Carolinabirds
Received From Subject
7/20/17 6:50 pm <susan...> central NC hummingbird programs-- two upcoming Saturdays
7/20/17 2:51 pm Henry Link <linkh...> Nesting Mississippi Kites in Greensboro
7/20/17 5:37 am Jerzy Smykla (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: New Hanover Co. Black-bellied Whistling-duck
7/19/17 6:55 pm Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Orchard Oriole family last seen July 17
7/19/17 4:32 pm Ann Truesdale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Donnelley & Bear Isl WMAs, Colleton Co, SC
7/19/17 3:03 pm David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Know of any protocols to monitor bird behavior during upcoming eclipse?
7/19/17 1:44 pm toadshade <toadshade...> FOY Hummingbird
7/19/17 7:38 am Gilbert Grant (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Great Shearwater at North Topsail Beach, NC
7/18/17 8:09 pm <badgerboy...> Sora at Valle Crucis Park, Watauga County
7/18/17 1:02 pm Bill Hilton Jr. <hilton...> Hilton Pond 07/01/17 (Midsummer Flora & Pollinators)
7/18/17 6:55 am Jessica Walden-Gray (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Juvenile White Ibis in Chatham Co., NC
7/17/17 5:34 am Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> 2017 Gray-cheeked Thrush Program
7/15/17 12:51 pm Sherry Lane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> New Hanover Co. Black-bellied Whistling-duck
7/14/17 6:46 pm Matt Lawing (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome
7/14/17 6:14 pm Kyle Kittelberger (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: RFI Field Guide for Southern Africa
7/14/17 4:48 pm Ann Truesdale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: RFI Field Guide for Southern Africa
7/14/17 4:08 pm Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: RFI Field Guide for Southern Africa
7/14/17 3:13 pm Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Possible breeding Blue-headed Vireos, Rockingham County, NC
7/14/17 2:01 pm David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Interesting blog post about snails found among the breast feathers of an Indigo Bunting
7/14/17 1:56 pm David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fall migration begins with Western Sandpipers on Bulls Island
7/14/17 1:24 pm Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome
7/14/17 12:51 pm Roger Moyer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RFI Field Guide for Southern Africa
7/13/17 12:25 pm Ann Truesdale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Donnelley & Bear Isl WMAs, Colleton Co, SC
7/13/17 10:04 am Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> UNC radio program on B.Eagles, Ellen Tinsley rebroadcast 8PM; cottonmouth behavior; eutrophication of Mattamuskeet
7/13/17 2:35 am John Fussell <jofuss...> Swallow-tailed Kite in Craven County, NC
7/12/17 4:40 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> North Carolina Biodiversity Project website is now online!
7/12/17 1:21 pm Edith Tatum (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hummingbirds
7/12/17 11:38 am Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> gull poop in easier to understand language
7/12/17 11:33 am Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> gull poop
7/12/17 7:29 am David Hart <david.hart...> Re: Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome
7/12/17 7:22 am Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome
7/12/17 7:08 am Mike Judd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome
7/12/17 6:13 am Sherry Lane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome
7/12/17 5:20 am Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome
7/12/17 4:37 am \Russell R.\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome
7/12/17 4:18 am Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome
7/11/17 7:49 pm Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Orchard Orioles: last brood leaves nest tree this eve
7/11/17 7:15 pm Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Loggerhead Shrike. Wood Thrush, & Bobwhite
7/11/17 7:00 pm Jeff Pippen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Winton-Ocampo wedding and Colombia trip!
7/10/17 6:29 pm David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Scissortail Flycatcher & Gunter Road
7/10/17 5:59 pm Derek Aldrich (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Directions to Gunter Road Scissortail???
7/10/17 5:45 pm John Fussell <jofuss...> some Carteret County observations on Sunday
7/10/17 4:55 pm Blayne & Anne <bolsen187...> Re: Directions to Gunter Road Scissortail???
7/10/17 12:22 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Acadian flycatcher nest?
7/10/17 11:40 am Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Acadian flycatcher nest?
7/10/17 11:07 am Kay Grinnell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> oregon trip
7/10/17 11:07 am Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: scarlet tanager
7/10/17 10:59 am Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> scarlet tanager
7/10/17 10:27 am Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Loggerhead Shrike. Wood Thrush, & Bobwhite
7/10/17 10:22 am Steve Compton <scompton1251...> Re: Directions to Gunter Road Scissortail???
7/10/17 7:50 am Gretchen Schramm (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Travel Plans
7/10/17 6:16 am David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Directions to Gunter Road Scissortail???
7/10/17 6:03 am Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> 2017 Gray-cheeked Thrush Program
7/9/17 10:26 am ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: RFI Southeastern Arizona info
7/8/17 6:16 pm Thomas Driscoll (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Arizona Birding info request
7/8/17 3:35 pm \Russell R.\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Arizona Birding info request
7/8/17 1:32 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Tyrrell Co., NC wood stork
7/8/17 11:35 am Peggy Schachte (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> This year's Cooper's Hawks Report
7/8/17 11:34 am David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Arizona Birding info request
7/8/17 11:18 am Alicia Jackson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Tyrrell Co., NC wood stork
7/8/17 6:29 am Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: pronunciation
7/8/17 4:09 am Jim Petranka <petranka...> pronunciation
7/7/17 11:05 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Updates for Birds of NC website, and checklist, completed
7/7/17 10:57 am Ary Bottoms (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Baby birds
7/7/17 8:53 am David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Summer has arrived; new posting to Birding Bulls blog
7/7/17 5:42 am Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bye-bye, Thayer's Gull
7/7/17 5:28 am Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bye-bye, Thayer's Gull
7/7/17 4:53 am Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bye-bye, Thayer's Gull
7/6/17 4:42 pm John Fussell <jofuss...> Re: {Disarmed} Re: Bye-bye, Thayer's Gull
7/6/17 2:43 pm Amy Nester (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Seattle birding
7/6/17 2:15 pm Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Red-breasted Nuthatch in Surry Co
7/6/17 1:55 pm Gretchen Schramm (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Praying mantises released for pest control are hunting hummingbirds : TreeHugger
7/6/17 1:14 pm Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Red-breasted Nuthatch in Surry Co
7/6/17 1:10 pm <eric...> Red-breasted Nuthatch in Surry Co
7/6/17 12:46 pm James Purcell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Swainson's Warblers around Ashville
7/6/17 11:31 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bye-bye, Thayer's Gull
7/6/17 10:14 am Mike Judd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Praying mantises released for pest control are hunting hummingbirds : TreeHugger
7/6/17 10:03 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bye-bye, Thayer's Gull
7/6/17 9:18 am Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Praying mantises released for pest control are hunting hummingbirds : TreeHugger
7/6/17 9:12 am Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Praying mantises released for pest control are hunting hummingbirds : TreeHugger
7/6/17 9:03 am Mike Judd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Praying mantises released for pest control are hunting hummingbirds : TreeHugger
7/6/17 7:09 am Ruth Marley (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Praying mantises released for pest control are hunting hummingbirds : TreeHugger
7/6/17 7:04 am ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Praying mantises released for pest control are hunting hummingbirds : TreeHugger
7/6/17 6:38 am lee van malssen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Praying mantises released for pest control are hunting hummingbirds : TreeHugger
7/6/17 4:18 am Me (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: possible Roseate Tern, Fort Macon SP, Carteret County, NC
7/6/17 3:30 am Sheryl McNair (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: possible Roseate Tern, Fort Macon SP, Carteret County, NC
7/5/17 4:29 pm Paul Serridge (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Scissor-tailed Flycatchers at Gunter Rd, Greenville County, SC
7/5/17 2:44 pm <scompton1251...> Re: possible Roseate Tern, Fort Macon SP, Carteret County, NC
7/5/17 12:23 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: possible Roseate Tern, Fort Macon SP, Carteret County, NC
7/5/17 11:38 am Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: possible Roseate Tern, Fort Macon SP, Carteret County, NC
7/5/17 11:33 am Mike Judd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: possible Roseate Tern, Fort Macon SP, Carteret County, NC
7/5/17 11:21 am Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> possible Roseate Tern, Fort Macon SP, Carteret County, NC
7/5/17 10:52 am Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hot Suet - One More Thing
7/5/17 7:30 am Steve <sshultz...> Re: Strange bird in Durham, NC
7/4/17 11:14 pm Brad Wood (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Strange bird in Durham, NC
7/4/17 9:10 pm Cecelia Mathis <weer...> Re: Strange bird in Durham, NC
7/4/17 6:27 pm Clyde Smith (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Strange bird in Durham, NC
7/4/17 4:25 pm dorothypugh (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Strange bird in Durham, NC
7/4/17 1:11 pm David Weesner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bluebirds and Cardinals
7/4/17 1:02 pm David Weesner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bluebirds and Cardinals
7/4/17 11:24 am Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...> RE: Summer Suet
7/4/17 6:54 am Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Swallow tailed kites - Horry County, SC - July 3
7/4/17 6:53 am Carol Chelette (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Radio show on birds
7/4/17 6:38 am Clyde Sorenson <sorenson...> North Johnston County Mississippi kite
7/4/17 4:51 am Gretchen Schramm (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bluebirds and Cardinals
7/3/17 1:57 pm Irvin Pitts <pittsjam...> Bear Island WMA bird activity - Wood Storks, Roseate Spoonbills and a Reddish Egret
7/3/17 12:03 pm <hilton...> <hilton...> Hilton Pond 06/01/17 (June Reptiles)
7/3/17 10:25 am Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Suet in the Summer
7/3/17 9:23 am Cecelia Mathis <weer...> Re: Suet in the Summer
7/3/17 8:49 am Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Suet in the Summer
7/3/17 6:52 am Rich Boyd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Wood Storks
7/3/17 5:04 am Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Suet in the Summer
7/2/17 6:03 pm John Fussell <jofuss...> they're back
7/2/17 6:01 pm John Fussell <jofuss...> birding in Down East Carteret County this morning
7/2/17 5:58 pm JILL MIDGETT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bear Island WMA & Bennett's Pt Rd, Colleton Co, SC
7/2/17 4:23 am Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> July Scarlet Tanager - Backyard
7/1/17 4:49 pm Shea Tiller (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Thank you!
6/30/17 1:02 pm David Weesner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Juvenile one legged Lesser Black-b. Gull
6/30/17 9:03 am Corey, Ed <ed.corey...> Swallow-tailed Kites - Lake Waccamaw SP
6/29/17 8:19 pm <badgerboy...> HCAS Brookshire Park bird walk this Saturday (Boone)
6/29/17 2:11 pm Clyde Sorenson <sorenson...> Wood storks on Genoa, NC BBS today
6/29/17 9:52 am Roger Moyer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Concord Mills Coots
6/28/17 6:27 pm Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Buckhorn Reservoir, Wilson best vantage point seems city boat landing
6/28/17 5:07 pm <jrgrego...> Cedar Waxwings in Columbia
6/28/17 1:42 pm Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Buckhorn Reservoir, Wilson best vantage point seems city boat landing
6/28/17 1:31 pm Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: (continuing) Painted Bunting at Wilson Educational Forest
6/28/17 11:03 am Ann Truesdale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bear Island WMA & Bennett's Pt Rd, Colleton Co, SC
6/28/17 9:07 am \J. Anderson\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Pilot Mountain State Park - Spring Bird Count
6/28/17 6:26 am Thomas Krakauer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Related to pelagic trips
6/28/17 1:41 am M Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Secretarybirds gender
6/27/17 7:16 pm Jeff Lemons (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Breeding Coots Concord
6/27/17 3:10 pm Rob G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Secretarybirds
6/27/17 12:49 pm M Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Purple Marten fledglings
6/27/17 11:46 am Alan Gamache <bird...> Shiny Cowbird / Fort Macon
6/27/17 11:22 am Derb Carter <derbc...> Secretarybirds
6/27/17 7:49 am Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> (continuing) Painted Bunting at Wilson Educational Forest
6/27/17 7:34 am Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Northern Piedmont BBS routes
6/26/17 9:39 pm Steve Landes (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, Jockey Ridge SP- OBX
6/26/17 6:55 pm Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Grackle roost continues, arrive 8:34 in tall pines, all quiet by 8:42PM
6/26/17 4:05 pm Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Female Shiny Cowbird captured by Painted Bunting Banders
6/26/17 1:42 pm Tony Paladino (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Moving to CA
6/26/17 12:40 pm Cynthia Fox (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> VOA site in Beaufort county NC
6/26/17 12:19 pm Clyde Smith (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Swallow-tailed Kite
6/26/17 12:07 pm Roger Moyer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bennettsville, SC BBS
6/26/17 8:42 am davidclark1338 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Cory's Least Bittern
6/26/17 6:23 am Roger Moyer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bennettsville, SC BBS
6/26/17 5:41 am davidclark1338 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> "Cory's" Least Bittern @ MacKay Island NWR
6/26/17 4:55 am Matt Curran <mcurran1...> White Ibis flying overhead
6/25/17 11:46 am scbirder (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> White-faced Ibis not found today
6/25/17 8:33 am <susan...> RE: White-faced Ibis in Camden, SC
6/24/17 8:03 pm Steve Patterson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> White-faced Ibis in Camden, SC
6/24/17 6:34 am Chris Kelly (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hermit Thrush nest, Haywood Co, NC
6/24/17 4:17 am Tom <tbausti...> Pure white Ibis - Dorchester County, SC
6/23/17 7:44 pm Will Cook <cwcook...> Re: A dozen White Ibis in Cary, NC
6/23/17 6:53 pm Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> A dozen White Ibis in Cary, NC
6/23/17 9:54 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Update: CBC Bonus Field Trip – Blue Ridge Parkway Sept. 16-17 (and some off-topic Alaska stuff)
6/23/17 9:20 am Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: wind farms and birds
6/23/17 8:28 am Elizabeth Faison (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: wind farms and birds
6/23/17 6:55 am Mike Judd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fwd: wind farms and birds
6/23/17 6:24 am Shelley Theye <veery...> Re: I found fledgling Carolina Wrens. Help!
6/23/17 6:17 am Shelley Theye <veery...> Re: I found fledgling Carolina Wrens. Help!
6/23/17 5:41 am Sally Robertson <sally...> Re: wind farms and birds
6/23/17 5:18 am Jonah Losh <jonahl...> I found fledgling Carolina Wrens. Help!
6/22/17 5:46 pm Kevin Metcalf (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Shiny Cowbirds - Ft. Macon, NC
6/22/17 2:51 pm David Weesner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Great Shearwater & Shiny Cowbird
6/22/17 2:27 pm Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Uncertain Shearwater identification
6/22/17 2:18 pm Kay Edgar (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Uncertain Shearwater identification
6/22/17 11:19 am Jonah Losh <jonahl...> Advice on Scissor tailed flycatcher Gunter Rd
6/22/17 10:19 am Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wind farms and birds
6/21/17 4:53 pm Elizabeth Link (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Swainson's Warblers near Brevard NC
6/21/17 3:42 pm Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Shiny Cowbird Continues
6/21/17 3:37 pm Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Yellow-throated Vireo - Question
6/21/17 2:30 pm Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Shiny Cowbird Continues
6/21/17 8:43 am Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Wild Turkey
6/21/17 8:06 am Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...> Wild Turkey
6/21/17 5:28 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Carolina Bird Club Bonus Field Trip – Blue Ridge Parkway September 16-17
6/21/17 3:35 am Lester Coble (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Black-bellied Whistling Ducks this morning
 
Back to top
Date: 7/20/17 6:50 pm
From: <susan...>
Subject: central NC hummingbird programs-- two upcoming Saturdays
All,

Just a note to let folks know that this Saturday(22nd) I will be doing a
banding demonstration/question & answer session at The NC Musuem's
Prairie Ridge facility (off Blue Ridge Rd.) from 9 am-1 pm. Note that,
given the heat, things could end early.

Also, next Saturday (29th) will be my very popular annual program, with
banding, at Big Bloomers Flower Farm in Sanford. It is scheduled to run
from 10 am until 2 pm. That will be the only indoor event of the summer
(for me at least-- not my trapping assistant!). There will be other
folks on site: Lee County Cooperative Extension providing summer
gardening advice and Maura Eagan from Wake County Audubon with
information on enhancing your backyard for birds.

Find links to both events on our North Carolina Hummingbirds Facebook
page.

Hope to see some of you this Saturday-- or maybe next!

Susan Campbell
Southern Pines, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/20/17 2:51 pm
From: Henry Link <linkh...>
Subject: Nesting Mississippi Kites in Greensboro

Six of us (Scott DePue, Matt Wangerin, Roberta Newton, Ann Vansant, Elizabeth Link and I) made a semi-organised search for nesting Mississippi Kites in Greensboro this past Saturday, July 15. A similar search in July 2015 turned up 14 adults and first years and three nests with five nestlings.

We covered some of the same neighborhoods as in 2015 and two new places where birds had been seen this year. The total this year (after a couple of follow-up visits) was 11 adults and one first year. Two nests were located: one on Madison Avenue with at least one nestling and one on Onslow Drive, also with only one confirmed nestling. The Onslow Dr. pair are almost certainly the same birds that Amy Hanson first reported back in May from the Green Valley Swim and Tennis Club, which borders the nest site.

Two other sightings have occurred recently in other areas: one in the Cardinal neighborhood north of the airport and one flying over my backyard in Lindley Park. Given the number of adults seen in different areas it seems probable that there are at least five or six nests in NW Greensboro this year.

Henry Link
Greensboro, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 7/20/17 5:37 am
From: Jerzy Smykla (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: New Hanover Co. Black-bellied Whistling-duck
Does anyone knows whereabouts of the duck? Is it still anywhere around?

Jurek Smykla
Wilmington, NC

From: Sherry Lane <carolinabirds...>
To: <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Saturday, July 15, 2017 3:51 PM
Subject: New Hanover Co. Black-bellied Whistling-duck

Sam Cooper found a Black-bellied Whistling-duck today in the pond on the corner of Shipyard Blvd. and Independence Rd. It is still there at this time.

Sherry Lane
Wilmington, NC

Sent from my iPhone



 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/17 6:55 pm
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Orchard Oriole family last seen July 17
As they went to roost in a pecan tree very overgrown with wisteria. Not seen previous day, nor since, but sometimes birds show up again.






Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/17 4:32 pm
From: Ann Truesdale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Donnelley & Bear Isl WMAs, Colleton Co, SC
The "end of state property" impoundment on the left side of TiTi Rd is
down today. Most of the birds are far back, though, and a couple I spoke
with who had walked down the dike to get closer said they were very
spooky. Fair scope views can be had from by Titi Rd.

Ponds are full at Donnelley lodge.


Ann Truesdale
<anntrue...>
Meggett, SC
 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/17 3:03 pm
From: David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Know of any protocols to monitor bird behavior during upcoming eclipse?
Wed 19 July 2017

All,

The upcoming eclipse (21 Aug 2017) will offer an opportunity to
observe, monitor, and record bird behavior during a total solar
eclipse. Rather than merely make anecdotal observations I'd like to
make more robust observations following a scientific protocol. Does
anyone on the listserv know of any protocols existing or proposed for
observing bird behavior during the eclipse? Maybe there is some
existing protocol (perhaps similar to BBS efforts?) that might be
adapted for use during the eclipse? Does anyone know of any larger
effort to coordinate such observational efforts? Thanks.

Regards,

David McLean
Charleston, SC

--
David C. McLean, Jr.
DCMcLean AT gmail DOT com
 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/17 1:44 pm
From: toadshade <toadshade...>
Subject: FOY Hummingbird
Saw my FOY Hummingbird today. Kinda late. Usually see them the last week of June my yard.

Lower Richland
Columbia, SC

James "Toadshade" Wilson

Sent from my iPhone



 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/17 7:38 am
From: Gilbert Grant (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Great Shearwater at North Topsail Beach, NC
This morning while conducting a seanet survey on North Topsail Beach, Onslow County, NC, I was surprised to see a Great Shearwater flying south between the breakers and the beach-very close to shore.

Gilbert S. Grant
Sneads Ferry , NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 7/18/17 8:09 pm
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Sora at Valle Crucis Park, Watauga County
Just to let people know that there is a possibility of breeding Sora at
Valle Crucis Community Park. A week ago R. Diaz observed a single Sora
in the cattail marsh there, on the right hand side near the matted down
typha. Tonight, at the HCAS membership meeting, about a dozen or more
people got fleeting looks at what appeared to be at least 2 birds, one
adult and a possible juvenile, which seemed to be slightly smaller and
browner without the yellow bill or blue throat coloring. A recording of
the descending whinny and some pictures were obtained.

Apparently there is no confirmed breeding in the state so if this could
be confirmed it would be pretty interesting.

Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 7/18/17 1:02 pm
From: Bill Hilton Jr. <hilton...>
Subject: Hilton Pond 07/01/17 (Midsummer Flora & Pollinators)
Spring and autumn are the big times for flowering plants at Hilton Pond Center (York SC), but even mid-summer brings eye-pleasing blooms when you take time to look. July flowers--native and otherwise--are the focus for installment #658 for "This Week at Hilton Pond." To view our 1-15 Jul 2017 photo essay--complete with references to all-important pollinators--please visit https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.hiltonpond.org_ThisWeek170701.html&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=n5mkx41yyp7Z-Wloc0mhAgIfIY-VH5EO6gVSYH_E4ks&s=4KxLqitZqAIlRP0GvCObKI9EOVhK_W52w4UADAohNHE&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.hiltonpond.org_ThisWeek170701.html&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=n5mkx41yyp7Z-Wloc0mhAgIfIY-VH5EO6gVSYH_E4ks&s=4KxLqitZqAIlRP0GvCObKI9EOVhK_W52w4UADAohNHE&e= > . And don't forget to scroll down for miscellaneous nature notes and lists of all birds (including hummingbirds) banded or recaptured during the period.

Happy Nature Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our Facebook pages at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.facebook.com_HiltonPond&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=n5mkx41yyp7Z-Wloc0mhAgIfIY-VH5EO6gVSYH_E4ks&s=UFnPyRxwQy70P25hFWYtxkzhFBlNJh_5OK3aX0Y-J5w&e= for
timely updates on nature topics, and for info about hummingbirds at
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.facebook.com_rubythroats&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=n5mkx41yyp7Z-Wloc0mhAgIfIY-VH5EO6gVSYH_E4ks&s=DUrP4o2cnObBRMAASoCLc9t7HgFWwIefM8Luf2zlOkY&e=

Follow us on Twitter @hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and education for students of all ages.

"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the sunset." BHjr.

============


 

Back to top
Date: 7/18/17 6:55 am
From: Jessica Walden-Gray (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Juvenile White Ibis in Chatham Co., NC
I'm a beginner-intermediate birder who lurks to learn more but I spotted
something of note today. A JUVENILE WHITE IBIS was foraging in the Briar
Chapel subdivision in Chatham County, NC this morning. I took photos and a
video and have confirmation from my expert birder college classmate.
--
Jessica Walden-Gray
(315) 879-8435
<jess.is.outside...>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/17 5:34 am
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: 2017 Gray-cheeked Thrush Program
Folks,

I have heard from a lot of folks already, and I have a couple of days
already full.
If you are interested, please contact me this week to make sure I have room.
See schedule below.

Wednesday, October 4th
Thursday, October 5th
*Friday, October 6th (FULL)*
*Saturday, October 7th (FULL)*
Sunday, October 8th
Saturday, October 14th
Sunday, October 15th

Thank you to everyone who has signed up this year. Currently 30 folks
signed
up.

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/15/17 12:51 pm
From: Sherry Lane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: New Hanover Co. Black-bellied Whistling-duck
Sam Cooper found a Black-bellied Whistling-duck today in the pond on the corner of Shipyard Blvd. and Independence Rd. It is still there at this time.

Sherry Lane
Wilmington, NC

Sent from my iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 7/14/17 6:46 pm
From: Matt Lawing (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome
We stayed in hotel bougainvillea, trogon lodge in San Gerardo de Dota, and hacienda baru in dominical. All great bird centric hotels.


> El jul. 14, 2017, a las 4:23 PM, Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> escribió:
>
> I've traveled to CR many times, almost moved there 8 years ago and find the above advise very good. Monte Verde is super great and you'll get the quetzal there I'm sure as well as mot mots and trogons. If you really want a world class birding experience, go to Rancho Naturalista near Turrialba (south/east of San Jose​).
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ranchonaturalista.net&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=CYPWHj5rRIaL4fr5b6krRPio9E5zUzohdwNPFhVIamc&s=s9fWA5Ie76uYf-WmyxSf_EjziuwMRaW1XFqSlwN5RII&e=
> It's a little on the expensive side to stay but is inclusive and has great food or you can go there just to bird. Turrialba is only 20 minutes away and has lots of reasonable priced hotels. The guides are incredible! They are set up specifically for birding and people from all over the world make it a destination birding stay. Remember, it IS a rain forest, very humid and rainy but VERY birdy. If you're into any tourist, action stuff, my friend Massi Devoto has a guiding company, Explornatura, in Turrialba and can make ANYTHING possible, tell him Helen sent you and he'll take good care of you. He specializes in logistics.
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.explornatura.com_en_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=CYPWHj5rRIaL4fr5b6krRPio9E5zUzohdwNPFhVIamc&s=368XKoyLbbOQrUa7LyoeZwxeAQHwl0IazVgWxT8SqAg&e= .
> Have a fabulous trip!
> Helen Kalevas
>
> Virus-free. www.avg.com
>
>> On Wed, Jul 12, 2017 at 10:28 AM, David Hart <david.hart...> wrote:
>> For what it’s worth, I’m enjoying hearing the responses. I’m saving them, in the hope that someday I might be able to go to Costa Rica too.
>>
>>
>> Dave Hart
>> Chapel Hill, NC
>>
>>
>> From: <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Jim G <carolinabirds...>
>> Reply-To: Jim G <jgouldoz...>
>> Date: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 at 10:21 AM
>> To: Mike Judd <ebwilderae...>
>> Cc: "<carolinabirds...>" <carolinabirds...>, Jamie Adams <Jamie.Adams...>, Sherry Lane <slane360...>, "Russell R." <rprmando...>
>> Subject: Re: Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome
>>
>> Everyone,
>>
>> I'm getting some great advice and may be able to visit more than one location. Perhaps, I can make it to Savegre Valley first and then Monteverde sometime later in my trip.
>>
>> Also, I'm all for being in the jungle or cloud forest, so dryer locations will be less appealing to me. Just so you know...
>>
>> Please keep the suggestions coming, but I encourage replies off the listserve as to not junk up others inboxes.
>>
>> Thank you all,
>>
>> Jim Gould
>>
>> Sent from my mobile device.
>>
>>> On Jul 12, 2017 10:08 AM, "Mike Judd" <ebwilderae...> wrote:
>>> Jim,
>>>
>>> Since no one else is taking your good suggestion to write you off list I'll jump in as well :-)
>>>
>>> I find Pat O'Donnell's website on living and birding in CR to be the best source of information. https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdingcraft.com_wordpress_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=CYPWHj5rRIaL4fr5b6krRPio9E5zUzohdwNPFhVIamc&s=qtUMa1dmDWSDSIgcJ2V4EF_4WTObtF4oFriQ9ugQ7Es&e=
>>> The current article happens to be on pelagic birding off the ferry. I would suggest you dive into posts for various November as well as specific places
>>> you intend to visit for a good introduction to what you might expect.
>>>
>>> As noted by others, Savegre Valley is the opposite direction from your coastal destination in Guanacaste state whereas Monteverde is pretty much on the way. Sort of.
>>>
>>> BTW have you looked at flying into Liberia rather than San Jose? Quite a bit closer to Tamarindo and you won't miss much by avoiding the busy SJ (actually in Alejuala) airport. Liberia is a nice enough town itself with some birding spots nearby. Violaceous Trogon is now Gartered Trogon the V name going back to a South American bird.
>>> They're still pretty!
>>>
>>> If you do go to Carara NP which is hot as hades year round you can find guides at the gate as you can at Monteverde. Carara is great birding with two main trails to choose from. The nearby boat ride on the RIo Tarcoles can net you some pretty sweet birds like Mangrove Hummer, Mangrove Swallow, the local very colorful version of our Yellow Warbler for very cheap. Cerrro Lodge is very popular, rightly so, I would suggest you look at booking it right now for November.
>>>
>>> Happy trails and good birding.
>>>
>>> Mike Judd
>>> Brevard, NC
>>>
>>>> On Wed, Jul 12, 2017 at 9:12 AM, Sherry Lane <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>>> If you are a member of the Carolina Bird Club you can check out the latest newsletter which has our trip report from our bonus trip to Costa Rica we ran last Feb.
>>>>
>>>> Savegre Valley is a great area where you can find your mentioned target birds.
>>>>
>>>> Sherry Lane
>>>> Wilmington, NC
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On Jul 12, 2017, at 8:19 AM, Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Yes if surfing is why your going to Tamarindo, consider Mal Pais instead. Better birds and less crowded surfing. Tamarindo is kind of touristy and drier. Take the ferry from Puntarenas as you can pick up some pelagics. I had Sabine's Gulls. You can stop at Carara for a day or two on the way. Carara is the intersection of three different types of habitat and is one of the better places in CR to pick up a ton of birds. FYI on the way from Carara to Puntarenas you will go by Boca Barranca one of the longest lefts in CR with exception of Pavones.
>>>>>
>>>>> That being said the whole country is awesome and you can't go wrong.
>>>>>
>>>>> Jamie Adams
>>>>> Wilmington, Nc
>>>>>
>>>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>>>
>>>>> On Jul 12, 2017, at 7:37 AM, Russell R. <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> You're not going to get the Quetzal between San Jose and Tamarindo, but if you have time to take a side trip to Monteverde you should be able to get it and lots of other great birds. There's one species of Trogan you should be able to get in the area you're going to. Violaceous, I think. Carara National Park is on the coast West of San Jose. I haven't been there, but it has a reputation for being very good for birding. Cerro Lodge is near there. The road to the lodge is supposed to be great for birding, as is the lodge itself.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Russell Roe
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> From: Jim G <carolinabirds...>
>>>>>> To: <carolinabirds...>
>>>>>> Sent: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 7:18 AM
>>>>>> Subject: Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Good Morning Birders,
>>>>>>
>>>>>> My wife and I will be heading to Costa Rica in November and I'll have a few days to dedicate to bird watching. Having never birded in CR, I was hoping some of you could give me some pointers on where to bird and stay. Of course, the cheaper the better. Ha. Birds I'd like to see include Long Tailed Silky Flycatcher, Resplendent Quetzal and any Trogons, but most birds in the country would be "lifers." I'm willing to travel but somewhere between San Jose and Tamarindo would be ideal.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Please email me off of the listserve with any advice.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Thanks for you help,
>>>>>> Jim Gould
>>>>>> Southern Shores, NC
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Sent from my mobile device.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>> ********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************ This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank you. **********************************************************************
>>>
>
>
>
> --
> Helen Kalevas
> Near Hillsborough, NC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/14/17 6:14 pm
From: Kyle Kittelberger (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: RFI Field Guide for Southern Africa
Hi Roger and everyone else interested,

Having spent three months in southern Africa this past fall, I can agree with others that SASOL is the best field guide for all the birds of that region. I also would suggest getting the companion app for that guide which is also really great.

However, I HIGHLY recommend also purchasing what is in my opinion the greatest bird field guide I have ever seen: Chamberlain's LBJs- The Definitive Guide to Southern Africa's Little Brown Jobs, by Faansie Peacock. The drawings and information in this book are second to none when it comes to field guides. The flight paths of larks, pipits, cisticolas and others are portrayed too. The whole book is a masterpiece and work of art. A definite must.
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.lbjs.co.za_index.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=dQWLrT7Vk7BipOrFXfndnMFOFe2TcN7LGZLJgMKXNQ8&s=Sk97Xs8sGNMgitUQ0xj20ugqOnMD1dBEeMQIUsplmyo&e=

Cheers,
Kyle Kittelberger
Raleigh, NC

--------------------------------------------
On Fri, 7/14/17, Roger Moyer <carolinabirds...> wrote:

Subject: RFI Field Guide for Southern Africa
To: "<carolinabirds...>" <carolinabirds...>
Date: Friday, July 14, 2017, 1:49 PM








Can anyone recommend a good field guide for South Africa
and Swaziland.  I'm going to be traveling there on
business and am expecting I can get in a couple days birding
in the time I'm there.



Thanks for
the help.



Roger Moyer
Concord, NC




 

Back to top
Date: 7/14/17 4:48 pm
From: Ann Truesdale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: RFI Field Guide for Southern Africa
SASOL Birds of Southern Africa by Ian Sinclair is very good.

I've also used the app, SASOL eBirds of Southern Africa, and found it to
be excellent. I bought the less expensive version without photos, but
was told by my SA friend that the photos were worth the extra cost.

Enjoy!

Ann

Ann Truesdale
<anntrue...>
Meggett, SC

On 7/14/2017 3:49 PM, Roger Moyer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> Can anyone recommend a good field guide for South Africa and Swaziland.
> I'm going to be traveling there on business and am expecting I can get
> in a couple days birding in the time I'm there.
>
>
> Thanks for the help.
>
>
> Roger Moyer
>
> Concord, NC
>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/14/17 4:08 pm
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: RFI Field Guide for Southern Africa
Roger - hands down, the best field guide for South Africa / southern
Africa is Sasol's Birds of Southern Africa.

It is available in printed field guide and app - both of which are excellent.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.sasolbirds.co.za_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=kPv-uF4VGne7x2c4z23JlzjYseOhO6Z9FEc4AQmEkVE&s=4mZiFvYQfB-C1GzycJeQ7nPHuQZYMGXmanStYQU6Nbg&e=

The Sasol Field Guide / app are very nearly as good as the Birds of
East Africa field guide and app by Stevenson, Fanshawe (and Finch).

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC


On Fri, Jul 14, 2017 at 3:49 PM, Roger Moyer <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> Can anyone recommend a good field guide for South Africa and Swaziland. I'm
> going to be traveling there on business and am expecting I can get in a
> couple days birding in the time I'm there.
>
>
> Thanks for the help.
>
>
> Roger Moyer
>
> Concord, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 7/14/17 3:13 pm
From: Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Possible breeding Blue-headed Vireos, Rockingham County, NC
Hi All,

For the past two years I have observed Blue-headed Vireos in the northwest
portion of Rockingham County during the breeding season. Last year I heard
two singing males at the Tyne Road tract of Mayo River State Park. I also
saw a second bird (possible female) with one of the males. This year I
have heard and seen singing males at Tyne Road and another location. The
elevation at the top of Tyne Road is close to 1000 feet. Reading the
species accounts on the "Birds of North Carolina: their Distribution and
Abundance" informed me of the species potential for breeding here. It is
nice to observe four vireo species in a morning, now if only a Philadelphia
Vireo will show up this fall!

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S38097502&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=wWVpAbbWRtYWnaudkvUKdXiXyp1E-I1IE9YgX66mLfI&s=UqDHl3IwnfV4CP0z8nFTsut0YRFEsWoZ5Rs0Xb7OLAg&e=

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S38125880&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=wWVpAbbWRtYWnaudkvUKdXiXyp1E-I1IE9YgX66mLfI&s=J27QDRZN8NHY5sKC-Xf4ZQOql7DIyo4DnUZhOar8IJM&e=

On a non-bird related note, there was a Manta Ray breaching at Holden
Beach, NC this past Sunday. I hear from of of my wife's cousins that it
was seen again Tuesday. I understand that this is unusual this far north.

Marty Wall
currently in Eden, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/14/17 2:01 pm
From: David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Interesting blog post about snails found among the breast feathers of an Indigo Bunting
Fri 14 July 2017

All,

My good friend Rob Dillon, a malacologist and nascent birder, has
recently posted on his blog a fascinating report of numerous snails
being found among the breast feathers of an Indigo Bunting. His blog
posting, dated Friday 26 May 2017, is at: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__fwgna.blogspot.com_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=L8hTccAIPlCnp0byYxj7iPQPT-kAm-YPvTwmZuEmfdw&s=GVKDgIqihsWWsWOnAtd1a9hZx7SlrhRyXMEDM31kVUI&e= .
Read there about the discovery and the collaboration between
ornithologists and malacologists.

Regards,

David McLean
Charleston, SC

--
David C. McLean, Jr.
DCMcLean AT gmail DOT com
 

Back to top
Date: 7/14/17 1:56 pm
From: David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fall migration begins with Western Sandpipers on Bulls Island
Fri 14 July 2017

All,

I have a new blog posting on my Birding Bulls blog about early fall
Western Sandpiper migrants. It was a hot day on the island, and there
was a fire to boot. I invite you to read more at:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__birdingbulls.blogspot.com_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=372XIXhd5gYsvHcOLOO6jDEi89O-kOx6lDJNIgaA9Mw&s=veJyPnpl5wRLBTCDbRwsGf3o7NBsCsbDAC444QGVBPo&e=

Regards,

David McLean
Charleston, SC

--
David C. McLean, Jr.
DCMcLean AT gmail DOT com
 

Back to top
Date: 7/14/17 1:24 pm
From: Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome
I've traveled to CR many times, almost moved there 8 years ago and find the
above advise very good. Monte Verde is super great and you'll get the
quetzal there I'm sure as well as mot mots and trogons. If you really want
a world class birding experience, go to Rancho Naturalista near Turrialba
(south/east of San Jose​).
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ranchonaturalista.net&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=z6wNA0dGx1YnVTbkkscfplE_i6FcjAOvBD-4ZIPYjm8&s=2Qv38uOjXmYjuETsQ8Tv5fKPbpF_J9V-U74iyaOIZTA&e=
It's a little on the expensive side to stay but is inclusive and has great
food or you can go there just to bird. Turrialba is only 20 minutes away
and has lots of reasonable priced hotels. The guides are incredible! They
are set up specifically for birding and people from all over the world make
it a destination birding stay. Remember, it IS a rain forest, very humid
and rainy but VERY birdy. If you're into any tourist, action stuff, my
friend Massi Devoto has a guiding company, Explornatura, in Turrialba and
can make ANYTHING possible, tell him Helen sent you and he'll take good
care of you. He specializes in logistics.
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.explornatura.com_en_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=z6wNA0dGx1YnVTbkkscfplE_i6FcjAOvBD-4ZIPYjm8&s=X0T3xcEhO34aswlAFhWnkR5ieOoCjJ1eZEuX4VDG9vo&e= .
Have a fabulous trip!
Helen Kalevas

<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.avg.com_email-2Dsignature-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=z6wNA0dGx1YnVTbkkscfplE_i6FcjAOvBD-4ZIPYjm8&s=hpG-ULh5vXIJBYuFo3J4S5T204BADEMG68b1NC8G5cE&e= >
Virus-free.
www.avg.com
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<#m_5324554958624386795_DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>

On Wed, Jul 12, 2017 at 10:28 AM, David Hart <david.hart...> wrote:

> For what it’s worth, I’m enjoying hearing the responses. I’m saving them,
> in the hope that someday I might be able to go to Costa Rica too.
>
>
> Dave Hart
> Chapel Hill, NC
>
>
> From: <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Jim G <
> <carolinabirds...>
> Reply-To: Jim G <jgouldoz...>
> Date: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 at 10:21 AM
> To: Mike Judd <ebwilderae...>
> Cc: "<carolinabirds...>" <carolinabirds...>, Jamie Adams <
> <Jamie.Adams...>, Sherry Lane <slane360...>, "Russell
> R." <rprmando...>
> Subject: Re: Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome
>
> Everyone,
>
> I'm getting some great advice and may be able to visit more than one
> location. Perhaps, I can make it to Savegre Valley first and then
> Monteverde sometime later in my trip.
>
> Also, I'm all for being in the jungle or cloud forest, so dryer locations
> will be less appealing to me. Just so you know...
>
> Please keep the suggestions coming, but I encourage replies off the
> listserve as to not junk up others inboxes.
>
> Thank you all,
>
> Jim Gould
>
> Sent from my mobile device.
>
> On Jul 12, 2017 10:08 AM, "Mike Judd" <ebwilderae...> wrote:
>
>> Jim,
>>
>> Since no one else is taking your good suggestion to write you off list
>> I'll jump in as well :-)
>>
>> I find Pat O'Donnell's website on living and birding in CR to be the best
>> source of information. https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdingcraft.com_wordpress_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=z6wNA0dGx1YnVTbkkscfplE_i6FcjAOvBD-4ZIPYjm8&s=bNKx103RV2iRIhMGY58wfQh8xhBCHFXphS8VTkT1bfA&e=
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdingcraft.com_wordpress_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=_xrk1RFmW8Hd7Ggf8fQPiEoCDRzxko8I05bcWyHPuvs&s=nvvo59RS7gVAfbAEQAxr3LE2iMJJwHGzqmwLACyfMnE&e=>
>> The current article happens to be on pelagic birding off the ferry. I
>> would suggest you dive into posts for various November as well as specific
>> places
>> you intend to visit for a good introduction to what you might expect.
>>
>> As noted by others, Savegre Valley is the opposite direction from your
>> coastal destination in Guanacaste state whereas Monteverde is pretty much
>> on the way. Sort of.
>>
>> BTW have you looked at flying into Liberia rather than San Jose? Quite a
>> bit closer to Tamarindo and you won't miss much by avoiding the busy SJ
>> (actually in Alejuala) airport. Liberia is a nice enough town itself with
>> some birding spots nearby. Violaceous Trogon is now Gartered Trogon the V
>> name going back to a South American bird.
>> They're still pretty!
>>
>> If you do go to Carara NP which is hot as hades year round you can find
>> guides at the gate as you can at Monteverde. Carara is great birding with
>> two main trails to choose from. The nearby boat ride on the RIo Tarcoles
>> can net you some pretty sweet birds like Mangrove Hummer, Mangrove Swallow,
>> the local very colorful version of our Yellow Warbler for very cheap.
>> Cerrro Lodge is very popular, rightly so, I would suggest you look at
>> booking it right now for November.
>>
>> Happy trails and good birding.
>>
>> Mike Judd
>> Brevard, NC
>>
>> On Wed, Jul 12, 2017 at 9:12 AM, Sherry Lane <carolinabirds...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> If you are a member of the Carolina Bird Club you can check out the
>>> latest newsletter which has our trip report from our bonus trip to Costa
>>> Rica we ran last Feb.
>>>
>>> Savegre Valley is a great area where you can find your mentioned target
>>> birds.
>>>
>>> Sherry Lane
>>> Wilmington, NC
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On Jul 12, 2017, at 8:19 AM, Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing
>>> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Yes if surfing is why your going to Tamarindo, consider Mal Pais
>>> instead. Better birds and less crowded surfing. Tamarindo is kind of
>>> touristy and drier. Take the ferry from Puntarenas as you can pick up some
>>> pelagics. I had Sabine's Gulls. You can stop at Carara for a day or two on
>>> the way. Carara is the intersection of three different types of habitat
>>> and is one of the better places in CR to pick up a ton of birds. FYI on
>>> the way from Carara to Puntarenas you will go by Boca Barranca one of the
>>> longest lefts in CR with exception of Pavones.
>>>
>>> That being said the whole country is awesome and you can't go wrong.
>>>
>>> Jamie Adams
>>> Wilmington, Nc
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>
>>> On Jul 12, 2017, at 7:37 AM, Russell R. <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>>
>>> You're not going to get the Quetzal between San Jose and Tamarindo, but
>>> if you have time to take a side trip to Monteverde you should be able to
>>> get it and lots of other great birds. There's one species of Trogan you
>>> should be able to get in the area you're going to. Violaceous, I think.
>>> Carara National Park is on the coast West of San Jose. I haven't been
>>> there, but it has a reputation for being very good for birding. Cerro Lodge
>>> is near there. The road to the lodge is supposed to be great for birding,
>>> as is the lodge itself.
>>>
>>> Russell Roe
>>>
>>>
>>> ------------------------------
>>> *From:* Jim G <carolinabirds...>
>>> *To:* <carolinabirds...>
>>> *Sent:* Wednesday, July 12, 2017 7:18 AM
>>> *Subject:* Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome
>>>
>>> Good Morning Birders,
>>>
>>> My wife and I will be heading to Costa Rica in November and I'll have a
>>> few days to dedicate to bird watching. Having never birded in CR, I was
>>> hoping some of you could give me some pointers on where to bird and stay.
>>> Of course, the cheaper the better. Ha. Birds I'd like to see include Long
>>> Tailed Silky Flycatcher, Resplendent Quetzal and any Trogons, but most
>>> birds in the country would be "lifers." I'm willing to travel but somewhere
>>> between San Jose and Tamarindo would be ideal.
>>>
>>> Please email me off of the listserve with any advice.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Thanks for you help,
>>> Jim Gould
>>> Southern Shores, NC
>>>
>>> Sent from my mobile device.
>>>
>>>
>>> ********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************
>>> This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL and may
>>> contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED information and is
>>> intended for the authorized recipient of the sender. If you are not the
>>> intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure,
>>> copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included
>>> in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this
>>> message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and
>>> permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies
>>> thereof, from all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.).
>>> Thank you. **********************************************************************
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>


--
Helen Kalevas
Near Hillsborough, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/14/17 12:51 pm
From: Roger Moyer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RFI Field Guide for Southern Africa
Can anyone recommend a good field guide for South Africa and Swaziland. I'm going to be traveling there on business and am expecting I can get in a couple days birding in the time I'm there.


Thanks for the help.


Roger Moyer

Concord, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/17 12:25 pm
From: Ann Truesdale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Donnelley & Bear Isl WMAs, Colleton Co, SC
Current status as of this morning: at Bear Island all ponds accessible
by road are full, and the wonderful snag covered with blooming trumpet
vine behind the equipment sheds has gone down. That was a good
hummingbird magnet, but now only a small patch of trumpet vine is left
in brush near the water.

At Donnelley, lodge pond is down today with a fair number of all the
usual birds - woodstorks, egrets & herons, both ibis, spoonbills, but
only a couple of shorebirds. A photographer told me that DNR personnel
told her that the water would be brought back up beginning tomorrow.
Best show of the day was 3-4 ST kites and ~10 MI kites foraging over
Fishburne Pond.


--
Ann Truesdale
<anntrue...>
Meggett, SC
 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/17 10:04 am
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: UNC radio program on B.Eagles, Ellen Tinsley rebroadcast 8PM; cottonmouth behavior; eutrophication of Mattamuskeet
The State Of Things program at noon had a woman describing eagles at Mattamuskeet, and she will give 2 talks in near future at Jordan Lake where she watches eagles. Program is available as podcast and is repeated at 8PM on your local UNC radio station. Look at website for details of talks.

While I am on the horn, who knows herpetologists who might confirm a public TV program from a few years ago which described male cottonmouths eating babies, in order to mate with bereaved ovoviviparous cottonmouth mother?
Searching the web I do not think this is so, especially since the young come out in fall, the females mainly mating in spring. But, as everybody who thinks it through--what do I really know?
I do think the authors/editors of that TV program must be fixated on such behavior by lions and some primates.

A third subtopic is that apparently scientists are now trying to understand why Mattamuskeet is getting too much nutrients. Probably, it is partially the decades of import of nutrients from outlying fields by the overpopulation of Snow Geese and Tundra Swans. Guess what the refuge personnel did when I asked about this, some 10 years ago?
What a joke, my typo "overpoopulation"! And how about Pungo Lake. But, of course, with sea level rise, as water levels outside rise, there is less flow out of the lakes (due to less hydraulic head) to cleanse from human-generated waterfowl poop in the lakes.
(Another fake news item might be that the polar bears starving due to less ice might be the solution, when they find nesting Snow Geese as alternate , subsistence food.)


Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/17 2:35 am
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: Swallow-tailed Kite in Craven County, NC
Yesterday I had a pleasant surprise: a Swallow-tailed Kite flying along
next to US 70 a few miles S of New Bern (at about Thurmond Road).

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/12/17 4:40 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: North Carolina Biodiversity Project website is now online!
Fellow biologists and nature lovers:

I am proud to announce the opening of a new website -- an umbrella website
called the *North Carolina Biodiversity Project*, which serves as the home
for a number of existing websites on taxonomic groups of animals found in
North Carolina, as well as a home for lists/checklists of a large number of
taxonomic groups of animals, as well. Its URL is:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__nc-2Dbiodiversity.com_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=FSB5qmY0FGau0zavhiJV-bticxtWTPWpYx-aKbQW5Kk&s=6vbjxpf-CWIzuNIK8eD2wHWSJMOwk-xySChTodyFJ0A&e=

On the homepage, under *Taxonomic Groups* you can click on a number of
"Websites", as well as several additional "Checklists", for various
taxonomic groups. You might already have bookmarked existing sites such as
Mammals, Butterflies, and Dragonflies and Damselflies. The Moths website
has only recently opened, as has the Hemipteran Hoppers. The Grasshoppers,
Crickets, and Katydids site is still under construction, though a Checklist
is available. Checklists for Amphibians and Reptiles, plus Birds, is also
available on the site.

You will also see a number of *Related Links* on the bottom of the
homepage. These links to other existing websites (not part of the NCBP)
should help you learn more about the names, statuses, ranges, and other
information about the animals of North Carolina.

A Vascular Plants website is currently being developed and will be uploaded
onto the NCBP website in the next month or two, though much work still
needs to be done with the plant list (as it contains roughly 4,000 taxa!).
More details on this list will be presented when it goes online. New
checklists will soon be uploaded on groups such as Freshwater Fishes,
Coastal/Marine Fishes, Freshwater Mussels, Snails/Gastropods, Crayfishes,
and additional taxonomic groups.

So, take a look at the new NCBP site, bookmark it, and use it as an
umbrella site so that you can more easily get to the array of existing
websites and checklists of the animals of the state.

Steve Hall is the lead biologist of the NCBP and its "founder", plus the
primarily author of the moth website. Tom Howard and I have authored a
number of the sites, though there are seven other current group members who
have participated in developing (writing and/or editing) the existing
sites. We can accept new group members, as long as they are authorities on
a particular group of organisms and are willing to work on creating a new
website (or checklist) or maintaining the ones that already exist
(including the upcoming vascular plants website).

Enjoy the site!

Harry LeGrand
retired, and former Zoologist of the NC Natural Heritage Program

 

Back to top
Date: 7/12/17 1:21 pm
From: Edith Tatum (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hummingbirds
I was in a local Lowes and saw a man with a hummingbird feed and the red nectar! I told him he didn't need to buy nectar and to make his own. I told him how and he thanked me and put the red stuff back. Just doing something for hummingbirds one person at a time.
Edith Tatum
Durham

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 7/12/17 11:38 am
From: Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: gull poop in easier to understand language
Here's a journalist's take on the work by Scott Winton and Mark River
quoted in my previous email.

Garbage-Fed Seagulls Are Spoiling Our Lakes and Reservoirs With Their Poop

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__gizmodo.com_garbage-2Dfed-2Dseagulls-2Dare-2Dspoiling-2Dour-2Dlakes-2Dand-2Dreservo-2D1796330393&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=2KHvPThyGakdVIBuxJsmLu-inoijmSIA8HUcr2ldfPc&s=93ef_7_0V3g5cXkVJ5skRob-qfdn_FLCdrr9W-SyEbA&e=

--
Norm Budnitz
Orange County
North Carolina
 

Back to top
Date: 7/12/17 11:33 am
From: Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: gull poop
For a number of years, we have been documenting huge numbers of gulls
on Jordan and Falls Lakes (NC) during our annual Christmas Bird
Counts. Now Scott Winton and Mark River of Duke University have put
some numbers on the impact these gulls might be having on these lakes.
Herewith, the abstract from their just-published paper on the subject.


The Biogeochemical Implications of Massive Gull Flocks at Landfills

Scott Winton and Mark River, Duke University Wetland Center, Nicholas
School of the Environment, Durham, NC, USA 27708

Abstract

Gulls have long been observed concentrating in flocks of tens to
hundreds of thousands at the anthropogenic food sources provided by
landfills. Yet, the biogeochemical implications of the landfill gull
phenomenon have been largely ignored. This study has two goals: 1) to
understand the magnitude and geographic extent of landfill gulls in
North America, and 2) to quantify the amount of carbon (C), nitrogen
(N), and phosphorus (P) transported from landfills to gull roosting
sites in order to understand their potential impacts on water quality
and methane (CH4) emission. We synthesized and mapped data from the
eBird Citizen Science database and found that 1.4 million gulls have
been documented at landfills throughout North America, though the
actual population is probably greater than 5 million. Using a
carnivorous bird transport model we estimate that these gulls
transport 39,000 to 139,000 kg of P and 240,000 to 858,000 kg of N y−1
to neighboring water bodies and avoid roughly 1.1 to 3.9 Tg y−1 of
landfill CH4 emissions. The avoided CH4 emission mitigation is
insignificant in the context of gross landfill emissions, but the
transported nutrients may be relevant to water quality management at
local and continental scales. For example, at the Jordan Lake
reservoir in North Carolina, a flock of 49,000 Ring-billed Gulls
(Larus delawarensis) annually deposits landfill feces containing 1070
kg P, an amount equivalent to approximately half of total maximum
daily load reduction targets and worth roughly $2.2 million USD in
nutrient credits. We estimate that continent-wide gull impacts are
worth at least $100 million in nutrient offset credits. We conclude
that mega-flocks of landfill gulls are common and widespread, and that
their capacity to transport nutrients may be contributing to the
eutrophication of aquatic ecosystems and water supplies.


--
Norm Budnitz
Orange County
North Carolina
 

Back to top
Date: 7/12/17 7:29 am
From: David Hart <david.hart...>
Subject: Re: Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome
For what its worth, Im enjoying hearing the responses. Im saving them, in the hope that someday I might be able to go to Costa Rica too.


Dave Hart
Chapel Hill, NC


From: <carolinabirds-request...><mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>> on behalf of Jim G <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>>
Reply-To: Jim G <jgouldoz...><mailto:<jgouldoz...>>
Date: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 at 10:21 AM
To: Mike Judd <ebwilderae...><mailto:<ebwilderae...>>
Cc: "<carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>" <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>>, Jamie Adams <Jamie.Adams...><mailto:<Jamie.Adams...>>, Sherry Lane <slane360...><mailto:<slane360...>>, "Russell R." <rprmando...><mailto:<rprmando...>>
Subject: Re: Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome

Everyone,

I'm getting some great advice and may be able to visit more than one location. Perhaps, I can make it to Savegre Valley first and then Monteverde sometime later in my trip.

Also, I'm all for being in the jungle or cloud forest, so dryer locations will be less appealing to me. Just so you know...

Please keep the suggestions coming, but I encourage replies off the listserve as to not junk up others inboxes.

Thank you all,

Jim Gould

Sent from my mobile device.

On Jul 12, 2017 10:08 AM, "Mike Judd" <ebwilderae...><mailto:<ebwilderae...>> wrote:
Jim,

Since no one else is taking your good suggestion to write you off list I'll jump in as well :-)

I find Pat O'Donnell's website on living and birding in CR to be the best source of information. https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdingcraft.com_wordpress_&d=DwIFEA&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=9SU776jalMUjN19qWoXrRmYmwNsgc4qwib8s8T3k68c&s=Qx9DVkKkafDU4QNsazxTwP9huQ9yrhBYYhwTt3Aai_o&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdingcraft.com_wordpress_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=_xrk1RFmW8Hd7Ggf8fQPiEoCDRzxko8I05bcWyHPuvs&s=nvvo59RS7gVAfbAEQAxr3LE2iMJJwHGzqmwLACyfMnE&e=>
The current article happens to be on pelagic birding off the ferry. I would suggest you dive into posts for various November as well as specific places
you intend to visit for a good introduction to what you might expect.

As noted by others, Savegre Valley is the opposite direction from your coastal destination in Guanacaste state whereas Monteverde is pretty much on the way. Sort of.

BTW have you looked at flying into Liberia rather than San Jose? Quite a bit closer to Tamarindo and you won't miss much by avoiding the busy SJ (actually in Alejuala) airport. Liberia is a nice enough town itself with some birding spots nearby. Violaceous Trogon is now Gartered Trogon the V name going back to a South American bird.
They're still pretty!

If you do go to Carara NP which is hot as hades year round you can find guides at the gate as you can at Monteverde. Carara is great birding with two main trails to choose from. The nearby boat ride on the RIo Tarcoles can net you some pretty sweet birds like Mangrove Hummer, Mangrove Swallow, the local very colorful version of our Yellow Warbler for very cheap. Cerrro Lodge is very popular, rightly so, I would suggest you look at booking it right now for November.

Happy trails and good birding.

Mike Judd
Brevard, NC

On Wed, Jul 12, 2017 at 9:12 AM, Sherry Lane <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
If you are a member of the Carolina Bird Club you can check out the latest newsletter which has our trip report from our bonus trip to Costa Rica we ran last Feb.

Savegre Valley is a great area where you can find your mentioned target birds.

Sherry Lane
Wilmington, NC



On Jul 12, 2017, at 8:19 AM, Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

Yes if surfing is why your going to Tamarindo, consider Mal Pais instead. Better birds and less crowded surfing. Tamarindo is kind of touristy and drier. Take the ferry from Puntarenas as you can pick up some pelagics. I had Sabine's Gulls. You can stop at Carara for a day or two on the way. Carara is the intersection of three different types of habitat and is one of the better places in CR to pick up a ton of birds. FYI on the way from Carara to Puntarenas you will go by Boca Barranca one of the longest lefts in CR with exception of Pavones.

That being said the whole country is awesome and you can't go wrong.

Jamie Adams
Wilmington, Nc

Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 12, 2017, at 7:37 AM, Russell R. <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

You're not going to get the Quetzal between San Jose and Tamarindo, but if you have time to take a side trip to Monteverde you should be able to get it and lots of other great birds. There's one species of Trogan you should be able to get in the area you're going to. Violaceous, I think. Carara National Park is on the coast West of San Jose. I haven't been there, but it has a reputation for being very good for birding. Cerro Lodge is near there. The road to the lodge is supposed to be great for birding, as is the lodge itself.

Russell Roe


________________________________
From: Jim G <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>>
To: <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>
Sent: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 7:18 AM
Subject: Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome

Good Morning Birders,

My wife and I will be heading to Costa Rica in November and I'll have a few days to dedicate to bird watching. Having never birded in CR, I was hoping some of you could give me some pointers on where to bird and stay. Of course, the cheaper the better. Ha. Birds I'd like to see include Long Tailed Silky Flycatcher, Resplendent Quetzal and any Trogons, but most birds in the country would be "lifers." I'm willing to travel but somewhere between San Jose and Tamarindo would be ideal.

Please email me off of the listserve with any advice.



Thanks for you help,
Jim Gould
Southern Shores, NC

Sent from my mobile device.


********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************ This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank you. **********************************************************************


 

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Date: 7/12/17 7:22 am
From: Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome
Everyone,

I'm getting some great advice and may be able to visit more than one
location. Perhaps, I can make it to Savegre Valley first and then
Monteverde sometime later in my trip.

Also, I'm all for being in the jungle or cloud forest, so dryer locations
will be less appealing to me. Just so you know...

Please keep the suggestions coming, but I encourage replies off the
listserve as to not junk up others inboxes.

Thank you all,

Jim Gould

Sent from my mobile device.

On Jul 12, 2017 10:08 AM, "Mike Judd" <ebwilderae...> wrote:

> Jim,
>
> Since no one else is taking your good suggestion to write you off list
> I'll jump in as well :-)
>
> I find Pat O'Donnell's website on living and birding in CR to be the best
> source of information. https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdingcraft.com_wordpress_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=_xrk1RFmW8Hd7Ggf8fQPiEoCDRzxko8I05bcWyHPuvs&s=nvvo59RS7gVAfbAEQAxr3LE2iMJJwHGzqmwLACyfMnE&e=
> The current article happens to be on pelagic birding off the ferry. I
> would suggest you dive into posts for various November as well as specific
> places
> you intend to visit for a good introduction to what you might expect.
>
> As noted by others, Savegre Valley is the opposite direction from your
> coastal destination in Guanacaste state whereas Monteverde is pretty much
> on the way. Sort of.
>
> BTW have you looked at flying into Liberia rather than San Jose? Quite a
> bit closer to Tamarindo and you won't miss much by avoiding the busy SJ
> (actually in Alejuala) airport. Liberia is a nice enough town itself with
> some birding spots nearby. Violaceous Trogon is now Gartered Trogon the V
> name going back to a South American bird.
> They're still pretty!
>
> If you do go to Carara NP which is hot as hades year round you can find
> guides at the gate as you can at Monteverde. Carara is great birding with
> two main trails to choose from. The nearby boat ride on the RIo Tarcoles
> can net you some pretty sweet birds like Mangrove Hummer, Mangrove Swallow,
> the local very colorful version of our Yellow Warbler for very cheap.
> Cerrro Lodge is very popular, rightly so, I would suggest you look at
> booking it right now for November.
>
> Happy trails and good birding.
>
> Mike Judd
> Brevard, NC
>
> On Wed, Jul 12, 2017 at 9:12 AM, Sherry Lane <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> If you are a member of the Carolina Bird Club you can check out the
>> latest newsletter which has our trip report from our bonus trip to Costa
>> Rica we ran last Feb.
>>
>> Savegre Valley is a great area where you can find your mentioned target
>> birds.
>>
>> Sherry Lane
>> Wilmington, NC
>>
>>
>>
>> On Jul 12, 2017, at 8:19 AM, Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
>> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> Yes if surfing is why your going to Tamarindo, consider Mal Pais
>> instead. Better birds and less crowded surfing. Tamarindo is kind of
>> touristy and drier. Take the ferry from Puntarenas as you can pick up some
>> pelagics. I had Sabine's Gulls. You can stop at Carara for a day or two on
>> the way. Carara is the intersection of three different types of habitat
>> and is one of the better places in CR to pick up a ton of birds. FYI on
>> the way from Carara to Puntarenas you will go by Boca Barranca one of the
>> longest lefts in CR with exception of Pavones.
>>
>> That being said the whole country is awesome and you can't go wrong.
>>
>> Jamie Adams
>> Wilmington, Nc
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On Jul 12, 2017, at 7:37 AM, Russell R. <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> You're not going to get the Quetzal between San Jose and Tamarindo, but
>> if you have time to take a side trip to Monteverde you should be able to
>> get it and lots of other great birds. There's one species of Trogan you
>> should be able to get in the area you're going to. Violaceous, I think.
>> Carara National Park is on the coast West of San Jose. I haven't been
>> there, but it has a reputation for being very good for birding. Cerro Lodge
>> is near there. The road to the lodge is supposed to be great for birding,
>> as is the lodge itself.
>>
>> Russell Roe
>>
>>
>> ------------------------------
>> *From:* Jim G <carolinabirds...>
>> *To:* <carolinabirds...>
>> *Sent:* Wednesday, July 12, 2017 7:18 AM
>> *Subject:* Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome
>>
>> Good Morning Birders,
>>
>> My wife and I will be heading to Costa Rica in November and I'll have a
>> few days to dedicate to bird watching. Having never birded in CR, I was
>> hoping some of you could give me some pointers on where to bird and stay.
>> Of course, the cheaper the better. Ha. Birds I'd like to see include Long
>> Tailed Silky Flycatcher, Resplendent Quetzal and any Trogons, but most
>> birds in the country would be "lifers." I'm willing to travel but somewhere
>> between San Jose and Tamarindo would be ideal.
>>
>> Please email me off of the listserve with any advice.
>>
>>
>>
>> Thanks for you help,
>> Jim Gould
>> Southern Shores, NC
>>
>> Sent from my mobile device.
>>
>>
>> ********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************
>> This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL and may
>> contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED information and is
>> intended for the authorized recipient of the sender. If you are not the
>> intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure,
>> copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included
>> in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this
>> message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and
>> permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies
>> thereof, from all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.).
>> Thank you. **********************************************************************
>>
>>
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/12/17 7:08 am
From: Mike Judd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome
Jim,

Since no one else is taking your good suggestion to write you off list I'll
jump in as well :-)

I find Pat O'Donnell's website on living and birding in CR to be the best
source of information. https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdingcraft.com_wordpress_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=6rCo3HuXuYgkQeWLtpjr1CZNAm560YJGMuI1goivC7w&s=MwEwLLOn5R1_YjX86zwtGJwgsyot11p_E5svsXrqx7M&e=
The current article happens to be on pelagic birding off the ferry. I
would suggest you dive into posts for various November as well as specific
places
you intend to visit for a good introduction to what you might expect.

As noted by others, Savegre Valley is the opposite direction from your
coastal destination in Guanacaste state whereas Monteverde is pretty much
on the way. Sort of.

BTW have you looked at flying into Liberia rather than San Jose? Quite a
bit closer to Tamarindo and you won't miss much by avoiding the busy SJ
(actually in Alejuala) airport. Liberia is a nice enough town itself with
some birding spots nearby. Violaceous Trogon is now Gartered Trogon the V
name going back to a South American bird.
They're still pretty!

If you do go to Carara NP which is hot as hades year round you can find
guides at the gate as you can at Monteverde. Carara is great birding with
two main trails to choose from. The nearby boat ride on the RIo Tarcoles
can net you some pretty sweet birds like Mangrove Hummer, Mangrove Swallow,
the local very colorful version of our Yellow Warbler for very cheap.
Cerrro Lodge is very popular, rightly so, I would suggest you look at
booking it right now for November.

Happy trails and good birding.

Mike Judd
Brevard, NC

On Wed, Jul 12, 2017 at 9:12 AM, Sherry Lane <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> If you are a member of the Carolina Bird Club you can check out the latest
> newsletter which has our trip report from our bonus trip to Costa Rica we
> ran last Feb.
>
> Savegre Valley is a great area where you can find your mentioned target
> birds.
>
> Sherry Lane
> Wilmington, NC
>
>
>
> On Jul 12, 2017, at 8:19 AM, Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <
> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Yes if surfing is why your going to Tamarindo, consider Mal Pais instead.
> Better birds and less crowded surfing. Tamarindo is kind of touristy and
> drier. Take the ferry from Puntarenas as you can pick up some pelagics. I
> had Sabine's Gulls. You can stop at Carara for a day or two on the way.
> Carara is the intersection of three different types of habitat and is one
> of the better places in CR to pick up a ton of birds. FYI on the way from
> Carara to Puntarenas you will go by Boca Barranca one of the longest lefts
> in CR with exception of Pavones.
>
> That being said the whole country is awesome and you can't go wrong.
>
> Jamie Adams
> Wilmington, Nc
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jul 12, 2017, at 7:37 AM, Russell R. <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> You're not going to get the Quetzal between San Jose and Tamarindo, but if
> you have time to take a side trip to Monteverde you should be able to get
> it and lots of other great birds. There's one species of Trogan you should
> be able to get in the area you're going to. Violaceous, I think. Carara
> National Park is on the coast West of San Jose. I haven't been there, but
> it has a reputation for being very good for birding. Cerro Lodge is near
> there. The road to the lodge is supposed to be great for birding, as is the
> lodge itself.
>
> Russell Roe
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* Jim G <carolinabirds...>
> *To:* <carolinabirds...>
> *Sent:* Wednesday, July 12, 2017 7:18 AM
> *Subject:* Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome
>
> Good Morning Birders,
>
> My wife and I will be heading to Costa Rica in November and I'll have a
> few days to dedicate to bird watching. Having never birded in CR, I was
> hoping some of you could give me some pointers on where to bird and stay.
> Of course, the cheaper the better. Ha. Birds I'd like to see include Long
> Tailed Silky Flycatcher, Resplendent Quetzal and any Trogons, but most
> birds in the country would be "lifers." I'm willing to travel but somewhere
> between San Jose and Tamarindo would be ideal.
>
> Please email me off of the listserve with any advice.
>
>
>
> Thanks for you help,
> Jim Gould
> Southern Shores, NC
>
> Sent from my mobile device.
>
>
> ********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************
> This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL and may
> contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED information and is
> intended for the authorized recipient of the sender. If you are not the
> intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure,
> copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included
> in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this
> message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and
> permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies
> thereof, from all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.).
> Thank you. **********************************************************************
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/12/17 6:13 am
From: Sherry Lane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome
If you are a member of the Carolina Bird Club you can check out the latest newsletter which has our trip report from our bonus trip to Costa Rica we ran last Feb.

Savegre Valley is a great area where you can find your mentioned target birds.

Sherry Lane
Wilmington, NC



> On Jul 12, 2017, at 8:19 AM, Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Yes if surfing is why your going to Tamarindo, consider Mal Pais instead. Better birds and less crowded surfing. Tamarindo is kind of touristy and drier. Take the ferry from Puntarenas as you can pick up some pelagics. I had Sabine's Gulls. You can stop at Carara for a day or two on the way. Carara is the intersection of three different types of habitat and is one of the better places in CR to pick up a ton of birds. FYI on the way from Carara to Puntarenas you will go by Boca Barranca one of the longest lefts in CR with exception of Pavones.
>
> That being said the whole country is awesome and you can't go wrong.
>
> Jamie Adams
> Wilmington, Nc
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jul 12, 2017, at 7:37 AM, Russell R. <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
>> You're not going to get the Quetzal between San Jose and Tamarindo, but if you have time to take a side trip to Monteverde you should be able to get it and lots of other great birds. There's one species of Trogan you should be able to get in the area you're going to. Violaceous, I think. Carara National Park is on the coast West of San Jose. I haven't been there, but it has a reputation for being very good for birding. Cerro Lodge is near there. The road to the lodge is supposed to be great for birding, as is the lodge itself.
>>
>> Russell Roe
>>
>>
>> From: Jim G <carolinabirds...>
>> To: <carolinabirds...>
>> Sent: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 7:18 AM
>> Subject: Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome
>>
>> Good Morning Birders,
>>
>> My wife and I will be heading to Costa Rica in November and I'll have a few days to dedicate to bird watching. Having never birded in CR, I was hoping some of you could give me some pointers on where to bird and stay. Of course, the cheaper the better. Ha. Birds I'd like to see include Long Tailed Silky Flycatcher, Resplendent Quetzal and any Trogons, but most birds in the country would be "lifers." I'm willing to travel but somewhere between San Jose and Tamarindo would be ideal.
>>
>> Please email me off of the listserve with any advice.
>>
>>
>>
>> Thanks for you help,
>> Jim Gould
>> Southern Shores, NC
>>
>> Sent from my mobile device.
>>
>>
> ********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************ This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank you. **********************************************************************

 

Back to top
Date: 7/12/17 5:20 am
From: Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome
Yes if surfing is why your going to Tamarindo, consider Mal Pais instead. Better birds and less crowded surfing. Tamarindo is kind of touristy and drier. Take the ferry from Puntarenas as you can pick up some pelagics. I had Sabine's Gulls. You can stop at Carara for a day or two on the way. Carara is the intersection of three different types of habitat and is one of the better places in CR to pick up a ton of birds. FYI on the way from Carara to Puntarenas you will go by Boca Barranca one of the longest lefts in CR with exception of Pavones.

That being said the whole country is awesome and you can't go wrong.

Jamie Adams
Wilmington, Nc

Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 12, 2017, at 7:37 AM, Russell R. <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

You're not going to get the Quetzal between San Jose and Tamarindo, but if you have time to take a side trip to Monteverde you should be able to get it and lots of other great birds. There's one species of Trogan you should be able to get in the area you're going to. Violaceous, I think. Carara National Park is on the coast West of San Jose. I haven't been there, but it has a reputation for being very good for birding. Cerro Lodge is near there. The road to the lodge is supposed to be great for birding, as is the lodge itself.

Russell Roe


________________________________
From: Jim G <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>>
To: <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>
Sent: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 7:18 AM
Subject: Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome

Good Morning Birders,

My wife and I will be heading to Costa Rica in November and I'll have a few days to dedicate to bird watching. Having never birded in CR, I was hoping some of you could give me some pointers on where to bird and stay. Of course, the cheaper the better. Ha. Birds I'd like to see include Long Tailed Silky Flycatcher, Resplendent Quetzal and any Trogons, but most birds in the country would be "lifers." I'm willing to travel but somewhere between San Jose and Tamarindo would be ideal.

Please email me off of the listserve with any advice.



Thanks for you help,
Jim Gould
Southern Shores, NC

Sent from my mobile device.


********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************ This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank you. **********************************************************************

 

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Date: 7/12/17 4:37 am
From: \Russell R.\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome
You're not going to get the Quetzal between San Jose and Tamarindo, but if you have time to take a side trip to Monteverde you should be able to get it and lots of other great birds. There's one species of Trogan you should be able to get in the area you're going to. Violaceous, I think. Carara National Park is on the coast West of San Jose. I haven't been there, but it has a reputation for being very good for birding. Cerro Lodge is near there. The road to the lodge is supposed to be great for birding, as is the lodge itself.
Russell Roe

From: Jim G <carolinabirds...>
To: <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 7:18 AM
Subject: Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome

Good Morning Birders,
My wife and I will be heading to Costa Rica in November and I'll have a few days to dedicate to bird watching. Having never birded in CR, I was hoping some of you could give me some pointers on where to bird and stay. Of course, the cheaper the better. Ha. Birds I'd like to see include Long Tailed Silky Flycatcher, Resplendent Quetzal and any Trogons, but most birds in the country would be "lifers." I'm willing to travel but somewhere between San Jose and Tamarindo would be ideal.   
Please email me off of the listserve with any advice. 


Thanks for you help,
Jim GouldSouthern Shores, NC

Sent from my mobile device.


 

Back to top
Date: 7/12/17 4:18 am
From: Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Costa Rica Birding Suggestions Welcome
Good Morning Birders,

My wife and I will be heading to Costa Rica in November and I'll have a few
days to dedicate to bird watching. Having never birded in CR, I was hoping
some of you could give me some pointers on where to bird and stay. Of
course, the cheaper the better. Ha. Birds I'd like to see include Long
Tailed Silky Flycatcher, Resplendent Quetzal and any Trogons, but most
birds in the country would be "lifers." I'm willing to travel but somewhere
between San Jose and Tamarindo would be ideal.

Please email me off of the listserve with any advice.



Thanks for you help,
Jim Gould
Southern Shores, NC

Sent from my mobile device.

 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/17 7:49 pm
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Orchard Orioles: last brood leaves nest tree this eve
Perhaps two weeks ago my 6-7 singing Orchard Orioles decreased to just one. Then, about a week ago, I found the tree (25' sweetgum by itself at northeast corner of big equipment shed (100' x 30')) with the babies in it. I still have not surely seen the nest, but this species likes isolated trees, perhaps to make life harder for snakes. (Which cannot just move through the canopy, having to return to ground zero.)

The male seems to sing about 100-150' from the nest tree, and this evening the young had moved to the big sycamore 120 feet across the bare , graveled chicken yard, the tree a favorite singing perch for the male.


While this brood will be a bit late to migrate south, I was thinking there might have been much less predation pressure, since there are not a lot of birds' nests to find, so late in the season (granted, mockers and C Wrens). The predators must allow a density dependent reduction in predation pressure, as their functional response shifts from nests to "whatever" as a source of food.

I think a recent article on salt marsh sparrow species indicated lower predation on renests---one thinks the nests being lost is such a disaster, but, in some passerines, renesting may help a lot, getting one out of from under the nest robbers, who very often have found something else to despoil, there not being enough (second, now) nests to be worth their while to hunt for them. The silver lining in the cloud, which may allow some stability of the passerine's population.


It is entirely possible that this renesting is the result of a kerfluffle I witnessed about a month ago, when maybe 6 Orchard Orioles were calling and flying in some tall trees, as if there were a snake aloft, which I was unable to locate. This happened some 200' east-southeast of the eventually successful (presumed) renest. (Could also have been a gray squirrel perturbing the orioles--I saw one some 1000 feet to the south recently, after my local squirrels were extirpated some years ago, some due to eating fruits, and most probably due to Cooper's Hawks.)





Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

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Date: 7/11/17 7:15 pm
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Loggerhead Shrike. Wood Thrush, & Bobwhite
Curiously, the three singing Wood Thrushes here stopped singing maybe 7-10 days ago, after the adventurous one worked his way almost to the county road, which is just an open field. I did feel the thrushes were putting the stamp of approval on my efforts to grow trees.


And, a Bobwhite started singing for several days about ten days ago, but then hushed.

And, I agree the shrikes here also seem harder to spot when on nests---after much frustration at not being able to see shrikes in open country every time I drive by, I think I have decided that some may have home ranges that include more than just the sites right along the county paved roads where I spot them on occasions that so far are quite unpredictable for me. There always is a bush in which the bird may be invisible. Sometimes it seems a shrike is likely to be seen every day (p more than 0.7), and, other times, the likeliehood of seeing a bird at a site is more like 0.2 or 0.3.

Why could one not recruit new farmers from birders? Who will keep my longleaf pines, live oaks and Norway spruce? (Strange mix.) And, so many people are stopping farming; in my case, raising broilers is terrible work, but these broiler houses would net at least $30,000, and possibly even $60,000 per year for another ten years or so, just rented out to somebody who would keep on with growing broilers and tending the few acres here.---One can hardly start new broiler houses, which cost maybe $300,000 each, and Perdue will not allow people a contract if they bought old broiler houses (which might cost $40,000 to $50,000 each) without substantial ($60,000 each house) upgrades.

But, some people might want to try living away from the major population centers.
How to find them? The rural areas are being hollowed out, the capable young people learning "Reading writing and the road to Raleigh" (or, Tidewater Va.).


Frank Enders, Halifax, NC
________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Anne Olsen <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Monday, July 10, 2017 1:26:52 PM
To: carolinabirds; <meckbirds...>
Subject: Loggerhead Shrike. Wood Thrush, & Bobwhite

Recently a Loggerhead Shrike has been appearing on our farm and can be seen from the road up to our house near the High tension tower. Shrikes are common on our farm but disappear during nesting. The one I saw this morning looked like it might be an immature but I was not sure so did not call it.

We have also been treated to Bobwhites and Wood Thrushes this season. The Wood Thrushes have been singing more than usual the past few days. Last Night there were two in our yard calling back & forth. I usually hear Bobwhites calling, but they were quiet this morning.

With all the bird activity this summer, I am reminded just how much I will miss this place when our farm is sold. I just hope someone buys it who maintains the property.

This morning's list is below.


Olsen's Farm, Union, North Carolina, US
Jul 10, 2017 8:30 AM - 9:50 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.2 mile(s)
Comments: Partly cloudy, 73F
21 species

Black Vulture 3
Turkey Vulture 2
Mourning Dove 9
Yellow-billed Cuckoo 2
Red-bellied Woodpecker 6
Downy Woodpecker 1
Eastern Phoebe 2
Loggerhead Shrike 1
American Crow 2
Tufted Titmouse 3
Carolina Wren 6
Wood Thrush 5 Lately they have been singing morning and evening. This year I have heard them a lot more than previous years.
Brown Thrasher 1
Northern Mockingbird 5
Common Yellowthroat 3
Field Sparrow 2
Eastern Towhee 2
Northern Cardinal 3
Blue Grosbeak 2
Eastern Meadowlark 2
American Goldfinch 2

View this checklist online at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S38066648&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Oc_0KQz3-hlWBYKfOUi0cvxpHVjSrHHPUEx-QCk0qAY&s=YALmoTtxnrrgugAPGaPSwH3pxNMoPeSIFF5m7wfKPkc&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S38066648&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LAcLQo8FkaLY38F3_gl9WHyPpAgQsGgn_HjOjZiUoUs&s=eAq3ZJOuIMdMAqLfZZ0_pf6wT_MQFdnO7qC43y5ovpI&e=>

Anne Olsen
Monroe, NC

 

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Date: 7/11/17 7:00 pm
From: Jeff Pippen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Winton-Ocampo wedding and Colombia trip!
Birders,

Many Carolina Birders know Scott Winton and Natalia Ocampo-Penuela, who have been active CBC members for many years. Perhaps you went on one of the several CBC field trips they organized and led to various foreign countries. Or maybe you enjoyed their leading a local CBC meeting trip here in North Carolina. Undoubtedly you’ve read various posts of their interesting bird sightings in North Carolina. Many of you even tallied your Durham County Rufous Hummingbird at Scott’s parents' house last winter! But not all of you know that about three weeks ago they got married in Natalia’s home country of Colombia.

I had the honor of attending their wedding, which I can honestly say was the most beautiful and amazing wedding I’ve ever seen. The parents of both bride and groom were incredibly gracious and wonderful hosts, and the outdoor setting of the ceremony allowed for the native birds like Rusty-margined Flycatchers to take part in the celebration! (Of course, I would never admit to having a photo of Scott distracted by a passing swallow during prime time…)

Anyway, I would like to congratulate Scott and Natalia and let Carolinabirders know the great news of this now-official power-birding couple!

Since we had an “excuse” to “have to go to” Colombia, my girlfriend and I planned a 3 week trip! We started in Cali, Colombia for some pre-wedding birding with Scott & Natalia and family at Km 18 Finca Alejandria El Paraiso de los Calibris, just 35 minutes or so “above” Cali in the western Andes. Several years ago Natalia conducted bird surveys there and documented significant biodiversity along with fostering a great relationship with the landowners. Now that location is one of the premier birding sites in the entire country and is a must-visit site for birders going to Colombia. Imagine Booted Raquet-tails and Long-tailed Sylph hummingbirds 10 feet away from your face amidst the frenzied cloud of a dozen hummingbird species along with tropical tanagers and toucanets enjoying the feeders.

After the wedding we traveled around “coffee country", visiting several towns and cities, and finally ended up at the Caribbean coast in Cartagena. While this was not a birding/butterfly trip per se, we still tallied around 250 species of birds and I managed to photograph around a hundred butterfly species, which I’m currently working on getting added to my website. I highly recommend adding Colombia to your future birding destinations. For the middle part of our trip, we hired a local birding guide (Johnnier Arango-Bermudez), recommended to us by Natalia, and he was excellent.

I’m ready to go back.

Good Birding,
Jeff

--
Jeffrey S. Pippen
Durham, NC
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.jeffpippen.com_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=s4m7ag-DDUoubT6hOfJZnrqz-WQW6MDi_CIKOM5IbMY&s=Ddvy3vKI8TkxSnfbH3uMKO4A2sJTtqueulEsfUfkqSk&e=


 

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Date: 7/10/17 6:29 pm
From: David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Scissortail Flycatcher & Gunter Road
Hi folks,
Thanks to everyone who pointed me in the right direction. Unfortunately I dipped on the Scissortails, BUT... I still got a lifer!!!
I saw TWO Grasshopper Sparrows - and got great looks at them both. One was singing its heart out on a fence post, then it flew closer and landed on a thistle about 70ft from me and I got the spotting scope on it. Then, as luck would have it, it flew to the overhead wires only 30ft from me - incredible!!!
I got a mediocre few photos through the scope wth my iPhone - without an adapter.
It made my day.
Ironically - Scissortail Flycatcher wouldn't have been a lifer for me, but Grasshopper Sparrow was... who'd a thunk it!
Happy Birding,
David

David Gardner
(Currently abiding at Kanuga Conferences)
Originally from Seabrook Island, SC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 7/10/17 5:59 pm
From: Derek Aldrich (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Directions to Gunter Road Scissortail???
34°40'01.1"N 82°20'02.6"W
34.666964, -82.334065

That should work. At the farm just before the Intersection of Gunter Rd.
and Oaklawn Rd.

Or use the eBird hotspot.

Derek Aldrich
Taylors, SC

On Mon, Jul 10, 2017 at 7:55 PM, Blayne & Anne <bolsen187...>
wrote:

> Do we have a GPS address ?
>
> Anne & Blayne Olsen, Monroe NC
>
>
> On Monday, July 10, 2017 1:22 PM, Steve Compton <scompton1251...>
> wrote:
>
>
> David,
>
> Gunter Road runs perpendicular to the road fronting Perry Correctional
> Institution.
>
> Steve Compton
>
> Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
> On Jul 10, 2017 9:16 AM, David Gardner <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> >
> > Hi folks,
> > I'm heading up to Hendersonville today and was hoping to try for the
> Scissortail Flycatcher on the way. Could someone please give me an update
> of whether it has been seen recently and also the address so I can find it.
> Thanks,
> > David
> >
> >
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
>
>
>

 

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Date: 7/10/17 5:45 pm
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: some Carteret County observations on Sunday
On Sunday, four of us birded Down East Carteret (Cedar Island causeway
around sunrise, then to the Cedar Island ferry terminal beach, and later to
the little impoundment at the North River Preserve).

Highlights were 3 Black Rails, 44 Least Bitterns, and 4 Northern Harriers,
all at the Cedar Island causeway, The Black Rails were in the same general
area as previous observations this spring/summer, i.e. on the NW side of the
causeway about 1 mile NE of the NE end of the highrise bridge. Most of the
Least Bitterns were in tall vegetation right next to the canals; most were
juveniles. Again, I think it is likely that harriers bred in these marshes
again this year.

Three of us went to Fort Macon in the afternoon. We got good looks at the
male Shiny Cowbird at the feeders at the visitors center. On the nearby
inlet beach, we had a nice count of 13 Wilson's Plovers, including 2 chicks.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

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Date: 7/10/17 4:55 pm
From: Blayne & Anne <bolsen187...>
Subject: Re: Directions to Gunter Road Scissortail???
Do we have a GPS address ? Anne & Blayne Olsen, Monroe NC

On Monday, July 10, 2017 1:22 PM, Steve Compton <scompton1251...> wrote:


David,

Gunter Road runs perpendicular to the road fronting Perry Correctional Institution.

Steve Compton

Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
On Jul 10, 2017 9:16 AM, David Gardner <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Hi folks,
> I'm heading up to Hendersonville today and was hoping to try for the Scissortail Flycatcher on the way. Could someone please give me an update of whether it has been seen recently and also the address so I can find it. Thanks,
> David
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone



 

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Date: 7/10/17 12:22 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Acadian flycatcher nest?
I've seen a number of Acadian Flycatcher nests, and yours indeed seems to
fit the bill. The nest is almost always built near the end of a
down-hanging branch, and usually over a creek or other water. The nest
usually looks much longer top to bottom than wide, thanks to a lot of
drooping or hanging material from the bottom, so that to a predator perhaps
it looks mostly like some dead plant material just hanging down from a
drooping branch.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Mon, Jul 10, 2017 at 2:39 PM, Betsy Kane <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Is anyone here familiar with Acadian flycatcher nests in coastal plain
> bottomland locations?
>
> Yesterday on Harvey Creek, a partly channelized upper tributary of Bath
> Creek in Beaufort County, surrounded by declining cypresses and bottomland
> / swamp mixed forest, I observed an Acadian flycatcher on (what looked
> something like) a nest.
>
> The "nest" consisted of a small hank of Spanish moss, across a fork of
> stems of a poison ivy plant that had taken a shrub form and hung way out
> over the creek. The flycatcher nestled down in the top (hammock-like)
> portion of the nest. Over the hammock portion, a single, very large
> poison-ivy leaf sheltered the nest and largely hid the hammock portion of
> it from view from above or one side. Below the hammock portion, the moss
> hung down five or six inches. The hank of moss was about four or five feet
> above the creek's surface. The bird "cuddled doon" in the hammock portion
> (as opposed to the perching posture it held on a twig elsewhere nearby).
>
> On a brief closer view, the bottom of the "hammock" portion was the
> merest, flimsy, single-layer skein of moss, with many holes between the
> tendrils. It didn't look at all like something that would keep tiny
> flycatcher eggs in place.
>
> On the other hand, the bird seemed very attached to the location and
> defensive of it, and had definitely nestled close down in the "hammock"
> before flying off as our little boat approached.
>
> What does an Acadian flycatcher nest consist of? How flimsy or
> insubstantial are they? If this *was* a nest, might it simply still be
> under construction; but isn't it a little late for nesting, for this
> species?
>
> Betsy Kane
> Raleigh
>

 

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Date: 7/10/17 11:40 am
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Acadian flycatcher nest?
Is anyone here familiar with Acadian flycatcher nests in coastal plain
bottomland locations?

Yesterday on Harvey Creek, a partly channelized upper tributary of Bath
Creek in Beaufort County, surrounded by declining cypresses and bottomland
/ swamp mixed forest, I observed an Acadian flycatcher on (what looked
something like) a nest.

The "nest" consisted of a small hank of Spanish moss, across a fork of
stems of a poison ivy plant that had taken a shrub form and hung way out
over the creek. The flycatcher nestled down in the top (hammock-like)
portion of the nest. Over the hammock portion, a single, very large
poison-ivy leaf sheltered the nest and largely hid the hammock portion of
it from view from above or one side. Below the hammock portion, the moss
hung down five or six inches. The hank of moss was about four or five feet
above the creek's surface. The bird "cuddled doon" in the hammock portion
(as opposed to the perching posture it held on a twig elsewhere nearby).

On a brief closer view, the bottom of the "hammock" portion was the merest,
flimsy, single-layer skein of moss, with many holes between the tendrils.
It didn't look at all like something that would keep tiny flycatcher eggs
in place.

On the other hand, the bird seemed very attached to the location and
defensive of it, and had definitely nestled close down in the "hammock"
before flying off as our little boat approached.

What does an Acadian flycatcher nest consist of? How flimsy or
insubstantial are they? If this *was* a nest, might it simply still be
under construction; but isn't it a little late for nesting, for this
species?

Betsy Kane
Raleigh

 

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Date: 7/10/17 11:07 am
From: Kay Grinnell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: oregon trip
Hello Birders...most especially Christopher Reidy
Four of us will be in Ashland Oregon from July 17-20, and would appreciate any tips on birding in the area.  We do have the Ashland area birding guide to use as a starter, along with an Oregon birding book.
We are intermediate birders, and while we would love to see a great grey owl, have no other particular target species.  We are looking for places where we might have an interesting self guided birding experience in the warm Oregon days of July.  
Thank you!KayHilton Head Island
Kay Grinnell
<kaytgrinnell...>
843 597-3633 cell
 

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Date: 7/10/17 11:07 am
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: scarlet tanager
I also heard two birds on my hike yesterday morning at Blue Jay Point
(Falls Lake). It is cool to have them in the central piedmont
of NC!

Brian Pendergraft
currently at work unfortunately
Falls Lake NC

On Mon, Jul 10, 2017 at 1:55 PM, Helen Kalevas <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> I've had a scarlet tanager singing here (on the Little River near
> Hillsborough, NC) since late May. Just now I saw him bathing in the river.
> I saw Brian Pendergraft has had one in his yard into July too. Cool stuff.
> Helen
>
> --
> Helen Kalevas
> Near Hillsborough, NC
>
>
>
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.avg.com_email-2Dsignature-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M6O872fXcyIWKrbJljrZY01Q5w0HHEEBxxarDXkKw4Q&s=r3Z8BGWToKhwCBvnaADeaNq51cGj2f0gCg7DF3IgOwY&e=> Virus-free.
> www.avg.com
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.avg.com_email-2Dsignature-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M6O872fXcyIWKrbJljrZY01Q5w0HHEEBxxarDXkKw4Q&s=r3Z8BGWToKhwCBvnaADeaNq51cGj2f0gCg7DF3IgOwY&e=>
> <#m_-262788496121176952_DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
>



--
Thanks!
Brian Pendergraft
919-270-5311

 

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Date: 7/10/17 10:59 am
From: Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: scarlet tanager
I've had a scarlet tanager singing here (on the Little River near
Hillsborough, NC) since late May. Just now I saw him bathing in the river.
I saw Brian Pendergraft has had one in his yard into July too. Cool stuff.
Helen

--
Helen Kalevas
Near Hillsborough, NC


<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.avg.com_email-2Dsignature-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M6O872fXcyIWKrbJljrZY01Q5w0HHEEBxxarDXkKw4Q&s=r3Z8BGWToKhwCBvnaADeaNq51cGj2f0gCg7DF3IgOwY&e= >
Virus-free.
www.avg.com
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.avg.com_email-2Dsignature-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M6O872fXcyIWKrbJljrZY01Q5w0HHEEBxxarDXkKw4Q&s=r3Z8BGWToKhwCBvnaADeaNq51cGj2f0gCg7DF3IgOwY&e= >
<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>

 

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Date: 7/10/17 10:27 am
From: Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Loggerhead Shrike. Wood Thrush, & Bobwhite
Recently a Loggerhead Shrike has been appearing on our farm and can be seen
from the road up to our house near the High tension tower. Shrikes are
common on our farm but disappear during nesting. The one I saw this
morning looked like it might be an immature but I was not sure so did not
call it.

We have also been treated to Bobwhites and Wood Thrushes this season. The
Wood Thrushes have been singing more than usual the past few days. Last
Night there were two in our yard calling back & forth. I usually hear
Bobwhites calling, but they were quiet this morning.

With all the bird activity this summer, I am reminded just how much I will
miss this place when our farm is sold. I just hope someone buys it who
maintains the property.

This morning's list is below.


Olsen's Farm, Union, North Carolina, US
Jul 10, 2017 8:30 AM - 9:50 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.2 mile(s)
Comments: Partly cloudy, 73F
21 species

Black Vulture 3
Turkey Vulture 2
Mourning Dove 9
Yellow-billed Cuckoo 2
Red-bellied Woodpecker 6
Downy Woodpecker 1
Eastern Phoebe 2
Loggerhead Shrike 1
American Crow 2
Tufted Titmouse 3
Carolina Wren 6
Wood Thrush 5 Lately they have been singing morning and evening. This
year I have heard them a lot more than previous years.
Brown Thrasher 1
Northern Mockingbird 5
Common Yellowthroat 3
Field Sparrow 2
Eastern Towhee 2
Northern Cardinal 3
Blue Grosbeak 2
Eastern Meadowlark 2
American Goldfinch 2

View this checklist online at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LAcLQo8FkaLY38F3_gl9WHyPpAgQsGgn_HjOjZiUoUs&s=5X8RtNStO4uP4lF-jW_Jy4O621wQU_63B4-OPWiRJYw&e=
checklist/S38066648

Anne Olsen
Monroe, NC

 

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Date: 7/10/17 10:22 am
From: Steve Compton <scompton1251...>
Subject: Re: Directions to Gunter Road Scissortail???
David,

Gunter Road runs perpendicular to the road fronting Perry Correctional Institution.

Steve Compton

Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
On Jul 10, 2017 9:16 AM, David Gardner <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Hi folks,
> I'm heading up to Hendersonville today and was hoping to try for the Scissortail Flycatcher on the way. Could someone please give me an update of whether it has been seen recently and also the address so I can find it. Thanks,
> David
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 7/10/17 7:50 am
From: Gretchen Schramm (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Travel Plans
Am seriously considering the Galapagos, Ecuador and Peru either in January
or February of next year.

Any helpful hints? Best birding book(s), places?

Many thanks for your help in advance.

Gretchen
Wilmington, NC

 

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Date: 7/10/17 6:16 am
From: David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Directions to Gunter Road Scissortail???
Hi folks,
I'm heading up to Hendersonville today and was hoping to try for the Scissortail Flycatcher on the way. Could someone please give me an update of whether it has been seen recently and also the address so I can find it. Thanks,
David



Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 7/10/17 6:03 am
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: 2017 Gray-cheeked Thrush Program
Folks,

I typically don't send anything out until August, however I'm getting quite
a few folks
asking about it.

Most on this listserv know about the program, so I won't discuss it in
length here.
If you have any questions, please write me directly.

The 2017 dates will be as follows:

Wednesday, Oct. 4th
Thursday, Oct 5th
Friday, October 6th
Saturday, October 7th (Burlington Bird Club has reserved this day, but I
could take a couple more.)

Saturday, Oct 14th
Sunday, Oct 15th

I like to hold it down to 10 participants each day, so reserve your spot as
soon as you can. I'll send out another email in early August.

I look forward to another good program, and hanging with my peeps.

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake, NC

 

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Date: 7/9/17 10:26 am
From: ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: RFI Southeastern Arizona info
As I have shared with many of you before- Mary Jo's place at Ash Canyon is
phenomenal for hummingbirds.

Last summer I had 9 species of hummingbirds in each day!

Ann


On Sun, Jul 9, 2017 at 12:44 PM Mary Jo Ballator <mjballator...>
wrote:

> Dear David,
>
> You will find our Arizona-New Mexico birding listserv at
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__list.arizona.edu_sympa_arc_aznmbirds&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=U6OEiUrkKpitbx9EDy2w13OhftwTaNjNZx4srQMmpRQ&s=BqBRvATdvJTxz7SdR8Gr1BS_ZBqjUKXOaGLa7jMjfX8&e= . Bookmark the page, or
> subscribe to get postings in your e-mail in-box. Free.
>
> You may also want to know how to find *every* birding listserv in the US,
> in digest form: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__digest.sialia.com_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=U6OEiUrkKpitbx9EDy2w13OhftwTaNjNZx4srQMmpRQ&s=TyYQUYUr3w3o871BIHjN7hQQUXGVpRBooN_Ft4KW1hU&e= .
>
> There are lots of other tips on my web site at
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ashcanyon.com_planning-2Dyour-2Dtrip_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=U6OEiUrkKpitbx9EDy2w13OhftwTaNjNZx4srQMmpRQ&s=6AGR7QFSCLw4Npr4EMKHtM1eEIdoIxtjzXi7fa3-IvU&e= about where to go. where to
> stay, and what to do in our area.
>
> Please feel free to write or call if you have further questions.
>
> Sincerely,
> Mary Jo
>
> *Mary Jo Ballator*
> Ash Canyon B&B
> 5255 E. Spring Road
> Hereford, AZ 85615
> <mjballator...>
> 520-378-0773
>
> Yard Hours: Dawn to dusk daily except Wednesday noon to dusk
>
> --
Ann Maddock <am.hummingbird.photos...> Hatteras Island, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/8/17 6:16 pm
From: Thomas Driscoll (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Arizona Birding info request
i am sure someone has already sent you this, but this link has all the birding listserves for the US and some other countries.  There is also several birding guide books on where to find what birds in SE Arizona that are very helpful.
Birding News

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Birding News
Read and search your favorite birding e-mail lists all in one place. | |

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 tom driscoll
chapel hill, nc usa
<spttdrdshnk...>
Do something nice for Earth today and every day!

From: David Gardner <carolinabirds...>
To: <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Saturday, July 8, 2017 2:35 PM
Subject: Arizona Birding info request

Hi folks,
Does anyone have any suggestions for where to go if I'm going to be in SE AZ late July, early August?
Also, is there an equivalent Birding email group for Arizona that I may get on?
Birds I am primarily targeting are as many hummingbird species as possible, but also the key Mexican birds that are likely; E. Trogon, Olive Warbler, Painted Redstart, Black-capped Gnatcatcher.
Also Elf and Flammulated Owls would be great. Any thoughts?
David

Sent from my iPhone


 

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Date: 7/8/17 3:35 pm
From: \Russell R.\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Arizona Birding info request
In the Sierra Vista area, Beatty's Guest House in Miller Canyon is one of the best places for hummingbirds, and you can get Elegant Trogon on the military base. You should be able to get Olive Warbler on Mt. Lemmon near Tucson. The Patton Center for Hummingbirds in Patagonia is a must too. You'll get a different mix of hummingbirds there. The campgrounds near Portal, on the eastern side of the Chiricahua Mountains, are also good for hummingbirds.
Russell Roe

From: David Gardner <carolinabirds...>
To: <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Saturday, July 8, 2017 2:35 PM
Subject: Arizona Birding info request

Hi folks,
Does anyone have any suggestions for where to go if I'm going to be in SE AZ late July, early August?
Also, is there an equivalent Birding email group for Arizona that I may get on?
Birds I am primarily targeting are as many hummingbird species as possible, but also the key Mexican birds that are likely; E. Trogon, Olive Warbler, Painted Redstart, Black-capped Gnatcatcher.
Also Elf and Flammulated Owls would be great. Any thoughts?
David

Sent from my iPhone


 

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Date: 7/8/17 1:32 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Tyrrell Co., NC wood stork
Regarding the county maps on the Birds of NC website: *These are
incomplete*. When the site started 8 or more years ago, Ali Iyoob tried to
populate all of the county maps with Chat data and whatever other data he
could find. Once he left birding about 4-5 years ago, the county mapping
was left without an editor. I still review the County Listing records that
are submitted, accepting most of them. But, it is up to the
observer/reporter of rare birds to populate the county maps by submitting
new county records. So, I have no idea if Wood Stork is new for Tyrrell
County or not. I know there are records of Wood Stork for Dare County, but
it also shows as "white" on the map.

Most of the maps for species with about 5-6 state records or less ought to
be mostly complete. But, it is not my job to complete the maps. In fact, I
wasn't in favor of them being on the website, as county maps for migratory
species don't mean much (at least to me). (Maps for non-migratory species
such as frogs, many butterflies, and plants are indeed helpful.)

Harry LeGrand
editor, Birds of North Carolina website


On Sat, Jul 8, 2017 at 2:18 PM, Alicia Jackson <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Hi everyone,
>
> Ben Decker and I spotted an adult wood stork on the way out of
> Palmetto-Peartree Preserve this morning on Goat Neck Rd. This appears to be
> a first for the county according to CBC's Birds of NC website and eBird.
>
> Bad iPhone photos will be available on eBird once it gets approved.
>
> Thanks,
> -Alicia Jackson
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>

 

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Date: 7/8/17 11:35 am
From: Peggy Schachte (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: This year's Cooper's Hawks Report
This year marks the 7th consecutive year that a pair of Coopers Hawks has nested and raised chicks in our yard on Sullivans Island. Of course, we cant know for sure but we believe it is the same pair each year. They were present and actively calling to each other by the end of January. By early March they were engaging in mating behavior and had selected their nesting site. Interestingly, for the first time, they-re-used last years nest. This might have had something to do with the fact that last years chicks didnt totally dismantle the nest in their fledging/flying activities. In previous years, they have built a new nest each year, gradually working their way about 180 around the yard in the first 5 years, and returning in year 6 to the tree they originally used in year 1 (or a tree next to it). Most years, the pair has raised 4 chicks, one year they raised 3, and last year (2016) only 2, although we think we saw a third chick early on that didnt make it to fledgling status. In addition, one of the 2016 juvies broke its neck in a window collision and didnt make it to migration time. That was a very sad sight. Heres the big news: This year the pair has raised FIVE chicks. We were incredulous at first, but we have seen 5 at the same time, all together, counted and recounted several times. The first hatch was about May 10-12 with the others following over a week or so, most likely. The first/largest was sitting up on the side of the nest by June 2. We were out of town a good portion of June. It appeared that the female adult had taken off before our return on June 18 and the male adult seems to have followed suit after about another week or ten days. June 30 was our first definitive count of 5 chicks, by which time they were all actively if somewhat clumsily engaged in hunting, some more successfully than others, but with an apparent willingness to share. Three of the chicks are still sticking together. We have observed these three in behavior we have never seen before, namely standing on the lawn, peering down, jumping up and pouncing down, and seeming to be hunting ground mammals or insects. Additionally, this morning we observed three juvies pack hunting a squirrel that they initially isolated in a flowerbed. Unfortunately for them, the squirrel had been practicing its broken field running and made a successful break for it. About an hour later, we again spotted the whole gang of 5. We are happy to report that this has been a banner year for the Coopers Hawks! Anyone who would like more info can contact us directly at our email addresses.
Peggy Schachte and Hal Currey

 

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Date: 7/8/17 11:34 am
From: David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Arizona Birding info request
Hi folks,
Does anyone have any suggestions for where to go if I'm going to be in SE AZ late July, early August?
Also, is there an equivalent Birding email group for Arizona that I may get on?
Birds I am primarily targeting are as many hummingbird species as possible, but also the key Mexican birds that are likely; E. Trogon, Olive Warbler, Painted Redstart, Black-capped Gnatcatcher.
Also Elf and Flammulated Owls would be great. Any thoughts?
David

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 7/8/17 11:18 am
From: Alicia Jackson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Tyrrell Co., NC wood stork
Hi everyone,

Ben Decker and I spotted an adult wood stork on the way out of Palmetto-Peartree Preserve this morning on Goat Neck Rd. This appears to be a first for the county according to CBC's Birds of NC website and eBird.

Bad iPhone photos will be available on eBird once it gets approved.

Thanks,
-Alicia Jackson

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 7/8/17 6:29 am
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: pronunciation
Thanks Jim. To be clear, the suggested pronunciation was not part of the Check-list Committee's report. I was just quoting another person's opinion that seemed plausible to me.

Kent Fiala

On 7/8/2017 7:08 AM, Jim Petranka wrote:
> Hi Kent. Not to be too picky, but the proper pronunciation is ick-TEHR-ee-ih-dee (not ‘day’). In digraphs like this the first letter is always silent (see https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__capewest.ca_pron.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=ejrg_M5IM5XqyPmOHEaGGeGfD1rxW8rJUBCaVTjs_qI&s=aC7N24uO_VJWuG5WDo20zpVZ7bgGnZ7cDrrKkSKWU_c&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__capewest.ca_pron.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=g-uquWty6CFxLWv-m62RQKdLD7o8juRdIUyV8JR5QHk&s=rQDUmy_m8juyJiB_o5NwtbvXy6L5PyWRYJl5Uv6Y3Tc&e=>). It’s odd that the committee on nomenclature doesn’t understand basic rules of pronunciation. Best, Jim.
>
>
>
> Jim Petranka
> Mars Hill, NC
> <petranka...> <mailto:<petranka...>
>
>
>


 

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Date: 7/8/17 4:09 am
From: Jim Petranka <petranka...>
Subject: pronunciation
Hi Kent. Not to be too picky, but the proper pronunciation is ick-TEHR-ee-ih-dee (not ‘day’). In digraphs like this the first letter is always silent (see https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__capewest.ca_pron.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=g-uquWty6CFxLWv-m62RQKdLD7o8juRdIUyV8JR5QHk&s=rQDUmy_m8juyJiB_o5NwtbvXy6L5PyWRYJl5Uv6Y3Tc&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__capewest.ca_pron.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=g-uquWty6CFxLWv-m62RQKdLD7o8juRdIUyV8JR5QHk&s=rQDUmy_m8juyJiB_o5NwtbvXy6L5PyWRYJl5Uv6Y3Tc&e= >). It’s odd that the committee on nomenclature doesn’t understand basic rules of pronunciation. Best, Jim.



Jim Petranka
Mars Hill, NC
<petranka...>




 

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Date: 7/7/17 11:05 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Updates for Birds of NC website, and checklist, completed
Using Kent Fiala's summary of changes to the 2017 AOS Checklist, Tom Howard
and I have edited the Birds of North Carolina website:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ncbirds.carolinabirdclub.org_accounts.php&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=COYY9h6gmY8llGyNk54ZJgq5G3qGWYCjsWQVhoq1P7M&s=aWZieDFoml1pZVxCebUGLR77VU9RhnEzmC76Kw2wHKg&e=

and the downloadable NC Checklist. No more Thayer's Gull; I cropped most
of the Thayer's material and copied it to the Iceland Gull page, changing
mostly the summary at the top of the page. The NC Accepted List falls from
480 to 479, with the Official List losing one to 466, and the Provisional
remaining at 13. The sequencing of some species has been edited, as have
scientific names for several species.

Kent also has made these edits to the NC and SC bird lists are can be seen
on the CBC website.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

 

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Date: 7/7/17 10:57 am
From: Ary Bottoms (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Baby birds
My mother had found an apparently abandoned baby wrens near her house in Boiling Springs, NC. Does anyone know who we could call for help?

Thanks,
Ary Bottoms
Boiling Springs, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 7/7/17 8:53 am
From: David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Summer has arrived; new posting to Birding Bulls blog
F 7 July 2017

All,

Summer has arrived at the Cape Romain NWR. I invite you to read my
recent blog post announcing this event:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__birdingbulls.blogspot.com_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=lkzX6h9IrpSOnyOagFDJ1LOEruvd76uEJZo40bDwx9g&s=WOc8DisRE4EHHN87Q89gD_AEHfgZy9KPIzeddV64r-c&e=

Regards,

David McLean
Charleston, SC


--
David C. McLean, Jr.
DCMcLean AT gmail DOT com
 

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Date: 7/7/17 5:42 am
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bye-bye, Thayer's Gull
Family names are always derived from one of the contained genera. The Icteridae is named from the genus Icterus (New World Oriole), and Icteriidae had to be named for its only genus, Icteria.

An interesting exception to this convention is that once a family has been named for a genus, if that genus is lost, the family can still keep its name. That's why we still have family Parulidae, even though the genus Parula was lumped into Setophaga a few years ago.

Kent Fiala

On 7/7/2017 8:27 AM, Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> It's fascinating to hear that the Yellow-breasted Chat, Icteria
> virens, has been moved to its own family. That's one I have been
> wondering about for years. I suppose the rules of AOS nomenclature
> determined the new family name, Icteriidae. Too bad it's so close to
> the spelling of the family of New World blackbirds, though, because
> that may well cause some confusion.
 

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Date: 7/7/17 5:28 am
From: Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bye-bye, Thayer's Gull
It's fascinating to hear that the Yellow-breasted Chat, Icteria
virens, has been moved to its own family. That's one I have been
wondering about for years. I suppose the rules of AOS nomenclature
determined the new family name, Icteriidae. Too bad it's so close to
the spelling of the family of New World blackbirds, though, because
that may well cause some confusion.

The "ayes" (or "i"s) have it!

On Fri, Jul 7, 2017 at 7:53 AM, Kent Fiala <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> I have updated the checklists of birds of North Carolina and South Carolina
> to reflect the changes in this year's AOS Check-list Supplement. The updated
> lists can be found at
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_brc_&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=66QYLFcgKyf3HRxlcSupHkMb3_qyxIxaLd2N5H95ZKM&s=vbw-cEZbaGBHRh8s4t4ncDn4nz-q_l_2XspPJqsquU8&e=
> . The list of changes this year is quite extensive, but nearly all of the
> changes are of interest mainly just to taxonomy nerds--changes in sequence,
> changes in scientific names, etc. As Harry noted, the only impact on
> anyone's life list (limiting discussion to species of the Carolinas) is that
> Thayer's Gull has been reduced to a subspecies of Iceland Gull. One other
> change of interest is that at long last, Yellow-breasted Chat has been
> removed from the warbler family and placed in a new monotypic family,
> Icteriidae. The Icteriidae are in
> serted in sequence just before the Icteridae. Yes, you read that right. As
> noted on the ABA blog, one is pronounced ick-TEHR-ee-ih-day and the other
> ICK-ter-ih-day. Oh, and if you have been misspelling the name of LeConte's
> Sparrow all these years, you now have vindication, as it has been determined
> that that is the correct spelling. LeConte's still has two capital letters,
> but it's now just one word. I suspect that the band code will remain LCSP
> though. A complete summary of the changes is at
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_brc_aouchanges.html-23aos58&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=66QYLFcgKyf3HRxlcSupHkMb3_qyxIxaLd2N5H95ZKM&s=jmo-IxIciUJQULS6d-oXgyI4TkRJab4VXaLGPkZrdrQ&e=
> .
>
> Kent Fiala
>
>



--
Norm Budnitz
Orange County
North Carolina
 

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Date: 7/7/17 4:53 am
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bye-bye, Thayer's Gull
I have updated the checklists of birds of North Carolina and South Carolina to reflect the changes in this year's AOS Check-list Supplement. The updated lists can be found at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_brc_&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=66QYLFcgKyf3HRxlcSupHkMb3_qyxIxaLd2N5H95ZKM&s=vbw-cEZbaGBHRh8s4t4ncDn4nz-q_l_2XspPJqsquU8&e= . The list of changes this year is quite extensive, but nearly all of the changes are of interest mainly just to taxonomy nerds--changes in sequence, changes in scientific names, etc. As Harry noted, the only impact on anyone's life list (limiting discussion to species of the Carolinas) is that Thayer's Gull has been reduced to a subspecies of Iceland Gull. One other change of interest is that at long last, Yellow-breasted Chat has been removed from the warbler family and placed in a new monotypic family, Icteriidae. The Icteriidae are in
serted in sequence just before the Icteridae. Yes, you read that right. As noted on the ABA blog, one is pronounced ick-TEHR-ee-ih-day and the other ICK-ter-ih-day. Oh, and if you have been misspelling the name of LeConte's Sparrow
all these years, you now have vindication, as it has been determined that that is the correct spelling. LeConte's still has two capital letters, but it's now just one word. I suspect that the band code will remain LCSP though. A complete summary of the changes is at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_brc_aouchanges.html-23aos58&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=66QYLFcgKyf3HRxlcSupHkMb3_qyxIxaLd2N5H95ZKM&s=jmo-IxIciUJQULS6d-oXgyI4TkRJab4VXaLGPkZrdrQ&e= .

Kent Fiala


 

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Date: 7/6/17 4:42 pm
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: Re: {Disarmed} Re: Bye-bye, Thayer's Gull
It is my understanding that Iceland and Thayer's would have been lumped way back in the 1980's except that the chairman of the AOU committee at that time, someone who favored lumping them, died before it was carried out. The new chairman decided to put off making a decision. So, the Thayer's Gull "survived" about 30 years longer than it might have.

It'll still be fun trying to pick out a Thayer's, whatever status they have.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC


----- Original Message -----
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
To: carolinabirds listserve ; Harry LeGrand
Sent: Thursday, July 06, 2017 2:31 PM
Subject: {Disarmed} Re: Bye-bye, Thayer's Gull


I need to correct myself -- Thayer's was within Herring Gull, until split out around 1970. Now, instead of lumping it back into Herring, it has been lumped into Iceland. Instead of a new name for the combined species, as Michael Retter suggests (i.e., Baffin Gull, Arctic Gull, Inuit Gull, etc.), AOU has kept the name of Iceland, which can and will be confusing. At least, here in the Carolinas, we can now refer to "Kumlien's" and "Thayer's" as the two main subspecies of Iceland.


Lumping of a Larus gull species in this day and age is most unusual, as a number of species have been split in recent decades, mainly in Mediterranean area.


Harry LeGrand



On Thu, Jul 6, 2017 at 12:59 PM, Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr...> wrote:

My brother let me know a moment ago that the new AOU Checklist supplement is now out -- July 6. Below is a summary of the changes, one of which affects the checklists of the Carolinas -- lumping Thayer's Gull back into Iceland Gull. (Yes, there are some name changes and sequence changes to Carolina birds, as well.)



Sadly, no split of Audubon's and Myrtle warblers -- yet, but thankfully no lumping of redpolls. There is a new split of Red Crossbill, but only for Idaho.


Read and weep:


MailScanner has detected definite fraud in the website at "urldefense.proofpoint.com". Do not trust this website: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__blog.aba.org_2017_07_2017-2Daos-2Dsupplement.html&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Nm35NcnG_cBXeLPM7_K2CC3KZepCchsT_GhjkRd8jJ0&s=vs4GSkimqIiYfKN3gNm3Qf25z2xOSn74cm3KOYaIyzE&e=


Harry LeGrand

Raleigh




--
This message has been scanned for viruses and
dangerous content by MailScanner, and is
believed to be clean.
 

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Date: 7/6/17 2:43 pm
From: Amy Nester (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Seattle birding
Hello birders,
I am in Seattle and want to know the best place to bird close to the city. I will only be able to go one place. Any advice? I have read about Union Park ( montlake fill) and Discovery Park, not sure which would be better. Or, another place all together? Thanks!
Amy Nester
Hillsborough, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 7/6/17 2:15 pm
From: Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Red-breasted Nuthatch in Surry Co
Eric,

They've been observed in July-Aug in several years recently along the Chattooga River on the GA/SC border. I don't know the elevation off hand but it's probably in that "lower" range.

Kevin Kubach
Greenville, SC

> On Jul 6, 2017, at 4:13 PM, Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> They are known to breed between 1500 and 2000 feet along the escarpment in Burke and likely Caldwell Counties and also in the South Mountains.
>
>> On Thu, Jul 6, 2017 at 4:10 PM <eric...> wrote:
>> While leading a group of Boy Scouts in a Bird Study Merit Badge class on a birding hike at Camp Raven Knob in Low Gap, I was a bit surprised to hear a red-breasted nuthatch calling this morning. I was able to lure the bird down to where the impressed scouts were able to get a good look at it (yes, you can darn well bet that any birding students of mine will know how to audio lure!!!). Yesterday, they were also impressed by a parula that came down low as well.
>>
>> Are other folks in the foothills seeing red-breasted nuthatches during the breeding season?
>>
>> Eric Harrold
>>
>> Hays, NC
>>
>>
>
> --
> Dwayne
> *************
> Dwayne Martin
> Hickory, NC
> <redxbill...>

 

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Date: 7/6/17 1:55 pm
From: Gretchen Schramm (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Praying mantises released for pest control are hunting hummingbirds : TreeHugger
Once again, human interference takes it's toll. The Universe is already
perfect.......why mess with it?

Gretchen
Wilmington, NC

On Thu, Jul 6, 2017 at 1:13 PM, Mike Judd <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Only fair that there is always a thing. Point well made Dwayne and now
> that I have had lunch I am feeling much better. Ate pork by the way, not
> fowl.
>
> Mike
>
> On Thu, Jul 6, 2017 at 12:12 PM, Dwayne Martin <redxbill...> wrote:
>
>> Here's the thing though, the Mantids that take Hummingbirds are normally
>> the large Chinese Mantis that is not native to this country. Our native
>> Carolina Mantis is much too small to take a Hummingbird.
>>
>> On Thu, Jul 6, 2017 at 12:03 PM Mike Judd <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>>> I routinely shoot any peregrines I see lest they kill a crossbill or
>>> junco.
>>>
>>> Mike Judd
>>> Brevard nc
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>
>>> On Jul 6, 2017, at 10:08 AM, Ruth Marley (via carolinabirds Mailing
>>> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>>
>>> I had a large mantis perched on the underside of my hummingbird feeder
>>> waiting for them. I shook him off and he was back there the next day.
>>> This time I gave him a firm whack to make sure he wouldn't return. No
>>> doubt about the intent.
>>>
>>> Ruth Marley
>>>
>>> Clarkston, GA
>>>
>>> Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
>>>
>>> On Thursday, July 6, 2017, "lee van malssen" (via carolinabirds Mailing
>>> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>>
>>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.treehugger.com_animals_praying-2Dmantises-2Dreleased&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=GcvEKwlKcR0_L3UNr7Sb8Kid0soIFwdPqMDvBcJ3qWc&s=yuXcgDNQmixNmKGNA28df9DNK7Dqfg9rJ_uPJISqylQ&e=
>>> -pest-control-are-hunting-hummingbirds.html
>>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.treehugger.com_animals_praying-2Dmantises-2Dreleased-2Dpest-2Dcontrol-2Dare-2Dhunting-2Dhummingbirds.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=0x9gCIJyuLhXCgkT7NPzE9fw6WmZ-BEgZwJdOuH8q9E&s=7CixQsKno2zjt4frNKR6t8eVhjlN9EDEATluU5SHxb0&e=>
>>>
>>> ---
>>> SmartNews
>>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__bit.ly_smartnews-2Dapp&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=GcvEKwlKcR0_L3UNr7Sb8Kid0soIFwdPqMDvBcJ3qWc&s=DIe_BL9XNihu-E4qIlmCZJPVF0oYGXB5sV-ZXwRISHE&e=
>>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__bit.ly_smartnews-2Dapp&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=0x9gCIJyuLhXCgkT7NPzE9fw6WmZ-BEgZwJdOuH8q9E&s=a57A_In8xTz9BarBZY8v9jxuqsdaRQD_5Az5yqlJsP4&e=>
>>>
>>> Have ne ver pers onally witnessed this but stories and photos pop up in
>>> news not infrequently.
>>>
>>>
>>> Lee van malssen
>>> Chatham cty, nc
>>>
>>> --
>> Dwayne
>> *************
>> Dwayne Martin
>> Hickory, NC
>> <redxbill...>
>>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/17 1:14 pm
From: Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Red-breasted Nuthatch in Surry Co
They are known to breed between 1500 and 2000 feet along the escarpment in
Burke and likely Caldwell Counties and also in the South Mountains.

On Thu, Jul 6, 2017 at 4:10 PM <eric...> wrote:

> While leading a group of Boy Scouts in a Bird Study Merit Badge class on a
> birding hike at Camp Raven Knob in Low Gap, I was a bit surprised to hear a
> red-breasted nuthatch calling this morning. I was able to lure the bird
> down to where the impressed scouts were able to get a good look at it (yes,
> you can darn well bet that any birding students of mine will know how to
> audio lure!!!). Yesterday, they were also impressed by a parula that came
> down low as well.
>
> Are other folks in the foothills seeing red-breasted nuthatches during the
> breeding season?
>
> Eric Harrold
>
> Hays, NC
>
>
--
Dwayne
*************
Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
<redxbill...>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/17 1:10 pm
From: <eric...>
Subject: Red-breasted Nuthatch in Surry Co
While leading a group of Boy Scouts in a Bird Study Merit Badge class on
a birding hike at Camp Raven Knob in Low Gap, I was a bit surprised to
hear a red-breasted nuthatch calling this morning. I was able to lure
the bird down to where the impressed scouts were able to get a good look
at it (yes, you can darn well bet that any birding students of mine will
know how to audio lure!!!). Yesterday, they were also impressed by a
parula that came down low as well.

Are other folks in the foothills seeing red-breasted nuthatches during
the breeding season?

Eric Harrold

Hays, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/17 12:46 pm
From: James Purcell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Swainson's Warblers around Ashville
I am visiting Asheville for a few days this weekend, and I am unfamiliar
with birding in this area. I am particularly hoping to find Swainson's
Warbler during my stay.

Can anyone give me any sites where I might be able to find Swainson's
Warblers in the general vicinity of Asheville or nearby? Any specific
locations or advice would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks,

James Purcell
Fairfield, CT

 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/17 11:31 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bye-bye, Thayer's Gull
I need to correct myself -- Thayer's was within *Herring *Gull, until split
out around 1970. Now, instead of lumping it back into Herring, it has been
lumped into Iceland. Instead of a new name for the combined species, as
Michael Retter suggests (i.e., Baffin Gull, Arctic Gull, Inuit Gull, etc.),
AOU has kept the name of Iceland, which can and will be confusing. At
least, here in the Carolinas, we can now refer to "Kumlien's" and
"Thayer's" as the two main subspecies of Iceland.

Lumping of a Larus gull species in this day and age is most unusual, as a
number of species have been split in recent decades, mainly in
Mediterranean area.

Harry LeGrand

On Thu, Jul 6, 2017 at 12:59 PM, Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr...> wrote:

> My brother let me know a moment ago that the new AOU Checklist supplement
> is now out -- July 6. Below is a summary of the changes, one of which
> affects the checklists of the Carolinas -- lumping Thayer's Gull back into
> Iceland Gull. (Yes, there are some name changes and sequence changes to
> Carolina birds, as well.)
>
> Sadly, no split of Audubon's and Myrtle warblers -- yet, but thankfully no
> lumping of redpolls. There is a new split of Red Crossbill, but only for
> Idaho.
>
> Read and weep:
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__blog.aba.org_2017_07_2017-2Daos-2Dsupplement.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=mb793hc02EUTPN17_W-zhcg9V0NJsOqDi8Z9zzrF9ZY&s=WUhc8eHxHVK4_tzWufCGmGooF_48VelRnOazT1c73Cg&e=
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/17 10:14 am
From: Mike Judd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Praying mantises released for pest control are hunting hummingbirds : TreeHugger
Only fair that there is always a thing. Point well made Dwayne and now
that I have had lunch I am feeling much better. Ate pork by the way, not
fowl.

Mike

On Thu, Jul 6, 2017 at 12:12 PM, Dwayne Martin <redxbill...> wrote:

> Here's the thing though, the Mantids that take Hummingbirds are normally
> the large Chinese Mantis that is not native to this country. Our native
> Carolina Mantis is much too small to take a Hummingbird.
>
> On Thu, Jul 6, 2017 at 12:03 PM Mike Judd <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
>> I routinely shoot any peregrines I see lest they kill a crossbill or
>> junco.
>>
>> Mike Judd
>> Brevard nc
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On Jul 6, 2017, at 10:08 AM, Ruth Marley (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
>> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> I had a large mantis perched on the underside of my hummingbird feeder
>> waiting for them. I shook him off and he was back there the next day.
>> This time I gave him a firm whack to make sure he wouldn't return. No
>> doubt about the intent.
>>
>> Ruth Marley
>>
>> Clarkston, GA
>>
>> Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
>>
>> On Thursday, July 6, 2017, "lee van malssen" (via carolinabirds Mailing
>> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.treehugger.com_animals_praying-2Dmantises-2D&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=kyLv5J1_hhlUBbLig-abhSFSt2dhnDVLQEd4yHRq_Xk&s=TYL4-zNz8jztDNQ4ZNnFl2ItQlAKoPFnjKwy4Zs8-og&e=
>> released-pest-control-are-hunting-hummingbirds.html
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.treehugger.com_animals_praying-2Dmantises-2Dreleased-2Dpest-2Dcontrol-2Dare-2Dhunting-2Dhummingbirds.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=0x9gCIJyuLhXCgkT7NPzE9fw6WmZ-BEgZwJdOuH8q9E&s=7CixQsKno2zjt4frNKR6t8eVhjlN9EDEATluU5SHxb0&e=>
>>
>> ---
>> SmartNews
>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__bit.ly_smartnews-2Dapp&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=kyLv5J1_hhlUBbLig-abhSFSt2dhnDVLQEd4yHRq_Xk&s=7Ovp53QUnEgYb59bhWe2DnidpsYc4Q0nBUtpKI7oocU&e=
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__bit.ly_smartnews-2Dapp&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=0x9gCIJyuLhXCgkT7NPzE9fw6WmZ-BEgZwJdOuH8q9E&s=a57A_In8xTz9BarBZY8v9jxuqsdaRQD_5Az5yqlJsP4&e=>
>>
>> Have ne ver pers onally witnessed this but stories and photos pop up in
>> news not infrequently.
>>
>>
>> Lee van malssen
>> Chatham cty, nc
>>
>> --
> Dwayne
> *************
> Dwayne Martin
> Hickory, NC
> <redxbill...>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/17 10:03 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bye-bye, Thayer's Gull
My brother let me know a moment ago that the new AOU Checklist supplement
is now out -- July 6. Below is a summary of the changes, one of which
affects the checklists of the Carolinas -- lumping Thayer's Gull back into
Iceland Gull. (Yes, there are some name changes and sequence changes to
Carolina birds, as well.)

Sadly, no split of Audubon's and Myrtle warblers -- yet, but thankfully no
lumping of redpolls. There is a new split of Red Crossbill, but only for
Idaho.

Read and weep:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__blog.aba.org_2017_07_2017-2Daos-2Dsupplement.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Pvv3IpouE9CcojoCilEM9KRpNeeweHxfye4Go_NkN2U&s=OAAikE6cQ-ZDWOGn_J0AN0iiAfFFI1icHZ2RTu3dPa0&e=

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/17 9:18 am
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Praying mantises released for pest control are hunting hummingbirds : TreeHugger
Think it's perfectly OK to whomp a non-native mantis.

Betsy Kane
Raleigh


On Thu, Jul 6, 2017 at 12:12 PM, Dwayne Martin <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Here's the thing though, the Mantids that take Hummingbirds are normally
> the large Chinese Mantis that is not native to this country. Our native
> Carolina Mantis is much too small to take a Hummingbird.
>
> On Thu, Jul 6, 2017 at 12:03 PM Mike Judd <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
>> I routinely shoot any peregrines I see lest they kill a crossbill or
>> junco.
>>
>> Mike Judd
>> Brevard nc
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On Jul 6, 2017, at 10:08 AM, Ruth Marley (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
>> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> I had a large mantis perched on the underside of my hummingbird feeder
>> waiting for them. I shook him off and he was back there the next day.
>> This time I gave him a firm whack to make sure he wouldn't return. No
>> doubt about the intent.
>>
>> Ruth Marley
>>
>> Clarkston, GA
>>
>> Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
>>
>> On Thursday, July 6, 2017, "lee van malssen" (via carolinabirds Mailing
>> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.treehugger.com_animals_praying-2Dmantises-2D&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=os-WwMFvEDaPFkpbQxEHlVYBIdqCts436kHjVDmZ_bk&s=yCCVAMmBPmEKVCi5XeGNPAkogMbMaepN9-5RnRMZK28&e=
>> released-pest-control-are-hunting-hummingbirds.html
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.treehugger.com_animals_praying-2Dmantises-2Dreleased-2Dpest-2Dcontrol-2Dare-2Dhunting-2Dhummingbirds.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=0x9gCIJyuLhXCgkT7NPzE9fw6WmZ-BEgZwJdOuH8q9E&s=7CixQsKno2zjt4frNKR6t8eVhjlN9EDEATluU5SHxb0&e=>
>>
>> ---
>> SmartNews
>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__bit.ly_smartnews-2Dapp&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=os-WwMFvEDaPFkpbQxEHlVYBIdqCts436kHjVDmZ_bk&s=-VF050nZja59HNecM0LZOb1CQT_o4egLRYcQDw3h4lw&e=
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__bit.ly_smartnews-2Dapp&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=0x9gCIJyuLhXCgkT7NPzE9fw6WmZ-BEgZwJdOuH8q9E&s=a57A_In8xTz9BarBZY8v9jxuqsdaRQD_5Az5yqlJsP4&e=>
>>
>> Have ne ver pers onally witnessed this but stories and photos pop up in
>> news not infrequently.
>>
>>
>> Lee van malssen
>> Chatham cty, nc
>>
>> --
> Dwayne
> *************
> Dwayne Martin
> Hickory, NC
> <redxbill...>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/17 9:12 am
From: Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Praying mantises released for pest control are hunting hummingbirds : TreeHugger
Here's the thing though, the Mantids that take Hummingbirds are normally
the large Chinese Mantis that is not native to this country. Our native
Carolina Mantis is much too small to take a Hummingbird.

On Thu, Jul 6, 2017 at 12:03 PM Mike Judd <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> I routinely shoot any peregrines I see lest they kill a crossbill or
> junco.
>
> Mike Judd
> Brevard nc
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jul 6, 2017, at 10:08 AM, Ruth Marley (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <
> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I had a large mantis perched on the underside of my hummingbird feeder
> waiting for them. I shook him off and he was back there the next day.
> This time I gave him a firm whack to make sure he wouldn't return. No
> doubt about the intent.
>
> Ruth Marley
>
> Clarkston, GA
>
> Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
>
> On Thursday, July 6, 2017, "lee van malssen" (via carolinabirds Mailing
> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.treehugger.com_animals_praying-2Dmantises-2Dreleased-2Dpest-2Dcontrol-2Dare-2Dhunting-2Dhummingbirds.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=DUd2RpfXNT-1qrAgOTMvbhwYdIN2oAeX23XzkZ_jqpA&s=Q4vLwJig4E7tC8OHZ8bCuU0_64BGE-UR9J4XAiwf-Ss&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.treehugger.com_animals_praying-2Dmantises-2Dreleased-2Dpest-2Dcontrol-2Dare-2Dhunting-2Dhummingbirds.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=0x9gCIJyuLhXCgkT7NPzE9fw6WmZ-BEgZwJdOuH8q9E&s=7CixQsKno2zjt4frNKR6t8eVhjlN9EDEATluU5SHxb0&e=>
>
> ---
> SmartNews
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__bit.ly_smartnews-2Dapp&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=DUd2RpfXNT-1qrAgOTMvbhwYdIN2oAeX23XzkZ_jqpA&s=vToYt7B3DA05xJtVhCnaXAx4uBVDjvEhosuDBc3ftwc&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__bit.ly_smartnews-2Dapp&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=0x9gCIJyuLhXCgkT7NPzE9fw6WmZ-BEgZwJdOuH8q9E&s=a57A_In8xTz9BarBZY8v9jxuqsdaRQD_5Az5yqlJsP4&e=>
>
> Have ne ver pers onally witnessed this but stories and photos pop up in
> news not infrequently.
>
>
> Lee van malssen
> Chatham cty, nc
>
> --
Dwayne
*************
Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
<redxbill...>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/17 9:03 am
From: Mike Judd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Praying mantises released for pest control are hunting hummingbirds : TreeHugger
I routinely shoot any peregrines I see lest they kill a crossbill or junco.

Mike Judd
Brevard nc

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 6, 2017, at 10:08 AM, Ruth Marley (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I had a large mantis perched on the underside of my hummingbird feeder waiting for them. I shook him off and he was back there the next day. This time I gave him a firm whack to make sure he wouldn't return. No doubt about the intent.
>
> Ruth Marley
> Clarkston, GA
>
> Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
>
> On Thursday, July 6, 2017, "lee van malssen" (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.treehugger.com_animals_praying-2Dmantises-2Dreleased-2Dpest-2Dcontrol-2Dare-2Dhunting-2Dhummingbirds.html&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=DDecAGO0UZLxRKbNgWFl_zkO8XgMrmWNRqtS6QuG5nM&s=EFS14UU1vkrNBsNrXl1ju-WtFQwkA30GZFlrCRFAL1Y&e=
>
> ---
> SmartNews
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__bit.ly_smartnews-2Dapp&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=DDecAGO0UZLxRKbNgWFl_zkO8XgMrmWNRqtS6QuG5nM&s=Or6mTOm_uuzteHwY8WqGSQfpnChT3Nz8MepSUMjmL0k&e=
>
> Have never pers onally witnessed this but stories and photos pop up in news not infrequently.
>
> Lee van malssen
> Chatham cty, nc

 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/17 7:09 am
From: Ruth Marley (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Praying mantises released for pest control are hunting hummingbirds : TreeHugger
I had a large mantis perched on the underside of my hummingbird feeder waiting for them. I shook him off and he was back there the next day. This time I gave him a firm whack to make sure he wouldn't return. No doubt about the intent.

Ruth Marley
Clarkston, GA

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail

On Thursday, July 6, 2017, "lee van malssen" (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.treehugger.com_animals_praying-2Dmantises-2Dreleased-2Dpest-2Dcontrol-2Dare-2Dhunting-2Dhummingbirds.html&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=gOYKXuSldFdDcQdKkasTUNbeeOa4-c7nRtqiSW_W77U&s=EZdnJ2jHj1kbXLgClox3st62MGhN212mE8klgjt7TTw&e=

---
SmartNews
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__bit.ly_smartnews-2Dapp&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=gOYKXuSldFdDcQdKkasTUNbeeOa4-c7nRtqiSW_W77U&s=xb8hVc8Wed-Mg5CROrUEEb2VmoLagDylM0G5N1195pU&e=

Have never personally witnessed this but stories and photos pop up in news not infrequently.

Lee van malssen
Chatham cty, nc
 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/17 7:04 am
From: ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Praying mantises released for pest control are hunting hummingbirds : TreeHugger
I believe it.
I took a photo of a dragonfly capturing a hummingbird a few years ago.
The dragonflies were in a bottle brush tree and hunting the hummingbirds.



On Thu, Jul 6, 2017 at 9:38 AM lee van malssen <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.treehugger.com_animals_praying-2Dmantises-2Dreleased-2Dpest-2Dcontrol-2Dare-2Dhunting-2Dhummingbirds.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=4wICg5h15ZEmWvdhM1Zx-5NNe2KKcWqp4VqDmHKGnm8&s=JIdfvy5-zbigZ-aeIDczrMyY_dbB4XzrG4ev0ZebmSo&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.treehugger.com_animals_praying-2Dmantises-2Dreleased-2Dpest-2Dcontrol-2Dare-2Dhunting-2Dhummingbirds.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=0x9gCIJyuLhXCgkT7NPzE9fw6WmZ-BEgZwJdOuH8q9E&s=7CixQsKno2zjt4frNKR6t8eVhjlN9EDEATluU5SHxb0&e=>
>
> ---
> SmartNews
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__bit.ly_smartnews-2Dapp&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=4wICg5h15ZEmWvdhM1Zx-5NNe2KKcWqp4VqDmHKGnm8&s=YNTGbmMo8cvLisrUElraXNCuxWi73qYlkQQ3Q4guYDw&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__bit.ly_smartnews-2Dapp&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=0x9gCIJyuLhXCgkT7NPzE9fw6WmZ-BEgZwJdOuH8q9E&s=a57A_In8xTz9BarBZY8v9jxuqsdaRQD_5Az5yqlJsP4&e=>
>
> Have never personally witnessed this but stories and photos pop up in news
> not infrequently.
>
> Lee van malssen
> Chatham cty, nc
>
--
Ann Maddock <am.hummingbird.photos...> Hatteras Island, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/17 6:38 am
From: lee van malssen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Praying mantises released for pest control are hunting hummingbirds : TreeHugger
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.treehugger.com_animals_praying-2Dmantises-2Dreleased-2Dpest-2Dcontrol-2Dare-2Dhunting-2Dhummingbirds.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=0x9gCIJyuLhXCgkT7NPzE9fw6WmZ-BEgZwJdOuH8q9E&s=7CixQsKno2zjt4frNKR6t8eVhjlN9EDEATluU5SHxb0&e=

---
SmartNews
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__bit.ly_smartnews-2Dapp&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=0x9gCIJyuLhXCgkT7NPzE9fw6WmZ-BEgZwJdOuH8q9E&s=a57A_In8xTz9BarBZY8v9jxuqsdaRQD_5Az5yqlJsP4&e=

Have never personally witnessed this but stories and photos pop up in news
not infrequently.

Lee van malssen
Chatham cty, nc

 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/17 4:18 am
From: Me (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: possible Roseate Tern, Fort Macon SP, Carteret County, NC
I noticed that too. When I zoom in on the tail in the first photo, I see more detail than is visible on the eBird photo. I think what may be happening is a combination of a backlit subject, gray/white sky, and a flared tail that spreads each feather out so that light passes right through them. There are faint artifacts in the image that suggest additional length too the outer tail feathers as well as an entire feather on the lower part that becomes nearly invisible on the scaled down image. Perfect light and a blue sky would probably make a big difference. I will try to tweak out an image showing those details.

Marty Wall
Beaufort, NC

> On Jul 6, 2017, at 6:29 AM, Sheryl McNair <sammcnair...> wrote:
>
> Not having seen them before (our trip to Ft Jefferson was in Jan)--could anyone tell me why the tail streamers don't show in the 1st photo? Great pix, BTW!
>
> Sheryl
>
>> On Jul 5, 2017, at 5:44 PM, <scompton1251...> wrote:
>>
>> Had a good look at Roseates in the Keys in May, photographed them at Fort Jefferson. These are excellent photos, the long thin black bill is very well seen, along with the very white overall plumage, long tail streamers. Nice find. Now I need one in SC.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Steve Compton
>>
>> Greenville, SC
>>
>>
>> -----------------------------------------
>>
>> From: "Harry LeGrand" (via carolinabirds Mailing List)"
>> To: "Mike Judd"
>> Cc: "Marty Wall", "carolinabirds listserve"
>> Sent: 05-Jul-2017 19:23:33 +0000
>> Subject: Re: possible Roseate Tern, Fort Macon SP, Carteret County, NC
>>
>> Yes, indeed. Roseate Tern. Great find and photos.
>>
>> Harry LeGrand
>> Raleigh
>>
>>> On Wed, Jul 5, 2017 at 2:33 PM, Mike Judd <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>> I'd go with Roseate with the orange feet, long black bill & those lovely streamers behind.
>>> Nice photos.
>>> Mike Judd
>>> Brevard nc
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>
>>> On Jul 5, 2017, at 2:20 PM, Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>>
>>> I photographed a tern that stood out from the Forster's Terns this morning at Fort Macon State Park. I believe it to be a Roseate Tern, but would like some confirmation. I have included a link to my eBird Report below that has a few photos. I would appreciate your opinions. The bird was flying over the inlet with many Forster' s and Least Terns first thing this morning. Birds often scatter once beach traffic picks up, so early (before 8 am) is best at this spot.
>>>
>>> Marty Wall
>>> Beaufort, NC
>>>
>>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S37981579&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=0SePHOLPgKLmX7MW6nVzFmZIz-c7QtkSp9sixzRAd4w&s=o0aaG_B6_osrG004K39JyURoZZc9xM3s00lffNKEdgQ&e=
>>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/17 3:30 am
From: Sheryl McNair (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: possible Roseate Tern, Fort Macon SP, Carteret County, NC
Not having seen them before (our trip to Ft Jefferson was in Jan)--could anyone tell me why the tail streamers don't show in the 1st photo? Great pix, BTW!

Sheryl

> On Jul 5, 2017, at 5:44 PM, <scompton1251...> wrote:
>
> Had a good look at Roseates in the Keys in May, photographed them at Fort Jefferson. These are excellent photos, the long thin black bill is very well seen, along with the very white overall plumage, long tail streamers. Nice find. Now I need one in SC.
>
>
>
>
>
> Steve Compton
>
> Greenville, SC
>
>
> -----------------------------------------
>
> From: "Harry LeGrand" (via carolinabirds Mailing List)"
> To: "Mike Judd"
> Cc: "Marty Wall", "carolinabirds listserve"
> Sent: 05-Jul-2017 19:23:33 +0000
> Subject: Re: possible Roseate Tern, Fort Macon SP, Carteret County, NC
>
> Yes, indeed. Roseate Tern. Great find and photos.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
>> On Wed, Jul 5, 2017 at 2:33 PM, Mike Judd <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>> I'd go with Roseate with the orange feet, long black bill & those lovely streamers behind.
>> Nice photos.
>> Mike Judd
>> Brevard nc
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On Jul 5, 2017, at 2:20 PM, Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> I photographed a tern that stood out from the Forster's Terns this morning at Fort Macon State Park. I believe it to be a Roseate Tern, but would like some confirmation. I have included a link to my eBird Report below that has a few photos. I would appreciate your opinions. The bird was flying over the inlet with many Forster' s and Least Terns first thing this morning. Birds often scatter once beach traffic picks up, so early (before 8 am) is best at this spot.
>>
>> Marty Wall
>> Beaufort, NC
>>
>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S37981579&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=RKaotWP8vyeN5RAoxritUB_BSC5oTif4S4nM-8Bv49c&s=J24T3vzuMZXQ80StZJ7uY3J26zlYWQKmobDLF3pxccI&e=
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/17 4:29 pm
From: Paul Serridge (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Scissor-tailed Flycatchers at Gunter Rd, Greenville County, SC
At 7.10 p.m. Thursday I received a very reliable report of a male, a
female, and an immature Scissor-tailed Flycatcher perched on the fence
along the farm track at the Kellett Farm on Gunter Rd.
Prior to this report only a male had been observed this year and he was
very distinctive having one side of his tail feathers much shorter than the
other side.

Good birding,

Paul Serridge
Greenville, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/17 2:44 pm
From: <scompton1251...>
Subject: Re: possible Roseate Tern, Fort Macon SP, Carteret County, NC


Had a good look at Roseates in the Keys in May, photographed them at
Fort Jefferson. These are excellent photos, the long thin black bill
is very well seen, along with the very white overall plumage, long
tail streamers. Nice find. Now I need one in SC.

Steve Compton

Greenville, SC

-----------------------------------------From: "Harry LeGrand" (via
carolinabirds Mailing List)"
To: "Mike Judd"
Cc: "Marty Wall", "carolinabirds listserve"
Sent: 05-Jul-2017 19:23:33 +0000
Subject: Re: possible Roseate Tern, Fort Macon SP, Carteret County, NC

Yes, indeed. Roseate Tern. Great find and photos.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Wed, Jul 5, 2017 at 2:33 PM, Mike Judd wrote:
I'd go with Roseate with the orange feet, long black bill & those
lovely streamers behind. Nice photos. Mike Judd Brevard nc
Sent from my iPhone
On Jul 5, 2017, at 2:20 PM, Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing
List) wrote:

I photographed a tern that stood out from the Forster's Terns
this morning at Fort Macon State Park. I believe it to be a Roseate
Tern, but would like some confirmation. I have included a link to my
eBird Report below that has a few photos. I would appreciate your
opinions. The bird was flying over the inlet with many Forster' s and
Least Terns first thing this morning. Birds often scatter once beach
traffic picks up, so early (before 8 am) is best at this spot.
Marty Wall Beaufort, NC
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=yk3BC4-P5uzClEzypV-lM5Mh8vdX6xw88vpRc2BLlws&s=Xf4uR0ivcZwV_2hjewU2nEI39REI_qEVLrIqvcFwh2Y&e= [3]checklist/S37981579



Links:
------
[1] mailto:<carolinabirds...>
[2] mailto:<carolinabirds...>
[3]
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S37981579&amp;d=DwMFaQ&amp;c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&amp;r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&amp;m=B0O8dmpu4GfIwVqQZ4Fh5FxHhF-jla2lHH1EvPh-Jvc&amp;s=bB-p6bWgSsZeT6hPceknEsKrDCRRJOSgC_c20kVJHto&amp;e=


 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/17 12:23 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: possible Roseate Tern, Fort Macon SP, Carteret County, NC
Yes, indeed. Roseate Tern. Great find and photos.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Wed, Jul 5, 2017 at 2:33 PM, Mike Judd <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> I'd go with Roseate with the orange feet, long black bill & those lovely
> streamers behind.
> Nice photos.
> Mike Judd
> Brevard nc
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jul 5, 2017, at 2:20 PM, Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <
> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I photographed a tern that stood out from the Forster's Terns this morning
> at Fort Macon State Park. I believe it to be a Roseate Tern, but would
> like some confirmation. I have included a link to my eBird Report below
> that has a few photos. I would appreciate your opinions. The bird was
> flying over the inlet with many Forster' s and Least Terns first thing this
> morning. Birds often scatter once beach traffic picks up, so early (before
> 8 am) is best at this spot.
>
> Marty Wall
> Beaufort, NC
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S37981579&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=IlOfIvK6C-UHFCLJj3koUau4aMEQsCzN6okyZmB8yV8&s=wa3X8Mx2rrxui0_BUShx_qKKKv38BTFWSDjRHW0Pxv0&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S37981579&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=B0O8dmpu4GfIwVqQZ4Fh5FxHhF-jla2lHH1EvPh-Jvc&s=bB-p6bWgSsZeT6hPceknEsKrDCRRJOSgC_c20kVJHto&e=>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/17 11:38 am
From: Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: possible Roseate Tern, Fort Macon SP, Carteret County, NC
It looks to have color bands on the rt leg.

Dennis

On Wed, Jul 5, 2017 at 2:33 PM, Mike Judd <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> I'd go with Roseate with the orange feet, long black bill & those lovely
> streamers behind.
> Nice photos.
> Mike Judd
> Brevard nc
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jul 5, 2017, at 2:20 PM, Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <
> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I photographed a tern that stood out from the Forster's Terns this morning
> at Fort Macon State Park. I believe it to be a Roseate Tern, but would
> like some confirmation. I have included a link to my eBird Report below
> that has a few photos. I would appreciate your opinions. The bird was
> flying over the inlet with many Forster' s and Least Terns first thing this
> morning. Birds often scatter once beach traffic picks up, so early (before
> 8 am) is best at this spot.
>
> Marty Wall
> Beaufort, NC
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S37981579&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=guiYdSJYOI3XVMLyNXyz7eCxcb1idTWhgpeV3fxh5G0&s=spc543Xx2fRFCbYwRoxbehfhIp8iFVdFQbK_oiHmbps&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S37981579&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=B0O8dmpu4GfIwVqQZ4Fh5FxHhF-jla2lHH1EvPh-Jvc&s=bB-p6bWgSsZeT6hPceknEsKrDCRRJOSgC_c20kVJHto&e=>
>
>


--
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/17 11:33 am
From: Mike Judd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: possible Roseate Tern, Fort Macon SP, Carteret County, NC
I'd go with Roseate with the orange feet, long black bill & those lovely streamers behind.
Nice photos.
Mike Judd
Brevard nc

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 5, 2017, at 2:20 PM, Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I photographed a tern that stood out from the Forster's Terns this morning at Fort Macon State Park. I believe it to be a Roseate Tern, but would like some confirmation. I have included a link to my eBird Report below that has a few photos. I would appreciate your opinions. The bird was flying over the inlet with many Forster's and Least Terns first thing this morning. Birds often scatter once beach traffic picks up, so early (before 8 am) is best at this spot.
>
> Marty Wall
> Beaufort, NC
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S37981579&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=idZH-gltQ2MfMOX5Oytxwq7YqsbO43uYIdTvi4x6lTY&s=bCtb3wi6voXlO5P88OnqZ0oTsxiZRiwEV54h8uwpK6w&e=
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/17 11:21 am
From: Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: possible Roseate Tern, Fort Macon SP, Carteret County, NC
I photographed a tern that stood out from the Forster's Terns this morning
at Fort Macon State Park. I believe it to be a Roseate Tern, but would
like some confirmation. I have included a link to my eBird Report below
that has a few photos. I would appreciate your opinions. The bird was
flying over the inlet with many Forster's and Least Terns first thing this
morning. Birds often scatter once beach traffic picks up, so early (before
8 am) is best at this spot.

Marty Wall
Beaufort, NC

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S37981579&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=B0O8dmpu4GfIwVqQZ4Fh5FxHhF-jla2lHH1EvPh-Jvc&s=bB-p6bWgSsZeT6hPceknEsKrDCRRJOSgC_c20kVJHto&e=

 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/17 10:52 am
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hot Suet - One More Thing
I want to thank everyone for discussing using suet, and other food supplies
in the summer. Some emails came directly back to me, and others to
Carolina Birds.
In addition, I wanted to also thank those of you that are already inquiring
about the Gray-cheeked Thrush Program already. (I'll send something out
around the first of August.)

One thing I wanted to expand on once more is the fact that a couple of
folks said
that their hot suet was being eaten by squirrels, which surprises me a
little bit.
I spend a lot of time in my yard working and watching birds and the
feeders, and
there isn't one squirrel that will even look at the hot suet feeder that I
have on the trunk
of a poplar. And if I don't wash my hands well after handling, and I dare
rub my eyes,
I'm running to the sink for cold water!

I'm wondering if some "brands" are not as effective? Just curious if
anyone can expand on this...

I know....slightly off topic, but my yard species counts are only around 40
in June and July, and I need something to do.

*I use the brand called "C and S", and I get it from Home Depot.*


Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/17 7:30 am
From: Steve <sshultz...>
Subject: Re: Strange bird in Durham, NC
I'm throwing in with the crow crowd! They can look pretty hinky this time of year.

Steve Shultz
RTP NC

> On Jul 5, 2017, at 12:05 AM, Cecelia Mathis <weer...> wrote:
>
> Dorothy,
> Please post the ID if/when you get it. I looked at your photos and will hazard a guess that it’s not a normally wild bird.
>
> Cecelia Butler Mathis
> Alleghany Co, NC
>
> From: dorothypugh (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
> Sent: Tuesday, July 4, 2017 7:25 PM
> To: <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: Strange bird in Durham, NC
>
> Yesterday I saw a strange large bird land on a treetop. I've got a couple of photos; can someone help with the ID?
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.dpughphoto.com_critters-5Fjuly-5F2017.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=tl-7PHinouOFuw7RfVjYxdU3MmWYpXETh0Glcp0fyYY&s=_nsDVLRQ5W8ng-U7w4O0cwj2Sw9Mb571nIgQS-CH4Ns&e=
>
> Dorothy Pugh
> Durham, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/17 11:14 pm
From: Brad Wood (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Strange bird in Durham, NC
Looks like a crow in molt.

On Wed, Jul 5, 2017 at 12:05 AM, Cecelia Mathis <weer...> wrote:

> Dorothy,
> Please post the ID if/when you get it. I looked at your photos and will
> hazard a guess that it’s not a normally wild bird.
>
> Cecelia Butler Mathis
> Alleghany Co, NC
>
> *From:* dorothypugh (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
> *Sent:* Tuesday, July 4, 2017 7:25 PM
> *To:* <carolinabirds...>
> *Subject:* Strange bird in Durham, NC
>
> Yesterday I saw a strange large bird land on a treetop. I've got a couple
> of photos; can someone help with the ID?
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.dpughphoto.com_critters-5Fjuly-5F2017.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=8KpYoNj01ET63XpTaRLI7Z9B-S9kulOpg3CkAgm57-E&s=Q0NQ_QTr82snTqQWyuw_dWVwNnArxtHy2GCu0NvOWvU&e=
>
> Dorothy Pugh
> Durham, NC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/17 9:10 pm
From: Cecelia Mathis <weer...>
Subject: Re: Strange bird in Durham, NC
Dorothy,
Please post the ID if/when you get it. I looked at your photos and will hazard a guess that it’s not a normally wild bird.

Cecelia Butler Mathis
Alleghany Co, NC

From: dorothypugh (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
Sent: Tuesday, July 4, 2017 7:25 PM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Strange bird in Durham, NC

Yesterday I saw a strange large bird land on a treetop. I've got a couple of photos; can someone help with the ID?

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.dpughphoto.com_critters-5Fjuly-5F2017.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=vPM_uN8n4n4_c0AgULHuHUiHqGxKgY2E5O2gbSsjDkI&s=KT2Zc1yNbu-bF9nSkO2ZRnizFJvkVG4TGVqzB1bCZiE&e=


Dorothy Pugh
Durham, NC
 

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Date: 7/4/17 6:27 pm
From: Clyde Smith (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Strange bird in Durham, NC
Could this possibly be a juvenile Common Raven? I known adults have been seen in Durham County, but I don’t know about nesting.

Clyde Smith
Raleigh, NC

> On Jul 4, 2017, at 7:25 PM, dorothypugh (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Yesterday I saw a strange large bird land on a treetop. I've got a couple of photos; can someone help with the ID?
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.dpughphoto.com_critters-5Fjuly-5F2017.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=IaR1W6gq1XZQxx3QE9lyqDrgnDH9FW0OFFG_ssP-Vmw&s=7XNczGQlbfNAQG7V0Pr2aifN4zILeSwRZCtSTEy6CeE&e=
>
> Dorothy Pugh
> Durham, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/17 4:25 pm
From: dorothypugh (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Strange bird in Durham, NC
Yesterday I saw a strange large bird land on a treetop. I've got a couple of photos; can someone help with the ID?


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.dpughphoto.com_critters-5Fjuly-5F2017.html&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=0RaR-VO5MNlv6esqTSWjcliLQrYY2HctZc8n9A5d7rE&s=nFZi_hCkLXRyMm5TXIicFXomP-x_UA2Tf2NI0BiKJ6c&e=



Dorothy Pugh
Durham, NC

 

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Date: 7/4/17 1:11 pm
From: David Weesner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bluebirds and Cardinals
Gretchen,I thought you sent this to me.I need to pay more attention.Dave WessnerWilmington, NC

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Tue, Jul 4, 2017 at 4:02 PM, David Weesner<carolinabirds...> wrote: Yes you should clean it out between broods if you get a chance.  If not don't worry about it.I would not attach it to the pole.  If you get an aggresive Mockingbird he will keep the Bluebirds from nesting in the box.
We have a stake (at Wild bird) that I like you can move it around. It has a blue dish on top.Did you say not one was eating the meal worms? Weird!Dave 
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
On Tue, Jul 4, 2017 at 7:51 AM, Gretchen Schramm<carolinabirds...> wrote: Couple of questions:
1.  Is it necessary to clean out a bluebird nesting box once the birds have fledged? I have a bluebird looking at one of the boxes, but have left the nest inside intact.
2.  With mealworms, I've tried both dried and live worms, placing them on the ground, on a small table close to the cardinal's nest, and in a glass dish attached to the bluebird nesting pole.  Why no takers?
Any advice would be appreciated.  Thank you.
GretchenWilmington, NC

 

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Date: 7/4/17 1:02 pm
From: David Weesner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bluebirds and Cardinals
Yes you should clean it out between broods if you get a chance.  If not don't worry about it.I would not attach it to the pole.  If you get an aggresive Mockingbird he will keep the Bluebirds from nesting in the box.
We have a stake (at Wild bird) that I like you can move it around. It has a blue dish on top.Did you say not one was eating the meal worms? Weird!Dave 
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Tue, Jul 4, 2017 at 7:51 AM, Gretchen Schramm<carolinabirds...> wrote: Couple of questions:
1.  Is it necessary to clean out a bluebird nesting box once the birds have fledged? I have a bluebird looking at one of the boxes, but have left the nest inside intact.
2.  With mealworms, I've tried both dried and live worms, placing them on the ground, on a small table close to the cardinal's nest, and in a glass dish attached to the bluebird nesting pole.  Why no takers?
Any advice would be appreciated.  Thank you.
GretchenWilmington, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/17 11:24 am
From: Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...>
Subject: RE: Summer Suet
Suet is very much in demand among my local birds.  I have three homemade hanging logs stuffed with soft suet with one log in reserve.  I have to refill them about every third day.  I also have a hopper type feeder that I stock with suet nuggets.  I put two hands-full of these nuggets EVERY morning and they're gone by late afternoon.*  Several species other than woodpeckers feed on my suet.  There are some that are still seen carrying suet away presumably to feed chicks.  I used to use suet cakes years ago, but they'd become moldy in the heat and humidity.  Frank HamiltonCharleston, SC
* Cardinals, Blue Jays, Mockingbirds Grackles and an occasional Red-Bellied Woodpecker are the most common feeders.  Adult Carolina Wrens can sometimes take one away to a place where they can break it up into smaller pieces.  Other wrens peck nuggets and consume the crumbs in the feeder.

 

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Date: 7/4/17 6:54 am
From: Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Swallow tailed kites - Horry County, SC - July 3
Two flying over Five Fathom Creek between the Waccamaw and the Great Pee Dee at Sandy Island, Horry County, SC.

Parkin Hunter
Columbia, SC

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 7/4/17 6:53 am
From: Carol Chelette (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Radio show on birds
Today (7/4) at noon on the "State of Things" show on WUNC 91.5, NC Public
Radio, Frank Stasio will be discussing "The Genius of Birds."

Carol Chelette
Durham, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/17 6:38 am
From: Clyde Sorenson <sorenson...>
Subject: North Johnston County Mississippi kite
Just had one soaring right over my house, which is located a mile north of
Clayton in Johnston County and about a mile from the Wake County line. My
house is about 3/4 mile from the Neuse.

Take care,

Clyde Sorenson
Clayton and Raleigh, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/17 4:51 am
From: Gretchen Schramm (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bluebirds and Cardinals
Couple of questions:

1. Is it necessary to clean out a bluebird nesting box once the birds have
fledged? I have a bluebird looking at one of the boxes, but have left the
nest inside intact.

2. With mealworms, I've tried both dried and live worms, placing them on
the ground, on a small table close to the cardinal's nest, and in a glass
dish attached to the bluebird nesting pole. Why no takers?

Any advice would be appreciated. Thank you.

Gretchen
Wilmington, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/3/17 1:57 pm
From: Irvin Pitts <pittsjam...>
Subject: Bear Island WMA bird activity - Wood Storks, Roseate Spoonbills and a Reddish Egret
Hello,
After seeing the reports of marsh wading bird activity at Bear Island WMA (Colleton County, SC) I decided to head down early this morning and arrived at 6:30 AM. I found hundreds of marsh wading birds on the the Pecan Tree impoundments, highlighted by a total of 52 Roseate Spoonbills, this being about as many as I've seen at one time in SC. In addition, there were many Wood Storks, egrets and herons, including an immature Reddish Egret, along with Glossy Ibises, Laughing Gulls, Forster's Terns, Least Terns, Caspian Terns, Black Skimmers, etc. It was a spectacular avian display, accentuated by the clacking sounds made by foraging wood storks.

Irvin Pitts
Lexington, SC
 

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Date: 7/3/17 12:03 pm
From: <hilton...> <hilton...>
Subject: Hilton Pond 06/01/17 (June Reptiles)
During June we watched and banded a nice complement of birds—including Ruby-throated Hummingbirds—but our attention during the month turned to an abundance of reptiles along our trails. Those scaled creatures are the emphasis for our “This Week at Hilton Pond” installment for 1-30 Jun 2017, a photo essay that includes lots of images of local snakes, lizards, and turtles. (We include an inventory of all 22 reptile species observed locally since 1982.)

Don’t forget to scroll own for our tally of birds banded or recaptured during the period, as well as some Miscellaneous Nature Notes about weather, hummers, teacher workshops, and deer. Read all about it at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.hiltonpond.org_ThisWeek170601.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=mxp3yNRb8IKi-52ywpXMHuFT3HblwAf-Ad7Q_07nD_U&s=D3sIAZ0qbV26Ip6kpMUalk97uCrfa3MdOZotbrgQ6GY&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.hiltonpond.org_ThisWeek170601.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=mxp3yNRb8IKi-52ywpXMHuFT3HblwAf-Ad7Q_07nD_U&s=D3sIAZ0qbV26Ip6kpMUalk97uCrfa3MdOZotbrgQ6GY&e= >

Happy (Mid-summer) Nature Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.facebook.com_HiltonPond&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=mxp3yNRb8IKi-52ywpXMHuFT3HblwAf-Ad7Q_07nD_U&s=XU-wWv208iSlTM5y6TfMsoNrsN5xD_D4n0Uu11gKR3A&e= for timely updates on nature topics,
and for info about hummingbirds at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.facebook.com_rubythroats&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=mxp3yNRb8IKi-52ywpXMHuFT3HblwAf-Ad7Q_07nD_U&s=ZpqRg7DvWAwACC8UUfKEL-K1C09UdHrSjx2LwpgUTjU&e=

Follow us on Twitter @hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and education for students of all ages.

"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the sunset." BHjr.

============


 

Back to top
Date: 7/3/17 10:25 am
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Suet in the Summer
My two peanut feeders are a hit as well. I buy my stuff from tractor supply. Good people and good prices.
I should monitor how much money I spend on the birds, but you what.....
It's a joy and I will continue to do it.
No matter the costs.
And I know my yard benefits in migration with as many migrants as I see around.

Enjoy!

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 3, 2017, at 12:17 PM, Cecelia Mathis <weer...> wrote:
>
> Following up with Betsy’s comments on peanuts, I buy them in 25-50 lb amounts from a local produce store. I store them in METAL TRASH CANS on the porch.
>
> Cecelia Butler
> Alleghany Co, NC
>
> From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
> Sent: Monday, July 3, 2017 11:48 AM
> To: Brian Pendergraft
> Cc: Carolinabirds Listserve
> Subject: Re: Suet in the Summer
>
> Thank you, Brian.
>
> I'll weigh in -- I have found peanuts to attract many suet-loving birds. If you can't get "summer-proof" suet cakes or don't want to use suet for another reason, peanuts are great for many insect- and suet-eating birds. The birds you mentioned above will eat peanuts, and even some warblers do. A good source is the Farmers Market suppliers that carry bulk peanuts (shelled) in the burlap bags -- inexpensive and much higher quality than birdseed-grade peanuts.
>
> The birds have been going after my apples (I mean the ones growing on the trees) and other yard fruits, and while I don't mind sharing, it does help to put water out, as very often the birds are just thirsty when they bite fruit.
>
> As a food source, cardinals really go for the raspberries ('Caroline' is one raspberry that is just barely productive in the Piedmont), while thrashers and catbirds are enjoying the huge, thornless Triple Crown blackberries a lot, and blueberries of course are the jays' favorites.
>
> Meanwhile, every one of my figs is carried off by a crow just before it gets ripe. I see the fig tree shake, and then the crow flies out with a fat fig by the neck, just like a cartoon bank robber carrying off a bag of cash.
>
> Hoping to enjoy Brian's thrush program this autumn.
>
> Betsy Kane
> Raleigh
>
>> On Mon, Jul 3, 2017 at 8:04 AM, Brian Pendergraft <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>> My hot suet cake in the front yard has to be replaced every day due to the bird traffic. Many of you who visit the Thrush Program know where I have it and just now I had Hairy Woodpecker, WB Nuthatch, Eastern Bluebird, and RB Woodpecker close by waiting there turns.
>> Some folks don't like to use suet in the summer but I provide it year around.
>> The hot no melt does the trick and the birds LOVE IT. I have a couple of crows that like it, and they get their share, but I have baffled cakes in the back as well.
>> Water and suet in the summer. A good combination!
>>
>> Brian Pendergraft
>> Falls Lake NC
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/3/17 9:23 am
From: Cecelia Mathis <weer...>
Subject: Re: Suet in the Summer
Following up with Betsy’s comments on peanuts, I buy them in 25-50 lb amounts from a local produce store. I store them in METAL TRASH CANS on the porch.

Cecelia Butler
Alleghany Co, NC

From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
Sent: Monday, July 3, 2017 11:48 AM
To: Brian Pendergraft
Cc: Carolinabirds Listserve
Subject: Re: Suet in the Summer

Thank you, Brian.

I'll weigh in -- I have found peanuts to attract many suet-loving birds. If you can't get "summer-proof" suet cakes or don't want to use suet for another reason, peanuts are great for many insect- and suet-eating birds. The birds you mentioned above will eat peanuts, and even some warblers do. A good source is the Farmers Market suppliers that carry bulk peanuts (shelled) in the burlap bags -- inexpensive and much higher quality than birdseed-grade peanuts.

The birds have been going after my apples (I mean the ones growing on the trees) and other yard fruits, and while I don't mind sharing, it does help to put water out, as very often the birds are just thirsty when they bite fruit.

As a food source, cardinals really go for the raspberries ('Caroline' is one raspberry that is just barely productive in the Piedmont), while thrashers and catbirds are enjoying the huge, thornless Triple Crown blackberries a lot, and blueberries of course are the jays' favorites.

Meanwhile, every one of my figs is carried off by a crow just before it gets ripe. I see the fig tree shake, and then the crow flies out with a fat fig by the neck, just like a cartoon bank robber carrying off a bag of cash.

Hoping to enjoy Brian's thrush program this autumn.

Betsy Kane
Raleigh

On Mon, Jul 3, 2017 at 8:04 AM, Brian Pendergraft <carolinabirds...> wrote:

My hot suet cake in the front yard has to be replaced every day due to the bird traffic. Many of you who visit the Thrush Program know where I have it and just now I had Hairy Woodpecker, WB Nuthatch, Eastern Bluebird, and RB Woodpecker close by waiting there turns.
Some folks don't like to use suet in the summer but I provide it year around.
The hot no melt does the trick and the birds LOVE IT. I have a couple of crows that like it, and they get their share, but I have baffled cakes in the back as well.
Water and suet in the summer. A good combination!

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC


Sent from my iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 7/3/17 8:49 am
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Suet in the Summer
Thank you, Brian.

I'll weigh in -- I have found peanuts to attract many suet-loving birds.
If you can't get "summer-proof" suet cakes or don't want to use suet for
another reason, peanuts are great for many insect- and suet-eating birds.
The birds you mentioned above will eat peanuts, and even some warblers do.
A good source is the Farmers Market suppliers that carry bulk peanuts
(shelled) in the burlap bags -- inexpensive and much higher quality than
birdseed-grade peanuts.

The birds have been going after my apples (I mean the ones growing on the
trees) and other yard fruits, and while I don't mind sharing, it does help
to put water out, as very often the birds are just thirsty when they bite
fruit.

As a food source, cardinals really go for the raspberries ('Caroline' is
one raspberry that is just barely productive in the Piedmont), while
thrashers and catbirds are enjoying the huge, thornless Triple Crown
blackberries a lot, and blueberries of course are the jays' favorites.

Meanwhile, every one of my figs is carried off by a crow just before it
gets ripe. I see the fig tree shake, and then the crow flies out with a
fat fig by the neck, just like a cartoon bank robber carrying off a bag of
cash.

Hoping to enjoy Brian's thrush program this autumn.

Betsy Kane
Raleigh

On Mon, Jul 3, 2017 at 8:04 AM, Brian Pendergraft <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> My hot suet cake in the front yard has to be replaced every day due to the
> bird traffic. Many of you who visit the Thrush Program know where I have
> it and just now I had Hairy Woodpecker, WB Nuthatch, Eastern Bluebird, and
> RB Woodpecker close by waiting there turns.
> Some folks don't like to use suet in the summer but I provide it year
> around.
> The hot no melt does the trick and the birds LOVE IT. I have a couple of
> crows that like it, and they get their share, but I have baffled cakes in
> the back as well.
> Water and suet in the summer. A good combination!
>
> Brian Pendergraft
> Falls Lake NC
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 7/3/17 6:52 am
From: Rich Boyd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Wood Storks
Dr. Clancey Ballenger just called for me to report on Carolinabirds that
today he has 24 Wood Storks, 15-20 White Ibis, and 18-20 Yellow-Crowned
Night Herons on his farm in Jones County. He has never seen this many Wood
Storks at one time on his farm.

Susan Boyd
Beaufort, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/3/17 5:04 am
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Suet in the Summer
My hot suet cake in the front yard has to be replaced every day due to the bird traffic. Many of you who visit the Thrush Program know where I have it and just now I had Hairy Woodpecker, WB Nuthatch, Eastern Bluebird, and RB Woodpecker close by waiting there turns.
Some folks don't like to use suet in the summer but I provide it year around.
The hot no melt does the trick and the birds LOVE IT. I have a couple of crows that like it, and they get their share, but I have baffled cakes in the back as well.
Water and suet in the summer. A good combination!

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC


Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/17 6:03 pm
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: they're back
I saw my first Ruby-throated Hummingbird of the "season" in my yard today.
It was the first I've seen since last winter's birds left in April.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/17 6:01 pm
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: birding in Down East Carteret County this morning
Four of us birded in eastern Carteret County this morning, beginning on the
Cedar Island NC 12 causeway, then walking some of the barrier strand SE of
the Cedar Island ferry terminal, and then briefly checking a small
impoundment area at the North River Preserve.

Our most interesting observations were 22 Least Bitterns and a total of 6
Northern Harriers for the morning.

All the Least Bitterns were along the Cedar Island causeway, many in grasses
right along the canal. It seems to be the case that Least Bitterns
concentrate along the canals when water levels are low, as they were this
morning.

We had 4 Northern Harriers in sight at one time from the causeway. Although
we did not see any adult males, two birds--which appeared to be
juveniles--perched close together in some low shrubs suggest that nesting
may have taken place in the marshes this summer.

Strangely, we also had 2 Northern Harriers at the North River Preserve,
where we had not seen any in several weeks. One bird was a subadult male.
Another very ratty-looking bird was probably a year-old bird.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/17 5:58 pm
From: JILL MIDGETT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bear Island WMA & Bennett's Pt Rd, Colleton Co, SC
Sunday 7/2 Update

Bennett's Point Rd- The wading bird feeding frenzy continues with count
changes. Visible in the fishing canal at10 am: 3 Woodstork, around 75
Snowies. 8-10 White Ibis (most were immature). 15 Tri-Color Herons, a few
Great Egrets, parent Common Moorhen with one chick swimming and the other
too tiny to make that journey today. One juvie Green Heron who stayed very
close and allowed photos.

Bear Island: Pecan Trees Rd 2 impoundments on right, just past locked
gates.
Walked both paths to see more in each pond. On the east side100+ Wood
stork wading, 20+ over head and in trees; 75 visible Snowy Egrets in trees,
25 Great Egrets and probably as many Tri-Color Herons and a grand total of
THIRTY EIGHT Roseate Spoonbills. This count excitedly shared with us by
birders driving out as we were arriving. Verified 20 in the east side pond,
feeding near the trunk. 18 were readily seen on the west side, all perched
in several trees. Many immature birds. One mature spoonbill was banded.

Finally, back on Bennett's Rd headed just past the overlook platform, a
Least Bittern flew frighteningly close in front of our car.

Jill Midgett
Charleston SC


On Wednesday, June 28, 2017, Ann Truesdale <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> There was a feeding frenzy on Bennett's Point Rd this morning. The
> impoundments to the right at the canal where people fish is being drained
> down. There were hundreds of Wood Storks, egrets, White Ibis feeding in the
> impoundment, some close to the highway. Many more birds were perched in the
> far trees in the back.
>
> I'm sure I underestimated, but here is my eBird list:
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.or
> g_ebird_view_checklist_S37850777&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmV
> OlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2
> LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Ffk9V6msBzlFznmHsXLzZHclPA9B_f576YGmSUHk49Q&
> s=ulPEd6eJc-vndp0IVlqDC08BkYlrtUk1sqiy1wDc-Gs&e=
> At Bear Island there was high water everywhere I checked, with the
> exception of low enough levels at one impoundment (past the gate on Pecan
> Trees Rd) where there were some egrets and four ROSEATE SPOONBILLS feeding
> in the marsh in back. That was the impoundment on the right side past the
> gate and canal. The spoonbills were far back and in the marsh, so not
> always visible.
>
> I will be adding some photos to my eBird lists later.
>
> --
> Ann Truesdale
> <anntrue...>
>

 

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Date: 7/2/17 4:23 am
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: July Scarlet Tanager - Backyard
When I moved to Falls Lake in December of 1999, I would have never thought I would see Scarlet Tanager in July here in my yard. 2nd year in a row though. Singing away in a gum tree presently and he's joined by the resident Yellow-throated Vireo.
Cool stuff for early July while sipping a cup of decaf!

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 7/1/17 4:49 pm
From: Shea Tiller (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Thank you!
Greetings.

Thanks to everyone who answered my recent RFI for southeast South Carolina.
I ended up having a great trip, and getting either 9 or 10 lifers,
depending on how you count subspecies: Swainson's warbler, Kentucky
warbler, clapper rail, white-eyed eastern towhee, black-bellied whistling
duck, swallow-tailed kite, least bittern, black-necked stilt, gull-billed
tern, and glossy ibis.

If anyone is interested, I have posted about 2/3 of my photos from the trip
to Flickr. Here is the link to the album: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.flickr.com_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=PG6qQLwcDNDJMKz0R9GYe01IrEDw4eHkqB7CsXRdWZ8&s=CBDrtYHDT7aGMfMcoOSuVBuN3xOlM1HFYx1wKRR3lUQ&e=
photos/148002166@N03/albums/72157682031677153

Great birding,

Shea

 

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Date: 6/30/17 1:02 pm
From: David Weesner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Juvenile one legged Lesser Black-b. Gull
While doing the bird stewart thing at the south end of Wrightsville Beach this morning (Black Skimmer and Least Tern colony).  I had a juvenile one legged Lesser Black-b. Gull.  He had just a stub of a leg. The other leg seemed fine. I saw him fly at one point and he was able to get off the ground with 3 hops from the good leg.Dave WessnerWilmington, NC

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 6/30/17 9:03 am
From: Corey, Ed <ed.corey...>
Subject: Swallow-tailed Kites - Lake Waccamaw SP
Yesterday, while processing freshwater mussels for a translocation project at the Lake Waccamaw dam, our group had 3 Swallow-tailed Kites coursing over us for the better part of an hour. Based on tail length, it looked to be 2 adults and a younger bird. They worked the trees and air over us, and even took turns coming down to the water's surface for a drink. At times, the birds were no more than 40 feet over head. Definitely an enjoyable experience for all in attendance!

Ed Corey
Raleigh, NC



 

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Date: 6/29/17 8:19 pm
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: HCAS Brookshire Park bird walk this Saturday (Boone)
This one snuck up on me but it will be held as usual at 8 AM July 1, day
after tomorrow. Please join us as we continue to explore the birds,
plants, and ecosystems of an urban mountain park on the New River.
Binoculars available and beginners welcome.

As always we meet at 8AM near the picnic shelter and rest rooms in the
main parking lot. Brookshire park is a couple miles east of Boone on
US421, left just before the bridge. Free and open to the public.

Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC


 

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Date: 6/29/17 2:11 pm
From: Clyde Sorenson <sorenson...>
Subject: Wood storks on Genoa, NC BBS today
All- I finally ran my second BBS route today (weather, work schedules, and
illness all transpired against an earlier run). This route starts in Genoa,
between Goldsboro and Mount Olive in Wayne County, and runs more or less
south to just north of Kenansville, in Duplin County. The traffic on this
route is getting unbearable- at least 20 stops deserved the black dot for
excessive noise. I had a grand total of 2 quail and only one shrike in 25
miles, but I did get three Mississippi kites, two red-tails, and two two
red-shouldered hawks. Write-ins included a pileated woodpecker, a common
nighthawk (route first for me), a catbird and a couple I'll mention below.
The last stop on this route is on the bridge across Goshen Swamp on
Summerlin Crossroads Road, and it's sort of like the cherry on your sundae
that you save to eat last - it's the sweetest bit. (I narrowly missed
getting to "officially" count a bald eagle here several years ago, and
frequently encounter surprises here.) I parked on the far side of the
bridge and walked back to start my 3 minute interval; shortly after I
pushed my timer, I heard one of my two red-shouldered hawks, which fired up
a barred owl (first ever on route). I looked across the creek and saw two
great egrets (first of the day), and then caught movement overhead out of
the corner of my eye. Looking up, I saw four (!) wood storks soaring and
flapping about 100 feet up, headed to the northwest; while watching them,
an anhinga (common at this stop) flew over about 50 feet up! I felt for a
moment like I was in a nature documentary. In the meantime, it might pay to
look up at Howell Woods...

I will give a more full report on both this and the Dudley route I did
earlier in the month once I get the data worked up.

Take care,

Clyde Sorenson
Clayton and Raleigh, NC

 

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Date: 6/29/17 9:52 am
From: Roger Moyer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Concord Mills Coots
As of 11:30 am today there was on adult and 5 juvenile coots in the retention pond in front of Concord Mills Mall in Concord, NC. Photos were obtained. If anyone wants to see them contact me off list.

Roger Moyer
Concord, NC

 

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Date: 6/28/17 6:27 pm
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Buckhorn Reservoir, Wilson best vantage point seems city boat landing
Thanks, Frank. We are always interested in new places with public access
to bird and naturalize around Wilson, as it is a halfway point for family
in Greenville and Raleigh.

So far we know of:

-Wilson Educational Forest
-Wilson Botanic Garden (behind extension office). Some migrants, summer
woodland birds
-Buckhorn Reservoir (thanks for your notes)
-Toisnot Reservoir (is this perhaps the city reservoir you referred to? -
have never been)
- Large borrow pond just southeast of Wilson, on north side of 264 Hwy.
(viewing only from roadsides, no public access; had variety of ducks incl.
couple of canvasbacks last winter)

We have always wished that there were a state park somewhere in the cluster
of counties east of Raleigh. So much landscape, so few public accesses to
it.

Betsy Kane
Raleigh

On Wednesday, June 28, 2017, Frank Enders <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Three longhorn cattle on approach may interest families.
>
>
>
> Today, I checked all around lake for better vantage points, but the boat
> landing seems best, for hurricane strays. Two Great Blues, nothing
> expected.
>
> The very far north of the reservoir has a dirt road ending at what may be
> a fairly decent viewing point. "Bunn Road".
>
>
> One of the two streams entering the north of the reservoir looks good
> (has herbaceous vegn) for canoeing for rails in season, upstream of the
> perimeter road's bridge.
>
>
> There is also a city reservoir northeast of Wilson, which had a few
> Ruddies and Ring-necks last winter, but I had not seen hurricane strays
> reported there in season.
>
>
>
>
> Frank Enders, Halifax, NC
>

 

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Date: 6/28/17 5:07 pm
From: <jrgrego...>
Subject: Cedar Waxwings in Columbia
I was biking home from USC down Greene Street today when I heard Cedar Waxwing keening overhead. I looked up and watched a flock of 13 tightly-bunched birds heading south along the railroad just west of Five Points.

John Grego
Columbia SC
 

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Date: 6/28/17 1:42 pm
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Buckhorn Reservoir, Wilson best vantage point seems city boat landing
Three longhorn cattle on approach may interest families.



Today, I checked all around lake for better vantage points, but the boat landing seems best, for hurricane strays. Two Great Blues, nothing expected.

The very far north of the reservoir has a dirt road ending at what may be a fairly decent viewing point. "Bunn Road".


One of the two streams entering the north of the reservoir looks good (has herbaceous vegn) for canoeing for rails in season, upstream of the perimeter road's bridge.


There is also a city reservoir northeast of Wilson, which had a few Ruddies and Ring-necks last winter, but I had not seen hurricane strays reported there in season.




Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

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Date: 6/28/17 1:31 pm
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: (continuing) Painted Bunting at Wilson Educational Forest
On June 24 7:30 AM I saw PABU singing from red maple to right of big "willow oak" out from the hours sign (about right angle from P.I. sign). An Indigo Bunting was singing at that time from a smaller tree to the north of the PABU.


But, on June 27 @ 8:34AM and June 28 @ 7:43AM neither bunting seen nor heard. We concentrated near the P.I sign, but also walked around on the other street by the Hawthorn sign.


Two Mississippi Kites were to the north around 9AM on June 27. The small tree labeled as Beech is perhaps a Hophornbeam; I left a branch of beech at the base today: key is spiky leaf buds on beech.

Frank Enders, Halifax, NC



Frank Enders, Halifax, NC
________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Betsy Kane <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Tuesday, June 27, 2017 10:49:00 AM
To: Carolinabirds Listserve
Subject: (continuing) Painted Bunting at Wilson Educational Forest

On Sunday, June 25, at noon and at 4 pm, the painted bunting was singing occasionally at Wilson Educational Forest on Dendrology Drive in Wilson, N.C. in the mixed field / early successional area behind the signs for "Hawthorn" and "Loblolly."

No visual confirmation; unfortunately, schedule limitations prevented a visit at a birder time of day.

Betsy Kane
Raleigh

 

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Date: 6/28/17 11:03 am
From: Ann Truesdale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bear Island WMA & Bennett's Pt Rd, Colleton Co, SC
There was a feeding frenzy on Bennett's Point Rd this morning. The
impoundments to the right at the canal where people fish is being
drained down. There were hundreds of Wood Storks, egrets, White Ibis
feeding in the impoundment, some close to the highway. Many more birds
were perched in the far trees in the back.

I'm sure I underestimated, but here is my eBird list:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S37850777&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Ffk9V6msBzlFznmHsXLzZHclPA9B_f576YGmSUHk49Q&s=ulPEd6eJc-vndp0IVlqDC08BkYlrtUk1sqiy1wDc-Gs&e=

At Bear Island there was high water everywhere I checked, with the
exception of low enough levels at one impoundment (past the gate on
Pecan Trees Rd) where there were some egrets and four ROSEATE SPOONBILLS
feeding in the marsh in back. That was the impoundment on the right side
past the gate and canal. The spoonbills were far back and in the marsh,
so not always visible.

I will be adding some photos to my eBird lists later.

--
Ann Truesdale
<anntrue...>
 

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Date: 6/28/17 9:07 am
From: \J. Anderson\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Pilot Mountain State Park - Spring Bird Count
Good afternoon all,


Summer is here, and spring escaped me by a couple days. Better late than
never, the spring bird count results are attached from the Pilot Mountain
State Park.


A small but mighty crew counted 111 (one hundred eleven) species, covering
mostly park land, unable to cover the entire count circle. [Total up from
109 last year, the 1st annual]. Birding and records in Surry County, NC
still have some potential, so quite a few county records were added.


Interesting contributions included county records of 4 Common Mergansers
(likely the same two adult male/female pair, seen by two parties at
different locations on the Yadkin River - new to both Yadkin/Surry Co. as
per NC Birds - Carolina Bird Club website), a high count of 15 Broad-wing
hawks in Yadkin County, a Northern Harrier, a small group of Bobolink and
Grasshopper Sparrows (also Surry County records), and 21 species of
warbler.


Happy birding all and have a great summer!



--
Jesse Anderson
Pinnacle, NC

 

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Date: 6/28/17 6:26 am
From: Thomas Krakauer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Related to pelagic trips
There is a free app called TURT available for one's cell phone that allows one to report sightings of sea turtles to a global database of species, location, health etc.

This relates to birding in the Carolinas because any person who participates in a pelagic birding trip , or diving can report turtle sightings and enhances the scientific value of the trips

It is available on Apple and Google apps.

Tom Krakauer
Bahama, NC


Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 6/28/17 1:41 am
From: M Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Secretarybirds gender
The Raleigh News and Observer reports that it is a 12 year old male and a 4 year old female.
________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Derb Carter <derbc...>
Sent: Tuesday, June 27, 2017 2:22:12 PM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Secretarybirds

Two Secretarybirds, originally sighted near Asheboro, NC a month ago, have been moving east in the general direction of Africa. The last sighting was near Sanford, NC about one week ago. They appear to be frequenting pastures and hayfields. When last seen, they were about four feet tall and gray and black above, white below, with shaggy hair, and black eyes. The escapees are not known to be dangerous, although this is disputed by the snakes that are their major prey. If you see them, do not approach but call the fugitive hotline at the NC Zoo 336-879-7610.

Derb Carter

 

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Date: 6/27/17 7:16 pm
From: Jeff Lemons (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Breeding Coots Concord
This evening I photographed a group of American Coots at the Concord Mills
Mall retention pond. There were two adults and five juvenile birds. This
pond is a good location for waterfowl in the winter. Most winters it
normally has a Lesser Scaup, Ruddy Ducks, Shovelers, Bufflehead and others.
Today there were about 20 Mallards and many Canada Geese in addition to the
Coots. Photos have been added to the carolina bird club photo gallery and
my eBird report.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S37842152&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=-Pp4nB9ZLOUc86ncOK_jN3o-Vunz8ocArvWHIrWXQws&s=I8FTJsizyVBS7HEU2pJqsO0xRfeaYhXUQaB8lOOjtaI&e=

I believe this may be the first record of American Coots breeding in the
Carolina Piedmont.

Good Birding,
Jeff Lemons
Charlotte, NC

 

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Date: 6/27/17 3:10 pm
From: Rob G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Secretarybirds
Do we know if they're the same or opposite sexes? :)


-- R. Gluck


________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Derb Carter <derbc...>
Sent: Tuesday, June 27, 2017 6:22 PM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Secretarybirds

Two Secretarybirds, originally sighted near Asheboro, NC a month ago, have been moving east in the general direction of Africa. The last sighting was near Sanford, NC about one week ago. They appear to be frequenting pastures and hayfields. When last seen, they were about four feet tall and gray and black above, white below, with shaggy hair, and black eyes. The escapees are not known to be dangerous, although this is disputed by the snakes that are their major prey. If you see them, do not approach but call the fugitive hotline at the NC Zoo 336-879-7610.

Derb Carter

 

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Date: 6/27/17 12:49 pm
From: M Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Purple Marten fledglings
My Purple Martens have fledged. They've been entertaining me for about a week with their aerial antics and calls. It's so nice to hear them and look up to a sky full of birds. Now to see how long they stay with me. Some years, they stay until fall. Other years, they go to the nearby forest. I still get to see them but not as many or as frequently. It is funny that when they go to the forest, I see sentries making routine sweeps over the Marten houses to be sure no one else is invading their turf. There are enough babies this year that I expect to lose them to the forest. I don't have enough compartments for this many full sized Martens. I hope everyone is having a population explosion with their Purple Martens this year.

Mae Howell
Goldsboro NC

 

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Date: 6/27/17 11:46 am
From: Alan Gamache <bird...>
Subject: Shiny Cowbird / Fort Macon
Steve Shaffer and I drove down to Fort Macon seeking the Shiny Cowbird near the back end of the visitor center (near the feeders). Successful ! This was a life bird for Steve as well as a life bird for a couple of birders up from Wilmington who joined us.

Also at this spot we had a very active, very songful, and a very visible Painted Bunting (male and female). Out along the Beaufort Inlet we had 12 to 18 Wilsons Plover in the sand dunes, and a single Common Nighthawk wheeling about in the sky repeatedly peenting and booming all the while we were there.

Al Gamache
New Bern, NC


 

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Date: 6/27/17 11:22 am
From: Derb Carter <derbc...>
Subject: Secretarybirds
Two Secretarybirds, originally sighted near Asheboro, NC a month ago, have been moving east in the general direction of Africa. The last sighting was near Sanford, NC about one week ago. They appear to be frequenting pastures and hayfields. When last seen, they were about four feet tall and gray and black above, white below, with shaggy hair, and black eyes. The escapees are not known to be dangerous, although this is disputed by the snakes that are their major prey. If you see them, do not approach but call the fugitive hotline at the NC Zoo 336-879-7610.

Derb Carter

 

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Date: 6/27/17 7:49 am
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: (continuing) Painted Bunting at Wilson Educational Forest
On Sunday, June 25, at noon and at 4 pm, the painted bunting was singing
occasionally at Wilson Educational Forest on Dendrology Drive in Wilson,
N.C. in the mixed field / early successional area behind the signs for
"Hawthorn" and "Loblolly."

No visual confirmation; unfortunately, schedule limitations prevented a
visit at a birder time of day.

Betsy Kane
Raleigh

 

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Date: 6/27/17 7:34 am
From: Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Northern Piedmont BBS routes
Like others the past couple weeks I have completed breeding bird survey
routes in Youngsville (Franklin/Granville/Vance) and
Gupton (Franklin/Warren) and a mini BBS in Orange and Durham county. Some
highlights.

Green Heron - durham, franklin county
Sharp-shinned Hawk - two separate stops in Franklin county (one with a
starling)
Eastern Screech Owl - Franklin
Belted Kingfisher - Franklin, Vance
Red-headed Woodpecker - two stops in Warren
Kentucky Warbler - Franklin twice, Warren twice
Dickcissel - Vance, same site as a decade ago
Grasshopper Sparrow - Franklin, Vance, thrice in Orange

Also had a Mississippi Kite near Rocky Mount on the way back from Pettigrew
last week.
--
Brian Bockhahn
<birdranger248...>

 

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Date: 6/26/17 9:39 pm
From: Steve Landes (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, Jockey Ridge SP- OBX
Hi all,
I am a visiting birder from Ohio, but wanted to make sure I got word out about a Scissor-tailed flycatcher I found today (6-26) at Jockey's Ridge State Park in Nags Head, NC. It looks like they are almost as rare here as they are in my home state of Ohio. Anyway, more details and pictures can be seen on the Ebird checklist here: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S37814838&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=jKDnQpjuLegk3H3uc9_hdNho_egft4GV6EjrKK6PLlo&s=1c0ckAxOnaJymO_g_VObwEjw_xOPYCd1ShtMItCVJt4&e=
Thanks,
Steve Landes
 

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Date: 6/26/17 6:55 pm
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Grackle roost continues, arrive 8:34 in tall pines, all quiet by 8:42PM
The blackbird roost west of Ringwood noted by me on June 20 seems to be all C. Grackles. The short-tailed birds then seen must have been recently fledged grackles.

Again, today, at least 300, but perhaps as many as 500, and very quickly they descended from the tall (100'?) pines where they swooped a bit, to the short (20'?) dense pines on the northwest side of Norman Road.

When I first arrived, there were perhaps 3 grackles to the east and a few heard (5?) well to the west, and I thought the roost was done for.

It was around 8:34 PM when the flock(s) staged and all quiet by 8:42. This time I made no noise, the previous occasion clapping hands to try to count the birds, repeatedly flushing them from the trees. Seems it may have taken less than 5 minutes from arrival to "lights out".

Quite an efficient way to protect the flock. Fall and winter roosts are more evident, arrivals and departures marked by columns of birds over an extended time period. But, of course, it takes time to settle tens or hundreds of thousands of individuals into roosts.


Grackles where I live are usually gone to corn fields by July, absent from location of breeding colonies. But corn is a marginal crop here, and I wonder that these grackles have not moved a few miles east, rainfall being greater east of Interstate 95, and acreage in corn consequently much greater in the flatlands (Ringwood being above the Fall LIne).


This is the first summer roost I have encountered (not a surprise, considering the short window of appearance at the roost), and I guess I will not know where they feed before they amalgamate into bigger flocks. (Though, thinking it over, I have seen a few grackles and redwings working corn in summer near the Halifax new airport, a wet lowland.)


Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

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Date: 6/26/17 4:05 pm
From: Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Female Shiny Cowbird captured by Painted Bunting Banders
Hi All,

I had the pleasure of observing Ed Dombrofski and Keith Jensen capture and
band four Painted Buntings in one hour this morning. They noted that it
was an exceptional hour. Just after the last Painted Bunting was released,
the female Shiny Cowbird was captured. As soon as she was in the trap, the
male landed on a branch right above the trap. He stayed there as we
approached to extract the female, even swooping at us as she was removed.
Ed and Keith did not have the proper size bands to band the Shiny Cowbird,
so she was examined and released. Both Shiny Cowbirds, as well as several
Painted Buntings were observed in the area of the feeders within an hour of
being released. I have posted a photo of the female Shiny Cowbird to the
Carolina Bird Club Gallery.

Marty Wall
Beaufort, NC

 

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Date: 6/26/17 1:42 pm
From: Tony Paladino (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Moving to CA
I got a new job at Yosemite NP, so please remove me from the list. Time to break out Sibley's Western Birds!

Cheers!

Sent from Tony's iPhone
 

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Date: 6/26/17 12:40 pm
From: Cynthia Fox (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: VOA site in Beaufort county NC
I see the NC wildlife resources commission has acquired the former Voice of America site A and will be opening the gates to the public August 1. It will be managed as game lands so eventually hunting and horseback riding may be allowed along with other interests. They claim they are interested in maintaining habitat for the Henslow sparrow so get your lists ready! Good news. Cynthia Fox Chapel Hill

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 6/26/17 12:19 pm
From: Clyde Smith (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Swallow-tailed Kite
I’ve been off Carolinabirds for so long that I have almost forgotten how to send a message. This is an information alert to birders in the North Eastern corner of NC.

On a road trip to attend a family reunion in Gates County we were traveling east on Hwy. 158 about 5 minutes out of Conway, Northampton County, when I saw a Swallow-tailed Kite fly over headed west. I checked with my cousin Ric Carter, a reliable source for the region, and he assured me that while the numbers of Mississippi Kites have been increasing in the area, a Swallow-tailed Kite was certainly an unusual sighting.

Clyde Smith
Raleigh, NC

 

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Date: 6/26/17 12:07 pm
From: Roger Moyer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bennettsville, SC BBS
I miscounted on the number of species I had Friday. The actual number was 61. The following birds were omitted from the first list.


Acadian Flycatcher

Great-crested Flycatcher

Eastern Wood-Pewee

Eastern Kingbird

Red-shouldered Hawk.



Roger Moyer

 

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Date: 6/26/17 8:42 am
From: davidclark1338 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Cory's Least Bittern
Sorry, I was interrupted during my previous attempt to post. Yesterday I saw 4
Least Bitterns at MacKay Island NWR in Currituck Co. NC, one of which was the
very rare dark form known as "Cory's". It flew across the road about 75 ft.
in front of my car but didn't stop until middle of the marsh, so I was unable
to get any photos. At first I thought it was a Green Heron, but as it got
closer it was obviously smaller and darker, appearing blackish all over but
with contrasting dark rufous wing patches. No white at all on face or neck. A
very cool looking bird!

David Clark
Norfolk, Va
 

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Date: 6/26/17 6:23 am
From: Roger Moyer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bennettsville, SC BBS
I finally had the time to get out and to the Bennettsville, SC Breeding Bird Survey Friday. I had 57 species. Nothing too out of the ordinary. There were 5 White Ibises in one spot as well as about 20 Anhingas. I don't know how rare they are in this area but they were nice to find. Below is a complete list of what I saw or heard. There is one species that I am endeavouring to ID. I have a recording of the call and have no idea what it is.


Wood Duck

Canada Goose

Bob White

Mourning Dove

Yellow-billed Cuckoo

Chuck-wills-widow

Killdeer

Great Blue Heron

Little Blue Heron

Green Heron

Great Egret

Cattle Egret

Anhinga

White Ibis

Turkey Vulture

Black Vulture

Red-tailed Hawk

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

Northern Flicker

Pileated Woodpecker

Red-eyed Vireo

White-eyed Vireo

Blue Jay

American Crow

Fish Crow

Purple Martin

Barn Swallow

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

Carolina Wren

Blue-grey Gnatcatcher

Eastern Bluebird

Wood Thrush

American Robin

Northern Mockingbird

European Starling

Common Yellowthroat

Prothonotary Warbler

Pine Warbler

Yellow-throated Warbler

Yellow-breasted Chat

Eastern Towhee

Chipping Sparrow

Field Sparrow

Summer Tanager

Northern Cardinal

Red-winged Blackbird

Common Grackle

Brown-headed Cowbird

Orchard Oriole

Rock Dove

Mississippi Kite

Gray Catbird

Blue Grosbeak

Indigo Bunting


Roger Moyer

Concord, NC






















 

Back to top
Date: 6/26/17 5:41 am
From: davidclark1338 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: "Cory's" Least Bittern @ MacKay Island NWR
Took advantage of "open roads day" at MacKay Islamd
 

Back to top
Date: 6/26/17 4:55 am
From: Matt Curran <mcurran1...>
Subject: White Ibis flying overhead
I saw two white Ibis fly over my home yesterday at about 5:30 PM.



Matt Curran

North Raleigh

Falls River subdivision


 

Back to top
Date: 6/25/17 11:46 am
From: scbirder (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: White-faced Ibis not found today


Debra and I returned to Springdale Racetrack this afternoon but did not find the ibis.  I will report if it returns or shows up in a nearby spot.

Steve PattersonCamden, SC


Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE smartphone
 

Back to top
Date: 6/25/17 8:33 am
From: <susan...>
Subject: RE: White-faced Ibis in Camden, SC
Dear Steve,

Great find! Your image is very satisfactory for identification of the
ibis. The diagnostic red eye is visible in addition to the white facial
feathering. Nice!!

Susan Campbell
Southern Pines, NC

> -------- Original Message --------
> Subject: White-faced Ibis in Camden, SC
> From: "Steve Patterson" (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
> <carolinabirds...>
> Date: Sat, June 24, 2017 11:03 pm
> To: <carolinabirds...>
>
>
> Around 6:00 this evening (Saturday) as a rain storm was finalizing, I found a dark ibis in the pond at Springdale Racetrack. At first I naturally guessed it would be a Glossy, but when I saw more white on the face than I expected, I took a (poor) digiscope video and photos, just in case.
>
>
> I have reported it to ebird as White-faced Ibis, and there are a few blurry screen captures there. If I have missed something that should be considered, I would appreciate your communication.
>
>
> The bird did not stay long, leaving after I had observed it for about 40 minutes or so.
>
>
>
>
> Steve Patterson
> Camden, Kershaw County, SC
 

Back to top
Date: 6/24/17 8:03 pm
From: Steve Patterson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: White-faced Ibis in Camden, SC
Around 6:00 this evening (Saturday) as a rain storm was finalizing, I found a dark ibis in the pond at Springdale Racetrack. At first I naturally guessed it would be a Glossy, but when I saw more white on the face than I expected, I took a (poor) digiscope video and photos, just in case.


I have reported it to ebird as White-faced Ibis, and there are a few blurry screen captures there. If I have missed something that should be considered, I would appreciate your communication.


The bird did not stay long, leaving after I had observed it for about 40 minutes or so.




Steve Patterson
Camden, Kershaw County, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 6/24/17 6:34 am
From: Chris Kelly (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hermit Thrush nest, Haywood Co, NC
On Tuesday, June 20th, while working in a project area off of the Flat
Laurel Branch Trail in the Great Balsams (Haywood County), I found a hermit
thrush nest with 4 eggs. Apparently I walked too close to the unseen nest,
and the incubating bird flushed. She flew low and silently toward a
blackberry patch and disappeared. I observed the brown body, rusty-red
brown tail, and briefest side glimpse of the spots on the breast. Veeries
are present in this area so I was expecting a veery, but instead was seeing
a hermit thrush! The eggs were pale blue. I continued past to avoid leaving
a dead-end scent trail to the nest. Approximately 5 minutes later, a male
hermit thrush was singing ~75-100 meters to the west and upslope. He then
moved closer to the nest. I am returning to work in this area soon and will
get an update. The nest is at the base of hay-scented ferns, as Marilyn
Westphal and Mark Simpson have seen with some other hermit thrush nests.
Hermit thrushes have been in the Balsams during the breeding season for
over 16 years. Mark and Marilyn observed fledglings near Devil's Courthouse
(Transylvania County) but I suspect this may be the first nest record for
Haywood County. Please contact me off list if you are aware of a nest
record in Haywood County. I'll post two nest photos to the CBC gallery.

Chris Kelly
Asheville, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 6/24/17 4:17 am
From: Tom <tbausti...>
Subject: Pure white Ibis - Dorchester County, SC
On my way home from work yesterday afternoon I saw a single Ibis fly low overhead through the power line right-of-way beside Ashley Ridge High School on SC-165 in Dorchester County, SC. The area is a fairly wet lowland surrounded by swamp, so it wasn't out of the ordinary and I often see many species of wading birds fly in this area.

However, I noticed something off about the Ibis, which I assumed was a White Ibis: It completely lacked the black wing tips of a mature bird but it was snow white throughout the plumage. I also don't remember seeing any red coloration on the head and bill, but that could have just been the lighting.

My question is whether there are any other potential species this could have been, other than a White Ibis, or was it probably just a leucistic bird or a transient molt pattern I'm unaware of?

Thanks,
-Tom Austin
 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/17 7:44 pm
From: Will Cook <cwcook...>
Subject: Re: A dozen White Ibis in Cary, NC
I had a similar sighting Monday morning (6/19) -- at 7:30 am, while I was
driving down I85 at the Bass Pro Shops in Concord NC, a flock of
about 12-14 White Ibis flew by, headed NW, in the direction of Lake
Norman. Definitely an unexpected sight!
Will Cookcurrently in Fancy Gap, VA
On Jun 23, 2017 9:52 PM, Eddie Owens <carolinabirds...> wrote:

Strangest sight! I was on a date with my honey-babe, visiting the
brand new fountain in downtown Cary, when a flock of 12 fairly
low-flying White Ibis flew over, heading NW. White wings, black
wingtips, long decurved pink bills. No bins but ID was easy with
these low-flying birds.


After dropping my wife off at the house, I drove over to Lake
Crabtree on a hunch, but no luck there.


Eddie Owens

Cary, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/17 6:53 pm
From: Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: A dozen White Ibis in Cary, NC
Strangest sight! I was on a date with my honey-babe, visiting the brand new
fountain in downtown Cary, when a flock of 12 fairly low-flying White Ibis
flew over, heading NW. White wings, black wingtips, long decurved pink
bills. No bins but ID was easy with these low-flying birds.


After dropping my wife off at the house, I drove over to Lake Crabtree on a
hunch, but no luck there.


Eddie Owens

Cary, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/17 9:54 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Update: CBC Bonus Field Trip – Blue Ridge Parkway Sept. 16-17 (and some off-topic Alaska stuff)
Just a note to update the status on this trip. Response was tremendous, and the trip sold out quickly. We do keep a waiting list as folks often change plans in the time leading up to the trip, so if you are interested, please consider joining the waiting list .

On a completely separate topic (and not relevant to birds in the Carolinas, so feel free to stop reading right about now) I recently visited Alaska on a cruise ship. I noticed that quite a few folks on the planes back home were from the Carolinas, so figured I would provide some basic info in case folks find themselves on an Alaska cruise this summer or in the future.

Pelagic birding from the ship was good. I took along my Kowa 82mm 20-60x spotting scope and had my Vortex Razor 8x42 bins along. This ship left from Seattle, so we ran up the west side of Vancouver Island and the Queen Charlottes, putting us in the open Pacific for a few hundred miles each way. SOOTY SHEARWATERS were common (and in serious molt), with hundreds seen (and scores milling around the seaward entrance to the Strait of Juan de Fuca where 40+ Humpback Whales were in attendance.) Small numbers of PINK FOOTED SHEARWATERS mixed with the Sooties.

LAYSAN and BLACK FOOTED ALBATROSS were noted in offshore waters, with many Black-footed. One SOUTH POLAR SKUA buzzed the ship while I was dining, making for a neat lifer. NORTHERN FULMAR in small numbers surprised me a bit, since the dark phase is more common in the Pacific, but the birds I saw were light phase.

Alcids really stole the show with large numbers of COMMON MURRE, quite a few ANCIENT MURRELETS, smaller numbers of TUFTED PUFFIN, CASSINS AUKLET, and RHINOCEROS AUKLET. MARBLED MURRLET and PIGEON GUILLEMOT were in harbors.

FORK TAILED STORM PETRELS were fairly common and flocks of LEACHS STORM PETREL accompanied the ship in the gap between Vancouver Is and the QCIs.

Best spots for birds were off the NW tip of Vancouver Is, west of the Queen Charlotte Islands, and the entrance to the Strait of Juan de Fuca. No albatross were seen inshore of the islands, but can occasionally be seen in the Hecate Strait. Most alcids were in offshore waters, but small numbers, usually in pairs, could be seen inshore, especially Common Murre. Often the alcids fed in the same areas as the shearwaters and albatross.

Marine mammals were conspicuous, with 106 Humpback Whales, 3 Sei Whales, 1 Fin Whale, 2 pods of Orca, Harbor Porpoise, Harbor Seal, Steller Sea Lion, and Pacific White-sided Dolphin. Cruisers visiting Sitka may see Sea Otters in Sitka Sound (we saw 20 or so here). Best spots for whales were the gap between Vancouver Is and the QCIs, the seaward entrance to Juan de Fuca, and anywhere two channels or straits met (for example the southern entrance to the Chatham Strait)

I spent 2-3 hours per day watching, either from the cabins verandah or one of the lounges that overlooked the bow. Handy to be able to either a) roll out of bed, throw on a jacket, and be looking at birds within a minute or two, or b) have a Manhattan in one hand and bins in the other while watching a whale! The scope simply sat on the balcony with the cover on overnight, or would accompany me to the lounge during the day.

If you are heading up that way and have any specific questions, be glad to chat!

Steve Shultz
Apex, NC
(919) 458-4999
From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of "Shultz, Steven"
Sent: Wednesday, June 21, 2017 8:27 AM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Carolina Bird Club Bonus Field Trip Blue Ridge Parkway September 16-17

Join us as we seek out and enjoy roving flocks of fall migrants on the beautiful Blue Ridge Parkway!

Are you a fan of warblers? Then this trip is for you. Mid to late September is the peak of fall migration for warblers in the Carolinas. This is the time when a variety of warblers abandon their breeding season stratification and join together with vireos, tanagers, cuckoos, grosbeaks and more to feast on the little buggy things that power their southward migration. These flocks frequently follow the crests of the Appalachian ranges, and we hope to encounter a variety of species as we travel the scenic Parkway. While not as common in the lowlands, up here on the Blue Ridge, Tennessee, Cape May, and Bay-breasted Warblers often take center stage, with many others playing supporting roles. In addition, this is the prime time for passage of southbound Broad-winged Hawks, and we will spend some time at the Mahogany Rock Hawk Watch waiting for raptors to drift overhead.

Sound like fun? Act quickly as space on this Bonus Trip is limited to 10 participants. This smaller group makes individualized interaction with the trip leaders easier and allows us to help you with identifying any of those confusing fall warblers.

Logistics:
This trip visits the Blue Ridge Parkway in northern North Carolina and southern Virginia on September 16 and 17nd. We will depart from Sparta, NC at 7 a.m. Saturday and Sunday with a full day of birding on Saturday and a half day on Sunday. Registration cost is $25. *You must be a member of the Carolina Bird Club to attend, but you may join at the same time as you register if you are currently not a member.* Participants are responsible for lodging, meals, and transportation. All levels of birding experience are welcome.

To Register:
Contact Steve Shultz for a reserved slot and a registration form. If your plans should change after registration, refunds are available through September 6th. After September 6th refunds are available if we can fill your slot. Additional information will be provided upon registration that address most commonly asked questions.

Steve Shultz
sshultz at nc.rr.com
919-629-7226



 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/17 9:20 am
From: Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: wind farms and birds
This is what we are up against in our own backyard.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__jeffduncan.house.gov_press-2Drelease_jeff-2Dduncan-2Dhas-2Dtrue-2D-25E2-2580-259Call-2Dabove-2Dapproach-2Denergy-25E2-2580-259D&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=8VewBSm0p-tnNTwqJPrSw528Zs0n4Tls6z7XHwSn4yI&s=bRVkqXnA48wtBGhKRmeymW-IhK1Ru9GWSEsjxelSDQA&e=

Parkin Hunter
Columbia, SC

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 23, 2017, at 11:27 AM, Elizabeth Faison (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> There are also a number of groups working on blade-less technology such as this one reported on YouTube www.youtube.com/watch?v=wYdvbbG52Qs&index=15&list=WL ,
>
> with an eye especially on protecting birds.
>
>
>
> Elizabeth Faison
> Boone, NC
>
>
>
>
> From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Sally Robertson <sally...>
> Sent: Friday, June 23, 2017 8:40 AM
> To: Linda Ward; <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: Re: wind farms and birds
>
> I’m in digest mode, so apologies if this has already been addressed.
>
> I look forward to seeing what others have posted about this important question, but here are my two cents.
>
> This article:
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__cleantechnica.com_2013_11_26_wind-2Dfarm-2Dbird-2Ddeaths-2Dfossil-2Dfuel-2Dnuclear-2Dbird-2Ddeaths_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=8VewBSm0p-tnNTwqJPrSw528Zs0n4Tls6z7XHwSn4yI&s=tr7b5qGZcU04jaJ6SWyDSWyisP4eojCtmxpC_XrZBxQ&e=
> claims that nuclear and fossil fuel plants kill more birds than wind farms.
>
> (Though I also found an article that disputed the nuclear point.)
>
> And that appears to be just at the plants. It doesn’t account for habitat devastation from mountaintop removal coal mining, for example.
>
> In my mind, the big picture wins out: Every wind farm reduces the amount of fossil fuel we have to burn. Every bit of fossil fuel we burn increases the likelihood that entire bird species (a lot of them) will become extinct.
>
> The wind farm-bird death issue is not a lie. But it is eagerly perpetuated (and probably exaggerated) by the fossil fuel industry (see https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.huffingtonpost.com_elliott-2Dnegin_wind-2Denergy-2Dthreat-2Dto-2Dbir-5Fb-5F4321113.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=8VewBSm0p-tnNTwqJPrSw528Zs0n4Tls6z7XHwSn4yI&s=nV_T_dDcgiRwbiAt1NXEizFhsVLIrXLZrhakz_KfZng&e= ) . We can counter their bottomless PR pockets by refusing to repeat their talking points (while, of course, helping the wind industry to reduce bird deaths as much as possible).
>
> From: Linda Ward
> Sent: Thursday, June 22, 2017 1:17 PM
> To: <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: wind farms and birds
>
> Can someone please post pertinent websites or other contact info that addesses the impact (pun intended) of wind farms on birds? I know this has been posted before, but I'd like up to date info, especially if it's including info on the new wind farms in Perquimans and Pasquotank Counties, NC. The NC Sierra Club has visited these windfarms and presents favorabile reports...are they off or what?
>
> I can be contacted directly at <tankapoet...>
>
> thanks
>
> Linda Ward
> Coinjock, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/17 8:28 am
From: Elizabeth Faison (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: wind farms and birds
There are also a number of groups working on blade-less technology such as this one reported on YouTube www.youtube.com/watch?v=wYdvbbG52Qs&index=15&list=WL<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.youtube.com_watch-3Fv-3DwYdvbbG52Qs-26index-3D15-26list-3DWL&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=v5oCUxc-5SrmafrclANdWWWT00LpZENXpF3_TiXfZLg&s=f_cJEf299DsX9OkVpQXpYoJh89h6CVbQjcp3T2DcUXA&e= > ,

with an eye especially on protecting birds.



Elizabeth Faison
Boone, NC




________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Sally Robertson <sally...>
Sent: Friday, June 23, 2017 8:40 AM
To: Linda Ward; <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: wind farms and birds

Im in digest mode, so apologies if this has already been addressed.

I look forward to seeing what others have posted about this important question, but here are my two cents.

This article:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__cleantechnica.com_2013_11_26_wind-2Dfarm-2Dbird-2Ddeaths-2Dfossil-2Dfuel-2Dnuclear-2Dbird-2Ddeaths_&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=v5oCUxc-5SrmafrclANdWWWT00LpZENXpF3_TiXfZLg&s=tWTHm5485BRzqpMTLRtLBkZZfi3eX6L5obRGwd9tEWY&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__cleantechnica.com_2013_11_26_wind-2Dfarm-2Dbird-2Ddeaths-2Dfossil-2Dfuel-2Dnuclear-2Dbird-2Ddeaths_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=qhr3BoVER0ODJHj16l9QAw2282LufeKRFZYpWiuEvbA&s=gETX_jqVhOtYEULsAAL5f0g-71x1-ZsUg1KzOPKjlhE&e=>
claims that nuclear and fossil fuel plants kill more birds than wind farms.

(Though I also found an article that disputed the nuclear point.)

And that appears to be just at the plants. It doesnt account for habitat devastation from mountaintop removal coal mining, for example.

In my mind, the big picture wins out: Every wind farm reduces the amount of fossil fuel we have to burn. Every bit of fossil fuel we burn increases the likelihood that entire bird species (a lot of them) will become extinct.

The wind farm-bird death issue is not a lie. But it is eagerly perpetuated (and probably exaggerated) by the fossil fuel industry (see https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.huffingtonpost.com_elliott-2Dnegin_wind-2Denergy-2Dthreat-2Dto-2Dbir-5Fb-5F4321113.html&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=v5oCUxc-5SrmafrclANdWWWT00LpZENXpF3_TiXfZLg&s=_DKpJcDigf54TyFEhtoGg2pWdQZz_UFGQYFf2BoSQ4M&e= ) <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.huffingtonpost.com_elliott-2Dnegin_wind-2Denergy-2Dthreat-2Dto-2Dbir-5Fb-5F4321113.html-29-2520bottomless&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=qhr3BoVER0ODJHj16l9QAw2282LufeKRFZYpWiuEvbA&s=o-oMScAQrkzkMwn4OPuNZJJUBrBSghFGhe3tyF_QvK4&e=> . We can counter their bottomless PR pockets by refusing to repeat their talking points (while, of course, helping the wind industry to reduce bird deaths as much as possible).

From: Linda Ward<mailto:<tankapoet2...>
Sent: Thursday, June 22, 2017 1:17 PM
To: <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>
Subject: wind farms and birds

Can someone please post pertinent websites or other contact info that addesses the impact (pun intended) of wind farms on birds? I know this has been posted before, but I'd like up to date info, especially if it's including info on the new wind farms in Perquimans and Pasquotank Counties, NC. The NC Sierra Club has visited these windfarms and presents favorabile reports...are they off or what?

I can be contacted directly at <tankapoet...><mailto:<tankapoet...>.

thanks

Linda Ward
Coinjock, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/17 6:55 am
From: Mike Judd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fwd: wind farms and birds
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Mike Judd <ebwilderae...>
Date: Fri, Jun 23, 2017 at 9:54 AM
Subject: Re: wind farms and birds
To: Sally Robertson <sally...>


I thought I had read that Cornell Labs among others were looking at
migration patterns and location of wind farms in order to minimize
casualties. It would seem to a simple-minded soul as myself that turning
the machines off during observed periods of migration in both directions
[which seem to be well tracked by radar at least for passarines moving at
night] for relatively short periods of time can do a lot. Of course there
are still structures present for birds to hit - which they will do. We
might have a handsome impact on the energy used/bird & other wildlife
mortality killed equation by not going birding around the country in our
quest to join the ABA 700 club, etc. but I don't see that happening anytime
soon :-)

Mike Judd
Brevard, NC

On Fri, Jun 23, 2017 at 8:40 AM, Sally Robertson <
<sally...> wrote:

> I’m in digest mode, so apologies if this has already been addressed.
>
> I look forward to seeing what others have posted about this important
> question, but here are my two cents.
>
> This article:
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__cleantechnica.com_2013_11_26_wind-2Dfarm-2Dbird-2Ddeaths-2D&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=L1Nh46v3WCto078BECNew7AITcbORA51gN5gfabin8w&s=IgCdN7Q9no0dYT9Fp6yHKXvdNYHH8E6adziz7fEAZI8&e=
> fossil-fuel-nuclear-bird-deaths/
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__cleantechnica.com_2013_11_26_wind-2Dfarm-2Dbird-2Ddeaths-2Dfossil-2Dfuel-2Dnuclear-2Dbird-2Ddeaths_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=qhr3BoVER0ODJHj16l9QAw2282LufeKRFZYpWiuEvbA&s=gETX_jqVhOtYEULsAAL5f0g-71x1-ZsUg1KzOPKjlhE&e=>
> claims that nuclear and fossil fuel plants kill more birds than wind farms.
>
> (Though I also found an article that disputed the nuclear point.)
>
> And that appears to be just at the plants. It doesn’t account for habitat
> devastation from mountaintop removal coal mining, for example.
>
> In my mind, the big picture wins out: Every wind farm reduces the amount
> of fossil fuel we have to burn. Every bit of fossil fuel we burn increases
> the likelihood that entire bird species (a lot of them) will become extinct.
>
> The wind farm-bird death issue is not a lie. But it is eagerly perpetuated
> (and probably exaggerated) by the fossil fuel industry (see
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.huffingtonpost.com_elliott-2Dnegin_wind-2Denergy-2Dthreat-2Dto-2Dbir-5Fb-5F4321113.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=L1Nh46v3WCto078BECNew7AITcbORA51gN5gfabin8w&s=dKyE-_Jbsaq0jvSsJQqSaN9ABqINZKBNnSmnaza-E_U&e= )
>
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.huffingtonpost.com_elliott-2Dnegin_wind-2Denergy-2Dthreat-2Dto-2Dbir-5Fb-5F4321113.html-29-2520bottomless&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=qhr3BoVER0ODJHj16l9QAw2282LufeKRFZYpWiuEvbA&s=o-oMScAQrkzkMwn4OPuNZJJUBrBSghFGhe3tyF_QvK4&e=>.
> We can counter their bottomless PR pockets by refusing to repeat their
> talking points (while, of course, helping the wind industry to reduce bird
> deaths as much as possible).
>
> *From:* Linda Ward <tankapoet2...>
> *Sent:* Thursday, June 22, 2017 1:17 PM
> *To:* <carolinabirds...>
> *Subject:* wind farms and birds
>
> Can someone please post pertinent websites or other contact info that
> addesses the impact (pun intended) of wind farms on birds? I know this has
> been posted before, but I'd like up to date info, especially if it's
> including info on the new wind farms in Perquimans and Pasquotank Counties,
> NC. The NC Sierra Club has visited these windfarms and presents favorabile
> reports...are they off or what?
>
> I can be contacted directly at <tankapoet...>
>
> thanks
>
> Linda Ward
> Coinjock, NC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/17 6:24 am
From: Shelley Theye <veery...>
Subject: Re: I found fledgling Carolina Wrens. Help!
I should say that the nests CAN be near houses. :-)

Shelley








> On Jun 23, 2017, at 9:17 AM, Shelley Theye <veery...> wrote:
>
> Hi Jonah!
>
> Are they fully feathered, hopping around, doing low very short mini flights?
> I would initially stand way back, so they aren’t affected by your presence and just observe.
> Carolina Wren nests are usually near houses, not high up unless under a porch rafter, etc.
> They can nest in flower pots, too, roosting boxes, places near human activity.
>
> When they young birds fledge, they can’t fly well yet, the parents try to herd them into safe spots so they
> can hop up into shrubbery.
>
> You may be seeing that, if so, they will be OK.
>
> If they seem to just be sitting in place and not hopping,
> you could try to see if the adults fly back to the nest to check it, that way you could see where it is and place them back in.
> You could also make a ‘nest’ with a little berry basket lined with paper toweling and attached securely to a branch or on something
> on your porch. Something near where they are currently.
>
> First just stand back or watch from indoors, and see how they act.
>
> Good luck!
> Shelley
>
> Shelley Theye
> <veery...> <mailto:<veery...>
> Chatham County, NC
>
>
>
>
>
>
>> On Jun 23, 2017, at 8:17 AM, Jonah Losh <jonahl...> <mailto:<jonahl...>> wrote:
>>
>> Hi all.
>>
>> This morning I found two fledgling Carolina Wrens. Annoy fly. They must have fallen out of a nest, because the parents are not abandoning them. I cannot find a nest. If any pone know ps what to do, I need help. Thank you.
>>
>> Jonah
>


 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/17 6:17 am
From: Shelley Theye <veery...>
Subject: Re: I found fledgling Carolina Wrens. Help!
Hi Jonah!

Are they fully feathered, hopping around, doing low very short mini flights?
I would initially stand way back, so they aren’t affected by your presence and just observe.
Carolina Wren nests are usually near houses, not high up unless under a porch rafter, etc.
They can nest in flower pots, too, roosting boxes, places near human activity.

When they young birds fledge, they can’t fly well yet, the parents try to herd them into safe spots so they
can hop up into shrubbery.

You may be seeing that, if so, they will be OK.

If they seem to just be sitting in place and not hopping,
you could try to see if the adults fly back to the nest to check it, that way you could see where it is and place them back in.
You could also make a ‘nest’ with a little berry basket lined with paper toweling and attached securely to a branch or on something
on your porch. Something near where they are currently.

First just stand back or watch from indoors, and see how they act.

Good luck!
Shelley

Shelley Theye
<veery...>
Chatham County, NC






> On Jun 23, 2017, at 8:17 AM, Jonah Losh <jonahl...> wrote:
>
> Hi all.
>
> This morning I found two fledgling Carolina Wrens. Annoy fly. They must have fallen out of a nest, because the parents are not abandoning them. I cannot find a nest. If any pone know ps what to do, I need help. Thank you.
>
> Jonah


 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/17 5:41 am
From: Sally Robertson <sally...>
Subject: Re: wind farms and birds
I’m in digest mode, so apologies if this has already been addressed.

I look forward to seeing what others have posted about this important question, but here are my two cents.

This article:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__cleantechnica.com_2013_11_26_wind-2Dfarm-2Dbird-2Ddeaths-2Dfossil-2Dfuel-2Dnuclear-2Dbird-2Ddeaths_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=qhr3BoVER0ODJHj16l9QAw2282LufeKRFZYpWiuEvbA&s=gETX_jqVhOtYEULsAAL5f0g-71x1-ZsUg1KzOPKjlhE&e=
claims that nuclear and fossil fuel plants kill more birds than wind farms.

(Though I also found an article that disputed the nuclear point.)

And that appears to be just at the plants. It doesn’t account for habitat devastation from mountaintop removal coal mining, for example.

In my mind, the big picture wins out: Every wind farm reduces the amount of fossil fuel we have to burn. Every bit of fossil fuel we burn increases the likelihood that entire bird species (a lot of them) will become extinct.

The wind farm-bird death issue is not a lie. But it is eagerly perpetuated (and probably exaggerated) by the fossil fuel industry (see https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.huffingtonpost.com_elliott-2Dnegin_wind-2Denergy-2Dthreat-2Dto-2Dbir-5Fb-5F4321113.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=qhr3BoVER0ODJHj16l9QAw2282LufeKRFZYpWiuEvbA&s=NnSLJaXTcjeflvPElSlBf36Gxm_dwcpdVF3fke9pm7I&e= ) . We can counter their bottomless PR pockets by refusing to repeat their talking points (while, of course, helping the wind industry to reduce bird deaths as much as possible).

From: Linda Ward
Sent: Thursday, June 22, 2017 1:17 PM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: wind farms and birds

Can someone please post pertinent websites or other contact info that addesses the impact (pun intended) of wind farms on birds? I know this has been posted before, but I'd like up to date info, especially if it's including info on the new wind farms in Perquimans and Pasquotank Counties, NC. The NC Sierra Club has visited these windfarms and presents favorabile reports...are they off or what?

I can be contacted directly at <tankapoet...>

thanks


Linda Ward
Coinjock, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/17 5:18 am
From: Jonah Losh <jonahl...>
Subject: I found fledgling Carolina Wrens. Help!
Hi all.

This morning I found two fledgling Carolina Wrens. Annoy fly. They must have fallen out of a nest, because the parents are not abandoning them. I cannot find a nest. If any pone know ps what to do, I need help. Thank you.

Jonah
 

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Date: 6/22/17 5:46 pm
From: Kevin Metcalf (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Shiny Cowbirds - Ft. Macon, NC
Monday, I spent some time observing the cowbirds at Ft. Macon. Harry Sell
was there at the same time and we shared our observations. The male
Shiny Cowbird came in around 9:25 am, but before that, a female
cowbird showed up and it struck me as having a noticeably long, thin
bill relative to a Brown-headed Cowbird. Other features noted on this
individual were more warm, brown tones, more even-colored head and
throat (throat not as pale as typical Brown-headed), and shorter
primary projection - all consistent with Shiny Cowbird. It also showed
a faint "eyebrow". However, variation in female cowbirds means that
none of these features alone provided a slam-dunk ID (except maybe the
bill shape ).
I took several photos of this bird as it came and went from the area
of the feeders over the next two hours or so. They are posted in
e-bird. Harry Sell noted the same features and photographed the same
bird.
A couple other observers have seen this female and have been leaning
toward Shiny Cowbird. Besides the bill shape, look for the shorter,
broader primary projection and spacing of the primaries relative to
Brown-headed Cowbird. I have one photo of the underside of the wing
that I believe shows that P-9 is shorter than P-8. Brown-headed has
more pointed wings than Shiny Cowbird, with the outermost (P-9)
primary typically the longest. Just some other features to look for
along with the bill shape.
Not sure if they are a happy couple, but given the suite of
characteristics of the female, I'd say we've got a pair of Shiny
Cowbirds now in North Carolina.

Kevin MetcalfHuntersville, NC
 

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Date: 6/22/17 2:51 pm
From: David Weesner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Great Shearwater & Shiny Cowbird
I meet Marty Wall at Fort Macon S.P. this morning to look for the Shiny Cowbird.  He had seen it earlier. After about 30 or 40 minutes I had several good looks at a male. At one point he was chasing the female.I left for the beach to look for Shearwaters.  I had a Great Shearwater sitting in the water about 75 yards from the shore.  I called Marty and he got some pictures of the bird.
When we left the bird was only about 20 feet from us standing on the sand. He did not apear to be in good health.I work for Wild Bird and Garden in Wilmington and Southport.  When I was in our Southport store on Wednesday Janet (who works at Sea Biscuit bird rehabilitaton) told me that had about 30 Great Shearwaters come in in the last week. All of the birds were emaciated. All of the beaches  in Brunswick Co. Face south like Carteret Co.Dave WeesnerWilmington, NC
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

Back to top
Date: 6/22/17 2:27 pm
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Uncertain Shearwater identification
Unfortunately this was a temporary link, which I removed when I responded to Kay about the identification a couple of days ago. It was a Great Shearwater.

Kent Fiala

On 6/22/2017 5:18 PM, Kay Edgar (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> On Saturday we were on a boat inside The Hook at Cape Lookout. We saw a Shearwater sitting on the water and then again a similar one behind Shackleford Banks. I have a link to two pictures. I am uncertain as to whether it is a Manx Shearwater or a Great Shearwater and would appreciate an opinion.
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_gallery_upload_preview.php_kayedgar1-40gmail.com_flbc-2D2017-2D06-2D19-2D143009&d=DwIC-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=B6BBaV2s8p2Flfl_3O-F3zeEqNaV0SGGa5ZY1ODBru4&s=3iNAjZVn08wZG59WEWlVkInhaCDc8qy2_JzpsWhmtcI&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_gallery_upload_preview.php_kayedgar1-40gmail.com_flbc-2D2017-2D06-2D19-2D143009&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=VJBSX5O0JDWBv0kuSlYFt1TrX4Saj5Vzcx5qiZq5JQI&s=uiZKWHI-7W1ru6aPce-RdkclYc5dCvLV0w6c3vXLqQ8&e=>


 

Back to top
Date: 6/22/17 2:18 pm
From: Kay Edgar (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Uncertain Shearwater identification
On Saturday we were on a boat inside The Hook at Cape Lookout. We saw a
Shearwater sitting on the water and then again a similar one behind
Shackleford Banks. I have a link to two pictures. I am uncertain as to
whether it is a Manx Shearwater or a Great Shearwater and would appreciate
an opinion.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_gallery_upload_preview&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=VJBSX5O0JDWBv0kuSlYFt1TrX4Saj5Vzcx5qiZq5JQI&s=uLTHTEX8RJUDui462TQ8iTzQYGsRkcldo1sVvJWbc88&e= .
php/<kayedgar1...>/flbc-2017-06-19-143009

 

Back to top
Date: 6/22/17 11:19 am
From: Jonah Losh <jonahl...>
Subject: Advice on Scissor tailed flycatcher Gunter Rd
Hi Birders.

I am driving to see the Flycatcher at Gunter Rd. Does anybody have any advice on finding it? Specific locations? I will be going today mid afternoon. Thank you in advance!

Jonah Losh
Taylors, SC


Jonah Losh
 

Back to top
Date: 6/22/17 10:19 am
From: Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: wind farms and birds
Can someone please post pertinent websites or other contact info that
addesses the impact (pun intended) of wind farms on birds? I know this has
been posted before, but I'd like up to date info, especially if it's
including info on the new wind farms in Perquimans and Pasquotank Counties,
NC. The NC Sierra Club has visited these windfarms and presents favorabile
reports...are they off or what?

I can be contacted directly at <tankapoet...>

thanks

Linda Ward
Coinjock, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 6/21/17 4:53 pm
From: Elizabeth Link (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Swainson's Warblers near Brevard NC
One heard singing and briefly seen around noon today, on the east side of
Hwy 276, just north of its intersection with the gravel road that goes to
the Pisgah Forest Riding Stables (.5 miles north of Ranger Station).
Closest approach to the bird was on a short trail leading up from a gravel
pullout on 276 about 100 yds north of the intersection.
Second bird heard singing at the Pisgah Center for Wildlife Education (Fish
Hatchery) about 4 pm. The bird was on the other side of the river from the
back end of the parking lot. (Louisiana Waterthrush also present in same
area.)

Henry and Elizabeth Link
Greensboro NC

 

Back to top
Date: 6/21/17 3:42 pm
From: Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Shiny Cowbird Continues
I'm glad the bird has been easier to find lately. Several people have made
an effort to keep the feeders full as well as spread some seed on the
ground, and it seems to be paying off. Although I'm not sure how I feel
about it long term, it was exciting to see what appears to be a female
Shiny Cowbird at the feeders this morning (I didn't see the male during my
stay, but I saw him yesterday afternoon). I had been studying the female
cowbirds since the male showed up, but I couldn't see a Shiny among them.
When others reported one (and interaction between the male and female), I
decided to look again. I have linked my eBird report below with photos of
the female. I would appreciate comments from those more familiar with
Shiny Cowbirds than me.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S37719109&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=OvULGoHZUcKJmSHy_QGTR9H-vaIGNqpaer4Seyt-pkU&s=yO4uLMzpKm6VUaKxysaWnaB4ch68yGBsfzME3ELnq38&e=

Marty Wall
Back in Beaufort, NC

On Wed, Jun 21, 2017 at 5:29 PM, Dwayne Martin <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> I saw the Shiny Cowbird this afternoon about 4:50pm at the feeders at the
> visitor center at Fort Macon State Park. It came and went several times
> while I watched. Thanks to all those that have been reporting this bird.
> --
> Dwayne
> *************
> Dwayne Martin
> Hickory, NC
> <redxbill...>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/21/17 3:37 pm
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Yellow-throated Vireo - Question
To the NC Central Piedmont folks.....
How many YT Vireos are there around? I've got a singing bird again this summer and I'm just wondering how uncommon or common that is here. I've been here at Falls Lake since 2000 and this is only the second year I have had this bird in the summer.
Reply off line please.

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 6/21/17 2:30 pm
From: Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Shiny Cowbird Continues
I saw the Shiny Cowbird this afternoon about 4:50pm at the feeders at the
visitor center at Fort Macon State Park. It came and went several times
while I watched. Thanks to all those that have been reporting this bird.
--
Dwayne
*************
Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
<redxbill...>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/21/17 8:43 am
From: Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Wild Turkey
Wild Turkeys are commonly seen feeding alongside Ladson Road, a very busy four lane highway in Summerville SC.
Pam Ford
Charleston SC
Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 21, 2017, at 11:05 AM, Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...> wrote:
>
> I was driving home last Monday evening when I spotted a hen turkey calmly walking across the road and disappearing into a thickly wooded area. This and other patches of land along this road are on a flood plain and remain undeveloped. I've never seen a wild turkey in my suburban area before, but I'm never surprised to find a bird or animal in these woods that one would not normally associate with suburbia. The thick woods, underbrush and soggy ground restricts access and provide a refuge for just about any bird or animal.
>
> I think most members are aware of efforts to conduct seismic testing for oil and gas exploration and possible drilling along the southeast coast. Personally, I believe such activities pose a serious risk to marine life and shore birds. Whatever your personal opinions, you have a chance to present for/against comments to the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) as shown below.
>
> Frank Hamilton
> Charleston, SC
>
> Comments should be addressed to Jolie Harrison, Chief Permits and Conservation Division, Office of Protected Resources, National Marine Fisheries Service. They can by sent by mail to 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910 or electronically to <ITP.Laws...> The deadline is July 7.

 

Back to top
Date: 6/21/17 8:06 am
From: Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...>
Subject: Wild Turkey
I was driving home last Monday evening when I spotted a hen turkey calmly walking across the road and disappearing into a thickly wooded area.  This and other patches of land along this road are on a flood plain and remain undeveloped.  I've never seen a wild turkey in my suburban area before, but I'm never surprised to find a bird or animal in these woods that one would not normally associate with suburbia.  The thick woods, underbrush and soggy ground restricts access and provide a refuge for just about any bird or animal.

I think most members are aware of efforts to conduct seismic testing for oil and gas exploration and possible drilling along the southeast coast.  Personally, I believe such activities pose a serious risk to marine life and shore birds.  Whatever your personal opinions, you have a chance to present for/against comments to the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) as shown below.   Frank HamiltonCharleston, SC
Commentsshould be addressed to Jolie Harrison, Chief Permits and Conservation Division,Office of Protected Resources, National Marine Fisheries Service. They can bysent by mail to 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910 orelectronically to <ITP.Laws...> The deadline is July 7.
 

Back to top
Date: 6/21/17 5:28 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Carolina Bird Club Bonus Field Trip – Blue Ridge Parkway September 16-17
Join us as we seek out and enjoy roving flocks of fall migrants on the beautiful Blue Ridge Parkway!

Are you a fan of warblers? Then this trip is for you. Mid to late September is the peak of fall migration for warblers in the Carolinas. This is the time when a variety of warblers abandon their breeding season stratification and join together with vireos, tanagers, cuckoos, grosbeaks and more to feast on the little buggy things that power their southward migration. These flocks frequently follow the crests of the Appalachian ranges, and we hope to encounter a variety of species as we travel the scenic Parkway. While not as common in the lowlands, up here on the Blue Ridge, Tennessee, Cape May, and Bay-breasted Warblers often take center stage, with many others playing supporting roles. In addition, this is the prime time for passage of southbound Broad-winged Hawks, and we will spend some time at the Mahogany Rock Hawk Watch waiting for raptors to drift overhead.

Sound like fun? Act quickly as space on this Bonus Trip is limited to 10 participants. This smaller group makes individualized interaction with the trip leaders easier and allows us to help you with identifying any of those confusing fall warblers.

Logistics:
This trip visits the Blue Ridge Parkway in northern North Carolina and southern Virginia on September 16 and 17nd. We will depart from Sparta, NC at 7 a.m. Saturday and Sunday with a full day of birding on Saturday and a half day on Sunday. Registration cost is $25. *You must be a member of the Carolina Bird Club to attend, but you may join at the same time as you register if you are currently not a member.* Participants are responsible for lodging, meals, and transportation. All levels of birding experience are welcome.

To Register:
Contact Steve Shultz for a reserved slot and a registration form. If your plans should change after registration, refunds are available through September 6th. After September 6th refunds are available if we can fill your slot. Additional information will be provided upon registration that address most commonly asked questions.

Steve Shultz
sshultz at nc.rr.com
919-629-7226



 

Back to top
Date: 6/21/17 3:35 am
From: Lester Coble (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks this morning
While walking along the farm pond, head down and covered against the rain,
5:50 A.M., I heard a single peep suggesting a tree duck. I raised my head
to see a dark colored long-necked duck walking out of the water on the far
side of the pond (150'). The long-necked shape indicated tree (whistling)
duck. It turned sideways to show dark belly, wing stripe and buffy chest. A
walk back to the house for binoculars resulted in confirmation of the gray
face and orange bill. Two birds were then seen, one having a slightly less
white stripe and less orange bill (female presumably). At 6:05 I felt
sufficient light to try a iphone picture, only to watch them fly off. Sorry
folks. I will report if they elect to visit the pond again.

 

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