Carolinabirds
Received From Subject
7/18/18 6:32 am Alan Gamache <bird...> Stilt Sandpiper/Cedar Island, NC
7/17/18 12:12 pm Shawn R. Smolen-Morton <SSmolenMorton...> Limpkin Continues, 17 July
7/17/18 9:35 am Matt Curran <mcurran1...> Story on Purple Martins and OBX Bridge
7/16/18 4:49 pm amaspirit (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Question for SC birders
7/16/18 1:37 pm James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Location of Limpkin at Congaree NP, Richland Co., SC
7/16/18 6:02 am Mike Judd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: entering ebird data for someone else
7/16/18 4:16 am Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: entering ebird data for someone else
7/16/18 3:43 am Paul Serridge (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: entering ebird data for someone else
7/15/18 2:06 pm Patrick Coin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Cowbird making like House Sparrow--Durham NC
7/15/18 1:48 pm Patrick Coin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Belted Kingfisher, Durham 7/13/18
7/15/18 12:51 pm Bruce Smithson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> White-winged Crow (with new URL)
7/15/18 12:26 pm Nate Swick <nswick...> Re: entering ebird data for someone else
7/15/18 12:15 pm Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: entering ebird data for someone else
7/15/18 12:01 pm James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: entering ebird data for someone else
7/15/18 11:46 am Keith McCullough (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: entering ebird data for someone else
7/15/18 11:46 am ken lady (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: entering ebird data for someone else
7/15/18 11:40 am Len Kopka (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: entering ebird data for someone else
7/15/18 11:12 am John Fussell <jofuss...> entering ebird data for someone else
7/15/18 9:44 am Bruce Smithson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> White-winged Crow
7/14/18 5:09 pm John Fussell <jofuss...> Roseate Spoonbills at Cape Lookout point
7/14/18 12:45 pm Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Limpkin on the Black River near Atkinson, NC
7/14/18 11:34 am James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Limpkin continues Congaree NP, Richland Co., SC
7/13/18 7:35 am Corey, Ed <ed.corey...> Two natural resource positions with NC State Parks
7/12/18 8:31 pm Ron <waxwing...> Texas Gulf Coast/Rio Grande Valley birding trip
7/12/18 9:28 am John Grego <jrgrego...> Limpkin at Congaree National Park
7/12/18 7:59 am <hilton...> <hilton...> Hilton Pond 06/01/18 (All American Toad Spectacle)
7/12/18 4:55 am Lena Gallitano <lbg...> Bodie-Pea Island Christmas Bird Count - Seeks Organizer and Compiler
7/9/18 7:55 pm Peter Stangel <peter...> New Ellenton, SC BBS Route
7/9/18 8:16 am John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Roseate Spoonbills still in Raleigh
7/9/18 7:29 am Matt Spangler (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Roseate Spoonbills also at Jordan Lake, plus different (BC) Night-Herons
7/8/18 7:23 pm Cindy Pirson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Grey kingbird?
7/8/18 6:33 pm Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Roseate Spoonbills still in Raleigh
7/8/18 6:06 pm Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: grey Kingbird?
7/8/18 5:32 pm Fred Burggraf (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Roseate Spoonbills at Huntington Beach S.P.
7/8/18 5:30 pm Birding Poet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: grey Kingbird?
7/8/18 5:29 pm Birding Poet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: grey Kingbird?
7/8/18 5:08 pm Cindy Pirson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> grey Kingbird?
7/8/18 5:54 am Sherry Lane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Carolina Bird Club Costa Rica Bonus Trip March 2019
7/8/18 5:20 am Sherry Lane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Carolina Bird Club Costa Rica Bonus Trip March 2019
7/7/18 7:53 pm Jack Rogers <jack...> (Second hand) Shiny Cowbird-Jasper co., SC
7/7/18 3:58 pm James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Color Deficient Male Painted Bunting, Botany Bay WMA, Edisto Island, SC
7/7/18 10:15 am Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Migratory Bird Treat Act
7/7/18 9:28 am Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Migratory Bird Treat Act
7/5/18 5:56 pm Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> NC mountains highlights
7/5/18 3:45 pm DPratt14 <DPratt14...> question about Mississippi Kite plumage
7/5/18 8:46 am <badgerboy...> Brookshire Park walk this Saturday
7/5/18 8:03 am Patricia Tice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Critter cam
7/5/18 7:42 am The Gaston Gang (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> butterfly speaker
7/5/18 6:31 am Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: AOS updates
7/5/18 6:00 am \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> RE: Updates to North Carolina and South Carolina bird lists (No NC/SC content)
7/4/18 5:10 pm Eric Harrold (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Another Wilkes County Barn Owl (BNOW)
7/4/18 12:24 pm Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Updates to North Carolina and South Carolina bird lists
7/4/18 12:00 pm Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Updates to North Carolina and South Carolina bird lists
7/4/18 11:10 am Steve Patterson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Updates to North Carolina and South Carolina bird lists
7/4/18 10:54 am Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Updates to North Carolina and South Carolina bird lists
7/4/18 8:45 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Critter cam
7/4/18 8:03 am Patricia Tice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Critter cam
7/3/18 6:56 pm David Weesner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Two Roseate Spoonbills
7/3/18 3:59 pm g57462 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Sad wild turkey nest update
7/3/18 3:24 pm Robin T (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Sad wild turkey nest update
7/3/18 12:11 pm Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: tool for notable sightings?
7/3/18 12:03 pm Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: tool for notable sightings?
7/3/18 11:59 am Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: tool for notable sightings?
7/3/18 11:56 am Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> tool for notable sightings?
7/3/18 11:25 am John Fussell <jofuss...> Limpkin location
7/3/18 6:07 am John Fussell <jofuss...> Limpkin on the Black River, NC
7/2/18 5:57 pm David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Long-billed Curlew seen on Bulls Island
7/1/18 1:08 pm John Fussell <jofuss...> Re: Cliff Swallows Nesting in Pitt County NC
7/1/18 6:59 am Robin T (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wild turkey nest update
6/30/18 7:07 pm Thomas Krakauer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fwd: Anyone with wild turkey knowledge?
6/30/18 4:18 pm Russ Tyndall <fitzbew...> Cliff Swallows Nesting in Pitt County NC
6/30/18 4:13 pm Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: gnatcatcher behavior
6/30/18 3:54 pm Cary Paynter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> gnatcatcher behavior
6/30/18 3:39 pm John Fussell <jofuss...> another Carteret County nest site for Cliff Swallows
6/30/18 3:23 pm John Fussell <jofuss...> question about Mississippi Kite plumage
6/30/18 2:12 pm Robin T (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Anyone with wild turkey knowledge?
6/28/18 8:49 am Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: red wolf
6/28/18 8:08 am michael welch (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: red wolf
6/27/18 11:02 am Derb Carter <derbc...> red wolf
6/25/18 3:43 pm John Fussell <jofuss...> American Bittern in Carteret County, NC
6/25/18 1:28 pm Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...> Wrens, kites, nuthatch and ruby-throated humingbird
6/24/18 4:56 pm Cotter, Michael G <COTTERMI...> Henslow's and other birds at the VOA site in Beaufort County, NC
6/24/18 2:09 pm <hilton...> Hilton Pond 05/01/18 (Mountain Wildflowers, Piedmont Birds)
6/24/18 9:28 am Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Wings over Water Wildlife Festival (NC Outer Banks) ad
6/24/18 6:06 am Taylor Piephoff (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Roseate spoonbill Ocean Isle Beach
6/23/18 2:19 pm jack thgipen <jack_thigpen...> Cape Fear Kites - Saturday
6/23/18 12:27 pm Len Kopka (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Roseate Spoonbill in upstate SC
6/23/18 10:04 am James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Great Shearwater has expired
6/23/18 9:47 am James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Great Shearwater Pitt St.
6/23/18 9:16 am James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Great Shearwater Pitt St. Mount Pleasant, SC
6/23/18 6:43 am Jim Holcomb (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Id help please
6/23/18 4:48 am Pam Diamond (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Id help please
6/22/18 1:43 pm Shun Endo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Swallow-tailed Kite
6/22/18 7:56 am Lester Coble (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Rose-breasted Grosbeak yesterday
6/21/18 6:08 pm Thomas Driscoll (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: No sightings - how do I find other state listserves?
6/21/18 6:04 pm Mike Judd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> No sightings - how do I find other state listserves?
6/21/18 5:25 pm David Hart <david.hart...> Spoonbills, Y-C Night Heron still in Raleigh
6/21/18 6:35 am J Gates (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Spoonbills - Raleigh Blvd pond
6/21/18 5:37 am Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> spoonbills still in Raleigh?
6/20/18 8:28 am Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bobwhites at VOA Bear Grass
6/20/18 8:18 am Eric Harrold (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bobwhites at VOA Bear Grass
6/20/18 7:25 am Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Bobwhites at VOA Bear Grass
6/20/18 6:41 am Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: A lesson on Bobwhites and the origin of calling birds
6/20/18 5:17 am \Harry E. LeGrand Jr\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Bohemian Waxwing
6/20/18 3:23 am Eric Harrold (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> A lesson on Bobwhites and the origin of calling birds
6/19/18 6:57 pm Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Fwd: Bohemian Waxwing
6/19/18 6:12 pm WALTER KENT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Fwd: Bohemian Waxwing
6/19/18 8:08 am Peter Quadarella (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: black river access
6/19/18 7:49 am Gilbert Grant (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Great Shearwater on North Topsail Beach,NC
6/19/18 7:34 am steve stevens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> black river access
6/18/18 5:33 pm Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Mississippi Kites and another spoonbill report
6/18/18 10:05 am Peter Quadarella (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Swallow-tailed Kite nest
6/18/18 9:06 am Tom & Karen <walencit...> Re: ROSEATE SPOONBILLS still present in Raleigh, Wake Co, NC 6-18-18 at 8 am
6/18/18 8:38 am Fuz Sanderson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: ROSEATE SPOONBILLS still present in Raleigh, Wake Co, NC 6-18-18 at 8 am
6/18/18 8:37 am Birding Poet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Re: Swallow-tailed Kite nest
6/18/18 7:52 am Derb Carter <derbc...> Swallow-tailed Kite nest
6/18/18 7:48 am Christine Stoughton-Root (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> Least Bittern-Pamlico County
6/18/18 5:32 am Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> ROSEATE SPOONBILLS still present in Raleigh, Wake Co, NC 6-18-18 at 8 am
 
Back to top
Date: 7/18/18 6:32 am
From: Alan Gamache <bird...>
Subject: Stilt Sandpiper/Cedar Island, NC
On Tuesday, 17 July 2018, drove out to Cedar Island Ferry Terminal to
catch up on some early shorebirds. Highlight was spotting three Stilt
Sandpipers.

Al Gamache
New Bern, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/18 12:12 pm
From: Shawn R. Smolen-Morton <SSmolenMorton...>
Subject: Limpkin Continues, 17 July
At 10AM, the Limpkin foraged by itself at the back of Duck Pond in the shallow trough that extends NNE of the main body of water. At this location, the bird can only be seen by walking around the west end of the pond and following the shoreline, crossing one large fallen tree. Mud boots were useful. The mud is quite sticky but the ground is firm and not slick.
No ibis and few herons to be found on the pond between 7:30 and 11:00 AM.
Thanks so much to Craig Watson for yesterday's very useful post and to John Grego's effort in finding the Limpkin in the first place.
Shawn Smolen-Morton
Florence, SC

 

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Date: 7/17/18 9:35 am
From: Matt Curran <mcurran1...>
Subject: Story on Purple Martins and OBX Bridge

Swarms of Summer Birds Are Lowering the Speed Limit on a North Carolina
Bridge
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.atlasobscura.com_articles_purple-2Dmartin-2Dbridge-2Douter-2Dbanks-3Futm-5F&d=DwICAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=-gAVk3x6H_-WATHhu54Npoo5a6LsSEQQ-yoTNJ8yvuc&s=Kl3ul525PIZoW_2FBViJ_pyuagLwT8fp52_Q4aCCajg&e=
source=article&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=sendtofriend>


 

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Date: 7/16/18 4:49 pm
From: amaspirit (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Question for SC birders
Any sightings of Swallow tailed Kites over hay fields near Allendale yet this month? I've missed them for two years and would love to bring some newbies to the area if possible.


ALSO to ADMINISTRATOR of EMAILS


Please change my email address to <Am2spirit...> which comes to my iphone. Thank you!


Patricia Voelker
Lexington, SC


 

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Date: 7/16/18 1:37 pm
From: James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Location of Limpkin at Congaree NP, Richland Co., SC
For those interested in chasing the Limpkin at Congaree NP, here is a link
to a map I made of the area. The map is of Duck Pond (lighter green area),
Congaree NP, almost all the way to the Congaree River from the Visitor
Center. Green is River Trail, take right loop, small yellowline is outline
of Duck Pond (you can walk the edges all the way around it), Pink X is
where I walked to and looked down back side of pond where Limpkin was
foraging, Red is where Limpkin was foraging on edge of pond, Pink line is
where you could view Limpkin, and you have to look between and behind
cypress trees; some previous observers saw it standing in the pond more
near the trail and center of the water, some saw it perched in a small
tree. Others saw it more in the center pond and more centric of the trail
along edge of pond. It's about a 8-9 mile round trip, and the pond is
approximately 100m across. I know that it wasn't seen by two separate
observers on Sunday. You can email me privately if you have any other
questions. It was very difficult for Pamela Ford and I to find, it was
foraging on the far side behind trees and in and out of sight, so it took
continued scanning for movement and us moving a lot to relocate it. You'll
most likely start at the Visitor Center, grab a map there for the River
Trail and then make your way there. A tricky part is once you reach the
River Trial loop, there is a tree across the path (second link to photo)
slightly obstructing the sign, so be on the watch out for the downed tree
and the sign and take the right loop and Duck Pond is about 200 up the
path, this downed tree is near your destination, and not sure of exact
mileage but 3-4 miles. And thanks to John Grego for spotting this bird in
a very remote area. It's relatively easy walking, just long, and take
plenty of water if you go. I did just see where another birder saw this
bird today. Best of luck, I thought this might help.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_lily-5Fcraig_shares_sLuk3x&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=uXfdVokHVsKCOMOsycBMbZWctroc1wX0L2uWCgkl_kA&s=7228BY3991DrIV-IWdFwFZ6_dx2M7oHW1TWfock5LEA&e=
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__flic.kr_p_26s6nZG&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=uXfdVokHVsKCOMOsycBMbZWctroc1wX0L2uWCgkl_kA&s=fGh6UbAs1uUKAd_zD469On8Y2mDfm7LUGrqo-kNX8KE&e=
--

*Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul - and sings the
tunes without the words - and never stops at all.*

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

 

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Date: 7/16/18 6:02 am
From: Mike Judd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: entering ebird data for someone else
In order to enter historic records for our county we created an account for
the Transylvania County Bird Club which a couple of us have used to enter
such data. When a non-birder recently showed Michael Plauche a photo of a
spoonbill she saw on the French Broad River we entered that sighting in
this acct with attribution given to the bird observer and always indicate
who entered the data in order for eBird reviewers to make contact in case
we have completely jumped the tracks.

On Mon, Jul 16, 2018 at 6:43 AM, Paul Serridge <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> I appreciate Nate's answer to John's question about entering data for a
> 3rd party.
> Nate writes:
> "I maintain a proxy account specifically for notable sightings in the
> Carolinas. If you know of something that needs to be included let me
> know and I can add it. "
>
> A few years ago I had occasion to send to Dennis Forsythe a report of a
> Caspian Tern at Conestee which had been sent to me (with a diagnostic
> photo) by a member of the LCNP staff. Dennis confirmed the ID and entered
> the report as "Historical data".
>
> In all such cases the reviewer should be very cautious.
> I would request detailed verification of the report (including date, time,
> location etc).
> I would like to be able to contact the original reporter for further
> details.
>
> I have had occasion to review a report showing a suburban Greenville
> location. The reporter had misunderstood "location" and entered their home
> address, when reporting species seen at Huntington Beach SP.
>
> Paul Serridge
> Greenville, SC
>
>
>
>
>
>


--
Mike Judd
Brevard, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/16/18 4:16 am
From: Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: entering ebird data for someone else
All,

I still maintain the "historical data" ebird account if it is needed for a
SC record.

Dennis

On Mon, Jul 16, 2018 at 6:43 AM Paul Serridge <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> I appreciate Nate's answer to John's question about entering data for a
> 3rd party.
> Nate writes:
> "I maintain a proxy account specifically for notable sightings in the
> Carolinas. If you know of something that needs to be included let me
> know and I can add it. "
>
> A few years ago I had occasion to send to Dennis Forsythe a report of a
> Caspian Tern at Conestee which had been sent to me (with a diagnostic
> photo) by a member of the LCNP staff. Dennis confirmed the ID and entered
> the report as "Historical data".
>
> In all such cases the reviewer should be very cautious.
> I would request detailed verification of the report (including date, time,
> location etc).
> I would like to be able to contact the original reporter for further
> details.
>
> I have had occasion to review a report showing a suburban Greenville
> location. The reporter had misunderstood "location" and entered their home
> address, when reporting species seen at Huntington Beach SP.
>
> Paul Serridge
> Greenville, SC
>
>
>
>
>
>

--
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/16/18 3:43 am
From: Paul Serridge (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: entering ebird data for someone else
I appreciate Nate's answer to John's question about entering data for a
3rd party.
Nate writes:
"I maintain a proxy account specifically for notable sightings in the
Carolinas. If you know of something that needs to be included let me
know and I can add it. "

A few years ago I had occasion to send to Dennis Forsythe a report of a
Caspian Tern at Conestee which had been sent to me (with a diagnostic
photo) by a member of the LCNP staff. Dennis confirmed the ID and entered
the report as "Historical data".

In all such cases the reviewer should be very cautious.
I would request detailed verification of the report (including date, time,
location etc).
I would like to be able to contact the original reporter for further
details.

I have had occasion to review a report showing a suburban Greenville
location. The reporter had misunderstood "location" and entered their home
address, when reporting species seen at Huntington Beach SP.

Paul Serridge
Greenville, SC

 

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Date: 7/15/18 2:06 pm
From: Patrick Coin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Cowbird making like House Sparrow--Durham NC
In an amusing note, I have seen a juvenile Brown-headed Cowbird the last
two weekends (7/8/18 and 7/15/18) hopping around with the *very* tame
biscuit-crumb-scavenging House Sparrows outside Rise Donuts on Renaissance
Parkway in Durham NC. It really made me do a double-take, because at first
I thought it was some sort of giant sparrow.
--
Patrick Coin
Durham, NC
<patrickcoin1...>

 

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Date: 7/15/18 1:48 pm
From: Patrick Coin (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Belted Kingfisher, Durham 7/13/18
Had a Belted Kingfisher at Parkwood Lake in southern Durham County, NC on
Friday 7/13/18. I do not usually see them in the summer.
Also had a Spotted Sandpiper on the same lake on 7/7/18. I guess it might
be a southward-bound migrant already?

--
Patrick Coin
Durham, NC
<patrickcoin1...>

 

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Date: 7/15/18 12:51 pm
From: Bruce Smithson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: White-winged Crow (with new URL)
Posted earlier with a link that didn't work for some viewers............ here's a better link (I hope).


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__photos.app.goo.gl_DXMmKsFKipo5tUw3A&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=A0TJc8Y8Vj27r5TRthuLV0n-5Og_8kNhKiPf2oH8DFM&s=mF-8RO8bxxaSBJoj20inV5lg8WbKXb0zyl-xcz5QIv4&e=


Click on a photo to get a larger view.


Bruce Smithson
Wilmington, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/15/18 12:26 pm
From: Nate Swick <nswick...>
Subject: Re: entering ebird data for someone else
I maintain a proxy account specifically for notable sightings in the
Carolinas. If you know of something that needs to be included let me
know and I can add it.

NS

On Sun, Jul 15, 2018 at 2:15 PM, Kent Fiala <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> You can set up an eBird account in someone else's name. You can use your own
> email instead of theirs (it's ok to have the same email for multiple eBird
> accounts). This is touched on in a different context in
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__help.ebird.org_customer_portal_articles_973960-2Dentering-2Dhistoric-2Ddata&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=BQjvQtlWoKI8f_LeIi3WWLfkrFw-W0BNqfCXwFHDixo&s=IXIqmGgxnV7kD5Pfg7JmWTAEk_WpIHp43-b-l-YBDEQ&e=
>
> Kent Fiala
>
>
> On 7/15/2018 2:12 PM, John Fussell wrote:
>>
>> A naive question: How does one go about entering an ebird record for
>> another person (who doesn't do ebird)?
>>
>> Specifically I would like to enter the Black River Limpkin record from a
>> few weeks ago and the recent Cape Lookout Roseate Spoonbill record.
>>
>> John Fussell
>> Morehead City, NC
>
>
>



--
The ABA Blog
blog.aba.org
American Birding Podcast
blog.aba.org/aba-podcast
American Birding Association
 

Back to top
Date: 7/15/18 12:15 pm
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: entering ebird data for someone else
You can set up an eBird account in someone else's name. You can use your own email instead of theirs (it's ok to have the same email for multiple eBird accounts). This is touched on in a different context in https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__help.ebird.org_customer_portal_articles_973960-2Dentering-2Dhistoric-2Ddata&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=BQjvQtlWoKI8f_LeIi3WWLfkrFw-W0BNqfCXwFHDixo&s=IXIqmGgxnV7kD5Pfg7JmWTAEk_WpIHp43-b-l-YBDEQ&e=

Kent Fiala

On 7/15/2018 2:12 PM, John Fussell wrote:
> A naive question:  How does one go about entering an ebird record for another person (who doesn't do ebird)?
>
> Specifically I would like to enter the Black River Limpkin record from a few weeks ago and the recent Cape Lookout Roseate Spoonbill record.
>
> John Fussell
> Morehead City, NC


 

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Date: 7/15/18 12:01 pm
From: James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: entering ebird data for someone else
John, I essentially did something similar to what Keith stated for
shorebird surveys in Turks and Csicos where no other surveyors on our team
were eBirders so I created an account for the team and entered data, which
kept it separate from my account and recorded the effort in TCi for those
two winters. However, I still had to manage the account as if my own.

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

On Sun, Jul 15, 2018 at 2:46 PM Keith McCullough <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> My understanding is that you may enter a record for someone else by
> creating a proxy eBird account that makes it clear what you are doing. The
> excerpt below came from the eBird Help page on entering Historical Data -
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__help.ebird.org_customer_en_portal_articles_973960-2Dentering-2Dhistoric-2Ddata-3Fb-5Fid-3D1928&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=x7IMaho-X6NsEBpQYyPVfqrfNy98QdC_nTYRtmUdrhA&s=rReNFoPrNSK38J8e9j1u-AiF746eGg8RPlqcc2cJ-No&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__help.ebird.org_customer_en_portal_articles_973960-2Dentering-2Dhistoric-2Ddata-3Fb-5Fid-3D1928&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=20InRFwOP_jw06Zz_4DTQ39hu1WAeSvwiGLnAxwzm_w&s=R9x09PkPLzdU2mUeMct1U4ynPcBu6CJZNCruNGCw7zU&e=>
>
> "It may also be useful to enter data as a proxy for another observer,
> including those who do not have an account or have passed away. It is
> possible to have multiple accounts in eBird, so you can create a proxy
> account on another person's behalf. Ideally, you would use that person's
> name and make it clear in the checklist comments that the data are being
> entered by another party (or even name the account in a way that makes this
> clear). If the account covers records submitted by multiple observers,
> please use "Data" as the last name for the account (e.g., Historical
> Singapore Data or Quivira NWR Data"). For each record, be sure to have the
> observer's name in the checklist comments field. As the person responsible
> for entering an historic dataset, be prepared to vouch for the dataset.”
>
> Keith McCullough
> Charleston, SC
> On Jul 15, 2018, 2:12 PM -0400, John Fussell <jofuss...>, wrote:
>
> A naive question: How does one go about entering an ebird record for
> another person (who doesn't do ebird)?
>
> Specifically I would like to enter the Black River Limpkin record from a
> few
> weeks ago and the recent Cape Lookout Roseate Spoonbill record.
>
> John Fussell
> Morehead City, NC
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/15/18 11:46 am
From: Keith McCullough (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: entering ebird data for someone else
My understanding is that you may enter a record for someone else by creating a proxy eBird account that makes it clear what you are doing. The excerpt below came from the eBird Help page on entering Historical Data - https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__help.ebird.org_customer_en_portal_articles_973960-2Dentering-2Dhistoric-2Ddata-3Fb-5Fid-3D1928&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=20InRFwOP_jw06Zz_4DTQ39hu1WAeSvwiGLnAxwzm_w&s=R9x09PkPLzdU2mUeMct1U4ynPcBu6CJZNCruNGCw7zU&e=

"It may also be useful to enter data as a proxy for another observer, including those who do not have an account or have passed away. It is possible to have multiple accounts in eBird, so you can create a proxy account on another person's behalf. Ideally, you would use that person's name and make it clear in the checklist comments that the data are being entered by another party (or even name the account in a way that makes this clear). If the account covers records submitted by multiple observers, please use "Data" as the last name for the account (e.g., Historical Singapore Data or Quivira NWR Data"). For each record, be sure to have the observer's name in the checklist comments field. As the person responsible for entering an historic dataset, be prepared to vouch for the dataset.”

Keith McCullough
Charleston, SC
On Jul 15, 2018, 2:12 PM -0400, John Fussell <jofuss...>, wrote:
> A naive question: How does one go about entering an ebird record for
> another person (who doesn't do ebird)?
>
> Specifically I would like to enter the Black River Limpkin record from a few
> weeks ago and the recent Cape Lookout Roseate Spoonbill record.
>
> John Fussell
> Morehead City, NC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/15/18 11:46 am
From: ken lady (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: entering ebird data for someone else
It may depend on how well you know the person and why that person doesn't use ebird. When I faced this problem for someone who was not computer literate, I simply created and ebird account in that person's name and entered their data. I, of course, had the person's permission to do that. I've only done that once and it was several years ago.

At 02:12 PM 7/15/2018, John Fussell wrote:
A naive question: How does one go about entering an ebird record for another person (who doesn't do ebird)?

Specifically I would like to enter the Black River Limpkin record from a few weeks ago and the recent Cape Lookout Roseate Spoonbill record.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/15/18 11:40 am
From: Len Kopka (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: entering ebird data for someone else
John,

It's my understanding that you cannot enter a sighting on behalf of someone else. I can certainly understand this restriction. But on the other hand, credible sightings can sometimes go unreported.

Len Kopka
Simpsonville, SC

On Jul 15, 2018, at 2:12 PM, John Fussell <jofuss...> wrote:

A naive question: How does one go about entering an ebird record for another person (who doesn't do ebird)?

Specifically I would like to enter the Black River Limpkin record from a few weeks ago and the recent Cape Lookout Roseate Spoonbill record.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/15/18 11:12 am
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: entering ebird data for someone else
A naive question: How does one go about entering an ebird record for
another person (who doesn't do ebird)?

Specifically I would like to enter the Black River Limpkin record from a few
weeks ago and the recent Cape Lookout Roseate Spoonbill record.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

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Date: 7/15/18 9:44 am
From: Bruce Smithson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: White-winged Crow
Came upon an aberrant or leucistic Fish Crow last Thursday p.m. ( 12 July) at Veterans Park in Wilmington, NC. The bird was recently fledged, free flying and still being fed by an adult. I had seen what I thought was white on crows before, but it was always an artifact of sunlight reflecting in some odd way from the bird. I did a double-take on this bird and it was the real McCoy!


Some photos here: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__photos.google.com_album_AF1QipMvEeT5t6WjwtShZ7q-2De35uqaOVgxOsuTQweWTu&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=WQfGkd2bsd444HKU3eLaMfvWRG1chWyGjuTbaeoAPks&s=l2Kpfma9RIlvwhE9UpWRX5ugu1YMxpOTcGgRzaXB6R8&e=



Bruce Smithson
Wilmington, NC


 

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Date: 7/14/18 5:09 pm
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: Roseate Spoonbills at Cape Lookout point
I just saw a photograph of 2 Roseate Spoonbills at Cape Lookout point, taken
by Jess Hawkins on Wednesday.

Actually, the birds were on Shark Island (feeding in a tide pool); Shark
Island is located a short distance offshore of Cape Lookout point.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

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Date: 7/14/18 12:45 pm
From: Jamie Adams (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Limpkin on the Black River near Atkinson, NC
The Limpkin that John Fussell posted about a couple weeks ago is still about two miles up the Black River from the route 11 and 53 junction. It flew before I could get my camera out of my dry bag. There are two false rivers sandwiching the Black River in this area both ending in beautiful old growth Bald Cypress trees. I first took the south fork and at the end where you can’t go any further, there was an area at the base of one of the trees that was littered with small discarded clam shells. I figured this was a good sign that there was a Limpkin nearby. I don’t know of any other critters around that do that. I took a picture of a particularly big pile of clam shells, not sure of the species. I then took the north fork and this time I flushed the Limpkin from the bank. I did not relocate it, but there was a bunch of discarded clam shells in this area too. I did not find the Swallow-tailed Kites but had some Mississippis soar by. This river is gorgeous and well worth the paddle even if you don’t find the Limpkin. There is a 3$ donation box next to the private ramp at the junction of 11 and 53.

Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC
 

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Date: 7/14/18 11:34 am
From: James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Limpkin continues Congaree NP, Richland Co., SC
Pam Ford and I relocated the Limpkin at Duck Pond in Congaree NP, foraging
on edge of pond all the way across from trail. Matt Malin and Mark Vukovich
saw the bird earlier and we met them on their way out. It is a long hike,
approximately 4 miles, and it was hot. We saw the bird about 1130 am and it
took us about a half hour of hard looking to find the bird once we arrived
at the pond. A note of caution: right before the loop begins a tree is
across the path hiding the trail sign and which tends to steer you to the
left loop, you need to stay right here and the pond is about 250m on the
right loop trail, if you go left you have miles more of walking(thanks for
the tip Matt/Mark). We have photos and video. And thanks to John Grego for
finding this bird, getting the word out, and providing good directions.

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

 

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Date: 7/13/18 7:35 am
From: Corey, Ed <ed.corey...>
Subject: Two natural resource positions with NC State Parks
The Resource Management Program within the NC Division of Parks and Recreation is happy to announce two positions, open until July 18th. Please see the links below for details.

Piedmont Regional Biologist - https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__agency.governmentjobs.com_northcarolina_job-5Fbulletin.cfm-3FJobID-3D2139155&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=va9yTt6GPBrR1JJXOhk8FXGPDoEHF38RDluaX_9MgWQ&s=gUe8zBoRQ3jsBgZJciUQ589K9Zcu3NCIwlyJdoAIYlY&e=

Fire Ecologist - https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__agency.governmentjobs.com_northcarolina_job-5Fbulletin.cfm-3FJobID-3D2139359&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=va9yTt6GPBrR1JJXOhk8FXGPDoEHF38RDluaX_9MgWQ&s=Wd6ClAJbMH7JeRzAVCsJP7KrlhmF58ikPttWUiunMaQ&e=

Good luck to those who apply!

Ed Corey
Inventory Biologist, NC Division of Parks and Recreation
NC Dept. of Natural and Cultural Resources
919 841 4037 Office
919 208 7864 Mobile
<Ed.Corey...><mailto:<Ed.Corey...>

12700 Bayleaf Church Road | Raleigh, North Carolina 27614

Email correspondence to and from this address is subject to the North Carolina Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.


 

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Date: 7/12/18 8:31 pm
From: Ron <waxwing...>
Subject: Texas Gulf Coast/Rio Grande Valley birding trip
One spot open for November 10-17. Small group. Reply off-list for info.

Ron Clark
Kings Mtn. NC
 

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Date: 7/12/18 9:28 am
From: John Grego <jrgrego...>
Subject: Limpkin at Congaree National Park
I was at Congaree National Park early today to get a couple final photos and coordinates for a map of the River Trail. I had walked by Duck Pond earlier and saw both immature White Ibis and immature Yellow-crowned Night Heron, and was retracing my steps when I saw a mottled brown wading bird. I almost didn't put my binoculars on it since I assumed it was one of the waders I had seen earlier, but when I did, it was a Limpkin. I botched some up-close photos, but got better photos when it flew to the middle of the pond and perched.

Duck Pond's level seems popular with wading birds right now, so the bird may linger there. If you don't have John Cely's map of the park, you can find the pond by following the River Trail to the start of the loop portion of the trail--take the right-hand fork and Duck Pond will show up on your right in a couple hundred yards. The shoreline near the trail is easy to explore for birds. There are some other good birds on the River Trail this time of year (Swainson's Warbler, American Redstart), but not on the portion I was walking today. I'd characterize it as a long hot walk with a modest chance for success.

John Grego
Columbia SC
 

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Date: 7/12/18 7:59 am
From: <hilton...> <hilton...>
Subject: Hilton Pond 06/01/18 (All American Toad Spectacle)
Back in May I was guiding, banding, and lecturing at West Virginia's New River Birding and Nature Festival. In a recent installment of "This Week at Hilton Pond" I wrote about some of the things we saw and did in the Mountain State, but one phenomenon was so amazing I decided to devote an entire photo essay to it. I speak here of an all American Toad spectacle in which amorous amphibians were doing their best to propagate their genes. Installment #674 for 1-30 Jun 2018 is all about toads (and amplexus) and includes a couple of interesting notes about nature happenings at Hilton Pond.

As always we provide a list of birds banded and recaptured during the period. Of particular interest were numerous "old" Ruby-throated Hummingbirds returning in June from previous years.

Please check it out at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.hiltonpond.org_ThisWeek180601.html&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=YzU-IBW9A6ippvGmqvUQd7Gn6Jjo55br6-xRlBcHalE&s=PvYHtPs1Qc_lZSh4b_05-3TxntFki_8hs0junh7pXNg&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__hiltonpond.us7.list-2Dmanage.com_track_click-3Fu-3D4425c444b9dfe1f0201be770b-26id-3Defb8de7734-26e-3D44df90e847&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=YzU-IBW9A6ippvGmqvUQd7Gn6Jjo55br6-xRlBcHalE&s=ZFfLxki020Ra_uSQ54DjgdLMfnprPJ1BEKJON-tJeN4&e=>
Happy Nature Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.facebook.com_HiltonPond&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=YzU-IBW9A6ippvGmqvUQd7Gn6Jjo55br6-xRlBcHalE&s=-UiPO8XaM_DCtQCRMjerQJuSQlg6elQ70oZ-n56oHHQ&e= for timely updates on nature topics,
and for info about hummingbirds at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.facebook.com_rubythroats&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=YzU-IBW9A6ippvGmqvUQd7Gn6Jjo55br6-xRlBcHalE&s=BFVLZsYAoLCn2PqQJEt5xBJ_dmIWLkKktY5DDNd4Vh0&e=

Follow us on Twitter @hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and education for students of all ages.

"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the sunset." BHjr.

============


 

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Date: 7/12/18 4:55 am
From: Lena Gallitano <lbg...>
Subject: Bodie-Pea Island Christmas Bird Count - Seeks Organizer and Compiler
Good morning Carolina Birders,

Many of you may know of Paul Sykes remarkable years of participation in
Christmas Bird Counts (CBC) from Georgia to Virginia. Paul began the
Bodie-Pea Island Count here in NC when he was in grad school at NCSU 53
years ago. Now Paul is looking for someone to take over this count
beginning this year, 2018. Here are the details from Paul:


"I am looking for one or more people to organize and compile the Bodie-Pea
Island Christmas Bird Count starting this year on 28 December. I will
provide assistance to anyone willing to take over the job (furnish maps,
contact info on list of potential participants, Pea Island NWR contacts,
answer questions, etc.). It takes me about 8-10 hours split up over several
days to put the results together and email to Audubon. Some compilers can
do the results in less time. After the last day of the count period on 5
January, there is a month and a half before the deadline of submitting the
count results to Audubon. National Audubon Society provides a complete
list of bird species, you simply fill in the numbers of each species
reported on the count on count day. Audubon also provides compilers all
the type of info needed to put in the list report, etc. I still plan to
continue to participate on this count. The Bodie-Pea CBC is among the top
counts in the Southeastern United States, generally with a species total
ranging from low 140s to the mid 150s. Please contact me, Paul Sykes, at:
<jjsykes...>; 706/769-9436 (there is an answering machine if no one
picks up), or 1080 Forest Road, Watkinsville, GA 30677
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__maps.google.com_-3Fq-3D1080-2BForest-2BRoad-2C-2BWatkinsville-2C-2BGA-2B30677-26entry-3Dgmail-26source-3Dg&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=ATPJlvhK41gQRrP2Prkl5K0CLmDLTy_qdOzuYPhrS3I&s=uLh_rcniOWVP3rAnapXV_5rOx4h1qZIX5GRYatHsQfw&e=>
".

Paul is not a subscriber to Carolinabirds so I'm helping him spread the
word.

I hope someone will take on this count so we can continue this tradition of
50+ years! It is a fun count and the birds are always remarkable. You do
not need to live near the coast to organize this count!

I've copied Paul on this email so you can contact him directly.

Good birding and I'll see you at the Bodie-Pea Island CBC,

Lena Gallitano
Raleigh, NC

 

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Date: 7/9/18 7:55 pm
From: Peter Stangel <peter...>
Subject: New Ellenton, SC BBS Route
I ran this Breeding Bird Survey route for the first time a couple weeks ago. Nice route with mix of rural and suburban habitats--mostly fields and young forests. Best bird for me was Common Ground Dove in Jackson, SC-first time I have seen this species in Aiken County in years. Had an Osprey in Jackson as well. Total of 48 species. Looking forward to tracking observations over time. If you have not volunteered to run a BBS route, I recommend it. It's fun, provides good data for conservation purposes, and is a nice way to see how birds and their habitats change over time along a standardized path. Also a good way to meet new people-one guy tracked me down after seeing me count from a point in front of his house. Fortunately, he wasn't mad-just wanted to tell me about a Bald Eagle he'd seen recently!

Peter Stangel
Co-Editor, TheBirdingWire.com, the free weekly news service about birds and birding




 

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Date: 7/9/18 8:16 am
From: John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Roseate Spoonbills still in Raleigh
Hi all. This wetland along Crabtree Creek was designed as a wetland
mitigation site for the filling in of wetlands when Raleigh Blvd was
elevated, and when we have heavy rains the lake fills- which is exactly
what has happened since Friday's storms. The lake no longer has mud flats
and shallows along its edge so I wouldn't be surprised if the Spoonbills
vacate the site. Of course, if things dry out the lake level will subside
and mud flats and shallows will reappear- which often happens in late
summer and then we tend to see egrets and young herons appear at the
wetland.
I visited the site this morning and did not see the Spoonbills nor the YC
Night-Heron, but did see an Osprey and lots of dragonflies.
John Connors
Raleigh

On Sun, Jul 8, 2018 at 9:32 PM, Kent Fiala <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> I finally made my long overdue first visit to the Crabtree Creek wetland
> in Raleigh today. Recent observations have suggested that the Roseate
> Spoonbills are now only coming to the wetland to roost, so I arrived
> about 7:20 PM. My initial impression was that there were absolutely no
> birds present. Then at 7:25 the two spoonbills caught my eye as they
> flew in from the south; literally the first birds that I saw there. They
> circled around a few times before dropping down out of sight. Later,
> after taking the opportunity to find that there were indeed other birds
> present, I relocated the spoonbills in a dead tree at the far end of the
> wetland, visible from the sidewalk along Raleigh Blvd, as others have
> reported. On my way out, I also relocated the Yellow-crowned
> Night-Heron, just off the boardwalk a short way before the zigzags at
> the end of the boardwalk. At the wetland, I also observed an extremely
> ratty-looking Hooded Merganser, evidently the same one reported by Harry
> Legrand a week ago but not reported by anyone else. It looks like I am
> something like the 64th different person to have eBirded the spoonbills.
> --
>
> Kent Fiala
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/9/18 7:29 am
From: Matt Spangler (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Roseate Spoonbills also at Jordan Lake, plus different (BC) Night-Herons
I also found 3 Roseate Spoonbills on the New Hope Creek arm of Jordan Lake yesterday, present from at least 9:30 AM until at least 11:30 AM.

I'm not sure whether there are currently 5 triangle spoonbills (seems possible to me), or whether two of the Jordan birds are also the Raleigh birds (if so, where did the third go?). What about the 2 found by Megan Lynch in Chatham Cty on June 1, or the 2 found by Jonathan Cantrell at the 751 bridge on July 1?

There is a lot of good shallow habitat at the northern end of Jordan Lake right now, so who knows where they might be (if they're still there). I first found them while kayaking about a quarter mile south of the power line crossing, in a shallow cove that may be difficult to access on foot. They flushed and headed north. One or two hours later, I relocated them about a half mile away, at the far northern shore of the lake (in Durham county), an area that is theoretically observable from the power line/ railroad spur that you can hike to from Transis Camp Road.

Also, about a half mile south of the power line cut, I found a group of 4 Black-crowned Night-Herons, including one adult, two immature, and a fourth that I didn't get good looks at. Are these from a post-breeding dispersal, or could they be breeding in the area?

Matt Spangler
Chatham County, NC


-----Original Message-----
From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Kent Fiala
Sent: Sunday, July 08, 2018 9:33 PM
To: carolinabirds <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Roseate Spoonbills still in Raleigh

I finally made my long overdue first visit to the Crabtree Creek wetland in Raleigh today. Recent observations have suggested that the Roseate Spoonbills are now only coming to the wetland to roost, so I arrived about 7:20 PM. My initial impression was that there were absolutely no birds present. Then at 7:25 the two spoonbills caught my eye as they flew in from the south; literally the first birds that I saw there. They circled around a few times before dropping down out of sight. Later, after taking the opportunity to find that there were indeed other birds present, I relocated the spoonbills in a dead tree at the far end of the wetland, visible from the sidewalk along Raleigh Blvd, as others have reported. On my way out, I also relocated the Yellow-crowned Night-Heron, just off the boardwalk a short way before the zigzags at the end of the boardwalk. At the wetland, I also observed an extremely ratty-looking Hooded Merganser, evidently the same one reported by Harry Legrand a week ago but not reported by anyone else. It looks like I am something like the 64th different person to have eBirded the spoonbills.
--

Kent Fiala

 

Back to top
Date: 7/8/18 7:23 pm
From: Cindy Pirson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Grey kingbird?
Hi, thanks all. Consensus seems to be female boat tailed grackle. There were quite a few female grackles on the pier, but this one was MUCH smaller than any of the other females. It did not appear to me to be a fledgling bird either-it was flying off the pier into heavy winds and seemed quite comfortable flying as it nabbed insects in the air. That is why i took photos of this bird with other boat tailed grackles in picture - to show the size difference. Does everyone still believe this is a female boat tailed grackle? It really stood out from the other birds.

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 7/8/18 6:33 pm
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Roseate Spoonbills still in Raleigh
I finally made my long overdue first visit to the Crabtree Creek wetland
in Raleigh today. Recent observations have suggested that the Roseate
Spoonbills are now only coming to the wetland to roost, so I arrived
about 7:20 PM. My initial impression was that there were absolutely no
birds present. Then at 7:25 the two spoonbills caught my eye as they
flew in from the south; literally the first birds that I saw there. They
circled around a few times before dropping down out of sight. Later,
after taking the opportunity to find that there were indeed other birds
present, I relocated the spoonbills in a dead tree at the far end of the
wetland, visible from the sidewalk along Raleigh Blvd, as others have
reported. On my way out, I also relocated the Yellow-crowned
Night-Heron, just off the boardwalk a short way before the zigzags at
the end of the boardwalk. At the wetland, I also observed an extremely
ratty-looking Hooded Merganser, evidently the same one reported by Harry
Legrand a week ago but not reported by anyone else. It looks like I am
something like the 64th different person to have eBirded the spoonbills.
--

Kent Fiala

 

Back to top
Date: 7/8/18 6:06 pm
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: grey Kingbird?
Definitely female Boat-tailed Grackle

Kent Fiala

On 7/8/2018 8:28 PM, Birding Poet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> I think that’s a fale Boat-tailed Grackle.
>
> On Sun, Jul 8, 2018 at 8:08 PM Cindy Pirson <carolinabirds...> <mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
>
> I’m on vacation at kure beach on the southern coast of nc and hope to get id confirmation. I took photos of a bird that was hanging out at the kure beach pier with hundreds of boat tailed grackles today. I have never seen one before but think it is a grey kingbird? I’ve put the 3 photos on my flickr page under my name- cindy pirson. I don’t know if this link will take you there directly but will try : https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_113139745-40N07_-3F&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=8Y5w5EFuHTVcnvuxzfeUrTBY11m4gHQpxHL6MgkJz2w&s=1fgTTAbjWkyEBTfq9MHl-HFr2sErv15zkW38JcZdxR0&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_113139745-40N07_-3F&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=DqsuNTIegfbi2gNTDwKptiJ_O0yaPMupZMOUenQ8MFI&s=UKz-5vxmZsJuiEpJSKYXfdOgJ8uRttpvjnoIS0XNCM8&e=>  Thanks so much for the id help.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> --
> ~Tracee 843/425-7630


 

Back to top
Date: 7/8/18 5:32 pm
From: Fred Burggraf (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Roseate Spoonbills at Huntington Beach S.P.
My wife and I observed three Roseate Spoonbills this morning at Huntington
Beach State Park, SC. They were feeding with an active mixed flock of
Common Egrets, White Ibis, immature Little Blue Herons and Snowy Egrets
along the west side of the causeway in the oyster beds.

Also of note this morning were: male Painted Bunting at the feeder at the
east end of the causeway, and a Yellow-billed Cuckoo in the same general
area.

Fred Burggraf
Murrells Inlet, SC
Georgetown County

 

Back to top
Date: 7/8/18 5:30 pm
From: Birding Poet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: grey Kingbird?
*female

On Sun, Jul 8, 2018 at 8:28 PM Birding Poet <tracee.clapper...>
wrote:

> I think that’s a fale Boat-tailed Grackle.
>
> On Sun, Jul 8, 2018 at 8:08 PM Cindy Pirson <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> I’m on vacation at kure beach on the southern coast of nc and hope to get
>> id confirmation. I took photos of a bird that was hanging out at the kure
>> beach pier with hundreds of boat tailed grackles today. I have never seen
>> one before but think it is a grey kingbird? I’ve put the 3 photos on my
>> flickr page under my name- cindy pirson. I don’t know if this link will
>> take you there directly but will try :
>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_113139745-40N07_-3F&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=vr090F3gjJvv0B2lNhKfn0vc6mKg7R-X01nbfoAxbpU&s=wPhkk8Zt0gdkVZaXNFWdxjQK0Hq0fjEfBawiEqw5BzU&e=
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_113139745-40N07_-3F&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=DqsuNTIegfbi2gNTDwKptiJ_O0yaPMupZMOUenQ8MFI&s=UKz-5vxmZsJuiEpJSKYXfdOgJ8uRttpvjnoIS0XNCM8&e=>
>> Thanks so much for the id help.
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
> --
> ~Tracee 843/425-7630
>
--
~Tracee 843/425-7630

 

Back to top
Date: 7/8/18 5:29 pm
From: Birding Poet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: grey Kingbird?
I think that’s a fale Boat-tailed Grackle.

On Sun, Jul 8, 2018 at 8:08 PM Cindy Pirson <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> I’m on vacation at kure beach on the southern coast of nc and hope to get
> id confirmation. I took photos of a bird that was hanging out at the kure
> beach pier with hundreds of boat tailed grackles today. I have never seen
> one before but think it is a grey kingbird? I’ve put the 3 photos on my
> flickr page under my name- cindy pirson. I don’t know if this link will
> take you there directly but will try :
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_113139745-40N07_-3F&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=k0otIq6gNN8OkBJoEjZSxbb_vd6kDr_19YGDUluH4mw&s=rJTTj7UHf_lviz5kL40RhYU3m1nFuQI4rWWsqokeDeM&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_113139745-40N07_-3F&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=DqsuNTIegfbi2gNTDwKptiJ_O0yaPMupZMOUenQ8MFI&s=UKz-5vxmZsJuiEpJSKYXfdOgJ8uRttpvjnoIS0XNCM8&e=>
> Thanks so much for the id help.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
--
~Tracee 843/425-7630

 

Back to top
Date: 7/8/18 5:08 pm
From: Cindy Pirson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: grey Kingbird?
I’m on vacation at kure beach on the southern coast of nc and hope to get id confirmation. I took photos of a bird that was hanging out at the kure beach pier with hundreds of boat tailed grackles today. I have never seen one before but think it is a grey kingbird? I’ve put the 3 photos on my flickr page under my name- cindy pirson. I don’t know if this link will take you there directly but will try : https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_113139745-40N07_-3F&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=DqsuNTIegfbi2gNTDwKptiJ_O0yaPMupZMOUenQ8MFI&s=UKz-5vxmZsJuiEpJSKYXfdOgJ8uRttpvjnoIS0XNCM8&e= Thanks so much for the id help.

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 7/8/18 5:54 am
From: Sherry Lane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Carolina Bird Club Costa Rica Bonus Trip March 2019

The Carolina Bird Club link doesn’t seem to work, but if you click on the word Costa Rica it will take you to the Carolina Bird Club webpage for more information.


Sherry Lane



> On Jul 8, 2018, at 8:19 AM, Sherry Lane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Hi Birders,
>
> Carolina Bird Club is announcing a Bonus Trip to Costa Rica in 2019. This 9 full day birding tour will visit some of the best areas on the Caribbean slope and lowlands of Costa Rica as well as the highlands on the slopes of two volcanoes. If interested check out this Carolina Bird Club link for details.
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_Trips_CostaRica2019.pdf&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=-kzfll5BeO5AsTrur2fdMxNlJRlqby1UuA1hXIJB5fI&s=t-CirCKAG-uOHjap9LgFD05VCjuQO_YeotL1YMBWV4Y&e=
>
> Sherry Lane
> Wilmington, NC
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/8/18 5:20 am
From: Sherry Lane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Carolina Bird Club Costa Rica Bonus Trip March 2019
Hi Birders,

Carolina Bird Club is announcing a Bonus Trip to Costa Rica in 2019. This 9 full day birding tour will visit some of the best areas on the Caribbean slope and lowlands of Costa Rica as well as the highlands on the slopes of two volcanoes. If interested check out this Carolina Bird Club link for details.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_Trips_CostaRica2019.pdf&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=14UhgXSrovp58mmgwB4_wA0LtdtLjT0x3x8FGdKax-4&s=jet1lnESPSIqwWBlDs-3pOQUtDUhcEcWmpgouHfORH0&e=

Sherry Lane
Wilmington, NC



 

Back to top
Date: 7/7/18 7:53 pm
From: Jack Rogers <jack...>
Subject: (Second hand) Shiny Cowbird-Jasper co., SC
Hi all,
Passing on an eBird report from today, Jasper co., SC. Shiny Cowbird
reported with photos.
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S47054174&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=_EMyiS28FW14ns6-YCmuxpsYx4idKN9iEWPl4Bm5tfM&s=2b7t7La8IeWha0YyENw44ciAhyxblvaY38CFzTXsEOc&e=
I have no other information other than what is on the report. Looks good to
me though.
Good luck from an unfortunately out of town birder,
Jack Rogers
Mt Pleasant, SC
--

Jack Rogers
Mt Pleasant, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/7/18 3:58 pm
From: James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Color Deficient Male Painted Bunting, Botany Bay WMA, Edisto Island, SC
Pamela Ford and I relocated the "color deficient" male Painted Bunting at
Botany Bay WMA today. The bird was first discovered and photographed by
Kelley Johnson Luikey and later by Kathy Hare, and others. The breast and
belly on the bird are all yellow, but the other color features are the same
as a normally pigmented male Painted Bunting. In some of the photos there
are hints of red, but difficult to see. The bird is on territory or at
least aggressive towards other birds and actively singing from two primary
areas at Botany Bay; near the beach parking lot there is a sunflower field,
the bird is singing from perches in a live oak tree immediately on the side
of the road at the edge of the field nearest the parking lot, then it
typically flies across the sunflower field to a cherry tree near the road
where it perches and sings. It also landed on a large standing sunflower
plant numerous times between these two trees. It is in the accompany of a
female Painted Bunting and two recently fledged young. The bird is very
vocal and can easily be found from the live oak or near the cherry tree, at
one time is was perched on the guide wire of the utility pole next to the
road. Here is the eBird checklist with some photos of the bird.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S47051453&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=kQ41D0uNuVnIpBbqAo-TryrOn1G600SfRLjgA0Av7bA&s=B0gHQIRmMijDe96NOAnyh9JdTJiA9uyjJxKDZ54ZB3o&e=

--

*Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul - and sings the
tunes without the words - and never stops at all.*

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/7/18 10:15 am
From: Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Migratory Bird Treat Act
Signed and submitted, thanks.

<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.avg.com_email-2Dsignature-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=CHRBvClfYLE06LLExcEuONHe38BahcJcNS4lYQdBSpA&s=Y-4mnXED9k1PaMr6L_8P4SLfLW7p2NPE_t7GhJ3ncFk&e=>
Virus-free.
www.avg.com
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.avg.com_email-2Dsignature-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=CHRBvClfYLE06LLExcEuONHe38BahcJcNS4lYQdBSpA&s=Y-4mnXED9k1PaMr6L_8P4SLfLW7p2NPE_t7GhJ3ncFk&e=>
<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>

On Mon, Apr 16, 2018 at 12:41 PM, KC Foggin <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> According to the Washington Post The Trump administration has officially
> clipped the wings of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act
>
> God help our bird life.
>
> Article on Audubon's Face book page:
>
> *https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_audubonca_-3Fhc-5Fref-3DARRDS0Zn7AMLaw37HWm6q2YIZF7BWy5lqkZI7Wr5mp0yoYYqN79Wbc9IxLmAuXM3oug-26fref-3Dnf&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=CHRBvClfYLE06LLExcEuONHe38BahcJcNS4lYQdBSpA&s=l099b2n_LW-vRS9rvA9FpLmJn-t-PpdHdNM64GC9024&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_audubonca_-3Fhc-5Fref-3DARRDS0Zn7AMLaw37HWm6q2YIZF7BWy5lqkZI7Wr5mp0yoYYqN79Wbc9IxLmAuXM3oug-26fref-3Dnf&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=3KLZZLfOwVvWirxpJygoVT-yY46IvpU4YrtX98OjVKk&s=uyQBAcIVPT5pt9pbSRBPxq_iYaR6D_21HowJ5DSSJ4I&e=>*
>
> K.C.
>
> K.C. Foggin
> Socastee
> Myrtle Beach SC
>
> Take nothing but pictures,
> Leave nothing but footprints
> Kill nothing but time
>
> www.birdforum.net
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.birdforum.net&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=3KLZZLfOwVvWirxpJygoVT-yY46IvpU4YrtX98OjVKk&s=23WNSddVLQpG9eW00sNMup0SCi-SX2UXeFOjYCmr430&e=>
>
> www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.pbase.com_kcfoggin_nikon-5Fd50-5Fpages&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=3KLZZLfOwVvWirxpJygoVT-yY46IvpU4YrtX98OjVKk&s=6TvifGhaxIZvOxqDATZh-qu4UoDMgQGIpDqEvfuWjIE&e=>
>



--
Helen Kalevas
Near Hillsborough, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/7/18 9:28 am
From: Parkin Hunter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Migratory Bird Treat Act
Please contact your congressman and urge a no vote on the Modern Fisheries Act next week. This threatens pelagic fisheries and the birds and mammals these fisheries support. Audubon makes it easy.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__act.audubon.org_onlineactions_CsHsKgcW1EuePxFv-5Feoh5w2-3Fms-3Demsharek&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=q0spQKlpeTlZDaSXhbWx6Eij6afR4bTRvoIfF3irSvc&s=PSICnjFKqWi4gJqhRnaifEP5pa5wrOR43FWVqsjvj7I&e=

Parkin Hunter
Columbia, SC
Garden City Beach, SC

 

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Date: 7/5/18 5:56 pm
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: NC mountains highlights
Al Hooks, Audrey Whitlock and I took a five day (including travel from the
outer banks) trip to the NC mountains June 30 - July 4. Highlights were: 18
species of warblers, including a singing male Yellow-rump in the Rhodo
garden at Roan Mountain, 2 Golden-wings, just over the line in Tenn at the
Hampton Creek State Natural area, a singing Magnolia Warbler along the Blue
Ridge Parkway across from Beacon Heights, a Cerulean just south of Lewis
Overlook, a Swainson's Warbler in Al's yard, a Worm-eating Warbler at
Linville Falls and a Blackburnian near Beacon Heights. We enjoyed hearing
the Veeries, Wood Thrushes and a few Hermit Thrushes (Roan Mtn). Also had
Alder, Willow, Least and Acadian Flycatchers, Vesper Sparrows on Roan
Mountain, a couple of Pine Siskins on Grandfather Mountain and at least 40
Red Crossbills, mainly on or near Grandfather Mountain, best spot being at
Beacon Heights. We had one nice flock of 19! Very cool was watching a
juvenile Yellow-bellied Sapsucker being fed by the adults at Trout Lake.
There was a pair of Belted Kingfishers there as well. We missed the Brown
Creepers that were supposed to be breeding there. There were plenty of
Broad-winged Hawks around; one called for about 30 minutes while we hiked a
trail on Grandfather Mountain - also found one Cooper's Hawk. We had a
couple of Winter Wrens and several Red-breasted Nuthatches, as expected. We
heard a few Scarlet Tanagers but somehow missed Rose-breasted Grosbeak -
they were probably busy feeding young. We found 3 vireos, missing
white-eyed and warbling. Lots of other birds, too - we totaled just over
100 species, missing Ruffed Grouse, Black-billed Cuckoo, Peregrine
Falcon and Swainson's Thrush.

I photographed a Red Squirrel eating a fledgling bird in Boone - yikes!

It was great to get away from work and into some cooler air!

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

 

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Date: 7/5/18 3:45 pm
From: DPratt14 <DPratt14...>
Subject: question about Mississippi Kite plumage
Hi John and others: I used to see a lot of Mississippi Kites when I lived in Baton Rouge LA. I often saw birds matching your description, apparently adult but with banded tails, like one would see in the Mexican Plumbeous Kite. I just assumed that the tail was the last thing to molt in the cycle, so you could have birds with adult body and wing feathers but still retaining juv rectrices. You're right that this combination is not shown in most field guides. -Doug

"How terribly strange to be seventy." -Paul Simon, "Old Friends" 1968

H. Douglas Pratt, Ph. D.
Ornithologist, illustrator, musician
1205 Selwyn Lane
Cary, NC 27511

Research Curator of Birds, Emeritus
North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
11 West Jones Street
Raleigh NC 27601

Phone 919-379-1679
Cell phone 919-270-0857 (for travel use only)

Website: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.hdouglaspratt.com_index.html&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=M7CadDVjtrGnRil8STFS027dgCU54j7Z3eTiBKOKquU&s=vdVHCKXxp0YqV1nk0-CdYDcocC0Ab2xFQTPOLKIFEpo&e=









 

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Date: 7/5/18 8:46 am
From: <badgerboy...>
Subject: Brookshire Park walk this Saturday
Its that time of the month again! This Saturday is the Brookshire Park
HCAS bird and nature walk, which is free and open to the public, and
starts at 8AM at the main lot in Brookshire park, in the floodplain of
the New River just where it is spanned by the US421 bridge east of Boone.

In honor of the long days of midsummer I will be arriving early, about
6AM to greet the birds when they are most active. Any early risers can
meet me in the end gravel lot by the last soccer field, for a pre-walk
walk, and we will get back to the main lot at 8, for the regular walk.

Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC


 

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Date: 7/5/18 8:03 am
From: Patricia Tice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Critter cam
Thank you so much for the info!

On Wed, Jul 4, 2018, 11:44 AM Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr...> wrote:

> N.C.'s Candid Critters is a collaboration among a number of NC
> organizations and agencies, especially N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission
> and the N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences. Here is the place to start:
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.nccandidcritters.org_about-2Dthe-2Dproject_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=9ruMiCHAvTutCskUJMjvzbTcrOX-IgOiLFdbSBFp6j4&s=ngoDPqjB0lZu-O-XQYhetH--_1ckHMuxDwCXiN85vQc&e=
>
> I am the author of the *Mammals of North Carolina* website, along with
> Tom Howard (he is the website administrator). We hope people who find
> notable mammals with the cameras they install will enter the records on the
> website. Many of you already have, and we have gotten lots of nice photo
> records for scarce or shy species such as Spotted Skunk, Nine-banded
> Armadillo, and Bobcat.
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.dpr.ncparks.gov_mammals_accounts.php&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=9ruMiCHAvTutCskUJMjvzbTcrOX-IgOiLFdbSBFp6j4&s=5e4CmeFFiYNeikYn3YHcW4EuuPno1BoKdXmwJDp5YI4&e=
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
> On Wed, Jul 4, 2018 at 11:02 AM, Patricia Tice <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>
>> I have seen a few articles about checking out critter cams to help track
>> local birds and animals. My recollection is that you check them out at
>> the library and then return them for the footage to be analyzed by whoever
>> is conducting the study. Our local library is unaware of the program. Do
>> any of you know anything about it?
>>
>> Patty Tice
>> Raleigh NC
>>
>
>

 

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Date: 7/5/18 7:42 am
From: The Gaston Gang (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: butterfly speaker
Good Morning

I am assisting the Johnston County master gardeners with a symposium next
year, Sep 14, 2019. The theme is pollinators. A speaker to sing the
praises of butterflies has not been found and an hour is the time allotted
to the presentation. Is anyone willing to give a talk or recommend
someone? If so please send me the contact information so I can forward to
the symposium chair.

Many thanks,
Ladybug, Hyco Lake

Edna Gaston, president
North Carolina Extension Master Gardener Association (NCEMGVA)

 

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Date: 7/5/18 6:31 am
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: AOS updates
It's hard not to feel a bit robbed by the fact that most of our
Ammodramus sparrows are no longer Ammodramus.

It will definitely take some getting used to.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC.

On Thu, Jul 5, 2018 at 8:59 AM, "Shultz, Steven" <carolinabirds...> wrote:
> Apologies in advance, not Carolina related but since it is a slow day in
> July, these names are technically on our website somewhere from bonus trip
> reports, and it does have slight impact to traveling Carolina-based birders
> (like those participating on our Costa Rica and Panama bonus trips!),
> figured I would provide this nugget. The update lumped two of the Central
> America tanagers (Cherrie’s and Passerini’s Tanagers) back into
> Scarlet-rumped Tanager. Passerini’s was the Caribbean form and Cherrie’s
> the Pacific slope form. Mark your Central American field guides accordingly
> J
>
>
>
> From the supplement-
>
>
>
> Notes.—Formerly (AOU 1998) treated as two species R.
>
> passerinii [Passerini’s Tanager] and R. costaricensis Cherrie,
>
> 1891 [Cherrie’s Tanager], but merged again (as in AOU
>
> 1983) based on similarities in song, plumage, and response
>
> to playback experiments (Freeman and Montgomery
>
> 2017), and a better understanding of the significance of
>
> differences in mitochondrial DNA, which had provided the
>
> rationale for the split.
>
>
>
> Steve Shultz
>
> Apex, NC
>
>
 

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Date: 7/5/18 6:00 am
From: \Shultz, Steven\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: RE: Updates to North Carolina and South Carolina bird lists (No NC/SC content)
Apologies in advance, not Carolina related but since it is a slow day in July, these names are technically on our website somewhere from bonus trip reports, and it does have slight impact to traveling Carolina-based birders (like those participating on our Costa Rica and Panama bonus trips!), figured I would provide this nugget. The update lumped two of the Central America tanagers (Cherrie’s and Passerini’s Tanagers) back into Scarlet-rumped Tanager. Passerini’s was the Caribbean form and Cherrie’s the Pacific slope form. Mark your Central American field guides accordingly ☺

From the supplement-

Notes.—Formerly (AOU 1998) treated as two species R.
passerinii [Passerini’s Tanager] and R. costaricensis Cherrie,
1891 [Cherrie’s Tanager], but merged again (as in AOU
1983) based on similarities in song, plumage, and response
to playback experiments (Freeman and Montgomery
2017), and a better understanding of the significance of
differences in mitochondrial DNA, which had provided the
rationale for the split.

Steve Shultz
Apex, NC

From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Kent Fiala
Sent: Wednesday, July 04, 2018 1:52 PM
To: carolinabirds
Subject: Updates to North Carolina and South Carolina bird lists


The American Ornithological Society has published its annual updates to the AOS Check-list of North American Birds, and I have written my annual summary of how it affects the bird lists of the Carolinas.

With respect to the Carolinas, this year there are no splits nor lumps; nobody gets any armchair ticks. There aren't even any new common names to learn. The changes are exclusively changes in scientific names, and in list sequence. I've applied the changes to the various lists of Carolina birds<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_brc_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=bZe46E581hz1JY3OxJ5aTzqAAZhUKwc9030JlyFS06M&s=b3X6aUhl8Z7KXbUHRA9WQUl2WY9d9jIBcyMJtUehlJg&e=>, and for the extremely small group of people who will care what they are, you can read my summary of the changes<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_brc_aouchanges.html-23aos59&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=bZe46E581hz1JY3OxJ5aTzqAAZhUKwc9030JlyFS06M&s=OaHk-iMPpoWLRa2KTejOEBauDPLr8qFriPjZNna38II&e=>.

You can find a complete summary of the AOS report, covering all of the ABA area, in the ABA blog<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__blog.aba.org_2018_06_aos2018.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=bZe46E581hz1JY3OxJ5aTzqAAZhUKwc9030JlyFS06M&s=dEyMESUgmtcWBpwZI7SOhncMM3jK4nJW6e6ckyHLzoU&e=>. There's not a whole lot there either, beyond Morelet's Seedeater and Canada Jay.

--

Kent Fiala
 

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Date: 7/4/18 5:10 pm
From: Eric Harrold (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Another Wilkes County Barn Owl (BNOW)
...from the same residence as the lightning-stunned adult from a few weeks
back!!! It appears to be okay, just kinda slipped up in leaving the nest
hole if I had to guess. Perhaps there wasn't a nearby limb to scramble up
to? I'll consult Carolina Raptor Center folks in the morning once they're
in to see what we need to do next. Presumably it is the progeny of the
adult I came to the aid, or at least should be. Looks like it should be
fine and it is nearly of the age to leave the nest cavity and disperse,
which is what it was likely in the process of doing.

Eric Harrold
Hays, NC

 

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Date: 7/4/18 12:24 pm
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Updates to North Carolina and South Carolina bird lists
Thanks. Tom Howard will have a bit of work to do to get the *Birds of
North Carolina* website re-arranged! Moving kites around and other moving
around of species is the trickiest thing for him; changing genus names like
for the Picoides and some grass sparrows less so. We all knew that the
four kites in the Carolinas are not closely related to any of each other --
all in different genera, so I guess at some point we would expected this
shuffling, just as the two eagles are not related and are quite distant on
the checklist.

Another year goes by without the expected and needed re-split of Audubon's
Warbler and Myrtle Warbler. 😢

Harry LeGrand

On Wed, Jul 4, 2018 at 1:51 PM, Kent Fiala <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> The American Ornithological Society has published its annual updates to
> the AOS Check-list of North American Birds, and I have written my annual
> summary of how it affects the bird lists of the Carolinas.
>
> With respect to the Carolinas, this year there are no splits nor lumps;
> nobody gets any armchair ticks. There aren't even any new common names to
> learn. The changes are exclusively changes in scientific names, and in list
> sequence. I've applied the changes to the various lists of Carolina birds
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_brc_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=bZe46E581hz1JY3OxJ5aTzqAAZhUKwc9030JlyFS06M&s=b3X6aUhl8Z7KXbUHRA9WQUl2WY9d9jIBcyMJtUehlJg&e=>,
> and for the extremely small group of people who will care what they are,
> you can read my summary of the changes
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_brc_aouchanges.html-23aos59&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=bZe46E581hz1JY3OxJ5aTzqAAZhUKwc9030JlyFS06M&s=OaHk-iMPpoWLRa2KTejOEBauDPLr8qFriPjZNna38II&e=>
> .
>
> You can find a complete summary of the AOS report, covering all of the ABA
> area, in the ABA blog
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__blog.aba.org_2018_06_aos2018.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=bZe46E581hz1JY3OxJ5aTzqAAZhUKwc9030JlyFS06M&s=dEyMESUgmtcWBpwZI7SOhncMM3jK4nJW6e6ckyHLzoU&e=>.
> There's not a whole lot there either, beyond Morelet's Seedeater and Canada
> Jay.
>
> --
> Kent Fiala
>
>

 

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Date: 7/4/18 12:00 pm
From: Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Updates to North Carolina and South Carolina bird lists
Very nice,

Thank.

Dennis

On Wed, Jul 4, 2018 at 2:10 PM Steve Patterson <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Thank you, Kent! I read and enjoyed.
>
>
>
> Steve Patterson
> Anderson, SC
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: \Kent Fiala\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <
> <carolinabirds...>
> To: carolinabirds <carolinabirds...>
> Sent: Wed, Jul 4, 2018 1:55 pm
> Subject: Updates to North Carolina and South Carolina bird lists
>
> The American Ornithological Society has published its annual updates to
> the AOS Check-list of North American Birds, and I have written my annual
> summary of how it affects the bird lists of the Carolinas.
>
> With respect to the Carolinas, this year there are no splits nor lumps;
> nobody gets any armchair ticks. There aren't even any new common names to
> learn. The changes are exclusively changes in scientific names, and in list
> sequence. I've applied the changes to the various lists of Carolina birds
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_brc_&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=bZe46E581hz1JY3OxJ5aTzqAAZhUKwc9030JlyFS06M&s=b3X6aUhl8Z7KXbUHRA9WQUl2WY9d9jIBcyMJtUehlJg&e=>,
> and for the extremely small group of people who will care what they are,
> you can read my summary of the changes
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_brc_aouchanges.html-23aos59&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=bZe46E581hz1JY3OxJ5aTzqAAZhUKwc9030JlyFS06M&s=OaHk-iMPpoWLRa2KTejOEBauDPLr8qFriPjZNna38II&e=>
> .
>
> You can find a complete summary of the AOS report, covering all of the ABA
> area, in the ABA blog
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__blog.aba.org_2018_06_aos2018.html&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=bZe46E581hz1JY3OxJ5aTzqAAZhUKwc9030JlyFS06M&s=dEyMESUgmtcWBpwZI7SOhncMM3jK4nJW6e6ckyHLzoU&e=>.
> There's not a whole lot there either, beyond Morelet's Seedeater and Canada
> Jay.
>
> --
> Kent Fiala
>
>

--
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>

 

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Date: 7/4/18 11:10 am
From: Steve Patterson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Updates to North Carolina and South Carolina bird lists
Thank you, Kent! I read and enjoyed.






Steve Patterson
Anderson, SC




-----Original Message-----
From: \Kent Fiala\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
To: carolinabirds <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Wed, Jul 4, 2018 1:55 pm
Subject: Updates to North Carolina and South Carolina bird lists



The American Ornithological Society has published its annual updates to the AOS Check-list of North American Birds, and I have written my annual summary of how it affects the bird lists of the Carolinas.

With respect to the Carolinas, this year there are no splits nor lumps; nobody gets any armchair ticks. There aren't even any new common names to learn. The changes are exclusively changes in scientific names, and in list sequence. I've applied the changes to the various lists of Carolina birds, and for the extremely small group of people who will care what they are, you can read my summary of the changes.

You can find a complete summary of the AOS report, covering all of the ABA area, in the ABA blog. There's not a whole lot there either, beyond Morelet's Seedeater and Canada Jay.



--
Kent Fiala




 

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Date: 7/4/18 10:54 am
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Updates to North Carolina and South Carolina bird lists
The American Ornithological Society has published its annual updates to the AOS Check-list of North American Birds, and I have written my annual summary of how it affects the bird lists of the Carolinas.

With respect to the Carolinas, this year there are no splits nor lumps; nobody gets any armchair ticks. There aren't even any new common names to learn. The changes are exclusively changes in scientific names, and in list sequence. I've applied the changes to the various lists of Carolina birds <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_brc_&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=bZe46E581hz1JY3OxJ5aTzqAAZhUKwc9030JlyFS06M&s=b3X6aUhl8Z7KXbUHRA9WQUl2WY9d9jIBcyMJtUehlJg&e=>, and for the extremely small group of people who will care what they are, you can read my summary of the changes <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_brc_aouchanges.html-23aos59&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=bZe46E581hz1JY3OxJ5aTzqAAZhUKwc9030JlyFS06M&s=OaHk-iMPpoWLRa2KTejOEBauDPLr8qFriPjZNna38II&e=>.

You can find a complete summary of the AOS report, covering all of the ABA area, in the ABA blog <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__blog.aba.org_2018_06_aos2018.html&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=bZe46E581hz1JY3OxJ5aTzqAAZhUKwc9030JlyFS06M&s=dEyMESUgmtcWBpwZI7SOhncMM3jK4nJW6e6ckyHLzoU&e=>. There's not a whole lot there either, beyond Morelet's Seedeater and Canada Jay.

--
Kent Fiala


 

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Date: 7/4/18 8:45 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Critter cam
N.C.'s Candid Critters is a collaboration among a number of NC
organizations and agencies, especially N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission
and the N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences. Here is the place to start:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.nccandidcritters.org_about-2Dthe-2Dproject_&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JrmyAEb8oCLuO6fJ4Tu__4PjrVcQrvoohsRID0F4gSo&s=agxherpegzoy6Ir56pwc-V7mBPsih4ERvp7GX9m8Oh4&e=

I am the author of the *Mammals of North Carolina* website, along with Tom
Howard (he is the website administrator). We hope people who find notable
mammals with the cameras they install will enter the records on the
website. Many of you already have, and we have gotten lots of nice photo
records for scarce or shy species such as Spotted Skunk, Nine-banded
Armadillo, and Bobcat.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.dpr.ncparks.gov_mammals_accounts.php&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JrmyAEb8oCLuO6fJ4Tu__4PjrVcQrvoohsRID0F4gSo&s=ACTOHOGXK_QVxd8yhfI2Y5EqATqUPuA8cqFHnsS2iHQ&e=

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Wed, Jul 4, 2018 at 11:02 AM, Patricia Tice <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> I have seen a few articles about checking out critter cams to help track
> local birds and animals. My recollection is that you check them out at
> the library and then return them for the footage to be analyzed by whoever
> is conducting the study. Our local library is unaware of the program. Do
> any of you know anything about it?
>
> Patty Tice
> Raleigh NC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/18 8:03 am
From: Patricia Tice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Critter cam
I have seen a few articles about checking out critter cams to help track
local birds and animals. My recollection is that you check them out at
the library and then return them for the footage to be analyzed by whoever
is conducting the study. Our local library is unaware of the program. Do
any of you know anything about it?

Patty Tice
Raleigh NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/3/18 6:56 pm
From: David Weesner (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Two Roseate Spoonbills
Two Roseate spoonbills actually in the Basin. About 1/4 mile out in the water, I believe they were in New Hanover Co.Thanks, for the help Sherry and Howard. Seen about 7:30 PM this evening.Dave WessnerWilmington, NC 

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

Back to top
Date: 7/3/18 3:59 pm
From: g57462 (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Sad wild turkey nest update
Robin this is sad and maddening, i feel your frustration as the poor hen
has been thru the gauntlet, i have never heard of such activities as
stealing clutches of eggs,but the wildlife officer has and your hearing
vehicle at 330 am confirms this and on top of that the turkey was attacked
i am truly sorry for all the sorrow and worry, i hope they [poachers are
caught] and the hen recovers, with your plans for haying in regards for the
wildlife i am sure you will have many new wildlife nieghbors, again i am
sorry for the heartache and apppreciate all you have tried to do to
protect the hen, sincerely david pennebaker person county

On Tue, Jul 3, 2018 at 6:24 PM, Robin T <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Devastating news to report. At 3:30 am I was out on our deck (insomnia). I
> heard 2 car/truck doors quietly shut and the vehicle roll away down the
> road by our pasture. I was concerned about the vacation home below us, so
> we drove down to it but all was well.
>
> At 6 am I was out again and the hen was acting and looking strange - kept
> standing in the nest, then walking around, standing in it, etc. After an
> hour she wandered off to the creek woods and did not return. My husband
> went down to check the nest and every single egg was gone. No shell
> fragments, nest looked undisturbed. We saw her a bit later and every tail
> feather is gone but she was eating under our bird feeders. Back to the
> pasture - not 1 feather to be found. At that point we doubted a 4 legged
> thief would be so tidy.
>
> Called the Wildlife Officer for our area. He thinks that poachers took the
> eggs, said they wait til a clutch is near hatching, take the eggs, incubate
> them & either raise them to hunt, eat or sell to hunt clubs (illegal). I am
> furious I wasn't out 10 minutes earlier.
>
> We have posted flyers and a local paper ad with a reward of $1000 for info
> leading to arrest & conviction. W.O. is sure someone will have talked and
> in this poor area, hopefully thete will be no honor among thieves with
> $1000 cash available. Already have 2 leads on known poachers in this area -
> and one came cruising by slowly this afternoon looking at all the posters
> (We saw him cruise slowly by pasture yesterday afternoon, and verified the
> nest could be seen from the road). Ordered 4 more cameras to put around our
> land
>
> So sad these 12 poults won't be giving us & other wildlife watchers
> enjoyment & adding to the population. Just hope the hen makes it til her
> tail feathers grow back in (they will, won't they? If she isn't predated?).
>
> Sadly,
> Robin Tingley
> Pisgah NF
>
>
> Sent from Yaho Mail on Android
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__go.onelink.me_107872968-3Fpid-3DInProduct-26c-3DGlobal-5FInternal-5FYGrowth-5FAndroidEmailSig-5F-5FAndroidUsers-26af-5Fwl-3Dym-26af-5Fsub1-3DInternal-26af-5Fsub2-3DGlobal-5FYGrowth-26af-5Fsub3-3DEmailSignature&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=EXr1RqLAQJZw0kIbW0TbvIi_uuNRakgV8poRd9Ntst0&s=g4HXT7W0tOmWazKSzo8mPN-D-uch2iyNd7Tja4Ftr6E&e=>
>
>
>
> On Tue, J ul 3, 2018 at
>
>
>
> *From:* <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> *On
> Behalf Of *Robin T (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
> *Sent:* Sunday, July 1, 2018 9:59 AM
> *To:* Carolinabirds Listserve <carolinabirds...>
> *Subject:* wild turkey nest update
>
>
>
> Thank you all for the input & advice. When my husband walked down to see
> if it was a hurt turkey laying in the pasture, and scared her off the nest,
> he spread a little hay from the ground in a wide circle around the nest. We
> stayed away since then and were convinced we had caused her to abandon the
> nest as we watched her walk around the pasture for an hour, walk around the
> hay, stretching her neck to look in at the nest, but then continue on.
>
>
>
> At 6:30 this morning we saw her again, but this time after walking around
> she entered the nest and has been on it all day so far. Hoping for the
> best, although I was dismayed to read that only 10% to 40% of nests result
> in hatched eggs, and of those only 25% make it to 4 weeks. Good thing they
> lay 9 to 13 eggs.
>
>
>
> It will be an anxious but hopeful time watching the nest from our deck
> (100 yards away). We see her stick her head up to check the surrounding me
> every so often and I will send a link to some pics.
>
>
>
> We will be researching the best time to allow haying for next year. Thanks
> so much for the file on the effects of haying! This land was strip logged
> in the late teens/1920s, farmed, then by the early 50s was an apple orchard
> til the 90s. We've only been here a little over a year and are trying to
> keep different environments - have 2 acres of woods from the 30s, banks we
> are leaving in native grasses and wildflowers, and the 5 acre pasture that
> has been cut in June & Sept for ten years or so by a local in the valley
> below in return for the hay. We will be discussing a later schedule for him
> as our first priority is providing for the wildlife.
>
>
>
> Thanks again & send good thoughts for this turkey clutch!
>
>
>
> Robin Tingley
>
> Pisgah NF
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/3/18 3:24 pm
From: Robin T (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Sad wild turkey nest update
Devastating news to report. At 3:30 am I was out on our deck (insomnia). I heard 2 car/truck doors quietly shut and the vehicle roll away down the road by our pasture. I was concerned about the vacation home below us, so we drove down to it but all was well.
At 6 am I was out again and the hen was acting and looking strange - kept standing in the nest, then walking around, standing in it, etc. After an hour she wandered off to the creek woods and did not return. My husband went down to check the nest and every single egg was gone. No shell fragments, nest looked undisturbed. We saw her a bit later and every tail feather is gone but she was eating under our bird feeders. Back to the pasture - not 1 feather to be found. At that point we doubted a 4 legged thief would be so tidy. 
Called the Wildlife Officer for our area. He thinks that poachers took the eggs, said they wait til a clutch is near hatching, take the eggs, incubate them & either raise them to hunt, eat or sell to hunt clubs (illegal). I am furious I wasn't out 10 minutes earlier. 
We have posted flyers and a local paper ad with a reward of $1000 for info leading to arrest & conviction. W.O. is sure someone will have talked and in this poor area, hopefully thete will be no honor among thieves with $1000 cash available. Already have 2 leads on known poachers in this area - and one came cruising by slowly this afternoon looking at all the posters (We saw him cruise slowly by pasture yesterday afternoon, and verified the nest could be seen from the road). Ordered 4 more cameras to put around our land 
So sad these 12 poults won't be giving us & other wildlife watchers enjoyment & adding to the population. Just hope the hen makes it til her tail feathers grow back in (they will, won't they? If she isn't predated?). 
Sadly, Robin TingleyPisgah NF



Sent from Yaho Mail on Android

 


On Tue, Jul 3, 2018 at 

 

From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> On Behalf Of Robin T (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
Sent: Sunday, July 1, 2018 9:59 AM
To: Carolinabirds Listserve <carolinabirds...>
Subject: wild turkey nest update

 

Thank you all for the input & advice. When my husband walked down to see if it was a hurt turkey laying in the pasture, and scared her off the nest, he spread a little hay from the ground in a wide circle around the nest. We stayed away since then and were convinced we had caused her to abandon the nest as we watched her walk around the pasture for an hour, walk around the hay, stretching her neck to look in at the nest, but then continue on.

 

At 6:30 this morning we saw her again, but this time after walking around she entered the nest and has been on it all day so far. Hoping for the best, although I was dismayed to read that only 10% to 40% of nests result in hatched eggs, and of those only 25% make it to 4 weeks. Good thing they lay 9 to 13 eggs. 

 

It will be an anxious but hopeful time watching the nest from our deck (100 yards away). We see her stick her head up to check the surrounding me every so often and I will send a link to some pics. 

 

We will be researching the best time to allow haying for next year. Thanks so much for the file on the effects of haying! This land was strip logged in the late teens/1920s, farmed, then by the early 50s was an apple orchard til the 90s. We've only been here a little over a year and are trying to keep different environments - have 2 acres of woods from the 30s, banks we are leaving in native grasses and wildflowers, and the 5 acre pasture that has been cut in June & Sept for ten years or so by a local in the valley below in return for the hay. We will be discussing a later schedule for him as our first priority is providing for the wildlife. 

 

Thanks again & send good thoughts for this turkey clutch!

 

Robin Tingley

Pisgah NF 


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Back to top
Date: 7/3/18 12:11 pm
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: tool for notable sightings?
This is most excellent -- now I know where to go look for a black-backed
woodpecker just 2.25 miles away. Many thanks again - Betsy

On Tue, Jul 3, 2018 at 3:02 PM, Betsy Kane <oldurbanist...> wrote:

> Many thanks, that's exactly it!
>
> Betsy Kane
>
> On Tue, Jul 3, 2018 at 2:58 PM, Kent Fiala <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
>> Go to the Carolina Bird Club site https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__urldefense.proofpoint&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=98ySjndw7R0C6lbcHot_Lclj24Z33rrgJAcvsK9aMT0&s=loT8QY6RscMc4_nhgQaFH7r3KBLshn7WCmaoHbKRZ3w&e=.
>> com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_&d=DwIFaQ&c=
>> imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug
>> _rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=pOeuCTITKm7HHDDanfAUfpT7tk2_
>> ARqWIJawow92O9c&s=EGUwSB5eKPRa7f3nbmXpDtYLTQkOKu2f73445FP24gk&e= and
>> click on the "Sightings" button, and then a little way down the page on the
>> "Nearby notable sightings" button.
>>
>> Kent Fiala
>>
>>
>> On 7/3/2018 2:54 PM, Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
>>
>>> A couple of years ago someone on this list posted a nice web tool that
>>> had been created by a very experienced person to search recent notable
>>> e-birds within a given radius of one's current location. It was designed
>>> with the Carolinas in mind but I tried it out while traveling elsewhere and
>>> it worked. I tried to save the link to the tool, but I'm not finding it
>>> now. Anyone familiar with this link?
>>>
>>> Betsy Kane
>>> Washington, N.C.
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/3/18 12:03 pm
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: tool for notable sightings?
Many thanks, that's exactly it!

Betsy Kane

On Tue, Jul 3, 2018 at 2:58 PM, Kent Fiala <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Go to the Carolina Bird Club site https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__urldefense.proofpoint&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=3L5-cDuiPXC4a2lZ7YgxMWszw8fzkpfgvPmiZcYEgy4&s=yBnhkNa7HNSTBXUng6SGW0Z3v5lW4dVc9JAm0uKAcvw&e=.
> com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_&d=DwIFaQ&c=
> imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug
> _rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=pOeuCTITKm7HHDDanfAUfpT7tk2_
> ARqWIJawow92O9c&s=EGUwSB5eKPRa7f3nbmXpDtYLTQkOKu2f73445FP24gk&e= and
> click on the "Sightings" button, and then a little way down the page on the
> "Nearby notable sightings" button.
>
> Kent Fiala
>
>
> On 7/3/2018 2:54 PM, Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
>
>> A couple of years ago someone on this list posted a nice web tool that
>> had been created by a very experienced person to search recent notable
>> e-birds within a given radius of one's current location. It was designed
>> with the Carolinas in mind but I tried it out while traveling elsewhere and
>> it worked. I tried to save the link to the tool, but I'm not finding it
>> now. Anyone familiar with this link?
>>
>> Betsy Kane
>> Washington, N.C.
>>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/3/18 11:59 am
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: tool for notable sightings?
Go to the Carolina Bird Club site https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.carolinabirdclub.org_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=pOeuCTITKm7HHDDanfAUfpT7tk2_ARqWIJawow92O9c&s=EGUwSB5eKPRa7f3nbmXpDtYLTQkOKu2f73445FP24gk&e= and click on the "Sightings" button, and then a little way down the page on the "Nearby notable sightings" button.

Kent Fiala

On 7/3/2018 2:54 PM, Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> A couple of years ago someone on this list posted a nice web tool that had been created by a very experienced person to search recent notable e-birds within a given radius of one's current location.  It was designed with the Carolinas in mind but I tried it out while traveling elsewhere and it worked.  I tried to save the link to the tool, but I'm not finding it now. Anyone familiar with this link?
>
> Betsy Kane
> Washington, N.C.


 

Back to top
Date: 7/3/18 11:56 am
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: tool for notable sightings?
A couple of years ago someone on this list posted a nice web tool that had
been created by a very experienced person to search recent notable e-birds
within a given radius of one's current location. It was designed with the
Carolinas in mind but I tried it out while traveling elsewhere and it
worked. I tried to save the link to the tool, but I'm not finding it now.
Anyone familiar with this link?

Betsy Kane
Washington, N.C.

 

Back to top
Date: 7/3/18 11:25 am
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: Limpkin location
The Black River Limpkin location is about 34.49071, -78.22389, which is a
couple of miles upstream of 53/11.

The description of the bird sounds very good.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/3/18 6:07 am
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: Limpkin on the Black River, NC
I got an email from someone who saw a Limpkin on the Black River while
kayaking on Sunday.

I'll see if I can get more details.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/18 5:57 pm
From: David McLean (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Long-billed Curlew seen on Bulls Island
M 2 July 2018

All,

Chris Snook and I today saw, twice, a Long-billed Curlew on Bulls Island, Cape Romain NWR, Charleston County, SC. Our first sighting was on the North Beach (the extreme northern tip of Bulls) at high tide (11:10 AM) where the curlew was in a small mixed flock of Marbled Godwits, terns, Brown Pelicans, and other small shorebirds. Our second sighting, of presumably the same bird, was at the oceanfront saltwater marsh at Jack’s Creek at about 11:50 AM when the curlew flew into and joined a large mixed flock of wading birds, terns, and shorebirds.

Regards,

David McLean
Charleston, SC

David C. McLean, Jr.
dcmclean AT gmail DOT com
 

Back to top
Date: 7/1/18 1:08 pm
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: Re: Cliff Swallows Nesting in Pitt County NC
Just wondering: I wonder if Cliff Swallows might tend to nest at more sites
during wetter than average springs (if this would make more nesting material
available).

I'm not suggesting that this has anything to do with these Pitt County
sites, or the Carteret County sites.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC


----- Original Message -----
From: "Russ Tyndall" <fitzbew...>
To: "Carolinabirds Carolinabirds" <carolinabirds...>
Sent: Saturday, June 30, 2018 7:17 PM
Subject: Cliff Swallows Nesting in Pitt County NC


John Fussell’s email about Cliff Swallows in Carteret County reminded me to
report that Cliff Swallows are now nesting in Pitt County under bridges
along the Tar River.

I observed Cliff Swallows feeding around the Greenville Town Common on June
15, and on June 16 my wife Patricia observed nests (and dozens of Cliff
Swallows) under each span of the Greene Street Bridge, the nearby railroad
trestle and beneath the the Memorial Drive Bridge some distance up river
near the airport in Greenville. My wife also observed Cliff Swallows
yesterday in the vicinity of the 264 Business bridge on the northeast side
of Greenville. We conservatively estimate close to 75 birds in total might
be present at all these sites.

Russ Tyndall
Wake Forest, NC








 

Back to top
Date: 7/1/18 6:59 am
From: Robin T (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: wild turkey nest update
Thank you all for the input & advice. When my husband walked down to see if it was a hurt turkey laying in the pasture, and scared her off the nest, he spread a little hay from the ground in a wide circle around the nest. We stayed away since then and were convinced we had caused her to abandon the nest as we watched her walk around the pasture for an hour, walk around the hay, stretching her neck to look in at the nest, but then continue on.
At 6:30 this morning we saw her again, but this time after walking around she entered the nest and has been on it all day so far. Hoping for the best, although I was dismayed to read that only 10% to 40% of nests result in hatched eggs, and of those only 25% make it to 4 weeks. Good thing they lay 9 to 13 eggs. 
It will be an anxious but hopeful time watching the nest from our deck (100 yards away). We see her stick her head up to check the surrounding me every so often and I will send a link to some pics. 
We will be researching the best time to allow haying for next year. Thanks so much for the file on the effects of haying! This land was strip logged in the late teens/1920s, farmed, then by the early 50s was an apple orchard til the 90s. We've only been here a little over a year and are trying to keep different environments - have 2 acres of woods from the 30s, banks we are leaving in native grasses and wildflowers, and the 5 acre pasture that has been cut in June & Sept for ten years or so by a local in the valley below in return for the hay. We will be discussing a later schedule for him as our first priority is providing for the wildlife. 
Thanks again & send good thoughts for this turkey clutch!
Robin TingleyPisgah NF 
 

Back to top
Date: 6/30/18 7:07 pm
From: Thomas Krakauer (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fwd: Anyone with wild turkey knowledge?


Sent from my iPad

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Alan Krakauer <ahkrakauer...>
> Date: June 30, 2018 at 10:03:42 PM EDT
> To: Tom Krakauer <thkrakauer...>
> Subject: Re: Anyone with wild turkey knowledge?
>
> I’m not sure about proactive solutions, but I think “leave it alone” is probably the best answer. Human activity to fix the situation is just as likely to draw attention, whether it be from watching crows or scent trails for the ground predators. It’s a late nest so hopefully it will not need much more incubation.
>
>
>> On Jun 30, 2018, at 5:57 PM, Thomas Krakauer <thkrakauer...> wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
>>
>> Begin forwarded message:
>>
>>> From: "Robin T" (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
>>> Date: June 30, 2018 at 5:11:52 PM EDT
>>> To: "<carolinabirds...>" <carolinabirds...>
>>> Subject: Anyone with wild turkey knowledge?
>>> Reply-To: Robin T <newsteadecs1...>
>>>
>>> Our pasture was hayed this week. For those unfamiliar with the process, it has 3 steps. During each step we noticed a turkey hen strolling away from the tractor. Today during baling we saw her again, then afterwards saw her sitting in the middle - sure enough, my husband walked down and saw 12 eggs.
>>>
>>> So now her best is in the middle of a cut field with no protection. Anything we can/should do for her and the nest?
>>>
>>> Robin Tingley
>>> Pisgah NF
>>>
>>>
>>> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/30/18 4:18 pm
From: Russ Tyndall <fitzbew...>
Subject: Cliff Swallows Nesting in Pitt County NC
John Fussell’s email about Cliff Swallows in Carteret County reminded me to report that Cliff Swallows are now nesting in Pitt County under bridges along the Tar River.

I observed Cliff Swallows feeding around the Greenville Town Common on June 15, and on June 16 my wife Patricia observed nests (and dozens of Cliff Swallows) under each span of the Greene Street Bridge, the nearby railroad trestle and beneath the the Memorial Drive Bridge some distance up river near the airport in Greenville. My wife also observed Cliff Swallows yesterday in the vicinity of the 264 Business bridge on the northeast side of Greenville. We conservatively estimate close to 75 birds in total might be present at all these sites.

Russ Tyndall
Wake Forest, NC








 

Back to top
Date: 6/30/18 4:13 pm
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: gnatcatcher behavior
Sun bathing. That posture is very characteristic. The bird may have been responding to the heat of the black hose as well as the sun. I’m not sure of the function, but maybe it cooks parasites.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

On Jun 30, 2018, at 6:54 PM, Cary Paynter <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

This afternoon I watched a blue-grey gnatcatcher who had nestled into a thin layer of pine straw, lying flat with its body feathers fluffed out, tail spread against the ground and beak open. It had chosen a place in full sun and it was lying close between the loops of a black hose so very, very hot. After a few minutes it flew and gleaned as usual, finding insects in the oak. Then it repeated the behavior a second time. Is this some form of dust bathing? It didn’t disturb the underlying dirt at all.
Any explanations appreciated!

Cary Paynter
Wilmington

 

Back to top
Date: 6/30/18 3:54 pm
From: Cary Paynter (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: gnatcatcher behavior
This afternoon I watched a blue-grey gnatcatcher who had nestled into a thin
layer of pine straw, lying flat with its body feathers fluffed out, tail
spread against the ground and beak open. It had chosen a place in full sun
and it was lying close between the loops of a black hose so very, very hot.
After a few minutes it flew and gleaned as usual, finding insects in the
oak. Then it repeated the behavior a second time. Is this some form of
dust bathing? It didnt disturb the underlying dirt at all.
Any explanations appreciated!

Cary Paynter
Wilmington



 

Back to top
Date: 6/30/18 3:39 pm
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: another Carteret County nest site for Cliff Swallows
On Thursday afternoon, while we (Martha Mayo and I) were checking out two
Carteret County sites where I had observed nesting by Cliff Swallows early
in the month, Martha spotted a Cliff Swallow at another site. That was at
the little bridge over Harlowe Creek (NC 101 bridge). We parked at a safe
location, got out, and made our way over to the bridge, and a swarm of Cliff
Swallows came out from under it. We estimated at least 80 birds. I went
down under the west side of the bridge and found 48 nests (in a very small
area). I did not check underneath the bridge from the east, but would
surely have found additional nests.

Quite a number of birds (and nests) for this little bridge. And for
Carteret County.

I wonder where birds at this site find nesting material.

We also checked the NC 101 bridge over the intracoastal waterway where I
estimated about 200 Cliff Swallows at the beginning of the month. Things
were really winding down at that site. We saw only about 30 birds; a few
were feeding young in nests. However, I counted nests on the south side of
the bridge where I had not counted earlier in the month; I could see about
50. Thus, there were about 140 nests on that bridge this year.

I wonder how many years we've been overlooking all these Cliff Swallows.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC


 

Back to top
Date: 6/30/18 3:23 pm
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: question about Mississippi Kite plumage
On Thursday afternoon, we (Martha Mayo and I) saw 2 Mississippi Kites in
Carteret County, near the community of Harlowe. We watched them for some
time as they worked their way up and down the the old canal (which is wooded
along both sides). Perhaps they're nesting in the area.

The birds were basically in adult plumage--dark underwings, whitish heads,
whitish secondaries. But, they did not have a very "clean" look And we
noticed that at least one of the birds had a faintly banded tail.

Nothing in Sibley really matches that bird. I wonder if some two-year-old
birds might look like this.

I might add that I don't see Mississippi Kites on a regular basis. They're
still relatively scarce in our outer Coastal Plain location, with just a
handful of nesting records for the county

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 6/30/18 2:12 pm
From: Robin T (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Anyone with wild turkey knowledge?
Our pasture was hayed this week. For those unfamiliar with the process, it has 3 steps. During each step we noticed a turkey hen strolling away from the tractor. Today during baling we saw her again, then afterwards saw her sitting in the middle - sure enough, my husband walked down and saw 12 eggs. 
So now her best is in the middle of a cut field with no protection. Anything we can/should do for her and the nest?
Robin TingleyPisgah NF

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/18 8:49 am
From: Dennis Forsythe (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: red wolf
All,

There is good DNA evidence to show there is no such thing as a Red Wolf and
that it is at best a hybrid between Gray Wolf and Coyote. Spending money
of the "Red Wolf" takes funds away from real species which need help like
Red-cockaded Woodpeckers etc.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.nytimes.com_2016_07_28_science_red-2Deastern-2Dgray-2Dwolves.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=defTy9CU6iB5oN07K2yRxpDsmxpk2fAhBnBl_cgtV28&s=l9rqyAzHjWIGNX5ZV7v9f5tsHlIx2NtXNTswWH5vgho&e=

Dennis

On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 11:18 AM michael welch <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Derb, I'm sure you do good work but what does this have to do with birds?
> This list is designated by owners/moderators as an "e-mail group for
> discussing wild birds, birders, and birding in the Carolinas." I think
> you are (once again) using the population of this mailing list as a captive
> audience for non-related issues.
>
>
> But since you've brought it up (again), please explain to the list what is
> meant by Minimum Viable Population (MVP), functional population size, and
> genetic drift. These issues play an important role in an agency's
> determination of whether a species has a reasonable expectation of
> recovery. Advocating finger-pointing by a constituency that isn't given all
> the relevant information and demands that an agency continue to spend
> dwindling funds on a project that is biologically beyond any chance of
> success seems irresponsible.
>
>
> Michael Welch
>
> Buncombe Co., NC
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...>
> on behalf of Derb Carter <derbc...>
> *Sent:* Wednesday, June 27, 2018 12:01 PM
> *To:* <carolinabirds...>
> *Subject:* red wolf
>
>
> The US Fish & Wildlife Service formally announced today its intention to
> abandon the only recovery population of red wolves in the world in
> northeastern North Carolina. If the new “plan” is implemented, only those
> wolves on Alligator River Refuge and the Dare Bombing Range would be
> protected, and the remaining wolves and those in the future that wander
> outside this area can be shot, killed, or trapped. Since the refuge and
> bombing range can only support a few wolves (2 packs now), it would no
> longer be managed for “recovery” of this critically endangered species but
> for “propagation” (I guess like a fish hatchery) for other red wolf
> recovery populations (that do not exist, with no plans to create any
> more). I hesitate to call this decision a new “plan,” because it is really
> just abandoning recovery efforts for the wolf in the wild. There is an
> opportunity to comment if you are interested, and a public hearing in
> Manteo on July 10.
>
>
>
> We have an ongoing case in federal court which will give the Fish &
> Wildlife Service the opportunity to explain to the court how this new
> “plan” complies with the agency’s legal obligation under the Endangered
> Species Act to recover endangered species in the wild. And having been
> involved in this for several years, I think it is important for North
> Carolinians to know that the state Wildlife Resources Commission is largely
> responsible for this decision, having passed a resolution calling for the
> removal of all red wolves and a declaration that is extinct in the wild.
>
>
>
>
> Derb Carter
>
> Chapel Hill, NC
>
>
> *Disclaimer*
>
> The information contained in this communication from the sender is
> confidential.
>
>

--
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Christmas Bird Count Editor
South Carolina Ebutterfly Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
<dennis.forsythe...>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/18 8:08 am
From: michael welch (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: red wolf
Derb, I'm sure you do good work but what does this have to do with birds? This list is designated by owners/moderators as an "e-mail group for discussing wild birds, birders, and birding in the Carolinas." I think you are (once again) using the population of this mailing list as a captive audience for non-related issues.


But since you've brought it up (again), please explain to the list what is meant by Minimum Viable Population (MVP), functional population size, and genetic drift. These issues play an important role in an agency's determination of whether a species has a reasonable expectation of recovery. Advocating finger-pointing by a constituency that isn't given all the relevant information and demands that an agency continue to spend dwindling funds on a project that is biologically beyond any chance of success seems irresponsible.


Michael Welch

Buncombe Co., NC




________________________________
From: <carolinabirds-request...> <carolinabirds-request...> on behalf of Derb Carter <derbc...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 27, 2018 12:01 PM
To: <carolinabirds...>
Subject: red wolf


The US Fish & Wildlife Service formally announced today its intention to abandon the only recovery population of red wolves in the world in northeastern North Carolina. If the new plan is implemented, only those wolves on Alligator River Refuge and the Dare Bombing Range would be protected, and the remaining wolves and those in the future that wander outside this area can be shot, killed, or trapped. Since the refuge and bombing range can only support a few wolves (2 packs now), it would no longer be managed for recovery of this critically endangered species but for propagation (I guess like a fish hatchery) for other red wolf recovery populations (that do not exist, with no plans to create any more). I hesitate to call this decision a new plan, because it is really just abandoning recovery efforts for the wolf in the wild. There is an opportunity to comment if you are interested, and a public hearing in Manteo on July 10.



We have an ongoing case in federal court which will give the Fish & Wildlife Service the opportunity to explain to the court how this new plan complies with the agencys legal obligation under the Endangered Species Act to recover endangered species in the wild. And having been involved in this for several years, I think it is important for North Carolinians to know that the state Wildlife Resources Commission is largely responsible for this decision, having passed a resolution calling for the removal of all red wolves and a declaration that is extinct in the wild.



Derb Carter

Chapel Hill, NC



Disclaimer

The information contained in this communication from the sender is confidential.


 

Back to top
Date: 6/27/18 11:02 am
From: Derb Carter <derbc...>
Subject: red wolf
Disclaimer: The information contained in this communication from the sender is confidential. It is intended solely for use by the recipient and others authorized to receive it. If you are not the recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution or taking action in relation of the contents of this information is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful.

 

Back to top
Date: 6/25/18 3:43 pm
From: John Fussell <jofuss...>
Subject: American Bittern in Carteret County, NC
Five of us birded the North River Preserve in Carteret County Sunday
morning. Our most noteworthy observation was an American Bittern in a
roadside ditch. We heard one or two individuals a few times in the spring,
but haven't had any recent observations until yesterday. I wonder if
nesting might have occurred in the preserve this year, perhaps on the
margins of the "Williston Creek Impoundment" (not an official name).

Some other observations were 2 male Anhingas (one full adult, the other
maybe not quite fully adult--I read that Anhingas don't attain full adult
plumage for 3 years), 4 King Rails, and 7 Dickcissels (6 singing males, 1
female--she had an insect in her mouth and we think young may have been
nearby).

I'll mention something in regard to King and Clapper Rails. The land for
the preserve (which was formerly farm land) was acquired in the early 2000's
and various fresh water habitats have been created over the years since
then. At these fresh water sites, every large rail we've seen has been a
"classic" King Rail , even though all the nearby natural marshes are salt or
brackish and harbor Clapper Rails.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 6/25/18 1:28 pm
From: Frank Hamilton <fhamil06...>
Subject: Wrens, kites, nuthatch and ruby-throated humingbird
The wren family in my yard has had a successful breeding season.  Two small, scruffy looking wrens have been coming to my meal worm feeder outside my kitchen window.  They are obviously recent fledglings when compared to the sleek adults seen at my feeders.
Mississippi kites come to my neighborhood every year.  I've seen them soaring above my house, but Sunday one landed in one of their favorite tail trees on my block.  I'm staying out of the heat as much as I can so I'm not spending much time in my front yard where there is a lot of clear sky--and hot sunshine--to spot them.
Earlier this spring I sighted a white-breasted nuthatch feeding on suet in my yard.  At the time I considered it a rare event because I'd only had one sighting in 2016 & in 2017.  To my delight it has been a frequent visitor & I just sighted one as I write this message.
This is the first year I've kept my nectar feeders up all spring.  Then I noticed a solitary male hummer coming to the feeder outside my window.  Also, the level of nectar in my rarely-watched front porch feeder is slightly lower than when I put it out.  This tells me I need to deploy me feeders in mid-March and keep them up until late fall. Frank HamiltonCharleston, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 6/24/18 4:56 pm
From: Cotter, Michael G <COTTERMI...>
Subject: Henslow's and other birds at the VOA site in Beaufort County, NC
Hello All!

This article appeared in Sunday's Daily Reflector (Greenville): https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.reflector.com_Look_2018_06_24_Hot-2Dspot-2Dfor-2Dbirding.html&d=DwIFAw&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=rs2aK7RQ8uJKffjryKjfUZAoW9O4Bve7qSpZ0bf3yPg&s=PJEAz9397r3S3r07cRHZlrUcW-3IwdNl2gbmveG0osY&e=
The site has been mentioned before on Carolinabirds, so I'll add to it.


Michael G. Cotter
Greenville NC
 

Back to top
Date: 6/24/18 2:09 pm
From: <hilton...>
Subject: Hilton Pond 05/01/18 (Mountain Wildflowers, Piedmont Birds)
After too long a delay I finally finished installment #673 of "This Week at Hilton Pond." This took a while because it is a composite of happenings during the merry month of May in the Carolina Piedmont AND at West Virginia's New River Birding and Nature Festival. Included are lots of images and anecdotal info about birds, wildflowers, butterflies, amphibians, and other natural wonders, including hummingbirds. (We also note how native flora are used by pollinators and as host plants.)

As usual we provide tallies of all birds banded and recaptured at the Center during the period, as well as acknowledgement of recent support provided by followers of Hilton Pond and "Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project."

To view our photo essay for 1-31 May 2018, please click on the link: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.hiltonpond.org_ThisWeek180501.html&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=MqDzb_ep4waS-fqgyYKYKRoVmB9EVgOdy2-Pcb9qmRM&s=QEWV9wpnwOpNYt4wcCJJxUCZXGU0gDiRJZbuXcJ9Hp0&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.hiltonpond.org_ThisWeek180501.html&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=MqDzb_ep4waS-fqgyYKYKRoVmB9EVgOdy2-Pcb9qmRM&s=QEWV9wpnwOpNYt4wcCJJxUCZXGU0gDiRJZbuXcJ9Hp0&e=>

Happy Nature Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.facebook.com_HiltonPond&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=MqDzb_ep4waS-fqgyYKYKRoVmB9EVgOdy2-Pcb9qmRM&s=_WKBqv-sjQQzeRw24SQC_yXNLOEcfkQUCenmJu-c94E&e= for timely updates on nature topics,
and for info about hummingbirds at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.facebook.com_rubythroats&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=MqDzb_ep4waS-fqgyYKYKRoVmB9EVgOdy2-Pcb9qmRM&s=pCflwNeULRZDT5yS8UPtou94XzJuPoF2OsVuYAlWt30&e=

Follow us on Twitter @hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and education for students of all ages.

"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the sunset." BHjr.

============


 

Back to top
Date: 6/24/18 9:28 am
From: Harry LeGrand (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Wings over Water Wildlife Festival (NC Outer Banks) ad
Finally -- after 10 or more years, the WOW folks are advertising the
festival nationally, at least in *Birding* magazine. The June 2018 issue
that I just received has a 1/6th page ad for WOW, on Page 50, with a
Marbled Godwit photo by Jeff Lewis. It does give both sets of dates -- the
main one from October 16-21 and the WOW Encore from December 7-9.

I led trips on both last year, and will again this year. I have led
trips for WOW off and on for many years, but last year it seems that the
WOW Encore was poorly attended. I seem to recall only 5 people on one walk
and 3 on another, and both were to North Pond and/or South Pond. Yes, the
latter does come only 2 weekends after the Thanksgiving Holiday Weekend,
and about 2-3 weeks before Christmas counts on the Outer Banks begin. So --
I think a lot of people prefer visiting coastal areas in late November and
late December. Nonetheless, any national ads are good to see.

The details for the festival(s), as always, can be found at <
www.wingsoverwater.org>

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

 

Back to top
Date: 6/24/18 6:06 am
From: Taylor Piephoff (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Roseate spoonbill Ocean Isle Beach
At Ferry Landing Park, east end of the island right now.

Taylor Piephoff
Matthews, NC
 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/18 2:19 pm
From: jack thgipen <jack_thigpen...>
Subject: Cape Fear Kites - Saturday
Thanks to Shun Endo for his post on Kites yesterday...

At 13:30 today I watched a pair of MIKIs hawking dragonflies at intersection
of NC 11 and Natmore Road, NE of the Cape Fear River. I also saw, what I
believe was an Anhinga soaring above them. I would appreciate comments on the
likelihood of this. The long neck really seems to eliminate anything other
than a Cormorant.

At 14:15 while heading N on Rt. 11 a Swallow-tailed Kite flew across the
highway, but I could not relocate.

At 14:30 I watched 6 MIKIs hawking something above the athletic fields N of
West Pender Middle School. Very nice views...

Jack Thigpen
Raleigh
Theys Road area
 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/18 12:27 pm
From: Len Kopka (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Roseate Spoonbill in upstate SC
Birders,
> I was contacted today about a Roseate Spoonbill on a subdivision pond in Simpsonville, SC. Confirming photos were provided.
>
> This is a great upstate sighting. A quick eBird check showed no other upstate reports in previous 10 years. Hendersonville, NC and Aiken, SC are the only current "nearby" locations with spoonbill sightings.
>

Len Kopka
Simpsonville, SC
 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/18 10:04 am
From: James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Great Shearwater has expired
Please do not travel to Pitt St to see the Shearwater, it has died, being
taken to Bitd of Prey Center.

Craig Watson

 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/18 9:47 am
From: James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Great Shearwater Pitt St.
Still present but it is injured.

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/18 9:16 am
From: James Watson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Great Shearwater Pitt St. Mount Pleasant, SC
Looking at bird now, sitting on ground on island harbor side near water at
edge of harbor, photos, low tide was about an hour ago, tide is incoming.
Pam Ford located the bird.

Pam Ford
Goose Creek, SC

Craig Watson
Mount Pleasant, SC

 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/18 6:43 am
From: Jim Holcomb (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Id help please
Hi Pam, I'm Jim at Wilmington. I am sure you are seeing least terns. They
are very abundant now at coastal inlets and sandbars where they nest.
Young terns are fledging from the nests and are being fed by the parents.

On Sat, Jun 23, 2018, 7:48 AM Pam Diamond <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> I’m in Beaufort NC on the water watching terns flying around and feeding.
> How can I tell definitively which tern I’m seeing since they move so
> quickly? 🤪 These have yellow/orange beaks, not black and forked scissor
> tails.
>
> Contact me if you can tell me some specifics to look for. Thanks.
> Pam from Cary NC in Beaufort NC
> 7:45am Saturday
>
> --
>
> *Pam Diamond*
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/18 4:48 am
From: Pam Diamond (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Id help please
I’m in Beaufort NC on the water watching terns flying around and feeding.
How can I tell definitively which tern I’m seeing since they move so
quickly? 🤪 These have yellow/orange beaks, not black and forked scissor
tails.

Contact me if you can tell me some specifics to look for. Thanks.
Pam from Cary NC in Beaufort NC
7:45am Saturday

--

*Pam Diamond*

 

Back to top
Date: 6/22/18 1:43 pm
From: Shun Endo (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Swallow-tailed Kite
I spotted a pair of Swallow-tailed Kites and a pair of Mississippi Kites at the intersection of NC 11 and Natmore Rd. The place was between The Cape Fear and the Black River. They were feeding very actively over a field on the east side of NC 11. The time was 2:30pm.

Shun Endo.
Wilmington, NC.

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 6/22/18 7:56 am
From: Lester Coble (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Rose-breasted Grosbeak yesterday
At a feeder in Taberna, New Bern, NC 5:15 P.M.

 

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Date: 6/21/18 6:08 pm
From: Thomas Driscoll (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: No sightings - how do I find other state listserves?
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birding.aba.org_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=lkkYPas4SbqA2cIvcMsf52J7cT1FHx_3d58-pqvaTl8&s=CwYqEtRQcDC4oHKycKjxnayb38zouj7Qql15zIaPQ7E&e=

tom driscoll
chapel hill, nc usa
<spttdrdshnk...>
Do something nice for Earth today and every day!

On Thursday, June 21, 2018, 9:04:31 PM EDT, Mike Judd <carolinabirds...> wrote:

Can't recall if via eBird or ABA or ??  Somewhere I know there is a listing.  Thanks in advance.

--
Mike JuddBrevard, NC

 

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Date: 6/21/18 6:04 pm
From: Mike Judd (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: No sightings - how do I find other state listserves?
Can't recall if via eBird or ABA or ?? Somewhere I know there is a
listing. Thanks in advance.

--
Mike Judd
Brevard, NC

 

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Date: 6/21/18 5:25 pm
From: David Hart <david.hart...>
Subject: Spoonbills, Y-C Night Heron still in Raleigh
The pair of Roseate Spoonbills and the Yellow-crowned Night Heron were both still at the Crabtree Creek Wetlands this evening.


Spoonbills were in the western reaches of the wetlands, in the general area of the gazebo, distant but easily visible from Raleigh Boulevard.


Yellow-crowned Night Heron was in the swampy area just inside the entrance to the boardwalk. Very cooperative bird, not 15 feet from the boardwalk.


Dave Hart

Chapel Hill

 

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Date: 6/21/18 6:35 am
From: J Gates (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Spoonbills - Raleigh Blvd pond

2 still present now at pond on raleigh blvd as previously reported. They are actually in open area easy to see with binoculars. (Standing at hydrant closest to Yonkers Rd intersection, the one covered with vines. ). Have not yet found the yellow crowned night heron.

Jim Gates
Raleigh NC
 

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Date: 6/21/18 5:37 am
From: Helen Kalevas (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: spoonbills still in Raleigh?
Finally have a chance to go up there if they're still there.

--
Helen Kalevas
Near Hillsborough, NC


<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.avg.com_email-2Dsignature-3Futm-5Fmedium-3Demail-26utm-5Fsource-3Dlink-26utm-5Fcampaign-3Dsig-2Demail-26utm-5Fcontent-3Dwebmail&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=2cpRWWJSYr_RVD-2KZtIJDKmJ_6wA2oeuHpOxW0OFVw&s=jyVxGS2jIeYw6celxIljYQmlSIcD_HJlqC6mh19Rs70&e=>
Virus-free.
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<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>

 

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Date: 6/20/18 8:28 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bobwhites at VOA Bear Grass
On the other hand, birds wander, and young birds wander a lot, even Bobwhite. Every year or two I get a bobwhite calling in my neighborhood, which is a long way from viable reproducing populations of bobwhite, but probably farther from any source of introductions (no agriculture nearby, and nobody in my suburban neighborhood is going to be releasing bobwhites.) There’s a lot of open/scrubby golf course edge/commercial/industrial landscape that is marginal for bobwhite, but which could easily serve as a bridge to actual wild populations. So I always figure the ones I hear are wandering young birds from wild populations. I can’t prove it, but it does seem more likely.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

On Jun 20, 2018, at 11:17 AM, Eric Harrold <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:

Thankfully those are likely to be wild birds!

Eric Harrold
Hays, NC

On Wed, Jun 20, 2018, 10:25 AM Ann Brice <carolinabirds...><mailto:<carolinabirds...>> wrote:
I have heard bobwhites calling several times at the VOA site this year. I thought there were at least three within earshot of the main entrance last week.

--
Ann Brice
Wilson, NC




 

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Date: 6/20/18 8:18 am
From: Eric Harrold (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bobwhites at VOA Bear Grass
Thankfully those are likely to be wild birds!

Eric Harrold
Hays, NC

On Wed, Jun 20, 2018, 10:25 AM Ann Brice <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> I have heard bobwhites calling several times at the VOA site this year. I
> thought there were at least three within earshot of the main entrance last
> week.
>
> --
> Ann Brice
> Wilson, NC
>
>
>
>

 

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Date: 6/20/18 7:25 am
From: Ann Brice (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Bobwhites at VOA Bear Grass
I have heard bobwhites calling several times at the VOA site this year. I
thought there were at least three within earshot of the main entrance last
week.

--
Ann Brice
Wilson, NC

 

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Date: 6/20/18 6:41 am
From: Betsy Kane (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: A lesson on Bobwhites and the origin of calling birds
Yeah, I heard a bobwhite in Raleigh in an exclusive inside-the-beltline
neighborhood a couple of years ago. It was a piquant sudden recollection
to my youth, but sadly had nothing to do with ecology.

On Wednesday, June 20, 2018, Eric Harrold <carolinabirds...> wrote:

> Was doing some field work a couple of weeks ago near Sugar Grove, west of
> Boone in Watauga County. I heard the distinct "bob-white" call of a male
> Northern Bobwhite coming from a hillside that had some brush and tall
> grass, which was obviously used as a pasture at times. So it wasn't a far
> stretch that this would be an area that a quail would use. My curiosity
> motivated an investigation to get closer and the bird was not responding to
> playback and I have found that Bobwhites, especially lone males are
> particularly responsive to. So I drove up to a house sitting on the
> hillside just off the road and was informed by the owner that he was indeed
> raising quail and had one male bird presently. I had to laugh because I was
> perplexed as to why the calling bird did not fly in to me in response to my
> audiolure...now I knew why.
>
> The situation could have been slightly different, and sometimes it is.
> Birds get released by their propagaters or those with good intentions
> hoping to re-establish local quail populations. Most of those birds don't
> live very long as they've been shown to be naive concerning predator
> avoidance. But they don't drop dead the moment they're released either. So
> one can hear birds of such origins with no way to distinguish them from
> "wild" birds. If there's a house nearby, there's a good chance that they're
> propagated birds, but if good habitat is also in abundance, this may amount
> to coincidence. More often than not, if there's much human development on
> the landscape, the origin of calling Bobwhites likely points to captive
> stock. At the very least, treat such birds with skepticism before reporting
> them as wild quail.
>
> Eric Harrold
> Hays, NC
>

 

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Date: 6/20/18 5:17 am
From: \Harry E. LeGrand Jr\ (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Bohemian Waxwing
Perhaps breeding Cedar Waxwings have a pale rosy wash to the head and face that is not present in the plumage in winter. Or maybe NC breeding waxwings are slightly different in color than in Indiana (not likely). Of course, she had a Cedar Waxwing, which nests in that part of NC. I feel sure the N C Bird Records Committee will pass on this as an obvious mis-ID and deal with Tahiti Petrel, Common Swift, and other reports with photos and thorough descriptions for their voting.

Harry LeGrand
Former Chair of the NC BRC

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 19, 2018, at 9:57 PM, Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> I respectfully disagree. Someone with 61 years of birding experience should have learned how to describe field marks. There are a number of easily described ways in which the waxwing species differ.
> Kent Fiala
>> On 6/19/2018 9:11 PM, WALTER KENT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
>> Sounds like she knew what she was talking about.
>> Walt Kent
>> Lenoir N.C.
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Susan Moore <SusanMoore...>
>> To: Walt <tneklw...>
>> Sent: Tue, Jun 19, 2018 9:05 pm
>> Subject: FW: Bohemian Waxwing
>>
>>
>> ________________________________________
>> From: Jane Leland [<lelandjane47...>]
>> Sent: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 8:06 PM
>> To: Susan Moore
>> Subject: Re: Bohemian Waxwing
>>
>> Hi!
>> I am very familiar with cedar waxwings and have them in my yard in Indiana.. .I got a very long good look at this bird and he definitely had a pale rosy wash to his head / face , was definitely a waxwing and perfectly matched the picture/description in my sibley of a b. Waxwing. .I am aware that this is outside his range, but I have been a birder for 61 years and I cannot account for the birds field marks if not a b.w. i was as surprised as you seem to be. . .
>>
>> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__go.onelink.me_107872968-3Fpid-3DInProduct-26c-3DGlobal-5FInternal-5FYGrowth-5FAndroidEmailSig-5F-5FAndroidUsers-26af-5Fwl-3Dym-26af-5Fsub1-3DInternal-26af-5Fsub2-3DGlobal-5FYGrowth-26af-5Fsub3-3DEmailSignature&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=PKJIwvZ7T106Do7tByispIRe-2y5R3Hu-NLg0Pm9m60&s=eCAp8JfzgV6DS8Ei1sES_L4PZwpdvTv3oBgcA_0zgWU&e=>
>>
>> On Tue, Jun 19, 2018 at 7:42 PM, Susan Moore
>> <SusanMoore...> wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> You may want to give Walt some more information. It was good talking with you.
>> Susan
>> ________________________________________
>> From: WALTER KENT [<tneklw...><mailto:<tneklw...>]
>> Sent: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 7:16 PM
>> To: Susan Moore
>> Subject: Re: Bohemian Waxwing
>>
>> More word, the Bo is not even listed as a visitor to N.C.
>> Walt
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Susan Moore <SusanMoore...><mailto:<SusanMoore...>>
>> To: Walt <tneklw...><mailto:<tneklw...>>; lelandjane47 <lelandjane47...><mailto:<lelandjane47...>>
>> Sent: Tue, Jun 19, 2018 2:30 pm
>> Subject: Bohemian Waxwing
>>
>> Hi Walt,
>>
>> This visitor saw what she thought was a Bohemian Waxwing down near Mount Pisgah. What do you think??
>>
>> Also, only1 dead lily bloom in the seep.
>>
>> Susan
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/20/18 3:23 am
From: Eric Harrold (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: A lesson on Bobwhites and the origin of calling birds
Was doing some field work a couple of weeks ago near Sugar Grove, west of
Boone in Watauga County. I heard the distinct "bob-white" call of a male
Northern Bobwhite coming from a hillside that had some brush and tall
grass, which was obviously used as a pasture at times. So it wasn't a far
stretch that this would be an area that a quail would use. My curiosity
motivated an investigation to get closer and the bird was not responding to
playback and I have found that Bobwhites, especially lone males are
particularly responsive to. So I drove up to a house sitting on the
hillside just off the road and was informed by the owner that he was indeed
raising quail and had one male bird presently. I had to laugh because I was
perplexed as to why the calling bird did not fly in to me in response to my
audiolure...now I knew why.

The situation could have been slightly different, and sometimes it is.
Birds get released by their propagaters or those with good intentions
hoping to re-establish local quail populations. Most of those birds don't
live very long as they've been shown to be naive concerning predator
avoidance. But they don't drop dead the moment they're released either. So
one can hear birds of such origins with no way to distinguish them from
"wild" birds. If there's a house nearby, there's a good chance that they're
propagated birds, but if good habitat is also in abundance, this may amount
to coincidence. More often than not, if there's much human development on
the landscape, the origin of calling Bobwhites likely points to captive
stock. At the very least, treat such birds with skepticism before reporting
them as wild quail.

Eric Harrold
Hays, NC

 

Back to top
Date: 6/19/18 6:57 pm
From: Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Fwd: Bohemian Waxwing
I respectfully disagree. Someone with 61 years of birding experience
should have learned how to describe field marks. There are a number of
easily described ways in which the waxwing species differ.

Kent Fiala

On 6/19/2018 9:11 PM, WALTER KENT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
> Sounds like she knew what she was talking about.
> Walt Kent
> Lenoir N.C.
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Susan Moore <SusanMoore...>
> To: Walt <tneklw...>
> Sent: Tue, Jun 19, 2018 9:05 pm
> Subject: FW: Bohemian Waxwing
>
>
> ________________________________________
> From: Jane Leland [<lelandjane47...> <mailto:<lelandjane47...>]
> Sent: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 8:06 PM
> To: Susan Moore
> Subject: Re: Bohemian Waxwing
>
> Hi!
> I am very familiar with cedar waxwings and have them in my yard in
> Indiana.. .I got a very long good look at this bird and he definitely
> had a pale rosy wash to his head / face , was definitely a waxwing and
> perfectly matched the picture/description in my sibley of a b.
> Waxwing. .I am aware that this is outside his range, but I have been a
> birder for 61 years and I cannot account for the birds field marks if
> not a b.w. i was as surprised as you seem to be. . .
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail on
> Android<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__go.onelink.me_107872968-3Fpid-3DInProduct-26c-3DGlobal-5FInternal-5FYGrowth-5FAndroidEmailSig-5F-5FAndroidUsers-26af-5Fwl-3Dym-26af-5Fsub1-3DInternal-26af-5Fsub2-3DGlobal-5FYGrowth-26af-5Fsub3-3DEmailSignature&d=DwID-g&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=JdIEhLBdso910QLKUz1l1svJ3Rr3t862Qg0kgHU6NW0&s=A3DwNdTXRm1RumbG_jauvP0tBzwdva334TDHPivVK6U&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__go.onelink.me_107872968-3Fpid-3DInProduct-26c-3DGlobal-5FInternal-5FYGrowth-5FAndroidEmailSig-5F-5FAndroidUsers-26af-5Fwl-3Dym-26af-5Fsub1-3DInternal-26af-5Fsub2-3DGlobal-5FYGrowth-26af-5Fsub3-3DEmailSignature&d=DwMCaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=oqHe0LzfDZtjDdW88LXsaiBD1lEQDMDsz48hxmRs3VM&s=uhF8qZ4d47mbTTcf8dRt7niS-ubqnETSlyj1Dj8Wr4g&e=>>
>
> On Tue, Jun 19, 2018 at 7:42 PM, Susan Moore
> <SusanMoore...>
> <mailto:<SusanMoore...>> wrote:
> Hi,
>
> You may want to give Walt some more information. It was good talking
> with you.
> Susan
> ________________________________________
> From: WALTER KENT [<tneklw...>
> <mailto:<tneklw...><mailto:<tneklw...> <mailto:<tneklw...>?>>]
> Sent: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 7:16 PM
> To: Susan Moore
> Subject: Re: Bohemian Waxwing
>
> More word, the Bo is not even listed as a visitor to N.C.
> Walt
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Susan Moore <SusanMoore...>
> <mailto:<SusanMoore...><mailto:<SusanMoore...>
> <mailto:<SusanMoore...>?>>>
> To: Walt <tneklw...> <mailto:<tneklw...><mailto:<tneklw...>
> <mailto:<tneklw...>?>>>; lelandjane47 <lelandjane47...>
> <mailto:<lelandjane47...><mailto:<lelandjane47...>
> <mailto:<lelandjane47...>?>>>
> Sent: Tue, Jun 19, 2018 2:30 pm
> Subject: Bohemian Waxwing
>
> Hi Walt,
>
> This visitor saw what she thought was a Bohemian Waxwing down near
> Mount Pisgah. What do you think??
>
> Also, only1 dead lily bloom in the seep.
>
> Susan


 

Back to top
Date: 6/19/18 6:12 pm
From: WALTER KENT (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Fwd: Bohemian Waxwing
Sounds like she knew what she was talking about.
Walt Kent
Lenoir N.C.



-----Original Message-----
From: Susan Moore <SusanMoore...>
To: Walt <tneklw...>
Sent: Tue, Jun 19, 2018 9:05 pm
Subject: FW: Bohemian Waxwing


________________________________________
From: Jane Leland [<lelandjane47...>]
Sent: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 8:06 PM
To: Susan Moore
Subject: Re: Bohemian Waxwing

Hi!
I am very familiar with cedar waxwings and have them in my yard in Indiana.. .I got a very long good look at this bird and he definitely had a pale rosy wash to his head / face , was definitely a waxwing and perfectly matched the picture/description in my sibley of a b. Waxwing. .I am aware that this is outside his range, but I have been a birder for 61 years and I cannot account for the birds field marks if not a b.w. i was as surprised as you seem to be. . .

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__go.onelink.me_107872968-3Fpid-3DInProduct-26c-3DGlobal-5FInternal-5FYGrowth-5FAndroidEmailSig-5F-5FAndroidUsers-26af-5Fwl-3Dym-26af-5Fsub1-3DInternal-26af-5Fsub2-3DGlobal-5FYGrowth-26af-5Fsub3-3DEmailSignature&d=DwICaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=oqHe0LzfDZtjDdW88LXsaiBD1lEQDMDsz48hxmRs3VM&s=uhF8qZ4d47mbTTcf8dRt7niS-ubqnETSlyj1Dj8Wr4g&e=>

On Tue, Jun 19, 2018 at 7:42 PM, Susan Moore
<SusanMoore...> wrote:
Hi,

You may want to give Walt some more information. It was good talking with you.
Susan
________________________________________
From: WALTER KENT [<tneklw...><mailto:<tneklw...>]
Sent: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 7:16 PM
To: Susan Moore
Subject: Re: Bohemian Waxwing

More word, the Bo is not even listed as a visitor to N.C.
Walt


-----Original Message-----
From: Susan Moore <SusanMoore...><mailto:<SusanMoore...>>
To: Walt <tneklw...><mailto:<tneklw...>>; lelandjane47 <lelandjane47...><mailto:<lelandjane47...>>
Sent: Tue, Jun 19, 2018 2:30 pm
Subject: Bohemian Waxwing

Hi Walt,

This visitor saw what she thought was a Bohemian Waxwing down near Mount Pisgah. What do you think??

Also, only1 dead lily bloom in the seep.

Susan


 

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Date: 6/19/18 8:08 am
From: Peter Quadarella (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: black river access
Thanks, the responses I got also said kayak/canoe were the way to go, and
there are public boat ramps. It would be great if we get a new state park.

Peter Quadarella
Weddington, NC

On Tue, Jun 19, 2018 at 10:33 AM steve stevens <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> to speak to Peter's question about good sites on the black river:
>
> the spot with the old growth is the three sisters swamp. there's no land
> access to it that i know of, the only way ive been able to get there is via
> canoe/kayak. its tricky, but definitely worth the trip. the best directions
> ive found are in paul fergusons book paddling eastern north carolina. (
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.pocosinpress.com&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=HsnKa81MU7ETpte-Sq7ZZetxbdvSlofb7_tiTX5fiOw&s=L6O71zULcLk-QgOL-NNByxTALs2qeRN7XObJLoLOKkg&e=
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.pocosinpress.com&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=VTRlbkv-3znk7BvLW7edE82bscnhic_uhkQicbF21YI&s=4FNqz3wX8Z4cEuc4a-wUy1MoATldKy4nWooOEXf4AHc&e=>
> ).
>
> he gives a description of the black river route under the "favorite trips"
> tab, though i imagine other people have written about it online as well.
> the write up in his book is throughout.
>
> best of luck, thats also really exciting news theyve found even older
> trees there! when i visited that site years ago i didnt make special note
> of the birds present, but id be curious.
>

 

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Date: 6/19/18 7:49 am
From: Gilbert Grant (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Great Shearwater on North Topsail Beach,NC

This morning there was a Great Shearwater dead on the beach above the high tide line of North Topsail Beach, Onslow County, NC. It was moderately decomposed so probably has been dead for a week or so.

Gilbert S. Grant
Sneads Ferry, NC
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 6/19/18 7:34 am
From: steve stevens (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: black river access
to speak to Peter's question about good sites on the black river:

the spot with the old growth is the three sisters swamp. there's no land
access to it that i know of, the only way ive been able to get there is via
canoe/kayak. its tricky, but definitely worth the trip. the best directions
ive found are in paul fergusons book paddling eastern north carolina. (
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.pocosinpress.com&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=VTRlbkv-3znk7BvLW7edE82bscnhic_uhkQicbF21YI&s=4FNqz3wX8Z4cEuc4a-wUy1MoATldKy4nWooOEXf4AHc&e=).

he gives a description of the black river route under the "favorite trips"
tab, though i imagine other people have written about it online as well.
the write up in his book is throughout.

best of luck, thats also really exciting news theyve found even older trees
there! when i visited that site years ago i didnt make special note of the
birds present, but id be curious.

 

Back to top
Date: 6/18/18 5:33 pm
From: Jeff Lewis (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Mississippi Kites and another spoonbill report
Joan and I traveled from the Outer Banks to Scotland Neck on Saturday. We
found our first Mississippi Kite along Hwy 64 just east of Williamston,
between Gardner and Sweetwater Creeks. Then, several miles south of
Scotland Neck, we found a flock over a field. There must have been at
least 8 or more, but by the time we pulled off and got out we counted only
6, as they were headed south. Then, several hours later, while at Sylvan
Heights Bird Center, we spotted at least 4 more kites through a small
opening in the forest canopy.

Ali Lubbock at Sylvan Heights said that there had recently been 3 Roseate
Spoonbills just outside Scotland Neck.

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC

 

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Date: 6/18/18 10:05 am
From: Peter Quadarella (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Swallow-tailed Kite nest
Thanks Derb, that was a very interesting post! I wasn't sure where the
Black River was so I searched around and found it in Sampson County. Are
there any public areas around the river that might be good to explore?

Regards,
Peter Quadarella
Weddington, NC

On Mon, Jun 18, 2018 at 10:52 AM Derb Carter <derbc...> wrote:

> Yesterday afternoon, I photographed a swallow-tailed kite nest with two
> nearly fledged immatures along the Black River in southeastern NC. This
> may be the first swallow-tailed kite nest photographed in NC, at least from
> the ground. I was taken to the nest by a local resident who found it
> several weeks ago. While in the area, I saw 4-5 adult swallow-tailed kites
> flying and perched. The local resident has a single photograph with 13
> kites from a few weeks ago. Since the kites are known to nest in loose
> colonies, there are likely more nests in the area. He has seen the kites
> regularly during the breeding season in this area along the Black River for
> four years. I have not heard many reports from the “usual” North Carolina
> site along the Cape Fear River at lock and dam number one. I do not know
> if some or most of the kites may have moved from that area or this is a new
> group and major expansion, which would be great. I sent some photos to
> Kent for the CBC website.
>
>
>
> The Black River has the oldest documented trees in eastern North America.
> The reigning champion ancient cypress is 1,650 years old. I also learned
> yesterday researchers have been back this year and found even older trees,
> which will be formally announced soon. The new champion will be – get this
> – nearly 1000 years older than the current champion. This means it
> sprouted in around 500 BC. Legislation has been introduced to make the
> core of the Black River corridor a new state park. It should be.
>
>
>
> Derb Carter
>
>
>
>
> *Disclaimer*
>
> The information contained in this communication from the sender is
> confidential.
>
>

 

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Date: 6/18/18 9:06 am
From: Tom & Karen <walencit...>
Subject: Re: ROSEATE SPOONBILLS still present in Raleigh, Wake Co, NC 6-18-18 at 8 am
Be careful around the gazebo.  Wasps stung at least two people this morning!
Tom W.

On Monday, June 18, 2018 11:38 AM, Fuz Sanderson <carolinabirds...> wrote:


Still present near the gazebo. Have to peer through the vegetation to see them. 
On Jun 18, 2018 8:31 AM, "Lynn Erla Beegle" <carolinabirds...> wrote:

ROSEATE SPOONBILLS still present in Raleigh, Wake Co, NC 6-18-18 at 8 am
Reported to me via text message - the birder was close enough to
photograph the 2 immature spoonbills.  See ebird.org checklists for
Crabtree Creek Wetland - West of Raleigh Blvd hotspot
My notes that I have sent to many birders are: go to the intersection
of Yonkers and Raleigh Blvd, cross over the RR tracks and park in the
lot of defunct Lumber Liquidators. Walk on the sidewalk to see the
marsh (away from the RR tracks) and stop at the vine-covered fire
hydrant and look over the mudflats. Then proceed to the wetland
boardwalk entrance to look for the YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON, who
tends to roost in willows at the bottom of the boardwalk ramp. A scope
is a good idea, depending on the location of the spoonbills. Thank you
to Lori White for giving us this morning's update. And another thank
you to John Connors for noting the presence of the YELLOW-CROWNED
NIGHT-HERON weeks ago. That bird was the catalyst for birders to visit
this location, who eventually noticed these spoonbills hiding in plain
sight! (It is easy to miss them if you just walk along the boardwalk -
use the Raleigh Blvd sidewalk). - LynnErla Beegle, Raleigh NC





 

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Date: 6/18/18 8:38 am
From: Fuz Sanderson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: ROSEATE SPOONBILLS still present in Raleigh, Wake Co, NC 6-18-18 at 8 am
Still present near the gazebo. Have to peer through the vegetation to see
them.

On Jun 18, 2018 8:31 AM, "Lynn Erla Beegle" <carolinabirds...> wrote:

ROSEATE SPOONBILLS still present in Raleigh, Wake Co, NC 6-18-18 at 8 am
Reported to me via text message - the birder was close enough to
photograph the 2 immature spoonbills. See ebird.org checklists for
Crabtree Creek Wetland - West of Raleigh Blvd hotspot
My notes that I have sent to many birders are: go to the intersection
of Yonkers and Raleigh Blvd, cross over the RR tracks and park in the
lot of defunct Lumber Liquidators. Walk on the sidewalk to see the
marsh (away from the RR tracks) and stop at the vine-covered fire
hydrant and look over the mudflats. Then proceed to the wetland
boardwalk entrance to look for the YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON, who
tends to roost in willows at the bottom of the boardwalk ramp. A scope
is a good idea, depending on the location of the spoonbills. Thank you
to Lori White for giving us this morning's update. And another thank
you to John Connors for noting the presence of the YELLOW-CROWNED
NIGHT-HERON weeks ago. That bird was the catalyst for birders to visit
this location, who eventually noticed these spoonbills hiding in plain
sight! (It is easy to miss them if you just walk along the boardwalk -
use the Raleigh Blvd sidewalk). - LynnErla Beegle, Raleigh NC

 

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Date: 6/18/18 8:37 am
From: Birding Poet (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Swallow-tailed Kite nest
Please make sure you report it with this form:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__stki.thecenterforbirdsofprey.org_&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=eUUYwEoF3_ancq26l5LmF5c6ZxJ_qkhboeS99WDxoJE&s=7HQoM50QHj2HRAeyW08m1EkAx5u-R2tJr7AfBmP4SGw&e=

On Mon, Jun 18, 2018 at 10:52 AM Derb Carter <derbc...> wrote:

> Yesterday afternoon, I photographed a swallow-tailed kite nest with two
> nearly fledged immatures along the Black River in southeastern NC. This
> may be the first swallow-tailed kite nest photographed in NC, at least from
> the ground. I was taken to the nest by a local resident who found it
> several weeks ago. While in the area, I saw 4-5 adult swallow-tailed kites
> flying and perched. The local resident has a single photograph with 13
> kites from a few weeks ago. Since the kites are known to nest in loose
> colonies, there are likely more nests in the area. He has seen the kites
> regularly during the breeding season in this area along the Black River for
> four years. I have not heard many reports from the “usual” North Carolina
> site along the Cape Fear River at lock and dam number one. I do not know
> if some or most of the kites may have moved from that area or this is a new
> group and major expansion, which would be great. I sent some photos to
> Kent for the CBC website.
>
>
>
> The Black River has the oldest documented trees in eastern North America.
> The reigning champion ancient cypress is 1,650 years old. I also learned
> yesterday researchers have been back this year and found even older trees,
> which will be formally announced soon. The new champion will be – get this
> – nearly 1000 years older than the current champion. This means it
> sprouted in around 500 BC. Legislation has been introduced to make the
> core of the Black River corridor a new state park. It should be.
>
>
>
> Derb Carter
>
>
>
>
> *Disclaimer*
>
> The information contained in this communication from the sender is
> confidential.
>
> --
~Tracee 843/425-7630

 

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Date: 6/18/18 7:52 am
From: Derb Carter <derbc...>
Subject: Swallow-tailed Kite nest
Disclaimer: The information contained in this communication from the sender is confidential. It is intended solely for use by the recipient and others authorized to receive it. If you are not the recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution or taking action in relation of the contents of this information is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful.

 

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Date: 6/18/18 7:48 am
From: Christine Stoughton-Root (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Least Bittern-Pamlico County
Hi Everyone

I know neither birds are rare but unusual in Pamlico County. I had a Female Least Bittern yesterday at Hobucken Goose Greek impoundment.
Male Kentucky on approach to Goose Creek

Heres the link to eBird, photo and location.
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S46606938&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=PuoG_cG9KEaPRlm8fMlrv9s5T5lPJNrYXCn7rXf_P6M&s=e_uip2umQgbqZ05Y_2zFDtnvwSonVod5gWmTgiSzn94&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S46606938&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=PuoG_cG9KEaPRlm8fMlrv9s5T5lPJNrYXCn7rXf_P6M&s=e_uip2umQgbqZ05Y_2zFDtnvwSonVod5gWmTgiSzn94&e=>

Also had a Kentucky Warbler no photo of him yet.
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S46606930&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=PuoG_cG9KEaPRlm8fMlrv9s5T5lPJNrYXCn7rXf_P6M&s=hRNBanj-uIb09V5_Bk3awokhqk6asGDqu1Z3glTCiQQ&e= <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S46606930&d=DwIFAg&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=PuoG_cG9KEaPRlm8fMlrv9s5T5lPJNrYXCn7rXf_P6M&s=hRNBanj-uIb09V5_Bk3awokhqk6asGDqu1Z3glTCiQQ&e=>

Christine Stoughton-Root
Merritt NC
 

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Date: 6/18/18 5:32 am
From: Lynn Erla Beegle (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: ROSEATE SPOONBILLS still present in Raleigh, Wake Co, NC 6-18-18 at 8 am
ROSEATE SPOONBILLS still present in Raleigh, Wake Co, NC 6-18-18 at 8 am
Reported to me via text message - the birder was close enough to
photograph the 2 immature spoonbills. See ebird.org checklists for
Crabtree Creek Wetland - West of Raleigh Blvd hotspot
My notes that I have sent to many birders are: go to the intersection
of Yonkers and Raleigh Blvd, cross over the RR tracks and park in the
lot of defunct Lumber Liquidators. Walk on the sidewalk to see the
marsh (away from the RR tracks) and stop at the vine-covered fire
hydrant and look over the mudflats. Then proceed to the wetland
boardwalk entrance to look for the YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON, who
tends to roost in willows at the bottom of the boardwalk ramp. A scope
is a good idea, depending on the location of the spoonbills. Thank you
to Lori White for giving us this morning's update. And another thank
you to John Connors for noting the presence of the YELLOW-CROWNED
NIGHT-HERON weeks ago. That bird was the catalyst for birders to visit
this location, who eventually noticed these spoonbills hiding in plain
sight! (It is easy to miss them if you just walk along the boardwalk -
use the Raleigh Blvd sidewalk). - LynnErla Beegle, Raleigh NC
 

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