monterey-bay-birders
Received From Subject
8/5/20 9:19 pm Phil Brown <pdpbrown...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Hoopoes
8/5/20 9:03 pm larry corridon <larry961357...> [MBBIRDS] Hoopoes
8/4/20 8:57 pm Jeff Manker <fireweed8...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post
8/4/20 8:49 pm Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao...> RE: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post
8/4/20 8:14 pm Randy Wardle <wrwardle...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post
8/4/20 6:42 pm Jeff Manker <fireweed8...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post
8/4/20 6:38 pm Arthur Macmillan <grrrrrrrrrr8...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post
8/4/20 5:56 pm Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao...> RE: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post
8/4/20 5:30 pm Arthur Macmillan <grrrrrrrrrr8...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post
8/4/20 5:01 pm larry corridon <larry961357...> Fwd: [MBBIRDS] Jupiter's moons
8/4/20 4:37 pm Liam Murphy <liammsf...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post
8/4/20 4:16 pm Elena Scott <elmscott23...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Black Swifts: Sand Hill Bluff.
8/4/20 4:10 pm Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao...> [MBBIRDS] Pelagic report - and Pelagic opportunities.
8/4/20 3:23 pm 'Breck Tyler' via mbbirds <mbbirds...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Black Swifts: Sand Hill Bluff.
8/4/20 1:30 pm Julia van der Wyk <juliavdw11...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post
8/4/20 12:34 pm larry corridon <larry961357...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post
8/4/20 11:57 am Randy Wardle <wrwardle...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post
8/4/20 10:42 am Jane Orbuch <jorbuch...> [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post
8/3/20 9:00 pm larry corridon <larry961357...> [MBBIRDS] Jupiter's moons
8/1/20 5:13 pm Don Roberson <creagrus...> [MBBIRDS] MTY highlights updated
8/1/20 4:55 pm Jeff Manker <fireweed8...> [MBBIRDS] Re: A Surf Scoter that has a white wing
7/31/20 10:59 pm Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao...> [MBBIRDS] Monterey pelagics - we are on. Info and some details.
7/31/20 9:47 am larry corridon <larry961357...> [MBBIRDS] Fwd: Kerry James Marshall’s Black Birds Take Flight in a New Series - The New York Times
7/30/20 7:47 pm Carol Pecot <carol.pecot...> [MBBIRDS] Swift article
7/29/20 1:45 pm Phil Brown <pdpbrown...> [MBBIRDS] Jim Williams
7/27/20 6:23 pm Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...> [MBBIRDS] Black Swift survey results
7/26/20 5:59 pm Don Roberson <creagrus...> Re: [MBBIRDS] pygmy-owls under the redwoods
7/26/20 4:53 pm Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...> [MBBIRDS] waxwings nesting again at CARE
7/26/20 4:07 pm Jeff Manker <fireweed8...> Re: [MBBIRDS] pygmy-owls under the redwoods
7/26/20 4:04 pm Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...> RE: [MBBIRDS] pygmy-owls under the redwoods
7/26/20 4:01 pm Pete Sole <pete...> [MBBIRDS] What's on the tree ...
7/26/20 2:59 pm larry corridon <larry961357...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Black-bellied Plover in breeding plumage
7/26/20 2:06 pm Pete Sole <pete...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Black-bellied Plover in breeding plumage
7/26/20 1:09 pm Barbara Riverwoman <river...> [MBBIRDS] Black-bellied Plover in breeding plumage
7/25/20 9:59 pm Jeff Manker <fireweed8...> Re: [MBBIRDS] pygmy-owls under the redwoods
7/25/20 8:58 pm Randy Wardle <wrwardle...> Re: [MBBIRDS] pygmy-owls under the redwoods
7/25/20 4:14 pm Lisa Larson <lisafaylarson...> Re: [MBBIRDS] pygmy-owls under the redwoods
7/25/20 2:44 pm Jeff Manker <fireweed8...> Re: [MBBIRDS] pygmy-owls under the redwoods
7/25/20 1:56 pm Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...> [MBBIRDS] Black Swift watch tomorrow
7/24/20 5:36 pm Michael Bolte <mjbolte...> Re: [MBBIRDS] pygmy-owls under the redwoods
7/24/20 5:00 pm Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...> [MBBIRDS] pygmy-owls under the redwoods
7/23/20 7:39 pm Glen Tepke <g.tepke...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Black Swifts: Sand Hill Bluff.
7/23/20 5:33 pm Brian Scanlon <briancscanlon...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Update Wandering Tattlers
7/23/20 4:44 pm Brian Scanlon <briancscanlon...> [MBBIRDS] Update Wandering Tattlers
7/23/20 4:42 pm Amanda Preece <apreece24...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Wandering Tattler
7/23/20 4:00 pm Brian Scanlon <briancscanlon...> [MBBIRDS] Wandering Tattler
7/23/20 12:22 pm brumba <brumba...> [MBBIRDS] Re: Wandering Tattler
7/23/20 11:37 am Sharon Hull <plants...> [MBBIRDS] Wandering Tattler
7/23/20 6:58 am <kyri...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Black Swifts: Sand Hill Bluff.
7/22/20 9:22 pm Glen Tepke <g.tepke...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Black Swifts: Sand Hill Bluff.
7/22/20 12:57 pm <kingfisher11...> [MBBIRDS] West Cliff Again
7/22/20 9:56 am D Wirkman <h2oneworld...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Digest for - 2 updates in 1 topic
7/21/20 6:13 pm Pete Sole <pete...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Osprey Surprise
7/21/20 9:16 am Bob Ramer <rjramer...> [MBBIRDS] Osprey Surprise
7/20/20 10:47 pm Phil Brown <pdpbrown...> [MBBIRDS] Westcliff
7/18/20 12:23 pm <kyri...> [MBBIRDS] Ano Nuevo SP - Bank Swallows not there
7/17/20 11:25 pm Liam Murphy <liammsf...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Black Swifts: Sand Hill Bluff.
7/17/20 10:51 pm David Kossack <dkossack...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Black Swifts: Sand Hill Bluff.
7/17/20 8:17 pm 'Breck Tyler' via mbbirds <mbbirds...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Kirby Park
7/17/20 6:55 pm Chris Campton <campton...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Kirby Park
7/17/20 6:53 pm 'Breck Tyler' via mbbirds <mbbirds...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Kirby Park
7/17/20 6:36 pm Lois Goldfrank <loisg...> [MBBIRDS] They're definitely back!
7/17/20 6:16 pm Mary Anne Goldberg <mapmg2011...> RE: [MBBIRDS] Kirby Park
7/17/20 11:34 am Jean Brocklebank <jeanbean...> [MBBIRDS] Impact of hunting on migratory shorebird populations
7/16/20 11:06 pm L.T. Jaeger <ltjaeger...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Kirby Park
7/16/20 6:50 pm Linda Brodman <redwdrn...> [MBBIRDS] Eared Grebe
7/16/20 5:15 pm Nickie Zavinsky <nickiezee0111...> [MBBIRDS] Kirby Park
7/16/20 3:44 pm Michael Bolte <mjbolte...> [MBBIRDS] Black Swifts at Wilder Ranch Old Cove Landing
7/16/20 12:38 pm Jane Orbuch <jorbuch...> [MBBIRDS] Fwd: National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: Seabirds 101--East Coast
7/15/20 9:59 pm Michael Bolte <mjbolte...> [MBBIRDS] Black Swifts on the Old Cove Landing trail
7/15/20 9:48 pm DEBRA SHEARWATER <debiluv...> [MBBIRDS] Panoche Road: CLOSED
7/14/20 5:42 pm James P Williams <jpwilliams2007...> [MBBIRDS] WETA
7/14/20 3:08 pm 'Lisa Sheridan' via mbbirds <mbbirds...> [MBBIRDS] Finally fledged Lawrence's Goldfinch
7/12/20 3:55 pm Don Roberson <creagrus...> [MBBIRDS] MTY highlights updated again
7/11/20 10:37 am Larry Corridon <larry961357...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Rose-breasted Grosbeak
7/11/20 9:44 am David Ekdahl <decvmbb...> [MBBIRDS] Rose-breasted Grosbeak
7/9/20 6:56 pm liammsf <liammsf...> [MBBIRDS] First Shearwater Action of the season
7/9/20 3:16 am Carol Pecot <carol.pecot...> Re: [MBBIRDS] East Meadow update 7/6/20
7/8/20 3:11 pm Lisa Larson <lisafaylarson...> [MBBIRDS] Harkins Slough Osprey
7/7/20 7:39 pm L.T. Jaeger <ltjaeger...> Re: [MBBIRDS] [MBBirds] Falcon Axillars, pale face, dark hood photos
7/7/20 7:37 pm L.T. Jaeger <ltjaeger...> Re: [MBBIRDS] [MBBirds] Falcon Axillars, pale face, dark hood photos
7/7/20 7:15 pm L.T. Jaeger <ltjaeger...> Re: [MBBIRDS] [MBBirds] falcons at Moore Creek
7/7/20 7:14 pm Pete Sole <pete...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Re: [MBBirds] falcons at Moore Creek
7/7/20 6:17 pm Phil Brown <pdpbrown...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Re: [MBBirds] falcons at Moore Creek
7/7/20 6:14 pm 'Breck Tyler' via mbbirds <mbbirds...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Re: [MBBirds] falcons at Moore Creek
7/7/20 6:09 pm Phil Brown <pdpbrown...> Re: [MBBIRDS] Re: [MBBirds] falcons at Moore Creek
7/7/20 6:01 pm 'Breck Tyler' via mbbirds <mbbirds...> [MBBIRDS] Re: [MBBirds] falcons at Moore Creek
7/7/20 12:50 pm 'Breck Tyler' via mbbirds <mbbirds...> [MBBIRDS] [MBBirds] falcons at Moore Creek
7/7/20 8:05 am 'Lisa Sheridan' via mbbirds <mbbirds...> [MBBIRDS] Fwd: East Meadow update 7/6/20
7/6/20 8:50 pm Randy Wardle <wrwardle...> [MBBIRDS] Prairie Falcon: Fw: [eBird Alert] Santa Cruz County Rare Bird Alert
 
Back to top
Date: 8/5/20 9:19 pm
From: Phil Brown <pdpbrown...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Hoopoes
one of my favorites, seen in France and China

On Wed, Aug 5, 2020, 21:03 larry corridon <larry961357...> wrote:

> There is a very nice show on Amazon Prime right now called “Return of the
> Hoopoe”, a beautiful bird found in Europe. If you have seen this remarkable
> bird, or hope to, or just want to watch an inspiring documentary about
> helping the recovery of a bird population, you might want to check it out.
>
> Larry D. Corridon
> <larry961357...>
>
>
>
>
>
> --
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "mbbirds" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
> email to mbbirds+<unsubscribe...>
> To view this discussion on the web visit
> https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/mbbirds/<7C5E5765-9F10-4A1A-A46D-C71C16723CE9...>
> <https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/mbbirds/<7C5E5765-9F10-4A1A-A46D-C71C16723CE9...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>
> .
>

--
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Back to top
Date: 8/5/20 9:03 pm
From: larry corridon <larry961357...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Hoopoes
There is a very nice show on Amazon Prime right now called “Return of the Hoopoe”, a beautiful bird found in Europe. If you have seen this remarkable bird, or hope to, or just want to watch an inspiring documentary about helping the recovery of a bird population, you might want to check it out.

Larry D. Corridon
<larry961357...>





--
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To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to mbbirds+<unsubscribe...>
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Back to top
Date: 8/4/20 8:57 pm
From: Jeff Manker <fireweed8...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post
Randy, I respect your stance.

Jeff

On Tue, Aug 4, 2020 at 8:14 PM Randy Wardle <wrwardle...> wrote:

> I am going to respectfully disagree with a number of you. I believe that
> those who have discovered new species and described them in detail for
> science deserve to have their name associated with those discoveries. Just
> because many decades later people decide to dislike the person for various
> reasons should not give them the right to rename the species in order to
> make themselves feel better.
>
> Randy Wardle
> Aptos
> ------------------------------
> *From:* Jeff Manker <fireweed8...>
> *Sent:* Wednesday, August 5, 2020 1:42 AM
> *To:* Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao...>
> *Cc:* Arthur Macmillan <grrrrrrrrrr8...>; Jane Orbuch <
> <jorbuch...>; Julia van der Wyk <juliavdw11...>; Liam
> Murphy <liammsf...>; MBB <mbbirds...>; Randy Wardle <
> <wrwardle...>; larry corridon <larry961357...>
> *Subject:* Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The
> Washington Post
>
> I admire those of you who have commented in support of getting rid of the
> eponymous names. My first reaction was against it. I read the article
> (which I hope will not be the only or last word on the topic as I believe
> it deserves discussion) and I wanted to defend Audubon and all the others
> as I am used to those names and found things to admire about those early
> pioneers of American ornithology. My mind ran through all forms of defense
> and excuses, trying to find a way to hang on to my version of who I thought
> they were and wanted them to be. I had to come to the conclusion that every
> defense I could come up with was flawed and not excusable. I wondered what
> level of my own morality would I have to give up to defend these names?
>
> Two things convinced me to accept that these names should be changed. The
> first were the last sentences of what Liam wrote, “ Plus, you have the
> added bonus of being actively anti-racist, and making birding more
> welcoming to our BIPoC brothers and sisters, thus creating even more
> advocates for bird ecosystem health and conservation. I am all for it.”
>
> The second were the immortal words of William Shakespeare,
> “What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell
> as sweet.” Romeo and Juliet ca. 1600.
>
> Of course, I am not in charge of making these changes, but after some
> mental struggle about giving up preconceived notions I have come down on
> the side of changing the names for the good of us all.
>
> Here’s to the Black-headed Oriole and the White-browed Wren!
>
> Jeff Manker
>
> On Tue, Aug 4, 2020 at 5:55 PM Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao...>
> wrote:
>
> Arthur
>
> The bad form was to name it after yourself. You can name a new species
> after anything you would like, but not yourself.
>
> Alvaro
>
>
>
> Alvaro Jaramillo
>
> <alvaro...>
>
> www.alvarosadventures.com
>
>
>
> *From:* <mbbirds...> <mbbirds...> *On Behalf Of
> *Arthur Macmillan
> *Sent:* Tuesday, August 4, 2020 5:30 PM
> *To:* Liam Murphy <liammsf...>
> *Cc:* Julia van der Wyk <juliavdw11...>; larry corridon <
> <larry961357...>; Randy Wardle <wrwardle...>; Jane
> Orbuch <jorbuch...>; MBB <mbbirds...>
> *Subject:* Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The
> Washington Post
>
>
>
> I think it has been considered "bad form" to name species after people's
> names for some time now. One additional pragmatic reason for using
> descriptive names is that I have noticed, at least with arthropods, species
> that are named after people often get renamed more often. It happens for a
> number of reasons. But a descriptive name is both more stable, and more
> instructive. This example with bird names may provide many more examples,
> in the end, of names that would have better been named with more
> objectivity.
>
>
>
> And it does make sense for a birds name not to invoke bad feelings.
>
>
>
> It would be strange, at first. But I like the idea!
>
>
>
> On Tue, Aug 4, 2020 at 4:37 PM Liam Murphy <liammsf...> wrote:
>
> I’ve seen this discussion on a number of forums lately. Descriptive
> common names for birds (whether by plumage trait or habitat) are just
> objectively better than honorific/eponymous names from a birding point of
> view. It would be SO much easier to mentally connect species with
> image/information, and to share knowledge with new birders and people
> interested in birds (no more “remember, Bewick’s Wren is the one with the
> white eyebrow and you can remember that because the word Bewick has a W in
> it and the word White starts with the letter W…” blah blah blah no
> thanks). I struggle to understand any argument against it. Plus, you have
> the added bonus of being actively anti-racist, and making birding more
> welcoming to our BIPoC brothers and sisters, thus creating even more
> advocates for bird ecosystem health and conservation. I am all for it.
>
>
>
> Good (happy/safe/inclusive) birding all!
>
> Liam
>
>
>
> On Aug 4, 2020, at 1:30 PM, Julia van der Wyk <juliavdw11...>
> wrote:
>
>
>
> Hello all,
>
> I think who we honor and why is an important issue to consider. If
> renaming some birds will move us toward dismantling systemic racism in our
> culture, I am for it. It won’t solve the greater problem but if it helps,
> to me that is a yes. I appreciate the thought and discussion from the
> article.
>
> It is definitely an uncomfortable thought process but like most, well
> worth examining in ourselves and with our peers. we will all have our own
> take on it. I am glad for this thread.
>
>
>
> –Julia v.
>
>
>
>
>
> On Aug 4, 2020, at 12:34 PM, larry corridon <larry961357...>
> wrote:
>
>
>
> Thank you Jane for bringing this to our attention. It does shed light on a
> very different side of those researchers and educators from the past whose
> information we use and whose wisdom we respect. They have some very serious
> flaws (to say the least!)
>
>
>
> However, I have several thoughts, mostly negative about the last
> paragraph of this article. To further comment on or discuss them in the MBB
> forum could turn it into a political platform that I don’t think would be
> appropriate or welcome to the members.
>
>
>
> Also, I’m not sure how well I would do having to remember new names for
> many birds. I have enough trouble with the ones we have now!
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Aug 4, 2020, at 11:57, Randy Wardle <wrwardle...> wrote:
>
>
>
> Oh good grief!
>
>
>
> Randy Wardle
>
> Aptos
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> *From:* <mbbirds...> <mbbirds...> on behalf of
> Jane Orbuch <jorbuch...>
> *Sent:* Tuesday, August 4, 2020 5:42 PM
> *To:* mbbirds <mbbirds...>
> *Subject:* [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The
> Washington Post
>
>
>
> Not sure I agree with all of the below—but definitely worth being aware
> of, thinking about and perhaps taking action on.
>
>
>
> https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/08/04/american-bird-names-colonialism-audubon/?arc404=true&utm_campaign=wp_post_most&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_most
> What Confederate statues and some American bird names have in common
>
> By Gabriel Foley, Jordan Rutter
>
> August 4, 2020
>
> *Gabriel Foley and Jordan Rutter are ornithologists and birders who
> created the website **Bird Names for Birds*
> <http://www.birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/>*.*
>
> Few figures tower over the study of American nature like John James
> Audubon
> <https://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/john-james-audubon-drawn-from-nature/106/>
> and small wonder. His “Birds of North America” was the first work to
> catalog most of the continent’s native species in vivid color, introducing
> them to a wide and enthusiastic audience that endures today. He also
> described an astonishing 25 new bird species
> <https://johnjames.audubon.org/john-james-audubon-0>, while two other
> species — Audubon’s shearwater
> <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/audubons-shearwater> and Audubon’s
> oriole <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Audubons_Oriole/overview>
> bear his name. Surely, most of us might think, this is an entirely fitting
> honor for someone who did so much for our understanding of the environment.
>
> <NB2IJWFLGJHV7KCKYJSTHB5AQY.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
>
> Yet science never exists in a vacuum, and Audubon’s story has a dark side
> — one that goes beyond his notable penchant for exaggeration and scientific
> fakery
> <https://bioone.org/journals/bulletin-of-the-british-ornithologists-club/volume-140/issue-2/bboc.v140i2.2020.a3/Audubons-Bird-of-Washington--unravelling-the-fraud-that-launched/10.25226/bboc.v140i2.2020.a3.full>.
> After the Battle of San Jacinto in 1836, when mostly White Texans defeated
> a Mexican army
> <https://www.britannica.com/event/Battle-of-San-Jacinto-1836> not far
> from present-day Houston, Audubon scoured the battlefield for the remains
> of Mexican soldiers. He decapitated several bodies
> <https://matthewhalley.wordpress.com/2020/06/16/the-literal-skeletons-in-the-closet-of-american-ornithology/> and
> sent the heads to Samuel George Morton, a notorious practitioner of
> phrenology, a pseudoscience that attempted to use skull dimensions to prove
> the superiority of White Europeans to other races. For Audubon, this might
> have been just another way of practicing science — but his actions hardly
> align with modern values, and his scientific contributions do not excuse
> him from judgment.
>
> When we name an animal species after the person who first made it known to
> science, we are effectively honoring that person’s contribution. Unlike a
> name describing a bird’s color or habitat, there is nothing “natural” about
> honorific names: They imply a choice, and we can also choose not to honor
> the person whose name has been affixed to the species. Bachman’s sparrow
> <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bachmans_Sparrow/id>, Townsend’s
> warbler <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Townsends_Warbler/overview>, Bendire’s
> thrasher <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bendires_Thrasher/overview>
> , Hammond’s flycatcher
> <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Hammonds_Flycatcher/overview>, McCown’s
> longspur <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/McCowns_Longspur/id>
> these are all examples of North American common bird names. For the bird
> community — ornithologists, bird-watchers, conservationists and more —
> these names are collectively referenced every day. For many, the esteem
> inherent in these names is unconsciously overlooked, and comfort lies in
> their familiarity.
>
> Yet these honorific names — known as eponyms — also cast long, dark
> shadows over our beloved birds and represent colonialism, racism and
> inequality. It is long overdue that we acknowledge the problem of such
> names, and it is long overdue that we should change them.
>
> <CLVXK5LGFBHTVIPW6YMWJI7YRY.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
>
> The Rev. John Bachman
> <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/bachman-john/> was
> among those who argued vehemently against
> <https://books.google.com/books?id=yY8FAAAAQAAJ&> the abolition of
> slavery. “The negro,” he wrote, “is a striking and now permanent variety,
> like the numerous permanent varieties in domesticated animals,” adding that
> “his intellect, although underrated, is greatly inferior to that of the
> Caucasian, and that he is ... incapable of self-government.” John McCownserved
> as a general
> <https://www.audubon.org/news/-bird-world-grappling-its-own-confederate-relic-mccowns-longspur> in
> the Confederate Army. William Alexander Hammond
> <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/hammond-william-alexander/>,
> once a surgeon general of the United States, asked U.S. soldiers to send
> him the bodies of indigenous people for comparative anatomy studies. Charles
> Bendire
> <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/bendire-charles/> fought
> in the Battle of Canyon Creek, among other violent attacks on indigenous
> peoples. John Kirk Townsend
> <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/townsend-john-kirk/> desecrated
> the graves of Native Americans and sent their skulls to Morton for his
> infamous cranial studies.
>
> <SEZHS6H5TNHZPNIAZOBN7NU7VI.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
>
> These men were among countless others who contributed to the library of
> knowledge we now rely on. They were active during the peak of scientific
> collection efforts in North America, efforts that were made possible by
> colonialism. But the westward expansion of the United States came at an
> incalculable cost to the country’s original inhabitants and their
> descendants today. To justify the harmful effects of their colonial
> actions, Europeans and Americans invented theories of race and civilization
> that conveniently labeled themselves as superior to everyone else. These
> theories led directly to the racism that still plagues our country today,
> affecting our society in countless insidious ways.
>
> The controversy over such names, which is now exciting passions within the
> bird community, mirrors similar conflicts over monuments to Confederates
> and colonialists now raging in the United States and elsewhere. Eponymous
> names serve as verbal statues: They are a memorial both to the colonial
> system that wove the fabric of systemic racism through every aspect of our
> lives — including the birds we see every day — and to the individuals who
> intentionally and directly perpetuated that system.
>
> <XPH43PCUENBIJDHIMPBDLNA2DU.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
>
> By rejecting the colonial monument that eponyms represent, we can show
> that we value inclusion and diversity in our community, and that we
> acknowledge the intrinsic worth of wildlife. We cannot subjectively decide
> — *especially* if the adjudicators are White — that some names can be
> retained because they are associated with less abhorrent pasts than others.
> We must remove all eponymous names. The stench of colonialism has saturated
> each of its participants, and the honor inherent within their names must be
> revoked.
>
> A bird’s beauty should not be marred by the baggage of an eponym. We could
> decide right now that the words we use matter, and that birds should carry
> their own history, not ours.
>
> *Read more*:
>
> Ty Seidule: What to rename the Army bases that honor Confederate soldiers
> <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/18/what-rename-army-bases-that-honor-confederate-soldiers/?arc404=true>
>
> Harry Anderson: My experience at a Confederate-named Army base shows why
> we need to rename them all — now
> <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/15/my-experience-confederate-named-army-base-shows-why-we-need-rename-them-all-now/>
>
> Christine Emba: Memorials to white supremacy are falling. What will
> replace them?
> <https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/opinions/confederate-statues-monuments/>
>
> David Von Drehle: Renaming military bases is not erasing history. It’s
> erasing propaganda.
> <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/renaming-military-bases-is-not-erasing-history-its-erasing-propaganda/2020/06/16/884a81a0-aff6-11ea-8758-bfd1d045525a_story.html>
>
> The Post’s View: Trump won’t remove Confederate names from military bases.
> So Congress and the Pentagon should.
> <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/trump-wont-remove-confederate-names-from-military-bases-so-congress-and-the-pentagon-should/2020/06/11/920624a6-ac09-11ea-94d2-d7bc43b26bf9_story.html>
>
> Robert W. Lee IV: Robert E. Lee is my ancestor. Take down his statue, and
> let his cause be lost.
> <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/07/robert-e-lee-is-my-ancestor-take-down-his-statue-let-his-cause-be-lost/>
>
> --
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> .
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>
>
> Larry D. Corridon
>
> <larry961357...>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
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Back to top
Date: 8/4/20 8:49 pm
From: Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao...>
Subject: RE: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post
Randy

Note that this is the change of the English Name, the Scientific names will not change, and the authorship of a species will not change. Those are kept through standards in taxonomy. Interesting conversation, taking it all in.

Alvaro



Alvaro Jaramillo

<mailto:<alvaro...> <alvaro...>

www.alvarosadventures.com



From: <mbbirds...> <mbbirds...> On Behalf Of Randy Wardle
Sent: Tuesday, August 4, 2020 8:15 PM
To: Jeff Manker <fireweed8...>; Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao...>
Cc: Arthur Macmillan <grrrrrrrrrr8...>; Jane Orbuch <jorbuch...>; Julia van der Wyk <juliavdw11...>; Liam Murphy <liammsf...>; MBB <mbbirds...>; larry corridon <larry961357...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post



I am going to respectfully disagree with a number of you. I believe that those who have discovered new species and described them in detail for science deserve to have their name associated with those discoveries. Just because many decades later people decide to dislike the person for various reasons should not give them the right to rename the species in order to make themselves feel better.



Randy Wardle

Aptos

_____

From: Jeff Manker <fireweed8...> <mailto:<fireweed8...> >
Sent: Wednesday, August 5, 2020 1:42 AM
To: Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao...> <mailto:<chucao...> >
Cc: Arthur Macmillan <grrrrrrrrrr8...> <mailto:<grrrrrrrrrr8...> >; Jane Orbuch <jorbuch...> <mailto:<jorbuch...> >; Julia van der Wyk <juliavdw11...> <mailto:<juliavdw11...> >; Liam Murphy <liammsf...> <mailto:<liammsf...> >; MBB <mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...> >; Randy Wardle <wrwardle...> <mailto:<wrwardle...> >; larry corridon <larry961357...> <mailto:<larry961357...> >
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post



I admire those of you who have commented in support of getting rid of the eponymous names. My first reaction was against it. I read the article (which I hope will not be the only or last word on the topic as I believe it deserves discussion) and I wanted to defend Audubon and all the others as I am used to those names and found things to admire about those early pioneers of American ornithology. My mind ran through all forms of defense and excuses, trying to find a way to hang on to my version of who I thought they were and wanted them to be. I had to come to the conclusion that every defense I could come up with was flawed and not excusable. I wondered what level of my own morality would I have to give up to defend these names?



Two things convinced me to accept that these names should be changed. The first were the last sentences of what Liam wrote, “ Plus, you have the added bonus of being actively anti-racist, and making birding more welcoming to our BIPoC brothers and sisters, thus creating even more advocates for bird ecosystem health and conservation. I am all for it.”





The second were the immortal words of William Shakespeare,

“What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.” Romeo and Juliet ca. 1600.





Of course, I am not in charge of making these changes, but after some mental struggle about giving up preconceived notions I have come down on the side of changing the names for the good of us all.





Here’s to the Black-headed Oriole and the White-browed Wren!





Jeff Manker



On Tue, Aug 4, 2020 at 5:55 PM Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao...> <mailto:<chucao...> > wrote:

Arthur

The bad form was to name it after yourself. You can name a new species after anything you would like, but not yourself.

Alvaro



Alvaro Jaramillo

<mailto:<alvaro...> <alvaro...>

www.alvarosadventures.com <http://www.alvarosadventures.com>



From: <mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...> <mbbirds...> On Behalf Of Arthur Macmillan
Sent: Tuesday, August 4, 2020 5:30 PM
To: Liam Murphy <liammsf...> <mailto:<liammsf...> >
Cc: Julia van der Wyk <juliavdw11...> <mailto:<juliavdw11...> >; larry corridon <larry961357...> <mailto:<larry961357...> >; Randy Wardle <wrwardle...> <mailto:<wrwardle...> >; Jane Orbuch <jorbuch...> <mailto:<jorbuch...> >; MBB <mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...> >
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post



I think it has been considered "bad form" to name species after people's names for some time now. One additional pragmatic reason for using descriptive names is that I have noticed, at least with arthropods, species that are named after people often get renamed more often. It happens for a number of reasons. But a descriptive name is both more stable, and more instructive. This example with bird names may provide many more examples, in the end, of names that would have better been named with more objectivity.



And it does make sense for a birds name not to invoke bad feelings.



It would be strange, at first. But I like the idea!



On Tue, Aug 4, 2020 at 4:37 PM Liam Murphy <liammsf...> <mailto:<liammsf...> > wrote:

I’ve seen this discussion on a number of forums lately. Descriptive common names for birds (whether by plumage trait or habitat) are just objectively better than honorific/eponymous names from a birding point of view. It would be SO much easier to mentally connect species with image/information, and to share knowledge with new birders and people interested in birds (no more “remember, Bewick’s Wren is the one with the white eyebrow and you can remember that because the word Bewick has a W in it and the word White starts with the letter W…” blah blah blah no thanks). I struggle to understand any argument against it. Plus, you have the added bonus of being actively anti-racist, and making birding more welcoming to our BIPoC brothers and sisters, thus creating even more advocates for bird ecosystem health and conservation. I am all for it.



Good (happy/safe/inclusive) birding all!

Liam



On Aug 4, 2020, at 1:30 PM, Julia van der Wyk <juliavdw11...> <mailto:<juliavdw11...> > wrote:



Hello all,

I think who we honor and why is an important issue to consider. If renaming some birds will move us toward dismantling systemic racism in our culture, I am for it. It won’t solve the greater problem but if it helps, to me that is a yes. I appreciate the thought and discussion from the article.

It is definitely an uncomfortable thought process but like most, well worth examining in ourselves and with our peers. we will all have our own take on it. I am glad for this thread.



–Julia v.





On Aug 4, 2020, at 12:34 PM, larry corridon <larry961357...> <mailto:<larry961357...> > wrote:



Thank you Jane for bringing this to our attention. It does shed light on a very different side of those researchers and educators from the past whose information we use and whose wisdom we respect. They have some very serious flaws (to say the least!)



However, I have several thoughts, mostly negative about the last paragraph of this article. To further comment on or discuss them in the MBB forum could turn it into a political platform that I don’t think would be appropriate or welcome to the members.



Also, I’m not sure how well I would do having to remember new names for many birds. I have enough trouble with the ones we have now!









On Aug 4, 2020, at 11:57, Randy Wardle <wrwardle...> <mailto:<wrwardle...> > wrote:



Oh good grief!



Randy Wardle

Aptos




_____


From: <mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...> <mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...> > on behalf of Jane Orbuch <jorbuch...> <mailto:<jorbuch...> >
Sent: Tuesday, August 4, 2020 5:42 PM
To: mbbirds <mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...> >
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post



Not sure I agree with all of the below—but definitely worth being aware of, thinking about and perhaps taking action on.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/08/04/american-bird-names-colonialism-audubon/?arc404=true <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/08/04/american-bird-names-colonialism-audubon/?arc404=true&utm_campaign=wp_post_most&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_most> &utm_campaign=wp_post_most&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_most


What Confederate statues and some American bird names have in common


By Gabriel Foley, Jordan Rutter

August 4, 2020

Gabriel Foley and Jordan Rutter are ornithologists and birders who created the website <http://www.birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/> Bird Names for Birds.

Few figures tower over the study of American nature like <https://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/john-james-audubon-drawn-from-nature/106/> John James Audubon — and small wonder. His “Birds of North America” was the first work to catalog most of the continent’s native species in vivid color, introducing them to a wide and enthusiastic audience that endures today. He also described an astonishing <https://johnjames.audubon.org/john-james-audubon-0> 25 new bird species, while two other species — <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/audubons-shearwater> Audubon’s shearwater and <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Audubons_Oriole/overview> Audubon’s oriole — bear his name. Surely, most of us might think, this is an entirely fitting honor for someone who did so much for our understanding of the environment.

<NB2IJWFLGJHV7KCKYJSTHB5AQY.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)

Yet science never exists in a vacuum, and Audubon’s story has a dark side — one that goes beyond his notable penchant for exaggeration and <https://bioone.org/journals/bulletin-of-the-british-ornithologists-club/volume-140/issue-2/bboc.v140i2.2020.a3/Audubons-Bird-of-Washington--unravelling-the-fraud-that-launched/10.25226/bboc.v140i2.2020.a3.full> scientific fakery. After the Battle of San Jacinto in 1836, when mostly White Texans <https://www.britannica.com/event/Battle-of-San-Jacinto-1836> defeated a Mexican army not far from present-day Houston, Audubon scoured the battlefield for the remains of Mexican soldiers. He <https://matthewhalley.wordpress.com/2020/06/16/the-literal-skeletons-in-the-closet-of-american-ornithology/> decapitated several bodies and sent the heads to Samuel George Morton, a notorious practitioner of phrenology, a pseudoscience that attempted to use skull dimensions to prove the superiority of White Europeans to other races. For Audubon, this might have been just another way of practicing science — but his actions hardly align with modern values, and his scientific contributions do not excuse him from judgment.

When we name an animal species after the person who first made it known to science, we are effectively honoring that person’s contribution. Unlike a name describing a bird’s color or habitat, there is nothing “natural” about honorific names: They imply a choice, and we can also choose not to honor the person whose name has been affixed to the species. <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bachmans_Sparrow/id> Bachman’s sparrow, <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Townsends_Warbler/overview> Townsend’s warbler, <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bendires_Thrasher/overview> Bendire’s thrasher, <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Hammonds_Flycatcher/overview> Hammond’s flycatcher, <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/McCowns_Longspur/id> McCown’s longspur — these are all examples of North American common bird names. For the bird community — ornithologists, bird-watchers, conservationists and more — these names are collectively referenced every day. For many, the esteem inherent in these names is unconsciously overlooked, and comfort lies in their familiarity.

Yet these honorific names — known as eponyms — also cast long, dark shadows over our beloved birds and represent colonialism, racism and inequality. It is long overdue that we acknowledge the problem of such names, and it is long overdue that we should change them.

<CLVXK5LGFBHTVIPW6YMWJI7YRY.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)

<https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/bachman-john/> The Rev. John Bachman was among those who <https://books.google.com/books?id=yY8FAAAAQAAJ&> argued vehemently against the abolition of slavery. “The negro,” he wrote, “is a striking and now permanent variety, like the numerous permanent varieties in domesticated animals,” adding that “his intellect, although underrated, is greatly inferior to that of the Caucasian, and that he is ... incapable of self-government.” John McCown <https://www.audubon.org/news/-bird-world-grappling-its-own-confederate-relic-mccowns-longspur> served as a general in the Confederate Army. <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/hammond-william-alexander/> William Alexander Hammond, once a surgeon general of the United States, asked U.S. soldiers to send him the bodies of indigenous people for comparative anatomy studies. <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/bendire-charles/> Charles Bendire fought in the Battle of Canyon Creek, among other violent attacks on indigenous peoples. <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/townsend-john-kirk/> John Kirk Townsend desecrated the graves of Native Americans and sent their skulls to Morton for his infamous cranial studies.

<SEZHS6H5TNHZPNIAZOBN7NU7VI.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)

These men were among countless others who contributed to the library of knowledge we now rely on. They were active during the peak of scientific collection efforts in North America, efforts that were made possible by colonialism. But the westward expansion of the United States came at an incalculable cost to the country’s original inhabitants and their descendants today. To justify the harmful effects of their colonial actions, Europeans and Americans invented theories of race and civilization that conveniently labeled themselves as superior to everyone else. These theories led directly to the racism that still plagues our country today, affecting our society in countless insidious ways.

The controversy over such names, which is now exciting passions within the bird community, mirrors similar conflicts over monuments to Confederates and colonialists now raging in the United States and elsewhere. Eponymous names serve as verbal statues: They are a memorial both to the colonial system that wove the fabric of systemic racism through every aspect of our lives — including the birds we see every day — and to the individuals who intentionally and directly perpetuated that system.

<XPH43PCUENBIJDHIMPBDLNA2DU.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)

By rejecting the colonial monument that eponyms represent, we can show that we value inclusion and diversity in our community, and that we acknowledge the intrinsic worth of wildlife. We cannot subjectively decide — especially if the adjudicators are White — that some names can be retained because they are associated with less abhorrent pasts than others. We must remove all eponymous names. The stench of colonialism has saturated each of its participants, and the honor inherent within their names must be revoked.

A bird’s beauty should not be marred by the baggage of an eponym. We could decide right now that the words we use matter, and that birds should carry their own history, not ours.

Read more:

<https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/18/what-rename-army-bases-that-honor-confederate-soldiers/?arc404=true> Ty Seidule: What to rename the Army bases that honor Confederate soldiers

<https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/15/my-experience-confederate-named-army-base-shows-why-we-need-rename-them-all-now/> Harry Anderson: My experience at a Confederate-named Army base shows why we need to rename them all — now

<https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/opinions/confederate-statues-monuments/> Christine Emba: Memorials to white supremacy are falling. What will replace them?

<https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/renaming-military-bases-is-not-erasing-history-its-erasing-propaganda/2020/06/16/884a81a0-aff6-11ea-8758-bfd1d045525a_story.html> David Von Drehle: Renaming military bases is not erasing history. It’s erasing propaganda.

<https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/trump-wont-remove-confederate-names-from-military-bases-so-congress-and-the-pentagon-should/2020/06/11/920624a6-ac09-11ea-94d2-d7bc43b26bf9_story.html> The Post’s View: Trump won’t remove Confederate names from military bases. So Congress and the Pentagon should.

<https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/07/robert-e-lee-is-my-ancestor-take-down-his-statue-let-his-cause-be-lost/> Robert W. Lee IV: Robert E. Lee is my ancestor. Take down his statue, and let his cause be lost.

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Larry D. Corridon

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Back to top
Date: 8/4/20 8:14 pm
From: Randy Wardle <wrwardle...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post
I am going to respectfully disagree with a number of you. I believe that those who have discovered new species and described them in detail for science deserve to have their name associated with those discoveries. Just because many decades later people decide to dislike the person for various reasons should not give them the right to rename the species in order to make themselves feel better.

Randy Wardle
Aptos
________________________________
From: Jeff Manker <fireweed8...>
Sent: Wednesday, August 5, 2020 1:42 AM
To: Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao...>
Cc: Arthur Macmillan <grrrrrrrrrr8...>; Jane Orbuch <jorbuch...>; Julia van der Wyk <juliavdw11...>; Liam Murphy <liammsf...>; MBB <mbbirds...>; Randy Wardle <wrwardle...>; larry corridon <larry961357...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post

I admire those of you who have commented in support of getting rid of the eponymous names. My first reaction was against it. I read the article (which I hope will not be the only or last word on the topic as I believe it deserves discussion) and I wanted to defend Audubon and all the others as I am used to those names and found things to admire about those early pioneers of American ornithology. My mind ran through all forms of defense and excuses, trying to find a way to hang on to my version of who I thought they were and wanted them to be. I had to come to the conclusion that every defense I could come up with was flawed and not excusable. I wondered what level of my own morality would I have to give up to defend these names?

Two things convinced me to accept that these names should be changed. The first were the last sentences of what Liam wrote, “ Plus, you have the added bonus of being actively anti-racist, and making birding more welcoming to our BIPoC brothers and sisters, thus creating even more advocates for bird ecosystem health and conservation. I am all for it.”

The second were the immortal words of William Shakespeare,
“What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.” Romeo and Juliet ca. 1600.

Of course, I am not in charge of making these changes, but after some mental struggle about giving up preconceived notions I have come down on the side of changing the names for the good of us all.

Here’s to the Black-headed Oriole and the White-browed Wren!

Jeff Manker

On Tue, Aug 4, 2020 at 5:55 PM Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao...><mailto:<chucao...>> wrote:

Arthur

The bad form was to name it after yourself. You can name a new species after anything you would like, but not yourself.

Alvaro



Alvaro Jaramillo

<alvaro...><mailto:<alvaro...>

www.alvarosadventures.com<http://www.alvarosadventures.com>



From: <mbbirds...><mailto:<mbbirds...> <mbbirds...><mailto:<mbbirds...>> On Behalf Of Arthur Macmillan
Sent: Tuesday, August 4, 2020 5:30 PM
To: Liam Murphy <liammsf...><mailto:<liammsf...>>
Cc: Julia van der Wyk <juliavdw11...><mailto:<juliavdw11...>>; larry corridon <larry961357...><mailto:<larry961357...>>; Randy Wardle <wrwardle...><mailto:<wrwardle...>>; Jane Orbuch <jorbuch...><mailto:<jorbuch...>>; MBB <mbbirds...><mailto:<mbbirds...>>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post



I think it has been considered "bad form" to name species after people's names for some time now. One additional pragmatic reason for using descriptive names is that I have noticed, at least with arthropods, species that are named after people often get renamed more often. It happens for a number of reasons. But a descriptive name is both more stable, and more instructive. This example with bird names may provide many more examples, in the end, of names that would have better been named with more objectivity.



And it does make sense for a birds name not to invoke bad feelings.



It would be strange, at first. But I like the idea!



On Tue, Aug 4, 2020 at 4:37 PM Liam Murphy <liammsf...><mailto:<liammsf...>> wrote:

I’ve seen this discussion on a number of forums lately. Descriptive common names for birds (whether by plumage trait or habitat) are just objectively better than honorific/eponymous names from a birding point of view. It would be SO much easier to mentally connect species with image/information, and to share knowledge with new birders and people interested in birds (no more “remember, Bewick’s Wren is the one with the white eyebrow and you can remember that because the word Bewick has a W in it and the word White starts with the letter W…” blah blah blah no thanks). I struggle to understand any argument against it. Plus, you have the added bonus of being actively anti-racist, and making birding more welcoming to our BIPoC brothers and sisters, thus creating even more advocates for bird ecosystem health and conservation. I am all for it.



Good (happy/safe/inclusive) birding all!

Liam



On Aug 4, 2020, at 1:30 PM, Julia van der Wyk <juliavdw11...><mailto:<juliavdw11...>> wrote:



Hello all,

I think who we honor and why is an important issue to consider. If renaming some birds will move us toward dismantling systemic racism in our culture, I am for it. It won’t solve the greater problem but if it helps, to me that is a yes. I appreciate the thought and discussion from the article.

It is definitely an uncomfortable thought process but like most, well worth examining in ourselves and with our peers. we will all have our own take on it. I am glad for this thread.



–Julia v.





On Aug 4, 2020, at 12:34 PM, larry corridon <larry961357...><mailto:<larry961357...>> wrote:



Thank you Jane for bringing this to our attention. It does shed light on a very different side of those researchers and educators from the past whose information we use and whose wisdom we respect. They have some very serious flaws (to say the least!)



However, I have several thoughts, mostly negative about the last paragraph of this article. To further comment on or discuss them in the MBB forum could turn it into a political platform that I don’t think would be appropriate or welcome to the members.



Also, I’m not sure how well I would do having to remember new names for many birds. I have enough trouble with the ones we have now!









On Aug 4, 2020, at 11:57, Randy Wardle <wrwardle...><mailto:<wrwardle...>> wrote:



Oh good grief!



Randy Wardle

Aptos



________________________________

From: <mbbirds...><mailto:<mbbirds...> <mbbirds...><mailto:<mbbirds...>> on behalf of Jane Orbuch <jorbuch...><mailto:<jorbuch...>>
Sent: Tuesday, August 4, 2020 5:42 PM
To: mbbirds <mbbirds...><mailto:<mbbirds...>>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post



Not sure I agree with all of the below—but definitely worth being aware of, thinking about and perhaps taking action on.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/08/04/american-bird-names-colonialism-audubon/?arc404=true&utm_campaign=wp_post_most&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_most

What Confederate statues and some American bird names have in common

By Gabriel Foley, Jordan Rutter

August 4, 2020

Gabriel Foley and Jordan Rutter are ornithologists and birders who created the website Bird Names for Birds<http://www.birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/>.

Few figures tower over the study of American nature like John James Audubon<https://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/john-james-audubon-drawn-from-nature/106/> — and small wonder. His “Birds of North America” was the first work to catalog most of the continent’s native species in vivid color, introducing them to a wide and enthusiastic audience that endures today. He also described an astonishing 25 new bird species<https://johnjames.audubon.org/john-james-audubon-0>, while two other species — Audubon’s shearwater<https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/audubons-shearwater> and Audubon’s oriole<https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Audubons_Oriole/overview> — bear his name. Surely, most of us might think, this is an entirely fitting honor for someone who did so much for our understanding of the environment.

<NB2IJWFLGJHV7KCKYJSTHB5AQY.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)

Yet science never exists in a vacuum, and Audubon’s story has a dark side — one that goes beyond his notable penchant for exaggeration and scientific fakery<https://bioone.org/journals/bulletin-of-the-british-ornithologists-club/volume-140/issue-2/bboc.v140i2.2020.a3/Audubons-Bird-of-Washington--unravelling-the-fraud-that-launched/10.25226/bboc.v140i2.2020.a3.full>. After the Battle of San Jacinto in 1836, when mostly White Texans defeated a Mexican army<https://www.britannica.com/event/Battle-of-San-Jacinto-1836> not far from present-day Houston, Audubon scoured the battlefield for the remains of Mexican soldiers. He decapitated several bodies<https://matthewhalley.wordpress.com/2020/06/16/the-literal-skeletons-in-the-closet-of-american-ornithology/> and sent the heads to Samuel George Morton, a notorious practitioner of phrenology, a pseudoscience that attempted to use skull dimensions to prove the superiority of White Europeans to other races. For Audubon, this might have been just another way of practicing science — but his actions hardly align with modern values, and his scientific contributions do not excuse him from judgment.

When we name an animal species after the person who first made it known to science, we are effectively honoring that person’s contribution. Unlike a name describing a bird’s color or habitat, there is nothing “natural” about honorific names: They imply a choice, and we can also choose not to honor the person whose name has been affixed to the species. Bachman’s sparrow<https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bachmans_Sparrow/id>, Townsend’s warbler<https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Townsends_Warbler/overview>, Bendire’s thrasher<https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bendires_Thrasher/overview>, Hammond’s flycatcher<https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Hammonds_Flycatcher/overview>, McCown’s longspur<https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/McCowns_Longspur/id> — these are all examples of North American common bird names. For the bird community — ornithologists, bird-watchers, conservationists and more — these names are collectively referenced every day. For many, the esteem inherent in these names is unconsciously overlooked, and comfort lies in their familiarity.

Yet these honorific names — known as eponyms — also cast long, dark shadows over our beloved birds and represent colonialism, racism and inequality. It is long overdue that we acknowledge the problem of such names, and it is long overdue that we should change them.

<CLVXK5LGFBHTVIPW6YMWJI7YRY.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)

The Rev. John Bachman<https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/bachman-john/> was among those who argued vehemently against<https://books.google.com/books?id=yY8FAAAAQAAJ&> the abolition of slavery. “The negro,” he wrote, “is a striking and now permanent variety, like the numerous permanent varieties in domesticated animals,” adding that “his intellect, although underrated, is greatly inferior to that of the Caucasian, and that he is ... incapable of self-government.” John McCownserved as a general<https://www.audubon.org/news/-bird-world-grappling-its-own-confederate-relic-mccowns-longspur> in the Confederate Army. William Alexander Hammond<https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/hammond-william-alexander/>, once a surgeon general of the United States, asked U.S. soldiers to send him the bodies of indigenous people for comparative anatomy studies. Charles Bendire<https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/bendire-charles/> fought in the Battle of Canyon Creek, among other violent attacks on indigenous peoples. John Kirk Townsend<https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/townsend-john-kirk/> desecrated the graves of Native Americans and sent their skulls to Morton for his infamous cranial studies.

<SEZHS6H5TNHZPNIAZOBN7NU7VI.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)

These men were among countless others who contributed to the library of knowledge we now rely on. They were active during the peak of scientific collection efforts in North America, efforts that were made possible by colonialism. But the westward expansion of the United States came at an incalculable cost to the country’s original inhabitants and their descendants today. To justify the harmful effects of their colonial actions, Europeans and Americans invented theories of race and civilization that conveniently labeled themselves as superior to everyone else. These theories led directly to the racism that still plagues our country today, affecting our society in countless insidious ways.

The controversy over such names, which is now exciting passions within the bird community, mirrors similar conflicts over monuments to Confederates and colonialists now raging in the United States and elsewhere. Eponymous names serve as verbal statues: They are a memorial both to the colonial system that wove the fabric of systemic racism through every aspect of our lives — including the birds we see every day — and to the individuals who intentionally and directly perpetuated that system.

<XPH43PCUENBIJDHIMPBDLNA2DU.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)

By rejecting the colonial monument that eponyms represent, we can show that we value inclusion and diversity in our community, and that we acknowledge the intrinsic worth of wildlife. We cannot subjectively decide — especially if the adjudicators are White — that some names can be retained because they are associated with less abhorrent pasts than others. We must remove all eponymous names. The stench of colonialism has saturated each of its participants, and the honor inherent within their names must be revoked.

A bird’s beauty should not be marred by the baggage of an eponym. We could decide right now that the words we use matter, and that birds should carry their own history, not ours.

Read more:

Ty Seidule: What to rename the Army bases that honor Confederate soldiers<https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/18/what-rename-army-bases-that-honor-confederate-soldiers/?arc404=true>

Harry Anderson: My experience at a Confederate-named Army base shows why we need to rename them all — now<https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/15/my-experience-confederate-named-army-base-shows-why-we-need-rename-them-all-now/>

Christine Emba: Memorials to white supremacy are falling. What will replace them?<https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/opinions/confederate-statues-monuments/>

David Von Drehle: Renaming military bases is not erasing history. It’s erasing propaganda.<https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/renaming-military-bases-is-not-erasing-history-its-erasing-propaganda/2020/06/16/884a81a0-aff6-11ea-8758-bfd1d045525a_story.html>

The Post’s View: Trump won’t remove Confederate names from military bases. So Congress and the Pentagon should.<https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/trump-wont-remove-confederate-names-from-military-bases-so-congress-and-the-pentagon-should/2020/06/11/920624a6-ac09-11ea-94d2-d7bc43b26bf9_story.html>

Robert W. Lee IV: Robert E. Lee is my ancestor. Take down his statue, and let his cause be lost.<https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/07/robert-e-lee-is-my-ancestor-take-down-his-statue-let-his-cause-be-lost/>

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<larry961357...><mailto:<larry961357...>











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Back to top
Date: 8/4/20 6:42 pm
From: Jeff Manker <fireweed8...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post
I admire those of you who have commented in support of getting rid of the
eponymous names. My first reaction was against it. I read the article
(which I hope will not be the only or last word on the topic as I believe
it deserves discussion) and I wanted to defend Audubon and all the others
as I am used to those names and found things to admire about those early
pioneers of American ornithology. My mind ran through all forms of defense
and excuses, trying to find a way to hang on to my version of who I thought
they were and wanted them to be. I had to come to the conclusion that every
defense I could come up with was flawed and not excusable. I wondered what
level of my own morality would I have to give up to defend these names?

Two things convinced me to accept that these names should be changed. The
first were the last sentences of what Liam wrote, “ Plus, you have the
added bonus of being actively anti-racist, and making birding more
welcoming to our BIPoC brothers and sisters, thus creating even more
advocates for bird ecosystem health and conservation. I am all for it.”

The second were the immortal words of William Shakespeare,
“What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell
as sweet.” Romeo and Juliet ca. 1600.

Of course, I am not in charge of making these changes, but after some
mental struggle about giving up preconceived notions I have come down on
the side of changing the names for the good of us all.

Here’s to the Black-headed Oriole and the White-browed Wren!

Jeff Manker

On Tue, Aug 4, 2020 at 5:55 PM Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao...>
wrote:

> Arthur
>
> The bad form was to name it after yourself. You can name a new species
> after anything you would like, but not yourself.
>
> Alvaro
>
>
>
> Alvaro Jaramillo
>
> <alvaro...>
>
> www.alvarosadventures.com
>
>
>
> *From:* <mbbirds...> <mbbirds...> *On Behalf Of
> *Arthur Macmillan
> *Sent:* Tuesday, August 4, 2020 5:30 PM
> *To:* Liam Murphy <liammsf...>
> *Cc:* Julia van der Wyk <juliavdw11...>; larry corridon <
> <larry961357...>; Randy Wardle <wrwardle...>; Jane
> Orbuch <jorbuch...>; MBB <mbbirds...>
> *Subject:* Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The
> Washington Post
>
>
>
> I think it has been considered "bad form" to name species after people's
> names for some time now. One additional pragmatic reason for using
> descriptive names is that I have noticed, at least with arthropods, species
> that are named after people often get renamed more often. It happens for a
> number of reasons. But a descriptive name is both more stable, and more
> instructive. This example with bird names may provide many more examples,
> in the end, of names that would have better been named with more
> objectivity.
>
>
>
> And it does make sense for a birds name not to invoke bad feelings.
>
>
>
> It would be strange, at first. But I like the idea!
>
>
>
> On Tue, Aug 4, 2020 at 4:37 PM Liam Murphy <liammsf...> wrote:
>
> I’ve seen this discussion on a number of forums lately. Descriptive
> common names for birds (whether by plumage trait or habitat) are just
> objectively better than honorific/eponymous names from a birding point of
> view. It would be SO much easier to mentally connect species with
> image/information, and to share knowledge with new birders and people
> interested in birds (no more “remember, Bewick’s Wren is the one with the
> white eyebrow and you can remember that because the word Bewick has a W in
> it and the word White starts with the letter W…” blah blah blah no
> thanks). I struggle to understand any argument against it. Plus, you have
> the added bonus of being actively anti-racist, and making birding more
> welcoming to our BIPoC brothers and sisters, thus creating even more
> advocates for bird ecosystem health and conservation. I am all for it.
>
>
>
> Good (happy/safe/inclusive) birding all!
>
> Liam
>
>
>
> On Aug 4, 2020, at 1:30 PM, Julia van der Wyk <juliavdw11...>
> wrote:
>
>
>
> Hello all,
>
> I think who we honor and why is an important issue to consider. If
> renaming some birds will move us toward dismantling systemic racism in our
> culture, I am for it. It won’t solve the greater problem but if it helps,
> to me that is a yes. I appreciate the thought and discussion from the
> article.
>
> It is definitely an uncomfortable thought process but like most, well
> worth examining in ourselves and with our peers. we will all have our own
> take on it. I am glad for this thread.
>
>
>
> –Julia v.
>
>
>
>
>
> On Aug 4, 2020, at 12:34 PM, larry corridon <larry961357...>
> wrote:
>
>
>
> Thank you Jane for bringing this to our attention. It does shed light on a
> very different side of those researchers and educators from the past whose
> information we use and whose wisdom we respect. They have some very serious
> flaws (to say the least!)
>
>
>
> However, I have several thoughts, mostly negative about the last
> paragraph of this article. To further comment on or discuss them in the MBB
> forum could turn it into a political platform that I don’t think would be
> appropriate or welcome to the members.
>
>
>
> Also, I’m not sure how well I would do having to remember new names for
> many birds. I have enough trouble with the ones we have now!
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Aug 4, 2020, at 11:57, Randy Wardle <wrwardle...> wrote:
>
>
>
> Oh good grief!
>
>
>
> Randy Wardle
>
> Aptos
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> *From:* <mbbirds...> <mbbirds...> on behalf of
> Jane Orbuch <jorbuch...>
> *Sent:* Tuesday, August 4, 2020 5:42 PM
> *To:* mbbirds <mbbirds...>
> *Subject:* [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The
> Washington Post
>
>
>
> Not sure I agree with all of the below—but definitely worth being aware
> of, thinking about and perhaps taking action on.
>
>
>
> https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/08/04/american-bird-names-colonialism-audubon/?arc404=true&utm_campaign=wp_post_most&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_most
> What Confederate statues and some American bird names have in common
>
> By Gabriel Foley, Jordan Rutter
>
> August 4, 2020
>
> *Gabriel Foley and Jordan Rutter are ornithologists and birders who
> created the website **Bird Names for Birds*
> <http://www.birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/>*.*
>
> Few figures tower over the study of American nature like John James
> Audubon
> <https://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/john-james-audubon-drawn-from-nature/106/>
> and small wonder. His “Birds of North America” was the first work to
> catalog most of the continent’s native species in vivid color, introducing
> them to a wide and enthusiastic audience that endures today. He also
> described an astonishing 25 new bird species
> <https://johnjames.audubon.org/john-james-audubon-0>, while two other
> species — Audubon’s shearwater
> <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/audubons-shearwater> and Audubon’s
> oriole <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Audubons_Oriole/overview>
> bear his name. Surely, most of us might think, this is an entirely fitting
> honor for someone who did so much for our understanding of the environment.
>
> <NB2IJWFLGJHV7KCKYJSTHB5AQY.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
>
> Yet science never exists in a vacuum, and Audubon’s story has a dark side
> — one that goes beyond his notable penchant for exaggeration and scientific
> fakery
> <https://bioone.org/journals/bulletin-of-the-british-ornithologists-club/volume-140/issue-2/bboc.v140i2.2020.a3/Audubons-Bird-of-Washington--unravelling-the-fraud-that-launched/10.25226/bboc.v140i2.2020.a3.full>.
> After the Battle of San Jacinto in 1836, when mostly White Texans defeated
> a Mexican army
> <https://www.britannica.com/event/Battle-of-San-Jacinto-1836> not far
> from present-day Houston, Audubon scoured the battlefield for the remains
> of Mexican soldiers. He decapitated several bodies
> <https://matthewhalley.wordpress.com/2020/06/16/the-literal-skeletons-in-the-closet-of-american-ornithology/> and
> sent the heads to Samuel George Morton, a notorious practitioner of
> phrenology, a pseudoscience that attempted to use skull dimensions to prove
> the superiority of White Europeans to other races. For Audubon, this might
> have been just another way of practicing science — but his actions hardly
> align with modern values, and his scientific contributions do not excuse
> him from judgment.
>
> When we name an animal species after the person who first made it known to
> science, we are effectively honoring that person’s contribution. Unlike a
> name describing a bird’s color or habitat, there is nothing “natural” about
> honorific names: They imply a choice, and we can also choose not to honor
> the person whose name has been affixed to the species. Bachman’s sparrow
> <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bachmans_Sparrow/id>, Townsend’s
> warbler <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Townsends_Warbler/overview>, Bendire’s
> thrasher <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bendires_Thrasher/overview>
> , Hammond’s flycatcher
> <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Hammonds_Flycatcher/overview>, McCown’s
> longspur <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/McCowns_Longspur/id>
> these are all examples of North American common bird names. For the bird
> community — ornithologists, bird-watchers, conservationists and more —
> these names are collectively referenced every day. For many, the esteem
> inherent in these names is unconsciously overlooked, and comfort lies in
> their familiarity.
>
> Yet these honorific names — known as eponyms — also cast long, dark
> shadows over our beloved birds and represent colonialism, racism and
> inequality. It is long overdue that we acknowledge the problem of such
> names, and it is long overdue that we should change them.
>
> <CLVXK5LGFBHTVIPW6YMWJI7YRY.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
>
> The Rev. John Bachman
> <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/bachman-john/> was
> among those who argued vehemently against
> <https://books.google.com/books?id=yY8FAAAAQAAJ&> the abolition of
> slavery. “The negro,” he wrote, “is a striking and now permanent variety,
> like the numerous permanent varieties in domesticated animals,” adding that
> “his intellect, although underrated, is greatly inferior to that of the
> Caucasian, and that he is ... incapable of self-government.” John McCownserved
> as a general
> <https://www.audubon.org/news/-bird-world-grappling-its-own-confederate-relic-mccowns-longspur> in
> the Confederate Army. William Alexander Hammond
> <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/hammond-william-alexander/>,
> once a surgeon general of the United States, asked U.S. soldiers to send
> him the bodies of indigenous people for comparative anatomy studies. Charles
> Bendire
> <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/bendire-charles/> fought
> in the Battle of Canyon Creek, among other violent attacks on indigenous
> peoples. John Kirk Townsend
> <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/townsend-john-kirk/> desecrated
> the graves of Native Americans and sent their skulls to Morton for his
> infamous cranial studies.
>
> <SEZHS6H5TNHZPNIAZOBN7NU7VI.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
>
> These men were among countless others who contributed to the library of
> knowledge we now rely on. They were active during the peak of scientific
> collection efforts in North America, efforts that were made possible by
> colonialism. But the westward expansion of the United States came at an
> incalculable cost to the country’s original inhabitants and their
> descendants today. To justify the harmful effects of their colonial
> actions, Europeans and Americans invented theories of race and civilization
> that conveniently labeled themselves as superior to everyone else. These
> theories led directly to the racism that still plagues our country today,
> affecting our society in countless insidious ways.
>
> The controversy over such names, which is now exciting passions within the
> bird community, mirrors similar conflicts over monuments to Confederates
> and colonialists now raging in the United States and elsewhere. Eponymous
> names serve as verbal statues: They are a memorial both to the colonial
> system that wove the fabric of systemic racism through every aspect of our
> lives — including the birds we see every day — and to the individuals who
> intentionally and directly perpetuated that system.
>
> <XPH43PCUENBIJDHIMPBDLNA2DU.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
>
> By rejecting the colonial monument that eponyms represent, we can show
> that we value inclusion and diversity in our community, and that we
> acknowledge the intrinsic worth of wildlife. We cannot subjectively decide
> — *especially* if the adjudicators are White — that some names can be
> retained because they are associated with less abhorrent pasts than others.
> We must remove all eponymous names. The stench of colonialism has saturated
> each of its participants, and the honor inherent within their names must be
> revoked.
>
> A bird’s beauty should not be marred by the baggage of an eponym. We could
> decide right now that the words we use matter, and that birds should carry
> their own history, not ours.
>
> *Read more*:
>
> Ty Seidule: What to rename the Army bases that honor Confederate soldiers
> <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/18/what-rename-army-bases-that-honor-confederate-soldiers/?arc404=true>
>
> Harry Anderson: My experience at a Confederate-named Army base shows why
> we need to rename them all — now
> <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/15/my-experience-confederate-named-army-base-shows-why-we-need-rename-them-all-now/>
>
> Christine Emba: Memorials to white supremacy are falling. What will
> replace them?
> <https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/opinions/confederate-statues-monuments/>
>
> David Von Drehle: Renaming military bases is not erasing history. It’s
> erasing propaganda.
> <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/renaming-military-bases-is-not-erasing-history-its-erasing-propaganda/2020/06/16/884a81a0-aff6-11ea-8758-bfd1d045525a_story.html>
>
> The Post’s View: Trump won’t remove Confederate names from military bases.
> So Congress and the Pentagon should.
> <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/trump-wont-remove-confederate-names-from-military-bases-so-congress-and-the-pentagon-should/2020/06/11/920624a6-ac09-11ea-94d2-d7bc43b26bf9_story.html>
>
> Robert W. Lee IV: Robert E. Lee is my ancestor. Take down his statue, and
> let his cause be lost.
> <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/07/robert-e-lee-is-my-ancestor-take-down-his-statue-let-his-cause-be-lost/>
>
> --
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> .
>
>
>
> Larry D. Corridon
>
> <larry961357...>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
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> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
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> .
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> .
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> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
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> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
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Back to top
Date: 8/4/20 6:38 pm
From: Arthur Macmillan <grrrrrrrrrr8...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post
Alvaro,
Thanks for correcting me on that! Now that you mention it, it does
always seem to involve using the name of someone that the discoverer has
admired. Yet, in a way, that seems to make it worse! Naming a species
after someone who may never even have seen it! Instead of adding
information about the species, it places it in a misleading context!
Maybe even in the wrong time or place. I can see how it might be
satisfying to honor someone in that way. But I, personally think it does
not make things better for future generations of naturalists.

-Mac





On Tue, Aug 4, 2020 at 5:55 PM Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao...>
wrote:

> Arthur
>
> The bad form was to name it after yourself. You can name a new species
> after anything you would like, but not yourself.
>
> Alvaro
>
>
>
> Alvaro Jaramillo
>
> <alvaro...>
>
> www.alvarosadventures.com
>
>
>
> *From:* <mbbirds...> <mbbirds...> *On Behalf Of
> *Arthur Macmillan
> *Sent:* Tuesday, August 4, 2020 5:30 PM
> *To:* Liam Murphy <liammsf...>
> *Cc:* Julia van der Wyk <juliavdw11...>; larry corridon <
> <larry961357...>; Randy Wardle <wrwardle...>; Jane
> Orbuch <jorbuch...>; MBB <mbbirds...>
> *Subject:* Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The
> Washington Post
>
>
>
> I think it has been considered "bad form" to name species after people's
> names for some time now. One additional pragmatic reason for using
> descriptive names is that I have noticed, at least with arthropods, species
> that are named after people often get renamed more often. It happens for a
> number of reasons. But a descriptive name is both more stable, and more
> instructive. This example with bird names may provide many more examples,
> in the end, of names that would have better been named with more
> objectivity.
>
>
>
> And it does make sense for a birds name not to invoke bad feelings.
>
>
>
> It would be strange, at first. But I like the idea!
>
>
>
> On Tue, Aug 4, 2020 at 4:37 PM Liam Murphy <liammsf...> wrote:
>
> I’ve seen this discussion on a number of forums lately. Descriptive
> common names for birds (whether by plumage trait or habitat) are just
> objectively better than honorific/eponymous names from a birding point of
> view. It would be SO much easier to mentally connect species with
> image/information, and to share knowledge with new birders and people
> interested in birds (no more “remember, Bewick’s Wren is the one with the
> white eyebrow and you can remember that because the word Bewick has a W in
> it and the word White starts with the letter W…” blah blah blah no
> thanks). I struggle to understand any argument against it. Plus, you have
> the added bonus of being actively anti-racist, and making birding more
> welcoming to our BIPoC brothers and sisters, thus creating even more
> advocates for bird ecosystem health and conservation. I am all for it.
>
>
>
> Good (happy/safe/inclusive) birding all!
>
> Liam
>
>
>
> On Aug 4, 2020, at 1:30 PM, Julia van der Wyk <juliavdw11...>
> wrote:
>
>
>
> Hello all,
>
> I think who we honor and why is an important issue to consider. If
> renaming some birds will move us toward dismantling systemic racism in our
> culture, I am for it. It won’t solve the greater problem but if it helps,
> to me that is a yes. I appreciate the thought and discussion from the
> article.
>
> It is definitely an uncomfortable thought process but like most, well
> worth examining in ourselves and with our peers. we will all have our own
> take on it. I am glad for this thread.
>
>
>
> –Julia v.
>
>
>
>
>
> On Aug 4, 2020, at 12:34 PM, larry corridon <larry961357...>
> wrote:
>
>
>
> Thank you Jane for bringing this to our attention. It does shed light on a
> very different side of those researchers and educators from the past whose
> information we use and whose wisdom we respect. They have some very serious
> flaws (to say the least!)
>
>
>
> However, I have several thoughts, mostly negative about the last
> paragraph of this article. To further comment on or discuss them in the MBB
> forum could turn it into a political platform that I don’t think would be
> appropriate or welcome to the members.
>
>
>
> Also, I’m not sure how well I would do having to remember new names for
> many birds. I have enough trouble with the ones we have now!
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Aug 4, 2020, at 11:57, Randy Wardle <wrwardle...> wrote:
>
>
>
> Oh good grief!
>
>
>
> Randy Wardle
>
> Aptos
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> *From:* <mbbirds...> <mbbirds...> on behalf of
> Jane Orbuch <jorbuch...>
> *Sent:* Tuesday, August 4, 2020 5:42 PM
> *To:* mbbirds <mbbirds...>
> *Subject:* [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The
> Washington Post
>
>
>
> Not sure I agree with all of the below—but definitely worth being aware
> of, thinking about and perhaps taking action on.
>
>
>
> https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/08/04/american-bird-names-colonialism-audubon/?arc404=true&utm_campaign=wp_post_most&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_most
> What Confederate statues and some American bird names have in common
>
> By Gabriel Foley, Jordan Rutter
>
> August 4, 2020
>
> *Gabriel Foley and Jordan Rutter are ornithologists and birders who
> created the website **Bird Names for Birds*
> <http://www.birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/>*.*
>
> Few figures tower over the study of American nature like John James
> Audubon
> <https://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/john-james-audubon-drawn-from-nature/106/>
> and small wonder. His “Birds of North America” was the first work to
> catalog most of the continent’s native species in vivid color, introducing
> them to a wide and enthusiastic audience that endures today. He also
> described an astonishing 25 new bird species
> <https://johnjames.audubon.org/john-james-audubon-0>, while two other
> species — Audubon’s shearwater
> <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/audubons-shearwater> and Audubon’s
> oriole <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Audubons_Oriole/overview>
> bear his name. Surely, most of us might think, this is an entirely fitting
> honor for someone who did so much for our understanding of the environment.
>
> <NB2IJWFLGJHV7KCKYJSTHB5AQY.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
>
> Yet science never exists in a vacuum, and Audubon’s story has a dark side
> — one that goes beyond his notable penchant for exaggeration and scientific
> fakery
> <https://bioone.org/journals/bulletin-of-the-british-ornithologists-club/volume-140/issue-2/bboc.v140i2.2020.a3/Audubons-Bird-of-Washington--unravelling-the-fraud-that-launched/10.25226/bboc.v140i2.2020.a3.full>.
> After the Battle of San Jacinto in 1836, when mostly White Texans defeated
> a Mexican army
> <https://www.britannica.com/event/Battle-of-San-Jacinto-1836> not far
> from present-day Houston, Audubon scoured the battlefield for the remains
> of Mexican soldiers. He decapitated several bodies
> <https://matthewhalley.wordpress.com/2020/06/16/the-literal-skeletons-in-the-closet-of-american-ornithology/> and
> sent the heads to Samuel George Morton, a notorious practitioner of
> phrenology, a pseudoscience that attempted to use skull dimensions to prove
> the superiority of White Europeans to other races. For Audubon, this might
> have been just another way of practicing science — but his actions hardly
> align with modern values, and his scientific contributions do not excuse
> him from judgment.
>
> When we name an animal species after the person who first made it known to
> science, we are effectively honoring that person’s contribution. Unlike a
> name describing a bird’s color or habitat, there is nothing “natural” about
> honorific names: They imply a choice, and we can also choose not to honor
> the person whose name has been affixed to the species. Bachman’s sparrow
> <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bachmans_Sparrow/id>, Townsend’s
> warbler <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Townsends_Warbler/overview>, Bendire’s
> thrasher <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bendires_Thrasher/overview>
> , Hammond’s flycatcher
> <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Hammonds_Flycatcher/overview>, McCown’s
> longspur <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/McCowns_Longspur/id>
> these are all examples of North American common bird names. For the bird
> community — ornithologists, bird-watchers, conservationists and more —
> these names are collectively referenced every day. For many, the esteem
> inherent in these names is unconsciously overlooked, and comfort lies in
> their familiarity.
>
> Yet these honorific names — known as eponyms — also cast long, dark
> shadows over our beloved birds and represent colonialism, racism and
> inequality. It is long overdue that we acknowledge the problem of such
> names, and it is long overdue that we should change them.
>
> <CLVXK5LGFBHTVIPW6YMWJI7YRY.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
>
> The Rev. John Bachman
> <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/bachman-john/> was
> among those who argued vehemently against
> <https://books.google.com/books?id=yY8FAAAAQAAJ&> the abolition of
> slavery. “The negro,” he wrote, “is a striking and now permanent variety,
> like the numerous permanent varieties in domesticated animals,” adding that
> “his intellect, although underrated, is greatly inferior to that of the
> Caucasian, and that he is ... incapable of self-government.” John McCownserved
> as a general
> <https://www.audubon.org/news/-bird-world-grappling-its-own-confederate-relic-mccowns-longspur> in
> the Confederate Army. William Alexander Hammond
> <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/hammond-william-alexander/>,
> once a surgeon general of the United States, asked U.S. soldiers to send
> him the bodies of indigenous people for comparative anatomy studies. Charles
> Bendire
> <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/bendire-charles/> fought
> in the Battle of Canyon Creek, among other violent attacks on indigenous
> peoples. John Kirk Townsend
> <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/townsend-john-kirk/> desecrated
> the graves of Native Americans and sent their skulls to Morton for his
> infamous cranial studies.
>
> <SEZHS6H5TNHZPNIAZOBN7NU7VI.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
>
> These men were among countless others who contributed to the library of
> knowledge we now rely on. They were active during the peak of scientific
> collection efforts in North America, efforts that were made possible by
> colonialism. But the westward expansion of the United States came at an
> incalculable cost to the country’s original inhabitants and their
> descendants today. To justify the harmful effects of their colonial
> actions, Europeans and Americans invented theories of race and civilization
> that conveniently labeled themselves as superior to everyone else. These
> theories led directly to the racism that still plagues our country today,
> affecting our society in countless insidious ways.
>
> The controversy over such names, which is now exciting passions within the
> bird community, mirrors similar conflicts over monuments to Confederates
> and colonialists now raging in the United States and elsewhere. Eponymous
> names serve as verbal statues: They are a memorial both to the colonial
> system that wove the fabric of systemic racism through every aspect of our
> lives — including the birds we see every day — and to the individuals who
> intentionally and directly perpetuated that system.
>
> <XPH43PCUENBIJDHIMPBDLNA2DU.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
>
> By rejecting the colonial monument that eponyms represent, we can show
> that we value inclusion and diversity in our community, and that we
> acknowledge the intrinsic worth of wildlife. We cannot subjectively decide
> — *especially* if the adjudicators are White — that some names can be
> retained because they are associated with less abhorrent pasts than others.
> We must remove all eponymous names. The stench of colonialism has saturated
> each of its participants, and the honor inherent within their names must be
> revoked.
>
> A bird’s beauty should not be marred by the baggage of an eponym. We could
> decide right now that the words we use matter, and that birds should carry
> their own history, not ours.
>
> *Read more*:
>
> Ty Seidule: What to rename the Army bases that honor Confederate soldiers
> <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/18/what-rename-army-bases-that-honor-confederate-soldiers/?arc404=true>
>
> Harry Anderson: My experience at a Confederate-named Army base shows why
> we need to rename them all — now
> <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/15/my-experience-confederate-named-army-base-shows-why-we-need-rename-them-all-now/>
>
> Christine Emba: Memorials to white supremacy are falling. What will
> replace them?
> <https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/opinions/confederate-statues-monuments/>
>
> David Von Drehle: Renaming military bases is not erasing history. It’s
> erasing propaganda.
> <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/renaming-military-bases-is-not-erasing-history-its-erasing-propaganda/2020/06/16/884a81a0-aff6-11ea-8758-bfd1d045525a_story.html>
>
> The Post’s View: Trump won’t remove Confederate names from military bases.
> So Congress and the Pentagon should.
> <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/trump-wont-remove-confederate-names-from-military-bases-so-congress-and-the-pentagon-should/2020/06/11/920624a6-ac09-11ea-94d2-d7bc43b26bf9_story.html>
>
> Robert W. Lee IV: Robert E. Lee is my ancestor. Take down his statue, and
> let his cause be lost.
> <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/07/robert-e-lee-is-my-ancestor-take-down-his-statue-let-his-cause-be-lost/>
>
> --
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> .
>
>
>
> Larry D. Corridon
>
> <larry961357...>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
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Back to top
Date: 8/4/20 5:56 pm
From: Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao...>
Subject: RE: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post
Arthur

The bad form was to name it after yourself. You can name a new species after anything you would like, but not yourself.

Alvaro



Alvaro Jaramillo

<mailto:<alvaro...> <alvaro...>

www.alvarosadventures.com



From: <mbbirds...> <mbbirds...> On Behalf Of Arthur Macmillan
Sent: Tuesday, August 4, 2020 5:30 PM
To: Liam Murphy <liammsf...>
Cc: Julia van der Wyk <juliavdw11...>; larry corridon <larry961357...>; Randy Wardle <wrwardle...>; Jane Orbuch <jorbuch...>; MBB <mbbirds...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post



I think it has been considered "bad form" to name species after people's names for some time now. One additional pragmatic reason for using descriptive names is that I have noticed, at least with arthropods, species that are named after people often get renamed more often. It happens for a number of reasons. But a descriptive name is both more stable, and more instructive. This example with bird names may provide many more examples, in the end, of names that would have better been named with more objectivity.



And it does make sense for a birds name not to invoke bad feelings.



It would be strange, at first. But I like the idea!



On Tue, Aug 4, 2020 at 4:37 PM Liam Murphy <liammsf...> <mailto:<liammsf...> > wrote:

I’ve seen this discussion on a number of forums lately. Descriptive common names for birds (whether by plumage trait or habitat) are just objectively better than honorific/eponymous names from a birding point of view. It would be SO much easier to mentally connect species with image/information, and to share knowledge with new birders and people interested in birds (no more “remember, Bewick’s Wren is the one with the white eyebrow and you can remember that because the word Bewick has a W in it and the word White starts with the letter W…” blah blah blah no thanks). I struggle to understand any argument against it. Plus, you have the added bonus of being actively anti-racist, and making birding more welcoming to our BIPoC brothers and sisters, thus creating even more advocates for bird ecosystem health and conservation. I am all for it.



Good (happy/safe/inclusive) birding all!

Liam





On Aug 4, 2020, at 1:30 PM, Julia van der Wyk <juliavdw11...> <mailto:<juliavdw11...> > wrote:



Hello all,

I think who we honor and why is an important issue to consider. If renaming some birds will move us toward dismantling systemic racism in our culture, I am for it. It won’t solve the greater problem but if it helps, to me that is a yes. I appreciate the thought and discussion from the article.

It is definitely an uncomfortable thought process but like most, well worth examining in ourselves and with our peers. we will all have our own take on it. I am glad for this thread.



–Julia v.







On Aug 4, 2020, at 12:34 PM, larry corridon <larry961357...> <mailto:<larry961357...> > wrote:



Thank you Jane for bringing this to our attention. It does shed light on a very different side of those researchers and educators from the past whose information we use and whose wisdom we respect. They have some very serious flaws (to say the least!)



However, I have several thoughts, mostly negative about the last paragraph of this article. To further comment on or discuss them in the MBB forum could turn it into a political platform that I don’t think would be appropriate or welcome to the members.



Also, I’m not sure how well I would do having to remember new names for many birds. I have enough trouble with the ones we have now!











On Aug 4, 2020, at 11:57, Randy Wardle <wrwardle...> <mailto:<wrwardle...> > wrote:



Oh good grief!



Randy Wardle

Aptos




_____


From: <mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...> <mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...> > on behalf of Jane Orbuch <jorbuch...> <mailto:<jorbuch...> >
Sent: Tuesday, August 4, 2020 5:42 PM
To: mbbirds <mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...> >
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post



Not sure I agree with all of the below—but definitely worth being aware of, thinking about and perhaps taking action on.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/08/04/american-bird-names-colonialism-audubon/?arc404=true <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/08/04/american-bird-names-colonialism-audubon/?arc404=true&utm_campaign=wp_post_most&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_most> &utm_campaign=wp_post_most&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_most


What Confederate statues and some American bird names have in common


By Gabriel Foley, Jordan Rutter

August 4, 2020

Gabriel Foley and Jordan Rutter are ornithologists and birders who created the website <http://www.birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/> Bird Names for Birds.

Few figures tower over the study of American nature like <https://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/john-james-audubon-drawn-from-nature/106/> John James Audubon — and small wonder. His “Birds of North America” was the first work to catalog most of the continent’s native species in vivid color, introducing them to a wide and enthusiastic audience that endures today. He also described an astonishing <https://johnjames.audubon.org/john-james-audubon-0> 25 new bird species, while two other species — <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/audubons-shearwater> Audubon’s shearwater and <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Audubons_Oriole/overview> Audubon’s oriole — bear his name. Surely, most of us might think, this is an entirely fitting honor for someone who did so much for our understanding of the environment.

<NB2IJWFLGJHV7KCKYJSTHB5AQY.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)

Yet science never exists in a vacuum, and Audubon’s story has a dark side — one that goes beyond his notable penchant for exaggeration and <https://bioone.org/journals/bulletin-of-the-british-ornithologists-club/volume-140/issue-2/bboc.v140i2.2020.a3/Audubons-Bird-of-Washington--unravelling-the-fraud-that-launched/10.25226/bboc.v140i2.2020.a3.full> scientific fakery. After the Battle of San Jacinto in 1836, when mostly White Texans <https://www.britannica.com/event/Battle-of-San-Jacinto-1836> defeated a Mexican army not far from present-day Houston, Audubon scoured the battlefield for the remains of Mexican soldiers. He <https://matthewhalley.wordpress.com/2020/06/16/the-literal-skeletons-in-the-closet-of-american-ornithology/> decapitated several bodies and sent the heads to Samuel George Morton, a notorious practitioner of phrenology, a pseudoscience that attempted to use skull dimensions to prove the superiority of White Europeans to other races. For Audubon, this might have been just another way of practicing science — but his actions hardly align with modern values, and his scientific contributions do not excuse him from judgment.

When we name an animal species after the person who first made it known to science, we are effectively honoring that person’s contribution. Unlike a name describing a bird’s color or habitat, there is nothing “natural” about honorific names: They imply a choice, and we can also choose not to honor the person whose name has been affixed to the species. <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bachmans_Sparrow/id> Bachman’s sparrow, <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Townsends_Warbler/overview> Townsend’s warbler, <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bendires_Thrasher/overview> Bendire’s thrasher, <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Hammonds_Flycatcher/overview> Hammond’s flycatcher, <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/McCowns_Longspur/id> McCown’s longspur — these are all examples of North American common bird names. For the bird community — ornithologists, bird-watchers, conservationists and more — these names are collectively referenced every day. For many, the esteem inherent in these names is unconsciously overlooked, and comfort lies in their familiarity.

Yet these honorific names — known as eponyms — also cast long, dark shadows over our beloved birds and represent colonialism, racism and inequality. It is long overdue that we acknowledge the problem of such names, and it is long overdue that we should change them.

<CLVXK5LGFBHTVIPW6YMWJI7YRY.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)

<https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/bachman-john/> The Rev. John Bachman was among those who <https://books.google.com/books?id=yY8FAAAAQAAJ&> argued vehemently against the abolition of slavery. “The negro,” he wrote, “is a striking and now permanent variety, like the numerous permanent varieties in domesticated animals,” adding that “his intellect, although underrated, is greatly inferior to that of the Caucasian, and that he is ... incapable of self-government.” John McCown <https://www.audubon.org/news/-bird-world-grappling-its-own-confederate-relic-mccowns-longspur> served as a general in the Confederate Army. <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/hammond-william-alexander/> William Alexander Hammond, once a surgeon general of the United States, asked U.S. soldiers to send him the bodies of indigenous people for comparative anatomy studies. <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/bendire-charles/> Charles Bendire fought in the Battle of Canyon Creek, among other violent attacks on indigenous peoples. <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/townsend-john-kirk/> John Kirk Townsend desecrated the graves of Native Americans and sent their skulls to Morton for his infamous cranial studies.

<SEZHS6H5TNHZPNIAZOBN7NU7VI.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)

These men were among countless others who contributed to the library of knowledge we now rely on. They were active during the peak of scientific collection efforts in North America, efforts that were made possible by colonialism. But the westward expansion of the United States came at an incalculable cost to the country’s original inhabitants and their descendants today. To justify the harmful effects of their colonial actions, Europeans and Americans invented theories of race and civilization that conveniently labeled themselves as superior to everyone else. These theories led directly to the racism that still plagues our country today, affecting our society in countless insidious ways.

The controversy over such names, which is now exciting passions within the bird community, mirrors similar conflicts over monuments to Confederates and colonialists now raging in the United States and elsewhere. Eponymous names serve as verbal statues: They are a memorial both to the colonial system that wove the fabric of systemic racism through every aspect of our lives — including the birds we see every day — and to the individuals who intentionally and directly perpetuated that system.

<XPH43PCUENBIJDHIMPBDLNA2DU.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)

By rejecting the colonial monument that eponyms represent, we can show that we value inclusion and diversity in our community, and that we acknowledge the intrinsic worth of wildlife. We cannot subjectively decide — especially if the adjudicators are White — that some names can be retained because they are associated with less abhorrent pasts than others. We must remove all eponymous names. The stench of colonialism has saturated each of its participants, and the honor inherent within their names must be revoked.

A bird’s beauty should not be marred by the baggage of an eponym. We could decide right now that the words we use matter, and that birds should carry their own history, not ours.

Read more:

<https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/18/what-rename-army-bases-that-honor-confederate-soldiers/?arc404=true> Ty Seidule: What to rename the Army bases that honor Confederate soldiers

<https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/15/my-experience-confederate-named-army-base-shows-why-we-need-rename-them-all-now/> Harry Anderson: My experience at a Confederate-named Army base shows why we need to rename them all — now

<https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/opinions/confederate-statues-monuments/> Christine Emba: Memorials to white supremacy are falling. What will replace them?

<https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/renaming-military-bases-is-not-erasing-history-its-erasing-propaganda/2020/06/16/884a81a0-aff6-11ea-8758-bfd1d045525a_story.html> David Von Drehle: Renaming military bases is not erasing history. It’s erasing propaganda.

<https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/trump-wont-remove-confederate-names-from-military-bases-so-congress-and-the-pentagon-should/2020/06/11/920624a6-ac09-11ea-94d2-d7bc43b26bf9_story.html> The Post’s View: Trump won’t remove Confederate names from military bases. So Congress and the Pentagon should.

<https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/07/robert-e-lee-is-my-ancestor-take-down-his-statue-let-his-cause-be-lost/> Robert W. Lee IV: Robert E. Lee is my ancestor. Take down his statue, and let his cause be lost.

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Larry D. Corridon

<larry961357...> <mailto:<larry961357...>











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Back to top
Date: 8/4/20 5:30 pm
From: Arthur Macmillan <grrrrrrrrrr8...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post
I think it has been considered "bad form" to name species after people's
names for some time now. One additional pragmatic reason for using
descriptive names is that I have noticed, at least with arthropods, species
that are named after people often get renamed more often. It happens for a
number of reasons. But a descriptive name is both more stable, and more
instructive. This example with bird names may provide many more examples,
in the end, of names that would have better been named with more
objectivity.

And it does make sense for a birds name not to invoke bad feelings.

It would be strange, at first. But I like the idea!

On Tue, Aug 4, 2020 at 4:37 PM Liam Murphy <liammsf...> wrote:

> I’ve seen this discussion on a number of forums lately. Descriptive
> common names for birds (whether by plumage trait or habitat) are just
> objectively better than honorific/eponymous names from a birding point of
> view. It would be SO much easier to mentally connect species with
> image/information, and to share knowledge with new birders and people
> interested in birds (no more “remember, Bewick’s Wren is the one with the
> white eyebrow and you can remember that because the word Bewick has a W in
> it and the word White starts with the letter W…” blah blah blah no
> thanks). I struggle to understand any argument against it. Plus, you have
> the added bonus of being actively anti-racist, and making birding more
> welcoming to our BIPoC brothers and sisters, thus creating even more
> advocates for bird ecosystem health and conservation. I am all for it.
>
> Good (happy/safe/inclusive) birding all!
> Liam
>
> On Aug 4, 2020, at 1:30 PM, Julia van der Wyk <juliavdw11...>
> wrote:
>
> Hello all,
> I think who we honor and why is an important issue to consider. If
> renaming some birds will move us toward dismantling systemic racism in our
> culture, I am for it. It won’t solve the greater problem but if it helps,
> to me that is a yes. I appreciate the thought and discussion from the
> article.
> It is definitely an uncomfortable thought process but like most, well
> worth examining in ourselves and with our peers. we will all have our own
> take on it. I am glad for this thread.
>
> –Julia v.
>
>
> On Aug 4, 2020, at 12:34 PM, larry corridon <larry961357...>
> wrote:
>
> Thank you Jane for bringing this to our attention. It does shed light on a
> very different side of those researchers and educators from the past whose
> information we use and whose wisdom we respect. They have some very serious
> flaws (to say the least!)
>
> However, I have several thoughts, mostly negative about the last
> paragraph of this article. To further comment on or discuss them in the MBB
> forum could turn it into a political platform that I don’t think would be
> appropriate or welcome to the members.
>
> Also, I’m not sure how well I would do having to remember new names for
> many birds. I have enough trouble with the ones we have now!
>
>
>
>
> On Aug 4, 2020, at 11:57, Randy Wardle <wrwardle...> wrote:
>
> Oh good grief!
>
> Randy Wardle
> Aptos
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* <mbbirds...> <mbbirds...> on behalf of
> Jane Orbuch <jorbuch...>
> *Sent:* Tuesday, August 4, 2020 5:42 PM
> *To:* mbbirds <mbbirds...>
> *Subject:* [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The
> Washington Post
>
> Not sure I agree with all of the below—but definitely worth being aware
> of, thinking about and perhaps taking action on.
>
>
>
> https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/08/04/american-bird-names-colonialism-audubon/?arc404=true&utm_campaign=wp_post_most&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_most
>
> What Confederate statues and some American bird names have in common
> By Gabriel Foley, Jordan Rutter
> August 4, 2020
> *Gabriel Foley and Jordan Rutter are ornithologists and birders who
> created the website **Bird Names for Birds*
> <http://www.birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/>*.*
> Few figures tower over the study of American nature like John James
> Audubon
> <https://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/john-james-audubon-drawn-from-nature/106/>
> — and small wonder. His “Birds of North America” was the first work to
> catalog most of the continent’s native species in vivid color, introducing
> them to a wide and enthusiastic audience that endures today. He also
> described an astonishing 25 new bird species
> <https://johnjames.audubon.org/john-james-audubon-0>, while two other
> species — Audubon’s shearwater
> <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/audubons-shearwater> and Audubon’s
> oriole <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Audubons_Oriole/overview>
> bear his name. Surely, most of us might think, this is an entirely fitting
> honor for someone who did so much for our understanding of the environment.
> <NB2IJWFLGJHV7KCKYJSTHB5AQY.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
> Yet science never exists in a vacuum, and Audubon’s story has a dark side
> — one that goes beyond his notable penchant for exaggeration and scientific
> fakery
> <https://bioone.org/journals/bulletin-of-the-british-ornithologists-club/volume-140/issue-2/bboc.v140i2.2020.a3/Audubons-Bird-of-Washington--unravelling-the-fraud-that-launched/10.25226/bboc.v140i2.2020.a3.full>.
> After the Battle of San Jacinto in 1836, when mostly White Texans defeated
> a Mexican army
> <https://www.britannica.com/event/Battle-of-San-Jacinto-1836> not far
> from present-day Houston, Audubon scoured the battlefield for the remains
> of Mexican soldiers. He decapitated several bodies
> <https://matthewhalley.wordpress.com/2020/06/16/the-literal-skeletons-in-the-closet-of-american-ornithology/>
> and sent the heads to Samuel George Morton, a notorious practitioner of
> phrenology, a pseudoscience that attempted to use skull dimensions to prove
> the superiority of White Europeans to other races. For Audubon, this might
> have been just another way of practicing science — but his actions hardly
> align with modern values, and his scientific contributions do not excuse
> him from judgment.
> When we name an animal species after the person who first made it known to
> science, we are effectively honoring that person’s contribution. Unlike a
> name describing a bird’s color or habitat, there is nothing “natural” about
> honorific names: They imply a choice, and we can also choose not to honor
> the person whose name has been affixed to the species. Bachman’s sparrow
> <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bachmans_Sparrow/id>, Townsend’s
> warbler <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Townsends_Warbler/overview>, Bendire’s
> thrasher <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bendires_Thrasher/overview>,
> Hammond’s flycatcher
> <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Hammonds_Flycatcher/overview>, McCown’s
> longspur <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/McCowns_Longspur/id>
> these are all examples of North American common bird names. For the bird
> community — ornithologists, bird-watchers, conservationists and more —
> these names are collectively referenced every day. For many, the esteem
> inherent in these names is unconsciously overlooked, and comfort lies in
> their familiarity.
> Yet these honorific names — known as eponyms — also cast long, dark
> shadows over our beloved birds and represent colonialism, racism and
> inequality. It is long overdue that we acknowledge the problem of such
> names, and it is long overdue that we should change them.
> <CLVXK5LGFBHTVIPW6YMWJI7YRY.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
> The Rev. John Bachman
> <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/bachman-john/>
> was among those who argued vehemently against
> <https://books.google.com/books?id=yY8FAAAAQAAJ&> the abolition of
> slavery. “The negro,” he wrote, “is a striking and now permanent variety,
> like the numerous permanent varieties in domesticated animals,” adding that
> “his intellect, although underrated, is greatly inferior to that of the
> Caucasian, and that he is ... incapable of self-government.” John McCownserved
> as a general
> <https://www.audubon.org/news/-bird-world-grappling-its-own-confederate-relic-mccowns-longspur>
> in the Confederate Army. William Alexander Hammond
> <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/hammond-william-alexander/>,
> once a surgeon general of the United States, asked U.S. soldiers to send
> him the bodies of indigenous people for comparative anatomy studies. Charles
> Bendire
> <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/bendire-charles/>
> fought in the Battle of Canyon Creek, among other violent attacks on
> indigenous peoples. John Kirk Townsend
> <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/townsend-john-kirk/>
> desecrated the graves of Native Americans and sent their skulls to
> Morton for his infamous cranial studies.
> <SEZHS6H5TNHZPNIAZOBN7NU7VI.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
> These men were among countless others who contributed to the library of
> knowledge we now rely on. They were active during the peak of scientific
> collection efforts in North America, efforts that were made possible by
> colonialism. But the westward expansion of the United States came at an
> incalculable cost to the country’s original inhabitants and their
> descendants today. To justify the harmful effects of their colonial
> actions, Europeans and Americans invented theories of race and civilization
> that conveniently labeled themselves as superior to everyone else. These
> theories led directly to the racism that still plagues our country today,
> affecting our society in countless insidious ways.
> The controversy over such names, which is now exciting passions within the
> bird community, mirrors similar conflicts over monuments to Confederates
> and colonialists now raging in the United States and elsewhere. Eponymous
> names serve as verbal statues: They are a memorial both to the colonial
> system that wove the fabric of systemic racism through every aspect of our
> lives — including the birds we see every day — and to the individuals who
> intentionally and directly perpetuated that system.
> <XPH43PCUENBIJDHIMPBDLNA2DU.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
> By rejecting the colonial monument that eponyms represent, we can show
> that we value inclusion and diversity in our community, and that we
> acknowledge the intrinsic worth of wildlife. We cannot subjectively decide —
> *especially* if the adjudicators are White — that some names can be
> retained because they are associated with less abhorrent pasts than others.
> We must remove all eponymous names. The stench of colonialism has saturated
> each of its participants, and the honor inherent within their names must be
> revoked.
> A bird’s beauty should not be marred by the baggage of an eponym. We could
> decide right now that the words we use matter, and that birds should carry
> their own history, not ours.
> *Read more*:
> Ty Seidule: What to rename the Army bases that honor Confederate soldiers
> <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/18/what-rename-army-bases-that-honor-confederate-soldiers/?arc404=true>
> Harry Anderson: My experience at a Confederate-named Army base shows why
> we need to rename them all — now
> <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/15/my-experience-confederate-named-army-base-shows-why-we-need-rename-them-all-now/>
> Christine Emba: Memorials to white supremacy are falling. What will
> replace them?
> <https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/opinions/confederate-statues-monuments/>
> David Von Drehle: Renaming military bases is not erasing history. It’s
> erasing propaganda.
> <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/renaming-military-bases-is-not-erasing-history-its-erasing-propaganda/2020/06/16/884a81a0-aff6-11ea-8758-bfd1d045525a_story.html>
> The Post’s View: Trump won’t remove Confederate names from military bases.
> So Congress and the Pentagon should.
> <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/trump-wont-remove-confederate-names-from-military-bases-so-congress-and-the-pentagon-should/2020/06/11/920624a6-ac09-11ea-94d2-d7bc43b26bf9_story.html>
> Robert W. Lee IV: Robert E. Lee is my ancestor. Take down his statue, and
> let his cause be lost.
> <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/07/robert-e-lee-is-my-ancestor-take-down-his-statue-let-his-cause-be-lost/>
>
> --
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> .
>
>
> Larry D. Corridon
> <larry961357...>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --
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> <https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/mbbirds/<5119C518-907E-41BA-9819-CBC0D71322E6...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>
> .
>
>
>
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>

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Back to top
Date: 8/4/20 5:01 pm
From: larry corridon <larry961357...>
Subject: Fwd: [MBBIRDS] Jupiter's moons
Meant to send this to Lisa and MBB but blew it. Here is a little more info.

> Begin forwarded message:
>
> From: larry corridon <larry961357...>
> Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Jupiter's moons
> Date: August 4, 2020 at 10:58:44 PDT
> To: Lisa Larson <lisafaylarson...>
>
> Here’s more!
>
>
>
> When Galileo pointed his telescope at Jupiter, the largest planet in our solar system, he made a startling discovery. The planet had four "stars" surrounding it. Within days, Galileo figured out that these "stars" were actually moons in orbit of Jupiter.
>
>> <https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-BIfJhYi9hHk/UVC3JCw26PI/AAAAAAAABXo/j21MiU0R4lk/s1600/huygens_phases1.gif>
>> Compilation from Huygen's Systema Saturnium (1659)
>> showing how Saturn's appearance had changed from
>> 1610 to 1646.
>> Galileo' <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galileo_Galilei>s first, distorted views of Saturn's disc in July 1610 would have occurred at a heliocentric longitude of 150 degrees (i.e., the position of Saturn in its orbit as observed from the Sun, measured from a longitude of zero at the northern spring equinox, 90 at the northern summer solstice, 180 at the northern autumnal equinox and 270 at the northern winter solstice). So Galileo was observing in late northern summer. For reference, Cassini arrived at Saturn in 2004 (heliocentric longitude of 293, just after the northern winter solstice), and today we're in northern spring (heliocentric longitude of 43 today). It's interesting to note that Saturn has been around the Sun 13.5 times between Galileo's observations and those of the Cassini spacecraft 400 year later. We know the story of Galileo seeing 'strange appendages' that appeared fixed in position and brightness (unlike Jupiter's moons, which moved from night to night), and describing Saturn as a 'triple planet.' Those accompanying 'servants' vanished two years later at the autumnal equinox, when the ring opening angle had closed to zero as viewed from Earth. "Has Saturn, perhaps, devoured his own children?", he asked?
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>> On Aug 4, 2020, at 10:47, larry corridon <larry961357...> <mailto:<larry961357...>> wrote:
>>
>> OK😘. Here is corroboration from Carol Pecot and also a description of Saturn that I and Galileo!) saw. “ His (Galileo’s) initial version only magnified 8x but was soon refined to the 20x magnification… I wonder what a 30-60 X spotting scope could see. I would guess the rings. But no more than the 4 moons I saw. The rest are too small.
>>
>> Unfortunately, we may not have another clear day and evening for who knows how long!
>>> Begin forwarded message:
>>>
>>> From: larry corridon <larry961357...> <mailto:<larry961357...>>
>>> Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Jupiter's moons
>>> Date: August 4, 2020 at 08:01:31 PDT
>>> To: Carol Pecot <carol.pecot...> <mailto:<carol.pecot...>>
>>>
>>> Were you able to see the rings of Saturn? I could see the planet clearly last night but with my 30 power scope but I couldn’t quite discern the rings. Saturn (through the scope) looked like a flattened ovoid. Galileo couldn't quite see the rings but saw the ovoid shape. He thought it either had handles or 2 large moons close to the planet.
>>>
>>>> On Aug 4, 2020, at 03:13, Carol Pecot <carol.pecot...> <mailto:<carol.pecot...>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> We looked at it several days ago with our spotting scope. The moons were great, and we even enjoyed the banding on Jupiter!
>>>> Carol Pecot
>>>>
>>>>> On Aug 3, 2020, at 9:00 PM, larry corridon <larry961357...> <mailto:<larry961357...>> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> I know this isn’t about birds, but had I had to pass this on. I hope it’s ok with everyone,
>>>>>
>>>>> If you have a view to the Southeast and a scope, not too far above the horizon, Jupiter is clearly visible right now, as are it’s 4 largest moons. The moon is rising and that may affect the visibility soon. It’s the view Galileo had when he first looked to the heavens.
>>>>>
>>>>> Larry D. Corridon
>>>>> <larry961357...> <mailto:<larry961357...>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "mbbirds" group.
>>>>> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to mbbirds+<unsubscribe...> <mailto:mbbirds+<unsubscribe...>.
>>>>> To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/mbbirds/<EDA93921-D7D6-41DC-980A-06210D1A6535...> <https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/mbbirds/<EDA93921-D7D6-41DC-980A-06210D1A6535...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>.
>>>>
>>>
>>> Larry D. Corridon
>>> <larry961357...> <mailto:<larry961357...>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>> Larry D. Corridon
>> <larry961357...> <mailto:<larry961357...>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
> Larry D. Corridon
> <larry961357...> <mailto:<larry961357...>
>
>
>
>
>

Larry D. Corridon
<larry961357...>





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Back to top
Date: 8/4/20 4:37 pm
From: Liam Murphy <liammsf...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post
I’ve seen this discussion on a number of forums lately. Descriptive common names for birds (whether by plumage trait or habitat) are just objectively better than honorific/eponymous names from a birding point of view. It would be SO much easier to mentally connect species with image/information, and to share knowledge with new birders and people interested in birds (no more “remember, Bewick’s Wren is the one with the white eyebrow and you can remember that because the word Bewick has a W in it and the word White starts with the letter W…” blah blah blah no thanks). I struggle to understand any argument against it. Plus, you have the added bonus of being actively anti-racist, and making birding more welcoming to our BIPoC brothers and sisters, thus creating even more advocates for bird ecosystem health and conservation. I am all for it.

Good (happy/safe/inclusive) birding all!
Liam

> On Aug 4, 2020, at 1:30 PM, Julia van der Wyk <juliavdw11...> wrote:
>
> Hello all,
> I think who we honor and why is an important issue to consider. If renaming some birds will move us toward dismantling systemic racism in our culture, I am for it. It won’t solve the greater problem but if it helps, to me that is a yes. I appreciate the thought and discussion from the article.
> It is definitely an uncomfortable thought process but like most, well worth examining in ourselves and with our peers. we will all have our own take on it. I am glad for this thread.
>
> –Julia v.
>
>
>> On Aug 4, 2020, at 12:34 PM, larry corridon <larry961357...> <mailto:<larry961357...>> wrote:
>>
>> Thank you Jane for bringing this to our attention. It does shed light on a very different side of those researchers and educators from the past whose information we use and whose wisdom we respect. They have some very serious flaws (to say the least!)
>>
>> However, I have several thoughts, mostly negative about the last paragraph of this article. To further comment on or discuss them in the MBB forum could turn it into a political platform that I don’t think would be appropriate or welcome to the members.
>>
>> Also, I’m not sure how well I would do having to remember new names for many birds. I have enough trouble with the ones we have now!
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>> On Aug 4, 2020, at 11:57, Randy Wardle <wrwardle...> <mailto:<wrwardle...>> wrote:
>>>
>>> Oh good grief!
>>>
>>> Randy Wardle
>>> Aptos
>>>
>>> From: <mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...> <mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...>> on behalf of Jane Orbuch <jorbuch...> <mailto:<jorbuch...>>
>>> Sent: Tuesday, August 4, 2020 5:42 PM
>>> To: mbbirds <mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...>>
>>> Subject: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post
>>>
>>> Not sure I agree with all of the below—but definitely worth being aware of, thinking about and perhaps taking action on.
>>>>
>>>> https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/08/04/american-bird-names-colonialism-audubon/?arc404=true&utm_campaign=wp_post_most&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_most <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/08/04/american-bird-names-colonialism-audubon/?arc404=true&utm_campaign=wp_post_most&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_most>
>>>>
>>>> What Confederate statues and some American bird names have in common
>>>> By Gabriel Foley, Jordan Rutter
>>>> August 4, 2020
>>>> Gabriel Foley and Jordan Rutter are ornithologists and birders who created the website Bird Names for Birds <http://www.birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/>.
>>>> Few figures tower over the study of American nature like John James Audubon <https://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/john-james-audubon-drawn-from-nature/106/> — and small wonder. His “Birds of North America” was the first work to catalog most of the continent’s native species in vivid color, introducing them to a wide and enthusiastic audience that endures today. He also described an astonishing 25 new bird species <https://johnjames.audubon.org/john-james-audubon-0>, while two other species — Audubon’s shearwater <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/audubons-shearwater> and Audubon’s oriole <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Audubons_Oriole/overview> — bear his name. Surely, most of us might think, this is an entirely fitting honor for someone who did so much for our understanding of the environment.
>>>> <><NB2IJWFLGJHV7KCKYJSTHB5AQY.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
>>>> Yet science never exists in a vacuum, and Audubon’s story has a dark side — one that goes beyond his notable penchant for exaggeration and scientific fakery <https://bioone.org/journals/bulletin-of-the-british-ornithologists-club/volume-140/issue-2/bboc.v140i2.2020.a3/Audubons-Bird-of-Washington--unravelling-the-fraud-that-launched/10.25226/bboc.v140i2.2020.a3.full>. After the Battle of San Jacinto in 1836, when mostly White Texans defeated a Mexican army <https://www.britannica.com/event/Battle-of-San-Jacinto-1836> not far from present-day Houston, Audubon scoured the battlefield for the remains of Mexican soldiers. He decapitated several bodies <https://matthewhalley.wordpress.com/2020/06/16/the-literal-skeletons-in-the-closet-of-american-ornithology/> and sent the heads to Samuel George Morton, a notorious practitioner of phrenology, a pseudoscience that attempted to use skull dimensions to prove the superiority of White Europeans to other races. For Audubon, this might have been just another way of practicing science — but his actions hardly align with modern values, and his scientific contributions do not excuse him from judgment.
>>>> When we name an animal species after the person who first made it known to science, we are effectively honoring that person’s contribution. Unlike a name describing a bird’s color or habitat, there is nothing “natural” about honorific names: They imply a choice, and we can also choose not to honor the person whose name has been affixed to the species. Bachman’s sparrow <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bachmans_Sparrow/id>, Townsend’s warbler <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Townsends_Warbler/overview>, Bendire’s thrasher <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bendires_Thrasher/overview>, Hammond’s flycatcher <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Hammonds_Flycatcher/overview>, McCown’s longspur <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/McCowns_Longspur/id> — these are all examples of North American common bird names. For the bird community — ornithologists, bird-watchers, conservationists and more — these names are collectively referenced every day. For many, the esteem inherent in these names is unconsciously overlooked, and comfort lies in their familiarity.
>>>> Yet these honorific names — known as eponyms — also cast long, dark shadows over our beloved birds and represent colonialism, racism and inequality. It is long overdue that we acknowledge the problem of such names, and it is long overdue that we should change them.
>>>> <><CLVXK5LGFBHTVIPW6YMWJI7YRY.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
>>>> The Rev. John Bachman <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/bachman-john/> was among those who argued vehemently against <https://books.google.com/books?id=yY8FAAAAQAAJ&> the abolition of slavery. “The negro,” he wrote, “is a striking and now permanent variety, like the numerous permanent varieties in domesticated animals,” adding that “his intellect, although underrated, is greatly inferior to that of the Caucasian, and that he is ... incapable of self-government.” John McCownserved as a general <https://www.audubon.org/news/-bird-world-grappling-its-own-confederate-relic-mccowns-longspur> in the Confederate Army. William Alexander Hammond <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/hammond-william-alexander/>, once a surgeon general of the United States, asked U.S. soldiers to send him the bodies of indigenous people for comparative anatomy studies. Charles Bendire <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/bendire-charles/> fought in the Battle of Canyon Creek, among other violent attacks on indigenous peoples. John Kirk Townsend <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/townsend-john-kirk/> desecrated the graves of Native Americans and sent their skulls to Morton for his infamous cranial studies.
>>>> <><SEZHS6H5TNHZPNIAZOBN7NU7VI.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
>>>> These men were among countless others who contributed to the library of knowledge we now rely on. They were active during the peak of scientific collection efforts in North America, efforts that were made possible by colonialism. But the westward expansion of the United States came at an incalculable cost to the country’s original inhabitants and their descendants today. To justify the harmful effects of their colonial actions, Europeans and Americans invented theories of race and civilization that conveniently labeled themselves as superior to everyone else. These theories led directly to the racism that still plagues our country today, affecting our society in countless insidious ways.
>>>> The controversy over such names, which is now exciting passions within the bird community, mirrors similar conflicts over monuments to Confederates and colonialists now raging in the United States and elsewhere. Eponymous names serve as verbal statues: They are a memorial both to the colonial system that wove the fabric of systemic racism through every aspect of our lives — including the birds we see every day — and to the individuals who intentionally and directly perpetuated that system.
>>>> <><XPH43PCUENBIJDHIMPBDLNA2DU.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
>>>> By rejecting the colonial monument that eponyms represent, we can show that we value inclusion and diversity in our community, and that we acknowledge the intrinsic worth of wildlife. We cannot subjectively decide — especially if the adjudicators are White — that some names can be retained because they are associated with less abhorrent pasts than others. We must remove all eponymous names. The stench of colonialism has saturated each of its participants, and the honor inherent within their names must be revoked.
>>>> A bird’s beauty should not be marred by the baggage of an eponym. We could decide right now that the words we use matter, and that birds should carry their own history, not ours.
>>>> Read more:
>>>> Ty Seidule: What to rename the Army bases that honor Confederate soldiers <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/18/what-rename-army-bases-that-honor-confederate-soldiers/?arc404=true>
>>>> Harry Anderson: My experience at a Confederate-named Army base shows why we need to rename them all — now <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/15/my-experience-confederate-named-army-base-shows-why-we-need-rename-them-all-now/>
>>>> Christine Emba: Memorials to white supremacy are falling. What will replace them? <https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/opinions/confederate-statues-monuments/>
>>>> David Von Drehle: Renaming military bases is not erasing history. It’s erasing propaganda. <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/renaming-military-bases-is-not-erasing-history-its-erasing-propaganda/2020/06/16/884a81a0-aff6-11ea-8758-bfd1d045525a_story.html>
>>>> The Post’s View: Trump won’t remove Confederate names from military bases. So Congress and the Pentagon should. <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/trump-wont-remove-confederate-names-from-military-bases-so-congress-and-the-pentagon-should/2020/06/11/920624a6-ac09-11ea-94d2-d7bc43b26bf9_story.html>
>>>> Robert W. Lee IV: Robert E. Lee is my ancestor. Take down his statue, and let his cause be lost. <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/07/robert-e-lee-is-my-ancestor-take-down-his-statue-let-his-cause-be-lost/>
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>>
>> Larry D. Corridon
>> <larry961357...> <mailto:<larry961357...>
>>
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Date: 8/4/20 4:16 pm
From: Elena Scott <elmscott23...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Black Swifts: Sand Hill Bluff.
Thank you for confirming this!
Some guy tried to tell me I was trespassing even though I was told it was
fine to use that path. So I guess if anyone else runs in to him it's
probably alright to just to ignore him

-Elena



On Tue, Aug 4, 2020, 3:23 PM 'Breck Tyler' via mbbirds <
<mbbirds...> wrote:

> Following up (belatedly) on Glen Tepke’s detailed post about access to
> Sand Hill Bluff. A friend with the Coastal Commission confirms that access
> from Coast Road/Majors is legal. Glen’s directions starting at 5511 Coast
> Road are exactly right. Both routes (west side and east side of the
> drainage) are fine. The No Trespassing signs are outdated and should have
> been removed. Visitors should stay clear of the farm buildings and interior
> roads. The small beach is known locally as Piggy Beach or 5 Mile Beach.
>
> Breck Tyler
> Santa Cruz
>
>
> On Jul 23, 2020, at 7:39 PM, Glen Tepke <g.tepke...> wrote:
>
> Sand Hill Bluff, like most places, can be found by searching for it in
> Google Maps:
> https://www.google.com/maps/place/Sand+Hill+Bluff/@36.9766166,-122.1609444,3614m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m5!3m4!1s0x808e4322061bf5e7:0x61ea58236e8644d8!8m2!3d36.9766174!4d-122.1521896
>
> It is part of Coast Dairies State Park, on the coast between Santa Cruz
> and Davenport. It is a small point with sea cliffs and several sea caves -
> similar to the Old Cove Landing Trail in Wilder Ranch SP but with more
> caves - and the namesake Sand Hill, a large Native American midden
> (shellmound). The birding is from the top of the cliffs, not Sand Hill,
> which is fenced off for its protection.
>
> There are a couple of ways get to the cliffs, both involving roughly a
> mile of walking. The most direct access is from the hamlet of Majors on
> Coast Road, but it is not clear to me whether access from Majors is legal.
> From the light on Rt. 1 at Western Drive in Santa Cruz (the last light in
> town before getting into the hinterlands), go 5.2 miles NW on Rt. 1, turn
> left and a quick right onto Coast Road, go 0.2 miles to an unnamed farm
> road on the left, where there is a small sign for 5511 Coast Rd and room
> for 3 or 4 cars to park. Walk or bike - do not drive - down the farm road
> to the railroad tracks, where there is a No Trespassing sign. The most
> direct route is to continue across the tracks and between some farm
> buildings to a dirt farm road on the west side of a willow-filled creek
> drainage heading toward the coast, but this route has several more No
> Trespassing signs, so I'm not recommending it. Perhaps a better route is
> to go left along the (inactive) railroad tracks a short distance, then
> right to another dirt road along the east side of the creek. Google Maps
> indicates this is a public path to a small unnamed (on Google) beach, but
> it still requires passing the No Trespassing sign at the tracks, hence my
> uncertainty about whether this route is any more legal than the first one.
> If you go this way, after a short distance the road drops into the creek
> drainage to a small pond. The trail to the beach continues down through
> the willows below the pond. To get to the cliffs, follow the road to the
> right around the bottom of the pond and back up the hill to where it meets
> the road along the west side of the creek mentioned above. Turn left and
> left again at the next intersection, then straight to the coast. If anyone
> knows more about the legality or illegality of approaching from Majors,
> please chime in.
>
> Another more difficult but more scenic and more clearly legal way is via
> Laguna Creek Beach. From the Rt 1/Western Drive light, go 5.9 miles on Rt.
> 1 to a rough parking lot on the right, at the 2nd intersection with Laguna
> Rd. Note that this lot is well known for car break-ins. From the N end of
> the lot, cross Rt. 1 (carefully) to a path through willows, across the
> tracks and down to the beach. Go left to the SE end of the beach and up a
> steep rocky path to the top of the bluff. This might be challenging if you
> are not comfortable with heights and steep terrain. At the top of the
> bluff, continue to the right to a boardwalk along the N side of Sand Hill.
> The path turns right along a row of cypresses and ends at the top of the
> cliffs a few yards west of the end of the farm road from Majors.
>
> There are several viewpoints along the cliffs. For the spot where we saw
> Black Swifts last night, go right a few yards to a vague short path that
> leads down to a long rock shelf. Walk to the far (N) end of the shelf
> where it overlooks a large sea cave. I think, but am not sure, that this
> is the western cave referred to in Alex's 2018 post below. For another
> spot, turn left at the end of the approach paths until you can see another
> rock shelf that forms a point projecting out to sea. From the end of this
> point you can see more caves on either side of the point.
>
> Per eBird and MBB posts, most BLSW sightings are within an hour of sunset
> when the birds are returning to their nesting or roosting sites in the
> caves after spending the day foraging up and down the coast. But you could
> get lucky and see them at other times of day. Sand Hill Bluff is in the
> fog belt, so when visiting in the evenings be prepared for cool to cold,
> overcast, windy and perhaps wet conditions no matter how warm and sunny it
> is elsewhere in the county.
>
> Good birding,
> Glen Tepke
> Santa Cruz
>
>
> On 7/23/2020 6:58 AM, <kyri...> wrote:
>
> Where exactly is Sand Hill Bluff? I get the feeling it's the place where
> the trail drops down and crosses the beach, and there's a tiny lagoon that
> often has a Snowy Egret in it -- is that right?
>
> I bird the Wilder coastal trail when I'm in town, but don't know the names
> of the landmarks along the way -- and Black Swift would be a life bird for
> me. Clearly I'm not there at the right time of day.
>
> Kyri Freeman
>
> Ben Lomond
> ---
> My dark fantasy and historical fiction novels are available for Kindle on
> Amazon. Print copies also available.
>
> On 2020-07-22 21:22, Glen Tepke wrote:
>
> This evening at 8:11 pm (about 12 minutes before sunset, though it was
> hard to tell thanks to a heavy marine layer and light drizzle), three Black
> Swifts appeared out of nowhere right in front of our position near Sand
> Hill Bluff, flying SSE along the west-facing sea-cliff, made very abrupt
> 180-degree turns and flew back directly over our heads and rocketed into
> what I think is the westernmost sea-cave. They did not emerge in the 15
> minutes we stayed after that. The whole show lasted about 10 seconds out
> of the 50 minutes we were out there, but that was good enough for an
> overdue county bird for us.
>
> Good birding,
> Glen Tepke & Carol Chetkovich
> Santa Cruz
>
>
> On 7/17/2020 11:25 PM, Liam Murphy wrote:
>
> I've had several black swift sightings at Sand Hill Bluff this month as
> well. On July 2nd at around 7:25p I observed a group of 5 loosely grouped
> swifts flying southeast (down the coast) high and with a fairly determined
> pace. Perhaps these were on the way to Wilder if there is a larger colony
> there. This past weekend, 7/12, about 20 minutes after sunset as my
> girlfriend and I were trying to photograph a barn owl (who hunts the bluff
> reliably at sunset - seen 3 times now), a lone black swift flew low within
> 10 feet of us, moving west to east over the fields just shy of the cypress
> grove. The low altitude and late time of this sighting would lead me to
> believe this lone bird (and possibly more) could be roosting at the SHB
> caves.
>
> We, too, picked up a tick on our outing...be sure to check when you get
> home!
>
> Good birding,
> Liam
>
> On Jul 17, 2020, at 10:51 PM, David Kossack <dkossack...> wrote:
>
> With BLACK SWIFTS active at Wilder Ranch I thought I might see what I
> could find at Sand Hill Bluff (see Alex Rinkert's description below from
> 2018). Sand Bluff is 1 - 2 miles west of Michael Bolte's siting at Old Cove
> Landing.
>
> I arrived at the shelf between the caves about 5pm, today, July 17, and
> stayed until 7pm. At 6:30 pm a solitary BLACK SWIFT appeared. The bird flew
> about the air space in front of the shelf for 15 - 30 seconds then
> disappeared. A second solitary BLACK SWIFT appeared not quite 10 minutes
> later. As before it occupied the airspace in front of the shelf for about
> 15 - 30 seconds, then dropped down on the east side of the shelf to water
> level and disappeared in the scatter. I believe that it went into the cave
> tucked closest to the shelf on the east side, it didn't go up... I didn't
> see any other BLACK SWIFTS this evening.
>
> The shelf is the same location visited by BLACK SWIFT field trip described
> below.
> Wind was minimal, ocean flat, temp. low 60s.
> A lot of birds calling for food, and a lot of ticks, too.
>
> David Kossack
> Santa Cruz
>
>
> On Aug 9, 2018, at 5:47 PM, Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...> wrote:
>
> On the morning of July 19 I visited Sand Hill Bluff to search the sea
> caves for BLACK SWIFT nests. I was only able to safely access the eastern
> caves (no nests) so I climbed to a vantage point where I could see the
> western caves and watched for a few hours. During that time I saw a single,
> silent swift fly into a cave on two occasions about an hour apart, staying
> inside the cave for several minutes on both visits, then exiting and flying
> directly inland. No socializing, no foraging, not carrying nest material.
> Around 2:15 PM a group of 6 swifts appeared and performed the most amazing
> aerial displays I have seen from this species. When the group arrived, one
> swift entered the same cave and stayed inside for several minutes while the
> others made audaciously close passes to the bluff face and ocean surface at
> breakneck speed. Wow. A few minutes later the other swift left the cave and
> joined the others for a while, then they all flew off.
>
> Given the time of day and year, duration of visits, behavior and context,
> I would say there is an active nest in that cave. This species has not been
> confirmed breeding in Santa Cruz County since 1994, although observations
> at this location and perhaps elsewhere suggest they may have bred or
> attempted to in recent years.
>
> For anyone who wants to see the Black Swift, I will be leading an
> impromptu Santa Cruz Bird Club-sanctioned field trip on the evening of
> August 15 to Sand Hill Bluff. We will meet at 6:30 PM at the intersection
> of Highway 1 and Shaffer Road, and then will caravan to Sand Hill Bluff.
> Expect two miles of level walking and a brisk evening wind.
>
> Alex Rinkert
> Santa Cruz
>
> *From:* 'Paul Miller' via mbbirds [mailto:<mbbirds...>
> <mbbirds...>]
> *Sent:* Monday, July 23, 2018 10:35 AM
> *To:* MBB Listserv
> *Subject:* [MBBIRDS] Black Swifts
>
> Last night, for the 9th or 10th time, I headed out to Sand Hill Bluff to
> try for Black Swifts again.
> I parked along Coast Rd. and rode my bike in to the site, past the farm
> with the red buildings.
> This has been my nemesis bird for the last 3 years or so.
> At around 745, 3-4 appeared and flew above the sea cave for about 20
> seconds. They vocalized briefly.
> I lost them and couldn't refind them in the next 10 minutes or so. I
> decided that a brief view was plenty good for me!
>
> I encourage you to head out there if you haven't seen Black Swifts. Stake
> it out at around 715 and be patient.
> It would be interesting to see if someone could verify breeding. Any
> updates on that?
> One more check mark--
>
> Paul Miller
> Mount Hermon
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Date: 8/4/20 4:10 pm
From: Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Pelagic report - and Pelagic opportunities.
Hello all,

My apologies for sending to various groups all at one time. But, this
Saturday we did our first offshore pelagic of the season, from Half Moon Bay
(San Mateo County). We have been doing trips to the Farallon Islands, but
those have a limited time in deeper water, so I thought folks would be
interested in knowing what is out there in the central CA offshore waters
now. In short, it is pretty interesting and diverse with element suggesting
this will be a warm water year with elements of the south moving north, and
it is a season that is amazingly abundant as far as ocean productivity goes.
We saw four species of storm-petrels, with groups of Ashy, and a scattering
of Fork-tailed, Wilson's, and Black storm-petrels. The Black are always of
interest to us, since they do not always make it to our latitude, being
dependent on what the conditions are like farther to the south. The weather
was choppy, with a flatter ocean we would likely have found more and larger
flocks of storm petrels. Where we found them, the water was warmer and more
translucent, offshore water. We did find all three jaegers, as well as South
Polar Skua which was early. There are good densities of Cassin's Auklets out
there, we found a gorgeous adult Tufted Puffin as well as the more expected
alcids including Marbled Murrelets at the coast. Good numbers of
Black-footed Albatross and nice densities of Pink-footed and Sooty
shearwaters, earlier in the season Buller's showed up (again early).
Sabine's Gulls are heading south, including our first juvenile of the
season. Right now tens of thousands of Sooty Shearwaters are close to the
beach in Half Moon Bay, this is a year with lots of anchovy, lots of krill
and also squid. Abundance is the word. There is so much krill out there that
the Cassin's Auklets are trying to pull off a second brood due to the
abundance of food. Meanwhile the Rhinoceros Auklets are feeding on 100%
anchovy.

The real oddity in the region has been the arrival of Bluefin tuna off
Monterey, and Half Moon Bay. Big ones, averaging over 150 lbs each. This is
not the norm, but is super exciting as it suggests northward movement of
southern critters. Similarly, we had a good look at a Guadalupe Fur Seal
offshore a little known marine mammal that seems to be found in warm water
years. Warm offshore water has been peeking close to Monterey Bay recently.
The combination of potential for some warm water birds offshore, and lots
and lots of food closer to shore is great! We have consistently found
awesome feeding congregations of Humpback Whales about 10 miles offshore. On
this last trip we also found Fin Whale where the Cassin's Auklets were
(krill feeding we assume), and a super pod of hundreds and hundreds of
Pacific White-sided Dolphins with a good number of the always dapper
Northern Right Whale Dolphin. Blue Whale has been seen this year, but not
this last weekend.

It is early in the season and it is already pretty awesome offshore. I
think this is going to be a great year for pelagics, and unfortunately not
that many people are going to be able to enjoy it. We have a full schedule
of trips out of Monterey and Half Moon Bay, Morro Bay is sold out, but are
going with half or less of the boat capacity. On the trips we are
encouraging people to be outside, in the breeze, social distance and to wear
masks. As such, on the various trips we have done people have felt
comfortable and safe. Key is to consider that the science clarifies that
being outside, in the breeze, and in humid and salty air is a low risk
situation. Crew are diligently disinfecting the boat, and ample sanitizer is
available. One of the net benefits is a lot more room on the boats this
year, and in Monterey keep in mind that the boats are much larger allowing
for good spacing of birders and naturalists. Particularly this year, being
out on the ocean is special, with nature abounding and away from the news,
it is invigorating and good for the soul!

Our next trip is an offshore Monterey trip on Aug 14, we are hoping to
get into the real deep waters on this day and see if we can find some
offshore murrelets and other goodies. The upcoming Farallon island trips are
sold out. Our schedule of trips is here:

https://www.alvarosadventures.com/pelagic-dates-2020.html

See you at sea!

Alvaro



Alvaro Jaramillo

<mailto:<alvaro...> <alvaro...>

www.alvarosadventures.com



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Date: 8/4/20 3:23 pm
From: 'Breck Tyler' via mbbirds <mbbirds...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Black Swifts: Sand Hill Bluff.
Following up (belatedly) on Glen Tepke’s detailed post about access to Sand Hill Bluff. A friend with the Coastal Commission confirms that access from Coast Road/Majors is legal. Glen’s directions starting at 5511 Coast Road are exactly right. Both routes (west side and east side of the drainage) are fine. The No Trespassing signs are outdated and should have been removed. Visitors should stay clear of the farm buildings and interior roads. The small beach is known locally as Piggy Beach or 5 Mile Beach.

Breck Tyler
Santa Cruz



> On Jul 23, 2020, at 7:39 PM, Glen Tepke <g.tepke...> wrote:
>
> Sand Hill Bluff, like most places, can be found by searching for it in Google Maps: https://www.google.com/maps/place/Sand+Hill+Bluff/@36.9766166,-122.1609444,3614m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m5!3m4!1s0x808e4322061bf5e7:0x61ea58236e8644d8!8m2!3d36.9766174!4d-122.1521896 <https://www.google.com/maps/place/Sand+Hill+Bluff/@36.9766166,-122.1609444,3614m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m5!3m4!1s0x808e4322061bf5e7:0x61ea58236e8644d8!8m2!3d36.9766174!4d-122.1521896>
> It is part of Coast Dairies State Park, on the coast between Santa Cruz and Davenport. It is a small point with sea cliffs and several sea caves - similar to the Old Cove Landing Trail in Wilder Ranch SP but with more caves - and the namesake Sand Hill, a large Native American midden (shellmound). The birding is from the top of the cliffs, not Sand Hill, which is fenced off for its protection.
>
> There are a couple of ways get to the cliffs, both involving roughly a mile of walking. The most direct access is from the hamlet of Majors on Coast Road, but it is not clear to me whether access from Majors is legal. From the light on Rt. 1 at Western Drive in Santa Cruz (the last light in town before getting into the hinterlands), go 5.2 miles NW on Rt. 1, turn left and a quick right onto Coast Road, go 0.2 miles to an unnamed farm road on the left, where there is a small sign for 5511 Coast Rd and room for 3 or 4 cars to park. Walk or bike - do not drive - down the farm road to the railroad tracks, where there is a No Trespassing sign. The most direct route is to continue across the tracks and between some farm buildings to a dirt farm road on the west side of a willow-filled creek drainage heading toward the coast, but this route has several more No Trespassing signs, so I'm not recommending it. Perhaps a better route is to go left along the (inactive) railroad tracks a short distance, then right to another dirt road along the east side of the creek. Google Maps indicates this is a public path to a small unnamed (on Google) beach, but it still requires passing the No Trespassing sign at the tracks, hence my uncertainty about whether this route is any more legal than the first one. If you go this way, after a short distance the road drops into the creek drainage to a small pond. The trail to the beach continues down through the willows below the pond. To get to the cliffs, follow the road to the right around the bottom of the pond and back up the hill to where it meets the road along the west side of the creek mentioned above. Turn left and left again at the next intersection, then straight to the coast. If anyone knows more about the legality or illegality of approaching from Majors, please chime in.
>
> Another more difficult but more scenic and more clearly legal way is via Laguna Creek Beach. From the Rt 1/Western Drive light, go 5.9 miles on Rt. 1 to a rough parking lot on the right, at the 2nd intersection with Laguna Rd. Note that this lot is well known for car break-ins. From the N end of the lot, cross Rt. 1 (carefully) to a path through willows, across the tracks and down to the beach. Go left to the SE end of the beach and up a steep rocky path to the top of the bluff. This might be challenging if you are not comfortable with heights and steep terrain. At the top of the bluff, continue to the right to a boardwalk along the N side of Sand Hill. The path turns right along a row of cypresses and ends at the top of the cliffs a few yards west of the end of the farm road from Majors.
>
> There are several viewpoints along the cliffs. For the spot where we saw Black Swifts last night, go right a few yards to a vague short path that leads down to a long rock shelf. Walk to the far (N) end of the shelf where it overlooks a large sea cave. I think, but am not sure, that this is the western cave referred to in Alex's 2018 post below. For another spot, turn left at the end of the approach paths until you can see another rock shelf that forms a point projecting out to sea. From the end of this point you can see more caves on either side of the point.
>
> Per eBird and MBB posts, most BLSW sightings are within an hour of sunset when the birds are returning to their nesting or roosting sites in the caves after spending the day foraging up and down the coast. But you could get lucky and see them at other times of day. Sand Hill Bluff is in the fog belt, so when visiting in the evenings be prepared for cool to cold, overcast, windy and perhaps wet conditions no matter how warm and sunny it is elsewhere in the county.
>
> Good birding,
>
> Glen Tepke
> Santa Cruz
>
>
> On 7/23/2020 6:58 AM, <kyri...> <mailto:<kyri...> wrote:
>> Where exactly is Sand Hill Bluff? I get the feeling it's the place where the trail drops down and crosses the beach, and there's a tiny lagoon that often has a Snowy Egret in it -- is that right?
>>
>> I bird the Wilder coastal trail when I'm in town, but don't know the names of the landmarks along the way -- and Black Swift would be a life bird for me. Clearly I'm not there at the right time of day.
>>
>> Kyri Freeman
>>
>> Ben Lomond
>>
>> ---
>> My dark fantasy and historical fiction novels are available for Kindle on Amazon. Print copies also available.
>> On 2020-07-22 21:22, Glen Tepke wrote:
>>
>>> This evening at 8:11 pm (about 12 minutes before sunset, though it was hard to tell thanks to a heavy marine layer and light drizzle), three Black Swifts appeared out of nowhere right in front of our position near Sand Hill Bluff, flying SSE along the west-facing sea-cliff, made very abrupt 180-degree turns and flew back directly over our heads and rocketed into what I think is the westernmost sea-cave. They did not emerge in the 15 minutes we stayed after that. The whole show lasted about 10 seconds out of the 50 minutes we were out there, but that was good enough for an overdue county bird for us.
>>>
>>> Good birding,
>>>
>>> Glen Tepke & Carol Chetkovich
>>> Santa Cruz
>>>
>>>
>>> On 7/17/2020 11:25 PM, Liam Murphy wrote:
>>>> I've had several black swift sightings at Sand Hill Bluff this month as well. On July 2nd at around 7:25p I observed a group of 5 loosely grouped swifts flying southeast (down the coast) high and with a fairly determined pace. Perhaps these were on the way to Wilder if there is a larger colony there. This past weekend, 7/12, about 20 minutes after sunset as my girlfriend and I were trying to photograph a barn owl (who hunts the bluff reliably at sunset - seen 3 times now), a lone black swift flew low within 10 feet of us, moving west to east over the fields just shy of the cypress grove. The low altitude and late time of this sighting would lead me to believe this lone bird (and possibly more) could be roosting at the SHB caves.
>>>>
>>>> We, too, picked up a tick on our outing...be sure to check when you get home!
>>>>
>>>> Good birding,
>>>> Liam
>>>>
>>>>> On Jul 17, 2020, at 10:51 PM, David Kossack <dkossack...> <mailto:<dkossack...>> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> With BLACK SWIFTS active at Wilder Ranch I thought I might see what I could find at Sand Hill Bluff (see Alex Rinkert's description below from 2018). Sand Bluff is 1 - 2 miles west of Michael Bolte's siting at Old Cove Landing.
>>>>>
>>>>> I arrived at the shelf between the caves about 5pm, today, July 17, and stayed until 7pm. At 6:30 pm a solitary BLACK SWIFT appeared. The bird flew about the air space in front of the shelf for 15 - 30 seconds then disappeared. A second solitary BLACK SWIFT appeared not quite 10 minutes later. As before it occupied the airspace in front of the shelf for about 15 - 30 seconds, then dropped down on the east side of the shelf to water level and disappeared in the scatter. I believe that it went into the cave tucked closest to the shelf on the east side, it didn't go up... I didn't see any other BLACK SWIFTS this evening.
>>>>>
>>>>> The shelf is the same location visited by BLACK SWIFT field trip described below.
>>>>> Wind was minimal, ocean flat, temp. low 60s.
>>>>> A lot of birds calling for food, and a lot of ticks, too.
>>>>>
>>>>> David Kossack
>>>>> Santa Cruz
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>> On Aug 9, 2018, at 5:47 PM, Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...> <mailto:<arinkert12...>> wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>> On the morning of July 19 I visited Sand Hill Bluff to search the sea caves for BLACK SWIFT nests. I was only able to safely access the eastern caves (no nests) so I climbed to a vantage point where I could see the western caves and watched for a few hours. During that time I saw a single, silent swift fly into a cave on two occasions about an hour apart, staying inside the cave for several minutes on both visits, then exiting and flying directly inland. No socializing, no foraging, not carrying nest material. Around 2:15 PM a group of 6 swifts appeared and performed the most amazing aerial displays I have seen from this species. When the group arrived, one swift entered the same cave and stayed inside for several minutes while the others made audaciously close passes to the bluff face and ocean surface at breakneck speed. Wow. A few minutes later the other swift left the cave and joined the others for a while, then they all flew off.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Given the time of day and year, duration of visits, behavior and context, I would say there is an active nest in that cave. This species has not been confirmed breeding in Santa Cruz County since 1994, although observations at this location and perhaps elsewhere suggest they may have bred or attempted to in recent years.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> For anyone who wants to see the Black Swift, I will be leading an impromptu Santa Cruz Bird Club-sanctioned field trip on the evening of August 15 to Sand Hill Bluff. We will meet at 6:30 PM at the intersection of Highway 1 and Shaffer Road, and then will caravan to Sand Hill Bluff. Expect two miles of level walking and a brisk evening wind.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Alex Rinkert
>>>>>> Santa Cruz
>>>>>>
>>>>>> From: 'Paul Miller' via mbbirds [mailto:<mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...>]
>>>>>> Sent: Monday, July 23, 2018 10:35 AM
>>>>>> To: MBB Listserv
>>>>>> Subject: [MBBIRDS] Black Swifts
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Last night, for the 9th or 10th time, I headed out to Sand Hill Bluff to try for Black Swifts again.
>>>>>> I parked along Coast Rd. and rode my bike in to the site, past the farm with the red buildings.
>>>>>> This has been my nemesis bird for the last 3 years or so.
>>>>>> At around 745, 3-4 appeared and flew above the sea cave for about 20 seconds. They vocalized briefly.
>>>>>> I lost them and couldn't refind them in the next 10 minutes or so. I decided that a brief view was plenty good for me!
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I encourage you to head out there if you haven't seen Black Swifts. Stake it out at around 715 and be patient.
>>>>>> It would be interesting to see if someone could verify breeding. Any updates on that?
>>>>>> One more check mark--
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Paul Miller
>>>>>> Mount Hermon
>>>>>> --
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Back to top
Date: 8/4/20 1:30 pm
From: Julia van der Wyk <juliavdw11...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post
Hello all,
I think who we honor and why is an important issue to consider. If renaming some birds will move us toward dismantling systemic racism in our culture, I am for it. It won’t solve the greater problem but if it helps, to me that is a yes. I appreciate the thought and discussion from the article.
It is definitely an uncomfortable thought process but like most, well worth examining in ourselves and with our peers. we will all have our own take on it. I am glad for this thread.

–Julia v.


> On Aug 4, 2020, at 12:34 PM, larry corridon <larry961357...> <mailto:<larry961357...>> wrote:
>
> Thank you Jane for bringing this to our attention. It does shed light on a very different side of those researchers and educators from the past whose information we use and whose wisdom we respect. They have some very serious flaws (to say the least!)
>
> However, I have several thoughts, mostly negative about the last paragraph of this article. To further comment on or discuss them in the MBB forum could turn it into a political platform that I don’t think would be appropriate or welcome to the members.
>
> Also, I’m not sure how well I would do having to remember new names for many birds. I have enough trouble with the ones we have now!
>
>
>
>
>> On Aug 4, 2020, at 11:57, Randy Wardle <wrwardle...> <mailto:<wrwardle...>> wrote:
>>
>> Oh good grief!
>>
>> Randy Wardle
>> Aptos
>>
>> From: <mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...> <mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...>> on behalf of Jane Orbuch <jorbuch...> <mailto:<jorbuch...>>
>> Sent: Tuesday, August 4, 2020 5:42 PM
>> To: mbbirds <mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...>>
>> Subject: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post
>>
>> Not sure I agree with all of the below—but definitely worth being aware of, thinking about and perhaps taking action on.
>>>
>>> https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/08/04/american-bird-names-colonialism-audubon/?arc404=true&utm_campaign=wp_post_most&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_most <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/08/04/american-bird-names-colonialism-audubon/?arc404=true&utm_campaign=wp_post_most&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_most>
>>>
>>> What Confederate statues and some American bird names have in common
>>> By Gabriel Foley, Jordan Rutter
>>> August 4, 2020
>>> Gabriel Foley and Jordan Rutter are ornithologists and birders who created the website Bird Names for Birds <http://www.birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/>.
>>> Few figures tower over the study of American nature like John James Audubon <https://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/john-james-audubon-drawn-from-nature/106/> — and small wonder. His “Birds of North America” was the first work to catalog most of the continent’s native species in vivid color, introducing them to a wide and enthusiastic audience that endures today. He also described an astonishing 25 new bird species <https://johnjames.audubon.org/john-james-audubon-0>, while two other species — Audubon’s shearwater <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/audubons-shearwater> and Audubon’s oriole <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Audubons_Oriole/overview> — bear his name. Surely, most of us might think, this is an entirely fitting honor for someone who did so much for our understanding of the environment.
>>> <><NB2IJWFLGJHV7KCKYJSTHB5AQY.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
>>> Yet science never exists in a vacuum, and Audubon’s story has a dark side — one that goes beyond his notable penchant for exaggeration and scientific fakery <https://bioone.org/journals/bulletin-of-the-british-ornithologists-club/volume-140/issue-2/bboc.v140i2.2020.a3/Audubons-Bird-of-Washington--unravelling-the-fraud-that-launched/10.25226/bboc.v140i2.2020.a3.full>. After the Battle of San Jacinto in 1836, when mostly White Texans defeated a Mexican army <https://www.britannica.com/event/Battle-of-San-Jacinto-1836> not far from present-day Houston, Audubon scoured the battlefield for the remains of Mexican soldiers. He decapitated several bodies <https://matthewhalley.wordpress.com/2020/06/16/the-literal-skeletons-in-the-closet-of-american-ornithology/> and sent the heads to Samuel George Morton, a notorious practitioner of phrenology, a pseudoscience that attempted to use skull dimensions to prove the superiority of White Europeans to other races. For Audubon, this might have been just another way of practicing science — but his actions hardly align with modern values, and his scientific contributions do not excuse him from judgment.
>>> When we name an animal species after the person who first made it known to science, we are effectively honoring that person’s contribution. Unlike a name describing a bird’s color or habitat, there is nothing “natural” about honorific names: They imply a choice, and we can also choose not to honor the person whose name has been affixed to the species. Bachman’s sparrow <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bachmans_Sparrow/id>, Townsend’s warbler <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Townsends_Warbler/overview>, Bendire’s thrasher <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bendires_Thrasher/overview>, Hammond’s flycatcher <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Hammonds_Flycatcher/overview>, McCown’s longspur <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/McCowns_Longspur/id> — these are all examples of North American common bird names. For the bird community — ornithologists, bird-watchers, conservationists and more — these names are collectively referenced every day. For many, the esteem inherent in these names is unconsciously overlooked, and comfort lies in their familiarity.
>>> Yet these honorific names — known as eponyms — also cast long, dark shadows over our beloved birds and represent colonialism, racism and inequality. It is long overdue that we acknowledge the problem of such names, and it is long overdue that we should change them.
>>> <><CLVXK5LGFBHTVIPW6YMWJI7YRY.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
>>> The Rev. John Bachman <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/bachman-john/> was among those who argued vehemently against <https://books.google.com/books?id=yY8FAAAAQAAJ&> the abolition of slavery. “The negro,” he wrote, “is a striking and now permanent variety, like the numerous permanent varieties in domesticated animals,” adding that “his intellect, although underrated, is greatly inferior to that of the Caucasian, and that he is ... incapable of self-government.” John McCownserved as a general <https://www.audubon.org/news/-bird-world-grappling-its-own-confederate-relic-mccowns-longspur> in the Confederate Army. William Alexander Hammond <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/hammond-william-alexander/>, once a surgeon general of the United States, asked U.S. soldiers to send him the bodies of indigenous people for comparative anatomy studies. Charles Bendire <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/bendire-charles/> fought in the Battle of Canyon Creek, among other violent attacks on indigenous peoples. John Kirk Townsend <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/townsend-john-kirk/> desecrated the graves of Native Americans and sent their skulls to Morton for his infamous cranial studies.
>>> <><SEZHS6H5TNHZPNIAZOBN7NU7VI.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
>>> These men were among countless others who contributed to the library of knowledge we now rely on. They were active during the peak of scientific collection efforts in North America, efforts that were made possible by colonialism. But the westward expansion of the United States came at an incalculable cost to the country’s original inhabitants and their descendants today. To justify the harmful effects of their colonial actions, Europeans and Americans invented theories of race and civilization that conveniently labeled themselves as superior to everyone else. These theories led directly to the racism that still plagues our country today, affecting our society in countless insidious ways.
>>> The controversy over such names, which is now exciting passions within the bird community, mirrors similar conflicts over monuments to Confederates and colonialists now raging in the United States and elsewhere. Eponymous names serve as verbal statues: They are a memorial both to the colonial system that wove the fabric of systemic racism through every aspect of our lives — including the birds we see every day — and to the individuals who intentionally and directly perpetuated that system.
>>> <><XPH43PCUENBIJDHIMPBDLNA2DU.jpeg>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
>>> By rejecting the colonial monument that eponyms represent, we can show that we value inclusion and diversity in our community, and that we acknowledge the intrinsic worth of wildlife. We cannot subjectively decide — especially if the adjudicators are White — that some names can be retained because they are associated with less abhorrent pasts than others. We must remove all eponymous names. The stench of colonialism has saturated each of its participants, and the honor inherent within their names must be revoked.
>>> A bird’s beauty should not be marred by the baggage of an eponym. We could decide right now that the words we use matter, and that birds should carry their own history, not ours.
>>> Read more:
>>> Ty Seidule: What to rename the Army bases that honor Confederate soldiers <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/18/what-rename-army-bases-that-honor-confederate-soldiers/?arc404=true>
>>> Harry Anderson: My experience at a Confederate-named Army base shows why we need to rename them all — now <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/15/my-experience-confederate-named-army-base-shows-why-we-need-rename-them-all-now/>
>>> Christine Emba: Memorials to white supremacy are falling. What will replace them? <https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/opinions/confederate-statues-monuments/>
>>> David Von Drehle: Renaming military bases is not erasing history. It’s erasing propaganda. <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/renaming-military-bases-is-not-erasing-history-its-erasing-propaganda/2020/06/16/884a81a0-aff6-11ea-8758-bfd1d045525a_story.html>
>>> The Post’s View: Trump won’t remove Confederate names from military bases. So Congress and the Pentagon should. <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/trump-wont-remove-confederate-names-from-military-bases-so-congress-and-the-pentagon-should/2020/06/11/920624a6-ac09-11ea-94d2-d7bc43b26bf9_story.html>
>>> Robert W. Lee IV: Robert E. Lee is my ancestor. Take down his statue, and let his cause be lost. <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/07/robert-e-lee-is-my-ancestor-take-down-his-statue-let-his-cause-be-lost/>
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>
> Larry D. Corridon
> <larry961357...> <mailto:<larry961357...>
>
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Date: 8/4/20 12:34 pm
From: larry corridon <larry961357...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post
Thank you Jane for bringing this to our attention. It does shed light on a very different side of those researchers and educators from the past whose information we use and whose wisdom we respect. They have some very serious flaws (to say the least!)

However, I have several thoughts, mostly negative about the last paragraph of this article. To further comment on or discuss them in the MBB forum could turn it into a political platform that I don’t think would be appropriate or welcome to the members.

Also, I’m not sure how well I would do having to remember new names for many birds. I have enough trouble with the ones we have now!




> On Aug 4, 2020, at 11:57, Randy Wardle <wrwardle...> wrote:
>
> Oh good grief!
>
> Randy Wardle
> Aptos
>
> From: <mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...> <mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...>> on behalf of Jane Orbuch <jorbuch...> <mailto:<jorbuch...>>
> Sent: Tuesday, August 4, 2020 5:42 PM
> To: mbbirds <mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...>>
> Subject: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post
>
> Not sure I agree with all of the below—but definitely worth being aware of, thinking about and perhaps taking action on.
>>
>> https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/08/04/american-bird-names-colonialism-audubon/?arc404=true&utm_campaign=wp_post_most&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_most <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/08/04/american-bird-names-colonialism-audubon/?arc404=true&utm_campaign=wp_post_most&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_most>
>>
>> What Confederate statues and some American bird names have in common
>> By Gabriel Foley, Jordan Rutter
>> August 4, 2020
>> Gabriel Foley and Jordan Rutter are ornithologists and birders who created the website Bird Names for Birds <http://www.birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/>.
>> Few figures tower over the study of American nature like John James Audubon <https://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/john-james-audubon-drawn-from-nature/106/> — and small wonder. His “Birds of North America” was the first work to catalog most of the continent’s native species in vivid color, introducing them to a wide and enthusiastic audience that endures today. He also described an astonishing 25 new bird species <https://johnjames.audubon.org/john-james-audubon-0>, while two other species — Audubon’s shearwater <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/audubons-shearwater> and Audubon’s oriole <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Audubons_Oriole/overview> — bear his name. Surely, most of us might think, this is an entirely fitting honor for someone who did so much for our understanding of the environment.
>> <>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
>> Yet science never exists in a vacuum, and Audubon’s story has a dark side — one that goes beyond his notable penchant for exaggeration and scientific fakery <https://bioone.org/journals/bulletin-of-the-british-ornithologists-club/volume-140/issue-2/bboc.v140i2.2020.a3/Audubons-Bird-of-Washington--unravelling-the-fraud-that-launched/10.25226/bboc.v140i2.2020.a3.full>. After the Battle of San Jacinto in 1836, when mostly White Texans defeated a Mexican army <https://www.britannica.com/event/Battle-of-San-Jacinto-1836> not far from present-day Houston, Audubon scoured the battlefield for the remains of Mexican soldiers. He decapitated several bodies <https://matthewhalley.wordpress.com/2020/06/16/the-literal-skeletons-in-the-closet-of-american-ornithology/> and sent the heads to Samuel George Morton, a notorious practitioner of phrenology, a pseudoscience that attempted to use skull dimensions to prove the superiority of White Europeans to other races. For Audubon, this might have been just another way of practicing science — but his actions hardly align with modern values, and his scientific contributions do not excuse him from judgment.
>> When we name an animal species after the person who first made it known to science, we are effectively honoring that person’s contribution. Unlike a name describing a bird’s color or habitat, there is nothing “natural” about honorific names: They imply a choice, and we can also choose not to honor the person whose name has been affixed to the species. Bachman’s sparrow <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bachmans_Sparrow/id>, Townsend’s warbler <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Townsends_Warbler/overview>, Bendire’s thrasher <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bendires_Thrasher/overview>, Hammond’s flycatcher <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Hammonds_Flycatcher/overview>, McCown’s longspur <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/McCowns_Longspur/id> — these are all examples of North American common bird names. For the bird community — ornithologists, bird-watchers, conservationists and more — these names are collectively referenced every day. For many, the esteem inherent in these names is unconsciously overlooked, and comfort lies in their familiarity.
>> Yet these honorific names — known as eponyms — also cast long, dark shadows over our beloved birds and represent colonialism, racism and inequality. It is long overdue that we acknowledge the problem of such names, and it is long overdue that we should change them.
>> <>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
>> The Rev. John Bachman <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/bachman-john/> was among those who argued vehemently against <https://books.google.com/books?id=yY8FAAAAQAAJ&> the abolition of slavery. “The negro,” he wrote, “is a striking and now permanent variety, like the numerous permanent varieties in domesticated animals,” adding that “his intellect, although underrated, is greatly inferior to that of the Caucasian, and that he is ... incapable of self-government.” John McCownserved as a general <https://www.audubon.org/news/-bird-world-grappling-its-own-confederate-relic-mccowns-longspur> in the Confederate Army. William Alexander Hammond <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/hammond-william-alexander/>, once a surgeon general of the United States, asked U.S. soldiers to send him the bodies of indigenous people for comparative anatomy studies. Charles Bendire <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/bendire-charles/> fought in the Battle of Canyon Creek, among other violent attacks on indigenous peoples. John Kirk Townsend <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/townsend-john-kirk/> desecrated the graves of Native Americans and sent their skulls to Morton for his infamous cranial studies.
>> <>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
>> These men were among countless others who contributed to the library of knowledge we now rely on. They were active during the peak of scientific collection efforts in North America, efforts that were made possible by colonialism. But the westward expansion of the United States came at an incalculable cost to the country’s original inhabitants and their descendants today. To justify the harmful effects of their colonial actions, Europeans and Americans invented theories of race and civilization that conveniently labeled themselves as superior to everyone else. These theories led directly to the racism that still plagues our country today, affecting our society in countless insidious ways.
>> The controversy over such names, which is now exciting passions within the bird community, mirrors similar conflicts over monuments to Confederates and colonialists now raging in the United States and elsewhere. Eponymous names serve as verbal statues: They are a memorial both to the colonial system that wove the fabric of systemic racism through every aspect of our lives — including the birds we see every day — and to the individuals who intentionally and directly perpetuated that system.
>> <>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
>> By rejecting the colonial monument that eponyms represent, we can show that we value inclusion and diversity in our community, and that we acknowledge the intrinsic worth of wildlife. We cannot subjectively decide — especially if the adjudicators are White — that some names can be retained because they are associated with less abhorrent pasts than others. We must remove all eponymous names. The stench of colonialism has saturated each of its participants, and the honor inherent within their names must be revoked.
>> A bird’s beauty should not be marred by the baggage of an eponym. We could decide right now that the words we use matter, and that birds should carry their own history, not ours.
>> Read more:
>> Ty Seidule: What to rename the Army bases that honor Confederate soldiers <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/18/what-rename-army-bases-that-honor-confederate-soldiers/?arc404=true>
>> Harry Anderson: My experience at a Confederate-named Army base shows why we need to rename them all — now <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/15/my-experience-confederate-named-army-base-shows-why-we-need-rename-them-all-now/>
>> Christine Emba: Memorials to white supremacy are falling. What will replace them? <https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/opinions/confederate-statues-monuments/>
>> David Von Drehle: Renaming military bases is not erasing history. It’s erasing propaganda. <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/renaming-military-bases-is-not-erasing-history-its-erasing-propaganda/2020/06/16/884a81a0-aff6-11ea-8758-bfd1d045525a_story.html>
>> The Post’s View: Trump won’t remove Confederate names from military bases. So Congress and the Pentagon should. <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/trump-wont-remove-confederate-names-from-military-bases-so-congress-and-the-pentagon-should/2020/06/11/920624a6-ac09-11ea-94d2-d7bc43b26bf9_story.html>
>> Robert W. Lee IV: Robert E. Lee is my ancestor. Take down his statue, and let his cause be lost. <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/07/robert-e-lee-is-my-ancestor-take-down-his-statue-let-his-cause-be-lost/>
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Larry D. Corridon
<larry961357...>





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Date: 8/4/20 11:57 am
From: Randy Wardle <wrwardle...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post
Oh good grief!

Randy Wardle
Aptos

________________________________
From: <mbbirds...> <mbbirds...> on behalf of Jane Orbuch <jorbuch...>
Sent: Tuesday, August 4, 2020 5:42 PM
To: mbbirds <mbbirds...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post

Not sure I agree with all of the below—but definitely worth being aware of, thinking about and perhaps taking action on.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/08/04/american-bird-names-colonialism-audubon/?arc404=true&utm_campaign=wp_post_most&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_most

What Confederate statues and some American bird names have in common

By Gabriel Foley, Jordan Rutter

August 4, 2020

Gabriel Foley and Jordan Rutter are ornithologists and birders who created the website Bird Names for Birds<http://www.birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/>.

Few figures tower over the study of American nature like John James Audubon<https://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/john-james-audubon-drawn-from-nature/106/> — and small wonder. His “Birds of North America” was the first work to catalog most of the continent’s native species in vivid color, introducing them to a wide and enthusiastic audience that endures today. He also described an astonishing 25 new bird species<https://johnjames.audubon.org/john-james-audubon-0>, while two other species — Audubon’s shearwater<https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/audubons-shearwater> and Audubon’s oriole<https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Audubons_Oriole/overview> — bear his name. Surely, most of us might think, this is an entirely fitting honor for someone who did so much for our understanding of the environment.

[cid:<0B292175-91DD-4658-871A-5B47EDA759D2...>] (Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)

Yet science never exists in a vacuum, and Audubon’s story has a dark side — one that goes beyond his notable penchant for exaggeration and scientific fakery<https://bioone.org/journals/bulletin-of-the-british-ornithologists-club/volume-140/issue-2/bboc.v140i2.2020.a3/Audubons-Bird-of-Washington--unravelling-the-fraud-that-launched/10.25226/bboc.v140i2.2020.a3.full>. After the Battle of San Jacinto in 1836, when mostly White Texans defeated a Mexican army<https://www.britannica.com/event/Battle-of-San-Jacinto-1836> not far from present-day Houston, Audubon scoured the battlefield for the remains of Mexican soldiers. He decapitated several bodies<https://matthewhalley.wordpress.com/2020/06/16/the-literal-skeletons-in-the-closet-of-american-ornithology/> and sent the heads to Samuel George Morton, a notorious practitioner of phrenology, a pseudoscience that attempted to use skull dimensions to prove the superiority of White Europeans to other races. For Audubon, this might have been just another way of practicing science — but his actions hardly align with modern values, and his scientific contributions do not excuse him from judgment.

When we name an animal species after the person who first made it known to science, we are effectively honoring that person’s contribution. Unlike a name describing a bird’s color or habitat, there is nothing “natural” about honorific names: They imply a choice, and we can also choose not to honor the person whose name has been affixed to the species. Bachman’s sparrow<https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bachmans_Sparrow/id>, Townsend’s warbler<https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Townsends_Warbler/overview>, Bendire’s thrasher<https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bendires_Thrasher/overview>, Hammond’s flycatcher<https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Hammonds_Flycatcher/overview>, McCown’s longspur<https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/McCowns_Longspur/id> — these are all examples of North American common bird names. For the bird community — ornithologists, bird-watchers, conservationists and more — these names are collectively referenced every day. For many, the esteem inherent in these names is unconsciously overlooked, and comfort lies in their familiarity.

Yet these honorific names — known as eponyms — also cast long, dark shadows over our beloved birds and represent colonialism, racism and inequality. It is long overdue that we acknowledge the problem of such names, and it is long overdue that we should change them.

[cid:<E11AF8F1-9205-486F-9A9F-E27723BEEAD0...>] (Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)

The Rev. John Bachman<https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/bachman-john/> was among those who argued vehemently against<https://books.google.com/books?id=yY8FAAAAQAAJ&> the abolition of slavery. “The negro,” he wrote, “is a striking and now permanent variety, like the numerous permanent varieties in domesticated animals,” adding that “his intellect, although underrated, is greatly inferior to that of the Caucasian, and that he is ... incapable of self-government.” John McCown served as a general<https://www.audubon.org/news/-bird-world-grappling-its-own-confederate-relic-mccowns-longspur> in the Confederate Army. William Alexander Hammond<https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/hammond-william-alexander/>, once a surgeon general of the United States, asked U.S. soldiers to send him the bodies of indigenous people for comparative anatomy studies. Charles Bendire<https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/bendire-charles/> fought in the Battle of Canyon Creek, among other violent attacks on indigenous peoples. John Kirk Townsend<https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/townsend-john-kirk/> desecrated the graves of Native Americans and sent their skulls to Morton for his infamous cranial studies.

[cid:<30C7DB30-8CED-492F-92DA-F5073B5A3160...>] (Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)

These men were among countless others who contributed to the library of knowledge we now rely on. They were active during the peak of scientific collection efforts in North America, efforts that were made possible by colonialism. But the westward expansion of the United States came at an incalculable cost to the country’s original inhabitants and their descendants today. To justify the harmful effects of their colonial actions, Europeans and Americans invented theories of race and civilization that conveniently labeled themselves as superior to everyone else. These theories led directly to the racism that still plagues our country today, affecting our society in countless insidious ways.

The controversy over such names, which is now exciting passions within the bird community, mirrors similar conflicts over monuments to Confederates and colonialists now raging in the United States and elsewhere. Eponymous names serve as verbal statues: They are a memorial both to the colonial system that wove the fabric of systemic racism through every aspect of our lives — including the birds we see every day — and to the individuals who intentionally and directly perpetuated that system.

[cid:<EFD8FD93-7053-4CE4-88CB-672F73BA61D4...>] (Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)

By rejecting the colonial monument that eponyms represent, we can show that we value inclusion and diversity in our community, and that we acknowledge the intrinsic worth of wildlife. We cannot subjectively decide — especially if the adjudicators are White — that some names can be retained because they are associated with less abhorrent pasts than others. We must remove all eponymous names. The stench of colonialism has saturated each of its participants, and the honor inherent within their names must be revoked.

A bird’s beauty should not be marred by the baggage of an eponym. We could decide right now that the words we use matter, and that birds should carry their own history, not ours.

Read more:

Ty Seidule: What to rename the Army bases that honor Confederate soldiers<https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/18/what-rename-army-bases-that-honor-confederate-soldiers/?arc404=true>

Harry Anderson: My experience at a Confederate-named Army base shows why we need to rename them all — now<https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/15/my-experience-confederate-named-army-base-shows-why-we-need-rename-them-all-now/>

Christine Emba: Memorials to white supremacy are falling. What will replace them?<https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/opinions/confederate-statues-monuments/>

David Von Drehle: Renaming military bases is not erasing history. It’s erasing propaganda.<https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/renaming-military-bases-is-not-erasing-history-its-erasing-propaganda/2020/06/16/884a81a0-aff6-11ea-8758-bfd1d045525a_story.html>

The Post’s View: Trump won’t remove Confederate names from military bases. So Congress and the Pentagon should.<https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/trump-wont-remove-confederate-names-from-military-bases-so-congress-and-the-pentagon-should/2020/06/11/920624a6-ac09-11ea-94d2-d7bc43b26bf9_story.html>

Robert W. Lee IV: Robert E. Lee is my ancestor. Take down his statue, and let his cause be lost.<https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/07/robert-e-lee-is-my-ancestor-take-down-his-statue-let-his-cause-be-lost/>

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Back to top
Date: 8/4/20 10:42 am
From: Jane Orbuch <jorbuch...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Remove all eponymous American bird names - The Washington Post
Not sure I agree with all of the below—but definitely worth being aware of, thinking about and perhaps taking action on.
>
> https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/08/04/american-bird-names-colonialism-audubon/?arc404=true&utm_campaign=wp_post_most&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_most <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/08/04/american-bird-names-colonialism-audubon/?arc404=true&utm_campaign=wp_post_most&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_most>
>
> What Confederate statues and some American bird names have in common
>
> By Gabriel Foley, Jordan Rutter
>
> August 4, 2020
>
> Gabriel Foley and Jordan Rutter are ornithologists and birders who created the website Bird Names for Birds <http://www.birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/>.
>
> Few figures tower over the study of American nature like John James Audubon <https://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/john-james-audubon-drawn-from-nature/106/> — and small wonder. His “Birds of North America” was the first work to catalog most of the continent’s native species in vivid color, introducing them to a wide and enthusiastic audience that endures today. He also described an astonishing 25 new bird species <https://johnjames.audubon.org/john-james-audubon-0>, while two other species — Audubon’s shearwater <https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/audubons-shearwater> and Audubon’s oriole <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Audubons_Oriole/overview> — bear his name. Surely, most of us might think, this is an entirely fitting honor for someone who did so much for our understanding of the environment.
>
> <>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
> Yet science never exists in a vacuum, and Audubon’s story has a dark side — one that goes beyond his notable penchant for exaggeration and scientific fakery <https://bioone.org/journals/bulletin-of-the-british-ornithologists-club/volume-140/issue-2/bboc.v140i2.2020.a3/Audubons-Bird-of-Washington--unravelling-the-fraud-that-launched/10.25226/bboc.v140i2.2020.a3.full>. After the Battle of San Jacinto in 1836, when mostly White Texans defeated a Mexican army <https://www.britannica.com/event/Battle-of-San-Jacinto-1836> not far from present-day Houston, Audubon scoured the battlefield for the remains of Mexican soldiers. He decapitated several bodies <https://matthewhalley.wordpress.com/2020/06/16/the-literal-skeletons-in-the-closet-of-american-ornithology/> and sent the heads to Samuel George Morton, a notorious practitioner of phrenology, a pseudoscience that attempted to use skull dimensions to prove the superiority of White Europeans to other races. For Audubon, this might have been just another way of practicing science — but his actions hardly align with modern values, and his scientific contributions do not excuse him from judgment.
>
> When we name an animal species after the person who first made it known to science, we are effectively honoring that person’s contribution. Unlike a name describing a bird’s color or habitat, there is nothing “natural” about honorific names: They imply a choice, and we can also choose not to honor the person whose name has been affixed to the species. Bachman’s sparrow <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bachmans_Sparrow/id>, Townsend’s warbler <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Townsends_Warbler/overview>, Bendire’s thrasher <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bendires_Thrasher/overview>, Hammond’s flycatcher <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Hammonds_Flycatcher/overview>, McCown’s longspur <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/McCowns_Longspur/id> — these are all examples of North American common bird names. For the bird community — ornithologists, bird-watchers, conservationists and more — these names are collectively referenced every day. For many, the esteem inherent in these names is unconsciously overlooked, and comfort lies in their familiarity.
>
> Yet these honorific names — known as eponyms — also cast long, dark shadows over our beloved birds and represent colonialism, racism and inequality. It is long overdue that we acknowledge the problem of such names, and it is long overdue that we should change them.
>
> <>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
> The Rev. John Bachman <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/bachman-john/> was among those who argued vehemently against <https://books.google.com/books?id=yY8FAAAAQAAJ&> the abolition of slavery. “The negro,” he wrote, “is a striking and now permanent variety, like the numerous permanent varieties in domesticated animals,” adding that “his intellect, although underrated, is greatly inferior to that of the Caucasian, and that he is ... incapable of self-government.” John McCown served as a general <https://www.audubon.org/news/-bird-world-grappling-its-own-confederate-relic-mccowns-longspur> in the Confederate Army. William Alexander Hammond <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/hammond-william-alexander/>, once a surgeon general of the United States, asked U.S. soldiers to send him the bodies of indigenous people for comparative anatomy studies. Charles Bendire <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/bendire-charles/> fought in the Battle of Canyon Creek, among other violent attacks on indigenous peoples. John Kirk Townsend <https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/historical-profiles/profiles-a-z/townsend-john-kirk/> desecrated the graves of Native Americans and sent their skulls to Morton for his infamous cranial studies.
>
> <>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
> These men were among countless others who contributed to the library of knowledge we now rely on. They were active during the peak of scientific collection efforts in North America, efforts that were made possible by colonialism. But the westward expansion of the United States came at an incalculable cost to the country’s original inhabitants and their descendants today. To justify the harmful effects of their colonial actions, Europeans and Americans invented theories of race and civilization that conveniently labeled themselves as superior to everyone else. These theories led directly to the racism that still plagues our country today, affecting our society in countless insidious ways.
>
> The controversy over such names, which is now exciting passions within the bird community, mirrors similar conflicts over monuments to Confederates and colonialists now raging in the United States and elsewhere. Eponymous names serve as verbal statues: They are a memorial both to the colonial system that wove the fabric of systemic racism through every aspect of our lives — including the birds we see every day — and to the individuals who intentionally and directly perpetuated that system.
>
> <>(Sergio Peçanha/The Washington Post)
> By rejecting the colonial monument that eponyms represent, we can show that we value inclusion and diversity in our community, and that we acknowledge the intrinsic worth of wildlife. We cannot subjectively decide — especially if the adjudicators are White — that some names can be retained because they are associated with less abhorrent pasts than others. We must remove all eponymous names. The stench of colonialism has saturated each of its participants, and the honor inherent within their names must be revoked.
>
> A bird’s beauty should not be marred by the baggage of an eponym. We could decide right now that the words we use matter, and that birds should carry their own history, not ours.
>
> Read more:
>
> Ty Seidule: What to rename the Army bases that honor Confederate soldiers <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/18/what-rename-army-bases-that-honor-confederate-soldiers/?arc404=true>
> Harry Anderson: My experience at a Confederate-named Army base shows why we need to rename them all — now <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/15/my-experience-confederate-named-army-base-shows-why-we-need-rename-them-all-now/>
> Christine Emba: Memorials to white supremacy are falling. What will replace them? <https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/opinions/confederate-statues-monuments/>
> David Von Drehle: Renaming military bases is not erasing history. It’s erasing propaganda. <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/renaming-military-bases-is-not-erasing-history-its-erasing-propaganda/2020/06/16/884a81a0-aff6-11ea-8758-bfd1d045525a_story.html>
> The Post’s View: Trump won’t remove Confederate names from military bases. So Congress and the Pentagon should. <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/trump-wont-remove-confederate-names-from-military-bases-so-congress-and-the-pentagon-should/2020/06/11/920624a6-ac09-11ea-94d2-d7bc43b26bf9_story.html>
> Robert W. Lee IV: Robert E. Lee is my ancestor. Take down his statue, and let his cause be lost. <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/07/robert-e-lee-is-my-ancestor-take-down-his-statue-let-his-cause-be-lost/>

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Date: 8/3/20 9:00 pm
From: larry corridon <larry961357...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Jupiter's moons
I know this isn’t about birds, but had I had to pass this on. I hope it’s ok with everyone,

If you have a view to the Southeast and a scope, not too far above the horizon, Jupiter is clearly visible right now, as are it’s 4 largest moons. The moon is rising and that may affect the visibility soon. It’s the view Galileo had when he first looked to the heavens.

Larry D. Corridon
<larry961357...>





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Date: 8/1/20 5:13 pm
From: Don Roberson <creagrus...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] MTY highlights updated
The bird summer highlights through July 2020 have now been updated at
http://creagrus.home.montereybay.com/MTY_2020b.html

Thanks to Terence Degan, Michael Rieser, Carole Rose, and Kent Van Vuren for new July photos!

Be safe,
Don Roberson

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Date: 8/1/20 4:55 pm
From: Jeff Manker <fireweed8...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Re: A Surf Scoter that has a white wing
Something you don't see everyday. A Surf Scoter in the north end of Moss
Landing Harbor had an all white, left wing. NOT a White-winged Scoter, but
a white-winged Surf Scoter!

Jeff Manker

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Date: 7/31/20 10:59 pm
From: Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Monterey pelagics - we are on. Info and some details.
Hello all,

I hope you are all well, safe and staying healthy. I wanted to mention
that our first Monterey pelagic trip is on Aug 14. We have been operating
pelagic trips out of Half Moon Bay under county guidance for keeping us safe
during this pandemic. We will be using similar protocols in Monterey, where
whale watching has been happening for a few weeks now. First of all, we will
be at less than half of total numbers the boat capacity, mandatory masks,
and encouraging people to be outside as opposed to inside the cabin, in
addition to protocols for cleaning, and sanitizing. For the Aug 14 trip we
are currently scheduled on the Sea Wolf, a larger boat than the Pt. Sur
Clipper facilitating social distancing given the reduced number of clients
on the trip. We have had to temporarily increase prices while this process
is happening. Note that 8 hour trips (Aug 23) is shorter and less expensive
than the Albacore trips.

But enough of the realities, let's dream a little! There has been some
warm water offshore, reaching 62 F at the outer buoy in Monterey recently.
Also Bluefin Tuna have been around, which is unusual. A sign that there has
been a northward movement of southern creatures. We found a Nazca Booby on
the Farallon Islands, and 5 Brown Boobies have been there, suggesting this
could be a good booby year offshore. As well, farther north some great
activity has been happening birdwise, and we expect that offshore Monterey
is likely equally interesting. We will be the first birding boat out this
season and we are looking forward to it. Baird's Beaked Whales were seen
offshore recently, always a good sign. We have great hopes and that tingling
excitement of the unknown and possibilities for our Monterey trips this
August. We hope that some of you may be able to join us this year. To book a
spot, and remember they are limited this year, please go to our website:

https://www.alvarosadventures.com/pelagic-dates-2020.html

Looking forward to some nice Monterey boat trips! Keep safe, healthy and
sane. Get out birding, get outside and take in the best medicine of all to
calm nerves and stress - birds and nature.

Alvaro



Alvaro Jaramillo

<mailto:<alvaro...> <alvaro...>

www.alvarosadventures.com



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Date: 7/31/20 9:47 am
From: larry corridon <larry961357...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Fwd: Kerry James Marshall’s Black Birds Take Flight in a New Series - The New York Times

>
> Here is an interesting article about birds, J. J. Audubon, race, and a great contemporary artist. I hope it opens ok or is already opened for you. If it is too big for anyones computer, please let me know and I won’t send something like this again.
>>
>> https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/29/arts/design/kerry-james-marshall-audubon.html?campaign_id=2&emc=edit_th_20200731&instance_id=20856&nl=todaysheadlines&regi_id=59067893&segment_id=34861&user_id=f4a9bf3b91ed991119faacf64100e89e <https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/29/arts/design/kerry-james-marshall-audubon.html?campaign_id=2&emc=edit_th_20200731&instance_id=20856&nl=todaysheadlines&regi_id=59067893&segment_id=34861&user_id=f4a9bf3b91ed991119faacf64100e89e>
>>
>> Kerry James Marshall’s Black Birds Take Flight in a New Series
>> Inspired by John James Audubon, the painter explores the societal “pecking order” in two works that dovetail with “this mystery about whether or not Audubon himself was Black.”
>>
>> By Ted Loos <https://www.nytimes.com/by/ted-loos>Updated July 30, 2020
>>
>> Kerry James Marshall’s “Black and part Black Birds in America: (Crow, Goldfinch),” 2020. It is one of two new works by the artist that David Zwirner Gallery will put on view this week.Kerry James Marshall and David Zwirner
>> About 10 years ago, the artist Kerry James Marshall caught a crow with his bare hands.
>>
>> The bird was cornered awkwardly near Mr. Marshall’s home on the South Side of Chicago, and curiosity got the better of him. “I’ve always been impressed by that kind of bird,” he recalled the other day.
>>
>> Mr. Marshall, widely acknowledged as one of the best painters working today, wanted to photograph and take video of the crow, since he often used such documentation as the basis for his work (he prefers props now). So he grabbed it and took it home.
>>
>> “At first he screamed like he was being murdered,” Mr. Marshall said. “The minute I put him by my side, he got quiet.”
>>
>> On his second-floor deck, Mr. Marshall tied a cord to the crow’s leg, and provided a meal of mulberries “so he wouldn’t starve.” He showed the crow to his wife and documented the bird as planned. The next day, he let the bird go.
>>
>> Some days later, he saw the crow being menaced by a cat. Mr. Marshall recalled: “So I picked up a rock and threw it at the cat. And I swear to God, that same bird, he stood there just looking at me. And I said, ‘You better keep your butt off the ground because I’m not going to be around to save you the next time.’”
>>
>> The crow meeting, which started out as research, somehow edged into a metaphysical encounter with deeper meanings, and it now informs Mr. Marshall’s newest series of paintings. His first two canvases officially debut Thursday in an online show, “Studio: Kerry James Marshall <https://www.davidzwirner.com/viewing-room/studio-kerry-james-marshall>, at David Zwirner Gallery through Aug. 30.
>>
>> As he has for decades, Mr. Marshall, 64, has harnessed history, especially the history of painting, in these new canvases: They are his reimagining of John James Audubon’s landmark series, “Birds of America,” <https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america> the painstakingly rendered 435 watercolors made in the first half of the 19th century, significant achievements in the fields of both ornithology and art.
>>
>> In one image, “Black and part Black Birds in America: (Crow, Goldfinch),” a large crow dominates the canvas, clearly too large for the birdhouses depicted behind it. There are glorious leaves, flowers and a small goldfinch in the bottom left corner. In the other picture, finished just last week, “Black and part Black Birds in America: (Grackle, Cardinal & Rose-breasted Grosbeak),” a grackle is the protagonist with a dainty birdhouse and brightly colored flowers. The cardinal and grosbeak are both flying in different directions, giving them a sense of being at cross purposes with the grackle.
>>
>>
>> Kerry James Marshall is a bird enthusiast — and he also collects plastic flowers, which he uses as props in his painting.Andres Gonzalez
>> “There’s a disconnect between the house that’s built and the birds,” Mr. Marshall said of the crow and grackle. “It’s not designed for them, you know?” The scene considers, he said, “the pecking order.”
>>
>> The series itself has been brewing in Mr. Marshall’s mind for eight or nine years, he said, and he began painting the works just before transmissions of the coronavirus accelerated in the United States in March.
>>
>> A casual bird enthusiast who has been fascinated by Audubon’s draughtsmanship since he was a child, Mr. Marshall has long put Black protagonists at the center of his complex, richly layered compositions. “Many Mansions” <https://www.artic.edu/artworks/137125/many-mansions>(1994), one of his large-scale depictions of housing projects, features three Black men gardening — and, not incidentally, there are two bluebirds holding up a banner, too. The pointed inclusion of Black figures is part of what he has called a “counter-archive” to the familiar, white-centered story of Western art.
>>
>> For the new series, the images hinge on Audubon’s own racial heritage: Many people believe he was, as Mr. Marshall’s title suggests, “part Black” — born in what is now Haiti, as Jean Rabin, to a white, plantation-owning father and a Creole chambermaid who may have been of racially-mixed descent. But, the theory goes, he was able to pass as white.
>>
>> Not everyone agrees on this narrative. The biographer Richard Rhodes, author of “John James Audubon: The Making of an American, <https://www.nytimes.com/2004/10/31/books/review/john-james-audubon-the-birdman-of-america.html> said that Audubon’s biological mother was a white French chambermaid who died months after childbirth. “I know Audubon has been an inspiration to many people of color,” Mr. Rhodes said, adding that he felt “terrible” about not being able to support the theory.
>>
>> But for Mr. Marshall, what he called the “mystery” of Audubon’s parentage has fueled his imagination since 1976, when he saw the Los Angeles County Museum of Art exhibition “Two Centuries of Black American Art: 1750-1950.” <https://www.lacma.org/art/exhibition/two-centuries-black-american-art> Organized by the curator and scholar David C. Driskell <https://driskellcenterarchives.wordpress.com/tag/two-centuries-of-black-american-art-1750-1950/>, the show included Audubon’s work, a surprise to many at the time.
>>
>> “I didn’t know what to make of it, honestly,” said Mr. Marshall, who was a student at what is now the Otis College of Art and Design. “If somebody did the research and put it in a book, then maybe it must be true. And I never forgot that assertion was made.”
>>
>>
>> Kerry James Marshall, “Black and part Black Birds in America: (Grackle, Cardinal & Rose-breasted Grosbeak),” 2020.Kerry James Marshall and David Zwirner
>> He referenced the notorious “one drop rule” — that someone with one drop of Black blood made the person Black.
>>
>> “That’s the key to the whole thing,” Mr. Marshall said of his new series, noting that in “Black and part Black” he included a goldfinch, a bird that also has black markings but is named for its yellow color. “And it dovetails with this mystery about whether or not Audubon himself was Black.”
>>
>> Helen Molesworth <https://www.moca.org/exhibition/kerry-james-marshall-mastry>, who was a co-organizer of a 2016-17 retrospective of Mr. Marshall’s work, “Kerry James Marshall: Mastry <https://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/21/arts/design/kerry-james-marshalls-paintings-show-what-it-means-to-be-black-in-america.html>, when she was chief curator of the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, said that his foregrounding of birds was significant.
>>
>> “He’s known as a figurative painter, but in these he has left the human figure out,” said Ms. Molesworth, who has seen photographs of the new paintings.
>>
>> “His paintings have been filled with birds all along,” she added. “If you wanted to go birding in a Kerry James Marshall show, you could. People were paying so much attention to the human figure in his work, the birds may have gone unexamined.”
>>
>> Examples include “They Know That I Know” <https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/668312> (1992), “Bang” <https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/668319> (1994) and “7 am Sunday Morning” <https://mcachicago.org/Collection/Items/2003/Kerry-James-Marshall-7am-Sunday-Morning-2003> (2003), all depicting birds as supporting players.
>>
>> Ms. Molesworth, a birder herself, said the new works were evidence that Mr. Marshall is a “polymath, deeply interested in a lot of things. He thinks the world is filled with knowledge, and all of it is available to him.”
>>
>> His deep dives started early. Born in Birmingham, Ala., in 1955, Mr. Marshall moved to the South Central area of Los Angeles when he was a child, and the public library on Central Avenue was a primary destination as of age 8 or 9.
>>
>> “I’d pick out books by the stack,” he said. “You had a limit of 10, so I would get 10 every time I went.”
>>
>> Books depicting reptiles, birds and insects were first, and soon after came Audubon’s images. “They appealed to me for two reasons,” he said. “One, the way he set up the images and tableaus to create some drama, they were beautifully done — and they were hand-drawn.”
>>
>> The Belgian painter Luc Tuymans <https://www.davidzwirner.com/artists/luc-tuymans>, a friend of Mr. Marshall’s, noted that he is an intensely “deliberate” painter, and that Audubon’s obsessive meticulousness would naturally have appealed.
>>
>> James Rondeau, the director of the Art Institute of Chicago <https://www.artic.edu/artists/47905/kerry-james-marshall>, hadn’t seen the new series yet, but as someone who knows Mr. Marshall well, he said it was typical of the artist to attempt to highlight “not only the Black experience, but Black expertise,” referring to painting as well as ornithology.
>>
>>
>> “Black and part Black Birds in America: (Grackle, Cardinal & Rose-breasted Grosbeak),” in progress at Kerry James Marshall’s studio in Chicago. Kerry James Marshall and David Zwirner
>> Mr. Marshall was well underway with his series when, in May, Christian Cooper, a director of New York City Audubon, who is Black, was birding in Central Park <https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/14/nyregion/central-park-amy-cooper-christian-racism.html>, and he asked a white woman to leash her dog. She threatened to call the police and tell them “an African-American man is threatening my life.” The collision exposed a deep vein of racial bias and was a blatant example of the routine humiliations in the daily life of African-Americans.
>>
>> Mr. Marshall’s reaction to news of the incident did not dwell on the conflict. Rather, he said he felt some kind of kinship to Mr. Cooper — who was in the park pursuing a field he knows well and had memorized “The Birds of North America” when he was 11 — and related to expertise that transcends race.
>>
>> “There are assumptions about the kinds of things that Black people do and are interested in,” he said, adding that he wanted to push back on the idea that “all Black people’s lives are consumed by trauma. I’m not thinking about trauma all day.”
>>
>> What consumes this artist is paint itself.
>>
>> Mr. Marshall can talk about color theory for hours. The crow and the grackle in the “Black and part Black” pictures are particularly nuanced.
>>
>> “I have to be able to show that it’s not just a silhouette; it has volume, it breathes,” he said. “And so I had to figure out how to make that happen but not diminish the fundamental blackness of the thing.”
>>
>> To do that, Mr. Marshall painstakingly adjusts both the chroma (the warmth or coolness) and the value (the amount of light or dark) by mixing colors like raw sienna, chrome green, cobalt blue, and violet with black pigments.
>>
>> It’s among the things that Mr. Tuymans noticed first in the 1990s, when he got to know Mr. Marshall and his work. He called Mr. Marshall’s attention to blackness, at a time when it was a more radical move, “decisive and unapologetic.”
>>
>> True, but in painting, bravery only makes a difference if the artist has the tools, and the focus, to get the message across.
>>
>> “The picture plane is the site of every action,” Mr. Marshall said. He seemed to be speaking not only about the painting process but also how he conducts his whole life — after all, this is a man who captured a live crow to get to know it better. “How things occupy that space,” he added, “matters more than anything.”
>>
>
>
> Larry D. Corridon
> <larry961357...> <mailto:<larry961357...>
>
>
>
>
>

Larry D. Corridon
<larry961357...>





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Date: 7/30/20 7:47 pm
From: Carol Pecot <carol.pecot...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Swift article
With all of the Black Swift observation going on, I thought I’d pass on a lovely piece about Swifts in the New York Times today. The Vespers flight was very interesting, but the whole article was very good.

Carol Pecot
Downhill from Summit

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/29/magazine/vesper-flights.html?action=click&module=Editors%20Picks&pgtype=Homepage

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Date: 7/29/20 1:45 pm
From: Phil Brown <pdpbrown...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Jim Williams
Hi All,
I received this news today, For those who do not know him, Jim is a
wonderful gentleman who has been a stalwart in the Santa Cruz birding
community for many years, Phil Brown

Richard James ran into Ann Williams at our post office today and she told
him that Jim Williams had a stroke last Thursday and is in the hospital and
recovering.

This apparently happened in their house in Ben Lomond and he was found by
his daughter-in-law within the 3 hour critical time period after onset and
was rushed to the hospital. When he collapsed he also broke his right ankle
in two places so he also had orthopedic surgery. The stroke is still
affecting his left side but his speech is not as slurred as originally
noted directly after the event and he is getting better and he is cognizant
of everything he should be considering what happened. It was a hemolytic
stroke where a blood vessel burst in his brain and the blood pooled and
caused pressure and the stroke. He's had brain surgery and had the vessel
repaired but there is currently no prognosis when he will get out of the
hospital or return home. Ann is visiting regularly via FaceTime and no
physical visitors are allowed to see him.

Ann asked Richard to share this information since she hasn't taken the time
to try to figure out all to contact. Fingers crossed and prayers.

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Date: 7/27/20 6:23 pm
From: Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Black Swift survey results
Yesterday evening we conducted a coordinated survey to estimate the
population of BLACK SWIFTS on the coast between Año Nuevo and Santa Cruz.
Twenty observers were stationed along the coast between 6:30-8:30 PM at
locations where swifts are known or suspected to be nesting, as well as at
historical nesting locations. The weather could not have been better for
observing. And now the results!



· A minimum of 22 Black Swifts were observed on the coast last
night. This of course may not include any that are sitting on nests right
now.

· Only 4 of 11 (36%) major areas had activity that suggested
nesting. These areas were Año Nuevo, Sand Hill Bluff, Wilder Ranch, and near
Davenport.

· High counts at these four sites ranged from 3 to 7 swifts.

· Most sightings were between 7:00-8:30 PM. (The survey ended at
8:30.)



Thanks to all the observers who helped make this happen on short notice.



Alex Rinkert

Santa Cruz

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Date: 7/26/20 5:59 pm
From: Don Roberson <creagrus...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] pygmy-owls under the redwoods
Well done, Alex.

For those who have the Monterey County Breeding Bird Atlas, more on the story of the begging call of N. Pygmy-Owl is found at p. 162, which was helpful to confirm breeding in that species in MTY as well. Joseph Grinnell described it from the Little Sur River back in 1902 (“a strange cry, a sort of shrill whinnying call”) but the vocalization, notes the Atlas, “seems to have been overlooked in the more recent literature.”

Thanks,

Don Roberson

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Date: 7/26/20 4:53 pm
From: Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] waxwings nesting again at CARE
Following up on a report from Elisabeth yesterday, I visited CARE Park this
morning and found a pair of CEDAR WAXWINGS tending an active nest high in a
tree. I think the nest has eggs based on the pair's behavior. The female
would sit on the nest for a while, then the male would come push her off the
nest and they would fly together to an elderberry where he would then feed
her. This is the ninth waxwing nest that has been found in the lower Pajaro
Valley since 2016. Depending on when the eggs were laid, it may end up being
the second latest of these nine nests.



https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/251753701



Alex Rinkert

Santa Cruz

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Date: 7/26/20 4:07 pm
From: Jeff Manker <fireweed8...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] pygmy-owls under the redwoods
Thanks for the tips and for being a good sport. It was all in the name of
fun.

Jeff

On Sun, Jul 26, 2020 at 4:04 PM Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...> wrote:

> I can neither confirm nor deny the legends are true, but to answer Jeff’s
> question: a) cover a lot of ground, and b) listen for the begging trill of
> the fledgling pygmy-owls. Their begging call is similar to the song of a
> Chipping Sparrow or Dark-eyed Junco, which is easier to pick out at this
> time of year now that most juncos have stopped singing.
>
>
>
> Alex
>
>
>
> *From:* <mbbirds...> [mailto:<mbbirds...>] *On
> Behalf Of *Jeff Manker
> *Sent:* Saturday, July 25, 2020 10:00 PM
> *To:* Randy Wardle
> *Cc:* mbbirds
> *Subject:* Re: [MBBIRDS] pygmy-owls under the redwoods
>
>
>
> I knew the legends were true!
>
>
>
> On Sat, Jul 25, 2020 at 8:58 PM Randy Wardle <wrwardle...> wrote:
>
> Jeff, I have birded many times with Alex and believe me when I tell you he
> is not only an Owl Whisperer, he is a BIRD Whisperer. As he levitates
> slowly along about a foot above the ground, Alex doesn't come to the birds,
> the birds come to him!
>
>
>
> Randy Wardle
>
> Aptos
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> *From:* <mbbirds...> <mbbirds...> on behalf of
> Jeff Manker <fireweed8...>
> *Sent:* Saturday, July 25, 2020 9:44 PM
> *To:* Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...>
> *Cc:* mbbirds <mbbirds...>
> *Subject:* Re: [MBBIRDS] pygmy-owls under the redwoods
>
>
>
> Alex,
>
>
>
> I don’t know if you are some kind of Owl whisperer or what, but for those
> of us who are trying to find ONE Northern Pygmy Owl (much less FIVE pairs!)
> for our Breeding Bird survey blocks, do have any tips on how to find them?
>
>
>
> I’m picturing you in the lotus position, levitating a foot off the ground,
> in a quiet forest glen when a wise old Northern Pygmy Owl alights on your
> shoulder and whispers “You have now achieved mastery, follow me”, then
> proceeds to show you every nest in the forest.
>
>
>
> That or you are hearing something, seeing something, are in the right
> place and time or are incredibly lucky. Please tell me it is not the
> levitating thing.
>
>
>
> Jeff Manker
>
>
>
> On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 4:59 PM Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...>
> wrote:
>
> I’ve had a good run of atlasing at the redwood state parks over the past
> ten days. The highlight has been finding no less than FIVE families of
> NORTHERN PYGMY-OWLS with begging fledglings. Atlas data shows July is the
> best time to find fledglings, but I did not see this surge coming. Family
> groups were found near Rancho Del Oso on July 15, Portola State Park on
> July 17, Butano State Park on July 22, and two families at Big Basin on
> July 23. I had an opportunity to spend some time with the family at Butano
> and saw two prey deliveries to the three fledglings. One was brought a
> shrew, another got a Dark-eyed Junco, and the third one went hungry. Photos:
> https://ebird.org/checklist/S71788896
>
>
>
> Other good finds lately include SHARP-SHINNED HAWK fledglings at Big
> Basin, China Grade, and Henry Cowell and two groups of HERMIT WARBLER
> fledglings at Big Basin. The HERMIT and SWAINSON’S THRUSH nests I’ve had
> under surveillance at Big Basin have finally hatched.
>
>
>
> July is a nice time to be under the redwoods. The tiger lilies have
> reached their peak bloom and the breeding season is still going strong in
> the cool redwood canyons.
>
>
>
> Alex Rinkert
>
> Santa Cruz
>
> --
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> email to mbbirds+<unsubscribe...>
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> <https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/mbbirds/005501d66216%2488121fa0%2498365ee0%<24...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>
> .
>
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> <https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/mbbirds/<CAAF0wfFFM852tr1qD3pHTN-1RronNMXVxc1JNocymrT8Lb5xeA...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>
> .
>
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> .
>

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Back to top
Date: 7/26/20 4:04 pm
From: Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...>
Subject: RE: [MBBIRDS] pygmy-owls under the redwoods
I can neither confirm nor deny the legends are true, but to answer Jeff’s question: a) cover a lot of ground, and b) listen for the begging trill of the fledgling pygmy-owls. Their begging call is similar to the song of a Chipping Sparrow or Dark-eyed Junco, which is easier to pick out at this time of year now that most juncos have stopped singing.



Alex



From: <mbbirds...> [mailto:<mbbirds...>] On Behalf Of Jeff Manker
Sent: Saturday, July 25, 2020 10:00 PM
To: Randy Wardle
Cc: mbbirds
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] pygmy-owls under the redwoods



I knew the legends were true!



On Sat, Jul 25, 2020 at 8:58 PM Randy Wardle <wrwardle...> wrote:

Jeff, I have birded many times with Alex and believe me when I tell you he is not only an Owl Whisperer, he is a BIRD Whisperer. As he levitates slowly along about a foot above the ground, Alex doesn't come to the birds, the birds come to him!



Randy Wardle

Aptos



_____

From: <mbbirds...> <mbbirds...> on behalf of Jeff Manker <fireweed8...>
Sent: Saturday, July 25, 2020 9:44 PM
To: Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...>
Cc: mbbirds <mbbirds...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] pygmy-owls under the redwoods



Alex,



I don’t know if you are some kind of Owl whisperer or what, but for those of us who are trying to find ONE Northern Pygmy Owl (much less FIVE pairs!) for our Breeding Bird survey blocks, do have any tips on how to find them?



I’m picturing you in the lotus position, levitating a foot off the ground, in a quiet forest glen when a wise old Northern Pygmy Owl alights on your shoulder and whispers “You have now achieved mastery, follow me”, then proceeds to show you every nest in the forest.



That or you are hearing something, seeing something, are in the right place and time or are incredibly lucky. Please tell me it is not the levitating thing.



Jeff Manker



On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 4:59 PM Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...> wrote:

I’ve had a good run of atlasing at the redwood state parks over the past ten days. The highlight has been finding no less than FIVE families of NORTHERN PYGMY-OWLS with begging fledglings. Atlas data shows July is the best time to find fledglings, but I did not see this surge coming. Family groups were found near Rancho Del Oso on July 15, Portola State Park on July 17, Butano State Park on July 22, and two families at Big Basin on July 23. I had an opportunity to spend some time with the family at Butano and saw two prey deliveries to the three fledglings. One was brought a shrew, another got a Dark-eyed Junco, and the third one went hungry. Photos: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71788896



Other good finds lately include SHARP-SHINNED HAWK fledglings at Big Basin, China Grade, and Henry Cowell and two groups of HERMIT WARBLER fledglings at Big Basin. The HERMIT and SWAINSON’S THRUSH nests I’ve had under surveillance at Big Basin have finally hatched.



July is a nice time to be under the redwoods. The tiger lilies have reached their peak bloom and the breeding season is still going strong in the cool redwood canyons.



Alex Rinkert

Santa Cruz

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Back to top
Date: 7/26/20 4:01 pm
From: Pete Sole <pete...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] What's on the tree ...
Hi birders,

To play along, see the links below on a big screen.

Guess what bird this is?

http://www.lighthousenet.com/photos/birds/web_ready/warblers/warbler_wilsons_200725a.jpg


Another hint? Maybe if it takes a nap and we zoom in a little...:

http://www.lighthousenet.com/photos/birds/web_ready/warblers/warbler_wilsons_200725e.jpg


3 cheers for those who guessed Wilson's Warbler! And one more bonus image:

http://www.lighthousenet.com/photos/birds/web_ready/warblers/warbler_wilsons_200725d.jpg

Fun bird photography in the garden yesterday,

Pete Sole'
Soquel Bird Paparazzi

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Date: 7/26/20 2:59 pm
From: larry corridon <larry961357...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Black-bellied Plover in breeding plumage
Elisabeth F. and I were there also on Saturday. We saw the Black-bellied Plovers and one Sanderling in breeding plunge and the mix of Elegant and caspian Terns. I wish I could remember when during one year I went down to Jetty road and saw over 2000 Elegant Terns. I didn’t really trust my count, but Randy W. had counted separately (but on the same day) and he got 3,200 or so. Now His trust I count!

> On Jul 26, 2020, at 14:06, Pete Sole <pete...> wrote:
>
> Hi Barbara,
>
> We were at Jetty Road, Moss Landing this morning (Sunday 7/26), over the border in Monterey. My sense is that about 40% of the 7 or so Black-bellied Plovers we saw, were still mostly in breeding plumage. See this individual from the morning:
> http://www.lighthousenet.com/photos/birds/web_ready/shore_birds/plover_black_bellied_200726a.jpg
>
> According to Cornell's Birds of the World, Black-bellied Plover species description:
> "...Large numbers arrive in last week of July in central California..."
> Source Link: https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/bkbplo/cur/movement#mignat
>
> I guess the Black-bellied Plovers are here. :)
>
> For a full list of what we saw at Moss Landing, see this ebird link:
> https://ebird.org/checklist/S71841714
>
> Cheers,
>
> Pete
>
> On 7/26/20 1:09 PM, Barbara Riverwoman wrote:
>> Saw a black-bellied plover in full breeding plumage on rock shelf at Terrace Point, half-way between museum and DeAnza MHP. A very early arrival?
>>
>
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Larry D. Corridon
<larry961357...>





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Date: 7/26/20 2:06 pm
From: Pete Sole <pete...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Black-bellied Plover in breeding plumage
Hi Barbara,

We were at Jetty Road, Moss Landing this morning (Sunday 7/26), over the
border in Monterey. My sense is that about 40% of the 7 or so
Black-bellied Plovers we saw, were still mostly in breeding plumage. See
this individual from the morning:
http://www.lighthousenet.com/photos/birds/web_ready/shore_birds/plover_black_bellied_200726a.jpg

According to Cornell's Birds of the World, Black-bellied Plover  species
description:
"...Large numbers arrive in last week of July in central California..."
Source Link:
https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/bkbplo/cur/movement#mignat

I guess the Black-bellied Plovers are here. :)

For a full list of what we saw at Moss Landing, see this ebird link:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S71841714

Cheers,

Pete

On 7/26/20 1:09 PM, Barbara Riverwoman wrote:
> Saw a black-bellied plover in full breeding plumage on rock shelf at Terrace Point, half-way between museum and DeAnza MHP. A very early arrival?
>

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Back to top
Date: 7/26/20 1:09 pm
From: Barbara Riverwoman <river...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Black-bellied Plover in breeding plumage
Saw a black-bellied plover in full breeding plumage on rock shelf at Terrace Point, half-way between museum and DeAnza MHP. A very early arrival?

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Back to top
Date: 7/25/20 9:59 pm
From: Jeff Manker <fireweed8...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] pygmy-owls under the redwoods
I knew the legends were true!

On Sat, Jul 25, 2020 at 8:58 PM Randy Wardle <wrwardle...> wrote:

> Jeff, I have birded many times with Alex and believe me when I tell you he
> is not only an Owl Whisperer, he is a BIRD Whisperer. As he levitates
> slowly along about a foot above the ground, Alex doesn't come to the birds,
> the birds come to him!
>
> Randy Wardle
> Aptos
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* <mbbirds...> <mbbirds...> on behalf of
> Jeff Manker <fireweed8...>
> *Sent:* Saturday, July 25, 2020 9:44 PM
> *To:* Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...>
> *Cc:* mbbirds <mbbirds...>
> *Subject:* Re: [MBBIRDS] pygmy-owls under the redwoods
>
> Alex,
>
> I don’t know if you are some kind of Owl whisperer or what, but for those
> of us who are trying to find ONE Northern Pygmy Owl (much less FIVE pairs!)
> for our Breeding Bird survey blocks, do have any tips on how to find them?
>
> I’m picturing you in the lotus position, levitating a foot off the ground,
> in a quiet forest glen when a wise old Northern Pygmy Owl alights on your
> shoulder and whispers “You have now achieved mastery, follow me”, then
> proceeds to show you every nest in the forest.
>
> That or you are hearing something, seeing something, are in the right
> place and time or are incredibly lucky. Please tell me it is not the
> levitating thing.
>
> Jeff Manker
>
> On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 4:59 PM Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...>
> wrote:
>
> I’ve had a good run of atlasing at the redwood state parks over the past
> ten days. The highlight has been finding no less than FIVE families of
> NORTHERN PYGMY-OWLS with begging fledglings. Atlas data shows July is the
> best time to find fledglings, but I did not see this surge coming. Family
> groups were found near Rancho Del Oso on July 15, Portola State Park on
> July 17, Butano State Park on July 22, and two families at Big Basin on
> July 23. I had an opportunity to spend some time with the family at Butano
> and saw two prey deliveries to the three fledglings. One was brought a
> shrew, another got a Dark-eyed Junco, and the third one went hungry. Photos:
> https://ebird.org/checklist/S71788896
>
>
>
> Other good finds lately include SHARP-SHINNED HAWK fledglings at Big
> Basin, China Grade, and Henry Cowell and two groups of HERMIT WARBLER
> fledglings at Big Basin. The HERMIT and SWAINSON’S THRUSH nests I’ve had
> under surveillance at Big Basin have finally hatched.
>
>
>
> July is a nice time to be under the redwoods. The tiger lilies have
> reached their peak bloom and the breeding season is still going strong in
> the cool redwood canyons.
>
>
>
> Alex Rinkert
>
> Santa Cruz
>
> --
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "mbbirds" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
> email to mbbirds+<unsubscribe...>
> To view this discussion on the web visit
> https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/mbbirds/005501d66216%2488121fa0%2498365ee0%<24...>
> <https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/mbbirds/005501d66216%2488121fa0%2498365ee0%<24...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>
> .
>
> --
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
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> .
>

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Date: 7/25/20 8:58 pm
From: Randy Wardle <wrwardle...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] pygmy-owls under the redwoods
Jeff, I have birded many times with Alex and believe me when I tell you he is not only an Owl Whisperer, he is a BIRD Whisperer. As he levitates slowly along about a foot above the ground, Alex doesn't come to the birds, the birds come to him!

Randy Wardle
Aptos

________________________________
From: <mbbirds...> <mbbirds...> on behalf of Jeff Manker <fireweed8...>
Sent: Saturday, July 25, 2020 9:44 PM
To: Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...>
Cc: mbbirds <mbbirds...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] pygmy-owls under the redwoods

Alex,

I don’t know if you are some kind of Owl whisperer or what, but for those of us who are trying to find ONE Northern Pygmy Owl (much less FIVE pairs!) for our Breeding Bird survey blocks, do have any tips on how to find them?

I’m picturing you in the lotus position, levitating a foot off the ground, in a quiet forest glen when a wise old Northern Pygmy Owl alights on your shoulder and whispers “You have now achieved mastery, follow me”, then proceeds to show you every nest in the forest.

That or you are hearing something, seeing something, are in the right place and time or are incredibly lucky. Please tell me it is not the levitating thing.

Jeff Manker

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 4:59 PM Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...><mailto:<arinkert12...>> wrote:

I’ve had a good run of atlasing at the redwood state parks over the past ten days. The highlight has been finding no less than FIVE families of NORTHERN PYGMY-OWLS with begging fledglings. Atlas data shows July is the best time to find fledglings, but I did not see this surge coming. Family groups were found near Rancho Del Oso on July 15, Portola State Park on July 17, Butano State Park on July 22, and two families at Big Basin on July 23. I had an opportunity to spend some time with the family at Butano and saw two prey deliveries to the three fledglings. One was brought a shrew, another got a Dark-eyed Junco, and the third one went hungry. Photos: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71788896



Other good finds lately include SHARP-SHINNED HAWK fledglings at Big Basin, China Grade, and Henry Cowell and two groups of HERMIT WARBLER fledglings at Big Basin. The HERMIT and SWAINSON’S THRUSH nests I’ve had under surveillance at Big Basin have finally hatched.



July is a nice time to be under the redwoods. The tiger lilies have reached their peak bloom and the breeding season is still going strong in the cool redwood canyons.



Alex Rinkert

Santa Cruz

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Back to top
Date: 7/25/20 4:14 pm
From: Lisa Larson <lisafaylarson...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] pygmy-owls under the redwoods
I can totally visualize that, Jeff! I have found a few, but never in this
county!

Thanks for the imagery!

Lisa

P.S. It is actually true. You wouldn't believe the stuff Alex does to
achieve this Masterhood!

On Sat, Jul 25, 2020, 2:44 PM Jeff Manker <fireweed8...> wrote:

> Alex,
>
> I don’t know if you are some kind of Owl whisperer or what, but for those
> of us who are trying to find ONE Northern Pygmy Owl (much less FIVE pairs!)
> for our Breeding Bird survey blocks, do have any tips on how to find them?
>
> I’m picturing you in the lotus position, levitating a foot off the ground,
> in a quiet forest glen when a wise old Northern Pygmy Owl alights on your
> shoulder and whispers “You have now achieved mastery, follow me”, then
> proceeds to show you every nest in the forest.
>
> That or you are hearing something, seeing something, are in the right
> place and time or are incredibly lucky. Please tell me it is not the
> levitating thing.
>
> Jeff Manker
>
> On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 4:59 PM Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...>
> wrote:
>
>> I’ve had a good run of atlasing at the redwood state parks over the past
>> ten days. The highlight has been finding no less than FIVE families of
>> NORTHERN PYGMY-OWLS with begging fledglings. Atlas data shows July is the
>> best time to find fledglings, but I did not see this surge coming. Family
>> groups were found near Rancho Del Oso on July 15, Portola State Park on
>> July 17, Butano State Park on July 22, and two families at Big Basin on
>> July 23. I had an opportunity to spend some time with the family at Butano
>> and saw two prey deliveries to the three fledglings. One was brought a
>> shrew, another got a Dark-eyed Junco, and the third one went hungry. Photos:
>> https://ebird.org/checklist/S71788896
>>
>>
>>
>> Other good finds lately include SHARP-SHINNED HAWK fledglings at Big
>> Basin, China Grade, and Henry Cowell and two groups of HERMIT WARBLER
>> fledglings at Big Basin. The HERMIT and SWAINSON’S THRUSH nests I’ve had
>> under surveillance at Big Basin have finally hatched.
>>
>>
>>
>> July is a nice time to be under the redwoods. The tiger lilies have
>> reached their peak bloom and the breeding season is still going strong in
>> the cool redwood canyons.
>>
>>
>>
>> Alex Rinkert
>>
>> Santa Cruz
>>
>> --
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>> "mbbirds" group.
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>> email to mbbirds+<unsubscribe...>
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>> .
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Date: 7/25/20 2:44 pm
From: Jeff Manker <fireweed8...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] pygmy-owls under the redwoods
Alex,

I don’t know if you are some kind of Owl whisperer or what, but for those
of us who are trying to find ONE Northern Pygmy Owl (much less FIVE pairs!)
for our Breeding Bird survey blocks, do have any tips on how to find them?

I’m picturing you in the lotus position, levitating a foot off the ground,
in a quiet forest glen when a wise old Northern Pygmy Owl alights on your
shoulder and whispers “You have now achieved mastery, follow me”, then
proceeds to show you every nest in the forest.

That or you are hearing something, seeing something, are in the right place
and time or are incredibly lucky. Please tell me it is not the levitating
thing.

Jeff Manker

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 4:59 PM Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...> wrote:

> I’ve had a good run of atlasing at the redwood state parks over the past
> ten days. The highlight has been finding no less than FIVE families of
> NORTHERN PYGMY-OWLS with begging fledglings. Atlas data shows July is the
> best time to find fledglings, but I did not see this surge coming. Family
> groups were found near Rancho Del Oso on July 15, Portola State Park on
> July 17, Butano State Park on July 22, and two families at Big Basin on
> July 23. I had an opportunity to spend some time with the family at Butano
> and saw two prey deliveries to the three fledglings. One was brought a
> shrew, another got a Dark-eyed Junco, and the third one went hungry. Photos:
> https://ebird.org/checklist/S71788896
>
>
>
> Other good finds lately include SHARP-SHINNED HAWK fledglings at Big
> Basin, China Grade, and Henry Cowell and two groups of HERMIT WARBLER
> fledglings at Big Basin. The HERMIT and SWAINSON’S THRUSH nests I’ve had
> under surveillance at Big Basin have finally hatched.
>
>
>
> July is a nice time to be under the redwoods. The tiger lilies have
> reached their peak bloom and the breeding season is still going strong in
> the cool redwood canyons.
>
>
>
> Alex Rinkert
>
> Santa Cruz
>
> --
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> "mbbirds" group.
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> email to mbbirds+<unsubscribe...>
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> .
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Date: 7/25/20 1:56 pm
From: Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Black Swift watch tomorrow
Birders,



A group of us will be doing a coordinated survey for Black Swifts tomorrow
evening. We will be simultaneously observing at over a dozen locations along
the coast between 6:30-8:30 pm. There are some locations, including on the
Westside, that still need an observer. Let me know if you are interested in
helping out with this effort.



Thanks,

Alex

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Date: 7/24/20 5:36 pm
From: Michael Bolte <mjbolte...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] pygmy-owls under the redwoods
thanks for the news and the excellent photos Alex!

Mike

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 4:59 PM Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...> wrote:

> I’ve had a good run of atlasing at the redwood state parks over the past
> ten days. The highlight has been finding no less than FIVE families of
> NORTHERN PYGMY-OWLS with begging fledglings. Atlas data shows July is the
> best time to find fledglings, but I did not see this surge coming. Family
> groups were found near Rancho Del Oso on July 15, Portola State Park on
> July 17, Butano State Park on July 22, and two families at Big Basin on
> July 23. I had an opportunity to spend some time with the family at Butano
> and saw two prey deliveries to the three fledglings. One was brought a
> shrew, another got a Dark-eyed Junco, and the third one went hungry. Photos:
> https://ebird.org/checklist/S71788896
>
>
>
> Other good finds lately include SHARP-SHINNED HAWK fledglings at Big
> Basin, China Grade, and Henry Cowell and two groups of HERMIT WARBLER
> fledglings at Big Basin. The HERMIT and SWAINSON’S THRUSH nests I’ve had
> under surveillance at Big Basin have finally hatched.
>
>
>
> July is a nice time to be under the redwoods. The tiger lilies have
> reached their peak bloom and the breeding season is still going strong in
> the cool redwood canyons.
>
>
>
> Alex Rinkert
>
> Santa Cruz
>
> --
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "mbbirds" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
> email to mbbirds+<unsubscribe...>
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> <https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/mbbirds/005501d66216%2488121fa0%2498365ee0%<24...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>
> .
>

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Date: 7/24/20 5:00 pm
From: Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] pygmy-owls under the redwoods
I've had a good run of atlasing at the redwood state parks over the past ten
days. The highlight has been finding no less than FIVE families of NORTHERN
PYGMY-OWLS with begging fledglings. Atlas data shows July is the best time
to find fledglings, but I did not see this surge coming. Family groups were
found near Rancho Del Oso on July 15, Portola State Park on July 17, Butano
State Park on July 22, and two families at Big Basin on July 23. I had an
opportunity to spend some time with the family at Butano and saw two prey
deliveries to the three fledglings. One was brought a shrew, another got a
Dark-eyed Junco, and the third one went hungry. Photos:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S71788896



Other good finds lately include SHARP-SHINNED HAWK fledglings at Big Basin,
China Grade, and Henry Cowell and two groups of HERMIT WARBLER fledglings at
Big Basin. The HERMIT and SWAINSON'S THRUSH nests I've had under
surveillance at Big Basin have finally hatched.



July is a nice time to be under the redwoods. The tiger lilies have reached
their peak bloom and the breeding season is still going strong in the cool
redwood canyons.



Alex Rinkert

Santa Cruz

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Date: 7/23/20 7:39 pm
From: Glen Tepke <g.tepke...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Black Swifts: Sand Hill Bluff.
Sand Hill Bluff, like most places, can be found by searching for it in
Google Maps:
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Sand+Hill+Bluff/@36.9766166,-122.1609444,3614m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m5!3m4!1s0x808e4322061bf5e7:0x61ea58236e8644d8!8m2!3d36.9766174!4d-122.1521896

It is part of Coast Dairies State Park, on the coast between Santa
Cruz and Davenport. It is a small point with sea cliffs and several
sea caves - similar to the Old Cove Landing Trail in Wilder Ranch SP
but with more caves - and the namesake Sand Hill, a large Native
American midden (shellmound). The birding is from the top of the
cliffs, not Sand Hill, which is fenced off for its protection.

There are a couple of ways get to the cliffs, both involving roughly a
mile of walking. The most direct access is from the hamlet of Majors
on Coast Road, but it is not clear to me whether access from Majors is
legal. From the light on Rt. 1 at Western Drive in Santa Cruz (the
last light in town before getting into the hinterlands), go 5.2 miles
NW on Rt. 1, turn left and a quick right onto Coast Road, go 0.2 miles
to an unnamed farm road on the left, where there is a small sign for
5511 Coast Rd and room for 3 or 4 cars to park. Walk or bike - do
not drive - down the farm road to the railroad tracks, where there is
a No Trespassing sign. The most direct route is to continue across
the tracks and between some farm buildings to a dirt farm road on the
west side of a willow-filled creek drainage heading toward the coast,
but this route has several more No Trespassing signs, so I'm not
recommending it. Perhaps a better route is to go left along the
(inactive) railroad tracks a short distance, then right to another
dirt road along the east side of the creek. Google Maps indicates
this is a public path to a small unnamed (on Google) beach, but it
still requires passing the No Trespassing sign at the tracks, hence my
uncertainty about whether this route is any more legal than the first
one. If you go this way, after a short distance the road drops into
the creek drainage to a small pond. The trail to the beach continues
down through the willows below the pond. To get to the cliffs,
follow the road to the right around the bottom of the pond and back up
the hill to where it meets the road along the west side of the creek
mentioned above. Turn left and left again at the next intersection,
then straight to the coast. If anyone knows more about the legality
or illegality of approaching from Majors, please chime in.

Another more difficult but more scenic and more clearly legal way is
via Laguna Creek Beach. From the Rt 1/Western Drive light, go 5.9
miles on Rt. 1 to a rough parking lot on the right, at the 2nd
intersection with Laguna Rd. Note that this lot is well known for
car break-ins. From the N end of the lot, cross Rt. 1 (carefully) to
a path through willows, across the tracks and down to the beach. Go
left to the SE end of the beach and up a steep rocky path to the top
of the bluff. This might be challenging if you are not comfortable
with heights and steep terrain. At the top of the bluff, continue to
the right to a boardwalk along the N side of Sand Hill. The path
turns right along a row of cypresses and ends at the top of the cliffs
a few yards west of the end of the farm road from Majors.

There are several viewpoints along the cliffs. For the spot where we
saw Black Swifts last night, go right a few yards to a vague short
path that leads down to a long rock shelf. Walk to the far (N) end
of the shelf where it overlooks a large sea cave. I think, but am
not sure, that this is the western cave referred to in Alex's 2018
post below. For another spot, turn left at the end of the approach
paths until you can see another rock shelf that forms a point
projecting out to sea. From the end of this point you can see more
caves on either side of the point.

Per eBird and MBB posts, most BLSW sightings are within an hour of
sunset when the birds are returning to their nesting or roosting sites
in the caves after spending the day foraging up and down the coast.
But you could get lucky and see them at other times of day. Sand
Hill Bluff is in the fog belt, so when visiting in the evenings be
prepared for cool to cold, overcast, windy and perhaps wet conditions
no matter how warm and sunny it is elsewhere in the county.

Good birding,

Glen Tepke
Santa Cruz


On 7/23/2020 6:58 AM, <kyri...> wrote:

Where exactly is Sand Hill Bluff? I get the feeling it's the place
where the trail drops down and crosses the beach, and there's a tiny
lagoon that often has a Snowy Egret in it -- is that right?

I bird the Wilder coastal trail when I'm in town, but don't know the
names of the landmarks along the way -- and Black Swift would be a
life bird for me. Clearly I'm not there at the right time of day.

Kyri Freeman

Ben Lomond

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On 2020-07-22 21:22, Glen Tepke wrote:

This evening at 8:11 pm (about 12 minutes before sunset, though it
was hard to tell thanks to a heavy marine layer and light
drizzle), three Black Swifts appeared out of nowhere right in
front of our position near Sand Hill Bluff, flying SSE along the
west-facing sea-cliff, made very abrupt 180-degree turns and
flew back directly over our heads and rocketed into what I think
is the westernmost sea-cave. They did not emerge in the 15
minutes we stayed after that. The whole show lasted about 10
seconds out of the 50 minutes we were out there, but that was good
enough for an overdue county bird for us.

Good birding,

Glen Tepke & Carol Chetkovich
Santa Cruz


On 7/17/2020 11:25 PM, Liam Murphy wrote:

I've had several black swift sightings at Sand Hill Bluff this
month as well. On July 2nd at around 7:25p I observed a
group of 5 loosely grouped swifts flying southeast (down the
coast) high and with a fairly determined pace. Perhaps these
were on the way to Wilder if there is a larger colony there.
This past weekend, 7/12, about 20 minutes after sunset as my
girlfriend and I were trying to photograph a barn owl (who
hunts the bluff reliably at sunset - seen 3 times now), a lone
black swift flew low within 10 feet of us, moving west to east
over the fields just shy of the cypress grove. The low
altitude and late time of this sighting would lead me to
believe this lone bird (and possibly more) could be roosting
at the SHB caves. We, too, picked up a tick on our
outing...be sure to check when you get home! Good birding,Liam

On Jul 17, 2020, at 10:51 PM, David Kossack <dkossack...>
wrote:
With BLACK SWIFTS active at Wilder Ranch I thought I might
see what I could find at Sand Hill Bluff (see Alex
Rinkert's description below from 2018). Sand Bluff is 1 -
2 miles west of Michael Bolte's siting at Old Cove
Landing. I arrived at the shelf between the caves
about 5pm, today, July 17, and stayed until 7pm. At 6:30
pm a solitary BLACK SWIFT appeared. The bird flew about
the air space in front of the shelf for 15 - 30 seconds
then disappeared. A second solitary BLACK SWIFT appeared
not quite 10 minutes later. As before it occupied the
airspace in front of the shelf for about 15 - 30 seconds,
then dropped down on the east side of the shelf to water
level and disappeared in the scatter. I believe that it
went into the cave tucked closest to the shelf on the east
side, it didn't go up... I didn't see any other BLACK
SWIFTS this evening. The shelf is the same location
visited by BLACK SWIFT field trip described below. Wind
was minimal, ocean flat, temp. low 60s.A lot of birds
calling for food, and a lot of ticks, too. David KossackSanta
Cruz

On Aug 9, 2018, at 5:47 PM, Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...>
wrote:
On the morning of July 19 I visited Sand Hill Bluff to
search the sea caves for BLACK SWIFT nests. I was only
able to safely access the eastern caves (no nests) so
I climbed to a vantage point where I could see the
western caves and watched for a few hours. During that
time I saw a single, silent swift fly into a cave on
two occasions about an hour apart, staying inside the
cave for several minutes on both visits, then exiting
and flying directly inland. No socializing, no
foraging, not carrying nest material. Around 2:15 PM a
group of 6 swifts appeared and performed the most
amazing aerial displays I have seen from this species.
When the group arrived, one swift entered the same
cave and stayed inside for several minutes while the
others made audaciously close passes to the bluff face
and ocean surface at breakneck speed. Wow. A few
minutes later the other swift left the cave and joined
the others for a while, then they all flew off. Given
the time of day and year, duration of visits, behavior
and context, I would say there is an active nest in
that cave. This species has not been confirmed
breeding in Santa Cruz County since 1994, although
observations at this location and perhaps elsewhere
suggest they may have bred or attempted to in recent
years. For anyone who wants to see the Black Swift, I
will be leading an impromptu Santa Cruz Bird
Club-sanctioned field trip on the evening of August 15
to Sand Hill Bluff. We will meet at 6:30 PM at the
intersection of Highway 1 and Shaffer Road, and then
will caravan to Sand Hill Bluff. Expect two miles of
level walking and a brisk evening wind. Alex RinkertSanta
Cruz From: 'Paul Miller' via mbbirds [mailto:<mbbirds...>]
Sent: Monday, July 23, 2018 10:35 AM
To: MBB Listserv
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Black Swifts Last night, for the
9th or 10th time, I headed out to Sand Hill Bluff to
try for Black Swifts again.I parked along Coast Rd.
and rode my bike in to the site, past the farm with
the red buildings.This has been my nemesis bird for
the last 3 years or so.At around 745, 3-4 appeared and
flew above the sea cave for about 20 seconds. They
vocalized briefly.I lost them and couldn't refind them
in the next 10 minutes or so. I decided that a brief
view was plenty good for me! I encourage you to head
out there if you haven't seen Black Swifts. Stake it
out at around 715 and be patient.It would be
interesting to see if someone could verify breeding.
Any updates on that?One more check mark-- Paul MillerMount
Hermon--
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Date: 7/23/20 5:33 pm
From: Brian Scanlon <briancscanlon...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Update Wandering Tattlers
When I left at 4:50 there were at least 5 and probably 6 Wandering Tattlers
with a group of 13 Black Turnstones in the rocks about 100-150 ft. east of
Woodrow. They looked like they were settling in if you want to see them.
Easiest views were from the rocks just west of the outflow at Woodrow.

On Thu, Jul 23, 2020 at 4:53 PM Bernadette Ramer <baramer...>
wrote:

> Darn! I looked east of Woodrow along West Cliff at 1:30 pm and had no luck.
> I should rush out there but I’m too tired :-)
> Bernadette
>
> On Jul 23, 2020, at 4:44 PM, Brian Scanlon <briancscanlon...>
> wrote:
>
> Now 5 WATA with 9 BLTU just east of Woodrow.
>
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>
>
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Date: 7/23/20 4:44 pm
From: Brian Scanlon <briancscanlon...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Update Wandering Tattlers
Now 5 WATA with 9 BLTU just east of Woodrow.

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Date: 7/23/20 4:42 pm
From: Amanda Preece <apreece24...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Wandering Tattler
Had 2 WATA come by Asilomar today as well! Glad I was already on the
lookout...
So many shorebirds already coming in!
Amanda
Asilomar State Beach

On Thu, Jul 23, 2020, 4:00 PM Brian Scanlon <briancscanlon...> wrote:

> Single bird at West Cliff and Woodrow now.
>
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Date: 7/23/20 4:00 pm
From: Brian Scanlon <briancscanlon...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Wandering Tattler
Single bird at West Cliff and Woodrow now.

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Date: 7/23/20 12:22 pm
From: brumba <brumba...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Re: Wandering Tattler
Thank you! The tattler was there taking a thorough bath and preening in the
creek/drainage outflow until noon, when it flew south.

Dan


On Thursday, July 23, 2020 at 11:37:46 AM UTC-7, plants wrote:
>
> 3 at West Cliff & Woodrow now.
> Sharon Hull
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>

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Date: 7/23/20 11:37 am
From: Sharon Hull <plants...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Wandering Tattler
3 at West Cliff & Woodrow now.
Sharon Hull

Sent from my iPhone

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Date: 7/23/20 6:58 am
From: <kyri...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Black Swifts: Sand Hill Bluff.
Where exactly is Sand Hill Bluff? I get the feeling it's the place where
the trail drops down and crosses the beach, and there's a tiny lagoon
that often has a Snowy Egret in it -- is that right?

I bird the Wilder coastal trail when I'm in town, but don't know the
names of the landmarks along the way -- and Black Swift would be a life
bird for me. Clearly I'm not there at the right time of day.

Kyri Freeman

Ben Lomond

---
My dark fantasy and historical fiction novels are available for Kindle
on Amazon. Print copies also available.

On 2020-07-22 21:22, Glen Tepke wrote:

> This evening at 8:11 pm (about 12 minutes before sunset, though it was hard to tell thanks to a heavy marine layer and light drizzle), three Black Swifts appeared out of nowhere right in front of our position near Sand Hill Bluff, flying SSE along the west-facing sea-cliff, made very abrupt 180-degree turns and flew back directly over our heads and rocketed into what I think is the westernmost sea-cave. They did not emerge in the 15 minutes we stayed after that. The whole show lasted about 10 seconds out of the 50 minutes we were out there, but that was good enough for an overdue county bird for us.
>
> Good birding, Glen Tepke & Carol Chetkovich
> Santa Cruz
>
> On 7/17/2020 11:25 PM, Liam Murphy wrote: I've had several black swift sightings at Sand Hill Bluff this month as well. On July 2nd at around 7:25p I observed a group of 5 loosely grouped swifts flying southeast (down the coast) high and with a fairly determined pace. Perhaps these were on the way to Wilder if there is a larger colony there. This past weekend, 7/12, about 20 minutes after sunset as my girlfriend and I were trying to photograph a barn owl (who hunts the bluff reliably at sunset - seen 3 times now), a lone black swift flew low within 10 feet of us, moving west to east over the fields just shy of the cypress grove. The low altitude and late time of this sighting would lead me to believe this lone bird (and possibly more) could be roosting at the SHB caves.
>
> We, too, picked up a tick on our outing...be sure to check when you get home!
>
> Good birding,
> Liam
>
> On Jul 17, 2020, at 10:51 PM, David Kossack <dkossack...> wrote:
>
> With BLACK SWIFTS active at Wilder Ranch I thought I might see what I could find at Sand Hill Bluff (see Alex Rinkert's description below from 2018). Sand Bluff is 1 - 2 miles west of Michael Bolte's siting at Old Cove Landing.
>
> I arrived at the shelf between the caves about 5pm, today, July 17, and stayed until 7pm. At 6:30 pm a solitary BLACK SWIFT appeared. The bird flew about the air space in front of the shelf for 15 - 30 seconds then disappeared. A second solitary BLACK SWIFT appeared not quite 10 minutes later. As before it occupied the airspace in front of the shelf for about 15 - 30 seconds, then dropped down on the east side of the shelf to water level and disappeared in the scatter. I believe that it went into the cave tucked closest to the shelf on the east side, it didn't go up... I didn't see any other BLACK SWIFTS this evening.
>
> The shelf is the same location visited by BLACK SWIFT field trip described below.
> Wind was minimal, ocean flat, temp. low 60s.
> A lot of birds calling for food, and a lot of ticks, too.
>
> David Kossack
> Santa Cruz
>
> On Aug 9, 2018, at 5:47 PM, Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...> wrote:
>
> On the morning of July 19 I visited Sand Hill Bluff to search the sea caves for BLACK SWIFT nests. I was only able to safely access the eastern caves (no nests) so I climbed to a vantage point where I could see the western caves and watched for a few hours. During that time I saw a single, silent swift fly into a cave on two occasions about an hour apart, staying inside the cave for several minutes on both visits, then exiting and flying directly inland. No socializing, no foraging, not carrying nest material. Around 2:15 PM a group of 6 swifts appeared and performed the most amazing aerial displays I have seen from this species. When the group arrived, one swift entered the same cave and stayed inside for several minutes while the others made audaciously close passes to the bluff face and ocean surface at breakneck speed. Wow. A few minutes later the other swift left the cave and joined the others for a while, then they all flew off.
>
> Given the time of day and year, duration of visits, behavior and context, I would say there is an active nest in that cave. This species has not been confirmed breeding in Santa Cruz County since 1994, although observations at this location and perhaps elsewhere suggest they may have bred or attempted to in recent years.
>
> For anyone who wants to see the Black Swift, I will be leading an impromptu Santa Cruz Bird Club-sanctioned field trip on the evening of August 15 to Sand Hill Bluff. We will meet at 6:30 PM at the intersection of Highway 1 and Shaffer Road, and then will caravan to Sand Hill Bluff. Expect two miles of level walking and a brisk evening wind.
>
> Alex Rinkert
> Santa Cruz
>
> From: 'Paul Miller' via mbbirds [mailto:<mbbirds...>]
> Sent: Monday, July 23, 2018 10:35 AM
> To: MBB Listserv
> Subject: [MBBIRDS] Black Swifts
>
> Last night, for the 9th or 10th time, I headed out to Sand Hill Bluff to try for Black Swifts again.
>
> I parked along Coast Rd. and rode my bike in to the site, past the farm with the red buildings.
>
> This has been my nemesis bird for the last 3 years or so.
>
> At around 745, 3-4 appeared and flew above the sea cave for about 20 seconds. They vocalized briefly.
>
> I lost them and couldn't refind them in the next 10 minutes or so. I decided that a brief view was plenty good for me!
>
> I encourage you to head out there if you haven't seen Black Swifts. Stake it out at around 715 and be patient.
>
> It would be interesting to see if someone could verify breeding. Any updates on that?
>
> One more check mark--
>
> Paul Miller
>
> Mount Hermon
> --
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Date: 7/22/20 9:22 pm
From: Glen Tepke <g.tepke...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Black Swifts: Sand Hill Bluff.
This evening at 8:11 pm (about 12 minutes before sunset, though it was
hard to tell thanks to a heavy marine layer and light drizzle), three
Black Swifts appeared out of nowhere right in front of our position
near Sand Hill Bluff, flying SSE along the west-facing sea-cliff,
made very abrupt 180-degree turns and flew back directly over our
heads and rocketed into what I think is the westernmost sea-cave.
They did not emerge in the 15 minutes we stayed after that. The
whole show lasted about 10 seconds out of the 50 minutes we were out
there, but that was good enough for an overdue county bird for us.

Good birding,

Glen Tepke & Carol Chetkovich
Santa Cruz


On 7/17/2020 11:25 PM, Liam Murphy wrote:

I’ve had several black swift sightings at Sand Hill Bluff this month
as well. On July 2nd at around 7:25p I observed a group of 5 loosely
grouped swifts flying southeast (down the coast) high and with a
fairly determined pace. Perhaps these were on the way to Wilder if
there is a larger colony there. This past weekend, 7/12, about 20
minutes after sunset as my girlfriend and I were trying to photograph
a barn owl (who hunts the bluff reliably at sunset - seen 3 times
now), a lone black swift flew low within 10 feet of us, moving west to
east over the fields just shy of the cypress grove. The low altitude
and late time of this sighting would lead me to believe this lone bird
(and possibly more) could be roosting at the SHB caves.
We, too, picked up a tick on our outing…be sure to check when you
get home!
Good birding,Liam

On Jul 17, 2020, at 10:51 PM, David Kossack <dkossack...>
wrote:

With BLACK SWIFTS active at Wilder Ranch I thought I might see what I
could find at Sand Hill Bluff (see Alex Rinkert's description below
from 2018). Sand Bluff is 1 - 2 miles west of Michael Bolte’s siting
at Old Cove Landing.
I arrived at the shelf between the caves about 5pm, today, July 17,
and stayed until 7pm. At 6:30 pm a solitary BLACK SWIFT appeared. The
bird flew about the air space in front of the shelf for 15 - 30
seconds then disappeared. A second solitary BLACK SWIFT appeared not
quite 10 minutes later. As before it occupied the airspace in front of
the shelf for about 15 - 30 seconds, then dropped down on the east
side of the shelf to water level and disappeared in the scatter. I
believe that it went into the cave tucked closest to the shelf on the
east side, it didn’t go up… I didn’t see any other BLACK SWIFTS
this evening.
The shelf is the same location visited by BLACK SWIFT field trip
described below. Wind was minimal, ocean flat, temp. low 60s.A lot of
birds calling for food, and a lot of ticks, too.
David KossackSanta Cruz

On Aug 9, 2018, at 5:47 PM, Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...>
wrote:
On the morning of July 19 I visited Sand Hill Bluff to search the
sea caves for BLACK SWIFT nests. I was only able to safely access
the eastern caves (no nests) so I climbed to a vantage point where
I could see the western caves and watched for a few hours. During
that time I saw a single, silent swift fly into a cave on two
occasions about an hour apart, staying inside the cave for several
minutes on both visits, then exiting and flying directly inland.
No socializing, no foraging, not carrying nest material. Around
2:15 PM a group of 6 swifts appeared and performed the most
amazing aerial displays I have seen from this species. When the
group arrived, one swift entered the same cave and stayed inside
for several minutes while the others made audaciously close passes
to the bluff face and ocean surface at breakneck speed. Wow. A few
minutes later the other swift left the cave and joined the others
for a while, then they all flew off. Given the time of day and
year, duration of visits, behavior and context, I would say there
is an active nest in that cave. This species has not been
confirmed breeding in Santa Cruz County since 1994, although
observations at this location and perhaps elsewhere suggest they
may have bred or attempted to in recent years. For anyone who
wants to see the Black Swift, I will be leading an impromptu Santa
Cruz Bird Club-sanctioned field trip on the evening of August 15
to Sand Hill Bluff. We will meet at 6:30 PM at the intersection of
Highway 1 and Shaffer Road, and then will caravan to Sand Hill
Bluff. Expect two miles of level walking and a brisk evening wind. Alex
RinkertSanta Cruz From: 'Paul Miller' via mbbirds [mailto:<mbbirds...>]
Sent: Monday, July 23, 2018 10:35 AM
To: MBB Listserv
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Black Swifts Last night, for the 9th or 10th
time, I headed out to Sand Hill Bluff to try for Black Swifts
again.I parked along Coast Rd. and rode my bike in to the site,
past the farm with the red buildings.This has been my nemesis bird
for the last 3 years or so.At around 745, 3-4 appeared and flew
above the sea cave for about 20 seconds. They vocalized briefly.I
lost them and couldn't refind them in the next 10 minutes or so.
I decided that a brief view was plenty good for me! I encourage
you to head out there if you haven't seen Black Swifts. Stake it
out at around 715 and be patient.It would be interesting to see if
someone could verify breeding. Any updates on that?One more
check mark-- Paul MillerMount Hermon--
For Monterey Rare Bird alerts call 831-250-4550
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Date: 7/22/20 12:57 pm
From: <kingfisher11...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] West Cliff Again
Hey Birders,

The ELEGANT TERNS continue on West Cliff this a.m. Also, around 20
HEERMAN's GULLS flew in, a few at a time, and landed on a rock at the
end of Columbia, already full of many BRANDT's and fewer DOUBLE-CRESTED
CORMORANTS.

Good birding!

Dave Lavorando

Santa Cruz

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Date: 7/22/20 9:56 am
From: D Wirkman <h2oneworld...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Digest for - 2 updates in 1 topic
Some months ago I was surprised to see an osprey eating a crow atop a tall
Cypress tree while the crow's mates circled above protesting loudly.
Deb

On Wed, Jul 22, 2020, 8:15 AM <mbbirds...> wrote:

> <mbbirds...>
> <https://groups.google.com/forum/?utm_source=digest&utm_medium=email#!forum/mbbirds/topics> Google
> Groups
> <https://groups.google.com/forum/?utm_source=digest&utm_medium=email/#!overview>
> <https://groups.google.com/forum/?utm_source=digest&utm_medium=email/#!overview>
> Topic digest
> View all topics
> <https://groups.google.com/forum/?utm_source=digest&utm_medium=email#!forum/mbbirds/topics>
>
> - Osprey Surprise <#m_-5516395185782045267_group_thread_0> - 2 Updates
>
> Osprey Surprise
> <http://groups.google.com/group/mbbirds/t/34220d2c3feec5a1?utm_source=digest&utm_medium=email>
> "Bob Ramer" <rjramer...>: Jul 21 09:16AM -0700
>
> Monday morning, while birding at Pelican Rock, I was surprised to see an
> Osprey flying north along the coast with an adult Pigeon Guillemot in its
> talons. Of course, I was probably less surprised than the Pigeon Guillemot
> was.
>
>
>
> Bob Ramer
>
> Santa Cruz
> Pete Sole <pete...>: Jul 21 06:13PM -0700
>
> Hi Bob,
>
> Wonder if the Pigeon Guillemot was alive or dead when it got picked up.
>
> Researching on Cornell's Birds of the World side, I found the following:
>
> "Live fish account for over 99% of prey items recorded in almost every
> published account, with a wide variety of species taken."....(lots more
> information, and then)...
>
> "Anecdotal observations of Ospreys with non-fish prey include birds,
> snakes, voles, squirrels, muskrats (/Ondatra zibethica/), salamanders,
> molluscs, and even a small alligator (/Alligator mississippiensis/;
> Wiley and Lohrer 1973
> <https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/osprey/cur/references#REF46661>,
> Proctor 1977
> <https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/osprey/cur/references#REF16623>,
> Thorpe and Boddham 1977
> <https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/osprey/cur/references#REF46656>,
> Castrale and McCall 1983
> <https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/osprey/cur/references#REF46598>,
> Taylor 1986d
> <https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/osprey/cur/references#REF46655>,
> King 1988
> <https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/osprey/cur/references#REF16599>,
> Poole 1989a
> <https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/osprey/cur/references#REF16617>,
> Pawloski 1996
> <https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/osprey/cur/references#REF34553>,
> Watermolen 1996
> <https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/osprey/cur/references#REF46659>,
> Douglass 1997
> <https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/osprey/cur/references#REF59806>,
> Jennings 2010
> <https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/osprey/cur/references#REF143967>).
>
> An Osprey was observed foraging by walking along the ground and sallying
> out 2 m to capture ground squirrels (/Citrellus/ sp.; Werren and
> Peterson 1988
> <https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/osprey/cur/references#REF16645>).
>
> Known to drop conch shells on to hard surface to extract mollusc inside
> (Jennings 2010
> <https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/osprey/cur/references#REF143967>).
>
> Some of these reports include non-fish taken in water, probably using
> typical foraging techniques (e.g., alligator, muskrat) and emphasizing
> the generalist nature of Osprey predation while hunting over water. "
>
> BTW, for those that want to "nerd out" on known science of specific bird
> species, I highly recommend a subscription to Cornell's Birds of the
> World: https://birdsoftheworld.org/ . It's 42 bucks per year, which
> works out to $3.50 a month. This is a resource for researchers, so
> expect scientific language and content.
>
> Good birding,
>
> Pete
>
> On 7/21/20 9:16 AM, Bob Ramer wrote:
> Back to top <#m_-5516395185782045267_digest_top>
> You received this digest because you're subscribed to updates for this
> group. You can change your settings on the group membership page
> <https://groups.google.com/forum/?utm_source=digest&utm_medium=email#!forum/mbbirds/join>
> .
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it send an
> email to mbbirds+<unsubscribe...>
>

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Date: 7/21/20 6:13 pm
From: Pete Sole <pete...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Osprey Surprise
Hi Bob,

Wonder if the Pigeon Guillemot was alive or dead when it got picked up.

Researching on Cornell's Birds of the World side, I found the following:

"Live fish account for over 99% of prey items recorded in almost every
published account, with a wide variety of species taken."....(lots more
information, and then)...

"Anecdotal observations of Ospreys with non-fish prey include birds,
snakes, voles, squirrels, muskrats (/Ondatra zibethica/), salamanders,
molluscs, and even a small alligator (/Alligator mississippiensis/;
Wiley and Lohrer 1973
<https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/osprey/cur/references#REF46661>,
Proctor 1977
<https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/osprey/cur/references#REF16623>,
Thorpe and Boddham 1977
<https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/osprey/cur/references#REF46656>,
Castrale and McCall 1983
<https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/osprey/cur/references#REF46598>,
Taylor 1986d
<https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/osprey/cur/references#REF46655>,
King 1988
<https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/osprey/cur/references#REF16599>,
Poole 1989a
<https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/osprey/cur/references#REF16617>,
Pawloski 1996
<https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/osprey/cur/references#REF34553>,
Watermolen 1996
<https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/osprey/cur/references#REF46659>,
Douglass 1997
<https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/osprey/cur/references#REF59806>,
Jennings 2010
<https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/osprey/cur/references#REF143967>).
An Osprey was observed foraging by walking along the ground and sallying
out 2 m to capture ground squirrels (/Citrellus/ sp.; Werren and
Peterson 1988
<https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/osprey/cur/references#REF16645>).
Known to drop conch shells on to hard surface to extract mollusc inside
(Jennings 2010
<https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/osprey/cur/references#REF143967>).
Some of these reports include non-fish taken in water, probably using
typical foraging techniques (e.g., alligator, muskrat) and emphasizing
the generalist nature of Osprey predation while hunting over water. "

BTW, for those that want to "nerd out" on known science of specific bird
species, I highly recommend a subscription to Cornell's Birds of the
World: https://birdsoftheworld.org/ . It's 42 bucks per year, which
works out to $3.50 a month. This is a resource for researchers, so
expect scientific language and content.

Good birding,

Pete

On 7/21/20 9:16 AM, Bob Ramer wrote:
>
> Monday morning, while birding at Pelican Rock, I was surprised to see
> an Osprey flying north along the coast with an adult Pigeon Guillemot
> in its talons. Of course, I was probably less surprised than the
> Pigeon Guillemot was.
>
> Bob Ramer
>
> Santa Cruz
>
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Date: 7/21/20 9:16 am
From: Bob Ramer <rjramer...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Osprey Surprise
Monday morning, while birding at Pelican Rock, I was surprised to see an
Osprey flying north along the coast with an adult Pigeon Guillemot in its
talons. Of course, I was probably less surprised than the Pigeon Guillemot
was.



Bob Ramer

Santa Cruz

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Date: 7/20/20 10:47 pm
From: Phil Brown <pdpbrown...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Westcliff
THis morning there were still groups of ELEGANT TERNS on the kelp off
Westcliff, and one MARBLED MURRELET at the East side of Mitchell's cove.
Phil Brown SCBC

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Date: 7/18/20 12:23 pm
From: <kyri...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Ano Nuevo SP - Bank Swallows not there
Interestingly, the Cove Beach colony was reported on eBird as occupied
by Bank and Cliff Swallows just a week ago.

Today, the colony was completely deserted except for the word CROATAN
pecked into the sand cliff by a tiny beak... just kidding, but there was
no sign of life. Holes and mud nests were present but unoccupied. There
was no sign of a disaster under the cliff (i.e. debris, bodies). I have
to conclude they have fledged and left over the last week. Is that what
you all normally observe?

Cliff Swallows were abundant over the meadow and pond. Nothing I was
able to get in binoculars was a Bank and I didn't hear any indicative
chattering calls.

Here's the complete eBird list:

> https://ebird.org/checklist/S71608479
>
> Kyri Freeman
> Ben Lomond

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Date: 7/17/20 11:25 pm
From: Liam Murphy <liammsf...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Black Swifts: Sand Hill Bluff.
I’ve had several black swift sightings at Sand Hill Bluff this month as well. On July 2nd at around 7:25p I observed a group of 5 loosely grouped swifts flying southeast (down the coast) high and with a fairly determined pace. Perhaps these were on the way to Wilder if there is a larger colony there. This past weekend, 7/12, about 20 minutes after sunset as my girlfriend and I were trying to photograph a barn owl (who hunts the bluff reliably at sunset - seen 3 times now), a lone black swift flew low within 10 feet of us, moving west to east over the fields just shy of the cypress grove. The low altitude and late time of this sighting would lead me to believe this lone bird (and possibly more) could be roosting at the SHB caves.

We, too, picked up a tick on our outing…be sure to check when you get home!

Good birding,
Liam

> On Jul 17, 2020, at 10:51 PM, David Kossack <dkossack...> wrote:
>
> With BLACK SWIFTS active at Wilder Ranch I thought I might see what I could find at Sand Hill Bluff (see Alex Rinkert's description below from 2018). Sand Bluff is 1 - 2 miles west of Michael Bolte’s siting at Old Cove Landing.
>
> I arrived at the shelf between the caves about 5pm, today, July 17, and stayed until 7pm. At 6:30 pm a solitary BLACK SWIFT appeared. The bird flew about the air space in front of the shelf for 15 - 30 seconds then disappeared. A second solitary BLACK SWIFT appeared not quite 10 minutes later. As before it occupied the airspace in front of the shelf for about 15 - 30 seconds, then dropped down on the east side of the shelf to water level and disappeared in the scatter. I believe that it went into the cave tucked closest to the shelf on the east side, it didn’t go up… I didn’t see any other BLACK SWIFTS this evening.
>
> The shelf is the same location visited by BLACK SWIFT field trip described below.
> Wind was minimal, ocean flat, temp. low 60s.
> A lot of birds calling for food, and a lot of ticks, too.
>
> David Kossack
> Santa Cruz
>
>
>> On Aug 9, 2018, at 5:47 PM, Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...> <mailto:<arinkert12...>> wrote:
>>
>> On the morning of July 19 I visited Sand Hill Bluff to search the sea caves for BLACK SWIFT nests. I was only able to safely access the eastern caves (no nests) so I climbed to a vantage point where I could see the western caves and watched for a few hours. During that time I saw a single, silent swift fly into a cave on two occasions about an hour apart, staying inside the cave for several minutes on both visits, then exiting and flying directly inland. No socializing, no foraging, not carrying nest material. Around 2:15 PM a group of 6 swifts appeared and performed the most amazing aerial displays I have seen from this species. When the group arrived, one swift entered the same cave and stayed inside for several minutes while the others made audaciously close passes to the bluff face and ocean surface at breakneck speed. Wow. A few minutes later the other swift left the cave and joined the others for a while, then they all flew off.
>>
>> Given the time of day and year, duration of visits, behavior and context, I would say there is an active nest in that cave. This species has not been confirmed breeding in Santa Cruz County since 1994, although observations at this location and perhaps elsewhere suggest they may have bred or attempted to in recent years.
>>
>> For anyone who wants to see the Black Swift, I will be leading an impromptu Santa Cruz Bird Club-sanctioned field trip on the evening of August 15 to Sand Hill Bluff. We will meet at 6:30 PM at the intersection of Highway 1 and Shaffer Road, and then will caravan to Sand Hill Bluff. Expect two miles of level walking and a brisk evening wind.
>>
>> Alex Rinkert
>> Santa Cruz
>>
>> From: 'Paul Miller' via mbbirds [mailto:<mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...>]
>> Sent: Monday, July 23, 2018 10:35 AM
>> To: MBB Listserv
>> Subject: [MBBIRDS] Black Swifts
>>
>> Last night, for the 9th or 10th time, I headed out to Sand Hill Bluff to try for Black Swifts again.
>> I parked along Coast Rd. and rode my bike in to the site, past the farm with the red buildings.
>> This has been my nemesis bird for the last 3 years or so.
>> At around 745, 3-4 appeared and flew above the sea cave for about 20 seconds. They vocalized briefly.
>> I lost them and couldn't refind them in the next 10 minutes or so. I decided that a brief view was plenty good for me!
>>
>> I encourage you to head out there if you haven't seen Black Swifts. Stake it out at around 715 and be patient.
>> It would be interesting to see if someone could verify breeding. Any updates on that?
>> One more check mark--
>>
>> Paul Miller
>> Mount Hermon
>> --
>> For Monterey Rare Bird alerts call 831-250-4550
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>>
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Date: 7/17/20 10:51 pm
From: David Kossack <dkossack...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Black Swifts: Sand Hill Bluff.
With BLACK SWIFTS active at Wilder Ranch I thought I might see what I could find at Sand Hill Bluff (see Alex Rinkert's description below from 2018). Sand Bluff is 1 - 2 miles west of Michael Bolte’s siting at Old Cove Landing.

I arrived at the shelf between the caves about 5pm, today, July 17, and stayed until 7pm. At 6:30 pm a solitary BLACK SWIFT appeared. The bird flew about the air space in front of the shelf for 15 - 30 seconds then disappeared. A second solitary BLACK SWIFT appeared not quite 10 minutes later. As before it occupied the airspace in front of the shelf for about 15 - 30 seconds, then dropped down on the east side of the shelf to water level and disappeared in the scatter. I believe that it went into the cave tucked closest to the shelf on the east side, it didn’t go up… I didn’t see any other BLACK SWIFTS this evening.

The shelf is the same location visited by BLACK SWIFT field trip described below.
Wind was minimal, ocean flat, temp. low 60s.
A lot of birds calling for food, and a lot of ticks, too.

David Kossack
Santa Cruz


> On Aug 9, 2018, at 5:47 PM, Alex Rinkert <arinkert12...> wrote:
>
> On the morning of July 19 I visited Sand Hill Bluff to search the sea caves for BLACK SWIFT nests. I was only able to safely access the eastern caves (no nests) so I climbed to a vantage point where I could see the western caves and watched for a few hours. During that time I saw a single, silent swift fly into a cave on two occasions about an hour apart, staying inside the cave for several minutes on both visits, then exiting and flying directly inland. No socializing, no foraging, not carrying nest material. Around 2:15 PM a group of 6 swifts appeared and performed the most amazing aerial displays I have seen from this species. When the group arrived, one swift entered the same cave and stayed inside for several minutes while the others made audaciously close passes to the bluff face and ocean surface at breakneck speed. Wow. A few minutes later the other swift left the cave and joined the others for a while, then they all flew off.
>
> Given the time of day and year, duration of visits, behavior and context, I would say there is an active nest in that cave. This species has not been confirmed breeding in Santa Cruz County since 1994, although observations at this location and perhaps elsewhere suggest they may have bred or attempted to in recent years.
>
> For anyone who wants to see the Black Swift, I will be leading an impromptu Santa Cruz Bird Club-sanctioned field trip on the evening of August 15 to Sand Hill Bluff. We will meet at 6:30 PM at the intersection of Highway 1 and Shaffer Road, and then will caravan to Sand Hill Bluff. Expect two miles of level walking and a brisk evening wind.
>
> Alex Rinkert
> Santa Cruz
>
> From: 'Paul Miller' via mbbirds [mailto:<mbbirds...>]
> Sent: Monday, July 23, 2018 10:35 AM
> To: MBB Listserv
> Subject: [MBBIRDS] Black Swifts
>
> Last night, for the 9th or 10th time, I headed out to Sand Hill Bluff to try for Black Swifts again.
> I parked along Coast Rd. and rode my bike in to the site, past the farm with the red buildings.
> This has been my nemesis bird for the last 3 years or so.
> At around 745, 3-4 appeared and flew above the sea cave for about 20 seconds. They vocalized briefly.
> I lost them and couldn't refind them in the next 10 minutes or so. I decided that a brief view was plenty good for me!
>
> I encourage you to head out there if you haven't seen Black Swifts. Stake it out at around 715 and be patient.
> It would be interesting to see if someone could verify breeding. Any updates on that?
> One more check mark--
>
> Paul Miller
> Mount Hermon
> --
> For Monterey Rare Bird alerts call 831-250-4550
> ---
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "mbbirds" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to mbbirds+<unsubscribe...> <mailto:mbbirds+<unsubscribe...>.
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>
> --
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Date: 7/17/20 8:17 pm
From: 'Breck Tyler' via mbbirds <mbbirds...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Kirby Park
Not entirely, but one lane is open.


> On Jul 17, 2020, at 6:55 PM, Chris Campton <campton...> wrote:
>
> So did they repair the road that caved in?
>
>
> Sent from Xfinity Connect Application
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
>
> From: <mbbirds...>
> To: <mapmg2011...>
> Cc: <nickiezee0111...>, <mbbirds...>
> Sent: 2020-07-17 6:53:55 PM
> Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Kirby Park
>
> I drove by Kirby Park today about 1:00pm and the gate was open, half a dozen cars in the parking lot.
>
>
> Breck Tyler
> Santa Cruz
>
>
>
>> On Jul 17, 2020, at 6:16 PM, Mary Anne Goldberg <mapmg2011...> <mailto:<mapmg2011...>> wrote:
>>
>> Nickie,
>> I live nearby. Yes, you can park outside the locked gates and walk in. I have heard reports of car break-ins there, so be sure to leave nothing visible inside. I doubt it’s a problem if you’re planning on going early in the morning.
>> Mary Anne Goldberg
>>   <>
>> From: <mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...> [mailto:<mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...>] On Behalf Of Nickie Zavinsky
>> Sent: Thursday, July 16, 2020 5:16 PM
>> To: Mbbirds Bay Birds <mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...>>
>> Subject: [MBBIRDS] Kirby Park
>>
>> Does anyone know if Kirby Park is open?
>> --
>> Nickie Zavinsky
>> Old Friends Pet Support
>> 1-(831)566-8580
>>
>> --
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>>
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Date: 7/17/20 6:55 pm
From: Chris Campton <campton...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Kirby Park
 

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Date: 7/17/20 6:53 pm
From: 'Breck Tyler' via mbbirds <mbbirds...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Kirby Park
I drove by Kirby Park today about 1:00pm and the gate was open, half a dozen cars in the parking lot.


Breck Tyler
Santa Cruz



> On Jul 17, 2020, at 6:16 PM, Mary Anne Goldberg <mapmg2011...> wrote:
>
> Nickie,
> I live nearby. Yes, you can park outside the locked gates and walk in. I have heard reports of car break-ins there, so be sure to leave nothing visible inside. I doubt it’s a problem if you’re planning on going early in the morning.
> Mary Anne Goldberg
>   <>
> From: <mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...> [mailto:<mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...>] On Behalf Of Nickie Zavinsky
> Sent: Thursday, July 16, 2020 5:16 PM
> To: Mbbirds Bay Birds <mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...>>
> Subject: [MBBIRDS] Kirby Park
>
> Does anyone know if Kirby Park is open?
> --
> Nickie Zavinsky
> Old Friends Pet Support
> 1-(831)566-8580
>
> --
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "mbbirds" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to mbbirds+<unsubscribe...> <mailto:mbbirds+<unsubscribe...>.
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>
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Date: 7/17/20 6:36 pm
From: Lois Goldfrank <loisg...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] They're definitely back!
Walking on West Cliff with a friend just now I saw over 200 Elegant Terns between the Lighthouse and the Dream Inn. Most were settled down on small patches of kelp in groups of 3-8, but there were some larger groups too and some in the air.Their calls were what alerted me, and at first I counted each one, then by 10’s. After estimating 200 I stopped and caught up with my friend who was watching 4 Dolphins splashing around near shore. Great shoe, though no Sooties tonight.

Lois Goldfrank

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Date: 7/17/20 6:16 pm
From: Mary Anne Goldberg <mapmg2011...>
Subject: RE: [MBBIRDS] Kirby Park
Nickie,

I live nearby. Yes, you can park outside the locked gates and walk in. I have heard reports of car break-ins there, so be sure to leave nothing visible inside. I doubt it’s a problem if you’re planning on going early in the morning.

Mary Anne Goldberg



From: <mbbirds...> [mailto:<mbbirds...>] On Behalf Of Nickie Zavinsky
Sent: Thursday, July 16, 2020 5:16 PM
To: Mbbirds Bay Birds <mbbirds...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Kirby Park



Does anyone know if Kirby Park is open?

--

Nickie Zavinsky
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1-(831)566-8580

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Date: 7/17/20 11:34 am
From: Jean Brocklebank <jeanbean...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Impact of hunting on migratory shorebird populations
https://news.mongabay.com/2020/07/new-study-quantifies-impact-of-hunting-on-migratory-shorebird-populations/

New study quantifies impact of hunting on migratory shorebird populations [photos in online edition]

Mongabay.com
17 July 2020

* Hunting might be a major threat for thousands of migratory shorebirds in the East Asian-Australasian Flyway (EAAF), one of the major corridors for migratory birds in the world.

* A new study shows that hunting has contributed to the demise of at least a third of migratory shorebirds in the flyway since the 1970s.

* The flyway, which spans 22 countries from the Arctic to Australia, is the most threatened flyway among the nine migratory bird corridors in the world, with habitat loss and climate change the main drivers of the plummeting population.

* Around 50 million waterbirds pass through the flyway on an annual basis, but recent data shows a 61% decline in migrating waterbird species.

Habitat loss and climate change are often blamed for the decreasing numbers of migratory shorebirds in a major flyway in the Asia-Pacific region in recent years. But it might be time to add another likely suspect: hunting.

More than 50 million waterbirds from more than 250 different populations use the East Asian-Australasian Flyway (EAAF), a major migratory corridor that sees birds crossing 22 countries — from the Arctic across East Asia until Australia — in a journey that covers a treacherous 25,000 kilometers (15,500 miles).

At least 32 globally threatened species and 19 near-threatened species use this flyway once the wintering season comes. It’s also the most threatened bird migration corridor in the world: U.K.-based BirdLife International has recorded a dramatic decline among migrating birds in the flyway, with the latest estimates showing that populations have fallen by 61% among waterbird species.

Previous studies point to habitat loss driven by development infrastructures, which is most notable in China and the Korean Peninsula, as main factors for the plummeting population of migratory birds. This is on top of erratic weather patterns and predators, including human hunting, which pose challenges to a migratory bird’s annual flight.

But a new study, published in the June 2020 edition of Biological Conservation, shows that hunting might have a bigger impact than expected — or recorded.

Hunting, through shooting, trapping and poisoning, among others, has long been recorded in the region. But its scale and impacts on the flyway as a whole have not been thoroughly analyzed. This study does just that: it attempts to fill in the knowledge gap and give a clearer picture of the extent of human hunting on the birds in the flyway.

“While hunting has always been known to occur, its scale and significance were unknown prior to this study, and it’s clear that hunting has likely contributed to declines of migratory shorebirds in this region,” lead author Eduardo Gallo-Cajiao, from the University of Queensland in Australia, says in a statement.

“To address hunting from a conservation perspective, we need to know the extent of it across the entire flyway,” he tells Mongabay. “For instance, we need to know what the total level of take is on an annual basis for each species, so we can assess whether hunting is sustainable or not.”

To make this happen, Gallo-Cajiao and 15 other researchers dug through hundreds of journals, papers and published literature from the 22 countries in the flyway. It’s through this massive literature analysis that they discovered evidence of pervasive hunting practices in the flyway since the 1970s. Even though records in each country are scant and not enough to establish if hunting is sustainable or not, these hunting practices altogether could be contributing to a massive decline in the bird population.

They went through 107 documents from 165 locations across 14 countries, including journals, books and written documentation that recorded at least 46 avian species in the hunting list. In the study, Gallo-Caijao and his team decided on a bookmark year: 1970, the start of a pivotal era that saw international policy frameworks for conserving migratory shorebirds emerging in the Asia-Pacific region.

Records before 1970s were classified under historical hunting, while those from the 1970s until December 2017 were tagged as contemporary hunting. Qualitative narrative analyses were done for historical records, while a combined methodology worked for contemporary records.

But records, as the team would find out, are like a series of jigsaw puzzles, says Gallo-Cajiao, and sometimes the whole picture isn’t as clear yet. While Gallo-Cajiao and his team knew hunting occurs across the flyway, records were scattered and possibly downplayed due to international environmental agreements. Most records don’t identify specific species, or worse, skip records. There’s also no standard metrics to measure the gravity of shorebird hunting.

“In this study, we put all the pieces together, like assembling a huge jigsaw puzzle,” Gallo-Cajiao says. “However, the flyway is an enormous region … with various capacities and motivations for assessing hunting.”

But they were able to establish two things: That hunting has indeed been rampant among the countries within the EAAF, with earliest recorded hunting data going as far back as the late 19th century; and that it might have a much bigger impact in the traveling avian population than expected.

“Even though our study revealed that most records do not allow [us] to determine whether hunting is sustainable or not because of a lack of more detailed information, the resulting jigsaw puzzle revealed that hunting is pervasive enough to warrant further studies and attention by key actors, such as national governments, NGOs, and researchers,” Gallo-Cajiao says.

The study was also able to match bird hunting for specific species in the records, although limited, with the species’ existing conservation status, driving home the point that yes, it’s possible that human hunting during the annual migration season is impacting bird populations.

Among the flocks that frequent the flyway, it’s the shorebirds that are most at risk from hunters. There are 214 species of shorebirds in the world, and 61 of them use the Asia-Pacific flyway, according to the study.

Five threatened shorebirds species appeared in hunting documents. This includes the critically endangered spoon-billed sandpiper (Calidris pygmaea), which breeds in northeastern Russia and spends the winters in Southeast Asia.. These small waders are down to a few hundred breeding pairs in the wild and rely on the Yellow Sea intertidal areas as a resting stop on their journeys.

The other threatened shorebirds include the endangered Far Eastern curlew (Numenius madagascariensis), spotted greenshank (Tringa guttifer) and great knot (Calidris tenuirostris), and the vulnerable wood snipe (Gallinago nemoricola).

“Many of these fascinating birds are unfortunately declining, with several now on the brink of extinction,” Callo-Gajiao said. “We did not know how many other threatened species could be affected.”

Addressing the hunting issue, however, is as complicated as its records: each country has its own measures, policies and directives when it comes to hunting. Conservation strategies thus need to be localized and in tune with the needs of local hunters, some of who depend on subsistence hunting.

“Hunting of migratory shorebirds is a difficult issue to address, because it involves people who hunt for different purposes across many different countries with different national wildlife laws,” Gallo-Cajiao says. “For instance, some migratory shorebirds are hunted in western Alaska by Native Americans for subsistence, while hunting in Indonesia has involved trade.”

Hunting can be legal for some species in Russia and the United States, Gallo-Cajiao says, while being banned in other countries like Australia. “A one-size-fits-all approach will likely not work for these species,” he adds.

In Southeast Asia, the problem is complicated by the fact that hunting has a domestic and cross-border dimension, says study co-author Ding Li Yong of BirdLife International Asia, based in Singapore. “Livelihoods of some communities rely on harvesting forest products, including wildlife.”

But it’s not all grim. In Bangladesh, the Spoon-billed Sandpiper Conservation Project has rolled out a series of campaigns that saw a drastic drop in trapping practices to improve the remaining number of the species.

“Through the provision of alternative livelihoods, we have seen hunting of migratory shorebirds reduced to very low levels in Bangladesh,” says Sayam U. Chowdhury, assistant coordinator of the conservation project and a co-author of the study. “Ex-hunters are now working as fishermen, tailors, watermelon producers, and guardians of threatened shorebirds.”

Beyond the communities, collaboration among governments, conservation groups and communities is paramount, Gallo-Cajiao says. There’s a need to “develop a coordinated monitoring system of hunting at a flyway scale,” the researchers say. “If hunting still is a significant threat, then overlooking it at a policy level may be a serious conservation oversight.”

The importance of protecting migratory birds, fish and mammals is recognized under the recent United Nations Convention on Migratory Species. In 2017 the East Asian-Australasian Flyway Partnership established a task force specifically on hunting.

“Addressing hunting across such a vast area, as the East Asian-Australasian Flyway, is not easy, but conservation work focused on particular places can yield important small wins,” Gallo-Cajiao says. “The road ahead is still very steep though.”

Citation:

Gallo-Cajiao, E., Morrison, T. H., Woodworth, B. K., Lees, A. C., Naves, L. C., Yong, D. L., … Fuller, R. A. (2020). Extent and potential impact of hunting on migratory shorebirds in the Asia-Pacific. Biological Conservation, 246, 108582. doi:10.1016/j.biocon.2020.108582

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Date: 7/16/20 11:06 pm
From: L.T. Jaeger <ltjaeger...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Kirby Park
The entrance is barricaded from car entrances, but people still walk in.


> On Jul 16, 2020, at 5:15 PM, Nickie Zavinsky <nickiezee0111...> wrote:
>
> Does anyone know if Kirby Park is open?
> --
> Nickie Zavinsky
> Old Friends Pet Support
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Date: 7/16/20 6:50 pm
From: Linda Brodman <redwdrn...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Eared Grebe
At Jetty Road today, there was an Eared Grebe in full adult breeding
plumage.

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Date: 7/16/20 5:15 pm
From: Nickie Zavinsky <nickiezee0111...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Kirby Park
Does anyone know if Kirby Park is open?
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Date: 7/16/20 3:44 pm
From: Michael Bolte <mjbolte...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Black Swifts at Wilder Ranch Old Cove Landing
all - I had several requests for better directions to the spot where we saw
the swifts. We have seen them at about the same spot in previous years.

Here is a map.

Mike

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Date: 7/16/20 12:38 pm
From: Jane Orbuch <jorbuch...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Fwd: National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: Seabirds 101--East Coast
FYI

>
> Free webinar about seabirds, who are among the most widely traveled and extraordinary navigators in the bird world.
> <>
> <https://lnks.gd/l/eyJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJidWxsZXRpbl9saW5rX2lkIjoxMDAsInVyaSI6ImJwMjpjbGljayIsImJ1bGxldGluX2lkIjoiMjAyMDA3MTYuMjQ0OTU4MDEiLCJ1cmwiOiJodHRwczovL3NhbmN0dWFyaWVzLm5vYWEuZ292Lz91dG1fbWVkaXVtPWVtYWlsJnV0bV9zb3VyY2U9R292RGVsaXZlcnkifQ.6JZcgbT3qbCOjQKGmeGAG6lLp4CeSM5q5lwgvBblif4/s/572635893/br/81155687401-l>
> Connecting You to America's Ocean and Great Lakes Treasures
> National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series <https://lnks.gd/l/eyJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJidWxsZXRpbl9saW5rX2lkIjoxMDEsInVyaSI6ImJwMjpjbGljayIsImJ1bGxldGluX2lkIjoiMjAyMDA3MTYuMjQ0OTU4MDEiLCJ1cmwiOiJodHRwczovL3NhbmN0dWFyaWVzLm5vYWEuZ292L2VkdWNhdGlvbi90ZWFjaGVycy93ZWJpbmFyLXNlcmllcy5odG1sP3V0bV9tZWRpdW09ZW1haWwmdXRtX3NvdXJjZT1Hb3ZEZWxpdmVyeSJ9.SOzNXPPvnQTHTaiY4Z--JZqKOsi384VGZxYc-6xmqUU/s/572635893/br/81155687401-l>
>
> Seabirds 101
> July 23, 2020
> 3 pm Pacific / 6 pm Eastern
> <https://lnks.gd/l/eyJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJidWxsZXRpbl9saW5rX2lkIjoxMDIsInVyaSI6ImJwMjpjbGljayIsImJ1bGxldGluX2lkIjoiMjAyMDA3MTYuMjQ0OTU4MDEiLCJ1cmwiOiJodHRwczovL2F0dGVuZGVlLmdvdG93ZWJpbmFyLmNvbS9yZWdpc3Rlci82NTIzNDQyNDc4MjQ4NDc2NDI3P3V0bV9tZWRpdW09ZW1haWwmdXRtX3NvdXJjZT1Hb3ZEZWxpdmVyeSJ9.E91cydYEyUQVROHFAh3NjVwfcnqpHFNm-icQ2dEAxOY/s/572635893/br/81155687401-l>
> Seabirds are among the most widely traveled and extraordinary navigators in the bird world. Find out from Wayne Petersen, Mass Audubon’s Important Bird Area Program Director, how these remarkable birds are supremely adapted to spend most of their lives in some of the most remote and hostile environments on the planet. We will trace the travels of some of these amazing birds as they seasonally utilize Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary, and learn what they are telling us, both about the marine environment and ourselves.
>
> The National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series <https://lnks.gd/l/eyJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJidWxsZXRpbl9saW5rX2lkIjoxMDMsInVyaSI6ImJwMjpjbGljayIsImJ1bGxldGluX2lkIjoiMjAyMDA3MTYuMjQ0OTU4MDEiLCJ1cmwiOiJodHRwczovL3NhbmN0dWFyaWVzLm5vYWEuZ292L2VkdWNhdGlvbi90ZWFjaGVycy93ZWJpbmFyLXNlcmllcy5odG1sP3V0bV9tZWRpdW09ZW1haWwmdXRtX3NvdXJjZT1Hb3ZEZWxpdmVyeSJ9.MAw6vgs_y0KgDdS4AVCum6cKI8rSOJEnNoiExkKTIeI/s/572635893/br/81155687401-l> provides educators with educational and scientific expertise, resources, and training to support ocean and climate literacy in the classroom. This series currently targets formal and informal educators, students (high school through college), as well as members of the community, including families. You can also visit the archives of the webinar series to catch up on presentations you may have missed here <https://lnks.gd/l/eyJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJidWxsZXRpbl9saW5rX2lkIjoxMDQsInVyaSI6ImJwMjpjbGljayIsImJ1bGxldGluX2lkIjoiMjAyMDA3MTYuMjQ0OTU4MDEiLCJ1cmwiOiJodHRwczovL3NhbmN0dWFyaWVzLm5vYWEuZ292L2VkdWNhdGlvbi90ZWFjaGVycy93ZWJpbmFyLXNlcmllcy1hcmNoaXZlcy5odG1sP3V0bV9tZWRpdW09ZW1haWwmdXRtX3NvdXJjZT1Hb3ZEZWxpdmVyeSJ9.isqJd08VBLgekkzSSpDsm74mZW4-FwVAolc2pLivqQc/s/572635893/br/81155687401-l>.
>
> After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. The Webinar ID is 598-601-171.
>
> <https://lnks.gd/l/eyJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJidWxsZXRpbl9saW5rX2lkIjoxMDUsInVyaSI6ImJwMjpjbGljayIsImJ1bGxldGluX2lkIjoiMjAyMDA3MTYuMjQ0OTU4MDEiLCJ1cmwiOiJodHRwczovL2F0dGVuZGVlLmdvdG93ZWJpbmFyLmNvbS9yZWdpc3Rlci82NTIzNDQyNDc4MjQ4NDc2NDI3P3V0bV9tZWRpdW09ZW1haWwmdXRtX3NvdXJjZT1Hb3ZEZWxpdmVyeSJ9.AK1SG0rY8RWnNgYnBJ4uFoKOgUORVgF6IsotHRTOEHY/s/572635893/br/81155687401-l>
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Date: 7/15/20 9:59 pm
From: Michael Bolte <mjbolte...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Black Swifts on the Old Cove Landing trail
This afternoon around 5pm Frances and I had some nice views of Black Swifts
on the Old Cove Landing trail. If you are doing the loop south to north,
they were at the spot where the shelf is as you first get to the open water.

Some photos in the e-bird report.

https://ebird.org/checklist/S71531384

regards, Mike

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Date: 7/15/20 9:48 pm
From: DEBRA SHEARWATER <debiluv...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Panoche Road: CLOSED
Howdy, Birders,

Not many birders would venture out to Panoche Road at this time of year. However, I was just about to head down to Brown’s Valley Road via Panoche Road when I noticed an awful lot of flashing red lights along Highway 25. Overhead, I saw at least 4 fixed wing Cal Fire aircraft heading toward Panoche. After at least 10 fire vehicles passed me, including a flat bed with a dozer on it, I headed home instead.

A wildfire is burning near the Antelope Valley Cal Fire Station in the Willow Creek area where there are many homes on 40 acre parcels. Most birders will be familiar with this fire station as a place where Lewis’s Woodpecker used to be found.

Cal Fire has named this fire the Coyote Fire as it is along Coyote Creek. As of 7 pm, 1400 acres had burned and several structures. The fire in 20% contained.

People are being evacuated. I read an unconfirmed report that all animals and children have been evacuated. The Red Cross has set up an evac station at Bolado County Park.

Although the news media doesn’t say so, I believe PANOCHE ROAD IS CLOSED to regular traffic. Every agency has been called out. No injuries have been reported.

For more info:
https://www.mercurynews.com/cal-fire-battling-1400-acre-wildfire-southeast-of-hollister <https://www.mercurynews.com/cal-fire-battling-1400-acre-wildfire-southeast-of-hollister>
https://www.fire.ca.gov/incidents/2020/7/15/coyote-fire/ <https://www.fire.ca.gov/incidents/2020/7/15/coyote-fire/>

I know one family who lives right at the location of this fire. Hopefully, they are okay. They are very “fire savvy.”

Stay safe. Stay healthy.
Happy Trails,
Debi Shearwater


DEBRA SHEARWATER
Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
PO Box 190
Hollister, CA 95024
831.637.8527
<debi...>
www.shearwaterjourneys.com
www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com

Celebrating 44 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
Siberia’s Forgotten Coast & Spoon-billed Sandpiper- 23 June - 6 July 2020
Northeast Passage: Northern Sea Route 27 July - 22 August 2020




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Date: 7/14/20 5:42 pm
From: James P Williams <jpwilliams2007...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] WETA
Observed male WESTERN TANAGER at Quail Hollow late morning today. He was in
the bottom of the lower meadow along the Discovery Loop.

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Date: 7/14/20 3:08 pm
From: 'Lisa Sheridan' via mbbirds <mbbirds...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Finally fledged Lawrence's Goldfinch
I had something great to show mom!
A pair of Lawrence's Goldfinch arrived in Late May and have continued to show up at my water fountain often. Just this week the male was at my feeder chowing down on the husked sunflower seeds which I had not seen him do. Today he has arrived with two fledglings. 
My 93 year old mother noticed them on feeder first with a little brood. She saw that the chest of the babies is light grayish almost white and looked just enough different than the other Lesser Goldfinches. She didn't even didn't actually notice their stunning father!
I'm so proud of my beginner mom. You really can learn birds at any age!
Some pictures of the babies on ebird. I believe these may be a new breeding bird for Soquel.
https://ebird.org/checklist/S71498521
Lisa Sheridan - Soquel





Lisa Sheridan Photography...Mostly Birds www.lisasheridanphotography.com

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Date: 7/12/20 3:55 pm
From: Don Roberson <creagrus...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] MTY highlights updated again
The Monterey County bird highlights for summer 2020 have been updated again with new photos graciously provided by Rita Carratello, Byron Chin, Paul Fenwick, John Hills, Bill Hill, and Karen Kreiger. Among the highlights is documentation for a new Monterey County breeding species!

Updated page at http://creagrus.home.montereybay.com/MTY_2020b.html

Thanks,
Don Roberson
MTY bird compiler

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Date: 7/11/20 10:37 am
From: Larry Corridon <larry961357...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Is it my imagination or are their more spottings of Rose-Breasted Grosbeaks this year?

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 11, 2020, at 09:44, David Ekdahl <decvmbb...> wrote:
>
> A male Rose-breasted Grosbeak visited our feeder yesterday late afternoon, July 10. We have not seen today, so far.
>
> David Ekdahl
> Connie Vigno
>
> in south Felton
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Date: 7/11/20 9:44 am
From: David Ekdahl <decvmbb...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Rose-breasted Grosbeak
A male Rose-breasted Grosbeak visited our feeder yesterday late afternoon,
July 10. We have not seen today, so far.

David Ekdahl
Connie Vigno

in south Felton

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Date: 7/9/20 6:56 pm
From: liammsf <liammsf...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] First Shearwater Action of the season
Big movement of shearwaters on the east side of Santa Cruz, right now, 6:55p. First I've seen this summer/fall season.

Excited for fall!
Good birding,
Liam

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Date: 7/9/20 3:16 am
From: Carol Pecot <carol.pecot...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] East Meadow update 7/6/20
Thanks Lisa for making us aware of an opportunity to present the case to the new administration! Also, the list of reasons for opposition to the current plan (hasty-made by out of state developers) is very helpful.

Carol Pecot

> On Jul 7, 2020, at 8:04 AM, 'Lisa Sheridan' via mbbirds <mbbirds...> wrote:
>
> For those of you who are interested, here is the latest info on the UCSC East Meadow housing a Project.
>
> Lisa Sheridan
>
> Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
> Get the new AOL app: mail.mobile.aol.com <http://mail.mobile.aol.com/>
> On Monday, July 6, 2020, James Clifford <jcliff...> wrote:
>
>
>
> East Meadow Update, 7/6/20
>
> Dear Defender of UCSC’s East Meadow,
>
> Thank you for your long-standing support for saving the East Meadow. Without your efforts and the efforts of so many others, the bulldozers would have torn into the East Meadow nearly two years ago. As we explain below, the struggle has entered a new phase. We are writing to enlist you in an email campaign, and we’re hoping for hundreds of emails to the UCSC administration. Time is of the essence.
>
> The trial phase of our litigation is nearly complete. The judge has announced his verdict from the bench. He has found that the approval of the project by the UC Regents was improper due to UCSC withholding from the Regents information that was necessary for approval of the project. And he has directed the Regents to vacate that approval.
>
> We had hoped for a more far-reaching judgment that would direct the university to redo its Environmental Impact Report, a time-consuming process. We were confident that if the university were required to provide a detailed and careful assessment of the project, in contrast to the hasty and careless decision that included the destruction of the East Meadow, this might produce an even more favorable outcome. We may continue to pursue this course in an appeal.
>
> But for the moment, the movement to protect the meadow must shift from the legal arena to the arena of persuasion and politics. The new UCSC administration—Chancellor Cindy Larive and Executive Vice Chancellor Lori Kletzer—must decide very soon what request to make of the Regents:
>
> -Approve the same project, with the missing information supplied.
>
> -Ask for approval of a modified project that protects the East Meadow. At the original Regents meeting that resulted in the approval of the project, several powerful Regents supported this course.
>
> The epidemic and recession, and drastic cuts for the University of California budget may provide a changed context, with significant opportunities. On university campuses across the country, construction projects—particularly of student residences—have been cancelled. There is no word about this possibility at the University of California, but current conditions could buy us time. The administration may now be encouraged to listen more attentively to the large numbers of donors and alumni who oppose development of the East Meadow. Many, over the course of our campaign, have notified the university that they will withhold donations until the plans have been scrapped.
>
> Most of the key UCSC administrators who supported the East Meadow development plan when it was proposed by the Alabama-based developer have left the University. Chancellor Larive and Executive Vice Chancellor Kletzer were not present during the earlier debate and opposition to putting 5% of the larger Student Housing West project on the East Meadow. They need to know how much opposition there is to the East Meadow portion of the Student Housing West project. They need to know how this decision offends the fundamental values that the friends and supporters of UCSC hold dear.
>
> They need to hear from you.
>
> And it’s easy. Send an email to: Chancellor Cynthia Larive (<chancelloroffice...> <mailto:<chancelloroffice...> or <clarive...> <mailto:<clarive...>) and to Campus Provost/Executive Vice Chancellor Lori Kletzer (<officeofcpevc...> <mailto:<officeofcpevc...> or <lkletzer...> <mailto:<lkletzer...>).
>
> Tell them that you want them to adopt an alternative version of the Student Housing West project, an alternative that does not build on the East Meadow. There are many alternatives to choose from. And please tell them why you feel that way. We’re pasting below a list of arguments that others have made in case that helps with your argument. For more details, check out our website: https://www.eastmeadowaction.org/ <https://www.eastmeadowaction.org/>.
>
> And please, don’t wait. We can’t predict when the administration might make this decision. It might be soon.
>
> Thank you for your continued support for the Meadow and for the campus.
>
> The East Meadow Action Committee
>
>
> Some reasons for opposition.
>
> We offer them as suggestions. Please craft your own letter choosing what works best, or write an original letter. The most effective letters will be concise and pointed.
>
> · UCSC has a long tradition of environmental stewardship – it is one of our strengths when it comes to recruiting in areas such as field biology, environmental studies, biochemistry, marine biology, etc. It’s a tradition that pairs well with our system of UCSC Natural Reserves. This tradition of stewardship and long-held design principles has given UCSC worldwide acclaim as one of the world’s most beautiful universities. That a public institution should be so acclaimed is a testament to California’s democratic and inclusionary promise. The East Meadow project belies that tradition and undermines that core strength.
> · There are so many alternatives to choose from: alternatives that were included in the environmental review and many other alternatives as well. Any of them would be preferable to the one chosen.
> · The Student Housing West project enjoyed broad support across the campus and the wider UCSC community, until the belated and secret decision to move part of the project from the west side of campus onto the East Meadow became known. The project has been mired in conflict and resistance ever since. The obvious solution is to modify the project to get it out of the East Meadow.
> · Once it became known that part of this housing project would be built in the East Meadow, the project became a divisive and corrosive force that afflicted certain specific campus institutions, such as the Foundation Board of Trustees and the Alumni Council, but it also contributed to conflict, division and disillusionment more widely on campus. We need the project to be modified in a way that unifies rather than divides.
> · Building on the East Meadow constitutes only 5% of the project, but it’s causing 95% of the opposition to the entire project. The sensible thing to do is get that 5% out of the Meadow so that plans for student housing on campus can move forward.
> · It is a bad idea to put housing for families with small children and a child-care facility immediately adjacent to the busiest intersection on campus.
> · The East Meadow part of this project is an issue that has disillusioned and alienated alumni and other campus supporters, at a time when UCSC needs their support more than ever.
> § We’re all trying to raise the stature of UCSC. Putting a sprawl of pre-fab housing just inside the main entrance to the campus destroys one of the campus’s most distinctive and iconic features.
> § With the pandemic in full swing, we don’t need housing as quickly as possible. But we will need housing in the long -term. We have the time to get it right, and getting it right would be the best way to get it built. Getting it right means getting it out of the East Meadow.
>
>
>
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Date: 7/8/20 3:11 pm
From: Lisa Larson <lisafaylarson...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Harkins Slough Osprey
Hi Birders!

A baby fledged this morning about 11:15! It circled the nest 5 times and
returned.

Lisa

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Date: 7/7/20 7:39 pm
From: L.T. Jaeger <ltjaeger...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] [MBBirds] Falcon Axillars, pale face, dark hood photos
oops….forgot the link to the final bird

https://pbase.com/ternvomitthief/image/50987041

> On Jul 7, 2020, at 7:37 PM, L.T. Jaeger <ltjaeger...> wrote:
>
> Here’s a few photos showing the dark armpits and the paler overall color of a Prairie Falcon in flight:
>
> https://pbase.com/ternvomitthief/image/106986981
> https://pbase.com/ternvomitthief/image/106986978
> https://pbase.com/ternvomitthief/image/139631119
>
> And a couple showing the dark hood and horizontal barring on an adult Peregrine, albeit on two (different) perched birds.
> https://pbase.com/ternvomitthief/image/89876344
> https://pbase.com/ternvomitthief/image/130914046
>
> Lastly, what I would call a sub-adult Peregrine, which has the gray head, back and upper breast of an adult, but has browner and streaked (rather than barred) flanks and under tail coverts, as well as browner flight feathers, tertials, and upper-wing coverts
>
> Clay
>
>
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Date: 7/7/20 7:37 pm
From: L.T. Jaeger <ltjaeger...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] [MBBirds] Falcon Axillars, pale face, dark hood photos
Here’s a few photos showing the dark armpits and the paler overall color of a Prairie Falcon in flight:

https://pbase.com/ternvomitthief/image/106986981
https://pbase.com/ternvomitthief/image/106986978
https://pbase.com/ternvomitthief/image/139631119

And a couple showing the dark hood and horizontal barring on an adult Peregrine, albeit on two (different) perched birds.
https://pbase.com/ternvomitthief/image/89876344
https://pbase.com/ternvomitthief/image/130914046

Lastly, what I would call a sub-adult Peregrine, which has the gray head, back and upper breast of an adult, but has browner and streaked (rather than barred) flanks and under tail coverts, as well as browner flight feathers, tertials, and upper-wing coverts

Clay


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Date: 7/7/20 7:15 pm
From: L.T. Jaeger <ltjaeger...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] [MBBirds] falcons at Moore Creek
Very definitive photos, Breck!!

These birds are Peregrine Falcons, as both have “hooded” heads, which Prairie Falcons do not. The bird in the majority of the photos is also an adult, as shown by the fine horizontal barring on the breast and belly, and the very dark hood contrasting with the rest of the body, which looks more grey than brown. Bird #2 (NOT the Red-tail) is harder to see due to lighting, but it appears to be browner overall and showing less contrast between the hood and the rest of the bird. That implies the bird is a juvenile; probably the offspring of Bird #1. Juveniles also lack the fine grey vermiculation on the underparts that the adult bird shows; instead, having brown vertical streaks; kind of like what is seen on a juvenile accipiter, but perhaps a bit denser.

And as Phil mentioned, the darker overall color and lack of boldly contrasting axillars/armpits is another clue; to me, that eliminates Prairie, where as the hood confirms Peregrine.

Thanks for sharing the link to the photos; it’s always fun to help I.D. a bird or two!

Clay Kempf
Elkhorn



> On Jul 7, 2020, at 6:17 PM, Phil Brown <pdpbrown...> wrote:
>
> Thanks Breck,
> the pictures that do show the underwings can eliminate Prairie pretty clearly based on my previous comments.
> Phil
>
> On Tue, Jul 7, 2020 at 6:14 PM 'Breck Tyler' via mbbirds <mbbirds...> wrote:
> Thanks Phil. Sorry, here is the eBird link.
>
> https://ebird.org/checklist/S71243273
>
> Breck
>
>> On Jul 7, 2020, at 6:09 PM, Phil Brown <pdpbrown...> wrote:
>>
>> Hi Breck,
>> Prairie falcons are pale, and they have black axillaries (armpits) and black underwing coverts that contrast with the rest of the wing. It would help if you posted a link to your ebird list.
>> Thanks, Phil Brown SCBC
>>
>> On Tue, Jul 7, 2020 at 6:01 PM 'Breck Tyler' via mbbirds <mbbirds...> wrote:
>> Following up on my sighting of falcons at Moore Creek Preserve earlier today and seeking feedback. I have reported the birds as unidentified falcons and posted 10 low res photos on eBird. My feeling is that both were Peregrines, but I’d appreciate opinions on the IDs and whether either bird looks like the Prairie that has been reported. I would also like to know how difficult it is to distinguish between the alarm calls for the two species. Oh, and what is the prey species?
>>
>> Thanks to anyone who wishes to chime in,
>>
>> Breck Tyler
>> Santa Cruz
>>
>>
>>
>>> On Jul 7, 2020, at 12:50 PM, Breck Tyler <ospr...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Today about 1115, near the NW fence gate, I saw two large falcons harassing a Red-tailed Hawk carrying prey. One falcon appeared darker and heavier, the other lighter and sleeker. The encounter continued for several minutes over the dry pasture, the paler bird frequently calling “kree kree kree.” I will post photos on eBird and let folks weigh in on the IDs.
>>>
>>> Breck Tyler
>>> Santa Cruz
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>> On Jul 6, 2020, at 8:50 PM, Randy Wardle <wrwardle...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> There have been several reports of a PRAIRIE FALCON hanging out at Moore Creek Preserve in Santa Cruz the past several days. This would be highly unusual and worthy of chasing if it is true. Has anyone taken any photos of the bird at this location to get a positive ID?
>>>>
>>>> Randy Wardle
>>>> Aptos
>>>> From: <ebird-alert...> <ebird-alert...>
>>>> Sent: Monday, July 6, 2020 6:43 AM
>>>> Subject: [eBird Alert] Santa Cruz County Rare Bird Alert <hourly>
>>>>
>>>> *** Species Summary:
>>>>
>>>> - Prairie Falcon (1 report)
>>>>
>>>> ---------------------------------------------
>>>> Thank you for subscribing to the <hourly> Santa Cruz County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Santa Cruz County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35726
>>>> NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.
>>>>
>>>> eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully
>>>>
>>>> Prairie Falcon (Falco mexicanus) (1)
>>>> - Reported Jul 05, 2020 08:55 by Larry Corridon
>>>> - Moore Creek preserve, Santa Cruz, California
>>>> - Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=36.9622545,-122.0642707&ll=36.9622545,-122.0642707
>>>> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71184121
>>>> - Comments: "Although not super light colored from below, there was no obvious black/white striping or or very dark underside. The head wad lighter than the Peragrine and showed a light collar below the back of the head. From above it had a tannish/reddish color, not the blue/black I expect with the peregrine."
>>>>
>>>> ***********
>>>>
>>>> You received this message because you are subscribed to eBird's Santa Cruz County Rare Bird Alert
>>>>
>>>> Manage your eBird alert subscriptions:
>>>> https://ebird.org/alerts
>>>>
>>>> eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or seasonally rare species (Rarities Alerts) or species you have not yet observed (Needs Alerts) in your region of interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed observations are included. Some reports may be from private property or inaccessible to the general public. It is the responsibility of every eBirder to be aware of and respectful of access restrictions. For more information, see our Terms of Use:https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/
>>>> --
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>>>
>>
>>
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>
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Date: 7/7/20 7:14 pm
From: Pete Sole <pete...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Re: [MBBirds] falcons at Moore Creek
All,

I concur with Phil.

Prairie Falcons are paler than Peregrines, more sandy, dusty brown on
top vs. dark grey blue. As Phil noted, the lack of a dark "armpit" under
the wing, clinches the id as not a Prairie. As Randy pointed out in the
original email, individual Prairie Falcons are rare in our area.
Checking ebird, all verified reports of Prairie Falcons in Santa Cruz
county have been individual birds. Not one has been a pair. Not to say
it could never happen, but makes it even less likely.

To answer the Prairie's prey question, here is the beginning Prairie's
description from Cornell Labs Birds of the World species account:

"This inhabitant of dry environments of western North America, where
cliffs or bluffs punctuate open plains and shrub-steppe deserts, is an
efficient and specialized predator of medium-sized desert mammals and
birds, ranging widely in search of patchily distributed prey. Several
species of ground squirrels (/Spermophilus/ spp.) are the mainstay of
the Prairie Falcon's diet; they provide fat-rich calories that pairs
need for raising their broods of 4–5 young during the 3- to 4-month
nesting season. When ground squirrels move underground to escape summer
heat and dryness, most Prairie Falcons leave their nesting areas in
search of other prey. Horned Larks (/Eremophila alpestris/) and Western
Meadowlarks (/Sturnella neglecta/) are important prey items in winter."

One of my favorite birds... Prairie Falcon... terrible quality but fun
image:
http://www.lighthousenet.com/photos/birds/web_ready/hawks_eagles_kites/falcon_prairie_130127a.jpg

Pete


On 7/7/20 6:17 PM, Phil Brown wrote:
> Thanks Breck,
> the pictures that do show the underwings can eliminate Prairie pretty
> clearly based on my previous comments.
> Phil
>
> On Tue, Jul 7, 2020 at 6:14 PM 'Breck Tyler' via mbbirds
> <mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...>> wrote:
>
> Thanks Phil. Sorry, here is the eBird link.
>
> https://ebird.org/checklist/S71243273
>
> Breck
>
>> On Jul 7, 2020, at 6:09 PM, Phil Brown <pdpbrown...>
>> <mailto:<pdpbrown...>> wrote:
>>
>> Hi Breck,
>> Prairie falcons are pale, and they have black
>> axillaries (armpits) and black underwing coverts that contrast
>> with the rest of the wing. It would help if you posted a link to
>> your ebird list.
>> Thanks, Phil Brown SCBC
>>
>> On Tue, Jul 7, 2020 at 6:01 PM 'Breck Tyler' via mbbirds
>> <mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...>> wrote:
>>
>> Following up on my sighting of falcons at Moore Creek
>> Preserve earlier today and seeking feedback. I have reported
>> the birds as unidentified falcons and posted 10 low res
>> photos on eBird. My feeling is that both were Peregrines, but
>> I’d appreciate opinions on the IDs and whether either bird
>> looks like the Prairie that has been reported. I would also
>> like to know how difficult it is to distinguish between the
>> alarm calls for the two species. Oh, and what is the prey
>> species?
>>
>> Thanks to anyone who wishes to chime in,
>>
>> Breck Tyler
>> Santa Cruz
>>
>>
>>
>>> On Jul 7, 2020, at 12:50 PM, Breck Tyler <ospr...>
>>> <mailto:<ospr...>> wrote:
>>>
>>> Today about 1115, near the NW fence gate, I saw two large
>>> falcons harassing a Red-tailed Hawk carrying prey. One
>>> falcon appeared darker and heavier, the other lighter and
>>> sleeker. The encounter continued for several minutes over
>>> the dry pasture, the paler bird frequently calling “kree
>>> kree kree.” I will post photos on eBird and let folks weigh
>>> in on the IDs.
>>>
>>> Breck Tyler
>>> Santa Cruz
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>> On Jul 6, 2020, at 8:50 PM, Randy Wardle
>>>> <wrwardle...> <mailto:<wrwardle...>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> There have been several reports of a PRAIRIE FALCON hanging
>>>> out at Moore Creek Preserve in Santa Cruz the past several
>>>> days. This would be highly unusual and worthy of chasing if
>>>> it is true. Has anyone taken any photos of the bird at this
>>>> location to get a positive ID?
>>>>
>>>> Randy Wardle
>>>> Aptos
>>>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>>> *From:*<ebird-alert...>
>>>> <mailto:<ebird-alert...><ebird-alert...>
>>>> <mailto:<ebird-alert...>>
>>>> *Sent:*Monday, July 6, 2020 6:43 AM
>>>> *Subject:*[eBird Alert] Santa Cruz County Rare Bird Alert
>>>> <hourly>
>>>> *** Species Summary:
>>>>
>>>> - Prairie Falcon (1 report)
>>>>
>>>> ---------------------------------------------
>>>> Thank you for subscribing to the <hourly> Santa Cruz County
>>>> Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare
>>>> birds in Santa Cruz County.  View or unsubscribe to this
>>>> alert athttps://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35726
>>>> NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.
>>>>
>>>> eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and
>>>> mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local
>>>> health authorities and respect any active travel
>>>> restrictions in your area. For more information
>>>> visit:https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully
>>>>
>>>> Prairie Falcon (Falco mexicanus) (1)
>>>> - Reported Jul 05, 2020 08:55 by Larry Corridon
>>>> - Moore Creek preserve, Santa Cruz, California
>>>> -
>>>> Map:http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=36.9622545,-122.0642707&ll=36.9622545,-122.0642707
>>>> - Checklist:https://ebird.org/checklist/S71184121
>>>> - Comments: "Although not super light colored from below,
>>>> there was no obvious black/white striping or or very dark
>>>> underside. The head wad lighter than the Peragrine and
>>>> showed a light collar below the back of the head. From
>>>> above it had a tannish/reddish color, not the blue/black I
>>>> expect with the peregrine."
>>>>
>>>> ***********
>>>>
>>>> You received this message because you are subscribed to
>>>> eBird's Santa Cruz County Rare Bird Alert
>>>>
>>>> Manage your eBird alert subscriptions:
>>>> https://ebird.org/alerts
>>>>
>>>> eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or
>>>> seasonally rare species (Rarities Alerts) or species you
>>>> have not yet observed (Needs Alerts) in your region of
>>>> interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed observations are
>>>> included. Some reports may be from private property or
>>>> inaccessible to the general public. It is the
>>>> responsibility of every eBirder to be aware of and
>>>> respectful of access restrictions. For more information,
>>>> see our Terms of
>>>> Use:https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/
>>>> --
>>>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the
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>>>> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails
>>>> from it, send an email
>>>> tombbirds+<unsubscribe...>
>>>> <mailto:mbbirds+<unsubscribe...>.
>>>> To view this discussion on the web
>>>> visithttps://groups.google.com/d/msgid/mbbirds/<MWHPR06MB34409D4AF4E751D19AA8186BC3660...>
>>>> <https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/mbbirds/<MWHPR06MB34409D4AF4E751D19AA8186BC3660...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>.
>>>
>>
>>
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Date: 7/7/20 6:17 pm
From: Phil Brown <pdpbrown...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Re: [MBBirds] falcons at Moore Creek
Thanks Breck,
the pictures that do show the underwings can eliminate Prairie pretty
clearly based on my previous comments.
Phil

On Tue, Jul 7, 2020 at 6:14 PM 'Breck Tyler' via mbbirds <
<mbbirds...> wrote:

> Thanks Phil. Sorry, here is the eBird link.
>
> https://ebird.org/checklist/S71243273
>
> Breck
>
> On Jul 7, 2020, at 6:09 PM, Phil Brown <pdpbrown...> wrote:
>
> Hi Breck,
> Prairie falcons are pale, and they have black axillaries (armpits) and
> black underwing coverts that contrast with the rest of the wing. It would
> help if you posted a link to your ebird list.
> Thanks, Phil Brown SCBC
>
> On Tue, Jul 7, 2020 at 6:01 PM 'Breck Tyler' via mbbirds <
> <mbbirds...> wrote:
>
>> Following up on my sighting of falcons at Moore Creek Preserve earlier
>> today and seeking feedback. I have reported the birds as unidentified
>> falcons and posted 10 low res photos on eBird. My feeling is that both were
>> Peregrines, but I’d appreciate opinions on the IDs and whether either bird
>> looks like the Prairie that has been reported. I would also like to know
>> how difficult it is to distinguish between the alarm calls for the two
>> species. Oh, and what is the prey species?
>>
>> Thanks to anyone who wishes to chime in,
>>
>> Breck Tyler
>> Santa Cruz
>>
>>
>>
>> On Jul 7, 2020, at 12:50 PM, Breck Tyler <ospr...> wrote:
>>
>> Today about 1115, near the NW fence gate, I saw two large falcons
>> harassing a Red-tailed Hawk carrying prey. One falcon appeared darker and
>> heavier, the other lighter and sleeker. The encounter continued for several
>> minutes over the dry pasture, the paler bird frequently calling “kree kree
>> kree.” I will post photos on eBird and let folks weigh in on the IDs.
>>
>> Breck Tyler
>> Santa Cruz
>>
>>
>>
>> On Jul 6, 2020, at 8:50 PM, Randy Wardle <wrwardle...> wrote:
>>
>> There have been several reports of a PRAIRIE FALCON hanging out at Moore
>> Creek Preserve in Santa Cruz the past several days. This would be highly
>> unusual and worthy of chasing if it is true. Has anyone taken any photos of
>> the bird at this location to get a positive ID?
>>
>> Randy Wardle
>> Aptos
>> ------------------------------
>> *From:* <ebird-alert...> <ebird-alert...>
>> *Sent:* Monday, July 6, 2020 6:43 AM
>> *Subject:* [eBird Alert] Santa Cruz County Rare Bird Alert <hourly>
>>
>> *** Species Summary:
>>
>> - Prairie Falcon (1 report)
>>
>> ---------------------------------------------
>> Thank you for subscribing to the <hourly> Santa Cruz County Rare Bird
>> Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Santa Cruz
>> County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at
>> https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35726
>> NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.
>>
>> eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully.
>> Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and
>> respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information
>> visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully
>>
>> Prairie Falcon (Falco mexicanus) (1)
>> - Reported Jul 05, 2020 08:55 by Larry Corridon
>> - Moore Creek preserve, Santa Cruz, California
>> - Map:
>> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=36.9622545,-122.0642707&ll=36.9622545,-122.0642707
>> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71184121
>> - Comments: "Although not super light colored from below, there was no
>> obvious black/white striping or or very dark underside. The head wad
>> lighter than the Peragrine and showed a light collar below the back of the
>> head. From above it had a tannish/reddish color, not the blue/black I
>> expect with the peregrine."
>>
>> ***********
>>
>> You received this message because you are subscribed to eBird's Santa
>> Cruz County Rare Bird Alert
>>
>> Manage your eBird alert subscriptions:
>> https://ebird.org/alerts
>>
>> eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or seasonally rare
>> species (Rarities Alerts) or species you have not yet observed (Needs
>> Alerts) in your region of interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed
>> observations are included. Some reports may be from private property or
>> inaccessible to the general public. It is the responsibility of every
>> eBirder to be aware of and respectful of access restrictions. For more
>> information, see our Terms of Use:
>> https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/
>>
>> --
>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
>> "mbbirds" group.
>> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
>> email to mbbirds+<unsubscribe...>
>> To view this discussion on the web visit
>> https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/mbbirds/<MWHPR06MB34409D4AF4E751D19AA8186BC3660...>
>> <https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/mbbirds/<MWHPR06MB34409D4AF4E751D19AA8186BC3660...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>
>> .
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
>> "mbbirds" group.
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>> email to mbbirds+<unsubscribe...>
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>> <https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/mbbirds/<EA0096BE-95BB-4B8F-8E27-D2DCB3273D31...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>
>> .
>>
>
> --
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> .
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Date: 7/7/20 6:14 pm
From: 'Breck Tyler' via mbbirds <mbbirds...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Re: [MBBirds] falcons at Moore Creek
Thanks Phil. Sorry, here is the eBird link.

https://ebird.org/checklist/S71243273 <https://ebird.org/checklist/S71243273>

Breck

> On Jul 7, 2020, at 6:09 PM, Phil Brown <pdpbrown...> wrote:
>
> Hi Breck,
> Prairie falcons are pale, and they have black axillaries (armpits) and black underwing coverts that contrast with the rest of the wing. It would help if you posted a link to your ebird list.
> Thanks, Phil Brown SCBC
>
> On Tue, Jul 7, 2020 at 6:01 PM 'Breck Tyler' via mbbirds <mbbirds...> <mailto:<mbbirds...>> wrote:
> Following up on my sighting of falcons at Moore Creek Preserve earlier today and seeking feedback. I have reported the birds as unidentified falcons and posted 10 low res photos on eBird. My feeling is that both were Peregrines, but I’d appreciate opinions on the IDs and whether either bird looks like the Prairie that has been reported. I would also like to know how difficult it is to distinguish between the alarm calls for the two species. Oh, and what is the prey species?
>
> Thanks to anyone who wishes to chime in,
>
> Breck Tyler
> Santa Cruz
>
>
>
>> On Jul 7, 2020, at 12:50 PM, Breck Tyler <ospr...> <mailto:<ospr...>> wrote:
>>
>> Today about 1115, near the NW fence gate, I saw two large falcons harassing a Red-tailed Hawk carrying prey. One falcon appeared darker and heavier, the other lighter and sleeker. The encounter continued for several minutes over the dry pasture, the paler bird frequently calling “kree kree kree.” I will post photos on eBird and let folks weigh in on the IDs.
>>
>> Breck Tyler
>> Santa Cruz
>>
>>
>>
>>> On Jul 6, 2020, at 8:50 PM, Randy Wardle <wrwardle...> <mailto:<wrwardle...>> wrote:
>>>
>>> There have been several reports of a PRAIRIE FALCON hanging out at Moore Creek Preserve in Santa Cruz the past several days. This would be highly unusual and worthy of chasing if it is true. Has anyone taken any photos of the bird at this location to get a positive ID?
>>>
>>> Randy Wardle
>>> Aptos
>>> From: <ebird-alert...> <mailto:<ebird-alert...> <ebird-alert...> <mailto:<ebird-alert...>>
>>> Sent: Monday, July 6, 2020 6:43 AM
>>> Subject: [eBird Alert] Santa Cruz County Rare Bird Alert <hourly>
>>>
>>> *** Species Summary:
>>>
>>> - Prairie Falcon (1 report)
>>>
>>> ---------------------------------------------
>>> Thank you for subscribing to the <hourly> Santa Cruz County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Santa Cruz County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35726 <https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35726>
>>> NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.
>>>
>>> eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully <https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully>
>>>
>>> Prairie Falcon (Falco mexicanus) (1)
>>> - Reported Jul 05, 2020 08:55 by Larry Corridon
>>> - Moore Creek preserve, Santa Cruz, California
>>> - Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=36.9622545,-122.0642707&ll=36.9622545,-122.0642707 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=36.9622545,-122.0642707&ll=36.9622545,-122.0642707>
>>> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71184121 <https://ebird.org/checklist/S71184121>
>>> - Comments: "Although not super light colored from below, there was no obvious black/white striping or or very dark underside. The head wad lighter than the Peragrine and showed a light collar below the back of the head. From above it had a tannish/reddish color, not the blue/black I expect with the peregrine."
>>>
>>> ***********
>>>
>>> You received this message because you are subscribed to eBird's Santa Cruz County Rare Bird Alert
>>>
>>> Manage your eBird alert subscriptions:
>>> https://ebird.org/alerts <https://ebird.org/alerts>
>>>
>>> eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or seasonally rare species (Rarities Alerts) or species you have not yet observed (Needs Alerts) in your region of interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed observations are included. Some reports may be from private property or inaccessible to the general public. It is the responsibility of every eBirder to be aware of and respectful of access restrictions. For more information, see our Terms of Use:https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/ <https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/>
>>> --
>>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "mbbirds" group.
>>> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to mbbirds+<unsubscribe...> <mailto:mbbirds+<unsubscribe...>.
>>> To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/mbbirds/<MWHPR06MB34409D4AF4E751D19AA8186BC3660...> <https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/mbbirds/<MWHPR06MB34409D4AF4E751D19AA8186BC3660...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>.
>>
>
>
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Back to top
Date: 7/7/20 6:09 pm
From: Phil Brown <pdpbrown...>
Subject: Re: [MBBIRDS] Re: [MBBirds] falcons at Moore Creek
Hi Breck,
Prairie falcons are pale, and they have black axillaries (armpits) and
black underwing coverts that contrast with the rest of the wing. It would
help if you posted a link to your ebird list.
Thanks, Phil Brown SCBC

On Tue, Jul 7, 2020 at 6:01 PM 'Breck Tyler' via mbbirds <
<mbbirds...> wrote:

> Following up on my sighting of falcons at Moore Creek Preserve earlier
> today and seeking feedback. I have reported the birds as unidentified
> falcons and posted 10 low res photos on eBird. My feeling is that both were
> Peregrines, but I’d appreciate opinions on the IDs and whether either bird
> looks like the Prairie that has been reported. I would also like to know
> how difficult it is to distinguish between the alarm calls for the two
> species. Oh, and what is the prey species?
>
> Thanks to anyone who wishes to chime in,
>
> Breck Tyler
> Santa Cruz
>
>
>
> On Jul 7, 2020, at 12:50 PM, Breck Tyler <ospr...> wrote:
>
> Today about 1115, near the NW fence gate, I saw two large falcons
> harassing a Red-tailed Hawk carrying prey. One falcon appeared darker and
> heavier, the other lighter and sleeker. The encounter continued for several
> minutes over the dry pasture, the paler bird frequently calling “kree kree
> kree.” I will post photos on eBird and let folks weigh in on the IDs.
>
> Breck Tyler
> Santa Cruz
>
>
>
> On Jul 6, 2020, at 8:50 PM, Randy Wardle <wrwardle...> wrote:
>
> There have been several reports of a PRAIRIE FALCON hanging out at Moore
> Creek Preserve in Santa Cruz the past several days. This would be highly
> unusual and worthy of chasing if it is true. Has anyone taken any photos of
> the bird at this location to get a positive ID?
>
> Randy Wardle
> Aptos
> ------------------------------
> *From:* <ebird-alert...> <ebird-alert...>
> *Sent:* Monday, July 6, 2020 6:43 AM
> *Subject:* [eBird Alert] Santa Cruz County Rare Bird Alert <hourly>
>
> *** Species Summary:
>
> - Prairie Falcon (1 report)
>
> ---------------------------------------------
> Thank you for subscribing to the <hourly> Santa Cruz County Rare Bird
> Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Santa Cruz
> County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at
> https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35726
> NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.
>
> eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully.
> Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and
> respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information
> visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully
>
> Prairie Falcon (Falco mexicanus) (1)
> - Reported Jul 05, 2020 08:55 by Larry Corridon
> - Moore Creek preserve, Santa Cruz, California
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=36.9622545,-122.0642707&ll=36.9622545,-122.0642707
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71184121
> - Comments: "Although not super light colored from below, there was no
> obvious black/white striping or or very dark underside. The head wad
> lighter than the Peragrine and showed a light collar below the back of the
> head. From above it had a tannish/reddish color, not the blue/black I
> expect with the peregrine."
>
> ***********
>
> You received this message because you are subscribed to eBird's Santa Cruz
> County Rare Bird Alert
>
> Manage your eBird alert subscriptions:
> https://ebird.org/alerts
>
> eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or seasonally rare
> species (Rarities Alerts) or species you have not yet observed (Needs
> Alerts) in your region of interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed
> observations are included. Some reports may be from private property or
> inaccessible to the general public. It is the responsibility of every
> eBirder to be aware of and respectful of access restrictions. For more
> information, see our Terms of Use:
> https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/
>
> --
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "mbbirds" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
> email to mbbirds+<unsubscribe...>
> To view this discussion on the web visit
> https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/mbbirds/<MWHPR06MB34409D4AF4E751D19AA8186BC3660...>
> <https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/mbbirds/<MWHPR06MB34409D4AF4E751D19AA8186BC3660...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>
> .
>
>
>
> --
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> "mbbirds" group.
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> .
>

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Back to top
Date: 7/7/20 6:01 pm
From: 'Breck Tyler' via mbbirds <mbbirds...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Re: [MBBirds] falcons at Moore Creek
Following up on my sighting of falcons at Moore Creek Preserve earlier today and seeking feedback. I have reported the birds as unidentified falcons and posted 10 low res photos on eBird. My feeling is that both were Peregrines, but I’d appreciate opinions on the IDs and whether either bird looks like the Prairie that has been reported. I would also like to know how difficult it is to distinguish between the alarm calls for the two species. Oh, and what is the prey species?

Thanks to anyone who wishes to chime in,

Breck Tyler
Santa Cruz



> On Jul 7, 2020, at 12:50 PM, Breck Tyler <ospr...> wrote:
>
> Today about 1115, near the NW fence gate, I saw two large falcons harassing a Red-tailed Hawk carrying prey. One falcon appeared darker and heavier, the other lighter and sleeker. The encounter continued for several minutes over the dry pasture, the paler bird frequently calling “kree kree kree.” I will post photos on eBird and let folks weigh in on the IDs.
>
> Breck Tyler
> Santa Cruz
>
>
>
>> On Jul 6, 2020, at 8:50 PM, Randy Wardle <wrwardle...> <mailto:<wrwardle...>> wrote:
>>
>> There have been several reports of a PRAIRIE FALCON hanging out at Moore Creek Preserve in Santa Cruz the past several days. This would be highly unusual and worthy of chasing if it is true. Has anyone taken any photos of the bird at this location to get a positive ID?
>>
>> Randy Wardle
>> Aptos
>> From: <ebird-alert...> <mailto:<ebird-alert...> <ebird-alert...> <mailto:<ebird-alert...>>
>> Sent: Monday, July 6, 2020 6:43 AM
>> Subject: [eBird Alert] Santa Cruz County Rare Bird Alert <hourly>
>>
>> *** Species Summary:
>>
>> - Prairie Falcon (1 report)
>>
>> ---------------------------------------------
>> Thank you for subscribing to the <hourly> Santa Cruz County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Santa Cruz County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35726 <https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35726>
>> NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.
>>
>> eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully <https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully>
>>
>> Prairie Falcon (Falco mexicanus) (1)
>> - Reported Jul 05, 2020 08:55 by Larry Corridon
>> - Moore Creek preserve, Santa Cruz, California
>> - Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=36.9622545,-122.0642707&ll=36.9622545,-122.0642707 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=36.9622545,-122.0642707&ll=36.9622545,-122.0642707>
>> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71184121 <https://ebird.org/checklist/S71184121>
>> - Comments: "Although not super light colored from below, there was no obvious black/white striping or or very dark underside. The head wad lighter than the Peragrine and showed a light collar below the back of the head. From above it had a tannish/reddish color, not the blue/black I expect with the peregrine."
>>
>> ***********
>>
>> You received this message because you are subscribed to eBird's Santa Cruz County Rare Bird Alert
>>
>> Manage your eBird alert subscriptions:
>> https://ebird.org/alerts <https://ebird.org/alerts>
>>
>> eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or seasonally rare species (Rarities Alerts) or species you have not yet observed (Needs Alerts) in your region of interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed observations are included. Some reports may be from private property or inaccessible to the general public. It is the responsibility of every eBirder to be aware of and respectful of access restrictions. For more information, see our Terms of Use:https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/ <https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/>
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Date: 7/7/20 12:50 pm
From: 'Breck Tyler' via mbbirds <mbbirds...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] [MBBirds] falcons at Moore Creek
Today about 1115, near the NW fence gate, I saw two large falcons harassing a Red-tailed Hawk carrying prey. One falcon appeared darker and heavier, the other lighter and sleeker. The encounter continued for several minutes over the dry pasture, the paler bird frequently calling “kree kree kree.” I will post photos on eBird and let folks weigh in on the IDs.

Breck Tyler
Santa Cruz



> On Jul 6, 2020, at 8:50 PM, Randy Wardle <wrwardle...> wrote:
>
> There have been several reports of a PRAIRIE FALCON hanging out at Moore Creek Preserve in Santa Cruz the past several days. This would be highly unusual and worthy of chasing if it is true. Has anyone taken any photos of the bird at this location to get a positive ID?
>
> Randy Wardle
> Aptos
> From: <ebird-alert...> <mailto:<ebird-alert...> <ebird-alert...> <mailto:<ebird-alert...>>
> Sent: Monday, July 6, 2020 6:43 AM
> Subject: [eBird Alert] Santa Cruz County Rare Bird Alert <hourly>
>
> *** Species Summary:
>
> - Prairie Falcon (1 report)
>
> ---------------------------------------------
> Thank you for subscribing to the <hourly> Santa Cruz County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Santa Cruz County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35726 <https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35726>
> NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.
>
> eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully <https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully>
>
> Prairie Falcon (Falco mexicanus) (1)
> - Reported Jul 05, 2020 08:55 by Larry Corridon
> - Moore Creek preserve, Santa Cruz, California
> - Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=36.9622545,-122.0642707&ll=36.9622545,-122.0642707 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=36.9622545,-122.0642707&ll=36.9622545,-122.0642707>
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71184121 <https://ebird.org/checklist/S71184121>
> - Comments: "Although not super light colored from below, there was no obvious black/white striping or or very dark underside. The head wad lighter than the Peragrine and showed a light collar below the back of the head. From above it had a tannish/reddish color, not the blue/black I expect with the peregrine."
>
> ***********
>
> You received this message because you are subscribed to eBird's Santa Cruz County Rare Bird Alert
>
> Manage your eBird alert subscriptions:
> https://ebird.org/alerts <https://ebird.org/alerts>
>
> eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or seasonally rare species (Rarities Alerts) or species you have not yet observed (Needs Alerts) in your region of interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed observations are included. Some reports may be from private property or inaccessible to the general public. It is the responsibility of every eBirder to be aware of and respectful of access restrictions. For more information, see our Terms of Use:https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/ <https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/>
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Date: 7/7/20 8:05 am
From: 'Lisa Sheridan' via mbbirds <mbbirds...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Fwd: East Meadow update 7/6/20
For those of you who are interested, here is the latest info on the UCSC East Meadow housing a Project.
Lisa Sheridan

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
Get the new AOL app: mail.mobile.aol.com
On Monday, July 6, 2020, James Clifford <jcliff...> wrote:


 

 

East Meadow Update, 7/6/20

 

Dear Defender of UCSC’s East Meadow,

 

Thank you for your long-standing support for saving the East Meadow.  Without your efforts and the efforts of so many others, the bulldozers would have torn into the East Meadow nearly two years ago.  As we explain below, the struggle has entered a new phase.  We are writing to enlist you in an email campaign, and we’re hoping for hundreds of emails to the UCSC administration.  Time is of the essence.

 

The trial phase of our litigation is nearly complete.  The judge has announced his verdict from the bench.  He has found that the approval of the project by the UC Regents was improper due to UCSC withholding from the Regents information that was necessary for approval of the project.  And he has directed the Regents to vacate that approval.

 

We had hoped for a more far-reaching judgment that would direct the university to redo its Environmental Impact Report, a time-consuming process.  We were confident that if the university were required to provide a detailed and careful assessment of the project, in contrast to the hasty and careless decision that included the destruction of the East Meadow, this might produce an even more favorable outcome.  We may continue to pursue this course in an appeal.  

 

But for the moment, the movement to protect the meadow must shift from the legal arena to the arena of persuasion and politics.  The new UCSC administration—Chancellor Cindy Larive and Executive Vice Chancellor Lori Kletzer—must decide very soon what request to make of the Regents:

 

-Approve the same project, with the missing information supplied.

 

-Ask for approval of a modified project that protects the East Meadow.  At the original Regents meeting that resulted in the approval of the project, several powerful Regents supported this course. 

 

The epidemic and recession, and drastic cuts for the University of California budget may provide a changed context, with significant opportunities.  On university campuses across the country, construction projects—particularly of student residences—have been cancelled.   There is no word about this possibility at the University of California, but current conditions could buy us time.  The administration may now be encouraged to listen more attentively to the large numbers of donors and alumni who oppose development of the East Meadow.  Many, over the course of our campaign, have notified the university that they will withhold donations until the plans have been scrapped. 

 

Most of the key UCSC administrators who supported the East Meadow development plan when it was proposed by the Alabama-based developer have left the University.  Chancellor Larive and Executive Vice Chancellor Kletzer were not present during the earlier debate and opposition to putting 5% of the larger Student Housing West project on the East Meadow.  They need to know how much opposition there is to the East Meadow portion of the Student Housing West project.  They need to know how this decision offends the fundamental values that the friends and supporters of UCSC hold dear.  

 

They need to hear from you.

 

And it’s easy.  Send an email to: Chancellor Cynthia Larive (<chancelloroffice...> or <clarive...>) and to Campus Provost/Executive Vice Chancellor Lori Kletzer (<officeofcpevc...> or <lkletzer...>).

 

Tell them that you want them to adopt an alternative version of the Student Housing West project, an alternative that does not build on the East Meadow.  There are many alternatives to choose from.  And please tell them why you feel that way. We’re pasting below a list of arguments that others have made in case that helps with your argument.   For more details, check out our website: https://www.eastmeadowaction.org/.

 

And please, don’t wait.  We can’t predict when the administration might make this decision. It might be soon.

 

Thank you for your continued support for the Meadow and for the campus.

 

The East Meadow Action Committee

 

 

Some reasons for opposition. 

 

We offer them as suggestions. Please craft your own letter choosing what works best, or write an original letter. The most effective letters will be concise and pointed.

 

·      UCSC has a long tradition of environmental stewardship – it is one of our strengths when it comes to recruiting in areas such as field biology, environmental studies, biochemistry, marine biology, etc.  It’s a tradition that pairs well with our system of UCSC Natural Reserves.   This tradition of stewardship and long-held design principles has given UCSC worldwide acclaim as one of the world’s most beautiful universities.  That a public institution should be so acclaimed is a testament to California’s democratic and inclusionary promise. The East Meadow project belies that tradition and undermines that core strength.

·      There are so many alternatives to choose from: alternatives that were included in the environmental review and many other alternatives as well.  Any of them would be preferable to the one chosen.

·      The Student Housing West project enjoyed broad support across the campus and the wider UCSC community, until the belated and secret decision to move part of the project from the west side of campus onto the East Meadow became known.  The project has been mired in conflict and resistance ever since.  The obvious solution is to modify the project to get it out of the East Meadow.

·      Once it became known that part of this housing project would be built in the East Meadow, the project became a divisive and corrosive force that afflicted certain specific campus institutions, such as the Foundation Board of Trustees and the Alumni Council, but it also contributed to conflict, division and disillusionment more widely on campus.  We need the project to be modified in a way that unifies rather than divides. 

·      Building on the East Meadow constitutes only 5% of the project, but it’s causing 95% of the opposition to the entire project.  The sensible thing to do is get that 5% out of the Meadow so that plans for student housing on campus can move forward.

·      It is a bad idea to put housing for families with small children and a child-care facility immediately adjacent to the busiest intersection on campus.

·      The East Meadow part of this project is an issue that has disillusioned and alienated alumni and other campus supporters, at a time when UCSC needs their support more than ever.

§  We’re all trying to raise the stature of UCSC.  Putting a sprawl of pre-fab housing just inside the main entrance to the campus destroys one of the campus’s most distinctive and iconic features. 

§  With the pandemic in full swing, we don’t need housing as quickly as possible.  But we will need housing in the long -term.  We have the time to get it right, and getting it right would be the best way to get it built.  Getting it right means getting it out of the East Meadow.

 




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Date: 7/6/20 8:50 pm
From: Randy Wardle <wrwardle...>
Subject: [MBBIRDS] Prairie Falcon: Fw: [eBird Alert] Santa Cruz County Rare Bird Alert
There have been several reports of a PRAIRIE FALCON hanging out at Moore Creek Preserve in Santa Cruz the past several days. This would be highly unusual and worthy of chasing if it is true. Has anyone taken any photos of the bird at this location to get a positive ID?

Randy Wardle
Aptos
________________________________
From: <ebird-alert...> <ebird-alert...>
Sent: Monday, July 6, 2020 6:43 AM
Subject: [eBird Alert] Santa Cruz County Rare Bird Alert <hourly>

*** Species Summary:

- Prairie Falcon (1 report)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <hourly> Santa Cruz County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Santa Cruz County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35726
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully

Prairie Falcon (Falco mexicanus) (1)
- Reported Jul 05, 2020 08:55 by Larry Corridon
- Moore Creek preserve, Santa Cruz, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=36.9622545,-122.0642707&ll=36.9622545,-122.0642707
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71184121
- Comments: "Although not super light colored from below, there was no obvious black/white striping or or very dark underside. The head wad lighter than the Peragrine and showed a light collar below the back of the head. From above it had a tannish/reddish color, not the blue/black I expect with the peregrine."

***********

You received this message because you are subscribed to eBird's Santa Cruz County Rare Bird Alert

Manage your eBird alert subscriptions:
https://ebird.org/alerts

eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or seasonally rare species (Rarities Alerts) or species you have not yet observed (Needs Alerts) in your region of interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed observations are included. Some reports may be from private property or inaccessible to the general public. It is the responsibility of every eBirder to be aware of and respectful of access restrictions. For more information, see our Terms of Use: https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/

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