Carolinabirds
Received From Subject
6/19/21 9:31 am Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Rehab needed for baby birds in Richmond, Va
6/17/21 5:56 pm Steve <sshultz...> Durham Nighthawks
6/17/21 9:47 am Will Cook <cwcook...> Forsyth County NC Roseate Spoonbill 5/31/21
6/16/21 1:59 pm Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fwd: Before Your Next Trip 🛩
6/16/21 1:47 pm oksanaduck (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Male bluebird priblem
6/16/21 9:43 am Wayne Hoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Brood X Cicadas
6/16/21 8:24 am Will Cook <cwcook...> 28 Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks in Hertford (Perquimans County, NC)
6/16/21 6:38 am Thomas McNeil (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Black-crowned Night-Heron (Mitchell Co., NC)
6/14/21 2:21 pm Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: 7 species of woodpeckers today in Watauga County, NC
6/14/21 1:15 pm \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> 7 species of woodpeckers today in Watauga County, NC
6/13/21 10:35 am steve stevens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Final Nightjar Survey Window Approaching
6/13/21 7:44 am Steve <sshultz...> Whistling ducks
6/12/21 11:54 am \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: interesting mammal observation while birding
6/12/21 10:50 am John Fussell <jofuss...> interesting mammal observation while birding
6/11/21 5:19 am Peter Vankevich (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Black-bellied Whistling Ducks on Ocracoke
6/11/21 5:01 am Paul Serridge (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hotspot renamed in Greenville County, SC
6/10/21 6:57 pm David Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> lots of NC wood storks
6/10/21 2:04 pm Alan Meijer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Scarlet Tanager @ Merchant's Millpond St Pk. Sunbury, NC
6/9/21 4:07 pm Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks in Durham, NC
6/9/21 2:12 pm Wayne Hoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Information request
6/9/21 10:03 am Bill Hilton Jr. <hilton...> Hilton Pond 04/01/21 (April's Migrant Birds)
6/8/21 10:17 am Erik Thomas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Swainson’s Warblers in the Piedmont
6/8/21 5:21 am Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Swainson’s Warblers in the Piedmont
6/7/21 3:16 pm <badgerboy...> Call BBS 2021 results and comments (Wilkesboro)
6/7/21 9:55 am HENRY LINK <linkh...> Wilson's Phalarope at Oregon Inlet Fishing Center
6/6/21 4:05 pm Alan Meijer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Loon & Frigatebird. Jennette's Pier. Dare Co. NC
6/5/21 7:10 am Josh Southern (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Call for Spring 2021 reports for the "Briefs for the Files"
6/5/21 5:06 am Marcia Mandel (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Birding spots in and near Shenandoah National Park
6/4/21 11:13 am Oscar Carmona (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks - Apex (Wake) NC
6/4/21 11:07 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Black-bellied Whistling Ducks - Apex (Wake) NC
6/2/21 7:26 pm Mark Kosiewski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Barn Owl nest boxes
6/2/21 12:21 pm Rob G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Barn Owl nestboxes
6/2/21 10:56 am Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Minnesota or Wisconsin birders?
5/30/21 2:49 pm Steve Patterson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> update about Fork-tailed Flycatcher, Anderson County
5/30/21 2:13 pm Murphy (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Snake Baffle
5/30/21 5:05 am Terri Buckner <tbuckner...> Re: Bobwhites
5/30/21 4:49 am William Majoros <bmajoros...> Bobwhites
5/29/21 4:57 pm Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Snake Baffle
5/29/21 2:21 pm ra shahid <rashahid...> Snake Baffle
5/29/21 11:41 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: multiple N. Bobwhites at a Jordan Lake, NC, locale
5/29/21 11:34 am Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: multiple N. Bobwhites at a Jordan Lake, NC, locale
5/29/21 11:17 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: multiple N. Bobwhites at a Jordan Lake, NC, locale
5/29/21 10:48 am Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: multiple N. Bobwhites at a Jordan Lake, NC, locale
5/29/21 4:04 am scbirder (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: Fork-tailed Flycatcher in Townville
5/28/21 6:56 pm hdpratt (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Another late Pine Siskin
5/28/21 2:36 pm John Fussell <jofuss...> Loggerhead Shrikes nesting in Morehead City, NC
5/28/21 2:12 pm Steve Patterson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Fork-tailed Flycatcher in Townville
5/28/21 12:21 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> multiple N. Bobwhites at a Jordan Lake, NC, locale
5/28/21 11:56 am scbirder (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: Fork-tailed Flycatcher in Townville
5/28/21 9:34 am Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> SC Fork-tailed Flycatcher Continues
5/28/21 9:32 am William Niemczyk (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Northern Bobwhite
5/28/21 5:36 am scbirder (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fork-tailed Flycatcher in Townville
5/27/21 7:09 pm Anita Huffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Piedmont Pine Siskin
5/27/21 4:01 pm Kevin Metcalf (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Pine Siskin - Mecklenburg County
5/27/21 3:19 pm ronclark2277 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Piedmont Pine Siskin
5/27/21 7:18 am whoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> No Kites. Winnabow
5/27/21 7:02 am Paul Serridge (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Purple Gallinule reported at Lake Conestee Nature Preserve, Greenville County, SC
5/25/21 5:50 am Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Recommendation for hot pepper in homemade suet
5/24/21 4:28 pm John Fussell <jofuss...> Loggerhead Shrikes nest in Morehead City, NC
5/24/21 12:37 pm Erik Thomas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Raven Rock St. Pk. Spring Bird Count results
5/23/21 10:28 am Judi Durr (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Meadowlarks
5/22/21 12:55 pm Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Wedge-tailed Shearwater today on NC pelagic trip!
5/22/21 12:47 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Wedge-tailed Shearwater today on NC pelagic trip!
5/22/21 9:17 am Hurlbert, Allen Hartley <Hurlbert...> RE: Still Here
5/22/21 9:14 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Documentation of Yellow-green Vireo request for the Carolina Bird Club website
5/21/21 3:55 pm My AOL (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Still Here
5/21/21 3:49 pm Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Mottled Ducks- Ft Fisher
5/21/21 2:18 pm Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Still Here
 
Back to top
Date: 6/19/21 9:31 am
From: Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Rehab needed for baby birds in Richmond, Va
We have a friend who lives in Richmond, Va who found a fallen nest in her
yard...we suggested she try to put it back, but no luck. She is
successfully feeding them worms that she bought (using long plastic
tweezers). She sent a video and they're eagerly eating, but the problem is
that this is someone who travels and is away from home a lot. Can anyone
recommend a rehabber for birds (there are three) in the Richmond, Va area?
I'll pass along the info to her if you have it. They look like they're
just beginning to get blue feathers....

You can reply to this off list, but a better address is <tankapoet...>

LInda Ward
Coinjock, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 6/17/21 5:56 pm
From: Steve <sshultz...>
Subject: Durham Nighthawks
I’ve found the best place to see nighthawk in Durham is from the rooftop of The Durham Hotel. Grab a beverage and start watching. The birds come out at dusk.

For a treat, try The Durham cocktail. For cheapies, they have Narragansett in the can.

Steve Shultz
Durham NC
 

Back to top
Date: 6/17/21 9:47 am
From: Will Cook <cwcook...>
Subject: Forsyth County NC Roseate Spoonbill 5/31/21
Belated forward, accompanied by several photos showing a Roseate Spoonbill.

Will Cook - Durham, NC

-----Original Message-----
From: Ron Morris <ronmorris...>
Sent: Monday, May 31, 2021 4:27 PM
To: '<carolinabirds-request...>' <carolinabirds-request...>
Subject: Forsyth County Roseate Spoonbill

Nancy Tutterow reported a Roseate Spoonbill at a private lake this
morning, apparently the first for Forsyth County. Her photos are attached.

Ron Morris
Winston-Salem, NC



 

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Date: 6/16/21 1:59 pm
From: Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fwd: Before Your Next Trip 🛩
Greetings all.

Received this email from our Senator Mark Warner

I thought it would be of interest to those who may be planning on international travel this year.


From my iPhone

Go Birding be Safe

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>


Begin forwarded message:

> From: "Sen. Mark Warner" <donotreply...>
> Date: June 16, 2021 at 11:33:20 AM EDT
> To: <jcbabirder...>
> Subject: Before Your Next Trip 🛩
>
> 
> `
>
> n
>
>
>
>
> Dear Friend,
>
> As vaccine rates go up and COVID-19 rates go down, many Virginians are making plans to travel safely this summer. Whether you’re finally planning a long-delayed vacation or a much anticipated reunion with far-away loved ones, I urge you to make sure your documents are up to date if you’re planning on traveling internationally.
>
>
>
> Increased demand, mail delays, and processing backlogs due to COVID-19 mean that it may take more time than you expect to obtain or renew a passport. The U.S. State Department is currently projecting a wait time of 10-12 weeks for renewals, and some folks are reporting even longer delays, resulting in stress, added expenses, and canceled trips.
>
> Don’t let this be you. Instead, jumpstart the process today by visiting travel.state.gov/passport.
>
> If you have travel planned in the next 14 days and still need assistance in getting or renewing a U.S. passport, my office can help! Please call us at 540-857-2676 or fill out the form here.
>
> Please keep in mind that many countries require your passport to be valid for an additional 3-6 months beyond your planned stay in order to be granted entry. Don’t wait until it’s too late – if you’re planning to travel in the next six months, make sure you know when your passport expires, and make a plan to get it renewed as soon as possible.
>
> If you ever want to share your thoughts about an issue that’s important to you, you can send me an email any time using the form on my Senate website. You can also follow me on Facebook and Twitter. I look forward to hearing from you.
>
> Sincerely,
>
>
>
>
> WHAT DO YOU THINK?
>
> Did you find this email useful?
> YES
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>
> What Issues are most important to you?
> African American Community Agriculture Asian American and Pacific Islander Community
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> Housing Labor Latino Community
> Immigration Seniors Taxes
> Transportation Vaccine Distribution Veterans
> Other (please specify)
>
> Submit
>
> Click to open in a separate window
> Sen. Mark R. Warner
> Washington, DC
> 703 Hart Senate Office Building.
> Washington, D.C. 20510
> Tel: (202) 224-2023
>
> WARNER.SENATE.GOV
>
>
>
> PREPARED, PUBLISHED, AND MAILED AT TAXPAYER EXPENSE
>
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>
>
> Click here to unsubscribe
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/16/21 1:47 pm
From: oksanaduck (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Male bluebird priblem
For the past 3 months I've had a male bluebird flying into the windows, sometimes off and on all day!  For about 5 weeks I had to completely cover the bedroom windows to stop him because he would come about 6:30am.  I'm not a morning person, so was very unhappy and tired!  He moved onto another part of the house for a while, came back and I tried a rubber snake, he didn't care.  He stopped again for a while and moved to the kitchen windows, now he's back to the bedroom, 6:00am today!  I have those UV stickers on all windows, no help!  Any suggestions,  I'm desperate! Thanks,Patty TiceRaleigh NCSent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 

Back to top
Date: 6/16/21 9:43 am
From: Wayne Hoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Brood X Cicadas
Hi -

I want to thank the people who gave me information on Brood X occurrence in NC. On Sunday I drove up to the Wilkesboro area, and was able to encounter the tail end of the emergence near the village of Ronda. I got good photos of the cicadas, but unfortunately did not see any birds feeding on them.

Again, thanks.

Wayne Hoffman
Wilmington


 

Back to top
Date: 6/16/21 8:24 am
From: Will Cook <cwcook...>
Subject: 28 Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks in Hertford (Perquimans County, NC)
Bo Leisenring saw quite a spectacle yesterday in Hertford - larger than
the largest flock reported for the state do far on ebird, though this
report may not make it there.

Will Cook - Durham, NC


-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: FW: Birds
Date: Wed, 16 Jun 2021 09:44:53 -0400
From: Ron Morris <ronmorris...>
To: <carolinabirds-request...>

*From:* boakeknows <boakeknows...>
*Sent:* Tuesday, June 15, 2021 9:41 PM
*To:* <birding...>
*Subject:* Birds

Black bellied whistling ducks, 28 in total stayed on my point of land
all day today. I got over 100 photos and many videos. Hertford NC. Bo
Leisenring 717 885 3424.


 

Back to top
Date: 6/16/21 6:38 am
From: Thomas McNeil (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Black-crowned Night-Heron (Mitchell Co., NC)
16 June 2021
Mitchell Co., NC
Bakersville (Cane Creek Road)

As of 9:15am, there was an immature Black-crowned Night-Heron in Bakersville, NC. The bird was standing on a rock in Cane Creek, directly beside the Clarissa Community Center (on Cane Creek Road).


Thomas S. McNeil
Cathryn L. McNeil
Hampton, TN

 

Back to top
Date: 6/14/21 2:21 pm
From: Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: 7 species of woodpeckers today in Watauga County, NC
Thanks for an enjoyable story! On a related note, I ran into two birders
at Lake Betz (Wake County NC) as they finished up a day of birding. They
were able to see SEVEN of the eight woodpecker species in the North
Carolina Piedmont and Sandhills, dawn to dusk. Their only miss... the DOWNY
WOODPECKER. No, really. When they added up their lists for the day, that
bird was missing. They had a good laugh about that!
L Erla Beegle
Raleigh NC
PS I have 84 straight days of NC Bird Atlas checklists, and counting! Join
in the fun!
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/atlasnc/effortmap__;!!OToaGQ!5cREmfkaWYitBdi7zEKYlpD4V4OZwIKP_Dxr6rnK40_4zdh91aRdJBQU0TwiTV7Rj7s$





On Mon, Jun 14, 2021 at 4:15 PM "J. Merrill Lynch" <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Birders, I saw all 7 possible woodpeckers on my property today, a first
> for me during the breeding season in the NC mountains. Now seeing 7 species
> during the breeding season at one location is not that hard to do in the
> Sandhills and other places where red-cockadeds occur. But in the mountains
> the only possible way to get to seven is to see both red-headed woodpecker
> and yellow-bellied sapsucker, hard enough in the winter, but very difficult
> during the breeding season.
> The 7-woodpecker day was made possible by an adult red-headed woodpecker
> that showed up this morning on a dead tree in front of our house. The first
> one in 13 years living here! I’ve had 2 records of flyover migrants but
> this is the first physically on the property. Red-headed woodpeckers are
> almost unheard of as a breeding species at high elevations in the NC
> mountains so I was totally floored when this one appeared out of nowhere.
>
> That’s one reason birding is so fun. You never know what you are going to
> see next! The complete list (plus photos of the red-headed) are in the
> eBird link below.
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S90189985__;!!OToaGQ!5cREmfkaWYitBdi7zEKYlpD4V4OZwIKP_Dxr6rnK40_4zdh91aRdJBQU0TwiP-wLFgM$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S90189985__;!!OToaGQ!6P9qmvdg4r1P_EHOodSijYz43eGwouHkERPpH9NY72sMfg3H250FVrSxtgg6pGi4MJM$>
>
> Merrill Lynch
> Echo Valley Farm
> Watauga County, NC
> Sent from my iPhone
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/14/21 1:15 pm
From: \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: 7 species of woodpeckers today in Watauga County, NC
Birders, I saw all 7 possible woodpeckers on my property today, a first for me during the breeding season in the NC mountains. Now seeing 7 species during the breeding season at one location is not that hard to do in the Sandhills and other places where red-cockadeds occur. But in the mountains the only possible way to get to seven is to see both red-headed woodpecker and yellow-bellied sapsucker, hard enough in the winter, but very difficult during the breeding season.
The 7-woodpecker day was made possible by an adult red-headed woodpecker that showed up this morning on a dead tree in front of our house. The first one in 13 years living here! I’ve had 2 records of flyover migrants but this is the first physically on the property. Red-headed woodpeckers are almost unheard of as a breeding species at high elevations in the NC mountains so I was totally floored when this one appeared out of nowhere.

That’s one reason birding is so fun. You never know what you are going to see next! The complete list (plus photos of the red-headed) are in the eBird link below.

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S90189985__;!!OToaGQ!6P9qmvdg4r1P_EHOodSijYz43eGwouHkERPpH9NY72sMfg3H250FVrSxtgg6pGi4MJM$

Merrill Lynch
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 6/13/21 10:35 am
From: steve stevens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Final Nightjar Survey Window Approaching
I know many of you know about this, and participate, but I wanted to
remind everyone of a volunteer opportunity to help document nightjars.

The Nightjar Survey Network (nightjars.org) 3rd window (June17-July1) is
approaching, which is the last window for NC in 2021. In short, you can
participate by adopting one of the routes they have on their site or
make your own. The routes are 10 miles with a 6 minute stationary stop
every mile. At these stops you record the individual birds you hear
calling onto a datasheet then fill in the fields of that datasheet on
their website. The windows align with the brighter phases of the moon,
as nightjars sing more during these phases (especially a clear sky with
low wind and full moon overhead). Very detailed instructions and all the
information you need is on their website: nightjars.org

I've done a few of these surveys throughout the years and they're really
enjoyable. Last month during the full moon I documented 41 individual
nightjars along a route I made (along with other night singing birds
like chats, owls, cuckoos, etc) in the sandhills. If you make your own
route, you can correlate it with priority blocks of the NC Bird Atlas to
help cover the nocturnal requirements to complete the blocks.
Personally, I'd suggest trying to find a time when the moon is high in
the sky, bright, visible, there's low wind, and to conduct the survey
between astronomical twilight (a short window in the summer) for best
results. I set aside around two hours to conduct a survey.

I'm not affiliated with the project other than being an excited
volunteer, but feel free to email me directly if I can help at all!

steve b

Chapel Hill, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 6/13/21 7:44 am
From: Steve <sshultz...>
Subject: Whistling ducks
Spotted a flight of half a dozen fowl larger than mallard and smaller than Can, so presume Black-bellied Whistling Duck based on the rash of birds flying about as of late. This was over the pool at Walden Creek in Apex (Wake NC) yesterday afternoon.
Maybe those ducks from the other week remained in the are? Or maybe newbies.

Steve Shultz
Apex NC
The waterfowl capital of Wake County
 

Back to top
Date: 6/12/21 11:54 am
From: \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: interesting mammal observation while birding
Thanks John. Always interesting, your observations. Reminds me of a stop years ago on a BBS route, Todd route in Ashe County. I was standing by the side of the road starting my count when a young rabbit came loping by, not in full stride but faster than a nonchalant hop. Seconds later a mustelid appeared, a mink, following the rabbit’s exact path. This went on for several minutes with the rabbit crossing the paved road several times and disappearing into the shoulder grass. With the mink in pursuit, not hot but lukewarm, I’d say. There was a sizable stream on one side of the road that I think was blocking the rabbit’s escape route. Anyway, both finally disappeared so I don’t know the final outcome.

I do know that my bird list for that stop was a little sparse…


Merrill Lynch
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 12, 2021, at 1:50 PM, John Fussell <jofuss...> wrote:
>
> I've never been much interested in small mammals, because they are generally nocturnal and/or secretive. And when you do see one, it's usually just a blur, unless you happen to find a road-kill.
>
> However, on Monday (7 June) I had exceptional views of a small mammal species that I had never seen before.
>
> I was standing in a jeep trail near the Black Swamp Road in the western Croatan National Forest, doing a point-count of breeding birds (exact site is in Craven County, but, based on Google Earth, only about 300 meters E of Jones County). The trail runs along on an old dike through pocosin habitat. Vegetation adjacent to the trail is virtually impenetrable.
>
> I think I had just started the 10-minute count when I noticed a small, young rabbit moving up the trail toward me, coming closer and closer. It seemed not to notice me. Then I noticed another "rabbit" following the first, but back a ways. My first impression was that this was not a chase, because both critters were just steadily moving toward me--neither was running fast.
>
> Then I noticed that the second "rabbit" was not a rabbit, but that it was something entirely different. About this time, the first rabbit, the real one, had come to within 5-10 feet of me, still seemingly unaware of my presence. Then it turned and went into a dense growth of blackberry (Rubus) that lined the trail at that point (hmm--rabbit, thick briars--that kind of rings a bell). After it disappeared, I could hear it moving around in the vegetation.
>
> Then the second animal came to within 5-10 feet of me. I saw that it was a weasel (Long-tailed Weasel). It then turned and went into the thick blackberry growth.
>
> A few seconds later, the rabbit re-emerged from the patch, and headed back up the trail in the direction from which it had come. I could still hear the weasel rummaging around in the blackberry patch for several more seconds. But, then it too re-emerged just a few feet from me, and headed back up the trail in the direction from which it and the rabbit had come.
>
> Going back to when the weasel was still in the blackberry patch, and when the rabbit was moving back up the trail, I noticed that the rabbit did not go around a large and deep mud puddle that almost covered the trail, but went up the middle of it--it actually appeared to have to swim a few feet. Perhaps this behavior and the back-tracking were an effort to elude the weasel.
>
> By the time the weasel had started back down the trail, the rabbit had disappeared from view, and the weasel soon disappeared too.
>
> One thing that really impressed me was that it never looked like the encounter involved an actual chase. Neither animal was running fast, just moving steadily along. The other aspect of the experience was how oblivious to me they were--I guess they were too focused on each other!
>
> About 30 minutes later when I returned to this section of trail after finishing a couple of more point-counts, I looked carefully within/along the trail for evidence of a kill, but saw none.
>
> Incidentally, the rabbit was very small and when I first noticed the weasel my focus was shifted to it. So, I have to confess, I am not certain if the rabbit was a cottontail or a marsh rabbit.
>
> John Fussell
> Morehead City, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 6/12/21 10:50 am
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: interesting mammal observation while birding
I've never been much interested in small mammals, because they are generally
nocturnal and/or secretive. And when you do see one, it's usually just a
blur, unless you happen to find a road-kill.

However, on Monday (7 June) I had exceptional views of a small mammal
species that I had never seen before.

I was standing in a jeep trail near the Black Swamp Road in the western
Croatan National Forest, doing a point-count of breeding birds (exact site
is in Craven County, but, based on Google Earth, only about 300 meters E of
Jones County). The trail runs along on an old dike through pocosin habitat.
Vegetation adjacent to the trail is virtually impenetrable.

I think I had just started the 10-minute count when I noticed a small, young
rabbit moving up the trail toward me, coming closer and closer. It seemed
not to notice me. Then I noticed another "rabbit" following the first, but
back a ways. My first impression was that this was not a chase, because
both critters were just steadily moving toward me--neither was running fast.

Then I noticed that the second "rabbit" was not a rabbit, but that it was
something entirely different. About this time, the first rabbit, the real
one, had come to within 5-10 feet of me, still seemingly unaware of my
presence. Then it turned and went into a dense growth of blackberry (Rubus)
that lined the trail at that point (hmm--rabbit, thick briars--that kind of
rings a bell). After it disappeared, I could hear it moving around in the
vegetation.

Then the second animal came to within 5-10 feet of me. I saw that it was a
weasel (Long-tailed Weasel). It then turned and went into the thick
blackberry growth.

A few seconds later, the rabbit re-emerged from the patch, and headed back
up the trail in the direction from which it had come. I could still hear
the weasel rummaging around in the blackberry patch for several more
seconds. But, then it too re-emerged just a few feet from me, and headed
back up the trail in the direction from which it and the rabbit had come.

Going back to when the weasel was still in the blackberry patch, and when
the rabbit was moving back up the trail, I noticed that the rabbit did not
go around a large and deep mud puddle that almost covered the trail, but
went up the middle of it--it actually appeared to have to swim a few feet.
Perhaps this behavior and the back-tracking were an effort to elude the
weasel.

By the time the weasel had started back down the trail, the rabbit had
disappeared from view, and the weasel soon disappeared too.

One thing that really impressed me was that it never looked like the
encounter involved an actual chase. Neither animal was running fast, just
moving steadily along. The other aspect of the experience was how oblivious
to me they were--I guess they were too focused on each other!

About 30 minutes later when I returned to this section of trail after
finishing a couple of more point-counts, I looked carefully within/along the
trail for evidence of a kill, but saw none.

Incidentally, the rabbit was very small and when I first noticed the weasel
my focus was shifted to it. So, I have to confess, I am not certain if the
rabbit was a cottontail or a marsh rabbit.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

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Date: 6/11/21 5:19 am
From: Peter Vankevich (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks on Ocracoke
At least 8 Black-bellied Whistling Ducks have been seen feeding, June 8-9,
2021, in the rain-soaked yards of Ocracoke village. Photos available.
Regards,
/Peter Vankevich

 

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Date: 6/11/21 5:01 am
From: Paul Serridge (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hotspot renamed in Greenville County, SC
Lake Conestee Nature Preserve has changed its official name to *Conestee
Nature Preserve*, and the eBird Hotspot has been similarly renamed.
If you have submitted eBird checklists from that hotspot all your records
will have automatically changed to the new name.
If by any chance you submitted any checklists using the former name *as a
personal location*, those records will not have been changed automatically.

Good birding,

Paul Serridge
Greenville, SC

 

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Date: 6/10/21 6:57 pm
From: David Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: lots of NC wood storks
While we were collecting fossils at a private site near Hallsboro, Columbus
County, we saw over 100 wood storks fly past in small to large groups this
morning.

--
Dr. David Campbell
Associate Professor, Geology
Department of Natural Sciences
110 S Main St, #7270
Gardner-Webb University
Boiling Springs NC 28017

 

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Date: 6/10/21 2:04 pm
From: Alan Meijer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Scarlet Tanager @ Merchant's Millpond St Pk. Sunbury, NC
Took a quick walk at Merchant's over a lunch break and saw a whack of
Flycatchers of course: Yellow-throated, White-eyed, Red-eyed, Great
Crested, all along the Coleman Trail (canoe launch parking lot). Warblers
included Prothonotary, Yellow-throated, and Parula. As we got into the
beech forest part of the trail, I said this would be place for a Tanager of
sorts - and bam! A Scarlet Tanager appeared.

Alan Meijer
Beaufort County NC



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Date: 6/9/21 4:07 pm
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks in Durham, NC
Four, maybe five, Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks are being seen at Patterson
Place Constructed Wetland in Durham. There is also a hybrid
Mallard/American Black Duck that could almost pass for a Black.

 

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Date: 6/9/21 2:12 pm
From: Wayne Hoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Information request
Hi -

Is there anywhere in North Carolina that currently has large numbers of Brood X Cicadas and is accessible to the public?

I am looking for a place where I can watch them and hopefully photograph birds eating them.

Thanks -

Wayne Hoffman

Wilmingtion

 

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Date: 6/9/21 10:03 am
From: Bill Hilton Jr. <hilton...>
Subject: Hilton Pond 04/01/21 (April's Migrant Birds)
We've fallen a bit behind on posting "This Week at Hilton Pond" but thought the variety of birds we saw or banded 1-30 April 2021 was worth reporting--everything from warblers to wrens and flycatchers to hummingbirds. To view photo essay #743--and to read about the male Black-throated Blue Warbler in our attached image--please visit https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek210401.html__;!!OToaGQ!--I7je65SdbxrpnHuEApiBqymse-8-Z641GoelfwRRjjQfeC-7pgAEJ01KNOTLs-42Q$

As always we include lists of birds banded and recovered during the period plus acknowledgment of our recent supporters.

Happy Nature Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond__;!!OToaGQ!--I7je65SdbxrpnHuEApiBqymse-8-Z641GoelfwRRjjQfeC-7pgAEJ01KNOqfR55p8$ for timely updates on nature topics,
and for info about hummingbirds at https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats__;!!OToaGQ!--I7je65SdbxrpnHuEApiBqymse-8-Z641GoelfwRRjjQfeC-7pgAEJ01KNOdhNccPA$

Follow us on Twitter @hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and education for students of all ages.

"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the sunset." BHjr.

============


 

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Date: 6/8/21 10:17 am
From: Erik Thomas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Swainson’s Warblers in the Piedmont
Swainson's Warbler is a puzzling species, with its separate coastal plain
and mountain distributions. One has to wonder why it doesn't show up very
often in the Piedmont region, where you found yours.

During counts for the NC Bird Atlas this spring, I've found Swainson's
Warblers singing at three sites in the inner coastal plain parts of North
Carolina, one in Johnston County (and not at Howell Woods, a known spot for
them) and two in Robeson County. The interesting thing about all three
sites is that, although they're all in bottomlands, they aren't in the
wettest parts of the bottomlands. Instead, they're away from flooded
areas, generally upstream from the swampy parts. The song sounds to me
like "Neil, Neil, Neil, catch the girl" and that mnemonic has been quite
useful to me.

Erik Thomas
Raleigh, NC

On Tue, Jun 8, 2021 at 8:20 AM Kevin Kubach <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Good Morning. Yesterday while working on streams in York County, SC, I
> encountered Swainson’s Warblers singing at two sites just west of Rock
> Hill. In one case near the adult I also heard calls that I suspect were
> those of fledglings but could not confirm. There are very few observations
> in eBird in June in this area.
>
> In recent years I’ve also observed the species during the breeding season
> in places in the western Piedmont of SC—in the gap between the published
> mountain and midlands/coastal plain breeding range as shown on most maps.
>
> Just wanted to share these observations.
>
> Kevin Kubach
> Greenville, SC



--
Erik R. Thomas
Linguistics Program
North Carolina State University

 

Back to top
Date: 6/8/21 5:21 am
From: Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Swainson’s Warblers in the Piedmont
Good Morning. Yesterday while working on streams in York County, SC, I encountered Swainson’s Warblers singing at two sites just west of Rock Hill. In one case near the adult I also heard calls that I suspect were those of fledglings but could not confirm. There are very few observations in eBird in June in this area.

In recent years I’ve also observed the species during the breeding season in places in the western Piedmont of SC—in the gap between the published mountain and midlands/coastal plain breeding range as shown on most maps.

Just wanted to share these observations.

Kevin Kubach
Greenville, SC
 

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Date: 6/7/21 3:16 pm
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Call BBS 2021 results and comments (Wilkesboro)
I ran the 33rd year of the Call BBS route on May 30th, near Wilkesboro
NC . Results below with comments on species of interest.

Guy McGrane, Boone, NC


****

_Species_, _Route totals_, _Comments_

Canada Goose         13
Rock Pigeon             4
Mourning Dove         49     Steady increase recent years
Yellow-billed Cuckoo     3
Chimney Swift         1     lowest since '75
Turkey Vulture         1
Red-shouldered Hawk     2     7th straight year, 3 of 26 years previous
Red-tailed Hawk         1
Red-bellied Woodpecker     8     Last 2 years lower than peak in 2018
after long gains
Downy Woodpecker         2
Pileated Woodpecker         2
Great Crested Flycatcher     1
Eastern Kingbird         3
Eastern Phoebe         1
Red-eyed Vireo         24
Blue Jay             8
American Crow         45
Fish Crow             4     Record high count, 4th year since 2013,
absent previous
No. Rough-winged Swallow     1
Barn Swallow         7     Much lower than in 90's, likely fewer nest sites
Cliff Swallow             2     4th straight year, nesting at roaring river
Carolina Chickadee         2
Tufted Titmouse         23     Increasing since late 90's, ~4X more now
White-breasted Nuthatch     7     Record high, recent average 2
House Wren             5
Carolina Wren         40     Increasing since late 90's, ~5X more now
Eastern Bluebird         25     Increasing since 70's, ~6X more now
Wood Thrush             15     Highest since 1980. steady gain this
century after sharp drop
American Robin         31
Gray Catbird             2
Brown Thrasher         2
Northern Mockingbird     18
European Starling         65
Cedar Waxwing         9
House Finch             12
American Goldfinch         6
Chipping Sparrow         4     Decline since early 2000's to about half
or less
Field Sparrow         6     Holding fairly steady
Song Sparrow         2     Tie for all-time low ~10X drop since late 90's
Eastern Towhee         7
Yellow-breasted Chat     2
Eastern Meadowlark         5
Orchard Oriole         6     Record high, previous high 3, overall avg 1
Brown-headed Cowbird     9
Common Grackle         15     Last 2 yrs lowest since 1975
Common Yellowthroat     2     Lowest since 2004
Pine Warbler             2
Northern Cardinal         41
Blue Grosbeak         6
Indigo Bunting         14     Overall decline by >50% since late 90's
Wild Turkey             2
Black Vulture             3
Common Raven         1     2nd year, first was 2019
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher    0    Observer-bias-caused not found recent years
Scarlet Tanager        0    Unexplained absence this year after steady
levels recently
House Sparrow        0    First ever miss, decreasing recent years
Acadian Flycatcher        0    2nd straight miss, usually 1 to 3 per year
Purple Martin            0    First miss since 1996, all houses torn
down on route
Eastern Wood Pewee        0    3rd straight miss, combo observer bias
and lower density
Northern Flicker        0    Rarely found this century; common before then


Total Species : 53     (avg 52)
Total ind. : 571     (avg 594)
Vehicles     166   (seemed very high this year)
__




 

Back to top
Date: 6/7/21 9:55 am
From: HENRY LINK <linkh...>
Subject: Wilson's Phalarope at Oregon Inlet Fishing Center
Just got a call from Julien McCarthy reporting a Wilson’s Phalarope present now in the ephemeral pond at the Oregon Inlet Fishing Center.

Henry Link

Greensboro NC
 

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Date: 6/6/21 4:05 pm
From: Alan Meijer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Loon & Frigatebird. Jennette's Pier. Dare Co. NC
Arrived at Jennette's Pier in Nags Head about an hour and a half ago to
find a Magnificent Frigatebird soar overhead for a bit. A lifer for me!

There's a Common Loon bobbing around off the north side of the pier about
200 yards away.

Alan Meijer

 

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Date: 6/5/21 7:10 am
From: Josh Southern (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Call for Spring 2021 reports for the "Briefs for the Files"
Dear Carolinabirders,

It's now time to submit your Spring 2021 (March 1st through May 31st)
reports of noteworthy NC/SC bird sightings for the "Briefs for the Files"
section of "The Chat."

If you already posted your sighting to the carolinabirds listserv or
submitted a checklist through ebird, then it's not necessary to send me a
separate report (as I'll probably see it), but all direct submissions are
welcome and encouraged.

I'm most interested in reports of rare species, very late or very early
migrants, very high counts, and breeding well outside of typical range. For
all reports, please include the bird's full common name (no abbreviations),
the name of the observer(s), the date of the sighting, the location of the
sighting, and attached photographs if available. For very rare or
hard-to-identify species, please include written details if not attaching a
photograph. For the most unusual sightings, I may ask you to fill out a
Rare Bird Report Form for submission to the state's Bird Records Committee.

Please email your report to me at <joshsouthern79...> before the end
of June. If attaching a word document, please also "copy and paste" the
contents into the body of the email.

Thanks and Good Birding,
Josh Southern
Holly Springs, NC

 

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Date: 6/5/21 5:06 am
From: Marcia Mandel (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Birding spots in and near Shenandoah National Park
I'm going to be in Mcgaheysville, Virginia, in between Harrisonburg and
Shenandoah National Park, in a few weeks and would appreciate any tips for
good birding spots. Please reply directly to me, offline. Thanks!
Marcia

 

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Date: 6/4/21 11:13 am
From: Oscar Carmona (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks - Apex (Wake) NC
Thanks for sharing - those definitely remind me of being back in Texas. 
Oscar CarmonaWake Forest, NC


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone


On Friday, June 4, 2021, 2:06 PM, Shultz, Steven <carolinabirds...> wrote:

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A small group of subject line birds are at a retention pond (now neighborhood amenity!) near downtown Apex in western Wake County. 

The birds are located at the intersection of Ambergate Station and Tender (not Tinder) Drive in Apex, just off Apex Peakway.

 

 

Steve Shultz

The Peak of Good Living




 

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Date: 6/4/21 11:07 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks - Apex (Wake) NC
A small group of subject line birds are at a retention pond (now neighborhood amenity!) near downtown Apex in western Wake County.
The birds are located at the intersection of Ambergate Station and Tender (not Tinder) Drive in Apex, just off Apex Peakway.


Steve Shultz
The Peak of Good Living

 

Back to top
Date: 6/2/21 7:26 pm
From: Mark Kosiewski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Barn Owl nest boxes
Rob,
The nest boxes in the Triangle were donated to NCWRC, which started its own Barn Owl monitoring program a few years ago. It's unlikely that any of the New Hope Audubon nest boxes were utilized, as Barn Owls have become increasingly scarce in the area. NCWRC has promised to monitor the existing boxes, and to gradually move them to confirmed breeding spots around the state.

MarkKosiewski
Chapel Hill NC




 

Back to top
Date: 6/2/21 12:21 pm
From: Rob G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Barn Owl nestboxes
Just recently discovered this NC birder/photographer on Twitter with a Barn Owl box photo:

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://twitter.com/nature_dg/status/1399798417438748673__;!!OToaGQ!5gsm-kOulFmlkg4a-MTAWILmC7f6TBmVxVHjDaH51bVeWd-VbmdenHaiEJEFlCdN1j4$

made me wonder if the Barn Owl boxes Audubon put up in the Triangle years ago ever had any success and/or are still being monitored?


-- Rob Gluck.... Carrboro, NC.....



 

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Date: 6/2/21 10:56 am
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Minnesota or Wisconsin birders?
Hello birders, I’m hoping that some members of this list are very familiar
with the area around Rochester, MN, and La Crosse, WI — and could advise on
the must-see or most characteristic birding sites around there, or some
good places to get birds that we typically don’t see in Piedmont/coastal
plain North Carolina. I’m not much of a traveling birder, so any tips for
an easterner birding for the first time in the Midwest would also be
welcome. Please reply off-list, thanks.
Betsy Kane
Washington, N.C.

 

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Date: 5/30/21 2:49 pm
From: Steve Patterson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: update about Fork-tailed Flycatcher, Anderson County
To my knowledge, no one has found the bird today (Sunday), although many people have searched.  Debra and I stopped by the site and spoke with persons who had been there.  As of 2:00, no positive reports had been registered.  


Steve PattersonAnderson, SC
 

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Date: 5/30/21 2:13 pm
From: Murphy (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Snake Baffle
Ann, I've always mounted bluebird boxes on 4" PVC pipe, about 5' high. That
seems to keep any terrestrial predators at bay.

Jennifer Griffith
Durham, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 5/30/21 5:05 am
From: Terri Buckner <tbuckner...>
Subject: Re: Bobwhites
I've heard them at what used to be called the OWASA mitigation tract and is
now called the Buckhorn Gamelands.

Terri
Carrboro NC

On Sun, May 30, 2021 at 7:49 AM William Majoros <bmajoros...>
wrote:

> Regarding bobwhites in the triangle region, I hear them every year at a
> particular location on Falls Lake when kayaking -- just south of the
> causeway that delimits Beaverdam Lake, on the eastern shore of the lake
> where there is now a system of bike trails ("New Light Trails"). I kayak
> the entire lake each summer, and that's the only place I regularly
> encounter them. That whole area is forested, though parts appear to have
> been thinned in the last few years.
>
>
>
> Bill Majoros
>
> Durham, NC
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/30/21 4:49 am
From: William Majoros <bmajoros...>
Subject: Bobwhites
Regarding bobwhites in the triangle region, I hear them every year at a particular location on Falls Lake when kayaking -- just south of the causeway that delimits Beaverdam Lake, on the eastern shore of the lake where there is now a system of bike trails ("New Light Trails"). I kayak the entire lake each summer, and that's the only place I regularly encounter them. That whole area is forested, though parts appear to have been thinned in the last few years.

Bill Majoros
Durham, NC


 

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Date: 5/29/21 4:57 pm
From: Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Snake Baffle
I have used cylindrical raccoon baffles with excellent success. They are
essentially a long piece of stove pipe.

On Sat, May 29, 2021 at 5:21 PM ra shahid <rashahid...> wrote:

> Do any of you have recommendations for a snake baffle/guard for a bluebird
> house on a post?
> Thanks.
> Ann Shahid
> Ridgeville, SC
>


--
Norm Budnitz
Orange County
North Carolina

 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/21 2:21 pm
From: ra shahid <rashahid...>
Subject: Snake Baffle
Do any of you have recommendations for a snake baffle/guard for a bluebird house on a post?Thanks.Ann ShahidRidgeville, SC
 

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Date: 5/29/21 11:41 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: multiple N. Bobwhites at a Jordan Lake, NC, locale
Shelley has gotten back to me, and the hotspot is named now as:

Jordan Game Land--Seaforth Road South End


I had figured you might have had Bobwhite at this site! Perfect looking to
me.

Harry L.

On Sat, May 29, 2021 at 2:33 PM Brian Bockhahn <birdranger248...>
wrote:

> Yes they were at “seaforth game land”. Now i need to keep two lists for
> the cbc, though it deserves its own hot spot. I had a few cross the road
> once, few years before the clear cut, either the thinning or burning helped
> keep them there.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On May 29, 2021, at 2:16 PM, Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr...> wrote:
>
> 
> Thanks. It is possible that Brian's reported Bobwhite on the 2021 spring
> count COULD have come from this same area. There is no eBird hotspot where
> I heard 2+ yesterday, and I am currently working with Shelley Rutkin on the
> Hotspot name. After all, Brian knows this spot well, as he had Evening
> Grosbeaks there over the winter. I'll let folks know about an approved
> eBird Hotspot name shortly.
>
> I'm not surprised that a few Bobwhites are probably still lurking in the
> southern part of the Jordan Lake circle. A good chunk of the land is Duke
> Energy Progress "buffer" land for the Shearon Harris Nuclear Power Plant,
> and there are extensive clearcuts and other unsettled (by humans) lands
> down there. Part of the southwestern section of the circle is various
> timber company lands, always with varied age-stands of forests.
>
> Harry LeGrand
>
> On Sat, May 29, 2021 at 1:47 PM Norman Budnitz <nbudnitz...> wrote:
>
>> Having read Harry's account, I did a bit of searching through the Jordan
>> Lake Christmas and Spring bird count records. The counts began in 1977.
>> Click here
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.google.com/maps/d/edit?mid=1osLzhfhpq1ZGMEnVSopPGdZHl5I&<ll...>*2C-79.04324850000002&z=12__;JQ!!OToaGQ!7TnJ0e3Id_k9T1LjrFiWybMIQozTjmPzhvtzSIqhn42qI7y5HN9CrHjQHqZym0Pn1zI$ >
>> for a map of the circle. To see the article I have written about species in
>> decline in these counts, you can go here
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.newhopeaudubon.org/blog/jordan-lake-bird-counts-part-3-species-in-decline/__;!!OToaGQ!7TnJ0e3Id_k9T1LjrFiWybMIQozTjmPzhvtzSIqhn42qI7y5HN9CrHjQHqZyi8_cx_g$ >.
>> There are graphs of the Bobwhite in the article, and you can see the rather
>> precipitous decline. If you just want to look at the graphs, you can
>> go here
>> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.newhopeaudubon.org/get-outdoors/bird-counts/bird-count-charts/__;!!OToaGQ!7TnJ0e3Id_k9T1LjrFiWybMIQozTjmPzhvtzSIqhn42qI7y5HN9CrHjQHqZymL2Snik$ >
>> and generate graphs for Bobwhite (and other species) in the count circle.
>>
>> I also went back through some of the old yearly summaries to look for
>> patterns of Bobwhite occurrence in the count circle. In the early years of
>> the counts, Bobwhite were found throughout the circle. After the decline in
>> the 1980s and 1990s, the birds were almost never reported in the northern
>> half of the circle. The very few quail that were reported were almost
>> always in open areas and young second growth on the west side of the lake
>> (Vista Point area) or in the southern part of the circle near Harris Lake,
>> Moncure, etc. Most of these reports were in the spring, when the birds are
>> vocal. There are hardly any reports from the Christmas counts.
>>
>> There was only 1 Bobwhite reported this spring, in the Vista Point area,
>> by Brian Bockhahn. Perhaps he could pinpoint where that bird was.
>>
>> Norm
>>
>>
>> On Fri, May 28, 2021 at 3:21 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> From Norm Budnitz's summaries of the Jordan Lake Spring and Christmas
>>> bird counts, in The Chat and online here, it seems like Bobwhites are down
>>> to about "zero" in that count circle these days, as it seems to be in most
>>> of neighboring Wake, Durham, and Orange counties nowadays. I have heard a
>>> few Bobwhites here and there in the last year at one Wake site (Pulley Town
>>> Road), 1-2 Granville sites (Butner area), and 1 Durham site (Brickhouse
>>> Rd.). At each place, just one.
>>>
>>> Today I heard 2 or more "singing" (the bob-WHITE call, not the "poi"
>>> dawn/dusk contact call) at the large clearcut area at the end of the gravel
>>> road from the terminus of Seaforth Road, on the west side of Jordan Lake.
>>> This is where Brian Bockhahn had a large number of Evening Grosbeaks this
>>> past winter. The forest on the NE side of the clearcut has been opened and
>>> thinned by the NC Wildlife Resources Commission, which manages this US Army
>>> Corps of Engineers land. Some burning has taken place there and in part of
>>> the clearcut. It's a good area for breeding Chats, Prairie Warblers, Field
>>> Sparrows, Orchard Oriole, etc.
>>>
>>> I do not know if anyone had Bobwhite here on the recent Spring Count,
>>> though I do know that Bobwhites often don't give the "song" until later in
>>> May. A lot of the former early succession habitats around Jordan Lake have
>>> grown up in recent years, and this might be the best early succession stand
>>> at the moment. Note that I also briefly visited the extensive fields and
>>> brushy clearcuts on the east side of the dam, reached either from the west
>>> side and walking eastward at the base of the dam, or from the east side via
>>> a long gated paved track off Pea Ridge Road. I have yet to hear a Bobwhite
>>> here, though it looks extensive enough to have 5 pairs or more! It reminds
>>> me of a military drop zone, but is depauperate in breeders, even lacking
>>> Grasshopper Sparrows and maybe Meadowlarks.
>>>
>>> I DID make an eBird checklist for this site, naming it Seaforth Rd Game
>>> Land. I suggested it be a Hotspot.
>>>
>>> Harry LeGrand
>>> Raleigh
>>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Norm Budnitz
>> Orange County
>> North Carolina
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/21 11:34 am
From: Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: multiple N. Bobwhites at a Jordan Lake, NC, locale
Yes they were at “seaforth game land”. Now i need to keep two lists for the cbc, though it deserves its own hot spot. I had a few cross the road once, few years before the clear cut, either the thinning or burning helped keep them there.

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 29, 2021, at 2:16 PM, Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr...> wrote:
>
> 
> Thanks. It is possible that Brian's reported Bobwhite on the 2021 spring count COULD have come from this same area. There is no eBird hotspot where I heard 2+ yesterday, and I am currently working with Shelley Rutkin on the Hotspot name. After all, Brian knows this spot well, as he had Evening Grosbeaks there over the winter. I'll let folks know about an approved eBird Hotspot name shortly.
>
> I'm not surprised that a few Bobwhites are probably still lurking in the southern part of the Jordan Lake circle. A good chunk of the land is Duke Energy Progress "buffer" land for the Shearon Harris Nuclear Power Plant, and there are extensive clearcuts and other unsettled (by humans) lands down there. Part of the southwestern section of the circle is various timber company lands, always with varied age-stands of forests.
>
> Harry LeGrand
>
>> On Sat, May 29, 2021 at 1:47 PM Norman Budnitz <nbudnitz...> wrote:
>> Having read Harry's account, I did a bit of searching through the Jordan Lake Christmas and Spring bird count records. The counts began in 1977. Click here for a map of the circle. To see the article I have written about species in decline in these counts, you can go here. There are graphs of the Bobwhite in the article, and you can see the rather precipitous decline. If you just want to look at the graphs, you can go here and generate graphs for Bobwhite (and other species) in the count circle.
>>
>> I also went back through some of the old yearly summaries to look for patterns of Bobwhite occurrence in the count circle. In the early years of the counts, Bobwhite were found throughout the circle. After the decline in the 1980s and 1990s, the birds were almost never reported in the northern half of the circle. The very few quail that were reported were almost always in open areas and young second growth on the west side of the lake (Vista Point area) or in the southern part of the circle near Harris Lake, Moncure, etc. Most of these reports were in the spring, when the birds are vocal. There are hardly any reports from the Christmas counts.
>>
>> There was only 1 Bobwhite reported this spring, in the Vista Point area, by Brian Bockhahn. Perhaps he could pinpoint where that bird was.
>>
>> Norm
>>
>>
>>> On Fri, May 28, 2021 at 3:21 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>> From Norm Budnitz's summaries of the Jordan Lake Spring and Christmas bird counts, in The Chat and online here, it seems like Bobwhites are down to about "zero" in that count circle these days, as it seems to be in most of neighboring Wake, Durham, and Orange counties nowadays. I have heard a few Bobwhites here and there in the last year at one Wake site (Pulley Town Road), 1-2 Granville sites (Butner area), and 1 Durham site (Brickhouse Rd.). At each place, just one.
>>>
>>> Today I heard 2 or more "singing" (the bob-WHITE call, not the "poi" dawn/dusk contact call) at the large clearcut area at the end of the gravel road from the terminus of Seaforth Road, on the west side of Jordan Lake. This is where Brian Bockhahn had a large number of Evening Grosbeaks this past winter. The forest on the NE side of the clearcut has been opened and thinned by the NC Wildlife Resources Commission, which manages this US Army Corps of Engineers land. Some burning has taken place there and in part of the clearcut. It's a good area for breeding Chats, Prairie Warblers, Field Sparrows, Orchard Oriole, etc.
>>>
>>> I do not know if anyone had Bobwhite here on the recent Spring Count, though I do know that Bobwhites often don't give the "song" until later in May. A lot of the former early succession habitats around Jordan Lake have grown up in recent years, and this might be the best early succession stand at the moment. Note that I also briefly visited the extensive fields and brushy clearcuts on the east side of the dam, reached either from the west side and walking eastward at the base of the dam, or from the east side via a long gated paved track off Pea Ridge Road. I have yet to hear a Bobwhite here, though it looks extensive enough to have 5 pairs or more! It reminds me of a military drop zone, but is depauperate in breeders, even lacking Grasshopper Sparrows and maybe Meadowlarks.
>>>
>>> I DID make an eBird checklist for this site, naming it Seaforth Rd Game Land. I suggested it be a Hotspot.
>>>
>>> Harry LeGrand
>>> Raleigh
>>
>>
>> --
>> Norm Budnitz
>> Orange County
>> North Carolina

 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/21 11:17 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: multiple N. Bobwhites at a Jordan Lake, NC, locale
Thanks. It is possible that Brian's reported Bobwhite on the 2021 spring
count COULD have come from this same area. There is no eBird hotspot where
I heard 2+ yesterday, and I am currently working with Shelley Rutkin on the
Hotspot name. After all, Brian knows this spot well, as he had Evening
Grosbeaks there over the winter. I'll let folks know about an approved
eBird Hotspot name shortly.

I'm not surprised that a few Bobwhites are probably still lurking in the
southern part of the Jordan Lake circle. A good chunk of the land is Duke
Energy Progress "buffer" land for the Shearon Harris Nuclear Power Plant,
and there are extensive clearcuts and other unsettled (by humans) lands
down there. Part of the southwestern section of the circle is various
timber company lands, always with varied age-stands of forests.

Harry LeGrand

On Sat, May 29, 2021 at 1:47 PM Norman Budnitz <nbudnitz...> wrote:

> Having read Harry's account, I did a bit of searching through the Jordan
> Lake Christmas and Spring bird count records. The counts began in 1977.
> Click here
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.google.com/maps/d/edit?mid=1osLzhfhpq1ZGMEnVSopPGdZHl5I&<ll...>*2C-79.04324850000002&z=12__;JQ!!OToaGQ!_eH8k_n8an3nCz4zQD611ywRp8azdSvm6c4UeLHoVrnwGxT2-0_31sZikjtGt7lUi-Q$ >
> for a map of the circle. To see the article I have written about species in
> decline in these counts, you can go here
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.newhopeaudubon.org/blog/jordan-lake-bird-counts-part-3-species-in-decline/__;!!OToaGQ!_eH8k_n8an3nCz4zQD611ywRp8azdSvm6c4UeLHoVrnwGxT2-0_31sZikjtG2sNIBRE$ >.
> There are graphs of the Bobwhite in the article, and you can see the rather
> precipitous decline. If you just want to look at the graphs, you can
> go here
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.newhopeaudubon.org/get-outdoors/bird-counts/bird-count-charts/__;!!OToaGQ!_eH8k_n8an3nCz4zQD611ywRp8azdSvm6c4UeLHoVrnwGxT2-0_31sZikjtGg8xFewc$ >
> and generate graphs for Bobwhite (and other species) in the count circle.
>
> I also went back through some of the old yearly summaries to look for
> patterns of Bobwhite occurrence in the count circle. In the early years of
> the counts, Bobwhite were found throughout the circle. After the decline in
> the 1980s and 1990s, the birds were almost never reported in the northern
> half of the circle. The very few quail that were reported were almost
> always in open areas and young second growth on the west side of the lake
> (Vista Point area) or in the southern part of the circle near Harris Lake,
> Moncure, etc. Most of these reports were in the spring, when the birds are
> vocal. There are hardly any reports from the Christmas counts.
>
> There was only 1 Bobwhite reported this spring, in the Vista Point area,
> by Brian Bockhahn. Perhaps he could pinpoint where that bird was.
>
> Norm
>
>
> On Fri, May 28, 2021 at 3:21 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> From Norm Budnitz's summaries of the Jordan Lake Spring and Christmas
>> bird counts, in The Chat and online here, it seems like Bobwhites are down
>> to about "zero" in that count circle these days, as it seems to be in most
>> of neighboring Wake, Durham, and Orange counties nowadays. I have heard a
>> few Bobwhites here and there in the last year at one Wake site (Pulley Town
>> Road), 1-2 Granville sites (Butner area), and 1 Durham site (Brickhouse
>> Rd.). At each place, just one.
>>
>> Today I heard 2 or more "singing" (the bob-WHITE call, not the "poi"
>> dawn/dusk contact call) at the large clearcut area at the end of the gravel
>> road from the terminus of Seaforth Road, on the west side of Jordan Lake.
>> This is where Brian Bockhahn had a large number of Evening Grosbeaks this
>> past winter. The forest on the NE side of the clearcut has been opened and
>> thinned by the NC Wildlife Resources Commission, which manages this US Army
>> Corps of Engineers land. Some burning has taken place there and in part of
>> the clearcut. It's a good area for breeding Chats, Prairie Warblers, Field
>> Sparrows, Orchard Oriole, etc.
>>
>> I do not know if anyone had Bobwhite here on the recent Spring Count,
>> though I do know that Bobwhites often don't give the "song" until later in
>> May. A lot of the former early succession habitats around Jordan Lake have
>> grown up in recent years, and this might be the best early succession stand
>> at the moment. Note that I also briefly visited the extensive fields and
>> brushy clearcuts on the east side of the dam, reached either from the west
>> side and walking eastward at the base of the dam, or from the east side via
>> a long gated paved track off Pea Ridge Road. I have yet to hear a Bobwhite
>> here, though it looks extensive enough to have 5 pairs or more! It reminds
>> me of a military drop zone, but is depauperate in breeders, even lacking
>> Grasshopper Sparrows and maybe Meadowlarks.
>>
>> I DID make an eBird checklist for this site, naming it Seaforth Rd Game
>> Land. I suggested it be a Hotspot.
>>
>> Harry LeGrand
>> Raleigh
>>
>
>
> --
> Norm Budnitz
> Orange County
> North Carolina
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/21 10:48 am
From: Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: multiple N. Bobwhites at a Jordan Lake, NC, locale
Having read Harry's account, I did a bit of searching through the Jordan
Lake Christmas and Spring bird count records. The counts began in 1977.
Click here
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.google.com/maps/d/edit?mid=1osLzhfhpq1ZGMEnVSopPGdZHl5I&<ll...>*2C-79.04324850000002&z=12__;JQ!!OToaGQ!72IRU-mIJ4tju6MwlzHVbhXeinRANCWwFC5KMLp3H_ciDBmy0S3ZIe3udGttgM6Utzc$ >
for a map of the circle. To see the article I have written about species in
decline in these counts, you can go here
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.newhopeaudubon.org/blog/jordan-lake-bird-counts-part-3-species-in-decline/__;!!OToaGQ!72IRU-mIJ4tju6MwlzHVbhXeinRANCWwFC5KMLp3H_ciDBmy0S3ZIe3udGttSAHxBN0$ >.
There are graphs of the Bobwhite in the article, and you can see the rather
precipitous decline. If you just want to look at the graphs, you can go here
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.newhopeaudubon.org/get-outdoors/bird-counts/bird-count-charts/__;!!OToaGQ!72IRU-mIJ4tju6MwlzHVbhXeinRANCWwFC5KMLp3H_ciDBmy0S3ZIe3udGttz7VSdww$ >
and generate graphs for Bobwhite (and other species) in the count circle.

I also went back through some of the old yearly summaries to look for
patterns of Bobwhite occurrence in the count circle. In the early years of
the counts, Bobwhite were found throughout the circle. After the decline in
the 1980s and 1990s, the birds were almost never reported in the northern
half of the circle. The very few quail that were reported were almost
always in open areas and young second growth on the west side of the lake
(Vista Point area) or in the southern part of the circle near Harris Lake,
Moncure, etc. Most of these reports were in the spring, when the birds are
vocal. There are hardly any reports from the Christmas counts.

There was only 1 Bobwhite reported this spring, in the Vista Point area, by
Brian Bockhahn. Perhaps he could pinpoint where that bird was.

Norm


On Fri, May 28, 2021 at 3:21 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> From Norm Budnitz's summaries of the Jordan Lake Spring and Christmas bird
> counts, in The Chat and online here, it seems like Bobwhites are down to
> about "zero" in that count circle these days, as it seems to be in most of
> neighboring Wake, Durham, and Orange counties nowadays. I have heard a few
> Bobwhites here and there in the last year at one Wake site (Pulley Town
> Road), 1-2 Granville sites (Butner area), and 1 Durham site (Brickhouse
> Rd.). At each place, just one.
>
> Today I heard 2 or more "singing" (the bob-WHITE call, not the "poi"
> dawn/dusk contact call) at the large clearcut area at the end of the gravel
> road from the terminus of Seaforth Road, on the west side of Jordan Lake.
> This is where Brian Bockhahn had a large number of Evening Grosbeaks this
> past winter. The forest on the NE side of the clearcut has been opened and
> thinned by the NC Wildlife Resources Commission, which manages this US Army
> Corps of Engineers land. Some burning has taken place there and in part of
> the clearcut. It's a good area for breeding Chats, Prairie Warblers, Field
> Sparrows, Orchard Oriole, etc.
>
> I do not know if anyone had Bobwhite here on the recent Spring Count,
> though I do know that Bobwhites often don't give the "song" until later in
> May. A lot of the former early succession habitats around Jordan Lake have
> grown up in recent years, and this might be the best early succession stand
> at the moment. Note that I also briefly visited the extensive fields and
> brushy clearcuts on the east side of the dam, reached either from the west
> side and walking eastward at the base of the dam, or from the east side via
> a long gated paved track off Pea Ridge Road. I have yet to hear a Bobwhite
> here, though it looks extensive enough to have 5 pairs or more! It reminds
> me of a military drop zone, but is depauperate in breeders, even lacking
> Grasshopper Sparrows and maybe Meadowlarks.
>
> I DID make an eBird checklist for this site, naming it Seaforth Rd Game
> Land. I suggested it be a Hotspot.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>


--
Norm Budnitz
Orange County
North Carolina

 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/21 4:04 am
From: scbirder (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Fork-tailed Flycatcher in Townville
People are seeing the Fork-tailed Flycatcher at Dobbins Farm again this morning,  as early as 6:30.  Steve PattersonAnderson,  SCSent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: scbirder <scbirder...> Date: 5/28/21 2:56 PM (GMT-05:00) To: Carolinabirds Listserv <carolinabirds...> Subject: RE: Fork-tailed Flycatcher in Townville The Fork-tailed Flycatcher was still present as of 2:46.Steve Patterson Anderson, SCSent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone-------- Original message --------From: scbirder <scbirder...> Date: 5/28/21 8:35 AM (GMT-05:00) To: Carolinabirds Listserv <carolinabirds...> Subject: Fork-tailed Flycatcher in Townville Found by George McHenry.  I confirmed.  Still here.  Fence along McAdams Road by lower pond.Steve Patterson ANDERSON, SCSent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/21 6:56 pm
From: hdpratt (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Another late Pine Siskin
Hi all:

I also had a Pine Siskin at my feeders in Cary NC this week (eBird checklist S89002097). THE REPORT INCLUDES A PHOTO. THE BIRD WAS ALL PUFFED UP LIKE SOME OF THE SICK ONES THAT HAVE BEEN REPORTED, BUT FLEW AWAY STRONGLY. IT FED ON THE DECK BELOW THE FEEDERS RATHER THAN ON THE SUNFLOWER CHIP FEEDER FAVORED BY THE WINTER FLOCKS.

DOUG PRATT
CARY, NC







 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/21 2:36 pm
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: Loggerhead Shrikes nesting in Morehead City, NC
Earlier in the week I reported a nesting by Loggerhead Shrikes in Morehead
City, on the grounds of the community college. Nesting in this county
(Carteret) is now very rare. The last nesting in the county that I know of
was about 10 years ago.

I offered the opinion that the nesting probably failed because of cool,
windy, rainy weather (on 12 May).

I am delighted to say that I was wrong. This morning I watched an adult
feeding two young. The young looked healthy and were flying around from
live oak to live oak.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/21 2:12 pm
From: Steve Patterson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Fork-tailed Flycatcher in Townville
The Fork-tailed Flycatcher at Dobbins Farm is still present at least as of 4:53.  Best wishes to all who may try for it tomorrow.  Many were successful today, and I don't know of any who missed it.  
Again, big thanks to George McHenry for making such a great find this morning.


Steve PattersonAnderson, SC


-----Original Message-----
From: scbirder <scbirder...>
To: Carolinabirds Listserv <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Fri, May 28, 2021 2:56 pm
Subject: RE: Fork-tailed Flycatcher in Townville

The Fork-tailed Flycatcher was still present as of 2:46.


Steve Patterson Anderson, SC


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: scbirder <scbirder...> Date: 5/28/21 8:35 AM (GMT-05:00) To: Carolinabirds Listserv <carolinabirds...> Subject: Fork-tailed Flycatcher in Townville

Found by George McHenry.  I confirmed.  Still here.  Fence along McAdams Road by lower pond.


Steve Patterson ANDERSON, SC

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/21 12:21 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: multiple N. Bobwhites at a Jordan Lake, NC, locale
From Norm Budnitz's summaries of the Jordan Lake Spring and Christmas bird
counts, in The Chat and online here, it seems like Bobwhites are down to
about "zero" in that count circle these days, as it seems to be in most of
neighboring Wake, Durham, and Orange counties nowadays. I have heard a few
Bobwhites here and there in the last year at one Wake site (Pulley Town
Road), 1-2 Granville sites (Butner area), and 1 Durham site (Brickhouse
Rd.). At each place, just one.

Today I heard 2 or more "singing" (the bob-WHITE call, not the "poi"
dawn/dusk contact call) at the large clearcut area at the end of the gravel
road from the terminus of Seaforth Road, on the west side of Jordan Lake.
This is where Brian Bockhahn had a large number of Evening Grosbeaks this
past winter. The forest on the NE side of the clearcut has been opened and
thinned by the NC Wildlife Resources Commission, which manages this US Army
Corps of Engineers land. Some burning has taken place there and in part of
the clearcut. It's a good area for breeding Chats, Prairie Warblers, Field
Sparrows, Orchard Oriole, etc.

I do not know if anyone had Bobwhite here on the recent Spring Count,
though I do know that Bobwhites often don't give the "song" until later in
May. A lot of the former early succession habitats around Jordan Lake have
grown up in recent years, and this might be the best early succession stand
at the moment. Note that I also briefly visited the extensive fields and
brushy clearcuts on the east side of the dam, reached either from the west
side and walking eastward at the base of the dam, or from the east side via
a long gated paved track off Pea Ridge Road. I have yet to hear a Bobwhite
here, though it looks extensive enough to have 5 pairs or more! It reminds
me of a military drop zone, but is depauperate in breeders, even lacking
Grasshopper Sparrows and maybe Meadowlarks.

I DID make an eBird checklist for this site, naming it Seaforth Rd Game
Land. I suggested it be a Hotspot.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/21 11:56 am
From: scbirder (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Fork-tailed Flycatcher in Townville
The Fork-tailed Flycatcher was still present as of 2:46.Steve Patterson Anderson, SCSent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: scbirder <scbirder...> Date: 5/28/21 8:35 AM (GMT-05:00) To: Carolinabirds Listserv <carolinabirds...> Subject: Fork-tailed Flycatcher in Townville Found by George McHenry.  I confirmed.  Still here.  Fence along McAdams Road by lower pond.Steve Patterson ANDERSON, SCSent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/21 9:34 am
From: Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: SC Fork-tailed Flycatcher Continues
The Fork-tailed Flycatcher in Townville, SC continues to put on a show this
afternoon. It's still along the fence near the lower pond.--
Dwayne
*************
Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
<redxbill...>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/21 9:32 am
From: William Niemczyk (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Northern Bobwhite
I heard Northern Bobwhite at Bolan Hall Landing, Jasper County, SC. Is it
wild or domestic?
Thanks
Bill Niemczyk

--
*We all go a little mad sometimes.*
*Norman Bates*

 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/21 5:36 am
From: scbirder (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fork-tailed Flycatcher in Townville
Found by George McHenry.  I confirmed.  Still here.  Fence along McAdams Road by lower pond.Steve Patterson ANDERSON, SCSent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/27/21 7:09 pm
From: Anita Huffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Piedmont Pine Siskin
I had a pine siskin May 19 at the feeder. It looked very healthy.

Anita Huffman
Rugby, Va
Grayson County

On 5/27/21 6:18 PM, ronclark2277 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> I just had a siskin show up at one of our bird baths. Easily the latest
> for here, by three weeks. 40 minutes west of Charlotte. I wonder if it
> isnt an after effect of the recent disease. It flew well, but maybe
> cant migrate. Any thoughts?
>
> Ron Clark
>
> Kings Mtn. NC
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/27/21 4:01 pm
From: Kevin Metcalf (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Pine Siskin - Mecklenburg County
There was one Pine Siskin today in the bird feeding area by Reedy Creek
Nature Center, Charlotte. Maybe not entirely unexpected given the
numbers we had this winter, but still a pretty late occurrence for
this area.
Kevin MetcalfHuntersville, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 5/27/21 3:19 pm
From: ronclark2277 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Piedmont Pine Siskin
I just had a siskin show up at one of our bird baths. Easily the latest for
here, by three weeks. 40 minutes west of Charlotte. I wonder if it isn't an
after effect of the recent disease. It flew well, but maybe can't migrate.
Any thoughts?



Ron Clark

Kings Mtn. NC


 

Back to top
Date: 5/27/21 7:18 am
From: whoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: No Kites. Winnabow
Hi-I stopped by the Winnabow farm fields 10 AM this morning.  No Laughing Gulls, no Kites, so I suspect the Japanese Beetles are done swarming there.Wayne Hoffman Wilmington Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 

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Date: 5/27/21 7:02 am
From: Paul Serridge (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Purple Gallinule reported at Lake Conestee Nature Preserve, Greenville County, SC
This eBird report has not yet been confirmed.
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S89017892__;!!OToaGQ!9izlj4UN6FswOQB6W7dCL3YImVg6XJ6zo84OR_7pXZjENzJr3GMV-NNSky9N-ZoIbjQ$

If anyone relocates this bird please let me know.

Good birding,

Paul Serridge
Greenville, SC

 

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Date: 5/25/21 5:50 am
From: Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Recommendation for hot pepper in homemade suet
I have had much success with my homemade suet mix but would like to discourage squirrels. Can someone recommend a good hot pepper to add to the suet and how much?

Thank you.
Anne Olsen
Cornelius, NC


Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 5/24/21 4:28 pm
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: Loggerhead Shrikes nest in Morehead City, NC
Recently, a pair of shrikes nested in Morehead City, on the grounds of the
community college (in a small live oak, one of several on a large lawn
area).

As far as I know, this was the first nesting by shrikes in the county in
about 10 years.

On 8 May, the nest had at least 2 young (as reported by Carol Price).

However, it seems that the nesting failed. If so, I assume that this was
related to the weather on 12 May--it was chilly and windy that day, and
there was a steady rain most of the day.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

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Date: 5/24/21 12:37 pm
From: Erik Thomas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Raven Rock St. Pk. Spring Bird Count results
The 2021 Raven Rock St. Pk. Spring Bird Count occurred on May 1, 2021.
(The name of the count is something of a misnomer, since it covers most of
Harnett County.) We enjoyed excellent weather conditions.

16 participants in 11 parties took part in the count. We found 118
species, our highest since 2015, and 3516 individuals, our lowest since
2008.

Notable finds included a Worm-eating Warbler by Mitch, Kevin, and Henry
Reese and Swainson's and Magnolia Warblers and two Swainson's Thrushes by
David Williams. We also found all of the regularly occurring
nocturnal birds except Eastern Screech-owl. The Cliff Swallow colony at
the bridge in Lillington continues to grow; we tallied 68 Cliff Swallows
there.

Our Christmas Bird Count is tentatively scheduled for Sat., Dec. 18, 2021.

Erik Thomas
Compiler

--
Erik R. Thomas
Linguistics Program
North Carolina State University

 

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Date: 5/23/21 10:28 am
From: Judi Durr (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Meadowlarks
Several E. Meadowlarks in the fields around Bethany Community Middle School N. of Greensboro, NC yesterday. Saw and heard at least 3 during Grandsons LL game. Lovely sound😊

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/22/21 12:55 pm
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Wedge-tailed Shearwater today on NC pelagic trip!
Most discussion I’ve seen says first for the Atlantic Ocean period.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

> On May 22, 2021, at 3:46 PM, Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.
>
> Just now looking at Facebook ABA Rare Bird Alert. Apparently a first Atlantic record for the ABA area!!
>
> Excellent photos posted there.
>
> I got to see hundreds of Wedgies in the western Pacific last year, the most common tubenose in the tropical Pacific, and a cool and very slender species. The one today is a light-phase bird.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
> Sent from my iPhone

 

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Date: 5/22/21 12:47 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Wedge-tailed Shearwater today on NC pelagic trip!
Just now looking at Facebook ABA Rare Bird Alert. Apparently a first Atlantic record for the ABA area!!

Excellent photos posted there.

I got to see hundreds of Wedgies in the western Pacific last year, the most common tubenose in the tropical Pacific, and a cool and very slender species. The one today is a light-phase bird.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/22/21 9:17 am
From: Hurlbert, Allen Hartley <Hurlbert...>
Subject: RE: Still Here
I’ve had a Swainson’s Thrush singing from the same spot every day in Carrboro since May 10—can’t ever remember one sticking around for so long!

Allen Hurlbert
Carrboro NC

From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> On Behalf Of My AOL
Sent: Friday, May 21, 2021 6:55 PM
To: Brian Pendergraft <bkpendergraft...>
Cc: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Still Here

Brian,

And I still have 1 Swainson’s plus 1 Veery dining together in my serviceberry tree.
Len Kopka
Upstate SC


On May 21, 2021, at 5:18 PM, Brian Pendergraft <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
Ok this is now noteworthy for my property. Swainsons Thrush singing and eating berries.

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/22/21 9:14 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Documentation of Yellow-green Vireo request for the Carolina Bird Club website
A number of people were able to see Daniel Irons' fantastic find of
Yellow-green Vireo at Nags Head Woods Preserve on May 14-15. However, it
would be very helpful for some of you who have photos of the bird to upload
a photo or two of it to the CBC Photo Gallery, as the NC Bird Records
Committee would like to see a minimum of one photo (if not more) of each
new species to NC on the website. Photos there are much easier for folks
to get to and view for themselves than on eBird or Facebook.

I addition, no one has yet filled out a CBC Rare Bird Report form, which is
available here, and is automatically submitted to the Committee Chairs at
the stroke of a finger:

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/brc/rare_bird/__;!!OToaGQ!7BPYM1krB86AhP74iRt9zM_80ojuOdMv7jVDh1YoF5ypOc_on8jyKuI2mPuDuNzI-to$

The Records Committees (NC and SC) would like at least one such completed
form for each first (second, and third) state record, as such a form
provides important information, such as a description of field marks --
especially ones not visible from the photos, behavior, viewing conditions,
confusing species eliminated, etc. Yes, Daniel provided a little bit of
description on his initial eBird report, but Committees would like more
thorough details.

Thanks to any or all who provide a photo to the CBC Gallery or fill out a
Rare Bird Report form.

Harry LeGrand
NC Bird Records Committee, non-voting member

 

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Date: 5/21/21 3:55 pm
From: My AOL (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Still Here
Brian,

And I still have 1 Swainson’s plus 1 Veery dining together in my serviceberry tree.

Len Kopka
Upstate SC

> On May 21, 2021, at 5:18 PM, Brian Pendergraft <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Ok this is now noteworthy for my property. Swainsons Thrush singing and eating berries.
>
> Brian Pendergraft
> Falls Lake NC
>
> Sent from my iPhone

 

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Date: 5/21/21 3:49 pm
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mottled Ducks- Ft Fisher
Appears that at least two pairs of Mottled Ducks were photographed today, Basin Trail- Ft Fisher.

Not my sighting.

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://forums.whatbird.com/index.php?*topic*19190-nc-ducks*__;Ly8v!!OToaGQ!82QF5G7J9vai4b8Or_PTg_sD348D471V5Em-du__wabuK833Qw_AGgTXAlQ2P5Vckzo$

Ryan

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/21/21 2:18 pm
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Still Here
Ok this is now noteworthy for my property. Swainsons Thrush singing and eating berries.

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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