Carolinabirds
Received From Subject
3/22/17 5:08 am \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Blue-headed Vireo arrives in Watauga County, NC...finally
3/22/17 4:56 am Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Dare County Lark Sparrow - last post?
3/22/17 3:35 am Lester Coble (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: strange Bald Eagle observation
3/21/17 5:08 pm Ron Clark <waxwing...> Re: strange Bald Eagle observation
3/21/17 4:04 pm \Jeff Click\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Blue Wall Birding Festival, Upstate SC, May 11-14
3/21/17 3:51 pm John Fussell <jofuss...> strange Bald Eagle observation
3/21/17 3:25 pm Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Merchants Millpond, NC
3/21/17 12:41 pm Rob G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Chapel Hill Osprey
3/21/17 11:38 am Helmut Mueller <helmutmueller...> Re: passing of Chan Robbins
3/21/17 10:35 am Jack Rogers <jack...> Re: passing of Chan Robbins
3/21/17 10:28 am \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: passing of Chan Robbins
3/21/17 9:39 am Scott Winton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Durham Rufous Hummingbird gone
3/21/17 9:14 am Marcus Simpson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> passing of Chan Robbins
3/21/17 8:16 am Peter Perlman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> FOY Blue-headed Vireo on Bolin Creek Trail in Chapel Hill
3/21/17 6:06 am Lewis Burke (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Swainsons warbler
3/20/17 4:59 pm WALTER KENT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> 2 days, 2records for me
3/20/17 1:37 pm \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: Woodcock no more--north to die in snow?
3/20/17 1:26 pm Pauline Sterin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> FOY Yellow-throated Warbler, Arapahoe, NC
3/20/17 1:25 pm John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Woodcock no more--north to die in snow?
3/20/17 9:56 am GRIGGS, JERRY <griggs...> Continuing Selasphorous Hummers NC, SC
3/20/17 9:06 am nicholas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Yellow-crowned Night-Heron, Pettigrew State Park, 3/20/17
3/20/17 9:04 am nicholas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Yellow-crowned Night-Heron, Pettigrew State Park, 3/20/17
3/20/17 9:04 am Christopher Hill <Chill...> Re: Woodcock no more--north to die in snow?
3/20/17 6:02 am \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Woodcock no more--north to die in snow?
3/20/17 5:56 am <eric...> Re: Woodcock no more--north to die in snow?
3/20/17 5:40 am Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Purple Finch numbers up and down, 16 on 4th, 5 on18th; feeder birds
3/20/17 5:04 am Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Wood Ducks leave roost pairwise 6:50 AM peak
3/20/17 4:47 am Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Woodcock no more--north to die in snow?
3/19/17 8:32 pm \<drivesa3...>\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Purple Martins
3/19/17 9:25 am <susan...> RE: No Rufous at the Wintons, Durham, Nc
3/19/17 9:05 am Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> No Rufous at the Wintons, Durham, Nc
3/19/17 8:40 am David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> New posting to Birding Bulls blog
3/19/17 5:30 am Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Great Kiskadee still present at Bear Island WMA
3/19/17 4:58 am Will Whitsett <willwhitsett...> Re: Great Kiskadee still present at Bear Island WMA
3/18/17 2:29 pm Christopher Hill <Chill...> 1000 Pipits
3/18/17 10:58 am Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Great Kiskadee still present at Bear Island WMA
3/18/17 5:47 am Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Purple Finches
3/18/17 5:21 am Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hermit Thrushes - Singing
3/17/17 6:33 pm WALTER KENT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Monk Parakeet
3/17/17 6:01 pm David Weesner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Monk Parakeet in town of Northwest
3/17/17 4:21 pm Alan Gamache <bird...> Louisiana Waterthrush, New Bern, NC
3/17/17 10:43 am Ricky Davis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Annual Call for Breeding Bird Survey Volunteers
3/17/17 8:52 am Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Sat. CHBC walk
3/17/17 6:27 am Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Dare County Lark Sparrow continues
3/17/17 5:11 am richardscott w (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: R.T. Loons - Holden Beach, Brunswick County
3/16/17 6:33 pm <Rubberhead...> <rubberhead...> Help with odd gull
3/16/17 4:28 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: R.T. Loons - Holden Beach, Brunswick County
3/16/17 4:11 pm David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Birding at St. Christopher, Seabrook Island,SC
3/16/17 2:16 pm richardscottw (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> R.T. Loons - Holden Beach, Brunswick County
3/16/17 6:45 am Pauline Sterin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> FOY Blue-gray Gnatcatchers, Arapahoe, NC
3/14/17 1:39 pm Pauline Sterin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Northern Gannets Over the Neuse River in Arapahoe County, NC
3/14/17 6:32 am Patricia Tice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Brown-Headed Nuthatch Nest
3/13/17 4:27 pm Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fox Sparrow & Red-breasted Nuthatch
3/12/17 6:35 pm Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Cliff Swallow at Bogue Inlet Pier, Carteret County, NC
3/12/17 5:52 pm <brian...> Lake Crabtree/Brier Creek
3/12/17 12:02 pm Wayne K. Forsythe <wforsythe...> Birds of Hawaii
3/12/17 11:42 am William Majoros <william.majoros...> FOY waterthrush in Durham
3/12/17 6:08 am Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Light Snow Outer Banks - Chipping Sparrows
3/11/17 3:33 pm David Weesner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Sora at the NC Battleship
3/11/17 11:48 am Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Eurasian Green-winged Teal, Ocean Isle Beach Wastewater reclamation facility, NC
3/11/17 11:23 am Scott Winton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Rufous Hummingbird continues in Durham - now in breeding plumage
3/10/17 9:13 am Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Sat. CHBC birding walk
3/10/17 8:21 am Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Weekly Dare County Lark Sparrow report
3/10/17 8:04 am Aaron Steed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lake Julian Ducks
3/9/17 11:51 am Bonnie/Tom <bks1956...> FOY Blue-headed Vireo
3/9/17 2:27 am Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> West Winds Friday Outer Banks, NC
3/8/17 4:21 pm David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> New posting to my Birding Bulls blog includes an update on Old Man Plover
3/8/17 1:42 pm Peter Perlman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> FOY Northern Parula Chapel Hill
3/8/17 10:03 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Mountain waterfowl information -- Trumpeter Swan and Greater Scaup
3/8/17 7:13 am Tom Krakauer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Hawk question
3/7/17 6:23 pm Jay Wherley (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: : Trumpeter Swan still on French Broad River, Asheville
3/7/17 6:06 pm Dennis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Buncombe County - TRUMPETER SWAN
3/7/17 4:58 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Greater Scaup on the Little Tennessee River, Macon Co., NC
3/7/17 3:09 pm Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Barnacle Goose
3/7/17 3:04 pm Corey, Ed <ed.corey...> Re: Barnacle Goose
3/7/17 2:54 pm Brad Wood (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Barnacle Goose
3/7/17 1:07 pm Bill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Barnacle Goose
3/6/17 3:57 pm WALTER KENT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Red-shouldered Hawk
3/6/17 1:24 pm Monroe Pannell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: (Eurasian) Green-winged teal Ocean Isle Beach NC
3/6/17 11:11 am Taylor Piephoff (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> (Eurasian) Green-winged teal Ocean Isle Beach NC
3/5/17 10:51 am Jerry Kerschner <bogey...> Re: Great Kiskadee still at Bear Island?
3/5/17 9:43 am Jim Edwards <jim.edwards...> Great Kiskadee still at Bear Island?
3/5/17 9:27 am Roger Smith <scbirder...> Long-tailed Duck
3/5/17 7:42 am Joel Ludlam (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Many feeding American Woodcock, Lake Conestee, Greenville, SC
3/5/17 7:30 am Joel Ludlam (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Many feeding American Woodcock, Lake Conestee, Greenville, SC
3/4/17 7:42 pm \<megascops.2014...>\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Vikings killing birds - clean URL
3/4/17 6:21 pm Cotter, Michael G <COTTERMI...> Vikings killing birds
3/4/17 12:06 pm Ken Goldsmith (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Pungo update
3/4/17 10:56 am Stacy and Natalie Barbour (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Tundra Swans plentiful at Pungo Lake
3/4/17 8:41 am Jim George (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Pectoral Sandpipers in Durham
3/4/17 7:39 am Jerzy Smykla (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Help--possible Glaucous (maybe Iceland) at Wrightsville Beach Mason Inlet
3/4/17 7:02 am Steve Compton <scompton1251...> White-fronted Geese present now Dobbins Farm
3/4/17 4:14 am james poling (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Trumpeter Swan near Asheville, NC
3/4/17 3:49 am james poling (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Trumpeter Swan near Asheville, NC
3/3/17 8:20 pm Rbakelaar (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Glaucous Gull Photos
3/3/17 4:14 pm Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: Help--possible Glaucous (maybe Iceland) at Wrightsville Beach Mason Inlet
3/3/17 4:10 pm Matt Spangler (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: Help--possible Glaucous (maybe Iceland) at Wrightsville Beach Mason Inlet
3/3/17 4:02 pm Matt Spangler (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Help--possible Glaucous (maybe Iceland) at Wrightsville Beach Mason Inlet
3/3/17 12:03 pm David Hart <david.hart...> Pectoral Sandpipers in Durham
3/3/17 11:25 am Tom Krakauer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Turkey Trot
3/3/17 11:12 am Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Date correction in re CHBC Sat. Birding trip
3/3/17 9:09 am Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> CHBC Sat. birding trip
3/3/17 4:36 am Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Dare County Lark Sparrow still present
3/2/17 5:33 pm Caroline Harvey (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Buncombe County - TRUMPETER SWAN
3/2/17 3:09 pm EASTMAN, CAROLINE <EASTMAN...> Mystery teal at Santee Coastal
3/2/17 3:06 pm Patrick Coin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> FOS Osprey Durham NC 3/2/17
3/2/17 9:35 am Josh Southern (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Call for Winter '16-'17 reports for the "Briefs for the Files"
3/2/17 6:15 am <badgerboy...> Brookshire Park Boone Bird Walk this Saturday 8AM Boone NC
3/1/17 4:12 pm ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Anna's hummingbird- still here 😊
3/1/17 2:28 pm Olwen Jarvis <Olwen...> First ospreys!
3/1/17 5:37 am Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> FOS Osprey - Dare County, Roanoke Island
2/28/17 4:25 pm Christine Stoughton-Root (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Congrats Bailey Eichorn!
2/28/17 4:24 pm ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Congrats Bailey Eichorn!
2/28/17 4:22 pm Jack Rogers <jack...> Congrats Bailey Eichorn!
2/28/17 8:38 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Latest (2017) version of the Dragonflies and Damselflies of NC website done
2/28/17 5:27 am Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Canvasback @ Lake Betz, NC
2/27/17 6:24 pm Steve Buettner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Trumpeter Swan continuing today at Ledges Whitewater River Park, Feb 27, 2017, Buncombe County
2/27/17 3:53 pm <annbailes...> 3 Greater White-fronted Geese at Dobbins Farm Ponds - Townville SC
2/27/17 3:31 pm Stu <sgibeau...> Re: Marathon at Umstead SP in NC Saturday March 4 2017
2/27/17 10:02 am Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Marathon at Umstead SP in NC Saturday March 4 2017
2/26/17 9:00 pm \Jeff Click\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Townville, SC - Pectoral Sandpiper, Greater White-fronted Geese
2/26/17 4:11 pm rdnc13 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Sunday evening Pungo report
2/26/17 3:31 pm Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Mottled Duck - Wrightsville Beach, NC
2/26/17 2:56 pm Sam Cooper <dmcooper2...> Re: Mallard x Mottled Duck - Wrightsville Beach, NC
2/26/17 2:01 pm ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Swallow tailed kites- Avon
2/26/17 1:04 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Buncombe County Swan
2/26/17 12:45 pm Ben Ringer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Buncombe County Swan
2/26/17 12:12 pm Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Ducks on Quaker Rd pond in Wilson County
2/26/17 11:33 am rdnc13 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Razorbills flight at Jennette's Pier
2/26/17 11:04 am Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Mottled Duck - Wrightsville Beach, NC
2/26/17 8:34 am Sam Cooper <dmcooper2...> Re: Mottled Duck - Wrightsville Beach, NC
2/26/17 8:02 am <Rubberhead...> <rubberhead...> Rusty Blackbirds (Fort Mill SC)
2/26/17 6:50 am Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> The Buncombe County Swan
2/26/17 6:18 am James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Great Kiskadee Bear Island WMA
2/26/17 4:33 am Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> SPARROW locations in Wake County, NC
2/26/17 4:06 am Steve Compton <scompton1251...> Great Kiskadee present Saturday
2/25/17 5:03 pm Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Spectacular swans and geese, etc.
2/25/17 2:39 pm Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lark Sparrow, Orange Co., NC
2/25/17 7:47 am Sam Cooper <dmcooper2...> Mottled Duck - Wrightsville Beach, NC
2/24/17 2:11 pm Kevin Metcalf (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Louisiana Waterthrush today - NC
2/24/17 12:57 pm Clyde Sorenson <sorenson...> First Wake Co osprey (for me, any way...)
2/24/17 12:54 pm Ann Truesdale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Armchair birding through books
2/24/17 11:31 am Jim George (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Armchair birding through books
2/24/17 11:23 am Jay Wherley (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: : Trumpeter Swan still on French Broad River, Asheville
2/24/17 11:15 am M Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> FOY Purple Martin
2/24/17 10:21 am Ruth Marley (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Armchair birding through books
2/24/17 10:06 am photobill9 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: Armchair birding through books
2/24/17 9:02 am Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Lark Sparrow still present at UNC-CSI
2/24/17 8:54 am Steve Compton <scompton1251...> Re: : Trumpeter Swan still on French Broad River, Asheville
2/24/17 8:14 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: : Trumpeter Swan still on French Broad River, Asheville
2/24/17 6:50 am <susan...> RE: : Trumpeter Swan still on French Broad River, Asheville
2/24/17 6:17 am Nate Swick <nswick...> Re: : Trumpeter Swan still on French Broad River, Asheville
2/24/17 4:22 am Scott Hartley (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Harlequin ducks
2/24/17 3:57 am Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: : Trumpeter Swan still on French Broad River, Asheville
2/23/17 6:00 pm Andrew Tan-Delli Cicchi <andrew.tan.delli.cicchi...> Interview on Birding in Durham
2/23/17 4:51 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Great Kiskadee, Bear Island, Feb 22 2017
2/23/17 4:00 pm Pam Diamond (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> birding in New Orleans next month
2/23/17 3:47 pm Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Still flying over at Pungo Lake?
2/23/17 3:26 pm Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Great Kiskadee, Bear Island, Feb 22 2017
2/23/17 3:24 pm Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Great Kiskadee, Bear Island, Feb 22 2017
2/23/17 3:01 pm Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Great Kiskadee, Bear Island, Feb 22 2017
2/23/17 2:55 pm linda.allman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Great Kiskadee, Bear Island, Feb 22 2017
2/23/17 1:52 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: : Trumpeter Swan still on French Broad River, Asheville
2/23/17 1:43 pm Karen Bearden (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Still flying over at Pungo Lake?
2/23/17 1:14 pm Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Still flying over at Pungo Lake?
2/23/17 11:58 am Doug Pratt (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Armchair birding through books
2/23/17 11:03 am Tony Paladino (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Santee Coastal Reserve
2/23/17 10:37 am ATCClack (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> : Trumpeter Swan still on French Broad River, Asheville
2/23/17 9:52 am Keith McCullough (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Cinnamon Teal Santee Coastal Reserve - Hybrid??
2/23/17 9:40 am Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Chapel Hill Bird Club outing, Saturday, 25 Feb
2/22/17 6:58 pm \Johnson, Matthew\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: Cinnamon Teal Santee Coastal Reserve - Hybrid??
2/22/17 5:49 pm James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Cinnamon Teal Santee Coastal Reserve - Hybrid??
2/22/17 4:54 pm Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Chapel Hill Bird Club Meeting - Kent Fiala - eBirding 101
2/22/17 6:46 am \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.
2/22/17 6:32 am David Hart <david.hart...> Re: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.
2/22/17 6:28 am <susan...> First real signs of Spring in the Sandhills
2/21/17 4:43 pm Ann Truesdale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.
2/21/17 4:28 pm Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.
2/21/17 10:01 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Summary of a 2-day trip to the Outer Banks, NC, and adjacent mainland
2/20/17 4:00 pm Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> No luck with New Hanover Co, NC Pacific Loons and Harlequin Ducks
2/20/17 3:50 pm Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> GBBC - My Backyard
2/20/17 2:51 pm John Fussell <jofuss...> Vesper Sparrow still present at Fort Macon, NC
2/20/17 1:57 pm Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Purple Finches about gone
2/20/17 11:28 am Tom Krakauer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Red-breasted nuthatch
2/20/17 8:35 am \Harry E. LeGrand Jr\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Even better birds at Jennette's Pier, NC
2/20/17 7:53 am Henry Link <linkh...> Common Eider at South Topsail Beach
2/20/17 5:35 am \Harry E. LeGrand Jr\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Common Eider again at Jennette's Pier, NC
2/20/17 4:42 am Paul Serridge (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Great Kiskadee at Bear Island, SC
2/20/17 3:33 am Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Update on ROSS'S GOOSE and HEAVY TRAFFIC on I-440
 
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Date: 3/22/17 5:08 am
From: \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Blue-headed Vireo arrives in Watauga County, NC...finally
Birders,

I had my first of the season blue-headed vireo singing this morning in the
woods next to the house. 5 days later than the first last year.

--
J. Merrill Lynch
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Elevation: 3,400 feet

 

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Date: 3/22/17 4:56 am
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Dare County Lark Sparrow - last post?
The Lark Sparrow at the UNC-Coastal Studies Institute refuses to leave. I was hoping it would have departed by now because I'm heading out tomorrow for a long birding trip to the San Francisco area and I wanted to record the bird's exit date. I seriously doubt that it will be around when I return.
So, if anyone sees the Lark Sparrow in the next two weeks, please post it or let me know or eBird it. Yes, people are still coming to see it, as recently as yesterday.
Today is day number 114!
Thanks,
Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 3/22/17 3:35 am
From: Lester Coble (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: strange Bald Eagle observation
Locking talons was my first thought. At this time of year I have seen
several instances of locked-talon adult birds falling onto the ground.
These were all short. less than 70' , falls. None of the birds appeared
injured, all eventually flying off; however, these birds did not crash
adjacent a highway.

On Tue, Mar 21, 2017 at 8:03 PM, Ron Clark <waxwing...> wrote:

> They should be raising young by now. I've read that sometimes when they
> lock talons and somersault down, they actually hit the ground or crash into
> trees. That's one possibility. At least it sounds like they are okay.
>
> Ron Clark
> Kings Mtn. NC
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Mar 21, 2017, at 6:50 PM, John Fussell <jofuss...> wrote:
> >
> > On Sunday, 19 March, four of us were driving down Pringle Road in the
> southern Croatan National Forest (NC), when we spotted what we immediately
> assumed to be an injured Bald Eagle. It was apparently lying on the ground
> (not standing) just a few feet from the road.
> >
> > We stopped and as we were considering what to do if there was an injured
> eagle, a second head perked up. So there were two Bald Eagles lying on the
> ground together (i.e. touching). Both birds were full adults. They took
> flight in a few seconds. We saw that one had a green band on the right leg.
> >
> > Could the eagles have been copulating? (It would be a strange time of
> year and from what I read I guess that it would be rare for Bald Eagles to
> copulate on the ground.) Could they have been fighting? (We didn't notice
> if the birds flew off in separate directions or stayed together.)
> >
> > Anyway, it was a bizarre lifer observation for all of us.
> >
> > John Fussell
> > Morehead City, NC
> >
> >
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/21/17 5:08 pm
From: Ron Clark <waxwing...>
Subject: Re: strange Bald Eagle observation
They should be raising young by now. I've read that sometimes when they lock talons and somersault down, they actually hit the ground or crash into trees. That's one possibility. At least it sounds like they are okay.

Ron Clark
Kings Mtn. NC

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 21, 2017, at 6:50 PM, John Fussell <jofuss...> wrote:
>
> On Sunday, 19 March, four of us were driving down Pringle Road in the southern Croatan National Forest (NC), when we spotted what we immediately assumed to be an injured Bald Eagle. It was apparently lying on the ground (not standing) just a few feet from the road.
>
> We stopped and as we were considering what to do if there was an injured eagle, a second head perked up. So there were two Bald Eagles lying on the ground together (i.e. touching). Both birds were full adults. They took flight in a few seconds. We saw that one had a green band on the right leg.
>
> Could the eagles have been copulating? (It would be a strange time of year and from what I read I guess that it would be rare for Bald Eagles to copulate on the ground.) Could they have been fighting? (We didn't notice if the birds flew off in separate directions or stayed together.)
>
> Anyway, it was a bizarre lifer observation for all of us.
>
> John Fussell
> Morehead City, NC
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/21/17 4:04 pm
From: \Jeff Click\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Blue Wall Birding Festival, Upstate SC, May 11-14
Carolina birders,

I wanted to take a chance to let everyone know that registration for this
year's Blue Wall Birding Festival is still open. This year's event,
scheduled for May 11-14, will again be based at Table Rock State Park, on
the edge of the Blue Ridge Escarpment in Upstate SC. It is meant to
showcase the great spring birding that the area has to offer, as well as the
area's fantastic state parks. Birders who attended either of the first two
festivals can attest to the great birding that Upstate SC has to offer in
the spring. We'll hit several of the hotspots in the area, covering a wide
variety of habitats. New this year is the inclusion of some
butterfly-focused field trips.

Our keynote speaker this year is Rudy Mancke, best known for his
long-running SC Public TV series NatureScene, as well as his currently
running Nature Notes segment on SC Public Radio.

Participation will be capped at 50 birders. For more information, click the
link below or drop me a line.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.gcbirdclub.org_BlueWall.html&d=DwICAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=e5jNkhgXdvzciAYVjk2JdnqTJDZ1qMmD0rAsXD26Upw&s=6p_-QBJw4L7CNL3gozkZ6N7Y1yWsT1_F_tQHOBX_Uvo&e=

Happy Spring!

Jeff Click
Easley, SC
864-508-2351

 

Back to top
Date: 3/21/17 3:51 pm
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: strange Bald Eagle observation
On Sunday, 19 March, four of us were driving down Pringle Road in the
southern Croatan National Forest (NC), when we spotted what we immediately
assumed to be an injured Bald Eagle. It was apparently lying on the ground
(not standing) just a few feet from the road.

We stopped and as we were considering what to do if there was an injured
eagle, a second head perked up. So there were two Bald Eagles lying on the
ground together (i.e. touching). Both birds were full adults. They took
flight in a few seconds. We saw that one had a green band on the right leg.

Could the eagles have been copulating? (It would be a strange time of year
and from what I read I guess that it would be rare for Bald Eagles to
copulate on the ground.) Could they have been fighting? (We didn't notice
if the birds flew off in separate directions or stayed together.)

Anyway, it was a bizarre lifer observation for all of us.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 3/21/17 3:25 pm
From: Linda Ward (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Merchants Millpond, NC
Canoed Merchants Millpond State Park today.

Eagle's nest active, saw pair at nest. Ask at Ranger's station for
directions. Viewed only from canoe or kayack.

Other highlights:

yellow-throated warbler
hermit thrush
winter wren
E. bluebird
osprey
ruby-crowned kinglet
red-shouldered hawk

LInda Ward
Skip Hancock
Coinjock, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 3/21/17 12:41 pm
From: Rob G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Chapel Hill Osprey

Finally today I had my FOS Osprey at the golf ponds off Pinehurst Dr... even got to seem him catch a fish!


-- Rob Gluck.... Carrboro, NC.....


 

Back to top
Date: 3/21/17 11:38 am
From: Helmut Mueller <helmutmueller...>
Subject: Re: passing of Chan Robbins
I have many fond memories of Chan. beginning in 1953, when we mat during a AOU field trip to Cedar Grove. WI. He saw how experienced we were in extracting hawks from nets (dhogazzas) that he gave use some mist nets & the authority to use them. He lived a very full, & amazing life!

Helmut C. Mueller
Professor Emeritus
Department of Biology and Curriculum in Ecology
University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill, NC 27599
919-942-4937
<hmueller...>


> On Mar 21, 2017, at 1:34 PM, Jack Rogers <jack...> wrote:
>
> Very sad news. My great-grandfather, Robert E. Stewart, Sr., Was Chan's long-time friend and mentor. Unfortunate that I was never able to meet Chan in person however I did appreciate being able to talk over the phone with such an amazing man when I was starting out but am ashamed to say we had fallen out of touch in recent years. A great loss in birding history, but he will be remembered as one of the greats for sure.
>
>
> On Tue, Mar 21, 2017, 1:28 PM "J. Merrill Lynch" <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> Sad. And thanks very much for posting. I'm giving a talk this evening on the BBS, one of his great legacies.
>
> J. Merrill Lynch
> Conservation Biologist
> Echo Valley Farm
> Watauga County, NC
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Mar 21, 2017, at 12:14 PM, Marcus Simpson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> >
> > Unfortunate news this morning that Chan Robbins, one of the preeminent leaders in American ornithology, passed away yesterday at the age of 98. Chan was particularly known for his work with the North American Breeding Bird Survey and the North American Bird Phenology Program, as well as for research involving effects of DDT on breeding bird populations. He was an author with Brun and Zim of Birds of North America: A Guide to Field Identification and recipient of numerous awards and honors in ornithology. A brief biographical sketch has been posted this morning on-line in Wikipedia.
> >
> > Marcus B. Simpson, Jr.
> > Hendersonville, NC
> >
> >
> --
> Jack Rogers
> Mt Pleasant, SC
>




 

Back to top
Date: 3/21/17 10:35 am
From: Jack Rogers <jack...>
Subject: Re: passing of Chan Robbins
Very sad news. My great-grandfather, Robert E. Stewart, Sr., Was Chan's
long-time friend and mentor. Unfortunate that I was never able to meet
Chan in person however I did appreciate being able to talk over the phone
with such an amazing man when I was starting out but am ashamed to say we
had fallen out of touch in recent years. A great loss in birding history,
but he will be remembered as one of the greats for sure.

On Tue, Mar 21, 2017, 1:28 PM "J. Merrill Lynch" <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Sad. And thanks very much for posting. I'm giving a talk this evening on
> the BBS, one of his great legacies.
>
> J. Merrill Lynch
> Conservation Biologist
> Echo Valley Farm
> Watauga County, NC
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Mar 21, 2017, at 12:14 PM, Marcus Simpson (via carolinabirds Mailing
> List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> >
> > Unfortunate news this morning that Chan Robbins, one of the preeminent
> leaders in American ornithology, passed away yesterday at the age of 98.
> Chan was particularly known for his work with the North American Breeding
> Bird Survey and the North American Bird Phenology Program, as well as for
> research involving effects of DDT on breeding bird populations. He was an
> author with Brun and Zim of Birds of North America: A Guide to Field
> Identification and recipient of numerous awards and honors in ornithology.
> A brief biographical sketch has been posted this morning on-line in
> Wikipedia.
> >
> > Marcus B. Simpson, Jr.
> > Hendersonville, NC
> >
> >
>
--

Jack Rogers
Mt Pleasant, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 3/21/17 10:28 am
From: \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: passing of Chan Robbins
Sad. And thanks very much for posting. I'm giving a talk this evening on the BBS, one of his great legacies.

J. Merrill Lynch
Conservation Biologist
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 21, 2017, at 12:14 PM, Marcus Simpson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Unfortunate news this morning that Chan Robbins, one of the preeminent leaders in American ornithology, passed away yesterday at the age of 98. Chan was particularly known for his work with the North American Breeding Bird Survey and the North American Bird Phenology Program, as well as for research involving effects of DDT on breeding bird populations. He was an author with Brun and Zim of Birds of North America: A Guide to Field Identification and recipient of numerous awards and honors in ornithology. A brief biographical sketch has been posted this morning on-line in Wikipedia.
>
> Marcus B. Simpson, Jr.
> Hendersonville, NC
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 3/21/17 9:39 am
From: Scott Winton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Durham Rufous Hummingbird gone
As Jamie and a few other long-travelling birders had the misfortune to
discover, the Durham Rufous has moved on, with the last sighting sometime
on March 17.

He made quite a run spending at least 99 consecutive days around the
feeders at my folks' place. He probably arrived quite a bit earlier than
the day I discovered him (Dec. 8), as my parents mentioned seeing a
'hummingbird' around 'a few weeks ago' after I pointed him out.

My mom really seemed to enjoy having all the birders around and visits
intensified immediately after I reported him being in breeding he plumage.

"He went off into the woods a boy, and returned a man,' says my mom.

And then of the birders she said: "...they are flocking all over our deck
and into the backyard – we are very welcoming and happy to have them. They
have big cameras are taking lots of shots from angles on our deck."

So congrats to all who managed to see him. To those who showed up a day
late and a bird short, well, there's always the chance he'll be back next
winter.
--
R. Scott Winton, PhD
Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__rscottwinton.wordpress.com_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=FnHnTE24Tb8BsUKPMV8GWybW5t7FDjV8TO7kD2nbDwA&s=Sn20-fZkfSGSaunC8dP4ekGufuHGHDVCeAj8rzI3hzw&e=
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__scottsup.blogspot.com&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=FnHnTE24Tb8BsUKPMV8GWybW5t7FDjV8TO7kD2nbDwA&s=WHZfx0pBySfR-xcsqrUuLtEn05_F07qaMVs5rHc45H8&e= >

 

Back to top
Date: 3/21/17 9:14 am
From: Marcus Simpson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: passing of Chan Robbins
Unfortunate news this morning that Chan Robbins, one of the preeminent
leaders in American ornithology, passed away yesterday at the age of 98.
Chan was particularly known for his work with the North American Breeding
Bird Survey and the North American Bird Phenology Program, as well as for
research involving effects of DDT on breeding bird populations. He was an
author with Brun and Zim of *Birds of North America: A Guide to Field
Identification *and recipient of numerous awards and honors in ornithology.
A brief biographical sketch has been posted this morning on-line in
Wikipedia.

Marcus B. Simpson, Jr.
Hendersonville, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 3/21/17 8:16 am
From: Peter Perlman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: FOY Blue-headed Vireo on Bolin Creek Trail in Chapel Hill
Hi all,

Had a Blue-headed Vireo singing this morning along the gravel trail,
halfway Between Seawell School Road entrance and Bolin Creek. Got a brief
look as moved through the canopy.

Happy Birding!

Peter Perlman
Chapel HIll

 

Back to top
Date: 3/21/17 6:06 am
From: Lewis Burke (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Swainsons warbler
Had my first of the year Swainsons on Dry creek in Saluda County, SC this
morning.
Lewis Burke

 

Back to top
Date: 3/20/17 4:59 pm
From: WALTER KENT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: 2 days, 2records for me
record # 1 Yesterday I had 27 species of birds on my feeders. 24 were regulars that i expect to see every day. Of the regulars were 6 species of Sparrow; White-crown, White -throat, Fox, Song, Field, and Chipping. Three were what I call irregulars. They are ones I don't expect to see every day, but don't surprise me. They were; Brown Thrasher, Yellow-rump Warbler, and Purple Finch.
Record#2 Watched both Osprey and Red-shouldered Hawks at their respective nest.
Walt Kent
Lenoir N.C.

 

Back to top
Date: 3/20/17 1:37 pm
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Woodcock no more--north to die in snow?
To John’s point, I’ve witnessed woodcock displaying in NC seven months out of the year (November through May, inclusive), an indication that this behavior is not specifically tied to what we widely consider “breeding season”. I’ve had birds in the Piedmont display from November through March (inclusive) and in April in May along the Blue Ridge Parkway.

We tend to *think* of them displaying in February, but that’s probably more of an anthropomorphism on our part than a behavioral characteristic on theirs. I can typically count on getting my “year bird” woodcock on or about 1/1 each year, but that’s just having to wait on the calendar to roll around.

Steve Shultz
Apex, NC

From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of John Connors
Sent: Monday, March 20, 2017 4:25 PM
To: Christopher Hill
Cc: J. Merrill Lynch; <eric...>; Frank Enders; <Carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Woodcock no more--north to die in snow?

When we were doing woodcock studies during winter in the late 1970s near Lake Mattamuskeet in Hyde County, NC large numbers of males would engage in courtship activity in February. Most of these were wintering birds as evidenced by band recoveries we received from the north east US and Canada.
This is the same for most birds...they are stimulated to rehearse their courtship song/display as their hormones kick in, sometimes on the wintering grounds and often during migration.
John Connors
Raleigh, NC

On Mon, Mar 20, 2017 at 12:03 PM, Christopher Hill <Chill...><mailto:<Chill...>> wrote:
I’d keep an open mind about displaying on wintering grounds, or in general, about what does and doesn’t "make sense." The testosterone rises, and male birds start singing and displaying. It might not make sense for woodcock to waste energy displaying on wintering grounds, but there are costs to singing from a perch, too, and lots and lots of birds start singing, and showing aggression towards other males, long before they get to where they are going to breed. It might be hard physiologically to be able to have a clean on-off switch for breeding behaviors, and as with singing, there might also be some benefits to “practice” before you do it for real, with breeding success on the line. If by foraging for an extra half hour a bird can easily meet the extra caloric needs from displaying, there may be very small costs to displaying a bit on wintering ground.

Also I recall a study at a banding station that found that spring migrant female Tennessee warblers in some southeastern state, hundreds of miles south of the nearest breeding grounds, sometimes had sperm in their reproductive tracts. So some of that singing in migration and on wintering grounds might be more than just practice!

But as Merrill says, the answer may be out there and probably is if we did some digging.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC



On Mar 20, 2017, at 8:59 AM, J. Merrill Lynch <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

I asked Frank the same questions and I share the same supposition as you: I doubt any northern nonbreeding birds display on the wintering grounds. It wouldn't make sense for the reasons you stated. Surely someone has done research on this and can supply a definitive answer.
J. Merrill Lynch
Conservation Biologist
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 20, 2017, at 8:55 AM, <eric...><mailto:<eric...> wrote:

Excellent questions, Frank. I am curious if there is an accompanying article somewhere given your first sentence or is this some combination of word-of-mouth and personal observation?

It would be interesting to know whether migrant male woodcock would bother displaying anywhere other than the sites where they intended to attract females? Would appear to be a waste of energy to do so. Their aerial displays require more energy and risk more exposure to predators than simply singing from a perch. Perhaps there's a published paper out there somewhere?


Eric Harrold

Hays, NC



On 2017-03-20 07:47, Frank Enders wrote:

Many woodcock have died, NY to Vermont, in recent snow--some by imm Goshawk in Brooklyn's Prospect Park, some hitting tall buildings, some starving on frozen white.


For months one to several woodcock were singing just north of Quankey Creek along Aurelian Springs Road. But, the displays stopped about two weeks ago. Makes me wonder how many of "our" woodcock are birds which breed in more northern areas. Always have wondered about "double-brooding", which might be just by males which try here and try again up there, females "stuck" here with nests. Too speculative, I guess.


But, nobody knows what percentage of "our" woodcock, which display for the Xmas bird counts, may not be local breeders.


Frank Enders, Halifax, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 3/20/17 1:26 pm
From: Pauline Sterin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: FOY Yellow-throated Warbler, Arapahoe, NC
This afternoon while walking between a marsh and a pine forest, I heard my first-of-year Yellow-throated Warbler, a welcome song. I got a very, very faint recording and will try to upload it to eBird.

Pauline Sterin
Arapahoe, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 3/20/17 1:25 pm
From: John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Woodcock no more--north to die in snow?
When we were doing woodcock studies during winter in the late 1970s near
Lake Mattamuskeet in Hyde County, NC large numbers of males would engage in
courtship activity in February. Most of these were wintering birds as
evidenced by band recoveries we received from the north east US and Canada.
This is the same for most birds...they are stimulated to rehearse their
courtship song/display as their hormones kick in, sometimes on the
wintering grounds and often during migration.
John Connors
Raleigh, NC

On Mon, Mar 20, 2017 at 12:03 PM, Christopher Hill <Chill...>
wrote:

> I’d keep an open mind about displaying on wintering grounds, or in
> general, about what does and doesn’t "make sense." The testosterone rises,
> and male birds start singing and displaying. It might not make sense for
> woodcock to waste energy displaying on wintering grounds, but there are
> costs to singing from a perch, too, and lots and lots of birds start
> singing, and showing aggression towards other males, long before they get
> to where they are going to breed. It might be hard physiologically to be
> able to have a clean on-off switch for breeding behaviors, and as with
> singing, there might also be some benefits to “practice” before you do it
> for real, with breeding success on the line. If by foraging for an extra
> half hour a bird can easily meet the extra caloric needs from displaying,
> there may be very small costs to displaying a bit on wintering ground.
>
> Also I recall a study at a banding station that found that spring migrant
> female Tennessee warblers in some southeastern state, hundreds of miles
> south of the nearest breeding grounds, sometimes had sperm in their
> reproductive tracts. So some of that singing in migration and on wintering
> grounds might be more than just practice!
>
> But as Merrill says, the answer may be out there and probably is if we did
> some digging.
>
> Chris Hill
> Conway, SC
>
>
>
> On Mar 20, 2017, at 8:59 AM, J. Merrill Lynch <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
> I asked Frank the same questions and I share the same supposition as you:
> I doubt any northern nonbreeding birds display on the wintering grounds. It
> wouldn't make sense for the reasons you stated. Surely someone has done
> research on this and can supply a definitive answer.
>
> J. Merrill Lynch
> Conservation Biologist
> Echo Valley Farm
> Watauga County, NC
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Mar 20, 2017, at 8:55 AM, <eric...> wrote:
>
> Excellent questions, Frank. I am curious if there is an accompanying
> article somewhere given your first sentence or is this some combination of
> word-of-mouth and personal observation?
>
> It would be interesting to know whether migrant male woodcock would bother
> displaying anywhere other than the sites where they intended to attract
> females? Would appear to be a waste of energy to do so. Their aerial
> displays require more energy and risk more exposure to predators than
> simply singing from a perch. Perhaps there's a published paper out there
> somewhere?
>
>
> Eric Harrold
>
> Hays, NC
>
>
>
> On 2017-03-20 07:47, Frank Enders wrote:
>
> Many woodcock have died, NY to Vermont, in recent snow--some by imm
> Goshawk in Brooklyn's Prospect Park, some hitting tall buildings, some
> starving on frozen white.
>
>
> For months one to several woodcock were singing just north of Quankey
> Creek along Aurelian Springs Road. But, the displays stopped about two
> weeks ago. Makes me wonder how many of "our" woodcock are birds which
> breed in more northern areas. Always have wondered about
> "double-brooding", which might be just by males which try here and try
> again up there, females "stuck" here with nests. Too speculative, I guess.
>
>
> But, nobody knows what percentage of "our" woodcock, which display for the
> Xmas bird counts, may not be local breeders.
>
>
> Frank Enders, Halifax, NC
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/20/17 9:56 am
From: GRIGGS, JERRY <griggs...>
Subject: Continuing Selasphorous Hummers NC, SC
A Rufous/Allen's Hummingbird that had been coming to our feeder and yard in Columbia, SC, since Thanksgiving disappeared soon after my last report of yard activity a month ago. But after ten days, my wife thought she saw a hummer in our yard, and then a few days later (two weeks ago) a hummer resumed regular feeder and yard activity. It is still around, despite a spell of several more nights in the low 20's.

Based on its activity and plumage pattern, we believe it is the same Selasphorous Hummingbird we hosted all winter. It has grown just a few more dark/reflective gorget feathers on its throat. It has a line of several small dark feathers, a thin dark choker above a wider white band across the lower throat, which in turn is above the more rufous/orange flanks and breast. The back is still mainly green. Photos are posted on eBird. It has not developed adult male plumage, so I continue to suspect this bird we call Haley is a female. We never get a view of Haley's tail feathers, to decide which species it is.

A similar bird continues to visit a yard and feeders up in downtown Brevard, NC. The owner has lately observed that bird acting aggressively towards other birds, behavior I associate particularly with Rufous Hummers out west. By contrast, if our hummer discovers a Chickadee or Titmouse drinking water from the ant-trap above our hummer feeder, the hummer merely hovers and waits, but does not chase off the "intruder". I keep thinking Haley acts like a (wussy) Allen's. [Susan Campbell can set me straight on this behavioral analysis.]

Our fond hope is to see Haley interact with returning Ruby-throats (though I may miss the fun due to an upcoming trip...). We think our bird is fattening up now for the long migration trip west.

PS Other bird news: Now that the Carolina/USC/SC fighting chickens have exorcised the Devils in basketball (both Blue and Sun), we look forward to the men's and women's Sweet 16s! [Oops, I hope I'm not kicked off by the Carolinabirds server for crowing.]

Jerry Griggs, j at sc dot edu
Columbia, SC


 

Back to top
Date: 3/20/17 9:06 am
From: nicholas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Yellow-crowned Night-Heron, Pettigrew State Park, 3/20/17
Was surprised to see an ad. Yellow-crowned Night-Heron on the ground in the cypress swamp off the Moccasin Overlook boardwalk this morning.

Nick Flanders
Portsmouth, VA
 

Back to top
Date: 3/20/17 9:04 am
From: nicholas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Yellow-crowned Night-Heron, Pettigrew State Park, 3/20/17
Was surprised to see an ad. Yellow-crowned Night-Heron on the ground in the cypress swamp off the Moccasin Overlook boardwalk this morning.

Nick Flanders
Portsmouth, VA
 

Back to top
Date: 3/20/17 9:04 am
From: Christopher Hill <Chill...>
Subject: Re: Woodcock no more--north to die in snow?
I’d keep an open mind about displaying on wintering grounds, or in general, about what does and doesn’t "make sense." The testosterone rises, and male birds start singing and displaying. It might not make sense for woodcock to waste energy displaying on wintering grounds, but there are costs to singing from a perch, too, and lots and lots of birds start singing, and showing aggression towards other males, long before they get to where they are going to breed. It might be hard physiologically to be able to have a clean on-off switch for breeding behaviors, and as with singing, there might also be some benefits to “practice” before you do it for real, with breeding success on the line. If by foraging for an extra half hour a bird can easily meet the extra caloric needs from displaying, there may be very small costs to displaying a bit on wintering ground.

Also I recall a study at a banding station that found that spring migrant female Tennessee warblers in some southeastern state, hundreds of miles south of the nearest breeding grounds, sometimes had sperm in their reproductive tracts. So some of that singing in migration and on wintering grounds might be more than just practice!

But as Merrill says, the answer may be out there and probably is if we did some digging.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC


On Mar 20, 2017, at 8:59 AM, J. Merrill Lynch <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

I asked Frank the same questions and I share the same supposition as you: I doubt any northern nonbreeding birds display on the wintering grounds. It wouldn't make sense for the reasons you stated. Surely someone has done research on this and can supply a definitive answer.

J. Merrill Lynch
Conservation Biologist
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 20, 2017, at 8:55 AM, <eric...><mailto:<eric...> wrote:


Excellent questions, Frank. I am curious if there is an accompanying article somewhere given your first sentence or is this some combination of word-of-mouth and personal observation?

It would be interesting to know whether migrant male woodcock would bother displaying anywhere other than the sites where they intended to attract females? Would appear to be a waste of energy to do so. Their aerial displays require more energy and risk more exposure to predators than simply singing from a perch. Perhaps there's a published paper out there somewhere?



Eric Harrold

Hays, NC




On 2017-03-20 07:47, Frank Enders wrote:

Many woodcock have died, NY to Vermont, in recent snow--some by imm Goshawk in Brooklyn's Prospect Park, some hitting tall buildings, some starving on frozen white.



For months one to several woodcock were singing just north of Quankey Creek along Aurelian Springs Road. But, the displays stopped about two weeks ago. Makes me wonder how many of "our" woodcock are birds which breed in more northern areas. Always have wondered about "double-brooding", which might be just by males which try here and try again up there, females "stuck" here with nests. Too speculative, I guess.



But, nobody knows what percentage of "our" woodcock, which display for the Xmas bird counts, may not be local breeders.



Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 3/20/17 6:02 am
From: \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Woodcock no more--north to die in snow?
I asked Frank the same questions and I share the same supposition as you: I doubt any northern nonbreeding birds display on the wintering grounds. It wouldn't make sense for the reasons you stated. Surely someone has done research on this and can supply a definitive answer.

J. Merrill Lynch
Conservation Biologist
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 20, 2017, at 8:55 AM, <eric...> wrote:
>
> Excellent questions, Frank. I am curious if there is an accompanying article somewhere given your first sentence or is this some combination of word-of-mouth and personal observation?
>
> It would be interesting to know whether migrant male woodcock would bother displaying anywhere other than the sites where they intended to attract females? Would appear to be a waste of energy to do so. Their aerial displays require more energy and risk more exposure to predators than simply singing from a perch. Perhaps there's a published paper out there somewhere?
>
>
>
> Eric Harrold
>
> Hays, NC
>
>
>
>
>> On 2017-03-20 07:47, Frank Enders wrote:
>>
>> Many woodcock have died, NY to Vermont, in recent snow--some by imm Goshawk in Brooklyn's Prospect Park, some hitting tall buildings, some starving on frozen white.
>>
>>
>>
>> For months one to several woodcock were singing just north of Quankey Creek along Aurelian Springs Road. But, the displays stopped about two weeks ago. Makes me wonder how many of "our" woodcock are birds which breed in more northern areas. Always have wondered about "double-brooding", which might be just by males which try here and try again up there, females "stuck" here with nests. Too speculative, I guess.
>>
>>
>>
>> But, nobody knows what percentage of "our" woodcock, which display for the Xmas bird counts, may not be local breeders.
>>
>>
>>
>> Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 3/20/17 5:56 am
From: <eric...>
Subject: Re: Woodcock no more--north to die in snow?
Excellent questions, Frank. I am curious if there is an accompanying
article somewhere given your first sentence or is this some combination
of word-of-mouth and personal observation?

It would be interesting to know whether migrant male woodcock would
bother displaying anywhere other than the sites where they intended to
attract females? Would appear to be a waste of energy to do so. Their
aerial displays require more energy and risk more exposure to predators
than simply singing from a perch. Perhaps there's a published paper out
there somewhere?

Eric Harrold

Hays, NC

On 2017-03-20 07:47, Frank Enders wrote:

> Many woodcock have died, NY to Vermont, in recent snow--some by imm Goshawk in Brooklyn's Prospect Park, some hitting tall buildings, some starving on frozen white.
>
> For months one to several woodcock were singing just north of Quankey Creek along Aurelian Springs Road. But, the displays stopped about two weeks ago. Makes me wonder how many of "our" woodcock are birds which breed in more northern areas. Always have wondered about "double-brooding", which might be just by males which try here and try again up there, females "stuck" here with nests. Too speculative, I guess.
>
> But, nobody knows what percentage of "our" woodcock, which display for the Xmas bird counts, may not be local breeders.
>
> Frank Enders, Halifax, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 3/20/17 5:40 am
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Purple Finch numbers up and down, 16 on 4th, 5 on18th; feeder birds
March 4 and 5, 16 and 14, then weeks with only 2-4 as high counts (many zeroes). The 5 on March 18th were 2 males, 2 females.


House FInches are much more numerous now than in winter at my feeder, and I can see how some bright male House FInches now can be called Purple males, especially when one is trying to count moving, mixed groups.


What do these Purples find to eat? Red maple? Sycamore crop sucked.

The main feeder seems to get "swarmed" by a flock of White-throats, every now and then, sometimes with the finches mixed in, plus Cardinals which are getting hostile toward one another. More often there are long periods with nothing at the feeder, and the up and down daily temperatures seem to affect demand for the sunflower seeds. A thrasher appeared a week ago, after several weeks of no-show, while Red-bellied and Downy Woodpeckers drop by regularly. M. Doves take a lot of seed (up to 7 birds).
The local grackle colony still exists, but ignores the feeder, since the snow melted.

No problem with Starlings (ever?) and Cowbirds are not now seen---Redwings, cowbirds and grackles did swarm the feeder in the snow. THis winter I several times heard a House Sparrow, but never got sight nor sights of it.



Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 3/20/17 5:04 am
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Wood Ducks leave roost pairwise 6:50 AM peak
For about a month I have watched Wood Ducks come and go to a roost in flooded brush along Quankey Creek just southeast of the bridge at Aurelian Springs Road. 25-35 each time coming from or going to the west.

Today it occurred to me that I do not know how many more might be to and fro the downstream, east side. I had been down the creek twice at twilight by canoe, but I guess I did not go far enough east to tell? Numbers can be tricky.

Today I got out on the road around 6:40 (civil twilight supposedly 6:36-6:56 AM should be the WOODCOCK flight times). A single bird was first, rest pairwise, leaving roost westbound, mostly around 6:50.

Today the birds seems to circle out east and wide of the creek before going upstream, west Maybe the Barred Owl I saw around 7 leaving the last big tree near the roost was the cause?

I guess the females are not yet on eggs. I had thought they might be.




Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 3/20/17 4:47 am
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Woodcock no more--north to die in snow?
Many woodcock have died, NY to Vermont, in recent snow--some by imm Goshawk in Brooklyn's Prospect Park, some hitting tall buildings, some starving on frozen white.


For months one to several woodcock were singing just north of Quankey Creek along Aurelian Springs Road. But, the displays stopped about two weeks ago. Makes me wonder how many of "our" woodcock are birds which breed in more northern areas. Always have wondered about "double-brooding", which might be just by males which try here and try again up there, females "stuck" here with nests. Too speculative, I guess.


But, nobody knows what percentage of "our" woodcock, which display for the Xmas bird counts, may not be local breeders.



Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 3/19/17 8:32 pm
From: \<drivesa3...>\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Purple Martins
 Every year, I seem to have the earliest and by far the largest numbers of Purple Martins in the area. At Cane Creek Park lake (Union County, NC), I had 30 last week, more mature males than females with a number of juvenile plumaged birds as well. For any Purple Martin whisperers, I have to ask why?! There are always good numbers of insects emerging and while some birds are feeding, some are perched along the very high high voltage lines, both being possible factors. There is no development along the county owned lake and it's surrounded by a mix of woods and nearby agricultural land, and maybe that's a factor as well. I wonder if there is any migration stopover fidelity, too. As I researched this, I found studies involving "scouts", but nothing to help answer the question of why so many here and as early as they are. It's a real delight to see them, but it is so odd, and I can't get the question out of my head! Any ideas or possible sources for further research will be appr
eciated! 
George AndrewsIndian Trail, NC
Sent from my LG G4, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
 

Back to top
Date: 3/19/17 9:25 am
From: <susan...>
Subject: RE: No Rufous at the Wintons, Durham, Nc
All,

Indeed it is time for male hummers to be on the move--- so I am not
surprised. Breeding season for Rufous Hummingbirds is just around the
corner.

The first returning male Rubys will be here within two weeks-- even
sooner down south.....

Susan Campbell
Southern Pines, NC


 

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Date: 3/19/17 9:05 am
From: Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: No Rufous at the Wintons, Durham, Nc
Has not been seen yesterday or today. Most probably gone now.

Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC

Sent from my iPhone
********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************ This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank you. **********************************************************************
 

Back to top
Date: 3/19/17 8:40 am
From: David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: New posting to Birding Bulls blog
Sun 19 Mar 2017

All,

We completed our last winter survey of waterfowl and shorebirds on Bulls
Island last Thursday. I've posted a report on my Birding Bulls blog and
invite you to read about the decreases in waterfowl and shorebirds that
were somewhat balanced by good upland birding at:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__birdingbulls.blogspot.com&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=QYUkOygxJbxoJsCOYY20r-hSMLeE2Z2vn-7wQXiDGOg&s=daWVdeVlWSkWwse6VU_Pzo-AyZS9pluMi7KyEQZzKYY&e=

Regards,

David McLean
Charleston, SC

--
David C. McLean, Jr.
DCMcLean AT gmail DOT com

 

Back to top
Date: 3/19/17 5:30 am
From: Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Great Kiskadee still present at Bear Island WMA
The bird was seen around lunch time, yesterday by 3 observers that were from NC, Todd Pusser and Jeff Beane. We heard the bird a couple hours later, in known location.
Pam Ford
Charleston SC

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 19, 2017, at 7:58 AM, Will Whitsett <willwhitsett...> wrote:
>
> Does anybody know if the Kiskadee was relocated yesterday? We are heading back to Mount Pleasant from Beaufort and might stop by Bear Island and look for it.
>
> Will Whitsett
> Mount Pleasant
> SC
>
>> On Mar 18, 2017, at 1:58 PM, Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> Great Kiskadee heard just now at Bear Island and seen earlier today, at its known location trying to relocate bird now with Ray Swagerty, Ed Blitch.
>> Pam Ford
>> Charleston SC
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>
 

Back to top
Date: 3/19/17 4:58 am
From: Will Whitsett <willwhitsett...>
Subject: Re: Great Kiskadee still present at Bear Island WMA
Does anybody know if the Kiskadee was relocated yesterday? We are heading back to Mount Pleasant from Beaufort and might stop by Bear Island and look for it.

Will Whitsett
Mount Pleasant
SC

> On Mar 18, 2017, at 1:58 PM, Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Great Kiskadee heard just now at Bear Island and seen earlier today, at its known location trying to relocate bird now with Ray Swagerty, Ed Blitch.
> Pam Ford
> Charleston SC
>
> Sent from my iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 3/18/17 2:29 pm
From: Christopher Hill <Chill...>
Subject: 1000 Pipits
Y’all:

I found myself up in North Carolina, at the intersection of New Salem Road and Highway 205 (near Monroe, in what is probably Union County) today around noon, and looked out over probably about 1,000 American Pipits in sight at once in the fields around me. I don’t know, there could have been only 800, there could have been 2000, and who knows what was elsewhere, but it seemed like a lot of pipits in one place so I thought I’d mention them here.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC
 

Back to top
Date: 3/18/17 10:58 am
From: Pamela Ford (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Great Kiskadee still present at Bear Island WMA
Great Kiskadee heard just now at Bear Island and seen earlier today, at its known location trying to relocate bird now with Ray Swagerty, Ed Blitch.
Pam Ford
Charleston SC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 3/18/17 5:47 am
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Purple Finches
Still have seven. 4 males.

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 3/18/17 5:21 am
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hermit Thrushes - Singing
Cool to hear their lovely song in the middle of March. Two singing in the backyard in the light rain.

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 3/17/17 6:33 pm
From: WALTER KENT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Monk Parakeet
What is the status of the Monks in Newland N.C ?
Walt Kent
Lenoir N.C.

 

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Date: 3/17/17 6:01 pm
From: David Weesner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Monk Parakeet in town of Northwest
About 8:00 this morning the Monk Parakeet was at the intersection of Northwest Rd. and Mt. Misery Rd. In Bruswick County.He or she was not in the nest, but in the top of a tall tree.Dave WeesnerWilmington, NC 

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

Back to top
Date: 3/17/17 4:21 pm
From: Alan Gamache <bird...>
Subject: Louisiana Waterthrush, New Bern, NC
Louisiana Waterthrush this morning (FOY), County Line Road (eastern end of road), Croatan National Forest.

Al Gamache
New Bern, NC
 

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Date: 3/17/17 10:43 am
From: Ricky Davis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Annual Call for Breeding Bird Survey Volunteers
Hi Folks

This is my annual call (plea) for willing volunteers to take up one or more
of the available Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) routes in NC. There are
currently 11 routes available, with four in the Mountains, three in the
Inner Coastal Plain, one in the Outer Coastal Plain, one near the
Sandhills, and two in the Piedmont. Go to the BBS website to see exactly
where these routes are, AND to learn more about the BBS if you don't know
much about it! The site address is www.pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs/

Briefly each BBS route consists of 50 three-minute stops at .5 mile
intervals along a 24.5 mile route. Each route, conducted once a year during
a late May to late June window, starts at 30 minutes before sunrise and can
usually be finished in around 4 hours. The main requirement that must be
met is that the Observer must be very confident in recognizing all the
sounds of the breeding species normally found along the Route. Generally
70-80% of the birds detected during the survey will by ear. Also it is
customary for new Observers to commit to a Route for 3 years or longer. I
will be running my first route for the 40th time this season! The longer an
Observer runs the same route, the more confidence one has in analysis of
changes during the years.

So if you are interested in taking on a Route, or you long-timers adding
another route, please let me know. I can answer any questions you might
have and /or get you set up for starting this year.

Thanks, later, Ricky

--
Ricky Davis
NC BBS Coordinator
Rocky Mount, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 3/17/17 8:52 am
From: Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Sat. CHBC walk
Saturdays (18 Mar.) Chapel Hill Bird Club outing will be to the Johnston Mill Nature Preserve. As usual, this trip leaves the Glen Lennox parking lot (on the north side of 54 just east of the intersection with 15-501 in Chapel Hill) at 7:30 a.m.
Good birding!

Bob Rybczynski
Cary, NC

 

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Date: 3/17/17 6:27 am
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Dare County Lark Sparrow continues
The Lark Sparrow at the Coastal Studies Institute on Roanoke Island continues.
Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 3/17/17 5:11 am
From: richardscott w (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: R.T. Loons - Holden Beach, Brunswick County
Thanks to all for the feedback.
I have changed my report of Red-necked Grebe to Horned Grebe. I have
had a chance to study these birds some more and see the mistake I made
now.
This list is a great learning tool.
-Scott Walker-

On Thu, Mar 16, 2017 at 7:28 PM, Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr...> wrote:
> Actually, Red-necked Grebe is very rare in southern coastal waters. I am not
> aware of any coastal records at all in the last month or two, even north of
> Cape Hatteras. I am surprised that there are no such reports, as Feb into
> March is a good time to see it on the ocean, but not in the warmish waters
> south of Cape Hatteras. Thus, you should provide details/descriptions on
> eBird, this listserve, etc., before your report were to get accepted.
>
> Red-throated Loons are often much, much more numerous than Common Loons on
> the ocean along the NC coast. It is quite variable by location -- off
> Wrightsville Beach, you often see 50 Commons for every few R-t Loons. But,
> off many other beaches, such as along the east shore of the Outer Banks, it
> is about 50 R-t Loons per Common.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
> On Thu, Mar 16, 2017 at 5:16 PM, richardscottw <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>>
>> I am seeing so many Red-throated Loons today on the ocean at Holden Beach
>> that
>> I thought I would post and see if folks think its an unusual event. In a
>> five-
>> minute scan from the shore of a portion of the bay I counted 60+.
>> Everywhere I
>> look on the water I see them.
>> Also had one Common Loon and a few Red-necked Grebes.
>> We're from Pennsylvania, so for all I know this is not unusual at all. But
>> its
>> remarkable to me.
>> We also had a nice little raft of Horned Grebes at the west end of the
>> island
>> today.
>> -Scott Walker
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/17 6:33 pm
From: <Rubberhead...> <rubberhead...>
Subject: Help with odd gull
Sorry, the photos and video are poor.

Anyway, I'm pretty sure it's just a Bonaparte's gull but the feeding method makes me wonder. I've seen Bonaparte's diving like terns and swimming and picking but never anything like this. See the youtube for a short video of it dancing in the mud and feeding on, I guess, invertebrates.

Any validations for Bonepartes? Other thoughts?

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.youtube.com_watch-3Fv-3DnuUweVG0nG0&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=DdH8lFxoabNHICsGEpGKKGmU3Ps11j7XNCac6YUyhZE&s=9J6N5ooIvuRgv4-0VIv6tm9ZQlG3PRY7_IacYOYwNPk&e=

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__c1.staticflickr.com_4_3833_33276260255-5Fd89d73370f-5Fb.jpg&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=DdH8lFxoabNHICsGEpGKKGmU3Ps11j7XNCac6YUyhZE&s=HCd9YozPRVk-hZXR38bqdXywXsg6SJVG5ZvxwViQw0o&e=

Stephen Thomas
Fort Mill SC
 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/17 4:28 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: R.T. Loons - Holden Beach, Brunswick County
Actually, Red-necked Grebe is very rare in southern coastal waters. I am
not aware of any coastal records at all in the last month or two, even
north of Cape Hatteras. I am surprised that there are no such reports, as
Feb into March is a good time to see it on the ocean, but not in the
warmish waters south of Cape Hatteras. Thus, you should provide
details/descriptions on eBird, this listserve, etc., before your report
were to get accepted.

Red-throated Loons are often much, much more numerous than Common Loons on
the ocean along the NC coast. It is quite variable by location -- off
Wrightsville Beach, you often see 50 Commons for every few R-t Loons. But,
off many other beaches, such as along the east shore of the Outer Banks, it
is about 50 R-t Loons per Common.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Thu, Mar 16, 2017 at 5:16 PM, richardscottw <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> I am seeing so many Red-throated Loons today on the ocean at Holden Beach
> that
> I thought I would post and see if folks think its an unusual event. In a
> five-
> minute scan from the shore of a portion of the bay I counted 60+.
> Everywhere I
> look on the water I see them.
> Also had one Common Loon and a few Red-necked Grebes.
> We're from Pennsylvania, so for all I know this is not unusual at all. But
> its
> remarkable to me.
> We also had a nice little raft of Horned Grebes at the west end of the
> island
> today.
> -Scott Walker
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/17 4:11 pm
From: David Gardner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Birding at St. Christopher, Seabrook Island,SC
Hi Folks,
I just finished with a very cold yet rewarding bird walk with Kiawah Island Naturalist Group. We got great views of Northern Parula's (FOS), Yellow-throated Warblers, Pine Warblers, Black&White Warblers, Blue-gray Gnatcatchers and a fleeting look, but prolonged calling from a RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH!
With a few ducks and woodpeckers, our species count was 40 for 3hrs. Not bad for a 32deg morning walk.
Happy Birding,
David

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 3/16/17 2:16 pm
From: richardscottw (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: R.T. Loons - Holden Beach, Brunswick County
I am seeing so many Red-throated Loons today on the ocean at Holden Beach that
I thought I would post and see if folks think its an unusual event. In a five-
minute scan from the shore of a portion of the bay I counted 60+. Everywhere I
look on the water I see them.
Also had one Common Loon and a few Red-necked Grebes.
We're from Pennsylvania, so for all I know this is not unusual at all. But its
remarkable to me.
We also had a nice little raft of Horned Grebes at the west end of the island
today.
-Scott Walker
 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/17 6:45 am
From: Pauline Sterin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: FOY Blue-gray Gnatcatchers, Arapahoe, NC
What a nice surprise on this cold morning (36') to see my first-of-year Blue-gray Gnatcatchers hopping around at eye-level.

Pauline Sterin
Arapahoe, NC
 

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Date: 3/14/17 1:39 pm
From: Pauline Sterin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Northern Gannets Over the Neuse River in Arapahoe County, NC
For the last 3 days, I've seen at least 6 Northern Gannets soaring over and diving into the Neuse River here in Arapahoe, where it's ~ 4 miles across. Local birders who've been here longer than I report having seen them here in the winter before, but it's a first for me. Yard bird #104.

Pauline Sterin
Arapahoe, NC
 

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Date: 3/14/17 6:32 am
From: Patricia Tice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Brown-Headed Nuthatch Nest
A pair of Nuthatches have completed a nest in one of my bluebird houses.

I saw a Wren collecting nest materials about a month ago, but haven't found
the nest, yet.

Patty Tice
Raleigh, NC

 

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Date: 3/13/17 4:27 pm
From: Anne Olsen (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fox Sparrow & Red-breasted Nuthatch
This afternoon one Fox Sparrow showed up and I had 2 Red-breasted Nuthatches as well. Two good yard birds.

Anne Olsen
Monroe, NC

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 3/12/17 6:35 pm
From: Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Cliff Swallow at Bogue Inlet Pier, Carteret County, NC
While doing some late day seawatching from the elevated platform at the end
of the Bogue Inlet Fishing Pier, I had a Cliff Swallow fly around the end
several times, then fly down the pier towards shore and possibly land under
the pier to roost. Definitely the best and most unusual bird of the
outing! Lousy photo showing buffy rump included in eBird report.

Marty Wall
Beaufort & Eden, NC

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S35139658&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=orICW0owhIp3fTf3cG1KgnBvmCcjdtd_9B4ssCaYmRo&s=6J77b6paJJ7kpTsRdL5Aajs6LvG5bn06Gto36HVv8PU&e=

 

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Date: 3/12/17 5:52 pm
From: <brian...>
Subject: Lake Crabtree/Brier Creek
Hi all,

Dusted off the optics today for some snowy birding at Lake Crabtree and Brier Creek areas (Wake Co., NC).  Very birdy.  Beautiful day.

Highlights from 58 species -

• FIVE immature Bald Eagles playing around over the boat rental area. (this was a repeat performance from last month)
• For sheer numbers, 500 + Ring-billed Gulls and 300+ DC Cormorant
• On first look, Brier Creek Resv. had some Greater Scaup, then the usual Lesser flock of about 50-75 flew overhead at Lake Crabtree and I found them later on 2nd visit to Brier Creek Resv. , a behavior they exhibit when people kayak or paddle board near the Crabtree dam.
• other Waterfowl = Green-winged Teal, Shoveler, Ring-necked, Mallard, Amer. Widgeon, PB Grebe, Bufflehead, Hoodies and Ruddies
• Rusty Blackbirds at Brierdale marshes behind EarthFare.
• Ruby-crowned Kinglets singing
• Did I mention it was snowing?

Brian Murphy
Durham NC

 

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Date: 3/12/17 12:02 pm
From: Wayne K. Forsythe <wforsythe...>
Subject: Birds of Hawaii
Folks,
I am going to Hawaii for 2 weeks in late May, early June. Can someone recommend a good field guide for this adventure. Any help received, is greatly appreciated!
Wayne
Wayne K. Forsythe
16 Colonial Way
Hendersonville, N. C. 28791
wforsytheATmorrisbb.net
 

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Date: 3/12/17 11:42 am
From: William Majoros <william.majoros...>
Subject: FOY waterthrush in Durham
Just found a waterthrush in the Ellerbe Creek at 17 Acre Woods off Guess Rd in Durham. I'm guessing a Louisiana but I could be wrong.

Bill Majoros
Durham, NC

 

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Date: 3/12/17 6:08 am
From: Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Light Snow Outer Banks - Chipping Sparrows
Light snow, despite 40 degree air temperature, has brought 9
(first-of-the-year) Chipping Sparrows to the backyard feeders.
Interestingly enough, they showed up last year on 3/6.

Enjoy the day,

Jim Gould

Sent from my mobile device.

 

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Date: 3/11/17 3:33 pm
From: David Weesner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Sora at the NC Battleship
This morning about 8:30 I had Sora at the NC Battleship.Dave WessnerWilmington, NC 

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 3/11/17 11:48 am
From: Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Eurasian Green-winged Teal, Ocean Isle Beach Wastewater reclamation facility, NC
Taylor's Eurasian Green-winged Teal is still around in middle pond, viewable from perimeter fence. Sam and I obtained photos.

Maybe a future armchair tick if your into that.

Search eBird for location if interested.

Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC

Sent from my iPhone
********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************ This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank you. **********************************************************************
 

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Date: 3/11/17 11:23 am
From: Scott Winton (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Rufous Hummingbird continues in Durham - now in breeding plumage
My dad just sent me some beautiful photos of the Rufous Hummingbird now
with a full gorget of shining feathers.

Not sure how much longer he'll be around, but he's still using the feeder
regularly as of today.

There's still an open invitation to any birders or photographers who way
wish to see it. No need to call or knock, just enter the yard.

134 Pinecrest

--
R. Scott Winton, PhD
Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__rscottwinton.wordpress.com_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=H71806z2uh6ZI7MGBvxqD2M_K1iTKLmgC_fJpuydAjI&s=WKpa_gHvChjDAQh2XzuhT4sUvGRYPnWgx7YcmMdefFw&e=
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__scottsup.blogspot.com&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=H71806z2uh6ZI7MGBvxqD2M_K1iTKLmgC_fJpuydAjI&s=fi1sTw0aVFbHHljg1xAVWoa4o5X_7HTjZXsUd5N0Vg0&e= >

 

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Date: 3/10/17 9:13 am
From: Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Sat. CHBC birding walk
Saturdays (11 Mar) Chapel Hill Bird Club outing will be to Sandy Creek Park in Durham. Meet me there, in the parking lot, at 7:45 a.m. -Note, I will not be meeting beforehand at Glen Lennox in Chapel Hill. If you need directions, see https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__durhamnc.gov_Facilities_Facility_Details_Sandy-2DCreek-2DPark-2D141&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=SuehbreInxFuK3MqXKOQWwVsf3s_X3mMyO8f6fL1HxA&s=e-sypT8HcjEzSM2nRti_dJsV6ch6sxh_9Nx2E9V7RGU&e= or enter 35.9674, -78.9684 into Google or your GPS.

Good birding!
Bob Rybczynski
Cary, NC


 

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Date: 3/10/17 8:21 am
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Weekly Dare County Lark Sparrow report
The Lark Sparrow at the UNC- Coastal Studies Institute is still here. Today is day 102, but who's counting :)

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 3/10/17 8:04 am
From: Aaron Steed (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lake Julian Ducks
Nice variety of stuff on Lake Julian at the moment.

200+ Lesser Scaup
At least 2 Greater Scaup (in with Lessers)
Along with smaller numbers of:
Red-breasted Merganser
Redhead
Ring-necked Duck
Bufflehead
American Wigeon
Ruddy Duck

Also
1 Bonaparte's Gull
40+ Horned Grebe

Plus the usual Double-crested Cormorants ( on the tower), PB Grebe and Fish
Crow.

Happy birding!

Aaron Steed
Ventures Birding Tours
Asheville, NC
--
Aaron Steed
Ventures Birding Tours
Asheville, NC

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=UwViBy7b2NDfYaB0d-Aqetz-tH79lDnRxBSkkWy230U&s=lWf7PfPmbnpyShCPUmNIU5-O2m0SuKLbwfRg-Ji-2gM&e=

 

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Date: 3/9/17 11:51 am
From: Bonnie/Tom <bks1956...>
Subject: FOY Blue-headed Vireo
Our first-of-year Blue-headed Vireo was heard today while hiking in Pisgah National Forest just north of Old Fort, McDowell County, N.C.
Tom PericakBonnie Simmons
Old Fort, N.C.

 

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Date: 3/9/17 2:27 am
From: Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: West Winds Friday Outer Banks, NC
Looks like 20 MPH sustained West winds Friday on OBX then switch to North Saturday and NNE on Sunday. Will be interesting to see if this will cause upwelling to manifest and if we will have one more push of winter sea birds and Manx. Will be crappy weather and cold on Sunday but I bet sea watching would be good.

Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC

Sent from my iPhone
********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************ This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank you. **********************************************************************
 

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Date: 3/8/17 4:21 pm
From: David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: New posting to my Birding Bulls blog includes an update on Old Man Plover
Wed 8 Mar 2017

All,

I have a new posting to my Birding Bulls blog that includes a video
update on Old Man Plover. I invite you to read it at:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__birdingbulls.blogspot.com&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=sBAXJMSRaxSx9RbM8tp1E-PMK1fWMXdt8UR2f0LRThA&s=ncmlcCOCHKBRx6Azk7DY_P1xB2ytT7UXl08-ushjibw&e=

Regards,

David McLean
Charleston, SC

--
David C. McLean, Jr.
DCMcLean AT gmail DOT com

 

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Date: 3/8/17 1:42 pm
From: Peter Perlman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: FOY Northern Parula Chapel Hill
Hi all
Heard a Northern Parula while walking along Bolin Creek, off Seawell School
Road this morning. And snow expected Sunday! How strange.
Happy Birding!

Peter Perlman
Chapel Hill

 

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Date: 3/8/17 10:03 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mountain waterfowl information -- Trumpeter Swan and Greater Scaup
Here is an e-mail that Steve Dinsmore, an excellent Iowa birder who spent
some time birding in NC about 20 years ago, sent to Derb Carter about the
Buncombe County swan.

---------------

I hope this email finds you doing well. I regularly peruse the Carolina
Birding listserv and have been following the discussion of this swan. Both
Tundra and Trumpeter swans are regular in Iowa (the latter are now more
common) and this is a frequent i.d. challenge we experience. From that
experience, I will say that the Buncombe Co. swan is absolutely a Trumpeter
Swan (probably a subadult). The Jay Wherley photos from 24 Feb are
conclusive and show the pink tomium, shape of feathering on the forehead,
massive bill, head shape, etc. very clearly. One objective feature that can
be easily measured on these photos is the comparison of distances between
the eye and (1) the tip of the bill, and (2) the rear of the head. On this
bird, the ratio of #1 to #2 is >1.5 whereas on Tundra Swan it would be
<<1.5. A nice bird for western NC.

I suspect this conversation will happen more frequently in the upcoming
years as Trumpeter Swans continue to increase. They were downright common
in parts of Iowa this winter with a couple of locales each hosting >300
birds all winter!

Cheers,

Steve
**********
Stephen J. Dinsmore
Department of Natural Resource Ecology & Management
Iowa State University
203 Science II
Ames, IA 50011
Phone: 515-294-1348 <(515)%20294-1348>
E-mail: <cootjr...>
Web: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.public.iastate.edu_-7Ecootjr_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=f0c94_X85nVCX_4h0l_RVS-4GspPmEhLwKjC-8qIhSw&s=jNmWIXy6A6IU-Kqb1GUoj0GAoLHWkyiBBy4NTRlG_zg&e=

---------------------------

In addition, Wayne Forsythe e-mailed me that:

"For what it's worth, since 1995, we have had over 30 sightings of
Greater Scaup in the mountains of WNC! Many consisted of multiple birds."

So, I was mistaken in that there were barely 10 mountain records. This is
in regard to the photo of the Greater Scaup on the CBC Photo Gallery. I
will update the Birds of North Carolina species account accordingly for the
scaup in the mountain region.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

 

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Date: 3/8/17 7:13 am
From: Tom Krakauer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Hawk question
I had a hawk sitting in a tree right off my deck. Buteo shape without a long accipiter tail. The tail did not have prominent banding. It had a light colored breast with dark streaking. The streaking was not a band across the chest like on sees on a Red-tailed Hawk, but covered much of the chest with no hint of a lighter throat patch. It had a bright yellow cere. So my best guess is that it was a juvenile red-shouldered hawk.

Do last year's juveniles still retain their juvenile plumage into March, or could it be a 2017 juvenile?

Tom Krakauer
Bahama, NC


Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 3/7/17 6:23 pm
From: Jay Wherley (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: : Trumpeter Swan still on French Broad River, Asheville
I heard back from Trumpeter Swan Society today regarding the 3 swans
seen Christmas 2016
at about the same location as the recent confirmed Trumpeter Swan.

Their response is quoted below. (I've changing my ID in that list from
Tundra to 3 Trumpeter Swans.)

Photos they reviewed are included in this checklist from that day:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S33190316&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=mggmvfQorfmRfeNlAEqZTwuVCHMr7hZY1s505yYWc7M&s=cs-1Te9kZL4gqg3vngJonkMxzLaoxZKySp4s0-3nuHk&e=

(As far as I know, the group of 3 "Swan or goose" was first
seen/reported to the EMAS list by
Nancy Herbert/Michael Galovic on 24 Dec 2016 with 2 cell phone photos.)

Jay Wherley
Asheville NC

Subject: Follow-up on North Carolina mountains Trumpeter Swan - earlier visit?
Date: Tue, Mar 7, 2017 at 6:57 PM

"Hi Jay,
Dr. Gary Ivey and I [Margaret Smith, Executive Director] were able to
touch base today to review and discuss your photos.
I am copying him here in case you have further questions.

He is 90% sure they are trumpeter swans, most likely brood mates.
Signs of being trumpeter swans include the deep V shape of the bill
between the eyes, the flatter head shape
(especially the top of the head) creating more of a wedge-shape head.
Did you hear any sounds from them? Where were their parents?

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.sibleyguides.com_2006_02_distinguishing-2Dtrumpeter-2Dand-2Dtundra-2Dswans_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=mggmvfQorfmRfeNlAEqZTwuVCHMr7hZY1s505yYWc7M&s=WRSLAYaHUHlWV7tW3JKQR0_0oEAflow93Kjehw0PKp4&e=


It is pretty difficult to tell tundra swans from trumpeter swans,
especially when they are cygnets and change over time."


On Fri, Feb 24, 2017 at 2:22 PM, Jay Wherley <wherley+<birding...> wrote:
> I went out today over lunch to try and get visuals and photographs of
> leg color on the Buncombe County/French Broad River Swan.
> It obliged with some views at about a 40 yard distance. I'd have to
> say the legs/feet are black. Some of the photos I've seen, and a few
> of mine, in certain lighting pop with more highlights, but the
> binocular view and most of the photos I've attached to the checklist
> support black legs/feet IMO. I also got a few forehead shots. The "top
> view" does make an argument to go with Tundra based on the thin bill
> connection to eye, rather than thick per
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.sibleyguides.com_2006_02_distinguishing-2Dtrumpeter-2Dand-2Dtundra-2Dswans_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=mggmvfQorfmRfeNlAEqZTwuVCHMr7hZY1s505yYWc7M&s=WRSLAYaHUHlWV7tW3JKQR0_0oEAflow93Kjehw0PKp4&e=
>
> Checklist with 10 photos here:
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S34764235&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=mggmvfQorfmRfeNlAEqZTwuVCHMr7hZY1s505yYWc7M&s=aB8N75oZrNn_Phb0kD9yFqXol4QXVRYaAgLaIxVR_DM&e=
>
> I almost think in the second photo on the checklist that the yellow
> Tundra mark may be starting to appear, but that could just be an
> artifact. (Last years juvenile Tundra Swan at Beaver Lake had this
> mark become more distinct over the Jan/Feb time it was here.)
>
> Anyway - wanted to provide some more evidence to see if it helps ID
> this swan. (I'm listing it in my checklist as Tundra at this time.)
>
> Jay Wherley
> Asheville, NC
>
>
>
> On 2/24/17 6:57 AM, Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
>> Hello all,
>>
>>
>>
>> I believe it is a Trumpeter, see this link. Middle bill pink is normal for Trumpeter, Tundra juvenile would have more pink. Leg color better and probably most compelling case for
>> Trumpeter and retaining gray plumage longer for subadult bird fits for Trumpeter.
>>
>>
>>
>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.trumpeterswansociety.org_juvenile-2Dswans.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=mggmvfQorfmRfeNlAEqZTwuVCHMr7hZY1s505yYWc7M&s=JZc_p-pjPkuSvIEyUudQFVcTgaWUQrjyz1sW1g9XSJo&e=
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.trumpeterswansociety.org_juvenile-2Dswans.html&d=DwMGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=nejclrBwh_Bq3lBsnLBBLiheE_YHaKFwgLKA6F8HYyM&s=uO4tV_qXk5Gc9SNJZ2O0kD-8iBoq68HgkTr-VF3FHv0&e=>
>>
>>
>>
>> here is text if link not working:
>>
>>
>>
>> Both Trumpeter and Tundra juveniles are gray in fall and winter. Tundras are brighter silvery gray with black legs and feet. Trumpeters are darker sooty gray, especially in the
>> head and neck area, and their leg and foot color is primarily yellow-orange mottling with some black. Tundra juveniles begin turning white in late December and by mid March are
>> nearly all white. Trumpeter juveniles usually remain darker gray longer, with gray feathers on the head and neck persisting well into spring. In winter, Trumpeter juveniles may
>> vary in age by up to 6 weeks due to geographic differences in hatching dates. As a result, they show considerable individual and geographic variation in the timing of their molt
>> into white plumage. Tundra bill color is usually mottled pink with black tip, with less black at the base than Trumpeters. Trumpeter bills are black at base and tip with a pink
>> middle. Juvenile bill color in winter gradually shifts to all black in both species.
>>
>>
>>
>> Now look at these pics on eBird of the Asheville bird.
>>
>>
>>
>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S34629890&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=mggmvfQorfmRfeNlAEqZTwuVCHMr7hZY1s505yYWc7M&s=QAsVlgyF4GdQMbHkaSnbouN8TbUeW2DoA3L1e1PlBU8&e=
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S34629890&d=DwMGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=nejclrBwh_Bq3lBsnLBBLiheE_YHaKFwgLKA6F8HYyM&s=LvBbP5Wr46yUkif8UTr3LPB6mCzga6jmXSps4nxUKSQ&e=>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Jamie Adams
>>
>> Wilmington, NC
>>
>>
>>
>> *From:*<carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] *On Behalf Of *Harry LeGrand
>> *Sent:* Thursday, February 23, 2017 4:52 PM
>> *To:* ATCClack <atcclack...>
>> *Cc:* Simon Thompson <carolinabirds...>
>> *Subject:* Re: : Trumpeter Swan still on French Broad River, Asheville
>>
>>
>>
>> I haven't seen much if any discussion of this Buncombe County swan. While at Pungo refuge on Monday, Derb Carter and I studied hundreds and hundreds of Tundra Swans at very close
>> range -- less than 100 yards away thru 30+ scopes. We saw none that were 15-20% larger, and thus all we saw were Tundras. So -- what's the connection and concern? Most of the
>> immatures -- identified by light sooty face and neck, if not some pink on the bill, _had a strong and clear V-feathering on the forehead where it meets the bill._ We did not see
>> this on adults -- white plumage and all dark bills (yellow spot or nor). The adults showed the characteristic rounded or straight-ish meeting of the feathers of the forehead with
>> the top of the bill. But MOST of the immature Tundra Swans showed the V-shape of the feathering at the top of the bill.
>>
>>
>>
>> My brother in TN e-mailed me earlier about concern over the ID of the Buncombe bird, thinking it might be a Tundra. A lot of the gestalt features I have seen in the photos lean me
>> toward a Tundra Swan -- such as the narrowness of the black bill where it meets the eye, shape of the bill, etc. Of course, we who have not seen the bird in the field cannot judge
>> its overall size from photos; it is a lot bigger than a Mallard in a few photos, but all swans are.
>>
>>
>>
>> I just read an e-bird report saying the bird is an immature. Some descriptions say the neck is light grayish or light sooty. So -- is the bird an immature? What other marks on
>> the bird -- besides the V-shape of feathering (and no yellow spot on the bill) -- lead folks to identifying the bird as a Trumpeter?
>>
>>
>>
>> Harry LeGrand
>>
>> Raleigh
>>
>>
>>
>> On Thu, Feb 23, 2017 at 1:36 PM, ATCClack <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
>>
>> Trumpeter swan is still at Ledges Park just a little bit north as of 12:30 today.
>>
>> Chris Clack
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE Device
>>
>>
>>
>> -------- Original message --------
>> From: Simon Thompson <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>>
>> Date: 2/18/17 5:37 PM (GMT-05:00)
>> To: <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>
>> Subject: Fwd: Trumpeter Swan on French Broad River, Asheville
>>
>> Folks
>>
>> We are pretty confident that the swan on the French Broad River just north of Asheville is indeed a sub-adult Trumpeter Swan. Photos have been uploaded to the Carolina Bird
>> Club website:
>>
>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_gallery_Johnston_trus.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=mggmvfQorfmRfeNlAEqZTwuVCHMr7hZY1s505yYWc7M&s=4hUTKBVF5-MFJRzFp_HR3qZoelQaqclFTavva-cf8z0&e=
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_gallery_Johnston_trus.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz%20-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LHuusX8cUFM8NW-cI8bCnLPkJmeAFVfQLkLeNKL9agc&s=RuphG-M16QbiCuAeQvo64VQQcjeGOnepcO1ey6DE764&e=>
>>
>>
>>
>> Thanks to Doug Johnston, Clifton Avery, John Koon and Tom Bush for getting photos that clinched the ID. It's a tough call, but the "V" shape of the white above the bill is
>> conclusive, Compare this to the U shaped or flat shape on the Tundra Swan.
>>
>> See Sibley's information for more details:
>>
>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.sibleyguides.com_2006_02_distinguishing-2Dtrumpeter-2Da&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=mggmvfQorfmRfeNlAEqZTwuVCHMr7hZY1s505yYWc7M&s=p8R0FVEYYLh3iUn8mj1ayAl3UQxPTV91CgwuJ-ZHwcI&e= nd-tundra-swans/
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.sibleyguides.com_2006_02_distinguishing-2Dtrumpeter-2Dand-2Dtundra-2Dswans_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LHuusX8cUFM8NW-cI8bCnLPkJmeAFVfQLkLeNKL9agc&s=D43QzZW6ijcAOsHXGJEKlj-6KwA-s3INpnaZVoe54No&e=>
>>
>>
>>
>> A few photos are also attached
>>
>>
>>
>> Directions: Go to Ledges Whitewater River Park on the French Broad River (Alexander)
>>
>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps_place_Ledges-2BWhitewater-2BRiver-2BPark_-4035.6845176-2C-2D82.6196865-2C17z_data-3D-214m5-213m4-211s0x0-3A0xc81f18538ccbcb6c-218m2-213d35.6845132-214d-2D82.617498-3Fhl-3Den-26authuser-3D0&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=mggmvfQorfmRfeNlAEqZTwuVCHMr7hZY1s505yYWc7M&s=lAvFH6aK2Gf0Qhcvuuc6XDGJh3k0wW88OWi7_UhDx6o&e=
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps_place_Ledges-2BWhitewater-2BRiver-2BPark_-4035.6845176-2C-2D82.6196865-2C17z_data-3D-214m5-213m4-211s0x0-3A0xc81f18538ccbcb6c-218m2-213d35.6845132-214d-2D82.617498-3Fhl-3Den-26authuser-3D0&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LHuusX8cUFM8NW-cI8bCnLPkJmeAFVfQLkLeNKL9agc&s=TsyK2_SDUL7L1fxndQjXiO_vIgzyUKmuvBDueyRqC6w&e=>
>>
>> Continue downstream for half a mile and park in the large pull- off. The swan was in the river (far side) near this pull-off around 4:30 PM today. Hope it's in the same place
>> tomorrow.
>>
>> As far as I know, this may be a first record for Western North Carolina.
>>
>> Simon
>>
>>
>> Simon RB Thompson
>>
>> Ventures Birding Tours
>>
>> Asheville, North Carolina
 

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Date: 3/7/17 6:06 pm
From: Dennis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Buncombe County - TRUMPETER SWAN
Thanks for the tips everyone. I was able to find the bird today, right around 4pm. It was on the far side across from the second pull off up, and the light wasn't great, so I can't add much to the debate

I took some pics, and if anything useful comes out of them, I'll let you know

Dennis Parslow

Falls Lake, Wake Forest NC

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 2, 2017, at 8:32 PM, Caroline Harvey (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I travelled North and was lucky to get good views of the swan from just North of Ledges Park. I parked at the pull in and walked to the path down at the riverside. This gave direct views to the swan across the river.
>
> My overriding view was this bird was too big to be close to a Tundra Swan. Overall size was Trumpeter like with long neck and heavy look.
> Naive I maybe but this was nothing like a Tundra/Bewicks Swan. Big guy all the way!
>
> Simon
> --
> Sent from Gmail Mobile

 

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Date: 3/7/17 4:58 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Greater Scaup on the Little Tennessee River, Macon Co., NC
I was looking at the photo of a scaup on the CBC Photo Gallery that the
photographer identified as a Lesser Scaup. This is a very nice photo of a
male Greater Scaup -- seen today. The very round head, even flattened on
top, with a slight greenish sheen, and the very pale back, are clearly
marks of a Greater Scaup. I just checked photos on Google, and they match
to a T. (I didn't need to do this, but just for the heck of it, I did.)

The Birds of North Carolina website, compiled by me, shows only about 10
previous mountains records.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

 

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Date: 3/7/17 3:09 pm
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Barnacle Goose
That would be Sarah Duke Gardens, usually shortened as Duke Gardens. And yes, all Duke Gardens waterfowl are pinioned and thus are considered captive and should not be eBirded. I invalidate all of these reports.

https://today.duke.edu/2016/03/new-waterfowl-arrive-duke-gardens#video

Kent Fiala

On 3/7/2017 5:53 PM, Brad Wood (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> The Barnacle Geese are the property of Sarah Gardens. They are not "countable" and should not be e-birded. In fact, all of the waterfowl at Sarah Gardens should be presumed captive and not e-birded.
>
>
> On Tue, Mar 7, 2017 at 4:07 PM, Bill <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
>
> Any more info on Peggy Maslow's goose? exact time and location? many thanks, Bill Steiner
>
>
> Sent from Outlook <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__aka.ms_weboutlook&d=DwMFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=O-1N1Gg2AeyKlWzZ0XbOTZYSeYisaOo9LCObaeMHR-s&s=cGs0dEFfnv3xN8C8XM7YvUPz9i-JmL2RhwZH-Er0sfk&e=>
>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 3/7/17 3:04 pm
From: Corey, Ed <ed.corey...>
Subject: Re: Barnacle Goose
I think Brad meant to say Sarah P. Duke Gardens.

Ed Corey
Inventory Biologist
NC Division of Parks and Recreation
12700 Bayleaf Church Road
Raleigh, NC 27614
(919) 841 4037
(919) 208 7864 (cell)

Sent from my mobile device
On Mar 7, 2017 5:54 PM, Brad Wood <carolinabirds...> wrote:
The Barnacle Geese are the property of Sarah Gardens. They are not "countable" and should not be e-birded. In fact, all of the waterfowl at Sarah Gardens should be presumed captive and not e-birded.



On Tue, Mar 7, 2017 at 4:07 PM, Bill <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

Any more info on Peggy Maslow's goose? exact time and location? many thanks, Bill Steiner


Sent from Outlook<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__aka.ms_weboutlook&d=DwMFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=O-1N1Gg2AeyKlWzZ0XbOTZYSeYisaOo9LCObaeMHR-s&s=cGs0dEFfnv3xN8C8XM7YvUPz9i-JmL2RhwZH-Er0sfk&e=>


 

Back to top
Date: 3/7/17 2:54 pm
From: Brad Wood (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Barnacle Goose
The Barnacle Geese are the property of Sarah Gardens. They are not
"countable" and should not be e-birded. In fact, all of the waterfowl at
Sarah Gardens should be presumed captive and not e-birded.



On Tue, Mar 7, 2017 at 4:07 PM, Bill <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Any more info on Peggy Maslow's goose? exact time and location? many
> thanks, Bill Steiner
>
>
> Sent from Outlook
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__aka.ms_weboutlook&d=DwMFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=O-1N1Gg2AeyKlWzZ0XbOTZYSeYisaOo9LCObaeMHR-s&s=cGs0dEFfnv3xN8C8XM7YvUPz9i-JmL2RhwZH-Er0sfk&e=>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/7/17 1:07 pm
From: Bill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Barnacle Goose
Any more info on Peggy Maslow's goose? exact time and location? many thanks, Bill Steiner


Sent from Outlook<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__aka.ms_weboutlook&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=O-1N1Gg2AeyKlWzZ0XbOTZYSeYisaOo9LCObaeMHR-s&s=cGs0dEFfnv3xN8C8XM7YvUPz9i-JmL2RhwZH-Er0sfk&e= >

 

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Date: 3/6/17 3:57 pm
From: WALTER KENT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Red-shouldered Hawk
Nesting is in progress at The Armory Wetlands in Lenoir.
Walt Kent
Lenoir N.C.

 

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Date: 3/6/17 1:24 pm
From: Monroe Pannell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: (Eurasian) Green-winged teal Ocean Isle Beach NC
Hey Taylor I was down there over the weekend and talked about going to the WWTP on Friday as we were coming off Ocean Isle. Since I figured there had not been much at Twin Lakes I assumed wrongly about the WWTP. Will not take it for granted next time. Still had a good population of shorebirds at the east end of SSB -just before the tide reaches its high point that is where there is some mudflats still not covered  by the tide. Since we stay on SSB am able to check that out a good bit. Not much on the ocean but did see a few red breasted mergansers and a few red throated loons at the east end of the beach.  Best regards, Monroe Pannell Conover,NC Catawba Co.

On Monday, March 6, 2017 2:11 PM, Taylor Piephoff <carolinabirds...> wrote:


I observed a male this morning at the Ocean Isle Beach Wastewater Treatment Plant. Conspicuous and obvious horizontal pale stripe on the scapulars and no hint of a vertical white bar. Pale markings on the face were not obvious.
There is still a good number of ducks on the ponds here. The teal generally forage in the cattail patches that line some of the shorelines. They can be tough to see when doing this. I was fortunate to arrive when plant staff were around the ponds resulting in the ducks bunching up in the middle of the ponds to wait for staff to leave.
If anyone is interested in trying for this bird I park outside the gate and walk left along the chain link fence. Most of the birds were in the second pond to the left. In recent years staff have been reluctant to allow entry by birders but are used to seeing birders outside the fence. Depending on who you talk to you might be able to gain short-term entry.

Taylor Piephoff
Matthews, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 3/6/17 11:11 am
From: Taylor Piephoff (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: (Eurasian) Green-winged teal Ocean Isle Beach NC
I observed a male this morning at the Ocean Isle Beach Wastewater Treatment Plant. Conspicuous and obvious horizontal pale stripe on the scapulars and no hint of a vertical white bar. Pale markings on the face were not obvious.
There is still a good number of ducks on the ponds here. The teal generally forage in the cattail patches that line some of the shorelines. They can be tough to see when doing this. I was fortunate to arrive when plant staff were around the ponds resulting in the ducks bunching up in the middle of the ponds to wait for staff to leave.
If anyone is interested in trying for this bird I park outside the gate and walk left along the chain link fence. Most of the birds were in the second pond to the left. In recent years staff have been reluctant to allow entry by birders but are used to seeing birders outside the fence. Depending on who you talk to you might be able to gain short-term entry.

Taylor Piephoff
Matthews, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 3/5/17 10:51 am
From: Jerry Kerschner <bogey...>
Subject: Re: Great Kiskadee still at Bear Island?
I’dd like to know myself...;
Jerry Kerschner, Pawleys Island, SC

From: Jim Edwards
Sent: Sunday, March 5, 2017 12:42 PM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Great Kiskadee still at Bear Island?

Has anyone seen the Great Kisdadee at Bear Island lately?


If you've got any relevant info, please write me off list.


Thanks.


Jim Edwards

jim(DOT)edwards(AT)furman(DOT)edu


Virus-free. www.avg.com

 

Back to top
Date: 3/5/17 9:43 am
From: Jim Edwards <jim.edwards...>
Subject: Great Kiskadee still at Bear Island?
Has anyone seen the Great Kisdadee at Bear Island lately?

If you've got any relevant info, please write me off list.

Thanks.

Jim Edwards
jim(DOT)edwards(AT)furman(DOT)edu

 

Back to top
Date: 3/5/17 9:27 am
From: Roger Smith <scbirder...>
Subject: Long-tailed Duck
Observed a female Long-tailed Duck off of the end of the Folly Beach Pier in Charleston SC for 20 minutes. Still there when I left.

Roger Smith

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 3/5/17 7:42 am
From: Joel Ludlam (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Many feeding American Woodcock, Lake Conestee, Greenville, SC
Retraction: I had Woodcock on the brain since some good birding with them
recently, and I totally morphed these Wilson's snipe into Woodcock.
Apologies all!

-Joel Ludlam

On Mar 5, 2017 10:30 AM, "Joel Ludlam" <jhludlam...> wrote:

> I'm sitting at the South bay observation deck (on the south side of South bay)
> watching at least 8 AMWO feeding on the far side of the bay, in the company
> of a single GRYE and KILL. High power scope definitely required, but the
> best views I've ever had of so many, so active, and in the late morning!
>
> If anyone tries, I'm sitting on the deck bench. There is an exposed rock/stump
> just breaking the surface to the north, currently with a turtle on it.
> They've been in the leaf litter right behind that stump.
>
> Good birding all!
>
> -Joel Ludlam
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/5/17 7:30 am
From: Joel Ludlam (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Many feeding American Woodcock, Lake Conestee, Greenville, SC
I'm sitting at the South bay observation deck (on the south side of South bay)
watching at least 8 AMWO feeding on the far side of the bay, in the company
of a single GRYE and KILL. High power scope definitely required, but the
best views I've ever had of so many, so active, and in the late morning!

If anyone tries, I'm sitting on the deck bench. There is an exposed rock/stump
just breaking the surface to the north, currently with a turtle on it.
They've been in the leaf litter right behind that stump.

Good birding all!

-Joel Ludlam

 

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Date: 3/4/17 7:42 pm
From: \<megascops.2014...>\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Vikings killing birds - clean URL
Hi,
Here's a clean link -- with no tracking info-- for that story:http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/birds-perish-new-vikings-stadium/

The link in the post below has all sorts of tracking info.
Hopefully something can be done about the birds colliding into glass. 
Resources:http://www.audubon.org/magazine/november-december-2008/when-birds-and-glass-collide


Mary KMassachusetts
------ Original message------From: Cotter, Michael G Date: Sat, Mar 4, 2017 9:21 PMTo: <carolinabirds...>;Cc: Subject:Vikings killing birds
Hello all! My son-in-law sent me this link: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.pbs.org_newshour_rundown_birds-2Dperish-2Dnew-2Dvikings-2Dstadium_&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=vIZY2_5mQkJkzDd_fRWn77daIgQxGtDg2f2GHCM5jqQ&s=ij_dHtIlBRcAAQMrTZslwY7TMuSy8KkT_wQLFvmV9oA&e=

(I don't think that the fact that he is a Green Bay Packers fan has anything to do with it).

Michael G. Cotter
Greenville NC

 

Back to top
Date: 3/4/17 6:21 pm
From: Cotter, Michael G <COTTERMI...>
Subject: Vikings killing birds
Hello all! My son-in-law sent me this link: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.pbs.org_newshour_rundown_birds-2Dperish-2Dnew-2Dvikings-2Dstadium_&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=vIZY2_5mQkJkzDd_fRWn77daIgQxGtDg2f2GHCM5jqQ&s=ij_dHtIlBRcAAQMrTZslwY7TMuSy8KkT_wQLFvmV9oA&e=

(I don't think that the fact that he is a Green Bay Packers fan has anything to do with it).

Michael G. Cotter
Greenville NC
 

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Date: 3/4/17 12:06 pm
From: Ken Goldsmith (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Pungo update
I’m considering heading out to Pungo Lake tomorrow. Does anyone have an update on whether the waterfowl are still there in good numbers?

Ken Goldsmith
Raleigh
 

Back to top
Date: 3/4/17 10:56 am
From: Stacy and Natalie Barbour (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Tundra Swans plentiful at Pungo Lake
Yesterday (Friday) we made the trip to Pungo Lake from Raleigh and the swans are still present in the thousands along with many ducks. As we were leaving on Pat's Road we noticed five Greater White-fronted Geese hanging out with a lone Canada Goose.
Remember if you are traveling there from the west or north that a bridge is still out on Hwy 45/99 and the unmarked detour is frustrating (a fact I forgot, but certainly experienced). Access from Hwy 264 is better.

Stacy Barbour
Raleigh, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 3/4/17 8:41 am
From: Jim George (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Pectoral Sandpipers in Durham
The Pectoral Sandpipers are still there this morning at the Beaver Marsh
Preserve in Durham. Thanks to Dave for alerting us since they were lifers
for us.

Jim and Mary George
Chapel Hill, NC

On Fri, Mar 3, 2017 at 3:02 PM, David Hart <david.hart...> wrote:

> Unusual for this time of year around here: four Pectoral Sandpipers
> hanging out with Wilson’s Snipes at the Beaver Marsh in Durham, NC, this
> afternoon. Photos with eBird report: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=FES4VZe2dAILjnoWorwsotA04VTAK-OxBNKwxHnT21k&s=7yincMRIljY6qByO9_MFcMwh3jGx3GxUOf7HwT-Uvhg&e=
> ebird/view/checklist/S34935739
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S34935739&d=DwMF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=O7ZoBdXFHY3r7PYQkXN8lVEIOCTUEjQZxOzpgsq7kMM&s=iaN22_7m--omqzUrNIE3hb98woYU9_hTUiE8DV0qWcc&e=>
>
> Dave Hart
> Chapel Hill, NC
>

 

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Date: 3/4/17 7:39 am
From: Jerzy Smykla (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Help--possible Glaucous (maybe Iceland) at Wrightsville Beach Mason Inlet
Glaucus Gull is still present at Wrightsville Beach Mason Inlet (the North end of WB).

When I came early in the mourning it was not there but, it showed up again at 7:40am and landed on the beach on Figure Eight Island (on the inland side of the beach) in a group of Herring Gulls. It was still there half an hour latter when I left.

CheersJurek SmyklaWilmington NC
 

From: Jamie Adams <carolinabirds...>
To: Matt Spangler <spanglerwoodbirds...>; "<carolinabirds...>" <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Friday, March 3, 2017 7:14 PM
Subject: RE: Help--possible Glaucous (maybe Iceland) at Wrightsville Beach Mason Inlet

#yiv1127651739 #yiv1127651739 -- _filtered #yiv1127651739 {panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4;} _filtered #yiv1127651739 {font-family:Calibri;panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;}#yiv1127651739 #yiv1127651739 p.yiv1127651739MsoNormal, #yiv1127651739 li.yiv1127651739MsoNormal, #yiv1127651739 div.yiv1127651739MsoNormal {margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:11.0pt;}#yiv1127651739 a:link, #yiv1127651739 span.yiv1127651739MsoHyperlink {color:#0563C1;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv1127651739 a:visited, #yiv1127651739 span.yiv1127651739MsoHyperlinkFollowed {color:#954F72;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv1127651739 span.yiv1127651739EmailStyle17 {color:windowtext;}#yiv1127651739 span.yiv1127651739EmailStyle18 {color:#1F497D;}#yiv1127651739 span.yiv1127651739EmailStyle19 {color:#1F497D;}#yiv1127651739 .yiv1127651739MsoChpDefault {font-size:10.0pt;} _filtered #yiv1127651739 {margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}#yiv1127651739 div.yiv1127651739WordSection1 {}#yiv1127651739 It was still there on the North End when I got there at 5:45pm.  Definitely Glaucous.  I got some bad pics..   Jamie Adams Wilmington, NC   From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>]On Behalf Of Matt Spangler
Sent: Friday, March 03, 2017 7:10 PM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Help--possible Glaucous (maybe Iceland) at Wrightsville Beach Mason Inlet   Thanks to those who responded so rapidly, consensus being Glaucous based on size. I forgot to mention that it was around the same size as nearby Herrings, maybe slightly larger.   Thank you!   Matt Spangler     From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>]On Behalf Of Matt Spangler
Sent: Friday, March 03, 2017 7:02 PM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Help--possible Glaucous (maybe Iceland) at Wrightsville Beach Mason Inlet   Today (Friday) between 1:30 and 3 pm an apparent immature Glaucous or maybe Iceland Gull was hanging out at the north end of Wrightsville Beach (Mason Inlet) with other gulls and terns, providing great looks. I would appreciate help confirming the species—photos are in the ebird checklist linked below. The bird had entirely white plumage and a two-toned bill that looked more like 1cy Glaucous than Iceland, but I am admittedly not familiar with either.     https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S34941060&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=h7R26sAkAK2apNopT8bMS1UZpOWA3MXB4Gcq1_b0Z04&s=KBt6pwAouW8xW5_DDzZTa8fGghnb3_zei2ZnysyWyno&e=   Good luck if you are in the area, hope it sticks around!   Thanks!   Matt Spangler currently Wrightsville Beach NC   ********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************ This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank you. **********************************************************************


 

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Date: 3/4/17 7:02 am
From: Steve Compton <scompton1251...>
Subject: White-fronted Geese present now Dobbins Farm
Three White-fronted Geese reported earlier this week by Jeff Click present now Dobbins Farm, Townsville, SC second pond. Located by Ventures leader Clifton Avery.

Steve Compton

Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
 

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Date: 3/4/17 4:14 am
From: james poling (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Trumpeter Swan near Asheville, NC
Here is another picture of the Trumpeter Swan that gives a different size perspective in relation to the Canada Geese.


> On Mar 4, 2017, at 6:50 AM, Simon Thompson <simonrbt...> wrote:
>
> Or else the Canada is very small.........
> :)
> S
>
> Simon RB Thompson
> Ventures Birding Tours
> Asheville, North Carolina
>
> Check out our 2017 birding & nature tours - International <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_InternationalTours.html&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=vPkwuDhSA_W6dNnhCdEQPadtA0YrXgGEkZ-mXY1x1b0&s=i4KwhfUeBl_IjJV7JzaCVAftBPmYpg7rc9PNqHQ2Eu8&e= >, USA & Canada <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_NorthAmerica.html&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=vPkwuDhSA_W6dNnhCdEQPadtA0YrXgGEkZ-mXY1x1b0&s=6pO_W6j1440-yQ21-lfZGRf3Y6QhRfeYOegljbP2r1w&e= >, and WNC day trips <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_DayTrips.html&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=vPkwuDhSA_W6dNnhCdEQPadtA0YrXgGEkZ-mXY1x1b0&s=FB9h0VCppV4PqAuig-FGEWY2eDTy7FNShV_LSF7MWbU&e= >
> Like us on Facebook at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_pages_Ventures-2DBirding-2DTours_207237043263-3Fref-3Dhl&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=vPkwuDhSA_W6dNnhCdEQPadtA0YrXgGEkZ-mXY1x1b0&s=0JK2WqWYoQrS__QVO940UIDMNjDn9sJ91I1XInaWSUg&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_pages_Ventures-2DBirding-2DTours_207237043263-3Fref-3Dhl&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=vPkwuDhSA_W6dNnhCdEQPadtA0YrXgGEkZ-mXY1x1b0&s=0JK2WqWYoQrS__QVO940UIDMNjDn9sJ91I1XInaWSUg&e= >
>
>

 

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Date: 3/4/17 3:49 am
From: james poling (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Trumpeter Swan near Asheville, NC
Simon Thompson commented on the size of the Trumpeter Swan at Ledges River Park north of Asheville. I remember I had this picture in my file from last Monday. I agree with Simon that this is a large bird.




james poling, Black Mountain, North Carolina, Buncombe County
<jnpoling...>







 

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Date: 3/3/17 8:20 pm
From: Rbakelaar (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Glaucous Gull Photos
All,

Nice photos of the Glaucous. However, I was curious as to the identity of the adult Gull in the third and fourth photos. It appears to have dark coloration that extends to the superior mandible from the gonys of the lower. The mantle appears darker than I would expect for a Herring. Also, the legs look rather yellow-green. Iris color I can't determine........Winter plumage California Gull????? Maybe I'm reading too much into that one??? Also not sure if the partial adult in the second is the same bird in the third and fourth.

This is why I like Heermann's gulls....not much challenge there!

Ryan.


Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 3/3/17 4:14 pm
From: Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Help--possible Glaucous (maybe Iceland) at Wrightsville Beach Mason Inlet
It was still there on the North End when I got there at 5:45pm. Definitely Glaucous. I got some bad pics..

Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC

From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Matt Spangler
Sent: Friday, March 03, 2017 7:10 PM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Help--possible Glaucous (maybe Iceland) at Wrightsville Beach Mason Inlet

Thanks to those who responded so rapidly, consensus being Glaucous based on size. I forgot to mention that it was around the same size as nearby Herrings, maybe slightly larger.

Thank you!

Matt Spangler


From: <carolinabirds-request...><mailto:<carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Matt Spangler
Sent: Friday, March 03, 2017 7:02 PM
To: <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>
Subject: Help--possible Glaucous (maybe Iceland) at Wrightsville Beach Mason Inlet

Today (Friday) between 1:30 and 3 pm an apparent immature Glaucous or maybe Iceland Gull was hanging out at the north end of Wrightsville Beach (Mason Inlet) with other gulls and terns, providing great looks. I would appreciate help confirming the species-photos are in the ebird checklist linked below. The bird had entirely white plumage and a two-toned bill that looked more like 1cy Glaucous than Iceland, but I am admittedly not familiar with either.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S34941060&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=AXuaKpN6k-UdkXo_5vEMAjVJonllCatuLZC2lqGImJY&s=MUB0by-D7spAj7w7FxRKHy-0ewONidVo0Mr02UALZo4&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S34941060&d=DwMFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=pPPFJJoVYXToS_TIH9zf-Tga5VHfdBR7IUQsIqpMWjc&s=ebpIf7C5ZXkmxf2To-fduTAzXS-TjkRQVCuFtISLozM&e=>

Good luck if you are in the area, hope it sticks around!

Thanks!

Matt Spangler
currently Wrightsville Beach NC

********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************ This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank you. **********************************************************************

 

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Date: 3/3/17 4:10 pm
From: Matt Spangler (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Help--possible Glaucous (maybe Iceland) at Wrightsville Beach Mason Inlet
Thanks to those who responded so rapidly, consensus being Glaucous based on size. I forgot to mention that it was around the same size as nearby Herrings, maybe slightly larger.

Thank you!

Matt Spangler


From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Matt Spangler
Sent: Friday, March 03, 2017 7:02 PM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Help--possible Glaucous (maybe Iceland) at Wrightsville Beach Mason Inlet

Today (Friday) between 1:30 and 3 pm an apparent immature Glaucous or maybe Iceland Gull was hanging out at the north end of Wrightsville Beach (Mason Inlet) with other gulls and terns, providing great looks. I would appreciate help confirming the species-photos are in the ebird checklist linked below. The bird had entirely white plumage and a two-toned bill that looked more like 1cy Glaucous than Iceland, but I am admittedly not familiar with either.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S34941060&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=35PpGEC0MymtLHZSl8s6-73V_wtu0M5DxDHkTycYkRY&s=JNnvIQ2R_w_8_o-7bSd3GsvAMtvJfGGoQPj5l-SZqzU&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S34941060&d=DwMFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=pPPFJJoVYXToS_TIH9zf-Tga5VHfdBR7IUQsIqpMWjc&s=ebpIf7C5ZXkmxf2To-fduTAzXS-TjkRQVCuFtISLozM&e=>

Good luck if you are in the area, hope it sticks around!

Thanks!

Matt Spangler
currently Wrightsville Beach NC


 

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Date: 3/3/17 4:02 pm
From: Matt Spangler (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Help--possible Glaucous (maybe Iceland) at Wrightsville Beach Mason Inlet
Today (Friday) between 1:30 and 3 pm an apparent immature Glaucous or maybe Iceland Gull was hanging out at the north end of Wrightsville Beach (Mason Inlet) with other gulls and terns, providing great looks. I would appreciate help confirming the species-photos are in the ebird checklist linked below. The bird had entirely white plumage and a two-toned bill that looked more like 1cy Glaucous than Iceland, but I am admittedly not familiar with either.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S34941060&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=pPPFJJoVYXToS_TIH9zf-Tga5VHfdBR7IUQsIqpMWjc&s=ebpIf7C5ZXkmxf2To-fduTAzXS-TjkRQVCuFtISLozM&e=

Good luck if you are in the area, hope it sticks around!

Thanks!

Matt Spangler
currently Wrightsville Beach NC


 

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Date: 3/3/17 12:03 pm
From: David Hart <david.hart...>
Subject: Pectoral Sandpipers in Durham
Unusual for this time of year around here: four Pectoral Sandpipers hanging out with Wilsons Snipes at the Beaver Marsh in Durham, NC, this afternoon. Photos with eBird report: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S34935739&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=O7ZoBdXFHY3r7PYQkXN8lVEIOCTUEjQZxOzpgsq7kMM&s=iaN22_7m--omqzUrNIE3hb98woYU9_hTUiE8DV0qWcc&e=

Dave Hart
Chapel Hill, NC

 

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Date: 3/3/17 11:25 am
From: Tom Krakauer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Turkey Trot

My son, Alan, sent me this video of a flock of turkeys marching around in a circle around a road killed cat. Speculation of trying to achieve a 10th life

Fun to look at, but except for the fact that we have turkeys in the Carolinas might be off topic.
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.npr.org_sections_thetwo-2Dway_2017_03_02_518200840_turkeys-2Dcircling-2Da-2Ddead-2Dcat-2Dare-2Dprobably-2Dwary-2Dnot-2Dworking-2Ddark-2Dmagic-3Futm-5Fsource-3Dtwitter.com-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dnpr-26utm-5Fmedium-3Dsocial-26utm-5Fterm-3Dnprnews&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=J7YaYELSQApxVlg4Jv2j5i_TgP1t5IRRIYoYv_O1sPc&s=jeqfDXjb6yVEPxbYHakMc4yu4hvvGLlP4zBtpqpyBwM&e=
>
>
Tom Krakauer
Bahama, NC


> __________________________
>
>
>
 

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Date: 3/3/17 11:12 am
From: Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Date correction in re CHBC Sat. Birding trip
Tomorrows (Sat., 4 March, NOT 14 March) Chapel Hill Bird Club outing will be to Mason Farm in Chapel Hill. As usual, this trip leaves the Glen Lennox parking lot (on the north side of 54 just east of the intersection with 15-501 in Chapel Hill) at 7:30 a.m.

Good birding!
Bob Rybczynski
Cary, NC


 

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Date: 3/3/17 9:09 am
From: Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: CHBC Sat. birding trip
Tomorrows (Sat., 14 March) Chapel Hill Bird Club outing will be to Mason Farm in Chapel Hill. As usual, this trip leaves the Glen Lennox parking lot (on the north side of 54 just east of the intersection with 15-501 in Chapel Hill) at 7:30 a.m.
Good birding!
Bob Rybczynski
Cary, NC

 

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Date: 3/3/17 4:36 am
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Dare County Lark Sparrow still present
Day 95 for the Lark Sparrow at UNC-CSI on Roanoke Island.
Jeff Lewis
Manteo

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 3/2/17 5:33 pm
From: Caroline Harvey (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Buncombe County - TRUMPETER SWAN
I travelled North and was lucky to get good views of the swan from just
North of Ledges Park. I parked at the pull in and walked to the path down
at the riverside. This gave direct views to the swan across the river.

My overriding view was this bird was too big to be close to a Tundra Swan.
Overall size was Trumpeter like with long neck and heavy look.
Naive I maybe but this was nothing like a Tundra/Bewicks Swan. Big guy all
the way!

Simon
--
Sent from Gmail Mobile

 

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Date: 3/2/17 3:09 pm
From: EASTMAN, CAROLINE <EASTMAN...>
Subject: Mystery teal at Santee Coastal
Last Sunday I was at Santee Coastal. I saw a bird with field marks consistent with a Cinnamon Teal -- cinnamon body and head. I did not see a white mark on its face consistent with the reported hybrid; the head appeared to be all cinnamon. However, I was not all that close. And I do not have a picture. The bird was not in the Peachtree empoundment; I didn't see anything unusual there. It was in the second empoundment on the north side of the main trail.

I am hesitant to call it a Cinnamon Teal without a picture or other observations, especially since there has been a well-documented hybrid in the area. However, I encourage anyone looking for interesting teals at Santee Coastal to check out as many empoundments as possible. The birds were clearly moving around a bit.

Caroline Eastman
Columbia, SC

 

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Date: 3/2/17 3:06 pm
From: Patrick Coin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: FOS Osprey Durham NC 3/2/17
Saw my first Osprey of the season flying north this blustery morning near
Parkwood Lake in southern Durham County NC.
Also notable were several Red-shouldered Hawks engaging in noisy
territorial disputes in the same area.
--
Patrick Coin
Durham, NC
<patrickcoin1...>

 

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Date: 3/2/17 9:35 am
From: Josh Southern (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Call for Winter '16-'17 reports for the "Briefs for the Files"
Dear Carolinabirders,

It's now time to submit your Winter '16-'17 (December 1st 2016 through
February 28th 2017) reports of noteworthy NC/SC bird sightings for
inclusion in the "Briefs for the Files" section of "The Chat," and in the
"Southern Atlantic Region" section of "North American Birds."

As always, I'm requesting reports of any unusual bird sightings - rare
species, late/early migrants, unusually high counts, etc. Basically, I'm
interested in any bird sightings that you feel are noteworthy. Please note
that not all reports submitted will be published and it's my responsibility
to decide which reports merit inclusion. With all reports, please include
the observers' names, the date, and the location (including county, if
known) of the sighting. For rare or hard-to-identify species, please
include details and/or photographs. Any photographs submitted may be
published, with a credit to the photographer, in "The Chat" and/or "North
American Birds."

Please email the reports to me at <joshsouthern79...> by the end of
March. If you send your report as an attached document, please also "cut
and paste" the report into the body of the email.

Thanks and Good Birding,
Josh Southern
Holly Springs, NC

 

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Date: 3/2/17 6:15 am
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Brookshire Park Boone Bird Walk this Saturday 8AM Boone NC
Saturday is the only day that gives an order, so "March Fo(u)rth" to the
free and fun, bird and nature walk at Brookshire Park in Boone NC to
help celebrate the coming of birding spring, this Saturday at 8AM. Our
earliest spring arrivals, the red-winged blackbirds and common grackles,
have been here for a few weeks now, and they will join all our regular
winter birds with perhaps some additional early birds. Come on out to
see and bring a friend. Be ready for some cool temperatures, and
hopefully the winds behind this front will have calmed a bit by then. We
meet at the main parking lot by the picnic shelter.

Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC


 

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Date: 3/1/17 4:12 pm
From: ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Anna's hummingbird- still here 😊
Hi everyone

For all of you who have been inquiring- yes, the adult male Anna's is still
here. However, he ventures out and about away from his primary feeder a
little more time each day. And he has been using a different feeder at
dusk the past few evenings- and spending up to 5 minutes drinking. This is
a behavior the regular RTHU hummers in the yard show just before migrating
either in the fall or spring. While the RTHUs in the yard are exhibiting
various stages of molt - from body feathers to retrices to primaries (but
not gorget feathers yet), he is not molting at all.


So, who knows how much longer he will stay- but he sure is beautiful!

Ann
--
Ann Maddock <am.hummingbird.photos...> Hatteras Island, NC

 

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Date: 3/1/17 2:28 pm
From: Olwen Jarvis <Olwen...>
Subject: First ospreys!
Friends,



I heard the unmistakable sound a few minutes ago! Grabbed my binos..not
necessary.three beautiful Ospreys were circling overhead.



Location, Northwest creek off the Neuse river, Fairfield Harbour, New Bern,
NC.



Mrs. Olwen Jarvis.


 

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Date: 3/1/17 5:37 am
From: Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: FOS Osprey - Dare County, Roanoke Island
Good Morning Birders,

I observed my first-of-the-season Osprey this morning at Water Plant Road
on the way to Wanchese on Roanoke Island, NC.

Jim Gould
Southern Shores, NC

 

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Date: 2/28/17 4:25 pm
From: Christine Stoughton-Root (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Congrats Bailey Eichorn!
Wow Jack thanks for passing that on!
Christine
> On Feb 28, 2017, at 7:21 PM, Jack Rogers <jack...> wrote:
>
> C-birders,
> Great news today. Fellow Carolina Young Birder Bailey Eichorn, and one of the recipients of the new CBC Young Birders Scholarships (young birders, you can still enter! Enter at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_grants_ybc_event.html&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=6vUQC_kKNmvPzmtYGURNbMW4O89bUCYgT-zqCEcOsZY&s=cyw6fqQTgMLY3IBaojs2akt0OCKt0ItHkIEupsYCNaM&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_grants_ybc_event.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=eyk-ltcQ3Y7EU8jAO3vnESNot8X28aN1Xk4JYMqBFi4&s=gxNBJeY_GubJMCmtB_gRQpUTwsqnX862YVCEdar-rO4&e=>), has won American Birding Association's award of Young Birder of the year! This is a very difficult task to achieve, as Bailey beat out dozens of other young birders in his age group to tie with a young birder from California for first place. As far as I know (please do correct me if I am wrong), Bailey is the first winner of ABA Young Birder of the Year from the Carolinas! We are very proud of you Bailey!
> To read the whole article, visit https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__youngbirders.aba.org_2017_02_2017-2Daba-2Dyby.html&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=6vUQC_kKNmvPzmtYGURNbMW4O89bUCYgT-zqCEcOsZY&s=gGUT64uWvxfDjhb_4cMCVKmcD4lOSXVefIDi1dp7FOk&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__youngbirders.aba.org_2017_02_2017-2Daba-2Dyby.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=eyk-ltcQ3Y7EU8jAO3vnESNot8X28aN1Xk4JYMqBFi4&s=PBy4tZhKK_jBWKJ0f9ofDKWhYcbetefLKTDhAkzG2TU&e=>. Unfortunately at this time the roster is not working but hopefully will be fixed soon.
> Just some more proof that the money donated by CBC members really does affect and assist us Young Birders!
> Great job Bailey,
> Jack Rogers
> Mt Pleasant, SC
>
> --
> Jack Rogers
> Mt Pleasant, SC
> My Flickr page <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_90726323-40N05_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=eyk-ltcQ3Y7EU8jAO3vnESNot8X28aN1Xk4JYMqBFi4&s=yHiC91YDw73DUgGUuZWKPLO4K0njjZYzfa5Lp8fFl3s&e=>


 

Back to top
Date: 2/28/17 4:24 pm
From: ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Congrats Bailey Eichorn!
WHAT A GREAT ACHIEVEMENT!!



On Tue, Feb 28, 2017 at 7:22 PM Jack Rogers <jack...> wrote:

> C-birders,
> Great news today. Fellow Carolina Young Birder Bailey Eichorn, and one of
> the recipients of the new CBC Young Birders Scholarships (young birders,
> you can still enter! Enter at
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_grants_ybc_event.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=mLrLIDkvaEGNndv89F2S1bd8EjvPHIORrhGr7L3i1OU&s=LA6QjtnE7RTKlnRttai3qJ-gOMlAW8Rb6HRWsb04X84&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_grants_ybc_event.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=eyk-ltcQ3Y7EU8jAO3vnESNot8X28aN1Xk4JYMqBFi4&s=gxNBJeY_GubJMCmtB_gRQpUTwsqnX862YVCEdar-rO4&e=>),
> has won American Birding Association's award of Young Birder of the year!
> This is a very difficult task to achieve, as Bailey beat out dozens of
> other young birders in his age group to tie with a young birder from
> California for first place. As far as I know (please do correct me if I am
> wrong), Bailey is the first winner of ABA Young Birder of the Year from the
> Carolinas! We are very proud of you Bailey!
> To read the whole article, visit
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__youngbirders.aba.org_2017_02_2017-2Daba-2Dyby.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=mLrLIDkvaEGNndv89F2S1bd8EjvPHIORrhGr7L3i1OU&s=_GMA1xcAT6rkQG9ZKtBjRhBdC9A-Evdj_FUVb_Kv4PU&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__youngbirders.aba.org_2017_02_2017-2Daba-2Dyby.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=eyk-ltcQ3Y7EU8jAO3vnESNot8X28aN1Xk4JYMqBFi4&s=PBy4tZhKK_jBWKJ0f9ofDKWhYcbetefLKTDhAkzG2TU&e=>.
> Unfortunately at this time the roster is not working but hopefully will be
> fixed soon.
> Just some more proof that the money donated by CBC members really does
> affect and assist us Young Birders!
> Great job Bailey,
> Jack Rogers
> Mt Pleasant, SC
>
>
> --
> Jack Rogers
> Mt Pleasant, SC
> My Flickr page
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_90726323-40N05_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=eyk-ltcQ3Y7EU8jAO3vnESNot8X28aN1Xk4JYMqBFi4&s=yHiC91YDw73DUgGUuZWKPLO4K0njjZYzfa5Lp8fFl3s&e=>
>
--
Ann Maddock <am.hummingbird.photos...> Hatteras Island, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 2/28/17 4:22 pm
From: Jack Rogers <jack...>
Subject: Congrats Bailey Eichorn!
C-birders,
Great news today. Fellow Carolina Young Birder Bailey Eichorn, and one of
the recipients of the new CBC Young Birders Scholarships (young birders,
you can still enter! Enter at
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_grants_ybc_event.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=eyk-ltcQ3Y7EU8jAO3vnESNot8X28aN1Xk4JYMqBFi4&s=gxNBJeY_GubJMCmtB_gRQpUTwsqnX862YVCEdar-rO4&e= ), has won American
Birding Association's award of Young Birder of the year! This is a very
difficult task to achieve, as Bailey beat out dozens of other young birders
in his age group to tie with a young birder from California for first
place. As far as I know (please do correct me if I am wrong), Bailey is
the first winner of ABA Young Birder of the Year from the Carolinas! We
are very proud of you Bailey!
To read the whole article, visit
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__youngbirders.aba.org_2017_02_2017-2Daba-2Dyby.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=eyk-ltcQ3Y7EU8jAO3vnESNot8X28aN1Xk4JYMqBFi4&s=PBy4tZhKK_jBWKJ0f9ofDKWhYcbetefLKTDhAkzG2TU&e= . Unfortunately at
this time the roster is not working but hopefully will be fixed soon.
Just some more proof that the money donated by CBC members really does
affect and assist us Young Birders!
Great job Bailey,
Jack Rogers
Mt Pleasant, SC

--
Jack Rogers
Mt Pleasant, SC
My Flickr page <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_90726323-40N05_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=eyk-ltcQ3Y7EU8jAO3vnESNot8X28aN1Xk4JYMqBFi4&s=yHiC91YDw73DUgGUuZWKPLO4K0njjZYzfa5Lp8fFl3s&e= >

 

Back to top
Date: 2/28/17 8:38 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Latest (2017) version of the Dragonflies and Damselflies of NC website done
Folks:

The *Dragonflies and Damselflies of North Carolina* website has been
revised, with all of the 2016 (and earlier) records added. The latest PDF
is also done, so you can download that to your computer or print in out and
put it in a binder..

You will note a few changes to the website:
1. The map legends have been simplified, reducing 7-8 categories down to
5. The brighter colors are intended to catch your eye, and we prefer to
have Photo (online on the website) be the top confirmation category, over
Specimen/Collection, as more and more folks are documenting records with a
camera and not a net/specimen, and folks on the website can see the photos
and review their identification. We have removed Cuyler's name from the
legends, and segregated specimens by before or after the last 20 years.
Sightings, including reports with photos not uploaded online, are in a
separate color, and finally records without any data other than species,
county, and maybe observer/collector, are in the last category.

2. John Petranka and Mark Shields have been added as "authors", as they
not only reviewed essentially all photos on the website, they also reviewed
the text I have written and offered many suggestions. You should note that
a few dozen photos were judged to be inaccurately identified, and thus
moved to the correct species page. So, if you are wondering what happened
to your Mustached Clubtail photo, it might be in the Green-faced Clubtail
account, for example.

The website link is: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__dpr.ncparks.gov_odes_index.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=7bHEv17zggjX6yxoZPb3G0KsEeP6xA1UDofV2E2huGo&s=6ei8Ne0Y29FljJATODM7eYYde7WLODYuakiuxGLD3O8&e=

The URL to the download page for the 8th (206 pages) is:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__dpr.ncparks.gov_odes_a_ode-5Fapprox.php&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=7bHEv17zggjX6yxoZPb3G0KsEeP6xA1UDofV2E2huGo&s=-DTKa0FKr4cIZySusr7yhvOabYTEgruY9zEHuIybNMY&e=

Note that from the home page on the website, you can get to the PDF by
clicking on "Files to Download" near the top of the page. Also, remember
that the authors do *not* enter records for you. Records are entered by
you, yourself. Tom has given many of you a USERID and PASSWORD for data
entry (and photo upload). So, if you have records you want to get into the
database (and we hope you do), contact Tom.

Hope you enjoy the revised site (and revised maps and colors). Remember to
check the "Show Recent Occurrence Entries" often during the year to see
what has been entered recently into the database -- the color maps
automatically update with new records, as do the flight charts. And
remember to click on a colored county to see the records for the county.
Also remember to click on the View PDF next to the top photo or above the
map to see the latest flight charts of the species (as the flight charts
are automatically updated with any new record).

Enjoy, and let us know if you see errors or have trouble with downloads,
etc.

Harry LeGrand
<hlegrandjr...>

Tom Howard
<tom.howard...>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/28/17 5:27 am
From: Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Canvasback @ Lake Betz, NC
Just saw a Canvasback at Lake Betz, w/ a Mallard, near the dam.

Orange-crowned Warbler is still in the patch of wax myrtles/young pines.

Eddie Owens
Cary NC

 

Back to top
Date: 2/27/17 6:24 pm
From: Steve Buettner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Trumpeter Swan continuing today at Ledges Whitewater River Park, Feb 27, 2017, Buncombe County
I’ve posted ten images of the Buncombe County NC swan on ebird to add the pile already there.

Ledges Whitewater River Park, Buncombe, North Carolina, US
Feb 27, 2017 2:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Protocol: Stationary
Comments: Visited the Buncombe County Swan, still actively feeding. Find myself in the Trumpeter camp after examining my photos and comparing with comments others have previously made.

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) 15
Mallard 1
Carolina Chickadee 2
Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator) 1 About 40-50 yards from eastern bank of French Broad River. Feeding in vicinity of a group of Canada geese. Interesting to see that the pink on top of the bill has faded away (nearly? Hard to keep my imagination out of it, or perhaps the rather gray lighting had an effect) since the earliest pictures posted of this bird.

View this checklist online at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S34857208&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=hbyNCoy051ud5W1HlsnvvPp5FpqtXGpL1tz8OupkUqY&s=dU99m1pJj_V5nzzawUv229cLXt3hsIrMZhfbL7p_tb8&e=


Steve Buettner
302 Robertson Street
Burnsvillle, NC 28714
<stevebuettnerphoto...>
828-284-1741



 

Back to top
Date: 2/27/17 3:53 pm
From: <annbailes...>
Subject: 3 Greater White-fronted Geese at Dobbins Farm Ponds - Townville SC
My husband and I took a run at the Dobbins Farm Ponds tonight and saw three
greater white-fronted geese hanging with about a dozen Canada geese on the
north pond.

Ann Bailes
Anderson SC
<annbailes...>
 

Back to top
Date: 2/27/17 3:31 pm
From: Stu <sgibeau...>
Subject: Re: Marathon at Umstead SP in NC Saturday March 4 2017
I've run the marathon at Umstead and enjoyed birding while running. I swear the nuthatches were laughing at me the whole time. It's a big park so I wouldn't worry too much about it. Unlike road marathons they have a vary limited field, only 207 this year. I'd go to the race website and look at the route. There are areas of the park the runners don't go.

Here's the link to the map.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.umsteadmarathon.com_http-3A__www.umsteadmarathon.com__index.php-3Fpage-3Dcourse-2Dmap-2D2&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=gvIjhi0wyZoAqEX3nkid-9OnWAetXm6MjrDOmVi4g2I&s=IwC5m1QL1xw64gVcrM5eXmUMWMU5lWD09rNOOs3PSq4&e=

Stu Gibeau
Black Mountain, NC

On Feb 27, 2017, at 1:01 PM, Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:

Just a heads'-up to birders that there is a big (runners') Marathon in
Umstead State Park, Wake Co, NC, on Saturday, March 4, 2017. Areas
accessed via the Glenwood/70 (Crabtree) entrance are most affected,
but overall, it is NOT a good day to try and bird there!
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.umsteadmarathon.com_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=OCGPOnQKunsR5c3mNWJaTDLXBxyjF2BSziN0rfFiwaw&s=Vxrj8ZToDpw3p2Lnp7lzcTMK6gx-Bstr18TN4Ghejm0&e=
Erla Beegle, Raleigh, Wake Co, NC


Stu-Man-Fu
 

Back to top
Date: 2/27/17 10:02 am
From: Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Marathon at Umstead SP in NC Saturday March 4 2017
Just a heads'-up to birders that there is a big (runners') Marathon in
Umstead State Park, Wake Co, NC, on Saturday, March 4, 2017. Areas
accessed via the Glenwood/70 (Crabtree) entrance are most affected,
but overall, it is NOT a good day to try and bird there!
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.umsteadmarathon.com_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=OCGPOnQKunsR5c3mNWJaTDLXBxyjF2BSziN0rfFiwaw&s=Vxrj8ZToDpw3p2Lnp7lzcTMK6gx-Bstr18TN4Ghejm0&e=
Erla Beegle, Raleigh, Wake Co, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 2/26/17 9:00 pm
From: \Jeff Click\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Townville, SC - Pectoral Sandpiper, Greater White-fronted Geese
Birders,
I made a brief stop at the ponds at Dobbins Farm at Townville, SC, on Sunday
morning, and was surprised to find a very early PECTORAL SANDPIPER at the
more southern pond, as well as three GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE at the
northern pond, along with some more typical species there.

Good birding,

Jeff Click
Easley, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 2/26/17 4:11 pm
From: rdnc13 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Sunday evening Pungo report
Hi Folks

Derb Carter and I spent the last two hours of the day on the southwest side of the lake. Yes the evening flight of waterfowl from the lake and impoundments is still going on. Among the thousands of Tundra Swans and Snow Geese flying over and in the fields, the best birds we picked out were 5 Gr. White-fronted, 2 Ross's, and 20 Cackling Geese. Fifteen Cacklers flew over us, giving their distinctive calls. Five others were found in the field along Canal D road. The White-fronts were also in the field. By the way, we noted definitely fewer birds this time, so the birds must be in the process of leaving the area for the season.

Later, Ricky

Ricky Davis
Ricky Mount, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 2/26/17 3:31 pm
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Mottled Duck - Wrightsville Beach, NC
I've published Marty's photo as a Mallard/Mottled Duck.

Kent Fiala

On 2/26/2017 2:03 PM, Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> I have been curious about Motted Ducks as well. I read the article on Mottled Duck Hybridization by Tony Leukering and Bill Pranty available here: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_content_ebird_wp-2Dcontent_uploads_sites_55_eBird-5FMuddled-5FDucks.pdf&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=05OtuCHcAPNtpHjjj4_pcl2G3jbKPvY4WGpKAvc5smo&s=ev-HlqVztwscQbLER6WhbUyUVAz53i2zJxJQPe0ySKg&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_content_ebird_wp-2Dcontent_uploads_sites_55_eBird-5FMuddled-5FDucks.pdf&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=jaYfgFryfsRflEB3y01LYhM_7TaxrhoFxkmL5q5SpR0&s=yp-Qofs-KqMNfB47hLJqmKtWACvMmHQx8HZiV8zird4&e=>.
>
> I photographed a duck in Beaufort on January 14 that had several Mottled Duck traits, but had the streaky cheeks mentioned as a hybrid trait. I have uploaded a photo to the Carolina Bird Club Gallery as unidentified (so it isn't showing up yet) and have also included one in my eBird report linked below.
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S33654955&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=05OtuCHcAPNtpHjjj4_pcl2G3jbKPvY4WGpKAvc5smo&s=qkMyiwNYfdWCF_WyyWxUR62LJj7gukPBa_DLLdD8ekA&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S33654955&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=jaYfgFryfsRflEB3y01LYhM_7TaxrhoFxkmL5q5SpR0&s=Ja8ZFnUmeX6ZDNLneO5y27csrR8L3AIpQ5k9f_joylA&e=>
>
> How often do pure Mottled Ducks show up in our area? Where are the closest ducks that "fit the bill?"
>
> Marty Wall
> Beaufort & Eden, NC
>
>
>
> On Sun, Feb 26, 2017 at 11:32 AM, Sam Cooper <dmcooper2...> <mailto:<dmcooper2...>> wrote:
>
> It's been suggested this bird was a hybrid Mottled x Mallard. I can't disagree there are some traits (darker spot at rear of head and recurved tail feathers) suggestive of Mallard lineage. If the traits are not 100% supportive, is that alone enough to list in eBird as a hybrid, or how much confident evidence of a hybrid is needed before listing as such? Interested to hear what those in South Carolina are seeing. Is the bird from Wrightsville Beach (https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S34783228&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=QsriHQ3SXzfUrxHNACkYg5UZBRtAAAvtGjnD_cguEOY&s=hArI5Dct0Jc3UHGwdzZkqfkNz-vZFuNIsdi0lO5MTXI&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S34783228&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=QsriHQ3SXzfUrxHNACkYg5UZBRtAAAvtGjnD_cguEOY&s=hArI5Dct0Jc3UHGwdzZkqfkNz-vZFuNIsdi0lO5MTXI&e=> ) within the range of a typical/pure Mottled, and how common are hybrids in SC (vs. than the dozen or so records in eBird)? Appreciate the input.
>
> Sam Cooper
> Wilmington, NC
>
>
> ---------- Original Message ----------
> From: "Sam Cooper" <dmcooper2...> <mailto:<dmcooper2...>>
> To: <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>
> Subject: Mottled Duck - Wrightsville Beach, NC
> Date: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 15:45:15 GMT
>
> In the salt marsh this morning just south of the most northern parking lot with a female mallard near 34.233475, -77.778230. Birds are still around but flew to the south and landed again in the marsh. Posted a few photos in ebird (New Hanover County, NC Mason Inlet Waterbird Management Area).
>
> Sam Cooper
> Wilmington, NC
> ____________________________________________________________
> 1 Brilliant Tip Removes Wrinkles & Eye Bags In Just A Minute
> livinghealthnews.co <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__livinghealthnews.co&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=jaYfgFryfsRflEB3y01LYhM_7TaxrhoFxkmL5q5SpR0&s=VuL3KLlef0Ko06izlNS-1dAcWnsKv58o07vVZvyMZhI&e=>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__thirdpartyoffers.juno.com_TGL3141_58b3035ea1dcc35e5b18st04duc&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=QsriHQ3SXzfUrxHNACkYg5UZBRtAAAvtGjnD_cguEOY&s=LztgmufMQX9ASQHQOOYBNU-L3F8I8PALwkQEpWwSuag&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__thirdpartyoffers.juno.com_TGL3141_58b3035ea1dcc35e5b18st04duc&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=QsriHQ3SXzfUrxHNACkYg5UZBRtAAAvtGjnD_cguEOY&s=LztgmufMQX9ASQHQOOYBNU-L3F8I8PALwkQEpWwSuag&e=>
>
>


 

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Date: 2/26/17 2:56 pm
From: Sam Cooper <dmcooper2...>
Subject: Re: Mallard x Mottled Duck - Wrightsville Beach, NC
Marty (and others), The bird at Wrightsville certainly does not look like a "pure" Mottled, so the eBird entry has been changed to a mallard x mottled duck hybrid. Thanks for the input and great article. - Sam

Sam Cooper
Wilmington, NC

---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Marty Wall" (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
To: "<carolinabirds...>" <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Mottled Duck - Wrightsville Beach, NC
Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2017 14:03:41 -0500


I have been curious about Motted Ducks as well. I read the article on Mottled Duck Hybridization by Tony Leukering and Bill Pranty available here: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_content_ebird_wp-2Dcontent_uploads_sites_55_eBird-5FMuddled-5FDucks.pdf&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=7lUA6MZzgcoZMkv4W45p8xDLZj88QCtZ1OSXM3gRy5I&s=kbXoNlVr3OyCfNcHB3HJBvDrY5duWTr_CfQz3dJvI9k&e= . I photographed a duck in Beaufort on January 14 that had several Mottled Duck traits, but had the streaky cheeks mentioned as a hybrid trait. I have uploaded a photo to the Carolina Bird Club Gallery as unidentified (so it isn't showing up yet) and have also included one in my eBird report linked below. https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S33654955&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=7lUA6MZzgcoZMkv
4W45p8xDLZj88QCtZ1OSXM3gRy5I&s=hckqOnW6lygCjZcERj8JUf3WmmF57id33HXaMscS-so&e= How often do pure Mottled Ducks show up in our area? Where are the closest ducks that "fit the bill?" Marty WallBeaufort & Eden, NC
On Sun, Feb 26, 2017 at 11:32 AM, Sam Cooper <dmcooper2...> wrote:
It's been suggested this bird was a hybrid Mottled x Mallard. I can't disagree there are some traits (darker spot at rear of head and recurved tail feathers) suggestive of Mallard lineage. If the traits are not 100% supportive, is that alone enough to list in eBird as a hybrid, or how much confident evidence of a hybrid is needed before listing as such? Interested to hear what those in South Carolina are seeing. Is the bird from Wrightsville Beach (https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S34783228&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=QsriHQ3SXzfUrxHNACkYg5UZBRtAAAvtGjnD_cguEOY&s=hArI5Dct0Jc3UHGwdzZkqfkNz-vZFuNIsdi0lO5MTXI&e= ) within the range of a typical/pure Mottled, and how common are hybrids in SC (vs. than the dozen or so records in eBird)? Appreciate the input.

Sam Cooper
Wilmington, NC


---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Sam Cooper" <dmcooper2...>
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mottled Duck - Wrightsville Beach, NC
Date: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 15:45:15 GMT

In the salt marsh this morning just south of the most northern parking lot with a female mallard near 34.233475, -77.778230. Birds are still around but flew to the south and landed again in the marsh. Posted a few photos in ebird (New Hanover County, NC Mason Inlet Waterbird Management Area).

Sam Cooper
Wilmington, NC
____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________
Warning: Don't Use Probiotics Before You See This
Gundry MD
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__thirdpartyoffers.juno.com_TGL3141_58b35ce2d19d55ce2157dst02duc&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=7lUA6MZzgcoZMkv4W45p8xDLZj88QCtZ1OSXM3gRy5I&s=IZ_0Dgf0THxIWwiYuM7M_FJpesNwjju9jaGxQKOW1hI&e=
 

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Date: 2/26/17 2:01 pm
From: ann maddock (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Swallow tailed kites- Avon
We observed pair of swallow tailed kites in Avon ( 0ver the car wash at
Askins Creek) at 3:30 this afternoon
--
Ann Maddock <am.hummingbird.photos...> Hatteras Island, NC

 

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Date: 2/26/17 1:04 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Buncombe County Swan
After seeing Jay Wherley's excellent set of photos from Feb. 24 on eBird,
the several profile photos -- especially 3 and 4 -- do indeed show the
reddish gape, the long bill, straight bill line from the tip to the back of
the head, with the peak of the crown well beyond the eye. As I commented
before, the V-feathering above the bill is seen on immatures of both
Trumpeter and Tundra and is not definitive. The first handful of photos
had the bird mostly not in perfect profile with the neck extended, and made
me think it was a Tundra. So -- I now move into the Trumpeter camp thanks
to the excellent profile photos.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Sun, Feb 26, 2017 at 3:44 PM, Ben Ringer <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> The swan was still at the Ledges Riverside park Sat. afternoon at : 5:00
> p.m. but was a distance upriver to the right mostly in front of a small
> island with trees on. We walked a small fisherman's trail to get closer
> and better looks.
>
> Ben & Carol Ringer
>

 

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Date: 2/26/17 12:45 pm
From: Ben Ringer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Buncombe County Swan
The swan was still at the Ledges Riverside park Sat. afternoon at : 5:00
p.m. but was a distance upriver to the right mostly in front of a small
island with trees on. We walked a small fisherman's trail to get closer
and better looks.

Ben & Carol Ringer

 

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Date: 2/26/17 12:12 pm
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Ducks on Quaker Rd pond in Wilson County
In Wilson along Quaker Rd near US 264 Hwy, there are some interesting
groups of ducks. Buffleheads, Ringnecked ducks, ruddy ducks, and 3
canvasback.

An easy look from the quaker road overpass looking high over the pond.

Betsy Kane
Raleigh

 

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Date: 2/26/17 11:33 am
From: rdnc13 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Razorbills flight at Jennette's Pier
Hi Folks


Derb Carter and I spent the morning at Jennette's Pier at Nags Head and witnessed one of those impressive Razorbills flights. In 3.5 hours we counted almost 8,000 Razorbills flying north and many more spread out on the water too! We looked very hard for Dovekies or Murres but to no avail. Also Red-throated Loons put on a big show with over 3,200 counted moving north. We did have a few other goodies including a Pacific Loon flying north not very far off the end of the Pier, 3 Manx Shearwaters flying north(one was very close to the end of the Pier), and two Little Gulls (adult and 1st winter). Yesterday we did have 3 Dovekies, two off the Pier, and one out from the Ramada Inn North.

Later, Ricky

Ricky Davis
Ricky Mount, NC

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 2/26/17 11:04 am
From: Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Mottled Duck - Wrightsville Beach, NC
I have been curious about Motted Ducks as well. I read the article on
Mottled Duck Hybridization by Tony Leukering and Bill Pranty available
here:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_content_ebird_wp-2Dcontent_uploads_sites_55_eBird-5FMuddled-5FDucks.pdf&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=jaYfgFryfsRflEB3y01LYhM_7TaxrhoFxkmL5q5SpR0&s=yp-Qofs-KqMNfB47hLJqmKtWACvMmHQx8HZiV8zird4&e=
.

I photographed a duck in Beaufort on January 14 that had several Mottled
Duck traits, but had the streaky cheeks mentioned as a hybrid trait. I
have uploaded a photo to the Carolina Bird Club Gallery as unidentified (so
it isn't showing up yet) and have also included one in my eBird report
linked below.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S33654955&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=jaYfgFryfsRflEB3y01LYhM_7TaxrhoFxkmL5q5SpR0&s=Ja8ZFnUmeX6ZDNLneO5y27csrR8L3AIpQ5k9f_joylA&e=

How often do pure Mottled Ducks show up in our area? Where are the closest
ducks that "fit the bill?"

Marty Wall
Beaufort & Eden, NC



On Sun, Feb 26, 2017 at 11:32 AM, Sam Cooper <dmcooper2...> wrote:

> It's been suggested this bird was a hybrid Mottled x Mallard. I can't
> disagree there are some traits (darker spot at rear of head and recurved
> tail feathers) suggestive of Mallard lineage. If the traits are not 100%
> supportive, is that alone enough to list in eBird as a hybrid, or how much
> confident evidence of a hybrid is needed before listing as such?
> Interested to hear what those in South Carolina are seeing. Is the bird
> from Wrightsville Beach (https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-
> 3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S34783228&d=DwIF-g&c=
> imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-
> sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=QsriHQ3SXzfUrxHNACkYg5UZBRtAAA
> vtGjnD_cguEOY&s=hArI5Dct0Jc3UHGwdzZkqfkNz-vZFuNIsdi0lO5MTXI&e= ) within
> the range of a typical/pure Mottled, and how common are hybrids in SC (vs.
> than the dozen or so records in eBird)? Appreciate the input.
>
> Sam Cooper
> Wilmington, NC
>
>
> ---------- Original Message ----------
> From: "Sam Cooper" <dmcooper2...>
> To: <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: Mottled Duck - Wrightsville Beach, NC
> Date: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 15:45:15 GMT
>
> In the salt marsh this morning just south of the most northern parking lot
> with a female mallard near 34.233475, -77.778230. Birds are still around
> but flew to the south and landed again in the marsh. Posted a few photos
> in ebird (New Hanover County, NC Mason Inlet Waterbird Management Area).
>
> Sam Cooper
> Wilmington, NC
> ____________________________________________________________
> 1 Brilliant Tip Removes Wrinkles & Eye Bags In Just A Minute
> livinghealthnews.co
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__
> thirdpartyoffers.juno.com_TGL3141_58b3035ea1dcc35e5b18st04duc&d=DwIF-g&c=
> imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-
> sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=QsriHQ3SXzfUrxHNACkYg5UZBRtAAA
> vtGjnD_cguEOY&s=LztgmufMQX9ASQHQOOYBNU-L3F8I8PALwkQEpWwSuag&e=
>

 

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Date: 2/26/17 8:34 am
From: Sam Cooper <dmcooper2...>
Subject: Re: Mottled Duck - Wrightsville Beach, NC
It's been suggested this bird was a hybrid Mottled x Mallard. I can't disagree there are some traits (darker spot at rear of head and recurved tail feathers) suggestive of Mallard lineage. If the traits are not 100% supportive, is that alone enough to list in eBird as a hybrid, or how much confident evidence of a hybrid is needed before listing as such? Interested to hear what those in South Carolina are seeing. Is the bird from Wrightsville Beach (https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S34783228&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=QsriHQ3SXzfUrxHNACkYg5UZBRtAAAvtGjnD_cguEOY&s=hArI5Dct0Jc3UHGwdzZkqfkNz-vZFuNIsdi0lO5MTXI&e= ) within the range of a typical/pure Mottled, and how common are hybrids in SC (vs. than the dozen or so records in eBird)? Appreciate the input.

Sam Cooper
Wilmington, NC


---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Sam Cooper" <dmcooper2...>
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mottled Duck - Wrightsville Beach, NC
Date: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 15:45:15 GMT

In the salt marsh this morning just south of the most northern parking lot with a female mallard near 34.233475, -77.778230. Birds are still around but flew to the south and landed again in the marsh. Posted a few photos in ebird (New Hanover County, NC Mason Inlet Waterbird Management Area).

Sam Cooper
Wilmington, NC
____________________________________________________________
1 Brilliant Tip Removes Wrinkles & Eye Bags In Just A Minute
livinghealthnews.co
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__thirdpartyoffers.juno.com_TGL3141_58b3035ea1dcc35e5b18st04duc&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=QsriHQ3SXzfUrxHNACkYg5UZBRtAAAvtGjnD_cguEOY&s=LztgmufMQX9ASQHQOOYBNU-L3F8I8PALwkQEpWwSuag&e=
 

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Date: 2/26/17 8:02 am
From: <Rubberhead...> <rubberhead...>
Subject: Rusty Blackbirds (Fort Mill SC)
There's a small flock of Rusty Blackbirds hanging around the Dairy Barn at
the Ann Springs Greenway in Fort Mill, SC. They are really skittish but
feeding in the grassy areas around the Dairy Barn and horse pastures. Also
look in the places where straw is thrown for erosion control.

They are mixed in with a few brown headed cowbirds and a common grackle or
two but mostly Rusties.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__c1.staticflickr.com_4_3904_32972612722-5F16e9ffd10b-5Fb.jpg&d=DwICAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=hn0mJtK8xxwlgEB4hBBywjYSB-WAo75j0KkdcAWG78M&s=iGgj20blbLM4iXbgSIWOU_VMHFIqwSfTFZJ66-ZKUOQ&e=

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__c1.staticflickr.com_4_3843_32972612162-5F95ef522629-5Fb.jpg&d=DwICAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=hn0mJtK8xxwlgEB4hBBywjYSB-WAo75j0KkdcAWG78M&s=el8Z0cgq4U1l9Q6uOSmfgPJ_jjGcmMVIkwydKxwyDt0&e=

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__c1.staticflickr.com_3_2895_32972610772-5Fcedbc2108e-5Fb.jpg&d=DwICAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=hn0mJtK8xxwlgEB4hBBywjYSB-WAo75j0KkdcAWG78M&s=gYC4ocYrV1PdojmwVckNL3yoUuxWriXLu5VkqVnzfNI&e=

Stephen Thomas
Fort Mill, SC


 

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Date: 2/26/17 6:50 am
From: Simon Thompson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: The Buncombe County Swan
Hi Folks
Sorry to be late in this conversation. I am en route to London and won't be
home until April 10, but should have time to look at the new information
that is appearing.
Regardless of the ID of this bird, having a good conversation encourages
birders to really look at the relevant details of the species involved.
I hope to be back involved by Tuesday.
Simon

Simon RB Thompson
Ventures Birding Tours
Asheville, North Carolina

Check out our 2017 birding & nature tours - International
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_InternationalTours.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=tNKiqc-S2nwc74cZ0icQkDBf_xmXdI1IHEamA_YMSZI&s=TrvsL8_Gf85BbMxXkqeDWdgpP0QgRuQXToINsFVLHL0&e= >, USA & Canada
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_NorthAmerica.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=tNKiqc-S2nwc74cZ0icQkDBf_xmXdI1IHEamA_YMSZI&s=bvAZ8go-T0Bt3bqXZR1QPme8YLT4_hbHvznClwbRNic&e= >, and WNC day trips
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_DayTrips.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=tNKiqc-S2nwc74cZ0icQkDBf_xmXdI1IHEamA_YMSZI&s=d3cIZPGFZRs-clfb9aL90Yz2v3ke5XUxQtU5nFMyYus&e= >
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Date: 2/26/17 6:18 am
From: James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Great Kiskadee Bear Island WMA
Observed by myself, Pam Ford, and Keith Watson in area of live oak tree off
Chapman Island Rd., was eating berries in holly tree where your toad
intersects Chapman, 909am, vocalizing.

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC
--

Happy Birding!

Craig Watson, Mount Pleasant, SC

 

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Date: 2/26/17 4:33 am
From: Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: SPARROW locations in Wake County, NC
SPARROW locations in Wake County, NC
Winter is "Sparrow Season" in the Piedmont (good time for
waterfowl.,too). In my experience, these three parks and one greenway
are the best places to find and study sparrows in the Raleigh, Wake
Co, NC area:
(I pasted NON active links in here, just cut and paste to get them to
work. Makes the email shorter)

(1) Umstead State Park, Big Lake (70/Glenwood Entrance). The walk
along the powerlines from the beachhouse northwest has a grassy area
that has a good variety of close sparrows, various species. The
overview of the upper marsh of Big Lake is very good for waterfowl
(scope needed). The park gets very busy on the weekends. Hotspot
ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L1334627

(2) Horseshoe Farm Nature Preserve (off Ligon Mill Road, north
Raleigh). Plenty of fields (most were mowed this winter) in a 1-mile
unpaved loop. Watch for postholes and other hazards. Vesper Sparrow
was reported here last year. Hotspot: ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L1341989

(3) Wilkerson Nature Preserve: entrance on Raven Ridge Road. The three
fields are all visible from the naturalist center, so short walks,
loads of sparrows, including ONE with a very musical song and white
outer tail feathers! Another bird and I heard that sparrow three days
ago but could not see it for more than a second. That same birder saw
the sparrow with white outer tail feathers the next day. Three birders
checked Saturday but other than hearing the song - no luck. So
possible Vesper Sparrow is lurking at Wilkerson. Open 1 pm Sunday,
CLOSED MONDAYS, open 10 am Tues-Sat. The sparrow was spotted at 11:30
both days.
Wilkerson Hotspot: ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L2607737

In addition:

(4) Joyner Park on Harris Road in Wake Forest provides excellent views
of singing FIELD SPARROWS.
Joyner: ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L1057149

(5) Abbotts Creek Greenway (mile marker 1 to Neuse River Greenway) has
a couple of marshy sections near bridges 204 and 203 that provide
plenty of sparrows, including FOX and LINCOLN'S. in addition to SWAMP.
Hotspot is on an obscure parking area, but best place to park is dead
end of DUNN Road, then walk onto greenway and turn LEFT:
ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L1597517

Wake Audubon frequently visits all of these spots. Catch a walk in the
next few weeks!
L Erla Beegle, Raleigh
Find us on wakeaudubon.org or on Meetup:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.meetup.com_Wake-2DAudubon-2DMeetup_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=oUWeXCAr4d2pn1wdlmImUBnrDsA0vHFOEv1mA1MZdm0&s=GJFZycGOp4iZpfyH3WtER8DWPtJbfYKd6YY2MAhFFWY&e=
 

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Date: 2/26/17 4:06 am
From: Steve Compton <scompton1251...>
Subject: Great Kiskadee present Saturday
Birders,

Richard Hayes and I, with other birders, relocated the Great Kiskadee, singing and calling, good views in flight, about 1100 Saturday, Bear Island GMA, Colleton County, SC field 300 yards past Chapman Island and "do not enter" signs off Pecan Trees Road.

Steve Compton

Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
 

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Date: 2/25/17 5:03 pm
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Spectacular swans and geese, etc.
I went to the southwest edge of Pungo Lake yesterday (Friday February 24th)
between 4 p.m. and about 6:30 p.m.

The swans and snow geese were STILL there in tens of thousands. They flew
over for an hour, before sunset, at times in vast flocks and sub-flocks --
it was completely thrilling -- from horizon to horizon, in undulating and
overlapping skeins -- like a huge lace mantilla had been thrown over the
sky and was billowing in some great Breeze.

Then shortly after dark huge numbers (hundreds and hundreds) of tiny
little ducks came in the other direction, flying north appaently rising out
of the pocosiny/swampy woods from the south edge of the lake. It was so
dark and I'm not good at ducks and I have no idea what theywere, maybe
teal?, but totally worth seeing for someone who could identify them.

During the waning day, I also noted 100 coots and several northern
shovelers near the shore, among the thousands of swans on the lake.

The best place to be for flyover is the SW edge of pungo lake, W end of
lake drive, between about 5:00 and 6:00 pm. (at least from my one data
point yesterday)

Also wood ducks seen in "departing quickly" mode and a mother bear and
large cub on Van Staalduinen Road.

Thanks to all the birders who reported their experiences and/or encouraged
me to go to Pungo Lake after my recent inquiry on this list.

Betsy Kane
Raleigh

 

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Date: 2/25/17 2:39 pm
From: Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lark Sparrow, Orange Co., NC
This morning's Chapel Hill Bird Club trip went directly to search for the recently reported Lark Sparrow on Stanford Rd., Orange Co. After an hour and a half, we found the Lark Sparrow feeding (c. 9:30 a.m.) in the open in a shortly-cropped pasture.

Good birding!
Bob Rybczynski
Cary, NC


 

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Date: 2/25/17 7:47 am
From: Sam Cooper <dmcooper2...>
Subject: Mottled Duck - Wrightsville Beach, NC
In the salt marsh this morning just south of the most northern parking lot with a female mallard near 34.233475, -77.778230. Birds are still around but flew to the south and landed again in the marsh. Posted a few photos in ebird (New Hanover County, NC Mason Inlet Waterbird Management Area).

Sam Cooper
Wilmington, NC
____________________________________________________________
Beauty Game Changer: Magnetic Lashes
Making Beauty Effortless
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__thirdpartyoffers.juno.com_TGL3141_58b1a6dd91b6026dd0894st01duc&d=DwIF-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=CdFRTRB_QlJVYt5ROecAXcgWF8IRZTHAq5h_EOEr4Fk&s=kJO-FcwSS0U0MMBPEJ8uDkOCKFZiwVuq_bF0saalxs8&e=
 

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Date: 2/24/17 2:11 pm
From: Kevin Metcalf (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Louisiana Waterthrush today - NC
Had a Louisiana Waterthrush at McDowell Nature Preserves in SW
Mecklenburg Co., NC. This is the first I have seen this species in
February in the Carolinas. Photos obtained.
Kevin MetcalfHuntersville, NC
 

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Date: 2/24/17 12:57 pm
From: Clyde Sorenson <sorenson...>
Subject: First Wake Co osprey (for me, any way...)
Seen on the cell tower on Rock Quarry Road near the intersection of Old
Baucom Rd in southeastern Wake County very near the Johnston County line on
Tuesday. Been there every day since.


Clyde

 

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Date: 2/24/17 12:54 pm
From: Ann Truesdale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Armchair birding through books
>
> Of course, a more light-hearted book about listers is "*The Big Year: A
> Tale of Man, Nature, and Fowl Obsession*". Don't be dissuaded if you saw
> the movie based on this book, because the book is factual and much
> better done as is often the case.
>
> - Jim George
> Chapel Hill, NC

Having happened to have been on a birding tour with Sandy Komoto a
couple of years ago, I second Jim's comment about the factuality of the
book vs. the movie. The book had Sandy down to a T; the movie was all
wrong. The other two main characters were not changed as much IMHO. I
had seen the movie, but not read the book, when I met Sandy. I was quite
puzzled as to why no character in the movie fit. The real Sandy is an
interesting character, but I guess they needed to create a villain for
the movie.

So much for "artistic license" as applied in cinema. ;-)

Ann

Ann Truesdale
<anntrue...>
Meggett, SC
 

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Date: 2/24/17 11:31 am
From: Jim George (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Armchair birding through books
Just to follow up on Doug's recommendations, Scott Weidensaul followed the
route of Peterson's "Wild America" journey and published "Return to Wild
America" in 2005, which is a good read whether you read it first or second.

Also "Life List: A Woman's Quest for the World's Most Amazing Birds" by
Olivia Gentile may be a somewhat easier read about Phoebe Snetsinger's
obsessive and dangerous quest to see the most birds ever. I think she
reached 8,500 species. It's really interesting that Doug was the
illustrator for Snetsinger's own book.

Of course, a more light-hearted book about listers is "*The Big Year: A
Tale of Man, Nature, and Fowl Obsession*". Don't be dissuaded if you saw
the movie based on this book, because the book is factual and much better
done as is often the case.

- Jim George
Chapel Hill, NC

On Thu, Feb 23, 2017 at 2:58 PM, Doug Pratt <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> In response to Merrill Lynch's recommendation, I would also recommend
> Phoebe Snetsinger's first-hand account "Birding on Borrowed Time",
> available through ABA Sales. It is equally tragic and truthful, and will
> give you a challenge keeping up with all the world birds mentioned. But
> it's a good read even if you don't know one bird from another. My mother
> passed it around her retirement home and it got rave reviews. She said you
> just have to treat those long lists of birds like the biblical "begats".
> The book is more a chronicle of obsession than a birding report. Full
> disclosure: I illustrated this book and am mentioned in it, but receive no
> money from sales.
>
> While we're on the subject, I want to also recommend a book even older
> than "Kingbird Highway" (which I agree is a must-read), Peterson and
> Fisher's "Wild America", which chronicles a birding journey by car across
> North America in the early 1950s by Roger Tory Peterson and his British
> friend. It was before interstate highways and mass air travel. At the
> time, Ivory-billed Woodpeckers and Bachman's Warblers were still a
> reasonable possibility. This book in many ways made me who I am today.
> It's still a great read, and brings back a long-lost era that nevertheless
> existed within many of our lifetimes.
>
> Doug Pratt
> Cary, NC
>
>
>

 

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Date: 2/24/17 11:23 am
From: Jay Wherley (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: : Trumpeter Swan still on French Broad River, Asheville
I went out today over lunch to try and get visuals and photographs of
leg color on the Buncombe County/French Broad River Swan.
It obliged with some views at about a 40 yard distance. I'd have to
say the legs/feet are black. Some of the photos I've seen, and a few
of mine, in certain lighting pop with more highlights, but the
binocular view and most of the photos I've attached to the checklist
support black legs/feet IMO. I also got a few forehead shots. The "top
view" does make an argument to go with Tundra based on the thin bill
connection to eye, rather than thick per
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.sibleyguides.com_2006_02_distinguishing-2Dtrumpeter-2Dand-2Dtundra-2Dswans_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=8L3XueKBlXXOIqZk6yWxDos6MSffj2fPHx7FH3IVdiA&s=anMM2wyv3DxVPWGjMWeey3OfETp6lNvxVbXfLcfaRT0&e=

Checklist with 10 photos here:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S34764235&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=8L3XueKBlXXOIqZk6yWxDos6MSffj2fPHx7FH3IVdiA&s=NQ8hsZGO-SvQzkNkwlIdkUhkLbpPiE8rSBK5j1eSymM&e=

I almost think in the second photo on the checklist that the yellow
Tundra mark may be starting to appear, but that could just be an
artifact. (Last years juvenile Tundra Swan at Beaver Lake had this
mark become more distinct over the Jan/Feb time it was here.)

Anyway - wanted to provide some more evidence to see if it helps ID
this swan. (I'm listing it in my checklist as Tundra at this time.)

Jay Wherley
Asheville, NC



On 2/24/17 6:57 AM, Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> Hello all,
>
>
>
> I believe it is a Trumpeter, see this link. Middle bill pink is normal for Trumpeter, Tundra juvenile would have more pink. Leg color better and probably most compelling case for
> Trumpeter and retaining gray plumage longer for subadult bird fits for Trumpeter.
>
>
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.trumpeterswansociety.org_juvenile-2Dswans.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=8L3XueKBlXXOIqZk6yWxDos6MSffj2fPHx7FH3IVdiA&s=4t8yPiPRMydEt6pXVRvlsCWLHAAMULqmZ3Y7UwmLEGc&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.trumpeterswansociety.org_juvenile-2Dswans.html&d=DwMGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=nejclrBwh_Bq3lBsnLBBLiheE_YHaKFwgLKA6F8HYyM&s=uO4tV_qXk5Gc9SNJZ2O0kD-8iBoq68HgkTr-VF3FHv0&e=>
>
>
>
> here is text if link not working:
>
>
>
> Both Trumpeter and Tundra juveniles are gray in fall and winter. Tundras are brighter silvery gray with black legs and feet. Trumpeters are darker sooty gray, especially in the
> head and neck area, and their leg and foot color is primarily yellow-orange mottling with some black. Tundra juveniles begin turning white in late December and by mid March are
> nearly all white. Trumpeter juveniles usually remain darker gray longer, with gray feathers on the head and neck persisting well into spring. In winter, Trumpeter juveniles may
> vary in age by up to 6 weeks due to geographic differences in hatching dates. As a result, they show considerable individual and geographic variation in the timing of their molt
> into white plumage. Tundra bill color is usually mottled pink with black tip, with less black at the base than Trumpeters. Trumpeter bills are black at base and tip with a pink
> middle. Juvenile bill color in winter gradually shifts to all black in both species.
>
>
>
> Now look at these pics on eBird of the Asheville bird.
>
>
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S34629890&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=8L3XueKBlXXOIqZk6yWxDos6MSffj2fPHx7FH3IVdiA&s=p3fzXztRTllCn1aK2SQWUO-BdmaQq0A4xlTMtlov2uE&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S34629890&d=DwMGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=nejclrBwh_Bq3lBsnLBBLiheE_YHaKFwgLKA6F8HYyM&s=LvBbP5Wr46yUkif8UTr3LPB6mCzga6jmXSps4nxUKSQ&e=>
>
>
>
>
>
> Jamie Adams
>
> Wilmington, NC
>
>
>
> *From:*<carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] *On Behalf Of *Harry LeGrand
> *Sent:* Thursday, February 23, 2017 4:52 PM
> *To:* ATCClack <atcclack...>
> *Cc:* Simon Thompson <carolinabirds...>
> *Subject:* Re: : Trumpeter Swan still on French Broad River, Asheville
>
>
>
> I haven't seen much if any discussion of this Buncombe County swan. While at Pungo refuge on Monday, Derb Carter and I studied hundreds and hundreds of Tundra Swans at very close
> range -- less than 100 yards away thru 30+ scopes. We saw none that were 15-20% larger, and thus all we saw were Tundras. So -- what's the connection and concern? Most of the
> immatures -- identified by light sooty face and neck, if not some pink on the bill, _had a strong and clear V-feathering on the forehead where it meets the bill._ We did not see
> this on adults -- white plumage and all dark bills (yellow spot or nor). The adults showed the characteristic rounded or straight-ish meeting of the feathers of the forehead with
> the top of the bill. But MOST of the immature Tundra Swans showed the V-shape of the feathering at the top of the bill.
>
>
>
> My brother in TN e-mailed me earlier about concern over the ID of the Buncombe bird, thinking it might be a Tundra. A lot of the gestalt features I have seen in the photos lean me
> toward a Tundra Swan -- such as the narrowness of the black bill where it meets the eye, shape of the bill, etc. Of course, we who have not seen the bird in the field cannot judge
> its overall size from photos; it is a lot bigger than a Mallard in a few photos, but all swans are.
>
>
>
> I just read an e-bird report saying the bird is an immature. Some descriptions say the neck is light grayish or light sooty. So -- is the bird an immature? What other marks on
> the bird -- besides the V-shape of feathering (and no yellow spot on the bill) -- lead folks to identifying the bird as a Trumpeter?
>
>
>
> Harry LeGrand
>
> Raleigh
>
>
>
> On Thu, Feb 23, 2017 at 1:36 PM, ATCClack <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
>
> Trumpeter swan is still at Ledges Park just a little bit north as of 12:30 today.
>
> Chris Clack
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE Device
>
>
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Simon Thompson <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>>
> Date: 2/18/17 5:37 PM (GMT-05:00)
> To: <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>
> Subject: Fwd: Trumpeter Swan on French Broad River, Asheville
>
> Folks
>
> We are pretty confident that the swan on the French Broad River just north of Asheville is indeed a sub-adult Trumpeter Swan. Photos have been uploaded to the Carolina Bird
> Club website:
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_gallery_Johnston_trus.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=8L3XueKBlXXOIqZk6yWxDos6MSffj2fPHx7FH3IVdiA&s=h-41IHWq3O2VEelyPQY1bncKwpNEZdpkwoNQKok1GCc&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_gallery_Johnston_trus.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz%20-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LHuusX8cUFM8NW-cI8bCnLPkJmeAFVfQLkLeNKL9agc&s=RuphG-M16QbiCuAeQvo64VQQcjeGOnepcO1ey6DE764&e=>
>
>
>
> Thanks to Doug Johnston, Clifton Avery, John Koon and Tom Bush for getting photos that clinched the ID. It's a tough call, but the "V" shape of the white above the bill is
> conclusive, Compare this to the U shaped or flat shape on the Tundra Swan.
>
> See Sibley's information for more details:
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.sibleyguides.com_2006_02_distinguishing-2Dtrumpeter-2Da&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=8L3XueKBlXXOIqZk6yWxDos6MSffj2fPHx7FH3IVdiA&s=3PG6mR1lhEsXe-WFti1GvKYjRKITVuN6eJj7_0ooLW4&e= nd-tundra-swans/
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.sibleyguides.com_2006_02_distinguishing-2Dtrumpeter-2Dand-2Dtundra-2Dswans_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LHuusX8cUFM8NW-cI8bCnLPkJmeAFVfQLkLeNKL9agc&s=D43QzZW6ijcAOsHXGJEKlj-6KwA-s3INpnaZVoe54No&e=>
>
>
>
> A few photos are also attached
>
>
>
> Directions: Go to Ledges Whitewater River Park on the French Broad River (Alexander)
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps_place_Ledges-2BWhitewater-2BRiver-2BPark_-4035.6845176-2C-2D82.6196865-2C17z_data-3D-214m5-213m4-211s0x0-3A0xc81f18538ccbcb6c-218m2-213d35.6845132-214d-2D82.617498-3Fhl-3Den-26authuser-3D0&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=8L3XueKBlXXOIqZk6yWxDos6MSffj2fPHx7FH3IVdiA&s=5jBDj0WHUQfAci60G1wNaykKWIHAd3p8u2uAhKwWkQg&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps_place_Ledges-2BWhitewater-2BRiver-2BPark_-4035.6845176-2C-2D82.6196865-2C17z_data-3D-214m5-213m4-211s0x0-3A0xc81f18538ccbcb6c-218m2-213d35.6845132-214d-2D82.617498-3Fhl-3Den-26authuser-3D0&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LHuusX8cUFM8NW-cI8bCnLPkJmeAFVfQLkLeNKL9agc&s=TsyK2_SDUL7L1fxndQjXiO_vIgzyUKmuvBDueyRqC6w&e=>
>
> Continue downstream for half a mile and park in the large pull- off. The swan was in the river (far side) near this pull-off around 4:30 PM today. Hope it's in the same place
> tomorrow.
>
> As far as I know, this may be a first record for Western North Carolina.
>
> Simon
>
>
> Simon RB Thompson
>
> Ventures Birding Tours
>
> Asheville, North Carolina
 

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Date: 2/24/17 11:15 am
From: M Howell (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: FOY Purple Martin
I heard, then saw my first Purple Martin of the year today. I spent most of the GBBC weekend working on new housing for them, with plans to have the first 6 houses up before Monday. My Martins began coming back (I first saw them) the first week of March 2016. They are one week earlier in 2017. And thanks to the beautiful weather we've been having, I'm ready for them.

Mae Howell
Goldsboro NC
 

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Date: 2/24/17 10:21 am
From: Ruth Marley (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Armchair birding through books
Dear Bill,

Edwin Way Teal is a superb writer and naturalist whose way with words enchants as it illuminates the natural world. Yes, these are must reads for anyone who loves nature and birds.


Cheers,

Ruth Marley
Clarkston, GA






-----Original Message-----
From: \photobill9\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
To: Doug Pratt <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Fri, 24 Feb 2017 1:07 pm
Subject: RE: Armchair birding through books



Although not exclusively about birding, Edwin Way Teals’ four books about traveling in each season through the United States are great reads. He, and his wife, saw all of nature (including much about birds), had a great style of writing and knew and also quoted when relevant the great naturalists that came before. Also much history about populations of birds in the U.S., migration, etc. as well as everything from insects to mammals. Human interest also – for example, about the lady in south Texas (the name escapes me) who took up birding relatively late and was reporting birds that the experts didn’t think were there – until they came down and drove around with her (and her small dog)!

Bill Haddad
Spruce Pine, N.C.

Sent from Mail for Windows 10


From: Doug Pratt
Sent: Thursday, February 23, 2017 2:58 PM
To: Listserve Carolinabirds
Subject: Armchair birding through books


In response to Merrill Lynch's recommendation, I would also recommend Phoebe Snetsinger's first-hand account "Birding on Borrowed Time", available through ABA Sales. It is equally tragic and truthful, and will give you a challenge keeping up with all the world birds mentioned. But it's a good read even if you don't know one bird from another. My mother passed it around her retirement home and it got rave reviews. She said you just have to treat those long lists of birds like the biblical "begats". The book is more a chronicle of obsession than a birding report. Full disclosure: I illustrated this book and am mentioned in it, but receive no money from sales.

While we're on the subject, I want to also recommend a book even older than "Kingbird Highway" (which I agree is a must-read), Peterson and Fisher's "Wild America", which chronicles a birding journey by car across North America in the early 1950s by Roger Tory Peterson and his British friend. It was before interstate highways and mass air travel. At the time, Ivory-billed Woodpeckers and Bachman's Warblers were still a reasonable possibility. This book in many ways made me who I am today. It's still a great read, and brings back a long-lost era that nevertheless existed within many of our lifetimes.

Doug Pratt
Cary, NC






 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/17 10:06 am
From: photobill9 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Armchair birding through books
Although not exclusively about birding, Edwin Way Teals’ four books about traveling in each season through the United States are great reads. He, and his wife, saw all of nature (including much about birds), had a great style of writing and knew and also quoted when relevant the great naturalists that came before. Also much history about populations of birds in the U.S., migration, etc. as well as everything from insects to mammals. Human interest also – for example, about the lady in south Texas (the name escapes me) who took up birding relatively late and was reporting birds that the experts didn’t think were there – until they came down and drove around with her (and her small dog)!

Bill Haddad
Spruce Pine, N.C.

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Doug Pratt
Sent: Thursday, February 23, 2017 2:58 PM
To: Listserve Carolinabirds
Subject: Armchair birding through books

In response to Merrill Lynch's recommendation, I would also recommend Phoebe Snetsinger's first-hand account "Birding on Borrowed Time", available through ABA Sales. It is equally tragic and truthful, and will give you a challenge keeping up with all the world birds mentioned. But it's a good read even if you don't know one bird from another. My mother passed it around her retirement home and it got rave reviews. She said you just have to treat those long lists of birds like the biblical "begats". The book is more a chronicle of obsession than a birding report. Full disclosure: I illustrated this book and am mentioned in it, but receive no money from sales.

While we're on the subject, I want to also recommend a book even older than "Kingbird Highway" (which I agree is a must-read), Peterson and Fisher's "Wild America", which chronicles a birding journey by car across North America in the early 1950s by Roger Tory Peterson and his British friend. It was before interstate highways and mass air travel. At the time, Ivory-billed Woodpeckers and Bachman's Warblers were still a reasonable possibility. This book in many ways made me who I am today. It's still a great read, and brings back a long-lost era that nevertheless existed within many of our lifetimes.

Doug Pratt
Cary, NC




 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/17 9:02 am
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Lark Sparrow still present at UNC-CSI
Lark Sparrow still present this morning near the east end of the main building at the Coastal Studies Institute on Roanoke Island.
Jeff Lewis
Manteo

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/17 8:54 am
From: Steve Compton <scompton1251...>
Subject: Re: : Trumpeter Swan still on French Broad River, Asheville
Birders,
I have been on a roadside north of Seattle with ten Washington birders
looking through scopes at a field with 500 Trumpeters trying to find
one Tundra. They had the same trouble. In reverse. They also get a few
Whoopers there, just to make it spicier.
Steve ComptonGreenville, SC
Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE DroidOn Feb 24, 2017 9:16 AM, Nate Swick
<nswick...> wrote:

I think those most recent photos to eBird make a pretty good case
for Tundra Swan for this bird, particularly around the eye. Dwayne
Martin pointed out to me backchannel that there were three Tundra
Swans at this very site not much more than a month ago.

Here are some photos included on an eBird checklist from this
period. Note that one of the younger birds has a splotchy bill and
appears to have a pointed forehead, like this bird we're
discussing.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S33190316

Seems to me to most likely be this bird that is advancing in its
molt. It took off to some location nearby for a few weeks where it
was not recorded and has returned to the same spot.

What I find most interesting is the inconsistency of this forehead
field mark. If you look at most (all?) North American field guides
they treat it as a hard and fast rule. But scrutiny of Tundra
Swans in North Carolina, particularly now that we have regular
Trumpeters mixed in, has suggested that this isn't the case at
all.

Nate Swick
GSO, NC
On Fri, Feb 24, 2017 at 6:57 AM, Jamie Adams <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

Hello all,



I believe it is a Trumpeter, see this link. Middle bill pink
is normal for Trumpeter, Tundra juvenile would have more
pink. Leg color better and probably most compelling case for
Trumpeter and retaining gray plumage longer for subadult bird
fits for Trumpeter.



http://www.trumpeterswansociety.org/juvenile-swans.html



here is text if link not working:



Both Trumpeter and Tundra juveniles are gray in fall and
winter. Tundras are brighter silvery gray with black legs and
feet. Trumpeters are darker sooty gray, especially in the head
and neck area, and their leg and foot color is primarily
yellow-orange mottling with some black. Tundra juveniles begin
turning white in late December and by mid March are nearly all
white. Trumpeter juveniles usually remain darker gray longer,
with gray feathers on the head and neck persisting well into
spring. In winter, Trumpeter juveniles may vary in age by up
to 6 weeks due to geographic differences in hatching dates. As
a result, they show considerable individual and geographic
variation in the timing of their molt into white plumage.
Tundra bill color is usually mottled pink with black tip, with
less black at the base than Trumpeters. Trumpeter bills are
black at base and tip with a pink middle. Juvenile bill color
in winter gradually shifts to all black in both species.



Now look at these pics on eBird of the Asheville bird.



http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34629890





Jamie Adams

Wilmington, NC



From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>]
On Behalf Of Harry LeGrand
Sent: Thursday, February 23, 2017 4:52 PM
To: ATCClack <atcclack...>
Cc: Simon Thompson <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: : Trumpeter Swan still on French Broad River,
Asheville



I haven't seen much if any discussion of this Buncombe County
swan. While at Pungo refuge on Monday, Derb Carter and I
studied hundreds and hundreds of Tundra Swans at very close
range -- less than 100 yards away thru 30+ scopes. We saw
none that were 15-20% larger, and thus all we saw were
Tundras. So -- what's the connection and concern? Most of
the immatures -- identified by light sooty face and neck, if
not some pink on the bill, had a strong and clear V-feathering
on the forehead where it meets the bill. We did not see this
on adults -- white plumage and all dark bills (yellow spot or
nor). The adults showed the characteristic rounded or
straight-ish meeting of the feathers of the forehead with the
top of the bill. But MOST of the immature Tundra Swans showed
the V-shape of the feathering at the top of the bill.



My brother in TN e-mailed me earlier about concern over the ID
of the Buncombe bird, thinking it might be a Tundra. A lot
of the gestalt features I have seen in the photos lean me
toward a Tundra Swan -- such as the narrowness of the black
bill where it meets the eye, shape of the bill, etc. Of
course, we who have not seen the bird in the field cannot
judge its overall size from photos; it is a lot bigger than a
Mallard in a few photos, but all swans are.



I just read an e-bird report saying the bird is an immature.
Some descriptions say the neck is light grayish or light
sooty. So -- is the bird an immature? What other marks on
the bird -- besides the V-shape of feathering (and no yellow
spot on the bill) -- lead folks to identifying the bird as a
Trumpeter?



Harry LeGrand

Raleigh



On Thu, Feb 23, 2017 at 1:36 PM, ATCClack <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

Trumpeter swan is still at Ledges Park just a little bit
north as of 12:30 today.

Chris Clack







Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE Device



-------- Original message --------
From: Simon Thompson <carolinabirds...>
Date: 2/18/17 5:37 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fwd: Trumpeter Swan on French Broad River,
Asheville

Folks

We are pretty confident that the swan on the French Broad
River just north of Asheville is indeed a sub-adult
Trumpeter Swan. Photos have been uploaded to the Carolina
Bird Club website:

http://www.carolinabirdclub.org/gallery/Johnston/trus.html



Thanks to Doug Johnston, Clifton Avery, John Koon and Tom
Bush for getting photos that clinched the ID. It's a tough
call, but the "V" shape of the white above the bill is
conclusive, Compare this to the U shaped or flat shape on
the Tundra Swan.

See Sibley's information for more details:

http://www.sibleyguides.com/2006/02/distinguishing-trumpeter-a
nd-tundra-swans/



A few photos are also attached



Directions: Go to Ledges Whitewater River Park on the
French Broad River (Alexander)

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ledges+Whitewater+River+Park/@35.6845176,-82.6196865,17z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x0:0xc81f18538ccbcb6c!8m2!3d35.6845132!4d-82.617498?hl=en&authuser=0

Continue downstream for half a mile and park in the large
pull- off. The swan was in the river (far side) near this
pull-off around 4:30 PM today. Hope it's in the same place
tomorrow.

As far as I know, this may be a first record for Western
North Carolina.

Simon


Simon RB Thompson

Ventures Birding Tours

Asheville, North Carolina

Check out our 2017 birding & nature tours - International,
USA & Canada, and WNC day trips

Like us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Ventures-Birding-Tours/207237043263?ref=hl







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Back to top
Date: 2/24/17 8:14 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: : Trumpeter Swan still on French Broad River, Asheville
I agree with Nate and some others on this likely being a Tundra Swan. The
overall jizz looks wrong for Trumpeter Swan to me..

Here are photos of the immature swan, accepted by the NC Bird Records
Committee unanimously, from a few years ago at Jordan Lake.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_gallery_Suau_trus.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=D4ezf9qJSPSdU-KW8e_t1KKusURDU4XWbWROMC6nD1Y&s=CozIICj8GHEM6djJo65NCVnEJMbRn8msLYN_SJ4IIsM&e=

Note the long bill, and how the line of the culmen continues as a straight
line all the way to the back of the head, where there is a clear peak far
beyond the eye. The neck is quite straight when alert and the lowest part
is rested on the back. The last isn't that big of a deal, maybe, but the
overall shape of the head and bill is quite striking.

The Buncombe swan has a medium-length bill, there is a somewhat "puffy"
forehead (a rise where it meets the bill), and the head is somewhat
rounded, such that is difficult to see where the highest point in the head
is relative to the eye. You don't see the long straight line from the bill
tip all the way to a distinct peak of the crown toward the nape, well
behind the eye. The stretched-out neck looks medium length to me. Here is
a good profile (second one) of the Buncombe bird:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_gallery_Koon_trus.html&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=D4ezf9qJSPSdU-KW8e_t1KKusURDU4XWbWROMC6nD1Y&s=qOvhUBxrCiwq7W6BpyhOWe0rmSMAX9_-25TwhQxK5no&e=

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh


On Fri, Feb 24, 2017 at 9:49 AM, <susan...> wrote:

> All,
>
> To this debate, I will add that molt in immature Tundras can be quite
> variable. Although some almost look like their parents in early
> January, I have seen lingering individuals at Mattamuskeet in late
> March-early April that still have pale bills and a grayish wash.
>
> Susan Campbell
> Southern Pines, NC
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/17 6:50 am
From: <susan...>
Subject: RE: : Trumpeter Swan still on French Broad River, Asheville
All,

To this debate, I will add that molt in immature Tundras can be quite
variable. Although some almost look like their parents in early
January, I have seen lingering individuals at Mattamuskeet in late
March-early April that still have pale bills and a grayish wash.

Susan Campbell
Southern Pines, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/17 6:17 am
From: Nate Swick <nswick...>
Subject: Re: : Trumpeter Swan still on French Broad River, Asheville
I think those most recent photos to eBird make a pretty good case for
Tundra Swan for this bird, particularly around the eye. Dwayne Martin
pointed out to me backchannel that there were three Tundra Swans at this
very site not much more than a month ago.

Here are some photos included on an eBird checklist from this period. Note
that one of the younger birds has a splotchy bill and appears to have a
pointed forehead, like this bird we're discussing.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S33190316&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=CRAb8dNnGu7yrOJFv4qStAxmo1wFnXgc7sr0ZpHqgG0&s=MmDwJtb6EHsT3hg_8mEntvpYYgGjfFnC5vTxJmfkYOE&e=

Seems to me to most likely be this bird that is advancing in its molt. It
took off to some location nearby for a few weeks where it was not recorded
and has returned to the same spot.

What I find most interesting is the inconsistency of this forehead field
mark. If you look at most (all?) North American field guides they treat it
as a hard and fast rule. But scrutiny of Tundra Swans in North Carolina,
particularly now that we have regular Trumpeters mixed in, has suggested
that this isn't the case at all.

Nate Swick
GSO, NC

On Fri, Feb 24, 2017 at 6:57 AM, Jamie Adams <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Hello all,
>
>
>
> I believe it is a Trumpeter, see this link. Middle bill pink is normal
> for Trumpeter, Tundra juvenile would have more pink. Leg color better and
> probably most compelling case for Trumpeter and retaining gray plumage
> longer for subadult bird fits for Trumpeter.
>
>
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.trumpeterswansociety.org_juvenile-2Dswans.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=CRAb8dNnGu7yrOJFv4qStAxmo1wFnXgc7sr0ZpHqgG0&s=fbuMwbuWWEFvpnP8ZW0IUJ-c8RXjlgdmiVP7qRTGNg0&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.trumpeterswansociety.org_juvenile-2Dswans.html&d=DwMGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=nejclrBwh_Bq3lBsnLBBLiheE_YHaKFwgLKA6F8HYyM&s=uO4tV_qXk5Gc9SNJZ2O0kD-8iBoq68HgkTr-VF3FHv0&e=>
>
>
>
> here is text if link not working:
>
>
>
> Both Trumpeter and Tundra juveniles are gray in fall and winter. Tundras
> are brighter silvery gray with black legs and feet. Trumpeters are darker
> sooty gray, especially in the head and neck area, and their leg and foot
> color is primarily yellow-orange mottling with some black. Tundra juveniles
> begin turning white in late December and by mid March are nearly all white.
> Trumpeter juveniles usually remain darker gray longer, with gray feathers
> on the head and neck persisting well into spring. In winter, Trumpeter
> juveniles may vary in age by up to 6 weeks due to geographic differences in
> hatching dates. As a result, they show considerable individual and
> geographic variation in the timing of their molt into white plumage. Tundra
> bill color is usually mottled pink with black tip, with less black at the
> base than Trumpeters. Trumpeter bills are black at base and tip with a pink
> middle. Juvenile bill color in winter gradually shifts to all black in both
> species.
>
>
>
> Now look at these pics on eBird of the Asheville bird.
>
>
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S34629890&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=CRAb8dNnGu7yrOJFv4qStAxmo1wFnXgc7sr0ZpHqgG0&s=W1tsrnHoGyE0HoWjq0_AOgn0GqmwXYYr0okQkwcjNWQ&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S34629890&d=DwMGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=nejclrBwh_Bq3lBsnLBBLiheE_YHaKFwgLKA6F8HYyM&s=LvBbP5Wr46yUkif8UTr3LPB6mCzga6jmXSps4nxUKSQ&e=>
>
>
>
>
>
> Jamie Adams
>
> Wilmington, NC
>
>
>
> *From:* <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:carolinabirds-request@
> duke.edu] *On Behalf Of *Harry LeGrand
> *Sent:* Thursday, February 23, 2017 4:52 PM
> *To:* ATCClack <atcclack...>
> *Cc:* Simon Thompson <carolinabirds...>
> *Subject:* Re: : Trumpeter Swan still on French Broad River, Asheville
>
>
>
> I haven't seen much if any discussion of this Buncombe County swan. While
> at Pungo refuge on Monday, Derb Carter and I studied hundreds and hundreds
> of Tundra Swans at very close range -- less than 100 yards away thru 30+
> scopes. We saw none that were 15-20% larger, and thus all we saw were
> Tundras. So -- what's the connection and concern? Most of the immatures
> -- identified by light sooty face and neck, if not some pink on the bill, *had
> a strong and clear V-feathering on the forehead where it meets the bill.*
> We did not see this on adults -- white plumage and all dark bills (yellow
> spot or nor). The adults showed the characteristic rounded or straight-ish
> meeting of the feathers of the forehead with the top of the bill. But MOST
> of the immature Tundra Swans showed the V-shape of the feathering at the
> top of the bill.
>
>
>
> My brother in TN e-mailed me earlier about concern over the ID of the
> Buncombe bird, thinking it might be a Tundra. A lot of the gestalt features
> I have seen in the photos lean me toward a Tundra Swan -- such as the
> narrowness of the black bill where it meets the eye, shape of the bill,
> etc. Of course, we who have not seen the bird in the field cannot judge
> its overall size from photos; it is a lot bigger than a Mallard in a few
> photos, but all swans are.
>
>
>
> I just read an e-bird report saying the bird is an immature. Some
> descriptions say the neck is light grayish or light sooty. So -- is the
> bird an immature? What other marks on the bird -- besides the V-shape of
> feathering (and no yellow spot on the bill) -- lead folks to identifying
> the bird as a Trumpeter?
>
>
>
> Harry LeGrand
>
> Raleigh
>
>
>
> On Thu, Feb 23, 2017 at 1:36 PM, ATCClack <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Trumpeter swan is still at Ledges Park just a little bit north as of 12:30
> today.
>
> Chris Clack
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE Device
>
>
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Simon Thompson <carolinabirds...>
> Date: 2/18/17 5:37 PM (GMT-05:00)
> To: <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: Fwd: Trumpeter Swan on French Broad River, Asheville
>
> Folks
>
> We are pretty confident that the swan on the French Broad River just north
> of Asheville is indeed a sub-adult Trumpeter Swan. Photos have been
> uploaded to the Carolina Bird Club website:
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_gallery_Johnston_trus.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=CRAb8dNnGu7yrOJFv4qStAxmo1wFnXgc7sr0ZpHqgG0&s=hn5cuORZaMeAOsIhLEFNmR2eLljjFyNdE6beIZIkXt0&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_gallery_Johnston_trus.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz%20-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LHuusX8cUFM8NW-cI8bCnLPkJmeAFVfQLkLeNKL9agc&s=RuphG-M16QbiCuAeQvo64VQQcjeGOnepcO1ey6DE764&e=>
>
>
>
> Thanks to Doug Johnston, Clifton Avery, John Koon and Tom Bush for getting
> photos that clinched the ID. It's a tough call, but the "V" shape of the
> white above the bill is conclusive, Compare this to the U shaped or flat
> shape on the Tundra Swan.
>
> See Sibley's information for more details:
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.sibleyguides.com_2006_02_distinguishing-2Dtrumpeter-2Da&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=CRAb8dNnGu7yrOJFv4qStAxmo1wFnXgc7sr0ZpHqgG0&s=63NWkulFVYw3aw10aaObpo2oHFupiA866acOC3t_Yr8&e=
> nd-tundra-swans/
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.sibleyguides.com_2006_02_distinguishing-2Dtrumpeter-2Dand-2Dtundra-2Dswans_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LHuusX8cUFM8NW-cI8bCnLPkJmeAFVfQLkLeNKL9agc&s=D43QzZW6ijcAOsHXGJEKlj-6KwA-s3INpnaZVoe54No&e=>
>
>
>
> A few photos are also attached
>
>
>
> Directions: Go to Ledges Whitewater River Park on the French Broad River
> (Alexander)
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps_place_Ledges-2BWhitewater-2BRiver-2B&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=CRAb8dNnGu7yrOJFv4qStAxmo1wFnXgc7sr0ZpHqgG0&s=_Ab6U2GScOUJJEFWZMq7HXIZ4fcCQ67jWwRvXyRKBZc&e=
> Park/@35.6845176,-82.6196865,17z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x0:
> 0xc81f18538ccbcb6c!8m2!3d35.6845132!4d-82.617498?hl=en&authuser=0
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps_place_Ledges-2BWhitewater-2BRiver-2BPark_-4035.6845176-2C-2D82.6196865-2C17z_data-3D-214m5-213m4-211s0x0-3A0xc81f18538ccbcb6c-218m2-213d35.6845132-214d-2D82.617498-3Fhl-3Den-26authuser-3D0&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LHuusX8cUFM8NW-cI8bCnLPkJmeAFVfQLkLeNKL9agc&s=TsyK2_SDUL7L1fxndQjXiO_vIgzyUKmuvBDueyRqC6w&e=>
>
> Continue downstream for half a mile and park in the large pull- off. The
> swan was in the river (far side) near this pull-off around 4:30 PM today.
> Hope it's in the same place tomorrow.
>
> As far as I know, this may be a first record for Western North Carolina.
>
> Simon
>
>
> Simon RB Thompson
>
> Ventures Birding Tours
>
> Asheville, North Carolina
>
> Check out our 2017 birding & nature tours - International
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_InternationalTours.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LHuusX8cUFM8NW-cI8bCnLPkJmeAFVfQLkLeNKL9agc&s=rA524xwQZBbl7SqqeTe6S5L9dRLmxqLky7K5ktyNkHw&e=>,
> USA & Canada
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_NorthAmerica.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LHuusX8cUFM8NW-cI8bCnLPkJmeAFVfQLkLeNKL9agc&s=dgiwHC2Vh9E0InkWviE77rws9zyVH1-eolscsgndgck&e=>,
> and WNC day trips
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_DayTrips.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LHuusX8cUFM8NW-cI8bCnLPkJmeAFVfQLkLeNKL9agc&s=yHJuxqdGRJVZc8KhCYFSo97BiF2Sw2YkHVdWjVcBkh0&e=>
>
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>
>
>
>
>
>
> ********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************
> This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL and may
> contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED information and is
> intended for the authorized recipient of the sender. If you are not the
> intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure,
> copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included
> in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this
> message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and
> permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies
> thereof, from all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.).
> Thank you. **********************************************************************
>
>



--
Editor, ABA Blog
American Birding Association
blog.aba.org

 

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Date: 2/24/17 4:22 am
From: Scott Hartley (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Harlequin ducks
Hi

Has anyone seen the Harlequin ducks lately? Finally have some time this
weekend to Ft. Fisher to look for them.

Thanks and good birding to you all.

Scott Hartley
Myrtle Beach, SC

 

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Date: 2/24/17 3:57 am
From: Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: : Trumpeter Swan still on French Broad River, Asheville
Hello all,

I believe it is a Trumpeter, see this link. Middle bill pink is normal for Trumpeter, Tundra juvenile would have more pink. Leg color better and probably most compelling case for Trumpeter and retaining gray plumage longer for subadult bird fits for Trumpeter.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.trumpeterswansociety.org_juvenile-2Dswans.html&d=DwIGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=nejclrBwh_Bq3lBsnLBBLiheE_YHaKFwgLKA6F8HYyM&s=uO4tV_qXk5Gc9SNJZ2O0kD-8iBoq68HgkTr-VF3FHv0&e=

here is text if link not working:

Both Trumpeter and Tundra juveniles are gray in fall and winter. Tundras are brighter silvery gray with black legs and feet. Trumpeters are darker sooty gray, especially in the head and neck area, and their leg and foot color is primarily yellow-orange mottling with some black. Tundra juveniles begin turning white in late December and by mid March are nearly all white. Trumpeter juveniles usually remain darker gray longer, with gray feathers on the head and neck persisting well into spring. In winter, Trumpeter juveniles may vary in age by up to 6 weeks due to geographic differences in hatching dates. As a result, they show considerable individual and geographic variation in the timing of their molt into white plumage. Tundra bill color is usually mottled pink with black tip, with less black at the base than Trumpeters. Trumpeter bills are black at base and tip with a pink middle. Juvenile bill color in winter gradually shifts to all black in both species.

Now look at these pics on eBird of the Asheville bird.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S34629890&d=DwIGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=nejclrBwh_Bq3lBsnLBBLiheE_YHaKFwgLKA6F8HYyM&s=LvBbP5Wr46yUkif8UTr3LPB6mCzga6jmXSps4nxUKSQ&e=


Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC

From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Harry LeGrand
Sent: Thursday, February 23, 2017 4:52 PM
To: ATCClack <atcclack...>
Cc: Simon Thompson <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: : Trumpeter Swan still on French Broad River, Asheville

I haven't seen much if any discussion of this Buncombe County swan. While at Pungo refuge on Monday, Derb Carter and I studied hundreds and hundreds of Tundra Swans at very close range -- less than 100 yards away thru 30+ scopes. We saw none that were 15-20% larger, and thus all we saw were Tundras. So -- what's the connection and concern? Most of the immatures -- identified by light sooty face and neck, if not some pink on the bill, had a strong and clear V-feathering on the forehead where it meets the bill. We did not see this on adults -- white plumage and all dark bills (yellow spot or nor). The adults showed the characteristic rounded or straight-ish meeting of the feathers of the forehead with the top of the bill. But MOST of the immature Tundra Swans showed the V-shape of the feathering at the top of the bill.

My brother in TN e-mailed me earlier about concern over the ID of the Buncombe bird, thinking it might be a Tundra. A lot of the gestalt features I have seen in the photos lean me toward a Tundra Swan -- such as the narrowness of the black bill where it meets the eye, shape of the bill, etc. Of course, we who have not seen the bird in the field cannot judge its overall size from photos; it is a lot bigger than a Mallard in a few photos, but all swans are.

I just read an e-bird report saying the bird is an immature. Some descriptions say the neck is light grayish or light sooty. So -- is the bird an immature? What other marks on the bird -- besides the V-shape of feathering (and no yellow spot on the bill) -- lead folks to identifying the bird as a Trumpeter?

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Thu, Feb 23, 2017 at 1:36 PM, ATCClack <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
Trumpeter swan is still at Ledges Park just a little bit north as of 12:30 today.
Chris Clack



Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE Device


-------- Original message --------
From: Simon Thompson <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>>
Date: 2/18/17 5:37 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fwd: Trumpeter Swan on French Broad River, Asheville
Folks
We are pretty confident that the swan on the French Broad River just north of Asheville is indeed a sub-adult Trumpeter Swan. Photos have been uploaded to the Carolina Bird Club website:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_gallery_Johnston_trus.html&d=DwIGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=nejclrBwh_Bq3lBsnLBBLiheE_YHaKFwgLKA6F8HYyM&s=dXHSxI3_buZO0qPSQGO_pm4ELatV7gf9VTyeMeHsRfo&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_gallery_Johnston_trus.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz%20-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LHuusX8cUFM8NW-cI8bCnLPkJmeAFVfQLkLeNKL9agc&s=RuphG-M16QbiCuAeQvo64VQQcjeGOnepcO1ey6DE764&e=>

Thanks to Doug Johnston, Clifton Avery, John Koon and Tom Bush for getting photos that clinched the ID. It's a tough call, but the "V" shape of the white above the bill is conclusive, Compare this to the U shaped or flat shape on the Tundra Swan.
See Sibley's information for more details:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.sibleyguides.com_2006_02_distinguishing-2Dtrumpeter-2Da&d=DwIGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=nejclrBwh_Bq3lBsnLBBLiheE_YHaKFwgLKA6F8HYyM&s=ebzA3qbznkyyVGlbCNK30r8YubesxQUO7kxxfHUVwME&e= nd-tundra-swans/<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.sibleyguides.com_2006_02_distinguishing-2Dtrumpeter-2Dand-2Dtundra-2Dswans_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LHuusX8cUFM8NW-cI8bCnLPkJmeAFVfQLkLeNKL9agc&s=D43QzZW6ijcAOsHXGJEKlj-6KwA-s3INpnaZVoe54No&e=>

A few photos are also attached

Directions: Go to Ledges Whitewater River Park on the French Broad River (Alexander)
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps_place_Ledges-2BWhitewater-2BRiver-2BPark_-4035.6845176-2C-2D82.6196865-2C17z_data-3D-214m5-213m4-211s0x0-3A0xc81f18538ccbcb6c-218m2-213d35.6845132-214d-2D82.617498-3Fhl-3Den-26authuser-3D0&d=DwIGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=nejclrBwh_Bq3lBsnLBBLiheE_YHaKFwgLKA6F8HYyM&s=4MuF_6kd9Pt40c3FDbeOC_V5mgpbclksQqm9Ziw4iJk&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps_place_Ledges-2BWhitewater-2BRiver-2BPark_-4035.6845176-2C-2D82.6196865-2C17z_data-3D-214m5-213m4-211s0x0-3A0xc81f18538ccbcb6c-218m2-213d35.6845132-214d-2D82.617498-3Fhl-3Den-26authuser-3D0&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LHuusX8cUFM8NW-cI8bCnLPkJmeAFVfQLkLeNKL9agc&s=TsyK2_SDUL7L1fxndQjXiO_vIgzyUKmuvBDueyRqC6w&e=>
Continue downstream for half a mile and park in the large pull- off. The swan was in the river (far side) near this pull-off around 4:30 PM today. Hope it's in the same place tomorrow.
As far as I know, this may be a first record for Western North Carolina.
Simon

Simon RB Thompson
Ventures Birding Tours
Asheville, North Carolina
Check out our 2017 birding & nature tours - International<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_InternationalTours.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LHuusX8cUFM8NW-cI8bCnLPkJmeAFVfQLkLeNKL9agc&s=rA524xwQZBbl7SqqeTe6S5L9dRLmxqLky7K5ktyNkHw&e=>, USA & Canada<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_NorthAmerica.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LHuusX8cUFM8NW-cI8bCnLPkJmeAFVfQLkLeNKL9agc&s=dgiwHC2Vh9E0InkWviE77rws9zyVH1-eolscsgndgck&e=>, and WNC day trips<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_DayTrips.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LHuusX8cUFM8NW-cI8bCnLPkJmeAFVfQLkLeNKL9agc&s=yHJuxqdGRJVZc8KhCYFSo97BiF2Sw2YkHVdWjVcBkh0&e=>
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********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************ This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank you. **********************************************************************

 

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Date: 2/23/17 6:00 pm
From: Andrew Tan-Delli Cicchi <andrew.tan.delli.cicchi...>
Subject: Interview on Birding in Durham
Hi there,


I'm an undergraduate at Duke participating in a journalism class, and am doing a piece on wildlife observation in Durham. I was wondering if there was anyone planning to go out birding this weekend, and might be interested in being interviewed and teaching someone relatively new about the practice!


Thanks!

Andrew



Andrew Tan-Delli Cicchi


B.A. Literature

Duke University | Class of 2017

 

Back to top
Date: 2/23/17 4:51 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Great Kiskadee, Bear Island, Feb 22 2017
The general policy is to not use banding codes, or other cryptic codes, on
carolinabirds. When you want to provide a full species list, it is best to
provide the URL link to your eBird list, or copy the birds on the eBird
list and paste that into the carolinabirds message. If you don't eBird,
then please list the full common names. It is tedious to do this by hand,
so if you don't use the eBird methods, most folks simply just name the
highlights. Frankly, most of us don't care to read on carolinabirds if you
saw a Northern Cardinal or Carolina Wren or Eastern Bluebird there anyway
-- just the better birds.

So, to borrow one of your birds: "Don't anyone use banding codes on
carolinabirds NOMO."

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Thu, Feb 23, 2017 at 5:55 PM, linda.allman <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Brief sighting around 7:15 am by my friend, Anita Wood and Ed, a wonderful
> birder from Pennsylvania, as it flew from trees on the left over our heads
> to
> the right, landing briefly, then lost. Ed actually spotted it first briefly
> before it flew.
>
> We searched for several hours eventually walking up to the pecan "'grove''.
>
> We then birded at the lake and saw the following:
> AMAV
> AMCR
> AMKE
> AWPE
> BAEA
> BEKI
> BLVU
> BUFF
> CHSP
> EABL
> GADW
> GLIB
> GRBL
> GWTE
> NOMO
> NSHO
> NOCA
> PBGR
> RWBL
> SNEG
> TRHE
> TUVU
> WBNU
> YBSA
> YRWA
> YTWA
>
>
> At Donnelly we saw a Nothern FlicKer who posed a long time for us and was
> still there when we left. Also saw fox squirrel and Yellowrumped warblers.
>
> First time posting, so hope this is done correctly.
>

 

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Date: 2/23/17 4:00 pm
From: Pam Diamond (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: birding in New Orleans next month
I want to accompany my husband on a business trip to NOLA in March and
thought birding might be a good addition to eating and drinking my days
away. Does anyone have experience with birding in the city? I won't have a
car.


Pam Diamond
Cary NC

 

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Date: 2/23/17 3:47 pm
From: Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Still flying over at Pungo Lake?
I went Wed and saw nothing; but I am not having good luck on my coast
trips. I have dipped on lark sparrow, clay-colored sparrow and snow geese
on three brief trips. I went to the West end of Swindell Rd (ends in a
farmyard) where it was mentioned that the geese might be heading to feed
and looked around the fields there. I saw a couple of V-formations but
nothing unusual. I made it to Canal D Rd, SW corner of the lake at about
5:15, maybe 5:30 which is where I think Harry Legrand said they watched and
I didn't see anything but some swans in the impoundment there. I spoke to
a local retired hunter who was there to watch the flight and he told me on
a cloudy afternoon like Wed that they may have left earlier in the
afternoon. He also told me that the snow geese take off and go straight up
and fly so high that it is difficult to see them in flight. Can anyone
confirm this?

I have a cousin who lives on the coast in Maryland and she posted a picture
of snow geese in the field behind her house this weekend so I definitely
think they have started migrating.

Good luck! (I did see a Cooper's hawk chasing a wood duck over my house
last weekend so I can't complain about my birding luck!)

Ann Brice
Wilson, NC

On Thu, Feb 23, 2017 at 4:14 PM, Betsy Kane <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> I thank the birders who wrote recently about the continuing late-day
> flyovers near Pungo Lake. It is very late in the season, but I have an
> opportunity to try go down tomorrow (Friday). Does anyone know if this is
> still going on?
>
> Betsy Kane
> Raleigh
>

 

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Date: 2/23/17 3:26 pm
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Great Kiskadee, Bear Island, Feb 22 2017
This is one of the reasons that I would never advise using band codes in a public forum. You must be 100% perfect. Get one letter wrong, and you have named a completely different species, or the code is completely indecipherable.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_misc_bandcodes.html&d=DwIC-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=1xAEo_SRjDh4M-qlBIZtl-7LtpTnKMvcY2XB0racX3A&s=8V6y7W18u35UZsrXh_WcgiOh-nfKfgJxKhhrHRTnI1A&e=

Kent Fiala

On 2/23/2017 6:23 PM, Jamie Adams wrote:
> It's a small mammal frequently used as a pet.
>
> Jamie Adams
> Wilmington, Nc
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Feb 23, 2017, at 6:01 PM, Kent Fiala <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>>
>> What is a "GRBL"?
>>
>> Kent Fiala
>>
>>> On 2/23/2017 5:55 PM, linda.allman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
>>> Brief sighting around 7:15 am by my friend, Anita Wood and Ed, a wonderful
>>> birder from Pennsylvania, as it flew from trees on the left over our heads to
>>> the right, landing briefly, then lost. Ed actually spotted it first briefly
>>> before it flew.
>>>
>>> We searched for several hours eventually walking up to the pecan "'grove''.
>>>
>>> We then birded at the lake and saw the following:
>>> AMAV
>>> AMCR
>>> AMKE
>>> AWPE
>>> BAEA
>>> BEKI
>>> BLVU
>>> BUFF
>>> CHSP
>>> EABL
>>> GADW
>>> GLIB
>>> GRBL
>>> GWTE
>>> NOMO
>>> NSHO
>>> NOCA
>>> PBGR
>>> RWBL
>>> SNEG
>>> TRHE
>>> TUVU
>>> WBNU
>>> YBSA
>>> YRWA
>>> YTWA
>>>
>>>
>>> At Donnelly we saw a Nothern FlicKer who posed a long time for us and was
>>> still there when we left. Also saw fox squirrel and Yellowrumped warblers.
>>>
>>> First time posting, so hope this is done correctly.
>>>
>>
> ********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************ This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank you. **********************************************************************
>
 

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Date: 2/23/17 3:24 pm
From: Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Great Kiskadee, Bear Island, Feb 22 2017
It's a small mammal frequently used as a pet.

Jamie Adams
Wilmington, Nc

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 23, 2017, at 6:01 PM, Kent Fiala <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> What is a "GRBL"?
>
> Kent Fiala
>
>> On 2/23/2017 5:55 PM, linda.allman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
>> Brief sighting around 7:15 am by my friend, Anita Wood and Ed, a wonderful
>> birder from Pennsylvania, as it flew from trees on the left over our heads to
>> the right, landing briefly, then lost. Ed actually spotted it first briefly
>> before it flew.
>>
>> We searched for several hours eventually walking up to the pecan "'grove''.
>>
>> We then birded at the lake and saw the following:
>> AMAV
>> AMCR
>> AMKE
>> AWPE
>> BAEA
>> BEKI
>> BLVU
>> BUFF
>> CHSP
>> EABL
>> GADW
>> GLIB
>> GRBL
>> GWTE
>> NOMO
>> NSHO
>> NOCA
>> PBGR
>> RWBL
>> SNEG
>> TRHE
>> TUVU
>> WBNU
>> YBSA
>> YRWA
>> YTWA
>>
>>
>> At Donnelly we saw a Nothern FlicKer who posed a long time for us and was
>> still there when we left. Also saw fox squirrel and Yellowrumped warblers.
>>
>> First time posting, so hope this is done correctly.
>>
>
********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************ This electronic message, including its attachments, is CONFIDENTIAL and may contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED or PROTECTED information and is intended for the authorized recipient of the sender. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure, copying, or distribution of this message or any of the information included in it is unauthorized and strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please immediately notify the sender by reply e-mail and permanently delete this message and its attachments, along with any copies thereof, from all locations received (e.g., computer, mobile device, etc.). Thank you. **********************************************************************
 

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Date: 2/23/17 3:01 pm
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Great Kiskadee, Bear Island, Feb 22 2017
What is a "GRBL"?

Kent Fiala

On 2/23/2017 5:55 PM, linda.allman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> Brief sighting around 7:15 am by my friend, Anita Wood and Ed, a wonderful
> birder from Pennsylvania, as it flew from trees on the left over our heads to
> the right, landing briefly, then lost. Ed actually spotted it first briefly
> before it flew.
>
> We searched for several hours eventually walking up to the pecan "'grove''.
>
> We then birded at the lake and saw the following:
> AMAV
> AMCR
> AMKE
> AWPE
> BAEA
> BEKI
> BLVU
> BUFF
> CHSP
> EABL
> GADW
> GLIB
> GRBL
> GWTE
> NOMO
> NSHO
> NOCA
> PBGR
> RWBL
> SNEG
> TRHE
> TUVU
> WBNU
> YBSA
> YRWA
> YTWA
>
>
> At Donnelly we saw a Nothern FlicKer who posed a long time for us and was
> still there when we left. Also saw fox squirrel and Yellowrumped warblers.
>
> First time posting, so hope this is done correctly.
>

 

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Date: 2/23/17 2:55 pm
From: linda.allman (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Great Kiskadee, Bear Island, Feb 22 2017
Brief sighting around 7:15 am by my friend, Anita Wood and Ed, a wonderful
birder from Pennsylvania, as it flew from trees on the left over our heads to
the right, landing briefly, then lost. Ed actually spotted it first briefly
before it flew.

We searched for several hours eventually walking up to the pecan "'grove''.

We then birded at the lake and saw the following:
AMAV
AMCR
AMKE
AWPE
BAEA
BEKI
BLVU
BUFF
CHSP
EABL
GADW
GLIB
GRBL
GWTE
NOMO
NSHO
NOCA
PBGR
RWBL
SNEG
TRHE
TUVU
WBNU
YBSA
YRWA
YTWA


At Donnelly we saw a Nothern FlicKer who posed a long time for us and was
still there when we left. Also saw fox squirrel and Yellowrumped warblers.

First time posting, so hope this is done correctly.
 

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Date: 2/23/17 1:52 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: : Trumpeter Swan still on French Broad River, Asheville
I haven't seen much if any discussion of this Buncombe County swan. While
at Pungo refuge on Monday, Derb Carter and I studied hundreds and hundreds
of Tundra Swans at very close range -- less than 100 yards away thru 30+
scopes. We saw none that were 15-20% larger, and thus all we saw were
Tundras. So -- what's the connection and concern? Most of the immatures
-- identified by light sooty face and neck, if not some pink on the bill, *had
a strong and clear V-feathering on the forehead where it meets the bill.*
We did not see this on adults -- white plumage and all dark bills (yellow
spot or nor). The adults showed the characteristic rounded or straight-ish
meeting of the feathers of the forehead with the top of the bill. But MOST
of the immature Tundra Swans showed the V-shape of the feathering at the
top of the bill.

My brother in TN e-mailed me earlier about concern over the ID of the
Buncombe bird, thinking it might be a Tundra. A lot of the gestalt features
I have seen in the photos lean me toward a Tundra Swan -- such as the
narrowness of the black bill where it meets the eye, shape of the bill,
etc. Of course, we who have not seen the bird in the field cannot judge
its overall size from photos; it is a lot bigger than a Mallard in a few
photos, but all swans are.

I just read an e-bird report saying the bird is an immature. Some
descriptions say the neck is light grayish or light sooty. So -- is the
bird an immature? What other marks on the bird -- besides the V-shape of
feathering (and no yellow spot on the bill) -- lead folks to identifying
the bird as a Trumpeter?

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Thu, Feb 23, 2017 at 1:36 PM, ATCClack <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Trumpeter swan is still at Ledges Park just a little bit north as of 12:30
> today.
> Chris Clack
>
>
>
> Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE Device
>
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Simon Thompson <carolinabirds...>
> Date: 2/18/17 5:37 PM (GMT-05:00)
> To: <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: Fwd: Trumpeter Swan on French Broad River, Asheville
>
> Folks
> We are pretty confident that the swan on the French Broad River just north
> of Asheville is indeed a sub-adult Trumpeter Swan. Photos have been
> uploaded to the Carolina Bird Club website:
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_gallery_Johnston_trus.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=jBegMPY5vh0sHjlehiLkLG9yeuuoOCH-6RW7qvfhFjA&s=RPMDBSOhP8b0Et0kgQSNWSAXbfHczjVkc_PrtwQUynY&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_gallery_Johnston_trus.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz%20-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LHuusX8cUFM8NW-cI8bCnLPkJmeAFVfQLkLeNKL9agc&s=RuphG-M16QbiCuAeQvo64VQQcjeGOnepcO1ey6DE764&e=>
>
> Thanks to Doug Johnston, Clifton Avery, John Koon and Tom Bush for getting
> photos that clinched the ID. It's a tough call, but the "V" shape of the
> white above the bill is conclusive, Compare this to the U shaped or flat
> shape on the Tundra Swan.
> See Sibley's information for more details:
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.sibleyguides.com_2006_02_distinguishing-2Dtrumpeter-2Da&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=jBegMPY5vh0sHjlehiLkLG9yeuuoOCH-6RW7qvfhFjA&s=aWdvyOXotqQB-_ZpY31QYtPtCEdd4vh2zLGp-hgM8eo&e=
> nd-tundra-swans/
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.sibleyguides.com_2006_02_distinguishing-2Dtrumpeter-2Dand-2Dtundra-2Dswans_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LHuusX8cUFM8NW-cI8bCnLPkJmeAFVfQLkLeNKL9agc&s=D43QzZW6ijcAOsHXGJEKlj-6KwA-s3INpnaZVoe54No&e=>
>
> A few photos are also attached
>
> Directions: Go to Ledges Whitewater River Park on the French Broad River
> (Alexander)
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps_place_Ledges-2BWhitewater-2BRiver-2BPa&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=jBegMPY5vh0sHjlehiLkLG9yeuuoOCH-6RW7qvfhFjA&s=zRbqKFH-XqjDOF-hUR121ia3N8sB7-HS5AVCowmmHbI&e=
> rk/@35.6845176,-82.6196865,17z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x0:0xc81f185
> 38ccbcb6c!8m2!3d35.6845132!4d-82.617498?hl=en&authuser=0
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps_place_Ledges-2BWhitewater-2BRiver-2BPark_-4035.6845176-2C-2D82.6196865-2C17z_data-3D-214m5-213m4-211s0x0-3A0xc81f18538ccbcb6c-218m2-213d35.6845132-214d-2D82.617498-3Fhl-3Den-26authuser-3D0&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LHuusX8cUFM8NW-cI8bCnLPkJmeAFVfQLkLeNKL9agc&s=TsyK2_SDUL7L1fxndQjXiO_vIgzyUKmuvBDueyRqC6w&e=>
> Continue downstream for half a mile and park in the large pull- off. The
> swan was in the river (far side) near this pull-off around 4:30 PM today.
> Hope it's in the same place tomorrow.
> As far as I know, this may be a first record for Western North Carolina.
> Simon
>
> Simon RB Thompson
> Ventures Birding Tours
> Asheville, North Carolina
>
> Check out our 2017 birding & nature tours - International
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_InternationalTours.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LHuusX8cUFM8NW-cI8bCnLPkJmeAFVfQLkLeNKL9agc&s=rA524xwQZBbl7SqqeTe6S5L9dRLmxqLky7K5ktyNkHw&e=>,
> USA & Canada
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_NorthAmerica.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LHuusX8cUFM8NW-cI8bCnLPkJmeAFVfQLkLeNKL9agc&s=dgiwHC2Vh9E0InkWviE77rws9zyVH1-eolscsgndgck&e=>,
> and WNC day trips
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdventures.com_DayTrips.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LHuusX8cUFM8NW-cI8bCnLPkJmeAFVfQLkLeNKL9agc&s=yHJuxqdGRJVZc8KhCYFSo97BiF2Sw2YkHVdWjVcBkh0&e=>
> Like us on Facebook at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_pages&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=jBegMPY5vh0sHjlehiLkLG9yeuuoOCH-6RW7qvfhFjA&s=zWsaXNVTshh1aneEo73k9B52JfmYwDKD8Kh43dSZIbk&e=
> /Ventures-Birding-Tours/207237043263?ref=hl
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.f%20acebook.com_pages_Ventures-2DBirding-2DTours_207237043263-3Fref-3Dhl&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=LHuusX8cUFM8NW-cI8bCnLPkJmeAFVfQLkLeNKL9agc&s=1MVjbnJHN31g0gKo11yM1KxBTNz8MN6SkXZB22CRRRM&e=>
>
>
>

 

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Date: 2/23/17 1:43 pm
From: Karen Bearden (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Still flying over at Pungo Lake?
Howdy!

We were there Sunday night and it was AMAZING!!! Such a SPECIAL experience to witness!!!!

Hurry up and go! You’ll be so glad you did!!

Peace and love for our beautiful Earth, Karen Bearden
Raleigh, NC



On Feb 23, 2017, at 4:14 PM, Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:

I thank the birders who wrote recently about the continuing late-day flyovers near Pungo Lake. It is very late in the season, but I have an opportunity to try go down tomorrow (Friday). Does anyone know if this is still going on?

Betsy Kane
Raleigh

 

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Date: 2/23/17 1:14 pm
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Still flying over at Pungo Lake?
I thank the birders who wrote recently about the continuing late-day
flyovers near Pungo Lake. It is very late in the season, but I have an
opportunity to try go down tomorrow (Friday). Does anyone know if this is
still going on?

Betsy Kane
Raleigh

 

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Date: 2/23/17 11:58 am
From: Doug Pratt (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Armchair birding through books
In response to Merrill Lynch's recommendation, I would also recommend Phoebe Snetsinger's first-hand account "Birding on Borrowed Time", available through ABA Sales. It is equally tragic and truthful, and will give you a challenge keeping up with all the world birds mentioned. But it's a good read even if you don't know one bird from another. My mother passed it around her retirement home and it got rave reviews. She said you just have to treat those long lists of birds like the biblical "begats". The book is more a chronicle of obsession than a birding report. Full disclosure: I illustrated this book and am mentioned in it, but receive no money from sales.

While we're on the subject, I want to also recommend a book even older than "Kingbird Highway" (which I agree is a must-read), Peterson and Fisher's "Wild America", which chronicles a birding journey by car across North America in the early 1950s by Roger Tory Peterson and his British friend. It was before interstate highways and mass air travel. At the time, Ivory-billed Woodpeckers and Bachman's Warblers were still a reasonable possibility. This book in many ways made me who I am today. It's still a great read, and brings back a long-lost era that nevertheless existed within many of our lifetimes.

Doug Pratt
Cary, NC


 

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Date: 2/23/17 11:03 am
From: Tony Paladino (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Santee Coastal Reserve
Hello Everyone.

I'm planning an afternoon at the beginning of March to the Santee Coastal
Reserve, but I've never been there. Any suggestions for where to park, what
trails to walk, and what I should be on the lookout for?

Thanks for your help.

Tony Paladino
Charleston, SC

 

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Date: 2/23/17 10:37 am
From: ATCClack (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: : Trumpeter Swan still on French Broad River, Asheville


Trumpeter swan is still at Ledges Park just a little bit north as of 12:30 today.Chris Clack


Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE Device

-------- Original message --------
From: Simon Thompson <carolinabirds...>
Date: 2/18/17 5:37 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fwd: Trumpeter Swan on French Broad River, Asheville

FolksWe are pretty confident that the swan on the French Broad River just north of Asheville is indeed a sub-adult Trumpeter Swan. Photos have been uploaded to the Carolina Bird Club website:http://www.carolinabirdclub.org/gallery/Johnston/trus.html
Thanks to Doug Johnston, Clifton Avery, John Koon and Tom Bush for getting photos that clinched the ID. It's a tough call, but the "V" shape of the white above the bill is conclusive, Compare this to the U shaped or flat shape on the Tundra Swan.See Sibley's information for more details:http://www.sibleyguides.com/2006/02/distinguishing-trumpeter-and-tundra-swans/
A few photos are also attached
Directions: Go to Ledges Whitewater River Park on the French Broad River (Alexander)https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps_place_Ledges-2BWhitewater-2BRiver-2BPark_-4035.6845176-2C-2D82.6196865-2C17z_data-3D-214m5-213m4-211s0x0-3A0xc81f18538ccbcb6c-218m2-213d35.6845132-214d-2D82.617498-3Fhl-3Den-26authuser-3D0&d=DwIGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=rJdSGX3taAGb2uR_poTEw4Ovaec2wpemg5Y15HSmHRc&s=AScqHDDxKrvpkPDn7fJ1_LsEmes4IOTsSicHTSX_G5M&e=
Continue downstream for half a mile and park in the large pull-off. The swan was in the river (far side) near this pull-off around 4:30 PM today. Hope it's in the same place tomorrow.As far as I know, this may be a first record for Western North Carolina. Simon
Simon RB Thompson
Ventures Birding Tours
Asheville, North Carolina

Check out our 2017 birding & nature tours - International, USA & Canada, and WNC day trips
Like us on Facebook at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_pages_Ventures-2DBirding-2DTours_207237043263-3Fref-3Dhl&d=DwIGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=rJdSGX3taAGb2uR_poTEw4Ovaec2wpemg5Y15HSmHRc&s=BpBMvfxyn1M3tj7RjhDzbaASrGZDIsb8wZQW1yKDZdw&e=






 

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Date: 2/23/17 9:52 am
From: Keith McCullough (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Cinnamon Teal Santee Coastal Reserve - Hybrid??
Thanks to Craig for getting some word out about considering hybrids when
looking for a Cinnamon Teal at Santee Coastal Reserve in SC. However,
neither the photos taken by Matt (now on eBird as a hybrid), the photos of
the original sighting on 2/18, nor the photos taken by Craig's party show a
pure Cinnamon Teal. All photos show pale rump patches, which eliminates
pure Cinnamon Teal and is common of hybrids. The overall head color is
difficult to determine in all of these photos, but presence or absence of
white is easier to see, which seems to suggest there are multiple birds
being discussed here. The original bird shows some white on the face in one
of the photos, which is corroborated by the observer.

It is good practice to discuss possibilities like hybrids on the way to
view supposed rarities, especially when a teal is involved. In addition to
noting a thorough description of the bird, if anyone else finds themselves
with excellent scope views, it would be great if you could digiscope a
photo.

Keith McCullough
Charleston, SC

On Wed, Feb 22, 2017 at 8:49 PM, James Watson <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Hi everyone, the Cinnamon Teal occurring at Santee Coastal Reserve in
> Charleston County South Carolina is providing birders with some
> identification challenges so birders attempting to find the Cinnamon Teal
> should know that there are photographs of a hybrid teal that were taken on
> Monday, most likely with Blue-winged Teal, at the Reserve in the area of
> the Peachtree Impoundment, however, those photographs have not been posted
> to eBird. A single Cinnamon Teal was first observed this past Saturday,
> and our party went there on Sunday. The bird we observed did not have the
> markings on the bird located on Monday. So I am not sure what is going on
> there. Some of us had purposely discussed hybrids on the drive there, and
> we made sure to look for those markings while viewing our bird. What we
> observed appeared to be a full Cinnamon Teal, all one color, without those
> markings. You can see photos on our eBird list. I suppose it is possible
> that lighting and distance could have influenced our view, but we had
> excellent scope views from two dikes and did not see these hybrid type
> field marks. And as I said, the other photos have not been put out for
> public viewing.
>
> I write this as several folks have written me asking where to find this
> bird, and because no one will post about the possible hybrid and provide
> those photos, I have to tell the folks asking me where to find this bird
> that they may be disappointed in finding a Cinnamon/Blue-winged Teal hybrid.
>
> I am probably going back on Friday, but everyone should know about this
> and carefully look at the field marks of any bird suspected of being a
> Cinnamon Teal.
>
> Craig Watson
> Mount Pleasant, SC
>
> --
>
> Happy Birding!
>
> Craig Watson, Mount Pleasant, SC
>

 

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Date: 2/23/17 9:40 am
From: Robert Rybczynski (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Chapel Hill Bird Club outing, Saturday, 25 Feb
Saturdays (25 Feb) Chapel Hill Bird Club outing will be to various locations in Orange County, west of Chapel Hill, with the first stop to try to find the recently seen Lark Sparrow, or to Mason Farm, or some combination thereof. Well decide Sat. a.m. As usual, this trip leaves the Glen Lennox parking lot (on the north side of 54 just east of the intersection with 15-501 in Chapel Hill) at 7:30 a.m.

Good birding!
Bob Rybczynski
Cary, NC
 

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Date: 2/22/17 6:58 pm
From: \Johnson, Matthew\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Cinnamon Teal Santee Coastal Reserve - Hybrid??
Hi All,

Thanks to Craig’s prodding, I’ve submitted my e-bird report with photos of the teal I saw at Santee Coastal Reserve in McClellanville, SC yesterday (Tuesday). Link to e-bird report here: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S34659386&d=DwIGaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=c91JGMDYZmBdnQ_PZNW2p-pIIdtPz3SpjRELeAkHZ0U&s=Q7jyJiaWWOcuqAZu6jm3VQ0XhOdqjAyF6hb_89MfEZs&e= . The duck was in the Peachtree impoundment, best seen from the western dike, with a flock of Blue-winged Teal. Not having much experience with Cinnamon Teal, I welcome thoughts on it.

Sorry for the delay in reporting this possible hybrid. I hope others are able to find this bird and hopefully obtain some better photos.

Good birding,

Matt Johnson
Summerville, SC

From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of James Watson
Sent: Wednesday, February 22, 2017 8:49 PM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Cinnamon Teal Santee Coastal Reserve - Hybrid??

Hi everyone, the Cinnamon Teal occurring at Santee Coastal Reserve in Charleston County South Carolina is providing birders with some identification challenges so birders attempting to find the Cinnamon Teal should know that there are photographs of a hybrid teal that were taken on Monday, most likely with Blue-winged Teal, at the Reserve in the area of the Peachtree Impoundment, however, those photographs have not been posted to eBird. A single Cinnamon Teal was first observed this past Saturday, and our party went there on Sunday. The bird we observed did not have the markings on the bird located on Monday. So I am not sure what is going on there. Some of us had purposely discussed hybrids on the drive there, and we made sure to look for those markings while viewing our bird. What we observed appeared to be a full Cinnamon Teal, all one color, without those markings. You can see photos on our eBird list. I suppose it is possible that lighting and distance could have influenced our view, but we had excellent scope views from two dikes and did not see these hybrid type field marks. And as I said, the other photos have not been put out for public viewing.

I write this as several folks have written me asking where to find this bird, and because no one will post about the possible hybrid and provide those photos, I have to tell the folks asking me where to find this bird that they may be disappointed in finding a Cinnamon/Blue-winged Teal hybrid.

I am probably going back on Friday, but everyone should know about this and carefully look at the field marks of any bird suspected of being a Cinnamon Teal.

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

--

Happy Birding!

Craig Watson, Mount Pleasant, SC

 

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Date: 2/22/17 5:49 pm
From: James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Cinnamon Teal Santee Coastal Reserve - Hybrid??
Hi everyone, the Cinnamon Teal occurring at Santee Coastal Reserve in
Charleston County South Carolina is providing birders with some
identification challenges so birders attempting to find the Cinnamon Teal
should know that there are photographs of a hybrid teal that were taken on
Monday, most likely with Blue-winged Teal, at the Reserve in the area of
the Peachtree Impoundment, however, those photographs have not been posted
to eBird. A single Cinnamon Teal was first observed this past Saturday,
and our party went there on Sunday. The bird we observed did not have the
markings on the bird located on Monday. So I am not sure what is going on
there. Some of us had purposely discussed hybrids on the drive there, and
we made sure to look for those markings while viewing our bird. What we
observed appeared to be a full Cinnamon Teal, all one color, without those
markings. You can see photos on our eBird list. I suppose it is possible
that lighting and distance could have influenced our view, but we had
excellent scope views from two dikes and did not see these hybrid type
field marks. And as I said, the other photos have not been put out for
public viewing.

I write this as several folks have written me asking where to find this
bird, and because no one will post about the possible hybrid and provide
those photos, I have to tell the folks asking me where to find this bird
that they may be disappointed in finding a Cinnamon/Blue-winged Teal hybrid.

I am probably going back on Friday, but everyone should know about this and
carefully look at the field marks of any bird suspected of being a Cinnamon
Teal.

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

--

Happy Birding!

Craig Watson, Mount Pleasant, SC

 

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Date: 2/22/17 4:54 pm
From: Eddie Owens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Chapel Hill Bird Club Meeting - Kent Fiala - eBirding 101
What, you're still not using eBird? Visit us this month to hear Kent Fiala
describe why and how you should get started. Kent will describe the value
that you can get out of eBird data online, even if you don't put in your
own data. For those who are already eBirders, Kent will reveal the hidden
world of the eBird reviewer, mistakes that you shouldn't make, and how to
make checklists that are more valuable for scientific purposes. Kent Fiala
can probably tell you something you didn't know, no matter how long you've
been eBirding.

*When*: Monday, Feb. 27, 7:30pm
*Where*: Binkley Baptist Church, 1712 Willow Dr., Chapel Hill, NC

Admission is free and the public is invited.

I hope you can join us for this informative program.

Eddie Owens
Cary, NC

 

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Date: 2/22/17 6:46 am
From: \J. Merrill Lynch\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.
While on the subject of world birding and listing, I would highly recommend this book, a true and tragically candid story about birder, Richard Koepple, written by his nonbirder son, Dan. To me this book captures the obsession of world listing like no other. Very well written and the most truthful account I have read:


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.amazon.com_See-2DEvery-2DBird-2DEarth-2DObsession_dp_0452285399&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=mqsU3HYFfzBmm29uaSA6FJ2ySfvdCNmQ3i0koJr5mn8&s=XpVKr3BN-R-KM8sLSsb9g7Bou1e6P5yv5O3fcjnYeGM&e=


J. Merrill Lynch
Conservation Biologist
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 22, 2017, at 9:31 AM, David Hart <david.hart...> wrote:
>
> Also highly recommended: “Hope Is the Thing With Feathers,” by Christopher Cokinos (not to be confused with Noah Stryker’s similarly titled one), a beautifully written meditation and natural history of six extraordinary birds lost to extinction: Carolina Parakeet, Passenger Pigeon, Labrador Duck, Heath Hen, Ivory-billed Woodpecker, and Great Auk.
>
>
> Dave Hart
> Chapel Hill, NC
>
>
> From: <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Ann Truesdale <carolinabirds...>
> Reply-To: Ann Truesdale <anntrue...>
> Date: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 at 7:42 PM
> To: "<carolinabirds...>" <carolinabirds...>
> Subject: Re: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.
>
> I agree that Kingbird Highway is a fantastic read. I'll have to use my
> phone as you suggest when I reread it, as I plan to do soon. Thanks for
> the idea!
>
> Ann
>
> Ann Truesdale
> <anntrue...>
> Meggett, SC
>
>
> On 2/21/2017 7:27 PM, Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> Good Evening Birders,
>
> With work, budgets and other constraints, I don't get near enough time
> to go birding. Luckily, I have found that reading can partly satisfy my
> insatiable birding desires.
>
> Without going into detail, I can say with conviction that you must read
> Kingbird Highway by Kenn Kaufman. Considering this was published in
> 1997, some might think I'm a little late, but it was certainly an
> entertaining, educational and even emotional read for this 31 year
> novice birder. In fact, using my smartphone to quickly look up
> unfamiliar birds mentioned by Kenn, made the book so much more
> enjoyable. I recommend that approach.
>
> Other books on my list include:
>
> The Genius of Birds - Jennifer Ackerman
> The Thing With Feathers - Noah Strycker
> Snapper - Brian Kimberling
>
> Have fun,
>
> Jim Gould
> Southern Shores, NC
>

 

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Date: 2/22/17 6:32 am
From: David Hart <david.hart...>
Subject: Re: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.
Also highly recommended: Hope Is the Thing With Feathers, by Christopher Cokinos (not to be confused with Noah Strykers similarly titled one), a beautifully written meditation and natural history of six extraordinary birds lost to extinction: Carolina Parakeet, Passenger Pigeon, Labrador Duck, Heath Hen, Ivory-billed Woodpecker, and Great Auk.


Dave Hart
Chapel Hill, NC


From: <carolinabirds-request...><mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>> on behalf of Ann Truesdale <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>>
Reply-To: Ann Truesdale <anntrue...><mailto:<anntrue...>>
Date: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 at 7:42 PM
To: "<carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>" <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>>
Subject: Re: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.

I agree that Kingbird Highway is a fantastic read. I'll have to use my
phone as you suggest when I reread it, as I plan to do soon. Thanks for
the idea!

Ann

Ann Truesdale
<anntrue...><mailto:<anntrue...>
Meggett, SC


On 2/21/2017 7:27 PM, Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
Good Evening Birders,

With work, budgets and other constraints, I don't get near enough time
to go birding. Luckily, I have found that reading can partly satisfy my
insatiable birding desires.

Without going into detail, I can say with conviction that you must read
Kingbird Highway by Kenn Kaufman. Considering this was published in
1997, some might think I'm a little late, but it was certainly an
entertaining, educational and even emotional read for this 31 year
novice birder. In fact, using my smartphone to quickly look up
unfamiliar birds mentioned by Kenn, made the book so much more
enjoyable. I recommend that approach.

Other books on my list include:

The Genius of Birds - Jennifer Ackerman
The Thing With Feathers - Noah Strycker
Snapper - Brian Kimberling

Have fun,

Jim Gould
Southern Shores, NC


 

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Date: 2/22/17 6:28 am
From: <susan...>
Subject: First real signs of Spring in the Sandhills
All,

A pair of Eastern Phoebes are busily nest building in the hay barn---
and I have watched the male House Finch feeding his mate from the
sunflower feeder on the deck. Guess Spring is here!

Susan Campbell
Southern Pines, NC

 

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Date: 2/21/17 4:43 pm
From: Ann Truesdale (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.
I agree that Kingbird Highway is a fantastic read. I'll have to use my
phone as you suggest when I reread it, as I plan to do soon. Thanks for
the idea!

Ann

Ann Truesdale
<anntrue...>
Meggett, SC


On 2/21/2017 7:27 PM, Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> Good Evening Birders,
>
> With work, budgets and other constraints, I don't get near enough time
> to go birding. Luckily, I have found that reading can partly satisfy my
> insatiable birding desires.
>
> Without going into detail, I can say with conviction that you must read
> Kingbird Highway by Kenn Kaufman. Considering this was published in
> 1997, some might think I'm a little late, but it was certainly an
> entertaining, educational and even emotional read for this 31 year
> novice birder. In fact, using my smartphone to quickly look up
> unfamiliar birds mentioned by Kenn, made the book so much more
> enjoyable. I recommend that approach.
>
> Other books on my list include:
>
> The Genius of Birds - Jennifer Ackerman
> The Thing With Feathers - Noah Strycker
> Snapper - Brian Kimberling
>
> Have fun,
>
> Jim Gould
> Southern Shores, NC
 

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Date: 2/21/17 4:28 pm
From: Jim G (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.
Good Evening Birders,

With work, budgets and other constraints, I don't get near enough time to
go birding. Luckily, I have found that reading can partly satisfy my
insatiable birding desires.

Without going into detail, I can say with conviction that you must read
Kingbird Highway by Kenn Kaufman. Considering this was published in 1997,
some might think I'm a little late, but it was certainly an entertaining,
educational and even emotional read for this 31 year novice birder. In
fact, using my smartphone to quickly look up unfamiliar birds mentioned by
Kenn, made the book so much more enjoyable. I recommend that approach.

Other books on my list include:

The Genius of Birds - Jennifer Ackerman
The Thing With Feathers - Noah Strycker
Snapper - Brian Kimberling

Have fun,

Jim Gould
Southern Shores, NC

 

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Date: 2/21/17 10:01 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Summary of a 2-day trip to the Outer Banks, NC, and adjacent mainland
Derb Carter and I covered a handful of refuges "down East" and then covered
the Nags Head and Pea Island areas, on February 19-20. I have posted our
best results previously, and I have filled out eBird reports for Jennette's
Pier for both days, plus one for Coquina Beach on the 19th.

Ocean highlights (details are posted on eBird reports):

Feb. 19: Beasley Road pond area (note -- NC DOT has replaced the Beasley
Road highway sign at Exit 548 with one for Edenton -- so, if you are
looking for "Beasley Road" on the sign, you will fail to exit.) Amid the
few thousand Canada Geese in the fields, mostly in bad light, we saw a
smaller bird that we feel was a Lesser Canada Goose. But, we saw no
Cacklings or other rare geese.

Alligator River NWR -- the USFWS has now pumped essentially all of the
water out of the ponds and pools along River Road, Sawyer Lake Road, and
Twiford Road; so we saw ZERO waterbirds at all. Don't bother stopping at
this refuge for waterfowl until around November.

Pea Island -- we saw the female COMMON GOLDENEYE, and 10 AMERICAN WHITE
PELICANS, at North Pond. thankfully, all three impoundments were still full
of waterfowl, though probably not like in the dead of winter.

Coquina Beach -- we saw one MANX SHEARWATER and a few RAZORBILLS.

Jennette's Pier -- We saw 2 LITTLE GULLS (one adult and one immature),
along with a few hundred RAZORBILLS. Also saw about 8 Humpback Whales.

Feb. 20: Jennette's Pier -- We were joined in the morning by Greg Massey,
Harry Sell, and a few others for up to 3 hours. The light SW wind from the
19th (and calmish seas) were replaced by NNE winds at 12-14 mph to chop up
the water a bit. We saw the female COMMON EIDER next to a float, as we
walked out to the end of the pier. But, thousands of birds were still on
the water -- mostly Red-throated Loons and Razorbills, but many Horned
Grebes and Red-breasted Mergansers. Derb picked out a THICK-BILLED MURRE
from a group of Razorbills on the water, and Greg and I got a good look.
Later in the morning, we added an immature BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE and a
MANX SHEARWATER. Despite seeing maybe 800 Bonaparte's Gulls, we could not
find a Little Gull. But, we did manage to see 8 species of gulls over the
two days from the pier. We also failed to pick out a Red-necked Grebe,
despite the large numbers of Horned Grebes and loons.

By 11:15, we headed to Mattamuskeet NWR, but checking several impoundments
and part of the lake failed to turn up a Eurasian Wigeon, Trumpeter Swan,
etc. The impoundment on the west side at Lake Landing did have a few
Blue-winged Teals, and we saw another pair in a canal near the refuge
entrance.

We then got to Pungo refuge by 2:30. Pungo Lake from the observation tower
did indeed have thousands of Tundra Swans, and the dense Snow Goose flock
looked like a white sandbar, though about 2 miles away. We and a few others
there then drove the South Lake Road to the west, and we stopped along this
road near the WSW corner of the lake, where there are several small
impoundments. Swans blanketed these impoundments by the thousands! We
searched hard for Trumpeters but saw none; a few other puddle ducks were
around. We waited at this spot on the refuge, and sure enough, around 4:30
the swans started leaving the lake, heading SW low over our heads, to feed
in fields (which according to Frank Enders are near Swindell Road). A few
minutes later some of the Snow Geese started trickling over, higher up.
Derb picked out 3 ROSS' GEESE from the flocks, and we had a number of "Blue
Geese". By about 5:15 - 5:30, the big Snow Goose flock finally started
leaving. We must have seen 10-15,000 each of swans and geese flying over,
and not only that, there were a few thousand ducks flying N heading to the
lake, presumably from the wet areas that Frank mentioned, near Swindell
Road. *So -- in case you are curious -- despite the very warm weather --
the swans and geese have NOT mostly left, as of February 20*.


Here is the eBird list, with details, for Jennette's Pier, for Feb. 19:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S34616578&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=PnkN3NjlrQDn_qwTfecqlGMpfd1PyHzbuDmIRjQFNaw&s=9sectLYPoBDv6llXujJcP-ZEEH8yVmVeUzLT4n1kJag&e=

Here is the eBird list, with details, for Jennette's Pier, for Feb. 20:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_view_checklist_S34615995&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=PnkN3NjlrQDn_qwTfecqlGMpfd1PyHzbuDmIRjQFNaw&s=DvLRvScPgFazLFk2VmQb3yvrx5EUbOr_x0VJObM7z4s&e=


Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

 

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Date: 2/20/17 4:00 pm
From: Marty Wall (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: No luck with New Hanover Co, NC Pacific Loons and Harlequin Ducks
I tried for both Pacific Loon and Herlequin Duck in New Hanover County this
morning with no luck. The change in winds overnight may have been a
factor. I spent about an hour scanning the loons that were close enough to
see and only saw Common. There were more loons too far out to see well
enough in the glare and chop. There were about 25 Bufflehead at the Fort
Fisher Ocean Overlook, but no Harlequin Ducks. I checked the Kure Beach
Pier twice and the Ocean Overlook three times between 10:00 and 14:00.
Hopefully they are still around and someone else will have better luck on
another day.

Marty Wall
Beaufort & Eden, NC

 

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Date: 2/20/17 3:50 pm
From: Brian Pendergraft (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: GBBC - My Backyard
I had another wonderful time counting this year. I counted Saturday-Monday, and I won’t bore you with
all the species, but the highlights are below. I had 36 species every day, with some variation. My weekend total was 41, which is about average. I had a Blue Jay imitate a Red-tailed Hawk a lot today, and I must admit that I hear the Red-shouldered copy more often.

I had a high of 18 Purple Finches yesterday, but today only had 3, so like Frank said earlier, maybe they are heading out now. I had a couple of Bald Eagle flyovers, and three hawks (Red-tailed, Red-shouldered, and Coopers. Woodpeckers were Pileated, Hairy, Downy, Red-bellied, and Yellow-bellied. An Eastern Phoebe was noisy this weekend, and two Brown-headed Cowbirds were definitely early to the ground feeders.

I hope many of you had as much fun as I did!

Good birding!

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake, NC



 

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Date: 2/20/17 2:51 pm
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: Vesper Sparrow still present at Fort Macon, NC
The Vesper Sparrow at Fort Macon (swimming beach/bathhouse site) was still
present this morning. I saw it on one of the grassy strips between the
parking lots, west of the bathhouse.

I did about 15 minutes of ocean watching there and saw 9 Razorbills.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

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Date: 2/20/17 1:57 pm
From: Frank Enders (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Purple Finches about gone
Several days with no Purple FInches at feeder, possibly related to two days of Sharp-shinned Hawk sitting in tree above log feeder, or, increasingly warm weather and late in season. Finally today just 2 PUFI appeared.

All birds seemed to shun the feeder for two days after the hawk, and one White-throat went "crazy" hitting the ground on the other side of the house one day, for no apparent reason except "panic".

Increasing invertebrate activity (=alternate food source) may have caused White-throats to not visit the feeder so much. [ Grackles returned to the colony, going off to northeast to roost at night, and several robins were here --first one a black-headed =male(but not singing--many singing in Portsmouth, VA on 14th and 15th Feb.).]

After probably 80 PUFI Jan 8 and 9, down to 20 10 &11, 10 13th, 40 14th, 10-15 rest of January to February 14th, 8 15 & 16, 0 17,18 &19, with 2 today, 20th. Sharpie was seen 16 and 17th of Feb.



Frank Enders, Halifax, NC

 

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Date: 2/20/17 11:28 am
From: Tom Krakauer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Red-breasted nuthatch
I was sitting on my deck enjoying the spring-like weather, when among the "usualsuspects", I saw and heard aRed-breasted nuthatch. My first for 2017

TomKrakauer
Bahama, NC


Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 2/20/17 8:35 am
From: \Harry E. LeGrand Jr\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Even better birds at Jennette's Pier, NC
At 11:10, Derb Carter and I have left the pier. Seen in our 3 hours today:

THICK-BILLED MURRE- Seen for several minutes in a flock of Razorbills on the water.

BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE - one immature

Manx Shearwater - one

Razorbills - 2000 or more.

Common Eider - the female mentioned in the earlier post.

No Little Gull despite 800 or more Bonaparte's Gulls.

A number of other birders with us for a while, though only Greg Massey saw the Murre with us. Will post further details tonight or tomorrow, plus enter these into eBird later as well.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh



Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 2/20/17 7:53 am
From: Henry Link <linkh...>
Subject: Common Eider at South Topsail Beach
Between 9 and 10 AM on Feb.18,. Sleeping on a sandbar across the inlet from the parking area at the south end of Topsail Island. eBird report with photo submitted.

Henry Link
Greensboro NC
 

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Date: 2/20/17 5:35 am
From: \Harry E. LeGrand Jr\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Common Eider again at Jennette's Pier, NC
Six folks are scoping now at the pier in Nags Head. Female Common Eider is close to the pier. Hundreds of Razorbills flying north. Probably into the thousands if we stay long enough. But it is windy so viewing isn't the best.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 2/20/17 4:42 am
From: Paul Serridge (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Great Kiskadee at Bear Island, SC
Saw the bird at 7.35 this morning. Flew over field, perched in tree, then
flew into woods and I lost it.

Paul Serridge
Greenville, SC

 

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Date: 2/20/17 3:33 am
From: Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Update on ROSS'S GOOSE and HEAVY TRAFFIC on I-440
First: A warning about troublesome traffic this week near the ROSS'S
GOOSE location, which is Mid Pines Road and Lake Wheeler Road in Wake
County, NC. The 440 Lake Wheeler exit will be CLOSED for paving all
week (2/20-2/24), diverting all exit traffic to Gorman Street. These
are the two exits we use to get to Mid Pines Road and Yates Mill
County Park. So plan for extra travel time, or plot a way to get to
these birding locations without using the I-440.

Second: Re: Mae Howell's comment on 2/19, who asked for confirmation
on her sighting: " Turning off of Lake Wheeler Rd at the sign that
says Hidden Heaven Farm before you get to(north of) Midpines Rd, at
the first pond on the right, there is 1 Ross's Goose amid about 25
Canada Geese."
Yes, Mae, there IS a ROSS'S GOOSE at this location in Raleigh, Wake Co, NC.
****That is the advantage of using ebird.org -- you can check and see
many reports of one to four ROSS'S GOOSE that have been in the area
for weeks. So you are correct! Look at the "Explore Data - Explore a
Region" feature, and type in Wake and pick Wake County to see ALL
recent sightings.

Reminder that the most likely place to see the ROSS'S GOOSE is behind
the church that is at the intersection of Lake Wheeler Road and Inwood
Road; often in one of the two ponds behind that church. Reminder also
that the ponds and fields are state property, so do not walk anywhere
but on the roads and parking lots (no trespassing on the farm
property). While you are there and on Mid Pines Road, check for many
exciting species. I won't list them here, but you can see them on
ebird at: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_hotspot_L1263899&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=MMJtVX14w-H05I5A3CTBo4FJ3sj1TqrBlEml2gViJgE&s=GPwb-pM9eVHq5dKvgFfmt-AbwKmYqka2A4QjzPOEcjE&e=
Good birding, everyone!
L Erla Beegle, Raleigh, NC
 

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