Carolinabirds
Received From Subject
9/22/19 12:12 pm Derb Carter <derbc...> Jackson Park, Hendersonville today
9/22/19 10:36 am Karen Lebing (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
9/22/19 7:53 am william haddad (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hefner Gap the last few days
9/22/19 7:30 am Hilda Flamholtz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bird Decline
9/21/19 6:08 pm Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bird decline
9/21/19 4:19 pm Gary Harbour (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bird decline
9/21/19 3:28 pm Charlie Bostwick (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bird decline
9/21/19 9:50 am rdnc13 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Am. Golden-Plover at Buckhorn
9/21/19 9:09 am Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Loggerhead Shrike on Alligator River NWR
9/21/19 6:57 am Ginny Wood <boykinwoods1...> Re: Bird decline
9/21/19 4:04 am Mike Judd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bird decline
9/21/19 3:33 am \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bird decline
9/20/19 1:48 pm Derb Carter <derbc...> Bird decline
9/20/19 1:39 pm Gary Harbour (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: "Bird Decline" should lead to Action...
9/20/19 11:50 am Brad Wood (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: "Bird Decline" should lead to Action...
9/20/19 9:51 am Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: "Bird Decline" should lead to Action...
9/20/19 7:53 am Kevin Hudson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Wilsons warbler, lake lynn county park raleigh / wake county
9/20/19 5:33 am \J. Anderson\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> "Bird Decline" should lead to Action...
9/20/19 4:28 am Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Wilson's Warbler, Coinjock, NC
9/19/19 2:45 pm Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: bird decline
9/19/19 12:48 pm \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: bird decline
9/19/19 12:10 pm Rob Brown (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Mailing List
9/19/19 11:58 am Cynthia Fox (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> bird decline
9/19/19 11:41 am Karen Bearden (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: bird decline
9/19/19 11:36 am Derb Carter <derbc...> bird decline
9/19/19 11:14 am Gretchen Schramm (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fwd: Breaking News: There are 2.9 billion fewer birds in the U.S. and Canada now than 50 years ago, a new study found, a steep decline that stunned the researchers.
9/18/19 2:46 pm Elizabeth Faison (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: ID Needed
9/18/19 2:21 pm Cecelia Mathis <weer...> ID Needed
9/18/19 1:54 pm Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Durham Co NC Trip Summary 09/18/2019
9/18/19 12:41 pm Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Joyner Park migrants
9/18/19 4:26 am Ron <waxwing...> Jackson Park
9/17/19 2:48 pm Jesse Anderson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Olive-sided flycatcher - Surry Co. NC
9/17/19 2:06 pm Ron <waxwing...> Re: Jackson Park
9/17/19 2:03 pm Ron <waxwing...> Jackson Park
9/17/19 12:45 pm Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> eBird Trip Summary - Durham Co 09/17/2019
9/17/19 10:23 am jim.capel (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Chapel Hill Bird Club Meeting–Monday 9/23–Birding South Africa–Keith Kennedy
9/16/19 5:34 pm M Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Roommate wanted for September meeting
9/14/19 7:11 am Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hefner Gap NC migrants
9/14/19 5:53 am nicholas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> migrants in Uwharrie National Forest, Randolph & Montgomery Co.'s, NC, 9/11-9/12/19
9/13/19 4:30 pm Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Trout Lake (Watauga Co. NC)- migrant activity
9/13/19 3:10 pm <badgerboy...> Semipalm Plover Kerr Scott Reservoir
9/12/19 4:44 pm Murphy (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Dead juvenile Sora in Durham
9/12/19 9:25 am Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...> FOS Baltimore Oriole
9/12/19 7:38 am Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Flat River Waterfowl Impoundment -- Sep 12, 2019
9/12/19 6:49 am Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Wood Stork @ Durham Co
9/11/19 12:22 pm Mike Judd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> No sightings just selling a few books
9/11/19 6:24 am scompton1251 <scompton1251...> Christmas Count dates
9/10/19 7:40 pm Susan Campbell <susan...> Mattamuskeet Christmas Bird Count
9/9/19 3:45 pm Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> eBird Trip Summary -- 09/09/2019
9/9/19 2:00 pm Derb Carter <derbc...> Dorian and Cape Lookout Seashore
9/9/19 7:21 am Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Garner warblers
9/9/19 5:20 am William Majoros <bmajoros...> Tons of birds at Eno River State Park
9/8/19 4:27 pm Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> nighthawks
9/8/19 10:42 am Jelmer Poelstra (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Mourning Warbler at Walter Knob Overlook, BRP, Buncombe Co.
9/8/19 8:25 am Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> blue-winged warbler, other migrants at Joyner Park
9/8/19 6:02 am Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> common nighthawks near Hillsborough NC
9/7/19 8:38 am Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Swanson's thrush, Jordan Lake
9/7/19 8:22 am Patricia Hanlon (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Dealing with Hurricane Dorian
9/7/19 8:12 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Monk Parakeet, Blue Jay surprise
9/7/19 6:58 am rdnc13 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> American Turf birds
9/6/19 4:45 pm Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Brown Noddy -- Duck Boardwalk
9/6/19 4:20 pm Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...> Dealing with Hurricane Dorian
9/6/19 3:34 pm Corey, Ed <ed.corey...> Brown Noddy -- Duck Boardwalk
9/6/19 6:28 am Martina Nordstrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Sooty Terns - Cane Creek Park, Union Co., NC
9/6/19 5:16 am Jelmer Poelstra (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Sooty Tern at Falls Lake (and at Jordan Lake)
9/5/19 9:11 am Jelmer Poelstra (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> About 270 Common Terns at Falls Lake
9/4/19 8:34 pm Bill Hilton Jr. <hilton...> Hilton Pond 08/01/19 (Swallowtails & Swamp Milkweed)
9/3/19 6:00 pm scompton1251 <scompton1251...> Re: Space available Santee Coastal field trip
9/3/19 3:16 pm william haddad (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Yesterday and this morning - migrants very active at Hefner Gap and at Humpback
9/3/19 1:53 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Space available Santee Coastal field trip
9/3/19 10:05 am <scompton1251...> Space available Santee Coastal field trip
9/3/19 10:04 am <scompton1251...> Space available Santee Coastal field trip
9/3/19 8:24 am Loren Hintz <ldhintz...> Re: carolinabirds Digest Tue, 03 Sep 2019
9/3/19 6:57 am Loren Hintz <ldhintz...> mistake yesterday's post Black Skimmers were seen
9/2/19 6:37 pm Loren Hintz <ldhintz...> Pre hurricane coastal birds New Hanover and Onslow
9/2/19 11:46 am evan wunder (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Olive-Sided Flycatcher
9/2/19 3:03 am John Fussell <jofuss...> Long-billed Curlew and Reddish Egrets at east Shackleford Banks, NC
9/1/19 6:47 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Cape Hatteras Salt Pond and Pea Island Birds
9/1/19 4:16 pm Monroe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Red Crossbills at Carver’s Gap/ Kenn & Kim Kaufman
9/1/19 10:11 am Birding Poet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Swallow-tailed Kite
9/1/19 10:04 am Chris Snook (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Swallow-tailed Kite
9/1/19 8:05 am Craig Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Possible Magnificent Frigatebird Shem Creek, Mount Pleasant, SC
9/1/19 7:08 am rdnc13 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Am Golden-Plover at Vandemark Sod (I-95 and NC 33)
9/1/19 5:00 am Miskiewicz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Swan Goose with Greyleg Goose in Angier
8/31/19 9:34 am ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: rfi-az, nm, west tx
8/31/19 9:33 am ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: rfi-az, nm, west tx
8/31/19 7:13 am Robert Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: rfi-az, nm, west tx
8/31/19 6:42 am scompton1251 <scompton1251...> Re: rfi-az, nm, west tx
8/31/19 6:33 am lee van malssen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> rfi-az, nm, west tx
8/30/19 4:56 pm Jessie Dale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> common nighthawks, banner elk, nc
8/30/19 1:04 pm Josh Southern (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Migrants starting to move through central NC
8/29/19 3:25 pm Marilyn Westphal <mjwestph...> Ridge Junction-Blue Ridge Parkway
8/29/19 7:33 am Kevin Hudson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Falls Lake black terns
8/29/19 5:54 am Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Olive-sided Flycatcher - Fants Grove WMA (Anderson Co., SC)
8/28/19 5:12 pm Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Olive-sided Flycatcher - Fants Grove WMA (Anderson Co., SC)
8/28/19 5:06 pm Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Olive-sided Flycatcher - Fants Grove WMA (Anderson Co., SC)
8/28/19 9:22 am Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Falls Lake black terns and not too exciting herring gull
8/28/19 4:15 am Peter Vankevich (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> White-winged Dove on Ocracoke
8/27/19 5:48 pm Jelmer Poelstra (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: exciting gull at Falls Lake
8/27/19 11:44 am Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fwd: Orangeburg Sod Farms
8/27/19 11:43 am Birding Poet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Protocol for birding Orangeburg Sod Farms
8/27/19 11:06 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Orangeburg Sod Farms
8/27/19 10:49 am Ron <waxwing...> Re: Orangeburg Sod Farms
8/27/19 10:10 am Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Orangeburg Sod Farms
8/27/19 9:31 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Orangeburg Sod Farms
8/27/19 9:25 am Ron <waxwing...> Orangeburg Sod Farms
8/26/19 3:45 pm Daniel Kaplan (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: On Lazuli Bunting, an August rare gull, and other birds that got away
8/26/19 12:52 pm Nate Swick <nswick...> Likely Lazuli Bunting, Carteret Co
8/26/19 12:44 pm Dennis Burnette <deburnette...> Re: On Lazuli Bunting, an August rare gull, and other birds that got away
8/26/19 11:56 am Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: Name-dropping carolinabirds Digest Sun 25 Aug 2019
8/26/19 7:14 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> On Lazuli Bunting, an August rare gull, and other birds that got away
8/25/19 8:39 pm GRIGGS, JERRY <griggs...> Yard activity, Columbia, SC
8/25/19 4:41 pm David Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Cherokee Co. SC scissor-tail continuing
8/25/19 9:02 am Pam Diamond (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: carolinabirds Digest Sun, 25 Aug 2019
8/25/19 8:48 am Nate Swick <nswick...> Re: carolinabirds Digest Sun, 25 Aug 2019
8/25/19 8:29 am Mariann Ramsayer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: carolinabirds Digest Sun, 25 Aug 2019
8/25/19 7:55 am Jelmer Poelstra (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: exciting gull at Falls Lake
8/25/19 6:16 am Pam Diamond (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: carolinabirds Digest Sun, 25 Aug 2019
8/24/19 7:03 pm Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> exciting gull viewing at Falls Lake
8/24/19 6:09 pm bruce young (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> exciting gull at Falls Lake
8/24/19 11:16 am Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Falls Lake Caspian and Black terns
8/24/19 8:47 am rdnc13 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Brown Pelican at Buckhorn Res. (Wilson County)
8/24/19 8:45 am Birding Poet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lark Sparrow - not at Ft. Moultrie this morning
8/24/19 7:03 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Lazuli Bunting in Beaufort NC?
8/24/19 5:48 am nicholas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Baird's Sandpiper in Hertford Co., NC 8/24/2019
8/23/19 6:30 pm whoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Terns, shorebirds at N. Topsail Beach
8/23/19 5:22 pm william haddad (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Great migratory activity in the mts today
8/23/19 11:52 am Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Mississippi Kite -- Catawba County
8/23/19 11:38 am Jerry <bogey...> Re: Lark sparrow present at Fort Moultrie
8/23/19 11:18 am Jerry <bogey...> Re: Lark sparrow present at Fort Moultrie
8/23/19 11:08 am jcox3222 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lark sparrow present at Fort Moultrie
8/23/19 6:43 am Steven Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: lazuli Bunting Update
8/23/19 6:31 am Steven Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> lazuli Bunting Update
 
Back to top
Date: 9/22/19 12:12 pm
From: Derb Carter <derbc...>
Subject: Jackson Park, Hendersonville today
Noteworthy birds included Blue-winged, Golden-winged and Canada Warblers, Philadelphia Vireo, and an Empidonax (Willow/Alder) Flycatcher. Most interesting was a female/immature Selasphorous hummingbird working the flowers on the edge of the warbler trail.

Derb Carter

 

Back to top
Date: 9/22/19 10:36 am
From: Karen Lebing (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
This morning, Mike Gosselin let us know that he'd spotted a yellow-bellied
flycatcher at the Kinnakeet Lifesaving Station, Hatteras Island, NC. Since
this is a rare bird for the area, I thought I'd let folks know, since Mike
won't be able to report until later. He also has photos that he will be
able to share.

To see my eBird report and my photos, you can go to
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S60020980&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=WxM1IEQCGg7J79IJ-uWoVMbadGAs9nl9SiI8IeAt6JY&s=u5mdYEcG3mdyDj_fV3UfezYypIwndaKtynQS7dC-WP4&e=

Thanks, Mike!! It's a life bird for me!

Karen

 

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Date: 9/22/19 7:53 am
From: william haddad (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hefner Gap the last few days
Didn't go out today but birded Hefner the last three days - two of which
were with two good birders from the Raleigh area -Nan and Fleeta, sometimes
joined by
local birder Gordon. Except for an inclement day (where we still saw a few
good birds) we had very good birding at Hefner and would add a few species
at
the nearby Orchard at Altapass road. As is typical with Hefner the action
starts early. We averaged 11 Warbler species (good looks). As is typical
with Hefner,
you may get that approximate number the next day but with a few different
Warbler species..We also saw Summer as well as Scarlet Tanagers, a Baltimore
Oriole, Yellow-billed Cuckoo, Blue-headed, Yellow-throated and White-eyed
Vireos (I had Red-eyed and Philadelphia a few days before), Red-tailed
Hawk, Ravens, etc
The virtue of Hefner is consistency and close looks rather than a huge
Warbler species count on any one day. As to many species, a good number of
individual birds.

We also enjoyed late summer wildflowers including Evening Primrose, Bladder
Campion, several types of Astor, Spiderwort and the related Day Flower,
Wild Sunflower, Green-headed Coneflower,
etc. The Bull Thistle and Snakeroot Flowers attracted several species of
Butterflies, including Monarchs, Tiger Swallowtails, a Buckeye, Spicebush
Swallowtails, a Pipevine
Swallowtail and Great Spangled Fritillaries. Ah, the Southern Appalachians!

 

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Date: 9/22/19 7:30 am
From: Hilda Flamholtz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bird Decline
I have enjoyed reading the emails with all of the ideas about how to
mitigate the impact of our birding travel on the environment. Two more
ideas to throw out there:

1. If you are a member of a travel club, Better World Club is a travel club
that advocates for the environment and helps us mitigate our impact; they
even offer Bicycle Assistance
2. Public transit - I've been trying to learn how to use transit in my area
and while it is not great, the more of us that use it, the more funding it
will get, reducing our carbon footprint.

Happy Birding.
Hilda Flamholtz
Columbia, SC

 

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Date: 9/21/19 6:08 pm
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bird decline
Everyone has a different choice to make regarding the tremendous carbon
impact of traveling long distances, especially by air, to observe birds.

For those who would like to reduce their impact -- I know a great way to
see lots of birds without traveling at all !

Twice a year, the birds, incredibly, travel thousands and thousands of
miles! All we have to do is position ourselves outdoors at the right
moment in spring or fall, and there they are.

Sure, I guess this means some of us will get to see puffins only in the
free Nature Conservancy calendar that comes in the mail solicitations. I
am okay with that, if it means that the puffins get to be in the world for
a long time to come, and not just on the pages of calendars and old books.

Betsy Kane
Writing from "Pearl Hall", elevation 10 feet above sea level
Washington, N.C.




On Sat, Sep 21, 2019 at 7:19 PM Gary Harbour <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Hi Charlie,
>
> Yes it helps. There are two thoughts on the best approach. One is to buy
> Offsets with a company that invests in projects in developing countries
> that help protect local resources or sequester or avoid carbon. The second
> general approach is to buy Offsets or even better Renewable Energy
> Certificates (RECs) here in the US. This helps finance renewables at home
> by allowing the suppliers to make a little better rate of return on their
> investment. Many people like to look for projects that wouldn’t happen
> without support like projects on Native American lands.
>
> I have to say while I buy RECs, it is much better if you can personally
> sign up for a community solar farm. Check with your provider and don’t
> worry about being told you have to go on a waiting list as this helps drive
> additional capacity and here in SC the new Solar Freedom law requires all
> providers to add capacity. If you can’t sign up for community solar see if
> you can select green power from your provider. It will probably increase
> your rate by about 1 penny a KWH. I buy RECs to offset the remainder or my
> power usage after taking off for my providers renewable % + nuclear power %
> (non-carbon %) and my community solar farm. It’s usually only about
> $10/month.
>
> Here is a domestic REC & Offset company which I have used for my energy
> offset and am satisfied with:
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.terrapass.com&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=IT4B_BxMexsW8qAVFiiS2imB_upomKvnCplw7Foaqfo&s=WOlwsNCH8u6z9SBEu71pdetILkmCmCUqHlNWZPghstc&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.terrapass.com&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=2EkD8jD0wuALhjCxj0ek2CY53E15ImRnUV5RhQgB9jw&s=-1Zo250Rw1hiV3AKQoh-DRSbb-brWKyfbF8eNN5W-fQ&e=>
>
>
> Here is a company that invests in developing country projects and I use
> for air-travel offsets:
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.atmosfair.de_en_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=IT4B_BxMexsW8qAVFiiS2imB_upomKvnCplw7Foaqfo&s=2MhjuVQrR0F5TpkIX3LDRKsAQtsMyT6MgcYqIOYfv98&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.atmosfair.de_en_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=2EkD8jD0wuALhjCxj0ek2CY53E15ImRnUV5RhQgB9jw&s=EmeksWpfCwqq-W5GlzUoQ5sD4zamXGRfq46cZz3rwuU&e=>
>
> You can find many more companies online. Just look for how they
> accredited and verified. There are also reviews online.
>
> Best,
> Gary Harbour
> Chair
> The Climate Reality Project,
> South Carolina Upstate
>
>
>
> On Sep 21, 2019, at 6:27 PM, Charlie Bostwick (via carolinabirds Mailing
> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Does anyone know whether purchasing carbon offsets significantly offsets
> the impact of traveling to see birds? If so, please provide any advice on
> how to do this effectively. Perhaps others on this list would like to know
> as well.
>
> Charlie Bostwick
> Vegetarian
> Electric Car Driver
> Solar Panel Instaler
> Green Builder
> Land Trust Donator
> Native Plant Gardner
> ... Bird Chasing Addict
>
>
> On Sep 21, 2019, at 9:56 AM, Ginny Wood <boykinwoods1...>
> wrote:
>
> Uh-huh. I have come to feel that by running all over the place in our
> cars, cutting roads into the woods, standing around in gaggles making noise
> (sometimes calling the birds), and so forth, that we are literally
> *consuming* them as if they were, well, consumer goods. I began to ask,
> "How can I privilege my fleeting pleasures over their happiness and
> welfare--not to mention very survival?" And I very nearly quit birding last
> year. I've been out a couple of times this year, starting off a newbie from
> one of my classes last semester. And I can literally see and hear the
> dramatic dropoff in bird populations in places I haven't visited in a
> couple of years.
>
> I am focusing my energies and money on doing what I can to live lighter:
> Installing dark-sky certified outside lighting, closing all the drapes at
> dusk, caring for my trees and flowers and shrubs (literally trying to
> restore my little postage-stamp-sized micro-habitat), putting out water and
> food for migrators, giving the $ I would have spent on gas to Audubon,
> League of Conservation Voters, Sierra Club, et al.
>
> When my roof fails, I will put in solar. When my little van dies, I will
> buy electric.
>
> One does what one can.
>
> Virginia
>
> 🙏* Happy, at rest,*
> *may all beings be happy at heart. *-Khp 9
>
> Ginny Wood
> Pshrink Emeritus
>
>
> On Saturday, September 21, 2019, 7:04:37 AM EDT, Mike Judd <
> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
>
> Which is why my monthly $ goes to Planned Parenthood as well as selected
> politicians & environmental groups.
> A bit more car pooling & less cross-state bird chasing is another personal
> contribution 😜
>
> Mike Judd
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Sep 21, 2019, at 6:32 AM, J. Merrill Lynch (via carolinabirds Mailing
> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Thanks for the pep talk but I wouldn’t use Rachel Carson as an example of
> positive change. The songbirds she lamented in her book Silent Spring
> continue to decline despite the ban on DDT, as the new paper documents.
> Citing the power of a long ago president in establishing new parks and
> refuges with a stroke of the pen doesn’t inspire much hope with me either
> in today’s political climate—anger on all sides.
>
> Out of curiosity, I looked up the human population of the mainland USA and
> Canada in 1970 (223,946,000) and compared that to the current estimated
> population (364,905,000). That’s an increase of 63%! Food for thought
> there.
>
> The decline of birds and the rest of nature is evident to all of us who
> spend their time outdoors in what’s left of it. And the decline is even
> more acute for those of us alive and aware in 1970.
>
> I personally have no faith in a political solution to our troubled
> evolution (to paraphrase the lyrics from a song by The Police). So is it
> all just doom and gloom? NO! For hope, I turn to people like the late
> Doug Thompkins, a visionary conservationist who personally acquired over 2
> million acres in southern Chile and Argentina, almost all of it contiguous,
> creating multiple new national parks. For real inspiration...google him.
>
> Human population growth and all of its associated ramifications is the
> root cause of our predicament—pick your poison—development sprawl,
> intensive agriculture, deforestation, chemical toxins, invasive species,
> climate change, etc and etc...
>
> Saving as much of the natural landscape that remains, including restoring
> some degraded parts, is in my opinion, the only real option we have left.
> Nature and biological diversity is undeniably in retreat. We need to save
> as much as possible of what’s left to get through the coming human
> population bottleneck. For details of what I’m talking about see the
> thoughts of biologist E.O. Wilson here:
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__news.harvard.edu_gazette_story_2002_01_wilson-2Doptimistic-2Damid-2Denvironmental-2Dgloom_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=IT4B_BxMexsW8qAVFiiS2imB_upomKvnCplw7Foaqfo&s=4zLMD4X2IvqU2DbughBY89GqYTrQn_DIj8g4FrQzbaw&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__news.harvard.edu_gazette_story_2002_01_wilson-2Doptimistic-2Damid-2Denvironmental-2Dgloom_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=ducRy_SAtUgucR8mXtq25q4GpJlK8_iHeezTnnaVD-U&s=o4ppH2PL0RXa0LbPmD5eGF0xEmY1TGYo9NAp5cgJM7I&e=>
>
>
> There is a growing movement in the scientific community to declare the era
> of substantial human impact on the earth as a new geological era, the
> Anthropocene. The evidence of substantial human impact is all around us
> including this new paper on bird decline.
>
> Given the trajectory of the human population and it’s growing impact on
> natural systems and biodiversity, and the sober realization that humans
> aren’t going to do anything meaningful about it, I am left with this. To
> paraphrase yet another song lyric from The Police: “As the world keeps
> running down, you make the best of what’s still around.”
>
>
> Merrill Lynch
> Echo Valley Farm
> Watauga County, NC
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Sep 20, 2019, at 4:47 PM, Derb Carter <derbc...> wrote:
>
>
> If you are saddened or frustrated by the loss of nearly a third of our
> birds since 1970, do something. One person can make a difference, and
> collectively many like minded people can make change. Rachel Carson was
> concerned about the loss of birds to DDT, wrote about it, and in short
> order it was banned. Fifteen year old Greta Thunberg decided to strike
> from school to demand action on climate and today over a million joined her
> worldwide. Some women in New York banded together to stop the use of egret
> and heron feathers to adorn hats and soon it was illegal. The people
> elected a birder Theodore Roosevelt and with a stroke of the pen he
> protected millions of acres of public lands forever as parks, monuments,
> and wildlife refuges.
>
>
> Others have made great suggestions on what you can do personally or on
> your property. I will add some more. There are as many ways to get
> involved to respond to the causes of the decline in birds as there are
> causes. And there are organizations working to address all these
> problems. Find an organization working to acquire and protect habitat in
> your area, or working to increase public awareness of the decline of birds
> and loss of habitat, or working to move to clean energy as quickly as
> possible - and get involved. Ask candidates who want your vote - from town
> councils to president - what their positions are on issues affecting birds
> and get involved.
>
>
> Margaret Mead said "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful,
> committed citizens can change the world; indeed it is the only thing that
> ever has."
>
>
> Derb Carter
>
> Chapel Hill NC
>
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/19 4:19 pm
From: Gary Harbour (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bird decline
Hi Charlie,

Yes it helps. There are two thoughts on the best approach. One is to buy Offsets with a company that invests in projects in developing countries that help protect local resources or sequester or avoid carbon. The second general approach is to buy Offsets or even better Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) here in the US. This helps finance renewables at home by allowing the suppliers to make a little better rate of return on their investment. Many people like to look for projects that wouldn’t happen without support like projects on Native American lands.

I have to say while I buy RECs, it is much better if you can personally sign up for a community solar farm. Check with your provider and don’t worry about being told you have to go on a waiting list as this helps drive additional capacity and here in SC the new Solar Freedom law requires all providers to add capacity. If you can’t sign up for community solar see if you can select green power from your provider. It will probably increase your rate by about 1 penny a KWH. I buy RECs to offset the remainder or my power usage after taking off for my providers renewable % + nuclear power % (non-carbon %) and my community solar farm. It’s usually only about $10/month.

Here is a domestic REC & Offset company which I have used for my energy offset and am satisfied with:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.terrapass.com&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=2EkD8jD0wuALhjCxj0ek2CY53E15ImRnUV5RhQgB9jw&s=-1Zo250Rw1hiV3AKQoh-DRSbb-brWKyfbF8eNN5W-fQ&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.terrapass.com_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=2EkD8jD0wuALhjCxj0ek2CY53E15ImRnUV5RhQgB9jw&s=0vuJq-o-GzPUfMfIdP1nCvRwpkle397Hd5s-0G-HJd4&e= >

Here is a company that invests in developing country projects and I use for air-travel offsets:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.atmosfair.de_en_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=2EkD8jD0wuALhjCxj0ek2CY53E15ImRnUV5RhQgB9jw&s=EmeksWpfCwqq-W5GlzUoQ5sD4zamXGRfq46cZz3rwuU&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.atmosfair.de_en_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=2EkD8jD0wuALhjCxj0ek2CY53E15ImRnUV5RhQgB9jw&s=EmeksWpfCwqq-W5GlzUoQ5sD4zamXGRfq46cZz3rwuU&e= >

You can find many more companies online. Just look for how they accredited and verified. There are also reviews online.

Best,
Gary Harbour
Chair
The Climate Reality Project,
South Carolina Upstate



> On Sep 21, 2019, at 6:27 PM, Charlie Bostwick (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Does anyone know whether purchasing carbon offsets significantly offsets the impact of traveling to see birds? If so, please provide any advice on how to do this effectively. Perhaps others on this list would like to know as well.
>
> Charlie Bostwick
> Vegetarian
> Electric Car Driver
> Solar Panel Instaler
> Green Builder
> Land Trust Donator
> Native Plant Gardner
> ... Bird Chasing Addict
>
>
> On Sep 21, 2019, at 9:56 AM, Ginny Wood <boykinwoods1...> <mailto:<boykinwoods1...>> wrote:
>
>> Uh-huh. I have come to feel that by running all over the place in our cars, cutting roads into the woods, standing around in gaggles making noise (sometimes calling the birds), and so forth, that we are literally consuming them as if they were, well, consumer goods. I began to ask, "How can I privilege my fleeting pleasures over their happiness and welfare--not to mention very survival?" And I very nearly quit birding last year. I've been out a couple of times this year, starting off a newbie from one of my classes last semester. And I can literally see and hear the dramatic dropoff in bird populations in places I haven't visited in a couple of years.
>>
>> I am focusing my energies and money on doing what I can to live lighter: Installing dark-sky certified outside lighting, closing all the drapes at dusk, caring for my trees and flowers and shrubs (literally trying to restore my little postage-stamp-sized micro-habitat), putting out water and food for migrators, giving the $ I would have spent on gas to Audubon, League of Conservation Voters, Sierra Club, et al.
>>
>> When my roof fails, I will put in solar. When my little van dies, I will buy electric.
>>
>> One does what one can.
>>
>> Virginia
>>
>> 🙏 Happy, at rest,
>> may all beings be happy at heart. -Khp 9
>>
>> Ginny Wood
>> Pshrink Emeritus
>>
>>
>> On Saturday, September 21, 2019, 7:04:37 AM EDT, Mike Judd <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
>>
>>
>> Which is why my monthly $ goes to Planned Parenthood as well as selected politicians & environmental groups.
>> A bit more car pooling & less cross-state bird chasing is another personal contribution 😜
>>
>> Mike Judd
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On Sep 21, 2019, at 6:32 AM, J. Merrill Lynch (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
>>
>>
>> Thanks for the pep talk but I wouldn’t use Rachel Carson as an example of positive change. The songbirds she lamented in her book Silent Spring continue to decline despite the ban on DDT, as the new paper documents. Citing the power of a long ago president in establishing new parks and refuges with a stroke of the pen doesn’t inspire much hope with me either in today’s political climate—anger on all sides.
>>
>> Out of curiosity, I looked up the human population of the mainland USA and Canada in 1970 (223,946,000) and compared that to the current estimated population (364,905,000). That’s an increase of 63%! Food for thought there.
>>
>> The decline of birds and the rest of nature is evident to all of us who spend their time outdoors in what’s left of it. And the decline is even more acute for those of us alive and aware in 1970.
>>
>> I personally have no faith in a political solution to our troubled evolution (to paraphrase the lyrics from a song by The Police). So is it all just doom and gloom? NO! For hope, I turn to people like the late Doug Thompkins, a visionary conservationist who personally acquired over 2 million acres in southern Chile and Argentina, almost all of it contiguous, creating multiple new national parks. For real inspiration...google him.
>>
>> Human population growth and all of its associated ramifications is the root cause of our predicament—pick your poison—development sprawl, intensive agriculture, deforestation, chemical toxins, invasive species, climate change, etc and etc...
>>
>> Saving as much of the natural landscape that remains, including restoring some degraded parts, is in my opinion, the only real option we have left. Nature and biological diversity is undeniably in retreat. We need to save as much as possible of what’s left to get through the coming human population bottleneck. For details of what I’m talking about see the thoughts of biologist E.O. Wilson here: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__news.harvard.edu_gazette_story_2002_01_wilson-2Doptimistic-2Damid-2Denvironmental-2Dgloom_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=2EkD8jD0wuALhjCxj0ek2CY53E15ImRnUV5RhQgB9jw&s=8Yn5i2kwKDLxdkrWlYhFatZTIfoUI5xBx0seQkZRVDE&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__news.harvard.edu_gazette_story_2002_01_wilson-2Doptimistic-2Damid-2Denvironmental-2Dgloom_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=ducRy_SAtUgucR8mXtq25q4GpJlK8_iHeezTnnaVD-U&s=o4ppH2PL0RXa0LbPmD5eGF0xEmY1TGYo9NAp5cgJM7I&e=>
>>
>> There is a growing movement in the scientific community to declare the era of substantial human impact on the earth as a new geological era, the Anthropocene. The evidence of substantial human impact is all around us including this new paper on bird decline.
>>
>> Given the trajectory of the human population and it’s growing impact on natural systems and biodiversity, and the sober realization that humans aren’t going to do anything meaningful about it, I am left with this. To paraphrase yet another song lyric from The Police: “As the world keeps running down, you make the best of what’s still around.”
>>
>>
>> Merrill Lynch
>> Echo Valley Farm
>> Watauga County, NC
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On Sep 20, 2019, at 4:47 PM, Derb Carter <derbc...> <mailto:<derbc...>> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>> If you are saddened or frustrated by the loss of nearly a third of our birds since 1970, do something. One person can make a difference, and collectively many like minded people can make change. Rachel Carson was concerned about the loss of birds to DDT, wrote about it, and in short order it was banned. Fifteen year old Greta Thunberg decided to strike from school to demand action on climate and today over a million joined her worldwide. Some women in New York banded together to stop the use of egret and heron feathers to adorn hats and soon it was illegal. The people elected a birder Theodore Roosevelt and with a stroke of the pen he protected millions of acres of public lands forever as parks, monuments, and wildlife refuges.
>>>>
>>>> Others have made great suggestions on what you can do personally or on your property. I will add some more. There are as many ways to get involved to respond to the causes of the decline in birds as there are causes. And there are organizations working to address all these problems. Find an organization working to acquire and protect habitat in your area, or working to increase public awareness of the decline of birds and loss of habitat, or working to move to clean energy as quickly as possible - and get involved. Ask candidates who want your vote - from town councils to president - what their positions are on issues affecting birds and get involved.
>>>>
>>>> Margaret Mead said "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed it is the only thing that ever has."
>>>>
>>>> Derb Carter
>>>> Chapel Hill NC
>>>>
>>>


 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/19 3:28 pm
From: Charlie Bostwick (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bird decline
Does anyone know whether purchasing carbon offsets significantly offsets the impact of traveling to see birds? If so, please provide any advice on how to do this effectively. Perhaps others on this list would like to know as well.

Charlie Bostwick
Vegetarian
Electric Car Driver
Solar Panel Instaler
Green Builder
Land Trust Donator
Native Plant Gardner
... Bird Chasing Addict


> On Sep 21, 2019, at 9:56 AM, Ginny Wood <boykinwoods1...> wrote:
>
> Uh-huh. I have come to feel that by running all over the place in our cars, cutting roads into the woods, standing around in gaggles making noise (sometimes calling the birds), and so forth, that we are literally consuming them as if they were, well, consumer goods. I began to ask, "How can I privilege my fleeting pleasures over their happiness and welfare--not to mention very survival?" And I very nearly quit birding last year. I've been out a couple of times this year, starting off a newbie from one of my classes last semester. And I can literally see and hear the dramatic dropoff in bird populations in places I haven't visited in a couple of years.
>
> I am focusing my energies and money on doing what I can to live lighter: Installing dark-sky certified outside lighting, closing all the drapes at dusk, caring for my trees and flowers and shrubs (literally trying to restore my little postage-stamp-sized micro-habitat), putting out water and food for migrators, giving the $ I would have spent on gas to Audubon, League of Conservation Voters, Sierra Club, et al.
>
> When my roof fails, I will put in solar. When my little van dies, I will buy electric.
>
> One does what one can.
>
> Virginia
>
> 🙏 Happy, at rest,
> may all beings be happy at heart. -Khp 9
>
> Ginny Wood
> Pshrink Emeritus
>
>
> On Saturday, September 21, 2019, 7:04:37 AM EDT, Mike Judd <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
>
> Which is why my monthly $ goes to Planned Parenthood as well as selected politicians & environmental groups.
> A bit more car pooling & less cross-state bird chasing is another personal contribution 😜
>
> Mike Judd
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Sep 21, 2019, at 6:32 AM, J. Merrill Lynch (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>
> Thanks for the pep talk but I wouldn’t use Rachel Carson as an example of positive change. The songbirds she lamented in her book Silent Spring continue to decline despite the ban on DDT, as the new paper documents. Citing the power of a long ago president in establishing new parks and refuges with a stroke of the pen doesn’t inspire much hope with me either in today’s political climate—anger on all sides.
>
> Out of curiosity, I looked up the human population of the mainland USA and Canada in 1970 (223,946,000) and compared that to the current estimated population (364,905,000). That’s an increase of 63%! Food for thought there.
>
> The decline of birds and the rest of nature is evident to all of us who spend their time outdoors in what’s left of it. And the decline is even more acute for those of us alive and aware in 1970.
>
> I personally have no faith in a political solution to our troubled evolution (to paraphrase the lyrics from a song by The Police). So is it all just doom and gloom? NO! For hope, I turn to people like the late Doug Thompkins, a visionary conservationist who personally acquired over 2 million acres in southern Chile and Argentina, almost all of it contiguous, creating multiple new national parks. For real inspiration...google him.
>
> Human population growth and all of its associated ramifications is the root cause of our predicament—pick your poison—development sprawl, intensive agriculture, deforestation, chemical toxins, invasive species, climate change, etc and etc...
>
> Saving as much of the natural landscape that remains, including restoring some degraded parts, is in my opinion, the only real option we have left. Nature and biological diversity is undeniably in retreat. We need to save as much as possible of what’s left to get through the coming human population bottleneck. For details of what I’m talking about see the thoughts of biologist E.O. Wilson here: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__news.harvard.edu_gazette_story_2002_01_wilson-2Doptimistic-2Damid-2Denvironmental-2Dgloom_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=7IczPxHlZ2_ZwIA3nAoj807alhs5uzL8oGXzYxzKQ84&s=NJ1SroS7ZuFeknbNcZCPUCJdEkmtEcO7JAXxmGtA1rk&e=
>
> There is a growing movement in the scientific community to declare the era of substantial human impact on the earth as a new geological era, the Anthropocene. The evidence of substantial human impact is all around us including this new paper on bird decline.
>
> Given the trajectory of the human population and it’s growing impact on natural systems and biodiversity, and the sober realization that humans aren’t going to do anything meaningful about it, I am left with this. To paraphrase yet another song lyric from The Police: “As the world keeps running down, you make the best of what’s still around.”
>
>
> Merrill Lynch
> Echo Valley Farm
> Watauga County, NC
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Sep 20, 2019, at 4:47 PM, Derb Carter <derbc...> wrote:
>>
>>
>>> If you are saddened or frustrated by the loss of nearly a third of our birds since 1970, do something. One person can make a difference, and collectively many like minded people can make change. Rachel Carson was concerned about the loss of birds to DDT, wrote about it, and in short order it was banned. Fifteen year old Greta Thunberg decided to strike from school to demand action on climate and today over a million joined her worldwide. Some women in New York banded together to stop the use of egret and heron feathers to adorn hats and soon it was illegal. The people elected a birder Theodore Roosevelt and with a stroke of the pen he protected millions of acres of public lands forever as parks, monuments, and wildlife refuges.
>>>
>>> Others have made great suggestions on what you can do personally or on your property. I will add some more. There are as many ways to get involved to respond to the causes of the decline in birds as there are causes. And there are organizations working to address all these problems. Find an organization working to acquire and protect habitat in your area, or working to increase public awareness of the decline of birds and loss of habitat, or working to move to clean energy as quickly as possible - and get involved. Ask candidates who want your vote - from town councils to president - what their positions are on issues affecting birds and get involved.
>>>
>>> Margaret Mead said "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed it is the only thing that ever has."
>>>
>>> Derb Carter
>>> Chapel Hill NC
>>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/19 9:50 am
From: rdnc13 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Am. Golden-Plover at Buckhorn
One in basic plumage at Buckhorn Res. (Wilson Co.) today. Seen from the spit on the east end where Bunn Road crosses. At flat at upper end, very far, need scope at 60x. I finally saw it fly to confirm identity. Always nice to find these!

Later, Ricky

Ricky Davis
Rocky Mount, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/19 9:09 am
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Loggerhead Shrike on Alligator River NWR
Found yesterday, September 20, in a willow in the farm fields off Twiford
Road by Karen LeBing, this is the first record of Loggerhead Shrike that
I'm aware of on the Alligator Refuge. It actually is my first LOSH ever in
this county, becoming my 397th Dare County bird! There was one seen in
Hatteras years ago, but I chased and missed it.

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/19 6:57 am
From: Ginny Wood <boykinwoods1...>
Subject: Re: Bird decline
Uh-huh. I have come to feel that by running all over the place in our cars, cutting roads into the woods, standing around in gaggles making noise (sometimes calling the birds), and so forth, that we are literally consuming them as if they were, well, consumer goods. I began to ask, "How can I privilege my fleeting pleasures over their happiness and welfare--not to mention very survival?" And I very nearly quit birding last year. I've been out a couple of times this year, starting off a newbie from one of my classes last semester. And I can literally see and hear the dramatic dropoff in bird populations in places I haven't visited in a couple of years.

I am focusing my energies and money on doing what I can to live lighter: Installing dark-sky certified outside lighting, closing all the drapes at dusk, caring for my trees and flowers and shrubs (literally trying to restore my little postage-stamp-sized micro-habitat), putting out water and food for migrators, giving the $ I would have spent on gas to Audubon, League of Conservation Voters, Sierra Club, et al.

When my roof fails, I will put in solar. When my little van dies, I will buy electric.

One does what one can.

Virginia

🙏 Happy, at rest,may all beings be happy at heart. -Khp 9
Ginny WoodPshrink Emeritus

On Saturday, September 21, 2019, 7:04:37 AM EDT, Mike Judd <carolinabirds...> wrote:

Which is why my monthly $ goes to Planned Parenthood as well as selected politicians & environmental groups. A bit more car pooling & less cross-state bird chasing is another personal contribution 😜
Mike Judd 

Sent from my iPhone
On Sep 21, 2019, at 6:32 AM, J. Merrill Lynch (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:



Thanks for the pep talk but I wouldn’t use Rachel Carson as an example of positive change. The songbirds she lamented in her book Silent Spring continue to decline despite the ban on DDT, as the new paper documents. Citing the power of a long ago president in establishing new parks and refuges with a stroke of the pen doesn’t inspire much hope with me either in today’s political climate—anger on all sides. 
Out of curiosity, I looked up the human population of the mainland USA and Canada in 1970 (223,946,000) and compared that to the current estimated population (364,905,000). That’s an increase of 63%!  Food for thought there. 
The decline of birds and the rest of nature is evident to all of us who spend their time outdoors in what’s left of it. And the decline is even more acute for those of us alive and aware in 1970. 
I personally have no faith in a political solution to our troubled evolution (to paraphrase the lyrics from a song by The Police). So is it all just doom and gloom?  NO!  For hope, I turn to people like the late Doug Thompkins, a visionary conservationist who personally acquired over 2 million acres in southern Chile and Argentina, almost all of it contiguous, creating multiple new national parks. For real inspiration...google him. 
Human population growth and all of its associated ramifications is the root cause of our predicament—pick your poison—development sprawl, intensive agriculture, deforestation, chemical toxins, invasive species, climate change, etc and etc...
Saving as much of the natural landscape that remains, including restoring some degraded parts, is in my opinion, the only real option we have left. Nature and biological diversity is undeniably in retreat. We need to save as much as possible of what’s left to get through the coming human population bottleneck. For details of what I’m talking about see the thoughts of biologist E.O. Wilson here: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__news.harvard.edu_gazette_story_2002_01_wilson-2Doptimistic-2Damid-2Denvironmental-2Dgloom_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=nRJgo22ut9sd9vwt2NdlM3WwLzzsmHXTnehYZth2uwM&s=B0tWXqjR7C5c7xwmx9AMMHy-m-vHegTdbWrAmEvxxZk&e=  
There is a growing movement in the scientific community to declare the era of substantial human impact on the earth as a new geological era, the Anthropocene.  The evidence of substantial human impact is all around us including this new paper on bird decline.  
Given the trajectory of the human population and it’s growing impact on natural systems and biodiversity, and the sober realization that humans aren’t going to do anything meaningful about it, I am left with this. To paraphrase yet another song lyric from The Police:  “As the world keeps running down, you make the best of what’s still around.”

Merrill LynchEcho Valley FarmWatauga County, NCSent from my iPhone
On Sep 20, 2019, at 4:47 PM, Derb Carter <derbc...> wrote:




If you are saddened or frustrated by the loss of nearly a third of our birds since 1970, do something.  One person can make a difference, and collectively many like minded people can make change.  Rachel Carson was concerned about the loss of birds to DDT, wrote about it, and in short order it was banned.  Fifteen year old Greta Thunberg decided to strike from school to demand action on climate and today over a million joined her worldwide.  Some women in New York banded together to stop the use of egret and heron feathers to adorn hats and soon it was illegal.  The people elected a birder Theodore Roosevelt and with a stroke of the pen he protected millions of acres of public lands forever as parks, monuments, and wildlife refuges.





Others have made great suggestions on what you can do personally or on your property.  I will add some more.  There are as many ways to get involved to respond to the causes of the decline in birds as there are causes.   And there are organizations working to address all these problems.   Find an organization working to acquire and protect habitat in your area, or working to increase public awareness of the decline of birds and loss of habitat, or working to move to clean energy as quickly as possible - and get involved.  Ask candidates who want your vote - from town councils to president - what their positions are on issues affecting birds and get involved.  





Margaret Mead said "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed it is the only thing that ever has."





Derb Carter


Chapel Hill NC







 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/19 4:04 am
From: Mike Judd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bird decline
Which is why my monthly $ goes to Planned Parenthood as well as selected politicians & environmental groups.
A bit more car pooling & less cross-state bird chasing is another personal contribution 😜

Mike Judd

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 21, 2019, at 6:32 AM, J. Merrill Lynch (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Thanks for the pep talk but I wouldn’t use Rachel Carson as an example of positive change. The songbirds she lamented in her book Silent Spring continue to decline despite the ban on DDT, as the new paper documents. Citing the power of a long ago president in establishing new parks and refuges with a stroke of the pen doesn’t inspire much hope with me either in today’s political climate—anger on all sides.
>
> Out of curiosity, I looked up the human population of the mainland USA and Canada in 1970 (223,946,000) and compared that to the current estimated population (364,905,000). That’s an increase of 63%! Food for thought there.
>
> The decline of birds and the rest of nature is evident to all of us who spend their time outdoors in what’s left of it. And the decline is even more acute for those of us alive and aware in 1970.
>
> I personally have no faith in a political solution to our troubled evolution (to paraphrase the lyrics from a song by The Police). So is it all just doom and gloom? NO! For hope, I turn to people like the late Doug Thompkins, a visionary conservationist who personally acquired over 2 million acres in southern Chile and Argentina, almost all of it contiguous, creating multiple new national parks. For real inspiration...google him.
>
> Human population growth and all of its associated ramifications is the root cause of our predicament—pick your poison—development sprawl, intensive agriculture, deforestation, chemical toxins, invasive species, climate change, etc and etc...
>
> Saving as much of the natural landscape that remains, including restoring some degraded parts, is in my opinion, the only real option we have left. Nature and biological diversity is undeniably in retreat. We need to save as much as possible of what’s left to get through the coming human population bottleneck. For details of what I’m talking about see the thoughts of biologist E.O. Wilson here: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__news.harvard.edu_gazette_story_2002_01_wilson-2Doptimistic-2Damid-2Denvironmental-2Dgloom_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=EcbE8q3cMXh-4YbQG7XWEvIMMmhS3sUXy0jFZUDEED8&s=YHUK3xHB61vL4h17Gl-k20kYOVS4IFUxBZlTyMnrezU&e=
>
> There is a growing movement in the scientific community to declare the era of substantial human impact on the earth as a new geological era, the Anthropocene. The evidence of substantial human impact is all around us including this new paper on bird decline.
>
> Given the trajectory of the human population and it’s growing impact on natural systems and biodiversity, and the sober realization that humans aren’t going to do anything meaningful about it, I am left with this. To paraphrase yet another song lyric from The Police: “As the world keeps running down, you make the best of what’s still around.”
>
>
> Merrill Lynch
> Echo Valley Farm
> Watauga County, NC
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Sep 20, 2019, at 4:47 PM, Derb Carter <derbc...> wrote:
>>
>>
>>> If you are saddened or frustrated by the loss of nearly a third of our birds since 1970, do something. One person can make a difference, and collectively many like minded people can make change. Rachel Carson was concerned about the loss of birds to DDT, wrote about it, and in short order it was banned. Fifteen year old Greta Thunberg decided to strike from school to demand action on climate and today over a million joined her worldwide. Some women in New York banded together to stop the use of egret and heron feathers to adorn hats and soon it was illegal. The people elected a birder Theodore Roosevelt and with a stroke of the pen he protected millions of acres of public lands forever as parks, monuments, and wildlife refuges.
>>>
>>> Others have made great suggestions on what you can do personally or on your property. I will add some more. There are as many ways to get involved to respond to the causes of the decline in birds as there are causes. And there are organizations working to address all these problems. Find an organization working to acquire and protect habitat in your area, or working to increase public awareness of the decline of birds and loss of habitat, or working to move to clean energy as quickly as possible - and get involved. Ask candidates who want your vote - from town councils to president - what their positions are on issues affecting birds and get involved.
>>>
>>> Margaret Mead said "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed it is the only thing that ever has."
>>>
>>> Derb Carter
>>> Chapel Hill NC
>>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/19 3:33 am
From: \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bird decline
Thanks for the pep talk but I wouldn’t use Rachel Carson as an example of positive change. The songbirds she lamented in her book Silent Spring continue to decline despite the ban on DDT, as the new paper documents. Citing the power of a long ago president in establishing new parks and refuges with a stroke of the pen doesn’t inspire much hope with me either in today’s political climate—anger on all sides.

Out of curiosity, I looked up the human population of the mainland USA and Canada in 1970 (223,946,000) and compared that to the current estimated population (364,905,000). That’s an increase of 63%! Food for thought there.

The decline of birds and the rest of nature is evident to all of us who spend their time outdoors in what’s left of it. And the decline is even more acute for those of us alive and aware in 1970.

I personally have no faith in a political solution to our troubled evolution (to paraphrase the lyrics from a song by The Police). So is it all just doom and gloom? NO! For hope, I turn to people like the late Doug Thompkins, a visionary conservationist who personally acquired over 2 million acres in southern Chile and Argentina, almost all of it contiguous, creating multiple new national parks. For real inspiration...google him.

Human population growth and all of its associated ramifications is the root cause of our predicament—pick your poison—development sprawl, intensive agriculture, deforestation, chemical toxins, invasive species, climate change, etc and etc...

Saving as much of the natural landscape that remains, including restoring some degraded parts, is in my opinion, the only real option we have left. Nature and biological diversity is undeniably in retreat. We need to save as much as possible of what’s left to get through the coming human population bottleneck. For details of what I’m talking about see the thoughts of biologist E.O. Wilson here: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__news.harvard.edu_gazette_story_2002_01_wilson-2Doptimistic-2Damid-2Denvironmental-2Dgloom_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=ducRy_SAtUgucR8mXtq25q4GpJlK8_iHeezTnnaVD-U&s=o4ppH2PL0RXa0LbPmD5eGF0xEmY1TGYo9NAp5cgJM7I&e=

There is a growing movement in the scientific community to declare the era of substantial human impact on the earth as a new geological era, the Anthropocene. The evidence of substantial human impact is all around us including this new paper on bird decline.

Given the trajectory of the human population and it’s growing impact on natural systems and biodiversity, and the sober realization that humans aren’t going to do anything meaningful about it, I am left with this. To paraphrase yet another song lyric from The Police: “As the world keeps running down, you make the best of what’s still around.”


Merrill Lynch
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 20, 2019, at 4:47 PM, Derb Carter <derbc...> wrote:
>
>
>> If you are saddened or frustrated by the loss of nearly a third of our birds since 1970, do something. One person can make a difference, and collectively many like minded people can make change. Rachel Carson was concerned about the loss of birds to DDT, wrote about it, and in short order it was banned. Fifteen year old Greta Thunberg decided to strike from school to demand action on climate and today over a million joined her worldwide. Some women in New York banded together to stop the use of egret and heron feathers to adorn hats and soon it was illegal. The people elected a birder Theodore Roosevelt and with a stroke of the pen he protected millions of acres of public lands forever as parks, monuments, and wildlife refuges.
>>
>> Others have made great suggestions on what you can do personally or on your property. I will add some more. There are as many ways to get involved to respond to the causes of the decline in birds as there are causes. And there are organizations working to address all these problems. Find an organization working to acquire and protect habitat in your area, or working to increase public awareness of the decline of birds and loss of habitat, or working to move to clean energy as quickly as possible - and get involved. Ask candidates who want your vote - from town councils to president - what their positions are on issues affecting birds and get involved.
>>
>> Margaret Mead said "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed it is the only thing that ever has."
>>
>> Derb Carter
>> Chapel Hill NC
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/20/19 1:48 pm
From: Derb Carter <derbc...>
Subject: Bird decline

> If you are saddened or frustrated by the loss of nearly a third of our birds since 1970, do something. One person can make a difference, and collectively many like minded people can make change. Rachel Carson was concerned about the loss of birds to DDT, wrote about it, and in short order it was banned. Fifteen year old Greta Thunberg decided to strike from school to demand action on climate and today over a million joined her worldwide. Some women in New York banded together to stop the use of egret and heron feathers to adorn hats and soon it was illegal. The people elected a birder Theodore Roosevelt and with a stroke of the pen he protected millions of acres of public lands forever as parks, monuments, and wildlife refuges.
>
> Others have made great suggestions on what you can do personally or on your property. I will add some more. There are as many ways to get involved to respond to the causes of the decline in birds as there are causes. And there are organizations working to address all these problems. Find an organization working to acquire and protect habitat in your area, or working to increase public awareness of the decline of birds and loss of habitat, or working to move to clean energy as quickly as possible - and get involved. Ask candidates who want your vote - from town councils to president - what their positions are on issues affecting birds and get involved.
>
> Margaret Mead said "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed it is the only thing that ever has."
>
> Derb Carter
> Chapel Hill NC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/20/19 1:39 pm
From: Gary Harbour (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: "Bird Decline" should lead to Action...
Jesse and Simon,

Thank you for sharing your excellent ideas on how we can fight the loss of the birds we all love. Rachel Carson first warned of the Silent Spring. Let’s do what we can to stop the decline and bring back the birds.

Good Birding,
Gary Harbour

> On Sep 20, 2019, at 8:32 AM, J. Anderson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> ...not somber discussion.
>
> To counter Derb's lead, if you are reading this DON'T STOP (no offense Derb, I appreciate you sharing, as it will hopefully lead to helpful discussion and action about conservation. An inconvenient truth for bird enthusiasts everywhere, especially the younger generations who have to live through this continual decline)
>
> All too often we get caught up in the doom and gloom, pout about it, and never do anything.
>
> Today as I write this, on Friday, September 20th; students worldwide - many too young to vote - are around the world walking out of the classroom (and work) to sit in front of their legislative / parliament buildings to protest inaction in government toward climate solutions globally. No matter where you may be today, stop by or email your local representative. Demand change. Join them on the steps of your local legislative building - today. If you are working in a major city today, especially Raleigh, I can bet that there will be students on the steps of the legislature. If nothing else, go by. Thank them or join them.
>
> This is the time. Now, is the time. Take action.
>
> Hanging bird feeders is not the answer - reduce your lawn and plant natives
> If you live anywhere in North Carolina with more than 1/16 or 1/32 an acre of mowed grass, you are doing birds a disservice. Plant a tree. This is the year. Buy and plant an oak, or a cluster of oaks in an open space. Worried about what "your HOA will say?" - take time to explain it to them. Change starts with you.
> Live on the edge of a wood line or forest? Start by introducing native shrubs and small trees along the edge to feather the border, and taper into wildflowers and warm season grasses like big bluestem. Reduce the amount of mowed grass each year. Now is the time to plant. Change starts with you.
> Have a "non-native" in your garden that is taking up space? Row of crape myrtles? Plant a native replacement beside it and allow time for it to establish before removing the other. Change starts with you.
> [And really, aside from the action perspective, now (Sept. - early Nov.) is the best time to plant trees, shrubs, and perennial plants as they will focus efforts on root development, rather than leaf and fruit production]
> If you physically or mentally can't implement these - email me personally. I would be glad to talk with you about options or even design for implementing a native garden in your backyard - whether in person, over the phone, or online.
>
> Stop using single use plastics
> A reusable set of utensils are not expensive nor daunting to carry around. Don't want to buy any? You can have the same effect by wrapping personal silverware in a small towel or bandanna. The same goes for reusable plastic bags and coffee mugs. Put them in your car now and you will always have it. Don't be ashamed to deny straws, or plastic forks, spoons, or knives. With a group of people? Take the initiative to stand up and say no or refuse for the group. At best, it creates positive conversation and awareness. If you are one "who doesn't like to leave food at a restaurant, but can't eat it" - then be prepared and bring a container with you - again, just leave it in the trunk of your car. Change starts with you.
>
> Purchase bird friendly coffee, chocolate, and palm oil products - and food
> The decline is not only restricted to the United States. We are in a global economy. Make every choice count. Purchase specific bird-friendly shade grown coffee. Can't find or afford that? Look to 'Rainforest Alliance' or at least 'Fair-trade' certified coffee, teas, and chocolate. Many of these products come from the overwintering areas in South and Central America. Do you already do this? If so, take a few seconds or a minute to randomly explain it to someone in line or in an aisle in a grocery store. Change starts with you.
> Reducing your consumption of meat products can reduce emissions, deforestation, water shortages, and dead zones in the ocean from agricultural pollutants. I am not telling you to go vegan, although appreciate you if you choose. Just by reducing the consumption, by any percentage, you are helping shift the new norm.
> www.nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0594-0 <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.nature.com_articles_s41586-2D018-2D0594-2D0&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=D4QFWRiBt_MBPSvLmb7NEmokNLZFrc4M1Q0G9GXltFg&s=PHv32wZqi0_bCqWkTYxJNXtC23IM7zXBOOU9Kd6oCD4&e=>
> If you choose to eat seafood, do so sustainably. Supporting local fishing industry by buying wild caught fish from NC is much more sustainable than the farm-raised option from Chile. The same goes for shrimp. Change starts with you.
> Know your species. Looking to grill a nice fish steak? Bluefin tuna can take 10+ years to reach reproductive age - not a good option. Yellowfin tuna? Considerably less. Looking for the sustainable option? Mahi-mahi grow and mature much faster, reaching reproductive age within the first few years. Get the Seafood Watch App on your phone or visit this site to carry the info with you always www.seafoodwatch.org/ <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.seafoodwatch.org_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=D4QFWRiBt_MBPSvLmb7NEmokNLZFrc4M1Q0G9GXltFg&s=zZwCU4r5A1z_48EB7h0ZvUxMXF3IcRSKmBm0TXWWIBE&e=>
> DON'T STOP AT YOUR FOOD - the food and diet of your pet is having the same effects on deforestation and overfishing - look at the labels on your dog and cat food and switch to a more sustainable option. Change starts with you.
>
> Work to make glass in your home or office more bird friendly. Change starts with you.
>
> Keep cats indoors. Period. I don't care how much 'Fluffy' likes the feeling of sun on her back. If she's outside, put her in a cage with a roof. Change starts with you.
>
> In conclusion. Birds are in decline. But there are ways we can help. Unfortunately humans are not going anywhere. Education can be awkward, but there are opportunities all around you. Change starts with you.
>
> --
> Jesse Anderson
> Pinnacle, NC
>
>
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.avg.com_email-2Dsignature-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=D4QFWRiBt_MBPSvLmb7NEmokNLZFrc4M1Q0G9GXltFg&s=zo3uaYVt_EshOC1vGFfQtzPf6q1ew-Zzgal8QtlAdCc&e=> Virus-free. www.avg.com <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.avg.com_email-2Dsignature-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=D4QFWRiBt_MBPSvLmb7NEmokNLZFrc4M1Q0G9GXltFg&s=zo3uaYVt_EshOC1vGFfQtzPf6q1ew-Zzgal8QtlAdCc&e=> <x-msg://66/#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/20/19 11:50 am
From: Brad Wood (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: "Bird Decline" should lead to Action...
I would like to know what "gun control" has to do with declining bird
species. P.S. Out of all the things you listed, the best thing you can do
for the planet is to stop flying to Alaska every year.

On Fri, Sep 20, 2019 at 11:51 AM Simon Thompson <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> C-birders
> I heartily support the J Anderson's thoughts and ideas. As a birder and a
> businessman I am always trying to do the best I can in personal life and in
> running our very environmental business. Most of us have not seen much of a
> climate change aside from dealing with hotter conditions. I have been going
> to Alaska at the same time of the year for many years and have seen
> ice-bound conditions in Nome when I started to travel there and now spring
> is well advance and leafed out willows are the norm. Quite a contrast over
> a short space of time!
>
> My thoughts.....
>
> 1. I will be at the Asheville, NC climate rally this afternoon.
> 2. My husband and I eat a plant-based diet whenever possible - even when
> we travel. We have used the Seafood App and try to buy NC wild-caught
> shrimp at all times when we eat seafood (not often these days). Also
> wild-caught Atlantic Salmon once in a while.
> 3. We have "ungrassed" our property considerably and it's grown up a lot
> now. Birdlist around 130 and mammals every day including bears, bobcat and
> more
> 4. We use native plants whenever possible and no pesticides at all
> 5. Cats are certainly indoors. Any that appear in the yard are caught with
> our Have-a heart trap and taken to the no-kill shelter here in Asheville.
> 6. As for single-use plastics. For our Ventures Birding Tours picnics, we
> use washable heavy plastic plates, real cutlery (silverware!), and
> recyclable cups. The only rubbish we ever have is paper napkins afterwards
> - we may work on that as well. As for plastic bags, much to my husband's
> annoyance, I always lecture the check-out person at the grocery store and
> have actually given away reusable bags to other shoppers!!
>
> I know we feel helpless when governments around the world are more
> interested in opening up wildlife areas to drilling and other destructive
> motives to please their corporate interests - worldwide not just in this
> country. I am so pleased that young people are stepping up to the plate for
> gun control and ant-pollution measures. I travel a lot and have seen things
> around the world that defy description, such as taking a boat across
> Jakarta Bay in Indonesia to see the Christmas Island Frigatebirds - the
> boat captain had to pull the engine up every few minutes to remove plastic
> bags from the propeller! Ugh!
>
> This isn't a lecture or designed to make me feel good, I feel as if we
> have no choice but to go out and talk to people. I know as a traveling
> birder, my air travel is not good, but I can't see that changing any time
> soon.
> Thanks again for hearing me out.
> Simon
>
> Simon RB Thompson
>
> Ventures Birding Tours
> www.birdventures.com
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.birdventures.com&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=d2RQ4VAnctM8fbdxNQ7v1pd9BkiD4tyPHiFlU9f2NsY&s=lc_q5FJABZ98ytwsKHPRrPwmWyQh6PiUN39-wFaKHrg&e=>
>
> Please use the Ventures e-mail (<Venturesbirding...>) to contact the
> Ventures office - thanks!
>
>
>
> On Fri, Sep 20, 2019 at 8:33 AM "J. Anderson" <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> ...not somber discussion.
>>
>> To counter Derb's lead, *if you are reading this* DON'T STOP (no offense
>> Derb, I appreciate you sharing, as it will hopefully lead to helpful
>> discussion and action about conservation. An inconvenient truth for bird
>> enthusiasts everywhere, especially the younger generations who have to live
>> through this continual decline)
>>
>> All too often we get caught up in the doom and gloom, pout about it, and
>> never do anything.
>>
>> Today as I write this, on Friday, September 20th; students worldwide -
>> many too young to vote - are around the world walking out of the classroom
>> (and work) to sit in front of their legislative / parliament buildings to
>> protest inaction in government toward climate solutions globally. No matter
>> where you may be today, stop by or email your local representative. Demand
>> change. Join them on the steps of your local legislative building - today.
>> If you are working in a major city today, especially Raleigh, I can bet
>> that there will be students on the steps of the legislature. If nothing
>> else, go by. Thank them or join them.
>>
>> This is the time. Now, is the time. Take action.
>>
>> Hanging bird feeders is not the answer - reduce your lawn and plant
>> natives
>> If you live anywhere in North Carolina with more than 1/16 or 1/32
>> an acre of mowed grass, you are doing birds a disservice. Plant a tree.
>> This is the year. Buy and plant an oak, or a cluster of oaks in an open
>> space. Worried about what "your HOA will say?" - take time to explain it to
>> them. Change starts with you.
>> Live on the edge of a wood line or forest? Start by introducing
>> native shrubs and small trees along the edge to feather the border, and
>> taper into wildflowers and warm season grasses like big bluestem. Reduce
>> the amount of mowed grass each year. Now is the time to plant. Change
>> starts with you.
>> Have a "non-native" in your garden that is taking up space? Row of
>> crape myrtles? Plant a native replacement beside it and allow time for it
>> to establish before removing the other. Change starts with you.
>> [And really, aside from the action perspective, now (Sept. - early
>> Nov.) is the best time to plant trees, shrubs, and perennial plants as they
>> will focus efforts on root development, rather than leaf and fruit
>> production]
>> If you physically or mentally can't implement these - *email me
>> personally.* I would be glad to talk with you about options or even
>> design for implementing a native garden in your backyard - whether in
>> person, over the phone, or online.
>>
>> Stop using single use plastics
>> A reusable set of utensils are not expensive nor daunting to carry
>> around. Don't want to buy any? You can have the same effect by wrapping
>> personal silverware in a small towel or bandanna. The same goes for
>> reusable plastic bags and coffee mugs. Put them in your car *now* and
>> you will always have it. Don't be ashamed to deny straws, or plastic forks,
>> spoons, or knives. With a group of people? Take the initiative to stand up
>> and say no or refuse for the group. At best, it creates positive
>> conversation and awareness. If you are one "who doesn't like to leave food
>> at a restaurant, but can't eat it" - then be prepared and bring a container
>> with you - again, just leave it in the trunk of your car. Change starts
>> with you.
>>
>> Purchase bird friendly coffee, chocolate, and palm oil products - and food
>> The decline is not only restricted to the United States. We are in
>> a global economy. Make every choice count. Purchase specific bird-friendly
>> shade grown coffee. Can't find or afford that? Look to 'Rainforest
>> Alliance' or at least 'Fair-trade' certified coffee, teas, and chocolate.
>> Many of these products come from the overwintering areas in South and
>> Central America. Do you already do this? If so, take a few seconds or a
>> minute to randomly explain it to someone in line or in an aisle in a
>> grocery store. Change starts with you.
>> Reducing your consumption of meat products can reduce emissions,
>> deforestation, water shortages, and dead zones in the ocean from
>> agricultural pollutants. I am not telling you to go vegan, although
>> appreciate you if you choose. Just by reducing the consumption, by any
>> percentage, you are helping shift the new norm.
>> www.nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0594-0
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.nature.com_articles_s41586-2D018-2D0594-2D0&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=D4QFWRiBt_MBPSvLmb7NEmokNLZFrc4M1Q0G9GXltFg&s=PHv32wZqi0_bCqWkTYxJNXtC23IM7zXBOOU9Kd6oCD4&e=>
>> If you choose to eat seafood, do so sustainably. Supporting local
>> fishing industry by buying wild caught fish from NC is much more
>> sustainable than the farm-raised option from Chile. The same goes for
>> shrimp. Change starts with you.
>> Know your species. Looking to grill a nice fish steak? Bluefin tuna
>> can take 10+ years to reach reproductive age - not a good option. Yellowfin
>> tuna? Considerably less. Looking for the sustainable option? Mahi-mahi grow
>> and mature much faster, reaching reproductive age within the first few
>> years. Get the Seafood Watch App on your phone or visit this site to carry
>> the info with you always www.seafoodwatch.org/
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.seafoodwatch.org_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=D4QFWRiBt_MBPSvLmb7NEmokNLZFrc4M1Q0G9GXltFg&s=zZwCU4r5A1z_48EB7h0ZvUxMXF3IcRSKmBm0TXWWIBE&e=>
>>
>> DON'T STOP AT YOUR FOOD - the food and diet of your pet is having
>> the same effects on deforestation and overfishing - look at the labels on
>> your dog and cat food and switch to a more sustainable option. Change
>> starts with you.
>>
>> Work to make glass in your home or office more bird friendly. Change
>> starts with you.
>>
>> Keep cats indoors. Period. I don't care how much 'Fluffy' likes the
>> feeling of sun on her back. If she's outside, put her in a cage with a
>> roof. Change starts with you.
>>
>> In conclusion. Birds are in decline. But there are ways we can help.
>> Unfortunately humans are not going anywhere. Education can be awkward, but
>> there are opportunities all around you. Change starts with you.
>>
>> --
>> Jesse Anderson
>> Pinnacle, NC
>>
>>
>>
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.avg.com_email-2Dsignature-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=D4QFWRiBt_MBPSvLmb7NEmokNLZFrc4M1Q0G9GXltFg&s=zo3uaYVt_EshOC1vGFfQtzPf6q1ew-Zzgal8QtlAdCc&e=> Virus-free.
>> www.avg.com
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.avg.com_email-2Dsignature-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=D4QFWRiBt_MBPSvLmb7NEmokNLZFrc4M1Q0G9GXltFg&s=zo3uaYVt_EshOC1vGFfQtzPf6q1ew-Zzgal8QtlAdCc&e=>
>> <#m_-8066522692750551388_m_-4276328602537770962_DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/20/19 9:51 am
From: Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: "Bird Decline" should lead to Action...
C-birders
I heartily support the J Anderson's thoughts and ideas. As a birder and a
businessman I am always trying to do the best I can in personal life and in
running our very environmental business. Most of us have not seen much of a
climate change aside from dealing with hotter conditions. I have been going
to Alaska at the same time of the year for many years and have seen
ice-bound conditions in Nome when I started to travel there and now spring
is well advance and leafed out willows are the norm. Quite a contrast over
a short space of time!

My thoughts.....

1. I will be at the Asheville, NC climate rally this afternoon.
2. My husband and I eat a plant-based diet whenever possible - even when we
travel. We have used the Seafood App and try to buy NC wild-caught shrimp
at all times when we eat seafood (not often these days). Also wild-caught
Atlantic Salmon once in a while.
3. We have "ungrassed" our property considerably and it's grown up a lot
now. Birdlist around 130 and mammals every day including bears, bobcat and
more
4. We use native plants whenever possible and no pesticides at all
5. Cats are certainly indoors. Any that appear in the yard are caught with
our Have-a heart trap and taken to the no-kill shelter here in Asheville.
6. As for single-use plastics. For our Ventures Birding Tours picnics, we
use washable heavy plastic plates, real cutlery (silverware!), and
recyclable cups. The only rubbish we ever have is paper napkins afterwards
- we may work on that as well. As for plastic bags, much to my husband's
annoyance, I always lecture the check-out person at the grocery store and
have actually given away reusable bags to other shoppers!!

I know we feel helpless when governments around the world are more
interested in opening up wildlife areas to drilling and other destructive
motives to please their corporate interests - worldwide not just in this
country. I am so pleased that young people are stepping up to the plate for
gun control and ant-pollution measures. I travel a lot and have seen things
around the world that defy description, such as taking a boat across
Jakarta Bay in Indonesia to see the Christmas Island Frigatebirds - the
boat captain had to pull the engine up every few minutes to remove plastic
bags from the propeller! Ugh!

This isn't a lecture or designed to make me feel good, I feel as if we have
no choice but to go out and talk to people. I know as a traveling birder,
my air travel is not good, but I can't see that changing any time soon.
Thanks again for hearing me out.
Simon

Simon RB Thompson

Ventures Birding Tours
www.birdventures.com <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.birdventures.com&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=d2RQ4VAnctM8fbdxNQ7v1pd9BkiD4tyPHiFlU9f2NsY&s=lc_q5FJABZ98ytwsKHPRrPwmWyQh6PiUN39-wFaKHrg&e= >

Please use the Ventures e-mail (<Venturesbirding...>) to contact the
Ventures office - thanks!



On Fri, Sep 20, 2019 at 8:33 AM "J. Anderson" <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> ...not somber discussion.
>
> To counter Derb's lead, *if you are reading this* DON'T STOP (no offense
> Derb, I appreciate you sharing, as it will hopefully lead to helpful
> discussion and action about conservation. An inconvenient truth for bird
> enthusiasts everywhere, especially the younger generations who have to live
> through this continual decline)
>
> All too often we get caught up in the doom and gloom, pout about it, and
> never do anything.
>
> Today as I write this, on Friday, September 20th; students worldwide -
> many too young to vote - are around the world walking out of the classroom
> (and work) to sit in front of their legislative / parliament buildings to
> protest inaction in government toward climate solutions globally. No matter
> where you may be today, stop by or email your local representative. Demand
> change. Join them on the steps of your local legislative building - today.
> If you are working in a major city today, especially Raleigh, I can bet
> that there will be students on the steps of the legislature. If nothing
> else, go by. Thank them or join them.
>
> This is the time. Now, is the time. Take action.
>
> Hanging bird feeders is not the answer - reduce your lawn and plant natives
> If you live anywhere in North Carolina with more than 1/16 or 1/32
> an acre of mowed grass, you are doing birds a disservice. Plant a tree.
> This is the year. Buy and plant an oak, or a cluster of oaks in an open
> space. Worried about what "your HOA will say?" - take time to explain it to
> them. Change starts with you.
> Live on the edge of a wood line or forest? Start by introducing
> native shrubs and small trees along the edge to feather the border, and
> taper into wildflowers and warm season grasses like big bluestem. Reduce
> the amount of mowed grass each year. Now is the time to plant. Change
> starts with you.
> Have a "non-native" in your garden that is taking up space? Row of
> crape myrtles? Plant a native replacement beside it and allow time for it
> to establish before removing the other. Change starts with you.
> [And really, aside from the action perspective, now (Sept. - early
> Nov.) is the best time to plant trees, shrubs, and perennial plants as they
> will focus efforts on root development, rather than leaf and fruit
> production]
> If you physically or mentally can't implement these - *email me
> personally.* I would be glad to talk with you about options or even
> design for implementing a native garden in your backyard - whether in
> person, over the phone, or online.
>
> Stop using single use plastics
> A reusable set of utensils are not expensive nor daunting to carry
> around. Don't want to buy any? You can have the same effect by wrapping
> personal silverware in a small towel or bandanna. The same goes for
> reusable plastic bags and coffee mugs. Put them in your car *now* and you
> will always have it. Don't be ashamed to deny straws, or plastic forks,
> spoons, or knives. With a group of people? Take the initiative to stand up
> and say no or refuse for the group. At best, it creates positive
> conversation and awareness. If you are one "who doesn't like to leave food
> at a restaurant, but can't eat it" - then be prepared and bring a container
> with you - again, just leave it in the trunk of your car. Change starts
> with you.
>
> Purchase bird friendly coffee, chocolate, and palm oil products - and food
> The decline is not only restricted to the United States. We are in a
> global economy. Make every choice count. Purchase specific bird-friendly
> shade grown coffee. Can't find or afford that? Look to 'Rainforest
> Alliance' or at least 'Fair-trade' certified coffee, teas, and chocolate.
> Many of these products come from the overwintering areas in South and
> Central America. Do you already do this? If so, take a few seconds or a
> minute to randomly explain it to someone in line or in an aisle in a
> grocery store. Change starts with you.
> Reducing your consumption of meat products can reduce emissions,
> deforestation, water shortages, and dead zones in the ocean from
> agricultural pollutants. I am not telling you to go vegan, although
> appreciate you if you choose. Just by reducing the consumption, by any
> percentage, you are helping shift the new norm.
> www.nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0594-0
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.nature.com_articles_s41586-2D018-2D0594-2D0&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=D4QFWRiBt_MBPSvLmb7NEmokNLZFrc4M1Q0G9GXltFg&s=PHv32wZqi0_bCqWkTYxJNXtC23IM7zXBOOU9Kd6oCD4&e=>
> If you choose to eat seafood, do so sustainably. Supporting local
> fishing industry by buying wild caught fish from NC is much more
> sustainable than the farm-raised option from Chile. The same goes for
> shrimp. Change starts with you.
> Know your species. Looking to grill a nice fish steak? Bluefin tuna
> can take 10+ years to reach reproductive age - not a good option. Yellowfin
> tuna? Considerably less. Looking for the sustainable option? Mahi-mahi grow
> and mature much faster, reaching reproductive age within the first few
> years. Get the Seafood Watch App on your phone or visit this site to carry
> the info with you always www.seafoodwatch.org/
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.seafoodwatch.org_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=D4QFWRiBt_MBPSvLmb7NEmokNLZFrc4M1Q0G9GXltFg&s=zZwCU4r5A1z_48EB7h0ZvUxMXF3IcRSKmBm0TXWWIBE&e=>
>
> DON'T STOP AT YOUR FOOD - the food and diet of your pet is having
> the same effects on deforestation and overfishing - look at the labels on
> your dog and cat food and switch to a more sustainable option. Change
> starts with you.
>
> Work to make glass in your home or office more bird friendly. Change
> starts with you.
>
> Keep cats indoors. Period. I don't care how much 'Fluffy' likes the
> feeling of sun on her back. If she's outside, put her in a cage with a
> roof. Change starts with you.
>
> In conclusion. Birds are in decline. But there are ways we can help.
> Unfortunately humans are not going anywhere. Education can be awkward, but
> there are opportunities all around you. Change starts with you.
>
> --
> Jesse Anderson
> Pinnacle, NC
>
>
>
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.avg.com_email-2Dsignature-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=D4QFWRiBt_MBPSvLmb7NEmokNLZFrc4M1Q0G9GXltFg&s=zo3uaYVt_EshOC1vGFfQtzPf6q1ew-Zzgal8QtlAdCc&e=> Virus-free.
> www.avg.com
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.avg.com_email-2Dsignature-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=D4QFWRiBt_MBPSvLmb7NEmokNLZFrc4M1Q0G9GXltFg&s=zo3uaYVt_EshOC1vGFfQtzPf6q1ew-Zzgal8QtlAdCc&e=>
> <#m_-4276328602537770962_DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/20/19 7:53 am
From: Kevin Hudson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Wilsons warbler, lake lynn county park raleigh / wake county
Still here as of 10:45 am. Slowly moving south from Glenharden entrance

Kevin Hudson
Raleigh NC

 

Back to top
Date: 9/20/19 5:33 am
From: \J. Anderson\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: "Bird Decline" should lead to Action...
...not somber discussion.

To counter Derb's lead, *if you are reading this* DON'T STOP (no offense
Derb, I appreciate you sharing, as it will hopefully lead to helpful
discussion and action about conservation. An inconvenient truth for bird
enthusiasts everywhere, especially the younger generations who have to live
through this continual decline)

All too often we get caught up in the doom and gloom, pout about it, and
never do anything.

Today as I write this, on Friday, September 20th; students worldwide - many
too young to vote - are around the world walking out of the classroom (and
work) to sit in front of their legislative / parliament buildings to
protest inaction in government toward climate solutions globally. No matter
where you may be today, stop by or email your local representative. Demand
change. Join them on the steps of your local legislative building - today.
If you are working in a major city today, especially Raleigh, I can bet
that there will be students on the steps of the legislature. If nothing
else, go by. Thank them or join them.

This is the time. Now, is the time. Take action.

Hanging bird feeders is not the answer - reduce your lawn and plant natives
If you live anywhere in North Carolina with more than 1/16 or 1/32
an acre of mowed grass, you are doing birds a disservice. Plant a tree.
This is the year. Buy and plant an oak, or a cluster of oaks in an open
space. Worried about what "your HOA will say?" - take time to explain it to
them. Change starts with you.
Live on the edge of a wood line or forest? Start by introducing
native shrubs and small trees along the edge to feather the border, and
taper into wildflowers and warm season grasses like big bluestem. Reduce
the amount of mowed grass each year. Now is the time to plant. Change
starts with you.
Have a "non-native" in your garden that is taking up space? Row of
crape myrtles? Plant a native replacement beside it and allow time for it
to establish before removing the other. Change starts with you.
[And really, aside from the action perspective, now (Sept. - early
Nov.) is the best time to plant trees, shrubs, and perennial plants as they
will focus efforts on root development, rather than leaf and fruit
production]
If you physically or mentally can't implement these - *email me
personally.* I would be glad to talk with you about options or even design
for implementing a native garden in your backyard - whether in person, over
the phone, or online.

Stop using single use plastics
A reusable set of utensils are not expensive nor daunting to carry
around. Don't want to buy any? You can have the same effect by wrapping
personal silverware in a small towel or bandanna. The same goes for
reusable plastic bags and coffee mugs. Put them in your car *now* and you
will always have it. Don't be ashamed to deny straws, or plastic forks,
spoons, or knives. With a group of people? Take the initiative to stand up
and say no or refuse for the group. At best, it creates positive
conversation and awareness. If you are one "who doesn't like to leave food
at a restaurant, but can't eat it" - then be prepared and bring a container
with you - again, just leave it in the trunk of your car. Change starts
with you.

Purchase bird friendly coffee, chocolate, and palm oil products - and food
The decline is not only restricted to the United States. We are in a
global economy. Make every choice count. Purchase specific bird-friendly
shade grown coffee. Can't find or afford that? Look to 'Rainforest
Alliance' or at least 'Fair-trade' certified coffee, teas, and chocolate.
Many of these products come from the overwintering areas in South and
Central America. Do you already do this? If so, take a few seconds or a
minute to randomly explain it to someone in line or in an aisle in a
grocery store. Change starts with you.
Reducing your consumption of meat products can reduce emissions,
deforestation, water shortages, and dead zones in the ocean from
agricultural pollutants. I am not telling you to go vegan, although
appreciate you if you choose. Just by reducing the consumption, by any
percentage, you are helping shift the new norm.
www.nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0594-0
If you choose to eat seafood, do so sustainably. Supporting local
fishing industry by buying wild caught fish from NC is much more
sustainable than the farm-raised option from Chile. The same goes for
shrimp. Change starts with you.
Know your species. Looking to grill a nice fish steak? Bluefin tuna
can take 10+ years to reach reproductive age - not a good option. Yellowfin
tuna? Considerably less. Looking for the sustainable option? Mahi-mahi grow
and mature much faster, reaching reproductive age within the first few
years. Get the Seafood Watch App on your phone or visit this site to carry
the info with you always www.seafoodwatch.org/
DON'T STOP AT YOUR FOOD - the food and diet of your pet is having the
same effects on deforestation and overfishing - look at the labels on your
dog and cat food and switch to a more sustainable option. Change starts
with you.

Work to make glass in your home or office more bird friendly. Change starts
with you.

Keep cats indoors. Period. I don't care how much 'Fluffy' likes the feeling
of sun on her back. If she's outside, put her in a cage with a roof. Change
starts with you.

In conclusion. Birds are in decline. But there are ways we can help.
Unfortunately humans are not going anywhere. Education can be awkward, but
there are opportunities all around you. Change starts with you.

--
Jesse Anderson
Pinnacle, NC


<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.avg.com_email-2Dsignature-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=D4QFWRiBt_MBPSvLmb7NEmokNLZFrc4M1Q0G9GXltFg&s=zo3uaYVt_EshOC1vGFfQtzPf6q1ew-Zzgal8QtlAdCc&e= >
Virus-free.
www.avg.com
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<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/20/19 4:28 am
From: Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Wilson's Warbler, Coinjock, NC
Yesterday (19th) we had a male Wilson's warbler visit our water spray and
bath beside our goldfish pond. This is our first sighting since 2007, when
we saw one at Mattamuskeet NWR, NC. We've had several redstart females
visit the same location over the past couple of weeks, but no other
warblers here. Our records show that we've had seven sightings of Wilson's
over the years, five of the seven here in Coinjock.

Birding has been limited for us, as we lost one third of our house to H.
Dorian and are dealing with all that means. We were here during the storm
(and if we hadn't been we would have lost our entire house), neither of us
were injured despite bailing water for three hours with 3 trees crashing
thru our roof. Most of our woodland birds appear to have returned, altho
blue jay number went from five to two. We've only seen one nuthatch so far,
whereas we did have two regularly.

Linda Ward
Skip Hancock
Coinjock, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 9/19/19 2:45 pm
From: Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: bird decline
Not too hard to start figuring out what is going on.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.postandcourier.com_politics_migratory-2Dbirds-2Din-2Dsouth-2Dcarolina-2Dface-2Dnew-2Dchallenges-2Das-2Dfate_article-5Fae128018-2D2551-2D11e8-2Da6cf-2De3e5f38643ba.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Q7n1DXZkb0pWKHSWIJphdWTMGMTQHYpUE2yiWrhCvCI&s=tcpAbt3R617T5yRoZRPH_VNwlF4kdnXQj43bPIzl8mc&e=

Parkin Hunter
Columbia, Ridgeway, and Garden City Beach


Sent from my iPad

> On Sep 19, 2019, at 2:41 PM, Karen Bearden (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Howdy!
>
> Sad!! Here’s the link Cornell just shared that leads to the full study and more.
>
> Peace and love for our beautiful Earth, Karen
> Raleigh
>
> On Sep 19, 2019, at 2:35 PM, Derb Carter <derbc...> wrote:
>
> If you want to get out and enjoy the nice weather and have a good weekend, stop now and don’t read this. An article published by researchers in Science this week concludes birds in North America have declined by 2.9 billion or 29% since 1970. So in the last 50 years we have lost nearly a third of our birds. Those of us who have birded that long know things were much different in 1970 than now, especially the numbers of migratory songbirds, but the magnitude of the decline in a relatively short period of time surprises me, and surprised the researchers. I know there was some discussion this Spring of the paucity of migrant warblers and other songbirds. This may be the new norm, and unfortunately if things don’t change may get worse. If you are interested in the details the article is in Science, and good summary with commentary in the New York Times today.
>
> Derb Carter
> Chapel Hill, NC
>

 

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Date: 9/19/19 12:48 pm
From: \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: bird decline
Sad news indeed. The Breeding Bird Survey, run annually by a dedicated group of mostly unpaid volunteers, was the primary source of data used to document the declines. A very important contribution by citizen science. Kudos to all birders who contribute to that program.

Merrill Lynch
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 19, 2019, at 2:35 PM, Derb Carter <derbc...> wrote:
>
> If you want to get out and enjoy the nice weather and have a good weekend, stop now and don’t read this. An article published by researchers in Science this week concludes birds in North America have declined by 2.9 billion or 29% since 1970. So in the last 50 years we have lost nearly a third of our birds. Those of us who have birded that long know things were much different in 1970 than now, especially the numbers of migratory songbirds, but the magnitude of the decline in a relatively short period of time surprises me, and surprised the researchers. I know there was some discussion this Spring of the paucity of migrant warblers and other songbirds. This may be the new norm, and unfortunately if things don’t change may get worse. If you are interested in the details the article is in Science, and good summary with commentary in the New York Times today.
>
> Derb Carter
> Chapel Hill, NC

 

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Date: 9/19/19 12:10 pm
From: Rob Brown (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mailing List
Please remove me from this mailing list.

 

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Date: 9/19/19 11:58 am
From: Cynthia Fox (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: bird decline
This summer we made our first trip to Alaska. So excited. Until we got
there. Hottest summer temperatures and central Alaska was on fire.
Smoke was everywhere, sometimes visibility less than 1/4 mile. The
hotel was giving out masks to those who needed them. So no vistas as
anticipated. The really sad part was there were NO bugs NO mosquitoes.
Came home with lots of unopened insect repellant. The smoke was
evident all the way to the Arctic Circle. So I worry for the birds who
migrated to the far North to take advantage of the bugs. I wont be
surprised if I hear waterfowl numbers are down this year. I fear this
may become the norm rather than the anomaly. BTW, I expected lots of
new birds from the trip. I got 6.


Cynthia Fox

Chapel Hill NC
 

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Date: 9/19/19 11:41 am
From: Karen Bearden (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: bird decline
Howdy!

Sad!! Here’s the link <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.birds.cornell.edu_home_bring-2Dbirds-2Dback-3Futm-5Fcampaign-3D2019-252009-2520Bird-2520Crisis-2520Announcement-26utm-5Fsource-3Dhs-5Femail-26utm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3D77054305-26-5Fhsenc-3Dp2ANqtz-2D9J4MmHgp-2DmmyGJqaaFLYZyHtBIN97ygCZExRStf-2D8vkP30Dvm7dQm9CkDzn1E6MKJWRqRlJp2xPg0N0Vyr8l-2D8MS-2DlYaDahufc0MUc4-2D2HZY1U8rs-26-5Fhsmi-3D77054305&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=35tA2NafO9cM1j30UfZMaYxVsKIbYQXB6JNhPoLw_7Y&s=KERvRaTROfZO32U7Hxe6cZJFJYekTKhy1axIVKkKZa8&e= > Cornell just shared that leads to the full study and more.

Peace and love for our beautiful Earth, Karen
Raleigh

On Sep 19, 2019, at 2:35 PM, Derb Carter <derbc...> wrote:

If you want to get out and enjoy the nice weather and have a good weekend, stop now and don’t read this. An article published by researchers in Science this week concludes birds in North America have declined by 2.9 billion or 29% since 1970. So in the last 50 years we have lost nearly a third of our birds. Those of us who have birded that long know things were much different in 1970 than now, especially the numbers of migratory songbirds, but the magnitude of the decline in a relatively short period of time surprises me, and surprised the researchers. I know there was some discussion this Spring of the paucity of migrant warblers and other songbirds. This may be the new norm, and unfortunately if things don’t change may get worse. If you are interested in the details the article is in Science, and good summary with commentary in the New York Times today.

Derb Carter
Chapel Hill, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 9/19/19 11:36 am
From: Derb Carter <derbc...>
Subject: bird decline
If you want to get out and enjoy the nice weather and have a good weekend, stop now and don't read this. An article published by researchers in Science this week concludes birds in North America have declined by 2.9 billion or 29% since 1970. So in the last 50 years we have lost nearly a third of our birds. Those of us who have birded that long know things were much different in 1970 than now, especially the numbers of migratory songbirds, but the magnitude of the decline in a relatively short period of time surprises me, and surprised the researchers. I know there was some discussion this Spring of the paucity of migrant warblers and other songbirds. This may be the new norm, and unfortunately if things don't change may get worse. If you are interested in the details the article is in Science, and good summary with commentary in the New York Times today.

Derb Carter
Chapel Hill, NC

 

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Date: 9/19/19 11:14 am
From: Gretchen Schramm (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fwd: Breaking News: There are 2.9 billion fewer birds in the U.S. and Canada now than 50 years ago, a new study found, a steep decline that stunned the researchers.
---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: The New York Times <nytdirect...>
Date: Thu, Sep 19, 2019 at 2:09 PM
Subject: Breaking News: There are 2.9 billion fewer birds in the U.S. and
Canada now than 50 years ago, a new study found, a steep decline that
stunned the researchers.
To: <gretchenschramm7...>


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September 19, 2019
NYTimes.com »
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BREAKING NEWS
There are 2.9 billion fewer birds in the U.S. and Canada now than 50 years
ago, a new study found, a steep decline that stunned the researchers.
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__nl.nytimes.com_f_newsletter_zQBtyh9-5FwnASumGXIsrcaA-7E-7E_AAAAAQA-7E_RgRfZklfP0TxaHR0cDovL3d3dy5ueXRpbWVzLmNvbS8yMDE5LzA5LzE5L3NjaWVuY2UvYmlyZC1wb3B1bGF0aW9ucy1hbWVyaWNhLWNhbmFkYS5odG1sP2VtYz1lZGl0X25hXzIwMTkwOTE5JnJlZj1oZWFkbGluZSZubD1icmVha2luZy1uZXdzP2NhbXBhaWduX2lkPTYwJmluc3RhbmNlX2lkPTAmc2VnbWVudF9pZD0xNzE2OCZ1c2VyX2lkPWM3NmU2NGZiOTJjNWVjNmY5YTg2N2NhN2YzNDZkNzk5JnJlZ2lfaWQ9OTUxMTUzODNpbmctbmV3c1cDbnl0QgoAKF-5FEg12-5FedOZUhpncmV0Y2hlbnNjaHJhbW03QGdtYWlsLmNvbVgEAAAAAA-7E-7E&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=lwlJekTAfWMz2AJ2_FBE7GkLDHxQyYUiMx---Kefe1c&s=Bjfvtbi2VFNosJBb8yAqwetBaL4FNmDlowunNqFaEKY&e= >
Thursday, September 19, 2019 2:04 PM EST

The analysis, published in the journal Science, is the most exhaustive and
ambitious attempt yet to learn what is happening to avian populations. The
results have shocked researchers and conservation organizations.
Read More »
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Date: 9/18/19 2:46 pm
From: Elizabeth Faison (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: ID Needed
Female grosbeak. Fun picture!
________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Cecelia Mathis <weer...>
Sent: Wednesday, September 18, 2019 5:18 PM
To: <carolinabirds...> <carolinabirds...>
Subject: ID Needed

ID Needed with explanation
My Yard
Eating Suet
4:00 pm
Wed, 9-18-2019
heavy clouds
I think Female Rose-breasted Grosbeak
not Female Purple Finch
Whichever it is, its a First of Season

Cecelia Butler Mathis
Sparta, Alleghany Co, NC
[ID NEEDED FEMALE RB Grosbeak OR FEMALE PURPLE FINCH 2019-09-18 008]

 

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Date: 9/18/19 2:21 pm
From: Cecelia Mathis <weer...>
Subject: ID Needed
ID Needed with explanation
My Yard
Eating Suet
4:00 pm
Wed, 9-18-2019
heavy clouds
I think Female Rose-breasted Grosbeak
not Female Purple Finch
Whichever it is, it’s a First of Season

Cecelia Butler Mathis
Sparta, Alleghany Co, NC

 

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Date: 9/18/19 1:54 pm
From: Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Durham Co NC Trip Summary 09/18/2019
Greetings all

Well I made another outing today to Durham Co again to try and add some species to my county list and I was able to add three; the Magnolia Warbler seeing 2 of them with better looks at the second one, Swainson’s Thrush both calling as they flew overhead in the dark and one in the day as well and saw it, the third was a fast moving Merlin flying about 10 feet above ground over a field on the hunt for breakfast.

But the best find of the day way to see 7 Wood Storks circling around and around for about 8 to 10 minutes. I got a few pictures with my iPhone but not the best.

I left my camera in the car because I knew I was going to be out there for a while and I just didn’t want to have to carry it that long.

Durham Co is now at 153 species.

Good Birding Always


Number of Checklists: 3
Number of Taxa: 42

Checklists included in this summary:
(1): Butner Game Land--Brickhouse Rd. (Durham Co.)
Date: Sep 18, 2019 at 5:40 AM
(2): Butner Game Land--Brickhouse Rd. (Durham Co.)
Date: Sep 18, 2019 at 7:00 AM
(3): Butner Game Land--Brickhouse Rd. (Durham Co.)
Date: Sep 18, 2019 at 1:00 PM

3 duck sp. -- (1)
1 Mourning Dove -- (1)
4 Chimney Swift -- (2)
7 Wood Stork -- (2)
3 Great Egret -- (2)
3 Turkey Vulture -- (2)
2 Bald Eagle -- (2)
1 Eastern Screech-Owl -- (2)
4 Barred Owl -- (1)
3 Red-headed Woodpecker -- (2)
2 Red-bellied Woodpecker -- (2)
1 Downy Woodpecker -- (2)
1 Hairy Woodpecker -- (2)
2 Pileated Woodpecker -- (2)
1 Merlin -- (2)
2 Eastern Wood-Pewee -- (2)
7 White-eyed Vireo -- (2),(3)
2 Red-eyed Vireo -- (2)
6 Blue Jay -- (2)
8 American Crow -- (1),(2)
5 Carolina Chickadee -- (2),(3)
6 Tufted Titmouse -- (2)
2 Barn Swallow -- (2)
1 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher -- (2)
8 Carolina Wren -- (1),(2)
10 Gray Catbird -- (1),(2),(3)
4 Brown Thrasher -- (1),(2)
4 Swainson's Thrush -- (1),(2)
25 Brown-headed Cowbird -- (2)
60 Common Grackle -- (2)
1 Black-and-white Warbler -- (2)
1 Common Yellowthroat -- (2)
1 Hooded Warbler -- (2)
2 American Redstart -- (2)
4 Northern Parula -- (2),(3)
2 Magnolia Warbler -- (2),(3)
1 Pine Warbler -- (3)
2 Summer Tanager -- (2),(3)
1 Scarlet Tanager -- (2)
11 Northern Cardinal -- (2),(3)
4 Blue Grosbeak -- (2)
9 Indigo Bunting -- (2),(3)

This trip summary was created using the eBird app for iPhone and iPad.
See eBird for more information.


From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>


 

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Date: 9/18/19 12:41 pm
From: Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Joyner Park migrants
I had high hopes this morning, given the passage of a decent cold front and the sound of flight calls over my house at 5:30 this morning (Swainson's thrush plus other stuff).  I went to Joyner Park in Wake Forest and had only moderate success.  I did find tally 51 species but not as many warblers and other migrants as I had hoped.  Warblers were redstarts, magnolia, worm-eating, pine, black-and-white, and common yellowthroat.  Other notables were veery, wood  thrush, scarlet tanager, chimney swifts, and yellow-throated vireo.
Marc RibaudoGarner
 

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Date: 9/18/19 4:26 am
From: Ron <waxwing...>
Subject: Jackson Park
I’m sorry I didn’t mention the location of the park in my post. Even though it’s fairly well-known, not everyone has heard of it as I was reminded. It’s in Hendersonville, NC.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps_place_Jackson-2BPark_-4035.3157269-2C-2D82.4450427-2C15z_data-3D-214m5-213m4-211s0x0-3A0xd8f8799b9da20e36-218m2-213d35.3157269-214d-2D82.4450427&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=fjuXuILSFRcgzsKtd4KMpnYt0tAxCQCHMTKwnj9JOzM&s=9sHbBelfnu9Iw8DscehPqke2WCghMEXO2DzcN7YKKvU&e=

Ron Clark
Kings Mtn NC
 

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Date: 9/17/19 2:48 pm
From: Jesse Anderson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Olive-sided flycatcher - Surry Co. NC
While volunteering for hawk watch, an Olive-sided flycatcher made an appearance at Pilot Mountain this morning (09/17/19) on Little Pinnacle Overlook- Surry Co. New species for the park.

Might be hanging around the east side of the Jomeokee Trail, among the abundance of snags that remain along the SE side of the mountain.


Jesse Anderson
Pinnacle, NC
 

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Date: 9/17/19 2:06 pm
From: Ron <waxwing...>
Subject: Re: Jackson Park
I left out the Philadelphia Vireo, of all things.



Jackson Park was very good today, even into early afternoon. 53 species, with 15 warblers. Below are migrants.

Ron Clark
Kings Mtn. NC

Yellow-billed Cuckoo 1
Chimney Swift 1
Ruby-throated Hummingbird 3
Eastern Wood-Pewee 7
White-eyed Vireo 3
Yellow-throated Vireo 1
Red-eyed Vireo 2
Tree Swallow 2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 1
Gray Catbird 3
Swainson's Thrush 3
Wood Thrush 1
Ovenbird 1
Northern Waterthrush 1
Golden-winged Warbler 1
Black-and-white Warbler 2
Tennessee Warbler 3
Common Yellowthroat 1
Hooded Warbler 1
American Redstart 15
Cape May Warbler 1
Northern Parula 2
Magnolia Warbler 10
Bay-breasted Warbler 1
Blackburnian Warbler 3
Chestnut-sided Warbler 7
Yellow-throated Warbler 2
Canada Warbler 1
Scarlet Tanager 1

 

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Date: 9/17/19 2:03 pm
From: Ron <waxwing...>
Subject: Jackson Park
Jackson Park was very good today, even into early afternoon. 53 species, with 15 warblers. Below are migrants.

Ron Clark
Kings Mtn. NC

Yellow-billed Cuckoo 1
Chimney Swift 1
Ruby-throated Hummingbird 3
Eastern Wood-Pewee 7
White-eyed Vireo 3
Yellow-throated Vireo 1
Red-eyed Vireo 2
Tree Swallow 2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 1
Gray Catbird 3
Swainson's Thrush 3
Wood Thrush 1
Ovenbird 1
Northern Waterthrush 1
Golden-winged Warbler 1
Black-and-white Warbler 2
Tennessee Warbler 3
Common Yellowthroat 1
Hooded Warbler 1
American Redstart 15
Cape May Warbler 1
Northern Parula 2
Magnolia Warbler 10
Bay-breasted Warbler 1
Blackburnian Warbler 3
Chestnut-sided Warbler 7
Yellow-throated Warbler 2
Canada Warbler 1
Scarlet Tanager 1

 

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Date: 9/17/19 12:45 pm
From: Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: eBird Trip Summary - Durham Co 09/17/2019
Greetings all

I spent the day Birding in Durham Co, first going to Stagecoach Rd Waterfowl Impoundment to see if I could find the White Ibis there for my Durham Co List but didn’t have any luck on them.

On my way to my next stop Falls Lake--Ellerbe Creek RR Grade as I was heading west on I40 and at Hwy 54 intersection, I saw the best bird of the day but at a rather odd spot. It was a Northern Harrier that must have been passing through the area and spotted something that looked like it would make a nice meal. The area I saw it in probably wasn’t as big as 1/4 of an acre it was between the entrance ramp off of 54 to get onto I40 East when it caught my eye and I saw it bank to it left thus showing me its white rump. A new Durham Co bird.

At Ellerbe Creek RR Grade, I found a few shorebirds adding both Semipalmed Plover and Sandpiper and Pectoral Sandpiper to my Durham Co list now at 150 species.

It was a total lack of song birds today with only one species of Warbler the Pine and only 2 species of Vireos. No thrushes seen or heard which was disappointing. Oh well just another reason to go back another day.

Good Birding Always

Number of Checklists: 4
Number of Taxa: 38

Checklists included in this summary:
(1): NC Highway 54E & Hwy40 Durham US-NC
Date: Sep 17, 2019 at 10:30 AM
(2): Falls Lake--Ellerbe Creek RR Grade
Date: Sep 17, 2019 at 11:05 AM
(3): Stagecoach Road Waterfowl Impoundment
Date: Sep 17, 2019 at 6:45 AM
(4): Lake Michie
Date: Sep 17, 2019 at 1:20 PM

1 Mallard -- (3)
1 Yellow-billed Cuckoo -- (3)
4 Chimney Swift -- (3)
1 Ruby-throated Hummingbird -- (3)
2 Semipalmated Plover -- (2)
7 Killdeer -- (2),(4)
2 Sanderling -- (2)
2 Pectoral Sandpiper -- (2)
3 Semipalmated Sandpiper -- (2)
1 Double-crested Cormorant -- (2)
4 Great Blue Heron (Blue form) -- (3),(4)
29 Great Egret -- (2),(3),(4)
1 Turkey Vulture -- (2)
1 Northern Harrier -- (1)
4 Red-shouldered Hawk -- (2),(3)
1 Barred Owl -- (2)
2 Belted Kingfisher -- (3),(4)
5 Red-headed Woodpecker -- (3)
5 Red-bellied Woodpecker -- (2),(3),(4)
4 Downy Woodpecker -- (3),(4)
1 Hairy Woodpecker -- (3)
1 Pileated Woodpecker -- (3)
2 Great Crested Flycatcher -- (2),(3)
3 White-eyed Vireo -- (2)
1 Yellow-throated Vireo -- (4)
4 Blue Jay -- (3)
11 American Crow -- (2),(3)
6 Fish Crow -- (2)
6 Carolina Chickadee -- (2),(3),(4)
8 Tufted Titmouse -- (2),(3),(4)
2 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher -- (4)
9 Carolina Wren -- (2),(3),(4)
2 House Finch -- (3)
10 Brown-headed Cowbird -- (3)
40 Common Grackle -- (3)
1 Pine Warbler -- (2)
9 Northern Cardinal -- (2),(3),(4)
1 Indigo Bunting -- (2)

This trip summary was created using the eBird app for iPhone and iPad.
See eBird for more information.


From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>


 

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Date: 9/17/19 10:23 am
From: jim.capel (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Chapel Hill Bird Club Meeting–Monday 9/23–Birding South Africa–Keith Kennedy
The Chapel Hill Bird Club will meet at 7:30 pm on Monday, September 23rd in the lounge at Binkley Baptist Church. Binkley is located at 1712 Willow Drive in Chapel Hill, NC.

Visitors are welcome! Come at 7:15 p.m. for light refreshments.

The featured speaker is Keith Kennedy, who will present on “Birding the Western Cape and the Southern Kalahari of South Africa.” Two unique areas of South Africa offer chances to see a number of endemic bird species as well as seldom-seen mammals. Keith is a retired entomologist and an exceptional wildlife photographer.

Admission is free and the public is invited.

Location: Binkley Baptist Church, 1712 Willow Dr., Chapel Hill



 

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Date: 9/16/19 5:34 pm
From: M Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Roommate wanted for September meeting
Hey Ladies, I am looking for a roommate to share expenses at the September CBC meeting. A two bed, nonsmoking room is reserved for three nights, checking in Thursday night. Expenses to be shared equally by the number of adults in the room.

If this interests you, please contact me. <hareboro...><mailto:%<20hareboro...>
919-580-8330<tel:919-580-8330>

Mae Howell
Goldsboro, NC

Powered by Cricket Wireless

 

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Date: 9/14/19 7:11 am
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hefner Gap NC migrants
After a fog-induced slow start at the Orchard at Altapass, a massive, slow-moving feeding flock was viewed at Hefner Gap.

Warblers:

Cerulean- 1
Nashville- 1
Worm-eating- 1
Bay-breasted- 3
Tennessee- 40
Redstart- 14
Cape May- 1 (breeding plumaged)
Yellow-throated- 1
Magnolia- 10
Black-throated Blue- 3
Black-throated Green- 2
Hooded- 1
Black-and-white- 10
Chestnut-sided- 2
Parula- 2

Other birds:
Yellow-throated Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Lots of pewees and goldfinches

Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/14/19 5:53 am
From: nicholas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: migrants in Uwharrie National Forest, Randolph & Montgomery Co.'s, NC, 9/11-9/12/19
Hiked in the King Mountain area on the trail off Thayer Dr./King Mtn. Rd. near the Randolph Co. and Montgomery Co. line on 9/11/19 and ran into a few migrant flocks in Randolph Co. that included 1 Blackburnian Warbler & 1 Blackpoll Warbler. Highlights from a trail off Dutch John Rd. near Falls Mountain in Montgomery Co. on 9/12 were 1 Scarlet Tanager, 1 Yellow-throated Warbler, and 1 Swainson's Warbler.

Nick Flanders
Portsmouth, VA

 

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Date: 9/13/19 4:30 pm
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Trout Lake (Watauga Co. NC)- migrant activity
Trout Lake, just outside of Blowing Rock, was surprisingly active this mid/late afternoon. Several really large feeding flocks were encountered. Nothing unusual but it was at times overwhelming because the flocks were so tightly concentrated. Easily could have missed something.

Warblers:
Black-throated Blue- 15
Black-and-white- 8
American Redstart- 10
Black-throated Green- 10
Hooded- 5
Magnolia- 12
Tennessee- 10
Yellowthroat- 4
Chestnut-sided- 5
Cape May- 1
Nashville- 1

Other migrants/birds included Blue-throated and White-eyed Vireos, lots of pewees, Brown Creeper and Golden-crowned Kinglet.

The long-staying Greater Scaup was also preset at Bass Lake.

Ryan Justice





Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/13/19 3:10 pm
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Semipalm Plover Kerr Scott Reservoir
There was a single Semipalmated Plover at the upper end of Kerr Scott
Reservoir in Wilkes Co today, hanging out with some Killdeer on sandbars
in the river. Even though its not listed as rare by ebird, its been
several years since we've seen one in this part of the state.

Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC


 

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Date: 9/12/19 4:44 pm
From: Murphy (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Dead juvenile Sora in Durham
Found a beautiful bird which had apparently gotten hit by a car on our
street. After sharing photos of it with a birding group on Facebook, I was
informed that it was a juvenile Sora. Not sure what a Sora would be doing
in my part of town, but I'm saddened that it was apparently in the wrong
place in the wrong time.

Jennifer Griffith
Durham, NC

 

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Date: 9/12/19 9:25 am
From: Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...>
Subject: FOS Baltimore Oriole
Recent member reports indicated Orioles had been seen in my general area.  I put up a grape jelly feeder last Sunday, the 8th, based on these reports.  This morning a sighted a male at this feeder.  This is the earliest first-sighting since I began recording such dates in 2012.  Prior to today, my earliest sighting had been 19 September 2015.  If anyone has any insight into such an early appearance I would appreciate the information.

Frank HamiltonCharleston, SC

 

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Date: 9/12/19 7:38 am
From: Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Flat River Waterfowl Impoundment -- Sep 12, 2019
Greeting all

Enjoyed a nice walk through part of the Flat River Waterfowl Impoundments before it got to hot and humid

Best bird of the day was a Wood Stork that flew overhead several times and seen by Brian Bockhahn as well when he was making his rounds and I stopped and told him about the Stork.

Flat River Waterfowl Impoundment
Sep 12, 2019
6:30 AM
Traveling
1.00 miles
240 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.9.3 Build 13

4 Wood Duck
7 Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)
4 Mourning Dove
1 Yellow-billed Cuckoo
2 Ruby-throated Hummingbird
1 Wood Stork -- Large legged wader with black and white wings white body with black featherless head and black curved bill.
2 Great Blue Heron (Blue form)
3 Great Egret
1 Snowy Egret
20 Little Blue Heron -- Was all I could count because of the Wood Stork flew up with them.
2 Green Heron
2 Turkey Vulture
2 Red-shouldered Hawk
3 Red-headed Woodpecker
1 Red-bellied Woodpecker
3 Downy Woodpecker
1 Pileated Woodpecker
1 American Kestrel
1 Eastern Wood-Pewee
1 Eastern Phoebe
7 White-eyed Vireo
2 Blue Jay
2 American Crow
2 Fish Crow
2 Carolina Chickadee
2 Tufted Titmouse
5 Carolina Wren
3 Gray Catbird
2 Eastern Bluebird
1 American Robin
8 American Goldfinch
2 Eastern Towhee
1 Northern Waterthrush
1 Black-and-white Warbler
2 Summer Tanager
2 Northern Cardinal
4 Indigo Bunting

Number of Taxa: 37


From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>

 

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Date: 9/12/19 6:49 am
From: Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Wood Stork @ Durham Co
Greetings all

This morning I found a Wood Stork at Flat River Waterfowl Impoundments

Follow road to the right and at the end of the first Impoundment where there is a small pond to the right in the woods is where it is hanging around.

Sometimes it flys off but returns in a short time.

Any questions call me direct.


From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>

 

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Date: 9/11/19 12:22 pm
From: Mike Judd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: No sightings just selling a few books
Anyone interested please let me know. Inexpensive.

A Photographic Guide to Birds of Java, Sumatra & Bali Tilford 2000

Birds of Thailand Robson 2002

Birds of Bali Mason & Jarvis 1989

Migratory Birds of Sungei Bulow Wetland Reserve 2nd Ed 2012

Birds of Fraser's Hill Strange 2004

FG to Birds of Australia Simpson & Day 7th Ed 2004

Birds of SE Asia Robson 2005

Mike Judd
Brevard

 

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Date: 9/11/19 6:24 am
From: scompton1251 <scompton1251...>
Subject: Christmas Count dates
Count compilers,Noticed today that no SC Christmas Count dates are listed on the Carolina Bird Club site. I am particularly interested in the Charleston, North Greenville, and Pawleys-Litchfield dates, but might do another if schedules allow. Like many, my December is already full of  family, cultural, and faith community dates. It would be very helpful if I could have the Christmas Count dates very soon.Thanks,Steve ComptonGreenville, SCFormer compiler Charleston, SC CountChristmas Count volunteer since 1979Sent from my Verizon LG Smartphone
 

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Date: 9/10/19 7:40 pm
From: Susan Campbell <susan...>
Subject: Mattamuskeet Christmas Bird Count
Dear All,

It may still feel like summer BUT....

We are looking for volunteers to assist with the CBC in the Mattamuskeet area (Hyde Co. NC) on Sunday, December 29th. We have a core of experienced helpers but need more eyes and ears on count day this year. Historically, most of our volunteers are from out of the area so advance planning is critical for a successful count.

The circle is one with good diversity--- and historically has produced some very interesting birds. Of course we count a large variety of waterfowl and waterbirds as well as numerous raptors. Among other species, Eurasian Wigeon, Golden Eagle, Barn Owl, and Brewer's Blackbird have all been counted in the last couple years. The causeway across the lake is legendary for interesting warblers in winter. Double digits have been tallied on some counts when conditions are good for drawing songbirds out of the the thick vegetation along Hwy. 94.

Mattamuskeet is unique-- with amazing habitat and views as well as wildlife. Experiencing this part of the inner coastal plain during the winter is always special.

Please let me know ASAP if you think you might like to join our count in late December!

Many thanks,
Susan Campbell
Compiler, Mattamuskeet CBC

 

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Date: 9/9/19 3:45 pm
From: Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: eBird Trip Summary -- 09/09/2019
Greetings all

I spent the day birding at Brumley Nature Preserve in Orange Co NC today starting my first eBird Report at 0605 hrs and hearing and later saw a Wood Thrush to start the day and later saw a Veery, Blue Birds and Robins.

The Veery was a Life Bird for me in NC now at 280 and I added 8 species to my Orange Co list with seeing a Broad-winged Hawk just as I started for home.

The start of the day was warm and muggy with fog and I felt like I was back in Panama feeling like a wet noodle.

I saw 9 species of Warblers of which B&W Warblers is one of my favorites.

eBird Checklist Summary for: Sep 9, 2019

Number of Checklists: 5
Number of Taxa: 41

Checklists included in this summary:
(1): Brumley Nature Preserve--North
Date: Sep 9, 2019 at 6:05 AM
(2): Brumley Nature Preserve--North
Date: Sep 9, 2019 at 7:00 AM
(3): Brumley Nature Preserve--North
Date: Sep 9, 2019 at 12:15 PM
(4): Lawrence Rd & Jefferson Dr, Hillsborough US-NC
Date: Sep 9, 2019 at 1:36 PM
(5): 2431–2599 Walker Rd, Hillsborough US-NC
Date: Sep 9, 2019 at 1:51 PM

1 Ruby-throated Hummingbird -- (2)
1 Black Vulture -- (2)
1 Broad-winged Hawk -- (4)
1 Red-tailed Hawk -- (5)
2 Red-bellied Woodpecker -- (2)
6 Downy Woodpecker -- (2),(3)
3 Hairy Woodpecker -- (2)
1 Acadian Flycatcher -- (2)
4 Eastern Phoebe -- (2)
7 White-eyed Vireo -- (2),(3)
8 Red-eyed Vireo -- (1),(2),(3)
16 American Crow -- (1),(2),(3)
6 Carolina Chickadee -- (2),(3)
7 Tufted Titmouse -- (2),(3)
1 White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern) -- (2)
3 Brown-headed Nuthatch -- (3)
6 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher -- (2),(3)
2 House Wren -- (2)
17 Carolina Wren -- (1),(2),(3)
4 Gray Catbird -- (2)
6 Brown Thrasher -- (2)
1 Northern Mockingbird -- (2)
4 Eastern Bluebird -- (2)
2 Veery -- (2)
2 Wood Thrush -- (1),(2)
10 American Robin -- (2)
30 Cedar Waxwing -- (2)
6 American Goldfinch -- (2)
5 Eastern Towhee -- (2),(3)
1 Worm-eating Warbler -- (3)
3 Black-and-white Warbler -- (2),(3)
1 Common Yellowthroat -- (2)
1 Hooded Warbler -- (2)
2 American Redstart -- (2)
1 Northern Parula -- (3)
1 Magnolia Warbler -- (3)
1 Chestnut-sided Warbler -- (3)
6 Pine Warbler -- (2),(3)
6 Summer Tanager -- (2),(3)
14 Northern Cardinal -- (2),(3)
5 Indigo Bunting -- (2)

This trip summary was created using the eBird app for iPhone and iPad.
See eBird for more information.

Good Birding Always

From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>


 

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Date: 9/9/19 2:00 pm
From: Derb Carter <derbc...>
Subject: Dorian and Cape Lookout Seashore
I am sure most of you have heard about the impacts of Hurricane Dorian on Ocracoke and Hatteras Islands. I wish all of the residents and those with interests on this part of the Outer Banks a speedy recovery. There has been less information about Cape Lookout National Seashore over which Dorian also directly tracked. The National Park Service has just issued an update in which it states the hurricane has formed "no less than 54 inlets" in the 35 miles of Seashore from Cape Lookout to Portsmouth. Prior to the hurricane there was only one inlet, Ophelia (named after a hurricane) where the Mountain Plover spent much of the winter of 2016-17. Cape Lookout Seashore is largely undeveloped, this is a natural response of a barrier island to major storms, and it will actually create habitat beneficial to Piping Plover and other beach nesting birds. Fifty-four inlets is nevertheless spectacular, as you can see in the attached post-storm aerial photographs from NOAA.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__storms.ngs.noaa.gov_&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=PT2TplGtneru3WHdxDVsObtzSBuAHTXpEhCoWs_Rm_s&s=BEurvjgLXkO4tUo31NZDfRWMb0ZAHZW9PQOyPA-uuYk&e=

Derb Carter
Chapel Hill, NC

 

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Date: 9/9/19 7:21 am
From: Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Garner warblers
I had some warbler activity in the vicinity of my home in Garner this morning.  A couple of mixed flocks contained 2 blue-winged, 2 black-and-whites, 2 American redstarts, 1 worm-eating, 1 northern parula, 1 pine.  Also, 1 white-eyed vireo and 1 yellow-throated vireo.
 Marc Ribaudo
 

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Date: 9/9/19 5:20 am
From: William Majoros <bmajoros...>
Subject: Tons of birds at Eno River State Park
Both Saturday and Sunday morning there were many birds at Eno River State Park (Few's Ford access), primarily in the meadow and along the river across from the log cabin. My combined list for the two mornings:

Blue-winged Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
Hooded Warbler
Baltimore Oriole
Summer Tanager
Scarlet Tanager
Chimney Swift
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Red-headed Woodpecker
Common Yellowthroat
White-eyed Vireo
Pine Warbler
Northern Parula
Red-eyed Vireo
Yellow-beasted Chat (heard only)
Eastern Kingbird
Indigo Bunting
House Finch
American Goldfinch
Red-shouldered Hawk
Brown Thrasher
Gray Catbird
Carolina Wren
Eastern Bluebird
Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
American Robin
Northern Cardinal
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Chipping Sparrow

---
Bill Majoros, PhD
Durham, NC
ThirdBirdFromTheSun.com



 

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Date: 9/8/19 4:27 pm
From: Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: nighthawks
A loose flock of 7 common nighthawks just flew over my house in Garner (7:25pm).
Marc Ribaudo
 

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Date: 9/8/19 10:42 am
From: Jelmer Poelstra (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mourning Warbler at Walter Knob Overlook, BRP, Buncombe Co.
Hi all,

I just saw an adult male Mourning Warbler at Walter Knob Overlook (which I
believe is the same place as Balsam Gap). The bird is in the brushy area
directly across the parkway from the parking area. I first saw it briefly
after some phishing, and then had more brief views and lots of calls after
playing tape (of calls, not song), to which it responded quite vigorously.
May thus be possible to find it back if you happen to be in the area.

At the nearby Ridge Junction, there was a rather good morning flight this
morning, though oddly enough most birds crossed the gap as late as between
9 and 10. Highlights among many 100s of warblers were a "Brewster's", a
Golden-winged, a Wilson's, several Nashville, and astonishingly many Cape
May Warblers.

Good birding,

Jelmer Poelstra
Durham

 

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Date: 9/8/19 8:25 am
From: Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: blue-winged warbler, other migrants at Joyner Park
I got great looks at a blue-winged warbler at E. Carroll Joyner Park in Wake Co this morning.  It was near the maintenance yard at the southern end of the park.  In addition I saw magnolia, black-and-white, redstart, and yellow warblers, plus Baltimore oriole, veery, red-headed woodpecker, several flocks of red-eyed vireos, and yellow-throated vireo.  I also saw an empid I believe was a least, but it was too far out for me to check all the field marks needed to satisfy e-bird.  I tallied 53 species in all.
Marc RibaudoGarner
 

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Date: 9/8/19 6:02 am
From: Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: common nighthawks near Hillsborough NC
I saw three late yesterday afternoon foraging over a meadow near the Little
River near Hillsborough, NC. I've lived here nine years and these are first
nighthawks I've seen around here.
Helen

 

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Date: 9/7/19 8:38 am
From: Marc Ribaudo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Swanson's thrush, Jordan Lake

I birded the Ebenezer boat launch area of Jordan Lake SP this morning, looking for migrants.  I heard and saw a Swanson's thrush along the entrance road to the parking lot.  There were lots of birds in the trees along the shore, but most were pine warblers.  Several mixed flocks along the trails also contained lots of pines, plus the expected chickadees, titmice, nutatches, and red-eyes vireos.  I did manage to find redstart, parula, black-and-white, and yellow warblers, plus yellow-billed cuckoos and red-headed woodpeckers.

Marc Ribaudo 

 

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Date: 9/7/19 8:22 am
From: Patricia Hanlon (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Dealing with Hurricane Dorian
I lowered one hummingbird feeder further down in the azalea bush with a red hood over it. They used it throughout the storm. I moved the one from out back on a freestanding pole on the deck to the inside corner of front door within covered porch, hanging over flowers. Also used all day Thursday.
I had a covered area where birds could get to mealworms all day Thursday. Took feeders down Wednesday night, make painted bunting last millet visitor. Got them back out first thing Friday morning.
Returned the hummer feeder with red rain cover to back deck and a beautiful male Baltimore Oriole appeared. Quickly hit orange and jelly feeder out, but have not seen it yet.
Inland from Charleston area coast on Goose Creek Reservoir in Hanahan, SC.
Hope everyone faired well.

Pat Eckstine
Sent from my iPhone. Please excuse any typos.

> On Sep 6, 2019, at 7:19 PM, Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...> wrote:
>
> I started taking down my poles, seed and suet feeders Wednesday afternoon as wind increased. My "usual suspects" kept flying in and looking around for the missing buffet. Despite the increasing wind, I kept my hummingbird feeders up until almost dark. On Thursday, the wind was too strong for feeders. I did step out onto the front porch in the afternoon to look around and take a few photos to send a situation report to out-of-town family. It hurt my heart to look up and see a hummer on a perch next to where the porch feeder was supposed to be.
>
> As evening approached, the wind had subsided to where I hung two nectar feeders, one the front porch and one outside my kitchen window. Later, I was able to replace two poles and put out three seed feeders until I could replace everything today. I've been blessed with a constant stream of songbirds and hummingbirds throughout today.
>
> Hope everyone near the coast is safe.
>
> Frank Hamilton
> Charleston, SC

 

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Date: 9/7/19 8:12 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Monk Parakeet, Blue Jay surprise
Just saw a Monk Parakeet in Myrtle beach this morning, and I wonder what the odds are of a bird moving from an established population compared to a recent cage bird escape. I would think the former is more likely?

Common birds can still surprise me after 50 years of birdwatching. All summer we’ve been hearing this mystery call, an upslurred whistle that makes me think “begging raptor” but we could never trace it to a Cooper’s Hawk or a Kite. I started to think it was a Blue Jay but never could see anybody where the noise was coming from (nor could my wife - we have a lot of very tall pines in the neighborhood). Well, today I finally saw the Blue Jay who’s been whistling all summer. I never heard one make this particular noise before this summer. I wonder where he got it from.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC
 

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Date: 9/7/19 6:58 am
From: rdnc13 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: American Turf birds
Hi folks

Still a lot of water on the fields at American Turf Farms (US 64 East, between Roper and Creswell). This morning best birds were 2 Baird’s and 3 Buff-breasted Sandpipers, and single Red-necked and Wilson’s Phalaropes. Also a Tricolored Heron out in the fields was an unusual sight. A lot of swallows and a nice number of Horned Larks added interest.

Thanks, later, Ricky

Ricky Davis
Rocky Mount, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/6/19 4:45 pm
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Brown Noddy -- Duck Boardwalk
Joan and I were headed to the boardwalk and were within 1/4 mile when
Jonathan called me with the brown noddy. Great bird! We watched it a while
and then left. When we retuned it was gone, but we spotted it flying,
south, then north, then south again, looking for the ocean, I guess!

Jeff Lewis
Southern Shores, NC

On Fri, Sep 6, 2019 at 6:34 PM Corey, Ed <ed.corey...> wrote:

> Jonathan Cooley just sent me two pics of a Brown Noddy being seen at the
> Duck Boardwalk (Dare County) currently. Wanted to get the word out (even
> if I'm majorly jealous!).
>
> Ed Corey
> Raleigh, NC
>
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>

 

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Date: 9/6/19 4:20 pm
From: Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...>
Subject: Dealing with Hurricane Dorian
I started taking down my poles, seed and suet feeders Wednesday afternoon as wind increased.  My "usual suspects" kept flying in and looking around for the missing buffet. Despite the increasing wind, I kept my hummingbird feeders up until almost dark.  On Thursday,  the wind was too strong for feeders.  I did step out onto the front porch in the afternoon to look around and take a few photos to send a situation report to out-of-town family.  It hurt my heart to look up and see a hummer on a perch next to where the porch feeder was supposed to be. 

As evening approached, the wind had subsided to where I hung two nectar feeders, one the front porch and one outside my kitchen window.  Later, I was able to replace two poles and put out three seed feeders until I could replace everything today.  I've been blessed with a constant stream of songbirds and hummingbirds throughout today.
Hope everyone near the coast is safe.

Frank Hamilton
Charleston, SC

 

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Date: 9/6/19 3:34 pm
From: Corey, Ed <ed.corey...>
Subject: Brown Noddy -- Duck Boardwalk
Jonathan Cooley just sent me two pics of a Brown Noddy being seen at the Duck Boardwalk (Dare County) currently. Wanted to get the word out (even if I'm majorly jealous!).

Ed Corey
Raleigh, NC

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

 

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Date: 9/6/19 6:28 am
From: Martina Nordstrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Sooty Terns - Cane Creek Park, Union Co., NC
This morning I checked the marsh at Cane Creek Park, hoping for some
shorebirds that may have dropped in from Dorian. Besides killdeer and 2
Solitary Sandpiper I was initially disappointed. However, while scanning
the sky (I was watching a Mourning Dove) I noticed 2 terns flying high and
away, westward towards the main lake. I managed to snap a few poor but
identifiable photos as they flew off. The two were both Sooty Terns, an
adult and juvenile. They flew over the tree line and I lost them. I ran
over to the main park entrance to check the rest of the lake, but no luck.
They were flying pretty high and into the wind.

This is obviously a first record for Union County and I believe only the
third record for the area (I believe Mecklenburg has 2 records, off the top
of my head). Also a lifer for me too!

Good birding,

Martina Nordstrand

 

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Date: 9/6/19 5:16 am
From: Jelmer Poelstra (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Sooty Tern at Falls Lake (and at Jordan Lake)
Hi all,

I just saw an adult Sooty Tern from Sandling Beach at Falls Lake. It was
foraging and may still be present although I haven't seen it for about 15
mins now. Many Common Terns as well as some Caspian, Forsters and Black
Terns are also present.

And Andrew Thornton is reporting a Sooty Tern from Seaforth at Jordan Lake.

Jelmer Poelstra
Durham

 

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Date: 9/5/19 9:11 am
From: Jelmer Poelstra (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: About 270 Common Terns at Falls Lake
Hi all,

There was a large flock of Common Terns at Falls Lake this morning, seen
from Rolling view. I estimated about 270 birds, which appears to be, by
far, a high count for the Triangle area.

There were also 3 Black Terns that were mostly cruising around by
themselves, but I could not see any other species of tern among the group.
That said, I could have easily overlooked one or more of a few similar
species due to distance and did not stay very long to extensively check
them.

I guess there are good odds that they will remain and perhaps more terns
etc will come in today due to Dorian. In other words, might be worth to
have a look there or at Jordan Lake.

Good birding,

Jelmer Poelstra
Durham

--
Jelmer Poelstra
311 Biological Sciences Building, Biology Department
Duke University Durham, NC
Email: <jelmerpoelstra...> / <jelmer.poelstra...>
Phone: (+1) 919-260-8253

 

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Date: 9/4/19 8:34 pm
From: Bill Hilton Jr. <hilton...>
Subject: Hilton Pond 08/01/19 (Swallowtails & Swamp Milkweed)
August was an inauspicious month for banding birds at Hilton Pond Center; even our usually faithful Ruby-throated Hummingbirds were relatively few. (More in a later post about that.) Thus, it was good we had a patch of Swamp Milkweed to watch; it brought in an unusually large number of swallowtail butterflies and even a NEW lepidopteran species for the Center! To read all about it, check out Installment #699 of "This Week at Hilton Pond" for 1-31 Aug 2019.

As always, we include tallies of what birds we did band or recapture, along with our continuing "Yard List" of avian species encountered locally during the year.

It's all at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.hiltonpond.org_ThisWeek190801.html&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=6hUTMQounavANZ_Ljq64EiNMtp1TpheacYvOWBf_Xfk&s=ElLKvHMx8OVwxlps9WgJmCMrciiJiQTA7ggUWEM4ZMs&e=


Happy Nature-Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.facebook.com_HiltonPond&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=6hUTMQounavANZ_Ljq64EiNMtp1TpheacYvOWBf_Xfk&s=hGYs85sH5rnG4XGGHuHQ8ThnLzH-alQEGkKiigSX_q4&e= for timely updates on nature topics,
and for info about hummingbirds at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.facebook.com_rubythroats&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=6hUTMQounavANZ_Ljq64EiNMtp1TpheacYvOWBf_Xfk&s=iRmcTYV_h6Vv2bV4jhNRWTg97cXj7-mQ3Im5Af9mNxA&e=

Follow us on Twitter @hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and education for students of all ages.

"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the sunset." BHjr.

============


 

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Date: 9/3/19 6:00 pm
From: scompton1251 <scompton1251...>
Subject: Re: Space available Santee Coastal field trip
Harry,Thanks. I noticed. My step daughter and her wife, and my step son are all medical and emergency personnel in the Charleston area. I lived there 1975-2007 and went through many storms and several evacuations. Four of my photos from the Charleston Christmas Count of 1989 were published in "American Birds", showing Hugo damage on Bulls Island. Craig Watson is a professional biologist who has worked in that area for many years. He will monitor conditions and stay in close communication with the Santee Coastal refuge manager. Thanks for your concern and all you have contributed to ornithology in the Carolinas over the years.Steve ComptonGreenville, SC Sent from my Verizon LG Smartphone------ Original message------From: Harry LeGrandDate: Tue, Sep 3, 2019 4:53 PMTo: Steve Compton;Cc: <carolinabirds...>;<gcbirdclub...>;Subject:Re: Space available Santee Coastal field tripThis isn't a question, but a comment.  As you are based way upstate in Greenville, you may hav
e forgotten that in 2-3 days, Hurricane Dorian may shake up the reserve a bit, with winds potentially of hurricane speed, lots of rain, etc.  So, nobody knows what the place might look like around Sept. 27-28.  You can only hope it is open to the public and ready for visitation then, with most of the RCW cavity trees still standing, the impoundments not full of sand or dikes breached, etc.Of course, this notice involves all coastal birding sites in the Carolinas, as Dorian is expected to move parallel to the coast in the next 2-3 days.  Surely, many coastal birding sites will be off-limits this weekend (Sept. 6-8)..  Security personnel might not let you look for storm birds on the coast this weekend.Harry LeGrandRaleigh  On Tue, Sep 3, 2019 at 1:04 PM <scompton1251...> wrote:Birders,Craig Watson tells me there is space available on the September 27 field trip to the Santee Coastal Reserve and Delta. I am leading the Saturday, September 28 trip, one of the
trips organized by the Carolina Bird Club. The meeting is headquartered in Summerville this years and has a great variety of trips planed to birding hotspots along the coast and coastal plain. Richard Hayes and I scouted the area recently, and Richard has been back since. The reserve is one of SC's best birding locations, an extensive area of pinelands and old rice fields maintained for waterfowl and other species. By September 27 many fall migrants can be expected, as the SC coast is a funnel of birds following the coast on their way to the tropics. Red-cockaded Woodpeckers have been very reliable along the wooded entrance road, and there are about 20,000 acres of wetlands.  Insects should be only moderately bothersome, but
could be a problem, so insect repellant and long pants and shirtsleeves are highly recommended. Orange clothing IS REQUIRED as there is a bow hunt scheduled. Craig Watson, our local expert who is organizing all the trips, is checking with the refuge manager about water levels. If right, we could have a bonanza of shorebirds. Charleston harbor high tide will be 7:12 AM, so we will look for rails in the impoundments in the morning. See the Carolina Bird Club website for registration details. Hope we see you there!Questions about this trip? Glad to answer. Also you should check eBird lists for birds seen in the reserve and delta around this date in recent years.Steve ComptonGreenville, SC


 

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Date: 9/3/19 3:16 pm
From: william haddad (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Yesterday and this morning - migrants very active at Hefner Gap and at Humpback
Mark Thomas birded Hefner yesterday morning while I was birding Humpback
Mountain at my cabIn. He had a large flock at Hefner at 8.am - including an
Eastern Kingbird! I had 10 Warbler species at the cabin with extremely
close looks in the backyard as they found good food in a Blue Spruce and in
my
Rose of Sharon Tree as well as wild vegetation. They were feeding
frantically - most at low levels - and one bird being chased brushed
against me as I sat
in a backyard chair. The action lasted a full three quarters of an hour
there. The Warblers seen (many in multiple numbers) were:as follows:
1. B.T. Greens
2. Chestnut-sided
3.Worm-eating
4. Blackburnian
5. B.T. Blue
6. N. Parula
7. Hooded
8. Black and White
9. Am. Redstart
10. Tennessee

The action continued off and on for another 2 hours, especially close to
the bird feeders for the seed eaters on the side deck. Some of the BT.
Blues and Greens
actually landed on the deck close to the feeders. After 6 pm a pair of
Common Nighthawks came overhead to cap off a very enjoyable day.

Today I joined Mark at Hefner and had much of the same Warblers with some
additions. Mark saw a Yellow-throated Warbler and I saw a Canada Warbler.
We both
had brief looks at a Warbler that was either a Bay-breasted or a Pine.
Both at the cabin yesterday and at Hefner today, I had a three Vireo
morning, with Yellow-
throated out numbering Red-eyed and Blue-headed. One flock at the cabin
yesterday included a Cuckoo but completely in a very shaded area at some
distance
so I could not ID it.

On a more somber note, there is now mature Tall Ragweed, more than in past
years, at Hefner and The Orchard Road and I am suffering accordingly, so if
you
are allergic, come prepared with any meds. Any advice would be appreciated!

Bill Haddad
Spruce Pine, N.C.

 

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Date: 9/3/19 1:53 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Space available Santee Coastal field trip
This isn't a question, but a comment. As you are based way upstate in
Greenville, you may have forgotten that in 2-3 days, *Hurricane Dorian *may
shake up the reserve a bit, with winds potentially of hurricane speed, lots
of rain, etc. So, nobody knows what the place might look like around Sept.
27-28. You can only hope it is open to the public and ready for visitation
then, with most of the RCW cavity trees still standing, the impoundments
not full of sand or dikes breached, etc.

Of course, this notice involves all coastal birding sites in the Carolinas,
as Dorian is expected to move parallel to the coast in the next 2-3 days.
Surely, many coastal birding sites will be off-limits this weekend (Sept.
6-8).. Security personnel might not let you look for storm birds on the
coast this weekend.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Tue, Sep 3, 2019 at 1:04 PM <scompton1251...> wrote:

> Birders,
>
>
> Craig Watson tells me there is space available on the September 27 field
> trip to the Santee Coastal Reserve and Delta. I am leading the Saturday,
> September 28 trip, one of the trips organized by the Carolina Bird Club.
> The meeting is headquartered in Summerville this years and has a great
> variety of trips planed to birding hotspots along the coast and coastal
> plain.
>
>
> Richard Hayes and I scouted the area recently, and Richard has been back
> since. The reserve is one of SC's best birding locations, an extensive area
> of pinelands and old rice fields maintained for waterfowl and other
> species. By September 27 many fall migrants can be expected, as the SC
> coast is a funnel of birds following the coast on their way to the tropics.
> Red-cockaded Woodpeckers have been very reliable along the wooded entrance
> road, and there are about 20,000 acres of wetlands.
>
>
> Insects should be only moderately bothersome, but could be a problem, so
> insect repellant and long pants and shirtsleeves are highly recommended.
> Orange clothing IS REQUIRED as there is a bow hunt scheduled.
>
>
> Craig Watson, our local expert who is organizing all the trips, is
> checking with the refuge manager about water levels. If right, we could
> have a bonanza of shorebirds. Charleston harbor high tide will be 7:12 AM,
> so we will look for rails in the impoundments in the morning.
>
>
> See the Carolina Bird Club website for registration details. Hope we see
> you there!
>
>
> Questions about this trip? Glad to answer. Also you should check eBird
> lists for birds seen in the reserve and delta around this date in recent
> years.
>
>
> Steve Compton
>
> Greenville, SC
>

 

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Date: 9/3/19 10:05 am
From: <scompton1251...>
Subject: Space available Santee Coastal field trip


Birders,

Craig Watson tells me there is space available on the September 27
field trip to the Santee Coastal Reserve and Delta. I am leading the
Saturday, September 28 trip, one of the trips organized by the
Carolina Bird Club. The meeting is headquartered in Summerville this
years and has a great variety of trips planed to birding hotspots
along the coast and coastal plain.

Richard Hayes and I scouted the area recently, and Richard has been
back since. The reserve is one of SC's best birding locations, an
extensive area of pinelands and old rice fields maintained for
waterfowl and other species. By September 27 many fall migrants can be
expected, as the SC coast is a funnel of birds following the coast on
their way to the tropics. Red-cockaded Woodpeckers have been very
reliable along the wooded entrance road, and there are about 20,000
acres of wetlands.

Insects should be only moderately bothersome, but could be a problem,
so insect repellant and long pants and shirtsleeves are highly
recommended. Orange clothing IS REQUIRED as there is a bow hunt
scheduled.

Craig Watson, our local expert who is organizing all the trips, is
checking with the refuge manager about water levels. If right, we
could have a bonanza of shorebirds. Charleston harbor high tide will
be 7:12 AM, so we will look for rails in the impoundments in the
morning.

See the Carolina Bird Club website for registration details. Hope we
see you there!

Questions about this trip? Glad to answer. Also you should check
eBird lists for birds seen in the reserve and delta around this date
in recent years.

Steve Compton

Greenville, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 9/3/19 10:04 am
From: <scompton1251...>
Subject: Space available Santee Coastal field trip


Birders,

Craig Watson tells me there is space available on the September 27
field trip to the Santee Coastal Reserve and Delta. I am leading the
Saturday, September 28 trip, one of the trips organized by the
Carolina Bird Club. The meeting is headquartered in Summerville this
years and has a great variety of trips planed to birding hotspots
along the coast and coastal plain.

Richard Hayes and I scouted the area recently, and Richard has been
back since. The reserve is one of SC's best birding locations, an
extensive area of pinelands and old rice fields maintained for
waterfowl and other species. By September 27 many fall migrants can be
expected, as the SC coast is a funnel of birds following the coast on
their way to the tropics. Red-cockaded Woodpeckers have been very
reliable along the wooded entrance road, and there are about 20,000
acres of wetlands.

Insects should be only moderately bothersome, but could be a problem,
so insect repellant and long pants and shirtsleeves are highly
recommended. Orange clothing IS REQUIRED as there is a bow hunt
scheduled.

Craig Watson, our local expert who is organizing all the trips, is
checking with the refuge manager about water levels. If right, we
could have a bonanza of shorebirds. Charleston harbor high tide will
be 7:12 AM, so we will look for rails in the impoundments in the
morning.

See the Carolina Bird Club website for registration details. Hope we
see you there!

Questions about this trip? Glad to answer. Also you should check
eBird lists for birds seen in the reserve and delta around this date
in recent years.

Steve Compton

Greenville, SC

 

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Date: 9/3/19 8:24 am
From: Loren Hintz <ldhintz...>
Subject: Re: carolinabirds Digest Tue, 03 Sep 2019
3 people have already emailed me about my mistake. My apologies for the error yesterday. I saw many Black Skimmers (adults and juveniles) at New River,Mason and Masonboro Inlets Onslow and Hanover Counties. Too many hours on the road and no proofreading caused the typing error of Razorbills  (NOT seen).

From Loren Hintz Chapel Hill, NC

On Tuesday, September 3, 2019, 6:02:02 AM EDT, <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> wrote:

carolinabirds Digest Tue, 03 Sep 2019

Table of contents:

1. Long-billed Curlew and Reddish Egrets at east Shackleford Banks, NC - "John
    Fussell" <jofuss...>
2. Olive-Sided Flycatcher - evan wunder <evanwun...>
3. Pre hurricane coastal birds New Hanover and Onslow - Loren Hintz
    <ldhintz...>

Yesterday, Steve Howell and I saw a Long-billed Curlew and 3 Reddish Egrets
near the SE end of Shackleford Banks.

The tide was high (extremely high) in the morning and at that time we
checked the ocean (bight) side of the island, where shorebirds frequently
congregate when water levels are high.  That is when we saw the Long-billed
Curlew and a Reddish Egret.  158 Marbled Godwits were a nice count.

Because of the threat of rain and probably also because of hurricane
publicity there were almost no other people there in the morning, a bizarre
occurrence for a Sunday, especially on Labor Day weekend.

When the tide started to fall, we spotted 3 Reddish Egrets on the "Hidden
Flats".  All were dark-morph adults.  (We assume that one of them was the
one we had seen on the ocean side earlier.)

(Because of the strong threat of rain yesterday morning, including lots of
rain and thunderstorms lurking just offshore, it was with some hesitation
that we made our trip to east Shack--where there is no sort of shelter.
After we got out there, showers also started popping up on the adjacent
mainland, but we never got more than a couple of very light sprinkles where
we were.)

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC


Good afternoon everyone,While birding with Alex Marine this morning we had an Olive-Sided Flycatcher at Rough Ridge at 8:30 this morning. Rough Ridge is in Avery county along the parkway near the Linville Cove Viaduct. The bird was seen from the parking lot facing north. It was perched and feeding in some dead trees. Was identified by the darkness on the sides and the large dark bill. It was also displaying white tufts on its side. The bird was still present when we left. Happy Birding,Evan WunderAppalachian State


For Labor Day before the Hurricane, I visited  New River Inlet at North Topsail. Scanning the Marsh near the parking lot I found 1 Yellow-crowned Night-heron with a dozen snowy egrets. There were a number of Sandwich and Royal terns and also shorebirds including two spotted sandpipers, black bellied, wilson and semipalmated plovers. At Wrightsville Beach at Mason Inlet a single Black Tern was flying over the marsh. I found one Wilson Plover and many Semipalmated Plovers. Again there were a number of species of Terns and Gulls. Behind the protection posts and string at Masonboro inlet were almost all the birds that I sighted. Lots of Rudy Turnstones, Terns and Razorbills. Also two banded Oystercatchers (EF8 and CT4)

From Loren Hintz Chapel Hill, NCEnd of carolinabirds Digest Tue, 03 Sep 2019

 

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Date: 9/3/19 6:57 am
From: Loren Hintz <ldhintz...>
Subject: mistake yesterday's post Black Skimmers were seen
My apologies for the error yesterday. I saw many Black Skimmers (adults and juveniles) at New River,Mason and Masonboro Inlets Onslow and Hanover Counties. Too many hours on the road and no proofreading caused the typing error of Razorbills  (NOT seen).

From Loren Hintz Chapel Hill, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/19 6:37 pm
From: Loren Hintz <ldhintz...>
Subject: Pre hurricane coastal birds New Hanover and Onslow
For Labor Day before the Hurricane, I visited  New River Inlet at North Topsail. Scanning the Marsh near the parking lot I found 1 Yellow-crowned Night-heron with a dozen snowy egrets. There were a number of Sandwich and Royal terns and also shorebirds including two spotted sandpipers, black bellied, wilson and semipalmated plovers. At Wrightsville Beach at Mason Inlet a single Black Tern was flying over the marsh. I found one Wilson Plover and many Semipalmated Plovers. Again there were a number of species of Terns and Gulls. Behind the protection posts and string at Masonboro inlet were almost all the birds that I sighted. Lots of Rudy Turnstones, Terns and Razorbills. Also two banded Oystercatchers (EF8 and CT4)

From Loren Hintz Chapel Hill, NC
 

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Date: 9/2/19 11:46 am
From: evan wunder (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Olive-Sided Flycatcher
Good afternoon everyone,
While birding with Alex Marine this morning we had an Olive-Sided
Flycatcher at Rough Ridge at 8:30 this morning. Rough Ridge is in Avery
county along the parkway near the Linville Cove Viaduct. The bird was seen
from the parking lot facing north. It was perched and feeding in some dead
trees. Was identified by the darkness on the sides and the large dark bill.
It was also displaying white tufts on its side. The bird was still present
when we left.
Happy Birding,
Evan Wunder
Appalachian State

 

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Date: 9/2/19 3:03 am
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: Long-billed Curlew and Reddish Egrets at east Shackleford Banks, NC
Yesterday, Steve Howell and I saw a Long-billed Curlew and 3 Reddish Egrets
near the SE end of Shackleford Banks.

The tide was high (extremely high) in the morning and at that time we
checked the ocean (bight) side of the island, where shorebirds frequently
congregate when water levels are high. That is when we saw the Long-billed
Curlew and a Reddish Egret. 158 Marbled Godwits were a nice count.

Because of the threat of rain and probably also because of hurricane
publicity there were almost no other people there in the morning, a bizarre
occurrence for a Sunday, especially on Labor Day weekend.

When the tide started to fall, we spotted 3 Reddish Egrets on the "Hidden
Flats". All were dark-morph adults. (We assume that one of them was the
one we had seen on the ocean side earlier.)

(Because of the strong threat of rain yesterday morning, including lots of
rain and thunderstorms lurking just offshore, it was with some hesitation
that we made our trip to east Shack--where there is no sort of shelter.
After we got out there, showers also started popping up on the adjacent
mainland, but we never got more than a couple of very light sprinkles where
we were.)

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

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Date: 9/1/19 6:47 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Cape Hatteras Salt Pond and Pea Island Birds
Today I joined three others on a one-day trip to the Banks, from Raleigh. The Salt Pond is still quite good, though you need to walk to the south side, as the birds are there, often in the grasses and camphorweed.

Best bird was a BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPER. We had a few Marbled Godwits and Whimbrels, and a few continuing Piping Plovers. We had 6 of the 8 possible terns there. At the blind area of North Pond we added a Black Tern. At the north dike we had a pair of Gull-billeds swooping into marsh grass for feeding. So we found all 8 possible onshore terms. You can check eBird lists for these hotspots.

Note that the Bodie Island Pond is dismal. North Pond had few shorebirds and most are with a tern and gull flock near the blind. And South Pond is also poor, as most birds are on a sandbar on the back - west side, hard to ID birds from NC 12.

Sadly the places will change in a week.. Who knows what the Banks will look like after Dorian crashes the party. Heck, the island might even be inaccessible for a week or more after it passes. Coastal N.C. doesn’t need still another hurricane.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/1/19 4:16 pm
From: Monroe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Red Crossbills at Carver’s Gap/ Kenn & Kim Kaufman
I attended on Saturday Friends of Roan Mountain Naturalist Rally ( the 57 th Annual) mainly to hear and see Kenn and Kim Kaufman speak. The Kaufman’s gave an excellent talk on bird migration ( Kenn has a new book on the topic) and Kim enthusiastically spoke of McGee Marsh and the Black Swamp Bird Observatory of NW Ohio. Red Crossbills were seen and well photographed during the Saturday morning field trips at Carver’s Gap. I was on a geology of the Roan Highlands field trip on Saturday afternoon but no crossbills were to be seen. I got up to Carver’s Gap at about 8:30 this morning and it did not take long to find the crossbills. They were literally on the border and flying back and forth. In fact on one occasion I followed them from Carter Co. TN into Mitchell Co. NC. For a while they posed on the top rail of the split rail fences lining the highway. A wonderful morning to be in the mountains.


Monroe Pannell
Conover NC
Catawba County

 

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Date: 9/1/19 10:11 am
From: Birding Poet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Swallow-tailed Kite
There have been a few I’ve pulled over for, seen on Savannah Highway near
the Clemson Coastal Research & Education Center. MIKIs hang out near there,
as well.

On Sun, Sep 1, 2019 at 1:04 PM Chris Snook <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Saw a pair of Swallow-tailed Kites soaring over Orange Grove Road in
> Charleston ant about 11:30 this morning. Almost caused an accident
> getting confirmation. Normally only see the breeding Mississippi Kites
> in this area.
>
> Chris Snook,
> Charleston, SC
>
--
~Tracee 843/425-7630

 

Back to top
Date: 9/1/19 10:04 am
From: Chris Snook (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Swallow-tailed Kite
Saw a pair of Swallow-tailed Kites soaring over Orange Grove Road in
Charleston ant about 11:30 this morning. Almost caused an accident
getting confirmation. Normally only see the breeding Mississippi Kites
in this area.

Chris Snook,
Charleston, SC
 

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Date: 9/1/19 8:05 am
From: Craig Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Possible Magnificent Frigatebird Shem Creek, Mount Pleasant, SC
Elizabeth Anderegg relayed to me that’s she’s 90% positive a Magnificent
Frigatebird flew over her at Shem Creek about 9am this morning, folks
birding in the area may want to be aware.

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

 

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Date: 9/1/19 7:08 am
From: rdnc13 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Am Golden-Plover at Vandemark Sod (I-95 and NC 33)
Hi folks

One Am Golden-Plover, as always, scoped from the road. Not much else except a few Leasts and one Pectoral.

Later, Ricky

Ricky Davis
Rocky Mount, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/1/19 5:00 am
From: Miskiewicz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Swan Goose with Greyleg Goose in Angier
While visiting Angier this past week I saw a swan goose paired with a
grey-leg goose. I'm pretty sure this is the same couple I saw there
frequently in the spring.

According to a bird the swan goose is a rare sighting here so I wanted to
point it out, for awareness and confirmation.

I posted a photo of both on ebird on Aug. 49. Can photos be posted here
directly to this email?

Thanks!

Kimberly Miskiewicz
Raleigh, NC

 

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Date: 8/31/19 9:34 am
From: ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: rfi-az, nm, west tx
Oops

Meant to send to Lee

On Sat, Aug 31, 2019 at 12:33 PM ann maddock <
<am.hummingbird.photos...> wrote:

> Hi Robert
> I am returning tonight from 9 PHENOMENAL birding days in southeastern
> Arizona.
>
> I have some recommendations and will send you the info in next day or so
> Ann
>
>
> On Sat, Aug 31, 2019 at 10:12 AM Robert Lewis <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, west Texas covers a lot of territory. Not
>> sure what route you've planned.
>>
>> For New Mexico, check out Birding in New Mexico
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.audubon.org_news_birding-2Dnew-2Dmexico&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JuAq_T70v0Ey7EoavfzEaCVne-2RrazRlOIaMNXwDzM&s=2Mj0Q7nxA5dpemblrc9y6ih6tD7wtvYCFoim2hlqkAk&e=>
>>
>>
>> Birding in New Mexico
>>
>>
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.audubon.org_news_birding-2Dnew-2Dmexico&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JuAq_T70v0Ey7EoavfzEaCVne-2RrazRlOIaMNXwDzM&s=2Mj0Q7nxA5dpemblrc9y6ih6tD7wtvYCFoim2hlqkAk&e=>
>>
>> Bob Lewis
>> Sleepy Hollow NY
>>
>>
>> On Saturday, August 31, 2019, 9:33:12 AM EDT, lee van malssen <
>> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>>
>> embarking on a 2 month birding and sightseeing trip to western usa.
>> primary states of interest are arizona, new mexico and west texas. have
>> books on birding hot spots but any recommendations for places to not miss
>> or special birds i should aim for are welcome. leaving sept 8th but
>> heading directly to utah to do volunteer work before starting the birding,
>> etc. leaving the animal sanctuary on sept 20th. do plan to do a little
>> sightseeing in utah before heading to arizona.
>>
>> thanks in advance for all help.
>>
>> lee van malssen
>>
> --
>> Lee Van Malssen
>> Chatham Cty, NC
>>
> --
> Ask me about my upcoming book - a photo essay of North American and
> Caribbean Hummingbirds!
>
> Ann Maddock
> <am.hummingbird.photos...>
> Hatteras Island, NC
>
--
Ask me about my upcoming book - a photo essay of North American and
Caribbean Hummingbirds!

Ann Maddock
<am.hummingbird.photos...>
Hatteras Island, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/19 9:33 am
From: ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: rfi-az, nm, west tx
Hi Robert
I am returning tonight from 9 PHENOMENAL birding days in southeastern
Arizona.

I have some recommendations and will send you the info in next day or so
Ann


On Sat, Aug 31, 2019 at 10:12 AM Robert Lewis <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, west Texas covers a lot of territory. Not sure
> what route you've planned.
>
> For New Mexico, check out Birding in New Mexico
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.audubon.org_news_birding-2Dnew-2Dmexico&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JuAq_T70v0Ey7EoavfzEaCVne-2RrazRlOIaMNXwDzM&s=2Mj0Q7nxA5dpemblrc9y6ih6tD7wtvYCFoim2hlqkAk&e=>
>
>
> Birding in New Mexico
>
>
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.audubon.org_news_birding-2Dnew-2Dmexico&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JuAq_T70v0Ey7EoavfzEaCVne-2RrazRlOIaMNXwDzM&s=2Mj0Q7nxA5dpemblrc9y6ih6tD7wtvYCFoim2hlqkAk&e=>
>
> Bob Lewis
> Sleepy Hollow NY
>
>
> On Saturday, August 31, 2019, 9:33:12 AM EDT, lee van malssen <
> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
>
> embarking on a 2 month birding and sightseeing trip to western usa.
> primary states of interest are arizona, new mexico and west texas. have
> books on birding hot spots but any recommendations for places to not miss
> or special birds i should aim for are welcome. leaving sept 8th but
> heading directly to utah to do volunteer work before starting the birding,
> etc. leaving the animal sanctuary on sept 20th. do plan to do a little
> sightseeing in utah before heading to arizona.
>
> thanks in advance for all help.
>
> lee van malssen
> --
> Lee Van Malssen
> Chatham Cty, NC
>
--
Ask me about my upcoming book - a photo essay of North American and
Caribbean Hummingbirds!

Ann Maddock
<am.hummingbird.photos...>
Hatteras Island, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/19 7:13 am
From: Robert Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: rfi-az, nm, west tx
Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, west Texas covers a lot of territory.  Not sure what route you've planned.
For New Mexico, check out Birding in New Mexico


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Birding in New Mexico


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Bob LewisSleepy Hollow NY

On Saturday, August 31, 2019, 9:33:12 AM EDT, lee van malssen <carolinabirds...> wrote:

embarking on a 2 month birding and sightseeing trip to western usa.  primary states of interest are arizona, new mexico and west texas. have books on birding hot spots but any recommendations for places to not miss or special birds i should aim for are welcome.  leaving sept 8th but heading directly to utah to do volunteer work before starting the birding, etc.  leaving the animal sanctuary on sept 20th.  do plan to do a little sightseeing in utah before heading to arizona.
thanks in advance for all help.
lee van malssen --
Lee Van Malssen
Chatham Cty, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/19 6:42 am
From: scompton1251 <scompton1251...>
Subject: Re: rfi-az, nm, west tx
Lee,Portal in the Chiricahuas, SEAZ. Central Utah and southern Utah. The Wasach Range near Ferron, Utah is lightly birded but excellent. Steve ComptonGreenville, SCSent from my Verizon LG Smartphone------ Original message------From: lee van malssen Date: Sat, Aug 31, 2019 9:33 AMTo: carolinabirds;Cc: Subject:rfi-az, nm, west txembarking on a 2 month birding and sightseeing trip to western usa.  primary states of interest are arizona, new mexico and west texas. have books on birding hot spots but any recommendations for places to not miss or special birds i should aim for are welcome.  leaving sept 8th but heading directly to utah to do volunteer work before starting the birding, etc.  leaving the animal sanctuary on sept 20th.  do plan to do a little sightseeing in utah before heading to arizona.thanks in advance for all help.lee van malssen -- Lee Van MalssenChatham Cty, NC

 

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Date: 8/31/19 6:33 am
From: lee van malssen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: rfi-az, nm, west tx
embarking on a 2 month birding and sightseeing trip to western usa.
primary states of interest are arizona, new mexico and west texas. have
books on birding hot spots but any recommendations for places to not miss
or special birds i should aim for are welcome. leaving sept 8th but
heading directly to utah to do volunteer work before starting the birding,
etc. leaving the animal sanctuary on sept 20th. do plan to do a little
sightseeing in utah before heading to arizona.

thanks in advance for all help.

lee van malssen
--
Lee Van Malssen
Chatham Cty, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 8/30/19 4:56 pm
From: Jessie Dale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: common nighthawks, banner elk, nc
saw 50+common nighthawks pass over in one group (about 30 seconds) as i was leaving work this evening in the tynecastle/banner elk/sugar mountain area.

jessie dale
linville, nc
avery county
 

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Date: 8/30/19 1:04 pm
From: Josh Southern (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Migrants starting to move through central NC
I had three Baltimore Orioles and a Worm-eating Warbler among the usual
birds at Bass Lake in Wake County this morning. It's still slow
diversity-wise but I'm looking forward to what's to come over the next
couple of months.

Though I haven't seen any posts yet, Common Nighthawks should start moving
over us any day now, so don't forget to look up if you're outside about an
hour before sunset.

Good Birding,
Josh Southern
Holly Springs, NC

 

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Date: 8/29/19 3:25 pm
From: Marilyn Westphal <mjwestph...>
Subject: Ridge Junction-Blue Ridge Parkway
Some early migrants showing up at Ridge Junction (mile 355 on the Blue
Ridge Parkway). Still fairly quiet, but a nice bunch of birds along the
road up to Mt Mitchell SP about 1/4 mile up from the parkway, including
some true blue migrants (ie don't breed in this area, so sure they came
from elsewhere). These were:
Olive-sided Flycatcher - flycatching from the dead branches at the top of a
tall spruce tree. Stuck around for quite a while.
Tennessee Warbler - 2
Magnolia Warbler - 1
Cape May Warbler - 2
along with some local breeders like Black-throated Green, Black-throated
Blue, Blackburnian, Ovenbird, Canada Warblers, Blue-headed and Red-eyed
Vireos, Scarlet Tanager, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, RT Hummingbirds zipping up
and down the road, Blue-gray Gnatcatchers, Pine Siskin, Red-breasted
Nuthatch, Waxwings and a few others.
Beautiful morning. Nice weather forecasted for the next few days, so
hopefully some more good birding.
Marilyn

--
Marilyn Westphal
Hendersonville, NC

 

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Date: 8/29/19 7:33 am
From: Kevin Hudson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Falls Lake black terns
Not present 9 am 8/29 at Sandling Beach (lonely herring gull still hanging
out). I also checked Beaverdam & boat ramp, no luck.
Park fees were waived when I asked nicely to just check beaches.

Kevin Hudson

>
>

 

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Date: 8/29/19 5:54 am
From: Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Olive-sided Flycatcher - Fants Grove WMA (Anderson Co., SC)
Good Morning. Another birder and I watched the snags from about 7-8 AM this
morning (Thu. 8/29) and did not see the Olive-sided Flycatcher. We also did
not see much insect activity, so maybe it is waiting for better feeding
conditions.

Kevin Kubach
Greenville/Clemson, SC


On Wed, Aug 28, 2019 at 8:05 PM Kevin Kubach <kmkubach...> wrote:

> Good Evening, Birders.
>
> Two birders had good views of an Olive-sided Flycatcher this afternoon in
> Fants Grove Wildlife Management Area in northern Anderson Co., SC. The bird
> was flycatching from the highest perches in the tallest snags in a scrubby
> cut-over area about 3/4 mile southwest of the "Big Oaks" parking area. A
> couple rough photos are available in this eBird checklist:
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S59334995&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=rd_weWcSFjk8OVDxM9BEuvSUGLKhCviYv7G4PEr330c&s=je8c3QccZSVX_GPPIABYDJNiee0rVHUUZRsC1JmyMKw&e= .
>
> Parking is available at the "Big Oaks" gravel parking area:
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__goo.gl_maps_QSazzTYwVRHvNqsy8&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=rd_weWcSFjk8OVDxM9BEuvSUGLKhCviYv7G4PEr330c&s=AXmAdxIIXudWuwJCif4Hh_d2OjJBG4GHAC7VOXBJkvs&e=
>
> Walk the gated dirt/gravel road (Ridge Road), which is adjacent to the
> parking area, for about 3/4 mile southwest (stay left on the main road at
> the first "fork") to where the big, open scrubby area is on your right
> (west) side. This is an easy, gently sloping road. The bird was up on the
> big snags...here: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__goo.gl_maps_EDCDv34bZW1MZCaf6&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=rd_weWcSFjk8OVDxM9BEuvSUGLKhCviYv7G4PEr330c&s=QS2bFBtLKtAK50q3vq8pvuflhfiYL1fQvpoNQjVT-j8&e= .
>
> Some important notes:
>
> A few deer flies ("yellow flies") are still hanging around, so plan
> accordingly.
>
> The National Champs open the season tomorrow evening (Thu. 8/29) just a
> few miles up the road in Clemson and traffic in the area for the next
> couple days will probably reflect this.
>
> Good Birding,
>
> Kevin Kubach
> Greenville/Clemson, SC
>

 

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Date: 8/28/19 5:12 pm
From: Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Olive-sided Flycatcher - Fants Grove WMA (Anderson Co., SC)
Also, for eBirders: Fants Grove WMA is an eBird Hotspot, so please log any
reports accordingly (to the "Fants Grove Wildlife Management Area," not the
similarly named "Waterfowl Area").

Thanks,
Kevin Kubach
Greenville/Clemson, SC

On Wed, Aug 28, 2019 at 8:05 PM Kevin Kubach <kmkubach...> wrote:

> Good Evening, Birders.
>
> Two birders had good views of an Olive-sided Flycatcher this afternoon in
> Fants Grove Wildlife Management Area in northern Anderson Co., SC. The bird
> was flycatching from the highest perches in the tallest snags in a scrubby
> cut-over area about 3/4 mile southwest of the "Big Oaks" parking area. A
> couple rough photos are available in this eBird checklist:
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S59334995&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=2v0ZXqw5FmelYlPQh8sIvam-w7QNveWrmAidJFg4kaY&s=dldCx20jXipgkg3O6hLAOWud29AwVrP6MopT7haboJs&e= .
>
> Parking is available at the "Big Oaks" gravel parking area:
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__goo.gl_maps_QSazzTYwVRHvNqsy8&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=2v0ZXqw5FmelYlPQh8sIvam-w7QNveWrmAidJFg4kaY&s=ZzPF4cmE9kXKXCFPWwQUFmQiGlDhV_Uj9D7cVdTtQPg&e=
>
> Walk the gated dirt/gravel road (Ridge Road), which is adjacent to the
> parking area, for about 3/4 mile southwest (stay left on the main road at
> the first "fork") to where the big, open scrubby area is on your right
> (west) side. This is an easy, gently sloping road. The bird was up on the
> big snags...here: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__goo.gl_maps_EDCDv34bZW1MZCaf6&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=2v0ZXqw5FmelYlPQh8sIvam-w7QNveWrmAidJFg4kaY&s=rA7EaBKubfeySSzrgO0OwdDJwCEty5RA2vz374HgDHk&e= .
>
> Some important notes:
>
> A few deer flies ("yellow flies") are still hanging around, so plan
> accordingly.
>
> The National Champs open the season tomorrow evening (Thu. 8/29) just a
> few miles up the road in Clemson and traffic in the area for the next
> couple days will probably reflect this.
>
> Good Birding,
>
> Kevin Kubach
> Greenville/Clemson, SC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/28/19 5:06 pm
From: Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Olive-sided Flycatcher - Fants Grove WMA (Anderson Co., SC)
Good Evening, Birders.

Two birders had good views of an Olive-sided Flycatcher this afternoon in
Fants Grove Wildlife Management Area in northern Anderson Co., SC. The bird
was flycatching from the highest perches in the tallest snags in a scrubby
cut-over area about 3/4 mile southwest of the "Big Oaks" parking area. A
couple rough photos are available in this eBird checklist:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S59334995&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=VouRYjqGtEn6RS34lKCL7sQ8RRuiZDVUv9hgNKpjdyM&s=shUVFTWqCjmrX9-4HjQ5kovVJcA2Tm6lsODRImXkuaA&e= .

Parking is available at the "Big Oaks" gravel parking area:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__goo.gl_maps_QSazzTYwVRHvNqsy8&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=VouRYjqGtEn6RS34lKCL7sQ8RRuiZDVUv9hgNKpjdyM&s=qJguRiSnqSRySDOkthP1RUGvw_Y3v8qvguKGg13Yr1A&e=

Walk the gated dirt/gravel road (Ridge Road), which is adjacent to the
parking area, for about 3/4 mile southwest (stay left on the main road at
the first "fork") to where the big, open scrubby area is on your right
(west) side. This is an easy, gently sloping road. The bird was up on the
big snags...here: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__goo.gl_maps_EDCDv34bZW1MZCaf6&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=VouRYjqGtEn6RS34lKCL7sQ8RRuiZDVUv9hgNKpjdyM&s=6XOJPAYjD1wDdMelfkcujnhmMdwf0Rbi1Bem7RoA3Fk&e= .

Some important notes:

A few deer flies ("yellow flies") are still hanging around, so plan
accordingly.

The National Champs open the season tomorrow evening (Thu. 8/29) just a few
miles up the road in Clemson and traffic in the area for the next couple
days will probably reflect this.

Good Birding,

Kevin Kubach
Greenville/Clemson, SC

 

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Date: 8/28/19 9:22 am
From: Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Falls Lake black terns and not too exciting herring gull
A quick stop at Sandling Beach today around 9am found 8 black terns, all
non breeding plumage and one juvenile herring gull on the beach. It then
flew over my head, circled and landed near my feet, begging for food or
recognizing the green and gray park uniform? No sign of the juvenile
little gull but it's a big lake and when I left the black terns were
nowhere to seen, maybe they were up Ledge Creek towards the boat ramp.

Sandling and Rollingview are still charging $7 vehicle entry fee up until
5pm, and park is open until 9pm. As of Sep 1 parks close at 8pm. After
labor day vehicle entry fee only on weekends.

--
Brian Bockhahn
<birdranger248...>

 

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Date: 8/28/19 4:15 am
From: Peter Vankevich (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: White-winged Dove on Ocracoke
On Sunday afternoon, Aug. 26, a White-winged Dove appeared in my yard and
flew up to the telephone wire in the Widgeon Woods section of Ocracoke,
near the lighthouse. I put bird seed on the ground, and it was feeding
with the many Eurasian Collared and Mourning Doves. It has not reappeared.
I work on my porch, so I’ve been on the lookout for it. This is the second
time I’ve seen one in the yard. A few years ago, one was reported on a
Wings Over Water field trip. A few days later, I saw one here. I think this
is an unusual time of the year for one to show up. I got a very good look
at it, but it left by the time I got my camera. /Pete Vankevich

 

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Date: 8/27/19 5:48 pm
From: Jelmer Poelstra (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: exciting gull at Falls Lake
Just a brief note that we now think we can safely call the bird discussed
in this thread a Little Gull. Any nagging doubts about the remote
possibility of a Ross's were squashed by Bruce's confidence in having seen
a black terminal band across the entire tail, as well as a clear vagrancy
pattern: first-cycle Ross's mostly turn up from mid- to late winter (just a
single October record in Scotland was the earliest non-arctic appearance of
a first-year bird that I could find). Records of August juvenile Little
Gulls quite far south, on the other hand, are not too hard to find --e.g. 3
together on an Aug 14th in Colorado--, though not close to the Atlantic
coast. As for plumage, the shoulder patch is among the last to disappear in
the juv to first-winter molt, such that a more Kittiwake-like appearance is
indeed possible. Still, this early in the year, it is likely that this bird
did have some dark markings that we did not notice on the back and
scapulars.

Good birding,

Jelmer Poelstra
Durham

On Sun, Aug 25, 2019 at 10:54 AM Jelmer Poelstra <jelmerpoelstra...>
wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> I first noticed this Gull from Rolling View yesterday at about 4:20 pm,
> within a group of Common Terns, but soon went to Sandling Beach since the
> birds were much closer to that shore. That turned out to be a bad choice,
> as the group had moved westwards *passed* Rolling View by the time I
> arrived at Sandling. They did come back to the area between Rolling View
> and Sandling Beach several times but never close by. I don't think I ever
> saw the bird closer than at about 1-2,000 ft. but did see it for extended
> periods of time (15+ minutes in the scope).
>
> I tried to take both pictures and phone-scoped videos of the bird when the
> group got a little closer but failed -- the bird wasn't identifiable among
> the mass of terns on the phone or camera screen. This just got me very
> frustrated as I was missing opportunities to see the bird better. I also
> attempted to post to Carolinabirds soon after I first saw the bird, by
> replying to Brian B's message, but in my haste only replied to him.
>
> A couple of the features noted:
> * Striking black W on upperwing.
> * Outside of the W, the upperwing appeared pale. Thus on the arm, there
> was pale both in front of the diagonal band (i.e., not at all a
> Sabine's-patern) and behind it, with entirely whitish secondaries (e.g. not
> the black trailing edge of Bonaparte's).
> * Obvious shoulder patch reminiscent of Black Tern, likely continuing up
> the top of the neck.
> * No obvious dark on head.
> * Gray back that appeared unmarked.
> * Black terminal tail band, though I am unsure whether it went across the
> entire tail or was limited to the central tail feathers.
> * Rather similar in size to the Common Terns it was flying amidst, but
> slightly smaller, both in terms of body size and wingspan.
> * Flight style also very similar to the Common Terns, but slightly
> flappier. (I did note it first by flight style and then noticed the W when
> zooming in. Nevertheless, the flight style in combination with the size
> made it surprisingly easy to overlook at a distance among the terns.)
>
> I went back-and-forth on the ID. I initially identified it as a Kittiwake,
> taking the black shoulder patch to be diagnostic. But as I started paying
> more attention to the fact that the bird was slightly smaller rather than
> clearly bigger and bulkier than the Common Terns, that seemed untenable. I
> still excluded Little Gull based on the shoulder patch, white secondaries,
> and no apparent dark on the head -- and when I thought I saw that the black
> on the tail was limited to slightly protruding central tail feathers, I for
> a while thought Ross's.
>
> However, I had completely overlooked the fact that juvenile Little Gulls,
> before moulting to the 1st winter plumage we are more used to seeing them
> in, do have a big dark spot on the upper side of the breast. Moreover,
> looking at some pictures of various 1cy Little Gulls, the dark secondary
> markings seem rather variable and can be absent or nearly so. Finally, the
> appearance of a pale head can possibly be blamed on the distance (i.e.,
> overlooking the cap). But to keep things puzzling all the same, an
> unmoulted juvenile Little Gull should, in addition to the black shoulder
> patch, also show dark markings on much of the back -- and the back appeared
> an unmarked gray. Can the dark back molt to gray before the shoulder patch?
>
> All in all, I think the size as described fully excludes Kittiwake, and
> think the bird is most likely to have been a Little Gull. But given some
> puzzling apparent features of the plumage, I still have trouble excluding
> Ross's, however unlikely. But any feedback is welcome! (For instance, I
> wonder if the timing of breeding and dispersal would make a 1cy of any of
> these 3 species a priori out of the question as early as late August.)
>
> I also briefly saw an adult Laughing Gull flying east to west almost right
> over Rolling View before I noted the other gull, so plenty of excitement
> going around from the get-go. Otherwise, the 3 Black Terns that Brian B.
> reported earlier were still there, as were at least 4 Caspian Terns and a
> single Forster's Tern, making for four species of tern.
>
> Good birding,
>
> Jelmer Poelstra
> Durham
>
>
> On Sat, Aug 24, 2019 at 9:09 PM bruce young <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> Jelmer Poelstra reported a juvenile Black-legged Kittwake around 5:00 and
>> I got there a little after 6 right about the time he postulated it might
>> just be a Ross's Gull (!!!). At that point he was at Sandling beach and I
>> was at Rolling View. Brian Bockhahn joined me maybe 30 minutes later.
>> I had one sustained 4-5 minute view and a couple of shorter ones in my
>> scope of the flying bird. It was never exactly close and I was near top
>> power on my scope (60x) for most of it and the birds did not stop at any
>> time. It was a gray day with night coming on.
>> I believe it was a Kittiwake.
>> It was flying mostly with a group of Caspian Terns. It was noticeably
>> smaller and more compact than them. There were a couple of Common and at
>> least 1 Black Tern around but I never got a good size comparison with them.
>> The most noticeable plumage feature was the broad black M across the
>> wings comprising the front of the wings to the outer primary tips then back
>> to the base of the wings through the coverts. The M was not neat more messy
>> and broad. Other than the outer primaries the rest of the flight feathers
>> were pale. Mantle was light gray. Underwings pale
>> The tail was square with a black band going clear across the tail from
>> side to side.
>> There was a small black ear patch and a larger black area on the side of
>> the neck which may have met as a collar in back but couldn't really tell.
>> Other than Ross's, Little and Sabines were also mooted. Sabines is out
>> with the pale mantle and full black M. I believe Ross's is out based o n
>> the tail shape, the black bar going all the way across the tail and the
>> black collar. Little Gull is tougher. There was a lot of black on the top
>> of the wing but I didn't see a black patch at the base of the secondaries
>> or a black cap and I did see the black collar especially on the sides of
>> the neck. Plus I don't think it was quite that small.
>> Bruce Young
>> <byoung715...>
>> Durham, NC
>>
>
>
> --
> Jelmer Poelstra
> 311 Biological Sciences Building, Biology Department
> Duke University Durham, NC
> Email: <jelmerpoelstra...> / <jelmer.poelstra...>
> Phone: (+1) 919-260-8253
>


--
Jelmer Poelstra
311 Biological Sciences Building, Biology Department
Duke University Durham, NC
Email: <jelmerpoelstra...> / <jelmer.poelstra...>
Phone: (+1) 919-260-8253

 

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Date: 8/27/19 11:44 am
From: Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fwd: Orangeburg Sod Farms
All,

Here is the offical policy.

Dennis

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe...>
Date: Tue, Aug 27, 2019 at 2:40 PM
Subject: Re: Orangeburg Sod Farms
To: Martha R. Burleson <mburleson...>


thanks. I will forward your message to the people

On Tue, Aug 27, 2019 at 1:53 PM Martha R. Burleson <mburleson...>
wrote:

> Mr. Forsythe,
> In speaking with the farm manager, he doesn’t mind anyone coming to the
> farm on weekends. I just thought, I would let you know. I saw your email
> and didn’t want you to worry. There are dove hunts sometimes around the
> farm this time of year. Hopefully, no one finds this offensive.
> Best regards,
> Martha Burleson
> Office Manager
> Super-Sod Orangeburg
> 843-540-9800
>
> Get Outlook for iOS <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__aka.ms_o0ukef&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=WB7v5q6zmsS74hhMOwVYe4bLlFGf1gYmPoM1xsap2Xk&s=S6S33Ip0kiiMSuI7hbVqTwD0bDSJbEXR3iiwoc2TFdQ&e= >
> ------------------------------
> *From:* Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe...>
> *Sent:* Tuesday, August 27, 2019 1:09:02 PM
> *To:* Christopher Hill <Chill...>
> *Cc:* Carolinabirds <Carolinabirds...>; Ron <waxwing...>
> *Subject:* Re: Orangeburg Sod Farms
>
> I assume you got permission to visit the sod farm Sunday when the office
> is closed
>
> On Tue, Aug 27, 2019 at 12:30 PM Christopher Hill <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> That’s a great list, but the question marks have me confused. Does that
>> mean the numbers are uncertain, or….?
>>
>> The two sets of question marks on the snipe line were particularly
>> cryptic. :-)
>>
>> Chris Hill
>> Conway, SC
>>
>> > On Aug 27, 2019, at 12:24 PM, Ron <waxwing...> wrote:
>> >
>> > Mecklenburg Audubon had a trip there on Sunday and found quite a few
>> shorebirds. Nine Wood Storks flew over in the afternoon.
>> >
>> > Least Sandpiper - 100+
>> > Killdeer - 100+
>> > Western Sandpiper - 30+
>> > Sanderling ??? 6
>> > Pectoral sandpiper - 40+
>> > Lesser Yellowlegs ??? 3
>> > White-rumped Sandpiper
>> > Solitary Sandpiper
>> > Wilson???s Snipe ??? 10+
>> > Dowitcher sp. - 2
>> >
>> > Ron Clark
>> > Kings Mtn. NC
>>
>> --
> Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
> South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
> South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
> Emeritus Professor of Biology
> The Citadel
> 171 Moultrie St,
> Charleston, SC 29409
> 843.795.3996-home
> 843.953.7264-fax
> 843.708.1605-cell
> <dennis.forsythe...>
>


--
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>


--
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/27/19 11:43 am
From: Birding Poet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Protocol for birding Orangeburg Sod Farms
All:

The original email with all the logos and attachments was too large to send
to the listserv. This is copied and pasted directly from an email from the
office at the sod farms.

Might be good to keep on file for future reference.

‘Ms. Clapper,

It was nice speaking with you. We are happy to have birders come onto the
property and see all the different birds we have here. There are some rules
we ask that you abide by:


1. Please check in with the main office. This allows us to alert the
farm that they might see an unusual car on the roads back there.
2. Stay on the roads. We ask that you do not leave the main roads to get
a better view. There is a chance you could damage the sod or get stuck in
the fields.
3. We are happy to have you come on the weekends. (Might be better for
you as traffic would be greatly reduced) We do ask that you call the main
office 803-531-4443 on the Friday before and let us know when you might
be coming so we can alert weekend staff that they might see someone outside
the norm on the roads.


If you have any other questions feel free to reach out to me.

Sincerely,



Webb Porter



*Super-Sod *

*office main:* 803-531-4443

*office direct:* 803-937-4051
*address:* 3086 Five Chop Road, Orangeburg, SC 29115
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps_search_3086-2BFive-2BChop-2BRoad-2C-2BOrangeburg-2C-2BSC-2B29115-3Fentry-3Dgmail-26source-3Dg&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=bbAgZb2UlxsyfCLSf3WWk2Wp-poUXP2kuw5pUTQv5Js&s=NePlqWf_2TjQi29YySYeiptAADyX12cg0ZbkEhYU1wM&e= >
--
~Tracee 843/425-7630

 

Back to top
Date: 8/27/19 11:06 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Orangeburg Sod Farms
Well, an obsessively rigorous birder might argue you can’t be sure the snipe sp. were Wilson’s and not Common. :-). Most of us would agree you CAN be too careful.

CH

> On Aug 27, 2019, at 1:48 PM, Ron <waxwing...> wrote:
>
> Beats me Chris. It looks like my computer replaced some of the hyphens and one apostrophe with question marks. Maybe HAL is rebelling again!
>
> Sorry for the confusion.
>
> Ron
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message----- From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
> Sent: Tuesday, August 27, 2019 12:30 PM
> To: Ron
> Cc: Carolinabirds
> Subject: Re: Orangeburg Sod Farms
>
> That???s a great list, but the question marks have me confused. Does that mean the numbers are uncertain, or???.?
>
> The two sets of question marks on the snipe line were particularly cryptic. :-)
>
> Chris Hill
> Conway, SC
>
>> On Aug 27, 2019, at 12:24 PM, Ron <waxwing...> wrote:
>>
>> Mecklenburg Audubon had a trip there on Sunday and found quite a few shorebirds. Nine Wood Storks flew over in the afternoon.
>>
>> Least Sandpiper - 100+
>> Killdeer - 100+
>> Western Sandpiper - 30+
>> Sanderling ??? 6
>> Pectoral sandpiper - 40+
>> Lesser Yellowlegs ??? 3
>> White-rumped Sandpiper
>> Solitary Sandpiper
>> Wilson???s Snipe ??? 10+
>> Dowitcher sp. - 2
>>
>> Ron Clark
>> Kings Mtn. NC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/27/19 10:49 am
From: Ron <waxwing...>
Subject: Re: Orangeburg Sod Farms
Beats me Chris. It looks like my computer replaced some of the hyphens and
one apostrophe with question marks. Maybe HAL is rebelling again!

Sorry for the confusion.

Ron




-----Original Message-----
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
Sent: Tuesday, August 27, 2019 12:30 PM
To: Ron
Cc: Carolinabirds
Subject: Re: Orangeburg Sod Farms

That???s a great list, but the question marks have me confused. Does that
mean the numbers are uncertain, or???.?

The two sets of question marks on the snipe line were particularly cryptic.
:-)

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

> On Aug 27, 2019, at 12:24 PM, Ron <waxwing...> wrote:
>
> Mecklenburg Audubon had a trip there on Sunday and found quite a few
> shorebirds. Nine Wood Storks flew over in the afternoon.
>
> Least Sandpiper - 100+
> Killdeer - 100+
> Western Sandpiper - 30+
> Sanderling ??? 6
> Pectoral sandpiper - 40+
> Lesser Yellowlegs ??? 3
> White-rumped Sandpiper
> Solitary Sandpiper
> Wilson???s Snipe ??? 10+
> Dowitcher sp. - 2
>
> Ron Clark
> Kings Mtn. NC

 

Back to top
Date: 8/27/19 10:10 am
From: Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Orangeburg Sod Farms
I assume you got permission to visit the sod farm Sunday when the office is
closed

On Tue, Aug 27, 2019 at 12:30 PM Christopher Hill <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> That’s a great list, but the question marks have me confused. Does that
> mean the numbers are uncertain, or….?
>
> The two sets of question marks on the snipe line were particularly
> cryptic. :-)
>
> Chris Hill
> Conway, SC
>
> > On Aug 27, 2019, at 12:24 PM, Ron <waxwing...> wrote:
> >
> > Mecklenburg Audubon had a trip there on Sunday and found quite a few
> shorebirds. Nine Wood Storks flew over in the afternoon.
> >
> > Least Sandpiper - 100+
> > Killdeer - 100+
> > Western Sandpiper - 30+
> > Sanderling ??? 6
> > Pectoral sandpiper - 40+
> > Lesser Yellowlegs ??? 3
> > White-rumped Sandpiper
> > Solitary Sandpiper
> > Wilson???s Snipe ??? 10+
> > Dowitcher sp. - 2
> >
> > Ron Clark
> > Kings Mtn. NC
>
> --
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/27/19 9:31 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Orangeburg Sod Farms
That’s a great list, but the question marks have me confused. Does that mean the numbers are uncertain, or….?

The two sets of question marks on the snipe line were particularly cryptic. :-)

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

> On Aug 27, 2019, at 12:24 PM, Ron <waxwing...> wrote:
>
> Mecklenburg Audubon had a trip there on Sunday and found quite a few shorebirds. Nine Wood Storks flew over in the afternoon.
>
> Least Sandpiper - 100+
> Killdeer - 100+
> Western Sandpiper - 30+
> Sanderling ??? 6
> Pectoral sandpiper - 40+
> Lesser Yellowlegs ??? 3
> White-rumped Sandpiper
> Solitary Sandpiper
> Wilson???s Snipe ??? 10+
> Dowitcher sp. - 2
>
> Ron Clark
> Kings Mtn. NC

 

Back to top
Date: 8/27/19 9:25 am
From: Ron <waxwing...>
Subject: Orangeburg Sod Farms
Mecklenburg Audubon had a trip there on Sunday and found quite a few
shorebirds. Nine Wood Storks flew over in the afternoon.

Least Sandpiper - 100+
Killdeer - 100+
Western Sandpiper - 30+
Sanderling ??? 6
Pectoral sandpiper - 40+
Lesser Yellowlegs ??? 3
White-rumped Sandpiper
Solitary Sandpiper
Wilson???s Snipe ??? 10+
Dowitcher sp. - 2

Ron Clark
Kings Mtn. NC

 

Back to top
Date: 8/26/19 3:45 pm
From: Daniel Kaplan (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: On Lazuli Bunting, an August rare gull, and other birds that got away
To close on a positive note, a Lazuli Bunting at Ft Macon in 1996 was I
think the first rarity I twitched thanks to carolinabirds.

Dan Kaplan
Durm

On Mon, Aug 26, 2019 at 3:44 PM Dennis Burnette <deburnette...>
wrote:

> I suggest that we let this blow over and get back to birds. Drop it and
> few people will even remember it in a few weeks. It would be nice to know
> if the main bird in question actually was a Lazuli Bunting, but even that
> isn’t worth all the angst and hurt feelings being generated.
> --
> Dennis E. Burnette
> Greensboro, NC 27410
> <deburnette...>
>
> From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-re%0D+<quest...>>
> on behalf of Carolinabirds <carolinabirds...>
> Reply-To: "LeGrand, Harry" <hlegrandjr...>
> Date: Monday, August 26, 2019 at 10:13 AM
> To: Carolinabirds <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: On Lazuli Bunting, an August rare gull, and other birds that got
> away
>
> Yesterday, on this listserve, I was verbally attacked by a person named
> Pam Diamond, who claims that I called her "not a birder" in regard to the
> report of a Lazuli Bunting. This greatly bothered and confused me, because*
> her name is not the name of the observer and photographer of the bird
> report ed as a Lazuli Bunting*. That person's name is Patricia Finch,
> and she lives in Beaufort. This name and town appear on the *CBC Rare
> Bird Report form, which Ms. Finch has submitted now to the NC Bird Records
> Committee.* Her name -- Patricia Beers Finch -- also is mentioned often
> in the Facebook string.
>
> I have read, re-read, etc., about all of the 37 comments on Facebook
> regarding this bird, and *nowhere in these comments does the name of Pam
> Diamond appear*. From what I understand, Ms. Diamond lives in Cary (Wake
> County), nowhere near the coast. Late last night, after reading her strong
> wording to me, I felt like these two names were one and the same person,
> and I'm still not sure they aren't the same person. Why would someone who
> lives in Cary, and whose name did not appear on the Facebook string, give
> me grief for attacking her credibility as being "not a birder"?
>
> At an y rate, the Records Committee now has a Rare Bird Report form. (As
> a advisory member of the committee, I have access to the submitted Rare
> Bird Report forms, from the CBC website.) I DO want to thank Ms. Finch for
> taking the time to fill out the report form. The Records Committee will be
> reviewing that and the photo and presumably will vote on it later this year.
>
> As for "birds that got away", and it is possible that this Beaufort bird
> is one that "got away" without being accepted by the Committee, we can
> probably add -- and these are birds seen by experienced observers with
> dozens of years I the field:
>
> 1. the immature Falls Lake gull. Was it a Ross' Gull (would be a first
> Carolina record)? A Little Gull (several previous Piedmont records)? A
> Black-legged Kittiwake (two previous Piedmont records)? In any case, such
> a gull in AUGUST is a complete shock.
>
> 2. a large swift seen flying past several birders at Oregon Inlet years
> ago. There was talk of it being a needletail swift of some type. Whatever
> it was, it almost certainly was a first state record.
>
> 3. a medium-sized shearwater that I and a few other birders saw on a
> pelagic trip off Hatteras, on August 5, 1995. We discussed it as being
> in-between a Cory's, Greater, and Manx in size, but brownish above.. We
> were thinking an odd Mediterranean Shearwater. A handful of years later,
> Cape Verde Shearwater was formally described, and at that time one was
> photographed off Hatteras. In hindsight, plus now that I have seen about 5
> of them near the Cape Verde Islands, I know in fact it was a Cape Verde
> Shearwater -- but, I'm not writing up an after-the-fact report, without
> photos of it. It is a "bird that got away" (Sight reports of rare pelagic
> bird s aren't in vogue these days!).
>
> In summary, even very experienced birders have "birds that got away" --
> too far away to be confirmed, too similar to other species to be
> identified, too quick of a view, etc. But, inexperienced birders make a
> great contribution by photographing rare birds -- like several rare orioles
> at feeders in NC, even if they know they are odd but don't know what they
> are. Or, by notifying other birders about an odd or unusual bird that
> needs identification or confirmation. Plus, there are many, many more
> inexperienced birders in the Carolinas than there are those with a dozen or
> more years of experience. So, the Carolinas need all types to contribute
> to the bird records.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/26/19 12:52 pm
From: Nate Swick <nswick...>
Subject: Likely Lazuli Bunting, Carteret Co
For those following along for bird news, the observer Ms Finch did send me
an additional photo of marginally higher quality than the one going around
on FB. It does appear to show some color and the pattern to at least
eliminate chaffinch as an option and is arguably conclusive.

I'll submit them to the CBC website to include on the report to the bird
records committee.

Nate Swick
GSO, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 8/26/19 12:44 pm
From: Dennis Burnette <deburnette...>
Subject: Re: On Lazuli Bunting, an August rare gull, and other birds that got away
I suggest that we let this blow over and get back to birds. Drop it and few
people will even remember it in a few weeks. It would be nice to know if the
main bird in question actually was a Lazuli Bunting, but even that isnt
worth all the angst and hurt feelings being generated.
--
Dennis E. Burnette
Greensboro, NC 27410
<deburnette...>

From: <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Carolinabirds
<carolinabirds...>
Reply-To: "LeGrand, Harry" <hlegrandjr...>
Date: Monday, August 26, 2019 at 10:13 AM
To: Carolinabirds <carolinabirds...>
Subject: On Lazuli Bunting, an August rare gull, and other birds that got
away

Yesterday, on this listserve, I was verbally attacked by a person named Pam
Diamond, who claims that I called her "not a birder" in regard to the report
of a Lazuli Bunting. This greatly bothered and confused me, because her
name is not the name of the observer and photographer of the bird reported
as a Lazuli Bunting. That person's name is Patricia Finch, and she lives in
Beaufort. This name and town appear on the CBC Rare Bird Report form, which
Ms. Finch has submitted now to the NC Bird Records Committee. Her name --
Patricia Beers Finch -- also is mentioned often in the Facebook string.

I have read, re-read, etc., about all of the 37 comments on Facebook
regarding this bird, and nowhere in these comments does the name of Pam
Diamond appear. From what I understand, Ms. Diamond lives in Cary (Wake
County), nowhere near the coast. Late last night, after reading her strong
wording to me, I felt like these two names were one and the same person, and
I'm still not sure they aren't the same person. Why would someone who lives
in Cary, and whose name did not appear on the Facebook string, give me grief
for attacking her credibility as being "not a birder"?

At any rate, the Records Committee now has a Rare Bird Report form. (As a
advisory member of the committee, I have access to the submitted Rare Bird
Report forms, from the CBC website.) I DO want to thank Ms. Finch for
taking the time to fill out the report form. The Records Committee will be
reviewing that and the photo and presumably will vote on it later this year.

As for "birds that got away", and it is possible that this Beaufort bird is
one that "got away" without being accepted by the Committee, we can probably
add -- and these are birds seen by experienced observers with dozens of
years I the field:

1. the immature Falls Lake gull. Was it a Ross' Gull (would be a first
Carolina record)? A Little Gull (several previous Piedmont records)? A
Black-legged Kittiwake (two previous Piedmont records)? In any case, such a
gull in AUGUST is a complete shock.

2. a large swift seen flying past several birders at Oregon Inlet years
ago. There was talk of it being a needletail swift of some type. Whatever
it was, it almost certainly was a first state record.

3. a medium-sized shearwater that I and a few other birders saw on a
pelagic trip off Hatteras, on August 5, 1995. We discussed it as being
in-between a Cory's, Greater, and Manx in size, but brownish above.. We
were thinking an odd Mediterranean Shearwater. A handful of years later,
Cape Verde Shearwater was formally described, and at that time one was
photographed off Hatteras. In hindsight, plus now that I have seen about 5
of them near the Cape Verde Islands, I know in fact it was a Cape Verde
Shearwater -- but, I'm not writing up an after-the-fact report, without
photos of it. It is a "bird that got away" (Sight reports of rare pelagic
birds aren't in vogue these days!).

In summary, even very experienced birders have "birds that got away" -- too
far away to be confirmed, too similar to other species to be identified, too
quick of a view, etc. But, inexperienced birders make a great contribution
by photographing rare birds -- like several rare orioles at feeders in NC,
even if they know they are odd but don't know what they are. Or, by
notifying other birders about an odd or unusual bird that needs
identification or confirmation. Plus, there are many, many more
inexperienced birders in the Carolinas than there are those with a dozen or
more years of experience. So, the Carolinas need all types to contribute to
the bird records.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh



 

Back to top
Date: 8/26/19 11:56 am
From: Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Name-dropping carolinabirds Digest Sun 25 Aug 2019
To Pam Diamond, Regarding the August 25 discussion about properly
reporting rare bird sightings:
I do not appreciate having my name dropped into carolinabirds without
my permission, approval, or knowledge, especially when you put words
in my mouth ("[she] would tell you I am a passionate and committed
birder").

Although I don't find your name-dropping "deeply offensive", I DO find
it to be a fine example of "chutzpah". Do not drag me into your
arguments.

And by the way - it's Dr. LeGrand. Not Mr. ... As long as you're using titles.
Erla Beegle
Raleigh, NC
P.S. I responded publicly only because my name and INCORRECT opinion
were placed on the carolinabirds listserv without my approval.
 

Back to top
Date: 8/26/19 7:14 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: On Lazuli Bunting, an August rare gull, and other birds that got away
Yesterday, on this listserve, I was verbally attacked by a person named Pam
Diamond, who claims that I called her "not a birder" in regard to the
report of a Lazuli Bunting. This greatly bothered and confused me, because*
her name is not the name of the observer and photographer of the bird
reported as a Lazuli Bunting*. That person's name is Patricia Finch, and
she lives in Beaufort. This name and town appear on the *CBC Rare Bird
Report form, which Ms. Finch has submitted now to the NC Bird Records
Committee.* Her name -- Patricia Beers Finch -- also is mentioned often in
the Facebook string.

I have read, re-read, etc., about all of the 37 comments on Facebook
regarding this bird, and *nowhere in these comments does the name of Pam
Diamond appear*. From what I understand, Ms. Diamond lives in Cary (Wake
County), nowhere near the coast. Late last night, after reading her strong
wording to me, I felt like these two names were one and the same person,
and I'm still not sure they aren't the same person. Why would someone who
lives in Cary, and whose name did not appear on the Facebook string, give
me grief for attacking her credibility as being "not a birder"?

At any rate, the Records Committee now has a Rare Bird Report form. (As a
advisory member of the committee, I have access to the submitted Rare Bird
Report forms, from the CBC website.) I DO want to thank Ms. Finch for
taking the time to fill out the report form. The Records Committee will be
reviewing that and the photo and presumably will vote on it later this year.

As for "birds that got away", and it is possible that this Beaufort bird is
one that "got away" without being accepted by the Committee, we can
probably add -- and these are birds seen by experienced observers with
dozens of years I the field:

1. the immature Falls Lake gull. Was it a Ross' Gull (would be a first
Carolina record)? A Little Gull (several previous Piedmont records)? A
Black-legged Kittiwake (two previous Piedmont records)? In any case, such
a gull in AUGUST is a complete shock.

2. a large swift seen flying past several birders at Oregon Inlet years
ago. There was talk of it being a needletail swift of some type. Whatever
it was, it almost certainly was a first state record.

3. a medium-sized shearwater that I and a few other birders saw on a
pelagic trip off Hatteras, on August 5, 1995. We discussed it as being
in-between a Cory's, Greater, and Manx in size, but brownish above.. We
were thinking an odd Mediterranean Shearwater. A handful of years later,
Cape Verde Shearwater was formally described, and at that time one was
photographed off Hatteras. In hindsight, plus now that I have seen about 5
of them near the Cape Verde Islands, I know in fact it was a Cape Verde
Shearwater -- but, I'm not writing up an after-the-fact report, without
photos of it. It is a "bird that got away" (Sight reports of rare pelagic
birds aren't in vogue these days!).

In summary, even very experienced birders have "birds that got away" -- too
far away to be confirmed, too similar to other species to be identified,
too quick of a view, etc. But, inexperienced birders make a great
contribution by photographing rare birds -- like several rare orioles at
feeders in NC, even if they know they are odd but don't know what they
are. Or, by notifying other birders about an odd or unusual bird that
needs identification or confirmation. Plus, there are many, many more
inexperienced birders in the Carolinas than there are those with a dozen or
more years of experience. So, the Carolinas need all types to contribute
to the bird records.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

 

Back to top
Date: 8/25/19 8:39 pm
From: GRIGGS, JERRY <griggs...>
Subject: Yard activity, Columbia, SC
There was some nice activity today, including a new bird for our list, in our yard in Columbia/Irmo along Rawls Creek, upstream from Saluda Shoals Park and by the new Mungo Park. The unusually mild temperatures (a high here of just 78), clouds, and northeast winds suggested we should pay attention today.

A mustard-colored Summer Tanager (female) came to bathe in the birdbath, and was seen later snacking on the berries of our Chinese Fringetree. It looked like the bird that came once before this month. A greenish Painted Bunting came to the feeders, a female or perhaps an immature male as there was a reddish tinge to the wings. It was coming regularly a month ago, but we haven't seen it for three weeks. It loves the white millet seed. We suspect they breed near us in the new park.

A Hackberry Emperor landed on a Red Oak trunk, a new butterfly for us.

We spotted a bright bird flitting in a nearby short Persimmons tree, at eye level from our house. Head and chest yellow, gray wings, and a black line through the eye. Blue-winged Warbler! Not reported in our county in eBird since spring. Male. I rushed out back, and got quick looks at it in a thicket of trees and vines. My blurry photos also revealed the white wingbars, and white undertail. New for our yard list! No. 142. Our other addition this year was Merlin, last spring. It is amazing what one can find.

Jerry Griggs
Columbia, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 8/25/19 4:41 pm
From: David Campbell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Cherokee Co. SC scissor-tail continuing
Just north of I-85, along Webber Road, we saw two scissor-tailed
flycatchers on the fence, in the area where a nest had been reported.
Stopping on the road was possible. In principle, one might glimpse them
from I-85 but an ID would be difficult.

--
Dr. David Campbell
Associate Professor, Geology
Department of Natural Sciences
Box 7270
Gardner-Webb University
Boiling Springs NC 28017

 

Back to top
Date: 8/25/19 9:02 am
From: Pam Diamond (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: carolinabirds Digest Sun, 25 Aug 2019
Listening now. Thanks, Nate.

*Pam Diamond*

*Cary, NC*









On Sun, Aug 25, 2019 at 11:47 AM Nate Swick <nswick...> wrote:

> In my capacity as chair of the NC Bird Records Committee, I am working
> with the observer to get something to us that the committee can vote on. I
> think the record is compelling and the photo is certainly interesting. The
> observers are novice birders and they clearly noted that this was something
> different and used the internet as a resource to identify it. This is a
> good thing.
>
> That's all I have to say about this specific record, though if Will Cook
> will allow me a little bit of self-indulgence I would like to point folks
> to a conversation Birding magazine editor Ted Floyd and I had with regard
> to the pitfalls of expertise on the American Birding Podcast, which I host.
>
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__podcasts.apple.com_us_podcast_03-2D15-2Dwhere-2Dexpertise-2Dfalls-2Dshort_id1186824033-3Fi-3D1000445284767&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=HSonS36SjUY3zxldgJxDomMGGjFJecmHyql8lkeGELo&s=PpceI5KqpJgG63vb2ppDnzZQ0soB1Ds03gXuWqBsMis&e=
>
> Nate Swick
> Greensboro, NC
>
>
>
>
> On Sun, Aug 25, 2019 at 9:16 AM Pam Diamond <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> "1) the observer to complete a Rare Bird Report form, to let us know more
>> about what she saw. It is clear she is not a birder, had no idea what a
>> Lazuli Bunting was, and of course Chaffinch is a foreign word. Thus, we
>> have no idea from Facebook comments if she had looked at photos of Common
>> Chaffinch, to say "yes" or "no" to that. She did say "yes" to Lazuli after
>> she had seen online photos, but ….."
>>
>>
>> I was excited to read the “buzz” and learn about this possible Lazuli
>> Bunting. I was hopeful that Steve Howell, with whom I had the privilege of
>> birding once at Howell Woods (he helped me find my first prothonotary and
>> hooded warblers years ago), would find it and document it in good photos.
>> But I have to say, Mr. Legrand, I find your words deeply offensive. Clearly
>> by your standards, whatever they are, you would say I am not a birder. But
>> I hope that Kevin Karlson, Glenn Crawford, Angel Abreu and some of the
>> other fabulous guides, authors and ornithology experts (some of whom I
>> birded with during spring migration on the shores of Lake Erie) would tell
>> you differently. I hope that some of the local people - Brian Pendergraft
>> (thank you for helping me shift my passion into high gear), Erla Beegle,
>> John Gerwin, John Connors, Susan Campbell, Lucas Bobay, Jim Capel and the
>> list goes on - would tell you I am a passionate and committed birder. My
>> neighbors and friends for sure will describe me as such. Just the other
>> night at religious services I was greeted with, “ah, the bird lady.” (Way
>> better than crazy cat lady IMHO.) Can I identify everything I see? NO. Do I
>> know every bird there is to know? NO (I did not know what a Lazuli Bunting
>> was.) Do I know all the terminology? No. Do I know all the right ways to
>> report things? No. Do I want to be a part of important record keeping and
>> reporting for our state? YES. Do I care about bird conservation?
>> Absolutely. Am I personally involved in bird conservation? Yes. And that,
>> sir, is why you want to to be inclusive and helpful to those of us who
>> don’t know everything there is to know about birding and reporting vs.
>> being off putting, offensive and holier than thou. To paraphrase Jack
>> Nicholson, YOU WANT ME ON THAT TEAM. YOU NEED ME ON THAT TEAM. This is not
>> a hobby or passion to keep only for the select few. If that’s the case, our
>> beautiful birds will surely suffer the consequences.
>>
>> *Pam Diamond*
>>
>> *Cary, NC *
>>
>>
>> On Sun, Aug 25, 2019 at 6:00 AM <carolinabirds-request...> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
>>> From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr...>
>>> To: Will Cook <cwcook...>
>>> Cc: Carolina Birds <carolinabirds...>
>>> Bcc:
>>> Date: Sat, 24 Aug 2019 10:02:13 -0400
>>> Subject: Re: Lazuli Bunting in Beaufort NC?
>>> I keep hearing "buzz" from various sources, for which I cannot seem to
>>> locate either on Facebook or eBird -- though friends have said they have
>>> found such "buzz" -- that this bird likely will have to remain
>>> "unidentified", or "inconclusively documented", to use my paraphrasing.
>>> The original photo and the lightened/enlarged photo certainly by itself
>>> does not document a Lazuli Bunting, in my opinion, especially as Common
>>> Chaffinch does not seem to have been ruled out from the photo. Though
>>> the observer reported "bright blue head, rusty orange feathers under the
>>> chin and a white breast" on her Facebook comments, which does lean it to
>>> the bunting and not the Chaffinch, note that Chaffinch also has a large
>>> white upper wing bar, and it rusty orange on the throat up to the chin, has
>>> some blueish on the crown and nape, and the belly is pale. Lazuli Bunting
>>> -- certainly the much more likely of the two -- has two of the three
>>> written marks -- a bright blue head and a white belly, but the rusty orange
>>> color is on the upper breast; the throat and chin is mainly blue.
>>>
>>> I am on the NC Bird Records Committee, in an advisory capacity, as a
>>> non-voting member. I encourage:
>>>
>>> 1) the observer to complete a Rare Bird Report form, to let us know more
>>> about what she saw. It is clear she is not a birder, had no idea what a
>>> Lazuli Bunting was, and of course Chaffinch is a foreign word. Thus, we
>>> have no idea from Facebook comments if she had looked at photos of Common
>>> Chaffinch, to say "yes" or "no" to that. She did say "yes" to Lazuli after
>>> she had seen online photos, but …..
>>>
>>> 2) the NC BRC to vote on the bird, as from what I currently see on
>>> Facebook, it stands there as an identification as a Lazuli Bunting. This
>>> has never been sent to eBird, that I can tell. Someone told me that the
>>> eBird reviewer was not going to accept the report, but … as it nonetheless
>>> WAS reported on Facebook as a Lazuli Bunting, it needs a vote, as the
>>> potential third record for NC.
>>>
>>> Harry LeGrand
>>> Raleigh
>>>
>>> On Wed, Aug 21, 2019 at 4:57 PM Will Cook <cwcook...> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Folks may be interested to know that there's an apparent Lazuli Bunting
>>>> at a feeder in Beaufort, NC, confirmed by a photo that may just be good
>>>> enough to clinch the ID. I know nothing more than what's in this post on
>>>> the Carolina Birders facebook group:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_groups_carolinabirders_permalink_2348108728598053_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=HSonS36SjUY3zxldgJxDomMGGjFJecmHyql8lkeGELo&s=DJAoXGNZ7ydMJf3fnX1hvZvaW7Ic8PRlabp_95v-kvY&e=
>>>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_groups_carolinabirders_permalink_2348108728598053_&d=DwMGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=XrBMmnjJr2WUZtmTQ9w08J9H8db1CV74kBkJglmmiqI&s=2GbwzeEsC7Cys97LYgB-87EX3la4A69h57tswfVEkHg&e=>
>>>>
>>>> A darling little bird, indeed!
>>>>
>>>> Will
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> Charles W. (Will) Cook
>>>> Nicholas School of the Environment
>>>> Division of Environmental Science & Policy
>>>> Box 90328, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708
>>>>
>>>>
>>>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/25/19 8:48 am
From: Nate Swick <nswick...>
Subject: Re: carolinabirds Digest Sun, 25 Aug 2019
In my capacity as chair of the NC Bird Records Committee, I am working with
the observer to get something to us that the committee can vote on. I think
the record is compelling and the photo is certainly interesting. The
observers are novice birders and they clearly noted that this was something
different and used the internet as a resource to identify it. This is a
good thing.

That's all I have to say about this specific record, though if Will Cook
will allow me a little bit of self-indulgence I would like to point folks
to a conversation Birding magazine editor Ted Floyd and I had with regard
to the pitfalls of expertise on the American Birding Podcast, which I host.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__podcasts.apple.com_us_podcast_03-2D15-2Dwhere-2Dexpertise-2Dfalls-2Dshort_id1186824033-3Fi-3D1000445284767&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JaeQA8yrzTDzwvoLbg0UaizhljK-M2fNnH8FsHh1b64&s=yLGGjCs0Pwtp3uFB25yRz5e3cl70au5MWUyFdVyLChY&e=

Nate Swick
Greensboro, NC




On Sun, Aug 25, 2019 at 9:16 AM Pam Diamond <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> "1) the observer to complete a Rare Bird Report form, to let us know more
> about what she saw. It is clear she is not a birder, had no idea what a
> Lazuli Bunting was, and of course Chaffinch is a foreign word. Thus, we
> have no idea from Facebook comments if she had looked at photos of Common
> Chaffinch, to say "yes" or "no" to that. She did say "yes" to Lazuli after
> she had seen online photos, but ….."
>
>
> I was excited to read the “buzz” and learn about this possible Lazuli
> Bunting. I was hopeful that Steve Howell, with whom I had the privilege of
> birding once at Howell Woods (he helped me find my first prothonotary and
> hooded warblers years ago), would find it and document it in good photos.
> But I have to say, Mr. Legrand, I find your words deeply offensive. Clearly
> by your standards, whatever they are, you would say I am not a birder. But
> I hope that Kevin Karlson, Glenn Crawford, Angel Abreu and some of the
> other fabulous guides, authors and ornithology experts (some of whom I
> birded with during spring migration on the shores of Lake Erie) would tell
> you differently. I hope that some of the local people - Brian Pendergraft
> (thank you for helping me shift my passion into high gear), Erla Beegle,
> John Gerwin, John Connors, Susan Campbell, Lucas Bobay, Jim Capel and the
> list goes on - would tell you I am a passionate and committed birder. My
> neighbors and friends for sure will describe me as such. Just the other
> night at religious services I was greeted with, “ah, the bird lady.” (Way
> better than crazy cat lady IMHO.) Can I identify everything I see? NO. Do I
> know every bird there is to know? NO (I did not know what a Lazuli Bunting
> was.) Do I know all the terminology? No. Do I know all the right ways to
> report things? No. Do I want to be a part of important record keeping and
> reporting for our state? YES. Do I care about bird conservation?
> Absolutely. Am I personally involved in bird conservation? Yes. And that,
> sir, is why you want to to be inclusive and helpful to those of us who
> don’t know everything there is to know about birding and reporting vs.
> being off putting, offensive and holier than thou. To paraphrase Jack
> Nicholson, YOU WANT ME ON THAT TEAM. YOU NEED ME ON THAT TEAM. This is not
> a hobby or passion to keep only for the select few. If that’s the case, our
> beautiful birds will surely suffer the consequences.
>
> *Pam Diamond*
>
> *Cary, NC *
>
>
> On Sun, Aug 25, 2019 at 6:00 AM <carolinabirds-request...> wrote:
>
>>
>> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
>> From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr...>
>> To: Will Cook <cwcook...>
>> Cc: Carolina Birds <carolinabirds...>
>> Bcc:
>> Date: Sat, 24 Aug 2019 10:02:13 -0400
>> Subject: Re: Lazuli Bunting in Beaufort NC?
>> I keep hearing "buzz" from various sources, for which I cannot seem to
>> locate either on Facebook or eBird -- though friends have said they have
>> found such "buzz" -- that this bird likely will have to remain
>> "unidentified", or "inconclusively documented", to use my paraphrasing.
>> The original photo and the lightened/enlarged photo certainly by itself
>> does not document a Lazuli Bunting, in my opinion, especially as Common
>> Chaffinch does not seem to have been ruled out from the photo. Though
>> the observer reported "bright blue head, rusty orange feathers under the
>> chin and a white breast" on her Facebook comments, which does lean it to
>> the bunting and not the Chaffinch, note that Chaffinch also has a large
>> white upper wing bar, and it rusty orange on the throat up to the chin, has
>> some blueish on the crown and nape, and the belly is pale. Lazuli Bunting
>> -- certainly the much more likely of the two -- has two of the three
>> written marks -- a bright blue head and a white belly, but the rusty orange
>> color is on the upper breast; the throat and chin is mainly blue.
>>
>> I am on the NC Bird Records Committee, in an advisory capacity, as a
>> non-voting member. I encourage:
>>
>> 1) the observer to complete a Rare Bird Report form, to let us know more
>> about what she saw. It is clear she is not a birder, had no idea what a
>> Lazuli Bunting was, and of course Chaffinch is a foreign word. Thus, we
>> have no idea from Facebook comments if she had looked at photos of Common
>> Chaffinch, to say "yes" or "no" to that. She did say "yes" to Lazuli after
>> she had seen online photos, but …..
>>
>> 2) the NC BRC to vote on the bird, as from what I currently see on
>> Facebook, it stands there as an identification as a Lazuli Bunting. This
>> has never been sent to eBird, that I can tell. Someone told me that the
>> eBird reviewer was not going to accept the report, but … as it nonetheless
>> WAS reported on Facebook as a Lazuli Bunting, it needs a vote, as the
>> potential third record for NC.
>>
>> Harry LeGrand
>> Raleigh
>>
>> On Wed, Aug 21, 2019 at 4:57 PM Will Cook <cwcook...> wrote:
>>
>>> Folks may be interested to know that there's an apparent Lazuli Bunting
>>> at a feeder in Beaufort, NC, confirmed by a photo that may just be good
>>> enough to clinch the ID. I know nothing more than what's in this post on
>>> the Carolina Birders facebook group:
>>>
>>>
>>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_groups_carolinabirders_permalink_2348108728598053_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JaeQA8yrzTDzwvoLbg0UaizhljK-M2fNnH8FsHh1b64&s=5IymVlFT1hvBdjSvAtrTM-RzaD-LDkRn2SZorChp5RU&e=
>>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_groups_carolinabirders_permalink_2348108728598053_&d=DwMGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=XrBMmnjJr2WUZtmTQ9w08J9H8db1CV74kBkJglmmiqI&s=2GbwzeEsC7Cys97LYgB-87EX3la4A69h57tswfVEkHg&e=>
>>>
>>> A darling little bird, indeed!
>>>
>>> Will
>>>
>>> --
>>> Charles W. (Will) Cook
>>> Nicholas School of the Environment
>>> Division of Environmental Science & Policy
>>> Box 90328, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708
>>>
>>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/25/19 8:29 am
From: Mariann Ramsayer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: carolinabirds Digest Sun, 25 Aug 2019
I too was taken aback by the comments in that email. I'm a fairly new
birder and just started reading Kenn Kaufman's *Field Guide to Advanced
Birding*. The below text is from page 17 of that book, captioned, Expert
Birders and Their Responsibility to Beginners. I absolutely loved that Kenn
addressed this topic, and what he said is ultimately crucial to bird
conservation. Please take the time to read this!

“With increasing numbers of birders gathering at popular spots, and with
the explosive growth of online communication and networking, there are also
far more contacts between experts and beginners than at any time in the
past. I believe that experts have a responsibility to handle these contacts
with care and diplomacy, to avoid dampening the enthusiasm of the beginning
bird watchers. The fact is that there are literally tens of millions of
people in North America who enjoy birds at a casual level and who will
never become highly skilled birds - and there is no reason why they should.
Their approach is just as legitimate as the interest of the most ardent
field ornithologist, and their casual enjoyment deserves our respect.”

“Unfortunately, some expert birders lose sight of this. They insist that
every newcomer to birding should move in the direction of increasing their
skill level, that every beginner should start off with advanced references
and learn to use them. This attitude - of teaching people to swim by
throwing everyone into the deep end of the pool - has predictably bad
results. I’ve met many people who were tempted to give up birding
altogether after run-ins with well-intentional but foolish “experts.” We
need those millions of people who simply like birds. We need millions of
perpetual beginners who value our wildlife and who support conservation
efforts. In the larger perspective, broad support for conservation is far
more important than accurate field identification, and a truly advanced
birder will never do anything to discourage the casual bird enthusiasts.” Kenn
Kaufman's *Field Guide to Advanced Birding*


Mariann Ramsayer

Apex, NC




On Sun, Aug 25, 2019 at 9:16 AM Pam Diamond <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> "1) the observer to complete a Rare Bird Report form, to let us know more
> about what she saw. It is clear she is not a birder, had no idea what a
> Lazuli Bunting was, and of course Chaffinch is a foreign word. Thus, we
> have no idea from Facebook comments if she had looked at photos of Common
> Chaffinch, to say "yes" or "no" to that. She did say "yes" to Lazuli after
> she had seen online photos, but ….."
>
>
> I was excited to read the “buzz” and learn about this possible Lazuli
> Bunting. I was hopeful that Steve Howell, with whom I had the privilege of
> birding once at Howell Woods (he helped me find my first prothonotary and
> hooded warblers years ago), would find it and document it in good photos.
> But I have to say, Mr. Legrand, I find your words deeply offensive. Clearly
> by your standards, whatever they are, you would say I am not a birder. But
> I hope that Kevin Karlson, Glenn Crawford, Angel Abreu and some of the
> other fabulous guides, authors and ornithology experts (some of whom I
> birded with during spring migration on the shores of Lake Erie) would tell
> you differently. I hope that some of the local people - Brian Pendergraft
> (thank you for helping me shift my passion into high gear), Erla Beegle,
> John Gerwin, John Connors, Susan Campbell, Lucas Bobay, Jim Capel and the
> list goes on - would tell you I am a passionate and committed birder. My
> neighbors and friends for sure will describe me as such. Just the other
> night at religious services I was greeted with, “ah, the bird lady.” (Way
> better than crazy cat lady IMHO.) Can I identify everything I see? NO. Do I
> know every bird there is to know? NO (I did not know what a Lazuli Bunting
> was.) Do I know all the terminology? No. Do I know all the right ways to
> report things? No. Do I want to be a part of important record keeping and
> reporting for our state? YES. Do I care about bird conservation?
> Absolutely. Am I personally involved in bird conservation? Yes. And that,
> sir, is why you want to to be inclusive and helpful to those of us who
> don’t know everything there is to know about birding and reporting vs.
> being off putting, offensive and holier than thou. To paraphrase Jack
> Nicholson, YOU WANT ME ON THAT TEAM. YOU NEED ME ON THAT TEAM. This is not
> a hobby or passion to keep only for the select few. If that’s the case, our
> beautiful birds will surely suffer the consequences.
>
> *Pam Diamond*
>
> *Cary, NC *
>
>
> On Sun, Aug 25, 2019 at 6:00 AM <carolinabirds-request...> wrote:
>
>>
>> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
>> From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr...>
>> To: Will Cook <cwcook...>
>> Cc: Carolina Birds <carolinabirds...>
>> Bcc:
>> Date: Sat, 24 Aug 2019 10:02:13 -0400
>> Subject: Re: Lazuli Bunting in Beaufort NC?
>> I keep hearing "buzz" from various sources, for which I cannot seem to
>> locate either on Facebook or eBird -- though friends have said they have
>> found such "buzz" -- that this bird likely will have to remain
>> "unidentified", or "inconclusively documented", to use my paraphrasing.
>> The original photo and the lightened/enlarged photo certainly by itself
>> does not document a Lazuli Bunting, in my opinion, especially as Common
>> Chaffinch does not seem to have been ruled out from the photo. Though
>> the observer reported "bright blue head, rusty orange feathers under the
>> chin and a white breast" on her Facebook comments, which does lean it to
>> the bunting and not the Chaffinch, note that Chaffinch also has a large
>> white upper wing bar, and it rusty orange on the throat up to the chin, has
>> some blueish on the crown and nape, and the belly is pale. Lazuli Bunting
>> -- certainly the much more likely of the two -- has two of the three
>> written marks -- a bright blue head and a white belly, but the rusty orange
>> color is on the upper breast; the throat and chin is mainly blue.
>>
>> I am on the NC Bird Records Committee, in an advisory capacity, as a
>> non-voting member. I encourage:
>>
>> 1) the observer to complete a Rare Bird Report form, to let us know more
>> about what she saw. It is clear she is not a birder, had no idea what a
>> Lazuli Bunting was, and of course Chaffinch is a foreign word. Thus, we
>> have no idea from Facebook comments if she had looked at photos of Common
>> Chaffinch, to say "yes" or "no" to that. She did say "yes" to Lazuli after
>> she had seen online photos, but …..
>>
>> 2) the NC BRC to vote on the bird, as from what I currently see on
>> Facebook, it stands there as an identification as a Lazuli Bunting. This
>> has never been sent to eBird, that I can tell. Someone told me that the
>> eBird reviewer was not going to accept the report, but … as it nonetheless
>> WAS reported on Facebook as a Lazuli Bunting, it needs a vote, as the
>> potential third record for NC.
>>
>> Harry LeGrand
>> Raleigh
>>
>> On Wed, Aug 21, 2019 at 4:57 PM Will Cook <cwcook...> wrote:
>>
>>> Folks may be interested to know that there's an apparent Lazuli Bunting
>>> at a feeder in Beaufort, NC, confirmed by a photo that may just be good
>>> enough to clinch the ID. I know nothing more than what's in this post on
>>> the Carolina Birders facebook group:
>>>
>>>
>>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_groups_carolinabirders_permalink_2348108728598053_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=FsEc9Yl1LcZLsrZ60r-3pL25qUrOITmXCf9rHSkeNes&s=x043g9ZNGQ1eRe4hwfpKC7i5L122p_hmahByG_Z04mI&e=
>>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_groups_carolinabirders_permalink_2348108728598053_&d=DwMGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=XrBMmnjJr2WUZtmTQ9w08J9H8db1CV74kBkJglmmiqI&s=2GbwzeEsC7Cys97LYgB-87EX3la4A69h57tswfVEkHg&e=>
>>>
>>> A darling little bird, indeed!
>>>
>>> Will
>>>
>>> --
>>> Charles W. (Will) Cook
>>> Nicholas School of the Environment
>>> Division of Environmental Science & Policy
>>> Box 90328, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708
>>>
>>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/25/19 7:55 am
From: Jelmer Poelstra (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: exciting gull at Falls Lake
Hi all,

I first noticed this Gull from Rolling View yesterday at about 4:20 pm,
within a group of Common Terns, but soon went to Sandling Beach since the
birds were much closer to that shore. That turned out to be a bad choice,
as the group had moved westwards *passed* Rolling View by the time I
arrived at Sandling. They did come back to the area between Rolling View
and Sandling Beach several times but never close by. I don't think I ever
saw the bird closer than at about 1-2,000 ft. but did see it for extended
periods of time (15+ minutes in the scope).

I tried to take both pictures and phone-scoped videos of the bird when the
group got a little closer but failed -- the bird wasn't identifiable among
the mass of terns on the phone or camera screen. This just got me very
frustrated as I was missing opportunities to see the bird better. I also
attempted to post to Carolinabirds soon after I first saw the bird, by
replying to Brian B's message, but in my haste only replied to him.

A couple of the features noted:
* Striking black W on upperwing.
* Outside of the W, the upperwing appeared pale. Thus on the arm, there was
pale both in front of the diagonal band (i.e., not at all a
Sabine's-patern) and behind it, with entirely whitish secondaries (e.g. not
the black trailing edge of Bonaparte's).
* Obvious shoulder patch reminiscent of Black Tern, likely continuing up
the top of the neck.
* No obvious dark on head.
* Gray back that appeared unmarked.
* Black terminal tail band, though I am unsure whether it went across the
entire tail or was limited to the central tail feathers.
* Rather similar in size to the Common Terns it was flying amidst, but
slightly smaller, both in terms of body size and wingspan.
* Flight style also very similar to the Common Terns, but slightly
flappier. (I did note it first by flight style and then noticed the W when
zooming in. Nevertheless, the flight style in combination with the size
made it surprisingly easy to overlook at a distance among the terns.)

I went back-and-forth on the ID. I initially identified it as a Kittiwake,
taking the black shoulder patch to be diagnostic. But as I started paying
more attention to the fact that the bird was slightly smaller rather than
clearly bigger and bulkier than the Common Terns, that seemed untenable. I
still excluded Little Gull based on the shoulder patch, white secondaries,
and no apparent dark on the head -- and when I thought I saw that the black
on the tail was limited to slightly protruding central tail feathers, I for
a while thought Ross's.

However, I had completely overlooked the fact that juvenile Little Gulls,
before moulting to the 1st winter plumage we are more used to seeing them
in, do have a big dark spot on the upper side of the breast. Moreover,
looking at some pictures of various 1cy Little Gulls, the dark secondary
markings seem rather variable and can be absent or nearly so. Finally, the
appearance of a pale head can possibly be blamed on the distance (i.e.,
overlooking the cap). But to keep things puzzling all the same, an
unmoulted juvenile Little Gull should, in addition to the black shoulder
patch, also show dark markings on much of the back -- and the back appeared
an unmarked gray. Can the dark back molt to gray before the shoulder patch?

All in all, I think the size as described fully excludes Kittiwake, and
think the bird is most likely to have been a Little Gull. But given some
puzzling apparent features of the plumage, I still have trouble excluding
Ross's, however unlikely. But any feedback is welcome! (For instance, I
wonder if the timing of breeding and dispersal would make a 1cy of any of
these 3 species a priori out of the question as early as late August.)

I also briefly saw an adult Laughing Gull flying east to west almost right
over Rolling View before I noted the other gull, so plenty of excitement
going around from the get-go. Otherwise, the 3 Black Terns that Brian B.
reported earlier were still there, as were at least 4 Caspian Terns and a
single Forster's Tern, making for four species of tern.

Good birding,

Jelmer Poelstra
Durham


On Sat, Aug 24, 2019 at 9:09 PM bruce young <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Jelmer Poelstra reported a juvenile Black-legged Kittwake around 5:00 and
> I got there a little after 6 right about the time he postulated it might
> just be a Ross's Gull (!!!). At that point he was at Sandling beach and I
> was at Rolling View. Brian Bockhahn joined me maybe 30 minutes later.
> I had one sustained 4-5 minute view and a couple of shorter ones in my
> scope of the flying bird. It was never exactly close and I was near top
> power on my scope (60x) for most of it and the birds did not stop at any
> time. It was a gray day with night coming on.
> I believe it was a Kittiwake.
> It was flying mostly with a group of Caspian Terns. It was noticeably
> smaller and more compact than them. There were a couple of Common and at
> least 1 Black Tern around but I never got a good size comparison with them.
> The most noticeable plumage feature was the broad black M across the wings
> comprising the front of the wings to the outer primary tips then back to
> the base of the wings through the coverts. The M was not neat more messy
> and broad. Other than the outer primaries the rest of the flight feathers
> were pale. Mantle was light gray. Underwings pale
> The tail was square with a black band going clear across the tail from
> side to side.
> There was a small black ear patch and a larger black area on the side of
> the neck which may have met as a collar in back but couldn't really tell.
> Other than Ross's, Little and Sabines were also mooted. Sabines is out
> with the pale mantle and full black M. I believe Ross's is out based o n
> the tail shape, the black bar going all the way across the tail and the
> black collar. Little Gull is tougher. There was a lot of black on the top
> of the wing but I didn't see a black patch at the base of the secondaries
> or a black cap and I did see the black collar especially on the sides of
> the neck. Plus I don't think it was quite that small.
> Bruce Young
> <byoung715...>
> Durham, NC
>


--
Jelmer Poelstra
311 Biological Sciences Building, Biology Department
Duke University Durham, NC
Email: <jelmerpoelstra...> / <jelmer.poelstra...>
Phone: (+1) 919-260-8253

 

Back to top
Date: 8/25/19 6:16 am
From: Pam Diamond (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: carolinabirds Digest Sun, 25 Aug 2019
"1) the observer to complete a Rare Bird Report form, to let us know more
about what she saw. It is clear she is not a birder, had no idea what a
Lazuli Bunting was, and of course Chaffinch is a foreign word. Thus, we
have no idea from Facebook comments if she had looked at photos of Common
Chaffinch, to say "yes" or "no" to that. She did say "yes" to Lazuli after
she had seen online photos, but ….."


I was excited to read the “buzz” and learn about this possible Lazuli
Bunting. I was hopeful that Steve Howell, with whom I had the privilege of
birding once at Howell Woods (he helped me find my first prothonotary and
hooded warblers years ago), would find it and document it in good photos.
But I have to say, Mr. Legrand, I find your words deeply offensive. Clearly
by your standards, whatever they are, you would say I am not a birder. But
I hope that Kevin Karlson, Glenn Crawford, Angel Abreu and some of the
other fabulous guides, authors and ornithology experts (some of whom I
birded with during spring migration on the shores of Lake Erie) would tell
you differently. I hope that some of the local people - Brian Pendergraft
(thank you for helping me shift my passion into high gear), Erla Beegle,
John Gerwin, John Connors, Susan Campbell, Lucas Bobay, Jim Capel and the
list goes on - would tell you I am a passionate and committed birder. My
neighbors and friends for sure will describe me as such. Just the other
night at religious services I was greeted with, “ah, the bird lady.” (Way
better than crazy cat lady IMHO.) Can I identify everything I see? NO. Do I
know every bird there is to know? NO (I did not know what a Lazuli Bunting
was.) Do I know all the terminology? No. Do I know all the right ways to
report things? No. Do I want to be a part of important record keeping and
reporting for our state? YES. Do I care about bird conservation?
Absolutely. Am I personally involved in bird conservation? Yes. And that,
sir, is why you want to to be inclusive and helpful to those of us who
don’t know everything there is to know about birding and reporting vs.
being off putting, offensive and holier than thou. To paraphrase Jack
Nicholson, YOU WANT ME ON THAT TEAM. YOU NEED ME ON THAT TEAM. This is not
a hobby or passion to keep only for the select few. If that’s the case, our
beautiful birds will surely suffer the consequences.

*Pam Diamond*

*Cary, NC *


On Sun, Aug 25, 2019 at 6:00 AM <carolinabirds-request...> wrote:

>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr...>
> To: Will Cook <cwcook...>
> Cc: Carolina Birds <carolinabirds...>
> Bcc:
> Date: Sat, 24 Aug 2019 10:02:13 -0400
> Subject: Re: Lazuli Bunting in Beaufort NC?
> I keep hearing "buzz" from various sources, for which I cannot seem to
> locate either on Facebook or eBird -- though friends have said they have
> found such "buzz" -- that this bird likely will have to remain
> "unidentified", or "inconclusively documented", to use my paraphrasing.
> The original photo and the lightened/enlarged photo certainly by itself
> does not document a Lazuli Bunting, in my opinion, especially as Common
> Chaffinch does not seem to have been ruled out from the photo. Though
> the observer reported "bright blue head, rusty orange feathers under the
> chin and a white breast" on her Facebook comments, which does lean it to
> the bunting and not the Chaffinch, note that Chaffinch also has a large
> white upper wing bar, and it rusty orange on the throat up to the chin, has
> some blueish on the crown and nape, and the belly is pale. Lazuli Bunting
> -- certainly the much more likely of the two -- has two of the three
> written marks -- a bright blue head and a white belly, but the rusty orange
> color is on the upper breast; the throat and chin is mainly blue.
>
> I am on the NC Bird Records Committee, in an advisory capacity, as a
> non-voting member. I encourage:
>
> 1) the observer to complete a Rare Bird Report form, to let us know more
> about what she saw. It is clear she is not a birder, had no idea what a
> Lazuli Bunting was, and of course Chaffinch is a foreign word. Thus, we
> have no idea from Facebook comments if she had looked at photos of Common
> Chaffinch, to say "yes" or "no" to that. She did say "yes" to Lazuli after
> she had seen online photos, but …..
>
> 2) the NC BRC to vote on the bird, as from what I currently see on
> Facebook, it stands there as an identification as a Lazuli Bunting. This
> has never been sent to eBird, that I can tell. Someone told me that the
> eBird reviewer was not going to accept the report, but … as it nonetheless
> WAS reported on Facebook as a Lazuli Bunting, it needs a vote, as the
> potential third record for NC.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
> On Wed, Aug 21, 2019 at 4:57 PM Will Cook <cwcook...> wrote:
>
>> Folks may be interested to know that there's an apparent Lazuli Bunting
>> at a feeder in Beaufort, NC, confirmed by a photo that may just be good
>> enough to clinch the ID. I know nothing more than what's in this post on
>> the Carolina Birders facebook group:
>>
>>
>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_groups_carolinabirders_permalink_2348108728598053_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=-IkOyZM4WCx4F2-F5WC1PoS79LDIl2xqs5WPCv4lA5I&s=3KanySRDSqwKuYeQt91W_XPWeAFtJChEuSALMFpk0pM&e=
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_groups_carolinabirders_permalink_2348108728598053_&d=DwMGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=XrBMmnjJr2WUZtmTQ9w08J9H8db1CV74kBkJglmmiqI&s=2GbwzeEsC7Cys97LYgB-87EX3la4A69h57tswfVEkHg&e=>
>>
>> A darling little bird, indeed!
>>
>> Will
>>
>> --
>> Charles W. (Will) Cook
>> Nicholas School of the Environment
>> Division of Environmental Science & Policy
>> Box 90328, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708
>>
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/24/19 7:03 pm
From: Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: exciting gull viewing at Falls Lake
I only got distant scope view of the bird, and do also lean towards
kittiwake based on size, dark M on back, darker gray mantle, was unable to
observe tail, but others had better views.

Rollingview and Sandling Beach will open at 8am officially, but sometimes
our maintenance staff opens earlier, or if you are there they may let you
in. Rangers from both parks are aware and checked in with birders
tonight. Both parks charge $7 vehicle entry fee.

Ledge Rock boat ramp is open 24 hours at no charge and may have a chance.
You could also hike in from highway 50, about one half mile south of
entrance to Sandling on the west side of the road there is parking for a
couple cars at a gate that leads down to the lake.

The flock moved all over lakes center from SB to RV, up Ledge Creek, etc,
the exciting gull was working through and around with the Caspian, common
and black terns, scope needed. 168x zoom on camera didn't work at that
distance.

If kittiwake only the 2nd record for Falls Lake

And would be county lifer 255 for wake, 257 for durham

Great find!

--
Brian Bockhahn
Durham NC
<birdranger248...>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/24/19 6:09 pm
From: bruce young (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: exciting gull at Falls Lake
Jelmer Poelstra reported a juvenile Black-legged Kittwake around 5:00 and I got there a little after 6 right about the time he postulated it might just be a Ross's Gull (!!!). At that point he was at Sandling beach and I was at Rolling View. Brian Bockhahn joined me maybe 30 minutes later. I had one sustained 4-5 minute view and a couple of shorter ones in my scope of the flying bird. It was never exactly close and I was near top power on my scope (60x) for most of it and the birds did not stop at any time. It was a gray day with night coming on.I believe it was a Kittiwake.It was flying mostly with a group of Caspian Terns. It was noticeably smaller and more compact than them. There were a couple of Common and at least 1 Black Tern around but I never got a good size comparison with them. The most noticeable plumage feature was the broad black M across the wings comprising the front of the wings to the outer primary tips then back to the base of the wings through the coverts. The M was not neat more messy and broad. Other than the outer primaries the rest of the flight feathers were pale. Mantle was light gray. Underwings paleThe tail was square with a black band going clear across the tail from side to side. There was a small black ear patch and a larger black area on the side of the neck which may have met as a collar in back but couldn't really tell. Other than Ross's, Little and Sabines were also mooted. Sabines is out with the pale mantle and full black M. I believe Ross's is out based on the tail shape, the black bar going all the way across the tail and the black collar. Little Gull is tougher. There was a lot of black on the top of the wing but I didn't see a black patch at the base of the secondaries or a black cap and I did see the black collar especially on the sides of the neck. Plus I don't think it was quite that small. Bruce <Youngbyoung715...>, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 8/24/19 11:16 am
From: Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Falls Lake Caspian and Black terns
Today 8/24 while leading a snake hike at Sandling Beach, Wake County, we
saw three Black Terns from the shoreline past shelter 7 in Ledge Creek arm
of lake. Non breeding plumage. Seen from Matt Daws tern overlook (many
tern species seen up this arm of lake!). Ledge Rock boat ramp across the
way a quicker free way to scan the lake.

A quick stop at Cheek Road bridge tallied four Caspian Tern north of the
bridge, in both wake and durham counties, maybe Granville too if you
watched long enough...

Oh and we found one southern ringneck snake and one angry black racer.
--
Brian Bockhahn
<birdranger248...>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/24/19 8:47 am
From: rdnc13 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Brown Pelican at Buckhorn Res. (Wilson County)
There is a young Brown Pelican at Buckhorn Res. It has been hanging out near the Boat Ramp. Definitely unexpected around these parts!

Later, Ricky

Ricky Davis
Rocky Mount, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 8/24/19 8:45 am
From: Birding Poet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lark Sparrow - not at Ft. Moultrie this morning
Birded around Battery Jasper and out to the beach access and back with no
luck on the Lark Sparrow.

Seems like people have had better luck in the afternoons.
--
~Tracee 843/425-7630

 

Back to top
Date: 8/24/19 7:03 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Lazuli Bunting in Beaufort NC?
I keep hearing "buzz" from various sources, for which I cannot seem to
locate either on Facebook or eBird -- though friends have said they have
found such "buzz" -- that this bird likely will have to remain
"unidentified", or "inconclusively documented", to use my paraphrasing.
The original photo and the lightened/enlarged photo certainly by itself
does not document a Lazuli Bunting, in my opinion, especially as Common
Chaffinch does not seem to have been ruled out from the photo. Though
the observer reported "bright blue head, rusty orange feathers under the
chin and a white breast" on her Facebook comments, which does lean it to
the bunting and not the Chaffinch, note that Chaffinch also has a large
white upper wing bar, and it rusty orange on the throat up to the chin, has
some blueish on the crown and nape, and the belly is pale. Lazuli Bunting
-- certainly the much more likely of the two -- has two of the three
written marks -- a bright blue head and a white belly, but the rusty orange
color is on the upper breast; the throat and chin is mainly blue.

I am on the NC Bird Records Committee, in an advisory capacity, as a
non-voting member. I encourage:

1) the observer to complete a Rare Bird Report form, to let us know more
about what she saw. It is clear she is not a birder, had no idea what a
Lazuli Bunting was, and of course Chaffinch is a foreign word. Thus, we
have no idea from Facebook comments if she had looked at photos of Common
Chaffinch, to say "yes" or "no" to that. She did say "yes" to Lazuli after
she had seen online photos, but …..

2) the NC BRC to vote on the bird, as from what I currently see on
Facebook, it stands there as an identification as a Lazuli Bunting. This
has never been sent to eBird, that I can tell. Someone told me that the
eBird reviewer was not going to accept the report, but … as it nonetheless
WAS reported on Facebook as a Lazuli Bunting, it needs a vote, as the
potential third record for NC.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Wed, Aug 21, 2019 at 4:57 PM Will Cook <cwcook...> wrote:

> Folks may be interested to know that there's an apparent Lazuli Bunting at
> a feeder in Beaufort, NC, confirmed by a photo that may just be good enough
> to clinch the ID. I know nothing more than what's in this post on the
> Carolina Birders facebook group:
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_groups_carolinabirders_permalink_2348108728598053_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=iI8589_IPU62SqJln6VOSkqnbx4giVjYiQrZhPut-NU&s=P5uC3e1AYf4waMo74U2iIPRIusuEzM9BUHTHhhoO3eo&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_groups_carolinabirders_permalink_2348108728598053_&d=DwMGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=XrBMmnjJr2WUZtmTQ9w08J9H8db1CV74kBkJglmmiqI&s=2GbwzeEsC7Cys97LYgB-87EX3la4A69h57tswfVEkHg&e=>
>
> A darling little bird, indeed!
>
> Will
>
> --
> Charles W. (Will) Cook
> Nicholas School of the Environment
> Division of Environmental Science & Policy
> Box 90328, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/24/19 5:48 am
From: nicholas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Baird's Sandpiper in Hertford Co., NC 8/24/2019
Elisa & I are looking at a Baird's Sandpiper working the edge of the first cell at the water treatment plant off 258 just north of Murfreesboro, NC. Scoping from near the boat ramp sign just off 258.

Nick Flanders
Portsmouth, VA

 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/19 6:30 pm
From: whoffman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Terns, shorebirds at N. Topsail Beach
Hi -

I birded the NE end of Topsail I. this morning.

Tern numbers are lower than earlier in the summer, although some Black Terns have appeared.

Black Tern 12 all in groups (2-5) coming in off the water.
Caspian Tern 2
Royal Tern 10
Sandwich Tern 12
Forster's Tern 4

Laughing Gull 15
Great Black backed Gull 1
Herring Gull 2
Shorebirds are now mostly in non-breeding plumages
American Oystercatcher 1
Black-necked Stilt 5 in pond at corner before parking lot.
Piping Plover 3-5 one banded - combo sent to BBL
Wilson's Plover 18 Much lower than earlier in summer
Semipalmated Plover 15
Killdeer 1
Willet 7 one appeared to be western ssp. Is this early?
Greater Yellowlegs 1
Spotted Sandpiper 2
Ruddy Turnstone 6 Only 1 in full alternate plumage
Sanderling 25 very scattered - not flocked up yet.
Semipalmated Sandpiper 8
Least Sandpiper 2
Short-billed Dowitcher 80+ Flocks of 5-15 flying in off the channel.

Other birds were scarce -
Osprey 2 (plus 1 with rotating propulsion)
grackles a few on beach
Barn Swallow quite a few - 2-3 at a time continuously - seemed to be moving down the coast.
Purple Martin 0 they seem to have left - red nearby and were present all visits through the summer.
Great Egrets 30+ at great distance
Snowy Egret 2
Great Blue Heron 2

Wayne Hoffman
Wilmington


 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/19 5:22 pm
From: william haddad (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Great migratory activity in the mts today
After a decent early morning at Hefner and the Orchard Road this morning -
interrupted be rain - birds gone by 8am - there was great activity around
the cabin beginning at noon and on and of until 7pm. Saw 11 Warbler species
including more than one of most: and most from the deck.
1. B.T. Greens
2. Worm-eating
3. Blackburnian
4.Black and White
5. Parula
6. Hooded
7. Yellow-throated
8. Chestnut-sided
9. Canada
10. Am. Redstart
11.B.T. Blues
In the morning saw one different species - a Prairie. These mountains have
lots of active early migrant species right now - a good time to get out
there!

Bill Haddad
Spruce Pine, N.C.

 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/19 11:52 am
From: Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mississippi Kite -- Catawba County
Talk about consistency. For the 4th year in a row, we have had Mississippi
Kite at our hawkwatch at Riverbend Park - Catawba County, NC. 2016, 2017,
and 2019 they were observed on August 23 and in 2018 on August 24! Not the
same birds either since most have been immatures, like today's Kite.


--
Dwayne
*************
Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
<redxbill...>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/19 11:38 am
From: Jerry <bogey...>
Subject: Re: Lark sparrow present at Fort Moultrie
Correction!! After looking through some morning shots today, I did find 3 photos of
the Lark Sparrow at 9:30 a.m on the wall of Battery Jasaper. It was hot, and I was shooting up
into the sky with the sun behind me. The photos are not good, but that’s the bird.
I’ll post the photos on Carolina Rare Birds Facebook page.

Jerry Kerschner

From: jcox3222 (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
Sent: Friday, August 23, 2019 2:08 PM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lark sparrow present at Fort Moultrie

The previously reported lark sparrow is present in a dead snag along the path on the beach side path (across newly mown field from Battery Jasper) at Fort Moultrie. Observed from 1350 to 1405 today.
John Cox
Mount Pleasant SC

Sent from XFINITY Connect Mobile App

 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/19 11:18 am
From: Jerry <bogey...>
Subject: Re: Lark sparrow present at Fort Moultrie
Oh great! Five of us combed the area this morning without finding it.

Jerry Kerschner
Pawleys Island, SC


From: jcox3222 (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
Sent: Friday, August 23, 2019 2:08 PM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lark sparrow present at Fort Moultrie

The previously reported lark sparrow is present in a dead snag along the path on the beach side path (across newly mown field from Battery Jasper) at Fort Moultrie. Observed from 1350 to 1405 today.
John Cox
Mount Pleasant SC

Sent from XFINITY Connect Mobile App

 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/19 11:08 am
From: jcox3222 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lark sparrow present at Fort Moultrie
The previously reported lark sparrow is present in a dead snag along the path on the beach side path (across newly mown field from Battery Jasper) at Fort Moultrie. Observed from 1350 to 1405 today.
John Cox
Mount Pleasant SC

Sent from XFINITY Connect Mobile App

 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/19 6:43 am
From: Steven Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: lazuli Bunting Update
I meant to say Blue Grosbeak! Not Blue Bunting. Laugh...

On Fri, Aug 23, 2019 at 9:31 AM Steven Howell <
<stevesantiquetelephones2...> wrote:

> Good morning birders. Spent several hours looking for the Lazuli Bunting
> this morning in the area that I believe the bird was last seen in. I did
> find an area that would be a good habitat for that bird to visit. If I am
> correct the lady that had the bird on her feeder backs up to that open
> area. Although I did not find the Lazuli Bunting this morning did see the
> following birds. Some of the birds seen using Indigo Bunting playback.
> Painting Bunting, Blue Bunting, Prairie Warbler, Gnatcatcher and other song
> birds. Hoping that Patricia will see her bird again and call me so that I
> can get good photos and details. May return again to research the area.
> If you would like to search the area too. Look for dirt path at the end of
> the airport runway on hwy 101. The path is an electrical easement path
> which you can walk all the way to hwy 70. I think it’s safe to use path,
> but watch out for ticks.
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/19 6:31 am
From: Steven Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: lazuli Bunting Update
Good morning birders. Spent several hours looking for the Lazuli Bunting
this morning in the area that I believe the bird was last seen in. I did
find an area that would be a good habitat for that bird to visit. If I am
correct the lady that had the bird on her feeder backs up to that open
area. Although I did not find the Lazuli Bunting this morning did see the
following birds. Some of the birds seen using Indigo Bunting playback.
Painting Bunting, Blue Bunting, Prairie Warbler, Gnatcatcher and other song
birds. Hoping that Patricia will see her bird again and call me so that I
can get good photos and details. May return again to research the area.
If you would like to search the area too. Look for dirt path at the end of
the airport runway on hwy 101. The path is an electrical easement path
which you can walk all the way to hwy 70. I think it’s safe to use path,
but watch out for ticks.

 

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