Carolinabirds
Received From Subject
4/25/18 5:33 am Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Good Birds -- Lake Hickory
4/25/18 5:25 am Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Indigo Bunting
4/24/18 3:44 pm Thomas Blower (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bioblitz at Piedmont Wildlife Center needs bird hike leader Thursday
4/24/18 3:10 pm Fuz Sanderson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bioblitz at Piedmont Wildlife Center needs bird hike leader Thursday
4/24/18 3:07 pm Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Crested Flycatcher evidently hit ordinary low electrical wires 4/18/18
4/24/18 2:53 pm Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Sent some e-mails to entire C-birds. SORRY.
4/24/18 2:33 pm Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> FOY birds in backyard- Raleigh
4/24/18 2:29 pm Marcia Lyons (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> FOY RB Grosbeak in Buxton
4/24/18 2:03 pm Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Birding by bike
4/24/18 6:51 am John McCormick (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Unsubscribe
4/24/18 2:59 am Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: RR WalMart House Sparrow roost disappears---pest control? Compare to quail.
4/24/18 2:13 am Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Short-eared Owl
4/24/18 2:12 am Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Short-eared Owl
4/24/18 2:02 am Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bad conservation news from eastern NC
4/23/18 5:53 pm Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bar-tailed Godwit, East Shackleford Banks, Carteret Co, NC
4/23/18 1:10 pm Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Santee Coastal on Saturday 4/21
4/23/18 11:34 am Bert Fisher (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Vireo Lane birds: from Chuck-will's-widow to Barred Owl
4/23/18 8:26 am Jeannie Kraus (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Shiny cowbird
4/23/18 7:41 am John Fussell <jofuss...> Bar-tailed Godwit at east Shackleford Banks, NC
4/22/18 2:58 pm Eric Harrold (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Wilkes/Surry birds today
4/22/18 9:44 am andrew thornton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Cattle Egret, Greensboro
4/22/18 9:07 am Edith Tatum (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> eBird -- Eno River SP--Few's Ford -- Apr 22, 2018
4/22/18 8:07 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bobolink and Grasshopper Sparrow at NCSU farm fields
4/21/18 7:53 pm James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> 18 species of shorebirds Bear Island WMA, SC, including American Golden Plover
4/21/18 7:29 pm Hurlbert, Allen Hartley <Hurlbert...> RE: Shiny Cowbird, Fort Macon SP, Carteret County, NC
4/21/18 3:48 pm Irvin Pitts <pittsjam...> Nashville Warbler in Chester County, SC
4/21/18 10:57 am Edith Tatum (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> eBird -- Eno River SP--Cole Mill/Pump Station -- Apr 21, 2018
4/21/18 8:09 am Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Durham spring bird count April 29 and other spring count help needed
4/21/18 6:21 am Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Yard birds of Little Washington
4/20/18 7:39 pm Bradley Dalton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Another 70 species day at Lake Conestee Nature Park, Greenville, SC
4/20/18 4:51 pm Thomas Krakauer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> My patio
4/20/18 2:44 pm Cynthia Fox (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Yard birds in Orange County NC
4/20/18 2:37 pm Murphy (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Good news/bad news in Durham
4/20/18 11:44 am John Haire (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lawrence's Warbler
4/20/18 10:14 am Thomas Miko (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> California birder visiting Charleston SC in May
4/20/18 6:10 am Me (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Clay-colored Sparrow now at Fort Macon SP, Carteret Co, NC
4/20/18 6:06 am Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Southern Pines NC yesterday
4/20/18 5:05 am Me (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Shiny Cowbird, Fort Macon SP, Carteret County, NC
4/19/18 9:23 pm GRIGGS, JERRY <griggs...> Yard activity, Columbia SC Arrivals and Departures including Hummers
4/19/18 5:27 pm Audrey (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Attn SC couple in Brevard Cty FL; Found Panasonic luminix camera accessory
4/19/18 8:29 am Cotter, Michael G <COTTERMI...> Re: Orioles
4/19/18 5:49 am \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker distinctive early spring calls and drumming
4/18/18 5:36 pm John Fussell <jofuss...> why I'm superstitious
4/18/18 4:16 pm Mary Bridges <maryhuot...> Orioles
4/18/18 3:40 pm WALTER KENT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> birds
4/18/18 12:51 pm David Hart <david.hart...> Western Tanager in Durham continuing
4/18/18 11:32 am FRANK LAWKINS (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> App
4/18/18 4:49 am John Fussell <jofuss...> winter Baltimores gone?
4/17/18 7:02 pm James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> 177 Stilt Sandpipers at Santee Coastal Reserve WMA, South Carolina
4/17/18 3:27 pm ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Hummingbird Survival
4/17/18 2:20 pm Marcus Simpson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Cattle Egret - Mills River - Henderson County
4/17/18 12:35 pm susan <susan...> Western Tanager continues in Durham
4/17/18 10:47 am Patsy Bailey (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Western Tanager in Durham NC
4/17/18 9:52 am Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Caspian Terns
4/17/18 8:16 am Holly Powell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hummingbirds & Catbirds
4/17/18 6:10 am WALTER KENT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hummers
4/17/18 5:01 am Robin T (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hummingbird Survival
4/17/18 4:57 am Sam Cooper <dmcooper2...> Brunswick County, NC Spring Count 21 April 2018
4/16/18 3:37 pm <susan...> RE: Hummingbird survival in late cold snap?
4/16/18 3:17 pm Robin T (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hummingbird survival in late cold snap?
4/16/18 12:24 pm Monty <mec...> Re: [highcountryaudubon] Ospreys nesting Kerr Scott reservoir, Wilkes Co.
4/16/18 12:07 pm \Jim Capel\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Chapel Hill Bird Club Monthly Meeting - Monday 4/23 - Keith Kennedy - Japan's Winter Wildlife
4/16/18 11:24 am <badgerboy...> Ospreys nesting Kerr Scott reservoir, Wilkes Co.
4/16/18 11:23 am Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Warning: Blatantly Political Post: Re: Migratory Bird Treat Act
4/16/18 10:39 am Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Purple Finch, Rockingham County, NC
4/16/18 10:12 am Andy Smith <andrew.w.smith...> Re: Migratory Bird Treat Act
4/16/18 9:41 am KC Foggin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Migratory Bird Treat Act
4/16/18 8:55 am Patricia Tice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: 1st female hummer near Hillsborough, NC
4/16/18 8:04 am Bert Fisher (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Western Tanager in Durham - Seen Today
4/16/18 7:19 am Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Lesser Black-b, Gulls feed at 30 km; some nos, to our north now
4/16/18 5:37 am Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> 1st female hummer near Hillsborough, NC
4/16/18 3:30 am Marcia Mandel (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Western Tanager in Durham NC
4/16/18 3:22 am Patrick Coin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> FOS chimney swifts Durham NC 4/15/18
4/16/18 12:17 am Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lesser Black-b, Gulls feed at 30 km; some nos, to our north now
4/15/18 11:59 pm Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Am. White Pelicans-Davidson Co., NC-04/02/2018
4/15/18 7:27 pm Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Warblers at Alligator River NWR 4/14/18
4/15/18 4:09 pm Dennis Kent <dkjtk...> Re: [meckbirds] Mecklenburg County Arrivals Sunday, Apr. 15
4/15/18 3:59 pm Stacy and Natalie Barbour (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Western Tanager in Durham, NC
4/15/18 8:45 am Kevin Metcalf (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Mecklenburg County Arrivals Sunday, Apr. 15
4/15/18 6:52 am Gretchen Schramm (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> The Last Two Weeks
4/15/18 5:31 am <brbirders...> Hummingbird in Alleghany Co. NC
4/14/18 5:18 pm \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Spring arrivals in Watauga County, NC
4/14/18 4:30 pm Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Ruby throated hummingbird
4/14/18 4:24 pm Monroe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Shortoff Mountain Trail Burke Co. NC
4/14/18 2:03 pm Sharyn Caudell <scaudell...> Ruby throated hummingbird
4/14/18 11:23 am Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> fos ovenbird today in Hillsborough, nc
4/14/18 10:32 am Ginny Alfano (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Prairie Warbler
4/14/18 6:43 am Will Whitsett <willwhitsett...> Re: Say’s phoebe
4/14/18 6:27 am Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Say’s phoebe
4/14/18 6:24 am Will Whitsett <willwhitsett...> Fwd: Say’s phoebe
4/14/18 6:15 am Bonnie/Tom <bks1956...> Re: FOS birds in McDowell County
4/14/18 4:31 am Ken Bennett (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hummingbird FOS
4/14/18 4:12 am Robin T (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: First Hummingbird
4/14/18 4:03 am Patrick Coin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> FOS hummingbird Durham NC 4/13/18
4/13/18 3:39 pm Rob G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Patterson Place pond
4/13/18 1:59 pm Peter Perlman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: First Hummingbird
4/13/18 12:08 pm Carol Chelette (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Prairie Warbler
4/13/18 7:31 am <hilton...> Hilton Pond 03/18/18 (Ducks, Raptors, Hummers)
4/13/18 5:59 am Bonnie/Tom <bks1956...> Re: FOS birds in McDowell County
4/13/18 2:23 am Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Carolina birders took notes for 150 years. Many of the species they saw are gone. http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/local/article208684944.html
4/12/18 11:55 pm lee van malssen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Carolina birders took notes for 150 years. Many of the species they saw are gone. http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/local/article208684944.html
4/12/18 6:02 pm EASTMAN, CAROLINE <EASTMAN...> RE: Still No Say’s Phoebe (1:00 PM)
4/12/18 1:03 pm Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> No Say’s Phoebe
4/12/18 1:00 pm Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Still No Say’s Phoebe (1:00 PM)
4/12/18 10:04 am Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Still No Say’s Phoebe (1:00 PM)
4/12/18 9:47 am Don Crutchfield <dcrutchfield...> Hummingbird
4/12/18 9:02 am Thomas Krakauer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> First Hummingbird
4/12/18 4:25 am Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Morning scan - No Say’s Phoebe
4/11/18 3:55 pm jcox3222 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Say’s phoebe
4/11/18 2:42 pm Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Say’s Phoebe - Clemson, SC
4/11/18 1:47 pm Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Vesper Sparrow and Worm-eating Warbler at Clark's Creek
4/11/18 9:07 am Marilyn Westphal <mjwestph...> Arrivals
4/10/18 10:30 am Aaron Steed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> White-winged Scoter, Lake Julian, Asheville
4/10/18 8:36 am Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Great Horned Owl fledglings at Anderson Point Park, Wake Co, NC
4/9/18 1:01 pm \Herbert, Teri Lynn\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> New short film from Folly Lama
4/9/18 12:53 pm Carol Chelette (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hawks mating
4/9/18 10:04 am Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> today near Hillsborough, NC
4/8/18 4:47 pm Stephen Thomas <rubberhead...> Re: Duckhunting.com vs Carolinabirds
4/8/18 3:24 pm Jeff Eichinger (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: FOS Hummer
4/8/18 3:07 pm Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Great Crested FC and Purple Martin's - outer banks
4/8/18 10:36 am Sharyn Caudell <scaudell...> Male Scarlett tanager
4/8/18 5:14 am Chris Wilson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: FOS Hummer
4/8/18 4:09 am Rob G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> FOS Hummer
4/7/18 3:51 pm Lisa Hayes (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Southern California
4/7/18 3:25 pm Derb Carter <derbc...> Palmetto Peartree Preserve
4/7/18 2:15 pm Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Tripod question - Bogen 3130 head
4/7/18 1:18 pm Steve Shultz <sshultz...> Tripod question - Bogen 3130 head
4/7/18 12:07 pm John Ennis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Oops! Holly Shelter Lodge Road
4/7/18 12:05 pm John Ennis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Yesterday’s FOS
4/7/18 11:32 am Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: WRC, the bane of Red-cockaded Woodp?--bad news or fake in ENC
4/7/18 11:06 am Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Back to Birds- Insult Free- Little Green Herons - Georgetown County, SC
4/7/18 9:41 am Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> WRC, the bane of Red-cockaded Woodp?--bad news or fake in ENC
4/7/18 8:49 am Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Duckhunting.com vs Carolinabirds
4/7/18 7:54 am Peter Vankevich (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Trumpeter Swan still on Ocracoke, April 6, 2018
4/6/18 7:24 pm David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Unsubscribe
4/6/18 6:35 pm Jane Morrow (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> finding a red-cockaded woodpecker near Wilmington
4/6/18 3:14 pm Alan Gamache <bird...> Summer Tanager / New Bern, NC
4/6/18 7:11 am susan <susan...> Good news from Weymouth Woods
4/5/18 12:28 pm <badgerboy...> HCAS Brookshire Park Walk Saturday 8AM
4/5/18 4:21 am Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Am. White Pelicans-Davidson Co., NC-04/02/2018
4/4/18 5:53 pm <susan...> more from the Sandhills this evening
4/4/18 2:17 pm Wendy Kaplan (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> FOS Ruby-throat
4/4/18 1:05 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Southport entrance to lake Crabtree
4/4/18 12:58 pm Cynthia Fox (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Southport entrance to lake Crabtree
4/4/18 10:29 am Clyde Smith (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> FOS Ruby-throated Hummingbird
4/4/18 7:06 am <susan...> Surprising feeder activity this morning
4/4/18 5:46 am nicholas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Cattle Egrets, Pasquotank Co. NC, 4/3/18
4/4/18 5:35 am nicholas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> late report: warblers at Great Dismal Swamp NWR, Gates Co. NC (mostly), 3/29/18
4/3/18 3:55 pm Patsy Bailey (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Jordan Lake Spring Count
4/3/18 3:54 pm Derb Carter <derbc...> Scottish birding guides
4/3/18 3:52 pm Elizabeth Faison (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> spring!
4/3/18 1:56 pm Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Jordan Lake Spring Count
4/3/18 12:10 pm Thomas Driscoll (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bird guide wanted for Scotland
4/3/18 12:04 pm M Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: thank you for feedback on "likely Connecticut Warbler, Mt. Mitchell, NC"
4/3/18 10:37 am Marilyn Westphal <mjwestph...> Re: likely Connecticut Warbler, Mt. Mitchell, NC
4/3/18 10:31 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: likely Connecticut Warbler, Mt. Mitchell, NC
4/3/18 10:07 am Fred Burggraf (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Chuck-will's-widow in Murrells Inlet
4/3/18 9:33 am Cynthia Fox (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bird guide wanted for Scotland
4/3/18 9:11 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: likely Connecticut Warbler, Mt. Mitchell, NC
4/3/18 9:04 am M Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> re: likely Connecticut Warbler, Mt. Mitchell, NC
4/3/18 8:06 am Robin T (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Wild turkeys
4/3/18 6:17 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: Are limpkin unusual around lake Marion, SC?
4/3/18 6:12 am Barry Scully (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Are limpkin unusual around lake Marion, SC?
4/3/18 6:10 am Margaretta Yarborough (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bird apps
4/2/18 4:46 pm WALTER KENT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> hummers
4/2/18 3:19 pm Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Alligator Refuge birding
4/2/18 1:46 pm Mike Turner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Am. White Pelicans-Davidson Co., NC-04/02/2018
4/2/18 9:47 am Edith Tatum (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Pileated
4/2/18 6:58 am Sheryl McNair (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bird apps
4/2/18 5:12 am Lewis Burke (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Spring
4/2/18 4:29 am \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Spring arrivals in Halifax County, NC
4/2/18 4:08 am \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Spring arrivals in Halifax County, NC
4/1/18 8:34 pm Stephen Buczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> FOS Yellow-Throated Warbler in Duke Forest
4/1/18 5:24 pm John Fussell <jofuss...> Long-billed Curlew at east Shackleford Banks NC
4/1/18 4:54 pm Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> A. White Pelican -- Oxford Dam/ Riverbend Park
4/1/18 4:33 pm John Bloomfield (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bird apps
4/1/18 3:46 pm Robert Williams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bird apps
4/1/18 3:33 pm Krystyna 00 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bird apps
4/1/18 12:19 pm Isabel Reddy (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bird apps
4/1/18 12:15 pm Jim Edwards <jim.edwards...> Piping Plovers at Seabrook Island (Charleston Co., SC)
4/1/18 11:13 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Passing of Bob Simpson
4/1/18 10:59 am Cherrie Sneed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> GreatCormorant
4/1/18 6:35 am Lester Coble (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Whip-poor-will
4/1/18 4:02 am \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Whip-poor-will
3/31/18 7:15 pm Marilyn Westphal <mjwestph...> Whip-poor-will
3/31/18 3:17 pm Steve <sshultz...> Spring sprung in the Triangle
3/31/18 3:08 pm Bill Majoros <william.majoros...> FOS Palm Warbler in Durham county
3/30/18 4:43 pm Bonnie/Tom <bks1956...> FOS warblers in McDowell County
3/30/18 3:10 pm Bill Majoros <william.majoros...> C Yellowthroat, WE Vireo in Durham
3/30/18 12:34 pm Ann Truesdale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> American Golden Plover at Bear Island WMA, Colleton County, SC - still present
3/30/18 7:06 am Stewart Gibeau <sgibeau...> Black Mountain, NC
3/30/18 6:27 am Lex Glover <GloverL...> Volunteers Needed for SC Breeding Bird Survey Routes
3/29/18 7:12 pm GRIGGS, JERRY <griggs...> Yard Activity, Columbia, SC
3/29/18 2:05 pm Tim Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Afternoon fallout (mountains)
3/29/18 9:57 am Corey, Ed <ed.corey...> Three Natural Resources Positions available - NC State Parks
3/29/18 8:43 am birdermom63 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Birding in and around Waynesville
3/29/18 8:26 am Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...> FOS Ruby-throat Hummingbird
3/29/18 6:43 am Bill Majoros <william.majoros...> Parula, YT Warbler, L Waterthrush, Gnatcatcher in Durham
3/29/18 5:33 am \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Spring arrivals in the northern mountains
3/28/18 6:05 pm <susan...> Spring seems to have arrived in the Sandhills...
3/28/18 1:10 pm Marilyn Westphal <mjwestph...> Green River Cove Rd, Polk County NC
3/28/18 11:53 am Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Black-throated Green Warblers South Mtns SP.
3/28/18 9:16 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: 5000 gulls, Buckhorn Res. eve. 3/27/18
3/28/18 9:16 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: Louisiana Waterthrush!
3/28/18 8:50 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Louisiana Waterthrush!
3/28/18 5:41 am Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> 5000 gulls, Buckhorn Res. eve. 3/27/18
3/28/18 5:35 am Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Louisiana Waterthrush!
3/27/18 4:22 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Buckhorn Res. Lesser Black-backed Gulls
3/27/18 3:10 pm Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Buckhorn Res. Lesser Black-backed Gulls
3/27/18 11:37 am Alan Gamache <bird...> Purple Martins (FOY) New Bern, NC
3/27/18 9:38 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Buckhorn Res. Lesser Black-backed Gulls
3/27/18 7:07 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Buckhorn Res. Lesser Black-backed Gulls
3/27/18 6:49 am \Harry E. LeGrand Jr\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Buckhorn Res. Lesser Black-backed Gulls
3/27/18 6:23 am Ricky Davis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Buckhorn Res. Lesser Black-backed Gulls
 
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Date: 4/25/18 5:33 am
From: Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Good Birds -- Lake Hickory
At Oxford Access area on Lake Hickory this morning there is a great group
of birds hanging out at the boat launch area. Best bird is an adult Lesser
Black-backed Gull which is a county record. Also present are 3 Laughing
Gulls, 4 Caspian Terns and 16 Herring Gulls (not common here).
--
Dwayne
*************
Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
<redxbill...>

 

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Date: 4/25/18 5:25 am
From: Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Indigo Bunting
I have an Indigo Bunting visiting my backyard feeders this morning. FOY

Cornelius, NC
Anne Olsen


Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 4/24/18 3:44 pm
From: Thomas Blower (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bioblitz at Piedmont Wildlife Center needs bird hike leader Thursday
Unsubscribe

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 24, 2018, at 6:10 PM, Fuz Sanderson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Greetings all,
> The Piedmont Wildlife Center in Durham is conducting a Bio Blitz this Thursday. I had to drop out of leading the bird hike due to some work commitments. Anyone interested in stepping in?
>
> Thanks
> fuz
>
>
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.piedmontearthskillsgathering.com_&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=FFS-KOIfP53oW6QVX5PRwzsk6WO_4BXbqX7t7xf9UoA&s=DQ7YgSlyJ94FQ0IFQatvxWpk5sHWu4VuWMKB4DoCtmk&e=
>
>
> "With learning a skill comes self-confidence, and with that self confidence we become a more fully alive human being"
> - Darry Wood
>
>
>

 

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Date: 4/24/18 3:10 pm
From: Fuz Sanderson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bioblitz at Piedmont Wildlife Center needs bird hike leader Thursday
Greetings all,
The Piedmont Wildlife Center in Durham is conducting a Bio Blitz this
Thursday. I had to drop out of leading the bird hike due to some work
commitments. Anyone interested in stepping in?

Thanks
fuz



https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.piedmontearthskillsgathering.com_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=HYn1oWlKh6FuNGiPJJcrCl9Mv-f2a2JDcuAzNr7RAHA&s=lU9JqLlpwaMF2-JetePxRfUzfFE6Qt6iSShyPMPzaMs&e=


"With learning a skill comes self-confidence, and with that self confidence
we become a more fully alive human being"
- Darry Wood

 

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Date: 4/24/18 3:07 pm
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Crested Flycatcher evidently hit ordinary low electrical wires 4/18/18
This beautiful bird was found dead on a concrete pad under my rural electrical transmission lines, the usual height some 20'(?). Around 8 AM, with eyes somewhat sunken, so I assumed the bird on a moonless night had sadly hit the wires above.
Breast muscle was good, though no fat found in furculum, so I think the bird probably did not die from the cold night.

I have seen dead migrants under broadcast towers with guy cables, but did not realize there may also be significant losses due to usual above-ground transmission lines.




Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

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Date: 4/24/18 2:53 pm
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Sent some e-mails to entire C-birds. SORRY.
I had gotten into the habit of reading bird posts on the ABA site, since I look at Virginia and other states. But this left my e-mail account clogged with hundreds of C-birds posts.
Also, Microsoft changed the format of Hotmail, which led to mistakes so that I sent posts meant for individuals to the entire C-birds. Last night I worked through all my old received e-mails, and wrote some stuff to individuals. But, as has happened to better people, I sent them to the entire community.
Some of the problem may be that Microsoft figured out how to deal with my verbosity by dropping my overlong writing into a draft, and I could not find the send button, and had to reply twice.

I find it amusing that my maternal grandfather, it was said, used to tell his friends "I know I am talking too much, but it is because I have had a beer, so I am going home now to stop talking and sleep it off (and stop boring you to tears)." This is the grandfather who took the family out into nature, such as to hear the European cuckoos.

In my case, no beer was consumed (nor even caffeine) by me.

And, on my paternal side, I remember my father looking down at me when I was perhaps 6, and he pointed at me and said "He likes to hear himself talking." And, I thought, "Yes, I know that man up there also likes to hear himself talk. But, he would hit me if I said so."

And, another aside, I looked on Xeno Canto to hear nightingales. And, I thought mockingbird is not such a great singer, but mockers sure sound much better than the nightingale!





Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

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Date: 4/24/18 2:33 pm
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: FOY birds in backyard- Raleigh
3 Solitary and 2 Spotted Sandpipers, plus a Lesser Yellowlegs on the mudflats in backyard.

Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 4/24/18 2:29 pm
From: Marcia Lyons (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: FOY RB Grosbeak in Buxton
Charlotte Fulcher reports a male Rose Breasted Grosbeak at her feeder in
Buxton Woods. It is the first seen at feeders since a single bird sighted
in 1997.

Buxton NC

 

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Date: 4/24/18 2:03 pm
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Birding by bike
I'm a bicycle and pedestrian transportation planner as well as a birder.
Last fall, I inquired on this list to find out how people are using
bicycles in their birding activities. I received two dozen individual
responses to my inquiry on this email list about how birders are using
bicycles. Many thanks to all who took the time to respond. And please
pardon the delay in compiling the responses; I moved and had a job
transition, among other activities and events that intervened.

The following summary report characterizes the responses.

RESPONDENTS: Responses came primarily from North Carolina and South
Carolina, but also from New York State, and describing experiences in a
couple of other states such as Georgia and Florida. Responses were about
evenly sourced from women and men. Ages and other demographic information
are unknown.

SEASON: Birders stated they use bikes for birding in all seasons of the
year, including "in summer heat" and "for the Christmas bird count."
However, the most mentioned season was SPRING, especially "spring warbler
season" or "spring migration".
Fall migration was also mentioned.

WEATHER: Many birders said they mostly limit their usage to agreeable
weather.
Some birders said they use bikes "less in hot weather".
However, a couple of birders pointed out they find that bikes especially
useful in *bad* weather for limiting the time that a birder must spend
exposed to weather conditions when covering a lot of territory.
For example, one person mentioned getting quickly via bike to the middle of
an extremely hot and sunny site to find a noteworthy bird in a known
location.
Another reply mentioned that "biting bugs don't build up around you when
you are on a bike, quite as much as when walking."

LOCATIONS MENTIONED included:
-- Urban, suburban, and semi-rural greenways. Examples: RiverWalk in Rock
Hill, SC; Shelley Lake Greenway in Raleigh, NC; Roanoke Canal Trail in
Roanoke Rapids, NC
-- Wildlife refuges, gamelands, other preserves. Examples: VOA gamelands
in eastern NC; Ding Darling NWR in FL; St. Marks in FL; Howell Woods in
Johnston County, NC; Allendale and Santee NWR; Bear Island WMA; Great
Dismal Swamp NWR
-- State and local parks. Examples: Huntington Beach State Park, SC;
Magnolia Gardens near Summerville, SC
-- Restricted-speed/limited access scenic roads: Blue Ridge Parkway in NC
-- Other locations: Savannah GA; Pax River Naval Base, MD; Georgetown, SC;
Kiawah, SC

NUMBER IN PARTY: Most respondents appear to go bicycle-birding solo; some
with one partner; and one respondent mentioned going bicycle-birding as a
group occasionally.

ADVANTAGES OF BICYCLE BIRDING
Birding using a bicycle offers several interesting advantages, as follows.
These are listed in the order of frequency mentioned:

-- DISTANCE COVERAGE was the most frequently mentioned reason to bird with
a bicycle, with SCREENING as the most popular aspect of distance coverage
as well as the salient logistical advantage of bicycle birding.
Clearly, from the responses, the number one feature of birding with a
bicycle is the ability to cover large amounts of territory, uniquely
combined with the following factors: being able to SEE UNOBSTRUCTED, HEAR
WELL and STOP EASILY for closer observation.

1. This *"screening" aspect* of distance coverage was eagerly described by
many respondents:
"I use the bike to cover more territory (cover different habitats)"
"I like to take long rides on the Parkway in the spring and listen for
birds, which I report on eBird."
"Howell Woods is my favorite place to bird by bike. It's a huge area [with
variety of habitats] and biking helps me cover the highlights"
"Just the right speed to be able to take in features, and still let you get
around to a good number of [sites]"
"very efficient way to get into the middle of a mixed flock of birds"
"My boyfriend who birded as an Army reserve officer … each spring would
schedule his annual reserve duty at Pax River adding to his life list while
cycling through the refuge."

2. Another aspect of *distance coverage* is to *locate a reported bird *that
is a long distance from vehicular access:
"About 12 years ago I rented a beach bike at the south end of Kiawah and
biked the approximately ten miles to the North end in order to see a Snowy
Plover, carrying my scope and tripod in an improvised backpack. Tough going
into the wind. And I saw and photographed the bird, a lifer! Lot of fun,
very good exercise."
"Biked along roads in VOA gamelands to look for Henslow's Sparrow"

3. Another aspect of distance coverage, respondents said bike-birding is
the *best way to get around a large site*. For example:
"Best way to get around a huge site with no shade in brutally hot weather"

4. Finally, *distance coverage* helped some respondents *perform formal
bird counts on specific territories* -- using the bike to cover terrain
quickly, while not having to drive, park, or have their hearing limited by
being in a car.
"Using to do Xmas bird count"

-- STEALTH
Respondents stated that birding by bike "allows you to get close to birds
quietly, like with a kayak or canoe."
Unlike a walking human, respondents noted that a birder pedaling a bicycle
seems not to be as easily recognized by birds as a potential threat:
"[Birds and other] animals are not accustomed to see that shape and you can
get closer. I see and photograph mink, bobcats, coyotes, wild hogs, fox and
many other animals"
"The bike can be almost noiseless, especially with the right bike, and
often you can smoothly and quickly approach without the upright posture and
swinging motions of arms and legs that otherwise scare birds off"

-- BIRDING BY EAR
Several respondents mentioned that a bike is useful for birding by ear.
"Most birding is by ear (bike seems to help)"
"Hear more birds while biking"
"I will bird by ear while biking … it's always easier to hear than in a
car. I've spotted quite a few birds this way"
"I listen for birds [while riding on Blue Ridge Parkway]"
"I'll ride … listening for birds and stopping ... I would miss some birds
from a car."

-- CARGO
Some bicycle-birders use the bicycle to carry birding-related cargo.
"Carry my scope and tripod in an improvised backpack ... [use for
photography, covered many miles]
"Normal gear is mosquito spray, smartphone, binoculars, Canon ultra-zoom
camera; [additional gear is in some cases] tripod, scope and digi-scope
camera and attachments;"
Full bike outfitted for long trips can include "Bike trailer, with rain
gear, boots, full body netting, lawn chairs, and cooler"

-- EASE OF STOPPING for a closer look
This aspect is partly covered under the "Screening" role described above,
but was frequently noted as part of both casual pleasure birding and
dedicated coverage birding:
"Sometimes I park the bike for a deeper look around"
"I'll ride … listening for birds and stopping anywhere without having to
find a place to park a car."
Casual greenway riders (who are birding incidentally to the bike ride)
report that they "stop often to look and listen" and "stop a lot to watch
for birds."

-- PLEASURE
Of course, riding a bike is just fun. This aspect was described in
different ways:
"One of my favorite ways to bird"
"I find Bike/Birding very rewarding and do no understand why more people do
not do it"

- - - - - - - - - - - -

Thank you to all who kindly took the time to respond.


Betsy Kane
Washingon, N.C.

 

Back to top
Date: 4/24/18 6:51 am
From: John McCormick (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 4/24/18 2:59 am
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: RR WalMart House Sparrow roost disappears---pest control? Compare to quail.
I think the end of the roost must have been due to the loss of leaves from the roost-oaks (NOT PEST CONTROL). House Sparrows survived at some Tractor Supply, and Lowe's store locations locally through the winter, and singing males are at most usual locations. Often a singing male passes through my home site each spring, though perhaps the singing this year was a mockingbird imitating House Sparrow. Some individuals of this sparrow definitely migrate south (along the coastal barrier beaches) but return migration hard to notice.

I still wonder if some Bobwhite also migrate, since they suddenly show up in spring here (last 5 days one singing male), despite statements to the contrary, that they are resident, by scientists. My wife flushed the quail one day before it started to sing, so I wonder why we did not flush quail all fall and winter. The answerr is supposed to be, I suppose, that the winter coveys break up and disperse, sort of a degree-day phenomenon. Perhaps the House Sparrows winter in small flocks which then disperse in spring to usual breeding sites.

I found it interesting that some oak branches here which had been bent almost to break retain their dead leaves even now. That hormonal effects cause leaves to drop off, and so leaves can be retained if the continuity of the woody fibers is broken.

The autumn roost of sparrows in oaks which are slow to abscise is a merry sight.

Late post? Well, I finally worked through my inbox, instead of doing work needing my attention.






Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Frank Enders <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Monday, January 29, 2018 7:44 PM
To: <Carolinabirds...>
Subject: RR WalMart House Sparrow roost disappears---pest control?


There used to be a fairly pleasant House Sparrow roost in the trees (oaks, now some 20' tall) nearest WalMart in Roanoke Rapids. Would build in the fall, and with shorter daylengths was evident when shopping in evening. Sometimes I would try to flush the birds to count them,up to several score.

About 4-8 weeks ago I noticed there were no more.


I suspect pest control (such as spraying soap water at night). But, what do I know.


Anybody else noticed such?






Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

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Date: 4/24/18 2:13 am
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Short-eared Owl







Frank Enders, Halifax, NC
________________________________
From: Frank Enders <fkenders...>
Sent: Tuesday, April 24, 2018 5:12 AM
To: Christine Stoughton-Root
Subject: Re: Short-eared Owl



Can you tell me the story of how the CBC sold a property it had in Tryon, NC (headquarters), and where the money went?

For years I imagined it was an actual nature preserve and wondered why it was disposed of.

Questions include the club politiics, who wanted or needed it sold (budget?) and what the property looks like now (overdeveloped?).

I am a life member of the CBC. Perhaps you could ask people who are aware of the circumstances (active/experienced CBC administrators).




Frank Enders, Halifax, NC
________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Christine Stoughton-Root <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Thursday, March 15, 2018 1:25 PM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Short-eared Owl

Located and record a Short-eared Owl for Pamlico County.
I have suspected them for awhile but was unable to get good views just flybys.
Recorded 3/13/2018 Shery McNair came over the following evening in 20 knot winds and 38 we heard barks but a bit softer. 5 min before we had a Male Harrier fly thru with dinner and an immature Bale Eagle.
Christine Stoughton Root

 

Back to top
Date: 4/24/18 2:12 am
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Short-eared Owl


Can you tell me the story of how the CBC sold a property it had in Tryon, NC (headquarters), and where the money went?

For years I imagined it was an actual nature preserve and wondered why it was disposed of.

Questions include the club politiics, who wanted or needed it sold (budget?) and what the property looks like now (overdeveloped?).

I am a life member of the CBC. Perhaps you could ask people who are aware of the circumstances (active/experienced CBC administrators).




Frank Enders, Halifax, NC
________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Christine Stoughton-Root <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Thursday, March 15, 2018 1:25 PM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Short-eared Owl

Located and record a Short-eared Owl for Pamlico County.
I have suspected them for awhile but was unable to get good views just flybys.
Recorded 3/13/2018 Shery McNair came over the following evening in 20 knot winds and 38 we heard barks but a bit softer. 5 min before we had a Male Harrier fly thru with dinner and an immature Bale Eagle.
Christine Stoughton Root

 

Back to top
Date: 4/24/18 2:02 am
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bad conservation news from eastern NC
I think thinking is overrated.

First of all, if Nags Head has a problem wiith coyotes on its beach, and coyotes are present down to Hatteras, why blame orv use when canids wipe out plovers, etc.
For example, look up North Brigantine, NJ, where the wildlife commission (equivalent in NJ) has been removing RED FOX due to failure of Piping Plover reproduction. Residents there want the foxes left alone because the foxes eat rodents. Obviously, it is likely any canids (pet dogs, coyotes, foxes) seek out and destroy nesting birds on th beaches. ORV people do help by randomly running over "our" preferred birds. Apex predators like Peregrines eat Red Knots. Canids or other predators have "unforeseen consequences".

Thinking and verbal/written abuse does not help. All sides are right and wrong.

If you and Derb Carter want to use other people's money to achieve your ends (who does not?) I do not see how that is any different from beggars along the highway (homeless, need work, anything will help). Why are you (and I) not deserving of the epthet "aggressive panhandlers"? Is is because we are wealthier or morally better, and so more deserving than other people getting corporate welfare (on the one hand) or starving due to overreproduction, undereducation, and general lack of political organization?

Derb's rant against the Wildlife Resources Commission does not mention the probability mentioned by Brian Patteson (sp) that the WRC simply did not want to commit to paying big bucks to maintain Palmetto-Peartree for Red-cockaded Woodpeckers. Factually, another birder pointed up the fact that the hardwoods at P-p are suffering from saltwater intrusion, so maybe the WRC did not need to worry about keeping the hardwoods out.

Everybody's thinking is wrong, in part (and right in part). Hardly seems worth fighting about.

BTY, the Pogonomyrmex badius ants which I had hosted for many years now seem to be gone, shaded out by me growing trees all around my broiler houses. As a neighbor complained, I have just turned good cropland into brushland! The ants are probably complaining too.

I am amazed how much work it takes to fix up even a few acres for wildlife (and humans). Maybe some of the loudmouths need to get out and remove those invasive rodents and plants themselves. I am hopeful we are making progress in conservation, but the real progress is by norms, not expensive legal work. I know how incompetent NC and US lawakers are, and the laws used by Derb are sorely in need of updating and correction. Sort of like the debates about the US Constitution.

When we criticize Trump or anybody, we forget that millions of white slaves went to the Ottoman galleys from 1500 to 1830, Coastal areas of western Europe were depopulated (abandoned) due to slaving raids by the Barbary pirates. When France took Algiers in 1830, that was the end of the piracy. "Colonialism" has some worthwhile results, which we today forget.
Dutch privateers working from North Africa (largely fighting the Spanish) were a main factor in raids to Iceland and Newfoundland--who knew history was so complex? (Remember local pirates blockaded Charleston.)
Jefferson got elected partly because the Federalists stated "millions for defence, but not one cent for tribute." (To France.) While voters knew our government was paying tribute to the Barbary states.
Today Turkey still tries to be great. Maybe Trump is great when he complains about murderous Moslems. Our navy was produced by Jefferson, and anti-racists (antifas?) complain about Jefferson. Do we say we owe our big military industrial complex to the Ottomans and Barbary pirates (and Dutch! and evangelist Protestants?)?


So complex--let us just all vote for some nationalist Fascist! Let us all salute the SELC, which is just a parasite and symptom of the lack of organization of our "country". (More complex than that.) Who gives them money, anyway? I do think we need criticism and legal challenges, but I fear the SELC is just club politics, as in the CBC. (Where did the money go, when the CBC sold its land in Tryon, NC? What does CBC actually do to help bird conservation--as opposed to twitching/listing?)

A secret: my sister took $300,000 to $500,000 from me, by being the last person with our mother. Now the millions she got belongs to a guy from the Ukraine who served 10 years for burning down an occupied apartment building in NYC. Since he was a citizen of the Soviet Union, neither Russia nor the Ukraine would take him when the US tried to deport him.. Go figure.
(And watch your back.)

Maybe I would not be such a pest if I did not have so much to work in my old age now!

Do need to go and work now. Good luck, and do not take the complexities too seriously, As we all go to hell in a handbasket, it has to be OK, since we are really all headed to the same place.

Simpler to say things are more complex, even on the beach, let alone on the high seas. Easier to stop making stupid statements as if we know what is going on.
History is not even over, and natural history is also not over yet.



Frank Enders, Halifax, NC
________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Nate Dias <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Thursday, March 22, 2018 4:57 PM
To: CarolinaBirds
Subject: Re: Bad conservation news from eastern NC

I think Michael Welch is borderline putting words in Derb's mouth.
Derb did not promote a political agenda - he pointed out some shady
deals and decisions (anti-conservation) that the NCWRC and USFWS
should be ashamed of.

Bird conservation is squarely on-topic for this Listserv and it has a
long history of such subjects. For example, when we needed public
input to get augmenting Crab Bank (an eroding seabird nesting island)
to be the top Beneficial Use of the Charleston Harbor dredge spoils,
many Carolinabirds subscribers stepped up and sent emails the US Army
Corps of Engineers and made it happen. Plus numerous other examples.

Perhaps you don't know it Michael, but the reason for the lack of
aquatic vegetation in Mattauskeet is because Bass fishing interests
bullied through changes in lake levels and other management changes,
despite warnings from birders, conservationists, ecologists and
waterfowl managers that it would degrade the waterfowl habitat
terribly. This has come to pass, as folks like Derb predicted - to
the detriment of both waterfowl and waterfowl hunters I would note.
Once again, angry noise by narrow special interests trumped logic.

Beach nesting birds are down because ORV enthusiasts put pressure on
elected officials to pressure the USFWS. A corresponding effort by
birders and conservationists came up short as so often happens.

The RCW travesty at Palmetto Peartree is the most egregious move by
agencies charged with protecting them that I have heard in a while.
Posting news about the impending loss of endangered BIRDS that will
affect BIRDING in eastern NC is SQUARELY ON-TOPIC. Who knows,
publicizing it may help head off future travesties by getting birders
to express their outrage over such behavior to the NC Governor and
other elected officials.

Talking about the symptoms of the egregious decisions without root
cause background info is letting the bad guys off the hook and doing a
disservice to those of us who care. Not to mention the birds - which
have no voice, no money and no vote.

There is nothing wrong with trying to rally people to protect the
birds we love on a BIRDING Listserv. I think bird conservation is
squarely on-topic (Birds and Birding in the Carolinas) for this
Listserv which has had such threads all along.

If someone doesn't want to read conservation news or "rallying cries"
then hit the delete button or skip opening the email.

I for one was glad Derb made his post - some of it was news to me,
albeit sad news.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

PS
Apex predators like Red Wolves are key in controlling invasive species
like feral cats, overpopulated herbivores, etc. which harm bird
populations and declining bird species. So I don't think that is as
off-topic as Michael implies. And Derb has made multiple posts about
that situation in more detail and Michael can always add detail to the
debate if he likes.

On Thu, Mar 22, 2018 at 10:51 AM, michael welch <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> I realize it is easy to believe that the captive audience on CarolinaBirds
> is as conservation-minded as they come, but can we please refrain from
> political agendas on the listserve? This type of NCWRC- and USFWS-bashing is
> becoming common in the newsletters and action alerts that I receive from the
> watchdog groups and nonprofit environmental stewardship organizations that I
> support by choice with donations and membership fees. It is not necessarily
> something that I think we need to be exposed to on a listserve dedication to
> discussion of birds and birding.
>
>
> The majority of these news items concern birds, it's true, but the bit about
> the red wolves is completely out of place and not nearly as simplistic as
> this small paragraph implies. It is a saga that has been going on for a very
> long time and through many different permutations. The distillation given
> here is a perfect example of a political agenda--taking a very convoluted
> issue and presenting it in a way that makes dedicated state and federal
> employees seem like pseudo-criminals. In all, this post reads very much like
> the latest NC Wildlife Federation newsletter currently lying on my kitchen
> table. I'm aware that Derb is affiliated with the SELC but that's the
> point--this type of alarmism comes at us from many different directions. I
> don't necessarily want it coming from the CarolinaBirds listserve. There is
> more to every story, so perhaps the people making the changes to policies
> should be invited to contribute their side of the issue. But then it would
> become a forum, wouldn't it? I'm sorry, but that's not what I subscribe to
> CarolinaBirds for.
>
>
> Relating bird-specific information is fine: beach-nesting bird production is
> down, submerged aquatic vegetation is disappearing, an RCW mitigation bank
> property transfer has occurred. The name calling and attempts at rousing the
> citizens belong elsewhere. And the last two bits of snide commentary about
> missions and duties are childish and uncalled for. Take it somewhere else
> please.
>
>
> Let's talk birds.
>
>
> Michael Welch
>
> Buncombe County
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________
> From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on
> behalf of Derb Carter <derbc...>
> Sent: Wednesday, March 21, 2018 1:21 PM
> To: <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: Bad conservation news from eastern NC
>
>
> There appear to be two, perhaps three, breeding pairs of endangered red
> wolves remaining in the worlds only wild population in northeastern NC.
> After the NC Wildlife Resources Commission passed a resolution calling for
> removal of red wolves from NC and to declare it extinct, the US Fish and
> Wildlife Service abandoned the remaining wolves and its legal responsibility
> to recover this critically endangered species. We are asking a federal
> court to step in and insure the Fish and Wildlife Service complies with the
> Endangered Species Act.
>
>
>
> Submerged aquatic vegetation that once covered nearly the entire bottom of
> Lake Mattamuskeet - and fed tens of thousands of ducks, geese, and swans -
> had been rapidly decreasing in extent. It completely disappeared from the
> lake last year. The lake bottom is barren, and waterfowl numbers on the
> refuge plummeted, as any of you who visited this winter can attest.
>
>
>
> Beach nesting birds on Cape Hatteras National Seashore had one the worst
> nesting seasons on record. 53 Oystercatcher nests produced only two chicks
> and 11 Piping Plover nests produced only two chicks. Beach nesting birds
> had begun to rebound under an ORV management plan, but at the behest of ORV
> groups Congress passed a rider to budget legislation directing the Park
> Service to reduce buffers for nesting birds and allow driving in sensitive
> areas.
>
>
>
> Palmetto Peartree Preserve is the place to go in northeastern NC to see
> red-cockaded woodpeckers with 33 nesting groups. It was acquired by NC
> Department of Transportation to protect and improve woodpecker habitat in
> order to mitigate impacts of road projects in NC that destroy woodpeckers
> and habitat elsewhere. NCDOT has reached a deal to transfer the property to
> the NC Wildlife Resources Commission as gamelands. Apparently, the NC
> Wildlife Commission likes woodpeckers as much as wolves, and a secret deal
> has been approved by the US Fish and Wildlife Service to remove all the
> red-cockaded woodpeckers from Palmetto Peartree Preserve. But, not to
> worry, US Fish and Wildlife Service will still allow NCDOT to use the
> non-existent woodpeckers on PPP to mitigate for destroying woodpeckers or
> woodpecker habitat elsewhere in the state.
>
>
>
> But there is some good news. The legislated purpose and duty of the NC
> Wildlife Resources Commission has not changed: To manage, restore,
> conserve, and protect the wildlife resources of the State.
>
>
>
> And the mission of the US Fish and Wildlife Service has not changed: To
> conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats
> for the continuing benefit of the American people.
>
>
>
> Derb Carter
>
> Chapel Hill, NC
>
>

 

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Date: 4/23/18 5:53 pm
From: Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bar-tailed Godwit, East Shackleford Banks, Carteret Co, NC
Hi Birders,

I saw what was probably the same Bar-tailed Godwit that has been seen on
East Shackleford the past two falls. John Fussell had commented that it
was probably wintering somewhere in the area, and I think this adds weight
to that argument. It was feeding along the tidal creek that drains the
basin north of the ferry drop-off, at approximately 34.639738, -76.534375.
It was still there when I returned from the ocean-side beach area. I am
very behind in processing photos, but will post some as soon as I am able.

I did not see the Long-billed Curlew that has been seen here recently. The
ferry service was on an abbreviated schedule due to impending weather, so I
had to leave while the tide was still quite low. I had hoped the Curlew
would go to the beach-side at high tide to get some shelter from the wind.
There were, however, lots of Whimbrels to pick through, but they were all
apparently Whimbrels!

Marty Wall
Beaufort, NC

 

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Date: 4/23/18 1:10 pm
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Santee Coastal on Saturday 4/21
I took my ornithology class to Santee Coastal birding on Saturday and the Big Well impoundments were crawling with shorebirds in great variety. These were beginning birders, so we were oohing and ah-ing over Black-necked Stilts rather than examining every brown bird in sight to track down rare strays (like the Ruff that has been seen there recently) but we still tallied 14 species of shorebirds, with super looks at many species that I only see occasionally (and my students had never seen at all) like Long-billed Dowitchers and Stilt Sandpipers. We tallied 90 species at Santee Coastal in 5+ hours of slow-paced birding. Every day birding at Santee Coastal is a good day, but the shorebird show was better than I ever remember there, more like what I have occasionally seen at the Yawkey Center.

Thanks very much to Craig Watson for sharing what he had found there the previous week and exactly where, and to SCDNR biologist Felicia Sanders, who joined us and shared her scope and knowledge.

Chris Hill
Coastal Carolina University
Conway, SC
 

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Date: 4/23/18 11:34 am
From: Bert Fisher (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Vireo Lane birds: from Chuck-will's-widow to Barred Owl
Lots of birding fun on Vireo Lane the past few days. At 8:17pm last night we had a singing Chuck-will's-widow come through (right over our heads) as we were enjoying the firepit. First observation of this species on our property in 15 years.

Also this week, we confirmed nesting Barred Owls in the cavity of a dead tree 40 feet behind our house.

As for returning migrants, had FOY great crested flycatcher this morning, red-eyed vireo and parula on Friday, and we have at least 2 ovenbirds already establishing territory.

Happy birding.

Bert Fisher & Leto Copeley
Hillsborough, NC


Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 4/23/18 8:26 am
From: Jeannie Kraus (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Shiny cowbird
Shiny cowbird (male) and make painted bunting at Ft Macon feeders just now.

Jeannie Wilson Kraus
Morehead City NC
Sent from my iPhone

 

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Date: 4/23/18 7:41 am
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: Bar-tailed Godwit at east Shackleford Banks, NC
Marty Wall found a Bar-tailed Godwit at east Shackleford Banks this morning.

I assume that this is the same bird we found out there in the fall of 2016
(when a juvenile) and last fall. I bet that the bird overwintered in the
area, but there are such large expanses of flats in the area, it is
typically "unfindable".

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

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Date: 4/22/18 2:58 pm
From: Eric Harrold (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Wilkes/Surry birds today
Near the intersection of Greenhorne and White Plains Rds, there was at
least one Horned Lark (presumably the same one hanging around yesterday)
along with a Grasshopper Sparrow and Savannah Sparrow. Would be interesting
to know if the Horned Larks are breeding in this area. Noticed more Tree
Swallows than ever before today in this area.

Along Austin-Little Mountain Rd in a young pine stand we found White-eyed
Vireo, Yellow-breasted Chat, and Prairie Warbler.

In Elkin, along the Overmountain Victory Trail we had Prothonotary Warbler,
Yellow-breasted Chat, Yellow-throated Warbler, Northern Parula, Osprey,
Northern Rough-winged Swallow and Brown-headed Nuthatch.

Eric Harrold
Hays, NC

 

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Date: 4/22/18 9:44 am
From: andrew thornton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Cattle Egret, Greensboro
This morning there was a Cattle Egret at the Horse Pen Creek end of Lake
Brandt. I viewed the bird from the Palmetto Trail side, but it would have
been easily seen from the Nat Greene trail as well. Right before I left
the bird flew further up the creek, but did not appear to leave.

Digiscoped photo on the ebird list here:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S44821838&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=QTM5YxclO4mhHIZuGaZVUoDEVQpfBXwiaugRzI-OH40&s=8vEFBVR5Pj3aFkyYW2tgiyvNksmdHt8_iogyydwNmjE&e=

Andrew Thornton
Julian, NC

 

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Date: 4/22/18 9:07 am
From: Edith Tatum (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: eBird -- Eno River SP--Few's Ford -- Apr 22, 2018
Eno River SP--Few's Ford
Apr 22, 2018
8:59 AM
Traveling
1.78 miles
166 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.6.5 Build 36

1 Cooper's Hawk
2 Mourning Dove
1 Pileated Woodpecker
2 Great Crested Flycatcher
1 White-eyed Vireo
2 Yellow-throated Vireo
1 Blue-headed Vireo
4 Red-eyed Vireo
1 Blue Jay
1 American Crow
1 Fish Crow
1 Northern Rough-winged Swallow
3 Carolina Chickadee
4 Tufted Titmouse
1 White-breasted Nuthatch
1 House Wren
2 Carolina Wren
3 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
5 Eastern Bluebird
2 American Robin
2 Ovenbird
1 Louisiana Waterthrush
1 Black-and-white Warbler
1 Common Yellowthroat
3 Northern Parula
2 Pine Warbler
3 Chipping Sparrow
5 White-throated Sparrow
1 Song Sparrow
2 Eastern Towhee
3 Northern Cardinal
1 Blue Grosbeak
2 American Goldfinch

Number of Taxa: 33


Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 4/22/18 8:07 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bobolink and Grasshopper Sparrow at NCSU farm fields
This morning I did my usual route through the NC State farm fields south of
Raleigh -- Mid-Pines Road (back and return), Inwood Road, and Chi Road --
in addition to a quick trip down the hill the Yates Mill. I found 52
species! I was hoping to get my first GRASSHOPPER SPARROW of the year, and
I wasn't disappointed. One sang from a fence post near the Agri-Ecology
sign. There is often one along Inwood Road, but I did not hear one there
or elsewhere. In a typical summer, there tend to be about 2 or
occasionally 3 singing birds in the NCSU fields.

I got a male BOBOLINK singing along Inwood. I looked for it in the
pastures, but instead it was at the very top of a 75-foot tall oak along
the road, at the edge of a pasture! It almost sang like on territory
(certainly not), but I had never had a singing male from anywhere but
fields, fences, etc.

I had a few AMERICAN PIPITS still around, but I heard or saw no Horned
Larks. Loggerhead Shrike appears to be gone for good as a breeder, though
I think a pair of Larks nest, as they did a year ago, and a male has been
singing for 1-2 months. Orchard Oriole was the only expected miss, though
I did get Yellow-breasted Chat and Blue Grosbeak; Indigo Buntings aren't
quite in yet.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

 

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Date: 4/21/18 7:53 pm
From: James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: 18 species of shorebirds Bear Island WMA, SC, including American Golden Plover
Ed Blitch, Pamela Ford, and I spent most of the day birding at Bear Island
where we observed over 2000 individuals of 18 species of shorebirds,
including American Golden Plover. Most were observed in Larvae and Lower
Tank Hill Ponds, both on Pecan Tree Road. An American Golden Plover was
first reported there on March 24, 2018 in Larvae Pond by Carl and Cathy
Miller. This bird was in the adjacent Lower Tank Hill Pond and could
possibly be the same bird, no way of knowing. We had a total of 102
species for the day, here is the eBird link to the checklist for the list
of species, specifically the shorebirds.

The Great Kiskadee was not observed nor heard.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S44801584&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=oDypzy78Mo-mbz76J4HXEySXt1GqZlmHc5hw88tl9cs&s=gPsDB1PDs6sUaxDCfuuDX1lgiaMnk36_K1uFG8XVChU&e=

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

 

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Date: 4/21/18 7:29 pm
From: Hurlbert, Allen Hartley <Hurlbert...>
Subject: RE: Shiny Cowbird, Fort Macon SP, Carteret County, NC
UNC's Avian Biology class saw the male shiny cowbird at Fort Macon in the grass in front of the Coast Guard Station this morning, walking side by side with a brown-headed cowbird for a great comparison.

Allen Hurlbert

-----Original Message-----
From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>]
Sent: Saturday, April 21, 2018 6:02 AM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: carolinabirds Digest Sat, 21 Apr 2018

carolinabirds Digest Sat, 21 Apr 2018

Table of contents:

1. Shiny Cowbird, Fort Macon SP, Carteret County, NC - Me
<mwbirdmail...>
2. Southern Pines NC yesterday - Helen Kalevas <hkalevas...> 3. Clay-colored Sparrow now at Fort Macon SP, Carteret Co, NC - Me
<mwbirdmail...>
4. California birder visiting Charleston SC in May - Thomas Miko
<thomas_miko...>
5. Lawrence's Warbler - John Haire <johnhaire...> 6. Good news/bad news in Durham - Murphy <murphygrif...> 7. Yard birds in Orange County NC - Cynthia Fox <wildbird...> 8. My patio - Thomas Krakauer <thkrakauer...> 9. Another 70 species day at Lake Conestee Nature Park, Greenville, SC -
Bradley Dalton <bradley.dalt...>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/21/18 3:48 pm
From: Irvin Pitts <pittsjam...>
Subject: Nashville Warbler in Chester County, SC
Hello,
Totally unexpected was a Nashville Warbler a group of us found today along the Carolina Thread Trail by Rocky Creek near Great Falls, SC. Some of us got nice looks but unfortunately no photos. This is the earliest spring date (April 21) I've ever seen this bird in South Carolina. I checked e-bird reports out of interest and was surprised to see that another Nashville Warbler was seen and photographed today at the Clemson Botanical Gardens. So, are we experiencing a small wave?

Birding has been rather good this week in the SC midlands. Yesterday, Roger Smith and I found 72 species at Saluda Shoals Park, Lexington County, this being one of my higher totals here, including 16 species of wood warblers. Today at Rocky Creek, we had 14 species of wood warblers, highlighted by the Nashville Warbler.

Good birding!

Irvin Pitts
Lexington, SC


 

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Date: 4/21/18 10:57 am
From: Edith Tatum (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: eBird -- Eno River SP--Cole Mill/Pump Station -- Apr 21, 2018
Eno River SP--Cole Mill/Pump Station
Apr 21, 2018
11:30 AM
Traveling
2.00 miles
1 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.6.5 Build 36

2 Red-bellied Woodpecker
1 Downy Woodpecker
1 Pileated Woodpecker
3 Red-eyed Vireo
2 Carolina Chickadee
3 Tufted Titmouse
2 Brown-headed Nuthatch
1 Carolina Wren
1 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
1 Ovenbird
1 Northern Parula
1 Pine Warbler
1 Summer Tanager
2 American Goldfinch

Number of Taxa: 14


Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 4/21/18 8:09 am
From: Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Durham spring bird count April 29 and other spring count help needed
Hello all,

As is typical in spring there are few vacant areas in each of the upcoming
counts, let me know if you're interested. Everything has arrived recently
and singing at falls lake and area, tanagers, gc flycatchers, kingbirds,
cliff swallows, wood thrush etc. And those yellow rumped warblers keep
tricking my ears with that lazy song

Durham April 29 Sun
Kerr Lake April 24 Tue
Falls Lake April 25 Wed
Mayo River May 1 Tue
Pilot Mountain May 2 Wed (contact <Jesse.Anderson...> or join me)

--
Brian Bockhahn
<birdranger248...>

 

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Date: 4/21/18 6:21 am
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Yard birds of Little Washington
Along with the usual starlings, grackles, house finches, and pigeons, ...
I've had a great crested flycatcher, a gray catbird, and a prairie warbler
in my yard in downtown Little Washington during April 12-19. Chipping
sparrows as well. Red-winged blackbirds calling from mixed flocks

Earlier, blue-gray gnatcatcher, white-eyed vireo, and RCKI, pileated
woodpecker, and still have white-throated sparrows.

Abundant chimney swifts in our old city full of huge old chimneys, too.
The occasional bald eagle over the waterfront.

With warm weather, I see where small bats and green tree frogs make their
homes in crevices of my ancient house.

Betsy Kane
Washington, N.C.

 

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Date: 4/20/18 7:39 pm
From: Bradley Dalton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Another 70 species day at Lake Conestee Nature Park, Greenville, SC
For the past two mornings I have had fantastic showings from migrants at
Lake Conestee Nature Park in Greenville, SC. Today's best bird by far was
with Simon Harvey where we heard a Wilson's Warbler singing along the trail
near the bridge where the west bay feeds the river. I had to cut the
morning short and only birded until 10am but nonetheless had a strong
showing with 70 species!

In addition to the Wilson's, other highlights included great looks at an
Orange-crowned Warbler by the river, FOY Broad-winged Hawk soaring
overhead, and a stunningly beautiful Blackburnian Warbler singing his heart
out. Yesterday there were FOUR American Bitterns out in the park and
probably nearly a dozen Solitary Sandpipers.

Among that seventy species were twelve I did not find in yesterday's 78,
which leaves me with 90 species, including 18 warblers, in two days at
Conestee! My highest one day total at Conestee was 83 species back in 2013 (
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S13817688&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=GSszDNtFZ0CNuR4cTtLaR3GybgQRiGT6eXTxsHvqP6Q&s=-MKo8ClVRJRKgpMzngnW5JTWTlzwR4zM_d1gUL0B2qM&e=). A decent effort either of
these days could have beaten that!

Below are the checklists for the past two days:

4/19: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S44753689&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=GSszDNtFZ0CNuR4cTtLaR3GybgQRiGT6eXTxsHvqP6Q&s=03MQyxSg33Zp8RVRtZTudnzqnI-uNGXszWPFzP68N9Q&e=

4/20: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S44757511&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=GSszDNtFZ0CNuR4cTtLaR3GybgQRiGT6eXTxsHvqP6Q&s=FHQhuv5hgFudAdMqeIpMx6bdsgbuEln9uoiNdxhaJMQ&e=



Good Birding,

Brad Dalton
Simpsonville, SC

<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.avast.com_sig-2Demail-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail-26utm-5Fterm-3Dicon&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=GSszDNtFZ0CNuR4cTtLaR3GybgQRiGT6eXTxsHvqP6Q&s=NFVyzWT4zhnHEilH4TMG5NDZoZAsIE7bJrsuyL60VWc&e=>
Virus-free.
www.avast.com
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.avast.com_sig-2Demail-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail-26utm-5Fterm-3Dlink&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=GSszDNtFZ0CNuR4cTtLaR3GybgQRiGT6eXTxsHvqP6Q&s=Mie8sDMngP_YGpDguBoJLjV0in3d_jWWim5QcsOaaWc&e=>
<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>

 

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Date: 4/20/18 4:51 pm
From: Thomas Krakauer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: My patio
I saw my first Pine Siskin today on my deck, and now have male and female hummingbirds.

Tom

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 4/20/18 2:44 pm
From: Cynthia Fox (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Yard birds in Orange County NC
Along with the hummingbirds, Summer Tanager etc, I still have Pine Siskins at the feeders. They should be leaving soon. Fortunately, my 2 doz yellow rumpled warblers have started to leave. Thank heavens! They eat an astonishing amount of suet.
Cynthia Fox, Chapel Hill NC

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 4/20/18 2:37 pm
From: Murphy (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Good news/bad news in Durham
This past few days has brought in a couple FOTY birds, but that's not
necessarily a good thing. The bad news is, cowbirds are back. I heard their
annoying calls in the trees, I think it was on Monday, and the next day
they were at my feeders.

The good news is, yesterday while in the garden I heard the local wood
thrush announce its return. Always a pleasure to hear those flute-note
songs.

On a side note, just a reminder that if you have a watering can or similar
container that's been sitting out since last fall, you might want to check
it before moving it. We have a wren nest (haven't seen the occupants really
well, but I think they're Carolina wrens) with 5 eggs in a watering can
that was sitting on an outdoor rack against the house; I almost picked up
the can to move it, but noticed nesting material sticking out of it, & when
I leaned over to take a peek she flew out of it. I haven't looked in there
since, but might take another look today.

Have a bird-i-ful day!

Jennifer Griffith
Near Southpoint in Durham, NC

 

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Date: 4/20/18 11:44 am
From: John Haire (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lawrence's Warbler
Had a nice look at a Lawrence's type warbler at Reynolda in
Winston-Salem yesterday April 19, along with David and Susan Disher and
Hop Hopkins. David got some good photos. It does not show up on the
Ebird rare bird report as far as I can tell, probably because it's a
hybrid. I could not find it again today.

Ebird report links below.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S44722180&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=jUWswasm2JeXemdfQs3l9vaHMjKFZXEi1HW66bwBPoY&s=HPy8VZvG8gmjSXGh56IpLFN4sugunNtqLMbGkQURLe8&e=

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S44722769&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=jUWswasm2JeXemdfQs3l9vaHMjKFZXEi1HW66bwBPoY&s=Ee_uBjSR6LEcLSm6DaA0qG-8b0LoTVEuoOWqVB8yecE&e=

Good birding ----

John Haire

Winston-Salem

 

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Date: 4/20/18 10:14 am
From: Thomas Miko (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: California birder visiting Charleston SC in May
Hi !

My job is sending me to a conference in Charleston, South Carolina from May 19 to 23, flying home on May 24. I have no control over what time I fly in and out of Charleston, and they are not providing a rental car, because the conference will be inside the same (very, very overpriced) hotel we will be staying in. If needed, I might rent a car for 24 to 48 hours, and sneak out of some of the presentations.

Somehow I would like to get the following life birds:

1.
Swallow-tailed Kite (Please, please, please! This bird has shown up twice in California, only to be seen by one or two birders who photographed them, before they disappeared into thin air
2.
Swainson's Warbler
3.
Seaside Sparrow
4.
Greater Black-backed Gull

If I get to see any Anhingas, Roseate Spoonbills, or Painted Buntings, I will not complain.

I'm also interested in visiting Fort Sumter as a history buff (I am not a Civil War buff in terms of having memorized the names and dates of all the battles and generals) and would love tips about that. My overpriced hotel:

Charleston Marriott
170 Lockwood Boulevard
Charleston, South Carolina 29403

Any suggestions and inside info would be greatly appreciated, and if any of you are available to escort me, to make sure I go to the right place, and look at the right tree, I would really appreciate it.
Tom Miko
653 S. Indian Hill Blvd., #C
Claremont, CA 91711
personal cell # 909.241.3300
work cell 213.471.6001








 

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Date: 4/20/18 6:10 am
From: Me (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Clay-colored Sparrow now at Fort Macon SP, Carteret Co, NC
Now at feeders...don’t see Shiny Cowbird at the moment...I need to go get some millet...feeders almost empty!
Marty Wall
Beaufort , NC
 

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Date: 4/20/18 6:06 am
From: Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Southern Pines NC yesterday
Heard a great-crested flycatcher and common yellowthroat in the Walthour
Moss Foundation.
Here in Hillsborough, NC, also yesterday, saw a female ruby-throated
hummingbird, 2nd of the season. A rose-breasted grosbeak is still coming to
the feeder here (3 days now). There's a picture of him on fb.

--
Helen Kalevas
Near Hillsborough, NC


<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.avg.com_email-2Dsignature-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LzkZdQKgdEmcPzPTcTxJyo5eQf01Emdu3pKYTQ7ry4I&s=kL9Rd7u0GsUVDuJnfVkfB_q8GnhnjpiqBQKBa995ujw&e=>
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<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>

 

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Date: 4/20/18 5:05 am
From: Me (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Shiny Cowbird, Fort Macon SP, Carteret County, NC
It appears he has returned. Currently under feeders. Have not seen female.
Marty Wall
Beaufort, NC
 

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Date: 4/19/18 9:23 pm
From: GRIGGS, JERRY <griggs...>
Subject: Yard activity, Columbia SC Arrivals and Departures including Hummers
We last saw the female Rufous Hummingbird that spent the winter in our yard/feeder (from late November) on Easter Sunday morning, April 1st. That afternoon, our FOS (first of season) Ruby-throated Hummingbird, a bright male, came to the feeder. We wonder if they saw each other at all? It was our first ever day with more than one species of hummer.

The Ruby-throated sat with its feet on the outer rim of the round feeder. In contrast, on those rare occasions when the Rufous did not hover to feed, she would cling to the edge of the main section, as if she could not reach the feeder hole when sitting on the outside rim.

It seemed like the same adult male Ruby-throated came by for a couple of weeks. We have seen no females yet, and no hummers at all the past few days.

Tuesday felt like moving day. We heard our FOS N. Parula here in the morning. Late in the day we heard a couple of Great-crested Flycatchers, our FOS (but no more Wednesday or Thursday).

Wednesday afternoon at U.S.C. in downtown Columbia, I heard my FOS Chimney Swifts. When I could see them, they appeared to be moving very fast, perhaps on their way to someplace else (advance scouts?).

Midday Thursday, a bright male Rose-breasted Grosbeak came briefly to our feeders. It was not only our FOS-I see no other eBird reports of them in our county, Lexington. We are hoping for a good year here for Grosbeaks.

Jerry Griggs
Columbia, SC

 

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Date: 4/19/18 5:27 pm
From: Audrey (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Attn SC couple in Brevard Cty FL; Found Panasonic luminix camera accessory
Hey Birders
Sorry this is not a bird report.
I found a Panasonic Luminix camera accessory in Lori Wilson Park in Cocoa Beach FL this morning. I think it belongs to a SC couple that lives near Savanah NWR. It was left on a bench where they were hoping to see the Bananaquit. I do not know their names.
I can be contacted at <ajw...>
Thank you.

It's Amazing Out There!

Audrey Whitlock
Nags Head NC & Merritt Island FL

Sent from iPhone


 

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Date: 4/19/18 8:29 am
From: Cotter, Michael G <COTTERMI...>
Subject: Re: Orioles
Ours (or should that be "our"?) male is still here.

Michael G. Cotter

Greenville NC

________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Mary Bridges <maryhuot...>
Sent: Wednesday, April 18, 2018 7:15 PM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Orioles

The winter Baltimore Orioles are lingering here but down to just a few-three to five over the past week; I had two this a.m. High count this year was 22, lower than previous five or six years and much less grape jelly consumed.

Mary Bridges
Goldsboro, NC

 

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Date: 4/19/18 5:49 am
From: \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Yellow-bellied Sapsucker distinctive early spring calls and drumming
Birders, I have spent most of my life birding in eastern NC where sapsuckers are winter residents. When I was a kid I learned their distinctive cat-like “meow” call which is often the only clue of their presence.

Since moving to the mountains near Boone, I have heard a different vocalization that I’ve never heard elsewhere and that seems to be associated with early spring/breeding/territorial behavior. It is a squealing, jay or hawk-like call, repeated on the same pitch 4-6 times. It sounds nothing like the typical “meow” call. For those of you who have the iBird PRO app, you can listen to this different call (recording #4). The description of the call even states it is “mainly heard early in the breeding season.”

Has anyone else heard this call? If so, does it appear to be associated with breeding territorial birds?

For several weeks I have been hearing this call from up to 3 birds (all seem to be males) on my property—hardwood forest at 3400’. I tried playback one time with the iBird PRO call and immediately had a vigorous response from a male that flew right in to me.

I have also been hearing the distinctive Morse code-like drumming from several birds, presumably males, on my property. To my knowledge, I have never had birds stick around to breed during the 10 years I’ve lived here but I have seen birds during the breeding season (and presumably nesting) within 5 miles or so.

I don’t remember in past Springs hearing the distinctive calls and drumming to such a long period of time or for more than one or two instances during the spring season. I’m hoping of course than all of the activity this year will result in one or more pairs hanging around to nest.

Anyone out there with experience observing sapsuckers during the breeding season?

J. Merrill Lynch
Conservation Biologist
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 4/18/18 5:36 pm
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: why I'm superstitious
This morning after I proclaimed my last winter Baltimore Oriole gone, I
looked out in the backyard, and sure enough...

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

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Date: 4/18/18 4:16 pm
From: Mary Bridges <maryhuot...>
Subject: Orioles
The winter Baltimore Orioles are lingering here but down to just a few—three to five over the past week; I had two this a.m. High count this year was 22, lower than previous five or six years and much less grape jelly consumed.

Mary Bridges
Goldsboro, NC
 

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Date: 4/18/18 3:40 pm
From: WALTER KENT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: birds
Had my first of the season Indigo Bunting along with 27 other species today. Have had over 25 each day on my feeder every day for a week.
Walt Kent
Lenoir N.C.

 

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Date: 4/18/18 12:51 pm
From: David Hart <david.hart...>
Subject: Western Tanager in Durham continuing
Finally had a chance to run over to try for the Western Tanager in Durham this afternoon. After about a half hour, it showed up, briefly but beautifully. Made my day.

Dave Hart
Chapel Hill, NC

 

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Date: 4/18/18 11:32 am
From: FRANK LAWKINS (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: App
Is anyone else having trouble with the Peterson Field Guide app for birds.   Mine will not open.  Please respond directly since I know this is off topic


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone

 

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Date: 4/18/18 4:49 am
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: winter Baltimores gone?
The last of my winter Baltimore Orioles (I had only 3 this year) may have
migrated away last night.

It "chattered" at me when I re-filled the jelly feeder late yesterday
afternoon, but there was none of the typical morning chattering when I put
the feeder around sunrise (take it in at night to avoid raccoon
depredations).

It was a first-year bird, and was molting into adult male plumage.

My lone winter hummingbird (the only one that survived the early January
cold) left many days ago.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

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Date: 4/17/18 7:02 pm
From: James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: 177 Stilt Sandpipers at Santee Coastal Reserve WMA, South Carolina
I observed 177 Stilt Sandpipers at Santee Coastal Reserve WMA near McClellanville, SC today in the Big Well impoundments near the office and adjacent to the South Santee River and boat ramp. One flock had 115 individuals and I have photos and video. There were several other smaller flocks of 20-40 in the adjacent cells. I saw approximately 1000 shorebirds of 12 species there today, and Pamela Ford and I saw over 1000 shorebirds of 11 species at Bear Island WMA this past Saturday, including a large flock of Stilt Sandpipers that flew away. We spent only a few hours at Bear, and I spent only a hour or so at Santee Coastal Reserve, and between the two sites had over 2000 shorebirds of 15 species viewed from the roadside, shorebird conditions are great at both places now and if one could spend time at all the impoundments and sorting through the thousands of birds, there is likely something different to be found.

The manager at Santee Coastal said the impoundments on the Cape Trail are great for shorebirds now and holding many birds, and I didn’t have time to walk out there.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S44672497&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=pf9158MY2L5jztgEFvbELiQB64NO1uw7evXOek8B03w&s=SXVYDtiKDVWeEXHH9_6AXBcVaw_ZDDFdCFp1Bl5qRmY&e=

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S44578917&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=pf9158MY2L5jztgEFvbELiQB64NO1uw7evXOek8B03w&s=G581hAMvvLFyRReZ5vVP_PdY_noC_GWRjmFEycQWtl8&e=

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

Sent from Mail for Windows 10



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Date: 4/17/18 3:27 pm
From: ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Hummingbird Survival
😊😊

On Tue, Apr 17, 2018 at 8:01 AM Robin T <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Good news-after a dip to 19 and a steady temp of 23 all night, at least
> one of the male hummingbirds survived. We got the feeders back out at 6:30
> this morning and within 15 min a male was at the deck feeder. He has been
> there most of the morning, sitting for up to 10 min at a time filling up.
> Haven't seen the 2nd one yet, but hopefully he is visiting the feeder in
> front which we can't easily see.
>
> Thanks for the tips & support.
>
> Robin Y
> Pisgah NF 3800 ft
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__go.onelink.me_107872968-3Fpid-3DInProduct-26c-3DGlobal-5FInternal-5FYGrowth-5FAndroidEmailSig-5F-5FAndroidUsers-26af-5Fwl-3Dym-26af-5Fsub1-3DInternal%0D%20-26af-5Fsub2-3DGlobal-5FYGrowth-26af-5Fsub3-3DEmailSignature&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=E_hxQ1kC4rck-rgM6yNUNqMVE_aIhsbTyvR2BEXUvoA&s=XRA1nUUtUW2hFIWo6MKLlutvWaKjYsetFGvHpb__p58&e=>
>
--
Ann Maddock <am.hummingbird.photos...> Hatteras Island, NC

 

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Date: 4/17/18 2:20 pm
From: Marcus Simpson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Cattle Egret - Mills River - Henderson County
Mark and I were on our way back from the grocery store this afternoon
and saw a Cattle Egret in a horse pasture next to the road on NC191.
We went on home and put our groceries away and came back with cameras,
but it was flying up just as we arrived. The woman who owns the
pasture was there and said the bird had been coming to visit every
afternoon for over a week, usually around 3pm or so. The pasture is
across and a hundred feet or so beyond the VanWingerden office on NC
191. If you are coming from NC 280, that's before you get to the Mills
River Town Hall and library entrance.
Mark Simpson and Marilyn Westphal
 

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Date: 4/17/18 12:35 pm
From: susan <susan...>
Subject: Western Tanager continues in Durham
All, 
Had to wait a bit (a half hour) for him but was rewarded with good looks this morning. Was entertained by plenty of other feeder birds in the meantime...
Susan CampbellSouthern Pines, NC


Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.
 

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Date: 4/17/18 10:47 am
From: Patsy Bailey (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Western Tanager in Durham NC
Marcia,
I read your note and made a trip by your house a little after 12 noon yesterday and was happy to see the bird.  I stood in the driveway with a great view of the feeders for about 20 minutes with no luck. But once I retired to my car and sat with the window open it immediately appeared.  Lovely bird.  Lucky you!
Thanks for letting us know and inviting us over to share the bird.
Patsy Bailey


On Monday, April 16, 2018, 6:30:36 AM EDT, Marcia Mandel <carolinabirds...> wrote:

We have had a Western Tanager (young male) at our feeders since Friday (April 13). He was last seen at 4:15 this afternoon (April 15). Folks are welcome to come by and have a look. Please stay off our neighbors' property. You can go in our driveway but if you do, please stay on the cement. He is very skittish, so if you can, it's best to look from the road. It is very easy to see the feeders, which are on the right side of the house, from the road. It is a small cul-de-sac so please just be mindful of not blocking driveways or mailboxes. He has been going back and forth to the feeders a fair amount, enjoying the sunflower hearts. A few photos have been posted on ebird and on Facebook. 5 Radley Place, Durham.Marcia


 

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Date: 4/17/18 9:52 am
From: Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Caspian Terns
This morning there were 9 Caspian Terns resting on the break wall at the Crosswinds Marina on Jordan Lake, NC.

Good Birding!
Bob Rybczynski
Cary, NC




 

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Date: 4/17/18 8:16 am
From: Holly Powell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hummingbirds & Catbirds
Our first male ruby-throated hummer of the year arrived March 30, first
female on April 13. We were seeing up to 3 hummers at a time until the
evening of April 15 when we suddenly had a charm--more than 15-20 swarming
the feeders at once. Same thing last night. Had to put out more large
feeders!

Although we see Gray Catbirds in our yard from time to time, this is the
first time we've had any coming regularly to a feeder--seem to like orange
flavored suet. It's also the first time I've seen two at once in our
yard. Wondering if we have a breeding pair.

*Holly Powell*
*​Hummingbird Hideaway*
*15 miles north of Beaufort, NC *

*On Adams Creek, Intracoastal Waterway​*

 

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Date: 4/17/18 6:10 am
From: WALTER KENT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hummers
My hummers also survived and are doing well. I have both male and female and I saw a male doing the courting dance yesterday.
Walt Kent
Lenoir N.C.

 

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Date: 4/17/18 5:01 am
From: Robin T (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hummingbird Survival
Good news-after a dip to 19 and a steady temp of 23 all night, at least one of the male hummingbirds survived. We got the feeders back out at 6:30 this morning and within 15 min a male was at the deck feeder. He has been there most of the morning, sitting for up to 10 min at a time filling up. Haven't seen the 2nd one yet, but hopefully he is visiting the feeder in front which we can't easily see.
Thanks for the tips & support.
Robin YPisgah NF 3800 ft

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 4/17/18 4:57 am
From: Sam Cooper <dmcooper2...>
Subject: Brunswick County, NC Spring Count 21 April 2018

There will be a Spring Bird Count this Saturday (21 April 2018) in Brunswick County, NC. If you're birding in Brunswick County this Saturday, please post your list to eBird or send it to Dave Weesner or me. If you want more specific info or to join others, call Dave at 301 302-6376 or email me at <dmcooper2...>

Sam Cooper
Dave Weesner
Wilmington, NC
____________________________________________________________
He Transformed His Gut With One Thing
gundrymd.com
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__thirdpartyoffers.juno.com_TGL3141_5ad5e0cb7ee7960cb6b12st04duc&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=wybohag1vzRaXuCjNJslU6kl0a3GhSEbfH-kwWmIHdM&s=FOe6QO_SNxjO21u1FioKFJCROo4gwGPHboiOgIbjaw0&e=
 

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Date: 4/16/18 3:37 pm
From: <susan...>
Subject: RE: Hummingbird survival in late cold snap?
Robin and All,

These little birds are tougher than you think! If the hummingbirds are
healthy when they arrived-- and especially if they are experienced
adults who have been through migration before-- they will likely be just
fine.

Your hummers (as well as many across the state) will utilize torpor
tonight, in order to contend with the cold temps. They will find a
roosting spot that is protected, puff up-- and then their heart rate and
breathing will fall which results in a short term hibernation state
(called torpor)until dawn. This allows the birds to conserve a good bit
of energy. Torpor is something many Ruby-throateds rely on, no doubt,
during Spring migration.

And---I am happy to report at least one male as well as a feisty female
hummer arrived here in Apex-- just this afternoon...

Susan Campbell
Southern Pines (and often Apex), NC

> -------- Original Message --------
> Subject: Hummingbird survival in late cold snap?
> From: "Robin T" (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
> <carolinabirds...>
> Date: Mon, April 16, 2018 6:16 pm
> To: Carolinabirds Listserve <carolinabirds...>
>
>
> We had our FOY RT hummingbird (male) Thursday. Yesterday another male showed up and they started the Fight Club over the deck feeder, so we added another in front of the house. Last night & all today it has snowed off & on, just 2- 3 inches accumulation... but temps are rapidly falling - low tonight up on our mtn will probably be 20°. Just saw one male at deck feeder at 27° and blowing light snow. 
> Will they survive the night? Temps will be in 50s tomorrow, up to almost 70 Wed so if they can get through tonight they should be ok.
> Worried about the little guys.
> Robin TingleyPisgah NF 3800 ft
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 4/16/18 3:17 pm
From: Robin T (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hummingbird survival in late cold snap?
We had our FOY RT hummingbird (male) Thursday. Yesterday another male showed up and they started the Fight Club over the deck feeder, so we added another in front of the house. Last night & all today it has snowed off & on, just 2- 3 inches accumulation... but temps are rapidly falling - low tonight up on our mtn will probably be 20°. Just saw one male at deck feeder at 27° and blowing light snow. 
Will they survive the night? Temps will be in 50s tomorrow, up to almost 70 Wed so if they can get through tonight they should be ok.
Worried about the little guys.
Robin TingleyPisgah NF 3800 ft

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 4/16/18 12:24 pm
From: Monty <mec...>
Subject: Re: [highcountryaudubon] Ospreys nesting Kerr Scott reservoir, Wilkes Co.
Thanks,Guy for the info. We live just upstream of this site and I have seen them circling over our house this month. They use to nest across the cove from us and behind the
Girl Scout Camp until it closed and a Doctor from South Carolina bought all that property and put in a house. Too much noise now when they are in residence with the parties, four wheelers etc. Unfortunately the Rangers cannot get to them quick enough when they are tearing up the Corp. property and riding in the water day and night. We obviously do not have anymore WoodDucks, etc. nesting in our area.

Monty

> On Apr 16, 2018, at 2:23 PM, <badgerboy...> [highcountryaudubon] <highcountryaudubon...> wrote:
>
> It looks like they've set up a nest at the Fort Hamby recreation area in
> a pine snag overhanging the lake. It can be seen easily from the public
> boat ramp at Smithey's Creek, and the pair has been there for about 3
> weeks. One appeared to be sitting on eggs today while the other stood
> atop the nest.
>
> After rumors of a nest at YMCA Camp Harrison a couple years back its
> nice to finally get some documentation. For a couple passable pictures
> of 2 ospreys at the nest see my ebird checklist at
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S44635569&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=zRIzLr4RfTN06S6Jx7gHq_i9iwYurhRlBkgdgwgVc-E&s=9qV_wrId5GW0cRnZDaSzGH-xiaN-eFdN7MHLp4Y6qPc&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S44635569&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=zRIzLr4RfTN06S6Jx7gHq_i9iwYurhRlBkgdgwgVc-E&s=9qV_wrId5GW0cRnZDaSzGH-xiaN-eFdN7MHLp4Y6qPc&e=> .
>
> Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC
>
>
> __._,_.___
> Posted by: <badgerboy...> <mailto:<badgerboy...>
> Reply via web post <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__groups.yahoo.com_neo_groups_highcountryaudubon_conversations_messages_6794-3B-5Fylc-3DX3oDMTJxZGpxNGNwBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzIwODIxMTE2BGdycHNwSWQDMTcwNjAyMzg0NARtc2dJZAM2Nzk0BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA3JwbHkEc3RpbWUDMTUyMzkwMzAxMw-2D-2D-3Fact-3Dreply-26messageNum-3D6794&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=zRIzLr4RfTN06S6Jx7gHq_i9iwYurhRlBkgdgwgVc-E&s=unOovqES9L2V0oCutOM6N-EB63bxN0zIAmYSUFyO8Vo&e=> • Reply to sender  <mailto:<badgerboy...>?subject=Re%3A%20Ospreys%20nesting%20Kerr%20Scott%20reservoir%2C%20Wilkes%20Co%2E> • Reply to group  <mailto:<highcountryaudubon...>?subject=Re%3A%20Ospreys%20nesting%20Kerr%20Scott%20reservoir%2C%20Wilkes%20Co%2E> • Start a New Topic <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__groups.yahoo.com_neo_groups_highcountryaudubon_conversations_newtopic-3B-5Fylc-3DX3oDMTJmaGw0bzJvBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzIwODIxMTE2BGdycHNwSWQDMTcwNjAyMzg0NARzZWMDZnRyBHNsawNudHBjBHN0aW1lAzE1MjM5MDMwMTM-2D&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=zRIzLr4RfTN06S6Jx7gHq_i9iwYurhRlBkgdgwgVc-E&s=Y2aiGvQoiC3QZun5DCg2U-uRnvuPdnUx2Td35p-bnjM&e=> • Messages in this topic <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__groups.yahoo.com_neo_groups_highcountryaudubon_conversations_topics_6794-3B-5Fylc-3DX3oDMTM1YmgybWhtBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzIwODIxMTE2BGdycHNwSWQDMTcwNjAyMzg0NARtc2dJZAM2Nzk0BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA3Z0cGMEc3RpbWUDMTUyMzkwMzAxMwR0cGNJZAM2Nzk0&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=zRIzLr4RfTN06S6Jx7gHq_i9iwYurhRlBkgdgwgVc-E&s=wdh-hwvJGvKEwrz9_6c6lcJVdGtmgg2AeBfo_0HQQyg&e=> (1)
> Have you tried the highest rated email app?
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__yho.com_1wwmgg&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=zRIzLr4RfTN06S6Jx7gHq_i9iwYurhRlBkgdgwgVc-E&s=NElo4SgC7ZSAsR6jKbQLilAOFC9ZnOZO29wT8yAiso4&e=>With 4.5 stars in iTunes, the Yahoo Mail app is the highest rated email app on the market. What are you waiting for? Now you can access all your inboxes (Gmail, Outlook, AOL and more) in one place. Never delete an email again with 1000GB of free cloud storage.
> VISIT YOUR GROUP <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__groups.yahoo.com_neo_groups_highcountryaudubon_info-3B-5Fylc-3DX3oDMTJmdDVjM25yBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzIwODIxMTE2BGdycHNwSWQDMTcwNjAyMzg0NARzZWMDdnRsBHNsawN2Z2hwBHN0aW1lAzE1MjM5MDMwMTM-2D&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=zRIzLr4RfTN06S6Jx7gHq_i9iwYurhRlBkgdgwgVc-E&s=NVhWAiyZZF268GnQV24CcmE_VUnaX2irWfijPR62gKM&e=>
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__groups.yahoo.com_neo-3B-5Fylc-3DX3oDMTJldWZ2ZjFoBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzIwODIxMTE2BGdycHNwSWQDMTcwNjAyMzg0NARzZWMDZnRyBHNsawNnZnAEc3RpbWUDMTUyMzkwMzAxMw-2D-2D&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=zRIzLr4RfTN06S6Jx7gHq_i9iwYurhRlBkgdgwgVc-E&s=BFR19MZqcrw1ee-GGZ2qYpqFC-C-qtWuXiaKfcaZxgs&e=> Privacy <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__info.yahoo.com_privacy_us_yahoo_groups_details.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=zRIzLr4RfTN06S6Jx7gHq_i9iwYurhRlBkgdgwgVc-E&s=wr7gcofGHUSuZEqW7X8kq_f56mK_xtbo8DnXu2aK4c8&e=> • Unsubscribe <mailto:<highcountryaudubon-unsubscribe...>?subject=Unsubscribe> • Terms of Use <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__info.yahoo.com_legal_us_yahoo_utos_terms_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=zRIzLr4RfTN06S6Jx7gHq_i9iwYurhRlBkgdgwgVc-E&s=eXSBGQXU4IZ-ELeeXOuBzW3TiF4Z86Td5pQH5yZ8TUE&e=>
> .
>
>
> __,_._,___


 

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Date: 4/16/18 12:07 pm
From: \Jim Capel\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Chapel Hill Bird Club Monthly Meeting - Monday 4/23 - Keith Kennedy - Japan's Winter Wildlife


The Chapel Hill Bird Club will meet at 7:30 pm on Monday, April 23rd in the lounge at Binkley Baptist Church. Binkley is at 1712 Willow Drive in Chapel Hill, NC at the intersection with 15-501 near University Mall (map with meeting room pinned - https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.google.com_maps-3Fq-3D35.92905-2C-2D79.02535&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=hriQW0Ktwpap7pLXKFXCDWyAdwSV9PchMMsYNu4v3C0&s=H6ODMENfS_mqNyT_-4z7lDwz9EVZW3KZuQYA3NkCwKY&e=).



Visitors are welcome! Come at 7:15 p.m. for light refreshments.



The featured speakers are Keith and Sharon Kennedy, who will present on "Japan's Winter Wildlife." A winter trip to Japan provided a unique opportunity to experience both its culture and its incredible scenery and wildlife including many remarkable birds. Keith is a retired entomologist and an exceptional wildlife photographer, and Sharon has been an avid birder for the last 20 years.



Admission is free and the public is invited.



For more information, see chbc.carolinanature.com


---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.avast.com_antivirus&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=hriQW0Ktwpap7pLXKFXCDWyAdwSV9PchMMsYNu4v3C0&s=7rNaNB3DvOqR6Hei9q_wdBacDz1HSP8zEOpd5FN3OtM&e=

 

Back to top
Date: 4/16/18 11:24 am
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Ospreys nesting Kerr Scott reservoir, Wilkes Co.
It looks like they've set up a nest at the Fort Hamby recreation area in
a pine snag overhanging the lake. It can be seen easily from the public
boat ramp at Smithey's Creek, and the pair has been there for about 3
weeks. One appeared to be sitting on eggs today while the other stood
atop the nest.

After rumors of a nest at YMCA Camp Harrison a couple years back its
nice to finally get some documentation. For a couple passable pictures
of 2 ospreys at the nest see my ebird checklist at
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S44635569&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=khVoRgIBn5GW_i3ET6NCM82K3wwR_j5r8j61ILslf3k&s=7-Yw904l2iCHZiPO5wFuLF9lMZ9gR9fSWLxL-Jo5c0Q&e= .

Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 4/16/18 11:23 am
From: Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Warning: Blatantly Political Post: Re: Migratory Bird Treat Act

At the risk of getting kicked off Carolinabirds, please take action and complain to your elected representatives. This is one of the most appalling things yet from this administration. For what it is worth, I just sent this to Sens. Graham and Scott:

“You really need to act if the Republicans want to have any environmental/stewardship legacy. The attack by Dept. of Interior on the Migratory Bird Treaty Act today is simply appalling. You cannot keep selling out to business interests. How many of your constituents feed birds and have no idea about the importance of the MBTA?”

SC is at ground zero in these attacks. Check out Congressman Jeff Duncan’s position on the MBTA. It is my understanding that a lot of this is from kowtowing to the Koch brothers with their Western wind farms. Keep in mind that SC birds are at risk from offshore wind farms and SC’s location relative to migration routes. For you listers, there may be little to list down the road.

Parkin Hunter
Columbia, SC
Garden City Beach, Georgetown County, SC

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 16, 2018, at 1:11 PM, Andy Smith <andrew.w.smith...> wrote:
>
> Original article for those who do not have or care not for Facebook:
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.washingtonpost.com_news_energy-2Denvironment_wp_2018_04_13_the-2Dtrump-2Dadministration-2Dofficially-2Dclipped-2Dthe-2Dwings-2Dof-2Dthe-2Dmigratory-2Dbird-2Dtreaty-2Dact&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=dmDZNM48zFrbP78FZJi6jjTbX_IvoL5Qhq_YM9jB_pA&s=bmfInWnVgD4doIegwoQ3023nbnZCXCFwMQWFyPPeOgY&e=
> From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of KC Foggin <carolinabirds...>
> Sent: Monday, April 16, 2018 12:41:06 PM
> To: <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: Migratory Bird Treat Act
>
> According to the Washington Post The Trump administration has officially clipped the wings of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act
>
> God help our bird life.
>
> Article on Audubon's Face book page:
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_audubonca_-3Fhc-5Fref-3DARRDS0Zn7AMLaw37HWm6q2YIZF7BWy5lqkZI7Wr5mp0yoYYqN79Wbc9IxLmAuXM3oug-26fref-3Dnf&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=dmDZNM48zFrbP78FZJi6jjTbX_IvoL5Qhq_YM9jB_pA&s=K2eCH9iZLJlBJ3EP_C2gP3KGUdi5cQN-SnwfBc7oPyw&e=
>
> K.C.
>
> K.C. Foggin
> Socastee
> Myrtle Beach SC
>
> Take nothing but pictures,
> Leave nothing but footprints
> Kill nothing but time
>
> www.birdforum.net
>
> www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages

 

Back to top
Date: 4/16/18 10:39 am
From: Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Purple Finch, Rockingham County, NC
Hi Carolina Birders,

I saw one female/immature Purple Finch with a flock of American Goldfinches
along Deshazo Road (part of Mayo River State Park) in northwest Rockingham
County, NC this morning. The finches were feeding on the abundant slippery
elm seeds near the one lane bridge about half a mile north od Anglin Mill
Road. This spot has been consistently good for Purple Finches during the
middle of April every year since I started birding there in 2013, except
for 2015, when I didn't make it during the peak week. eBird checklist with
photos linked below. Below that is a list of Purple Finch high counts by
year for the location. In a good finch year, it is amazing...even in an
off year, there was at least one Purple Finch.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S44627917&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=IKXo4ycAeGA0qY3eQkwcmpLVTryPiu8YBflRnsznps8&s=w_e4af46zPbTg9snD4K2iycUcRIvilH3Uun0ykGdimA&e=

2013 - 15
2014 - 2
2015 - 0...(five visits in April, but none during the peak week)
2016 - 28
2017 - 3
2018 - 1

Marty Wall
currently in Eden, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 4/16/18 10:12 am
From: Andy Smith <andrew.w.smith...>
Subject: Re: Migratory Bird Treat Act
Original article for those who do not have or care not for Facebook:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.washingtonpost.com_news_energy-2Denvironment_wp_2018_04_13_the-2Dtrump-2Dadministration-2Dofficially-2Dclipped-2Dthe-2Dwings-2Dof-2Dthe-2Dmigratory-2Dbird-2Dtreaty-2Dact&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Q4HgIjW3qpr7UDgAQJk5qcFEb9lyh2Ii_eIqz6IyJIk&s=k4dHXZL1BvT9-2cPx8gZNAS7_74CyunGNfuYnQXx-eE&e=

________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of KC Foggin <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Monday, April 16, 2018 12:41:06 PM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Migratory Bird Treat Act

According to the Washington Post The Trump administration has officially clipped the wings of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act

God help our bird life.

Article on Audubon's Face book page:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_audubonca_-3Fhc-5Fref-3DARRDS0Zn7AMLaw37HWm6q2YIZF7BWy5lqkZI7Wr5mp0yoYYqN79Wbc9IxLmAuXM3oug-26fref-3Dnf&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Q4HgIjW3qpr7UDgAQJk5qcFEb9lyh2Ii_eIqz6IyJIk&s=t9TBKHuoY06w1C1n-o3lASqj9mnWgOhu0sZSzW41fb8&e=<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_audubonca_-3Fhc-5Fref-3DARRDS0Zn7AMLaw37HWm6q2YIZF7BWy5lqkZI7Wr5mp0yoYYqN79Wbc9IxLmAuXM3oug-26fref-3Dnf&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=3KLZZLfOwVvWirxpJygoVT-yY46IvpU4YrtX98OjVKk&s=uyQBAcIVPT5pt9pbSRBPxq_iYaR6D_21HowJ5DSSJ4I&e=>

K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

Take nothing but pictures,
Leave nothing but footprints
Kill nothing but time

www.birdforum.net<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.birdforum.net&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=3KLZZLfOwVvWirxpJygoVT-yY46IvpU4YrtX98OjVKk&s=23WNSddVLQpG9eW00sNMup0SCi-SX2UXeFOjYCmr430&e=>

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.pbase.com_kcfoggin_nikon-5Fd50-5Fpages&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=3KLZZLfOwVvWirxpJygoVT-yY46IvpU4YrtX98OjVKk&s=6TvifGhaxIZvOxqDATZh-qu4UoDMgQGIpDqEvfuWjIE&e=>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/16/18 9:41 am
From: KC Foggin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Migratory Bird Treat Act
According to the Washington Post The Trump administration has officially
clipped the wings of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act

God help our bird life.

Article on Audubon's Face book page:

*https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_audubonca_-3Fhc-5Fref-3DARRDS0Zn7AMLaw37HWm6q2YIZF7BWy5lqkZI7Wr5mp0yoYYqN79Wbc9IxLmAuXM3oug-26fref-3Dnf&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=3KLZZLfOwVvWirxpJygoVT-yY46IvpU4YrtX98OjVKk&s=uyQBAcIVPT5pt9pbSRBPxq_iYaR6D_21HowJ5DSSJ4I&e=
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_audubonca_-3Fhc-5Fref-3DARRDS0Zn7AMLaw37HWm6q2YIZF7BWy5lqkZI7Wr5mp0yoYYqN79Wbc9IxLmAuXM3oug-26fref-3Dnf&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=3KLZZLfOwVvWirxpJygoVT-yY46IvpU4YrtX98OjVKk&s=uyQBAcIVPT5pt9pbSRBPxq_iYaR6D_21HowJ5DSSJ4I&e=>*

K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

Take nothing but pictures,
Leave nothing but footprints
Kill nothing but time

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages

 

Back to top
Date: 4/16/18 8:55 am
From: Patricia Tice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: 1st female hummer near Hillsborough, NC
I saw my first female hummer this morning.
Patty Tice
Raleigh NC

On Mon, Apr 16, 2018, 8:37 AM Helen Kalevas <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Seen just now at the feeder. Two males have been fighting over the feeder
> for about a week. Also had my first summer tanager this morning.
> ​Helen​
>
> --
> Helen Kalevas
> Near Hillsborough, NC
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/16/18 8:04 am
From: Bert Fisher (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Western Tanager in Durham - Seen Today
The Western Tanager coming to the feeders at Radley Place in Durham was seen at 10:45 this morning. The bird was very cooperative, staying on the feeder for several minutes.

Bert Fisher & Leto Copeley
Hillsborough, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 4/16/18 7:19 am
From: Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Lesser Black-b, Gulls feed at 30 km; some nos, to our north now
I don't believe there is a landfill near Buckhorn. I know the Wilson
county landfill is on Hwy 42 just east of Wilson. I think the gulls are
coming in from the coast to roost on the lake during bad weather. It is
usually foggy or overcast or a front moving through when I see large
numbers of gulls at Buckhorn. I went out there the next evening after
Ricky's sightings and I saw one gull on the whole lake.

It is about 90 miles from the Pamlico and Neuse rivers to Buckhorn
reservoir, but it appears to be the first large body of water west of the
rivers.

Ann Brice
Wilson, NC

On Mon, Apr 16, 2018 at 3:17 AM, Frank Enders <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Looking at the internet, I found that in Finland breeding LBBG would go
> 30-40 km away to feed; at fur farms, individuals flying over OK feeding
> spots to go to their "favorites" (stealing penned animals' food). Some
> other individual LBBG would stick to more-natural sources of food.
>
>
>
>
> And, just this last week, some 40 or 100 (cannot remember at which site)
> LBBG were seen at the Northampton County Landfill in PA, and at Irondequoit
> Bay, Lake Ontario (site of a recent fishkill).
>
>
> I do not know about landfills near Buckhorn Lake in WIlson County.
>
>
> And, ebird did not seem to have any double-digit numbers of LBBG since R.
> Davis located that fantastic flock of 300 at Buckhorn (though, as
> noted,some just showed up on the birdlines).
>
>
> Supposedly the LBBG here are from a Greenland population, but I did not
> see any numbers in eBird in Newfoundland or Greenland, just the usual
> single digit reports for Iceland (bigger nos. in Europe, as expected).
>
>
>
>
> Frank Enders, Halifax, NC
>



--
Ann Brice

*First Wilson Properties, Real Estate Broker, GRI
www.FirstWilsonProperties.com <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.firstwilsonproperties.com_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=bvmAb9feFvFykNRnFUZUpXhG27nFT9QwzVfxTFVMJ18&s=fvd_K8q2Hkam6h07cn0Khd9K-TiX-tZkyfjF2iofbq8&e=>*
*Preservation of Wilson, Properties Committee www.PreservationofWilson.com
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.preservationofwilson.com_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=bvmAb9feFvFykNRnFUZUpXhG27nFT9QwzVfxTFVMJ18&s=KQTDWPWjPzxCvEXTS9z5719dXxNLyrJW0uDRXCJBzMU&e=>*
*City of Wilson Appearance Comission, Winner 2016 Outstanding Tree
Board, Chair www.WilsonNC.org <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.wilsonnc.org_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=bvmAb9feFvFykNRnFUZUpXhG27nFT9QwzVfxTFVMJ18&s=ubayrCFP1ZpVsZzpxhJqqWqfLWhYA9rc8Hy3QmvdQA0&e=>*

<ann.brice...>
cell: 252 373-0326
office: 252 237-9900
fax: 252 243-9600

 

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Date: 4/16/18 5:37 am
From: Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: 1st female hummer near Hillsborough, NC
Seen just now at the feeder. Two males have been fighting over the feeder
for about a week. Also had my first summer tanager this morning.
​Helen​

--
Helen Kalevas
Near Hillsborough, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 4/16/18 3:30 am
From: Marcia Mandel (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Western Tanager in Durham NC
We have had a Western Tanager (young male) at our feeders since Friday
(April 13). He was last seen at 4:15 this afternoon (April 15). Folks are
welcome to come by and have a look. Please stay off our neighbors'
property. You can go in our driveway but if you do, please stay on the
cement. He is very skittish, so if you can, it's best to look from the
road. It is very easy to see the feeders, which are on the right side of
the house, from the road. It is a small cul-de-sac so please just be
mindful of not blocking driveways or mailboxes. He has been going back and
forth to the feeders a fair amount, enjoying the sunflower hearts. A few
photos have been posted on ebird and on Facebook. 5 Radley Place, Durham.
Marcia

 

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Date: 4/16/18 3:22 am
From: Patrick Coin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: FOS chimney swifts Durham NC 4/15/18
Had two chimney swifts flying and calling over southern Durham NC in the
late afternoon of Sunday 4/15/18. This was during blustery weather before
the big storm front moved in from the southwest.

--
Patrick Coin
Durham, NC
<patrickcoin1...>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/16/18 12:17 am
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lesser Black-b, Gulls feed at 30 km; some nos, to our north now
Looking at the internet, I found that in Finland breeding LBBG would go 30-40 km away to feed; at fur farms, individuals flying over OK feeding spots to go to their "favorites" (stealing penned animals' food). Some other individual LBBG would stick to more-natural sources of food.




And, just this last week, some 40 or 100 (cannot remember at which site) LBBG were seen at the Northampton County Landfill in PA, and at Irondequoit Bay, Lake Ontario (site of a recent fishkill).


I do not know about landfills near Buckhorn Lake in WIlson County.


And, ebird did not seem to have any double-digit numbers of LBBG since R. Davis located that fantastic flock of 300 at Buckhorn (though, as noted,some just showed up on the birdlines).


Supposedly the LBBG here are from a Greenland population, but I did not see any numbers in eBird in Newfoundland or Greenland, just the usual single digit reports for Iceland (bigger nos. in Europe, as expected).




Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

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Date: 4/15/18 11:59 pm
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Am. White Pelicans-Davidson Co., NC-04/02/2018
I was told the pelicans were not present a week ago. Also, a flock of White Pelicans was reported on Pennsylvania birds online flying over a few daysago.







Frank Enders, Halifax, NC
________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Frank Enders <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Thursday, April 5, 2018 7:20:30 AM
To: Mike Turner; <Carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Am. White Pelicans-Davidson Co., NC-04/02/2018


50-52 pelicans at spot 4/4/18 1:30 PM. Some partially hidden in white-washed rocks to west; most floating near outfall from High Rock Lake. One chased cormaorant (200 corms present). No herons seen, one osprey. Only 5 Ring-billed Gulls.





Frank Enders, Halifax, NC
________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Mike Turner <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Monday, April 2, 2018 4:46:13 PM
To: Carolinabirds
Subject: Am. White Pelicans-Davidson Co., NC-04/02/2018

Today at Tuckertown Lake, just below the High Rock Dam, there were 47! Am. White Pelicans. They can be easily seen from the boat landing on Bringle Ferry Rd. or from the fishing area on the Rowan County side of the lake. Also of note were 4 Little Blue Herons also at the base of the dam. Good birding.

Mike Turner
Winston-Salem, NC

 

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Date: 4/15/18 7:27 pm
From: Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Warblers at Alligator River NWR 4/14/18
Good Evening,

Variety and numbers of warblers are on the rise at Alligator River National
Wildlife Refuge in Dare County, NC.

Warblers (listed in with most common heard/seen first) include:

Prothonotary Warblers
Prairie Warblers
Common Yellowthroats
Black-Throated Green Warblers
Yellow-Rumped Warblers
Yellow-Throated Warblers
Northern Parulas
Ovenbirds
Worm-Eating Warblers
Hooded Warblers
Swainson's Warblers


Other cool birds seen recently include:

Anhingas
Barred Owls
Blue-Grey Gnatcatchers
Chimney Swifts
Bobwhite Quails
Hairy Woodpeckers
White-Eyed Vireos
Rusty Blackbirds

Have fun out there!

Jim Gould
Southern Shores, NC


--
Jim Gould
1-804-731-1353 (mobile)

 

Back to top
Date: 4/15/18 4:09 pm
From: Dennis Kent <dkjtk...>
Subject: Re: [meckbirds] Mecklenburg County Arrivals Sunday, Apr. 15
Add to the list, Cape May Warbler, and Sora from Six Mile in addition to the American Bittern I mentioned earlier.
Dennis Kent


Sent from my Sprint Samsung Galaxy S7.
-------- Original message --------From: Ken Kneidel <kenkneidel...> Date: 4/15/18 4:52 PM (GMT-05:00) To: Kevin Metcalf <skermetcalf...> Cc: Carolina Birds <carolinabirds...>, Mecklenburg Audubon Society List <meckbirds...> Subject: Re: [meckbirds] Mecklenburg County Arrivals Sunday, Apr. 15
Blue-winged Warbler and American Redstart today at Freedom Park.Ken Kneidel
On Sun, Apr 15, 2018 at 11:45 AM, Kevin Metcalf <skermetcalf...> wrote:
Some first-of-season sightings in Mecklenburg County this morning (first for me, anyway - I didn't get out birding yesterday):
Gray Catbird (2)Red-eyed Vireo (a few)Northern WaterthrushBlack-throated Green WarblerWorm-eating WarblerBlue Grosbeak (3 total, one each at three locations)Summer Tanager (2)
Other warblers included Northern Parula, Yellow-rumped, Pine, Prairie, Prothonotary, and Common Yellowthroat. 
Kevin MetcalfHuntersville, NC





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Back to top
Date: 4/15/18 3:59 pm
From: Stacy and Natalie Barbour (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Western Tanager in Durham, NC
Does anyone know if the homeowners in Durham hosting the Western Tanager the past few days are receptive to guests coming by to watch? Got any contact info or tips to share?

Thanks
Stacy Barbour
Raleigh
 

Back to top
Date: 4/15/18 8:45 am
From: Kevin Metcalf (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mecklenburg County Arrivals Sunday, Apr. 15
Some first-of-season sightings in Mecklenburg County this morning (first
for me, anyway - I didn't get out birding yesterday):
Gray Catbird (2)Red-eyed Vireo (a few)Northern WaterthrushBlack-throated
Green WarblerWorm-eating WarblerBlue Grosbeak (3 total, one each at
three locations)Summer Tanager (2)
Other warblers included Northern Parula, Yellow-rumped, Pine, Prairie,
Prothonotary, and Common Yellowthroat.
Kevin MetcalfHuntersville, NC
 

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Date: 4/15/18 6:52 am
From: Gretchen Schramm (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: The Last Two Weeks
In my garden in Wilmington over the last several days, I've had Northern
Parula, Red-eyed Vireo, Great Crested Flycatcher and one American Goldfinch.

Gretchen
Wilmington, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 4/15/18 5:31 am
From: <brbirders...>
Subject: Hummingbird in Alleghany Co. NC
Our FOS hummingbird stopped by to “tank up” at our feeders on its way north here near MP 235 Blue Ridge Parkway in Alleghany County yesterday (4/14). Our hummingbird-popular columbine and coral honeysuckle is not quite fully open yet (about a week late) or maybe he might have stayed longer. He drank steadily for almost 3 or 4 minutes with a quick return but then did not appear again all day.

Jim Keighton
Bullhead Rd, Sparta, near MP 235 Blue Ridge Parkway
 

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Date: 4/14/18 5:18 pm
From: \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Spring arrivals in Watauga County, NC
Birders, had my first hummer this afternoon and my first Wood Thrush just before dark today. On my property located near Snake Mountain at 3,400’.

J. Merrill Lynch
Conservation Biologist
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 4/14/18 4:30 pm
From: Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Ruby throated hummingbird
All,

Our wintering adult male and immature male Ruby-throated Hummingbirds
appear t have left us here on James Is, SC. We never had hummingbirds in
the summer.

Dennis

On Sat, Apr 14, 2018 at 5:02 PM, Sharyn Caudell <scaudell...> wrote:

> I spotted the first ruby throat on 3/31. He was hovering around where I
> hang my feeder. I put it out the next day for him. Haven't seen any females
> yet.
>
> Sharyn
>



--
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>

 

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Date: 4/14/18 4:24 pm
From: Monroe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Shortoff Mountain Trail Burke Co. NC
Foothills Conservancy sponsored a hike on this trail which begins at the south end of the Linville Gorge on its east flank. The area has had several fires in the last few years so much early successional habitat.

Many Prairie Warblers(25 plus). Easily the most common bird of the day.
From the trailhead (at the end of Wolf Pit Rd.off of NC 126)all the way to the top of the mountain is about a 2 mile walk on well maintained trail. Other birds:

Hooded Warbler and Black Throated Green on Wolf Pit Road.
On the trail:

N. Cardinal
Red Breasted Nuthatch
Black and White Warbler. This bird fairly common also.
Prairie Warbler
Bald Eagle
Common Raven
Turkey Vulture
Flicker
Towhee
Field Sparrow
Carolina Chickadee
Carolina Wren
White Eyed and Blue headed Vireo
Eastern Bluebird

Looked in vain for Peregrine Falcon.


Monroe Pannell
Conover NC
Catawba County

 

Back to top
Date: 4/14/18 2:03 pm
From: Sharyn Caudell <scaudell...>
Subject: Ruby throated hummingbird
I spotted the first ruby throat on 3/31. He was hovering around where I
hang my feeder. I put it out the next day for him. Haven't seen any
females yet.

Sharyn


 

Back to top
Date: 4/14/18 11:23 am
From: Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: fos ovenbird today in Hillsborough, nc
Heard him singing several times during a wildflower walk at historic
Moorefields in Hillsborough, NC

--
Helen Kalevas
Near Hillsborough, NC


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<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>

 

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Date: 4/14/18 10:32 am
From: Ginny Alfano (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Prairie Warbler
Saw my first ever Prairie Warbler (male) today at site 186, Parker's Creek
Campground on Jordan Lake, NC. I'm 70 years old and find it very difficult
to see a life bird anymore. Hence, a very exciting day for me!! He was with
a group of Yellow-rumped Warblers that appeared to be quickly moving
through.
--
Ginny Alfano Cleveland, NY

 

Back to top
Date: 4/14/18 6:43 am
From: Will Whitsett <willwhitsett...>
Subject: Re: Say’s phoebe
Thanks Kevin
Will Whitsett
Mount Pleasant

> On Apr 14, 2018, at 9:26 AM, Kevin Kubach <kmkubach...> wrote:
>
> Will,
>
> To my knowledge it has not been seen since Wed., but still worth a shot!
>
> Kevin Kubach
> Greenville, SC
>
>> On Apr 14, 2018, at 9:24 AM, Will Whitsett <willwhitsett...> wrote:
>>
>> Has anyone relocated the Say’s Phoebe in Clemson? I am heading up today for an event and would love to try for it. Thanks
>> Will Whitsett
>> Mount Pleasant
>> S.C.
>>
>>
>> Begin forwarded message:
>>
>>> From: "jcox3222" (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
>>> Date: April 11, 2018 at 6:55:08 PM EDT
>>> To: <carolinabirds...>
>>> Subject: Say’s phoebe
>>> Reply-To: <jcox3222...>
>>>
>>> I just relocated the Say’s phoebe reported on eBird earlier by Kevin Kobach at Clemson Cherry Farm facility.
>>>
>>> Light gray back and wings, black tail, pale orange-rufus belly, flanks and under tail coverts. Pale wing bars. Hawking insects from barbed wire fence. Pumped tail when alighting but otherwise only occasionally. First seen with eastern phoebe for good comparison.
>>>
>>> I just happened to be in Clemson for a geology continuing ed field trip and technical presentations and saw Kevin Kubach’s rare bird report and found the bird easily.
>>> John Cox
>>> Mount Pleasant, SC
>>>
>>> Sent from XFINITY Connect Mobile App

 

Back to top
Date: 4/14/18 6:27 am
From: Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Say’s phoebe
Will,

To my knowledge it has not been seen since Wed., but still worth a shot!

Kevin Kubach
Greenville, SC

> On Apr 14, 2018, at 9:24 AM, Will Whitsett <willwhitsett...> wrote:
>
> Has anyone relocated the Say’s Phoebe in Clemson? I am heading up today for an event and would love to try for it. Thanks
> Will Whitsett
> Mount Pleasant
> S.C.
>
>
> Begin forwarded message:
>
>> From: "jcox3222" (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
>> Date: April 11, 2018 at 6:55:08 PM EDT
>> To: <carolinabirds...>
>> Subject: Say’s phoebe
>> Reply-To: <jcox3222...>
>>
>> I just relocated the Say’s phoebe reported on eBird earlier by Kevin Kobach at Clemson Cherry Farm facility.
>>
>> Light gray back and wings, black tail, pale orange-rufus belly, flanks and under tail coverts. Pale wing bars. Hawking insects from barbed wire fence. Pumped tail when alighting but otherwise only occasionally. First seen with eastern phoebe for good comparison.
>>
>> I just happened to be in Clemson for a geology continuing ed field trip and technical presentations and saw Kevin Kubach’s rare bird report and found the bird easily.
>> John Cox
>> Mount Pleasant, SC
>>
>> Sent from XFINITY Connect Mobile App

 

Back to top
Date: 4/14/18 6:24 am
From: Will Whitsett <willwhitsett...>
Subject: Fwd: Say’s phoebe
Has anyone relocated the Say’s Phoebe in Clemson? I am heading up today for an event and would love to try for it. Thanks
Will Whitsett
Mount Pleasant
S.C.


Begin forwarded message:

> From: "jcox3222" (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
> Date: April 11, 2018 at 6:55:08 PM EDT
> To: <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: Say’s phoebe
> Reply-To: <jcox3222...>
>
> I just relocated the Say’s phoebe reported on eBird earlier by Kevin Kobach at Clemson Cherry Farm facility.
>
> Light gray back and wings, black tail, pale orange-rufus belly, flanks and under tail coverts. Pale wing bars. Hawking insects from barbed wire fence. Pumped tail when alighting but otherwise only occasionally. First seen with eastern phoebe for good comparison.
>
> I just happened to be in Clemson for a geology continuing ed field trip and technical presentations and saw Kevin Kubach’s rare bird report and found the bird easily.
> John Cox
> Mount Pleasant, SC
>
> Sent from XFINITY Connect Mobile App

 

Back to top
Date: 4/14/18 6:15 am
From: Bonnie/Tom <bks1956...>
Subject: Re: FOS birds in McDowell County


We had our first of season Scarlet Tanager and Rose-breasted Grosbeak today.   We're in southwestern McDowell County, near the Buncombe County line. Bonnie Simmons
Tom Pericak
Old Fort NC





 

Back to top
Date: 4/14/18 4:31 am
From: Ken Bennett (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hummingbird FOS
Had our first hummingbird last night, at our lilac bush next to the front porch here in Winston-Salem. It’s the first year we’ve had multiple flowers on the lilac, too. :)

Ken Bennett

Sent from my mobile
 

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Date: 4/14/18 4:12 am
From: Robin T (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: First Hummingbird
First hummingbird here on Thursday, 4/12. Must not have read we are due for snow showers tomorrow night through Monday morning. 
Robin TingleyPisgah NF3800 ft
 

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Date: 4/14/18 4:03 am
From: Patrick Coin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: FOS hummingbird Durham NC 4/13/18
Had my first hummingbird of the season in Durham NC as well on lucky Friday
the 13th. It was investigating my patch of coral honeysuckle, which just
started blooming.

------------------------------
> Message-ID: <CALpZGOOkoHun-FMj3Ma_8L00cfSiygvEZEA820z9-
> <ADgqJeU8A...>
> Date: Fri, 13 Apr 2018 16:59:06 -0400
> From: Peter Perlman <pperlman...>
> Subject: Re: First Hummingbird
>
> Some first of'season birds here in Chapel Hill:
> First Hummer came yesterday seeming annoyed we weren't psychic enough to
> know he was on his way.
> Barn Swallows under the James Taylor Bride where they nest.
> Lots of White Eyed Vireos and Parulas calling on Bolin Creek near Seawell
> School.
>
> Happy Birding,
> Peter.
>
>
--
Patrick Coin
Durham, NC
<patrickcoin1...>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/13/18 3:39 pm
From: Rob G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Patterson Place pond
at holding pond behind Patterson Place Shopping Center (Hwy 15-501, Durham) this morning Purple Martins were back taking up residence in the Audubon-provided Martin house. FOS Green Heron present also. Oddly, saw no Tree Swallows today after seeing several there 2+ weeks ago.

Also oddly, have not seen a hummingbird at my apt. complex since the one brief appearance last Sunday :(


-- Rob Gluck.... Carrboro, NC........



 

Back to top
Date: 4/13/18 1:59 pm
From: Peter Perlman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: First Hummingbird
Some first of'season birds here in Chapel Hill:
First Hummer came yesterday seeming annoyed we weren't psychic enough to
know he was on his way.
Barn Swallows under the James Taylor Bride where they nest.
Lots of White Eyed Vireos and Parulas calling on Bolin Creek near Seawell
School.

Happy Birding,
Peter.


On Thu, Apr 12, 2018 at 12:01 PM, Thomas Krakauer <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> I currently live a Croasdaile Retirement Community in N. Durham County
>
> This morning I saw my first Male Ruby-throated Hummingbird at my feeder
> on my patio. Filled the feeder on Sunday.
>
> Tom Krakauer
> 2600 Croasdaile Farm Pkwy, Durham 27705
>
>
> Sent from my iPad




--
Peter Perlman, MSW, LCSW, IHC
Clinical Social Worker, Psychotherapist
Certified Integrative Health Coach
1411 Broad St. Durham, NC 27705
Phone: (919) 286-1736

 

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Date: 4/13/18 12:08 pm
From: Carol Chelette (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Prairie Warbler
Just watched a prairie warbler in my yard! Have had hummers for several
days. The neighborhood pileateds have been hammering away. Red-shouldered
hawks copulating several times in the last week.

This morning, a pine siskin was at the feeder. Guess he'll be heading north
soon.

Ah, spring!

Carol Chelette
Durham, NC

 

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Date: 4/13/18 7:31 am
From: <hilton...>
Subject: Hilton Pond 03/18/18 (Ducks, Raptors, Hummers)
The last half of March 2018 was wild and wooly weather-wise in much of the Carolina Piedmont, but that didn't interfere with plants starting to green up and animals beginning to stir. In our 18-31 Mar 2018 edition of "This Week at Hilton Pond" we take a look at some spring bird activity we observed (from ducks to raptors to passerines). We also make some suggestions about when folks further north might expect Ruby-throated Hummingbirds to arrive, noting that ours came right about on schedule near month’s end.

There’s also a nod to Dr. Whit Gibbons of herpetology fame, plus acknowledgements of supporters who recently contributed to the Center and Operation RubyThroat. And, of course, there are our usual lists of birds banded or recaptured during the period. To view our 671st installment, please visit https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.hiltonpond.org_ThisWeek180318.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=OOSC62R1GjRmmtUI2Q-QNt__RoONGCnzqPpJ8QCtobg&s=YaNfZ9p3UFUpKIRC6lYgQbHKT2Ihy2Oq3Xr8FgU0Skk&e=

Happy Nature Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.facebook.com_HiltonPond&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=OOSC62R1GjRmmtUI2Q-QNt__RoONGCnzqPpJ8QCtobg&s=qyKVJRTwqlHIisPPi09loflmN8MTK-ALDFC7rsJbKNU&e= for timely updates on nature topics,
and for info about hummingbirds at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.facebook.com_rubythroats&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=OOSC62R1GjRmmtUI2Q-QNt__RoONGCnzqPpJ8QCtobg&s=4AaheoVKJjM7iS7wZTSDCm6PlxGNjfCM_yX4JieMYJg&e=

Follow us on Twitter @hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and education for students of all ages.

"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the sunset." BHjr.

============


 

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Date: 4/13/18 5:59 am
From: Bonnie/Tom <bks1956...>
Subject: Re: FOS birds in McDowell County



We had our first of season Red-eyed and Yellow-throated Vireos and Hooded Warbler today. The first Wormeating Warbler arrived yesterday. We're in southwestern McDowell County, near the Buncombe County line. Bonnie Simmons
Tom Pericak
Old Fort NC





 

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Date: 4/13/18 2:23 am
From: Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Carolina birders took notes for 150 years. Many of the species they saw are gone. http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/local/article208684944.html
I look forward to the book and am glad to see it mentions the MBTA. It would be nice to see similar with regard to birds protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act in NC and SC reported to Carolinabirds to use as advocacy. SC’s Congressman, Jeff Duncan, is a leader of the fight against the MBTA. See this link from Audubon:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.audubon.org_news_bird-2Dkiller-2Damendment-2Dinfects-2Dappropriations-2Dbill&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=SOhBege8lMY3deYbzDhrRjBm6cRHUy5_ihBZSrpB-Sg&s=8ZUvq8A8NH6xTI3_u3GGvJ-0kZSzINR_k3eQswVW-Lo&e=

Parkin Hunter
Columbia, SC
Garden City Beach, Georgetown County, SC




Sent from my iPad

> On Apr 13, 2018, at 2:54 AM, lee van malssen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Carolina birders took notes for 150 years. Many of the species they saw are gone.
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.charlotteobserver.com_news_local_article208684944.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=SOhBege8lMY3deYbzDhrRjBm6cRHUy5_ihBZSrpB-Sg&s=BkUfOEodnMo4kfkVdi9scF8Zc3qOfDWoGogCvZU-myQ&e=
>
> Although the article is referencing central piedmont counties thought others may find interesting. The Mecklenburg Audubon is publishing a book based on field notes on birds seen in 14 Piedmont Counties. Publication date is May.
>
> Lee Van Malssen
> Chatham county

 

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Date: 4/12/18 11:55 pm
From: lee van malssen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Carolina birders took notes for 150 years. Many of the species they saw are gone. http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/local/article208684944.html
Carolina birders took notes for 150 years. Many of the species they saw are
gone.
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.charlotteobserver.com_news_local_article208684944.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=VL4BUbmtW1Dvm6l4G1gggUOd8vb9vePm_eyQCj9fD80&s=88ahH-SsvKeLJxsuaR6mADw1Fvi252wPSrCMCXgNnJk&e=

Although the article is referencing central piedmont counties thought
others may find interesting. The Mecklenburg Audubon is publishing a book
based on field notes on birds seen in 14 Piedmont Counties. Publication
date is May.

Lee Van Malssen
Chatham county

 

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Date: 4/12/18 6:02 pm
From: EASTMAN, CAROLINE <EASTMAN...>
Subject: RE: Still No Say’s Phoebe (1:00 PM)
Say's Phoebes apparently do not often hang around in SC. I have tried over the years to relocate a few SC strays without success, including one in Congaree NP that didn't even hang around for the afternoon. Robin and I looked for one in the Townville area Christmas Day one year. No bird. But we did have a nice Christmas dinner in a Hooter's that transformed itself into a family restaurant for the day. Maybe one will show up in my yard. After years of looking for reported Varied Thrushes, two showed up in my yard for a brief visit one snowy morning.

Caroline Eastman
Columbia, SC
________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> [<carolinabirds-request...>] on behalf of Kevin Kubach [<carolinabirds...>]
Sent: Thursday, April 12, 2018 1:03 PM
To: Carolina Birds; Len Kopka <lenkopka...> [gcbirdclub]
Subject: Still No Says Phoebe (1:00 PM)

Good Afternoon. Several birders have stopped by today and (to my knowledge) no one has seen the Say's Phoebe thus far.

Kevin Kubach
Clemson, SC



On Thu, Apr 12, 2018 at 7:24 AM, Kevin Kubach <kmkubach...><mailto:<kmkubach...>> wrote:
Good Morning. An initial scan of the fence and nearby area just now did not reveal the Says Phoebe this morning, but maybe its waiting for the sun to come up and bugs to get active?

Kevin Kubach
Clemson, SC

On Apr 11, 2018, at 5:42 PM, Kevin Kubach <kmkubach...><mailto:<kmkubach...>> wrote:

Good afternoon. A Says Phoebe was seen at the Clemson/SCDNR Cherry Farm today around noon, and the bird was again seen flycatching from the barbed wire fence into late afternoon.

Location details in checklist linked below:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist-3FsubID-3DS44469295&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=wPdcVRJInPWl4gsvR7SCTFbW2gXRXw1zmwnrsTLCHgI&s=JeonpI3at-3Gifv8oXOXC2OS25O8QW1mlIiP4didLSc&e=<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist-3FsubID-3DS44469295&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=gTEks9IifwU_HQvvDYpc2MSiIRT-WRtHqHTWQNJOVp0&s=bOXgyKoOmpu2LKUCAXZSe7EIRyUu2e58mPOeacZT_vY&e=>

Kevin Kubach
Greenville/Clemson, SC


 

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Date: 4/12/18 1:03 pm
From: Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: No Say’s Phoebe
Blayne and I were joined by two other birders hunting for the Phoebe. We were here from 1:40 pm until 3:50pm. We Checked all around including the area where it was seen yesterday. We had no luck. It may have moved on.

Anne Olsen
From Clemson, Cherry Farm research area


Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 4/12/18 1:00 pm
From: Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Still No Say’s Phoebe (1:00 PM)
,

Sent from my iPad

> On Apr 12, 2018, at 1:29 PM, Kevin Kubach <kmkubach...> wrote:
>
> Anne,
>
> I apologize for the delayed response. I've had a lot of e-mails and many have gotten lost in the shuffle. You can park anywhere alongside Hopewell Road (north side of the field / fence: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__goo.gl_maps_sEK9fohTF5t&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=H-NLinDfdVQ7Hi5enN8EL9NaaTgMfIWTUB_LxL_Zjo4&s=YGSLudZg-VRu3xDWKy00ygo6Zv4O9xOomzmvqq4ZaX8&e=) or at the SCDNR office at the end of Natural Resources Drive and walk back over to the field. The marker and coordinates I included in my eBird list were essentially right where the bird was hanging out yesterday (as well as other parts of the fence, which can be easily scanned with bino or scope).
>
> Kevin
>
>
>> On Thu, Apr 12, 2018 at 1:20 PM, Anne Olsen <olsena187...> wrote:
>> We are heading to Cherry Farm to try for the Phoebe. I emailed earlier for details. Will be there soon. What about parking? Is it clearly marked?
>> Anne Olsen
>> Cornelius NC
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
>>
>>> On Apr 12, 2018, at 1:03 PM, Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Good Afternoon. Several birders have stopped by today and (to my knowledge) no one has seen the Say's Phoebe thus far.
>>>
>>> Kevin Kubach
>>> Clemson, SC
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>> On Thu, Apr 12, 2018 at 7:24 AM, Kevin Kubach <kmkubach...> wrote:
>>>> Good Morning. An initial scan of the fence and nearby area just now did not reveal the Say’s Phoebe this morning, but maybe it’s waiting for the sun to come up and bugs to get active?
>>>>
>>>> Kevin Kubach
>>>> Clemson, SC
>>>>
>>>>> On Apr 11, 2018, at 5:42 PM, Kevin Kubach <kmkubach...> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> Good afternoon. A Say’s Phoebe was seen at the Clemson/SCDNR “Cherry Farm” today around noon, and the bird was again seen flycatching from the barbed wire fence into late afternoon.
>>>>>
>>>>> Location details in checklist linked below:
>>>>>
>>>>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist-3FsubID-3DS44469295&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=H-NLinDfdVQ7Hi5enN8EL9NaaTgMfIWTUB_LxL_Zjo4&s=DOoTOsSv-BBRusKIhOd7xvMAOvN3HPJgjhYE78vwI3Y&e=
>>>>>
>>>>> Kevin Kubach
>>>>> Greenville/Clemson, SC
>>>
>

 

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Date: 4/12/18 10:04 am
From: Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Still No Say’s Phoebe (1:00 PM)
Good Afternoon. Several birders have stopped by today and (to my knowledge)
no one has seen the Say's Phoebe thus far.

Kevin Kubach
Clemson, SC



On Thu, Apr 12, 2018 at 7:24 AM, Kevin Kubach <kmkubach...> wrote:

> Good Morning. An initial scan of the fence and nearby area just now did
> not reveal the Say’s Phoebe this morning, but maybe it’s waiting for the
> sun to come up and bugs to get active?
>
> Kevin Kubach
> Clemson, SC
>
> On Apr 11, 2018, at 5:42 PM, Kevin Kubach <kmkubach...> wrote:
>
> Good afternoon. A Say’s Phoebe was seen at the Clemson/SCDNR “Cherry Farm”
> today around noon, and the bird was again seen flycatching from the barbed
> wire fence into late afternoon.
>
> Location details in checklist linked below:
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist-3FsubID-3DS44469295&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=gTEks9IifwU_HQvvDYpc2MSiIRT-WRtHqHTWQNJOVp0&s=bOXgyKoOmpu2LKUCAXZSe7EIRyUu2e58mPOeacZT_vY&e=
>
> Kevin Kubach
> Greenville/Clemson, SC
>
>

 

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Date: 4/12/18 9:47 am
From: Don Crutchfield <dcrutchfield...>
Subject: Hummingbird
Have 2 male Hummingbirds at my feeder starting Monday March 9, 2018



Don Crutchfield

Chesterfield SC 29709

Chesterfield County SC








 

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Date: 4/12/18 9:02 am
From: Thomas Krakauer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: First Hummingbird
I currently live a Croasdaile Retirement Community in N. Durham County

This morning I saw my first Male Ruby-throated Hummingbird at my feeder on my patio. Filled the feeder on Sunday.

Tom Krakauer
2600 Croasdaile Farm Pkwy, Durham 27705


Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 4/12/18 4:25 am
From: Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Morning scan - No Say’s Phoebe
Good Morning. An initial scan of the fence and nearby area just now did not reveal the Say’s Phoebe this morning, but maybe it’s waiting for the sun to come up and bugs to get active?

Kevin Kubach
Clemson, SC

> On Apr 11, 2018, at 5:42 PM, Kevin Kubach <kmkubach...> wrote:
>
> Good afternoon. A Say’s Phoebe was seen at the Clemson/SCDNR “Cherry Farm” today around noon, and the bird was again seen flycatching from the barbed wire fence into late afternoon.
>
> Location details in checklist linked below:
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist-3FsubID-3DS44469295&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Z-HQLVqSJbmh4irX_7jDKQwhmdkAa4ylSZNk3WbKcoc&s=RXw6IG2NvQEW8S2hEcn6_ywEMqQEPFf6ggfrNlUqk6g&e=
>
> Kevin Kubach
> Greenville/Clemson, SC

 

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Date: 4/11/18 3:55 pm
From: jcox3222 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Say’s phoebe
I just relocated the Say’s phoebe reported on eBird earlier by Kevin Kobach at Clemson Cherry Farm facility.

Light gray back and wings, black tail, pale orange-rufus belly, flanks and under tail coverts. Pale wing bars. Hawking insects from barbed wire fence. Pumped tail when alighting but otherwise only occasionally. First seen with eastern phoebe for good comparison.

I just happened to be in Clemson for a geology continuing ed field trip and technical presentations and saw Kevin Kubach’s rare bird report and found the bird easily.
John Cox
Mount Pleasant, SC

Sent from XFINITY Connect Mobile App

 

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Date: 4/11/18 2:42 pm
From: Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Say’s Phoebe - Clemson, SC
Good afternoon. A Say’s Phoebe was seen at the Clemson/SCDNR “Cherry Farm” today around noon, and the bird was again seen flycatching from the barbed wire fence into late afternoon.

Location details in checklist linked below:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist-3FsubID-3DS44469295&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=zu7q085qsLnXzOi2PGuA5Pie3Zkf42T1emZDSN797C4&s=Mzgi5p6IDxLGZF8rKJCW9p50mcXHLnX5_C6C1nnd5Oo&e=

Kevin Kubach
Greenville/Clemson, SC
 

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Date: 4/11/18 1:47 pm
From: Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Vesper Sparrow and Worm-eating Warbler at Clark's Creek
This morning I saw a Vesper Sparrow and a Worm-eating Warbler at Clark's
Creek Nature Preserve. I went back this afternoon with Blayne and his
camera. We were about to give up re-finding the Vesper Sparrow when we saw
it with other sparrows on the path by the hedge row. A link to my eBird
list with the picture is below.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S44471765&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=yEpgkpuDhwLQfTCnBOTbq31_WQjJl2GALkzmUDfYMWg&s=ysKu2WGE2DmCdT3XWmMQSpcSDYMW5yDU13J5FiuDhjc&e=


Anne Olsen
Cornelius NC

 

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Date: 4/11/18 9:07 am
From: Marilyn Westphal <mjwestph...>
Subject: Arrivals
After all this cold and clammy weather we're finally getting some decent
weather and some new arrivals. Mark and I went to Big Hungry River-Green
River Gamelands this morning and had ten species of warbler including
Louisiana Waterthrush, Black-and-white, Common Yellowthroat, Hooded (FOY
for us) Northern Parula, Pine, Yellow-rumped, Yellow-throated, Prairie (FOY
for us), and Black-throated Green. Nice morning! Still plenty more to
come. This week should be a good one for more arrivals.
Marilyn

--
Marilyn Westphal
Hendersonville, NC

 

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Date: 4/10/18 10:30 am
From: Aaron Steed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: White-winged Scoter, Lake Julian, Asheville
There’s currently a White-winged Scoter at Lake Julian, looking like a
first year bird. All dark, almost no distinctive markings visible (except
for a very small amount of white on the cheek) until it flaps its wings,
revealing the white secondaries.

Currently diving fairly far out (but visible with scope), in front of the
power plant as seen from the park. Too far for a decent photo.

Also 4 Lesser Scaup and a Blue-winged Teal.

Aaron Steed
Ventures Birding Tours
Asheville, NC
--
Aaron Steed
Ventures Birding Tours
Asheville, NC

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=7b781Pi8ohvCICDSRHtsRjDm_vVl9bGTmyrmtBJPmG0&s=a0mdFGws_Sg2jYAi9tHZsaWyMjuQ9n_7JdT4jGB96Ww&e=

 

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Date: 4/10/18 8:36 am
From: Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Great Horned Owl fledglings at Anderson Point Park, Wake Co, NC
The Wake Audubon birdwalk today (April 10, 2018) was at Anderson Point
Park. Despite traffic noise, the cold cloudy conditions, and the
strong stench of sewage near the river, we enjoyed the walk, for we
found FOUR GREAT HORNED OWLS !
One of us spotted the older GHOW fledgling sitting in a pine tree near
bridge 256 (the huge bridge that crosses Crabtree Creek near the
Point, part of the Neuse River Greenway). The young owl was sitting
on the Neuse side of the bridge, near the west end of the bridge, in a
pine tree that is over the dirt trail that leads to the Anderson
Point. We MUST have walked directly below this owl without seeing it
when we walked out to the Point. It was (almost) easy to spot from the
ramp leading up to the bridge (looked like a football in the tree.
At about 9:30 am, two American Crows arrived to harass the owl, and
that's when the other three GHOW appeared: two adults and a younger
fledgling! These adults defended those young. We also noted what is
probably the GHOW nest, in a pine tree with one trunk that splits into
two trunks high up. This was just a few yards from the young owls.
You might see these Great Horned Owls if you head over to Anderson
Point Park in the next day or two (Anderson Point Drive, Raleigh, Wake
County, NC). Walk the paved greenway east towards the big bridge that
crosses near the Point (where Crabtree Creek merges with Neuse River).
NOTE: Get ready for a very strong smell from what must be spilled
sewage, however. I may have to call the town to ask about that. Sewage
odors have been a recurring problem, but it's never been that bad
before.

Here is our ebird checklist with two owl photos (so far)
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S44427716&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=9Wug9M7B7d99XPFnrbEz1IjOrmWtycTy4-zn-iyVLH0&s=fLzjq_WI7RdzQqer3kDog59q13fN_Ndm65uJrv9KaKs&e=
(Better photos will be added later)

There is also a GHOW nest at Wilkerson Preserve (Raven Ridge Road,
Raleigh, Wake County NC), which is easier to see than these birds. It
is in the pine tree above the restrooms. There are two young in that
nest. You might want to try both sites. Note that the owls are still
in the nest at Wilkerson, while these young owls at Anderson are quite
a bit older - able to fly short distances and trading their down for
feathers.
Good birding to you!
Lynn Erla Beegle
Raleigh NC
465 days of birding.... can't stop now!
 

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Date: 4/9/18 1:01 pm
From: \Herbert, Teri Lynn\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: New short film from Folly Lama
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__vimeo.com_252245287&d=DwIGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=B4ns5C4p5S7ccTvslMBECfjnOQse1Z7rCuJBJMG-QMc&s=iY_q2LWxrvv9UKlbl_PydYZU_cnlDAB9THe26Kw0Ds0&e=

Called Fog Day; 3 minutes, the bird parts are great! Folly Beach, SC

Teri Lynn




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This message was secured via TLS by MUSC.

 

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Date: 4/9/18 12:53 pm
From: Carol Chelette (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hawks mating
Yesterday a male and female red-shouldered hawk copulated on top of one of
our feeders. Isn't that a bit late for hawk breeding (or were they just
having fun!)?

Carol Chelette
Durham, NC

 

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Date: 4/9/18 10:04 am
From: Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: today near Hillsborough, NC
Heard red-eyed vireo, blue-grey gnatcatchers, saw Louisiana waterthrush
pair, house finches and tufted titmouse pair breeding. Thought I had a
great crested flycatcher but it was a no mockingbird imitating one, ha ha,
he got me.

--
Helen Kalevas
Near Hillsborough, NC


<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.avg.com_email-2Dsignature-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=n97oS83KhRH6AmcWpQgTqBtVqbHlUdgjt5IhtDEGFn0&s=1RGIH_tydgqCu0yiKHsRQbb_y6h7_fTLSM4B6rYloz4&e=>
Virus-free.
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<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>

 

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Date: 4/8/18 4:47 pm
From: Stephen Thomas <rubberhead...>
Subject: Re: Duckhunting.com vs Carolinabirds


I understand and have always tried, very hard, to abide by the rules of Carolinabirds and I will continue to do so in this reply and all future posts on the Carolinabird list serv.



I am passionate about both birding and duck hunting. I hope, at 53, I fit Frank’s description of “rather young.” Regardless, I agree with Frank.



I will say from hanging around with both groups and being somewhat active in both on-line communities, birders can stand to learn a lot from hunters.



Hunters, because of the money they inject into the process, are very objective and data driven. Waterfowl seasons and limits are based annually on very expensive and thorough surveys with data run through very complicated formulas. Google “adaptive harvest management” if you want to know more. Most hunters don’t understand all the math but they know, in general, how the principles apply and affect what they do.



Hunters are much more pragmatic about the world around them than birders. They function very well in the “gray” areas and are not nearly, on average, as absolute or dogmatic about things as birders.



Hunters are much more accepting of others than birders. (I bet almost everyone who read this far just gasped at the idea.) Everyone on the “duck sites” knows I am a birder. It doesn’t bother them one bit. I can and often times do discuss birding on the hunting sites while hunting is a regulated to rarely discussed topic on a birding site. Please don’t respond with a list of reasons why this is – I get it, believe me.




Birders and non-game birds benefit from all the public and private land that is set aside and managed for hunting. The land and monies are there either directly from hunters, indirectly from excise taxes or legislatively dictated from the well-coordinated lobby effort of the hunting community. It's hard to get 10 birders to agree on anything...




But, in the end, hunters and birders want exactly the same thing – a sky full of birds.


From: "Frank Enders" <fkenders...>
To: "carolinabirds" <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Saturday, April 7, 2018 11:49:14 AM
Subject: Duckhunting.com vs Carolinabirds



Reading more on the internet than just Carolinabirds (when my poor internet connection and my other tasks permit), I found Duckhunting.com (re Buckhorn Reservoir). Seems the duckhunting community is rather young and "male", dissing the Bernie crowd, sort of like the negative responses I got for attempting to get those in the know to discuss sexual harrassment of birders by birding people.

Reading the duckhunting website helped give me some perspective on "you guys". People boasting about killing more ducks than other hunters. Twitchers boasting about their finds. (All OK.)




Reminds me of what I find lacking in both Farm Bureau and Audubon. Hardly objective. Not I, nor they.




The duck hunters discuss their issues and the birders discuss theirs. Both wrong and both right. Not driven by data.




For example, Derb Carter gets dissed and threatened on lots of blogs, re Red Wolf, for example.




But, that does not make him right when he relates poor waterbird productivity on the Outer Banks to less restriction on motorized traffic on the beaches.




Where's the data? I would, for the sake of his argument, allow the birds are doing worse.





Consider the fact that Nag's Head town hired a trapper who took out 17 (?) coyotes (and PETA protested, saying we should instead drop the coyotes off in a different neighborhood). The coyotes were roaming the beaches; the hunter said they just used the beaches to move up and down the coastline. And, now the internet states Dare Count was the last NC county to be invaded by coyotes, and now these "dogs" are all the way to Hatteras.

OOPS. Do I need data to remember that coyotes are major predators on sea turtle nests in Central and South America? Do I need data to make the assertion that if I were a coyote and walked up and down the beach that I would clean up Piping Plovers, Oystercatchers and skimmers?




Then, jumping to the (improbable?) conclusion that coyotes are very likely part of the bad news for our birds (though, hopefully, they might reduce the numbers of raccoons, another species that is very bird-friendly), there are any number of greater stretches:

if the birds cannot make it with coyotes, then just let the ORVs have the entire beach. End of problem.




Or, if the WRC says one cannot remove coyotes after February, maybe we need some better administration of the WRC. I mean, the coyotes were checked for Red Wolf blood, and island Dare County almost certainly lacks Red Wolves (which obviously are fully ready, willing and able to hybridize with coyotes). Talk about mismanaged bureaucracy.

(I believe we need bureaucracy, better than systems where bribery and nepotism are prime movers, but somebody needs to get everybody together to eradicate coyotes from the Outer Banks islands, just as somebody needs to get a move on to slow down and eradicate pythons in Florida. Maybe SELC could start some lawsuits---I know they exclude Florida from their purview, but do we have to wait for breeing pythons in Georgia and Alabama?) (Personally, I favor eradicating ORVs from beaches, at least in springtime.)




What are we to do, if everybody is right and everybody is wrong?




Might talk about it and stop taking offence.




More on WRC in next post.



















One could as well relate the poor productivity of those waterbirds to this item: Nags Head trapped out







Frank Enders, Halifax, NC


 

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Date: 4/8/18 3:24 pm
From: Jeff Eichinger (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: FOS Hummer
Yep, saw our first one today too, near Burlington. Good looking male.
Jeff Eichinger

On Sun, Apr 8, 2018 at 8:14 AM, Chris Wilson <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Had one at our feeder in Hendersonville this morning. Possibly sooner, we
> were out of town for last several days - Chris
>
> On Sun, Apr 8, 2018 at 7:08 AM, Rob G <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
>>
>> Wooohooo... hummer feeder fluid has been going down for a week, so not
>> sure how long any may have been stopping by, but finally saw my first
>> hummer this morning just before 7am in west Carrboro (near Hwy
>> 54). (earliest I've ever seen one here)
>>
>>
>> -- Rob Gluck.... Carrboro, NC.....
>>
>>
>
>
> --
>
> -----
> Chris Wilson
> <critterfro...>
> 828-772-9007 - mobile/ txt
>
>

 

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Date: 4/8/18 3:07 pm
From: Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Great Crested FC and Purple Martin's - outer banks
Good Evening,

Thought it was worth mentioning that Great Crested Flycatchers and Purple
Martins have returned to Southern Shores, NC on the Outer Banks. Also,
there are plenty of Blue-Grey Gnatcatchers to be heard and found.

Have fun birding,

Jim Gould
Southern Shores, NC

Sent from my mobile device.

 

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Date: 4/8/18 10:36 am
From: Sharyn Caudell <scaudell...>
Subject: Male Scarlett tanager
Seen this am in my backyard at a suet feeder. Durham, NC.  All my photos
are too many KB to post here( limit is 100KB)

Sharyn


 

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Date: 4/8/18 5:14 am
From: Chris Wilson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: FOS Hummer
Had one at our feeder in Hendersonville this morning. Possibly sooner, we
were out of town for last several days - Chris

On Sun, Apr 8, 2018 at 7:08 AM, Rob G <carolinabirds...> wrote:

>
> Wooohooo... hummer feeder fluid has been going down for a week, so not
> sure how long any may have been stopping by, but finally saw my first
> hummer this morning just before 7am in west Carrboro (near Hwy
> 54). (earliest I've ever seen one here)
>
>
> -- Rob Gluck.... Carrboro, NC.....
>
>


--

-----
Chris Wilson
<critterfro...>
828-772-9007 - mobile/ txt

 

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Date: 4/8/18 4:09 am
From: Rob G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: FOS Hummer

Wooohooo... hummer feeder fluid has been going down for a week, so not sure how long any may have been stopping by, but finally saw my first hummer this morning just before 7am in west Carrboro (near Hwy 54). (earliest I've ever seen one here)


-- Rob Gluck.... Carrboro, NC.....


 

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Date: 4/7/18 3:51 pm
From: Lisa Hayes (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Southern California
My husband and I are traveling to CA at the end of May. This is
vacation/visiting family, but I hope to spend a decent amount of time
birding. Specifically, we will be in San Diego (but only a couple of days),
Mission Bay area. Then LA, near Griffith Park for a few days, ending with a
few days at Yosemite NP at the beginning of June.

Any recommendations, insights, guide info etc would be greatly appreciated.
The only portion of the trip that is still wide open is Yosemite. I'm
trying to decide where to stay that won't cost a fortune. Two contenders
are Mariposa, with a focus on the western side of the park and Mono Lake
(may still be snowing) , with a focus on the Eastern side. We won't have
time for both. The plan is to fly back from LAX, but both locations are
about the same travel time as far as I can tell.

Advice??

Thanks in advance,
Lisa Hayes
Charleston, SC

 

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Date: 4/7/18 3:25 pm
From: Derb Carter <derbc...>
Subject: Palmetto Peartree Preserve
Management of PPP over the past 15 or so years has expanded the red-cockaded woodpecker population from 23 to 33 active clusters or potentially breeding groups. PPP is part of an "essential support population" for ultimate recovery of this endangered species. I would be glad to provide anyone interested copies of (1) the memorandum between NCDOT and USFWS providing for translocation of the woodpeckers from PPP but allowing NCDOT to retain the mitigation credits and (2) the memorandum between NCDOT and NCWRC providing for transfer of PPP to the WRC and specifically relieving the WRC of any responsibility to continue to manage PPP for woodpeckers. These are public documents obtained from NCDOT under the Public Records Act. I sent these directly to Frank so he can evaluate whether it is real or fake news.

PPP is on the NC Birding Trail and is a special place for birding in northeastern NC and I thought this would be of interest to birders on Carolinabirds. But this topic apparently hits a nerve with some so this will be my last post.

Derb Carter


>
> Management of PPP over the past 15 or so years has expanded the red-cockaded woodpecker population from 23 to 33 active clusters or potentially breeding groups. PPP is part of an "essential support population" for ultimate recovery of this endangered species. I would be glad to provide anyone interested copies of (1) the memorandum between NCDOT providing for translocation of the woodpeckers from PPP but allowing NCDOT to retain the mitigation credits and (2) the memorandum between NCDOT and NCWRC providing for transfer of PPP to the WRC and relieving the WRC of any responsibility to manage for the woodpeckers on PPP. These are public documents obtained under the Public Records Act. I sent these directly to Frank so he can evaluate whether it is real or fake news.
>
> PPP is on the NC Birding Trail and a special place for birding in northeastern NC and I thought it would of interest to subscribers on Carolinabirds. But this discussion apparently hits a nerve with some so this will be my last post.
>
> Derb Carter
>
>
 

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Date: 4/7/18 2:15 pm
From: Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Tripod question - Bogen 3130 head
Any of them should. All of those heads mount on the standard 3/8 stud. You should be able to put that on any set of sticks except for some really small cheesy tripods you don’t want to use. Even if it had a 1/4 inch stud, you could use a bushing to adapt it to the head. Anyhow, specs say it’s 3/8, so it’s turnkey.

Brian Patteson
Hatteras, NC

> On Apr 7, 2018, at 4:09 PM, Steve Shultz <sshultz...> wrote:
>
> I need to shave a few pounds off a full suitcase for a trip next week. Looking at replacing my aluminum tripod legs with carbon fiber. Does anyone know which Bogen/Manfrotto carbon fiber legs will mate to a Bogen 3130 head? I’m specifically looking at the Manfrotto 290XTRA. I need a working height of at least 65 inches.
>
> Many thanks!
>
> Steve Shultz
> Apex, NC


 

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Date: 4/7/18 1:18 pm
From: Steve Shultz <sshultz...>
Subject: Tripod question - Bogen 3130 head
I need to shave a few pounds off a full suitcase for a trip next week. Looking at replacing my aluminum tripod legs with carbon fiber. Does anyone know which Bogen/Manfrotto carbon fiber legs will mate to a Bogen 3130 head? I’m specifically looking at the Manfrotto 290XTRA. I need a working height of at least 65 inches.

Many thanks!

Steve Shultz
Apex, NC
 

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Date: 4/7/18 12:07 pm
From: John Ennis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Oops! Holly Shelter Lodge Road
Yesterday’s location

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 4/7/18 12:05 pm
From: John Ennis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Yesterday’s FOS
While on a butterflying trip yesterday, April 6, I saw my first Eastern Kingbird and Green Heron of spring...

Wind was pretty strong which seemed to impact the ‘flies so only FOS’s were Pearl Crescent & Easter Tiger Swallowtails including one dark form female...many black swallowtails sp...

John Ennis
Leland NC
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 4/7/18 11:32 am
From: Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: WRC, the bane of Red-cockaded Woodp?--bad news or fake in ENC
Frank,

I’m glad you brought this up. I have also been wondering about the purported deal to “remove” the Red-cockadoodles from P3. Presumably that would involve trapping them and relocating them to areas where the woodpeckers had been extirpated but the habitat has since progressed to the point it could sustain them with proper management. I know that these woodpeckers are doomed when the hardwoods get up to cavity height, and maybe WRC doesn’t want to deal with managing that. Just a thought and it could be wrong, but the understory problem was an issue up in SE VA which is not too far north as the woodpecker flies. I have not been up to the P3 for years and I don’t know how it’s looking or what sort of management has been done previously.

Brian Patteson
Hatteras, NC

> On Apr 7, 2018, at 12:40 PM, Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I do not think anybody commented on the allegation by Derb Carter of a backroom deal to remove Red-cockaded Woodpecker from Palmetto-Peartree.
>
> First of all, I have to sort of admire the idiot who killed off all the Red-cockadeds in some rich guy's timber in Florida. The owner of the timber first had to not cut the wood, and so he hired a killer to remove the woodpeckers, and then asked the FWS where are these woodpeckers? There do not seem to be any on my tract.
> I do not think I would be able to kill off a bunch of woodpeckers that fast and that well.
>
> Second of all, who is thinking here? The idea that the WRC would want to remove the woodpeckers from Palmetto-Peartree? That they would be able to kill them all off? DOES THIS MAKE ANY SENSE AT ALL?
>
> Was it not the WRC that stepped up to take care (hopefully of Henslow's Sp.) of the VOA site? Did anybody on Carolinabirds do anything to buy up that land and "save" it (and the population of sparrows)? I thought, but did not act.
> Again, nobody stepped up to take Palmetto-Peartree. BUT, the WRC did!
>
> I know I am somewhat crazy, but this makes no sense whatsoever.
>
> The Center for Conservation Biology at Wm and Mary did take 4 woodpeckers (in 2016?). But, come on, let us get realistic here. Removing those birds (chosen because they were teenagers ready to disperse anyway) and putting them carefully in the Dismal Swamp NWR is not a threat to the woodpecker species.
> Maybe what Derb Carter was talking about was that the WRC needed to get a permit to remove any Red-cockaded Woodpeckers, even for restoration of the bird to its original habitat/range.
>
> Again, I jump to conclusions, too, and stand (or sit, whatever) ready willing and needing to be corrected. We all make mistakes all the time. Things are complex. Good luck for conservation in ENC, and worldwide. We do need good luck. And, more discussion, rather than sarcasm (used by me, too).
>
> The comment by Derb Carter that the FIsh and WIldlife Service and the WRC fortunately still have the same old mission statements was sarcasm, and I was astounded to read one post stating that Derb's comments were not negative, snide and snarky. But, if I hired a lawyer, I would hope he would use some sarcasm, and be negative, snide and snarky, since, after all, our court system (like our binary political party system) is confrontational.
> Sometimes one has to go to court.
> At the same time, I am sure Derb Carter also tries nonconfrontational negotiation before going to court. He does not deserve the negative comments made about him, such, for example, that he is a rich, out-of-town, educated out-of-state lawyer, that the $80,000 he supposedly makes is his only motivation (which has been disputed by people who described the potential $150,000/year many or most lawyers make for efforts which probably are less beneficial to our country--which, last I heard, included our environment).
>
> My motivation is that I like to have things just so. Both right, and moral. Ain't happening.
>
> And I have heard the resentment of Hyde County residents about the effects of Red Wolf introduction, and the mismanagement of payments due for losses to Red Wolf (actually may be coyote) depredation. And I have read about the anger of (rich, out-of-town and out-of-state) people about ORV restrictions. (This also goes back to the case in Florida, where the government should have pre-emptively and promptly paid the landowner for his timber which the Red-cockadeds had invaded.)
>
> Then, the entire country got it, Trump elected on resentment.
>
> My hope is what one of my horrible/wonderful neighbors told me once. He said that we used to shoot all buzzards, but that we now do not. (Somehow it became non-u to kill them.) At first, I thought he was making this up, but in the decades that have since passed, it turned out true. (Even though Black Vultures really like to pull the rubber off vehicles, at Dutch Gap, VA, for example.)
> There is hope for gradual improvement of the general public's attitude toward crimes like shooting eagles, and assaulting women.
> {We will still have some oddballs like the guy who shot two Whooping Cranes in Florida, some years back, and finally was apprehended when he shot up a gas station using a slingshot. (?Why not just use firearms on people?--I guess in his mind people were more valuable than cranes.)]
>
> I say, let us all calm down.
> House Sparrows are not yet extinct, despite my mother warning me they would go extinct. (Probably she had good data---apparently Alfred Kinsey hated urban areas, especially all the House Sparrows in Hoboken, NJ where he grew up---eliminating horses did put a big dent in the sparrow's populations, and would lead people to follow the trendline to predict imminent extinction of the House Sparrow.)
>
>
>
>
> Frank Enders, Halifax, NC


 

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Date: 4/7/18 11:06 am
From: Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Back to Birds- Insult Free- Little Green Herons - Georgetown County, SC
Now, back to birds. The two Little Green Herons that have nested in my palmettos the last two years are reconnoitering my yard today.

Parkin Hunter
Garden City Beach, Georgetown County
Columbia, SC

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 4/7/18 9:41 am
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: WRC, the bane of Red-cockaded Woodp?--bad news or fake in ENC
I do not think anybody commented on the allegation by Derb Carter of a backroom deal to remove Red-cockaded Woodpecker from Palmetto-Peartree.


First of all, I have to sort of admire the idiot who killed off all the Red-cockadeds in some rich guy's timber in Florida. The owner of the timber first had to not cut the wood, and so he hired a killer to remove the woodpeckers, and then asked the FWS where are these woodpeckers? There do not seem to be any on my tract.

I do not think I would be able to kill off a bunch of woodpeckers that fast and that well.


Second of all, who is thinking here? The idea that the WRC would want to remove the woodpeckers from Palmetto-Peartree? That they would be able to kill them all off? DOES THIS MAKE ANY SENSE AT ALL?


Was it not the WRC that stepped up to take care (hopefully of Henslow's Sp.) of the VOA site? Did anybody on Carolinabirds do anything to buy up that land and "save" it (and the population of sparrows)? I thought, but did not act.

Again, nobody stepped up to take Palmetto-Peartree. BUT, the WRC did!


I know I am somewhat crazy, but this makes no sense whatsoever.


The Center for Conservation Biology at Wm and Mary did take 4 woodpeckers (in 2016?). But, come on, let us get realistic here. Removing those birds (chosen because they were teenagers ready to disperse anyway) and putting them carefully in the Dismal Swamp NWR is not a threat to the woodpecker species.

Maybe what Derb Carter was talking about was that the WRC needed to get a permit to remove any Red-cockaded Woodpeckers, even for restoration of the bird to its original habitat/range.


Again, I jump to conclusions, too, and stand (or sit, whatever) ready willing and needing to be corrected. We all make mistakes all the time. Things are complex. Good luck for conservation in ENC, and worldwide. We do need good luck. And, more discussion, rather than sarcasm (used by me, too).


The comment by Derb Carter that the FIsh and WIldlife Service and the WRC fortunately still have the same old mission statements was sarcasm, and I was astounded to read one post stating that Derb's comments were not negative, snide and snarky. But, if I hired a lawyer, I would hope he would use some sarcasm, and be negative, snide and snarky, since, after all, our court system (like our binary political party system) is confrontational.

Sometimes one has to go to court.

At the same time, I am sure Derb Carter also tries nonconfrontational negotiation before going to court. He does not deserve the negative comments made about him, such, for example, that he is a rich, out-of-town, educated out-of-state lawyer, that the $80,000 he supposedly makes is his only motivation (which has been disputed by people who described the potential $150,000/year many or most lawyers make for efforts which probably are less beneficial to our country--which, last I heard, included our environment).


My motivation is that I like to have things just so. Both right, and moral. Ain't happening.



And I have heard the resentment of Hyde County residents about the effects of Red Wolf introduction, and the mismanagement of payments due for losses to Red Wolf (actually may be coyote) depredation. And I have read about the anger of (rich, out-of-town and out-of-state) people about ORV restrictions. (This also goes back to the case in Florida, where the government should have pre-emptively and promptly paid the landowner for his timber which the Red-cockadeds had invaded.)


Then, the entire country got it, Trump elected on resentment.

My hope is what one of my horrible/wonderful neighbors told me once. He said that we used to shoot all buzzards, but that we now do not. (Somehow it became non-u to kill them.) At first, I thought he was making this up, but in the decades that have since passed, it turned out true. (Even though Black Vultures really like to pull the rubber off vehicles, at Dutch Gap, VA, for example.)
There is hope for gradual improvement of the general public's attitude toward crimes like shooting eagles, and assaulting women.
{We will still have some oddballs like the guy who shot two Whooping Cranes in Florida, some years back, and finally was apprehended when he shot up a gas station using a slingshot. (?Why not just use firearms on people?--I guess in his mind people were more valuable than cranes.)]

I say, let us all calm down.
House Sparrows are not yet extinct, despite my mother warning me they would go extinct. (Probably she had good data---apparently Alfred Kinsey hated urban areas, especially all the House Sparrows in Hoboken, NJ where he grew up---eliminating horses did put a big dent in the sparrow's populations, and would lead people to follow the trendline to predict imminent extinction of the House Sparrow.)




Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

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Date: 4/7/18 8:49 am
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Duckhunting.com vs Carolinabirds
Reading more on the internet than just Carolinabirds (when my poor internet connection and my other tasks permit), I found Duckhunting.com (re Buckhorn Reservoir). Seems the duckhunting community is rather young and "male", dissing the Bernie crowd, sort of like the negative responses I got for attempting to get those in the know to discuss sexual harrassment of birders by birding people.

Reading the duckhunting website helped give me some perspective on "you guys". People boasting about killing more ducks than other hunters. Twitchers boasting about their finds. (All OK.)


Reminds me of what I find lacking in both Farm Bureau and Audubon. Hardly objective. Not I, nor they.


The duck hunters discuss their issues and the birders discuss theirs. Both wrong and both right. Not driven by data.


For example, Derb Carter gets dissed and threatened on lots of blogs, re Red Wolf, for example.


But, that does not make him right when he relates poor waterbird productivity on the Outer Banks to less restriction on motorized traffic on the beaches.


Where's the data? I would, for the sake of his argument, allow the birds are doing worse.


Consider the fact that Nag's Head town hired a trapper who took out 17 (?) coyotes (and PETA protested, saying we should instead drop the coyotes off in a different neighborhood). The coyotes were roaming the beaches; the hunter said they just used the beaches to move up and down the coastline. And, now the internet states Dare Count was the last NC county to be invaded by coyotes, and now these "dogs" are all the way to Hatteras.

OOPS. Do I need data to remember that coyotes are major predators on sea turtle nests in Central and South America? Do I need data to make the assertion that if I were a coyote and walked up and down the beach that I would clean up Piping Plovers, Oystercatchers and skimmers?


Then, jumping to the (improbable?) conclusion that coyotes are very likely part of the bad news for our birds (though, hopefully, they might reduce the numbers of raccoons, another species that is very bird-friendly), there are any number of greater stretches:

if the birds cannot make it with coyotes, then just let the ORVs have the entire beach. End of problem.


Or, if the WRC says one cannot remove coyotes after February, maybe we need some better administration of the WRC. I mean, the coyotes were checked for Red Wolf blood, and island Dare County almost certainly lacks Red Wolves (which obviously are fully ready, willing and able to hybridize with coyotes). Talk about mismanaged bureaucracy.

(I believe we need bureaucracy, better than systems where bribery and nepotism are prime movers, but somebody needs to get everybody together to eradicate coyotes from the Outer Banks islands, just as somebody needs to get a move on to slow down and eradicate pythons in Florida. Maybe SELC could start some lawsuits---I know they exclude Florida from their purview, but do we have to wait for breeing pythons in Georgia and Alabama?) (Personally, I favor eradicating ORVs from beaches, at least in springtime.)


What are we to do, if everybody is right and everybody is wrong?


Might talk about it and stop taking offence.


More on WRC in next post.







One could as well relate the poor productivity of those waterbirds to this item: Nags Head trapped out






Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 4/7/18 7:54 am
From: Peter Vankevich (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Trumpeter Swan still on Ocracoke, April 6, 2018
The Trumpeter Swans remains on Ocracoke, seen yesterday afternoon, April 6,
2018. It is in a marshy area on the left side of the South Point Road as
you head to the beach. That sandy road requires a beach driving permit for
vehicles. Bikes are fine, and the walk is a couple hundred yards or so.
Easily seen, it is often in the back area and best observed with a scope.
It does also, at times, feed much closer to the road. It is very active. If
anyone wants additional info. or a quick update and I can scoot over, feel
free to contact me via Facebook or <petevankevich...> /Peter
Vankevich

 

Back to top
Date: 4/6/18 7:24 pm
From: David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 4/6/18 6:35 pm
From: Jane Morrow (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: finding a red-cockaded woodpecker near Wilmington
I have a cousin coming from Minnesota. Where are our best chances of
finding a red-cockaded woodpecker in the Wilmington area?

Thanks for any insights-
-Jane

 

Back to top
Date: 4/6/18 3:14 pm
From: Alan Gamache <bird...>
Subject: Summer Tanager / New Bern, NC
Just sat down at my desk, looked out the window at my feeding station ( 6:07 p.m.) and there perched a female Summer Tanager for about ten seconds.

Al Gamache
 

Back to top
Date: 4/6/18 7:11 am
From: susan <susan...>
Subject: Good news from Weymouth Woods
All, 
I am pleased to report that we have at least three male Bachman's Sparrows on territories here at Weymouth Woods SNP now.
Being back on track with our prescribed burning has clearly gotten the birds' attention!
Woo hoo!!
Suan CampbellSouthern Pines, NC
Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.



 

Back to top
Date: 4/5/18 12:28 pm
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: HCAS Brookshire Park Walk Saturday 8AM
High Country Audubon's monthly Brookshire Park walk is this Saturday at
8AM. We meet at the restrooms/picnic shelter in the main parking lot at
8AM. Brookshire Park is on Brookshire Road off 421 just east of Boone in
the New River floodplain.

The walk is free and open to the public.

Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 4/5/18 4:21 am
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Am. White Pelicans-Davidson Co., NC-04/02/2018
50-52 pelicans at spot 4/4/18 1:30 PM. Some partially hidden in white-washed rocks to west; most floating near outfall from High Rock Lake. One chased cormaorant (200 corms present). No herons seen, one osprey. Only 5 Ring-billed Gulls.





Frank Enders, Halifax, NC
________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Mike Turner <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Monday, April 2, 2018 4:46:13 PM
To: Carolinabirds
Subject: Am. White Pelicans-Davidson Co., NC-04/02/2018

Today at Tuckertown Lake, just below the High Rock Dam, there were 47! Am. White Pelicans. They can be easily seen from the boat landing on Bringle Ferry Rd. or from the fishing area on the Rowan County side of the lake. Also of note were 4 Little Blue Herons also at the base of the dam. Good birding.

Mike Turner
Winston-Salem, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 4/4/18 5:53 pm
From: <susan...>
Subject: more from the Sandhills this evening
All--

Had multiple male hummers here at the farm this evening-- so hung
another feeder. And also spotted at least 3 Chimney Swifts overhead--
as well as heard a Whip-poor-will in the distance...

Wooo hooo!

Susan Campbell
Southern Pines, NC

 

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Date: 4/4/18 2:17 pm
From: Wendy Kaplan (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: FOS Ruby-throat
A brilliant adult male graced my back garden feeder a few minutes ago in the SouthPark area of Charlotte! The fun begins!
Such a joy!
Wendy

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Wendy Ross Kaplan
Charlotte, NC
<Wenbirdy...>

iPhone SE avoidance technology

"When elephants fight, it is the grass that suffers." - old African saying
 

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Date: 4/4/18 1:05 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Southport entrance to lake Crabtree
Sadly, it is not. You have to walk a trail down from the warehouse parking
area (behind 900 Aviation Parkway) to the lakeshore trail. There are
several ways to get to the viewing of the island/mudflat and the part of
the lake where Crabtree Creek enters it, but in each case -- there is no
paved trail.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Wed, Apr 4, 2018 at 3:57 PM, Cynthia Fox <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Is the Southport entrance to Lake Crabtree handicapped accessible? I have
> been asked but can’t respond with any knowledge. Maybe I just don’t
> understand the Southport part! Thanks for the input. There is a wonderful
> 94 yr old birder who wishes to go there. Cynthia Fox
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/4/18 12:58 pm
From: Cynthia Fox (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Southport entrance to lake Crabtree
Is the Southport entrance to Lake Crabtree handicapped accessible? I have been asked but can’t respond with any knowledge. Maybe I just don’t understand the Southport part! Thanks for the input. There is a wonderful 94 yr old birder who wishes to go there. Cynthia Fox

Sent from my iPad

 

Back to top
Date: 4/4/18 10:29 am
From: Clyde Smith (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: FOS Ruby-throated Hummingbird
I was eating lunch today, April 4, and watching out the kitchen window saw my first hummer of the new year. Unfortunately it took a quick flyby of the place where my feeder hung before our winter storms tore it down and kept on going. I got my feeder back up and am hoping for forgiveness of my oversight.

Clyde Smith
Raleigh, Wake County, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 4/4/18 7:06 am
From: <susan...>
Subject: Surprising feeder activity this morning
Morning All!

I was shocked to see a female Ruby-throated arrive at my window feeder a
little while ago- a good week ahead of schedule. She took a very long
drink suggesting that she had just arrived.

Then, just a couple minutes later, a male Indigo Bunting hopped onto my
seed feeder!

Wonder who the southerly breezes will bring to the farm next??!

Susan Campbell
Southern Pines, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 4/4/18 5:46 am
From: nicholas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Cattle Egrets, Pasquotank Co. NC, 4/3/18
Driving on Byp. US-17 west of Elizabeth City yesterday I noticed a lot of birds working a field behind a tractor adjacent to the pond just north of the Walmart off the Halstead exit. I turned around and checked out the group and noted 3 Cattle Egrets mixed in with the Ring-billed Gulls, along with a few Laughing, Herring, and Bonaparte's Gulls. Nearby a group of 25 yellowlegs was huddled near the pond edge. In the water was 60 Coots and 1 Ring-necked Duck.


Nick Flanders

Portsmouth, VA

 

Back to top
Date: 4/4/18 5:35 am
From: nicholas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: late report: warblers at Great Dismal Swamp NWR, Gates Co. NC (mostly), 3/29/18
Hey all, late report, but while working on March 29 in a portion of Great Dismal Swamp NWR mostly in Gates Co. NC that is closed to the public I tallied my FOS Ovenbird, Prairie Warbler, and Louisiana Waterthrush. Also good numbers of Yellow-throated Warblers and Black-and-white Warblers singing. The highlight for me was approximately 10 singing Black-throated Green Warblers. A few singing Rusty Blackbirds mixed in with the Grackle flocks.


Nick Flanders

Portsmouth, VA

 

Back to top
Date: 4/3/18 3:55 pm
From: Patsy Bailey (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Jordan Lake Spring Count
Count me in.


On Tuesday, April 3, 2018, 4:56:35 PM EDT, Norman Budnitz <carolinabirds...> wrote:

The Jordan Lake (NC) Spring Count will be May 6, 2018.  If you are interested in participating, please contact me.  If you are new to counting or new to the area, I may team you up with more experienced birders.

--
Norm Budnitz
Orange County
North Carolina
 

Back to top
Date: 4/3/18 3:54 pm
From: Derb Carter <derbc...>
Subject: Scottish birding guides
Stay at the Mount View Hotel in Nethy Bridge. Near both Atherton Forest and the Cairngorms. Heatherlea (dot co dot uk) birding tours is based there with great local guides, frequent tours, and day trip access to all the sites you want to go with a guide or on your own. I stayed there last spring and with information from the guides easily found all three targets, black grouse leks, Scottish crossbills, and five capercaillie (which are becoming quite rare). Can't go wrong there.

Derb Carter

 

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Date: 4/3/18 3:52 pm
From: Elizabeth Faison (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: spring!
I have two broad wing hawks weaving together above the hillside!


Elizabeth Faison
Boone, NC



 

Back to top
Date: 4/3/18 1:56 pm
From: Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Jordan Lake Spring Count
The Jordan Lake (NC) Spring Count will be May 6, 2018. If you are
interested in participating, please contact me. If you are new to counting
or new to the area, I may team you up with more experienced birders.

--
Norm Budnitz
Orange County
North Carolina

 

Back to top
Date: 4/3/18 12:10 pm
From: Thomas Driscoll (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bird guide wanted for Scotland
Hi Cynthia,
Victor Emmanuel Tours has a tour of Scotland that has birding in the morning and distilleries in the afternoon.  Always wanted to try that one ...
Short of that, Simon Thompson will know of someone i bet.
Take care,tom
tom driscoll
chapel hill, nc usa
<spttdrdshnk...>
Do something nice for Earth today and every day!

On Tuesday, April 3, 2018, 12:33:35 PM EDT, Cynthia Fox <carolinabirds...> wrote:

Does anyone have a contact for a guide in the Scottish highlands? Thanks.  Cynthia Fox 🦊

 

Back to top
Date: 4/3/18 12:04 pm
From: M Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: thank you for feedback on "likely Connecticut Warbler, Mt. Mitchell, NC"
Dear All,

Thank you for the feedback. I appreciate that this would be very early for
Connecticut Warbler, and that Connecticut Warblers are not a common bird
even at the right time and habitat in migration. I will talk with the
student and pass along your suggestions.

Matthew Campbell
Charleston, SC

On Tue, Apr 3, 2018 at 1:37 PM, Marilyn Westphal <mjwestph...>
wrote:

> It's actually highly unlikely to find any kind of warbler at Mt Mitchell
> on March 31, but since he/she was half way up it could have been one of the
> early arrivers, but as Steve said, CT Warblers are very late in the
> migratory chain of events and Nashville's wouldn't be here for a while yet
> either, so I don't know what it might be. Common Yellowthroats are just
> starting to arrive, but even that would be rare in Yancey County this
> early. So I don't know.
> Marilyn
>
> On Tue, Apr 3, 2018 at 12:04 PM, M Campbell <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> Hello,
>>
>> One of my students gave a good description of a warbler with extensive
>> yellow, gray head, and a white eye ring. The warbler was seen about 1pm on
>> Saturday March 31 as the student was halfway up on a climb of Mt. Mitchell.
>>
>>
>> Matthew Campbell
>> Charleston, SC
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Marilyn Westphal
> Hendersonville, NC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/3/18 10:37 am
From: Marilyn Westphal <mjwestph...>
Subject: Re: likely Connecticut Warbler, Mt. Mitchell, NC
It's actually highly unlikely to find any kind of warbler at Mt Mitchell on
March 31, but since he/she was half way up it could have been one of the
early arrivers, but as Steve said, CT Warblers are very late in the
migratory chain of events and Nashville's wouldn't be here for a while yet
either, so I don't know what it might be. Common Yellowthroats are just
starting to arrive, but even that would be rare in Yancey County this
early. So I don't know.
Marilyn

On Tue, Apr 3, 2018 at 12:04 PM, M Campbell <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Hello,
>
> One of my students gave a good description of a warbler with extensive
> yellow, gray head, and a white eye ring. The warbler was seen about 1pm on
> Saturday March 31 as the student was halfway up on a climb of Mt. Mitchell.
>
>
> Matthew Campbell
> Charleston, SC
>



--
Marilyn Westphal
Hendersonville, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 4/3/18 10:31 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: likely Connecticut Warbler, Mt. Mitchell, NC
My best guess is that the student saw a Blue-headed Vireo, from the side --
white eye ring, gray head, and the "extensive yellow" could be the flanks
of the bird as seen from the side.

Not only is Steve correct that Connecticut Warbler is a rare and very late
migrant -- typically from about May 5-25 -- but mountain birders will tell
you that our migrants like a Connecticut Warbler do not stop over in spring
at overly high elevations, like the spruce-fir zone. These are barren
grounds for migrants at this time of year, and only permanent residents,
winter residents, or newly arriving summer residents (like the vireo) are
present in the spruce-fir zone in spring. Migrating songbirds, in spring,
drop down into places that are heavily vegetated -- and that means they are
found in valleys and lower slopes, and mid-slopes later in May.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Tue, Apr 3, 2018 at 12:10 PM, "Shultz, Steven" <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Common Yellowthroat?
>
> Not saying that a CT could not happen, but they tend to be one of the
> latest warblers to migrate, not arriving until May, and being very rare
> even then. They “should” all be sending in another month’s rent for their
> winter homes at this point.
>
>
>
> Steve Shultz
>
> Apex, NC
>
>
>
> *From:* <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:carolinabirds-request@
> duke.edu] *On Behalf Of *M Campbell
> *Sent:* Tuesday, April 03, 2018 12:04 PM
> *To:* carolinabirds
> *Subject:* re: likely Connecticut Warbler, Mt. Mitchell, NC
>
>
>
> Hello,
>
>
>
> One of my students gave a good description of a warbler with extensive
> yellow, gray head, and a white eye ring. The warbler was seen about 1pm on
> Saturday March 31 as the student was halfway up on a climb of Mt. Mitchell.
>
>
>
>
>
> Matthew Campbell
>
> Charleston, SC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/3/18 10:07 am
From: Fred Burggraf (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Chuck-will's-widow in Murrells Inlet
Last night around midnight I stepped out onto my back porch and
heard--faintly but unmistakably--a calling Chuck. My home is in the
southern portion of Prince Creek development and the calling bird was to
the west---off towards the Waccamaw River and the NWR beyond it.

Fred Burggraf
Murrells Inlet
Georgetown County

 

Back to top
Date: 4/3/18 9:33 am
From: Cynthia Fox (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bird guide wanted for Scotland
Does anyone have a contact for a guide in the Scottish highlands? Thanks. Cynthia Fox 🦊

 

Back to top
Date: 4/3/18 9:11 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: likely Connecticut Warbler, Mt. Mitchell, NC
Common Yellowthroat?
Not saying that a CT could not happen, but they tend to be one of the latest warblers to migrate, not arriving until May, and being very rare even then. They “should” all be sending in another month’s rent for their winter homes at this point.

Steve Shultz
Apex, NC

From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of M Campbell
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 12:04 PM
To: carolinabirds
Subject: re: likely Connecticut Warbler, Mt. Mitchell, NC

Hello,

One of my students gave a good description of a warbler with extensive yellow, gray head, and a white eye ring. The warbler was seen about 1pm on Saturday March 31 as the student was halfway up on a climb of Mt. Mitchell.


Matthew Campbell
Charleston, SC
 

Back to top
Date: 4/3/18 9:04 am
From: M Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: re: likely Connecticut Warbler, Mt. Mitchell, NC
Hello,

One of my students gave a good description of a warbler with extensive
yellow, gray head, and a white eye ring. The warbler was seen about 1pm on
Saturday March 31 as the student was halfway up on a climb of Mt. Mitchell.


Matthew Campbell
Charleston, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 4/3/18 8:06 am
From: Robin T (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Wild turkeys
Spring love has come to the mountains.  Have a male wild turkey with a harem of 5 females displaying daily in our pasture. He thinks quite a lot of himself. 
Robin TingleyPisgah NF 3800' 

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android



 

Back to top
Date: 4/3/18 6:17 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Are limpkin unusual around lake Marion, SC?
Yes, great find! Worthy of a rare bird report to the SC records committee if you don't mind taking a few moments. Here's the link:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_brc_rare-5Fbird_&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=NfexQnrDuS1mKrTv9Z18ypnm0PF6t9DjV6nJAX3QGu4&s=f2vpXqj_18SqJpjGSZRUoJbgQX2UvDanu-Q9VkgTCuU&e=


Steve Shultz
Apex, NC


-----Original Message-----
From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Barry Scully
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 9:11 AM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Are limpkin unusual around lake Marion, SC?

Seen kayaking off sparkleberry landing on Sunday. I have pictures if this is a notable find.

Barry Scully

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 4/3/18 6:12 am
From: Barry Scully (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Are limpkin unusual around lake Marion, SC?
Seen kayaking off sparkleberry landing on Sunday. I have pictures if this is a notable find.

Barry Scully

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 4/3/18 6:10 am
From: Margaretta Yarborough (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bird apps
I've used iBird for many years, and it's continually improving. I'm still
on iBirdPlus, which is now $9.99 and absolutely worth it. (Had a problem
upgrading to Pro, thanks to various outdated phones, and haven't yet taken
the trouble to fix that.) There are multiple song recordings for each bird,
which now include the state location of each recording. The illustrations
are constantly improved (full-color, full-screen-sized, and field marks can
be toggled on and off); in addition, there are well-curated photos of the
birds in various life stages. The search features are quite specific and
useful. I also have the Sibley app.

This note to the latest upgrade is typical of the iBird product's detail: "...
completely updated for the 2017 American Ornithological Union (AOU)
Supplement. There are two new species; the Cassia Crossbill and the Sinaloa
Wren. The Thayer’s Gull has been lumped as a subspecies of the Iceland
Gull. Plus there are over 100 small changes..."

Plus, it builds strength of character not using the app's birdsong feature
to torment housecats. (Or birds, for that matter--the app also includes the
ABA Disclaimer on not stressing birds under observation, which should be
common sense--right under the recordings.)

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.birdwatching-2Dbliss.com_birding-2Dapps-2Dfor-2Diphone.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=bhjNZFfDljnv9gYXQB-PAQiXOnBlhMI6B5DY9AKvSSs&s=TXho7LWCTijkRHvSzrbS9Er522EGnWGJxnjcShoQ2Sg&e=

Margaretta Yarborough
Orange County, NC

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Sheryl McNair <sammcnair...>
To: Isabel Reddy <belreddy...>
Cc: <carolinabirds...>
Bcc:
Date: Mon, 2 Apr 2018 13:53:27 +0000 (UTC)
Subject: Re: Bird apps
Merlin is a great, free app. You just have to download the bird packs for
the various regions of the world. And now that Audubon has filled their app
up with so many bells & whistles, so that you can’t access a bird’s song or
description quickly, Merlin is much better. IBird is nice, but it costs &
doesn’t tell you where the songs are from, so they can be “off”,
location-wise.


Sheryl

On Sunday, April 1, 2018, 3:19 PM, Isabel Reddy <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

Hello,

Does anyone have a recommendation for a good bird ID app?

I liked the Nat’l Geo one, but w the upgrades I can no longer use it and I
haven’t found a new version of it.

Thank you,

Isabel Reddy
Chapel Hill

Sent from iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 4/2/18 4:46 pm
From: WALTER KENT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: hummers
Had 2 hummers on the feeder at 7:40 PM today.
Walt Kent
Lenoir N.C.

 

Back to top
Date: 4/2/18 3:19 pm
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Alligator Refuge birding
Went out on the Alligator Refuge Saturday morning, 31 March, and found a few unexpected birds: 2 Ovenbirds, about a dozen Prairie Warblers and a Northern Parula, all a little early. The next day, yesterday, I found a Prothonotary Warbler, the earliest date by almost a week - that I've ever seen one. Also present were plenty of Yellow-throated Warblers and Black-throated Greens, including a couple of females. Common Yellowthroats seemed to be present in low numbers, based on the lack of song. Also heard a couple of White-eyed Vireos.
Al Hooks and I had at least several Rusty Blackbirds, too, yesterday, but could only hear them in the dense Pocosin habitat.
Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 4/2/18 1:46 pm
From: Mike Turner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Am. White Pelicans-Davidson Co., NC-04/02/2018
Today at Tuckertown Lake, just below the High Rock Dam, there were 47! Am.
White Pelicans. They can be easily seen from the boat landing on Bringle
Ferry Rd. or from the fishing area on the Rowan County side of the lake.
Also of note were 4 Little Blue Herons also at the base of the dam. Good
birding.

Mike Turner
Winston-Salem, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 4/2/18 9:47 am
From: Edith Tatum (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Pileated
I just had my second sighted of a Pileated Woodpecker in my yard. This one was a male.
Edith Tatum
Durham, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 4/2/18 6:58 am
From: Sheryl McNair (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bird apps
Merlin is a great, free app. You just have to download the bird packs for the various regions of the world. And now that Audubon has filled their app up with so many bells & whistles, so that you can’t access a bird’s song or description quickly, Merlin is much better. IBird is nice, but it costs & doesn’t tell you where the songs are from, so they can be “off”, location-wise. 


Sheryl

On Sunday, April 1, 2018, 3:19 PM, Isabel Reddy <carolinabirds...> wrote:

Hello,
Does anyone have a recommendation for a good bird ID app?
I liked the Nat’l Geo one, but w the upgrades I can no longer use it and I haven’t found a new version of it.
Thank you,
Isabel Reddy Chapel Hill 

Sent from iPhone 
On Apr 1, 2018, at 3:14 PM, Jim Edwards <jim.edwards...> wrote:


Along with the usual suspects, Jane Chew and I had six Piping Plovers today on North Beach at Seabrook Island.  I couldn't see that any of them were banded.  We also had Wilson's Plover and eight Marbled Godwits.

Jim Edwards







 

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Date: 4/2/18 5:12 am
From: Lewis Burke (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Spring
We have had an interesting spring in Saluda County, sc. Ovenbird, La
waterthrushes, hooded, N parulas, Black snd white, yellow throated, and
pine are here. Still s few yellow rumps. A lone n waterthrush probably the
only migrant. Yellow throated and white eyed vireos are here. But no red
eyed. The whippoorwills have been here nearly a month but no chucks.
Ruby throateds been here for two weeks. An osprey is visiting and our
first green heron came this morning.
Lewis burke,
Warbler creek farm,
Ward, sc

 

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Date: 4/2/18 4:29 am
From: \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Spring arrivals in Halifax County, NC
Add FOS Yellow-throated Vireo and Yellow-throated Warbler to the morning list.

J. Merrill Lynch
Conservation Biologist
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 2, 2018, at 7:07 AM, J. Merrill Lynch <jmerrilllynch...> wrote:
>
> Birders,
>
> I had my FOS singing Ovenbird this morning—seems a tad early for it. Along with Louisiana Waterthrush, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, White-eyed Vireo, Eastern Whip-poor-Will, and Common Yellowthroat.
>
> Near Ringwood, Halifax Co. on the fall zone of the Piedmont/Coastal Plain.
>
> J. Merrill Lynch
> Conservation Biologist
> Echo Valley Farm
> Watauga County, NC
> Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 4/2/18 4:08 am
From: \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Spring arrivals in Halifax County, NC
Birders,

I had my FOS singing Ovenbird this morning—seems a tad early for it. Along with Louisiana Waterthrush, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, White-eyed Vireo, Eastern Whip-poor-Will, and Common Yellowthroat.

Near Ringwood, Halifax Co. on the fall zone of the Piedmont/Coastal Plain.

J. Merrill Lynch
Conservation Biologist
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 4/1/18 8:34 pm
From: Stephen Buczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: FOS Yellow-Throated Warbler in Duke Forest
A beautiful afternoon in the Korstain Division of Duke Forest on Saturday.
While walking along the New Hope Creek, I heard a familiar call and looked
high up in the yet mostly leafless canopy and spied my FOS brilliant
yellow-throated warbler!

Steve Buczynski
Durham, NC

 

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Date: 4/1/18 5:24 pm
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: Long-billed Curlew at east Shackleford Banks NC
Yesterday a Long-billed Curlew was photographed at east Shackleford Banks.
It's in an ebird report, but was labeled as a Whimbrel.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

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Date: 4/1/18 4:54 pm
From: Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: A. White Pelican -- Oxford Dam/ Riverbend Park
There is an American White Pelican hanging out around the base of Oxford
Dam(creates Lake Hickory) and the river in front of Riverbend Park. It was
diving for fish with Cormorants and Gulls. It was first reported to us on
Friday, but we didn't see it until this evening when it was spotted by
Monroe Pannell. It was last seen flying down river toward Lookout Shoals
Lake were it may be roosting.
--
Dwayne
*************
Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
<redxbill...>

 

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Date: 4/1/18 4:33 pm
From: John Bloomfield (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bird apps
You might look at the Sibley Birds app (at a price) or the brand new Audubon app (free) from the National Audubon Society.

John Bloomfield
NJ and Hilton Head Island


John


> On Apr 1, 2018, at 5:45 PM, Robert Williams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I like the Sibley e-guide to Birds of North America.
> Robert Williams
> Hickory, NC
>
>
>
>> On Sun, Apr 1, 2018 at 3:19 PM Isabel Reddy <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>> Hello,
>>
>> Does anyone have a recommendation for a good bird ID app?
>>
>> I liked the Nat’l Geo one, but w the upgrades I can no longer use it and I haven’t found a new version of it.
>>
>> Thank you,
>>
>> Isabel Reddy
>> Chapel Hill
>>
>> Sent from iPhone
>>
>>> On Apr 1, 2018, at 3:14 PM, Jim Edwards <jim.edwards...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Along with the usual suspects, Jane Chew and I had six Piping Plovers today on North Beach at Seabrook Island. I couldn't see that any of them were banded. We also had Wilson's Plover and eight Marbled Godwits.
>>>
>>> Jim Edwards
>>>
>>>

 

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Date: 4/1/18 3:46 pm
From: Robert Williams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bird apps
I like the Sibley e-guide to Birds of North America.
Robert Williams
Hickory, NC



On Sun, Apr 1, 2018 at 3:19 PM Isabel Reddy <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Hello,
>
> Does anyone have a recommendation for a good bird ID app?
>
> I liked the Nat’l Geo one, but w the upgrades I can no longer use it and I
> haven’t found a new version of it.
>
> Thank you,
>
> Isabel Reddy
> Chapel Hill
>
> Sent from iPhone
>
> On Apr 1, 2018, at 3:14 PM, Jim Edwards <jim.edwards...> wrote:
>
> Along with the usual suspects, Jane Chew and I had six Piping Plovers
> today on North Beach at Seabrook Island. I couldn't see that any of them
> were banded. We also had Wilson's Plover and eight Marbled Godwits.
>
> Jim Edwards
>
>
>

 

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Date: 4/1/18 3:33 pm
From: Krystyna 00 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bird apps
IBird Pro.

General info/graphics with field marks
Great details
Sounds
Similar birds
Birdpedia
Searches by common name, Latin name, band code (haven't had the opp.to try this)
Downloadable database for when you don't have cell or wireless
Inexpensive, I think it's now 14.99, highly rated.

Krys






Get Outlook for Android<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__aka.ms_ghei36&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=YfzstXoY9aPWS2n0xpBQeLU_37Ih4Wiu3oisSYcAeHU&s=N5iyOVmXpLJ7ZBxzbAk7FBoJV6ptJYgY2qXMwK9tGRg&e=>

________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Isabel Reddy <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Sunday, April 1, 2018 3:19:12 PM
To: I
Cc: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bird apps

Hello,

Does anyone have a recommendation for a good bird ID app?

I liked the Natl Geo one, but w the upgrades I can no longer use it and I havent found a new version of it.

Thank you,

Isabel Reddy
Chapel Hill

Sent from iPhone

On Apr 1, 2018, at 3:14 PM, Jim Edwards <jim.edwards...><mailto:<jim.edwards...>> wrote:

Along with the usual suspects, Jane Chew and I had six Piping Plovers today on North Beach at Seabrook Island. I couldn't see that any of them were banded. We also had Wilson's Plover and eight Marbled Godwits.

Jim Edwards



 

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Date: 4/1/18 12:19 pm
From: Isabel Reddy (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bird apps
Hello,

Does anyone have a recommendation for a good bird ID app?

I liked the Nat’l Geo one, but w the upgrades I can no longer use it and I haven’t found a new version of it.

Thank you,

Isabel Reddy
Chapel Hill

Sent from iPhone

> On Apr 1, 2018, at 3:14 PM, Jim Edwards <jim.edwards...> wrote:
>
> Along with the usual suspects, Jane Chew and I had six Piping Plovers today on North Beach at Seabrook Island. I couldn't see that any of them were banded. We also had Wilson's Plover and eight Marbled Godwits.
>
> Jim Edwards
>
>

 

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Date: 4/1/18 12:15 pm
From: Jim Edwards <jim.edwards...>
Subject: Piping Plovers at Seabrook Island (Charleston Co., SC)
Along with the usual suspects, Jane Chew and I had six Piping Plovers today
on North Beach at Seabrook Island. I couldn't see that any of them were
banded. We also had Wilson's Plover and eight Marbled Godwits.

Jim Edwards

 

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Date: 4/1/18 11:13 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Passing of Bob Simpson
Sadly, the great NC outdoors writer (weekly column in the Raleigh News &
Observer for several dozen years), originator of the Big Rock Blue Marlin
Tournament, and owner and operator of a charter fishing boat, passed away
at age 92 on March 28. He was probably the most famous outdoorsman along
the central NC coast, and he also received the Order of the Long Leaf Pine
award, the highest civilian honor the State of NC can bestow.

I met Bob a few times on Morehead City bird counts, though I certainly
didn't know him well in person. But, my reading of the Sunday paper wasn't
complete without learning about what Bob and friends had been up to in
Carteret and nearby counties in terms of nature watching. He often referred
to friends Gene Huntsman and John Fussell, with whom he spent much time in
the field.

Here is his obituary. Note that memorial donations may be made to the
Carteret County Wildlife Club -- certainly a very worthy cause for outdoors
interests.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.legacy.com_obituaries_newsobserver_obituary.aspx-3Fn-3Drobert-2Dsimpson-2Dbob-26pid-3D188616189-26fhid-3D6256&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=lOhwCwJIs_Ycs0WMRCnk1-u8oBMX-2KYLlFsYAR-bhU&s=kbwXIWh8_CEvHjcs2Hfe5m0n928NMDgW1c8GhMw4-bE&e=

 

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Date: 4/1/18 10:59 am
From: Cherrie Sneed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: GreatCormorant
Hi Birders,

Dan Sneed and I saw the Great Cormorant late this morning, April 1. There are some directions in the checklist for getting to the place where it was perched. A scope is helpful since it was on the SC side of the river almost to shore but was vowed from the GA side. I won’t get photos up until Tues., but they look like photos others have taken.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S44150657&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=o6NPGacsRiGWh_rWnA9TUP4ApAc5nkhkh20VidoGVM4&s=2sZ7F-dO8rPrEZzWtFvSw7zRacs2INzxEKVtG61l-Eo&e=

Cherrie Sneed
Meggett, SC
Charleston County
 

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Date: 4/1/18 6:35 am
From: Lester Coble (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Whip-poor-will
Calling this morning just north of New Bern.

On Sun, Apr 1, 2018 at 7:02 AM, "J. Merrill Lynch" <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Whip-poor-Wills also calling on 31 March near Ringwood, Halifax County, NC
> in the “fall zone” along the Piedmont-Coastal Plain border. Right on time.
>
> J. Merrill Lynch
> Conservation Biologist
> Echo Valley Farm
> Watauga County, NC
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Mar 31, 2018, at 10:15 PM, Marilyn Westphal <mjwestph...>
> wrote:
> >
> > Mark and I went up to Trace Ridge in the Pisgah Forest at North Mills
> River (Henderson County) and heard our first Whip-poor-will of the year.
> That's the earliest I've gotten them, but it was a full moon and that has
> been pretty much a slam dunk spot for the last few years at least. I
> recorded them (on ebird now) with one recording including a bird that
> landed on the road next to the car and was giving the quirt call.
> > Marilyn
> >
> > --
> > Marilyn Westphal
> > Hendersonville, NC
>

 

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Date: 4/1/18 4:02 am
From: \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Whip-poor-will
Whip-poor-Wills also calling on 31 March near Ringwood, Halifax County, NC in the “fall zone” along the Piedmont-Coastal Plain border. Right on time.

J. Merrill Lynch
Conservation Biologist
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 31, 2018, at 10:15 PM, Marilyn Westphal <mjwestph...> wrote:
>
> Mark and I went up to Trace Ridge in the Pisgah Forest at North Mills River (Henderson County) and heard our first Whip-poor-will of the year. That's the earliest I've gotten them, but it was a full moon and that has been pretty much a slam dunk spot for the last few years at least. I recorded them (on ebird now) with one recording including a bird that landed on the road next to the car and was giving the quirt call.
> Marilyn
>
> --
> Marilyn Westphal
> Hendersonville, NC
 

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Date: 3/31/18 7:15 pm
From: Marilyn Westphal <mjwestph...>
Subject: Whip-poor-will
Mark and I went up to Trace Ridge in the Pisgah Forest at North Mills River
(Henderson County) and heard our first Whip-poor-will of the year. That's
the earliest I've gotten them, but it was a full moon and that has been
pretty much a slam dunk spot for the last few years at least. I recorded
them (on ebird now) with one recording including a bird that landed on the
road next to the car and was giving the quirt call.
Marilyn

--
Marilyn Westphal
Hendersonville, NC

 

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Date: 3/31/18 3:17 pm
From: Steve <sshultz...>
Subject: Spring sprung in the Triangle
Finally seeing some signs of spring. Haw River this morning produced LA Waterthrush (6), Northern Parula (12), Yellow-throated Warbler (10), Black and White (3), WEVI, Cliff Swallow (20), Barn Swallow (2). Chatham Co NC

Later at Lake Crabtree Pectoral Sandpiper (2), Blue-winged Teal, Green-winged Teal, wigeon, harrier and other random locals.
Wake County NC

Nice to get out and enjoy the pollen.

Steve Shultz
Apex N.C.
 

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Date: 3/31/18 3:08 pm
From: Bill Majoros <william.majoros...>
Subject: FOS Palm Warbler in Durham county
Saw my first-of-season palm warbler at Butner gamelands in Durham county today.

Ive been seeing increasing numbers of gnatcatchers and parulas as well,

Bill Majoros
Durham NC

 

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Date: 3/30/18 4:43 pm
From: Bonnie/Tom <bks1956...>
Subject: FOS warblers in McDowell County
We had our first of season Black-throated Green and Louisiana Waterthrush today. The first Black & White Warbler arrived yesterday. We're in southwestern McDowell County, near the Buncombe County line.
Bonnie Simmons
Tom Pericak
Old Fort NC
 

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Date: 3/30/18 3:10 pm
From: Bill Majoros <william.majoros...>
Subject: C Yellowthroat, WE Vireo in Durham

I saw my first of season Common Yellowthroat and White Eyed Vireo this morning along the Eno River in Durham.

Bill Majoros
Durham NC

 

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Date: 3/30/18 12:34 pm
From: Ann Truesdale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: American Golden Plover at Bear Island WMA, Colleton County, SC - still present
As reported last Sat. by Carl Miller, seen feeding in the rain this
morning with some other shorebirds. It is in the same location, on Pecan
Trees Rd in the impoundment on the right past the gate that's usually
closed in summer, although it will be more easily seen on the driving
route from the other end of that impoundment. Or from the
closed-to-motor-vehicles road next to the canal. There's some
obstructing vegetation looking from Pecan Trees Rd side.


--
Ann Truesdale
<anntrue...>
Meggett, Charleston Co, SC
 

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Date: 3/30/18 7:06 am
From: Stewart Gibeau <sgibeau...>
Subject: Black Mountain, NC
Saw a wild turkey today downtown. Also there’s the largest flock of Siskins I’ve ever seen near my house. Over 300 and the noise is incredible.

Stu Gibeau


 

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Date: 3/30/18 6:27 am
From: Lex Glover <GloverL...>
Subject: Volunteers Needed for SC Breeding Bird Survey Routes
SC Birders,
Please see email below and respond to Amy Tegeler.
Lex Glover
Lugoff, SC

Hello Bird Enthusiasts!
As SC state coordinator for the Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) I'd like to send a call out to see if any of you are interested in volunteering to run one or more available BBS routes. We have several vacant routes in SC: 7 in the Southeastern coastal plain and 2 in the Piedmont. A map of available routes and information about the BBS can be found here https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.pwrc.usgs.gov_bbs_RouteMap_Map.cfm-23&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=XfxxTJTo3IEjFqs66cPVi09yns9BjjEkhYmuoRFw7SY&s=P0ThWzPIrU9gflbfBIuGMq9U6VQ3O266udNem-p-4N0&e=<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.pwrc.usgs.gov_bbs_RouteMap_Map.cfm&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=XfxxTJTo3IEjFqs66cPVi09yns9BjjEkhYmuoRFw7SY&s=Ox6G8aSgb2W1hWCRrNgK16qnuOWqPG3hK2y9QZirKL4&e=>.
For anyone not familiar with the BBS, each route consists of 50 three-minute stops at 0.5 mile intervals along a 24.5 mile route. All the stops are roadside. Each route is conducted once a year between mid May to late June. The survey starts 30 minutes before sunrise and is typically finished in about 4 hours. Volunteers need to be able to identify all the anticipated breeding bird species in the area by sight and sound; most birds detected will only be by their vocalizations. The BBS prefers if volunteers are willing to commit to running a route for at least 3 years when possible.
If you are interested in volunteering please provide me with the name of the route(s), a phone number, and a mailing address so the BBS can mail you the route maps.
If you have any additional questions, please let me know.
Thanks!
Amy Tegeler
SCDNR Bird Conservation Coordinator
SC BBS Coordinator
803-521-2119
<TegelerA...>

 

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Date: 3/29/18 7:12 pm
From: GRIGGS, JERRY <griggs...>
Subject: Yard Activity, Columbia, SC
The female Rufous Hummingbird we call Haley came to the feeder several times this morning. This marks four months that she has been in our yard. We believe Haley is the same bird that spent more than four months here last winter. It was only on New Year's Day this year that we could finally see the tail feathers well enough to tell she is Rufous (and not Allen's).

She is not coming as often to the feeder recently. We have seen her feeding on the flowers of Piedmont Azalea and Buckeye. This is three days later than we saw Haley a year ago, so we are fortunate to be hosting her still. Might she take off tonight, taking advantage of the full moon? Perhaps she should wait for the line of strong storms to our west to pass by first.

A new spring arrival here this morning was Louisiana Waterthrush, singing loudly along Rawls Creek in back of our yard. A male-female pair of Wood Ducks was on the creek. Earlier this week we saw our first Brown-headed Cowbirds of the season at our feeders (a male-female pair). Our first Black-and-White Warbler of the season here worked the trees. An Eastern Phoebe is roosting atop the wind chimes on our front porch, where Phoebes have nested successfully the past two years.

Today we also got a new mammal for our yard list, when three White-tailed Deer went along the creek just over our fence. Everything seems to be on the move.

Jerry Griggs
Columbia, SC



 

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Date: 3/29/18 2:05 pm
From: Tim Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Afternoon fallout (mountains)
Mar 29, 2018 4:30 PM - 4:50 PM
Protocol: Stationary

23 species

Mourning Dove 4
Red-bellied Woodpecker 1
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 1
Hairy Woodpecker 1
Pileated Woodpecker 1
Eastern Phoebe 2
Blue-headed Vireo 1
American Crow 3
Common Raven 1 First we have seen here for a while. Soaring.
Carolina Chickadee 1
Tufted Titmouse 2
Carolina Wren 2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 4
Golden-crowned Kinglet 1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1
Hermit Thrush 1
Northern Parula 1
Pine Warbler 1
Yellow-rumped Warbler 3
Chipping Sparrow 3 This is rarely their favorite place but they nest 1/4 mile away.
Northern Cardinal 2
Pine Siskin 1
American Goldfinch 3

Tim Lewis, Jackson Co. NC
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.tim-2Dlewis.com_&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=tZYN1XxG2MsMD-4w9UXBXZn3ZrAtQYRdOivbwWtdhds&s=-sz4pwmfTQZKvnSLTV5bhPAM42xG_W7dII1q4IURYdA&e=>

 

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Date: 3/29/18 9:57 am
From: Corey, Ed <ed.corey...>
Subject: Three Natural Resources Positions available - NC State Parks
Folks,

We're happy to announce three positions with the Natural Resources Program of North Carolina State Parks. Please see the announcements below. Positions will close fast, so don't delay!

Mountain Regional Biologist (formerly Marshall Ellis' position):
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__agency.governmentjobs.com_northcarolina_job-5Fbulletin.cfm-3FJobID-3D2030924&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=GNEf0XQPo5XEEHVIALiC_ouskBPpsIzitUT9oIyjv0A&s=pPk3ZACYqaAVwGI3QPVbBFIjoHfx-O_-P-f4UIYPImc&e=
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.governmentjobs.com_careers_northcarolina_jobs_2030924_environmental-2Dspecialist&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=GNEf0XQPo5XEEHVIALiC_ouskBPpsIzitUT9oIyjv0A&s=W0qhEvlL91LrKjAWeBSEwIL-bGuNck_td2MSU9DUx_E&e=
Fire Specialist:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__agency.governmentjobs.com_northcarolina_job-5Fbulletin.cfm-3FJobID-3D2030875&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=GNEf0XQPo5XEEHVIALiC_ouskBPpsIzitUT9oIyjv0A&s=VMo9a1lBU3V7srPX7W40kKALeB5Y8l3Ei0Me0UFC7dE&e=

Restoration Specialist:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__agency.governmentjobs.com_northcarolina_job-5Fbulletin.cfm-3FJobID-3D2030312&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=GNEf0XQPo5XEEHVIALiC_ouskBPpsIzitUT9oIyjv0A&s=UCwOEKTv11uQoC9N85dPU8K7C1LcCwhe1IsrhCjjE_c&e=

Please forward to any qualified applicants you may know!

Ed

Ed Corey
Inventory Biologist, NC Division of Parks and Recreation
NC Dept. of Natural and Cultural Resources
919 841 4037 Office
919 208 7864 Mobile
<Ed.Corey...><mailto:<Ed.Corey...>

12700 Bayleaf Church Road | Raleigh, North Carolina 27614

Email correspondence to and from this address is subject to the North Carolina Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.


 

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Date: 3/29/18 8:43 am
From: birdermom63 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Birding in and around Waynesville
Hello NC birders,

My brother lives in Waynesville so I visit regularly. We often walk around
Lake Junaluska and I have seen some wonderful birds there, but I am hoping to
get some suggestions about other spots in the area. I am certainly willing to
do some hiking if necessary.

I will be there this weekend and would love to find some migrants.

Any information about good locations in the area would be much appreciated!

Thank you!
Juliet
 

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Date: 3/29/18 8:26 am
From: Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...>
Subject: FOS Ruby-throat Hummingbird
The first sighting of a hummer occurred yesterday outside my kitchen window.  I'd put out two feeders last week, a week later than intended, and attracted the male that appeared.  I monitor the spring migration map at hummingbirds.net and usually deploy feeders on or about 15 March.  The first reported sightings along the southern SC coast, according to the map, occurred on the 17th.
 Frank HamiltonCharleston, SC

 

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Date: 3/29/18 6:43 am
From: Bill Majoros <william.majoros...>
Subject: Parula, YT Warbler, L Waterthrush, Gnatcatcher in Durham
This morning I saw a yellow throated warbler, a Louisiana waterthrush, a blue gray gnatcatcher, and multiple parulas along the Eno river in Durham at Fews ford.

Bill Majoros
Durham NC

 

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Date: 3/29/18 5:33 am
From: \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Spring arrivals in the northern mountains
Birders, my first of the season Blue-headed Vireo and Louisiana Waterthrush arrived this morning. I’m at 3,400’ in Watauga County, NC near Boone. The vireo is about a week or so late and the waterthrush is about on time for my location.

J. Merrill Lynch
Conservation Biologist
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 3/28/18 6:05 pm
From: <susan...>
Subject: Spring seems to have arrived in the Sandhills...
All,

This morning there were multiple Black-and-white Warblers and Blue-gray
Gnatcatchers "singing" here at the farm-- and not far off in the creek
bed so was a Yellow-throated Warbler. I also had a female Common
Yellowthroat angrily chipping from a wet spot on the edge of Ft. Bragg
during our dog walk.

This evening, the first male Ruby-throateds (at least 2) showed up at
the feeders.

So I guess Spring has really sprung! Cannot wait to see what Mike
McCloy and I find around McKinney Lake Fish Hatchery tomorrow at dawn!!

As our old friend Gary Phillips would say: woo hoo!

Susan Campbell
Southern Pines, NC

 

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Date: 3/28/18 1:10 pm
From: Marilyn Westphal <mjwestph...>
Subject: Green River Cove Rd, Polk County NC
Finally a little warm weather and some birds are arriving. It was quite overcast this morning, but there were still birds singing. Arrivals included a Black-throated Green Warbler, two Black-and-white Warblers, 8 La Waterthrushes spaced fairly evenly down the road about a mile apart from each other, a Yellow-throated Warbler, 5 Blue-headed Vireos, and the surprise early bird- a Yellow-throated Vireo. Surprise because that’s the only one that was earlier than usual. Also saw a couple of Great Egrets at the Lake Adger Headwaters.
Looking forward to more warm weather this week and more arrivals.
Marilyn

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 3/28/18 11:53 am
From: Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Black-throated Green Warblers South Mtns SP.
I did a short walk at South Mountains State Park in Burke Co this
afternoon. As I expected, a few Black-throated Green Warblers were already
back and singing. Also present were Louisiana Waterthrushes and Blue-headed
Vireos. Looks like Spring might finally be here.
--
Dwayne
*************
Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
<redxbill...>

 

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Date: 3/28/18 9:16 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: 5000 gulls, Buckhorn Res. eve. 3/27/18
To follow-up on Frank's questions, and my comments on Ring-billed vs.
Lesser Black-backed numbers:

1. In the eastern Piedmont, using data from Jordan Lake, Falls
Lake/Beaverdam, Lake Crabtree, and Lake Wheeler this winter:

the typical ratio of RBG: LBBG is about 200-300:1. That is, for every 1000
Ring-billed, you might average about 5 Lessers, at best. I see the
all-time high LBBG count in our area was 39, seen by Jelmer Poelstra at
Jordan on 25 Feb 2018; at that same spot from Ebenezer Point, he tallied
7,000 Ring-billeds:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S43195109&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=n_YDtl-rLlsijR942-InXc054wAbTpwUbg28IL78XAg&s=xwO63FLziNDL0_bhWE9IutQ8eZMuULiZYi1TOl-n65M&e=

Some numbers of Lesser have been seen recently at Lake Crabtree, with a
peak of 18, also seen by him, on 18 Mar 2018:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S43766309&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=n_YDtl-rLlsijR942-InXc054wAbTpwUbg28IL78XAg&s=PEm4d9z7ntfyUjEahUBkTgWtWsJQyqpQ7jllqKyJ1FM&e=

As you can see, his Ring-billed count was 1,200.

I never see Lessers at Beaverdam Reservoir, where as many as several
hundred Ring-billeds were present during the winter. Lake Wheeler always
has 100 or more Ring-bills in winter, and never a Lesser.

In summary, you can see that, at best, in the eastern Piedmont you would
expect to see one Lesser for every 300 or more Ring-billeds, as of this
winter.

2. I suggest that Frank has the right idea about feeding habitat for all
those Lessers near Buckhorn Reservoir, which is in the upper Coastal
Plain. We do know that both species in the inland portion of the Coastal
Plain spend much time feeding in croplands during the cooler months, such
as around the Beasley Road ponds in Washington County. In the Piedmont,
even in the Triangle area, close to the Coastal Plain, *I never see gulls
feeding in winter croplands*. I'll leave it to others why that is, such as
the crop remains (or insects, etc.) they prefer in winter. In the
Triangle, gulls feed: 1) from the surface of lakes and large ponds; 2) at
landfills; and 3) at shopping centers (mainly just Ring-billed there). So,
Lessers seem to be specializing, if that is the right word, on feeding in
croplands in the inner and central Coastal Plain (almost always with many
or more Ring-billeds). In the Piedmont, most Lessers are probably feeding
at landfills, and secondarily at lakes. Though we do have plenty of
cornfields and other croplands still left in the Piedmont (though these are
constantly dwindling due to development), gulls don't seem to feed in them
here.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Wed, Mar 28, 2018 at 8:41 AM, Frank Enders <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> I was at boat landing 6:48 to 7:07 P. Then waded to shoreline through 6"
> deep marsh at 15 mph curve on Bailey Road, and ended looking at upper end
> of lake through house lots by7:25 P when too dark to id species.
> Differences with Davis's eBird report are that I faiiled to id many
> species, had a flock of 8 Horned Grebes, more loons (5), more martins
> (50-70 mostly males apparently trying to survive by skimming the water in
> the warmer eve, while he had 5, probably most not out of boxes at dawn).
>
> EXECUTIVE SUMMARY is that his numbers make sense, except that I had about
> 5000 Ring-billed Gulls at roost--gulls were coming in from east.
>
> From boat landing, 20-50 Lesser Black-backed Gull, 400 Ring-billed Gull.
> At times no gulls. I do not know where they went when I saw none, perhaps
> upstream out of view. LBBG were seen to land for a while on the water,
> while Ring-bills were mmore flighty. At one point the gulls may have been
> flushed by the noise of some 40 rounds of gunfire from the south shore, but
> I think it was just the noise, no shots aimed, since there was a fishing
> boat between the shooter and the gulls, which fishers ramined unperturbed.
>
> From the marshy spot, more of the same (grebes here).
>
> Looking upstream at end of time, I was surprised to estimate so many gulls
> (5000), clearly mostly Ring-bills.
>
> I do not understand why Davis saw so few--perhaps he was not where I was,
> and perhaps the Ring-bills left the lake first in AM. There had been a
> recent report of thousands (2000, 3000?) there, but nobody seems to be
> reporting manny LBBG anywhere. High count was Horry County Landfill (SC,
> 30? 40?).
> Perhaps there are mmore reported at Cape Hatteras in eBird for March,
> which hotspot I happened not to click on. Incidentally, I first saw
> Davis's C-bird post on ABA Carolinabirds, which showed Legrand's comments,
> but not Patteson's--- ABA does this on many threads. My direct receipt of
> Carolinabirds shows all items in thread, and I will check Hatteras hotspot
> birdlists.
>
> If you figure some 10% of the gulls which I could id from boat landing
> were LBBG, then 10% of roosting 5000 gulls means Davis undercounted the 500
> LBBG by about 40%. (THAT IS A JOKE!) In other words, there were about the
> same number, probably, of LBBG on the lake at 7:30 PM as at 7:30 AM.
>
> NEXT QUESTIONS: where are the LBBG in the daytime---in fields off NC 97
> where Davis had seen double digits on occasion? I won't say probably
> spread out over any number of such fields in Wilson and Edgecombe Counties.
> AND, who will bell the cat? Who will follow the gulls off the reservoir
> in the AM (toward east), and who will be able to get to points (dirt road
> from north deadends at lake) where they can scope the gull flock for a few
> days to see how numbers will drop off?
>
> The site reminds me of the joke about seeing Collared Dove and Eurasian
> Wigeon in this country--just like in overdeveloped rural England! The
> mansions around Buckhorn must be like the expensive houses twitcher bird in
> suburban England. Big useless lawns which somebody on C-birds recently
> complained about.
> Close as the subdivisions are to the reservoir, there may be a Jordan Lake
> pollution event here.
> Does anybody else think that Ruddy Ducks, eating chironomid larvae from
> the mud in reservoirs, are an indicator species for water pollution from
> septic systems?
>
> And, I do not appreciate anybody who tells me they have to work and cannot
> get out like I do. I have slowed down so much that I cannot keep up with
> my work, let alone my blabbing e-mails.
>
> Frank Enders, Halifax, NC.
>
>
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Date: 3/28/18 9:16 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Louisiana Waterthrush!
Agree with Harry. And caution that even visiting a location may not result in detecting the bird. Even when one knows what to look and listen for. Louisiana’s have a loud, ringing song, but they do not sing constantly, and early in the season, they sing rather irregularly. For example, I took my son fishing at the Haw River last weekend. We fished at a known spot for LAWA. Did not hear or see one at all. We could say that they were not there yet, but would be wrong, as a friend had one at the same spot earlier in the day. The bird was no doubt there, just silent. The old adage that negative confirmation is not actual confirmation.

Steve Shultz
(919) 458-4999
WPS Service Delivery Manager
Fidelity Investments
CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The information in this email and subsequent attachments may contain confidential information that is intended solely for the attention and use of the named addressee(s). This message or any part thereof must not be disclosed, copied, distributed or retained by any person without authorization from Fidelity Investments.

From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Harry LeGrand
Sent: Wednesday, March 28, 2018 11:50 AM
To: Helen Kalevas
Cc: carolinabirds listserve
Subject: Re: Louisiana Waterthrush!

No, it is not early. Louisiana Waterthrushes normally arrive in the Triangle area between March 20-25. So, technically, March 28 is a tad late for them. I say, technically, because we would need to know how often you visit this site. If you visit it daily, or every two days, and this is the first day you have recorded it in 2018, then -- it IS late. However, if you visit this site once a week (or less often), say your last visit was March 21 and it was not there, it COULD have arrived March 22, 23, 24, etc., and been about right on time. But, March 28 is not early for this species.

For example, I saw and heard my first Blue-gray Gnatcatchers of 2018 this morning along Crabtree Creek in Raleigh. Compared with the last 5 years, that might be a tad late. But, I had not visited this particular stretch of greenway since February. Thus, the gnatcatchers could have arrived on March 15 or 25, and been early or right on time.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh


On Wed, Mar 28, 2018 at 8:34 AM, Helen Kalevas <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
Singing here on the Little River near Hillsborough, NC today. Seems early for that?

--
Helen Kalevas
Near Hillsborough, NC


[https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ipmcdn.avast.com_images_icons_icon-2Denvelope-2Dtick-2Dgreen-2Davg-2Dv1.png&d=DwIGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=1EgXwBB7FQlG1SUyUV88iIHp__AIhUi7US9ETyjBulM&s=MwyIxfnEaZmSwJCgJd5n-nqC1op0A-pkOTnnyrFrn64&e=]<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.avg.com_email-2Dsignature-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=wi7tk_-6vVdzQnjxItkOp8jKsWBIIzrCX6ayEo7WTaA&s=LkUCPFzb2Smapqc0el3xEUwtr2fekuo2bHk0TUbb6Fg&e=>

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Date: 3/28/18 8:50 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Louisiana Waterthrush!
No, it is not early. Louisiana Waterthrushes normally arrive in the
Triangle area between March 20-25. So, technically, March 28 is a tad late
for them. I say, technically, because we would need to know how often you
visit this site. If you visit it daily, or every two days, and this is the
first day you have recorded it in 2018, then -- it IS late. However, if
you visit this site once a week (or less often), say your last visit was
March 21 and it was not there, it COULD have arrived March 22, 23, 24,
etc., and been about right on time. But, March 28 is not early for this
species.

For example, I saw and heard my first Blue-gray Gnatcatchers of 2018 this
morning along Crabtree Creek in Raleigh. Compared with the last 5 years,
that might be a tad late. But, I had not visited this particular stretch
of greenway since February. Thus, the gnatcatchers could have arrived on
March 15 or 25, and been early or right on time.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh


On Wed, Mar 28, 2018 at 8:34 AM, Helen Kalevas <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Singing here on the Little River near Hillsborough, NC today. Seems early
> for that?
>
> --
> Helen Kalevas
> Near Hillsborough, NC
>
>
>
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.avg.com_email-2Dsignature-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=wi7tk_-6vVdzQnjxItkOp8jKsWBIIzrCX6ayEo7WTaA&s=LkUCPFzb2Smapqc0el3xEUwtr2fekuo2bHk0TUbb6Fg&e=> Virus-free.
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> <#m_3795802286139904042_DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
>

 

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Date: 3/28/18 5:41 am
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: 5000 gulls, Buckhorn Res. eve. 3/27/18
I was at boat landing 6:48 to 7:07 P. Then waded to shoreline through 6" deep marsh at 15 mph curve on Bailey Road, and ended looking at upper end of lake through house lots by7:25 P when too dark to id species.
Differences with Davis's eBird report are that I faiiled to id many species, had a flock of 8 Horned Grebes, more loons (5), more martins (50-70 mostly males apparently trying to survive by skimming the water in the warmer eve, while he had 5, probably most not out of boxes at dawn).

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY is that his numbers make sense, except that I had about 5000 Ring-billed Gulls at roost--gulls were coming in from east.

From boat landing, 20-50 Lesser Black-backed Gull, 400 Ring-billed Gull. At times no gulls. I do not know where they went when I saw none, perhaps upstream out of view. LBBG were seen to land for a while on the water, while Ring-bills were mmore flighty. At one point the gulls may have been flushed by the noise of some 40 rounds of gunfire from the south shore, but I think it was just the noise, no shots aimed, since there was a fishing boat between the shooter and the gulls, which fishers ramined unperturbed.

From the marshy spot, more of the same (grebes here).

Looking upstream at end of time, I was surprised to estimate so many gulls (5000), clearly mostly Ring-bills.

I do not understand why Davis saw so few--perhaps he was not where I was, and perhaps the Ring-bills left the lake first in AM. There had been a recent report of thousands (2000, 3000?) there, but nobody seems to be reporting manny LBBG anywhere. High count was Horry County Landfill (SC, 30? 40?).
Perhaps there are mmore reported at Cape Hatteras in eBird for March, which hotspot I happened not to click on. Incidentally, I first saw Davis's C-bird post on ABA Carolinabirds, which showed Legrand's comments, but not Patteson's--- ABA does this on many threads. My direct receipt of Carolinabirds shows all items in thread, and I will check Hatteras hotspot birdlists.

If you figure some 10% of the gulls which I could id from boat landing were LBBG, then 10% of roosting 5000 gulls means Davis undercounted the 500 LBBG by about 40%. (THAT IS A JOKE!) In other words, there were about the same number, probably, of LBBG on the lake at 7:30 PM as at 7:30 AM.

NEXT QUESTIONS: where are the LBBG in the daytime---in fields off NC 97 where Davis had seen double digits on occasion? I won't say probably spread out over any number of such fields in Wilson and Edgecombe Counties.
AND, who will bell the cat? Who will follow the gulls off the reservoir in the AM (toward east), and who will be able to get to points (dirt road from north deadends at lake) where they can scope the gull flock for a few days to see how numbers will drop off?

The site reminds me of the joke about seeing Collared Dove and Eurasian Wigeon in this country--just like in overdeveloped rural England! The mansions around Buckhorn must be like the expensive houses twitcher bird in suburban England. Big useless lawns which somebody on C-birds recently complained about.
Close as the subdivisions are to the reservoir, there may be a Jordan Lake pollution event here.
Does anybody else think that Ruddy Ducks, eating chironomid larvae from the mud in reservoirs, are an indicator species for water pollution from septic systems?

And, I do not appreciate anybody who tells me they have to work and cannot get out like I do. I have slowed down so much that I cannot keep up with my work, let alone my blabbing e-mails.

Frank Enders, Halifax, NC.


















































 

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Date: 3/28/18 5:35 am
From: Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Louisiana Waterthrush!
Singing here on the Little River near Hillsborough, NC today. Seems early
for that?

--
Helen Kalevas
Near Hillsborough, NC


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Date: 3/27/18 4:22 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Buckhorn Res. Lesser Black-backed Gulls
I agree. However, *inland,* the Ring-billed Gull is still, by far, the
most numerous gull species in the state. This is especially true in the
Piedmont, where I live.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Tue, Mar 27, 2018 at 6:10 PM, Brian Patteson <patteson1...>
wrote:

> Harry,
>
> Lesser Black-backs are taking over here in the 21st Century.
>
> Brian Patteson
> Hatteras, NC
>
> On Mar 27, 2018, at 12:34 PM, Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing
> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Ricky did e-mail me and said there were about 110 Ring-billed Gulls at
> Buckhorn. Makes me feel better! Still, as he said: "I have not heard any
> sighting where Lessers outnumbered Ring-billeds 3 to 1!"
>
> Harry LeGrand
>
> On Tue, Mar 27, 2018 at 10:07 AM, Christopher Hill <Chill...>
> wrote:
>
>> I don’t necessarily agree about the ring-bills - even a couple weeks ago
>> the thousands of adult Ring-bills had left the landfill at Conway, SC,
>> leaving only a scant couple hundred straggling immatures. And this week I
>> have seen internet photos of Ring-bills at their nesting colonies in the
>> great lakes.
>>
>> There is a window in spring when the large white-headed gulls greatly
>> outnumber the Ring-bills. Weird, but it does happen.
>>
>> Chris Hill
>> Conway, SC
>>
>> > On Mar 27, 2018, at 9:48 AM, Harry E. LeGrand Jr <
>> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>> >
>> > A total of 321 gulls and nary a RIng-billed Gull? Anywhere else
>> inland, a group of that many gulls would nearly all be RBG -- like at Lake
>> Crabtree. Must have been some Ring-billeds that you simply didn't mention
>> in your posting.
>> >
>> > Harry LeGrand
>> > Raleigh
>> >
>> > Sent from my iPhone
>> >
>> >> On Mar 27, 2018, at 9:22 AM, Ricky Davis (via carolinabirds Mailing
>> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>> >>
>> >> Stopped by Buckhorn Reservoir in Wilson County at sunrise this
>> >> morning. From the boat ramp, was able to count the gulls sitting on
>> >> the water. There were two main rafts of birds with both being made up
>> >> of all Lesser Black-backeds! There were only a couple of handfuls of
>> >> Herring Gulls mixed in with them. I counted 307 Lessers and 14
>> >> Herrings. All age classes were present, and some of the adults were in
>> >> fine plumage with clean heads and bright bills. Quite a few of the
>> >> adults were very dark backed. Within thirty minutes the birds started
>> >> flying around and by 8:00 they had dispersed and only 20-30 were left
>> >> over the lake. This must have been some kind of staging before moving
>> >> on. I do not remember ever seeing anything quite like this with
>> >> Lessers. An amazing total for anywhere in NC, especially inland!
>> >>
>> >> --
>> >> Ricky Davis
>> >> Rocky Mount, NC
>>
>>
>
>

 

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Date: 3/27/18 3:10 pm
From: Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Buckhorn Res. Lesser Black-backed Gulls
Harry,

Lesser Black-backs are taking over here in the 21st Century.

Brian Patteson
Hatteras, NC

> On Mar 27, 2018, at 12:34 PM, Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Ricky did e-mail me and said there were about 110 Ring-billed Gulls at Buckhorn. Makes me feel better! Still, as he said: "I have not heard any
> sighting where Lessers outnumbered Ring-billeds 3 to 1!"
>
> Harry LeGrand
>
> On Tue, Mar 27, 2018 at 10:07 AM, Christopher Hill <Chill...> <mailto:<Chill...>> wrote:
> I don’t necessarily agree about the ring-bills - even a couple weeks ago the thousands of adult Ring-bills had left the landfill at Conway, SC, leaving only a scant couple hundred straggling immatures. And this week I have seen internet photos of Ring-bills at their nesting colonies in the great lakes.
>
> There is a window in spring when the large white-headed gulls greatly outnumber the Ring-bills. Weird, but it does happen.
>
> Chris Hill
> Conway, SC
>
> > On Mar 27, 2018, at 9:48 AM, Harry E. LeGrand Jr <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
> >
> > A total of 321 gulls and nary a RIng-billed Gull? Anywhere else inland, a group of that many gulls would nearly all be RBG -- like at Lake Crabtree. Must have been some Ring-billeds that you simply didn't mention in your posting.
> >
> > Harry LeGrand
> > Raleigh
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
> >
> >> On Mar 27, 2018, at 9:22 AM, Ricky Davis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
> >>
> >> Stopped by Buckhorn Reservoir in Wilson County at sunrise this
> >> morning. From the boat ramp, was able to count the gulls sitting on
> >> the water. There were two main rafts of birds with both being made up
> >> of all Lesser Black-backeds! There were only a couple of handfuls of
> >> Herring Gulls mixed in with them. I counted 307 Lessers and 14
> >> Herrings. All age classes were present, and some of the adults were in
> >> fine plumage with clean heads and bright bills. Quite a few of the
> >> adults were very dark backed. Within thirty minutes the birds started
> >> flying around and by 8:00 they had dispersed and only 20-30 were left
> >> over the lake. This must have been some kind of staging before moving
> >> on. I do not remember ever seeing anything quite like this with
> >> Lessers. An amazing total for anywhere in NC, especially inland!
> >>
> >> --
> >> Ricky Davis
> >> Rocky Mount, NC
>
>


 

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Date: 3/27/18 11:37 am
From: Alan Gamache <bird...>
Subject: Purple Martins (FOY) New Bern, NC
On the way back this morning from the Croatan N.F. , Steve and I drove through the New Bern Airport, where we got 2 Hooded Mergansers, 4 Tree Swallows, and (FOY) 6 Purple Martins.

Al Gamache
New Bern, NC
 

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Date: 3/27/18 9:38 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Buckhorn Res. Lesser Black-backed Gulls
Ricky did e-mail me and said there were about 110 Ring-billed Gulls at
Buckhorn. Makes me feel better! Still, as he said: "I have not heard any
sighting where Lessers outnumbered Ring-billeds 3 to 1!"

Harry LeGrand

On Tue, Mar 27, 2018 at 10:07 AM, Christopher Hill <Chill...>
wrote:

> I don’t necessarily agree about the ring-bills - even a couple weeks ago
> the thousands of adult Ring-bills had left the landfill at Conway, SC,
> leaving only a scant couple hundred straggling immatures. And this week I
> have seen internet photos of Ring-bills at their nesting colonies in the
> great lakes.
>
> There is a window in spring when the large white-headed gulls greatly
> outnumber the Ring-bills. Weird, but it does happen.
>
> Chris Hill
> Conway, SC
>
> > On Mar 27, 2018, at 9:48 AM, Harry E. LeGrand Jr <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
> >
> > A total of 321 gulls and nary a RIng-billed Gull? Anywhere else inland,
> a group of that many gulls would nearly all be RBG -- like at Lake
> Crabtree. Must have been some Ring-billeds that you simply didn't mention
> in your posting.
> >
> > Harry LeGrand
> > Raleigh
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
> >
> >> On Mar 27, 2018, at 9:22 AM, Ricky Davis (via carolinabirds Mailing
> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> >>
> >> Stopped by Buckhorn Reservoir in Wilson County at sunrise this
> >> morning. From the boat ramp, was able to count the gulls sitting on
> >> the water. There were two main rafts of birds with both being made up
> >> of all Lesser Black-backeds! There were only a couple of handfuls of
> >> Herring Gulls mixed in with them. I counted 307 Lessers and 14
> >> Herrings. All age classes were present, and some of the adults were in
> >> fine plumage with clean heads and bright bills. Quite a few of the
> >> adults were very dark backed. Within thirty minutes the birds started
> >> flying around and by 8:00 they had dispersed and only 20-30 were left
> >> over the lake. This must have been some kind of staging before moving
> >> on. I do not remember ever seeing anything quite like this with
> >> Lessers. An amazing total for anywhere in NC, especially inland!
> >>
> >> --
> >> Ricky Davis
> >> Rocky Mount, NC
>
>

 

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Date: 3/27/18 7:07 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Buckhorn Res. Lesser Black-backed Gulls
I don’t necessarily agree about the ring-bills - even a couple weeks ago the thousands of adult Ring-bills had left the landfill at Conway, SC, leaving only a scant couple hundred straggling immatures. And this week I have seen internet photos of Ring-bills at their nesting colonies in the great lakes.

There is a window in spring when the large white-headed gulls greatly outnumber the Ring-bills. Weird, but it does happen.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

> On Mar 27, 2018, at 9:48 AM, Harry E. LeGrand Jr <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> A total of 321 gulls and nary a RIng-billed Gull? Anywhere else inland, a group of that many gulls would nearly all be RBG -- like at Lake Crabtree. Must have been some Ring-billeds that you simply didn't mention in your posting.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Mar 27, 2018, at 9:22 AM, Ricky Davis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> Stopped by Buckhorn Reservoir in Wilson County at sunrise this
>> morning. From the boat ramp, was able to count the gulls sitting on
>> the water. There were two main rafts of birds with both being made up
>> of all Lesser Black-backeds! There were only a couple of handfuls of
>> Herring Gulls mixed in with them. I counted 307 Lessers and 14
>> Herrings. All age classes were present, and some of the adults were in
>> fine plumage with clean heads and bright bills. Quite a few of the
>> adults were very dark backed. Within thirty minutes the birds started
>> flying around and by 8:00 they had dispersed and only 20-30 were left
>> over the lake. This must have been some kind of staging before moving
>> on. I do not remember ever seeing anything quite like this with
>> Lessers. An amazing total for anywhere in NC, especially inland!
>>
>> --
>> Ricky Davis
>> Rocky Mount, NC

 

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Date: 3/27/18 6:49 am
From: \Harry E. LeGrand Jr\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Buckhorn Res. Lesser Black-backed Gulls
A total of 321 gulls and nary a RIng-billed Gull? Anywhere else inland, a group of that many gulls would nearly all be RBG -- like at Lake Crabtree. Must have been some Ring-billeds that you simply didn't mention in your posting.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 27, 2018, at 9:22 AM, Ricky Davis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Stopped by Buckhorn Reservoir in Wilson County at sunrise this
> morning. From the boat ramp, was able to count the gulls sitting on
> the water. There were two main rafts of birds with both being made up
> of all Lesser Black-backeds! There were only a couple of handfuls of
> Herring Gulls mixed in with them. I counted 307 Lessers and 14
> Herrings. All age classes were present, and some of the adults were in
> fine plumage with clean heads and bright bills. Quite a few of the
> adults were very dark backed. Within thirty minutes the birds started
> flying around and by 8:00 they had dispersed and only 20-30 were left
> over the lake. This must have been some kind of staging before moving
> on. I do not remember ever seeing anything quite like this with
> Lessers. An amazing total for anywhere in NC, especially inland!
>
> --
> Ricky Davis
> Rocky Mount, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 3/27/18 6:23 am
From: Ricky Davis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Buckhorn Res. Lesser Black-backed Gulls
Stopped by Buckhorn Reservoir in Wilson County at sunrise this
morning. From the boat ramp, was able to count the gulls sitting on
the water. There were two main rafts of birds with both being made up
of all Lesser Black-backeds! There were only a couple of handfuls of
Herring Gulls mixed in with them. I counted 307 Lessers and 14
Herrings. All age classes were present, and some of the adults were in
fine plumage with clean heads and bright bills. Quite a few of the
adults were very dark backed. Within thirty minutes the birds started
flying around and by 8:00 they had dispersed and only 20-30 were left
over the lake. This must have been some kind of staging before moving
on. I do not remember ever seeing anything quite like this with
Lessers. An amazing total for anywhere in NC, especially inland!

--
Ricky Davis
Rocky Mount, NC
 

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