AKBirding
Received From Subject
8/7/20 9:18 pm Rita Eagle <eaglerita...> Re: [AKBirding] Swainson's Thrush
8/7/20 10:58 am <seaside...> <seaside...> Re: [AKBirding] Swainson's Thrush
8/7/20 10:53 am Christine Maack <cmaackster...> Re: [AKBirding] Swainson's Thrush
8/7/20 10:24 am Emily Weiser <emily.l.weiser...> Re: [AKBirding] Swainson's Thrush
8/7/20 10:01 am Connie Taylor <connie...> Re: [AKBirding] Swainson's Thrush
8/7/20 9:55 am George Matz <geomatz41...> [AKBirding] Swainson's Thrush
8/3/20 5:47 pm rainyday via groups.io <c_griz=<yahoo.com...> [AKBirding] Monday, August 3, 2020 Marbled Murrelets commuting at dawn
8/3/20 12:36 pm David Sonneborn via groups.io <davidsonne=<aol.com...> Re: [AKBirding] Goodbye Northwest Crow [New Ebird Question]
8/3/20 9:39 am Gary & Terri Lyon <sealion...> Re: [AKBirding] Goodbye Northwest Crow [New Ebird Question]
7/31/20 5:43 pm rainyday via groups.io <c_griz=<yahoo.com...> [AKBirding] Friday, July 31, 2020 Greater Yellowlegs hunting
7/30/20 6:35 pm rainyday via groups.io <c_griz=<yahoo.com...> [AKBirding] Thursday, July 30, 2020 Trumpeter Swan update
7/22/20 6:03 pm Connie Taylor <connie...> Re: [AKBirding] Ptarmigan near Anchorage
7/22/20 5:59 pm Josiah Verbrugge <jverbrugge25...> [AKBirding] Ptarmigan near Anchorage
7/22/20 1:11 pm <aaron...> Re: [AKBirding] Goodbye Northwest Crow [New Ebird Question]
7/17/20 11:27 am George Matz <geomatz41...> [AKBirding] Western Wood Pewee
7/16/20 11:19 am Velton Cason <vlcason...> [AKBirding] Olive-sided flycatcher Halibut Cove Lagoon
7/15/20 2:52 pm Buzz Scher <buzzscher...> [AKBirding] Townsend’s Solitaire, Near Peak, Chugach State Park
7/14/20 5:29 pm Karen Coady <Theavery12...> [AKBirding] Cliff swallow
7/11/20 2:51 pm Karen Coady <Theavery12...> [AKBirding] Cliff swallow
7/9/20 5:34 pm rainyday via groups.io <c_griz=<yahoo.com...> [AKBirding] Thursday, July 9, 2020 Sorrow to Elation!
 
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Date: 8/7/20 9:18 pm
From: Rita Eagle <eaglerita...>
Subject: Re: [AKBirding] Swainson's Thrush
We have netting too- 100%. You just don’t notice it after awhile. So worth it. We have bird netting- google it.

Rita Eagle

> On Aug 7, 2020, at 10:58 AM, "<seaside...>" <seaside...> wrote:
>
> Hi George, thanks for the posting. Do you have netting over the windows? Please do! Anyone who cares about birds...Used seine net is available from gear shed and fishermen everywhereI I have not had ONE bird strike in ten years since I hung fish net over all the windows. Its the ONLY thing that works almost 100%. guaranteed. Mossy Kilcher
>> On Aug 7, 2020, at 8:54 AM, George Matz <geomatz41...> wrote:
>>
>> This morning, about 6 am as I was awakening, I heard a thump. About 15 minutes later, as I was looking out on the deck I saw a bird. There was a Swainson's Thrush that had obviously hit the window. Swainson's Thrush are similar to Hermit Thrush, which are more common around here, but the plumage is more olive-gray and it has a distinct yellow eye ring. Also, the Hermit Thrush has a rufous-colored tail.
>>
>> It looked a little dazed. When I have had a window strike that might be just an injury, I approach the bird to keep it more awake. I figure this will get the adrenal going and speed any recovery. In the winter, to keep the bird from getting hypothermic, I cup it in my hands. But it was warm enough to not bother with that. I petted the bird and spoke softly to it. That certainly kept it alert. It seemed to be recovering, so I took it off the deck and put it on the railing. I have had stunned birds before that try to fly away and hit the railings. The top of the railing had no obstructions if it tried to fly. Then I went in and got the camera, getting some close shots. After a couple of minutes, it seemed to be recovering, and then, suddenly flew off into the woods. It flew straight and strong, but I will never know if it actually survived.
>>
>> These are my thoughts on how to treat a window strike that seems to be just stunned. Any other suggestions.
>>
>> George
>> <Swainson's Thrush (2).JPG>
>
>

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Date: 8/7/20 10:58 am
From: <seaside...> <seaside...>
Subject: Re: [AKBirding] Swainson's Thrush
Hi George, thanks for the posting. Do you have netting over the windows? Please do! Anyone who cares about birds...Used seine net is available from gear shed and fishermen everywhereI I have not had ONE bird strike in ten years since I hung fish net over all the windows. Its the ONLY thing that works almost 100%. guaranteed. Mossy Kilcher
> On Aug 7, 2020, at 8:54 AM, George Matz <geomatz41...> wrote:
>
> This morning, about 6 am as I was awakening, I heard a thump. About 15 minutes later, as I was looking out on the deck I saw a bird. There was a Swainson's Thrush that had obviously hit the window. Swainson's Thrush are similar to Hermit Thrush, which are more common around here, but the plumage is more olive-gray and it has a distinct yellow eye ring. Also, the Hermit Thrush has a rufous-colored tail.
>
> It looked a little dazed. When I have had a window strike that might be just an injury, I approach the bird to keep it more awake. I figure this will get the adrenal going and speed any recovery. In the winter, to keep the bird from getting hypothermic, I cup it in my hands. But it was warm enough to not bother with that. I petted the bird and spoke softly to it. That certainly kept it alert. It seemed to be recovering, so I took it off the deck and put it on the railing. I have had stunned birds before that try to fly away and hit the railings. The top of the railing had no obstructions if it tried to fly. Then I went in and got the camera, getting some close shots. After a couple of minutes, it seemed to be recovering, and then, suddenly flew off into the woods. It flew straight and strong, but I will never know if it actually survived.
>
> These are my thoughts on how to treat a window strike that seems to be just stunned. Any other suggestions.
>
> George
>
> <Swainson's Thrush (2).JPG>


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Date: 8/7/20 10:53 am
From: Christine Maack <cmaackster...>
Subject: Re: [AKBirding] Swainson's Thrush
I second Emily's advice, but with the addendum that rehabilitators have
only one option to help the bird recover: an anti-inflammatory that
supposedly prevents brain swelling, which is what can still happen after a
bird flies strongly away. Having volunteered for 25 years at Bird TLC, I
still would not be able to confirm that this actually helps. And if the
drug is administered hours after the strike, that is probably too late.

Chris

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Date: 8/7/20 10:24 am
From: Emily Weiser <emily.l.weiser...>
Subject: Re: [AKBirding] Swainson's Thrush
Recommendations are to put the bird in a ventilated box in a dark, quiet
place and avoid disturbing it until you check on it a little later (30-60
minutes). Touching the bird, speaking, or otherwise showing it that a human
is nearby only stresses the bird out, which will make it more difficult for
the bird to recover (think about when a person gets a concussion - they are
told to rest, not seek adrenaline rushes). Wild birds see humans as
predators, not helpers.

Some more details from an Audubon source here:
https://audubonportland.org/our-work/rehabilitate-wildlife/being-a-good-wildlife-neighbor/birds-and-windows/

which also has links for how to prevent bird strikes.

Unfortunately, I've heard from licensed rehabilitators that even birds that
appear to recover and fly away can develop fatal conditions later. Some
recommend taking the bird to a rehabilitator immediately, even if you think
there's a chance it will be able to fly away soon. It would be worth
calling Bird TLC (907-562-4852) or your local rehabilitator for advice when
you do get a window strike. (Of course, prevention is the best possible
medicine.)

Good birding,

Emily


On Fri, Aug 7, 2020 at 9:01 AM Connie Taylor <connie...>
wrote:

> I've had good results from this product preventing bird strikes.
>
> https://www.collidescape.org/
> On 8/7/2020 8:54 AM, George Matz wrote:
>
> This morning, about 6 am as I was awakening, I heard a thump. About 15
> minutes later, as I was looking out on the deck I saw a bird. There was a
> Swainson's Thrush that had obviously hit the window. Swainson's Thrush are
> similar to Hermit Thrush, which are more common around here, but the
> plumage is more olive-gray and it has a distinct yellow eye ring. Also,
> the Hermit Thrush has a rufous-colored tail.
>
> It looked a little dazed. When I have had a window strike that might be
> just an injury, I approach the bird to keep it more awake. I figure this
> will get the adrenal going and speed any recovery. In the winter, to keep
> the bird from getting hypothermic, I cup it in my hands. But it was warm
> enough to not bother with that. I petted the bird and spoke softly to it.
> That certainly kept it alert. It seemed to be recovering, so I took it off
> the deck and put it on the railing. I have had stunned birds before that
> try to fly away and hit the railings. The top of the railing had no
> obstructions if it tried to fly. Then I went in and got the camera, getting
> some close shots. After a couple of minutes, it seemed to be recovering,
> and then, suddenly flew off into the woods. It flew straight and strong,
> but I will never know if it actually survived.
>
> These are my thoughts on how to treat a window strike that seems to be
> just stunned. Any other suggestions.
>
> George
>
> --
> Connie Taylor, Publisher
> Fathom Publishing Company
> PO Box 200448, Anchorage, AK 99520
> Office phone and fax 907-272-3305
> Email <connie...>://fathompublishing.comhttps:arctictern.fathompublishing.com
>
>
>
> <http://www.avg.com/email-signature?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient> Virus-free.
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>

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Date: 8/7/20 10:01 am
From: Connie Taylor <connie...>
Subject: Re: [AKBirding] Swainson's Thrush
I've had good results from this product preventing bird strikes.

https://www.collidescape.org/

On 8/7/2020 8:54 AM, George Matz wrote:
> This morning, about 6 am as I was awakening, I heard a thump.  About
> 15 minutes later, as I was looking out on the deck I saw a bird. 
> There was a Swainson's Thrush that had obviously hit the window.
> Swainson's Thrush are similar to Hermit Thrush, which are more common
> around here, but the plumage is more olive-gray and it has a distinct
> yellow eye ring.  Also, the Hermit Thrush has a rufous-colored tail.
>
> It looked a little dazed. When I have had a window strike that might
> be just an injury, I approach the bird to keep it more awake.  I
> figure this will get the adrenal going and speed any recovery.  In the
> winter, to keep the bird from getting hypothermic, I cup it in my
> hands. But it was warm enough to not bother with that.  I petted the
> bird and spoke softly to it. That certainly kept it alert. It seemed
> to be recovering, so I took it off the deck and put it on the
> railing.  I have had stunned birds before that try to fly away and hit
> the railings.  The top of the railing had no obstructions if it tried
> to fly. Then I went in and got the camera, getting some close shots.
> After a couple of minutes, it seemed to be recovering, and then,
> suddenly flew off into the woods. It flew straight and strong, but I
> will never know if it actually survived.
>
> These are my thoughts on how to treat a window strike that seems to be
> just stunned.  Any other suggestions.
>
> George
>

--
Connie Taylor, Publisher
Fathom Publishing Company
PO Box 200448, Anchorage, AK 99520
Office phone and fax 907-272-3305
Email <connie...>
https://fathompublishing.com
https:arctictern.fathompublishing.com



--
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Date: 8/7/20 9:55 am
From: George Matz <geomatz41...>
Subject: [AKBirding] Swainson's Thrush
This morning, about 6 am as I was awakening, I heard a thump. About 15
minutes later, as I was looking out on the deck I saw a bird. There was a
Swainson's Thrush that had obviously hit the window. Swainson's Thrush are
similar to Hermit Thrush, which are more common around here, but the
plumage is more olive-gray and it has a distinct yellow eye ring. Also,
the Hermit Thrush has a rufous-colored tail.

It looked a little dazed. When I have had a window strike that might be
just an injury, I approach the bird to keep it more awake. I figure this
will get the adrenal going and speed any recovery. In the winter, to keep
the bird from getting hypothermic, I cup it in my hands. But it was warm
enough to not bother with that. I petted the bird and spoke softly to it.
That certainly kept it alert. It seemed to be recovering, so I took it off
the deck and put it on the railing. I have had stunned birds before that
try to fly away and hit the railings. The top of the railing had no
obstructions if it tried to fly. Then I went in and got the camera, getting
some close shots. After a couple of minutes, it seemed to be recovering,
and then, suddenly flew off into the woods. It flew straight and strong,
but I will never know if it actually survived.

These are my thoughts on how to treat a window strike that seems to be just
stunned. Any other suggestions.

George

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Date: 8/3/20 5:47 pm
From: rainyday via groups.io <c_griz=<yahoo.com...>
Subject: [AKBirding] Monday, August 3, 2020 Marbled Murrelets commuting at dawn
Monday, August 3, 2020 Marbled Murrelets commuting at dawnSeward, Alaska
Sunrise 5:45 am, sunset 10:24 pm for a total day length of 16 hours and 39 minutes. Tomorrow will be 4 minutes and 58 seconds shorter. Intermittent showers today; calm, temps in the upper 50s. Might see some sunshine Tuesday and Wednesday, then back to rain.
The good dog roused me from a sound sleep at 5:32 AM. As I waited in the doorway listening to the green new day waking up, a ROBIN scolded briefly. 
Then loud, piercing cries rang out overhead. MARBLED MURRELETS! It sounded like a family commuting from its forest roost to the bay to fish. Back in bed with the window open just in case, I heard another small flock calling ten minutes later. There may have been more earlier and later, but if so, I missed them. 
It’s so amazing to me that this chunky seabird chooses to not only nest in the forest, but to commute every day throughout the year from the ocean to the forest, even when nesting is done. 
On July 18, 1998, I found an unhurt but dazed fledgling Marbled Murrelet by the white shoulder line at the Mile 12 divide. I scooped it up and delivered it to the fledgling Alaska Sealife Center. They fed it and released it by Fox Island the next day. 
No one knows how far our Marbled Murrelets commute, but at least this one family commuted 12 miles twice every day.
It also seems odd to be so vocal about it. Why advertise to predators? “Honk, honk! Coming through! Here I am, where are YOU?” Nonetheless, I’m happy to hear them. What a great day to start the day!
Other special sightings:Tuesday night, July 28: a camper reported two GREAT HORNED OWLS screeching and hunting at the South Fork Tonsina Creek just south of Lowell Point. The reporter even got a photo of a ghostly GRHO looking at her from the bridge. 
Wednesday afternoon, July 29: Robin C spotted a GREAT BLUE HERON flying across the road heading towards the abandoned coal ship loader (blue dipper). GRBH have proven as elusive as owls lately; it’s nice to know they are still around.
Friday, July 31: a hiker spotted a family of four MERLINS perched in a tree on the lower slopes of Mt Marathon.  
Sunday, August 2: a PEREGRINE FALCON flashed past me at the tidelands, heading west where it quickly disappeared.
Happy Birding!Carol GriswoldSeward Sporadic Bird Report Reporter



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Date: 8/3/20 12:36 pm
From: David Sonneborn via groups.io <davidsonne=<aol.com...>
Subject: Re: [AKBirding] Goodbye Northwest Crow [New Ebird Question]
You can count anything you want. After all it is your list. However, the two crows are now "Lumped". Only one species so officially you can only count one.David Sonneborn


-----Original Message-----
From: Gary & Terri Lyon <sealion...>
To: <AKBirding...>
Sent: Mon, Aug 3, 2020 8:39 am
Subject: Re: [AKBirding] Goodbye Northwest Crow [New Ebird Question]

A question; if one saw the American Crow in Hyder before the taxonomic lump, can one still count it as a separate Alaska list species for their Alaska list?

Gary Lyon

On 7/22/2020 12:11 PM, <aaron...> wrote:

Thanks, Pat, for sending out the info on the recent taxonomic lump of Northwestern and American Crow. Fortunately there are so many other great birding reasons to go to Hyder!

For those of us who use Ebird, a question has recently come up: how should we now enter our observations of Alaska's crows into Ebird?

And here is the answer from Cornell. We should continue to enter our crow sightings as Northwestern Crow (unless you're seeing crows in Hyder) until Ebird's taxonomy updates occur. When Ebird's taxonomy is updated (which I understand won't happen until next year), all of these sightings will automatically be reassigned to American Crow. Handling your observations in this manner will minimize unnecessary work of the Ebird reviewers now and after the taxonomic update and eliminate confusion on the back end.

Happy birding!

Aaron Lang
Homer



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Date: 8/3/20 9:39 am
From: Gary & Terri Lyon <sealion...>
Subject: Re: [AKBirding] Goodbye Northwest Crow [New Ebird Question]
A question; if one saw the American Crow in Hyder before the taxonomic
lump, can one still count it as a separate Alaska list species for their
Alaska list?

Gary Lyon

On 7/22/2020 12:11 PM, <aaron...> wrote:
>
> Thanks, Pat, for sending out the info on the recent taxonomic lump of
> Northwestern and American Crow. Fortunately there are so many other
> great birding reasons to go to Hyder!
>
> For those of us who use Ebird, a question has recently come up: how
> should we now enter our observations of Alaska's crows into Ebird?
>
> And here is the answer from Cornell. We should continue to enter our
> crow sightings as Northwestern Crow (unless you're seeing crows in
> Hyder) until Ebird's taxonomy updates occur. When Ebird's taxonomy is
> updated (which I understand won't happen until next year), all of
> these sightings will automatically be reassigned to American Crow.
> Handling your observations in this manner will minimize unnecessary
> work of the Ebird reviewers now and after the taxonomic update and
> eliminate confusion on the back end.
>
> Happy birding!
>
> Aaron Lang
> Homer
>
>


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Date: 7/31/20 5:43 pm
From: rainyday via groups.io <c_griz=<yahoo.com...>
Subject: [AKBirding] Friday, July 31, 2020 Greater Yellowlegs hunting
Friday, July 31, 2020 Greater Yellowlegs huntingSeward, Alaska

After not seeing any GREATER YELLOWLEGS for several weeks, two waded into view along the shore of a wetlands and continued hunting. I immediately sat down to watch, camera at the ready. 
Wading up to their bellies and probing past their eyeballs into the decomposing leafy sediment, they gobbled up small invertebrates. I held still, amazed, as one continued to approached closely, unconcerned. 
The long bill plunged underwater as it caught another one, then thrashed the prize back and forth in the water. I snapped a photo of the de-cased caddisfly larva just before it went down the hatch. Who knew there were caddisfly larvae here in this tidally-inundated water?
According to field guides, adults in non-breeding plumage and juveniles both have a bi-colored bill with a paler base and mostly clear white flanks and belly. Juveniles have more streaking on the neck, crisper markings, and a browner back. If any experts would like to help clarify the plumages, please do.
The two shorebirds lit up the overcast day, not only with their long yellow legs, but by letting me observe them and trusting that all was well.
Happy Birding!Carol GriswoldSeward Sporadic Bird Report Reporter
For photos, please visit my blog at Sporadic Bird from Seward, Alaska

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Sporadic Bird from Seward, Alaska


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Date: 7/30/20 6:35 pm
From: rainyday via groups.io <c_griz=<yahoo.com...>
Subject: [AKBirding] Thursday, July 30, 2020 Trumpeter Swan update
Thursday, July 30, 2020 Trumpeter Swan updateSeward, Alaska
Sunrise 5:36 am, sunset 10:34 pm for a total day length of 16 hours and 58 minutes. Tomorrow will be 4 minutes and 49 seconds shorter.
Cloudy skies returned today after several days of sunshine, veiled by the haze of catastrophic wildfire smoke from Siberia. Today’s high crept up to 60 from a low of 54 at 6 am. Showers in the forecast for the next week; we need the rain.
I caught a glimpse today of the elusive Nash Road TRUMPETER SWAN family, paddling across the far side of the pond. The remaining two of the original four cygnets are growing fast, about two-thirds the size of their parents with ever-longer necks.
Last year’s three cygnets have found an unlikely home at Preacher Pond where at least two can reliably be found peacefully paddling or tip-up feeding. Sometimes, they walk up the denuded shore to feed like geese and rest amid the stubble of the clear-cut alders, willows. 
One thoroughly preened this afternoon while standing in shallow water; delicate white feathers fell like autumn leaves and gently floated away. Its reflection, heads almost touching, made a lovely, looping shape. The year-old Swan bodies are mostly white, but the head and neck retain many gray-brown feathers. Next year, I probably won’t be able to discern them from adults.
Happy Birding!Carol GriswoldSeward Sporadic Bird Report Reporter
For photos, please visit my blog at https://sporadicbird.blogspot.com







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Date: 7/22/20 6:03 pm
From: Connie Taylor <connie...>
Subject: Re: [AKBirding] Ptarmigan near Anchorage
Hello,

Try a search of iNat.

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations?place_id=6&taxon_id=974

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations?place_id=6&taxon_id=949

You'll see where they have been spotted before.

--
Connie Taylor, Publisher
Fathom Publishing Company
PO Box 200448, Anchorage, AK 99520
Office phone and fax 907-272-3305
Email <connie...>
https://fathompublishing.com
https:arctictern.fathompublishing.com

On 7/22/2020 4:55 PM, Josiah Verbrugge wrote:
> Hi AK Birders,
> I was wondering if any of you had any recommendations for good spots
> to find White-tailed and Rock Ptarmigan in Hatcher Pass, Anchorage, or
> the Kenai Peninsula. I'm looking for trails and smaller areas rather
> than a large area, but all information is appreciated.
> Thanks,
> Josiah Verbrugge
>

--
Connie Taylor, Publisher
Fathom Publishing Company
PO Box 200448, Anchorage, AK 99520
Office phone and fax 907-272-3305
Email <connie...>
https://fathompublishing.com
https:arctictern.fathompublishing.com



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Date: 7/22/20 5:59 pm
From: Josiah Verbrugge <jverbrugge25...>
Subject: [AKBirding] Ptarmigan near Anchorage
Hi AK Birders,
I was wondering if any of you had any recommendations for good spots to
find White-tailed and Rock Ptarmigan in Hatcher Pass, Anchorage, or the
Kenai Peninsula. I'm looking for trails and smaller areas rather than a
large area, but all information is appreciated.
Thanks,
Josiah Verbrugge

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Date: 7/22/20 1:11 pm
From: <aaron...>
Subject: Re: [AKBirding] Goodbye Northwest Crow [New Ebird Question]
Thanks, Pat, for sending out the info on the recent taxonomic lump of Northwestern and American Crow. Fortunately there are so many other great birding reasons to go to Hyder!

For those of us who use Ebird, a question has recently come up: how should we now enter our observations of Alaska's crows into Ebird?

And here is the answer from Cornell. We should continue to enter our crow sightings as Northwestern Crow (unless you're seeing crows in Hyder) until Ebird's taxonomy updates occur. When Ebird's taxonomy is updated (which I understand won't happen until next year), all of these sightings will automatically be reassigned to American Crow. Handling your observations in this manner will minimize unnecessary work of the Ebird reviewers now and after the taxonomic update and eliminate confusion on the back end.

Happy birding!

Aaron Lang
Homer

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Date: 7/17/20 11:27 am
From: George Matz <geomatz41...>
Subject: [AKBirding] Western Wood Pewee
Yesterday, I submitted this post to the Kachemak Bay Birders list. On
second thought, I thought the AKBirding list might also be interested.
Pardon the double postings.

A question arises, even with locals; where is the Watermelon Trail? First
of all, it's an old pioneering trail that provides access to the Anchor
River/Fritz Creek CHA and, further on, the Caribou Hills. Beaver Creek is
3.9 miles from the trailhead .The trail is used by some berry pickers
(great place for watermelon berries, which is what I think the trail is
named after), and moose hunters. Also occasional four-wheelers and
snowmachines, depending on the season. Unfortunately, there are two
Watermelon Trails in the same area, which adds to the confusion. But both
provide great subalpine and boreal forest hiking and birding
opportunities. I might be the only one who knows this since I think I am
the only one with eBird reports from this trail.

To get to either trail, drive up to Skyline and the turn on the Olson Mt.
Road. After you pass the nordic ski area on the left you will pass a
Snowmad parking area behind the bushes. If you pass the small downhill rope
tow on the left, you have gone too far. On the other hand, if you want to
try Watermelon Trail 2 keep going until you come to Olson Mt. about a mile
further. Park at the trailhead and right there is the trail, with a kiosk
that explains everything.(well, mostly). From there it's all downhill (like
life itself) until you get to Beaver Creek.

This trail is not listed as a hotspot, but I have made a request to change
that because of some of the birds you can expect to see, such as the
Western Wood Pewee in the summer and Spruce Grouse anytime. Plus the
typical songbirds for this area.

The few folks that live in the area talk about the brown bears they often
encounter. I would recommend bear spray.

George


---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: George Matz <geomatz41...>
Date: Thu, Jul 16, 2020 at 8:44 AM
Subject: Western Wood Pewee
To: Kachemak Bay Birders <birding...>


Yesterday, while hiking the Watermelon Trail and about 3/4 the way to
Beaver Creek, I thought I heard one call of a Western Wood Pewee. This was
in the same area where I have seen and heard this bird before. So I
stopped, got out my cell phone and played back it's song using the Merin
app. Within a few seconds I had a bird fly over and perch in a nearby tree
with a posture much like a flycatcher (Pewees are in the Tyrant Flycatcher
family). After much angling I got a few decent shots, which are attached.
Since I couldn't get very close, I used a 1/2000 shutter speed to get a
sharp photo that could be cropped.

In the same genus as wood pewees is the Olive-sided Flycatcher, which is
pretty common around here in the summer. Bur the Olive-sided is larger, has
a more pointed head, and not the clear breast as the wood pewee.

If you are in the right spot, I think that seeing the Western Wood Pewee is
pretty predictable. Also, predictable are Spruce Grouse. I see them
nearlky every time I hike this trail. Saw a mom with 5 chicks yesterday.

George

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Date: 7/16/20 11:19 am
From: Velton Cason <vlcason...>
Subject: [AKBirding] Olive-sided flycatcher Halibut Cove Lagoon
Heard frequently on the various trails between the cabins near the salt
water and China Poot Lake.

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Date: 7/15/20 2:52 pm
From: Buzz Scher <buzzscher...>
Subject: [AKBirding] Townsend’s Solitaire, Near Peak, Chugach State Park
Hiked up to Near Peak today to celebrate the late Pete Islieb’s discovery
of a Willow Flycatcher on that trail 32 years ago from tomorrow (16 July
1988). I wasn’t that lucky, but did see 3 Townsend’s Solitaire (inc 2 HY
birds) at the top.

RLS

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Date: 7/14/20 5:29 pm
From: Karen Coady <Theavery12...>
Subject: [AKBirding] Cliff swallow
Thanks to all of you who responded to my query about location of cliff swallows. It was found behind service high school and several if you wrote that there has been cliff swallows nesting there for a long time. I tried to release Sunday afternoon in the midst of powerful winds. The swallow took off and ended up on the ground. Monday morning it was beautiful weather so up we went. As soon as I opened the carrier the swallow shit out, flew around the little gym then up and was joined right away by another swallow. One of the most glorious releases ever. Thank you for letting me know about service high and other spots for release. I deeply appreciate your observations and caring.
Karen Coady

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Date: 7/11/20 2:51 pm
From: Karen Coady <Theavery12...>
Subject: [AKBirding] Cliff swallow
Bird tlc has a cliff swallow that was found behind service high school. Has any seen a flock of them around that area? Hoping this one can be released soon

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Date: 7/9/20 5:34 pm
From: rainyday via groups.io <c_griz=<yahoo.com...>
Subject: [AKBirding] Thursday, July 9, 2020 Sorrow to Elation!
Thursday, July 9, 2020 Sorrow to Elation!Seward, Alaska
My worst fears about the loss of the three TRUMPETER SWAN cygnets were recently confirmed by another birder. He saw two BALD EAGLES sitting near the Nash Road nest site on Monday afternoon, June 29, eating something. He could see a bit of white in the grasses, likely a cygnet. The parents swam back and forth around them without being aggressive; no cygnets were seen, or other Swans. At one point, one of the Eagles took off with talons full of vegetation and quite possibly a cygnet carcass. So, so sad.
What a bleak week without the family! One day, three 2-year olds napped on the wetlands on the east side of the road, and another day, a single Swan fed in the main pond. But overall, the pond, so recently filled with the joy of new life, then the distress of the five invading siblings, followed by the two marauding Eagles, now seemed abandoned.
When I drove past this morning, nothing had changed. Quiet and empty. Sigh.
But when I drove past in the early afternoon, I couldn’t believe my eyes! I turned around as soon as safely possible and starting taking photos of the unbelievable sight of two cygnets steaming across the pond accompanied by the mom. Where had they been hiding all week???
I watched anxiously for the dad, who soon paddled into view. Was the third cygnet with him? As he paddled across to join the family, it soon became clear that alas, the third cygnet had indeed perished. The confirmation dimmed my joy, but I felt so ecstatic that two survived. Two babies to watch as they grow bigger and become more competent. Two to stretch ever longer necks and wings, and learn to fly. Two to learn how to survive a long Alaskan winter.
The future is never certain, but now one can hope!
Happy Birding!Carol GriswoldSeward Sporadic Bird Report Reporter
For photos, please visit my blog at https://sporadicbird.blogspot.com







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