Carolinabirds
Received From Subject
11/28/20 10:07 am Derb Carter <derbc...> Pacific Loons, Figure 8 Island
11/28/20 7:36 am scbirder (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Eared Grebe, Anderson County, SC
11/28/20 4:32 am David Gibson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Winter Finches
11/27/20 5:43 pm mtove (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Winter Finches
11/27/20 4:04 pm Wayne Hoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Ashley Pond waterfowl - Mottled Duck present
11/27/20 2:18 pm Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> late Grasshopper Sparrow, Rockingham County, NC
11/27/20 11:14 am Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Heads up if you use eBird alerts
11/27/20 7:54 am David Hart <david.hart...> Snow Goose, Ashley High School
11/27/20 3:38 am William Majoros <bmajoros...> Thanksgiving birds
11/26/20 7:46 pm Richard Ricardo Waldrop (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lost & Found Near Townville
11/26/20 11:44 am <sshultz...> Impressive Rusty Blackbird flock
11/25/20 5:58 pm Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> eBird Trip Summary -- Nov 25, 2020
11/25/20 9:26 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Mid-Pines Road, Wake NC
11/25/20 6:17 am John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Siskins & other winter finches
11/25/20 5:55 am Michael Clark <mdc...> Re: Siskins & other winter finches
11/25/20 5:51 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: Siskins & other winter finches
11/25/20 5:12 am mtove (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Siskins & other winter finches
11/24/20 3:56 pm Bill Hilton Jr. <hilton...> Hilton Pond 11/01/20 (Siskins: Here Today, Gone Tomorrow) 🐦
11/24/20 11:54 am Margaret McGuinn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Thank you!
11/24/20 10:17 am David Gibson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Advice?
11/24/20 10:15 am David Gibson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Advice?
11/24/20 9:13 am KEN LIPSHY (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: Advice?
11/24/20 8:59 am Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Cold weather birding gloves
11/24/20 8:57 am Joe Donahue <joe_donahue...> Re: Advice?
11/24/20 8:56 am Scott Schulz <swschulz...> Re: Advice?
11/24/20 8:44 am Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Advice?
11/24/20 8:27 am Margaret McGuinn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Advice?
11/24/20 7:40 am Ken Bennett (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Purple sandpiper, Huntington Beach SP jetty
11/24/20 5:52 am Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Evening grosbeak, Williamson Preserve
11/23/20 11:57 am nicholas Flanders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Vesper Sparrows and Evening Grosbeak, Pequimans & Pasquotank Co.'s, NC, 11/21/20
11/23/20 10:55 am Wiley, R Haven <rhwiley...> Re: More on Ned Brinkley's passing
11/23/20 10:12 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> More on Ned Brinkley's passing
11/23/20 5:14 am Robert Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Very sad news about Ned Brinkley
11/23/20 3:49 am William Majoros <bmajoros...> B&W warbler in Durham
11/22/20 3:26 pm william haddad (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Some Good Birds at the Cabin the last two Days
11/22/20 1:53 pm Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Good yard birding in suburban Charleston
11/22/20 10:27 am Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: FRANKLIN'S GULL, Lake Crabtree dam area, Wake, NC
11/22/20 10:07 am Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: FRANKLIN'S GULL, Lake Crabtree dam area, Wake, NC
11/22/20 9:59 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: FRANKLIN'S GULL, Lake Crabtree dam area, Wake, NC
11/22/20 7:30 am Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: FRANKLIN'S GULL, Lake Crabtree dam area, Wake, NC
11/22/20 5:59 am Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> FRANKLIN'S GULL, Lake Crabtree dam area, Wake, NC
11/20/20 11:31 am ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Hilton Pond10/01/20 (October Birds And Nature Stuff)
11/20/20 11:13 am Bill Hilton Jr. <hilton...> Hilton Pond10/01/20 (October Birds And Nature Stuff)
11/20/20 10:59 am Craig Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> White-winged Dove, Mount Pleasant, SC
11/20/20 9:53 am Fischer David (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Lincoln's sparrow, Williamson Preserve, Wake Co
11/20/20 6:05 am David Wilson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Eider ducks
11/19/20 8:01 am Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lincoln's sparrow, Williamson Preserve, Wake Co
11/18/20 4:41 pm Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> eBird Back
11/18/20 3:07 pm Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Big Lake waterfowl: the marsh overlook is CLOSED a week or more: Umstead State Park SP, Wake NC
11/18/20 8:38 am jim.capel (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Chapel Hill Bird Club - November 23, 2020 – David and Judy Smith – Birding the Edges of Costa Rica
11/17/20 4:10 pm Margaret McGuinn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Myrtle Beach
11/17/20 10:37 am Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Some state park etc CBCs
11/17/20 9:58 am Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Apparent Shiny Cowbird in Charleston
11/17/20 9:51 am Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Durham evening grosbeak
11/17/20 4:26 am Bill Hilton Jr. <hilton...> Hilton Pond 09/16/20 (Migrant Birds, And A Butterfly)
11/16/20 4:53 pm Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> eBird outage
11/16/20 7:40 am Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Western Meadowlark continues 11/16/20 - Dobbins Farm, Townville, SC
11/16/20 7:17 am <sshultz...> OBX Birding 11/14-15
11/16/20 4:58 am Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Black-legged Kittiwake ID
11/16/20 3:52 am piephofft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Southern Lake Norman Christmas Bird Count
11/15/20 10:17 am martha <cutford...> evening grosbeaks Todd
11/15/20 10:06 am Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lake Benson waterfowl and other birds
11/15/20 8:33 am Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Evening Grosbeak flyover, Rockingham County, NC
11/15/20 7:30 am Jay Wherley (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Western Meadowlark Dobbins Farm Anderson County SC
11/15/20 7:04 am Monroe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Western Meadowlark Dobbins Farm Anderson County SC
11/15/20 4:25 am David Gibson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Orange-crowned warbler in Durham
11/15/20 3:58 am William Majoros <bmajoros...> Orange-crowned warbler in Durham
11/14/20 6:16 pm Susan Campbell <susan...> RE: Selasphorus hummingbird in Asheville, NC?
11/14/20 4:32 pm Anita Huffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Project Feederwatch
11/14/20 3:51 pm Ken Bennett (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Project Feederwatch
11/14/20 12:01 pm Judi Sawyer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Evening Grosbeak in Watauga County, NC
11/14/20 11:53 am \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Evening Grosbeak in Watauga County, NC
11/14/20 9:27 am David Wilson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> White pelican
11/14/20 7:30 am Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> 3 Selasphorus Hummingbirds at Riverbend Park
11/14/20 7:24 am H. Clarke <dclarke...> Selasphorus hummingbird in Asheville, NC?
11/14/20 6:54 am Derb Carter <derbc...> Evening Grosbeaks - Chapel Hill
11/14/20 6:28 am scompton1251 <scompton1251...> Western Meadowlark refound Sat.
11/14/20 6:16 am Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Lapland Longspur at Huntington Beach SP
11/14/20 5:33 am Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lapland Longspur at Huntington Beach SP
11/13/20 5:34 pm Steve Patterson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Black-legged Kittiwake - Murrells Inlet Jetty, Huntington Beach SP - 11/10/2020
11/13/20 5:30 pm Steve Patterson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Western Meadowlark continues in Townville
11/13/20 11:20 am \Mark McShane\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Black-legged Kittiwake - Murrells Inlet Jetty, Huntington Beach SP - 11/10/2020
11/13/20 10:24 am Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...> Coincidence?
11/13/20 5:15 am \<k.grinnell...>\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: [gcbirdclub] [eBird Regional Editors] eBird Outage Nov 17-19 - help spread the word
11/13/20 4:12 am John Fussell <jofuss...> Long-billed Curlew at east Shackleford Banks
11/12/20 4:17 pm Steve Patterson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Western Meadowlark, Anderson County, 11-12-20
11/12/20 4:02 pm Oscar Carmona (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: meadowlark species, Townville, SC
11/12/20 3:40 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: meadowlark species, Townville, SC
11/12/20 2:23 pm Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: [gcbirdclub] [eBird Regional Editors] eBird Outage Nov 17-19 - help spread the word
11/12/20 2:07 pm Anita Huffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: meadowlark species, Townville, SC
11/12/20 1:48 pm Oscar Carmona (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: meadowlark species, Townville, SC
11/12/20 1:38 pm <dave...> <dave...> Re: [gcbirdclub] [eBird Regional Editors] eBird Outage Nov 17-19 - help spread the word
11/12/20 1:33 pm Paul Serridge (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fwd: [eBird Regional Editors] eBird Outage Nov 17-19 - help spread the word
11/12/20 1:04 pm Paul Glass <pag...> RE: Peripheral Rarity - GRAY HERON, Northampton Co, VA
11/12/20 12:37 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: meadowlark species, Townville, SC
11/12/20 10:16 am \Russell R.\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Charleston area birding
11/12/20 10:11 am Aaron Steed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Frigatebird, Masonboro Inlet
11/12/20 9:29 am Steve Patterson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> meadowlark species, Townville, SC
11/12/20 5:38 am Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Peripheral Rarity - GRAY HERON, Northampton Co, VA
11/11/20 11:03 am Corey, Ed <ed.corey...> Peripheral Rarity - GRAY HERON, Northampton Co, VA
11/11/20 10:47 am David Gibson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: wants to buy a used scope
11/11/20 10:17 am John Fussell <jofuss...> wants to buy a used scope
11/11/20 5:20 am ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Eastern Phoebe
11/9/20 3:52 pm Wayne Hoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Black-headed Gull at Carolina Beach Lake
11/9/20 10:02 am whoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RBA. Black-headed Gull at Carolina Beach Lake
11/9/20 8:03 am Steven Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Krider’s Red-tailed Hawk
11/8/20 9:15 am Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Red Crossbill Recording Request
11/8/20 5:03 am Jessie Dale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> pine siskins
11/7/20 9:17 am Derb Carter <derbc...> Durant
11/7/20 8:45 am Thea and Mark Sinclair (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Evening Grosbeaks - Mecklenburg County, NC
11/7/20 7:22 am Kevin Metcalf (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Evening Grosbeaks - Mecklenburg County, NC
11/7/20 7:15 am Thomas McNeil (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> LeConte’s Sparrow (Watauga Co., NC)
11/7/20 6:53 am Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> eBird Trip Summary November 6, 2020
11/7/20 4:45 am Karen LORENZO (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Sandhill cranes
11/6/20 1:49 pm Corey, Ed <ed.corey...> Getting the word out - Martin sp. reported from Durant Nature Park, Wake Co.
11/6/20 6:58 am Ken <wavedogsc20...> American White Pelicans Murrells Inlet Oyster Recycle
11/6/20 4:56 am \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> My first ever November Hooded Warbler in Watauga County, NC
11/5/20 4:03 pm Ken Bennett (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Purple Finch
11/5/20 3:55 pm sheryl mcnair (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Purple Finch
11/5/20 3:48 pm Craig Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Snow Bunting, Ft. Sumter National Monument, Charleston Co., SC
11/5/20 3:48 pm Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Purple Finch
11/5/20 11:15 am Doug Hughes (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> White-winged Scoters
11/5/20 10:41 am Ricky Davis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Roanoke-Rapids Lake - Vultare Access
11/5/20 9:02 am Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Roseate Spoonbill on James Is, SC 5 Nov 2020
11/5/20 8:50 am ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Ruby-Throated Hummer behavior
11/5/20 7:40 am whoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Black Rail Fort Fisher
11/5/20 4:02 am Matt Curran <mcurran1...> RE: Winter Birds arriving
11/4/20 1:25 pm Matt Curran <mcurran1...> Winter Birds arriving
11/4/20 5:00 am KEN LIPSHY (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fwd: Graylag vs Gtr White Fronted vs Hybrid GOOSE?
11/3/20 4:44 am Susan Campbell <susan...> Late albino Ruby-throated in Charlotte NC
11/2/20 1:05 pm \gilbert grant\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> 61 American White Pelicans over Sneads Ferry,NC
11/2/20 11:58 am Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...> FOS Baltimore Oriole & Chipping Sparrow
11/2/20 7:05 am Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Eastwood, James Is, SC 2 Nov 2020
11/2/20 4:54 am ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Ruby-Throated Hummer behavior
11/1/20 2:27 pm Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: New eBird Hotspot
11/1/20 2:21 pm Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: New eBird Hotspot
11/1/20 11:53 am Shelley Rutkin <shelleyr...> New eBird Hotspot
11/1/20 10:07 am <badgerboy...> Re: Crow flock sizes
11/1/20 9:06 am Elizabeth Link (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Crow flock sizes
11/1/20 8:31 am Clyde Sorenson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Large number of siskins and one purple finch in Johnston Co...
11/1/20 6:11 am Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Purple Finches
11/1/20 5:56 am Corey, Ed <ed.corey...> Secondhand -- Evening Grosbeaks, Gates Co
11/1/20 4:39 am Karen LORENZO (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Swans
10/31/20 4:28 pm Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> eBird Trip Summary 10-31-2020
10/31/20 12:57 pm Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lot's O' Finches-- Catawba Co.
10/31/20 10:28 am Bogey <bogey...> Re: Swans
10/31/20 9:30 am Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fwd: Lake Crabtree ducks
10/31/20 8:56 am Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: Lake Crabtree ducks
10/31/20 7:56 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lake Crabtree ducks
10/31/20 5:28 am Karen LORENZO (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Swans
10/30/20 12:29 pm Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Crow Flock Sizes
10/30/20 11:41 am Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Lake Crabtree, NC, birds
10/30/20 11:31 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lake Crabtree, NC, birds
10/30/20 11:16 am Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Crow Flock Sizes
10/30/20 10:30 am Thomas Austin <TBAUSTI...> Re: Crow Flock Sizes
10/30/20 9:54 am Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Ebird trackers
10/30/20 9:35 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: Rough-legged hawk posting
10/30/20 8:56 am Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Rough-legged hawk posting
10/30/20 7:49 am Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Rough legged hawk at Alligator River NWR yesterday
10/30/20 5:04 am Matt Curran <mcurran1...> RE: Crow flock sizes
10/29/20 7:55 pm Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Crow flock sizes
10/29/20 5:10 pm Troi Perkins <troi.perkins...> RE: Crow flock sizes
10/29/20 5:09 pm Troi Perkins <troi.perkins...> RE: Crow flock sizes
10/29/20 2:12 pm Oscar Carmona (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Urgent Appeal for Action, Salineno Preserve
10/29/20 1:46 pm sheryl mcnair (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Urgent Appeal for Action, Salineno Preserve
10/29/20 9:36 am Robin T (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: pine siskins
10/29/20 9:24 am Cecelia Mathis <weer...> pine siskins
10/29/20 9:21 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Crow flock sizes
10/29/20 9:07 am David Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Crow flock sizes
10/29/20 8:50 am Gretchen Schramm (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Crow flock sizes
10/29/20 8:48 am Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Crow flock sizes
10/29/20 8:35 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: Crow flock sizes
10/29/20 7:29 am Michael Clark <mdc...> Crow flock sizes
10/29/20 7:20 am Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Finch pecking order
10/29/20 7:07 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Finch pecking order
10/29/20 4:53 am Judy Halleron (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> more pine siskins
 
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Date: 11/28/20 10:07 am
From: Derb Carter <derbc...>
Subject: Pacific Loons, Figure 8 Island
Four Pacific Loons were feeding with a group of 5-600 Common Loons and a handful of Red-throated just off the beach at Figure 8 Island NC this morning. A flat ocean and overcast made scoping easy. The loon flock builds up during November into December feeding on (I think) striped anchovy which form large schools along the beach. Hundreds of Laughing Gulls and Black Skimmers still around. Three Black-and-white Warblers in the thickets early this morning.

Derb Carter

 

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Date: 11/28/20 7:36 am
From: scbirder (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Eared Grebe, Anderson County, SC
Hi, birders.This morning I located the subject bird at the Lake Hartwell Dam.  It was far out in the lake but drifted fairly close before turning westward and joining Buffleheads on the Georgia side of the lake.There was good duck, gull, and loon activity on the GA side. Including 8 duck species.Steve PattersonAnderson, SCSent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 

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Date: 11/28/20 4:32 am
From: David Gibson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Winter Finches
Mike, Very cool report. And we're all hoping for Evening Grosbeaks, aren't
we, after seeing Red-breasted Nuthatches, Pine Siskins, and now Purple
Finches at our feeders.
Dave Gibson
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://birdpartner.com/__;!!OToaGQ!7WKRUqMEw743mJDZSfkTFcLgJX-1VZOtjHa8BkeemNfA3R6jL3SyLqnNSQxqKyAAdwI$



On Fri, Nov 27, 2020 at 8:42 PM mtove <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Funny how things work. Just a couple days after reporting that my feeders
> had NO winter finches at all, today I had several Pine Siskins and two
> Purple Finches. (I almost never get Purple Finches – even when I have
> hordes of Siskins). So now I’m actually hoping for an Evening Grosbeak.
>
>
>
> Mike Tove
>
> Cary, NC
>

 

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Date: 11/27/20 5:43 pm
From: mtove (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Winter Finches
Funny how things work. Just a couple days after reporting that my feeders
had NO winter finches at all, today I had several Pine Siskins and two
Purple Finches. (I almost never get Purple Finches - even when I have hordes
of Siskins). So now I'm actually hoping for an Evening Grosbeak.



Mike Tove

Cary, NC


 

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Date: 11/27/20 4:04 pm
From: Wayne Hoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Ashley Pond waterfowl - Mottled Duck present
Hi -

I visited the Ashley School/Park complex this afternoon.

The Snow Goose was still present, feeding with Canada Geese on the athletic fields.

The pond had the following ducks:

Mallard: 20+
Gadwall about 10
American Wigeon 6
Black Duck 1
Mottled Duck 1

At one point the Mottled and Black ducks were swimming side by side.

Wayne Hoffman
Wilmington


 

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Date: 11/27/20 2:18 pm
From: Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: late Grasshopper Sparrow, Rockingham County, NC
Hi Carolina Birders,

I saw a Grasshopper Sparrow at the Chinqua-Penn Walking Trail in Rockingham
County, NC this morning. It is later by a month than I have had here
before. I keep thinking that I should see one in early November, but never
do. I'll have to go back in a few days to see if it is still present in
December!

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S76757035__;!!OToaGQ!6CKLXrtK_9-3zeJwaaFrWeW2hLzv8BhXBQykiTrPNv0zY9aNUX8ZjyeKx3U-b7Co7UU$

Marty Wall
Eden, NC

 

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Date: 11/27/20 11:14 am
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Heads up if you use eBird alerts
Since eBird's database update about 10 days ago, I've seen a lot of complaints about eBird alerts not working. Since I've been getting alerts I haven't looked closely at mine until today, and it's disturbing. I have ten alerts and only seven of them have definitely been working. I have two alerts that have definitely failed to notify me. The last one I think wouldn't have had any recent alerts anyway.

So you might want to check your alerts at https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/alerts__;!!OToaGQ!8zZ0AKAezNwlTl8hR2M4VFDGA5s_ztp61j3UTiyYRPMFI1nITe2JFaN7uKhYGYBd2j4$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/alerts__;!!OToaGQ!8zZ0AKAezNwlTl8hR2M4VFDGA5s_ztp61j3UTiyYRPMFI1nITe2JFaN7uKhYGYBd2j4$ >. There have been reports that unsubscribing and resubscribing helps so you might try that.

If you have never used alerts, I recommend trying one or more.

--
Kent Fiala

 

Back to top
Date: 11/27/20 7:54 am
From: David Hart <david.hart...>
Subject: Snow Goose, Ashley High School
Struck out on the Mottled Duck at Ashley High School pond in Wilmington, NC, but a nice jogger alerted me to a white goose feeding with Canadas in one of the nearby soccer field. It turned out to be a beautiful white morph Snow Goose.

eBird doesn’t flag it as rare, but a nice bird.

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S76748158__;!!OToaGQ!_MutLp_cJ2H1FM5tUNiH_FIXyjE6cPuxB-VLSW9RCbZE23gb_ptFXJ1iSMXqgGr5suE$

Dave Hart
Chapel Hill

 

Back to top
Date: 11/27/20 3:38 am
From: William Majoros <bmajoros...>
Subject: Thanksgiving birds
My normally quiet front yard was filled with birds yesterday afternoon, including a northern parula, a white-eyed vireo, a pine warbler, and a flock of yellow-rumped warblers, as well as many siskins and a few purple finches.

On Wednesday I was happy to spot a black-and-white warbler at 17 Acre Woods, and two wild turkeys at Butner Gamelands, both in Durham County.

---
Bill Majoros, Ph.D.
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.ThirdBirdFromTheSun.com__;!!OToaGQ!4da_gfIV-oSkz669_mDimUhxBuG5PGKNN46Yu11_34uI6yu1TJMVz2d-1El6FV0zF2g$



 

Back to top
Date: 11/26/20 7:46 pm
From: Richard Ricardo Waldrop (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lost & Found Near Townville
Hello CarolinaBirders, here's my first post to this listserv:

I spent most of the day yesterday birding around the Dobbins farm site
looking and listening for W. Meadowlark and Lapland Longspur neither of
which I was able to locate.

I LOST MY IPHONE somewhere along the road near the W. Meadowlark site
because I left it on top of my car!!#@% after listening to the meadowlark
and longspur calls. If any of you find it and would be so kind, please send
me a note to <rewaldrop...> or Facebook messenger at Rick Waldrop.

In the FOUND department, in the middle of the day I made a run to
the Lake Robinson/J Verne Smith Park eBird site near Greer for the Greater
Scaup. I saw it through my scope out in the middle of the lake--larger size
and completely round head distinctive.

Back at Dobbins farm 6 Bald Eagles, mostly immatures, were perched together
in trees. I also got a lead on a probable Barn Owl location back near
Townville but didn't see it come out of it's roost--especially when I
realized that my phone was missing and went running back to the farm roads
to see if I could find it.

Good birding.

Rick Waldrop
Cleveland, Tennessee

 

Back to top
Date: 11/26/20 11:44 am
From: <sshultz...>
Subject: Impressive Rusty Blackbird flock
After an impressive showing of birds yesterday at Mid-Pines Rd (Wake NC),
today was deader than a rave at 4 in the afternoon. I guess it was the
wind.



In any case, we evacuated the area and decided to hit up Lake Benson park in
Garner. I've not been there before, but Marc R often sends positive reports
about the place.



We arrived to find an impressive flock of Rusty Blackbirds feeding below
pecan trees on the park's western edge (in the yards of the adjacent homes).
The flock consisted of about 200 birds. I wonder if they were collecting
the pecans for a pie??



Happy Thanksgiving!



Steve Shultz

Apex NC


 

Back to top
Date: 11/25/20 5:58 pm
From: Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: eBird Trip Summary -- Nov 25, 2020
Greetings all and Happy Thanksgiving to you

With rain forecast for Turkey day, I decided to do my annual all day birding day today in Durham Co.

I started off the day at Sandy Creek Park then going to Falls Lake Rolling View SP, then to Beaver Dam and finally stopping at Brickhouse Road - Durham Co.

The day was very enjoyable in that it wasn’t hot or cold but a nice mild temp all day. The wind as well was just a delightful breeze and with cloudy skies no glare from the sun.


Besides the ducks listed also seen was a possible Northern Pintail that I wasn’t able to ID 100% so I couldn’t count it.

Following is summary checklist of what I saw.

eBird Checklist Summary for: Nov 25, 2020

Number of Checklists: 4
Number of Taxa: 52

Checklists included in this summary:
(1): Sandy Creek Park
Date: Nov 25, 2020 at 7:35 AM
(2): Falls Lake--Rolling View
Date: Nov 25, 2020 at 12:35 PM
(3): Beaver Marsh
Date: Nov 25, 2020 at 3:25 PM
(4): Butner Game Land--Brickhouse Rd. (Durham Co.)
Date: Nov 25, 2020 at 5:00 PM

60 Canada Goose -- (1)
5 Wood Duck -- (1),(4)
4 Gadwall -- (2)
16 Lesser Scaup -- (2)
7 Ruddy Duck -- (2)
1 Pied-billed Grebe -- (2)
1 Horned Grebe -- (2)
8 Mourning Dove -- (1)
10 Bonaparte's Gull -- (2)
10 Ring-billed Gull -- (2)
2 Common Loon -- (2)
1500 Double-crested Cormorant -- (2)
1 Black Vulture -- (1)
1 Belted Kingfisher -- (3)
1 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker -- (3)
1 Red-headed Woodpecker -- (3)
5 Red-bellied Woodpecker -- (1),(3)
6 Downy Woodpecker (Eastern) -- (1)
1 Pileated Woodpecker -- (3)
6 Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) -- (1)
2 Eastern Phoebe -- (1)
8 Blue Jay -- (1)
8 American Crow -- (1),(2)
1 Fish Crow -- (2)
11 Carolina Chickadee -- (1),(2),(3)
10 Tufted Titmouse -- (1),(2)
1 Golden-crowned Kinglet -- (1)
6 Ruby-crowned Kinglet -- (1)
3 Red-breasted Nuthatch -- (1)
7 White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern) -- (1),(3)
4 Brown-headed Nuthatch -- (1)
3 Winter Wren -- (1)
8 Carolina Wren -- (1),(3)
2 European Starling -- (1)
3 Brown Thrasher -- (4)
2 Northern Mockingbird -- (1)
8 Eastern Bluebird -- (1)
2 Hermit Thrush -- (1)
8 American Robin -- (1)
15 Cedar Waxwing -- (1)
20 Pine Siskin -- (1)
15 American Goldfinch -- (1)
1 Chipping Sparrow -- (1)
8 Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) -- (1)
23 White-throated Sparrow -- (1),(3),(4)
8 Song Sparrow -- (1)
2 Swamp Sparrow -- (1)
3 Eastern Towhee -- (1),(3)
10 Red-winged Blackbird -- (1)
1 Pine Warbler -- (1)
3 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) -- (1)
8 Northern Cardinal -- (1)

This trip summary was created using the eBird app for iPhone and iPad.
See eBird for more information.


From my iPhone

Go Birding be Safe

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>


 

Back to top
Date: 11/25/20 9:26 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mid-Pines Road, Wake NC
Scooted by the aforementioned thoroughfare at lunchtime hoping to luck into a Vesper Sparrow. I almost hit two. They are not, by any stretch hard to find. I think there were 6-8 in the stretch between the 90 degree turn and pecan grove. We usually get one or two winter here, but this is by far the most I've seen. Will be interesting to see how many stick around.

I think one reason for the banner fall is that the fields were planted with corn over a ground crop, and now that's it harvested, it's a great mix of weedy little stalks. And it seems to be attracting birds. I had about 60 American Pipit, Horned Lark, several Palm Warblers, a flock of waxwings... All in all a nice lunchtime diversion.

Will be interesting to see what the area attracts this winter, the habitat looks better than it has in a long time!

Steve Shultz
Apex NC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/25/20 6:17 am
From: John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Siskins & other winter finches
I agree with what folks are saying. Most of the small winter finches, and
our goldfinch, are happy to feed on the seeds of trees at this time- sweet
gum, pine, sourwood, alder (as well as some seeds of herbaceous weeds)-
being some of their preferred woody species. But the sweetgum and pine are
actually shedding their seed right now, so that seed source will be
exhausted by the end of December. Good for the juncos and sparrows. It is
at that time the siskins, Goldfinch and Purple Finch will come hard to the
feeders. Red-breasted Nuthatch behave differently- they hoard seed. So
those that set up shop will be collecting and storing pine seed, and also
sunflower seed from your feeder right now. They defend their feeding
territories in winter so I wouldn't expect a lot of movement from here on
out. Not sure about Evening Grosbeak and Common Redpoll- we just don't see
them very often around here.

John Connors
Raleigh, NC

On Wed, Nov 25, 2020 at 8:51 AM "Shultz, Steven" <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> I've noticed similar to what Mike notes. It *seems* that we often get a
> big push of birds early in the season, which then tails off. And then when
> the real winter weather hits, the birds reappear. Mike's suggestion about
> wild forage seems to make sense.
>
> For example, back in Sept/Oct there was a big push of Red-breasted
> Nuthatch. Could not walk around the neighborhood without hearing several.
> Now there is maybe one.
>
> Similar with the siskins, we had an onset with about 50 birds. That has
> (thankfully) reduced to a core group of about 20 that hangs around
> consistently.
>
> I sort of suspect that these birds move south in a wave or front, which we
> see as the sudden appearance nearly everywhere of birds, and then they
> spread out a bit to fill available habitat.
>
> We see them again when the cold weather hits and they look to feeders.
>
> The grosbeaks seem to be doing this. Right now they are moving. Lots
> more sightings (or more accurately hearings) of birds overhead than at a
> feeder. And many of the feeder birds don't stay. For finch lovers, that
> will likely change. Go ahead and take out your seed loan now 😊
>
> Steve Shultz
> Legal guardian of one score of Pine Siskins and the occasional Purple Finch
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> On
> Behalf Of mtove
> Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 8:14 AM
> To: <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: Siskins & other winter finches
>
> This email is from an external source - exercise caution regarding links
> and attachments.
>
>
> From what I can gather, Bill Hilton's observation that Siskins were "Here
> today and gone tomorrow" (from feeders) seems to be a wide-spread
> phenomenon. While my personal feeders are far from the best (comparative to
> others, they're quite modest), I've had NO Siskins at them thus far this
> year but I have seen plenty of them out and about when I go on casual bird
> walks. My assumption (conclusion?) is that with mild ("Indian Summer")
> weather, and (presumptive) abundance of "wild" food, they've not been
> motivated to concentrate around feeders, yet. If (or when) winter does
> actually arrive, I suspect that will change.
>
> By all indications, this is a stacking up to be a major winter finch
> invasion. An ebird search of recent sightings of various winter finch
> species shows a broad swath south through the Carolinas with Evening
> Grosbeaks predominantly south through central to southern Virginia. Even
> Common Redpoll sightings are rampant to the central mid-Atlantic states.
> Hopefully, as we enter "true winter" (perhaps arguably all three weeks of
> it this day and age), feeder finch activity will pick up and with it, maybe
> one if not both of these "higher octane" visitors. Fingers crossed.
>
> Mike Tove
> Cary, NC
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/25/20 5:55 am
From: Michael Clark <mdc...>
Subject: Re: Siskins & other winter finches
This is consistent with my experience; a month ago I had flocks of 120 -
150 siskins at my feeders. Nowadays, I have anywhere from 4 to a dozen, but
see them all throughout my neighborhood. No Evening Grosbeaks or Redpolls
so far, but as Mike says "fingers crossed!"

On Wed, Nov 25, 2020 at 8:12 AM mtove <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> From what I can gather, Bill Hilton's observation that Siskins were "Here
> today and gone tomorrow" (from feeders) seems to be a wide-spread
> phenomenon. While my personal feeders are far from the best (comparative to
> others, they're quite modest), I've had NO Siskins at them thus far this
> year but I have seen plenty of them out and about when I go on casual bird
> walks. My assumption (conclusion?) is that with mild ("Indian Summer")
> weather, and (presumptive) abundance of "wild" food, they've not been
> motivated to concentrate around feeders, yet. If (or when) winter does
> actually arrive, I suspect that will change.
>
> By all indications, this is a stacking up to be a major winter finch
> invasion. An ebird search of recent sightings of various winter finch
> species shows a broad swath south through the Carolinas with Evening
> Grosbeaks predominantly south through central to southern Virginia. Even
> Common Redpoll sightings are rampant to the central mid-Atlantic states.
> Hopefully, as we enter "true winter" (perhaps arguably all three weeks of
> it
> this day and age), feeder finch activity will pick up and with it, maybe
> one
> if not both of these "higher octane" visitors. Fingers crossed.
>
> Mike Tove
> Cary, NC
>
>

--
Michael Clark
Durham, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/25/20 5:51 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Siskins & other winter finches
I've noticed similar to what Mike notes. It *seems* that we often get a big push of birds early in the season, which then tails off. And then when the real winter weather hits, the birds reappear. Mike's suggestion about wild forage seems to make sense.

For example, back in Sept/Oct there was a big push of Red-breasted Nuthatch. Could not walk around the neighborhood without hearing several. Now there is maybe one.

Similar with the siskins, we had an onset with about 50 birds. That has (thankfully) reduced to a core group of about 20 that hangs around consistently.

I sort of suspect that these birds move south in a wave or front, which we see as the sudden appearance nearly everywhere of birds, and then they spread out a bit to fill available habitat.

We see them again when the cold weather hits and they look to feeders.

The grosbeaks seem to be doing this. Right now they are moving. Lots more sightings (or more accurately hearings) of birds overhead than at a feeder. And many of the feeder birds don't stay. For finch lovers, that will likely change. Go ahead and take out your seed loan now 😊

Steve Shultz
Legal guardian of one score of Pine Siskins and the occasional Purple Finch


-----Original Message-----
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> On Behalf Of mtove
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 8:14 AM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Siskins & other winter finches

This email is from an external source - exercise caution regarding links and attachments.


From what I can gather, Bill Hilton's observation that Siskins were "Here today and gone tomorrow" (from feeders) seems to be a wide-spread phenomenon. While my personal feeders are far from the best (comparative to others, they're quite modest), I've had NO Siskins at them thus far this year but I have seen plenty of them out and about when I go on casual bird walks. My assumption (conclusion?) is that with mild ("Indian Summer") weather, and (presumptive) abundance of "wild" food, they've not been motivated to concentrate around feeders, yet. If (or when) winter does actually arrive, I suspect that will change.

By all indications, this is a stacking up to be a major winter finch invasion. An ebird search of recent sightings of various winter finch species shows a broad swath south through the Carolinas with Evening Grosbeaks predominantly south through central to southern Virginia. Even Common Redpoll sightings are rampant to the central mid-Atlantic states.
Hopefully, as we enter "true winter" (perhaps arguably all three weeks of it this day and age), feeder finch activity will pick up and with it, maybe one if not both of these "higher octane" visitors. Fingers crossed.

Mike Tove
Cary, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/25/20 5:12 am
From: mtove (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Siskins & other winter finches
From what I can gather, Bill Hilton's observation that Siskins were "Here
today and gone tomorrow" (from feeders) seems to be a wide-spread
phenomenon. While my personal feeders are far from the best (comparative to
others, they're quite modest), I've had NO Siskins at them thus far this
year but I have seen plenty of them out and about when I go on casual bird
walks. My assumption (conclusion?) is that with mild ("Indian Summer")
weather, and (presumptive) abundance of "wild" food, they've not been
motivated to concentrate around feeders, yet. If (or when) winter does
actually arrive, I suspect that will change.

By all indications, this is a stacking up to be a major winter finch
invasion. An ebird search of recent sightings of various winter finch
species shows a broad swath south through the Carolinas with Evening
Grosbeaks predominantly south through central to southern Virginia. Even
Common Redpoll sightings are rampant to the central mid-Atlantic states.
Hopefully, as we enter "true winter" (perhaps arguably all three weeks of it
this day and age), feeder finch activity will pick up and with it, maybe one
if not both of these "higher octane" visitors. Fingers crossed.

Mike Tove
Cary, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/24/20 3:56 pm
From: Bill Hilton Jr. <hilton...>
Subject: Hilton Pond 11/01/20 (Siskins: Here Today, Gone Tomorrow) 🐦
In October, literally hundreds of Pine Siskins (and a few Purple Finches) descended on Hilton Pond Center like a plague of locusts, devouring all the black sunflower seed we could offer. By mid-November there were still plenty of seeds but these winter finches were all gone! That's the story we cover "This Week at Hilton Pond" in our photo essay #732 for 1-15 Nov 2020. As always we include tallies of all birds banded or recaptured during that period, plus notes about recent hurricane damage and acknowledgment of support from friends. Check it out at https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek201101.html__;!!OToaGQ!_o4SdNZ-Rn6ukuJerWaxwzJD8SWL8n1rHG2rxHrISRmqs_mU6LZQSxpN4uwuCaeSBm8$

Happy (Late Fall) Nature Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond__;!!OToaGQ!_o4SdNZ-Rn6ukuJerWaxwzJD8SWL8n1rHG2rxHrISRmqs_mU6LZQSxpN4uwus50QOag$ for timely updates on nature topics,
and for info about hummingbirds at https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats__;!!OToaGQ!_o4SdNZ-Rn6ukuJerWaxwzJD8SWL8n1rHG2rxHrISRmqs_mU6LZQSxpN4uwutwMA_cM$

Follow us on Twitter @hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and education for students of all ages.

"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the sunset." BHjr.

============


 

Back to top
Date: 11/24/20 11:54 am
From: Margaret McGuinn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Thank you!
Thanks to everyone who sent advice on gloves--- now I need to do my
homework among all the options!

Margaret

 

Back to top
Date: 11/24/20 10:17 am
From: David Gibson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Advice?
Oops. I bought both my wife and I a pair...
Dave Gibson
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://birdpartner.com/__;!!OToaGQ!6WGcP38evfyn5--m3z3U7hK_b6FkPnk9B3iCm9HDTcYUvRxb4IBL54AZSmtZeIi-Wdk$



On Tue, Nov 24, 2020 at 1:14 PM David Gibson <20cabot...> wrote:

> Margaret, I think your best bet would be to get a pair of photo gloves. I
> buy my photo gear (and photo gloves) @ B&H Photo Video in NYC. Here's a
> link to their selection
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/buy/photo-gloves/ci/26450/N/3845464596__;!!OToaGQ!6WGcP38evfyn5--m3z3U7hK_b6FkPnk9B3iCm9HDTcYUvRxb4IBL54AZSmtZNbU3hig$ >.
> I bought both my wife and pair of knit ones with fold-back fingers a
> few years ago, and we use them all the time while birding/photographing
> birds in cooler weather. Good luck!
> Dave Gibson
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://birdpartner.com/__;!!OToaGQ!6WGcP38evfyn5--m3z3U7hK_b6FkPnk9B3iCm9HDTcYUvRxb4IBL54AZSmtZeIi-Wdk$
>
>
>
> On Tue, Nov 24, 2020 at 11:27 AM Margaret McGuinn <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> Hi Friends---
>>
>> Any recommendations on gloves for cold weather birding? I think I'd like
>> ones with no fingertips and a mitten covering, but I've never tried them.
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> Margaret McGuinn
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/24/20 10:15 am
From: David Gibson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Advice?
Margaret, I think your best bet would be to get a pair of photo gloves. I
buy my photo gear (and photo gloves) @ B&H Photo Video in NYC. Here's a
link to their selection
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/buy/photo-gloves/ci/26450/N/3845464596__;!!OToaGQ!69t-eDZ1Tubdz4F70_aKmf6abnR2Je_CmkmDDp4AGr17kZztW_yyNUu1vIse6nuYnFY$ >. I
bought both my wife and pair of knit ones with fold-back fingers a
few years ago, and we use them all the time while birding/photographing
birds in cooler weather. Good luck!
Dave Gibson
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://birdpartner.com/__;!!OToaGQ!69t-eDZ1Tubdz4F70_aKmf6abnR2Je_CmkmDDp4AGr17kZztW_yyNUu1vIseIoB1Hbw$



On Tue, Nov 24, 2020 at 11:27 AM Margaret McGuinn <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Hi Friends---
>
> Any recommendations on gloves for cold weather birding? I think I'd like
> ones with no fingertips and a mitten covering, but I've never tried them.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Margaret McGuinn
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/24/20 9:13 am
From: KEN LIPSHY (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Advice?
I made several annual treks over to the eastern shore when I lived in Hampton roads and for years I had wool “hunting” gloves that allowed the mitten piece and the index finger to fold back. Inevitably they were annoying and they were either too hot or the rain soaked them too fast.
They soon came out with winter gloves that were similar but they too were too bulky and became annoying.
I ended up buying water resistant gloves with the touchscreen fingers off amazon (I saw them on sale at several stores before buying any).
I think mine are men isotoners (maybe) but there are many many more options on amazon now.
I can text, take phone photos, take photos with my camera and adjust the binoculars fairly well and they keep my hands pretty warm unless the temp stayed below 30.
That ended up being my preference.
They are also cheap enough that if I lose one its not a big deal compared to the heavier models.

Kenneth A. Lipshy
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://Www.crisismanagementleadership.com__;!!OToaGQ!7Bh8q1ooOHYxgkCMOZRyEAHGKM4oXdfjjT-usPFf3P4PsLaZ8CAeQqbao022TWhEHhg$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.crisismanagementleadership.com/__;!!OToaGQ!7Bh8q1ooOHYxgkCMOZRyEAHGKM4oXdfjjT-usPFf3P4PsLaZ8CAeQqbao022oBTXupY$ >
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.crisislead.blogspot.com__;!!OToaGQ!7Bh8q1ooOHYxgkCMOZRyEAHGKM4oXdfjjT-usPFf3P4PsLaZ8CAeQqbao0224ZlKqZw$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.crisislead.blogspot.com__;!!OToaGQ!7Bh8q1ooOHYxgkCMOZRyEAHGKM4oXdfjjT-usPFf3P4PsLaZ8CAeQqbao0224ZlKqZw$ >

From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> On Behalf Of Anne Olsen
Sent: Tuesday, November 24, 2020 11:43 AM
To: Margaret McGuinn <margaretmcguinn1...>
Cc: <Carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Advice?

Please reply to the list. I am also interested in good gloves for cold weather birding. I saw someone with a pair that were mitten shaped and the top folded back to allow manipulation for adjusting binoculars. Thank you.


Anne Olsen
Sent from my iPad


On Nov 24, 2020, at 11:27 AM, Margaret McGuinn <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

Hi Friends---

Any recommendations on gloves for cold weather birding? I think I'd like ones with no fingertips and a mitten covering, but I've never tried them.

Thanks,

Margaret McGuinn

 

Back to top
Date: 11/24/20 8:59 am
From: Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Cold weather birding gloves
Hi All,

I use two pairs of gloves, one inside of the other. The first pair is made
of a stretchy nylon type of fabric, the kind sold as "driving" gloves that
fit tight over your fingers. The second pair are those mittens a couple of
birders mentioned, with the holes for the fingers to poke thru and a flap
that folds over when not using binocs. The tight fitting gloves aren't that
warm, but they'll keep your fingertips from freezing when you fold back the
flaps on the mittens to use the binocs. The stretchy gloves fit so snug
that you can pull the mitten (preferably wool) over them.

Linda Ward
Coinjock, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/24/20 8:57 am
From: Joe Donahue <joe_donahue...>
Subject: Re: Advice?
I have both the mittens you described as well as photography gloves that have a fold back tip for the index finger and the thumb and prefer them over my mittens. They come in two weights so if you go that route be sure to get the heavier weight. Either way I still use the charcoal hand warmers. 


Sent from AT&T Yahoo Mail for iPhone


On Tuesday, November 24, 2020, 11:44 AM, Anne Olsen <carolinabirds...> wrote:

Please reply to the list.  I am also interested in good gloves for cold weather birding.  I saw someone with a pair that were mitten shaped and the top folded back to allow manipulation for adjusting binoculars.  Thank you.

Anne Olsen

Sent from my iPad

On Nov 24, 2020, at 11:27 AM, Margaret McGuinn <carolinabirds...> wrote:



Hi Friends---
Any recommendations on gloves for cold weather birding? I think I'd like ones with no fingertips and a mitten covering, but I've never tried them.
Thanks,
Margaret McGuinn




 

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Date: 11/24/20 8:56 am
From: Scott Schulz <swschulz...>
Subject: Re: Advice?
You should be able to find these at most outdoor shops, e.g. Dick’s,
Cabela’s, and REI in either fleece, down, or synthetic options.
Examples:

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.cabelas.com/shop/en/glacier-glove-alaska-river-windproof-flip-mitt__;!!OToaGQ!7EtjUic-IjUhpKNcke8VDVvNtfnP8oBnJoGutUWoTxeP699tXJ23vE-O-g0uJNYorro$

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.cabelas.com/shop/en/natural-reflections-fleece-mittens-for-ladies__;!!OToaGQ!7EtjUic-IjUhpKNcke8VDVvNtfnP8oBnJoGutUWoTxeP699tXJ23vE-O-g0u2enM7VE$

If you use ebird, look for a pair that have a touch-screen capable thumb
(depending on how often you want to expose your fingers).

Scott


On 24 Nov 2020, at 11:42, Anne Olsen wrote:

> Please reply to the list. I am also interested in good gloves for
> cold weather birding. I saw someone with a pair that were mitten
> shaped and the top folded back to allow manipulation for adjusting
> binoculars. Thank you.
>
>
> Anne Olsen
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>> On Nov 24, 2020, at 11:27 AM, Margaret McGuinn
>> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> 
>> Hi Friends---
>>
>> Any recommendations on gloves for cold weather birding? I think I'd
>> like ones with no fingertips and a mitten covering, but I've never
>> tried them.
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> Margaret McGuinn
 

Back to top
Date: 11/24/20 8:44 am
From: Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Advice?
Please reply to the list. I am also interested in good gloves for cold weather birding. I saw someone with a pair that were mitten shaped and the top folded back to allow manipulation for adjusting binoculars. Thank you.


Anne Olsen

Sent from my iPad

> On Nov 24, 2020, at 11:27 AM, Margaret McGuinn <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> 
> Hi Friends---
>
> Any recommendations on gloves for cold weather birding? I think I'd like ones with no fingertips and a mitten covering, but I've never tried them.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Margaret McGuinn

 

Back to top
Date: 11/24/20 8:27 am
From: Margaret McGuinn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Advice?
Hi Friends---

Any recommendations on gloves for cold weather birding? I think I'd like
ones with no fingertips and a mitten covering, but I've never tried them.

Thanks,

Margaret McGuinn

 

Back to top
Date: 11/24/20 7:40 am
From: Ken Bennett (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Purple sandpiper, Huntington Beach SP jetty
Looking at a purple sandpiper on the jetty at HBSP, on the inlet side.

Ken Bennett

Sent from my mobile
 

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Date: 11/24/20 5:52 am
From: Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Evening grosbeak, Williamson Preserve

Erla Beagle and I just heard an Evening Grosbeak fly over at Williamson Preserve in Wake Co.  Along Twin Ponds trail between the ponds. 

Marc Ribaudo

 

Back to top
Date: 11/23/20 11:57 am
From: nicholas Flanders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Vesper Sparrows and Evening Grosbeak, Pequimans & Pasquotank Co.'s, NC, 11/21/20
Hey all, on Saturday Elisa & I found 3 Vesper Sparrows in the northern sections of Perquimans & Pasquotank Co.'s, NC: 1 along Turnpike Rd. b/w US-158 and the Pasquotank/Perquimans county line, and 2 together off Hickory Cross Rd. just w. of Sandy Cross Rd. in Perquimans. At the latter location we also heard 1 fly-over Evening Grosbeak.

We are also saddened and shocked to hear of the passing of Ned Brinkley; I am certainly grateful for everything I learned during time birding with him.

Nick Flanders
Portsmouth, VA

 

Back to top
Date: 11/23/20 10:55 am
From: Wiley, R Haven <rhwiley...>
Subject: Re: More on Ned Brinkley's passing


Ned Brinkley --
> author of _Field Guide to Birds of North America_, sponsored by the
> National Wildlife Federation, in 2007

a damn good guide, too, still worth consulting.

Sorry to hear of his untimely death.

Haven Wiley


On 11/23/20 1:12 PM, Harry LeGrand wrote:
> I knew Ned Brinkley quite well, more so as a teen and in my 20s, when we
> were often on the same Christmas Bird Counts in coastal VA and the
> northern NC coast back in the day (1970s and 1980s mostly).  He was a
> few years younger than me, but was highly energetic and later became an
> expert in pelagic birds, often joining Brian Patteson in writing papers
> for highly significant pelagic bird records.  His home base was coastal
> Virginia, especially the Cape Charles area, where I believe he ran a
> bed-and-breakfast there.
>
> He had at least two major claims to fame that I recall.  1) He was the
> Editor of the _North American Birds_ journal for several decades, mostly
> in the 1990s and 2000s.  He wrote numerous Seasonal Summary reports that
> summarized the bird trends over the entire continent, especially
> relating bird trends to seasonal weather patterns.  2) He was the sole
> author of _Field Guide to Birds of North America_, sponsored by the
> National Wildlife Federation, in 2007.  This was a field guide using
> color photos for all species -- the first such photo field guide in a
> single volume.
>
> He was certainly one of the most important ornithologists in VA and the
> central Atlantic coast, and his influence across North America with his
> above works cannot be underestimated.  He will be sorely missed.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 11/23/20 10:12 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: More on Ned Brinkley's passing
I knew Ned Brinkley quite well, more so as a teen and in my 20s, when we
were often on the same Christmas Bird Counts in coastal VA and the northern
NC coast back in the day (1970s and 1980s mostly). He was a few years
younger than me, but was highly energetic and later became an expert in
pelagic birds, often joining Brian Patteson in writing papers for highly
significant pelagic bird records. His home base was coastal Virginia,
especially the Cape Charles area, where I believe he ran a
bed-and-breakfast there.

He had at least two major claims to fame that I recall. 1) He was the
Editor of the *North American Birds* journal for several decades, mostly in
the 1990s and 2000s. He wrote numerous Seasonal Summary reports that
summarized the bird trends over the entire continent, especially relating
bird trends to seasonal weather patterns. 2) He was the sole author of *Field
Guide to Birds of North America*, sponsored by the National Wildlife
Federation, in 2007. This was a field guide using color photos for all
species -- the first such photo field guide in a single volume.

He was certainly one of the most important ornithologists in VA and the
central Atlantic coast, and his influence across North America with his
above works cannot be underestimated. He will be sorely missed.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

 

Back to top
Date: 11/23/20 5:14 am
From: Robert Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Very sad news about Ned Brinkley
Many Carolina birders met and birded with Ned Brinkley.  I remember him well from NC, New York, and Virginia. 

Bob Lewis
Sleepy Hollow NY


From: On Behalf Of Kevin J. McGowan 
Sent: Sunday, November 22, 2020 6:11 PM 
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L <CAYUGABIRDS-L...> 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Former Ithaca birder Ned Brinkley has passed 

I just got a phone call from former Cornell undergrad and super birder Adam Byrne that our good friend Ned Brinkley died today in Ecuador on a birding trip. No details except he was hiking up a trail, got short of breathe, sat down and died. 

For those of you who were around in the 1990s, you will remember that Ned Brinkley was an irresistible force of nature who transformed the birding community here. He was getting his Ph.D. in German, but spent all his daylight hours birding. I think he only slept about 4 hours a night. When he was in charge of the Cayuga Bird Club field trips, and they were trying to decide on whether to have them on Saturdays or Sundays, Ned decided that we would do them on BOTH days, and he would lead them. He taught the Lab's World Series of Birding team, the Sapsuckers, how to win, turning us from a middle-of-the-pack team to champions! 

I'm not going to do an obituary tonight. I just wanted to get the word out. I know there are people on this list that knew Ned in the day, and will be saddened to learn of his death. 

Kevin 

Kevin J. McGowan, Ph.D. 
Senior Course Developer and Instructor 
Bird Academy 
Cornell Lab of Ornithology 
159 Sapsucker Woods Road 
Ithaca, NY 14850
 

Back to top
Date: 11/23/20 3:49 am
From: William Majoros <bmajoros...>
Subject: B&W warbler in Durham
I was pleased to find a very nice looking black-and-white warbler at Sandy Creek Park in Durham yesterday morning, near the wooden bridge, in the same spot where I saw the orange-crowned warbler last Saturday. Both birds were seen behind the bench dedicated to John Goebel.

---
Bill Majoros, Ph.D.
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.ThirdBirdFromTheSun.com__;!!OToaGQ!6lgEZHAAaH1kx0X7EmkkqLukzDBnbbjDX5DM8Rqb223GJZkxdq-ayC_AHyVlWehUJEo$



 

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Date: 11/22/20 3:26 pm
From: william haddad (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Some Good Birds at the Cabin the last two Days
To compliment Nate Dias"s good low country house list with quite different
more high country current birds saw these from the cabin deck today and
yesterday::

1. Purple Finches
2. Goldfinches
3. Pine Siskens
4. White-throated Sparrows and a few Song Sparrows
l 5. Yellow - bellied Sapsuckers (as well as the usual 3
other Woodpecker species)
6. One Brown Creeper (climbing a bare tree just adjacent to the deck).
7. The usual Chickadees, Titmice, White-breasted Nuthatches, Juncos,
Towhees, etc.

Last week I saw a Winter Wren at the cabin and heard another one singing
and also had a couple of White-crowned Sparrows. Between the high country
and low country,the Carolinas don't disappoint even after the Fall
migration.

Bill Haddad
Spruce Pine, N.C..

 

Back to top
Date: 11/22/20 1:53 pm
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Good yard birding in suburban Charleston
I saw some nice birds in my mother's suburban habitat in western Charleston
today.

In a 10-minute period, I saw the following out the kitchen window:
Orange-crowned Warbler (foraging), Blue-headed Vireo (bathing and
foraging), Baltimore Oriole (bathing), Palm Warbler (bathing and foraging),
Pine Warbler (eating suet), several Chipping Sparrows, 3 Song Sparrows,
Eastern Bluebirds (bathing and looking in nest boxes),
Red-bellied Woodpecker (bathing and foraging), Downy Woodpecker, Tufted
Titmouse, Carolina Chickadee, Carolina Wren, House Wren, and lots of Myrtle
Warblers and House Finches.

The Eastern Screech-Owl in the nest box did not peep out while I was there.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

--
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2/__;!!OToaGQ!6E9qovPMD82YpTemwiJoKfMyAzTKD7jGMa_w1M10VSG7x3vivhApD6UAyOVMFnpPxgI$


"These days I prefer to hunt with a camera. A good photograph demands more
skill from the hunter, better nerves and more patience than the rifle
shot." -- Bror Blixen

 

Back to top
Date: 11/22/20 10:27 am
From: Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: FRANKLIN'S GULL, Lake Crabtree dam area, Wake, NC
Realizing the same. Apologies for the mistake. Report has been corrected.

Eddie Owens
Cary, NC

On Sun, Nov 22, 2020 at 1:07 PM Ryan Justice <blackburnian151...>
wrote:

> Agreed. Not a Franklin’s.
>
> Ryan
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Nov 22, 2020, at 12:59 PM, Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing
> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Why isn’t this just a Bonapartes Gull still with a black head? Mantle is
> very pale for a Franklins, and size of the bird matches the other
> Bonapartes. Franklins is confusable with a Laughing Gull; should be
> obviously larger than a Bonaparte and with a slaty mantle color.
>
> Harry LeGrand
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Nov 22, 2020, at 10:30 AM, Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> 
> Refound the Franklin's Gull by scoping from the tower at the boat rental.
> Was in small raft with Bonies, sleeping, then preening, then they all flew.
>
> Eddie Owens
> Cary NC
>
> On Sun, Nov 22, 2020, 8:58 AM Lynn Erla Beegle <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>>
>> FRANKLIN'S GULL at Lake Crabtree dam area, at 8:15. Wake County, NC. See
>> ebird list S76537712 for details or carolinabirds sightings page to
>> access list. Spotted by Genny P.
>> LynnErla Beegle, Raleigh NC
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/22/20 10:07 am
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: FRANKLIN'S GULL, Lake Crabtree dam area, Wake, NC
Agreed. Not a Franklin’s.

Ryan

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 22, 2020, at 12:59 PM, Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Why isn’t this just a Bonapartes Gull still with a black head? Mantle is very pale for a Franklins, and size of the bird matches the other Bonapartes. Franklins is confusable with a Laughing Gull; should be obviously larger than a Bonaparte and with a slaty mantle color.
>
> Harry LeGrand
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>>> On Nov 22, 2020, at 10:30 AM, Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>>
>> 
>> Refound the Franklin's Gull by scoping from the tower at the boat rental. Was in small raft with Bonies, sleeping, then preening, then they all flew.
>>
>> Eddie Owens
>> Cary NC
>>
>>> On Sun, Nov 22, 2020, 8:58 AM Lynn Erla Beegle <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>>
>>> FRANKLIN'S GULL at Lake Crabtree dam area, at 8:15. Wake County, NC. See ebird list S76537712 for details or carolinabirds sightings page to access list. Spotted by Genny P.
>>> LynnErla Beegle, Raleigh NC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/22/20 9:59 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: FRANKLIN'S GULL, Lake Crabtree dam area, Wake, NC
Why isn’t this just a Bonapartes Gull still with a black head? Mantle is very pale for a Franklins, and size of the bird matches the other Bonapartes. Franklins is confusable with a Laughing Gull; should be obviously larger than a Bonaparte and with a slaty mantle color.

Harry LeGrand

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 22, 2020, at 10:30 AM, Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> 
> Refound the Franklin's Gull by scoping from the tower at the boat rental. Was in small raft with Bonies, sleeping, then preening, then they all flew.
>
> Eddie Owens
> Cary NC
>
>> On Sun, Nov 22, 2020, 8:58 AM Lynn Erla Beegle <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> FRANKLIN'S GULL at Lake Crabtree dam area, at 8:15. Wake County, NC. See ebird list S76537712 for details or carolinabirds sightings page to access list. Spotted by Genny P.
>> LynnErla Beegle, Raleigh NC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/22/20 7:30 am
From: Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: FRANKLIN'S GULL, Lake Crabtree dam area, Wake, NC
Refound the Franklin's Gull by scoping from the tower at the boat rental.
Was in small raft with Bonies, sleeping, then preening, then they all flew.

Eddie Owens
Cary NC

On Sun, Nov 22, 2020, 8:58 AM Lynn Erla Beegle <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

>
> FRANKLIN'S GULL at Lake Crabtree dam area, at 8:15. Wake County, NC. See
> ebird list S76537712 for details or carolinabirds sightings page to
> access list. Spotted by Genny P.
> LynnErla Beegle, Raleigh NC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/22/20 5:59 am
From: Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: FRANKLIN'S GULL, Lake Crabtree dam area, Wake, NC
FRANKLIN'S GULL at Lake Crabtree dam area, at 8:15. Wake County, NC. See
ebird list S76537712 for details or carolinabirds sightings page to
access list. Spotted by Genny P.
LynnErla Beegle, Raleigh NC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/20/20 11:31 am
From: ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Hilton Pond10/01/20 (October Birds And Nature Stuff)
Bill,
As always, it’s a pleasure reading your regular updates to what’s happening
at your place.

Your posts are SO INFORMATIVE
And science- based. No where else can birders gather such a regular
narrative on so many species!

You are a great educator 😊👏👏
Thank and keep up the great work!



On Fri, Nov 20, 2020 at 2:13 PM Bill Hilton Jr. <hilton...>
wrote:

> We don't often post two installments of "This Week at Hilton Pond" in one
> week, but we're playing catch up and hope you'll enjoy photo essay #731 for
> 1-31 Oct 2020. The month was one of our most diverse ever for migratory
> species, so we include lots of images with I.D. hints for birds from
> hummingbirds to warblers (Blue-winged, above)--and, lest we forget, the
> first "winter finches!" The rest of nature was likewise active, indicated
> by snippets about spiders, wildflowers, and fruits. Also included are
> acknowledgments of recent supporters. To view it all, see
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek201001.html__;!!OToaGQ!-anDUnpYboBezT-TgAnsc1OHPtGjFEKJJU6rKth4u16ZodTCH71wIwxjfEvpRY7fs3A$
>
> Happy (Fall) Nature Watching!
>
> BILL
>
>
>
> Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond__;!!OToaGQ!-anDUnpYboBezT-TgAnsc1OHPtGjFEKJJU6rKth4u16ZodTCH71wIwxjfEvpz0tnCt8$
> for timely updates on nature topics,
> and for info about hummingbirds at
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats__;!!OToaGQ!-anDUnpYboBezT-TgAnsc1OHPtGjFEKJJU6rKth4u16ZodTCH71wIwxjfEvpsA5skn8$
>
> Follow us on Twitter @hiltonpond
>
> ========
>
> DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
> Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
> 1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.google.com/maps/search/1432*DeVinney*Road,*York,*South*Carolina*29745*USA?entry=gmail&source=g__;KysrKysrKw!!OToaGQ!80RNWIDhpEkF06Wi6j7w2aL-tvABtL9XJuD0ZaIr4VV0RdIK020Sgfv2TV0kmuISxkQ$ >
> office & cell (803) 684-5852
>
> The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to
> conserve plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the
> Piedmont Region of the eastern United States through observation,
> scientific study, and education for students of all ages.
>
> "Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch
> the sunset." BHjr.
>
> ============
>
>
> --
Ask me about my upcoming book - a photo essay of select breeding
hummingbirds in North American and The Bahamas!

Inline image
Inline image



Ann Maddock
<am.hummingbird.photos...>
Hatteras Island, NC
919-600-4945

 

Back to top
Date: 11/20/20 11:13 am
From: Bill Hilton Jr. <hilton...>
Subject: Hilton Pond10/01/20 (October Birds And Nature Stuff)
We don't often post two installments of "This Week at Hilton Pond" in one week, but we're playing catch up and hope you'll enjoy photo essay #731 for 1-31 Oct 2020. The month was one of our most diverse ever for migratory species, so we include lots of images with I.D. hints for birds from hummingbirds to warblers (Blue-winged, above)--and, lest we forget, the first "winter finches!" The rest of nature was likewise active, indicated by snippets about spiders, wildflowers, and fruits. Also included are acknowledgments of recent supporters. To view it all, see https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek201001.html__;!!OToaGQ!-anDUnpYboBezT-TgAnsc1OHPtGjFEKJJU6rKth4u16ZodTCH71wIwxjfEvpRY7fs3A$

Happy (Fall) Nature Watching!

BILL



Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond__;!!OToaGQ!-anDUnpYboBezT-TgAnsc1OHPtGjFEKJJU6rKth4u16ZodTCH71wIwxjfEvpz0tnCt8$ for timely updates on nature topics,
and for info about hummingbirds at https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats__;!!OToaGQ!-anDUnpYboBezT-TgAnsc1OHPtGjFEKJJU6rKth4u16ZodTCH71wIwxjfEvpsA5skn8$

Follow us on Twitter @hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and education for students of all ages.

"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the sunset." BHjr.

============


 

Back to top
Date: 11/20/20 10:59 am
From: Craig Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: White-winged Dove, Mount Pleasant, SC
A single White-winged Dove continues at my yard in Mount Pleasant, SC. It
first appeared yesterday before lunch and remained until dusk, and was
absent most of the day today until a short time ago. If you are interested
in seeing the bird in my yard, please email me privately and I will provide
you with some instructions/directions. Based on the last two days, it
seems to prefer the afternoons to make an appearance.
--

*“I never for a day gave up listening to the songs of our birds, or
watching their peculiar habits, or delineating them the best way I could.”*
J.J. Audubon

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/20/20 9:53 am
From: Fischer David (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Lincoln's sparrow, Williamson Preserve, Wake Co

I keep missing Lincoln's Sparrow so I checked out Mark's sighting this morning.  I found many sparrows including at least one and possibly 2 Lincolns near the first pond.  However, they were in the weedy area north of the first pond (the side nearest the parking lot, not the far side).  I posted a couple photos with my ebird report at the link below.  
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S76438859__;!!OToaGQ!9JbzcrAXES_TqYT7ks2poLtxAQprvVUkxTykeOnoR2Ubc6anNRHPn_kidt9nhCaLdb0$
Dave FischerCary, NC

-----Original Message-----
From: Marc Ribaudo <carolinabirds...>
To: <carolinabirds...> <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Thu, Nov 19, 2020 11:01 am
Subject: Lincoln's sparrow, Williamson Preserve, Wake Co

I found 2 Lincoln's Sparrows at Williamson Preserve SE Wake Co. this frosty morning.  They were on the far side of the first pond on the Twin Ponds loop.  The area requires venturing off the official trail and following an unofficial trail.  This area contained tons of sparrows.  Also seen this morning was a Loggerhead Shrike along Walnut Way, American Kestrel, Red-breasted Nuthatch, and Fox Sparrow.  
Marc RibaudoGarner
 

Back to top
Date: 11/20/20 6:05 am
From: David Wilson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Eider ducks
2 Eider ducks floating off the end of the pier at Sunset Beach. 9 a.m. Friday.

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 11/19/20 8:01 am
From: Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lincoln's sparrow, Williamson Preserve, Wake Co
I found 2 Lincoln's Sparrows at Williamson Preserve SE Wake Co. this frosty morning.  They were on the far side of the first pond on the Twin Ponds loop.  The area requires venturing off the official trail and following an unofficial trail.  This area contained tons of sparrows.  Also seen this morning was a Loggerhead Shrike along Walnut Way, American Kestrel, Red-breasted Nuthatch, and Fox Sparrow.  
Marc RibaudoGarner
 

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Date: 11/18/20 4:41 pm
From: Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: eBird Back
Greetings all

Just wanted to let everyone know that eBird is back online.

From my iPhone

Go Birding be Safe

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>

 

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Date: 11/18/20 3:07 pm
From: Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Big Lake waterfowl: the marsh overlook is CLOSED a week or more: Umstead State Park SP, Wake NC
The Big Lake waterfowl marsh overlook is CLOSED a week or more:
Umstead State Park, Crabtree entrance, Wake, NC.
Heavy machinery is removing a lot of trees that are encroaching on
the power lines, plus, they are regrading the trail. A lot of scrubby
habitat near the stairs and under the utility lines will be removed,
but the marsh is not affected.
Birders enter Umstead SP on the Crabtree side, drive to Big Lake
parking lot, then walk downhill and then north along the utility line
trail to Pole 420, then turn onto a fishing trail to see the
waterfowl. I managed to get permission to get in today by
bushwhacking, but at this point, there is no access until they finish
the project. It's a hard hat area!

Please stay away for at least a week. Perhaps try again right after
Thanksgiving.

I did see eight waterfowl species today at Umstead Big Lake (see below).
I will upload the list when eBird comes back online. Scope is recommended.
Canada Goose 18
Northern Shoveler 2
Gadwall 9
Mallard 1
American Black Duck 2
Green-winged Teal 52
Ring-necked Duck 4
Bufflehead 17

LynnErla Beegle, Raleigh, NC
 

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Date: 11/18/20 8:38 am
From: jim.capel (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Chapel Hill Bird Club - November 23, 2020 – David and Judy Smith – Birding the Edges of Costa Rica

The Chapel Hill Bird Club Meeting will be held Monday, November 23, 2020, via Zoom. Please see below for zoom link, meeting ID and passcode. Zoom lines will be open at 7:15pm and the meeting will begin at 7:30pm.

Speakers and Topic: David and Judy Smith – Birding the Edges of Costa Rica

Talk Description: Costa Rica, with its wealth of tropical birds, its comfortable and convenient lodges, and its friendly people, is one of the world's great birding destinations. Earlier this year, before the pandemic hit, former club officers, Judy and David Smith, took a birding trip to Costa Rica (their fourth) that, unlike other tours, concentrated on areas near the Panamanian and Nicaraguan borders. Join them for a visit to the Southern and Northern edges of Costa Rica.

Join Zoom Meeting
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81616753751?pwd=UCtCQjVkWTNFeWtmK2c5UU9ldUlTUT09__;!!OToaGQ!7vz3hEgao3slDoHpKv4ox_7sC3nfk5_MHxmeIgt4b74NxD3nHryZ__q7r_C82dt4DU4$

Meeting ID: 816 1675 3751
Passcode: Bird Club
One tap mobile
+13126266799,,81616753751#,,,,,,0#,,260470521# US (Chicago)
+19292056099,,81616753751#,,,,,,0#,,260470521# US (New York)

Dial by your location
+1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
+1 929 205 6099 US (New York)
+1 301 715 8592 US (Germantown)
+1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
+1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)
+1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
Meeting ID: 816 1675 3751
Passcode: 260470521
Find your local number: https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://us02web.zoom.us/u/kdVDxME83S__;!!OToaGQ!7vz3hEgao3slDoHpKv4ox_7sC3nfk5_MHxmeIgt4b74NxD3nHryZ__q7r_C8V5M8E5g$

 

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Date: 11/17/20 4:10 pm
From: Margaret McGuinn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Myrtle Beach
Hi birders
Any advice on best birding right now in the area of Myrtle Beach?
Thanks
Margaret McGuinn

 

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Date: 11/17/20 10:37 am
From: Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Some state park etc CBCs
Forgot to mention that evening grosbeak was a durham county lifer, #259
woohoo. No, not on ebird, hadn't had time to backtrack enter.

let me know if you are interested in helping with any of the following
counts, either by land or sea (kayaking options at all)

Dec 17 Cumberland County
Dec 18 Rocky Mount
Dec 21 Pilot Mountain
Dec 22 Haw River (NEW count get me some feeder counters in north
Greensboro! See circle at
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/christmas/countmap.html__;!!OToaGQ!_nBYDqBzGhL2ii-VXSXH1ycVuDByonvRJ_k9cU3MHKTghpPKqXuulQLIT2xaV1HqL-Q$ )
Dec 23 Mayo River
Jan 2 Roanoke Rapids (Ricky can get 110 sp blindfolded here, lots of
territory please help, it's been a small group of dedicated people led by
desire for chinese buffet countdown lunch that is probably not covid
possible this year)
Jan 4 Falls Lake
Jan 5 Kerr Lake

Yes I compile 7...ugh labor of love, start the count period with 10
straight CBCs and 18 total through period. Sitting at 208 lifetime CBCs
and gotta catch Paul Sykes somehow (yes I tally and list everything I guess)
--
Brian Bockhahn
<birdranger248...>

 

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Date: 11/17/20 9:58 am
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Apparent Shiny Cowbird in Charleston
What’s this bird? Facebook Group strikes again, this time with an apparent Shiny Cowbird seen in Charleston.

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://m.facebook.com/groups/whatsthisbird/permalink/3397309963651039/?anchor_composer=false__;!!OToaGQ!_JjC-0XopiPy03rSdsJ3uRlgfG0M7LypxAtqJlX7SoEvA-KGEAQac87-jdeH2m1GysA$

Good birding,
Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 11/17/20 9:51 am
From: Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Durham evening grosbeak
I will add to the sightings. Sunday nov 15 while working several hours in
yard near eno river, heard an evening grosbeak give calls while flying
over, there were three birds in a loose flock but I only heard one give
calls so only reported one. windy day tons of finch movement in the
neighborhood. Thought I heard one a few days ago over neighbors feeders.
Sibley app describes it as a ringing trill, or in flocks a low dry rattle,
but my ears hear it as a finch being swallowed by a rattlesnake.

--
Brian Bockhahn
<birdranger248...>

 

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Date: 11/17/20 4:26 am
From: Bill Hilton Jr. <hilton...>
Subject: Hilton Pond 09/16/20 (Migrant Birds, And A Butterfly)
The good news is it's been a great fall for bird banding--so good the bad news is we've fallen 'way behind on posting our "This Week at Hilton Pond" installments from York SC. So here's the link to the latest photo essay for 16-30 Sep 2020, complete with lots of images of birds like Gray-cheeked Thrush and Yellow-throated Vireo. There's commentary about a colorful butterfly we encountered, plus acknowledgments of recent support. To view #730, please visit https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek200916.html__;!!OToaGQ!8CXBjllSWlxBV96ytRlZAN82t1_InIrxkhbqqnfAkn9oPu006kWCBeQelpAkga5ev1Q$

Happy (Fall) Nature Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond__;!!OToaGQ!8CXBjllSWlxBV96ytRlZAN82t1_InIrxkhbqqnfAkn9oPu006kWCBeQelpAkoVGyJHg$ for timely updates on nature topics,
and for info about hummingbirds at https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats__;!!OToaGQ!8CXBjllSWlxBV96ytRlZAN82t1_InIrxkhbqqnfAkn9oPu006kWCBeQelpAkkDBWv_4$

Follow us on Twitter @hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and education for students of all ages.

"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the sunset." BHjr.

============


 

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Date: 11/16/20 4:53 pm
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: eBird outage
Because there can never be too many reminders--remember that eBird is going to be down starting TOMORROW MORNING at 8AM Eastern time. The outage is scheduled to last TWO DAYS. Read about it at https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/news/database-update-november-17-19-maintenance__;!!OToaGQ!8JLBvRKieYf2wkN9N2q1KzGOMiSLz9TGpzCfzMaOG4fb5ShqhoVVBUEqPgkp7IrIMME$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/news/database-update-november-17-19-maintenance__;!!OToaGQ!8JLBvRKieYf2wkN9N2q1KzGOMiSLz9TGpzCfzMaOG4fb5ShqhoVVBUEqPgkp7IrIMME$ >. Everything that depends on eBird will be down. That includes the sightings page on the Carolina Bird Club website at https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/sightings/__;!!OToaGQ!8JLBvRKieYf2wkN9N2q1KzGOMiSLz9TGpzCfzMaOG4fb5ShqhoVVBUEqPgkprbOIHX4$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/sightings/__;!!OToaGQ!8JLBvRKieYf2wkN9N2q1KzGOMiSLz9TGpzCfzMaOG4fb5ShqhoVVBUEqPgkprbOIHX4$ >.

The one thing that will continue working as normal is the eBird mobile app. The mobile app does not depend on being online, so you can continue to record bird lists in the app, however you cannot submit them until the outage is over. Just hold onto them.

On social media, discuss "life without eBird" using the hashtag #eBirdLife <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.facebook.com/hashtag/ebirdlife?__eep__=6&__cft__*0*=AZXg9ZOFPiEK4TIoyi9scSGU9DnGrJqw0aEKYQec8wrsQGx86HccIX0BQ02zTvOedllHKh9M4cMtbYkeOXR2UVcHWTYmr4AT5_ck-hN4cn5Q5h6EumbnWKO0iQpzSojKNLVcwKwYRrlAXLiCs-pC0QFOZE-_Rh5qZQI61_oIQzpubw&__tn__=*NK-R__;W10q!!OToaGQ!8JLBvRKieYf2wkN9N2q1KzGOMiSLz9TGpzCfzMaOG4fb5ShqhoVVBUEqPgkpW98h67I$ >

--
Kent Fiala


 

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Date: 11/16/20 7:40 am
From: Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Western Meadowlark continues 11/16/20 - Dobbins Farm, Townville, SC
Good Morning. George McHenry, Michael Robertson and I had good views of the
Western Meadowlark at Dobbins Farm in Townville, SC, this morning (first
reported last week by Steve Patterson). The bird was first detected by its
song at about 7:45AM and then quickly located on the west side of McAdams
Road, singing from the ground about 30 yards from the road, just south of
the south/lower pond (here: https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://goo.gl/maps/mHV2pFCKjfCmVYCR6__;!!OToaGQ!6QcmNBovW8sCHi20dNncgPjYlYiT8HZFySX8Rcn07jLGaT2DdOk57KW36AzSm-UKQrw$ ). The
bird sang continuously from this location for about 15 minutes before
flying directly west (away from the road) and landing in the lone tree
south of the lower pond.

Please remember to respect the farm operations and do not block the road.

Kevin Kubach
Greenville, SC

 

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Date: 11/16/20 7:17 am
From: <sshultz...>
Subject: OBX Birding 11/14-15
Based on the wx forecast Wednesday, this weekend would have been holiday
shopping. 20 knots NE is no fun on the coast. But as is often the case,
these forecasts have to be taken with a sizeable piece of sodium chloride.
Which is why we found ourselves standing at the end of Jennette's Pier
Saturday morning in t-shirt weather with a light 5 mph zephyr.



Birds swirled above schools of hapless bait fish as far as the eye could
see. With warmish 67 degree water and plenty of food, Laughing Gulls and
pelicans, often getting uncommon as we move through November, remained in
good numbers. And Laughing Gulls are nasty little birds. Since we were
watching for jaegers, we'd key on a darker bird chasing a smaller, whiter
one. And it would be a Laughing Gull trying to rob an innocent tern or
ringer.



But we managed three Parasitic Jaegers, two at the same time, cutting in and
out of feeding flocks. Cannonball jellies littered the water and attracted
a Leatherback turtle that swam about just below, providing crippling looks.
A bit later a cute family boldly emblazoned with shiny new "OBX North
Carolina" gear pointed over the edge and called turtle. Except this one was
greenish brown and covered with barnacles (some named Bill). Yep, a
Loggerhead, for a two-sea-turtle-morning. We also spotted a Basking Shark
that decided, for no apparent reason, to leap out of the water.



The Split Pea section of Hatteras Island ponied up all the expected marsh
birdies, Nelson's Sparrow, Saltmarsh Sparrow, Seaside Sparrow, Sedge Wren,
Virginia Rail, and produced a surprise bittern. Surprise from the
perspective that it scared the %#$^ out of me by popping up underfoot.
Heart rate returned to normal sometime later.



After missing the Rough-legged Hawk at Alligator on the way in, we tried in
the late afternoon. Little stinker still AWOL. But hanging around as the
sun set produced three perched Great Horned Owls, an oodle of woodcock, and
two shmedium-sized black bears. One of the bears popped out on the road
between me and the car, so had to wait for it to sniff around, play with its
feet a while, and then saunter across the road, swim across the ditch, and
proceed to annoy the soybeans.



The wind, what little there was, shifted overnight from N to S, so after
watching Lewis Hamilton win a record-tying 7th Formula 1 championship at the
Turkish Grand Prix (5:10 am start time!), we sea-watched from the hotel
balcony, noting many more southbound birds than the previous day. I've
noticed that sea birds seem to prefer to fly into the wind, so while one
would think a north wind would bring birds, I like a south wind. Lines of
scoters scooted south, and we played the "what's that puddle duck flying
with them" game for a while, and marveled at the number of gannets flying
away from Canada.



After tiring of that game, we played "how many Red-breasted Nuthatches can
you find at Bodie Island". A lot. If you are wondering where your backyard
nuthatch has gotten off to, it's probably here.



Next up, Oregon Inlet. Word on the tough streets of birding was that the
Purple Sandpipers were back at the jetty. With high lunar tides, the water
was still higher than desired at our arrival, so we hung out waiting for the
tide to slosh the other way. I noticed a little bird crossing Oregon Inlet
and watched as it lit on the rocks. Snow Bunting! Due to the wonders of
GroupMe, several folks were able to see it/him/her/shim. Two other
white-bellied passerines flying over were likely SNBU as well.



Roger Shaw alerted to a frigatebird in Kill Devil, and we hoped it might
come down the coast. Frigates love inlets, and we were at one, so it made
sense to hang out a while and hope. Sadly, the frigate went elsewhere. And
so did we, North Pond. The area around the photo blind produces the normal
duckage along with hen Surf Scoters, a White-winged Scoter, and a
Long-tailed Duck, all visible from the pull off just south of the blind.



Overall a lovely weekend on the Banks, and the first time this season
without wall to wall people! Good birds, good weather, and only 3
mosquitos! Hard to complain.





Steve Shultz

Sea-Turtle-Free Apex NC


 

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Date: 11/16/20 4:58 am
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Black-legged Kittiwake ID
Over the weekend, some people have been reporting "Black-legged Kittiwake"
at Huntington Beach State Park and describing it as 'having a dark M
pattern on the upperwings and a dark terminal tail band'.

* These features are not enough to eliminate 1st-year Bonaparte's Gull,
which also shows those field marks. In addition to those 2 field marks, a
BL Kittiwake also shows a wide dark smudgey collar.

In addition, 1st winter Bonapartes also has dark outer tips to the
primaries and secondaries on the upperwing, giving it the appearance of a
dark line along the entire trailing edge of the supperwings. BL Kittiwake
only has this dark trailing edge on the outer primaries (out near the
wingtips) - not the entire trailing edge of the upperwing.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

--
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2/__;!!OToaGQ!-xls9LE4OpJWR5Ks_DsFQnpaNawp9kECRzpiiemB8TRpcqCwDuYlNtGYlXNAS6QSBzo$


"These days I prefer to hunt with a camera. A good photograph demands more
skill from the hunter, better nerves and more patience than the rifle
shot." -- Bror Blixen

 

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Date: 11/16/20 3:52 am
From: piephofft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Southern Lake Norman Christmas Bird Count
Good morning,The Southern Lake Norman Christmas Bird Count will be held Sunday December 20, 2020. The count is open to anyone who wishes to participate. If you are interested in joining a group or just birding a few hours on your own, I can accommodate that. I just need to know. If you have traditionally been with a group on this count, let me know if you are in for this year also.If you are a potential first-timer to this count or for any Christmas Count and you have questions, I will be glad to talk with you.Stay Safe and Well,. 

Taylor Piephoff
Matthews, NC
<PiephoffT...>
 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/20 10:17 am
From: martha <cutford...>
Subject: evening grosbeaks Todd
Today I have a small flock of Evening Grosbeaks (2 males 6 females or imm) here at our feeder in Todd. These are the first I’ve had in the yard since sometime in the mid-90s.

Martha Cutler


 

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Date: 11/15/20 10:06 am
From: Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lake Benson waterfowl and other birds

Lake Benson in Garner, Wake Co. was pretty birdy this morning.  A nice variety of waterfowl were present.  These included a large raft of cormorants (175), a large raft of ring-necked ducks (200), and smaller groups of Canada goose, mallard, black duck, gadwall, ruddy duck, bufflehead, green-winged teal, hooded merganser, and pied-billed grebe.  A large blackbird flock in the large field around the parking lot for Shelter 2 contained starlings, cowbirds, rusty blackbirds, red-winged blackbirds, and common grackles.  The field also contained killdeer and American pipits.

Marc Ribaudo

 

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Date: 11/15/20 8:33 am
From: Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Evening Grosbeak flyover, Rockingham County, NC
I saw nine Evening Grosbeaks fly over while I was preparing to scope the
landfill this morning. They were a mix of yellow and gray birds with
conspicuous white wing patches. There were several males that really
stood out. Hoping for a better look next time!

Marty Wall
Eden, NC

 

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Date: 11/15/20 7:30 am
From: Jay Wherley (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Western Meadowlark Dobbins Farm Anderson County SC
I had a Western Meadowlark there yesterday, making the diagnostic Chuup
call. I have a pretty poor recording - in which the chuups match Birds of
the World sonogram very well. (Pam F. heard and recorded the same bird in
her checklist.) I also have some middling photos of this individual bird.
What’s intriguing to me - my photos seem to show a less saturated /
colorful bird than the earlier YouTube video posted to this list. My
checklist with sound and photos:
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S76245328__;!!OToaGQ!4Zoa_72fPejHeplpXjvDZeOdjkWQuaqVgs1Wbz1RxClnZG9cSr0UPMztuW0yCWys8ZM$

So - is this difference within photographic variations? Or, could there
more than one Western present?

Jay Wherley
Asheville, NC


On Sun, Nov 15, 2020 at 10:05 AM Monroe <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Bird seen and heard on east side McAdams Road. Just north of first feeding
> trough. In soy bean field.
>
> About 945 am.
>
> Also Seen and heard a bit further south in front of first feeding trough
> at 830.am.
>
> Monroe Pannell
> Conover
> Catawba County NC
> Sent from my iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/20 7:04 am
From: Monroe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Western Meadowlark Dobbins Farm Anderson County SC
Bird seen and heard on east side McAdams Road. Just north of first feeding trough. In soy bean field.

About 945 am.

Also Seen and heard a bit further south in front of first feeding trough at 830.am.

Monroe Pannell
Conover
Catawba County NC
Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/20 4:25 am
From: David Gibson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Orange-crowned warbler in Durham
Hi Bill, Very cool about the Orange-crowned sighting. They're regular
winter visitors just north of you in SE VA.
Small world! I often write about birds, bird photography, fieldcraft, etc.
and referenced your work, "Secrets of Digital Bird Photography Tools and
Techniques <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://digitalbirdphotography.com/construction.html__;!!OToaGQ!6Nlg72EpqhywzUgi6-sSNDfWWnDhv56y8AFKa6tzLOWO9J4G4Q_c3Gnck52KgMeG9IA$ >" a while
back in my own piece, "Birds and Bird Photography, Cont'd
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://birdpartner.com/2019/11/22/birds-bird-photography-3/__;!!OToaGQ!6Nlg72EpqhywzUgi6-sSNDfWWnDhv56y8AFKa6tzLOWO9J4G4Q_c3Gnck52K4HyTMhc$ >." Your work
is a great resource, and I often recommend it to others. Best,
Dave Gibson
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://birdpartner.com/__;!!OToaGQ!6Nlg72EpqhywzUgi6-sSNDfWWnDhv56y8AFKa6tzLOWO9J4G4Q_c3Gnck52KpGDMGAc$



On Sun, Nov 15, 2020 at 6:58 AM William Majoros <bmajoros...>
wrote:

> Yesterday morning I was happy to see what I believe was an orange-crowned
> warbler at Sandy Creek park in Durham, next to the wooden bridge. There
> were a number of sightings of this species there last winter, so maybe this
> bird will stick around this winter.
>
>
>
> ---
>
> Bill Majoros, Ph.D.
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.ThirdBirdFromTheSun.com__;!!OToaGQ!6Nlg72EpqhywzUgi6-sSNDfWWnDhv56y8AFKa6tzLOWO9J4G4Q_c3Gnck52Kvhxx2nU$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.ThirdBirdFromTheSun.com__;!!OToaGQ!7ar9d7EDuk500eiKJFkVIpR3lfSIyOHzRut2jVri5f5S8gd8KMR9y7GBYCQh6cB95X8$>
>
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/20 3:58 am
From: William Majoros <bmajoros...>
Subject: Orange-crowned warbler in Durham
Yesterday morning I was happy to see what I believe was an orange-crowned warbler at Sandy Creek park in Durham, next to the wooden bridge. There were a number of sightings of this species there last winter, so maybe this bird will stick around this winter.

---
Bill Majoros, Ph.D.
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.ThirdBirdFromTheSun.com__;!!OToaGQ!7ar9d7EDuk500eiKJFkVIpR3lfSIyOHzRut2jVri5f5S8gd8KMR9y7GBYCQh6cB95X8$



 

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Date: 11/14/20 6:16 pm
From: Susan Campbell <susan...>
Subject: RE: Selasphorus hummingbird in Asheville, NC?
Great to see your report! It is one of several up that way in the mountain region this season.

Rufous/Allen's types are arriving-- as is the case each winter. A few have been confirmed as Rufous in the last week as a result of banding. More are on the schedule during the next week.

I would not be surprised if at least one of these hummers turns out to be something different. Not only do we know other species can and do show up in NC but, unfortunately, ID is tricky in most cases.

I will send you winter feeding tips tomorrow. We have very good advice that we send to all new cold weather hosts in the Carolinas each year.

Keep in mind that these are tough little birds. And as you know from your prior experience, they have no problem spending time here: for part of--or even the entire winter.

Congrats and I will be in touch. I have a colleague in TN who may be able to pay you a visit in the very near future!

Susan Campbell
Research Affiliate, NCMNS
Apex, NC

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "H. Clarke" <dclarke...>
Date: 11/14/20 10:24 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Selasphorus hummingbird in Asheville, NC?

Can anyone confirm the identity? We leave the feeders up in the hopes of catching a waif each winter. We had one several years ago that stayed most of the winter. Does anyone have any tips on keeping the feeders from freezing?
[IMG-11171.jpg]
Dr. H. David Clarke, Professor
Department of Biology, CPO # 2040
326 Zeis Hall
University of North Carolina at Asheville
One University Heights
Asheville, NC 28804
phone: 828-232-5151


 

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Date: 11/14/20 4:32 pm
From: Anita Huffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Project Feederwatch
That's the way it always worked for me! :)
Anita Huffman
Rugby, VA
Grayson County

On 11/14/20 6:50 PM, Ken Bennett (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> How do the birds know that today is the day we start counting them? :-)
>
> We've had a flock of over 100 pine siskins on our deck every single day
> this week. Today? We got six.
>
> Our daughter, who lives in northern New Mexico, had some great birds at
> her feeders all week. Today? Not a single bird showed up. Zero.
>
> I'm sure they'll be back by, er, Monday.
>
> On the positive side, we got our FOS junco.
>
> Ken Bennett
> Winston-Salem
 

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Date: 11/14/20 3:51 pm
From: Ken Bennett (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Project Feederwatch
How do the birds know that today is the day we start counting them? :-)

We've had a flock of over 100 pine siskins on our deck every single day
this week. Today? We got six.

Our daughter, who lives in northern New Mexico, had some great birds at her
feeders all week. Today? Not a single bird showed up. Zero.

I'm sure they'll be back by, er, Monday.

On the positive side, we got our FOS junco.

Ken Bennett
Winston-Salem

 

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Date: 11/14/20 12:01 pm
From: Judi Sawyer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Evening Grosbeak in Watauga County, NC
I had one at my house in Roan Mountain this morning too!!

Judi Sawyer
Roan Mountain, TN

On Sat, Nov 14, 2020, 2:53 PM "J. Merrill Lynch" <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Birders, I have a single female Evening Grosbeak at my feeder this
> afternoon. The first one I’ve seen in NC since the mid-1990’s. Very
> exciting!
>
> Merrill Lynch
> Echo Valley Farm (3,400’)
> Zionville, Watauga County, NC
> Sent from my iPhone

 

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Date: 11/14/20 11:53 am
From: \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Evening Grosbeak in Watauga County, NC
Birders, I have a single female Evening Grosbeak at my feeder this afternoon. The first one I’ve seen in NC since the mid-1990’s. Very exciting!

Merrill Lynch
Echo Valley Farm (3,400’)
Zionville, Watauga County, NC
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 11/14/20 9:27 am
From: David Wilson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: White pelican

Pelican at the very East End Of Sunset Beach. Right now
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 11/14/20 7:30 am
From: Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: 3 Selasphorus Hummingbirds at Riverbend Park
There are currently 3 Selasphorus Hummingbirds at the Bean House at
Riverbend Park (northern Catawba Co). We were about to catch and band one
adult female Rufous. We saw all 3 together chasing each other. I may try to
set up a time tomorrow for anyone who would like to come in to see them
without having to walk the mile to get to the house from the office. --
Dwayne
*************
Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
<redxbill...>

 

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Date: 11/14/20 7:24 am
From: H. Clarke <dclarke...>
Subject: Selasphorus hummingbird in Asheville, NC?
Can anyone confirm the identity? We leave the feeders up in the hopes of
catching a waif each winter. We had one several years ago that stayed most
of the winter. Does anyone have any tips on keeping the feeders from
freezing?
[image: IMG-11171.jpg]
Dr. H. David Clarke, Professor
Department of Biology, CPO # 2040
326 Zeis Hall
University of North Carolina at Asheville
One University Heights
Asheville, NC 28804
phone: 828-232-5151

 

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Date: 11/14/20 6:54 am
From: Derb Carter <derbc...>
Subject: Evening Grosbeaks - Chapel Hill
Just had a flock of six Evening Grosbeaks fly by my office window in downtown Chapel Hill. First I have seen in NC in maybe 20 years.

Derb Carter

 

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Date: 11/14/20 6:28 am
From: scompton1251 <scompton1251...>
Subject: Western Meadowlark refound Sat.
Western Meadowlark refound 8:34am Saturday McAdams Road past second feeding trough, same location as Thursday and Friday. Poor visuals but clear song. Singing edge of soybean and sunflower field SW of road, about 200 yards distant. Heard by Imtioz Haque and later by me and Chip Gilbert. This is in Townville, SC Anderson County, NW SC. Steve ComptonGreenville, SCSent from my Verizon LG Smartphone
 

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Date: 11/14/20 6:16 am
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Lapland Longspur at Huntington Beach SP
I meant “tern” nesting area - damned iPhone.

On Saturday, November 14, 2020, Nate Dias <offshorebirder...> wrote:

> John Cox and I just flushed a Lapland Longspur from the dunes at HBSP and
> heard its rattle call well. We followed it in flight with our bins for a
> while.
>
> It was where the beach meets dunes 1/3 of the way from the access path to
> the jetty.
>
> It flew back towards the old dune road / teen nesting area. We will try
> to realities after birding the jetty.
>
> Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
>
>
> --
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2/__;!!OToaGQ!9-mCTGxhvCWtTDwQEawiT-utU7kOa1j3Zqrqa05QrasZWgBXB5u4oLfS3gLURHB6V1Y$
>
>
> "These days I prefer to hunt with a camera. A good photograph demands
> more skill from the hunter, better nerves and more patience than the rifle
> shot." -- Bror Blixen
>


--
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2/__;!!OToaGQ!9-mCTGxhvCWtTDwQEawiT-utU7kOa1j3Zqrqa05QrasZWgBXB5u4oLfS3gLURHB6V1Y$


"These days I prefer to hunt with a camera. A good photograph demands more
skill from the hunter, better nerves and more patience than the rifle
shot." -- Bror Blixen

 

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Date: 11/14/20 5:33 am
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lapland Longspur at Huntington Beach SP
John Cox and I just flushed a Lapland Longspur from the dunes at HBSP and
heard its rattle call well. We followed it in flight with our bins for a
while.

It was where the beach meets dunes 1/3 of the way from the access path to
the jetty.

It flew back towards the old dune road / teen nesting area. We will try to
realities after birding the jetty.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC


--
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2/__;!!OToaGQ!5rftXAoJMFVgn5K0ylQorB0lu8EnICsoJlTFoDfdeuImBkXi0xpVsM0dWEGOgfrnrYI$


"These days I prefer to hunt with a camera. A good photograph demands more
skill from the hunter, better nerves and more patience than the rifle
shot." -- Bror Blixen

 

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Date: 11/13/20 5:34 pm
From: Steve Patterson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Black-legged Kittiwake - Murrells Inlet Jetty, Huntington Beach SP - 11/10/2020
Glad you're over the illness, Mark.  Congratulations on a fantastic find!


Steve Patterson


-----Original Message-----
From: Mark McShane <carolinabirds...>
To: <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Fri, Nov 13, 2020 2:21 pm
Subject: Black-legged Kittiwake - Murrells Inlet Jetty, Huntington Beach SP - 11/10/2020

Hi All,

Early Tuesday morning I started over to Murrells Inlet from northeast metro
Atlanta hoping to see the recently reported Common Murre duo there, but only
found a first for me for South Carolina Black-legged Kittiwake as a good
consolation prize out on the jetty!

I wanted to post this bird Tuesday evening but came down deathly ill after
dinner after leaving the state park apparently a victim of either some bad
good food or some bad bad food somewhere along the way this week and had to
hole up in a Murrells Inlet hotel for two nights (which I guess wasn't too bad
as with the weather after that couldn't really bird anywhere anyway for a good
while).  Finally made it back home to the computer and big screen and updated
the video frame screen shots of the kittiwake a bit.

The eBird checklist with footage and more details:
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S76096238__;!!OToaGQ!87WeFpvs4DRHutYx4OKgVKQQzPYmm7HioxyaNL19Ns0o9e0zbC_wFuOSM-LsW2cHNAk$

Thanks again South Carolina, and Good Birding All,

Mark

Mark McShane
Georgia Birder-at-Large
Lawrenceville, Gwinnett County, Georgia
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.neargareport.com__;!!OToaGQ!87WeFpvs4DRHutYx4OKgVKQQzPYmm7HioxyaNL19Ns0o9e0zbC_wFuOSM-LspJkCGqU$

 

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Date: 11/13/20 5:30 pm
From: Steve Patterson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Western Meadowlark continues in Townville
At least 18 persons scanned the pastures of Dobbins Farm for the meadowlark, today.  Several of them heard the bird singing a few different times during the morning.  Others both heard and saw the bird in the afternoon, around 1:45, or so.  Today, the bird was located in the field past the second pond (to the left of the pond) and up the hill in the vicinity of the lone tree.  This is a different location from yesterday's spot by the first pond, but there is ample suitable habitat everywhere out there.  And there are plenty of Eastern Meadowlarks to help hide the one you're looking for.
Best wishes to all who look for it tomorrow.  Please remember to park away from the feedlot pulloffs and do not block traffic.


Steve PattersonAnderson, SC
 

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Date: 11/13/20 11:20 am
From: \Mark McShane\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Black-legged Kittiwake - Murrells Inlet Jetty, Huntington Beach SP - 11/10/2020
Hi All,

Early Tuesday morning I started over to Murrells Inlet from northeast metro
Atlanta hoping to see the recently reported Common Murre duo there, but only
found a first for me for South Carolina Black-legged Kittiwake as a good
consolation prize out on the jetty!

I wanted to post this bird Tuesday evening but came down deathly ill after
dinner after leaving the state park apparently a victim of either some bad
good food or some bad bad food somewhere along the way this week and had to
hole up in a Murrells Inlet hotel for two nights (which I guess wasn't too bad
as with the weather after that couldn't really bird anywhere anyway for a good
while). Finally made it back home to the computer and big screen and updated
the video frame screen shots of the kittiwake a bit.

The eBird checklist with footage and more details:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S76096238

Thanks again South Carolina, and Good Birding All,

Mark

Mark McShane
Georgia Birder-at-Large
Lawrenceville, Gwinnett County, Georgia
www.neargareport.com
 

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Date: 11/13/20 10:24 am
From: Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...>
Subject: Coincidence?
I count birds each weekend between FeederWatch cycles.  Birds have been very scarce in my yard over the past two weeks.  Last weekend I saw none.  Today, I sighted five different species at the same time!  Could it be a coincidence that FeederWatch starts tomorrow, the 14, and they are giving me something to do with my time?  Anything to get over being stuck at home during this pandemic.

Frank HamiltonCharleston, SC

 

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Date: 11/13/20 5:15 am
From: \<k.grinnell...>\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: [gcbirdclub] [eBird Regional Editors] eBird Outage Nov 17-19 - help spread the word
Paul, Thanks for the head's up.
  From the outage info:
"...you can start eBird Mobile checklists during the downtime and submit them once eBird is back online."

In other words, yes Dave, you can create checklists and submit them on the 20th.  In fact, Cornell is encouraging birders to submit lists that are started on the 17-19th.
Kay
Kay Grinnell
<kaytgrinnell...>
843 597-3633 cell

On Thursday, November 12, 2020, 05:23:49 PM EST, Kent Fiala <carolinabirds...> wrote:


Regarding the eBird outage coming up next week, please read https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/news/database-update-november-17-19-maintenance__;!!OToaGQ!-LAtFeRpuiCvhs5U3h55Z4eWejUPpOcMe5dBuFcTm6vv1RtNozeUIfn_E45IXGIyiOQ$

Kent Fiala On 11/12/2020 4:37 PM, <dave...> wrote:


Thanks Paul,
Do you know what the implications of this are for the mobile app? Will we be unable to create checklists, or just to submit them?
--dave 

On Nov 12, 2020, at 4:32 PM, Paul Serridge <paulserridge...> wrote:



 Ebirders, please see email below.
Paul Serridge Greenville SC
---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: John Garrett <curvirostra9...>
Date: Thu, Nov 12, 2020 at 4:10 PM
Subject: [eBird Regional Editors] eBird Outage Nov 17-19 - help spread the word
To: eBird Regional Editors <ebird-regional-editors...>


Dear eBird Regional Editors,
As you are likely aware, eBird's long-term database migration from Oracle to Postgres will be coming to an end on November 17-19. This means that all of eBird will be down on those days - including the review tools, as well as the Macaulay Library, Birds of the World - everything. More information is here: https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/news/database-update-november-17-19-maintenance__;!!OToaGQ!-LAtFeRpuiCvhs5U3h55Z4eWejUPpOcMe5dBuFcTm6vv1RtNozeUIfn_E45IXGIyiOQ$
While we will have a notification system in eBird Mobile to warn users about this, we can't reach everyone. Please feel free to distribute this information to your local birding listservs, Whatsapp groups, or other channels, including the link to the homepage article above.
Thanks for your help, and I sincerely hope everyone will be able to enjoy birding in an eBirdless world for a few days!
Best,
John Garrett eBird Project Assistant --
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "eBird Regional Editors" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to ebird-regional-editors+<unsubscribe...>
To view this discussion on the web visit https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/ebird-regional-editors/CACs*3DmsjWfycA__VbPAF3vSvx*2BDu0hZ*2Bv6p0FrcXhFOX9BN*2BfZg*40mail.gmail.com__;JSUlJSU!!OToaGQ!-LAtFeRpuiCvhs5U3h55Z4eWejUPpOcMe5dBuFcTm6vv1RtNozeUIfn_E45I0o4rtZs$ .
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Date: 11/13/20 4:12 am
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: Long-billed Curlew at east Shackleford Banks
A record that is not on ebird is:

1 Long-billed Curlew, with 2 Whimbrels, and many oystercatchers on a tiny
island (Baregrass Island) in Back Sound adjacent to east Shackleford Banks
on 6 November, seen by Jon Altman and others

The Whimbrels are likely wintering birds. A few Whimbrels apparently
overwinter in the east Shackleford area most years.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

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Date: 11/12/20 4:17 pm
From: Steve Patterson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Western Meadowlark, Anderson County, 11-12-20
The meadowlark I reported earlier is receiving a good bit of positive feedback form others who are looking at the video.  Here is the video again, if you missed it:
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://youtu.be/xyJBOo1Xlnc__;!!OToaGQ!41QQ0ohCvTwSk97rWIzqSf5MAs24u8UvLj5CfCwiMPQ8OKFG5mo0cH7yE0TDRcJepyE$

For those wanting to search for it, here are some simple directions.  From Fred Dobbins Road in Townville, turn onto McAdams Road and drive toward the two famous ponds.  Stop before the first feedlot pulloff.  (Remember to not park at or too near these feedlots, and give traffic and farm operations plenty of room.)  The bird was between the galvanized gate and this feedlot, roughly where a muddy puddle forms in the pasture right beside the fence.  I found it on the pond side of the road.  After a few minutes of observation, the bird flew across the road and landed in the sunflower stubble very near the soybeans.  
If you stop where the soybean field meets the old sunflower field, you're in the right place.  Of course, the bird might find suitable surroundings all along this road, so be patient and listen for the song.  I was driving when I first heard it and stopped immediately to try to get a look.  
According to an eBird report, Andy Norris went out after noon and relocated the bird.  Good luck if you try.  Debra and I will likely be there in the morning.  



Steve PattersonAnderson, SC
 

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Date: 11/12/20 4:02 pm
From: Oscar Carmona (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: meadowlark species, Townville, SC
Definitely a Western - the Killdeer in the background also agrees!
Oscar CarmonaWake Forest, NC


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone


On Thursday, November 12, 2020, 6:40 PM, Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...> wrote:

Steve has put a video of the meadowlark with its song on You Tube:
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xyJBOo1Xlnc&<feature...>;!!OToaGQ!-2noga30aQAjHeG2zpi14rqRw4DupUajLD5AlWGTLuwqqpZE4shpU1r8ReX3sK4Oido$
Indeed it is a Western Meadowlark, but you can judge for yourself.

Harry LeGrand

On Thu, Nov 12, 2020 at 12:29 PM Steve Patterson <carolinabirds...> wrote:

Birders,
For your information, this morning I found a meadowlark at Dobbins Farm that was singing a Western Meadowlark song.  An eBird report has been filed and documentation will be sent to the SC Bird Records Committee.  Whether there is enough evidence to confirm it as a Western will have to be determined.  I hope you find it if you are in the area.



Steve PattersonAnderson, SC




 

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Date: 11/12/20 3:40 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: meadowlark species, Townville, SC
Steve has put a video of the meadowlark with its song on You Tube:

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xyJBOo1Xlnc&<feature...>;!!OToaGQ!_gsTDXGaFn3IyNeYTPma_m86mX-uO6X_I6ZYXIy0_Q1OVks7IlRT-g6arbowbXC4kFo$

Indeed it is a Western Meadowlark, but you can judge for yourself.

Harry LeGrand

On Thu, Nov 12, 2020 at 12:29 PM Steve Patterson <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Birders,
>
> For your information, this morning I found a meadowlark at Dobbins Farm
> that was singing a Western Meadowlark song. An eBird report has been filed
> and documentation will be sent to the SC Bird Records Committee. Whether
> there is enough evidence to confirm it as a Western will have to be
> determined. I hope you find it if you are in the area.
>
>
>
>
> Steve Patterson
> Anderson, SC
>

 

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Date: 11/12/20 2:23 pm
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: [gcbirdclub] [eBird Regional Editors] eBird Outage Nov 17-19 - help spread the word
Regarding the eBird outage coming up next week, please read https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/news/database-update-november-17-19-maintenance__;!!OToaGQ!4G7W-DPGLg1erVvCj_XqqqDxbJBg6-3qXVH4a9VHreuY41Xgvp3LDw6Y47UHzN27xcE$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/news/database-update-november-17-19-maintenance__;!!OToaGQ!4G7W-DPGLg1erVvCj_XqqqDxbJBg6-3qXVH4a9VHreuY41Xgvp3LDw6Y47UHzN27xcE$ >

Kent Fiala

On 11/12/2020 4:37 PM, <dave...> wrote:
> Thanks Paul,
>
> Do you know what the implications of this are for the mobile app? Will we be unable to create checklists, or just to submit them?
>
> --dave
>
>> On Nov 12, 2020, at 4:32 PM, Paul Serridge <paulserridge...> wrote:
>>
>> 
>> Ebirders, please see email below.
>>
>> Paul Serridge
>> Greenville SC
>>
>> ---------- Forwarded message ---------
>> From: *John Garrett* <curvirostra9...> <mailto:<curvirostra9...>>
>> Date: Thu, Nov 12, 2020 at 4:10 PM
>> Subject: [eBird Regional Editors] eBird Outage Nov 17-19 - help spread the word
>> To: eBird Regional Editors <ebird-regional-editors...> <mailto:<ebird-regional-editors...>>
>>
>>
>> Dear eBird Regional Editors,
>>
>> As you are likely aware, eBird's long-term database migration from Oracle to Postgres will be coming to an end on November 17-19. This means that all of eBird will be down on those days - including the review tools, as well as the Macaulay Library, Birds of the World - everything. More information is here: https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/news/database-update-november-17-19-maintenance__;!!OToaGQ!4G7W-DPGLg1erVvCj_XqqqDxbJBg6-3qXVH4a9VHreuY41Xgvp3LDw6Y47UHzN27xcE$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/news/database-update-november-17-19-maintenance__;!!OToaGQ!-VAgp_2xCendq8U0sfiDLtcit9smp4YxXZAJoHHsTyO0ZwBmbv4dstPAGKEn7IwqGp0$>
>>
>> While we will have a notification system in eBird Mobile to warn users about this, we can't reach everyone. Please feel free to distribute this information to your local birding listservs, Whatsapp groups, or other channels, including the link to the homepage article above.
>>
>> Thanks for your help, and I sincerely hope everyone will be able to enjoy birding in an eBirdless world for a few days!
>>
>> Best,
>>
>> John Garrett
>> eBird Project Assistant
>> --
>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "eBird Regional Editors" group.
>> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to ebird-regional-editors+<unsubscribe...> <mailto:ebird-regional-editors+<unsubscribe...>.
>> To view this discussion on the web visit https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/ebird-regional-editors/CACs*3DmsjWfycA__VbPAF3vSvx*2BDu0hZ*2Bv6p0FrcXhFOX9BN*2BfZg*40mail.gmail.com__;JSUlJSU!!OToaGQ!4G7W-DPGLg1erVvCj_XqqqDxbJBg6-3qXVH4a9VHreuY41Xgvp3LDw6Y47UH73sEjH0$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/ebird-regional-editors/CACs*3DmsjWfycA__VbPAF3vSvx*2BDu0hZ*2Bv6p0FrcXhFOX9BN*2BfZg*40mail.gmail.com?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer__;JSUlJSU!!OToaGQ!-VAgp_2xCendq8U0sfiDLtcit9smp4YxXZAJoHHsTyO0ZwBmbv4dstPAGKEnELIjDPE$>.
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Back to top
Date: 11/12/20 2:07 pm
From: Anita Huffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: meadowlark species, Townville, SC
There was a Virginia's Warbler in Kingsport, TN last January or maybe it
was Jan 2018. My son and I went down to see it. People came from as far
as New Jersey (at least that I know about, maybe farther) to see and
photograph it.

Anita Huffman
Rugby, VA
Grayson, County

On 11/12/20 4:45 PM, Oscar Carmona (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> Being that this winter is shaping up to be both a western species and
> northern finch invasion, opportunities for finding unusual species is
> definitely better this year than others. We have already seen Townsend’s
> Solitaires and Painted Redstart in NC and a Virginia’s Warbler in Virginia!
>
> Oscar Carmona
> Wake Forest, NC
>
 

Back to top
Date: 11/12/20 1:48 pm
From: Oscar Carmona (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: meadowlark species, Townville, SC
Being that this winter is shaping up to be both a western species and northern finch invasion, opportunities for finding unusual species is definitely better this year than others. We have already seen Townsend’s Solitaires and Painted Redstart in NC and a Virginia’s Warbler in Virginia! 

Oscar CarmonaWake Forest, NC

Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone


On Thursday, November 12, 2020, 3:37 PM, Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...> wrote:

Steve,
Welcome to the club!  I think Paul Sykes and I are about the only other people still alive who have seen and heard a Western Meadowlark in the Carolinas!  I note that SC has a specimen record from 1958, and NC has only sight and heard records (no recordings or photos) from the latter part of the 1960's (1965 and 1968).  So, it seems to have been over 50 years (!) since a legit report of one in the Carolinas.  I managed to see and hear the 1968 bird at Greenview Farm near Raleigh; the 1965 bird was on the Outer Banks -- seen and heard only.  So, for NC it has always had to remain on the Provisional List.
I have never heard what I would consider an Eastern Meadowlark singing a Western song.  That is not going to happen, as Meadowlarks are not mimids!  The Greenview bird was reported and found by Lee Jones (he much later wrote the Birds of Belize).  The pale plumage AND the flute-like, "warbling" song were noted.  This was back in the day when cameras were usually not taken into the field -- they would have been mostly large and messy, and of course there was no way of recording a bird song easily then. 

What I DO suggest for you to get your bird accepted by the SC Committee -- not only fill out a Carolina Bird Club Rare Bird Report form, but DESCRIBE the song you heard -- not just that you heard its song, it sounded like the recordings, etc.  And, mention if you are familiar with the bird and song from out West.  I don't  know if the photos by themselves are going to be definitive, but -- the species is already on the SC Definitive List, so it's already on the official list.  But, we all want your bird accepted as a first record in the Carolinas since 1968!
Yes, let's hope someone else can re-find it and get a recording.  It shouldn't be flying OUT of the place today -- but it could tonight and be gone by tomorrow.   I would think your report would be accepted, as long as you give a good visual description and describe the song.

Harry LeGrandRaleigh

On Thu, Nov 12, 2020 at 12:29 PM Steve Patterson <carolinabirds...> wrote:

Birders,
For your information, this morning I found a meadowlark at Dobbins Farm that was singing a Western Meadowlark song.  An eBird report has been filed and documentation will be sent to the SC Bird Records Committee.  Whether there is enough evidence to confirm it as a Western will have to be determined.  I hope you find it if you are in the area.



Steve PattersonAnderson, SC




 

Back to top
Date: 11/12/20 1:38 pm
From: <dave...> <dave...>
Subject: Re: [gcbirdclub] [eBird Regional Editors] eBird Outage Nov 17-19 - help spread the word
Thanks Paul,

Do you know what the implications of this are for the mobile app? Will we be unable to create checklists, or just to submit them?

--dave

> On Nov 12, 2020, at 4:32 PM, Paul Serridge <paulserridge...> wrote:
>
> 
> Ebirders, please see email below.
>
> Paul Serridge
> Greenville SC
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ---------
> From: John Garrett <curvirostra9...>
> Date: Thu, Nov 12, 2020 at 4:10 PM
> Subject: [eBird Regional Editors] eBird Outage Nov 17-19 - help spread the word
> To: eBird Regional Editors <ebird-regional-editors...>
>
>
> Dear eBird Regional Editors,
>
> As you are likely aware, eBird's long-term database migration from Oracle to Postgres will be coming to an end on November 17-19. This means that all of eBird will be down on those days - including the review tools, as well as the Macaulay Library, Birds of the World - everything. More information is here: https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/news/database-update-november-17-19-maintenance__;!!OToaGQ!-VAgp_2xCendq8U0sfiDLtcit9smp4YxXZAJoHHsTyO0ZwBmbv4dstPAGKEn7IwqGp0$
>
> While we will have a notification system in eBird Mobile to warn users about this, we can't reach everyone. Please feel free to distribute this information to your local birding listservs, Whatsapp groups, or other channels, including the link to the homepage article above.
>
> Thanks for your help, and I sincerely hope everyone will be able to enjoy birding in an eBirdless world for a few days!
>
> Best,
>
> John Garrett
> eBird Project Assistant
> --
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "eBird Regional Editors" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to ebird-regional-editors+<unsubscribe...>
> To view this discussion on the web visit https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/ebird-regional-editors/CACs*3DmsjWfycA__VbPAF3vSvx*2BDu0hZ*2Bv6p0FrcXhFOX9BN*2BfZg*40mail.gmail.com__;JSUlJSU!!OToaGQ!-VAgp_2xCendq8U0sfiDLtcit9smp4YxXZAJoHHsTyO0ZwBmbv4dstPAGKEn7kb5Isg$ .
> _._,_._,_
> Groups.io Links:
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> View/Reply Online (#3087) | Reply To Sender | Reply To Group | Mute This Topic | New Topic
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> _._,_._,_

 

Back to top
Date: 11/12/20 1:33 pm
From: Paul Serridge (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fwd: [eBird Regional Editors] eBird Outage Nov 17-19 - help spread the word
Ebirders, please see email below.

Paul Serridge
Greenville SC

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: John Garrett <curvirostra9...>
Date: Thu, Nov 12, 2020 at 4:10 PM
Subject: [eBird Regional Editors] eBird Outage Nov 17-19 - help spread the
word
To: eBird Regional Editors <ebird-regional-editors...>


Dear eBird Regional Editors,

As you are likely aware, eBird's long-term database migration from Oracle
to Postgres will be coming to an end on November 17-19. This means that all
of eBird will be down on those days - including the review tools, as well
as the Macaulay Library, Birds of the World - everything. More information
is here: https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/news/database-update-november-17-19-maintenance__;!!OToaGQ!7_z_7fU02lYJAEyqFvwBJGyiUyQTcv7AZeJEFDprcATEQOEq2QD3pipcyGfxxdlDObE$

While we will have a notification system in eBird Mobile to warn users
about this, we can't reach everyone. Please feel free to distribute this
information to your local birding listservs, Whatsapp groups, or other
channels, including the link to the homepage article above.

Thanks for your help, and I sincerely hope everyone will be able to enjoy
birding in an eBirdless world for a few days!

Best,

John Garrett
eBird Project Assistant

--
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
"eBird Regional Editors" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
email to ebird-regional-editors+<unsubscribe...>
To view this discussion on the web visit
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/ebird-regional-editors/CACs*3DmsjWfycA__VbPAF3vSvx*2BDu0hZ*2Bv6p0FrcXhFOX9BN*2BfZg*40mail.gmail.com__;JSUlJSU!!OToaGQ!7_z_7fU02lYJAEyqFvwBJGyiUyQTcv7AZeJEFDprcATEQOEq2QD3pipcyGfx2lx5M3g$
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/ebird-regional-editors/CACs*3DmsjWfycA__VbPAF3vSvx*2BDu0hZ*2Bv6p0FrcXhFOX9BN*2BfZg*40mail.gmail.com?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer__;JSUlJSU!!OToaGQ!7_z_7fU02lYJAEyqFvwBJGyiUyQTcv7AZeJEFDprcATEQOEq2QD3pipcyGfxq5WTcNY$ >
.

 

Back to top
Date: 11/12/20 1:04 pm
From: Paul Glass <pag...>
Subject: RE: Peripheral Rarity - GRAY HERON, Northampton Co, VA
More pics here: https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S75656540__;!!OToaGQ!7JLKKqGs11q6EmccJBRk8Y73eF-zk_LSGL8eaJcFhuOs2ITRWSCCndn2YtgSg_zdVbA$
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S75656540__;!!OToaGQ!7JLKKqGs11q6EmccJBRk8Y73eF-zk_LSGL8eaJcFhuOs2ITRWSCCndn2YtgSg_zdVbA$ >

Apparently the bird was at Chincoteague before it was found in Cheriton.

Paul Glass
South Boston, VA

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Patteson [mailto:<carolinabirds...>]
Sent: Thursday, November 12, 2020 8:38 AM
To: Corey, Ed
Cc: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Peripheral Rarity - GRAY HERON, Northampton Co, VA


The original checklist got deleted. A corrected checklist with pics of the
heron is here: https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S76139031__;!!OToaGQ!7JLKKqGs11q6EmccJBRk8Y73eF-zk_LSGL8eaJcFhuOs2ITRWSCCndn2YtgS_PsyD4Q$
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S76139031__;!!OToaG
Q!48QcefClyH5zDGQWkWzRLzukds5nOCYKNz34FkM5xojFhxOCGUppWUsL0Y4H8twaRvw$>

Brian Patteson
Hatteras. NC


On Nov 11, 2020, at 2:02 PM, Corey, Ed <ed.corey...>
<mailto:<ed.corey...> > wrote:

Just to get NC birders in the loop, a GRAY HERON was reported from the
Cheriton Landfill on the Eastern Shore of VA on Nov 9th. Originally
identified as a Wurdemann's form of Great Blue Heron, it was only corrected
to a Gray today. So far, local birders have been unable to relocate it, but
there is some potential that the bird could head south. Keep an eye out for
any unusually pale Great Blues if you're out and about! Please see the
eBird list below for pictures:
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S76076626__;!!OToaGQ!7JLKKqGs11q6EmccJBRk8Y73eF-zk_LSGL8eaJcFhuOs2ITRWSCCndn2YtgSyMZC10A$
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S76076626__;!!OToaG
Q!4qRz8aGhHtP2volWWzotYVPWQDzvIZJgh5phW222dF64YQq1B5KoOUxFZ7Tvk1o3lW4$>
Good birding!
Ed Corey
Inventory Biologist, NC Division of Parks and Recreation
NC Dept. of Natural and Cultural Resources
919 841 4037 Office
919 208 7864 Mobile
<mailto:<Ed.Corey...> <Ed.Corey...>
12700 Bayleaf Church Road | Raleigh, North Carolina 27614
#StayStrongNC
Learn more @ nc.gov/covid19
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://nc.gov/covid19__;!!OToaGQ!48QcefClyH5zDG
QWkWzRLzukds5nOCYKNz34FkM5xojFhxOCGUppWUsL0Y4HqROi9RU$>
And don't forget your Ws! Wear. Wait. Wash.
WEAR a face covering.
WAIT 6 feet apart from other people.
WASH your hands often.
Email correspondence to and from this address is subject to the North
Carolina Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.



 

Back to top
Date: 11/12/20 12:37 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: meadowlark species, Townville, SC
Steve,

Welcome to the club! I think Paul Sykes and I are about the only other
people still alive who have seen and heard a Western Meadowlark in the
Carolinas! I note that SC has a specimen record from 1958, and NC has only
sight and heard records (no recordings or photos) from the latter part of
the 1960's (1965 and 1968). So, it seems to have been over 50 years (!)
since a legit report of one in the Carolinas. I managed to see and hear
the 1968 bird at Greenview Farm near Raleigh; the 1965 bird was on the
Outer Banks -- seen and heard only. So, for NC it has always had to remain
on the Provisional List.

I have never heard what I would consider an Eastern Meadowlark singing a
Western song. That is not going to happen, as Meadowlarks are not mimids!
The Greenview bird was reported and found by Lee Jones (he much later wrote
the Birds of Belize). The pale plumage AND the flute-like, "warbling" song
were noted. This was back in the day when cameras were usually not taken
into the field -- they would have been mostly large and messy, and of
course there was no way of recording a bird song easily then.

What I DO suggest for you to get your bird accepted by the SC Committee --
not only fill out a Carolina Bird Club Rare Bird Report form, but DESCRIBE
the song you heard -- not just that you heard its song, it sounded like the
recordings, etc. And, mention if you are familiar with the bird and song
from out West. I don't know if the photos by themselves are going to be
definitive, but -- the species is already on the SC Definitive List, so
it's already on the official list. But, we all want your bird accepted as
a first record in the Carolinas since 1968!

Yes, let's hope someone else can re-find it and get a recording. It
shouldn't be flying OUT of the place today -- but it could tonight and be
gone by tomorrow. I would think your report would be accepted, as long as
you give a good visual description and describe the song.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Thu, Nov 12, 2020 at 12:29 PM Steve Patterson <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Birders,
>
> For your information, this morning I found a meadowlark at Dobbins Farm
> that was singing a Western Meadowlark song. An eBird report has been filed
> and documentation will be sent to the SC Bird Records Committee. Whether
> there is enough evidence to confirm it as a Western will have to be
> determined. I hope you find it if you are in the area.
>
>
>
>
> Steve Patterson
> Anderson, SC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/12/20 10:16 am
From: \Russell R.\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Charleston area birding
It looks like I'm heading to the Charleston area this weekend. If I want to find Seaside and other Ammodramus sparrows, what's the most likely place to find them? Same question for Piping Plovers.
Russell RoeAsheville
 

Back to top
Date: 11/12/20 10:11 am
From: Aaron Steed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Frigatebird, Masonboro Inlet
Just had a Magnificent Frigatebird going over the parking lot at Masonboro
Inlet at the S end of Wrightsville Beach. Another birder said it’s been
hanging out in the area for about 30 min.

Good birding!

Aaron Steed
Asheville, NC
--
Aaron Steed
Ventures Birding Tours
Asheville, NC

https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://birdventures.com/__;!!OToaGQ!4K-F9d3NWASdaMKm1EubsnRI8c8uaZ4XOJnjikgZXKU_B_vlDY_3N75AzjCouiQrmzs$

 

Back to top
Date: 11/12/20 9:29 am
From: Steve Patterson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: meadowlark species, Townville, SC
Birders,
For your information, this morning I found a meadowlark at Dobbins Farm that was singing a Western Meadowlark song.  An eBird report has been filed and documentation will be sent to the SC Bird Records Committee.  Whether there is enough evidence to confirm it as a Western will have to be determined.  I hope you find it if you are in the area.



Steve PattersonAnderson, SC
 

Back to top
Date: 11/12/20 5:38 am
From: Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Peripheral Rarity - GRAY HERON, Northampton Co, VA
The original checklist got deleted. A corrected checklist with pics of the heron is here: https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S76139031__;!!OToaGQ!48QcefClyH5zDGQWkWzRLzukds5nOCYKNz34FkM5xojFhxOCGUppWUsL0Y4H8twaRvw$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S76139031__;!!OToaGQ!48QcefClyH5zDGQWkWzRLzukds5nOCYKNz34FkM5xojFhxOCGUppWUsL0Y4H8twaRvw$ >

Brian Patteson
Hatteras. NC

> On Nov 11, 2020, at 2:02 PM, Corey, Ed <ed.corey...> wrote:
>
> Just to get NC birders in the loop, a GRAY HERON was reported from the Cheriton Landfill on the Eastern Shore of VA on Nov 9th. Originally identified as a Wurdemann’s form of Great Blue Heron, it was only corrected to a Gray today. So far, local birders have been unable to relocate it, but there is some potential that the bird could head south. Keep an eye out for any unusually pale Great Blues if you’re out and about! Please see the eBird list below for pictures:
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S76076626__;!!OToaGQ!48QcefClyH5zDGQWkWzRLzukds5nOCYKNz34FkM5xojFhxOCGUppWUsL0Y4H3xWEOtA$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S76076626__;!!OToaGQ!4qRz8aGhHtP2volWWzotYVPWQDzvIZJgh5phW222dF64YQq1B5KoOUxFZ7Tvk1o3lW4$>
>
> Good birding!
>
> Ed Corey
> Inventory Biologist, NC Division of Parks and Recreation
> NC Dept. of Natural and Cultural Resources
> 919 841 4037 Office
> 919 208 7864 Mobile
> <Ed.Corey...> <mailto:<Ed.Corey...>
>
> 12700 Bayleaf Church Road | Raleigh, North Carolina 27614
>
> #StayStrongNC
> Learn more @ nc.gov/covid19 <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://nc.gov/covid19__;!!OToaGQ!48QcefClyH5zDGQWkWzRLzukds5nOCYKNz34FkM5xojFhxOCGUppWUsL0Y4HqROi9RU$ >
>
> And don’t forget your Ws! Wear. Wait. Wash.
> WEAR a face covering.
> WAIT 6 feet apart from other people.
> WASH your hands often.
>
> Email correspondence to and from this address is subject to the North Carolina Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.


 

Back to top
Date: 11/11/20 11:03 am
From: Corey, Ed <ed.corey...>
Subject: Peripheral Rarity - GRAY HERON, Northampton Co, VA
Just to get NC birders in the loop, a GRAY HERON was reported from the Cheriton Landfill on the Eastern Shore of VA on Nov 9th. Originally identified as a Wurdemann's form of Great Blue Heron, it was only corrected to a Gray today. So far, local birders have been unable to relocate it, but there is some potential that the bird could head south. Keep an eye out for any unusually pale Great Blues if you're out and about! Please see the eBird list below for pictures:

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S76076626__;!!OToaGQ!4qRz8aGhHtP2volWWzotYVPWQDzvIZJgh5phW222dF64YQq1B5KoOUxFZ7Tvk1o3lW4$

Good birding!

Ed Corey
Inventory Biologist, NC Division of Parks and Recreation
NC Dept. of Natural and Cultural Resources
919 841 4037 Office
919 208 7864 Mobile
<Ed.Corey...><mailto:<Ed.Corey...>

12700 Bayleaf Church Road | Raleigh, North Carolina 27614

#StayStrongNC
Learn more @ nc.gov/covid19

And don't forget your Ws! Wear. Wait. Wash.
WEAR a face covering.
WAIT 6 feet apart from other people.
WASH your hands often.

Email correspondence to and from this address is subject to the North Carolina Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.


 

Back to top
Date: 11/11/20 10:47 am
From: David Gibson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: wants to buy a used scope
Hi John, We just joined the listserv. A birding friend here in VA is
selling his and just put it up for sale on va-bird. Here's his email:

The spotting scope is a Nikon Sky and Earth 20x60x80, it has an attached
sliding sunshade with attached rubber objective lens cover. It comes with a
Nikon vue-thru protective case and a heavy duty Slik tripod model # 504Qf
II. The scope is like new condition with no scratches on the body or the
lenses, and no internal mold or fogging. The view is sharp and clear !! The
tripod holds up to eleven pounds and costs new @ $150. It will be a great
scope /tripod combo for someone as it has served me well for years. Price
$500 Firm. Feel free to contact me at <wmmullins...> or call my phone
number listed below.
Thanks, Mark Mullins Claytor Lake, Va
1-540-731-1730

Good luck!
Dave Gibson
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://birdpartner.com/__;!!OToaGQ!_FG_t7PZOTncgLipHcH1G5_l7G0-xvAeRcw5E9FhehRa5AMILJAv3QnJTb8eh6O1sHo$




On Wed, Nov 11, 2020 at 1:17 PM John Fussell <jofuss...> wrote:

> A friend who is a beginning birder (actually, is getting back into birding
> again), is interested in buying a used scope of decent quality, preferably
> with a tripod.
>
> If anyone out there is interested in selling such a scope, please contact
> me
> with info, and I will forward the email to her.
>
> Thanks,
> John Fussell
> Morehead City, NC
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/11/20 10:17 am
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: wants to buy a used scope
A friend who is a beginning birder (actually, is getting back into birding
again), is interested in buying a used scope of decent quality, preferably
with a tripod.

If anyone out there is interested in selling such a scope, please contact me
with info, and I will forward the email to her.

Thanks,
John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/11/20 5:20 am
From: ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Eastern Phoebe
First of the winter- Eastern Phoebe

We usually have 1 or 2 in the yard all winter.
--
Ask me about my upcoming book - a photo essay of select breeding
hummingbirds in North American and The Bahamas!

Inline image
Inline image



Ann Maddock
<am.hummingbird.photos...>
Hatteras Island, NC
919-600-4945

 

Back to top
Date: 11/9/20 3:52 pm
From: Wayne Hoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Black-headed Gull at Carolina Beach Lake
Hi -

At about 12:30 PM today (Nov. 9) I observed and photographed a Black-headed Gull at Carolina Beach Lake, roosting with Laughing Gulls on exposed mud just off the viewing platform near the picnic pavilion.

The bird was in definitive basic plumage (=adult winter plumage). The head was white with smudging around the eye and a gray vertical bar behind the eye. The mantle was much paler than the Laughing Gulls, and upper wings were gray, going to whitish on the primaries, but with black tips. Under wings had the outer 2 primaries mainly white, then the next 4-6 with dark shading, and the inner primaries, secondaries, and under-wing coverts whitish. The tail was white, and the legs and feet were bright red, much darker than the pink feet of Bonaparte's Gulls. The bill was red with a blackish tip.

I think it is likely this is the same individual that wintered in Carolina Beach last winter. That bird was in immature plumage, on track to molt into definitive basic feathering this fall. The black tip to the bill possibly is a retained immature trait: if so this would support it being the same individual. Hopefully I will again spend the winter.

Wayne Hoffman

 

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Date: 11/9/20 10:02 am
From: whoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RBA. Black-headed Gull at Carolina Beach Lake
Same bird as lasy winter??Wayne Hoffman Wilmington Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 

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Date: 11/9/20 8:03 am
From: Steven Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Krider’s Red-tailed Hawk
Sorry for delay to possible sighting of a Krider’s Red-tailed Hawk on
Milltail Road at Alligator River National Refuge. Seen by Curtiss Merrick
and myself Saturday while looking for the Rough-legged Hawk. We have lots
of photos and can be seen on my Saturday list. May not be countable as it
is a subspecies but, may be interesting never the less. While I have your
attention please forgive me on my photo posting this past year got way
behind and also mixed up a few listings trying to do so much. Still have
thousands of photos to go through and may not get back to them. Anyway go
birding and enjoy!

 

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Date: 11/8/20 9:15 am
From: Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Red Crossbill Recording Request
Matt Young, from the Finch Network, is requesting recordings of any Red
Crossbill seen or heard this winter, especially from the mountains. He is
trying to see which Red Crossbill types are moving south this year. He ask
that you either upload the recording to eBird or email it to him at
<info...>
Thanks!

Dwayne
*************
J. Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
<redxbill...>


Catawba County Park Ranger
Riverbend Park - Conover, NC
<jdmartin...>
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.catawbacountync.gov/depts/parks/__;!!OToaGQ!5zz9YAW-FAEFs2BRAcg0iJ9cV2r8bc5dDgBLTlXIk7co_TRPRokAKsclP2rfjCupmEs$
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://tempestwx.com/station/24999/__;!!OToaGQ!5zz9YAW-FAEFs2BRAcg0iJ9cV2r8bc5dDgBLTlXIk7co_TRPRokAKsclP2rf7Hcj3vE$

 

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Date: 11/8/20 5:03 am
From: Jessie Dale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: pine siskins
with reports of large flocks of pine siskins from around my area, it was only a matter of time before they made it here. on thursday, two arrived. i began this morning with around 50 and now i’m easily over 100. a handful of purple finches (all female) are here along with about 8 goldfinches.

jessie dale
pine siskin hell
linville, nc
avery county


 

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Date: 11/7/20 9:17 am
From: Derb Carter <derbc...>
Subject: Durant
Had to go to Raleigh anyway so checked Durant and nearby Gresham Lake for the reported Martin. No luck. Probably less than 1% chance on a bird like that. Did have a Raven at Durant and a Vesper Sparrow at Gresham.

Derb Carter

 

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Date: 11/7/20 8:45 am
From: Thea and Mark Sinclair (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Evening Grosbeaks - Mecklenburg County, NC
Very cool!

On Sat, Nov 7, 2020, 10:22 AM Kevin Metcalf <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> I just had two EVENING GROSBEAKS fly over my residence in Huntersville,
> NC, just north of Charlotte. They appeared to be female plumaged, heading
> NE. I first heard them calling as they flew over. So, they were moving and
> not chaseable. I suggest near their flight call and put your ears to the
> sky. Clearing they are coming into the area.
>
> There are a lot of birds moving this morning, with flocks of Pine Siskins,
> small numbers of Purple Finches, lots of American Robins and Cedar
> Waxwings. As a bonus, I also had a Merlin cruise through. Not bad to get
> two new yard birds in one morning!
>
> Kevin Metcalf
> Huntersville, NC
>

 

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Date: 11/7/20 7:22 am
From: Kevin Metcalf (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Evening Grosbeaks - Mecklenburg County, NC
I just had two EVENING GROSBEAKS fly over my residence in Huntersville,
NC, just north of Charlotte. They appeared to be female plumaged,
heading NE. I first heard them calling as they flew over. So, they
were moving and not chaseable. I suggest near their flight call and
put your ears to the sky. Clearing they are coming into the area.
There are a lot of birds moving this morning, with flocks of Pine
Siskins, small numbers of Purple Finches, lots of American Robins and
Cedar Waxwings. As a bonus, I also had a Merlin cruise through. Not
bad to get two new yard birds in one morning!
Kevin MetcalfHuntersville, NC
 

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Date: 11/7/20 7:15 am
From: Thomas McNeil (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: LeConte’s Sparrow (Watauga Co., NC)
There is currently a LeConte’s Sparrow in the ditch-line directly behind the office at Valle Crucis Community Park in Watauga County.


Thomas S. McNeil
Hampton, TN

 

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Date: 11/7/20 6:53 am
From: Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: eBird Trip Summary November 6, 2020
Greetings all

Yesterday I made the trip down to Mecklenburg Co NC for the LeConte’s Sparrow that had been reported there.

I left the house at 0435 hrs and went I reach just 8 miles out from I485 I got a notification from Google Map about a 19 minute delay on my route due to a wreck. And then received a notice of a route change that would saved me 15 minutes and did I want to accept to and with just a few minutes to spare to make the change I was rerouted and ended up saving some time but was still 8 minutes later than my ETA.

Upon my arrival I saw a few other birders out looking and asked had it been seen today and was informed that it hasn’t.

I made my way out into the field and started looking and within a few minutes a birder said loud enough for all to hear that he was on the bird and we all closed in at his location and within a few minutes we were all able to not only see the bird but most were able to get pictures.

Thanks to Kevin Metcalf for locating the sparrow and making sure everyone got to see it.

I then went to McAlpine Creek Park which is an eBird Hotpot and I spent several hours there walking it’s many trails and adding more birds to my Mecklenburg Co list. This Hotspot is a great place to bird for those who are Wheelchair bound as all the trails that I saw were flat except for one and smooth.

This Hotspot is a place that I think one could easily spend 2 to 4 days birding in during migration and come away with a very impressive list.

I added one species to my NC Life List now at 327 and 20 species for Mecklenburg Co.


jeffblalock
eBird Checklist Summary for: Nov 6, 2020

Number of Checklists: 3
Number of Taxa: 41

Checklists included in this summary:
(1): 7249–7309 S Rea Park Ln, Charlotte US-NC
Date: Nov 6, 2020 at 7:35 AM
(2): 11300–11386 Golf Links Dr, Charlotte US-NC
Date: Nov 6, 2020 at 8:25 AM
(3): McAlpine Creek Park
Date: Nov 6, 2020 at 9:00 AM

28 Canada Goose -- (3)
1 Great Blue Heron (Blue form) -- (3)
1 Great Egret -- (3)
2 Black Vulture -- (3)
2 Turkey Vulture -- (3)
1 Belted Kingfisher -- (3)
1 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker -- (3)
3 Red-bellied Woodpecker -- (3)
2 Downy Woodpecker (Eastern) -- (3)
2 Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) -- (3)
1 Merlin -- (1)
5 Eastern Phoebe -- (3)
12 Blue Jay -- (1),(2),(3)
12 American Crow -- (1),(3)
1 Fish Crow -- (3)
3 Carolina Chickadee -- (3)
1 Tufted Titmouse -- (3)
4 Ruby-crowned Kinglet -- (2),(3)
3 Red-breasted Nuthatch -- (3)
2 White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern) -- (3)
1 Brown-headed Nuthatch -- (2)
12 Carolina Wren -- (3)
6 European Starling -- (1),(3)
3 Northern Mockingbird -- (2),(3)
11 Eastern Bluebird -- (2),(3)
1 Hermit Thrush -- (3)
100 American Robin -- (3)
10 Cedar Waxwing -- (3)
3 House Finch -- (2)
1 Purple Finch -- (3)
7 Pine Siskin -- (2)
14 American Goldfinch -- (2),(3)
3 Chipping Sparrow -- (2)
7 White-throated Sparrow -- (3)
1 LeConte's Sparrow -- (1)
2 Savannah Sparrow -- (1)
11 Song Sparrow -- (1),(2),(3)
22 Red-winged Blackbird -- (1),(3)
1 Rusty Blackbird -- (3)
6 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) -- (3)
2 Northern Cardinal -- (3)

This trip summary was created using the eBird app for iPhone and iPad.
See eBird for more information.


From my iPhone

Go Birding be Safe

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>


 

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Date: 11/7/20 4:45 am
From: Karen LORENZO (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Sandhill cranes
3 Sandhill cranes at Pungo

 

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Date: 11/6/20 1:49 pm
From: Corey, Ed <ed.corey...>
Subject: Getting the word out - Martin sp. reported from Durant Nature Park, Wake Co.
Folks,

If anyone is in the area, please look out for a martin, reported by John Lynch just now. Initial observation was of an imm Purple, but several people are suspecting another species as more probable!

Ed Corey
Inventory Biologist, NC Division of Parks and Recreation
NC Dept. of Natural and Cultural Resources
919 841 4037 Office
919 208 7864 Mobile
<Ed.Corey...><mailto:<Ed.Corey...>

12700 Bayleaf Church Road | Raleigh, North Carolina 27614

#StayStrongNC
Learn more @ nc.gov/covid19

And don't forget your Ws! Wear. Wait. Wash.
WEAR a face covering.
WAIT 6 feet apart from other people.
WASH your hands often.

Email correspondence to and from this address is subject to the North Carolina Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.


 

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Date: 11/6/20 6:58 am
From: Ken <wavedogsc20...>
Subject: American White Pelicans Murrells Inlet Oyster Recycle
There were 17 American White Pelicans at the Oyster Recycle but they left with the rising tide a little after 9 am.



Ken Davis
Pawleys Island SC
 

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Date: 11/6/20 4:56 am
From: \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: My first ever November Hooded Warbler in Watauga County, NC
Birders,

I had an adult female Hooded Warbler at dawn this morning on my property in northern Watauga County. This is my latest fall record at my place by over 3 weeks. It was foraging close to the ground around an American Holly, the only evergreen in the vicinity. It probably roosted in that same tree overnight.

I also had an Orange-crowned Warbler on my property on 1 November, only my second record for that scarce mountain migrant in the 13 years I’ve lived here.

Merrill Lynch
Echo Valley Farm (3,400’ elevation)
Watauga County, NC
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 11/5/20 4:03 pm
From: Ken Bennett (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Purple Finch
Yes, I can't remember having this many purple finches for this long. We've
had at least five -- probably more, but that's how many I've seen at a
time. They are hanging out at the feeders with a flock of pine siskins (do
we call that a "bankruptcy of siskins" given how much they eat?), and the
usual house finches, nuthatches, woodpeckers of various types, etc.

It's been fun!

Ken Bennett
Winston-Salem


On Thu, Nov 5, 2020 at 6:48 PM Anne Olsen <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> I had 4 Purple Finches at my feeders this morning, one female and three
> males. I have had at least one Purple Finch almost everyday for the past
> few weeks. It has been years since I had Purple Finches at my feeders
> over several days.
>
> Anne Olsen
> Cornelius, NC
>
>
> Sent from my iPad

 

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Date: 11/5/20 3:55 pm
From: sheryl mcnair (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Purple Finch
Me too. Ages since I’ve seen them, and, even though we only got here Tuesday, put feeders up yesterday, we had 2 males, 1 female today.

Sheryl
Blowing Rock, NC

> On Nov 5, 2020, at 6:48 PM, Anne Olsen <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I had 4 Purple Finches at my feeders this morning, one female and three males. I have had at least one Purple Finch almost everyday for the past few weeks. It has been years since I had Purple Finches at my feeders over several days.
>
> Anne Olsen
> Cornelius, NC
>
>
> Sent from my iPad

 

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Date: 11/5/20 3:48 pm
From: Craig Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Snow Bunting, Ft. Sumter National Monument, Charleston Co., SC
A single Snow Bunting was observed by NPS staff in the grass and rocks
today around noon with photos and a video, and I posted to the GroupMe SC
Rare Bird Alert. Pam Ford and I took the 3pm ferry out to Ft. Sumter and
after some time Pam found the bird on the rocks where the dock from the
ferry meets land on Ft. Sumter. It remained there for some time, flew to
the grass in front of the Ft. Sumter sign, and generally fed heavily on
grass seed there until the ferry left at 435pm. The bird did fly to the
near top of the Fort, but flew back to the grass in a few minutes. This
bird is located literally as you step on land from the boat, both sides of
the walkway, the same area it was observed by NPS staff earlier in the day.

Other birds of interest there and on the sand flats at low tide were Piping
Plovers (4) and one adult Lesser Black-backed Gull. There were
approximately 50 Herring Gulls roosting on the flats as well.

If interested, here is the link to the eBird checklist:
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S75873074__;!!OToaGQ!4DzbD2pFGgaVQ-sgZzybtyBI04N5DjSdG68_SmkfiIrSawnyRo3hQymubnzHWqmqb0s$

Check out the ferry schedule to get to Ft. Sumter, and thanks to the
awareness of the ranger at the Fort to notice something different and
notify other NPS staff on the mainland, who passed the word on to me.

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

*“I never for a day gave up listening to the songs of our birds, or
watching their peculiar habits, or delineating them the best way I could.”*
J.J. Audubon

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

 

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Date: 11/5/20 3:48 pm
From: Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Purple Finch
I had 4 Purple Finches at my feeders this morning, one female and three males. I have had at least one Purple Finch almost everyday for the past few weeks. It has been years since I had Purple Finches at my feeders over several days.

Anne Olsen
Cornelius, NC


Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 11/5/20 11:15 am
From: Doug Hughes (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: White-winged Scoters
3 White-winged Scoters flying west past East end of Sunset Beach, NC this morning at 10:30.

Doug Hughes
Ocean Isle Beach

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 11/5/20 10:41 am
From: Ricky Davis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Roanoke-Rapids Lake - Vultare Access
Hi folks

I went up to Ro-Rap Lake this morning, to check out the upper end of the lake from the Vultare Access ramp area. There are lots of birds and the most Hydrilla on the lake that I can remember. Fourteen species of waterfowl with highlights being 4 Tundra Swans, 95 Shovelers, 280 Gadwall, 60 American Wigeon, 7 Black Ducks, 11 Pintail, and 415 Ring-necked Ducks. There were groups of ducks spread out as far as I could see downstream, needless to say I could not identify many of these, therefore the numbers I tallied were not close to the actual number of birds present!

The most amazing thing though was the number of Pied-billed Grebes. I recorded a count of 354 at the upper end! I made three separate sweep counts and this was the average number for the three sweeps. Still I feel like this is undercounting the actual number of Pied-billeds on the upper end of the lake! What’s interesting is that they were mostly in a couple of large groups (100 and 200), I did not know they migrated in such big groups! I can’t remember finding such a large number in one spot in NC before!

Other interesting stuff included a Common Gallinule on the far side up against the grasses(a rare bird for this location); a Black-belled Plover and five Dunlin on the Hydrilla flats in the middle of the lake; and first-of-season Bonaparte’s Gulls and Rusty Blackbird. Also not surprising for this time, had all three Nuthatches, a Purple Finch, and Siskins.

Later, Ricky

Ricky Davis
Rocky Mount, NC

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 11/5/20 9:02 am
From: Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Roseate Spoonbill on James Is, SC 5 Nov 2020
All,

While walking our dogs, Donna found a Roseate Spoonbill at the pond on N
Sterling in the Eastwood Subdivision on James IS, SC. This is the 220
species we have seen in this neighborhood since we moved in in 1995.

Dennis

--
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
South Carolina eButterfly reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>

 

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Date: 11/5/20 8:50 am
From: ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Ruby-Throated Hummer behavior
To clarify
We watched the adult male use his beak like a sewing machine as he stabbed
the younger male repeatedly

Blood all over

On Mon, Nov 2, 2020 at 7:53 AM ann maddock <am.hummingbird.photos...>
wrote:

> Sidney and I just watched an adult male RTHU pin a young male on the deck
> and wrestled with it until the youngster escaped.
> This cold front has everyone ferociously battling for the flowers and
> feeders.
>
> --
> Ask me about my upcoming book - a photo essay of select breeding
> hummingbirds in North American and The Bahamas!
>
> Inline image
> Inline image
>
>
>
> Ann Maddock
> <am.hummingbird.photos...>
> Hatteras Island, NC
> 919-600-4945
>
--
Ask me about my upcoming book - a photo essay of select breeding
hummingbirds in North American and The Bahamas!

Inline image
Inline image



Ann Maddock
<am.hummingbird.photos...>
Hatteras Island, NC
919-600-4945

 

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Date: 11/5/20 7:40 am
From: whoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Black Rail Fort Fisher
At The Rocks.  Flew from Spartina into patch of sea oxeye daisy.Also several pointy tailed sparrows, also seen only in flight.Wayne Hoffman Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 

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Date: 11/5/20 4:02 am
From: Matt Curran <mcurran1...>
Subject: RE: Winter Birds arriving
I apologize for lack of location.



North Raleigh, Falls River Subdivision off Durant Road



From: Matt Curran <mcurran1...>
Sent: Wednesday, November 4, 2020 4:24 PM
To: 'carolinabirds' <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Winter Birds arriving



In the last week - juncos, wt sparrow, song sparrow (more active at my
feeders in winter), RC kinglet and a first today - red breasted nuthatch.






 

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Date: 11/4/20 1:25 pm
From: Matt Curran <mcurran1...>
Subject: Winter Birds arriving
In the last week - juncos, wt sparrow, song sparrow (more active at my
feeders in winter), RC kinglet and a first today - red breasted nuthatch.






 

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Date: 11/4/20 5:00 am
From: KEN LIPSHY (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fwd: Graylag vs Gtr White Fronted vs Hybrid GOOSE?

Spotted two geese that were not present this summer at the VA in SBY.
Looked like two immature Gtr White Fronted Geese or I guess could be graylag..
IDEAS???

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://pbase.com/klipshy/va_sby__;!!OToaGQ!6Go5u8Ee9Hz3hzFeFsKVjE7v8aHpuUoVB9bpnB4d71aeiF5J5O017WxlXjCF-A_HnJE$

Kenneth A. Lipshy
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://Www.crisismanagementleadership.com__;!!OToaGQ!6Go5u8Ee9Hz3hzFeFsKVjE7v8aHpuUoVB9bpnB4d71aeiF5J5O017WxlXjCFQ3OR6ic$
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://Www.crisislead.blogspot.com__;!!OToaGQ!6Go5u8Ee9Hz3hzFeFsKVjE7v8aHpuUoVB9bpnB4d71aeiF5J5O017WxlXjCFUcz6270$

Begin forwarded message:

From: KEN LIPSHY <wuzupdoc12...>
Date: November 3, 2020 at 8:32:00 PM EST
To: <carolinabirds-request...>
Subject: Graylag vs Gtr White Fronted vs Hybrid GOOSE?


Spotted two geese that were not present this summer at the VA in SBY.
Looked like two immature Gtr White Fronted Geese or I guess could be graylag..
IDEAS???

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://pbase.com/klipshy/va_sby__;!!OToaGQ!6Go5u8Ee9Hz3hzFeFsKVjE7v8aHpuUoVB9bpnB4d71aeiF5J5O017WxlXjCF-A_HnJE$

Kenneth A. Lipshy MD FACS
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.crisismanagementleadership.com__;!!OToaGQ!6Go5u8Ee9Hz3hzFeFsKVjE7v8aHpuUoVB9bpnB4d71aeiF5J5O017WxlXjCFooAkvhc$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.crisismanagementleadership.com__;!!OToaGQ!6Go5u8Ee9Hz3hzFeFsKVjE7v8aHpuUoVB9bpnB4d71aeiF5J5O017WxlXjCFooAkvhc$ >
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.crisislead.blogspot.com__;!!OToaGQ!6Go5u8Ee9Hz3hzFeFsKVjE7v8aHpuUoVB9bpnB4d71aeiF5J5O017WxlXjCFHYdW-BY$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.crisislead.blogspot.com__;!!OToaGQ!6Go5u8Ee9Hz3hzFeFsKVjE7v8aHpuUoVB9bpnB4d71aeiF5J5O017WxlXjCFHYdW-BY$ >


 

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Date: 11/3/20 4:44 am
From: Susan Campbell <susan...>
Subject: Late albino Ruby-throated in Charlotte NC

Yesterday I paid a visit to a hummer hosts just south of Charlotte who have been hosting an albino Ruby-throated Hummingbird at thier feeders and spending most of its time in the yard since mid-August. I only heard about it late last week.

Distant iPhone images that I was sent clearly showed an albino. Indeed, when I arrived this striking bird was moving back and forth from the feeder to the adjacent vine where it likes to perch. The hummer was predictably puffed up but seemed healthy. It visited the feeder on the outside of my trap a couple times--- and then headed off. Literally! Apparently, it was time to migrate-- finally. So, I was unable to get it in hand. Not the first time that has happened to me-- and I am sure it will not be the last!

This white hummer is definitely the latest reported in North Carolina. Although it is probably not the latest for the species, it certainly is remarkable. 2020 has been quite a year for white hummingbirds with four other white hummers being reported across the state, including another albino.

Susan Campbell
Apex, NC

 

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Date: 11/2/20 1:05 pm
From: \gilbert grant\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: 61 American White Pelicans over Sneads Ferry,NC

Just now there was a flock of at least 61 White Pelicans flying in a NE
direction over Sneads Ferry, Onslow County, NC. I’ll try to upload a photo
later.

Gilbert S. Grant
Sneads Ferry, NC

 

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Date: 11/2/20 11:58 am
From: Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...>
Subject: FOS Baltimore Oriole & Chipping Sparrow
I had a two-fer yesterday.  The female Oriole was seen twice, once at my feeder with peanut pieces and once at my grape jelly tray.  The female Chipper was at my white millet tray.

Frank HamiltonCharleston, SC

 

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Date: 11/2/20 7:05 am
From: Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Eastwood, James Is, SC 2 Nov 2020
All,

Donna had a Gray Catbird, Gray-cheeked Thrush, and Orange-crowned Warbler
and White-tthoated Sparrow in our yard this morning.

Dennis



--
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
South Carolina eButterfly reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>

 

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Date: 11/2/20 4:54 am
From: ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Ruby-Throated Hummer behavior
Sidney and I just watched an adult male RTHU pin a young male on the deck
and wrestled with it until the youngster escaped.
This cold front has everyone ferociously battling for the flowers and
feeders.

--
Ask me about my upcoming book - a photo essay of select breeding
hummingbirds in North American and The Bahamas!

Inline image
Inline image



Ann Maddock
<am.hummingbird.photos...>
Hatteras Island, NC
919-600-4945

 

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Date: 11/1/20 2:27 pm
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: New eBird Hotspot
Thanks Lynn Erla, I have merged the NHAS location.

Kent Fiala

On 11/1/2020 5:21 PM, Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> Thanks Shelley, for setting up this new hotspot (which is L12486427 )
> in Wake County , NC.
> I've merged several of my private locations to a shared location on
> ebird, but THIS time, I was unable to merge my list in the usual
> fashion. The error message indicated that the location I was using was
> OWNED by NHAS (New Hope Audubon Society) and therefore I did not have
> the rights to merge it.
> So instead of merging, I searched my checklists, found the list from
> the time I did the "thrush watch" (S31904872) , then clicked on "Edit
> Location" on the checklist itself, then I chose "Nearby Location on a
> Map", and zoomed in on the red spot for Brian P's yard.
> Keep in mind if you attended more than one event, you may have to
> repeat this step for each list to get them on the new location. (When
> you are finished, go back to My Ebird, Locations, and scroll down all
> your locations, and DELETE any that are left over that have no lists
> associated with them. Not necessary, but it helps you clean up your
> locations list.)
>
> Whoever owns checklist S31904603 (it says NHAS), please make sure you
> move the location to Brian P's yard, as that will help about a dozen
> of us! Maybe you did that already, but it still says "P--- Thrush
> Watch" on your list).
> And some birders have moved out of the area (list S31912760 for
> example), so I hope Shelly R will edit those on her own.
>
> Thank you thank you thank you Shelley R for getting this new (Private)
> hotspot coordinated!
>
> And many thanks to the wonderful Brian P: for providing such wonderful
> habitat in your Falls Lake yard, for getting on ebird, and for
> graciously sharing your yard with so many birders!
> Lynn Erla Beegle
> Raleigh NC
>
>
> On Sun, Nov 1, 2020 at 2:53 PM Shelley Rutkin <shelleyr...> wrote:
>> Hello C’birders,
>>
>> Dozens of us have enjoyed Brian Pendergraft’s hospitality over the last few years as he has generously opened his amazing yard for birders to observe fall migration. And, a large majority of us have eBirded those sightings. Because of this unique situation, Brian’s yard is now an eBird Hotspot - “Brian P’s Yard (Private)”. If you have checklists from Brian’s yard, please merge them with the new hotspot. Instructions for merging a personal location can be found here https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://support.ebird.org/en/support/solutions/articles/48000850891-choosing-and-managing-locations-in-ebird*anchorMergeLocation__;Iw!!OToaGQ!43DR1Q70zcblyjtgL412ei7PWaRgWXiuIq4COrIEtCQ5H4EyDeQpV1kXk6BiXcHzrGU$ . Let me know if you need any help with that process.
>>
>> Please remember that even thought it’s now an eBird Hotspot, Brian’s yard is a private location. Don’t just drop by. This is the first personal yard that I’ve approved in the five years that I’ve been reviewing hotspots for North Carolina. It’s really a unique situation because of the number and quality of birds and Brian's repeated invitations to everyone on Carolinabirds to visit (on specific dates). It will be fun to see the complete list of species, photos, etc. that are only available for hotspots.
>>
>> Let me now if you have any questions.
>>
>> Shelley Rutkin
>> NC eBird Hotspot Reviewer
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/1/20 2:21 pm
From: Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: New eBird Hotspot
Thanks Shelley, for setting up this new hotspot (which is L12486427 )
in Wake County , NC.
I've merged several of my private locations to a shared location on
ebird, but THIS time, I was unable to merge my list in the usual
fashion. The error message indicated that the location I was using was
OWNED by NHAS (New Hope Audubon Society) and therefore I did not have
the rights to merge it.
So instead of merging, I searched my checklists, found the list from
the time I did the "thrush watch" (S31904872) , then clicked on "Edit
Location" on the checklist itself, then I chose "Nearby Location on a
Map", and zoomed in on the red spot for Brian P's yard.
Keep in mind if you attended more than one event, you may have to
repeat this step for each list to get them on the new location. (When
you are finished, go back to My Ebird, Locations, and scroll down all
your locations, and DELETE any that are left over that have no lists
associated with them. Not necessary, but it helps you clean up your
locations list.)

Whoever owns checklist S31904603 (it says NHAS), please make sure you
move the location to Brian P's yard, as that will help about a dozen
of us! Maybe you did that already, but it still says "P--- Thrush
Watch" on your list).
And some birders have moved out of the area (list S31912760 for
example), so I hope Shelly R will edit those on her own.

Thank you thank you thank you Shelley R for getting this new (Private)
hotspot coordinated!

And many thanks to the wonderful Brian P: for providing such wonderful
habitat in your Falls Lake yard, for getting on ebird, and for
graciously sharing your yard with so many birders!
Lynn Erla Beegle
Raleigh NC


On Sun, Nov 1, 2020 at 2:53 PM Shelley Rutkin <shelleyr...> wrote:
>
> Hello C’birders,
>
> Dozens of us have enjoyed Brian Pendergraft’s hospitality over the last few years as he has generously opened his amazing yard for birders to observe fall migration. And, a large majority of us have eBirded those sightings. Because of this unique situation, Brian’s yard is now an eBird Hotspot - “Brian P’s Yard (Private)”. If you have checklists from Brian’s yard, please merge them with the new hotspot. Instructions for merging a personal location can be found here https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://support.ebird.org/en/support/solutions/articles/48000850891-choosing-and-managing-locations-in-ebird*anchorMergeLocation__;Iw!!OToaGQ!43DR1Q70zcblyjtgL412ei7PWaRgWXiuIq4COrIEtCQ5H4EyDeQpV1kXk6BiXcHzrGU$ . Let me know if you need any help with that process.
>
> Please remember that even thought it’s now an eBird Hotspot, Brian’s yard is a private location. Don’t just drop by. This is the first personal yard that I’ve approved in the five years that I’ve been reviewing hotspots for North Carolina. It’s really a unique situation because of the number and quality of birds and Brian's repeated invitations to everyone on Carolinabirds to visit (on specific dates). It will be fun to see the complete list of species, photos, etc. that are only available for hotspots.
>
> Let me now if you have any questions.
>
> Shelley Rutkin
> NC eBird Hotspot Reviewer
>
 

Back to top
Date: 11/1/20 11:53 am
From: Shelley Rutkin <shelleyr...>
Subject: New eBird Hotspot
Hello C’birders,

Dozens of us have enjoyed Brian Pendergraft’s hospitality over the last few years as he has generously opened his amazing yard for birders to observe fall migration. And, a large majority of us have eBirded those sightings. Because of this unique situation, Brian’s yard is now an eBird Hotspot - “Brian P’s Yard (Private)”. If you have checklists from Brian’s yard, please merge them with the new hotspot. Instructions for merging a personal location can be found here https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://support.ebird.org/en/support/solutions/articles/48000850891-choosing-and-managing-locations-in-ebird*anchorMergeLocation__;Iw!!OToaGQ!5eXm2H9rEiBf8PYMJdAM0zX-PNIFUQ620L6mIpFC21WYxyvQBTY3rd6UwssqdfKGISQ$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://support.ebird.org/en/support/solutions/articles/48000850891-choosing-and-managing-locations-in-ebird*anchorMergeLocation__;Iw!!OToaGQ!5eXm2H9rEiBf8PYMJdAM0zX-PNIFUQ620L6mIpFC21WYxyvQBTY3rd6UwssqdfKGISQ$ >. Let me know if you need any help with that process.

Please remember that even thought it’s now an eBird Hotspot, Brian’s yard is a private location. Don’t just drop by. This is the first personal yard that I’ve approved in the five years that I’ve been reviewing hotspots for North Carolina. It’s really a unique situation because of the number and quality of birds and Brian's repeated invitations to everyone on Carolinabirds to visit (on specific dates). It will be fun to see the complete list of species, photos, etc. that are only available for hotspots.

Let me now if you have any questions.

Shelley Rutkin
NC eBird Hotspot Reviewer


 

Back to top
Date: 11/1/20 10:07 am
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Re: Crow flock sizes
I've read in several places that the two types of crows rarely mix with
each other. Also that American Crows frequently make sounds similar to
Fish Crows. What are others' experiences? Do the 2 crow species mix
together?

In the High Country, very large flocks of American Crows start gathering
this time of year and usually stay together till early spring. For
example the was a flock of Am. crows about a hundred strong yesterday at
Bass Lake in Watauga Co.

Guy McGrane, Boone, NC

On 11/1/2020 12:05 PM, Elizabeth Link (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
wrote:
> In the last 6-8 years, downtown Greensboro has attracted a large
> fall/winter roost of crows.  The size can range from around 50 to many
> hundreds - the numbers tend to grow during the course of the winter.
>   While most of the vocalizations I hear are American Crows, there are
> usually some Fish Crows mingling with them, and this year there has
> been a Raven hanging out in the area intermittently. (Christmas count
> total for the downtown last year was 930, with only a few Fish Crows
> in that group identified by vocalization.) They seem to like the area
> around City Hall and the courthouse -  not the tallest buildings, but
> some of the larger ones in the area, and with trees nearby in the
> plaza and along streets. They gather on the tops of the buildings at
> dusk and then move into the trees overnight.  Some of the merchants
> downtown are unhappy at the mess they leave on the sidewalks, and want
> the trees taken down to keep them away.
> Elizabeth Link
>
> On Thu, Oct 29, 2020 at 8:10 PM Troi Perkins <troi.perkins...>
> <mailto:<troi.perkins...>> wrote:
>
> I should specify that the ‘study’ was on American Crows. I have no
> idea about Fish Crows but you all have made me very curious
>
> Cheers,
>
> Troi
>
> *Troi Y. Perkins, B.S.
> *Outreach Lead| ECOE Student Club <mailto:<ecoe...>
> Co-event Coordinator | NicNats Student Club
> <mailto:<nicnats...>
> Master’s of Forestry |Master’s of Environmental Management,
>
> Certificate of Community-based Environmental Management,
> Duke University | Nicholas School of the Environment ‘21
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.linkedin.com/in/troi__;!!OToaGQ!845rN-PgDlrSfemIMG7Iwm3WYYuFRrpYI2rWLJmuGamCJbDDrqPAu4RtHJsEylmb578$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http:/www.linkedin.com/in/troi__;!!OToaGQ!7HzkADl6EqIfkq3YGYe45OzXU4yao9yq7FFHjUe4FXbG8y-COiheqF2S-zkI$>
>
> *From: *Troi Perkins <mailto:<troi.perkins...>
> *Sent: *Thursday, October 29, 2020 8:07 PM
> *To: *Christopher Hill <mailto:<Chill...>; Norman Budnitz
> <mailto:<nbudnitz...>
> *Cc: *carolinabirds <mailto:<carolinabirds...>
> *Subject: *RE: Crow flock sizes
>
> Your observations are indeed accurate! In the winter crows have a
> pre-roost site and then gather together around sunset in their
> actual roosting site. I did some wildlife biology work on this
> while living in Vermont. Here is a link to a podcast episode that
> my colleagues at the Vermont Center for Ecostudies did in 2017.
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.vpr.org/post/outdoor-radio-mega-roost-crows*stream/0__;Iw!!OToaGQ!845rN-PgDlrSfemIMG7Iwm3WYYuFRrpYI2rWLJmuGamCJbDDrqPAu4RtHJsENeIfmd4$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.vpr.org/post/outdoor-radio-mega-roost-crows*stream/0__;Iw!!OToaGQ!4DUV1Wen2tMBQMryfUrkXhMdl9jJQ-QWIZpsZ-NUV8KFBahx-RGnSTanUxnSq3yxpOY$>
>
> I’ve threaten to go crow chasing again now that I live in NC to
> try and find these roosting sites.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Troi
>
> *Troi Y. Perkins, B.S.
> *Outreach Lead| ECOE Student Club <mailto:<ecoe...>
> Co-event Coordinator | NicNats Student Club
> <mailto:<nicnats...>
> Master’s of Forestry |Master’s of Environmental Management,
>
> Certificate of Community-based Environmental Management,
> Duke University | Nicholas School of the Environment ‘21
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.linkedin.com/in/troi__;!!OToaGQ!845rN-PgDlrSfemIMG7Iwm3WYYuFRrpYI2rWLJmuGamCJbDDrqPAu4RtHJsEylmb578$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http:/www.linkedin.com/in/troi__;!!OToaGQ!7HzkADl6EqIfkq3YGYe45OzXU4yao9yq7FFHjUe4FXbG8y-COiheqF2S-zkI$>
>
> *From: *Christopher Hill <mailto:<carolinabirds...>
> *Sent: *Thursday, October 29, 2020 12:21 PM
> *To: *Norman Budnitz <mailto:<nbudnitz...>
> *Cc: *carolinabirds <mailto:<carolinabirds...>
> *Subject: *Re: Crow flock sizes
>
> Great discussion.  This one of those chin-scratching “hey, I agree
> but I never consciously noticed and articulated that before”
> things.  Two or three times this week I have been around small
> groups of American Crows, probably family groups.
>
> Chris Hill
>
> Conway, SC
>
> On Oct 29, 2020, at 11:47 AM, Norman Budnitz
> <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
>
> CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization.
> Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links,
> especially from unknown senders.
>
> I think this also may be a seasonal phenomenon. During and for
> quite a while after the breeding season, American Crows hang
> out in family groups. As cold weather approaches they have
> more of a tendency to form smaller and then larger flocks.
> They separate again with the next breeding season.
>
> Fish crows aggregate into larger flocks pretty quickly after
> the breeding season. So, I see them in large flocks throughout
> the summer months here in Piedmont NC. I suspect this is true
> at the coast as well.
>
> Norm
>
> On Thu, Oct 29, 2020 at 11:35 AM "Shultz, Steven"
> <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
>
> I’d say somewhat sociopathic crows 😊
>
> I’ve encountered large flocks of American Crows, but it
> **seems** that Fish Crows tend to flock in larger groups.
>
> Steve Shultz
>
> Apex NC
>
> *From:* <carolinabirds-request...>
> <mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>
> <carolinabirds-request...>
> <mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>> *On Behalf Of
> *Michael Clark
> *Sent:* Thursday, October 29, 2020 10:29 AM
> *To:* carolinabirds <carolinabirds...>
> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>>
> *Subject:* Crow flock sizes
>
> *This email is from an external source - **exercise
> caution regarding links and attachments. *
>
> I see both American and Fish crows in my area. Something
> I've noticed recently is that I almost never see American
> Crows in flocks larger than four, but the Fish Crows tend
> to flock in larger groups - typically 11 to 14. Has anyone
> else noticed this? Or do I just have antisocial Am. Crows?
>
>
> --
>
> Michael Clark
>
> Durham, NC
>
>
> --
>
> Norm Budnitz
> Orange County
> North Carolina
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/1/20 9:06 am
From: Elizabeth Link (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Crow flock sizes
In the last 6-8 years, downtown Greensboro has attracted a large
fall/winter roost of crows. The size can range from around 50 to many
hundreds - the numbers tend to grow during the course of the winter.
While most of the vocalizations I hear are American Crows, there are
usually some Fish Crows mingling with them, and this year there has been a
Raven hanging out in the area intermittently. (Christmas count total for
the downtown last year was 930, with only a few Fish Crows in that group
identified by vocalization.) They seem to like the area around City Hall
and the courthouse - not the tallest buildings, but some of the larger
ones in the area, and with trees nearby in the plaza and along streets.
They gather on the tops of the buildings at dusk and then move into the
trees overnight. Some of the merchants downtown are unhappy at the mess
they leave on the sidewalks, and want the trees taken down to keep them
away.
Elizabeth Link

On Thu, Oct 29, 2020 at 8:10 PM Troi Perkins <troi.perkins...> wrote:

> I should specify that the ‘study’ was on American Crows. I have no idea
> about Fish Crows but you all have made me very curious
>
>
>
> Cheers,
>
> Troi
>
>
>
>
> *Troi Y. Perkins, B.S. *Outreach Lead| ECOE Student Club <ecoe...>
> Co-event Coordinator | NicNats Student Club <nicnats...>
> Master’s of Forestry |Master’s of Environmental Management,
>
> Certificate of Community-based Environmental Management,
> Duke University | Nicholas School of the Environment ‘21
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.linkedin.com/in/troi__;!!OToaGQ!7TUu-iJHzy3MEJFzM8HgHhl8yeIHzVpY1uxpdQ-TLmdy7Zf9tmY0RDSAE9VdFIyxhtw$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http:/www.linkedin.com/in/troi__;!!OToaGQ!7HzkADl6EqIfkq3YGYe45OzXU4yao9yq7FFHjUe4FXbG8y-COiheqF2S-zkI$>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From: *Troi Perkins <troi.perkins...>
> *Sent: *Thursday, October 29, 2020 8:07 PM
> *To: *Christopher Hill <Chill...>; Norman Budnitz
> <nbudnitz...>
> *Cc: *carolinabirds <carolinabirds...>
> *Subject: *RE: Crow flock sizes
>
>
>
> Your observations are indeed accurate! In the winter crows have a
> pre-roost site and then gather together around sunset in their actual
> roosting site. I did some wildlife biology work on this while living in
> Vermont. Here is a link to a podcast episode that my colleagues at the
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies did in 2017.
>
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.vpr.org/post/outdoor-radio-mega-roost-crows*stream/0__;Iw!!OToaGQ!7TUu-iJHzy3MEJFzM8HgHhl8yeIHzVpY1uxpdQ-TLmdy7Zf9tmY0RDSAE9Vd3ErFBGU$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.vpr.org/post/outdoor-radio-mega-roost-crows*stream/0__;Iw!!OToaGQ!4DUV1Wen2tMBQMryfUrkXhMdl9jJQ-QWIZpsZ-NUV8KFBahx-RGnSTanUxnSq3yxpOY$>
>
>
>
> I’ve threaten to go crow chasing again now that I live in NC to try and
> find these roosting sites.
>
>
>
> Cheers,
>
> Troi
>
>
>
>
> *Troi Y. Perkins, B.S. *Outreach Lead| ECOE Student Club <ecoe...>
> Co-event Coordinator | NicNats Student Club <nicnats...>
> Master’s of Forestry |Master’s of Environmental Management,
>
> Certificate of Community-based Environmental Management,
> Duke University | Nicholas School of the Environment ‘21
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.linkedin.com/in/troi__;!!OToaGQ!7TUu-iJHzy3MEJFzM8HgHhl8yeIHzVpY1uxpdQ-TLmdy7Zf9tmY0RDSAE9VdFIyxhtw$
> <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http:/www.linkedin.com/in/troi__;!!OToaGQ!7HzkADl6EqIfkq3YGYe45OzXU4yao9yq7FFHjUe4FXbG8y-COiheqF2S-zkI$>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From: *Christopher Hill <carolinabirds...>
> *Sent: *Thursday, October 29, 2020 12:21 PM
> *To: *Norman Budnitz <nbudnitz...>
> *Cc: *carolinabirds <carolinabirds...>
> *Subject: *Re: Crow flock sizes
>
>
>
> Great discussion. This one of those chin-scratching “hey, I agree but I
> never consciously noticed and articulated that before” things. Two or
> three times this week I have been around small groups of American Crows,
> probably family groups.
>
>
>
> Chris Hill
>
> Conway, SC
>
>
>
> On Oct 29, 2020, at 11:47 AM, Norman Budnitz <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>
>
> CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise
> caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown
> senders.
>
> I think this also may be a seasonal phenomenon. During and for quite a
> while after the breeding season, American Crows hang out in family groups.
> As cold weather approaches they have more of a tendency to form smaller and
> then larger flocks. They separate again with the next breeding season.
>
>
>
> Fish crows aggregate into larger flocks pretty quickly after the breeding
> season. So, I see them in large flocks throughout the summer months here in
> Piedmont NC. I suspect this is true at the coast as well.
>
>
>
> Norm
>
>
>
> On Thu, Oct 29, 2020 at 11:35 AM "Shultz, Steven" <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
> I’d say somewhat sociopathic crows 😊
>
>
>
> I’ve encountered large flocks of American Crows, but it **seems** that
> Fish Crows tend to flock in larger groups.
>
>
>
>
>
> Steve Shultz
>
> Apex NC
>
>
>
> *From:* <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> *On
> Behalf Of *Michael Clark
> *Sent:* Thursday, October 29, 2020 10:29 AM
> *To:* carolinabirds <carolinabirds...>
> *Subject:* Crow flock sizes
>
>
>
> *This email is from an external source - **exercise caution regarding
> links and attachments. *
>
>
>
> I see both American and Fish crows in my area. Something I've noticed
> recently is that I almost never see American Crows in flocks larger than
> four, but the Fish Crows tend to flock in larger groups - typically 11 to
> 14. Has anyone else noticed this? Or do I just have antisocial Am. Crows?
>
>
> --
>
> Michael Clark
>
> Durham, NC
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Norm Budnitz
> Orange County
> North Carolina
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/1/20 8:31 am
From: Clyde Sorenson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Large number of siskins and one purple finch in Johnston Co...
I've got a flock of 30-40 siskin coming to my thistle feeder one mile north
of Clayton in Johnston County, NC. Also just saw one female purple finch.

Clyde Sorenson
Clayton and Raligh, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/1/20 6:11 am
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Purple Finches
One male and two female currently on sunflower heart feeder.
Come on grosbeaks!

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 11/1/20 5:56 am
From: Corey, Ed <ed.corey...>
Subject: Secondhand -- Evening Grosbeaks, Gates Co
Floyd and Signa Williams had a flock of 10 Evening Grosbeaks at their feeders this morning, near Merchants Millpond SP! Time to get those feeders ready!

Ed Corey
Raleigh, NC

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy Tablet


 

Back to top
Date: 11/1/20 4:39 am
From: Karen LORENZO (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Swans
Tundra

On Sat, Oct 31, 2020, 1:28 PM Bogey <bogey...> wrote:

> *Mute? Tundra?*
>
>
> *From:* Karen LORENZO (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
> *Sent:* Saturday, October 31, 2020 8:27 AM
> *To:* carolinabirds
> *Subject:* Swans
>
> 5 SWANS JUST ARRIVED at Pungo !
> Karen
>

 

Back to top
Date: 10/31/20 4:28 pm
From: Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: eBird Trip Summary 10-31-2020
Greetings all

I hope that everyone was able to get out today and do some birding because it sure was one beautiful day. I was a little bit on the chilly side this morning at the start as I needed a heavier jacket that what I had but as the day wore on I was ok.

The birds were very cooperative today for the most part. Today I birded 4 eBird Hotspots in Durham Co and was able to add one species the Green-winged Teal to my Durham Co Life List and three species for my Durham Co Year List and one species for my NC Year List.

On Wednesday evening I was looking at my Durham Co List for the month of October which stood at 95 species. So I looked at the species on what I had seen and realized that I hadn’t seen a Bald Eagle or heard a Barred Owl yet either. So on Thursday with Zeta passing through I decided to give it a try to see birds that might gotten pulled in by the storm and the answer was NONE that I saw.

However by the end of the day I added 4 species to the October list.

So still needing one species to reach 100 I managed to add 6 species today to end up at 105 species for Durham Co for October.

Following is summary checklist for the day.

Number of Checklists: 4
Number of Taxa: 47

Checklists included in this summary:
(1): 17 Acre Woods
Date: Oct 31, 2020 at 7:15 AM
(2): Beaver Marsh
Date: Oct 31, 2020 at 11:10 AM
(3): Flat River Waterfowl Impoundment
Date: Oct 31, 2020 at 12:55 PM
(4): Little River Fishing Facility
Date: Oct 31, 2020 at 4:00 PM

2 Wood Duck -- (3)
2 Blue-winged Teal -- (3)
2 Gadwall -- (3)
1 Green-winged Teal -- (3)
15 Ring-necked Duck -- (3)
2 Pied-billed Grebe -- (3)
2 Great Blue Heron (Blue form) -- (3),(4)
7 Turkey Vulture -- (1),(2),(3)
1 Barred Owl -- (3)
1 Belted Kingfisher -- (3)
3 Red-headed Woodpecker -- (3),(4)
8 Red-bellied Woodpecker -- (1),(2),(3),(4)
6 Downy Woodpecker (Eastern) -- (1),(3)
3 Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) -- (1),(3)
4 Eastern Phoebe -- (1),(3)
16 Blue Jay -- (1),(2),(3),(4)
20 American Crow -- (1),(2),(3),(4)
1 Common Raven -- (3)
10 Carolina Chickadee -- (1),(3)
6 Tufted Titmouse -- (1),(3),(4)
1 Golden-crowned Kinglet -- (1)
7 Ruby-crowned Kinglet -- (1),(3)
1 Red-breasted Nuthatch -- (1)
2 White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern) -- (1)
1 Brown-headed Nuthatch -- (1)
1 Brown Creeper -- (1)
13 Carolina Wren -- (1),(3)
1 Gray Catbird -- (1)
2 Northern Mockingbird -- (1),(2)
16 Eastern Bluebird -- (1),(3),(4)
1 Hermit Thrush -- (1)
55 American Robin -- (1),(3)
3 House Sparrow -- (2)
4 House Finch -- (1)
2 Purple Finch -- (1)
15 Pine Siskin -- (3)
24 American Goldfinch -- (1),(3)
4 Chipping Sparrow -- (1)
17 White-throated Sparrow -- (1),(3)
6 Song Sparrow -- (1),(3)
8 Eastern Towhee -- (1),(3)
4 Rusty Blackbird -- (3)
9 Common Grackle -- (1),(3)
1 Hooded Warbler -- (1)
3 Pine Warbler -- (1)
7 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) -- (1),(3),(4)
15 Northern Cardinal -- (1),(3)

This trip summary was created using the eBird app for iPhone and iPad.
See eBird for more information.


From my iPhone

Go Birding be Safe

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>


 

Back to top
Date: 10/31/20 12:57 pm
From: Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lot's O' Finches-- Catawba Co.
Lots of finches flying around today. In 3 hours (starting at 11:00am)at the
hawkwatch at Riverbend Park--Catawba County, I had 170 Pine Siskins and 156
Purple Finches fly over. Once I got back to the office, 30 Pine Siskins
have found our feeders, and we are up to about 20 Purple Finches.


Dwayne
*************
J. Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
<redxbill...>


Catawba County Park Ranger
Riverbend Park - Conover, NC
<jdmartin...>
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.catawbacountync.gov/depts/parks/__;!!OToaGQ!_rueZfAIdo_RaEbrE2UFFznRpvBjGZMeOlXCGVhXOeGr-ekfZHZlWCuOZZo1pi1CY9Y$
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://tempestwx.com/station/24999/__;!!OToaGQ!_rueZfAIdo_RaEbrE2UFFznRpvBjGZMeOlXCGVhXOeGr-ekfZHZlWCuOZZo1pHsnAxU$

 

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Date: 10/31/20 10:28 am
From: Bogey <bogey...>
Subject: Re: Swans
Mute? Tundra?


From: Karen LORENZO (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
Sent: Saturday, October 31, 2020 8:27 AM
To: carolinabirds
Subject: Swans

5 SWANS JUST ARRIVED at Pungo !
Karen
 

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Date: 10/31/20 9:30 am
From: Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fwd: Lake Crabtree ducks
Re: Waterfowl arriving in various Wake County NC hotspots in the last day or so:
I will add my ten cents (as opposed to two)
I ventured out to the marsh overlook of Big Lake in Umstead State Park
(Crabtree entrance side of the park) today, 10/31. I was rewarded with
scope views of TEN waterfowl species, along with a cooperative pair of
PURPLE FINCH:
Ebird checklist S75631130
27 CANADA GOOSE, 5 WOOD DUCK, 2 BLUE-WINGED TEAL, 4 NORTHERN SHOVELER,
6 GADWALL, 13 MALLARD, 2 AMERICAN BLACK DUCK, 2 NORTHERN PINTAIL, 11
GREEN-WINGED TEAL, and 6 BUFFLEHEAD. Oddly enough, no Ruddy Duck or
Ring-necked Duck, which are typical winter waterfowl for Umstead's Big
Lake. The Shoveler, Pintail and Blue-winged Teal are probably just
passing through on their way to the coast, as I usually don't see them
at Big Lake except during the fly-in times. The other species listed
tend to overwinter at this lake.
This is an enjoyable way to celebrate my 1400th day in my "ebird
birding streak". I started the birding streak 1/1/2017 as a New Year's
Resolution (at least one complete birding checklist each day), and I
forgot to stop!
LynnErla Beegle
Raleigh, NC
 

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Date: 10/31/20 8:56 am
From: Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Lake Crabtree ducks

There were two horned grebes at Lake Benson yesterday morning.

Marc Ribaudo
On Saturday, October 31, 2020 Shultz, Steven <Steven.Shultz...> wrote:
<!--#yiv0788894293 _filtered {} _filtered {}#yiv0788894293 #yiv0788894293 p.yiv0788894293MsoNormal, #yiv0788894293 li.yiv0788894293MsoNormal, #yiv0788894293 div.yiv0788894293MsoNormal {margin:0in;font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri", sans-serif;}#yiv0788894293 span.yiv0788894293EmailStyle17 {font-family:"Calibri", sans-serif;color:windowtext;}#yiv0788894293 .yiv0788894293MsoChpDefault {font-family:"Calibri", sans-serif;} _filtered {}#yiv0788894293 div.yiv0788894293WordSection1 {}-->
The first cold front coincident with the first of November generally brings waterfowl to the Triangle, and so it was this morning at Lake Crabtree County Park (Wake NC).

 

Gadwall 3

American Black Duck 3

Green-winged Teal 2

Ring-necked 5

Bufflehead 6

Ruddy Duck 6

 

2 Wilson’s Snipe on the little delta island across from the park.

 

Steve Shultz

Apex NC

 

Back to top
Date: 10/31/20 7:56 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lake Crabtree ducks
The first cold front coincident with the first of November generally brings waterfowl to the Triangle, and so it was this morning at Lake Crabtree County Park (Wake NC).

Gadwall 3
American Black Duck 3
Green-winged Teal 2
Ring-necked 5
Bufflehead 6
Ruddy Duck 6

2 Wilson's Snipe on the little delta island across from the park.

Steve Shultz
Apex NC

 

Back to top
Date: 10/31/20 5:28 am
From: Karen LORENZO (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Swans
5 SWANS JUST ARRIVED at Pungo !
Karen

 

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Date: 10/30/20 12:29 pm
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Crow Flock Sizes
We’ve got one here in Conway that I’ve meant to track down for over a decade now and I never get around to it. They fly over the Coastal Carolina Campus and the Hospital (and my house) toward the Waccamaw River near sundown in the fall. I’m just lazy I guess. But interesting to know that they shift their roosts from place to place.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

On Oct 30, 2020, at 2:15 PM, Nate Dias <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:


CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.

For what it's worth, that roost (like other large Fish Crow roosts I have known) moves around and is not static. A few winters ago it was using the wooded island to the west of the Bear Island bridge, between the bridge and Ashepoo Plantation. It can also be much larger than 10K crows. I have seen it as large as 50K individuals (which is really striking and brings Alfred Hitchcock to mind).

There are multiple ones like it along the SC coast. The "river of crows" that flows down the Ashley River to Charleston Harbor often uses Rat Island, which is bisected by the James Island connector as it touches down at Albemarle Point. They once used Drum Island back when it was wooded.

There is a similar flock that roosts around Winyah Bay. The Savannah River has one too but the times I have seen it, it was not as large as the ACE Basin / Charleston / Winyah Bay roosts.

CBC participants in areas with fish crow roosts (and blackbird roosts) can get big tallies by staying till sundown.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

On Fri, Oct 30, 2020 at 1:30 PM Thomas Austin <TBAUSTI...><mailto:<TBAUSTI...>> wrote:
All,

A bit tangential to the discussion but I seem to see both species in much larger groups here in the ACE Basin. I regularly see American Crows in groups of 10-20 foraging in fields and other open habitats. I also see Fish Crows in somewhat larger flocks in the tidal creeks and managed impoundments but more notably in flocks of hundreds to thousands during winter evenings. All my life I've watched the Fish Crows stream over my grandparents home for an hour or so each winter afternoon, on their way to their nightly roost. First a few birds at a time, then groups of a dozen or so, then great sheets of crows roll in as the light begins to dim more quickly, before both slowly peter out in kind. A few years back David Youngblood and I, both curious of this annual display, were able to track the birds to where they were roosting, Bear Island. Specifically the farthest corner of the WMA, beside the Jehossee Island NWR and on the bank of the South Edisto River. I was able to witness their final gathering in February that year, reaching the roost myself for the first time just as the birds, a cacophonous flock of something nearing 10,000, left for the last time that season. All taking flight and flowing down the South Edisto River as the last light gave way to night. It was a long and eerie walk back to my car but definitely worth it. I haven't tried to view the spectacle since, but the flocks are beginning to return for this year and it may be a sight worth pursuing again.

-Tom Austin
Meggett, SC


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Michael Clark <mdc...><mailto:<mdc...>>
To: carolinabirds <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>>
Cc:
Bcc:
Date: Thu, 29 Oct 2020 10:28:36 -0400
Subject: Crow flock sizes
I see both American and Fish crows in my area. Something I've noticed recently is that I almost never see American Crows in flocks larger than four, but the Fish Crows tend to flock in larger groups - typically 11 to 14. Has anyone else noticed this? Or do I just have antisocial Am. Crows?

--
Michael Clark
Durham, NC


--
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2/__;!!OToaGQ!7Xyd5i9AJb9zfTGhVN95twrCh_CSXtbLfiFETlsj2ypOInDjyaueNUTvdKs01siEbLM$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https*3A*2F*2Furldefense.com*2Fv3*2F__https*3A*2F*2Fwww.flickr.com*2Fphotos*2Foffshorebirder2*2F__*3B!!OToaGQ!6x9-sXE5I2F45RJ7NsouN2MGkO5f87BQqgA_nwz6DhIibEMz7PGAb-KazCCR4Eg0iDU*24&data=04*7C01*7Cchill*40coastal.edu*7C2a060c57f66b47fd7d0f08d87cffe9f2*7Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797*7C0*7C0*7C637396785887993384*7CUnknown*7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0*3D*7C1000&sdata=*2BkUMeNLy1u6GvbrDFFV5nAD*2Bvr2Emdm4yC14wTi9PJs*3D&reserved=0__;JSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJSUlJQ!!OToaGQ!7Xyd5i9AJb9zfTGhVN95twrCh_CSXtbLfiFETlsj2ypOInDjyaueNUTvdKs0R0d96GQ$ >


"These days I prefer to hunt with a camera. A good photograph demands more skill from the hunter, better nerves and more patience than the rifle shot." -- Bror Blixen


 

Back to top
Date: 10/30/20 11:41 am
From: Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Lake Crabtree, NC, birds
Evening Grosbeaks have been reported in Virginia, West Virginia, and
Tennessee already, so as Harry says, they could be in the Carolinas any
time soon!

On Fri, Oct 30, 2020 at 2:31 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Several of us birded Lake Crabtree outside of Raleigh this morning. No
> great birds -- eBird write-ins, but nice to see 2 Gadwalls, 5 Green-winged
> Teals, and a Dunlin. The Dunlin was on the island at the Southport side,
> with 2 Killdeers. It was a tad smaller than the Killdeers, with the dusky
> chest and long black bill with a short droop to the tip. They are a bit
> regular at this time of year, and thus not an eBird rarity.
>
> I point this out because someone else reported a Western Sandpiper at this
> island this morning, without a Dunlin. Certainly, it must have been this
> Dunlin; Westerns are very rare inland at this time of year. There were
> also 2 Wilson's Snipes at this island reported by another group; I did not
> see them.
>
> I've got my ear attuned to listen for fly-over Evening Grosbeaks any day
> or week now. No NC reports yet this fall that I know of, but ..... at
> least I heard a few fly-over Pine Siskins and a Purple Finch -- no big deal
> this fall. Close but no cigar!
>
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
--
Dwayne
*************
Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
<redxbill...>

 

Back to top
Date: 10/30/20 11:31 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lake Crabtree, NC, birds
Several of us birded Lake Crabtree outside of Raleigh this morning. No
great birds -- eBird write-ins, but nice to see 2 Gadwalls, 5 Green-winged
Teals, and a Dunlin. The Dunlin was on the island at the Southport side,
with 2 Killdeers. It was a tad smaller than the Killdeers, with the dusky
chest and long black bill with a short droop to the tip. They are a bit
regular at this time of year, and thus not an eBird rarity.

I point this out because someone else reported a Western Sandpiper at this
island this morning, without a Dunlin. Certainly, it must have been this
Dunlin; Westerns are very rare inland at this time of year. There were
also 2 Wilson's Snipes at this island reported by another group; I did not
see them.

I've got my ear attuned to listen for fly-over Evening Grosbeaks any day or
week now. No NC reports yet this fall that I know of, but ..... at least
I heard a few fly-over Pine Siskins and a Purple Finch -- no big deal this
fall. Close but no cigar!

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

 

Back to top
Date: 10/30/20 11:16 am
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Crow Flock Sizes
For what it's worth, that roost (like other large Fish Crow roosts I have
known) moves around and is not static. A few winters ago it was using the
wooded island to the west of the Bear Island bridge, between the bridge and
Ashepoo Plantation. It can also be much larger than 10K crows. I have
seen it as large as 50K individuals (which is really striking and brings
Alfred Hitchcock to mind).

There are multiple ones like it along the SC coast. The "river of crows"
that flows down the Ashley River to Charleston Harbor often uses Rat
Island, which is bisected by the James Island connector as it touches down
at Albemarle Point. They once used Drum Island back when it was wooded.

There is a similar flock that roosts around Winyah Bay. The Savannah
River has one too but the times I have seen it, it was not as large as the
ACE Basin / Charleston / Winyah Bay roosts.

CBC participants in areas with fish crow roosts (and blackbird roosts) can
get big tallies by staying till sundown.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

On Fri, Oct 30, 2020 at 1:30 PM Thomas Austin <TBAUSTI...> wrote:

> All,
>
> A bit tangential to the discussion but I seem to see both species in much
> larger groups here in the ACE Basin. I regularly see American Crows in
> groups of 10-20 foraging in fields and other open habitats. I also see Fish
> Crows in somewhat larger flocks in the tidal creeks and managed
> impoundments but more notably in flocks of hundreds to thousands during
> winter evenings. All my life I've watched the Fish Crows stream over my
> grandparents home for an hour or so each winter afternoon, on their way to
> their nightly roost. First a few birds at a time, then groups of a dozen or
> so, then great sheets of crows roll in as the light begins to dim more
> quickly, before both slowly peter out in kind. A few years back David
> Youngblood and I, both curious of this annual display, were able to track
> the birds to where they were roosting, Bear Island. Specifically the
> farthest corner of the WMA, beside the Jehossee Island NWR and on the bank
> of the South Edisto River. I was able to witness their final gathering in
> February that year, reaching the roost myself for the first time just as
> the birds, a cacophonous flock of something nearing 10,000, left for the
> last time that season. All taking flight and flowing down the South Edisto
> River as the last light gave way to night. It was a long and eerie walk
> back to my car but definitely worth it. I haven't tried to view the
> spectacle since, but the flocks are beginning to return for this year and
> it may be a sight worth pursuing again.
>
> -Tom Austin
> Meggett, SC
>
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: Michael Clark <mdc...>
> To: carolinabirds <carolinabirds...>
> Cc:
> Bcc:
> Date: Thu, 29 Oct 2020 10:28:36 -0400
> Subject: Crow flock sizes
> I see both American and Fish crows in my area. Something I've noticed
> recently is that I almost never see American Crows in flocks larger than
> four, but the Fish Crows tend to flock in larger groups - typically 11 to
> 14. Has anyone else noticed this? Or do I just have antisocial Am. Crows?
>
> --
> Michael Clark
> Durham, NC
>


--
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2/__;!!OToaGQ!6x9-sXE5I2F45RJ7NsouN2MGkO5f87BQqgA_nwz6DhIibEMz7PGAb-KazCCR4Eg0iDU$


"These days I prefer to hunt with a camera. A good photograph demands more
skill from the hunter, better nerves and more patience than the rifle
shot." -- Bror Blixen

 

Back to top
Date: 10/30/20 10:30 am
From: Thomas Austin <TBAUSTI...>
Subject: Re: Crow Flock Sizes
All,

A bit tangential to the discussion but I seem to see both species in much
larger groups here in the ACE Basin. I regularly see American Crows in
groups of 10-20 foraging in fields and other open habitats. I also see Fish
Crows in somewhat larger flocks in the tidal creeks and managed
impoundments but more notably in flocks of hundreds to thousands during
winter evenings. All my life I've watched the Fish Crows stream over my
grandparents home for an hour or so each winter afternoon, on their way to
their nightly roost. First a few birds at a time, then groups of a dozen or
so, then great sheets of crows roll in as the light begins to dim more
quickly, before both slowly peter out in kind. A few years back David
Youngblood and I, both curious of this annual display, were able to track
the birds to where they were roosting, Bear Island. Specifically the
farthest corner of the WMA, beside the Jehossee Island NWR and on the bank
of the South Edisto River. I was able to witness their final gathering in
February that year, reaching the roost myself for the first time just as
the birds, a cacophonous flock of something nearing 10,000, left for the
last time that season. All taking flight and flowing down the South Edisto
River as the last light gave way to night. It was a long and eerie walk
back to my car but definitely worth it. I haven't tried to view the
spectacle since, but the flocks are beginning to return for this year and
it may be a sight worth pursuing again.

-Tom Austin
Meggett, SC


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Michael Clark <mdc...>
To: carolinabirds <carolinabirds...>
Cc:
Bcc:
Date: Thu, 29 Oct 2020 10:28:36 -0400
Subject: Crow flock sizes
I see both American and Fish crows in my area. Something I've noticed
recently is that I almost never see American Crows in flocks larger than
four, but the Fish Crows tend to flock in larger groups - typically 11 to
14. Has anyone else noticed this? Or do I just have antisocial Am. Crows?

--
Michael Clark
Durham, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 10/30/20 9:54 am
From: Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Ebird trackers
Thanks Steve S for a nice coverage of sources for birders to learn about
sightings by other birders.

I mentioned before that I've signed up for "ebird alerts" for the areas in
NC and VA that are within a couple of hours from my home.

I recently also discovered the use of "ebird tracker". In my area in NE NC,
I found ebird tracker listings for Pea Island NWR, Alligator River NWR and
Dismal Swamp NWR (includes VA and NC for this one). Dates, species and
number sighted are listed with most recent date at the top of the list.
Just Google "bird sightings Pea Island NWR" for example, and it will take
you to that one. I just checked the one for Alligator River NWR and the
rough-legged hawk was indeed listed for 10-29-20, along with many others.

Linda Ward
Coinjock, NC
<Tankapoet...>

 

Back to top
Date: 10/30/20 9:35 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Rough-legged hawk posting
I lament the progression of bird sighting info from a reasonably narrow and easily-monitored system (i.e. Carolinabirds + “the good old boy (gender neutral here!) network”) to the current fractured system.

In order to keep up with rarities and bird activity, it’s now necessary to join and monitor a number of different platforms.

On the plus side, I think it can be argued that more sightings come to light than was the case before. For example, recently a number of national rarities have been brought to the birding community’s attention via channels like “What’s This Bird”, where non-birders ask for avian idea, and sometimes locate juicy vagrants.

Here’s a quick round-up of the tools I use to try and keep abreast of the situation. Some are more annoying than others. Note that a primary focus for me are local and state rarities, many folks couldn’t care less, and I respect that!


1. Carolinabirds. Love it. But it’s clearly falling out of favor as a primary method of sighting information. Would be interesting to see what the average # messages/day is now vs. 5 yrs ago. I know, I know, email is, like, so 90s, ya know?

2. eBird. Love it and hate it. I set eBird to email me a daily list of rarities for NC, Wake County, and the United States. Much of it is “junk”, regular birds slightly outside of expected parameters, but can be useful in finding rare birds that the observer failed to report via any other venue. Generally details are sparse, and folks are not always timely about posting. For example, I’ve seen a rarity pop up that was seen the week before, the person just never got around to submitting their checklist. That type of time delay is a killer for a twitcher.

3. GroupMe. A mobile device “chat” app. Intent is for short messages. More heavily moderated than Carolinabirds, but really the same thing in a different bag, although with a stricter charter. Tends to have an fairly high noise to signal ratio, but moderators try their best to keep the noise low, and as folks learn to use the tool, fewer and fewer “like!!” messages come across. Join the SC version (rare birds only) at https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://groupme.com/join_group/52879351/5PT34NjX__;!!OToaGQ!4ZpKex-1C18uD8qz99zSCTUfxJj9KKsgfKg3MCFhtfwQ1StsxFACKdjV8HGH-87aD0A$ and the NC flavor at https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://groupme.com/join_group/44042177/tdYiPA__;!!OToaGQ!4ZpKex-1C18uD8qz99zSCTUfxJj9KKsgfKg3MCFhtfwQ1StsxFACKdjV8HGHub0-piw$ . There are also some local groups for dissemination of information on birds that, while not necessarily rare, may be of interest to locals.

4. Facebook groups. Lord help us. There are many. And many are full of noise. But some tend to be more rewarding than others. ABA Rare Bird Alert and Carolina Rare Birds are two that I browse. Many other iterations exist. Some liberally updated with various pictures of cardinals. Don’t get me wrong, I like cardinals. I do not like staring at a little screen full of cardinals all day.

5. CBC website. Kent made a tool that collects NC and SC rare bird sightings (reports that flag as “rare” and need details) at https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.carolinabirdclub.org/sightings/__;!!OToaGQ!4ZpKex-1C18uD8qz99zSCTUfxJj9KKsgfKg3MCFhtfwQ1StsxFACKdjV8HGH7Pu_Zxs$ . Updated more or less real time.

Folks may have other tools of interest to the group. What works best for you?

And folks may bristle at my opinion of various tools. Most of that is tongue-in-cheek (it takes a while to get used to what I call humor), but feel free to hammer me with feedback! I need something to keep my attention away from the siskins draining my 401k faster than the stock market…

Steve Shultz
Apex NC

From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> On Behalf Of Linda Ward
Sent: Friday, October 30, 2020 11:56 AM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Rough-legged hawk posting

This email is from an external source - exercise caution regarding links and attachments.

thanks Ann Brice for posting the Rough-legged hawk to Carolina Birds. I learned about it from ebird alert. I avoid the territory occupied by Cambridge Analytica at FB.

Linda Ward
Coinjock, NC

 

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Date: 10/30/20 8:56 am
From: Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Rough-legged hawk posting
thanks Ann Brice for posting the Rough-legged hawk to Carolina Birds. I
learned about it from ebird alert. I avoid the territory occupied by
Cambridge Analytica at FB.

Linda Ward
Coinjock, NC

 

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Date: 10/30/20 7:49 am
From: Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Rough legged hawk at Alligator River NWR yesterday
I didn't see it posted here but was on Facebook and Audrey Whitlock and
Peggy Eubank relocated it yesterday afternoon:
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://ebird.org/checklist/S75571097__;!!OToaGQ!96bu34LxjDMxADZaYwEDw7BF18isxdD2dazuUdpAystxgijq9WUE2Y062BBkrqRA1Zk$

Has anyone looked this morning?

--
Ann Brice
<ann.brice...>
*Wilson, NC*

 

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Date: 10/30/20 5:04 am
From: Matt Curran <mcurran1...>
Subject: RE: Crow flock sizes
I have seen larger flocks of American crows flying around my neighborhood in North Raleigh. 10-20. My neighbor has something good on his lawn to eat and I will see 6 or 7 munching.







From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> On Behalf Of Troi Perkins
Sent: Thursday, October 29, 2020 8:09 PM
To: Christopher Hill <Chill...>; Norman Budnitz <nbudnitz...>
Cc: carolinabirds <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Crow flock sizes



I should specify that the ‘study’ was on American Crows. I have no idea about Fish Crows but you all have made me very curious



Cheers,

Troi



Troi Y. Perkins, B.S.
Outreach Lead| <mailto:<ecoe...> ECOE Student Club
Co-event Coordinator | <mailto:<nicnats...> NicNats Student Club
Master’s of Forestry |Master’s of Environmental Management,

Certificate of Community-based Environmental Management,
Duke University | Nicholas School of the Environment ‘21
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__http:/www.linkedin.com/in/troi__;!!OToaGQ!7HzkADl6EqIfkq3YGYe45OzXU4yao9yq7FFHjUe4FXbG8y-COiheqF2S-zkI$> https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.linkedin.com/in/troi__;!!OToaGQ!7IarpP-s8JshumJjosqno0HVDV4uyl1vYD9t6-eLuxgdRxKHES1I_mIbIxlNvX8l4yw$







From: Troi Perkins <mailto:<troi.perkins...>
Sent: Thursday, October 29, 2020 8:07 PM
To: Christopher Hill <mailto:<Chill...> ; Norman Budnitz <mailto:<nbudnitz...>
Cc: carolinabirds <mailto:<carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Crow flock sizes



Your observations are indeed accurate! In the winter crows have a pre-roost site and then gather together around sunset in their actual roosting site. I did some wildlife biology work on this while living in Vermont. Here is a link to a podcast episode that my colleagues at the Vermont Center for Ecostudies did in 2017.

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.vpr.org/post/outdoor-radio-mega-roost-crows*stream/0__;Iw!!OToaGQ!7IarpP-s8JshumJjosqno0HVDV4uyl1vYD9t6-eLuxgdRxKHES1I_mIbIxlNM57zR5o$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__https:/www.vpr.org/post/outdoor-radio-mega-roost-crows*stream/0__;Iw!!OToaGQ!4DUV1Wen2tMBQMryfUrkXhMdl9jJQ-QWIZpsZ-NUV8KFBahx-RGnSTanUxnSq3yxpOY$>



I’ve threaten to go crow chasing again now that I live in NC to try and find these roosting sites.



Cheers,

Troi



Troi Y. Perkins, B.S.
Outreach Lead| <mailto:<ecoe...> ECOE Student Club
Co-event Coordinator | <mailto:<nicnats...> NicNats Student Club
Master’s of Forestry |Master’s of Environmental Management,

Certificate of Community-based Environmental Management,
Duke University | Nicholas School of the Environment ‘21
<https://urldefense.com/v3/__http:/www.linkedin.com/in/troi__;!!OToaGQ!7HzkADl6EqIfkq3YGYe45OzXU4yao9yq7FFHjUe4FXbG8y-COiheqF2S-zkI$> https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.linkedin.com/in/troi__;!!OToaGQ!7IarpP-s8JshumJjosqno0HVDV4uyl1vYD9t6-eLuxgdRxKHES1I_mIbIxlNvX8l4yw$







From: Christopher Hill <mailto:<carolinabirds...>
Sent: Thursday, October 29, 2020 12:21 PM
To: Norman Budnitz <mailto:<nbudnitz...>
Cc: carolinabirds <mailto:<carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Crow flock sizes



Great discussion. This one of those chin-scratching “hey, I agree but I never consciously noticed and articulated that before” things. Two or three times this week I have been around small groups of American Crows, probably family groups.



Chris Hill

Conway, SC



On Oct 29, 2020, at 11:47 AM, Norman Budnitz <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...> > wrote:



CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.

I think this also may be a seasonal phenomenon. During and for quite a while after the breeding season, American Crows hang out in family groups. As cold weather approaches they have more of a tendency to form smaller and then larger flocks. They separate again with the next breeding season.



Fish crows aggregate into larger flocks pretty quickly after the breeding season. So, I see them in large flocks throughout the summer months here in Piedmont NC. I suspect this is true at the coast as well.



Norm



On Thu, Oct 29, 2020 at 11:35 AM "Shultz, Steven" <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...> > wrote:

I’d say somewhat sociopathic crows 😊



I’ve encountered large flocks of American Crows, but it *seems* that Fish Crows tend to flock in larger groups.





Steve Shultz

Apex NC



From: <carolinabirds-request...> <mailto:<carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> <mailto:<carolinabirds-request...> > On Behalf Of Michael Clark
Sent: Thursday, October 29, 2020 10:29 AM
To: carolinabirds <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...> >
Subject: Crow flock sizes



This email is from an external source - exercise caution regarding links and attachments.



I see both American and Fish crows in my area. Something I've noticed recently is that I almost never see American Crows in flocks larger than four, but the Fish Crows tend to flock in larger groups - typically 11 to 14. Has anyone else noticed this? Or do I just have antisocial Am. Crows?



--

Michael Clark

Durham, NC






--

Norm Budnitz
Orange County
North Carolina








 

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Date: 10/29/20 7:55 pm
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Crow flock sizes
I happened to see a good-sized loose flock today (20+ individuals) and it
was full of both species. From the source of the Fish Crow calls and the
American Crow calls, it seemed like one "lobe" of the widely spread flock
was mostly or all Fish Crows, and the other lobe was mostly or all American
Crows. Did the two areas overlap like a Venn diagram, or were some of each
species in both areas, I could not tell you. It did seem that as they flew
and moved over the vicinity some members of each lobe relocated and mixed
(based on where voices were coming from), but no way to be sure.

On the subject of distinguishing by voice, I think I can reliably pick out
Fish Crows from American Crows whether or not they're saying "UH-uh." Over
a dozen years, as a child I spent probably hundreds of hours with cousins
under and around a dock in a lake in north Florida, looking at bream beds,
attempting to throw each other out of canoes, draping ourselves in
hydrilla, smashing lake mussels to feed on the half-shell to ducklings,
throwing half-rotted windfall grapefruits (full of wasps) at each other,
holding our breath the longest, looking for baby alligators to catch,
telling each other to be more careful not to smush the beautiful pink and
pearly snail eggs that were laid in rows on the dock pilings, and
squelching around muddy shallows looking for marsh gas bubbles that we
imagined were a sign of quicksand -- all of which escapades were
accompanied by the sound of the Fish Crows constantly voicing their
apparent disapproval. As a result the voice of the Fish Crow is pretty
distinguishable in timbre to me now, even when the call pattern is similar
to Am. Crow. Or so I think. I have never blind-tested this "ability."

Regardless, one musical screech from a Boat-Tailed Grackle is enough to
take me back in time forty-some years, when quicksand was among my bigger
worries.

Betsy Kane
Washington, N.C.

On Thu, Oct 29, 2020 at 11:48 AM Norman Budnitz <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> I think this also may be a seasonal phenomenon. During and for quite a
> while after the breeding season, American Crows hang out in family groups.
> As cold weather approaches they have more of a tendency to form smaller and
> then larger flocks. They separate again with the next breeding season.
>
> Fish crows aggregate into larger flocks pretty quickly after the breeding
> season. So, I see them in large flocks throughout the summer months here in
> Piedmont NC. I suspect this is true at the coast as well.
>
> Norm
>
> On Thu, Oct 29, 2020 at 11:35 AM "Shultz, Steven" <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> I’d say somewhat sociopathic crows 😊
>>
>>
>>
>> I’ve encountered large flocks of American Crows, but it **seems** that
>> Fish Crows tend to flock in larger groups.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Steve Shultz
>>
>> Apex NC
>>
>>
>>
>> *From:* <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> *On
>> Behalf Of *Michael Clark
>> *Sent:* Thursday, October 29, 2020 10:29 AM
>> *To:* carolinabirds <carolinabirds...>
>> *Subject:* Crow flock sizes
>>
>>
>>
>> *This email is from an external source - **exercise caution regarding
>> links and attachments. *
>>
>>
>>
>> I see both American and Fish crows in my area. Something I've noticed
>> recently is that I almost never see American Crows in flocks larger than
>> four, but the Fish Crows tend to flock in larger groups - typically 11 to
>> 14. Has anyone else noticed this? Or do I just have antisocial Am. Crows?
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>> Michael Clark
>>
>> Durham, NC
>>
>
>
> --
> Norm Budnitz
> Orange County
> North Carolina
>

 

Back to top
Date: 10/29/20 5:10 pm
From: Troi Perkins <troi.perkins...>
Subject: RE: Crow flock sizes
I should specify that the ‘study’ was on American Crows. I have no idea about Fish Crows but you all have made me very curious

Cheers,
Troi


Troi Y. Perkins, B.S.
Outreach Lead| ECOE Student Club<mailto:<ecoe...>
Co-event Coordinator | NicNats Student Club<mailto:<nicnats...>
Master’s of Forestry |Master’s of Environmental Management,

Certificate of Community-based Environmental Management,
Duke University | Nicholas School of the Environment ‘21
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.linkedin.com/in/troi__;!!OToaGQ!4DUV1Wen2tMBQMryfUrkXhMdl9jJQ-QWIZpsZ-NUV8KFBahx-RGnSTanUxnSIHRHDQs$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http:/www.linkedin.com/in/troi__;!!OToaGQ!7HzkADl6EqIfkq3YGYe45OzXU4yao9yq7FFHjUe4FXbG8y-COiheqF2S-zkI$>




From: Troi Perkins<mailto:<troi.perkins...>
Sent: Thursday, October 29, 2020 8:07 PM
To: Christopher Hill<mailto:<Chill...>; Norman Budnitz<mailto:<nbudnitz...>
Cc: carolinabirds<mailto:<carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Crow flock sizes

Your observations are indeed accurate! In the winter crows have a pre-roost site and then gather together around sunset in their actual roosting site. I did some wildlife biology work on this while living in Vermont. Here is a link to a podcast episode that my colleagues at the Vermont Center for Ecostudies did in 2017.

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.vpr.org/post/outdoor-radio-mega-roost-crows*stream/0__;Iw!!OToaGQ!4DUV1Wen2tMBQMryfUrkXhMdl9jJQ-QWIZpsZ-NUV8KFBahx-RGnSTanUxnSq3yxpOY$

I’ve threaten to go crow chasing again now that I live in NC to try and find these roosting sites.

Cheers,
Troi


Troi Y. Perkins, B.S.
Outreach Lead| ECOE Student Club<mailto:<ecoe...>
Co-event Coordinator | NicNats Student Club<mailto:<nicnats...>
Master’s of Forestry |Master’s of Environmental Management,

Certificate of Community-based Environmental Management,
Duke University | Nicholas School of the Environment ‘21
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.linkedin.com/in/troi__;!!OToaGQ!4DUV1Wen2tMBQMryfUrkXhMdl9jJQ-QWIZpsZ-NUV8KFBahx-RGnSTanUxnSIHRHDQs$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http:/www.linkedin.com/in/troi__;!!OToaGQ!7HzkADl6EqIfkq3YGYe45OzXU4yao9yq7FFHjUe4FXbG8y-COiheqF2S-zkI$>




From: Christopher Hill<mailto:<carolinabirds...>
Sent: Thursday, October 29, 2020 12:21 PM
To: Norman Budnitz<mailto:<nbudnitz...>
Cc: carolinabirds<mailto:<carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Crow flock sizes

Great discussion. This one of those chin-scratching “hey, I agree but I never consciously noticed and articulated that before” things. Two or three times this week I have been around small groups of American Crows, probably family groups.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

On Oct 29, 2020, at 11:47 AM, Norman Budnitz <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.
I think this also may be a seasonal phenomenon. During and for quite a while after the breeding season, American Crows hang out in family groups. As cold weather approaches they have more of a tendency to form smaller and then larger flocks. They separate again with the next breeding season.

Fish crows aggregate into larger flocks pretty quickly after the breeding season. So, I see them in large flocks throughout the summer months here in Piedmont NC. I suspect this is true at the coast as well.

Norm

On Thu, Oct 29, 2020 at 11:35 AM "Shultz, Steven" <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
I’d say somewhat sociopathic crows 😊

I’ve encountered large flocks of American Crows, but it *seems* that Fish Crows tend to flock in larger groups.


Steve Shultz
Apex NC

From: <carolinabirds-request...><mailto:<carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...><mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>> On Behalf Of Michael Clark
Sent: Thursday, October 29, 2020 10:29 AM
To: carolinabirds <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>>
Subject: Crow flock sizes

This email is from an external source - exercise caution regarding links and attachments.

I see both American and Fish crows in my area. Something I've noticed recently is that I almost never see American Crows in flocks larger than four, but the Fish Crows tend to flock in larger groups - typically 11 to 14. Has anyone else noticed this? Or do I just have antisocial Am. Crows?

--
Michael Clark
Durham, NC


--
Norm Budnitz
Orange County
North Carolina




 

Back to top
Date: 10/29/20 5:09 pm
From: Troi Perkins <troi.perkins...>
Subject: RE: Crow flock sizes
Your observations are indeed accurate! In the winter crows have a pre-roost site and then gather together around sunset in their actual roosting site. I did some wildlife biology work on this while living in Vermont. Here is a link to a podcast episode that my colleagues at the Vermont Center for Ecostudies did in 2017.

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.vpr.org/post/outdoor-radio-mega-roost-crows*stream/0__;Iw!!OToaGQ!-_qGGtx15Y7_6H-U_zSOsFYFJafDCYTu-8YbrThiWSkQWRC0qYt-aUKTspV1n-rM6Uw$

I’ve threaten to go crow chasing again now that I live in NC to try and find these roosting sites.

Cheers,
Troi


Troi Y. Perkins, B.S.
Outreach Lead| ECOE Student Club<mailto:<ecoe...>
Co-event Coordinator | NicNats Student Club<mailto:<nicnats...>
Master’s of Forestry |Master’s of Environmental Management,

Certificate of Community-based Environmental Management,
Duke University | Nicholas School of the Environment ‘21
https://urldefense.com/v3/__http://www.linkedin.com/in/troi__;!!OToaGQ!-_qGGtx15Y7_6H-U_zSOsFYFJafDCYTu-8YbrThiWSkQWRC0qYt-aUKTspV1caR2Bwo$ <https://urldefense.com/v3/__http:/www.linkedin.com/in/troi__;!!OToaGQ!7HzkADl6EqIfkq3YGYe45OzXU4yao9yq7FFHjUe4FXbG8y-COiheqF2S-zkI$>




From: Christopher Hill<mailto:<carolinabirds...>
Sent: Thursday, October 29, 2020 12:21 PM
To: Norman Budnitz<mailto:<nbudnitz...>
Cc: carolinabirds<mailto:<carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Crow flock sizes

Great discussion. This one of those chin-scratching “hey, I agree but I never consciously noticed and articulated that before” things. Two or three times this week I have been around small groups of American Crows, probably family groups.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC


On Oct 29, 2020, at 11:47 AM, Norman Budnitz <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.
I think this also may be a seasonal phenomenon. During and for quite a while after the breeding season, American Crows hang out in family groups. As cold weather approaches they have more of a tendency to form smaller and then larger flocks. They separate again with the next breeding season.

Fish crows aggregate into larger flocks pretty quickly after the breeding season. So, I see them in large flocks throughout the summer months here in Piedmont NC. I suspect this is true at the coast as well.

Norm

On Thu, Oct 29, 2020 at 11:35 AM "Shultz, Steven" <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
I’d say somewhat sociopathic crows 😊

I’ve encountered large flocks of American Crows, but it *seems* that Fish Crows tend to flock in larger groups.


Steve Shultz
Apex NC

From: <carolinabirds-request...><mailto:<carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...><mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>> On Behalf Of Michael Clark
Sent: Thursday, October 29, 2020 10:29 AM
To: carolinabirds <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>>
Subject: Crow flock sizes

This email is from an external source - exercise caution regarding links and attachments.

I see both American and Fish crows in my area. Something I've noticed recently is that I almost never see American Crows in flocks larger than four, but the Fish Crows tend to flock in larger groups - typically 11 to 14. Has anyone else noticed this? Or do I just have antisocial Am. Crows?

--
Michael Clark
Durham, NC


--
Norm Budnitz
Orange County
North Carolina



 

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Date: 10/29/20 2:12 pm
From: Oscar Carmona (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Urgent Appeal for Action, Salineno Preserve
Thanks for sharing. Having spent a lot of time at Saliñeno over the past several years, this special place has provided many birders their life Audubon’s Orioles, Brown Jay, Red-billed Pigeon and more. 
I encourage signing on to support keeping some of our unique birding locations intact.
Oscar CarmonaWake Forest, NC


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone


On Thursday, October 29, 2020, 4:46 PM, sheryl mcnair <carolinabirds...> wrote:


https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://mailchi.mp/59c10bb8d5f6/run-for-the-refuge-3125326?e=334c1222a1&fbclid=IwAR2KX0z1K1cJ6SqgVEcrCWhlQPJrVTsIaUVJAlfUA8wAQN-zfQ_FWvxOlE0__;!!OToaGQ!84Ti2nEeqEzypZ4gpmqYuElfYsWXYkCMDX7b5xUxKWt13ancZWFC-nNg4yG7Ap3oVPo$


Sheryl



 

Back to top
Date: 10/29/20 1:46 pm
From: sheryl mcnair (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Urgent Appeal for Action, Salineno Preserve

https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://mailchi.mp/59c10bb8d5f6/run-for-the-refuge-3125326?e=334c1222a1&fbclid=IwAR2KX0z1K1cJ6SqgVEcrCWhlQPJrVTsIaUVJAlfUA8wAQN-zfQ_FWvxOlE0__;!!OToaGQ!84Ti2nEeqEzypZ4gpmqYuElfYsWXYkCMDX7b5xUxKWt13ancZWFC-nNg4yG7Ap3oVPo$


Sheryl
 

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Date: 10/29/20 9:36 am
From: Robin T (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: pine siskins
That is about the number I am seeing right now at our feeders. The purple finches showed up a couple of days before the onslaught of siskins.
Robin TPisgah NFYancey County, NC

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Thu, Oct 29, 2020 at 12:24 PM, Cecelia Mathis<weer...> wrote: #yiv7376695565 P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;}Last week I was having 3-4 dozen pine siskins with large numbers of purple finches mixed in. But where will they go this winter? I found a very good range map. Help me to understand it.https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Pine_Siskin/maps-range*:*:text=Migration,these*20movements*20are*20extremely*20variable__;I34lJSUl!!OToaGQ!4mOzqp2IH0gJNqW5jpUxcNvjnFjvgzkFEj6q0ERQsRsCDXwfU89-Qd3cPcpoKHGKtDI$ . Cecelia Butler MathisAlleghany Co, NC in the Blue Ridge Mts.

 

Back to top
Date: 10/29/20 9:24 am
From: Cecelia Mathis <weer...>
Subject: pine siskins
Last week I was having 3-4 dozen pine siskins with large numbers of purple finches mixed in. But where will they go this winter? I found a very good range map. Help me to understand it.
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Pine_Siskin/maps-range*:*:text=Migration,these*20movements*20are*20extremely*20variable__;I34lJSUl!!OToaGQ!_ByJrSo8kUaGiop2-usOXy5t6HnmQfMB26eTzh_WoDA8HBOPGTnaI9I9D72lrzJAeY4$ .
Cecelia Butler Mathis
Alleghany Co, NC in the Blue Ridge Mts.
 

Back to top
Date: 10/29/20 9:21 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Crow flock sizes
Great discussion. This one of those chin-scratching “hey, I agree but I never consciously noticed and articulated that before” things. Two or three times this week I have been around small groups of American Crows, probably family groups.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

On Oct 29, 2020, at 11:47 AM, Norman Budnitz <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:


CAUTION: This email originated from outside your organization. Exercise caution when opening attachments or clicking links, especially from unknown senders.

I think this also may be a seasonal phenomenon. During and for quite a while after the breeding season, American Crows hang out in family groups. As cold weather approaches they have more of a tendency to form smaller and then larger flocks. They separate again with the next breeding season.

Fish crows aggregate into larger flocks pretty quickly after the breeding season. So, I see them in large flocks throughout the summer months here in Piedmont NC. I suspect this is true at the coast as well.

Norm

On Thu, Oct 29, 2020 at 11:35 AM "Shultz, Steven" <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
I’d say somewhat sociopathic crows 😊

I’ve encountered large flocks of American Crows, but it *seems* that Fish Crows tend to flock in larger groups.


Steve Shultz
Apex NC

From: <carolinabirds-request...><mailto:<carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...><mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>> On Behalf Of Michael Clark
Sent: Thursday, October 29, 2020 10:29 AM
To: carolinabirds <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>>
Subject: Crow flock sizes

This email is from an external source - exercise caution regarding links and attachments.

I see both American and Fish crows in my area. Something I've noticed recently is that I almost never see American Crows in flocks larger than four, but the Fish Crows tend to flock in larger groups - typically 11 to 14. Has anyone else noticed this? Or do I just have antisocial Am. Crows?

--
Michael Clark
Durham, NC


--
Norm Budnitz
Orange County
North Carolina

 

Back to top
Date: 10/29/20 9:07 am
From: David Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Crow flock sizes
About a week ago, there was a flock of 45 Fish Crows here on the
Gardner-Webb campus (based on the calls), with an occasional American Crow
commenting on the passing group.

Locally, Fish Crows will perch at least on trees, buildings, the ground,
and dumpsters, so choice of perch does not seem like a useful distinctive.

Winter roosts can have huge numbers of American Crows flying there, but
during the day they tend to be somewhat more dispersed.

On Thu, Oct 29, 2020 at 10:29 AM Michael Clark <mdc...> wrote:

> I see both American and Fish crows in my area. Something I've noticed
> recently is that I almost never see American Crows in flocks larger than
> four, but the Fish Crows tend to flock in larger groups - typically 11 to
> 14. Has anyone else noticed this? Or do I just have antisocial Am. Crows?
>
> --
> Michael Clark
> Durham, NC
>


--
Dr. David Campbell
Associate Professor, Geology
Department of Natural Sciences
Box 7270
Gardner-Webb University
Boiling Springs NC 28017

 

Back to top
Date: 10/29/20 8:50 am
From: Gretchen Schramm (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Crow flock sizes
I wish I could even BEGIN to id one crow from another! Only the "uh ah"
nasal call is recognizable to me to distinguish one from the other.

Gretchen


On Thu, Oct 29, 2020 at 10:29 AM Michael Clark <mdc...> wrote:

> I see both American and Fish crows in my area. Something I've noticed
> recently is that I almost never see American Crows in flocks larger than
> four, but the Fish Crows tend to flock in larger groups - typically 11 to
> 14. Has anyone else noticed this? Or do I just have antisocial Am. Crows?
>
> --
> Michael Clark
> Durham, NC
>

 

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Date: 10/29/20 8:48 am
From: Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Crow flock sizes
I think this also may be a seasonal phenomenon. During and for quite a
while after the breeding season, American Crows hang out in family groups.
As cold weather approaches they have more of a tendency to form smaller and
then larger flocks. They separate again with the next breeding season.

Fish crows aggregate into larger flocks pretty quickly after the breeding
season. So, I see them in large flocks throughout the summer months here in
Piedmont NC. I suspect this is true at the coast as well.

Norm

On Thu, Oct 29, 2020 at 11:35 AM "Shultz, Steven" <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> I’d say somewhat sociopathic crows 😊
>
>
>
> I’ve encountered large flocks of American Crows, but it **seems** that
> Fish Crows tend to flock in larger groups.
>
>
>
>
>
> Steve Shultz
>
> Apex NC
>
>
>
> *From:* <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> *On
> Behalf Of *Michael Clark
> *Sent:* Thursday, October 29, 2020 10:29 AM
> *To:* carolinabirds <carolinabirds...>
> *Subject:* Crow flock sizes
>
>
>
> *This email is from an external source - **exercise caution regarding
> links and attachments. *
>
>
>
> I see both American and Fish crows in my area. Something I've noticed
> recently is that I almost never see American Crows in flocks larger than
> four, but the Fish Crows tend to flock in larger groups - typically 11 to
> 14. Has anyone else noticed this? Or do I just have antisocial Am. Crows?
>
>
> --
>
> Michael Clark
>
> Durham, NC
>


--
Norm Budnitz
Orange County
North Carolina

 

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Date: 10/29/20 8:35 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Crow flock sizes
I’d say somewhat sociopathic crows 😊

I’ve encountered large flocks of American Crows, but it *seems* that Fish Crows tend to flock in larger groups.


Steve Shultz
Apex NC

From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> On Behalf Of Michael Clark
Sent: Thursday, October 29, 2020 10:29 AM
To: carolinabirds <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Crow flock sizes

This email is from an external source - exercise caution regarding links and attachments.

I see both American and Fish crows in my area. Something I've noticed recently is that I almost never see American Crows in flocks larger than four, but the Fish Crows tend to flock in larger groups - typically 11 to 14. Has anyone else noticed this? Or do I just have antisocial Am. Crows?

--
Michael Clark
Durham, NC
 

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Date: 10/29/20 7:29 am
From: Michael Clark <mdc...>
Subject: Crow flock sizes
I see both American and Fish crows in my area. Something I've noticed
recently is that I almost never see American Crows in flocks larger than
four, but the Fish Crows tend to flock in larger groups - typically 11 to
14. Has anyone else noticed this? Or do I just have antisocial Am. Crows?

--
Michael Clark
Durham, NC

 

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Date: 10/29/20 7:20 am
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Finch pecking order
That is the hierarchy I have noticed over the years Steve.

And when my mother had a Common Redpoll at her feeders several years ago,
it trumped EVERYTHING. Obvious royalty and the rest were peasants.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

On Thu, Oct 29, 2020 at 10:07 AM "Shultz, Steven" <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Unsettled weather this morning (but not the rain we were hoping for!)
> brought the brothers of the brothers of the Pine Siskins we had yesterday.
> Numbers roughly double that of 48 hours ago, so supporting about 50
> additional dependents (trying to get SSNs on them so that I can claim on
> this year’s taxes, however being Canadian, most claim green card status).
>
>
>
> The finches seem to have a fairly established pecking order. Purple Finch
> on top, followed by House Finch, with siskins bringing up the rear. While
> the siskins are not overly successful at ousting a PUFI or HOFI from a
> feeder port, the sheer number of siskins allows them to take over when they
> arrive en masse.
>
>
>
> In spite of a platform feeder literally covered in finches, the sturdy
> Song Sparrow simply hunkers down and crunches millet. No one messes with
> the Song Sparrow. Well, I guess the Cooper’s Hawk would, but probably
> can’t establish a clear flight path to the sparrow without hitting a dozen
> siskins.
>
>
>
> Now if the EveBeaks show up as hinted at by early reports up north, we
> could be for a hefty seed bill come end of season.
>
>
>
> Steve Shultz
>
> Apex NC
>


--
https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2/__;!!OToaGQ!90ot2-dgI6bfVJS_NmGB8MimLss90vVYablzUPsPYSnxhWti2KyK22tkOihG5h48yN0$


"These days I prefer to hunt with a camera. A good photograph demands more
skill from the hunter, better nerves and more patience than the rifle
shot." -- Bror Blixen

 

Back to top
Date: 10/29/20 7:07 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Finch pecking order
Unsettled weather this morning (but not the rain we were hoping for!) brought the brothers of the brothers of the Pine Siskins we had yesterday. Numbers roughly double that of 48 hours ago, so supporting about 50 additional dependents (trying to get SSNs on them so that I can claim on this year's taxes, however being Canadian, most claim green card status).

The finches seem to have a fairly established pecking order. Purple Finch on top, followed by House Finch, with siskins bringing up the rear. While the siskins are not overly successful at ousting a PUFI or HOFI from a feeder port, the sheer number of siskins allows them to take over when they arrive en masse.

In spite of a platform feeder literally covered in finches, the sturdy Song Sparrow simply hunkers down and crunches millet. No one messes with the Song Sparrow. Well, I guess the Cooper's Hawk would, but probably can't establish a clear flight path to the sparrow without hitting a dozen siskins.

Now if the EveBeaks show up as hinted at by early reports up north, we could be for a hefty seed bill come end of season.

Steve Shultz
Apex NC

 

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Date: 10/29/20 4:53 am
From: Judy Halleron (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: more pine siskins

We had more than 100 Pine Siskins under our feeders late afternoon Thursday. With them were several Purple Finch, male, female and immatures. Hoping for a Red-breasted Nuthatch - but none yet. Have had at several pairs of White-breasted Nuthatch all year.

Judy Halleron
Marble, NC
Cherokee County

 

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