NYSbirds-L
Received From Subject
6/18/18 5:28 pm Steve Walter <swalter15...> RE: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
6/18/18 5:21 pm peter paul <pepaul...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
6/18/18 5:01 pm Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...> RE: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
6/18/18 4:57 pm Timothy Healy <tph56...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
6/18/18 4:41 pm Andrew Baksh <birdingdude...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
6/18/18 4:32 pm Pat Aitken <aitkenpatricia...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
6/18/18 4:28 pm Timothy Healy <tph56...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
6/18/18 4:27 pm Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...> RE: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
6/18/18 4:15 pm Steve Walter <swalter15...> RE: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
6/18/18 3:49 pm Timothy Healy <tph56...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
6/18/18 3:05 pm Steve Walter <swalter15...> [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
6/18/18 1:53 pm Dennis Hrehowsik <deepseagangster...> [nysbirds-l] Reminder: BBC Talk Tomorrow, VULTURE: THE PRIVATE LIFE OF AN UNLOVED BIRD
6/18/18 1:17 pm Joseph Brin <brinjoseph...> [nysbirds-l] Syracuse RBA
6/18/18 6:40 am Nancy Tognan <nancy.tognan...> [nysbirds-l] "Vulture" - a Queens County Bird Club presentation this Weds. June 20
6/18/18 4:58 am <suefeustel...> [nysbirds-l] Cattle Egret at Timber Point/No (Suffolk Count)
6/17/18 6:58 pm Andrew Block <ablock22168...> [nysbirds-l] Liberty Loop Trail, Wallkill River NWR
6/17/18 6:46 pm Andrew Block <ablock22168...> [nysbirds-l] N. Rough-winged Swallow nest
6/17/18 4:32 pm Matthew Wills <matthewwills...> [nysbirds-l] Kestrels in Brooklyn
6/17/18 3:58 pm Deborah Allen <dallenyc...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Sun. June 17, 2018 - Black-billed Cuckoo, N. Parula, & Nesting Birds
6/17/18 5:45 am John Gluth <jgluth...> Re:[nysbirds-l] CATTLE EGRET - Timberpoint golf course (Suffolk Co.)
6/17/18 5:36 am John Gluth <jgluth...> [nysbirds-l] CATTLE EGRET - Timberpoint golf course (Suffolk Co.)
6/17/18 3:18 am Timothy Healy <tph56...> [nysbirds-l] Arctic Tern, Nickerson Beach, Nassau
6/16/18 4:08 pm kevin rogers <kev31317...> [nysbirds-l] 2 Royal Terns nickerson beach
6/16/18 3:20 pm Karen Fung <easternbluebird...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Henslows Sparrow redux: Shawangunk Grasslands, NWR (Ulster County)
6/16/18 9:02 am clay spencer <cfmspencer...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Shawangunk Grasslands NWR Trail closing
6/16/18 8:14 am Patricia Lindsay <pjlindsay...> [nysbirds-l] Arctic Tern Nickerson Beach, Nassau Co.
6/16/18 6:59 am Curt McDermott <tele-tek...> [nysbirds-l] Shawangunk Grasslands NWR Trail closing
6/16/18 6:49 am Colleen Veltri <cfinneganv...> [nysbirds-l] Lesser Black Back Gull
6/15/18 9:42 pm Gail Benson <gbensonny...> [nysbirds-l] NYC Area RBA: 15 June 2018
6/15/18 8:40 pm Robert Lewis <rfermat...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach - Terns
6/15/18 6:08 pm peter paul <pepaul...> [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach - Terns
6/15/18 4:16 pm Ken F <feustel...> [nysbirds-l] Cupsogue Beach County Park Birds (Suffolk Co.)
6/15/18 2:26 pm robert adamo <radamo4691...> [nysbirds-l] Mecox Bay today - Black & Roseate Terns
6/15/18 12:53 pm Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
6/15/18 12:33 pm Thomas Fiore <tomfi2...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park & Manhattan, NYC 6/9-15 - migrants, lingerers, & etc.
6/15/18 12:12 pm Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...> RE: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
6/15/18 11:46 am JOHN TURNER <redknot...> RE: [nysbirds-l] Henslows Sparrow redux: Shawangunk Grasslands, NWR (Ulster County)
6/15/18 11:23 am Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...> RE: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
6/15/18 11:11 am Deborah Allen <dallenyc...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Fri., June 15, 2018 - 4 Species of Wood Warblers
6/15/18 10:32 am Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
6/15/18 8:45 am Robert Lewis <rfermat...> Re: RE: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
6/15/18 6:45 am Pepaul <pepaul...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
6/14/18 5:51 pm Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
6/14/18 4:52 pm <rcech...> RE: [nysbirds-l] Henslows Sparrow redux: Shawangunk Grasslands, NWR (Ulster County)
6/14/18 3:58 pm Peg Hart <sshearwater...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
6/14/18 11:46 am Karen Fung <easternbluebird...> [nysbirds-l] Henslows Sparrow redux: Shawangunk Grasslands, NWR (Ulster County)
6/14/18 10:31 am Grover, Bob <rgrover...> RE: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
6/14/18 8:59 am Greg Lawrence <glawrence21...> [nysbirds-l] 2018 New York State Ornithological Association Annual Meeting and Birders Conference Announcement
6/14/18 8:36 am Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
6/14/18 8:05 am Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
6/14/18 7:50 am Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...> RE: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
6/14/18 7:46 am Robert Lewis <rfermat...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
6/14/18 6:08 am Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
6/14/18 4:59 am Robert Lewis <rfermat...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
6/13/18 6:01 pm Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...> [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
6/13/18 3:30 pm Robert Lewis <rfermat...> [nysbirds-l] Possible Common Tern of race longipennis at Nickerson Beach, Nassau County
6/13/18 3:25 pm Mike McBrien <mcb3mb...> [nysbirds-l] Siberian Common Tern candidates - Nickerson Beach, Nassau Co. 6/12-13
6/13/18 2:03 pm Andrew Baksh <birdingdude...> [nysbirds-l] Arctic and Sandwich Tern @ Breezy Point Queens NYC
6/13/18 7:31 am Robert Lewis <rfermat...> [nysbirds-l] Arctic Terns, Long Island
6/13/18 5:46 am Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...> RE: [nysbirds-l] Breezy Point Queens
6/13/18 5:42 am Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...> RE: [nysbirds-l] Breezy Point Queens
6/13/18 5:08 am Dennis Hrehowsik <deepseagangster...> [nysbirds-l] Brooklyn Bird Club Evening Presentation: VULTURE: THE PRIVATE LIFE OF AN UNLOVED BIRD
6/13/18 2:14 am peter paul <pepaul...> [nysbirds-l] Breezy Point Queens
6/12/18 5:05 pm Andrew Baksh <birdingdude...> [nysbirds-l] Breezy Point 6-11
6/12/18 8:01 am Gus Keri <guskeri...> [nysbirds-l] Tricolor Heron
6/11/18 9:11 pm robert adamo <radamo4691...> [nysbirds-l] Roanoke Ave Elementary School Turkey Vulture Roost, Riverhead
6/11/18 2:53 pm Deborah Allen <dallenyc...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Mon., June 11, 2018 - Magnolia Warbler, America Redstart & Peregrine Falcon Update
6/11/18 1:43 pm Sean Sime <sean...> [nysbirds-l] Black Tern at Breezy Point: Queens County
6/11/18 11:34 am Joseph Brin <brinjoseph...> [nysbirds-l] Syracuse RBA
6/11/18 7:48 am Robert Lewis <rfermat...> [nysbirds-l] RFI: Places close to Nickerson Beach
6/11/18 5:34 am Long Island Birding <michaelzito...> [nysbirds-l] 5 Roseate Terns - Nickerson Beach
6/10/18 3:06 pm Ben Cacace <bcacace...> [nysbirds-l] eBird.org: Recent Additions to County Checklists
6/10/18 1:34 pm Deborah Allen <dallenyc...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Sun., June 10, 2018 - Ovenbird, Northern Parula, Opsrey, Great Crested Flycatchers
6/10/18 8:11 am Dave Medd <dmedd906...> [nysbirds-l] GWWA Muscoot Farms Westchester
6/10/18 7:25 am Patricia Lindsay <pjlindsay...> [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach, Nassau Co. this morning
6/10/18 2:46 am Andrew Baksh <birdingdude...> [nysbirds-l] Arctic Tern ++ @ Cupsogue LI
6/9/18 3:25 pm Ryan Candee <ryanacandee...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Bryant Park Northern Waterthrush etc continue
6/9/18 2:47 pm Deborah Allen <dallenyc...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Sat., June 9, 2018 - American Redstart, Yellow Warbler, Yellow-billed Cuckoo, & Nesting Birds
6/9/18 1:27 pm Long Island Birding <michaelzito...> [nysbirds-l] QCBC Nickerson Beach Trip Report
6/9/18 10:39 am Sy Schiff <icterus...> [nysbirds-l] Marine Nature Study Area, Oceanside
6/9/18 8:30 am Anthony Collerton <icollerton...> [nysbirds-l] Sandwich Tern - Dune Road, Suffolk County
6/9/18 6:37 am <hobbesmom4ever...> <hobbesmom4ever...> [nysbirds-l] Tricolor Heron on Dune Rd.
6/9/18 5:45 am Ben Cacace <bcacace...> [nysbirds-l] NYC Area RBA: 8 June 2018
6/9/18 5:17 am Joseph Wallace <joew701...> Re:[nysbirds-l] Bryant Park Northern Waterthrush etc continue
6/8/18 6:50 pm Angus Wilson <oceanwanderers...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Bryant Park Northern Waterthrush etc continue
6/8/18 4:11 pm Joseph Wallace <joew701...> [nysbirds-l] Bryant Park Northern Waterthrush etc continue
6/8/18 2:29 pm Andrew Block <ablock22168...> [nysbirds-l] turkey on car in scasdale
6/8/18 2:03 pm Steve Walter <swalter15...> [nysbirds-l] Brown Pelican at Nickerson Beach
6/8/18 11:24 am Deborah Allen <dallenyc...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park (North End), NYC - Fri., June 8, 2018 - 5 Species of Wood Warblers
6/8/18 7:16 am Thomas Fiore <tomfi2...> [nysbirds-l] Manhattan, N.Y. City; 10+ prior days of migration & nesting activity to 6/8
6/8/18 6:13 am Long Island Birding <michaelzito...> Re:[nysbirds-l] Black Tern - Nickerson Beach
6/8/18 6:09 am Colleen Veltri <cfinneganv...> [nysbirds-l] Cliff Swallows
6/8/18 6:02 am Robert Lewis <rfermat...> [nysbirds-l] Roseate Terns, Nickerson Beach, yesterday June 7
6/8/18 5:36 am Long Island Birding <michaelzito...> [nysbirds-l] Black Tern - Nickerson Beach
6/8/18 3:34 am peter paul <pepaul...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach - Possible Common Tern (longipennis) Species - Comments and thoughts welcome
6/7/18 6:40 pm Long Island Birding <michaelzito...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach - Possible Common Tern (longipennis) Species - Comments and thoughts welcome
6/7/18 6:09 pm Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...> RE: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach - Possible Common Tern (longipennis) Species - Comments and thoughts welcome
6/7/18 5:30 pm Felipe Pimentel <fpimentel...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Brewster's Warbler
6/7/18 5:08 pm Long Island Birding <michaelzito...> [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach - Possible Common Tern (longipennis) Species - Comments and thoughts welcome
6/7/18 12:34 pm Deborah Allen <dallenyc...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Thu., June 7, 2018 - 4 Species of Wood Warblers, Cedar Waxwings nesting 2 Locations
6/7/18 6:26 am Robert Lewis <rfermat...> [nysbirds-l] Nickerson beach roseates
6/6/18 4:46 pm Joan Collins <joan.collins...> [nysbirds-l] Adirondack Birding Festival Keynote Speaker: Chris Rimmer
6/6/18 3:24 pm Long Island Birding <michaelzito...> Re:[nysbirds-l] [ebirdsnyc] Roseate Terns and Gull-billed Terns, Nickerson Beach
6/6/18 3:20 pm Robert Lewis <rfermat...> Re:[nysbirds-l] [ebirdsnyc] Roseate Terns and Gull-billed Terns, Nickerson Beach
6/6/18 9:34 am Josh Cantor <joshcantor98...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Arctic Tern at Nickerson Beach (Nassau Co.)
6/6/18 8:50 am Martin Carney <carneym...> [nysbirds-l] Brewster's Warbler
6/6/18 7:40 am Ken Feustel <feustel...> [nysbirds-l] Arctic Tern at Nickerson Beach (Nassau Co.)
6/5/18 7:19 pm Robert Lewis <rfermat...> Re:[nysbirds-l] Terns at Nickerson Beach this morning: update
6/5/18 4:14 pm Mardi Dickinson <mardi1d...> [nysbirds-l] Sheri Williamson Hummingbirds - BirdCallsRadio
6/5/18 12:32 pm Robert Lewis <rfermat...> [nysbirds-l] Roseate Tern at Nickerson Beach this morning
6/5/18 9:34 am Jean Sparacin <jsparacin...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Muscoot Farm, Westchester: Red-Hooded Woodpecker & Hooded Warblers
6/5/18 5:34 am John Gluth <jgluth...> [nysbirds-l] Heckscher Park (Suffolk) Wilson’s Phalarope — NO
6/4/18 12:59 pm Joseph Brin <brinjoseph...> [nysbirds-l] Syracuse RBA
6/4/18 10:25 am Pat Aitken <aitkenpatricia...> [nysbirds-l] Wilson's phalatope yes
6/4/18 9:55 am Michael Higgiston <mikehigg...> [nysbirds-l] Phalarope
6/4/18 9:14 am Anne Swaim <anneswaim...> [nysbirds-l] Muscoot Farm, Westchester: Red-Hooded Woodpecker & Hooded Warblers
6/4/18 6:12 am Patricia Lindsay <pjlindsay...> [nysbirds-l] Wilson's Phalarope Heckscher SP Suffolk Co.
6/3/18 7:13 pm Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...> [nysbirds-l] Arctic Terns on the south shore of Long Island.
6/3/18 3:21 pm Deborah Allen <dallenyc...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Sun., June 3, 2018 - American Redstarts & Magnolia Warblers, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
6/3/18 12:36 pm Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...> RE: [nysbirds-l] Strong Sooty Shearwater flight, Cupsogue, Suffolk
6/3/18 5:34 am Patricia Lindsay <pjlindsay...> [nysbirds-l] Strong Sooty Shearwater flight, Cupsogue, Suffolk
6/2/18 7:32 pm Joseph Wallace <joew701...> [nysbirds-l] Bryant Park Waterthrush
6/2/18 2:15 pm Ben Cacace <bcacace...> [nysbirds-l] NYS eBird Hotspots: State, Counties & Locations Updated (Jun/'18)
6/2/18 1:46 pm Deborah Allen <dallenyc...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Sat., June 2, 2018 - 6 Species of Wood Warblers, Olive-sided & Yellow-bellied Flycatchers
6/2/18 11:13 am Robert Lewis <rfermat...> [nysbirds-l] Arctic Terns on the south shore of Long Island.
6/2/18 11:01 am BOB WASHBURN <nyc_bob...> [nysbirds-l] Henslow's Sparrow Continues at Shawangunk Grasslands NWR, Ulster Co.
6/1/18 8:51 pm Gail Benson <gbensonny...> [nysbirds-l] NYC Area RBA: 01 June 2018
5/31/18 5:51 pm David Suggs <dsuggs...> [nysbirds-l] RBA Buffalo Bird Report 31 May 2018
5/31/18 5:26 pm Deborah Allen <dallenyc...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Thurs., May 31, 2018 - Blackpoll & Northern Parula Warblers, Green Heron, nesting E. Kingbirds
5/31/18 4:08 pm Karen Fung <easternbluebird...> [nysbirds-l] Henslow's Sparrow at Shawangunk Grasslands NWR: comparison of audiograms
5/30/18 9:30 pm Joe DiCostanzo <jdicost...> [nysbirds-l] Henslow's Sparrow at Shawangunk Grasslands NWR, Ulster Co. 05/30/2018
5/30/18 4:56 pm Arie Gilbert <ArieGilbert...> [nysbirds-l] Re: [nysbirds-l] Henslow’s Sparrow at Shawangunk Grasslands, Ulster Co.
5/30/18 2:56 pm Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...> [nysbirds-l] Henslow’s Sparrow at Shawangunk Grasslands, Ulster Co.
5/30/18 12:12 pm Robert Lewis <rfermat...> [nysbirds-l] Golden-winged Warblers at Ironwood Road
5/29/18 6:02 pm Pat Martin <emartin139...> Re:[nysbirds-l] [cayugabirds-l] Montezuma Today May 29th, 2018- Red Knot, Red-Necked Phalarope
5/29/18 5:46 pm David Nicosia <daven102468...> [nysbirds-l] Montezuma Today May 29th, 2018- Red Knot, Red-Necked Phalarope
5/29/18 3:07 pm kevin rogers <kev31317...> [nysbirds-l] Roseate Tern Nickerson Beach
5/29/18 2:58 pm Mardi Dickinson <mardi1d...> [nysbirds-l] David Toews Ph.D., Warbler Hybrids & Genomics - BirdCallsRadio
5/29/18 12:23 pm Steve Walter <swalter15...> [nysbirds-l] Forest Park Prothonotary Warbler
5/29/18 3:15 am Ken F <feustel...> [nysbirds-l] Chuck-will's-widows on South Country Road, Quogue (Suffolk Co.)
5/28/18 5:08 pm Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...> [nysbirds-l] Pacific Loon and Black(-ish) Brant, Nassau County, LI
5/28/18 2:35 pm Deborah Allen <dallenyc...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Mon., May 28, 2018 - 11 Species of Wood Warblers & Ruby-throated Hummingbird
5/28/18 12:18 pm Ben Cacace <bcacace...> [nysbirds-l] eBird.org: Recent Additions to County Checklists
5/28/18 10:53 am Sy Schiff <icterus...> [nysbirds-l] Another possible kite
5/28/18 10:02 am Andrew Block <ablock22168...> [nysbirds-l] Kites everywhere!
5/28/18 7:43 am Timothy Healy <tph56...> [nysbirds-l] Mississippi Kite, Hempstead Lake State Park, Nassau
5/27/18 5:25 am Thomas Robben <robben99...> [nysbirds-l] openings for June 3rd pelagic trip from Gloucester MA
5/26/18 3:34 pm Deborah Allen <dallenyc...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Sat., May 26, 2018 - 8 Species of Wood Warblers, Blue-gray Gnatctcher, Ruby-throated Hummingbird
5/26/18 2:58 pm Andrew Block <ablock22168...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Mississippi Kite, East Hampton
5/26/18 2:45 pm Anthony Collerton <icollerton...> [nysbirds-l] Mississippi Kite, East Hampton
5/26/18 11:39 am Steve Walter <swalter15...> [nysbirds-l] Forest Park Summer Tanager, Mourning Warbler
5/26/18 5:52 am Jose Ramirez-Garofalo <jose.ramirez.garofalo...> [nysbirds-l] Red-necked Phalarope - Breezy Pt
5/25/18 9:13 pm Gail Benson <gbensonny...> [nysbirds-l] NYC Area RBA: 25 May 2018
5/25/18 12:43 pm Deborah Allen <dallenyc...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Fri., May 25, 2018 - 10 Species of Wood Warblers at the North End
5/25/18 10:20 am Ken Feustel <feustel...> [nysbirds-l] Pileated Woodpecker at Caumsett State Park (Suffolk Co.)
5/25/18 8:18 am Deborah Allen <dallenyc...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Thu., May 24, 2018 - 12 Species of Wood Warblers incl. Mourning Warbler
5/24/18 5:13 pm Peter Reisfeld <drpinky...> [nysbirds-l] Doodletown Road, Bear Mountain
5/24/18 10:16 am Colleen Veltri <cfinneganv...> [nysbirds-l] Tri-colored Hero
5/24/18 7:40 am matt klein <matt.klein...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Ruff - No
5/24/18 7:35 am Purbita <bitasaha...> RE: [nysbirds-l] Ruff at Heckscher Park - NO (Suffolk Co.)
5/24/18 7:13 am Larry Trachtenberg <Trachtenberg...> RE: [nysbirds-l] Ruff at Heckscher Park - NO (Suffolk Co.)
5/24/18 6:50 am Robert Lewis <rfermat...> Re: RE: [nysbirds-l] Ruff at Heckscher Park - NO (Suffolk Co.)
5/24/18 6:48 am Karen McCaffrey <kmccaffr...> RE: [nysbirds-l] Ruff at Heckscher Park - NO (Suffolk Co.)
5/24/18 6:28 am Gus Keri <guskeri...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Ruff at Heckscher Park - NO (Suffolk Co.)
5/24/18 5:41 am Mike <mikec02...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Ruff at Heckscher Park - NO (Suffolk Co.)
5/24/18 5:23 am Ken F <feustel...> [nysbirds-l] Ruff at Heckscher Park - NO (Suffolk Co.)
5/24/18 4:58 am Larry Trachtenberg <Trachtenberg...> [nysbirds-l] Croton Point
5/23/18 7:31 pm Joseph Fell <jfell2000...> [nysbirds-l] Common Nightgawk, Swainson’s Thrushes
5/23/18 7:02 pm Steve Walter <swalter15...> [nysbirds-l] Ruff at Heckscher SP Suffolk
5/23/18 1:35 pm Deborah Martin <martindf...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Ruff
5/23/18 12:41 pm Tyler Goldstein <tylergoldstein98...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Ruff
5/23/18 12:11 pm Deborah Allen <dallenyc...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Weds., May 23, 2018 - Mourning Warbler & 16 other Species of Wood Warblers, Common Nightlawk
5/23/18 11:30 am harry Maas <hdmaas101...> [nysbirds-l] Ruff
5/23/18 10:14 am Mickey Scilingo <mickey.scilingo...> [nysbirds-l] Oneida Lake Islands in Constantia
5/23/18 9:49 am Isaac Grant <hosesbroadbill...> [nysbirds-l] 32 Whimbrel at Great Kills on Staten Island
5/23/18 4:43 am Patricia Lindsay <pjlindsay...> [nysbirds-l] Arctic and Roseate Terns Nickerson Beach Nassau Co.
5/23/18 4:15 am Long Island Birding <michaelzito...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Ruff still at Heckscher SP Suffolk
5/23/18 4:13 am Long Island Birding <michaelzito...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Ruff still at Heckscher SP Suffolk
5/23/18 3:49 am Edward Becher <ebe6580017...> RE: [nysbirds-l] Ruff still at Heckscher SP Suffolk
5/22/18 8:29 pm Robert Lewis <rfermat...> [nysbirds-l] Forest Park, Queens
5/22/18 6:11 pm Thomas Fiore <tomfi2...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park, NYC 5/22 including 23 Warbler spp. + various later-season migrants
5/22/18 4:11 pm Patricia Lindsay <pjlindsay...> [nysbirds-l] Ruff still at Heckscher SP Suffolk
5/22/18 2:46 pm Patricia Lindsay <pjlindsay...> [nysbirds-l] Ruff Heckscher SP Suffolk
5/22/18 1:14 pm Deborah Allen <dallenyc...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Tues., May 22, 2018 - 15 Species of Wood Warblers, Philadelphia Vireo, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
5/22/18 4:52 am Robert Lewis <rfermat...> [nysbirds-l] Cliff Swallows at Croton Point Park
5/22/18 3:52 am Thomas Fiore <tomfi2...> [nysbirds-l] Manhattan, N.Y. City 5/20 & 21 - incl. 28 Warbler spp., (singing) Flycatcher-diversity, & more...
5/21/18 4:52 pm Joseph Brin <brinjoseph...> [nysbirds-l] Syracuse RBA
5/21/18 3:56 pm Deborah Allen <dallenyc...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Mon., May 21, 2018 - R-t Hummingbird, Olive-sided & Yellow-bellied Flycatchers, 17 Species of Warblers
5/21/18 3:39 pm Robert Lewis <rfermat...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Brant Migration
5/21/18 3:24 pm Will Raup <hoaryredpoll...> Re: [nysbirds-l] Brant Migration
5/21/18 3:21 pm Corey Finger <10000birdsblogger...> [nysbirds-l] Brant Migration
5/21/18 1:18 pm Joseph Wallace <joew701...> [nysbirds-l] Madison Square Park
5/21/18 1:10 pm Joseph Wallace <joew701...> [nysbirds-l] Bryant Park: Thrushes, Swamp Sparrow
5/21/18 9:43 am Jonathan Perez <jonathan.aperez...> [nysbirds-l] Jamaica Bay East Pond
5/21/18 6:14 am Dennis Hrehowsik <deepseagangster...> [nysbirds-l] Reminder! Brooklyn Bird Club Evening Presentation Tomorrow 7PM
5/21/18 3:05 am Gus Keri <guskeri...> [nysbirds-l] Radar phenomenon again
5/20/18 7:18 pm Doug Gochfeld <fresha2411...> [nysbirds-l] 5/20- Brooklyn & Queens migration events, Bicknell's Thrush, Summer Tanager, lingerers etc.
5/20/18 4:34 pm <rcech...> [nysbirds-l] Ironwood Road, Sterling Forest
5/20/18 4:01 pm Nancy Tognan <nancy.tognan...> [nysbirds-l] "Preparing for Climate Change" - NSAS Meeting this Tuesday, May 22, 2018
5/20/18 3:12 pm Deborah Allen <dallenyc...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Sun., May 20, 2018 - 20 Species of Wood Warblers, Green Herons (4), Least Flycatcher
5/20/18 3:10 pm <lstocker...> [nysbirds-l] Red-Headed Woodpecker-Bayport
5/20/18 1:44 pm robert adamo <radamo4691...> [nysbirds-l] 2nd Unofficial Fauna-thon, led by Steve Biasetti of Group for the East End.
5/20/18 10:31 am Robert A. Proniewych <baobabbob...> [nysbirds-l] American Golden Plover
5/20/18 8:59 am Ben Cacace <bcacace...> [nysbirds-l] eBird.org Shared Location - Central Park--Spector Playground and vicinity
5/20/18 7:07 am matt klein <matt.klein...> [nysbirds-l] Pond Park (Great Neck) - Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
5/20/18 5:19 am Ardith Bondi <ardbon...> [nysbirds-l] unID nightjar near Maintenance bathrooms
5/20/18 4:58 am Thomas Fiore <tomfi2...> [nysbirds-l] Manhattan- N.Y.C., May 15-19, 2018
5/19/18 5:09 pm david nicosia <daven1024...> Re:[nysbirds-l] [cayugabirds-l] Montezuma NWR Guided Spring Shorebird Walk around Tschache Pool This Morning May 19th
5/19/18 4:55 pm David Nicosia <daven102468...> [nysbirds-l] Montezuma NWR Guided Spring Shorebird Walk around Tschache Pool This Morning May 19th
5/19/18 12:26 pm Deborah Allen <dallenyc...> [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Sat. May 19, 2018 - 21 Species of Wood Warblers, Cliff & Other Swallows
 
Back to top
Date: 6/18/18 5:28 pm
From: Steve Walter <swalter15...>
Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
And that ties into a point that’s been made before. You don’t really chase the previously reported Arctic Tern – you go in hopes of catching the next one.



And as long as I’m issuing this not terribly necessary post… In my effort to get other points in earlier, I neglected to give all credits due. Eric Miller got on the bird just about the same time that I did. His scoping and that of Bill Hanley and Joe ? allowed for honing in on the bird and the ID.



From: Timothy Healy [mailto:<tph56...>]
Sent: Monday, June 18, 2018 7:57 PM
To: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude...>
Cc: Steve Walter <swalter15...>; NYSBIRDS <NYSBIRDS-L...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others



Everyone patient and curious enough to follow this conversation,



Interestingly, Steve’s bird does like like a different individual from the one I reported yesterday morning.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46604935

The white forehead speckling on Steve’s photographed bird is more prominent, the shakiness on the carpal bar seems more pronounced, and the tail streamers are longer than the wingtips. Yesterday’s bird looked more “mature” and classically Arctic yet its tail was only about as long the folded wings. Tripper’s bird from Friday, which to my knowledge was not seen on Saturday, also has short streamers and looks very similar to the one I documented.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46569053

With the dark-billed youngster from Saturday taken into account, we have quite a few individual Arctic Terns coming and going from this site alone. That’s to say nothing of all the other reports up and down the Island in the past few weeks. I’m personally fascinated by all of this, it seems like we agree always learning more about the transient terns here. I wasn’t planning on plugging myself when I jumped in on this conversation, but I did publish a piece about all of this today.

http://nemesisbird.com/birding/tern-it-up/

Keep on getting out there and scouring the tern flocks, everyone. Methinks we’re due for another whopper of a surprise.



Cheers!

-Tim H


On Jun 18, 2018, at 7:40 PM, Andrew Baksh <birdingdude...> <mailto:<birdingdude...> > wrote:

Hi Tim,



I would be in the ASY camp on this bird as well. Fascinating bird and excellent photo from Steve.



Yesterday at Nickerson a group of us had an entirely different bird and I thought I had a second bird that looked like this one but could never connect with it after my initial observation.



Good to see more folks documenting the Arctic Terns as we will find there are more of them moving through now that we have more eyes sifting through the flock.



Cheers,



--------

"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick Douglass





風 Swift as the wind

林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain

<http://refspace.com/quotes/Sun_Tzu> Sun Tzu <http://refspace.com/quotes/The_Art_of_War> The Art of War



(\__/)
(= '.'=)

(") _ (")

Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device!



Andrew Baksh

www.birdingdude.blogspot.com <http://www.birdingdude.blogspot.com>


On Jun 18, 2018, at 7:28 PM, Timothy Healy <tph56...> <mailto:<tph56...> > wrote:

This is where many banders and field biologists often use the abbreviations SY and ASY, for second year and after second year. The second year, a.k.a. second summer a.k.a. year old, plumages for many species are pretty definitive, and quite distinct from adults. In the case of COTE and ARTE, birds stay in a plumage that resembles their initial juvenile coloration for their second calendar year. The black-billed, white-foreheaded birds that are so abundant at the beach this season are coming up on a year old. This “imperfect” adult Arctic, with only some smudges, flecks, and short streamers to separate it from a classic mature bird, is probably at least two years old. I certainly don’t think it was born during the last season, which is what I understand makes a second summer bird. It may be in its third summer, or maybe it’s older and just a little funky. I reported it on eBird as ASY, because it is definitely far more progressed than the typical yearling birds loafing around the inlets.



Cheers!

-Tim H


On Jun 18, 2018, at 7:15 PM, Steve Walter <swalter15...> <mailto:<swalter15...> > wrote:

Tim,



In normal conversation, I typically use the phrase “two year old” for birds that I suspect were born two summers ago. But as the conversation of recent days has alluded, there can be adults that for whatever reason, are not complete. And adult traits may not develop in sync in younger birds. Looking back at the weekend’s posts, I saw that Pat Lindsay made a point about her “second summer type” having a black bill. Today’s had a red bill. So a two year old? Probably. But definitely? Maybe, maybe not. It looks like it – so “second summer type” works for the public record.



Steve





From: Timothy Healy [mailto:<tph56...>]
Sent: Monday, June 18, 2018 6:49 PM
To: Steve Walter <swalter15...> <mailto:<swalter15...> >
Cc: NYSBIRDS <NYSBIRDS-L...> <mailto:<NYSBIRDS-L...> >
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others



Steve and other sternid enthusiasts,



Isn’t second summer the term used for the immature aspect birds with white foreheads and black bills? A freshly fledged juvenile would be living through its first summer, so second summer individuals are yearlings, correct? If my understanding of the nomenclature is accurate, the bird I found yesterday, which matches Steve’s description and the photos of Tripper’s bird from Friday, would be in its third summer or older. At a glance it looks like a classic alternate plumage adult ARTE, but the faint darker smudging on the carpal bar and the tail streamers that don’t extend beyond the folded wingtips indicate that it is not fully mature. I saw a similarly marked individual at Nickerson last year, and in 2015 I got a photo of an adult-like ARTE with a surprisingly dark bill. The variation in age classes and species of terns is so fascinating. I’ve learned a lot from these discussions about Arctics, Roseates, and the mysterious dark Commons. Mornings and afternoons at the colonies and inlets are one of my favorite parts of early summer here on Long Island.



Cheers!

-Tim H


On Jun 18, 2018, at 6:05 PM, Steve Walter <swalter15...> <mailto:<swalter15...> > wrote:

Another day, another Arctic Tern at Nickerson Beach. Actually, my first for the year, and this one had to be waited on. It might have been too foggy in the morning for it to find land (joke). Interesting bird this one. My tern guru advises me to call it a “second summer type”. Basically adult looking with a red bill, but with a carpal bar and speckling on the forehead (not well visible in the picture I posted). In a similar vein, there was a Roseate Tern of less than full adult appearance. This bird, and also a full adult, had readable blue legs bands. Maybe others have seen this, but this is the first time I’ve seen terns with something more readable in the field than the metal bands. I’ll reports these (bands B97 and Y11) and find out more in due time. But perhaps someone on this list might know something (Joe D?). Also, a Gull-billed Tern flying over the east tern colony around mid-day. Pictures of the Arctic and Roseates have been added to the bottom of the Recent Work page at my web site http://stevewalternature.com/ .



Steve Walter

Bayside, NY

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Back to top
Date: 6/18/18 5:21 pm
From: peter paul <pepaul...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
As interested as I am in the aging of these birds, I'm just gonna keep
reading the thoughts of others. But going back to the
how-many-Arctic-Terns-are-we-seeing thread:

Tim,
My Sunday and Friday birds were different. Look at my pictures from Friday
<https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46569053> and Sunday <http://sunday/>.
Looking back at Tim's pictures <https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46604935>,
I'm now wondering if on Sunday morning he had my Friday bird (or at least a
similar one), and then we found an entirely new one later after he left.
When comparing, look especially at the upper primaries (quite light on my
Friday bird, dark on my Sunday), bill color, leg color (both much deeper
red on Sunday than on Friday).

Andrew, this would kind of square with what you thought happened as
well... Maybe the group of us saw both on Sunday morning, but we
documented the second one better...?

Anyway, thanks all for the crash course in everything ARTE. I feel like
the past few weeks have been all ARTE all the time.

Tripper


On Mon, Jun 18, 2018 at 8:01 PM, Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...>
wrote:

> Tim,
>
> There's an error here.
>
> Regardless of what's true of any given bird, note the following
> equivalenciesduring June-July in NYS:
>
> Juvenile = HY = hatching-year
> First-summer = SY = Second calendar year
> Second-summer = TY = Third calendar year (but caveat: many this age look
> like adults, and some adults look like this, hence "type")
> Adult = ATY = After Third calendar year.
>
> With terns:
>
> 1. the first-summer plumage (=SY =second calendar year) is usually highly
> stereotyped; this is the "portlandica" plumage; one year-old birds that
> differ obviously and consistently from breeding adults.
>
> 2. the second-summer type plumage (associated with but not identical to TY
> = third calendar year) is highly variable. Part of this arises because it
> comprises some actual TY birds (two years old; but note, many TY birds
> attain definitive adult appearance), and also a percentage of older, fully
> adult birds that are not in prime condition (very old Common Terns >20
> years old often look like this).
>
> Below are links to a series of second-summer type Arctic Tern individuals,
> spanning the gamut from very delayed (almost portlandica-looking) to nearly
> adult looking. The Arctic Terns that show up on LI are non-breeders, and
> they range from classic first-summers through all manner of second-summer
> types to almost adult-looking birds. But among the latter, they almost
> always show some defect from full breeding adult condition, and these occur
> all through June and early July. Thus I tend to suspect them as mainly
> seond-summer = TY = Third year = two year-olds.
>
> https://flic.kr/p/VVHtaZ
> https://flic.kr/p/VhQ65U
> https://flic.kr/p/VT2po6
> https://flic.kr/p/VCjr6C
> https://flic.kr/p/VPwvqd
> https://flic.kr/p/VT2pRk
> https://flic.kr/p/VCjq6G
> https://flic.kr/p/VT2rrp
> https://flic.kr/p/VT2otk
> https://flic.kr/p/VhQ6fo
>
> Best,
> Shai
>
>
> ________________________________________
> From: <bounce-122646499-3714944...> [bounce-122646499-3714944@
> list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Timothy Healy [<tph56...>]
> Sent: Monday, June 18, 2018 7:28 PM
> To: Steve Walter
> Cc: NYSBIRDS
> Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
>
> This is where many banders and field biologists often use the
> abbreviations SY and ASY, for second year and after second year. The second
> year, a.k.a. second summer a.k.a. year old, plumages for many species are
> pretty definitive, and quite distinct from adults. In the case of COTE and
> ARTE, birds stay in a plumage that resembles their initial juvenile
> coloration for their second calendar year. The black-billed,
> white-foreheaded birds that are so abundant at the beach this season are
> coming up on a year old. This “imperfect” adult Arctic, with only some
> smudges, flecks, and short streamers to separate it from a classic mature
> bird, is probably at least two years old. I certainly don’t think it was
> born during the last season, which is what I understand makes a second
> summer bird. It may be in its third summer, or maybe it’s older and just a
> little funky. I reported it on eBird as ASY, because it is definitely far
> more progressed than the typical yearling birds loafing around the inlets.
>
> Cheers!
> -Tim H
>
> On Jun 18, 2018, at 7:15 PM, Steve Walter <swalter15...><mailto:
> <swalter15...>> wrote:
>
> Tim,
>
> In normal conversation, I typically use the phrase “two year old” for
> birds that I suspect were born two summers ago. But as the conversation of
> recent days has alluded, there can be adults that for whatever reason, are
> not complete. And adult traits may not develop in sync in younger birds.
> Looking back at the weekend’s posts, I saw that Pat Lindsay made a point
> about her “second summer type” having a black bill. Today’s had a red bill.
> So a two year old? Probably. But definitely? Maybe, maybe not. It looks
> like it – so “second summer type” works for the public record.
>
> Steve
>
>
> From: Timothy Healy [mailto:<tph56...>]
> Sent: Monday, June 18, 2018 6:49 PM
> To: Steve Walter <swalter15...><mailto:<swalter15...>>
> Cc: NYSBIRDS <NYSBIRDS-L...><mailto:NYSBIRDS-L@list.
> cornell.edu>>
> Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
>
> Steve and other sternid enthusiasts,
>
> Isn’t second summer the term used for the immature aspect birds with white
> foreheads and black bills? A freshly fledged juvenile would be living
> through its first summer, so second summer individuals are yearlings,
> correct? If my understanding of the nomenclature is accurate, the bird I
> found yesterday, which matches Steve’s description and the photos of
> Tripper’s bird from Friday, would be in its third summer or older. At a
> glance it looks like a classic alternate plumage adult ARTE, but the faint
> darker smudging on the carpal bar and the tail streamers that don’t extend
> beyond the folded wingtips indicate that it is not fully mature. I saw a
> similarly marked individual at Nickerson last year, and in 2015 I got a
> photo of an adult-like ARTE with a surprisingly dark bill. The variation in
> age classes and species of terns is so fascinating. I’ve learned a lot from
> these discussions about Arctics, Roseates, and the mysterious dark Commons.
> Mornings and afternoons at the colonies and inlets are one of my favorite
> parts of early summer here on Long Island.
>
> Cheers!
> -Tim H
>
> On Jun 18, 2018, at 6:05 PM, Steve Walter <swalter15...><mailto:
> <swalter15...>> wrote:
> Another day, another Arctic Tern at Nickerson Beach. Actually, my first
> for the year, and this one had to be waited on. It might have been too
> foggy in the morning for it to find land (joke). Interesting bird this one.
> My tern guru advises me to call it a “second summer type”. Basically adult
> looking with a red bill, but with a carpal bar and speckling on the
> forehead (not well visible in the picture I posted). In a similar vein,
> there was a Roseate Tern of less than full adult appearance. This bird, and
> also a full adult, had readable blue legs bands. Maybe others have seen
> this, but this is the first time I’ve seen terns with something more
> readable in the field than the metal bands. I’ll reports these (bands B97
> and Y11) and find out more in due time. But perhaps someone on this list
> might know something (Joe D?). Also, a Gull-billed Tern flying over the
> east tern colony around mid-day. Pictures of the Arctic and Roseates have
> been added to the bottom of the Recent Work page at my web site
> http://stevewalternature.com/ .
>
> Steve Walter
> Bayside, NY
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Back to top
Date: 6/18/18 5:01 pm
From: Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...>
Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
Tim,

There's an error here.

Regardless of what's true of any given bird, note the following equivalenciesduring June-July in NYS:

Juvenile = HY = hatching-year
First-summer = SY = Second calendar year
Second-summer = TY = Third calendar year (but caveat: many this age look like adults, and some adults look like this, hence "type")
Adult = ATY = After Third calendar year.

With terns:

1. the first-summer plumage (=SY =second calendar year) is usually highly stereotyped; this is the "portlandica" plumage; one year-old birds that differ obviously and consistently from breeding adults.

2. the second-summer type plumage (associated with but not identical to TY = third calendar year) is highly variable. Part of this arises because it comprises some actual TY birds (two years old; but note, many TY birds attain definitive adult appearance), and also a percentage of older, fully adult birds that are not in prime condition (very old Common Terns >20 years old often look like this).

Below are links to a series of second-summer type Arctic Tern individuals, spanning the gamut from very delayed (almost portlandica-looking) to nearly adult looking. The Arctic Terns that show up on LI are non-breeders, and they range from classic first-summers through all manner of second-summer types to almost adult-looking birds. But among the latter, they almost always show some defect from full breeding adult condition, and these occur all through June and early July. Thus I tend to suspect them as mainly seond-summer = TY = Third year = two year-olds.

https://flic.kr/p/VVHtaZ
https://flic.kr/p/VhQ65U
https://flic.kr/p/VT2po6
https://flic.kr/p/VCjr6C
https://flic.kr/p/VPwvqd
https://flic.kr/p/VT2pRk
https://flic.kr/p/VCjq6G
https://flic.kr/p/VT2rrp
https://flic.kr/p/VT2otk
https://flic.kr/p/VhQ6fo

Best,
Shai


________________________________________
From: <bounce-122646499-3714944...> [<bounce-122646499-3714944...>] on behalf of Timothy Healy [<tph56...>]
Sent: Monday, June 18, 2018 7:28 PM
To: Steve Walter
Cc: NYSBIRDS
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others

This is where many banders and field biologists often use the abbreviations SY and ASY, for second year and after second year. The second year, a.k.a. second summer a.k.a. year old, plumages for many species are pretty definitive, and quite distinct from adults. In the case of COTE and ARTE, birds stay in a plumage that resembles their initial juvenile coloration for their second calendar year. The black-billed, white-foreheaded birds that are so abundant at the beach this season are coming up on a year old. This imperfect adult Arctic, with only some smudges, flecks, and short streamers to separate it from a classic mature bird, is probably at least two years old. I certainly dont think it was born during the last season, which is what I understand makes a second summer bird. It may be in its third summer, or maybe its older and just a little funky. I reported it on eBird as ASY, because it is definitely far more progressed than the typical yearling birds loafing around the inlets.

Cheers!
-Tim H

On Jun 18, 2018, at 7:15 PM, Steve Walter <swalter15...><mailto:<swalter15...>> wrote:

Tim,

In normal conversation, I typically use the phrase two year old for birds that I suspect were born two summers ago. But as the conversation of recent days has alluded, there can be adults that for whatever reason, are not complete. And adult traits may not develop in sync in younger birds. Looking back at the weekends posts, I saw that Pat Lindsay made a point about her second summer type having a black bill. Todays had a red bill. So a two year old? Probably. But definitely? Maybe, maybe not. It looks like it so second summer type works for the public record.

Steve


From: Timothy Healy [mailto:<tph56...>]
Sent: Monday, June 18, 2018 6:49 PM
To: Steve Walter <swalter15...><mailto:<swalter15...>>
Cc: NYSBIRDS <NYSBIRDS-L...><mailto:<NYSBIRDS-L...>>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others

Steve and other sternid enthusiasts,

Isnt second summer the term used for the immature aspect birds with white foreheads and black bills? A freshly fledged juvenile would be living through its first summer, so second summer individuals are yearlings, correct? If my understanding of the nomenclature is accurate, the bird I found yesterday, which matches Steves description and the photos of Trippers bird from Friday, would be in its third summer or older. At a glance it looks like a classic alternate plumage adult ARTE, but the faint darker smudging on the carpal bar and the tail streamers that dont extend beyond the folded wingtips indicate that it is not fully mature. I saw a similarly marked individual at Nickerson last year, and in 2015 I got a photo of an adult-like ARTE with a surprisingly dark bill. The variation in age classes and species of terns is so fascinating. Ive learned a lot from these discussions about Arctics, Roseates, and the mysterious dark Commons. Mornings and afternoons at the colonies and inlets are one of my favorite parts of early summer here on Long Island.

Cheers!
-Tim H

On Jun 18, 2018, at 6:05 PM, Steve Walter <swalter15...><mailto:<swalter15...>> wrote:
Another day, another Arctic Tern at Nickerson Beach. Actually, my first for the year, and this one had to be waited on. It might have been too foggy in the morning for it to find land (joke). Interesting bird this one. My tern guru advises me to call it a second summer type. Basically adult looking with a red bill, but with a carpal bar and speckling on the forehead (not well visible in the picture I posted). In a similar vein, there was a Roseate Tern of less than full adult appearance. This bird, and also a full adult, had readable blue legs bands. Maybe others have seen this, but this is the first time Ive seen terns with something more readable in the field than the metal bands. Ill reports these (bands B97 and Y11) and find out more in due time. But perhaps someone on this list might know something (Joe D?). Also, a Gull-billed Tern flying over the east tern colony around mid-day. Pictures of the Arctic and Roseates have been added to the bottom of the Recent Work page at my web site http://stevewalternature.com/ .

Steve Walter
Bayside, NY
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Date: 6/18/18 4:57 pm
From: Timothy Healy <tph56...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
Everyone patient and curious enough to follow this conversation,

Interestingly, Steve’s bird does like like a different individual from the one I reported yesterday morning.
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46604935
The white forehead speckling on Steve’s photographed bird is more prominent, the shakiness on the carpal bar seems more pronounced, and the tail streamers are longer than the wingtips. Yesterday’s bird looked more “mature” and classically Arctic yet its tail was only about as long the folded wings. Tripper’s bird from Friday, which to my knowledge was not seen on Saturday, also has short streamers and looks very similar to the one I documented.
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46569053
With the dark-billed youngster from Saturday taken into account, we have quite a few individual Arctic Terns coming and going from this site alone. That’s to say nothing of all the other reports up and down the Island in the past few weeks. I’m personally fascinated by all of this, it seems like we agree always learning more about the transient terns here. I wasn’t planning on plugging myself when I jumped in on this conversation, but I did publish a piece about all of this today.
http://nemesisbird.com/birding/tern-it-up/
Keep on getting out there and scouring the tern flocks, everyone. Methinks we’re due for another whopper of a surprise.

Cheers!
-Tim H

> On Jun 18, 2018, at 7:40 PM, Andrew Baksh <birdingdude...> wrote:
>
> Hi Tim,
>
> I would be in the ASY camp on this bird as well. Fascinating bird and excellent photo from Steve.
>
> Yesterday at Nickerson a group of us had an entirely different bird and I thought I had a second bird that looked like this one but could never connect with it after my initial observation.
>
> Good to see more folks documenting the Arctic Terns as we will find there are more of them moving through now that we have more eyes sifting through the flock.
>
> Cheers,
>
> --------
> "I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick Douglass
>
> 風 Swift as the wind
> 林 Quiet as the forest
> 火 Conquer like the fire
> 山 Steady as the mountain
> Sun Tzu The Art of War
>
>> (\__/)
>> (= '.'=)
>> (") _ (")
>> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device!
>
> Andrew Baksh
> www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
>
>> On Jun 18, 2018, at 7:28 PM, Timothy Healy <tph56...> wrote:
>>
>> This is where many banders and field biologists often use the abbreviations SY and ASY, for second year and after second year. The second year, a.k.a. second summer a.k.a. year old, plumages for many species are pretty definitive, and quite distinct from adults. In the case of COTE and ARTE, birds stay in a plumage that resembles their initial juvenile coloration for their second calendar year. The black-billed, white-foreheaded birds that are so abundant at the beach this season are coming up on a year old. This “imperfect” adult Arctic, with only some smudges, flecks, and short streamers to separate it from a classic mature bird, is probably at least two years old. I certainly don’t think it was born during the last season, which is what I understand makes a second summer bird. It may be in its third summer, or maybe it’s older and just a little funky. I reported it on eBird as ASY, because it is definitely far more progressed than the typical yearling birds loafing around the inlets.
>>
>> Cheers!
>> -Tim H
>>
>>> On Jun 18, 2018, at 7:15 PM, Steve Walter <swalter15...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Tim,
>>>
>>> In normal conversation, I typically use the phrase “two year old” for birds that I suspect were born two summers ago. But as the conversation of recent days has alluded, there can be adults that for whatever reason, are not complete. And adult traits may not develop in sync in younger birds. Looking back at the weekend’s posts, I saw that Pat Lindsay made a point about her “second summer type” having a black bill. Today’s had a red bill. So a two year old? Probably. But definitely? Maybe, maybe not. It looks like it – so “second summer type” works for the public record.
>>>
>>> Steve
>>>
>>>
>>> From: Timothy Healy [mailto:<tph56...>]
>>> Sent: Monday, June 18, 2018 6:49 PM
>>> To: Steve Walter <swalter15...>
>>> Cc: NYSBIRDS <NYSBIRDS-L...>
>>> Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
>>>
>>> Steve and other sternid enthusiasts,
>>>
>>> Isn’t second summer the term used for the immature aspect birds with white foreheads and black bills? A freshly fledged juvenile would be living through its first summer, so second summer individuals are yearlings, correct? If my understanding of the nomenclature is accurate, the bird I found yesterday, which matches Steve’s description and the photos of Tripper’s bird from Friday, would be in its third summer or older. At a glance it looks like a classic alternate plumage adult ARTE, but the faint darker smudging on the carpal bar and the tail streamers that don’t extend beyond the folded wingtips indicate that it is not fully mature. I saw a similarly marked individual at Nickerson last year, and in 2015 I got a photo of an adult-like ARTE with a surprisingly dark bill. The variation in age classes and species of terns is so fascinating. I’ve learned a lot from these discussions about Arctics, Roseates, and the mysterious dark Commons. Mornings and afternoons at the colonies and inlets are one of my favorite parts of early summer here on Long Island.
>>>
>>> Cheers!
>>> -Tim H
>>>
>>> On Jun 18, 2018, at 6:05 PM, Steve Walter <swalter15...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Another day, another Arctic Tern at Nickerson Beach. Actually, my first for the year, and this one had to be waited on. It might have been too foggy in the morning for it to find land (joke). Interesting bird this one. My tern guru advises me to call it a “second summer type”. Basically adult looking with a red bill, but with a carpal bar and speckling on the forehead (not well visible in the picture I posted). In a similar vein, there was a Roseate Tern of less than full adult appearance. This bird, and also a full adult, had readable blue legs bands. Maybe others have seen this, but this is the first time I’ve seen terns with something more readable in the field than the metal bands. I’ll reports these (bands B97 and Y11) and find out more in due time. But perhaps someone on this list might know something (Joe D?). Also, a Gull-billed Tern flying over the east tern colony around mid-day. Pictures of the Arctic and Roseates have been added to the bottom of the Recent Work page at my web site http://stevewalternature.com/ .
>>>
>>> Steve Walter
>>> Bayside, NY
>>> --
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>>
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Date: 6/18/18 4:41 pm
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
Hi Tim,

I would be in the ASY camp on this bird as well. Fascinating bird and excellent photo from Steve.

Yesterday at Nickerson a group of us had an entirely different bird and I thought I had a second bird that looked like this one but could never connect with it after my initial observation.

Good to see more folks documenting the Arctic Terns as we will find there are more of them moving through now that we have more eyes sifting through the flock.

Cheers,

--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick Douglass

風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu The Art of War

> (\__/)
> (= '.'=)
> (") _ (")
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device!

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com

> On Jun 18, 2018, at 7:28 PM, Timothy Healy <tph56...> wrote:
>
> This is where many banders and field biologists often use the abbreviations SY and ASY, for second year and after second year. The second year, a.k.a. second summer a.k.a. year old, plumages for many species are pretty definitive, and quite distinct from adults. In the case of COTE and ARTE, birds stay in a plumage that resembles their initial juvenile coloration for their second calendar year. The black-billed, white-foreheaded birds that are so abundant at the beach this season are coming up on a year old. This “imperfect” adult Arctic, with only some smudges, flecks, and short streamers to separate it from a classic mature bird, is probably at least two years old. I certainly don’t think it was born during the last season, which is what I understand makes a second summer bird. It may be in its third summer, or maybe it’s older and just a little funky. I reported it on eBird as ASY, because it is definitely far more progressed than the typical yearling birds loafing around the inlets.
>
> Cheers!
> -Tim H
>
>> On Jun 18, 2018, at 7:15 PM, Steve Walter <swalter15...> wrote:
>>
>> Tim,
>>
>> In normal conversation, I typically use the phrase “two year old” for birds that I suspect were born two summers ago. But as the conversation of recent days has alluded, there can be adults that for whatever reason, are not complete. And adult traits may not develop in sync in younger birds. Looking back at the weekend’s posts, I saw that Pat Lindsay made a point about her “second summer type” having a black bill. Today’s had a red bill. So a two year old? Probably. But definitely? Maybe, maybe not. It looks like it – so “second summer type” works for the public record.
>>
>> Steve
>>
>>
>> From: Timothy Healy [mailto:<tph56...>]
>> Sent: Monday, June 18, 2018 6:49 PM
>> To: Steve Walter <swalter15...>
>> Cc: NYSBIRDS <NYSBIRDS-L...>
>> Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
>>
>> Steve and other sternid enthusiasts,
>>
>> Isn’t second summer the term used for the immature aspect birds with white foreheads and black bills? A freshly fledged juvenile would be living through its first summer, so second summer individuals are yearlings, correct? If my understanding of the nomenclature is accurate, the bird I found yesterday, which matches Steve’s description and the photos of Tripper’s bird from Friday, would be in its third summer or older. At a glance it looks like a classic alternate plumage adult ARTE, but the faint darker smudging on the carpal bar and the tail streamers that don’t extend beyond the folded wingtips indicate that it is not fully mature. I saw a similarly marked individual at Nickerson last year, and in 2015 I got a photo of an adult-like ARTE with a surprisingly dark bill. The variation in age classes and species of terns is so fascinating. I’ve learned a lot from these discussions about Arctics, Roseates, and the mysterious dark Commons. Mornings and afternoons at the colonies and inlets are one of my favorite parts of early summer here on Long Island.
>>
>> Cheers!
>> -Tim H
>>
>> On Jun 18, 2018, at 6:05 PM, Steve Walter <swalter15...> wrote:
>>
>> Another day, another Arctic Tern at Nickerson Beach. Actually, my first for the year, and this one had to be waited on. It might have been too foggy in the morning for it to find land (joke). Interesting bird this one. My tern guru advises me to call it a “second summer type”. Basically adult looking with a red bill, but with a carpal bar and speckling on the forehead (not well visible in the picture I posted). In a similar vein, there was a Roseate Tern of less than full adult appearance. This bird, and also a full adult, had readable blue legs bands. Maybe others have seen this, but this is the first time I’ve seen terns with something more readable in the field than the metal bands. I’ll reports these (bands B97 and Y11) and find out more in due time. But perhaps someone on this list might know something (Joe D?). Also, a Gull-billed Tern flying over the east tern colony around mid-day. Pictures of the Arctic and Roseates have been added to the bottom of the Recent Work page at my web site http://stevewalternature.com/ .
>>
>> Steve Walter
>> Bayside, NY
>> --
>> NYSbirds-L List Info:
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>> Rules and Information
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>> Please submit your observations to eBird!
>> --
>
> --
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Date: 6/18/18 4:32 pm
From: Pat Aitken <aitkenpatricia...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
Thank you all, again, for this excellent discussion, and for generous
sharing of your knowledge!

On Mon, Jun 18, 2018 at 7:29 PM Timothy Healy <tph56...> wrote:

> This is where many banders and field biologists often use the
> abbreviations SY and ASY, for second year and after second year. The second
> year, a.k.a. second summer a.k.a. year old, plumages for many species are
> pretty definitive, and quite distinct from adults. In the case of COTE and
> ARTE, birds stay in a plumage that resembles their initial juvenile
> coloration for their second calendar year. The black-billed,
> white-foreheaded birds that are so abundant at the beach this season are
> coming up on a year old. This “imperfect” adult Arctic, with only some
> smudges, flecks, and short streamers to separate it from a classic mature
> bird, is probably at least two years old. I certainly don’t think it was
> born during the last season, which is what I understand makes a second
> summer bird. It may be in its third summer, or maybe it’s older and just a
> little funky. I reported it on eBird as ASY, because it is definitely far
> more progressed than the typical yearling birds loafing around the inlets.
>
> Cheers!
> -Tim H
>
>
> On Jun 18, 2018, at 7:15 PM, Steve Walter <swalter15...> wrote:
>
> Tim,
>
>
>
> In normal conversation, I typically use the phrase “two year old” for
> birds that I suspect were born two summers ago. But as the conversation of
> recent days has alluded, there can be adults that for whatever reason, are
> not complete. And adult traits may not develop in sync in younger birds.
> Looking back at the weekend’s posts, I saw that Pat Lindsay made a point
> about her “second summer type” having a black bill. Today’s had a red bill.
> So a two year old? Probably. But definitely? Maybe, maybe not. It looks
> like it – so “second summer type” works for the public record.
>
>
>
> Steve
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* Timothy Healy [mailto:<tph56...> <tph56...>]
> *Sent:* Monday, June 18, 2018 6:49 PM
> *To:* Steve Walter <swalter15...>
> *Cc:* NYSBIRDS <NYSBIRDS-L...>
> *Subject:* Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
>
>
>
> Steve and other sternid enthusiasts,
>
>
>
> Isn’t second summer the term used for the immature aspect birds with white
> foreheads and black bills? A freshly fledged juvenile would be living
> through its first summer, so second summer individuals are yearlings,
> correct? If my understanding of the nomenclature is accurate, the bird I
> found yesterday, which matches Steve’s description and the photos of
> Tripper’s bird from Friday, would be in its third summer or older. At a
> glance it looks like a classic alternate plumage adult ARTE, but the faint
> darker smudging on the carpal bar and the tail streamers that don’t extend
> beyond the folded wingtips indicate that it is not fully mature. I saw a
> similarly marked individual at Nickerson last year, and in 2015 I got a
> photo of an adult-like ARTE with a surprisingly dark bill. The variation in
> age classes and species of terns is so fascinating. I’ve learned a lot from
> these discussions about Arctics, Roseates, and the mysterious dark Commons.
> Mornings and afternoons at the colonies and inlets are one of my favorite
> parts of early summer here on Long Island.
>
>
>
> Cheers!
>
> -Tim H
>
>
> On Jun 18, 2018, at 6:05 PM, Steve Walter <swalter15...> wrote:
>
> Another day, another *Arctic Tern* at Nickerson Beach. Actually, my first
> for the year, and this one had to be waited on. It might have been too
> foggy in the morning for it to find land (joke). Interesting bird this one.
> My tern guru advises me to call it a “second summer type”. Basically adult
> looking with a red bill, but with a carpal bar and speckling on the
> forehead (not well visible in the picture I posted). In a similar vein,
> there was a Roseate Tern of less than full adult appearance. This bird, and
> also a full adult, had readable blue legs bands. Maybe others have seen
> this, but this is the first time I’ve seen terns with something more
> readable in the field than the metal bands. I’ll reports these (bands B97
> and Y11) and find out more in due time. But perhaps someone on this list
> might know something (Joe D?). Also, *a Gull-billed Tern* flying over
> the east tern colony around mid-day. Pictures of the Arctic and Roseates
> have been added to the bottom of the Recent Work page at my web site
> http://stevewalternature.com/ .
>
>
>
> Steve Walter
>
> Bayside, NY
>
> --
>
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Date: 6/18/18 4:28 pm
From: Timothy Healy <tph56...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
This is where many banders and field biologists often use the abbreviations SY and ASY, for second year and after second year. The second year, a.k.a. second summer a.k.a. year old, plumages for many species are pretty definitive, and quite distinct from adults. In the case of COTE and ARTE, birds stay in a plumage that resembles their initial juvenile coloration for their second calendar year. The black-billed, white-foreheaded birds that are so abundant at the beach this season are coming up on a year old. This “imperfect” adult Arctic, with only some smudges, flecks, and short streamers to separate it from a classic mature bird, is probably at least two years old. I certainly don’t think it was born during the last season, which is what I understand makes a second summer bird. It may be in its third summer, or maybe it’s older and just a little funky. I reported it on eBird as ASY, because it is definitely far more progressed than the typical yearling birds loafing around the inlets.

Cheers!
-Tim H

> On Jun 18, 2018, at 7:15 PM, Steve Walter <swalter15...> wrote:
>
> Tim,
>
> In normal conversation, I typically use the phrase “two year old” for birds that I suspect were born two summers ago. But as the conversation of recent days has alluded, there can be adults that for whatever reason, are not complete. And adult traits may not develop in sync in younger birds. Looking back at the weekend’s posts, I saw that Pat Lindsay made a point about her “second summer type” having a black bill. Today’s had a red bill. So a two year old? Probably. But definitely? Maybe, maybe not. It looks like it – so “second summer type” works for the public record.
>
> Steve
>
>
> From: Timothy Healy [mailto:<tph56...>]
> Sent: Monday, June 18, 2018 6:49 PM
> To: Steve Walter <swalter15...>
> Cc: NYSBIRDS <NYSBIRDS-L...>
> Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
>
> Steve and other sternid enthusiasts,
>
> Isn’t second summer the term used for the immature aspect birds with white foreheads and black bills? A freshly fledged juvenile would be living through its first summer, so second summer individuals are yearlings, correct? If my understanding of the nomenclature is accurate, the bird I found yesterday, which matches Steve’s description and the photos of Tripper’s bird from Friday, would be in its third summer or older. At a glance it looks like a classic alternate plumage adult ARTE, but the faint darker smudging on the carpal bar and the tail streamers that don’t extend beyond the folded wingtips indicate that it is not fully mature. I saw a similarly marked individual at Nickerson last year, and in 2015 I got a photo of an adult-like ARTE with a surprisingly dark bill. The variation in age classes and species of terns is so fascinating. I’ve learned a lot from these discussions about Arctics, Roseates, and the mysterious dark Commons. Mornings and afternoons at the colonies and inlets are one of my favorite parts of early summer here on Long Island.
>
> Cheers!
> -Tim H
>
> On Jun 18, 2018, at 6:05 PM, Steve Walter <swalter15...> wrote:
>
> Another day, another Arctic Tern at Nickerson Beach. Actually, my first for the year, and this one had to be waited on. It might have been too foggy in the morning for it to find land (joke). Interesting bird this one. My tern guru advises me to call it a “second summer type”. Basically adult looking with a red bill, but with a carpal bar and speckling on the forehead (not well visible in the picture I posted). In a similar vein, there was a Roseate Tern of less than full adult appearance. This bird, and also a full adult, had readable blue legs bands. Maybe others have seen this, but this is the first time I’ve seen terns with something more readable in the field than the metal bands. I’ll reports these (bands B97 and Y11) and find out more in due time. But perhaps someone on this list might know something (Joe D?). Also, a Gull-billed Tern flying over the east tern colony around mid-day. Pictures of the Arctic and Roseates have been added to the bottom of the Recent Work page at my web site http://stevewalternature.com/ .
>
> Steve Walter
> Bayside, NY
> --
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Date: 6/18/18 4:27 pm
From: Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...>
Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
Hi Tim and all,

There are a number of parallel systems for denoting age. The worst for birders is the plumage cycle system, because at this time of year a flock of 30 manky looking Lesser Black-backed Gulls of exactly the same age 350-370 days since hatching might include both first and second cycle individuals, and it's obviously absurd to lump the former with fresh juvs and the latter with two year-olds in summaries of age break-downs.

My preferred system for terns is the standard one used by Grant, Malling Olsen, and others:
Juvenile the newly hatched COTE juvs are the cutest of all birds
First-summer one-year-old birds with black bills, white foreheads, white underparts, short tails, etc.
Second-summer types a category including some (but not all) actual two year-olds and a fraction of older adults failing to attain full breeding condition. The appearance of birds in this category is highly variable because it includes some very delayed two year-olds as well as some birds that barely differ from normal adults.
Adult

Calendar year notation works well too in the temperate zone:
HY
SY
TY type
Adult

Best,
Shai
________________________________________
From: <bounce-122646468-3714944...> [<bounce-122646468-3714944...>] on behalf of Timothy Healy [<tph56...>]
Sent: Monday, June 18, 2018 6:48 PM
To: Steve Walter
Cc: NYSBIRDS
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others

Steve and other sternid enthusiasts,

Isnt second summer the term used for the immature aspect birds with white foreheads and black bills? A freshly fledged juvenile would be living through its first summer, so second summer individuals are yearlings, correct? If my understanding of the nomenclature is accurate, the bird I found yesterday, which matches Steves description and the photos of Trippers bird from Friday, would be in its third summer or older. At a glance it looks like a classic alternate plumage adult ARTE, but the faint darker smudging on the carpal bar and the tail streamers that dont extend beyond the folded wingtips indicate that it is not fully mature. I saw a similarly marked individual at Nickerson last year, and in 2015 I got a photo of an adult-like ARTE with a surprisingly dark bill. The variation in age classes and species of terns is so fascinating. Ive learned a lot from these discussions about Arctics, Roseates, and the mysterious dark Commons. Mornings and afternoons at the colonies and inlets are one of my favorite parts of early summer here on Long Island.

Cheers!
-Tim H

On Jun 18, 2018, at 6:05 PM, Steve Walter <swalter15...><mailto:<swalter15...>> wrote:

Another day, another Arctic Tern at Nickerson Beach. Actually, my first for the year, and this one had to be waited on. It might have been too foggy in the morning for it to find land (joke). Interesting bird this one. My tern guru advises me to call it a second summer type. Basically adult looking with a red bill, but with a carpal bar and speckling on the forehead (not well visible in the picture I posted). In a similar vein, there was a Roseate Tern of less than full adult appearance. This bird, and also a full adult, had readable blue legs bands. Maybe others have seen this, but this is the first time Ive seen terns with something more readable in the field than the metal bands. Ill reports these (bands B97 and Y11) and find out more in due time. But perhaps someone on this list might know something (Joe D?). Also, a Gull-billed Tern flying over the east tern colony around mid-day. Pictures of the Arctic and Roseates have been added to the bottom of the Recent Work page at my web site http://stevewalternature.com/ .

Steve Walter
Bayside, NY
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Date: 6/18/18 4:15 pm
From: Steve Walter <swalter15...>
Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
Tim,



In normal conversation, I typically use the phrase “two year old” for birds that I suspect were born two summers ago. But as the conversation of recent days has alluded, there can be adults that for whatever reason, are not complete. And adult traits may not develop in sync in younger birds. Looking back at the weekend’s posts, I saw that Pat Lindsay made a point about her “second summer type” having a black bill. Today’s had a red bill. So a two year old? Probably. But definitely? Maybe, maybe not. It looks like it – so “second summer type” works for the public record.



Steve





From: Timothy Healy [mailto:<tph56...>]
Sent: Monday, June 18, 2018 6:49 PM
To: Steve Walter <swalter15...>
Cc: NYSBIRDS <NYSBIRDS-L...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others



Steve and other sternid enthusiasts,



Isn’t second summer the term used for the immature aspect birds with white foreheads and black bills? A freshly fledged juvenile would be living through its first summer, so second summer individuals are yearlings, correct? If my understanding of the nomenclature is accurate, the bird I found yesterday, which matches Steve’s description and the photos of Tripper’s bird from Friday, would be in its third summer or older. At a glance it looks like a classic alternate plumage adult ARTE, but the faint darker smudging on the carpal bar and the tail streamers that don’t extend beyond the folded wingtips indicate that it is not fully mature. I saw a similarly marked individual at Nickerson last year, and in 2015 I got a photo of an adult-like ARTE with a surprisingly dark bill. The variation in age classes and species of terns is so fascinating. I’ve learned a lot from these discussions about Arctics, Roseates, and the mysterious dark Commons. Mornings and afternoons at the colonies and inlets are one of my favorite parts of early summer here on Long Island.



Cheers!

-Tim H


On Jun 18, 2018, at 6:05 PM, Steve Walter <swalter15...> <mailto:<swalter15...> > wrote:

Another day, another Arctic Tern at Nickerson Beach. Actually, my first for the year, and this one had to be waited on. It might have been too foggy in the morning for it to find land (joke). Interesting bird this one. My tern guru advises me to call it a “second summer type”. Basically adult looking with a red bill, but with a carpal bar and speckling on the forehead (not well visible in the picture I posted). In a similar vein, there was a Roseate Tern of less than full adult appearance. This bird, and also a full adult, had readable blue legs bands. Maybe others have seen this, but this is the first time I’ve seen terns with something more readable in the field than the metal bands. I’ll reports these (bands B97 and Y11) and find out more in due time. But perhaps someone on this list might know something (Joe D?). Also, a Gull-billed Tern flying over the east tern colony around mid-day. Pictures of the Arctic and Roseates have been added to the bottom of the Recent Work page at my web site http://stevewalternature.com/ .



Steve Walter

Bayside, NY

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Date: 6/18/18 3:49 pm
From: Timothy Healy <tph56...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
Steve and other sternid enthusiasts,

Isn’t second summer the term used for the immature aspect birds with white foreheads and black bills? A freshly fledged juvenile would be living through its first summer, so second summer individuals are yearlings, correct? If my understanding of the nomenclature is accurate, the bird I found yesterday, which matches Steve’s description and the photos of Tripper’s bird from Friday, would be in its third summer or older. At a glance it looks like a classic alternate plumage adult ARTE, but the faint darker smudging on the carpal bar and the tail streamers that don’t extend beyond the folded wingtips indicate that it is not fully mature. I saw a similarly marked individual at Nickerson last year, and in 2015 I got a photo of an adult-like ARTE with a surprisingly dark bill. The variation in age classes and species of terns is so fascinating. I’ve learned a lot from these discussions about Arctics, Roseates, and the mysterious dark Commons. Mornings and afternoons at the colonies and inlets are one of my favorite parts of early summer here on Long Island.

Cheers!
-Tim H

> On Jun 18, 2018, at 6:05 PM, Steve Walter <swalter15...> wrote:
>
> Another day, another Arctic Tern at Nickerson Beach. Actually, my first for the year, and this one had to be waited on. It might have been too foggy in the morning for it to find land (joke). Interesting bird this one. My tern guru advises me to call it a “second summer type”. Basically adult looking with a red bill, but with a carpal bar and speckling on the forehead (not well visible in the picture I posted). In a similar vein, there was a Roseate Tern of less than full adult appearance. This bird, and also a full adult, had readable blue legs bands. Maybe others have seen this, but this is the first time I’ve seen terns with something more readable in the field than the metal bands. I’ll reports these (bands B97 and Y11) and find out more in due time. But perhaps someone on this list might know something (Joe D?). Also, a Gull-billed Tern flying over the east tern colony around mid-day. Pictures of the Arctic and Roseates have been added to the bottom of the Recent Work page at my web site http://stevewalternature.com/ .
>
> Steve Walter
> Bayside, NY
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Date: 6/18/18 3:05 pm
From: Steve Walter <swalter15...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach Arctic Tern and others
Another day, another Arctic Tern at Nickerson Beach. Actually, my first for
the year, and this one had to be waited on. It might have been too foggy in
the morning for it to find land (joke). Interesting bird this one. My tern
guru advises me to call it a "second summer type". Basically adult looking
with a red bill, but with a carpal bar and speckling on the forehead (not
well visible in the picture I posted). In a similar vein, there was a
Roseate Tern of less than full adult appearance. This bird, and also a full
adult, had readable blue legs bands. Maybe others have seen this, but this
is the first time I've seen terns with something more readable in the field
than the metal bands. I'll reports these (bands B97 and Y11) and find out
more in due time. But perhaps someone on this list might know something (Joe
D?). Also, a Gull-billed Tern flying over the east tern colony around
mid-day. Pictures of the Arctic and Roseates have been added to the bottom
of the Recent Work page at my web site http://stevewalternature.com/ .



Steve Walter

Bayside, NY


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Date: 6/18/18 1:53 pm
From: Dennis Hrehowsik <deepseagangster...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Reminder: BBC Talk Tomorrow, VULTURE: THE PRIVATE LIFE OF AN UNLOVED BIRD
*Tomorrow Tuesday June 19th @ 7PM*

*BBC Evening Presentation:*

*KATIE FALLON PRESENTS: VULTURE: THE PRIVATE LIFE OF AN UNLOVED BIRD*

*BROOKLYN PUBLIC LIBRARY, CENTRAL BRANCH AT GRAND ARMY PLAZA*

Vultures are often overlooked, underappreciated, and unloved, despite the
vital role they play healthy ecosystems. Worldwide, vultures are more
likely to be threatened or endangered than any other group of raptor, but
in the United States Turkey and Black Vultures may be increasing in number.
Based on Katie Fallon’s new book, this presentation will discuss the life
and times of the noble Turkey Vulture, including its feeding, nesting, and
roosting habits, migratory behaviors, and common misconceptions.

Katie Fallon lives in West Virginia and is co-founder of the Avian
Conservation Center of Appalachia, a nonprofit organization dedicated to
conserving the region’s wild birds through research, education, and
rehabilitation.

http://brooklynbirdclub.org/event/katie-fallon-presents-
vulture-the-private-life-of-an-unloved-bird/


Dennis Hrehowsik

President Brooklyn Bird Club

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Date: 6/18/18 1:17 pm
From: Joseph Brin <brinjoseph...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Syracuse RBA

 RBA




*New York

- Syracuse
- June 18, 2018
- NYSY 06.18.18




Hotline: Syracuse Area Rare Bird Alert

Dates: June 11 - June 18

To report by email: brinjoseph AT yahoo DOT com

Reporting upstate counties: Onondaga, Oswego, Madison, Oneida, Herkimer, Cayuga, Montezuma Wildlife Refuge and Montezuma Wetlands complex

compiled: June 18 AT 3:30 p.m. EDT

compiler: Joseph Brin

Onondaga Audubon Homepage: www.onondgaaudubon.org







Greetings: This is the Syracuse Area Rare Bird Alert for the week on June 11, 2018




Highlights:




CATTLE EGRET

BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON

LEAST BITTERN

RED-SHOULDERED HAWK

WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER

RED-HEADED WOODPECKER

SWAINSON’S THRUSH

LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH

PROTHONOTARY WARBLER

PRAIRIE WARBLER

CLAY-COLORED SPARROW

GRASSHOPPER SPARROW

ORCHARD ORIOLE







Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge (MNWR) and Montezuma Wetlands Complex (MWC)

------------




     6/12: A CATTLE EGRET was seen in Knox-Marsellus Marsh. It was observed again on the 13th.

     6/15: A WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER was seen along the Wildlife Drive near the Eagle Statue. Three LEAST BITTERNS and an ORCHARD ORIOLE were seen at VanDyne Spoor Road. 2 PROTHONOTARY WARBLERS continus at the forested area of Armitage Road. They were seen through 6/17.

     6/17: A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was again reported form the complex. No specific area was mentioned.







Onondaga County

------------




     6/13: A COMMON LOON was seen an Onondaga Lake. it was reported again on the 16th.

     6/16: 2 PRAIRIE WARBLERS were again found at Green Lakes State Park. A probable family group of 7 ORCHARD ORIOLES were seen at Green Lakes also. 2 GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS were again seen at Three Rivers WMA in Baldwinsville.







Oswego County

------------




     6/17: A LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH continues at Salmon River Falls.







Madison County

------------




     6/16: A PRAIRIE WARBLER was seen on Muller Hill Road near Georgetown.







Oneida County

------------




     6/12: A CLAY-COLORED SPARROW continues at Spring Farms Nature Sanctuary south of Clinton.

     6/14: A LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH was seen at Pixley Falls State Park.

     6/16: A RED-SHOULDERED HAWK was seen at Castlebrook Farm east of Williamston.







Herkimer County

------------




     6/13: An ORCHARD ORIOLE was seen on Carlson Road south of Salisbury Center.   

     6/16: A SWAINSON’S THRUSH was found on the trail to House Pond off the Powley Road north of Stratford.




       




-end transcript




Joseph Brin

Region 5

Baldwinsville, N.Y. 13027 USA


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Date: 6/18/18 6:40 am
From: Nancy Tognan <nancy.tognan...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] "Vulture" - a Queens County Bird Club presentation this Weds. June 20
The Queens County Bird Club will be meeting at the Alley Pond Environmental Center, 228-06 Northern Blvd Douglaston, NY 11362 >Map of location< <http://goo.gl/8cnmjT> at 8:00 pm this Wednesday, June 20, 2018. Free admission. Refreshments served.

Katie Fallon will present “Vulture: The Private Life of an Unloved Bird”. Katie is traveling from West Virginia to meet with us - I hope you will join us in giving her a warm welcome.

Turkey vultures, the most widely distributed and abundant scavenging birds of prey on the planet, are found from central Canada to the southern tip of Argentina, and nearly everywhere in between. But despite being ubiquitous and recognizable, the turkey vulture has never had a book of literary nonfiction devoted to it—until Vulture: the Private Life of an Unloved Bird by Katie Fallon.
Floating on six-foot wings, turkey vultures use their keen senses of smell and sight to locate carrion. Unlike the black vulture, turkey vultures do not kill weak or dying animals; instead, they cleanse, purify, and renew the environment by clearing it of decaying carcasses, thus slowing the spread of such dangerous pathogens as anthrax, rabies, and botulism. The beauty, grace, and important role of these birds in the ecosystem notwithstanding, turkey vultures are maligned and underappreciated; they have been accused of spreading disease and killing livestock, neither of which has ever been substantiated. Although turkey vultures are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, the birds still face persecution. They’ve been killed because of their looks, their odor, and their presence in proximity to humans. Even the federal government occasionally sanctions “roost dispersals,” which involve the harassment and sometimes the murder of communally roosting vultures.
Vulture follows a year in the life of a typical North American turkey vulture. By incorporating information from scientific papers and articles, as well as interviews with world-renowned raptor and vulture experts, author Katie Fallon examines all aspects of the bird’s natural history: breeding, incubating eggs, raising chicks, migrating, and roosting. After reading this book you will never look at a vulture in the same way again.
Katie Fallon is the cofounder of the Avian Conservation Center of Appalachia, a nonprofit research, education, and rehabilitation center for injured birds. A member of the International Association of Avian Trainers and Educators, she has glove-trained a wide variety of raptor species, including turkey vultures, hawks, owls, and falcons. She is the author of Cerulean Blues: A personal Search for a Vanishing Songbird. Katie lives in West Virginia.
Copies of Katie’s books will be available for sale at the meeting.

Nancy Tognan
<nancy.tognan...>
Vice President, Queens County Bird Club

See http://www.qcbirdclub.org for more information on trips, speakers, and other events.

See our 'Birding Maps & Locations' page for directions to and info about many local birding hotspots

* QCBC is a tax exempt, charitable organization {501c3}. *
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Date: 6/18/18 4:58 am
From: <suefeustel...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Cattle Egret at Timber Point/No (Suffolk Count)
From 6:45 to 7:45 AM we were unable to locate the Cattle Egret reported there yesterday.

Sent from my iPhone

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Date: 6/17/18 6:58 pm
From: Andrew Block <ablock22168...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Liberty Loop Trail, Wallkill River NWR
I spent the day today at Wallkill River NWR and started early at the Liberty Loop Trail.  I hadn't been there at this time of year in a long time, probably not since I was doing inventories there in the early 2000's.  I was pleased to see how many cool birds were now breeding there that I didn't find in the early 2000's.  I had several Least Bitterns, at least 3 families of Pied-billed Grebes, several American Coots including one family, and at least three pairs of Common Gallinules including one family with 7 or 8 chicks.  Also some regular breeders with families: two or three Wood Duck females with their many ducklings and a Mute Swan pair with five cygnets.  There were also several Green Herons in the area which I assume were nesting too.  Very cool to see these rare and not so rare breeders with families at the refuge.  They really have done a wonderful job there.  I just hope the grassland birds that were nesting at LLT moved to other grasslands in the refuge since it's mostly wetland now.
Andrew   Andrew v. F. Block
Consulting Naturalist
20 Hancock Avenue, Apt. 3
Yonkers, Westchester Co., New York 10705-4629 
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Date: 6/17/18 6:46 pm
From: Andrew Block <ablock22168...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] N. Rough-winged Swallow nest
When I was at the TDBank on Central Ave. in Yonkers yesterday I was surprised to see a N. Rough-winged Swallow flying low around the parking lot and then go in and out of one of the drains on the wall of the back part of the property.  Pretty cool.  Confirmed breeding:-)
Andrew Andrew v. F. Block
Consulting Naturalist
20 Hancock Avenue, Apt. 3
Yonkers, Westchester Co., New York 10705-4629 
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Date: 6/17/18 4:32 pm
From: Matthew Wills <matthewwills...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Kestrels in Brooklyn
My wife and I have been observing American Kestrels outside our
Brooklyn apartment since January. The male showed up first, the female
soon afterwards. They seemed paired up by late February, when I
happened to see one shoot into a cornice down the block (not,
unfortunately, visible from our apartment). I understand that a part
of their pair-bonding is scouting nest sites. Well, that's the one
they chose, above a bodega.

Today, apropos for Father's Day, I glimpsed the first evidence of the
payoff for all their hard work: a young male, still inside the
cornice. We certainly hope there's more, and that the (nerve-wracking
for us) fledgling proceeds apace.

This has been the most sustained nature observation I've ever
experienced and it has been amazing, and gory: have watched more than
a few songbird feet being gulped down kestrel throats.


There are pictures galore on my blog Backyard and Beyond,
https://matthewwills.com. If you want to skip straight to all the
#BrooklynKestrels it's https://matthewwills.com/tag/kestrels/


Keep your eyes on those old TV antennas,


Matthew

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Date: 6/17/18 3:58 pm
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Sun. June 17, 2018 - Black-billed Cuckoo, N. Parula, & Nesting Birds
Central Park NYC
Sunday, June 17, 2018
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob.

Highlights: Black-billed Cuckoo, Northern Parula & Nesting Birds: Cedar Waxwing, Eastern Kingbird, Baltimore Orioles, Gray Catbird.

Canada Goose - 5 at the Pond
Wood Duck - male in eclipse plumage at the Pond
Mallard - 30 at the Pond, others at Turtle Pond & Oak Bridge
Mourning Dove - residents
Black-billed Cuckoo - Captain's Bench/Balancing Rock & later at Swampy Pin Oak
Chimney Swift - 3 or 4 getting drinks at Turtle Pond & a few flyovers
Herring Gull - flyover
Double-crested Cormorant - flyover
Great Egret - the Pond
Black-crowned Night-Heron - 2 at the Pond
Red-bellied woodpecker - Oven & near Azalea Pond
Downy Woodpecker - 2 or 3
Northern Flicker - pair Gill Overlook
Great Crested Flycatcher - Mugger's Woods
Eastern Kingbird - female at Turtle Pond nest
Warbling Vireo - 4 (Boathouse, Turtle Pond, Oak Bridge (P. Haskel), Swampy Pin Oak)
Blue Jay - residents
American Robin - residents nesting
Gray Catbird - adult carrying mulberry wing-waving display at the Point (nest)
Cedar Waxwing - pair at nest Shakespeare Garden (male has orange-tipped tail), 5 Maintenance Field, etc.
House Finch - 2 or 3 in Mulberry near Gapstow Bridge
Song Sparrow - singing Gapstow Bridge
Baltimore Oriole - pair at nest Delacorte (S. Critelli), pair at nest Maint. Fld.
Red-winged Blackbird - male & female Turtle Pond
Common Grackle - residents
Northern Parula - singing west of Gapstow Bridge (reported there 6/12/18 by J. Suzuki)
Northern Cardinal - residents
--

Carine Mitchell reported a singing Wood Thrush or two in Riverside Park.

Sol Shamilzadeh reports that both juvenile Red-tailed Hawks from the 5th Ave. nest fledged this week and are doing well, perching on a building and in a pine nearby.

Jean Shum reported on June 16th on twitter* that all three of the orphaned Red-tailed Hawks at the Grant's Tomb nest have now been rescued by Bobby Horvath of WINORR (Wildlife in Need of Rescue & Rehabilitation) & the Urban Park Rangers.

American Kestrels are fledgling now too.

Deb Allen

Follow us on twitter @BirdingBobNYC & @DAllenNYC

*See Manhattan Bird Alert @BirdCentralPark maintained by David Barrett for additional reports.


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Date: 6/17/18 5:45 am
From: John Gluth <jgluth...>
Subject: Re:[nysbirds-l] CATTLE EGRET - Timberpoint golf course (Suffolk Co.)
Currently on right side of road near a cart path on far side of pond.

John Gluth
Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 17, 2018, at 8:36 AM, John Gluth <jgluth...> wrote:
>
> Along road to east marina.
>
> John Gluth
> Sent from my iPhone

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Date: 6/17/18 5:36 am
From: John Gluth <jgluth...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] CATTLE EGRET - Timberpoint golf course (Suffolk Co.)
Along road to east marina.

John Gluth
Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 6/17/18 3:18 am
From: Timothy Healy <tph56...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Arctic Tern, Nickerson Beach, Nassau
Just arrived at Nickerson and immediately found an adult Arctic Tern in front of the eastern colony. Will post if I see anything else of note, but wanted to get the word out early so people could get here before collecting starts. Roseates present as well.

Cheers!
-Tim H
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Date: 6/16/18 4:08 pm
From: kevin rogers <kev31317...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] 2 Royal Terns nickerson beach
Heard and then visually saw two Royal terns briefly over the East Colony of loafing terns at nickerson beach at 7:02 pm...there's a bunch of Roseate Terns around..at least 4!-kev

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Date: 6/16/18 3:20 pm
From: Karen Fung <easternbluebird...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Henslows Sparrow redux: Shawangunk Grasslands, NWR (Ulster County)
Thanks John and Rick (and all those who wrote to me privately) for the
feedback :-).

The possibility of using spectrograms as a tracking tool for ID'ing
individual birds has become very intriguing to me. For example, if it
becomes established that adult Henslow's Sparrows only have one song in
their repertoire that never changes, and *IF* it turns out that its own
song is unique, like a fingerprint, then if the same spectrogram is
recorded elsewhere, one could possibly assume it was the same individual.
This line of reasoning had me return just now to the eBird database and
review the most recent audio files for 2018, hoping that I might find the
2017 Shawangunk bird represented somewhere in their treasure trove. The
result is that I came across this eBird checklist from Centre County
Pennsylvania on 25 May 2018 that contains an audio file of a Henslow's.
Its spectrogram appears to match the spectrogram of last year's Henslow's
seen at Shawangunk:

Here's the Pennsylvania bird ( 25 May 2018):
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46124750

Here's one of the recordings of the New York bird (27 May 2017):
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S37188198

Do folks agree that the spectrograms and recordings look and sound fairly
similar?

I am cc'ing Nathan Pieplow on this, but he's based in Colorado and may not
subscribe to this list. If his reply appears off-list, I will post it.

Karen Fung
NYC


On Fri, Jun 15, 2018 at 2:45 PM, JOHN TURNER <redknot...> wrote:

> I totally agree with Rick.
>
>
>
> On Thu, Jun 14, 2018 at 07:51 PM, <rcech...> wrote:
>
> Karen: Don’t confuse lack of interest with folks not having enough
> expertise on the topic to feel they are qualified to contribute to the
> discussion (e.g., me). I for, one, was fascinated, and look forward to
> further developments.
>
>
>
> Rick Cech
>
>
>
> P.S. Also add kudos for the fine tern id discussion, Joe, Shai & others.
> We’re fortunate to have individuals in the community with such depths of
> insight and experience.
>
>
>
> *From:* <bounce-122638804-3714678...> <
> <bounce-122638804-3714678...> *On Behalf Of *Karen Fung
> *Sent:* Thursday, June 14, 2018 2:46 PM
> *To:* <nysbirds-L...>
> *Subject:* [nysbirds-l] Henslows Sparrow redux: Shawangunk Grasslands,
> NWR (Ulster County)
>
>
>
> Hi All,
>
> A few weeks ago, I posted a query to the list, noting that this year's
> Henslow's Sparrow at Shawangunk is singing a different song compared to the
> single song recorded by multiple observers last year, and wondering if that
> was enough of an indication that this year's bird is a different
> individual. That post did not really elicit much interest, based on the
> little feedback I received.
>
>
>
> Since then, I wrote to a few people directly, including Nathan Pieplow,
> whose book, "Peterson Field Guide to Bird Sounds of Eastern North
> America", was published last year. Am including my direct query to him.
> Nathan agrees that this year's bird is almost certainly a different
> individual, and he gave me permission to post his reply, which you will see
> below.
>
>
>
> For those interested, the screen shot of the spectrograms that I sent to
> him is now online on my website, in this gallery. You can see from the
> screen shot that the first four spectrograms show a "Mi-Re-Do" sequence of
> notes, and they are all from this year's bird. The remaining spectrograms
> show a "Mi-Do-Re" type sequence of notes. Both three syllable "songs", just
> a different sequence of sounds.
>
>
>
> https://www.birdsiviews.com/Henslows-Sparrow-Shawangunk-Grasslands/
>
>
>
> If you want to see and play back the entire eBird collection of
> spectrograms and audio files for both Shawangunk birds, the link is here:
>
>
>
> https://ebird.org/media/catalog?taxonCode=henspa&
> mediaType=a&region=Ulster,%20New%20York,%20United%
> 20States%20(US)&regionCode=US-NY-111&q=Henslow%27s%
> 20Sparrow%20-%20Ammodramus%20henslowii
>
>
>
> Nathan's reply and my query to him follow here.
>
>
>
> --------------
>
>
>
> Karen,
>
>
>
> Thanks for the email! I'm very glad you like my book. We need to get more
> people using it!
>
>
>
> I'm about as certain as I can be that the 2018 bird is a different
> individual than the 2017 bird. Here's why:
>
> · Henslow's is a poorly studied species. But in the research for my
> book, I never found a documented case of an individual Henslow's switching
> songtypes on a recording.
>
> · You've got a pretty good sample size of recordings here. I went
> through all the 2018 recordings and every rendition is identical. I didn't
> go through all the 2017 recordings but in my sample, they were all
> identical to each other and different from the 2018 bird.
>
> · All the 2017 and 2018 recordings in your sample are stereotyped, not
> plastic. This basically ensures the recordings come from adult birds. It
> has been shown in many passerine species that once birds are adults, they
> cannot learn new songs. A few birds have been shown to break this rule
> (like Northern Mockingbird), but it would be a surprise for Henslow's
> Sparrow.
>
> · The 2017 and 2018 songs differ in many details -- one is not merely a
> truncation of the other.
>
> This is actually a pretty good test case for the number of songtypes per
> individual Henslow's Sparrow. If birders visit the same bird many times
> over the course of a season and never document any song variation, it's
> very good evidence that each individual has a single songtype. Plus, it
> happens to fit with the little we know about song in Henslow's, and a great
> deal that we know about song in passerines in general.
>
>
>
> So, I'd say you have a new bird this year.
>
>
>
>
>
> Nathan
>
>
>
> On Thu, Jun 14, 2018 at 3:59 AM, Karen Fung <easternbluebird...>
> > wrote:
>
> Dear Nathan,
>
> I very much enjoyed your presentation at the Linnaean Society (NY) last
> year, and bought your book as soon as it came out. I grew up playing the
> piano as a hobby, so am used to seeing sounds presented in visual form.
> Spectrograms are a great aid in learning bird song!
>
>
>
> Anyway, I'm writing to hopefully get your thoughts on whether you think
> the male Henslow's Sparrow that is currently singing at Shawangunk
> Grasslands NWR (NY: Ulster County) is a different bird from last year's
> since its spectrogram is slightly different. See below for part of an
> email that I sent to local birders. Was told that Henslow's hasn't nested
> at Shawungunk in maybe 30 years, and that last year's sighting was the
> first one documented in recent memory. That alone made some folks think
> that the current bird had to be the same one as last year's due to its
> rarity. Last year it was around for maybe ten days, singing incessantly.
> This year it also sings non-stop, but the sequence of notes is different.
> This year it has a mate, so could it be singing a different song just based
> on that fact? Your book seemed to indicate that Henslow's only has one
> song in its repertoire.. but could it have modulated its song between
> seasons?. Some birders agree that it is likely to be a different bird,
> based on its different song, plus its plumage appears to be paler this year
> (but I'm not sure how to evaluate plumage if the bird has molted).
>
>
>
> Any thoughts would be appreciated. The attached screen shot was taken a
> few days ago. The link to the eBird data for the audio files is below.
>
>
>
> Best Wishes,
>
> Karen Fung
>
> Manhattan
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --
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Date: 6/16/18 9:02 am
From: clay spencer <cfmspencer...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Shawangunk Grasslands NWR Trail closing
Just to add to Curt's comment.

The entire Blue Trail (northern) loop should be passable.

And yes, the singing male can be easily heard from both the platform & gazebo, and should be visible with scope when it's up on its favorite perches, the taller sprigs of flowering bushes (multiflora rose?).

Clay

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 16, 2018, at 9:58 AM, Curt McDermott <tele-tek...> wrote:
>
> FYI...The Shawangunk Grasslands Red Trail (the one that had previously gone in the direction of the Henslows Sparrow) is closed until further notice. This is the trail that leads from the area of the Gazebo and heads south toward Blue Chip Farms. The trail then runs along the southern edge of the Grasslands, and eventually mid way along the Eastern edge of the refuge, where it meets up with the blue trail. It is possible to see the Henslows from the platform, with a sharp eye and good optics, if he is posted up and singing. The blue trail, which begins at the north western edge of the parking lot, remains open up to the point where it becomes the red trail. So....An out and back walk on the blue trail is still possible. Information only.
>
> Good Birding,
> Curt McDermott
>
> Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
> On Jun 15, 2018 7:16 PM, Ken F <feustel...> wrote:
> I spent four hours birding the Cupsogue flats on an outgoing tide late this morning and early afternoon. Highlights included an immature Arctic Tern (photos on my flickr site) and a single Royal Tern on the Moriches Inlet sandbar. Eight species of shorebirds were observed, all common species, but a hundred and five Semipalmated Sandpipers were a good number for this late date. No luck on Sandwich or Black Tern.
>
> If anyone is thinking about going out to Cupsogue this weekend (from the west) US Open patrons are using Gabreski Airport to park and shuttle buses are going in and out of the airport grounds frequently. They have a dedicated bus lane down the middle of the road that slows things down a bit. It may be worthwhile to get off one exit early and take Montauk Highway into Westhampton Beach.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Ken Feustel
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/kfeustel/
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Date: 6/16/18 8:14 am
From: Patricia Lindsay <pjlindsay...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Arctic Tern Nickerson Beach, Nassau Co.
Second summer type, with black bill (different from Tripper's bird yesterday).

Sent from my iPhone

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Date: 6/16/18 6:59 am
From: Curt McDermott <tele-tek...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Shawangunk Grasslands NWR Trail closing
FYI...The Shawangunk Grasslands Red Trail (the one that had previously gone in the direction of the Henslows Sparrow) is closed until further notice. This is the trail that leads from the area of the Gazebo and heads south toward Blue Chip Farms. The trail then runs along the southern edge of the Grasslands, and eventually mid way along the Eastern edge of the refuge, where it meets up with the blue trail. It is possible to see the Henslows from the platform, with a sharp eye and good optics, if he is posted up and singing. The blue trail, which begins at the north western edge of the parking lot, remains open up to the point where it becomes the red trail. So....An out and back walk on the blue trail is still possible. Information only.

Good Birding,
Curt McDermott

Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
On Jun 15, 2018 7:16 PM, Ken F <feustel...> wrote:
I spent four hours birding the Cupsogue flats on an outgoing tide late this morning and early afternoon. Highlights included an immature Arctic Tern (photos on my flickr site) and a single Royal Tern on the Moriches Inlet sandbar. Eight species of shorebirds were observed, all common species, but a hundred and five Semipalmated Sandpipers were a good number for this late date. No luck on Sandwich or Black Tern.

If anyone is thinking about going out to Cupsogue this weekend (from the west) US Open patrons are using Gabreski Airport to park and shuttle buses are going in and out of the airport grounds frequently. They have a dedicated bus lane down the middle of the road that slows things down a bit. It may be worthwhile to get off one exit early and take Montauk Highway into Westhampton Beach.

Cheers,

Ken Feustel
http://www.flickr.com/photos/kfeustel/
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Date: 6/16/18 6:49 am
From: Colleen Veltri <cfinneganv...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Lesser Black Back Gull
Lesser Black Back Gull Nickerson Beach west side with flock of assorted gulls

May the birds be with you

Bobby and Colleen

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Date: 6/15/18 9:42 pm
From: Gail Benson <gbensonny...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] NYC Area RBA: 15 June 2018
-RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* June 15, 2018
* NYNY1806.15

- Birds Mentioned

ARCTIC TERN+
SANDWICH TERN+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

Lesser Scaup
CORY'S SHEARWATER
Sooty Shearwater
WILSON’S STORM-PETREL
Bald Eagle
Red-shouldered Hawk
Whimbrel
Ruddy Turnstone
Semipalmated Sandpiper
American Woodcock
PARASITIC JAEGER
Lesser Black-backed Gull
GULL-BILLED TERN
Black Tern
Roseate Tern
Common Tern
Royal Tern
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Black-billed Cuckoo
Barred Owl
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Peregrine Falcon
Acadian Flycatcher
Alder Flycatcher
Red-breasted Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
Swainson’s Thrush
Mourning Warbler
Hooded Warbler
YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER
Saltmarsh Sparrow
Seaside Sparrow
SUMMER TANAGER
BLUE GROSBEAK
Eastern Meadowlark


If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report
electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at
http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to
nysarc44<at>nybirds<dot>org

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or
sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compilers: Tom Burke and Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Gail Benson

[~BEGIN RBA TAPE~]

Greetings! This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, June 15, 2018
at 10:00 pm.

The highlights of today’s tape are SANDWICH, ARCTIC, GULL-BILLED and other
TERNS, CORY'S SHEARWATER, WILSON’S STORM-PETREL, PARASITIC JAEGER,
YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER, SUMMER TANAGER, BLUE GROSBEAK and more.

With much of this week’s birding efforts concentrated on coastal beaches
and inlets where Terns gather, the number and variety of Terns has
increased to even include a couple of SANDWICH TERNS – one was found last
Saturday along Dune Road west of Shinnecock Inlet and the other appeared
Wednesday near the Breezy Point Tip.

A few ARCTIC TERNS included two immatures on the flats at Cupsogue County
Park in Westhampton Dunes last Sunday and Monday, an adult last Sunday and
again today at the Tern colony at Nickerson Beach off Lido Boulevard, and
an immature at Breezy Point Tuesday and Wednesday.

Single BLACK TERNS visited Nickerson last Saturday, Breezy Point Monday and
Mecox Bay today, while arriving ROYAL TERNS included three at Cupsogue last
Sunday, one on Fire Island Wednesday, and two at Smith Point County Park in
Shirley today, their numbers expected to increase as the summer progresses.

ROSEATE TERNS include up to five around the Nickerson colony, six at
Cupsogue Sunday, and four at Mecox Bay today.

One or two GULL-BILLED TERNS continue to be seen at Nickerson, and
regarding identification of immature and sub-adult Siberian race COMMON
TERNS at sites like Nickerson, we can only urge extreme caution be
exercised unless one is quite familiar with Siberian longipennis and
nominate hirundo variations within each subspecies.

Two GULL-BILLED TERNS visited the Cedar Beach Marina last Saturday for the
Captree Summer Bird Count, which recorded 127 species. Other Count
highlights included two LESSER SCAUP, eight CORY’S and eight SOOTY
SHEARWATERS, two RED-SHOULDERED HAWKS, a gathering of birds at Democrat
Point on Fire Island that featured a WHIMBREL, two PARASITIC JAEGERS and
six ROSEATE TERNS, twenty-two LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS, one BLACK-BILLED
and two YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOOS and a MOURNING WARBLER at mainland parks, the
continuing YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER at Bayard Cutting Arboretum, and good
numbers of SALTMARSH and SEASIDE SPARROWS.

A sea watch off Cupsogue County Park on Monday produced 20 CORY’S, 28 SOOTY
and 10 unidentified SHEARWATERS and a single WILSON’S STORM-PETREL.

Last Saturday a SUMMER TANAGER was encountered at a private home in
Northwest Harbor out in East Hampton, and BLUE GROSBEAKS continue in the
Calverton area.

Last weekend the Greenwich-Stamford Summer Bird Count, including much of
eastern Westchester County, tallied 126 species including eight BALD EAGLES
and two PEREGRINE FALCONS, three RUDDY TURNSTONES, SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER
and AMERICAN WOODCOCK, two YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKERS, fifteen BARRED OWLS,
an ALDER and two ACADIAN FLYCATCHERS, two RED-BREASTED NUTCHATCHES, BROWN
CREEPER, SWAINSON’S THRUSH, HOODED WARBLER and EASTERN MEADOWLARK.

To phone in reports, on Long Island call Tony Lauro at (631) 734 4126 or
call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922 and leave a message.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the
National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

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Date: 6/15/18 8:40 pm
From: Robert Lewis <rfermat...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach - Terns
Great photos.  It looks like this is not the same bird as the one I photographed there June 12.  "My" bird seems to have a slightly larger bill, darker legs, and mottled gray underparts.  They both have the domed-head look and the long primaries. 

To try to quantify the long wings, I measured from where the legs join the body back to the tip of the primaries, then forward to the front of the chest.  The ratio of these lengths is 2.83 to 3.0 on my bird, depending on the photograph.  I get 2.83 for yours.  For various Common Terns in my photos I get 2.22 to 2.63.  All the birds have to have the same standing posture.
Bob Lewis
Index of /lewis/birds/odd_comm_tern

|
|
| |
Index of /lewis/birds/odd_comm_tern


|

|

|


Also see photos of longipennis from Asia:
Index of /lewis/birds/other_long

|
|
| |
Index of /lewis/birds/other_long


|

|

|




On Friday, June 15, 2018, 9:08:21 PM EDT, peter paul <pepaul...> wrote:

Just to add to the Long Island bird reports from today - I went to Nickerson and spent around 4 and a half hours terning.  Highlights were a second summer type ARCTIC TERN, four ROSEATE TERNs, and a much-discussed-as-of-late, black billed, black legged, long winged, speckled forheaded COMMON TERN (A Notorious C.O.T.E., if you will).  Finally, there were also at least 15 first summer Common Terns, and a few second summer types.  
The black billed COTE and Roseate's were there for the entire duration of my time at the park - each time that they flushed, they returned to loaf in front of the colony.  The ARTE stayed for around an hour, and was eventually flushed by a truck driving down the beach.  
A cooperative Tricolored Heron continued at Marine Nature Study Area as well.  
More photos and details:
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46569053

https://www.flickr.com/photos/129132563@N05/
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Date: 6/15/18 6:08 pm
From: peter paul <pepaul...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach - Terns
Just to add to the Long Island bird reports from today - I went to
Nickerson and spent around 4 and a half hours terning. Highlights were a
second summer type ARCTIC TERN, four ROSEATE TERNs, and a
much-discussed-as-of-late, black billed, black legged, long winged,
speckled forheaded COMMON TERN (A Notorious C.O.T.E., if you will).
Finally, there were also at least 15 first summer Common Terns, and a few
second summer types.

The black billed COTE and Roseate's were there for the entire duration of
my time at the park - each time that they flushed, they returned to loaf in
front of the colony. The ARTE stayed for around an hour, and was
eventually flushed by a truck driving down the beach.

A cooperative Tricolored Heron continued at Marine Nature Study Area as
well.

More photos and details:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46569053

https://www.flickr.com/photos/129132563@N05/

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Date: 6/15/18 4:16 pm
From: Ken F <feustel...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Cupsogue Beach County Park Birds (Suffolk Co.)
I spent four hours birding the Cupsogue flats on an outgoing tide late this morning and early afternoon. Highlights included an immature Arctic Tern (photos on my flickr site) and a single Royal Tern on the Moriches Inlet sandbar. Eight species of shorebirds were observed, all common species, but a hundred and five Semipalmated Sandpipers were a good number for this late date. No luck on Sandwich or Black Tern.

If anyone is thinking about going out to Cupsogue this weekend (from the west) US Open patrons are using Gabreski Airport to park and shuttle buses are going in and out of the airport grounds frequently. They have a dedicated bus lane down the middle of the road that slows things down a bit. It may be worthwhile to get off one exit early and take Montauk Highway into Westhampton Beach.

Cheers,

Ken Feustel
http://www.flickr <http://www.flickr/>.com/photos/kfeustel/
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Date: 6/15/18 2:26 pm
From: robert adamo <radamo4691...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Mecox Bay today - Black & Roseate Terns
Per Willie Becker, at 1615 there were 1 of the former, and 4 of the latter
- way to go Willie !

Cheers,
Bob

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Date: 6/15/18 12:53 pm
From: Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
Shai,

Thank you for the dive into your bookshelves.

For those who are away from the libraries :), or don’t have back issues of North American Birds, you can go to the SORA site (Searchable Ornithological Research Archive) maintained by the University of New Mexico (sora.unm.edu). Many ornithological journals, including North American Birds are available there as pdfs. The issue Shai cites is among them and the bird in question is also discussed in the Seasonal Highlights section, as well as a color photo in the Pictorial Highlights section as well as the page Shai references.

Joe DiCostanzo

Sent from my iPad

> On Jun 15, 2018, at 3:12 PM, Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...> wrote:
>
> Swore I wouldn't do it, but I just pulled my stacks of North American Birds off the shelf.
>
> The NJ bird was photographed at Stone Harbor, near Cape May, by Michael O'Brien on 14 Jul 2003, and reproduced in Volume 57, p. 473 of North American Birds. The caption reads, "One of the most interesting birds of the season to be documented in the [Hudson-Delaware] Region, indeed one of the most intriguing in many years, was the apparent longipennis Common Tern, a Siberian nester never before recorded in the Atlantic basin, which was studied carefully at Stone Harbor Pt. 14 Jul (ph. MO'B, m/ ob.). Old World authorities have reviewed the series of photographs by O'Brien and concur with the identification as longipennis, probably a bird in its second summer."
>
> The RI bird was around that time, and it is possible that I conflated it with the NJ bird vis a vis the NAB photo, but I've put in the call to an observer of that bird (which was definitely well photographed) to pin it down, too.
>
> Shai
> ________________________________________
> From: Shaibal Mitra
> Sent: Friday, June 15, 2018 2:23 PM
> To: NYSBIRDS (<NYSBIRDS-L...>)
> Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
>
> Again, nobody is saying we know for sure what these birds are. But those who know the most about the records in question find them intriguing, and, having studied variation in hirundo collectively with great interest for many decades, remain uncomfortable with that null hypothesis. Another hypothesis that people have offered is hirundo x Arctic Tern hybrid; genetic incompatibility might result in deviations in various traits associated with normal breeding condition. Another possibility (which could account for the oddity that most/all have been "second-summer types" (based on white in the forehead, mottling on the underparts, and atypical primary replacement pattern) is that just a couple of birds have been rattling up and down the Atlantic and have gotten old and lonely.
>
> The cool thing about the better candidates is that they would absolutely stand out from hirundo in multiple ways, even if their bills and legs were colored exactly like typical hirundo:
>
> They are long-winged--as judged relative to their bodies, resembling Arctic Tern in this way
> They are very long-tailed--at least one with tail streamers extending beyond the tips of their already relatively long wings
> They are intensely gray below--more intensely gray than even high breeding hirundo; this is especially notable on second-summer types, because second-summer type hirundo tend to be less intensely gray than even dull breeding adult hirundo
> They have shorter, subtly different shaped bills than typical hirundo--obviously just a supporting character, easily matched by variant hirundo, but interesting because supposedly typical of longipennis
>
> Their dark bills catch the eye but as Joe noted are not that exceptional for hirundo, even in June. In contrast, their dark legs are vastly more unusual at this date. In my experience, dark legs are extremely rare among hirundo in May-June, even within each of the odd-ball categories: adults that arrive with dark bills, second-summer types, and first-summers.
>
> Getting back to the question at hand, yes, there have been carefully scrutinized, documented, and published longipennis candidates from NJ, LI, RI, and MA (I recall less clearly one from the UKin this time frame also). I have collected (but not assembled and analyzed) the particulars on these over the years. The place to look for the best information is not eBird or other online sites, but rather North American Birds, the relevant state publications, and the original documents, photos, and correspondence I've archived (and promise some day to publish).
>
> The first one I remember was from Rhode Island; it was photographed and published in North American Birds. The issues are right there on my shelf, but I don't have time or interest to search right now.
> This was earlier, I think, than one from NJ in 2003.
> Another was studied and photographed by Scott Whittle and me at Moriches Inlet in June 2009.
> 2011 brought not only the LI bird we've been discussing, but another at Muskeget Island, off Nantucket, studied by Vern Laux and photographed by Peter Trimble.
>
> From an email from Dick Veit: "Factors distinguishing this [Muskeget] bird from other terns include (aside from the blackish bill) reddish brown legs, upperparts darker gray than local common terns, bill rather short, head more rounded, rather "domed", underparts darkish gray (though not as dark as they would be in May), tail feathers longer than wingtips at rest, legs seemed slightly shorter than commons, though not as short as on arctic."
>
> All this typing is cramping my scope-focusing hand. I think I might just head down to an inlet, any inlet!
>
> Best,
> Shai
>
>
> ________________________________________
> From: <bounce-122640877-11143133...> [<bounce-122640877-11143133...>] on behalf of Joseph DiCostanzo [<jdicost...>]
> Sent: Friday, June 15, 2018 1:31 PM
> To: Robert Lewis
> Cc: NYSBIRDS (<NYSBIRDS-L...>)
> Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
>
> I went to the ABA’s Birding News site that lists RBA’s around the country and did a search for longipennis. For the months of May and June of this year, most of the returns of the search seemed to refer to a dragonfly with that scientific name. There was one bird report from the Aleutians and all other reports came from reports on Long Island related to this discussion.
>
> I also searched for Siberian Tern and got nothing.
>
> Joe DiCostanzo
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> On Jun 15, 2018, at 11:44 AM, Robert Lewis <rfermat...><mailto:<rfermat...>> wrote:
>
> Perhaps I missed it, but there seems to be an obvious question here: have bids like this been reported from neighboring states?
>
> Bob Lewis
> Sleepy Hollow Y
>
>
> On Thursday, June 14, 2018, 10:49:25 AM EDT, Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...><mailto:<Shaibal.Mitra...>> wrote:
>
>
> As I mentioned in my earlier note to the list on this subject (8 Jun 18, copied at the very end of the present note), the jury is certainly still out on the status of longipennis Common Terns on the east coast. Joe's highly informed contributions are a very welcome addition to the process and underscore several areas to focus on in resolving the matter. First, it is clearly true that to claim an extralimital longipennis, the evidence must be very strong and include multiple characters beyond dark bills and dark legs. I have a lot to contribute on this front, because I have made a point of studying non-breeding terns for more than 20 years, during which time I have collected detailed data on large samples of carefully scored first-summers and "second-summer types" (a category which, as Joe notes, consists of an odd amalgam of a subset of some but not all two year-olds, older adults short of full breeding condition, and very old, senescent adults)--not only of Common Terns, but also of Arctic, Roseate, Least, Black, and others.
>
> For now I just want to make two very simple points in response to the queries Joe raises toward the end of his note.
>
> First, I'd like to address Joe's skepticism about judging wing length visually. I once wrote a long, detailed note to the ID Frontiers list defending the critical, visual assessment of shape (i.e., the relative sizes of morphological structures; that piece concerned warblers, or maybe willets, or maybe I did it separately for both?). I might be able to dig it/them up, but for now I remember demonstrating that large samples of in-hand measurements counter-intuitively often obscure real differences between similar species, males and females, etc. The reason is that handbooks over-emphasize extreme data, neglecting quantitative measures of variance and covariance, and because most observers are unprepared or unwilling to think quantitatively. At the same time, sharp-eyed birders can unerringly distinguish Blackpoll and Pine Warblers at a glance by shape, even though practically all their measurements, viewed individually in huge samples, overlap. With regard to terns, I can recognize visually how the length of an individual's primary projection compares to the chord of its dorsum with enough precision to distinguish Common and Arctic Terns very confidently. So I would caution against categorically dismissing this line of evidence.
>
> Second, the true statuses of non-breeding seabirds remain an amazing mystery, and the few glimpses we've had so far have been really exciting. Most obviously, the local status of Arctic Tern has been completely re-written in the past 20 years based precisely on attention to loafing flocks of non-breeding terns. Furthermore, scrutiny of these flocks has yielded many other rarities, some of them as unexpected as longipennis might seem: Elegant Tern, Cayenne Tern, acuflavidus Sandwich Terns during June, Little Gulls during June, etc. My point is that although the improbability of longipennis needs to be answered with strong evidence, much stranger things have happened. I still examine every Arctic Tern I see with the remote potential of Antarctic Tern in mind; the non-breeders hang out together down there, so maybe a few stick together up here, too. Ditto for examining first-summer Least Terns for Littles and first-summer Black Terns for White-winged and Whiskered.
>
> Brian Patteson recently saw a Tahiti Petrel off of Hatteras!
>
> Shai Mitra
> Bay Shore
>
>
> ________________________________________
> From: <bounce-122637763-11143133...><mailto:<bounce-122637763-11143133...> [<bounce-122637763-11143133...><mailto:<bounce-122637763-11143133...>] on behalf of Joseph DiCostanzo [<jdicost...><mailto:<jdicost...>]
> Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2018 9:08 AM
> To: Robert Lewis
> Cc: nysbirds-l
> Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
>
> Bob,
>
> Molt, (and I am including change in soft part colors such as bill and leg color under the term “molt”) is hormonally controlled. There is also considerable variation between individuals in the timing of molt. The timing and sequence of molt is no where as neat and fixed as many references might lead you to believe. Having worked extensively with a banded population, where the age of individuals is known from their banding histories, I know how much variation there is. I have seen birds with extensive white foreheads (or heavy speckling) and extensive carpal bars that I knew from their bands were two years old. I have also seen two year olds that were indistinguishable from normal adults. I have also seen that I knew were three, or four years old (or older based on their bands) that showed speckled foreheads and traces of carpal bars. I have seen adults in August at the breeding colony on Great Gull Island that were already in full winter plumage (black bill, dark legs, carpal bar). Individuals that don’t match the expected are unusual, but they do occur.
>
> As for the lack of a carpal bar on these dark billed, dark legged individuals, you are assuming that feather molt (carpal bar) and soft part colors (legs and bill) must be in total lock-step with each other. There is no reason they couldn’t be out of sync in some instances. As for primary length, this is being based on photos, not actual measurements of the bird in hand. How is the primary length being assessed? I am guessing versus tail length. How does anyone know the tail length?
>
> These dark billed, dark legged Common Terns get reported every year at this season, just at the time young Common Terns are coming back from South America. Where are these supposed longipennis birds coming from? The race breeds in Siberia and winters in the Indian Ocean east to Australia. If longipennis were going to occur here on the East Coast, the fall seems a more likely time than the spring migration. It seems far more likely that these birds are aberrant hirundo retaining aspects of their winter/non-breeding plumage than that there is an annual movement of Siberian based longipennis birds through Long Island.
>
> Joe DiCostanzo
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> On Jun 14, 2018, at 7:59 AM, Robert Lewis <rfermat...><mailto:<rfermat...><mailto:<rfermat...><mailto:<rfermat...>>> wrote:
>
> Good points Joe.
>
> Let's go with the null hypothesis: it's an unusual Common tern (hirundo). Apparently a Common tern in September can get gray blotches on the underparts. During the winter they have a black bill, black legs, and a black cap with white forehead, as first summer birds do now. If it is four - eight months late in molt (or four months early), maybe that would explain some features. But then there should be a prominent dark carpal bar. Instead, there is none. Also, how to explain the very long primaries? And the fact that the back is a bit darker gray than neighboring Commons, both adult and immature?
>
> I found a number of images of longipennis on the web. Here are some screen shots:
>
> Index of /lewis/birds/other_long<http://home.bway.net/lewis/birds/other_long/>
>
> <http://home.bway.net/lewis/birds/other_long/>
>
> Index of /lewis/birds/other_long
>
>
>
>
> Bob Lewis
>
>
>
> On Wednesday, June 13, 2018, 9:01:37 PM EDT, Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...><mailto:<jdicost...><mailto:<jdicost...><mailto:<jdicost...>>> wrote:
>
>
> One thing that has to be kept in mind about dark billed and/or dark legged Common Terns seen on Long Island in the spring is that our Common Terns (Sterna hirundo hirundo) have dark bills and dark legs in winter (both the young birds and adults). The possibility that these birds are just S. hirundo hirundo retaining aspects of their winter plumage must be considered. Indeed, given the breeding and wintering ranges of S. hirundo longipennis, S. hirundo hirundo with retained winter characters seems a more likely possibility.
>
> Joe DiCostanzo
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> --
>
> Pasted here 14 Jun 2018 from note to NYSBirds 8 June 2018:
>
> Subject: Nickerson Beach - Possible Common Tern (longipennis) Species - Comments and thoughts welcome
> Date: Fri Jun 8 2018 1:09 am
> From: Shaibal.Mitra AT csi.cuny.edu<http://csi.cuny.edu>
>
>
> Dear Mike and all,
>
>
>
> This is an interesting bird, and well worth careful discussion. The photos are, as is so often necessarily the case, not ideal for assessing wing pattern and structure, and several other features. To my eye, the combination of adult-like plumage, darkish bill, not so dark legs, and not very deeply gray underparts is consistent with an early season variation of adult hirundo Common Tern that we do see from time to time.
>
>
>
> The jury is certainly still out on the status of longipennis Common Terns on the east coast, and in the past I have eBirded the ones I've seen under regular "Common Tern"--but with lots of notation and documentation. Based on the checklists you've linked from Jay and Michael, provisionally specifying this form, I agree it might be best to take this approach while we work things out. At least it would be easier to collect and access the evidence.
>
>
>
> Anyway, two of the best (and earliest in NY) candidates for longipennis were birds at Cupsogue on 26 Jun 2011 and 24 Jun 2014. I've aggregated photos of these at the following link:
>
>
>
> https://flic.kr/s/aHskD7WtGd
>
>
>
> As you will see, these birds were not only different in soft parts colors and plumage from same-aged hirundo COTE, but also different in terms of structure and molt (as explained in part in the note to this listserv from 27 Jun 2011, copied at the end of this note).
>
>
>
> I've seen a few more also, including these two I was able to find quickly just now:
>
>
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
>
>
>
> It seems odd that the best candidates have always been second-summer (TY) birds, but there are two points worth emphasizing on this front. First, subadult terns are definitely proven to be prone to wander; second, these longipennis candidates differ very strongly in multiple ways from the range of variation I've documented in same-aged hirundo COTE over the past 20 years. The links in my copied email are long defunct, but I can direct those who are interested to long series of images of TY hirundo COTE from our area.
>
>
>
> Shai Mitra
>
> Bay Shore
>
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Date: 6/15/18 12:33 pm
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Central Park & Manhattan, NYC 6/9-15 - migrants, lingerers, & etc.
Saturday, 9 June thru Friday, 15 June, 2018

Central Park, with occasional visits to other Manhattan (N.Y. City) parks & greenspaces.

* It should be mentioned, yet again, that the playing of any amplified sounds without a permit in Central Park is prohibited at all times and in all areas. Signage stating this is posted in various areas of that park and includes precisely that language & also shows the logos of the Parks Dept./City of New York, and the Central Park Conservancy, who are responsible for day-to-day management of that park. *

Over recent weeks in particular, I have been in the park[s] on a regular basis at first-light. Some of the nesting birds in particular are heard & thus seen to advantage, & of course with no disturbance needed, in observations made. On some days activity was continuing on thru the day, while on others, & certainly for most nesting species, that activity was low[er] by later in the morning or mid-day. Most often in Central Park earliest & when also fewer park users, & to other parks such as Riverside, Morningside, & several other smaller parks, at later hours of various days. The number or variety of very late migrants, or likely some “lingerers” that could end up staying part of the summer season, are [or seem] greater in Central, but that also may be a function of time & energy devoted, & not a lack of migrants in the other parks. It also is not really unusual to have the variety of lingering migrants as seen this past week here; perhaps more so after a slightly-delayed & also protracted migration north, all through May. Were there still the same number of keen and energetic birders out & about in a park or parks such as Central, there might well be many additional finds, even well into the month of June.

Lightly annotated list of species seen or heard in 7 days ending Friday 6/15:

Double-crested Cormorant (regular daily visitors in Central Park, & on the Hudson river off Manhattan)
Great Blue Heron (fly-by, Sat., 6/9)
Great Egret (multiple, daily fly-bys, from n. end of Central Park & other west-east & east-west sightings)
Snowy Egret (less-common but regular sightings, fly-bys, & seen as per above species)
Green Heron (several nesting pairs)
Black-crowned Night-Heron (multiple, esp. evident at first-light or sometimes at dusk, visiting Central Park)
Canada Goose (regular now & nests)
Wood Duck (at least 2 drakes continue, Central Park)
American Black Duck (Riverside Park - Hudson River, uncommon for June)
Mallard (common; nests)
Osprey (several fly-overs at Central Park & 1 from Riverside Park, over Hudson River)
Red-tailed Hawk (near-common & nesting in many locations around Manhattan, including in some parks)
Spotted Sandpiper (“late”, Sat., 6/9, Central Park reservoir, e. edge)
Laughing Gull (3, Hudson River, Wed., 6/19 - from W. 79 St. boat-basin area, Riverside Park)
Ring-billed Gull (scant numbers, occasional now)
[American] Herring Gull (relatively uncommon)
Great Black-backed Gull (uncommon now)
['feral'] Rock Pigeon (ubiquitous)
Mourning Dove (common, nesting)
American Kestrel (many nest sites around N.Y. City, including all of Manhattan)
Peregrine Falcon (multiple nest sites thru Manhattan)
Yellow-billed Cuckoo (several; has nested in Manhattan but scarcely these days; poss. late migrants; to at least Thurs., 6/14)
Chimney Swift (multiple, but not that many)
Ruby-throated Hummingbird (1 female, late if a migrant, Central Park, Sat., 6/9)
Red-bellied Woodpecker (multiple, nests)
Downy Woodpecker (multiple, nests)
Hairy Woodpecker (1, Riverside Park, & poss. unmated?)
Yellow-shafted Flicker (multiple but not that many; nesting and struggling as always with invasive-pest birds; Eur.Starlings in particular)
Eastern Wood-Pewee (not rare, nesting & not very vocal lately)
Acadian Flycatcher (still singing to Friday, 6/15, in several locations; a potential nester in a lot of NYC parks)
Empidopnax [genus] Flycatcher (several, poss. of “Traill’s” type/ migrants)
Great Crested Flycatcher (few, nesting - & poss. at least 1 or 2 un-mated)
Eastern Kingbird (uncommon but regular, nesting in multiple / usual areas)
Warbling Vireo (fairly common, nesting)
Red-eyed Vireo (few, & a few nesting)
Blue Jay (nesting)
American Crow (nesting)
Tree Swallow (few this past week)
Northern Rough-winged Swallow (multiple, but not very many)
Barn Swallow (multiple, nesting in Central Park, in usual locations)
Black-capped Chickadee (near-“rare” as nesters, but some still are)
Tufted Titmouse (scarce, nesting)
White-breasted Nuthatch (uncommon, nesting & fairly quiet lately)
Carolina Wren (few, are or just were nesting)
House Wren (multiple, & nesting)
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (2, location undisclosed)
Gray-cheeked / Bicknell's Thrush (multiple of this species-group, some appeared likelier Gray-cheeked; to at least Thurs., 6/14)
Swainson's Thrush (several to at least Wed., 6/13, Central & Riverside Parks)
Wood Thrush (esp. scarce this mid-June, also very quiet recently)
American Robin (a few may be on 3rd cycle of breeding already; common)
Gray Catbird (nesting)
Northern Mockingbird (nesting)
Brown Thrasher (nested)
European Starling
Cedar Waxwing (multiple, and some nesting)
-
Northern Parula (several, including 2 singing males, Central & Morningside Parks, to Friday, 6/15)
Yellow Warbler (diminished no’s now in southern 3/4 of Manhattan, still a few as of Fri., 6/15)
Chestnut-sided Warbler (less-expected species in June; male, Riverside Park, Sat., 6/9)
Magnolia Warbler (several, incl. 2 males, Central Park to at least Thurs., 6/14)
Black-throated Blue Warbler (several to at least Wed., 6/13, in 2 parks)
Yellow-rumped [Myrtle] Warbler (late but not unprecedented in June; Central Park, Sun., 6/10)
Blackburnian Warbler (1 first-spring female, Central Park, Friday, 6/15)
Prairie Warbler (less-expected species in June; one female, Morningside Park, Sun., 6/10)
Blackpoll Warbler (4, all females, in Central Park Friday 6/15; also one at Morningside Park)
Black-and-white Warbler (minimum of 3 to Friday, 6/15, including one male at Riverside Park)
American Redstart (very modest numbers thru Friday, 6/15, in various locations)
Ovenbird (several continuing, various locations, one seen 6/15 in Central’s n. woods)
Northern Waterthrush (one at least to Mon., 6/11)
Common Yellowthroat (several continuing to Fri. 6/15)
Hooded Warbler (Sat., 6/9, Riverside Park)
Canada Warbler (to at least Sunday, 6/10, Central Park)
-
Eastern Towhee (2, so far)
Chipping Sparrow (nesting)
Song Sparrow (nesting)
Swamp Sparrow (uncommon summering visitor)
White-throated Sparrow (uncommon summering visitors)
Northern Cardinal
Rose-breasted Grosbeak (probably very late migrant, Mon., 6/11, Riverside Park)
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
Orchard Oriole (not in Central, location undisclosed)
Baltimore Oriole (many nesting in multiple parks; also ‘helpers’ around some nest locations)
House Finch (scattered throughout many areas)
American Goldfinch (few, and surprisingly quiet)
House Sparrow (ubiquitous…)

Butterflies of at least 12 species have been seen in the past week in Central & Riverside Parks, none unexpected. Odonates (damselflies & dragonflies) of at least 9 species have been seen in Central Park in the past week. Many families / genera / species of various other insects have been seen in the past week in Manhattan.

- - - - -
"Have we fallen into a mesmerized state that makes us accept as inevitable that which is inferior or detrimental, as though having lost the will or the vision to demand that which is good?” - Rachel Carson (1907-1964; marine biologist, conservationist, author whose books include ‘Silent Spring’. Sir David Attenborough has remarked that that book may have had an effect on science second only to Charles Darwin’s “On the Origin of Species”.)

Good -& quiet & responsible- birding to all,

Tom Fiore
manhattan
















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Back to top
Date: 6/15/18 12:12 pm
From: Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...>
Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
Swore I wouldn't do it, but I just pulled my stacks of North American Birds off the shelf.

The NJ bird was photographed at Stone Harbor, near Cape May, by Michael O'Brien on 14 Jul 2003, and reproduced in Volume 57, p. 473 of North American Birds. The caption reads, "One of the most interesting birds of the season to be documented in the [Hudson-Delaware] Region, indeed one of the most intriguing in many years, was the apparent longipennis Common Tern, a Siberian nester never before recorded in the Atlantic basin, which was studied carefully at Stone Harbor Pt. 14 Jul (ph. MO'B, m/ ob.). Old World authorities have reviewed the series of photographs by O'Brien and concur with the identification as longipennis, probably a bird in its second summer."

The RI bird was around that time, and it is possible that I conflated it with the NJ bird vis a vis the NAB photo, but I've put in the call to an observer of that bird (which was definitely well photographed) to pin it down, too.

Shai
________________________________________
From: Shaibal Mitra
Sent: Friday, June 15, 2018 2:23 PM
To: NYSBIRDS (<NYSBIRDS-L...>)
Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island

Again, nobody is saying we know for sure what these birds are. But those who know the most about the records in question find them intriguing, and, having studied variation in hirundo collectively with great interest for many decades, remain uncomfortable with that null hypothesis. Another hypothesis that people have offered is hirundo x Arctic Tern hybrid; genetic incompatibility might result in deviations in various traits associated with normal breeding condition. Another possibility (which could account for the oddity that most/all have been "second-summer types" (based on white in the forehead, mottling on the underparts, and atypical primary replacement pattern) is that just a couple of birds have been rattling up and down the Atlantic and have gotten old and lonely.

The cool thing about the better candidates is that they would absolutely stand out from hirundo in multiple ways, even if their bills and legs were colored exactly like typical hirundo:

They are long-winged--as judged relative to their bodies, resembling Arctic Tern in this way
They are very long-tailed--at least one with tail streamers extending beyond the tips of their already relatively long wings
They are intensely gray below--more intensely gray than even high breeding hirundo; this is especially notable on second-summer types, because second-summer type hirundo tend to be less intensely gray than even dull breeding adult hirundo
They have shorter, subtly different shaped bills than typical hirundo--obviously just a supporting character, easily matched by variant hirundo, but interesting because supposedly typical of longipennis

Their dark bills catch the eye but as Joe noted are not that exceptional for hirundo, even in June. In contrast, their dark legs are vastly more unusual at this date. In my experience, dark legs are extremely rare among hirundo in May-June, even within each of the odd-ball categories: adults that arrive with dark bills, second-summer types, and first-summers.

Getting back to the question at hand, yes, there have been carefully scrutinized, documented, and published longipennis candidates from NJ, LI, RI, and MA (I recall less clearly one from the UKin this time frame also). I have collected (but not assembled and analyzed) the particulars on these over the years. The place to look for the best information is not eBird or other online sites, but rather North American Birds, the relevant state publications, and the original documents, photos, and correspondence I've archived (and promise some day to publish).

The first one I remember was from Rhode Island; it was photographed and published in North American Birds. The issues are right there on my shelf, but I don't have time or interest to search right now.
This was earlier, I think, than one from NJ in 2003.
Another was studied and photographed by Scott Whittle and me at Moriches Inlet in June 2009.
2011 brought not only the LI bird we've been discussing, but another at Muskeget Island, off Nantucket, studied by Vern Laux and photographed by Peter Trimble.

From an email from Dick Veit: "Factors distinguishing this [Muskeget] bird from other terns include (aside from the blackish bill) reddish brown legs, upperparts darker gray than local common terns, bill rather short, head more rounded, rather "domed", underparts darkish gray (though not as dark as they would be in May), tail feathers longer than wingtips at rest, legs seemed slightly shorter than commons, though not as short as on arctic."

All this typing is cramping my scope-focusing hand. I think I might just head down to an inlet, any inlet!

Best,
Shai


________________________________________
From: <bounce-122640877-11143133...> [<bounce-122640877-11143133...>] on behalf of Joseph DiCostanzo [<jdicost...>]
Sent: Friday, June 15, 2018 1:31 PM
To: Robert Lewis
Cc: NYSBIRDS (<NYSBIRDS-L...>)
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island

I went to the ABAs Birding News site that lists RBAs around the country and did a search for longipennis. For the months of May and June of this year, most of the returns of the search seemed to refer to a dragonfly with that scientific name. There was one bird report from the Aleutians and all other reports came from reports on Long Island related to this discussion.

I also searched for Siberian Tern and got nothing.

Joe DiCostanzo

Sent from my iPad

On Jun 15, 2018, at 11:44 AM, Robert Lewis <rfermat...><mailto:<rfermat...>> wrote:

Perhaps I missed it, but there seems to be an obvious question here: have bids like this been reported from neighboring states?

Bob Lewis
Sleepy Hollow Y


On Thursday, June 14, 2018, 10:49:25 AM EDT, Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...><mailto:<Shaibal.Mitra...>> wrote:


As I mentioned in my earlier note to the list on this subject (8 Jun 18, copied at the very end of the present note), the jury is certainly still out on the status of longipennis Common Terns on the east coast. Joe's highly informed contributions are a very welcome addition to the process and underscore several areas to focus on in resolving the matter. First, it is clearly true that to claim an extralimital longipennis, the evidence must be very strong and include multiple characters beyond dark bills and dark legs. I have a lot to contribute on this front, because I have made a point of studying non-breeding terns for more than 20 years, during which time I have collected detailed data on large samples of carefully scored first-summers and "second-summer types" (a category which, as Joe notes, consists of an odd amalgam of a subset of some but not all two year-olds, older adults short of full breeding condition, and very old, senescent adults)--not only of Common Terns, but also of Arctic, Roseate, Least, Black, and others.

For now I just want to make two very simple points in response to the queries Joe raises toward the end of his note.

First, I'd like to address Joe's skepticism about judging wing length visually. I once wrote a long, detailed note to the ID Frontiers list defending the critical, visual assessment of shape (i.e., the relative sizes of morphological structures; that piece concerned warblers, or maybe willets, or maybe I did it separately for both?). I might be able to dig it/them up, but for now I remember demonstrating that large samples of in-hand measurements counter-intuitively often obscure real differences between similar species, males and females, etc. The reason is that handbooks over-emphasize extreme data, neglecting quantitative measures of variance and covariance, and because most observers are unprepared or unwilling to think quantitatively. At the same time, sharp-eyed birders can unerringly distinguish Blackpoll and Pine Warblers at a glance by shape, even though practically all their measurements, viewed individually in huge samples, overlap. With regard to terns, I can recognize visually how the length of an individual's primary projection compares to the chord of its dorsum with enough precision to distinguish Common and Arctic Terns very confidently. So I would caution against categorically dismissing this line of evidence.

Second, the true statuses of non-breeding seabirds remain an amazing mystery, and the few glimpses we've had so far have been really exciting. Most obviously, the local status of Arctic Tern has been completely re-written in the past 20 years based precisely on attention to loafing flocks of non-breeding terns. Furthermore, scrutiny of these flocks has yielded many other rarities, some of them as unexpected as longipennis might seem: Elegant Tern, Cayenne Tern, acuflavidus Sandwich Terns during June, Little Gulls during June, etc. My point is that although the improbability of longipennis needs to be answered with strong evidence, much stranger things have happened. I still examine every Arctic Tern I see with the remote potential of Antarctic Tern in mind; the non-breeders hang out together down there, so maybe a few stick together up here, too. Ditto for examining first-summer Least Terns for Littles and first-summer Black Terns for White-winged and Whiskered.

Brian Patteson recently saw a Tahiti Petrel off of Hatteras!

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore


________________________________________
From: <bounce-122637763-11143133...><mailto:<bounce-122637763-11143133...> [<bounce-122637763-11143133...><mailto:<bounce-122637763-11143133...>] on behalf of Joseph DiCostanzo [<jdicost...><mailto:<jdicost...>]
Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2018 9:08 AM
To: Robert Lewis
Cc: nysbirds-l
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island

Bob,

Molt, (and I am including change in soft part colors such as bill and leg color under the term molt) is hormonally controlled. There is also considerable variation between individuals in the timing of molt. The timing and sequence of molt is no where as neat and fixed as many references might lead you to believe. Having worked extensively with a banded population, where the age of individuals is known from their banding histories, I know how much variation there is. I have seen birds with extensive white foreheads (or heavy speckling) and extensive carpal bars that I knew from their bands were two years old. I have also seen two year olds that were indistinguishable from normal adults. I have also seen that I knew were three, or four years old (or older based on their bands) that showed speckled foreheads and traces of carpal bars. I have seen adults in August at the breeding colony on Great Gull Island that were already in full winter plumage (black bill, dark legs, carpal bar). Individuals that dont match the expected are unusual, but they do occur.

As for the lack of a carpal bar on these dark billed, dark legged individuals, you are assuming that feather molt (carpal bar) and soft part colors (legs and bill) must be in total lock-step with each other. There is no reason they couldnt be out of sync in some instances. As for primary length, this is being based on photos, not actual measurements of the bird in hand. How is the primary length being assessed? I am guessing versus tail length. How does anyone know the tail length?

These dark billed, dark legged Common Terns get reported every year at this season, just at the time young Common Terns are coming back from South America. Where are these supposed longipennis birds coming from? The race breeds in Siberia and winters in the Indian Ocean east to Australia. If longipennis were going to occur here on the East Coast, the fall seems a more likely time than the spring migration. It seems far more likely that these birds are aberrant hirundo retaining aspects of their winter/non-breeding plumage than that there is an annual movement of Siberian based longipennis birds through Long Island.

Joe DiCostanzo

Sent from my iPad

On Jun 14, 2018, at 7:59 AM, Robert Lewis <rfermat...><mailto:<rfermat...><mailto:<rfermat...><mailto:<rfermat...>>> wrote:

Good points Joe.

Let's go with the null hypothesis: it's an unusual Common tern (hirundo). Apparently a Common tern in September can get gray blotches on the underparts. During the winter they have a black bill, black legs, and a black cap with white forehead, as first summer birds do now. If it is four - eight months late in molt (or four months early), maybe that would explain some features. But then there should be a prominent dark carpal bar. Instead, there is none. Also, how to explain the very long primaries? And the fact that the back is a bit darker gray than neighboring Commons, both adult and immature?

I found a number of images of longipennis on the web. Here are some screen shots:

Index of /lewis/birds/other_long<http://home.bway.net/lewis/birds/other_long/>

<http://home.bway.net/lewis/birds/other_long/>

Index of /lewis/birds/other_long




Bob Lewis



On Wednesday, June 13, 2018, 9:01:37 PM EDT, Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...><mailto:<jdicost...><mailto:<jdicost...><mailto:<jdicost...>>> wrote:


One thing that has to be kept in mind about dark billed and/or dark legged Common Terns seen on Long Island in the spring is that our Common Terns (Sterna hirundo hirundo) have dark bills and dark legs in winter (both the young birds and adults). The possibility that these birds are just S. hirundo hirundo retaining aspects of their winter plumage must be considered. Indeed, given the breeding and wintering ranges of S. hirundo longipennis, S. hirundo hirundo with retained winter characters seems a more likely possibility.

Joe DiCostanzo

Sent from my iPad

--

Pasted here 14 Jun 2018 from note to NYSBirds 8 June 2018:

Subject: Nickerson Beach - Possible Common Tern (longipennis) Species - Comments and thoughts welcome
Date: Fri Jun 8 2018 1:09 am
From: Shaibal.Mitra AT csi.cuny.edu<http://csi.cuny.edu>


Dear Mike and all,



This is an interesting bird, and well worth careful discussion. The photos are, as is so often necessarily the case, not ideal for assessing wing pattern and structure, and several other features. To my eye, the combination of adult-like plumage, darkish bill, not so dark legs, and not very deeply gray underparts is consistent with an early season variation of adult hirundo Common Tern that we do see from time to time.



The jury is certainly still out on the status of longipennis Common Terns on the east coast, and in the past I have eBirded the ones I've seen under regular "Common Tern"--but with lots of notation and documentation. Based on the checklists you've linked from Jay and Michael, provisionally specifying this form, I agree it might be best to take this approach while we work things out. At least it would be easier to collect and access the evidence.



Anyway, two of the best (and earliest in NY) candidates for longipennis were birds at Cupsogue on 26 Jun 2011 and 24 Jun 2014. I've aggregated photos of these at the following link:



https://flic.kr/s/aHskD7WtGd



As you will see, these birds were not only different in soft parts colors and plumage from same-aged hirundo COTE, but also different in terms of structure and molt (as explained in part in the note to this listserv from 27 Jun 2011, copied at the end of this note).



I've seen a few more also, including these two I was able to find quickly just now:



https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

https://ebird.org/view/checkli...



It seems odd that the best candidates have always been second-summer (TY) birds, but there are two points worth emphasizing on this front. First, subadult terns are definitely proven to be prone to wander; second, these longipennis candidates differ very strongly in multiple ways from the range of variation I've documented in same-aged hirundo COTE over the past 20 years. The links in my copied email are long defunct, but I can direct those who are interested to long series of images of TY hirundo COTE from our area.



Shai Mitra

Bay Shore

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Date: 6/15/18 11:46 am
From: JOHN TURNER <redknot...>
Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] Henslows Sparrow redux: Shawangunk Grasslands, NWR (Ulster County)

I totally agree with Rick. 

On Thu, Jun 14, 2018 at 07:51 PM, <rcech...> wrote:

Karen:  Don’t confuse lack of interest with folks not having enough
expertise on the topic to feel they are qualified to contribute to the
discussion (e.g., me).  I for, one, was fascinated, and look forward to
further developments.
 
Rick Cech
 
P.S.  Also add kudos for the fine tern id discussion, Joe, Shai &
others. We’re fortunate to have individuals in the community with such
depths of insight and experience.
 
From: <bounce-122638804-3714678...>
<bounce-122638804-3714678...> On Behalf Of Karen Fung
Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2018 2:46 PM
To: <nysbirds-L...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Henslows Sparrow redux: Shawangunk Grasslands, NWR
(Ulster County)
 
Hi All,
A few weeks ago, I posted a query to the list, noting that this year's
Henslow's Sparrow at Shawangunk is singing a different song compared to
the single song recorded by multiple observers last year, and wondering
if that was enough of an indication that this year's bird is a different
individual.  That post did not really elicit much interest, based on the
little feedback I received.

 

Since then, I wrote to a few people directly, including Nathan Pieplow,
whose book, "Peterson Field Guide to Bird Sounds of Eastern North
America", was published last year. Am including my direct query to him.
Nathan agrees that this year's bird is almost certainly a different
individual, and he gave me permission to post his reply, which you will
see below.

 

For those interested, the screen shot of the spectrograms that I sent to
him is now online on my website, in this gallery. You can see from the
screen shot that the first four spectrograms show a "Mi-Re-Do" sequence
of notes, and they are all from this year's bird. The remaining
spectrograms show a "Mi-Do-Re" type sequence of notes. Both three
syllable "songs", just a different sequence of sounds.

 

https://www.birdsiviews.com/Henslows-Sparrow-Shawangunk-Grasslands/
<https://www.birdsiviews.com/Henslows-Sparrow-Shawangunk-Grasslands/>

 

If you want to see and play back the entire eBird collection of
spectrograms and audio files for both Shawangunk birds, the link is
here:

 

https://ebird.org/media/catalog?taxonCode=henspa&mediaType=a&region=Ulster,%20New%20York,%20United%20States%20(US)&regionCode=US-NY-111&q=Henslow%27s%20Sparrow%20-%20Ammodramus%20henslowii
<https://ebird.org/media/catalog?taxonCode=henspa&mediaType=a&region=Ulster,%20New%20York,%20United%20States%20(US)&regionCode=US-NY-111&q=Henslow%27s%20Sparrow%20-%20Ammodramus%20henslowii>

 

Nathan's reply and my query to him follow here.

 

--------------

 

Karen,

 

Thanks for the email! I'm very glad you like my book. We need to get
more people using it!

 

I'm about as certain as I can be that the 2018 bird is a different
individual than the 2017 bird. Here's why:

·  Henslow's is a poorly studied species. But in the research for my
book, I never found a documented case of an individual Henslow's
switching songtypes on a recording.
·  You've got a pretty good sample size of recordings here. I went
through all the 2018 recordings and every rendition is identical. I
didn't go through all the 2017 recordings but in my sample, they were
all identical to each other and different from the 2018 bird.
·  All the 2017 and 2018 recordings in your sample are stereotyped, not
plastic. This basically ensures the recordings come from adult birds. It
has been shown in many passerine species that once birds are adults,
they cannot learn new songs. A few birds have been shown to break this
rule (like Northern Mockingbird), but it would be a surprise for
Henslow's Sparrow.
·  The 2017 and 2018 songs differ in many details -- one is not merely a
truncation of the other. 

This is actually a pretty good test case for the number of songtypes per
individual Henslow's Sparrow. If birders visit the same bird many times
over the course of a season and never document any song variation, it's
very good evidence that each individual has a single songtype. Plus, it
happens to fit with the little we know about song in Henslow's, and a
great deal that we know about song in passerines in general.

 

So, I'd say you have a new bird this year.

 


 

Nathan


 
On Thu, Jun 14, 2018 at 3:59 AM, Karen Fung <easternbluebird...>
<mailto:<easternbluebird...> > wrote:

Dear Nathan,

I very much enjoyed your presentation at the Linnaean Society (NY) last
year, and bought your book as soon as it came out.  I grew up playing
the piano as a hobby, so am used to seeing sounds presented in visual
form.  Spectrograms are a great aid in learning bird song!

 

Anyway, I'm writing to hopefully get your thoughts on whether you think
the male Henslow's Sparrow that is currently singing at Shawangunk
Grasslands NWR (NY: Ulster County) is a different bird from last year's
since its spectrogram is slightly different.  See below for part of an
email that I sent to local birders.  Was told that Henslow's hasn't
nested at Shawungunk in maybe 30 years, and that last year's sighting
was the first one documented in recent memory.  That alone made some
folks think that the current bird had to be the same one as last year's
due to its rarity.  Last year it was around for maybe ten days, singing
incessantly.  This year it also sings non-stop, but the sequence of
notes is different.  This year it has a mate, so could it be singing a
different song just based on that fact?  Your book seemed to indicate
that Henslow's only has one song in its repertoire.. but could it have
modulated its song between seasons?.  Some birders agree that it is
likely to be a different bird, based on its different song, plus its
plumage appears to be paler this year (but I'm not sure how to evaluate
plumage if the bird has molted).

 

Any thoughts would be appreciated.  The attached screen shot was taken a
few days ago.  The link to the eBird data for the audio files is below.

 

Best Wishes,

Karen Fung

Manhattan



 

 

 

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Back to top
Date: 6/15/18 11:23 am
From: Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...>
Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
Again, nobody is saying we know for sure what these birds are. But those who know the most about the records in question find them intriguing, and, having studied variation in hirundo collectively with great interest for many decades, remain uncomfortable with that null hypothesis. Another hypothesis that people have offered is hirundo x Arctic Tern hybrid; genetic incompatibility might result in deviations in various traits associated with normal breeding condition. Another possibility (which could account for the oddity that most/all have been "second-summer types" (based on white in the forehead, mottling on the underparts, and atypical primary replacement pattern) is that just a couple of birds have been rattling up and down the Atlantic and have gotten old and lonely.

The cool thing about the better candidates is that they would absolutely stand out from hirundo in multiple ways, even if their bills and legs were colored exactly like typical hirundo:

They are long-winged--as judged relative to their bodies, resembling Arctic Tern in this way
They are very long-tailed--at least one with tail streamers extending beyond the tips of their already relatively long wings
They are intensely gray below--more intensely gray than even high breeding hirundo; this is especially notable on second-summer types, because second-summer type hirundo tend to be less intensely gray than even dull breeding adult hirundo
They have shorter, subtly different shaped bills than typical hirundo--obviously just a supporting character, easily matched by variant hirundo, but interesting because supposedly typical of longipennis

Their dark bills catch the eye but as Joe noted are not that exceptional for hirundo, even in June. In contrast, their dark legs are vastly more unusual at this date. In my experience, dark legs are extremely rare among hirundo in May-June, even within each of the odd-ball categories: adults that arrive with dark bills, second-summer types, and first-summers.

Getting back to the question at hand, yes, there have been carefully scrutinized, documented, and published longipennis candidates from NJ, LI, RI, and MA (I recall less clearly one from the UKin this time frame also). I have collected (but not assembled and analyzed) the particulars on these over the years. The place to look for the best information is not eBird or other online sites, but rather North American Birds, the relevant state publications, and the original documents, photos, and correspondence I've archived (and promise some day to publish).

The first one I remember was from Rhode Island; it was photographed and published in North American Birds. The issues are right there on my shelf, but I don't have time or interest to search right now.
This was earlier, I think, than one from NJ in 2003.
Another was studied and photographed by Scott Whittle and me at Moriches Inlet in June 2009.
2011 brought not only the LI bird we've been discussing, but another at Muskeget Island, off Nantucket, studied by Vern Laux and photographed by Peter Trimble.

From an email from Dick Veit: "Factors distinguishing this [Muskeget] bird from other terns include (aside from the blackish bill) reddish brown legs, upperparts darker gray than local common terns, bill rather short, head more rounded, rather "domed", underparts darkish gray (though not as dark as they would be in May), tail feathers longer than wingtips at rest, legs seemed slightly shorter than commons, though not as short as on arctic."

All this typing is cramping my scope-focusing hand. I think I might just head down to an inlet, any inlet!

Best,
Shai


________________________________________
From: <bounce-122640877-11143133...> [<bounce-122640877-11143133...>] on behalf of Joseph DiCostanzo [<jdicost...>]
Sent: Friday, June 15, 2018 1:31 PM
To: Robert Lewis
Cc: NYSBIRDS (<NYSBIRDS-L...>)
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island

I went to the ABAs Birding News site that lists RBAs around the country and did a search for longipennis. For the months of May and June of this year, most of the returns of the search seemed to refer to a dragonfly with that scientific name. There was one bird report from the Aleutians and all other reports came from reports on Long Island related to this discussion.

I also searched for Siberian Tern and got nothing.

Joe DiCostanzo

Sent from my iPad

On Jun 15, 2018, at 11:44 AM, Robert Lewis <rfermat...><mailto:<rfermat...>> wrote:

Perhaps I missed it, but there seems to be an obvious question here: have bids like this been reported from neighboring states?

Bob Lewis
Sleepy Hollow Y


On Thursday, June 14, 2018, 10:49:25 AM EDT, Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...><mailto:<Shaibal.Mitra...>> wrote:


As I mentioned in my earlier note to the list on this subject (8 Jun 18, copied at the very end of the present note), the jury is certainly still out on the status of longipennis Common Terns on the east coast. Joe's highly informed contributions are a very welcome addition to the process and underscore several areas to focus on in resolving the matter. First, it is clearly true that to claim an extralimital longipennis, the evidence must be very strong and include multiple characters beyond dark bills and dark legs. I have a lot to contribute on this front, because I have made a point of studying non-breeding terns for more than 20 years, during which time I have collected detailed data on large samples of carefully scored first-summers and "second-summer types" (a category which, as Joe notes, consists of an odd amalgam of a subset of some but not all two year-olds, older adults short of full breeding condition, and very old, senescent adults)--not only of Common Terns, but also of Arctic, Roseate, Least, Black, and others.

For now I just want to make two very simple points in response to the queries Joe raises toward the end of his note.

First, I'd like to address Joe's skepticism about judging wing length visually. I once wrote a long, detailed note to the ID Frontiers list defending the critical, visual assessment of shape (i.e., the relative sizes of morphological structures; that piece concerned warblers, or maybe willets, or maybe I did it separately for both?). I might be able to dig it/them up, but for now I remember demonstrating that large samples of in-hand measurements counter-intuitively often obscure real differences between similar species, males and females, etc. The reason is that handbooks over-emphasize extreme data, neglecting quantitative measures of variance and covariance, and because most observers are unprepared or unwilling to think quantitatively. At the same time, sharp-eyed birders can unerringly distinguish Blackpoll and Pine Warblers at a glance by shape, even though practically all their measurements, viewed individually in huge samples, overlap. With regard to terns, I can recognize visually how the length of an individual's primary projection compares to the chord of its dorsum with enough precision to distinguish Common and Arctic Terns very confidently. So I would caution against categorically dismissing this line of evidence.

Second, the true statuses of non-breeding seabirds remain an amazing mystery, and the few glimpses we've had so far have been really exciting. Most obviously, the local status of Arctic Tern has been completely re-written in the past 20 years based precisely on attention to loafing flocks of non-breeding terns. Furthermore, scrutiny of these flocks has yielded many other rarities, some of them as unexpected as longipennis might seem: Elegant Tern, Cayenne Tern, acuflavidus Sandwich Terns during June, Little Gulls during June, etc. My point is that although the improbability of longipennis needs to be answered with strong evidence, much stranger things have happened. I still examine every Arctic Tern I see with the remote potential of Antarctic Tern in mind; the non-breeders hang out together down there, so maybe a few stick together up here, too. Ditto for examining first-summer Least Terns for Littles and first-summer Black Terns for White-winged and Whiskered.

Brian Patteson recently saw a Tahiti Petrel off of Hatteras!

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore


________________________________________
From: <bounce-122637763-11143133...><mailto:<bounce-122637763-11143133...> [<bounce-122637763-11143133...><mailto:<bounce-122637763-11143133...>] on behalf of Joseph DiCostanzo [<jdicost...><mailto:<jdicost...>]
Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2018 9:08 AM
To: Robert Lewis
Cc: nysbirds-l
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island

Bob,

Molt, (and I am including change in soft part colors such as bill and leg color under the term molt) is hormonally controlled. There is also considerable variation between individuals in the timing of molt. The timing and sequence of molt is no where as neat and fixed as many references might lead you to believe. Having worked extensively with a banded population, where the age of individuals is known from their banding histories, I know how much variation there is. I have seen birds with extensive white foreheads (or heavy speckling) and extensive carpal bars that I knew from their bands were two years old. I have also seen two year olds that were indistinguishable from normal adults. I have also seen that I knew were three, or four years old (or older based on their bands) that showed speckled foreheads and traces of carpal bars. I have seen adults in August at the breeding colony on Great Gull Island that were already in full winter plumage (black bill, dark legs, carpal bar). Individuals that dont match the expected are unusual, but they do occur.

As for the lack of a carpal bar on these dark billed, dark legged individuals, you are assuming that feather molt (carpal bar) and soft part colors (legs and bill) must be in total lock-step with each other. There is no reason they couldnt be out of sync in some instances. As for primary length, this is being based on photos, not actual measurements of the bird in hand. How is the primary length being assessed? I am guessing versus tail length. How does anyone know the tail length?

These dark billed, dark legged Common Terns get reported every year at this season, just at the time young Common Terns are coming back from South America. Where are these supposed longipennis birds coming from? The race breeds in Siberia and winters in the Indian Ocean east to Australia. If longipennis were going to occur here on the East Coast, the fall seems a more likely time than the spring migration. It seems far more likely that these birds are aberrant hirundo retaining aspects of their winter/non-breeding plumage than that there is an annual movement of Siberian based longipennis birds through Long Island.

Joe DiCostanzo

Sent from my iPad

On Jun 14, 2018, at 7:59 AM, Robert Lewis <rfermat...><mailto:<rfermat...><mailto:<rfermat...><mailto:<rfermat...>>> wrote:

Good points Joe.

Let's go with the null hypothesis: it's an unusual Common tern (hirundo). Apparently a Common tern in September can get gray blotches on the underparts. During the winter they have a black bill, black legs, and a black cap with white forehead, as first summer birds do now. If it is four - eight months late in molt (or four months early), maybe that would explain some features. But then there should be a prominent dark carpal bar. Instead, there is none. Also, how to explain the very long primaries? And the fact that the back is a bit darker gray than neighboring Commons, both adult and immature?

I found a number of images of longipennis on the web. Here are some screen shots:

Index of /lewis/birds/other_long<http://home.bway.net/lewis/birds/other_long/>

<http://home.bway.net/lewis/birds/other_long/>

Index of /lewis/birds/other_long




Bob Lewis



On Wednesday, June 13, 2018, 9:01:37 PM EDT, Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...><mailto:<jdicost...><mailto:<jdicost...><mailto:<jdicost...>>> wrote:


One thing that has to be kept in mind about dark billed and/or dark legged Common Terns seen on Long Island in the spring is that our Common Terns (Sterna hirundo hirundo) have dark bills and dark legs in winter (both the young birds and adults). The possibility that these birds are just S. hirundo hirundo retaining aspects of their winter plumage must be considered. Indeed, given the breeding and wintering ranges of S. hirundo longipennis, S. hirundo hirundo with retained winter characters seems a more likely possibility.

Joe DiCostanzo

Sent from my iPad

--

Pasted here 14 Jun 2018 from note to NYSBirds 8 June 2018:

Subject: Nickerson Beach - Possible Common Tern (longipennis) Species - Comments and thoughts welcome
Date: Fri Jun 8 2018 1:09 am
From: Shaibal.Mitra AT csi.cuny.edu<http://csi.cuny.edu>


Dear Mike and all,



This is an interesting bird, and well worth careful discussion. The photos are, as is so often necessarily the case, not ideal for assessing wing pattern and structure, and several other features. To my eye, the combination of adult-like plumage, darkish bill, not so dark legs, and not very deeply gray underparts is consistent with an early season variation of adult hirundo Common Tern that we do see from time to time.



The jury is certainly still out on the status of longipennis Common Terns on the east coast, and in the past I have eBirded the ones I've seen under regular "Common Tern"--but with lots of notation and documentation. Based on the checklists you've linked from Jay and Michael, provisionally specifying this form, I agree it might be best to take this approach while we work things out. At least it would be easier to collect and access the evidence.



Anyway, two of the best (and earliest in NY) candidates for longipennis were birds at Cupsogue on 26 Jun 2011 and 24 Jun 2014. I've aggregated photos of these at the following link:



https://flic.kr/s/aHskD7WtGd



As you will see, these birds were not only different in soft parts colors and plumage from same-aged hirundo COTE, but also different in terms of structure and molt (as explained in part in the note to this listserv from 27 Jun 2011, copied at the end of this note).



I've seen a few more also, including these two I was able to find quickly just now:



https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

https://ebird.org/view/checkli...



It seems odd that the best candidates have always been second-summer (TY) birds, but there are two points worth emphasizing on this front. First, subadult terns are definitely proven to be prone to wander; second, these longipennis candidates differ very strongly in multiple ways from the range of variation I've documented in same-aged hirundo COTE over the past 20 years. The links in my copied email are long defunct, but I can direct those who are interested to long series of images of TY hirundo COTE from our area.



Shai Mitra

Bay Shore

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Back to top
Date: 6/15/18 11:11 am
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Fri., June 15, 2018 - 4 Species of Wood Warblers
Central Park - North End, NYC
Friday, June 15, 2018
OBS: Robert DeCandido, m.ob.

Highlights: Black-and-white Warbler (great views of a female), Blackpoll Warbler, Northern Parula (3), and American Redstart.

Canada Goose - 11 Harlem Meer
Mallard - 7 Meer
Mourning Cove - 5
Chimney Swift - 2
Herring Gull - flyover
Double-crested Cormorant - 4 flyovers
Great Egret - Meer
Snowy Egret - 5 flyovers
Black-crowned Night-Heron - Meer Island
Red-tailed Hawk - pair of adults Lasker Pool
Red-bellied Woodpecker - male Loch
Northern Flicker - male Loch
Warbling Vireo - east side of the Pool
Red-eyed Vireo - North Woods South of the Blockhouse
Blue Jay - Loch
Barn Swallow - 4 Meer
American Robin - nests
Gray Catbird - 5 + nest Loch
Northern Mockingbird - heard Conservatory Garden
Song Sparrow - pair, male singing Conservatory Garden
Baltimore Oriole - heard in 3 or 4 locations
Red-winged Blackbird - 3 males & 2 females south side Meer
Common Grackle - 5 Loch
Black-and-white Warbler - female Conservatory Garden
American Redstart - immature male Loch
Northern Parula - 3 (male & female Loch, first-summer male east of Great Hill)
Blackpoll Warbler - male Loch
Northern Cardinal - 2 males Loch

Deb Allen
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Date: 6/15/18 10:32 am
From: Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
I went to the ABA’s Birding News site that lists RBA’s around the country and did a search for longipennis. For the months of May and June of this year, most of the returns of the search seemed to refer to a dragonfly with that scientific name. There was one bird report from the Aleutians and all other reports came from reports on Long Island related to this discussion.

I also searched for Siberian Tern and got nothing.

Joe DiCostanzo

Sent from my iPad

> On Jun 15, 2018, at 11:44 AM, Robert Lewis <rfermat...> wrote:
>
> Perhaps I missed it, but there seems to be an obvious question here: have bids like this been reported from neighboring states?
>
> Bob Lewis
> Sleepy Hollow Y
>
>
> On Thursday, June 14, 2018, 10:49:25 AM EDT, Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...> wrote:
>
>
> As I mentioned in my earlier note to the list on this subject (8 Jun 18, copied at the very end of the present note), the jury is certainly still out on the status of longipennis Common Terns on the east coast. Joe's highly informed contributions are a very welcome addition to the process and underscore several areas to focus on in resolving the matter. First, it is clearly true that to claim an extralimital longipennis, the evidence must be very strong and include multiple characters beyond dark bills and dark legs. I have a lot to contribute on this front, because I have made a point of studying non-breeding terns for more than 20 years, during which time I have collected detailed data on large samples of carefully scored first-summers and "second-summer types" (a category which, as Joe notes, consists of an odd amalgam of a subset of some but not all two year-olds, older adults short of full breeding condition, and very old, senescent adults)--not only of Common Terns, but also of Arctic, Roseate, Least, Black, and others.
>
> For now I just want to make two very simple points in response to the queries Joe raises toward the end of his note.
>
> First, I'd like to address Joe's skepticism about judging wing length visually. I once wrote a long, detailed note to the ID Frontiers list defending the critical, visual assessment of shape (i.e., the relative sizes of morphological structures; that piece concerned warblers, or maybe willets, or maybe I did it separately for both?). I might be able to dig it/them up, but for now I remember demonstrating that large samples of in-hand measurements counter-intuitively often obscure real differences between similar species, males and females, etc. The reason is that handbooks over-emphasize extreme data, neglecting quantitative measures of variance and covariance, and because most observers are unprepared or unwilling to think quantitatively. At the same time, sharp-eyed birders can unerringly distinguish Blackpoll and Pine Warblers at a glance by shape, even though practically all their measurements, viewed individually in huge samples, overlap. With regard to terns, I can recognize visually how the length of an individual's primary projection compares to the chord of its dorsum with enough precision to distinguish Common and Arctic Terns very confidently. So I would caution against categorically dismissing this line of evidence.
>
> Second, the true statuses of non-breeding seabirds remain an amazing mystery, and the few glimpses we've had so far have been really exciting. Most obviously, the local status of Arctic Tern has been completely re-written in the past 20 years based precisely on attention to loafing flocks of non-breeding terns. Furthermore, scrutiny of these flocks has yielded many other rarities, some of them as unexpected as longipennis might seem: Elegant Tern, Cayenne Tern, acuflavidus Sandwich Terns during June, Little Gulls during June, etc. My point is that although the improbability of longipennis needs to be answered with strong evidence, much stranger things have happened. I still examine every Arctic Tern I see with the remote potential of Antarctic Tern in mind; the non-breeders hang out together down there, so maybe a few stick together up here, too. Ditto for examining first-summer Least Terns for Littles and first-summer Black Terns for White-winged and Whiskered.
>
> Brian Patteson recently saw a Tahiti Petrel off of Hatteras!
>
> Shai Mitra
> Bay Shore
>
>
> ________________________________________
> From: <bounce-122637763-11143133...> [<bounce-122637763-11143133...>] on behalf of Joseph DiCostanzo [<jdicost...>]
> Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2018 9:08 AM
> To: Robert Lewis
> Cc: nysbirds-l
> Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
>
> Bob,
>
> Molt, (and I am including change in soft part colors such as bill and leg color under the term “molt”) is hormonally controlled. There is also considerable variation between individuals in the timing of molt. The timing and sequence of molt is no where as neat and fixed as many references might lead you to believe. Having worked extensively with a banded population, where the age of individuals is known from their banding histories, I know how much variation there is. I have seen birds with extensive white foreheads (or heavy speckling) and extensive carpal bars that I knew from their bands were two years old. I have also seen two year olds that were indistinguishable from normal adults. I have also seen that I knew were three, or four years old (or older based on their bands) that showed speckled foreheads and traces of carpal bars. I have seen adults in August at the breeding colony on Great Gull Island that were already in full winter plumage (black bill, dark legs, carpal bar). Individuals that don’t match the expected are unusual, but they do occur.
>
> As for the lack of a carpal bar on these dark billed, dark legged individuals, you are assuming that feather molt (carpal bar) and soft part colors (legs and bill) must be in total lock-step with each other. There is no reason they couldn’t be out of sync in some instances. As for primary length, this is being based on photos, not actual measurements of the bird in hand. How is the primary length being assessed? I am guessing versus tail length. How does anyone know the tail length?
>
> These dark billed, dark legged Common Terns get reported every year at this season, just at the time young Common Terns are coming back from South America. Where are these supposed longipennis birds coming from? The race breeds in Siberia and winters in the Indian Ocean east to Australia. If longipennis were going to occur here on the East Coast, the fall seems a more likely time than the spring migration. It seems far more likely that these birds are aberrant hirundo retaining aspects of their winter/non-breeding plumage than that there is an annual movement of Siberian based longipennis birds through Long Island.
>
> Joe DiCostanzo
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> On Jun 14, 2018, at 7:59 AM, Robert Lewis <rfermat...><mailto:<rfermat...>> wrote:
>
> Good points Joe.
>
> Let's go with the null hypothesis: it's an unusual Common tern (hirundo). Apparently a Common tern in September can get gray blotches on the underparts. During the winter they have a black bill, black legs, and a black cap with white forehead, as first summer birds do now. If it is four - eight months late in molt (or four months early), maybe that would explain some features. But then there should be a prominent dark carpal bar. Instead, there is none. Also, how to explain the very long primaries? And the fact that the back is a bit darker gray than neighboring Commons, both adult and immature?
>
> I found a number of images of longipennis on the web. Here are some screen shots:
>
> Index of /lewis/birds/other_long<http://home.bway.net/lewis/birds/other_long/>
>
> <http://home.bway.net/lewis/birds/other_long/>
>
> Index of /lewis/birds/other_long
>
>
>
>
> Bob Lewis
>
>
>
> On Wednesday, June 13, 2018, 9:01:37 PM EDT, Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...><mailto:<jdicost...>> wrote:
>
>
> One thing that has to be kept in mind about dark billed and/or dark legged Common Terns seen on Long Island in the spring is that our Common Terns (Sterna hirundo hirundo) have dark bills and dark legs in winter (both the young birds and adults). The possibility that these birds are just S. hirundo hirundo retaining aspects of their winter plumage must be considered. Indeed, given the breeding and wintering ranges of S. hirundo longipennis, S. hirundo hirundo with retained winter characters seems a more likely possibility.
>
> Joe DiCostanzo
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> --
>
> Pasted here 14 Jun 2018 from note to NYSBirds 8 June 2018:
>
> Subject: Nickerson Beach - Possible Common Tern (longipennis) Species - Comments and thoughts welcome
> Date: Fri Jun 8 2018 1:09 am
> From: Shaibal.Mitra AT csi.cuny.edu
>
>
> Dear Mike and all,
>
>
>
> This is an interesting bird, and well worth careful discussion. The photos are, as is so often necessarily the case, not ideal for assessing wing pattern and structure, and several other features. To my eye, the combination of adult-like plumage, darkish bill, not so dark legs, and not very deeply gray underparts is consistent with an early season variation of adult hirundo Common Tern that we do see from time to time.
>
>
>
> The jury is certainly still out on the status of longipennis Common Terns on the east coast, and in the past I have eBirded the ones I've seen under regular "Common Tern"--but with lots of notation and documentation. Based on the checklists you've linked from Jay and Michael, provisionally specifying this form, I agree it might be best to take this approach while we work things out. At least it would be easier to collect and access the evidence.
>
>
>
> Anyway, two of the best (and earliest in NY) candidates for longipennis were birds at Cupsogue on 26 Jun 2011 and 24 Jun 2014. I've aggregated photos of these at the following link:
>
>
>
> https://flic.kr/s/aHskD7WtGd
>
>
>
> As you will see, these birds were not only different in soft parts colors and plumage from same-aged hirundo COTE, but also different in terms of structure and molt (as explained in part in the note to this listserv from 27 Jun 2011, copied at the end of this note).
>
>
>
> I've seen a few more also, including these two I was able to find quickly just now:
>
>
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
>
>
>
> It seems odd that the best candidates have always been second-summer (TY) birds, but there are two points worth emphasizing on this front. First, subadult terns are definitely proven to be prone to wander; second, these longipennis candidates differ very strongly in multiple ways from the range of variation I've documented in same-aged hirundo COTE over the past 20 years. The links in my copied email are long defunct, but I can direct those who are interested to long series of images of TY hirundo COTE from our area.
>
>
>
> Shai Mitra
>
> Bay Shore
>
> --
>
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Date: 6/15/18 8:45 am
From: Robert Lewis <rfermat...>
Subject: Re: RE: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
Perhaps I missed it, but there seems to be an obvious question here:  have bids like this been reported from neighboring states?
Bob LewisSleepy Hollow Y

On Thursday, June 14, 2018, 10:49:25 AM EDT, Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...> wrote:

As I mentioned in my earlier note to the list on this subject (8 Jun 18, copied at the very end of the present note), the jury is certainly still out on the status of longipennis Common Terns on the east coast. Joe's highly informed contributions are a very welcome addition to the process and underscore several areas to focus on in resolving the matter. First, it is clearly true that to claim an extralimital longipennis, the evidence must be very strong and include multiple characters beyond dark bills and dark legs. I have a lot to contribute on this front, because I have made a point of studying non-breeding terns for more than 20 years, during which time I have collected detailed data on large samples of carefully scored first-summers and "second-summer types" (a category which, as Joe notes, consists of an odd amalgam of a subset of some but not all two year-olds, older adults short of full breeding condition, and very old, senescent adults)--not only of Common Terns, but also of Arctic, Roseate, Least, Black, and others.

For now I just want to make two very simple points in response to the queries Joe raises toward the end of his note.

First, I'd like to address Joe's skepticism about judging wing length visually. I once wrote a long, detailed note to the ID Frontiers list defending the critical, visual assessment of shape (i.e., the relative sizes of morphological structures; that piece concerned warblers, or maybe willets, or maybe I did it separately for both?). I might be able to dig it/them up, but for now I remember demonstrating that large samples of in-hand measurements counter-intuitively often obscure real differences between similar species, males and females, etc. The reason is that handbooks over-emphasize extreme data, neglecting quantitative measures of variance and covariance, and because most observers are unprepared or unwilling to think quantitatively. At the same time, sharp-eyed birders can unerringly distinguish Blackpoll and Pine Warblers at a glance by shape, even though practically all their measurements, viewed individually in huge samples, overlap. With regard to terns, I can recognize visually how the length of an individual's primary projection compares to the chord of its dorsum with enough precision to distinguish Common and Arctic Terns very confidently. So I would caution against categorically dismissing this line of evidence.

Second, the true statuses of non-breeding seabirds remain an amazing mystery, and the few glimpses we've had so far have been really exciting. Most obviously, the local status of Arctic Tern has been completely re-written in the past 20 years based precisely on attention to loafing flocks of non-breeding terns. Furthermore, scrutiny of these flocks has yielded many other rarities, some of them as unexpected as longipennis might seem: Elegant Tern, Cayenne Tern, acuflavidus Sandwich Terns during June, Little Gulls during June, etc. My point is that although the improbability of longipennis needs to be answered with strong evidence, much stranger things have happened. I still examine every Arctic Tern I see with the remote potential of Antarctic Tern in mind; the non-breeders hang out together down there, so maybe a few stick together up here, too. Ditto for examining first-summer Least Terns for Littles and first-summer Black Terns for White-winged and Whiskered.

Brian Patteson recently saw a Tahiti Petrel off of Hatteras!

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore


________________________________________
From: <bounce-122637763-11143133...> [<bounce-122637763-11143133...>] on behalf of Joseph DiCostanzo [<jdicost...>]
Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2018 9:08 AM
To: Robert Lewis
Cc: nysbirds-l
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island

Bob,

Molt, (and I am including change in soft part colors such as bill and leg color under the term “molt”) is hormonally controlled. There is also considerable variation between individuals in the timing of molt. The timing and sequence of molt is no where as neat and fixed as many references might lead you to believe. Having worked extensively with a banded population, where the age of individuals is known from their banding histories, I know how much variation there is. I have seen birds with extensive white foreheads (or heavy speckling) and extensive carpal bars that I knew from their bands were two years old. I have also seen two year olds that were indistinguishable from normal adults. I have also seen that I knew were three, or four years old (or older based on their bands) that showed speckled foreheads and traces of carpal bars. I have seen adults in August at the breeding colony on Great Gull Island that were already in full winter plumage (black bill, dark legs, carpal bar). Individuals that don’t match the expected are unusual, but they do occur.

As for the lack of a carpal bar on these dark billed, dark legged individuals, you are assuming that feather molt (carpal bar) and soft part colors (legs and bill) must be in total lock-step with each other. There is no reason they couldn’t be out of sync in some instances. As for primary length, this is being based on photos, not actual measurements of the bird in hand. How is the primary length being assessed? I am guessing versus tail length. How does anyone know the tail length?

These dark billed, dark legged Common Terns get reported every year at this season, just at the time young Common Terns are coming back from South America. Where are these supposed longipennis birds coming from? The race breeds in Siberia and winters in the Indian Ocean east to Australia. If longipennis were going to occur here on the East Coast, the fall seems a more likely time than the spring migration. It seems far more likely that these birds are aberrant hirundo retaining aspects of their winter/non-breeding plumage than that there is an annual movement of Siberian based longipennis birds through Long Island.

Joe DiCostanzo

Sent from my iPad

On Jun 14, 2018, at 7:59 AM, Robert Lewis <rfermat...><mailto:<rfermat...>> wrote:

Good points Joe.

Let's go with the null hypothesis: it's an unusual Common tern (hirundo). Apparently a Common tern in September can get gray blotches on the underparts. During the winter they have a black bill, black legs, and a black cap with white forehead, as first summer birds do now. If it is four - eight months late in molt (or four months early), maybe that would explain some features. But then there should be a prominent dark carpal bar. Instead, there is none. Also, how to explain the very long primaries? And the fact that the back is a bit darker gray than neighboring Commons, both adult and immature?

I found a number of images of longipennis on the web.  Here are some screen shots:

Index of /lewis/birds/other_long<http://home.bway.net/lewis/birds/other_long/>

<http://home.bway.net/lewis/birds/other_long/>

Index of /lewis/birds/other_long




Bob Lewis



On Wednesday, June 13, 2018, 9:01:37 PM EDT, Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...><mailto:<jdicost...>> wrote:


One thing that has to be kept in mind about dark billed and/or dark legged Common Terns seen on Long Island in the spring is that our Common Terns (Sterna hirundo hirundo) have dark bills and dark legs in winter (both the young birds and adults). The possibility that these birds are just S. hirundo hirundo retaining aspects of their winter plumage must be considered. Indeed, given the breeding and wintering ranges of S. hirundo longipennis, S. hirundo hirundo with retained winter characters seems a more likely possibility.

Joe DiCostanzo

Sent from my iPad

--

Pasted here 14 Jun 2018 from note to NYSBirds 8 June 2018:

Subject: Nickerson Beach - Possible Common Tern (longipennis) Species - Comments and thoughts welcome
Date: Fri Jun 8 2018 1:09 am
From: Shaibal.Mitra AT csi.cuny.edu


Dear Mike and all,



This is an interesting bird, and well worth careful discussion. The photos are, as is so often necessarily the case, not ideal for assessing wing pattern and structure, and several other features. To my eye, the combination of adult-like plumage, darkish bill, not so dark legs, and not very deeply gray underparts is consistent with an early season variation of adult hirundo Common Tern that we do see from time to time.



The jury is certainly still out on the status of longipennis Common Terns on the east coast, and in the past I have eBirded the ones I've seen under regular "Common Tern"--but with lots of notation and documentation. Based on the checklists you've linked from Jay and Michael, provisionally specifying this form, I agree it might be best to take this approach while we work things out. At least it would be easier to collect and access the evidence.



Anyway, two of the best (and earliest in NY) candidates for longipennis were birds at Cupsogue on 26 Jun 2011 and 24 Jun 2014. I've aggregated photos of these at the following link:



https://flic.kr/s/aHskD7WtGd



As you will see, these birds were not only different in soft parts colors and plumage from same-aged hirundo COTE, but also different in terms of structure and molt (as explained in part in the note to this listserv from 27 Jun 2011, copied at the end of this note).



I've seen a few more also, including these two I was able to find quickly just now:



https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

https://ebird.org/view/checkli...



It seems odd that the best candidates have always been second-summer (TY) birds, but there are two points worth emphasizing on this front. First, subadult terns are definitely proven to be prone to wander; second, these longipennis candidates differ very strongly in multiple ways from the range of variation I've documented in same-aged hirundo COTE over the past 20 years. The links in my copied email are long defunct, but I can direct those who are interested to long series of images of TY hirundo COTE from our area.



Shai Mitra

Bay Shore

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Date: 6/15/18 6:45 am
From: Pepaul <pepaul...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
For anyone interested in simply seeing a bird of this type, there is currently one on the beach at Nickerson. Also present are at least 4 Roseate Terns, and many young Common Terns.

> On Jun 14, 2018, at 20:51, Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...> wrote:
>
> I just wanted to add some information to my comments about variation in individuals. I looked at data from Common Terns trapped on Great Gull Island in the summer of 2017. We have weights on 918 individuals. The weights ranged from 99.1 grams to 158.9 grams. That means at the extremes, the largest birds were 60% more massive than the smallest birds. That kind of difference is likely to be noticeable in the field. And that difference is not between different subspecies or populations, but within a single colony.
>
> I should point out that these 918 birds were nearly all trapped on nests, so they are healthy birds. Also the birds at the top and bottom of that range were not extreme outliers. At both extremes, there were numbers of individuals within 10 grams of those lowest and highest weights. For the statistically minded, the average weight was 126.0 grams and the standard deviation was 9.45.
>
> Joe DiCostanzo
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> --
>
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>
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>
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Date: 6/14/18 5:51 pm
From: Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
I just wanted to add some information to my comments about variation in individuals. I looked at data from Common Terns trapped on Great Gull Island in the summer of 2017. We have weights on 918 individuals. The weights ranged from 99.1 grams to 158.9 grams. That means at the extremes, the largest birds were 60% more massive than the smallest birds. That kind of difference is likely to be noticeable in the field. And that difference is not between different subspecies or populations, but within a single colony.

I should point out that these 918 birds were nearly all trapped on nests, so they are healthy birds. Also the birds at the top and bottom of that range were not extreme outliers. At both extremes, there were numbers of individuals within 10 grams of those lowest and highest weights. For the statistically minded, the average weight was 126.0 grams and the standard deviation was 9.45.

Joe DiCostanzo

Sent from my iPad

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Date: 6/14/18 4:52 pm
From: <rcech...>
Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] Henslows Sparrow redux: Shawangunk Grasslands, NWR (Ulster County)
Karen: Don’t confuse lack of interest with folks not having enough expertise on the topic to feel they are qualified to contribute to the discussion (e.g., me). I for, one, was fascinated, and look forward to further developments.



Rick Cech



P.S. Also add kudos for the fine tern id discussion, Joe, Shai & others. We’re fortunate to have individuals in the community with such depths of insight and experience.



From: <bounce-122638804-3714678...> <bounce-122638804-3714678...> On Behalf Of Karen Fung
Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2018 2:46 PM
To: <nysbirds-L...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Henslows Sparrow redux: Shawangunk Grasslands, NWR (Ulster County)



Hi All,

A few weeks ago, I posted a query to the list, noting that this year's Henslow's Sparrow at Shawangunk is singing a different song compared to the single song recorded by multiple observers last year, and wondering if that was enough of an indication that this year's bird is a different individual. That post did not really elicit much interest, based on the little feedback I received.



Since then, I wrote to a few people directly, including Nathan Pieplow, whose book, "Peterson Field Guide to Bird Sounds of Eastern North America", was published last year. Am including my direct query to him. Nathan agrees that this year's bird is almost certainly a different individual, and he gave me permission to post his reply, which you will see below.



For those interested, the screen shot of the spectrograms that I sent to him is now online on my website, in this gallery. You can see from the screen shot that the first four spectrograms show a "Mi-Re-Do" sequence of notes, and they are all from this year's bird. The remaining spectrograms show a "Mi-Do-Re" type sequence of notes. Both three syllable "songs", just a different sequence of sounds.



https://www.birdsiviews.com/Henslows-Sparrow-Shawangunk-Grasslands/



If you want to see and play back the entire eBird collection of spectrograms and audio files for both Shawangunk birds, the link is here:



https://ebird.org/media/catalog?taxonCode=henspa <https://ebird.org/media/catalog?taxonCode=henspa&mediaType=a&region=Ulster,%20New%20York,%20United%20States%20(US)&regionCode=US-NY-111&q=Henslow%27s%20Sparrow%20-%20Ammodramus%20henslowii> &mediaType=a&region=Ulster,%20New%20York,%20United%20States%20(US)&regionCode=US-NY-111&q=Henslow%27s%20Sparrow%20-%20Ammodramus%20henslowii



Nathan's reply and my query to him follow here.



--------------



Karen,



Thanks for the email! I'm very glad you like my book. We need to get more people using it!



I'm about as certain as I can be that the 2018 bird is a different individual than the 2017 bird. Here's why:

* Henslow's is a poorly studied species. But in the research for my book, I never found a documented case of an individual Henslow's switching songtypes on a recording.

* You've got a pretty good sample size of recordings here. I went through all the 2018 recordings and every rendition is identical. I didn't go through all the 2017 recordings but in my sample, they were all identical to each other and different from the 2018 bird.

* All the 2017 and 2018 recordings in your sample are stereotyped, not plastic. This basically ensures the recordings come from adult birds. It has been shown in many passerine species that once birds are adults, they cannot learn new songs. A few birds have been shown to break this rule (like Northern Mockingbird), but it would be a surprise for Henslow's Sparrow.

* The 2017 and 2018 songs differ in many details -- one is not merely a truncation of the other.

This is actually a pretty good test case for the number of songtypes per individual Henslow's Sparrow. If birders visit the same bird many times over the course of a season and never document any song variation, it's very good evidence that each individual has a single songtype. Plus, it happens to fit with the little we know about song in Henslow's, and a great deal that we know about song in passerines in general.



So, I'd say you have a new bird this year.





Nathan



On Thu, Jun 14, 2018 at 3:59 AM, Karen Fung < <mailto:<easternbluebird...> <easternbluebird...> wrote:

Dear Nathan,

I very much enjoyed your presentation at the Linnaean Society (NY) last year, and bought your book as soon as it came out. I grew up playing the piano as a hobby, so am used to seeing sounds presented in visual form. Spectrograms are a great aid in learning bird song!



Anyway, I'm writing to hopefully get your thoughts on whether you think the male Henslow's Sparrow that is currently singing at Shawangunk Grasslands NWR (NY: Ulster County) is a different bird from last year's since its spectrogram is slightly different. See below for part of an email that I sent to local birders. Was told that Henslow's hasn't nested at Shawungunk in maybe 30 years, and that last year's sighting was the first one documented in recent memory. That alone made some folks think that the current bird had to be the same one as last year's due to its rarity. Last year it was around for maybe ten days, singing incessantly. This year it also sings non-stop, but the sequence of notes is different. This year it has a mate, so could it be singing a different song just based on that fact? Your book seemed to indicate that Henslow's only has one song in its repertoire.. but could it have modulated its song between seasons?. Some birders agree that it is likely to be a different bird, based on its different song, plus its plumage appears to be paler this year (but I'm not sure how to evaluate plumage if the bird has molted).



Any thoughts would be appreciated. The attached screen shot was taken a few days ago. The link to the eBird data for the audio files is below.



Best Wishes,

Karen Fung

Manhattan







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Back to top
Date: 6/14/18 3:58 pm
From: Peg Hart <sshearwater...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
Shai and Joe,

I concur heartily with Bob; thanks to you both for weighing in with your extensive field experience, quantitative and qualitative analyses. These added insights and the discussion as a whole is especially helpful for all of us, I think!

Regards,

Peg Hart

On Jun 14, 2018, at 1:30 PM, Grover, Bob <rgrover...> wrote:

Shai and Joe,
Great job by both of you. I learned a great deal from this discussion! If only I possessed the visual acuity to actually discern these details...

Bob Grover
d +1 (631) 761-7369 | c +1 (516) 318-8536
-----Original Message-----
From: <bounce-122638150-3714742...> <bounce-122638150-3714742...> On Behalf Of Joseph DiCostanzo
Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2018 11:35 AM
To: Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...>
Cc: NYSBIRDS (<NYSBIRDS-L...>) <NYSBIRDS-L...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island

Shai,

I certainly did not intend to “categorically dismiss” any line of evidence. And I certainly did not mean to say longipennis is an impossibility (see my last post to Bob). I think we completely agree that there is a tendency to not think “quantitatively” - no where enough consideration is given to variability in common species. So when an individual does not fit the “field guide” picture of the common species there is often a tendency to immediately go for something rare instead of giving enough consideration to variation in the more likely occurring species.

Of course rarities do occur! Birding wouldn’t be nearly as much fun as it is without them. The operative word, however, is “rare”. As the saying goes in medial diagnostics, “If you hear hoofbeats in the distance, think horse, not zebra.” (Unless, of course, you are in Africa. :) )

Joe

Sent from my iPad

> On Jun 14, 2018, at 10:49 AM, Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...> wrote:
>
> As I mentioned in my earlier note to the list on this subject (8 Jun 18, copied at the very end of the present note), the jury is certainly still out on the status of longipennis Common Terns on the east coast. Joe's highly informed contributions are a very welcome addition to the process and underscore several areas to focus on in resolving the matter. First, it is clearly true that to claim an extralimital longipennis, the evidence must be very strong and include multiple characters beyond dark bills and dark legs. I have a lot to contribute on this front, because I have made a point of studying non-breeding terns for more than 20 years, during which time I have collected detailed data on large samples of carefully scored first-summers and "second-summer types" (a category which, as Joe notes, consists of an odd amalgam of a subset of some but not all two year-olds, older adults short of full breeding condition, and very old, senescent adults)--not only of Common Terns, but also of Arctic, Roseate, Least, Black, and others.
>
> For now I just want to make two very simple points in response to the queries Joe raises toward the end of his note.
>
> First, I'd like to address Joe's skepticism about judging wing length visually. I once wrote a long, detailed note to the ID Frontiers list defending the critical, visual assessment of shape (i.e., the relative sizes of morphological structures; that piece concerned warblers, or maybe willets, or maybe I did it separately for both?). I might be able to dig it/them up, but for now I remember demonstrating that large samples of in-hand measurements counter-intuitively often obscure real differences between similar species, males and females, etc. The reason is that handbooks over-emphasize extreme data, neglecting quantitative measures of variance and covariance, and because most observers are unprepared or unwilling to think quantitatively. At the same time, sharp-eyed birders can unerringly distinguish Blackpoll and Pine Warblers at a glance by shape, even though practically all their measurements, viewed individually in huge samples, overlap. With regard to terns, I can recognize visually how the length of an individual's primary projection compares to the chord of its dorsum with enough precision to distinguish Common and Arctic Terns very confidently. So I would caution against categorically dismissing this line of evidence.
>
> Second, the true statuses of non-breeding seabirds remain an amazing mystery, and the few glimpses we've had so far have been really exciting. Most obviously, the local status of Arctic Tern has been completely re-written in the past 20 years based precisely on attention to loafing flocks of non-breeding terns. Furthermore, scrutiny of these flocks has yielded many other rarities, some of them as unexpected as longipennis might seem: Elegant Tern, Cayenne Tern, acuflavidus Sandwich Terns during June, Little Gulls during June, etc. My point is that although the improbability of longipennis needs to be answered with strong evidence, much stranger things have happened. I still examine every Arctic Tern I see with the remote potential of Antarctic Tern in mind; the non-breeders hang out together down there, so maybe a few stick together up here, too. Ditto for examining first-summer Least Terns for Littles and first-summer Black Terns for White-winged and Whiskered.
>
> Brian Patteson recently saw a Tahiti Petrel off of Hatteras!
>
> Shai Mitra
> Bay Shore
>
>
> ________________________________________
> From: <bounce-122637763-11143133...> [<bounce-122637763-11143133...>] on behalf of Joseph DiCostanzo [<jdicost...>]
> Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2018 9:08 AM
> To: Robert Lewis
> Cc: nysbirds-l
> Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
>
> Bob,
>
> Molt, (and I am including change in soft part colors such as bill and leg color under the term “molt”) is hormonally controlled. There is also considerable variation between individuals in the timing of molt. The timing and sequence of molt is no where as neat and fixed as many references might lead you to believe. Having worked extensively with a banded population, where the age of individuals is known from their banding histories, I know how much variation there is. I have seen birds with extensive white foreheads (or heavy speckling) and extensive carpal bars that I knew from their bands were two years old. I have also seen two year olds that were indistinguishable from normal adults. I have also seen that I knew were three, or four years old (or older based on their bands) that showed speckled foreheads and traces of carpal bars. I have seen adults in August at the breeding colony on Great Gull Island that were already in full winter plumage (black bill, dark legs, carpal bar). Individuals that don’t match the expected are unusual, but they do occur.
>
> As for the lack of a carpal bar on these dark billed, dark legged individuals, you are assuming that feather molt (carpal bar) and soft part colors (legs and bill) must be in total lock-step with each other. There is no reason they couldn’t be out of sync in some instances. As for primary length, this is being based on photos, not actual measurements of the bird in hand. How is the primary length being assessed? I am guessing versus tail length. How does anyone know the tail length?
>
> These dark billed, dark legged Common Terns get reported every year at this season, just at the time young Common Terns are coming back from South America. Where are these supposed longipennis birds coming from? The race breeds in Siberia and winters in the Indian Ocean east to Australia. If longipennis were going to occur here on the East Coast, the fall seems a more likely time than the spring migration. It seems far more likely that these birds are aberrant hirundo retaining aspects of their winter/non-breeding plumage than that there is an annual movement of Siberian based longipennis birds through Long Island.
>
> Joe DiCostanzo
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> On Jun 14, 2018, at 7:59 AM, Robert Lewis <rfermat...><mailto:<rfermat...>> wrote:
>
> Good points Joe.
>
> Let's go with the null hypothesis: it's an unusual Common tern (hirundo). Apparently a Common tern in September can get gray blotches on the underparts. During the winter they have a black bill, black legs, and a black cap with white forehead, as first summer birds do now. If it is four - eight months late in molt (or four months early), maybe that would explain some features. But then there should be a prominent dark carpal bar. Instead, there is none. Also, how to explain the very long primaries? And the fact that the back is a bit darker gray than neighboring Commons, both adult and immature?
>
> I found a number of images of longipennis on the web. Here are some screen shots:
>
> Index of /lewis/birds/other_long<http://home.bway.net/lewis/birds/other_long/>
>
> <http://home.bway.net/lewis/birds/other_long/>
>
> Index of /lewis/birds/other_long
>
>
>
>
> Bob Lewis
>
>
>
> On Wednesday, June 13, 2018, 9:01:37 PM EDT, Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...><mailto:<jdicost...>> wrote:
>
>
> One thing that has to be kept in mind about dark billed and/or dark legged Common Terns seen on Long Island in the spring is that our Common Terns (Sterna hirundo hirundo) have dark bills and dark legs in winter (both the young birds and adults). The possibility that these birds are just S. hirundo hirundo retaining aspects of their winter plumage must be considered. Indeed, given the breeding and wintering ranges of S. hirundo longipennis, S. hirundo hirundo with retained winter characters seems a more likely possibility.
>
> Joe DiCostanzo
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> --
>
> Pasted here 14 Jun 2018 from note to NYSBirds 8 June 2018:
>
> Subject: Nickerson Beach - Possible Common Tern (longipennis) Species - Comments and thoughts welcome
> Date: Fri Jun 8 2018 1:09 am
> From: Shaibal.Mitra AT csi.cuny.edu
>
>
> Dear Mike and all,
>
>
>
> This is an interesting bird, and well worth careful discussion. The photos are, as is so often necessarily the case, not ideal for assessing wing pattern and structure, and several other features. To my eye, the combination of adult-like plumage, darkish bill, not so dark legs, and not very deeply gray underparts is consistent with an early season variation of adult hirundo Common Tern that we do see from time to time.
>
>
>
> The jury is certainly still out on the status of longipennis Common Terns on the east coast, and in the past I have eBirded the ones I've seen under regular "Common Tern"--but with lots of notation and documentation. Based on the checklists you've linked from Jay and Michael, provisionally specifying this form, I agree it might be best to take this approach while we work things out. At least it would be easier to collect and access the evidence.
>
>
>
> Anyway, two of the best (and earliest in NY) candidates for longipennis were birds at Cupsogue on 26 Jun 2011 and 24 Jun 2014. I've aggregated photos of these at the following link:
>
>
>
> https://flic.kr/s/aHskD7WtGd
>
>
>
> As you will see, these birds were not only different in soft parts colors and plumage from same-aged hirundo COTE, but also different in terms of structure and molt (as explained in part in the note to this listserv from 27 Jun 2011, copied at the end of this note).
>
>
>
> I've seen a few more also, including these two I was able to find quickly just now:
>
>
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
>
>
>
> It seems odd that the best candidates have always been second-summer (TY) birds, but there are two points worth emphasizing on this front. First, subadult terns are definitely proven to be prone to wander; second, these longipennis candidates differ very strongly in multiple ways from the range of variation I've documented in same-aged hirundo COTE over the past 20 years. The links in my copied email are long defunct, but I can direct those who are interested to long series of images of TY hirundo COTE from our area.
>
>
>
> Shai Mitra
>
> Bay Shore
>
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Back to top
Date: 6/14/18 11:46 am
From: Karen Fung <easternbluebird...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Henslows Sparrow redux: Shawangunk Grasslands, NWR (Ulster County)
Hi All,
A few weeks ago, I posted a query to the list, noting that this year's
Henslow's Sparrow at Shawangunk is singing a different song compared to the
single song recorded by multiple observers last year, and wondering if that
was enough of an indication that this year's bird is a different
individual. That post did not really elicit much interest, based on the
little feedback I received.

Since then, I wrote to a few people directly, including Nathan Pieplow,
whose book, "Peterson Field Guide to Bird Sounds of Eastern North America",
was published last year. Am including my direct query to him. Nathan agrees
that this year's bird is almost certainly a different individual, and he
gave me permission to post his reply, which you will see below.

For those interested, the screen shot of the spectrograms that I sent to
him is now online on my website, in this gallery. You can see from the
screen shot that the first four spectrograms show a "Mi-Re-Do" sequence of
notes, and they are all from this year's bird. The remaining spectrograms
show a "Mi-Do-Re" type sequence of notes. Both three syllable "songs", just
a different sequence of sounds.

https://www.birdsiviews.com/Henslows-Sparrow-Shawangunk-Grasslands/

If you want to see and play back the entire eBird collection of
spectrograms and audio files for both Shawangunk birds, the link is here:

https://ebird.org/media/catalog?taxonCode=henspa&mediaType=a&region=Ulster,%20New%20York,%20United%20States%20(US)&regionCode=US-NY-111&q=Henslow%27s%20Sparrow%20-%20Ammodramus%20henslowii

Nathan's reply and my query to him follow here.

--------------

Karen,

Thanks for the email! I'm very glad you like my book. We need to get more
people using it!

I'm about as certain as I can be that the 2018 bird is a different
individual than the 2017 bird. Here's why:

- Henslow's is a poorly studied species. But in the research for my
book, I never found a documented case of an individual Henslow's switching
songtypes on a recording.
- You've got a pretty good sample size of recordings here. I went
through all the 2018 recordings and every rendition is identical. I didn't
go through all the 2017 recordings but in my sample, they were all
identical to each other and different from the 2018 bird.
- All the 2017 and 2018 recordings in your sample are stereotyped, not
plastic. This basically ensures the recordings come from adult birds. It
has been shown in many passerine species that once birds are adults, they
cannot learn new songs. A few birds have been shown to break this rule
(like Northern Mockingbird), but it would be a surprise for Henslow's
Sparrow.
- The 2017 and 2018 songs differ in many details -- one is not merely a
truncation of the other.

This is actually a pretty good test case for the number of songtypes per
individual Henslow's Sparrow. If birders visit the same bird many times
over the course of a season and never document any song variation, it's
very good evidence that each individual has a single songtype. Plus, it
happens to fit with the little we know about song in Henslow's, and a great
deal that we know about song in passerines in general.

So, I'd say you have a new bird this year.


Nathan

On Thu, Jun 14, 2018 at 3:59 AM, Karen Fung <easternbluebird...>
wrote:

> Dear Nathan,
> I very much enjoyed your presentation at the Linnaean Society (NY) last
> year, and bought your book as soon as it came out. I grew up playing the
> piano as a hobby, so am used to seeing sounds presented in visual form.
> Spectrograms are a great aid in learning bird song!
>
> Anyway, I'm writing to hopefully get your thoughts on whether you think
> the male Henslow's Sparrow that is currently singing at Shawangunk
> Grasslands NWR (NY: Ulster County) is a different bird from last year's
> since its spectrogram is slightly different. See below for part of an
> email that I sent to local birders. Was told that Henslow's hasn't nested
> at Shawungunk in maybe 30 years, and that last year's sighting was the
> first one documented in recent memory. That alone made some folks think
> that the current bird had to be the same one as last year's due to its
> rarity. Last year it was around for maybe ten days, singing incessantly.
> This year it also sings non-stop, but the sequence of notes is different.
> This year it has a mate, so could it be singing a different song just based
> on that fact? Your book seemed to indicate that Henslow's only has one
> song in its repertoire.. but could it have modulated its song between
> seasons?. Some birders agree that it is likely to be a different bird,
> based on its different song, plus its plumage appears to be paler this year
> (but I'm not sure how to evaluate plumage if the bird has molted).
>
> Any thoughts would be appreciated. The attached screen shot was taken a
> few days ago. The link to the eBird data for the audio files is below.
>
> Best Wishes,
> Karen Fung
> Manhattan
>

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Back to top
Date: 6/14/18 10:31 am
From: Grover, Bob <rgrover...>
Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
Shai and Joe,
Great job by both of you. I learned a great deal from this discussion! If only I possessed the visual acuity to actually discern these details...

Bob Grover
d +1 (631) 761-7369 | c +1 (516) 318-8536
-----Original Message-----
From: <bounce-122638150-3714742...> <bounce-122638150-3714742...> On Behalf Of Joseph DiCostanzo
Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2018 11:35 AM
To: Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...>
Cc: NYSBIRDS (<NYSBIRDS-L...>) <NYSBIRDS-L...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island

Shai,

I certainly did not intend to “categorically dismiss” any line of evidence. And I certainly did not mean to say longipennis is an impossibility (see my last post to Bob). I think we completely agree that there is a tendency to not think “quantitatively” - no where enough consideration is given to variability in common species. So when an individual does not fit the “field guide” picture of the common species there is often a tendency to immediately go for something rare instead of giving enough consideration to variation in the more likely occurring species.

Of course rarities do occur! Birding wouldn’t be nearly as much fun as it is without them. The operative word, however, is “rare”. As the saying goes in medial diagnostics, “If you hear hoofbeats in the distance, think horse, not zebra.” (Unless, of course, you are in Africa. :) )

Joe

Sent from my iPad

> On Jun 14, 2018, at 10:49 AM, Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...> wrote:
>
> As I mentioned in my earlier note to the list on this subject (8 Jun 18, copied at the very end of the present note), the jury is certainly still out on the status of longipennis Common Terns on the east coast. Joe's highly informed contributions are a very welcome addition to the process and underscore several areas to focus on in resolving the matter. First, it is clearly true that to claim an extralimital longipennis, the evidence must be very strong and include multiple characters beyond dark bills and dark legs. I have a lot to contribute on this front, because I have made a point of studying non-breeding terns for more than 20 years, during which time I have collected detailed data on large samples of carefully scored first-summers and "second-summer types" (a category which, as Joe notes, consists of an odd amalgam of a subset of some but not all two year-olds, older adults short of full breeding condition, and very old, senescent adults)--not only of Common Terns, but also of Arctic, Roseate, Least, Black, and others.
>
> For now I just want to make two very simple points in response to the queries Joe raises toward the end of his note.
>
> First, I'd like to address Joe's skepticism about judging wing length visually. I once wrote a long, detailed note to the ID Frontiers list defending the critical, visual assessment of shape (i.e., the relative sizes of morphological structures; that piece concerned warblers, or maybe willets, or maybe I did it separately for both?). I might be able to dig it/them up, but for now I remember demonstrating that large samples of in-hand measurements counter-intuitively often obscure real differences between similar species, males and females, etc. The reason is that handbooks over-emphasize extreme data, neglecting quantitative measures of variance and covariance, and because most observers are unprepared or unwilling to think quantitatively. At the same time, sharp-eyed birders can unerringly distinguish Blackpoll and Pine Warblers at a glance by shape, even though practically all their measurements, viewed individually in huge samples, overlap. With regard to terns, I can recognize visually how the length of an individual's primary projection compares to the chord of its dorsum with enough precision to distinguish Common and Arctic Terns very confidently. So I would caution against categorically dismissing this line of evidence.
>
> Second, the true statuses of non-breeding seabirds remain an amazing mystery, and the few glimpses we've had so far have been really exciting. Most obviously, the local status of Arctic Tern has been completely re-written in the past 20 years based precisely on attention to loafing flocks of non-breeding terns. Furthermore, scrutiny of these flocks has yielded many other rarities, some of them as unexpected as longipennis might seem: Elegant Tern, Cayenne Tern, acuflavidus Sandwich Terns during June, Little Gulls during June, etc. My point is that although the improbability of longipennis needs to be answered with strong evidence, much stranger things have happened. I still examine every Arctic Tern I see with the remote potential of Antarctic Tern in mind; the non-breeders hang out together down there, so maybe a few stick together up here, too. Ditto for examining first-summer Least Terns for Littles and first-summer Black Terns for White-winged and Whiskered.
>
> Brian Patteson recently saw a Tahiti Petrel off of Hatteras!
>
> Shai Mitra
> Bay Shore
>
>
> ________________________________________
> From: <bounce-122637763-11143133...> [<bounce-122637763-11143133...>] on behalf of Joseph DiCostanzo [<jdicost...>]
> Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2018 9:08 AM
> To: Robert Lewis
> Cc: nysbirds-l
> Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
>
> Bob,
>
> Molt, (and I am including change in soft part colors such as bill and leg color under the term “molt”) is hormonally controlled. There is also considerable variation between individuals in the timing of molt. The timing and sequence of molt is no where as neat and fixed as many references might lead you to believe. Having worked extensively with a banded population, where the age of individuals is known from their banding histories, I know how much variation there is. I have seen birds with extensive white foreheads (or heavy speckling) and extensive carpal bars that I knew from their bands were two years old. I have also seen two year olds that were indistinguishable from normal adults. I have also seen that I knew were three, or four years old (or older based on their bands) that showed speckled foreheads and traces of carpal bars. I have seen adults in August at the breeding colony on Great Gull Island that were already in full winter plumage (black bill, dark legs, carpal bar). Individuals that don’t match the expected are unusual, but they do occur.
>
> As for the lack of a carpal bar on these dark billed, dark legged individuals, you are assuming that feather molt (carpal bar) and soft part colors (legs and bill) must be in total lock-step with each other. There is no reason they couldn’t be out of sync in some instances. As for primary length, this is being based on photos, not actual measurements of the bird in hand. How is the primary length being assessed? I am guessing versus tail length. How does anyone know the tail length?
>
> These dark billed, dark legged Common Terns get reported every year at this season, just at the time young Common Terns are coming back from South America. Where are these supposed longipennis birds coming from? The race breeds in Siberia and winters in the Indian Ocean east to Australia. If longipennis were going to occur here on the East Coast, the fall seems a more likely time than the spring migration. It seems far more likely that these birds are aberrant hirundo retaining aspects of their winter/non-breeding plumage than that there is an annual movement of Siberian based longipennis birds through Long Island.
>
> Joe DiCostanzo
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> On Jun 14, 2018, at 7:59 AM, Robert Lewis <rfermat...><mailto:<rfermat...>> wrote:
>
> Good points Joe.
>
> Let's go with the null hypothesis: it's an unusual Common tern (hirundo). Apparently a Common tern in September can get gray blotches on the underparts. During the winter they have a black bill, black legs, and a black cap with white forehead, as first summer birds do now. If it is four - eight months late in molt (or four months early), maybe that would explain some features. But then there should be a prominent dark carpal bar. Instead, there is none. Also, how to explain the very long primaries? And the fact that the back is a bit darker gray than neighboring Commons, both adult and immature?
>
> I found a number of images of longipennis on the web. Here are some screen shots:
>
> Index of /lewis/birds/other_long<http://home.bway.net/lewis/birds/other_long/>
>
> <http://home.bway.net/lewis/birds/other_long/>
>
> Index of /lewis/birds/other_long
>
>
>
>
> Bob Lewis
>
>
>
> On Wednesday, June 13, 2018, 9:01:37 PM EDT, Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...><mailto:<jdicost...>> wrote:
>
>
> One thing that has to be kept in mind about dark billed and/or dark legged Common Terns seen on Long Island in the spring is that our Common Terns (Sterna hirundo hirundo) have dark bills and dark legs in winter (both the young birds and adults). The possibility that these birds are just S. hirundo hirundo retaining aspects of their winter plumage must be considered. Indeed, given the breeding and wintering ranges of S. hirundo longipennis, S. hirundo hirundo with retained winter characters seems a more likely possibility.
>
> Joe DiCostanzo
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> --
>
> Pasted here 14 Jun 2018 from note to NYSBirds 8 June 2018:
>
> Subject: Nickerson Beach - Possible Common Tern (longipennis) Species - Comments and thoughts welcome
> Date: Fri Jun 8 2018 1:09 am
> From: Shaibal.Mitra AT csi.cuny.edu
>
>
> Dear Mike and all,
>
>
>
> This is an interesting bird, and well worth careful discussion. The photos are, as is so often necessarily the case, not ideal for assessing wing pattern and structure, and several other features. To my eye, the combination of adult-like plumage, darkish bill, not so dark legs, and not very deeply gray underparts is consistent with an early season variation of adult hirundo Common Tern that we do see from time to time.
>
>
>
> The jury is certainly still out on the status of longipennis Common Terns on the east coast, and in the past I have eBirded the ones I've seen under regular "Common Tern"--but with lots of notation and documentation. Based on the checklists you've linked from Jay and Michael, provisionally specifying this form, I agree it might be best to take this approach while we work things out. At least it would be easier to collect and access the evidence.
>
>
>
> Anyway, two of the best (and earliest in NY) candidates for longipennis were birds at Cupsogue on 26 Jun 2011 and 24 Jun 2014. I've aggregated photos of these at the following link:
>
>
>
> https://flic.kr/s/aHskD7WtGd
>
>
>
> As you will see, these birds were not only different in soft parts colors and plumage from same-aged hirundo COTE, but also different in terms of structure and molt (as explained in part in the note to this listserv from 27 Jun 2011, copied at the end of this note).
>
>
>
> I've seen a few more also, including these two I was able to find quickly just now:
>
>
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
>
>
>
> It seems odd that the best candidates have always been second-summer (TY) birds, but there are two points worth emphasizing on this front. First, subadult terns are definitely proven to be prone to wander; second, these longipennis candidates differ very strongly in multiple ways from the range of variation I've documented in same-aged hirundo COTE over the past 20 years. The links in my copied email are long defunct, but I can direct those who are interested to long series of images of TY hirundo COTE from our area.
>
>
>
> Shai Mitra
>
> Bay Shore
>
> --
>
> NYSbirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME.htm
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES.htm
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> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
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>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
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>


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Date: 6/14/18 8:59 am
From: Greg Lawrence <glawrence21...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] 2018 New York State Ornithological Association Annual Meeting and Birders Conference Announcement
Hello New York State birders,
Youwill absolutely not want to miss the New York State OrnithologicalAssociation’s annual meeting and birders conference, October 5-7, 2018, at theRIT Inn and Conference Center, 5257 West Henrietta Road, in Henrietta.Burroughs Audubon Nature Club and the Rochester Birding Association are themeeting’s co-sponsors.
It’s a great opportunity to meet birdersfrom across the state - forming and renewing friendships and learning about themany clubs in our state that are devoted to nature study and conservation.There will be many field trips: Friday afternoon plus Saturday and Sundaymornings. Friday evening’s activities are workshops on Snowy Owls and eBird anda buffet dinner. Saturday features an afternoon paper session, where you canhear about the latest research inornithology, and a second buffet dinner followed by the keynote address by GregMiller, a birding tour guide, whose “Big Year” of birding was featured in a bookand subsequent movie. 
To learn more about the meeting and forregistration forms, go to the NYSOA web site, www.nybirds.org or to the Rochester BirdingAssociation website https://rochesterbirding.com/nysoa-reg/ whereyou can register online or download paper registration forms.
Registration to attend is $50 throughAugust 15 and $60 thereafter through September 15. The buffet dinners cost $35each. For more information, contact Shirley Shaw at <shirley...> or Bob Spahn at <rspahn...> . Hotel reservations should bemade directly with the RIT Inn, with contact information or link to be found withthe registration information.
Hope to see you all there,Greg <Lawrenceglawrence21...>

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Date: 6/14/18 8:36 am
From: Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
Shai,

I certainly did not intend to “categorically dismiss” any line of evidence. And I certainly did not mean to say longipennis is an impossibility (see my last post to Bob). I think we completely agree that there is a tendency to not think “quantitatively” - no where enough consideration is given to variability in common species. So when an individual does not fit the “field guide” picture of the common species there is often a tendency to immediately go for something rare instead of giving enough consideration to variation in the more likely occurring species.

Of course rarities do occur! Birding wouldn’t be nearly as much fun as it is without them. The operative word, however, is “rare”. As the saying goes in medial diagnostics, “If you hear hoofbeats in the distance, think horse, not zebra.” (Unless, of course, you are in Africa. :) )

Joe

Sent from my iPad

> On Jun 14, 2018, at 10:49 AM, Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...> wrote:
>
> As I mentioned in my earlier note to the list on this subject (8 Jun 18, copied at the very end of the present note), the jury is certainly still out on the status of longipennis Common Terns on the east coast. Joe's highly informed contributions are a very welcome addition to the process and underscore several areas to focus on in resolving the matter. First, it is clearly true that to claim an extralimital longipennis, the evidence must be very strong and include multiple characters beyond dark bills and dark legs. I have a lot to contribute on this front, because I have made a point of studying non-breeding terns for more than 20 years, during which time I have collected detailed data on large samples of carefully scored first-summers and "second-summer types" (a category which, as Joe notes, consists of an odd amalgam of a subset of some but not all two year-olds, older adults short of full breeding condition, and very old, senescent adults)--not only of Common Terns, but also of Arctic, Roseate, Least, Black, and others.
>
> For now I just want to make two very simple points in response to the queries Joe raises toward the end of his note.
>
> First, I'd like to address Joe's skepticism about judging wing length visually. I once wrote a long, detailed note to the ID Frontiers list defending the critical, visual assessment of shape (i.e., the relative sizes of morphological structures; that piece concerned warblers, or maybe willets, or maybe I did it separately for both?). I might be able to dig it/them up, but for now I remember demonstrating that large samples of in-hand measurements counter-intuitively often obscure real differences between similar species, males and females, etc. The reason is that handbooks over-emphasize extreme data, neglecting quantitative measures of variance and covariance, and because most observers are unprepared or unwilling to think quantitatively. At the same time, sharp-eyed birders can unerringly distinguish Blackpoll and Pine Warblers at a glance by shape, even though practically all their measurements, viewed individually in huge samples, overlap. With regard to terns, I can recognize visually how the length of an individual's primary projection compares to the chord of its dorsum with enough precision to distinguish Common and Arctic Terns very confidently. So I would caution against categorically dismissing this line of evidence.
>
> Second, the true statuses of non-breeding seabirds remain an amazing mystery, and the few glimpses we've had so far have been really exciting. Most obviously, the local status of Arctic Tern has been completely re-written in the past 20 years based precisely on attention to loafing flocks of non-breeding terns. Furthermore, scrutiny of these flocks has yielded many other rarities, some of them as unexpected as longipennis might seem: Elegant Tern, Cayenne Tern, acuflavidus Sandwich Terns during June, Little Gulls during June, etc. My point is that although the improbability of longipennis needs to be answered with strong evidence, much stranger things have happened. I still examine every Arctic Tern I see with the remote potential of Antarctic Tern in mind; the non-breeders hang out together down there, so maybe a few stick together up here, too. Ditto for examining first-summer Least Terns for Littles and first-summer Black Terns for White-winged and Whiskered.
>
> Brian Patteson recently saw a Tahiti Petrel off of Hatteras!
>
> Shai Mitra
> Bay Shore
>
>
> ________________________________________
> From: <bounce-122637763-11143133...> [<bounce-122637763-11143133...>] on behalf of Joseph DiCostanzo [<jdicost...>]
> Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2018 9:08 AM
> To: Robert Lewis
> Cc: nysbirds-l
> Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
>
> Bob,
>
> Molt, (and I am including change in soft part colors such as bill and leg color under the term “molt”) is hormonally controlled. There is also considerable variation between individuals in the timing of molt. The timing and sequence of molt is no where as neat and fixed as many references might lead you to believe. Having worked extensively with a banded population, where the age of individuals is known from their banding histories, I know how much variation there is. I have seen birds with extensive white foreheads (or heavy speckling) and extensive carpal bars that I knew from their bands were two years old. I have also seen two year olds that were indistinguishable from normal adults. I have also seen that I knew were three, or four years old (or older based on their bands) that showed speckled foreheads and traces of carpal bars. I have seen adults in August at the breeding colony on Great Gull Island that were already in full winter plumage (black bill, dark legs, carpal bar). Individuals that don’t match the expected are unusual, but they do occur.
>
> As for the lack of a carpal bar on these dark billed, dark legged individuals, you are assuming that feather molt (carpal bar) and soft part colors (legs and bill) must be in total lock-step with each other. There is no reason they couldn’t be out of sync in some instances. As for primary length, this is being based on photos, not actual measurements of the bird in hand. How is the primary length being assessed? I am guessing versus tail length. How does anyone know the tail length?
>
> These dark billed, dark legged Common Terns get reported every year at this season, just at the time young Common Terns are coming back from South America. Where are these supposed longipennis birds coming from? The race breeds in Siberia and winters in the Indian Ocean east to Australia. If longipennis were going to occur here on the East Coast, the fall seems a more likely time than the spring migration. It seems far more likely that these birds are aberrant hirundo retaining aspects of their winter/non-breeding plumage than that there is an annual movement of Siberian based longipennis birds through Long Island.
>
> Joe DiCostanzo
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> On Jun 14, 2018, at 7:59 AM, Robert Lewis <rfermat...><mailto:<rfermat...>> wrote:
>
> Good points Joe.
>
> Let's go with the null hypothesis: it's an unusual Common tern (hirundo). Apparently a Common tern in September can get gray blotches on the underparts. During the winter they have a black bill, black legs, and a black cap with white forehead, as first summer birds do now. If it is four - eight months late in molt (or four months early), maybe that would explain some features. But then there should be a prominent dark carpal bar. Instead, there is none. Also, how to explain the very long primaries? And the fact that the back is a bit darker gray than neighboring Commons, both adult and immature?
>
> I found a number of images of longipennis on the web. Here are some screen shots:
>
> Index of /lewis/birds/other_long<http://home.bway.net/lewis/birds/other_long/>
>
> <http://home.bway.net/lewis/birds/other_long/>
>
> Index of /lewis/birds/other_long
>
>
>
>
> Bob Lewis
>
>
>
> On Wednesday, June 13, 2018, 9:01:37 PM EDT, Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...><mailto:<jdicost...>> wrote:
>
>
> One thing that has to be kept in mind about dark billed and/or dark legged Common Terns seen on Long Island in the spring is that our Common Terns (Sterna hirundo hirundo) have dark bills and dark legs in winter (both the young birds and adults). The possibility that these birds are just S. hirundo hirundo retaining aspects of their winter plumage must be considered. Indeed, given the breeding and wintering ranges of S. hirundo longipennis, S. hirundo hirundo with retained winter characters seems a more likely possibility.
>
> Joe DiCostanzo
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> --
>
> Pasted here 14 Jun 2018 from note to NYSBirds 8 June 2018:
>
> Subject: Nickerson Beach - Possible Common Tern (longipennis) Species - Comments and thoughts welcome
> Date: Fri Jun 8 2018 1:09 am
> From: Shaibal.Mitra AT csi.cuny.edu
>
>
> Dear Mike and all,
>
>
>
> This is an interesting bird, and well worth careful discussion. The photos are, as is so often necessarily the case, not ideal for assessing wing pattern and structure, and several other features. To my eye, the combination of adult-like plumage, darkish bill, not so dark legs, and not very deeply gray underparts is consistent with an early season variation of adult hirundo Common Tern that we do see from time to time.
>
>
>
> The jury is certainly still out on the status of longipennis Common Terns on the east coast, and in the past I have eBirded the ones I've seen under regular "Common Tern"--but with lots of notation and documentation. Based on the checklists you've linked from Jay and Michael, provisionally specifying this form, I agree it might be best to take this approach while we work things out. At least it would be easier to collect and access the evidence.
>
>
>
> Anyway, two of the best (and earliest in NY) candidates for longipennis were birds at Cupsogue on 26 Jun 2011 and 24 Jun 2014. I've aggregated photos of these at the following link:
>
>
>
> https://flic.kr/s/aHskD7WtGd
>
>
>
> As you will see, these birds were not only different in soft parts colors and plumage from same-aged hirundo COTE, but also different in terms of structure and molt (as explained in part in the note to this listserv from 27 Jun 2011, copied at the end of this note).
>
>
>
> I've seen a few more also, including these two I was able to find quickly just now:
>
>
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
>
>
>
> It seems odd that the best candidates have always been second-summer (TY) birds, but there are two points worth emphasizing on this front. First, subadult terns are definitely proven to be prone to wander; second, these longipennis candidates differ very strongly in multiple ways from the range of variation I've documented in same-aged hirundo COTE over the past 20 years. The links in my copied email are long defunct, but I can direct those who are interested to long series of images of TY hirundo COTE from our area.
>
>
>
> Shai Mitra
>
> Bay Shore
>
> --
>
> NYSbirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME.htm
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES.htm
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/<nysbirds-l...>/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
> 3) http://birding.aba.org/maillist/NY01
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
> --
>


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Date: 6/14/18 8:05 am
From: Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
Bob,

I am not saying a Siberian longipennis race Common Tern is a total impossibility here in the east. Among shorebirds, many of us saw the Broad-billed Sandpiper at Jamaica Bay years ago and there are multiple records of Sharp-tailed Sandpipers in the northeast. I am saying that an aberrant hirundo would fit the bill just as well and seems much more likely.

At least the Gray-hooded Gull is from this (Western) hemisphere and it does occur together with wintering Laughing Gulls on the north coast of South America. You just don’t have that same possibility for a longipennis to take up with a northbound flock of hirundo.

Joe

Sent from my iPad

> On Jun 14, 2018, at 10:44 AM, Robert Lewis <rfermat...> wrote:
>
> Thanks for the thorough reply. As a long time student of gulls, I am aware of the concepts you delineated about timing and odd individuals that don't fit the norms.
>
> As for how did it (they) get here, stranger things have happened, namely the Gray-hooded gull of a few years back. Ship-assisted? Who knows.
>
> Bob Lewis
>
> On Thursday, June 14, 2018, 9:08:12 AM EDT, Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...> wrote:
>
>
> Bob,
>
> Molt, (and I am including change in soft part colors such as bill and leg color under the term “molt”) is hormonally controlled. There is also considerable variation between individuals in the timing of molt. The timing and sequence of molt is no where as neat and fixed as many references might lead you to believe. Having worked extensively with a banded population, where the age of individuals is known from their banding histories, I know how much variation there is. I have seen birds with extensive white foreheads (or heavy speckling) and extensive carpal bars that I knew from their bands were two years old. I have also seen two year olds that were indistinguishable from normal adults. I have also seen that I knew were three, or four years old (or older based on their bands) that showed speckled foreheads and traces of carpal bars. I have seen adults in August at the breeding colony on Great Gull Island that were already in full winter plumage (black bill, dark legs, carpal bar). Individuals that don’t match the expected are unusual, but they do occur.
>
> As for the lack of a carpal bar on these dark billed, dark legged individuals, you are assuming that feather molt (carpal bar) and soft part colors (legs and bill) must be in total lock-step with each other. There is no reason they couldn’t be out of sync in some instances. As for primary length, this is being based on photos, not actual measurements of the bird in hand. How is the primary length being assessed? I am guessing versus tail length. How does anyone know the tail length?
>
> These dark billed, dark legged Common Terns get reported every year at this season, just at the time young Common Terns are coming back from South America. Where are these supposed longipennis birds coming from? The race breeds in Siberia and winters in the Indian Ocean east to Australia. If longipennis were going to occur here on the East Coast, the fall seems a more likely time than the spring migration. It seems far more likely that these birds are aberrant hirundo retaining aspects of their winter/non-breeding plumage than that there is an annual movement of Siberian based longipennis birds through Long Island.
>
> Joe DiCostanzo
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>> On Jun 14, 2018, at 7:59 AM, Robert Lewis <rfermat...> wrote:
>>
>> Good points Joe.
>>
>> Let's go with the null hypothesis: it's an unusual Common tern (hirundo). Apparently a Common tern in September can get gray blotches on the underparts. During the winter they have a black bill, black legs, and a black cap with white forehead, as first summer birds do now. If it is four - eight months late in molt (or four months early), maybe that would explain some features. But then there should be a prominent dark carpal bar. Instead, there is none. Also, how to explain the very long primaries? And the fact that the back is a bit darker gray than neighboring Commons, both adult and immature?
>>
>> I found a number of images of longipennis on the web. Here are some screen shots:
>>
>> Index of /lewis/birds/other_long
>>
>> Index of /lewis/birds/other_long
>>
>> Bob Lewis
>>
>>
>>
>> On Wednesday, June 13, 2018, 9:01:37 PM EDT, Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...> wrote:
>>
>>
>> One thing that has to be kept in mind about dark billed and/or dark legged Common Terns seen on Long Island in the spring is that our Common Terns (Sterna hirundo hirundo) have dark bills and dark legs in winter (both the young birds and adults). The possibility that these birds are just S. hirundo hirundo retaining aspects of their winter plumage must be considered. Indeed, given the breeding and wintering ranges of S. hirundo longipennis, S. hirundo hirundo with retained winter characters seems a more likely possibility.
>>
>> Joe DiCostanzo
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
>>
>> --
>>
>> --

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Date: 6/14/18 7:50 am
From: Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...>
Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
As I mentioned in my earlier note to the list on this subject (8 Jun 18, copied at the very end of the present note), the jury is certainly still out on the status of longipennis Common Terns on the east coast. Joe's highly informed contributions are a very welcome addition to the process and underscore several areas to focus on in resolving the matter. First, it is clearly true that to claim an extralimital longipennis, the evidence must be very strong and include multiple characters beyond dark bills and dark legs. I have a lot to contribute on this front, because I have made a point of studying non-breeding terns for more than 20 years, during which time I have collected detailed data on large samples of carefully scored first-summers and "second-summer types" (a category which, as Joe notes, consists of an odd amalgam of a subset of some but not all two year-olds, older adults short of full breeding condition, and very old, senescent adults)--not only of Common Terns, but also of Arctic, Roseate, Least, Black, and others.

For now I just want to make two very simple points in response to the queries Joe raises toward the end of his note.

First, I'd like to address Joe's skepticism about judging wing length visually. I once wrote a long, detailed note to the ID Frontiers list defending the critical, visual assessment of shape (i.e., the relative sizes of morphological structures; that piece concerned warblers, or maybe willets, or maybe I did it separately for both?). I might be able to dig it/them up, but for now I remember demonstrating that large samples of in-hand measurements counter-intuitively often obscure real differences between similar species, males and females, etc. The reason is that handbooks over-emphasize extreme data, neglecting quantitative measures of variance and covariance, and because most observers are unprepared or unwilling to think quantitatively. At the same time, sharp-eyed birders can unerringly distinguish Blackpoll and Pine Warblers at a glance by shape, even though practically all their measurements, viewed individually in huge samples, overlap. With regard to terns, I can recognize visually how the length of an individual's primary projection compares to the chord of its dorsum with enough precision to distinguish Common and Arctic Terns very confidently. So I would caution against categorically dismissing this line of evidence.

Second, the true statuses of non-breeding seabirds remain an amazing mystery, and the few glimpses we've had so far have been really exciting. Most obviously, the local status of Arctic Tern has been completely re-written in the past 20 years based precisely on attention to loafing flocks of non-breeding terns. Furthermore, scrutiny of these flocks has yielded many other rarities, some of them as unexpected as longipennis might seem: Elegant Tern, Cayenne Tern, acuflavidus Sandwich Terns during June, Little Gulls during June, etc. My point is that although the improbability of longipennis needs to be answered with strong evidence, much stranger things have happened. I still examine every Arctic Tern I see with the remote potential of Antarctic Tern in mind; the non-breeders hang out together down there, so maybe a few stick together up here, too. Ditto for examining first-summer Least Terns for Littles and first-summer Black Terns for White-winged and Whiskered.

Brian Patteson recently saw a Tahiti Petrel off of Hatteras!

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore


________________________________________
From: <bounce-122637763-11143133...> [<bounce-122637763-11143133...>] on behalf of Joseph DiCostanzo [<jdicost...>]
Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2018 9:08 AM
To: Robert Lewis
Cc: nysbirds-l
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island

Bob,

Molt, (and I am including change in soft part colors such as bill and leg color under the term molt) is hormonally controlled. There is also considerable variation between individuals in the timing of molt. The timing and sequence of molt is no where as neat and fixed as many references might lead you to believe. Having worked extensively with a banded population, where the age of individuals is known from their banding histories, I know how much variation there is. I have seen birds with extensive white foreheads (or heavy speckling) and extensive carpal bars that I knew from their bands were two years old. I have also seen two year olds that were indistinguishable from normal adults. I have also seen that I knew were three, or four years old (or older based on their bands) that showed speckled foreheads and traces of carpal bars. I have seen adults in August at the breeding colony on Great Gull Island that were already in full winter plumage (black bill, dark legs, carpal bar). Individuals that dont match the expected are unusual, but they do occur.

As for the lack of a carpal bar on these dark billed, dark legged individuals, you are assuming that feather molt (carpal bar) and soft part colors (legs and bill) must be in total lock-step with each other. There is no reason they couldnt be out of sync in some instances. As for primary length, this is being based on photos, not actual measurements of the bird in hand. How is the primary length being assessed? I am guessing versus tail length. How does anyone know the tail length?

These dark billed, dark legged Common Terns get reported every year at this season, just at the time young Common Terns are coming back from South America. Where are these supposed longipennis birds coming from? The race breeds in Siberia and winters in the Indian Ocean east to Australia. If longipennis were going to occur here on the East Coast, the fall seems a more likely time than the spring migration. It seems far more likely that these birds are aberrant hirundo retaining aspects of their winter/non-breeding plumage than that there is an annual movement of Siberian based longipennis birds through Long Island.

Joe DiCostanzo

Sent from my iPad

On Jun 14, 2018, at 7:59 AM, Robert Lewis <rfermat...><mailto:<rfermat...>> wrote:

Good points Joe.

Let's go with the null hypothesis: it's an unusual Common tern (hirundo). Apparently a Common tern in September can get gray blotches on the underparts. During the winter they have a black bill, black legs, and a black cap with white forehead, as first summer birds do now. If it is four - eight months late in molt (or four months early), maybe that would explain some features. But then there should be a prominent dark carpal bar. Instead, there is none. Also, how to explain the very long primaries? And the fact that the back is a bit darker gray than neighboring Commons, both adult and immature?

I found a number of images of longipennis on the web. Here are some screen shots:

Index of /lewis/birds/other_long<http://home.bway.net/lewis/birds/other_long/>

<http://home.bway.net/lewis/birds/other_long/>

Index of /lewis/birds/other_long




Bob Lewis



On Wednesday, June 13, 2018, 9:01:37 PM EDT, Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...><mailto:<jdicost...>> wrote:


One thing that has to be kept in mind about dark billed and/or dark legged Common Terns seen on Long Island in the spring is that our Common Terns (Sterna hirundo hirundo) have dark bills and dark legs in winter (both the young birds and adults). The possibility that these birds are just S. hirundo hirundo retaining aspects of their winter plumage must be considered. Indeed, given the breeding and wintering ranges of S. hirundo longipennis, S. hirundo hirundo with retained winter characters seems a more likely possibility.

Joe DiCostanzo

Sent from my iPad

--

Pasted here 14 Jun 2018 from note to NYSBirds 8 June 2018:

Subject: Nickerson Beach - Possible Common Tern (longipennis) Species - Comments and thoughts welcome
Date: Fri Jun 8 2018 1:09 am
From: Shaibal.Mitra AT csi.cuny.edu


Dear Mike and all,



This is an interesting bird, and well worth careful discussion. The photos are, as is so often necessarily the case, not ideal for assessing wing pattern and structure, and several other features. To my eye, the combination of adult-like plumage, darkish bill, not so dark legs, and not very deeply gray underparts is consistent with an early season variation of adult hirundo Common Tern that we do see from time to time.



The jury is certainly still out on the status of longipennis Common Terns on the east coast, and in the past I have eBirded the ones I've seen under regular "Common Tern"--but with lots of notation and documentation. Based on the checklists you've linked from Jay and Michael, provisionally specifying this form, I agree it might be best to take this approach while we work things out. At least it would be easier to collect and access the evidence.



Anyway, two of the best (and earliest in NY) candidates for longipennis were birds at Cupsogue on 26 Jun 2011 and 24 Jun 2014. I've aggregated photos of these at the following link:



https://flic.kr/s/aHskD7WtGd



As you will see, these birds were not only different in soft parts colors and plumage from same-aged hirundo COTE, but also different in terms of structure and molt (as explained in part in the note to this listserv from 27 Jun 2011, copied at the end of this note).



I've seen a few more also, including these two I was able to find quickly just now:



https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

https://ebird.org/view/checkli...



It seems odd that the best candidates have always been second-summer (TY) birds, but there are two points worth emphasizing on this front. First, subadult terns are definitely proven to be prone to wander; second, these longipennis candidates differ very strongly in multiple ways from the range of variation I've documented in same-aged hirundo COTE over the past 20 years. The links in my copied email are long defunct, but I can direct those who are interested to long series of images of TY hirundo COTE from our area.



Shai Mitra

Bay Shore

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Date: 6/14/18 7:46 am
From: Robert Lewis <rfermat...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
Thanks for the thorough reply.   As a long time student of gulls, I am aware of the concepts you delineated about timing and odd individuals that don't fit the norms. 

As for how did it (they) get here, stranger things have happened, namely the Gray-hooded gull of a few years back.  Ship-assisted?  Who knows.
Bob Lewis

On Thursday, June 14, 2018, 9:08:12 AM EDT, Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...> wrote:

Bob,
Molt, (and I am including change in soft part colors such as bill and leg color under the term “molt”) is hormonally controlled. There is also considerable variation between individuals in the timing of molt. The timing and sequence of molt is no where as neat and fixed as many references might lead you to believe. Having worked extensively with a banded population, where the age of individuals is known from their banding histories, I know how much variation there is. I have seen birds with extensive white foreheads (or heavy speckling) and extensive carpal bars that I knew from their bands were two years old. I have also seen two year olds that were indistinguishable from normal adults. I have also seen that I knew were three, or four years old (or older based on their bands) that showed speckled foreheads and traces of carpal bars. I have seen adults in August at the breeding colony on Great Gull Island that were already in full winter plumage (black bill, dark legs, carpal bar). Individuals that don’t match the expected are unusual, but they do occur.
As for the lack of a carpal bar on these dark billed, dark legged individuals, you are assuming that feather molt (carpal bar) and soft part colors (legs and bill) must be in total lock-step with each other. There is no reason they couldn’t be out of sync in some instances. As for primary length, this is being based on photos, not actual measurements of the bird in hand. How is the primary length being assessed? I am guessing versus tail length. How does anyone know the tail length?
These dark billed, dark legged Common Terns get reported every year at this season, just at the time young Common Terns are coming back from South America. Where are these supposed longipennis birds coming from? The race breeds in Siberia and winters in the Indian Ocean east to Australia. If longipennis were going to occur here on the East Coast, the fall seems a more likely time than the spring migration. It seems far more likely that these birds are aberrant hirundo retaining aspects of their winter/non-breeding plumage than that there is an annual movement of Siberian based longipennis birds through Long Island.
Joe DiCostanzo

Sent from my iPad
On Jun 14, 2018, at 7:59 AM, Robert Lewis <rfermat...> wrote:


Good points Joe.
Let's go with the null hypothesis: it's an unusual Common tern (hirundo). Apparently a Common tern in September can get gray blotches on the underparts. During the winter they have a black bill, black legs, and a black cap with white forehead, as first summer birds do now. If it is four - eight months late in molt (or four months early), maybe that would explain some features. But then there should be a prominent dark carpal bar. Instead, there is none. Also, how to explain the very long primaries? And the fact that the back is a bit darker gray than neighboring Commons, both adult and immature?
I found a number of images of longipennis on the web.  Here are some screen shots:
Index of /lewis/birds/other_long

|
|
| |
Index of /lewis/birds/other_long


|

|

|


Bob Lewis


On Wednesday, June 13, 2018, 9:01:37 PM EDT, Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...> wrote:

One thing that has to be kept in mind about dark billed and/or dark legged Common Terns seen on Long Island in the spring is that our Common Terns (Sterna hirundo hirundo) have dark bills and dark legs in winter (both the young birds and adults). The possibility that these birds are just S. hirundo hirundo retaining aspects of their winter plumage must be considered. Indeed, given the breeding and wintering ranges of S. hirundo longipennis, S. hirundo hirundo with retained winter characters seems a more likely possibility.

Joe DiCostanzo

Sent from my iPad

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Date: 6/14/18 6:08 am
From: Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
Bob,

Molt, (and I am including change in soft part colors such as bill and leg color under the term “molt”) is hormonally controlled. There is also considerable variation between individuals in the timing of molt. The timing and sequence of molt is no where as neat and fixed as many references might lead you to believe. Having worked extensively with a banded population, where the age of individuals is known from their banding histories, I know how much variation there is. I have seen birds with extensive white foreheads (or heavy speckling) and extensive carpal bars that I knew from their bands were two years old. I have also seen two year olds that were indistinguishable from normal adults. I have also seen that I knew were three, or four years old (or older based on their bands) that showed speckled foreheads and traces of carpal bars. I have seen adults in August at the breeding colony on Great Gull Island that were already in full winter plumage (black bill, dark legs, carpal bar). Individuals that don’t match the expected are unusual, but they do occur.

As for the lack of a carpal bar on these dark billed, dark legged individuals, you are assuming that feather molt (carpal bar) and soft part colors (legs and bill) must be in total lock-step with each other. There is no reason they couldn’t be out of sync in some instances. As for primary length, this is being based on photos, not actual measurements of the bird in hand. How is the primary length being assessed? I am guessing versus tail length. How does anyone know the tail length?

These dark billed, dark legged Common Terns get reported every year at this season, just at the time young Common Terns are coming back from South America. Where are these supposed longipennis birds coming from? The race breeds in Siberia and winters in the Indian Ocean east to Australia. If longipennis were going to occur here on the East Coast, the fall seems a more likely time than the spring migration. It seems far more likely that these birds are aberrant hirundo retaining aspects of their winter/non-breeding plumage than that there is an annual movement of Siberian based longipennis birds through Long Island.

Joe DiCostanzo

Sent from my iPad

> On Jun 14, 2018, at 7:59 AM, Robert Lewis <rfermat...> wrote:
>
> Good points Joe.
>
> Let's go with the null hypothesis: it's an unusual Common tern (hirundo). Apparently a Common tern in September can get gray blotches on the underparts. During the winter they have a black bill, black legs, and a black cap with white forehead, as first summer birds do now. If it is four - eight months late in molt (or four months early), maybe that would explain some features. But then there should be a prominent dark carpal bar. Instead, there is none. Also, how to explain the very long primaries? And the fact that the back is a bit darker gray than neighboring Commons, both adult and immature?
>
> I found a number of images of longipennis on the web. Here are some screen shots:
>
> Index of /lewis/birds/other_long
>
> Index of /lewis/birds/other_long
>
> Bob Lewis
>
>
>
> On Wednesday, June 13, 2018, 9:01:37 PM EDT, Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...> wrote:
>
>
> One thing that has to be kept in mind about dark billed and/or dark legged Common Terns seen on Long Island in the spring is that our Common Terns (Sterna hirundo hirundo) have dark bills and dark legs in winter (both the young birds and adults). The possibility that these birds are just S. hirundo hirundo retaining aspects of their winter plumage must be considered. Indeed, given the breeding and wintering ranges of S. hirundo longipennis, S. hirundo hirundo with retained winter characters seems a more likely possibility.
>
> Joe DiCostanzo
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> --
>
> --

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Date: 6/14/18 4:59 am
From: Robert Lewis <rfermat...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
Good points Joe.
Let's go with the null hypothesis: it's an unusual Common tern (hirundo). Apparently a Common tern in September can get gray blotches on the underparts. During the winter they have a black bill, black legs, and a black cap with white forehead, as first summer birds do now. If it is four - eight months late in molt (or four months early), maybe that would explain some features. But then there should be a prominent dark carpal bar. Instead, there is none. Also, how to explain the very long primaries? And the fact that the back is a bit darker gray than neighboring Commons, both adult and immature?
I found a number of images of longipennis on the web.  Here are some screen shots:
Index of /lewis/birds/other_long

|
|
| |
Index of /lewis/birds/other_long


|

|

|


Bob Lewis


On Wednesday, June 13, 2018, 9:01:37 PM EDT, Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...> wrote:

One thing that has to be kept in mind about dark billed and/or dark legged Common Terns seen on Long Island in the spring is that our Common Terns (Sterna hirundo hirundo) have dark bills and dark legs in winter (both the young birds and adults). The possibility that these birds are just S. hirundo hirundo retaining aspects of their winter plumage must be considered. Indeed, given the breeding and wintering ranges of S. hirundo longipennis, S. hirundo hirundo with retained winter characters seems a more likely possibility.

Joe DiCostanzo

Sent from my iPad

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Date: 6/13/18 6:01 pm
From: Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Dark billed, dark legged Common Terns on Long Island
One thing that has to be kept in mind about dark billed and/or dark legged Common Terns seen on Long Island in the spring is that our Common Terns (Sterna hirundo hirundo) have dark bills and dark legs in winter (both the young birds and adults). The possibility that these birds are just S. hirundo hirundo retaining aspects of their winter plumage must be considered. Indeed, given the breeding and wintering ranges of S. hirundo longipennis, S. hirundo hirundo with retained winter characters seems a more likely possibility.

Joe DiCostanzo

Sent from my iPad

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Date: 6/13/18 3:30 pm
From: Robert Lewis <rfermat...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Possible Common Tern of race longipennis at Nickerson Beach, Nassau County

Here's an odd Common Tern from Nickerson Beach, Long Island, NY yesterday morning. In the field, the bill and legs looked black. There was very bright sunlight. On the photos, the feet are brown and the legs are a sort of deep red-black-brown.

Over the last few years, several longipennis-type terns have been seen on Long Island. This one looks like some photos one can find on the internet of longipennis. Thoughts?

Bob Lewis
Sleepy Hollow NY
Index of /lewis/birds/odd_comm_tern

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Date: 6/13/18 3:25 pm
From: Mike McBrien <mcb3mb...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Siberian Common Tern candidates - Nickerson Beach, Nassau Co. 6/12-13
Two probable Siberian Common Terns (S.h. longipennis) candidates were present at Nickerson Beach, Nassau County. These individuals were present mid-morning, following the passage of a rain band that emptied the beach of all beach goers, photographers, and birders. Both exhibited various plumage, molt, and soft parts field marks rendering them distinct from hirundos of their respective age class(es), as well as subtle structural differences from our local birds.

One individual appeared to be a TY bird, showing some signs of immaturity (white forehead speckling, dark smudging on the tertials, etc). This bird was present briefly for 20ish min yesterday but was flushed, precluding more detailed, definitive study. The second individual appeared much more adult-like, and sported very long tail streamers projecting beyond the primaries.

Photos can be seen beginning here:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/oceanites69/27914395167/

Best,
Michael McBrien
East Patchogue, NY - Bristol, RI


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Date: 6/13/18 2:03 pm
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Arctic and Sandwich Tern @ Breezy Point Queens NYC
It does not always pan out but I have always liked my chances on bad weather producing good birds. Today was a good day in Queens (Cube would approve).

A 1st Summer Arctic was seen briefly this morning on the tide edge with Common Terns. Observed last heading out towards the ocean in the direction of the Silver Gull Club. It never turned back as far as I could follow it with bins.

As if this was not lucky enough, an adult SANDWICH TERN that I spotted offshore then lost, was unexpectedly found loafing with Common Terns on the beach. It stuck around long enough for good documentation via phonescoping.

A Red Knot was also a nice surprise on the beach during the intermittent rain.

There were several banded birds observed. Multiple American Oystercatchers, a 2CY Herring Gull and a Common Tern. I was able to read and document all of the bands.

For those of us who have worked with him. We will sadly no longer have the services of Mr. Plover himself, Tony Luscombe. Tony has decided to move on after 22 years with NPS. He was a lovable curmudgeon and while we did not always agree I respected his straight talk. I will miss our exchanges for sure.

“Gamma Sennin”

--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick Douglass

風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu The Art of War

> (\__/)
> (= '.'=)
> (") _ (")
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device!

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
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Date: 6/13/18 7:31 am
From: Robert Lewis <rfermat...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Arctic Terns, Long Island

The recent emails from Peter Paul and Shai Mitra prompt me to post these images here.  This is a first summer Arctic Tern I photographed at Nickerson Beach (Nassau County) on June 5.  I posted a couple photos to the New York Birders facebook page then, but I don't think I ever mentioned it here.

Bob LewisSleepy Hollow NY

http://home.bway.net/lewis/birds/first_sum_arc/
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Date: 6/13/18 5:46 am
From: Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...>
Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] Breezy Point Queens
Tripper and all,

This is indeed a first-summer Arctic Tern, a long-anticipated first for Breezy Point. This record illustrates three things that need emphasis: the variability of this species and the relative importance of the many subtle characters; the difficulty of identifying this species confidently--and ongoing requirement for thorough documentation for the acceptance of any report on Long Island; and the species peculiar, probably unique, mode of occurrence on Long Island, wherein the records are more numerous than in other rare species, can be expected to occur in the appropriate highly stereotyped context around any ocean inlet, from Rockaway to Sagaponack, but individual occurrences are nevertheless basically unchaseable.

As you note, its structure differs less strongly from that of Common Tern than those of many Arctic Terns. Both its bill and its legs are larger than those of other recently well-documented individuals, and its overall plumage appearance is also different from the assortment of adult-like, advanced second-summer type, delayed second-summer type, and first-summer individuals recently observed, documented, discussed, and debated. Furthermore, as is often the case, the impression given by this bird varies greatly from image to image. In brief, images ML104255381 and ML104255391 are perhaps the most unambiguous, showing the overall structure (short bill, short neck, long hands, long tail), head pattern (white forecrown extending further back on the head and forward part of face mask triangular and encompassing the eye), and primary pattern (dark tips of individual feathers smaller than on Common Tern) conveniently. In contrast, Im guessing that image ML104255361 is causing a lot of confusion, as the bill and legs look long and the head pattern looks too much unlike those on some of the motley first-summer Common Terns weve been seeing lately. But if the bird is an Arctic Tern an image of this quality should be diagnostic, and it is. The length of the primary projection (the blade of folded feathers extending from the tertials) is longer relative to the overall size of the body than in Common Tern. Furthermore, one can assess accurately the length of the black tip to the outermost primary on the far wing: it hooks back on the inner web for just a short distance, perhaps a centimeter or so (in the field, measure this against the leg and bill, allowing for what you know about their absolute lengths). This feature can be hard to see in individual photos, but it is often readily assessed in the field. Compare the adult and left-hand first-summer Common Terns in image ML104255291: the black on p10 extends more than twice as far along the tip of the inner web. Another point is the color of the legs, a vinaceous, dusky-maroon tone unexpected on first-summer Common Tern. In sum, the structural points reign supreme but are variable and require a lot of familiarity; ditto for the head pattern (and covert patterning and other aspects of body plumage), except that here the variability is even more complicated; the primary pattern is diagnostic, unequivocal when assessed properly, and unvarying among age groups in both species. The only downside with this last feature is that it can be difficult to assess properly from individual images, because of angle, parallax, lighting, etc.

The second point is that this species is difficult to identify and still requires thorough documentation. Every June in recent years I have received photos of prospective Arctic Terns from many, many people, many of whom are highly skilled, careful, and experienced birders. It is remarkable how low the correlation has been between the observers initial confidence and the subject birds identities: many of the genuine Arctics thus revealed were reported as, I think this is just a Common Tern, but whereas a large percentage of the birds strongly hoped for as Arctics were actually Commons. I suspect that more than a few people viewing Trippers images were not completely sure about the identification. Ask yourself honestly, did you think this was a Common Tern? If not, were you completely sure this was an Arctic Tern? I strongly suspect that only a very small handful of people confidently knew the answer, understood why, and would be able to explain it. If so many of our best birders are unsure, even given this long series of high quality images, then how can we trust sight records, which nowadays usually imply poor, distant, and brief views?

Thirdly, this record, along with Trippers discovery earlier this spring of an adult Arctic Tern at Plum Beach, should establish definitively that this species occurs in its intriguing, almost inscrutable fashion, at ocean inlets all along the outer coast of Long Island. The first five Arctic Terns I found on Long Island were at Democrat Point, Fire Island Inlet, in 1999-2000. I didnt find another one until I resorted to tern therapy to calm myself while baby-sitting Ken and Sues Bar-tailed Godwit at Mecox Bay in 2004. All of these records were genuinely a big deal at the time. It was not until 2005 that Pat and I found the first one at Moriches Inlet, precipitating the now-familiar cottage industry of tern ogling, phone dunking, and margarita guzzling there. Earlier, P. A. Buckley had found them on the inaccessible bars at Shinnecock Inlet, and eventually we managed a couple from that area, too. Later, Donna Schulman, John Shemilt, and others proved that the early Mecox bird was not a fluke by finding several there. Far to the west, Nickerson Beach has produced the steadiest stream of records over the last five years or so, owing in part to its accessibility and the off the charts concentration of camera attention. More recently, proving the point in an elegant scientific experiment, Derek Rogers has found Arctic Terns at Long Islands newest inlet, Old Inlet, which re-breached after Sandy. Lastly, we have Trippers two records from Rockway Inlet already this year. To my eye, there is no peculiar concentration of records at Moriches Inlet, just a prolonged period of good conditions and thorough and competent coverage. As the precise positions favored by loafing flocks of non-breeding terns shift around, and as observers become more numerous and more familiar with this species, we will surely continue to see more and more records from a variety of sitesbut we will only understand this based on well-documented reports.

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore

________________________________________
From: <bounce-122635039-11143133...> [<bounce-122635039-11143133...>] on behalf of peter paul [<pepaul...>]
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 5:14 AM
To: nysbirds-l; Ebird NYC
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Breezy Point Queens

Last evening I had a possible Arctic Tern at Breezy point in Queens. The jury is still out, and thoughts would be welcome. Images of the bird can be seen below in my ebird report, and from flickr. The bird stuck around for about 6 minutes before flying off, and I was unable to refind it (though I didn't stay terribly long looking). Winds were strong from the SSE, and terns were constantly rotating though - there were at least four first summer COTEs and one second summer bird over the course of my observation. Details here:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46510785

https://www.flickr.com/photos/129132563@N05/ and

Happy terning,
Tripper


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Date: 6/13/18 5:42 am
From: Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...>
Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] Breezy Point Queens
Tripper and all,

This is indeed a first-summer Arctic Tern, a long-anticipated first for Breezy Point. This record illustrates three things that need emphasis: the variability of this species and the relative importance of the many subtle characters; the difficulty of identifying this species confidently--and ongoing requirement for thorough documentation for the acceptance of any report on Long Island; and the species peculiar, probably unique, mode of occurrence on Long Island, wherein the records are more numerous than in other rare species, can be expected to occur in the appropriate highly stereotyped context around any ocean inlet, from Rockaway to Sagaponack, but individual occurrences are nevertheless basically unchaseable.

As you note, its structure differs less strongly from that of Common Tern than those of many Arctic Terns. Both its bill and its legs are larger than those of other recently well-documented individuals, and its overall plumage appearance is also different from the assortment of adult-like, advanced second-summer type, delayed second-summer type, and first-summer individuals recently observed, documented, discussed, and debated. Furthermore, as is often the case, the impression given by this bird varies greatly from image to image. In brief, images ML104255381 and ML104255391 are perhaps the most unambiguous, showing the overall structure (short bill, short neck, long hands, long tail), head pattern (white forecrown extending further back on the head and forward part of face mask triangular and encompassing the eye), and primary pattern (dark tips of individual feathers smaller than on Common Tern) conveniently. In contrast, Im guessing that image ML104255361 is causing a lot of confusion, as the bill and legs look long and the head pattern looks too much unlike those on some of the motley first-summer Common Terns weve been seeing lately. But if the bird is an Arctic Tern an image of this quality should be diagnostic, and it is. The length of the primary projection (the blade of folded feathers extending from the tertials) is longer relative to the overall size of the body than in Common Tern. Furthermore, one can assess accurately the length of the black tip to the outermost primary on the far wing: it hooks back on the inner web for just a short distance, perhaps a centimeter or so (in the field, measure this against the leg and bill, allowing for what you know about their absolute lengths). This feature can be hard to see in individual photos, but it is often readily assessed in the field. Compare the adult and left-hand first-summer Common Terns in image ML104255291: the black on p10 extends more than twice as far along the tip of the inner web. Another point is the color of the legs, a vinaceous, dusky-maroon tone unexpected on first-summer Common Tern. In sum, the structural points reign supreme but are variable and require a lot of familiarity; ditto for the head pattern (and covert patterning and other aspects of body plumage), except that here the variability is even more complicated; the primary pattern is diagnostic, unequivocal when assessed properly, and unvarying among age groups in both species. The only downside with this last feature is that it can be difficult to assess properly from individual images, because of angle, parallax, lighting, etc.

The second point is that this species is difficult to identify and still requires thorough documentation. Every June in recent years I have received photos of prospective Arctic Terns from many, many people, many of whom are highly skilled, careful, and experienced birders. It is remarkable how low the correlation has been between the observers initial confidence and the subject birds identities: many of the genuine Arctics thus revealed were reported as, I think this is just a Common Tern, but whereas a large percentage of the birds strongly hoped for as Arctics were actually Commons. I suspect that more than a few people viewing Trippers images were not completely sure about the identification. Ask yourself honestly, did you think this was a Common Tern? If not, were you completely sure this was an Arctic Tern? I strongly suspect that only a very small handful of people confidently knew the answer, understood why, and would be able to explain it. If so many of our best birders are unsure, even given this long series of high quality images, then how can we trust sight records, which nowadays usually imply poor, distant, and brief views?

Thirdly, this record, along with Trippers discovery earlier this spring of an adult Arctic Tern at Plum Beach, should establish definitively that this species occurs in its intriguing, almost inscrutable fashion, at ocean inlets all along the outer coast of Long Island. The first five Arctic Terns I found on Long Island were at Democrat Point, Fire Island Inlet, in 1999-2000. I didnt find another one until I resorted to tern therapy to calm myself while baby-sitting Ken and Sues Bar-tailed Godwit at Mecox Bay in 2004. All of these records were genuinely a big deal at the time. It was not until 2005 that Pat and I found the first one at Moriches Inlet, precipitating the now-familiar cottage industry of tern ogling, phone dunking, and margarita guzzling there. Earlier, P. A. Buckley had found them on the inaccessible bars at Shinnecock Inlet, and eventually we managed a couple from that area, too. Later, Donna Schulman, John Shemilt, and others proved that the early Mecox bird was not a fluke by finding several there. Far to the west, Nickerson Beach has produced the steadiest stream of records over the last five years or so, owing in part to its accessibility and the off the charts concentration of camera attention. More recently, proving the point in an elegant scientific experiment, Derek Rogers has found Arctic Terns at Long Islands newest inlet, Old Inlet, which re-breached after Sandy. Lastly, we have Trippers two records from Rockway Inlet already this year. To my eye, there is no peculiar concentration of records at Moriches Inlet, just a prolonged period of good conditions and thorough and competent coverage. As the precise positions favored by loafing flocks of non-breeding terns shift around, and as observers become more numerous and more familiar with this species, we will surely continue to see more and more records from a variety of sitesbut we will only understand this based on well-documented reports.

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore

________________________________________
From: <bounce-122635039-11143133...> [<bounce-122635039-11143133...>] on behalf of peter paul [<pepaul...>]
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 5:14 AM
To: nysbirds-l; Ebird NYC
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Breezy Point Queens

Last evening I had a possible Arctic Tern at Breezy point in Queens. The jury is still out, and thoughts would be welcome. Images of the bird can be seen below in my ebird report, and from flickr. The bird stuck around for about 6 minutes before flying off, and I was unable to refind it (though I didn't stay terribly long looking). Winds were strong from the SSE, and terns were constantly rotating though - there were at least four first summer COTEs and one second summer bird over the course of my observation. Details here:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46510785

https://www.flickr.com/photos/129132563@N05/ and

Happy terning,
Tripper


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Date: 6/13/18 5:08 am
From: Dennis Hrehowsik <deepseagangster...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Brooklyn Bird Club Evening Presentation: VULTURE: THE PRIVATE LIFE OF AN UNLOVED BIRD
*Tuesday June 19th @ 7PM*

*BBC Evening Presentation:*

*KATIE FALLON PRESENTS: VULTURE: THE PRIVATE LIFE OF AN UNLOVED BIRD*

*BROOKLYN PUBLIC LIBRARY, CENTRAL BRANCH AT GRAND ARMY PLAZA*

Vultures are often overlooked, underappreciated, and unloved, despite the
vital role they play healthy ecosystems. Worldwide, vultures are more
likely to be threatened or endangered than any other group of raptor, but
in the United States Turkey and Black Vultures may be increasing in number.
Based on Katie Fallon’s new book, this presentation will discuss the life
and times of the noble Turkey Vulture, including its feeding, nesting, and
roosting habits, migratory behaviors, and common misconceptions.

Katie Fallon lives in West Virginia and is co-founder of the Avian
Conservation Center of Appalachia, a nonprofit organization dedicated to
conserving the region’s wild birds through research, education, and
rehabilitation.

http://brooklynbirdclub.org/event/katie-fallon-presents-vulture-the-private-life-of-an-unloved-bird/


Dennis Hrehowsik

President Brooklyn Bird Club

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Date: 6/13/18 2:14 am
From: peter paul <pepaul...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Breezy Point Queens
Last evening I had a possible Arctic Tern at Breezy point in Queens. The
jury is still out, and thoughts would be welcome. Images of the bird can
be seen below in my ebird report, and from flickr. The bird stuck around
for about 6 minutes before flying off, and I was unable to refind it
(though I didn't stay terribly long looking). Winds were strong from the
SSE, and terns were constantly rotating though - there were at least four
first summer COTEs and one second summer bird over the course of my
observation. Details here:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46510785

https://www.flickr.com/photos/129132563@N05/ and

Happy terning,
Tripper

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Date: 6/12/18 5:05 pm
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Breezy Point 6-11
I hiked Breezy Point in the morning for a few hours covering the Tern Colony near the Silver Gull Club and looping back to the fisherman’s parking lot.

The highlights were: Black Tern (adult) feeding off the tip with Common Terns and a couple of Forster’s Terns.

On the Jetty, 2 White-rumped Sandpipers were among a flock of Semipalmated Sandpipers gleaning food from the seaweed on the rocks.

The changes to the beach resulting from Sandy and other less notable storms, resulted in flattening of some of the dune system creating more open beach. As a result, the Least Tern colony did well last year and this year they appear to be doing just as well. My count was 87 without looking at birds within the Co-op.

Interestingly, it appears the Common Tern colony is smaller than previous years. I will have to see if the numbers shake out as the season progresses.

Last year, I noted a few Bank Swallows had nested in the dunes. This again, was a result of shifting dune changes and further along into the season (2017) after one storm, there were quite a few areas where steeper banks shaped out.

On Monday, I counted in one small sample area, 18 cavities with 11 birds noted. This bodes well and perhaps we will see this develop further; especially if the dunes hold steady and are undisturbed.

Piping Plovers appear to be doing well with several enclosures hosting parents and chicks. Let’s hope we have a good season of survival rate.

Cheers,
--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick Douglass

風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu The Art of War

> (\__/)
> (= '.'=)
> (") _ (")
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device!

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
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Date: 6/12/18 8:01 am
From: Gus Keri <guskeri...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Tricolor Heron




Under the Osprey nest in Marine nature area study in Nassau CountySent using Zoho Mail









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Date: 6/11/18 9:11 pm
From: robert adamo <radamo4691...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Roanoke Ave Elementary School Turkey Vulture Roost, Riverhead
The first T.V. I saw today ( Lonesome George ? ) was at ~ 1545 on the way
to help at the Riverhead "Soup Kitchen". The bird was circling over the
Bishop McGann-Mercy Catholic High School, and, as the school just graduated
its final Senior Class, prior to closing permanently due to financial
problems, I found this "moment in time" a bit "weird" ! Here you have a
hunter of carrion flying over an object about to cease living - the bird
moved on, and one can only hope the other can have new life breathed into
it, before too much time has elapsed !

After the S.K., spurred on by the earlier T.V. contact, I decided to check
for any possible activity at the R/A/E/S/T/V/R, finding a total of 10 T.V's
on the school's chimney, its roof, or flying onto same ! I haven't checked
this location recently, but will now...hey, you never know !

Cheers,
Bob

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Date: 6/11/18 2:53 pm
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Mon., June 11, 2018 - Magnolia Warbler, America Redstart & Peregrine Falcon Update
Central Park NYC
Monday, June 11, 2018
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, m.ob.

Highlights: Magnolia Warbler, America Redstart & Peregrine Falcon Update (see below).

Canada Goose - 11 Lake
Mallard - 4 Lake
Mourning Dove - a few in the Ramble
Chimney Swift - 6 flyovers
Herring Gull - 3 flyovers
Double-crested Cormorant - 4 flyovers (east to west over 72nd)
Great Egret - 3 (1 Lake, 2 flyovers)
Black-crowned Night-Heron - Wagner Cove
Red-bellied Woodpecker - pair Summer House
Northern Flicker - pair Gill Overlook, but evicted by another Eu. Starling
Peregrine Falcon - all 3 young have fledged from the CP West nest
Great Crested Flycatcher - pair Gill Overlook
Eastern Kingbird - Balcony Bridge
Warbling Vireo - 5 territories (Strawberry Fields, Ladies Pavilion, Maintenance Field, Wagner Cove, Swedish Cottage)
Blue Jay - Laupot Bridge
Barn Swallow - 8 over Great Lawn
White-breasted Nuthatch - Laupot Bridge
American Robin - residents many juveniles
Gray Catbird - our first fledgling of the season in the Ramble
European Starling - many fledglings, but see Northern Flicker
Cedar Waxwing - 3 active nests & flock of 8
White-throated Sparrow - black-and-white morph singing at Gill Overlook
Baltimore Oriole - adult male Ladies Pavilion, active nest continues Maint. Field
Brown-headed Cowbird - male
Common Grackle - resident, fledglings
American Redstart - 2 immature males Gill Overlook
Magnolia Warbler - male Upper Lobe
Northern Cardinal - resident pairs

--
The Snapping Turtle nest at Laupot Bridge dug up by Raccoon & eggs eaten.

Deb Allen
Follow us on twitter @BirdingBobNYC & @DAllenNYC


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Date: 6/11/18 1:43 pm
From: Sean Sime <sean...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Black Tern at Breezy Point: Queens County
There was a Black Tern in nearly full adult plumage feeding off the jetty
at the tip of Breezy Point this afternoon. Also noteworthy was a flock of
114 Semipalmated Sandpipers containing 2 White-rumped Sandpipers and a
Dunlin. A low soaring Turkey Vulture was unusual for the location and date,
but not surprising given their expansion on LI.

Of the modest number of Common Terns on the Gateway side only a single
first-year plumaged bird was observed.


Good birding,

Sean Sime
Brooklyn, NY

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Date: 6/11/18 11:34 am
From: Joseph Brin <brinjoseph...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Syracuse RBA

RBA




*New York

- Syracuse
- June 11, 2018
- NYSY 06.11.18




Hotline: Syracuse Area Rare Bird Alert

Dates: June 04 - June 11

To report by email: brinjoseph AT yahoo DOT com

Reporting upstate counties: Onondaga, Oswego, Madison, Oneida, Herkimer, Cayuga, Montezuma Wildlife Refuge and Montezuma Wetlands complex

compiled: June 04 AT 2:30 p.m. EDT

compiler: Joseph Brin

Onondaga Audubon Homepage: www.onondgaaudubon.org







Greetings: This is the Syracuse Area Rare Bird Alert for the week on June 04, 2018




Highlights:




SNOWY EGRET

BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON

LEAST BITTERN

SANDHILL CRANE

PEREGRINE FALCON

WILSON’S PHALAROPE

UPLAND SANDPIPER

AMERICAN AVOCET

LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH

PROTHONOTARY WARBLER

GRASSHOPPER SPARROW

ORCHARD ORIOLE
















Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge (MNWR) and Montezuma Wetlands Complex (MWC)

------------




     6/5: A (the) AMERICAN AVOCET was seen in Knox-Marsellus Marsh. A LEAST BITTERN was seen at VanDyne Spoor Marsh.

     6/8: A SNOWY EGRET was seen at Tschache Pool. A WILSON’S PHALAROPE was seenKnox-Marsellus Marsh.

     6/9: PROTHONOTARY WARBLERS continue at the forested area of Armitage Road. They were also seen at the north end of Howland Island by boat.

     6/10: A BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON was seen at VanDyne Spoor Road and along the Wildlife Drive.







Onondaga County

------------




     6/7: A LEAST BITTERN was found at the Dewitt Marsh of off Fisher Road.

     6/8: A GRASSHOPPER SPARROW and an ORCHARD ORIOLE continue at Three Rivers WMA. 

     6/9: A LEAST BITTERN continues at Three Rivers WMA.

     6/10: A SANDHILL CRANE was found at Three Rivers WMA.







Oswego County

------------




     6/6: A LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH was again found at Salmon River Falls.







Oneida County

------------




     6/5: 3 CLAY-COLORED SPARROWS were seen at Spring Farms Nature Sanctuary south of Clinton. One was again observed on the 10th.

     6/6: A breeding pair of PEREGRINE FALCONS continue in downtown Utica.

     6/8: An UPLAND SANDPIPER was again observed at the Deerfield Grasslands south of Poland. A LEAST BITTERN was found at the Utaca Marsh.

     6/10: A PROTHONOTARY WARBLER was found at Lake Delta State Park.




  




-end transcript




Joseph Brin

Region 5

Baldwinsville, N.Y. 13027 USA


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Date: 6/11/18 7:48 am
From: Robert Lewis <rfermat...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] RFI: Places close to Nickerson Beach
I'm thinking of combining a trip to Nickerson with another area fairly close by, presumably on the south shore.  Would any spot at Jones Beach be productive now?  How about farther east (not too far).
Bob Lewis
Sleepy Hollow NY

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Date: 6/11/18 5:34 am
From: Long Island Birding <michaelzito...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] 5 Roseate Terns - Nickerson Beach
Currently in front of east colony.
Mike Z.

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Date: 6/10/18 3:06 pm
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] eBird.org: Recent Additions to County Checklists
When working on the NYS eBird Hotspots wiki I'll compare the previous bar
chart list of species with the current one picking up any additions or
deletions. By going to each county's 'Overview' page you can determine the
date the species was added by county. Some are from newly submitted
checklists from many months / years ago.

It isn't possible to spot these additions from old checklists. On the
'Overview' page you can sort on 'First Seen' but if the species wasn't
added recently it won't appear at the top of the list.

For each county on the NYS eBird Hotspots site click the 'Overview' link on
the 'Explore a Location' line:
http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Birding+in+New+York

Since last update: 13 days

Yellow highlights a species added for the first time over the past few
weeks.

*Albany County: <http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Albany>*
Blue Grosbeak (8-Jun-2018)

*Allegany County: <http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Allegany>*
Golden-winged Warbler (30-Aug-2016)

*Montgomery County: <http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Montgomery>*
Hooded Warbler (2-Jun-2018)

*Schuyler County: <http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Schuyler>*
Black Vulture (31-May-2018)

*Genesee County: <http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Genesee>*
Yellow-breasted Chat (Removed)

*Lewis County: <http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Lewis>*
Yellow-breasted Chat (Removed)
--
Ben Cacace
Manhattan, NYC
Wiki for NYS eBird Hotspots
<http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Birding+in+New+York>
Facebook Discussion for NYS eBird Hotspots: Q & A
<https://www.facebook.com/groups/NYeBirdHotspots/>

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Date: 6/10/18 1:34 pm
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Sun., June 10, 2018 - Ovenbird, Northern Parula, Opsrey, Great Crested Flycatchers
Central Park (North End), NYC
Sunday, June 10, 2018
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob.

Highlights: Ovenbird, Northern Parula, Opsrey, Great Crested Flycatchers.

Canada Goose - 11 Harlem Meer
Mallard - 13
Mourning Dove - residents
Chimney Swift - 4 (1 gathering nesting material)
Herring Gull - flyovers
Double-crested Cormorant - flyovers
Great Egret - 1 west side of Meer, 8 flyovers
Snowy Egret - 5 flyovers
Black-crowned Night-Heron - 2 adults Harlem Meer (Christine Youngblood)
Osprey - flyover Meer (Harry & Melinda from the UK)
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3 (1 Loch, 2 Wildflower Meadow)
Northern Flicker - male east side Wildflower Meadow
Great Crested Flycatcher - probably 3 (2 Wildflower Meadow, 1 Blockhouse/Lily Ponds)
Eastern Kingbird - pair Harlem Meer
Warbling Vireo - 3
Blue Jay - residents
Barn Swallow - flyover Wildflower Meadow
House Wren - singing at Wildflower Meadow
American Robin - nests and juveniles around
Gray Catbird - pairs in many locations
Cedar Waxwing - 10
House Finch - several, at least one singing male Conservatory Garden
Song Sparrow - singing Conservatory Garden
Baltimore Oriole - 3 (2 males, 1 female)
Red-winged Blackbird - 3 (2 male, 1 female)
Brown-headed Cowbird - male Wildflower Meadow
Common Grackle - residents
Ovenbird - wooden bridge farthest west on the Loch
Northern Parula - southwest side of the Pool
Northern Cardinal - several resident pairs

Deb Allen
Follow us on twitter @BirdingBobNYC & @DAllenNYC


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Date: 6/10/18 8:11 am
From: Dave Medd <dmedd906...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] GWWA Muscoot Farms Westchester
Female golden winged warbler this morning at Muscoot Farms. First field past woods where RHWO

Dave Medd

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Date: 6/10/18 7:25 am
From: Patricia Lindsay <pjlindsay...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach, Nassau Co. this morning
Highlights included an adult Arctic Tern and continuing Gull-billed (at least one) and Roseate (at least four) Terns. Also notable were at least 20 first-summer Common Terns, one of the largest single-site counts we are aware of.

Patricia Lindsay and Shai Mitra
Bay Shore

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Date: 6/10/18 2:46 am
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Arctic Tern ++ @ Cupsogue LI
A lovely day at Cupsogue yesterday spent birding two tide cycles. Highlights were a 1st Summer Arctic Tern, 2 White-rumped Sandpipers and 47 Red Knots. One Knot had the banding scheme for Argentina.

An interesting looking peep, was chalked up as a diminutive (presumed male) aberrant looking Semipalmated Sandpiper. Upon further study of the few phonescoped shots I obtained.

Cheers,

--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick Douglass

風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu The Art of War

> (\__/)
> (= '.'=)
> (") _ (")
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device!

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
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Date: 6/9/18 3:25 pm
From: Ryan Candee <ryanacandee...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Bryant Park Northern Waterthrush etc continue
For what it's worth, we've been seeing a male Common Yellowthroat in our backyard (and I'm sure our neighbors' yards) near the Brooklyn museum since May 5. No way of telling whether it's the same bird but most years we don't get any warblers back here (also had BT Blue and Parula during peak migration but they moved on pretty quickly).

> On Jun 9, 2018, at 8:16 AM, Joseph Wallace <joew701...> wrote:
>
> Thanks, Angus...I find this discussion very interesting. I agree about the "trap" qualities of Bryant Park, though I do hope that many of the birds eventually move on. (A pair of park workers once told me that they call in animal rehab often for disoriented Woodcocks, so at least those birds survive.)
>
> The gender disparity in Yellowthroats intrigues me as well. I've been trying to check the park about once a week since last fall, and there have been Yellowthroats there nearly every visit aside from deep winter. And virtually every time there have been more males than females. That amazing day last month (with the Mourning Warbler on the lawn of Madison Square Park), when I saw 16 Yellowthroats on the lawn at Bryant Park, 10 of them were male...and that was actually a lower ratio than usual, though obv a larger sample size. (And speaking of Madison Sq. Park...the male/female Yellowthroat ratio has been similarly skewed when I've searched there...a small-park thing?) Thanks again--Joe
> --
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Date: 6/9/18 2:47 pm
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Sat., June 9, 2018 - American Redstart, Yellow Warbler, Yellow-billed Cuckoo, & Nesting Birds
Central Park NYC
Saturday, June 9, 2018
Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob.

Highlights on a sunny & seasonable day: American Redstart, Yellow Warbler, Yellow-billed Cuckoo. Nesting Birds: Cedar Waxwings (3 active nests), Baltimore Orioles, Eastern Kingbirds, etc.

Canada Goose -44 (pair Turtle Pond, 29 adults & 13 goslings Reservoir)
Mallard - 20 (12 adults & 2 ducklings Reservoir, 6 adults Turtle Pond)
Mourning Dove - 10
Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 1 (heard Maint. Field (Signe Hammer), seen at Azalea Pond)
Chimney Swift - only a few
Herring Gull - 54 Reservoir (7am)
Great Black-backed Gull - 7 Reservoir (7am), flyover Warbler Rock
Double-crested Cormorant - 9 (8 Reservoir, 1 Turtle Pond)
Great Egret - Turtle Pond
Red-tailed Hawk - adult circling over Castle
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 4 (male drumming Laupot Br. pair Azalea Pond, male SW Great Lawn)
Downy Woodpecker - 3 (female Balancing Rock, pair Azalea Pond)
Northern Flicker - pair continues at Gill Overlook nest
Great Crested Flycatcher - 3 (pair & lone male in Ramble)
Eastern Kingbird - 3 (1 Reservoir, nesting pair Willow Oak Turtle Pond Dock)
Warbling Vireo - at least 3 (Maint. Field, Reservoir, Azalea Pond (Karen Evans))
Blue Jay - residents
Barn Swallow - 5 (4 Reservoir, 1 Tupelo Field)
Tufted Titmouse - heard Reservoir
American Robin - residents (adults, nests with young, juveniles)
Gray Catbird - residents (some nesting)
Cedar Waxwing - 3 active nests (Turtle Pond, Shakespeare Garden, Maint. Field)
House Finch - male Gill Overlook in Shadbush
Song Sparrow - singing north end Reservoir
Baltimore Oriole - 2 nests Maint. Field (food delivered to one), pair SW Great Lawn)
Red-winged Blackbird - male Oven, female Evodia Field
Common Grackle - residents
American Redstart - immature male Tupelo Field
Yellow Warbler - male east side of Turtle Pond (after twitter alert)
Northern Cardinal - residents, some singing
--

Insects: Eastern Amberwing & Blue Dasher (Dragonflies).
--

Deb Allen
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Date: 6/9/18 1:27 pm
From: Long Island Birding <michaelzito...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] QCBC Nickerson Beach Trip Report
Today the Queens County Bird Club had the following birds of interest at
Nickerson Beach:

Roseate Tern (at least 3)
Black Tern (1, adult)
Gull-billed Tern (1, flyover)
Common Eider (3, seen in the water and briefly resting on the shore)

Mike Z.

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Date: 6/9/18 10:39 am
From: Sy Schiff <icterus...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Marine Nature Study Area, Oceanside
The TRICOLORED HERON continues in the cut close to the office (surrounded by photographers, all very well behaved).
It’s breeding time in the marsh. So, things are quiet. However, SALTMARSH SPARROWS are active, although Seaside Sparrows are not around nor are Marsh Wrens. Clapper Rails were quiet today, probably on nests., A few WILLETS can be picked out in the marsh and mostly silent.
A WILLOW FLYCATCHER was singing from the top of the trees by the golf course.
Sy Schiff

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Date: 6/9/18 8:30 am
From: Anthony Collerton <icollerton...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Sandwich Tern - Dune Road, Suffolk County
With the term flock just East of Triton Lane.

Sent from my iPhone

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Date: 6/9/18 6:37 am
From: <hobbesmom4ever...> <hobbesmom4ever...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Tricolor Heron on Dune Rd.

Tricolor Heron found on Dune Rd near Road L wayside.Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE device
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Date: 6/9/18 5:45 am
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] NYC Area RBA: 8 June 2018
- RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Jun. 8, 2018
* NYNY1806.08

- Birds mentioned
ARCTIC TERN+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

Snow Goose
EURASIAN WIGEON
CORY'S SHEARWATER
Sooty Shearwater
MANX SHEARWATER
BROWN PELICAN
White-rumped Sandpiper
WILSON'S PHALAROPE
Iceland Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
GULL-BILLED TERN
CASPIAN TERN
BLACK TERN
Roseate Tern
ROYAL TERN
SNOWY OWL
Red-headed Woodpecker
Olive-sided Flycatcher
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
Mourning Warbler
YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER
Henslow's Sparrow
BLUE GROSBEAK

- Transcript

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report
electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at
http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to
nysarc44(at)nybirds{dot}org.

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or
sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compilers: Tom Burke and Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Ben Cacace

BEGIN TAPE

Greetings. This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, June 8th 2018
at 10pm. The highlights of today's tape are BROWN PELICAN, SNOWY OWL,
WILSON'S PHALAROPE, ARCTIC TERN, GULL-BILLED TERN, CASPIAN TERN, ROYAL
TERN, BLACK TERN, EURASIAN WIGEON, MANX SHEARWATER, CORY'S SHEARWATER,
YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER, BLUE GROSBEAK and more.

Two more Spring BROWN PELICAN reports. First one moving east off eastern
Fire Island on Tuesday and then one also going east off Nickerson Beach
today. These hopefully an omen of a good Summer to come for this species
locally.

A male WILSON'S PHALAROPE spent last Monday around the field 7 puddles at
Heckscher State Park joining 2 WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERS and other shorebirds
there. Unfortunately this bird did not reappear Tuesday. It should be noted
that very exposed areas such as the pools at Heckscher, while they do
attract some great birds, are very susceptible to disturbance due to
proximity and birders and photographers should be very mindful to keep
their distances and use their vehicles as blinds.

Very unexpected was a SNOWY OWL sitting on a rooftop in Brooklyn Tuesday
afternoon. The location along the bay just west of the end of Bay Ridge
Avenue.

A good variety of terns recently have featured single immature and adult
ARCTIC TERNS at Nickerson Beach on Wednesday. The Common and Least Terns
and Black Skimmers nesting at Nickerson have also attracted a few
GULL-BILLED and up to 5 ROSEATE TERNS to the colony along with single BLACK
TERNS Saturday and today. Two ROYAL TERNS appeared Wednesday both at
Heckscher State Park and in Moriches Bay near Cupsogue County Park where an
adult CASPIAN TERN visited today.

A drake EURASIAN WIGEON was still on the West Pond at Jamaica Bay Wildlife
Refuge last Saturday. A presumably injured SNOW GOOSE also continuing there.

Pelagic birding off Long Island's south shore has been spotty lately. Last
Sunday was the most productive day with 33 SOOTY SHEARWATERS counted off
Robert Moses State Park while later that day off Triton Lane west of
Shinnecock Inlet there were a couple of CORY'S SHEARWATERS followed by 2
MANX and 3 more SOOTY SHEARWATERS.

An ICELAND GULL was still at Moses Park Sunday with another at Smith Point
County Park to Wednesday and Smith Point produced the weeks peak count of
LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS with 36 Sunday.

RED-HEADED WOODPECKER continues at Connetquot River State Park as does a
YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER at Bayard Cutting Arboretum. BLUE GROSBEAKS were
noted last Saturday at Calvert Vaux Park in Brooklyn and out at the
Calverton Grasslands. Please do not harass in any way these very uncommon
local breeders or potential nesters.

Among the late northbound migrants have been several species of warblers
including a MOURNING WARBLER at Fort Greene Park in Brooklyn Wednesday and
a few species of flycatchers including OLIVE-SIDED and YELLOW-BELLIED.

The HENSLOW'S SPARROW pair at the Shawangunk Grasslands National Wildlife
Refuge in Ulster County have settled into a nesting scenario and should
only be passively observed from a respectful distance as set out by refuge
personnel.

To phone in reports on Long Island call Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 or
call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the
National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript

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Date: 6/9/18 5:17 am
From: Joseph Wallace <joew701...>
Subject: Re:[nysbirds-l] Bryant Park Northern Waterthrush etc continue
Thanks, Angus...I find this discussion very interesting. I agree about the
"trap" qualities of Bryant Park, though I do hope that many of the birds
eventually move on. (A pair of park workers once told me that they call in
animal rehab often for disoriented Woodcocks, so at least those birds
survive.)

The gender disparity in Yellowthroats intrigues me as well. I've been
trying to check the park about once a week since last fall, and there have
been Yellowthroats there nearly every visit aside from deep winter. And
virtually every time there have been more males than females. That amazing
day last month (with the Mourning Warbler on the lawn of Madison Square
Park), when I saw 16 Yellowthroats on the lawn at Bryant Park, 10 of them
were male...and that was actually a lower ratio than usual, though obv a
larger sample size. (And speaking of Madison Sq. Park...the male/female
Yellowthroat ratio has been similarly skewed when I've searched there...a
small-park thing?) Thanks again--Joe

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Date: 6/8/18 6:50 pm
From: Angus Wilson <oceanwanderers...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Bryant Park Northern Waterthrush etc continue
Joe,

As you know from your regular visits, Bryant Park seems to have an unusual
ability to hold migrants (including some scarce species e.g. Sora,
Chuck-wills-widow, Prothonotary Warbler and numerous Woodcock) for long
periods. I would wager, but can't prove, many of these waifs eventually die
there. Remember the 2-3 chats that lingered for weeks in 2011, one
eventually being found freshly dead. The rats probably make swift work of
bodies so it would be hard to distinguish disappearances (moved on) from
mortality. Compared to other parks, Bryant always strikes me as quite
enclosed and the night sky may be masked by bright illumination, especially
from the imposing Bank of America building. Does this makes it harder for
migrants to escape?

All speculation of course but as you point out, migrants do seem to linger
from spring into the summer (and from the fall into the winter). A test
would might be to trap and band individuals and look at how long they
remain and compare the periods to other urban locations like central park.
The habitat doesn't strike me as right for breeding of any of the species
you list, even for Catbirds it seems sub-optimal. That's why I don't think
they are there by choice.

There was a panel discussion about the topic at a meeting of the Linnaean
Society of New York a couple of years ago. Of all the 'pocket parks' in
NYC, Bryant seems to be among the best for noteworthy birds. Some of this
may be observer diligence, the scant foliage, abundant food scraps and the
Patagonia Picnic table effect from birders following up on reports but I
can't help wondering if the proximity and dimensions of the surrounding
buildings aren't part of the equation. Recently I flew over Mid-Town
Manhattan at night and noticed how Bryant Park stood out against the darker
surrounding, more so than similar sized parks such as Union Square and
Washington Square.

The gender inequality in the Common Yellowthroats is interesting. I wonder
if local banders might have some thoughts on this? Are spring migrants
through the region a 50:50 split or is the ratio unequal? Diligent field
observers might even keep notes on the ratios they observe.

Angus Wilson
New York City.

On Fri, Jun 8, 2018 at 7:11 PM, Joseph Wallace <joew701...> wrote:

> A check of the park between 11AM and noon revealed the skittish Northern
> Waterthrush in the same location as before (southwest corner around the
> shack), as well as a scattering of other lingering species amid the nesting
> Catbirds: a single Ovenbird, Swainson's Thrush, and Swamp Sparrow, a
> handful of White-throated Sparrows, and two male Common Yellowthroats.
>
> The presence of these adult birds into mid-June makes me wonder: Are they
> "stuck" here, or simply an overflow of individuals that haven't paired up
> this year? Also, there's been a preponderance of male Yellowthroats in the
> Bryant Park population I've seen all spring: Is this reflective of some
> population quirk in the area, a matter of which gender chooses the small
> urban greenspace, or (most likely) some factor I haven't thought of? (I
> know what female Yellowthroats look like, and the park is so small that I
> haven't been missing larger numbers of them than males.) --Joe Wallace
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Angus Wilson
New York City & The Springs, NY, USA
http://birdingtotheend.blogspot.com/

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Date: 6/8/18 4:11 pm
From: Joseph Wallace <joew701...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Bryant Park Northern Waterthrush etc continue
A check of the park between 11AM and noon revealed the skittish Northern
Waterthrush in the same location as before (southwest corner around the
shack), as well as a scattering of other lingering species amid the nesting
Catbirds: a single Ovenbird, Swainson's Thrush, and Swamp Sparrow, a
handful of White-throated Sparrows, and two male Common Yellowthroats.

The presence of these adult birds into mid-June makes me wonder: Are they
"stuck" here, or simply an overflow of individuals that haven't paired up
this year? Also, there's been a preponderance of male Yellowthroats in the
Bryant Park population I've seen all spring: Is this reflective of some
population quirk in the area, a matter of which gender chooses the small
urban greenspace, or (most likely) some factor I haven't thought of? (I
know what female Yellowthroats look like, and the park is so small that I
haven't been missing larger numbers of them than males.) --Joe Wallace

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Date: 6/8/18 2:29 pm
From: Andrew Block <ablock22168...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] turkey on car in scasdale
My friend who lives in Scarsdale just showed me photos of a turkey walking down her driveway and then sitting on the roof of her car!  An unusual site to see when going out to your car in the morning:-)
Andrew Andrew v. F. Block
Consulting Naturalist
20 Hancock Avenue, Apt. 3
Yonkers, Westchester Co., New York 10705-4629 
www.flickr.com/photos/conuropsis/albums
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Date: 6/8/18 2:03 pm
From: Steve Walter <swalter15...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Brown Pelican at Nickerson Beach
Aside from the Black Tern at Nickerson Beach this morning, I know of up to 5
Roseate Terns seen at one time (although I suspect there could have been
more individuals all tolled). As far as I know, no Arctics were found today.



So after I had about had my fill of tern watching a little after noon, I
went into socializing mode with Peter Post and John Zarudski. I was facing
west during this time, when I saw a Brown Pelican approaching. It quickly
continued east, and from what I could tell, turned north into Jones Inlet. A
picture of the pelican - not exactly the kind I try to get - is on my web
site http://stevewalternature.com/ , on the Birds Recent Work page. I also
posted a few other birds from today and earlier this week.



Steve Walter

Bayside, NY


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Date: 6/8/18 11:24 am
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Central Park (North End), NYC - Fri., June 8, 2018 - 5 Species of Wood Warblers
Central Park - North End, NYC
Friday, June 8, 2018
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, m.ob.

Highlights: 5 Species of Wood Warblers, Chimney Swifts gathering nesting material.

Canada Goose - 2 flyovers
Mallard - 4 Harlem Meer
Mourning Dove - 4
Chimney Swift - 8 drinking at the Meer at 7am and gathering nesting material
Herring Gull - 6 flyovers
Double-crested Cormorant - 4 flyovers
Great Egret - 2 (1at the Loch, 1 flyover)
Red-tailed Hawk - adult circling over west side seen from the Green Bench
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2 pairs (Loch & Blockhouse)
Downy Woodpecker - male drumming Loch
Northern Flicker - pair Blockhouse
Great Crested Flycatcher - lone bird west side of Wildflower Meadow
Eastern Kingbird - pair Dana Center side of the Meer
Warbling Vireo - 3 pairs, including one pair at Conservatory Garden
Red-eyed Vireo - pair Blockhouse
Blue Jay - 6 (North Woods & Loch)
Crow - silent flyover
Barn Swallow - over Meer
House Wren - singing and probably nesting east side of Wildflower Meadow
American Robin - residents
Gray Catbird - pairs
Cedar Waxwing - 4 (Green Bench & Loch)
House Finch - 3
Song Sparrow - singing male (Conservatory Garden pair)
American Goldfinch - female flyover Dana Center 7am
Baltimore Oriole - 2 males (Green Bench & Fort Clinton)
Red-winged Blackbird - 3 (female carrying food n. side Meer, pair s. side Meer)
Common Grackle - 8 (mostly males at various locations)
Black-and-white Warbler - female west side Wildflower Meadow
Common Yellowthroat - singing male west side Wildflower Meadow
American Redstart - 3 imm. males incl. two singing, one at Conservatory Garden
Yellow Warbler - singing male Loch
Blackpoll Warbler - immature male Conservatory Garden
Northern Cardinal - residents

Deb Allen
Follow us on twitter @BirdingBobNYC & @DAllenNYC



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Date: 6/8/18 7:16 am
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Manhattan, N.Y. City; 10+ prior days of migration & nesting activity to 6/8
Update for Friday, 8 June, in just Central Park:

Great Egret, Snowy Egret, Green Heron, Black-crowned Night-Heron, Chimney Swift, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Yellow-shafted Flicker, Eastern Wood-Pewee, Acadian Flycatcher, Great Crested Flycatcher, Eastern Kingbird, Warbling Vireo, Red-eyed Vireo, Northern Rough-winged Swallow, Barn Swallow, Black-capped Chickadee, White-breasted Nuthatch, Carolina Wren, House Wren, Gray-cheeked Thrush, Swainson's Thrush, Wood Thrush, Cedar Waxwing - - at least 9 warbler species: Northern Parula, Yellow Warbler (several), Magnolia Warbler, Black-throated Blue Warbler, Blackpoll Warbler (multiple), Black-and-white Warbler, American Redstart (multiple), Common Yellowthroat (several), Canada Warbler - - & Eastern Towhee, Chipping Sparrow, Song Sparrow, Swamp Sparrow, White-throated Sparrow, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Orchard Oriole, Baltimore Oriole (many, House Finch, American Goldfinch, & more than a dozen additional either very common or resident bird species.

- - - - - -
Manhattan, New York City -

While it’s been evident, and rather expected, that migration rather generally, and especially the migration of songbirds, wound down since after the Memorial weekend in late May, there have been ongoing migrants and migrations taking place in the ten days or so since then, in & over Manhattan island. There were still a minimum of ten warbler species being seen in Central Park alone right into Thursday, June 7th, & also a number of those “late” migrants in that park on Friday morning (June 8th).

None of the finds of these past ten+ days have been extraordinary nor even at all unexpected or surprising, as there are always some migrant songbird still passing thru, usually in modest numbers, into the month of June, some even well into the month. There also tend to be (almost always very small numbers of) some migrants that may be non-breeders, which do not go on to their typical nesting-grounds, &/or simply do not make it out of the local parks, and may remain in them here in the city, for days, weeks, or occasionally, much of a summer. It can be interesting to keep an eye on some of these, to see if there is any sign at all of breeding-attempts, but often, these are individuals that are not mated, & may not have even a potential species-partner in the immediate area, by the time migration has wound-down so completely.

It is precisely in such “species-poor” locations as Central (in terms of relative breeding numbers, for example as related to some location that might be a woodland 30 miles out of the city of New York, or even relative to a woods that is within the city!) & some of the other parks in inner-urban Manhattan, where, when a migrant is found in the midst of its’ species breeding season, it can illustrate how there are such non-breeders (in a place such as say Central Park etc.), & also how “late” some of migration may go on into spring… & as well, how ‘early' some migrants can (even in June) be starting a return-voyage south, which can (for some individual songbirds) start even just around when summer has just begun (according to our calendars, that is)… All that said, it’s not that unusual that there are still a small number of various songbirds & other migrants that continue to pass through… a fair number seen now are females, and it is also interesting to note that the species make-up is not all of species known to breed in the very-northernmost parts of the N. American continent (although some also may still be working towards far-north places, such as some late flycatchers, or of course some thrushes such as Gray-cheeked, and some warblers such as Blackpolls & others.

A majority of the numbers of individuals, as well as the species-diversity, were seen at the end of May & first 2 days of June; however many migrants still continued even to the most-recent several days, on relatively favorable winds, or lack of wind, at night in the area. A very modest movement of waders, a.k.a. shorebirds, also were noted from several observation points, esp. in northern Manhattan’s river-edges & small “inlets".

Lightly-annoated list of species for Manhattan (Battery to Inwood areas, i.e., the length of Manhattan island) & in the past 10+ days of observation:

Common Loon (few ongoing to 2 June, flyovers all moving in northerly direction)
Double-crested Cormorant (regular, many obs. points)
Great Blue Heron (2 sightings, May & into early June)
Great Egret (regular sightings of fly-overs, far fewer seen feeding)
Snowy Egret (regular as fly-overs, most from between the “latitudes” of 96th to about 129th Streets, going east or west)
Green Heron (multiple, with several pairs nesting)
Black-crowned Night-Heron (regular, all being visitors, & some frequenting same areas for long stretches)
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (1 lingering to early June)
Turkey Vulture (occasional to at least early June)
Canada Goose (multiple, & multiple bred w/goslings)
Brant (few thru at least 1 June, Hudson river locations)
Wood Duck (2 drakes continued in Central Park thru all of the period, locations same as previous)
Gadwall (several, Harlem & Hudson river locations)
American Black Duck (2, Hudson river n. of W. 145 St.)
Mallard (common & multiple nestings, w/ducklings)
Osprey (few, seen to 3 June over Manhattan & the rivers)
Bald Eagle (1 adult, seen from Fort Tryon Park, late May)
Cooper's Hawk (location undisclosed, but appears to be a single, into early June)
Red-tailed Hawk (multiple locations all over Manhattan - some w/fledgelings now)
American Coot (1 likely badly-injured or ill, persisted at CP reservoir to end of May)
Black-bellied Plover (6 fly-overs, n. Manhattan, 3 June)
Semipalmated Plover (n. Manhattan, 3 June)
Killdeer (several locations, n. Manhattan)
Spotted Sandpiper (fewer by June, 1 on 2 June in C.P.)
Short-billed Dowitcher (seen-heard, 2 in n. Manhattan, moving on towards NE, 3 June)
Laughing Gull (mostly from s. end of Manhattan, “few")
Ring-billed Gull (uncommon since late May but still a few in scattered sightings)
[American] Herring Gull (regular)
Great Black-backed Gull (regular, including at CP reservoir)
Common Tern (NY Harbor from s. end of Manhattan, June)
Forster's Tern (as for above sp.)
Black Skimmer (2, from Battery Park, 31 May, flying WSW)
['feral'] Rock Pigeon (common)
Mourning Dove (common, & have nested)
American Kestrel (not rare & have nested)
Peregrine Falcon (not rare & have nested)
Black-billed Cuckoo (to at least 1 June, Central Park)
Yellow-billed Cuckoo (several, into June in multiple locations)
Common Nighthawk (few, to at least 3 June, Central Park, & elsewhere)
Chimney Swift (diminished no’s. since 3 June)
Ruby-throated Hummingbird (few; locations now undisclosed)
Red-bellied Woodpecker (regular, some nesting)
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (persisiting VERY late, Madison Square Park to 1 June)
Downy Woodpecker (regular, some nesting)
Hairy Woodpecker (several parks, possibly nesting; locations are now undisclosed)
Yellow-shafted Flicker (multiple in multiple parks, nesting now)
Olive-sided Flycatcher (several, with 1 to at least 4 June in Central Park’s n. end)
Eastern Wood-Pewee (many, some apparently nesting, also some migrants were ongoing)
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher (diminished but still a few to at least 4 June, in several locations)
Acadian Flycatcher (several locations & should be watched for potential as nesters in any NYC locations now)
Alder Flycatcher (at least 2 calling in late May, 1 present to at least 2 June)
Willow Flycatcher (several to end of May, but all apparently now moved on)
Great Crested Flycatcher (multiple, no’s. of pairs & a few apparently nesting in the quieter areas of large parks)
Eastern Kingbird (many nesting, & already some hatchlings at 2 nests, multiple locations & parks)
Yellow-throated Vireo (2 thru 4 June, will be monitored; rare nesting species in parts of NYC, & has nested even in Central Park in modern era)
Warbling Vireo (common, many nesting pairs & some appear to be feeding young; in multiple locations & parks)
Red-eyed Vireo (still migrants passing as of 8 June; also some nesting, an uncommon nester in many larger Manhattan parks)
Blue Jay (common, nesting)
American Crow (various nests observed, some with fledglings)
Tree Swallow (daily sightings)
Northern Rough-winged Swallow (daily sightings)
Barn Swallow (common, daily sightings / nesting)
Cliff Swallow (1 to 31st May, Central Park; not noted since then)
Black-capped Chickadee (now quite uncommon nesting, various parks)
Tufted Titmouse (uncommon nester)
White-breasted Nuthatch (nesting, not rare & found in multiple parks in Manhattan)
Carolina Wren (few noted, but may be much quieter in nesting period)
House Wren (common, and nesting in a number of Manhattan parks)
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (uncommon-rare as a Manhattan breeder, & locations now undisclosed)
Veery (few, thru 3 June)
Gray-cheeked / Bicknell's Thrush (only Gray-cheeked ID’d to species if-when singing or calling well; some poss. Bicknell’s also but not heard; thru 8 June)
Swainson's Thrush (diminshed no’s. after 2 June, but still a few into the week after)
Wood Thrush (uncommon to rare nester in Manhattan & locations now undisclosed)
American Robin (common, some on at least 2nd nest-cycle now)
Gray Catbird (common, many nesting)
Northern Mockingbird (fairly common)
Brown Thrasher (increasingly scarce; & as with all native bird species, any intentional harrassment is a punishable offense)
European Starling (common)
Cedar Waxwing (multiple migrants ongoing into early June; multiple Manhattan nesting locations as is also typical & expected)
-
Blue-winged Warbler (uncommon so late, 1 to at least 31 May)
Tennessee Warbler (several into early June, & at least 1 still on 4 June in Central Park)
Nashville Warbler (uncommon so late, 1 to at least 1 June, Central Park)
Northern Parula (multiple, not unexpected into early June)
Yellow Warbler (multiple, including in typical nesting locations in n. Manhattan; also some ongoing late migrants passing thru)
Chestnut-sided Warbler (modestly late, 2 to early June in Central Park)
Magnolia Warbler (multiple thru early June, several ongoing to at least 8 June)
Cape May Warbler (modestly late, 1 female, to at least 1 June, Central Park)
Black-throated Blue Warbler (multiple, into early June; & at least 1 to 8 June)
Yellow-rumped [Myrtle] Warbler (odd, late, but often found as single in June, to 8 June, Central Park)
Black-throated Green Warbler (fairly late, 1 to 5 June, Ft. Tryon Park)
Blackburnian Warbler (multiple, into early June, most were females or 1st-year; & to June 8 in Central Park)
Prairie Warbler (1, quite late in Manhattan in June, to 2 June in Riverside Park’s “sanctuary”, n. of W. 118 St.)
Bay-breasted Warbler (after a very strong spring, less-surprising with 1 to 5 June, Central Park)
Blackpoll Warbler (modest no’s. ongoing into early June; minimum of 4 females to 8 June)
Black-and-white Warbler (small no’s. ongoing in early June, which is not unusual in Manhattan’s larger parks)
American Redstart (minimum of 10, mostly females, & a few singing 1st-year males, 8 June in several parks)
Worm-eating Warbler (slightly late, in Central Park to 1 June, north end)
Ovenbird (few, still a few in early June in various locations in Manhattan)
Northern Waterthrush (2 continuing to 8 June, in 2 separate locations in Manhattan)
Mourning Warbler (to at least 3 June; likely some additional passed thru & could still be for another week or so)
Common Yellowthroat (multiple, including a few attempting to nest, various locations in Manhattan)
Hooded Warbler (a bit late for Manhattan, to at least 5 June, Central Park)
Wilson's Warbler (singing male had persisted in Central Park to at least 3 June; not noted since by me or others)
Canada Warbler (fairly common to early June, now scarce but still present to 8 June)
-
Scarlet Tanager (still present in early June in a few locations)
Eastern Towhee (comments as for Brown Thrasher)
Chipping Sparrow (small numbers now nesting, or attempting to)
Field Sparrow (uncommon so late, to at least 1 June)
Song Sparrow (multiple nesting & some fledglings out)
Lincoln's Sparrow (to at least 30 May, & in several locations then)
Swamp Sparrow (“rare” in June in Manhattan, 1 noted w/location withheld)
White-throated Sparrow (several, persisting into June, scant but regular in summers in Manhattan w/ NO evidence of breeding)
Northern Cardinal (common, nested &/or nesting)
Rose-breasted Grosbeak (uncommon, has nested in Manhattan in modern era, & may be doing so again this year)
Indigo Bunting (scant breeder in Manhattan in modern era, and occasional summering birds w/no breeding observed; 2 into June this year)
Red-winged Blackbird (uncommon breeding in Manhattan)
Common Grackle (fairly common in Manhattan about all year these days)
Brown-headed Cowbird (few, scarce in summer in Manhattan)
Orchard Oriole (scarce but regular breeder & locations undisclosed)
Baltimore Oriole (regular & fairly common breeder, with “helpers” additionally often also in or near some nesting areas)
House Finch (scattered breeding - & wandering a bit, all around Manhattan)
American Goldfinch (few now; some migrants were likely still about thru all of May)
House Sparrow (overly ubiquitous & pestiferous, & can be damaging to native songbirds)

At least the following butterflies have been noted & documented in Central Park alone so far this spring: Black Swallowtail, Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, Spicebush Swallowtail, Cabbage White, Orange Sulphur, Red-banded Hairstreak, Eastern Tailed-Blue, “Summer” Azure, Pearl Crescent, Question Mark, Eastern Comma, American Lady, Red Admiral, Red-spotted Purple (uncommon to rare in Central, although regular in N.Y. City), Monarch, Silver-spotted Skipper, Zabulon Skipper, a minimum of 17 species, most (except as noted) rather expected by this time of year (& in the modern era). A smaller number of odonate (damselfly & dragonfly) species recorded so far this spring, but in much more casual observing. Many scores of various other insects in many families also have been noted.

- - - - - -
In addition to the many other pieces recently written on the big migration-flight witnessed in Quebec (Canada) in late May, there was a note in the Audubon.org’s news-blog. https://www.audubon.org/news/incredible-combination-factors-leads-historic-migration-flight

So…. speaking of Stygian Owl: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46217270 <https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46217270> Yes, that’s Key West, a bit beyond the south tip of peninsular Florida… and not really that far off from where the species is known, in (along with the farther-away Greater Antillean island of Hispaniola) Cuba. It’s also a species that has a very broad, seemingly modestly-disjunct range going well thru much of Central & South America, & much of Mexico (as considered a part of N. America geographically, in part, if not ‘politically’, and not in its entirety in geological terms), there south of a certain rough line. The species is documented well in Texas, also - but very rarely so, perhaps only twice there, & in the 1990’s.

. . . .
"Have we fallen into a mesmerized state that makes us accept as inevitable that which is inferior or detrimental, as though having lost the will or the vision to demand that which is good?” - Rachel Carson (1907-1964; marine biologist, conservationist, author whose books include ‘Silent Spring’. Sir David Attenborough has remarked that that book may have had an effect on science second only to Charles Darwin’s “On the Origin of Species”.)

good -& quiet and ethical- birding & other nature-observing to all,

Tom Fiore
manhattan
















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Date: 6/8/18 6:13 am
From: Long Island Birding <michaelzito...>
Subject: Re:[nysbirds-l] Black Tern - Nickerson Beach
Update - Bird flew off for now

On Fri, Jun 8, 2018, 8:36 AM Long Island Birding <michaelzito...>
wrote:

> Black tern on the flat originally found by Steve Walter.
> Mike Z.
>

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Date: 6/8/18 6:09 am
From: Colleen Veltri <cfinneganv...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Cliff Swallows

Cliff swallows continue at orchard beach abandoned buildings just past the snack bar. Thank you Laura Weir.

May the birds be with you

Colleen and Bobby
Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 6/8/18 6:02 am
From: Robert Lewis <rfermat...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Roseate Terns, Nickerson Beach, yesterday June 7
Nobody seems to have posted it here.  Yesterday morning we had eight adult Roseates, only one or two with bands,  Most showing lots of rosy coloring.
Bob LewisSleepy Hollow NY

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Date: 6/8/18 5:36 am
From: Long Island Birding <michaelzito...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Black Tern - Nickerson Beach
Black tern on the flat originally found by Steve Walter.
Mike Z.

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Date: 6/8/18 3:34 am
From: peter paul <pepaul...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach - Possible Common Tern (longipennis) Species - Comments and thoughts welcome
Hey all,
Just to throw another specimen into the mix, here (
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S30364262) is a bird that Simon Taylor and
I found a couple of summers ago at Nickerson. We noted many of the
structural, plumage, and molt features that Shai mentions in the 2011
listserv email.

This album has a couple more pictures of the same bird:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/129132563@N05/albums/72157687846819856

Happy tern-ing,
Tripper

On Thu, Jun 7, 2018 at 9:40 PM, Long Island Birding <michaelzito...>
wrote:

> Hello Shai and everyone,
> Thanks so much for your detailed response Shai. I changed the listing to
> Common Tern and added one more picture with more of a side view, but
> unfortunately I wasn't able to get a flight shot or any shots with the
> wings spread open. I am curious if this bird will reach more of the
> classic breeding plumage that I am used to seeing or remain dark and how
> that might affect its ability to breed this year. I do also think the legs
> are a bit darker than the pictures let on. There was another interesting
> bird yesterday that was speculated to be an adult common tern showing
> retarded plumage, however it looked quite different than the one in my
> report and resembled more of a second summer tern. Thank you again for
> shedding some light on this Shai!
> Mike Z.
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Date: 6/7/18 6:40 pm
From: Long Island Birding <michaelzito...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach - Possible Common Tern (longipennis) Species - Comments and thoughts welcome
Hello Shai and everyone,
Thanks so much for your detailed response Shai. I changed the listing to
Common Tern and added one more picture with more of a side view, but
unfortunately I wasn't able to get a flight shot or any shots with the
wings spread open. I am curious if this bird will reach more of the
classic breeding plumage that I am used to seeing or remain dark and how
that might affect its ability to breed this year. I do also think the legs
are a bit darker than the pictures let on. There was another interesting
bird yesterday that was speculated to be an adult common tern showing
retarded plumage, however it looked quite different than the one in my
report and resembled more of a second summer tern. Thank you again for
shedding some light on this Shai!
Mike Z.

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Date: 6/7/18 6:09 pm
From: Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...>
Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach - Possible Common Tern (longipennis) Species - Comments and thoughts welcome
Dear Mike and all,

This is an interesting bird, and well worth careful discussion. The photos are, as is so often necessarily the case, not ideal for assessing wing pattern and structure, and several other features. To my eye, the combination of adult-like plumage, darkish bill, not so dark legs, and not very deeply gray underparts is consistent with an early season variation of adult hirundo Common Tern that we do see from time to time.

The jury is certainly still out on the status of longipennis Common Terns on the east coast, and in the past I have eBirded the ones I've seen under regular "Common Tern"--but with lots of notation and documentation. Based on the checklists you've linked from Jay and Michael, provisionally specifying this form, I agree it might be best to take this approach while we work things out. At least it would be easier to collect and access the evidence.

Anyway, two of the best (and earliest in NY) candidates for longipennis were birds at Cupsogue on 26 Jun 2011 and 24 Jun 2014. I've aggregated photos of these at the following link:

https://flic.kr/s/aHskD7WtGd

As you will see, these birds were not only different in soft parts colors and plumage from same-aged hirundo COTE, but also different in terms of structure and molt (as explained in part in the note to this listserv from 27 Jun 2011, copied at the end of this note).

I've seen a few more also, including these two I was able to find quickly just now:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S37872552
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S37963638

It seems odd that the best candidates have always been second-summer (TY) birds, but there are two points worth emphasizing on this front. First, subadult terns are definitely proven to be prone to wander; second, these longipennis candidates differ very strongly in multiple ways from the range of variation I've documented in same-aged hirundo COTE over the past 20 years. The links in my copied email are long defunct, but I can direct those who are interested to long series of images of TY hirundo COTE from our area.

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore


________________________________________
From: <bounce-122625024-3714944...> [<bounce-122625024-3714944...>] on behalf of Long Island Birding [<michaelzito...>]
Sent: Thursday, June 7, 2018 8:08 PM
To: birds
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach - Possible Common Tern (longipennis) Species - Comments and thoughts welcome

Hello all,
On 5/22 at Nickerson Beach I observed a Common Tern that stood out from the rest. It was the same size/shape as the other common terns, but the bill and legs were much darker.
I showed the bird to a friend who is an eBird reviewer and he suggested that it was a Common Tern (longipennis). He also mentioned that this particular subspecies has been previously reported on Long Island.
Looking up those reports, I found there were two entries with photos by Jay McGowan and Michael McBrien on eBird, described by both as exceedingly rare. Here are the checklists:
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S14608476
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S30291552

After seeing this I was surprised, because I have seen birds that looked like this before (even one yesterday). In the past I have heard them referred to as portlandica type birds, but it is my understanding that portlandica refers to first summer tern plumage, which this bird clearly was not (I would say it was also clearly not second summer tern plumage either.....). My report was not accepted to eBird as of yet, so it is not in eBird output, but here is the bird I saw (Pictures in the linked eBird checklist and short video in youtube):
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46147297
https://youtu.be/qGdfoevCKxU

Anyway I would like to hear any thoughts or comments. Thanks,
Mike Z.
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________________________________________
From: <bounce-37742728-11143133...> [<bounce-37742728-11143133...>] on behalf of Shaibal Mitra [<Shaibal.Mitra...>]
Sent: Monday, June 27, 2011 11:43 AM
To: NYSBIRDS (<NYSBIRDS-L...>)
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Possible Siberian Common Tern (S. h. longipennis) on Long Island

A second-summer type Common Tern present at Cupsogue, just east of Moriches Inlet, last weekend (25-26 June) resembled the Siberian subspecies of Common Tern (Sterna hirundo longipennis):

Bill black, with a slight red tinge
Legs dark reddish-black
Ventral body deeply gray, especially for a second-summer type individual
Wings appeared relatively long both at rest and in flight

Its wingtip pattern also differed from the typical summer pattern of local Common Terns in that all the primaries (except perhaps p10) appeared uniformly fresh and pale, but it is not very unusual for non-adults to vary in this regard.

In my experience, however, it is extremely rare to see such dark legs on any early summer Common Tern (even first summer birds), and it is also extremely rare to see an all-dark bill in combination with deeply gray underparts, at least prior to very late summer.

Photos of this bird can be seen at:

https://picasaweb.google.com/tixbirdz/PossibleSiberianCommonTernSHLongipennisOnLongIslandNY

Some representative photos of second-summer type Common Terns can be seen at:

https://picasaweb.google.com/tixbirdz/CommonTernsOnLongIsland#

I've never seen longipennis in its core range and am unfamiliar with how to assess other published characters, such as its whiter inner rectrices and subtly different tertials, but the photos might help here (even its second-to-outermost rectrices appeared less extensively dark in the field than in many local Common Terns).

Longipennis is said to have a shorter bill than hirundo, but this bird's bill looked pretty similar in size to those of local birds.

I'm calling this bird a second-summer type because its forehead and its gray underbody were mottled to varying degrees with white. I first noticed it on Saturday but I was not able to get good photos. It was present again on Sunday and studied by at least 19 observers.

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore

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Date: 6/7/18 5:30 pm
From: Felipe Pimentel <fpimentel...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Brewster's Warbler
Today (around 11am) the bird was seen between the second and the third pair of metal towers. Some observers took photos of the Brewster’s warbler (I did not) and the bird continued flying north (toward Route 17A that is at the end of the last field). It seems that the Brewster’s warbler moves in the entire area of that hill and it can be found anywhere after the first pair of power towers.

FP

> On Jun 6, 2018, at 11:49 AM, Martin Carney <carneym...> wrote:
>
> I saw a Brewster's warbler at Ironwood Drive this morning at about 9:30 a m. Head north from the circle. Don't count the first metal structure holding power lines but afterwards go through three pairs of those metal structures heading north. About 200 yards beyond that I saw the warbler...Martin Carney
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Date: 6/7/18 5:08 pm
From: Long Island Birding <michaelzito...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson Beach - Possible Common Tern (longipennis) Species - Comments and thoughts welcome
Hello all,
On 5/22 at Nickerson Beach I observed a Common Tern that stood out from the
rest. It was the same size/shape as the other common terns, but the bill
and legs were much darker.
I showed the bird to a friend who is an eBird reviewer and he suggested
that it was a Common Tern (longipennis). He also mentioned that this
particular subspecies has been previously reported on Long Island.
Looking up those reports, I found there were two entries with photos by Jay
McGowan and Michael McBrien on eBird, described by both as exceedingly
rare. Here are the checklists:
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S14608476
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S30291552

After seeing this I was surprised, because I have seen birds that looked
like this before (even one yesterday). In the past I have heard them
referred to as portlandica type birds, but it is my understanding that
portlandica refers to first summer tern plumage, which this bird clearly
was not (I would say it was also clearly not second summer tern plumage
either.....). My report was not accepted to eBird as of yet, so it is not
in eBird output, but here is the bird I saw (Pictures in the linked eBird
checklist and short video in youtube):
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46147297
https://youtu.be/qGdfoevCKxU

Anyway I would like to hear any thoughts or comments. Thanks,
Mike Z.

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Date: 6/7/18 12:34 pm
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Thu., June 7, 2018 - 4 Species of Wood Warblers, Cedar Waxwings nesting 2 Locations
Central Park NYC
Thursday, June 7, 2018
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, m.ob.

Highlights: Yellow & Magnolia Warblers, Northern Parula, American Redstarts. Cedar Waxwings Nesting in Two Locations.

Canada Goose - pair Turtle Pond
Wood Duck - male Reservoir
Mallard - 6 Turtle Pond
Mourning Dove - 10
Chimney Swift - around 20 south side Reservoir & over adjacent bridle path
Herring Gull - 12 Reservoir
Great Black-backed Gull - 6 Reservoir
Double-crested Cormorant - 8 Reservoir
Great Egret - Turtle Pond
Black-crowned Night-Heron - flyover Turtle Pond (6 Black-crowned Night-Herons reported at the Pond)
Red-bellied Woodpecker - male excavating between Summer House & Laupot Bridge
Downy Woodpecker - male Swampy Pin Oak
Northern Flicker - male of pair Gill Overlook
Great Crested Flycatcher - individual seen at several locations
Eastern Kingbird - pair with nest Turtle Pond
Warbling Vireo - 2 pairs (Turtle Pond Dock & Maintenance Field)
Red-eyed Vireo - 3 (2 SW Reservoir, 1 heard in Ramble)
Blue Jay - 2 in Ramble
Tree Swallow - 2 Reservoir
Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 2 Reservoir
Barn Swallow - 10 Reservoir
American Robin - residents
Gray Catbird - pairs in several locations
Cedar Waxwing - 2 nesting pairs in Willow Oaks (Turtle Pond & Shakespeare Garden)
House Finch - 2 Bald Cypress Turtle Pond Dock
Baltimore Oriole - nest north end of Maintenance Field
Red-winged Blackbird - 3 to 5 males (locations bet. Turtle Pond & Oven)
Brown-headed Cowbird - male heard in Ramble
Common Grackle - at least 2 pairs feeding fledged young south side Reservoir
American Redstart - 5 or 6 (at least 2 imm. males singing, no adult males)
Northern Parula - female Mugger's Woods
Magnolia Warbler - female Mugger's Woods
Yellow Warbler - SW Reservoir
Northern Cardinal - residents

Deb Allen
Follow us on twitter @BirdingBobNYC & @DAllenNYC


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Date: 6/7/18 6:26 am
From: Robert Lewis <rfermat...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Nickerson beach roseates
5 adults east side of Nickerson beach

Sent from my iPhone

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Date: 6/6/18 4:46 pm
From: Joan Collins <joan.collins...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Adirondack Birding Festival Keynote Speaker: Chris Rimmer
Hi Everyone,



This year's Adirondack Birding Festival Keynote Speaker is Chris Rimmer,
Executive Director of the Vermont Center for Ecostudies. The talk will take
place at 4 p.m. on Friday, June 8, 2018 at the Adirondack Experience, The
Museum on Blue Mountain Lake. It is sponsored by Northern New York Audubon.
Here is a short description:



Bicknell's Thrush: Conserving a Bird of Two Worlds



The Bicknell's Thrush is one of North America's most rare and vulnerable
songbirds. Nesting only in mountaintop forests of northern New England and
New York, and wintering primarily on the island of Hispaniola (Dominican
Republic and Haiti), Bicknell's Thrush faces numerous threats to its
long-term survival. On its breeding grounds, these include atmospheric
pollution, ski area development, communications tower construction, wind
power development, mercury contamination, and climate change. The species'
limited winter habitats are under siege from deforestation, caused by human
population pressures. Since 1992, Vermont Center for Ecostudies (VCE)
Executive Director Chris Rimmer has led efforts to conserve the species and
these habitats on which it depends. Rimmer will discuss this fascinating and
rare songbird, VCE's efforts to study it in New England and the Caribbean,
and how Bicknell's Thrush represents a vital conservation link across
international boundaries.



I hope you can attend!



Joan Collins

Editor, New York Birders

Long Lake, NY

(315) 244-7127 cell

(518) 624-5528 home

http://www.adirondackavianexpeditions.com/

http://www.facebook.com/AdirondackAvian




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Date: 6/6/18 3:24 pm
From: Long Island Birding <michaelzito...>
Subject: Re:[nysbirds-l] [ebirdsnyc] Roseate Terns and Gull-billed Terns, Nickerson Beach
To add to the report, this evening there were at least 5 roseate terns,
some showing a very nice rosey hue on the breast, and at least one of them
had bling. A single gull-billed tern made an appearance and there were
multiple first year common terns.
Mike Z.

On Wed, Jun 6, 2018, 6:20 PM Robert Lewis <rfermat...> [ebirdsnyc] <
<ebirdsnyc-noreply...> wrote:

>
>
> Interesting. The adult Roseate we saw yesterday had no leg bands.
>
> Bob Lewis
>
>
>
> On Wednesday, June 6, 2018, 4:43:33 PM EDT, <annelazarus904...>
> [ebirdsnyc] <ebirdsnyc-noreply...> wrote:
>
> Today we saw one Roseate Tern at the Western protected area of the dried
> out pond at Nickerson Beach.
>
> It had a leg band, and we have pictures. Then we saw another Roseate tern
> near the Common Tern colony. It was at the shore, and it had a band on each
> of its legs. We have pictures of that Roseate Tern also.
>
> __._,_.___
> ------------------------------
> Posted by: Robert Lewis <rfermat...>
> ------------------------------
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Date: 6/6/18 3:20 pm
From: Robert Lewis <rfermat...>
Subject: Re:[nysbirds-l] [ebirdsnyc] Roseate Terns and Gull-billed Terns, Nickerson Beach
__,_._,___ Interesting.  The adult Roseate we saw yesterday had no leg bands.
Bob Lewis


On Wednesday, June 6, 2018, 4:43:33 PM EDT, <annelazarus904...> [ebirdsnyc] <ebirdsnyc-noreply...> wrote:

Today we saw one Roseate Tern at the Western protected area of the dried out  pond at Nickerson Beach.

It had a leg band, and we have pictures.  Then we saw another Roseate tern near the Common Tern colony. It was at the shore, and it had a band on each of its legs. We have pictures of that Roseate Tern also.



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Date: 6/6/18 9:34 am
From: Josh Cantor <joshcantor98...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Arctic Tern at Nickerson Beach (Nassau Co.)
Still present at 12:30 along with an adult Roseate Tern

Josh Cantor, AKA: "The Bird Nerd"
For more of my adventures, follow my blog at https://theyoungbirdersodyssey.weebly.com/

> On Jun 6, 2018, at 10:40 AM, Ken Feustel <feustel...> wrote:
>
> An adult observed at 10:15AM with Common Terns at dried-up puddle on west side of beach.
>
> Ken Feustel
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
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Date: 6/6/18 8:50 am
From: Martin Carney <carneym...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Brewster's Warbler
I saw a Brewster's warbler at Ironwood Drive this morning at about 9:30 a
m. Head north from the circle. Don't count the first metal structure
holding power lines but afterwards go through three pairs of those metal
structures heading north. About 200 yards beyond that I saw the
warbler...Martin Carney

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Date: 6/6/18 7:40 am
From: Ken Feustel <feustel...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Arctic Tern at Nickerson Beach (Nassau Co.)
An adult observed at 10:15AM with Common Terns at dried-up puddle on west side of beach.

Ken Feustel

Sent from my iPhone

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Date: 6/5/18 7:19 pm
From: Robert Lewis <rfermat...>
Subject: Re:[nysbirds-l] Terns at Nickerson Beach this morning: update
Slight correction!
When I got home and reviewed my photographs I strongly suspected that I had seen and photographed a first summer Arctic Tern this morning.  Shai Mitra confirmed it.
I  will post some photos to The New York Birders facebook site.
Bob LewisSleepy Hollow NY



On Tuesday, June 5, 2018, 3:31:49 PM EDT, Robert Lewis <rfermat...> wrote:

There were around ten birders checking Nickerson Beach this morning, from around 8:30 to 11:30.  No Arctic Tern.  There was one cooperative Roseate that hung around from around 10:00 to 11:00. 

If you arrive before 9:00, just drive in.  Supposedly, after that there is a fee, quite large if you don't live in Nassau County.  However, someone today reported that at 9:20 there was still no one at the booth.
Bob LewisSleepy Hollow NY

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Date: 6/5/18 4:14 pm
From: Mardi Dickinson <mardi1d...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Sheri Williamson Hummingbirds - BirdCallsRadio

Birders et al,

Thought many of your would be interested in my conversation with guest Sheri Williamson on hummingbirds https://bit.ly/2akUsxp

Cheers,
Mardi Dickinson
www.kymrygroup.com


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Date: 6/5/18 12:32 pm
From: Robert Lewis <rfermat...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Roseate Tern at Nickerson Beach this morning
There were around ten birders checking Nickerson Beach this morning, from around 8:30 to 11:30.  No Arctic Tern.  There was one cooperative Roseate that hung around from around 10:00 to 11:00. 

If you arrive before 9:00, just drive in.  Supposedly, after that there is a fee, quite large if you don't live in Nassau County.  However, someone today reported that at 9:20 there was still no one at the booth.
Bob LewisSleepy Hollow NY

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Date: 6/5/18 9:34 am
From: Jean Sparacin <jsparacin...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Muscoot Farm, Westchester: Red-Hooded Woodpecker & Hooded Warblers
She ment red - HEADED, and hooded warbler.

On Mon, Jun 4, 2018 at 12:13 PM, Anne Swaim <anneswaim...> wrote:

> Ten birders on Saw Mill River Audubon's 1st Monday walk at Muscoot Farm
> this morning endured steady rain for first hour and then were rewarded with
> some good birding including these two highlights:
>
> * Red-headed Woodpecker continuing,
> * Hooded Warbler heard and seen on White Trail (see trail map below).
> Second HOWA was singing in NE corner in woods by Muscoot Reservoir.
>
> *Our eBird list is here:* https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46293948
>
> *Trail map image below showing location of HOWA (white trail) and RHWO
> (red trail) here:* http://www.sawmillriveraudubon.org/docs/
> Muscoot-Farm-June4-2018-HOWA-RHWO.jpg
> <http://www.sawmillriveraudubon.org/docs/Muscoot-Farm-June4-2018-HOWA-RHWO.jpg>
>
> (Above excerpted from more complete Muscoot Farm trail map here:
> https://www.mobilemaplets.com/showplace/14652)
>
> Anne Swaim
> Saw Mill River Audubon
> www.sawmillriveraudubon.org
>
>
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Date: 6/5/18 5:34 am
From: John Gluth <jgluth...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Heckscher Park (Suffolk) Wilson’s Phalarope — NO
Between 07:35 and 08:00 the only shorebirds observed in the parking field 7 rain pools were a White-rumped Sandpiper and a couple Killdeer. A Willet was foraging on the beach. In field 8 there were 7 Black-bellied Plovers.

John Gluth
Sent from my iPhone

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Date: 6/4/18 12:59 pm
From: Joseph Brin <brinjoseph...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Syracuse RBA




 RBA




*New York

- Syracuse
- June 04, 2018
- NYSY 06.04.18




Hotline: Syracuse Area Rare Bird Alert

Dates: May 29 - June 04

To report by email: brinjoseph AT yahoo DOT com

Reporting upstate counties: Onondaga, Oswego, Madison, Oneida, Herkimer, Cayuga, Montezuma Wildlife Refuge and Montezuma Wetlands complex

compiled: June 04 AT 11:30 a.m. EDT

compiler: Joseph Brin

Onondaga Audubon Homepage: www.onondgaaudubon.org







Greetings: This is the Syracuse Area Rare Bird Alert for the week on May 29, 2018




Highlights:




LEAST BITTERN

TUNDRA SWAN

NORTHERN GOSHAWK

RED KNOT

RED-NECKED PHALAROPE

UPLAND SANDPIPER

AMERICAN AVOCET

COMMON NIGHTHAWK

RED-HEADED WOODPECKER

ACADIAN FLYCATCHER

LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH

PROTHONOTARY WARBLER

PRAIRIE WARBLER

GRASSHOPPER SPARROW

WESTERN MEADOWLARK

ORCHARD ORIOLE

PINE SISKIN

RED CROSSBILL













Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge (MNWR) and Montezuma Wetlands Complex (MWC)

------------




     Shorebird species numbers were down to 13 this week but rarities such as AMERICAN AVOCET and other tough to find species such as RED KNOT and RED-NECKED PHALAROPE were around.

     5/28: A RED-NECKED PHALAROPE was seen in the Thru-way Pools on the Wildlife Drive. It was seen again on the 29th. but not since.

     5/29: This date was the last sighting of the WESTERN MEADOWLARK on 

Armitage Road. A RED KNOT was seen at Tschache Pool. It was found again on the 30th. but not since. SANDHILL CRANE pairs with a colt were seen near the Potato Barn on Rt. 31 and at Knox-Marsellus Marsh

     5/30: PROTHONOTARY WARBLERS were seen at one of the nest box in the forested area of Armitage Road and are believed to be breeding.

     5/31: A BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON and an AMERICAN AVOCET were seen in the Morgan Road Marsh.

     6/1: A (the) AMERICAN AVOCET  was seen at Tschache Pool and later along the Wildlife Drive. 

     6/2: A TUNDRA SWAN was seen from Est Road. A (the ) AMERICAN AVOCET was seen at Knox-Marsellus Marsh. It was seen there again today.







Cayuga County

------------




     6/3: A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER continues of West Barrier Park in Fair Haven. 2 ACADIAN FLYCATCHERS were seen at Sterling Nature Center.







Oswego County

------------




     6/3: A LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH was again seen at Salmon River Falls north of Altmar. A PINE SISKIN was seen at a feeder near Mexico.







Onondaga County

------------




     5/29: A PRAIRIE WARBLER was seen at Green Lakes State Park. It was seen again of 6/3.

     6/1: A LEAST BITTERN was seen at Hamlin Marsh.

     6/2: A GRASSHOPPER SPARROW and an ORCHARD ORIOLE were seen at Three Rivers WMA north of Baldwinsville. 2 COMMON NIGHTHAWKS were seen at the NBT stadium in Syracuse.

     6/3: An ORCHARD ORIOLE was seen at Green Lakes State Park. A CERULEAN WARBLER was found in Cicero Swamp.







Oneida County

------------




     5/31: An ORCHARD ORIOLE was found at Spring Farms Nature Center south of Clinton.

     6/1: 2 UPLAND SANDPIPERS were seen at the Deerfield Grasslands south of Poland. A NORTHERN GOSHAWK was found at Woodford Forest east of Sangerfield.







Herkimer County

------------




     5/30: A RED CROSSBILL was seen near Little Moose Lake south of Old Forge.

     6/1: An UPLAND SANDPIPER was seen on North Gage Road south of Poland.







-end transcript




Joseph Brin

Region 5

Baldwinsville, N.Y. 13027 USA


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Date: 6/4/18 10:25 am
From: Pat Aitken <aitkenpatricia...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Wilson's phalatope yes
Currently in pool south side field 7 at heckscher--

Pat Aitken | 516.857.7567

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Date: 6/4/18 9:55 am
From: Michael Higgiston <mikehigg...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Phalarope

Any sightings of phalarope Monday morning? Thanks
Mike Higgiston
Sent from my iPhone

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Date: 6/4/18 9:14 am
From: Anne Swaim <anneswaim...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Muscoot Farm, Westchester: Red-Hooded Woodpecker & Hooded Warblers
Ten birders on Saw Mill River Audubon's 1st Monday walk at Muscoot Farm
this morning endured steady rain for first hour and then were rewarded with
some good birding including these two highlights:

* Red-headed Woodpecker continuing,
* Hooded Warbler heard and seen on White Trail (see trail map below).
Second HOWA was singing in NE corner in woods by Muscoot Reservoir.

*Our eBird list is here:* https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46293948

*Trail map image below showing location of HOWA (white trail) and RHWO (red
trail) here:* http://www.sawmillriveraudubon.org/docs/Muscoot-Farm-June4-2018-HOWA-RHWO.jpg
<http://www.sawmillriveraudubon.org/docs/Muscoot-Farm-June4-2018-HOWA-RHWO.jpg>

(Above excerpted from more complete Muscoot Farm trail map here:
https://www.mobilemaplets.com/showplace/14652)

Anne Swaim
Saw Mill River Audubon
www.sawmillriveraudubon.org

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Date: 6/4/18 6:12 am
From: Patricia Lindsay <pjlindsay...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Wilson's Phalarope Heckscher SP Suffolk Co.
Male, feeding in grassy puddle Field 7. Greater Yellowlegs, 2 White-rumped and a few Semipalmated Sandpipers as well.

Sent from my iPhone

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Date: 6/3/18 7:13 pm
From: Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Arctic Terns on the south shore of Long Island.
Dear Bob and all,

You are correct that the window is open for Arctic Terns.

There are very few rules for searching for them, and the foremost involves place. The observer must be present near an ocean inlet and receptive to studying terns.

It still amazes me, but wind, weather, time of day, and point of tide cycle are all remarkably unpredictive of Arctic Tern occurrence. What you need to do is get down to an inlet and look for loafing flocks of terns. Any flock of 30+ birds, especially one including a subadult tern of any species, deserves serious scrutiny. The motley subadults are the key, and their turnover illustrates that birds are cycling through the flock you are watching. Plum Beach in Brooklyn and Nickerson Beach in Nassau County are simpler to access than places like Breezy Point, Democrat Point, the new Old Inlet flats, the Moriches Inlet flats, and Mecox Bay (the promising-looking area formerly known as Baldelli's Breach or Wasilco's Wash, near Tiana Beach, is a near total loss due to chronic kite-surf disturbance).

These are pelagic birds and they seem to drop in almost randomly (but within a very well-defined date range, 20 May-10 July). The key is that you have to be there when one drops in! It might be worth emphasizing this a little more. Given that observer patience is a critical variable, and that weather is not, choose tolerable weather over intolerable for your search. For instance, today started out as possibly an Arctic Tern search for us, but the brutal 25 mph easterly winds readily discouraged that approach in favor of seawatching.

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore
________________________________________
From: Robert Lewis [<rfermat...>]
Sent: Saturday, June 2, 2018 2:12 PM
To: NYSBIRDS (<NYSBIRDS-L...>); Shaibal Mitra; EBirds NYC; Robert Lewis
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Arctic Terns on the south shore of Long Island.

June is here, and every year some Arctic Terns are seen at several places on the south shore of Long Island. Does anyone have a sense of how weather impacts the probability of seeing this species? Specifically, how does the forecast for the next week or so look for maybe seeing Arctic Terns?

Bob Lewis
Sleepy Hollow NY

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Date: 6/3/18 3:21 pm
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Sun., June 3, 2018 - American Redstarts & Magnolia Warblers, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
Central Park NYC
Sunday, June 3, 2018
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob.

Highlights on a cool and cloudy day: American Redstarts & Magnolia Warblers, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, nesting Cedar Waxwings.

Canada Goose - pair Turtle Pond, others on Reservoir
Mallard - 18 (15 Reservoir, 3 Turtle Pond)
Mourning Dove - residents including juvenile in Shakespeare Garden
Chimney Swift - around 20 at the Reservoir at 7am
Ruby-throated Hummingbird - female Summer House
Herring Gull - 41 Reservoir & flyovers
Great Black-backed Gull - 8 Reservoir
Double-crested Cormornant - 9 Reservoir & flyover
Black-crowned Night-Heron - flying from Riviera to the Point (Peter Haskel)
Red-tailed Hawk - flyover
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2 males (Swampy Pin Oak & Summer House)
Downy woodpecker - heard
Northern Flicker - pair Gill Overlook (starlings apparently done with the tree)
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher - in Honeylocust at Upper Lobe
Great Crested Flycatcher - 3 (2 Tupelo Field, 1 Ramble & Upper Lobe)
Eastern Kingbird - pair with nest at Turtle Pond
Warbling Vireo - 4
Red-eyed Vireo - the Point
Blue Jay - residents
Tree Swallow - Reservoir 7am
Barn Swallow - 2 Reservoir 7 am
Black-capped Chickadee - singing Shakespeare Garden
American Robin - residents with several juveniles around
Gray Catbird - residents in many locations
Cedar Waxwings - small flocks of 4 to 8 birds, pair with nest Shakespeare Garden
House Finch - 2 males Gill Overlook
Baltimore Oriole - 4 including female at Maintenance Field nest
Red-winged Blackbird - singing male Oven
Brown-headed Cowbird - 3 (male & 2 females)
Common Grackle - residents
American Redstart - 6 or 7 (no adult males)
Magnolia Warbler - 2 (female Upper Lobe, first-spring male Warbler Rock)
Northern Cardinal - residents

--
Sandra Critelli reported 3 more Black-crowned Night-Herons and a Great Egret at the Pond (59th St.) this afternoon.

Deb Allen
Follow us on twitter @BirdingBobNYC & @DAllenNYC

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Date: 6/3/18 12:36 pm
From: Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...>
Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] Strong Sooty Shearwater flight, Cupsogue, Suffolk
We counted 33 Sooty Shearwaters at Cupsogue from 8:15-9:15, then two more at Shinnecock Inlet over 24 minutes, and three more plus two Manx Shearwaters from Triton Lane, on Dune Road, over 36 minutes ending 11:47.

The flight rate diminished after about 8:45 and visibility deteriorated as the clouds cleared and the sun rose higher.

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore
________________________________________
From: <bounce-122614325-3714944...> [<bounce-122614325-3714944...>] on behalf of Patricia Lindsay [<pjlindsay...>]
Sent: Sunday, June 3, 2018 8:34 AM
To: <nysbirds-l...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Strong Sooty Shearwater flight, Cupsogue, Suffolk

Steady west to east flight. Common Loons moving too.

Sent from my iPhone


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Date: 6/3/18 5:34 am
From: Patricia Lindsay <pjlindsay...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Strong Sooty Shearwater flight, Cupsogue, Suffolk
Steady west to east flight. Common Loons moving too.

Sent from my iPhone

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Date: 6/2/18 7:32 pm
From: Joseph Wallace <joew701...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Bryant Park Waterthrush
A quick circuit in the hot midday of the crowded park revealed an
unexpected Waterthrush in the southwest corner, where the plantings are
deeper and hiding places easier to find. I'm nearly certain it was a
Northern, but though it was active, moving back and forth and around the
shack there, it stayed in deep shadow and remained silent. Other sightings
in the park included a pair of Catbirds apparently nesting in a yew (?) on
the northern edge and a female Brown-headed Cowbird lurking near the
Catbirds' bush.

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Date: 6/2/18 2:15 pm
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] NYS eBird Hotspots: State, Counties & Locations Updated (Jun/'18)
Thanks to @Team_eBird for their dedication to keeping eBird.org running
smoothly and for the group of New York State hotspot moderators for their
time reviewing shared location suggestions.

The wiki page site was developed to access data on eBird.org and in places
it includes additional links to birding resources at the county and
location levels. If you have any suggestions for additional links please
send them to me off list.

All County pages currently have links for the Illustrated Checklists and
links to both Images and Audio from the Macaulay Library.

Species totals have been updated for all *county pages*. This includes
the *total
number of species with an equivalent color code* highlighting the county
name based on colors used on eBird maps. The alphabetical list of counties
on the main page has been updated with total spp. #.

*Hotspot pages*: All location pages have been updated on the wiki. These
include 913 pages representing a total of 1,878 out of 6,157 hotspots
(30.5%). Updates involve # of species and color codings based on species #
along with updated 2018 periods on the bar chart tables displaying the:

• Current Month: Jun./2018
• Prior Month: May/2018
• the current two month period May-Jun./2018
• along with the current year: 2018

For the following counties there are individual 'dynamic' wiki pages for
the Top 10+ locations at the top of the list of shared locations: Cayuga,
Erie, Monroe, Niagara, Orange, Oswego, Seneca, Tompkins, Kings (Brooklyn),
Queens, Richmond (Staten Island), Nassau and Suffolk Counties. Westchester
and New York (Borough of Manhattan) Counties have all shared locations
linked to wikipages.

Counties with 'static' pages do not need to be maintained on a monthly
basis. These include pages for the Top 10+ locations and includes Albany,
Bronx, Broome, Chautauqua, Clinton, Columbia, Delaware, Dutchess, Essex,
Genesee, Greene, Hamilton, Jefferson, Livingston, Madison, Oneida,
Onondaga, Ontario, Orleans, Rensselaer, Rockland, St. Lawrence, Saratoga,
Sullivan, Ulster & Wayne with Putnam County currently having all shared
locations linked to wikipages.

An *alphabetical list of all hotspots* (6,157) can be found on a single
page. Links exist for any hotspot with a wikipage. Clicking the county name
to the right of any hotspot will bring up the county page showing all
county hotspots. A link to the alphabetical list page is at the bottom of
this message. There is a link to the page at the top of the New York State
page.

*Bar Charts (Species Lists)*: For all county and Top 10+ location pages
there's a table showing the months, seasons and several time frames for the
current year. Clicking any of these links will bring up a complete list of
species and other taxa with bar charts representing abundance. To see a
list of species for *all* periods click on the name above the months i.e.
'New York State (489 spp.)' or 'Niagara County (320 spp.)'.

*Maps of sightings*: After bringing up a bar chart list you'll see a MAP
button to the right of each species. Clicking this will produce a map of
the latest sightings. Red icons show sightings within the past 30 days.
Click on the icons to see a list of who reported each species and click on
'Checklist' to view their submission. Click on 'Explore Rich Media' in the
right sidebar to view locations with photos, audio or video. These also
exist for any multi-location page combining the hotspots associated with
the location i.e. Tonawanda WMA in Niagara County with its 16 locations.

*Printable Checklists*: a link has been created to produce an eBird
checklist (PDF format) for all hotspots on the wiki site. Additional
details are in this email sent to the list <
https://www.mail-archive.com/<nysbirds-l...>/msg20153.html >.

*Tide Graphs* exist for New York County, Kings County (Brooklyn) and
Richmond County (Staten Island). There's a quick link to the tide graphs on
the "Go To >" line highlighted in blue for each location. If there are
multiple graphs on a page the left/right is generally north/south or
west/east. If you spot any issues please let me know[ off line **].

Click '*Overview*' on any of the wiki pages to bring up a sortable list of
all species along with the latest checklists submitted and a list of the
Top eBirders. The default sort is for the latest additions to the State,
County or location.

Check out '*My Location Life List*', '*My County Life List*' and '*My State
Life List*' links on their respective pages.

For each location page click on '*Google Map Directions*' to bring up a
Google Map page. On Google Maps click 'Directions' then 'Transit' to plot a
public transportation route. By clicking 'More Options and Times' you can
refine your search. This also works with 'Driving' and 'Walking'.

• Home page: http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Birding+in+New+York
• Alphabetical list of hotspots:
http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/AlphaHotspots
--
Ben Cacace
Manhattan, NYC
Wiki for NYS eBird Hotspots
<http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Birding+in+New+York>
Facebook Discussion for NYS eBird Hotspots: Q & A
<https://www.facebook.com/groups/NYeBirdHotspots/>

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Date: 6/2/18 1:46 pm
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Sat., June 2, 2018 - 6 Species of Wood Warblers, Olive-sided & Yellow-bellied Flycatchers
Central Park NYC
Saturday, June 2, 2018
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob.

Highlights: Light NW winds and some rain overnight brought in a few new birds. Six Species of Wood Warblers including Blackburnian Warbler, Olive-sided & Yellow-bellied Flycatchers.

Canada Goose - 40 (14 adults plus 3 family groups with goslings Reservoir, 2 Great Lawn/Turtle Pond)
Wood Duck - male SE Reservoir
Mallard - 21 (5 Turtle Pond, 12 + 4 ducklings Reservoir)
Mourning Dove - 5 or 6
Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 2 Azalea Pond area (one with a twig in its beak)
Chimney Swift - one or two in several locations
Herring Gull - 15 Reservoir & a few flyovers
Great Black-backed Gull - 2 Reservoir
Double-crested Cormorant - at least 12 Reservoir & flyovers
Great Egret - south shore of Lake
Black-crowned Night-Heron - 2 adults south side Reservoir (6am)
Red-tailed Hawk - 2 flyovers (east & west side) + 2 birds 5th Ave. nest
Red-bellied Woodpecker - male excavating Summer House, male south of Evodia Field
Downy Woodpecker - excavating east side Turtle Pond (Andrea Hessel)
Northern Flicker - pair Gill Overlook
Olive-sided Flycatcher - north of Gill Source
Eastern Wood-Pewee - north of Gill Source
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher - Humming Tombstone
Empidonax Flycatcher - prob. Least (small-billed, white below, short wings) Swampy Pin Oak (Alison Schondorf)
Great Crested Flycatcher - 2 to 4 (Ramble & SW Great Lawn)
Eastern Kingbird - 4 (nesting pair Turtle Pond, 1 north of Gill Source, 1 Warbler Rock/Swampy Pin Oak)
Warbling Vireo - 3 (Warbler Rock, Maintenance Field, Humming Tombstone)
Red-eyed Vireo - 3
Blue Jay - residents
Barn Swallow - 2 south side Reservoir (early)
White-breasted Nuthatch - top of the Oven (Bob - early), another 72nd Street entrance (via Gillian Henry)
American Robin - residents
Gray Catbird - residents
Cedar Waxwing - 8 or 9 (3 or 4 Maint. Field (Gillian Henry), 5 Gill Overlook)
House Finch - female Mugger's Woods
Red-winged Blackbird - 3 males Turtle Pond
Brown-headed Cowbird - male & one or two females Mugger's Woods
Common Grackle - residents incl. adult feeding fledgling at Reservoir (6:30am)
Common Yellowthroat - male Turtle Pond (Alison Schondorf)
American Redstart - 3
Magnolia Warbler - 2 Humming Tombstone (Ally)
Blackburnian Warbler - female Humming Tombstone (Gillian Henry)
Blackpoll Warbler - female - Humming Tombstone
Canada Warbler - male Humming Tombstone
Northern Cardinal - residents

Deb Allen
Follow us on twitter @BirdingBobNYC & @DAllenNYC



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Date: 6/2/18 11:13 am
From: Robert Lewis <rfermat...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Arctic Terns on the south shore of Long Island.
June is here, and every year some Arctic Terns are seen at several places on the south shore of Long Island.  Does anyone have a sense of how weather impacts the probability of seeing this species?  Specifically, how does the forecast for the next week or so look for maybe seeing Arctic Terns?
Bob LewisSleepy Hollow NY

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Date: 6/2/18 11:01 am
From: BOB WASHBURN <nyc_bob...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Henslow's Sparrow Continues at Shawangunk Grasslands NWR, Ulster Co.
Still styling and profiling in the spot Joe described.

BOB WASHBURN
The City
_
( '<
/ ) )
//"


> On May 31, 2018, at 12:26 AM, Joe DiCostanzo <jdicost...> wrote:
>
> Here is a link to my eBird checklist https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46165624 that contains pictures and a recording of the Henslow’s Sparrow found on Wednesday afternoon, May 30, at the Shawangunk Grasslands NWR. It was down the Red Loop trail that starts at the corner of the parking area and goes past the gazebo and platform. As you go down the trail it crosses a dry channel. The bird was actively calling and perching up about 50 feet or so past the dry channel, mainly on the right side of the trail.
>
> Joseph DiCostanzo
>
> www.greatgullisland.org
> www.inwoodbirder.blogspot.com
>
> --
> NYSbirds-L List Info:
> Welcome and Basics
> Rules and Information
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> Archives:
> The Mail Archive
> Surfbirds
> ABA
> Please submit your observations to eBird!
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Date: 6/1/18 8:51 pm
From: Gail Benson <gbensonny...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] NYC Area RBA: 01 June 2018
-RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* June 1, 2018
* NYNY1806.01

- Birds Mentioned

PACIFIC LOON+
MISSISSIPPI KITE+
WHITE-WINGED DOVE+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

Brant
EURASIAN WIGEON
Common Eider
Red-throated Loon
Common Loon
Sooty Shearwater
CATTLE EGRET
WHIMBREL
RED-NECKED PHALAROPE
Iceland Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Gull-billed Tern
Caspian Tern
Roseate Tern
Black Skimmer
Red-headed Woodpecker
Acadian Flycatcher
Gray-cheeked Thrush
PROTHONOTARY WARBLER
Mourning Warbler
YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER
Henslow’s Sparrow
SUMMER TANAGER
BLUE GROSBEAK

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report
electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at
http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to
nysarc44<at>nybirds<dot>org

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or
sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compilers: Tom Burke and Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Gail Benson

[~BEGIN RBA TAPE~]

Greetings! This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, June 1, 2018 at
9:00 pm.

The highlights of today’s tape are MISSISSIPPI KITE, PACIFIC LOON,
WHITE-WINGED DOVE, RED-NECKED PHALAROPE, EURASIAN WIGEON, WHIMBREL, CATTLE
EGRET, PROTHONOTARY and YELLOW-THROATED WARBLERS, SUMMER TANAGER, BLUE
GROSBEAK and more.

Marking pretty much the end of spring migration, punctuated by an estimated
720,000 warblers moving past a Quebec site along the St. Lawrence Seaway
Monday, this week did produce some interesting sightings locally.

Two local MISSISSIPPI KITES involved one flying over Northwest Harbor in
the town of East Hampton last Saturday afternoon and a sub-adult soaring
over Hempstead Lake State Park Monday morning. Watch for them almost
anywhere.

Also on Monday morning, among a few RED-THROATED and COMMON LOONS well out
in the Atlantic off Nickerson Beach was a Loon studied with difficulty due
to the distance and conditions that was judged to be a PACIFIC LOON in
changing plumage. It unfortunately soon disappeared, but Nickerson also
provided some other nice birds around the Tern and BLACK SKIMMER colonies
on Monday, including single CASPIAN and ROSEATE and two GULL-BILLED TERNS,
plus two COMMON EIDER and two SOOTY SHEARWATERS offshore. At the Lido
Preserve near Nickerson on Monday, among a flock of ATLANTIC BRANT was a
dark individual mostly showing the characteristics of a “BLACK” BRANT.

On Wednesday at Cupsogue County Park in Westhampton Dunes a WHITE-WINGED
DOVE was photographed sitting on a snow fence in mid-afternoon. This park
in particular and along Dune Road have produced past sightings of this
species as well.

A RED-NECKED PHALAROPE along the bayside at Breezy Point last Saturday was
a nice find.

A drake EURASIAN WIGEON was spotted Monday on the West Pond at Jamaica Bay
Wildlife Refuge.

Three WHIMBREL in the swale at Jones Beach West End Sunday were also noted
around the West End before and after that date, apparently hanging around.
A large number of seasonal shorebirds has been present recently along south
shore gathering sites.

A CATTLE EGRET was at Oakwood Beach on State Island, just northeast of
Great Kills Park, at least from Monday to Wednesday.

Single ICELAND GULLS were present early in the week at Cedar Beach in
Southold and at Robert Moses State Park, and decent numbers of LESSER
BLACK-BACKED GULLS continue at sites like Moses Park. Four SOOTY
SHEARWATERS were off Moses Park Monday, and the activity of offshore
pelagics should increase this month.

Two RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS were still at Connetquot River State Park
Wednesday.

The Forest Park water hole was still producing some nice passerines this
week, with a SUMMER TANAGER and a MOURNING WARBLER there last Saturday and
a PROTHONOTARY WARBLER and a GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH on Tuesday.

ACADIAN FLYCATCHERS at Prospect Park to Monday and Greenwood Cemetery in
Brooklyn last Saturday are potential nesters around those areas and should
be monitored as such. Breeding birds such as the YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER
at Bayard Cutting Arboretum and BLUE GROSBEAK at Calverton, while being
enjoyed, should not be disturbed in these activities in any way. This also
pertains to the HENSLOW’S SPARROW back now at the Shawangunk Grasslands
National Wildlife Refuge in Ulster County.

To phone in reports, on Long Island call Tony Lauro at (631) 734 4126 or
call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922 and leave a message.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the
National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript

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Date: 5/31/18 5:51 pm
From: David Suggs <dsuggs...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] RBA Buffalo Bird Report 31 May 2018
- RBA
* New York
* Buffalo
* 05/31/2018
* NYBU1805.31
- Birds mentioned

-------------------------------------------
Please submit reports to
<DSuggs...>
-------------------------------------------

Black-bellied Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Whimbrel
Ruddy Turnstone
Red Knot
Sanderling
Semipalm. Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Dunlin
Short-b. Dowitcher
Black-billed Cuckoo
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Common Nighthawk
Whip-poor-will
Merlin
Eastern Wood-Pewee
Alder Flycatcher
Willow Flycatcher
Least Flycatcher
Veery
Gray-cheeked Thrush
Wood Thrush
Cedar Waxwing
Blue-headed Vireo
Philadelphia Vireo
Tennessee Warbler
Nashville Warbler
Northern Parula
Chestnut-s. Warbler
Magnolia Warbler
Bl.-thr. Bl. Warbler
Yellow-r. Warbler
Bl.-thr. Green Warb.
Blackburnian Warbler
Palm Warbler
Bay-breasted Warbler
Blackpoll Warbler
American Redstart
Common Yellowthroat
Wilson's Warbler
Canada Warbler
Rose-br. Grosbeak
Eastern Towhee
Lincoln's Sparrow
Yellow-h. Blackbird
Pine Siskin

- Transcript
Hotline: Buffalo Bird Report at the Buffalo Museum of Science
Date: 05/31/2018
Number: 716-896-1271
To Report: Same
Compiler: David F. Suggs
Coverage: Western New York and adjacent Ontario
Website: www.BuffaloOrnithologicalSociety.org

Thursday, May 31, 2018

The Buffalo Bird Report is a service provided
by your Buffalo Museum of Science and the
Buffalo Ornithological Society. To contact the
Science Museum, call 896-5200. Press the pound
key to report sightings before the end of this
message.

Highlights of reports received May 17 through
May 31 from the Niagara Frontier Region.

Still a good count of migrant warblers at
Forest Lawn in Buffalo on May 20. Sixteen
species included TENNESSEE WARBLER, NASHVILLE
WARBLER, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, AMERICAN
REDSTART, NORTHERN PARULA, MAGNOLIA WARBLER,
BAY-BREASTED WARBLER, BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER,
CHESTNUT-S. WARBLER, BLACKPOLL WARBLER, BL.-
THR. BL. WARBLER, PALM WARBLER, YELLOW-R.
WARBLER, BL.-THR. GREEN WARB., CANADA WARBLER
and WILSON'S WARBLER, plus BLUE-HEADED VIREO,
PHILADELPHIA VIREO, LINCOLN'S SPARROW and GRAY-
CHEEKED THRUSH. PHILADELPHIA VIREO also
reported at Tifft Nature Preserve in Buffalo.

A fallout of shorebird migrants occurred on May
22. At the Port Dalhousie piers, on Lake
Ontario in Saint Catharine's, Ontario, 1200
DUNLINS, 65 WHIMBRELS and 7 RED KNOTS, plus
SHORT-B. DOWITCHER, SANDERLING, SEMIPALMATED
PLOVER and SEMIPALM. SANDPIPER. The same date
in Niagara County, 11 shorebird species.
Highlights at Burgess and Lower Lake Roads - 11
BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS and 10 SHORT-B.
DOWITCHERS, with RUDDY TURNSTONE, DUNLIN,
SEMIPALMATED PLOVER and peep sandpipers.

May 26, the BOS WHIP-POOR-WILL Field Trip to
the Wainfleet Bog Sanctuary, on the Niagara
Peninsula of Ontario, reported four calling
WHIP-POOR-WILLS after sunset at Wilson and
Garringers Roads. Also on the evening trip,
COMMON NIGHTHAWK, BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO, YELLOW-
BILLED CUCKOO, EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE, ALDER
FLYCATCHER, WILLOW FLYCATCHER, LEAST
FLYCATCHER, GR. CR. FLYCATCHER, VEERY, WOOD
THRUSH, 21 CEDAR WAXWINGS, EASTERN TOWHEE and 3
ROSE-BR. GROSBEAKS.

At feeders - May 18, a reported YELLOW-H.
BLACKBIRD at Sunset Beach, on Lake Ontario in
Orleans County. A PINE SISKIN still at a
feeder in North Boston on May 20.

And, MERLINS are nesting in a North Buffalo
neighborhood.

You may report sightings after the tone. Thank
you for calling and reporting.

- End Transcript

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Date: 5/31/18 5:26 pm
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Thurs., May 31, 2018 - Blackpoll & Northern Parula Warblers, Green Heron, nesting E. Kingbirds
Central Park NYC
Thursday, May 31, 2018
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, m.ob.

Highlights: A slow day with some rain/drizzle and two species of Wood Warblers - Northern Parula and Blackpoll Warbler, nesting Eastern Kingbirds, and a Green Heron at Turtle Pond.

Canada Goose - 5 goslings at the south side of the Reservoir
Mallard - 10
Herring Gull - 6 Reservoir
Great Black-backed Gull - 8 Reservoir
Great Egret - LakeGreen Heron - Turtle Pond
Black-crowned Night-heron - 2 flyovers heading south
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2 pairs (Oven and summer House)
Downy Woodpecker - male in Ramble
Northern Flicker - 3 (2 males Summer House, female drinking at the Oven)
Great Crested Flycatcher - 3 (pair in Ramble, 1 Upper Lobe)
Eastern Kingbird - pair nesting at Turtle Pond
Warbling Vireo - 2 pairs (Upper Lobe & Turtle Pond Dock)
Blue Jay - Oven
Barn Swallow - 4 Reservoir
White-breasted Nuthatch - Chez Armando (top of the Oven)
American Robin - residents
Gray Catbird - pairs in Ramble & Upper Lobe
House Finch - 3 Turtle Pond Dock
Baltimore Oriole - 3 (female in nest at Maintenance Field, pair Upper Lobe)
Red-winged Blackbird - 4 (2 males Turtle Pond, adult male Ramble, first-spring male Oven)
Brown-headed Cowbird - female Upper Lobe
Common Grackle - 8 Oven
Northern Parula - female Gill Overlook
Blackpoll Warbler - 2 females (Gill Overlook, turtle Pond Dock)
Northern Cardinal - residents
--
On Wednesday May 30) Bob saw three Northern Rough-winged Swallows at the south side of the Reservoir.

Deb Allen
Follow us on twitter @BirdingBobNYC & @DAllenNYC

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Date: 5/31/18 4:08 pm
From: Karen Fung <easternbluebird...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Henslow's Sparrow at Shawangunk Grasslands NWR: comparison of audiograms
Hi, I looked at the audio files posted on eBird, comparing Joe's file from
yesterday with the many files that were posted a year ago. The bird that
showed up yesterday sang a song with three descending notes. Last year's
bird also sang a three part song, but the pitches were in the order of
high/low/medium. I don't think this was obvious when listening to the
files, but the audiograms give visual proof. All the songs from last year,
spanning several days, show the same pattern.
What are the chances that this is a different individual? Or maybe he just
altered his song this year?

Here's a link to the audio files:

https://ebird.org/media/catalog?taxonCode=henspa&mediaType=a&region=Ulster,%20New%20York,%20United%20States%20(US)&regionCode=US-NY-111&q=Henslow%27s%20Sparrow%20-%20Ammodramus%20henslowii

All input welcome, either here or privately.

Karen Fung
NYC

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Date: 5/30/18 9:30 pm
From: Joe DiCostanzo <jdicost...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Henslow's Sparrow at Shawangunk Grasslands NWR, Ulster Co. 05/30/2018
Here is a link to my eBird checklist
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46165624 that contains pictures and a
recording of the Henslow's Sparrow found on Wednesday afternoon, May 30, at
the Shawangunk Grasslands NWR. It was down the Red Loop trail that starts at
the corner of the parking area and goes past the gazebo and platform. As you
go down the trail it crosses a dry channel. The bird was actively calling
and perching up about 50 feet or so past the dry channel, mainly on the
right side of the trail.



Joseph DiCostanzo



www.greatgullisland.org <http://www.greatgullisland.org/>

www.inwoodbirder.blogspot.com <http://www.inwoodbirder.blogspot.com/>




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Date: 5/30/18 4:56 pm
From: Arie Gilbert <ArieGilbert...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Re: [nysbirds-l] Henslow’s Sparrow at Shawangunk Grasslands, Ulster Co.
Congrats Joe!  ( wish I had your hearing )

On 5-26, Ian Resnick, Arlene Rawls, and I birded Shawangunk.  We Crossed
paths with Shai Mitra and Pat Lindsey, the former had informed us that
he believed he had heard a Henslow's Sparrow.

Our group walked to the blind where one had been last year, and then
down to the next blind, and Ian though he heard a faint / distant bird.
Neither Arlene or I heard it , and all who had seemed to think it was
distant and or calling faintly, and not often and loudly as the one last
year had done.

Ian and I were musing about the following... Is there any merit to the
thought that a bird -hoping- for a mate would sing loudly and
frequently, while one who may have attracted one would be more demure?

thoughts?

Arie Gilbert
North Babylon, NY

WWW.Powerbirder.blogspot.com
 WWW.qcbirdclub.org

Where's That Bird? Maps to Local Birding Hotspots!
http://www.qcbirdclub.org/birding-site-maps



On 5/30/2018 5:56 PM, Joseph DiCostanzo wrote:
> Singing Henslow’s Sparrow this afternoon at the Shawangunk Grasslands NWR. Down the red loop trail past the gazebo, about fifty feet past a dry channel.
>
> Joe DiCostanzo
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> --
>
> NYSbirds-L List Info:
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>
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>
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> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
> --
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>


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Date: 5/30/18 2:56 pm
From: Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Henslow’s Sparrow at Shawangunk Grasslands, Ulster Co.
Singing Henslow’s Sparrow this afternoon at the Shawangunk Grasslands NWR. Down the red loop trail past the gazebo, about fifty feet past a dry channel.

Joe DiCostanzo

Sent from my iPad

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Date: 5/30/18 12:12 pm
From: Robert Lewis <rfermat...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Golden-winged Warblers at Ironwood Road
The previously reported Golden-wings can still be found at Ironwood Road, Orange County, but it is not easy.
The parking lot is here:  41.234666, -74.237770

I visited on May 29 and May 30.  I talked to a number of other birders.
One can walk both north and south along the power lines.  Going north, however, means you have to walk up a quite steep hill.  I passed on that.  Someone said if you do that and go half a mile you could find a Brewster's.
Going south, on the 29th a Golden-wing was reported here:  41.233091, -74.237365.  That is just slightly south of the apartments, which you can see.  I didn't see or hear anything there.
The best spot I found was a bit farther south.  After going up over the first rocky hill, continue down hill a hundred fifty yards or so to a wet low area 41.230688, -74.236466.  There are a lot of dead bushes or small trees. I found a Golden-wing apparently mated to a Blue-winged here, on the right.  The Golden-winged was singing a Blue-winged song.  I took two poor photos that I will post to the New York Birder's Facebook page.
I also heard a Blue-winged song close to the parking lot here: 41.234409, -74.238008.
Get there early.  The birds have become secretive.  There are also Prairie and Yellow warblers around.

I saw no sign of bears, but I did encounter two enormous snapping turtles at the start of the trail today.  Almost stepped on one.
Bob LewisSleepy Hollow NY


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Date: 5/29/18 6:02 pm
From: Pat Martin <emartin139...>
Subject: Re:[nysbirds-l] [cayugabirds-l] Montezuma Today May 29th, 2018- Red Knot, Red-Necked Phalarope
Hi All,
We were indeed correct that our Phalarope today was a different bird
than the one Dave Kennedy had yesterday. See his ebird report from
today, which contains lovely pictures (in good light) of our male or
molting female bird.
Pat Martin

-----Original Message-----
From: David Nicosia
Sent: May 29, 2018 8:46 PM
To: Cayuga birds , NY Birds , <broomebirds...>
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Montezuma Today May 29th, 2018- Red Knot,
Red-Necked Phalarope



All,
I had a change of plans and am not going to the NJ coast for
shorebirds. So I decided to try Montezuma again for shorebirds and
amazingly I had a pretty awesome day. Good weather usually
doesn't mean rare birds for me. That was false today!
First stop was Tschache Pool Tower and I could see a fair number
of mainly peeps very distant with one larger shorebird. It was
very shimmery so I decided to go to Rte 89 and look from there. At
this time I was unaware of Dave Kennedy's earlier report of a Red
Knot here. So I looked from Rte 89 and saw the grouping of
shorebirds but they were too close to the top of the weeds on the
dike so I couldn't ID much. Then an eagle flew over and the birds
took flight and I got great views of a RED KNOT in breeding
plumage with the peeps. The peeps flew around a couple more times
and the Knot stayed in with them offering great scope views in
flight. Then I went back to the tower as they appeared to be
closer than earlier. Maybe I could get a better look. But I was
fortunate enough to run into Pete Sar and Jackie Baker who were
doing the refuge survey at Tschache. They were gracious enough to
let me ride with them and I got much closer views of this great
bird. The irony is that is the main specie I go for to see in NJ!
The list for Tschache that I compiled can be found here with poor
photos of the knot. The shimmer was awful. https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46130168
Then after this, I headed over to wildlife drive and there are
still 7 REDHEADS main pool, one GREATER YELLOWLEGS Seneca Flats.
The Snowy Egret was not present at Eaton at this time. Benning
Marsh was fairly quiet too.
Then I hit the north side of the drive and, WOW, a large flock of
shorebirds! Most of the birds were SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS.
There were also quite a few DUNLIN including one still in basic /
non-breeding plumage. I found at least 5 WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERS
but it was hard to keep track of numbers as the birds were flying
around from mudflat to mudflat across from the Eagle sculpture. Then,
I got on a RED-NECKED PHALAROPE! Jay texted me that there was one
on wildlife drive yesterday. So I assumed this was the same one.
But looking at photos of yesterday vs today, this one was duller.
Not sure if it is a male or a duller female. In any event, another
great bird!!
Who needs to go to NJ!! This was a ton of fun and it was great
birding with Ann Mitchell and Pat Martin as they joined me at the
thruway ponds to see the Phalarope! My list is below for wildlife
drive with poor photos of the RNPH and others(lighting was
horrible):
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46135318

Best,
Dave Nicosia--Cayugabirds-L List Info:Welcome and BasicsRules and
InformationSubscribe, Configuration and LeaveArchives:The Mail
ArchiveSurfbirdsBirdingOnThe.NetPlease submit your observations to
eBird!--

--NYSbirds-L List Info:Welcome and Basics Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and LeaveArchives:The Mail ArchiveSurfbirdsABAPlease
submit your observations to eBird!--
 

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Date: 5/29/18 5:46 pm
From: David Nicosia <daven102468...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Montezuma Today May 29th, 2018- Red Knot, Red-Necked Phalarope
All,

I had a change of plans and am not going to the NJ coast for shorebirds. So
I decided to try Montezuma again for shorebirds and amazingly I had a
pretty awesome day. Good weather usually doesn't mean rare birds for me.
That was false today!

First stop was Tschache Pool Tower and I could see a fair number of mainly
peeps very distant with one larger shorebird. It was very shimmery so I
decided to go to Rte 89 and look from there. At this time I was unaware of
Dave Kennedy's earlier report of a Red Knot here. So I looked from Rte 89
and saw the grouping of shorebirds but they were too close to the top of
the weeds on the dike so I couldn't ID much. Then an eagle flew over and
the birds took flight and I got great views of a RED KNOT in breeding
plumage with the peeps. The peeps flew around a couple more times and the
Knot stayed in with them offering great scope views in flight. Then I went
back to the tower as they appeared to be closer than earlier. Maybe I could
get a better look. But I was fortunate enough to run into Pete Sar and Jackie
Baker who were doing the refuge survey at Tschache. They were gracious
enough to let me ride with them and I got much closer views of this great
bird. The irony is that is the main specie I go for to see in NJ!

The list for Tschache that I compiled can be found here with poor photos of
the knot. The shimmer was awful. https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46130168

Then after this, I headed over to wildlife drive and there are still 7
REDHEADS main pool, one GREATER YELLOWLEGS Seneca Flats. The Snowy Egret
was not present at Eaton at this time. Benning Marsh was fairly quiet too.

Then I hit the north side of the drive and, WOW, a large flock of
shorebirds! Most of the birds were SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS. There were
also quite a few DUNLIN including one still in basic / non-breeding
plumage. I found at least 5 WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERS but it was hard to keep
track of numbers as the birds were flying around from mudflat to mudflat
across from the Eagle sculpture.
Then, I got on a RED-NECKED PHALAROPE! Jay texted me that there was one on
wildlife drive yesterday. So I assumed this was the same one. But looking
at photos of yesterday vs today, this one was duller. Not sure if it is a
male or a duller female. In any event, another great bird!!

Who needs to go to NJ!! This was a ton of fun and it was great birding
with Ann Mitchell and Pat Martin as they joined me at the thruway ponds to
see the Phalarope! My list is below for wildlife drive with poor photos of
the RNPH and others(lighting was horrible):

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46135318

Best,
Dave Nicosia

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Date: 5/29/18 3:07 pm
From: kevin rogers <kev31317...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Roseate Tern Nickerson Beach
Hi everybody there's at least one Roseate Tern hanging around at Nickerson by the East tern Colony right now 6:03 pm-Kev

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Date: 5/29/18 2:58 pm
From: Mardi Dickinson <mardi1d...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] David Toews Ph.D., Warbler Hybrids & Genomics - BirdCallsRadio
Birders et al,

Thought many of you would be interested in my next guest David Toews Ph.D on Warbler Hybrids & Genomics https://bit.ly/2akUsxp

Cheers,
Mardi Dickinson
Norwalk CT
https://kymrygroup.com


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Date: 5/29/18 12:23 pm
From: Steve Walter <swalter15...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Forest Park Prothonotary Warbler
A Prothonotary Warbler made a couple of visits to the Forest Park (Queens)
waterhole around mid-day. Less surprising for the date was a Gray-cheeked
Thrush, which soon took off from the area of the waterhole, delivering its
flight call just as it was whizzing past my ear. The Yellow-throated Vireo
continues. The brief duration of its singing suggests that the waterhole
area may be away from the its territory - if it is maintaining one. But this
rare Queens breeder is staying in the park - for now.



Steve Walter

Bayside, NY


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Date: 5/29/18 3:15 am
From: Ken F <feustel...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Chuck-will's-widows on South Country Road, Quogue (Suffolk Co.)
Monday evening Sue and I traveled to the Quogue/Westhampton Beach area to listen for nightjars. We were not disappointed as we heard three distinct calling Chuck’s at different locations along South Country Road. After striking out on Old Meeting House Road (the one on the east side of Quantuck Creek) we returned to the Quogue Wildlife Refuge parking lot on the south side of South Country Road, where we heard a faintly calling Chuck’s on the south side of the railroad tracks but some distance away. We drove through the subdivision east of Old Meeting House Road but were unable to hear the bird from that location.

We then headed west on South Country Road to listen for Whip-poor-will’s, when we heard a second Chuck’s calling at mid-distance on the south side of South Country Road. A third, and much closer Chuck’s was calling a short distance down the road on the north side of South Country Road (audio obtained). We then proceeded to Stewart Ave. in Westhampton Beach, across from Gabreski Airport where at least two Whip-poor-will’s were calling.

Back in the day, when Chuck’s occurred in western Suffolk County, I recall seeing a nest of Chuck’s with two chicks at Oak Beach, but this is the first time we have heard three adults calling in a single trip. Nice!

Ken & Sue Feustel
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Date: 5/28/18 5:08 pm
From: Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Pacific Loon and Black(-ish) Brant, Nassau County, LI
Ken & Sue Feustel and Doug Futuyma found a likely Pacific Loon in partial breeding plumage at Nickerson Beach this morning, and Pat and I were able to re-find it and observe a definitive combination of features: size and structure in direct comparison to Red-throated Loon, and combination of gray head, black face and throat, and a partly white-checkered panel on the back. The bird was quite distant and difficult at best to observe, and Pat and I lost it entirely as it began feeding actively and drifting westward from the area in front of the eastern tern colony. Tom Burke and Gail Benson were unable later to find any candidate loon in the area.

The earlier observers were not able to see the white markings on the back and were further concerned that the nape did not appear pale, resulting in some uncertainty. I agree that the nape didn't look pale, but nevertheless feel confident ruling out both Common (of which three basic plumaged individuals were present) and Red-throated Loon (of which four basic and one alternate plumaged individuals were present).

After leaving Nickerson, Pat and I ran into Doug at nearby Lido Preserve (roughly opposite Nickerson, on the bay side). While conducting a moderately careful counting of the Brant (much diminished since last week), I found a non-hrota Brant resembling Pacific Black Brant in most ways, but the absolute tone of its dark, extensive apron was definitely paler than expected on orientalis, and more like that of Gray-bellied Brant (nigricans). The neck collar was quite bold and possibly complete in the front (we weren't sure about this), the rear edge of the apron was pretty well-defined (as in Black and unlike Gray-bellied), and the head had the blocky, straight-profiled appearance I associate with Black Brant, so it is perhaps best interpreted as a variant, or worn/faded Black Brant. I'll post an update after I get a chance to look at my photos.

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore, NY
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Date: 5/28/18 2:35 pm
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Mon., May 28, 2018 - 11 Species of Wood Warblers & Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Central Park NYC
Monday, May 28, 2018
OBS: Robert DeCandido,PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob.

Highlights: 11 Species of Wood Warblers including Black-throated Green and Chestnut-sided Warblers, & Ruby-throated Hummingbird.

Mallard - 4 Lake
Mourning Dove - a few at feeders and in the Ramble
Chimney Swift - 2 over the Lake
Ruby-throated Hummingbird - Hernshead
Herring Gull - flyover
Double-crested cormorant - 4 Lake and a couple of fyovers
Great Egret - flew over the Lake landing on the west side of the Point
Black-crowned Night-Heron - 2 adults (Bow Bridge Island & Wagner Cove)
Red-tailed Hawk - young bird standing in Fifth Ave. nest
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3 (Warbler Rock, Summer House, & the Oven)
Downy Woodpecker - male at the Oven
Northern Flicker - 2 or 3 (2 Warbler Rock, 1 Summer House)
Eastern Wood-Pewee - 3 (Peter Haskel)
Empidonax Flycatcher - 2 (Humming Tombstone, south end of Maintenance Field)
Great Crested Flycatcher - 1 or 2 (Swampy Pin Oak & Mugger's Woods)
Warbling Vireo - singing in 4 locations
Red-eyed Vireo - 7Blue Jay - several residents
White-breasted Nuthatch - north of Evodia Field (Bob & Deb - early)
House Wren - south side of Maintenance Field (Bob & Deb - afternoon)
Swainson's Thrush - east side of Mugger's Woods
American Robin - resident, nesting
Gray Catbird - resident pairs
European Starling - noisy juveniles around
Cedar Waxwing - 2 bathing at the Oven, others in Mugger's Woods
Baltimore Oriole - 3 adult males, occupied nest at Maintenance Field
Red-winged Blackbird - 4 (3 males, female at Bow Bridge displaying to male)
Common Grackle - scattered around the Ramble and around the shore of the Lake
Ovenbird - 3
Black-and-white Warbler - 3 females
Common Yellowthroat 3 (1 male, 2 female)
American Redstart - 8 to 10 (one adult male)
Northern Parula - 2 females (Summer House, Bow Bridge)
Magnolia Warbler - 8 (1 adult male)
Chestnut-sided Warbler - female Hernshead
Blackpoll Warbler - 7 or 8 (3 males, 5 or 6 females) (David Barrett)
Black-throated Blue Warbler - female on the Point
Black-throated Green Warbler - female Humming Tombstone
Canada Warbler - 2 females (Bow Bridge & Summer House)
Scarlet Tanager - 1st-spring male (probably the same bird at Warbler Rock & Summer House)
Northern Cardinal - residents

Deb Allen
Follow us on twitter @BirdingBobNYC & @DAllenNYC

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Date: 5/28/18 12:18 pm
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] eBird.org: Recent Additions to County Checklists
When working on the NYS eBird Hotspots wiki I'll compare the previous bar
chart list of species with the current one picking up any additions or
deletions. By going to each county's 'Overview' page you can determine the
date the species was added by county. Some are from newly submitted
checklists from many months / years ago.

It isn't possible to spot these additions from old checklists. On the
'Overview' page you can sort on 'First Seen' but if the species wasn't
added recently it won't appear at the top of the list.

For each county on the NYS eBird Hotspots site click the 'Overview' link on
the 'Explore a Location' line:
http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Birding+in+New+York

Since last update: 32 days

Green represents a New York State first and yellow highlights a species
added for the first time over the past few weeks.

*Allegany County: <http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Allegany>*
Northern Waterthrush (11-May-2018)
Harris's Sparrow (3-May-2018)

*Bronx County: <http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Bronx>*
Red Phalarope (17-Apr-2018)

*Broome County: <http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Broome>*
Red-necked Phalarope (20-May-2018)

*Chemung County: <http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Chemung>*
White-eyed Vireo (12-May-2018)

*Delaware County: <http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Delaware>*
Black-bellied Plover (16-May-2018)

*Jefferson County: <http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Jefferson>*
Snowy Egret (17-May-2018)

*Kings County: <http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Kings>*
Arctic Tern (19-May-2018)

*Montgomery County: <http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Montgomery>*
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher (23-May-2018)

*New York County: <http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/New York>*
Bell's Vireo (11-May-1950)
Kirtland's Warbler (11-May-2018)
LeConte's Sparrow (17-Mar-1996)

*Putnam County: <http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Putnam>*
Mississippi Kite (4-May-2018)
Bonaparte's Gull (23-Apr-2012)

*Suffolk County: <http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Suffolk>*
Whooper Swan (11-Mar-1993)

*Tioga County: <http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Tioga>*
Whimbrel (20-May-2018)
Golden-winged Warbler (4-May-2018)

*Washington County: <http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Washington>*
Little Gull (29-Apr-2018)

*Wayne County: <http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Wayne>*
Worm-eating Warbler (3-May-2018)

--
Ben Cacace
Manhattan, NYC
Wiki for NYS eBird Hotspots
<http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Birding+in+New+York>
Facebook Discussion for NYS eBird Hotspots: Q & A
<https://www.facebook.com/groups/NYeBirdHotspots/>

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Date: 5/28/18 10:53 am
From: Sy Schiff <icterus...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Another possible kite
On 26 May at Hempstead Lake SP, a large very high overflying raptor caused a bit of a stir. It was overcast, the bird was high flying, visible marks not apparent. No consensus from the birders who saw the bird, although a Mississippi Kite was noted as a possible suspect. That was my first impression based solely on shape and movement. Some ebird birders reported - Raptor, Sp.
Seeing Tim Healy’s post---- now, I wonder????

Sy Schiff

Sent from Mail for Windows 10


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Date: 5/28/18 10:02 am
From: Andrew Block <ablock22168...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Kites everywhere!
It's interesting the number of Mississippi Kites being reported in the last two days in NY, RI, and CT.  Yesterday two were in CT, two in RI, and one on LI reported all within an hour of each other and then the one now on LI.  Hopefully they are going to be nesting.  It's a good sign that two of the reports were of pairs.  This is the greatest number I remember being reported so close together in the area.
Andrew Andrew v. F. Block
Consulting Naturalist
20 Hancock Avenue, Apt. 3
Yonkers, Westchester Co., New York 10705-4629 
www.flickr.com/photos/conuropsis/albums
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Date: 5/28/18 7:43 am
From: Timothy Healy <tph56...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Mississippi Kite, Hempstead Lake State Park, Nassau
I just had a Mississippi Kite circling low over the treetops near Schodack Pond at Hempstead Lake SP. It was a second year individual with a banded tail. I lost the bird as it kept looping once some kingbirds flew up to harass it, it was low enough that it became obscured by the foliage. I’m currently standing where the view of the sky is more open and keeping an eye out.

Cheers!
-Tim H
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Date: 5/27/18 5:25 am
From: Thomas Robben <robben99...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] openings for June 3rd pelagic trip from Gloucester MA
June 3rd Sunday : 6 -hour PELAGIC TRIP from Gloucester MA.
We still have tickets available for June 3rd.
Combining seabirds with whales, fish, plankton, and marine biology.
What is out there, off the coast, at this time of year?
There were 40! humpback whales there yesterday!
Get registration and payment info and links at this site:

http://trips33.blogspot.com

This trip replaces the May 19th trip, due to weather.


Thank you,
Tom Robben
robben99 AT gmail.com

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Date: 5/26/18 3:34 pm
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Sat., May 26, 2018 - 8 Species of Wood Warblers, Blue-gray Gnatctcher, Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Central Park NYC
Saturday, May 26, 2018
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob.

Highlights: A slow day, warm and breezy, but 8 Species of Wood Warblers, Blue-gray Gnatctcher, and Ruby-throated Hummingbird topped the list.

Canada Goose - 14 adults and 10 goslings (2 broods) Reservoir
Mallard - 14 Reservoir, others at Turtle Pond, Azalea Pond, etc.
Mourning Dove - residents
Chimney Swift - a few
Ruby-throated Hummingbird - male hill west of Boathouse (Russell Burke)
American Coot - continues SW Reservoir
Herring Gull - 55 Reservoir
Great Black-backed Gull - 5 Reservoir
Double-crested Cormorant - 13 Reservoir
Great Egret - flyover Turtle Pond
Red-tailed Hawk - flyover seen from Warbler Rock
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3 (s. of Evodia Field & pair Summer House)
Downy Woodpecker - male south of Evodia Field
Northern Flicker - 3 (pair & lone male Summer House)
Eastern Wood-Pewee - very vocal at Upper Lobe Lawn
Great Crested Flycatcher - 1 or maybe 2 pairs in the Ramble
Eastern Kingbird - pair continues at Turtle Pond
Warbling Vireo - 4
Red-eyed Vireo - 2 or 3 pairs in the Ramble
Blue Jay - residents
Barn Swallow - at least 4 north end Reservoir
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - male north end Upper Lobe (reported at female earlier)
Gray Catbird - resident pairs (most nests in dense shrubs)
Northern Mockingbird - heard NE Reservoir
Cedar Waxwing - 25+ (a dozen at Gill Overlook, at least 5 at the Oven, 8 Upper Lobe, etc.)
House Finch - 2 juveniles feeding on lawn north end Reservoir
Song Sparrow - singing north end Reservoir
Baltimore Oriole - 5 (3 adult males Warbler Rock, lone male & pair with nest Maintenance Field)
Red-winged Blackbird - 2 males (singing at the Oven & Turtle Pond)
Common Grackle - residents
Black-and-white Warbler - female NW of Iphigene's Walk
Common Yellowthroat - female on the Point
American Redstart - 4 (David Barrett & Russell Burke)
Northern Parula - 3 females (Muggger's Woods, Summer House, Upper Lobe)
Magnolia Warbler - 3 (1 Balancing Rock (Peter Haskel), 2 Warbler Rock)
Yellow Warbler - female Warbler Rock (Barbara Green)Chestnut-sided Warbler - Swedish Cottage
Blackpoll Warbler - 2 (male Gill Overlook, female Summer House)
Northern Cardinal - residents

--
The young Peregrine Falcons in the nest on Central Park West at 62-63rd Street are getting big enough to be seen easily from Central Park.

Junko Suzuki @junconyc photographed a Yellow-billed Cuckoo at the Turtle Pond Dock this morning sending out a report via twitter. See @BirdCentralPark, maintained by David Barrett, for NY County bird tweets.

Deb Allen
Follow us on twitter @BirdingBobNYC & @DAllenNYC

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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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Date: 5/26/18 2:58 pm
From: Andrew Block <ablock22168...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Mississippi Kite, East Hampton
Nice bird Anthony.  That's the 5th kite seen within the last hour in NY, CT, and RI.  Two were just seen in CT, two in RI, and yours.  That's the most in one day I've heard of in our general area.
Andrew Andrew v. F. Block
Consulting Naturalist
20 Hancock Avenue, Apt. 3
Yonkers, Westchester Co., New York 10705-4629 
www.flickr.com/photos/conuropsis/albums

From: Anthony Collerton <icollerton...>
To: <NYSBIRDS-L...>
Sent: Saturday, May 26, 2018 5:45 PM
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Mississippi Kite, East Hampton

Just had a kite soaring over my yard in Northwest Harbor.  Drifting North towards Cedar Point.  Photos.

Sent from my iPhone
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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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Date: 5/26/18 2:45 pm
From: Anthony Collerton <icollerton...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Mississippi Kite, East Hampton
Just had a kite soaring over my yard in Northwest Harbor. Drifting North towards Cedar Point. Photos.

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 5/26/18 11:39 am
From: Steve Walter <swalter15...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Forest Park Summer Tanager, Mourning Warbler
A Summer Tanager, looking like a year old male, made a couple of visits to
the Forest Park waterhole in late morning and mid-day. A Mourning Warbler
also made a brief appearance around the waterhole, while singing once or
twice. A Yellow-throated Vireo also sang and appeared, as it passed through
the waterhole area. It's kind of late for this species to be migrating, so
there is a potential for a rare Queens nesting. Or maybe just a "floater"
trying to figure out where to go.



Steve Walter

Bayside, NY


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Date: 5/26/18 5:52 am
From: Jose Ramirez-Garofalo <jose.ramirez.garofalo...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Red-necked Phalarope - Breezy Pt
I’ve got a breeding plumage Red-necked Phalarope off of the bayside of
Breezy- in water right in front of the path leading to the fisherman’s lot

Jose
--
José Ramírez-Garofalo

Research Assistant
College of Staten Island

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Date: 5/25/18 9:13 pm
From: Gail Benson <gbensonny...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] NYC Area RBA: 25 May 2018
-RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* May 25, 2018
* NYNY1805.25

- Birds Mentioned

RUFF+
ARCTIC TERN+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

Cackling Goose
Canada Goose
Black-bellied Plover
AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVER
WHIMBREL
Iceland Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
GULL-BILLED TERN
BLACK TERN
Roseate Tern
Black Skimmer
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Black-billed Cuckoo
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER
Pileated Woodpecker
Olive-sided Flycatcher
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
Acadian Flycatcher
Alder Flycatcher
PHILADELPHIA VIREO
Gray-cheeked Thrush
Bicknell’s Thrush
PROTHONOTARY WARBLER
Mourning Warbler
KENTUCKY WARBLER
Cape May Warbler
Bay-breasted Warbler
YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER
CLAY-COLORED SPARROW
LARK SPARROW
SUMMER TANAGER
BLUE GROSBEAK
DICKCISSEL

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report
electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at
http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to
nysarc44<at>nybirds<dot>org

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or
sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compilers: Tom Burke and Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Gail Benson

[~BEGIN RBA TAPE~]

Greetings! This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, May 25, 2018 at
9:00 pm.

The highlights of today’s tape are RUFF, ARCTIC, GULL-BILLED and BLACK
TERNS, AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVER, WHIMBREL, PROTHONOTARY, YELLOW-THROATED and
KENTUCKY WARBLERS, SUMMER TANAGER, BLUE GROSBEAK, DICKCISSEL, LARK and
CLAY-COLORED SPARROWS, PHILADELPHIA VIREO, RED-HEADED WOODPECKER and more.

An interesting week, even as spring migration starts to wind down. A great
find Tuesday afternoon was the RUFF spotted around the temporary pools at
Field 7 in Heckscher State Park. Sporting a mostly blackish plumage with
some brownish highlights, the RUFF on Wednesday drifted between Fields 6
and 7, generally with some BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS, but seemed to move on
overnight. Another highlight for those watching the RUFF early Wednesday
was a calling DICKCISSEL passing overhead to the west. A CACKLING GOOSE
with a small flock of CANADA GEESE was also very unexpected there Wednesday.

Another good find was an ARCTIC TERN nicely photographed last Saturday on
the flats at Plumb Beach in Brooklyn; it disappeared soon thereafter, but a
ROSEATE TERN there hung around longer. Another adult ARCTIC TERN was
photographed Wednesday near the tern and BLACK SKIMMER colonies at
Nickerson Beach west of Point Lookout. Nickerson also produced three
GULL-BILLED TERNS Tuesday, plus two ROSEATE TERNS Wednesday and a BLACK
TERN Thursday. Other GULL-BILLED TERNS were reported from Robert Moses
State Park last Saturday and Plumb Beach Thursday.

An ICELAND GULL Saturday at Robert Moses State Park was in company with the
week’s largest count of LESSER BLACK- BACKED GULLS, with 38 estimated
between parking lots 2 and 5 and along the ocean beach.

Most notable among the increasing numbers of shorebirds gathering mostly
along the Atlantic inlets were an AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVER reported from the
marsh off the Lido Passive Sanctuary on the north side of Lido Boulevard
last Sunday and a count of 32 WHIMBRELS flying north past Great Kills Park
on Staten Island Wednesday.

Interesting among the WOODPECKERS, two RED-HEADEDS were seen together
Thursday at Connetquot River State Park and a PILEATED WOODPECKER was
spotted today at Caumsett State Park.

Despite declining WARBLER numbers and species totals, a decent mix
continues, highlighted by a PROTHONOTARY in Central Park to Monday, a
KENTUCKY there Sunday, an increase in the numbers of the later moving
MOURNING, and the continuation of some CAPE MAY, BAY-BREASTED and the
like. YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER is presumably nesting in Bayard Cutting
Arboretum, so please do nothing that would disturb this very rare breeder
in our area.

That also pertains to such species as SUMMER TANAGER and BLUE GROSBEAK.
Migrant SUMMER TANAGERS featured two in Central Park Tuesday and adult
males found at Breezy Point last Sunday, on Governors Island on Monday, and
in Prospect Park Wednesday. A BLUE GROSBEAK also visited Governors Island
last Sunday.

A LARK SPARROW found last Friday at Shore Road Park in Brooklyn was still
being seen there through Sunday, and a CLAY-COLORED SPARROW was
photographed in Brooklyn’s Green-wood Cemetery on Wednesday.

Interesting this spring have been the frequency of reports of PHILADELPHIA
VIREO, usually sparse as a spring migrant here – Central Park has reported
a few to Tuesday, and one was nicely photographed in Prospect Park on
Wednesday.

The THRUSHES have been well represented, with singing BICKNELL’S THRUSHES
reported last Sunday from Central and Forest Parks as well as at Coney
Island Creek Park. GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSHES have also been widely noted.

All ten species of eastern FLYCATCHERS were recorded this week, including
several OLIVE-SIDED and a few YELLOW-BELLIED, ALDER and ACADIAN.

Both YELLOW-BILLED and BLACK-BILLED CUCKOOS have also been noted in
increasing numbers.

To phone in reports, on Long Island call Tony Lauro at (631) 734 4126 or
call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922 and leave a message.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the
National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript

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Date: 5/25/18 12:43 pm
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Fri., May 25, 2018 - 10 Species of Wood Warblers at the North End
Central Park - North End, NYC
Friday, May 25, 2018
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, m.ob.

Highlights: 10 Species of Wood Warblers and a House Wren carrying nesting material.

Canada Goose - 11 Harlem Meer
Mallard - 5 Meer
Mourning Dove - 5
Chimney Swift - 6 incl. one getting a drink at the Meer
Herring Gull - flyover
Double-crested Cormorant - 6 (5 flyovers, 1 at the Meer)
Great Egret - flyover (David Barrett)
Red-tailed Hawk - adult flyover on the west side
Red-bellied Woodpecker - pair Blockhouse
Downy Woodpecker - pair east side of the Great Hill
Northern Flicker - male west side of the Loch
Eastern Wood-Pewee - 2 North Woods
Empidonax Flycatcher - North woods
Eastern Kingbird - pair Harlem Meer
Warbling Vireo - 3 pairs (n. side Meer, Conservatory Garden, e. side Great Hill)
Red-eyed Vireo - 2 pairs (e. Loch, e. Great Hill-same place as last year)
Blue Jay -residents along the Loch
Barn Swallow - 1 Harlem Meer
House Wren - east side Wildflower Meadow carrying nesting material
Swainson's Thrush - 2 Blockhouse
American Robin - many residents, adult feeding young in nest at the Loch
Gray Catbird - common, resident pairs
Cedar Waxwing - 30 in Tuliptree near Blockhouse
Baltimore Oriole - 4 (3 males & 1 female - Great Hill & Fort Clinton)
Red-winged Blackbird - male chasing female Brown-headed Cowbird at the Meer
Brown-headed Cowbird - female chased by male Red-winged Blackbird at the Meer
Common Grackle - 4 or 5
Black-and-white Warbler - 4 females
Common Yellowthroat - 2 females (Loch & West side Wildflower Meadow)
American Redstart - 9 (2 adult makes, 7 female/immature males)
Northern Parula - 5 (2 male, 3 female)
Magnolia Warbler - 4 (2 male, 2 female)
Yellow Warbler - male Fort Clinton
Chestnut-sided Warbler -west side of Wildflower Meadow (Bob - early)
Blackpoll Warbler - 6 females
Black-throated Blue Warbler - 3 females west side Wildflower Meadow
Canada Warbler - female west side Wildflower Meadow
Northern Cardinal - residents

Deb Allen
Follow us on twitter @BirdingBobNYC & @DAllenNYC

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Date: 5/25/18 10:20 am
From: Ken Feustel <feustel...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Pileated Woodpecker at Caumsett State Park (Suffolk Co.)
Seen and heard in woods west of Fresh Pond. A Long Island first for us!

Ken & Sue Feustel

Sent from my iPhone

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Date: 5/25/18 8:18 am
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Thu., May 24, 2018 - 12 Species of Wood Warblers incl. Mourning Warbler
Central Park NYC
Thursday, May 24, 2018
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, m.ob.

Highlights: 12 Species of Wood Warblers including Mourning Warbler. A Common Nighthawk (continuing female) chased by an Eastern Kingbird, a late Field Sparrow, and a continuing Green Heron.

Canada Goose - 4 (2 flyovers, 2 Turtle Pond/Great Lawn)
Mallard - 5 Turtle Pond
Mourning Dove - 9 Evodia Field feeders

Common Nighthawk - female feeding over East Drive & Turtle Pond, chased by Turtle Pond resident E. Kingbird (Bob - 5:15am), roosting later at Maintenance Field.

Chimney Swift - 6 over Turtle Pond, one chased by the resident Eastern Kingbird (Bob - 5:15am)

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1 or 2 females (Summer House & Laupot Bridge)
Herring Gull - flyovers
Double-crested cormorant - 5 flyovers
Green Heron - Upper Lobe
Black-crowned Night-Heron - 2 Turtle Pond (5 others 59 St. Pond (S. Critelli))
Red-tailed Hawk - adult East 74th Street
Red-bellied Woodpecker - pair at Tupelo Field
Downy Woodpecker - pair at Oak Bridge
Northern Flicker - 2 (female Upper Lobe, male Warbler Rock)
Eastern Wood-Pewee - 3 heard in Ramble
Empidonax Flycatcher
Great Crested Flycatcher - pair Oak Bridge to Warbler Rock
Eastern Kingbird - 2 Turtle Pond (see Common Nighthawk & Chimney Swift)
Warbling Vireo - 4 (pair Turtle Pond, pair Oak Bridge)
Red-eyed Vireo - 5
Blue Jay - pair collecting nesting material Turtle Pond (Bob - 5:15am)
Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 2 Turtle Pond (Bob - 5:15am)
Barn Swallow - 4 Turtle Pond (Bob - 5:15 am)
White-breasted Nuthatch - Evodia Field feeders
House Wren - Shakespeare Garden
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - Upper Lobe
Veery - singing in Ramble
Swainson's Thrush - 3
American Robin - residents, many nesting, juvenile at Tanner's Spring (Deb)
Gray Catbird - pairs in Ramble
Northern Mockingbird - Tupelo Field (1pm Deb with Ethan Goodman)
Cedar Waxwing - a dozen flyovers
American Goldfinch - 2 females Upper Lobe

Field Sparrow - Tanner's Spring (Deb 3:37pm), late for Central Park, not a record date

Baltimore Oriole - 4 pairs in the Ramble
Red-winged Blackbird - 3 (2 males Turtle Pond, male bathing at Oven (Deb))
Common Grackle - 5Ovenbird - 1 in Ramble
Northern Waterthrush - 2 (Swampy Pin Oak & Upper Lobe)
Black-and-white Warbler - 5 (4 females, 1 first-spring male)
Mourning Warbler - prob. first-spring male giving partial songs Swedish Cottage
Common Yellowthroat - 3 females
American Redstart - 7 (females and immature males)
Northern Parula - 8 (2 males, 6 females)
Magnolia Warbler - 8 (2 males, 6 females)
Yellow Warbler - 7 (2 males, 5 females)
Chestnut-sided Warbler - 2 females (Swampy Pin Oak & Shakespeare Garden)
Blackpoll Warbler - 13 (3 males, 10 females)
Black-throated Blue Warbler - 3 females
Scarlet Tanager - female Tanner's Spring (Deb 4:26pm)
Northern Cardinal - residents, nest in Shakespeare Garden appears abandoned
Indigo Bunting - male Tanner's Spring (Deb around 3:40pm & later)

--
Deb Allen
Follow us on twitter @BirdingBobNYC & @DAllenNYC

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Date: 5/24/18 5:13 pm
From: Peter Reisfeld <drpinky...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Doodletown Road, Bear Mountain
Today I made my annual pilgimmage to Doodletown Road.  By the time I had climbed up Gray’s hill I had most of my target birds, with singing ceruleans, yellow-throated vireos, indigo buntings, a yellow billed cuckoo, a singing Louisiana waterthrush,  a blue winged warbler, a worm-eating warbler, and hooded in the background.  But when I ran into a bunch of Queens and Long Island birding buddies leaving the First June cemetery things really kicked up a notch.

After a stop at the other June cemetery, we headed up Doodletown road to see if the Kentucky warbler was in it’s usual spot.  On the way Eric Miller found a female Cape may warbler in a thin, bittersweet-covered tree.  Then we saw an olive-sided flycatcher in a bare tree a bit further up the road.  I had to take a personal call and missed the pileated in the woods past the stream.  When I headed up the hill to see if I could catch up with it, the I got the surprise of the day.  Eric called out  that he has found a golden winged warbler in a meadow south of the road.  It was a first at Doodletown for pretty much everyone there.  

We missed the Kentucky, but got scattering of other birds including multiple worm-eatings, ceruleans, cuckoos, a few more warblers found by Eric including magnolia, BT green, and canada, another olive sided flycatcher, and even a timber rattlesnake along Pleasant Valley road.  When we were all done I had seen or heard 16 species of warbler for a great day of birding.
Wishing you good birding days as well,

Peter





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Date: 5/24/18 10:16 am
From: Colleen Veltri <cfinneganv...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Tri-colored Hero
Tri-colored heron Cow Meadow county park Nassau county NY. On platform at end of trail.

May the birds be with you.

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 5/24/18 7:40 am
From: matt klein <matt.klein...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Ruff - No
Still not here but the puddles look very inviting.

... to be continued.

On May 23, 2018, at 4:35 PM, Deborah Martin <martindf...><mailto:<martindf...>> wrote:

Ruff has left and returned within 5 minutes to puddles at Heckscher field 7 at least 3 times in last 30-40 minutes. Here now at 4:34 pm.

On May 23, 2018, at 3:08 PM, Tyler Goldstein <tylergoldstein98...><mailto:<tylergoldstein98...>> wrote:

still present! seen from my new ride..."life bird"

Tyler Goldstein
Jericho, NY

On Wednesday, May 23, 2018, harry Maas <hdmaas101...><mailto:<hdmaas101...>> wrote:
As of 2:28 pm, remains in pools on Field 7, Herkscher State Park.

I am switching all email from <hmaas...><mailto:<hmaas...> to my <hdmaas101...><mailto:<hdmaas101...> ,NUSBII Please send all emails to this address going forward. Thank you! -Harrya& to ds
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Date: 5/24/18 7:35 am
From: Purbita <bitasaha...>
Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] Ruff at Heckscher Park - NO (Suffolk Co.)
Hi Larry, 
I think your sentiment of deescalating tensions is great, but comparing feuds between birders and photographers with police brutality of black Americans is off base. I'll stop there to not distract from the point of the listserv. Anyone can email me personally to talk more. 
Happy birding,Purbita Saha




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-------- Original message --------From: Larry Trachtenberg <Trachtenberg...> Date: 5/24/18 10:13 AM (GMT-05:00) To: Karen McCaffrey <kmccaffr...>, Gus Keri <guskeri...>, Mike <mikec02...> Cc: Ken F <feustel...>, <NYSBIRDS-L...> Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] Ruff at Heckscher Park - NO (Suffolk Co.)


 
Photographers definitely can be incredibly inconsiderate and chase away rare (or not rare) birds (and then deny it).  Indeed, I remember the Gyrfalcon (like Ruff a bird
I have never seen) spooked by a photographer at Blue Chip Farms who sacrilegiously uses the moniker “LarryBird.”  However, I am not sure calling the police is really the way to go.   So whether it’s birders v. photographers (redux), or anything of far more
import in this world, not likely to change anytime soon.  In the words of Rodney King, c. 1992  -- who suffered a far greater indignity than missing a ruff or a gyrfalcon:   
 
“People, I just want to say, you know, can we all get along? Can we get along? … I mean, we’re all stuck here for a while. Let’s try to work it out . . .”  (Yeah,
sure.)
 
Go Celts.

 
L. Trachtenberg
Ossining

 

 


From: <bounce-122595008-26736881...> [mailto:<bounce-122595008-26736881...>]
On Behalf Of Karen McCaffrey

Sent: Thursday, May 24, 2018 9:42 AM

To: Gus Keri <guskeri...>; Mike <mikec02...>

Cc: Ken F <feustel...>; <NYSBIRDS-L...>

Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] Ruff at Heckscher Park - NO (Suffolk Co.)


 
While, that is a viable punishment, safety of the bird is paramount and birders will have to be birders and do their own due diligence.  In other words, find your own dam birds instead of chasing a list.

Just my opinion, YMMV.
 

Karen McCaffrey

 


From:
<bounce-122594973-76105490...> [mailto:<bounce-122594973-76105490...>]
On Behalf Of Gus Keri

Sent: Thursday, May 24, 2018 9:28 AM

To: Mike <mikec02...>

Cc: Ken F <feustel...>;
<NYSBIRDS-L...>

Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Ruff at Heckscher Park - NO (Suffolk Co.)


 


Why is the solution always to punish the good birders who only want to enjoy looking at these rare birds?


Why not punishing the misbehaving birders/photographers?


If you see someone breaking the law by harassing a migratory bird or stepping on restricted area to get closer to it, call the police and photograph them being arrested. Then
post their photo on social media and let it be a lesson to all the misbehaving birders.


This collective punishment doesn’t help any bird or birder.


Gus


 

Sent using
Zoho Mail



 


---- On Thu, 24 May 2018 05:41:35 -0700 Mike<mikec02...>
wrote ----


 



Probably another successful chase away thanks to the photographers on the scene last night who relentlessly chased the bird from one pool to the other despite being told that
the bird was best observed and photographed from the car.  

 


Unfortunately the solution may be to no longer post birds to the list until after they’re gone. 


 


Mike Cooper


Ridge, LI

Sent from my iPhone




On May 24, 2018, at 8:22 AM, Ken F <feustel...>
wrote:



The previously reported Ruff at Heckscher State Park was not relocated this morning at about 7:00AM. However, it may still be here but becoming more elusive.

 


Ken Feustel


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Date: 5/24/18 7:13 am
From: Larry Trachtenberg <Trachtenberg...>
Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] Ruff at Heckscher Park - NO (Suffolk Co.)

Photographers definitely can be incredibly inconsiderate and chase away rare (or not rare) birds (and then deny it). Indeed, I remember the Gyrfalcon (like Ruff a bird I have never seen) spooked by a photographer at Blue Chip Farms who sacrilegiously uses the moniker “LarryBird.” However, I am not sure calling the police is really the way to go. So whether it’s birders v. photographers (redux), or anything of far more import in this world, not likely to change anytime soon. In the words of Rodney King, c. 1992 -- who suffered a far greater indignity than missing a ruff or a gyrfalcon:

“People, I just want to say, you know, can we all get along? Can we get along? … I mean, we’re all stuck here for a while. Let’s try to work it out . . .” (Yeah, sure.)

Go Celts.

L. Trachtenberg
Ossining


From: <bounce-122595008-26736881...> [mailto:<bounce-122595008-26736881...>] On Behalf Of Karen McCaffrey
Sent: Thursday, May 24, 2018 9:42 AM
To: Gus Keri <guskeri...>; Mike <mikec02...>
Cc: Ken F <feustel...>; <NYSBIRDS-L...>
Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] Ruff at Heckscher Park - NO (Suffolk Co.)

While, that is a viable punishment, safety of the bird is paramount and birders will have to be birders and do their own due diligence. In other words, find your own dam birds instead of chasing a list.
Just my opinion, YMMV.

Karen McCaffrey

From: <bounce-122594973-76105490...><mailto:<bounce-122594973-76105490...> [mailto:<bounce-122594973-76105490...>] On Behalf Of Gus Keri
Sent: Thursday, May 24, 2018 9:28 AM
To: Mike <mikec02...><mailto:<mikec02...>>
Cc: Ken F <feustel...><mailto:<feustel...>>; <NYSBIRDS-L...><mailto:<NYSBIRDS-L...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Ruff at Heckscher Park - NO (Suffolk Co.)

Why is the solution always to punish the good birders who only want to enjoy looking at these rare birds?
Why not punishing the misbehaving birders/photographers?
If you see someone breaking the law by harassing a migratory bird or stepping on restricted area to get closer to it, call the police and photograph them being arrested. Then post their photo on social media and let it be a lesson to all the misbehaving birders.
This collective punishment doesn’t help any bird or birder.
Gus


Sent using Zoho Mail<https://www.zoho.com/mail/>

---- On Thu, 24 May 2018 05:41:35 -0700 Mike<mikec02...><mailto:<mikec02...>> wrote ----

Probably another successful chase away thanks to the photographers on the scene last night who relentlessly chased the bird from one pool to the other despite being told that the bird was best observed and photographed from the car.

Unfortunately the solution may be to no longer post birds to the list until after they’re gone.

Mike Cooper
Ridge, LI
Sent from my iPhone

On May 24, 2018, at 8:22 AM, Ken F <feustel...><mailto:<feustel...>> wrote:
The previously reported Ruff at Heckscher State Park was not relocated this morning at about 7:00AM. However, it may still be here but becoming more elusive.

Ken Feustel
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Date: 5/24/18 6:50 am
From: Robert Lewis <rfermat...>
Subject: Re: RE: [nysbirds-l] Ruff at Heckscher Park - NO (Suffolk Co.)
No.  Not the answer. That would be a throwback to two generations ago when there was an "old boys network" and everyone else was locked out.
Bob LewisSleepy Hollow NY

On Thursday, May 24, 2018, 9:42:27 AM EDT, Karen McCaffrey <kmccaffr...> wrote:


While, that is a viable punishment, safety of the bird is paramount and birders will have to be birders and do their own due diligence.  In other words, find your own dam birds instead of chasing a list.

Just my opinion, YMMV.

 

Karen McCaffrey

 

From: <bounce-122594973-76105490...> [mailto:<bounce-122594973-76105490...>]On Behalf Of Gus Keri
Sent: Thursday, May 24, 2018 9:28 AM
To: Mike <mikec02...>
Cc: Ken F <feustel...>; <NYSBIRDS-L...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Ruff at Heckscher Park - NO (Suffolk Co.)

 

Why is the solution always to punish the good birders who only want to enjoy looking at these rare birds?

Why not punishing the misbehaving birders/photographers?

If you see someone breaking the law by harassing a migratory bird or stepping on restricted area to get closer to it, call the police and photograph them being arrested. Then post their photo on social media and let it be a lesson to all the misbehaving birders.

This collective punishment doesn’t help any bird or birder.

Gus

 

Sent usingZoho Mail

 

---- On Thu, 24 May 2018 05:41:35 -0700 Mike<mikec02...> wrote ----

 


Probably another successful chase away thanks to the photographers on the scene last night who relentlessly chased the bird from one pool to the other despite being told that the bird was best observed and photographed from the car.  

 

Unfortunately the solution may be to no longer post birds to the list until after they’re gone. 

 

Mike Cooper

Ridge, LI

Sent from my iPhone


On May 24, 2018, at 8:22 AM, Ken F <feustel...> wrote:


The previously reported Ruff at Heckscher State Park was not relocated this morning at about 7:00AM. However, it may still be here but becoming more elusive.

 

Ken Feustel

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Date: 5/24/18 6:48 am
From: Karen McCaffrey <kmccaffr...>
Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] Ruff at Heckscher Park - NO (Suffolk Co.)
While, that is a viable punishment, safety of the bird is paramount and birders will have to be birders and do their own due diligence. In other words, find your own dam birds instead of chasing a list.
Just my opinion, YMMV.

Karen McCaffrey

From: <bounce-122594973-76105490...> [mailto:<bounce-122594973-76105490...>] On Behalf Of Gus Keri
Sent: Thursday, May 24, 2018 9:28 AM
To: Mike <mikec02...>
Cc: Ken F <feustel...>; <NYSBIRDS-L...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Ruff at Heckscher Park - NO (Suffolk Co.)

Why is the solution always to punish the good birders who only want to enjoy looking at these rare birds?
Why not punishing the misbehaving birders/photographers?
If you see someone breaking the law by harassing a migratory bird or stepping on restricted area to get closer to it, call the police and photograph them being arrested. Then post their photo on social media and let it be a lesson to all the misbehaving birders.
This collective punishment doesn’t help any bird or birder.
Gus


Sent using Zoho Mail<https://www.zoho.com/mail/>

---- On Thu, 24 May 2018 05:41:35 -0700 Mike<mikec02...><mailto:<mikec02...>> wrote ----

Probably another successful chase away thanks to the photographers on the scene last night who relentlessly chased the bird from one pool to the other despite being told that the bird was best observed and photographed from the car.

Unfortunately the solution may be to no longer post birds to the list until after they’re gone.

Mike Cooper
Ridge, LI
Sent from my iPhone

On May 24, 2018, at 8:22 AM, Ken F <feustel...><mailto:<feustel...>> wrote:
The previously reported Ruff at Heckscher State Park was not relocated this morning at about 7:00AM. However, it may still be here but becoming more elusive.

Ken Feustel
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Date: 5/24/18 6:28 am
From: Gus Keri <guskeri...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Ruff at Heckscher Park - NO (Suffolk Co.)




Why is the solution always to punish the good birders who only want to enjoy looking at these rare birds?Why not punishing the misbehaving birders/photographers?If you see someone breaking the law by harassing a migratory bird or stepping on restricted area to get closer to it, call the police and photograph them being arrested. Then post their photo on social media and let it be a lesson to all the misbehaving birders.This collective punishment doesn’t help any bird or birder.GusSent using Zoho Mail---- On Thu, 24 May 2018 05:41:35 -0700 Mike<mikec02...> wrote ----Probably another successful chase away thanks to the photographers on the scene last night who relentlessly chased the bird from one pool to the other despite being told that the bird was best observed and photographed from the car.  Unfortunately the solution may be to no longer post birds to the list until after they’re gone. Mike CooperRidge, LISent from my iPhoneOn May 24, 2018, at 8:22 AM, Ken F <feustel...> wrote:The previously reported Ruff at Heckscher State Park was not relocated this morning at about 7:00AM. However, it may still be here but becoming more elusive.Ken Feustel -- NYSbirds-L List Info: Welcome and Basics Rules and Information Subscribe, Configuration and Leave Archives: The Mail Archive Surfbirds ABA Please submit your observations to eBird! -- -- NYSbirds-L List Info: Welcome and Basics Rules and Information Subscribe, Configuration and Leave Archives: The Mail Archive Surfbirds ABA Please submit your observations to eBird! --







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Date: 5/24/18 5:41 am
From: Mike <mikec02...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Ruff at Heckscher Park - NO (Suffolk Co.)
Probably another successful chase away thanks to the photographers on the scene last night who relentlessly chased the bird from one pool to the other despite being told that the bird was best observed and photographed from the car.

Unfortunately the solution may be to no longer post birds to the list until after they’re gone.

Mike Cooper
Ridge, LI

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 24, 2018, at 8:22 AM, Ken F <feustel...> wrote:
>
> The previously reported Ruff at Heckscher State Park was not relocated this morning at about 7:00AM. However, it may still be here but becoming more elusive.
>
> Ken Feustel
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Date: 5/24/18 5:23 am
From: Ken F <feustel...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Ruff at Heckscher Park - NO (Suffolk Co.)
The previously reported Ruff at Heckscher State Park was not relocated this morning at about 7:00AM. However, it may still be here but becoming more elusive.

Ken Feustel
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Date: 5/24/18 4:58 am
From: Larry Trachtenberg <Trachtenberg...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Croton Point
On a brief landfill walk this morning I saw two grasshopper sparrows (one singing, the other nicely perched up), saw several bobolinks - heard more. No meadowlark(s) and do not know if they are present this spring. There are (at least) 5 Purple Martins using the martin house by the park office and 3 Cliff Swallows were pulling mud at the ball field puddle at the park entrance. And to boot, of course, finally a beautiful spring morning.

L. Trachtenberg
Ossining

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Date: 5/23/18 7:31 pm
From: Joseph Fell <jfell2000...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Common Nightgawk, Swainson’s Thrushes
I had 1 Common Nighthawk earlier this evening. Currently 5 or more
Swainson’s Thrushes have passed over the house in downtown Buffalo.

Joe Fell
<Jfell2000...>

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Date: 5/23/18 7:02 pm
From: Steve Walter <swalter15...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Ruff at Heckscher SP Suffolk
For those who might be interested, I've posted a picture of the Ruff at my
web site http://stevewalternature.com/ . Pictures taken from my old ride.
And from what I saw, that's the way to do it. Trying to walk toward it is
not advisable. And staking it out at the field 7 pools seems like the best
approach to seeing it.



Steve Walter

Bayside, NY


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Date: 5/23/18 1:35 pm
From: Deborah Martin <martindf...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Ruff
Ruff has left and returned within 5 minutes to puddles at Heckscher field 7 at least 3 times in last 30-40 minutes. Here now at 4:34 pm.

> On May 23, 2018, at 3:08 PM, Tyler Goldstein <tylergoldstein98...> wrote:
>
> still present! seen from my new ride..."life bird"
>
> Tyler Goldstein
> Jericho, NY
>
>> On Wednesday, May 23, 2018, harry Maas <hdmaas101...> wrote:
>> As of 2:28 pm, remains in pools on Field 7, Herkscher State Park.
>>
>> I am switching all email from <hmaas...> to my <hdmaas101...> ,NUSBII Please send all emails to this address going forward. Thank you! -Harrya& to ds
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Date: 5/23/18 12:41 pm
From: Tyler Goldstein <tylergoldstein98...>
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Ruff
still present! seen from my new ride..."life bird"

Tyler Goldstein
Jericho, NY

On Wednesday, May 23, 2018, harry Maas <hdmaas101...> wrote:

> As of 2:28 pm, remains in pools on Field 7, Herkscher State Park.
>
> I am switching all email from <hmaas...> to my <hdmaas101...>
> ,NUSBII Please send all emails to this address going forward. Thank you!
> -Harrya& to ds
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Date: 5/23/18 12:11 pm
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Weds., May 23, 2018 - Mourning Warbler & 16 other Species of Wood Warblers, Common Nightlawk
Central Park NYC
Wednesday, May 23, 2018
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, m.ob.

Highlights: 17 Species of Wood Warblers including Mourning Warbler, continuing Common Nighthawk and Green Heron.

Canada Goose - 5 (1 Reservoir, 4 Great Lawn) & flyovers
Mallard - 6
Mourning Dove - 5
Common Nighthawk - north end Maintenance field (continuing bird)
Chimney Swift - a dozen at the Reservoir
Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 2 females (1 Shakespeare Garden, 1 ranging from Gill Overlook to Summer House)
Herring Gull - 5 Reservoir
Great Black-backed Gull - 3 Reservoir
Double-crested Cormorant - 11 (8 Reservoir, 3 Turtle Pond)
Green Heron - Upper Lobe
Black-crowned Night-Heron - Upper Lobe
Red-bellied Woodpecker - male Gill Overlook area (female may be on eggs)
Downy Woodpecker - 2 Upper Lobe, chasing each other
Northern Flicker - male Gill Overlook to Summer House (female may be on eggs)
Eastern Wood-Pewee - several heard in Ramble (Carine Mitchell)
Great Crested Flycatcher - pair Summer House to Gill Overlook (not nesting yet)
Eastern Kingbird - pair Turtle Pond
Warbling Vireo - pair continues at Turtle Pond Dock
Red-eyed Vireo - 8
Blue Jay - residents
Barn Swallow - 6 Reservoir
Swainson's Thrush - 3
American Robin - residents
Gray Catbird - several pairs in Ramble (Warbler Rock, Gill Overlook, Shakespeare Garden, etc.)
Cedar Waxwing - pair collecting nesting material Willow Oak Turtle Pond Dock
House Finch - male Bald Cypress Turtle Pond Dock
Eastern Towhee - female between Gill Overlook & Summer House (lone bird, not nesting)
White-throated Sparrow - Warbler Rock
Baltimore Oriole - 4 pairs (Turtle Pond, Gill Overlook, 2 pairs Warbler Rock)
Red-winged Blackbird - 2 (adult male and first-spring male) Turtle Pond
Common Grackle - 5 (Turtle Pond incl. female on nest in Willow Oak)
Ovenbird - Riviera Hill
Northern Waterthrush - 3
Black-and-white Warbler - 2 (first-spring male Warbler Rock, female Point)
Nashville Warbler - male Tupelo Field
Mourning Warbler - male Shakespeare Garden
Common Yellowthroat - 5 (4 female, 1 male)
American Redstart - 18 (1 adult male, 12 females, 5 immature males)
Northern Parula - 21 (3 male, 18 female)
Magnolia Warbler - 15 (3 male, 12 female)
Blackburnian Warbler - female Tupelo Field (David Barrett)
Yellow Warbler - 7 (2 male, 5 female)
Chestnut-sided Warbler - 2 adult males (Upper Lobe & Tupelo Field)
Blapckpoll Warbler - 25 (5 male, 20 female)
Black-throated Green Warbler - adult male Turtle Pond Dock
Canada Warbler - 2 (male Riviera Hill, female Point)
Wilson's Warbler - male end of the Point
Northern Cardinal - residents

Deb Allen
Follow us on twitter @BirdingBobNYC & @DAllenNYC

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Date: 5/23/18 11:30 am
From: harry Maas <hdmaas101...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Ruff
As of 2:28 pm, remains in pools on Field 7, Herkscher State Park.

I am switching all email from <hmaas...> to my <hdmaas101...>
,NUSBII Please send all emails to this address going forward. Thank you!
-Harrya& to ds

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Date: 5/23/18 10:14 am
From: Mickey Scilingo <mickey.scilingo...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Oneida Lake Islands in Constantia


I had a very good morning viewing the islands in Oneida Lake in Constantia from Mill Street after the fog lifted. I arrived around 9:20 and immediately found a group of 22 DUNLIN on Grassy Island (the nearest island.) I next found a group of a dozen or so BRANT floating around the near side of the rocks of Long Island. Aside from the Dunlin, I couldn't find any other shorebirds on the islands. After about an hour, a nice-sized flock of large brown shorebirds flew through my scope view and started to circle around the islands - WHIMBREL!! I spent a good 6 to 7 minutes watching them fly around and around and back and forth over the islands. Twice, it appeared that they were going to land - once on Grassy Island and the second time on Long Island - but instead, they continued to circle aimlessly. Finally, after about a half dozen laps, they continued on their way westward down the lake and out of my sight.


Not too long after the excitement of the Whimbrel, another flock of 40 or so shorebirds caught my attention. Originally found flying low along the rocks of Long Island, the BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS mimicked what the Whimbrel did and passed back and forth around the islands for a few minutes before moving on westward down the lake. As they flew away, I was able to count 32 individuals. I eventually saw another half-dozen Plovers pass the islands and picked out another 15 perched on the rocks.


Back on Grassy Island, the Dunlin numbers seemed to diminish to a handful, until something caused all of the birds on the island to fly up. I'm not sure what they reacted to, as I did not see any reason for the disruption, but the Dunlins flock circled around for a bit and I was able to count at least 38 in the group before they settled down again, with most landing out of view.


A few other notable birds that I saw were 3 WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS, 5 COMMON LOONS, 4 RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS, 2 MERLIN, and a singing BLACKPOLL WARBLER in the tree behind me. I pasted my eBird list below beneath my signature.


Mickey Scilingo
Constantia, Oswego County
<mickey.scilingo...>
315-679-6299




Oneida Lake, Constantia (Mill St. parking area)
May 23, 2018
9:20 AM
Stationary
147 minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments:

90 Brant -- Group of 15 hanging around the rocky islands and a large group of 75 flying past.
12 Canada Goose -- 4 pair with young
1 Wood Duck -- Female that flew across the bay with an egg in her mouth to the shoreline of the peninsula to the west of the viewing site, where she left it floating in the lake.
5 Mallard
3 White-winged Scoter (North American)
4 Red-breasted Merganser
5 Common Loon
77 Double-crested Cormorant
1 Osprey
53 Black-bellied Plover -- Groups of 32 and 6 flew past and 15 more were found perching on the rocks.
62 Whimbrel -- Flock of large brown shorebirds with long decurved bills. Circled the islands several times before moving west down Oneida Lake.
38 Dunlin -- Small shorebirds with broad black belly patches. Originally counted 22, but later saw at least 38.
1 Spotted Sandpiper
X Ring-billed Gull
X Herring Gull
3 Great Black-backed Gull
X Common Tern
2 Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)
3 Mourning Dove
1 Belted Kingfisher
1 Downy Woodpecker (Eastern)
2 Merlin
1 Eastern Phoebe
1 Great Crested Flycatcher
2 Warbling Vireo (Eastern)
1 Blue Jay
2 American Crow
13 Purple Martin
X Barn Swallow
1 Tufted Titmouse
1 American Robin
2 European Starling
1 Blackpoll Warbler
1 Chipping Sparrow
1 Song Sparrow
1 Baltimore Oriole
X Red-winged Blackbird
2 Common Grackle

Number of Taxa: 38




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Date: 5/23/18 9:49 am
From: Isaac Grant <hosesbroadbill...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] 32 Whimbrel at Great Kills on Staten Island
Last seen flying north towards Brooklyn.

Isaac Grant
Senior Loan Officer

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Date: 5/23/18 4:43 am
From: Patricia Lindsay <pjlindsay...>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Arctic and Roseate Terns Nickerson Beach Nassau Co.
Shai Mitra reports an adult Arctic Tern and two Roseate Terns at
Nickerson. I had three Gull-billed Terns there yesterday, and a Humpback
Whale was moving west off shore..


Patricia Lindsay
Bay Shore



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