NYSbirds-L
Received From Subject
6/21/24 11:45 pm Ben Cacace <bcacace...> [nysbirds-l] NYC Area RBA: 21 June 2024
6/21/24 3:33 am Tom Fiore <tomfi2...> [nysbirds-l] N.Y. County, NYC - last of Spring, start of Summer birds
6/15/24 4:12 am Tom Fiore <tomfi2...> [nysbirds-l] N.Y. County, NYC - near mid-June, migrations not over...
6/15/24 1:52 am Ben Cacace <bcacace...> [nysbirds-l] NYC Area RBA: 14 June 2024
6/11/24 7:44 pm Peter Polshek <pmaxp...> [nysbirds-l] American Flamingo - Georgica Pond
6/11/24 4:23 am <marciaaabrahams...> <marciaaabrahams...> [nysbirds-l] Don't miss tomorrow evening's Queens County Bird Club meeting featuring Donna Schulman "Cockatoos, Fairy-Wrens & Roos: Australia in Bits & Pieces"
6/9/24 2:54 pm <leormand...> [nysbirds-l] Hooded merganser - East Patchogue
6/9/24 2:46 pm John Turner <redknot948...> [nysbirds-l] Pileated Woodpecker Sighting on Long Island
6/7/24 8:52 pm Gail Benson <gbensonny...> [nysbirds-l] NYC Area RBA: 7 June 2024
6/5/24 6:57 am Jay Pitocchelli <jpitocch...> Re:[nysbirds-l] nysbirds-l digest: June 05, 2024
6/4/24 3:05 am Tom Fiore <tomfi2...> [nysbirds-l] N.Y. County, NYC - thru Mon., 6/3 - ongoing migrations; elsewhere-Northeast Flamingo-flights, etc.
6/3/24 9:24 am <leormand...> Re: [nysbirds-l] American Flamingos in New York State
6/3/24 5:44 am Paul R Sweet <sweet...> RE: [nysbirds-l] American Flamingos in New York State
6/3/24 5:34 am Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...> Re: [nysbirds-l] American Flamingos in New York State
6/2/24 3:04 pm zach schwartz-weinstein <zachsw...> Re: [nysbirds-l] American Flamingos in New York State
6/2/24 12:28 pm Deborah Allen <dallenyc...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC, Sun. June 2, 2024: Multiple Yellow-billed Cuckoos, Olive-sided Flycatcher
6/2/24 11:59 am Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...> [nysbirds-l] American Flamingos in New York State
6/1/24 2:26 pm Deborah Allen <dallenyc...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC, Sat. June 1, 2024: Mourning Warbler and Eight Other Species of Wood Warblers
5/31/24 8:20 pm Gail Benson <gbensonny...> [nysbirds-l] NYC Area RBA: 31 May 2024
5/31/24 1:28 pm Deborah Allen <dallenyc...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC, Fri. May 31, 2024: Mourning Warbler, Nesting Birds
5/31/24 5:57 am Sameer Apte <sameerapte1...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Black-throated Gray, Kentucky, and Yellow0throated Warblers Heckcher SP, Suffolk County
5/31/24 4:17 am Tom Fiore <tomfi2...> [nysbirds-l] N.Y. County, NYC -to 5/30- Blue Grosbeak, Summer Tanager, flycatcher diversity, other migrants, breeding-birds, etc.
5/30/24 5:16 am Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...> Re:[nysbirds-l] Black-throated Gray, Kentucky, and Yellow0throated Warblers Heckcher SP, Suffolk County
5/29/24 3:29 pm Patricia Lindsay <gelochelidon...> [nysbirds-l] Birds at Heckscher SP, Suffolk Co.
5/29/24 9:18 am Patricia Lindsay <gelochelidon...> [nysbirds-l] Black throated Gray Warbler Heckscher SP Suffolk Co
5/29/24 8:33 am Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...> [nysbirds-l] Black-throated Gray, Kentucky, and Yellow0throated Warblers Heckcher SP, Suffolk County
5/28/24 9:36 am Andrew Block <ablock22168...> [nysbirds-l] Montezuma birds and others goodies
5/27/24 11:16 am Deborah Allen <dallenyc...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park, NYC, Mon. May 27, 2024: Blackburnian, Chestnut-sided and Other Wood Warblers
5/27/24 9:02 am Tom Fiore <tomfi2...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park, NYC -Sunday, May 26- 18+ Warbler spp., Yellow-bellied Flycatchers, etc.
5/26/24 1:49 pm Deborah Allen <dallenyc...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC, Sun. May 26, 2024: Gray-cheeked/Bicknell's Thrush, Blackburnian, black-throated Green and Other Warblers
5/26/24 9:19 am Andrew Block <ablock22168...> [nysbirds-l] Trumpeter swans at Montezuma
5/26/24 8:57 am Andrew Block <ablock22168...> [nysbirds-l] More cranes at Montezuma
5/26/24 7:13 am Andrew Block <ablock22168...> [nysbirds-l] Cranes at montezuma
5/26/24 6:56 am Joshua Malbin <joshuamalbin...> [nysbirds-l] Black-necked Stilt, Jamaica Bay
5/25/24 5:26 pm Tom Fiore <tomfi2...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park, NYC - Sat., 5/25 - 18+ Warbler spp, both Cuckoo spp, many more migrants
5/25/24 1:09 pm Deborah Allen <dallenyc...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC, Sat. May 15, 2024: Black-billed Cuckoo, Acadian Flycatcher, 8 Species of Wood Warblers
5/25/24 1:53 am Ben Cacace <bcacace...> [nysbirds-l] NYC Area RBA: 24 May 2024
5/24/24 7:37 am Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...> [nysbirds-l] Sandwich Tern Nickerson Beach
 
Back to top
Date: 6/21/24 11:45 pm
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] NYC Area RBA: 21 June 2024
- RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Jun. 21, 2024
* NYNY2406.21

- Birds mentioned
BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK+
AMERICAN FLAMINGO+
WHITE-FACED IBIS+
SWALLOW-TAILED KITE+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

Common Eider
WILSON'S PHALAROPE
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Gull-billed Tern
Caspian Tern
Black Tern
BROWN PELICAN
Least Bittern
Red-headed Woodpecker
Acadian Flycatcher
PROTHONOTARY WARBLER
Mourning Warbler
YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER
BLUE GROSBEAK

- Transcript

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report
electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at
http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to nysarc44
(at)nybirds{dot}org.

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or
sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compiler: Tom Burke
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Ben Cacace

BEGIN TAPE

Greetings. This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for *Friday, June 21st 2024*
at 11pm. The highlights of today's tape are AMERICAN FLAMINGO,
SWALLOW-TAILED KITE, BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK, WHITE-FACED IBIS, BROWN
PELICAN, WILSON'S PHALAROPE, PROTHONOTARY and YELLOW-THROATED WARBLERS,
BLUE GROSBEAK and more.

The AMERICAN FLAMINGO seems to have settled in at Georgica Pond in
Wainscott, present there all week despite potentially disturbing incidents
and hopefully it will continue at least for the short term. The best
approach to seeing the FLAMINGO on Georgica Pond stills seems to be to park
in the small lot at the end of Beach Lane west of the pond and walk east
along the beach to the overview of the pond. For those without local
parking permits, plan your visit for early in the morning because expensive
tickets are being issued once the beach activity picks up usually around 10
am.

The SWALLOW-TAILED KITE provided a nice but brief view Sunday morning as it
cruised over the beach at Fort Wadsworth on Staten Island just south of the
Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge.

Two BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCKS moving from the East Pond to the West
Pond last Friday at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge continued on the West Pond
for Saturday but then moved on. An adult WHITE-FACED IBIS occasionally seen
as it visits the south end of the East Pond was reported there again on
Wednesday and a WILSON'S PHALAROPE also appeared around the south end on
Wednesday and Thursday. A LEAST BITTERN has been in the same area as the
East Pond but has been seen best as it feeds around Big John's Pond, nicely
viewed from the bird-blind on the way to the Raunt overlook. One or two
GULL-BILLED TERNS also continue to visit the south ends of both the East
and West Ponds and a female COMMON EIDER was still on the West Pond last
Saturday.

Possibly the same BROWN PELICAN was seen Monday evening near the ferry
terminal at Davis Park on central Fire Island and then briefly on the
mudflats off Oak Beach in Fire Island Inlet Tuesday morning.

A young male COMMON EIDER was still in the Fort Tilden to Breezy Point
stretch of coastline at least to Wednesday.

A nice count of 18 LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS and a BLACK TERN were out at
Breezy Point Tuesday with another BLACK TERN also at Nickerson Beach Monday
while a CASPIAN TERN visited Georgica Pond last Saturday.

A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER at Connetquot River State Park Wednesday has
continued in the same location and may be nesting there.

Single ACADIAN FLYCATCHERS recently in Brooklyn were seen at Calvert Vaux
Park Saturday and at Green-wood Cemetery Sunday.

A PROTHONOTARY WARBLER was spotted Sunday at Blydenburgh County Park in
Hauppauge east of Stump Pond. YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER continues at the
Bayard Cutting Arboretum in Great River and a late MOURNING WARBLER
appeared in Brooklyn Bridge Park last Monday.

BLUE GROSBEAKS continue out in the Calverton area concluding around the
Preston Ponds complex.

To phone in reports, call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the
National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript

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Date: 6/21/24 3:33 am
From: Tom Fiore <tomfi2...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] N.Y. County, NYC - last of Spring, start of Summer birds
New York County -in N.Y. City- including Manhattan, Governors, Randalls, Roosevelt Islands and the adjacent waters and skies above - and through last days of Spring, start of Summer -

A very sad loss to the birding community of this city and of Manhattan, Lenore Swenson has passed this week, after a period of illness. Lenore was a leader of many walks in places far and wide, including many within Central Park, and for such organizations as the Linnaean Society of New York, and was also very helpful to that and other non-profit organizations in having field trips get out in-the-fields, and in many other behind-the-scenes ways furthering the cause of birding, conservation, science, and in the wider sense of learning more in all things-natural. She will be much missed by many, and long remembered for her work and for her cameraderie with many of our naturalist-community. Rest in sweet peace, Lenore.

. . . .
There were still a fairly high number of very-late stragglers, lingerers, and some probably now-summering migrant birds, of the latter some that never-ever breed in this county, while also some which potentially just might, but - probably wont. And some evidence of still-moving migrants passing, albeit incredibly-late if any were to make it for a breeding-season and have much, if any success, whether relatively local-breeders in nearby counties or states, or birds that would breed only a lot farther north.

Many county-birders were able to view American Oystercatchers recently, not only by visiting Randalls Island and persisting in watch-efforts, but in getting aboard an eco-cruise boat that the NYC Bird Alliance helped bring to the East River estuary, and up into waters for viewing of the isle and areas where the oystercatchers are being found. From Randalls Island as well, there are ongoing sightings of Yellow-crowned Night-Heron, albeit likely just regularly visiting there, so far no definitive showing of any solid evidence for nesting on Randalls. In the past and recent years, there are also occasional sightings of Yellow-crowned Night-Heron at lower Manhattan and from the ferries that serve that sector, and occasionally-rarely also from Governors Island, so it is worth checking any heron seen in that area, especially thru the summer months. By far, the usual and far-more-common Night-Heron of the entire city, region, and of N.Y. County is Black-crowned Night-Heron, and that latter species is a regular in, as befits the name, often seen at dusk, dawn or at night for those out watching at those hours - as well as fairly regular all thru days in some sectors, sometimes quietly roosting.

Black Skimmer has not made many reports, at least yet, in the county, and the few that came along may have moved on to other areas, not as regular -yet- in this county, as they might be; these may be watched for anyhow from most anywhere along the waters, and rarely in the past, have also shown in Central Park, over the waters there, and often at dusk or dawn hours, from past observations. The Common Nighthawks of June may by now have all moved on; that is a species that once nested in the county, on rooftops. The species in general has sadly declined greatly over all of its known range, and in some areas has about disappeared as a breeding species. A few were still passing thru this county up to about one week ago, quite late for the spring.

Many or almost-all of migrant thrushes have moved on, to more-northerly breeding places, but the rather more southerly-ranging - as a breeding species - Wood Thrush, a regular, annual nester in N.Y. City, have been starting to fledge, with some successes already for those that nested in the county. One recent day, this payst week, I counted a surprising total of 18 Wood Thrush, for all of just one park where they always attempt nesting - Central Park - and of that number, at least 4 were just-fledged birds seen in the earliest hours. In a few places, groups that likely were family-groupings were seen in threes, and even one group of four seen all-at-once. This included a pair with 2 young birds not at all far from where many-thousands of humans converge and jog by, every day, in the warmer months. There were also a few Wood Thrush in the southern end of that park, and in the north woods. And, the species has been in at least 5 additional named city parks in the county, including, not surprisingly, Inwood Hill, which has more woods habitat appropriate to a lot of -potential- nesters in woods or forest, with some very large old-growth deciduous trees, and some areas of reasonably intact understory. No matter, any woodland nesting or virtually any native nesting bird in this ultra-urbanized county faces a lot of challenges in nesting and fledging young. And the challenges to those young birds continues as they try to make it into more-experienced fliers, and for the non-year-round birds, as migrators when that time comes. The very few other thrushes, aside from ubiquitous American Robins, that were still found into this past, and last week, of spring, included Gray-cheeked, Swainsons and Hermit Thrushes - a few of the latter also still around, perhaps not at all likely to breed in thr case of some that are just summering, stuck in smaller parks where there can be other lingering migratory species as well...

There were still a number of migratory species stuck in Bryant Park, in midtown Manhattan, into the start of calendar-summer. These included at least 3 species of sparrow which will not breed in this county - Swamp, White-throated, and long-lingering Lincolns Sparrow - of White-throated Sparrows these are but a part of the numbers that are summering, with some in multiple other locations, both small greenspaces and parks and also in a number of the larger parks here including Central, Inwood Hill, Riverside, and likely a few more as well.

Again at Bryant Park, other lingerers included at least four Warbler species - Mourning - with at least one female and one male still present into 6-20, and also Magnolia Warbler, Ovenbird, and Common Yellowthroat, all of which had been present there in prior weeks as well. The usual batch of Gray Catbirds also continued on at Bryant Park, and a representative of the dozen or more summering Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers was also still present, the other sapsuckers in many locations in Manhattan, and at least one still at Governors Island to Wednesday of this week. A rapidly-diminishing number of Empidonax-genus flycatchers were still passing early in the week, and perhaps just two species may have lingered, among the others all of which were among the 5 typical-migrators of the region - Willow Flycatcher, still present in at least 2 locations to Wed., 6-19, and Acadian Flycatcher, also still present to the start of calendar-summer, and a potential / plausible breeder, as might be Willow, for the county. These also could simply be individuals that are not mated and may not end up nesting, so time may tell....

Of migratory warbler species still around in the county, there have been at least ten species, and in addition to the two regular species seen every summer - Yellow, which has included some birds at nests, hopefully successful, and also at least a few likely-breeding or attempting-to Common Yellowthroats, not-likely to include some in places such as Bryant Park, however, again - time may tell if any observers keep close tabs on any of these.

The other warblers that have lingered on to now, or to at-least the start of calendar-summer, include Magnolia - with up to four lingerers, 2 or more still at Central Park, Ovenbird, in multiple locations and a not-that-unusual summering, never-breeding warbler in this county, a species that can get stuck in some smaller city parks, gardens, and other smaller areas in the county, typically in lower Manhattan but also possible elsewhere in the county, and of others, Northern Parula at Central Park, a species that had summered previously but is still not-expected here in summer, Black-and-white Warblers in several locations, also not very likely to even attempt breeding, and not being found as paired birds, anyhow, and the Mourning Warblers as noted, in Bryant Park, and also in a couple of other sites to this past week, still moving thru quite late, and a bit more unusual so late in spring, Chestnut-sided Warbler in Central Park, and also Prairie Warbler to the start of summer at Central Park - these both being species which may breed within a few-dozen miles or less from Manhattan, but are not known to breed in this county. There may be some additional warblers lurking, or even still straggling thru, so late into now-summer. We are also at a point of the season where it is slightly possible to see a few of the warblers coming south, either as individuals that did not mate, or some that may have, and are - esp. some male birds - heading southwards, as summer is barely begun. The Northern Waterthrush in Central Park is more-likely to have been a very-late straggling bird, and also possibly had suffered some small injuries at some point, and was-is not a returning-south individual, however, the other waterthrush species just might show in coming weeks as a returning species making the way south again. There were a somewhat high number of various migratory land-birds which were still moving thru even after the first week of this month. In some cases, the multiple reports can be seen as a high volume of observer-efforts, and so a result appears as a lot of birds still being seen. Even allowing that, there were a lot of species, and for some species a lot of individuals, passing thru into mid-June. That was partially confirmed as well via N.F.C, nocturnal flight calls recorded and analysed for some nights this month.

Ducks seen this past week have included several ongoing Wood Ducks, including in eclipse, at Central Park, and also a -report of- a late Red-breasted Merganser at N.Y. Harbor, which is not unheard of if a non-breeder but is quite unusual by now in this area. Of shorebirds, there may have been just 2 rather-expected species this week, the Killdeer which are regular, and Spotted Sandpiper which can appear in almost any week in summer months around here, with the American Oystercatchers noted at top, as a nice plus to the birds in this category. We are also in the period when a few of the earliest-returning shorebirds are at least in the realm of possibility. The terns which are rather regular for the county, all summer, Common Terns, are being seen from a number of sites, most-of-all near to where a small colony exists in one part of Governors Island. Any other tern species which is seen or suspected in this county ought to be photo or video recorded, and notes also made on-scene, black skimmers included. Last but not least, a hen Wild Turkey given the nickname Astoria by some local observers, was ongoing at Roosevelt Island, which is located in the East river, just east of Manhattan, thru this week. She like so many New Yorkers is a hardy survivor. Many more birds are of course still around, and some may yet be passing, as exceedingly-late migrants or just what may be called stragglers. A further update to the migration and nesting season, as June goes along.

Thanks to many many observers -including those out for our Pride activities- finding so many birds this past week, and to many photographers as well, and to all for your concern and care around all native nesting birds everywhere.

Good birding to all, and stay safe in the heat of this time-period.

Tom Fiore
manhattan




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Back to top
Date: 6/15/24 4:12 am
From: Tom Fiore <tomfi2...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] N.Y. County, NYC - near mid-June, migrations not over...
New York County -in N.Y. City- including Manhattan, Randalls, Governors, and Roosevelt Islands - and the skies above and adjacent waters -
to Friday, June 14th

There are still birds on the move, including plenty of passerines, as well as shore and sea birds and others, as of this day, and thru this past week, passing this county, city, and for some, headed on to locations north of New York State, some going far-north.

Some species seen at times previously this spring have shown again in some of same locations, and in some instances there is a chance breeding is taking place, albeit not always in this county itself. Among such species, American Oystercatchers have been seen several times recently from Randalls Island, and it looks plausible they may be attempting, or actually, breeding on isles just off in Bronx-county waters. Also seen with some regularity this month have been Yellow-crowned Night-Herons, although again, lacking any clear breeding in N.Y. County itself. An odd and very-late appearance over the past weekend, but not lingering, was a single Hooded Merganser, in Central Park at The Pool, where there had been a very long-lingering pair, and sometimes over the winter more than just two, of Green-winged Teal. That late merganser was in line with some other equally-late sightings of that species in and near N.Y. City this month. Some of the many species of migratory American warblers seen are listed -with annotations for some- in the full species listings below.

Among many additional species for the past week in, or passing N.Y. County, and including Saturday, June 8, have been these birds -

Atlantic Brant - almost all had moved out by now.
Canada Goose
Wood Duck - was ongoing at Central Park, and in-eclipse, can be rather shy.
Gadwall
American Black Duck
Mallard
Hooded Merganser - as noted at top.
Osprey - few recently, but some within this past week.
Bald Eagle - still being seen regularly in the county.
Cooper's Hawk - scarce.
Red-tailed Hawk
American Kestrel
Peregrine Falcon
Wild Turkey - the hen, nicknamed Astoria by some local birders, had continued in same areas of Roosevelt Island this week.
American Oystercatcher - as noted above.
Killdeer - noted from a number of locations, most-often on Governors and Randalls Islands, also elsewhere.
Spotted Sandpiper
American Woodcock - there was at least 1 still lurking in Bryant Park, midtown-Manhattan this past week, far later than a typical migrant of the species.
Laughing Gull - has become fairly regular, some sightings from Central Park, and far more seen elsewhere.
Ring-billed Gull - scarce but some still persisting.
[American] Herring Gull - the most-common summer gull, here.
Great Black-backed Gull
Common Tern - the near-default tern species, and breeding at Governors Island, with -any other- tern species wanting photos or videos, and particularly for reports from now into July - this for N.Y. County and not in general.
feral Rock Pigeon - the city-pigeon of all of this city, and very common.
Mourning Dove - also fairly common.
Monk Parakeet - still some in the county, with few recent public reports.
Black-billed Cuckoo - far fewer of this cuckoo species than the next listed.
Yellow-billed Cuckoo - both of the cuckoos were still passing but with far fewer reports of late.
Common Nighthawk - few reports and few sightings. There are other nocturnal birds, still in the county.
Chimney Swift - fair to good numbers, while many have moved on in the past week.
- Ruby-throated Hummingbird - absent, it seems from any most-recent observations.
Belted Kingfisher - very scarce, with a very few sightings in past week or more.
Common Loon - fly-bys, last weekend.
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Snowy Egret - particularly noticed as fly-overs.
Green Heron - shy for now.
Black-crowned Night-Heron
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - particularly from Randalls Island.
Black Vulture - sightings are still coming in particular from watch-sites in northern Manhattan, and some elsewhere.
Turkey Vulture - also seen over multiple areas of the county, including occasionally still over Manhattan.
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - a modest number of these are, again, summering, or at least lingering far, far later than any would which could attempt breeding in other locations. -Not a breeding species in this county.-
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Yellow-shafted Flicker
Olive-sided Flycatcher - possibly the last of the spring migrators went thru over the past weekend here.
Eastern Wood-Pewee - ongoing, as a scarce or uncommonly recorded county breeder.
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher - few were still being found into early this week. Not all that late for the species.
Acadian Flycatcher - several, including an ongoing chance of breeding pairs.
other Empidonax-genus flycatchers - of the three species that are expected in the region additional to the above two, we have Willow Flycatcher lingering on, and a potential breeder. Otherwise, many in the genus Empidonax have moved on by now, out of the county.
Eastern Phoebe - scarce, and a likely breeder - but also not often noticed in sometimes-obscure locations.
Great Crested Flycatcher - any still present are likely nesting or are attempting to here.
Eastern Kingbird - nesting in multiple locations.
White-eyed Vireo - notable for the month, and a potential breeder in this county, as the species breeds each year in N.Y. City.
Yellow-throated Vireo - also notable for this month, and also a possible breeder. This species has bred even in Central Park, albeit not often, and not noticed by many when it had, successfully.
Warbling Vireo - the most-regular and most-apparent breeding vireo of this county.
Red-eyed Vireo - smaller numbers than the prior vireo which breed as well, some in the largest areas of woodland, but on occasion might be found in an unexpected site in this county in summer.
Blue Jay
Northern Raven - multiple, continuing, some with fledged young from nesting in this county.
American Crow
Fish Crow
Tree Swallow
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Barn Swallow
- any other additional swallow or martin species might be seen, as summer continues... we must hope for some further sightings of the Cliff Swallows and also possibilities of Purple Martin nesting in the county.
Black-capped Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Carolina Wren
House Wren
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - an interesting late sighting; this species has at least scarcely nested in the county.
Gray-cheeked Thrush - all of the multiple birds of this type in the past week seemed to sing, or call with the vocalizations of this species, and not the bicknells song or call types.
Swainson's Thrush - v. small numbers made passage thru this week.
Hermit Thrush - a very few lingered on, in one instance in Bryant Park, midtown-Manhattan.
Wood Thrush - fairly good numbers, all by now looking likely as making breeding attempts - do NOT disturb!
American Robin
Gray Catbird
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher - in extremely quiet mode, when with nests.
European Starling
House Sparrow - one of, if not the most common passerine bird in the county and in New York City.
Cedar Waxwing - good numbers, some appear to have started the nesting process.
Scarlet Tanager - last? may have been over the previous weekend, but worth watching-listening for even now.
- Eastern Towhee - not seen nor heard at all lately.
Chipping Sparrow - scant, a small number usually breed in the county.
Song Sparrow - the most-frequent and typical breeding -native- sparrow of the county.
Lincoln's Sparrow - one has lingered on at Bryant Park, in midtown, far later than is normal for the species.
Swamp Sparrow - few, and almost-certainly non-breeders, some may summer thru each year, in this county.
White-throated Sparrow - many ongoing in some locations, esp. around Manhattan - regularly summering with none at all trying to breed here.
Northern Cardinal
Rose-breasted Grosbeak - a species to watch, if found ongoing into the calendar-summer here.
Indigo Bunting - a very few still present a week prior, possibly all moved on now.
Bobolink - very few females were still passing into last weekend.
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
Orchard Oriole - in multiple sites and by now, all remaining are likely either trying to breed, or are assisting with the process of other pairs.
Baltimore Oriole - the much more common of the 2 oriole species breeding in the county. Multiple nestings are now taking place.
House Finch
American Goldfinch - exceedingly scant, but at least a few still passing or lingering into this week.
- A surprising number of migratory warbler species were still being seen, and while some were in the literal migrant-trap of Bryant Park, midtown Manhattan and some of those watched by many dozens of observers, there also have been ongoing warblers for other locations, indicating actual passage for some still going thru, not only a few that were-are trapped in one smaller park in the midst of high-rise midtown. For some species such as Yellow Warblers and Common Yellowthroats, the lingers may well be attempting to breed in the county, hopefully with success. A lot of the rest are simply late-migrators, and for a very few species such as Blackpoll and Mourning Warbler, the passage in the 2nd week of June is not extremely unusual here, for modest numbers of individuals, that is - most of all of the warbler species have moved on to breeding locations. Many of the species listed were not being seen past Monday, or the prior weekend, however at least one-dozen of these warbler species were still in the county into this week, for a few species running exceedingly late, and for many, seen in low to single numbers. Among the warblers still lingering, other than the 2 potential-breeders noted above, some of the lingerers may not have chances for likely breeding, but in some cases, there may still be that possibility.
Nashville Warbler - late for even a straggler, in this county.
Northern Parula
Yellow Warbler - multiple, as is expected, found in some areas where breeding is at least possible.
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Magnolia Warbler - a fairly good passage, as with Blackburnian, for this warbler species, well into June.
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Myrtle, also still called Yellow-rumped, Warbler - quite late.
Black-throated Green Warbler - rather late, still around into the last weekend here.
Blackburnian Warbler - some fairly good passage was seen a lot later into spring than is typical, but this may not have been a typical spring overall, if such can even be quantified.
Bay-breasted Warbler
Blackpoll Warbler - still passing, with almost all still moving having been quiet females of the species.
Black-and-white Warbler - one of the more typical of summering stragglers here, of the many warbler species.
American Redstart - this species, if seen thru late June, might be watched for any indications of nesting, although these may also be stragglers, as with a lot of the other warblers still being seen this far into June, in this county.
Worm-eating Warbler - decidely late. A species which nests in the nearby counties to north and west of N.Y. City, and however usually will need much more -quiet- woods than is offered in any locations in this county.
Ovenbird
Northern Waterthrush
Mourning Warbler - a modest number in addition to the several individuals stlll being seen in Bryant Park, but the species migrations have slowed, as would be expected by now.
Common Yellowthroat - some or all still lingering may be trying to breed in the county, or simply stragglers.
Canada Warbler - as with others listed with no specifics, most of these have moved on, but a few may yet be found, in some cases, the more quiet females that might linger or be straggling thru.

Certainly likely some other, additional species were also found. Some birds given brief reports via the alerts were not noted-above, and at least a few were simply slips of a fast-thumb etc. in a too-quickly made report. Many of the birds are on nests or have nestlings or fledgelings near, and some species have been very quiet and retiring with this season. Please continue to do nothing at all that might disturb any native nesting birds, thank you!! The birds will thank us all for this.
. . .
The season of many more insects is upon us, and many hundreds, actually far-more, of these creatures in their species-diversity are out flying, crawling, jumping, swimming, etc. - among these many have been many more butterflies, and dragonflies and damselflies, along with many other types of active insect and invertebrate life.

Of mammals, there have been at least a few species of bats, plus native mice, native cottontail rabbits, native woodchucks - also might be called eastern-marmots- and eastern chipmunks, squirrels, and yes a few coyotes roaming here and there, in the county called New York. A great variety of plant life had already bloomed, while some trees, shrubs, and herbaceous plants are just coming into flower. Many locations are very green with foliage and grasses, etc. all having had plenty of rain, this entire spring.

Thanks to many quiet, courteous, keen observers and photographers who are and were still out finding birds and all else in nature. We all will want to be careful in coming hot days, the more so when humidities are high, and when sun is very strong.

Good birding to all,

Tom Fiore
manhattan





















































































































































































































































































































































































































































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Date: 6/15/24 1:52 am
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] NYC Area RBA: 14 June 2024
- RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Jun. 14, 2024
* NYNY2406.14

- Birds mentioned
BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK+
AMERICAN FLAMINGO+
ARCTIC TERN+
SANDWICH TERN+
PACIFIC LOON+
WHITE-FACED IBIS+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

Common Eider
Eastern Whip-poor-will
White-rumped Sandpiper
WILSON'S PHALAROPE
Least Tern
Gull-billed Tern
Caspian Tern
Roseate Tern
Common Tern
Black Skimmer
Least Bittern
Olive-sided Flycatcher
Acadian Flycatcher
Alder Flycatcher
Hooded Warbler
YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER
SUMMER TANAGER
BLUE GROSBEAK

- Transcript

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report
electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at
http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to nysarc44
(at)nybirds{dot}org.

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or
sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compiler: Tom Burke
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Ben Cacace

BEGIN TAPE

Greetings. This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for *Friday, June 14th 2024*
at 11pm. The highlights of today's tape are AMERICAN FLAMINGO,
BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK, SANDWICH and ARCTIC TERNS, WHITE-FACED IBIS,
PACIFIC LOON, WILSON'S PHALAROPE, YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER, BLUE GROSBEAK,
SUMMER TANAGER and more.

After wandering about the northeast for a short time, by Monday the
AMERICAN FLAMINGO had returned to Georgica Pond in Wainscott where it has
remained through today. Since Georgica Pond is surrounded by private
property except along the beachfront the best approach for looking for the
Flamingo seems to be parking in a small lot at the end of Beach Lane west
of the pond and walking east on the beach to view the pond. The issue there
is the potential for a parking ticket so best to be there early before the
beach crowd starts building up.

Two BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCKS found on the East Pond at Jamaica Bay
Wildlife Refuge last Sunday continued around the pond's south end through
Thursday but today flew over to the south end of the West Pond. An adult
WHITE-FACED IBIS has also been noted occasionally along the southeast
shoreline of the East Pond starting on Monday and Tuesday this area
attracting a revolving set of Ibis constantly coming in and staying for a
short while. The southern section of the East Pond has also produced a
couple of sightings of LEAST BITTERN usually in flight and some lingering
shorebirds including 50 or more WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERS gathered there
Wednesday. A female COMMON EIDER remains on the West Pond and one or two
GULL-BILLED TERNS continue to appear at both the West and East Ponds.

An adult SANDWICH TERN was spotted Tuesday morning at the Fire Island Old
Inlet in Bellport Bay west of Smith Point County Park and single ARCTIC
TERNS were photographed at Nickerson Beach last Sunday, this an adult,
followed by an immature at Cupsogue Beach County Park on Tuesday.

A CASPIAN TERN in Pelham Bay Park's Orchard Beach last Saturday was
followed by one today flying over the Cliffdale Farm's section of Teatown
Reservation in northern Westchester.

PACIFIC LOON was photographed and identified as it flew by a boat off Jones
Beach last Saturday.

A WILSON'S PHALAROPE was found Sunday at Nickerson Beach and unexpected was
an EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILL calling at Jones Beach Sunday evening.

ACADIAN FLYCATCHERS were on Saturday at Heckscher State Park and Connetquot
River State Park and Wednesday and Thursday in Prospect Park and
YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER continues at the Bayard Cutting Arboretum in Great
River.

A SUMMER TANAGER was spotted in Cunningham Park Monday and single BLUE
GROSBEAKS were present at Bayswater Point State Park including Saturday and
at Cliffdale Farm on Tuesday while nesting pairs are also in residence out
in the Calverton area.

The Captree Summer Bird Count last Saturday netted 129 species including an
OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER and YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER at the Bayard Cutting
Arboretum and a healthy gathering of nesting birds at Democrat Point with
good numbers of COMMON and LEAST TERNS and BLACK SKIMMERS plus a few
ROSEATE TERNS.

The Greenwich-Stamford Summer Bird Count including much of eastern
Westchester recorded 130 species last weekend including WHITE-RUMPED
SANDPIPER, ACADIAN FLYCATCHER and ALDER FLYCATCHERS, HOODED WARBLER and
count period BLUE GROSBEAK.

To phone in reports, call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the
National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript

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Date: 6/11/24 7:44 pm
From: Peter Polshek <pmaxp...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] American Flamingo - Georgica Pond
The continuing American Flamingo was observed at Georgica Pond, Town of East Hampton by several birders from at least mid-morning until about 7:30pm. It was actively feeding and resting/preening. I watched it from 5-7pm.

--
Peter Polshek
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Date: 6/11/24 4:23 am
From: <marciaaabrahams...> <marciaaabrahams...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Don't miss tomorrow evening's Queens County Bird Club meeting featuring Donna Schulman "Cockatoos, Fairy-Wrens & Roos: Australia in Bits & Pieces"
Don't miss tomorrow evening's Queens County Bird Club meeting. It will be held on Wednesday, June 12, 2024, at 7:30 PM at Alley Pond Environmental Center, 229-10 Northern Boulevard, Douglaston, NY 11362.

Donna Schulman will present "Cockatoos, Fairy-Wrens, & Roos:  Australia in Bits & Pieces" 
Australia! Home of unique, endearing birds and mammals, bucket list destination for many a birder. With over 850 avian species and a geographic size as large as the continental U.S., where do you start? Donna visited Australia in 2022, dividing her time between the Northern Territory and the area around Melbourne, birding with a tour group, on her own, and with a private guide. Habitats birded ranged from the endangered savanna woodlands of Lee Point to the billabongs and sandstone walks of Kakadu N.P. (where you can also see aboriginal rock drawings) to the coastal heaths of Wilsons Prom to the ocean cliffs of the Nobbies. There will be photographs and video, of course, as Donna talks about the rewards and challenges of bird travel in an upside-down country where the parrots are wild, the people drive on the wrong side of the road, and no tipping is required.
BIODonna learned how to bird with QCBC and has branched out to Central & South America, Africa, SE Asia, Europe, and Australia. A former academic labor educator and library director, she reviews books for 10,000 Birds and Birding magazine and discusses best birding books with the members of the Birding Book Club on the American Birding Association podcast. Donna’s photographs have been featured in Birding and Birdwatching Magazine, the publications and social media of N.J. Audubon and Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the educational signage of Negri-Nepote Grasslands in N.J. and a tern colony somewhere in Germany. She is a past editor of QCBC’s News and Notes.
Please arrive early since the front door must be locked after the meeting starts. 


Marcia AbrahamsVP/Programs CoordinatorQueens County Bird Clubhttps://qcbirdclub.org/
Email:  <MarciaAAbrahams...>

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Date: 6/9/24 2:54 pm
From: <leormand...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Hooded merganser - East Patchogue
This morning around 7:15 I observed a male hooded merganser in Robinsons pond just not the if south country road in East Patchogue.

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Date: 6/9/24 2:46 pm
From: John Turner <redknot948...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Pileated Woodpecker Sighting on Long Island
On June 5th I had a prolonged sighting of a male pileated woodpecker at the
NSLA's Humes Preserve in Mill Neck while standing at the top of the stairs
that lead down into the meadow. The bird flew from right to left across the
length of the meadow and started to both vocalize and rap on a dead
branch, soon after entering the forest. I watched it for another 30 seconds
or so before it flew north out of sight.

John Turner

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Date: 6/7/24 8:52 pm
From: Gail Benson <gbensonny...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] NYC Area RBA: 7 June 2024
-RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* June 7, 2024
* NYNY2406.07

- Birds Mentioned

BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK+
AMERICAN FLAMINGO+
THICK-BILLED MURRE+
ATLANTIC PUFFIN+
BAND-RUMPED STORM-PETREL+
MISSISSIPPI KITE+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)


KING EIDER
SANDHILL CRANE
Whimbrel
HUDSONIAN GODWIT
MARBLED GODWIT
White-rumped Sandpiper
Parasitic Jaeger
DOVEKIE
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Gull-billed Tern
Caspian Tern
Roseate Tern
Royal Tern
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
Leach’s Storm-Petrel
NORTHERN FULMAR
BLACK-CAPPED PETREL (in New Jersey waters)
FEA’S PETREL (in New Jersey waters)
Cory’s Shearwater
Sooty Shearwater
Great Shearwater
Manx Shearwater
Audubon’s Shearwater
Northern Gannet
BROWN PELICAN
Red-headed Woodpecker
Olive-sided Flycatcher
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
Acadian Flycatcher
Alder Flycatcher
Mourning Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
SUMMER TANAGER
BLUE GROSBEAK


If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report
electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at
http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to
nysarc44<at>nybirds<dot>org

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or
sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compiler: Tom Burke
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Gail Benson

[~BEGIN RBA TAPE~]

Greetings! This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, June 7, 2024 at
11:00 pm.

The highlights of today's tape are AMERICAN FLAMINGO, pelagic trip results
including ATLANTIC PUFFIN, DOVEKIE and THICK-BILLED MURRE, BAND-RUMPED
STORM-PETREL and NORTHERN FULMAR as well as FEA’S PETREL and BLACK-CAPPED
PETREL in New Jersey waters, plus BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK, MISSISSIPPI
KITE, BROWN PELICAN, SANDHILL CRANE, KING EIDER, HUDSONIAN and MARBLED
GODWITS, SUMMER TANAGER, BLUE GROSBEAK and more.

The adult AMERICAN FLAMINGO found at Georgica Pond in Wainscott last Friday
spent all of Saturday at that location but then moved on, quite possibly
the same bird appearing Sunday up at Dennis on Cape Cod. A few subsequent
scattered but unconfirmed sightings at various sites between Massachusetts
and Long Island after Sunday led to Wednesday, when a FLAMINGO (conceivably
the same one) was spotted well out in the marsh north of Cedar Beach
Marina, staying there until dark but not seen Thursday or today. Where will
it appear next?

A pelagic trip aboard the American Princess left Brooklyn Sunday night and
returned the next evening. The boat diverted early Monday morning into New
Jersey waters due to stormy weather and fortuitously encountered two FEA’S
PETRELS and a BLACK-CAPPED PETREL before steering back towards Hudson
Canyon. With improving weather, the trip tallied a PARASITIC JAEGER, 3
ATLANTIC PUFFINS, 8 DOVEKIES and a THICK-BILLED MURRE, 588 WILSON'S, 1
LEACH’S and 2 BAND-RUMPED STORM-PETRELS, 5 NORTHERN FULMARS, 9 CORY’S, 68
GREAT, 1 AUDUBON’S and 135 SOOTY SHEARWATERS, 7 NORTHERN GANNETS and a
BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER, among others. Certainly a major highlight were the
Cetaceans, including 10 North Atlantic Right Whales as well as one Humpback
Whale and some Risso’s, Striped, Offshore Bottlenose and Common Dolphins.

A BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING DUCK spotted last Sunday on a pond at the Matrix
Global Logistics Park in Bloomfield on Staten Island was seen only up to
Tuesday.

Two sightings of MISSISSIPPI KITE featured one photographed while perched
briefly at the Bayard Cutting Arboretum in Great River last Saturday and
one flying over the Cliffdale Farm section of Teatown Reservation in
northern Westchester today.

A BROWN PELICAN was spotted flying off Fire Island last Tuesday, and on
Wednesday three SANDHILL CRANES were reported moving past Fort Wadsworth on
Staten Island, while two female KING EIDERS were photographed off Great
Gull Island Wednesday.

An HUDSONIAN GODWIT was among the many shorebirds gathered at Old Inlet on
Fire Island west of Smith Point County Park last Sunday, where other birds
included a WHIMBREL, 11 WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERS, 10 LESSER BLACK-BACKED
GULLS and three ROSEATE TERNS. A MARBLED GODWIT was reported from Cupsogue
Beach County Park Monday, with two WHIMBREL and a GULL-BILLED TERN noted
there Tuesday.

A MANX SHEARWATER and many WILSON'S STORM-PETRELS were present off Robert
Moses State Park Wednesday, and SOOTY SHEARWATERS have also begun to appear
offshore. ROYAL TERN numbers are increasing along the coast, and an
occasional CASPIAN TERN included one reported at Nickerson Beach Tuesday.

A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was still in the gardens at Jamaica Bay Wildlife
Refuge Tuesday.

Passerine migrants recently have featured OLIVE-SIDED, ACADIAN, ALDER and
YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHERS as well as some MOURNING WARBLERS, including
four in Bryant Park in Manhattan Monday, these hopefully able to continue
moving on.

SUMMER TANAGERS last weekend were noted in Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn
and at the Preston Pond Complex out in Calverton, while single BLUE
GROSBEAKS were photographed in Westchester County at Rockefeller State Park
Preserve Wednesday and at Marshlands Conservancy in Rye Thursday.

To phone in reports call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the
National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript

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Date: 6/5/24 6:57 am
From: Jay Pitocchelli <jpitocch...>
Subject: Re:[nysbirds-l] nysbirds-l digest: June 05, 2024
NYC birders,

Was anyone able to record some of the recent MOWAs in Bryant or Central
Parks?  I could use them for my study of songs of migrants.  These birds
tend to be singing songs from either Nova Scotia or Newfoundland.  I
already have some great recordings from some excellent birders in
Brooklyn this year.

Dr. Jay Pitocchelli, Professor Emeritus
Biology Department
Saint Anselm College
Manchester, NH 03102

https://www.anselm.edu/about/campus-directory/jay-pitocchelli

Blog: http://mourningwarbler.blogspot.com/


On 6/5/24 12:01 AM, New York State Birds digest wrote:
> Mourning W

--
Newbury, NH

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Date: 6/4/24 3:05 am
From: Tom Fiore <tomfi2...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] N.Y. County, NYC - thru Mon., 6/3 - ongoing migrations; elsewhere-Northeast Flamingo-flights, etc.
As some have noticed or noted in various online fora, there was a sighting, with photos taken, of American Flamingo at Cape Cod, Massachusetts on June 2nd -from the Chapin beach, Dennis township on Cape Cod- and also reports from the state of Connecticut - in addition to the sightings by many on Long Island, NY this week, and there is a fair chance that these are the same individual flamingo, but also a chance more than one bird is involved. Also as already noted by an increasing number of birders, the records of several state bird-records committees may not reflect all of past sightings of flamingoes as having been naturally-occurring, and it remains to be seen if state records committees choose to revisit any of the older or prior sightings per each state where sightings have been reported. On a lighter, or darker note, depending on ones personal thinking and etc., should a flamingo come up to meet nearly face-to-face with the ongoing Stellers Sea Eagle in Newfoundland, Canada -seen as lately as June 3, 2024 there - we really will be in eyes-open-view of a dramatic result of changing conditions in climate and much more of the planets workings. That noted, these far-north flamingo-incursions of the North American kind may have happened, at some intervals, in the past, and it is not only this century that has seen this, unless all earlier reports going back in time are lumped-in to escapee-types of sightings. Thanks to those taking looks back into some of those prior records in the northeastern states. - - As some may have noticed, eBird, in the USA, is taking some of the recent-current American Flamingo sightings of the U.S. state of Georgia as acceptable for general view in that forum, while the sightings from our northeastern region are for now, treated in a different way, -at this point-. And of course, many sightings of the -wild- flamingoes in the state of Florida are readily reported publicly within eBird.

. . . .
New York County -in N.Y. City- including Manhattan, Roosevelt, Randalls and Governors Islands, and the skies above as well as adjacent nearby waters - thru Monday, June 3rd -

A hen Wild Turkey, given the nickname -Astoria- by some regular observers, has been fairly regular again into this month on Roosevelt Island, which is to the east of Manhattan in the East river estuary. There is some concern that this lone bird is a bit incautious with the traffic that is normal to that island, as a very-much populated part of the county and of N.Y. City.

For a lot of county-birders, the sight of multiple Mourning Warblers in a rather small, concentrated area of Bryant Park over recent days was unusual, at least, even while that species is not a rarity and is also not always uncommon in peak-passage periods in this county, both late spring and in what we birders -call- fall-migration, which is very active by August in our area. There were a minimum of 4 individual Mourning Warblers present at Bryant Park, at least by Monday, 6-3, and it is slightly possible even more than four were present in all of that park. One might -speculate- that some or all of those multiples of the species in the small park had been traveling together, as part of a vastly-larger nocturnal songbird migration in the area, which happened over successive nights - and is still going from Monday night into this Tues., June 4th - with so many species of migrants still pushing thru, some running decidedly later than usual for some species. In Mourning Warblers this timing is still well-within the expected period of abundance on spring northbound movements. A very-many of this species of warbler also pass without many noting their passages, and especially-so of non-singing females, making the occurrences at Bryant Park that much more notable for many, many observers, who got word of these birds via real-time, NON-X-brand alerts which a vast majority of birders use, and as always thru ongoing eBird alerts as well. In other parks, the species also has been passing, and incidentally, the numbers of Mournings seen lately at Bryant Park do not come near the high-number per any one park, or for one day, in recent times. At Central Park, there were also a number of Mourning Warblers, and the species has been found in multiple other parks and green-spaces this spring, in N.Y. County, including the other islands off Manhattan.

At least 16 additional warbler species have been seen so far this June in N.Y. County, and of those, all were additionally seen in Central Park, in particular on Sunday, into Monday. Of some note were the many Blackburnian Warblers still passing, in locations around all of the county, into Monday 6-3, as well as a number of Bay-breasted and Blackpoll Warblers, all of these including males, as well as numbers of females of their species. These species and others all were being found in a number of locations, and some of the 16 warbler species were certainly also showing to the large numbers of observers coming in to Bryant Park in the past several days. A female Hooded Warbler into Sunday, June 2 was a bit late on-passage, for this county.

Also noted at Bryant Park were a lingering Lincolns Sparrow and a variety of flycatcher species, which included at least 2 of the expected Empidonax-genus flycatchers, one of those being Acadian Flycatcher, among a fair variety of additional, varied migrant species seen there, by many watchers.

In Central Park and elsewhere, all five of our northeastern-breeding Empidonax-genus flycatchers were still passing thru Monday, albeit some being mainly quiet, and-or unobtrusive for good viewing, or listening. Also still ongoing, Great Crested Flycatchers, E. Wood-Pewees, and E. Kingbirds all of which breed in N.Y. County. Less common by June, some E. Phoebes are also around, in select sites, and there were still Olive-sided Flycatcher passages for this month in and thru the county. Its also worth a note than June can sometimes bring much-rarer, unexpected species of out-of-range flycatcher species, and so it is worth having a close look, and a listen-to, any birds that might appear odd, or unusual.

Cliff Swallow has been confirmed for the date of at-least May 30, on Governors Island, and it can still be hoped that some more of that species are found, and might breed, as in other recent years, in the county. Also reported more-recently, Purple Martin which is another species to watch-for as a potential nester, esp. in any sites where they might be protected and have special nesting structures placed for their possible use. Tree, Barn, and N. Rough-winged Swallows continue to be seen in multiple areas of the county, and all three nest, with Tree and Barn Swallow fairly easy to see in some sites such as on Governors Island all summer. Also being seen regularly in many sites are Chimney Swifts, with some locations in use by that species as night-roosts. There are some who have felt that sightings of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds may have been low this spring, and it may not be until the -fall- or August-starting southward migrations that some sense of their numbers, and successes at many northeastern nesting places, could be gauged to some extent. On Governors Island, the breeding and now-expected species of tern is Common Tern, seen daily in numbers from the portion of the island with views to roost and feeding areas. Any -other tern species- suspected ought to be photod or videod, as well as noted made on all aspects of any sightings.

An American Woodcock was somewhat-sadly still being seen at Bryant Park, which in midtown Manhattan, is terribly off course to where the species should have long since been, even if some good breeding areas can be as little as 5 to ten miles or so away, as the woodcock flies. Hopefully, all of the multiple migrants in some smaller spaces, such as Bryant Park, will be able to navigate out soon enough and make their way to where their species is likely to attempt breeding. In some instances, with Bryant Park a bit of an example of such, migrant birds may remain, even all summer and later, without managing to get off to where most of their migratory kin will be, or have already made it to, in breeding-places far and wide. Some birds in such inner-urban parks, and this can certainly include Central Park, etc., may have injuries related to windows, and other structures, sustained in the nearby area where they might be, and in some instances, such injury will not allow them to escape to life outside of the city. This is not any new phenomenon, but with so many more observers in this era, there are vastly more sightings and reports, and what can seem as-if more of such late, lost, or in some instances, injured migrants that continue on for longer than a healthy migrant bird would.

Among many, many more migrants and some possible-breeders still being seen in the county, have been multiple Yellow-billed Cuckoos and a lesser number of Black-billed Cuckoos, Common Nighthawks - those mainly in dusk and first-light hours, Vireos of a somewhat-surprising 5 specieshas even into June, including one species that has never nested in the county, Blue-headed Vireo, now significantly late as a migrant here, as well as at least several Yellow-throated Vireos - a species which has rarely bred in the county - and the -more likely in June- Vireo species of -scant- White-eyed, which is a regular breeder in some parts of N.Y. City, and the 2 most-regular Vireo species of this county at this time of year, Red-eyed, and Warbling, both of which breed annually, with the latter near-common in good habitat locations. For both Orchard and Baltimore Orioles, there are some on nests now in the county, and of the latter, in many locations, including in a few places not that often watched. It has been a bit notable for a small number of Hermit Thrush to have lingered on, even to early June here, although that species has occasionally stayed this late in past late-springs, even though not a breeder in this county. The regularly-breeding thrush, besides the very-ubiquitous American Robins, are Wood Thrushes, in at least several of the larger wooded parks. Other thrushes still being seen, and sometimes heard into June have included Swainsons and Gray-cheeked Thrushes.

Also still passing thru have been Indigo Bunting, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, and Scarlet Tanager, each of which could be watched, if pairs are noticed and if any females linger. Each of those last 3 species have at-least sometimes lingered into summer, and Indigo Buntings have bred successfully in Manhattan, over some recent decades, albeit in low numbers. In some places around the county, in particular in Central Park, but also elsewhere, White-throated Sparrow will be seen and-or heard singing or chipping, and these are all non-breeders, with a modest number summering, not attempting to breed, here in almost any given summer. A small number of Savannah Sparrows were still being seen into June, in the county, while some other native sparrows have included the usual Song, a regularly-breeding species, and some Swamp, a few of which may summer in the county, as well as Field, and more-so Chipping, these latter 2 sparrow spp. deserving of watching, for possible breeding with the latter one a regular breeder in the county, including -scantly- at Central Park.

Raptors which were still being seen include Bald Eagles, of which a good place to observe can be from the northern side of Manhattan, but with some seen elsewhere, and from the other islands in the county as well. Black and Turkey Vultures also were ongoing with Black Vulture still the less-often seen of those, and again a good area to seek these being from northern Manhattan in this county, but also possible elsewhere. Osprey also has been a somewhat regular sighting from a number of locations into June, here. And while not a raptor by definition at all, our largest corvid, the Ravens of N.Y. County are ongoing and have fledged at least several nest-fulls of youngsters by now. Fish Crows and American Crows are also in a variety of sites, some with young by now. Red-tailed Hawks, American Kestrels, and Peregrine Falcons all nest in the county and more-generally in N.Y. City, and all have some eggs in nests, nestlings, or fledges out by now, and for Red-tailed Hawks, in quite good numbers. Some additional raptor species have been noted in the county into June, which may be mentioned in a much-later report.

As is typical of the last part of spring migrations here, Cedar Waxwings are still coming thru even as some of them are ready for, or already have set up in, nesting places. Many many other species of migratory, and some resident wild birds are now nesting, and all who give respect to the birds best-interests in that regard are thanked.

Thanks to many quiet, courteous observers and photographers, independently-observing, and leaders of, and participants with, not-for-profit guided bird-walks, such as with the NYC Bird Alliance, the American Museum of Natural History, and the Linnaean Society of New York, naming just 3 of some of the nonprofit orgs which offer regular guided bird and nature walks in this county, and beyond, and who all have contributed so many sightings of recent days.

Good birding to all,

Tom Fiore
manhattan







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Date: 6/3/24 9:24 am
From: <leormand...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] American Flamingos in New York State
 

Back to top
Date: 6/3/24 5:44 am
From: Paul R Sweet <sweet...>
Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] American Flamingos in New York State
In light of modern knowledge of vagrancy in this species, perhaps these old records should be resurrected and sent to NYSARC for review?

Paul Sweet
Collection Manager, Department of Ornithology
American Museum of Natural History
Central Park West at 79th Street
New York, NY 10024, USA
T: 212 769 5780, C: 718 757 5941


From: <bounce-128239119-11471062...> <bounce-128239119-11471062...> On Behalf Of Shaibal Mitra
Sent: Monday, June 3, 2024 8:34 AM
To: NYSBIRDS (<NYSBIRDS-L...>) <NYSBIRDS-L...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] American Flamingos in New York State

EXTERNAL SENDER

Thanks to Zach for reminding me of this more recent report.

Please add to the list another one as well, from Long Island ornithologist Peg Hart, who found an American Flamingo at her home in Bellport as a child! That this one has managed to remain overlooked is in part a consequence of Manny Levine's overly "rigorous" editorial approach in Bull's Birds (1998), in which even Bull's "Hypothetical" category was purged. Peg worked with me in the late 90s when I was running the field station at Fire Island Lighthouse, so this story must have come up at some point and thus my faulty memory is probably also partly to blame.

11 Nov 1978, Bellport (Peat Hole), Suffolk County
Peg Hart, pers. comm. and The Advance (archives): “I grew up in a house next to the Peat Hole in Bellport; my mom still lives there. One day in the, I was playing in the yard and looked up to see a beautiful flamingo standing in the shallow water, near the sluiceway to the bay. I was 11 and ran excitedly to tell my dad who came out to see for himself. Dad called Art Cooley and much excitement ensued! Our yard was very lively that week and while many photographs were taken, we would be hard pressed to locate one.”
The Kingbird 29: 57-58; Barbara J. Spencer
“The origin and status of an American Flamingo in good plumage, found in Bellport Nov. 11 and seen frequently in the Bellport-Brookhaven area for two weeks, is unknown. Three late fall occurrences in Canada (1969, 1973, 1977) have been thought to have been storm-related vagrants by some.”
________________________________
From: zach schwartz-weinstein <zachsw...><mailto:<zachsw...>>
Sent: Sunday, June 2, 2024 6:02 PM
To: Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...><mailto:<Shaibal.Mitra...>>
Cc: NYSBIRDS (<NYSBIRDS-L...><mailto:<NYSBIRDS-L...>) <NYSBIRDS-L...><mailto:<NYSBIRDS-L...>>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] American Flamingos in New York State


* This email originates from a sender outside of CUNY. Verify the sender before replying or clicking on links and attachments. *
It may be worth adding to these the report from October 1 of last year of a bird flying up the Hudson in northern Ulster county:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S151204238. Many region 8 birders staked out various spots among the river, but did not relocate a flamingo.



Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774


On Sun, Jun 2, 2024 at 2:59 PM Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...><mailto:<Shaibal.Mitra...>> wrote:
In the excitement over the potential addition of American Flamingo to the New York State Checklist, people have been curious about prior records. As far as I am aware, there have been four prior occurrences of American Flamingo. All of these were doubted as natural vagrants at the time, but no evidence of captive origin is cited in any of the cases (except for "faded plumage" in one case), and what is known of the dates and locations of their occurrences actually appear consistent with natural vagrancy. In particular, the records from 1964 and 1965 occurred during a period of multiple occurrences in nearby Massachusetts and elsewhere.

about 1915, Speonk, Suffolk County
Birds of the New York Area, p. 471; John Bull
“shot by duck hunters… mounted specimen still in Westhampton.”
Described by Leroy Wilcox as “in bright plumage” and was considered by Bull to have “possibly wandered north or was hurricane borne, but of this we cannot be certain.”

3 Oct 1931, Shinnecock Bay, Suffolk County
Birds of the New York Area, p. 471; John Bull
collected by Leroy Wilcox, who described it as “somewhat faded" and regarded by Bull as "presumably escaped from captivity.”

14 Nov 1964, Hudson River shore near Coxsackie, Greene County
The Kingbird 15: 49, 1965; Peter P. Wickham
“the bird was able to fly and was seen by numerous observers in this vicinity until it was captured Nov 25 and turned over (alive) to the Delmar Game Farm; it seems probable that this bird is non-feral, although its origin has not been dtermined with certainty.”

The Kingbird 16: 60-61, 1966; Thomas H. Davis and Fred Heath
2 Sep 1965, Mecox Bay; 9 Sep-16 Oct, Shinnecock Inlet, Suffolk County
“probably an escape.”

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore
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Date: 6/3/24 5:34 am
From: Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] American Flamingos in New York State
Thanks to Zach for reminding me of this more recent report.

Please add to the list another one as well, from Long Island ornithologist Peg Hart, who found an American Flamingo at her home in Bellport as a child! That this one has managed to remain overlooked is in part a consequence of Manny Levine's overly "rigorous" editorial approach in Bull's Birds (1998), in which even Bull's "Hypothetical" category was purged. Peg worked with me in the late 90s when I was running the field station at Fire Island Lighthouse, so this story must have come up at some point and thus my faulty memory is probably also partly to blame.

11 Nov 1978, Bellport (Peat Hole), Suffolk County
Peg Hart, pers. comm. and The Advance (archives): “I grew up in a house next to the Peat Hole in Bellport; my mom still lives there. One day in the, I was playing in the yard and looked up to see a beautiful flamingo standing in the shallow water, near the sluiceway to the bay. I was 11 and ran excitedly to tell my dad who came out to see for himself. Dad called Art Cooley and much excitement ensued! Our yard was very lively that week and while many photographs were taken, we would be hard pressed to locate one.”
The Kingbird 29: 57-58; Barbara J. Spencer
“The origin and status of an American Flamingo in good plumage, found in Bellport Nov. 11 and seen frequently in the Bellport-Brookhaven area for two weeks, is unknown. Three late fall occurrences in Canada (1969, 1973, 1977) have been thought to have been storm-related vagrants by some.”
________________________________
From: zach schwartz-weinstein <zachsw...>
Sent: Sunday, June 2, 2024 6:02 PM
To: Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...>
Cc: NYSBIRDS (<NYSBIRDS-L...>) <NYSBIRDS-L...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] American Flamingos in New York State


* This email originates from a sender outside of CUNY. Verify the sender before replying or clicking on links and attachments. *

It may be worth adding to these the report from October 1 of last year of a bird flying up the Hudson in northern Ulster county:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S151204238. Many region 8 birders staked out various spots among the river, but did not relocate a flamingo.


Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774


On Sun, Jun 2, 2024 at 2:59 PM Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...><mailto:<Shaibal.Mitra...>> wrote:
In the excitement over the potential addition of American Flamingo to the New York State Checklist, people have been curious about prior records. As far as I am aware, there have been four prior occurrences of American Flamingo. All of these were doubted as natural vagrants at the time, but no evidence of captive origin is cited in any of the cases (except for "faded plumage" in one case), and what is known of the dates and locations of their occurrences actually appear consistent with natural vagrancy. In particular, the records from 1964 and 1965 occurred during a period of multiple occurrences in nearby Massachusetts and elsewhere.

about 1915, Speonk, Suffolk County
Birds of the New York Area, p. 471; John Bull
“shot by duck hunters… mounted specimen still in Westhampton.”
Described by Leroy Wilcox as “in bright plumage” and was considered by Bull to have “possibly wandered north or was hurricane borne, but of this we cannot be certain.”

3 Oct 1931, Shinnecock Bay, Suffolk County
Birds of the New York Area, p. 471; John Bull
collected by Leroy Wilcox, who described it as “somewhat faded" and regarded by Bull as "presumably escaped from captivity.”

14 Nov 1964, Hudson River shore near Coxsackie, Greene County
The Kingbird 15: 49, 1965; Peter P. Wickham
“the bird was able to fly and was seen by numerous observers in this vicinity until it was captured Nov 25 and turned over (alive) to the Delmar Game Farm; it seems probable that this bird is non-feral, although its origin has not been dtermined with certainty.”

The Kingbird 16: 60-61, 1966; Thomas H. Davis and Fred Heath
2 Sep 1965, Mecox Bay; 9 Sep-16 Oct, Shinnecock Inlet, Suffolk County
“probably an escape.”

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore
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Date: 6/2/24 3:04 pm
From: zach schwartz-weinstein <zachsw...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] American Flamingos in New York State
It may be worth adding to these the report from October 1 of last year of a
bird flying up the Hudson in northern Ulster county:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S151204238. Many region 8 birders staked out
various spots among the river, but did not relocate a flamingo.


Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774


On Sun, Jun 2, 2024 at 2:59 PM Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...>
wrote:

> In the excitement over the potential addition of American Flamingo to the
> New York State Checklist, people have been curious about prior records. As
> far as I am aware, there have been four prior occurrences of American
> Flamingo. All of these were doubted as natural vagrants at the time, but no
> evidence of captive origin is cited in any of the cases (except for "faded
> plumage" in one case), and what is known of the dates and locations of
> their occurrences actually appear consistent with natural vagrancy. In
> particular, the records from 1964 and 1965 occurred during a period of
> multiple occurrences in nearby Massachusetts and elsewhere.
>
> about 1915, Speonk, Suffolk County
> Birds of the New York Area, p. 471; John Bull
> “shot by duck hunters… mounted specimen still in Westhampton.”
> Described by Leroy Wilcox as “in bright plumage” and was considered by
> Bull to have “possibly wandered north or was hurricane borne, but of this
> we cannot be certain.”
>
> 3 Oct 1931, Shinnecock Bay, Suffolk County
> Birds of the New York Area, p. 471; John Bull
> collected by Leroy Wilcox, who described it as “somewhat faded" and
> regarded by Bull as "presumably escaped from captivity.”
>
> 14 Nov 1964, Hudson River shore near Coxsackie, Greene County
> *The Kingbird* 15: 49, 1965; Peter P. Wickham
> “the bird was able to fly and was seen by numerous observers in this
> vicinity until it was captured Nov 25 and turned over (alive) to the Delmar
> Game Farm; it seems probable that this bird is non-feral, although its
> origin has not been dtermined with certainty.”
>
> *The Kingbird* 16: 60-61, 1966; Thomas H. Davis and Fred Heath
> 2 Sep 1965, Mecox Bay; 9 Sep-16 Oct, Shinnecock Inlet, Suffolk County
> “probably an escape.”
>
> Shai Mitra
> Bay Shore
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Date: 6/2/24 12:28 pm
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC, Sun. June 2, 2024: Multiple Yellow-billed Cuckoos, Olive-sided Flycatcher
Central Park NYC
Sunday June 2, 2024
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob.


Highlights: Multiple Yellow-billed Cuckoos, Olive-sided Flycatcher.


Canada Goose - 2 Turtle Pond
Wood Duck - 1 male Turtle Pond
Mallard - 16 (including a dozen ducklings)
Mourning Dove - 40-50
Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 3
Chimney Swift - 3 or 4
Herring Gull - 4 or 5 flyovers
Double-crested Cormorant - 6-8 flyovers
Great Blue Heron - 1 flyover
Black-crowned Night-Heron - 1 flyover
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2 pairs
Downy Woodpecker - 3
Northern Flicker - pair Maintenance Field
Great Crested Flycatcher - 2 pairs
Eastern Kingbird - 1 Turtle Pond Dock
Olive-sided Flycatcher - 1 Ramble
Eastern Wood-Pewee - 1 Evodia Field
Warbling Vireo - 1 south side Turtle Pond
Red-eyed Vireo - 4
Blue Jay - 1 East Drive at 80th Street
Tufted Titmouse - 1 continuing in the Ramble
Barn Swallow - 1 Turtle Pond
Cedar Waxwing - 6
Wood Thrush - 2 males singing in the Ramble
American Robin - 30-40
House Finch - 10-15
White-throated Sparrow - 1 Swampy Pin Oak
Baltimore Oriole - pair at nest
Red-winged Blackbird - 4-6
Common Grackle - 9-12
American Redstart - 3
Magnolia Warbler - 1 female east end of Turtle Pond
Blackpoll Warbler - 1 female Gill Overlook
Canada Warbler - 1 singing male Ramble
Northern Cardinal - 4 or 5

--
Eastern Red Bat - Turtle Pond
Eastern Cottontail - north end of Maintenance Field
--

Deb Allen


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Date: 6/2/24 11:59 am
From: Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] American Flamingos in New York State
In the excitement over the potential addition of American Flamingo to the New York State Checklist, people have been curious about prior records. As far as I am aware, there have been four prior occurrences of American Flamingo. All of these were doubted as natural vagrants at the time, but no evidence of captive origin is cited in any of the cases (except for "faded plumage" in one case), and what is known of the dates and locations of their occurrences actually appear consistent with natural vagrancy. In particular, the records from 1964 and 1965 occurred during a period of multiple occurrences in nearby Massachusetts and elsewhere.

about 1915, Speonk, Suffolk County
Birds of the New York Area, p. 471; John Bull
shot by duck hunters mounted specimen still in Westhampton.
Described by Leroy Wilcox as in bright plumage and was considered by Bull to have possibly wandered north or was hurricane borne, but of this we cannot be certain.

3 Oct 1931, Shinnecock Bay, Suffolk County
Birds of the New York Area, p. 471; John Bull
collected by Leroy Wilcox, who described it as somewhat faded" and regarded by Bull as "presumably escaped from captivity.

14 Nov 1964, Hudson River shore near Coxsackie, Greene County
The Kingbird 15: 49, 1965; Peter P. Wickham
the bird was able to fly and was seen by numerous observers in this vicinity until it was captured Nov 25 and turned over (alive) to the Delmar Game Farm; it seems probable that this bird is non-feral, although its origin has not been dtermined with certainty.

The Kingbird 16: 60-61, 1966; Thomas H. Davis and Fred Heath
2 Sep 1965, Mecox Bay; 9 Sep-16 Oct, Shinnecock Inlet, Suffolk County
probably an escape.

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore

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Date: 6/1/24 2:26 pm
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC, Sat. June 1, 2024: Mourning Warbler and Eight Other Species of Wood Warblers
Central Park NYC
Saturday June 1, 2024
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob.

Highlights: Mourning Warbler and Eight Other Species of Wood Warblers. At lunchtime today three Mourning Warblers and a Blackburnian Warbler were reported in Bryant Park. ( https://twitter.com/mbalerter/status/1796948737241104585 )


Canada Goose - 19
Wood Duck - 1 male Reservoir (Deb - 6:05am)
Mallard - 20
Mourning Dove - 30-40
Herring Gull - 19
Great Black-backed Gull - 1 Reservoir (Deb - early)
Double-crested Cormorant - 11
Great Egret - 2 Reservoir - Deb - 6:45am)
Black-crowned Night-Heron - 3 flyovers
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1 Ramble
Downy Woodpecker - 4 or 5
Northern Flicker - pair plus one
Great Crested Flycatcher - pair Tupelo Field
Eastern Kingbird - 1 Turtle Pond
Eastern Wood-Pewee - 1 Azalea Pond
Empidonax Flycatcher - 2 (Ramble, Turtle Pond)
Warbling Vireo - 1 Maintenance Field
Red-eyed Vireo - 5
Blue Jay - 5 or 6 including pair collecting nesting material
Tufted Titmouse - 1 continuing in the Ramble
Barn Swallow - 5 or 6 with 2 birds sitting on nests
Gray Catbird - 6-8
Wood Thrush - 2 singing in Ramble
American Robin - 30-40
House Finch - 10-15 (adults and juveniles)
Song Sparrow - 4 (3 singing)
Baltimore Oriole - 2 males and active nest
Red-winged Blackbird - 5-7
Common Grackle - 10-15 including adult feeding young at Maintenance Field
Black-and-white Warbler - 2 females Ramble
Mourning Warbler - 1 male top of the Point
Common Yellowthroat - 2 (male, female) Belvedere Castle
American Redstart - 2 Ramble
Northern Parula - 2 (Swampy Pin Oak, Balancing Rock)
Magnolia Warbler - 3 or 4
Chestnut-sided Warbler - 1 Belvedere Castle
Blackpoll Warbler - 3 females
Canada Warbler - 2 (King of Poland (Bob - early), Weather Station)
Northern Cardinal - 9 or 10

--

Deb Allen


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Date: 5/31/24 8:20 pm
From: Gail Benson <gbensonny...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] NYC Area RBA: 31 May 2024
-RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* May 31, 2024
* NYNY2405.31

- Birds Mentioned

AMERICAN FLAMINGO+
BLACK-NECKED STILT+
BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

Common Eider
HARLEQUIN DUCK
RED-NECKED PHALAROPE
BLACK-HEADED GULL
Gull-billed Tern
Caspian Tern
Black Tern
Royal Tern
BROWN PELICAN
Red-headed Woodpecker
Olive-sided Flycatcher
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
Acadian Flycatcher
Alder Flycatcher
YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT
PROTHONOTARY WARBLER
KENTUCKY WARBLER
YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER
SUMMER TANAGER
BLUE GROSBEAK

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report
electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at
http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to
nysarc44<at>nybirds<dot>org

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos
or sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compiler: Tom Burke
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Gail Benson

[~BEGIN RBA TAPE~]

Greetings! This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, May 31,
2024 at 11:00 pm.

The highlights of today's tape are AMERICAN FLAMINGO, BLACK-THROATED
GRAY WARBLER, BLACK-NECKED STILT, BROWN PELICAN, HARLEQUIN DUCK,
RED-NECKED PHALAROPE, BLACK-HEADED GULL, YELLOW BREASTED CHAT,
PROTHONOTARY, KENTUCKY and YELLOW-THROATED WARBLERS, SUMMER TANAGER,
BLUE GROSBEAK, and more.

And adult AMERICAN FLAMINGO was found today out on Eastern Long Island
at Georgica Pond in Wainscott, where it has continued into this
evening. This residential area has quite restricted access, and the
pond is generally viewable only from the Atlantic Ocean beachfront.
Parking is very limited, with small lots on the east side of Georgica
Pond off Lily Pond Lane and on the west side off Beach Lane, but the
restrictions on these lots are not currently known. Either lot
requires a hike along the beach to the pond. This would be a first New
York State record if accepted by NYSARC.

A BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER, singing an odd song for this species,
was found Wednesday at Heckscher State Park around Forty Foot Road and
ultimately photographed as it wandered about. It was only heard a
couple of times early Thursday morning but then disappeared. A
KENTUCKY WARBLER first heard at the same location on Tuesday was
confirmed visually on Wednesday and still singing there today.

Two kayakers out in Jamaica Bay on Sunday spotted a BLACK-NECKED STILT
flying by Ruffle Bar southwest of the West Pond at Jamaica Bay
Wildlife Refuge and managed to get a few photos before the bird
disappeared; perhaps this is the individual present recently in
Connecticut.

An adult BROWN PELICAN was photographed Wednesday flying west off Fire
Island south of Shirley.

A female HARLEQUIN DUCK was still present off Sunset Cove Park on the
south side off Broad Channel on Sunday, while excitement at Jamaica
Bay Wildlife Refuge just to the north featured a RED-NECKED PHALAROPE
continuing at least to Saturday on the West Pond, where a female
COMMON EIDER also remains. A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was still around
the north end of the South Garden today, and four GULL-BILLED TERNS
present Saturday on Yellow Bar Hassock out in the Bay are likely the
source of the birds seen occasionally at the Refuge.

An immature BLACK-HEADED GULL was spotted Tuesday on the bar off the
Jones Beach West End Coast Guard Station.

Among the TERNS, a CASPIAN at Great Kills Park on Staten Island
Saturday was followed by two at nearby Wolfe’s Pond Park Tuesday, a
BLACK was seen at Nickerson Beach from Sunday through Wednesday, and
some ROYALS included four at Nickerson Sunday and six at Mecox Bay
Tuesday.

Several OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHERS were noted during the week, as were
such Empidonax as YELLOW-BELLIED, ACADIAN, and ALDER FLYCATCHERS.

A YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT was heard Sunday in fields south of Water Mill,
while rarer WARBLERS for the week included a PROTHONOTARY reported at
Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge Saturday, a KENTUCKY in Prospect Park
Wednesday, and a YELLOW-THROATED at Pine Neck Sanctuary in East Quogue
Sunday.

SUMMER TANAGERS were reported in Central Park and Maple Swamp County
Park in Flanders on Sunday and at the Preston Ponds Complex in
Calverton today, while BLUE GROSBEAKS were noted Monday at Randalls
Island and yesterday at Heckscher State Park as well as out in
Calverton.


To phone in reports call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the
National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

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Date: 5/31/24 1:28 pm
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC, Fri. May 31, 2024: Mourning Warbler, Nesting Birds
Central Park NYC
Friday May 31, 2024
OBS: Deborah Allen, m.ob.

Highlights: Mourning Warbler, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Nesting Birds.

Canada Goose - 17
Mallard - 9 adults plus 2 ducklings
Mourning Dove - 8
Chimney Swift - 5 or 6
Double-crested Cormorant - 5
Great Blue Heron - 1 immature Island Harlem Meer
Great Egret - 1 foraging at Harlem Meer, plus at least 10 flyovers
Snowy Egret - 1 flyover
Red-tailed Hawk - 3 flyovers (1 adult, 2 immature birds)
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3 (1 adult male, 2 juveniles - nest empty)
Downy Woodpecker - 1 male Loch
Northern Flicker - 1 male working on old Red-bellied Woodpecker nest
Eastern Wood-Pewee - 2 or 3
Warbling Vireo - 3 adults (one nest - nestlings fed)
Blue Jay - 4
Barn Swallow - 1 flyover Harlem Meer
Cedar Waxwing - 15 or 16
House Wren - 1 heard
Gray Catbird - 4 or 5
American Robin - nests with young
Baltimore Oriole - 1 adult male Plant Nursery (Scott Brevda)
Red-winged Blackbird - 10
Common Grackle - around a dozen including 2 juveniles
Mourning Warbler - 1 male singing north of the west side of the Pool (found by Charles*)
American Redstart - 1 immature male singing north of the west side of the Pool
Magnolia Warbler - 1 at the Loch (Paul Curtis)
Northern Cardinal - 4
Rose-breasted Grosbeak - 1 male Great Hill (Caren Jahre)
--

*@FoodvsF https://twitter.com/FoodvsF/status/1796551319635026108/photo/1
Charles also photographed a male Indigo Bunting at the Great Hill. See @BirdCentralPark for this and other New York County bird reports.
--
Deb Allen


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Date: 5/31/24 5:57 am
From: Sameer Apte <sameerapte1...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Black-throated Gray, Kentucky, and Yellow0throated Warblers Heckcher SP, Suffolk County
 

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Date: 5/31/24 4:17 am
From: Tom Fiore <tomfi2...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] N.Y. County, NYC -to 5/30- Blue Grosbeak, Summer Tanager, flycatcher diversity, other migrants, breeding-birds, etc.
It seems highly plausible that a Black-necked Stilt that was seen from the Jamaica Bay area -of Kings and Queens Counties in N.Y. City, in totality- from only the morning of May 26th, and not-again there, is the same individual that then was found at more-northerly and easterly Hammonasset 'Beach' State Park on Long Island Sounds shore, at Madison, -Connecticut- and which bird was still in that latter location over some days to May 30th, additionally seen and photod by many at that latter CT site - as was the seen-in-flight Black-necked Stilt of May 26th over Jamaica Bays waters but with perhaps just one photographer in a kayak in the Kings County NYC -sector- of Jamaica Bay.

. . . .
New York County -in N.Y. City- including Manhattan -with Central Park-, and Randalls, Governors, and Roosevelt Islands and the skies above and nearby waters -
thru Thursday, May 30th -

A female-type Blue Grosbeak and 2 in-flight American Oystercatcher were two of the species found at Randalls Island on May 27th. At Governors Island, more-recent sightings included a variety of flycatcher species with Olive-sided, Alder, and Willow Flycatchers among others, also having been found there in recent days were all of the other expected flycatcher species of the region, some of which are breeding there and some also breeding in other parts of N.Y. County, the regular breeders in some sites including Great Crested Flycatcher, E. Wood-Pewee, and E. Kingbird, and in more-limited sites in this county, also E. Phoebe, as well as the chance for breeding of at-least 2 of the 5 species of Empidonax-genus flycatchers which pass thru each spring and again by early fall, or by the calendar, as soon as late summer. The 2 potential breeders of the county in that latter genus are Willow Flycatcher and Acadian Flycatcher, with the other 3 Empidonax found as migrants here. Also seen again at Governors Island have been some Bobolinks, which are fairly regular there in mid to late May and again by August and into early autumn, typically in modest numbers there.

Back to Randalls Island for the 5-27 sightings of Semipalmated Sandpipers, and in more general terms ongoing sightings of Spotted Sandpipers, as well as Killdeer which latter 2 species are found at multiple sites in the county. Also seen somewhat regularly recently and to May 30th have been Yellow-crowned Night-Herons on Randalls, with more than one per visit seen on some days. With the reports of Cliff Swallow -at least for fly-bys- at Governors Island, we also hope for some potential breeding of that swallow species, again, in the county. Now nesting have been Tree, Barn, and N. Rough-winged Swallows, and there are a small fraction of Bank Swallow sightings for the past week, those on-passage for this county. In a variety of sites around the county, we have ongoing Ravens and some of those are nesting pairs, additional to the very-few more widely-watched ones in Manhattan.

Of overall migrations for the county, while diversity and big numbers of birds have slacked-off in recent days, there is and has been good ongoing movement, and in the county overall, as one example, up to 17 species of migratory American warblers were still to be seen in the county this week, and of those, at least 16 species were found in Central Park, as well as many in multiple other sites all thru the countys multiple islands. The most recent reports of Summer Tanager appear to be from May 26th, at Central Park, however that species could still be around in the county, following a very good month for the species showing in many, many county locations.

Thrush species still passing thru have included even a few very-late Hermit Thrushes, and some Veery, while more common have been Swainsons and also Gray-cheeked Thrushes, the latter more regular in late spring than many - even keen observers - may realize as that latter species is highly adept at lurking in shaded places and in some sites even in ever-so-busy Central Park where they can and do escape most detection, including some areas few to almost-no birders tread and trod. Songs of all of these thrush species are occasionally to even-regularly heard, and that may include hearing in the small hours of mornings and at twilight, also in rainy weather, and for Wood Thrushes which breed, and attempt to breed, in the county, singing in some sites may well mean a nest is not very far away.

The season of nesting is upon us for many birds, and all of our birds should be given every possible respect to allow their breeding successes a fair chance. Please do nothing that could jeopardize any native bird at a nest site or where breeding is a possibility - this is a most-critical time for the continuance of all species, for the places where they have set a territory or sector of whatever habitat has been selected by the birds. Thanks to all quiet and courteous observers and photographers, and for many reports of so many migrant, and some breeding or visiting-here birds.

Good birding to all,

Tom Fiore
manhattan





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Date: 5/30/24 5:16 am
From: Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...>
Subject: Re:[nysbirds-l] Black-throated Gray, Kentucky, and Yellow0throated Warblers Heckcher SP, Suffolk County
On Tuesday 28 May, Mike Vedder found what he was pretty sure was a Kentucky Warbler, singing at Heckscher SP, Suffolk County, Long Island. The bird was not visible, and he was not able to obtain a recording. He called Patricia J. Lindsay, but she was birding Nickerson Beach, Nassau County, and thus unable to follow up the report until the following morning. On Wednesday morning, PJL readily heard the bird singing to the south of the Forty Foot Road, east of the Administration compound and west of where the road bends 90 degrees to the north. She called me, working at home, and I quickly joined her. The bird was singing constantly and nearer to the road now, and we reported this to the local birders as we waited for visual confirmation. Because the bird would sing for extended periods without moving from its perch, seeing it required patience, waiting until one saw it fly to a new perch that happened to be unobstructed by foliage. This accomplished, I turned attention to what sounded like a Yellow-throated Warbler, singing in the vicinity. I was not able to see this bird as it moved around the area, and I heard it last on the north side of the road opposite the Administration compound. We communicated this to our local contacts, including the Captree Birding Fiends (sic) and Keith Klein, and then returned to our nearby home to work.

Arriving a little later, John Gluth and Keith Klein readily found the Kentucky Warbler and turned attention to the YTWA-like song. This individual bird was sonsistently difficult to see as it foraged and sang high in the canopy, but as they sought it, they were astonished to see (and photograph) a male Black-throated Gray Warbler! They got the word out, and I was dragged from my desk for a second time that morning, but not before communicating their amazing discovery to the listserv.

By the time PJL and I arrived on site at 11:47, the Kentuck Warbler had gone silent, but the singer of the YTWA-like song was singing almost constantly, though roving about more widely than a territorial Dendroica typically wouldoften around the corner where the 90 degree bend, two-track to the east, and Horseshoe Trail to the south intersect, but also as far to the southeast as the southern edge of the field east of the two-track. The possibility that this singer and the Black-throated Gray Warbler were the same loomed in our minds, and I was very desirous of seeing the bird, proving this by pursuing the song through the thigh-high grass of the afore-mentioned field when it appeared that the bird might be trending off in that direction. (The net result of this maneuver was continuous contact with the singer and just one adult male Lone Star Tick.)

Fortunately, the singer returned to the area of the 90 degree bend, where John and PJL and I were joined by Pat Palladino. Famously eagle-eyed, both Pats fixed on the singer and helped John and me get on it. We noted that it was in fact the Black-throated Gray Warbler! Singing almost constantly, it was relatively easy for newly arriving birders to track it around the area southeast of the 90 degree bend, but very difficult to see. In the afternoon, it I dont think it ever ranged as far west or north as it had in the morning.

Two notes about Merlin: While we were waiting for views of the Kentucky Warbler in the morning, PJL turned on Merlin to pass the time (my phone is not and never has been allowed to think of such things). Although the app picked up in real time, and correctly identified, the American Redstarts, Yellow Warblers, Red-eyed Vireos, and Gray Catbirds we were hearingand even discerned an almost impossibly distant Eastern Wood-Pewee, it flatly ignored the almost painfully loud songs of the Kentucky Warbler! Not even registering the existence of a bird at the moments it sang. Conversely, during our later stalking of the Black-throated Gray Warbler, Merlin consistently identifed its songs as those of Yellow-throated Warbler. My interpretation of these foibles is that the algorithm has probably been over-tweaked to emphasize geographical location and eBird frequency data (Kentucky Warbler is genuinely rare in Suffolk County, whereas Yellow-throated Warbler occurs here regularly). This sort of AI stupidity would be an understandable consequence of attempts to solve Merlins notorious Philadelphia Vireo Problem, but its worth noting here so that future birders might know the indignities our generation is suffering in the quest for fully automated bird detection.

08:12 am Thursday the 30thjust go the call from PJL that Suzy Feustel has an Olive-sided Flycatcher at Heckscher. Stay Tuned.

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore
________________________________
From: <bounce-128232517-11143133...> <bounce-128232517-11143133...> on behalf of Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 29, 2024 11:33 AM
To: NYSBIRDS (<NYSBIRDS-L...>) <NYSBIRDS-L...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Black-throated Gray, Kentucky, and Yellow0throated Warblers Heckcher SP, Suffolk County

Black-throated Gray, Kentucky, and Yellow-throated Warblers are present this morning at Heckscher SP, Suffolk County. They are in the woods along the Forty Foot Road, east of Field 1 and Admin compound.

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore
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Date: 5/29/24 3:29 pm
From: Patricia Lindsay <gelochelidon...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Birds at Heckscher SP, Suffolk Co.
Those planning to look for the Black-throated Gray and Kentucky Warblers tomorrow should be aware that the park personnel did not want anyone parking on the Forty Foot Road. Park in Field 1 near the admin building and walk east about a quarter mile. Listen for the bird(s) along the road, along the horseshoe trail that makes an arc to the south, or the two track to the east. We definitely want to keep on good terms with the parties.
Good luck if you go.
Patricia Lindsay and Shai Mitra
Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 5/29/24 9:18 am
From: Patricia Lindsay <gelochelidon...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Black throated Gray Warbler Heckscher SP Suffolk Co
We have discovered that the bird singing Yellow th roared Warbler song is actually the Black throated Gray. Still present and singing along the two track on east side of Forty Foot Rd

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Date: 5/29/24 8:33 am
From: Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Black-throated Gray, Kentucky, and Yellow0throated Warblers Heckcher SP, Suffolk County
Black-throated Gray, Kentucky, and Yellow-throated Warblers are present this morning at Heckscher SP, Suffolk County. They are in the woods along the Forty Foot Road, east of Field 1 and Admin compound.

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore

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Date: 5/28/24 9:36 am
From: Andrew Block <ablock22168...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Montezuma birds and others goodies
5/26/24 - Montezuma N.W.R. complex, Savannah/Tyre/Montezuma/Seneca Falls, NY
Observers: Andrew BlockTime: 9:15 to 530pm
many Canada Geese1 Mute Swan5 Trumpeter Swans (1 crippled; Sandhill Crane Unit, Main Pool, May's Pt. Pool) several Wood Ducks2 Gadwallsmany Mallards3 Redheads1 Northern Pintailmany Pied-billed Grebes4 Mourning Doves1 Sora3+ American Cootsmany Common Gallinules7 Sandhill Cranes (LaRue's Lagoon, Sandhill Crane Unit, Tschache Pool) 1 Killdeer10+ Caspian Ternsseveral Black Terns7+ Double-crested Cormorants4 American Bitternsmany Great Blue Herons1 Great Egret2 Black-crowned Night-Herons3 Turkey Vultures2 Ospreys3 Bald Eagles2 Red-tailed Hawks2 Red-bellied Woodpeckers4 Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers1 Downy Woodpecker3 Northern Flickers1 Pileated Woodpecker1 Eastern Kingbird2 Great Crested Flycatchers2 Eastern Wood-Pewees2 Alder Flycatchersseveral Willow Flycatchers2 Least Flycatchers3+ Red-eyed Vireos4 Warbling Vireos7+ American Crowsmany Tree Swallowsseveral Barn Swallowsseveral Purple Martinsseveral Bank Swallowsseveral Cedar Waxwings1 House Wrenmany Marsh Wrens1 Carolina Wren5 Gray Catbirdsmany European Starlings1 Eastern Bluebird4 American Robins3 House Sparrows3 American Goldfinches5+ Chipping Sparrows4 Song Sparrows1 Baltimore Oriolemany Red-winged Blackbirds6 Common Grackles1 Ovenbird5+ Common Yellowthroats3+ American Redstarts3 Cerulean Warblers6 Yellow Warblers2 Northern Cardinals1 Indigo Bunting
Also had an American Mink, Snapping Turtle, 30+ huge Common Carps, Midland Painted Turtles, and several leps and dragonflies.
Andrew
Andrew BlockConsulting Naturalist
Yonkers, New York www.flickr.com/photos/conuropsis/albums
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Date: 5/27/24 11:16 am
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Central Park, NYC, Mon. May 27, 2024: Blackburnian, Chestnut-sided and Other Wood Warblers
Central Park, NYC
Monday May 27, 2024
OBS: Robert DeCandidoPhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob.

Memorial Day Highlights: Blackburnian, Chestnut-sided and Other Wood Warblers.


Canada Goose - 6
Mallard - 15-16 including a hen and ducklings on Turtle Pond
Mourning Dove - 50-60
Chimney Swift - 4-6
Herring Gull - 3 flyovers
Double-crested Cormorant - 4-6
Black-crowned Night-Heron - 3 (2 adults, 1 second-year)
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3
Downy Woodpecker - 1 female Shakespeare Garden
Great Crested Flycatcher - pair in the Ramble
Eastern Kingbird - 1 Belvedere Castle (one of the pair nesting at Turtle Pond)
Warbling Vireo - 3 or 4
Red-eyed Vireo - 8-10
Blue Jay - 3 or 4
Tufted Titmouse - 1 Ramble
Cedar Waxwing - 15-20
Gray Catbird - 5-7
Wood Thrush - 3
American Robin - 20-25
House Finch - 8-10
Baltimore Oriole - 2 or 3
Red-winged Blackbird - 5 or 6
Common Grackle - 5-10
American Redstart - 5 or 6
Northern Parula - 2 (Humming Tombstone, Strawberry Fields)
Magnolia Warbler - 4 or 5
Blackburnian Warbler - 1 female Strawberry Fields
Yellow Warbler - 1 female Belvedere Castle (Bob and Deb - early)
Chestnut-sided Warbler - 1 Belvedere Castle (Bob and Deb - early)
Blackpoll Warbler - 3
Northern Cardinal - 4 or 5

--

Deb Allen




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Date: 5/27/24 9:02 am
From: Tom Fiore <tomfi2...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Central Park, NYC -Sunday, May 26- 18+ Warbler spp., Yellow-bellied Flycatchers, etc.
Central Park, Manhattan, N.Y. City -
Sunday, May 26th -

Again on Sunday, Central Park had at least 18 species of migratory American warblers, as found by a great many observers, zero of them reporting any sightings as -early- as a euphemism. Some species were much diminished in numbers from some peak days earlier in this month, yet a few species of the warblers continued to show in double-digits for the park on Sunday. At least several Yellow-bellied Flycatchers were among the Empidonax-genus of flycatchers seen and carefully identified by multiple observers. This included that last species of Empidonax within the Ramble area of the park Sunday, and also seen by multiple observers in the Ramble area was Gray-cheeked Thrush, again carefully identified eliminating the possible Bicknells from the choices amongst migrating Catharus-genus thrushes, on Sunday.

Thanks to quiet, courteous observers and photographers for many reliable identifications, made with care, including birds pointed out by leaders of not-for-profit guided bird walks done near-daily in this park for the migration seasons, offered by such organizations as the NYC Bird Alliance, the Linnaean Society of New York, the American Museum of Natural History, and multiple other non-profit organizations working for the advancement of conservation and science in the best interests of the birds, and for education in and of our natural world.

Good birding,

Tom Fiore
manhattan






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Date: 5/26/24 1:49 pm
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC, Sun. May 26, 2024: Gray-cheeked/Bicknell's Thrush, Blackburnian, black-throated Green and Other Warblers
Central Park NYC
Sunday May 26, 2024
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob.

Highlights: Gray-cheeked/Bicknell's Thrush, Blackburnian, Black-throated Green and other Wood Warblers.

Canada Goose - 6
Mallard - 10
Mourning Dove - 50-60
Chimney Swift - 5-10
Herring Gull - 10-15
Great Black-backed Gull - 1 Reservoir (Deb - 7am)
Double-crested Cormorant - 12-15
Black-crowned Night-Heron - 1 flyover Turtle Pond
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 4
Downy Woodpecker - 3
Northern Flicker - 3 or 4
Great Crested Flycatcher - pair Tupelo Field
Eastern Kingbird - 1 female Belvedere Castle
Eastern Wood-Pewee - 2 or 3
Warbler Vireo - 4
Red-eyed Vireo - 10-12
Blue Jay - 4 or 5
American Crow - 1 flyover
Tufted Titmouse - 1 Balancing Rock
Cedar Waxwing - 15-20
House Wren - 1 Swedish Cottage
Gray Catbird - 8-10
Gray-cheeked/Bicknell's Thrush - 1 Azalea Pond
Wood Thrush - 3
American Robin - 30-40
House Finch - 10-15 including adults feeding juveniles
White-throated Sparrow - 2 Ramble
Baltimore Oriole - 1 male south of Maintenance Field
Red-winged Blackbird - 6-8
Common Grackle - 5-10
Ovenbird - 1 Azalea Pond (Bob - early)
Common Yellowthroat - 1 King of Poland
American Redstart - 6-8
Magnolia Warbler - 3
Blackburnian Warbler - 3 (2 males, 1 female)
Yellow Warbler - 1 female east side of Turtle Pond
Chestnut-sided Warbler - 3
Blackpoll Warbler - 5 or 6
Black-throated Green Warbler - 1 female east side of Turtle Pond
Northern Cardinal - 6-8

--

Deb Allen


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Date: 5/26/24 9:19 am
From: Andrew Block <ablock22168...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Trumpeter swans at Montezuma
Another nice bird at Montezuma New for me were four trumpeter swans.  Two in main pool and two in May's point pool.
Andrew Block Yonkers new York 

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Date: 5/26/24 8:57 am
From: Andrew Block <ablock22168...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] More cranes at Montezuma
Just had two more Sandhill cranes here at Montezuma in tschache pool.
Andrew Block Yonkers new York 

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Date: 5/26/24 7:13 am
From: Andrew Block <ablock22168...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Cranes at montezuma
Probably nothing special but a first for me.  A pair of Sandhill cranes are being seen now at the LaRue lagoon on the east side of the wildlife drive.
Andrew Block Yonkers new york



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Date: 5/26/24 6:56 am
From: Joshua Malbin <joshuamalbin...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Black-necked Stilt, Jamaica Bay
While out kayak birding Ruffle Bar in Jamaica Bay, Louis DeMarco and I just
had a Black-necked Stilt fly off in the direction of West Pond. Worth
checking there and East Pond, most likely.

Good birding,

Joshua Malbin

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Date: 5/25/24 5:26 pm
From: Tom Fiore <tomfi2...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Central Park, NYC - Sat., 5/25 - 18+ Warbler spp, both Cuckoo spp, many more migrants
A highlight bird for the county even when seen - and photographed - by a sole observer, is the probable first -photo-documented- of its species for New York County, a Tricolored Heron, seen on May 25th and nicely photod in flight, as it passed over Randalls Island and reported by A. Cunningham, one of a modest number of birding regulars at all seasons to that island location in recent years. A photo set of that heron is now archived in the Macaulay Library, via the eBird report of same.

...
Central Park, Manhattan, N.Y. City -
Saturday, May 25th -

At least 18 species of migratory American warblers were found in the park on the day, with an approximation of order of abundances per species shown just below in a list of those warblers. Yellow-billed and Black-billed Cuckoos were seen again, as both have been over the recent weeks of this month at this park, and elsewhere in N.Y. County.

Warblers in a rough listing of abundances for Saturday at Central Park -

American Redstart, Blackpoll, Yellow, Magnolia, Bay-breasted, Tennessee, Black-throated Blue, Canada, Ovenbird, Chestnut-sided, Northern Parula, Blackburnian, Wilsons, Northern Waterthrush, Black-and-white, Blue-winged, Black-throated Green, and last-listed but hardly least of the many sightings from far more than 200 total observers over the entirety of the park and thru all of the day, Mourning Warbler.

Many of the warblers are and recently have been females, quieter and not quite as colorful to stand out in all the lush, dense foliage of the final weekend of the month. There certainly might have also been a few additional species of other warblers still working thru for the day, and not noted above.

The entire range of expected Empidonax-genus flycatchers were being found, some only calling rather than giving what passes for sping-territorial songs, and some as is typical here mostly-silent. Among most vocal in recent days have been the multiple Acadian Flycatchers within all of Central Park, for which any pairs of the latter ought to be watched, if lingering long as a pair in the park, or anywhere in the county.

Many more migrants are continuing to pass through. Thanks to all of the quiet, keen, courteous birders, including a number of bird walk leaders on not-for-profit guided walks, and also many independent observers and photographers not with organized group walks, for so many good sightings.

Good birding,

Tom Fiore
manhattan



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Date: 5/25/24 1:09 pm
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC, Sat. May 15, 2024: Black-billed Cuckoo, Acadian Flycatcher, 8 Species of Wood Warblers
Central Park NYC
Saturday May 15, 2024
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob.

Highlights: Black-billed Cuckoo, Acadian Flycatcher, 8 Species of Wood Warblers.

Canada Goose - 20
Brant - flyover flock of 200+ birds (Deb - 6:15am)
Gadwall - 1 male Reservoir (Deb - 6am)
Mallard - 20
Mourning Dove - 50-60
Black-billed Cuckoo - 1 Top of the Point and Azalea Pond
Chimney Swift - 7-10
Herring Gull - 25
Great Black-backed Gull - 1 Reservoir (Deb - early)
Double-crested Cormorant - 20-25
Red-tailed Hawk - 2 perched over Central Park West (David Barrett)
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2 or 3
Downy Woodpecker - 2 Ramble
Northern Flicker - 1 Ramble
Great Crested Flycatcher - 1 Ramble
Eastern Wood-Pewee - 3 or 4
Acadian Flycatcher - 1 calling at Humming Tombstone
Warbling Vireo - 2-4
Red-eyed Vireo - 6-8
Blue Jay - 5-7
Tufted Titmouse - 1 Evodia Field near feeders
Barn Swallow - 3
Cedar Waxwing - 25-35 (a few flocks)
Gray Catbird - 6-8
Wood Thrush - 3
American Robin - 40-50
House Finch - 3
White-throated Sparrow - 1 Laupot Bridge
Song Sparrow - 1 singing north end Reservoir (Deb - early)
Baltimore Oriole - 3 or 4
Red-winged Blackbird - 6-8
Common Grackle - 10-15
American Redstart - 6-8
Magnolia Warbler - 3
Yellow Warbler - 1 female King of Poland
Chestnut-sided Warbler - 1 south side Turtle Pond
Blackpoll Warbler - 3
Black-throated Blue Warbler - 1 male Gill Overlook
Black-throated Green Warbler - 1 male Azalea Pond (Cliff)
Canada Warbler - 1 male Evodia Field (Caren Jahre)
Northern Cardinal - 6-8

--

Deb Allen



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Date: 5/25/24 1:53 am
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] NYC Area RBA: 24 May 2024
- RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* May. 24, 2024
* NYNY2405.24

- Birds mentioned
ARCTIC TERN+
SANDWICH TERN+
PACIFIC LOON+
MISSISSIPPI KITE+
BICKNELL'S THRUSH+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

Common Eider
HARLEQUIN DUCK
CHUCK-WILL'S-WIDOW
AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVER
Whimbrel
White-rumped Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper
RED-NECKED PHALAROPE
GULL-BILLED TERN
CASPIAN TERN
Roseate Tern
Royal Tern
Common Loon
Red-headed Woodpecker
Olive-sided Flycatcher
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
Acadian Flycatcher
Alder Flycatcher
Philadelphia Vireo
Gray-cheeked Thrush
Mourning Warbler
KENTUCKY WARBLER
YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER
SUMMER TANAGER
BLUE GROSBEAK

- Transcript

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report
electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at
http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to nysarc44
(at)nybirds{dot}org.

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or
sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compiler: Tom Burke
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Ben Cacace

BEGIN TAPE

Greetings. This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for *Friday, May 24th, 2024*
at 11 pm. The highlights of today's tape are SANDWICH and ARCTIC TERNS,
PACIFIC LOON, MISSISSIPPI KITE, CHUCK-WILL'S-WIDOW, RED-NECKED PHALAROPE
and AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVER, HARLEQUIN DUCK, GULL-BILLED and CASPIAN TERNS,
YELLOW-THROATED and KENTUCKY WARBLERS, SUMMER TANAGER, BLUE GROSBEAK and
more.

With migration winding down and overall numbers continuing to be on the low
side some terns are now showing up to make things more interesting. This
morning at Nickerson Beach and Lido Beach an adult SANDWICH TERN paid a
brief visit to the eastern Black Skimmer and Common Tern nesting area
before moving on. Other terns occurring there include ROSEATE and
GULL-BILLED with two early ROYAL TERNS reported Tuesday. Nickerson has in
recent Springs been a good location to search for ARCTIC TERNS with the
only reports so far this Spring has been an adult photographed last Sunday
at Plumb Beach in Brooklyn.

A surprise last Saturday was a PACIFIC LOON photographed as it flew by
Randall's Island as part of a small COMMON LOON flight.

MISSISSIPPI KITES appeared this week over three NYC parks. The first a
subadult spotted over Brooklyn's Prospect Park Monday evening followed
shortly thereafter by presumably the same one over nearby Green-wood
Cemetery and then one occurred Thursday over Forest Park in Queens.

Rather unexpected was a CHUCK-WILL'S-WIDOW recorded singing for a short
while last Monday evening at Hilltop Hanover Farm and Environmental Center
in Yorktown Heights one of very few Westchester records.

A variety of interesting birds at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge have included
a nicely plumaged RED-NECKED PHALAROPE around the south end of the West
Pond from Monday through today. With other shorebirds there including 2
WHIMBREL out on the bay Sunday as well as WHITE-RUMPED and PECTORAL
SANDPIPERS also present on the West Pond today. GULL-BILLED and CASPIAN
TERNS have been reported there recently while a female COMMON EIDER was
still there last Sunday with a female HARLEQUIN DUCK continuing off Sunset
Cove Park just south of the refuge at least to Wednesday. A lingering
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was also seen in the South Garden today.

Breeding plumaged AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVER was photographed at the Lido Beach
Passive Nature Area last Monday.

Among the flycatchers a few OLIVE-SIDED include one at Strack Pond at the
west end of Forest Park Saturday and one at Green-wood Cemetery Wednesday.
Some currently migrating species including ACADIAN, ALDER and
YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHERS, BICKNELL'S and GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSHES and
PHILADELPHIA VIREO can require extra scrutiny to ensure proper
identification.

A KENTUCKY WARBLER lingered on Governors Island from Saturday at least
through Wednesday and YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER continues at the Bayard
Cutting Arboretum in Great River while MOURNING WARBLERS have been found in
several parks.

A few SUMMER TANAGERS include birds in Central Park last week and Forest
Park Wednesday and Planting Fields Arboretum in Oyster Bay Thursday and a
BLUE GROSBEAK was at Green-wood Cemetery last Saturday others continuing
out around Calverton.

To phone in reports, call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the
National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript

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Back to top
Date: 5/24/24 7:37 am
From: Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Sandwich Tern Nickerson Beach
Patricia Lindsay reports that she and others just observed a breeding-plumaged Sandwich Tern at Nickerson Beach, Nassau County. The bird landed briefly and then flew off, but people are continuing to watch the loafing flocks.

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore

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