SCBIRDCL
Received From Subject
6/21/17 4:19 am JENNIFER ALAINE LEE <jal21...> Great Egret at paradise again tday
6/20/17 10:09 pm Wayne Laubscher <wnlaubscher...> Kestrels up close & personal
6/20/17 3:44 am David Facey <dcf2005...> Great Egret
6/18/17 10:00 am Robert Snyder <birdphotoginpa...> eBird -- BESP Upper Green's Run Rd to Bullit Run bridge 40.9949x-77.6996 -- Jun 18, 2017
6/18/17 6:50 am JAMES WILLIAM DUNN <jwd6...> common snipe
6/16/17 6:12 pm LAWRENCE WILLIAM RAMSEY <lwr...> Nesting Season
6/15/17 5:33 am Diane K. Bierly <dkb246...> Philipsburg Night Hawks
6/14/17 5:08 am Diane K. Bierly <dkb246...> Fwd: [PABIRDS] Breeding Bird Blitz
6/13/17 3:07 pm Nick Bolgiano <nickbolgiano...> Tuesday search for cerulean warblers above Lower Trail
6/12/17 6:47 pm Jeff Gallo <psugallo...> Ohio hotspots
6/12/17 5:19 pm Elizabeth Kirchner <epkirchner...> binoc harness
6/11/17 4:22 pm Robert Snyder <birdphotoginpa...> Horned Larks in tilled field at Horticulture Farm
6/10/17 6:37 am Chad Kauffman <chadkauffman...> Fwd: [PABIRDS] Hawk Counter Position at Waggoner's Gap
6/9/17 2:41 pm Nick Bolgiano <nickbolgiano...> cerulean warblers in SGL 118, Blair Co
6/9/17 11:16 am Dnadeb <dsg4...> Re: [PABIRDS] Registration for the PSO Annual Meeting begins on June 10th
6/9/17 11:06 am Dnadeb <dsg4...> Re: [PABIRDS] Registration for the PSO Annual Meeting begins on June 10th
6/9/17 10:41 am Chad Kauffman <chadkauffman...> Fwd: [PABIRDS] Registration for the PSO Annual Meeting begins on June 10th
6/8/17 12:18 pm Jason Hill <hill.jason.michael...> Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
6/8/17 11:43 am Chad Kauffman <chadkauffman...> Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
6/8/17 11:36 am Joseph Verica <joeverica...> Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
6/8/17 9:18 am Lewis Grove <zugunlew...> Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
6/8/17 7:46 am Centre Wildlife Care <centrewildlifecare...> Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
6/7/17 2:52 pm Jean Aron <000000ab966af9e4-dmarc-request...> Bird Chimes, a mini tale
6/7/17 9:06 am Robert Snyder <rhs2...> Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
6/7/17 7:34 am Centre Wildlife Care <centrewildlifecare...> Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
6/7/17 6:50 am Joseph Verica <joeverica...> Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
6/7/17 6:12 am Jason Hill <hill.jason.michael...> Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
6/7/17 5:14 am Diane K. Bierly <dkb246...> Fwd: [PABIRDS] Last Call - Winter 16/17 Photo Submissions for Pennsylvania Birds
6/6/17 6:05 pm Centre Wildlife Care <centrewildlifecare...> Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
6/6/17 3:36 pm Madison Botch <madisonbotch15...> Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
6/6/17 3:06 pm Joseph Verica <joeverica...> Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
6/6/17 2:01 pm Centre Wildlife Care <centrewildlifecare...> Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
6/6/17 1:30 pm Gregory William Grove <gwg2...> Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
6/6/17 1:10 pm Centre Wildlife Care <centrewildlifecare...> Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
6/5/17 3:18 pm JENNIFER ALAINE LEE <jal21...> The famous Yellow-headed Blackbird
6/5/17 11:30 am Julia Plummer <julia...> Re: white-winged dove near Williamsburg, Blair Co
6/4/17 5:37 pm Carl Engstrom <000021e74a5688a6-dmarc-request...> Re: white-winged dove near Williamsburg, Blair Co
6/4/17 12:27 pm Joseph Verica <joeverica...> Re: white-winged dove near Williamsburg, Blair Co
6/3/17 8:35 pm Tom Pluto <mapturtles...> Red-headed Woodpecker
6/3/17 1:49 pm Nick Bolgiano <nickbolgiano...> picture of white-winged dove
6/3/17 8:03 am JENNIFER ALAINE LEE <jal21...> Re: Yellow-headed Blackbird - Spring Mills
6/3/17 6:46 am Bob Fowles <rbf...> Re: Yellow-headed Blackbird - Spring Mills
6/2/17 1:10 pm Wayne Laubscher <wnlaubscher...> Re: Yellow-headed Blackbird - Spring Mills
6/1/17 4:14 pm Julia Plummer <julia...> Re: Yellow-headed Blackbird - Spring Mills
6/1/17 4:01 pm Joseph Verica <joeverica...> Yellow-headed Blackbird - Spring Mills
5/30/17 1:18 pm Nick Kerlin <bluebird6771...> VA Rail - Julian Wetlands
5/30/17 5:17 am Diane K. Bierly <dkb246...> Fwd: [PABIRDS] Breeding Bird Blitz June 16-19th
5/29/17 3:32 pm Gregory William Grove <gwg2...> Correction on Detweiler date - it's June 3! (not Jan 3)
5/29/17 3:20 pm Robert Snyder <birdphotoginpa...> Fwd: Titmouse Fledgling photos and Dunlin and Sanderling that were at Bald Eagle State Park last week.
5/29/17 3:13 pm Robert Snyder <birdphotoginpa...> Titmouse Fledgling photos and Dunlin and Sanderling that were at Bald Eagle State Park last week.
5/29/17 2:27 pm Gregory William Grove <gwg2...> Detweiler Run Natural Area Field Trip
5/29/17 12:49 pm Deborah Grove <dsg4...> Re: Huntingdon County Rarity of the week -- Red-necked Phalarope
5/29/17 12:44 pm Julia Plummer <julia...> Re: Huntingdon County Rarity of the week -- Red-necked Phalarope
5/25/17 4:26 pm Robert Snyder <birdphotoginpa...> Breeding plumage Dublin
5/25/17 7:05 am Brent Bacon <blbacon...> Help the PGC with your eagle nest photos
5/25/17 6:15 am Julia Plummer <julia...> Black-bellied plover
5/24/17 7:57 pm Craig&Jean Miller <csjhmiller...> Potluck Dinner
5/24/17 12:48 pm Jon Kauffman <jvk5019...> June 3rd Field Trip - Detweiler Run
5/23/17 1:48 pm Diane K. Bierly <dkb246...> Reminder--Bird Club Picnic--Wed., May 24--Millbrook Marsh
5/23/17 9:34 am Margaret Brittingham <mxb21...> Goshawk Tee Shirts
5/23/17 3:46 am David Facey <dcf2005...> Black vultures
 
Back to top
Date: 6/21/17 4:19 am
From: JENNIFER ALAINE LEE <jal21...>
Subject: Great Egret at paradise again tday
Fish hatchery bridge. Perched into NW trees when hatchery guys arrived. 33 GBH too.
from Jen
 

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Date: 6/20/17 10:09 pm
From: Wayne Laubscher <wnlaubscher...>
Subject: Kestrels up close & personal



Falcon retrieval & replacement.


Monday one of the young Kestrels in my nest box attached to my barn ended up in the grass below the box prematurely. Although seemingly close to fledging, she was not quite able to fly. She was likely sitting in the box opening when a strong thunderstorm came through and blew her out. I spotted her on the grass and and scooped her up, much to her objections. Obviously she did not appreciate her rescue. A neighbor and I put a ladder up and I put her back in the box. There were four other youngsters in the box, apparently in good health. Yesterday the adults were flying about and calling frequently. I think they were starting their behavior to coax the young birds to fledge.


Before I got to the little falcon I witnessed an encounter between the resident groundhog and the bird. The falcon jumped, flapped her wings and both did the "whoa, what are you?" reaction. Very funny.


Some photos attached.


Wayne Laubscher

Swissdale

Clinton Co.

<wnlaubscher...>



 

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Date: 6/20/17 3:44 am
From: David Facey <dcf2005...>
Subject: Great Egret
There is a Great Egret at Fisherman's Paradise this morning looking resplendent in the morning sun sharing the top of a pine with a GBH.


David Facey

State College

 

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Date: 6/18/17 10:00 am
From: Robert Snyder <birdphotoginpa...>
Subject: eBird -- BESP Upper Green's Run Rd to Bullit Run bridge 40.9949x-77.6996 -- Jun 18, 2017
I birded the lower section of Old Rt 150 to Bullit Run Bridge, on a mid-morning walk. Best find was a Worm-eating Warbler, in the woods on southeast side of the old road, about 400 yds east from Bullit Run.

First heard the birds dry, low Chpping Sparrow-like call, then saw it briefly on a branch above me, saw caramel head with black striped. Wasn't quick enough for a photo. Also had 2 B&W Warblers, a Hooded Warbler (singing) and 3 Ovenbirds. Two juvenile Bald Eagles circled low overhead (must be new crop from the nest up near the spillway marsh).

Wild Parsnip growing along edge of gravel parking lot at the bend in the Upper Green's Run access road.

Keep cool, and safe Birding!
Bob Snyder

BESP Upper Green's Run Rd to Bullit Run bridge 40.9949x-77.6996
Jun 18, 2017
10:36 AM
Traveling
1.00 miles
115 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Walked old Route 150 from Upper Green's Run access parking lot, thru the gate and to Bullit Run bridge, then retraced steps back to car. Best finds. 2 June Mike Bald Eagles soaring overhead, 1 Black and White Warbler in close view, and a brief encounter with a Worm-eating Warbler: best find of day.
Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.5.2 Build 140

2 Bald Eagle -- Both bird in Juvenile plumage
1 Red-tailed Hawk
5 Mourning Dove
1 Northern Flicker
2 Eastern Phoebe
1 Great Crested Flycatcher
6 Red-eyed Vireo
1 Blue Jay
2 American Crow
1 Fish Crow
5 Tree Swallow
1 Black-capped Chickadee
1 White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern)
2 Carolina Wren
1 Wood Thrush
6 Gray Catbird
4 Brown Thrasher
3 Ovenbird
1 Worm-eating Warbler -- Heard and seen multiple times, I was not able to get a photo. Saw the dull yellow brownish (guide calls it caramel) head with distinct black lines. Chipping Sparrow like song only softer and more metallic. Bird was in deciduous forest understory and forest edge where I was walking.
2 Black-and-white Warbler
6 Common Yellowthroat
2 Hooded Warbler
2 Yellow Warbler
1 Field Sparrow
6 Song Sparrow
12 Eastern Towhee
1 Scarlet Tanager -- Female
9 Northern Cardinal
2 Red-winged Blackbird

Number of Taxa: 29


Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 6/18/17 6:50 am
From: JAMES WILLIAM DUNN <jwd6...>
Subject: common snipe
This morning I had a Wilson's snipe fossicking in the ruts of the tire tracks on the very wet road? parallel to the left border of Curtin Wetlands. There was a snipe there in the summer many years ago.

Jim Dunn

<jwd6...>

 

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Date: 6/16/17 6:12 pm
From: LAWRENCE WILLIAM RAMSEY <lwr...>
Subject: Nesting Season
The local nesting season for Orioles is entering the fledging phase here along Sinking Creek and we will miss the two nests in the pics close to the house that we have been watching. This is the first year we have had the Orchard Orioles close by although we have confirmed breeding activity the last two.
larry

 

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Date: 6/15/17 5:33 am
From: Diane K. Bierly <dkb246...>
Subject: Philipsburg Night Hawks
I was driving through Philipsburg last night at dusk and decided to take a
detour through the business district to listen for night hawks.

I was not disappointed.

I heard two within moments of parking my car.

Diane

------------------------
Diane K. Bierly
State College Bird Club
http://www.scbirdcl.org/
 

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Date: 6/14/17 5:08 am
From: Diane K. Bierly <dkb246...>
Subject: Fwd: [PABIRDS] Breeding Bird Blitz
------ Original Message ------
Received: Wed, 14 Jun 2017 06:50:59 AM EDT
From: Vern Gauthier <pabirder...>
To: <PABIRDS...>
Subject: [PABIRDS] Breeding Bird Blitz

Greetings!
The FOURTH ANNUAL BREEDING BIRD BLITZ will be taking place THIS WEEKEND,
Friday, June 16th through Monday, June 19th. Another opportunity to add some
great PA Breeding Bird data to eBird! What will be different this year is NO
PRIZES.
Just like the Migration Count or a Christmas Bird Count the Blitz is
something to do for the sheer enjoyment of it, AND knowing the data you submit
to eBird will be helping out the birds we find so fascinating.
Some approaches to the Blitz:
1. Bird your local patch – You might be surprised how rewarding it is to
track down the local breeders. Do you know how much easier it is to get a good
look at warblers when they are on territory rather than migrating? Take the
time to explore your local area and try local nearby spot you don’t spend
much time at birding or just haven’t got around to before.
2. Bird a neglected county or two - Plan a Breeding Bird Blitz Road Trip with
some friends in one of the PA Counties that does not get much love when it
comes the number of eBird checklists submitted. Below is a list of the
counties from the least to most and the number of eBird checklists submitted
all time for each county.
Cameron - 698
Sullivan – 1,205
Elk – 1,241
Jefferson – 1,389
Wyoming – 1,448
Venango – 1,537
Snyder – 1,642
Warren – 1,708
Fulton – 1,886
Forrest – 1,982
Columbia – 2,045
Union – 2,060
Green – 2,116
Potter – 2,145
McKean – 2,168
3. Create a Competition – If birding competitively is your thing then create
a competition for you and some birding friends over one or more day of the
Blitz. Maybe held in the neglected counties?
4. Use of Breeding Codes – Now that you can include Breeding Codes on the
mobile app this task has become a lot easier. Choose one day to include
highest breeding codes on all your checklists or maybe a checklist or two each
day over the course of the four days.
5. Go Nocturnal – How about some Owls, Whip-poor-wills, and Rails?
6. Send your Stories and Pictures – Send in your stories and pictures to
<breedingbirdblitz...> so we can include them in the next edition of the
Pileated or post them on the PSO Facebook Page www.facebook.com/pabirds/
DO THE BLITZ!
Vern Gauthier
Cumberland County
 

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Date: 6/13/17 3:07 pm
From: Nick Bolgiano <nickbolgiano...>
Subject: Tuesday search for cerulean warblers above Lower Trail
I found 3 singing male cerulean warblers several hundred feet above the
Lower Trail today - looking S from the rt 22 flea market, on top of the
ridge to the right of the river.

The location is above what once was the Goodman stone quarry - there are
some concrete ruins along the trail. I didn't appreciate how extensive this
quarry was until I viewed it from across the river on Tussey Mt last June
(first picture) and since then I've wondered if it could have created
cerulean warbler habitat - some are found where ridge height creates an
uneven tree canopy. The old quarry extended perhaps 1 mi along the face of
that ridge. Today, I walked on the ridge top above - the ceruleans were in
the trees at the very top. Pictures 2-4 show the scenery that these birds
experience. I could hear Louisiana waterthrush on the river below.

I watched one male cerulean with a small caterpillar in its bill - the bird
and I were near the same elevation so I had a great view. The
bird repeatedly hit the caterpillar against a branch to subdue it, all the
while singing about every 5 sec with the caterpillar in its bill. Once it
swallowed the caterpillar, it was able to sing with its bill wide open
again.

Also, 11 worm-eating warblers.

Nick Bolgiano

 

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Date: 6/12/17 6:47 pm
From: Jeff Gallo <psugallo...>
Subject: Ohio hotspots
Going to be traveling along northern Ohio and into Michigan later in June. Probably will have a few hours to bird along the way. Planning to get out and stretch my legs at Magee Marsh unless someone has a better suggestion based on the time of year and having missed migration. I welcome messages with any thoughts (or must stop food spots!).

Thanks,

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 6/12/17 5:19 pm
From: Elizabeth Kirchner <epkirchner...>
Subject: binoc harness
...at that neat picnic back in May, I saw some folks with a new-style binoc
harness. I need one! What do you recommend?

thanks for any info you can send.

Betty K.

 

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Date: 6/11/17 4:22 pm
From: Robert Snyder <birdphotoginpa...>
Subject: Horned Larks in tilled field at Horticulture Farm
Hello All,

On June 8, I was checking the status of our fields at the Horticulture
Farm, and noticed a 3-4 sparrow-sized Horned Larks on the field that had
been recently tilled. This has always been a hard bird to photograph,
always eluding if I approach on foot. This time using the car as a blind I
parked at one end of the field. The larks slowly worked across the field
hunting insects. They eventually came within 20 ft of the car.

Patience paid off and so here is the link to the photographs.

http://www.pbase.com/bobsnyderphotography/horned_larks_2017


Bob Snyder

--
Do the best you can, where you are, with what you have.
Theodore Roosevelt

 

Back to top
Date: 6/10/17 6:37 am
From: Chad Kauffman <chadkauffman...>
Subject: Fwd: [PABIRDS] Hawk Counter Position at Waggoner's Gap



-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: [PABIRDS] Hawk Counter Position at Waggoner's Gap
Date: Sat, 10 Jun 2017 13:17:38 +0000
From: Weidensaul, Amy <aweidensaul...>
Reply-To: Weidensaul, Amy <aweidensaul...>
To: <PABIRDS...>



Audubon PA is hiring a hawk counter for this fall at Waggoner's Gap (Carlisle, PA). This is a 12 week position from Sept. to Nov.
Job posting and instructions on how to apply can be found at https://careers-audubon.icims.com/jobs/3239/hawk-counter/job.
Please help to spread the word.
Thanks, Amy

Amy Weidensaul
Director of Community Conservation & Education
Audubon Pennsylvania
(570) 617 9748 (cell)

--
***See our new video https://youtu.be/3gyjkxmmFS4 *** ***Check us out on
facebook - https://www.facebook.com/kauffmaninsurance/ ***Call us
717-436-8257 Toll free 866-588-7831

 

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Date: 6/9/17 2:41 pm
From: Nick Bolgiano <nickbolgiano...>
Subject: cerulean warblers in SGL 118, Blair Co
Today, I continued my quest to determine where cerulean warblers are found
near the Frankstown Branch of the Juniata River:

On Tussey Mt above the Lower Trail between Mt. Etna and Williamsburg (above
where white-winged dove was seen), there is a logging road on State Game
Lands 118, starting at Covedale Rd south out of Williamsburg. There was a
shelterwood cut there several years ago, leaving large trees with gaps.
Last year, I found 7 cerulean warblers there. Today, I found 9. This is the
only concentration that I've found that far away from the river.

From that cerulean cluster, I then walked down the steep escarpment of
Tussey Mt to the river, finding no ceruleans along the way - same result as
I've found on the north end of the Lower Trail, with no ceruleans in the
unbroken forest on the steep side of Tussey.

I then walked the game lands river road thru the rehab center, finding 3
more ceruleans along the river. Found 1 more cerulean along a small stream
as I walked back up Covedale Rd to the SGL parking lot.

Nick Bolgiano

 

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Date: 6/9/17 11:16 am
From: Dnadeb <dsg4...>
Subject: Re: [PABIRDS] Registration for the PSO Annual Meeting begins on June 10th
Just wanted to mention that Ted Floyd is the speaker at the banquet Saturday night. Not only is he the Editor of the ABA publication Birding but he is also an ex-president of the State College Bird Club. He did his graduate work at PSU. He is a great speaker and a FUN guy to go Birding with. I went Birding with him many years ago in Colorado --just the two of us--and he kept a list of not only the species but different morphs etc. He showed me all the subspecies of Juncos that happened to be residents that winter near Boulder. I didn't get to see all of the Rosy Finches he said we would see but I had an unbelievable day.
Deb

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 9, 2017, at 1:41 PM, Chad Kauffman <chadkauffman...> wrote:
>
>
>
>
> -------- Forwarded Message --------
> Subject: [PABIRDS] Registration for the PSO Annual Meeting begins on June 10th
> Date: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 13:05:59 -0400
> From: Vern Gauthier <pabirder...>
> Reply-To: Vern Gauthier <pabirder...>
> To: <PABIRDS...>
>
> Greetings!
> Registration for the 2017 Pennsylvania Society for Ornithology (PSO) Annual Meeting to be held in Carlisle (Cumberland County) begins tomorrow (June 10). While the meeting is not until September 15-17, it behooves folks who are coming to register early as sign ups for field trips will occur when a person registers. The number of people allowed on any trip is capped, so spaces on any of the field trips are first come first serve. Things to know:
> 1. Non PSO members can take part in the Annual Meeting.
> 2. There is a registration fee which enables one to take part in the Saturday and Sunday field trips and attend the seminars. The registration fee also help covers expenses for our speakers, and the Conservation and Poole Awards and other costs associated with the meeting.
> 3. There is a separate fee for the Saturday Night Banquet.
> 4. This year we have a special edition t-shirt for the meeting in Iris Blue or Irish Green, with the PSO emblem on the front and a Dickcissel on the back, that is available to people who attend the meeting. Collector items for sure! They will be handed out when a person when the check in at the meeting.
> 5. All the information you need can be found in the June edition of the PSO Pileated (our newsletter) or by going to the PSO website and looking under the Annual Meeting tab.
> 6. You can register online at the PSO website or at https://pso.ticketspice.com/pennsylvania-society-for-ornithology-annual-meeting.
> 7. You can also register by mail. You can download and print a form at the PSO website www.pabirds.org/Index.html or you can find instructions on PSO website or Pileated.
> 8. There will be no late or walk in registrations. All online registrations need to be completed by August 25th and all mailed registrations need to be postmarked by August 20th.
> I hope to see you in Carlisle in September!
> Vern Gauthier
> Vice President PSO
>
> --
> ***See our new video https://youtu.be/3gyjkxmmFS4 *** ***Check us out on facebook - https://www.facebook.com/kauffmaninsurance/ ***Call us 717-436-8257 Toll free 866-588-7831

 

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Date: 6/9/17 11:06 am
From: Dnadeb <dsg4...>
Subject: Re: [PABIRDS] Registration for the PSO Annual Meeting begins on June 10th


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 9, 2017, at 1:41 PM, Chad Kauffman <chadkauffman...> wrote:
>
>
>
>
> -------- Forwarded Message --------
> Subject: [PABIRDS] Registration for the PSO Annual Meeting begins on June 10th
> Date: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 13:05:59 -0400
> From: Vern Gauthier <pabirder...>
> Reply-To: Vern Gauthier <pabirder...>
> To: <PABIRDS...>
>
> Greetings!
> Registration for the 2017 Pennsylvania Society for Ornithology (PSO) Annual Meeting to be held in Carlisle (Cumberland County) begins tomorrow (June 10). While the meeting is not until September 15-17, it behooves folks who are coming to register early as sign ups for field trips will occur when a person registers. The number of people allowed on any trip is capped, so spaces on any of the field trips are first come first serve. Things to know:
> 1. Non PSO members can take part in the Annual Meeting.
> 2. There is a registration fee which enables one to take part in the Saturday and Sunday field trips and attend the seminars. The registration fee also help covers expenses for our speakers, and the Conservation and Poole Awards and other costs associated with the meeting.
> 3. There is a separate fee for the Saturday Night Banquet.
> 4. This year we have a special edition t-shirt for the meeting in Iris Blue or Irish Green, with the PSO emblem on the front and a Dickcissel on the back, that is available to people who attend the meeting. Collector items for sure! They will be handed out when a person when the check in at the meeting.
> 5. All the information you need can be found in the June edition of the PSO Pileated (our newsletter) or by going to the PSO website and looking under the Annual Meeting tab.
> 6. You can register online at the PSO website or at https://pso.ticketspice.com/pennsylvania-society-for-ornithology-annual-meeting.
> 7. You can also register by mail. You can download and print a form at the PSO website www.pabirds.org/Index.html or you can find instructions on PSO website or Pileated.
> 8. There will be no late or walk in registrations. All online registrations need to be completed by August 25th and all mailed registrations need to be postmarked by August 20th.
> I hope to see you in Carlisle in September!
> Vern Gauthier
> Vice President PSO
>
> --
> ***See our new video https://youtu.be/3gyjkxmmFS4 *** ***Check us out on facebook - https://www.facebook.com/kauffmaninsurance/ ***Call us 717-436-8257 Toll free 866-588-7831

 

Back to top
Date: 6/9/17 10:41 am
From: Chad Kauffman <chadkauffman...>
Subject: Fwd: [PABIRDS] Registration for the PSO Annual Meeting begins on June 10th



-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: [PABIRDS] Registration for the PSO Annual Meeting begins on
June 10th
Date: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 13:05:59 -0400
From: Vern Gauthier <pabirder...>
Reply-To: Vern Gauthier <pabirder...>
To: <PABIRDS...>



Greetings!
Registration for the 2017 Pennsylvania Society for Ornithology (PSO) Annual Meeting to be held in Carlisle (Cumberland County) begins tomorrow (June 10). While the meeting is not until September 15-17, it behooves folks who are coming to register early as sign ups for field trips will occur when a person registers. The number of people allowed on any trip is capped, so spaces on any of the field trips are first come first serve. Things to know:
1. Non PSO members can take part in the Annual Meeting.
2. There is a registration fee which enables one to take part in the Saturday and Sunday field trips and attend the seminars. The registration fee also help covers expenses for our speakers, and the Conservation and Poole Awards and other costs associated with the meeting.
3. There is a separate fee for the Saturday Night Banquet.
4. This year we have a special edition t-shirt for the meeting in Iris Blue or Irish Green, with the PSO emblem on the front and a Dickcissel on the back, that is available to people who attend the meeting. Collector items for sure! They will be handed out when a person when the check in at the meeting.
5. All the information you need can be found in the June edition of the PSO Pileated (our newsletter) or by going to the PSO website and looking under the Annual Meeting tab.
6. You can register online at the PSO website or at https://pso.ticketspice.com/pennsylvania-society-for-ornithology-annual-meeting.
7. You can also register by mail. You can download and print a form at the PSO website www.pabirds.org/Index.html or you can find instructions on PSO website or Pileated.
8. There will be no late or walk in registrations. All online registrations need to be completed by August 25th and all mailed registrations need to be postmarked by August 20th.
I hope to see you in Carlisle in September!
Vern Gauthier
Vice President PSO

--
***See our new video https://youtu.be/3gyjkxmmFS4 *** ***Check us out on
facebook - https://www.facebook.com/kauffmaninsurance/ ***Call us
717-436-8257 Toll free 866-588-7831

 

Back to top
Date: 6/8/17 12:18 pm
From: Jason Hill <hill.jason.michael...>
Subject: Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
+1 to kauffman!

I think this entire process has been great. An ornithological mystery
concerning a bird identity, which we more or less get to definitely solve.
How often does that actually happen?

As a result, I am adjusting the Centre County eBird review guidelines for
Tundra and Trumpeter Swans, and I will now require a notarized copy of the
bill measurements for all swan records.
Thank you for your compliance everyone,
Jason

On Thu, Jun 8, 2017 at 2:42 PM, Chad Kauffman <chadkauffman...>
wrote:

> that should all make us more confident in the swan discussions from here
> on out. :)
>
>
>
> On 6/8/2017 2:35 PM, Joseph Verica wrote:
>
> Dear Robyn and SC Birders
>
> Robyn kindly made some time for me to visit her facility and take some
> measurements of the swan. Based on the measurements, it appears that Robyn
> is correct. The biostats say Tundra Swan! :D
>
> Here is the expected range for the stats as reported in the Pyle II Guide
>
> *Trumpeter Swans*: [adult Male=M; adult Female=F; First Year either sex =
> FY]
> Longest toe (usually middle): mean >142 mm (but range from 115 to 172
> mm) for all ages/sexes;
> Anterior end of nares (nostril) to tip of bill: >= 50 mm for all
> ages/sexes [see below]*
>
> *Tundra Swans*:
> Longest toe (usually middle): mean =120-125 mm (range from 110 to 132
> mm) for all ages/sexes;
> Anterior end of nares to tip of bill: typically 43-45 mm for all
> ages/sexes [see below]*
>
> *considered to be the best measurement to separate these two species
>
> My measurements were as follows:
>
> *Longest toe = 120 mm*
> *Anterior end of nares to tip of bill = 44 mm*
>
> Those are both "spot on" for Tundra Swan. So despite the birds physical
> appearance, it seems it is a Tundra Swan
>
> Take care
> Joe Verica
>
>
> On Thu, Jun 8, 2017 at 10:45 AM, Centre Wildlife Care <
> <centrewildlifecare...> wrote:
>
>> Interesting discussion for sure!
>>
>>
>>
>> The reason that I think that this is a tundra is size.
>>
>>
>>
>> Normal weight range for a tundra is 7-21 pounds
>>
>> Normal weight range for a trumpeter is 15-30 pounds
>>
>>
>>
>> This bird weighs 6.5 pounds. This bird is small for a tundra.
>> Trumpeters are dramatically larger in size.
>>
>>
>>
>> Does anyone know if there is a way to have this birds DNA typed to
>> identify species?
>>
>>
>>
>> Robyn
>>
>> *****
>>
>> Robyn Graboski
>> Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
>> Centre Wildlife Care
>> PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
>> www.centrewildlifecare.org
>> 814-692-0004
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> *From:* Robert Snyder [mailto:<rhs2...>]
>> *Sent:* Wednesday, June 07, 2017 12:05 PM
>> *To:* <robyn...>
>> *Cc:* StateCollegeBirdClub
>>
>> *Subject:* Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
>>
>>
>>
>> Hello Robyn,
>>
>>
>>
>> My two-cents worth, I think it looks like a Trumpeter Swan.
>>
>>
>>
>> Large bill, heavy looking neck, larger head with the 'peaked' crown.
>>
>>
>>
>> Here's two links to some photos I took of tagged Trumpeter Swans that
>> were in Clinton County on Bald Eagle Creek in March 2011:
>>
>>
>>
>> http://www.pbase.com/bobsnyderphotography/image/133078367
>>
>>
>>
>> http://www.pbase.com/bobsnyderphotography/image/133807237
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Of course proper measurements according to taxonomy would be more
>> decisive, as there have been many debates between Tundra Swan and Trumpeter
>> Swan over untagged birds in the past.
>>
>>
>>
>> Bob Snyder
>>
>>
>>
>> Robert Snyder
>> Research Technologist III
>> Penn State University
>> Dept of Plant Science
>> Rm 219 Tyson Bldg
>> University Park, PA 16802
>> Office: 814-863-6168 <%28814%29%20863-6168>
>> Cell: 814-753-2629 <%28814%29%20753-2629>-
>> Fax: 814-863-6139 <%28814%29%20863-6139>
>> <rhs2...>
>>
>> "Do what you can, with what you have, where you are."
>> Teddy Roosevelt
>>
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> *From: *"Centre Wildlife Care" <centrewildlifecare...>
>> *To: *"StateCollegeBirdClub" <SCBIRDCL...>
>> *Sent: *Wednesday, June 7, 2017 10:33:57 AM
>> *Subject: *Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
>>
>>
>>
>> Hi Joe,
>>
>>
>>
>> You can come over and measure the toes. J I’ll hold the bird. This is
>> quite an interesting discussion.
>>
>>
>>
>> Robyn
>>
>>
>>
>> *****
>>
>> Robyn Graboski
>> Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
>> Centre Wildlife Care
>> PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
>> www.centrewildlifecare.org
>> 814-692-0004
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> *From:* State College (PA) Bird Club [mailto:<SCBIRDCL...>] *On
>> Behalf Of *Joseph Verica
>> *Sent:* Wednesday, June 07, 2017 9:51 AM
>> *To:* <SCBIRDCL...>
>> *Subject:* Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
>>
>>
>>
>> Thanks Jason
>>
>>
>>
>> Normally I would not make such a fuss over a swan ID; however, this swan
>> appears to be untagged. All the previous Trumpeters I have seen in the east
>> have ALL been wing tagged. With Robyn's permission, I have posted some of
>> the photos on the PA Birds ID page on Facebook. So far, everyone who has
>> seen the photo and commented says Trumpeter.
>>
>>
>>
>> Take care
>>
>> Joe Verica
>>
>>
>>
>> On Wed, Jun 7, 2017 at 9:11 AM, Jason Hill <hill.jason.michael...>
>> wrote:
>>
>> I defer to Robyn's experience with these species in hand, but I agree
>> with Greg and Joe--the bird certainly *looks* more like a Trumpeter
>> Swan. I opened up my Pyle II guide (used for ageing/sexing non-Passerines
>> when banding) and the Bird's of North America account for these two
>> species. There are a few physical measurements (that, unlike weight,
>> shouldn't vary with the physical condition/nutritional status of the bird)
>> that should help separate these two species. Details below:
>>
>>
>>
>> *Trumpeter Swans*: [adult Male=M; adult Female=F; First Year either sex
>> = FY]
>>
>> Longest toe (usually middle): mean >142 mm (but range from 115 to
>> 172 mm) for all ages/sexes;
>>
>> Anterior end of nares (nostril) to tip of bill: >= 50 mm for all
>> ages/sexes [see below]**
>>
>> Bill length: [varies between populations] FY generally around
>> 110-117 mm, adults M= 112-120 mm and F = 116 mm
>>
>>
>>
>> *Tundra Swans*:
>>
>> Longest toe (usually middle): mean =120-125 mm (range from 110 to
>> 132 mm) for all ages/sexes;
>>
>> Anterior end of nares to tip of bill: typically 43-45 mm for all
>> ages/sexes [see below]**
>>
>> Bill length: FY around 90 mm, adult M = 103 mm, adult F = 101.
>>
>>
>>
>> **considered to be the best measurement to separate these two species;
>> only ~1.5% of the largest male Tundra Swans have >50 mm nares to tip
>> measurement.
>>
>>
>>
>> Of course, these are averages, and there will be really large Tundras and
>> really small Trumpeters.
>>
>>
>>
>> Other measurements (e.g., tarsus ) not typically useful in
>> differentiating the two species.
>>
>> Cheers,
>>
>> Jason
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Tue, Jun 6, 2017 at 9:05 PM, Centre Wildlife Care <
>> <centrewildlifecare...> wrote:
>>
>> Thank you all for your input, but having worked “hands” on with both
>> species, I can say that this is surely a tundra swan. It only weighs 3
>> Kg. They are dramatically different once you see both of them in person.
>>
>>
>>
>> Robyn
>>
>> *****
>>
>> Robyn Graboski
>> Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
>> Centre Wildlife Care
>> PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
>> www.centrewildlifecare.org
>> 814-692-0004
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> *From:* Madison Botch [mailto:<madisonbotch15...>]
>> *Sent:* Tuesday, June 06, 2017 6:25 PM
>> *To:* <SCBIRDCL...>; <robyn...>
>> *Subject:* Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
>>
>>
>>
>> Hey Robyn,
>>
>>
>>
>> I see there has been some confusion about the exact species of your found
>> swan! I hope the following helps sort it out:
>>
>>
>>
>> Trumpeter swans have orange at the edge of the bill, whereas tundra swans
>> will have yellow lores. Both will not occur on the same bird. This is the
>> main species determination when the black on the face isn't conclusive.
>>
>> In addition, trumpeter swans frequently have an s-shaped crook to their
>> neck and their neck seems to rest much more on their back than that of
>> Tundra swans.
>>
>>
>>
>> I know juvenile birds are sometimes hard to identify when it comes down
>> to minute differences such as these, and you may have already known these
>> identifiers, but I hope this helps someone somehow! I couldn't make a good
>> determination myself based solely on the picture we received. I know this
>> swan will be taken great care of regardless of whether he's a trumpeter or
>> tundra!
>>
>>
>>
>> Hope all is well,
>>
>> Madison Botch
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Tue, Jun 6, 2017 at 4:10 PM Centre Wildlife Care <
>> <centrewildlifecare...> wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>> I just picked up this juvenile tundra swan. As we (Sue DeArment retired
>> rehabber) were driving through the area, I got a call about a big white
>> bird just sitting in the grass near one of the office buildings. We were
>> able to easily pick it up with a blanket…it is very thin and very weak. I
>> am getting ready to do some blood work on the bird to see if we can figure
>> out what is going on.
>>
>>
>>
>> The interesting thing is the orange feathers on the neck. I thought
>> initially that the feathers were marked in some way, but they are not…they
>> are really orange.
>>
>>
>>
>> Robyn
>>
>> *****
>>
>> Robyn Graboski
>> Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
>>
>>
>> Centre Wildlife Care
>> PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
>> www.centrewildlifecare.org
>> 814-692-0004
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>> Jason M. Hill, PhD
>>
>> Conservation Biologist
>>
>> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
>>
>> 802.649.1431 Ext. 212 <%28802%29%20649-1431>
>>
>> http://vtecostudies.org/about-us/staff/jason-hill/
>>
>>
>>
>> "The universe works on a math equation that never even ever really even
>> ends in the end."
>>
>> -Isaac Brock
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>> ++++++++++++++++
>>
>>
>>
>> "If you listen to the thrush and hear a thrush, you've not really heard
>> the thrush. But if you listen to a thrush and hear a miracle, *then*
>> you've heard the thrush." - Zen Parable
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
> --
> ++++++++++++++++
>
> "If you listen to the thrush and hear a thrush, you've not really heard
> the thrush. But if you listen to a thrush and hear a miracle, *then*
> you've heard the thrush." - Zen Parable
>
>
> --
> ***See our new video https://youtu.be/3gyjkxmmFS4 *** ***Check us out on
> facebook - https://www.facebook.com/kauffmaninsurance/ ***Call us
> 717-436-8257 <(717)%20436-8257> Toll free 866-588-7831 <(866)%20588-7831>
>



--
Jason M. Hill, PhD
Conservation Biologist
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
802.649.1431 Ext. 212
http://vtecostudies.org/about-us/staff/jason-hill/

"The universe works on a math equation that never even ever really even
ends in the end."
-Isaac Brock

 

Back to top
Date: 6/8/17 11:43 am
From: Chad Kauffman <chadkauffman...>
Subject: Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
that should all make us more confident in the swan discussions from here
on out. :)



On 6/8/2017 2:35 PM, Joseph Verica wrote:
> Dear Robyn and SC Birders
>
> Robyn kindly made some time for me to visit her facility and take some
> measurements of the swan. Based on the measurements, it appears that
> Robyn is correct. The biostats say Tundra Swan! :D
>
> Here is the expected range for the stats as reported in the Pyle II Guide
>
> *Trumpeter Swans*: [adult Male=M; adult Female=F; First Year either
> sex = FY]
> Longest toe (usually middle): mean >142 mm (but range from 115 to
> 172 mm) for all ages/sexes;
> Anterior end of nares (nostril) to tip of bill: >= 50 mm for all
> ages/sexes [see below]*
>
> *Tundra Swans*:
> Longest toe (usually middle): mean =120-125 mm (range from 110 to
> 132 mm) for all ages/sexes;
> Anterior end of nares to tip of bill: typically 43-45 mm for all
> ages/sexes [see below]*
>
> *considered to be the best measurement to separate these two species
>
> My measurements were as follows:
>
> *Longest toe = 120 mm*
> *Anterior end of nares to tip of bill = 44 mm*
>
> Those are both "spot on" for Tundra Swan. So despite the birds
> physical appearance, it seems it is a Tundra Swan
>
> Take care
> Joe Verica
>
>
> On Thu, Jun 8, 2017 at 10:45 AM, Centre Wildlife Care
> <centrewildlifecare...> <mailto:<centrewildlifecare...>>
> wrote:
>
> Interesting discussion for sure!
>
> The reason that I think that this is a tundra is size.
>
> Normal weight range for a tundra is 7-21 pounds
>
> Normal weight range for a trumpeter is 15-30 pounds
>
> This bird weighs 6.5 pounds. This bird is small for a tundra.
> Trumpeters are dramatically larger in size.
>
> Does anyone know if there is a way to have this birds DNA typed to
> identify species?
>
> Robyn
>
> *****
>
> Robyn Graboski
> Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
> Centre Wildlife Care
> PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
> www.centrewildlifecare.org <http://www.centrewildlifecare.org/>
> 814-692-0004 <tel:814-692-0004>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> *From:*Robert Snyder [mailto:<rhs2...> <mailto:<rhs2...>]
> *Sent:* Wednesday, June 07, 2017 12:05 PM
> *To:* <robyn...> <mailto:<robyn...>
> *Cc:* StateCollegeBirdClub
>
>
> *Subject:* Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
>
> Hello Robyn,
>
> My two-cents worth, I think it looks like a Trumpeter Swan.
>
> Large bill, heavy looking neck, larger head with the 'peaked' crown.
>
> Here's two links to some photos I took of tagged Trumpeter Swans
> that were in Clinton County on Bald Eagle Creek in March 2011:
>
> http://www.pbase.com/bobsnyderphotography/image/133078367
> <http://www.pbase.com/bobsnyderphotography/image/133078367>
>
> http://www.pbase.com/bobsnyderphotography/image/133807237
> <http://www.pbase.com/bobsnyderphotography/image/133807237>
>
> Of course proper measurements according to taxonomy would be more
> decisive, as there have been many debates between Tundra Swan and
> Trumpeter Swan over untagged birds in the past.
>
> Bob Snyder
>
> Robert Snyder
> Research Technologist III
> Penn State University
> Dept of Plant Science
> Rm 219 Tyson Bldg
> University Park, PA 16802
> Office: 814-863-6168 <tel:%28814%29%20863-6168>
> Cell: 814-753-2629 <tel:%28814%29%20753-2629>-
> Fax: 814-863-6139 <tel:%28814%29%20863-6139>
> <rhs2...> <mailto:<rhs2...>
>
> "Do what you can, with what you have, where you are."
> Teddy Roosevelt
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> *From: *"Centre Wildlife Care" <centrewildlifecare...>
> <mailto:<centrewildlifecare...>>
> *To: *"StateCollegeBirdClub" <SCBIRDCL...>
> <mailto:<SCBIRDCL...>>
> *Sent: *Wednesday, June 7, 2017 10:33:57 AM
> *Subject: *Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
>
> Hi Joe,
>
> You can come over and measure the toes. JI’ll hold the bird. This
> is quite an interesting discussion.
>
> Robyn
>
> *****
>
> Robyn Graboski
> Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
> Centre Wildlife Care
> PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
> www.centrewildlifecare.org <http://www.centrewildlifecare.org/>
> 814-692-0004 <tel:814-692-0004>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> *From:*State College (PA) Bird Club [mailto:<SCBIRDCL...>
> <mailto:<SCBIRDCL...>] *On Behalf Of *Joseph Verica
> *Sent:* Wednesday, June 07, 2017 9:51 AM
> *To:* <SCBIRDCL...> <mailto:<SCBIRDCL...>
> *Subject:* Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
>
> Thanks Jason
>
> Normally I would not make such a fuss over a swan ID; however,
> this swan appears to be untagged. All the previous Trumpeters I
> have seen in the east have ALL been wing tagged. With Robyn's
> permission, I have posted some of the photos on the PA Birds ID
> page on Facebook. So far, everyone who has seen the photo and
> commented says Trumpeter.
>
> Take care
>
> Joe Verica
>
> On Wed, Jun 7, 2017 at 9:11 AM, Jason Hill
> <hill.jason.michael...>
> <mailto:<hill.jason.michael...>> wrote:
>
> I defer to Robyn's experience with these species in hand, but I
> agree with Greg and Joe--the bird certainly _looks_ more like a
> Trumpeter Swan. I opened up my Pyle II guide (used for
> ageing/sexing non-Passerines when banding) and the Bird's of North
> America account for these two species. There are a few physical
> measurements (that, unlike weight, shouldn't vary with the
> physical condition/nutritional status of the bird) that should
> help separate these two species. Details below:
>
> *Trumpeter Swans*: [adult Male=M; adult Female=F; First Year
> either sex = FY]
>
> Longest toe (usually middle): mean >142 mm (but range from 115 to
> 172 mm) for all ages/sexes;
>
> Anterior end of nares (nostril) to tip of bill: >= 50 mm for all
> ages/sexes [see below]**
>
> Bill length: [varies between populations] FY generally around
> 110-117 mm, adults M= 112-120 mm and F = 116 mm
>
> *Tundra Swans*:
>
> Longest toe (usually middle): mean =120-125 mm (range from 110 to
> 132 mm) for all ages/sexes;
>
> Anterior end of nares to tip of bill: typically 43-45 mm for all
> ages/sexes [see below]**
>
> Bill length: FY around 90 mm, adult M = 103 mm, adult F = 101.
>
> **considered to be the best measurement to separate these two
> species; only ~1.5% of the largest male Tundra Swans have >50 mm
> nares to tip measurement.
>
> Of course, these are averages, and there will be really large
> Tundras and really small Trumpeters.
>
> Other measurements (e.g., tarsus ) not typically useful in
> differentiating the two species.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Jason
>
> On Tue, Jun 6, 2017 at 9:05 PM, Centre Wildlife Care
> <centrewildlifecare...>
> <mailto:<centrewildlifecare...>> wrote:
>
> Thank you all for your input, but having worked “hands” on with
> both species, I can say that this is surely a tundra swan. It
> only weighs 3 Kg. They are dramatically different once you see
> both of them in person.
>
> Robyn
>
> *****
>
> Robyn Graboski
> Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
> Centre Wildlife Care
> PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
> www.centrewildlifecare.org <http://www.centrewildlifecare.org/>
> 814-692-0004 <tel:814-692-0004>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> *From:*Madison Botch [mailto:<madisonbotch15...>
> <mailto:<madisonbotch15...>]
> *Sent:* Tuesday, June 06, 2017 6:25 PM
> *To:* <SCBIRDCL...> <mailto:<SCBIRDCL...>;
> <robyn...> <mailto:<robyn...>
> *Subject:* Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
>
> Hey Robyn,
>
> I see there has been some confusion about the exact species of
> your found swan! I hope the following helps sort it out:
>
> Trumpeter swans have orange at the edge of the bill, whereas
> tundra swans will have yellow lores. Both will not occur on the
> same bird. This is the main species determination when the black
> on the face isn't conclusive.
>
> In addition, trumpeter swans frequently have an s-shaped crook to
> their neck and their neck seems to rest much more on their back
> than that of Tundra swans.
>
> I know juvenile birds are sometimes hard to identify when it comes
> down to minute differences such as these, and you may have already
> known these identifiers, but I hope this helps someone somehow! I
> couldn't make a good determination myself based solely on the
> picture we received. I know this swan will be taken great care of
> regardless of whether he's a trumpeter or tundra!
>
> Hope all is well,
>
> Madison Botch
>
> On Tue, Jun 6, 2017 at 4:10 PM Centre Wildlife Care
> <centrewildlifecare...>
> <mailto:<centrewildlifecare...>> wrote:
>
> I just picked up this juvenile tundra swan. As we (Sue
> DeArment retired rehabber) were driving through the area, I
> got a call about a big white bird just sitting in the grass
> near one of the office buildings. We were able to easily pick
> it up with a blanket…it is very thin and very weak. I am
> getting ready to do some blood work on the bird to see if we
> can figure out what is going on.
>
> The interesting thing is the orange feathers on the neck. I
> thought initially that the feathers were marked in some way,
> but they are not…they are really orange.
>
> Robyn
>
> *****
>
> Robyn Graboski
> Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
>
>
> Centre Wildlife Care
> PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
> www.centrewildlifecare.org <http://www.centrewildlifecare.org/>
> 814-692-0004 <tel:814-692-0004>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Jason M. Hill, PhD
>
> Conservation Biologist
>
> VermontCenterfor Ecostudies
>
> 802.649.1431 Ext. 212 <tel:%28802%29%20649-1431>
>
> http://vtecostudies.org/about-us/staff/jason-hill/
> <http://vtecostudies.org/about-us/staff/jason-hill/>
>
> "The universe works on a math equation that never even ever really
> even ends in the end."
>
> -Isaac Brock
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> ++++++++++++++++
>
> "If you listen to the thrush and hear a thrush, you've not really
> heard the thrush. But if you listen to a thrush and hear a
> miracle, //then// you've heard the thrush." - Zen Parable
>
>
>
>
> --
> ++++++++++++++++
> "If you listen to the thrush and hear a thrush, you've not really
> heard the thrush. But if you listen to a thrush and hear a miracle,
> /then/ you've heard the thrush." - Zen Parable

--
***See our new video https://youtu.be/3gyjkxmmFS4 *** ***Check us out on
facebook - https://www.facebook.com/kauffmaninsurance/ ***Call us
717-436-8257 Toll free 866-588-7831

 

Back to top
Date: 6/8/17 11:36 am
From: Joseph Verica <joeverica...>
Subject: Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
Dear Robyn and SC Birders

Robyn kindly made some time for me to visit her facility and take some
measurements of the swan. Based on the measurements, it appears that Robyn
is correct. The biostats say Tundra Swan! :D

Here is the expected range for the stats as reported in the Pyle II Guide

*Trumpeter Swans*: [adult Male=M; adult Female=F; First Year either sex =
FY]
Longest toe (usually middle): mean >142 mm (but range from 115 to 172
mm) for all ages/sexes;
Anterior end of nares (nostril) to tip of bill: >= 50 mm for all
ages/sexes [see below]*

*Tundra Swans*:
Longest toe (usually middle): mean =120-125 mm (range from 110 to 132
mm) for all ages/sexes;
Anterior end of nares to tip of bill: typically 43-45 mm for all
ages/sexes [see below]*

*considered to be the best measurement to separate these two species

My measurements were as follows:

*Longest toe = 120 mm*
*Anterior end of nares to tip of bill = 44 mm*

Those are both "spot on" for Tundra Swan. So despite the birds physical
appearance, it seems it is a Tundra Swan

Take care
Joe Verica


On Thu, Jun 8, 2017 at 10:45 AM, Centre Wildlife Care <
<centrewildlifecare...> wrote:

> Interesting discussion for sure!
>
>
>
> The reason that I think that this is a tundra is size.
>
>
>
> Normal weight range for a tundra is 7-21 pounds
>
> Normal weight range for a trumpeter is 15-30 pounds
>
>
>
> This bird weighs 6.5 pounds. This bird is small for a tundra. Trumpeters
> are dramatically larger in size.
>
>
>
> Does anyone know if there is a way to have this birds DNA typed to
> identify species?
>
>
>
> Robyn
>
> *****
>
> Robyn Graboski
> Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
> Centre Wildlife Care
> PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
> www.centrewildlifecare.org
> 814-692-0004
> ------------------------------
>
> *From:* Robert Snyder [mailto:<rhs2...>]
> *Sent:* Wednesday, June 07, 2017 12:05 PM
> *To:* <robyn...>
> *Cc:* StateCollegeBirdClub
>
> *Subject:* Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
>
>
>
> Hello Robyn,
>
>
>
> My two-cents worth, I think it looks like a Trumpeter Swan.
>
>
>
> Large bill, heavy looking neck, larger head with the 'peaked' crown.
>
>
>
> Here's two links to some photos I took of tagged Trumpeter Swans that were
> in Clinton County on Bald Eagle Creek in March 2011:
>
>
>
> http://www.pbase.com/bobsnyderphotography/image/133078367
>
>
>
> http://www.pbase.com/bobsnyderphotography/image/133807237
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Of course proper measurements according to taxonomy would be more
> decisive, as there have been many debates between Tundra Swan and Trumpeter
> Swan over untagged birds in the past.
>
>
>
> Bob Snyder
>
>
>
> Robert Snyder
> Research Technologist III
> Penn State University
> Dept of Plant Science
> Rm 219 Tyson Bldg
> University Park, PA 16802
> Office: 814-863-6168 <(814)%20863-6168>
> Cell: 814-753-2629 <(814)%20753-2629>-
> Fax: 814-863-6139 <(814)%20863-6139>
> <rhs2...>
>
> "Do what you can, with what you have, where you are."
> Teddy Roosevelt
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> *From: *"Centre Wildlife Care" <centrewildlifecare...>
> *To: *"StateCollegeBirdClub" <SCBIRDCL...>
> *Sent: *Wednesday, June 7, 2017 10:33:57 AM
> *Subject: *Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
>
>
>
> Hi Joe,
>
>
>
> You can come over and measure the toes. J I’ll hold the bird. This is
> quite an interesting discussion.
>
>
>
> Robyn
>
>
>
> *****
>
> Robyn Graboski
> Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
> Centre Wildlife Care
> PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
> www.centrewildlifecare.org
> 814-692-0004
> ------------------------------
>
> *From:* State College (PA) Bird Club [mailto:<SCBIRDCL...>] *On
> Behalf Of *Joseph Verica
> *Sent:* Wednesday, June 07, 2017 9:51 AM
> *To:* <SCBIRDCL...>
> *Subject:* Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
>
>
>
> Thanks Jason
>
>
>
> Normally I would not make such a fuss over a swan ID; however, this swan
> appears to be untagged. All the previous Trumpeters I have seen in the east
> have ALL been wing tagged. With Robyn's permission, I have posted some of
> the photos on the PA Birds ID page on Facebook. So far, everyone who has
> seen the photo and commented says Trumpeter.
>
>
>
> Take care
>
> Joe Verica
>
>
>
> On Wed, Jun 7, 2017 at 9:11 AM, Jason Hill <hill.jason.michael...>
> wrote:
>
> I defer to Robyn's experience with these species in hand, but I agree with
> Greg and Joe--the bird certainly *looks* more like a Trumpeter Swan. I
> opened up my Pyle II guide (used for ageing/sexing non-Passerines when
> banding) and the Bird's of North America account for these two species.
> There are a few physical measurements (that, unlike weight, shouldn't vary
> with the physical condition/nutritional status of the bird) that should
> help separate these two species. Details below:
>
>
>
> *Trumpeter Swans*: [adult Male=M; adult Female=F; First Year either sex =
> FY]
>
> Longest toe (usually middle): mean >142 mm (but range from 115 to 172
> mm) for all ages/sexes;
>
> Anterior end of nares (nostril) to tip of bill: >= 50 mm for all
> ages/sexes [see below]**
>
> Bill length: [varies between populations] FY generally around 110-117
> mm, adults M= 112-120 mm and F = 116 mm
>
>
>
> *Tundra Swans*:
>
> Longest toe (usually middle): mean =120-125 mm (range from 110 to 132
> mm) for all ages/sexes;
>
> Anterior end of nares to tip of bill: typically 43-45 mm for all
> ages/sexes [see below]**
>
> Bill length: FY around 90 mm, adult M = 103 mm, adult F = 101.
>
>
>
> **considered to be the best measurement to separate these two species;
> only ~1.5% of the largest male Tundra Swans have >50 mm nares to tip
> measurement.
>
>
>
> Of course, these are averages, and there will be really large Tundras and
> really small Trumpeters.
>
>
>
> Other measurements (e.g., tarsus ) not typically useful in differentiating
> the two species.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Jason
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Tue, Jun 6, 2017 at 9:05 PM, Centre Wildlife Care <
> <centrewildlifecare...> wrote:
>
> Thank you all for your input, but having worked “hands” on with both
> species, I can say that this is surely a tundra swan. It only weighs 3
> Kg. They are dramatically different once you see both of them in person.
>
>
>
> Robyn
>
> *****
>
> Robyn Graboski
> Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
> Centre Wildlife Care
> PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
> www.centrewildlifecare.org
> 814-692-0004
> ------------------------------
>
> *From:* Madison Botch [mailto:<madisonbotch15...>]
> *Sent:* Tuesday, June 06, 2017 6:25 PM
> *To:* <SCBIRDCL...>; <robyn...>
> *Subject:* Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
>
>
>
> Hey Robyn,
>
>
>
> I see there has been some confusion about the exact species of your found
> swan! I hope the following helps sort it out:
>
>
>
> Trumpeter swans have orange at the edge of the bill, whereas tundra swans
> will have yellow lores. Both will not occur on the same bird. This is the
> main species determination when the black on the face isn't conclusive.
>
> In addition, trumpeter swans frequently have an s-shaped crook to their
> neck and their neck seems to rest much more on their back than that of
> Tundra swans.
>
>
>
> I know juvenile birds are sometimes hard to identify when it comes down to
> minute differences such as these, and you may have already known these
> identifiers, but I hope this helps someone somehow! I couldn't make a good
> determination myself based solely on the picture we received. I know this
> swan will be taken great care of regardless of whether he's a trumpeter or
> tundra!
>
>
>
> Hope all is well,
>
> Madison Botch
>
>
>
>
>
> On Tue, Jun 6, 2017 at 4:10 PM Centre Wildlife Care <
> <centrewildlifecare...> wrote:
>
>
>
> I just picked up this juvenile tundra swan. As we (Sue DeArment retired
> rehabber) were driving through the area, I got a call about a big white
> bird just sitting in the grass near one of the office buildings. We were
> able to easily pick it up with a blanket…it is very thin and very weak. I
> am getting ready to do some blood work on the bird to see if we can figure
> out what is going on.
>
>
>
> The interesting thing is the orange feathers on the neck. I thought
> initially that the feathers were marked in some way, but they are not…they
> are really orange.
>
>
>
> Robyn
>
> *****
>
> Robyn Graboski
> Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
>
>
> Centre Wildlife Care
> PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
> www.centrewildlifecare.org
> 814-692-0004
>
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Jason M. Hill, PhD
>
> Conservation Biologist
>
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
>
> 802.649.1431 Ext. 212 <(802)%20649-1431>
>
> http://vtecostudies.org/about-us/staff/jason-hill/
>
>
>
> "The universe works on a math equation that never even ever really even
> ends in the end."
>
> -Isaac Brock
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> ++++++++++++++++
>
>
>
> "If you listen to the thrush and hear a thrush, you've not really heard
> the thrush. But if you listen to a thrush and hear a miracle, *then*
> you've heard the thrush." - Zen Parable
>
>
>



--
++++++++++++++++

"If you listen to the thrush and hear a thrush, you've not really heard the
thrush. But if you listen to a thrush and hear a miracle, *then* you've
heard the thrush." - Zen Parable

 

Back to top
Date: 6/8/17 9:18 am
From: Lewis Grove <zugunlew...>
Subject: Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
Hi all,

Just to toss my two cents in as well (who doesn't love a good swan ID
discussion!) - I agree that the bird *looks* like a Trumpeter at first
glance by the typical facial feathering field marks, but I think it is also
consistent with a misleading Tundra. To me, the black skin in front of the
eye just does not look thick enough to rule out Tundra. The eye on this
bird stands out to me - it is obvious in the white; on a Trumpeter, the eye
nearly disappears into that black skin that envelops it. There's no yellow
on this bird, but some small percentage of Tundras do not have that. As
for feather and head shapes, I think it's difficult to say anything
definitively from a single photo about Us and Vs and posture; those are all
the sorts of things that can be highly misleading in a single frame as
opposed to a bird in the field.

From what I've read on this in the past, Jason is correct - the bill
measurements are a more-or-less definitive mark (though of course they
rarely hold still in the field long enough for one to get their calipers
out!). Here's
<https://www.jstor.org/stable/3783945?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents>an
abstract to a paper from the late 90s with some of the measurements,
reporting a more-or-less definitive difference between tip-to-nare
measurements. The relevant section:

"We compared bill measurements (tip to posterior edge of nares opening) for
trumpeter swans captured in Idaho (n=672) with measurements of tundra swans
harvested in Utah (n=1,414) and with measurements reported on postcards
(n=890) returned by hunters who harvested swans in Montana. Mean bill
measurements for adult and cygnet trumpeter swans were 68.8 mm and 67.6 mm,
respectively, and for tundra swans, 54.0 mm and 52.4 mm, respectively;
differences were significant (P<0.001) between species and in each age
class. Over 99% of trumpeter swan adults and cygnets measured ≥62 mm and
≥61 mm, respectively, whereas 99% of tundra swan adults and cygnets were
≤60 mm and ≤59 mm, respectively."


Frankly, I think the weights Robyn reported are more or less definitive as
well. I never would've have guessed the disparity was that large myself!

Best,
Lewis

On Thu, Jun 8, 2017 at 10:45 AM, Centre Wildlife Care <
<centrewildlifecare...> wrote:

> Interesting discussion for sure!
>
>
>
> The reason that I think that this is a tundra is size.
>
>
>
> Normal weight range for a tundra is 7-21 pounds
>
> Normal weight range for a trumpeter is 15-30 pounds
>
>
>
> This bird weighs 6.5 pounds. This bird is small for a tundra. Trumpeters
> are dramatically larger in size.
>
>
>
> Does anyone know if there is a way to have this birds DNA typed to
> identify species?
>
>
>
> Robyn
>
> *****
>
> Robyn Graboski
> Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
> Centre Wildlife Care
> PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
> www.centrewildlifecare.org
> 814-692-0004
> ------------------------------
>
> *From:* Robert Snyder [mailto:<rhs2...>]
> *Sent:* Wednesday, June 07, 2017 12:05 PM
> *To:* <robyn...>
> *Cc:* StateCollegeBirdClub
>
> *Subject:* Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
>
>
>
> Hello Robyn,
>
>
>
> My two-cents worth, I think it looks like a Trumpeter Swan.
>
>
>
> Large bill, heavy looking neck, larger head with the 'peaked' crown.
>
>
>
> Here's two links to some photos I took of tagged Trumpeter Swans that were
> in Clinton County on Bald Eagle Creek in March 2011:
>
>
>
> http://www.pbase.com/bobsnyderphotography/image/133078367
>
>
>
> http://www.pbase.com/bobsnyderphotography/image/133807237
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Of course proper measurements according to taxonomy would be more
> decisive, as there have been many debates between Tundra Swan and Trumpeter
> Swan over untagged birds in the past.
>
>
>
> Bob Snyder
>
>
>
> Robert Snyder
> Research Technologist III
> Penn State University
> Dept of Plant Science
> Rm 219 Tyson Bldg
> University Park, PA 16802
> Office: 814-863-6168 <(814)%20863-6168>
> Cell: 814-753-2629 <(814)%20753-2629>-
> Fax: 814-863-6139 <(814)%20863-6139>
> <rhs2...>
>
> "Do what you can, with what you have, where you are."
> Teddy Roosevelt
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> *From: *"Centre Wildlife Care" <centrewildlifecare...>
> *To: *"StateCollegeBirdClub" <SCBIRDCL...>
> *Sent: *Wednesday, June 7, 2017 10:33:57 AM
> *Subject: *Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
>
>
>
> Hi Joe,
>
>
>
> You can come over and measure the toes. J I’ll hold the bird. This is
> quite an interesting discussion.
>
>
>
> Robyn
>
>
>
> *****
>
> Robyn Graboski
> Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
> Centre Wildlife Care
> PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
> www.centrewildlifecare.org
> 814-692-0004
> ------------------------------
>
> *From:* State College (PA) Bird Club [mailto:<SCBIRDCL...>] *On
> Behalf Of *Joseph Verica
> *Sent:* Wednesday, June 07, 2017 9:51 AM
> *To:* <SCBIRDCL...>
> *Subject:* Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
>
>
>
> Thanks Jason
>
>
>
> Normally I would not make such a fuss over a swan ID; however, this swan
> appears to be untagged. All the previous Trumpeters I have seen in the east
> have ALL been wing tagged. With Robyn's permission, I have posted some of
> the photos on the PA Birds ID page on Facebook. So far, everyone who has
> seen the photo and commented says Trumpeter.
>
>
>
> Take care
>
> Joe Verica
>
>
>
> On Wed, Jun 7, 2017 at 9:11 AM, Jason Hill <hill.jason.michael...>
> wrote:
>
> I defer to Robyn's experience with these species in hand, but I agree with
> Greg and Joe--the bird certainly *looks* more like a Trumpeter Swan. I
> opened up my Pyle II guide (used for ageing/sexing non-Passerines when
> banding) and the Bird's of North America account for these two species.
> There are a few physical measurements (that, unlike weight, shouldn't vary
> with the physical condition/nutritional status of the bird) that should
> help separate these two species. Details below:
>
>
>
> *Trumpeter Swans*: [adult Male=M; adult Female=F; First Year either sex =
> FY]
>
> Longest toe (usually middle): mean >142 mm (but range from 115 to 172
> mm) for all ages/sexes;
>
> Anterior end of nares (nostril) to tip of bill: >= 50 mm for all
> ages/sexes [see below]**
>
> Bill length: [varies between populations] FY generally around 110-117
> mm, adults M= 112-120 mm and F = 116 mm
>
>
>
> *Tundra Swans*:
>
> Longest toe (usually middle): mean =120-125 mm (range from 110 to 132
> mm) for all ages/sexes;
>
> Anterior end of nares to tip of bill: typically 43-45 mm for all
> ages/sexes [see below]**
>
> Bill length: FY around 90 mm, adult M = 103 mm, adult F = 101.
>
>
>
> **considered to be the best measurement to separate these two species;
> only ~1.5% of the largest male Tundra Swans have >50 mm nares to tip
> measurement.
>
>
>
> Of course, these are averages, and there will be really large Tundras and
> really small Trumpeters.
>
>
>
> Other measurements (e.g., tarsus ) not typically useful in differentiating
> the two species.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Jason
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Tue, Jun 6, 2017 at 9:05 PM, Centre Wildlife Care <
> <centrewildlifecare...> wrote:
>
> Thank you all for your input, but having worked “hands” on with both
> species, I can say that this is surely a tundra swan. It only weighs 3
> Kg. They are dramatically different once you see both of them in person.
>
>
>
> Robyn
>
> *****
>
> Robyn Graboski
> Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
> Centre Wildlife Care
> PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
> www.centrewildlifecare.org
> 814-692-0004
> ------------------------------
>
> *From:* Madison Botch [mailto:<madisonbotch15...>]
> *Sent:* Tuesday, June 06, 2017 6:25 PM
> *To:* <SCBIRDCL...>; <robyn...>
> *Subject:* Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
>
>
>
> Hey Robyn,
>
>
>
> I see there has been some confusion about the exact species of your found
> swan! I hope the following helps sort it out:
>
>
>
> Trumpeter swans have orange at the edge of the bill, whereas tundra swans
> will have yellow lores. Both will not occur on the same bird. This is the
> main species determination when the black on the face isn't conclusive.
>
> In addition, trumpeter swans frequently have an s-shaped crook to their
> neck and their neck seems to rest much more on their back than that of
> Tundra swans.
>
>
>
> I know juvenile birds are sometimes hard to identify when it comes down to
> minute differences such as these, and you may have already known these
> identifiers, but I hope this helps someone somehow! I couldn't make a good
> determination myself based solely on the picture we received. I know this
> swan will be taken great care of regardless of whether he's a trumpeter or
> tundra!
>
>
>
> Hope all is well,
>
> Madison Botch
>
>
>
>
>
> On Tue, Jun 6, 2017 at 4:10 PM Centre Wildlife Care <
> <centrewildlifecare...> wrote:
>
>
>
> I just picked up this juvenile tundra swan. As we (Sue DeArment retired
> rehabber) were driving through the area, I got a call about a big white
> bird just sitting in the grass near one of the office buildings. We were
> able to easily pick it up with a blanket…it is very thin and very weak. I
> am getting ready to do some blood work on the bird to see if we can figure
> out what is going on.
>
>
>
> The interesting thing is the orange feathers on the neck. I thought
> initially that the feathers were marked in some way, but they are not…they
> are really orange.
>
>
>
> Robyn
>
> *****
>
> Robyn Graboski
> Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
>
>
> Centre Wildlife Care
> PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
> www.centrewildlifecare.org
> 814-692-0004
>
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Jason M. Hill, PhD
>
> Conservation Biologist
>
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
>
> 802.649.1431 Ext. 212 <(802)%20649-1431>
>
> http://vtecostudies.org/about-us/staff/jason-hill/
>
>
>
> "The universe works on a math equation that never even ever really even
> ends in the end."
>
> -Isaac Brock
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> ++++++++++++++++
>
>
>
> "If you listen to the thrush and hear a thrush, you've not really heard
> the thrush. But if you listen to a thrush and hear a miracle, *then*
> you've heard the thrush." - Zen Parable
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/8/17 7:46 am
From: Centre Wildlife Care <centrewildlifecare...>
Subject: Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
Interesting discussion for sure!



The reason that I think that this is a tundra is size.



Normal weight range for a tundra is 7-21 pounds

Normal weight range for a trumpeter is 15-30 pounds



This bird weighs 6.5 pounds. This bird is small for a tundra. Trumpeters
are dramatically larger in size.



Does anyone know if there is a way to have this birds DNA typed to identify
species?



Robyn

*****

Robyn Graboski
Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
Centre Wildlife Care
PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
www.centrewildlifecare.org <http://www.centrewildlifecare.org/>
814-692-0004

_____

From: Robert Snyder [mailto:<rhs2...>]
Sent: Wednesday, June 07, 2017 12:05 PM
To: <robyn...>
Cc: StateCollegeBirdClub
Subject: Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave



Hello Robyn,



My two-cents worth, I think it looks like a Trumpeter Swan.



Large bill, heavy looking neck, larger head with the 'peaked' crown.



Here's two links to some photos I took of tagged Trumpeter Swans that were
in Clinton County on Bald Eagle Creek in March 2011:



http://www.pbase.com/bobsnyderphotography/image/133078367



http://www.pbase.com/bobsnyderphotography/image/133807237







Of course proper measurements according to taxonomy would be more decisive,
as there have been many debates between Tundra Swan and Trumpeter Swan over
untagged birds in the past.



Bob Snyder



Robert Snyder
Research Technologist III
Penn State University
Dept of Plant Science
Rm 219 Tyson Bldg
University Park, PA 16802
Office: 814-863-6168
Cell: 814-753-2629-
Fax: 814-863-6139
<rhs2...>

"Do what you can, with what you have, where you are."
Teddy Roosevelt



_____

From: "Centre Wildlife Care" <centrewildlifecare...>
To: "StateCollegeBirdClub" <SCBIRDCL...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 7, 2017 10:33:57 AM
Subject: Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave



Hi Joe,



You can come over and measure the toes. :-) I'll hold the bird. This is
quite an interesting discussion.



Robyn



*****

Robyn Graboski
Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
Centre Wildlife Care
PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
www.centrewildlifecare.org <http://www.centrewildlifecare.org/>
814-692-0004

_____

From: State College (PA) Bird Club [mailto:<SCBIRDCL...>] On Behalf
Of Joseph Verica
Sent: Wednesday, June 07, 2017 9:51 AM
To: <SCBIRDCL...>
Subject: Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave



Thanks Jason



Normally I would not make such a fuss over a swan ID; however, this swan
appears to be untagged. All the previous Trumpeters I have seen in the east
have ALL been wing tagged. With Robyn's permission, I have posted some of
the photos on the PA Birds ID page on Facebook. So far, everyone who has
seen the photo and commented says Trumpeter.



Take care

Joe Verica



On Wed, Jun 7, 2017 at 9:11 AM, Jason Hill <hill.jason.michael...>
wrote:

I defer to Robyn's experience with these species in hand, but I agree with
Greg and Joe--the bird certainly looks more like a Trumpeter Swan. I opened
up my Pyle II guide (used for ageing/sexing non-Passerines when banding) and
the Bird's of North America account for these two species. There are a few
physical measurements (that, unlike weight, shouldn't vary with the physical
condition/nutritional status of the bird) that should help separate these
two species. Details below:



Trumpeter Swans: [adult Male=M; adult Female=F; First Year either sex = FY]

Longest toe (usually middle): mean >142 mm (but range from 115 to 172
mm) for all ages/sexes;

Anterior end of nares (nostril) to tip of bill: >= 50 mm for all
ages/sexes [see below]**

Bill length: [varies between populations] FY generally around 110-117
mm, adults M= 112-120 mm and F = 116 mm



Tundra Swans:

Longest toe (usually middle): mean =120-125 mm (range from 110 to 132
mm) for all ages/sexes;

Anterior end of nares to tip of bill: typically 43-45 mm for all
ages/sexes [see below]**

Bill length: FY around 90 mm, adult M = 103 mm, adult F = 101.



**considered to be the best measurement to separate these two species; only
~1.5% of the largest male Tundra Swans have >50 mm nares to tip measurement.



Of course, these are averages, and there will be really large Tundras and
really small Trumpeters.



Other measurements (e.g., tarsus ) not typically useful in differentiating
the two species.

Cheers,

Jason



















On Tue, Jun 6, 2017 at 9:05 PM, Centre Wildlife Care
<centrewildlifecare...> wrote:

Thank you all for your input, but having worked "hands" on with both
species, I can say that this is surely a tundra swan. It only weighs 3 Kg.
They are dramatically different once you see both of them in person.



Robyn

*****

Robyn Graboski
Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
Centre Wildlife Care
PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
www.centrewildlifecare.org <http://www.centrewildlifecare.org/>
814-692-0004

_____

From: Madison Botch [mailto:<madisonbotch15...>]
Sent: Tuesday, June 06, 2017 6:25 PM
To: <SCBIRDCL...>; <robyn...>
Subject: Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave



Hey Robyn,



I see there has been some confusion about the exact species of your found
swan! I hope the following helps sort it out:



Trumpeter swans have orange at the edge of the bill, whereas tundra swans
will have yellow lores. Both will not occur on the same bird. This is the
main species determination when the black on the face isn't conclusive.

In addition, trumpeter swans frequently have an s-shaped crook to their neck
and their neck seems to rest much more on their back than that of Tundra
swans.



I know juvenile birds are sometimes hard to identify when it comes down to
minute differences such as these, and you may have already known these
identifiers, but I hope this helps someone somehow! I couldn't make a good
determination myself based solely on the picture we received. I know this
swan will be taken great care of regardless of whether he's a trumpeter or
tundra!



Hope all is well,

Madison Botch





On Tue, Jun 6, 2017 at 4:10 PM Centre Wildlife Care
<centrewildlifecare...> wrote:





I just picked up this juvenile tundra swan. As we (Sue DeArment retired
rehabber) were driving through the area, I got a call about a big white bird
just sitting in the grass near one of the office buildings. We were able to
easily pick it up with a blanket.it is very thin and very weak. I am
getting ready to do some blood work on the bird to see if we can figure out
what is going on.



The interesting thing is the orange feathers on the neck. I thought
initially that the feathers were marked in some way, but they are not.they
are really orange.



Robyn

*****

Robyn Graboski
Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator


Centre Wildlife Care
PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
www.centrewildlifecare.org <http://www.centrewildlifecare.org/>
814-692-0004







--

Jason M. Hill, PhD

Conservation Biologist

Vermont Center for Ecostudies

802.649.1431 <tel:(802)%20649-1431> Ext. 212

http://vtecostudies.org/about-us/staff/jason-hill/



"The universe works on a math equation that never even ever really even ends
in the end."

-Isaac Brock




--

++++++++++++++++



"If you listen to the thrush and hear a thrush, you've not really heard the
thrush. But if you listen to a thrush and hear a miracle, then you've heard
the thrush." - Zen Parable




 

Back to top
Date: 6/7/17 2:52 pm
From: Jean Aron <000000ab966af9e4-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bird Chimes, a mini tale

Monday, June 5. 2017
I could not identify this singing bird, but nevertheless it was a strange
and curious thing.
As I strolled through the aisles of potted blooms and greenery at Home
Depot Garden Center, I stopped to look at some silly, plastic garden decor in
the shape of birds and butterflies. I touched the red bird with “propellor
wings”, and my touch set off a pleasant tinkling sound of the little
attached wind chimes. I tried the similar blue plastic bird, and heard a similar
but lower- toned tinkle tune. (I liked the red bird chimes better,
although I know better than to bring them home.)
Then I heard a bird song -- quite melodious, like the chimes—but which
seemed to come from a real bird. I thought it must be a clever garden device
with a recorder. I looked around for the source, and saw a real live bird
perched on a wire overhead. He was looking at me and singing a beautiful
bubbling song, somewhat reminiscent of an oriole. I listened raptly, but
could not see the small bird clearly. He was mostly gray, and may have had a
tinge of orange somewhere. After a few seconds, the bird flew off and
away through the roofless walled garden center. Bye bye bird.
But then, on a hunch, I turned back to the red bird wind chimes, and
sounded them again. After a few seconds, lo and behold, the live bird
returned, and again perched nearby and answered the chimes with his song. He did
this a couple of times before abandoning the effort. I was amazed.
Could this have been a courtship song? I’ve had birds answer my calls
before, but never like this one.
Jean Aron
 

Back to top
Date: 6/7/17 9:06 am
From: Robert Snyder <rhs2...>
Subject: Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
Hello Robyn,

My two-cents worth, I think it looks like a Trumpeter Swan.

Large bill, heavy looking neck, larger head with the 'peaked' crown.

Here's two links to some photos I took of tagged Trumpeter Swans that were in Clinton County on Bald Eagle Creek in March 2011:

http://www.pbase.com/bobsnyderphotography/image/133078367

http://www.pbase.com/bobsnyderphotography/image/133807237



Of course proper measurements according to taxonomy would be more decisive, as there have been many debates between Tundra Swan and Trumpeter Swan over untagged birds in the past.

Bob Snyder

Robert Snyder
Research Technologist III
Penn State University
Dept of Plant Science
Rm 219 Tyson Bldg
University Park, PA 16802
Office: 814-863-6168
Cell: 814-753-2629-
Fax: 814-863-6139
<rhs2...>

"Do what you can, with what you have, where you are."
Teddy Roosevelt


From: "Centre Wildlife Care" <centrewildlifecare...>
To: "StateCollegeBirdClub" <SCBIRDCL...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 7, 2017 10:33:57 AM
Subject: Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave



Hi Joe,



You can come over and measure the toes. J I’ll hold the bird. This is quite an interesting discussion.



Robyn




*****

Robyn Graboski
Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
Centre Wildlife Care
PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
www.centrewildlifecare.org
814-692-0004



From: State College (PA) Bird Club [mailto:<SCBIRDCL...>] On Behalf Of Joseph Verica
Sent: Wednesday, June 07, 2017 9:51 AM
To: <SCBIRDCL...>
Subject: Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave





Thanks Jason





Normally I would not make such a fuss over a swan ID; however, this swan appears to be untagged. All the previous Trumpeters I have seen in the east have ALL been wing tagged. With Robyn's permission, I have posted some of the photos on the PA Birds ID page on Facebook. So far, everyone who has seen the photo and commented says Trumpeter.





Take care


Joe Verica





On Wed, Jun 7, 2017 at 9:11 AM, Jason Hill < <hill.jason.michael...> > wrote:


I defer to Robyn's experience with these species in hand, but I agree with Greg and Joe--the bird certainly looks more like a Trumpeter Swan. I opened up my Pyle II guide (used for ageing/sexing non-Passerines when banding) and the Bird's of North America account for these two species. There are a few physical measurements (that, unlike weight, shouldn't vary with the physical condition/nutritional status of the bird) that should help separate these two species. Details below:





Trumpeter Swans : [adult Male=M; adult Female=F; First Year either sex = FY]


Longest toe (usually middle): mean >142 mm (but range from 115 to 172 mm) for all ages/sexes;


Anterior end of nares (nostril) to tip of bill: >= 50 mm for all ages/sexes [see below]**


Bill length: [varies between populations] FY generally around 110-117 mm, adults M= 112-120 mm and F = 116 mm





Tundra Swans :


Longest toe (usually middle): mean =120-125 mm (range from 110 to 132 mm) for all ages/sexes;


Anterior end of nares to tip of bill: typically 43-45 mm for all ages/sexes [see below]**


Bill length: FY around 90 mm, adult M = 103 mm, adult F = 101.





**considered to be the best measurement to separate these two species; only ~1.5% of the largest male Tundra Swans have >50 mm nares to tip measurement.





Of course, these are averages, and there will be really large Tundras and really small Trumpeters.





Other measurements (e.g., tarsus ) not typically useful in differentiating the two species.


Cheers,


Jason





























On Tue, Jun 6, 2017 at 9:05 PM, Centre Wildlife Care < <centrewildlifecare...> > wrote:


Thank you all for your input, but having worked “hands” on with both species, I can say that this is surely a tundra swan. It only weighs 3 Kg. They are dramatically different once you see both of them in person.



Robyn


*****

Robyn Graboski
Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
Centre Wildlife Care
PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
www.centrewildlifecare.org
814-692-0004



From: Madison Botch [mailto: <madisonbotch15...> ]
Sent: Tuesday, June 06, 2017 6:25 PM
To: <SCBIRDCL...> ; <robyn...>
Subject: Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave





Hey Robyn,





I see there has been some confusion about the exact species of your found swan! I hope the following helps sort it out:





Trumpeter swans have orange at the edge of the bill, whereas tundra swans will have yellow lores. Both will not occur on the same bird. This is the main species determination when the black on the face isn't conclusive.


In addition, trumpeter swans frequently have an s-shaped crook to their neck and their neck seems to rest much more on their back than that of Tundra swans.





I know juvenile birds are sometimes hard to identify when it comes down to minute differences such as these, and you may have already known these identifiers, but I hope this helps someone somehow! I couldn't make a good determination myself based solely on the picture we received. I know this swan will be taken great care of regardless of whether he's a trumpeter or tundra!





Hope all is well,


Madison Botch








On Tue, Jun 6, 2017 at 4:10 PM Centre Wildlife Care < <centrewildlifecare...> > wrote:









I just picked up this juvenile tundra swan. As we (Sue DeArment retired rehabber) were driving through the area, I got a call about a big white bird just sitting in the grass near one of the office buildings. We were able to easily pick it up with a blanket…it is very thin and very weak. I am getting ready to do some blood work on the bird to see if we can figure out what is going on.



The interesting thing is the orange feathers on the neck. I thought initially that the feathers were marked in some way, but they are not…they are really orange.



Robyn

*****

Robyn Graboski
Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator



Centre Wildlife Care
PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
www.centrewildlifecare.org
814-692-0004












--


Jason M. Hill, PhD


Conservation Biologist


Vermont Center for Ecostudies


802.649.1431 Ext. 212


http://vtecostudies.org/about-us/staff/jason-hill/





"The universe works on a math equation that never even ever really even ends in the end."


-Isaac Brock





--


++++++++++++++++





"If you listen to the thrush and hear a thrush, you've not really heard the thrush. But if you listen to a thrush and hear a miracle, then you've heard the thrush." - Zen Parable


 

Back to top
Date: 6/7/17 7:34 am
From: Centre Wildlife Care <centrewildlifecare...>
Subject: Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
Hi Joe,



You can come over and measure the toes. :-) I'll hold the bird. This is
quite an interesting discussion.



Robyn



*****

Robyn Graboski
Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
Centre Wildlife Care
PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
www.centrewildlifecare.org <http://www.centrewildlifecare.org/>
814-692-0004

_____

From: State College (PA) Bird Club [mailto:<SCBIRDCL...>] On Behalf
Of Joseph Verica
Sent: Wednesday, June 07, 2017 9:51 AM
To: <SCBIRDCL...>
Subject: Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave



Thanks Jason



Normally I would not make such a fuss over a swan ID; however, this swan
appears to be untagged. All the previous Trumpeters I have seen in the east
have ALL been wing tagged. With Robyn's permission, I have posted some of
the photos on the PA Birds ID page on Facebook. So far, everyone who has
seen the photo and commented says Trumpeter.



Take care

Joe Verica



On Wed, Jun 7, 2017 at 9:11 AM, Jason Hill <hill.jason.michael...>
wrote:

I defer to Robyn's experience with these species in hand, but I agree with
Greg and Joe--the bird certainly looks more like a Trumpeter Swan. I opened
up my Pyle II guide (used for ageing/sexing non-Passerines when banding) and
the Bird's of North America account for these two species. There are a few
physical measurements (that, unlike weight, shouldn't vary with the physical
condition/nutritional status of the bird) that should help separate these
two species. Details below:



Trumpeter Swans: [adult Male=M; adult Female=F; First Year either sex = FY]

Longest toe (usually middle): mean >142 mm (but range from 115 to 172
mm) for all ages/sexes;

Anterior end of nares (nostril) to tip of bill: >= 50 mm for all
ages/sexes [see below]**

Bill length: [varies between populations] FY generally around 110-117
mm, adults M= 112-120 mm and F = 116 mm



Tundra Swans:

Longest toe (usually middle): mean =120-125 mm (range from 110 to 132
mm) for all ages/sexes;

Anterior end of nares to tip of bill: typically 43-45 mm for all
ages/sexes [see below]**

Bill length: FY around 90 mm, adult M = 103 mm, adult F = 101.



**considered to be the best measurement to separate these two species; only
~1.5% of the largest male Tundra Swans have >50 mm nares to tip measurement.



Of course, these are averages, and there will be really large Tundras and
really small Trumpeters.



Other measurements (e.g., tarsus ) not typically useful in differentiating
the two species.

Cheers,

Jason



















On Tue, Jun 6, 2017 at 9:05 PM, Centre Wildlife Care
<centrewildlifecare...> wrote:

Thank you all for your input, but having worked "hands" on with both
species, I can say that this is surely a tundra swan. It only weighs 3 Kg.
They are dramatically different once you see both of them in person.



Robyn

*****

Robyn Graboski
Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
Centre Wildlife Care
PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
www.centrewildlifecare.org <http://www.centrewildlifecare.org/>
814-692-0004

_____

From: Madison Botch [mailto:<madisonbotch15...>
<mailto:<madisonbotch15...> om]
Sent: Tuesday, June 06, 2017 6:25 PM
To: <SCBIRDCL...>; <robyn...>
Subject: Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave



Hey Robyn,



I see there has been some confusion about the exact species of your found
swan! I hope the following helps sort it out:



Trumpeter swans have orange at the edge of the bill, whereas tundra swans
will have yellow lores. Both will not occur on the same bird. This is the
main species determination when the black on the face isn't conclusive.

In addition, trumpeter swans frequently have an s-shaped crook to their neck
and their neck seems to rest much more on their back than that of Tundra
swans.



I know juvenile birds are sometimes hard to identify when it comes down to
minute differences such as these, and you may have already known these
identifiers, but I hope this helps someone somehow! I couldn't make a good
determination myself based solely on the picture we received. I know this
swan will be taken great care of regardless of whether he's a trumpeter or
tundra!



Hope all is well,

Madison Botch





On Tue, Jun 6, 2017 at 4:10 PM Centre Wildlife Care
<centrewildlifecare...> wrote:





I just picked up this juvenile tundra swan. As we (Sue DeArment retired
rehabber) were driving through the area, I got a call about a big white bird
just sitting in the grass near one of the office buildings. We were able to
easily pick it up with a blanket.it is very thin and very weak. I am
getting ready to do some blood work on the bird to see if we can figure out
what is going on.



The interesting thing is the orange feathers on the neck. I thought
initially that the feathers were marked in some way, but they are not.they
are really orange.



Robyn

*****

Robyn Graboski
Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator


Centre Wildlife Care
PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
www.centrewildlifecare.org <http://www.centrewildlifecare.org/>
814-692-0004







--

Jason M. Hill, PhD

Conservation Biologist

Vermont Center for Ecostudies

802.649.1431 Ext. 212 <tel:(802)%20649-1431>

http://vtecostudies.org/about-
<http://vtecostudies.org/about-us/staff/jason-hill/> us/staff/jason-hill/



"The universe works on a math equation that never even ever really even ends
in the end."

-Isaac Brock




--

++++++++++++++++



"If you listen to the thrush and hear a thrush, you've not really heard the
thrush. But if you listen to a thrush and hear a miracle, then you've heard
the thrush." - Zen Parable


 

Back to top
Date: 6/7/17 6:50 am
From: Joseph Verica <joeverica...>
Subject: Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
Thanks Jason

Normally I would not make such a fuss over a swan ID; however, this swan
appears to be untagged. All the previous Trumpeters I have seen in the east
have ALL been wing tagged. With Robyn's permission, I have posted some of
the photos on the PA Birds ID page on Facebook. So far, everyone who has
seen the photo and commented says Trumpeter.

Take care
Joe Verica

On Wed, Jun 7, 2017 at 9:11 AM, Jason Hill <hill.jason.michael...>
wrote:

> I defer to Robyn's experience with these species in hand, but I agree with
> Greg and Joe--the bird certainly *looks* more like a Trumpeter Swan. I
> opened up my Pyle II guide (used for ageing/sexing non-Passerines when
> banding) and the Bird's of North America account for these two species.
> There are a few physical measurements (that, unlike weight, shouldn't vary
> with the physical condition/nutritional status of the bird) that should
> help separate these two species. Details below:
>
> *Trumpeter Swans*: [adult Male=M; adult Female=F; First Year either sex =
> FY]
> Longest toe (usually middle): mean >142 mm (but range from 115 to 172
> mm) for all ages/sexes;
> Anterior end of nares (nostril) to tip of bill: >= 50 mm for all
> ages/sexes [see below]**
> Bill length: [varies between populations] FY generally around 110-117
> mm, adults M= 112-120 mm and F = 116 mm
>
> *Tundra Swans*:
> Longest toe (usually middle): mean =120-125 mm (range from 110 to 132
> mm) for all ages/sexes;
> Anterior end of nares to tip of bill: typically 43-45 mm for all
> ages/sexes [see below]**
> Bill length: FY around 90 mm, adult M = 103 mm, adult F = 101.
>
> **considered to be the best measurement to separate these two species;
> only ~1.5% of the largest male Tundra Swans have >50 mm nares to tip
> measurement.
>
> Of course, these are averages, and there will be really large Tundras and
> really small Trumpeters.
>
> Other measurements (e.g., tarsus ) not typically useful in differentiating
> the two species.
> Cheers,
> Jason
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Tue, Jun 6, 2017 at 9:05 PM, Centre Wildlife Care <
> <centrewildlifecare...> wrote:
>
>> Thank you all for your input, but having worked “hands” on with both
>> species, I can say that this is surely a tundra swan. It only weighs 3
>> Kg. They are dramatically different once you see both of them in person.
>>
>>
>>
>> Robyn
>>
>> *****
>>
>> Robyn Graboski
>> Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
>> Centre Wildlife Care
>> PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
>> www.centrewildlifecare.org
>> 814-692-0004
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> *From:* Madison Botch [mailto:<madisonbotch15...>]
>> *Sent:* Tuesday, June 06, 2017 6:25 PM
>> *To:* <SCBIRDCL...>; <robyn...>
>> *Subject:* Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
>>
>>
>>
>> Hey Robyn,
>>
>>
>>
>> I see there has been some confusion about the exact species of your found
>> swan! I hope the following helps sort it out:
>>
>>
>>
>> Trumpeter swans have orange at the edge of the bill, whereas tundra swans
>> will have yellow lores. Both will not occur on the same bird. This is the
>> main species determination when the black on the face isn't conclusive.
>>
>> In addition, trumpeter swans frequently have an s-shaped crook to their
>> neck and their neck seems to rest much more on their back than that of
>> Tundra swans.
>>
>>
>>
>> I know juvenile birds are sometimes hard to identify when it comes down
>> to minute differences such as these, and you may have already known these
>> identifiers, but I hope this helps someone somehow! I couldn't make a good
>> determination myself based solely on the picture we received. I know this
>> swan will be taken great care of regardless of whether he's a trumpeter or
>> tundra!
>>
>>
>>
>> Hope all is well,
>>
>> Madison Botch
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Tue, Jun 6, 2017 at 4:10 PM Centre Wildlife Care <
>> <centrewildlifecare...> wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>> I just picked up this juvenile tundra swan. As we (Sue DeArment retired
>> rehabber) were driving through the area, I got a call about a big white
>> bird just sitting in the grass near one of the office buildings. We were
>> able to easily pick it up with a blanket…it is very thin and very weak. I
>> am getting ready to do some blood work on the bird to see if we can figure
>> out what is going on.
>>
>>
>>
>> The interesting thing is the orange feathers on the neck. I thought
>> initially that the feathers were marked in some way, but they are not…they
>> are really orange.
>>
>>
>>
>> Robyn
>>
>> *****
>>
>> Robyn Graboski
>> Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
>>
>>
>> Centre Wildlife Care
>> PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
>> www.centrewildlifecare.org
>> 814-692-0004
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> Jason M. Hill, PhD
> Conservation Biologist
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> 802.649.1431 Ext. 212 <(802)%20649-1431>
> http://vtecostudies.org/about-us/staff/jason-hill/
>
> "The universe works on a math equation that never even ever really even
> ends in the end."
> -Isaac Brock
>



--
++++++++++++++++

"If you listen to the thrush and hear a thrush, you've not really heard the
thrush. But if you listen to a thrush and hear a miracle, *then* you've
heard the thrush." - Zen Parable

 

Back to top
Date: 6/7/17 6:12 am
From: Jason Hill <hill.jason.michael...>
Subject: Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
I defer to Robyn's experience with these species in hand, but I agree with
Greg and Joe--the bird certainly *looks* more like a Trumpeter Swan. I
opened up my Pyle II guide (used for ageing/sexing non-Passerines when
banding) and the Bird's of North America account for these two species.
There are a few physical measurements (that, unlike weight, shouldn't vary
with the physical condition/nutritional status of the bird) that should
help separate these two species. Details below:

*Trumpeter Swans*: [adult Male=M; adult Female=F; First Year either sex =
FY]
Longest toe (usually middle): mean >142 mm (but range from 115 to 172
mm) for all ages/sexes;
Anterior end of nares (nostril) to tip of bill: >= 50 mm for all
ages/sexes [see below]**
Bill length: [varies between populations] FY generally around 110-117
mm, adults M= 112-120 mm and F = 116 mm

*Tundra Swans*:
Longest toe (usually middle): mean =120-125 mm (range from 110 to 132
mm) for all ages/sexes;
Anterior end of nares to tip of bill: typically 43-45 mm for all
ages/sexes [see below]**
Bill length: FY around 90 mm, adult M = 103 mm, adult F = 101.

**considered to be the best measurement to separate these two species; only
~1.5% of the largest male Tundra Swans have >50 mm nares to tip measurement.

Of course, these are averages, and there will be really large Tundras and
really small Trumpeters.

Other measurements (e.g., tarsus ) not typically useful in differentiating
the two species.
Cheers,
Jason









On Tue, Jun 6, 2017 at 9:05 PM, Centre Wildlife Care <
<centrewildlifecare...> wrote:

> Thank you all for your input, but having worked “hands” on with both
> species, I can say that this is surely a tundra swan. It only weighs 3
> Kg. They are dramatically different once you see both of them in person.
>
>
>
> Robyn
>
> *****
>
> Robyn Graboski
> Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
> Centre Wildlife Care
> PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
> www.centrewildlifecare.org
> 814-692-0004
> ------------------------------
>
> *From:* Madison Botch [mailto:<madisonbotch15...>]
> *Sent:* Tuesday, June 06, 2017 6:25 PM
> *To:* <SCBIRDCL...>; <robyn...>
> *Subject:* Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
>
>
>
> Hey Robyn,
>
>
>
> I see there has been some confusion about the exact species of your found
> swan! I hope the following helps sort it out:
>
>
>
> Trumpeter swans have orange at the edge of the bill, whereas tundra swans
> will have yellow lores. Both will not occur on the same bird. This is the
> main species determination when the black on the face isn't conclusive.
>
> In addition, trumpeter swans frequently have an s-shaped crook to their
> neck and their neck seems to rest much more on their back than that of
> Tundra swans.
>
>
>
> I know juvenile birds are sometimes hard to identify when it comes down to
> minute differences such as these, and you may have already known these
> identifiers, but I hope this helps someone somehow! I couldn't make a good
> determination myself based solely on the picture we received. I know this
> swan will be taken great care of regardless of whether he's a trumpeter or
> tundra!
>
>
>
> Hope all is well,
>
> Madison Botch
>
>
>
>
>
> On Tue, Jun 6, 2017 at 4:10 PM Centre Wildlife Care <
> <centrewildlifecare...> wrote:
>
>
>
> I just picked up this juvenile tundra swan. As we (Sue DeArment retired
> rehabber) were driving through the area, I got a call about a big white
> bird just sitting in the grass near one of the office buildings. We were
> able to easily pick it up with a blanket…it is very thin and very weak. I
> am getting ready to do some blood work on the bird to see if we can figure
> out what is going on.
>
>
>
> The interesting thing is the orange feathers on the neck. I thought
> initially that the feathers were marked in some way, but they are not…they
> are really orange.
>
>
>
> Robyn
>
> *****
>
> Robyn Graboski
> Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
>
>
> Centre Wildlife Care
> PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
> www.centrewildlifecare.org
> 814-692-0004
>
>


--
Jason M. Hill, PhD
Conservation Biologist
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
802.649.1431 Ext. 212
http://vtecostudies.org/about-us/staff/jason-hill/

"The universe works on a math equation that never even ever really even
ends in the end."
-Isaac Brock

 

Back to top
Date: 6/7/17 5:14 am
From: Diane K. Bierly <dkb246...>
Subject: Fwd: [PABIRDS] Last Call - Winter 16/17 Photo Submissions for Pennsylvania Birds
------ Original Message ------
Received: Tue, 06 Jun 2017 04:06:49 PM EDT
From: Ted Nichols II <tanicholsii...>
To: <PABIRDS...>
Subject: [PABIRDS] Last Call - Winter 16/17 Photo Submissions for Pennsylvania
Birds

Do you have some great photos of any birds taken in Pennsylvania from
December 1, 2016 - February 28, 2017? Or a picture of a notable/significant
sighting from that period?


I am currently accepting photo submissions through end of day JUNE 11, 2017
to be considered for publication as space permits in the Pennsylvania
Society for Ornithology (PSO) Winter issue of Pennsylvania Birds.


Some instructions... If your submission does not follow the instructions
below or contain the info requested below, it will not be processed!


- Submissions for consideration **must** be taken during the above date
range and emailed to <pabirdsphotos...>, please make mention of the
word WINTER in the subject line to simplify processing.


- Please do not submit me dozens of images for consideration, please do
some initial limiting/judging of selections on your end that reflect the
best of your work. However, if you have 15 different images of truly
notable sightings in the state from this period, I'll gladly accept them
for consideration!


- VERY important!!! For each image attached to the e-mail, you must include
a description in the body of the e-mail for that image. Best format to
follow: Species Name - Location, County, DD Month. Sentence about
significance if known/applicable. (Photographer Name) Example: Antillean
Nighthawk - Presque Isle SP, Erie, 12 June. This bird represented a first
state record and was observed through 1 July. (John Doe)


- Please also submit your photos for consideration in full resolution or as
close to full resolution as possible as these will be printed. Your photo
also may be considered for a cover shot and a 250KB image just won't work
for that! I need to be able to crop your photo to fit the space as it
permits in the journal and a precropped / low-resolution image is
problematic for that. It's safe to say that if you're sending me an image
under a megabyte in size, it isn't going to be the resolution I need to
work with. I also need room to crop the image to the specs used for the
newsletter and an extremely tight crop may not allow me to do that.


- Photos selected for printing in the issue will be credited to the
photographer, please DO NOT submit watermarked/signatured images or they
will not be considered. The image should be clean of any add-ons.


Thanks for considering submitting your photos for consideration for our
statewide ornithology journal!


Regards,

Ted Nichols II

Photo Editor, Pennsylvania Birds

Annville, Pa. (Lebanon County)
 

Back to top
Date: 6/6/17 6:05 pm
From: Centre Wildlife Care <centrewildlifecare...>
Subject: Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
Thank you all for your input, but having worked "hands" on with both
species, I can say that this is surely a tundra swan. It only weighs 3 Kg.
They are dramatically different once you see both of them in person.



Robyn

*****

Robyn Graboski
Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
Centre Wildlife Care
PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
www.centrewildlifecare.org <http://www.centrewildlifecare.org/>
814-692-0004

_____

From: Madison Botch [mailto:<madisonbotch15...>]
Sent: Tuesday, June 06, 2017 6:25 PM
To: <SCBIRDCL...>; <robyn...>
Subject: Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave



Hey Robyn,



I see there has been some confusion about the exact species of your found
swan! I hope the following helps sort it out:



Trumpeter swans have orange at the edge of the bill, whereas tundra swans
will have yellow lores. Both will not occur on the same bird. This is the
main species determination when the black on the face isn't conclusive.

In addition, trumpeter swans frequently have an s-shaped crook to their neck
and their neck seems to rest much more on their back than that of Tundra
swans.



I know juvenile birds are sometimes hard to identify when it comes down to
minute differences such as these, and you may have already known these
identifiers, but I hope this helps someone somehow! I couldn't make a good
determination myself based solely on the picture we received. I know this
swan will be taken great care of regardless of whether he's a trumpeter or
tundra!



Hope all is well,

Madison Botch





On Tue, Jun 6, 2017 at 4:10 PM Centre Wildlife Care
<centrewildlifecare...> wrote:





I just picked up this juvenile tundra swan. As we (Sue DeArment retired
rehabber) were driving through the area, I got a call about a big white bird
just sitting in the grass near one of the office buildings. We were able to
easily pick it up with a blanket.it is very thin and very weak. I am
getting ready to do some blood work on the bird to see if we can figure out
what is going on.



The interesting thing is the orange feathers on the neck. I thought
initially that the feathers were marked in some way, but they are not.they
are really orange.



Robyn

*****

Robyn Graboski
Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator


Centre Wildlife Care
PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
www.centrewildlifecare.org <http://www.centrewildlifecare.org/>
814-692-0004


 

Back to top
Date: 6/6/17 3:36 pm
From: Madison Botch <madisonbotch15...>
Subject: Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
Hey Robyn,

I see there has been some confusion about the exact species of your found
swan! I hope the following helps sort it out:

Trumpeter swans have orange at the edge of the bill, whereas tundra swans
will have yellow lores. Both will not occur on the same bird. This is the
main species determination when the black on the face isn't conclusive.
In addition, trumpeter swans frequently have an s-shaped crook to their
neck and their neck seems to rest much more on their back than that of
Tundra swans.

I know juvenile birds are sometimes hard to identify when it comes down to
minute differences such as these, and you may have already known these
identifiers, but I hope this helps someone somehow! I couldn't make a good
determination myself based solely on the picture we received. I know this
swan will be taken great care of regardless of whether he's a trumpeter or
tundra!

Hope all is well,
Madison Botch


On Tue, Jun 6, 2017 at 4:10 PM Centre Wildlife Care <
<centrewildlifecare...> wrote:

>
>
> I just picked up this juvenile tundra swan. As we (Sue DeArment retired
> rehabber) were driving through the area, I got a call about a big white
> bird just sitting in the grass near one of the office buildings. We were
> able to easily pick it up with a blanket…it is very thin and very weak. I
> am getting ready to do some blood work on the bird to see if we can figure
> out what is going on.
>
>
>
> The interesting thing is the orange feathers on the neck. I thought
> initially that the feathers were marked in some way, but they are not…they
> are really orange.
>
>
>
> Robyn
>
> *****
>
> Robyn Graboski
> Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
>
>
> Centre Wildlife Care
> PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
> www.centrewildlifecare.org
> 814-692-0004
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/6/17 3:06 pm
From: Joseph Verica <joeverica...>
Subject: Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
Hi Robyn

It looks to me like it might be a Trumpeter.

Joe Verica

On Tue, Jun 6, 2017 at 5:01 PM, Centre Wildlife Care <
<centrewildlifecare...> wrote:

> Thanks Greg,
>
>
>
> It’s way too small to be a Trumpeter. It’s small for a Tundra.
>
>
>
> Robyn
>
> *****
>
> Robyn Graboski
> Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
> Centre Wildlife Care
> PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
> www.centrewildlifecare.org
> 814-692-0004
> ------------------------------
>
> *From:* Gregory William Grove [mailto:<gwg2...>]
> *Sent:* Tuesday, June 06, 2017 4:30 PM
> *To:* <robyn...>
> *Cc:* <SCBIRDCL...>
> *Subject:* Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
>
>
>
> Robyn
>
>
>
> I believe this a Trumpeter Swan, based on facial pattern.
>
>
>
> Greg Grove
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> *From: *"Centre Wildlife Care" <centrewildlifecare...>
> *To: *<SCBIRDCL...>
> *Sent: *Tuesday, June 6, 2017 4:00:16 PM
> *Subject: *Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
>
>
>
>
>
> I just picked up this juvenile tundra swan. As we (Sue DeArment retired
> rehabber) were driving through the area, I got a call about a big white
> bird just sitting in the grass near one of the office buildings. We were
> able to easily pick it up with a blanket…it is very thin and very weak. I
> am getting ready to do some blood work on the bird to see if we can figure
> out what is going on.
>
>
>
> The interesting thing is the orange feathers on the neck. I thought
> initially that the feathers were marked in some way, but they are not…they
> are really orange.
>
>
>
> Robyn
>
> *****
>
> Robyn Graboski
> Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
> Centre Wildlife Care
> PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
> www.centrewildlifecare.org
> 814-692-0004
>
>
>
>
>



--
++++++++++++++++

"If you listen to the thrush and hear a thrush, you've not really heard the
thrush. But if you listen to a thrush and hear a miracle, *then* you've
heard the thrush." - Zen Parable

 

Back to top
Date: 6/6/17 2:01 pm
From: Centre Wildlife Care <centrewildlifecare...>
Subject: Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
Thanks Greg,



It's way too small to be a Trumpeter. It's small for a Tundra.



Robyn

*****

Robyn Graboski
Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
Centre Wildlife Care
PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
www.centrewildlifecare.org <http://www.centrewildlifecare.org/>
814-692-0004

_____

From: Gregory William Grove [mailto:<gwg2...>]
Sent: Tuesday, June 06, 2017 4:30 PM
To: <robyn...>
Cc: <SCBIRDCL...>
Subject: Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave



Robyn



I believe this a Trumpeter Swan, based on facial pattern.



Greg Grove



_____

From: "Centre Wildlife Care" <centrewildlifecare...>
To: <SCBIRDCL...>
Sent: Tuesday, June 6, 2017 4:00:16 PM
Subject: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave







I just picked up this juvenile tundra swan. As we (Sue DeArment retired
rehabber) were driving through the area, I got a call about a big white bird
just sitting in the grass near one of the office buildings. We were able to
easily pick it up with a blanket.it is very thin and very weak. I am
getting ready to do some blood work on the bird to see if we can figure out
what is going on.



The interesting thing is the orange feathers on the neck. I thought
initially that the feathers were marked in some way, but they are not.they
are really orange.



Robyn

*****

Robyn Graboski
Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
Centre Wildlife Care
PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
www.centrewildlifecare.org <http://www.centrewildlifecare.org/>
814-692-0004






 

Back to top
Date: 6/6/17 1:30 pm
From: Gregory William Grove <gwg2...>
Subject: Re: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave
Robyn

I believe this a Trumpeter Swan, based on facial pattern.

Greg Grove


From: "Centre Wildlife Care" <centrewildlifecare...>
To: <SCBIRDCL...>
Sent: Tuesday, June 6, 2017 4:00:16 PM
Subject: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave







I just picked up this juvenile tundra swan. As we (Sue DeArment retired rehabber) were driving through the area, I got a call about a big white bird just sitting in the grass near one of the office buildings. We were able to easily pick it up with a blanket…it is very thin and very weak. I am getting ready to do some blood work on the bird to see if we can figure out what is going on.



The interesting thing is the orange feathers on the neck. I thought initially that the feathers were marked in some way, but they are not…they are really orange.



Robyn

*****

Robyn Graboski
Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
Centre Wildlife Care
PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
www.centrewildlifecare.org
814-692-0004





 

Back to top
Date: 6/6/17 1:10 pm
From: Centre Wildlife Care <centrewildlifecare...>
Subject: Tundra swan rescued from College Ave




I just picked up this juvenile tundra swan. As we (Sue DeArment retired
rehabber) were driving through the area, I got a call about a big white bird
just sitting in the grass near one of the office buildings. We were able to
easily pick it up with a blanket.it is very thin and very weak. I am
getting ready to do some blood work on the bird to see if we can figure out
what is going on.



The interesting thing is the orange feathers on the neck. I thought
initially that the feathers were marked in some way, but they are not.they
are really orange.



Robyn

*****

Robyn Graboski
Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
Centre Wildlife Care
PO Box 572, Lemont, PA 16851
www.centrewildlifecare.org <http://www.centrewildlifecare.org/>
814-692-0004




 

Back to top
Date: 6/5/17 3:18 pm
From: JENNIFER ALAINE LEE <jal21...>
Subject: The famous Yellow-headed Blackbird
Now has it's own sign along route 45! A friend just passed this picture along to me.
from Jen
 

Back to top
Date: 6/5/17 11:30 am
From: Julia Plummer <julia...>
Subject: Re: white-winged dove near Williamsburg, Blair Co
The WWDO was observed by a few birders this morning (including Joe Verica,
John Carter, myself) from both sides of the river. I opted to try from the
Cove Forge rehab center across the river from Covedale Station trailhead.
If you do go there, you do need to check in at the gate house and the
people there want confidentiality so taking a lot of obvious photos would
be an issue - I took a quick shot of the bird, in my car, through my binos
away from where most of the people were. It seems people have been having
good luck seeing it from the Lower trail side - the bird seems to like
sitting on top of the power line poles this morning, visible from the other
side of the river - though you can gain access where it is actually located
on Cove Forge Road.

Julia

On Sun, Jun 4, 2017 at 8:36 PM, Carl Engstrom <
<000021e74a5688a6-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> This morning I was able to locate the WWDO in the same area as Nick had it
> yesterday. After standing around for around 45 minutes the bird was finally
> heard calling from the sycamores across the river from the trail at 8:45
> AM. The bird called a few times for about two minutes before going silent,
> never was able to get a visual. My eBird checklist with a poor audio
> recording is attached:
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37374691
>
> Carl
>
> On Jun 4, 2017, at 3:27 PM, Joseph Verica <joeverica...> wrote:
>
> Hi Nick,
>
> I drove down to Williamsburg to look for the WWDO today. No luck. However,
> I did go over to Cove Forge Rd and spoke to the security officer at the
> Cove Forge Rehab. He was very friendly. He said the road through the rehab
> is open to the public. You can drive through slowly and look/listen for
> birds. At the end to the property, there is access to SGL 118. A nice
> walking area along the river just like the Lower Trail on the other side. I
> am going to go back early in the morning (weather permitting) and listen
> for the dove during the morning chorus.
>
> Take care
> Joe
>
> On Sat, Jun 3, 2017 at 12:57 PM, Nick Bolgiano <nickbolgiano...>
> wrote:
>
>> Betsy Manlove and I saw a white-winged dove from the Lower Trail this
>> morning at 845, coordinates (40.48630, -78.17223). It was on a power pole
>> on the east side of the river near the end of Cove Forge Rd outside
>> Williamsburg. We were on the west side of the river viewing through an
>> electric line right-of-way.
>>
>> I heard its "who-cooks-for-you" call and we both saw the white forewing
>> patches when perched and more extensive white patches when it fluttered
>> down.
>>
>> Our viewing spot didn't strike me as a reliable location to see it again
>> from. This spot was 1/4 mi S of the Covedale Station trailhead, near mile
>> marker 8, where a power line crosses the trail and river. On the other side
>> of the river, I recall that there was what appeared to be a rehab center in
>> the Cove Forge Rd area with a check-in booth on the road, so I'm uncertain
>> about access.
>>
>> Nick Bolgiano
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> ++++++++++++++++
>
> "If you listen to the thrush and hear a thrush, you've not really heard
> the thrush. But if you listen to a thrush and hear a miracle, *then*
> you've heard the thrush." - Zen Parable
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/4/17 5:37 pm
From: Carl Engstrom <000021e74a5688a6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: white-winged dove near Williamsburg, Blair Co
This morning I was able to locate the WWDO in the same area as Nick had it yesterday. After standing around for around 45 minutes the bird was finally heard calling from the sycamores across the river from the trail at 8:45 AM. The bird called a few times for about two minutes before going silent, never was able to get a visual. My eBird checklist with a poor audio recording is attached:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37374691

Carl

> On Jun 4, 2017, at 3:27 PM, Joseph Verica <joeverica...> wrote:
>
> Hi Nick,
>
> I drove down to Williamsburg to look for the WWDO today. No luck. However, I did go over to Cove Forge Rd and spoke to the security officer at the Cove Forge Rehab. He was very friendly. He said the road through the rehab is open to the public. You can drive through slowly and look/listen for birds. At the end to the property, there is access to SGL 118. A nice walking area along the river just like the Lower Trail on the other side. I am going to go back early in the morning (weather permitting) and listen for the dove during the morning chorus.
>
> Take care
> Joe
>
>> On Sat, Jun 3, 2017 at 12:57 PM, Nick Bolgiano <nickbolgiano...> wrote:
>> Betsy Manlove and I saw a white-winged dove from the Lower Trail this morning at 845, coordinates (40.48630, -78.17223). It was on a power pole on the east side of the river near the end of Cove Forge Rd outside Williamsburg. We were on the west side of the river viewing through an electric line right-of-way.
>>
>> I heard its "who-cooks-for-you" call and we both saw the white forewing patches when perched and more extensive white patches when it fluttered down.
>>
>> Our viewing spot didn't strike me as a reliable location to see it again from. This spot was 1/4 mi S of the Covedale Station trailhead, near mile marker 8, where a power line crosses the trail and river. On the other side of the river, I recall that there was what appeared to be a rehab center in the Cove Forge Rd area with a check-in booth on the road, so I'm uncertain about access.
>>
>> Nick Bolgiano
>>
>
>
>
> --
> ++++++++++++++++
>
> "If you listen to the thrush and hear a thrush, you've not really heard the thrush. But if you listen to a thrush and hear a miracle, then you've heard the thrush." - Zen Parable

 

Back to top
Date: 6/4/17 12:27 pm
From: Joseph Verica <joeverica...>
Subject: Re: white-winged dove near Williamsburg, Blair Co
Hi Nick,

I drove down to Williamsburg to look for the WWDO today. No luck. However,
I did go over to Cove Forge Rd and spoke to the security officer at the
Cove Forge Rehab. He was very friendly. He said the road through the rehab
is open to the public. You can drive through slowly and look/listen for
birds. At the end to the property, there is access to SGL 118. A nice
walking area along the river just like the Lower Trail on the other side. I
am going to go back early in the morning (weather permitting) and listen
for the dove during the morning chorus.

Take care
Joe

On Sat, Jun 3, 2017 at 12:57 PM, Nick Bolgiano <nickbolgiano...>
wrote:

> Betsy Manlove and I saw a white-winged dove from the Lower Trail this
> morning at 845, coordinates (40.48630, -78.17223). It was on a power pole
> on the east side of the river near the end of Cove Forge Rd outside
> Williamsburg. We were on the west side of the river viewing through an
> electric line right-of-way.
>
> I heard its "who-cooks-for-you" call and we both saw the white forewing
> patches when perched and more extensive white patches when it fluttered
> down.
>
> Our viewing spot didn't strike me as a reliable location to see it again
> from. This spot was 1/4 mi S of the Covedale Station trailhead, near mile
> marker 8, where a power line crosses the trail and river. On the other side
> of the river, I recall that there was what appeared to be a rehab center in
> the Cove Forge Rd area with a check-in booth on the road, so I'm uncertain
> about access.
>
> Nick Bolgiano
>
>


--
++++++++++++++++

"If you listen to the thrush and hear a thrush, you've not really heard the
thrush. But if you listen to a thrush and hear a miracle, *then* you've
heard the thrush." - Zen Parable

 

Back to top
Date: 6/3/17 8:35 pm
From: Tom Pluto <mapturtles...>
Subject: Red-headed Woodpecker
7:00 p.m. tonight on Brush Valley Road about 1 mile west of Sammis Nursery. I got an excellent view as it flew in front of our car and landed on a tree alonside the road. (I got chided by my wife [who was driving] when I startled her with my exclamation of excitement!)


Tom

 

Back to top
Date: 6/3/17 1:49 pm
From: Nick Bolgiano <nickbolgiano...>
Subject: picture of white-winged dove
Attached is the picture of the white-winged dove seen this a.m. Although it
is zoomed and not sharp, you can see the left white forewing typical of a
white-winged dove.

My description to PA Records Committee: I first heard a low and plaintive
"who-cooks-for-you" call and saw the bird that gave the call perched on the
crossarm of an electric pole about 60 yd away, across the Frankstown Branch
of the Juniata River. It was a dove, about the size of a mourning dove. We
both saw the white edge to the forewing. I took 2 pictures with a Canon
Digital Rebel at 135 mm. In the submitted picture, although indistinct, you
can see the left white forewing. After about 1 min, it fluttered down
toward the ground and we both saw more extensive white patches on the
forward part of the wing.

 

Back to top
Date: 6/3/17 8:03 am
From: JENNIFER ALAINE LEE <jal21...>
Subject: Re: Yellow-headed Blackbird - Spring Mills
I could not get anywhere close to the coords. Ran out of time this am. Had to give up.
from Jen
------ Original message------From: Bob FowlesDate: Sat, Jun 3, 2017 9:46 AMTo: <SCBIRDCL...>;Cc: Subject:Re: Yellow-headed Blackbird - Spring Mills
Both google maps and googleEarth are wrong. Mapquest is correct.

Bob

> On Jun 1, 2017, at 7:13 PM, Julia Plummer <julia...> wrote:
>
> In addition, google maps shows an Triple J drive that isn't where you want to be. The erroneous Triple J is an overgrown lane off of Gordon Lane. Residents of Gordon Lane were somewhat suspicious of what John Carter and I were doing when we parked on the side of Gordon lane. Instead, use the gps coordinates to look for the farm lane entrance off of 45 to go straight to the Amish farm.
>
> Julia
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
...

 

Back to top
Date: 6/3/17 6:46 am
From: Bob Fowles <rbf...>
Subject: Re: Yellow-headed Blackbird - Spring Mills
Both google maps and googleEarth are wrong. Mapquest is correct.

Bob

> On Jun 1, 2017, at 7:13 PM, Julia Plummer <julia...> wrote:
>
> In addition, google maps shows an Triple J drive that isn't where you want to be. The erroneous Triple J is an overgrown lane off of Gordon Lane. Residents of Gordon Lane were somewhat suspicious of what John Carter and I were doing when we parked on the side of Gordon lane. Instead, use the gps coordinates to look for the farm lane entrance off of 45 to go straight to the Amish farm.
>
> Julia
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
...
 

Back to top
Date: 6/2/17 1:10 pm
From: Wayne Laubscher <wnlaubscher...>
Subject: Re: Yellow-headed Blackbird - Spring Mills



The Yellow-headed Blackbird continued today through at least 11:30. It was in the pasture previously mentioned by Joe Verica with some cows then flew into the tree & rock lined swale just to the south of the pasture. Attached are a few photos.


Wayne Laubscher

Lock Haven

<wnlaubscher...> mailto:<wnlaubscher...>

"Owl be back"

>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/1/17 4:14 pm
From: Julia Plummer <julia...>
Subject: Re: Yellow-headed Blackbird - Spring Mills
In addition, google maps shows an Triple J drive that isn't where you want to be. The erroneous Triple J is an overgrown lane off of Gordon Lane. Residents of Gordon Lane were somewhat suspicious of what John Carter and I were doing when we parked on the side of Gordon lane. Instead, use the gps coordinates to look for the farm lane entrance off of 45 to go straight to the Amish farm.

Julia

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 1, 2017, at 7:01 PM, Joseph Verica <joeverica...> wrote:
>
> I got a heads-up from Chad E Kauffman regarding a YHBL in Centre Co. Bird was still present late this afternoon. Farm is located on Triple J Lane in Spring Mills (Triple J is right off Rt 45. GPS 40.8814,-77.4995). Bird was all the way down end of lane in the last horse pasture on right (pasture with the white shed). Amish Farmer is very friendly. If you go, please be aware that this is private property and we are guests. Farmer does NOT want people blocking lane or parking alongside the planted fields. He has big equipment & horses moving up and down road. Park in gravel areas and walk along road. — in Spring Mills, Pennsylvania.
>
> Here is a link to my eBird checklist with some pics for those who are interested.
>
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37314706
>
> Take care
> Joe Verica
> --
> ++++++++++++++++
>
> "If you listen to the thrush and hear a thrush, you've not really heard the thrush. But if you listen to a thrush and hear a miracle, then you've heard the thrush." - Zen Parable

 

Back to top
Date: 6/1/17 4:01 pm
From: Joseph Verica <joeverica...>
Subject: Yellow-headed Blackbird - Spring Mills
I got a heads-up from Chad E Kauffman
<https://www.facebook.com/chad.e.kauffman> regarding a YHBL in Centre Co.
Bird was still present late this afternoon. Farm is located on Triple J
Lane in Spring Mills (Triple J is right off Rt 45. GPS 40.8814,-77.4995).
Bird was all the way down end of lane in the last horse pasture on right
(pasture with the white shed). Amish Farmer is very friendly. If you go,
please be aware that this is private property and we are guests. Farmer
does NOT want people blocking lane or parking alongside the planted fields.
He has big equipment & horses moving up and down road. Park in gravel areas
and walk along road. — in Spring Mills, Pennsylvania.

Here is a link to my eBird checklist with some pics for those who are
interested.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37314706

Take care
Joe Verica
--
++++++++++++++++

"If you listen to the thrush and hear a thrush, you've not really heard the
thrush. But if you listen to a thrush and hear a miracle, *then* you've
heard the thrush." - Zen Parable

 

Back to top
Date: 5/30/17 1:18 pm
From: Nick Kerlin <bluebird6771...>
Subject: VA Rail - Julian Wetlands
While checking nest boxes this morning, I flushed a Va. Rail in the northeast section (east of Miles Hollow Rd).
Also found a peculiar instance with three adult Tree Swallows in one nest box that had a fully completed Tree Swallow nest (feathers and all). One flew out as I was opening the box, the other two had to be picked up off the nest and released. They flew off and then all three continued to "dive bomb" me at the box. The nest contained no eggs or young. First time in over 40 years of checking nest boxes that I observed this behavior. Any guesses?

Nick Kerlin

 

Back to top
Date: 5/30/17 5:17 am
From: Diane K. Bierly <dkb246...>
Subject: Fwd: [PABIRDS] Breeding Bird Blitz June 16-19th
------ Original Message ------
Received: Fri, 26 May 2017 04:53:01 PM EDT
From: Vern Gauthier <pabirder...>
To: <PABIRDS...>
Subject: [PABIRDS] Breeding Bird Blitz June 16-19th

The fourth annual PA Breeding Bird Blitz will be taking place Friday, June
16th through Monday, June 19th. Another opportunity to add some great PA
Breeding Bird data to eBird! What will be different this year is NO PRIZES.
Just like the Migration Count or a Christmas Bird Count the Blitz is
something to do for the sheer enjoyment of it, AND knowing the data you submit
to eBird will be helping out the birds we find so fascinating. To steal a
little historical thunder from John F. Kennedy, “Ask not what the birds can
do for you but what you can do for the birds!”
Some approaches to the Blitz below:

1. Bird your local patch – You might be surprised how rewarding it is to
track down the local breeders. Do you know how much easier it is to get a good
look at warblers when they are on territory rather than migrating? Take the
time to explore your local area and try local nearby spot you don’t spend
much time at birding or just haven’t got around to before.

2. Bird a neglected county or two - Plan a Breeding Bird Blitz Road Trip with
some friends in one of the PA Counties that does not get much love when it
comes the number of eBird checklists submitted. Below is a list of the
counties from the least to most and the number of eBird checklists submitted
all time for each county (as of a couple of weeks ago).

1. Cameron - 698
2. Sullivan – 1,205
3. Elk – 1,241
4. Jefferson – 1,389
5. Wyoming – 1,448
6. Venango – 1,537
7. Snyder – 1,642
8. Warren – 1,708
9. Fulton – 1,886
10. Forrest – 1,982
11. Columbia – 2,045
12. Union – 2,060
13. Green – 2,116
14. Potter – 2,145
15. McKean – 2,168

3. Create a Competition – If birding competitively is your thing then create
a competition for you and some birding friends over one or more day of the
Blitz. Maybe held in the neglected counties?

4. Use of Breeding Codes – Now that you can include Breeding Codes on the
mobile app this task has become a lot easier. Choose one day to include
highest breeding codes on all your checklists or maybe a checklist or two each
day over the course of the four days.

5. Go Nocturnal – How about some Owls, Whip-poor-wills, and Rails?

6. Send your Stories and Pictures – Send in your stories and pictures to
<breedingbirdblitz...> so we can include them in the next edition of the
Pileated.
DO THE BLITZ!
Vern Gauthier
Cumberland County
 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/17 3:32 pm
From: Gregory William Grove <gwg2...>
Subject: Correction on Detweiler date - it's June 3! (not Jan 3)
The Detweiler trip is June 3 - not Jan 3 as I typed!

Greg


From: "greg" <gwg2...>
To: <SCBIRDCL...>
Sent: Monday, May 29, 2017 5:27:38 PM
Subject: Detweiler Run Natural Area Field Trip

Hi all

Deb and I will lead a field trip in the Detweiler Run Natural Area in Rothrock State Forest on Saturday Jan 3. We will listen and look and listen for breeding warblers, vireos, Veery, Acadian Flycatcher, Scarlet Tanager, maybe Winter Wren. Among warblers: Canada, BT Blue, BT Green, Hooded, Blackburnian, Worm-eating, La. waterthrush, Ovenbird, Magnolia (maybe).

The hiking is of moderate exertion, on the Mid-State Trail and gated Detweiler Road. We will probably cover 2-3 miles. 2.5 - 3 hours. No major climbs. May be somewhat wet.

Please let me know if you are considering joining us.


For logistics for the Detweiler Run field trip-

I will suggest two possibilities:

1. Meet at 7:30 at the Galbreath Gap Parking area (for hikers etc). This is a short distance past the Tussey Mt ski area on Bear Meadows Rd - check the link to see location

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.765663,-77.757797,809m/data=!3m1!1e3

from there is 6 miles to Detweiler following Bear Meadows Road , about 20-25 minutes

https://www.google.com/maps/dir/40.765,+-77.756/40.717,+-77.753/@40.7411248,-77.7664977,14z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m9!4m8!1m3!2m2!1d-77.756!2d40.765!1m3!2m2!1d-77.753!2d40.717


2. Or you can drive direct to Detweiler - if so, plan to arrive there at 8:00

Please let me know if you planning to come, especially if you want to meet at the Galbreath parking area. Deb and I will be coming from Huntingdon (the opposite direction) and our hope is to meet people at Detweiler Run (gated road) at 8:00.


Greg

Greg Grove
Editor - Pennsylvania Birds
9524 Stone Creek Ridge Road, Huntingdon, PA. 16652
814 643 3295
<gwg2...>


--

Deborah S. Grove


 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/17 3:20 pm
From: Robert Snyder <birdphotoginpa...>
Subject: Fwd: Titmouse Fledgling photos and Dunlin and Sanderling that were at Bald Eagle State Park last week.
Well shucks and doggone it,

I've been relaxing too much over this grand 3-day Memorial Day Weekend!!

Here's the link to the photos:
http://www.pbase.com/bobsnyderphotography/end_of_may_photos


Bob Snyder



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Robert Snyder <birdphotoginpa...>
Date: Mon, May 29, 2017 at 6:12 PM
Subject: Titmouse Fledgling photos and Dunlin and Sanderling that were at
Bald Eagle State Park last week.
To: State College Bird Club Bird Club <SCBIRDCL...>
Cc: Deanna Kline <Dnthegarden...>, MICHAEL S WILLIAMS <msw191...>,
Molly Hanlon <hanlonmt...>, stephanie p klein <
<stephanie.p.klein...>, Hannah Schneider <hannahschneider01...>,
Christopher Strock <cfs149...>


I followed a Tufted Titmouse fledgling on its journey across my back yard:
found in the lilacs by the fence yesterday evening, and on a stack of
bricks at the east end of the garden this morning. Last heard and seen in
a large burning bush with parents nearby.

I photographed a Dunlin and a Sanderling at the beach at BESP on Thursday,
May 25, while hoping to see the Black-bellied Plover reported earlier. No
luck on the plover.

Enjoy!

Bob Snyder

--
Do the best you can, where you are, with what you have.
Theodore Roosevelt



--
Do the best you can, where you are, with what you have.
Theodore Roosevelt

 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/17 3:13 pm
From: Robert Snyder <birdphotoginpa...>
Subject: Titmouse Fledgling photos and Dunlin and Sanderling that were at Bald Eagle State Park last week.
I followed a Tufted Titmouse fledgling on its journey across my back yard:
found in the lilacs by the fence yesterday evening, and on a stack of
bricks at the east end of the garden this morning. Last heard and seen in
a large burning bush with parents nearby.

I photographed a Dunlin and a Sanderling at the beach at BESP on Thursday,
May 25, while hoping to see the Black-bellied Plover reported earlier. No
luck on the plover.

Enjoy!

Bob Snyder

--
Do the best you can, where you are, with what you have.
Theodore Roosevelt

 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/17 2:27 pm
From: Gregory William Grove <gwg2...>
Subject: Detweiler Run Natural Area Field Trip
Hi all

Deb and I will lead a field trip in the Detweiler Run Natural Area in Rothrock State Forest on Saturday Jan 3. We will listen and look and listen for breeding warblers, vireos, Veery, Acadian Flycatcher, Scarlet Tanager, maybe Winter Wren. Among warblers: Canada, BT Blue, BT Green, Hooded, Blackburnian, Worm-eating, La. waterthrush, Ovenbird, Magnolia (maybe).

The hiking is of moderate exertion, on the Mid-State Trail and gated Detweiler Road. We will probably cover 2-3 miles. 2.5 - 3 hours. No major climbs. May be somewhat wet.

Please let me know if you are considering joining us.


For logistics for the Detweiler Run field trip-

I will suggest two possibilities:

1. Meet at 7:30 at the Galbreath Gap Parking area (for hikers etc). This is a short distance past the Tussey Mt ski area on Bear Meadows Rd - check the link to see location

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.765663,-77.757797,809m/data=!3m1!1e3

from there is 6 miles to Detweiler following Bear Meadows Road , about 20-25 minutes

https://www.google.com/maps/dir/40.765,+-77.756/40.717,+-77.753/@40.7411248,-77.7664977,14z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m9!4m8!1m3!2m2!1d-77.756!2d40.765!1m3!2m2!1d-77.753!2d40.717


2. Or you can drive direct to Detweiler - if so, plan to arrive there at 8:00

Please let me know if you planning to come, especially if you want to meet at the Galbreath parking area. Deb and I will be coming from Huntingdon (the opposite direction) and our hope is to meet people at Detweiler Run (gated road) at 8:00.


Greg

Greg Grove
Editor - Pennsylvania Birds
9524 Stone Creek Ridge Road, Huntingdon, PA. 16652
814 643 3295
<gwg2...>


--

Deborah S. Grove


 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/17 12:49 pm
From: Deborah Grove <dsg4...>
Subject: Re: Huntingdon County Rarity of the week -- Red-necked Phalarope
Glad you found it.

Deb

----- Original Message -----
From: "Julia Plummer" <julia...>
To: "DEBORAH S" <dsg4...>
Cc: "SCBIRDCL" <SCBIRDCL...>
Sent: Monday, May 29, 2017 3:39:45 PM
Subject: Re: Huntingdon County Rarity of the week -- Red-necked Phalarope

Still here in flooded field behind farm house (pools of water near some telephone poles). I parked at top of hill and walked a little closer on the road to see with my scope.

Great find!

Susan Braun and I flushed a white-rumped sandpiper from hunter run cove (dam-end) at Bald Eagle SP this morning.

Julia

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 29, 2017, at 12:29 PM, Dnadeb <dsg4...> wrote:
>
> Thanks to about 2 inches of rain and flooded fields Jon Kauffman found a Red-necked Phalarope in a flooded farm field. Private property and requires a scope. Please respect the farmers property. McMahon Rd.
> Deb G
>
> Sent from my iPhone
--
Deborah S. Grove
 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/17 12:44 pm
From: Julia Plummer <julia...>
Subject: Re: Huntingdon County Rarity of the week -- Red-necked Phalarope
Still here in flooded field behind farm house (pools of water near some telephone poles). I parked at top of hill and walked a little closer on the road to see with my scope.

Great find!

Susan Braun and I flushed a white-rumped sandpiper from hunter run cove (dam-end) at Bald Eagle SP this morning.

Julia

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 29, 2017, at 12:29 PM, Dnadeb <dsg4...> wrote:
>
> Thanks to about 2 inches of rain and flooded fields Jon Kauffman found a Red-necked Phalarope in a flooded farm field. Private property and requires a scope. Please respect the farmers property. McMahon Rd.
> Deb G
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/25/17 4:26 pm
From: Robert Snyder <birdphotoginpa...>
Subject: Breeding plumage Dublin
At the BESP now! With a smaller "peep". More to come.

Bob Snyder



From my OM-D EM-1

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/25/17 7:05 am
From: Brent Bacon <blbacon...>
Subject: Help the PGC with your eagle nest photos
Other than just sharing your photo with friends, you can help the PGC Bald
Eagle Specialist for the North Central Region.

I have been reporting my observations and photos to Tony for some time.
But, I cannot get around to all of the nest the PGC is monitoring.

He is asking that if you have any observations and/or photos, to share this
information with him.



Attention Photographers & Observers!
If you would like to help the Pennsylvania Game Commission in the North
Central Region, with your photography of eagles nest or observed behavior,
here's your chance.
If you are photographing and following, or just occasionally checking on a
nest, consider sharing your photos and observations with the PGC's North
Central Region Eagle Specialist, Tony Ross.
You can send photos and information on observations to:
Tony Ross, <anross...>
Please note that he is only concerned with the North Central Region. A map
of the regions is available here, if you have any questions:
<https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fgoo.gl%2F3CxWsx&h=ATO2_N2lXczJ
wFxOHS5XQKAMWfFubCNCWLNTyAQ4IdEeRmkdIpYcnticmiBYkCx8AVINGKeXsAbBXQ1__LTVOj7a
o_BBPB3nnT0d18fMQy1W4azOEFgtm1Xb7uKBf9sasbcbWfbI68xmwu_vtDM&enc=AZMVjrU-SPQZ
ZEjiHrd6H3cwY-SRAM6fEXjO-VYq2z3RAN9Ir4B2wSY62exrBiXWfRgHqchQx5GyXzPX9gyHbWuW
MssQbJ7chzYTMsHkjrSJFLI_zDX6xuhgDMM87dF0MsLg459gvUy5eEwAgY2i7xwLClg3kU1Gl3sZ
9CH6FX0jzER727K65l2hFTa4-P-obck&s=1> https://goo.gl/3CxWsx
He would very much appreciate our help.


 

Back to top
Date: 5/25/17 6:15 am
From: Julia Plummer <julia...>
Subject: Black-bellied plover
Hi all,

Saw what looks to be a black-bellied plover at Bald Eagle SP beach this
morning (along with a Dunlin and 4 semi-palmated sandpipers). Attached are
some photos (it also had a white-rump, not visible in the photos).

Julia

 

Back to top
Date: 5/24/17 7:57 pm
From: Craig&Jean Miller <csjhmiller...>
Subject: Potluck Dinner
Did anyone at the Wednesday Bird Club potluck dinner see a small
stainless steel thermos? I think I left ours behind when we packed up.

Thank you,

Craig and Jean Miller
 

Back to top
Date: 5/24/17 12:48 pm
From: Jon Kauffman <jvk5019...>
Subject: June 3rd Field Trip - Detweiler Run
Hello all,

Below are details for the last field trip of the season. Driving logistics
will be announced next week. Please let me know if you have any questions.

Thank you and I hope to see you on the walk.

Best,
Jon




Saturday June 3, 2017 (8am-10:30am)

Walk at Detweiler Run

Trip Leader: Greg Grove

This trip will be for breeding birds of this beautiful, secluded valley,
which features fairly old-growth trees and a delightful tumbling stream
(Detweiler Run).

Among the possibilities beyond the many Ovenbirds and Red-eyed Vireos are
Canada, Hooded, Worm-eating, Black-throated Blue, Black-throated Green,
Magnolia (rare breeder) Warblers, Blue-headed Vireo, Veery, Acadian
Flycatcher, Winter Wren (fairly rare). Much of the birding will be by ear,
but we will do our best to see as many of these as possible.

The hike will be moderately strenuous: 2-3 miles on trail and old road;
probably will be some wet/moist areas, will be some rocks, no major rocks
fields however. A hiking stick can be helpful. No major elevation gains -
and this is not a physically demanding walk, especially given the usual
slow pace. About 3 hours, very approximately, for the walk. Driving time to
and from State College- about 30-40 minutes each way.

 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/17 1:48 pm
From: Diane K. Bierly <dkb246...>
Subject: Reminder--Bird Club Picnic--Wed., May 24--Millbrook Marsh
Reminder:

The State College Bird Club's annual potluck picnic will be held at Millbrook
Marsh on Wednesday, May 24 at 6:00 p.m.

Please bring your own beverage, plates, and utensils along with your "potluck"
dish.

Diane

------------------------
Diane K. Bierly
State College Bird Club
http://www.scbirdcl.org/
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/17 9:34 am
From: Margaret Brittingham <mxb21...>
Subject: Goshawk Tee Shirts
May 2017



*Dear friends in conservation,*



In 2016 Hawk Mountain and other members of the Ornithological Technical
Committee of the PA Biological Survey began work to assess the status of
Northern Goshawk within the state, an elusive and secretive forest-nesting
bird. The Second Breeding Bird Atlas conducted in early 2000s documented a
28% decline in nesting season records across the state, highlighting the
need for further research on the species. With small grants from Wild
Resources Conservation Fund and Kittatinny Ridge Coalition, The PA Goshawk
Project was launched in late 2016 with a goal to revisit every historical
nesting territory. We hope to see if the birds are still present and to
document any habitat status and attributes that may have led to their
decline. We are also recruiting reports of sightings to assess goshawk
distribution statewide. Because goshawks are challenging to study and
funding is limited, we are launching a campaign to help support work
throughout the state.



You can help by purchasing a shirt or sweatshirt and by sharing our message
about our campaign.



*Get your PA Goshawk Project shirt today!*

Shirts come in five colors and five designs and every sale benefits PA
Goshawk Project and helps us gain a better understanding of goshawk
distribution and status within Pennsylvania.

Orders are made directly through the Bonfire website. Then at end of two
weeks shirts are produced and mailed by Bonfire. Tee shirt design by PA
artist David Hughes.

Please share widely with your colleagues and friends…!!!



For information on the PA Goshawk Project and goshawks, visit

www.pabiologicalsurvey.org/goshawk



*https://www.bonfire.com/conserving-pennsylvanias-goshawks/
<https://www.bonfire.com/conserving-pennsylvanias-goshawks/>*





[image: fb_share_image_1024 (3) (2).png]

The *PA Goshawk Project* seeks your support for its work to survey and
conserve goshawks across Pennsylvania. Each shirt sale benefits goshawk
work, so buy one for all your friends and family!

*https://www.bonfire.com/conserving-pennsylvanias-goshawks/
<https://www.bonfire.com/conserving-pennsylvanias-goshawks/>*





Laurie J. Goodrich, Ph.D.

Director of Long-term Monitoring

Hawk Mountain Acopian Center for Conservation Learning

Hawk Mountain

410 Summer Valley Road

Orwigsburg, PA 17961

570-943-3411 x106 <%28570%29%20943-3411>

www.hawkmountain.org


[image: logo half size.jpg]

 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/17 3:46 am
From: David Facey <dcf2005...>
Subject: Black vultures
There are multiple black vultures (I counted at least 6) at a deer carcass on the lawn of the Centre County prison this morning along Benner Pike in Bellefonte.

 

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