CountyBirders
Received From Subject
5/27/20 2:41 pm jim lomax <sdrib...> [countybirders] Solano and Yolo Counties
5/27/20 9:26 am John Sterling <jsterling...> [countybirders] Alder flycatcher
5/26/20 1:00 pm jim lomax <sdrib...> [countybirders] Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, and Kern Counties
5/24/20 5:38 pm jim lomax <sdrib...> [countybirders] Santa Clara and Alameda Counties
5/18/20 5:20 pm DEBRA SHEARWATER <debiluv...> [countybirders] <countybirders-noreply...> [CB] SBT COUNTY: YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER
5/18/20 10:12 am John Sterling <jsterling...> [countybirders] Favor To Ask - El Rico Pay Station Hotspot
5/17/20 11:01 pm jim lomax <sdrib...> [countybirders] Contra Costa and San Benito Counties
5/17/20 10:50 pm DEBRA SHEARWATER <debiluv...> [countybirders] <countybirders-noreply...> [CB] SBT COUNTY: YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER
5/17/20 3:27 pm John Sterling <jsterling...> [countybirders] Yellow thr Warbler in San Benito county
5/13/20 10:02 am Dan Singer <dsg2...> [countybirders] [pen-bird] Apparent Kentucky Warbler in Pacifica
5/12/20 5:01 pm John Sterling <jsterling...> Re: [countybirders] [pen-bird] Apparent Kentucky Warbler in Pacifica
5/10/20 5:08 pm jim lomax <sdrib...> [countybirders] Yuba County
5/9/20 3:55 pm jim lomax <sdrib...> [countybirders] Lassen and El Dorado Counties
5/8/20 10:00 am Frances Oliver <hummer52...> [countybirders] Cancellation of NOVEMBER 2020 CV Birding Symposium
5/7/20 9:44 pm Dominik Mosur via groups.io <polskatata=<yahoo.com...> Re: [countybirders] Modoc County Big Day 5/4/2020 188 species (long)
5/7/20 4:17 pm Logan Kahle <logan...> [countybirders] Modoc County Big Day 5/4/2020 188 species (long)
5/5/20 5:34 pm jim lomax <sdrib...> [countybirders] Yuba County
5/4/20 8:18 pm jim lomax <sdrib...> Re: [countybirders] Sonoma County
5/4/20 8:04 pm Ruth Rudesill <ruthier...> Re: [countybirders] Sonoma County
5/4/20 7:11 pm jim lomax <sdrib...> [countybirders] Sonoma County
5/3/20 5:05 pm jim lomax <sdrib...> [countybirders] Calaveras and Yuba Counties
5/3/20 9:58 am Ruth Rudesill <ruthier...> [countybirders] Scissor-tailed Flycatcher Bodega Bay Sonoma Co
5/1/20 2:01 pm Jim Rowoth <rowoth...> [countybirders] Repost re: Kiln Canyon/Carnegie ORV SRA
4/29/20 9:29 pm James Laughlin via groups.io <ja_laughlin=<yahoo.com...> [countybirders] Sutter County Mini Big Day Results
4/29/20 12:41 pm jim lomax <sdrib...> [countybirders] Del Norte County
 
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Date: 5/27/20 2:41 pm
From: jim lomax <sdrib...>
Subject: [countybirders] Solano and Yolo Counties
’s up dogs?

Solano County Wednesday May 27th

Arrived at the South Fork (Putah Creek) Preserve, parked, and walked west along the creek about a mile or so going past the discarded icebox and past the alleged Wood Thrush spot about 50 to 100 yards. Here, after a few minutes, I heard the bird and then a few minutes later saw the YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT. As I was leaving I got a post from Mike Perone on What'sApp who was in the Grasslands Park located at Mace Boulevard and Tremont Road.


Yolo County Wednesday May 27th

I arrived and parked in the parking lot of Grasslands fifteen minutes later and walked north from the parking lot to find Mike Perone and Steve Hampton with another birder along the grass opening between the rows of archery lanes. They were near lane 25 and 26 where they last had the bird. During the next two and a half hours, I was able to see the KENTUCKY WARBLER well twice with full body looks once 50 feet away in a tree, and once 8 feet away under a bush on the ground but in full sun through the bush. The rest of the time I caught glimpses or flying by looks. It called a lot but not constantly and could go quiet for long periods of time. Other birders included Jim Holmes, Todd Easterly, John Luther, Frances Oliver, Liz West, Zane Pickus, Aaron Maizlish, Mark Sawyer, and Linda Gal. I left at 1115 as the temperature was closing in on 100. Home by 1230.


“Truckin’ like the do-dah man”,

Jim Lomax
Solitary Birder
from No Particular Place

Not at all sure where I’ve been, but I’m not starting over again.

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Date: 5/27/20 9:26 am
From: John Sterling <jsterling...>
Subject: [countybirders] Alder flycatcher
Still here this morning but difficult to get looks. Be patient. Primarily in westernmost willow on west pond on north side of golf course at California City.

Butterbredt spring was quiet this morning. Few migrants. Best was female cassins finch and summer tanager
John Sterling
530 908-3836
26 Palm Ave
Woodland, CA 95695

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Date: 5/26/20 1:00 pm
From: jim lomax <sdrib...>
Subject: [countybirders] Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, and Kern Counties
’s up dogs?

Left home at 0100 to go see one bird but as the day progressed, a couple of others became evident.

Santa Barbara County Monday May 25th

Arrived in Goleta early and proceeded to Camino Corto Open Space. Could not find the bird in the area reported and after awhile gave up. Then an hour later read that it was refound and went back. Birders were now searching west of the reported area and along West Campus Land and West Campus Point Lane. Along with a few other birders, finally saw the WHITE-EYED VIREO both along the Willows and Oaks north of West Campus Lane and the Willows west of West Campus Point Lane. Confusing I know.


San Luis Obispo Monday May 25th

Checked my phone and headed for Los Osos. I stopped to look for the reported Hooded Warbler but the area didn’t look right and checked my phone again. I discovered another bird was found by Jim Royer and reported down the road. Proceeded to the skate park located at the corner of Los Osos Valley Road and Palisades Avenue. Took awhile and the continued help of two very nice young boys and their mother, all of who could hear, but finally got very good looks of the YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER in the Eucalyptus Trees at the southwest corner of the park. Then Curtis Marantz called.


Kern County Monday May 25th

Arrived in California City and parked along Village Parkway on the north side of California City Boulevard at 1730 and walked north towards the pond with the Willows and reeds. Spoke with Tom Benson and Brittany O’Conner as they were leaving having seen the bird. Got to the pond and joined Nancy and Ron Overholtz, Guy McCaskie, Andy and Vern Howe, Jon Dunn, Kris Dunlap, a couple of other birders I don’t know, and later joined by Bob and Susan Steele. During the next two hours everyone got looks of the ALDER FLYCATCHER. Guy and I had our scopes and had very good looks when the bird, which it will, flew over the fence out of the pond area landing of twigs and snags in the adjacent weedy field and on top of a Creosote Bush. Long day. Home by 0120.


“Truckin’ like the do-dah man”,

Jim Lomax
Solitary Birder
from No Particular Place

Not at all sure where I’ve been, but I’m not starting over again.


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Date: 5/24/20 5:38 pm
From: jim lomax <sdrib...>
Subject: [countybirders] Santa Clara and Alameda Counties
’s up dogs?

Santa Clara County Friday May 22nd

Stopped at Almaden/Alamitos/Bertram Road about 1300, parked, and walked onto the sacred ground with the red holy building, whereupon I heard/saw the male NORTHERN PARULA in the Pine Trees on the west side. Very nice.


Alameda County Sunday May 24th

Sheree and I met Ethan Monk around mm 6.25 on Patterson Pass Road at 1505 hrs this afternoon. Ethan pointed out the area of the bird and as we watched, Ethan spotted it again and got us on the beautiful WHITE-EYED VIREO which periodically hopped up into plain view and/or sang several times during the half hour we were there. Thanks to Steve Huckabone for finding and reporting it and many thanks to Ethan for waiting there and helping us to see it.


“Truckin’ like the do-dah man”,

Jim Lomax
Solitary Birder
from No Particular Place

Not at all sure where I’ve been, but I’m not starting over again.

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Date: 5/18/20 5:20 pm
From: DEBRA SHEARWATER <debiluv...> [countybirders] <countybirders-noreply...>
Subject: [CB] SBT COUNTY: YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER
Howdy, Birders,

The previously reported YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER continued throughout the day, singing non-stop. I swear, I’m getting hoarse just hearing all the singing.

I arrived about 8:15 a.m. today. Again, I could hear it singing from where I parked my car. It showed very, very well and would have made photographers very happy this morning— the yellow feathers lighting up in the morning sun. No other birders were around. The two RED-NECKED PHALAROPES were still present on the pond.

This afternoon, I stopped by about 3:10 p.m. Once again, the Yellow-throated Warbler could be heard singing away. It was still in the pine trees where it seems to be finding plenty of food. Five other birders showed up. It was a life bird for two of these folks! The warbler was lower down in the pine trees. It is quite breezy this afternoon as is usual in Hollister. I did not see the Red-necked Phalaropes.

Good luck and good birding, everyone!
Happy Trails,
Debi Shearwater

DEBRA SHEARWATER
Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
PO Box 190
Hollister, CA 95024
831.637.8527
<debi...>
www.shearwaterjourneys.com
www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com

Celebrating 44 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
Siberia’s Forgotten Coast & Spoon-billed Sandpiper- 23 June - 6 July 2020
Northeast Passage: Northern Sea Route 27 July - 22 August 2020





 

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Date: 5/18/20 10:12 am
From: John Sterling <jsterling...>
Subject: [countybirders] Favor To Ask - El Rico Pay Station Hotspot


Begin forwarded message:

> From: Bob Barnes <bbarnes...>
> Date: May 18, 2020 at 10:08:29 AM PDT
> To: John Sterling <jsterling...>, Steve Summers <summers...>
> Subject: Favor To Ask - El Rico Pay Station Hotspot
> Reply-To: Bob Barnes <bbarnes...>
>
> John, Steve:
>
> Can you/will you please post this to the CalBirds/county birders/Central Valley (John) & Tulare/Kings birds (Steve) list servs respectively?
>
> I can't think of a more effective way to reach birders who might have birded El Rico Pay Station in the 1970s (?),1980s & early 1990s before it was dismantled...
>
> Thanks, Bob
>
> Here's the message..
> .
> For those of you who in the past birded the now dismantled El Rico Pay Station in Kings County (former J.G. Boswell headquarters), that county's eBird reviewer, Mark Stacy, has created an El Rico Pay Station (Historical) eBird Hotpsot. I just finished merging three lists from my personal location for that spot into the new eBird hotspot. A lot of "good" birds were found there which if merged or added to the new hotspot data set would give a much clearer picture of that spots former glory (e.g. Harris's Sparrow, Praire Warlber, American Redstart, etc., etc, etc.).

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Date: 5/17/20 11:01 pm
From: jim lomax <sdrib...>
Subject: [countybirders] Contra Costa and San Benito Counties
’s up dogs>

Contra Costa County Saturday May 16th

Parked myself about 300 yards from Pinehurst Road on Canyon Road at a pullout where I could observe the telephone pole northeast of the intersection at 0630. This was my forth attempt for this bird. At 0730, the PILEATED WOODPECKER flew up and landed at the top of the pole and for the next 10 minutes drummed periodically as I and two other birders watched. Finally.


San Benito County Sunday May 17th

Got a call from Scott Terrill this afternoon and decided to leave. I arrived at Summer Road and Apricot Road near the Hollister Industrial Ponds about 1645 meeting other birders already there, but the bird hadn’t been seen in over an hour. We searched the area for the next hour and some left. Finally I walked to my car to leave and as I sat with the engine running, John Luther, who was there, called. I rushed back to the Pine Trees and there, was the beautiful YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER. With several others, I watched it for the next ten minutes just 20 feet up in the tree. Home by dark.


“Truckin’ like the do-dah man”,

Jim Lomax
Solitary Birder
from No Particular Place

Not at all sure where I’ve been, but I’m not starting over again.

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Date: 5/17/20 10:50 pm
From: DEBRA SHEARWATER <debiluv...> [countybirders] <countybirders-noreply...>
Subject: [CB] SBT COUNTY: YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER
Howdy, Birders,

Spring birding has been popping in San Benito County!

Late this afternoon, Scott Terrill found a singing YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER at the Hollister Industrial Ponds. This is a first record for San Benito County. I zipped over to the ponds and could hear the warbler singing as soon as I emerged from my car. It was very loud! About half an hour after I arrived, Steve Rottenborn arrived. Both Scott and Steve managed to get photos, and I think Scott made a recording. Here is Scott’s initial eBird checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69241206 <https://ebird.org/checklist/S69241206>

To find this warbler: Go to the intersection of Apricot Lane and Summer Drive. This is the only place where you can view the ponds. Note that the pin in eBird for this hot spot has not been moved to this location, yet. Please use the eBird hot spot and do not make a personal location, despite this. Park on the street. The park is officially closed and blocked. Walk down the embankment toward the river. The warbler has been hanging out in the three large pine trees. These are the only pine trees in the area. It did fly over to the river area, but always returned to the pines.

BE AWARE: There are many homeless encampments along this portion of the river. Be sure to lock your car and don’t walk away from your scope and forget it. Most of the homeless people are just fine, but it is best to be safe.

Steve Rovell showed and was still there after I had to head home. I note in eBird that at least 7 other birders saw the warbler this evening, including Steve. It may well be present tomorrow. It was actually there, yesterday, too.

OTHER BIRDS: While Scott, Steve Rottenborn and I were watching the warbler, Scott pointed out a PURPLE MARTIN flying overhead, and a WHIMBREL was calling and flying overhead, too. On the nearest pond two RED-NECKED PHALAROPES were found by Steve Rottenborn, yesterday and still present today. Also, in this general area for over a month there has been a LEUCISTIC RED-TAILED HAWK.

OTHER COUNTY NEWS/BIRDS:

On April 30, Alacia Welch saw a PILEATED WOODPECKER at Pinnacles National Park. This is the first confirmed sight record for the county. She reported it in eBird. The park has been closed due to COVID-19. It remains closed at this time.

However, yesterday, Steve Rottenborn heard another PILEATED WOODPECKER near the top of San Juan Canyon Road which leads to Fremont Peak State Park. Steve heard it well several times, but did not see this woodpecker. I went up yesterday morning, but neither saw nor heard the woodpecker. (On May 2 Steve found a PURPLE MARTIN in this area, as well.)

Fremont State Park is CLOSED due to CORVID-19. It is not possible to park at the turn around/entrance to the park. It is signed stating this, and it is closely monitored by park personnel. However, you can park at the wide pullout known in eBird as the hotspot, San Juan Canyon Road - coulter pine pullout. Do not block the gate. From there, you can walk uphill toward the summit. The usual migrants have been passing through and this is a good birding area.

If you go birding, please use the known hot spots in eBird. It’s time to be on the lookout for Black Tern and Black Swift.

Many thanks to Scott Terrill for nailing down this terrific find for San Benito County. And, many thanks to Steve Rottenborn for various reports. Thanks to John Sterling for getting the warbler news out on the county group list.

Good luck out there!
Happy Trails,
Debi Shearwater

DEBRA SHEARWATER
Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
PO Box 190
Hollister, CA 95024
831.637.8527
<debi...>
www.shearwaterjourneys.com
www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com

Celebrating 44 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys



 

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Date: 5/17/20 3:27 pm
From: John Sterling <jsterling...>
Subject: [countybirders] Yellow thr Warbler in San Benito county
Scott Terrill just called to report that he found a singing Yellow-throated Warbler in grove of pine trees at the Hollister Industrial Ponds in San Benito County. Its an ebird hotspot at Apricot and Summer road intersection.

good luck!

John Sterling
VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV

26 Palm Ave
Woodland, CA 95695

PO Box 1653
Woodland, CA 95776A

530 908-3836
<jsterling...>
www.sterlingbirds.com


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Date: 5/13/20 10:02 am
From: Dan Singer <dsg2...>
Subject: [countybirders] [pen-bird] Apparent Kentucky Warbler in Pacifica
Hi Birders,

As John mentioned, the spring of 1992 was indeed one to remember. For the many of you who were not birding then, here’s a brief summary from the California Bird Records Committee 18th annual report:

"This unprecedented invasion took place simultaneously with that of the Yellow-throated Vireo (V. flavifrons; 9 birds: see below), Northern Parula (Parula americana; 138 birds), Yellow-throated Warbler (Dendroica dominica: 6 birds: see below), Worm-eating Warbler (Helmitheros vermivorus: 8 birds: see below), Kentucky Warbler (Oporornis formosus: 36 birds: see below), and Hooded Warbler (Wilsonia citrina; 76 birds). This massive incursion of species breeding predominantly in the southeastern United States was discussed by Terrill et al. (1992): more complete details will be published elsewhere.”

Thanks to the efforts of Joe Morlan, information like this can now be easily gleaned from the CBRC website using the search function.

https://www.californiabirds.org/default.asp <https://www.californiabirds.org/default.asp>

Dan Singer
Marin County



> On May 12, 2020, at 17:01, John Sterling <jsterling...> <mailto:<jsterling...>> wrote:
>
> It’s looking like another spring of 1992 when the state had an unprecedented number of hooded and Kentucky warblers along with other southeastern species. Going to be a fun four weeks if I’m right.
> John Sterling
> 530 908-3836
> 26 Palm Ave
> Woodland, CA 95695
>
>> On May 12, 2020, at 4:21 PM, Joe Morlan <jmorlan...> <mailto:<jmorlan...>> wrote:
>>
>> This morning I heard an unusual song along San Pedro Creek in Pacifica. I
>> made some audio recordings which have been analyzed by Al Jaramillo and
>> others. They are a good match for Kentucky Warbler. However I did not
>> actually see the bird. The recordings are on my eBird list at:
>>
>> https://ebird.org/checklist/S68940561 <https://ebird.org/checklist/S68940561>
>>
>> Recordings are also on Xeno-Canto:
>>
>> https://www.xeno-canto.org/557569 <https://www.xeno-canto.org/557569>
>>
>> https://www.xeno-canto.org/557571 <https://www.xeno-canto.org/557571>
>>
>> https://www.xeno-canto.org/557572 <https://www.xeno-canto.org/557572>
>>
>> The bird was in the riparian along San Pedro Terrace Rd immediately east of
>> the Linda Mar Rehabilitation nursing facility. Please be respectful of the
>> nursing home residents and property.
>>
>> Stay well!
>> --
>> Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
>> "It turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>

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Date: 5/12/20 5:01 pm
From: John Sterling <jsterling...>
Subject: Re: [countybirders] [pen-bird] Apparent Kentucky Warbler in Pacifica
It’s looking like another spring of 1992 when the state had an unprecedented number of hooded and Kentucky warblers along with other southeastern species. Going to be a fun four weeks if I’m right.
John Sterling
530 908-3836
26 Palm Ave
Woodland, CA 95695

> On May 12, 2020, at 4:21 PM, Joe Morlan <jmorlan...> wrote:
>
> This morning I heard an unusual song along San Pedro Creek in Pacifica. I
> made some audio recordings which have been analyzed by Al Jaramillo and
> others. They are a good match for Kentucky Warbler. However I did not
> actually see the bird. The recordings are on my eBird list at:
>
> https://ebird.org/checklist/S68940561
>
> Recordings are also on Xeno-Canto:
>
> https://www.xeno-canto.org/557569
>
> https://www.xeno-canto.org/557571
>
> https://www.xeno-canto.org/557572
>
> The bird was in the riparian along San Pedro Terrace Rd immediately east of
> the Linda Mar Rehabilitation nursing facility. Please be respectful of the
> nursing home residents and property.
>
> Stay well!
> --
> Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
> "It turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt
>
>
>


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Date: 5/10/20 5:08 pm
From: jim lomax <sdrib...>
Subject: [countybirders] Yuba County
’s up dogs?

After consultation with a friend last night, I responded this morning to Fruitland Road about a mile and a half north of it's juncture with Iowa City Road. Here scanning and listening in the grassy field on the east side of the road, a GRASSHOPPER SPARROW eventually appeared on a stalk of weeds about a hundred meters out. Watched it preen and sing for awhile.

Before going home, I checked and the Costa’s Hummingbird is still in the same area on Forbestown Road higher up in the hills.


“Truckin’ like the do-dah man”,

Jim Lomax
Solitary Birder
from No Particular Place

Not at all sure where I’ve been, but I’m not starting over again.

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Date: 5/9/20 3:55 pm
From: jim lomax <sdrib...>
Subject: [countybirders] Lassen and El Dorado Counties
’s up dogs?

Lassen County Friday May 8th

Arrived in Susanville about 0640 and responded to the Susanville Effluent Ponds to look in from the outside road. There were about 30 Ibis but within 20 minutes or so, they took off before it was daylight enough for a good I.D.

Spent the morning at two different private residences looking for two hummingbirds seen recently. Finally, saw a BLACK-CHINNED HUMMINGBIRD and a BROAD-TAILED HUMMINGBIRD, both several times at a home in Susanville. Then back to the ponds by 1330.

It took until 1800 and everyone had left including me except as I hadn’t gotten out of the compound yet when a large flock of ibis flew in and landed. So I took a quick look and sure enough, added a GLOSSY IBIS. I called my friends back and the two people who were still in the area drove back and got good looks and photos. If I had been squared away and ready to leave when they did, I would have missed it. Home by midnight.


El Dorado County Saturday May 9th

Arrived at a private home in Placerville about 0700. Took about two hours to add both BLACK-CHINED HUMMINGBIRD and COSTA’S HUMMINGBIRD with several good looks at both. This is the fourth Costa’s Hummingbird I have added to new counties this year: Alameda, Calaveras, Yuba, and now El Dorado. The message here: watch your feeders as there appears to be an uptick this year.


“Truckin’ like the do-dah man”,

Jim Lomax
Solitary Birder
from No Particular Place

Not at all sure where I’ve been, but I’m not starting over again.








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Date: 5/8/20 10:00 am
From: Frances Oliver <hummer52...>
Subject: [countybirders] Cancellation of NOVEMBER 2020 CV Birding Symposium
Hi All!

Due to the uncertainty of the Covid-19 pandemic in the fall months, the Central Valley Birding Symposium is being cancelled for 2020. The Symposium Committee felt that the health of our members, presenters, and staff was our primary consideration in making this decision. If conditions warrant, the Symposium will resume again on Nov 18-21, 2021, at the Stockton Hilton Hotel. We will miss seeing everyone this November, but we hope to see all of you again in 2021. Stay healthy and safe until then.

Patricia Bachetti
CVBC President

Frances
CVBC BOARD MEMBER
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Date: 5/7/20 9:44 pm
From: Dominik Mosur via groups.io <polskatata=<yahoo.com...>
Subject: Re: [countybirders] Modoc County Big Day 5/4/2020 188 species (long)
Epic read bro.

Thx
> On May 7, 2020, at 16:17, Logan Kahle <logan...> wrote:
>
> 
> Hi All,
>
> On 5/4 Adrian "the Germ" Hinkle and I ran a Modoc county big day, starting at midnight at Tule Lake NWR and ending at midnight at Modoc NWR. We covered 474 miles over the course of 24 hours and saw a total of 188 species. There was no real "official" Modoc record previous to this that I'm aware of, but Steve Rottenborn solo had 156 last spring on an impromptu big day/good birding day and Adrian and I had 157 on our first day of scouting. Only 22 species were seen on our two days of scouting that were not seen on the day itself.
>
> Many thanks to Steve Rottenborn and Kevin McKereghan for their invaluable insights into the birds of Modoc, local distribution, and route strategy. Our effort would not have been possible without their help.
>
> __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
>
> Itinerary:
>
> We started at midnight at Tule Lake after having scouted it the previous evening. We quickly picked up our first bird of the day, CANADA GOOSE, along with an assortment of 21 species of ducks, marsh birds, and shorebirds highlighted by SORA, VIRGINIA RAIL, AMERICAN BITTERN, and BARN and GREAT HORNED OWLS.
>
> We proceeded on to the Day region. We had a decently sized Owl hitlist here and wanted to knock them all out before sunrise. First up was Screech. We went on to a spot where we'd found one the previous night and started whistling. No dice. 10 minutes past. It only took 5 last night. Hmm. We went farther down the road and tried some more. Another 10 minutes. Uuuh. And another. This was getting concerning, then from a mighty oak, a single WESTERN SCREECH-OWL blessed our ears. Awesome.
>
> Our next stop was easy. We went up to where the Saw-whets were, whistled a bit, and within two minutes a NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWL was going off right next to us. We decided to take a 45 minute nap to wait for the Pygmy-Owl to wake up (we'd timed him waking up at 5:13 the previous morning). Sure enough, with a bit of patience we found the NORTHERN PYGMY-OWLS while a WILSON'S SNIPE displayed in the distance.
>
> It was now dawn, so we blasted up to the woods. This turned out to be a good idea. While waiting for dawn activity I felt off hearing dogs in the middle of the woods. After a second I realized they weren't dogs--they were FLAMMULATED OWLS! At least four of them. Sweet! Saved us a 10pm drive to the warners.
>
> Birds were starting to wake up for Dawn. One of the first breaks of the twilight silence were from MOUNTAIN QUAIL and HERMIT THRUSHES, notorious early risers. We quickly wracked up the more common montane breeders--GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET, BROWN CREEPER, RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH, WHITE-HEADED WOODPECKER, etc. However we'd had the whole forest pinned down for specific targets. At a certain clearing where we'd had migrants two days prior an OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER let out its 3-note drunken belch, and a freak PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER started singing. The road had deteriorated slightly due to overnight rains, but luckily we were still able to get far enough for our staked out DUSKY and GRAY FLYCATCHERS. PINE SISKINS flew around above us and a few BAND-TAILED PIGEONS boomed in the distance. We'd seen an Osprey the past visit but a thick fog at enveloped the meadow it liked. Hmm. We waited. After a bit Adrian spotted the OSPREY bombing by the meadow. This was our only one of the day.
>
> We were pretty much done but couldn't locate our last montane woodpecker. We hooted, we barked, we drummed. Nothin'. We went to our best known spot. Sure enough, a PILEATED WOODPECKER called close by and another flew over. Sweet.
>
> Rolling down the hill back to the oak section we picked up a few nice migrants like RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, WHITE- and GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW, as well as breeders like NASHVILLE WARBLER and BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER and residents like OAK TITMOUSE and DOWNY WOODPECKER. Proceeding downslope we picked up on a big bird flying over and realized it was a GREAT-TAILED GRACKLE!!! It circled the oaky ridge for about a minute before heading north. Definitely the craziest bird of the day! Heading to the base of the hill we had our first WARBLING VIREO of the trip.
>
> We then entered the grasslands section of the valley at 7am and started to search for a few targets. Much to our dismay, the Rough-winged Swallows which seemed so happy winging around the pond were nowhere to be seen. This was overshadowed though by a pair of WOOD DUCKS that kicked up in a little ditch on the side of the road! Our first ones of the trip! Additionally three AMERICAN CROWS, annoying to find in Modoc, flew up the valley. These were my first for the Day Valley.
>
> We headed into Day where our friends on the west side of town had put up an extra hummingbird feeder to increase our chances of an Anna's. Alas, no hummers in town but we did luck into the breeding PURPLE MARTINS and a single VAUX'S SWIFT, along with a flyover EVENING GROSBEAK, which turned out to be quite numerous on this route.
>
> It was time for our last big passerine sweep stop of the morning--widow valley road. Unfortunately, as anyone who's attempted to drive up Widow Valley road with anything less than a foot of clearance will know, its not exactly a highway. So, we got about half a mile up and decided to take the rest by foot. On our walk up through the oaks several HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHERS, rare in Modoc, piped off. Also piping off were two Pileated Woodpeckers. They knew we had strained for their uphill bretheren and conspired to mock us on our way out of town. Treacherous carpenters. But thats how big days are. Farther up, our staked out CALLIOPE HUMMINGBIRD and WRENTIT were sounding off. Adrian got on a singing ANNA'S HUMMINGBIRD and MACGILLIVRAY'S WARBLER that I wasn't able to hear. We decided to camp out along the edge of the canyon for a few minutes and were rewarded by a flyover TOWNSEND'S WARBELR. And with that we were done with general passerine birding. From here on, it was targetted searching and waterbirding.
>
> Our next stop was Lookout where a staked-out American Crow remained, solitary, on a pole in the farm fields. A quick check of Lower Roberts Reservoir pulled in many of our first waterbirds in the day along with a freak NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD on a fence, our first LARK SPARROW, and a couple of loafing BALD EAGLES on the shoreline. Swinging by a staked-out pond north of town we picked up a pair of RING-NECKED DUCKS. We headed on to a bridge on CR90 to look for Kingfishers and Green Herons, but were rewarded only with more Wood Ducks.
>
> Our next stop was a haul. We blasted down the road to Tionesta. We were hoping a sparrow staked out the previous evening would still cooperate. Sure enough, after a few minutes of trying, the VESPER SPARROW piped up. Phew! Continuing down the road, we quickly located our LEWIS'S WOODPECKERS at a nest hole, while a chorus of PYGMY NUTHATCHES piped off in the distance. Heading upslope, we were happy to clean up Anna's Hummingbird and, at a place we found the previous evening, two SOOTY GROUSE boomed away.
>
> Heading on to the Tule Lake Region, we found a GOLDEN EAGLE sitting on a rock near Petroglyph Point. At Petroglyph Point proper, WHITE-THROATED SWIFTS danced overhead while ROCK and CANYON WRENS called from the cliffs. Alas, the Prairie Falcons so easy a month ago were nowhere to be seen.
>
> It was time for our longest stop of the day--Tule Lake NWR. Over the next two hours we wracked up several dozen new birds, including singletons of a continuing HORNED GREBE, MARBLED GODWIT, BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, four species of gulls and three terns (including 150+ BLACK TERNS), several herons and egrets, AMERICAN PIPIT and TRICOLORED BLACKBIRD.
>
> We made a quick detour to a spot with reports of Turkey but failed to locate any galliforms. On our way to alturas, we headed up Crowder Flat road to look for a few birds we'd pinned down the previous evening. Driving up, we saw a beautiful male MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRD on a juniper. The waxwings we'd seen the previous day were not in evidence so we drove farther. Just after the road flattens out we quickly picked up a JUNIPER TITMOUSE, but still no waxwings. We looked at some more spots. No dice. Hmm.
>
> At the base of the hill we checked out a pond where we'd had Kingfisher and Solitary Sandpiper in scouting. No luck on those fronts but we did pick up a NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW. Continuing on to Dorris Reservoir we quickly checked the South end--the SNOW GOOSE flock was still there. On to the north end. We walked up the stairs where you are normally greeted by a Black Phoebe. No phoebe. Hmm. That's never happened before. We looked around the base by the creek. No phoebe. We played some tape. 10 minutes went by. We were starting to worry. Would we really miss this one?? Then adrian spotted it waaaay down the creek. Phew. Late save. We blasted on.
>
> Continuing on to CR 115 by Modoc NWR we quickly picked up a few groups of WILSON'S PHALAROPES. Among the dowitcher and Phalarope swarms we managed to find two RED-NECKED PHALAROPES and a three SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS. Scouting had been full of Violet-green Swallows but we suspected this was due to the recent storm. Today we were coming up dry. We kept looking. The other 5 Swallow species mocked us as they winged around the lake. Then, as we were scanning, we heard a familiar sound. Adrian and I looked at each other. "VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOW?" Sure enough, a male came zipping by the pond long enough for a nice look. Movin on.
>
> The auto tour loop added nothing but we snagged two SPOTTED SANDPIPERS on a small pond as we were leaving. As we entered the warners, Adrian spotted a BELTED KINGFISHER in the nearby creek. Sweet!
>
> Heading to the high fir forests of Stough Reservoir we easily kicked up a couple GREEN-TAILED TOWHEES. A little digging produced our staked out WILLIAMSON'S SAPSUCKER pair. We tried for nutcracker and Red-naped Sapsucker for a while to no avail. The mountains were quiet.
>
> Heading down slope, the sun was starting to wane slightly. We proceeded to cedarville and spent 20 minutes trying to find a waxwing, or a lowland hummingbird. No luck in either department. Drat. We headed farther south in the Surprise Valley. We'd seen a couple Prairie Falcons the previous day and had a sharp eye out for those. Alas, no dice. But, while looking for curlews at a random ranch, a SAY'S PHOEBE circled overhead. Awesome.
>
> Heading east towards the sagebrush sea a LONG-BILLED CURLEW flew into a nearby field. A LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE, the first of many this evening, teed up on a fence. We went out to the east end of the valley where the sagebrush really kicks in around 49er road. Driving up to our staked out location we stopped to listen. We expected dozens of Brewer's Sparrows and Sagebrush Sparrows to caress our earlobes but the sagebrush was quiet...waiting gave us a single BREWER'S SPARROW and SAGEBRUSH SPARROW. Ridiculous. Driving up to a small mound, we found our staked out BLACK-THROATED SPARROWS. Waiting til dusk, our final bird of daylight sounded off--the sad, wistful coos of a BURROWING OWL mourning the loss of habitat in the Surprise Valley.
>
> It was now dusk and we had just one obvious nightbird to get--poorwill. So we set off for a road into the hills. Problem was...they were all private. All of them. We tried like five. So eventually we decided to screw it and bomb south along the main road until it got close to the rocks. Finally, there, we found a single COMMON POORWILL.
>
> We spent the last hour of the day trying at Modoc NWR for Short-eared Owl before the clock struck midnight. No dice there, unfortunately.
>
> __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
>
>
>
> All in all, it was an incredible effort. Like any big day, we had a glut of misses, most notable being any merganser, Wild Turkey, Black-chinned and Rufous Hummingbirds, Greater Yellowlegs, Common Loon, any accipiter, Peregrine Falcon, Prairie Falcon, Western Wood-Pewee, Cedar Waxwing, Black-throated Gray Warbler, and Fox Sparrow.
>
> It seems to me that 190s is possible, but likely not 200. The day lined up very well in terms of seeing almost all resident and regular migrant/breeding species in the county, and the date was likely around optimal for this kind of effort. A full eBird list including general route comments and notes on where individual species were seen can be found here: https://ebird.org/checklist/S68529663
>
> Best of SPRING!
>
> Logan Kahle
>
> San Francisco, CA
>
>

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Date: 5/7/20 4:17 pm
From: Logan Kahle <logan...>
Subject: [countybirders] Modoc County Big Day 5/4/2020 188 species (long)
Hi All,

On 5/4 Adrian "the Germ" Hinkle and I ran a Modoc county big day,
starting at midnight at Tule Lake NWR and ending at midnight at Modoc
NWR. We covered 474 miles over the course of 24 hours and saw a total of
188 species. There was no real "official" Modoc record previous to this
that I'm aware of, but Steve Rottenborn solo had 156 last spring on an
impromptu big day/good birding day and Adrian and I had 157 on our first
day of scouting. Only 22 species were seen on our two days of scouting
that were not seen on the day itself.

Many thanks to Steve Rottenborn and Kevin McKereghan for their
invaluable insights into the birds of Modoc, local distribution, and
route strategy. Our effort would not have been possible without their help.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Itinerary:

We started at midnight at Tule Lake after having scouted it the previous
evening. We quickly picked up our first bird of the day, CANADA GOOSE,
along with an assortment of 21 species of ducks, marsh birds, and
shorebirds highlighted by SORA, VIRGINIA RAIL, AMERICAN BITTERN, and
BARN and GREAT HORNED OWLS.

We proceeded on to the Day region. We had a decently sized Owl hitlist
here and wanted to knock them all out before sunrise. First up was
Screech. We went on to a spot where we'd found one the previous night
and started whistling. No dice. 10 minutes past. It only took 5 last
night. Hmm. We went farther down the road and tried some more. Another
10 minutes. Uuuh. And another. This was getting concerning, then from a
mighty oak, a single WESTERN SCREECH-OWL blessed our ears. Awesome.

Our next stop was easy. We went up to where the Saw-whets were, whistled
a bit, and within two minutes a NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWL was going off
right next to us. We decided to take a 45 minute nap to wait for the
Pygmy-Owl to wake up (we'd timed him waking up at 5:13 the previous
morning). Sure enough, with a bit of patience we found the NORTHERN
PYGMY-OWLS while a WILSON'S SNIPE displayed in the distance.

It was now dawn, so we blasted up to the woods. This turned out to be a
good idea. While waiting for dawn activity I felt off hearing dogs in
the middle of the woods. After a second I realized they weren't
dogs--they were FLAMMULATED OWLS! At least four of them. Sweet! Saved us
a 10pm drive to the warners.

Birds were starting to wake up for Dawn. One of the first breaks of the
twilight silence were from MOUNTAIN QUAIL and HERMIT THRUSHES, notorious
early risers. We quickly wracked up the more common montane
breeders--GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET, BROWN CREEPER, RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH,
WHITE-HEADED WOODPECKER, etc. However we'd had the whole forest pinned
down for specific targets. At a certain clearing where we'd had migrants
two days prior an OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER let out its 3-note drunken
belch, and a freak PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER started singing. The road
had deteriorated slightly due to overnight rains, but luckily we were
still able to get far enough for our staked out DUSKY and GRAY
FLYCATCHERS. PINE SISKINS flew around above us and a few BAND-TAILED
PIGEONS boomed in the distance. We'd seen an Osprey the past visit but a
thick fog at enveloped the meadow it liked. Hmm. We waited. After a bit
Adrian spotted the OSPREY bombing by the meadow. This was our only one
of the day.

We were pretty much done but couldn't locate our last montane
woodpecker. We hooted, we barked, we drummed. Nothin'. We went to our
best known spot. Sure enough, a PILEATED WOODPECKER called close by and
another flew over. Sweet.

Rolling down the hill back to the oak section we picked up a few nice
migrants like RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, WHITE- and GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW,
as well as breeders like NASHVILLE WARBLER and BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER and
residents like OAK TITMOUSE and DOWNY WOODPECKER. Proceeding downslope
we picked up on a big bird flying over and realized it was a
GREAT-TAILED GRACKLE!!! It circled the oaky ridge for about a minute
before heading north. Definitely the craziest bird of the day! Heading
to the base of the hill we had our first WARBLING VIREO of the trip.

We then entered the grasslands section of the valley at 7am and started
to search for a few targets. Much to our dismay, the Rough-winged
Swallows which seemed so happy winging around the pond were nowhere to
be seen. This was overshadowed though by a pair of WOOD DUCKS that
kicked up in a little ditch on the side of the road! Our first ones of
the trip! Additionally three AMERICAN CROWS, annoying to find in Modoc,
flew up the valley. These were my first for the Day Valley.

We headed into Day where our friends on the west side of town had put up
an extra hummingbird feeder to increase our chances of an Anna's. Alas,
no hummers in town but we did luck into the breeding PURPLE MARTINS and
a single VAUX'S SWIFT, along with a flyover EVENING GROSBEAK, which
turned out to be quite numerous on this route.

It was time for our last big passerine sweep stop of the morning--widow
valley road. Unfortunately, as anyone who's attempted to drive up Widow
Valley road with anything less than a foot of clearance will know, its
not exactly a highway. So, we got about half a mile up and decided to
take the rest by foot. On our walk up through the oaks several HAMMOND'S
FLYCATCHERS, rare in Modoc, piped off. Also piping off were two Pileated
Woodpeckers. They knew we had strained for their uphill bretheren and
conspired to mock us on our way out of town. Treacherous carpenters. But
thats how big days are. Farther up, our staked out CALLIOPE HUMMINGBIRD
and WRENTIT were sounding off. Adrian got on a singing ANNA'S
HUMMINGBIRD and MACGILLIVRAY'S WARBLER that I wasn't able to hear. We
decided to camp out along the edge of the canyon for a few minutes and
were rewarded by a flyover TOWNSEND'S WARBELR. And with that we were
done with general passerine birding. From here on, it was targetted
searching and waterbirding.

Our next stop was Lookout where a staked-out American Crow remained,
solitary, on a pole in the farm fields. A quick check of Lower Roberts
Reservoir pulled in many of our first waterbirds in the day along with a
freak NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD on a fence, our first LARK SPARROW, and a
couple of loafing BALD EAGLES on the shoreline. Swinging by a staked-out
pond north of town we picked up a pair of RING-NECKED DUCKS. We headed
on to a bridge on CR90 to look for Kingfishers and Green Herons, but
were rewarded only with more Wood Ducks.

Our next stop was a haul. We blasted down the road to Tionesta. We were
hoping a sparrow staked out the previous evening would still cooperate.
Sure enough, after a few minutes of trying, the VESPER SPARROW piped up.
Phew! Continuing down the road, we quickly located our LEWIS'S
WOODPECKERS at a nest hole, while a chorus of PYGMY NUTHATCHES piped off
in the distance. Heading upslope, we were happy to clean up Anna's
Hummingbird and, at a place we found the previous evening, two SOOTY
GROUSE boomed away.

Heading on to the Tule Lake Region, we found a GOLDEN EAGLE sitting on a
rock near Petroglyph Point. At Petroglyph Point proper, WHITE-THROATED
SWIFTS danced overhead while ROCK and CANYON WRENS called from the
cliffs. Alas, the Prairie Falcons so easy a month ago were nowhere to be
seen.

It was time for our longest stop of the day--Tule Lake NWR. Over the
next two hours we wracked up several dozen new birds, including
singletons of a continuing HORNED GREBE, MARBLED GODWIT, BLACK-BELLIED
PLOVER, four species of gulls and three terns (including 150+ BLACK
TERNS), several herons and egrets, AMERICAN PIPIT and TRICOLORED BLACKBIRD.

We made a quick detour to a spot with reports of Turkey but failed to
locate any galliforms. On our way to alturas, we headed up Crowder Flat
road to look for a few birds we'd pinned down the previous evening.
Driving up, we saw a beautiful male MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRD on a juniper. The
waxwings we'd seen the previous day were not in evidence so we drove
farther. Just after the road flattens out we quickly picked up a JUNIPER
TITMOUSE, but still no waxwings. We looked at some more spots. No dice. Hmm.

At the base of the hill we checked out a pond where we'd had Kingfisher
and Solitary Sandpiper in scouting. No luck on those fronts but we did
pick up a NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW. Continuing on to Dorris
Reservoir we quickly checked the South end--the SNOW GOOSE flock was
still there. On to the north end. We walked up the stairs where you are
normally greeted by a Black Phoebe. No phoebe. Hmm. That's never
happened before. We looked around the base by the creek. No phoebe. We
played some tape. 10 minutes went by. We were starting to worry. Would
we really miss this one?? Then adrian spotted it waaaay down the creek.
Phew. Late save. We blasted on.

Continuing on to CR 115 by Modoc NWR we quickly picked up a few groups
of WILSON'S PHALAROPES. Among the dowitcher and Phalarope swarms we
managed to find two RED-NECKED PHALAROPES and a three SEMIPALMATED
PLOVERS. Scouting had been full of Violet-green Swallows but we
suspected this was due to the recent storm. Today we were coming up dry.
We kept looking. The other 5 Swallow species mocked us as they winged
around the lake. Then, as we were scanning, we heard a familiar sound.
Adrian and I looked at each other. "VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOW?" Sure enough,
a male came zipping by the pond long enough for a nice look. Movin on.

The auto tour loop added nothing but we snagged two SPOTTED SANDPIPERS
on a small pond as we were leaving. As we entered the warners, Adrian
spotted a BELTED KINGFISHER in the nearby creek. Sweet!

Heading to the high fir forests of Stough Reservoir we easily kicked up
a couple GREEN-TAILED TOWHEES. A little digging produced our staked out
WILLIAMSON'S SAPSUCKER pair. We tried for nutcracker and Red-naped
Sapsucker for a while to no avail. The mountains were quiet.

Heading down slope, the sun was starting to wane slightly. We proceeded
to cedarville and spent 20 minutes trying to find a waxwing, or a
lowland hummingbird. No luck in either department. Drat. We headed
farther south in the Surprise Valley. We'd seen a couple Prairie Falcons
the previous day and had a sharp eye out for those. Alas, no dice. But,
while looking for curlews at a random ranch, a SAY'S PHOEBE circled
overhead. Awesome.

Heading east towards the sagebrush sea a LONG-BILLED CURLEW flew into a
nearby field. A LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE, the first of many this evening, teed
up on a fence. We went out to the east end of the valley where the
sagebrush really kicks in around 49er road. Driving up to our staked out
location we stopped to listen. We expected dozens of Brewer's Sparrows
and Sagebrush Sparrows to caress our earlobes but the sagebrush was
quiet...waiting gave us a single BREWER'S SPARROW and SAGEBRUSH SPARROW.
Ridiculous. Driving up to a small mound, we found our staked out
BLACK-THROATED SPARROWS. Waiting til dusk, our final bird of daylight
sounded off--the sad, wistful coos of a BURROWING OWL mourning the loss
of habitat in the Surprise Valley.

It was now dusk and we had just one obvious nightbird to get--poorwill.
So we set off for a road into the hills. Problem was...they were all
private. All of them. We tried like five. So eventually we decided to
screw it and bomb south along the main road until it got close to the
rocks. Finally, there, we found a single COMMON POORWILL.

We spent the last hour of the day trying at Modoc NWR for Short-eared
Owl before the clock struck midnight. No dice there, unfortunately.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


All in all, it was an incredible effort. Like any big day, we had a glut
of misses, most notable being any merganser, Wild Turkey, Black-chinned
and Rufous Hummingbirds, Greater Yellowlegs, Common Loon, any
/accipiter, /Peregrine Falcon, Prairie Falcon, Western Wood-Pewee, Cedar
Waxwing, Black-throated Gray Warbler, and Fox Sparrow.

It seems to me that 190s is possible, but likely not 200. The day lined
up very well in terms of seeing almost all resident and regular
migrant/breeding species in the county, and the date was likely around
optimal for this kind of effort. A full eBird list including general
route comments and notes on where individual species were seen can be
found here: https://ebird.org/checklist/S68529663

Best of SPRING!

Logan Kahle

San Francisco, CA


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Date: 5/5/20 5:34 pm
From: jim lomax <sdrib...>
Subject: [countybirders] Yuba County
’s up dogs?

Was going to go to Merced County today but read last night of a bird I wanted to see in Yuba so I opted for there.

Arrived on Forbestown Road at the “Costa’s Hummingbird spot” about 0805 this morning and immediately saw the Costa’s Hummingbird still there. So got my chair out to wait. By 0900 a few other birders arrived to see the Costa’s and we watched the area looking for county birds. During this time, a Black-chinned Hummingbird came to the feeder which was set up to keep the Costa’s happy. By 1030 some birders left and three of us stayed. Suddenly a CALLIOPE HUMMINGBIRD arrived at the feeder. Very nice. Then I was left alone. Half an hour later the Calliope came back as did an Anna's. Then a few minutes later a RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD appeared at the feeder. This was the bird I came for as two were seen yesterday. Over the next hour or so both hummingbirds came a couple of times. Finally, I too, left homebound.

Finally got to 225 in Yuba County. Glory hallelujah.


“Truckin’ like the do-dah man”,

Jim Lomax
Solitary Birder
from No Particular Place

Not at all sure where I’ve been, but I’m not starting over again.



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Date: 5/4/20 8:18 pm
From: jim lomax <sdrib...>
Subject: Re: [countybirders] Sonoma County
Thank you Ruthie. I didn’t think it would still be there yesterday after being found the day before so I opted to chase the Costa’s Hummingbird in Yuba. Then I was going to come over this morning but a first county record Painted Redstart was found yesterday on Mt. Diablo and reported last night, soooo…I chased that this morning. Sterling called to let me know the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher had been seen this morning so nothing I could do but come over this afternoon. After I saw it I called John Luther who then left his house in Berkeley about 1630 and he saw it the moment he arrived. A very nice bird for Sonoma.

Jim

On May 4, 2020, at 8:04 PM, Ruth Rudesill via groups.io<http://groups.io> <ruthier=<sonic.net...><mailto:ruthier=<sonic.net...>> wrote:


Hi Jim,

Glad you were able to see the flycatcher! Was very exciting for us here in Sonoma County.

Ruthie

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Date: 5/4/20 8:04 pm
From: Ruth Rudesill <ruthier...>
Subject: Re: [countybirders] Sonoma County
Hi Jim,

Glad you were able to see the flycatcher! Was very exciting for us here
in Sonoma County.

Ruthie

On 2020-05-04 19:11, jim lomax wrote:

> 's up dogs?
>
> I went up into the hills on the south side of Mt. Diablo this morning but came up empty handed with no Painted Redstart. On the way home I talked to a friend and found out about the return of the bird in Sonoma County. I picked up Sheree at home and headed north.
>
> We arrived at Bodega Bay about 1430 and scanned the area around Diekmann's Store. No bird. We birded around the bay a little to kill time figuring that this bird might come back later in the afternoon as it did yesterday.
>
> At 1600 we parked just north of the store facing west and watched the trees and the telephone lines. At 1614 the SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER landed on a telephone wire just south of where we were sitting. Beautiful little bird. We watched it on the wire about five minutes and then it flew to the trees and we left. Very pleasant ride home.
>
> "Truckin' like the do-dah man",
>
> Jim Lomax
> Solitary Birder
> from No Particular Place
>
> Not at all sure where I've been, but I'm not starting over again.
>


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[3] https://groups.io/g/countybirders/post
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Date: 5/4/20 7:11 pm
From: jim lomax <sdrib...>
Subject: [countybirders] Sonoma County
’s up dogs?

I went up into the hills on the south side of Mt. Diablo this morning but came up empty handed with no Painted Redstart. On the way home I talked to a friend and found out about the return of the bird in Sonoma County. I picked up Sheree at home and headed north.

We arrived at Bodega Bay about 1430 and scanned the area around Diekmann’s Store. No bird. We birded around the bay a little to kill time figuring that this bird might come back later in the afternoon as it did yesterday.

At 1600 we parked just north of the store facing west and watched the trees and the telephone lines. At 1614 the SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER landed on a telephone wire just south of where we were sitting. Beautiful little bird. We watched it on the wire about five minutes and then it flew to the trees and we left. Very pleasant ride home.


“Truckin’ like the do-dah man”,

Jim Lomax
Solitary Birder
from No Particular Place

Not at all sure where I’ve been, but I’m not starting over again.

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Date: 5/3/20 5:05 pm
From: jim lomax <sdrib...>
Subject: [countybirders] Calaveras and Yuba Counties
’s up dogs?

Calaveras County Saturday May 2nd

Looked for the Yellow-headed Blackbird yesterday with no joy. Then got a call and responded to a private residence in Angeles Camp whereupon I, along with a couple of others, observed an adult male COSTA’S HUMMINGBIRD found this morning.


Yuba County Sunday May 3rd

Arrived early on La Porte Road just west of Woodleaf and turned north on Forbestown Road going almost 3 miles to the “spot”. No landmarks. Only a hummingbird feeder hanging on a bush. By 1000 hrs, along with others, added another adult male COSTA’S HUMMINGBIRD, a TOWNSEND’S WARBLER, and a beautiful CASSIN’S FINCH among many birds out and about. Home bound.

Of note: I will not identify anyone I bird with anymore to protect them from the hate mongers that attack people nowadays. Too bad.


“Truckin’ like the do-dah man”,

Jim Lomax
Solitary Birder
from No Particular Place

Not at all sure where I’ve been, but I’m not starting over again.

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Date: 5/3/20 9:58 am
From: Ruth Rudesill <ruthier...>
Subject: [countybirders] Scissor-tailed Flycatcher Bodega Bay Sonoma Co
Awesome morning! Scissor-tailed Flycatcher found yesterday evening by
Rick Lebaudour in the town of Bodega Bay. This is the 3rd or 4th county
record. New County Bird for me # 404! Thank you to Malcolm B for driving
us to the bird - saw several birding friends there. (Everyone on best
protocol behavior - had masks, stayed only a short time and then left.)
The bird was actively flycatching in the trees just north of Diekmanns
across from Bodega Harbor Inn (there's a pullout to stand in where there
are dumpsters.)

However, just heard flew off so not sure if still there.

Good Birding despite everything,

Ruthie Rudesill

Kewood Sonoma Valley

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Date: 5/1/20 2:01 pm
From: Jim Rowoth <rowoth...>
Subject: [countybirders] Repost re: Kiln Canyon/Carnegie ORV SRA
Reposted at Michale Park's request:

All,

John Blades and I assisted Tara (de Silva) Kerss, the resident staff biologist, with her spring breeding bird survey Friday morning, adhering to proper social distancing at all times. John and I drove separately, and we were there at the express invitation of Tara, during this time of coronavirus pandemic. We visited several San Joaquin Co sites in the lower portions of the SRA, then headed up Kiln Canyon itself.

We all remarked on the Prius parked at the CHES gate along Corral Hollow Rd.. Just so this is clear to everyone, parking here and hopping the gate is absolutely VERBOTEN (forbidden). We ran into Logan K on his way down the hill, and Tara firmly and politely reminded him that he should not be there.. We visited briefly about the birds he had found further up; you can check his eBird list. Our trio only went as far as “Patella Hill”; best birds were Golden Eagle and Rufous-crowned Sparrow. Our only hummers were Anna’s, and the Canyon Wren did not appear. The amount of sage in the area is much reduced as a result of last summer’s fire in the canyon.

This unpermitted access has the potential to becoming a real problem for the SRA. Please, please, please, if you wish to visit this area, follow the guidelines spelled out in San Joaquin Audubon’s 2019 updated bird finding guide, Birding in San Joaquin County. I am cutting and pasting from page 123:

An entrance fee may apply. After passing through the entrance gate, head east about 1.1 miles along a gravel road to Kiln Canyon. If you wish to try to walk this canyon (or anywhere else in this park), you MUST contact the staff biologist (<Tara.deSilva...> < mailto:<Tara.deSilva...> ( <Tara.deSilva...> ) ) prior to your arrival to arrange for foot traffic. Please be respectful of her time and work schedule.

NOTE: since publication, Tara has married so her email is <Tara.Kerss...> < mailto:<Tara.Kerss...> ( <Tara.Kerss...> ).

John and I may be back at other times this spring, but again, we will only be there at the SRA’s invitation.

I know we are all going crazy in these days of coronavirus, but if we all follow the rules, we’ll get through them. We can all look forward to brighter, freer days ahead.

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Date: 4/29/20 9:29 pm
From: James Laughlin via groups.io <ja_laughlin=<yahoo.com...>
Subject: [countybirders] Sutter County Mini Big Day Results
County Birders,
Sorry for the late post but I did aSutter County Mini big day on Sunday. The normal group were unable toparticipate but maybe next spring or fall. I tallied 103 species. I didn't addanything new but did see some species that are somewhat difficult to see in thecounty. 

Along Hughes Rd. in the Sutterbypass I had OSPREY, SORA, VIRGINIA RAIL, GREAT TAILED GRACKLE, YELLOW-HEADEDBLACKBIRD, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT,  AMERICAN BITTERN and for a moment Ithought I had a least bittern calling. I have seen them along this stretch ofthe road before.  My hearing sucks at this point. That would have been a new bird for the big day.

On top of the Sutter levee justsouth of the hunter check station at Sutter NWR and looking west. There is aflooded portion of the refuge. Here I had a EARED GREBE.

Along the birding trail at the very south end of the Sutter RefugeI had some great birding. At this location I had ASH-THROATED FLYCATCHER, GOLDEN CROWNED SPARROW,CASSINS VIREO, WARBLING VIREO, BLACK THROATED GRAY WARBLER, WILSON'S WARBLER, YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER and more BLACK HEADED GROSEBEAKS than I could count.

Along Bigelow Rd I had CHIPPING SPARROW, BULLOCKS ORIOLE, OAKTITMOUSE, LESSER GOLDFINCH, NUTTAL'S WOODPECKER, and DOWNY WOODPECKER. Dippedon the Lawrence's. This is usually a solid place to find them. I also had an unidentified empid at this location.

I also had VIOLET GREEN SWALLOWS along Moore Rd located on thesouth side of the Buttes. 

Along Pass Rd as you head west from Sutter where it opens up anddips into the open area of Pass rd, south side I had a ROCK WREN.  Myapologies for not a better description of the location. I also had WHITE-THROATEDSWIFTS at the top of the last peak. This is traditionally a knowlocation for that species.



Moving north around the Buttes I next visited the hummingbirdfeeders along Ingram Ln. The landowners are very friendly and love to havevisitors so feel free to visit. Here I had I found, BULLOCK'S ORIOLE, BLACKCHINNED, ANNA’S, and RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRDS (3).  No calliope's anywhere to be found.
There is a pair ofROUGH-WINGED SWALLOWS nesting in the rock wall at the corner of Pass Rd andWest Butte Rd.
From the Grace United Methodist Church on South WaltonAve I had HOODED ORIOLE using the feeders at the house across the road from thechurch. Unlike other years I decided to visit the feeders at dawnand saw it quickly. There you have it Mr Easterla!




In the rice fields along Marcus Rd I had FORSTERS TERNand WHIMBRELS.




At Bobelain I had WRENTIT, WHITE BREASTED NUTHATCH, and BANKSWALLOWS. The bank swallows are on the Yuba County side but occasionally theycome into Sutter county. There were so few swallows. The bank has eroded awayand there were not that many. Not sure how long that colony will last. 

The birding was actually very tough. Many places werevery dry. I couldn't access some of the private parks due to the virus. But with that being said it was fun to get out and bird. 



Notable misses: The list is toolong! 
CheersJim LaughlinPlumas Lake
 

 



 



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Date: 4/29/20 12:41 pm
From: jim lomax <sdrib...>
Subject: [countybirders] Del Norte County
’s up dogs?

Looked behind the new barn yesterday morning across from the west end of Moseley Road, and there, walking in a huge puddle under a pile of Escherichia coli, was the SOLITARY SANDPIPER found the day before by Lucas Brug. Next, stood at the south end of Stamps Way on the north end of Crescent City Harbor and scanned the gull flock, some 200+, standing and bathing in the Elk Creek mouth flowing into the bay at the north end of the harbor and observed the LAUGHING GULL. Also found by Lucas a couple of hours prior. Pleasant drive home.


“Truckin’ like the do-dah man”,

Jim Lomax
Solitary Birder
from No Particular Place

Not at all sure where I’ve been, but I’m not starting over again.

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