At any rate,
this would be about the 12th record for the NC Piedmont.

Harry LeGrand
author/editor, Birds of North Carolina website

 

Back to top
Date: 9/20/17 5:38 am
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: A Few Thrushes Around....
I had one Veery, and THREE Swainson's Thrushes before work this morning. I
wish
I could have stayed longer, because there was lots of stuff moving around
the property.

A Gray-cheeked Thrush will show up around the 25th or so. Lot's of food
around, so I'm
ready!

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 9/19/17 4:55 pm
From: Jeannie Kraus (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fwd: Ruff in Carteret County, NC


Jeannie Kraus
Sent from my iPhone


Begin forwarded message:

> From: Jeannie Kraus <jwkraus7...>
> Date: September 19, 2017 at 7:12:01 PM EDT
> To: "Adams, Jamie" <Jamie.Adams...>
> Subject: Re: Ruff in Carteret County, NC
>
> Yes both were there. I may have to go back since I didn't have my camera. Several other people were by also.
>
> Jeannie Kraus
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
>> On Sep 19, 2017, at 5:59 PM, "\"Adams wrote:
>>
>> Did anyone look for this today? Was hoping to go tomorrow.
>>
>> Jamie Adams
>> Wilmington, NC
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> ********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************ This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank you. **********************************************************************

 

Back to top
Date: 9/19/17 4:52 pm
From: A Bryan <nshrike...>
Subject: Ruff in Carteret County
I observed the Ruff,previously found by Clyde Atkins, this morning still
feeding the fields north of Beaufort, N.C. Some photographs are at:
http://visitingnature.com/main/fall-2017-september-through-november/
Enjoy each day, Allen Bryanwww.visitingnature.com
 

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Date: 9/19/17 3:00 pm
From: \Adams, Jamie\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Ruff in Carteret County, NC
Did anyone look for this today? Was hoping to go tomorrow.

Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 9/19/17 12:58 pm
From: Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Jordan Lake: Spoonbill and Wood Stork
Rick Payne and I visited both the New Hope Creek and Morgan Creek sections of Jordan Lake this morning. At the latter, we easily saw the Roseate Spoonbill feeding with Gr Egrets, as soon as we emerged from the forest onto the shore. We later saw it in flight, then perched in a tree before landing again with the egrets.
At New Hope Creek, we saw the Wood Stork fly south from the north end of the lake and then return several minutes later, to disappear behind the cypress trees.
Both spots had many Killdeer, Lesser Yellowlegs (some at Morgan Crk, 40-50 at New Hope), c. 3-5 Pectoral Sandpipers at each spot, a few peep at both spots (mainly Least, with a few Semis, and also 1 Western at Morgan), and 3 Stilt Sandpipers at New Hope. The shorebirds at New Hope Creek are well south of the railroad embankment, but its an easy walk south along a fairly dry shore. Light would be best in the later afternoon.

Good birding!
Bob Rybczynski
Cary, NC

 

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Date: 9/19/17 11:36 am
From: Pam Diamond (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Need help now at location for spoonbill
I am trying to locate the trailhead for the spoonbill out at Jordan lake.
Can someone please call me I'm in the field right now. 9192740445
Pam Diamond at Jordan lake.
--

*Pam Diamond, Owner*

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Date: 9/19/17 6:06 am
From: Audrey (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Baird"S Sandpiper continues at Oregon Inlet Fishing Center, Dare Cty NC
Hey Birders
The Baird's Sandpiper continues at Oregon Inlet FishIng Center this am.

It's Amazing Out There!

Audrey Whitlock
Nags Head NC & Merritt Island FL

Sent from iPhone

 

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Date: 9/19/17 5:44 am
From: <susan...>
Subject: Call for help at Wings Over Water

All,

We have had a couple of unavoidable leader cancellations at WOW in
October. I am putting out the call for two experienced beach drivers to
assist with trips to The Point on Friday (1 driver) and Saturday (2
drivers)mornings. We have free lodging in the area if needed.

If you are available and interested, please contact me directly as soon
as possible.

Many thanks!
Susan Campbell
Southern Pines, NC

 

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Date: 9/18/17 6:54 pm
From: Rich Boyd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Carteret County Ruff continues
Rich and I both observed the Ruff this morning at separate times between
8am and 9:15am. It was foraging close to the road at the location described
by John Fussell in yesterday's post. Thanks for the update, Marty.

Susan Boyd
Beaufort, NC

On Mon, Sep 18, 2017 at 8:06 PM, Marty Wall <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> I stopped by the Beaufort Country Club (formerly North River Golf Club) on
> my way back to Beaufort this evening and was able to view the Ruff found by
> Clyde Atkins yesterday. When I arrived around 5:30 PM, Chapel Hill birders
> Haven and Minna were already on the bird. They told me the Buff-breasted
> Sandpiper had been near the Ruff until just a few minutes before I arrived,
> apparently spooked by an Osprey. While we watched, the Ruff got up from
> its resting position and foraged for a few minutes, then stood very still
> for five minutes or so, and then flew away. We do not know whether, or
> where, it landed as it flew into the sun from our perspective. A short
> while later the Buff-breasted Sandpiper appeared, so it is possible the
> Ruff is still present, since they apparently have been hanging around
> together. Approximate GPS coordinates: *34.752550, -76.640012.*
>
> Marty Wall
> Beaufort, NC
>

 

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Date: 9/18/17 5:07 pm
From: Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Carteret County Ruff continues
I stopped by the Beaufort Country Club (formerly North River Golf Club) on
my way back to Beaufort this evening and was able to view the Ruff found by
Clyde Atkins yesterday. When I arrived around 5:30 PM, Chapel Hill birders
Haven and Minna were already on the bird. They told me the Buff-breasted
Sandpiper had been near the Ruff until just a few minutes before I arrived,
apparently spooked by an Osprey. While we watched, the Ruff got up from
its resting position and foraged for a few minutes, then stood very still
for five minutes or so, and then flew away. We do not know whether, or
where, it landed as it flew into the sun from our perspective. A short
while later the Buff-breasted Sandpiper appeared, so it is possible the
Ruff is still present, since they apparently have been hanging around
together. Approximate GPS coordinates: *34.752550, -76.640012.*

Marty Wall
Beaufort, NC

 

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Date: 9/18/17 4:59 pm
From: william haddad (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Belated report on Sat. birding at Hefner Gap

I did a bird walk for the Orchard at Altapass (approx. mm. 328 on the BRP). Joined by other birders we saw 12 species of Warblers, three species of Vireos and 17 species of other birds – all before 9:30 a.m. at Hefner Gap., a few miles north of the Orchard on the BRP. On a side note this has been the best year for Yellow-throated Vireos in my experience at Hefner, the Orchard and my cabin.

I will be doing another bird walk this upcoming Sat. meeting at the Orchard parking lot and beginning the birding at 7:30 a.m. sharp. We will bird the Orchard Road and/or Hefner Gap – of course spending more time where the most action is.

Bill Haddad
Spruce Pine, N.C.

Sent from Mail for Windows 10



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Date: 9/18/17 4:14 pm
From: Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lake Wheeler shorebirds
There is still a decent variety of shorebirds on the Lake Wheeler flats. This a.m. I had: both Yellowlegs, Pectoral, Stilt, Semipalmated, Least, White-rumped (1) and Spotted Sandpipers and Killdeer. When I first arrived, I found only a few Killdeer, but after about 15 min, just as I was starting to leave, several groups of shorebirds flew in. Based on this and other recent visits to this locale, its worth waiting around if you arrive to find few birds, since the birds move around a lot.

Good birding!
Bob Rybczynski
Cary, NC

 

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Date: 9/18/17 2:03 pm
From: Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: BAIRD'S Sandpiper - Oregon Inlet FC, Dare County, NC
Jeff Lewis and I just got great views and photos of the Baird's Sandpiper
originally found by Audrey Whitlock this AM.

Oregon Inlet Fishing Center
Lawn along entrance. DARE County, NC

The bird is still here, and looking lonely, right now...!

Jim Gould
SOUTHERN shores, NC

Sent from my mobile device.

 

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Date: 9/18/17 1:28 pm
From: Will Cook <cwcook...>
Subject: Jordan Lake fall count mudflats birds; Chapel Hill spring count results
I had a great time yesterday covering the Northeast Creek mudflats off
NC 751 at Jordan Lake in Chatham County, NC. While these mudflats don't
get as much press as the nearby New Hope Creek mudflats, they are still
worth checking out. It's a bit of a hike getting to the back, walking
around the edge to where you can scope the birds well, but slightly
easier than getting to the other mudflats at Jordan. To get there, park
at 35.833210,-78.963835 then look for a little trail across the road to
the east. Follow this to the lake, then follow the shoreline as desired
to get a better look at the birds. Best scoping I had was from
35.830532,-78.957283

Here's what I found there yesterday, highlighted by count rarities
Short-billed Dowitchers, Stilt Sandpipers, and a flyover Wood Stork:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S39230080&d=DwIDaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=kVNG2aSNRvdcsUWl7wgfFHjKRbMq2jZ4ZvVqOga34D0&s=093aH5E0wEvDWpGb0mrVDPrbmmP8pMBW1SID549sTvM&e=


The northern reaches of Jordan Lake were also covered on the Chapel Hill
Spring Bird Count back in May. I've just gotten the summary and detailed
results table posted (thanks for the reminder, Marilyn Westphal).

Detailed results and photos of rarities at
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__chbc.carolinanature.com_chsbc2017res.html&d=DwIDaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=kVNG2aSNRvdcsUWl7wgfFHjKRbMq2jZ4ZvVqOga34D0&s=YLQoOSfnhGpNEkvAAVEYP1Ui1LAzt63zCrRlv-kJB1E&e=

2017 Chapel Hill Spring Bird Count — Compiler's Comments

by Will Cook

We had an excellent Chapel Hill spring count on Saturday, May 13, 2017,
with the second highest species count in the last 30 years, though for
numbers of individual birds it was quite average. The calm, cool,
overcast conditions made for very pleasant counting and no doubt helped
the count by keeping the birds active throughout the day. The species
total of 130 is 9 above the 10-year average of 121, though the total
number of birds, 8381, is close to the average of 8433. Effort on the
count was average with 127.7 party-hours (average 128.2), as was the
number of birds per party hour (65.6, average 65.9).

We had an absolutely incredible three species new to the count this
year: Short-billed Dowitcher, Willow Flycatcher, and Dickcissel. I'm not
sure when the last time that happened, but it was probably decades ago.
The Chapel Hill count has been going on continuously since 1957, so it
isn't too easy to add a new species! The Short-billed Dowitcher was
spotted by Jan Hansen on the rocky bank near the dam at University Lake.
Jan also scored a Dickcissel at Maple View Farm and got a nice
photograph. Mark Kosiewski found the Willow Flycatcher on the Briar
Chapel trail. It cooperated nicely for photos, but couldn't be
identified for sure without hearing its call. Fortunately it responded
to a tape of Willow by sounding off the "ritz-bew" call. Other goodies
included Common Gallinule (Jill Froning, 4th count record), Semipalmated
Plover (Hansen), Black-billed Cuckoo (Mark Goodwin, first since 1975),
Hermit Thrush (Karyn Hede), Blackburnian Warbler (Brian Bockhahn), Palm
Warbler (Kosiewski), both Canada and Wilson's Warblers at Mason Farm
(Will Cook), and a count week King Rail (Ginger Travis, who couldn't get
to Cub Creek on count day).

We set a good number of record highs this year: Spotted Sandpiper (97,
average 16), N. Rough-winged Swallow (254, average 68), Cliff Swallow
(62, average 7), Magnolia Warbler (14, average 2). This is the second
record-setting year in a row for Rough-winged and Magnolia. Also in
unusually high numbers: Solitary Sandpiper (20, average 10), E.
Wood-Pewee (67, average 32), Acadian Flycatcher (81, average 59), Barn
Swallow (179, average 74), Veery (11 is highest since 1978, average 3),
Louisiana Waterthrush (31 is highest since 1976, average 14), Yellow
Warbler (15, average 8), Chestnut-sided Warbler (6, average 1), and
Black-throated Green Warbler (3, average 1)

The one big miss was Blue-headed Vireo, the first miss of this local
breeding bird since 1985. Remarkably scarce this year: Eastern Kingbird
(15 is lowest since 1974, average 26), Purple Martin (19, average 53),
Wood Thrush (38, average 60), White-throated Sparrow (1 ties record low,
average 17), and House Sparrow (13 ties record low set last year,
average 47).

Team honors: Jan Hansen, covering both the University Lake and Dairyland
Road areas, recorded a outstanding 97 species and 819 indivudual birds,
the highest for both. Tom Driscoll got the highest individual count with
910.

Weather in brief: low 53F, high 65F; wind variable 0-5 mph; mostly
cloudy, no rain.

Thanks to the 48 field counters and 3 feeder watchers for your help!

--
Will Cook - Durham, NC
www.carolinanature.com
 

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Date: 9/18/17 9:23 am
From: David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: New posting to Birding Bulls blog: Piping Plovers and white morph Reddish Egret reports pre-Irma
M 18 Sept 2017

All,

I have a new posting to my Birding Bulls blog detailing some of my
eclipse watching and the most recent (pre-Irma) survey on Bulls Island.
Hurricane Irma prevented the early Sept survey, but this blog posting
covers banded Piping Plovers and a white morph Reddish Egret continuing on
Bulls. There is also a post script link to an update on the condition of
the island post-Irma. I invite you to read my post at:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__birdingbulls.blogspot.com&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=uHpmBrJSE8pKtCNgVM6Gnpw-ifrst7h44_2gb-FEa5g&s=_ucG-NuDvJYGNqYGBReo1_vi-z2TtjpulYJrqUhcAR8&e=

Regards,

David McLean
Charleston, SC

--
David C. McLean, Jr.
DCMcLean AT gmail DOT com

 

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Date: 9/18/17 9:07 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Carolina Bird Club Blue Ridge Parkway trip 9/16-17
The Carolina Bird Club Blue Ridge Parkway field trip to northwestern North Carolina ran over the weekend. With cleanup in the aftermath of Irma's passage still underway mid-week, we were unsure if the parkway would reopen in time, but the National Park Service came through, and the road opened Thursday.

Saturday brought blue skies, light and variable wind, and crystal clear visibility. Perfect conditions for viewing the flocks of fall migrants normally found along the parkway. Maybe the weather was too good, as the birds found little need to flock together in hopes of finding sustenance. Instead of finding packs of madly feeding little feathered things, we found just a bare trickle of onesies an twosies. Normally the location of any chickadee/titmouse confab on the parkway results in finding attendant warblers, vireos, and tanagers, but the chicks and tits must not have showered Friday night, because they had few friends Saturday. We ended the day with 15 species of warbler, with Blue-winged probably the "best" along with Cape May, Tennessee and Bay-breasted. This is in spite of the very active day reported a bit farther south at Ridge Junction.

Sunday turned out to be much better. We stopped initially at Mahogany Rock overlook to drop a few cars, noticed birds zipping through the foliage, and ended up with the "flock of the weekend", an impressive swirl of neotrops that included no less than 15 species of warblers, two new for the trip. So mark the warbler tally at 17.

We enjoyed picnic lunch at the hawk watch both Saturday and Sunday, spotting small numbers of Broad-winged Hawk among the locals. A Peregrine Falcon Sunday morning topped the raptor list.

The fun does not stop on these trips when the clock hands move past five o'clock. From our tailgating party in the motel parking lot we enjoyed a stream of migrating nighthawks zipping overhead. And then as darkness fell, we had front row seats to an impressive Chimney Swift show where hundreds of tiny flying cigars met, mingled, and then all decided to share the same chimney for their overnight activities.

The parking lot also provided what was, for most of us, a lifer: watching a dog walk up to a restaurant drive through window to get a cheese sandwich.

The night ended with an impromptu dance party, also in the motel parking lot, before folks drifted off for well-deserved visions of sugar plums.

Look for another edition of this somewhat infamous trip next September :)

Happy birding,
Steve Shultz
Apex, NC



 

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Date: 9/18/17 5:59 am
From: Audrey (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Baird's Sandpiper Oregon Inlet Marina Dare Cty nc
As of 0845, a Baird's Sandpiper is in the field by the ORegon Inlet Marina

It's Amazing Out There!

Audrey Whitlock
Nags Head NC & Merritt Island FL

Sent from iPhone

 

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Date: 9/17/17 5:53 pm
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: 2 Am Golden Plovers still at Nash County sod farm at dark (7:35PM)
Vandemark turf had 92 Killdeer in AM, 32 in eve.


Golden Plovers, still in partial breeding plumage, noted first on green sod, then flew to dun brown area in front of Shiloh Church where peep used to hang out. Running and pecking quite actively, and must have arrived after 8AM. First seen around 7 PM, and still seen huddled down at 7:35 PM.


No other shorebirds seen. Killdeer mainly fairly close to road, flocking in far west and far east.





Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

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Date: 9/17/17 12:16 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Ruff/Reeve and Buff-breasted Sandpiper near Beaufort NC
Excellent photos of the Ruff and Buff-breasted Sandpiper from Steve Howell,
on the eBird report. However, Steve uploaded the two Least Sandpiper photos
under Buff-breasted Sandpiper, so that "Buff-breasted Sandpiper" on the
eBird list has 4 photos -- two of Leasts and two of the Buff-breasted. I
am sure he or an editor can quickly correct this. Thanks.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

P.S. Eddie Owens' White-rumped Sandpiper at Lake Wheeler from yesterday
remained to be seen by several of us (me around 9:30 and Lucas Bobay this
afternoon). I was going to enter an eBird report now but I saw essentially
what Lucas did from the overlook -- not much but Killdeer and far distant
other shorebirds.



On Sun, Sep 17, 2017 at 1:19 PM, John Fussell <jofuss...> wrote:

> This morning Clyde Atkins found a juvenile Ruff/Reeve and a juvenile
> Buff-breasted Sandpiper at the Beaufort Club golf course just N of
> Beaufort. Steve Howell and I found the birds soon thereafter.
>
> The birds were at the south end of the golf course, at the very end of the
> road, along the borders of a recently paved section of road in a new
> subdivision (no houses yet). Bordering the road, on both sides, is mostly
> bare ground with newly planted grass. The birds were at about 34.7525,
> -76.6423.
>
> Sometimes both birds could be seen standing next to each other, and both
> were very tame. Other shorebird species seen while we were there were
> Killdeer, Black-bellied Plover, Semipalmated Plover, Pectoral Sandpiper
> (1), Least Sandpiper, and Semipalmated Sandpiper.
>
> A Merlin was working the area while we were there, causeing the shorebirds
> to flush and fly around occasionally.
>
> John Fussell
> Morehead City, NC
>

 

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Date: 9/17/17 10:20 am
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: Ruff/Reeve and Buff-breasted Sandpiper near Beaufort NC
This morning Clyde Atkins found a juvenile Ruff/Reeve and a juvenile
Buff-breasted Sandpiper at the Beaufort Club golf course just N of Beaufort.
Steve Howell and I found the birds soon thereafter.

The birds were at the south end of the golf course, at the very end of the
road, along the borders of a recently paved section of road in a new
subdivision (no houses yet). Bordering the road, on both sides, is mostly
bare ground with newly planted grass. The birds were at about
34.7525, -76.6423.

Sometimes both birds could be seen standing next to each other, and both
were very tame. Other shorebird species seen while we were there were
Killdeer, Black-bellied Plover, Semipalmated Plover, Pectoral Sandpiper (1),
Least Sandpiper, and Semipalmated Sandpiper.

A Merlin was working the area while we were there, causeing the shorebirds
to flush and fly around occasionally.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

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Date: 9/17/17 8:37 am
From: Matt Spangler (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Spoonbill at Jordan Lake again--Morgan Creek
A spoonbill (possibly the same one last seen a few weeks ago) is currently present at the Morgan creek mudflats on jordan lake. It started off near the creek mouth (southwest end of the cove, really far from the peninsula from which you can access the mudflats), but is currently in the shallows at the northwest side of this arm of the lake, closer to the transis camp road peninsula. There are some paths off of transis camp road (to the right, after the gate) that will eventually take you to this arm of the lake. Or, you can kayak there, like I did.

Matt Spangler
Jordan Lake NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/17/17 8:08 am
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Slow morning in Duck, NC yields Nashville Warbler, YB Chat
Went to the Duck boardwalk this morning and found very little: a few Yellow
Warblers, a few Redstarts, one NASHVILLE Warbler, one Cape May Warbler one
Yellow-breasted Chat, one Blue Grosbeak. The calm before the storm, I hope,
with NW winds in the forecast.

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

 

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Date: 9/17/17 8:03 am
From: \Adams, Jamie\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Masonboro Island Jaegers, NC
I paddled over to Masonboro Island for some surfing this morning and had at least 10 fly over jaegers. Some might have been the same bird but certainly 5-6 different birds. If you are near the beach, might be worth ocean watching today. Jose might be pushing some birds our way.

Most appeared to be parasitic but I had at least one hefty bird that could have been a Pom and one little one with small bill that could have been a Long-tail but difficult to say while sitting on a surfboard.

Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC

Sent from my iPhone
********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************ This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank you. **********************************************************************
 

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Date: 9/17/17 6:42 am
From: Andy Harrison (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Clay-colored Sparrow at Patriot's Point
Ed Blitch, Pam Ford and I just relocated the Clay-colored Sparrow previously reported by Pam et al at Patriot's Point. The bird was observed at the end of the driving range near the sheds by the pond. It perched in a low shrub for a minute or two, and Pam got diagnostic photos.

Andy Harrison
Charleston, SC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/16/17 5:28 pm
From: EASTMAN, CAROLINE <EASTMAN...>
Subject: RE: Non-boat access Re: SC: AMERICAN FLAMINGO at Cape Romain NWR
I was at Tibwin midday today. No flamingo. Minimally adequate view of the target area. Some storks and spoonbills along with the herons. Not much for migrants. LOTS of mosquitoes.

Caroline Eastman
Columbia SC
________________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> [<carolinabirds-request...>] on behalf of Pamela Ford [<carolinabirds...>]
Sent: Saturday, September 16, 2017 10:03 AM
To: Nate Dias
Cc: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Non-boat access Re: SC: AMERICAN FLAMINGO at Cape Romain NWR

Craig Watson, Chris Snook and I just walked the outer dike at Tibwin. We arrived just after daylight to have the highest tide for detecting the bird, tide was going out and the bird is less likely to be seen from the dike as tide drops. Several boats on ICW flushed birds but no Flamingo. It appeared there were at least one, maybe two boats on the ICW looking for the bird in the general area of where Tibwin Creek enters the UCW.

Pam Ford
Charleston SC

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 15, 2017, at 4:12 PM, Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> * For those birders without boat access, the area where the flamingo
> was seen should be scope-able from an elevated impoundment dike at
> South Tibwin.
>
> It's not too long a walk from the Tibwin parking area on US-17 just
> south of McClellanville. For those unfamiliar with it, Tibwin is a
> former plantation now owned/managed by the US Forest Service as part
> of the Francis Marion National Forest.
>
> This Google Map shows the spot in question:
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps_place_33-25C2-25B003-2724.7-2522N-2B79-25C2-25B030-2757.2-2522W_-4033.0568735-2C-2D79.5180711-2C595m_data-3D-213m2-211e3-214b1-214m6-213m5-211s0x0-3A0x0-217e2-218m2-213d33.0568694-214d-2D79.5158768&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=pM3nWNzUqAlimyIzmm5m7X5PUhLShhuiujUMmusNADc&s=tbIO4zvJZxs-xwu9bZCAUGcqIUSTweYxHoAyA1QGX8A&e=
>
> Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
>
>> On Fri, Sep 15, 2017 at 3:30 PM, Nate Dias <offshorebirder...> wrote:
>> Nate Swick was kind enough to forward me some more info, including an
>> aerial map.
>>
>> The flamingo looked to be feeding across the ICW from the mouth of Tibwin Creek.
>>
>> Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
>>
>>> On Fri, Sep 15, 2017 at 3:15 PM, Nate Swick <nswick...> wrote:
>>> Just wanted to let folks know that I just this minute received a note via
>>> ABA info from a Florida birders with a boat captain acquaintance in SC who
>>> photographed an AMERICAN FLAMINGO at Cape Romain yesterday afternoon.
>>>
>>> Text of the email is as follows:
>>> "A friend, Captain Chris Wilson, photographed a flamingo today at 3:30pm in
>>> South Carolina. He was north of Charleston and just south of Mclellanville.
>>> The bird was feeding in a spartina marsh between two spoil islands on the
>>> east side of the Intracoastal Waterway in the Cape Romain Wildlife Refuge.
>>> Chris was in a boat on the Intracoastal when he saw it. Please see attached
>>> photos. I don't have the appropriate channels to disseminate this sighting
>>> so please share."
>>>
>>> I know that flamingo records are fraught in the Carolinas, but with the
>>> passage if Irma through Florida and the Caribbean, this one might have some
>>> legs. Besides the unusually long flamingo legs, of course.
>>>
>>> Photos were included, poor but undeniably flamingo. I'll send them along to
>>> SC BRC chair Chris Hill and post them on the Carolina Rare Bird Alert
>>> Facebook group and to Kent at the CBC website.
>>>
>>> Nate Swick
>>> GSO, NC
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> The ABA Blog
>>> blog.aba.org
>>> American Birding Podcast
>>> blog.aba.org/aba-podcast
>>> American Birding Association
>>>
>>>
>>>
 

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Date: 9/16/17 3:41 pm
From: Jesse Pope (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Grandfather Mountain Hawkwatch: 523 raptors today.
Dear birders,

We had 523 raptors today at the Grandfather Mountain hawkwatch. Highlights include 512 Broad-winged Hawks, 4 adult Bald Eagles, and an adult Peregrine Falcon.

I expect tomorrow to be another good day, possibly our peak coming in the next few days. This week we are expecting warm dry weather, so we should see a number of good days of hawk flight, but probably not the really big bird days. Make some time to get out to one of the NC hawkwatches this coming week!! It should be a good time!

I'll post our detailed report at hawkcount.org this evening.

Jesse Pope

Newland, NC
(C) 828-898-3012
(W) 828-733-3224
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/16/17 2:46 pm
From: Marilyn Westphal <mjwestph...>
Subject: Ridge Junction - Blue Ridge Parkway (mp355.2)
Good morning at Ridge Junction today, but hard to get there. The parkway
is still closed (post-Irma) from Asheville to Mt Mitchell SP, so we had to
drive up there via Marion and NC 80. It was worth it, though, as it was
quite an active morning. Birds were crossing over the gap and along the
lower part of the road from the time we got there at 7:70am to about 11am.
It got a little slower after that, but still some movement until noon.
There were probably somewhere between 500 and 1000 birds moving through,
although of course it's impossible to see all of them well enough to
identify. Most common along the lower end of 128 were Tennessee Warblers
(22 for sure, but undoubtedly lots more), and most common at the overlook
were Cape May Warblers (33 counted, but many more surely flying over).
Other warblers included Black-throated Green, Black-throated Blue,
Blackburnian, Black-and-white, a Nashville and a Bay-breasted.

There were also lots of Blue-gray Gnatcatchers (12), Rose-breasted
Grosbeaks (26), Swainson's Thrushes (11), 7 Scarlet Tanagers, and a
Yellow-billed Cuckoo along with a mix of other species. A small flock of
Red Crossbills hung out at the gap the whole morning. But the most
abundant bird counted was Ruby-throated Hummingbird (54). They were
constantly zipping over the ridge as well as down the lower end of NC128.

So, for now if you want to get there you have to either come up NC 80 from
Burnsville or from Marion or come up Curtis Creek Rd. We didn't know if
Curtis Creek Rd was open, so we went up 80, but we did go back Curtis Creek
and that cuts off quite a few miles. Latest word is that the BRP will
re-open from Asheville to MMSP sometime next week, but it's hard to say.
You just have to keep checking the BRP web site. Mt Mitchell SP re-opened
this morning.

Weather was great this morning, sunny and totally calm. We did see a
Merlin, but no Broad-wings coming through there yet. However, there was a
military transport plane that flew over the ridge only about 200 or 300
feet over our heads, close enough to read the numbers. Rather intimidating.
Marilyn

--
Marilyn Westphal
Hendersonville, NC

 

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Date: 9/16/17 8:54 am
From: Henry Link <linkh...>
Subject: Greensboro Sabine's Gulls- No
Many birders searched for the Sabine's Gulls on Lake Townsend and Lake Brandt this morning without success, so it appears they have moved on.

Henry Link
Greensboro NC
 

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Date: 9/16/17 7:03 am
From: Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Non-boat access Re: SC: AMERICAN FLAMINGO at Cape Romain NWR
Craig Watson, Chris Snook and I just walked the outer dike at Tibwin. We arrived just after daylight to have the highest tide for detecting the bird, tide was going out and the bird is less likely to be seen from the dike as tide drops. Several boats on ICW flushed birds but no Flamingo. It appeared there were at least one, maybe two boats on the ICW looking for the bird in the general area of where Tibwin Creek enters the UCW.

Pam Ford
Charleston SC

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 15, 2017, at 4:12 PM, Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> * For those birders without boat access, the area where the flamingo
> was seen should be scope-able from an elevated impoundment dike at
> South Tibwin.
>
> It's not too long a walk from the Tibwin parking area on US-17 just
> south of McClellanville. For those unfamiliar with it, Tibwin is a
> former plantation now owned/managed by the US Forest Service as part
> of the Francis Marion National Forest.
>
> This Google Map shows the spot in question:
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps_place_33-25C2-25B003-2724.7-2522N-2B79-25C2-25B030-2757.2-2522W_-4033.0568735-2C-2D79.5180711-2C595m_data-3D-213m2-211e3-214b1-214m6-213m5-211s0x0-3A0x0-217e2-218m2-213d33.0568694-214d-2D79.5158768&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=pM3nWNzUqAlimyIzmm5m7X5PUhLShhuiujUMmusNADc&s=tbIO4zvJZxs-xwu9bZCAUGcqIUSTweYxHoAyA1QGX8A&e=
>
> Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
>
>> On Fri, Sep 15, 2017 at 3:30 PM, Nate Dias <offshorebirder...> wrote:
>> Nate Swick was kind enough to forward me some more info, including an
>> aerial map.
>>
>> The flamingo looked to be feeding across the ICW from the mouth of Tibwin Creek.
>>
>> Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
>>
>>> On Fri, Sep 15, 2017 at 3:15 PM, Nate Swick <nswick...> wrote:
>>> Just wanted to let folks know that I just this minute received a note via
>>> ABA info from a Florida birders with a boat captain acquaintance in SC who
>>> photographed an AMERICAN FLAMINGO at Cape Romain yesterday afternoon.
>>>
>>> Text of the email is as follows:
>>> "A friend, Captain Chris Wilson, photographed a flamingo today at 3:30pm in
>>> South Carolina. He was north of Charleston and just south of Mclellanville.
>>> The bird was feeding in a spartina marsh between two spoil islands on the
>>> east side of the Intracoastal Waterway in the Cape Romain Wildlife Refuge.
>>> Chris was in a boat on the Intracoastal when he saw it. Please see attached
>>> photos. I don't have the appropriate channels to disseminate this sighting
>>> so please share."
>>>
>>> I know that flamingo records are fraught in the Carolinas, but with the
>>> passage if Irma through Florida and the Caribbean, this one might have some
>>> legs. Besides the unusually long flamingo legs, of course.
>>>
>>> Photos were included, poor but undeniably flamingo. I'll send them along to
>>> SC BRC chair Chris Hill and post them on the Carolina Rare Bird Alert
>>> Facebook group and to Kent at the CBC website.
>>>
>>> Nate Swick
>>> GSO, NC
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> The ABA Blog
>>> blog.aba.org
>>> American Birding Podcast
>>> blog.aba.org/aba-podcast
>>> American Birding Association
>>>
>>>
>>>
 

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Date: 9/16/17 5:44 am
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bridled or Sooty Tern Wing...
Don't report dead birds to eBird: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__help.ebird.org_customer_portal_articles_973921-2Dwhat-2Ddata-2Dare-2Dappropriate-2D&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=HfjFntArf200Qva9PC9bZbq6V2GVP02JgLUlnvA9u0A&s=TIieupr5yPu_mrAD4HYiD5U-2Up7UYKv_NUMlYKyz7A&e=

Kent Fiala

On 9/15/2017 11:53 PM, David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> Hi folks,
> Found a wing of a tern on our dunes (Seabrook Island, SC) on Tuesday after Irma struck.
> That same day I saw 10 Sooty Terns. The wings on those birds had undeniably black trailing edge of the underside of the wing.
> The wing I found looks like it could belong to a Bridled Tern instead. Without seeing it with the rest of the bird and in relation to everything else, I am just not 100%.
> I have photos, but then left the wing on the dunes since I have no USFWS permit to collect.
> If any of you would like to see the photos to confirm or deny my finding, please email me off list, and I will happily send you the photos.
> Question... can you add a bird "post-morgen" to an ebird hotspot? I ask partly in jest, but would kind of love to have a confirmed Bridled Tern having flown over our property.
> Thanks,
> David
>
> Sent from my iPhone

 

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Date: 9/16/17 5:15 am
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Sabine's Gulls and H. Godwits-- benefit from global warming?
What is with all the sightings (NC and VA)? Has global warming made their breeding more successful?


Also, how about somebody predicting, ahead of time, where these goodies will show up? Maybe it is just like Black Rails, the birds will be where there is some habitat (beaverdam complexes for the rail) and birders who get out to look, probably early in the morning (or whatever is the propitious time).






Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

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Date: 9/16/17 5:10 am
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Scores of Cliff Swallow nests under I-95 Roanoke River bridge
As I reported earlier, Cliff Swallows have moved downstream from Deep Creek on Roanoke Rapids Lake to both the I-95 and US301 bridges in recent years. Based on seeing hundreds and scores of swallows from above.

Last weekend, Sunday Sep. 10, I saw scores of (unused) nests on the Halifax County side of I-95, at tops of circular columns.


Supposedly there is some sort of summer (breeding?) record for Cliff Swallows far downstream (Roanoke River NWR)--perhaps WIlliamston bridges, but the refuge does not know how valid a record. As I have not been down there to look, iI much doubt it. This partly because I check out the Rich Square (US258) bridge from time to time, and have not encountered this species there, at the next bridge below US301 (Weldon).


Evidently Cliff Swallows studied in VIrginia have moved way downstream in recent years.




Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

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Date: 9/16/17 5:00 am
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Loggerhead Shrike back along Mid-Pines Rd., south of Raleigh
Made out to be a liar again. The very next day I saw a shrike "in the usual spot" where I had not seen any for 2-3 weeks. And, again several drive-by misses at same (and other) location.


Dew on ground or evening usually unlikely to see shrikes near roads, but, again, just unpredictable "in the usual spots". This time of year, birds may be lower down--have been seen foraging from low perches, usu in cotton fields, so not so visible driving by.






Frank Enders, Halifax, NC
________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Frank Enders <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 8:07:17 PM
To: Harry LeGrand
Subject: Re: Loggerhead Shrike back along Mid-Pines Rd., south of Raleigh


For 2-3 weeks, I have not encountered any of the several pairs of shrikes which nest between me and Roanoke Rapids. (Young were raised.)

While the probability of seeing a shrike between sightings (when bird is present before and after the drive-by) often is as low as 0.2, I have been driving back and forth too much for any conclusion other than that these birds have moved on.
These local birds may show up later in fall (some winter), but how do we know the winter birds here are birds which breed here? I "dunno" without marking the individuals in some way.
If "my" birds have moved on, as they seem to have, your Raleigh bird may also be a migrant (or local mover). It would seem that a bird which regularly sits on powerlines, like, say Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (or, here, shrike) should be highly visible, if present, but I have seen this species just not be "present", when it is at a spot both before and after the apparent absence. Just a mystery.

Wait a while, and a shrike will show up (on my way to and from town) to prove me a liar, but it is so hard to understand why this species is irregular in being detected. They do use woods edges and cutovers, and I always wonder if (and WHY) they might be there instead of at the roadsides where we are accustomed to encounter them. Maybe something about prey availability,

I used to think local shrikes showed up (arrived? came out of the woodwork to set up at roadside breeding locations?) around late February, but then there are years they are here later. Just hard to tell for this species. And most.
Even gamebird populations are not understood, no good predictions based on anything other than counting birds just before the "prediction", i.e., just extending a trendline of abundance with simply no or completely speculative real data reflecting the key factors influencing abundance of species.

SUMMARY: I do not know what is going on (either).


Frank Enders, Halifax, NC


________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 4:33 PM
To: carolinabirds listserve; Harry LeGrand
Subject: Loggerhead Shrike back along Mid-Pines Rd., south of Raleigh

Loggerhead Shrikes nested at the N.C. State U. farm fields up until a year or two ago, but not this year. The last report along this road appears to have been on March 24 of this year, on eBird; and the last along nearby Inwood Road was April 29 of this year. One did overwinter along Inwood Road.

So, this afternoon I was glad to see one, an apparent adult, along Mid-Pines just east of the creek that flows into Yates Pond. I will assume it must have bred somewhere fairly close by -- it seems a bit early for a true migrant, but tons of people bird this general area each week, and the species seemed to have disappeared this summer.

I do see a shrike now and then in SE and E Wake County in recent years, and I suspect a few still breed in these more rural parts of the county. But, shrikes have almost disappeared as breeders in the Triangle now, despite some good habitat in some places.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

 

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Date: 9/15/17 8:53 pm
From: David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bridled or Sooty Tern Wing...
Hi folks,
Found a wing of a tern on our dunes (Seabrook Island, SC) on Tuesday after Irma struck.
That same day I saw 10 Sooty Terns. The wings on those birds had undeniably black trailing edge of the underside of the wing.
The wing I found looks like it could belong to a Bridled Tern instead. Without seeing it with the rest of the bird and in relation to everything else, I am just not 100%.
I have photos, but then left the wing on the dunes since I have no USFWS permit to collect.
If any of you would like to see the photos to confirm or deny my finding, please email me off list, and I will happily send you the photos.
Question... can you add a bird "post-morgen" to an ebird hotspot? I ask partly in jest, but would kind of love to have a confirmed Bridled Tern having flown over our property.
Thanks,
David

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/15/17 5:24 pm
From: Brian Patteson <patteson1...>
Subject: Sabine's Gulls At Cape Hatteras
I got a report from Andrew Thornton that there were FIVE Sabine’s Gulls feeding with tern off the north beach at Cape Point this evening.

Brian Patteson
Hatteras, NC
 

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Date: 9/15/17 4:57 pm
From: \Adams, Jamie\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: SABINE'S GULLS at Lake Townsend, Guilford Co
After searching all over Lake Townsend with the Links, we decided to check Lake Brandt and the Links spotted the Sabine Gulls in failing light but we had good scope views of the silhouettes and the distinctive feeding and bobbing. I took a horrible photo but I think diagnostic with long wings. Plus they are the only gulls around. If someone hopes to get them tomorrow, suggest lake Brandt marina real early in the morning.

Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 15, 2017, at 2:00 PM, Jamie Adams <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Can anyone confirm if they are still there? Making the drive if they are.
>
>
> Jamie Adams
> Wilmington, NC
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Nate Swick
> Sent: Friday, September 15, 2017 11:30 AM
> To: Chris Kelly <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: NC: SABINE'S GULLS at Lake Townsend, Guilford Co
>
> Henry Link discovered two Sabine's Gulls on Lake Townsend. Visible from the north Church Street Causeway. Best views are had by taking the peninsula trail from the south causeway and waking out to the point.
>
> Nate Swick
> GSO, NC
>
> Sent from my phone
> ********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************ This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank you. **********************************************************************
********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************ This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank you. **********************************************************************
 

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Date: 9/15/17 1:12 pm
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Non-boat access Re: SC: AMERICAN FLAMINGO at Cape Romain NWR
* For those birders without boat access, the area where the flamingo
was seen should be scope-able from an elevated impoundment dike at
South Tibwin.

It's not too long a walk from the Tibwin parking area on US-17 just
south of McClellanville. For those unfamiliar with it, Tibwin is a
former plantation now owned/managed by the US Forest Service as part
of the Francis Marion National Forest.

This Google Map shows the spot in question:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps_place_33-25C2-25B003-2724.7-2522N-2B79-25C2-25B030-2757.2-2522W_-4033.0568735-2C-2D79.5180711-2C595m_data-3D-213m2-211e3-214b1-214m6-213m5-211s0x0-3A0x0-217e2-218m2-213d33.0568694-214d-2D79.5158768&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=pM3nWNzUqAlimyIzmm5m7X5PUhLShhuiujUMmusNADc&s=tbIO4zvJZxs-xwu9bZCAUGcqIUSTweYxHoAyA1QGX8A&e=

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

On Fri, Sep 15, 2017 at 3:30 PM, Nate Dias <offshorebirder...> wrote:
> Nate Swick was kind enough to forward me some more info, including an
> aerial map.
>
> The flamingo looked to be feeding across the ICW from the mouth of Tibwin Creek.
>
> Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
>
> On Fri, Sep 15, 2017 at 3:15 PM, Nate Swick <nswick...> wrote:
>> Just wanted to let folks know that I just this minute received a note via
>> ABA info from a Florida birders with a boat captain acquaintance in SC who
>> photographed an AMERICAN FLAMINGO at Cape Romain yesterday afternoon.
>>
>> Text of the email is as follows:
>> "A friend, Captain Chris Wilson, photographed a flamingo today at 3:30pm in
>> South Carolina. He was north of Charleston and just south of Mclellanville.
>> The bird was feeding in a spartina marsh between two spoil islands on the
>> east side of the Intracoastal Waterway in the Cape Romain Wildlife Refuge.
>> Chris was in a boat on the Intracoastal when he saw it. Please see attached
>> photos. I don't have the appropriate channels to disseminate this sighting
>> so please share."
>>
>> I know that flamingo records are fraught in the Carolinas, but with the
>> passage if Irma through Florida and the Caribbean, this one might have some
>> legs. Besides the unusually long flamingo legs, of course.
>>
>> Photos were included, poor but undeniably flamingo. I'll send them along to
>> SC BRC chair Chris Hill and post them on the Carolina Rare Bird Alert
>> Facebook group and to Kent at the CBC website.
>>
>> Nate Swick
>> GSO, NC
>>
>>
>> --
>> The ABA Blog
>> blog.aba.org
>> American Birding Podcast
>> blog.aba.org/aba-podcast
>> American Birding Association
>>
>>
>>
 

Back to top
Date: 9/15/17 12:56 pm
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: SC: AMERICAN FLAMINGO at Cape Romain NWR
I've placed the photos in the CBC gallery (https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_gallery_&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=-57NH3BvZAse6iBOJ-bdelrhWIH3tOvIDlJxD59ZJSk&s=9HQO3BLGPNBw0HaMlh1xuh7nTHj6YklZpR531oU73PQ&e= )

Kent Fiala

On 9/15/2017 3:15 PM, Nate Swick wrote:
> Just wanted to let folks know that I just this minute received a note via ABA info from a Florida birders with a boat captain acquaintance in SC who photographed an AMERICAN FLAMINGO at Cape Romain yesterday afternoon.
>
> Text of the email is as follows:
> "A friend, Captain Chris Wilson, photographed a flamingo today at 3:30pm in South Carolina. He was north of Charleston and just south of Mclellanville. The bird was feeding in a spartina marsh between two spoil islands on the east side of the Intracoastal Waterway in the Cape Romain Wildlife Refuge. Chris was in a boat on the Intracoastal when he saw it. Please see attached photos. I don't have the appropriate channels to disseminate this sighting so please share."
>
> I know that flamingo records are fraught in the Carolinas, but with the passage if Irma through Florida and the Caribbean, this one might have some legs. Besides the unusually long flamingo legs, of course.
>
> Photos were included, poor but undeniably flamingo. I'll send them along to SC BRC chair Chris Hill and post them on the Carolina Rare Bird Alert Facebook group and to Kent at the CBC website.
>
> Nate Swick
> GSO, NC
>
>
> --
> The ABA Blog
> blog.aba.org <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__blog.aba.org_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=vrtDlzCor-46vBwKR1bKGS2owFfk_1obka_QKCJApTM&s=nM5rlfhDfCMToS5PHPnCOKEcR9jBSd8tsESBGYMuS58&e=>
> American Birding Podcast
> blog.aba.org/aba-podcast <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__blog.aba.org_aba-2Dpodcast&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=vrtDlzCor-46vBwKR1bKGS2owFfk_1obka_QKCJApTM&s=QE7xdt3CJho3ObgAWdO0pVlE7Qs_0sCIMUe0FSNIydM&e=>
> American Birding Association
>
>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 9/15/17 12:45 pm
From: Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Flight calls - migrating thrushes?
Several lost links, but found this link with a nice comparison of the
thrushes:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.nightmigrants.com_main_page-5Fspecies-5Fcalls-5Fthrush-5Fcomparison-5Fpage.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=zE8Xkg5j3W8UWdM97Og2LipeJLwC0x-jE4zi2thVsYw&s=f0ycBKHfkz2glUe0FU3bYBUz-bdCegTNDyCAyWBQdLM&e=

I listen in advance and try to study up, but most nights my ears need to
tune up, so on a good night with multiple species I may miss the first few,
but then it's quite easy to start to compare. A musical ear makes the
distinction easier, and younger ears hear further.

Some speculations, so feel free to lambast me: I tend to hear more towards
dawn, I guess as they are flying lower preparing for landfall. Though the
other day I did have an increase before and during a light rain band, and a
couple even did drop into trees and continued calling. The higher in
elevation, or further west in nc the higher the number of veery. Hermit
thrushes won't start until later sep as the other species start to
decrease, same thing happens with migratory sparrows, when the
white-throated sparrows arrive in Oct they really arrive!!!

Sep 14, 2017 at Mayo River state park Rockingham county, fairly typical for
the site, numbers conservative.

5-6am
1 swainsons
2 wood
1 dickcissel

6-615
7 swainsons
9 veery
5 wood
1 warbler sp

615-630
8 swainsons
32 veery
12 wood
1 chipping sparrow
1 warbler sp

630-645
4 veery
3 wood



--
Brian Bockhahn
<birdranger248...>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/15/17 12:31 pm
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: SC: AMERICAN FLAMINGO at Cape Romain NWR
Nate Swick was kind enough to forward me some more info, including an
aerial map.

The flamingo looked to be feeding across the ICW from the mouth of Tibwin Creek.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

On Fri, Sep 15, 2017 at 3:15 PM, Nate Swick <nswick...> wrote:
> Just wanted to let folks know that I just this minute received a note via
> ABA info from a Florida birders with a boat captain acquaintance in SC who
> photographed an AMERICAN FLAMINGO at Cape Romain yesterday afternoon.
>
> Text of the email is as follows:
> "A friend, Captain Chris Wilson, photographed a flamingo today at 3:30pm in
> South Carolina. He was north of Charleston and just south of Mclellanville.
> The bird was feeding in a spartina marsh between two spoil islands on the
> east side of the Intracoastal Waterway in the Cape Romain Wildlife Refuge.
> Chris was in a boat on the Intracoastal when he saw it. Please see attached
> photos. I don't have the appropriate channels to disseminate this sighting
> so please share."
>
> I know that flamingo records are fraught in the Carolinas, but with the
> passage if Irma through Florida and the Caribbean, this one might have some
> legs. Besides the unusually long flamingo legs, of course.
>
> Photos were included, poor but undeniably flamingo. I'll send them along to
> SC BRC chair Chris Hill and post them on the Carolina Rare Bird Alert
> Facebook group and to Kent at the CBC website.
>
> Nate Swick
> GSO, NC
>
>
> --
> The ABA Blog
> blog.aba.org
> American Birding Podcast
> blog.aba.org/aba-podcast
> American Birding Association
>
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 9/15/17 12:21 pm
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: SC: AMERICAN FLAMINGO at Cape Romain NWR
Any more specific info on the location?

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

On Fri, Sep 15, 2017 at 3:15 PM, Nate Swick <nswick...> wrote:
> Just wanted to let folks know that I just this minute received a note via
> ABA info from a Florida birders with a boat captain acquaintance in SC who
> photographed an AMERICAN FLAMINGO at Cape Romain yesterday afternoon.
>
> Text of the email is as follows:
> "A friend, Captain Chris Wilson, photographed a flamingo today at 3:30pm in
> South Carolina. He was north of Charleston and just south of Mclellanville.
> The bird was feeding in a spartina marsh between two spoil islands on the
> east side of the Intracoastal Waterway in the Cape Romain Wildlife Refuge.
> Chris was in a boat on the Intracoastal when he saw it. Please see attached
> photos. I don't have the appropriate channels to disseminate this sighting
> so please share."
>
> I know that flamingo records are fraught in the Carolinas, but with the
> passage if Irma through Florida and the Caribbean, this one might have some
> legs. Besides the unusually long flamingo legs, of course.
>
> Photos were included, poor but undeniably flamingo. I'll send them along to
> SC BRC chair Chris Hill and post them on the Carolina Rare Bird Alert
> Facebook group and to Kent at the CBC website.
>
> Nate Swick
> GSO, NC
>
>
> --
> The ABA Blog
> blog.aba.org
> American Birding Podcast
> blog.aba.org/aba-podcast
> American Birding Association
>
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 9/15/17 12:19 pm
From: Christopher Hill <Chill...>
Subject: Re: SC: AMERICAN FLAMINGO at Cape Romain NWR
Thanks, Nate.

Aaron Given is now SCBRC chair. I’m just an ordinary member now.

Chris

On Sep 15, 2017, at 3:15 PM, Nate Swick <nswick...><mailto:<nswick...>> wrote:

Just wanted to let folks know that I just this minute received a note via ABA info from a Florida birders with a boat captain acquaintance in SC who photographed an AMERICAN FLAMINGO at Cape Romain yesterday afternoon.

Text of the email is as follows:
"A friend, Captain Chris Wilson, photographed a flamingo today at 3:30pm in South Carolina. He was north of Charleston and just south of Mclellanville. The bird was feeding in a spartina marsh between two spoil islands on the east side of the Intracoastal Waterway in the Cape Romain Wildlife Refuge. Chris was in a boat on the Intracoastal when he saw it. Please see attached photos. I don't have the appropriate channels to disseminate this sighting so please share."

I know that flamingo records are fraught in the Carolinas, but with the passage if Irma through Florida and the Caribbean, this one might have some legs. Besides the unusually long flamingo legs, of course.

Photos were included, poor but undeniably flamingo. I'll send them along to SC BRC chair Chris Hill and post them on the Carolina Rare Bird Alert Facebook group and to Kent at the CBC website.

Nate Swick
GSO, NC


--
The ABA Blog
blog.aba.org<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__blog.aba.org_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=vrtDlzCor-46vBwKR1bKGS2owFfk_1obka_QKCJApTM&s=nM5rlfhDfCMToS5PHPnCOKEcR9jBSd8tsESBGYMuS58&e=>
American Birding Podcast
blog.aba.org/aba-podcast<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__blog.aba.org_aba-2Dpodcast&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=vrtDlzCor-46vBwKR1bKGS2owFfk_1obka_QKCJApTM&s=QE7xdt3CJho3ObgAWdO0pVlE7Qs_0sCIMUe0FSNIydM&e=>
American Birding Association




 

Back to top
Date: 9/15/17 12:15 pm
From: Nate Swick <nswick...>
Subject: SC: AMERICAN FLAMINGO at Cape Romain NWR
Just wanted to let folks know that I just this minute received a note via
ABA info from a Florida birders with a boat captain acquaintance in SC who
photographed an AMERICAN FLAMINGO at Cape Romain yesterday afternoon.

Text of the email is as follows:
"A friend, Captain Chris Wilson, photographed a flamingo today at 3:30pm in
South Carolina. He was north of Charleston and just south of Mclellanville.
The bird was feeding in a spartina marsh between two spoil islands on the
east side of the Intracoastal Waterway in the Cape Romain Wildlife Refuge.
Chris was in a boat on the Intracoastal when he saw it. Please see attached
photos. I don't have the appropriate channels to disseminate this sighting
so please share."

I know that flamingo records are fraught in the Carolinas, but with the
passage if Irma through Florida and the Caribbean, this one might have some
legs. Besides the unusually long flamingo legs, of course.

Photos were included, poor but undeniably flamingo. I'll send them along to
SC BRC chair Chris Hill and post them on the Carolina Rare Bird Alert
Facebook group and to Kent at the CBC website.

Nate Swick
GSO, NC


--
The ABA Blog
blog.aba.org
American Birding Podcast
blog.aba.org/aba-podcast
American Birding Association

 

Back to top
Date: 9/15/17 11:55 am
From: Tracee Clapper (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: how to see a barn owl
I don't know about birding etiquette in this situation, but I don't mind
sharing my Barn Owl viewing story.

I dated an avid, lifelong birder in college. We went birding often, early
and devotedly. He knew all the spots to look for all species of birds and
often checked newly found spots. We quietly climbed up into the loft of an
abandoned (apparently) barn that he'd previously scoped out. We were able
to see an adult Barn Owl and several hatchlings from the top of the ladder
leading to the loft. The adult hissed, long and hard, at us once, and we
left them be shortly after that. *Please remember this was 25 years ago,
and I wouldn't do this without knowing proper Barn Owl viewing rules and
regulations at this age.*

On Fri, Sep 15, 2017 at 2:26 PM, Bill Rhodes <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> First of all, don't tell anyone you don't trust about the location, or you
> will have a million people all over the place. I will let others give more
> specifics as I am on my phone.
>
> On Fri, Sep 15, 2017 at 10:32 AM, Ann Brice <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> I think there is a barn own in a nearby neighborhood doing a territorial
>> call at night. How does one safely, for me and the bird, go about seeing
>> it?
>>
>> Ann Brice
>> Wilson, NC
>>
>>
>>
>


--
Peace & Light,

Tracee Clapper
843-425-7630

 

Back to top
Date: 9/15/17 11:55 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: how to see a barn owl
Please, please, please consider NOT advertising the location of a roosting owl, or in the case of sensitive species like Barn Owl in NC, the specific location of any bird, roosting or not.

I know (and I get it) how good-intentioned folks just want the chance to get to see one. But the sad truth often is that the advertisement of the bird’s location leads to being “loved to death” (in some cases quite literally).

And that is assuming that all who become aware of the specific location of the bird have good intentions. Sadly all do not.

So I would fully agree with Bill, and go a bit farther and suggest “don't tell anyone you don't trust about the location, and realize that the more people who you trust that you choose to tell, the better chance that someone you don’t trust (or just too many someone’s) will find out”

This suggestion goes for nearly any roosting owls, nesting raptors, and species sensitive to disturbance.

Steve Shultz
Apex NC

From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Bill Rhodes
Sent: Friday, September 15, 2017 2:26 PM
To: Ann Brice; carolinabirds
Subject: Re: how to see a barn owl

First of all, don't tell anyone you don't trust about the location, or you will have a million people all over the place. I will let others give more specifics as I am on my phone.

On Fri, Sep 15, 2017 at 10:32 AM, Ann Brice <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
I think there is a barn own in a nearby neighborhood doing a territorial call at night. How does one safely, for me and the bird, go about seeing it?

Ann Brice
Wilson, NC



 

Back to top
Date: 9/15/17 11:26 am
From: Bill Rhodes (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: how to see a barn owl
First of all, don't tell anyone you don't trust about the location, or you
will have a million people all over the place. I will let others give more
specifics as I am on my phone.

On Fri, Sep 15, 2017 at 10:32 AM, Ann Brice <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> I think there is a barn own in a nearby neighborhood doing a territorial
> call at night. How does one safely, for me and the bird, go about seeing
> it?
>
> Ann Brice
> Wilson, NC
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/15/17 11:18 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Hurricane Irma- Birds
For a round-up of storm birds across the southeast, you might find it worthwhile to peruse the blog post at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__blog.aba.org_2017_09_abarare-2Dhurricane-2Dirma-2Dbird-2Dround-2Dup.html&d=DwIGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=lbmLmoflpLBSfabS147a4wlG0rR0fyHvU2SzPprKE1A&s=wBS9VNaF3Mn4tGNMyOFpfW70ADSbEfLgl2s-TJfmXlQ&e=

While the Carolinas mostly missed out on the fun, with only a small number of the more expected species (terns, noddy), Tennessee really racked up (2 state 1st records) and Georgia was not too shabby either!


Steve Shultz
Apex NC

From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Nathan Gatto
Sent: Friday, September 15, 2017 2:13 PM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hurricane Irma- Birds


Carolina Birders,

A lot of us have been excited to chase all of the birds moved around by the latest hurricane. Lots of folks have been chasing Sooty Terns and other great birds all around the state. It’s important to remember that Brian Patteson’s Pelagic trips often see all of these birds and many others regularly off of Hatteras. We also try to go on a few trips a year because you never know what will show up. The last trip we took we had European Storm-Petrel along with 7 other pelagic species for the day. If you are thinking about doing a trip checkout his website https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.patteson.com_&d=DwIGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=lbmLmoflpLBSfabS147a4wlG0rR0fyHvU2SzPprKE1A&s=w60YYtgvcN5SJSD2-YNIJe_1SGQ0jivLDAL8zXf0qig&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.patteson.com_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=4v_r5L71C8IEG_AkyCitZHd93yvhhk4wEkBR5hUxKGo&s=olRAU6w0zFhwzeQ03hK_msfMAdPBaR3be9yZbb5SvgY&e=>

Good Birding,
Nathan Gatto

Wright’s Birding Center-Owner

Winston-Salem, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 9/15/17 11:13 am
From: Nathan Gatto (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hurricane Irma- Birds
Carolina Birders,

A lot of us have been excited to chase all of the birds moved around by the
latest hurricane. Lots of folks have been chasing Sooty Terns and other
great birds all around the state. It’s important to remember that Brian
Patteson’s Pelagic trips often see all of these birds and many others
regularly off of Hatteras. We also try to go on a few trips a year because
you never know what will show up. The last trip we took we had European
Storm-Petrel along with 7 other pelagic species for the day. If you are
thinking about doing a trip checkout his website https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.patteson.com_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=4v_r5L71C8IEG_AkyCitZHd93yvhhk4wEkBR5hUxKGo&s=olRAU6w0zFhwzeQ03hK_msfMAdPBaR3be9yZbb5SvgY&e=

Good Birding,
Nathan Gatto

Wright’s Birding Center-Owner

Winston-Salem, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 9/15/17 11:10 am
From: Matt Wangerin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: SABINE'S GULLS at Lake Townsend, Guilford Co
From the original viewpoint, last seen about 1 pm.
It is a big lake with various causeways and trails, etc.
Others, I know, are trying to relocate from vantage points to the east
(Yanceyville Rd causeway, Doggett Rd., marina).

Matt Wangerin
Summerfield, NC

On Fri, Sep 15, 2017 at 1:59 PM, Jamie Adams <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Can anyone confirm if they are still there? Making the drive if they are.
>
>
> Jamie Adams
> Wilmington, NC
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:carolinabirds-request@
> duke.edu] On Behalf Of Nate Swick
> Sent: Friday, September 15, 2017 11:30 AM
> To: Chris Kelly <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: NC: SABINE'S GULLS at Lake Townsend, Guilford Co
>
> Henry Link discovered two Sabine's Gulls on Lake Townsend. Visible from
> the north Church Street Causeway. Best views are had by taking the
> peninsula trail from the south causeway and waking out to the point.
>
> Nate Swick
> GSO, NC
>
> Sent from my phone
> ********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************
> This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL and may
> contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED information and is
> intended for the authorized recipient of the sender. If you are not the
> intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure,
> copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included
> in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this
> message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and
> permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies
> thereof, from all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.).
> Thank you. ************************************************************
> **********
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/15/17 11:00 am
From: Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: SABINE'S GULLS at Lake Townsend, Guilford Co
Can anyone confirm if they are still there? Making the drive if they are.


Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC

-----Original Message-----
From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Nate Swick
Sent: Friday, September 15, 2017 11:30 AM
To: Chris Kelly <carolinabirds...>
Subject: NC: SABINE'S GULLS at Lake Townsend, Guilford Co

Henry Link discovered two Sabine's Gulls on Lake Townsend. Visible from the north Church Street Causeway. Best views are had by taking the peninsula trail from the south causeway and waking out to the point.

Nate Swick
GSO, NC

Sent from my phone
********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************ This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank you. **********************************************************************
 

Back to top
Date: 9/15/17 10:48 am
From: Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Birdwalk this Saturday at Charles D Owen Park, Swannanoa, NC
Folks,
Our next Elisha Mitchell Audubon Society birdwalk is scheduled for 8 AM on
Saturday September 16 at Charles D Owen Park in Swannanoa. Meet for a
casual 2 hour walk around the lakes and onto the Warren-Wilson property. We
should see a good selection of migrants as well as many local birds. The
walk is open to beginners and experts alike - and the latter will be put to
work helping us out!
Directions at: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.emasnc.org_calendar&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=s-_m4W1DOjpqF-AwDcryyVDoAPwAjVjyVze0FvnZXfg&s=1tFN23GN2LsgZ1-zBwUjA58ArAN9teQ96gh99EntiFc&e=
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__l.facebook.com_l.php-3Fu-3Dhttps-253A-252F-252Fwww.emasnc.org-252Fcalendar-26h-3DATNu-2DOC6VJiLlNSFdr39IEwwNxCG1oUvSezEmSuPyC-2DxRV5hqBKnjOzwj2lmBxXPK9K5KMXZNlqik3F36nvHt6eekqb9D5WnE97-5FQzH9IRX7jHA8UXW0He8H8t6cYticJYrOleE1IJ8aD0zlc5Vap-5FOmnojv8OLNosAScB6AJSHfY17JGOIijqd1MIe9BX4PyYSRGcMepBdTAHNrnUwTLY88RFJrGlF5C4bFpywcfRTO5T1l-5FTkgzjno0mgk1PCy-2DexTZskxfexUCt0ITFP4H20-5FvtoD0laZnfBaYmMo&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=s-_m4W1DOjpqF-AwDcryyVDoAPwAjVjyVze0FvnZXfg&s=zuFna2HKbJ--X2WRPf7Lyz8P6dXmymTqyKGl8GGx7oU&e= >

Simon
Simon RB Thompson

Ventures Birding Tours
www.birdventures.com <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.birdventures.com&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=s-_m4W1DOjpqF-AwDcryyVDoAPwAjVjyVze0FvnZXfg&s=MkszIRQ8M4I-2gfpi9xadcxOeJw_HuRqyyDaK-sAZaE&e= >

Phone: 828.253.4247
Email: <Venturesbirding...>

Check out our 2017-18 Birding & Nature Tours - International
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_InternationalTours.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=s-_m4W1DOjpqF-AwDcryyVDoAPwAjVjyVze0FvnZXfg&s=kOoLKoNPrF_8C3fbaz1JY38A-5pG_iVVaHx35tlUaFM&e= >, USA & Canada
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Back to top
Date: 9/15/17 8:55 am
From: Derek Aldrich (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Yellow-legged Gull report in Dare Co., NC from Sept. 8
eBird has multiple portals you can use for different places. So, if you
enter a checklist using that portal, instead of just ebird.org, then the
checklist will show like that.

Derek Aldrich
Taylors, SC
SC Hotspot Reviewer.


On Fri, Sep 15, 2017 at 11:47 AM, Brian Patteson <patteson1...>
wrote:

> OK; it was on the Dare Co. eBird RBA earlier this morning. Now it is gone
> from there.
>
> When you pull it up the link, browser says eBird Northwest Pacific
> checklist at the top of the page. What’s up with that?
>
> Brian Patteson
> Hatteras, NC
>
> On Sep 15, 2017, at 10:37 AM, Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing
> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Folks:
>
> Somehow there was a report of Yellow-legged Gull that sneaked by us on
> eBird, as I think it was submitted only a couple of days ago and not on
> Sept. 8. At any rate, the observer has a nice photo on the eBird report
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_ebird_pnw_view_checklist-3FsubID-3DS39128071&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=5P6EWSLcp_FOn4T9IOcMY87MdxNhwfsZTxEiiX2LYNE&s=xWCnxsvnbwV0j8YKT0ApXDFt51ygQKuRyt_t3o0mRQs&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_ebird_pnw_view_checklist-3FsubID-3DS39128071&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=z3Y9c04QQ0zoKNugBDlmL_xYC4LpxDvHRPDsCqPN6Uw&s=8A7Ji53LVyH6vgFNdBiJX8-oPIBYhvIUna0HfAKSjKQ&e=>
>
> and says other photos are available. It had also been seen on Sept. 5 and
> 7. I am no expert on this European species, recently split from Herring
> Gull, as I have never seen the species in Europe. I feel sure I have seen
> one in winter at Cape Hatteras Point, along with a bunch of other folks.
>
> However, the species is not on the NC bird list, even as Provisional, as
> no one submitted a sight report or a photo report, as there was
> considerable discussion at that time about the potential of any
> "Yellow-legged Gulls" at Cape Point likely or possibly being hybrids of
> Herring x Lesser Black-back gulls. Also, I believe that Yellow-legged Gull
> had not been split out from Herring Gull at that time by the AOU.
>
> At any rate, this is a first report of Yellow-legged Gull for NC after the
> split,to the best of my knowledge. A September date would seem odd for a
> European stray, but ... who knows? At least, the bird is in immaculate
> breeding plumage, whatever it is decided to be.
>
> Thoughts on the ID of the bird, from the photograph, from persons familiar
> with the species in Europe? The N.C. Bird Records Committee obviously
> needs to conduct a vote on this report.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/15/17 8:47 am
From: Brian Patteson <patteson1...>
Subject: Re: Yellow-legged Gull report in Dare Co., NC from Sept. 8
OK; it was on the Dare Co. eBird RBA earlier this morning. Now it is gone from there.

When you pull it up the link, browser says eBird Northwest Pacific checklist at the top of the page. What’s up with that?

Brian Patteson
Hatteras, NC

> On Sep 15, 2017, at 10:37 AM, Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Folks:
>
> Somehow there was a report of Yellow-legged Gull that sneaked by us on eBird, as I think it was submitted only a couple of days ago and not on Sept. 8. At any rate, the observer has a nice photo on the eBird report
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_ebird_pnw_view_checklist-3FsubID-3DS39128071&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=SWrcKlreHLdIYeH_LJpu17eJ7mP--oLRDHC21zu5SX0&s=aWS48RjIWEQIwOfufM24-hQwwCaNeDe2yK_RFDN-NKg&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_ebird_pnw_view_checklist-3FsubID-3DS39128071&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=z3Y9c04QQ0zoKNugBDlmL_xYC4LpxDvHRPDsCqPN6Uw&s=8A7Ji53LVyH6vgFNdBiJX8-oPIBYhvIUna0HfAKSjKQ&e=>
>
> and says other photos are available. It had also been seen on Sept. 5 and 7. I am no expert on this European species, recently split from Herring Gull, as I have never seen the species in Europe. I feel sure I have seen one in winter at Cape Hatteras Point, along with a bunch of other folks.
>
> However, the species is not on the NC bird list, even as Provisional, as no one submitted a sight report or a photo report, as there was considerable discussion at that time about the potential of any "Yellow-legged Gulls" at Cape Point likely or possibly being hybrids of Herring x Lesser Black-back gulls. Also, I believe that Yellow-legged Gull had not been split out from Herring Gull at that time by the AOU.
>
> At any rate, this is a first report of Yellow-legged Gull for NC after the split,to the best of my knowledge. A September date would seem odd for a European stray, but ... who knows? At least, the bird is in immaculate breeding plumage, whatever it is decided to be.
>
> Thoughts on the ID of the bird, from the photograph, from persons familiar with the species in Europe? The N.C. Bird Records Committee obviously needs to conduct a vote on this report.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 9/15/17 8:32 am
From: Nate Swick <nswick...>
Subject: NC: SABINE'S GULLS at Lake Townsend, Guilford Co
Henry Link discovered two Sabine's Gulls on Lake Townsend. Visible from the north Church Street Causeway. Best views are had by taking the peninsula trail from the south causeway and waking out to the point.

Nate Swick
GSO, NC

Sent from my phone
 

Back to top
Date: 9/15/17 8:28 am
From: Christopher Hill <Chill...>
Subject: Re: Yellow-legged Gull report in Dare Co., NC from Sept. 8
Harry,

the report says he has more photos. I would try to get all that you can, including (even poor) spread wing if there are any.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

On Sep 15, 2017, at 10:37 AM, Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

Folks:

Somehow there was a report of Yellow-legged Gull that sneaked by us on eBird, as I think it was submitted only a couple of days ago and not on Sept. 8. At any rate, the observer has a nice photo on the eBird report

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_ebird_pnw_view_checklist-3FsubID-3DS39128071&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=3ozDdwP_0fr8_Yz0M10r_F-LobGnS6PoeT_6MhuaN3g&s=RC9t8aznicWzgDsMr47zYspBHmf4oZPik8GzHG3NgBo&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_ebird_pnw_view_checklist-3FsubID-3DS39128071&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=z3Y9c04QQ0zoKNugBDlmL_xYC4LpxDvHRPDsCqPN6Uw&s=8A7Ji53LVyH6vgFNdBiJX8-oPIBYhvIUna0HfAKSjKQ&e=>

and says other photos are available. It had also been seen on Sept. 5 and 7. I am no expert on this European species, recently split from Herring Gull, as I have never seen the species in Europe. I feel sure I have seen one in winter at Cape Hatteras Point, along with a bunch of other folks.

However, the species is not on the NC bird list, even as Provisional, as no one submitted a sight report or a photo report, as there was considerable discussion at that time about the potential of any "Yellow-legged Gulls" at Cape Point likely or possibly being hybrids of Herring x Lesser Black-back gulls. Also, I believe that Yellow-legged Gull had not been split out from Herring Gull at that time by the AOU.

At any rate, this is a first report of Yellow-legged Gull for NC after the split,to the best of my knowledge. A September date would seem odd for a European stray, but ... who knows? At least, the bird is in immaculate breeding plumage, whatever it is decided to be.

Thoughts on the ID of the bird, from the photograph, from persons familiar with the species in Europe? The N.C. Bird Records Committee obviously needs to conduct a vote on this report.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh




 

Back to top
Date: 9/15/17 7:53 am
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Yellow-legged Gull report in Dare Co., NC from Sept. 8
ID checklist for Yellow-legged Gull:

- dark (not yellow) orbital ring - check.
- yellow legs and feet - check.
- smaller white spots on dark primaries than HEGU - check.
- slightly darker gray mantle color than HEGU - pretty subjective and
lighting-dependent but the photo is not out of line with expectations.

Looks like a solid ID to me.

Good awareness on the part of Mr. Barnes.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

On Fri, Sep 15, 2017 at 10:37 AM, Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> Folks:
>
> Somehow there was a report of Yellow-legged Gull that sneaked by us on
> eBird, as I think it was submitted only a couple of days ago and not on
> Sept. 8. At any rate, the observer has a nice photo on the eBird report
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_ebird_pnw_view_checklist-3FsubID-3DS39128071&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=wN3q7tiIL8SyZVSVtXe9t6AelTrVpG-KKyLfshrwFBk&s=qhZ_h39ct5-pl3jwTcYw74rke7ThYrVEAoiTgCbIZDI&e=
>
> and says other photos are available. It had also been seen on Sept. 5 and 7.
> I am no expert on this European species, recently split from Herring Gull,
> as I have never seen the species in Europe. I feel sure I have seen one in
> winter at Cape Hatteras Point, along with a bunch of other folks.
>
> However, the species is not on the NC bird list, even as Provisional, as no
> one submitted a sight report or a photo report, as there was considerable
> discussion at that time about the potential of any "Yellow-legged Gulls" at
> Cape Point likely or possibly being hybrids of Herring x Lesser Black-back
> gulls. Also, I believe that Yellow-legged Gull had not been split out from
> Herring Gull at that time by the AOU.
>
> At any rate, this is a first report of Yellow-legged Gull for NC after the
> split,to the best of my knowledge. A September date would seem odd for a
> European stray, but ... who knows? At least, the bird is in immaculate
> breeding plumage, whatever it is decided to be.
>
> Thoughts on the ID of the bird, from the photograph, from persons familiar
> with the species in Europe? The N.C. Bird Records Committee obviously needs
> to conduct a vote on this report.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 9/15/17 7:37 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Yellow-legged Gull report in Dare Co., NC from Sept. 8
Folks:

Somehow there was a report of Yellow-legged Gull that sneaked by us on
eBird, as I think it was submitted only a couple of days ago and not on
Sept. 8. At any rate, the observer has a nice photo on the eBird report

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_ebird_pnw_view_checklist-3FsubID-3DS39128071&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=z3Y9c04QQ0zoKNugBDlmL_xYC4LpxDvHRPDsCqPN6Uw&s=8A7Ji53LVyH6vgFNdBiJX8-oPIBYhvIUna0HfAKSjKQ&e=

and says other photos are available. It had also been seen on Sept. 5 and
7. I am no expert on this European species, recently split from Herring
Gull, as I have never seen the species in Europe. I feel sure I have seen
one in winter at Cape Hatteras Point, along with a bunch of other folks.

However, the species is not on the NC bird list, even as Provisional, as no
one submitted a sight report or a photo report, as there was considerable
discussion at that time about the potential of any "Yellow-legged Gulls" at
Cape Point likely or possibly being hybrids of Herring x Lesser Black-back
gulls. Also, I believe that Yellow-legged Gull had not been split out from
Herring Gull at that time by the AOU.

At any rate, this is a first report of Yellow-legged Gull for NC after the
split,to the best of my knowledge. A September date would seem odd for a
European stray, but ... who knows? At least, the bird is in immaculate
breeding plumage, whatever it is decided to be.

Thoughts on the ID of the bird, from the photograph, from persons familiar
with the species in Europe? The N.C. Bird Records Committee obviously
needs to conduct a vote on this report.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

 

Back to top
Date: 9/15/17 7:32 am
From: Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: how to see a barn owl
I think there is a barn own in a nearby neighborhood doing a territorial
call at night. How does one safely, for me and the bird, go about seeing
it?

Ann Brice
Wilson, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 9/15/17 5:45 am
From: Will Cook <cwcook...>
Subject: Re: Donde estan my messages/emails
I think this is an annoying 'feature' of gmail, nothing to do with the
Carolinabirds email list (not a "listserve"). I haven't heard reports of
other email services doing this.

A gentle reminder to Mary/Suzanne and other new subscribers:
Please put your name (first name or nickname and last name) and location
(city or county and state) in each message you send to the list, so
people will know who you are and where you're from.

Thanks,
Will Cook - Durham, NC
<carolinabirds-owner...>

On 9/14/2017 3:21 PM, Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> I should be able to answer your first question.  I use gmail, as do you,
> and so do lots of folks on the listserve. The listserve is set up so
> that _unless you also add your own e-mail address to the list of
> recipients, you will NOT see your e-mail._   You will have no way of
> knowing if it got to the listserve members. Thus, to see your own
> e-mail, make sure that you send the e-mail not only to
> <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>, but also to
> <tapple50...> <mailto:<tapple50...>. (If you have been
> adding your e-mail address along with carolinabirds, then I am not sure
> what is going on.)  I want and have to do that -- adding my address --
> to make sure that my e-mail got to the listserve.
>
> However, if people are replying back to your e-mail, you should see a
> reply, even if you didn't add your own address.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> .
>
> On Thu, Sep 14, 2017 at 12:44 PM, Mary Tennessee <carolinabirds...>
> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
>
> I never see my emails appear on this list. Are they getting thru?
>
> I don't see replies to other people's emails. I find it
> disappointing to read some messages and then there appears to be no
> follow up, or replies, or discussion, or an answer to a question to
> a lot of the stuff posted.
>
> One example is the biking birding email. I would have -loved- to see
> the replies to that one, as this is one of my favorite ways to bird.
>
> Delightfully sent from Suzanne's iPad
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 9/14/17 5:49 pm
From: Nathan Dias <dias...>
Subject: Santee NWR bird walk this Saturday and good scouting report
In case people are wondering, Santee National Wildlife Refuge came through
the storm without significant damage. So the first fall bird walk this
Saturday is a go.

We will meet at the refuge Visitor's Center at 7:30am

Irvin Pitts visited the Bluff Unit yesterday and reported good migrant
activity - everything from American Bittern to Blue-winged Warbler to
Bobolinks.





 

Back to top
Date: 9/14/17 5:19 pm
From: <wforsythe...>
Subject: Jackson Park today
Folks,

A small group of us birded Jackson Park this AM for about 3 1/2
hours, with the following results: 15 species of Warblers, with the
best birds being, 1 brilliant, Blue-winged Warbler and 1 female Canada.
We also had my first Swainson's Thrush of the fall and 1st Great
Crested Flycatcher.

On the Warbler Trail, Catherine Ford spotted an immature Bald
Eagle, a very good bird for Jackson Park.

After several days of mainly Warblers, it appears that other
migrants are finally beginning to arrive!

Wayne
 

Back to top
Date: 9/14/17 5:12 pm
From: \Jeff Lemons\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lake Norman Sooty Tern
We took the boat out on Lake Norman again late this afternoon. The Sooty Tern found after Irma was still present. It was seen feeding in the north end of Mecklenburg and the south end of Iredell county.

There are not a lot of good public access areas in this part of the lake. The Lake Norman Yacht Club might be a possible location, but I'm not sure about access. It is private and may be gated.

We also had 6-7 Common and 1 Forster's Tern.

Jeff Lemons
Charlotte, NC





 

Back to top
Date: 9/14/17 2:04 pm
From: Ron <waxwing...>
Subject: NC Greater Pewee song
This was in the text of my posting and may have been missed.

In Charlotte yesterday, there was a bird doing a very good rendition of a
Greater Pewee’s “Jose Maria” morning song. It repeated it 10 or more times.
I’m assuming it was an Eastern Wood-Pewee variation. I’m not even sure if
Greaters get to the east, and I didn’t consider listing it as such. The
“Jose” was done two or three times, then the “Maria” which was not the
down-slurred “peer” of an Eastern’s call, but three notes.

If anyone knows of an Eastern doing it, or any thoughts, I’d like to hear
about it.

Ron Clark
Kings Mtn. NC

 

Back to top
Date: 9/14/17 12:22 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Donde estan my messages/emails
I should be able to answer your first question. I use gmail, as do you,
and so do lots of folks on the listserve. The listserve is set up so
that *unless
you also add your own e-mail address to the list of recipients, you will
NOT see your e-mail.* You will have no way of knowing if it got to the
listserve members. Thus, to see your own e-mail, make sure that you send
the e-mail not only to <carolinabirds...>, but also to
<tapple50...> (If you have been adding your e-mail address along
with carolinabirds, then I am not sure what is going on.) I want and have
to do that -- adding my address -- to make sure that my e-mail got to the
listserve.

However, if people are replying back to your e-mail, you should see a
reply, even if you didn't add your own address.

Harry LeGrand
.

On Thu, Sep 14, 2017 at 12:44 PM, Mary Tennessee <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> I never see my emails appear on this list. Are they getting thru?
>
> I don't see replies to other people's emails. I find it disappointing to
> read some messages and then there appears to be no follow up, or replies,
> or discussion, or an answer to a question to a lot of the stuff posted.
>
> One example is the biking birding email. I would have -loved- to see the
> replies to that one, as this is one of my favorite ways to bird.
>
> Delightfully sent from Suzanne's iPad
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/14/17 12:20 pm
From: Will Cook <cwcook...>
Subject: Re: Flight calls - migrating thrushes?
The 'peep!' (or 'weep!') call is Swainson's Thrush. I like to call them
'fall peepers' since they sound a little like Spring Peeper frog calls.

The 'veer' is Veery, a more emphatic 'wheer!' is Gray-cheeked Thrush.
Wood Thrush has a bedspring-like call.

I've forgotten my handle for the nocturnal flight call of Hermit Thrush,
but it's a clear descending whistle, somewhat drawn out.

You can find examples of most of these calls by searching on
www.xeno-canto.org

On 9/14/2017 6:54 AM, Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> Good Morning. I'm beginning to hear various flight calls overhead before dawn. Most are a short, clean, high-pitched, upslurred whistle: "weep."
>
> Others are a raspier, short, downslurred deal like "veer" (but not as high-pitched or lengthy as the call you'll find on recordings for Veery).
>
> Thoughts?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Kevin Kubach
> Clemson/Greenville, SC
>

--
Will Cook - Durham, NC
www.carolinanature.com
 

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Date: 9/14/17 9:45 am
From: Mary Tennessee (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Donde estan my messages/emails
I never see my emails appear on this list. Are they getting thru?

I don't see replies to other people's emails. I find it disappointing to read some messages and then there appears to be no follow up, or replies, or discussion, or an answer to a question to a lot of the stuff posted.

One example is the biking birding email. I would have -loved- to see the replies to that one, as this is one of my favorite ways to bird.

Delightfully sent from Suzanne's iPad

 

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Date: 9/14/17 7:41 am
From: Ben Ringer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Jackson Park
I birded at Jackson Park on Wed Sept. 13 9 am-12:45. There was a flurry in
the parking lot & then quieted down for awhile. I decided to checkout the
warbler trail before leaving. The birds started showing up with several
different flurries. I had 13 different warblers when finished, a beautiful
male Baltimore Oriole plus the usual ones. It was a good morning.

The warblers were:

Black-throated Green
Black-throated Blue
American Redstart
Magnolia
Palm
Yellow-throated
Chestnut-sided
Blackburnian
Golden-winged+
Black & White
Tennessee
Canada
Northern Parula

+ This was my prize for the day.

<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.avast.com_sig-2Demail-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail-26utm-5Fterm-3Dicon&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=kj6c18RRKGXPEHLLFIRPgsYI9TW0JbsFdBdUJ9cMQsM&s=X2R4oAoz1kn2O7wgSMTOPFyJCpbf5cBTM0Pxjm0oQPs&e= >
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Date: 9/14/17 7:08 am
From: Kevin Hudson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: glossy ibis @ lake crabtree, wake nc appear to be gone
unless they have disguised themselves as cormorants :-)

kevin hudson
raleigh nc

 

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Date: 9/14/17 3:59 am
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: FOS - Swainson's Thrush
Just left one calling from a poplar by the driveway.

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/14/17 3:54 am
From: Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Flight calls - migrating thrushes?
Good Morning. I'm beginning to hear various flight calls overhead before dawn. Most are a short, clean, high-pitched, upslurred whistle: "weep."

Others are a raspier, short, downslurred deal like "veer" (but not as high-pitched or lengthy as the call you'll find on recordings for Veery).

Thoughts?

Thanks,

Kevin Kubach
Clemson/Greenville, SC
 

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Date: 9/14/17 3:41 am
From: Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...>
Subject: Found item
Folks,
Yesterday morning while on Hooper Lane, I found a hook, probably from a tripod! I have it, let me know if you are missing one.
It is bright and shiny with no mud on it!
Wayne

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/13/17 5:56 pm
From: Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Glossy Ibis @ Lake Crabtree this evening
I watched 9 Glossy Ibis come in for a landing at the grassy island at Lake
Crabtree (Southport access) in Wake County, NC, this evening.

Eddie Owens
Cary, NC

 

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Date: 9/13/17 4:12 pm
From: ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Buxton Hummingbirds- banding, and Wings Over Water
Hi folks

Last winter when many of you visited the adult male Annas hummingbird who
was in our yard Jan. 15-March 15, I would mention the annual Wings Over
Water Festival and how Susan Campbell spends one of her two banding days
here during the festival. So here is your reminder I promised.
For those of you who never have witnessed the banding of a hummingbird, or
held one in your hand as she lets it free after banding- it is quite an
experience to see those little jewels so close!

Pasted below is the description of her banding session and info. if you
are interested.

Ann

*FRIDAY OCTOBER 20 2017 ( Buxton)
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.wingsoverwater.org_schedule.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=QHB0Mtt5NhzMrjZJ2t4-a7xXAqC6EN_midqGBJYIyXo&s=5_HgfaR6v9rec4Mf1Pg6RZCRxgr3RZE_U4N9uY_Onc4&e=
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.wingsoverwater.org_schedule.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=QHB0Mtt5NhzMrjZJ2t4-a7xXAqC6EN_midqGBJYIyXo&s=5_HgfaR6v9rec4Mf1Pg6RZCRxgr3RZE_U4N9uY_Onc4&e= >*
*Hummingbird Banding (Family Friendly) (Buxton-South)* We have two
different hummingbird banding locations-Roanoke Island (north) and Hatteras
Island (south). Be careful choosing the correct date and location.
Hummingbird expert and licensed bander, Susan Campbell will demonstrate
techniques for capturing and banding hummingbirds. The program also will
provide useful tips on attracting hummingbirds. Both the north & south
groups will go to residences that host hummingbirds throughout the year. On
Friday the demonstration will be held at a Buxton residence located near
the Buxton Woods Coastal Reserve. On Saturday the program will visit a
Roanoke island residence. If possible, bring a folding chair. ALERT:
Because this is a 'Family Friendly' trip, two children 12 or under may
accompany a paying, supervising adult at no charge. To include your child
or children you must make reservations by either calling or emailing.
252-216-9464 or <wow...> Meet: Cape Hatteras
Secondary School parking lot, near tennis courts, 48576. NC Hwy 12, Buxton,
NC 27920 (App. 48 miles south of Roanoke Island). From there you will
carpool/caravan following the leader to the hummingbird banding location.
Map ID Green Q. Map ID Blue W . Leader/Field Expert: Susan Campbell. Fri
10-20-17, 2:00-4:00 pm $25.00


--
Ann Maddock <am.hummingbird.photos...> Hatteras Island, NC

 

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Date: 9/13/17 2:35 pm
From: Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hooper Lane, Henderson County, NC 9/13/17
Folks
Several of us birded the flooded fields early this morning. The Sooty Tern
that was present yesterday (or another individual) was resting in the grass
before it joined a Black Tern feeding over the water.
The shorebirds were far fewer than yesterday with only the following
present:
Pectoral, Least, Stilt (2) Sandpipers
Semipalmated Plover
Red-necked Phalarope (3)
Also a pair of peregrines were hunting over the area causing the birds to
constantly move around and within an hour or so everything has left.
Photos were taken of the Sooty Tern and they will be posted to the Carolina
Bird Clubs photo page in a couple of days- when I am back home.
Simon

Simon Thompson
Ventures Birding Tours
Asheville, NC
Birdventures.com


--
Simon RB Thompson

Ventures Birding Tours
www.birdventures.com <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.birdventures.com&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=HTEGnKfjd3_uAh5KuwJHuy52Srsq8ndXW26qH64HKVo&s=Prns1Kdl7oPr3UcukZwIMT4AEVr0yRqkKiu24Fr1WKo&e= >

Phone: 828.253.4247
Email: <Venturesbirding...>

Check out our 2017-18 Birding & Nature Tours - International
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_InternationalTours.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=HTEGnKfjd3_uAh5KuwJHuy52Srsq8ndXW26qH64HKVo&s=0Xar_N8A2KekYMK7NwMO1MJdONvnEx9PKVFr7UFmTns&e= >, USA & Canada
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_NorthAmerica.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=HTEGnKfjd3_uAh5KuwJHuy52Srsq8ndXW26qH64HKVo&s=ZFmr6Qg0L7R2mJWY4vLWrHdGjgAlIMpzd_BmIP85aRo&e= >, and WNC day trips
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[image:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.tripadvisor.com_Attraction-5FReview-2Dg60742-2Dd12548573-2DReviews-2DVentures-5FBirding-5FTours-2DAsheville-5FNorth-5FCarolina.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=HTEGnKfjd3_uAh5KuwJHuy52Srsq8ndXW26qH64HKVo&s=Z2ILg8NTfcjHkCpqpskM_6K19xTXDQ4fi_kNeijGqbY&e= ]
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.tripadvisor.com_Attraction-5FReview-2Dg60742-2Dd12548573-2DReviews-2DVentures-5FBirding-5FTours-2DAsheville-5FNorth-5FCarolina.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=HTEGnKfjd3_uAh5KuwJHuy52Srsq8ndXW26qH64HKVo&s=Z2ILg8NTfcjHkCpqpskM_6K19xTXDQ4fi_kNeijGqbY&e= >
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_VenturesBirding_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=HTEGnKfjd3_uAh5KuwJHuy52Srsq8ndXW26qH64HKVo&s=6naYaNh24dihRZ_nwgQjssRNCAx_kc2U43gjiDIIkw4&e= >

 

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Date: 9/13/17 10:55 am
From: \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Probable yellow-bellied flycatcher in Watauga Co., NC
Birders, another enjoyable morning birding my property in northern Watauga Co. The highlight was an empid that I think is a probable yellow-bellied flycatcher. I had excellent looks as it foraged with a nice flock of wood warblers (13 spp, 50+ individuals) in a brushy clearing next to a small stream just a short distance from my house. Details are in the eBird report--link below.

I've learned the best way to get good looks at migrants is to find a place where they descend from the trees to drink and bathe. I am fortunate to have just the place very near my house--it is a customary spot for the resident birds and the migrants seem to follow their lead.


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S39159862&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=_fs0b-9e5uSlbqllLD-Q-9cCzMrGC-YrGat38SYDhC0&s=IHodzejnoJfQVZvz8qs2uIaMoU1PuEDo-tnU-0h3l3c&e=


J. Merrill Lynch
Conservation Biologist
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/13/17 10:48 am
From: Ron <waxwing...>
Subject: Ribbonwalk Nature Preserve, Charlotte

I birded the preserve this morning, with Jim Guyton for some of it. Excellent migration day, finishing with 52 species, including 15 warblers. The best was a male Nashville in the meadow edge. The migrant du jour was Red-eyed Vireo, which were everywhere. Twelve is probably low. A Common Nighthawk flew over around 10:00.

There was a bird doing a very good rendition of a Greater Pewee’s morning “Jose Maria” song. It repeated it 10 or more times, a very unique song. I’m assuming it was an Eastern Wood-Pewee variation or maybe learned. I’m not sure there’s even a state record for Greater and I didn’t even think of listing it as such. If anyone knows of an Eastern doing it, I’d like to know about it.

Ron Clark
Kings Mtn. NC

Migrants in gray.
Black Vulture 3
Turkey Vulture 2
Red-shouldered Hawk 2
Mourning Dove 2
Common Nighthawk 1
Chimney Swift 2
Ruby-throated Hummingbird 3
Red-bellied Woodpecker 4
Downy Woodpecker 3
Hairy Woodpecker 1
Eastern Wood-Pewee 2
Least Flycatcher 1 Empid. Bold eye ring. Short wing projection. Round, "large" head. Small bill. Another Empid nearby for size comparison. This one appeared smaller. Reacted a bit to Least playback.
Empidonax sp. 1
White-eyed Vireo 1
Yellow-throated Vireo 1
Red-eyed Vireo 12
Blue Jay 3
American Crow 5
Carolina Chickadee 8
Tufted Titmouse 9
White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern) 1
Brown-headed Nuthatch 1
Carolina Wren 8
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 1
Veery 4
Swainson's Thrush 3
Wood Thrush 2
American Robin 7
Gray Catbird 1
Brown Thrasher 1
Ovenbird 1
Worm-eating Warbler 2
Golden-winged Warbler 1
Black-and-white Warbler 2
Tennessee Warbler 1
Nashville Warbler 1
Common Yellowthroat 1
Hooded Warbler 1
American Redstart 6
Northern Parula 1
Magnolia Warbler 3
Bay-breasted Warbler 1
Chestnut-sided Warbler 2
Black-throated Blue Warbler 1
Pine Warbler 3
Eastern Towhee 2
Summer Tanager 3
Scarlet Tanager 1
Northern Cardinal 6
Indigo Bunting 1
Common Grackle 40
American Goldfinch 2


 

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Date: 9/13/17 10:31 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Hudsonian godwits @ Lake Wheeler, Wake NC appear to be gone
Jaime Adams just suggested to me that if a rare bird, it needs to be
approved (checkmark) before it can show up on the hotspot list. There is
no checkmark yet for the phalarope, but there is for the Hudsonian Godwit.
So, that should clear up my question.

Harry LeGrand

On Wed, Sep 13, 2017 at 1:23 PM, Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr...> wrote:

> The Wilson's Phalarope also appears to have disappeared overnight, as
> Kevin worked the mudflats in back. I only scoped from the overlook, and
> saw the 4+ Stilt Sandpipers, but little else of note.
>
> Odd "glitch" with eBird. I see the eBird and the editors got this as a
> rare sighting, as it shows on the CBC Sightings list for Sept. 12 -- with
> Stacy Barbour's excellent and definitive photos (yes, it is a Wilson's and
> not the more hurricane-expected Red-necked). But, even though "Lake
> Wheeler marshes" shows as the hotspot, when I enter this as the hotspot,
> and look at View Details, there is no listing for Wilson's Phalarope for 12
> Sep 2017. How can that be? The last sighting of the species on the list
> says 20 Aug 2017. As with so many other computer glitches, I suspect it
> has to do with the dreaded apostrophe -- Wilson's. Any way an editor can
> fix this to show Wilson's Phalarope on the Lake Wheeler marshes species
> list as last seen on 12 Sep 2017?
>
> Harry LeGrand
>
>
> On Wed, Sep 13, 2017 at 10:56 AM, Kevin Hudson <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> I hiked around SW side of lake to check out slough - handful of stilt
>> sandpipers & lesser yellowlegs, but no godwits.
>>
>> Kevin Hudson
>> Raleigh NC
>>
>>
>>
>

 

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Date: 9/13/17 10:24 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Hudsonian godwits @ Lake Wheeler, Wake NC appear to be gone
The Wilson's Phalarope also appears to have disappeared overnight, as Kevin
worked the mudflats in back. I only scoped from the overlook, and saw the
4+ Stilt Sandpipers, but little else of note.

Odd "glitch" with eBird. I see the eBird and the editors got this as a
rare sighting, as it shows on the CBC Sightings list for Sept. 12 -- with
Stacy Barbour's excellent and definitive photos (yes, it is a Wilson's and
not the more hurricane-expected Red-necked). But, even though "Lake
Wheeler marshes" shows as the hotspot, when I enter this as the hotspot,
and look at View Details, there is no listing for Wilson's Phalarope for 12
Sep 2017. How can that be? The last sighting of the species on the list
says 20 Aug 2017. As with so many other computer glitches, I suspect it
has to do with the dreaded apostrophe -- Wilson's. Any way an editor can
fix this to show Wilson's Phalarope on the Lake Wheeler marshes species
list as last seen on 12 Sep 2017?

Harry LeGrand


On Wed, Sep 13, 2017 at 10:56 AM, Kevin Hudson <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> I hiked around SW side of lake to check out slough - handful of stilt
> sandpipers & lesser yellowlegs, but no godwits.
>
> Kevin Hudson
> Raleigh NC
>
>
>

 

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Date: 9/13/17 8:34 am
From: Brian Patteson <patteson1...>
Subject: Sabine's Gull at Cape Hatteras
I found a juvenile Sabine’s Gull at Cape Point this morning. It was resting with a couple of young Laughing Gulls just west of the ORV closure a few hundred yards before you get to the channel between the point and “Shelly Island.” It flew off and headed out to sea, but it might be worth checking later to see if comes back as there are plenty of gulls and terns feeding in the nearby waters and coming back to rest on the point. There is now also a separation between the north beach and the south beach in the area that opened up last night. This channel is bringing fish in and there are dozens of Caspian Terns in the area in addition to a few hundred Royal Terns.

Brian Patteson
Hatteras, NC
 

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Date: 9/13/17 8:04 am
From: Kevin Hudson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hudsonian godwits @ Lake Wheeler, Wake NC appear to be gone
I hiked around SW side of lake to check out slough - handful of stilt
sandpipers & lesser yellowlegs, but no godwits.

Kevin Hudson
Raleigh NC

 

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Date: 9/13/17 6:56 am
From: FRANK LAWKINS (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Noddy

Checked both the washout and the jetty.  Not at either location. 
Frank

Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone

 

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Date: 9/13/17 5:48 am
From: Scott Hartley (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Juvenile brown booby
Hi All, Ann and I observed a juvenile brown booby yestetday, Tuesday around
5:15 pm. The bird was flying south to north about a quarter mile off of the
Myrtle Beach State Park fishing pier. I got some bad photos and will try to
post tonight.

Take care


Scott
Myrtle Beach, SC

 

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Date: 9/13/17 5:32 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Wings Over Water - October 17-22 - Eastern North Carolina
Trips are filling quickly for both the main Wings Over Water event (October 17-22) and the relatively new (but very popular) WOW-Encore: A Winter Weekend (December 8-10).

Wings Over Water, based in the northern Outer Banks of North Carolina but with field trips spanning mainland refuges to ocean beaches, offers birding, astronomy, photography, paddling, and natural history field trips, along with family and evening events.

This year's featured guest and keynote speaker is world "big year" record holder Noah Strycker, who observed an amazing 6,042 species during 2015!

Information on the festival, field trips, and the Winter Weekend can be found at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.wingsoverwater.org&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=2mLAk83FliExHbh5nTw_9m61tY_5FrJYSpw12B0V62E&s=yovbZ7QTvnu08IgZaMxx2J5e4BupVyRlJRj58dSypC4&e=

The Carolina Bird Club acts as one of the event's primary sponsors, and many of your favorite "carolinabirders" can be found in attendance or leading field trips.

Hope to see you there!

Steve Shultz
Apex, NC


 

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Date: 9/13/17 5:23 am
From: Mike Judd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Hooper Lane strikes again! 9/12/17
Thanks to Simon for putting out the early report (in the rain it appears)
and sharing those great birds with us.


On Tue, Sep 12, 2017 at 9:24 PM, Simon Thompson <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Folks
> A latish report from our "shorebird hotspot" from earlier today - several
> of us went out first thing this morning as the feeder bands of
> Hurricane/Tropical Storm Irma were coming through the NC Mountains. It was
> very muddy and rainy - and yes, a couple of us got very wet indeed!
>
> Anyway, we hiked down to some of the more flooded fields and the
> shorebird/wader show was quite impressive highlights are below:
>
> Black-bellied Plover 1
> American Golden-Plover 6
> Semipalmated Plover 4
> Killdeer 150
> Hudsonian Godwit 2
> Stilt Sandpiper 1
> Least Sandpiper 3
> White-rumped Sandpiper 5
> Buff-breasted Sandpiper 2
> Pectoral Sandpiper 28
> Semipalmated Sandpiper 4
> Western Sandpiper 8
> Red-necked Phalarope 1
> Lesser Yellowlegs 6
>
> As we were leaving, a black and white tern flew overhead, which we
> initially identified as a Bridled; subsequently the photos proved it was a
> Sooty Tern. Another was found at nearby Lake Julian an hour later. Photos
> have also been posted on e-bird. This was the first WNC record of this
> species, which was soon followed by another in Buncombe County.
> Photos of the Hudsonian Godwit, Red-necked Phalarope and Sooty Tern are on
> the e-bird list below.
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S39150699&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=IWqNesSN6T7kZgUHbV17zC12dURgOJM0yKoGImz_Y8E&s=Naze02x_rE5hiO9yd3RCXrW-HwYR8mffpd4clTZqDFo&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S39150699&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=K8SBr2JeV0Zzs0hWVMuQ4pdJSdNmdLptpI4kFsNMDDc&s=uZrSdoSycL-8sssjSz6Qdvj_zQSajy6QZ5hxHqJIu9M&e=>
>
> Thanks to Doug Johnston and Wayne Forsythe for their photos and Aaron
> Steed and Bob Butler for being such good sports in dreadful weather.
>
> It was an exhausting, but very satisfying, day!
>
> Simon
>
> Simon RB Thompson
>
> Ventures Birding Tours
> www.birdventures.com
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.birdventures.com&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=K8SBr2JeV0Zzs0hWVMuQ4pdJSdNmdLptpI4kFsNMDDc&s=Lr-YRgxnAyGgt5PqP9wvzkq5BVk97HkpWH7fixKi4QQ&e=>
>
> Phone: 828.253.4247 <(828)%20253-4247>
> Email: <Venturesbirding...>
>
> Check out our 2017-18 Birding & Nature Tours - International
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_InternationalTours.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=K8SBr2JeV0Zzs0hWVMuQ4pdJSdNmdLptpI4kFsNMDDc&s=Hs4Nmx0MIscoxal2aNyjG8Uetv41bhNb_a6eifxAhso&e=>,
> USA & Canada
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_NorthAmerica.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=K8SBr2JeV0Zzs0hWVMuQ4pdJSdNmdLptpI4kFsNMDDc&s=MsRcAnKo4pU-S4DtspoL51sbSuJQ6NW2wvFgzjWttdU&e=>,
> and WNC day trips
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_DayTrips.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=K8SBr2JeV0Zzs0hWVMuQ4pdJSdNmdLptpI4kFsNMDDc&s=mSClhqjdpjxlnCS4SSO55hmuL-SMti4z3a0DkwauOUo&e=>
>
> [image:
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.tripadvisor.com_Attraction-5FReview-2Dg60742-2Dd12548573-2DReviews-2DVentures-5FBirding-5FTours-2DAsheville-5FNorth-5FCarolina.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=IWqNesSN6T7kZgUHbV17zC12dURgOJM0yKoGImz_Y8E&s=UDgz9wWm9ekZ88ffUCOUwkAcNpgK_zcoAkm0AhcdwyA&e= ]
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.tripadvisor.com_Attraction-5FReview-2Dg60742-2Dd12548573-2DReviews-2DVentures-5FBirding-5FTours-2DAsheville-5FNorth-5FCarolina.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=K8SBr2JeV0Zzs0hWVMuQ4pdJSdNmdLptpI4kFsNMDDc&s=wv8Kr_7lti4CsvFanY4Xxk9C4Y_CrEztWD-3g6qNaMI&e=>
>
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_VenturesBirding_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=K8SBr2JeV0Zzs0hWVMuQ4pdJSdNmdLptpI4kFsNMDDc&s=5iu6TQaOLl4-JZ2YejYT2Gy-ZMJap92miIDZSYhx1JY&e=>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/12/17 7:49 pm
From: Robert Rowan Meehan (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Brown Noddy - Oak Island, NC
Hi all,


This evening about 6pm, I spotted a Brown Noddy working the breakers along the 3000 block of West Beach Dr on Oak Island, NC. Will check the western point in the morning to see if its roosting with the terns there. Photos will be posted soon to the Carolina Rare Birds Facebook page. Lucky find - our only storm bird, and a great one at that!

Robert Meehan
Durham, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 9/12/17 6:50 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
I see that report on eBird, to refresh our memory:
9507 S Old Oregon Inlet Rd, Nags Head US-NC (35.8712,-75.5760) Dare, US-NC
Date#Observer
2017-08-18 57
John O'Brien


Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Tue, Sep 12, 2017 at 9:39 PM, Kyle Kittelberger <kkturtledude...>
wrote:

> Hey everyone,
>
> Thought I'd follow up about Michael O'Brien's Hudsonian Godwit flock off
> the Outer Banks. As a friend of his, I let him know his sighting had been
> brought up while discussing Hudsonian high count records in the state. He
> shared that his observation was not 20 birds but an amazing sight of 50+
> Hudsonian's flying in two separate flocks a few minutes apart from one
> another. He further added that this is the most number of Hudsonian's he
> has ever heard of reported on the east coast south of Massachusetts.
>
> Cheers,
> Kyle Kittelberger
> Raleigh, NC
>
>
>
>
> On Tuesday, September 12, 2017 4:22 PM, Harry LeGrand <
> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
>
> Copied from my Birds of North Carolina website, for Hudsonian Godwit:
>
> *Coastal Plain* .....
> Peak counts: 16, Cape Hatteras, 29 Aug 1998; 15, resting on the ocean off
> Oregon Inlet, 25 Aug 1990; 15 at Rodanthe (*Dare*), 8 Sep 2009.
>
> *Piedmont* Casual fall transient (only in the eastern portion), with
> three records: 1, Falls Lake, 21-23 Aug 1999; 2, Falls Lake, 11-15 Sep
> 1988; and 1 (photographed), Lake Wheeler (*Wake*), 27 Aug 2011*.
>
> *Mountains* Accidental fall transient; one record -- 3 at Hooper Lane (
> *Henderson*), 8 Sep 2004* (after Tropical Storm Frances) [Chat 69:49 link
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_chat_chatpage.php-3Fvol-3D69-26page-3D49&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=diwY9FtwuvJ2fK4vwbLCi4vWO18-mIDCR001R6wvEwU&s=pUwsX5-qyW-0-Niw2lOXT_S_KYYr-HJbgFvKgEl5h9E&e=>
> ].
>
> -----
>
> Thus, Michael O'Brien's 20 or so from shore this season would be a state
> record, if it gets published in The Chat (I don't pull data off eBird,
> carolinabirds, etc. -- but wait until records get officially published in
> The Chat or North American Birds before I include them on the website.)
>
> As you can see, the 11 Hudsonians today at Lake Wheeler destroy the
> previous inland high of 3 birds.
>
> I agree with Brian that Hudsonian Godwits don't put down inland unless
> there is some (mostly nighttime?) storminess, etc. Certainly doesn't have
> to be a tropical system. And, winds don't HAVE to be strong from the E or
> NE to force them inland. They nest well inland in Canada and migrate SE
> over inland USA and continue their fall migration south over the ocean or
> along the immediate coast. So, we can't assume these 11 birds blew inland
> from their migration over the ocean. Recall also that Willets, Marbled
> Godwits, and Long-billed Curlews also nest far inland and do not normally
> stop at inland lakes unless there is a nighttime storm that forces them
> down. Thus, whether the godwits were migrating TOWARD the coast and were
> forced down, or were already migrating south over the ocean and were
> carried inland by strong NE winds and then forced down, I guess we may
> never know. (Presumably they were not carried in the eye of Irma up FL and
> then dropped out in NC; that doesn't compute.)
>
> Enjoy them while they are still here -- I did around 12:30 today. Thanks
> for the quick word on c-birds.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
> On Tue, Sep 12, 2017 at 3:56 PM, Paul Glass <pag...> wrote:
>
> Interestingly there was a group of 10 photographed near Harrisonburg, VA
> back on 8/29. No storms at the time.
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__urldefense.proofpoint&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Iec6nLVqs7di75d9kwGLHK2cSZNuBEGmXcHWizenuXU&s=8WbAl_1hcxc1GarWZTGBM8TCvgV7YEMqFEmExQC97V4&e= . com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.
> org_ebird_view_checklist_ S38894671&d=DwIBAg&c=
> imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6Y HLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-
> sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_ Ocvlal9U&m= IQ47uo8XV9imaqXFjQMv3ceNMk4qzq
> 8i0iCqAPB_7c8&s=83CfyMWcFg- IdfP- sH98VjQb0DFgsfBDysJVlS6IwA0&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S38894671&d=DwIBAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=IQ47uo8XV9imaqXFjQMv3ceNMk4qzq8i0iCqAPB_7c8&s=83CfyMWcFg-IdfP-sH98VjQb0DFgsfBDysJVlS6IwA0&e=>
>
>
> Paul Glass
> South Boston, VA
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Brian Patteson [mailto:patteson1@embarqmail. com
> <patteson1...>]
> Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 3:32 PM
> To: Jamie Adams
> Cc: Steve Compton; <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
>
>
> Actually a major dude had the godwits: Michael O'Brien and his brother John
> were watching the ocean from a beach house on vacation up at Nags Head in
> mid August.
>
> I've seen a big bunch offshore back in the 90s. It's probably in the Chat
> somewhere in the seasonal roundup. I've also seen a dozen or more on the
> flooded ground up in Rodanthe during a tropical storm some years back.
>
> Brian Patteson
> Hatteras
>
> > On Sep 12, 2017, at 3:17 PM, Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing
> > List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> >
> > Maybe for inland, but some dude just had like 20 something several
> > weeks ago while ocean watching at OBX.
> >
> > I just had several Jaegers which I am in process of trying to ID and a
> > Sooty Tern and another Red-necked Phalarope at North end of
> > Wrightsville Beach, NC.
> >
> > Jamie Adams
> > Wilmington NC
> >
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: <carolinabirds-request...>
> > [mailto:carolinabirds-request@ duke.edu <carolinabirds-request...>]
> On Behalf Of Steve Compton
> > Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 3:13 PM
> > To: <carolinabirds...>
> > Cc: <lucasrbobay...>
> > Subject: Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
> >
> > Birders,
> >
> > Got to be a record number of Hudsonians for the Carolinas. As you
> > know, they migrate far offshore. Almost certainly a storm blown flock.
> >
> > Steve Compton
> > Greenville, SC
> >
> > Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
> > On Sep 12, 2017 2:41 PM, Kyle Kittelberger <carolinabirds...>
> > wrote:
> >>
> >> Hey everyone,
> >>
> >> As of 2:37, the Godwits are still present and showing very nicely
> >> from the overlook at the end of the trail. Below is the list of
> >> shorebirds I had. Large number of Pectoral Sandpipers on the back,
> >> did not see anything else different among them.
> >>
> >> Killdeer
> >> Hudsonian Godwit- 11
> >> Stilt Sandpiper- 4
> >> Lesser Yellowlegs- 1
> >> Pectoral Sandpiper- 34
> >>
> >> Good birding! Thanks to Lucas for getting the word out about this
> >> awesome sighting. Cheers,
> >>
> >> Kyle Kittelberger
> >> Raleigh, NC
> >>
> >> ------------------------------ --------------
> >> On Tue, 9/12/17, Lucas Bobay <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> >>
> >> Subject: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
> >> To: "<carolinabirds...>" <carolinabirds...>
> >> Date: Tuesday, September 12, 2017, 11:54 AM
> >>
> >> There are currently 11
> >> Hudsonian Godwits at the Lake Wheeler mudflats visible from Penny Rd
> >> (Wake Co NC). Birds are resting, feeding, and preening. Here with
> >> Stacy and Natalie Barbour now. Great birds inland! Lucas BobayRaleigh
> >>
> > ********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************
> > This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL
> > and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED
> > information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the
> > sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified
> > that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or
> > any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly
> > prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please
> > immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete
> > this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from
> > all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank
> > you.
> > ****************************** ****************************** **********
>
>
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/12/17 6:50 pm
From: Kyle Kittelberger (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
Hey everyone,
Thought I'd follow up about Michael O'Brien's Hudsonian Godwit flock off the Outer Banks. As a friend of his, I let him know his sighting had been brought up while discussing Hudsonian high count records in the state. He shared that his observation was not 20 birds but an amazing sight of 50+ Hudsonian's flying in two separate flocks a few minutes apart from one another. He further added that this is the most number of Hudsonian's he has ever heard of reported on the east coast south of Massachusetts. 
Cheers,Kyle KittelbergerRaleigh, NC


On Tuesday, September 12, 2017 4:22 PM, Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...> wrote:


Copied from my Birds of North Carolina website, for Hudsonian Godwit:

Coastal Plain .....
Peak counts: 16, Cape Hatteras, 29 Aug 1998; 15, resting on the ocean off Oregon Inlet, 25 Aug 1990; 15 at Rodanthe (Dare), 8 Sep 2009.

Piedmont Casual fall transient (only in the eastern portion), with three records: 1, Falls Lake, 21-23 Aug 1999; 2, Falls Lake, 11-15 Sep 1988; and 1 (photographed), Lake Wheeler (Wake), 27 Aug 2011*.

Mountains Accidental fall transient; one record -- 3 at Hooper Lane (Henderson), 8 Sep 2004* (after Tropical Storm Frances) [Chat 69:49 link].

-----

Thus, Michael O'Brien's 20 or so from shore this season would be a state record, if it gets published in The Chat (I don't pull data off eBird, carolinabirds, etc. -- but wait until records get officially published in The Chat or North American Birds before I include them on the website.)

As you can see, the 11 Hudsonians today at Lake Wheeler destroy the previous inland high of 3 birds.

I agree with Brian that Hudsonian Godwits don't put down inland unless there is some (mostly nighttime?) storminess, etc. Certainly doesn't have to be a tropical system.  And, winds don't HAVE to be strong from the E or NE to force them inland.  They nest well inland in Canada and migrate SE over inland USA and continue their fall migration south over the ocean or along the immediate coast.  So, we can't assume these 11 birds blew inland from their migration over the ocean. Recall also that Willets, Marbled Godwits, and Long-billed Curlews also nest far inland and do not normally stop at inland lakes unless there is a nighttime storm that forces them down.  Thus, whether the godwits were migrating TOWARD the coast and were forced down, or were already migrating south over the ocean and were carried inland by strong NE winds and then forced down, I guess we may never know.  (Presumably they were not carried in the eye of Irma up FL and then dropped out in NC; that doesn't compute.)

Enjoy them while they are still here -- I did around 12:30 today.  Thanks for the quick word on c-birds.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Tue, Sep 12, 2017 at 3:56 PM, Paul Glass <pag...> wrote:

Interestingly there was a group of 10 photographed near Harrisonburg, VA
back on 8/29.  No storms at the time.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__urldefense.proofpoint&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=u_TqwmNtdN4la4xpOYzn214opJ2UpWeRRmLgVk2u_YM&s=pUvkoLjKo0Q3kWFEVyGugFFbZct5wtz7od-a_qA-1Mo&e= . com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird. org_ebird_view_checklist_ S38894671&d=DwIBAg&c= imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6Y HLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q- sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_ Ocvlal9U&m= IQ47uo8XV9imaqXFjQMv3ceNMk4qzq 8i0iCqAPB_7c8&s=83CfyMWcFg- IdfP- sH98VjQb0DFgsfBDysJVlS6IwA0&e=

Paul Glass
South Boston, VA

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Patteson [mailto:patteson1@embarqmail. com]
Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 3:32 PM
To: Jamie Adams
Cc: Steve Compton; <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler


Actually a major dude had the godwits: Michael O'Brien and his brother John
were watching the ocean from a beach house on vacation up at Nags Head in
mid August.

I've seen a big bunch offshore back in the 90s. It's probably in the Chat
somewhere in the seasonal roundup. I've also seen a dozen or more on the
flooded ground up in Rodanthe during a tropical storm some years back.

Brian Patteson
Hatteras

> On Sep 12, 2017, at 3:17 PM, Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing
> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Maybe for inland, but some dude just had like 20 something several
> weeks ago while ocean watching at OBX.
>
> I just had several Jaegers which I am in process of trying to ID and a
> Sooty Tern and another Red-necked Phalarope at North end of
> Wrightsville Beach, NC.
>
> Jamie Adams
> Wilmington NC
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: <carolinabirds-request...>
> [mailto:carolinabirds-request@ duke.edu] On Behalf Of Steve Compton
> Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 3:13 PM
> To: <carolinabirds...>
> Cc: <lucasrbobay...>
> Subject: Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
>
> Birders,
>
> Got to be a record number of Hudsonians for the Carolinas. As you
> know, they migrate far offshore. Almost certainly a storm blown flock.
>
> Steve Compton
> Greenville, SC
>
> Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
> On Sep 12, 2017 2:41 PM, Kyle Kittelberger <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>>
>> Hey everyone,
>>
>> As of 2:37, the Godwits are still present and showing very nicely
>> from the overlook at the end of the trail. Below is the list of
>> shorebirds I had. Large number of Pectoral Sandpipers on the back,
>> did not see anything else different among them.
>>
>> Killdeer
>> Hudsonian Godwit- 11
>> Stilt Sandpiper- 4
>> Lesser Yellowlegs- 1
>> Pectoral Sandpiper- 34
>>
>> Good birding! Thanks to Lucas for getting the word out about this
>> awesome sighting. Cheers,
>>
>> Kyle Kittelberger
>> Raleigh, NC
>>
>> ------------------------------ --------------
>> On Tue, 9/12/17, Lucas Bobay <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> Subject: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
>> To: "<carolinabirds...>" <carolinabirds...>
>> Date: Tuesday, September 12, 2017, 11:54 AM
>>
>> There are currently 11
>> Hudsonian Godwits at the Lake Wheeler mudflats visible from Penny Rd
>> (Wake Co NC). Birds are resting, feeding, and preening. Here with
>> Stacy and Natalie Barbour now. Great birds inland! Lucas BobayRaleigh
>>
> ********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************
> This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL
> and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED
> information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the
> sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified
> that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or
> any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly
> prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please
> immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete
> this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from
> all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank
> you.
> ****************************** ****************************** **********







 

Back to top
Date: 9/12/17 6:25 pm
From: Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hooper Lane strikes again! 9/12/17
Folks
A latish report from our "shorebird hotspot" from earlier today - several
of us went out first thing this morning as the feeder bands of
Hurricane/Tropical Storm Irma were coming through the NC Mountains. It was
very muddy and rainy - and yes, a couple of us got very wet indeed!

Anyway, we hiked down to some of the more flooded fields and the
shorebird/wader show was quite impressive highlights are below:

Black-bellied Plover 1
American Golden-Plover 6
Semipalmated Plover 4
Killdeer 150
Hudsonian Godwit 2
Stilt Sandpiper 1
Least Sandpiper 3
White-rumped Sandpiper 5
Buff-breasted Sandpiper 2
Pectoral Sandpiper 28
Semipalmated Sandpiper 4
Western Sandpiper 8
Red-necked Phalarope 1
Lesser Yellowlegs 6

As we were leaving, a black and white tern flew overhead, which we
initially identified as a Bridled; subsequently the photos proved it was a
Sooty Tern. Another was found at nearby Lake Julian an hour later. Photos
have also been posted on e-bird. This was the first WNC record of this
species, which was soon followed by another in Buncombe County.
Photos of the Hudsonian Godwit, Red-necked Phalarope and Sooty Tern are on
the e-bird list below.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S39150699&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=K8SBr2JeV0Zzs0hWVMuQ4pdJSdNmdLptpI4kFsNMDDc&s=uZrSdoSycL-8sssjSz6Qdvj_zQSajy6QZ5hxHqJIu9M&e=

Thanks to Doug Johnston and Wayne Forsythe for their photos and Aaron Steed
and Bob Butler for being such good sports in dreadful weather.

It was an exhausting, but very satisfying, day!

Simon

Simon RB Thompson

Ventures Birding Tours
www.birdventures.com <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.birdventures.com&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=K8SBr2JeV0Zzs0hWVMuQ4pdJSdNmdLptpI4kFsNMDDc&s=Lr-YRgxnAyGgt5PqP9wvzkq5BVk97HkpWH7fixKi4QQ&e= >

Phone: 828.253.4247 <(828)%20253-4247>
Email: <Venturesbirding...>

Check out our 2017-18 Birding & Nature Tours - International
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_InternationalTours.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=K8SBr2JeV0Zzs0hWVMuQ4pdJSdNmdLptpI4kFsNMDDc&s=Hs4Nmx0MIscoxal2aNyjG8Uetv41bhNb_a6eifxAhso&e= >, USA & Canada
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<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_DayTrips.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=K8SBr2JeV0Zzs0hWVMuQ4pdJSdNmdLptpI4kFsNMDDc&s=mSClhqjdpjxlnCS4SSO55hmuL-SMti4z3a0DkwauOUo&e= >

[image:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.tripadvisor.com_Attraction-5FReview-2Dg60742-2Dd12548573-2DReviews-2DVentures-5FBirding-5FTours-2DAsheville-5FNorth-5FCarolina.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=K8SBr2JeV0Zzs0hWVMuQ4pdJSdNmdLptpI4kFsNMDDc&s=wv8Kr_7lti4CsvFanY4Xxk9C4Y_CrEztWD-3g6qNaMI&e= ]
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.tripadvisor.com_Attraction-5FReview-2Dg60742-2Dd12548573-2DReviews-2DVentures-5FBirding-5FTours-2DAsheville-5FNorth-5FCarolina.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=K8SBr2JeV0Zzs0hWVMuQ4pdJSdNmdLptpI4kFsNMDDc&s=wv8Kr_7lti4CsvFanY4Xxk9C4Y_CrEztWD-3g6qNaMI&e= >
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Date: 9/12/17 5:52 pm
From: \Jeff Lemons\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lake Norman Storm Birds
Chris Talkington, Ron Van Epps, and myself took a boat out onto southern Lake Norman late this afternoon to check for storm birds.

Within the first 20 minutes we had a Sooty Tern and an adult Great Black-backed Gull. Both were seen in Mecklenburg, Iredell, and Lincoln counties. We chased the Gull down the lake until it circled higher and higher and then moved North out of sight.

We also checked Governor's Island in Lincoln County. This is a nice spit out into the lake only accessible by boat where we had a Buff-breasted and White-rumped Sandpiper, Ruddy Turnstone, Sanderling and Semi-palmated Plover.

The only other birds on the lake were 2 Common Terns, 1 Black Tern, a Bald Eagle and 2 Cormorants.

Kevin Metcalf joined us late and saw the Sooty Tern.

Good Birding,
Jeff Lemons
Charlotte, NC





 

Back to top
Date: 9/12/17 5:24 pm
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Vandemark Turf: two visits, only 1 peep now, 13 Killdeer noon, 57 3P
No Godwits (no water) at NC33/I95 turf. (SIC.)


11:30 to 11:55 AM, and again 2:40P to 3P.


Irrigation line had been moved to back. The single peep was in far west in AM, near church in PM, in both cases loosely associated with Killdeer, which had just 13 in far west in AM, but 57 mainly middle to east in PM. (The 30 peep hanging out for some days evidently have moved on.)


Few birds in AM, but in PM a flock of 40 Rock Pigeons, 15 scattered feeding crows (common), 25 Starlings northeast with Killdeer, and one big hawk (Red-tail?) on ground way back ne.


10+ mph wind from north and some drizzle.


Anybody's guess why the KIlldeer numbers change--way early to think of roosting.


10 H. Larks---maybe more if I spent more time waiting for small dun birds slightly moving in dun background, in front of church where flocks had been.





Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

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Date: 9/12/17 5:10 pm
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: House Finches chowing down on ash seeds for last two weeks
More birds than were here in summer, as many as 15 at a time. Where are your House Finches now?


They do migrate through in October, but, again, a local movement.





Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

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Date: 9/12/17 5:07 pm
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Loggerhead Shrike back along Mid-Pines Rd., south of Raleigh
For 2-3 weeks, I have not encountered any of the several pairs of shrikes which nest between me and Roanoke Rapids. (Young were raised.)

While the probability of seeing a shrike between sightings (when bird is present before and after the drive-by) often is as low as 0.2, I have been driving back and forth too much for any conclusion other than that these birds have moved on.
These local birds may show up later in fall (some winter), but how do we know the winter birds here are birds which breed here? I "dunno" without marking the individuals in some way.
If "my" birds have moved on, as they seem to have, your Raleigh bird may also be a migrant (or local mover). It would seem that a bird which regularly sits on powerlines, like, say Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (or, here, shrike) should be highly visible, if present, but I have seen this species just not be "present", when it is at a spot both before and after the apparent absence. Just a mystery.

Wait a while, and a shrike will show up (on my way to and from town) to prove me a liar, but it is so hard to understand why this species is irregular in being detected. They do use woods edges and cutovers, and I always wonder if (and WHY) they might be there instead of at the roadsides where we are accustomed to encounter them. Maybe something about prey availability,

I used to think local shrikes showed up (arrived? came out of the woodwork to set up at roadside breeding locations?) around late February, but then there are years they are here later. Just hard to tell for this species. And most.
Even gamebird populations are not understood, no good predictions based on anything other than counting birds just before the "prediction", i.e., just extending a trendline of abundance with simply no or completely speculative real data reflecting the key factors influencing abundance of species.

SUMMARY: I do not know what is going on (either).


Frank Enders, Halifax, NC


________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 4:33 PM
To: carolinabirds listserve; Harry LeGrand
Subject: Loggerhead Shrike back along Mid-Pines Rd., south of Raleigh

Loggerhead Shrikes nested at the N.C. State U. farm fields up until a year or two ago, but not this year. The last report along this road appears to have been on March 24 of this year, on eBird; and the last along nearby Inwood Road was April 29 of this year. One did overwinter along Inwood Road.

So, this afternoon I was glad to see one, an apparent adult, along Mid-Pines just east of the creek that flows into Yates Pond. I will assume it must have bred somewhere fairly close by -- it seems a bit early for a true migrant, but tons of people bird this general area each week, and the species seemed to have disappeared this summer.

I do see a shrike now and then in SE and E Wake County in recent years, and I suspect a few still breed in these more rural parts of the county. But, shrikes have almost disappeared as breeders in the Triangle now, despite some good habitat in some places.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

 

Back to top
Date: 9/12/17 4:53 pm
From: Stacy and Natalie Barbour (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lake Wheeler Hudsonian Godwits flew- Phalarope present
About 5:30 this afternoon three of us were scoping the Lake Wheeler marshes again and saw the godwits, however later just before sundown the flock flew off toward the southeast. Just before our planned departure we watched a phalarope for quite a while- it flew in from somewhere and joined 8 Stilt Sandpipers. We believe a Wilson's Phalarope at this time, but are checking photos for verification. It was on the mudflat closest to the point by the bridge where 2 parking spaces are located. Anyway it might be worthwhile for others to check that lake early tomorrow morning as it was present at sunset.

WS 'Stacy' Barbour
Natalie Barbour
Raleigh
 

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Date: 9/12/17 4:26 pm
From: Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hanging Rock hawk watch volunteers needed
Hey all, contact ranger Austin below if you would like to volunteer for the
hawk watch. We have a great 360 degree view, but you do have to hike there
and it's a steep 45 minute trek, very worth it though. I'll be there
during "peak week" Sep 25-29 and could always use extra eyes, one of those
days could be the "big one"

Please pass on to interested folks that we are in need of volunteers to
help out with this year's watch, specifically 09/15 through the 19th. They
can contact me directly for details.

Cheers,

Austin Paul

Park Ranger

Hanging Rock State Park

1790 Hanging Rock Park Road

Danbury, NC 27016



(336) 593-8480 office


--
Brian Bockhahn
<birdranger248...>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/12/17 3:54 pm
From: Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Sooty Tern at Lake Julian, Asheville, NC - 9/12/17
Folks
The windy, rainy weather after Hurricane Irma dropped a few treats for us
up here in the Mountains.
While some of us were sloshing through the mud along Hooper Lane in
Henderson County (report to be posted later), Jay Wherley alerted us to
some terns at nearby Lake Julian. Severl Forster's Terns were feeding over
the lake and a sleeker, darker tern appeared. Lots of photos were taken and
several have been posted on today's e-bird report and to the Carolina Bird
Club's photo gallery. We concluded that it had to be a Sooty Tern.
After checking on both e-bird and Birds of the Carolinas, this may be the
second (first may have been in Henderson County about an hour earlier!!)
record of Sooty Tern for the NC Mountains.
Seen well and photographed by Jay Wherley, Doug Johnston and myself.

Our checklist, along with some photos are below:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S39144753&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M8xre2TG3qDB0HT_VtPJjNc3u0z2I3A5qYwb4VmuPlA&s=w_JchXmcgFAqjfEG3EG-4b2EBpfyGZMfQw59kO7_Qv0&e=

Worn out after a great birding day!!
See you in Litchfield, SC for the CBC meeting.

Simon

Simon RB Thompson

Ventures Birding Tours
www.birdventures.com <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.birdventures.com&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M8xre2TG3qDB0HT_VtPJjNc3u0z2I3A5qYwb4VmuPlA&s=Ce2-4BYqbVu8gaHUbl9xuW_4_aRCNaKOc3U07xqH5Po&e= >

Phone: 828.253.4247
Email: <Venturesbirding...>

Check out our 2017-18 Birding & Nature Tours - International
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_InternationalTours.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M8xre2TG3qDB0HT_VtPJjNc3u0z2I3A5qYwb4VmuPlA&s=n19JBrHXH10CgPgOi9oPylll3o7clVhXalUlClZk1AM&e= >, USA & Canada
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_NorthAmerica.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M8xre2TG3qDB0HT_VtPJjNc3u0z2I3A5qYwb4VmuPlA&s=lOFHLAMr9d2rnem2VvfVCl76LIpRNisE41HkMGQoOq8&e= >, and WNC day trips
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_DayTrips.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M8xre2TG3qDB0HT_VtPJjNc3u0z2I3A5qYwb4VmuPlA&s=5Ygh1SVdf-DNpFdlBQpsBbcUcPdPrgN897_fmacroNY&e= >

[image:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.tripadvisor.com_Attraction-5FReview-2Dg60742-2Dd12548573-2DReviews-2DVentures-5FBirding-5FTours-2DAsheville-5FNorth-5FCarolina.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M8xre2TG3qDB0HT_VtPJjNc3u0z2I3A5qYwb4VmuPlA&s=N_Vbv2Lau3L6RBk9rmaeMu5fbU66l_gVq9IuO_-wz1o&e= ]
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.tripadvisor.com_Attraction-5FReview-2Dg60742-2Dd12548573-2DReviews-2DVentures-5FBirding-5FTours-2DAsheville-5FNorth-5FCarolina.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M8xre2TG3qDB0HT_VtPJjNc3u0z2I3A5qYwb4VmuPlA&s=N_Vbv2Lau3L6RBk9rmaeMu5fbU66l_gVq9IuO_-wz1o&e= >
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Date: 9/12/17 2:31 pm
From: Irvin Pitts <pittsjam...>
Subject: RE: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
Hello,
This reminds me - on August 22, 1992 (I know, this is old) I was leading a bird walk at Huntington Beach State Park during unsettled weather when a flock of about 20 Hudsonian Godwits flew in from the ocean, wheeled around and landed at the old jetty pond on the beach just in front of our group. The birds restlessly flashed their wings and gave us amazing scope views before they all took flight again 3 to 4 minutes later. Sorry for bringing up such an "old" sighting into the current discussion but these posts reminded me of one of my more memorable shorebird encounters!

Irvin Pitts
Lexington, SC

---- Paul Glass <pag...> wrote:
> Looked back at the weather history, and there was some rain from about 6am
> till noon that day. North winds of 5-10mph.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Brian Patteson [mailto:<patteson1...>]
> Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 4:07 PM
> To: Paul Glass
> Cc: Jamie Adams; Steve Compton; carolinabirds
> Subject: Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
>
>
> Paul,
>
> I heard about those. No cyclones for Harrisonburg, but I'm guessing there
> was some rain event to put them down initially? They don't usually fall out
> in fair weather.
>
> Brian Patteson
> Hatteras
>
> > On Sep 12, 2017, at 3:56 PM, Paul Glass <pag...> wrote:
> >
> > Interestingly there was a group of 10 photographed near Harrisonburg,
> > VA back on 8/29. No storms at the time.
> >
> > https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S38894671&d=DwIBAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=5S_P8w0vRJn7Mk_bAOSwnW_RA6i_ZaAlbGEBYExWLK8&s=IyMIhGkK5wbiLVojsEm4dJ2CvgBtKSA8x_PZogisjVE&e=
> >
> > Paul Glass
> > South Boston, VA
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Brian Patteson [mailto:<patteson1...>]
> > Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 3:32 PM
> > To: Jamie Adams
> > Cc: Steve Compton; <carolinabirds...>
> > Subject: Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
> >
> >
> > Actually a major dude had the godwits: Michael O'Brien and his brother
> > John were watching the ocean from a beach house on vacation up at Nags
> > Head in mid August.
> >
> > I've seen a big bunch offshore back in the 90s. It's probably in the
> > Chat somewhere in the seasonal roundup. I've also seen a dozen or more
> > on the flooded ground up in Rodanthe during a tropical storm some
> > years back.
> >
> > Brian Patteson
> > Hatteras
> >
> >> On Sep 12, 2017, at 3:17 PM, Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing
> >> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> >>
> >> Maybe for inland, but some dude just had like 20 something several
> >> weeks ago while ocean watching at OBX.
> >>
> >> I just had several Jaegers which I am in process of trying to ID and
> >> a
> >> Sooty Tern and another Red-necked Phalarope at North end of
> >> Wrightsville Beach, NC.
> >>
> >> Jamie Adams
> >> Wilmington NC
> >>
> >>
> >> -----Original Message-----
> >> From: <carolinabirds-request...>
> >> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Steve Compton
> >> Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 3:13 PM
> >> To: <carolinabirds...>
> >> Cc: <lucasrbobay...>
> >> Subject: Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
> >>
> >> Birders,
> >>
> >> Got to be a record number of Hudsonians for the Carolinas. As you
> >> know, they migrate far offshore. Almost certainly a storm blown flock.
> >>
> >> Steve Compton
> >> Greenville, SC
> >>
> >> Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
> >> On Sep 12, 2017 2:41 PM, Kyle Kittelberger <carolinabirds...>
> >> wrote:
> >>>
> >>> Hey everyone,
> >>>
> >>> As of 2:37, the Godwits are still present and showing very nicely
> >>> from the overlook at the end of the trail. Below is the list of
> >>> shorebirds I had. Large number of Pectoral Sandpipers on the back,
> >>> did not see anything else different among them.
> >>>
> >>> Killdeer
> >>> Hudsonian Godwit- 11
> >>> Stilt Sandpiper- 4
> >>> Lesser Yellowlegs- 1
> >>> Pectoral Sandpiper- 34
> >>>
> >>> Good birding! Thanks to Lucas for getting the word out about this
> >>> awesome sighting. Cheers,
> >>>
> >>> Kyle Kittelberger
> >>> Raleigh, NC
> >>>
> >>> --------------------------------------------
> >>> On Tue, 9/12/17, Lucas Bobay <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> >>>
> >>> Subject: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
> >>> To: "<carolinabirds...>" <carolinabirds...>
> >>> Date: Tuesday, September 12, 2017, 11:54 AM
> >>>
> >>> There are currently 11
> >>> Hudsonian Godwits at the Lake Wheeler mudflats visible from Penny Rd
> >>> (Wake Co NC). Birds are resting, feeding, and preening. Here with
> >>> Stacy and Natalie Barbour now. Great birds inland! Lucas BobayRaleigh
> >>>
> >> ********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ
> >> ************************
> >> This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL
> >> and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED
> >> information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the
> >> sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified
> >> that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or
> >> any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly
> >> prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please
> >> immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete
> >> this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from
> >> all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank
> >> you.
> >> **********************************************************************
> >
> >
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 9/12/17 2:25 pm
From: jcox3222 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Orangeburg sod farms 9/12/17
I checked out several of the Orangeburg sod farms today. There were lots of large puddles and some shorebirds but not great numbers. There were a fair number of pectorals and least sandpipers and ubiquitous killdeer. I also found one buff-breasted sandpiper and three Wilson's snipe just west of Supersod Boulevard. The best bird was a red-necked phalarope found in a large puddle on the farm past Bookhardt farm east of I-26. It was in the first farm on left just past the I-26 flyover. Look for a paved entrance that is blocked by hay bales; the puddle is just north of the road. The phalarope was mixed in with some lesser yellow legs but was easy to find. It is in basic plumage and was actively foraging in the puddle.
John Cox
Mount Pleasant, SC
 

 

Back to top
Date: 9/12/17 1:34 pm
From: Paul Glass <pag...>
Subject: RE: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
Looked back at the weather history, and there was some rain from about 6am
till noon that day. North winds of 5-10mph.

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Patteson [mailto:<patteson1...>]
Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 4:07 PM
To: Paul Glass
Cc: Jamie Adams; Steve Compton; carolinabirds
Subject: Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler


Paul,

I heard about those. No cyclones for Harrisonburg, but I'm guessing there
was some rain event to put them down initially? They don't usually fall out
in fair weather.

Brian Patteson
Hatteras

> On Sep 12, 2017, at 3:56 PM, Paul Glass <pag...> wrote:
>
> Interestingly there was a group of 10 photographed near Harrisonburg,
> VA back on 8/29. No storms at the time.
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S38894671&d=DwIBAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=5S_P8w0vRJn7Mk_bAOSwnW_RA6i_ZaAlbGEBYExWLK8&s=IyMIhGkK5wbiLVojsEm4dJ2CvgBtKSA8x_PZogisjVE&e=
>
> Paul Glass
> South Boston, VA
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Brian Patteson [mailto:<patteson1...>]
> Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 3:32 PM
> To: Jamie Adams
> Cc: Steve Compton; <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
>
>
> Actually a major dude had the godwits: Michael O'Brien and his brother
> John were watching the ocean from a beach house on vacation up at Nags
> Head in mid August.
>
> I've seen a big bunch offshore back in the 90s. It's probably in the
> Chat somewhere in the seasonal roundup. I've also seen a dozen or more
> on the flooded ground up in Rodanthe during a tropical storm some
> years back.
>
> Brian Patteson
> Hatteras
>
>> On Sep 12, 2017, at 3:17 PM, Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing
>> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> Maybe for inland, but some dude just had like 20 something several
>> weeks ago while ocean watching at OBX.
>>
>> I just had several Jaegers which I am in process of trying to ID and
>> a
>> Sooty Tern and another Red-necked Phalarope at North end of
>> Wrightsville Beach, NC.
>>
>> Jamie Adams
>> Wilmington NC
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: <carolinabirds-request...>
>> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Steve Compton
>> Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 3:13 PM
>> To: <carolinabirds...>
>> Cc: <lucasrbobay...>
>> Subject: Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
>>
>> Birders,
>>
>> Got to be a record number of Hudsonians for the Carolinas. As you
>> know, they migrate far offshore. Almost certainly a storm blown flock.
>>
>> Steve Compton
>> Greenville, SC
>>
>> Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
>> On Sep 12, 2017 2:41 PM, Kyle Kittelberger <carolinabirds...>
>> wrote:
>>>
>>> Hey everyone,
>>>
>>> As of 2:37, the Godwits are still present and showing very nicely
>>> from the overlook at the end of the trail. Below is the list of
>>> shorebirds I had. Large number of Pectoral Sandpipers on the back,
>>> did not see anything else different among them.
>>>
>>> Killdeer
>>> Hudsonian Godwit- 11
>>> Stilt Sandpiper- 4
>>> Lesser Yellowlegs- 1
>>> Pectoral Sandpiper- 34
>>>
>>> Good birding! Thanks to Lucas for getting the word out about this
>>> awesome sighting. Cheers,
>>>
>>> Kyle Kittelberger
>>> Raleigh, NC
>>>
>>> --------------------------------------------
>>> On Tue, 9/12/17, Lucas Bobay <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Subject: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
>>> To: "<carolinabirds...>" <carolinabirds...>
>>> Date: Tuesday, September 12, 2017, 11:54 AM
>>>
>>> There are currently 11
>>> Hudsonian Godwits at the Lake Wheeler mudflats visible from Penny Rd
>>> (Wake Co NC). Birds are resting, feeding, and preening. Here with
>>> Stacy and Natalie Barbour now. Great birds inland! Lucas BobayRaleigh
>>>
>> ********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ
>> ************************
>> This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL
>> and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED
>> information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the
>> sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified
>> that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or
>> any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly
>> prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please
>> immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete
>> this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from
>> all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank
>> you.
>> **********************************************************************
>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 9/12/17 1:33 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Loggerhead Shrike back along Mid-Pines Rd., south of Raleigh
Loggerhead Shrikes nested at the N.C. State U. farm fields up until a year
or two ago, but not this year. The last report along this road appears to
have been on March 24 of this year, on eBird; and the last along nearby
Inwood Road was April 29 of this year. One did overwinter along Inwood Road.

So, this afternoon I was glad to see one, an apparent adult, along
Mid-Pines just east of the creek that flows into Yates Pond. I will assume
it must have bred somewhere fairly close by -- it seems a bit early for a
true migrant, but tons of people bird this general area each week, and the
species seemed to have disappeared this summer.

I do see a shrike now and then in SE and E Wake County in recent years, and
I suspect a few still breed in these more rural parts of the county. But,
shrikes have almost disappeared as breeders in the Triangle now, despite
some good habitat in some places.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

 

Back to top
Date: 9/12/17 1:24 pm
From: Gardb (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: unsubscribe
unsubscribe
 

Back to top
Date: 9/12/17 1:22 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
Copied from my Birds of North Carolina website, for Hudsonian Godwit:

*Coastal Plain* .....
Peak counts: 16, Cape Hatteras, 29 Aug 1998; 15, resting on the ocean off
Oregon Inlet, 25 Aug 1990; 15 at Rodanthe (*Dare*), 8 Sep 2009.

*Piedmont* Casual fall transient (only in the eastern portion), with three
records: 1, Falls Lake, 21-23 Aug 1999; 2, Falls Lake, 11-15 Sep 1988; and
1 (photographed), Lake Wheeler (*Wake*), 27 Aug 2011*.

*Mountains* Accidental fall transient; one record -- 3 at Hooper Lane (
*Henderson*), 8 Sep 2004* (after Tropical Storm Frances) [Chat 69:49 link
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_chat_chatpage.php-3Fvol-3D69-26page-3D49&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=diwY9FtwuvJ2fK4vwbLCi4vWO18-mIDCR001R6wvEwU&s=pUwsX5-qyW-0-Niw2lOXT_S_KYYr-HJbgFvKgEl5h9E&e= >].

-----

Thus, Michael O'Brien's 20 or so from shore this season would be a state
record, if it gets published in The Chat (I don't pull data off eBird,
carolinabirds, etc. -- but wait until records get officially published in
The Chat or North American Birds before I include them on the website.)

As you can see, the 11 Hudsonians today at Lake Wheeler destroy the
previous inland high of 3 birds.

I agree with Brian that Hudsonian Godwits don't put down inland unless
there is some (mostly nighttime?) storminess, etc. Certainly doesn't have
to be a tropical system. And, winds don't HAVE to be strong from the E or
NE to force them inland. They nest well inland in Canada and migrate SE
over inland USA and continue their fall migration south over the ocean or
along the immediate coast. So, we can't assume these 11 birds blew inland
from their migration over the ocean. Recall also that Willets, Marbled
Godwits, and Long-billed Curlews also nest far inland and do not normally
stop at inland lakes unless there is a nighttime storm that forces them
down. Thus, whether the godwits were migrating TOWARD the coast and were
forced down, or were already migrating south over the ocean and were
carried inland by strong NE winds and then forced down, I guess we may
never know. (Presumably they were not carried in the eye of Irma up FL and
then dropped out in NC; that doesn't compute.)

Enjoy them while they are still here -- I did around 12:30 today. Thanks
for the quick word on c-birds.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Tue, Sep 12, 2017 at 3:56 PM, Paul Glass <pag...> wrote:

> Interestingly there was a group of 10 photographed near Harrisonburg, VA
> back on 8/29. No storms at the time.
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.
> org_ebird_view_checklist_S38894671&d=DwIBAg&c=
> imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-
> sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=IQ47uo8XV9imaqXFjQMv3ceNMk4qzq
> 8i0iCqAPB_7c8&s=83CfyMWcFg-IdfP-sH98VjQb0DFgsfBDysJVlS6IwA0&e=
>
> Paul Glass
> South Boston, VA
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Brian Patteson [mailto:<patteson1...>]
> Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 3:32 PM
> To: Jamie Adams
> Cc: Steve Compton; <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
>
>
> Actually a major dude had the godwits: Michael O'Brien and his brother John
> were watching the ocean from a beach house on vacation up at Nags Head in
> mid August.
>
> I've seen a big bunch offshore back in the 90s. It's probably in the Chat
> somewhere in the seasonal roundup. I've also seen a dozen or more on the
> flooded ground up in Rodanthe during a tropical storm some years back.
>
> Brian Patteson
> Hatteras
>
> > On Sep 12, 2017, at 3:17 PM, Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing
> > List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> >
> > Maybe for inland, but some dude just had like 20 something several
> > weeks ago while ocean watching at OBX.
> >
> > I just had several Jaegers which I am in process of trying to ID and a
> > Sooty Tern and another Red-necked Phalarope at North end of
> > Wrightsville Beach, NC.
> >
> > Jamie Adams
> > Wilmington NC
> >
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: <carolinabirds-request...>
> > [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Steve Compton
> > Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 3:13 PM
> > To: <carolinabirds...>
> > Cc: <lucasrbobay...>
> > Subject: Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
> >
> > Birders,
> >
> > Got to be a record number of Hudsonians for the Carolinas. As you
> > know, they migrate far offshore. Almost certainly a storm blown flock.
> >
> > Steve Compton
> > Greenville, SC
> >
> > Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
> > On Sep 12, 2017 2:41 PM, Kyle Kittelberger <carolinabirds...>
> > wrote:
> >>
> >> Hey everyone,
> >>
> >> As of 2:37, the Godwits are still present and showing very nicely
> >> from the overlook at the end of the trail. Below is the list of
> >> shorebirds I had. Large number of Pectoral Sandpipers on the back,
> >> did not see anything else different among them.
> >>
> >> Killdeer
> >> Hudsonian Godwit- 11
> >> Stilt Sandpiper- 4
> >> Lesser Yellowlegs- 1
> >> Pectoral Sandpiper- 34
> >>
> >> Good birding! Thanks to Lucas for getting the word out about this
> >> awesome sighting. Cheers,
> >>
> >> Kyle Kittelberger
> >> Raleigh, NC
> >>
> >> --------------------------------------------
> >> On Tue, 9/12/17, Lucas Bobay <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> >>
> >> Subject: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
> >> To: "<carolinabirds...>" <carolinabirds...>
> >> Date: Tuesday, September 12, 2017, 11:54 AM
> >>
> >> There are currently 11
> >> Hudsonian Godwits at the Lake Wheeler mudflats visible from Penny Rd
> >> (Wake Co NC). Birds are resting, feeding, and preening. Here with
> >> Stacy and Natalie Barbour now. Great birds inland! Lucas BobayRaleigh
> >>
> > ********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************
> > This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL
> > and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED
> > information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the
> > sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified
> > that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or
> > any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly
> > prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please
> > immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete
> > this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from
> > all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank
> > you.
> > **********************************************************************
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/12/17 1:07 pm
From: Brian Patteson <patteson1...>
Subject: Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
Paul,

I heard about those. No cyclones for Harrisonburg, but I’m guessing there was some rain event to put them down initially? They don’t usually fall out in fair weather.

Brian Patteson
Hatteras

> On Sep 12, 2017, at 3:56 PM, Paul Glass <pag...> wrote:
>
> Interestingly there was a group of 10 photographed near Harrisonburg, VA
> back on 8/29. No storms at the time.
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S38894671&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=ijNI0DFoaWBern3E4T1tffWqsZwUdUKuUKEhEUTmnuA&s=9I1d13NcZyCSVRiqskRKa-dGPE-66qO5dv6D4oiFM44&e=
>
> Paul Glass
> South Boston, VA
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Brian Patteson [mailto:<patteson1...>]
> Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 3:32 PM
> To: Jamie Adams
> Cc: Steve Compton; <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
>
>
> Actually a major dude had the godwits: Michael O'Brien and his brother John
> were watching the ocean from a beach house on vacation up at Nags Head in
> mid August.
>
> I've seen a big bunch offshore back in the 90s. It's probably in the Chat
> somewhere in the seasonal roundup. I've also seen a dozen or more on the
> flooded ground up in Rodanthe during a tropical storm some years back.
>
> Brian Patteson
> Hatteras
>
>> On Sep 12, 2017, at 3:17 PM, Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing
>> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> Maybe for inland, but some dude just had like 20 something several
>> weeks ago while ocean watching at OBX.
>>
>> I just had several Jaegers which I am in process of trying to ID and a
>> Sooty Tern and another Red-necked Phalarope at North end of
>> Wrightsville Beach, NC.
>>
>> Jamie Adams
>> Wilmington NC
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: <carolinabirds-request...>
>> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Steve Compton
>> Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 3:13 PM
>> To: <carolinabirds...>
>> Cc: <lucasrbobay...>
>> Subject: Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
>>
>> Birders,
>>
>> Got to be a record number of Hudsonians for the Carolinas. As you
>> know, they migrate far offshore. Almost certainly a storm blown flock.
>>
>> Steve Compton
>> Greenville, SC
>>
>> Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
>> On Sep 12, 2017 2:41 PM, Kyle Kittelberger <carolinabirds...>
>> wrote:
>>>
>>> Hey everyone,
>>>
>>> As of 2:37, the Godwits are still present and showing very nicely
>>> from the overlook at the end of the trail. Below is the list of
>>> shorebirds I had. Large number of Pectoral Sandpipers on the back,
>>> did not see anything else different among them.
>>>
>>> Killdeer
>>> Hudsonian Godwit- 11
>>> Stilt Sandpiper- 4
>>> Lesser Yellowlegs- 1
>>> Pectoral Sandpiper- 34
>>>
>>> Good birding! Thanks to Lucas for getting the word out about this
>>> awesome sighting. Cheers,
>>>
>>> Kyle Kittelberger
>>> Raleigh, NC
>>>
>>> --------------------------------------------
>>> On Tue, 9/12/17, Lucas Bobay <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Subject: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
>>> To: "<carolinabirds...>" <carolinabirds...>
>>> Date: Tuesday, September 12, 2017, 11:54 AM
>>>
>>> There are currently 11
>>> Hudsonian Godwits at the Lake Wheeler mudflats visible from Penny Rd
>>> (Wake Co NC). Birds are resting, feeding, and preening. Here with
>>> Stacy and Natalie Barbour now. Great birds inland! Lucas BobayRaleigh
>>>
>> ********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************
>> This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL
>> and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED
>> information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the
>> sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified
>> that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or
>> any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly
>> prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please
>> immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete
>> this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from
>> all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank
>> you.
>> **********************************************************************
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/12/17 12:57 pm
From: Paul Glass <pag...>
Subject: RE: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
Interestingly there was a group of 10 photographed near Harrisonburg, VA
back on 8/29. No storms at the time.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S38894671&d=DwIBAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=IQ47uo8XV9imaqXFjQMv3ceNMk4qzq8i0iCqAPB_7c8&s=83CfyMWcFg-IdfP-sH98VjQb0DFgsfBDysJVlS6IwA0&e=

Paul Glass
South Boston, VA

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Patteson [mailto:<patteson1...>]
Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 3:32 PM
To: Jamie Adams
Cc: Steve Compton; <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler


Actually a major dude had the godwits: Michael O'Brien and his brother John
were watching the ocean from a beach house on vacation up at Nags Head in
mid August.

I've seen a big bunch offshore back in the 90s. It's probably in the Chat
somewhere in the seasonal roundup. I've also seen a dozen or more on the
flooded ground up in Rodanthe during a tropical storm some years back.

Brian Patteson
Hatteras

> On Sep 12, 2017, at 3:17 PM, Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing
> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Maybe for inland, but some dude just had like 20 something several
> weeks ago while ocean watching at OBX.
>
> I just had several Jaegers which I am in process of trying to ID and a
> Sooty Tern and another Red-necked Phalarope at North end of
> Wrightsville Beach, NC.
>
> Jamie Adams
> Wilmington NC
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: <carolinabirds-request...>
> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Steve Compton
> Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 3:13 PM
> To: <carolinabirds...>
> Cc: <lucasrbobay...>
> Subject: Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
>
> Birders,
>
> Got to be a record number of Hudsonians for the Carolinas. As you
> know, they migrate far offshore. Almost certainly a storm blown flock.
>
> Steve Compton
> Greenville, SC
>
> Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
> On Sep 12, 2017 2:41 PM, Kyle Kittelberger <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>>
>> Hey everyone,
>>
>> As of 2:37, the Godwits are still present and showing very nicely
>> from the overlook at the end of the trail. Below is the list of
>> shorebirds I had. Large number of Pectoral Sandpipers on the back,
>> did not see anything else different among them.
>>
>> Killdeer
>> Hudsonian Godwit- 11
>> Stilt Sandpiper- 4
>> Lesser Yellowlegs- 1
>> Pectoral Sandpiper- 34
>>
>> Good birding! Thanks to Lucas for getting the word out about this
>> awesome sighting. Cheers,
>>
>> Kyle Kittelberger
>> Raleigh, NC
>>
>> --------------------------------------------
>> On Tue, 9/12/17, Lucas Bobay <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> Subject: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
>> To: "<carolinabirds...>" <carolinabirds...>
>> Date: Tuesday, September 12, 2017, 11:54 AM
>>
>> There are currently 11
>> Hudsonian Godwits at the Lake Wheeler mudflats visible from Penny Rd
>> (Wake Co NC). Birds are resting, feeding, and preening. Here with
>> Stacy and Natalie Barbour now. Great birds inland! Lucas BobayRaleigh
>>
> ********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************
> This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL
> and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED
> information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the
> sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified
> that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or
> any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly
> prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please
> immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete
> this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from
> all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank
> you.
> **********************************************************************


 

Back to top
Date: 9/12/17 12:33 pm
From: Brian Patteson <patteson1...>
Subject: Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
Actually a major dude had the godwits: Michael O’Brien and his brother John were watching the ocean from a beach house on vacation up at Nags Head in mid August.

I’ve seen a big bunch offshore back in the 90s. It’s probably in the Chat somewhere in the seasonal roundup. I’ve also seen a dozen or more on the flooded ground up in Rodanthe during a tropical storm some years back.

Brian Patteson
Hatteras

> On Sep 12, 2017, at 3:17 PM, Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Maybe for inland, but some dude just had like 20 something several weeks ago while ocean watching at OBX.
>
> I just had several Jaegers which I am in process of trying to ID and a Sooty Tern and another Red-necked Phalarope at North end of Wrightsville Beach, NC.
>
> Jamie Adams
> Wilmington NC
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Steve Compton
> Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 3:13 PM
> To: <carolinabirds...>
> Cc: <lucasrbobay...>
> Subject: Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
>
> Birders,
>
> Got to be a record number of Hudsonians for the Carolinas. As you know, they migrate far offshore. Almost certainly a storm blown flock.
>
> Steve Compton
> Greenville, SC
>
> Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
> On Sep 12, 2017 2:41 PM, Kyle Kittelberger <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> Hey everyone,
>>
>> As of 2:37, the Godwits are still present and showing very nicely from the overlook at the end of the trail. Below is the list of shorebirds I had. Large number of Pectoral Sandpipers on the back, did not see anything else different among them.
>>
>> Killdeer
>> Hudsonian Godwit- 11
>> Stilt Sandpiper- 4
>> Lesser Yellowlegs- 1
>> Pectoral Sandpiper- 34
>>
>> Good birding! Thanks to Lucas for getting the word out about this
>> awesome sighting. Cheers,
>>
>> Kyle Kittelberger
>> Raleigh, NC
>>
>> --------------------------------------------
>> On Tue, 9/12/17, Lucas Bobay <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> Subject: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
>> To: "<carolinabirds...>" <carolinabirds...>
>> Date: Tuesday, September 12, 2017, 11:54 AM
>>
>> There are currently 11
>> Hudsonian Godwits at the Lake Wheeler mudflats visible from Penny Rd
>> (Wake Co NC). Birds are resting, feeding, and preening. Here with
>> Stacy and Natalie Barbour now. Great birds inland!
>> Lucas BobayRaleigh
>>
> ********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************ This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank you. **********************************************************************

 

Back to top
Date: 9/12/17 12:17 pm
From: Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
Maybe for inland, but some dude just had like 20 something several weeks ago while ocean watching at OBX.

I just had several Jaegers which I am in process of trying to ID and a Sooty Tern and another Red-necked Phalarope at North end of Wrightsville Beach, NC.

Jamie Adams
Wilmington NC


-----Original Message-----
From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Steve Compton
Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 3:13 PM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Cc: <lucasrbobay...>
Subject: Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler

Birders,

Got to be a record number of Hudsonians for the Carolinas. As you know, they migrate far offshore. Almost certainly a storm blown flock.

Steve Compton
Greenville, SC

Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
On Sep 12, 2017 2:41 PM, Kyle Kittelberger <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Hey everyone,
>
> As of 2:37, the Godwits are still present and showing very nicely from the overlook at the end of the trail. Below is the list of shorebirds I had. Large number of Pectoral Sandpipers on the back, did not see anything else different among them.
>
> Killdeer
> Hudsonian Godwit- 11
> Stilt Sandpiper- 4
> Lesser Yellowlegs- 1
> Pectoral Sandpiper- 34
>
> Good birding! Thanks to Lucas for getting the word out about this
> awesome sighting. Cheers,
>
> Kyle Kittelberger
> Raleigh, NC
>
> --------------------------------------------
> On Tue, 9/12/17, Lucas Bobay <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Subject: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
> To: "<carolinabirds...>" <carolinabirds...>
> Date: Tuesday, September 12, 2017, 11:54 AM
>
> There are currently 11
> Hudsonian Godwits at the Lake Wheeler mudflats visible from Penny Rd
> (Wake Co NC). Birds are resting, feeding, and preening. Here with
> Stacy and Natalie Barbour now. Great birds inland!
> Lucas BobayRaleigh
>
********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************ This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank you. **********************************************************************
 

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Date: 9/12/17 12:13 pm
From: Steve Compton <scompton1251...>
Subject: Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
Birders,

Got to be a record number of Hudsonians for the Carolinas. As you know, they migrate far offshore. Almost certainly a storm blown flock.

Steve Compton
Greenville, SC

Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
On Sep 12, 2017 2:41 PM, Kyle Kittelberger <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Hey everyone,
>
> As of 2:37, the Godwits are still present and showing very nicely from the overlook at the end of the trail. Below is the list of shorebirds I had. Large number of Pectoral Sandpipers on the back, did not see anything else different among them.
>
> Killdeer
> Hudsonian Godwit- 11
> Stilt Sandpiper- 4
> Lesser Yellowlegs- 1
> Pectoral Sandpiper- 34
>
> Good birding! Thanks to Lucas for getting the word out about this awesome sighting. Cheers,
>
> Kyle Kittelberger
> Raleigh, NC
>
> --------------------------------------------
> On Tue, 9/12/17, Lucas Bobay <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Subject: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
> To: "<carolinabirds...>" <carolinabirds...>
> Date: Tuesday, September 12, 2017, 11:54 AM
>
> There are currently 11
> Hudsonian Godwits at the Lake Wheeler mudflats visible from
> Penny Rd (Wake Co NC). Birds are resting, feeding, and
> preening. Here with Stacy and Natalie Barbour now. Great
> birds inland!
> Lucas BobayRaleigh
>
 

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Date: 9/12/17 11:41 am
From: Kyle Kittelberger (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
Hey everyone,

As of 2:37, the Godwits are still present and showing very nicely from the overlook at the end of the trail. Below is the list of shorebirds I had. Large number of Pectoral Sandpipers on the back, did not see anything else different among them.

Killdeer
Hudsonian Godwit- 11
Stilt Sandpiper- 4
Lesser Yellowlegs- 1
Pectoral Sandpiper- 34

Good birding! Thanks to Lucas for getting the word out about this awesome sighting. Cheers,

Kyle Kittelberger
Raleigh, NC

--------------------------------------------
On Tue, 9/12/17, Lucas Bobay <carolinabirds...> wrote:

Subject: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
To: "<carolinabirds...>" <carolinabirds...>
Date: Tuesday, September 12, 2017, 11:54 AM

There are currently 11
Hudsonian Godwits at the Lake Wheeler mudflats visible from
Penny Rd (Wake Co NC). Birds are resting, feeding, and
preening. Here with Stacy and Natalie Barbour now. Great
birds inland!
Lucas BobayRaleigh

 

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Date: 9/12/17 10:04 am
From: bruce young (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Hudsonian Godwits
Gah, that's a lifer for me. And i can't get out of work today. 
On Tuesday, September 12, 2017, 12:54:09 PM EDT, Robert Rybczynski <carolinabirds...> wrote:

Godwits still here at Lake Wheeler

Good birding
Bob Rybczynski
Cary N C

 

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Date: 9/12/17 9:54 am
From: Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hudsonian Godwits
Godwits still here at Lake Wheeler

Good birding
Bob Rybczynski
Cary N C
 

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Date: 9/12/17 9:34 am
From: Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Sooty Tern?
I at lake Julian in Asheville; another Sooty or Bridled Hooper Lane,
Henderson County.
Will report back with details

Simon thompson
Asheville NC
--
Simon RB Thompson

Ventures Birding Tours
www.birdventures.com <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.birdventures.com&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=q-pJhMFYsddoLWa47sFNXNbPcKnSp0yhDh-HESztN_M&s=fuhWbrfujQGH4Fp0IfoeWUDQ3AJeagXLnfxctVsILdI&e= >

Phone: 828.253.4247
Email: <Venturesbirding...>

Check out our 2017-18 Birding & Nature Tours - International
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_InternationalTours.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=q-pJhMFYsddoLWa47sFNXNbPcKnSp0yhDh-HESztN_M&s=6rWvZXg2ghtiKG0koApFQw1pWnHLES9zYk0s16cxDJQ&e= >, USA & Canada
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_NorthAmerica.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=q-pJhMFYsddoLWa47sFNXNbPcKnSp0yhDh-HESztN_M&s=TuQ_OBnO-EJUDlUX3ZhEJZ__Ee2ggWadXTqrv8GRz8Y&e= >, and WNC day trips
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_DayTrips.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=q-pJhMFYsddoLWa47sFNXNbPcKnSp0yhDh-HESztN_M&s=SP5D3NeW0FhjipFhi-Qz2Hp1KygCLk9QfLYV5tQpRK4&e= >

[image:
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<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.tripadvisor.com_Attraction-5FReview-2Dg60742-2Dd12548573-2DReviews-2DVentures-5FBirding-5FTours-2DAsheville-5FNorth-5FCarolina.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=q-pJhMFYsddoLWa47sFNXNbPcKnSp0yhDh-HESztN_M&s=t9g-X2TCAt4tTRqvs_OJ7TARokorvEasPgvEtJE2e3k&e= >
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Date: 9/12/17 9:32 am
From: Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Shorebirds at Hooper Lane, Henderson County, NC
Lots of shorebirds on Hooper lane and best being:
Hudsonian Godwit 2
Red-necked Phalarope 1
White-rumps, Pectoral, Stilt Sand, western etc.

More information later- very wet and rainy

Simon thompson
Asheville NC

--
Simon RB Thompson

Ventures Birding Tours
www.birdventures.com <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.birdventures.com&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=fn9b01Gg0Y14MiVaAcBxXsrHZYnXCGjgLuOXUxdt9J4&s=1ZYOglR20mpeHRw6my-OYde8359mnHuhQVbQ7PH3s6Q&e= >

Phone: 828.253.4247
Email: <Venturesbirding...>

Check out our 2017-18 Birding & Nature Tours - International
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_InternationalTours.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=fn9b01Gg0Y14MiVaAcBxXsrHZYnXCGjgLuOXUxdt9J4&s=-Cxx4wVk8N9_KHJLBlPHXogqFMBU8CILdTZuCdOwY-Q&e= >, USA & Canada
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_NorthAmerica.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=fn9b01Gg0Y14MiVaAcBxXsrHZYnXCGjgLuOXUxdt9J4&s=eWXxHE8OJnARTWri-XXeZhCCb_S5QILVZKO4CzTHgk0&e= >, and WNC day trips
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_DayTrips.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=fn9b01Gg0Y14MiVaAcBxXsrHZYnXCGjgLuOXUxdt9J4&s=skD-cOpgXRZngf2fhWxv15SBot95BozrTxImv5hs5IM&e= >

[image:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.tripadvisor.com_Attraction-5FReview-2Dg60742-2Dd12548573-2DReviews-2DVentures-5FBirding-5FTours-2DAsheville-5FNorth-5FCarolina.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=fn9b01Gg0Y14MiVaAcBxXsrHZYnXCGjgLuOXUxdt9J4&s=pI_b0_QVA45LfCEpAXs04nplSx7Cj_MA7ePaUSRVJmo&e= ]
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.tripadvisor.com_Attraction-5FReview-2Dg60742-2Dd12548573-2DReviews-2DVentures-5FBirding-5FTours-2DAsheville-5FNorth-5FCarolina.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=fn9b01Gg0Y14MiVaAcBxXsrHZYnXCGjgLuOXUxdt9J4&s=pI_b0_QVA45LfCEpAXs04nplSx7Cj_MA7ePaUSRVJmo&e= >
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Date: 9/12/17 9:28 am
From: Will Cook <cwcook...>
Subject: Re: BROWN NODDY at Huntington Beach State Park, SC
Update: Chris reports that Huntington Beach State Park is closed today.

On 9/12/2017 11:22 AM, Will Cook wrote:
> Chris Hill‎ posted this to the Carolina Rare Birds facebook group 15
> mins ago:
>
> Brown Noddy on the beach at Huntington Beach State Park, photographed by
> Paul Laurent. Sitting with a large flock at the washout area (on the way
> up towards the Jetty).
>
> You can see the photo (after subscribing) at
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_groups_carolinararebirds_&d=DwIDaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Cwd1h9c_0LIcBp4Mu2rOMjoxsm6WCz6LeY77-fCLKew&s=ZrzxhuZkQnvbfk6Hd88-VnQdpXhQSVUXyWTO615-YaQ&e=
>

--
Will Cook - Durham, NC
www.carolinanature.com
 

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Date: 9/12/17 8:57 am
From: Lucas Bobay (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: 11 Hudsonian Godwits, Lake Wheeler
There are currently 11 Hudsonian Godwits at the Lake Wheeler mudflats
visible from Penny Rd (Wake Co NC). Birds are resting, feeding, and
preening. Here with Stacy and Natalie Barbour now. Great birds inland!

Lucas Bobay
Raleigh

 

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Date: 9/12/17 8:22 am
From: Will Cook <cwcook...>
Subject: BROWN NODDY at Huntington Beach State Park, SC
Chris Hill‎ posted this to the Carolina Rare Birds facebook group 15
mins ago:

Brown Noddy on the beach at Huntington Beach State Park, photographed by
Paul Laurent. Sitting with a large flock at the washout area (on the way
up towards the Jetty).

You can see the photo (after subscribing) at
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_groups_carolinararebirds_&d=DwIDaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Cwd1h9c_0LIcBp4Mu2rOMjoxsm6WCz6LeY77-fCLKew&s=ZrzxhuZkQnvbfk6Hd88-VnQdpXhQSVUXyWTO615-YaQ&e=

--
Will Cook - Durham, NC
www.carolinanature.com
 

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Date: 9/12/17 7:49 am
From: Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Red-necked Phalaropes. Fort Fisher, NC - GONE NOW
Hello all,

The phalaropes left when the wind dropped. Obtained photos.

I also saw a flock of 15 or so terns that looked good for Sooty Terns fly over the road and lost them behind trees. I was driving and did not get pics of those.


Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC

-----Original Message-----
From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Jamie Adams
Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 7:39 AM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Red-necked Phalaropes. Fort Fisher, NC

5 of them on side of road right before the road to the aquarium turn off.

Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC

Sent from my iPhone
********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************ This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank you. **********************************************************************
********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************ This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank you. **********************************************************************
 

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Date: 9/12/17 6:33 am
From: Irvin Pitts <pittsjam...>
Subject: Sooty Tern - Lake Murray
Hello,
This morning at 7:45 AM I saw a Sooty Tern from the SCE&G Park on the north side of the Lake Murray Dam in Lexington County, SC. The bird flew in from open water at a height of 15 to 20 feet and in a direct-line flight. When reaching the dam, it circled back over open water and then gained altitude and disappeared. I got a couple of mediocre photos which I'll post to my e-bird report.

Also of interest were Lesser Yellowlegs and a group of six immature Laughing Gulls.

Irvin Pitts
Lexington, SC
 

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Date: 9/12/17 4:39 am
From: Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Red-necked Phalaropes. Fort Fisher, NC
5 of them on side of road right before the road to the aquarium turn off.

Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC

Sent from my iPhone
********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************ This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank you. **********************************************************************
 

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Date: 9/11/17 4:20 pm
From: David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: SOOTY TERNS on Seabrook Island, SC
Hi folks,
Doing some tropical storm birding now that the rain is gone. 10 Sooty Terns seen flying back out to see.
Great views of juveniles and adults. Jet black trailing edge of underside of wing. No extensive white on forked tail.
Fantastic!
Here's hoping for Bridled and some jaegers soon.
David

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/11/17 10:43 am
From: Clifton Avery (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Yellow-bellied Flycatcher in Buncombe County
Hi Folks,

This morning at about 11:30 a.m. there was a large mixed flock in my front
yard. I was surprised to hear what sounded like a Yellow-bellied
Flycatcher amongst the commotion. I located a small flycatcher with
relatively long wings that had yellowish underparts, including the throat.
Broad, white wing bars and a complete, bold eye ring. The bird called and
responded to play back with continued "turree" calling. It also sang
twice. I will continue to keep trying to relocate and get photos.

Also, had a Swainson's Thrush and 7 species of warbler Looking forward to
seeing what else pops up in my yard over the next couple days.

Good Birding,

Clifton Avery
Tour Guide
Ventures Birding Tours
(828) 253-4247
birdventures.com

 

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Date: 9/11/17 10:04 am
From: Mike Judd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Brevard Hike & Bike Path--Hospital Fields, Sep 11, 2017
Hospital Fields, Transylvania County NC. A chilly wet morning provided an
outstanding warbler count (17) for three diligent and lucky folks.
May be a high count for this hotspot.

Mike Judd
Brevard
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: <ebird-checklist...>
Date: Mon, Sep 11, 2017 at 12:56 PM
Subject: eBird Report - Brevard Hike & Bike Path--Hospital Fields, Sep 11,
2017
To: <ebwilderae...>


Brevard Hike & Bike Path--Hospital Fields, Transylvania, North Carolina, US
Sep 11, 2017 9:20 AM - 11:30 AM
Protocol: Traveling
0.6 mile(s)
Comments: Early wet bands from Hurticane Irma. Lower fifties and
constant rain getting heavier as the morning progressed. Wind not too high
yet. A very memorable outing!
45 species (+1 other taxa)

Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) 1
Red-shouldered Hawk (Buteo lineatus) 1
Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) 3
Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) 9
Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens) 1
Eastern Wood-Pewee (Contopus virens) 4
Empidonax sp. (Empidonax sp.) 1
White-eyed Vireo (Vireo griseus) 1
Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) 2
Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) 7
American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) 8
Carolina Chickadee (Poecile carolinensis) 16
Tufted Titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor) 4
White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis) 1
House Wren (Troglodytes aedon) 1
Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus) 5
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea) 2
Eastern Bluebird (Sialia sialis) 6
Swainson's Thrush (Catharus ustulatus) 1
Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) 14
Brown Thrasher (Toxostoma rufum) 3
Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) 1
Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum) 2
Golden-winged Warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera) 1
Blue-winged Warbler (Vermivora cyanoptera) 1
Black-and-white Warbler (Mniotilta varia) 1
Tennessee Warbler (Oreothlypis peregrina) 5
Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas) 1
Hooded Warbler (Setophaga citrina) 1
American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla) 13
Northern Parula (Setophaga americana) 14
Magnolia Warbler (Setophaga magnolia) 6
Bay-breasted Warbler (Setophaga castanea) 1
Blackburnian Warbler (Setophaga fusca) 1
Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia) 1
Chestnut-sided Warbler (Setophaga pensylvanica) 5
Yellow-throated Warbler (Setophaga dominica) 3
Black-throated Green Warbler (Setophaga virens) 10
Canada Warbler (Cardellina canadensis) 1
Wilson's Warbler (Cardellina pusilla) 1
Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) 5
Eastern Towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus) 4
Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea) 3
Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) 8
House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) 1
American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis) 2

View this checklist online at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=t7GbBNa6d2E90pDSaxDVfDhpv10PkTkQQrCV1vbebWI&s=c2Hfj3qoH6Nimsly_YB5Cbk6sgba6mD2qOM7Ukz1dVA&e=
checklist/S39128033

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=t7GbBNa6d2E90pDSaxDVfDhpv10PkTkQQrCV1vbebWI&s=_NVtvAjDXBRlXqdnhFidhvO8R2sxObGIRr2Vz3hVWVw&e= )

 

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Date: 9/11/17 9:17 am
From: \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Warblers on the move this morning in Watauga Co., NC
Birders,

I had 15 species of wood warblers this morning on my farm in Watauga Co. I think this is a personal record for one day for the property. Notables were single golden-winged, Kentucky, and Wilson's warblers--the latter a new addition to the yard list!

The complete list submitted to eBird follows.

Merrill Lynch
Watauga Co., NC
>
> Echo Valley Farm, Watauga, North Carolina, US
> Sep 11, 2017 9:00 AM - 11:00 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 0.75 mile(s)
> 43 species
>
> Wood Duck (Aix sponsa) 2
> Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura) 1
> Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) 1
> Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) 2
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) 9
> Red-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus) 2
> Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens) 1
> Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) (Colaptes auratus auratus/luteus) 1
> Pileated Woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus) 1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee (Contopus virens) 2
> Eastern Phoebe (Sayornis phoebe) 1
> Yellow-throated Vireo (Vireo flavifrons) 1
> Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) 2
> American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) 5
> Carolina Chickadee (Poecile carolinensis) 4
> Tufted Titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor) 4
> White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern) (Sitta carolinensis carolinensis) 3
> House Wren (Troglodytes aedon) 1
> Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus) 2
> American Robin (Turdus migratorius) 10
> Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) 4
> Brown Thrasher (Toxostoma rufum) 1
> Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum) 42
> Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla) 2
> Golden-winged Warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera) 1
> Black-and-white Warbler (Mniotilta varia) 2
> Tennessee Warbler (Oreothlypis peregrina) 6
> Kentucky Warbler (Geothlypis formosa) 1
> Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas) 4
> Hooded Warbler (Setophaga citrina) 4
> American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla) 10
> Cape May Warbler (Setophaga tigrina) 2
> Magnolia Warbler (Setophaga magnolia) 1
> Blackburnian Warbler (Setophaga fusca) 1
> Chestnut-sided Warbler (Setophaga pensylvanica) 5
> Black-throated Blue Warbler (Setophaga caerulescens) 4
> Black-throated Green Warbler (Setophaga virens) 5
> Wilson's Warbler (Cardellina pusilla) 1
> Field Sparrow (Spizella pusilla) 2
> Eastern Towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus) 5
> Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) 2
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus) 1
> American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis) 3
>
> View this checklist online at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S39127154&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=FjbEXmCfWtZWEAmaCJM5RuvPXavj1n-_-AH2w5bUSC0&s=qWcoUmuJSO8Nve4IvdGvwQfd8JAAXpj9DUa0qr6h0ms&e=
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=FjbEXmCfWtZWEAmaCJM5RuvPXavj1n-_-AH2w5bUSC0&s=sqKQgLmwWxvR-3qwdlae7BebmE6igZcw9oXqscGLQIo&e= )
 

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Date: 9/11/17 8:38 am
From: <annbailes...>
Subject: Swarming Swallows at Dobbins Farm Ponds
We made a trip to the farm ponds this morning just to see if anything
interesting was out there as the remains of the hurricane come in. Not much
to see - except that a couple of hundred swallows were swarming over the lower
pond. Occasionally they would touch the surface. They appeared to be tree
swallows, although they were far enough away and moving so quickly that they
were difficult to identify the exact kind. They were definitely not barn
swallows. This behavior continued for the several-minutes period that we
watched them.

Ann Bailes
Anderson SC
<annbailes...>
 

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Date: 9/10/17 8:01 pm
From: Suzanne (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bird sightings list form
I really appreciate those folks that put their bird sightings in a list... such as ...

Carolina Chickadee
Bluebird
Goldfinch
Cardinal
White breasted nuthatch

I like to copy and paste these lists into a larger list so I can glance over what birds are here. I especially like to see FOS birds!

It's also easy to read.

🦆

Delightfully sent from Suzanne's iPhone

 

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Date: 9/10/17 5:31 pm
From: Greg Massey <gmassey001...>
Subject: Large Numbers of Black Terns at Fort Fisher Spit --Sept. 06, 2017
This report is a little late, but certainly noteworthy when Harry Sell and I observed over 650 Black Terns migrating south from Fort Fisher spit. It was over twenty years ago that the late Dr. Maurice Barnhill and I observed thousands of Black terns at the old Corncake Inlet (no longer, and when Bald Head was truly an island).
I haven't seen this many since that earlier observation. I am curious to know if anyone has seen these numbers of Black Terns in a migratory group.

Good birding!

Greg Massey
Leland,NC 28451
 

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Date: 9/10/17 4:36 pm
From: Aaron Steed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Olive-sided Flycatcher, Beaver Lake, Asheville
Hey everyone,

While looking for the Mourning Warbler found by Jay Wherley at Beaver Lake,
Clifton Avery and I spotted an Olive-sided Flycatcher alongside the filter
pond just before 2 PM. We got good but brief looks at this larger, stocky
flycatcher with dark, olive streaks on the flanks, as well as the large
head and bill longer and heftier than that of a pewee. The bird also called
a few times, the typical 'pit pit pit' - a nice surprise addition to the
day's excitement for sure! We lost track of it while trying to get eyes on
the Mourning in a flurry of activity, and efforts to relocate it were
unsuccessful.

We did both see the Mourning Warbler as well, also around the filter pond.
Hard to say which is the better bird for Buncombe Co. as both are
considered rare migrants through the region!

Also of note - earlier this morning Simon Thompson and I had a nice male
Wilson's Warbler at Hominy Creek Trail near Carrier Park. Although not
rare, it's always a treat to see one and is worth mentioning.

--
Aaron Steed
Ventures Birding Tours
Asheville, NC

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=5CXsf3-Fx9WtR9E0vb_Vjs2rrfk64aiaOEGjtgVYTTQ&s=w7a6LOya7jje1OMbQW-o2EKdYFLnpt9vGskjPsPRzg8&e=
LOTS of great day trip planned for this fall:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_DayTrips.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=5CXsf3-Fx9WtR9E0vb_Vjs2rrfk64aiaOEGjtgVYTTQ&s=1yTdAFdvwkTkoJ-Duxdd1BMypl2njhpLZIvduAIUEWs&e=

 

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Date: 9/10/17 2:58 pm
From: Jay Wherley (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mourning Warbler - Asheville / Beaver Lake Bird Sanctuary
Here is a link to a few photos of a Mourning Warbler from this morning
in Asheville. Subsequently seen by several others. Near the "filter
pond" area, around 10:30am, also seen this afternoon.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_gallery_Wherley_mowa.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=dpTFPOQIfEi7cQpFOJFlnQYoNQNt_SOD6TBHmP3SN3k&s=xpBEwUdZSo-TF8vwuTJeQMpuNjAYRJaC6_qunNmU96Y&e=

Field marks:
- broken white eye ring on gray head
- bright yellow undertail/belly
- olive-green/gray on top.
- possibly some light speckling on light throat

Jay Wherley
Asheville
 

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Date: 9/10/17 1:36 pm
From: Will Cook <cwcook...>
Subject: Fwd: Mississippi Kites Blue Ridge Pkwy MP 235 Alleghany Co.

-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: Mississippi Kites Blue Ridge Pkwy MP 235 Alleghany Co.
Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2017 05:51:35 -0400
From: <brbirders...>
To: <carolinabirds-request...>



4 Mississippi Kites were among the 30 some migrants at the Mahogany Rock
Hawk Watch yesterday 9/9/17. Mississippi Kites were counted last year at
the Mahogany Rock Hawk Count and have begun appearing this year at at
least one other western North Carolina hawk count site and also one over
my house at 7:30 pm August 30 when I was looking for nighthawks.
Jim Keighton
 

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Date: 9/10/17 11:18 am
From: Me (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lark Sparrow continues Fort Macon SP
Currently in septic field between back if visitors center and trail.
Marty Wall
Beaufort, NC
 

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Date: 9/10/17 8:40 am
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Duck, NC birds today
Went back to Duck this morning and had many of the same species as
yesterday, plus Black-throated Green, Northern Parula, Scarlet Tanager and
a Philadelphia Vireo!

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

 

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Date: 9/10/17 6:22 am
From: Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Clay-colored Sparrow, Patriots Point, Charleston, SC
At brush pile now with Ed and Marcy Blitch and Craig Watson, possibly two birds, one clearly seen.

Pam Ford
Charleston, SC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/10/17 5:06 am
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: Black Rail in Carteret County, NC
I heard a Black Rail giving growl calls at North River Marsh, wildlife club
property, on Friday, just before sunset. Good to know that the species is
still there.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

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Date: 9/10/17 3:59 am
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Wood Thrush - Dogwoods
FOS Wood Thrushes (2) hitting the dogwood berries currently. Heard Veery a minute ago but still no Swainson's. This week I'm certain.
A little more wind this morning early so finding stuff in this yard is going to be a bit more difficult.

Brian Pendergraft
with a sweatshirt on.....52 degrees!
Falls Lake NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/9/17 6:16 pm
From: Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Jackson Park, Hendersonville, NC Birdwalk today
Folks
We had about 30 birders turn up for the monthly walk today at Jackson Park.
It was a little cool and misty to start the day, so the birding was a
little slow. When the sun finally broke through we did have a few mixed
flocks that moved through the maples. The most abundant warbler had to be
American Redstart with the highest number being at least 8 in one stretch
of the Warbler Trail. We did manage 12 species of warblers, but numbers
were relatively low for the season- maybe the weather and impending storms
have kept them north. Hopefully the numbers will pick up in the next week
or so.

Our next walk in the area is at Charles D Owen Park in Swannanoa on
September 16 at 8 AM.
More details on the Elisha Mitchell Audubon Society's website:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.emasnc.org_calendar&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=I0493Q67WlkbSrgv359vV8bbqbkzxemYHWs42R9Z1oM&s=apVnES9GeN8sIQWKyz5ZtOKKhzKbLzjKcG0vGp_YZHQ&e=

Simon


The full list is below:
Jackson Park, Henderson, North Carolina, US
Sep 9, 2017 8:15 AM - 10:36 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.3 mile(s)
39 species

Great Blue Heron (Blue form) (Ardea herodias [herodias Group]) 1
Green Heron (Butorides virescens) 1
Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) 1
Red-shouldered Hawk (Buteo lineatus) 1
Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) 14
Red-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus) 2
Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens) 3
Hairy Woodpecker (Picoides villosus) 1
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) (Colaptes auratus auratus/luteus) 1
Eastern Wood-Pewee (Contopus virens) 5
Eastern Phoebe (Sayornis phoebe) 2
White-eyed Vireo (Vireo griseus) 1
Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) 4
Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) 6
American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) 20
Carolina Chickadee (Poecile carolinensis) 8
Tufted Titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor) 4
White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern) (Sitta carolinensis carolinensis) 4
House Wren (Troglodytes aedon) 1
Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus) 6
Eastern Bluebird (Eastern) (Sialia sialis sialis/bermudensis) 4
American Robin (Turdus migratorius) 8
Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) 1
Northern Waterthrush (Parkesia noveboracensis) 1
Black-and-white Warbler (Mniotilta varia) 2
Tennessee Warbler (Oreothlypis peregrina) 1
Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas) 1
Hooded Warbler (Setophaga citrina) 2
American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla) 14
Northern Parula (Setophaga americana) 2
Magnolia Warbler (Setophaga magnolia) 1
Bay-breasted Warbler (Setophaga castanea) 1
Blackburnian Warbler (Setophaga fusca) 6
Chestnut-sided Warbler (Setophaga pensylvanica) 5
Black-throated Green Warbler (Setophaga virens) 1
Eastern Towhee (Red-eyed) (Pipilo erythrophthalmus
erythrophthalmus/canaster) 1
Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) 4
Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) 2
American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis) 5

View this checklist online at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=I0493Q67WlkbSrgv359vV8bbqbkzxemYHWs42R9Z1oM&s=Q8__gbxTEvkVF8lRtm6sibNztpMnlZhNWSce21KIVYo&e=
checklist/S39079163


Simon RB Thompson

Ventures Birding Tours
www.birdventures.com <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.birdventures.com&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=I0493Q67WlkbSrgv359vV8bbqbkzxemYHWs42R9Z1oM&s=gADKKoAT7PanMq6zNk7IhL009PYd2X-Uzs-Y5ryRnpQ&e= >

Phone: 828.253.4247
Email: <Venturesbirding...>

Check out our 2017-18 Birding & Nature Tours - International
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_InternationalTours.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=I0493Q67WlkbSrgv359vV8bbqbkzxemYHWs42R9Z1oM&s=R5bMQztgMtouoI8S6ypxCLUESOrIq1gThNvQYAblGaQ&e= >, USA & Canada
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_NorthAmerica.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=I0493Q67WlkbSrgv359vV8bbqbkzxemYHWs42R9Z1oM&s=6rhV-FCW6rRyFQE_AaytKSm5Z9v1O1e7rl_fWUKkJw0&e= >, and WNC day trips
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_DayTrips.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=I0493Q67WlkbSrgv359vV8bbqbkzxemYHWs42R9Z1oM&s=9HYPdpwofQtBg19t1wp-1AL-EGD_pPgRA9ax7_b8bSA&e= >

[image:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.tripadvisor.com_Attraction-5FReview-2Dg60742-2Dd12548573-2DReviews-2DVentures-5FBirding-5FTours-2DAsheville-5FNorth-5FCarolina.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=I0493Q67WlkbSrgv359vV8bbqbkzxemYHWs42R9Z1oM&s=9pGQtTtSJvr_7FTWtErER9rXKouF4-mnlDH5VFQFdM4&e= ]
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.tripadvisor.com_Attraction-5FReview-2Dg60742-2Dd12548573-2DReviews-2DVentures-5FBirding-5FTours-2DAsheville-5FNorth-5FCarolina.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=I0493Q67WlkbSrgv359vV8bbqbkzxemYHWs42R9Z1oM&s=9pGQtTtSJvr_7FTWtErER9rXKouF4-mnlDH5VFQFdM4&e= >
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_VenturesBirding_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=I0493Q67WlkbSrgv359vV8bbqbkzxemYHWs42R9Z1oM&s=mcAgL4_WzEePPWROjill3OYfqwMETjL6nzNOZ0jMpiI&e= >

 

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Date: 9/9/17 5:32 pm
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Nash Vandemark Turf-early AM White-rump, 28 peep---Mills RIver sounds better!
Apparently most of the peep and the (40) Horned Larks spent the night near Gate B, around second and third wheel sets.

Key for these birds and the 10 peep at the far southwestern end is removed turf, leaving puddles and moist spots. I doubt there are many more birds in big back area, which is a sea of green, growing turf.

18 Least Sandpipers and one White-rumped at Gate B, 10 Leasts at Southwest (disturbed from Gate B). Only some 10 Killdeer--maybe rest left before I got here. Red-tailed and Red-shouldered Hawk out in fields (on irrigation).

Some peep got into turf, but the mist and dew make it obvious why short birds would not want to walk in there in AM. These peep are not grasspipers but mudpipers. The Killdeer seem to be able to handle the short green grass. Leasts that settled in the green soon got out.


7:15 to 7:50 AM.


I had two Killdeer fly in to my chick yard (gravel) near dawn, so I suppose the Killdeer that roost at Vandemark go out to small open areas very early.


How close do Baird's have to be to be called? A still photo allows one to examine details of plumage, but these peep are constantly walking about to feed, so I cannot see all that much (leg color, sure, but not anchors on feathers!) (30-40x scope and 10x bins). Maybe the trick is to find birds roosting at high tide, which does not occur near here.


I guess I am done here. Rare birds might fly in, from time to time, but winds from north do not bode well for anything except drop-in-and-get-out-birds. Just as I doubt this farm can support all the workers and new equipment, I have this feeling there are not the food resources for shorebirds to gain weight.

 

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Date: 9/9/17 5:18 pm
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: OBX migrants today
Birded Duck, NC this afternoon for a couple of hours. Had the following:
Several redstarts, 2 Black and whites, 2 Prairies, 2 Yellows, 1
Blackburnian, 2 yellowthroats, 1 Hooded, several Red-eyed Vireos, 2
Baltimore Orioles, lots of Eastern Kingbirds, lots of Ruby-throats, one
Eastern wood-pewee, one Blue-winged Teal.
At home this morning I had a Wilson's Warbler, Ovenbird, Black-and-white
and Red-eyed Vireo.

Fall fun!

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

 

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Date: 9/9/17 8:32 am
From: Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Decent Morning - Yard Stuff
Note worthy birds in our wooded backyard near Hillsborough on the Little
River right now

Scarlet Tanager​
Black-throated Blue Warbler!
Black and White Warbler
Pileated Woodpecker
Ruby-throated Hummingbirds (2 either females or juv) turf war over feeder

Cheers






On Sat, Sep 9, 2017 at 9:58 AM, Brian Pendergraft <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> I had a little fun in the yard on a down right chilly morning. Thursday
> and Friday morning may have been better but I had to work.
> 6:45-9:45 am (just the highlights)
>
> Scarlet Tanager (3)
> Yellow-throated Vireo (at least 3)
> Hooded Warbler
> American Redstart
> Black and White Warbler
> Common Yellowthroat
> Baltimore Oriole
> Veery (2)
> Pileated Woodpecker
>
> Stay safe everyone.
>
> Brian Pendergraft
> Falls Lake NC
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone




--
Helen Kalevas
Near Hillsborough, NC

 

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Date: 9/9/17 6:58 am
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Decent Morning - Yard Stuff
I had a little fun in the yard on a down right chilly morning. Thursday and Friday morning may have been better but I had to work.
6:45-9:45 am (just the highlights)

Scarlet Tanager (3)
Yellow-throated Vireo (at least 3)
Hooded Warbler
American Redstart
Black and White Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Baltimore Oriole
Veery (2)
Pileated Woodpecker

Stay safe everyone.

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC


Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/8/17 5:02 pm
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Nash Vandemark turf--nothing rare, 15-30 peep
6 to 7:15 P. 30 Crows at start, 6 at end; 7 Killdeer to start, 50 at end (heard to arrive).


Re yesterday's 6 in and out: a Buff Breast was seen in mts of Virginia yesterday; maybe peak migration time, with marked cooling and northwest winds. Surely some observers have seen migrant shorebirds drop in and leave turf farms, perhaps after running about to see if there is much food available (and finding little).


Yesterday's possible Uppie was a meadowlark, today much closer and walking in open cut grass; too dark and "rufous", among other things.

15-30 peep, including some Least S. Walking near Gate B, around second or third sets of wheels of center pivot irrigation. Along with some 20 H. Larks, usually at edges of fields, lines of tall dead or green grass, possibly in wheel ruts. Peep seemed fairly active, sometimes fly-hopping along a bit. Some as close as 200-300' from road. Why might there not be scores more, far from road, where similar vegetation can be seen?



Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

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Date: 9/8/17 3:10 pm
From: william haddad (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: This morning at Hefner Gap and the Orchard Road
I was joined by four birders from Burnsville at Hefner Gap at about 7:45 and we had pretty good action until about 9:am. Then we went a couple of miles south on the BRP, where we saw migrants until about 9:30 am. The recurring question that occurs to me is: how good would the Orchard have been when we were seeing birds at Hefner? In any case, combining the results as to birds seen in both places we saw the following twelve species of Warblers:

1. Black-throated Blue
2. Canada
3. Chestnut-sided
4. Cape May
5. Nashville
6. Hooded
7. Magnolia
8. Black-throated Green
9. Chestnut-sided
10. Tennessee
11. American Redstart
12. Black and White

Other notable birds we saw included a pair of Baltimore Orioles, several Wood Pewees which were flycatching down to the Orchard Road just in front of us and several Scarlet Tanagers and Indigo Buntings.

Bill Haddad
Spruce Pine, N.C.

Sent from Mail for Windows 10.


---
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Date: 9/8/17 12:59 pm
From: Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: fall bird counts coming up
Hello all, could always use more help at the upcoming state park fall
migration counts.

Sep 14 Mayo River State Park Rockingham county
Sep 18 Falls Lake Wake/Durham county
Sep 20 Kerr Lake Vance/Warren county

Let me know if you're interested in helping!

--
Brian Bockhahn
<birdranger248...>

 

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Date: 9/8/17 12:47 pm
From: Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: any Morrow Mountain state park, NC birders
Reply off list please if you have familiarity birding morrow mountain state
park in Albermarle NC. There is a kids event there in Oct with owl prowls
and bird id hikes and wanted some local knowledge.

thanks!

--
Brian Bockhahn
<birdranger248...>

 

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Date: 9/8/17 8:26 am
From: Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Jackson Park, Hendersonville Bird Walk this Saturday
Hi folks

Just to let you know that the monthly Jackson Park, Hendersonville, NC walk
is scheduled for Saturday September 9 at 8 AM
If you are not familiar with the park, it has consistently been a great
migration spot during the fall.
Directions: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.emasnc.org_calendar&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Sl8RqRIQZtKECqtKwHMqh6FMH4KQ_X_pUVfk4Y24q4k&s=3WX_W3xw3GvQe4HlDiJoSXIONclMNIdr1EyHczGE3dk&e=

The trails are easy, a leader will be along to help out with those
confusing fall warblers and be prepared for a 2 hour walk. The walk is open
to all with no charge. Please meet at the main administrative building
parking lot in Jackson Park.

Elisha Mitchell Audubon Society latest newsletter
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__myemail.constantcontact.com_August-2D2017.html-3Fsoid-3D1112350923316-26aid-3DV9WbPIBDRd4&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Sl8RqRIQZtKECqtKwHMqh6FMH4KQ_X_pUVfk4Y24q4k&s=JJUk-HidGXpBx3_pF2QiNIiQuWQ749lgqlJbxjOmNX8&e=

Simon RB Thompson

Ventures Birding Tours
www.birdventures.com <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.birdventures.com&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Sl8RqRIQZtKECqtKwHMqh6FMH4KQ_X_pUVfk4Y24q4k&s=IBqHxUFFthXioF-Zl6Rr--AMi34To1zZs6nEl9dPMp8&e= >

Phone: 828.253.4247
Email: <Venturesbirding...>

Check out our 2017-18 Birding & Nature Tours - International
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_InternationalTours.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Sl8RqRIQZtKECqtKwHMqh6FMH4KQ_X_pUVfk4Y24q4k&s=SVKDDSPb_qWnTdovaPSuxSiYDk1fcJ6WIV6bjv1zXbI&e= >, USA & Canada
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_NorthAmerica.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Sl8RqRIQZtKECqtKwHMqh6FMH4KQ_X_pUVfk4Y24q4k&s=7_rv7tjPRffWTC6mIf-GtTwkE0jqROkYTwVgwD6531k&e= >, and WNC day trips
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_DayTrips.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Sl8RqRIQZtKECqtKwHMqh6FMH4KQ_X_pUVfk4Y24q4k&s=IdWRvvdH_giPc-1V8wp25K8jUbE5nDvc8_jRMcfVkDM&e= >

[image:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.tripadvisor.com_Attraction-5FReview-2Dg60742-2Dd12548573-2DReviews-2DVentures-5FBirding-5FTours-2DAsheville-5FNorth-5FCarolina.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Sl8RqRIQZtKECqtKwHMqh6FMH4KQ_X_pUVfk4Y24q4k&s=JW1-ByNnhXfngfVaAaFNDDzw3fvZsZAgiTosgxTutNY&e= ]
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.tripadvisor.com_Attraction-5FReview-2Dg60742-2Dd12548573-2DReviews-2DVentures-5FBirding-5FTours-2DAsheville-5FNorth-5FCarolina.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Sl8RqRIQZtKECqtKwHMqh6FMH4KQ_X_pUVfk4Y24q4k&s=JW1-ByNnhXfngfVaAaFNDDzw3fvZsZAgiTosgxTutNY&e= >
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_VenturesBirding_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Sl8RqRIQZtKECqtKwHMqh6FMH4KQ_X_pUVfk4Y24q4k&s=TgPmiN3wdZ69FfmXZYPjC_SpxuEgmbqrrKv5msZciG0&e= >

 

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Date: 9/8/17 5:17 am
From: Jelmer Poelstra (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Buff-breasted Sandpiper at Jordan Lake
Hi all,

There is currently a Buff-breasted Sandpiper at New Hope Creek at Jordan
Lake. The bird is foraging on the flats on the eastern side of the lake,
south of the railroad grade (so the light is terrible from the RR grade at
the moment), along with other waders.

Jelmer Poelstra
Chapel Hill

 

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Date: 9/7/17 7:34 pm
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Nash Co. Turf Farm 6 Buff-breasted S. hustle around and leave? some peep
6 to 7 PM with wind from nw. Almost nothing at first, scanning from west to east end of turf farm. Maybe 4 Killdeer in sw. Thought skunked.


Returning to interstate while scanning with scope, I noticed some 15 H. Larks out behind the center pivot irrigation in bare ground behind a line of brown tall grass. These foraging birds caused me to notice some 20 peep foraging in the dead grass, including at least 2 Pectoral S. Way far out northeast. Viewing from road a bit west of main entrance to Vandemark Turf.


Set up scope again near Shiloh Church and noticed 6 Buff-breasted Sandpipers on green sod way out; these seemed not to have been there while I worked from west to east. They were rushing about, spread out, more active than any Buffies I have ever watched. And, they apparently upped and left, by the time I got my wife through the tall grass and traffic to view the birds.

When I tried to relocate the flock, I found a largish, darkish-reddish elongate ?sandpiper? in a line of tall brown grass, moving about v. slowly and ducking out of view, perhaps an Upland Sandpiper, center and way back from Shiloh Church. Using up to 60x, it was quite tough to make out most birds, due to distance. Good light.

And when I returned to the sw corner, a few more Killdeer moved in, giving a total of 6.


A few crows and Starlings when I arrived, but they left. No harriers. Mourning Doves on all three visits (not mentioned earlier).



Sept 7, 2017.

Also, had two Killdeer drop into my gravelled chick yard (semi- tractor-trailer turnaround) in morning, and one at Richneck Road cow pasture in PM. Killdeer numbers seem to change quite a lot--could this be migration?

Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

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Date: 9/7/17 2:34 pm
From: james poling (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Birds at Hooper Lane, Mills River, NC
A group of dedicated birders went to Hooper Lane, Mills River, NC today to see Simon’s birds. It was quiet, but we did see a few interesting birds: 1 Pectoral Sandpiper (injured), 2 Northern Harrier, 2 Bobolink, 1 Forster’s Tern among others. Two pictures included so others can confirm our ID, or not. Jim Poling



James Poling
624 Azalea Avenue
Black Mountain, NC 28711 USA
<james.poling...> <mailto:<james.poling...>
www.jamesnewtonpoling.com <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.jamesnewtonpoling.com_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=uQ0wnK-VXmBIlczzzsoF-X34m2cE4z2bTYFiYSMSFnc&s=N9COHx6PWGjqNfGf2fXI1Td-ak6CHn6ImZ3JiT5xrZA&e= >
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__pinterest.com_jamesnpoling_boards_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=uQ0wnK-VXmBIlczzzsoF-X34m2cE4z2bTYFiYSMSFnc&s=SV-pGVAAy7tT-20Wd3Y-_6UPdCSw5mFQwT7w-BwFYZI&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__pinterest.com_jamesnpoling_boards_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=uQ0wnK-VXmBIlczzzsoF-X34m2cE4z2bTYFiYSMSFnc&s=SV-pGVAAy7tT-20Wd3Y-_6UPdCSw5mFQwT7w-BwFYZI&e= >
828-707-7413




 

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Date: 9/6/17 6:06 pm
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Fwd: Bluebird presentation at Wilkes County Library Sept. 21
Deborah Beckel, a librarian at the Wilkes County Public Library, in
North Wilkesboro, NC, has asked to have a notice posted to the listservs
about a presentation on Bluebirds, which is being held at the Wilkes
County Library on Sept. 21. She provided the following information about
the presentation:


/**//*Year-round Bluebirds will be a presentation at Wilkes County
Public Library in North Wilkesboro on Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017, at 6 PM.
Join Juanna Carlton Wooten and her sister Ann Carlton McGuire, county
coordinators for the N.C. Bluebird Society, to learn and talk about
Eastern Bluebirds. Topics covered will include bluebird characteristics,
habits and food; putting up and monitoring bluebird houses; and
preventing predators. The talk will be about 40 minutes, followed by
questions and answers. Wilkes County Public Library is located at 215
Tenth St. in North Wilkesboro. The N.C. Bluebird Societys purpose is to
protect Eastern Bluebirds and to educate the public.*/


For more information please contact Deborah at the address listed as a
CC for this email, or the phone number listed below.

Guy McGrane
Deep Gap, NC


-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: Bluebird presentation at Wilkes County Library Sept. 21
Date: Tue, 5 Sep 2017 22:33:25 +0000
From: Deborah Beckel <DBeckel...>
To: <badgerboy...> <badgerboy...>



Hello Mr. McGrane,

There will be a presentation about Eastern bluebirds at Wilkes County
Public Library on Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017 at 6 pm by Juanna Wooten of
the NC Bluebird Society.

Would you be able to suggest any ways that I can promote this talk,
either through organizations or individuals.

I very much appreciate any advice or ideas that you may have.

With best wishes, and thanks,

Deborah

Deborah Beckel
Reference Librarian
Wilkes County Public Library
336-838-2818

 

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Date: 9/6/17 4:56 pm
From: M Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: re: Pitt Street, Mt. Pleasant, SC
Hello,

Good birds at Pitt Street, Mt. Pleasant, SC today included reddish egret,
roseate spoonbill, black tern, red-breasted merganser, and great
black-backed gull.

Photos will be posted to ebird.

Matthew Campbell
Charleston, SC

 

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Date: 9/6/17 4:50 pm
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Nash Co. Turf farm, Aug 25, Sep.6--not much, just changes in Killdeer##
First visit only 7 Killdeer; numbers and quality up since then (others). .

Only using 8x bins, but would have noticed harriers and bigger numbers of shorebirds.


Today, while winds still from south (but storms last night), thought I might see good species before they were pushed out by the change to north winds (plus storms at 4:30 P).

3:30-3:30 P using scope, 36 Killdeer and 2 peep (Semis?). Earlier obs were mainly southwest corner, gate 3, but 10 Killdeer and 2 peep there, while 26 more Killdeer were at gate 2 (also broken land, birds not seeming to care for turf).

One H. Lark seen flying far away. 20 Rock Pigeon--sure to eat seeds if they are seeding grass! These pigeons roost on several I-95 nearby bridges and surely eat other stuff too.

No harriers.


Killdeer surely lurk elsewhere--a small pasture on Richneck Road in Halifax County had 5 at 4:50P. Usual spot for Least Sandp. and snipe when mud pond lower.





Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

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Date: 9/6/17 11:48 am
From: Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: More Hooper Lane, Henderson County, NC Shorebirds
Folks
Aaron Steed and I checked out the flooded fields along Hooper Lane this
morning. It was raining heavily and birds kept moving around, due to
working machinery (which eventually stopped) and 1-2 Northern Harriers that
flushed the flocks.

Despite the rainy conditions, we had the following highlights:

Black-bellied Plover 10
American Golden Plover 7
Semipalmated Plover 8
Stilt Sandpiper 2
Baird's Sandpiper 1
Buff-breasted Sandpiper 2
Forster's Tern 3
Bobolink 70+

The e-bird link, along with some photos is as follows:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S39032998&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=A4U1t-4odgk-7p9pyI8IpDvpb5Tc0Mj14ZAmFpt2jU4&s=bj3me4D6grYZ5tzyFznaW4XRMSy3mvhAvTNON9i0938&e=

Simon

Simon RB Thompson

We have an excellent selection of day-trips offered this fall, so check out
the list below.

Ventures Birding Tours
www.birdventures.com <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.birdventures.com&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=A4U1t-4odgk-7p9pyI8IpDvpb5Tc0Mj14ZAmFpt2jU4&s=wFUWqLH00IBtBDeZVsrVA9a7UyBl1XmaDUAizgcBVCM&e= >

Phone: 828.253.4247
Email: <Venturesbirding...>

Check out our 2017-18 Birding & Nature Tours - International
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_InternationalTours.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=A4U1t-4odgk-7p9pyI8IpDvpb5Tc0Mj14ZAmFpt2jU4&s=NNB9Haqeg0Q_yqT5cCW-0f1m1_0nhsSE8-pcISKD3cs&e= >, USA & Canada
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_NorthAmerica.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=A4U1t-4odgk-7p9pyI8IpDvpb5Tc0Mj14ZAmFpt2jU4&s=GgBU0uivfTt2SGGiW9i7g4Z50hwbI380pfebG3oJBWw&e= >, and WNC day trips
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_DayTrips.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=A4U1t-4odgk-7p9pyI8IpDvpb5Tc0Mj14ZAmFpt2jU4&s=O1I8WVpKQLVSFTSoXf8w_EKp5-3eGDDfEBfRSJNZ60A&e= >

[image:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.tripadvisor.com_Attraction-5FReview-2Dg60742-2Dd12548573-2DReviews-2DVentures-5FBirding-5FTours-2DAsheville-5FNorth-5FCarolina.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=A4U1t-4odgk-7p9pyI8IpDvpb5Tc0Mj14ZAmFpt2jU4&s=-uRnxAYBNdyAeaK2gM-J8L_szt_pc_z22CpmjjXhylc&e= ]
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.tripadvisor.com_Attraction-5FReview-2Dg60742-2Dd12548573-2DReviews-2DVentures-5FBirding-5FTours-2DAsheville-5FNorth-5FCarolina.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=A4U1t-4odgk-7p9pyI8IpDvpb5Tc0Mj14ZAmFpt2jU4&s=-uRnxAYBNdyAeaK2gM-J8L_szt_pc_z22CpmjjXhylc&e= >
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_VenturesBirding_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=A4U1t-4odgk-7p9pyI8IpDvpb5Tc0Mj14ZAmFpt2jU4&s=hjGtHfTS0rEgBB0yTSofo-pbNIzPsL2C8dRaNsbg8vk&e= >

 

Back to top
Date: 9/5/17 4:18 pm
From: <wforsythe...>
Subject: Jackson Park, Henderson Cty., NC
Folks,

Simon Harvey and I birded Jackson Park this AM. Overall, things
were very quiet but we did have 6 species of warblers to include: 2
Chestnut-sided, 2 American Redstarts, 1 Black & White, 1 Northern
Parula, 1 Black-throated Green and 2 Yellow-throated Warblers!

Wayne
 

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Date: 9/5/17 2:34 pm
From: DPratt14 <dpratt14...>
Subject: Nighthawks in Yadkin R. Valley
Hi birders:

Sorry for the late posting. This past weekend I attended the Happy Valley Fiddlers Convention along the Yadkin River near the tiny town of Ferguson NC. On Saturday night, with low-hanging clouds after a day of rain, I noticed ca. 20 Common Nighthawks circling in the festival lights only a few hundred yards from the river. I assume they were feeding on insects attracted to the lights. They must have been migrating because they were not present the night before.

Doug Pratt
Cary, NC


 

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Date: 9/5/17 12:42 pm
From: \James.poling\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mississippi Kite. eBird -- Irma's Produce Fields -- Sep 5, 2017
Irma's Produce Fields
> Sep 5, 2017
> 3:07 PM
> Stationary
> 30 Minutes
> All birds reported? No
> Comments: Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.5.4 Build 149
>
> 2 Mississippi Kite -- Regular sightings over two weeks.
>
> Number of Taxa: 1
>
>
> James Poling, Black Mountain, NC
 

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Date: 9/5/17 12:07 pm
From: Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Ridge Junction and future trips
Folks

A group of us met at Ridge Junction on the Parkway yesterday morning.
Aside from a spectacular sunrise and a very pleasant temperature there was
some pretty good migration going on. through the gap and around the entry
road to Mt Mitchell.
Highlights included several small family groups of Red Crossbill,
Red-breasted Nuthatch, a handful of Scarlet Tanagers and Rose-breasted
Grosbeak, lots of hummingbirds flying across the road and a nice variety of
warblers, such as Cape May (50+), Tennessee, Black-throated Green,
Black-throated Blue, Blackburnian etc.
Complete list at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S38997403&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=cCuG-L-vQ2PrU1ZvqO7e66HDa_bGSfXRJqRDk9uTNcY&s=Xy8wu6ntNgVXHjTBSyRf4q7Dad61m3b1V1Lq3sGyTQI&e=

We have several trips coming up and a few spaces still available:

September 6: Warbler Workshop in Jackson Park, Hendersonville, NC
September 13: Ridge Junction Migration, Asheville, NC
September 15: Orchard at Altapass, Burnsville, NC
All details on the Ventures website.

Good birding this fall,
Simon

Simon RB Thompson

Ventures Birding Tours
www.birdventures.com <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.birdventures.com&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=cCuG-L-vQ2PrU1ZvqO7e66HDa_bGSfXRJqRDk9uTNcY&s=13VWXbQ4UPAjXf_L68WckpdlI2XI8zPo1CXsnxXuXmk&e= >

Phone: 828.253.4247
Email: <Venturesbirding...>

Check out our 2017-18 Birding & Nature Tours - International
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_InternationalTours.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=cCuG-L-vQ2PrU1ZvqO7e66HDa_bGSfXRJqRDk9uTNcY&s=YAtjQumIP99rkJ08S73Oe-PAzPcj1lNkaoBmgKsd_2Q&e= >, USA & Canada
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_NorthAmerica.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=cCuG-L-vQ2PrU1ZvqO7e66HDa_bGSfXRJqRDk9uTNcY&s=AUSCtIEB3bfeYFid5h7EHJtHLqtK-m7WVi2k1yPDASc&e= >, and WNC day trips
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_DayTrips.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=cCuG-L-vQ2PrU1ZvqO7e66HDa_bGSfXRJqRDk9uTNcY&s=aH_3RRhnhJxW-Db4kCJNGhUMqGXKsJ5wxGRukvLCxhc&e= >

[image:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.tripadvisor.com_Attraction-5FReview-2Dg60742-2Dd12548573-2DReviews-2DVentures-5FBirding-5FTours-2DAsheville-5FNorth-5FCarolina.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=cCuG-L-vQ2PrU1ZvqO7e66HDa_bGSfXRJqRDk9uTNcY&s=fAZ-nRuuNxFD4d88Klq4WZi6pVOTr1XJN1Ve9ggIXF0&e= ]
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.tripadvisor.com_Attraction-5FReview-2Dg60742-2Dd12548573-2DReviews-2DVentures-5FBirding-5FTours-2DAsheville-5FNorth-5FCarolina.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=cCuG-L-vQ2PrU1ZvqO7e66HDa_bGSfXRJqRDk9uTNcY&s=fAZ-nRuuNxFD4d88Klq4WZi6pVOTr1XJN1Ve9ggIXF0&e= >
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_VenturesBirding_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=cCuG-L-vQ2PrU1ZvqO7e66HDa_bGSfXRJqRDk9uTNcY&s=rnMEdugZb9w5NAdSfMs8NEkAwz_rs1JtJJtgkYiv7p0&e= >

 

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Date: 9/5/17 5:33 am
From: William Majoros <william.majoros...>
Subject: good labor day birding at Few's Ford, Eno River State Park

I spent 2.5 hours in the open field area at Few's Ford, Eno River State Park, Durham, on Monday, and got excellent views of the following birds, mostly in the grassy area at the end of Fowler's Field:

Canada warbler
Chestnut-sided warbler
Northern parula
Common nighthawk
Yellow-throated warbler
Yellow-throated vireo
White-eyed vireo
Red-eyed vireo
Yellow-billed cuckoo
Black-and-white warbler
Summer tanager
Indigo bunting
Blue-gray gnatcatcher
Rufous-sided towhee
American goldfinch
Ruby-throated hummingbird
Downy woodpecker
Hairy woodpecker
Cedar waxwing
Northern cardinal
Common yellowthroat
House finch
Eastern wood pewee

Bill Majoros
Durham, NC


 

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Date: 9/5/17 4:39 am
From: Chris Canfield (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Common Nighthawks. eBird -- US-NC-Black Mountain-510 NC-9 Ingles parking lot -- Sep 4, 2017
Interesting post since the evening before (Sunday) I was in Pittsboro NC practicing tennis serves when during the ball toss I looked up to see a flock of birds flying overhead. At first I thought they were chimneys swifts. But shape and wing beats wrong. Then on closer examination (albeit without binoculars) I saw the white stripes on at least one bird. Estimate 60-70 migrating Common Nighthawks.

Chris Canfield

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 4, 2017, at 7:48 PM, James.poling <james.poling...> wrote:
>
>
>
> James Poling, Black Mountain, NC
>
> Begin forwarded message:
>
>> From: "James.poling" <james.poling...>
>> Date: September 4, 2017 at 7:47:24 PM EDT
>> To: james poling <james.poling...>
>> Subject: eBird -- US-NC-Black Mountain-510 NC-9 Ingles parking lot -- Sep 4, 2017
>>
>> US-NC-Black Mountain-510 NC-9 Ingles parking lot
>> Sep 4, 2017
>> 7:30 PM
>> Stationary
>> 30 Minutes
>> All birds reported? No
>> Comments: Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.5.4 Build 149
>>
>> 200 Common Nighthawk -- Kettle of birds high in the sky. Obvious migration
>>
>> Number of Taxa: 1
>>
>>
>> James Poling, Black Mountain, NC

 

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Date: 9/4/17 4:49 pm
From: \James.poling\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Common Nighthawks. eBird -- US-NC-Black Mountain-510 NC-9 Ingles parking lot -- Sep 4, 2017


James Poling, Black Mountain, NC

Begin forwarded message:

> From: "James.poling" <james.poling...>
> Date: September 4, 2017 at 7:47:24 PM EDT
> To: james poling <james.poling...>
> Subject: eBird -- US-NC-Black Mountain-510 NC-9 Ingles parking lot -- Sep 4, 2017
>
> US-NC-Black Mountain-510 NC-9 Ingles parking lot
> Sep 4, 2017
> 7:30 PM
> Stationary
> 30 Minutes
> All birds reported? No
> Comments: Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.5.4 Build 149
>
> 200 Common Nighthawk -- Kettle of birds high in the sky. Obvious migration
>
> Number of Taxa: 1
>
>
> James Poling, Black Mountain, NC

 

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Date: 9/4/17 6:33 am
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Busy Yard This Morning
I needed a long sleeve shirt this morning early and the birds were everywhere. Many species not listed.

Scarlet Tanager
Summer Tanager (3-4)
Yellow-throated Vireo
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Baltimore Oriole (at least 3)
Red-eyed Vireo (probably 10)
Hooded Warbler (probably same bird as yesterday)
Black and White Warbler
Veery
Northern Parula
American Redstart
Pileated Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker

Another cold front coming through later this week . Kyle wrote me yesterday and said a good movement of birds is working through the northeast US currently.

Hope that hurricane stays away.

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC

Sent from my iPhone

 

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Date: 9/3/17 9:12 pm
From: Ricky Davis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: New Hope Creek, Jordan Lake
Hi folks,

Went looking for the Spoonbill at New Hope Creek Sunday - no luck!! But did see the continuing Wood Stork, and there were still lots of shorebirds. Highlights included 1 Black-bellied and 46 Semipalmated Plovers, 26 Stilt Sandpipers, 1 Sanderling, 1 Baird's and 5 White-rumped Sandpipers, 55 Pectorals, 75 Lesser Yellowlegs, and a smattering of the usuals. Real neat was at one point, the Bairds and White-rumpeds were side by side, affording great comparison! Most of the birds were in the mud flats around the RailRoad grade and upstream from there.

Thanks, later, Ricky

Ricky Davis
Rocky Mount, NC
 

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Date: 9/3/17 12:22 pm
From: Ron <waxwing...>
Subject: Southern Piedmont migrants

Jim Guyton and I birded Ribbonwalk Nature Preserve in Charlotte this morning
and found a good number of migrants. We finished with 39 species.

Ron Clark

Ruby-throated Hummingbird 1
Eastern Wood-Pewee 2
Willow Flycatcher 1 Empid. "Whit" call several times. Short wing
projection.
Empidonax sp. 2
Yellow-throated Vireo 1
Red-eyed Vireo 7
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 5
Wood Thrush 1
Gray Catbird 1
Worm-eating Warbler 2
Blue-winged Warbler 1
Black-and-white Warbler 2
American Redstart 8
Cape May Warbler 1
Northern Parula 1
Magnolia Warbler 2
Chestnut-sided Warbler 4
Yellow-breasted Chat 1
Scarlet Tanager 1

 

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Date: 9/3/17 10:27 am
From: william haddad (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Nashville Warbler and other Migrants at Hefner Gap this morning
Many birds from 7:30 to 9a.m. staging in the Sumac and then crossing to the trees on the upper side of the BRP. Saw the Nashville – first of Fall- soon after I arrived. Warblers seen: Nashville (1); Black-throated
Blue (12): Black-throated Green (7); Parula (7); Black and White (1); Hooded (1); Worm-eating (1): American Redstart (1); and Tennessee (4 – FOF). Mark Thomas, who arrived after I did saw many of these birds and also saw a Canada. Other birds of note – Indigo Bunting, Waxwings, Wood Peewee and Red-eyed Vireo.

Mark was out there in the bad weather yesterday and met a group pf birders from Burnsville. He told me there were many birds present yesterday but with the fog hard to ID.

Bill Haddad
Spruce Pine, N.C
Sent from Mail for Windows 10



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
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Date: 9/3/17 8:56 am
From: Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lake Wheeler: Wood Stork
I birded at Lake Wheeler this morning, after stopping at Mid Pines Rd and Yates Millpond. Nothing of note at the latter 2 spots except a hilarious, minutes-long floating log-rolling demonstration" by 4 turtles. At L. Wheeler, the only shorebirds I saw were Killdeer (c. 10) and both Yellowlegs (also c. 10). Just as I was packing up my scope, I spotted the Wood Stork circling over the westernmost part of the lake. As it gained altitude, it drifted east and I lost it when it passed over me, due to the tree canopy cover.

Good birding!
Bob Rybczynski
Cary, NC

 

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Date: 9/3/17 7:45 am
From: Tim Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Confusion about Hooper Lane shorebirds, and worrisome eBird filter
For anyone unfamiliar with the Hooper Lane area in Henderson Co. here is a Google Maps satellite view<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps_place_Hooper-2BLn-2C-2BMills-2BRiver-2C-2BNC-2B28759_-4035.3944618-2C-2D82.5453282-2C2038m_data-3D-213m1-211e3-214m5-213m4-211s0x8859eb24971805f1-3A0x17218c449cfc9d01-218m2-213d35.3887476-214d-2D82.5454094&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=cJe1QNiETG6LsqhgfuSqdbyctvTpaxAYPOp-Youe0nI&s=vSY6ewCeMHPBGAXNe_QlffLNDdg6K4VFG98rvEfXqRE&e= >. It is Mills River that floods the "former" wetlands area, now plowed fields and sod farms with drainage ditches.


Hooper Lane is a gravel (and mud) road.


Tim Lewis
Jackson County, NC
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.tim-2Dlewis.com_&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=cJe1QNiETG6LsqhgfuSqdbyctvTpaxAYPOp-Youe0nI&s=x09TpekLfyu2JXmhby5f1IDSYtRjCQDR5DID_gVaqh4&e= >


________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...>
Sent: Saturday, September 2, 2017 11:10 PM
To: Dwayne Martin
Cc: Simon Thompson; Harry LeGrand; carolinabirds listserve
Subject: Re: Confusion about Hooper Lane shorebirds, and worrisome eBird filter

Folks,
I have been birding Hooper Ln. for over 30 years. No one has spent more time in that area then I have. Buffies have been seen annually in the fall, with a high count as I recall of about 30 birds. Semi-P Plovers have been seen in the 20+ numbers, American Golden Plovers in double digits, less common, Black-bellied Plovers in double digits! I have found and photographed 2 Piping Plovers as well. Simon's count of Baird's S/P is probably the highest count for that species! However, all of these species are usually seen annually on Hooper Lane and the Mills River area. I have seen all of these species out there and most are documented with photos over the years.
I report to the Chat as well as N/A Birds but do not report to e-bird, which may shed so me light on some of the filter issues with e-bird. If one was to check back in the past records reported to the Chat and N/A Birds you will find these reports are not unusual for that area! Yes, some of the count numbers may be different, but the species being reported other then the Piping Plover, and the Sanderling are not rare for that area.
Over the past several days, I too saw 4 Am. Golden Plovers, 9 Black-bellied Plovers, 2 Baird's S/P, 2 Sanderling, 1 Piping Plover, many Pectorals, but peep numbers were low.
As Simon reported, it is a large area, with some restricted access, but in many cases, the birds are usually found in concentrated areas, containing large groups of many species!
Wayne
Sent from my iPhone

On Sep 2, 2017, at 9:33 PM, Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote :

The filters for many species were set many years ago, even before I took over as reviewer for the mountains. Some numbers can slip through the cracks. Ebird filtering is a continuing process. If anyone runs across something that doesn't seem right, please feel free to shot me an email and I will certainly look into it. Hopefully, I have straightened out some of the shorebird issues raised today.

Dwayne
*************
J. Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
<redxbill...><mailto:<redxbill...>


Catawba County Park Ranger
Riverbend Park - Conover, NC
<jdmartin...><mailto:<jdmartin...>
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.catawbacountync.gov_depts_parks_&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=cJe1QNiETG6LsqhgfuSqdbyctvTpaxAYPOp-Youe0nI&s=kNbVLI9LUMRSDCXaYhNL8nJ_vJPZZY2RtH9mkZWEYZ8&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__urldefense.pr-2520oofpoint.com_v2_url-3Fu-3Dhttp-2D3A-5F-5Fwww.catawbacountync.gov-5Fdepts-5Fparks-5F-26d-3DDwMFaQ-26c-3DimBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj-5FgZ4adc-26r-3DymRCw6Q-2DsBitug-5FrdeO1Tokz-2DI-5FSX2LQN2-5FOcvlal9U-26m-3DNYap-2DHbwiXMVXvP27bXuhRYOfKo-5FCArDT5H4oJ2QkE4-26s-3D0OlzSv-5Fyo6j1wgkLNX7CKesW5rqqI6qXxsj0AT2pm08-26e-3D&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=cJe1QNiETG6LsqhgfuSqdbyctvTpaxAYPOp-Youe0nI&s=FrPAYz_hV0F_PticSpnGEFZs1LWPF-F15seDG69fb0Q&e= >
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.weatherlink.com_user_riverbendpark&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=cJe1QNiETG6LsqhgfuSqdbyctvTpaxAYPOp-Youe0nI&s=7Rw73kn6LwEWA9DOZjjJFCRAiKduDS9oMaAmk2J5e58&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.weatherlink.com_user_riverbendpark&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=NYap-HbwiXMVXvP27bXuhRYOfKo_CArDT5H4oJ2QkE4&s=jdgkOlcFqF32zxXDKHY0EjqK--HJw4hj7H7vnVln0HM&e=>


On Sat, Sep 2, 2017 at 9:23 PM, Simon Thompson <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
Hi Harry et al

Thanks for your email re. shorebirds in the mountains. Yes, I agree that the e-bird filters are somewhat baffling. We even tested the filter by putting in over 20 Buff-breasts - again, no rarity box popped up! As for details entered. Never easy to do when you are entering data using the cell phone app - all done now!!

Anyway, filters aside - that is for the e-bird regional editors to monitor and adjust.

Hooper Lane is without a doubt the finest shorebird habitat in Henderson County and this area of the NC Mountains. The flooded fields over the years have produced some incredible birds and d uring bad weather, large numbers of shorebirds do drop in to feed and rest. This past spring we had dozens of White-rumped Sandpipers in the flooded fields (https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S37207806&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=cJe1QNiETG6LsqhgfuSqdbyctvTpaxAYPOp-Youe0nI&s=-shECMC__H33qNB7UjF1PUWunxXPq5yEsaWuqQYlbSU&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S37207806&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M9a6-J_pbB51KMdZRriGuMLrJxhtuRFGf3E5uS2rWR0&s=NNLLIFDN16TdbnLYjkdeyM3IYW70AXMTlBPhlEttnsM&e=>) plus over 50 Semipalmated Sandpipers the same day.

As for large plovers, both species have been present this past week. I have personally seen the Black-bellied Plovers, but the Am Goldens have eluded me on 2 visits. Multiple observers have seen the Goldens, so they are certainly around. There are photos on e-bird proving these sightings. Both species are regularly seen during spring and fall migration - weather de pending of course.

There are many tracks to explore and it could take you all day to walk the road beds to find any of the flooded areas. These usually occur where the sod has been harvested, but due to work gong on most days, the birds constantly move from field to field. In other words, there are lots of places where birds can be, and consequently, lots of birds. Plus a lot of the area is private property- hence, no access.

As for my reports today, I stood in 1 spot on Jeffress Road and never walked into any of the fields. The Black-bellied Plovers were at least 1.5 miles away from my position the previous day, so I never bothered to go that far. All of the shorebirds I reported today were from this one location! And yes, there were NO peeps present except the Baird's......the previous visit we had 1 Least......that's all!. As for Buff-breasted Sandpipers, yes, we had 7 today and 9 yesterday.

To concl ude, yes e-bird filters are a little odd for shorebirds in the mountains. The other day we had over 100 Killdeer (e-bird flagged!) and over 80 Eastern Kingbird migrating over (e-bird not flagged!) How often do we see 80 Kingbirds in one day? Never!

Anyway, we do need to add as much data as we can with shorebirds in the mountains. Photos are useful, but plumage descriptions are also important. E-bird is not perfect, but it's an awesome tool that can add so much to our knowledge of birds here in the mountains and throughout North Carolina.

Fun Birding
Simon

Simon Thompson
Ventures Birding Tours
Asheville, NC

www.birdventures.com<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.birdventures.com&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M9a6-J_pbB51KMdZRriGuMLrJxhtuRFGf3%20E5uS2rWR0&s=MsYD8P-_sH8IsiiUZr5xGdoUYukx9gM8fhd5-2gY2J8&e=>

Simon RB Thompson

Ventures Birding Tours
www.birdventures.com <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.birdventures.com&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M9a6-J_pbB51%20KMdZRriGuMLrJxhtuRFGf3E5uS2rWR0&s=MsYD8P-_sH8IsiiUZr5xGdoUYukx9gM8fhd5-2gY2J8&e=>

Phone: 828.253.4247<tel:(828)%20253-4247>
Email: <Venturesbirding...><mailto:<Venturesbirding...>

Check out our 2017-18 Birding & Nature Tours - International<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_InternationalTours.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M9a6-J_pbB51KMdZRriGuMLrJxhtuRFGf3E5uS2rWR0&s=QyDlV4IC7PSpStMZm8x03VoCMrzy0OZjmIAFQvSJ4wo&e=>, USA & Canada<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__bir%20dventures.com_NorthAmerica.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M9a6-J_pbB51KMdZRriGuMLrJxhtuRFGf3E5uS2rWR0&s=Yio2TNvRVlvBU0UtEFo32u4LWcu-Zol2TEXBFB62wjc&e=>, and WNC day trips<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_DayTrips.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M9a6-J_pbB51KMdZRriGuMLrJxhtuRFGf3E5uS2rWR0&s=H8jCF-U0G2NEvueoT_z-ZgtZ5BEoaLPFnXGWORUkPBU&e=>

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SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=cJe1QNiETG6LsqhgfuSqdbyctvTpaxAYPOp-Youe0nI&s=A_dSifJeE7S5UcReipuF3q0VUUti1rj4n6k2gDyd1JA&e= ] <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_VenturesBirding_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M9a6-J_pbB51KMdZRriGuMLrJxhtuRFGf3E5uS2rWR0&s=Dzye4DQznk11A15SpMICkvXb2FfE-4HjnXih4GjvHTA&e=>


On Sat, Sep 2, 2017 at 8:11 PM, Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
The eBird filter for both Baird's Sandpiper and Buff-breasted Sandpiper inland baffles me! It has Baird's as rare in the Piedmont, and maybe inland Coastal Plain, but NOT in the mountains? Simon Thompson just reported a whopping NINE Baird's Sandpiper (no details required, nor any given); this a record inland count in NC, by far! He also reported SEVEN Buff-breasted Sandpipers, again with no details required or given. Buff-breasted obviously is not filtered as rare in the mountains and maybe other inland sites. Yes, Simon is an excellent observer, and Baird's (one only) has be en photographed there in the past few days; it's the eBird filtering that is the concern with me.

Both of these species inland ought to be listed as rare (i.e., as write-ins), and details should be provided on eBird, especially with the filter not catching 9 Baird's Sandpipers.

Also, the large plover ratios there in the past two days have been interesting. Only one person has reported BOTH Black-bellieds and Am. Goldens on the same day/trip. Interestingly, James Poling provided excellent photos yesterday of some of the 5 Black-bellieds there, but he nor others had Am. Goldens yesterday. Today, some folks are reporting Black-bellieds, and I see that only Michael Robertson has reported Am. Goldens -- 4 of them!. I had assumed that was an ID error, but his photos on eBird clearly show about four Am. Goldens, in at least partial breeding plumage!! Apparently, the shorebird area out there in the Hooper Road area is extensive enough that s ome observers are missing some of these things.

Harry LeGrand
author/editor, Birds of North Carolina website.

P.S. It is disturbing to me that of the shorebirds that Simon reported today:
7 Semipalmated Plover
15 Killdeer
1 Sanderling
9 Baird's Sandpiper
7 Buff-breasted Sandpiper

that: 1) he saw no large plovers, 2) the only peep species reported was Baird's, and 3) only Sanderling was filtered by eBird as rare! I think some details on 9 Baird's Sandpipers, and no other peeps reported, should be given either on eBird or carolinabirds.




 

Back to top
Date: 9/3/17 4:16 am
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Backyard Numbers are Impressive
Get in your yards and parks folks.
Lots of birds here. The NW winds have helped this morning.
American Redstart
Magnolia Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Hooded Warbler

So far.......

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 9/3/17 3:55 am
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: FOS - Veery
Single calling and seen Veery in the front yard right now.
Let the Thrush season begin.

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/17 8:11 pm
From: Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...>
Subject: Re: Confusion about Hooper Lane shorebirds, and worrisome eBird filter
Folks,
I have been birding Hooper Ln. for over 30 years. No one has spent more time in that area then I have. Buffies have been seen annually in the fall, with a high count as I recall of about 30 birds. Semi-P Plovers have been seen in the 20+ numbers, American Golden Plovers in double digits, less common, Black-bellied Plovers in double digits! I have found and photographed 2 Piping Plovers as well. Simon's count of Baird's S/P is probably the highest count for that species! However, all of these species are usually seen annually on Hooper Lane and the Mills River area. I have seen all of these species out there and most are documented with photos over the years.
I report to the Chat as well as N/A Birds but do not report to e-bird, which may shed some light on some of the filter issues with e-bird. If one was to check back in the past records reported to the Chat and N/A Birds you will find these reports are not unusual for that area! Yes, some of the count numbers may be different, but the species being reported other then the Piping Plover, and the Sanderling are not rare for that area.
Over the past several days, I too saw 4 Am. Golden Plovers, 9 Black-bellied Plovers, 2 Baird's S/P, 2 Sanderling, 1 Piping Plover, many Pectorals, but peep numbers were low.
As Simon reported, it is a large area, with some restricted access, but in many cases, the birds are usually found in concentrated areas, containing large groups of many species!
Wayne
Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 2, 2017, at 9:33 PM, Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> The filters for many species were set many years ago, even before I took over as reviewer for the mountains. Some numbers can slip through the cracks. Ebird filtering is a continuing process. If anyone runs across something that doesn't seem right, please feel free to shot me an email and I will certainly look into it. Hopefully, I have straightened out some of the shorebird issues raised today.
>
> Dwayne
> *************
> J. Dwayne Martin
> Hickory, NC
> <redxbill...>
>
>
> Catawba County Park Ranger
> Riverbend Park - Conover, NC
> <jdmartin...>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.catawbacountync.gov_depts_parks_&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=ZEaNarSuYGLjvrgWYx9vwJvKFkt4oTVeALMyQTj62JY&s=thtmlRUWg6jOD_2xGDGHpPHz13FpO33r_2QM6Xgr_Zw&e=
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.weatherlink.com_user_riverbendpark&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=ZEaNarSuYGLjvrgWYx9vwJvKFkt4oTVeALMyQTj62JY&s=wiC5LSVdxWjUMA5DOh8tKrt2ucZPu0QqeHLA48g-V_A&e=
>
>
>> On Sat, Sep 2, 2017 at 9:23 PM, Simon Thompson <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>> Hi Harry et al
>>
>> Thanks for your email re. shorebirds in the mountains. Yes, I agree that the e-bird filters are somewhat baffling. We even tested the filter by putting in over 20 Buff-breasts - again, no rarity box popped up! As for details entered. Never easy to do when you are entering data using the cell phone app - all done now!!
>>
>> Anyway, filters aside - that is for the e-bird regional editors to monitor and adjust.
>>
>> Hooper Lane is without a doubt the finest shorebird habitat in Henderson County and this area of the NC Mountains. The flooded fields over the years have produced some incredible birds and during bad weather, large numbers of shorebirds do drop in to feed and rest. This past spring we had dozens of White-rumped Sandpipers in the flooded fields (https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S37207806&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=ZEaNarSuYGLjvrgWYx9vwJvKFkt4oTVeALMyQTj62JY&s=swuAfIvexfXwQO1uYmUYSCBXT5v_liGiix2_KcmTWv4&e= ) plus over 50 Semipalmated Sandpipers the same day.
>>
>> As for large plovers, both species have been present this past week. I have personally seen the Black-bellied Plovers, but the Am Goldens have eluded me on 2 visits. Multiple observers have seen the Goldens, so they are certainly around. There are photos on e-bird proving these sightings. Both species are regularly seen during spring and fall migration - weather depending of course.
>>
>> There are many tracks to explore and it could take you all day to walk the road beds to find any of the flooded areas. These usually occur where the sod has been harvested, but due to work gong on most days, the birds constantly move from field to field. In other words, there are lots of places where birds can be, and consequently, lots of birds. Plus a lot of the area is private property- hence, no access.
>>
>> As for my reports today, I stood in 1 spot on Jeffress Road and never walked into any of the fields. The Black-bellied Plovers were at least 1.5 miles away from my position the previous day, so I never bothered to go that far. All of the shorebirds I reported today were from this one location! And yes, there were NO peeps present except the Baird's......the previous visit we had 1 Least......that's all!. As for Buff-breasted Sandpipers, yes, we had 7 today and 9 yesterday.
>>
>> To conclude, yes e-bird filters are a little odd for shorebirds in the mountains. The other day we had over 100 Killdeer (e-bird flagged!) and over 80 Eastern Kingbird migrating over (e-bird not flagged!) How often do we see 80 Kingbirds in one day? Never!
>>
>> Anyway, we do need to add as much data as we can with shorebirds in the mountains. Photos are useful, but plumage descriptions are also important. E-bird is not perfect, but it's an awesome tool that can add so much to our knowledge of birds here in the mountains and throughout North Carolina.
>>
>> Fun Birding
>> Simon
>>
>> Simon Thompson
>> Ventures Birding Tours
>> Asheville, NC
>>
>> www.birdventures.com
>>
>> Simon RB Thompson
>>
>> Ventures Birding Tours
>> www.birdventures.com
>>
>> Phone: 828.253.4247
>> Email: <Venturesbirding...>
>>
>> Check out our 2017-18 Birding & Nature Tours - International, USA & Canada, and WNC day trips
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>> On Sat, Sep 2, 2017 at 8:11 PM, Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>> The eBird filter for both Baird's Sandpiper and Buff-breasted Sandpiper inland baffles me! It has Baird's as rare in the Piedmont, and maybe inland Coastal Plain, but NOT in the mountains? Simon Thompson just reported a whopping NINE Baird's Sandpiper (no details required, nor any given); this a record inland count in NC, by far! He also reported SEVEN Buff-breasted Sandpipers, again with no details required or given. Buff-breasted obviously is not filtered as rare in the mountains and maybe other inland sites. Yes, Simon is an excellent observer, and Baird's (one only) has been photographed there in the past few days; it's the eBird filtering that is the concern with me.
>>>
>>> Both of these species inland ought to be listed as rare (i.e., as write-ins), and details should be provided on eBird, especially with the filter not catching 9 Baird's Sandpipers.
>>>
>>> Also, the large plover ratios there in the past two days have been interesting. Only one person has reported BOTH Black-bellieds and Am. Goldens on the same day/trip. Interestingly, James Poling provided excellent photos yesterday of some of the 5 Black-bellieds there, but he nor others had Am. Goldens yesterday. Today, some folks are reporting Black-bellieds, and I see that only Michael Robertson has reported Am. Goldens -- 4 of them!. I had assumed that was an ID error, but his photos on eBird clearly show about four Am. Goldens, in at least partial breeding plumage!! Apparently, the shorebird area out there in the Hooper Road area is extensive enough that some observers are missing some of these things.
>>>
>>> Harry LeGrand
>>> author/editor, Birds of North Carolina website.
>>>
>>> P.S. It is disturbing to me that of the shorebirds that Simon reported today:
>>> 7 Semipalmated Plover
>>> 15 Killdeer
>>> 1 Sanderling
>>> 9 Baird's Sandpiper
>>> 7 Buff-breasted Sandpiper
>>>
>>> that: 1) he saw no large plovers, 2) the only peep species reported was Baird's, and 3) only Sanderling was filtered by eBird as rare! I think some details on 9 Baird's Sandpipers, and no other peeps reported, should be given either on eBird or carolinabirds.
>>>
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/17 6:33 pm
From: Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Confusion about Hooper Lane shorebirds, and worrisome eBird filter
The filters for many species were set many years ago, even before I took
over as reviewer for the mountains. Some numbers can slip through the
cracks. Ebird filtering is a continuing process. If anyone runs across
something that doesn't seem right, please feel free to shot me an email and
I will certainly look into it. Hopefully, I have straightened out some of
the shorebird issues raised today.

Dwayne
*************
J. Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
<redxbill...>


Catawba County Park Ranger
Riverbend Park - Conover, NC
<jdmartin...>
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.catawbacountync.gov_depts_parks_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=NYap-HbwiXMVXvP27bXuhRYOfKo_CArDT5H4oJ2QkE4&s=0OlzSv_yo6j1wgkLNX7CKesW5rqqI6qXxsj0AT2pm08&e=
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.weatherlink.com_user_riverbendpark&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=NYap-HbwiXMVXvP27bXuhRYOfKo_CArDT5H4oJ2QkE4&s=jdgkOlcFqF32zxXDKHY0EjqK--HJw4hj7H7vnVln0HM&e=


On Sat, Sep 2, 2017 at 9:23 PM, Simon Thompson <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Hi Harry et al
>
> Thanks for your email re. shorebirds in the mountains. Yes, I agree that
> the e-bird filters are somewhat baffling. We even tested the filter by
> putting in over 20 Buff-breasts - again, no rarity box popped up! As for
> details entered. Never easy to do when you are entering data using the cell
> phone app - all done now!!
>
> Anyway, filters aside - that is for the e-bird regional editors to monitor
> and adjust.
>
> Hooper Lane is without a doubt the finest shorebird habitat in Henderson
> County and this area of the NC Mountains. The flooded fields over the years
> have produced some incredible birds and during bad weather, large numbers
> of shorebirds do drop in to feed and rest. This past spring we had dozens
> of White-rumped Sandpipers in the flooded fields (
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S37207806&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=NYap-HbwiXMVXvP27bXuhRYOfKo_CArDT5H4oJ2QkE4&s=duuDSqBRT7I80_M-ATFqAmE7JMT9SFW1IpDbJw-9afg&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S37207806&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M9a6-J_pbB51KMdZRriGuMLrJxhtuRFGf3E5uS2rWR0&s=NNLLIFDN16TdbnLYjkdeyM3IYW70AXMTlBPhlEttnsM&e=>)
> plus over 50 Semipalmated Sandpipers the same day.
>
> As for large plovers, both species have been present this past week. I
> have personally seen the Black-bellied Plovers, but the Am Goldens have
> eluded me on 2 visits. Multiple observers have seen the Goldens, so they
> are certainly around. There are photos on e-bird proving these sightings.
> Both species are regularly seen during spring and fall migration - weather
> depending of course.
>
> There are many tracks to explore and it could take you all day to walk the
> road beds to find any of the flooded areas. These usually occur where the
> sod has been harvested, but due to work gong on most days, the birds
> constantly move from field to field. In other words, there are lots of
> places where birds can be, and consequently, lots of birds. Plus a lot of
> the area is private property- hence, no access.
>
> As for my reports today, I stood in 1 spot on Jeffress Road and never
> walked into any of the fields. The Black-bellied Plovers were at least 1.5
> miles away from my position the previous day, so I never bothered to go
> that far. All of the shorebirds I reported today were from this one
> location! And yes, there were NO peeps present except the Baird's......the
> previous visit we had 1 Least......that's all!. As for Buff-breasted
> Sandpipers, yes, we had 7 today and 9 yesterday.
>
> To conclude, yes e-bird filters are a little odd for shorebirds in the
> mountains. The other day we had over 100 Killdeer (e-bird flagged!) and
> over 80 Eastern Kingbird migrating over (e-bird not flagged!) How often do
> we see 80 Kingbirds in one day? Never!
>
> Anyway, we do need to add as much data as we can with shorebirds in the
> mountains. Photos are useful, but plumage descriptions are also important.
> E-bird is not perfect, but it's an awesome tool that can add so much to our
> knowledge of birds here in the mountains and throughout North Carolina.
>
> Fun Birding
> Simon
>
> Simon Thompson
> Ventures Birding Tours
> Asheville, NC
>
> www.birdventures.com
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.birdventures.com&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M9a6-J_pbB51KMdZRriGuMLrJxhtuRFGf3E5uS2rWR0&s=MsYD8P-_sH8IsiiUZr5xGdoUYukx9gM8fhd5-2gY2J8&e=>
>
> Simon RB Thompson
>
> Ventures Birding Tours
> www.birdventures.com
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.birdventures.com&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M9a6-J_pbB51KMdZRriGuMLrJxhtuRFGf3E5uS2rWR0&s=MsYD8P-_sH8IsiiUZr5xGdoUYukx9gM8fhd5-2gY2J8&e=>
>
> Phone: 828.253.4247 <(828)%20253-4247>
> Email: <Venturesbirding...>
>
> Check out our 2017-18 Birding & Nature Tours - International
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_InternationalTours.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M9a6-J_pbB51KMdZRriGuMLrJxhtuRFGf3E5uS2rWR0&s=QyDlV4IC7PSpStMZm8x03VoCMrzy0OZjmIAFQvSJ4wo&e=>,
> USA & Canada
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_NorthAmerica.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M9a6-J_pbB51KMdZRriGuMLrJxhtuRFGf3E5uS2rWR0&s=Yio2TNvRVlvBU0UtEFo32u4LWcu-Zol2TEXBFB62wjc&e=>,
> and WNC day trips
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_DayTrips.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M9a6-J_pbB51KMdZRriGuMLrJxhtuRFGf3E5uS2rWR0&s=H8jCF-U0G2NEvueoT_z-ZgtZ5BEoaLPFnXGWORUkPBU&e=>
>
> [image:
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.tripadvisor.com_Attraction-5FReview-2Dg60742-2Dd12548573-2DReviews-2DVentures-5FBirding-5FTours-2DAsheville-5FNorth-5FCarolina.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=NYap-HbwiXMVXvP27bXuhRYOfKo_CArDT5H4oJ2QkE4&s=j8K955YRaCPAWdrDaxuVrVCgZNx-MvUm2wKUnzaSkF8&e= ]
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.tripadvisor.com_Attraction-5FReview-2Dg60742-2Dd12548573-2DReviews-2DVentures-5FBirding-5FTours-2DAsheville-5FNorth-5FCarolina.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M9a6-J_pbB51KMdZRriGuMLrJxhtuRFGf3E5uS2rWR0&s=jYBsW0J0riIaPWwdx_vHupU4BEZ_Hyk5CIOdkF_jFd0&e=>
>
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_VenturesBirding_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M9a6-J_pbB51KMdZRriGuMLrJxhtuRFGf3E5uS2rWR0&s=Dzye4DQznk11A15SpMICkvXb2FfE-4HjnXih4GjvHTA&e=>
>
>
> On Sat, Sep 2, 2017 at 8:11 PM, Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> The eBird filter for both Baird's Sandpiper and Buff-breasted Sandpiper
>> inland baffles me! It has Baird's as rare in the Piedmont, and maybe
>> inland Coastal Plain, but NOT in the mountains? Simon Thompson just
>> reported a whopping *NINE *Baird's Sandpiper (no details required, nor
>> any given); this a record inland count in NC, by far! He also reported
>> SEVEN Buff-breasted Sandpipers, again with no details required or given.
>> Buff-breasted obviously is not filtered as rare in the mountains and maybe
>> other inland sites. Yes, Simon is an excellent observer, and Baird's (one
>> only) has been photographed there in the past few days; it's the eBird
>> filtering that is the concern with me.
>>
>> Both of these species inland ought to be listed as rare (i.e., as
>> write-ins), and details should be provided on eBird, especially with the
>> filter not catching 9 Baird's Sandpipers.
>>
>> Also, the large plover ratios there in the past two days have been
>> interesting. Only one person has reported BOTH Black-bellieds and Am.
>> Goldens on the same day/trip. Interestingly, James Poling provided
>> excellent photos yesterday of some of the 5 Black-bellieds there, but he
>> nor others had Am. Goldens yesterday. Today, some folks are reporting
>> Black-bellieds, and I see that only Michael Robertson has reported Am.
>> Goldens -- 4 of them!. I had assumed that was an ID error, but his photos
>> on eBird clearly show about four Am. Goldens, in at least partial breeding
>> plumage!! Apparently, the shorebird area out there in the Hooper Road area
>> is extensive enough that some observers are missing some of these things.
>>
>> Harry LeGrand
>> author/editor, Birds of North Carolina website.
>>
>> P.S. It is disturbing to me that of the shorebirds that Simon reported
>> today:
>> 7 Semipalmated Plover
>> 15 Killdeer
>> 1 Sanderling
>> 9 Baird's Sandpiper
>> 7 Buff-breasted Sandpiper
>>
>> that: 1) he saw no large plovers, 2) the only peep species reported was
>> Baird's, and 3) only Sanderling was filtered by eBird as rare! I think
>> some details on 9 Baird's Sandpipers, and no other peeps reported, should
>> be given either on eBird or carolinabirds.
>>
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/17 6:24 pm
From: Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Confusion about Hooper Lane shorebirds, and worrisome eBird filter
Hi Harry et al

Thanks for your email re. shorebirds in the mountains. Yes, I agree that
the e-bird filters are somewhat baffling. We even tested the filter by
putting in over 20 Buff-breasts - again, no rarity box popped up! As for
details entered. Never easy to do when you are entering data using the cell
phone app - all done now!!

Anyway, filters aside - that is for the e-bird regional editors to monitor
and adjust.

Hooper Lane is without a doubt the finest shorebird habitat in Henderson
County and this area of the NC Mountains. The flooded fields over the years
have produced some incredible birds and during bad weather, large numbers
of shorebirds do drop in to feed and rest. This past spring we had dozens
of White-rumped Sandpipers in the flooded fields (
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S37207806&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M9a6-J_pbB51KMdZRriGuMLrJxhtuRFGf3E5uS2rWR0&s=NNLLIFDN16TdbnLYjkdeyM3IYW70AXMTlBPhlEttnsM&e= ) plus over 50 Semipalmated
Sandpipers the same day.

As for large plovers, both species have been present this past week. I have
personally seen the Black-bellied Plovers, but the Am Goldens have eluded
me on 2 visits. Multiple observers have seen the Goldens, so they are
certainly around. There are photos on e-bird proving these sightings. Both
species are regularly seen during spring and fall migration - weather
depending of course.

There are many tracks to explore and it could take you all day to walk the
road beds to find any of the flooded areas. These usually occur where the
sod has been harvested, but due to work gong on most days, the birds
constantly move from field to field. In other words, there are lots of
places where birds can be, and consequently, lots of birds. Plus a lot of
the area is private property- hence, no access.

As for my reports today, I stood in 1 spot on Jeffress Road and never
walked into any of the fields. The Black-bellied Plovers were at least 1.5
miles away from my position the previous day, so I never bothered to go
that far. All of the shorebirds I reported today were from this one
location! And yes, there were NO peeps present except the Baird's......the
previous visit we had 1 Least......that's all!. As for Buff-breasted
Sandpipers, yes, we had 7 today and 9 yesterday.

To conclude, yes e-bird filters are a little odd for shorebirds in the
mountains. The other day we had over 100 Killdeer (e-bird flagged!) and
over 80 Eastern Kingbird migrating over (e-bird not flagged!) How often do
we see 80 Kingbirds in one day? Never!

Anyway, we do need to add as much data as we can with shorebirds in the
mountains. Photos are useful, but plumage descriptions are also important.
E-bird is not perfect, but it's an awesome tool that can add so much to our
knowledge of birds here in the mountains and throughout North Carolina.

Fun Birding
Simon

Simon Thompson
Ventures Birding Tours
Asheville, NC

www.birdventures.com

Simon RB Thompson

Ventures Birding Tours
www.birdventures.com <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.birdventures.com&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M9a6-J_pbB51KMdZRriGuMLrJxhtuRFGf3E5uS2rWR0&s=MsYD8P-_sH8IsiiUZr5xGdoUYukx9gM8fhd5-2gY2J8&e= >

Phone: 828.253.4247
Email: <Venturesbirding...>

Check out our 2017-18 Birding & Nature Tours - International
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_InternationalTours.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M9a6-J_pbB51KMdZRriGuMLrJxhtuRFGf3E5uS2rWR0&s=QyDlV4IC7PSpStMZm8x03VoCMrzy0OZjmIAFQvSJ4wo&e= >, USA & Canada
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_NorthAmerica.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M9a6-J_pbB51KMdZRriGuMLrJxhtuRFGf3E5uS2rWR0&s=Yio2TNvRVlvBU0UtEFo32u4LWcu-Zol2TEXBFB62wjc&e= >, and WNC day trips
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_DayTrips.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M9a6-J_pbB51KMdZRriGuMLrJxhtuRFGf3E5uS2rWR0&s=H8jCF-U0G2NEvueoT_z-ZgtZ5BEoaLPFnXGWORUkPBU&e= >

[image:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.tripadvisor.com_Attraction-5FReview-2Dg60742-2Dd12548573-2DReviews-2DVentures-5FBirding-5FTours-2DAsheville-5FNorth-5FCarolina.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M9a6-J_pbB51KMdZRriGuMLrJxhtuRFGf3E5uS2rWR0&s=jYBsW0J0riIaPWwdx_vHupU4BEZ_Hyk5CIOdkF_jFd0&e= ]
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.tripadvisor.com_Attraction-5FReview-2Dg60742-2Dd12548573-2DReviews-2DVentures-5FBirding-5FTours-2DAsheville-5FNorth-5FCarolina.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M9a6-J_pbB51KMdZRriGuMLrJxhtuRFGf3E5uS2rWR0&s=jYBsW0J0riIaPWwdx_vHupU4BEZ_Hyk5CIOdkF_jFd0&e= >
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_VenturesBirding_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M9a6-J_pbB51KMdZRriGuMLrJxhtuRFGf3E5uS2rWR0&s=Dzye4DQznk11A15SpMICkvXb2FfE-4HjnXih4GjvHTA&e= >


On Sat, Sep 2, 2017 at 8:11 PM, Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> The eBird filter for both Baird's Sandpiper and Buff-breasted Sandpiper
> inland baffles me! It has Baird's as rare in the Piedmont, and maybe
> inland Coastal Plain, but NOT in the mountains? Simon Thompson just
> reported a whopping *NINE *Baird's Sandpiper (no details required, nor
> any given); this a record inland count in NC, by far! He also reported
> SEVEN Buff-breasted Sandpipers, again with no details required or given.
> Buff-breasted obviously is not filtered as rare in the mountains and maybe
> other inland sites. Yes, Simon is an excellent observer, and Baird's (one
> only) has been photographed there in the past few days; it's the eBird
> filtering that is the concern with me.
>
> Both of these species inland ought to be listed as rare (i.e., as
> write-ins), and details should be provided on eBird, especially with the
> filter not catching 9 Baird's Sandpipers.
>
> Also, the large plover ratios there in the past two days have been
> interesting. Only one person has reported BOTH Black-bellieds and Am.
> Goldens on the same day/trip. Interestingly, James Poling provided
> excellent photos yesterday of some of the 5 Black-bellieds there, but he
> nor others had Am. Goldens yesterday. Today, some folks are reporting
> Black-bellieds, and I see that only Michael Robertson has reported Am.
> Goldens -- 4 of them!. I had assumed that was an ID error, but his photos
> on eBird clearly show about four Am. Goldens, in at least partial breeding
> plumage!! Apparently, the shorebird area out there in the Hooper Road area
> is extensive enough that some observers are missing some of these things.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> author/editor, Birds of North Carolina website.
>
> P.S. It is disturbing to me that of the shorebirds that Simon reported
> today:
> 7 Semipalmated Plover
> 15 Killdeer
> 1 Sanderling
> 9 Baird's Sandpiper
> 7 Buff-breasted Sandpiper
>
> that: 1) he saw no large plovers, 2) the only peep species reported was
> Baird's, and 3) only Sanderling was filtered by eBird as rare! I think
> some details on 9 Baird's Sandpipers, and no other peeps reported, should
> be given either on eBird or carolinabirds.
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/17 5:12 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Confusion about Hooper Lane shorebirds, and worrisome eBird filter
The eBird filter for both Baird's Sandpiper and Buff-breasted Sandpiper
inland baffles me! It has Baird's as rare in the Piedmont, and maybe
inland Coastal Plain, but NOT in the mountains? Simon Thompson just
reported a whopping *NINE *Baird's Sandpiper (no details required, nor any
given); this a record inland count in NC, by far! He also reported SEVEN
Buff-breasted Sandpipers, again with no details required or given.
Buff-breasted obviously is not filtered as rare in the mountains and maybe
other inland sites. Yes, Simon is an excellent observer, and Baird's (one
only) has been photographed there in the past few days; it's the eBird
filtering that is the concern with me.

Both of these species inland ought to be listed as rare (i.e., as
write-ins), and details should be provided on eBird, especially with the
filter not catching 9 Baird's Sandpipers.

Also, the large plover ratios there in the past two days have been
interesting. Only one person has reported BOTH Black-bellieds and Am.
Goldens on the same day/trip. Interestingly, James Poling provided
excellent photos yesterday of some of the 5 Black-bellieds there, but he
nor others had Am. Goldens yesterday. Today, some folks are reporting
Black-bellieds, and I see that only Michael Robertson has reported Am.
Goldens -- 4 of them!. I had assumed that was an ID error, but his photos
on eBird clearly show about four Am. Goldens, in at least partial breeding
plumage!! Apparently, the shorebird area out there in the Hooper Road area
is extensive enough that some observers are missing some of these things.

Harry LeGrand
author/editor, Birds of North Carolina website.

P.S. It is disturbing to me that of the shorebirds that Simon reported
today:
7 Semipalmated Plover
15 Killdeer
1 Sanderling
9 Baird's Sandpiper
7 Buff-breasted Sandpiper

that: 1) he saw no large plovers, 2) the only peep species reported was
Baird's, and 3) only Sanderling was filtered by eBird as rare! I think
some details on 9 Baird's Sandpipers, and no other peeps reported, should
be given either on eBird or carolinabirds.

 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/17 3:26 pm
From: Ricky Davis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: I-95/NC 33 Sod Farm
Hi folks,

I checked out the sod farm in northern Nash County again this afternoon. Numbers of birds were similar to several days ago. Had 200+ Killdeer, 4 Am. Golden-Plovers, 3 Buff-breasted Sandpipers, 6 Pectorals, 18 Leasts, 1 Semi-palmated Sand., and 1 Baird's Sandpiper. The Baird's was an adult. Once again there were groups of birds too far from the roadside to adequately ID even with the scope. Also had two Northern Harriers (male and female), and 31 Horned Larks (many were juveniles)! It was very nice to bird with Ann Brice, she even got a look at the Baird's, albeit not very close!

Thanks, later, Ricky

Sent from my iPad
 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/17 11:24 am
From: Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: American Golden plovers
I found just now a group of four plovers at the Vandemark sod farm on hwy 33 at I-95 as reported by Ricky Davis yesterday. They were in the grass strip closest to I-95. I pulled off the road at gate A. They show up as being dark and stand out against the sod. I assumed they were crows initially.

A Northern harrier was present initially and it flushed a large flock of small birds. I saw four horned lark in that area so that is likely what the flock was. I also saw a couple of peeps with the killdeer so might have been a flock of those also.

Visibility was very poor due to fog and drizzle but it was very birdy here.

Ann Brice
Currently at Whitakers NC

Ann Brice. 252.373.0326. Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/17 9:37 am
From: <brian...>
Subject: L. Crabtree - WR Sandpiper, Laughing Gull, Oriole
good morning,

Sheree’ and I took a quick walk around the main park area this morning at Lake Crabtree.  Started right out with a White-rumped Sandpiper fly-by at the grassy field. It came past us twice offering clear views of white rump, made a few calls, then took off across the lake.  Later on our walk we spotted the continuing Laughing Gull off from the boat rental area.  One other nice bird, a Baltimore Oriole seen in the large partially leafless tree at the entrance to the west trail.  The park has mowed EVERYTHING down along the shoreline, opening things up for some species, ruining habitat for others.

Brian Murphy
Durham,NC


 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/17 8:38 am
From: Caroline Gilmore (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Outdoors writers wanted
Community Sports News (CSN) Looks For Outdoor Writers

I have been the Outdoors Writer for this small Chapel Hill-based newspaper for the past ~5 years. I have had a blast doing this, but we now need additional outdoors writers.

CSN is looking for outdoor writers to help expand the paper’s coverage of Jordan Lake, active outdoor activities, competitive and recreational, and area park projects/improvements. Assignments would involve writing and taking your own pictures. Personal transportation and reliability are a must. It’s a volunteer experience.

If you’re interested, contact CSN at <joelcsn1...>

Thanks for your consideration.

Caroline Gilmore
Durham, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/17 7:30 am
From: Herbert, Teri Lynn <herbertl...>
Subject: Re: camera SD card?

>I have a Pentax camera that I just love. But I cannot find SD 2g cards
>any more. There are used ones on eBay, but I dont want to go there.
Anyone know of a real store that might still have these? Or anyone have
an old camera with new 2g SD cards laying around they would like to sell?

Thanks.

Teri Lynn
Charleston, SC





-------------------------------------------------------------------------
This message was secured via TLS by MUSC.

 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/17 7:26 am
From: Peter Quadarella (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Black-necked stilt
Just as a followup - after reviewing the photos - one of the Stilts was
definitely a juvenile, with pink at base of the bill, pale fringing on
feathers, and duller legs.

Peter Quadarella
Weddington, NC

On Wed, Aug 30, 2017 at 8:04 PM, Me <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> There was a pair along the causeway all summer. I don't know if these are
> the same birds, or some just passing through. Did any look like immatures?
> The pair in the marsh near the ferry terminal had two immatures with them
> last time I saw them. Nice find, Always fun to see them!
>
> Marty Wall
> Beaufort, NC
>
> > On Aug 30, 2017, at 7:33 PM, Peter Quadarella (via carolinabirds Mailing
> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> >
> > I have no idea if they are rare but they were a first for me so I
> thought I'd report I saw 3 Black-necked Stilts on the causeway at Cedar
> Island NWR late this afternoon.
> >
> > Peter Quadarella
> > Weddington, NC
> >
> >
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/17 12:30 am
From: M Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: binoculars
I purchased Nikon Monarch 5 8 X 42's a few months ago and am satisfied with them. I don't have access to higher priced binoculars, so can't compare them. These can be found for $250 - $300 and up.

Mae Howell
Goldsboro NC
________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Christopher Hill <Chill...>
Sent: Friday, September 1, 2017 9:06:23 PM
To: steve stevens
Cc: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: binoculars

[gonna reply to the group, sorrry]

So many good options in that price range these days!

Eagle Optics rangers, with ED glass, $320 or so. I use them. I hear that the Vortex mid-priced ones are excellent, I also hear that about the Nikon Monarchs are great - I guess the Monarch 7s are a step up from the still servicable Monarch 5s?

Anyway, in that price range you have multiple options with ED glass and waterproofing. And those are the three brands I hear recommended most often (though there are probably others that also are good).

Eagle Opticcs and Nikon I have dealt with with returns and both have been super duper customer friendly and helpful.

Good luck!

Chris Hill
Conwayhh, SC
> On Sep 1, 2017, at 8:50 PM, steve stevens <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> hello,
> my binoculars took a turn, and im in the market for new ones. while i know the nice ones are in the 1200-2500 dollar range, i was curious if anyone had recommendations on some decent binoculars in the <$500 range, or had some used binoculars they would be interested in parting with. i was using celestron natureDX and was happy with them until the lens started fogging up.
> please respond off list. thanks!
> steve, durham/chapel hill nc


 

Back to top
Date: 9/1/17 6:06 pm
From: Christopher Hill <Chill...>
Subject: Re: binoculars
[gonna reply to the group, sorrry]

So many good options in that price range these days!

Eagle Optics rangers, with ED glass, $320 or so. I use them. I hear that the Vortex mid-priced ones are excellent, I also hear that about the Nikon Monarchs are great - I guess the Monarch 7s are a step up from the still servicable Monarch 5s?

Anyway, in that price range you have multiple options with ED glass and waterproofing. And those are the three brands I hear recommended most often (though there are probably others that also are good).

Eagle Opticcs and Nikon I have dealt with with returns and both have been super duper customer friendly and helpful.

Good luck!

Chris Hill
Conwayhh, SC
> On Sep 1, 2017, at 8:50 PM, steve stevens <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> hello,
> my binoculars took a turn, and im in the market for new ones. while i know the nice ones are in the 1200-2500 dollar range, i was curious if anyone had recommendations on some decent binoculars in the <$500 range, or had some used binoculars they would be interested in parting with. i was using celestron natureDX and was happy with them until the lens started fogging up.
> please respond off list. thanks!
> steve, durham/chapel hill nc

 

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Date: 9/1/17 5:51 pm
From: steve stevens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: binoculars
hello,
my binoculars took a turn, and im in the market for new ones. while i know
the nice ones are in the 1200-2500 dollar range, i was curious if anyone
had recommendations on some decent binoculars in the <$500 range, or had
some used binoculars they would be interested in parting with. i was using
celestron natureDX and was happy with them until the lens started fogging
up.
please respond off list. thanks!
steve, durham/chapel hill nc

 

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Date: 9/1/17 1:17 pm
From: james poling (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Shorebirds at Hooper Lane, Mills River, NC
Shorebirds at Hooper Lane, Mills River, NC. Between rain showers, several birders saw a number of shorebirds today. I was able to identify and photograph three migrants: Black-bellied Plover, Baird’s Sandpiper. Semi-palmated Plover was also present. Jim Poling



James Poling
624 Azalea Avenue
Black Mountain, NC 28711 USA
<james.poling...> <mailto:<james.poling...>
www.jamesnewtonpoling.com <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.jamesnewtonpoling.com_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=6dLYE35IT70R9-eVDUJUx8rYricTPn0vqkPac3u9EXM&s=KYDD0TVMu_tAFhMu0DRDNzHMTqnpWyJlwMuORUVf8Is&e= >
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__pinterest.com_jamesnpoling_boards_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=6dLYE35IT70R9-eVDUJUx8rYricTPn0vqkPac3u9EXM&s=w70P4973TFKZbtVqjKhh86ch62cBsTyChPj88ob83pg&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__pinterest.com_jamesnpoling_boards_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=6dLYE35IT70R9-eVDUJUx8rYricTPn0vqkPac3u9EXM&s=w70P4973TFKZbtVqjKhh86ch62cBsTyChPj88ob83pg&e= >
828-707-7413





 

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Date: 9/1/17 9:05 am
From: Mark Kosiewski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Baird's
Looking at two juvie Baird's and a White-rumped Sandpiper at New Hope mudflats right now. Matt S and I had to hike pretty far south of the power lines to confirm, so prepare to get muddy if you do chase. Lots of other expected shorebirds, along with about 20 Stilt Sandpipers in the mix.

MarkKosiewski
Pittsboro, NC




 

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Date: 8/31/17 7:21 pm
From: Gale VerHague (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Attempted Hummingbird Predation
I have found that the best way to hang a hummingbird feeder is on a
clothesline type of setup. It also keeps the ants away. I've never seen a
snake attempt to get to a feeder along a wire.

Gale


On Thu, Aug 31, 2017 at 9:50 PM <susan...> wrote:

> Dear David and All,
>
> Rat Snakes can and do hunt hummingbirds. They sense (taste) the birds
> around feeders and will use the sit-and-wait strategy. Successful
> attempts have been documented. Wayne Irvin sent me an"after" photo a
> number of years ago. It was not a good shot -- but one that he was just
> barely able to get after running for the camera.
>
> I have had (a) Rat Snake here moving in the Holly Tree toward a feeder
> on more than one occasion in the last couple summers. I am confident it
> was honing in on the birds since I have had zero other food-sized
> critters on or around the sugar water.
>
> Note that also Chinese Mantids, Bullfrogs, and Green Herons, among
> others, have been seen taking hummingbirds in the eastern US.
>
> Susan Campbell
> Southern Pines, NC
>
>
>

 

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Date: 8/31/17 6:50 pm
From: <susan...>
Subject: RE: Attempted Hummingbird Predation
Dear David and All,

Rat Snakes can and do hunt hummingbirds. They sense (taste) the birds
around feeders and will use the sit-and-wait strategy. Successful
attempts have been documented. Wayne Irvin sent me an"after" photo a
number of years ago. It was not a good shot -- but one that he was just
barely able to get after running for the camera.

I have had (a) Rat Snake here moving in the Holly Tree toward a feeder
on more than one occasion in the last couple summers. I am confident it
was honing in on the birds since I have had zero other food-sized
critters on or around the sugar water.

Note that also Chinese Mantids, Bullfrogs, and Green Herons, among
others, have been seen taking hummingbirds in the eastern US.

Susan Campbell
Southern Pines, NC


 

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Date: 8/31/17 6:37 pm
From: David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Attempted Hummingbird Predation
Alas, I came home today to find the same snake with a notable hummingbird shaped bulge in its belly as it slowly ambled away from the scene of the crime.
I pray that it conveniently caught an anole, like many have suggested it was hunting, but all evidence (size and length of bulge) suggest otherwise.
I tell you this not to revel in this situation, but to let folks know that if perhaps uncommon, small Ratsnakes do appear to be occasionally successful in hunting for hummingbirds from our bird feeders that are hung in trees.
I have learned my lesson, and will be purchasing extra poles to set up for my feeders to avoid this situation again and to helpfully reduce the amount of sugar water the squirrels end up guzzling.
I am still feeding between 6-10 between the campus feeders and my yard feeders, so hopefully we can avoid this situation again.
Happy Birding - and keep an eye out for those sly snakes.
David

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 31, 2017, at 5:08 PM, ann maddock <am.hummingbird.photos...> wrote:
>
> take
 

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Date: 8/31/17 6:03 pm
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Brookshire Park Boone Bird walk Saturday 8AM
High Country Audubon's monthly bird and nature walk at Brookshire park
is coming just after(hopefully) a pretty big storm system clears out. At
this time of year that brings a good possibility of a fallout of
migratory birds. Add that to the spectacular display of late summer
wildflowers and it looks to be a good one.

We meet as always at the main parking lot by the picnic shelter at 8AM,
and the walk is free and open to everyone, so please join us! Brookshire
Park is just east of Boone NC on Brookshire Road just off 421 at the
bridge over the New River. We will have the walk rain or shine so be
prepared for all whethers.

Guy McGrane

Deep Gap, NC


 

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Date: 8/31/17 2:09 pm
From: ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Attempted Hummingbird Predation
We usually have a rat snake coiling around our window feeders a few times a
year.

But the hummers seem to always be aware and stay away. And when we see them
near a feeder all you need to do us walk near the snake and they take off.
I also have seen them sit by a feeder that is usually frequented by green
anoles- that may be an easier target for the snake



On Thu, Aug 31, 2017 at 3:01 PM David Gardner <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Hi folks,
> Most of my hummingbird feeders are hanging from snake and raccoon proof
> feeder poles, but I have a few hanging from trees. Apart from the
> occasional issue with Squirrels tilting and guzzling the sweet nectar, I
> haven't had any problems until yesterday.
> Yesterday morning I walked out the house to a racket of hummers... at
> least 6 were frenetically buzzing around this one bush which has two of my
> feeders on it. I couldn't figure out why until I looked more closely at the
> feeder. A juvenile Eastern Ratsnake (perhaps 12 inches long) was coiled on
> top of the high perch dish feeder I have from WBU. His neck was in the
> characteristic S shape of a snake in ambush predator position.
> I chose to leave the snake alone because the whole hummingbird family was
> clearly very aware of the threat and there were two other feeders within
> eyesight that were perfectly safe. There was no hummingbird sized bulge in
> the snakes belly either.
> I came home around 7pm to find the snake had not moved and had fortunately
> still not been successful. By 9pm it had moved on.
> I'm curious as to whether this is a commonly observed behavior. I would
> assume that an arboreal snake like the eastern Ratsnake would perhaps
> regularly hide in trumpet vine and crossvine in wait for unsuspecting
> hummers.
> Fascinating.
> I will most likely be reconsidering where to place the feeders to minimize
> this issue again.
> Happy Birding,
> David
> Director of Environmental Education
> St. Christopher Camp & Conference Center
> Seabrook Island, SC
>
> FYI - I have a photo of the snake on the feeder of anyone is interested, I
> will happily send you the photo.
>
> Sent from my iPhone

--
Ann Maddock <am.hummingbird.photos...> Hatteras Island, NC

 

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Date: 8/31/17 1:30 pm
From: Claire Herzog (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Henderson Cty., NC
Correct, Henderson Co. NC

On Thu, Aug 31, 2017 at 4:27 PM, Tracee Clapper <tracee.clapper...>
wrote:

> With the subject line, it's safe to disseminate that the super sod you
> speak of is not the one near Orangeburg, SC, correct?
>
> On Thu, Aug 31, 2017 at 1:46 PM Claire Herzog <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> Located the sanderling too.
>>
>> On Thursday, August 31, 2017, Claire Herzog <ceherzog...> wrote:
>>
>>> There are currently 8 Black-bellied plovers & 2 buff-breasted Sandpipers
>>> . No luck so far with the Sanderling.
>>> Claire Herzog
>>> Michael Plauche
>>>
>>> On Thursday, August 31, 2017, Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Folks,
>>>> Currently 1 SANDERLING in very nice plumage on Hooper Lane. Bird
>>>> is on the east side of the road just past the bridge when heading north on
>>>> Hooper Ln. At Super Sod.
>>>> PLEASE, PLEASE, do not Park at or near any gates that could interfere
>>>> with the operations of S/S!
>>>> Wayne
>>>>
>>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>>
>>> --
> ~Tracee 843/425-7630 <(843)%20425-7630>
>

 

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Date: 8/31/17 1:27 pm
From: Tracee Clapper (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Henderson Cty., NC
With the subject line, it's safe to disseminate that the super sod you
speak of is not the one near Orangeburg, SC, correct?

On Thu, Aug 31, 2017 at 1:46 PM Claire Herzog <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Located the sanderling too.
>
> On Thursday, August 31, 2017, Claire Herzog <ceherzog...> wrote:
>
>> There are currently 8 Black-bellied plovers & 2 buff-breasted Sandpipers
>> . No luck so far with the Sanderling.
>> Claire Herzog
>> Michael Plauche
>>
>> On Thursday, August 31, 2017, Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Folks,
>>> Currently 1 SANDERLING in very nice plumage on Hooper Lane. Bird
>>> is on the east side of the road just past the bridge when heading north on
>>> Hooper Ln. At Super Sod.
>>> PLEASE, PLEASE, do not Park at or near any gates that could interfere
>>> with the operations of S/S!
>>> Wayne
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>
>> --
~Tracee 843/425-7630

 

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Date: 8/31/17 1:16 pm
From: Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Migrating Nighthawks
Last evening I watched 5 Common Nighthawks feeding in the fields around the
barn at the corner of Edwards Mill and Reedy Creek in Raleigh. They and the
Chimney Swifts put on quite a show for about 30 minutes.

Eddie Owens
Cary NC

On Tue, Aug 29, 2017 at 6:03 PM Robert Rybczynski <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> About 1 pm, I had a group of perhaps 15 C. Nighthawks circling and
> drifting away to the east, in Cary NC, about 1/2 mile south of the
> intersection of US 1 and Cary Parkway. The number is definitely a crude
> estimate as I was driving on a busy road at the time.
> Good birding!
>
> Bob Rybczynski
> Cary, NC
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/17 12:47 pm
From: Christine Stoughton-Root (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Pamlico Cty
While birding Bent Tree Rd Oriental NC we came across a singing Swainson's Warbler and a Blue-headed Vireo. Photo of Swainsons on eBird no photo of the BHV not thinking he was rare at the time
Christine


Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 8/31/17 12:01 pm
From: David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Attempted Hummingbird Predation
Hi folks,
Most of my hummingbird feeders are hanging from snake and raccoon proof feeder poles, but I have a few hanging from trees. Apart from the occasional issue with Squirrels tilting and guzzling the sweet nectar, I haven't had any problems until yesterday.
Yesterday morning I walked out the house to a racket of hummers... at least 6 were frenetically buzzing around this one bush which has two of my feeders on it. I couldn't figure out why until I looked more closely at the feeder. A juvenile Eastern Ratsnake (perhaps 12 inches long) was coiled on top of the high perch dish feeder I have from WBU. His neck was in the characteristic S shape of a snake in ambush predator position.
I chose to leave the snake alone because the whole hummingbird family was clearly very aware of the threat and there were two other feeders within eyesight that were perfectly safe. There was no hummingbird sized bulge in the snakes belly either.
I came home around 7pm to find the snake had not moved and had fortunately still not been successful. By 9pm it had moved on.
I'm curious as to whether this is a commonly observed behavior. I would assume that an arboreal snake like the eastern Ratsnake would perhaps regularly hide in trumpet vine and crossvine in wait for unsuspecting hummers.
Fascinating.
I will most likely be reconsidering where to place the feeders to minimize this issue again.
Happy Birding,
David
Director of Environmental Education
St. Christopher Camp & Conference Center
Seabrook Island, SC

FYI - I have a photo of the snake on the feeder of anyone is interested, I will happily send you the photo.

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 8/31/17 10:46 am
From: Claire Herzog (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Henderson Cty., NC
Located the sanderling too.

On Thursday, August 31, 2017, Claire Herzog <ceherzog...> wrote:

> There are currently 8 Black-bellied plovers & 2 buff-breasted Sandpipers .
> No luck so far with the Sanderling.
> Claire Herzog
> Michael Plauche
>
> On Thursday, August 31, 2017, Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...>
> <javascript:_e(%7B%7D,'cvml','<wforsythe...>');>> wrote:
>
>> Folks,
>> Currently 1 SANDERLING in very nice plumage on Hooper Lane. Bird is
>> on the east side of the road just past the bridge when heading north on
>> Hooper Ln. At Super Sod.
>> PLEASE, PLEASE, do not Park at or near any gates that could interfere
>> with the operations of S/S!
>> Wayne
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>

 

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Date: 8/31/17 10:34 am
From: Claire Herzog (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Henderson Cty., NC
There are currently 8 Black-bellied plovers & 2 buff-breasted Sandpipers .
No luck so far with the Sanderling.
Claire Herzog
Michael Plauche

On Thursday, August 31, 2017, Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...> wrote:

> Folks,
> Currently 1 SANDERLING in very nice plumage on Hooper Lane. Bird is
> on the east side of the road just past the bridge when heading north on
> Hooper Ln. At Super Sod.
> PLEASE, PLEASE, do not Park at or near any gates that could interfere with
> the operations of S/S!
> Wayne
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/17 9:29 am
From: Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: hummers battle over taillight, NC
This is a first for a hummingbird sighting: this morning when I glanced out
the window I saw a hummer hover around and then approach the red plastic
covering of the taillight to Skip's car as though checking out a
feeder...while it was doing so, a second hummer flew rapidly in and chased
it off, and then checked out the taillight for itself. Of course, neither
returned.

Linda Ward
Coinjock, NC

 

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Date: 8/31/17 7:03 am
From: Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...>
Subject: Henderson Cty., NC
Folks,
Currently 1 SANDERLING in very nice plumage on Hooper Lane. Bird is on the east side of the road just past the bridge when heading north on Hooper Ln. At Super Sod.
PLEASE, PLEASE, do not Park at or near any gates that could interfere with the operations of S/S!
Wayne

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 8/31/17 4:57 am
From: andrew thornton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Swainson's Warbler, Greensboro
This morning I just stumbled on a Swainson's Warbler in Bryan Park, on the
Northeast side of Greensboro. I'm working on getting pictures now, but the
bird is along a trail that cuts over from the edge of golf practice area
over to the railroad. The map of where I'm talking about is here for
those interested:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__goo.gl_maps_HrwjJ9zoV3H2&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=fkHYOBYPjtr3gZlCf8ds9mYuwf4fTVHJrIA03tgP5aM&s=Pfxx463Aq4Ahr3102q2K0HL8Rhp2bCg116aGnTT_Kyw&e=

Andrew Thornton
Julian, NC

 

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Date: 8/30/17 5:46 pm
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Massive Nighthawk movement at Deep Gap
At the Osborne Mtn. Overlook on the blue ridge parkway, about mile
marker 278 near Deep Gap, tonight from 7:45 to 8:15 PM, a couple massive
flocks of migrating nighthawks almost filled the western sky for short
periods. During the half hour I was there I counted well over 500 birds,
and a few dozen flew right over me at low altitude. I'd never before
seen such a massive congregation of the birds, very impressive!

Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC


 

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Date: 8/30/17 5:04 pm
From: Me (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Black-necked stilt
There was a pair along the causeway all summer. I don't know if these are the same birds, or some just passing through. Did any look like immatures? The pair in the marsh near the ferry terminal had two immatures with them last time I saw them. Nice find, Always fun to see them!

Marty Wall
Beaufort, NC

> On Aug 30, 2017, at 7:33 PM, Peter Quadarella (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I have no idea if they are rare but they were a first for me so I thought I'd report I saw 3 Black-necked Stilts on the causeway at Cedar Island NWR late this afternoon.
>
> Peter Quadarella
> Weddington, NC
>
>
 

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Date: 8/30/17 4:34 pm
From: Peter Quadarella (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Black-necked stilt
I have no idea if they are rare but they were a first for me so I thought
I'd report I saw 3 Black-necked Stilts on the causeway at Cedar Island NWR
late this afternoon.

Peter Quadarella
Weddington, NC

 

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Date: 8/30/17 11:22 am
From: jackpateck (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Migration starting
A quick look out the window, and a female Redstart, a Worm-eating warbler and a female tanager foraging in our trees.

The worm-eating warbler is a first for us.

Pat and Jack Eckstine
On Goose Creek Reservoir
Hanahan, SC

 

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Date: 8/30/17 9:13 am
From: Josh Southern (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lake Wheeler (Wake, NC) update
There are currently three Stilt Sandpipers, eleven Short-billed Dowitchers,
and four Semipalmated Plovers amongst the Pecs, other peeps, both
Yellowlegs, and multitude of Killdeer. I don't see the Wood Stork, though.

Josh Southern
Holly Springs NC

 

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Date: 8/30/17 6:19 am
From: Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bodie Island, NC
We visited the flooded lawns and meadows at Bodie Island Tuesday following
the tropical low that passed through Dare County. Lots of shore birds, more
yellow legs than I've even seen in one place. Also killdeer and dowagers.
Highlights were two white-rumped sandpipers and three stilt sandpipers
among the others. The lawn around the light house had about 50 or so white
ibis. Oregon Inlet flooded meadow had many yellowlegs and assorted
sandpipers, but no rarities that we saw.

If anyone is interested in Aransas National Wildlife Reguge (where whooping
cranes winter), please visit the website for The National Wildlife Refuge
Association for info about this refuge and others hit by Hurricane Harvey.
I've found this group to be reliable in helping to contact Congress about
wildlife concerns.

Linda Ward
Skip Hancock
Coinjock, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 8/30/17 4:50 am
From: <brbirders...>
Subject: nighthawks Blue Ridge Pkwy 235 Alleghany Co
In the evenings we have checked during the last week we have seen from 15 to 149 nighthawks per evening, but last evening we saw many hundreds swarming, mostly in groups of 50 to 80, directly over our house near MP 235 on the Blue Ridge Pkwy, before streaming to the southwest. This a common sight in late August and the first few days of September every year in this valley just north of the Parkway here in Alleghany County.

Jim and Alice Keighton
 

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Date: 8/29/17 8:59 pm
From: Ricky Davis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Nash County Turf Farm
Hi folks

Went to the turf farm at the NC 33/I-95 area this evening. The American Golden-Plover reported earlier was still present along with two Buff-breasted Sandpipers, 6 Pectorals, 21 Leasts, and around 300 Killdeer! This is a big area and undoubtedly I missed some things! Will need to carry a scope since viewing can only be done from the roadside.

Later, Ricky

Ricky Davis
Rocky Mount, NC

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 8/29/17 3:03 pm
From: Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Migrating Nighthawks
About 1 pm, I had a group of perhaps 15 C. Nighthawks circling and drifting away to the east, in Cary NC, about 1/2 mile south of the intersection of US 1 and Cary Parkway. The number is definitely a crude estimate as I was driving on a busy road at the time.
Good birding!

Bob Rybczynski
Cary, NC

 

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Date: 8/29/17 11:09 am
From: james poling (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mississippi Kites at Old Fort, NC
14 Mississippi Kites hawking dragonflies over Irma’s Farm Fields yesterday, 2:00 pm Old Fort, NC. One posed for pictures on a nearby tree.




James Poling
624 Azalea Avenue
Black Mountain, NC 28711 USA
<james.poling...> <mailto:<james.poling...>
www.jamesnewtonpoling.com <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.jamesnewtonpoling.com_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=KS2V4Bg69VNrJFISytKz-jiBOje-HXj8qGg87fj8qoM&s=Ws-B9lZ59W1CeXk-bzzDeIj8dc_YS1xi3QqHvqVDf58&e= >
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__pinterest.com_jamesnpoling_boards_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=KS2V4Bg69VNrJFISytKz-jiBOje-HXj8qGg87fj8qoM&s=rOisUj_tnxVO8ofWSP5kRXIIhFkX_fveWexqRABk1dY&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__pinterest.com_jamesnpoling_boards_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=KS2V4Bg69VNrJFISytKz-jiBOje-HXj8qGg87fj8qoM&s=rOisUj_tnxVO8ofWSP5kRXIIhFkX_fveWexqRABk1dY&e= >
828-707-7413





 

Back to top
Date: 8/29/17 9:25 am
From: Greg Massey <gmassey001...>
Subject: Re: bird observation during the eclipse
Apparently, my first email did not send.
I experienced nearly the same thing during the eclipse. We observed it from my front yard. Prior to the start of the eclipse, birds were chirping and calling (titmice, chickadees, Cardinals, woodpeckers). When it became darker, the birds slowed down, and during the peak of the eclipse, there was complete silence. As more light became available, the birds started calling again. Very noticeable.


Greg Massey
Leland,NC 28451

---- John Fussell <jofuss...> wrote:
I experienced the eclipse at the Daventon Baptist Church parking lot,
southern Greenville County.

I thought that that would be a neat place to see the eclipse. My
great-grandparents donated the land for the church about 100 years ago, and
I had been there only once before. That was in 1955 or 1956.

About half-way into the "pre-partial eclipse", I became aware of 4 or 5
Chimney Swifts that were calling and flying around in the vicinity. I heard
them at least a few times during the rest of the pre-partial eclipse. I
definitely did not hear them during the total eclipse. However, within a
second or two of the full eclipse ending, when those first rays of the sun
burst through, I heard them again. They were very vocal, calling VERY fast
and excitedly.

Really neat experience. I'm glad we made the drive (even with the I-95
being a nightmare on the way back--didn't get home 'til 3am).

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 8/29/17 3:24 am
From: Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: LAUGHING GULL at Lake Crabtree (Southport marsh end); update on WOOD STORK at Lake Wheeler (marshes), Wake Co NC
Updates from Raleigh, Wake County, NC:

(1) A pair of immature LAUGHING GULL were seen at the Lake Crabtree
Southport mudflats on August 28. This mudflat is not easily visible
from the park, so head to 900 Aviation Parkway, and park in the back
behind the warehouse, then walk the steps down the wooded hill to the
Lake Crabtree trail. Turn RIGHT and go past a few sewer towers, then
turn LEFT when you see some orange flagging/string. This short path
ends at an overlook marked by a split-rail fence. Scope is required
for most shorebirds out there, but binoculars are enough to identify
the gulls.
You can see photographs of the Laughing Gulls on Eddie Owens' list:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S38876346&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Fb3AGXPU61bbnqnArAnqXue5hi8kIN-eFwV26W0LRkw&s=uq-Rx9_bTvGvoDIENFcbiyKvaTkdPPGEuAbJHX-QJMs&e=
Kevin H saw the Laughing Gulls Monday morning, Eddie photographed them
around 5 pm, and I saw them around 7:30 pm. And none of us knew that
the other had spotted these (rare) birds until we saw them all on
ebird! (well, they are rare around here....)

(1) The WOOD STORK was seen again by Kevin Hudson at "Lake Wheeler
marshes" on August 28, about 10 am. The Wood Stork tends to hide
behind the willows in the back of the marsh, out of view of the
overlook on Penny Road. You have to park, walk a trail that veers to
the left, and head around to the southwest side of the upper
lake/marsh and get a peek that way. I marked the start of the left
trail with yellow flagging on a small pine sapling to make it easier
to find.
Directions to Penny Road parking are included in this checklist:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S38857680&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Fb3AGXPU61bbnqnArAnqXue5hi8kIN-eFwV26W0LRkw&s=UwUgpMYHpTE90hiwTvZSEEUPDAVetalH9pj7w1Bscp0&e=
Other nifty birds out there include Pectoral, Stilt, and Least
Sandpiper, both Yellowlegs, and Short-billed Dowitcher. Gotta have a
scope for those, and the view is best in the morning with the sun at
your back.

I think it is so interesting that the Wood Stork at Jordan Lake was
last seen (on ebird) around August 22, and this Wood Stork at Lake
Wheeler was first spotted August 27. It isn't a long way between those
two lakes, as the stork flies! Any speculation that this may be the
same bird? I'd sure love to see his "pink buddy" pop up at Lake
Wheeler!

Good birding to you,
L Erla Beegle
 

Back to top
Date: 8/28/17 6:18 pm
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: bird observation during the eclipse
I experienced the eclipse at the Daventon Baptist Church parking lot,
southern Greenville County.

I thought that that would be a neat place to see the eclipse. My
great-grandparents donated the land for the church about 100 years ago, and
I had been there only once before. That was in 1955 or 1956.

About half-way into the "pre-partial eclipse", I became aware of 4 or 5
Chimney Swifts that were calling and flying around in the vicinity. I heard
them at least a few times during the rest of the pre-partial eclipse. I
definitely did not hear them during the total eclipse. However, within a
second or two of the full eclipse ending, when those first rays of the sun
burst through, I heard them again. They were very vocal, calling VERY fast
and excitedly.

Really neat experience. I'm glad we made the drive (even with the I-95
being a nightmare on the way back--didn't get home 'til 3am).

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC






 

Back to top
Date: 8/28/17 2:36 pm
From: Fred Burggraf (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Duplicate "Bird Life & Behavior" book by Sibley
I meant, of course, to contact me off-list.....not off-line.

Fred Burggraf
Murrells Inlet, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 8/28/17 10:09 am
From: Steve Compton <scompton1251...>
Subject: Re: Bicycle birding
Betsey,
About 12 years ago I rented a beach bike at the south end of Kiawah
and biked the approximately ten miles to the North end in order to see
a Snowy Plover, carrying my scope and tripod in an improvised
backpack. Tough going into the wind. And I saw and photographed the
bird, a lifer! Lot of fun, very good exercise.
Steve ComptonGreenville,SC
Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE DroidOn Aug 28, 2017 10:47 AM, Betsy Kane
<carolinabirds...> wrote:

The responses to my "birding by bike" inquiry have been so very
interesting. I will shortly compile/anonymize the range of
responses and report back to the listserv with a summary.
In the meantime if anyone wants to respond on how you are using
bikes to support your birding activities, I can include it when I
update.
Thanks so much to everyone who has submitted this interesting
information. I'm a bicycle transportation planner, so it is
great to learn more about this subset of bike use.
Betsy KaneRaleigh
On Mon, Aug 28, 2017 at 10:38 AM, Mary Tennessee <tapple50...>
wrote:

One of my favorite ways to bird. Use to do this at St. Marks
Wildlife Refuge in north FL. All flat and I could use a single
speed.

Delightfully sent from Suzanne's iPad


> On Aug 27, 2017, at 6:08 AM, Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds
Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I'm curious to learn how birders on this list have used
bikes when birding: getting to the field, traveling between
stops, carrying gear, in groups or solo, on bike-permitted
trails, etc.
> Do bikes figure prominently in your birding activities or
incidentally? etc.
>
> Betsy Kane
> Raleigh
 

Back to top
Date: 8/28/17 7:48 am
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bicycle birding
The responses to my "birding by bike" inquiry have been so very
interesting. I will shortly compile/anonymize the range of responses and
report back to the listserv with a summary.

In the meantime if anyone wants to respond on how you are using bikes to
support your birding activities, I can include it when I update.

Thanks so much to everyone who has submitted this interesting information.
I'm a bicycle transportation planner, so it is great to learn more about
this subset of bike use.

Betsy Kane
Raleigh

On Mon, Aug 28, 2017 at 10:38 AM, Mary Tennessee <tapple50...> wrote:

> One of my favorite ways to bird. Use to do this at St. Marks Wildlife
> Refuge in north FL. All flat and I could use a single speed.
>
> Delightfully sent from Suzanne's iPad
>
>
> > On Aug 27, 2017, at 6:08 AM, Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> >
> > I'm curious to learn how birders on this list have used bikes when
> birding: getting to the field, traveling between stops, carrying gear, in
> groups or solo, on bike-permitted trails, etc.
> > Do bikes figure prominently in your birding activities or incidentally?
> etc.
> >
> > Betsy Kane
> > Raleigh
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/28/17 7:39 am
From: Mary Tennessee (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bicycle birding
One of my favorite ways to bird. Use to do this at St. Marks Wildlife Refuge in north FL. All flat and I could use a single speed.

Delightfully sent from Suzanne's iPad


> On Aug 27, 2017, at 6:08 AM, Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I'm curious to learn how birders on this list have used bikes when birding: getting to the field, traveling between stops, carrying gear, in groups or solo, on bike-permitted trails, etc.
> Do bikes figure prominently in your birding activities or incidentally? etc.
>
> Betsy Kane
> Raleigh
 

Back to top
Date: 8/28/17 6:55 am
From: Lucas Bobay (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Wood Stork at Lake Wheeler, Wake Co (8/27)
Yesterday morning (8/27), Erla Beegle found a Wood Stork at the west end of
Lake Wheeler where the Wilson's Phalarope was a few weeks ago. The stork
apparently flew south around noon but was relocated by Sam Jolly and myself
yesterday around 7 pm foraging in the back slough not visible from the
Penny Rd overlook. It is possible to walk along the shoreline to get a
better view the mudflats. Use caution on Penny Rd.

Lucas Bobay
Raleigh

 

Back to top
Date: 8/28/17 4:04 am
From: David Shuford <deshuford1...>
Subject: Re: Eclipse Report
I saw the eclipse at a church near Madisonville, Tn. They had an event.
About 350 _yards_ off the centerline. I was much too taken by the
eclipse to remember to notice any wildlife effects. But after it was
over, the pastor did say he heard crickets. There were no birds around,
as this was in a field, far from trees. I don't think many birds sing in
the heat of the day in August anyway.

However, on both of the days I was there, in the morning, the first bird
I heard when I opened the door of my car was a Blue Grosbeak. Both days.

On the way down to the site, early on eclipse day, in my rearview
mirror, I noticed the sun rising. It was deep red-orange. It reminded my
of one of my favorite paintings, The Song of the Lark. So, I called this
experience The Song of the Grosbeak.

The next day, I stopped by Seven Isles State BIRDING Park. What?! I met
a couple who had also seen the eclipse from a church. They saw deer that
ventured out of the woods at the eclipse and then stumbled all over
themselves trying to get back in the woods once it was over.

David Shuford
Winston-Salem, NC




 

Back to top
Date: 8/27/17 2:36 pm
From: nicholas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: American Golden-Plover, Nash Co. NC, 8/27/2017
Elisa and I saw 1 American Golden-Plover with a large flock of Killdeer and a few Least Sandpipers in a turf farm field just northeast of I-95 x SR 33 in Nash Co. NC, viewed from the beginning of the onramp to northbound I-95 from westbound 33. This was around 4:30PM.

Nick Flanders
Portsmouth, VA
 

Back to top
Date: 8/27/17 1:07 pm
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Update on Blue wings
Two of them chasing each other. I've had this happen before during migration with multiple birds at once.
In 2015 I had three.
It excites me every time!

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 8/27/17 12:51 pm
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: BLUE-WINGED WARBLER - Backyard

Now I am excited!!!! I've been looking for one all weekend and he's in my backyard right now!

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 8/27/17 8:48 am
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: AviSys taxonomy update
For anyone still using AviSys, I have just published the 2017 taxonomy update at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__avisys.faintlake.com_&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=lE04W1hb8FrXVPuDQoazp6RcgC_eexZhhHVzUQeqMNA&s=_sjGWtYn3rDWV58crjligrDReOHCQHplCeffts3ExDA&e=

--
Kent Fiala

 

Back to top
Date: 8/27/17 5:28 am
From: Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Buff-Breasted Sandpiper, Sod Farm, Orangeburg SC
Ed Blitch and I have 2 Buff-Breasted Sandpipers in field to the right of Roquemore Road at the main Super Sod Farm.
Pam Ford
Charleston

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 8/27/17 3:09 am
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bicycle birding
I'm curious to learn how birders on this list have used bikes when birding:
getting to the field, traveling between stops, carrying gear, in groups or
solo, on bike-permitted trails, etc.
Do bikes figure prominently in your birding activities or incidentally?
etc.

Betsy Kane
Raleigh

 

Back to top
Date: 8/26/17 4:08 pm
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: Buff-breasted Sandpiper
Yesterday, while conducting a shorebird census at the Rachel Carson Reserve,
south of Beaufort (NC), I found a juvenile Buff-breasted Sandpiper. As
would be expected, it was feeding on dry flats (sparse cover of Spartina
patens).

Some other shorebirds on the census were 54 Wilson's Plover, 4 Piping
Plovers, 45 Whimbrels, and 62 Marbled Godwits.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 8/26/17 3:52 pm
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER - Backyard
I checked the Stokes Field Guide to Warblers, and my bird may be a couple of days early, but nothing special. Very close view from the back deck of the yellowish wash and triangular cheek patch. Cool to read about the "separate" wing bars. So obvious on this beautiful fall warbler.
Another morning with coffee and binoculars and hoping the prediction of higher winds holds off for a bit .

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 8/26/17 10:41 am
From: David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Reddish Egret, WHITE MORPH continues on Bulls Island
Sat 26 Aug 2017

All,

I first reported a WHITE MORPH Reddish Egret from Bulls Island, Cape
Romain NWR, Charleston County, SC, from my 11 Aug 2017 survey. The same,
presumed, white morph Reddish Egret was still in the same oceanfront
saltwater marsh at Jack's Creek location on my Thursday 24 Aug 2017 survey.
A photo of this bird is included in my eBird checklist from the 11 Aug 2017
survey at:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_ebird_iss_view_checklist_S38660880&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=t6-QYaGPTP-ubW3JvgkBhL2U-gW0SDg5ZBChZ84mVJI&s=_GM9awzsGwyC0-J03GUQ02YDvGy0mfZOVrp-QSDLeaU&e=

Regards,

David McLean
Charleston, SC

--
David C. McLean, Jr.
DCMcLean AT gmail DOT com

 

Back to top
Date: 8/25/17 5:42 pm
From: David Weesner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lots of Shorebirds at Fort Fisher Spit
I was there at high today from about 12 till 2.  Thousands of shorebirds on the spit and lots at the first crossover.This estimate is probably low!!Black-b. Plover -600,  Am. Oystercatcher-200, Semipalmated Plover- 9,000, Whimbrel- 15, Sanderling -200, Western Sanpiper- 450, Semipalmated Sandpiper- 15, S.b Dowitcher- 600, Caspian Tern- 15, and Black Terns- 160.Dave WeesnerWilmington, NC

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 8/25/17 2:53 pm
From: David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Small fall-out after storm yesterday: Seabrook, SC
Hi folks,
I got to walk the flooded trails at St. Christopher this afternoon and got some surprising numbers of early fall migrants.

1 Louisiana Waterthrush
14 Northern Waterthrush
4 Ovenbirds
8 Am. Redstarts
12 Eastern Kingbirds

The number of waterthrushes was very conservative- as I only counted the ones I saw. I heard a bunch more, but I am still not 100% on sorting them out from Cardinals.

I also heard a few Parula's and saw the typical number of Painted Buntings.
Happy Birding,
David

Dacid Gardner
Director of Environmental Education
St. Christopher Camp & Conference Center
Seabrook Island, SC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 8/25/17 2:29 pm
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Chestnut-sided Warbler - FOS
Looking at the gorgeous fall plumage from the back deck right now.
What a beautiful bird.

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 8/25/17 5:56 am
From: bruce young (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: upper Jordan lake
Yesterday afternoon i went for the third time to look for the Roseate Spoonbill. Third time was NOT a charm, still no pink birds. However, I did see 6 White Ibis and 12 Little Blue Herons. Pretty good counts of each. The mudflats were much more extensive than last weekend, but there were very few shorebirds, a handful of Killdeer and one Spotted Sandpiper. 
Bruce <Youngbyoung715...> NC
 

Back to top
Date: 8/25/17 5:28 am
From: Dennis Burnette <deburnette...>
Subject: Re: Important Conservation Issues - Consider Audubon
National Audubon Society sends out Action Alerts on issues that affect birds
and wildlife habitats. The alerts usually summarize the issues and suggest
steps members can take. One of the cool things about Audubon is that the
enormous national membership spans the whole political spectrum. There are
state Audubon offices both in North Carolina and South Carolina that send
out alerts of more regional interest. Joining National Audubon automatically
confers membership in a local chapter, if there is one nearby. (There are 9
chapters in North Carolina and 6 in South Carolina.) Even if there isnt a
chapter nearby, a national member still can get action alerts and be active
in conservation. Membership is only $20 a year. The National Audubon Society
website is https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.audubon.org_&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=ii2veGVuJ2MveDwgjjKq1xSH3cWxVF7-3g20OA2tV6Y&s=xnLofWKL0J8ZBSgR2F0cO2QbwmX5Lburx6NtRcrtx9g&e= ; click on Conservation to see a pull
down menu describing all the good work Audubon is doing. Audubon NC and
Audubon SC are very active in conservation at a more local level. The
websites are https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__nc.audubon.org_&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=ii2veGVuJ2MveDwgjjKq1xSH3cWxVF7-3g20OA2tV6Y&s=2rk823kG0nT57VWdOAqVWRAV8J6VgDHXOU9haB0mjxU&e= and https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__sc.audubon.org_&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=ii2veGVuJ2MveDwgjjKq1xSH3cWxVF7-3g20OA2tV6Y&s=siZxdFCK40O8BKzysUydUFEtjt1fQ9Lq2DtdGaiw3EA&e= . The websites
have a wealth of information about conservation activities in each state.
Clicking on the words under the banners will provide a quick tour of whats
going on.

By the way, I dont work for Audubon, Im just an active member of my local
chapter.

Dennis
--
Dennis Burnette
Greensboro, NC
Guilford County
<deburnette...>

From: <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Carolinabirds
<carolinabirds...>
Reply-To: Betsy Kane <oldurbanist...>
Date: Thursday, August 24, 2017 at 12:37 PM
To: Russ Oates <rmoates54...>
Cc: Maggie Strickland <gallinasviejas...>, Carolinabirds
<carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Important conservation issues

Russ,

Thank you for these details. I want to take action, but I don't have time
to dig deep into the issues or figure out the process from scratch, as I am
committed to other efforts. Would it be possible for you to advise, or can
someone you know advise, on specific actions to be taken when the time is
right? I would be extremely grateful and ready to call or submit comments
if I could know 1) what to say (very briefly) 2) when to say it, and 3) who
to say it to.

Betsy Kane
Raleigh

On Thu, Aug 24, 2017 at 8:30 AM, Russ Oates <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> Maggie,
>
> Thank you for your response. You are absolutely right about the EPA. I was
> remiss in omitting the EPA from my comments on "Continuity of Executive Branch
> Natural Resource Management." Administrator Pruitt is intent on destroying
> the agency. His efforts to remove science from the decision making process
> are dumbfounding. We should prepare for deadly smog and burning rivers....the
> clock is turning back to the 1950s.
>
> Truly overwhelming...
>
> Russ
>
> On Thu, Aug 24, 2017 at 7:46 AM, Maggie Strickland <gallinasviejas...>
> wrote:
>> Russ,
>> Thank you so much for this clear and specific information. While most of my
>> recent contacts with our senators and representatives has concerned other
>> matters, I am horrified at the sweeping changes at the EPA. The wholesale
>> retreat from preservation and conservation is so disheartening. I promise I
>> will take action on these issues.
>>
>> Sincerely,
>> Maggie Strickland
>> Harmony, Maine
>>
>> On Wed, Aug 23, 2017 at 8:39 PM, Russ Oates <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>> CBC Members,
>>>
>>> There are several nationally or internationally important bird-related
>>> issues in Alaska that are currently approaching decision points in the
>>> Congress and/or the Executive Branch. Given the anti-conservation statements
>>> and actions of the current Administration and the likely willingness by the
>>> Congress to follow suit, I am asking you to review these issues and to
>>> consider contacting the appropriate Executive Branch agencies and especially
>>> your US Congressional delegation to encourage them to act on the side of
>>> responsible conservation. Many of these issues will be decided in the US
>>> Senate. Currently-proposed legislation and executive actions will cause
>>> irreparable damage to Important Bird Areas. Much is at stake.
>>>
>>> A significant proportion of members from both parties in Congress are
>>> conservationists at heart but the Republicans will be under severe pressure
>>> to roll back environmental protections nationwide. We only need 3
>>> Republican senators to vote against an ill-advised development project or
>>> management action to block it, so your calls or letters to your US
>>> Congressional Delegation could be crucial.
>>>
>>> Alaska is a hugely-important nesting area for birds from all four North
>>> American flyways (especially Pacific and Central) as well as the East
>>> Asia/Australasia and East Asia/East Africa flyways. Bird band reports
>>> (returns) have shown that some of the Tundra Swans and at least 4 species of
>>> ducks that breed in Alaska also spend the winter in NC. Although I couldnt
>>> easily check banding data for other species, AK and NC share at least 16
>>> species of shorebirds. Also, Alaska has historically been a safe haven for
>>> species depleted elsewhere in their ranges (for example: Bald Eagles,
>>> Trumpeter Swans, Peregrine Falcons) and for many years provided eggs and/or
>>> young to the lower 48 states for restoration.
>>>
>>> I present each issue by identifying it, followed by the desired outcome.
>>> This will be followed by a brief explanation of whats at stake and why
>>> there is an issue. If you need more information, you can Google Audubon
>>> Alaska or the names of the locations of concern.
>>>
>>> ISSUES:
>>>
>>> 1) Issue: Beaufort/Chukchi Sea (off the north shore of Alaska) offshore
>>> petroleum drilling.
>>>
>>> Desired outcome: Block offshore development in Chukchi and Beaufort
>>> seas.
>>>
>>>
>>> I know of no oil spill anywhere in an area of broken or solid ice cover on
>>> marine water that was effectively cleaned up or even contained. Current
>>> spill clean up technology doesnt work in ice-choked waters. Historically,
>>> ice has been present in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas more than 200 days per
>>> year. In addition to the threats to whales, seals, and polar bears, an
>>> offshore or nearshore spill occurring in late winter or early spring poses a
>>> tremendous threat to at least 2 million spring-migrating Long-tailed Ducks
>>> and King and Common eiders. Also threatened would be Endangered Species Act
>>> (ESA)-listed Threatened Spectacled and Stellers eiders (the entire North
>>> American breeding population of Stellers Eiders) and ESA listed Warranted
>>> But Precluded Yellow-billed Loon. Large numbers of many species of
>>> shorebirds, gulls, terns, and jaegers would be at risk from floating oil and
>>> oiled shorelines. Here is the nightmare scenario: We know that essentially
>>> all of the bird species mentioned move to northern breeding grounds as early
>>> in spring as conditions will allow. These birds fly north along the Bering
>>> Sea coastline and turn east into the Chukchi, using any open water patches
>>> to rest and feed while enroute to their breeding grounds in arctic Alaska
>>> and Canada. If a spill occurs at an offshore rig or seabed pipeline in late
>>> winter or early spring, the floating portion of the spill could be waiting
>>> as a death trap there for the migrating birds. This could affect tens to
>>> hundreds of thousands of birds and there could be no way to stop the spill,
>>> clean up the spill, or rescue birds. There is clearly potential for
>>> population level impacts on several species (at a minimum: King Eider,
>>> Spectacled Eider, Stellers Eider, Common Eider, Yellow-billed Loon).
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> 2) Issue: Opening the Teshekpuk Lake Goose Molting area to oil development.
>>> Desired outcome: Maintain the moratorium on development of this area.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Teshekpuk Lake, the second-largest lake in Alaska, is located within the
>>> 23.5 million acre National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska (NPRA, administered by
>>> Bureau of Land Management), and sits about 15 miles south of the western
>>> Beaufort Sea coastline (175 miles west of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge).
>>> The 200+ lakes loosely clustered between Teshekpuk Lake and the coastline
>>> constitute the largest arctic goose molting resort in North America,
>>> supporting multiple species of flightless molting birds (Mid-continent
>>> White-fronted Geese, Pacific Black Brant, Lesser Snow Geese, and Cackling
>>> Geese) for several critical months each summer. Frequently, up to 100,000
>>> geese molt in these lakes. During the annual wing molt, these birds are
>>> exceptionally sensitive to disturbance, and an on-the-ground research
>>> scientist during the 1970s reported birds reacting (avoidance behavior) to a
>>> person walking across the board-flat tundra at a distance of one mile. With
>>> that high level of sensitivity, its no wonder that the geese picked one of
>>> the most remote locations in Alaska to undergo the 2-3 week flightless
>>> period. The area appeared to be secure from large-scale disturbance until
>>> winter seismic work revealed the possibility of extensive oil deposits
>>> directly under the molting area. I have seen a detailed proposed
>>> development scenario prepared by the petroleum industry that I strongly
>>> believe would result in the complete abandonment of the molting area. Over
>>> the years, scientists (from government and conservation organizations) have
>>> successfully defended this important molting area against several industry
>>> and pro-development administration attempts to open it for oil development.
>>> I credit Audubon Alaska with leading the effort that resulted in the latest
>>> stay of execution. During the Obama Administration, a ten-year moratorium on
>>> development was instituted in this area to protect the geese, shorebirds and
>>> the 60,000-head Teshekpuk Lake Caribou Herds calving area. Due to the
>>> intense pressure from the current administration to open currently closed
>>> areas of Alaska to petroleum development, it is very likely that the
>>> moratorium will be cancelled.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> 3) Issue: Opening the Coastal Plain (commonly referred to as the 1002
>>> {ten oh two} area) of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) to oil
>>> exploration and development.
>>>
>>> Desired outcome: Protect the entire Coastal Plain area of Arctic National
>>> Wildlife Refuge with wilderness designation.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> The coastal plain portion of ANWR is approximately 1.5 million acres in
>>> size, and represents about 5% of the coastal plain north of the Brooks
>>> Range. Virtually all of the 95% not within the Refuge is already open for
>>> oil exploration and development. Giving this relatively small area
>>> Wilderness status would permanently protect a complete arctic ecosystem from
>>> the shoreline on the Beaufort Sea coastline, south across the coastal plain,
>>> through the foothills and the north slope of the Brooks Range (its all
>>> tundra from the divide north to the Beaufort Sea), and sweeping down the
>>> south slope to the boreal forests and the northern floodplain of the Yukon
>>> River. Most of this area looks as it has for thousands of years, and it is
>>> ecologically complete and intact with a full suite of life including a
>>> complex of top-level predators. Why would it hurt to develop the coastal
>>> plain portion? The coastal plain is the calving area for the 150,000-strong
>>> Porcupine Caribou Herd, a herd that is a vitally important subsistence
>>> resource for the Gwichin Athabascan Indians that live south of the Brooks
>>> Range in Alaska and Yukon Territories (where the caribou herd winters). The
>>> herd concentrates on the coastal plain during a mass birthing in late
>>> June/early July, and the cows tend to their young and try to protect them
>>> from a whole host of predators (brown bears, wolves, wolverines, and Golden
>>> Eagles converge for this annual feast.) The caribou are also an important
>>> subsistence resource (second to bowhead whales) for the Inupiat Eskimos of
>>> the Alaska North Slope. Despite the deliberate misrepresentations of the
>>> affected area (particularly by former Secretary of Interior under George W.
>>> Bush) and research done on caribou response to oil pipelines (by multiple
>>> pro-development administrations), a prominent caribou researcher told me
>>> that pregnant females and females with calves stay away from oil pipelines
>>> (based on work done in the Prudhoe Bay area). A spider web of pipelines
>>> connecting production wells, and associated structures and airfields, would
>>> likely have dire long-term consequences for the herd and associated predator
>>> populations (not to mention the subsistence hunters). The coastal plain is
>>> also an important migration area for Yellow-billed Loons and nesting and
>>> migration habitat for a host of different shorebird species (for example:
>>> Buff-breasted Sandpiper, Black-bellied Plover, American Golden Plover,
>>> Semipalmated Plover, Pectoral Sandpiper, Semi-palmated Sandpiper,
>>> Long-billed Dowitcher, Stilt Sandpiper, Red and Red-necked Phalaropes,
>>> Bar-tailed Godwit, and Bairds Sandpiper.) The coastal plain is important
>>> in some years for as many as 350,000 Lesser Snow Geese (that nested in a
>>> western Canada colony) to fatten on sedge rhizomes before migrating south.
>>>
>>>
>>> 4) Issue: Approval of the Pebble Mine.
>>>
>>> Desired outcome: Maintain the EPA position protecting the area from mining
>>> and provide permanent protection to the watershed.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Pebble is a massive mining project proposed for Alaska state lands in the
>>> middle of the watershed containing the spawning area of the largest sockeye
>>> salmon stock in the world (and the other 4 species of salmon as well). In
>>> addition, sockeye hatchlings live 1-2 years in connected lakes until they
>>> are large enough to go out to sea. Roughly half of the worlds wild-caught
>>> salmon comes from Bristol Bay. If developed, the mine will be the largest
>>> mine in North America and the highly toxic tailings will be stored behind
>>> the largest earthen dam in the world (over 700 feet tall and several miles
>>> long.) This is a seismically active area, and independent scientists doubt
>>> whether the dam would survive a major earthquake on the order of the one
>>> that severely damaged Anchorage and several other southcentral Alaska
>>> coastal communities in 1964. Needless to say, the failure of this dam would
>>> be catastrophic for the salmon and potentially for the many species of
>>> marine birds (including Emperor Geese and ESA listed Stellers Eiders) that
>>> use Bristol Bay as a foraging area during migration.) After extensive
>>> investigations, this area was declared by the EPA to be too valuable and
>>> vulnerable to mine, but the Trump administration resurrected the project.
>>> If you like to eat wild salmon or support sustainable management of wild
>>> salmon, you have a dog in this fight. Please, take a moment to check out
>>> this web site: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.savebristolbay.org_home_&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=ii2veGVuJ2MveDwgjjKq1xSH3cWxVF7-3g20OA2tV6Y&s=n3VTWm2Va9EGSusTKJiFyJWtPDWtptO1fsPo5uby8Og&e=
>>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.savebristolbay.org_>>> home_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitu
>>> g_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=7EO4BVk-XJ7NwcinUfmYJ6IqVyRpdxRLrIOCGxsI31Q
>>> &s=UivxUYuxxj67rL43Q6khgMRE3p-5W3cZUbqTdOKj7ls&e=>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> 5) Issue: The State National Forest Management Act of 2017 (SNFMA) and the
>>> Alaska Mental Health Trust Land Transfer Act (AMHT).
>>>
>>> Desired outcome: Defeat both bills.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> SNFMA, (HR 232, sponsored by Rep. Don Young of Alaska) was introduced in
>>> January of this year. I dont understand all of the details, but I read the
>>> text and this is my take: While there are some specific Alaska provisions,
>>> much of the bill applies to all states and national forests in North and
>>> South Carolina could be profoundly affected. As written, this bill would
>>> allow each state to select up to 2,000,000 acres of National Forest within
>>> their respective state boundaries for transfer to state ownership and
>>> management with the mandate to supply the needs of all wood processing
>>> operations in the state. Potentially, 100% of NCs 1.255 million acres of
>>> National Forest could be transferred to the state. This legislation would
>>> also permit mining in the former national forests.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> AMHT, sponsored by Senator Lisa Murkowski, has been developed in the Senate
>>> to the point that it can be added as a rider to another, more urgent bill.
>>> The bill is intended to allow the transfer of old growth acreage to private
>>> (Alaska Native) corporations in exchange for their corporate-owned
>>> logged-over areas. This will facilitate the rapid destruction of the
>>> magnificent old growth trees, some of which are more than 1,000 years old.
>>>
>>>
>>> The Alaska congressional delegation has, for decades, done everything in
>>> their power to open up the remaining old growth trees of the magnificent
>>> Tongass National Forest to logging. Only 3% of the Tongass is old growth, so
>>> we must act now to save it.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> 6) Issue: Building a road to the village of King Cove through the
>>> Designated Wilderness portion of Izembek National Wildlife Refuge.
>>>
>>> Desired outcome: Prevent the road from being built.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Izembek National Wildlife Refuge, one of Alaskas oldest refuges, is the
>>> principal fall staging area for essentially 100% of the Pacific Black Brant
>>> population. The area is also a vital staging area for Emperor Geese, which
>>> winter to the west on the Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands and breed
>>> almost exclusively to the north on the Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge.
>>> Izembek lagoon provides lush eelgrass beds that allow the brant to
>>> accumulate huge amounts of body fat (nearly doubling their weight) necessary
>>> to enable the birds to survive the 60+ hour direct flight to overwintering
>>> areas principally in the bays of the Pacific coast of Baja and mainland
>>> Mexico. Most of the historic wintering areas on the west coast of the Lower
>>> 48 states have been destroyed or dramatically reduced by dredging and other
>>> development.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Never since the passage of the Wilderness Act in 1964 has a designated
>>> Wilderness Area been compromised for the purpose of road construction. A
>>> federal Judge ruled in 2015 in favor of the Department of Interiors
>>> decision to deny permission for construction of the road. The US House of
>>> Representatives recently passed legislation that would open the area to road
>>> construction. This bill sets a very dangerous precedent by potentially
>>> opening the door to road construction in Wilderness Areas nationwide. The
>>> bill now goes to the Senate where we will have our final chance to defeat
>>> it. Please contact your US Senators and encourage them to protect the
>>> Refuge.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Read more at the following site:
>>>
>>>
>>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__l.facebook.com_l.php-3Fu-3Dhttp-253A-252F-252Fbit.ly-252F2vyb6jU-26h-3DATMupmgV-2Dv-5FgK&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=ii2veGVuJ2MveDwgjjKq1xSH3cWxVF7-3g20OA2tV6Y&s=XTT6oKttxXA2uqU5Ao_qb8R49ZgBgyTAC4KP4GGhtRk&e=
>>> 4pynARMjWZyRCHtlXoqa7HSyzJ7Eavxean6O-cr04HohyVXHZ_oF7nxNLuA34P3lHvMs55XcmyuW
>>> sxwFL30mx32Pkg_QoLMSrT5MESKygZxJ5oqNn1lyGzfHnR37nhUVShgv23woUDpVuyhOmuUCZtb0
>>> MhUtBu8GzaUXLsOStYb3xPBORlIrV6NCdt30E7sS2WX4NTdCTOG99wIOm0DyrRNOAMCSHnLUVn1w
>>> DC28--kUtg
>>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__l.facebook.com_l.php-3>>> Fu-3Dhttp-253A-252F-252Fbit.ly-252F2vyb6jU-26h-3DATMupmgV-2Dv-5FgK4pynARMjWZ
>>> yRCHtlXoqa7HSyzJ7Eavxean6O-2Dcr04HohyVXHZ-5FoF7nxNLuA34P3lHvMs55XcmyuWsxwFL3
>>> 0mx32Pkg-5FQoLMSrT5MESKygZxJ5oqNn1lyGzfHnR37nhUVShgv23woUDpVuyhOmuUCZtb0MhUt
>>> Bu8GzaUXLsOStYb3xPBORlIrV6NCdt30E7sS2WX4NTdCTOG99wIOm0DyrRNOAMCSHnLUVn1wDC28
>>> -2D-2DkUtg&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-
>>> sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=7EO4BVk-XJ7NwcinUfmYJ6IqVyRpdxRLrIOCGx
>>> sI31Q&s=OJqcrSNTszJyGuUOX-39GQncztYfnRuZNQ1KWelo7_A&e=>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> 7) Issue: Climate change.
>>>
>>> Desired outcome: The US fully engages in the Paris Climate Change Accords.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Alaska is home to vast amounts of glacial ice, sea ice, and permafrost. If
>>> these melt, and they certainly are melting at this point, they will make a
>>> huge contribution to a warming climate. The threat of melting permafrost is
>>> probably least known by the public. When permafrost melts, it releases not
>>> only carbon dioxide the but also large amounts of methane (molecule for
>>> molecule, far more problematic than carbon dioxide.) The consequences of
>>> extensive permafrost melting across the northern hemisphere are unthinkable.
>>>
>>>
>>> 8) Issue: Continuity of Executive Branch Natural Resource Management.
>>>
>>> Desired Outcome: Full funding for natural resource conservation functions
>>> for Department of Interior (especially US Fish and Wildlife Service, US
>>> National Park Service, and Bureau of Land Management) Department of
>>> Agriculture (US Forest Service and the Farm Bill) and Department of Energy;
>>> cessation of the reshuffling of senior leadership positions among
>>> agencies; retain the designations of the National Monuments currently under
>>> review by Secretary of the Interior Zinke.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> In my recent summer trip to Alaska to visit family, I visited with former
>>> colleagues from the US Fish and Wildlife Service and learned that the
>>> Presidents budget as well as statements and actions by the top
>>> administrators in EPA, Energy, and Interior send clear signals of a desire
>>> to significantly damage or eliminate important federal conservation
>>> programs. Interior Secretary Zinke has engaged in a policy of shuffling
>>> occupants of senior leadership positions, removing leaders from areas of
>>> expertise and placing them in positions in other agencies that do not relate
>>> to their experience or training. Clearly, the intent is to cripple the
>>> agencies at the top, create chaos, and stop them from conducting and
>>> disseminating scientifically rigorous science that is inconvenient to the
>>> Administrations ideology. The extent of this effort is beyond anything I
>>> saw in my 31 year federal career.
>>>
>>>
>>> I regret the great length of this post. These are incredibly difficult
>>> times. There is so much at stake! Thank you for any help that you can
>>> provide!
>>>
>>> Russ Oates (USFWS Alaska, Retired)
>>> Burnsville, NC
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Conserve wild things, protect wild places.
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Conserve wild things, protect wild places.




 

Back to top
Date: 8/25/17 4:36 am
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Early Fall Stuff - Backyard
Just had Black and White Warbler, American Redstart, and Magnolia Warbler before leaving for work.
The fun begins.

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 8/24/17 6:23 pm
From: Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Four Upland Sandpipers at Beaufort, NC Airport
There were four Upland Sandpipers visible this evening at the airport in
Beaufort, NC. They were far out on the airfield, but clearly visible with
a scope. The as of yet unfinished Beaufort bypass on the south side
provides a little elevation to better see distant birds. From the high
point along the bypass, look in the grassy area far to the north, along
runway B.

Marty Wall
Beaufort, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 8/24/17 5:59 pm
From: John Grego <jrgrego...>
Subject: Tagged Piping Plover info from Harbor Island
My family and I spent the first week of August at Harbor Island near the Johnson Creek inlet. I reported 14 Piping Plover tags to Melissa Chaplin of US Fish & Wildlife Service and she shared them with other researchers. I thought I was taking good notes, but apparently flubbed a couple of the tags or I would have had more definitive IDs from the researchers. The feedback from researchers is likely routine for coastal birders, but it was exciting to me.

2015 banding (hatch year) on Harbor Island
2012 banding (the first Piping Plover Melissa ever banded) on Harbor Island. Nests on Rockaway Beach in Queens NY
2015 banding (adult) on Harbor Island
2013 banding (hatch year) on Harbor Island
2014 banding (hatch year) at Gulliver MI; nests near Sleeping Bear Point at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore. May have had a second bird that nests at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, but that was one of my mistakes.
2014 banding (adult) on the Missouri River near Yankton, South Dakota.
2013 banding (adult) on Harbor Island. Nests at Napeague State Park on Long Island NY.
2014 banding (adult) at Kouchibouguac National Park in New Brunswick. Has only been observed at Kouchibouguac and Harbor Island.

I also saw two Common Tern with silver bands.

John Grego
Columbia SC
 

Back to top
Date: 8/24/17 4:31 pm
From: <eric...>
Subject: Little Blue Heron - Yadkin Memorial Park
So the wader I saw yesterday was apparently an immature Little Blue
Heron. There were two mystery terns at too great a distance to identify.
An osprey was perched about 30 yards away for nice viewing and green
herons could be heard vocalizing along the edge of the lake.

I should add that one can rent kayaks or boats from the park for use on
the lake.

Eric Harrold

Hays, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 8/24/17 12:20 pm
From: william haddad (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Blue-winged Warbler and other birds at "The Orchard " Road
Birded with Mark Thomas (finally another birder in Spruce Pine!) at the Orchard this morning and saw only one small to medium size flock between appro. 8:15 and 8:45 am. However, the flock had great diversity
with Worm-eating, Chestnut-sided, Black-throated Green, Hooded, Am. Redstart, Parula and the Blue-winged. The latter was a life bird for Mark. I had told him that I only saw a very few during the Fall migration and the lower Orchard Road was the best place for them! I also saw a probable Blackburnian at the Orchard. Late yesterday I saw a Blackburnian and a Black-throated Blue Warbler at the cabin to make nine Warbler species in the space of a day. Fall migration is on!

Bill Haddad
Spruce Pine, N.C.
Sent from Mail for Windows 10



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Back to top
Date: 8/24/17 10:15 am
From: Mike Judd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Important conservation issues
It may be that by laying out a brief sum of money (virtually nothing
compared to what we spend on bins, scopes, birding trips, etc.) and joining
groups such as Natural Resources Defense Council, Sierra Club, Friends of
the Earth, etc., etc. you can pick up on the action alerts. I know it is
hard to stay on top of a lot of these issues and have a life as well but
making the phone call, writing the email to Congress, signing the petition
takes very little time & effort. I was certainly heartened by seeing the
President of the ABA down in Texas protesting the destruction of the
national butterfly center and other important wildlife habitat by the heavy
hand of misguided attempt to protect us in the us with the very ill-advised
wall.
Others likely know of other advocacy groups beyond what I mentioned. And I
thank the moderator(s) for allowing this conversation to go a ways.
Mike Judd
Brevard but soon to Tucson :-)

On Thu, Aug 24, 2017 at 12:37 PM, Betsy Kane <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Russ,
>
> Thank you for these details. I want to take action, but I don't have time
> to dig deep into the issues or figure out the process from scratch, as I am
> committed to other efforts. Would it be possible for you to advise, or can
> someone you know advise, on specific actions to be taken when the time is
> right? I would be extremely grateful and ready to call or submit comments
> if I could know 1) what to say (very briefly) 2) when to say it, and 3)
> who to say it to.
>
> Betsy Kane
> Raleigh
>
> On Thu, Aug 24, 2017 at 8:30 AM, Russ Oates <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> Maggie,
>>
>> Thank you for your response. You are absolutely right about the EPA. I
>> was remiss in omitting the EPA from my comments on "Continuity of Executive
>> Branch Natural Resource Management." Administrator Pruitt is intent on
>> destroying the agency. His efforts to remove science from the decision
>> making process are dumbfounding. We should prepare for deadly smog and
>> burning rivers....the clock is turning back to the 1950s.
>>
>> Truly overwhelming...
>>
>> Russ
>>
>> On Thu, Aug 24, 2017 at 7:46 AM, Maggie Strickland <
>> <gallinasviejas...> wrote:
>>
>>> Russ,
>>> Thank you so much for this clear and specific information. While most of
>>> my recent contacts with our senators and representatives has concerned
>>> other matters, I am horrified at the sweeping changes at the EPA. The
>>> wholesale retreat from preservation and conservation is so disheartening. I
>>> promise I will take action on these issues.
>>>
>>> Sincerely,
>>> Maggie Strickland
>>> Harmony, Maine
>>>
>>> On Wed, Aug 23, 2017 at 8:39 PM, Russ Oates <carolinabirds...>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> CBC Members,
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> There are several nationally or internationally important bird-related
>>>> issues in Alaska that are currently approaching decision points in the
>>>> Congress and/or the Executive Branch. Given the anti-conservation
>>>> statements and actions of the current Administration and the likely
>>>> willingness by the Congress to follow suit, I am asking you to review these
>>>> issues and to consider contacting the appropriate Executive Branch agencies
>>>> and especially your US Congressional delegation to encourage them to act on
>>>> the side of responsible conservation. Many of these issues will be
>>>> decided in the US Senate. Currently-proposed legislation and
>>>> executive actions will cause irreparable damage to Important Bird Areas.
>>>> Much is at stake.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> A significant proportion of members from both parties in Congress are
>>>> conservationists at heart but the Republicans will be under severe pressure
>>>> to roll back environmental protections nationwide. We only need 3
>>>> Republican senators to vote against an ill-advised development project or
>>>> management action to block it, so your calls or letters to your US
>>>> Congressional Delegation could be crucial.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Alaska is a hugely-important nesting area for birds from all four North
>>>> American flyways (especially Pacific and Central) as well as the East
>>>> Asia/Australasia and East Asia/East Africa flyways. Bird band reports
>>>> (returns) have shown that some of the Tundra Swans and at least 4 species
>>>> of ducks that breed in Alaska also spend the winter in NC. Although I
>>>> couldn’t easily check banding data for other species, AK and NC share at
>>>> least 16 species of shorebirds. Also, Alaska has historically been a
>>>> safe haven for species depleted elsewhere in their ranges (for example:
>>>> Bald Eagles, Trumpeter Swans, Peregrine Falcons) and for many years
>>>> provided eggs and/or young to the lower 48 states for restoration.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> I present each issue by identifying it, followed by the desired outcome.
>>>> This will be followed by a brief explanation of what’s at stake and why
>>>> there is an issue. If you need more information, you can Google
>>>> Audubon Alaska or the names of the locations of concern.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> *ISSUES:*
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> 1) *Issue:* Beaufort/Chukchi Sea (off the north shore of Alaska)
>>>> offshore petroleum drilling.
>>>>
>>>> *Desired outcome:* Block offshore development in Chukchi and Beaufort
>>>> seas.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> I know of no oil spill anywhere in an area of broken or solid ice cover
>>>> on marine water that was effectively cleaned up or even contained. *Current
>>>> spill clean up technology doesn’t work in ice-choked waters. * Historically,
>>>> ice has been present in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas more than 200 days
>>>> per year. In addition to the threats to whales, seals, and polar
>>>> bears, an offshore or nearshore spill occurring in late winter or early
>>>> spring poses a tremendous threat to at least 2 million spring-migrating
>>>> Long-tailed Ducks and King and Common eiders. Also threatened would be
>>>> Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed “Threatened” Spectacled and Steller’s
>>>> eiders (the entire North American breeding population of Steller’s Eiders)
>>>> and ESA listed “Warranted But Precluded” Yellow-billed Loon. Large
>>>> numbers of many species of shorebirds, gulls, terns, and jaegers would be
>>>> at risk from floating oil and oiled shorelines. Here is the nightmare
>>>> scenario: We know that essentially all of the bird species mentioned
>>>> move to northern breeding grounds as early in spring as conditions will
>>>> allow. These birds fly north along the Bering Sea coastline and turn
>>>> east into the Chukchi, using any open water patches to rest and feed while
>>>> enroute to their breeding grounds in arctic Alaska and Canada. If a
>>>> spill occurs at an offshore rig or seabed pipeline in late winter or early
>>>> spring, the floating portion of the spill could be waiting as a death trap
>>>> there for the migrating birds. This could affect tens to hundreds of
>>>> thousands of birds and there could be no way to stop the spill, clean up
>>>> the spill, or rescue birds. There is clearly potential for population
>>>> level impacts on several species (at a minimum: King Eider, Spectacled
>>>> Eider, Steller’s Eider, Common Eider, Yellow-billed Loon).
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> 2) *Issue:* Opening the Teshekpuk Lake Goose Molting area to oil
>>>> development. *Desired outcome:* Maintain the moratorium on development
>>>> of this area.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Teshekpuk Lake, the second-largest lake in Alaska, is located within
>>>> the 23.5 million acre National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska (NPRA,
>>>> administered by Bureau of Land Management), and sits about 15 miles south
>>>> of the western Beaufort Sea coastline (175 miles west of Arctic National
>>>> Wildlife Refuge). The 200+ lakes loosely clustered between Teshekpuk Lake
>>>> and the coastline constitute the largest arctic goose molting resort in
>>>> North America, supporting multiple species of flightless molting birds
>>>> (Mid-continent White-fronted Geese, Pacific Black Brant, Lesser Snow Geese,
>>>> and Cackling Geese) for several critical months each summer. Frequently,
>>>> up to 100,000 geese molt in these lakes. During the annual wing molt,
>>>> these birds are exceptionally sensitive to disturbance, and an
>>>> on-the-ground research scientist during the 1970s reported birds reacting
>>>> (avoidance behavior) to a person walking across the board-flat tundra at a
>>>> distance of one mile. With that high level of sensitivity, it’s no
>>>> wonder that the geese picked one of the most remote locations in Alaska to
>>>> undergo the 2-3 week flightless period. The area appeared to be
>>>> secure from large-scale disturbance until winter seismic work revealed the
>>>> possibility of extensive oil deposits directly under the molting area.
>>>> I have seen a detailed proposed development scenario prepared by the
>>>> petroleum industry that I strongly believe would result in the complete
>>>> abandonment of the molting area. Over the years, scientists (from
>>>> government and conservation organizations) have successfully defended this
>>>> important molting area against several industry and pro-development
>>>> administration attempts to open it for oil development. I credit
>>>> Audubon Alaska with leading the effort that resulted in the latest stay of
>>>> execution. During the Obama Administration, a ten-year moratorium on
>>>> development was instituted in this area to protect the geese, shorebirds
>>>> and the 60,000-head Teshekpuk Lake Caribou Herd’s calving area. Due
>>>> to the intense pressure from the current administration to open currently
>>>> closed areas of Alaska to petroleum development, it is very likely that the
>>>> moratorium will be cancelled.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> 3) *Issue:* Opening the Coastal Plain (commonly referred to as the
>>>> “1002 {ten oh two} area”) of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) to
>>>> oil exploration and development.
>>>>
>>>> *Desired outcome:* Protect the entire Coastal Plain area of Arctic
>>>> National Wildlife Refuge with wilderness designation.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> The coastal plain portion of ANWR is approximately 1.5 million acres in
>>>> size, and represents about 5% of the coastal plain north of the Brooks
>>>> Range. *Virtually all of the 95% not within the Refuge is already
>>>> open for oil exploration and development. * Giving this relatively
>>>> small area Wilderness status would permanently protect a complete arctic
>>>> ecosystem from the shoreline on the Beaufort Sea coastline, south across
>>>> the coastal plain, through the foothills and the north slope of the Brooks
>>>> Range (it’s all tundra from the divide north to the Beaufort Sea), and
>>>> sweeping down the south slope to the boreal forests and the northern
>>>> floodplain of the Yukon River. Most of this area looks as it has for
>>>> thousands of years, and it is ecologically complete and intact with a full
>>>> suite of life including a complex of top-level predators. Why would
>>>> it hurt to develop the coastal plain portion? The coastal plain is
>>>> *the* calving area for the 150,000-strong Porcupine Caribou Herd, a
>>>> herd that is a vitally important subsistence resource for the Gwichin
>>>> Athabascan Indians that live south of the Brooks Range in Alaska and Yukon
>>>> Territories (where the caribou herd winters). The herd concentrates
>>>> on the coastal plain during a mass birthing in late June/early July, and
>>>> the cows tend to their young and try to protect them from a whole host of
>>>> predators (brown bears, wolves, wolverines, and Golden Eagles converge for
>>>> this annual feast.) The caribou are also an important subsistence resource
>>>> (second to bowhead whales) for the Inupiat Eskimos of the Alaska North
>>>> Slope. Despite the deliberate misrepresentations of the affected area
>>>> (particularly by former Secretary of Interior under George W. Bush) and
>>>> research done on caribou response to oil pipelines (by multiple
>>>> pro-development administrations), a prominent caribou researcher told me
>>>> that pregnant females and females with calves stay away from oil pipelines
>>>> (based on work done in the Prudhoe Bay area). A spider web of
>>>> pipelines connecting production wells, and associated structures and
>>>> airfields, would likely have dire long-term consequences for the herd and
>>>> associated predator populations (not to mention the subsistence hunters).
>>>> The coastal plain is also an important migration area for Yellow-billed
>>>> Loons and nesting and migration habitat for a host of different shorebird
>>>> species (for example: Buff-breasted Sandpiper, Black-bellied Plover,
>>>> American Golden Plover, Semipalmated Plover, Pectoral Sandpiper,
>>>> Semi-palmated Sandpiper, Long-billed Dowitcher, Stilt Sandpiper, Red and
>>>> Red-necked Phalaropes, Bar-tailed Godwit, and Baird’s Sandpiper.) The
>>>> coastal plain is important in some years for as many as 350,000 Lesser Snow
>>>> Geese (that nested in a western Canada colony) to fatten on sedge rhizomes
>>>> before migrating south.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> 4) *Issue:* Approval of the Pebble Mine.
>>>>
>>>> *Desired outcome:* Maintain the EPA position protecting the area from
>>>> mining and provide permanent protection to the watershed.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Pebble is a massive mining project proposed for Alaska state lands in
>>>> the middle of the watershed containing the spawning area of the largest
>>>> sockeye salmon stock in the world (and the other 4 species of salmon as
>>>> well). In addition, sockeye hatchlings live 1-2 years in connected
>>>> lakes until they are large enough to go out to sea. Roughly half of
>>>> the world’s wild-caught salmon comes from Bristol Bay. If developed,
>>>> the mine will be the largest mine in North America and the highly toxic
>>>> tailings will be stored behind the largest earthen dam in the world (over
>>>> 700 feet tall and several miles long.) This is a seismically active
>>>> area, and independent scientists doubt whether the dam would survive a
>>>> major earthquake on the order of the one that severely damaged Anchorage
>>>> and several other southcentral Alaska coastal communities in 1964. Needless
>>>> to say, the failure of this dam would be catastrophic for the salmon and
>>>> potentially for the many species of marine birds (including Emperor Geese
>>>> and ESA listed Steller’s Eiders) that use Bristol Bay as a foraging area
>>>> during migration.) After extensive investigations, this area was
>>>> declared by the EPA to be too valuable and vulnerable to mine, but the
>>>> Trump administration resurrected the project. If you like to eat wild
>>>> salmon or support sustainable management of wild salmon, you have a dog in
>>>> this fight. Please, take a moment to check out this web site:
>>>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.savebristolbay.org_home_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=h8Wxhp_0GlPHdo-sxxB_C4Jw8L-AM0edfrFHG4k1pQM&s=NAPVG307TTNuHwb1fmzjBVGl4VOwHInoybsLo7QQ14s&e=
>>>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.savebristolbay.org_home_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=7EO4BVk-XJ7NwcinUfmYJ6IqVyRpdxRLrIOCGxsI31Q&s=UivxUYuxxj67rL43Q6khgMRE3p-5W3cZUbqTdOKj7ls&e=>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> 5) *Issue:* The State National Forest Management Act of 2017 (SNFMA)
>>>> and the Alaska Mental Health Trust Land Transfer Act (AMHT).
>>>>
>>>> *Desired outcome:* Defeat both bills.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> SNFMA, (HR 232, sponsored by Rep. Don Young of Alaska) was introduced
>>>> in January of this year. I don’t understand all of the details, but I
>>>> read the text and this is my take: While there are some specific Alaska
>>>> provisions, much of the bill applies to all states and national forests in
>>>> North and South Carolina could be profoundly affected. As written,
>>>> this bill would allow each state to select up to 2,000,000 acres of
>>>> National Forest within their respective state boundaries for transfer to
>>>> state ownership and management with the mandate to supply the needs of all
>>>> wood processing operations in the state. Potentially, 100% of NC’s
>>>> 1.255 million acres of National Forest could be transferred to the state.
>>>> This legislation would also permit mining in the “former” national forests.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> AMHT, sponsored by Senator Lisa Murkowski, has been developed in the
>>>> Senate to the point that it can be added as a rider to another, more urgent
>>>> bill. The bill is intended to allow the transfer of old growth
>>>> acreage to private (Alaska Native) corporations in exchange for their
>>>> corporate-owned logged-over areas. This will facilitate the rapid
>>>> destruction of the magnificent old growth trees, some of which are more
>>>> than 1,000 years old.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> The Alaska congressional delegation has, for decades, done everything
>>>> in their power to open up the remaining old growth trees of the magnificent
>>>> Tongass National Forest to logging. Only 3% of the Tongass is old growth,
>>>> so we must act now to save it.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> 6) *Issue:* Building a road to the village of King Cove through the
>>>> Designated Wilderness portion of Izembek National Wildlife Refuge.
>>>>
>>>> *Desired outcome*: Prevent the road from being built.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Izembek National Wildlife Refuge, one of Alaska’s oldest refuges, is
>>>> the principal fall staging area for essentially 100% of the Pacific Black
>>>> Brant population. The area is also a vital staging area for Emperor
>>>> Geese, which winter to the west on the Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian
>>>> Islands and breed almost exclusively to the north on the Yukon Delta
>>>> National Wildlife Refuge. Izembek lagoon provides lush eelgrass beds
>>>> that allow the brant to accumulate huge amounts of body fat (nearly
>>>> doubling their weight) necessary to enable the birds to survive the 60+
>>>> hour direct flight to overwintering areas principally in the bays of the
>>>> Pacific coast of Baja and mainland Mexico. Most of the historic wintering
>>>> areas on the west coast of the Lower 48 states have been destroyed or
>>>> dramatically reduced by dredging and other development.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Never since the passage of the Wilderness Act in 1964 has a designated
>>>> Wilderness Area been compromised for the purpose of road construction.
>>>> A federal Judge ruled in 2015 in favor of the Department of Interior’s
>>>> decision to deny permission for construction of the road. The US
>>>> House of Representatives recently passed legislation that would open the
>>>> area to road construction. This bill sets a very dangerous precedent
>>>> by potentially opening the door to road construction in Wilderness Areas
>>>> nationwide. *The bill now goes to the Senate where we will have our
>>>> final chance to defeat it.* Please contact your US Senators and
>>>> encourage them to protect the Refuge.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Read more at the following site:
>>>>
>>>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__l.facebook.com_l.php-3Fu-3Dhttp-253A-252F-252Fbit.ly-252F2vyb6j&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=h8Wxhp_0GlPHdo-sxxB_C4Jw8L-AM0edfrFHG4k1pQM&s=UWFGzbt7RhvyEeXXpbyJPdZKuGwBIxPmxnd63HGpyU8&e=
>>>> U&h=ATMupmgV-v_gK4pynARMjWZyRCHtlXoqa7HSyzJ7Eavxean6O-cr04Ho
>>>> hyVXHZ_oF7nxNLuA34P3lHvMs55XcmyuWsxwFL30mx32Pkg_QoLMSrT5MESK
>>>> ygZxJ5oqNn1lyGzfHnR37nhUVShgv23woUDpVuyhOmuUCZtb0MhUtBu8GzaU
>>>> XLsOStYb3xPBORlIrV6NCdt30E7sS2WX4NTdCTOG99wIOm0DyrRNOAMCSHnL
>>>> UVn1wDC28--kUtg
>>>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__l.facebook.com_l.php-3Fu-3Dhttp-253A-252F-252Fbit.ly-252F2vyb6jU-26h-3DATMupmgV-2Dv-5FgK4pynARMjWZyRCHtlXoqa7HSyzJ7Eavxean6O-2Dcr04HohyVXHZ-5FoF7nxNLuA34P3lHvMs55XcmyuWsxwFL30mx32Pkg-5FQoLMSrT5MESKygZxJ5oqNn1lyGzfHnR37nhUVShgv23woUDpVuyhOmuUCZtb0MhUtBu8GzaUXLsOStYb3xPBORlIrV6NCdt30E7sS2WX4NTdCTOG99wIOm0DyrRNOAMCSHnLUVn1wDC28-2D-2DkUtg&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=7EO4BVk-XJ7NwcinUfmYJ6IqVyRpdxRLrIOCGxsI31Q&s=OJqcrSNTszJyGuUOX-39GQncztYfnRuZNQ1KWelo7_A&e=>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> 7) *Issue:* Climate change.
>>>>
>>>> *Desired outcome:* The US fully engages in the Paris Climate Change
>>>> Accords.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Alaska is home to vast amounts of glacial ice, sea ice, and permafrost.
>>>> If these melt, and they certainly are melting at this point, they will
>>>> make a huge contribution to a warming climate. The threat of melting
>>>> permafrost is probably least known by the public. When permafrost
>>>> melts, it releases not only carbon dioxide the but also large amounts of
>>>> methane (molecule for molecule, far more problematic than carbon dioxide.)
>>>> The consequences of extensive permafrost melting across the northern
>>>> hemisphere are unthinkable.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> 8) *Issue:* Continuity of Executive Branch Natural Resource
>>>> Management.
>>>>
>>>> *Desired Outcome:* Full funding for natural resource conservation
>>>> functions for Department of Interior (especially US Fish and Wildlife
>>>> Service, US National Park Service, and Bureau of Land Management)
>>>> Department of Agriculture (US Forest Service and the Farm Bill) and
>>>> Department of Energy; cessation of the “reshuffling” of senior leadership
>>>> positions among agencies; retain the designations of the National Monuments
>>>> currently under “review” by Secretary of the Interior Zinke.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> In my recent summer trip to Alaska to visit family, I visited with
>>>> former colleagues from the US Fish and Wildlife Service and learned that
>>>> the President’s budget as well as statements and actions by the top
>>>> administrators in EPA, Energy, and Interior send clear signals of a desire
>>>> to significantly damage or eliminate important federal conservation
>>>> programs. Interior Secretary Zinke has engaged in a policy of
>>>> shuffling occupants of senior leadership positions, removing leaders from
>>>> areas of expertise and placing them in positions in other agencies that do
>>>> not relate to their experience or training. Clearly, the intent is to
>>>> cripple the agencies at the top, create chaos, and stop them from
>>>> conducting and disseminating scientifically rigorous science that is
>>>> inconvenient to the Administration’s ideology. The extent of this
>>>> effort is beyond anything I saw in my 31 year federal career.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> I regret the great length of this post. These are incredibly
>>>> difficult times. There is so much at stake! Thank you for any help that you
>>>> can provide!
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Russ Oates (USFWS Alaska, Retired)
>>>>
>>>> Burnsville, NC
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> *Conserve wild things, protect wild places.*
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> *Conserve wild things, protect wild places.*
>>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/24/17 9:38 am
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Important conservation issues
Russ,

Thank you for these details. I want to take action, but I don't have time
to dig deep into the issues or figure out the process from scratch, as I am
committed to other efforts. Would it be possible for you to advise, or can
someone you know advise, on specific actions to be taken when the time is
right? I would be extremely grateful and ready to call or submit comments
if I could know 1) what to say (very briefly) 2) when to say it, and 3)
who to say it to.

Betsy Kane
Raleigh

On Thu, Aug 24, 2017 at 8:30 AM, Russ Oates <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Maggie,
>
> Thank you for your response. You are absolutely right about the EPA. I
> was remiss in omitting the EPA from my comments on "Continuity of Executive
> Branch Natural Resource Management." Administrator Pruitt is intent on
> destroying the agency. His efforts to remove science from the decision
> making process are dumbfounding. We should prepare for deadly smog and
> burning rivers....the clock is turning back to the 1950s.
>
> Truly overwhelming...
>
> Russ
>
> On Thu, Aug 24, 2017 at 7:46 AM, Maggie Strickland <
> <gallinasviejas...> wrote:
>
>> Russ,
>> Thank you so much for this clear and specific information. While most of
>> my recent contacts with our senators and representatives has concerned
>> other matters, I am horrified at the sweeping changes at the EPA. The
>> wholesale retreat from preservation and conservation is so disheartening. I
>> promise I will take action on these issues.
>>
>> Sincerely,
>> Maggie Strickland
>> Harmony, Maine
>>
>> On Wed, Aug 23, 2017 at 8:39 PM, Russ Oates <carolinabirds...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> CBC Members,
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> There are several nationally or internationally important bird-related
>>> issues in Alaska that are currently approaching decision points in the
>>> Congress and/or the Executive Branch. Given the anti-conservation
>>> statements and actions of the current Administration and the likely
>>> willingness by the Congress to follow suit, I am asking you to review these
>>> issues and to consider contacting the appropriate Executive Branch agencies
>>> and especially your US Congressional delegation to encourage them to act on
>>> the side of responsible conservation. Many of these issues will be
>>> decided in the US Senate. Currently-proposed legislation and executive
>>> actions will cause irreparable damage to Important Bird Areas. Much is
>>> at stake.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> A significant proportion of members from both parties in Congress are
>>> conservationists at heart but the Republicans will be under severe pressure
>>> to roll back environmental protections nationwide. We only need 3
>>> Republican senators to vote against an ill-advised development project or
>>> management action to block it, so your calls or letters to your US
>>> Congressional Delegation could be crucial.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Alaska is a hugely-important nesting area for birds from all four North
>>> American flyways (especially Pacific and Central) as well as the East
>>> Asia/Australasia and East Asia/East Africa flyways. Bird band reports
>>> (returns) have shown that some of the Tundra Swans and at least 4 species
>>> of ducks that breed in Alaska also spend the winter in NC. Although I
>>> couldn’t easily check banding data for other species, AK and NC share at
>>> least 16 species of shorebirds. Also, Alaska has historically been a
>>> safe haven for species depleted elsewhere in their ranges (for example:
>>> Bald Eagles, Trumpeter Swans, Peregrine Falcons) and for many years
>>> provided eggs and/or young to the lower 48 states for restoration.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> I present each issue by identifying it, followed by the desired outcome.
>>> This will be followed by a brief explanation of what’s at stake and why
>>> there is an issue. If you need more information, you can Google
>>> Audubon Alaska or the names of the locations of concern.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> *ISSUES:*
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> 1) *Issue:* Beaufort/Chukchi Sea (off the north shore of Alaska)
>>> offshore petroleum drilling.
>>>
>>> *Desired outcome:* Block offshore development in Chukchi and Beaufort
>>> seas.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> I know of no oil spill anywhere in an area of broken or solid ice cover
>>> on marine water that was effectively cleaned up or even contained. *Current
>>> spill clean up technology doesn’t work in ice-choked waters. * Historically,
>>> ice has been present in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas more than 200 days
>>> per year. In addition to the threats to whales, seals, and polar
>>> bears, an offshore or nearshore spill occurring in late winter or early
>>> spring poses a tremendous threat to at least 2 million spring-migrating
>>> Long-tailed Ducks and King and Common eiders. Also threatened would be
>>> Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed “Threatened” Spectacled and Steller’s
>>> eiders (the entire North American breeding population of Steller’s Eiders)
>>> and ESA listed “Warranted But Precluded” Yellow-billed Loon. Large
>>> numbers of many species of shorebirds, gulls, terns, and jaegers would be
>>> at risk from floating oil and oiled shorelines. Here is the nightmare
>>> scenario: We know that essentially all of the bird species mentioned
>>> move to northern breeding grounds as early in spring as conditions will
>>> allow. These birds fly north along the Bering Sea coastline and turn
>>> east into the Chukchi, using any open water patches to rest and feed while
>>> enroute to their breeding grounds in arctic Alaska and Canada. If a
>>> spill occurs at an offshore rig or seabed pipeline in late winter or early
>>> spring, the floating portion of the spill could be waiting as a death trap
>>> there for the migrating birds. This could affect tens to hundreds of
>>> thousands of birds and there could be no way to stop the spill, clean up
>>> the spill, or rescue birds. There is clearly potential for population
>>> level impacts on several species (at a minimum: King Eider, Spectacled
>>> Eider, Steller’s Eider, Common Eider, Yellow-billed Loon).
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> 2) *Issue:* Opening the Teshekpuk Lake Goose Molting area to oil
>>> development. *Desired outcome:* Maintain the moratorium on development
>>> of this area.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Teshekpuk Lake, the second-largest lake in Alaska, is located within the
>>> 23.5 million acre National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska (NPRA, administered by
>>> Bureau of Land Management), and sits about 15 miles south of the western
>>> Beaufort Sea coastline (175 miles west of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge).
>>> The 200+ lakes loosely clustered between Teshekpuk Lake and the coastline
>>> constitute the largest arctic goose molting resort in North America,
>>> supporting multiple species of flightless molting birds (Mid-continent
>>> White-fronted Geese, Pacific Black Brant, Lesser Snow Geese, and Cackling
>>> Geese) for several critical months each summer. Frequently, up to
>>> 100,000 geese molt in these lakes. During the annual wing molt, these
>>> birds are exceptionally sensitive to disturbance, and an on-the-ground
>>> research scientist during the 1970s reported birds reacting (avoidance
>>> behavior) to a person walking across the board-flat tundra at a distance of
>>> one mile. With that high level of sensitivity, it’s no wonder that the
>>> geese picked one of the most remote locations in Alaska to undergo the 2-3
>>> week flightless period. The area appeared to be secure from
>>> large-scale disturbance until winter seismic work revealed the possibility
>>> of extensive oil deposits directly under the molting area. I have seen
>>> a detailed proposed development scenario prepared by the petroleum industry
>>> that I strongly believe would result in the complete abandonment of the
>>> molting area. Over the years, scientists (from government and
>>> conservation organizations) have successfully defended this important
>>> molting area against several industry and pro-development administration
>>> attempts to open it for oil development. I credit Audubon Alaska with
>>> leading the effort that resulted in the latest stay of execution. During
>>> the Obama Administration, a ten-year moratorium on development was
>>> instituted in this area to protect the geese, shorebirds and the
>>> 60,000-head Teshekpuk Lake Caribou Herd’s calving area. Due to the
>>> intense pressure from the current administration to open currently closed
>>> areas of Alaska to petroleum development, it is very likely that the
>>> moratorium will be cancelled.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> 3) *Issue:* Opening the Coastal Plain (commonly referred to as the
>>> “1002 {ten oh two} area”) of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) to
>>> oil exploration and development.
>>>
>>> *Desired outcome:* Protect the entire Coastal Plain area of Arctic
>>> National Wildlife Refuge with wilderness designation.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> The coastal plain portion of ANWR is approximately 1.5 million acres in
>>> size, and represents about 5% of the coastal plain north of the Brooks
>>> Range. *Virtually all of the 95% not within the Refuge is already open
>>> for oil exploration and development. * Giving this relatively small
>>> area Wilderness status would permanently protect a complete arctic
>>> ecosystem from the shoreline on the Beaufort Sea coastline, south across
>>> the coastal plain, through the foothills and the north slope of the Brooks
>>> Range (it’s all tundra from the divide north to the Beaufort Sea), and
>>> sweeping down the south slope to the boreal forests and the northern
>>> floodplain of the Yukon River. Most of this area looks as it has for
>>> thousands of years, and it is ecologically complete and intact with a full
>>> suite of life including a complex of top-level predators. Why would it
>>> hurt to develop the coastal plain portion? The coastal plain is *the*
>>> calving area for the 150,000-strong Porcupine Caribou Herd, a herd that is
>>> a vitally important subsistence resource for the Gwichin Athabascan Indians
>>> that live south of the Brooks Range in Alaska and Yukon Territories (where
>>> the caribou herd winters). The herd concentrates on the coastal plain
>>> during a mass birthing in late June/early July, and the cows tend to their
>>> young and try to protect them from a whole host of predators (brown bears,
>>> wolves, wolverines, and Golden Eagles converge for this annual feast.) The
>>> caribou are also an important subsistence resource (second to bowhead
>>> whales) for the Inupiat Eskimos of the Alaska North Slope. Despite the
>>> deliberate misrepresentations of the affected area (particularly by former
>>> Secretary of Interior under George W. Bush) and research done on caribou
>>> response to oil pipelines (by multiple pro-development administrations), a
>>> prominent caribou researcher told me that pregnant females and females with
>>> calves stay away from oil pipelines (based on work done in the Prudhoe Bay
>>> area). A spider web of pipelines connecting production wells, and
>>> associated structures and airfields, would likely have dire long-term
>>> consequences for the herd and associated predator populations (not to
>>> mention the subsistence hunters). The coastal plain is also an
>>> important migration area for Yellow-billed Loons and nesting and migration
>>> habitat for a host of different shorebird species (for example:
>>> Buff-breasted Sandpiper, Black-bellied Plover, American Golden Plover,
>>> Semipalmated Plover, Pectoral Sandpiper, Semi-palmated Sandpiper,
>>> Long-billed Dowitcher, Stilt Sandpiper, Red and Red-necked Phalaropes,
>>> Bar-tailed Godwit, and Baird’s Sandpiper.) The coastal plain is
>>> important in some years for as many as 350,000 Lesser Snow Geese (that
>>> nested in a western Canada colony) to fatten on sedge rhizomes before
>>> migrating south.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> 4) *Issue:* Approval of the Pebble Mine.
>>>
>>> *Desired outcome:* Maintain the EPA position protecting the area from
>>> mining and provide permanent protection to the watershed.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Pebble is a massive mining project proposed for Alaska state lands in
>>> the middle of the watershed containing the spawning area of the largest
>>> sockeye salmon stock in the world (and the other 4 species of salmon as
>>> well). In addition, sockeye hatchlings live 1-2 years in connected
>>> lakes until they are large enough to go out to sea. Roughly half of
>>> the world’s wild-caught salmon comes from Bristol Bay. If developed,
>>> the mine will be the largest mine in North America and the highly toxic
>>> tailings will be stored behind the largest earthen dam in the world (over
>>> 700 feet tall and several miles long.) This is a seismically active
>>> area, and independent scientists doubt whether the dam would survive a
>>> major earthquake on the order of the one that severely damaged Anchorage
>>> and several other southcentral Alaska coastal communities in 1964. Needless
>>> to say, the failure of this dam would be catastrophic for the salmon and
>>> potentially for the many species of marine birds (including Emperor Geese
>>> and ESA listed Steller’s Eiders) that use Bristol Bay as a foraging area
>>> during migration.) After extensive investigations, this area was
>>> declared by the EPA to be too valuable and vulnerable to mine, but the
>>> Trump administration resurrected the project. If you like to eat wild
>>> salmon or support sustainable management of wild salmon, you have a dog in
>>> this fight. Please, take a moment to check out this web site:
>>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.savebristolbay.org_home_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=wkjuZyyJ2djWtzFEe7kqA751LXlCcAJvgAhdbIpIrqk&s=x8cklnZOXDWplNYARYJqaoossSyMZr16G51-lZ4ICps&e=
>>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.savebristolbay.org_home_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=7EO4BVk-XJ7NwcinUfmYJ6IqVyRpdxRLrIOCGxsI31Q&s=UivxUYuxxj67rL43Q6khgMRE3p-5W3cZUbqTdOKj7ls&e=>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> 5) *Issue:* The State National Forest Management Act of 2017 (SNFMA)
>>> and the Alaska Mental Health Trust Land Transfer Act (AMHT).
>>>
>>> *Desired outcome:* Defeat both bills.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> SNFMA, (HR 232, sponsored by Rep. Don Young of Alaska) was introduced in
>>> January of this year. I don’t understand all of the details, but I
>>> read the text and this is my take: While there are some specific Alaska
>>> provisions, much of the bill applies to all states and national forests in
>>> North and South Carolina could be profoundly affected. As written,
>>> this bill would allow each state to select up to 2,000,000 acres of
>>> National Forest within their respective state boundaries for transfer to
>>> state ownership and management with the mandate to supply the needs of all
>>> wood processing operations in the state. Potentially, 100% of NC’s
>>> 1.255 million acres of National Forest could be transferred to the state.
>>> This legislation would also permit mining in the “former” national forests.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> AMHT, sponsored by Senator Lisa Murkowski, has been developed in the
>>> Senate to the point that it can be added as a rider to another, more urgent
>>> bill. The bill is intended to allow the transfer of old growth acreage
>>> to private (Alaska Native) corporations in exchange for their
>>> corporate-owned logged-over areas. This will facilitate the rapid
>>> destruction of the magnificent old growth trees, some of which are more
>>> than 1,000 years old.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> The Alaska congressional delegation has, for decades, done everything in
>>> their power to open up the remaining old growth trees of the magnificent
>>> Tongass National Forest to logging. Only 3% of the Tongass is old growth,
>>> so we must act now to save it.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> 6) *Issue:* Building a road to the village of King Cove through the
>>> Designated Wilderness portion of Izembek National Wildlife Refuge.
>>>
>>> *Desired outcome*: Prevent the road from being built.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Izembek National Wildlife Refuge, one of Alaska’s oldest refuges, is the
>>> principal fall staging area for essentially 100% of the Pacific Black Brant
>>> population. The area is also a vital staging area for Emperor Geese,
>>> which winter to the west on the Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands and
>>> breed almost exclusively to the north on the Yukon Delta National Wildlife
>>> Refuge. Izembek lagoon provides lush eelgrass beds that allow the
>>> brant to accumulate huge amounts of body fat (nearly doubling their weight)
>>> necessary to enable the birds to survive the 60+ hour direct flight to
>>> overwintering areas principally in the bays of the Pacific coast of Baja
>>> and mainland Mexico. Most of the historic wintering areas on the west coast
>>> of the Lower 48 states have been destroyed or dramatically reduced by
>>> dredging and other development.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Never since the passage of the Wilderness Act in 1964 has a designated
>>> Wilderness Area been compromised for the purpose of road construction. A
>>> federal Judge ruled in 2015 in favor of the Department of Interior’s
>>> decision to deny permission for construction of the road. The US House
>>> of Representatives recently passed legislation that would open the area to
>>> road construction. This bill sets a very dangerous precedent by
>>> potentially opening the door to road construction in Wilderness Areas
>>> nationwide. *The bill now goes to the Senate where we will have our
>>> final chance to defeat it.* Please contact your US Senators and
>>> encourage them to protect the Refuge.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Read more at the following site:
>>>
>>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__l.facebook.com_l.php-3Fu-3Dhttp-253A-252F-252Fbit.ly-252F2vyb6j&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=wkjuZyyJ2djWtzFEe7kqA751LXlCcAJvgAhdbIpIrqk&s=kjGMGHKjpV7zwjYDqF_KPgsUZOzYGRoyVahU63gjeCk&e=
>>> U&h=ATMupmgV-v_gK4pynARMjWZyRCHtlXoqa7HSyzJ7Eavxean6O-cr04Ho
>>> hyVXHZ_oF7nxNLuA34P3lHvMs55XcmyuWsxwFL30mx32Pkg_QoLMSrT5MESK
>>> ygZxJ5oqNn1lyGzfHnR37nhUVShgv23woUDpVuyhOmuUCZtb0MhUtBu8GzaU
>>> XLsOStYb3xPBORlIrV6NCdt30E7sS2WX4NTdCTOG99wIOm0DyrRNOAMCSHnL
>>> UVn1wDC28--kUtg
>>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__l.facebook.com_l.php-3Fu-3Dhttp-253A-252F-252Fbit.ly-252F2vyb6jU-26h-3DATMupmgV-2Dv-5FgK4pynARMjWZyRCHtlXoqa7HSyzJ7Eavxean6O-2Dcr04HohyVXHZ-5FoF7nxNLuA34P3lHvMs55XcmyuWsxwFL30mx32Pkg-5FQoLMSrT5MESKygZxJ5oqNn1lyGzfHnR37nhUVShgv23woUDpVuyhOmuUCZtb0MhUtBu8GzaUXLsOStYb3xPBORlIrV6NCdt30E7sS2WX4NTdCTOG99wIOm0DyrRNOAMCSHnLUVn1wDC28-2D-2DkUtg&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=7EO4BVk-XJ7NwcinUfmYJ6IqVyRpdxRLrIOCGxsI31Q&s=OJqcrSNTszJyGuUOX-39GQncztYfnRuZNQ1KWelo7_A&e=>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> 7) *Issue:* Climate change.
>>>
>>> *Desired outcome:* The US fully engages in the Paris Climate Change
>>> Accords.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Alaska is home to vast amounts of glacial ice, sea ice, and permafrost.
>>> If these melt, and they certainly are melting at this point, they will
>>> make a huge contribution to a warming climate. The threat of melting
>>> permafrost is probably least known by the public. When permafrost
>>> melts, it releases not only carbon dioxide the but also large amounts of
>>> methane (molecule for molecule, far more problematic than carbon dioxide.)
>>> The consequences of extensive permafrost melting across the northern
>>> hemisphere are unthinkable.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> 8) *Issue:* Continuity of Executive Branch Natural Resource
>>> Management.
>>>
>>> *Desired Outcome:* Full funding for natural resource conservation
>>> functions for Department of Interior (especially US Fish and Wildlife
>>> Service, US National Park Service, and Bureau of Land Management)
>>> Department of Agriculture (US Forest Service and the Farm Bill) and
>>> Department of Energy; cessation of the “reshuffling” of senior leadership
>>> positions among agencies; retain the designations of the National Monuments
>>> currently under “review” by Secretary of the Interior Zinke.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> In my recent summer trip to Alaska to visit family, I visited with
>>> former colleagues from the US Fish and Wildlife Service and learned that
>>> the President’s budget as well as statements and actions by the top
>>> administrators in EPA, Energy, and Interior send clear signals of a desire
>>> to significantly damage or eliminate important federal conservation
>>> programs. Interior Secretary Zinke has engaged in a policy of
>>> shuffling occupants of senior leadership positions, removing leaders from
>>> areas of expertise and placing them in positions in other agencies that do
>>> not relate to their experience or training. Clearly, the intent is to
>>> cripple the agencies at the top, create chaos, and stop them from
>>> conducting and disseminating scientifically rigorous science that is
>>> inconvenient to the Administration’s ideology. The extent of this
>>> effort is beyond anything I saw in my 31 year federal career.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> I regret the great length of this post. These are incredibly difficult
>>> times. There is so much at stake! Thank you for any help that you can
>>> provide!
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Russ Oates (USFWS Alaska, Retired)
>>>
>>> Burnsville, NC
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> *Conserve wild things, protect wild places.*
>>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> *Conserve wild things, protect wild places.*
>

 

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Date: 8/24/17 6:49 am
From: james poling (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mississippi Kites, Old Fort, NC
Some of the 20 Mississippi Kites seen hawking dragonflies over Irma’s Farm Fields, Exit 75, Parker Padgett Road, Interstate 40, Old Fort, NC yesterday.




James Poling
624 Azalea Avenue
Black Mountain, NC 28711 USA
<james.poling...> <mailto:<james.poling...>
www.jamesnewtonpoling.com <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.jamesnewtonpoling.com_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=lCsHT7ZoP3JRa_cwiLLXVl-iSfKPA39RimSAR7BoU8c&s=W5WcWpnyiqo23cXc9xys6YGFArlmTqB-kxcnXJKay-s&e= >
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__pinterest.com_jamesnpoling_boards_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=lCsHT7ZoP3JRa_cwiLLXVl-iSfKPA39RimSAR7BoU8c&s=n8eO4EdnfWIUijcfK-VHhGuU_87ycWFlg1U_56ZE4iU&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__pinterest.com_jamesnpoling_boards_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=lCsHT7ZoP3JRa_cwiLLXVl-iSfKPA39RimSAR7BoU8c&s=n8eO4EdnfWIUijcfK-VHhGuU_87ycWFlg1U_56ZE4iU&e= >
828-707-7413





 

Back to top
Date: 8/24/17 6:26 am
From: Tim Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Swallow-tailed Kite - Smokies
Yesterday afternoon I saw a swallow-tailed kite soaring low over the US74/441 near the cutoff for Cherokee. It was a solitary bird as far as I could tell at highway speeds. According to eBird reports, this is the 4th siting in the mountains: 1 in E. TN, plus 2 others E. of Asheville. This was my first for the mountains - but not quite close enough to consider it a yard bird.


It has been birdy at the house (3 miles from Dillsboro) with a loud argument yesterday by blue-headed vireo, red-eyed vireo, parula warbler, black & white warbler. They all nest here (2400') but we rarely hear much from them in the fall unless they sing to "reinforce" territory.


Our resident broadwing hawk hangs around close looking to put on some weight for the long glide south. It is difficult to drive anywhere in this area with out seeing one or two.


An osprey has been seen on the Tuckaseegee River recently.


Tim Lewis
Jackson County, NC
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.tim-2Dlewis.com_&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=NX4yqpvfZrcf8h3AMpTIRhWZjMGHRpTqMrFQXpG210U&s=Y7QJCxYFrKjid1Afl48Wn4mKLDMuqpGq2m_XsD6lJ2U&e= >

 

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Date: 8/24/17 5:30 am
From: Russ Oates (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Important conservation issues
Maggie,

Thank you for your response. You are absolutely right about the EPA. I
was remiss in omitting the EPA from my comments on "Continuity of Executive
Branch Natural Resource Management." Administrator Pruitt is intent on
destroying the agency. His efforts to remove science from the decision
making process are dumbfounding. We should prepare for deadly smog and
burning rivers....the clock is turning back to the 1950s.

Truly overwhelming...

Russ

On Thu, Aug 24, 2017 at 7:46 AM, Maggie Strickland <gallinasviejas...>
> wrote:

> Russ,
> Thank you so much for this clear and specific information. While most of
> my recent contacts with our senators and representatives has concerned
> other matters, I am horrified at the sweeping changes at the EPA. The
> wholesale retreat from preservation and conservation is so disheartening. I
> promise I will take action on these issues.
>
> Sincerely,
> Maggie Strickland
> Harmony, Maine
>
> On Wed, Aug 23, 2017 at 8:39 PM, Russ Oates <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> CBC Members,
>>
>>
>>
>> There are several nationally or internationally important bird-related
>> issues in Alaska that are currently approaching decision points in the
>> Congress and/or the Executive Branch. Given the anti-conservation
>> statements and actions of the current Administration and the likely
>> willingness by the Congress to follow suit, I am asking you to review these
>> issues and to consider contacting the appropriate Executive Branch agencies
>> and especially your US Congressional delegation to encourage them to act on
>> the side of responsible conservation. Many of these issues will be
>> decided in the US Senate. Currently-proposed legislation and executive
>> actions will cause irreparable damage to Important Bird Areas. Much is
>> at stake.
>>
>>
>>
>> A significant proportion of members from both parties in Congress are
>> conservationists at heart but the Republicans will be under severe pressure
>> to roll back environmental protections nationwide. We only need 3
>> Republican senators to vote against an ill-advised development project or
>> management action to block it, so your calls or letters to your US
>> Congressional Delegation could be crucial.
>>
>>
>>
>> Alaska is a hugely-important nesting area for birds from all four North
>> American flyways (especially Pacific and Central) as well as the East
>> Asia/Australasia and East Asia/East Africa flyways. Bird band reports
>> (returns) have shown that some of the Tundra Swans and at least 4 species
>> of ducks that breed in Alaska also spend the winter in NC. Although I
>> couldn’t easily check banding data for other species, AK and NC share at
>> least 16 species of shorebirds. Also, Alaska has historically been a
>> safe haven for species depleted elsewhere in their ranges (for example:
>> Bald Eagles, Trumpeter Swans, Peregrine Falcons) and for many years
>> provided eggs and/or young to the lower 48 states for restoration.
>>
>>
>>
>> I present each issue by identifying it, followed by the desired outcome.
>> This will be followed by a brief explanation of what’s at stake and why
>> there is an issue. If you need more information, you can Google
>> Audubon Alaska or the names of the locations of concern.
>>
>>
>>
>> *ISSUES:*
>>
>>
>>
>> 1) *Issue:* Beaufort/Chukchi Sea (off the north shore of Alaska)
>> offshore petroleum drilling.
>>
>> *Desired outcome:* Block offshore development in Chukchi and Beaufort
>> seas.
>>
>>
>>
>> I know of no oil spill anywhere in an area of broken or solid ice cover
>> on marine water that was effectively cleaned up or even contained. *Current
>> spill clean up technology doesn’t work in ice-choked waters. * Historically,
>> ice has been present in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas more than 200 days
>> per year. In addition to the threats to whales, seals, and polar bears,
>> an offshore or nearshore spill occurring in late winter or early spring
>> poses a tremendous threat to at least 2 million spring-migrating
>> Long-tailed Ducks and King and Common eiders. Also threatened would be
>> Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed “Threatened” Spectacled and Steller’s
>> eiders (the entire North American breeding population of Steller’s Eiders)
>> and ESA listed “Warranted But Precluded” Yellow-billed Loon. Large
>> numbers of many species of shorebirds, gulls, terns, and jaegers would be
>> at risk from floating oil and oiled shorelines. Here is the nightmare
>> scenario: We know that essentially all of the bird species mentioned
>> move to northern breeding grounds as early in spring as conditions will
>> allow. These birds fly north along the Bering Sea coastline and turn
>> east into the Chukchi, using any open water patches to rest and feed while
>> enroute to their breeding grounds in arctic Alaska and Canada. If a
>> spill occurs at an offshore rig or seabed pipeline in late winter or early
>> spring, the floating portion of the spill could be waiting as a death trap
>> there for the migrating birds. This could affect tens to hundreds of
>> thousands of birds and there could be no way to stop the spill, clean up
>> the spill, or rescue birds. There is clearly potential for population
>> level impacts on several species (at a minimum: King Eider, Spectacled
>> Eider, Steller’s Eider, Common Eider, Yellow-billed Loon).
>>
>>
>>
>> 2) *Issue:* Opening the Teshekpuk Lake Goose Molting area to oil
>> development. *Desired outcome:* Maintain the moratorium on development
>> of this area.
>>
>>
>>
>> Teshekpuk Lake, the second-largest lake in Alaska, is located within the
>> 23.5 million acre National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska (NPRA, administered by
>> Bureau of Land Management), and sits about 15 miles south of the western
>> Beaufort Sea coastline (175 miles west of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge).
>> The 200+ lakes loosely clustered between Teshekpuk Lake and the coastline
>> constitute the largest arctic goose molting resort in North America,
>> supporting multiple species of flightless molting birds (Mid-continent
>> White-fronted Geese, Pacific Black Brant, Lesser Snow Geese, and Cackling
>> Geese) for several critical months each summer. Frequently, up to
>> 100,000 geese molt in these lakes. During the annual wing molt, these
>> birds are exceptionally sensitive to disturbance, and an on-the-ground
>> research scientist during the 1970s reported birds reacting (avoidance
>> behavior) to a person walking across the board-flat tundra at a distance of
>> one mile. With that high level of sensitivity, it’s no wonder that the
>> geese picked one of the most remote locations in Alaska to undergo the 2-3
>> week flightless period. The area appeared to be secure from large-scale
>> disturbance until winter seismic work revealed the possibility of extensive
>> oil deposits directly under the molting area. I have seen a detailed
>> proposed development scenario prepared by the petroleum industry that I
>> strongly believe would result in the complete abandonment of the molting
>> area. Over the years, scientists (from government and conservation
>> organizations) have successfully defended this important molting area
>> against several industry and pro-development administration attempts to
>> open it for oil development. I credit Audubon Alaska with leading the
>> effort that resulted in the latest stay of execution. During the Obama
>> Adm