Carolinabirds
Received From Subject
1/16/19 6:17 pm Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Birding Halifax Co NC
1/16/19 11:14 am Karen Lebing (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Whimbrel
1/16/19 10:31 am Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lark Sparrow, Myrtle Beach State Park SC
1/15/19 9:56 pm Bobby Koch (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Long-tailed Duck, Male
1/15/19 10:12 am <badgerboy...> Apparent Peregrine hovering at Mattamuskeet
1/14/19 8:05 am Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Harlequin Duck continues
1/14/19 7:18 am Jessie Dale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> albino dark-eyed junco?
1/13/19 3:27 pm Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...> FOS Purple finches
1/13/19 11:33 am Brad Sale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Continuing Lark Sparrow at Myrtle Beach State Park
1/13/19 9:16 am Harry D Sell <sellbirding...> Golden-crowned Sparrow photos
1/13/19 8:41 am Cindy Pirson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Pine Siskin flock
1/12/19 4:28 pm John Fussell <jfuss...> Bar-tailed Godwit continues
1/12/19 4:22 pm Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> ACE Basin - Roseate Spoonbills, W. Pelicans, RB Nuthatches, Pine Siskins, Purple Finches
1/12/19 10:56 am Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Rockingham County CBC results, it was rescheduled because of RAIN
1/12/19 10:54 am Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Cumberland County CBC results, another rainy one
1/12/19 10:53 am Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Rocky Mount CBC results, Dr. Marshall Brooks started this count!
1/12/19 8:45 am scompton1251 <scompton1251...> Goldeneyes Jordan Pond now
1/12/19 7:32 am Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Painted Bunting (male) - OBX Southern Shores, NC
1/12/19 7:26 am Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Ocean watch birds this morning
1/12/19 6:24 am Aaron Given (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Edisto Curlews
1/12/19 6:17 am Scott Hartley (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lark sparrow
1/12/19 6:14 am Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Harlequin duck at Bonner Bridge
1/12/19 6:09 am Will Whitsett <willwhitsett...> Edisto Curlews
1/11/19 1:52 pm Ginny Alfano (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Lark Sparrow continues at Myrtle Beach State Park
1/11/19 12:17 pm Andy Harrison (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lark Sparrow continues at Myrtle Beach State Park
1/11/19 11:56 am Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Jordan Lake Gulls redux
1/11/19 11:52 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Jordan Lake Gulls redux
1/11/19 11:44 am Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Jordan Lake Gulls redux
1/11/19 11:22 am Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Jordan Lake (NC) CBC
1/11/19 9:49 am Mary Bridges <maryhuot...> NC Lark Sparrow
1/10/19 4:53 pm Mac Williams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lee County (SC) airport birding & leucistic northern harrier
1/10/19 11:11 am Tami Vogel <tvogel...> RE: Kingfisher tangle
1/10/19 11:02 am Andy Smith <andrew.w.smith...> Re: Kingfisher tangle
1/10/19 10:51 am <badgerboy...> Kingfisher tangle
1/10/19 9:42 am rod g (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lark Sparrow
1/10/19 7:56 am Ritch Lilly <ritch...> Lark Sparrow iin Myrtle Beach
1/9/19 11:13 am Stephen Brooks (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Dr. Marshall Brooks, 1942 - 2019
1/8/19 3:48 pm <badgerboy...> Stone Mountain CBC Dec 30, 2018 recap
1/8/19 1:24 pm M Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lark Sparrow continues
1/8/19 10:43 am scompton1251 <scompton1251...> Greenville ponds today
1/8/19 6:27 am steve stevens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Long-tailed ducks, Ocracoke/Swanquarter ferry
1/7/19 2:44 pm Andy Harrison (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Two Western Kingbirds at James Island County Park
1/7/19 11:58 am Jay Wherley (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Photos of Asheville Swainson's Thrush on CBC gallery
1/7/19 8:36 am Me (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> King Eider at Bonner Bridge
1/7/19 7:56 am Me (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> King Eider, south jetty, Bonner Bridge, Oregon Inlet, NC
1/7/19 6:27 am Edith Tatum (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> My yard
1/7/19 6:07 am Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Photos of Merlin and Snow Buntings at HBSP plus Snow Bunting feeding behavior
1/7/19 5:06 am Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RFI Say's Phoebe
1/7/19 5:04 am Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Painted Bunting at James Is CP
1/6/19 6:13 pm rod g (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Where to locate Nelson's, Saltmarsh, and Seaside Sparrows at Huntington Beach State Park?
1/6/19 5:29 pm Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Nelson's/Saltmarsh Sparrow
1/6/19 4:50 pm steve stevens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Nelson's/Saltmarsh Sparrow
1/6/19 4:34 pm John Fussell <jofuss...> Common Eiders at the Cedar Island Ferry Terminal
1/6/19 1:25 pm Krystyna 00 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Photos of Merlin and Snow Buntings at HBSP plus Snow Bunting feeding behavior
1/6/19 11:19 am Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Brown Thrasher singing
1/6/19 9:05 am Steve <sshultz...> Jeanette’s Pier
1/6/19 8:41 am scompton1251 <scompton1251...> Re: Where to locate Nelson's, Saltmarsh, and Seaside Sparrows at Huntington Beach State Park?
1/6/19 8:12 am <badgerboy...> Leica alignment repair?
1/6/19 7:14 am Steve <sshultz...> Razorbills Jeanette’s Pier
1/6/19 6:25 am scompton1251 <scompton1251...> Re: Where to locate Nelson's, Saltmarsh, and Seaside Sparrows at Huntington Beach State Park?
1/6/19 6:10 am Craig Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Western Tanager Mount Plead-ant, SC continues.
1/6/19 6:05 am grayro (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Where to locate Nelson's, Saltmarsh, and Seaside Sparrows at Huntington Beach State Park?
1/5/19 8:20 pm Will Cook <cwcook...> Re: Unsubscribe
1/5/19 6:19 pm Len Kopka (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Merlin preyed upon Snow Bunting at HBSP
1/5/19 6:06 pm Lucas Hale <lhale4...> Unsubscribe
1/5/19 6:02 pm Eric Harrold (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Merlin preyed upon Snow Bunting at HBSP
1/5/19 5:49 pm Kenneth Konoski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Removal from email updates
1/5/19 5:45 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Merlin preyed upon Snow Bunting at HBSP
1/5/19 5:42 pm Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Photos of Merlin and Snow Buntings at HBSP plus Snow Bunting feeding behavior
1/5/19 5:30 pm Eric Harrold (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Merlin preyed upon Snow Bunting at HBSP
1/5/19 5:12 pm Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Merlin preyed upon Snow Bunting at HBSP
1/5/19 4:44 pm Eric Harrold (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Merlin preyed upon Snow Bunting at HBSP
1/5/19 3:53 pm Gilbert Grant (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Two Wood Storks in Onslow County, NC today
1/5/19 12:24 pm Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Merlin took shorebird beside Snow Bunting
1/5/19 9:28 am Robin T (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bald Eagles Scavenging
1/5/19 9:26 am John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Common Raven in downtown Raleigh
1/5/19 8:44 am Jerry <bogey...> Re: SnowBuntingsYes
1/5/19 7:47 am Cherrie Sneed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: SnowBuntingsYes
1/5/19 7:30 am Cherrie Sneed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> SnowBuntingsYes
1/5/19 7:26 am Steve <sshultz...> Western Kingbird Ocracoke
1/5/19 7:14 am Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Merlin preyed upon Snow Bunting at HBSP
1/5/19 4:51 am David Schroder (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Possible black rail at Bodie Island
1/2/19 5:35 pm Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Manx Shearwaters , Dare Cty NC
1/2/19 9:52 am Lester Coble (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Western Kingbird
1/2/19 9:46 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bird checklist for Fort Bragg and Camp Mackall, NC
1/2/19 8:36 am Audrey (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Manx Shearwaters , Dare Cty NC
1/2/19 8:26 am <badgerboy...> HCAS' Brookshire Park walk this Saturday 8AM
1/2/19 7:00 am Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...> Henderson Cty., NC
1/2/19 6:56 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> New Year's Day Birding - Wake NC
1/1/19 5:51 pm Robert Hibbitts (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> 1/12019 Report
1/1/19 5:03 pm scompton1251 <scompton1251...> Re: Snow Buntings
1/1/19 4:20 pm Chris Snook (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Snow Buntings
1/1/19 2:37 pm Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Continuing curlew at Edisto
1/1/19 11:30 am Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Upcoming Winter Pelagic Trips from Hatteras, NC
1/1/19 9:58 am Susan Hoffmann (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bluebird egg already?!
1/1/19 6:32 am Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Mattamuskeet question
1/1/19 5:58 am Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Gnatcatcher- Raleigh
1/1/19 4:31 am FRANK LAWKINS (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Snow Buntings
12/31/18 6:17 pm Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Ring-billed Gulls later here every year.
12/31/18 4:07 pm M Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: gull numbers at Jordan Lake, NC
12/31/18 3:52 pm Fuz Sanderson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: gull numbers at Jordan Lake, NC
12/31/18 3:30 pm John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: gull numbers at Jordan Lake, NC
12/31/18 2:56 pm Derb Carter <derbc...> Warblers
12/31/18 2:45 pm Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: gull numbers at Jordan Lake, NC
12/31/18 2:31 pm Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: gull numbers at Jordan Lake, NC
12/31/18 2:19 pm Derb Carter <derbc...> Nine warbler day
12/31/18 1:56 pm Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> gull numbers at Jordan Lake, NC
12/31/18 1:18 pm <hilton...> <hilton...> Hilton Pond 12/16/18 (Results: York/Rock Hill Christmas Bird Count)
12/31/18 9:47 am David Hart <david.hart...> Common Eider at Mason Inlet
12/31/18 9:09 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: First eBird Report
12/31/18 8:21 am Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> First eBird Report
12/31/18 8:09 am Jack Rogers <jack...> Black-headed Gull-Georgetown WTP, Georgetown co., SC
12/31/18 5:18 am Carol Chelette (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Story about red-cockaded woodpeckers' homes being rebuilt
12/30/18 9:04 pm Hal Broadfoot (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: Hyde Co Curlew Sandpiper info
12/30/18 7:39 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Hyde Co Curlew Sandpiper info
12/30/18 7:19 pm Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Hyde Co Curlew Sandpiper info
12/30/18 6:54 pm Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hyde Co Curlew Sandpiper info
12/30/18 2:05 pm Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fwd: eBird Report - stakeout Golden-crowned Sparrow, Harbinger (2018), Dec 29, 2018
12/30/18 1:36 pm Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Evening Grosbeak -- Caldwell County
12/30/18 1:20 pm Mary Bridges <maryhuot...> Lark Sparrow
12/30/18 12:12 pm Robert Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Patagonia picnic table at Harbinger
12/30/18 9:27 am scompton1251 <scompton1251...> No Snow Bunting this AM:HBSP
12/30/18 8:30 am Terry Seyden (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lake lingo swans
12/30/18 8:15 am Hilda Flamholtz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Continuing curlew at Edisto
12/30/18 7:16 am Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Curlew Sandpiper on Ocracoke near Hatteras ferry dock
12/30/18 6:40 am susan <susan...> Re: Golden-Crowned Sparrow
12/30/18 5:18 am Allen Bryan (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Whirlwind Visit to N.C.
12/29/18 7:23 pm Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Currituck Co Birding 12/29/2018
12/29/18 5:26 pm Corey, Ed <ed.corey...> Western Tanager -- Tyrrell County (29Dec2018)
12/29/18 3:58 pm Steve <sshultz...> Re: Golden-Crowned Sparrow
12/29/18 3:57 pm Steve <sshultz...> Re: Mattamusskeet NWR access?
12/29/18 2:28 pm Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> James Is County Park today
12/29/18 6:56 am Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Mattamusskeet NWR access?
12/29/18 5:49 am Craig Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fwd: Common Eiders Edisto Beach, SC
12/29/18 5:35 am Craig Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Common Eiders Edisto Beach, SC
12/28/18 5:19 pm Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: New North Carolina Year Bird Record
12/28/18 5:02 pm Robert Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Golden-crowned Sparrow
12/28/18 4:42 pm Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Say’s Phoebe apparently seen 12/22 - Pendleton, SC
12/28/18 3:36 pm John Fussell <jofuss...> waterthrush on the Cape Hatteras NC CBC
12/28/18 3:26 pm John Fussell <jofuss...> Common Eider at Cedar Island NC ferry terminal
12/28/18 11:29 am Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Razorbills and Kittiwakes at Cape Hatteras
12/28/18 9:39 am Jack Rogers <jack...> Cape Point, Dare co., NC this AM
12/28/18 7:14 am Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: New North Carolina Year Bird Record
12/28/18 7:03 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: New North Carolina Year Bird Record
12/28/18 6:50 am Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: New North Carolina Year Bird Record
12/28/18 6:43 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: New North Carolina Year Bird Record
12/28/18 6:32 am Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: New North Carolina Year Bird Record
12/28/18 6:29 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: New North Carolina Year Bird Record
12/28/18 6:00 am Michael Boatwright <mboater...> Re: Golden-crowned Sparrow
12/28/18 5:40 am Marbry Hopkins (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Golden-crowned Sparrow
12/27/18 8:00 pm Greg Massey <gmassey001...> New North Carolina Year Bird Record
12/27/18 6:06 pm Kyle Kittelberger (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Cape Point, Hatteras- KITTIWAKES, ALCIDS, SEA DUCKS
12/27/18 5:49 pm Craig Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Razorbill and Long-billed Curlews at Edisto Beach, South Edisto River
12/27/18 5:37 pm Michael Sampson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Osprey at Furman University Swan Lake
12/27/18 3:27 pm Steve Ritt (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Golden-crowned SP tips2
12/27/18 2:47 pm Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Video of snow geese feeding near Pungo Lake
12/27/18 2:35 pm Eric Harrold (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fly-by Merlin in Wilkes yesterday
12/27/18 2:28 pm Michael Boatwright <mboater...> Re: GCSP Harbinger - 12/26/18
12/27/18 2:13 pm Michael Boatwright <mboater...> Re: GCSP Harbinger - 12/26/18
12/27/18 2:04 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Black Guillemot photos on the CBC Photo Gallery
12/27/18 1:09 pm Jack Rogers <jack...> Re: Little Gull-Jeanette's Pier, Dare co., NC
12/27/18 12:48 pm Jack Rogers <jack...> Little Gull-Jeanette's Pier, Dare co., NC
12/27/18 6:39 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: GCSP Harbinger - 12/26/18
12/27/18 6:38 am Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: GCSP Harbinger - 12/26/18
12/27/18 6:35 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: GCSP Harbinger - 12/26/18
12/27/18 6:31 am Robert Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: GCSP Harbinger - 12/26/18
12/26/18 9:34 pm Steve Ritt (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> GCSP Harbinger - 12/26/18
12/26/18 4:20 pm Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> (History) Golden-crowned Sparrow in SC
12/26/18 3:08 pm Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Guillemot, Nags Head, NC
12/26/18 1:52 pm Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Common Eider
12/26/18 1:34 pm FRANK LAWKINS (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Common Eider
12/26/18 12:53 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Black Guillemot - Jennette's Pier - Dare, Co NC
12/26/18 12:00 pm Chris Snook (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Snow buntings
12/26/18 11:38 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Black Guillemot - Jennette's Pier - Dare, Co NC
12/26/18 10:45 am Jacob Farmer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Black Guillemot - Jennette's Pier - Dare, Co NC
12/26/18 9:23 am Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Golden Eagle at Lake Mattamuskeet main entrance impoundment
12/26/18 9:18 am jcox3222 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Snow buntings
12/26/18 8:00 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: Golden-crowned Sparrow continues
12/26/18 7:41 am Will Cook <cwcook...> Re: Golden-crowned Sparrow continues
12/26/18 7:38 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Greater Yellowlegs at Lake Wheeler, NC, yesterday
12/26/18 7:33 am Ken Yount (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Red Breasted Nuthatch
12/26/18 7:03 am Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Golden-crowned Sparrow continues
12/26/18 6:59 am Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Stilt Sandpipers, Pine Siskins, Vesper Sparrows - Donnelley WMA
12/26/18 5:52 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Golden-crowned Sparrow - eBird hotspot
12/26/18 4:33 am Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Common Eider in down town Charleston
12/25/18 5:49 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Golden-crowned Sparrow - eBird hotspot
12/25/18 5:27 pm Shelley Rutkin <shelleyr...> Golden-crowned Sparrow - eBird hotspot
12/25/18 2:06 pm Elisa Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Golden-crowned sparrow, currituck county, nc
12/25/18 4:41 am <tas176...> Currituck GCSP continues
12/24/18 7:07 pm Steve Ritt (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Golden-crowned Sparrow tips
12/24/18 12:57 pm Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Golden-crowned sparrow, Harbinger, NC
12/24/18 8:34 am Jerry <bogey...> Snow Bunting pair at HBSP early this morning.
12/24/18 7:34 am Caroline Harvey (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> James Island Country Park - Western Kingbird 12/24
12/24/18 7:34 am scbirder (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Golden-crowned Sparrow, Harbinger, NC
12/24/18 4:48 am Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Golden-crowned Sparrow
12/23/18 6:40 pm steve stevens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Pungo Lake Sandhill Cranes
12/23/18 5:45 pm John Grego <jrgrego...> Re: Golden Eagle, Congaree Swamp CBC
12/23/18 3:09 pm Lucas Bobay (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Ft.Fisher Goldeneye redux
12/23/18 2:37 pm <badgerboy...> Ft.Fisher Goldeneye redux
12/23/18 2:29 pm <badgerboy...> Broad-winged Hawk and Pine Warbler-High Country
12/23/18 1:35 pm Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Common Eider Charleston Harbor, SC
12/23/18 8:59 am Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Come
12/23/18 7:05 am Wayne Hoffman <whoffman...> Re: OBX: potential GOLDEN-crowned Sparrow - 12/23/18
12/23/18 6:49 am Steve Ritt (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> OBX: potential GOLDEN-crowned Sparrow - 12/23/18
12/23/18 6:15 am Bradley Dalton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Golden Eagle, Congaree CBC
12/23/18 5:47 am Cherrie Sneed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> CommonMerganser_JamesIslCoPark
12/22/18 10:24 am Brad Sale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Georgetown Co. Rarity Roundup
12/22/18 9:17 am Mary Bridges <maryhuot...> Lark Sparrow
12/22/18 5:21 am Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Snow Bunting Huntington Beach State Park, SC
12/21/18 10:14 pm Steve Ritt (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> OBX: Iceland Gull - 12/21/18
12/21/18 12:38 pm Chris Snook (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Western Kingbird
12/21/18 11:17 am Shawn R. Smolen-Morton <SSmolenMorton...> RE: Snow Bunting
12/21/18 6:30 am Randy (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Ducks at Twin Lakes of Sunset Beach
12/20/18 2:47 pm Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Are Nashville Warblers being under-reported in the winter in NC?
12/20/18 8:56 am evan wunder (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Common Goldeneye, Lee County, SC
12/20/18 8:28 am FRANK LAWKINS (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Snow Bunting
12/20/18 3:45 am scbirder (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: [gcbirdclub] Any recent searches for Say’s Phoebe (Pendleton, SC)?
12/19/18 4:57 pm Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Late report of Black Rail at Mattamuskeet
12/19/18 4:55 pm Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Any recent searches for Say’s Phoebe (Pendleton, SC)?
12/19/18 4:18 pm Mac Williams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Common Goldeneye, Lee County, SC
12/19/18 3:30 pm rod g (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Western Kingbird
12/19/18 3:18 pm rod g (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Western Kingbird
12/19/18 10:48 am <susan...> RE: Potential government shutdown could affect Christmas Bird Counts
12/19/18 10:42 am Shelley Rutkin <shelleyr...> RE: Refurbished camera for sale - SOLD
12/19/18 9:02 am Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Potential government shutdown could affect Christmas Bird Counts
12/19/18 6:09 am Shelley Rutkin <shelleyr...> Refurbished camera for sale
12/18/18 5:29 pm <hilton...> <hilton...> Hilton Pond 12/01/18 (Snowmageddon and #68,000)
12/18/18 5:13 pm cfeeney03 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Black-headed Gull and Western Kingbird, Georgetown
12/18/18 4:49 pm <hilton...> <hilton...> Hilton Pond 12/01/18 (Snowmageddon and #68,000)
12/18/18 12:59 pm Cherrie Sneed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> WesternKingbird_JamesIslCountyPark
12/17/18 8:22 pm Matt Wangerin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: [PiedmontBirdClub] Greensboro CBC
12/17/18 6:28 pm Elizabeth Link (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Greensboro CBC
12/17/18 4:15 pm Wendy Kaplan (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Blue Jay irruption
12/17/18 3:24 pm Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Blue Jay irruption
12/17/18 3:03 pm piephofft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Blue Jay irruption
12/17/18 2:58 pm piephofft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Southern Lake Norman CBC
12/17/18 2:54 pm M Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Common Goldeneye, Lee County, SC
12/17/18 2:36 pm Mac Williams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Common Goldeneye, Lee County, SC
12/17/18 12:01 pm Craig Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Common Merganser - James Island County Park, Charleston, SC
 
Back to top
Date: 1/16/19 6:17 pm
From: Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Birding Halifax Co NC
Greetings all

With rain forecast for Thursday and another winter storm for this coming weekend, I decided that today would be a good day to go out Birding for the day.

My goal was to Birding in Halifax Co NC all day; however, my first stop ended up being in Warren Co where I heard an American Woodcock just as I got out of my car at 0630 hrs. I thought oh boy what a way to start a Life List for Halifax Co NC. But after submitting my list I found out that I was still in Warren Co. Still a great bird that I needed for Warren Co.

The rest of the stops were in Halifax Co NC where I tallied 53 species for the day. The weather was great and only a little wind at the Roanoke Rapids Lake.

The one bird that I was hoping to see but missed was the Loggerhead Shrike near Halifax Co Airport.

I came a cross a very large flock of Common Grackles and scanned through the flock as they flew back and forth across the road and as they spread out in a field and could not find a single Starling or BH Cowbird in the flock

Following is Trip List for the day.

Good Birding Always

Number of Checklists: 11
Number of Taxa: 54

Checklists included in this summary:
(1): 169–299 Jessie Shearin Rd, Littleton US-NC (36.4146,-77.9878)
Date: Jan 16, 2019 at 6:30 AM
(2): 1700–1898 Faulcon Rd, Littleton US-NC (36.4504,-77.8720)
Date: Jan 16, 2019 at 6:55 AM
(3): Roanoke Rapids Lake
Date: Jan 16, 2019 at 7:25 AM
(4): Roanoke Canal Trail (Upper)
Date: Jan 16, 2019 at 8:45 AM
(5): Cedarwood Cemetery Roanoke Rapids US-NC (36.4724,-77.6651)
Date: Jan 16, 2019 at 11:25 AM
(6): 1701–2099 Aurelian Springs Rd, Halifax US-NC (36.3825,-77.6446)
Date: Jan 16, 2019 at 12:52 PM
(7): Grapevine Rd, Halifax US-NC (36.3433,-77.6583)
Date: Jan 16, 2019 at 1:00 PM
(8): Jasmine Ln, Halifax US-NC (36.3274,-77.6492)
Date: Jan 16, 2019 at 1:10 PM
(9): Halifax Northampton Regional Airport, Halifax US-NC (36.3284,-77.6381)
Date: Jan 16, 2019 at 2:00 PM
(10): 990–1006 Grapevine Rd, Halifax US-NC (36.3179,-77.6477)
Date: Jan 16, 2019 at 2:35 PM
(11): Medoc Mountain State Park
Date: Jan 16, 2019 at 3:25 PM

10 Canada Goose -- (3),(10)
6 Wood Duck -- (10)
7 Canvasback -- (3)
5 Pied-billed Grebe -- (3)
4 Horned Grebe -- (3)
47 Mourning Dove -- (4),(8)
2 Killdeer -- (10)
1 American Woodcock -- (1)
3 Bonaparte's Gull -- (3)
4060 Ring-billed Gull -- (3),(4)
2 Herring Gull -- (3),(4)
1 Common Loon -- (3)
18 Double-crested Cormorant -- (3),(4)
3 Great Blue Heron (Blue form) -- (3),(4)
27 Black Vulture -- (8),(10)
41 Turkey Vulture -- (4),(5),(7),(8),(9),(10),(11)
1 Northern Harrier -- (8)
2 Bald Eagle -- (3),(4)
2 Red-shouldered Hawk -- (2),(5)
5 Red-tailed Hawk -- (7),(8),(9),(10)
1 Belted Kingfisher -- (10)
1 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker -- (3)
5 Red-bellied Woodpecker -- (3),(4),(5),(11)
1 Downy Woodpecker -- (5)
4 Pileated Woodpecker -- (3),(4),(11)
4 Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) -- (5),(11)
2 American Kestrel -- (6),(7)
4 Blue Jay -- (4),(11)
29 American Crow -- (2),(3),(4),(5),(7),(8),(9),(11)
1 Fish Crow -- (3)
4 Carolina Chickadee -- (3),(4),(11)
2 Tufted Titmouse -- (4)
2 Brown-headed Nuthatch -- (3)
16 Carolina Wren -- (2),(3),(4),(5),(8),(9),(11)
1 Golden-crowned Kinglet -- (11)
2 Ruby-crowned Kinglet -- (4),(5)
25 Eastern Bluebird -- (4),(5),(7)
2 Hermit Thrush -- (4)
12 American Robin -- (11)
4 Northern Mockingbird -- (3),(4),(5),(8)
17 European Starling -- (3),(4),(8),(9)
3 House Finch -- (3)
4 American Goldfinch -- (3),(4)
1 Field Sparrow -- (11)
5 Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) -- (3)
12 White-throated Sparrow -- (4),(5),(11)
2 Savannah Sparrow -- (8)
12 Song Sparrow -- (4),(8),(11)
2 Eastern Towhee -- (2),(11)
1 Eastern Meadowlark -- (8)
8 Red-winged Blackbird -- (8)
6000 Common Grackle -- (10)
3 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) -- (3),(4)
3 Northern Cardinal -- (4),(5)

This trip summary was created using the eBird app for iPhone and iPad.
See eBird for more information.


From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>


 

Back to top
Date: 1/16/19 11:14 am
From: Karen Lebing (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Whimbrel
I know many folks on this listserve are coming to the Outer Banks for the
CBC this weekend. If you travel down Hatteras Island, you might want to
stop at ramp 30. For the last 3 days, there's been a hungry whimbrel
feeding in the grass right along NC12. It does not seem to be too afraid
of cars, but it keeps its distance. You can see photos of the bird in my
eBird report at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S51733253&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=4qAqHxEjRHnonxPWqndfmAezaUimrQ8WQZxwc0NBSLE&s=bNaivyom6-Zau0ytmdFIKpzs6M0ezzN0DY-XUwNA3kw&e=.

Karen Lebing
Waves, Hatteras Island, NC
January 16, 2019

 

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Date: 1/16/19 10:31 am
From: Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lark Sparrow, Myrtle Beach State Park SC
Lark Sparrow observed today on grassy lawn near shelter 2.
Pam Ford
Charleston, SC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 1/15/19 9:56 pm
From: Bobby Koch (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Long-tailed Duck, Male
I was getting work done on my truck at RD sawyer in Manteo, waiting on my wife to meet me with the baby so we could have a family day. After having 2+ cups of coffee at Front porch while awaiting the where are you text, i decided to hoof it and walk to Festival Park, with a camera and bins of course. The boardwalk is a treat. Near the dry-docked sailboats I noticed a very white head on a distant swimming bird. The gazebo near RM lighthouse was no help, it was still a bit too far. Went around festival park boardwalk with intent and finally got to the V in the dock, near the stage. All of a sudden a bird with an unusual flight pattern was headed my way. Focus poor, not ready, yet perfect timing. If i had one more sip of coffee or looked at a yellow rumped warbler one second longer, this would not have happened. Just wild to think. Snapped the puckered up shots i could. He was headed north towards Jockeys ridge. The wife never texted, the boy was having a bad morning, unlike his dad.

Get Outlook for iOS<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__aka.ms_o0ukef&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Jvfp4BgMwlotpCyBNAD2mh880kZRfOe7ElC4RUdGcDw&s=AuJKDnq_jonKk2-B2V3g3soVMah21bRe5LTfEwpE51c&e=>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/15/19 10:12 am
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Apparent Peregrine hovering at Mattamuskeet
Yesterday at Mattamuskeet, on the wildlife drive, we saw what looked
like a Peregrine Falcon hovering on beating wings in the marsh along the
wildlife loop. I had never seen a Peregrine do that and there doesn't
seem to be any knowledge of the behavior occurring in the species. It
did this several times for about 10 seconds each time, at a height of
about 30 feet above the ground, in a very constant and strong wind,
perhaps 15 to 20 mph.

Having seen several Kestrels during the trip, this bird was obviously
heavier, with slower, more powerful wingbeats. Nor did it remind me of a
Rough-legged hawk hovering on stiff, quick wingbeats. Rather, it looked
in every way like a normal Peregrine falcon, other than the odd behavior.

Might be something to keep an eye out for if anyone is there.

Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC


 

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Date: 1/14/19 8:05 am
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Harlequin Duck continues
The harlequin duck at the north end of Pea Island at the Bonner Bridge continues to be seen today, 14 January. It spends a lot of time under the bridge and on the west side of the bridge, which is closed, so I may take some patience to see this bird.

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 1/14/19 7:18 am
From: Jessie Dale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: albino dark-eyed junco?
i believe i had an albino dark-eyed junco at my feeders this morning. i managed to get one halfway decent photo. i have posted it to the carolina birds photo gallery.

jessie dale
linville, nc
avery county
 

Back to top
Date: 1/13/19 3:27 pm
From: Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...>
Subject: FOS Purple finches
Spotted two female purple finches at my sunflower chips feeder yesterday.

Frank HamiltonCharleston, SC

 

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Date: 1/13/19 11:33 am
From: Brad Sale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Continuing Lark Sparrow at Myrtle Beach State Park
The Lark Sparrow continues between Shelter 2 and the south end restrooms at MBSP at 2pm today.

I did try, unsuccessfully, for two hours this morning.

Brad Sale
Moncks Corner, SC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 1/13/19 9:16 am
From: Harry D Sell <sellbirding...>
Subject: Golden-crowned Sparrow photos
I was able to get some photos a week ago. Didn’t post as were not particularly good photos, but I was able to get a couple of photos showing some yellow in the crown, I decided some may be interested so posted photos to my site. By the way Greg Massey suggested we scatter some seed with millet and milo, which we found at Dollar General across the street. That seemed to keep it in the open for a little longer. I have had cataract surgery and feel I might be better able to see colors and brightness again, so in the future I will be editing and adding more photos I haven’t previously posted.

Hope is worth your taking a look, enjoyed taking the photos and seeing several birding acquaintances again.

Harry D Sell

Boiling Spring Lakes
Brunswick County, NC
www.pbase.com/sellbirding
 

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Date: 1/13/19 8:41 am
From: Cindy Pirson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Pine Siskin flock
First time this season, pine siskin flock has arrived in my yard. I’m 20 miles north of Charlotte. A good 3 dozen (conservative count) voracious siskins have descended on my feeders. Last year they arrived about the same time and stayed for months. It is great to see them (although my birdseed bill doubles now until they head back north months from now!). They join the other winter regulars - purple and house finch, pine warblers, juncos, tufted titmouse, carolina chickadee and wren, thrasher, mockingbird, bluebirds, goldfinch, white throats, hermit thrush, cardinals and woodpeckers. We’ve also been hearing a male and a female great horned owl hooting almost daily in the early morning hours very close by. Our yard backs up to Lake Norman State Park. -Cindy Pirson

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 1/12/19 4:28 pm
From: John Fussell <jfuss...>
Subject: Bar-tailed Godwit continues
The Bar-tailed Godwit is apparently overwintering at east Shackleford Banks.
Again.

Marty Wall and I saw it on the "Hidden Flats" today. Toward the end of the
rising tide (late morning) we saw it toward the western end of the flats.
At the beginning of the falling tide (early afternoon) we saw it on the
eastern end of the flats.

We saw virtually no shorebirds on the ocean side of the island at high tide,
probably because the high tide was not very high. (However, the presence of
a Peregrine and later a Merlin there probably didn't help.)

It was kind of raw out there, especially since we were looking into the wind
much of the day.

We found a cold-stunned Green Sea Turtle by the tidal creek that feeds the
Hidden Flats. And at least 14 others were recovered over at Cape Lookout
today. They are all at the CMAST "spa" now.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

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Date: 1/12/19 4:22 pm
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: ACE Basin - Roseate Spoonbills, W. Pelicans, RB Nuthatches, Pine Siskins, Purple Finches
I birded Donnelley WMA, Bennett's Point Road and Cheeha-Combahee
Plantation (private property) today.

Of note at Donnelley: the lodge pond has been drawn down again - no
Stilt Sandpipers but lots of common shorebirds. Probably won't last
long - they are repeatedly draining and filling the lodge pond to dump
water from the Savage Backwater, after it has traversed the greentree
/ marshy impoundment between them.

Around midday, there was an extraordinary spectacle in a ricefield
beside Bennetts Point Road. Driving southeast on Bennetts Point Road
from US-17, 0.8 miles past the place where Social Hall Creek runs
under the road (and people often fish by the side of the road) , on
the right is a big semi-marshy impoundment (part of Social Hall
Plantation). It had been lowered and there were a LOT of waterbirds
feeding and flying back and forth. 400+ White Pelicans, 2500+ White
Ibis and several hundred Snowy Egrets and probably a couple of hundred
Great Egrets. Also present were Little Blue Herons, Tricolored
Herons, a lone Wood Stork and a couple of Glossy Ibis.

Donnelley highlights included Red-cockaded Woodpeckers and two
Red-breasted Nuthatches just past the main entrance kiosk, 30 Roseate
Spoonbills with lots of other wading birds at Fishburne Pond, Rusty
Blackbirds (mixed with Common Grackles) in the back left corner of the
big pond by the long dike near the HQ, and 13 Vesper Sparrows, 7 Pine
Siskins and a nice Fox Squirrel in the central dove field area.

At Cheeha-Combahee there were Purple Finches in two locations with
Pine Siskins accompanying them in one. At one point, two of the
Purple Finches left the Sweet Gum they had been feeding in, and
started scraping wax off Chinese Tallow berries. Red-cockaded
Woodpeckers were conspicuous in two locations. At the main
Red-cockaded Woodpecker colony, a Red-breasted Nuthatch was honking
along with a couple of White-breasted and a small flock of
Brown-headed Nuthatches for a nuthatch trio.

I also birded Cheeha-Combahee in the late afternoon a couple of days
ago. Highlights were a nice covey of Northern Bobwhites, several
RCWs, 6 King Rails + 2 Virginia Rails+ 1 Sora + 9 Clapper Rails all
vocalizing within earshot from a freshwater/tidal marsh dike, and a
wonderful close-range encounter at sundown with three River Otters.
They were eating Striped Mullet in a narrow little gully at the
outflow from a rice trunk into a tributary of the Old Chehaw River.

A couple of photos of the otters munching mullet are on my Flickr
page: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_offshorebirder2_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Fdpo-U_vbQ7BMEKp86f_FJdZpkGrZZ0cMZ3cvaqR6wk&s=nXCqDjk-uCQkn-HlXBTz75c3lvN60e0v0dG-5HfmyU8&e=

flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
-------
"These days I prefer to hunt with a camera. A good photograph demands
more skill from the hunter, better nerves and more patience than the
rifle shot."
-- Bror Blixen
 

Back to top
Date: 1/12/19 10:56 am
From: Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Rockingham County CBC results, it was rescheduled because of RAIN
The 7th Rockingham County Christmas Bird Count was held on Dec 26, 2018
with temperatures ranging from 25-49 under clear skies and no wind.



9 observers in 8 parties tallied our 7 year average of 76 species. We
tallied our third highest 3,745 (average 3,522) total birds led by 668
European Starling, 550 Ring-billed Gulls, 256 Canada Goose and 248 Black
Vulture. Two birds were seen during count week Great Horned Owl and Fox
Sparrow.



One bird was new to the count checklist and long overdue, a single
Brown-headed Cowbird! Second count records include two parties with a
single Bald Eagle east and west of the Mayo River, likely the same one; a
Northern Saw-whet Owl at dawn; a total of four Red-headed Woodpecker by two
parties; and a single Palm Warbler hanging out with some bluebirds. Third
count records include Northern Bobwhite calling at dawn; Herring Gull at
the landfill; Fish Crow by two parties.



Misses include Pied-billed Grebe (1st miss), Coopers Hawk (4th), American
Coot (3rd), House Wren (2nd), American Pipit (3rd) and Pine Warbler (1st
miss!). Last year I asked after 6 years when will we ever find a
Brown-headed Cowbird and this year we did. So now I will ask with hope
after 7 years when we will find Cormorant, Snipe or Common Yellowthroat…



Thank you all so much for your help! GREAT JOB!!! Our continuing goal is
to break 80 species…not bad for a foothills count!



Mark your calendars

Rockingham County Spring Bird Count May 1, 2019

Rockingham County Fall Count Sep. 13, 2019

Rockingham County Christmas Bird Count December 23, 2019

--
Brian Bockhahn
<birdranger248...>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/12/19 10:54 am
From: Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Cumberland County CBC results, another rainy one
The TENTH “revived” Cumberland County CBC was held on December 20, 2018
under cloudy skies, mild temperatures from 44-58 degrees and light rain
followed by more rain and then heavy rain. 8 counters in five parties
tallied 84 species (average of 81) and 4,006 total birds (average 7,766)
led by our regular leader 811 Red-winged Blackbird, 421 American Robin and
346 Rock Pigeon.



Two species were new to the CBC checklist, long awaited Gadwall showed up
in one flock in a pond and a single bird with Mallards in a flooded field.
And after 10 years of pre-dawn searching a single Short-eared Owl along
Daughtry Road was a pleasant surprise! Other highlights include second
count record Great Egret and Baltimore Oriole.



Misses include Double Crested Cormorant, Black Vulture, Bald Eagle, Coopers
Hawk, KILLDEER!, Belted Kingfisher and Fish Crow.





Mark your calendars for next year’s count December 19, 2019



Thanks to everyone who helped out!

--
Brian Bockhahn
<birdranger248...>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/12/19 10:53 am
From: Brian Bockhahn (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Rocky Mount CBC results, Dr. Marshall Brooks started this count!
The 22nd Rocky Mount CBC was held on December 14, 2018 under cloudy skies
and cooler temperatures 38-47 degrees but nearly an all day rain. 9 soggy
counters in the field and 1 feeder counter tallied our second highest
total *100
species*, in the RAIN!* (*average 88). Not as surprising we tallied our
second lowest with 5,715 birds (average 8,472). Most numerous birds were
1,300 Brown-headed Cowbirds, 580 Ring-billed Gull, 578 Red-winged Blackbird
and 486 Tundra Swan.



Highlights include one first count record bird, a single Blue-gray
Gnatcatcher along the railroad tracks to Swift Creek, finally! Second
records include Greater Scaup and Great Egret at 97 ponds, Green Heron
along Gay Road and Black-and-white Warbler along Seven Bridges Road. Third
count birds include 4 Sandhill Cranes in the floodplain swamps along Seven
Bridges Road, same spot as a few years back.



Misses include Northern Bobwhite (for the 14 time), Wilson’s Snipe (13th
miss), Gray Catbird (3rd miss) and for the first time AMERICAN PIPIT, Palm
Warbler (4th) and another rainy day first miss FOX SPARROW, which have not
been common on other counts too.



Thanks to all my intrepid counters for a great count!



Mark your calendars for next year’s count: December 20, 2019.

--
Brian Bockhahn
<birdranger248...>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/12/19 8:45 am
From: scompton1251 <scompton1251...>
Subject: Goldeneyes Jordan Pond now
Two Goldeneyes in Jordan Pond now. Northern Greenville County, SC.
Steve Compton843 709-2554
Sent from my Verizon LG Smartphone
 

Back to top
Date: 1/12/19 7:32 am
From: Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Painted Bunting (male) - OBX Southern Shores, NC
Good Morning,

The male Painted Bunting that came to my backyard bird feeders is still
here today. The bird is very skiddish, but with patience, great views can
be had.

I am accepting visitors, so feel free to reach out.

Happy Birding,

Jim Gould
Southern Shores, NC

 

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Date: 1/12/19 7:26 am
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Ocean watch birds this morning
Mike Gosselin and I found some good birds ocean watching from Jennettes Pier in Nags Head this morning. Lots of razorbills and red-throated loons, lots of black scoters with a few surf scoters mixed in. Good numbers of Bonaparte's Gulls with one Little Gull. One jaeger spp, and about a dozen Manx Shearwater.

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 1/12/19 6:24 am
From: Aaron Given (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Edisto Curlews
One bird was seen yesterday afternoon. With low tide occurring around 6pm this evening there may only be a short window of viewing if it/they are there.

Aaron Given
Charleston, SC


________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Will Whitsett <willwhitsett...>
Sent: Saturday, January 12, 2019 9:08 AM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Edisto Curlews

Has any body seen the Curlews at Edisto beach recently? Or does anyone know where they were last seen?
Thanks
Will Whitsett
Mount Pleasant SC

 

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Date: 1/12/19 6:17 am
From: Scott Hartley (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lark sparrow
Still present this morning in same location as previously reported.

Good birding!

Scott
Myrtle Beach State Park, SC

 

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Date: 1/12/19 6:14 am
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Harlequin duck at Bonner Bridge
Mike Gosselin and I just found a male harlequin duck on the north end of Pea island at the Bonner Bridge.
Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 1/12/19 6:09 am
From: Will Whitsett <willwhitsett...>
Subject: Edisto Curlews
Has any body seen the Curlews at Edisto beach recently? Or does anyone know where they were last seen?
Thanks
Will Whitsett
Mount Pleasant SC
 

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Date: 1/11/19 1:52 pm
From: Ginny Alfano (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Lark Sparrow continues at Myrtle Beach State Park
My sincerest thanks to Andy Harrison for posting the location where he and
Carl Miller saw the Lark Sparrow today. I believe you are the gentlemen my
husband and I spoke with this afternoon. Your post enabled me to hurry back
down there from where I'm camping in the park. I was able to locate the
bird a little bit further north and to the right of the bath house. He was
with four White-throated Sparrows. I was able to get some fairly good
photos right from the truck since he wasn't very shy. This is a life bird
for me, so thank you again Andy and Carl!

*Ginny Alfano*
*Cleveland, NY*

*"I think that I cannot preserve my health and spirits, unless I spend four
hours a day at least — and it is commonly more than that — sauntering
through the woods and over the hills and fields, absolutely free from all
worldly engagements. " *
*Henry David Thoreau *






On Fri, Jan 11, 2019 at 3:17 PM Andy Harrison <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> All,
>
> Carl Miller and I just got excellent looks at the continuing Lark Sparrow,
> discovered yesterday by John Hutchins and later observed and reported by
> Ritch Lilly and others. The sparrow was feeding on the ground near the
> bathhouse across from boardwalk number 1 (just north of the pier).
>
> Andy Harrison
> Charleston, SC
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>

 

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Date: 1/11/19 12:17 pm
From: Andy Harrison (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lark Sparrow continues at Myrtle Beach State Park
All,

Carl Miller and I just got excellent looks at the continuing Lark Sparrow, discovered yesterday by John Hutchins and later observed and reported by Ritch Lilly and others. The sparrow was feeding on the ground near the bathhouse across from boardwalk number 1 (just north of the pier).

Andy Harrison
Charleston, SC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 1/11/19 11:56 am
From: Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Jordan Lake Gulls redux
That may well be true. I just didn't feel comfortable pressing him for
actual numbers and don't have time right now to check out the landfill for
myself.

On Fri, Jan 11, 2019 at 2:52 PM Christopher Hill <Chill...> wrote:

> Absent any other evidence, I put almost no weight on the landfill
> operator’s comment, especially if he referenced the working face (as per
> your other email}. The working face at the landfill I frequent is always a
> maelstrom of gulls, whether the total number at the dump is 2000 or 20000.
> It’s the number just sitting around and loafing that really varies. And I
> have had the dump operator tell me there were "lots of gulls on top of the
> big hill, like 500!” Which is to say, the guy who oversees this landfill
> does not have any idea what a lot of gulls is in this context.
>
> C
>
>
> On Jan 11, 2019, at 2:44 PM, Norman Budnitz <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
> I have gathered information and the comments from various members of this
> email list, and written a blog article that I have posted on the New Hope
> Audubon Society website. You can read the blog here.
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com_-3Furl-3Dhttps-253A-252F-252Furldefense.proofpoint.com-252Fv2-252Furl-253Fu-253Dhttps-2D3A-5F-5Fwww.newhopeaudubon.org-5Fblog-5Fjordan-2D2Dlake-2D2Dgulls-2D2Drevisited-5F-2526d-253DDwMFaQ-2526c-253DimBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj-5FgZ4adc-2526r-253DymRCw6Q-2DsBitug-5FrdeO1Tokz-2DI-5FSX2LQN2-5FOcvlal9U-2526m-253D7Xn266-2DJDuhUs5hxF3xIU0yrLFROjqchlHdKdvsNF60-2526s-253Dgx0dvQsKP8S7KcOGy16gGytnn5zMsaUYNM-2DOEYhrReM-2526e-253D-26data-3D02-257C01-257CChill-2540coastal.edu-257Cc6af07ba380f4a88f61408d677fd3d5b-257Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797-257C0-257C0-257C636828326901059160-26sdata-3DjFyR-252FPtPpeRZXAf4zZCkXaUlUSQqLosV-252BCZIa0oukWY-253D-26reserved-3D0&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=D2tgQHuOqcoIvkZm7VUB0vIxTYe6PRyoZvcjWGX7D40&s=k4FS47pDPVt8l6ybn3jIT1k1wDBCuVgduZ_3njgZE78&e=>
>
> The short story is that there were more gulls dispersed throughout the
> Jordan Lake count circle than I originally thought, but there were still
> many fewer than in past years. The person I spoke to at the landfill said
> their numbers were the same as in previous years. We can only speculate at
> this time, but it will be worth seeing what things look like in a month or
> so once the lake level has returned to normal.
>
> --
> Norm Budnitz
> Orange County
> North Carolina
>
>
>

--
Norm Budnitz
Orange County
North Carolina

 

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Date: 1/11/19 11:52 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Jordan Lake Gulls redux
Absent any other evidence, I put almost no weight on the landfill operator’s comment, especially if he referenced the working face (as per your other email}. The working face at the landfill I frequent is always a maelstrom of gulls, whether the total number at the dump is 2000 or 20000. It’s the number just sitting around and loafing that really varies. And I have had the dump operator tell me there were "lots of gulls on top of the big hill, like 500!” Which is to say, the guy who oversees this landfill does not have any idea what a lot of gulls is in this context.

C

On Jan 11, 2019, at 2:44 PM, Norman Budnitz <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

I have gathered information and the comments from various members of this email list, and written a blog article that I have posted on the New Hope Audubon Society website. You can read the blog here.<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com_-3Furl-3Dhttps-253A-252F-252Furldefense.proofpoint.com-252Fv2-252Furl-253Fu-253Dhttps-2D3A-5F-5Fwww.newhopeaudubon.org-5Fblog-5Fjordan-2D2Dlake-2D2Dgulls-2D2Drevisited-5F-2526d-253DDwMFaQ-2526c-253DimBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj-5FgZ4adc-2526r-253DymRCw6Q-2DsBitug-5FrdeO1Tokz-2DI-5FSX2LQN2-5FOcvlal9U-2526m-253D7Xn266-2DJDuhUs5hxF3xIU0yrLFROjqchlHdKdvsNF60-2526s-253Dgx0dvQsKP8S7KcOGy16gGytnn5zMsaUYNM-2DOEYhrReM-2526e-253D-26data-3D02-257C01-257CChill-2540coastal.edu-257Cc6af07ba380f4a88f61408d677fd3d5b-257Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797-257C0-257C0-257C636828326901059160-26sdata-3DjFyR-252FPtPpeRZXAf4zZCkXaUlUSQqLosV-252BCZIa0oukWY-253D-26reserved-3D0&d=DwIGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=k5wEBTgi18HrYHBc7hYUHKiEVvkApmB9ZbdREe_futs&s=Y7Ocii5m_wQWhl8WhU_zwDLY_DRPWitu1r2tVO9LJCk&e=>

The short story is that there were more gulls dispersed throughout the Jordan Lake count circle than I originally thought, but there were still many fewer than in past years. The person I spoke to at the landfill said their numbers were the same as in previous years. We can only speculate at this time, but it will be worth seeing what things look like in a month or so once the lake level has returned to normal.

--
Norm Budnitz
Orange County
North Carolina


 

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Date: 1/11/19 11:44 am
From: Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Jordan Lake Gulls redux
I have gathered information and the comments from various members of this
email list, and written a blog article that I have posted on the New Hope
Audubon Society website. You can read the blog here.
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.newhopeaudubon.org_blog_jordan-2Dlake-2Dgulls-2Drevisited_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=7Xn266-JDuhUs5hxF3xIU0yrLFROjqchlHdKdvsNF60&s=gx0dvQsKP8S7KcOGy16gGytnn5zMsaUYNM-OEYhrReM&e=>

The short story is that there were more gulls dispersed throughout the
Jordan Lake count circle than I originally thought, but there were still
many fewer than in past years. The person I spoke to at the landfill said
their numbers were the same as in previous years. We can only speculate at
this time, but it will be worth seeing what things look like in a month or
so once the lake level has returned to normal.

--
Norm Budnitz
Orange County
North Carolina

 

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Date: 1/11/19 11:22 am
From: Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Jordan Lake (NC) CBC
Jordan Lake, NC, Christmas Bird Count

*December 30, 2018*

*Compiler's Notes*



The Jordan Lake Christmas Bird Count was held on December 30, 2018. Though
there was a little drizzle around dawn, that quickly passed, and the rest
of day was rather mild with moderate temperatures (46-60 °F), overcast
skies, and no wind. However, even though rain was not a factor, water
certainly was. Jordan Lake was at 230 feet, which is 14 feet above normal.
Central North Carolina had a record year in terms of rainfall, with
Hurricane Florence and Tropical Storm Michael and wave after wave of fronts
coming through that kept us very wet. With the lake level being so high
(to prevent flooding in communities downstream like Fayetteville and
Wilmington), areas where are parties usually count became inaccessible.
Despite that, we actually had an above average count in several ways,
except perhaps for Ring-billed Gulls.

Our soggy-footed counters reported 98 species, well above our 10-year
average of 92 and just a few species less than our record of 102. Brian
Bockhahn reported 13 species of ducks, seen while paddling his kayak around
Vista Point in areas that would normally be dry land. That’s called
foresight. He threw his kayak on his truck at the last minute. We also
reported 26,018 individual birds. This number requires some explanation.
It is well below our 10-year average of 52,345. As in past years, the
number of Ring-billed gulls have a profound affect on our totals. If we
subtract the gull numbers from our total, we get 15,814. Our 10-year
non-gull average is 15,117. So, not counting gulls, we had an average
count!

The Ring-billed Gull story is fascinating (at least to this compiler).
Since the opening of the South Wake County Landfill in 2008, a significant
source of food for these consummate scavengers, the gulls have spent their
days at the landfill and then fly to Jordan Lake to roost each night. They
have typically gathered in numbers ranging from 30,000 to 45,000 gulls
(with a high of 65,000 in 2011) in the deep part of the lake between
Ebenezer and Vista Points. This year that roost was estimated at only
about 2,000. That number is an order of magnitude less than what has
become ‘normal’ for the lake in winter. I have gathered some information
to make sense of what might be going on. The following is a short
summary. For more detail, I will post a blog article to the New Hope
Audubon Society website here <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.newhopeaudubon.org_blog_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=2f9I73wokx4WR7aCea-C-s_QrFoOusoxfkSwtIdak9k&s=-1ICoL5DivGUyNVNqG3HQNgc6KqAPUp4pPhCouhGewk&e=>.

· The total estimate for the entire count circle was 10,000 gulls.

· They were dispersed to various areas as follows: about 2,000 near
Ebenezer Point, about 5,000 from Farrington south to White Oak Creek, and
about 3,000 on Harris Lake. Brian Bockhahn reports that there were about
4,000 gulls on Falls Lake on January 4th.

· Roy Baldwin, the Solid Waste Facilities Manager for Wake County
responded to my inquiry about the number of gulls at the landfill as
follows: "We have just as many [gulls] as ever on our working face.”

· When we did this same count on January 3, 2016, the lake level was
232 feet, or 16 feet above normal—2 feet higher than this year. That year,
we estimated the Ebenezer roost at 30,000 gulls. Except for about 1,000
gulls near Farrington, there were no other significant concentrations
elsewhere on the lake or at Harris Lake.

If the total number of gulls at the landfill is essentially unchanged and
the combined number of gulls at Jordan and Harris Lakes is significantly
decreased, where are all those other gulls? Inquiring minds would like to
know. If the lake level returns to normal next year, or even later this
year while the gulls are still in the area, we might get more insight into
possible explanations. Stay tuned.

Fifty-nine birders (10-year average: 56) in 23 parties (average: 23) put in
114 party-hours (average: 123). Leaving out the gulls, that’s
approximately 139 birds per party-hour, a bit above our 10-year average of
123 birds per party-hour. (Including gulls, those numbers are 442 and 423
b/p-h, respectively.)



We had several new high species counts:



· Red-headed Woodpeckers—73 (previous high was 39 in 2014)

· Red-bellied Woodpeckers—242 (206 in 2007)

· Red-winged Blackbirds—3,252 (3,204 in 2007)

· Brown-headed Cowbirds—71 (70 in 2011)



The only misses of regularly occurring species were Wilson’s Snipe,
Savannah Sparrow, and Palm Warbler.



Observers also found some relatively unusual species:



· Canvasback (1)—Brian Bockhahn

· Greater Scaup (6)—Brian Bockhahn

· Merlin (1)— Andy Upshaw, Mark Owens, Rouse Wilson

· Common Raven (1)—Norm Budnitz (very close to a stone quarry where
one was reported in 2016)

· Red-breasted Nuthatches (18)—various parties in this irruption year

· Gray Catbirds (2)—Bishop party, Patsy Bailey, Gene Kingsley

· Rusty Blackbirds (10)—Tom Driscoll, Elizabeth Keating, Elizabeth
Lago, Don Pelly

· Common Yellowthroat (1)—Brian Bockhahn



Brian Bockhahn reported 69 species this year, while Jonathan Cantrell and
Fuz Sanderson found 59 species. It was the 13 species of ducks that
carried the day for Brian: Wood Duck, Northern Shoveler, Gadwall, American
Wigeon, Mallard, American Black Duck, Green-winged Teal, Canvasback,
Ring-necked Duck, Greater Scaup, Lesser Scaup, Hooded Merganser, and
Red-breasted Merganser. Perhaps he was really at Lake Mattamuskeet!



We had 59 birders in 23 parties. We put in 114 party hours (91 on foot, 19
by car, 4 by kayak), 182 party miles (70 on foot, 107 by car, 5 by kayak),
and 3 hours nocturnal birding.



Thank you all for counting.

Norm Budnitz, compiler

 

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Date: 1/11/19 9:49 am
From: Mary Bridges <maryhuot...>
Subject: NC Lark Sparrow
Continues at Willowdale Cemetery in Goldsboro. Observed for about 20 minutes this a.m. associating with two Chippies and a bluebird, VERY cooperative, perching on headstones, feeding in the grass and giving great looks.
Mary Bridges
Goldsboro, NC
 

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Date: 1/10/19 4:53 pm
From: Mac Williams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lee County (SC) airport birding & leucistic northern harrier
All,

I have been actively trying to identify and submit new eBird hotspots in
the less-birded counties of the Pee Dee (Chesterfield, Darlington, Lee,
Marlboro, Florence, Dillon, Marion), so this morning I was out and about
looking for a new spot near Bishopville.

Steve Patterson has shown me the great birds to be found at regional,
county, and city airports, so I decided to go to the Lee County Airport
(Butters Field) in Bishopville and see what their rules are for birding
there.

I met the director, a Mr. George Roberts (803-229-2679), and he explained
that anyone can bird as follows:

*1. * If there is someone in the office, please check in to let them know
you'll be there, as a courtesy. However, the airport is not always
staffed. If no one is there, you may still bird.
*2. *You may go anywhere on the tarmac and ramp, but you cannot step on
any asphalt on the runway--ever, or the part of the ramp after the very
large and thick double yellow lines (link to Google Maps showing the lines
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__goo.gl_maps_Mtt6g9Z5nLG2&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=0ObFbdikU-5tOCOaFkSnmL21a0mOxwdRohKGOtWTJY4&s=sd4HG9PuhwLmabzEHFkdtfk6Zv3hGYkYZCquPyRz3Ik&e=>). If there is something interesting on
the other side of the runway, you'll have to walk around. He said stepping
onto the runway for any reason is prohibited.
*3.* We are allowed to traverse all grassy areas, the length of the
field--in either direction. Additionally, we may enter the leased
"approach" land at the NE end of the runway, consisting of high grass. (link
showing the "approach" <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__goo.gl_maps_cX6praPNUmM2&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=0ObFbdikU-5tOCOaFkSnmL21a0mOxwdRohKGOtWTJY4&s=YIAXOYhzeburVS_sU3LmSfDsrnrxvgg1CMFemY-US0c&e=>)
*4. * If a plane comes in to land, please move as far away from the runway
as you can so as not to startle or distract the pilot.
*5.* The Lee County Animal Shelter abuts the airport. If you approach
that area of the complex, and the dogs begin to bark and get upset, please
move to a different area to bird.


Good things to know:
A. There is a restroom in the airport office.
B. Mr. Roberts says that there are frequently wild turkeys at the airport,
and that they need to check and shoo them away if a plane is going to land.
C. Mr. Roberts served in the military, stationed on a tiny island near
Attu, Alaska for over a year, and he enjoyed telling me about the birds he
saw there. I believe that he would especially enjoy conversations with any
birders who have been to the Aleutians or who have any interest in aviation.
D. There are some artesian springs along the edge of the runway, so much
of the ground is very soggy. I'd recommend wearing boots if it has rained
recently.

As for the birding, I walked 1.67 miles in 2 hrs 22mins, and I found 31
different species. Here's my list in case you're interested
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S51526160&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=0ObFbdikU-5tOCOaFkSnmL21a0mOxwdRohKGOtWTJY4&s=dY8Pn3oCgkSBLyYGJY4hf1PEFW2RZUPz1PQHYd7cjzI&e=>.

The highlight was a mostly leucistic Northern Harrier patrolling the south
end of the runway. It appeared to be buffy white everywhere except the
tips of the wings--over and under--and for some bands on either side of the
white spot on the tail. I don't normally bird with a camera because it's
not a good camera and I'm not a good photographer, so I can't provide
photos. But, if anyone decides to make a visit, you might get lucky and
see it again.

I tried to embed html links in the email to avoid the Duke server's
security thing for links. If I didn't do it right, I apologize for the
long url repackaging.

While lengthy, I hope that this email is an appropriate use of this
listserv.

Mac


--
Mac Williams, PhD
Associate Professor of Spanish
Coker College
300 E. College Ave
Hartsville, SC 29550
843-383-8117 (office)
843-991-3879 (cell)
<jwilliams...>

 

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Date: 1/10/19 11:11 am
From: Tami Vogel <tvogel...>
Subject: RE: Kingfisher tangle
Sadly, I can confirm it happens on a regular basis. Anytime you all have a chance to remove fishing line from the environment, please do. We see herons, as Andy mentioned, crows, ravens kingfishers, egrets, loons, mergansers - and even bats - caught in line.

Thanks for caring about the birds' health as well as enjoying seeing them.

(and in case you're wondering why I'm on this list, we had a fabulous trip to the OBX this October and completely fell in love with Pea Island!)



Regards,

Tami Vogel
Communications Director
Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Minnesota
www.wrcmn.org<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.wrcmn.org_&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=7_MKJk7U3t0YAGbYO-6lIW2tEOskCXxGixYWoqdbRw0&s=z_68w_dMXidG0ifycnSMp1p9M7-c5PXL_vQ2u4AleLU&e=>
www.facebook/WRCMN<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.facebook_WRCMN&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=7_MKJk7U3t0YAGbYO-6lIW2tEOskCXxGixYWoqdbRw0&s=TuxoH6ic3adD43-WqHp8npPJDz6Nzeh2ECxfO-anFdI&e=>
Twitter/IG @WRCMN



From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> On Behalf Of Andy Smith
Sent: Thursday, January 10, 2019 1:02 PM
To: Carolinabirds Listserve <carolinabirds...>; [highcountryaudubon] <highcountryaudubon...>; <badgerboy...>
Subject: Re: Kingfisher tangle


I suspect this kind of thing is more frequent than one would hope. My son and some friends found a blue heron tangled in discarded line last winter on Morgan Creek in Carrboro. Fortunately we were able to contact police and animal control and they got the bird to a rehabilitation center. I assume the bird survived, but it is an assumption.

________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...><mailto:<carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...><mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>> on behalf of <badgerboy...><mailto:<badgerboy...> <badgerboy...><mailto:<badgerboy...>>
Sent: Thursday, January 10, 2019 1:50:09 PM
To: Carolinabirds Listserve; [highcountryaudubon]
Subject: Kingfisher tangle

While Betty Scott and I were doing the New River CBC, at Farmers Fish
Camp Rd in alleghany county, we were saddened to see that all the
abandoned fishing line hung up on the utility wires had snagged and
killed a kingfisher. Neither of us could remember seeing this before and
we wondered how common such an occurrence might be. Has anyone else
noticed similar accidents before?

We were wondering whether doing the work to remove the old abandoned
fishing line might be justified.

Thanks, Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 1/10/19 11:02 am
From: Andy Smith <andrew.w.smith...>
Subject: Re: Kingfisher tangle
I suspect this kind of thing is more frequent than one would hope. My son and some friends found a blue heron tangled in discarded line last winter on Morgan Creek in Carrboro. Fortunately we were able to contact police and animal control and they got the bird to a rehabilitation center. I assume the bird survived, but it is an assumption.

________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of <badgerboy...> <badgerboy...>
Sent: Thursday, January 10, 2019 1:50:09 PM
To: Carolinabirds Listserve; [highcountryaudubon]
Subject: Kingfisher tangle

While Betty Scott and I were doing the New River CBC, at Farmers Fish
Camp Rd in alleghany county, we were saddened to see that all the
abandoned fishing line hung up on the utility wires had snagged and
killed a kingfisher. Neither of us could remember seeing this before and
we wondered how common such an occurrence might be. Has anyone else
noticed similar accidents before?

We were wondering whether doing the work to remove the old abandoned
fishing line might be justified.

Thanks, Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC



 

Back to top
Date: 1/10/19 10:51 am
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Kingfisher tangle
While Betty Scott and I were doing the New River CBC, at Farmers Fish
Camp Rd in alleghany county, we were saddened to see that all the
abandoned fishing line hung up on the utility wires had snagged and
killed a kingfisher. Neither of us could remember seeing this before and
we wondered how common such an occurrence might be. Has anyone else
noticed similar accidents before?

We were wondering whether doing the work to remove the old abandoned
fishing line might be justified.

Thanks, Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 1/10/19 9:42 am
From: rod g (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lark Sparrow
Lark Sparrow still present at Myrtle Beach State Park 12:15 in the open
area between shelter #2 and the restrooms towards the pier.

Rod Gonzalez,

Myrtle Beach

 

Back to top
Date: 1/10/19 7:56 am
From: Ritch Lilly <ritch...>
Subject: Lark Sparrow iin Myrtle Beach
John Hutchins found a Lark Sparrow at Myrtle Beach State Park this morning.
He has photos and I've seen the bird as well. It's been spotted multiple
times feeding on the ground in the area north of the pier between Shelter 2
and the bathhouse just to its south as well as in the vicinity of a
dumpster and power pole just south of that same bathhouse.

Ritch Lilly
Murrells Inlet, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 1/9/19 11:13 am
From: Stephen Brooks (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Dr. Marshall Brooks, 1942 - 2019
Dear Carolinas birders,
My father Dr. Marshall Brooks, of Lake Lure, NC, died peacefully early on
the morning of January 9, 2019, after a battle with dementia that lasted
years. He was 76.
He inspired in me and my wife a love of birding. I will always treasure our
time together, running the Marshall, NC Breeding Bird Survey route. In
addition to that and other BBS routes, Dad coordinated the Lake Lure and
Rocky Mount Christmas Bird Counts, operated a bird banding station for
Monitoring Avian Production and Survivorship (MAPS), and worked with
elementary and middle school classrooms to collect and report Project
FeederWatch data.
In 1998 Dad was an EarthWatch Expedition Volunteer, collecting data on
vertical migration of songbird populations in Ecuador. In 2000 he received
a Partners In Flight award in the Public Awareness category. He served as
NC Partners In Flight's webmaster.
In 2005, along with Mark Johns--with contributions from the Carolina Bird
Club--he edited *Birding North Carolina* (A Falcon Guide).
These represent a sample of his contributions to birding and conservation;
I know there are many others.
The date is not yet set for a memorial service at the Church of the
Transfiguration in Bat Cave, NC.

Best regards,
Stephen Brooks
Chapel Hill, NC
<sbrooks70...>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/8/19 3:48 pm
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Stone Mountain CBC Dec 30, 2018 recap
Notable at the Stone Mountain CBC this year were low overall numbers and
especially low numbers of sparrows. See list and species comments below.

Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC

26th Stone Mountain CBC, 12/30/2018
Number of Species 57 (25 yr avg 55)
Number of Individuals 1565 (25 yr avg 2097, not counting grackles)

Canada Goose 23
Mallard 11
Hooded Merganser 11
Rock Pigeon 6
Mourning Dove 157
Killdeer 6
Great Blue Heron 2
Black Vulture 8
Turkey Vulture 91
Sharp-shinned Hawk 1
Cooper's Hawk 4 (record high; previous high 3)
Red-shouldered Hawk 6
Red-tailed Hawk 4
Eastern Screech-Owl 1
Great Horned Owl 2
Belted Kingfisher 0 (first miss since 2006)
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 7
Red-bellied Woodpecker 11
Downy Woodpecker 8
Hairy Woodpecker 1
Pileated Woodpecker 7
Northern Flicker 16 (highest since 2010)
American Kestrel 5
Eastern Phoebe 7
Blue Jay 29
American Crow 160 (Lowest since 2009)
Common Raven 4
Horned Lark 2 (4th year out of last 7; 6th overall count)
Carolina Chickadee 31
Tufted Titmouse 25
Red-breasted Nuthatch 1
White-breasted Nuthatch 13
Brown-headed Nuthatch 5
Brown Creeper 2
Winter Wren 2
Carolina Wren 26
Golden-crowned Kinglet 11
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1
Eastern Bluebird 86
Hermit Thrush 4
American Robin 397
Northern Mockingbird 12
European Starling 72 (Lowest since 2007)
Cedar Waxwing 17
House Finch 8
Purple Finch 1
American Goldfinch 38
Chipping Sparrow 0 (1st miss since 2011)
Field Sparrow 9
Dark-eyed Junco 44 (lowest since 2008)
White-crowned Sparrow 12 (lowest since 2009)
White-throated Sparrow 55
Song Sparrow 37
Savannah Sparrow cw (first miss since 2011)
Swamp Sparrow 1
Eastern Towhee 3 (lowest since 2011)
Eastern Meadowlark 3 (lowest since 2011)
Pine Warbler 1
Yellow-rumped Warbler 0 (7th miss in a row!)
Northern Cardinal 37
House Sparrow 5
passerine sp. 16

 

Back to top
Date: 1/8/19 1:24 pm
From: M Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lark Sparrow continues
The Lark Sparrow at the Willow Dale Cemetery in Goldsboro, NC continues. Found just now among a flock of mostly Chipping Sparrows. Originally found by Mary Bridges team on the Wayne County, NC Christmas Bird Count December 15, 2018.

Mae Howell
Goldsboro NC
Powered by Cricket Wireless

 

Back to top
Date: 1/8/19 10:43 am
From: scompton1251 <scompton1251...>
Subject: Greenville ponds today

Birders,
Easily found Redhead, Canvasback, and Ring-necked Ducks at Stamey Valley at noon. Now at Jordan Pond on MiIlford Church Road (1:42pm) where there are no waterfowl of any sort.
Steve ComptonGreenville, SCSent from my Verizon LG Smartphone
 

Back to top
Date: 1/8/19 6:27 am
From: steve stevens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Long-tailed ducks, Ocracoke/Swanquarter ferry
While on the ferry ride from Ocracoke to Swanquarter I saw two male/female
pairs of Long-tailed Ducks in flight. They were seen about 30minutes before
the ferry docked at Swanquarter flying south to north across the bow of the
ferry at estimated 100-150yards. No pictures, but very distinct birds. The
first pair was followed by five Black Scoters, and many other exciting
birds seen during the enjoyable ferry trip. Also, if you're a walk-on, it's
only $1 for a 2.5hr boat ride!

Checklist: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S51460135&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=z-s6QWU5mnJt3bccdw0NP3a0BEGINDHp4PjQglf7hDs&s=uPt5QW_4nhVj0aPuGb7V1MWfT9A7HyxihBLQSkQRJuY&e=

Steve

Chapel Hill

 

Back to top
Date: 1/7/19 2:44 pm
From: Andy Harrison (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Two Western Kingbirds at James Island County Park
All,

Late this afternoon I briefly observed a second Western Kingbird at James Island County Park, in the same general area where a single bird has been reported for over two weeks (the parking area across the big lake from the dog park). I saw one bird at first, then another suddenly appeared and the two birds took flight, one chasing the other back toward the power line cut. I searched and waited for awhile to see if the second bird might return, but it never did. However, one bird continued to sally forth from perches around the field.

While at the park I also got nice looks at the continuing Common Merganser, as it swam in the big lake and for a short time preened on land near the parking area.

Andy Harrison
Charleston, SC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 1/7/19 11:58 am
From: Jay Wherley (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Photos of Asheville Swainson's Thrush on CBC gallery
I've posted my photos of a Swainson's Thrush initially spotted by
Aaron Steed several
days ago at Beaver Lake Bird Sanctuary (in Asheville NC) to the CBC
photo gallery.
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_gallery_Wherley_swth.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=5DkNoENrH6fD4-4LJ9t2Uu6LJSh3ODp1t5rK4igFUWI&s=xxJ5neCtodY1Zt9mH3gjhuDn1ktFLG8ngjA8Tnp_6Sw&e=

I took the photos yesterday after relocating bird in the same area as
it has been seen
for a few days. This particular individual bird has been noted to have
one flipped over
tail feather showing as white, which can be seen in the photos.

Jay Wherley
Asheville, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 1/7/19 8:36 am
From: Me (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: King Eider at Bonner Bridge
Female (immature male?) moved out of sight along inlet jetty. You might have to walk jetty out a bit to see it.
Marty Wall
Eden, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 1/7/19 7:56 am
From: Me (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: King Eider, south jetty, Bonner Bridge, Oregon Inlet, NC
Floating in basin now, will post photos tonight.
Marty Wall
Eden, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 1/7/19 6:27 am
From: Edith Tatum (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: My yard
Here’s a brief ‘snapshot ‘ of my back yard this morning. There were six Eastern Bluebirds, five House Finches, one Mourning Dove, four Chipping Sparrows, three Pine Warblers, one White-throated Sparrow, one Carolina Wren, one Brown-headed Nuthatch and two Bushy tailed Tree Rats.
Edith Tatum
Durham

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 1/7/19 6:07 am
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Photos of Merlin and Snow Buntings at HBSP plus Snow Bunting feeding behavior
Oh, my God. These photos are fantastic. I encourage anyone who might have
passed by this email earlier to do yourself a favor and take a look! Thank
you, Nate, for posting these.

Truly, we live in paradise.

Betsy Kane
Washington, N.C.

On Sat, Jan 5, 2019 at 8:42 PM Nate Dias <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> I have some images up on my Flickr page:
>
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_offshorebirder2_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=7_czVwm7I2U-KmSmPw71lNNL-w1lCxA9KCwUL_lQjKs&s=hfsSHzPXSxfU03eOsg9ng1XhnJW-Mb-6qIm1aWBjbcQ&e=
>
> flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2
>
> It was interesting to watch the Snow Buntings at fairly close range
> while they excavated seeds in the wrack line. Unlike Sparrows, that
> use their feet and toes to scratch up seeds, Snow Buntings seem to use
> their bills like picks or spades and make little showers of sand or
> debris. A couple of the photos show them doing this.
>
> Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/7/19 5:06 am
From: Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RFI Say's Phoebe
All,

I will be upstate on 12 January and if possible would like to see the Say's
Phoebe. Please respond to me privately if the bird is still being seen and
the exact location.

Thanks,

Dennis

--
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/7/19 5:04 am
From: Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Painted Bunting at James Is CP
All,

While looking successfully for the Common Merganser and the Western
Kingbird at James Is County Park, Donna found an immature male Painted
Bunting in the general vicinity of the open field were the Western Kingbird
was; 1st parking lot to the right after entering the park.

Dennis

--
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/6/19 6:13 pm
From: rod g (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Where to locate Nelson's, Saltmarsh, and Seaside Sparrows at Huntington Beach State Park?
I have seen both Nelson’s and Saltmarsh sparrows from the Marsh boardwalk where the old nature center was.

Rod Gonzalez
Myrtle Beach

> On Jan 6, 2019, at 9:24 AM, scompton1251 <scompton1251...> wrote:
>
> The bunting was seen as late as Sat. 10:30 am at the landward (west) end of the causeway. On your way to that spot you pass the prime sharp-tailed sparrow habitat against the rocks. They are best seen from atop the causeway.
>
> I am waiting for the Snow Bunting now at the end of the causeway.
>
> Steve Compton
> 843-709-2554 <tel:843-709-2554>
>
> Sent from my Verizon LG Smartphone
>
> ------ Original message------
> From: grayro
> Date: Sun, Jan 6, 2019 9:05 AM
> To: <carolinabirds...> <mailto:caroli <nabirds...>;
> Cc:
> Subject:Where to locate Nelson's, Saltmarsh, and Seaside Sparrows at Huntington Beach State Park?
>
> Hi,
> I will be visiting Huntington Beach State Park from Jan 8 - 11. I plan to
> look for the Snow Buntings, but am also interested in seeing Nelson's,
> Saltmarsh, and Seaside Sparrows at the park. Can anyone tell me what are the
> best places to see these sparrows in the park?
>
> Thanks, Richard Gray


 

Back to top
Date: 1/6/19 5:29 pm
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Nelson's/Saltmarsh Sparrow
Hi Steve,

Nelson’s are a widespread wintering species from North Carolina to Texas. I don’t think you have to worry about reporting them on ebird. If others have a different opinion, maybe they’ll chime in.

They are field identifiable if you’re willing to tolerate a 1/1500 (or 1/15,000, I don’t know) chance that you might instead have a hybrid that looks like a Nelson’s (hybrids are a small proportion of the overall population). I’ve banded probably 1,000 sharp-tailed sparrows and in the hand you can examine them quite closely. I have never had a for-sure hybrid. Hybrids should not really be something to worry about in field ID.

Separating the two species is still a difficult proposition. That’s the hard part. And within Nelson’s there are three subspecies. Only one of those subspecies hybridizes with Saltmarsh (the big dull subspecies, subvirgatus). It’s not as simple as “one set of field marks for Nelson’s, another for Saltmarsh.”

So it sounds like you saw three Nelson’s, and if you want to count them on ebird I think you should.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

On Jan 6, 2019, at 7:48 PM, steve stevens <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

Hello,

Probably an age old question, but I saw what I assumed were three Nelson's sparrows this morning while walking along the marshes of south point road on Ocracoke island (they were at the end of the spur that splits to the northwest). They had all the field marks I associated with Nelson's (shorter bill, lack of white throat, lack of distinct streaking, and some time looking through field guides/online images just to confirm), though I remember reading this article when I first saw one years ago:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__blog.aba.org_2015_06_th&d=DwIGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=GJ6Tq4OW6ZbsQbD5KZVBhqnXDHXGOei6S5yUUsypyL0&s=1XfEcGAYqK86uaflQawBzhUYvZ2ex2EOnPItBglwsxc&e= ink-you- know-sharp-tailed-sparrows-thank-again.html<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com_-3Furl-3Dhttps-253A-252F-252Furldefense.proofpoint.com-252Fv2-252Furl-253Fu-253Dhttp-2D3A-5F-5Fblog.aba.org-5F2015-5F06-5Fthink-2D2Dyou-2D2Dknow-2D2Dsharp-2D2Dtailed-2D2Dsparrows-2D2Dthank-2D2Dagain.html-2526d-253DDwMFaQ-2526c-253DimBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj-5FgZ4adc-2526r-253DymRCw6Q-2DsBitug-5FrdeO1Tokz-2DI-5FSX2LQN2-5FOcvlal9U-2526m-253DxYhzNtPYc-2DN4kZMkMP-5FMPg9Fu3JZaxlFi7nSygf920Q-2526s-253DgDjbThZah0FruYrFH6Nh2-2DCtXraQ9WXgHhxUaM-5FoTqg-2526e-253D-26data-3D02-257C01-257CChill-2540coastal.edu-257Cb15f11bc6f104027ce0508d6743a2b95-257Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797-257C0-257C0-257C636824190528075523-26sdata-3DuiCnQ3bsVzkTP8EjjIrIZjIXt4YY-252FJh06uyXcXFQKD4-253D-26reserved-3D0&d=DwIGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=GJ6Tq4OW6ZbsQbD5KZVBhqnXDHXGOei6S5yUUsypyL0&s=pJFA6eaY3_l3qyfsu_zmZpaiOGtQL8FzsDQFaz4MWNY&e=>

Which casts doubt on all but DNA identification. Aside from curiosity, I'm wondering how to report them on my eBird checklist responsibly, being it seems they're a sensitive species. I don't have any pictures of the birds, nor do I think that really speaks to the question.

Anyway, I'm curious what y'all think. Thanks in advance!

Steve
Chapel Hill




 

Back to top
Date: 1/6/19 4:50 pm
From: steve stevens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Nelson's/Saltmarsh Sparrow
Hello,

Probably an age old question, but I saw what I assumed were three Nelson's
sparrows this morning while walking along the marshes of south point road
on Ocracoke island (they were at the end of the spur that splits to the
northwest). They had all the field marks I associated with Nelson's
(shorter bill, lack of white throat, lack of distinct streaking, and some
time looking through field guides/online images just to confirm), though I
remember reading this article when I first saw one years ago:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__blog.aba.org_2015_06_think-2Dyou-2Dknow-2Dsharp-2Dtailed-2Dsparrows-2Dthank-2Dagain.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=xYhzNtPYc-N4kZMkMP_MPg9Fu3JZaxlFi7nSygf920Q&s=gDjbThZah0FruYrFH6Nh2-CtXraQ9WXgHhxUaM_oTqg&e=

Which casts doubt on all but DNA identification. Aside from curiosity, I'm
wondering how to report them on my eBird checklist responsibly, being it
seems they're a sensitive species. I don't have any pictures of the birds,
nor do I think that really speaks to the question.

Anyway, I'm curious what y'all think. Thanks in advance!

Steve
Chapel Hill

 

Back to top
Date: 1/6/19 4:34 pm
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: Common Eiders at the Cedar Island Ferry Terminal
This afternoon, Chandra Biggerstaff, Steve Howell, and I went to see if we
could find any Common Eiders at the Cedar Island Ferry Terminal. We found
three--all were first-year males.

Before we went on our trip, we had looked at Google Earth to see at what
shore points we needed to position ourselves to see all points inside the
harbor and all sides of the rock jetties around the harbor. However, even
after doing this, I'm not sure we would have seen the birds except a ferry
came in while we were there, probably causing the birds to vacate the one
small "jetty shoreline" not visible from shore.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 1/6/19 1:25 pm
From: Krystyna 00 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Photos of Merlin and Snow Buntings at HBSP plus Snow Bunting feeding behavior
Wonderful photos, and thanks for the description of their behavior. I'll be visiting HBSP end of January, hope their still there!

Krys Ochota-Leland,NC

Get Outlook for Android<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__aka.ms_ghei36&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=YCKICvVvkBriyavIpPL11UrqrhyiSgMgOqF6mjUddDc&s=8m9qTZWloEqTruwQk4rC3dKmmEjvh7rmwT3VeBeNXp0&e=>

________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Nate Dias <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Saturday, January 5, 2019 8:41:38 PM
To: CarolinaBirds
Subject: Photos of Merlin and Snow Buntings at HBSP plus Snow Bunting feeding behavior

I have some images up on my Flickr page:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__eur02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com_-3Furl-3Dhttps-253A-252F-252Furldefense.proofpoint.com-252Fv2-252Furl-253Fu-253Dhttps-2D3A-5F-5Fwww.flickr.com-5Fphotos-5Foffshorebirder2-5F-2526d-253DDwIBaQ-2526c-253DimBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj-5FgZ4adc-2526r-253DymRCw6Q-2DsBitug-5FrdeO1Tokz-2DI-5FSX2LQN2-5FOcvlal9U-2526m-253D7-5FczVwm7I2U-2DKmSmPw71lNNL-2Dw1lCxA9KCwUL-5FlQjKs-2526s-253DhfsSHzPXSxfU03eOsg9ng1XhnJW-2DMb-2D6qIm1aWBjbcQ-2526e-26amp-3Bdata-3D02-257C01-257C-257Cd1b10a4d8f36430ccc5a08d673782dae-257C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa-257C1-257C0-257C636823357326304048-26amp-3Bsdata-3DoDe0Q5aPlx-252FBMD2Ub-252B8CwN8U2LddjhfTLjYuw-252Bco7Pw-253D-26amp-3Breserved-3D0-3D&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=YCKICvVvkBriyavIpPL11UrqrhyiSgMgOqF6mjUddDc&s=D0g0w5N3DfMqhZ4za6Lfnalbph7Dt0VfT7rCDk4NKkw&e=

flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2

It was interesting to watch the Snow Buntings at fairly close range
while they excavated seeds in the wrack line. Unlike Sparrows, that
use their feet and toes to scratch up seeds, Snow Buntings seem to use
their bills like picks or spades and make little showers of sand or
debris. A couple of the photos show them doing this.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 1/6/19 11:19 am
From: Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Brown Thrasher singing
I was surprised to hear & see a Brown Thrasher singing. I happened to be
near the bush where it was hiding. Volume was low as if practicing for when
it will really count come this Spring. I was delighted to be treated to
such a concert.

Happy birding.

Eddie Owens
Cary NC

 

Back to top
Date: 1/6/19 9:05 am
From: Steve <sshultz...>
Subject: Jeanette’s Pier
Finished the morning with about 150 Razorbills.

1-2 Manx Shearwater cutting through feeding flocks of Bonies.

Humpback Whale passed close to the end of the pier.

Parasitic Jaeger molesting a gull.

Nice morning to be out!

Sightings are in Nags Head (Dare) NC.

Steve Shultz
Nags Head NC
 

Back to top
Date: 1/6/19 8:41 am
From: scompton1251 <scompton1251...>
Subject: Re: Where to locate Nelson's, Saltmarsh, and Seaside Sparrows at Huntington Beach State Park?
Snow Buntings relocated 1000, still present,
Steve Compton
Sent from my Verizon LG Smartphone
------ Original message------From: scompton1251Date: Sun, Jan 6, 2019 9:25 AMTo: grayro;Cc: Subject:Re: Where to locate Nelson's, Saltmarsh, and Seaside Sparrows at Huntington Beach State Park?

The bunting was seen as late as Sat. 10:30 am at the landward (west) end of the causeway. On your way to that spot you pass the prime sharp-tailed sparrow habitat against the rocks. They are best seen from atop the causeway. 
I am waiting for the Snow Bunting now at the end of the causeway.
Steve Compton843-709-2554
Sent from my Verizon LG Smartphone
------ Original message------From: grayroDate: Sun, Jan 6, 2019 9:05 AMTo: <carolinabirds...>;Cc: Subject:Where to locate Nelson's, Saltmarsh, and Seaside Sparrows at Huntington Beach State Park?
Hi,
I will be visiting Huntington Beach State Park from Jan 8 - 11. I plan to
look for the Snow Buntings, but am also interested in seeing Nelson's,
Saltmarsh, and Seaside Sparrows at the park. Can anyone tell me what are the
best places to see these sparrows in the park?

Thanks, Richard Gray




 

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Date: 1/6/19 8:12 am
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Leica alignment repair?
I've been searching online about how to best get a pair of Leica
trinovid binoculars realigned, but seems like people have had bad luck
with long wait times and poor communication from repair centers. Can
anyone recommend a good shop that will align an older pair of Leica
binoculars in reasonable time and at fair cost?

Thanks, Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC


 

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Date: 1/6/19 7:14 am
From: Steve <sshultz...>
Subject: Razorbills Jeanette’s Pier
Nice flight of Razorbills this morning. 27 on last scan. Flying and in the water.

Steve Shultz
OBX
 

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Date: 1/6/19 6:25 am
From: scompton1251 <scompton1251...>
Subject: Re: Where to locate Nelson's, Saltmarsh, and Seaside Sparrows at Huntington Beach State Park?
The bunting was seen as late as Sat. 10:30 am at the landward (west) end of the causeway. On your way to that spot you pass the prime sharp-tailed sparrow habitat against the rocks. They are best seen from atop the causeway. 
I am waiting for the Snow Bunting now at the end of the causeway.
Steve Compton843-709-2554
Sent from my Verizon LG Smartphone
------ Original message------From: grayroDate: Sun, Jan 6, 2019 9:05 AMTo: <carolinabirds...>;Cc: Subject:Where to locate Nelson's, Saltmarsh, and Seaside Sparrows at Huntington Beach State Park?
Hi,
I will be visiting Huntington Beach State Park from Jan 8 - 11. I plan to
look for the Snow Buntings, but am also interested in seeing Nelson's,
Saltmarsh, and Seaside Sparrows at the park. Can anyone tell me what are the
best places to see these sparrows in the park?

Thanks, Richard Gray

 

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Date: 1/6/19 6:10 am
From: Craig Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Western Tanager Mount Plead-ant, SC continues.
The Western Tanager continues to make brief and sporadic appearances at the
feeders in my back yard. If interested, birders are welcome to come by,
please send me a private email and I can give you specifics on entry into
the yard and where the bird usually hangs out.

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

 

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Date: 1/6/19 6:05 am
From: grayro (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Where to locate Nelson's, Saltmarsh, and Seaside Sparrows at Huntington Beach State Park?
Hi,
I will be visiting Huntington Beach State Park from Jan 8 - 11. I plan to
look for the Snow Buntings, but am also interested in seeing Nelson's,
Saltmarsh, and Seaside Sparrows at the park. Can anyone tell me what are the
best places to see these sparrows in the park?

Thanks, Richard Gray
 

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Date: 1/5/19 8:20 pm
From: Will Cook <cwcook...>
Subject: Re: Unsubscribe
I've taken Eric off the Carolinabirds list for repeatedly ignoring the
guidelines.

For instructions on how to unsubscribe and other email list
instructions, please see:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.carolinanature.com_birds_cbirds.html&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=60PEY3gJ_VlrPYnaS6Z-h9RuXX8yloQgd9Ppw2uIvUA&s=RVN9lJL-ASycF-0cS19a7BsZ-aLMTMpQJ2fpq3J6zko&e=

--
Will Cook - Durham, NC
 

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Date: 1/5/19 6:19 pm
From: Len Kopka (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Merlin preyed upon Snow Bunting at HBSP
Recommend that you 3 guys take your argument offline please.

Len Kopka
Simpsonville, SC

On Jan 5, 2019, at 9:01 PM, Eric Harrold (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:

Harry, you simply speak from ignoranc and don't have a damn clue about what you're talking about. For example, falconers have been very involved in the conservation of prairie grouse species and the propagation of rare raptor species around the world. They were the majority of hack site attendants during Peregrine recovery and have contributed greatly to surveys and banding efforts. And you are very wrong again that falconers have only invested resources in species utilized for falconry...Mauritius Kestrel and Orange-breasted Forest Falcons are a couple that come to mind and there are others. The World Center For Birds of Prey which was founded by falconers and maintains a huge influence focuses primarily on habitat conservation as the cornerstone of species recovery because they understand its importance. To say that falconers care only about raptors demonstrates your ignorance here. And I don't give a damn as to who on this list serve doesn't "condone" falconry

> On Sat, Jan 5, 2019 at 8:45 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> I agree with Nate. Eric, that falconry attitude of yours and your comments, especially using the word "Absurd", have gotten you in trouble here. Many people chase rare birds, and hopefully do not want a hawk, or owl, or mammal, etc., taking the rarity. Nate is right also about that falconry chip on your shoulder, and a lot of people on this listserve do not condone falconers and falconry. I certain do not approve of your hobby/pastime, but more importantly, as Nate said, you are picking a fight when none is needed. And now you are getting yourself into more hot water with the statement "The falconry community has done more for conservation of the resources they enjoy than any other interest group." [Bold is mine.] Actually, all that means is that falconers have done more to protect and conserve falcons, Harris' Hawks, and a few other raptors that they use in their hobby than have any other group. No more and no less. The rest of us are more interested in protecting habitats and all bird species, not just falcons and a few other hawk species.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
>
>
>
>> On Sat, Jan 5, 2019 at 8:12 PM Nate Dias <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>> Eric,
>>
>> At the time I said "unfortunate" because some birders are still hoping
>> to see the rarity - Snow Buntings - in coming days. And we feared
>> the female might depart as a result. This is a birding Listserv after
>> all. So in one aspect, it was unfortunate.
>>
>> In terms of "reality" - yes, in part we were thrilled at seeing (and
>> documenting) the predator successfully take prey at the end of a hunt.
>> More so after we later realized it was common prey, not a rarity
>> some people have not seen yet. So it's not black and white. We felt
>> thrilled for the predator but empathy for the prey and our fellow
>> birders. I happened to mention the latter in a HASTY MESSAGE FROM THE
>> FIELD. What's so wrong about that?
>>
>> The falconry chip on your shoulder has you trying to play "gotcha
>> games", and picking fights where none really exist.
>>
>> Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
>>
>> On Sat, Jan 5, 2019 at 7:12 PM Eric Harrold <gentilis03...> wrote:
>> >
>> > Why the hell is it unfortunate? You don't like reality either, Nate!? Well we knew the answer to that one...sadly, you're not by yourself.
>> >
>> > Eric Harrold
>> > Hays, NC
>> >
>> > On Saturday, January 5, 2019, 10:14:25 AM EST, Nate Dias <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>> >
>> >
>> > Unfortunately John Cox and I just watched a Merlin take one of the Snow Buntings at Huntington Beach State Park. We had noticed earlier that one had an injured leg / foot.
>> >
>> > I got some photos of the Merlin in flight carrying the Snow Bunting; I will post some online when I get home.
>> >
>> > Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

 

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Date: 1/5/19 6:06 pm
From: Lucas Hale <lhale4...>
Subject: Unsubscribe
I too would like my email <lhale4...> to be removed from this email
chain please. I no longer live in the state and seem to find more bickering
in this chain than any other that I receive sighting updates from.

Thank you and happy birding,
Lucas Hale
--
*Lucas Hale *I *Data Analytics Intern*
iSpecimen Inc. I 450 Bedford Street, Lexington, MA 02420
c: 978-831-3445 e: <lhale...>

 

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Date: 1/5/19 6:02 pm
From: Eric Harrold (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Merlin preyed upon Snow Bunting at HBSP
Harry, you simply speak from ignoranc and don't have a damn clue about what
you're talking about. For example, falconers have been very involved in the
conservation of prairie grouse species and the propagation of rare raptor
species around the world. They were the majority of hack site attendants
during Peregrine recovery and have contributed greatly to surveys and
banding efforts. And you are very wrong again that falconers have only
invested resources in species utilized for falconry...Mauritius Kestrel and
Orange-breasted Forest Falcons are a couple that come to mind and there are
others. The World Center For Birds of Prey which was founded by falconers
and maintains a huge influence focuses primarily on habitat conservation as
the cornerstone of species recovery because they understand its importance.
To say that falconers care only about raptors demonstrates your ignorance
here. And I don't give a damn as to who on this list serve doesn't
"condone" falconry

On Sat, Jan 5, 2019 at 8:45 PM Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> I agree with Nate. Eric, that falconry attitude of yours and your
> comments, especially using the word "Absurd", have gotten you in trouble
> here. Many people chase rare birds, and hopefully do not want a hawk, or
> owl, or mammal, etc., taking the rarity. Nate is right also about that
> falconry chip on your shoulder, and a lot of people on this listserve do
> not condone falconers and falconry. I certain do not approve of your
> hobby/pastime, but more importantly, as Nate said, you are picking a fight
> when none is needed. And now you are getting yourself into more hot water
> with the statement "The falconry community has done more for conservation
> of the resources *they enjoy* than any other interest group." [Bold is
> mine.] Actually, all that means is that falconers have done more to
> protect and conserve falcons, Harris' Hawks, and a few other raptors that
> they use in their hobby than have any other group. No more and no less.
> The rest of us are more interested in protecting habitats and all bird
> species, not just falcons and a few other hawk species.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
>
>
>
> On Sat, Jan 5, 2019 at 8:12 PM Nate Dias <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
>> Eric,
>>
>> At the time I said "unfortunate" because some birders are still hoping
>> to see the rarity - Snow Buntings - in coming days. And we feared
>> the female might depart as a result. This is a birding Listserv after
>> all. So in one aspect, it was unfortunate.
>>
>> In terms of "reality" - yes, in part we were thrilled at seeing (and
>> documenting) the predator successfully take prey at the end of a hunt.
>> More so after we later realized it was common prey, not a rarity
>> some people have not seen yet. So it's not black and white. We felt
>> thrilled for the predator but empathy for the prey and our fellow
>> birders. I happened to mention the latter in a HASTY MESSAGE FROM THE
>> FIELD. What's so wrong about that?
>>
>> The falconry chip on your shoulder has you trying to play "gotcha
>> games", and picking fights where none really exist.
>>
>> Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
>>
>> On Sat, Jan 5, 2019 at 7:12 PM Eric Harrold <gentilis03...> wrote:
>> >
>> > Why the hell is it unfortunate? You don't like reality either, Nate!?
>> Well we knew the answer to that one...sadly, you're not by yourself.
>> >
>> > Eric Harrold
>> > Hays, NC
>> >
>> > On Saturday, January 5, 2019, 10:14:25 AM EST, Nate Dias <
>> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>> >
>> >
>> > Unfortunately John Cox and I just watched a Merlin take one of the Snow
>> Buntings at Huntington Beach State Park. We had noticed earlier that one
>> had an injured leg / foot.
>> >
>> > I got some photos of the Merlin in flight carrying the Snow Bunting; I
>> will post some online when I get home.
>> >
>> > Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
>>
>

 

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Date: 1/5/19 5:49 pm
From: Kenneth Konoski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Removal from email updates
Thank you for including me in this email chain. At first I enjoyed it every
much, but its too often of an email for me to continue to enjoy. Please
remove me <kennykonoski...> from any more emails.

Thanks

Kenny K
--
Sent from Gmail Mobile

 

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Date: 1/5/19 5:45 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Merlin preyed upon Snow Bunting at HBSP
I agree with Nate. Eric, that falconry attitude of yours and your
comments, especially using the word "Absurd", have gotten you in trouble
here. Many people chase rare birds, and hopefully do not want a hawk, or
owl, or mammal, etc., taking the rarity. Nate is right also about that
falconry chip on your shoulder, and a lot of people on this listserve do
not condone falconers and falconry. I certain do not approve of your
hobby/pastime, but more importantly, as Nate said, you are picking a fight
when none is needed. And now you are getting yourself into more hot water
with the statement "The falconry community has done more for conservation
of the resources *they enjoy* than any other interest group." [Bold is
mine.] Actually, all that means is that falconers have done more to
protect and conserve falcons, Harris' Hawks, and a few other raptors that
they use in their hobby than have any other group. No more and no less.
The rest of us are more interested in protecting habitats and all bird
species, not just falcons and a few other hawk species.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh




On Sat, Jan 5, 2019 at 8:12 PM Nate Dias <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Eric,
>
> At the time I said "unfortunate" because some birders are still hoping
> to see the rarity - Snow Buntings - in coming days. And we feared
> the female might depart as a result. This is a birding Listserv after
> all. So in one aspect, it was unfortunate.
>
> In terms of "reality" - yes, in part we were thrilled at seeing (and
> documenting) the predator successfully take prey at the end of a hunt.
> More so after we later realized it was common prey, not a rarity
> some people have not seen yet. So it's not black and white. We felt
> thrilled for the predator but empathy for the prey and our fellow
> birders. I happened to mention the latter in a HASTY MESSAGE FROM THE
> FIELD. What's so wrong about that?
>
> The falconry chip on your shoulder has you trying to play "gotcha
> games", and picking fights where none really exist.
>
> Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
>
> On Sat, Jan 5, 2019 at 7:12 PM Eric Harrold <gentilis03...> wrote:
> >
> > Why the hell is it unfortunate? You don't like reality either, Nate!?
> Well we knew the answer to that one...sadly, you're not by yourself.
> >
> > Eric Harrold
> > Hays, NC
> >
> > On Saturday, January 5, 2019, 10:14:25 AM EST, Nate Dias <
> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> >
> >
> > Unfortunately John Cox and I just watched a Merlin take one of the Snow
> Buntings at Huntington Beach State Park. We had noticed earlier that one
> had an injured leg / foot.
> >
> > I got some photos of the Merlin in flight carrying the Snow Bunting; I
> will post some online when I get home.
> >
> > Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
>

 

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Date: 1/5/19 5:42 pm
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Photos of Merlin and Snow Buntings at HBSP plus Snow Bunting feeding behavior
I have some images up on my Flickr page:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_offshorebirder2_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=7_czVwm7I2U-KmSmPw71lNNL-w1lCxA9KCwUL_lQjKs&s=hfsSHzPXSxfU03eOsg9ng1XhnJW-Mb-6qIm1aWBjbcQ&e=

flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2

It was interesting to watch the Snow Buntings at fairly close range
while they excavated seeds in the wrack line. Unlike Sparrows, that
use their feet and toes to scratch up seeds, Snow Buntings seem to use
their bills like picks or spades and make little showers of sand or
debris. A couple of the photos show them doing this.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
 

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Date: 1/5/19 5:30 pm
From: Eric Harrold (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Merlin preyed upon Snow Bunting at HBSP
What does falconry have to do with your distorted reality about
predator-prey interactions, Nate? Of course, sacrifice everything for the
sake of the list. I don't have to have a chip on my shoulder borne of
falconry. The falconry community has done more for conservation of the
resources they enjoy than any other interest group.

Eric Harrold
Hays, NC

On Sat, Jan 5, 2019 at 8:12 PM Nate Dias <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Eric,
>
> At the time I said "unfortunate" because some birders are still hoping
> to see the rarity - Snow Buntings - in coming days. And we feared
> the female might depart as a result. This is a birding Listserv after
> all. So in one aspect, it was unfortunate.
>
> In terms of "reality" - yes, in part we were thrilled at seeing (and
> documenting) the predator successfully take prey at the end of a hunt.
> More so after we later realized it was common prey, not a rarity
> some people have not seen yet. So it's not black and white. We felt
> thrilled for the predator but empathy for the prey and our fellow
> birders. I happened to mention the latter in a HASTY MESSAGE FROM THE
> FIELD. What's so wrong about that?
>
> The falconry chip on your shoulder has you trying to play "gotcha
> games", and picking fights where none really exist.
>
> Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
>
> On Sat, Jan 5, 2019 at 7:12 PM Eric Harrold <gentilis03...> wrote:
> >
> > Why the hell is it unfortunate? You don't like reality either, Nate!?
> Well we knew the answer to that one...sadly, you're not by yourself.
> >
> > Eric Harrold
> > Hays, NC
> >
> > On Saturday, January 5, 2019, 10:14:25 AM EST, Nate Dias <
> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> >
> >
> > Unfortunately John Cox and I just watched a Merlin take one of the Snow
> Buntings at Huntington Beach State Park. We had noticed earlier that one
> had an injured leg / foot.
> >
> > I got some photos of the Merlin in flight carrying the Snow Bunting; I
> will post some online when I get home.
> >
> > Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
>

 

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Date: 1/5/19 5:12 pm
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Merlin preyed upon Snow Bunting at HBSP
Eric,

At the time I said "unfortunate" because some birders are still hoping
to see the rarity - Snow Buntings - in coming days. And we feared
the female might depart as a result. This is a birding Listserv after
all. So in one aspect, it was unfortunate.

In terms of "reality" - yes, in part we were thrilled at seeing (and
documenting) the predator successfully take prey at the end of a hunt.
More so after we later realized it was common prey, not a rarity
some people have not seen yet. So it's not black and white. We felt
thrilled for the predator but empathy for the prey and our fellow
birders. I happened to mention the latter in a HASTY MESSAGE FROM THE
FIELD. What's so wrong about that?

The falconry chip on your shoulder has you trying to play "gotcha
games", and picking fights where none really exist.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

On Sat, Jan 5, 2019 at 7:12 PM Eric Harrold <gentilis03...> wrote:
>
> Why the hell is it unfortunate? You don't like reality either, Nate!? Well we knew the answer to that one...sadly, you're not by yourself.
>
> Eric Harrold
> Hays, NC
>
> On Saturday, January 5, 2019, 10:14:25 AM EST, Nate Dias <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
>
> Unfortunately John Cox and I just watched a Merlin take one of the Snow Buntings at Huntington Beach State Park. We had noticed earlier that one had an injured leg / foot.
>
> I got some photos of the Merlin in flight carrying the Snow Bunting; I will post some online when I get home.
>
> Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
 

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Date: 1/5/19 4:44 pm
From: Eric Harrold (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Merlin preyed upon Snow Bunting at HBSP
Unfortunately??? Some folks have a hard time with reality it seems.
Absurd...

Eric Harrold
Hays, NC

On Sat, Jan 5, 2019 at 10:14 AM Nate Dias <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Unfortunately John Cox and I just watched a Merlin take one of the Snow
> Buntings at Huntington Beach State Park. We had noticed earlier that one
> had an injured leg / foot.
>
> I got some photos of the Merlin in flight carrying the Snow Bunting; I
> will post some online when I get home.
>
> Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
>

 

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Date: 1/5/19 3:53 pm
From: Gilbert Grant (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Two Wood Storks in Onslow County, NC today
Just before sunset today there were two immature Wood Storks perched in the top of a dead pine in Folkstone, Onslow County, NC. There is no surface water in the area. I will post a photo to the CBC Photo Gallery on Monday when I get back to my computer.

Gilbert S. Grant
Sneads Ferry, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 1/5/19 12:24 pm
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Merlin took shorebird beside Snow Bunting
I just got home and looked at blown-up photos on my computer.

The Merlin went down in a confusing panic of birds, RIGHT where the
Snow Buntings were. Then it sat on the sand for a while holding
something. Then we saw it flying off carrying an almost all-white
bird with a little dark line and no shorebird type bill. We took it
to be a Snow Bunting. It sure looked like it in binoculars and to
both of us zoomed in on the LCD screen of my camera.

So the good news is that we were wrong and apparently the Snow
Buntings survived the attack. Looking at the flight photos it seems
to have been carrying a Semipalmated Plover with the white belly and
undertail facing us, with the head turned so we could not see the
brown cap and the bill.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

On Sat, Jan 5, 2019 at 11:44 AM Jerry <bogey...> wrote:
>
> Unfortunately, Nate Diaz just reported that one Bunting was taken by a
> Merlin.
>
> Jerry Kerschner
> pawleys island, sc
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Cherrie Sneed (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
> Sent: Saturday, January 5, 2019 10:46 AM
> To: CarolinaBirds
> Subject: Re: SnowBuntingsYes
>
> Sorry! These birds are at Huntington Beach SP in Georgetown SC. There are
> 2 untings
>
> Cherrie Sneed
> Meggett, SC
> Charleston County
>
> > On Jan 5, 2019, at 10:30 AM, Cherrie Sneed <sneedcb...> wrote:
> >
> > At 10:15 at end of jetty cross beach to lagoon near path to inland hike.
> >
> > Cherrie Sneed
> > Meggett, SC
> > Charleston County
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.avg.com&d=DwICAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=YdJ8lxiP9J1sCX5y--AtkaEMnAT5VoLhcrxpriSEA28&s=dMfeG7uc8uVV1-mWVDLsg0JQpF7IM7UTtlAVHT0kTCY&e=
>
 

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Date: 1/5/19 9:28 am
From: Robin T (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bald Eagles Scavenging
Happened upon 2 adult bald eagles scavenging a dead wild turkey in a pasture this morning in Pensacola. Had seen one at times in trees above the Cane River, flying over the trout lakes and even flying over our pasture 1,000 feet up the mountain from there, but never knew there were actually two.
Pictures at Instagram (Newsteadecs).
Robin TPisgah NF

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 1/5/19 9:26 am
From: John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Common Raven in downtown Raleigh
For the 2nd time in a week I've heard and seen a Common Raven fly over my
house in the Mordecai neighborhood of downtown Raleigh, this time it was
chasing a Redtail.
Last summer in a visit to my childhood neighborhood on Long Island, NY I
noted Ravens now nesting on a tall cell tower structure. Birding friends
there told me they had been expanding there range on Long Island and
nesting on the structure for several years. Now I'm wondering if something
similar is going on here? There's a tall tower half a mile up Atlantic
Avenue from my house. Will have to pay closer attention.
John Connors
Raleigh, NC

 

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Date: 1/5/19 8:44 am
From: Jerry <bogey...>
Subject: Re: SnowBuntingsYes
Unfortunately, Nate Diaz just reported that one Bunting was taken by a
Merlin.

Jerry Kerschner
pawleys island, sc

-----Original Message-----
From: Cherrie Sneed (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
Sent: Saturday, January 5, 2019 10:46 AM
To: CarolinaBirds
Subject: Re: SnowBuntingsYes

Sorry! These birds are at Huntington Beach SP in Georgetown SC. There are
2 untings

Cherrie Sneed
Meggett, SC
Charleston County

> On Jan 5, 2019, at 10:30 AM, Cherrie Sneed <sneedcb...> wrote:
>
> At 10:15 at end of jetty cross beach to lagoon near path to inland hike.
>
> Cherrie Sneed
> Meggett, SC
> Charleston County


---
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Date: 1/5/19 7:47 am
From: Cherrie Sneed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: SnowBuntingsYes
Sorry! These birds are at Huntington Beach SP in Georgetown SC. There are 2 untings

Cherrie Sneed
Meggett, SC
Charleston County

> On Jan 5, 2019, at 10:30 AM, Cherrie Sneed <sneedcb...> wrote:
>
> At 10:15 at end of jetty cross beach to lagoon near path to inland hike.
>
> Cherrie Sneed
> Meggett, SC
> Charleston County
 

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Date: 1/5/19 7:30 am
From: Cherrie Sneed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: SnowBuntingsYes
At 10:15 at end of jetty cross beach to lagoon near path to inland hike.

Cherrie Sneed
Meggett, SC
Charleston County
 

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Date: 1/5/19 7:26 am
From: Steve <sshultz...>
Subject: Western Kingbird Ocracoke
Subject bird at Hatteras ferry terminal. Susan C had a Black-legged Kitiwake from the ferry.

Steve Shultz
Ocracoke NC
 

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Date: 1/5/19 7:14 am
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Merlin preyed upon Snow Bunting at HBSP
Unfortunately John Cox and I just watched a Merlin take one of the Snow
Buntings at Huntington Beach State Park. We had noticed earlier that one
had an injured leg / foot.

I got some photos of the Merlin in flight carrying the Snow Bunting; I will
post some online when I get home.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

 

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Date: 1/5/19 4:51 am
From: David Schroder (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Possible black rail at Bodie Island
Had 6-7 fleeting looks at it over the course of 10min, all within 8 feet
and as close as 4 feet from the boardwalk near the 90-degree curve.

Tiny - absolutely no bigger than 6”. Completely silent. Almost uniformly
dark all over; no hint of counter-shading like a Sora. Short, stubby tail
and overall shape/profile fit the rail family. Proportionally smaller bill
than the Clapper rails I’ve seen (and of course waaaay smaller).

The lighting was relatively poor when I first saw it, but had a strong
flashlight with me and was able to keep the light on the bird for 2-3
seconds. By the last time I saw the bird, it was quite bright overall and
the sun had just peeked over the horizon.

Since it’s flagged on eBird and I’m not a coastal birder other than the
2-3x a year I travel, I wanted to see if there was anything else it could
be before reporting. Size/impression/coloration/habitat/behavior all seem
to be a good match for black rail.

David Schroder
Davidson, NC (Mecklenburg)

 

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Date: 1/2/19 5:35 pm
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Manx Shearwaters , Dare Cty NC
Thanks for the heads up, Audrey. I saw 14 Manx Shearwaters in ten minutes,
plus two Razorbills, on my lunch break!

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

On Wed, Jan 2, 2019 at 11:36 AM Audrey <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Hey Birders
>
> Nice flight of Manx shearwaters and a few razorbills off Jennette’s pier
> in South nags head North Carolina all morning!!
>
> It's Amazing Out There!
>
> Audrey Whitlock
> Nags Head NC & Merritt Island FL
>
> Sent from iPhone
>
>

 

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Date: 1/2/19 9:52 am
From: Lester Coble (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Western Kingbird
Western kingbird at Glenburnie Park in new Bern. This afternoon. Located in trees around the parking lot.

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 1/2/19 9:46 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bird checklist for Fort Bragg and Camp Mackall, NC
Folks:

Michelle Wilcox, at Fort Bragg, has completed a 2-page (3-column,
fold-able) checklist of the birds at Fort Bragg and Camp Mackall, NC.
Susan Campbell, Bruce Sorrie, and Jay Carter provided the main input and
review of the checklist. Note that it is not simply a species listing, but
it has approximate abundances for each of the four seasons, as one
typically sees on a wildlife refuge checklist. Kent Fiala and I did a
final review, mainly for spelling of names. Kent has posted the checklist
(PDF) for downloading on the Carolina Bird Club website, under *Features *and
then *North Carolina birding sites*. You will see the "Site checklists"
heading at the bottom of the page, with the link.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_sites_NC_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=bZX2i_HnBSCHNah6vvCey2QrWwVNg6YfBvV4fRQbZxc&s=y5gWCht7lpTx0--0z08dOVFLcMoToG8hlfH8VO1Rswg&e=

These two military reservations are generally off-limits for birding, but
the main use of the list will be for persons birding in the overall
Sandhills region, such as at nearby Weymouth Woods Sandhills Nature
Preserve or the Sandhill Game Land.

Of significance is that the Spring Meeting of the Carolina Bird Club will
be held from May 3-5, 2019 in Southern Pines. Thus, I anticipate many
people will want to print out the checklist before the meeting, for use
during the meeting. In fact, it might be a good idea for the checklist to
be printed out by the CBC for inclusion in the registration packets at the
meeting, for use during the meeting.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

 

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Date: 1/2/19 8:36 am
From: Audrey (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Manx Shearwaters , Dare Cty NC
Hey Birders
Nice flight of Manx shearwaters and a few razorbills off Jennette’s pier in South nags head North Carolina all morning!!

It's Amazing Out There!

Audrey Whitlock
Nags Head NC & Merritt Island FL

Sent from iPhone


 

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Date: 1/2/19 8:26 am
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: HCAS' Brookshire Park walk this Saturday 8AM
The forecast calls for rain ending early then sunny mild conditions for
Saturday, so it should be a fun walk at Brookshire Park on the New River
in Boone this Saturday. All are welcome to this free walk sponsored by
High Country Audubon. We start at 8AM at the main parking lot by the
restrooms, which are closed for winter.

Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC


 

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Date: 1/2/19 7:00 am
From: Wayne Forsythe <wforsythe...>
Subject: Henderson Cty., NC
Folks,
Currently, 1 drake BLUE-WINGED TEAL on the farm pond, on Bryson Rd. In Mills River! Quite a surprise for Jan. 2!
Wayne

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 1/2/19 6:56 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: New Year's Day Birding - Wake NC
In what has become a traditional longer than we could recall, several of us (Brian "The Convict eBirder" Pendergraft, Susan Campbell, and I) started at the Pendergraft Penitentiary and birded our way south through Wake County, ending up on the shores of Harris Lake.

Along the way we spotted 71-78 species (depending on if you counted heard birds and/or missed something someone else saw), which is about average for our New Year's excursions. Noticeable was a lack of ducks. This must have been one of the warmest 1/1 ventures, with temps 65-72 degrees; much, much warmer than last year's 18-28 degree range!

Highlights this year includes Pine Siskin, Red-breasted Nuthatch, and Purple Finch at the penitentiary, Rufous Hummingbird in Apex (a 5-year and counting return bird), American Pipet and Horned Lark at Mid-Pines Road, and an American Woodcock at Harris Lake that came in and sat in front of us while still light enough to see all the salient visuals.

We tallied about 13,000 birds yesterday, but before you get too excited, 10,200 of those were Red-winged Blackbirds flying in to roost at Harris Lake, and another 2,000 plus birds were Ring-billed Gulls. We probably undercounted the gulls pretty severely.

Here's the day list in order spotted (me only):

AMERICAN CROW

NORTHERN CARDINAL

WHITE THROATED SPARROW

TURKEY VULTURE

PINE WARBLER

DARK EYED JUNCO

RUBY CROWNED KINGLET

TUFTED TITMOUSE

PURPLE FINCH

PINE SISKIN

RED BREASTED NUTHATCH

CAROLINA CHICKADEE

DOWNY WOODPECKER

CAROLINA WREN

YELLOW BELLIED SAPSCUKER

CEDAR WAXWING

PILEATED WOODPECKER

YELLOW RUMPED WARBLER

EASTERN BLUEBIRD

AMERICAN ROBIN

HERMIT THRUSH

RED BELLIED WOODPECKER

CANADA GOOSE

WHITE BREASTED NUTHATCH

MOURNING DOVE

NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD

GREAT BLUE HERON

BROWN THRASHER

EASTERN TOWHEE

HOUSE FINCH

BLUE JAY

ROCK DOVE

RED TAILED HAWK

KILLDEER

SONG SPARROW

FOX SPARROW

SHARP SHINNED HAWK

LESSER SCAUP

RUDDY DUCK

RING NECKED DUCK

DOUBLE CRESTED CORMORANT

MALLARD

RING BILLED GULL

HOODED MERGANSER

BALD EAGLE

BUFFLEHEAD

GREATER SCAUP

EASTERN PHOEBE

FOX SPARROW

SAVANNAH SPARROW

EUROPEAN STARLING

WINTER WREN

PIED BILLED GREBE

HERRING GULL

NORTHERN SHOVELER

BLACK VULTURE

BONAPARTES GULL

EASTERN MEADOWLARK

AMERICAN KESTREL

AMERICAN PIPIT

HORNED LARK

BROWN HEADED COWBIRD

RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD

AMERICAN COOT

BELTED KINGFISHER

COMMON LOON

GOLDEN CROWNED KINGLET

SWAMP SPARROW

RED WINGED BLACKBIRD

COMMON GRACKLE

AMERICAN WOODCOCK


Steve Shultz
Apex, NC


 

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Date: 1/1/19 5:51 pm
From: Robert Hibbitts (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: 1/12019 Report
Went looking to see second black headed gull of life and got that marked off list early this morning. Went over to lower Myrtle and scoped two red throated loans, a pair of common murres, and a pod of eight black backed gulls. Beaches were empty of birds. Mud flats were empty. Only birds I could see were in my scope. RCWAs weren’t active coming back north.

Robert H Hibbitts
 

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Date: 1/1/19 5:03 pm
From: scompton1251 <scompton1251...>
Subject: Re: Snow Buntings
Chris,
I will try for the Buntings again Sunday. Missed them last Sunday. What is your advice on time of day? Looks like the key is the association with the plover roost. What tide and time of day do they show up?
Thanks,Steve ComptonGreenville, SC
Sent from my Verizon LG Smartphone
------ Original message------From: Chris SnookDate: Tue, Jan 1, 2019 7:21 PMTo: <carolinabirds...>;Cc: Subject:Re: Snow Buntings

Snow buntings present from 3pm onwards today. They appeared after
the Dunlin roost started forming at about 2:20pm. Appearances seem
to be tide related.
Regards
Chris Snook,

Charleston

On 1/1/2019 07:30, FRANK LAWKINS (via
carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:





They have not been seen at HBSP jetty in two days





Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone



 

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Date: 1/1/19 4:20 pm
From: Chris Snook (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Snow Buntings
Snow buntings present from 3pm onwards today. They appeared after the
Dunlin roost started forming at about 2:20pm. Appearances seem to be
tide related.

Regards

Chris Snook,
Charleston
On 1/1/2019 07:30, FRANK LAWKINS (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> They have not been seen at HBSP jetty in two days
>
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__yho.com_footer0&d=DwMCaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=ftc5HJUpXLppYp75tDOl67tTtQX03oj5MdO9yk6hdmU&s=x9A5KA2P-uil8dmdgFfY-4m1h1pQwHTpnCi6BF1R_ks&e=>

 

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Date: 1/1/19 2:37 pm
From: Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Continuing curlew at Edisto
Both Eiders and Curlews continue to be seen today.
Curlews were observed from beach access 37 and Eiders were seen at beach access 3.
Pam Ford
Charleston
Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 30, 2018, at 11:15 AM, Hilda Flamholtz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> We were able to see 3 of the 4 long-billed curlew that had been reported during our visit Friday evening - but it was so close to dark - there was no hope of a photo. We went back this morning hoping for better light and were able to get a decent photo - but only saw 1 today. For the curlew, we followed Craig Watson's directions to "park at Beach Access 37, walk west toward the point and the flats are across the ICW at the mouth of Big Bay Creek, has to be low tide"
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S51049504&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=_uM5wkQrNSmLOyl8epPJOCKNZKXpE7-KUylr3rZGSf8&s=pep_cNsrI2CljtOJqTlyq0yOu_yUO4MtkbCNk0eQzXM&e=
>
> We were also able to see the 2 common eiders reported from near beach access 4 yesterday. Hanging out near a jetty with black scoters.
>
> Very much enjoying the birding on Edisto this week.
> Hilda & Jon Flamholtz

 

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Date: 1/1/19 11:30 am
From: Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Upcoming Winter Pelagic Trips from Hatteras, NC
Happy New Year!

As usual we have several boat trips planned to look for winter seabirds here off Cape Hatteras. The dates are as follows:

January 26(27)
February 2(3)
February 9(10)
February 16(17)
February 17(18)

Most of these are planned for Saturdays with a weather date on Sunday, except for Feb. 17, which is planned for Sunday with a weather date on Monday.

Target birds include Northern Fulmar, Manx Shearwater, Red Phalarope, Great Skua, Little Gull, Dovekie, Razorbill, and Atlantic Puffin. We also occasionally see Great and Sooty Shearwaters, Glaucous and Iceland Gulls, and Common and Thick-billed Murres. We have seen Yellow-nosed Albatross twice and Black-browed once. Humpback Whales, various dolphins, and Loggerhead Sea Turtles are also frequently encountered. We chum all day and there should be good photo ops of the gannets and other seabirds that follow in our wake. These trips are pretty nice because we generally do not have to go way offshore to see the target birds, and with all the wintering seabirds in the nearshore waters, there should be birds in view all day. We run these trips on our the 56’ Stormy Petrel II, which is now equipped with quiet clean burning Tier 3 Cummins diesels. She is a sea kindly boat with plenty of deck space, and I have been running her since 2007.

More information about these trips including the rates can be found at our website: www.seabirding.com/ <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.seabirding.com_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=KiqdIDIF60mGFk9day06ARm0eUv0God4630pAYZmehI&s=TTGOusQx3h3gXTGHDisQH4qmLXNcU-8AtJE-y0tK8HA&e=>

We also have an archive of reports from all of trips since 2012 on our Google blog: seabirding.blogspot.com <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__seabirding.blogspot.com_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=KiqdIDIF60mGFk9day06ARm0eUv0God4630pAYZmehI&s=hcHq5pM5-mPx6hrT8bvd7_JvoLEQwFmxaS2EHVelyTo&e=>

I hope some of you will join us in the weeks to come, and if you have friends who might not be aware of these opportunities, please share this message.

Brian Patteson
Hatteras, NC
<hatteraspetrel...> <mailto:<hatteraspetrel...>
(252) 986-1363




 

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Date: 1/1/19 9:58 am
From: Susan Hoffmann (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bluebird egg already?!
Mother Nature gave me a New Year's present! I saw one of my bluebirds go
inside my bluebird box. So we opened it to see if anyone had roosted in
there recently and if anything needed to be cleaned out. There is what
looks like a fresh nest with one small whitish egg deep in the top layer,
almost fully "submerged". BNA Online says whitish eggs are rare and egg
laying starts 6 weeks from now. Can anyone tell me if this is a new egg?
Will it matter? Should we remove it if it an old egg? One of the birds was
calling at us while we were out there. So we quickly shut it up and came
inside. If it were a fresh egg, would someone have been sitting on it? I
live in Wilmington and it is over 70 out there today. I've seen 4 adults
today.

I had a family hatch 2 years ago but not last year. So I am thrilled in any
event! Any insight appreciated!

Susan Hoffmann

 

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Date: 1/1/19 6:32 am
From: Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mattamuskeet question
We're getting ready to head out to Mattamuskeet...can anyone advise as to
the location of the horse pen where the small flock of blackbirds can be
seen? We didn't make it there last year, and I've lost track of the exact
spot.

Also, is a four wheel drive vehicle needed to travel the main road into
Gull Rock Gamelands? Last time we went there, it was gravel and OK, but
that was a couple of yrs ago.

Here in Coinjock., we have about six fox sparrows continuing, and one
red-breasted nuthatch. Our purple finch visitors have dropped to one female.

Linda Ward
Skip Hancock
Coinjock, NC

 

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Date: 1/1/19 5:58 am
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Gnatcatcher- Raleigh
Just had a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher in the yard. Not particularly rare, but a first in the winter in Wake Co. for me.

Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 1/1/19 4:31 am
From: FRANK LAWKINS (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Snow Buntings
They have not been seen at HBSP jetty in two days


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone

 

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Date: 12/31/18 6:17 pm
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Ring-billed Gulls later here every year.

Wait till better freeze up north (and here).





Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

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Date: 12/31/18 4:07 pm
From: M Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: gull numbers at Jordan Lake, NC

What is the proximity to the Air Port? Because of the nearby Air Force Base, the feds invade our water treatment plant on fly days. They have cannons and guns to make big boom booms and try to frighten the birds away. Birds and aircraft don't coexist harmoniously. Is something similar (scare tactics) going on at Jordan Lake?

Mae Howell
Goldsboro, NC
Powered by Cricket Wireless

------ Original message------
From: Kent Fiala
Date: Mon, Dec 31, 2018 5:45 PM
To: <carolinabirds...>;
Cc:
Subject:Re: gull numbers at Jordan Lake, NC


My land-locked Bojangles had no Ring-billed Gulls this year either.

Kent Fiala

On 12/31/2018 5:30 PM, Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
I've observed similar decreases in Wake County. Numbers at Lake Crabtree and Harris Lake are down compared to last year.

I wonder if it has something to do with the wetter weather (NC broke a rainfall record this year).

Another thought, did they change any practices over at the Wake County landfill?

Eddie Owens
Cary NC

On Mon, Dec 31, 2018, 4:56 PM Norman Budnitz <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...> wrote:
In recent years, since the opening of the South Wake County Landfill, there has been a huge influx of gulls in the area--mostly Ring-billeds with a smattering of other species. The gulls roost on Jordan lake at night and head to the landfill to feast on Wake County trash during the day. In the past decade we have estimated numbers from 30,000 to as high as 65,000 on the Jordan Lake Christmas Bird Count. But this year the numbers are way down. Our estimate of the size of the roost this year is a mere 2,000 gulls. I have not seen all the reports from all the counters yet, but even if there are gulls in other parts of the lake, I'm sure there are not tens of thousands.

If anyone reading this post has any insight as to what is going on, I'd be happy to hear your thoughts.

--
Norm Budnitz, Jordan Lake CBC compiler
Orange County
North Carolina

 

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Date: 12/31/18 3:52 pm
From: Fuz Sanderson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: gull numbers at Jordan Lake, NC
There were a lot of Ring-billed gulls on Harris lake during yesterday's
Count. Conservative estimate of 3,000.

On Dec 31, 2018 6:30 PM, "John Connors" <carolinabirds...> wrote:

Raleigh CBC had just over 1000 RB Gulls counted this year, so the big
numbers aren't on the southern wake county lakes.
John Connors
Raleigh, NC

On Mon, Dec 31, 2018 at 4:56 PM Norman Budnitz <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> In recent years, since the opening of the South Wake County Landfill,
> there has been a huge influx of gulls in the area--mostly Ring-billeds with
> a smattering of other species. The gulls roost on Jordan lake at night and
> head to the landfill to feast on Wake County trash during the day. In the
> past decade we have estimated numbers from 30,000 to as high as 65,000 on
> the Jordan Lake Christmas Bird Count. But this year the numbers are way
> down. Our estimate of the size of the roost this year is a mere 2,000
> gulls. I have not seen all the reports from all the counters yet, but even
> if there are gulls in other parts of the lake, I'm sure there are not tens
> of thousands.
>
> If anyone reading this post has any insight as to what is going on, I'd be
> happy to hear your thoughts.
>
> --
> Norm Budnitz, Jordan Lake CBC compiler
> Orange County
> North Carolina
>

 

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Date: 12/31/18 3:30 pm
From: John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: gull numbers at Jordan Lake, NC
Raleigh CBC had just over 1000 RB Gulls counted this year, so the big
numbers aren't on the southern wake county lakes.
John Connors
Raleigh, NC

On Mon, Dec 31, 2018 at 4:56 PM Norman Budnitz <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> In recent years, since the opening of the South Wake County Landfill,
> there has been a huge influx of gulls in the area--mostly Ring-billeds with
> a smattering of other species. The gulls roost on Jordan lake at night and
> head to the landfill to feast on Wake County trash during the day. In the
> past decade we have estimated numbers from 30,000 to as high as 65,000 on
> the Jordan Lake Christmas Bird Count. But this year the numbers are way
> down. Our estimate of the size of the roost this year is a mere 2,000
> gulls. I have not seen all the reports from all the counters yet, but even
> if there are gulls in other parts of the lake, I'm sure there are not tens
> of thousands.
>
> If anyone reading this post has any insight as to what is going on, I'd be
> happy to hear your thoughts.
>
> --
> Norm Budnitz, Jordan Lake CBC compiler
> Orange County
> North Carolina
>

 

Back to top
Date: 12/31/18 2:56 pm
From: Derb Carter <derbc...>
Subject: Warblers
Kent correctly pointed out adding a chat would now not have made a ten warbler day. Guess it would have been nine warblers and an Icteriidae Formerly Known as Warbler.

Derb Carter

 

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Date: 12/31/18 2:45 pm
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: gull numbers at Jordan Lake, NC
My land-locked Bojangles had no Ring-billed Gulls this year either.

Kent Fiala

On 12/31/2018 5:30 PM, Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> I've  observed similar decreases in Wake County. Numbers at Lake Crabtree and Harris Lake are down compared to last year.
>
> I wonder if it has something to do with the wetter weather (NC broke a rainfall record this year).
>
> Another thought, did they change any practices over at the Wake County landfill?
>
> Eddie Owens
> Cary NC
>
> On Mon, Dec 31, 2018, 4:56 PM Norman Budnitz <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> In recent years, since the opening of the South Wake County Landfill, there has been a huge influx of gulls in the area--mostly Ring-billeds with a smattering of other species.  The gulls roost on Jordan lake at night and head to the landfill to feast on Wake County trash during the day.  In the past decade we have estimated numbers from 30,000 to as high as 65,000 on the Jordan Lake Christmas Bird Count.  But this year the numbers are way down.  Our estimate of the size of the roost this year is a mere 2,000 gulls.  I have not seen all the reports from all the counters yet, but even if there are gulls in other parts of the lake, I'm sure there are not tens of thousands.
>
> If anyone reading this post has any insight as to what is going on, I'd be happy to hear your thoughts.
>
> --
> Norm Budnitz, Jordan Lake CBC compiler
> Orange County
> North Carolina
>

 

Back to top
Date: 12/31/18 2:31 pm
From: Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: gull numbers at Jordan Lake, NC
I've observed similar decreases in Wake County. Numbers at Lake Crabtree
and Harris Lake are down compared to last year.

I wonder if it has something to do with the wetter weather (NC broke a
rainfall record this year).

Another thought, did they change any practices over at the Wake County
landfill?

Eddie Owens
Cary NC

On Mon, Dec 31, 2018, 4:56 PM Norman Budnitz <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> In recent years, since the opening of the South Wake County Landfill,
> there has been a huge influx of gulls in the area--mostly Ring-billeds with
> a smattering of other species. The gulls roost on Jordan lake at night and
> head to the landfill to feast on Wake County trash during the day. In the
> past decade we have estimated numbers from 30,000 to as high as 65,000 on
> the Jordan Lake Christmas Bird Count. But this year the numbers are way
> down. Our estimate of the size of the roost this year is a mere 2,000
> gulls. I have not seen all the reports from all the counters yet, but even
> if there are gulls in other parts of the lake, I'm sure there are not tens
> of thousands.
>
> If anyone reading this post has any insight as to what is going on, I'd be
> happy to hear your thoughts.
>
> --
> Norm Budnitz, Jordan Lake CBC compiler
> Orange County
> North Carolina
>

 

Back to top
Date: 12/31/18 2:19 pm
From: Derb Carter <derbc...>
Subject: Nine warbler day
I had nine species of warbler today around Wilmington. It started with an amazing feeding station parade of Yellow-rumped, Pine, Orange-crowned, Yellow-throated, and Cape May in one yard. The warblers were accompanied by a Western Tanager and Baltimore Oriole. Having seen five species of warblers first thing in the morning I decided to check some spots for other species. At Fort Fisher I added Common Yellowthroat, Palm, and Prairie. In a stand of large trees along the Intracoastal in northern New Hanover I had a usually dependable Black-and-white. Tried a spot for chat to make ten but no luck. Not bad for December 31.

Derb Carter


 

Back to top
Date: 12/31/18 1:56 pm
From: Norman Budnitz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: gull numbers at Jordan Lake, NC
In recent years, since the opening of the South Wake County Landfill, there
has been a huge influx of gulls in the area--mostly Ring-billeds with a
smattering of other species. The gulls roost on Jordan lake at night and
head to the landfill to feast on Wake County trash during the day. In the
past decade we have estimated numbers from 30,000 to as high as 65,000 on
the Jordan Lake Christmas Bird Count. But this year the numbers are way
down. Our estimate of the size of the roost this year is a mere 2,000
gulls. I have not seen all the reports from all the counters yet, but even
if there are gulls in other parts of the lake, I'm sure there are not tens
of thousands.

If anyone reading this post has any insight as to what is going on, I'd be
happy to hear your thoughts.

--
Norm Budnitz, Jordan Lake CBC compiler
Orange County
North Carolina

 

Back to top
Date: 12/31/18 1:18 pm
From: <hilton...> <hilton...>
Subject: Hilton Pond 12/16/18 (Results: York/Rock Hill Christmas Bird Count)
Rather than go out in the dreary fog like we have here on New Year's Eve, why not curl up with your laptop or iPad tonight and check out installment #684 of "This Week at Hilton Pond" for 16-22 Dec 2018. It's a summary of the recently completed 28th annual York/Rock Hill (SC) Christmas Bird Count, complete with photos of some of the species seen. Since one of our more unusual sightings was a North American River Otter, we offer some images of it, too.

As always we include tallies of all birds banded or recaptured at the Center during the period, along with acknowledgment of those who recently made donations in support of our work with Hilton Pond Center and Operation RubyThroat.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.hiltonpond.org_ThisWeek181216.html&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=2cH8AtAsaVlIHvA7DuqKDNVDMRzlhhwx-tmQo3K9p3c&s=UUhbCJ0Z7nPhTk3pZB8dM895S48ir8SqRKTEEEeNmDE&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.hiltonpond.org_ThisWeek181216.html&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=2cH8AtAsaVlIHvA7DuqKDNVDMRzlhhwx-tmQo3K9p3c&s=UUhbCJ0Z7nPhTk3pZB8dM895S48ir8SqRKTEEEeNmDE&e=>

Happy End-of-Year Nature Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.facebook.com_HiltonPond&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=2cH8AtAsaVlIHvA7DuqKDNVDMRzlhhwx-tmQo3K9p3c&s=IP_H9rYUSuemNclKTrfPR7Y6QsARxJJRuSb8Xth3zjQ&e= for timely updates on nature topics,
and for info about hummingbirds at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.facebook.com_rubythroats&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=2cH8AtAsaVlIHvA7DuqKDNVDMRzlhhwx-tmQo3K9p3c&s=eDOFW81On9nTFXjR4oG3maFSYFfWH8O8Nu8o7vTiR44&e=

Follow us on Twitter @hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and education for students of all ages.

"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the sunset." BHjr.

============


 

Back to top
Date: 12/31/18 9:47 am
From: David Hart <david.hart...>
Subject: Common Eider at Mason Inlet
Had a Common Eider right off the beach at Mason Inlet, south end of Wrightsville Beach, this morning. Some kids playing flushed it and it flew off toward the intracoastal waterway. Will post photos with eBird report.


Dave Hart

Chapel Hill

 

Back to top
Date: 12/31/18 9:09 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: First eBird Report
Woah! Yes, I see the list now. I entered "Wake" in Explore, clicked Wake
County, NC within the list, and on the Recent Visits, on the right side of
the screen, a list of folks who have already submitted eBird checklists *just
for this morning in Wake County*! I clicked on his name on the list, and
it shows that Brian had a total of 30 species, including all 3 nuthatch
species, etc.

Congrats, Brian. Your data -- just for the morning of Dec. 31, 2018, are
"published" now. But, all of those Grey-cheeked Thrush reports from your
yard in the past, well .. Some folks do go way back into their records and
enter old data, which is perfectly fine. I know Will Cook has done that,
such that he is able to use eBird to generate his county or state lists for
him.

ObserverDateSpecies
LynnErla Beegle 31 Dec 2018 <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S51116558&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JsS_YCNUj5hUMPaYJIzdYrT9SvtYc33DKMYHqUoCBFM&s=XvQ8c9VEDu4sMED9t_0IzXSW4FrkLsbyZ_Mb4MxHRHE&e=>
14
WS Barbour 31 Dec 2018 <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S51116802&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JsS_YCNUj5hUMPaYJIzdYrT9SvtYc33DKMYHqUoCBFM&s=wNGyq_uUCnnzdB2Sb9PU3Xqu8Qz1L3SZ_CxyyioUmog&e=>  18
Natalie Barbour 31 Dec 2018 <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S51117052&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JsS_YCNUj5hUMPaYJIzdYrT9SvtYc33DKMYHqUoCBFM&s=59e8Tlt22g0x9PFGM9rdNNzPa4yFA-ixCRNigEwpsCM&e=>
18
LynnErla Beegle 31 Dec 2018 <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S51115929&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JsS_YCNUj5hUMPaYJIzdYrT9SvtYc33DKMYHqUoCBFM&s=Fg1S7HAZimIx9R0Yl6lOVS76MTZyKhedBNcoHsyji-U&e=>
30
John Gerwin 31 Dec 2018 <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S51115816&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JsS_YCNUj5hUMPaYJIzdYrT9SvtYc33DKMYHqUoCBFM&s=nujgqTUS0rzFWtMYg-bnufGVjNfmrcG6tHE9aPgPa7I&e=>  13
Gwen Ringenberg 31 Dec 2018 <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S51115427&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JsS_YCNUj5hUMPaYJIzdYrT9SvtYc33DKMYHqUoCBFM&s=maTUJBmZQ0_PI80KWaHThoI_5X2xIGB9JLwz7EmcQNA&e=>
12
Mitch Edwards 31 Dec 2018 <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S51116271&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JsS_YCNUj5hUMPaYJIzdYrT9SvtYc33DKMYHqUoCBFM&s=gO68MVAvjG4ieszaQeeOXeSkNJWp07P2sfC3V-GV46Y&e=>  15
Brian Pendergraft 31 Dec 2018 <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S51117419&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JsS_YCNUj5hUMPaYJIzdYrT9SvtYc33DKMYHqUoCBFM&s=0M-lpZfgbmTTroocjZXZM_dneSQgpSwP8sWek6zqBEo&e=>
30
Steve Patterson 31 Dec 2018 <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S51114719&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JsS_YCNUj5hUMPaYJIzdYrT9SvtYc33DKMYHqUoCBFM&s=OZELPxgFBQBSJGN2NZwwFFC0GEPkVSkiXsmJzv87kcc&e=>  6
Edward Landi 31 Dec 2018 <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S51114075&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JsS_YCNUj5hUMPaYJIzdYrT9SvtYc33DKMYHqUoCBFM&s=jXkTpf_alaiLykqF3wqZbX3EwFB9qB6cBKbJ9gBdzPo&e=>  20

Thanks to Kent for converting a convict.

Harry LeGrand

On Mon, Dec 31, 2018 at 11:21 AM Brian Pendergraft <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Wait......what?
> Yes it’s true! Kent Fiala was kind enough to spend a couple of hours with
> me this morning in the yard and I completed my first official eBird list.
> As Kent said when he left, “another convert.” I think in my case he meant
> CONVICT, but that’s ok too! THANKS KENT!
> I didn’t include it here because it’s all common stuff but we did have 47
> Siskins, 5 purple Finches, and 2 red breasted nuthatches
>
> Happy New Year folks.
>
> Brian Pendergraft
> Falls Lake NC
>
> Sent from my iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 12/31/18 8:21 am
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: First eBird Report
Wait......what?
Yes it’s true! Kent Fiala was kind enough to spend a couple of hours with me this morning in the yard and I completed my first official eBird list.
As Kent said when he left, “another convert.” I think in my case he meant CONVICT, but that’s ok too! THANKS KENT!
I didn’t include it here because it’s all common stuff but we did have 47 Siskins, 5 purple Finches, and 2 red breasted nuthatches

Happy New Year folks.

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 12/31/18 8:09 am
From: Jack Rogers <jack...>
Subject: Black-headed Gull-Georgetown WTP, Georgetown co., SC
C-birders,
Looking at the continuing rarity right now in the 3rd pond (the one that
usually is spraying the sewage water into the air). It was not visible in
the hour I looked earlier today, so I ate lunch and came back. The sprayers
were turned off and the bird is now foraging with a mixed flock of gulls.
There were also 2 Greater Scaup in the 2nd pond, a hen and a drake.
Happy New Year,
Jack Rogers
--

Jack Rogers
Mt Pleasant, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 12/31/18 5:18 am
From: Carol Chelette (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Story about red-cockaded woodpeckers' homes being rebuilt
This story was in yesterdays News and Observer (Raleigh, NC):

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.newsobserver.com_news_local_article223550275.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=wDlwC4VnS9cB5tOjT23VgiZ3Nmy8iFaJ0km-NplcA7k&s=HcjX4hXSmfvIYcO0Qqh4SlEx6xZBc5NaEDHt6z2BjXs&e=

Carol Chelette
Durham, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 12/30/18 9:04 pm
From: Hal Broadfoot (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Hyde Co Curlew Sandpiper info
Harry, et al.

Thanks for your comments.

Ann and I, and others, were scanning the cove near the ferry terminal when someone said, “A shorebird’s flying in.” I said, “It’s probably just another willet” before I got my binoculars on it. I saw a thin wing stripe, but I don’t recall whether the rump had a dark stripe or not. It landed and I thought, “This is crazy, that’s a stilt sandpiper.” It was lanky and had an upright posture. It had a light eyeline that gave the impression of a cap. But, I thought it was crazy because I knew a stilt sandpiper was out of place and out of season.

I asked everyone with us what they thought it was. Everyone was stumped. I mentioned stilt sandpiper and pectoral sandpiper, but we immediately rejected pectoral because of the long, curved bill and the upright posture. I asked if anyone could tell the color of the legs. We put a scope on it and saw the legs looked dark.

I went and got my camera. When I got back, the bird had moved around the point, so we repositioned ourselves and came at it from the other side. I took a lot of photographs, but almost all were blurry or obstructed. The photos confirmed dark legs, which eliminated stilt sandpiper (and the already eliminated pectoral). I concluded curlew sandpiper based on the constant impression I had of a stilt sandpiper with an even more decurved bill and dark legs. I never thought it had a dunlin’s posture or physique, although the photo I posted to the Carolina Rare Birds Facebook site (the sharpest one I had) does look squat like a dunlin (and might be a dunlin).

Eleven or twelve people, including some longtime birders with great familiarity with dunlins, saw the bird and thought it was curlew sandpiper. As you implied, the species can be surprisingly tough to tell apart in non-breeding plumage. To me, the best argument against curlew sandpiper is that the original photo I posted of the subject bird lacks an attenuated look due to long wings. But, I also have photos in which the bird looks more elongated. I have photos where eye stripe looks prominent and photographs where it looks subtle. I have photos that show what seem to be longer legs than a dunlin has. None of us saw or photographed the rump after it landed.

Odds are the bird is a dunlin, but it didn’t give me that impression.

I am having a tough time emailing the photos; even posting to Facebook has been iffy. Maybe when I get home, Internet service will be better.

Hal Broadfoot



Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Harry LeGrand
Sent: Sunday, December 30, 2018 10:39 PM
To: Ann Brice
Cc: Ryan Justice; carolinabirds listserve
Subject: Re: Hyde Co Curlew Sandpiper info

When not in breeding plumage or partial breeding plumage -- i.e., without some of the rusty coloration on the underparts showing -- you really need to see a white rump on the bird to confirm a Curlew Sandpiper, as there are so, so many Dunlins around now -- it is the most abundant winter shorebird in coastal NC.  You mentioned a narrow wing stripe, which is OK (but so do Dunlins), but if folks saw a wing stripe, that implies it was seen in flight.  And, if seen in flight, the white rump should be obvious.  Dunlin has a dark band down the middle, as do most smaller shorebirds; Stilt Sandpiper also has a white rump.   Neither Curlew Sandpiper nor Stilt Sandpiper should be in NC in winter, though there is one previous NC midwinter record of Curlew Sandpiper, of a banded bird seen in summer than was still present in winter -- see the Chat link on the Birds of North Carolina website.  At a tidal shore, Stilt Sandpiper can be ruled out by habitat whereas Curlew Sandpiper could be along a tidal shore, like the edge of the sound.

Obviously, owing to the extreme rarity of a Curlew Sandpiper anywhere in the US on December 30, photos will need to be posted and examined to be sure of what was seen.  Even photos might be inconclusive, if a white rump patch is not visible.   Certainly, if folks are already on the Outer Banks now, it is worth a look, if you know where to look.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh





On Sun, Dec 30, 2018 at 10:19 PM Ann Brice <carolinabirds...> wrote:
No. Some people saw pictures and pronounced it to be a Dunlin.  However about eight people saw it in person and no one said— hey that’s a Dunlin!  It seemed to match an online picture of the curlew sandpiper perfectly but we did not have a field guide with us when seen.  My apologies for any inconvenience my early posting may have caused.
Ann Brice
In Ocracoke

Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 30, 2018, at 9:54 PM, Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Did anybody see the bird past the initial reports this morning? Will be in the area tomorrow and would like as much info as possible.
>
> Ryan Justice
>
> Sent from my iPhone


 

Back to top
Date: 12/30/18 7:39 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Hyde Co Curlew Sandpiper info
When not in breeding plumage or partial breeding plumage -- i.e., without
some of the rusty coloration on the underparts showing -- you really need
to see a white rump on the bird to confirm a Curlew Sandpiper, as there are
so, so many Dunlins around now -- it is the most abundant winter shorebird
in coastal NC. You mentioned a narrow wing stripe, which is OK (but so do
Dunlins), but if folks saw a wing stripe, that implies it was seen in
flight. And, if seen in flight, the white rump should be obvious. Dunlin
has a dark band down the middle, as do most smaller shorebirds; Stilt
Sandpiper also has a white rump. Neither Curlew Sandpiper nor Stilt
Sandpiper should be in NC in winter, though there is one previous NC
midwinter record of Curlew Sandpiper, of a banded bird seen in summer than
was still present in winter -- see the Chat link on the Birds of North
Carolina website. At a tidal shore, Stilt Sandpiper can be ruled out by
habitat whereas Curlew Sandpiper could be along a tidal shore, like the
edge of the sound.

Obviously, owing to the extreme rarity of a Curlew Sandpiper anywhere in
the US on December 30, photos will need to be posted and examined to be
sure of what was seen. Even photos might be inconclusive, if a white rump
patch is not visible. Certainly, if folks are already on the Outer Banks
now, it is worth a look, if you know where to look.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh





On Sun, Dec 30, 2018 at 10:19 PM Ann Brice <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> No. Some people saw pictures and pronounced it to be a Dunlin. However
> about eight people saw it in person and no one said— hey that’s a Dunlin!
> It seemed to match an online picture of the curlew sandpiper perfectly but
> we did not have a field guide with us when seen. My apologies for any
> inconvenience my early posting may have caused.
> Ann Brice
> In Ocracoke
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Dec 30, 2018, at 9:54 PM, Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing
> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> >
> > Did anybody see the bird past the initial reports this morning? Will be
> in the area tomorrow and would like as much info as possible.
> >
> > Ryan Justice
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
>

 

Back to top
Date: 12/30/18 7:19 pm
From: Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Hyde Co Curlew Sandpiper info
No. Some people saw pictures and pronounced it to be a Dunlin. However about eight people saw it in person and no one said— hey that’s a Dunlin! It seemed to match an online picture of the curlew sandpiper perfectly but we did not have a field guide with us when seen. My apologies for any inconvenience my early posting may have caused.
Ann Brice
In Ocracoke

Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 30, 2018, at 9:54 PM, Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Did anybody see the bird past the initial reports this morning? Will be in the area tomorrow and would like as much info as possible.
>
> Ryan Justice
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 12/30/18 6:54 pm
From: Ryan Justice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hyde Co Curlew Sandpiper info
Did anybody see the bird past the initial reports this morning? Will be in the area tomorrow and would like as much info as possible.

Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 12/30/18 2:05 pm
From: Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - stakeout Golden-crowned Sparrow, Harbinger (2018), Dec 29, 2018
Greetings all

As promised here is my eBird Report from the stakeout for the Golden-crowned Sparrow

Click on the link below to see the actual report with the pictures. I’m sorry to say I didn’t get good pictures as I had hoped.

Happy New Year

From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>


Begin forwarded message:

> From: <ebird-checklist...>
> Date: December 30, 2018 at 5:00:07 PM EST
> To: <jcbabirder...>
> Subject: eBird Report - stakeout Golden-crowned Sparrow, Harbinger (2018), Dec 29, 2018
>
> stakeout Golden-crowned Sparrow, Harbinger (2018), Currituck, North Carolina, US
> Dec 29, 2018 9:15 AM - 10:25 AM
> Protocol: Stationary
> 15 species
>
> Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) 6
> Ring-billed Gull (Larus delawarensis) 1
> Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura) 2
> Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) 3
> American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) 1
> Tufted Titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor) 2
> Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus) 2
> Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) 1
> American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis) 1
> Golden-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia atricapilla) 1 Will add photos
> White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis) 10
> Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) 2
> Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) 2
> Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) (Setophaga coronata coronata) 1
> Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) 3
>
> View this checklist online at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S51046429&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=7giJDGLtliwVCDlgusT_xF7mUnmv_HR5nvOAi6kWViE&s=ML3iet-XoOwxzKSzkhOuDwbm8OLrswZIwEZxE4ZVytw&e=
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_home&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=7giJDGLtliwVCDlgusT_xF7mUnmv_HR5nvOAi6kWViE&s=M6WlF_2AplMSSk8-8og3s2LIAulkD-G9IwvIIpBeRYI&e=)

 

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Date: 12/30/18 1:36 pm
From: Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Evening Grosbeak -- Caldwell County
I got an email report, with photos, this afternoon of a female Evening
Grosbeak coming to a feeder this morning in the Dudley Shoals area of
Caldwell County. It's great to finally get a report of one in the western
part of NC.


Dwayne
*************
J. Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
<redxbill...>


Catawba County Park Ranger
Riverbend Park - Conover, NC
<jdmartin...>
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.catawbacountync.gov_depts_parks_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Njfxq6KfouSz7LitAJx4vRB_mN4c37-W069Jhh1c14Y&s=e8eGlLwKtv6EYGoZRBL3OdPWP9CL4ITEAFakc-bG6Vo&e=
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.weatherlink.com_user_riverbendpark&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=Njfxq6KfouSz7LitAJx4vRB_mN4c37-W069Jhh1c14Y&s=_WxkAE4VmKyEfK4aVe3lelHRP7vVQR93i_DfH-At7k8&e=

 

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Date: 12/30/18 1:20 pm
From: Mary Bridges <maryhuot...>
Subject: Lark Sparrow
The lark sparrow continues at the Willowdale Cemetery in Goldsboro. The large mostly chipping sparrow flock was feeding on the ground in the far back left corner. After about 30 minutes of picking through them there it was.
Mary Bridges
Goldsboro, NC
 

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Date: 12/30/18 12:12 pm
From: Robert Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Patagonia picnic table at Harbinger

At this Harbinger Exxon stakeout right now there is a Dickcissel on the ground by the pallets.

Bob Lewis

Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 30, 2018, at 11:28 AM, Terry Seyden (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
>
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone

 

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Date: 12/30/18 9:27 am
From: scompton1251 <scompton1251...>
Subject: No Snow Bunting this AM:HBSP
10:00-11:30 checked Western and of Jetty, no luck.
Steve Compton 
Sent from my Verizon LG Smartphone
 

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Date: 12/30/18 8:30 am
From: Terry Seyden (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lake lingo swans
Can someone tell me when the normal viewing season is for the tundra swan at lake pungo? Most importantly, how late in February are they usually still there in significant numbers?Thanks,Terry seydenFairview, NC


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone

 

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Date: 12/30/18 8:15 am
From: Hilda Flamholtz (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Continuing curlew at Edisto
We were able to see 3 of the 4 long-billed curlew that had been reported
during our visit Friday evening - but it was so close to dark - there was
no hope of a photo. We went back this morning hoping for better light and
were able to get a decent photo - but only saw 1 today. For the curlew, we
followed Craig Watson's directions to "park at Beach Access 37, walk west
toward the point and the flats are across the ICW at the mouth of Big Bay
Creek, has to be low tide"

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S51049504&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=b07vtGUzHEOf1GuwzaA2xJMUMkRgqQaF3dDpmb3Lr2o&s=Rnqq_T3iacYnNuHE2WHbcm86nTHz8BOUvlvdbkS8clE&e=

We were also able to see the 2 common eiders reported from near beach
access 4 yesterday. Hanging out near a jetty with black scoters.

Very much enjoying the birding on Edisto this week.
Hilda & Jon Flamholtz

 

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Date: 12/30/18 7:16 am
From: Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Curlew Sandpiper on Ocracoke near Hatteras ferry dock
Present now. Found by Hal Broadfoot and party on Ocracoke CBC. Confirmed by others.

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 12/30/18 6:40 am
From: susan <susan...>
Subject: Re: Golden-Crowned Sparrow

Seen this AM about 8:30.
Susan CampbellSouthern Pines, NC

Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.



 

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Date: 12/30/18 5:18 am
From: Allen Bryan (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Whirlwind Visit to N.C.
I visited N.C. on the 28th (travel) and 29th (Mattamuskeet NWR CBC) and enjoyed the birds offered as usual.  I caught up with the Golden-crowned Sparrow in Harbinger, visited Alligator River NWR and observed a Eurasian Widgeon, got to Mattamuskeet NWR and observed the Brewer's Blackbirds from last year's location, Lark Sparrow on 264, Yellow-breasted Chat on the north side of the lake and as always enjoyed the chorus of thousands of Snow Geese as they filled the air near Nebraska, NC.
Some photos at:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__visitingnature.com_main_december-2D2018_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=H9mcSrMBq1RdKrF_j6zgO4JSQvMo_G7_z0rw5Yv4Y98&s=vFS-brbSc3LYmQCuFDGz0msZ0VLyql3_92wgDpGnNfk&e=


Enjoy each day,
Allen
Allen Bryan Richmond, Va. www.visitingnature.com
 

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Date: 12/29/18 7:23 pm
From: Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Currituck Co Birding 12/29/2018
Greetings all

Following is trip Report for Currituck Co.

Today I decided to chase after the Golden-crowned Sparrow in Currituck Co. It was a 3.75 hr drive from South Boston VA and I arrived around 0915 hrs and it took 70 minutes to finally see it Great bird for my NC Life List.

From there I made my way to some nearby Hotspots and one beach access to adding 18 species to my Currituck Co List and of course the GCSP for NC.

It was a very long but great day to be out Birding as the temperatures were just above 60 and no wind.

I deleted my first two Reports as they were in VA

Tomorrow after I add photos I will email the eBird Report with a link to actual report with the photos.

Although it not quite New Years yet it’s close enough to say that for the last three Holidays I saw three Rare Birds First the Pacific Loon that I found in Vance Co on Thanksgiving, the Say’s Phoebe on Christmas Day in Amherst Co VA found by Mike Boatwright and the Golden-crowned Sparrow in Currituck Co for a New Years Day bird but just 3 days early.

I’m sorry to say that I need to go back and see who found the GCSP but I want to say great find and thanks for posting on eBird.

Wishing Everyone a Happy New Year and Great Birding in the year to come.

From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>


Begin forwarded message:

> From: Jeffrey Blalock <jcbabirder...>
> Date: December 29, 2018 at 8:59:15 PM EST
> To: Jeffrey Blalock <jcbabirder...>
> Subject: eBird Trip Summary -- Today
>
> jeffblalock
> eBird Checklist Summary for: Dec 29, 2018
>
> Number of Checklists: 8
> Number of Taxa: 42
>
> Checklists included in this summary:
> Date: Dec 29, 2018 at 7:28 AM
> (3): Chesapeake Expy S, Chesapeake US-VA (36.6467,-76.2226)
> Date: Dec 29, 2018 at 8:00 AM
> (4): Currituck Rest Area Coinjock US-NC (36.3045,-75.9302)
> Date: Dec 29, 2018 at 8:50 AM
> (5): stakeout Golden-crowned Sparrow, Harbinger (2018)
> Date: Dec 29, 2018 at 9:15 AM
> (6): stakeout Golden-crowned Sparrow, Harbinger (2018)
> Date: Dec 29, 2018 at 10:35 AM
> (7): Pine Island Audubon Sanctuary and Center
> Date: Dec 29, 2018 at 11:10 AM
> (8): Currituck Public Beach Access Corolla US-NC (36.2786,-75.7953)
> Date: Dec 29, 2018 at 1:10 PM
> (9): 791 Orions Way, Corolla US-NC (36.3255,-75.8171)
> Date: Dec 29, 2018 at 2:05 PM
> (10): Currituck Banks National Estuarine Research Reserve
> Date: Dec 29, 2018 at 2:20 PM
>
> 300 Snow Goose -- (7)
> 6 Canada Goose -- (5)
> 1 Tundra Swan -- (7)
> 5 Black Scoter -- (8)
> 2 Red-breasted Merganser -- (8)
> 1 Mourning Dove -- (7)
> 8 Sanderling -- (8)
> 6 Ring-billed Gull -- (5),(7),(8)
> 2 Herring Gull -- (8)
> 8 Great Black-backed Gull -- (8)
> 102 Forster's Tern -- (7),(8)
> 6 Common Loon -- (8)
> 6 Northern Gannet -- (8)
> 1 Double-crested Cormorant -- (9)
> 1 Snowy Egret -- (9)
> 5 Black Vulture -- (1)
> 3 Turkey Vulture -- (5),(7)
> 1 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker -- (7)
> 3 Red-bellied Woodpecker -- (7),(10)
> 2 Downy Woodpecker -- (10)
> 1 Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) (10)
> 1 Eastern Phoebe -- (7)
> 4 Blue Jay -- (4),(5)
> 11 American Crow -- (1),(5),(7),(8),(10)
> 4 Carolina Chickadee -- (4),(7)
> 4 Tufted Titmouse -- (5),(7),(10)
> 2 Brown-headed Nuthatch -- (10)
> 4 Carolina Wren -- (5),(7),(10)
> 1 Golden-crowned Kinglet -- (7)
> 1 Ruby-crowned Kinglet -- (7)
> 2 American Robin -- (7)
> 1 Northern Mockingbird -- (5)
> 1 Golden-crowned Sparrow -- (5)
> 10 White-throated Sparrow -- (5)
> 2 Song Sparrow -- (5)
> 10 Red-winged Blackbird -- (5),(10)
> 2 Boat-tailed Grackle -- (6)
> 2 Orange-crowned Warbler -- (7),(10)
> 38 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) -- (4),(5),(7),(10)
> 4 Northern Cardinal -- (5),(8)
> 3 House Sparrow -- (8)
>
> This trip summary was created using the eBird app for iPhone and iPad.
> See eBird for more information.
>
>
> From my iPhone
>
> May God Bless and Keep You
>
> Jeff Blalock
> 103 Elizabeth Court
> South Boston VA 24592
> 434-470-4352 Cell
> <jcbabirder...>
>

 

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Date: 12/29/18 5:26 pm
From: Corey, Ed <ed.corey...>
Subject: Western Tanager -- Tyrrell County (29Dec2018)
Sorry for the delay in getting this out, but Floyd and Signa Williams found a Western Tanager during the Pettigrew CBC today. The bird was feeding high up in the trees when I arrived, at the corner of Lake Shore Drive and Magnolia Road. Hopefully others will be able to relocate it.

Ed Corey
Raleigh, NC

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

 

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Date: 12/29/18 3:58 pm
From: Steve <sshultz...>
Subject: Re: Golden-Crowned Sparrow
Not seen after 3 pm. Hopefully tomorrow.

Steve Shultz


> On Dec 29, 2018, at 10:32 AM, Jeffrey Blalock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Greetings all
>
> The Golden-Crowned Sparrow continues this morning in Currituck Co.
>
> Check out Currituck Co Hotspots for location behind Exxon Gas Station.
>
> From my iPhone
>
> May God Bless and Keep You
>
> Jeff Blalock
> 103 Elizabeth Court
> South Boston VA 24592
> 434-470-4352 Cell
> <jcbabirder...>
>

 

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Date: 12/29/18 3:57 pm
From: Steve <sshultz...>
Subject: Re: Mattamusskeet NWR access?
Yes.

Steve Shultz


> On Dec 29, 2018, at 9:56 AM, Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Is the gate to the main wildlife road (circle around the large impoundment) open during the shutdown? I notice some people have posted sightings from MNWR, but are they parking outside the gate and walking, or can you drive in? The notice on the website was not clear about that.
>
> Thanks,
> Linda Ward
> Coinjock, NC

 

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Date: 12/29/18 2:28 pm
From: Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: James Is County Park today
All,

Donna walked our dog Charlie at James Is County Park this afternoon and had
both the Common Merganser on the big pond near the bridge light display and
the Western Kingbird in the field just to the right of the admissions area.

Dennis
--
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>

 

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Date: 12/29/18 6:56 am
From: Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mattamusskeet NWR access?
Is the gate to the main wildlife road (circle around the large impoundment)
open during the shutdown? I notice some people have posted sightings from
MNWR, but are they parking outside the gate and walking, or can you drive
in? The notice on the website was not clear about that.

Thanks,
Linda Ward
Coinjock, NC

 

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Date: 12/29/18 5:49 am
From: Craig Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fwd: Common Eiders Edisto Beach, SC
My apologies, Joshua S. Rose observed the Common Eiders at Edisto Beach, SC

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Pamela Ford <robinlikesong...>
Date: Sat, Dec 29, 2018 at 8:44 AM
Subject: Fwd: Common Eiders Edisto Beach, SC
To: Craig Watson <jcraigw1...>




Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

*From:* "Craig Watson" (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <
<carolinabirds...>
*Date:* December 29, 2018 at 8:34:15 AM EST
*To:* carolinabirds <carolinabirds...>
*Subject:* *Common Eiders Edisto Beach, SC*
*Reply-To:* Craig Watson <jcraigw1...>

Two Common Eiders are being seen between the jetties/groins, Matilda and
Whaley St., I didn’t see them but Josh Stone photographed them a few
minutes ago and sent me a photo.

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

 

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Date: 12/29/18 5:35 am
From: Craig Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Common Eiders Edisto Beach, SC
Two Common Eiders are being seen between the jetties/groins, Matilda and
Whaley St., I didn’t see them but Josh Stone photographed them a few
minutes ago and sent me a photo.

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

 

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Date: 12/28/18 5:19 pm
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: New North Carolina Year Bird Record
Taking another look at Derb's list, I note that it has an unnumbered species in between 344 and 345, White-faced Ibis noted as "countability not established". Wouldn't we agree that countability is established now? In which case the old record was 352 rather than 351.

Kent Fiala

On 12/28/2018 9:42 AM, Harry LeGrand wrote:
> Kent -- OK, nice.  But, can you tell us where is the green link on the Home Page that gets one to that list?  I've spent 10 minutes clicking all green links and can't find it, nor do I see the link on the long home page screen.  (A few days from now, we'll forget the URL to get us there again.) Something tells me that Derb's total is the only entry.
>
> Harry LeGrand
>
> On Fri, Dec 28, 2018 at 9:32 AM Kent Fiala <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
>
> The previous big year record list of 351 species can be found at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_bigyear_NC_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=HdolkNtDj7wKbS8F8n8eyYTSKfT-43D-3NhyWPDP3KU&s=vbV_A8nNFyI85JOX-18RX0x6tTWy40aBnSCSWg59wSk&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_bigyear_NC_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JA00FhSp21F_Gd2PB_e-9sPWJc2nkTykwYShevsKC0Q&s=fiq90Uyg85t3cHb_FyJsBUv3kQDgZOMipI1vsBeHmU0&e=>
>
> Kent Fiala
>
> On 12/28/2018 9:29 AM, Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
>> The ABA's Listing Central is back open again; it had been out of operation for months as the ABA Rules Committee was figuring out which Hawaiian species were countable, etc. (recall that Hawaii was added to the ABA Region over a year ago, but with all of the introduced species there were lots of decisions about which ones were countable on lists).
>>
>> I copied the top two annual NC lists.  Greg is certainly referring to the discredited Big Year turned in by Ali Iyoob in 2013, which featured some concocted rarities during the year, especially on December 31.  So, looks like the previous record of 348 by Ricky Davis is "officially" broken.
>>
>> I say "officially" in quotes, as until Jamie's totals are posted to an official listing site, which would be the ABA (American Birding Association) List Central, Ricky still remains #1.  I wonder if someone who runs the Listing Central can delete the 353 "record"??  Technically, until that 353 is wiped out, Jamie would only be second, unless he tallies another bird or two in the last 4 days of 2018.
>>
>> I think at one time there was an attempt to have folks submit their NC and SC Life Lists and Annual Lists to be "published" on the Carolina Bird Club website.  I don't think that ever took hold, though I did recall such a page/link a few years ago.
>>
>> Congratulations to Jamie, and still 4 days to go!
>>
>> Harry LeGrand
>>
>>
>> Rank Count [No Heard-only] Year Name Last Updated Actions
>> 1 353
>> 2013 Ali Iyoob 2014-01-03
>> 1
>> [User Profile] <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__listing.aba.org_-23&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=b_szRMKDBL9nQfwyEvf1VTEdT7ROh3XHa1rrt-6zfrs&s=7zLXx3ek8VUtk8aZBW1HmbHC5Kkhp_McBJe8k9xwXlE&e=>
>> 2 348
>> 2005 Ricky Davis 2013-01-17
>> 0
>>
>>
>>
>> On Thu, Dec 27, 2018 at 10:59 PM Greg Massey <gmassey001...> <mailto:<gmassey001...>> wrote:
>>
>>
>> Congratulations to Jamie Adams for the new year bird record for North Carolina at 352 species. I know how hard he has worked for this record, and he documented the majority of his sightings by photos. I doubt that he will receive as much publicity as the discredited record that made the USA paper some years ago, but everyone that knows Jamie appreciates his honesty and accuracy with his observations.
>>
>> Again, CONGRATULATIONS!!
>>
>> Greg Massey
>> Leland,NC 28451
>>

 

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Date: 12/28/18 5:02 pm
From: Robert Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Golden-crowned Sparrow
I arrived on the site in Harbinger about 12:30.  As others have written, I stayed in my car a few feet from the dumpster and looked toward the shrubs near the wooden pallet construction.  The bird appeared about 12:50 and was in view on the grass for about two minutes.  It appeared again in the same area about 1:30 for another two minutes.
Thank you Steve Ritt!
Bob Lewis
Sleepy Hollow NY



On Friday, December 28, 2018, 8:40:47 AM EST, Marbry Hopkins <carolinabirds...> wrote:

The sparrow was very cooperative this morning seen by numerous birders. Steve’s advice to stay on paved roadway was spot on. Heavy truck traffic at this area as they go to diesel pump nearby so be alert. Car is a great blind here.
Marbry HopkinsKernersville, NC now in Harbinger--
Hop Hopkins
Kernersville, NC
 

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Date: 12/28/18 4:42 pm
From: Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Say’s Phoebe apparently seen 12/22 - Pendleton, SC
Good Evening. An eBirder who looked for the Say’s Phoebe at Simpson Ag Station (Pendleton, SC) without success on Wed. 12/26 indicated in his notes that apparently the bird was seen on Sat. 12/22 but not reported to eBird.

The last eBird report of the bird was 12/17.

Just wanted to let folks know it might still be hanging around.

Kevin Kubach
Greenville, SC
 

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Date: 12/28/18 3:36 pm
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: waterthrush on the Cape Hatteras NC CBC
Bird species I observed in the maritime forest in my portion of the Cape
Hatteras NC CBC circle (Water Association Road area) on Thursday were a
White-eyed Vireo, an Ovenbird, a Black-and-whiteWarbler, a Yellow-throated
Warbler, and a waterthrush sp.

I was attracted to the loud, ringing calls of the waterthrush, which was
only about 15 feet away, but I was never able to see it. I returned 4 more
times during the day, and heard it each time, but was never able to see it.
It was certainly a Northern.

If anyone if the area wants to look for it, I can give detailed instructions
to the site.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

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Date: 12/28/18 3:26 pm
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: Common Eider at Cedar Island NC ferry terminal
On Wednesday afternoon, I saw an immature male Common Eider at the mouth of
the Cedar Island ferry terminal harbor (as I was leaving on the ferry).
There were also several Black Scoters and at least 1 Surf Scoter there.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

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Date: 12/28/18 11:29 am
From: Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Razorbills and Kittiwakes at Cape Hatteras
I was at Cape Point for a short time today and I saw at least 250 Razorbills and a handful of Black-legged Kittiwakes passing by. I was parked out at the tip looking south and the birds were eastbound. They were not very close, so a scope is useful if you want good looks. It is, however, pretty windy with some spray hitting the beach on the south side. I also saw a modest number of gannets and several Bonaparte’s Gulls taking the same course.

Brian Patteson
Hatteras, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 12/28/18 9:39 am
From: Jack Rogers <jack...>
Subject: Cape Point, Dare co., NC this AM
C-birders,
I followed up on Kate and Kyle's great checklist from yesterday at Cape
Point this morning. My best birds were actually before I got the point
itself; I had a Red-necked Grebe in the Salt Pond as well as a first cycle
Iceland Gull. Both were photographed. The Iceland flew out of the salt
pond before I could photograph it, but it buzzed by me, heading towards the
point, and allowed for some nice shots. However, it was not roosting there.
Nice assortment of roosting gulls at the point, but nothing too rare. I had
one very strange looking gull, probably just a sooty 3rd cycle Herring
Gull. Never seen anything like it; head was almost Heerman's colored. I'll
post some digiscopes to the gallery tonight, but won't have DSLR pics
(including spread wing and tail) until I get home. I'm open to discussion
on this bird. I had a small flock of 8 Kittiwakes fly by at the point and
then later 1 immature bird, all heading east low over the water. Swell was
huge and winds were fierce so I could not grab and shots. I had 1 decent
sized flock of alcids pretty far out. Looked like Dovekie to me but lost
them in the swell almost immediately so left as alcid sp.
On the Hatteras to Ocracoke ferry right now and there were about 100 Brant
near the Hatteras ferry terminal, maybe you could see them without having
to ride the boat?
Good birding,
Jack Rogers
--

Jack Rogers
Mt Pleasant, SC

 

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Date: 12/28/18 7:14 am
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: New North Carolina Year Bird Record
Ali's supposed Big Year was in 2013. The swallowgate incident was in 2011 and the frigatebird in 2012.

Kent Fiala

On 12/28/2018 10:06 AM, Harry LeGrand wrote:
>
> I hope Nate can, or can get someone he knows at ABA Listing Central, to remove Ali's total.  That was a shameful year.  I recall his absolutely unbelievable tales, printed for all to read on carolinabirds, of the last few days chasing the Big Year record.  Magically finding Iceland Gull, Yellow Rail, and a few other things on the 31st.  I think that was his Violet-green Swallow and Magnificent Frigatebird doctored photo year as well.

 

Back to top
Date: 12/28/18 7:03 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: New North Carolina Year Bird Record
I like that the rarities are boldfaced. Makes it fun to skim.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

On Dec 28, 2018, at 9:49 AM, Kent Fiala <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:


I'm sorry that I kind of tucked this one away, but there's only so much stuff that can be crammed into the top menu. And I figured that this page is not referenced too frequently. You can find it by clicking on "Features" and then "More articles and reports..." And then "State Big Years in the Carolinas".

Yes, Derb's is the only list there. I'm pretty sure that I invited Ricky to send his list. And Ali's list was once very briefly available there.

Kent Fiala

On 12/28/2018 9:42 AM, Harry LeGrand wrote:
Kent -- OK, nice. But, can you tell us where is the green link on the Home Page that gets one to that list? I've spent 10 minutes clicking all green links and can't find it, nor do I see the link on the long home page screen. (A few days from now, we'll forget the URL to get us there again.) Something tells me that Derb's total is the only entry.

Harry LeGrand

On Fri, Dec 28, 2018 at 9:32 AM Kent Fiala <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

The previous big year record list of 351 species can be found at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_bigyear_NC_&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=cTiniDdNSWczDm1b1kg21RE5F5u3pUZ_oHVJHHyTe28&s=mQOjbZakgTtMxGmebWS7pUVihCpc2PEqbdljackHdr0&e=<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com_-3Furl-3Dhttps-253A-252F-252Furldefense.proofpoint.com-252Fv2-252Furl-253Fu-253Dhttps-2D3A-5F-5Fwww.carolinabirdclub.org-5Fbigyear-5FNC-5F-2526d-253DDwMFaQ-2526c-253DimBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj-5FgZ4adc-2526r-253DymRCw6Q-2DsBitug-5FrdeO1Tokz-2DI-5FSX2LQN2-5FOcvlal9U-2526m-253DJA00FhSp21F-5FGd2PB-5Fe-2D9sPWJc2nkTykwYShevsKC0Q-2526s-253Dfiq90Uyg85t3cHb-5FFyJsBUv3kQDgZOMipI1vsBeHmU0-2526e-253D-26data-3D02-257C01-257CChill-2540coastal.edu-257C08852e98b5a94775360208d66cd3df26-257Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797-257C0-257C0-257C636816054580996754-26sdata-3DywSI-252FkDmMsks2UfDlJFX-252FrMHs3xFL2VG5Smbz4OCsrU-253D-26reserved-3D0&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=cTiniDdNSWczDm1b1kg21RE5F5u3pUZ_oHVJHHyTe28&s=Os__70BVwFOyWLaZDsln35bt7AUzRTaomsWoGbqsBxs&e=>

Kent Fiala

On 12/28/2018 9:29 AM, Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
The ABA's Listing Central is back open again; it had been out of operation for months as the ABA Rules Committee was figuring out which Hawaiian species were countable, etc. (recall that Hawaii was added to the ABA Region over a year ago, but with all of the introduced species there were lots of decisions about which ones were countable on lists).

I copied the top two annual NC lists. Greg is certainly referring to the discredited Big Year turned in by Ali Iyoob in 2013, which featured some concocted rarities during the year, especially on December 31. So, looks like the previous record of 348 by Ricky Davis is "officially" broken.

I say "officially" in quotes, as until Jamie's totals are posted to an official listing site, which would be the ABA (American Birding Association) List Central, Ricky still remains #1. I wonder if someone who runs the Listing Central can delete the 353 "record"?? Technically, until that 353 is wiped out, Jamie would only be second, unless he tallies another bird or two in the last 4 days of 2018.

I think at one time there was an attempt to have folks submit their NC and SC Life Lists and Annual Lists to be "published" on the Carolina Bird Club website. I don't think that ever took hold, though I did recall such a page/link a few years ago.

Congratulations to Jamie, and still 4 days to go!

Harry LeGrand



Rank Count [https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__listing.aba.org_app_img_no-2Dheard-2Donly.gif&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=cTiniDdNSWczDm1b1kg21RE5F5u3pUZ_oHVJHHyTe28&s=jlLc7e9RtoNDGQZ5EoXvvyaOHZCTtZeHC_lKaompW5s&e=] Year Name Last Updated Actions
1 353
2013 Ali Iyoob 2014-01-03
1
[https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__listing.aba.org_app_img_user-5Fprofile.png&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=cTiniDdNSWczDm1b1kg21RE5F5u3pUZ_oHVJHHyTe28&s=Km6r8H5cQjcS1-zljSdb6QssRbo3Q2M1ccGGex_xrbc&e=] <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com_-3Furl-3Dhttps-253A-252F-252Furldefense.proofpoint.com-252Fv2-252Furl-253Fu-253Dhttp-2D3A-5F-5Flisting.aba.org-5F-2D23-2526d-253DDwMFaQ-2526c-253DimBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj-5FgZ4adc-2526r-253DymRCw6Q-2DsBitug-5FrdeO1Tokz-2DI-5FSX2LQN2-5FOcvlal9U-2526m-253Db-5FszRMKDBL9nQfwyEvf1VTEdT7ROh3XHa1rrt-2D6zfrs-2526s-253D7zLXx3ek8VUtk8aZBW1HmbHC5Kkhp-5FMcBJe8k9xwXlE-2526e-253D-26data-3D02-257C01-257CChill-2540coastal.edu-257C08852e98b5a94775360208d66cd3df26-257Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797-257C0-257C0-257C636816054581006767-26sdata-3D624q14l4qpzBfdbl27EgOnE7G7o-252FtnsBbxurGjNhnbE-253D-26reserved-3D0&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=cTiniDdNSWczDm1b1kg21RE5F5u3pUZ_oHVJHHyTe28&s=i3TE7Mht__kOzjYhmfiqRrOZaCqttzsUNza_39iO6wI&e=>
2 348
2005 Ricky Davis 2013-01-17
0



On Thu, Dec 27, 2018 at 10:59 PM Greg Massey <gmassey001...><mailto:<gmassey001...>> wrote:

Congratulations to Jamie Adams for the new year bird record for North Carolina at 352 species. I know how hard he has worked for this record, and he documented the majority of his sightings by photos. I doubt that he will receive as much publicity as the discredited record that made the USA paper some years ago, but everyone that knows Jamie appreciates his honesty and accuracy with his observations.

Again, CONGRATULATIONS!!

Greg Massey
Leland,NC 28451


 

Back to top
Date: 12/28/18 6:50 am
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: New North Carolina Year Bird Record
I'm sorry that I kind of tucked this one away, but there's only so much stuff that can be crammed into the top menu. And I figured that this page is not referenced too frequently. You can find it by clicking on "Features" and then "More articles and reports..." And then "State Big Years in the Carolinas".

Yes, Derb's is the only list there. I'm pretty sure that I invited Ricky to send his list. And Ali's list was once very briefly available there.

Kent Fiala

On 12/28/2018 9:42 AM, Harry LeGrand wrote:
> Kent -- OK, nice.  But, can you tell us where is the green link on the Home Page that gets one to that list?  I've spent 10 minutes clicking all green links and can't find it, nor do I see the link on the long home page screen.  (A few days from now, we'll forget the URL to get us there again.) Something tells me that Derb's total is the only entry.
>
> Harry LeGrand
>
> On Fri, Dec 28, 2018 at 9:32 AM Kent Fiala <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
>
> The previous big year record list of 351 species can be found at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_bigyear_NC_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=wLTEvexGeTJJLzmX8cyO6RQsMGR5CwV7Rme8KY3eILQ&s=g5A3gfagv9x3FdhCrx3Dg4pJvGUmj8sx27SXTnoU-1Q&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_bigyear_NC_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JA00FhSp21F_Gd2PB_e-9sPWJc2nkTykwYShevsKC0Q&s=fiq90Uyg85t3cHb_FyJsBUv3kQDgZOMipI1vsBeHmU0&e=>
>
> Kent Fiala
>
> On 12/28/2018 9:29 AM, Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
>> The ABA's Listing Central is back open again; it had been out of operation for months as the ABA Rules Committee was figuring out which Hawaiian species were countable, etc. (recall that Hawaii was added to the ABA Region over a year ago, but with all of the introduced species there were lots of decisions about which ones were countable on lists).
>>
>> I copied the top two annual NC lists.  Greg is certainly referring to the discredited Big Year turned in by Ali Iyoob in 2013, which featured some concocted rarities during the year, especially on December 31.  So, looks like the previous record of 348 by Ricky Davis is "officially" broken.
>>
>> I say "officially" in quotes, as until Jamie's totals are posted to an official listing site, which would be the ABA (American Birding Association) List Central, Ricky still remains #1.  I wonder if someone who runs the Listing Central can delete the 353 "record"??  Technically, until that 353 is wiped out, Jamie would only be second, unless he tallies another bird or two in the last 4 days of 2018.
>>
>> I think at one time there was an attempt to have folks submit their NC and SC Life Lists and Annual Lists to be "published" on the Carolina Bird Club website.  I don't think that ever took hold, though I did recall such a page/link a few years ago.
>>
>> Congratulations to Jamie, and still 4 days to go!
>>
>> Harry LeGrand
>>
>>
>> Rank Count [No Heard-only] Year Name Last Updated Actions
>> 1 353
>> 2013 Ali Iyoob 2014-01-03
>> 1
>> [User Profile] <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__listing.aba.org_-23&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=b_szRMKDBL9nQfwyEvf1VTEdT7ROh3XHa1rrt-6zfrs&s=7zLXx3ek8VUtk8aZBW1HmbHC5Kkhp_McBJe8k9xwXlE&e=>
>> 2 348
>> 2005 Ricky Davis 2013-01-17
>> 0
>>
>>
>>
>> On Thu, Dec 27, 2018 at 10:59 PM Greg Massey <gmassey001...> <mailto:<gmassey001...>> wrote:
>>
>>
>> Congratulations to Jamie Adams for the new year bird record for North Carolina at 352 species. I know how hard he has worked for this record, and he documented the majority of his sightings by photos. I doubt that he will receive as much publicity as the discredited record that made the USA paper some years ago, but everyone that knows Jamie appreciates his honesty and accuracy with his observations.
>>
>> Again, CONGRATULATIONS!!
>>
>> Greg Massey
>> Leland,NC 28451
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 12/28/18 6:43 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: New North Carolina Year Bird Record
Kent -- OK, nice. But, can you tell us where is the green link on the Home
Page that gets one to that list? I've spent 10 minutes clicking all green
links and can't find it, nor do I see the link on the long home page
screen. (A few days from now, we'll forget the URL to get us there
again.) Something tells me that Derb's total is the only entry.

Harry LeGrand

On Fri, Dec 28, 2018 at 9:32 AM Kent Fiala <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> The previous big year record list of 351 species can be found at
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_bigyear_NC_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=BIZ4bU4GI_fjIct1gubXxiTE7Mc_TU_gM1AUen57wGY&s=00UOWVNmaaVyBwywk3VQHkeTicEXf0EW8sENybZSGgE&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_bigyear_NC_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JA00FhSp21F_Gd2PB_e-9sPWJc2nkTykwYShevsKC0Q&s=fiq90Uyg85t3cHb_FyJsBUv3kQDgZOMipI1vsBeHmU0&e=>
>
> Kent Fiala
>
> On 12/28/2018 9:29 AM, Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
> wrote:
>
> The ABA's Listing Central is back open again; it had been out of operation
> for months as the ABA Rules Committee was figuring out which Hawaiian
> species were countable, etc. (recall that Hawaii was added to the ABA
> Region over a year ago, but with all of the introduced species there were
> lots of decisions about which ones were countable on lists).
>
> I copied the top two annual NC lists. Greg is certainly referring to the
> discredited Big Year turned in by Ali Iyoob in 2013, which featured some
> concocted rarities during the year, especially on December 31. So, looks
> like the previous record of 348 by Ricky Davis is "officially" broken.
>
> I say "officially" in quotes, as until Jamie's totals are posted to an
> official listing site, which would be the ABA (American Birding
> Association) List Central, Ricky still remains #1. I wonder if someone who
> runs the Listing Central can delete the 353 "record"?? Technically, until
> that 353 is wiped out, Jamie would only be second, unless he tallies
> another bird or two in the last 4 days of 2018.
>
> I think at one time there was an attempt to have folks submit their NC and
> SC Life Lists and Annual Lists to be "published" on the Carolina Bird Club
> website. I don't think that ever took hold, though I did recall such a
> page/link a few years ago.
>
> Congratulations to Jamie, and still 4 days to go!
>
> Harry LeGrand
>
>
> Rank Count Year Name Last Updated Actions
> 1 353
> 2013 Ali Iyoob 2014-01-03
> 1
>
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__listing.aba.org_-23&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=b_szRMKDBL9nQfwyEvf1VTEdT7ROh3XHa1rrt-6zfrs&s=7zLXx3ek8VUtk8aZBW1HmbHC5Kkhp_McBJe8k9xwXlE&e=>
> 2 348
> 2005 Ricky Davis 2013-01-17
> 0
>
>
> On Thu, Dec 27, 2018 at 10:59 PM Greg Massey <gmassey001...> wrote:
>
>>
>> Congratulations to Jamie Adams for the new year bird record for North
>> Carolina at 352 species. I know how hard he has worked for this record, and
>> he documented the majority of his sightings by photos. I doubt that he will
>> receive as much publicity as the discredited record that made the USA paper
>> some years ago, but everyone that knows Jamie appreciates his honesty and
>> accuracy with his observations.
>>
>> Again, CONGRATULATIONS!!
>>
>> Greg Massey
>> Leland,NC 28451
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 12/28/18 6:32 am
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: New North Carolina Year Bird Record
The previous big year record list of 351 species can be found at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_bigyear_NC_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JA00FhSp21F_Gd2PB_e-9sPWJc2nkTykwYShevsKC0Q&s=fiq90Uyg85t3cHb_FyJsBUv3kQDgZOMipI1vsBeHmU0&e=

Kent Fiala

On 12/28/2018 9:29 AM, Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> The ABA's Listing Central is back open again; it had been out of operation for months as the ABA Rules Committee was figuring out which Hawaiian species were countable, etc. (recall that Hawaii was added to the ABA Region over a year ago, but with all of the introduced species there were lots of decisions about which ones were countable on lists).
>
> I copied the top two annual NC lists.  Greg is certainly referring to the discredited Big Year turned in by Ali Iyoob in 2013, which featured some concocted rarities during the year, especially on December 31.  So, looks like the previous record of 348 by Ricky Davis is "officially" broken.
>
> I say "officially" in quotes, as until Jamie's totals are posted to an official listing site, which would be the ABA (American Birding Association) List Central, Ricky still remains #1.  I wonder if someone who runs the Listing Central can delete the 353 "record"??  Technically, until that 353 is wiped out, Jamie would only be second, unless he tallies another bird or two in the last 4 days of 2018.
>
> I think at one time there was an attempt to have folks submit their NC and SC Life Lists and Annual Lists to be "published" on the Carolina Bird Club website.  I don't think that ever took hold, though I did recall such a page/link a few years ago.
>
> Congratulations to Jamie, and still 4 days to go!
>
> Harry LeGrand
>
>
> Rank Count [No Heard-only] Year Name Last Updated Actions
> 1 353
> 2013 Ali Iyoob 2014-01-03
> 1
> [User Profile] <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__listing.aba.org_-23&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=b_szRMKDBL9nQfwyEvf1VTEdT7ROh3XHa1rrt-6zfrs&s=7zLXx3ek8VUtk8aZBW1HmbHC5Kkhp_McBJe8k9xwXlE&e=>
> 2 348
> 2005 Ricky Davis 2013-01-17
> 0
>
>
>
> On Thu, Dec 27, 2018 at 10:59 PM Greg Massey <gmassey001...> <mailto:<gmassey001...>> wrote:
>
>
> Congratulations to Jamie Adams for the new year bird record for North Carolina at 352 species. I know how hard he has worked for this record, and he documented the majority of his sightings by photos. I doubt that he will receive as much publicity as the discredited record that made the USA paper some years ago, but everyone that knows Jamie appreciates his honesty and accuracy with his observations.
>
> Again, CONGRATULATIONS!!
>
> Greg Massey
> Leland,NC 28451
>

 

Back to top
Date: 12/28/18 6:29 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: New North Carolina Year Bird Record
The ABA's Listing Central is back open again; it had been out of operation
for months as the ABA Rules Committee was figuring out which Hawaiian
species were countable, etc. (recall that Hawaii was added to the ABA
Region over a year ago, but with all of the introduced species there were
lots of decisions about which ones were countable on lists).

I copied the top two annual NC lists. Greg is certainly referring to the
discredited Big Year turned in by Ali Iyoob in 2013, which featured some
concocted rarities during the year, especially on December 31. So, looks
like the previous record of 348 by Ricky Davis is "officially" broken.

I say "officially" in quotes, as until Jamie's totals are posted to an
official listing site, which would be the ABA (American Birding
Association) List Central, Ricky still remains #1. I wonder if someone who
runs the Listing Central can delete the 353 "record"?? Technically, until
that 353 is wiped out, Jamie would only be second, unless he tallies
another bird or two in the last 4 days of 2018.

I think at one time there was an attempt to have folks submit their NC and
SC Life Lists and Annual Lists to be "published" on the Carolina Bird Club
website. I don't think that ever took hold, though I did recall such a
page/link a few years ago.

Congratulations to Jamie, and still 4 days to go!

Harry LeGrand


RankCountYearNameLast UpdatedActions
1 353 2013 Ali Iyoob 2014-01-03
1
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__listing.aba.org_-23&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=b_szRMKDBL9nQfwyEvf1VTEdT7ROh3XHa1rrt-6zfrs&s=7zLXx3ek8VUtk8aZBW1HmbHC5Kkhp_McBJe8k9xwXlE&e=>
2 348 2005 Ricky Davis 2013-01-17
0
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__listing.aba.org_-23&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=b_szRMKDBL9nQfwyEvf1VTEdT7ROh3XHa1rrt-6zfrs&s=7zLXx3ek8VUtk8aZBW1HmbHC5Kkhp_McBJe8k9xwXlE&e=>

On Thu, Dec 27, 2018 at 10:59 PM Greg Massey <gmassey001...> wrote:

>
> Congratulations to Jamie Adams for the new year bird record for North
> Carolina at 352 species. I know how hard he has worked for this record, and
> he documented the majority of his sightings by photos. I doubt that he will
> receive as much publicity as the discredited record that made the USA paper
> some years ago, but everyone that knows Jamie appreciates his honesty and
> accuracy with his observations.
>
> Again, CONGRATULATIONS!!
>
> Greg Massey
> Leland,NC 28451
>

 

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Date: 12/28/18 6:00 am
From: Michael Boatwright <mboater...>
Subject: Re: Golden-crowned Sparrow
Golden-crowned Sparrow showed nicely at 0840 behind dumpsters 12/28..Great lifer..thanks to all, especially Steve Ritt, for info and tips!

Cheers,

Mike

Michael R. Boatwright

Amherst, VA

--------------------------------------------
On Fri, 12/28/18, Marbry Hopkins <carolinabirds...> wrote:

Subject: Golden-crowned Sparrow
To: "Carolinabirds" <carolinabirds...>
Date: Friday, December 28, 2018, 8:39 AM

The sparrow was very
cooperative this morning seen by numerous birders. Steve’s
advice to stay on paved roadway was spot on. Heavy truck
traffic at this area as they go to diesel pump nearby so be
alert. Car is a great blind here.
Marbry HopkinsKernersville, NC now in
Harbinger--
Hop
Hopkins
Kernersville, NC
 

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Date: 12/28/18 5:40 am
From: Marbry Hopkins (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Golden-crowned Sparrow
The sparrow was very cooperative this morning seen by numerous birders.
Steve’s advice to stay on paved roadway was spot on. Heavy truck traffic at
this area as they go to diesel pump nearby so be alert. Car is a great
blind here.

Marbry Hopkins
Kernersville, NC now in Harbinger
--
Hop Hopkins
Kernersville, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 12/27/18 8:00 pm
From: Greg Massey <gmassey001...>
Subject: New North Carolina Year Bird Record

Congratulations to Jamie Adams for the new year bird record for North Carolina at 352 species. I know how hard he has worked for this record, and he documented the majority of his sightings by photos. I doubt that he will receive as much publicity as the discredited record that made the USA paper some years ago, but everyone that knows Jamie appreciates his honesty and accuracy with his observations.

Again, CONGRATULATIONS!!

Greg Massey
Leland,NC 28451
 

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Date: 12/27/18 6:06 pm
From: Kyle Kittelberger (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Cape Point, Hatteras- KITTIWAKES, ALCIDS, SEA DUCKS
Hey everyone,
Today for the Hatteras CBC, Kate Sutherland and I covered the beach section of Cape Point, spending pretty much the entire day scoping the ocean. With the easterly winds, we had a pretty excellent day with some really nice finds and some terrific flights for several species. 
There were hundreds of alcids flying by the point heading north, mostly in the morning; most of these were Razorbill, some quite close to the point, with several Dovekie scattered. Some alcids were a bit too far out to identify conclusively- I think most of these were Dovekies based on size and profile, but best to leave at alcid sp. 
Perhaps most exciting of all was the amazing flight of Black-legged Kittiwakes going past the point heading east. We had an astounding 89 birds, just amazing!! A majority of these, perhaps 80% were first year birds, and most birds flew close enough to the beach to allow for some nice pictures; we did not start seeing Kittiwakes until around 1 pm. There were also hundreds of Bonaparte's Gulls flying by too, allowing for the Kittiwakes to really stand out.
Other notable finds were 4 Parasitic Jaegers, a female Common Eider and three Long-tailed Ducks that buzzed me on the point, and really nice looks at Merlin and Peregrine Falcon.
Below is my list of waterbirds and other notable birds from this morning. 

Cheers,Kyle KittelbergerRaleigh, NC

Greater Scaup- 34scaup sp.- 50COMMON EIDER- 1Surf Scoter- 50Black Scoter- 186scoter sp.- 63LONG-TAILED DUCK- 3Red-breasted Merganser- 24Sanderling- 60Willet- 46PARASITIC JAEGER- 4DOVEKIE- 6RAZORBILL- 374alcid sp.- 105BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE- 89Bonaparte's Gull- 249Laughing Gull- 32Ring-billed GullHerring GullLesser Black-backed GullGreat Black-backed GullForster's Tern- 90Royal Tern- 34Red-throated Loon- 87Common Loon- 6Northern Gannet- 2050Merlin- 1Peregrine Falcon- 1
 

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Date: 12/27/18 5:49 pm
From: Craig Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Razorbill and Long-billed Curlews at Edisto Beach, South Edisto River
I birded much of Edisto Beach today focusing on trying to relocated the
Long-billed Curlews that were reported earlier in the week, and the
Red-necked Grebe. I did not find the Grebe, but I did find 4 Long-billed
Curlews in the mudflats at Big Bay Creek in the same location as earlier in
the week. Hundreds of shorebirds began pouring into these flats as the
tide dropped exposing the mud, and the curlews came in. I have some
distant photos that show some relative size and shape, they were huge
shorebirds. I had birded earlier but the tide was high and there were no
shorebirds. However, at the high tide I did see a Razorbill with a
Red-throated Loon, Buffleheads, one Horned Grebe and one Black Scoter in
the the channel of the South Edisto River, east of the last major channel
marker. I observed the bird for about ten minutes as it swam an drifted
with the incoming tide to a spot a bit closer to me at 37th Beach Access.
It drifted about 300m closer and stopped at dead high tide just east of the
channel marker. There was a lot of turbulence, wind action, and choppy
water and I lost the bird. I went back at 330 and it was almost like
glass, but hardly any birds were in the channel at that time.
--

*Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul - and sings the
tunes without the words - and never stops at all.*

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

 

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Date: 12/27/18 5:37 pm
From: Michael Sampson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Osprey at Furman University Swan Lake
I am new to the area but this seemed to be an unusual time of year for an
Osprey to be in this area. It had a fish.

 

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Date: 12/27/18 3:27 pm
From: Steve Ritt (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Golden-crowned SP tips2
In response to Mike,

I can’t emphasize enough that the best way to let the GCSP come out of the thickets is to give it plenty of space and watch how comfortably the White-throateds come out. Sometimes, the sparrows will allow for close approach, but...if the birds aren’t out on the ground...there’s really nothing you can do but back way up and watch for things to come back out. Pishing doesn’t help; just space.

Once sparrows start coming back out to feed on the ground, one can get closer while monitoring their skittishness; but there’s no reason to approach closer than the dumpsters or gravel. If checking the Eleagnus hedge, the cart path by the putting green is close enough to see the bird.

I don’t fear that the bird will be flushed-off or anything, but I just think that giving it space will increase everyone’s chances of seeing it.

Flock on,

Steve Ritt
Harbinger, NC / San Diego, CA

——————————————-

Sorry, I sent this email earlier today but it apparently got hung up in my outbox until just a few minutes ago. I see the reports from today now on ebird and the Carolina Bird Club site. However, if you have any additional info/tips for an out of state birder I welcome them.
Cheers,
Mike
Michael R. Boatwright
Amherst, VA
 

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Date: 12/27/18 2:47 pm
From: Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Video of snow geese feeding near Pungo Lake
I hit Pungo Lake just right yesterday and saw the snow geese and swans
leave the lake around 4pm. Then as I was leaving I saw the fields on Pat's
Road where they had flown off to feed and got to see them take off and fly
back toward the lake after sunset. Here is a two minute video on YouTube
for those that are not on Carolina Birders on Facebook. It was a
spectacular display!

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__youtu.be_mwJYWcaMIe0&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=AcB4FHqXhcyP-ML1XohENLDh2UWoGMVJTDqIS8eB09k&s=P3ynOM-7VrKz3ZjAPwWj58vvs6KE6awhJ0F9CBhxlhA&e=

When they were leaving the lake, I estimated there were 10,000 snow
geese. There was a long and very dense line of geese leaving the lake!
There were swans that left the lake and were feeding in the same field, but
I estimated there were only about 1000 of them.

Ann Brice
Wilson, NC

 

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Date: 12/27/18 2:35 pm
From: Eric Harrold (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fly-by Merlin in Wilkes yesterday
First though it was a sharpie, as it came through the front yard as I was
pulling into the drive, but it never stopped flapping and was on a
straight-line course. We had one a couple years ago on the Stone Mtn CBC,
maybe this one will stick around and perch conspicuously.

Eric Harrold
Hays, NC

 

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Date: 12/27/18 2:28 pm
From: Michael Boatwright <mboater...>
Subject: Re: GCSP Harbinger - 12/26/18
Sorry, I sent this email earlier today but it apparently got hung up in my outbox until just a few minutes ago. I see the reports from today now on  ebird and the Carolina Bird Club site.  However, if you have any additional info/tips for an out of state birder I welcome them.
Cheers,
Mike
Michael R. Boatwright
Amherst, VA

On Thursday, December 27, 2018, 5:13:01 PM EST, Michael Boatwright <mboater...> wrote:

Was the Golden-crowned Sparrow seen today, December 27, 2018? Thinking of making the 4.5 hr drive down from Central VA tomorrow or Saturday.
Thanks,
Mike
Michael R. Boatwright
Amherst, VA

On Thursday, December 27, 2018, 9:39:38 AM EST, Shultz, Steven <carolinabirds...> wrote:


Sorry, misunderstand.  Here’s a link to the hotspot:  https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_hotspot_L8302250&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=8eEyhDOYohx3_kRWqxIDMdSUPzTizol72Ok8Ycw5rcg&s=9yKUw17DRmThINLTvs_mSn_rvgjx1Jsd7CkINpWfX08&e=

 

Steve Shultz

(919) 458-4999

WPS Service Delivery Manager
Fidelity Investments

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The information in this email and subsequent attachments may contain confidential information that is intended solely for the attention and use of the named addressee(s). This message or any part thereof must not be disclosed, copied, distributed or retained by any person without authorization from Fidelity Investments.

 

From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>]On Behalf Of Robert Lewis
Sent: Thursday, December 27, 2018 9:31 AM
To: Carolina Birds; Steve Ritt
Subject: Re: GCSP Harbinger - 12/26/18

 

This email is from an external source - exercise caution regarding links and attachments.

I don't do ebird.  Can someone provide a public link to the ebird site for this bird?

 

Bob Lewis

Sleepy Hollow NY

 

 

On Thursday, December 27, 2018, 12:34:22 AM EST, Steve Ritt <carolinabirds...> wrote:

 

 

The bird fell asleep in the Eleagnus hedge again tonight at 4:45 pm; this time just to the left (southwest) of the wax myrtle that is in the Eleagnus hedge by the putting green. Best viewed from the putting green.

 

The bird was not seen by the dumpsters from 4:00 pm on, so the diurnal pattern is being reinforced.

 

Yes, a rare bird report was submitted for it on the 23rd.

 

Steve Ritt

Harbinger, NC / San Diego, CA

 

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Date: 12/27/18 2:13 pm
From: Michael Boatwright <mboater...>
Subject: Re: GCSP Harbinger - 12/26/18
Was the Golden-crowned Sparrow seen today, December 27, 2018? Thinking of making the 4.5 hr drive down from Central VA tomorrow or Saturday.
Thanks,
Mike
Michael R. Boatwright
Amherst, VA

On Thursday, December 27, 2018, 9:39:38 AM EST, Shultz, Steven <carolinabirds...> wrote:


Sorry, misunderstand.  Here’s a link to the hotspot:  https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_hotspot_L8302250&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=HWXatGGE6g0F96cBVfYSBRAn2jtfC--u_fZMVdzUUk4&s=62yqQ1jOL7uup9fNdVukwwInhLkxF9G3HkWm1x9Dw60&e=

 

Steve Shultz

(919) 458-4999

WPS Service Delivery Manager
Fidelity Investments

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The information in this email and subsequent attachments may contain confidential information that is intended solely for the attention and use of the named addressee(s). This message or any part thereof must not be disclosed, copied, distributed or retained by any person without authorization from Fidelity Investments.

 

From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>]On Behalf Of Robert Lewis
Sent: Thursday, December 27, 2018 9:31 AM
To: Carolina Birds; Steve Ritt
Subject: Re: GCSP Harbinger - 12/26/18

 

This email is from an external source - exercise caution regarding links and attachments.

I don't do ebird.  Can someone provide a public link to the ebird site for this bird?

 

Bob Lewis

Sleepy Hollow NY

 

 

On Thursday, December 27, 2018, 12:34:22 AM EST, Steve Ritt <carolinabirds...> wrote:

 

 

The bird fell asleep in the Eleagnus hedge again tonight at 4:45 pm; this time just to the left (southwest) of the wax myrtle that is in the Eleagnus hedge by the putting green. Best viewed from the putting green.

 

The bird was not seen by the dumpsters from 4:00 pm on, so the diurnal pattern is being reinforced.

 

Yes, a rare bird report was submitted for it on the 23rd.

 

Steve Ritt

Harbinger, NC / San Diego, CA

 

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Date: 12/27/18 2:04 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Black Guillemot photos on the CBC Photo Gallery
Thanks to Jacob Farmer (the original finder) and Jeff Lewis for posting
photos of the NC Black Guillemot to the CBC Photo Gallery today. Very
close, excellent photos. However, I saw several photos posted on eBird
lists yesterday that showed the underwing, which was white. Though folks
can probably conclusively use Jacob's and Jeff's photos of sitting birds to
rule out Pigeon Guillemot, the NC Bird Records Committee might appreciate
someone posting *any photos you have that show the raised wing and the
white underside,* just for "completeness" of a definitive photo set; Pigeon
Guillemots have dark underwings.

Looks like the guillemot is no longer around today. Maybe it drifted to
the Wrightsville Beach/Masonboro Island/Inlet jetties. More than likely,
it will gravitate to the jetties at Huntington Beach State Park, SC.
Carolina guillemots seem to usually end up there!

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

 

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Date: 12/27/18 1:09 pm
From: Jack Rogers <jack...>
Subject: Re: Little Gull-Jeanette's Pier, Dare co., NC
Sent to early. Also have a Pacific Loon, have photos. Drifting towards
horizon.

On Thu, Dec 27, 2018, 3:47 PM Jack Rogers <jack...> wrote:

> Just had a Little Gull fly by the pier at the horizon, as well as one
> Parasitic Jaeger so far. Both too far for shots. Golden-crowned Sparrow
> continued at stakeout as of an hour or so ago.
> Jack Rogers
>
> --
>
> Jack Rogers
> Mt Pleasant, SC
>
--

Jack Rogers
Mt Pleasant, SC

 

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Date: 12/27/18 12:48 pm
From: Jack Rogers <jack...>
Subject: Little Gull-Jeanette's Pier, Dare co., NC
Just had a Little Gull fly by the pier at the horizon, as well as one
Parasitic Jaeger so far. Both too far for shots. Golden-crowned Sparrow
continued at stakeout as of an hour or so ago.
Jack Rogers

--

Jack Rogers
Mt Pleasant, SC

 

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Date: 12/27/18 6:39 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: GCSP Harbinger - 12/26/18
Sorry, misunderstand. Here's a link to the hotspot: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_hotspot_L8302250&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=FGvYH0dnPOFqHfz4uJ-ciIzHlc4w37IS0ys1rX27xbo&s=9empL59j-Pef9ix1dhDOoXurUPJLnugTkQl2HUpYnoE&e=

Steve Shultz
(919) 458-4999
WPS Service Delivery Manager
Fidelity Investments
CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The information in this email and subsequent attachments may contain confidential information that is intended solely for the attention and use of the named addressee(s). This message or any part thereof must not be disclosed, copied, distributed or retained by any person without authorization from Fidelity Investments.

From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Robert Lewis
Sent: Thursday, December 27, 2018 9:31 AM
To: Carolina Birds; Steve Ritt
Subject: Re: GCSP Harbinger - 12/26/18

This email is from an external source - exercise caution regarding links and attachments.
I don't do ebird. Can someone provide a public link to the ebird site for this bird?

Bob Lewis
Sleepy Hollow NY


On Thursday, December 27, 2018, 12:34:22 AM EST, Steve Ritt <carolinabirds...> wrote:


The bird fell asleep in the Eleagnus hedge again tonight at 4:45 pm; this time just to the left (southwest) of the wax myrtle that is in the Eleagnus hedge by the putting green. Best viewed from the putting green.

The bird was not seen by the dumpsters from 4:00 pm on, so the diurnal pattern is being reinforced.

Yes, a rare bird report was submitted for it on the 23rd.

Steve Ritt
Harbinger, NC / San Diego, CA

 

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Date: 12/27/18 6:38 am
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: GCSP Harbinger - 12/26/18
I don't understand, why wouldn't you "do eBird"?

But if you want to exploit the people who do do eBird, there is https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_sightings_&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=PoqyFlJoWStizgwsNSuL9F_D6LqL81RCaa3zo4UP0qE&s=AGBFWLXrrqfQwrVxwk6ghzK818LvbgqTp_1jeW3PrdI&e=

Kent Fiala

On 12/27/2018 9:31 AM, Robert Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> I don't do ebird. Can someone provide a public link to the ebird site for this bird?
>
> Bob Lewis
> Sleepy Hollow NY
>
>
> On Thursday, December 27, 2018, 12:34:22 AM EST, Steve Ritt <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
>
> The bird fell asleep in the Eleagnus hedge again tonight at 4:45 pm; this time just to the left (southwest) of the wax myrtle that is in the Eleagnus hedge by the putting green. Best viewed from the putting green.
>
> The bird was not seen by the dumpsters from 4:00 pm on, so the diurnal pattern is being reinforced.
>
> Yes, a rare bird report was submitted for it on the 23rd.
>
> Steve Ritt
> Harbinger, NC / San Diego, CA

 

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Date: 12/27/18 6:35 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: GCSP Harbinger - 12/26/18
8808 Caratoke Hwy, Harbinger, NC 27941

Or just Google "Exxon Harbinger".

Steve Shultz
Apex NC

From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Robert Lewis
Sent: Thursday, December 27, 2018 9:31 AM
To: Carolina Birds; Steve Ritt
Subject: Re: GCSP Harbinger - 12/26/18

This email is from an external source - exercise caution regarding links and attachments.
I don't do ebird. Can someone provide a public link to the ebird site for this bird?

Bob Lewis
Sleepy Hollow NY


On Thursday, December 27, 2018, 12:34:22 AM EST, Steve Ritt <carolinabirds...> wrote:


The bird fell asleep in the Eleagnus hedge again tonight at 4:45 pm; this time just to the left (southwest) of the wax myrtle that is in the Eleagnus hedge by the putting green. Best viewed from the putting green.

The bird was not seen by the dumpsters from 4:00 pm on, so the diurnal pattern is being reinforced.

Yes, a rare bird report was submitted for it on the 23rd.

Steve Ritt
Harbinger, NC / San Diego, CA

 

Back to top
Date: 12/27/18 6:31 am
From: Robert Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: GCSP Harbinger - 12/26/18
I don't do ebird.  Can someone provide a public link to the ebird site for this bird?
Bob LewisSleepy Hollow NY

On Thursday, December 27, 2018, 12:34:22 AM EST, Steve Ritt <carolinabirds...> wrote:

The bird fell asleep in the Eleagnus hedge again tonight at 4:45 pm; this time just to the left (southwest) of the wax myrtle that is in the Eleagnus hedge by the putting green. Best viewed from the putting green.

The bird was not seen by the dumpsters from 4:00 pm on, so the diurnal pattern is being reinforced.

Yes, a rare bird report was submitted for it on the 23rd.

Steve Ritt
Harbinger, NC / San Diego, CA

 

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Date: 12/26/18 9:34 pm
From: Steve Ritt (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: GCSP Harbinger - 12/26/18
The bird fell asleep in the Eleagnus hedge again tonight at 4:45 pm; this time just to the left (southwest) of the wax myrtle that is in the Eleagnus hedge by the putting green. Best viewed from the putting green.

The bird was not seen by the dumpsters from 4:00 pm on, so the diurnal pattern is being reinforced.

Yes, a rare bird report was submitted for it on the 23rd.

Steve Ritt
Harbinger, NC / San Diego, CA

 

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Date: 12/26/18 4:20 pm
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: (History) Golden-crowned Sparrow in SC
I was interested and a little surprised to find this in The Chat (Report of the South Carolina Bird Records Committee 1994):

Golden-crowned Sparrow-(12-93-3). One was reported by P. Nugent on 26 December in the Francis Marion Forest during the Charleston Christmas Count. This sighting caused much debate, but was finally accepted on a split vote.

--
Kent Fiala

 

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Date: 12/26/18 3:08 pm
From: Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Guillemot, Nags Head, NC
Along with many other birders, we were lucky to see a guillemot diving next
to Jeannette's Pier, Nags Head, NC. We were there about 4:00-4:30 pm.

Linda Ward
Skip Hancock
Coinjock, NC

 

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Date: 12/26/18 1:52 pm
From: Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Common Eider
neither could Donna and I.

Dennis

On Wed, Dec 26, 2018 at 4:34 PM FRANK LAWKINS <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

>
> I could not locate it this afternoon in Charleston.
>
> Frank
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__yho.com_footer0&d=DwMCaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=rsrFJZPFWisIEHeH-V8id_3z0EtmvuFduE2uxSknPzU&s=k-2avksjNhUCj_JLJ5AJc9hotufhkyacwZSqBX0jwus&e=>
>


--
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>

 

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Date: 12/26/18 1:34 pm
From: FRANK LAWKINS (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Common Eider

I could not locate it this afternoon in Charleston.
Frank

Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone

 

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Date: 12/26/18 12:53 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Black Guillemot - Jennette's Pier - Dare, Co NC
Good job! Jeff Lemons has already submitted two photos of the guillemot on
his eBird list, showing the white underwing; Pigeon Guillemot has dark
underwings. Jacob Farmer told me he will fill out a CBC Rare Bird Report
form, and upload his photos to eBird and to the CBC Photo Gallery, once he
gets back to Raleigh.

As for the documentation of the Golden-crowned Sparrow on the CBC Photo
Gallery, thanks to both Jamie Adams and Jeff Pippen for adding photos that
show the yellow spot on the forehead. Has anyone filled out a CBC Rare
Bird Report form on the sparrow yet? Though the photos are presumed fine,
it is always good to have some written description and details on the
location, how other species were eliminated, etc.

Harry LeGrand

P.S. It been a nice ending to 2018, with already species such as Tahiti
Petrel (1st), Common Ringed Plover (2nd), Golden-crowned Sparrow (1st),
Black Guillemot (3rd), and a likely Caribbean/Cuban/Sinaloa Martin (1st)
specimen that has not yet been identified to species having been
photographed this year.



On Wed, Dec 26, 2018 at 2:37 PM Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr...> wrote:

> There are NO photographs of Black Guillemot for N.C. There are just two
> accepted sight records, which puts it only on the Provisional List. Though
> acceptance of a third sight record would put it on the Official List, the
> SC rules and rules of many other states are more strict and require
> accepted photos, or a specimen, or audio recordings. Of course the NC rules
> could be made tougher in upcoming years.
>
> Thus photos of the bird would be highly desirable.
>
> Congrats on this find. Can this be considered the start of a Patagonia
> Picnic Table Effect?!
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Birds of N.C website author and Records Committee member
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Dec 26, 2018, at 1:43 PM, Jacob Farmer (via carolinabirds Mailing
> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> >
> > Sorry for the delay but my phone died. Josh Simms and I found a Black
> Guillemot at the end of Jennettes pier about 1.5 hours ago. It was still
> being seen by many when I left the pier at 115.
> >
> > Jacob Farmer
> > Raleigh, NC (currently in Dare County, NC)
>

 

Back to top
Date: 12/26/18 12:00 pm
From: Chris Snook (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Snow buntings
Hi John,

Glad you got them - I hope there were 2. I saw them at 0845 this morning
just before some duck hunters fired at some ducks in the creek behind
the spit. The shorebirds didn't move but I only saw one of the buntings
after that. I waited about 30 min before moving on without seeing them
again. Walking past the cedars a kestrel flew up with a small bird in
its talons, but with bad light I couldn't make out what it was - hoping
it wasn't a bunting. Very few ducks on the ocean due to duck hunters and
fishermen.

Happy holidays

Chris Snook,
Charleston, SC


On 12/26/2018 12:17, jcox3222 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> Present on sand spit west of jetty at Huntington Beach State Park as
> of 1130 today.
> John Cox
> Mount Pleasant SC
>
> Sent from XFINITY Connect Mobile App
 

Back to top
Date: 12/26/18 11:38 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Black Guillemot - Jennette's Pier - Dare, Co NC
There are NO photographs of Black Guillemot for N.C. There are just two accepted sight records, which puts it only on the Provisional List. Though acceptance of a third sight record would put it on the Official List, the SC rules and rules of many other states are more strict and require accepted photos, or a specimen, or audio recordings. Of course the NC rules could be made tougher in upcoming years.

Thus photos of the bird would be highly desirable.

Congrats on this find. Can this be considered the start of a Patagonia Picnic Table Effect?!

Harry LeGrand
Birds of N.C website author and Records Committee member

Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 26, 2018, at 1:43 PM, Jacob Farmer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Sorry for the delay but my phone died. Josh Simms and I found a Black Guillemot at the end of Jennettes pier about 1.5 hours ago. It was still being seen by many when I left the pier at 115.
>
> Jacob Farmer
> Raleigh, NC (currently in Dare County, NC)
 

Back to top
Date: 12/26/18 10:45 am
From: Jacob Farmer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Black Guillemot - Jennette's Pier - Dare, Co NC
Sorry for the delay but my phone died. Josh Simms and I found a Black
Guillemot at the end of Jennettes pier about 1.5 hours ago. It was still
being seen by many when I left the pier at 115.

Jacob Farmer
Raleigh, NC (currently in Dare County, NC)

 

Back to top
Date: 12/26/18 9:23 am
From: Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Golden Eagle at Lake Mattamuskeet main entrance impoundment
I just watched an all dark eagle in a tree near the first parking area on main entrance. It then flew and strafed the ducks in the impoundment. All the ducks flew up and it was quite a show for four or five minutes. While it was flying I couldn’t discern any white on the bird. As I was driving up the road to the entrance a large dark hawk with a obviously contrasting brown head flew across the road. I was on the phone so I wasn’t able to follow it then but it was flying toward the impoundments.

The bird was huge and the ducks wanted no part of it!

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 12/26/18 9:18 am
From: jcox3222 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Snow buntings
Present on sand spit west of jetty at Huntington Beach State Park as of 1130 today.
John Cox
Mount Pleasant SC

Sent from XFINITY Connect Mobile App

 

Back to top
Date: 12/26/18 8:00 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Golden-crowned Sparrow continues
Ah, I’m glad that someone decided to toss some seed out there. This worked well for the Green-tailed Towhee (long time ago in Southport, no one get excited ☺), and I hoped it might invite this little guy to stay, if for nothing other than those of us afflicted by that nasty thing called a job and who cannot get out until the weekend (ironically, my Dad lives down behind the golf course there, and they were in Raleigh visiting us this year when Steve found the bird… most years we would have been down there on the weekend before XMAS… aargh!!)

So if folks don’t mind dropping a bit of seed, that would be great! But probably on the down-low since we don’t want the folks at the Exxon accusing of attracting rats…

Steve Shultz
Apex, NC

From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Will Cook
Sent: Wednesday, December 26, 2018 10:41 AM
To: Kent Fiala
Cc: carolinabirds
Subject: Re: Golden-crowned Sparrow continues

This email is from an external source - exercise caution regarding links and attachments.
I should chastise Kent for not including the location - we're at the GetGo in Harbinger, NC. Haven't seen the bird in 50 minutes, but it's been associating with the White-throated Sparrows as usual and came out to the birdseed in the dirt road area for a minute.

Will Cook
Currently in Harbinger, NC

On Dec 26, 2018 10:03 AM, Kent Fiala <carolinabirds...> wrote:
It's still in the regular spot. --

Kent Fiala

 

Back to top
Date: 12/26/18 7:41 am
From: Will Cook <cwcook...>
Subject: Re: Golden-crowned Sparrow continues
I should chastise Kent for not including the location - we're at the
GetGo in Harbinger, NC. Haven't seen the bird in 50 minutes, but it's
been associating with the White-throated Sparrows as usual and came
out to the birdseed in the dirt road area for a minute.
Will Cook Currently in Harbinger, NC
On Dec 26, 2018 10:03 AM, Kent Fiala <carolinabirds...> wrote:

It's still in the regular spot. --

Kent Fiala
 

Back to top
Date: 12/26/18 7:38 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Greater Yellowlegs at Lake Wheeler, NC, yesterday
Yesterday afternoon (Dec. 25), I stopped by the upper end of Lake Wheeler,
south of Raleigh, to see if there were any waterbirds at the upper end of
the lake. The lake is at a very high level now, higher than I ever recall,
and the water has essentially flooded the marshes. Even so, I saw a
GREATER YELLOWLEGS with 2 Killdeers at the edge of the shrubs. This is a
rare sighting for the Piedmont in December (or winter in general). I'm
reporting it here because the eBird list for this area has this species,
along with Dunlin and Least Sandpiper, already included, and not a write-in
as a rare species. (I did provide a brief description on my eBird
checklist.) I would make a plea here that in the NC Piedmont, only
Killdeer, Wilson's Snipe, and American Woodcock are not "bold-faceable" on
a CBC or in the winter (Dec-Feb) months. I hope someone can re-set the
eBird filter. For example, I can't recall if the Raleigh/Wake County CBC
has ever had a Greater Yellowlegs on a count; it probably has, but not that
I can recall. It certainly wasn't here at Lake Wheeler in the past month,
until yesterday.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

 

Back to top
Date: 12/26/18 7:33 am
From: Ken Yount (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Red Breasted Nuthatch
I just had my first red breasted nuthatch in many years to show up on my
feeder.
Ken Yount
Wentworth (Rockingham County) NC

 

Back to top
Date: 12/26/18 7:03 am
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Golden-crowned Sparrow continues
It's still in the regular spot. --

Kent Fiala

 

Back to top
Date: 12/26/18 6:59 am
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Stilt Sandpipers, Pine Siskins, Vesper Sparrows - Donnelley WMA
They have drained the lodge pond at Donnelley WMA and among the many
shorebirds using it are 5 Stilt Sandpipers. It was a perfect setup for a
Ruff / Reeve but not today.

The dove fields at the work barn area had a small flock of Pine Siskins
associating with the Goldfinches, Eastern Bluebirds, Pine Warblers,
Chipping Sparrows, etc. and there were some Vesper Sparrows hanging out
near a puddle at the far end of the field from the buildings.

There were also some Rusty Blackbirds foraging across the big impoundment
from the long dike that is not far past the HQ. Scope required.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 12/26/18 5:52 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Golden-crowned Sparrow - eBird hotspot
Thanks to Martina Nordstrand for being first to post some Golden-crowned
Sparrow photos to the CBC Photo Gallery. However, now we need someone to
post several photos showing the crown -- showing the yellow patch at the
forehead. Martina's photos don't show that part of the head. Thanks in
advance.

Harry LeGrand

On Tue, Dec 25, 2018 at 8:48 PM Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr...> wrote:

> Folks have done well putting photos of the bird on your eBird list.
> However, it has been photographed for 3 or 4 days and no one has yet added
> photos to the Carolina Bird Club Photo Gallery. The two state records
> committees would like to have photo documentation of all first state
> records there, for long term record-keeping. Who will be the hero or
> heroine to be the first to upload some Golden- crowned photos to the
> website?
>
> Harry LeGrand
> NC Bird Records Committee
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Dec 25, 2018, at 8:27 PM, Shelley Rutkin <shelleyr...>
> wrote:
>
> Hi Everyone,
>
> We now have a stakeout hotspot for the NC Golden-crowned Sparrow. Good
> luck to everyone who will be looking for the bird. Please use the hotspot “stakeout
> Golden-crowned Sparrow, Harbinger (2018)” when reporting to eBird.
>
> If you have already seen and reported the bird, please merge your
> personal location into the hotspot. It should show up in eBird in a few
> hours.
>
> What a wonderful Christmas gift for NC birders! Merry Christmas, everyone!
>
> Shelley Rutkin
>
> NC eBird Hotspot Administrator
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 12/26/18 4:33 am
From: Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Common Eider in down town Charleston
Any information on if the Common Eider has been seen recently at seen at
Waterfront Park, Charleston, SC?

Thanks,

Dennis

--
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>

 

Back to top
Date: 12/25/18 5:49 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Golden-crowned Sparrow - eBird hotspot
Folks have done well putting photos of the bird on your eBird list. However, it has been photographed for 3 or 4 days and no one has yet added photos to the Carolina Bird Club Photo Gallery. The two state records committees would like to have photo documentation of all first state records there, for long term record-keeping. Who will be the hero or heroine to be the first to upload some Golden- crowned photos to the website?

Harry LeGrand
NC Bird Records Committee

Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 25, 2018, at 8:27 PM, Shelley Rutkin <shelleyr...> wrote:
>
> Hi Everyone,
>
> We now have a stakeout hotspot for the NC Golden-crowned Sparrow. Good luck to everyone who will be looking for the bird. Please use the hotspot “stakeout Golden-crowned Sparrow, Harbinger (2018)” when reporting to eBird.
>
> If you have already seen and reported the bird, please merge your personal location into the hotspot. It should show up in eBird in a few hours.
>
>
> What a wonderful Christmas gift for NC birders! Merry Christmas, everyone!
>
>
> Shelley Rutkin
>
> NC eBird Hotspot Administrator
>

 

Back to top
Date: 12/25/18 5:27 pm
From: Shelley Rutkin <shelleyr...>
Subject: Golden-crowned Sparrow - eBird hotspot
Hi Everyone,

We now have a stakeout hotspot for the NC Golden-crowned Sparrow. Good luck
to everyone who will be looking for the bird. Please use the hotspot
"stakeout Golden-crowned Sparrow, Harbinger (2018)" when reporting to eBird.

If you have already seen and reported the bird, please merge your personal
location into the hotspot. It should show up in eBird in a few hours.

What a wonderful Christmas gift for NC birders! Merry Christmas, everyone!

Shelley Rutkin
NC eBird Hotspot Administrator


 

Back to top
Date: 12/25/18 2:06 pm
From: Elisa Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Golden-crowned sparrow, currituck county, nc
The golden-crowned sparrow was seen at about 4:15pm and 4:30pm this afternoon, on the dirt path ("road") by the dumpsters at the gas station. It was feeding with White-throated Sparrows.
It took almost two hours for us to see it.

Steve Ritt's email provides excellent advice.

Thank you,

Elisa and Nick Flanders
Portsmouth, VA



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

 

Back to top
Date: 12/25/18 4:41 am
From: <tas176...>
Subject: Currituck GCSP continues
GCSP continues 8:38am 12/25/18

Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 24, 2018, at 10:06 PM, Steve Ritt (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I didn’t imagine that this bird would be difficult to refind, but there have been at least two 90 minute-long periods yesterday and today where the bird could not be seen. As one might expect, mid-day does not seem like a good time to try. It’s probably still in the shrubs (either the Eleagnus or the privet), but it hunkers down and refuses to come out. Yesterday, a Cooper’s Hawk shut everything down at 11:50 am for a while, and today all activity was mysteriously dead from 1-2ish. A handicapped house cat might have some mild effects.
>
> Basically, I think the bird sleeps in the 90-degree corner of the Eleagnus hedgerow by the putting green behind the clubhouse, and this seems to be a good place to find it first-thing in the morning and in the late evening. It then seems to spend the vast majority of the day behind the Exxon dumpsters, between the dirt “road” and the pallets, but sometimes favoring the privet edge along Edgewater Drive.
>
> If the White-throated Sparrows aren’t comfortably coming out to feed on the ground, the Golden-crowned will almost certainly not either. First, try backing up at least 40’ from the hedges. Second, use your car as a blind (but please keep the road clear for gas station traffic). Third, leave seed and come back at a different time, either late evening or early morning.
>
> Hope this helps anyone who’s coming from out of town to see it.
>
> Steve Ritt
> Harbinger, NC / San Diego, CA
>
> Sent from my iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 12/24/18 7:07 pm
From: Steve Ritt (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Golden-crowned Sparrow tips
I didn’t imagine that this bird would be difficult to refind, but there have been at least two 90 minute-long periods yesterday and today where the bird could not be seen. As one might expect, mid-day does not seem like a good time to try. It’s probably still in the shrubs (either the Eleagnus or the privet), but it hunkers down and refuses to come out. Yesterday, a Cooper’s Hawk shut everything down at 11:50 am for a while, and today all activity was mysteriously dead from 1-2ish. A handicapped house cat might have some mild effects.

Basically, I think the bird sleeps in the 90-degree corner of the Eleagnus hedgerow by the putting green behind the clubhouse, and this seems to be a good place to find it first-thing in the morning and in the late evening. It then seems to spend the vast majority of the day behind the Exxon dumpsters, between the dirt “road” and the pallets, but sometimes favoring the privet edge along Edgewater Drive.

If the White-throated Sparrows aren’t comfortably coming out to feed on the ground, the Golden-crowned will almost certainly not either. First, try backing up at least 40’ from the hedges. Second, use your car as a blind (but please keep the road clear for gas station traffic). Third, leave seed and come back at a different time, either late evening or early morning.

Hope this helps anyone who’s coming from out of town to see it.

Steve Ritt
Harbinger, NC / San Diego, CA

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 12/24/18 12:57 pm
From: Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Golden-crowned sparrow, Harbinger, NC
Continuing around 10:00 a.m. at 8808 Caratoke Hwy, Harbinger, NC, behind
Exon Station. Associating with white-throated sparrows at base of privet
bush eating privet berries. Seen by several birders.

The question is not what you look at, but what you see.
Henry David Thoreau

Linda Ward
Coinjock, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 12/24/18 8:34 am
From: Jerry <bogey...>
Subject: Snow Bunting pair at HBSP early this morning.
Good looks at the pair together staying outside the large numbers
of Westerns and Semipalmateds. Look for them near the fresh water
pond feeding in the small clumps of ?weeds. A Bald Eagle was in the area
spooking everything.

Jerry Kerschner
Pawleys Island, SC

---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.avg.com&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=qpSbgOpJhjgP219N9lZs9d6EiuOdewEAKIoybJe79eQ&s=q70i7g_VhqHJgMbgnx82G_j_0wrn3Mm9mK6O4-aA8u0&e=

 

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Date: 12/24/18 7:34 am
From: Caroline Harvey (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: James Island Country Park - Western Kingbird 12/24
Observed from 8:45am for about 20 minutes in the open field area between
powerlines and the big lake. No sign of the Common Merganser. The park
gate was closed so walked in.

Checklist
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S50920149&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=rfUykWnFeYdzMDeJuPpK-loQ5kdyInEqunHj4uP4dJU&s=ucUHjgVneBrcWafW-v8Gt3fBjA85FS-tGvO1SJIUKGw&e=

Simon C. Harvey
Simpsonville, SC




--
Caroline and Simon Harvey
Simpsonville, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 12/24/18 7:34 am
From: scbirder (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Golden-crowned Sparrow, Harbinger, NC
Still present it at 10:10 this morning.  Emerging from privet to the shady grass every few minutes.

Steve & Debra Patterson Anderson, SC


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 

Back to top
Date: 12/24/18 4:48 am
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Golden-crowned Sparrow
Golden-crowned Sparrow still here this morning, seen by Steve Ritt, Keith Camburn and myself. Currituck County, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 12/23/18 6:40 pm
From: steve stevens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Pungo Lake Sandhill Cranes
This Friday and Saturday I went out with friends to watch the tundra swans
and snow geese at Pungo lake in Hyde county. We got to the intersection of
W Lake Dr and S Lake Dr about 45 minutes before sunset and watched the
amazing spectacle of thousands of geese and swans fly by as the sun set and
the moon rose. We saw many different birds while out there, in particular
three SANDHILL CRANES in flight from south to north east of where we were
standing. They were very distinctive and all six observers got wonderful
long looks at them. Also worth mentioning we heard an AMERICAN WOODCOCK
calling from below the observation tower about an hour after sunset.

The roads in the refuge aren't in the best shape, so if you visit feel free
to email if you want to know what we experienced or take a 4wd vehicle if
possible.

Steve, Chapel Hill NC

 

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Date: 12/23/18 5:45 pm
From: John Grego <jrgrego...>
Subject: Re: Golden Eagle, Congaree Swamp CBC
A well-deserved sighting, Brad! We had a Golden Eagle on the count in 2015, and I know the park tried to bait for that Golden Eagle with hog carcasses and motion-activated cameras afterwards without success. Ron Ahle observed one along the US 601 corridor last winter.

John Grego
Columbia, SC
 

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Date: 12/23/18 3:09 pm
From: Lucas Bobay (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Ft.Fisher Goldeneye redux
I think others have pretty well established that yellow-billed female
Common Goldeneyes are uncommon but not unusual. Because this species is
scarce across this region, it follows that relatively few yellow-billed
individuals would be found. However, calling this bird “quite noteworthy”
is a stretch - it seems likely that other yellow-billed Common Goldeneyes
could have turned up, but were not reported as unusual simply because they
are not.

Lucas Bobay
Micaville NC

On Sun, Dec 23, 2018 at 5:37 PM <badgerboy...> wrote:

> It is of note that the Fort Fisher Goldeneye, as far as I can tell, was
> the only one ever reported in the Carolinas with a mostly yellow bill.
> There were ZERO replies to my earlier question of anyone who claimed to
> have seen one before, and I can find no mention of one on ebird or in
> any other sources. That in itself makes this bird quite noteworthy.
>
> I was able to find a recent report of a very similar bird in southwest
> virginia, with pictures, showing the mostly yellow bill. That bird was
> within a hundred miles of the NC border.
>
> Just in case anyone is interested in more than ticks on a list...
>
> Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 12/23/18 2:37 pm
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Ft.Fisher Goldeneye redux
It is of note that the Fort Fisher Goldeneye, as far as I can tell, was
the only one ever reported in the Carolinas with a mostly yellow bill.
There were ZERO replies to my earlier question of anyone who claimed to
have seen one before, and I can find no mention of one on ebird or in
any other sources. That in itself makes this bird quite noteworthy.

I was able to find a recent report of a very similar bird in southwest
virginia, with pictures, showing the mostly yellow bill. That bird was
within a hundred miles of the NC border.

Just in case anyone is interested in more than ticks on a list...

Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC


 

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Date: 12/23/18 2:29 pm
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Broad-winged Hawk and Pine Warbler-High Country
A Broad-winged Hawk soared fairly low with great views over my
neighborhood in Deep Gap in Watauga Co. this afternoon during some nice
sunny warm weather. It appeared to be slowly headed toward the southwest
along the blue ridge escarpment and seems likely to have been a very
late migrant. This seems to be our first county report for the species
in winter.

Also a Pine Warbler has been frequenting feeders near the Boone water
treatment plant for the last few weeks, and appears to be the same bird
that also spent most of the winter there last year. This appears to be
our first county record of an overwintering bird, and the first one for
the entire high country region as well, although we do get a few in mid
to late february that are more likely to be early spring migrants.

Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC


 

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Date: 12/23/18 1:35 pm
From: Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Common Eider Charleston Harbor, SC
There’s a first winter type Common Eider hanging around the Waterfront Park in Charleston. It can be best viewed from the pier, looking left under the Passenger Terminal, where it can be seen picking crustaceans off the pilings.
Pam Ford
Goose Creek SC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 12/23/18 8:59 am
From: Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Come
Bird currently on bank of big pond at James is cp
--
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>

 

Back to top
Date: 12/23/18 7:05 am
From: Wayne Hoffman <whoffman...>
Subject: Re: OBX: potential GOLDEN-crowned Sparrow - 12/23/18
Great Find!

I have just relocated to Wilmington from Oregon, and am very familiar with Golden-crowned Sparrows, and these photos look definitive to me.  I checked through my digital photo collection, and found quite a few that are very good matches for yours.

Unlike White-throated and White-crowned sparrows, adult Golden-crowned Sparrows have a winter plumage that is fairly similar to the first-winter plumage.  i never bothered to work out all the details to tell them apart, but yours could be a winter adult rather than an immature.  This is something not well-covered in most field guides.  i would refer to Peter Pyle's manual, but my copy is still lost in a pile of boxes waiting for installation of bookshelves.

Wayne Hoffman
Wilmington

On 12/23/2018 9:49:23 AM, Steve Ritt <carolinabirds...> wrote:
As far as three of us can tell in the field, there is an immature Zonotrichia that looks good for Golden-crowned Sparrow in Harbinger, NC behind the Exxon/Get Go dumpsters at 8808 Caratoke Highway, Harbinger, NC 27941.

Link to one set of pics here:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_127369771-40N07_46432281761_in_photostream&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=-CDOhpFNr4JNhb6D-Tvbs4J-iRhHe106VU3mz5gZupE&s=ZuRa3c05EpK94-HJgbtLjQEi8MFBl1F_hpmr1gMqHQ8&e= [https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_127369771-40N07_46432281761_in_photostream&amp;d=DwMFaQ&amp;c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&amp;r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&amp;m=eJW1cb_Hhk_aE1f1mhY4tpOJfOh1kIKKxTEdslC8ktM&amp;s=MRxo05UtZPIr7cAyrOAISX78MT-jxrtTj1iG-xVmsT8&amp;e=]

One other set to come.

We can’t rule out the possibility of an aberrant plumage or hybridization yet, but we can’t see anything that’s wrong for Golden-crowned.

I first saw this bird late last night, and I don’t think it’s going anywhere anytime soon. Hard telling not knowing though.

Feedback appreciated.

Steve Ritt
Harbinger, NC / San Diego, CA

Sent from my iPhone

 

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Date: 12/23/18 6:49 am
From: Steve Ritt (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: OBX: potential GOLDEN-crowned Sparrow - 12/23/18
As far as three of us can tell in the field, there is an immature Zonotrichia that looks good for Golden-crowned Sparrow in Harbinger, NC behind the Exxon/Get Go dumpsters at 8808 Caratoke Highway, Harbinger, NC 27941.

Link to one set of pics here:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_127369771-40N07_46432281761_in_photostream&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=eJW1cb_Hhk_aE1f1mhY4tpOJfOh1kIKKxTEdslC8ktM&s=MRxo05UtZPIr7cAyrOAISX78MT-jxrtTj1iG-xVmsT8&e=

One other set to come.

We can’t rule out the possibility of an aberrant plumage or hybridization yet, but we can’t see anything that’s wrong for Golden-crowned.

I first saw this bird late last night, and I don’t think it’s going anywhere anytime soon. Hard telling not knowing though.

Feedback appreciated.

Steve Ritt
Harbinger, NC / San Diego, CA

Sent from my iPhone

 

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Date: 12/23/18 6:15 am
From: Bradley Dalton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Golden Eagle, Congaree CBC
I realize this report comes a week late, but last weekend for the Congaree Christmas Bird Count I had a great look at an immature golden eagle flying east over Highway 601 at the park. Due to the flood waters, I was hardly able to set a foot in my territory. However, without that I almost certainly would not have seen the eagle, which was a lifer for me! I typically do 10-12 miles through the floodplain, however, ironically, being relegated to the highway 601 corridor I had my highest count for any Congaree CBC over the past eight years. I guess that shows the power of edge habitat!

I have some photos on my ebird report here: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S50866904&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=raxjGYpfRolYEYSOr18ekSXNju0FgkEcoMzSEFGs-zI&s=d-EmtxrHhCK2n6TFP084EJ7k41Gn81aqlLmSwGcR46Q&e=

Merry Christmas and happy Christmas Bird Count season!

Brad Dalton
Greenville, SC



 

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Date: 12/23/18 5:47 am
From: Cherrie Sneed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: CommonMerganser_JamesIslCoPark

The COME is appearing now in pool behind Headquarters and is not spooked by passers by as it preens. This park is Charleston Co, SC.

Cherrie

Cherrie Sneed
Meggett, SC
Charleston County
 

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Date: 12/22/18 10:24 am
From: Brad Sale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Georgetown Co. Rarity Roundup
Hello all,

Three Georgetown Co, SC rarities all continue today:
1. Snow Buntings at north end jetty at HBSP
2. Western Kingbird has moved back to the Carroll Campbell boat landing.
3. Black-headed Gull refound at wastewater treatment plant, in 3rd pool.

Pictures will be added to my eBird lists later.

Happy Holiday birding!

Brad Sale
Moncks Corner, SC


Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 12/22/18 9:17 am
From: Mary Bridges <maryhuot...>
Subject: Lark Sparrow
The lark sparrow found in the Willow Dale Cemetery in Goldsboro during the Wayne County CBC last Saturday is still there. It was with a flock of mostly chipping sparrows this a.m. around 10:30.
Mary Bridges
Goldsboro, NC
 

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Date: 12/22/18 5:21 am
From: Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Snow Bunting Huntington Beach State Park, SC
Craig Watson relocated the 2 Snow Buntings in the same location, previously seen, west of the jetty on the sand spit.
Pam Ford
Charleston
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 12/21/18 10:14 pm
From: Steve Ritt (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: OBX: Iceland Gull - 12/21/18
A pale, first-cycle Iceland Gull was on the beach behind the old Coast Guard station at Oregon Inlet this afternoon. Looks like they’ve been scarce in the south so far this winter.

Steve Ritt
Harbinger, NC / San Diego, CA
 

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Date: 12/21/18 12:38 pm
From: Chris Snook (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Western Kingbird
The Western Kingbird recently sighted at James Island County Park in
Charleston, SC was still present today at 1145 today despite the gale
force winds.

It was siting on the barbed wire above the gate under the power lines
(on the right as you drive into the park). This is adjacent to the area
where it was first seen by Irvin Pitts and reported recently by Cherrie
Sneed.

No sign of the Common Merganser.

Chris Snook,
Charleston, SC
 

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Date: 12/21/18 11:17 am
From: Shawn R. Smolen-Morton <SSmolenMorton...>
Subject: RE: Snow Bunting
The Snow Buntings discovered by Rich Lilly were in the same place this morning between 8 and 9AM.
They foraged actively between the Dunlin and Semi-palm Plovers.
The best strategy is to scope the spit from the dune at the east end, just off of the Jetty blacktop.
You can see the entire length of the spit and its northern shoreline without flushing the birds.
Minimum 1,000 shorebirds at high tide. Not one Piping Plover: argghhhh!
Shawn Smolen-Morton
Florence, SC
________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> [<carolinabirds-request...>] on behalf of FRANK LAWKINS [<carolinabirds...>]
Sent: Thursday, December 20, 2018 11:28 AM
To: Carolinabirds Listserve
Subject: Snow Bunting

Just a word to let people know I did not find the snow buntings at the HBSP jetty yesterday afternoon.

Frank Lawkins


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__overview.mail.yahoo.com_-3F.src-3DiOS&d=DwMCaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=9LqlF-OHzxYnSlU5lIyn5K_orCp0Utg8JM5Sy60tGpo&s=xqZdGu5fk1C5TuJRIeg24GgqUm6NWrcPcY4qT7sgl7M&e=>

 

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Date: 12/21/18 6:30 am
From: Randy (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Ducks at Twin Lakes of Sunset Beach
Apologies in delays for this post, but I was excited this week on Wednesday to discover the return of some interesting ducks to the Sunset Beach. There has been a paucity of ducks at the two lakes for the last several winters, at least whenever I drive by, which is at least a couple times a week.

On Wednesday, I was pleased to spot on the east lake several species I hadn't seen in a few years: an M and two F Redheads and the same mix of three Buffleheads. There was also a nice raft of approximately 20 Ringed-necks of mostly males with some females, not to mention a half dozen Pied-billed Grebes and a dozen D-C Cormorants. In the heron roost at the east side of the lakes were about 20 adult and one juvenile Black-crowned Night Herons, and six adult White Ibis.

I don't know why ducks more or less quit showing up at these lakes for a few years, in my observations--I could be wrong and just picked the wrong days, but previously they came and were there daily in great numbers of the entire late fall and winter. There were no ducks on the west lake that I could spot. Let's hope the appearance of these ducks is the beginning of a return to plentiful ducking at Twin Lakes during the winter.

Would be curious if anyone has like observations or, contrarily, have seen plenty of ducks the last two seasons. Also, if they have an idea why they absented themselves for at least several seasons.

Charles (Randy) Climpson
Ocean Isle Beach, NC
 

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Date: 12/20/18 2:47 pm
From: Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Are Nashville Warblers being under-reported in the winter in NC?
I saw what I believe was a Nashville Warbler on the Goldsboro Christmas
Count this past Sat. It was bright yellow underneath (throat, belly and
undertail coverts) and grey blue on top, similar to a blue-headed vireo. I
am wondering if this bird is under-reported because I may have seen two on
the Holly Shelter count a couple of years ago. I remember there were two
warblers that were yellow underneath that I was sure weren't pine,
yellow-rumped and I didn't think they were orange-crowned. In short, I
didn't have any idea what they could be because I was not familiar with
Nashville and didn't know they were a possibility. Nashville Warbler came
to my notice when Brian Brockhan saw one on the Pettigrew Park count that
year and I wondered about the birds I had seen.

Because I have seen possibly a second Nashville Warbler, I was wondering if
other people were familiar with the field marks of this bird and considered
it whenever they saw an unfamiliar warbler in the winter. The guide books
all talk about the eye ring but that can be hard to see. I found the
bright yellow breast and throat attracted my eye and I noticed the contrast
between the upperside of the bird and the lower side. I think that may be
a better field mark than eye, at least in the winter. Ebird has some good
pictures that show the nice contrast. From the home page choose Explore
Species and enter Nashville Warbler.

Ebird also has good pictures of Orange-crowned Warbler which you can
contrast with the Nashville Warbler, as it is another possible winter
warbler.

In summary, I challenge you to study the Nashville Warbler and consider it
the next time you seen a warbler that you can't immediately identify.

Ann Brice
Wilson, NC

 

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Date: 12/20/18 8:56 am
From: evan wunder (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Common Goldeneye, Lee County, SC
The female Common Goldeneye was at the sewage treatment plant this morning
at 10:00 am. There were also 10 Hooded Mergansers as well on the body of
water.

Evan Wunder

On Wed, Dec 19, 2018 at 7:18 PM Mac Williams <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> All,
>
> I relocated the Common Goldeneye this afternoon at the Bishopville, SC
> sewage treatment plant in Lee County. The only other ducks were 8 hooded
> mergansers, including a male this time.
>
> Here's a link to the location, for those who don't know where it is.
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps_-4034.2249225-2C-2D80.2187536-2C17.5z&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=XTDisVY1zuM9hSPZjf0EsNbRCqS1Rg0tOPG-EfuzSX4&s=LmnwaPVqvrUM9uWFZTaUk8n8ELV59bArbnwnZbGmWYA&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps_-4034.2249225-2C-2D80.2187536-2C17.5z&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JwUmfGo_sxkcNLDulYFeFiqmLZdQzvAS2WyOjsmHjA4&s=qNdlMArFFFUtrDivWezLPEUjVQ-Q36WKMnXkFHlOzH0&e=>
>
>
> Mac
>
>
>
> On Mon, Dec 17, 2018 at 5:35 PM Mac Williams <jwilliams...> wrote:
>
>> All,
>>
>> Shawn Smolen-Morten and I also found the female goldeneye again this
>> morning, along with 7 hooded mergansers. The other ducks have left in the
>> two days since the first report. If the gate is open, the staff said we
>> may take a couple of steps inside--on the asphalt--to better view the
>> ducks, but no more than that.
>>
>> Good luck,
>>
>> Mac
>>
>> On Sun, Dec 16, 2018 at 9:03 PM Steve Patterson <carolinabirds...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> On my way home from the Carolina Sandhills NWR CBC yesterday (Dec. 15),
>>> I stopped by the water treatment plant in Bishopville, SC. Among the
>>> several duck species was a female Common Goldeneye.
>>>
>>> The other ducks present were
>>> Ring-necked
>>> Ruddy
>>> American Wigeon
>>> Hooded Merganser
>>> Gadwall
>>>
>>> This location is limited in its view. There is one pond which is
>>> viewable from one spot outside the fence, even though you can see most of
>>> the pond from there.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Steve Patterson
>>> Anderson, SC
>>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Mac Williams, PhD
>> Associate Professor of Spanish
>> Coker College
>> 300 E. College Ave
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__maps.google.com_-3Fq-3D300-2BE.-2BCollege-2BAve-2BHartsville-2C-2BSC-2B29550-26entry-3Dgmail-26source-3Dg&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=XTDisVY1zuM9hSPZjf0EsNbRCqS1Rg0tOPG-EfuzSX4&s=XC5W9o9_GwtBYfpcDhC70JTVjPJahoQdtjNRR_73_kI&e=>
>> Hartsville, SC 29550
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__maps.google.com_-3Fq-3D300-2BE.-2BCollege-2BAve-2BHartsville-2C-2BSC-2B29550-26entry-3Dgmail-26source-3Dg&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=XTDisVY1zuM9hSPZjf0EsNbRCqS1Rg0tOPG-EfuzSX4&s=XC5W9o9_GwtBYfpcDhC70JTVjPJahoQdtjNRR_73_kI&e=>
>> 843-383-8117 (office)
>> 843-991-3879 (cell)
>> <jwilliams...>
>>
>
>
> --
> Mac Williams, PhD
> Associate Professor of Spanish
> Coker College
> 300 E. College Ave
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__maps.google.com_-3Fq-3D300-2BE.-2BCollege-2BAve-2BHartsville-2C-2BSC-2B29550-26entry-3Dgmail-26source-3Dg&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=XTDisVY1zuM9hSPZjf0EsNbRCqS1Rg0tOPG-EfuzSX4&s=XC5W9o9_GwtBYfpcDhC70JTVjPJahoQdtjNRR_73_kI&e=>
> Hartsville, SC 29550
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__maps.google.com_-3Fq-3D300-2BE.-2BCollege-2BAve-2BHartsville-2C-2BSC-2B29550-26entry-3Dgmail-26source-3Dg&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=XTDisVY1zuM9hSPZjf0EsNbRCqS1Rg0tOPG-EfuzSX4&s=XC5W9o9_GwtBYfpcDhC70JTVjPJahoQdtjNRR_73_kI&e=>
> 843-383-8117 (office)
> 843-991-3879 (cell)
> <jwilliams...>
>

 

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Date: 12/20/18 8:28 am
From: FRANK LAWKINS (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Snow Bunting
Just a word to let people know I did not find the snow buntings at the HBSP jetty yesterday afternoon.
Frank Lawkins


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

 

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Date: 12/20/18 3:45 am
From: scbirder (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: [gcbirdclub] Any recent searches for Say’s Phoebe (Pendleton, SC)?
Hi, Kevin.
I have no more recent information than you listed.  If I can swing by there today t check, I will.  I have tentative plans on my calendar to try to help someone see it tomorrow if it is still around. 
Steve

Steve Patterson Anderson, SC


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: "Kevin Kubach <kmkubach...> [gcbirdclub]" <gcbirdclub-noreply...> Date: 12/19/18 7:55 PM (GMT-05:00) To: <carolinabirds...>, <gcbirdclub...> Subject: [gcbirdclub] Any recent searches for Say’s Phoebe (Pendleton, SC)?

 









Greetings, Birders. Just curious if anyone has looked for the Say’s Phoebe at Simpson Ag Station (Pendleton, SC) in the past few days?



The last sighting shown on eBird was the morning of the 17th and the only subsequent visits shown on eBird were later that same day (neither reporting the Phoebe).



Thanks,



Kevin Kubach

Greenville, SC





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.







__,_._,___



 

Back to top
Date: 12/19/18 4:57 pm
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Late report of Black Rail at Mattamuskeet
Hi folks,

On December 8, I was birding along the back (south) side of wildlife drive
at Lake Mattamuskeet and had just stopped the car when a small, black
animal ran quickly from the fairly short grass on the shoulder of the road
about 4 feet into the thick, marshy vegetation of the impoundment. I
instantly thought Black Rail, but the encounter was very brief, and through
the windshield of my car. I sat for a while and it did not come back out,
so I got out and kicked into the habitat, but again, nothing happened, so I
continued birding.

Knowing how rare a Black Rail is this far inland, I have agonized for days
over what else this could have been, and can not come up with anything
other than Black Rail. It was black, the right size, ran, not hopped, and I
did not notice a tail (rodent). The habitat was fresh water marsh (flooded
field).

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 12/19/18 4:55 pm
From: Kevin Kubach (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Any recent searches for Say’s Phoebe (Pendleton, SC)?
Greetings, Birders. Just curious if anyone has looked for the Say’s Phoebe at Simpson Ag Station (Pendleton, SC) in the past few days?

The last sighting shown on eBird was the morning of the 17th and the only subsequent visits shown on eBird were later that same day (neither reporting the Phoebe).

Thanks,

Kevin Kubach
Greenville, SC
 

Back to top
Date: 12/19/18 4:18 pm
From: Mac Williams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Common Goldeneye, Lee County, SC
All,

I relocated the Common Goldeneye this afternoon at the Bishopville, SC
sewage treatment plant in Lee County. The only other ducks were 8 hooded
mergansers, including a male this time.

Here's a link to the location, for those who don't know where it is.
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps_-4034.2249225-2C-2D80.2187536-2C17.5z&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JwUmfGo_sxkcNLDulYFeFiqmLZdQzvAS2WyOjsmHjA4&s=qNdlMArFFFUtrDivWezLPEUjVQ-Q36WKMnXkFHlOzH0&e=

Mac



On Mon, Dec 17, 2018 at 5:35 PM Mac Williams <jwilliams...> wrote:

> All,
>
> Shawn Smolen-Morten and I also found the female goldeneye again this
> morning, along with 7 hooded mergansers. The other ducks have left in the
> two days since the first report. If the gate is open, the staff said we
> may take a couple of steps inside--on the asphalt--to better view the
> ducks, but no more than that.
>
> Good luck,
>
> Mac
>
> On Sun, Dec 16, 2018 at 9:03 PM Steve Patterson <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> On my way home from the Carolina Sandhills NWR CBC yesterday (Dec. 15), I
>> stopped by the water treatment plant in Bishopville, SC. Among the several
>> duck species was a female Common Goldeneye.
>>
>> The other ducks present were
>> Ring-necked
>> Ruddy
>> American Wigeon
>> Hooded Merganser
>> Gadwall
>>
>> This location is limited in its view. There is one pond which is
>> viewable from one spot outside the fence, even though you can see most of
>> the pond from there.
>>
>>
>>
>> Steve Patterson
>> Anderson, SC
>>
>
>
> --
> Mac Williams, PhD
> Associate Professor of Spanish
> Coker College
> 300 E. College Ave
> Hartsville, SC 29550
> 843-383-8117 (office)
> 843-991-3879 (cell)
> <jwilliams...>
>


--
Mac Williams, PhD
Associate Professor of Spanish
Coker College
300 E. College Ave
Hartsville, SC 29550
843-383-8117 (office)
843-991-3879 (cell)
<jwilliams...>

 

Back to top
Date: 12/19/18 3:30 pm
From: rod g (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Western Kingbird
The Western Kingbird was present today at 1:30 in the row of trees opposite the clubhouse at Craven’s point. Also present
was a large flock of Eastern Meadowlarks, an Eastern Phoebe, and a large flock of Blackbirds that I couldn’t ID but looked smaller
than common grackles possibly Rusty Blackbirds.

Rod Gonzalez
Myrtle Beach SC
 

Back to top
Date: 12/19/18 3:18 pm
From: rod g (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Western Kingbird
The Western Kingbird was present today at 1:30 in the row of trees opposite the clubhouse at Craven’s point. Also present
was a large flock of Eastern Meadowlarks, an Eastern Phoebe, and a large flock of Blackbirds that I couldn’t ID but looked smaller
than common grackles possibly Rusty Blackbirds.
 

Back to top
Date: 12/19/18 10:48 am
From: <susan...>
Subject: RE: Potential government shutdown could affect Christmas Bird Counts
All,

I echo Nate's sentiment. It will impact our Mattamuskeet count
significantly.

Birding as well as fishing and hunting will be affected on Federal
properties that have gated access points (i.e. they will be closed and
off limits).

Let's hope a shut down can be averted....

Susan Campbell
Southern Pines, NC

> -------- Original Message --------
> Subject: Potential government shutdown could affect Christmas Bird
> Counts
> From: "Nate Dias" (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
> <carolinabirds...>
> Date: Wed, December 19, 2018 12:02 pm
> To: CarolinaBirds <carolinabirds...>
>
>
> CBC compilers and participants: if the shutdown happens, then
> nonessential Federal agency staff get furloughed. This could mean
> that parts of National Wildlife Refuges, National Parks, etc. could be
> inaccessible.
>
> If you are a compiler or participant covering a NWR or National Park,
> you should stay in close contact with the relevant land managers /
> staff in coming days.
>
> Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
 

Back to top
Date: 12/19/18 10:42 am
From: Shelley Rutkin <shelleyr...>
Subject: RE: Refurbished camera for sale - SOLD
Thanks for the calls about my camera. It has been sold.

Shelley Rutkin

From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>]
On Behalf Of Shelley Rutkin
Sent: Wednesday, December 19, 2018 9:09 AM
To: Carolinabirds
Subject: Refurbished camera for sale

Hi Carolina birders,
I have been using a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ300 for about 3 years and I love
it. Recently, I started having problems and I sent it back to Panasonic for
repairs. They will fix it for $201.80 including taxes and shipping to me.
But, I was going on a birding trip while the camera was at Panasonic and
could not be without a camera, so I bought a new one. I love this camera so
much that I bought the exact same model. The cost of the camera new is
currently about $400. If you are interested in a refurbished one for just
over $200. Please let me know. I'll include a case and memory card. I have
nothing to gain from this. I just hate to think of the camera being wasted
when it should be good as new after the repairs. Call or email if you are
interested.
Shelley Rutkin
Winston-Salem
336-971-3961

 

Back to top
Date: 12/19/18 9:02 am
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Potential government shutdown could affect Christmas Bird Counts
CBC compilers and participants: if the shutdown happens, then
nonessential Federal agency staff get furloughed. This could mean
that parts of National Wildlife Refuges, National Parks, etc. could be
inaccessible.

If you are a compiler or participant covering a NWR or National Park,
you should stay in close contact with the relevant land managers /
staff in coming days.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
 

Back to top
Date: 12/19/18 6:09 am
From: Shelley Rutkin <shelleyr...>
Subject: Refurbished camera for sale
Hi Carolina birders,

I have been using a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ300 for about 3 years and I love
it. Recently, I started having problems and I sent it back to Panasonic for
repairs. They will fix it for $201.80 including taxes and shipping to me.
But, I was going on a birding trip while the camera was at Panasonic and
could not be without a camera, so I bought a new one. I love this camera so
much that I bought the exact same model. The cost of the camera new is
currently about $400. If you are interested in a refurbished one for just
over $200. Please let me know. I'll include a case and memory card. I have
nothing to gain from this. I just hate to think of the camera being wasted
when it should be good as new after the repairs. Call or email if you are
interested.

Shelley Rutkin
Winston-Salem
336-971-3961


 

Back to top
Date: 12/18/18 5:29 pm
From: <hilton...> <hilton...>
Subject: Hilton Pond 12/01/18 (Snowmageddon and #68,000)
"Snowmageddon" is long gone from the Carolina Piedmont, but we had enough of that white stuff here to merit mention in an installment of "This Week at Hilton Pond." Our latest post (#683) for 1-15 Dec 2018 includes info and photos for locally uncommon birds that came to our traps and feeders during the storm. One of them was #68,000! There's also a description of our eventful repair of a malfunctioning module on the Center's weather station--plus a note about Forsythia.

As always we have lists of birds banded or recaptured during the period (including an "old" American Goldfinch), along with acknowledgment of folks who recently donated in support of Hilton Pond Center's work in environmental education, conservation, and natural history research.

And please don't forget to check our info about the York/Rock Hill (SC) Christmas Bird Count coming up very soon on 22 December.
It's all at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.hiltonpond.org_ThisWeek181201.html&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=AogcQiZbm49dUGHmOF94v7zxJcygVOHZI4hwqwUfV8M&s=kN_A0UbsBWBqfbixKMwtVqy3IuChCn8mUJECT2nj2pc&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.hiltonpond.org_ThisWeek181201.html&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=AogcQiZbm49dUGHmOF94v7zxJcygVOHZI4hwqwUfV8M&s=kN_A0UbsBWBqfbixKMwtVqy3IuChCn8mUJECT2nj2pc&e=>

Happy (Holiday) Nature Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.facebook.com_HiltonPond&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=AogcQiZbm49dUGHmOF94v7zxJcygVOHZI4hwqwUfV8M&s=UtjQx0vamX8oXLBYbTzU7vhjk4KpPUimZmxYEIKlQaQ&e= for timely updates on nature topics,
and for info about hummingbirds at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.facebook.com_rubythroats&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=AogcQiZbm49dUGHmOF94v7zxJcygVOHZI4hwqwUfV8M&s=Zh7hQ9AVtK9op9JrGX2BJ5GnHpZo6Pfhmn8tIQSrvLc&e=

Follow us on Twitter @hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and education for students of all ages.

"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the sunset." BHjr.

============


 

Back to top
Date: 12/18/18 5:13 pm
From: cfeeney03 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Black-headed Gull and Western Kingbird, Georgetown
The Black-headed Gull was at the Georgetown Water Treatment Plant this
afternoon about 3:15. I had missed it this morning. It was in the first cell
on the far bank. It then moved to the third cell over, where it fed with a
flock of about 25 Bonaparte's Gulls.

I observed the Western Kingbird where it has been recently seen in the
undeveloped housing area on the right side of Highway 17 (heading towards
Georgetown) just before the bridge. It was in a tall tree just across from
the clubhouse/office. It was in the same tree yesterday evening. I observed
it about 4:15.

Chris Feeney
Martinez, GA
 

Back to top
Date: 12/18/18 4:49 pm
From: <hilton...> <hilton...>
Subject: Hilton Pond 12/01/18 (Snowmageddon and #68,000)
"Snowmageddon" is long gone from the Carolina Piedmont, but we had enough of that white stuff here to merit mention in an installment of "This Week at Hilton Pond." Our latest post (#683) for 1-15 Dec 2018 includes info and photos for locally uncommon birds that came to our traps and feeders during the storm. One of them was #68,000! There's also a description of our eventful repair of a malfunctioning module on the Center's weather station--plus a note about Forsythia.

As always we have lists of birds banded or recaptured during the period (including an "old" American Goldfinch), along with acknowledgment of folks who recently donated in support of Hilton Pond Center's work in environmental education, conservation, and natural history research. And please don't forget to check our info about the York/Rock Hill (SC) Christmas Bird Count coming up very soon on 22 December.

It's all at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.hiltonpond.org_ThisWeek181201.html&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=J6fNijtGE1DagNJC6RSP5b7ANCT6EL1RU7CTOM03FDw&s=EYHyM1TuYssC57RsGSxnzxm_SNp4xonw5CifW8-3WAI&e=

Happy (Holiday) Nature Watching!


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.facebook.com_HiltonPond&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=J6fNijtGE1DagNJC6RSP5b7ANCT6EL1RU7CTOM03FDw&s=9nUbTfpg8LiAHrFLBDiWT6gO1dOlSUhCHmk_Ej1AJ78&e= for timely updates on nature topics,
and for info about hummingbirds at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.facebook.com_rubythroats&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=J6fNijtGE1DagNJC6RSP5b7ANCT6EL1RU7CTOM03FDw&s=jsdTaVEu8-namBA-T52RDfx1preJX5FrPj6QxZPpgYY&e=

Follow us on Twitter @hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and education for students of all ages.

"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the sunset." BHjr.

============


 

Back to top
Date: 12/18/18 12:59 pm
From: Cherrie Sneed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: WesternKingbird_JamesIslCountyPark

Hi Birders,

The Western Kingbird found early in the afternoon by Irvin Pitts and seen by a number of birders is still present at 3:50 PM at James Island County Park in Charleston County, SC.

If you take the first right after entering the park you will see a large field on the right overlooking the large pond. The bird is in the field perching in bare trees, on posts and on strings of Christmas lights.

However, the Common Merganser was not seen.

Cherrie

Cherrie Sneed
Meggett, SC
Charleston County
 

Back to top
Date: 12/17/18 8:22 pm
From: Matt Wangerin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: [PiedmontBirdClub] Greensboro CBC
Did we whiff on Pine Warbler? If we did, we can add data from Julien’s house. Typical feeder birds also present in addition to a pair of Pine Warbler.


Matt Wangerin
Summerfield, NC

> On Dec 17, 2018, at 9:28 PM, Elizabeth Link <elizlink04...> wrote:
>
> The Greensboro CBC was held on Saturday, Dec. 15. Not all numbers are in yet, but initial results for the count indicate that the weather held down both the numbers of birds and the number of species. We had downpours first thing in the morning and for a couple of hours in the middle of the day, and the melting of the 12" of snow we received at the beginning of the week formed a heavy fog in many places for most of the day.
> So far we have 83 species, well down from our normal average in the 90's. We found Purple Finches and Red-breasted Nuthatches, which don't often turn up on our counts, and notable species included an Orange-crowned Warbler and a Baltimore Oriole. Also a Tundra Swan and unidentified Hummingbird for count week.
> Missing so far are some of the waterfowl species that usually turn up - hopefully some of those will be in the data not yet turned in.
> Thanks to everyone who contributed despite the bad weather!
>
> Elizabeth Link
> <elizlink04...>
>
> --
> PLEASE NOTE: This email list is for distributing PBC announcements and information. If you want to respond to the sender, please make sure that his/her address is the only one in your reply. If the list address (<pbc_announce...>) appears in the To: or CC: fields of your reply, please delete it before sending. Otherwise, your response will go to the entire mailing list.
>
> The views expressed here do not reflect the views of the Piedmont Bird Club. PBC does not participate in political campaigns, nor does it support or oppose candidates. PBC does not endorse any commercial product.
> ---
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Date: 12/17/18 6:28 pm
From: Elizabeth Link (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Greensboro CBC
The Greensboro CBC was held on Saturday, Dec. 15. Not all numbers are in
yet, but initial results for the count indicate that the weather held down
both the numbers of birds and the number of species. We had downpours
first thing in the morning and for a couple of hours in the middle of the
day, and the melting of the 12" of snow we received at the beginning of the
week formed a heavy fog in many places for most of the day.
So far we have 83 species, well down from our normal average in the 90's.
We found Purple Finches and Red-breasted Nuthatches, which don't often turn
up on our counts, and notable species included an Orange-crowned Warbler
and a Baltimore Oriole. Also a Tundra Swan and unidentified Hummingbird for
count week.
Missing so far are some of the waterfowl species that usually turn up -
hopefully some of those will be in the data not yet turned in.
Thanks to everyone who contributed despite the bad weather!

Elizabeth Link
<elizlink04...>

 

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Date: 12/17/18 4:15 pm
From: Wendy Kaplan (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Blue Jay irruption
Yes, here in the same location for 36 years in south central Charlotte, this past year has been record-setting for heard and seen numbers of Blue Jays, even at feeders! Glad to hear others are noticing this interesting trend, too!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Wendy Kaplan
<Wenbirdy...>

"When elephants fight, it is the grass that suffers." - old African saying

> On Dec 17, 2018, at 6:23 PM, Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Yes, back in September while doing our hawkwatch at Riverbend Park, we would have several hundred Blue Jays fly by every day. In the days after the snow storm, we would have 8-10 Blue Jays on our feeders at the park. This is definitely a big winter for them.
>
>> On Mon, Dec 17, 2018 at 6:03 PM piephofft <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>> While participating on two Christmas Counts over the weekend, I became aware of the unusually high numbers of blue jays I was seeing and hearing. I am wondering if others are seeing the same trend, and are we seeing a large irruption of this species that has largely flown under the radar in comparison to the RB nuthatches and winter finches. Seems that way to me from where I bird in the Southern Piedmont.
>> Good birding,
>>
>> Taylor Piephoff
>> Matthews, NC
>> <PiephoffT...>
> --
> Dwayne
> *************
> Dwayne Martin
> Hickory, NC
> <redxbill...>

 

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Date: 12/17/18 3:24 pm
From: Dwayne Martin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Blue Jay irruption
Yes, back in September while doing our hawkwatch at Riverbend Park, we
would have several hundred Blue Jays fly by every day. In the days after
the snow storm, we would have 8-10 Blue Jays on our feeders at the park.
This is definitely a big winter for them.

On Mon, Dec 17, 2018 at 6:03 PM piephofft <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> While participating on two Christmas Counts over the weekend, I became
> aware of the unusually high numbers of blue jays I was seeing and hearing.
> I am wondering if others are seeing the same trend, and are we seeing a
> large irruption of this species that has largely flown under the radar in
> comparison to the RB nuthatches and winter finches. Seems that way to me
> from where I bird in the Southern Piedmont.
> Good birding,
>
> Taylor Piephoff
> Matthews, NC
> <PiephoffT...>
>
--
Dwayne
*************
Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
<redxbill...>

 

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Date: 12/17/18 3:03 pm
From: piephofft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Blue Jay irruption
While participating on two Christmas Counts over the weekend, I became aware of the unusually high numbers of blue jays I was seeing and hearing. I am wondering if others are seeing the same trend, and are we seeing a large irruption of this species that has largely flown under the radar in comparison to the RB nuthatches and winter finches. Seems that way to me from where I bird in the Southern Piedmont.Good birding, Taylor Piephoff
Matthews, NC
<PiephoffT...>
 

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Date: 12/17/18 2:58 pm
From: piephofft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Southern Lake Norman CBC
Good evening,The Southern Lake Norman CBC was held yesterday December 16, 2018. Current returns indicate a record-tying 102 species recorded.Most notable:1st year glaucous gull at the evening gull roost in the Davidson creek Channel (great photos) and a 1st county record for MecklenburgYellow-throated warbler relocated on the Davidson College campus at the same spot where it was excellently photographed earlier in the week.  Other notables:Greater scaupSeveral blue-headed vireosSelasphorus hummingbirdGray catbirdSeveral orange-crowned warblersBaltimore oriole Thanks to all who participated; and Thanks to Marsha Wright for opening up her home for the tally-up supper; and to Lorraine Piephoff for making the vegetarian chili. Taylor Piephoff
Matthews, NC
<PiephoffT...>
 

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Date: 12/17/18 2:54 pm
From: M Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Common Goldeneye, Lee County, SC
Mac, the Water Treatment Plant in Goldsboro, NC has a process that should work at other plants if someone can initiate it and the plants are willing. We drive in M - F, park, go inside the office to tell them what we want, sign a liability release form, bird (walking), and let the plant personnel know when we leave. They are closed to the public on weekends. Part of my scouting for the Christmas Bird Count includes stopping by during the week to make arrangements for my team to go in on Saturday (count day). It works here. It should work elsewhere.

Mae Howell
Goldsboro, NC

Powered by Cricket Wireless

------ Original message------
From: Mac Williams
Date: Mon, Dec 17, 2018 5:36 PM
To: Steve Patterson;
Cc: CarolinaBirds;
Subject:Re: Common Goldeneye, Lee County, SC

All,

Shawn Smolen-Morten and I also found the female goldeneye again this morning, along with 7 hooded mergansers. The other ducks have left in the two days since the first report. If the gate is open, the staff said we may take a couple of steps inside--on the asphalt--to better view the ducks, but no more than that.

Good luck,

Mac

On Sun, Dec 16, 2018 at 9:03 PM Steve Patterson <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
On my way home from the Carolina Sandhills NWR CBC yesterday (Dec. 15), I stopped by the water treatment plant in Bishopville, SC. Among the several duck species was a female Common Goldeneye.

The other ducks present were
Ring-necked
Ruddy
American Wigeon
Hooded Merganser
Gadwall

This location is limited in its view. There is one pond which is viewable from one spot outside the fence, even though you can see most of the pond from there.



Steve Patterson
Anderson, SC


--
Mac Williams, PhD
Associate Professor of Spanish
Coker College
300 E. College Ave
Hartsville, SC 29550
843-383-8117 (office)
843-991-3879 (cell)
<jwilliams...><mailto:<jwilliams...>

 

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Date: 12/17/18 2:36 pm
From: Mac Williams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Common Goldeneye, Lee County, SC
All,

Shawn Smolen-Morten and I also found the female goldeneye again this
morning, along with 7 hooded mergansers. The other ducks have left in the
two days since the first report. If the gate is open, the staff said we
may take a couple of steps inside--on the asphalt--to better view the
ducks, but no more than that.

Good luck,

Mac

On Sun, Dec 16, 2018 at 9:03 PM Steve Patterson <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> On my way home from the Carolina Sandhills NWR CBC yesterday (Dec. 15), I
> stopped by the water treatment plant in Bishopville, SC. Among the several
> duck species was a female Common Goldeneye.
>
> The other ducks present were
> Ring-necked
> Ruddy
> American Wigeon
> Hooded Merganser
> Gadwall
>
> This location is limited in its view. There is one pond which is viewable
> from one spot outside the fence, even though you can see most of the pond
> from there.
>
>
>
> Steve Patterson
> Anderson, SC
>


--
Mac Williams, PhD
Associate Professor of Spanish
Coker College
300 E. College Ave
Hartsville, SC 29550
843-383-8117 (office)
843-991-3879 (cell)
<jwilliams...>

 

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Date: 12/17/18 12:01 pm
From: Craig Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Common Merganser - James Island County Park, Charleston, SC
There is a female/juvenile Common Merganser at James Island County Park,
Charleston, SC. It is in the lake on the right just after the entrance/pay
gate. Take the right lane after the pay gate and you are there. The
merganser was on the far side swimming/preening/bathing and eventually swam
to the middle of the lake, then back to the far shore where it climbed on
the bank and began preening adjacent to some domestic Mallards. There was
a lot of dog activity in the lake, owners tossing retrieving toys/dummies
into the lake, didn't seem to bother the duck. I have plenty of photos,
some on the eBird checklist.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S50753039&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=2LUYyACB5iUFDXJzaunCaFyI0aWdD8TPq0t7YbVMj58&s=gOIJ-fsSmrAH8GaE3y8SXmZ9A9L_6trWwgROdPDjeU0&e=

*Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul - and sings the
tunes without the words - and never stops at all.*

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

 

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