OKbirds
Received From Subject
6/18/19 7:00 pm Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...> FW: eBird Report - Beaver County, OK, US, Jun 13, 2019
6/18/19 6:39 pm Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...> FW: eBird Report - Texas County, OK, US, Jun 12, 2019
6/14/19 7:15 am Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...> New Photos
6/12/19 6:06 am Dan Reinking <dan...> birding survey
6/11/19 6:25 pm HAROLD YOCUM <drhal2...> Mitch Park 6/11/19
6/11/19 4:38 pm John Fisher <rgs455...> Tallgrass Prairie Preserve Butterfly Count - Reschduled
6/9/19 7:58 pm O Connell, Tim <tim.oconnell...> Re: Black Vulturs
6/9/19 3:33 pm Howery, Mark <mark.howery...> Re: Black Vulturs
6/9/19 6:02 am Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...> Re: Black Vulturs
6/8/19 7:04 pm J.B. Tibbits <jeff_osu...> Re: Black Vulturs
6/8/19 4:09 pm Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...> Recent Trip to Wisconsin.
6/8/19 12:35 pm Steve Schafer <steve...> Re: Black Vulturs
6/8/19 12:28 pm Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...> Re: Black Vulturs
6/8/19 12:12 pm Rodney Hartsfield <bassangler73...> Re: Black Vulturs
6/8/19 12:08 pm Bob and Nancy <blnllaval...> Black Vulturs
6/8/19 11:16 am Bostian, Kelly <Kelly.Bostian...> Re: Public comments open for hunting changes at Wichita Mtns
6/8/19 11:01 am Thompson, David M. (HSC) <David-Thompson...> Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: Public comments open for hunting changes at Wichita Mtns
6/8/19 7:59 am janis blanton <janis.blanton...> Re: Public comments open for hunting changes at Wichita Mtns
6/8/19 4:33 am Thompson, David M. (HSC) <David-Thompson...> Public comments open for hunting changes at Wichita Mtns
6/7/19 8:23 pm Richrd Gunn <richardgunn1940...> Re: Public comments open for hunting changes at Wichita Mtns
6/7/19 7:16 pm hope4herefords <hope4herefords...> Public comments open for hunting changes at Wichita Mtns
6/7/19 4:43 pm William Diffin <okiebirder...> Re: Tulsa areas shorebird photos from May 14-26
6/6/19 6:25 pm Ken or Carol Williams <kcwilliams...> Skiatook BBS
6/5/19 8:25 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Moffett, OK relief
6/5/19 5:40 am Dan Reinking <dan...> Re: nest identification
6/4/19 8:29 pm HAROLD YOCUM <drhal2...> Re: nest identification
6/4/19 7:44 pm Bob and Nancy <blnllaval...> Re: nest identification
6/4/19 7:20 pm David F. Evans <davefbirds...> nest identification
6/4/19 5:30 pm EUGENE YOUNG <EUGENE.YOUNG...> Re: Tulsa areas shorebird photos from May 14-26
6/4/19 5:19 pm Jim Arterburn <JIMARTERBURN...> Tulsa areas shorebird photos from May 14-26
6/3/19 9:13 am Diana Pond <dianap38...> Re: Passing of Ford Hendershot
6/3/19 4:58 am Melinda Droege <oklagranny26...> Re: Passing of Ford Hendershot
6/2/19 7:18 pm Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...> Re: Passing of Ford Hendershot
6/2/19 7:05 pm Della Neil <starblonde0460...> Re: Passing of Ford Hendershot
6/2/19 6:56 pm Harmon, Vonceil <vcharmon...> Re: Passing of Ford Hendershot
6/2/19 6:31 pm JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski...> Re: Passing of Ford Hendershot
6/2/19 6:27 pm Brett Niland <bestguess...> Re: Passing of Ford Hendershot
6/2/19 4:45 pm Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...> Re: Passing of Ford Hendershot
6/2/19 3:05 pm Linda Adams <000000853e24127e-dmarc-request...> Re: Passing of Ford Hendershot
6/2/19 11:32 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Passing of Ford Hendershot
6/2/19 10:46 am Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...> Re: Passing of Ford Hendershot
6/2/19 9:29 am David Arbour <arbour...> Passing of Ford Hendershot
6/2/19 5:33 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Owls
6/1/19 10:11 pm Sebastian Patti <sebastianpatti...> Re: Owls
6/1/19 9:44 pm EUGENE YOUNG <EUGENE.YOUNG...> Owls
6/1/19 4:13 pm O Connell, Tim <tim.oconnell...> Payne County – Cross Timbers Experimental Range, June 1 2019
6/1/19 1:34 pm Patricia Velte <pvelte...> June Migration Report
6/1/19 12:56 am Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...> Re: Status of Oxley Nature Center and Redbud Valley Nature Preserve
5/31/19 5:01 pm Brett Niland <bestguess...> Re: Status of Oxley Nature Center and Redbud Valley Nature Preserve
5/31/19 4:48 pm Susie Ruby <seruby...> Status of Oxley Nature Center and Redbud Valley Nature Preserve
5/30/19 12:33 pm John Fisher <rgs455...> Reminder: Tallgrass Prairie Preserve Butterfly Count
5/30/19 5:17 am Susie Ruby <seruby...> PhD candidate's survery
5/28/19 10:35 am Bostian, Kelly <Kelly.Bostian...> Re: Bixby sod farms
5/27/19 7:41 pm Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...> Lake Yahola this evening.
5/27/19 7:01 am Susanne Lutze <eztuls46...> Re: Common Nighthawks
5/27/19 5:51 am Hollis Price <hollis...> Re: Common Nighthawks
5/27/19 3:33 am Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...> Re: Common Nighthawks
5/26/19 7:41 pm Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...> Re: baby bird ID
5/26/19 6:49 pm Hollis Price <hollis...> Common Nighthawks
5/26/19 6:44 pm O Connell, Tim <tim.oconnell...> Stillwater, OK: morning walk birds
5/26/19 6:19 pm Dora Webb <owl112...> baby bird ID
5/26/19 5:19 pm Richrd Gunn <richardgunn1940...> Re: Bixby sod farms
5/26/19 3:08 pm Brett Niland <bestguess...> Re: Bixby sod farms
5/26/19 2:06 pm John Kennington <johnkennington...> Re: Bixby sod farms
5/26/19 1:46 pm Richrd Gunn <richardgunn1940...> Re: Bixby sod farms
5/26/19 11:03 am Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...> Flood and pelicans
5/26/19 7:08 am Brett Niland <bestguess...> Re: Bixby sod farms
5/26/19 6:55 am Brett Niland <bestguess...> Bixby sod farms
5/25/19 5:05 pm Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...> 56th St North
5/25/19 3:43 pm terry <terry...> Re: Tulsa area
5/25/19 3:39 pm J.B. Tibbits <jeff_osu...> Re: 2019 Oklahoma Birder Survey
5/25/19 8:24 am Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...> Cimarron County from 5-20-19 to 5-23-2019.
5/24/19 9:25 pm jana singletary <jssingletary...> Re: Tulsa area
5/24/19 7:23 pm terry <terry...> Tulsa area
5/23/19 6:59 pm Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...> Re: Leonard
5/23/19 4:09 pm Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...> Re: Sequoyah NWR
5/23/19 3:36 pm Melinda Droege <oklagranny26...> Re: Leonard
5/23/19 3:10 pm Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...> Leonard
5/23/19 1:29 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Sequoyah NWR
5/22/19 7:42 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Belated report: Red Slough Bird Survey - May 21
5/22/19 1:54 pm Jim Arterburn <JIMARTERBURN...> Red-necked Phalarope and other late shorebird migrants
5/22/19 12:45 pm O Connell, Tim <tim.oconnell...> Payne County Audubon Society – TWO field trips coming up!
5/22/19 11:46 am Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...> Re: Inca Dove
5/22/19 11:36 am Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...> Re: Whimbrels
5/22/19 8:05 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Inca Dove
5/22/19 7:44 am Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...> Inca Dove
5/21/19 2:37 pm Brett Niland <bestguess...> Re: Whimbrels
5/21/19 2:12 pm Brett Niland <bestguess...> Re: Whimbrels
5/21/19 10:51 am jana singletary <jssingletary...> Whimbrels
5/20/19 11:25 am Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...> Re: A Few Weekend Birds
5/20/19 9:16 am Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...> A Few Weekend Birds
 
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Date: 6/18/19 7:00 pm
From: Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...>
Subject: FW: eBird Report - Beaver County, OK, US, Jun 13, 2019
Here are the results of my Clear Lake BBS route in Beaver County I ran last week.
The weather was perfect with temps starting at 55 and ending at 69. Skies were overcast
and it rained lightly off and on for the first hour. Roads were dry so overall conditions
were perfect.
Bird species and numbers were about as expected. No real surprises.

Jimmy Woodard
Midwest City, OK


Beaver County, OK, US, Beaver, Oklahoma, US Jun 13, 2019 5:53 AM - 10:33 AM
Protocol: Traveling
25.0 mile(s)
Comments: This is the cumulative totals for the Clear Lake BBS route in Beaver County.
45 species

Mallard 1
Northern Bobwhite 61
Scaled Quail 3
Wild Turkey 3
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 1
Eurasian Collared-Dove 4
Mourning Dove 305
Common Nighthawk 31 Cumulative total from BBS route.
Killdeer 22
Turkey Vulture 14
Swainson's Hawk 3
Red-tailed Hawk 3
Great Horned Owl 8
Red-headed Woodpecker 2
American Kestrel 1
Say's Phoebe 4
Western Kingbird 15
Eastern Kingbird 6
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher 16
Warbling Vireo 1
American Crow 2
Horned Lark 106 Cumulative total from BBS run.
Barn Swallow 19
Cliff Swallow 392
Bewick's Wren 2
Eastern Bluebird 2
Brown Thrasher 1
Northern Mockingbird 18
European Starling 58
Cassin's Sparrow 61 Cumulative total from BBS run.
Grasshopper Sparrow 122 Cumulative total from BBS route.
Lark Sparrow 83
Lark Bunting 1 one male seen well.
Western Meadowlark 291
Eastern Meadowlark 70
Orchard Oriole 3
Bullock's Oriole 3
Red-winged Blackbird 19
Brown-headed Cowbird 26
Common Grackle 1
Great-tailed Grackle 10
Blue Grosbeak 5
Painted Bunting 1 one bird singing in appropriate habitat.
Dickcissel 216 Cumulative total from BBS run.
House Sparrow 5

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57500025

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)
 

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Date: 6/18/19 6:39 pm
From: Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...>
Subject: FW: eBird Report - Texas County, OK, US, Jun 12, 2019
Here is my results from the Hooker BBS route I ran in Texas County last week. Surprisingly,
the weather started cool, cloudy but dry for the 3rd year in a row. Conditions were great
for mid June in the panhandle.
Nighthawk, Cassin's Sparrow and Lark Sparrow numbers seemed to be down a bit. Nothing
unusual was found on the route.

Jimmy Woodard
Midwest City, OK


Texas County, OK, US, Texas, Oklahoma, US Jun 12, 2019 5:55 AM - 10:40 AM
Protocol: Traveling
25.0 mile(s)
Comments: This was the Hooker BBS route. All species numbers are cumulative totals for the 50 stops.
32 species

Northern Bobwhite 34 cumulative totals from the 50 stops on the BBS route.
Ring-necked Pheasant 57 Cumulative totals from BBS run.
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 76 Cumulative totals from BBS run.
Eurasian Collared-Dove 61
Mourning Dove 978 Cumulative total from BBS run.
Common Nighthawk 8
Chimney Swift 2
Killdeer 29
Swainson's Hawk 19 Cumulative total from BBS run.
Red-tailed Hawk 1
Western Kingbird 29
Loggerhead Shrike 1
Horned Lark 676 Cumulative total from the BBS run.
Barn Swallow 15
Cliff Swallow 1
American Robin 14
Northern Mockingbird 12 Cumulative total from BBS run.
European Starling 23
Cassin's Sparrow 7
Grasshopper Sparrow 83 Cumulative total from BBS run.
Lark Sparrow 10
Lark Bunting 33
Western Meadowlark 548 Cumulative total from BBS run.
Orchard Oriole 1
Bullock's Oriole 3
Red-winged Blackbird 150
Brown-headed Cowbird 3
Common Grackle 10
Great-tailed Grackle 69 Cumulative total from BBS run.
Blue Grosbeak 10 Cumulative total from BBS run.
Dickcissel 273 Cumulative total from BBS run.
House Sparrow 126 Cumulative total from BBS run.

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57499472

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)
 

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Date: 6/14/19 7:15 am
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...>
Subject: New Photos
Hello All,

Just finished adding April and May photos to my Pbase site. Still mostly
birds at this stage but the bugs and herps are starting to take over for
the summer (all of you who are interested in those categories stay tuned).
Highlights are photos from Salt Plains and the Black Mesa area, as well as
a series of shorebird shots from south Tulsa county, mostly White-Rumped
Sandpipers, but also Semipalmated, Pectoral and Lesser Yellowlegs:

https://pbase.com/lctsimages/recent&page=1

 

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Date: 6/12/19 6:06 am
From: Dan Reinking <dan...>
Subject: birding survey
OKbirders,

A PhD candidate from Boise State University is conducting a short online
survey of birders about the intersection of birding and conservation. If you
would like to participate, visit
https://boisestate.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bNvZE8A2QY8u2rz

Dan Reinking

Sutton Avian Research Center




 

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Date: 6/11/19 6:25 pm
From: HAROLD YOCUM <drhal2...>
Subject: Mitch Park 6/11/19
I birded Mitch Park, Edmond this Am 8-10:30 along with Sherman and Sharon Barr.

22 species

walked 1.75 miles

red shouldered hawk

bob white quail- calling, several locations

ruby throated hummingbird

black chinned hummingbird- near short path to pond. also a ruby throated male in the areas. they seem to in separated locations there. food source - scarlet honeysuckle

killdeer

Bells vireo- 3 calling , various locations, mostly east side along Kelly

mourning dove

fish crow- calling 1

American crow

northern cardinal-many

scissor-tailed flycatcher- adult and young

eastern phoebe

indigo bunting- 1seen and calling

painted bunting - 2 seen , 2 others hear . generally east side near Kelly , and along the power line on the north edge of the park . One central and 1 near the bridge.

eastern bluebird- several plus young

Carolina chickadee-2

Carolina wren 1

brown headed cowbird

field sparrow- singing at several locations

house sparrow

Brown thrasher-2

northern mockingbird

Hal Yocum, Edmond
 

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Date: 6/11/19 4:38 pm
From: John Fisher <rgs455...>
Subject: Tallgrass Prairie Preserve Butterfly Count - Reschduled
Since the TGP butterfly count was rained out Sunday, June 9th, we're
rescheduling for Saturday, June 22nd.




 

Back to top
Date: 6/9/19 7:58 pm
From: O Connell, Tim <tim.oconnell...>
Subject: Re: Black Vulturs
Wonderfully informative post, Mark.


On Jun 9, 2019, at 5:32 PM, Howery, Mark <mark.howery...><mailto:<mark.howery...>> wrote:

**External Email - Please verify sender email address before responding.**
Another issue created by Black Vultures that I've not seen in Oklahoma is their consumption of soft plastic such as windshield wiper blades.

In New Zealand, Keas are notorious for this – as they are for their depredations on sheep!


Re: Black Vultures – back in 2008 at the joint spring meeting of the OOS with the Arbuckle-Simpson Nature Festival, our guest speaker Jerry Jackson led my grad student Andy George and me to a black vulture nest on the Saturday morning field trip. At the banquet that night, we had a wonderful conversation with a colorful rancher at our table. I paraphrased as much of it as I could to preserve for posterity here: https://eatmorecookies.wordpress.com/2008/05/11/black-vulture-a-ranchers-perspective/.
~Tim O’Connell
Stillwater
 

Back to top
Date: 6/9/19 3:33 pm
From: Howery, Mark <mark.howery...>
Subject: Re: Black Vulturs
Hi Bob,
You started a very productive discussion on Black Vulture depredation! I'm
going to toss in my limited experience to build on the great information
that Jeff shared. The killing of calves by Black Vultures is rare, but
it's a real phenomenon that's been documented for nearly 50 years starting
in Texas and Florida. I first heard about it in the late 1990s, and since
1998 I've received 8 to 10 calls from ranchers/landowners who have lost
young calves (and in one case young goats) to Black Vultures. These
callers were scattered across south-central and southeastern Oklahoma -
Carter, Love, Johnston, Coal, Choctaw and McCurtain counties. As others
have said, the Black Vultures are attracted to the placenta and after-birth
when a calf is born. In some cases, the vultures will pick remnants of the
placenta off the newborn calves and in a few cases they will go as far as
to peck at the ears, eyes, nostrils, mouth, umbilical chord and anus of
calves and cause injury or death. Although I don't have any empirical
data, my belief is that the behavior of killing newborn calves is a random
event that a handful of Black Vultures learn, and then other Black Vultures
in their social group learn the behavior from watching them. I think that
is way the behavior is infrequent and scattered.

When I receive the rare calls about Black Vulture depredation, I refer the
callers to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service because they are the agency
with primary management authority for Black Vultures and other migratory
birds. Even though most Black Vultures are not migratory, they are
classified as migratory birds under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (50 CFR
10.13) and fall under the jurisdiction of the federal government and not
the states. I know that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S.
Department of Agriculture have been working on the Black Vulture
depredation issue for over two decades, and their work has ramped up in the
past six to eight years as the Black Vulture has expanded its range into
the Ohio River Valley.

There appear to be several factors in play that affect the frequency of
calf depredation by vultures including the access that cattle have to shrub
cover to hide their calves, and the length of exposure that cattle have had
to depredating vultures. Even through Black Vultures are very common in
Florida and Georgia, the frequency of calf deaths there is low (the USFWS
estimates that there are over 500,000 Black Vultures just in the state of
Florida). Many of the cattle raised in Florida are reared on rangeland
with abundant palmetto thickets and other forms of shrub cover where the
cows tend to hide their calves. Additionally, cows across the coastal
south, Florida and south Texas are more likely to chase away vultures when
they are calving - the assumption is that they have learned to perceive
Black Vultures as a threat. In contrast, as you move up into the upper
South and the Ohio River Valley, cattle in these places tend to be reared
in open grassy pastures (think of non-native bluegrass or fescue pastures)
where there is little to no cover for the calves, and the adult cattle have
had limited exposure to Black Vultures because Black Vultures have expanded
into those areas only within the past 20 to 25 years. Those cows tend to
ignore Black Vultures and rarely make an effort to scare them away during
the calving season. So there seem to be a few things that ranchers can do
to limit Black Vulture depredation such as moving their cattle during the
calving season into areas where there is shrub cover to hide their newborn
calves and areas where it is easier for the ranchers to monitor Black
Vulture numbers. Also, during the calving season, move cows as far away
from Black Vulture roost sites as feasible and don't let Black Vultures
develop a roost on the ranch prior to and during the calving season.

Fortunately, most ranchers coordinate the breeding and calving of their
herds so that most calves are born in a narrow window of a four to six
weeks. This synchronicity of calving makes newborn calves, placentas and
after-birth an ephemeral food source for vultures and reduces the
likelihood that Black Vultures would key in on calves and learn to kill
calves for food.

I apologize for the gross email, but I wanted to share a few things that
I've learned over the years in talking to ranchers and federal biologists.
Another issue created by Black Vultures that I've not seen in Oklahoma is
their consumption of soft plastic such as windshield wiper blades. This is
apparently a problem in urban areas along the Atlantic Coast from Virginia
to Florida, but hasn't been reported (yet) in our part of the country. I
don't know how they do it, but Black Vultures are apparently capable of
digesting some formulations of plastic and will eat this during the winter.
Mark

Mark Howery
Wildlife Diversity Biologist
Oklahoma Dept. of Wildlife Conservation
(405) 990-7259
<mark.howery...>


On Sun, Jun 9, 2019 at 8:01 AM Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...>
wrote:

> Thanks to everyone for the information. It was a big help. It’s good to
> know that actual research has been done although many of the words used
> were not in my vocabulary.
>
> Bob Laval
> Heavener
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> On Jun 8, 2019, at 9:04 PM, J.B. Tibbits <jeff_osu...> wrote:
>
> I've heard of "Mexican Buzzards" as well. As with coyotes, it does happen
> but not as frequent as described. I suspect they're more interested in the
> afterbirth, and any predation is rare/opportunistic.
>
>
> https://www.researchgate.net/publication/231859968_The_presence_of_black_vultures_at_the_calving_sites_and_its_effects_on_cows'_and_calves'_behaviour_immediately_following_parturition
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.researchgate.net_publication_231859968-5FThe-5Fpresence-5Fof-5Fblack-5Fvultures-5Fat-5Fthe-5Fcalving-5Fsites-5Fand-5Fits-5Feffects-5Fon-5Fcows-27-5Fand-5Fcalves-27-5Fbehaviour-5Fimmediately-5Ffollowing-5Fparturition&d=DwMF-g&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=uj09tYlLrg4eBMHJ3b7256QRigYRfzcxcg6jnndXwWY&s=M2f3c_ITxp0SvJS1RD4fmJAm8KRgFmrOwD3Xy98G-A4&e=>
>
> Abstract:
>
> "Black vultures (Coragyps atratus) are often present near calving sites,
> and under this situation they may play a positive role by removing animal
> carcasses and afterbirth or a negative role by attacking neonate calves or
> disturbing cow-calf behaviours following parturition. Cow-calf behaviour
> was recorded over a 4-year study period from a total of 300 births
> involving 200 Nellore, 54 Guzerat, 20 Gyr and 26 Caracu cows. The calving
> site in relation to the location of the herd, considering cow-calf pairs
> within, close or distant to the herd, the presence of vultures and the
> behaviour of cows and calves were recorded instantaneously, at 5-min
> interval. On average, vultures were present at 80% of the calving sites.
> The frequency of vultures present at calving sites was dependent on the
> years for the Nellore herd, increasing from 1998 to 2003. When vultures
> were present, the time that the cow was in contact with its calf decreased,
> and the percentage of time that the cow was standing still increased.
> Vultures were observed pecking cows and their neonates during 34.1% of all
> recordings. However, in only two cases pecking injuries were actually
> observed on calves that were noted to be very weak. The preliminary results
> suggest that although black vultures cannot be characterized as a predator
> of neonate calves, they sometimes attack neonate calves and their presence
> near the calving sites alter the behaviours of cows and calves."
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Steve Schafer <
> <steve...>
> *Sent:* Saturday, June 8, 2019 2:35 PM
> *To:* <OKBIRDS...>
> *Subject:* Re: [OKBIRDS] Black Vulturs
>
> Yes, Black Vultures are known to attack newborn livestock: calves, lambs,
> etc. It's uncommon, but it does occur.
>
> -Steve
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Bob and Nancy <
> <blnllaval...>
> *Sent:* Saturday, June 8, 2019 3:07 PM
> *To:* <OKBIRDS...>
> *Subject:* [OKBIRDS] Black Vulturs
>
> I drink coffee with a bunch of guys every morning, composed of ranchers,
> and chicken farmers and others. I heard something yesterday I have never
> head before. One of the ranchers was cussing *Mexican Buzzards*. I
> asked him what he was talking about. He described Black Vultures. He
> said they are killing some of his calf's. He described an action by the
> Vultures that he has observed more than once. The vultures swoop down on a
> live new calf laying on the ground and peck the eyes out if they catch the
> mother too far away. The calf of course starves to death and the vultures
> feast. Others around the table agreed. They say the BVs are new to the
> area at least in large numbers. I see a few every summer but I’m not really
> out on the ranches. Has anyone heard of this habit?
> Bob LaVal
> 20367 Pine Mtn. LP
> Heavener, OK 74937
> Phone: 918-653-7921
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/9/19 6:02 am
From: Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...>
Subject: Re: Black Vulturs
Thanks to everyone for the information. It was a big help. It’s good to know that actual research has been done although many of the words used were not in my vocabulary.

Bob Laval
Heavener

Sent from my iPad

> On Jun 8, 2019, at 9:04 PM, J.B. Tibbits <jeff_osu...> wrote:
>
> I've heard of "Mexican Buzzards" as well. As with coyotes, it does happen but not as frequent as described. I suspect they're more interested in the afterbirth, and any predation is rare/opportunistic.
>
> https://www.researchgate.net/publication/231859968_The_presence_of_black_vultures_at_the_calving_sites_and_its_effects_on_cows'_and_calves'_behaviour_immediately_following_parturition
>
> Abstract:
> "Black vultures (Coragyps atratus) are often present near calving sites, and under this situation they may play a positive role by removing animal carcasses and afterbirth or a negative role by attacking neonate calves or disturbing cow-calf behaviours following parturition. Cow-calf behaviour was recorded over a 4-year study period from a total of 300 births involving 200 Nellore, 54 Guzerat, 20 Gyr and 26 Caracu cows. The calving site in relation to the location of the herd, considering cow-calf pairs within, close or distant to the herd, the presence of vultures and the behaviour of cows and calves were recorded instantaneously, at 5-min interval. On average, vultures were present at 80% of the calving sites. The frequency of vultures present at calving sites was dependent on the years for the Nellore herd, increasing from 1998 to 2003. When vultures were present, the time that the cow was in contact with its calf decreased, and the percentage of time that the cow was standing still increased. Vultures were observed pecking cows and their neonates during 34.1% of all recordings. However, in only two cases pecking injuries were actually observed on calves that were noted to be very weak. The preliminary results suggest that although black vultures cannot be characterized as a predator of neonate calves, they sometimes attack neonate calves and their presence near the calving sites alter the behaviours of cows and calves."
> From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Steve Schafer <steve...>
> Sent: Saturday, June 8, 2019 2:35 PM
> To: <OKBIRDS...>
> Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Black Vulturs
>
> Yes, Black Vultures are known to attack newborn livestock: calves, lambs, etc. It's uncommon, but it does occur.
>
> -Steve
>
> From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Bob and Nancy <blnllaval...>
> Sent: Saturday, June 8, 2019 3:07 PM
> To: <OKBIRDS...>
> Subject: [OKBIRDS] Black Vulturs
>
> I drink coffee with a bunch of guys every morning, composed of ranchers, and chicken farmers and others. I heard something yesterday I have never head before. One of the ranchers was cussing Mexican Buzzards. I asked him what he was talking about. He described Black Vultures. He said they are killing some of his calf's. He described an action by the Vultures that he has observed more than once. The vultures swoop down on a live new calf laying on the ground and peck the eyes out if they catch the mother too far away. The calf of course starves to death and the vultures feast. Others around the table agreed. They say the BVs are new to the area at least in large numbers. I see a few every summer but I’m not really out on the ranches. Has anyone heard of this habit?
> Bob LaVal
> 20367 Pine Mtn. LP
> Heavener, OK 74937
> Phone: 918-653-7921

 

Back to top
Date: 6/8/19 7:04 pm
From: J.B. Tibbits <jeff_osu...>
Subject: Re: Black Vulturs
I've heard of "Mexican Buzzards" as well. As with coyotes, it does happen but not as frequent as described. I suspect they're more interested in the afterbirth, and any predation is rare/opportunistic.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/231859968_The_presence_of_black_vultures_at_the_calving_sites_and_its_effects_on_cows'_and_calves'_behaviour_immediately_following_parturition

Abstract:
"Black vultures (Coragyps atratus) are often present near calving sites, and under this situation they may play a positive role by removing animal carcasses and afterbirth or a negative role by attacking neonate calves or disturbing cow-calf behaviours following parturition. Cow-calf behaviour was recorded over a 4-year study period from a total of 300 births involving 200 Nellore, 54 Guzerat, 20 Gyr and 26 Caracu cows. The calving site in relation to the location of the herd, considering cow-calf pairs within, close or distant to the herd, the presence of vultures and the behaviour of cows and calves were recorded instantaneously, at 5-min interval. On average, vultures were present at 80% of the calving sites. The frequency of vultures present at calving sites was dependent on the years for the Nellore herd, increasing from 1998 to 2003. When vultures were present, the time that the cow was in contact with its calf decreased, and the percentage of time that the cow was standing still increased. Vultures were observed pecking cows and their neonates during 34.1% of all recordings. However, in only two cases pecking injuries were actually observed on calves that were noted to be very weak. The preliminary results suggest that although black vultures cannot be characterized as a predator of neonate calves, they sometimes attack neonate calves and their presence near the calving sites alter the behaviours of cows and calves."
________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Steve Schafer <steve...>
Sent: Saturday, June 8, 2019 2:35 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Black Vulturs

Yes, Black Vultures are known to attack newborn livestock: calves, lambs, etc. It's uncommon, but it does occur.

-Steve

________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Bob and Nancy <blnllaval...>
Sent: Saturday, June 8, 2019 3:07 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Black Vulturs

I drink coffee with a bunch of guys every morning, composed of ranchers, and chicken farmers and others. I heard something yesterday I have never head before. One of the ranchers was cussing Mexican Buzzards. I asked him what he was talking about. He described Black Vultures. He said they are killing some of his calf's. He described an action by the Vultures that he has observed more than once. The vultures swoop down on a live new calf laying on the ground and peck the eyes out if they catch the mother too far away. The calf of course starves to death and the vultures feast. Others around the table agreed. They say the BVs are new to the area at least in large numbers. I see a few every summer but Im not really out on the ranches. Has anyone heard of this habit?
Bob LaVal
20367 Pine Mtn. LP
Heavener, OK 74937
Phone: 918-653-7921

 

Back to top
Date: 6/8/19 4:09 pm
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...>
Subject: Recent Trip to Wisconsin.
Hello All,
Earlier this week, I went up to Wisconsin to help refresh my memories of the many warblers that I used to see up there during migration and during the summer months. I was not disappointed as I visited Wyalusing State Park, Horicon Marsh, Navarino Wildlife Area, Stockbridge-Munsee and Menominee Indian Reservations, Nicolet National Forest and Thunder Marsh. We in Oklahoma are severely shortchanged in seeing and hearing the northern warblers during migration. This has been a yearly trip since I moved to Oklahoma. Except for the gull, all were on breeding territories. Highlights included:

Great Black-backed Gull-1
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher-1
Alder Flycatcher-20+
Willow Flycatcher-1
Blue-headed Vireo-3
Black-capped Chickadee-10+
Red-breasted Nuthatch=4
Brown Creeper-3
Winter Wren-2
Golden Crowned Kinglet-2
Veery-20+
Hermit Thrush-3
Blue-winged Warbler-4
Golden-winged Warbler-3
Nashville Warbler-50+
Northern Parula Warbler-6
Yellow Warbler-20+
Chestnut-sided Warbler-20+
Magnolia Warbler-3
Cape May Warbler 2 or 3
Black-throated Blue Warbler-6
Yellow-rumped Warbler-10+
Black-throated Breen Warbler-20+
Blackburnian Warbler-10+
Yellow-throated Warbler-1
Pine Warbler-10+
Cerulean Warbler-6
Black and White Warbler-10+
American Redstart-20+
Prothonotary Warbler-1
Ovenbird-20+
Northern Waterthrush-10+
Louisiana Warbler-4
Kentucky Warbler-2
Mourning Warbler-6
Common Yellowthroat-20+
Hooded Warbler-3
Canada Warbler-10+
Le Conte's Sparrow-1
Lincoln's Sparrow-5

Mark Peterson
Bartlesville





 

Back to top
Date: 6/8/19 12:35 pm
From: Steve Schafer <steve...>
Subject: Re: Black Vulturs
Yes, Black Vultures are known to attack newborn livestock: calves, lambs, etc. It's uncommon, but it does occur.

-Steve

________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Bob and Nancy <blnllaval...>
Sent: Saturday, June 8, 2019 3:07 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Black Vulturs

I drink coffee with a bunch of guys every morning, composed of ranchers, and chicken farmers and others. I heard something yesterday I have never head before. One of the ranchers was cussing Mexican Buzzards. I asked him what he was talking about. He described Black Vultures. He said they are killing some of his calf's. He described an action by the Vultures that he has observed more than once. The vultures swoop down on a live new calf laying on the ground and peck the eyes out if they catch the mother too far away. The calf of course starves to death and the vultures feast. Others around the table agreed. They say the BVs are new to the area at least in large numbers. I see a few every summer but Im not really out on the ranches. Has anyone heard of this habit?
Bob LaVal
20367 Pine Mtn. LP
Heavener, OK 74937
Phone: 918-653-7921

 

Back to top
Date: 6/8/19 12:28 pm
From: Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...>
Subject: Re: Black Vulturs
Interesting story, could be true.
Only thing I ever heard that was close was a cartoon with an old vulture and a young one. They were near starvation . The elder vulture says “ patience son patience , everything eventually dies”
The young one replies “ patience my -as , I am going to kill something!
Hal Yocum, Edmond

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 8, 2019, at 2:12 PM, Rodney Hartsfield <bassangler73...> wrote:
>
> Thats new to me, but could very well be true
>
>
>
> Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Tab® 4, an AT&T 4G LTE tablet
>
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Bob and Nancy <blnllaval...>
> Date: 6/8/2019 2:08 PM (GMT-06:00)
> To: <OKBIRDS...>
> Subject: [OKBIRDS] Black Vulturs
>
> I drink coffee with a bunch of guys every morning, composed of ranchers, and chicken farmers and others. I heard something yesterday I have never head before. One of the ranchers was cussing Mexican Buzzards. I asked him what he was talking about. He described Black Vultures. He said they are killing some of his calf's. He described an action by the Vultures that he has observed more than once. The vultures swoop down on a live new calf laying on the ground and peck the eyes out if they catch the mother too far away. The calf of course starves to death and the vultures feast. Others around the table agreed. They say the BVs are new to the area at least in large numbers. I see a few every summer but I’m not really out on the ranches. Has anyone heard of this habit?
> Bob LaVal
> 20367 Pine Mtn. LP
> Heavener, OK 74937
> Phone: 918-653-7921

 

Back to top
Date: 6/8/19 12:12 pm
From: Rodney Hartsfield <bassangler73...>
Subject: Re: Black Vulturs
Thats new to me, but could very well be true



Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Tab 4, an AT&T 4G LTE tablet


-------- Original message --------
From: Bob and Nancy <blnllaval...>
Date: 6/8/2019 2:08 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Black Vulturs

I drink coffee with a bunch of guys every morning, composed of ranchers, and chicken farmers and others. I heard something yesterday I have never head before. One of the ranchers was cussing Mexican Buzzards. I asked him what he was talking about. He described Black Vultures. He said they are killing some of his calf's. He described an action by the Vultures that he has observed more than once. The vultures swoop down on a live new calf laying on the ground and peck the eyes out if they catch the mother too far away. The calf of course starves to death and the vultures feast. Others around the table agreed. They say the BVs are new to the area at least in large numbers. I see a few every summer but Im not really out on the ranches. Has anyone heard of this habit?
Bob LaVal
20367 Pine Mtn. LP
Heavener, OK 74937
Phone: 918-653-7921

 

Back to top
Date: 6/8/19 12:08 pm
From: Bob and Nancy <blnllaval...>
Subject: Black Vulturs
I drink coffee with a bunch of guys every morning, composed of ranchers, and chicken farmers and others. I heard something yesterday I have never head before. One of the ranchers was cussing Mexican Buzzards. I asked him what he was talking about. He described Black Vultures. He said they are killing some of his calf's. He described an action by the Vultures that he has observed more than once. The vultures swoop down on a live new calf laying on the ground and peck the eyes out if they catch the mother too far away. The calf of course starves to death and the vultures feast. Others around the table agreed. They say the BVs are new to the area at least in large numbers. I see a few every summer but I’m not really out on the ranches. Has anyone heard of this habit?
Bob LaVal
20367 Pine Mtn. LP
Heavener, OK 74937
Phone: 918-653-7921
 

Back to top
Date: 6/8/19 11:16 am
From: Bostian, Kelly <Kelly.Bostian...>
Subject: Re: Public comments open for hunting changes at Wichita Mtns
This is part of a national refuge plan announced Wednesday. There will be a list in the Tulsa World on Sunday's outdoors page. All Oklahoma refuges are making some changes to their hunting plans.


Kelly Bostian
Outdoors Writer
Tulsa World Media Company
www.tulsaworld.com<../../owa/redir.aspx?C=8laapRDrMk2IryHtj5G_mFisA4Zs59AIEjGwuoKJPsrXl3ZD0f_RbRx5YQGsIZUxlmflzPaUfrU.&URL=http%3a%2f%2fwww.tulsaworld.com%2f>
office | 918 581 8357
mobile | 918 231 1385
fax | 918 581 8353
315 S. Boulder Ave., Tulsa, OK 74103
twitter | @kellybostian
blog |tulsaworld.com/KellyBostian<../../owa/redir.aspx?C=8laapRDrMk2IryHtj5G_mFisA4Zs59AIEjGwuoKJPsrXl3ZD0f_RbRx5YQGsIZUxlmflzPaUfrU.&URL=http%3a%2f%2fwww.tulsaworld.com%2fblog>
email | <kelly.bostian...><../../owa/redir.aspx?C=8laapRDrMk2IryHtj5G_mFisA4Zs59AIEjGwuoKJPsrXl3ZD0f_RbRx5YQGsIZUxlmflzPaUfrU.&URL=mailto%<3aname...>
________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of hope4herefords <hope4herefords...>
Sent: Friday, June 7, 2019 9:15 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Public comments open for hunting changes at Wichita Mtns

There are proposed changes to the hunting seasons and species at the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge. Primarily of note, would be opening up most of the lakes to waterfowl hunting. You can visit their website or Facebook page for details. You can (e)mail your opinions to the address below by July 7, 2019.

Copies of the documents may also be obtained by visiting Refuge Headquarters between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. daily or by electronic request to <wmr_publiccomment...><mailto:<wmr_publiccomment...>?subject=Public%20Input%20-%20Hunting>. Comments should be mailed to Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge, 32 Refuge Headquarters, Indiahoma, OK 73552, or sent via email to <wmr_publiccomment...><mailto:<wmr_publiccomment...>?subject=Public%20Input%20-%20Hunting>. In order to be considered, all comments must be received by 11:59 p.m., July 7, 2019.
 

Back to top
Date: 6/8/19 11:01 am
From: Thompson, David M. (HSC) <David-Thompson...>
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: Public comments open for hunting changes at Wichita Mtns
Janis:

Now that I've revisited the draft, I see that I was confusing some of the controlled hunts with the wildfowl hunts. Thanks for redirecting me to the FWS draft.

Dave Thompson
________________________________
From: okbirds [<OKBIRDS...>] on behalf of janis blanton [<janis.blanton...>]
Sent: Saturday, June 08, 2019 9:59 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: Public comments open for hunting changes at Wichita Mtns

I did not read any restrictions on days for waterfowl hunting at the Wichita mountains. It would cover November through January in accordance with state waterfowl dates. :-(



https://www.fws.gov/refuge/wichita_mountains/hunt/draft.html<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.fws.gov_refuge_wichita-5Fmountains_hunt_draft.html&d=DwMCaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=4b1TUJn9pMyfnlX49naq1scBODGavd6DZEaLA5D0GZM&s=6ED73QG3GdtxAoBjTNREFEn7-_8jYM3EwTgwdJFBT1A&e=>


Janis Blanton

On Jun 8, 2019, at 6:32 AM, Thompson, David M. (HSC) <David-Thompson...><mailto:<David-Thompson...>> wrote:

Am I correct that the proposed waterfowl hunts will last 2 1/2 days and that they are proposing one to four of them? They're not proposing what we think of as a hunting "season." I'm curious if the proposals permit the construction and leasing of permanent or semi-permanent blinds.

Dave Thompson
Oklahoma City
________________________________
From: okbirds [<OKBIRDS...><mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] on behalf of Richrd Gunn [<richardgunn1940...><mailto:<richardgunn1940...>]
Sent: Friday, June 07, 2019 10:22 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...><mailto:<OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: Public comments open for hunting changes at Wichita Mtns

I didn't read the proposal/comments but have seen a few from other sources nationwide--mostly negative. I hope at some point someone mentions the fact that a substantial percentage of the money for obtaining and maintaining NWRs comes from hunter money--either from migratory wildlife stamps or Pittman-Robertson tax on firearms. I have spent many hours hunting on various well-managed NWRs (and have been prohibited from hunting when Whooping Cranes were present.) These include Quivira, Squaw Creek, Bombay Hook, Prime Hook and Valentine NWRs and probably a few that I can't recall. It was an experience that certainly Theodore Roosevelt would have endorsed,enjoyed and appreciated. Hunting for elk and deer is already allowed in the Wichita Mtns and it is a quality experience and consistent with maintaining the carrying capacity of the area. I think that well controlled waterfowl hunting is consistent with the goals of the NWR system.
D.

On Fri, Jun 7, 2019 at 9:15 PM hope4herefords <hope4herefords...><mailto:<hope4herefords...>> wrote:
There are proposed changes to the hunting seasons and species at the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge. Primarily of note, would be opening up most of the lakes to waterfowl hunting. You can visit their website or Facebook page for details. You can (e)mail your opinions to the address below by July 7, 2019.

Copies of the documents may also be obtained by visiting Refuge Headquarters between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. daily or by electronic request to <wmr_publiccomment...><mailto:<wmr_publiccomment...>?subject=Public%20Input%20-%20Hunting>. Comments should be mailed to Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge, 32 Refuge Headquarters, Indiahoma, OK 73552, or sent via email to <wmr_publiccomment...><mailto:<wmr_publiccomment...>?subject=Public%20Input%20-%20Hunting>. In order to be considered, all comments must be received by 11:59 p.m., July 7, 2019.

 

Back to top
Date: 6/8/19 7:59 am
From: janis blanton <janis.blanton...>
Subject: Re: Public comments open for hunting changes at Wichita Mtns
I did not read any restrictions on days for waterfowl hunting at the Wichita mountains. It would cover November through January in accordance with state waterfowl dates. :-(



https://www.fws.gov/refuge/wichita_mountains/hunt/draft.html


Janis Blanton

> On Jun 8, 2019, at 6:32 AM, Thompson, David M. (HSC) <David-Thompson...> wrote:
>
> Am I correct that the proposed waterfowl hunts will last 2 1/2 days and that they are proposing one to four of them? They're not proposing what we think of as a hunting "season." I'm curious if the proposals permit the construction and leasing of permanent or semi-permanent blinds.
>
> Dave Thompson
> Oklahoma City
> From: okbirds [<OKBIRDS...>] on behalf of Richrd Gunn [<richardgunn1940...>]
> Sent: Friday, June 07, 2019 10:22 PM
> To: <OKBIRDS...>
> Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: Public comments open for hunting changes at Wichita Mtns
>
> I didn't read the proposal/comments but have seen a few from other sources nationwide--mostly negative. I hope at some point someone mentions the fact that a substantial percentage of the money for obtaining and maintaining NWRs comes from hunter money--either from migratory wildlife stamps or Pittman-Robertson tax on firearms. I have spent many hours hunting on various well-managed NWRs (and have been prohibited from hunting when Whooping Cranes were present.) These include Quivira, Squaw Creek, Bombay Hook, Prime Hook and Valentine NWRs and probably a few that I can't recall. It was an experience that certainly Theodore Roosevelt would have endorsed,enjoyed and appreciated. Hunting for elk and deer is already allowed in the Wichita Mtns and it is a quality experience and consistent with maintaining the carrying capacity of the area. I think that well controlled waterfowl hunting is consistent with the goals of the NWR system.
> D.
>
>> On Fri, Jun 7, 2019 at 9:15 PM hope4herefords <hope4herefords...> wrote:
>> There are proposed changes to the hunting seasons and species at the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge. Primarily of note, would be opening up most of the lakes to waterfowl hunting. You can visit their website or Facebook page for details. You can (e)mail your opinions to the address below by July 7, 2019.
>>
>> Copies of the documents may also be obtained by visiting Refuge Headquarters between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. daily or by electronic request to <wmr_publiccomment...> Comments should be mailed to Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge, 32 Refuge Headquarters, Indiahoma, OK 73552, or sent via email to <wmr_publiccomment...> In order to be considered, all comments must be received by 11:59 p.m., July 7, 2019.

 

Back to top
Date: 6/8/19 4:33 am
From: Thompson, David M. (HSC) <David-Thompson...>
Subject: Public comments open for hunting changes at Wichita Mtns
Am I correct that the proposed waterfowl hunts will last 2 1/2 days and that they are proposing one to four of them? They're not proposing what we think of as a hunting "season." I'm curious if the proposals permit the construction and leasing of permanent or semi-permanent blinds.

Dave Thompson
Oklahoma City
________________________________
From: okbirds [<OKBIRDS...>] on behalf of Richrd Gunn [<richardgunn1940...>]
Sent: Friday, June 07, 2019 10:22 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: Public comments open for hunting changes at Wichita Mtns

I didn't read the proposal/comments but have seen a few from other sources nationwide--mostly negative. I hope at some point someone mentions the fact that a substantial percentage of the money for obtaining and maintaining NWRs comes from hunter money--either from migratory wildlife stamps or Pittman-Robertson tax on firearms. I have spent many hours hunting on various well-managed NWRs (and have been prohibited from hunting when Whooping Cranes were present.) These include Quivira, Squaw Creek, Bombay Hook, Prime Hook and Valentine NWRs and probably a few that I can't recall. It was an experience that certainly Theodore Roosevelt would have endorsed,enjoyed and appreciated. Hunting for elk and deer is already allowed in the Wichita Mtns and it is a quality experience and consistent with maintaining the carrying capacity of the area. I think that well controlled waterfowl hunting is consistent with the goals of the NWR system.
D.

On Fri, Jun 7, 2019 at 9:15 PM hope4herefords <hope4herefords...><mailto:<hope4herefords...>> wrote:
There are proposed changes to the hunting seasons and species at the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge. Primarily of note, would be opening up most of the lakes to waterfowl hunting. You can visit their website or Facebook page for details. You can (e)mail your opinions to the address below by July 7, 2019.

Copies of the documents may also be obtained by visiting Refuge Headquarters between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. daily or by electronic request to <wmr_publiccomment...><mailto:<wmr_publiccomment...>?subject=Public%20Input%20-%20Hunting>. Comments should be mailed to Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge, 32 Refuge Headquarters, Indiahoma, OK 73552, or sent via email to <wmr_publiccomment...><mailto:<wmr_publiccomment...>?subject=Public%20Input%20-%20Hunting>. In order to be considered, all comments must be received by 11:59 p.m., July 7, 2019.

 

Back to top
Date: 6/7/19 8:23 pm
From: Richrd Gunn <richardgunn1940...>
Subject: Re: Public comments open for hunting changes at Wichita Mtns
I didn't read the proposal/comments but have seen a few from other sources
nationwide--mostly negative. I hope at some point someone mentions the fact
that a substantial percentage of the money for obtaining and maintaining
NWRs comes from hunter money--either from migratory wildlife stamps or
Pittman-Robertson tax on firearms. I have spent many hours hunting on
various well-managed NWRs (and have been prohibited from hunting when
Whooping Cranes were present.) These include Quivira, Squaw Creek, Bombay
Hook, Prime Hook and Valentine NWRs and probably a few that I can't recall.
It was an experience that certainly Theodore Roosevelt would have
endorsed,enjoyed and appreciated. Hunting for elk and deer is already
allowed in the Wichita Mtns and it is a quality experience and consistent
with maintaining the carrying capacity of the area. I think that well
controlled waterfowl hunting is consistent with the goals of the NWR system.
D.

On Fri, Jun 7, 2019 at 9:15 PM hope4herefords <hope4herefords...>
wrote:

> There are proposed changes to the hunting seasons and species at the
> Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge. Primarily of note, would be opening up
> most of the lakes to waterfowl hunting. You can visit their website or
> Facebook page for details. You can (e)mail your opinions to the address
> below by July 7, 2019.
>
> Copies of the documents may also be obtained by visiting Refuge
> Headquarters between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. daily or by
> electronic request to <wmr_publiccomment...>
> <wmr_publiccomment...>?subject=Public%20Input%20-%20Hunting>.
> Comments should be mailed to Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge, 32 Refuge
> Headquarters, Indiahoma, OK 73552, or sent via email to
> <wmr_publiccomment...>
> <wmr_publiccomment...>?subject=Public%20Input%20-%20Hunting>. In
> order to be considered, all comments must be received by 11:59 p.m., July
> 7, 2019.
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/7/19 7:16 pm
From: hope4herefords <hope4herefords...>
Subject: Public comments open for hunting changes at Wichita Mtns
There are proposed changes to the hunting seasons and species at the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge.  Primarily of note, would be opening up most of the lakes to waterfowl hunting.  You can visit their website or Facebook page for details.  You can (e)mail your opinions to the address below by July 7, 2019.Copies of the documents may also be obtained by visiting Refuge Headquarters between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. daily or by electronic request to <wmr_publiccomment...> Comments should be mailed to Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge, 32 Refuge Headquarters, Indiahoma, OK 73552, or sent via email to <wmr_publiccomment...> In order to be considered, all comments must be received by 11:59 p.m., July 7, 2019.
null
 

Back to top
Date: 6/7/19 4:43 pm
From: William Diffin <okiebirder...>
Subject: Re: Tulsa areas shorebird photos from May 14-26
The photos of Short-billed Dowitchers in (close to) breeding plumage are
exceptionally good. Anyone interested in Dowitcher ID would do well to look
them over. Some beautiful photos of Ruddy Turnstones too.

Bill Diffin, OKC

On Tue, Jun 4, 2019, 7:18 PM Jim Arterburn <JIMARTERBURN...> wrote:

> OKBirds,
>
> I have added shorebird photos to my website. Photos were taken around the
> south Tulsa County and Wagoner County sod farms. Photos were taken from May
> 14 through May 26, towards the end of the spring shorebird migration. Some
> of the species added include American Golden-Plover, Black-bellied Plover,
> Semipalmated Plover, Greater & Lesser Yellowlegs, Willet, Hudsonian Godwit,
> Ruddy Turnstone, Dunlin, Sanderling, Short-billed Dowitcher, Red-necked and
> Wilson's Phalarope, Stilt Sandpiper along with several other sandpiper
> species. These photos can be seen at the link below.
>
> https://pbase.com/oklahomabirder/shorebirds_may_2019
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__pbase.com_oklahomabirder_shorebirds-5Fmay-5F2019&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=gBIobVnfqSytL-3-J02w2RCvoVUQQ7lj6w0c3dBdLTU&s=2LYAAq2E6Y8Wx4RKm7EFaWSwBKt_17vtLiLrl3AtQTA&e=>
>
> Jim Arterburn
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/6/19 6:25 pm
From: Ken or Carol Williams <kcwilliams...>
Subject: Skiatook BBS
Fellow Birders,

I did the Skiatook Breeding Bird Survey on June 1, 2019, and recorded 50
species and 459 individual birds on this years count. List below.

I have been doing this survey for 10 years and I got the route from Bob
Gard who did it for 10 years. The original observer was Aline Romero and
started the route in 1993.  Many of you may remember these birders.  The
reason I mention these other observers is that I am not going to be
doing the survey route next year.  The route starts west of Skiatook and
goes North and West towards Wynona for 25 miles.

If interested you must be able to hear and know the local bird songs. 
Many of the birds observed on this route are heard and not always seen. 
If any of you are interested in doing the route I can help you get
signed up, show you the route and help you get started.  If interested
email me and we can get you signed up for next year.  If more then one
person are interested, first one gets priority.

Ken Williams

Owasso


Northern Bobwhite Quail    19
Great Blue Heron    2
Turkey Vulture    3
Cooper's Hawk    1
Red-tailed Hawk    3
Mourning Dove    9
Yellow-billed Cuckoo    21
Chimney Swift    1
Ruby-throated Hummingbird    1
Red-bellied Woodpecker    6
Downy Woodpecker    3
Eastern Wood-Pewee    4
Eastern Phoebe    1
Great Crested Flycatcher    7
Eastern Kingbird    7
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher    20
Loggerhead Shrike    1
Bell's Vireo    1
Blue Jay    4
American Crow    31
Purple Martin    4
Barn Swallow    2
Carolina Chickadee    6
Tufted Titmouse    28
White-breasted Nuthatch    1
Carolina Wren    4
Bewick's Wren    3
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher    8
Eastern Bluebird    20
American Robin    5
Northern Mockingbird    13
Brown Thrasher    5
European Starling    11
Summer Tanager    9
Field Sparrow    18
Lark Sparrow    5
Grasshopper Sparrow    1
Northern Cardinal    24
Blue Grosbeak    7
Indigo Bunting    9
Painted Bunting    4
Dickcissel    44
Yellow-breasted Chat    1
Red-winged Blackbird    7
Eastern Meadowlark    32
Common Grackle    2
Brown-headed Cowbird    33
Orchard Oriole    3
American Goldfinch    1
House Sparrow    4


 

Back to top
Date: 6/5/19 8:25 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Moffett, OK relief
The little town of Moffett, OK has been sitting under water for two weeks.
The school lost every one of its library books. A book drive has been
started to help the school. I was thinking that other Oklahomans might want
to help them recover by donating new, or lightly used, bird/nature books.
If you would like to ship the books you can do so to Moffett Schools P.O.
Box 180 Moffett, Ok. 74946. The books are for kindergarten through 8th
grade.

I, and others, have birdwatched in the bottoms for 30 years. I’d like to
think this would be a good way to help give back to an area that has given
so much to us birders.

Sandy B.

 

Back to top
Date: 6/5/19 5:40 am
From: Dan Reinking <dan...>
Subject: Re: nest identification
With lots of poop…and the location in a front porch wreath…probably House Finches.

Dan Reinking

Sutton Avian Research Center



From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> On Behalf Of David F. Evans
Sent: Tuesday, June 04, 2019 9:20 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] nest identification



My mother-in-law lives near 30th and Utica in Tulsa. She asked me to remove a nest from a wreath on her front porch. The young had fledged and left so i removed it along with lots of poop. It was a small (approx. 3-4 inch diameter) nest with loosely stacked twigs lined with some fluffy material. I did not see the birds and am not familiar with the nest. Any ideas?

Dave Evans

Tenkiller Lake

405-413-5227


 

Back to top
Date: 6/4/19 8:29 pm
From: HAROLD YOCUM <drhal2...>
Subject: Re: nest identification
I have had Carolina wrens nest in flower pots on my porch / deck with all of us walking by every day and old Gym bags hanging in my garage. Sounds like a good bet.

Hal Yocum

.



> On June 4, 2019 at 10:39 PM Bob and Nancy <blnllaval...> wrote:
>
> A Carolina Wren has nested in our front porch wreath a couple of times.
>
> Bob and Nancy LaVal
> 20367 Pine Mtn. LP
> Heavener, OK 74937
> Phone: 918-653-7921
>




 

Back to top
Date: 6/4/19 7:44 pm
From: Bob and Nancy <blnllaval...>
Subject: Re: nest identification
A Carolina Wren has nested in our front porch wreath a couple of times.

Bob and Nancy LaVal
20367 Pine Mtn. LP
Heavener, OK 74937
Phone: 918-653-7921
 

Back to top
Date: 6/4/19 7:20 pm
From: David F. Evans <davefbirds...>
Subject: nest identification
My mother-in-law lives near 30th and Utica in Tulsa. She asked me to
remove a nest from a wreath on her front porch. The young had fledged and
left so i removed it along with lots of poop. It was a small (approx. 3-4
inch diameter) nest with loosely stacked twigs lined with some fluffy
material. I did not see the birds and am not familiar with the nest. Any
ideas?
Dave Evans
Tenkiller Lake
405-413-5227

 

Back to top
Date: 6/4/19 5:30 pm
From: EUGENE YOUNG <EUGENE.YOUNG...>
Subject: Re: Tulsa areas shorebird photos from May 14-26
Jim,

As always, stunning…Gene

Eugene A. Young


Agriculture and Biological Science
Northern Oklahoma College
1220 E. Grand, PO Box 310
Tonkawa, OK, 74653-0310
Phone: 580-628-6482
Fax: 580-628-6209
E-Mail: <Eugene.Young...><mailto:<Eugene.Young...>
Website: www.noc.edu<http://www.noc.edu/>



From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> On Behalf Of Jim Arterburn
Sent: Tuesday, June 04, 2019 7:18 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Tulsa areas shorebird photos from May 14-26

OKBirds,

I have added shorebird photos to my website. Photos were taken around the south Tulsa County and Wagoner County sod farms. Photos were taken from May 14 through May 26, towards the end of the spring shorebird migration. Some of the species added include American Golden-Plover, Black-bellied Plover, Semipalmated Plover, Greater & Lesser Yellowlegs, Willet, Hudsonian Godwit, Ruddy Turnstone, Dunlin, Sanderling, Short-billed Dowitcher, Red-necked and Wilson's Phalarope, Stilt Sandpiper along with several other sandpiper species. These photos can be seen at the link below.

https://pbase.com/oklahomabirder/shorebirds_may_2019<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__pbase.com_oklahomabirder_shorebirds-5Fmay-5F2019&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=gBIobVnfqSytL-3-J02w2RCvoVUQQ7lj6w0c3dBdLTU&s=2LYAAq2E6Y8Wx4RKm7EFaWSwBKt_17vtLiLrl3AtQTA&e=>

Jim Arterburn
 

Back to top
Date: 6/4/19 5:19 pm
From: Jim Arterburn <JIMARTERBURN...>
Subject: Tulsa areas shorebird photos from May 14-26
OKBirds,

I have added shorebird photos to my website. Photos were taken around
the south Tulsa County and Wagoner County sod farms. Photos were taken
from May 14 through May 26, towards the end of the spring shorebird
migration. Some of the species added include American Golden-Plover,
Black-bellied Plover, Semipalmated Plover, Greater & Lesser Yellowlegs,
Willet, Hudsonian Godwit, Ruddy Turnstone, Dunlin, Sanderling,
Short-billed Dowitcher, Red-necked and Wilson's Phalarope, Stilt
Sandpiper along with several other sandpiper species. These photos can
be seen at the link below.

https://pbase.com/oklahomabirder/shorebirds_may_2019

Jim Arterburn
 

Back to top
Date: 6/3/19 9:13 am
From: Diana Pond <dianap38...>
Subject: Re: Passing of Ford Hendershot
Such a sad day, I am sorry we can't attend his service today, if anyone is attending they might print these emails and give them to his family. Such great testimonials may give them some comfort.

We birded with him on several occasions at Red Slough, he was alway kind and as excited as we were about everything we found spending his whole day with us. He always said that was what he would be doing anyway-out birding and communing with nature. A great way and rewarding way to spend your time!

He will be missed!

Diana Pond
918.633.3270
________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Melinda Droege <oklagranny26...>
Sent: Monday, June 3, 2019 6:58 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Passing of Ford Hendershot

So sorry and sad to hear this about Ford. Such an enthusiastic and sharing man.

Melinda Droege

On Sun, Jun 2, 2019 at 11:29 AM David Arbour <arbour...><mailto:<arbour...>> wrote:

Ford Hendershot passed away last Wednesday night in his sleep. He was diagnosed with stage 4 Pancreatic cancer about three weeks earlier. Ford was a forest service volunteer who helped give tours at Red Slough. Many of you know Ford from going on his tours. Ford was also an avid ebirder. His Celebration of Life will be tomorrow (Monday) at 2:00 p.m. in Idabel at the United Methodist Church.



David Arbour

 

Back to top
Date: 6/3/19 4:58 am
From: Melinda Droege <oklagranny26...>
Subject: Re: Passing of Ford Hendershot
So sorry and sad to hear this about Ford. Such an enthusiastic and sharing
man.

Melinda Droege

On Sun, Jun 2, 2019 at 11:29 AM David Arbour <arbour...> wrote:

> Ford Hendershot passed away last Wednesday night in his sleep. He was
> diagnosed with stage 4 Pancreatic cancer about three weeks earlier. Ford
> was a forest service volunteer who helped give tours at Red Slough. Many
> of you know Ford from going on his tours. Ford was also an avid ebirder.
> His Celebration of Life will be tomorrow (Monday) at 2:00 p.m. in Idabel at
> the United Methodist Church.
>
>
>
> David Arbour
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/2/19 7:18 pm
From: Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...>
Subject: Re: Passing of Ford Hendershot
Sad day for all birders of OK, AR, near by Tx.
On one of my Red Slough trips on the last day , Tuesday noon, Ford was there at the museum as we returned for lunch. He asked me about what I saw and “wished I had seen”.
I mentioned missing a worm eating warbler. He said “ really, go get some lunch and meet me back here in an hour and we will go find one.” He went home for lunch.
After lunch he took me down near Red Slough. We parked at a forest service road, walked around the gate and up the dirt/ grassy road 100 yards or so. He said “ This should be good”. He played the song on a device and within 39 seconds one flew right up to a bush at 10 feet - and had a worm in it’s mouth!
Another life bird for me , delivered at close range by a wonderful man and great birder - and after the event was over and most were gone. Definitely beyond the call!
Hal Yocum

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 2, 2019, at 8:27 PM, Brett Niland <bestguess...> wrote:
>
> Sad day,
>
> He was a great guy and Lareina and I dearly enjoyed our time with him. His passion for the place and all its inhabitants was very evident in the way he performed tours.
>
> His love of fellow man and those that share a love of birds was clear in his service to others.
>
> A mighty oak has fallen. He will be missed.
>
> Thank You,
>
> Brett Niland
> Cell: (918) 200-1818
>
> On Jun 2, 2019, at 1:31 PM, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:
>
>> Awwww. I shall never forget when he met a group of us Fort Smith people very early one morning, and helped us get a very special bird at Red Slough. What a thrill that moment was when all of a sudden, just as it was getting light, a bird screamed out, “KISKADEE” from the tree above us.
>> What a nice, considerate man he was. Thank you for letting us know, David.
>>
>> Sandy B
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Sun, Jun 2, 2019 at 12:46 PM
>> Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...> wrote:
>>> I'm saddened by his passing; my heart-felt condolences to his family. Matt
>>>
>>>> On Sun, Jun 2, 2019 at 11:29 AM David Arbour <arbour...> wrote:
>>>> Ford Hendershot passed away last Wednesday night in his sleep. He was diagnosed with stage 4 Pancreatic cancer about three weeks earlier. Ford was a forest service volunteer who helped give tours at Red Slough. Many of you know Ford from going on his tours. Ford was also an avid ebirder. His Celebration of Life will be tomorrow (Monday) at 2:00 p.m. in Idabel at the United Methodist Church.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> David Arbour

 

Back to top
Date: 6/2/19 7:05 pm
From: Della Neil <starblonde0460...>
Subject: Re: Passing of Ford Hendershot
My prayers for family and friends of Ford Hendershot. May God's peace and
love be of comfort for you all.

Della Neil

On Sun, Jun 2, 2019, 11:29 AM David Arbour <arbour...> wrote:

> Ford Hendershot passed away last Wednesday night in his sleep. He was
> diagnosed with stage 4 Pancreatic cancer about three weeks earlier. Ford
> was a forest service volunteer who helped give tours at Red Slough. Many
> of you know Ford from going on his tours. Ford was also an avid ebirder.
> His Celebration of Life will be tomorrow (Monday) at 2:00 p.m. in Idabel at
> the United Methodist Church.
>
>
>
> David Arbour
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/2/19 6:56 pm
From: Harmon, Vonceil <vcharmon...>
Subject: Re: Passing of Ford Hendershot
My thoughts go out to his family and the great friends that he shared his unwavering passion for Red Slough and its avian inhabitants with. He was a wonderful fellow and I am blessed to have had the opportunity to see the Slough through his eyes. He will be greatly missed and I am sad for the future birders who will not experience his kindness and keen understanding of the natural world.

Thank you David for sharing the information.


Vonceil Harmon
Highway Biologist
Oklahoma Department of Transportation
Oklahoma Biological Survey
111 E Chesapeake St
Norman, Oklahoma, 73019
tel) 405.249.5130
fax) 405.325.7702
<vcharmon...>


________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of David Arbour <arbour...>
Sent: Sunday, June 2, 2019 11:29:08 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Passing of Ford Hendershot


Ford Hendershot passed away last Wednesday night in his sleep. He was diagnosed with stage 4 Pancreatic cancer about three weeks earlier. Ford was a forest service volunteer who helped give tours at Red Slough. Many of you know Ford from going on his tours. Ford was also an avid ebirder. His Celebration of Life will be tomorrow (Monday) at 2:00 p.m. in Idabel at the United Methodist Church.



David Arbour

 

Back to top
Date: 6/2/19 6:31 pm
From: JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski...>
Subject: Re: Passing of Ford Hendershot
Very sad news.  Brett stated well Ford's passion, sincerity and care for others.  JOE Grzybowski
On Sunday, June 2, 2019, 8:27:41 PM CDT, Brett Niland <bestguess...> wrote:

Sad day,
He was a great guy and Lareina and I dearly enjoyed our time with him.  His passion for the place and all its inhabitants was very evident in the way he performed tours. 
His love of fellow man and those that share a love of birds was clear in his service to others. 
A mighty oak has fallen. He will be missed. 

Thank You,
Brett NilandCell: (918) 200-1818
On Jun 2, 2019, at 1:31 PM, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:


Awwww.  I shall never forget when he met a group of us Fort Smith people very early one morning, and helped us get a very special bird at Red Slough.  What a thrill that moment was when all of a sudden, just as it was getting light, a bird screamed out, “KISKADEE” from the tree above us.What a nice, considerate man he was.  Thank you for letting us know, David. 
Sandy B




On Sun, Jun 2, 2019 at 12:46 PM Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...> wrote:

I'm saddened by his passing; my heart-felt condolences to his family.  Matt
On Sun, Jun 2, 2019 at 11:29 AM David Arbour <arbour...> wrote:


Ford Hendershot passed away last Wednesday night in his sleep.  He was diagnosed with stage 4 Pancreatic cancer about three weeks earlier.  Ford was a forest service volunteer who helped give tours at Red Slough.  Many of you know Ford from going on his tours.  Ford was also an avid ebirder.  His Celebration of Life will be tomorrow (Monday) at 2:00 p.m. in Idabel at the United Methodist Church.

 

David Arbour




 

Back to top
Date: 6/2/19 6:27 pm
From: Brett Niland <bestguess...>
Subject: Re: Passing of Ford Hendershot
Sad day,

He was a great guy and Lareina and I dearly enjoyed our time with him. His passion for the place and all its inhabitants was very evident in the way he performed tours.

His love of fellow man and those that share a love of birds was clear in his service to others.

A mighty oak has fallen. He will be missed.

Thank You,

Brett Niland
Cell: (918) 200-1818

On Jun 2, 2019, at 1:31 PM, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...><mailto:<sndbrgr...>> wrote:

Awwww. I shall never forget when he met a group of us Fort Smith people very early one morning, and helped us get a very special bird at Red Slough. What a thrill that moment was when all of a sudden, just as it was getting light, a bird screamed out, “KISKADEE” from the tree above us.
What a nice, considerate man he was. Thank you for letting us know, David.

Sandy B





On Sun, Jun 2, 2019 at 12:46 PM
Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...><mailto:<mpjung5125...>> wrote:
I'm saddened by his passing; my heart-felt condolences to his family. Matt

On Sun, Jun 2, 2019 at 11:29 AM David Arbour <arbour...><mailto:<arbour...>> wrote:
Ford Hendershot passed away last Wednesday night in his sleep. He was diagnosed with stage 4 Pancreatic cancer about three weeks earlier. Ford was a forest service volunteer who helped give tours at Red Slough. Many of you know Ford from going on his tours. Ford was also an avid ebirder. His Celebration of Life will be tomorrow (Monday) at 2:00 p.m. in Idabel at the United Methodist Church.

David Arbour
 

Back to top
Date: 6/2/19 4:45 pm
From: Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...>
Subject: Re: Passing of Ford Hendershot
David, please pass on my condolences to his family and
friends. I hope you and others can attend the celebration

on such short notice. I have to work or I would consider
coming, too.



I met Ford thru birding. He toured me around many times at
Red Slough and Little River and we birded together

on a Broken Bow CBC or two.



He was always kind, generous and considerate to me and others
he met. He would go to great lengths to make

sure other birders got to see what they were looking for.



I remember the time a few years ago when Larry Mays and I and
two birders from Louisiana met up with Ford

to search for a Red-necked Grebe on Broken Bow Lake. Larry
rented a pontoon boat and Ford drove it around

on the lake as our guide/driver/boat captain! It was quite an
experience.



I was supposed to bird with Ford during the Monday/Tuesday of
the Red Slough Festival. He graciously agreed to

help me even though he had guiding commitments to the
festival as well. I found out that Sunday of his condition.

I called him and thanked him for his offer to guide me but I
knew he wasn't in any shape to do so.



I had hopes that he might be allowed a few more months but
his passing was even quicker that Bill Thompson III,

Of the Bird Watcher's Digest family, who passed recently
three months after his diagnosis.



The birding world and society as a whole needs more people
like Ford and BT III. They were very nice folks. I will

miss them.



Jimmy Woodard

Midwest City, OK









From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of David Arbour
Sent: Sunday, June 02, 2019 11:29 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Passing of Ford Hendershot



Ford Hendershot passed away last Wednesday night in his sleep. He was
diagnosed with stage 4 Pancreatic cancer about three weeks earlier. Ford
was a forest service volunteer who helped give tours at Red Slough. Many of
you know Ford from going on his tours. Ford was also an avid ebirder. His
Celebration of Life will be tomorrow (Monday) at 2:00 p.m. in Idabel at the
United Methodist Church.



David Arbour


 

Back to top
Date: 6/2/19 3:05 pm
From: Linda Adams <000000853e24127e-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Passing of Ford Hendershot
I'm so sorry to hear about Ford.  He has given Bill and me some great tours at Red Slough and was such a nice person.
Linda AdamsDuncan, OK

On Sunday, June 2, 2019, 11:29:31 AM CDT, David Arbour <arbour...> wrote:


Ford Hendershot passed away last Wednesday night in his sleep.  He was diagnosed with stage 4 Pancreatic cancer about three weeks earlier.  Ford was a forest service volunteer who helped give tours at Red Slough.  Many of you know Ford from going on his tours.  Ford was also an avid ebirder.  His Celebration of Life will be tomorrow (Monday) at 2:00 p.m. in Idabel at the United Methodist Church.

 

David Arbour

 

Back to top
Date: 6/2/19 11:32 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Passing of Ford Hendershot
Awwww. I shall never forget when he met a group of us Fort Smith people
very early one morning, and helped us get a very special bird at Red
Slough. What a thrill that moment was when all of a sudden, just as it was
getting light, a bird screamed out, “KISKADEE” from the tree above us.
What a nice, considerate man he was. Thank you for letting us know, David.

Sandy B





On Sun, Jun 2, 2019 at 12:46 PM
Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...> wrote:

> I'm saddened by his passing; my heart-felt condolences to his family. Matt
>
> On Sun, Jun 2, 2019 at 11:29 AM David Arbour <arbour...>
> wrote:
>
>> Ford Hendershot passed away last Wednesday night in his sleep. He was
>> diagnosed with stage 4 Pancreatic cancer about three weeks earlier. Ford
>> was a forest service volunteer who helped give tours at Red Slough. Many
>> of you know Ford from going on his tours. Ford was also an avid ebirder.
>> His Celebration of Life will be tomorrow (Monday) at 2:00 p.m. in Idabel at
>> the United Methodist Church.
>>
>>
>>
>> David Arbour
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/2/19 10:46 am
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...>
Subject: Re: Passing of Ford Hendershot
I'm saddened by his passing; my heart-felt condolences to his family. Matt

On Sun, Jun 2, 2019 at 11:29 AM David Arbour <arbour...> wrote:

> Ford Hendershot passed away last Wednesday night in his sleep. He was
> diagnosed with stage 4 Pancreatic cancer about three weeks earlier. Ford
> was a forest service volunteer who helped give tours at Red Slough. Many
> of you know Ford from going on his tours. Ford was also an avid ebirder.
> His Celebration of Life will be tomorrow (Monday) at 2:00 p.m. in Idabel at
> the United Methodist Church.
>
>
>
> David Arbour
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/2/19 9:29 am
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Passing of Ford Hendershot
Ford Hendershot passed away last Wednesday night in his sleep. He was
diagnosed with stage 4 Pancreatic cancer about three weeks earlier. Ford
was a forest service volunteer who helped give tours at Red Slough. Many of
you know Ford from going on his tours. Ford was also an avid ebirder. His
Celebration of Life will be tomorrow (Monday) at 2:00 p.m. in Idabel at the
United Methodist Church.



David Arbour


 

Back to top
Date: 6/2/19 5:33 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Owls
Maybe another birder is playing recorded owl calls. It’s happened to me.
Any other birders out your way? 😉

On Sat, Jun 1, 2019 at 11:44 PM EUGENE YOUNG <EUGENE.YOUNG...> wrote:

> In Tonkawa, at NOC campus, 4 Great Horned Owls, 2 Barred Owls, and an E
> Screech Owl all calling on south edge of campus, unsolicited. Also an oil
> pump, cattle, sheep, and dogs vocalizing.
>
> Not often I’ve heard all 3 Owl species calling one spot unsolicited.
>
> Gene Young
> NOC
>
> Gene Young Sent from my iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 6/1/19 10:11 pm
From: Sebastian Patti <sebastianpatti...>
Subject: Re: Owls
Doesn't the College have a standing "No Solicitation" rule on campus????

SORRY... couldn't help myself.



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: EUGENE YOUNG <EUGENE.YOUNG...>
Date: 6/1/19 9:44 PM (GMT-08:00)
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Owls

In Tonkawa, at NOC campus, 4 Great Horned Owls, 2 Barred Owls, and an E Screech Owl all calling on south edge of campus, unsolicited. Also an oil pump, cattle, sheep, and dogs vocalizing.

Not often Ive heard all 3 Owl species calling one spot unsolicited.

Gene Young
NOC

Gene Young Sent from my iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 6/1/19 9:44 pm
From: EUGENE YOUNG <EUGENE.YOUNG...>
Subject: Owls
In Tonkawa, at NOC campus, 4 Great Horned Owls, 2 Barred Owls, and an E Screech Owl all calling on south edge of campus, unsolicited. Also an oil pump, cattle, sheep, and dogs vocalizing.

Not often I’ve heard all 3 Owl species calling one spot unsolicited.

Gene Young
NOC

Gene Young Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 6/1/19 4:13 pm
From: O Connell, Tim <tim.oconnell...>
Subject: Payne County – Cross Timbers Experimental Range, June 1 2019
OSU Cross Timbers Experimental Range – 1 June 2019

Dwayne and Leslie Elmore led participants Les Imboden, Kevin Wilson, John Couch, and Tim O'Connell on a wonderful tour of some birdy hotspots in a mix of pasture, shrubland, and oak/cedar forest on OSU land roughly 2 miles south of Lake Carl Blackwell on the west side of Stillwater.

1. Northern Bobwhite 2
2. Mourning Dove 5
3. Yellow-billed Cuckoo 3
4. Greater Roadrunner 1
5. Killdeer 1
6. Turkey Vulture 8
7. Mississippi Kite 1
8. Red-shouldered Hawk 1
9. Red-tailed Hawk 1
10. Pileated Woodpecker 1
11. Red-bellied Woodpecker 1
12. Downy Woodpecker 1
13. Pileated Woodpecker 1
14. Eastern Wood-Pewee 1
15. Acadian Flycatcher 1 I have for years expected Acadian Flycatcher to be the next "eastern forest" songbird to be breeding in riparian forests here in central Oklahoma. This bird was heard only, but gave four diagnostic "peetSA!" songs over the course of a minute or two. The location was closed-canopy oak-dominated forest along an incised stream and ravine. Sorry - no recorded audio or photo.
16. Eastern Phoebe 4
17. Great Crested Flycatcher 2
18. Scissor-tailed Flycatcher 1
19. White-eyed Vireo 3
20. Bell's Vireo 4
21. Red-eyed Vireo 7
22. American Crow 6
23. Carolina Chickadee 4
24. Tufted Titmouse 3
25. Carolina Wren 4
26. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 5
27. Eastern Bluebird 1
28. Northern Mockingbird 3
29. American Goldfinch 5
30. Field Sparrow 11
31. Lark Sparrow 4
32. Yellow-breasted Chat 1
33. Brown-headed Cowbird 7
34. Red-winged Blackbird 3
35. Eastern Meadowlark 2
36. Louisiana Waterthrush 3 includes 1 pair feeding fledglings and another unmated male
37. Kentucky Warbler 1
38. Black-and-white Warbler 2
39. Summer Tanager 3
40. Northern Cardinal 3
41. Blue Grosbeak 1 2nd year male
42. Indigo Bunting 8
43. Painted Bunting 7
44. Dickcissel 4

~Tim O'Connell

Stillwater

 

Back to top
Date: 6/1/19 1:34 pm
From: Patricia Velte <pvelte...>
Subject: June Migration Report
Dear OKBirders,



A much shorter list this month! Below are the arrival and departure lists
for June.



ARRIVALS



Wood Stork June 7 - Johnston and
Marshall Cos. Only in SC; Bryan, Choctaw and S. McCurtain Cos. Only in SE

Roseate Spoonbill June 7 - Rare in Johnston and
Marshall Cos. Only in SC; Rare in S. McCurtain Co. only in SE; Rare in Bryan
Co. only in SE

Greater Yellowlegs June 28 - ALL

Lesser Yellowlegs June 26 - ALL

Upland Sandpiper June 22 - NW, SW, C, SC, SE


Cave Swallow June 30 - SE rare in south
McCurtain co only



DEPARTURES



Eared Grebe June 1 - ALL

Swainson's Hawk June 1 - SE

Spotted Sandpiper June 4 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Lesser Yellowlegs June 1 - NW, C, SC, NE and
June 4 - PAN, SW, SE

Ruddy Turnstone June 1 - NW west to Alfalfa,
Major and Blaine Cos. Only, SW west to Washita, Kiowa and Tillman Cos. Only,
C, SC, NE, SE

Stilt Sandpiper June 1 - ALL

Sanderling June 1 - ALL

American Golden-Plover June 1 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Forster's Tern June 1 - PAN, NW, SW

Least Sandpiper June 7 - PAN

White-rumped Sandpiper June 20 - ALL

Pectoral Sandpiper June 12 - ALL

Semipalmated Sandpiper June 5 - ALL

Wilson's Phalarope June 5 - SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Olive-sided Flycatcher June 3 - ALL

Western Wood-Pewee June 5 - PAN Cimarron Co only

Alder Flycatcher June 1 - C, SC, NE, SE

Willow Flycatcher June 2 - ALL

Least Flycatcher June 1 - ALL

Swainson's Thrush June 4 - ALL

Cedar Waxwing June 4 - ALL

Cerulean Warbler June 30 - NE rare in Delaware
and Cherokee cos only, SE rare in LeFlore and McCurtain cos only

Lazuli Bunting June 4 - PAN

Indigo Bunting June 2 - PAN

Pine Siskin June 1 - ALL



The information presented here comes from The Oklahoma Bird Records
Committee of the Oklahoma Ornithological Society, which publishes a Date
Guide to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma. This booklet divides Oklahoma
into 7 geographic regions, and lists the normal dates of occurrence for each
Oklahoma bird species within each region. Observers are urged to report
unusual species, or birds out of date or out of normal range in Oklahoma,
based on the information given in this publication.



The Oklahoma Ornithological Society and Oklahoma Bird Records Committee web
site, http://www.okbirds.org/
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.okbirds.org_&d=DwMF
Ag&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWK
XWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=SXP5X1rcGOTe-8BLcgBgfrQIffBnP0CwWFH-xk9Jzcs&s=Ou4jdCTr0
lwevtBN_Ud9l_b9MMORF9n9FuyumXmcXyc&e=> , includes ordering information for
the Date Guide to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma, information on
documenting significant records, documentation forms, instructions, and a
searchable database for Oklahoma bird migration information. Birders are
cordially invited to join the Oklahoma Ornithological Society.



Happy birding!

Pat Velte

<pvelte...> <mailto:<pvelte...>

Oklahoma City, OK




 

Back to top
Date: 6/1/19 12:56 am
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...>
Subject: Re: Status of Oxley Nature Center and Redbud Valley Nature Preserve
On Thursday, I walked the trail at Oxley North Woods from Lake Yahola east to the road. Although it was muddy, the trail was all right and not damaged. I do not know how the trails to the north were, though. There were black and least terns flying over lake Yahola.

Mark Peterson
Nartlesville

________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Susie Ruby <seruby...>
Sent: Friday, May 31, 2019 6:42 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Status of Oxley Nature Center and Redbud Valley Nature Preserve

Oxley and Redbud will remain closed till June 9. That could change and close for longer as staff deals with flood damage. It is unsafe to hike the trails. At the Oxley Nature Center, the boardwalk at Blackbird Marsh is destroyed. Along the Bird Creek trail you cannot find the trail. The loop of that trail will be closed permanently. At this time we are trying to wrap our brains around it. We will start having cleanup days very soon. Our part of Mohawk park is closed at this time.
Redbud Valley's boardwalk is also damaged. Trail is washed out and the entry to the parking area has deep ruts. Just bear with us.

Susie Ruby, MS Artist/Naturalist Scissortail Fine Arts Studio <scissortailfinearts46...> <seruby...>
"To keep every cog and wheel is the first precaution of intelligent tinkering.--Aldo Leopold.

 

Back to top
Date: 5/31/19 5:01 pm
From: Brett Niland <bestguess...>
Subject: Re: Status of Oxley Nature Center and Redbud Valley Nature Preserve
Please continue to post updates.

I'd really appreciate opportunities to contribute time and or resources.

We have take advantage of both resources and are very much willing to give toward restoration and improvements.

Kindest regards,

Brett & Lareina Niland
918-200-1818
________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Susie Ruby <seruby...>
Sent: Friday, May 31, 2019 6:42 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Status of Oxley Nature Center and Redbud Valley Nature Preserve

Oxley and Redbud will remain closed till June 9. That could change and close for longer as staff deals with flood damage. It is unsafe to hike the trails. At the Oxley Nature Center, the boardwalk at Blackbird Marsh is destroyed. Along the Bird Creek trail you cannot find the trail. The loop of that trail will be closed permanently. At this time we are trying to wrap our brains around it. We will start having cleanup days very soon. Our part of Mohawk park is closed at this time.
Redbud Valley's boardwalk is also damaged. Trail is washed out and the entry to the parking area has deep ruts. Just bear with us.

Susie Ruby, MS Artist/Naturalist Scissortail Fine Arts Studio <scissortailfinearts46...> <seruby...>
"To keep every cog and wheel is the first precaution of intelligent tinkering.--Aldo Leopold.

 

Back to top
Date: 5/31/19 4:48 pm
From: Susie Ruby <seruby...>
Subject: Status of Oxley Nature Center and Redbud Valley Nature Preserve
Oxley and Redbud will remain closed till June 9. That could change and close for longer as staff deals with flood damage. It is unsafe to hike the trails. At the Oxley Nature Center, the boardwalk at Blackbird Marsh is destroyed. Along the Bird Creek trail you cannot find the trail. The loop of that trail will be closed permanently. At this time we are trying to wrap our brains around it. We will start having cleanup days very soon. Our part of Mohawk park is closed at this time.Redbud Valley's boardwalk is also damaged. Trail is washed out and the entry to the parking area has deep ruts. Just bear with us.

Susie Ruby,  MS Artist/Naturalist Scissortail Fine Arts Studio <scissortailfinearts46...> <seruby...> 
"To keep every cog and wheel is the first precaution of intelligent tinkering.”--Aldo Leopold.

 

Back to top
Date: 5/30/19 12:33 pm
From: John Fisher <rgs455...>
Subject: Reminder: Tallgrass Prairie Preserve Butterfly Count
The TNC Tallgrass Prairie Butterfly Count will be SUNDAY, June 9th, 2019.

It will start at 9:00 AM from the Visitor's Center.

Lunch will be in the air-conditioned Foreman's ( Stucco ) House.

Bring your lunch, plenty of water, & bug spray. Wear closed toed shoes and
be prepared to go off-trail. Also bring close-focusing binoculars and a
field if you have them.



John Fisher

<rgs455...>


 

Back to top
Date: 5/30/19 5:17 am
From: Susie Ruby <seruby...>
Subject: PhD candidate's survery
This student is working with the Playa Lakes Joint Venture to study birds. Here is the link to his survey
Online Survey Software | Qualtrics Survey Solutions

|
|
| |
Online Survey Software | Qualtrics Survey Solutions

Qualtrics sophisticated online survey software solutions make creating online surveys easy. Learn more about Res...
|

|

|



Susie Ruby,  MS Artist/Naturalist Scissortail Fine Arts Studio <scissortailfinearts46...> <seruby...> 
"To keep every cog and wheel is the first precaution of intelligent tinkering.”--Aldo Leopold.

 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/19 10:35 am
From: Bostian, Kelly <Kelly.Bostian...>
Subject: Re: Bixby sod farms
?I gotta ask... Just how unusual is a ruddy duck in Bixby?!? .. I've only ever seen them in the fall -- and usually farther west.

But those danged sod fields that I always seem to overlook (right next to my house) continue to surprise me time after time.

3 GW Egrets behind my house off 161st this morning.. that was a first thanks to the flood.


Kelly Bostian
Outdoors Writer
Tulsa World Media Company
www.tulsaworld.com<../../owa/redir.aspx?C=8laapRDrMk2IryHtj5G_mFisA4Zs59AIEjGwuoKJPsrXl3ZD0f_RbRx5YQGsIZUxlmflzPaUfrU.&URL=http%3a%2f%2fwww.tulsaworld.com%2f>
office | 918 581 8357
mobile | 918 231 1385
fax | 918 581 8353
315 S. Boulder Ave., Tulsa, OK 74103
twitter | @kellybostian
blog |tulsaworld.com/KellyBostian<../../owa/redir.aspx?C=8laapRDrMk2IryHtj5G_mFisA4Zs59AIEjGwuoKJPsrXl3ZD0f_RbRx5YQGsIZUxlmflzPaUfrU.&URL=http%3a%2f%2fwww.tulsaworld.com%2fblog>
email | <kelly.bostian...><../../owa/redir.aspx?C=8laapRDrMk2IryHtj5G_mFisA4Zs59AIEjGwuoKJPsrXl3ZD0f_RbRx5YQGsIZUxlmflzPaUfrU.&URL=mailto%<3aname...>
________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Richrd Gunn <richardgunn1940...>
Sent: Sunday, May 26, 2019 7:19 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Bixby sod farms

Actually I used to sex them in grad school. More important for geese, no sexual dimorphism.

On May 26, 2019 4:06 PM, "John Kennington" <johnkennington...><mailto:<johnkennington...>> wrote:
They are actually quite large (and shockingly corkscrewed!) Google duck "private parts" if you are not familiar.

On Sun, May 26, 2019, 3:46 PM Richrd Gunn <richardgunn1940...><mailto:<richardgunn1940...>> wrote:
You must have gotten really close to see that.

On Sun, May 26, 2019 at 9:07 AM Brett Niland <bestguess...><mailto:<bestguess...>> wrote:
Add a ruddy dick and a black necked stilt to the 129th E at about 146th area.

Thank You,

Brett Niland
Cell: (918) 200-1818

> On May 26, 2019, at 8:54 AM, Brett Niland <bestguess...><mailto:<bestguess...>> wrote:
>
> Not a lot out at the Bixby sod farms this AM. Cattle egrets at Watkins sand, and an avocet at 129th E at about 146th. Needed those this year.
>
> Thank You,
>
> Brett Niland
> Cell: (918) 200-1818
 

Back to top
Date: 5/27/19 7:41 pm
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...>
Subject: Lake Yahola this evening.
Hello All,
Mary and I stopped at Lake Yahola in Tulsa from about 8:20 to 8:30 this evening. There were 3 black terns and a least tern flying just north of the monument.

Mark Peterson
Bartlesville

 

Back to top
Date: 5/27/19 7:01 am
From: Susanne Lutze <eztuls46...>
Subject: Re: Common Nighthawks
I have a Mulberry Tree in the green belt behind me and love the big flocks
of Cedar Waxwings that visit the tree for a feast.

On Mon, May 27, 2019 at 7:51 AM Hollis Price <hollis...> wrote:

> Hal, I have a small mulberry tree that I planted. Not producing yet.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On May 27, 2019, at 5:32 AM, Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...> wrote:
> >
> > Hollis, they are nice to see. I have 1 flying over Mitch Park and one
> sitting like a “bump on a limb”.
> > One of the spring migration specials are having a Mulberry tree . There
> is one aight almond one path at Mitch where we’re get a daily burst of day
> long feeding spot with many visitors: Swainson’s thrushes, robins, red
> bellied woodpeckers, waxwings, catbirds, etc. and squirrels. I notice most
> of the birds are very quiet- they just move around and eat berries. The
> squirrels are often competing, racing all over the tree, and chattering.
> > In other local parks with mulberry trees I have seen thrashers, Orioles,
> warblers and tanagers.
> > Hope you have one of those mulberry trees nearby .
> > Hal Yocum, Edmond
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
> >
> >> On May 26, 2019, at 8:49 PM, Hollis Price <hollis...> wrote:
> >>
> >> I have been enjoying watching two common nighthawks the last two
> evenings flying above my back yard.
> >>
> >> Hollis Price
> >> NE if Jones
> >> Sent from my iPhone
>
--
" There is a pleasure in the pathless woods;
There is rapture on the lonely shore;
There is society, where none intrudes,
By the deep sea, and music in its roar:
I love not man the less, but Nature more...."

Lord Byron

 

Back to top
Date: 5/27/19 5:51 am
From: Hollis Price <hollis...>
Subject: Re: Common Nighthawks
Hal, I have a small mulberry tree that I planted. Not producing yet.

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 27, 2019, at 5:32 AM, Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...> wrote:
>
> Hollis, they are nice to see. I have 1 flying over Mitch Park and one sitting like a “bump on a limb”.
> One of the spring migration specials are having a Mulberry tree . There is one aight almond one path at Mitch where we’re get a daily burst of day long feeding spot with many visitors: Swainson’s thrushes, robins, red bellied woodpeckers, waxwings, catbirds, etc. and squirrels. I notice most of the birds are very quiet- they just move around and eat berries. The squirrels are often competing, racing all over the tree, and chattering.
> In other local parks with mulberry trees I have seen thrashers, Orioles, warblers and tanagers.
> Hope you have one of those mulberry trees nearby .
> Hal Yocum, Edmond
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On May 26, 2019, at 8:49 PM, Hollis Price <hollis...> wrote:
>>
>> I have been enjoying watching two common nighthawks the last two evenings flying above my back yard.
>>
>> Hollis Price
>> NE if Jones
>> Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/27/19 3:33 am
From: Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...>
Subject: Re: Common Nighthawks
Hollis, they are nice to see. I have 1 flying over Mitch Park and one sitting like a “bump on a limb”.
One of the spring migration specials are having a Mulberry tree . There is one aight almond one path at Mitch where we’re get a daily burst of day long feeding spot with many visitors: Swainson’s thrushes, robins, red bellied woodpeckers, waxwings, catbirds, etc. and squirrels. I notice most of the birds are very quiet- they just move around and eat berries. The squirrels are often competing, racing all over the tree, and chattering.
In other local parks with mulberry trees I have seen thrashers, Orioles, warblers and tanagers.
Hope you have one of those mulberry trees nearby .
Hal Yocum, Edmond

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 26, 2019, at 8:49 PM, Hollis Price <hollis...> wrote:
>
> I have been enjoying watching two common nighthawks the last two evenings flying above my back yard.
>
> Hollis Price
> NE if Jones
> Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/26/19 7:41 pm
From: Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...>
Subject: Re: baby bird ID
Let’s see your photo. I have been seeing young birds of cowbird, starlings, bluebirds, house sparrows so far.
Hal Yocum, Edmond

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 26, 2019, at 8:18 PM, Dora Webb <owl112...> wrote:
>
> Someone on Nextdoor posted a photo of a baby bird and nest. Can someone ID the bird.
> I’ll send the photo if you care to ID.
> Dora Webb
> Edmond, OK

 

Back to top
Date: 5/26/19 6:49 pm
From: Hollis Price <hollis...>
Subject: Common Nighthawks
I have been enjoying watching two common nighthawks the last two evenings flying above my back yard.

Hollis Price
NE if Jones
Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/26/19 6:44 pm
From: O Connell, Tim <tim.oconnell...>
Subject: Stillwater, OK: morning walk birds
Nothing too exciting here, but 32 species not too shabby. ~Tim O’Connell, Stillwater OK


1300 North Cimarron Hill Rd, Stillwater, OK, Payne, Oklahoma, US
May 26, 2019 7:15 AM - 7:45 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)
32 species

Northern Bobwhite 1
Mourning Dove 3
Yellow-billed Cuckoo 2
Great Blue Heron 1
Great Egret 2
Green Heron 2
Mississippi Kite 1
Red-shouldered Hawk 2
Red-bellied Woodpecker 2
Downy Woodpecker 3
Pileated Woodpecker 1
Northern Flicker 1
Eastern Phoebe 3
Great Crested Flycatcher 1
Blue Jay 2
American Crow 2
Carolina Chickadee 3
Tufted Titmouse 4
White-breasted Nuthatch 1
Carolina Wren 3
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 2
Eastern Bluebird 2
American Robin 1
Brown Thrasher 1
Northern Mockingbird 2
European Starling 3
Lark Sparrow 2
Brown-headed Cowbird 3
Louisiana Waterthrush 1
Northern Cardinal 9
Indigo Bunting 2
Dickcissel 1
 

Back to top
Date: 5/26/19 6:19 pm
From: Dora Webb <owl112...>
Subject: baby bird ID
Someone on Nextdoor posted a photo of a baby bird and nest. Can someone ID the bird.
I’ll send the photo if you care to ID.
Dora Webb
Edmond, OK
 

Back to top
Date: 5/26/19 5:19 pm
From: Richrd Gunn <richardgunn1940...>
Subject: Re: Bixby sod farms
Actually I used to sex them in grad school. More important for geese, no
sexual dimorphism.

On May 26, 2019 4:06 PM, "John Kennington" <johnkennington...> wrote:

> They are actually quite large (and shockingly corkscrewed!) Google duck
> "private parts" if you are not familiar.
>
> On Sun, May 26, 2019, 3:46 PM Richrd Gunn <richardgunn1940...>
> wrote:
>
>> You must have gotten really close to see that.
>>
>> On Sun, May 26, 2019 at 9:07 AM Brett Niland <bestguess...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Add a ruddy dick and a black necked stilt to the 129th E at about 146th
>>> area.
>>>
>>> Thank You,
>>>
>>> Brett Niland
>>> Cell: (918) 200-1818
>>>
>>> > On May 26, 2019, at 8:54 AM, Brett Niland <bestguess...>
>>> wrote:
>>> >
>>> > Not a lot out at the Bixby sod farms this AM. Cattle egrets at Watkins
>>> sand, and an avocet at 129th E at about 146th. Needed those this year.
>>> >
>>> > Thank You,
>>> >
>>> > Brett Niland
>>> > Cell: (918) 200-1818
>>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/26/19 3:08 pm
From: Brett Niland <bestguess...>
Subject: Re: Bixby sod farms
We were past the barricades on the other side of the water. The female ruddy was way back in the back, but through the scope the fanned raised tail was a dead giveaway.

The stilt came right over us and flew back to near the duck and landed by the avocet. It was an easy ID in the air close up, but even at a distance through the scope those legs are something else. :)

Thank You,

Brett Niland
Cell: (918) 200-1818

On May 26, 2019, at 3:46 PM, Richrd Gunn <richardgunn1940...><mailto:<richardgunn1940...>> wrote:

You must have gotten really close to see that.

On Sun, May 26, 2019 at 9:07 AM Brett Niland <bestguess...><mailto:<bestguess...>> wrote:
Add a ruddy dick and a black necked stilt to the 129th E at about 146th area.

Thank You,

Brett Niland
Cell: (918) 200-1818

> On May 26, 2019, at 8:54 AM, Brett Niland <bestguess...><mailto:<bestguess...>> wrote:
>
> Not a lot out at the Bixby sod farms this AM. Cattle egrets at Watkins sand, and an avocet at 129th E at about 146th. Needed those this year.
>
> Thank You,
>
> Brett Niland
> Cell: (918) 200-1818
 

Back to top
Date: 5/26/19 2:06 pm
From: John Kennington <johnkennington...>
Subject: Re: Bixby sod farms
They are actually quite large (and shockingly corkscrewed!) Google duck
"private parts" if you are not familiar.

On Sun, May 26, 2019, 3:46 PM Richrd Gunn <richardgunn1940...> wrote:

> You must have gotten really close to see that.
>
> On Sun, May 26, 2019 at 9:07 AM Brett Niland <bestguess...>
> wrote:
>
>> Add a ruddy dick and a black necked stilt to the 129th E at about 146th
>> area.
>>
>> Thank You,
>>
>> Brett Niland
>> Cell: (918) 200-1818
>>
>> > On May 26, 2019, at 8:54 AM, Brett Niland <bestguess...>
>> wrote:
>> >
>> > Not a lot out at the Bixby sod farms this AM. Cattle egrets at Watkins
>> sand, and an avocet at 129th E at about 146th. Needed those this year.
>> >
>> > Thank You,
>> >
>> > Brett Niland
>> > Cell: (918) 200-1818
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/26/19 1:46 pm
From: Richrd Gunn <richardgunn1940...>
Subject: Re: Bixby sod farms
You must have gotten really close to see that.

On Sun, May 26, 2019 at 9:07 AM Brett Niland <bestguess...> wrote:

> Add a ruddy dick and a black necked stilt to the 129th E at about 146th
> area.
>
> Thank You,
>
> Brett Niland
> Cell: (918) 200-1818
>
> > On May 26, 2019, at 8:54 AM, Brett Niland <bestguess...> wrote:
> >
> > Not a lot out at the Bixby sod farms this AM. Cattle egrets at Watkins
> sand, and an avocet at 129th E at about 146th. Needed those this year.
> >
> > Thank You,
> >
> > Brett Niland
> > Cell: (918) 200-1818
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/26/19 11:03 am
From: Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...>
Subject: Flood and pelicans
I live near Keystone dam and cross the dam frequently. With the water levels so high, the main channel is very fast and the surrounding wooded area is pretty much all flooded. A good number of pelicans that have abandoned the main channel now are swimming around among the trees well away from the river. Interesting to see pelicans in the woods.


Have fun,

Tom Curtis

 

Back to top
Date: 5/26/19 7:08 am
From: Brett Niland <bestguess...>
Subject: Re: Bixby sod farms
Add a ruddy dick and a black necked stilt to the 129th E at about 146th area.

Thank You,

Brett Niland
Cell: (918) 200-1818

> On May 26, 2019, at 8:54 AM, Brett Niland <bestguess...> wrote:
>
> Not a lot out at the Bixby sod farms this AM. Cattle egrets at Watkins sand, and an avocet at 129th E at about 146th. Needed those this year.
>
> Thank You,
>
> Brett Niland
> Cell: (918) 200-1818
 

Back to top
Date: 5/26/19 6:55 am
From: Brett Niland <bestguess...>
Subject: Bixby sod farms
Not a lot out at the Bixby sod farms this AM. Cattle egrets at Watkins sand, and an avocet at 129th E at about 146th. Needed those this year.

Thank You,

Brett Niland
Cell: (918) 200-1818
 

Back to top
Date: 5/25/19 5:05 pm
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...>
Subject: 56th St North
Hello All,

The 56th St N sod farms are accessible from the East. There's a high water
warning barricade but you can drive around, there's no water on the road.
Along with peeps and yellowlegs, Hudsonian Godwit, Willet, Black-Bellied
and Semipalmated Plovers.

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK

 

Back to top
Date: 5/25/19 3:43 pm
From: terry <terry...>
Subject: Re: Tulsa area
I just saw this, it was 129th.Sent from my U.S.Cellular© Smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: jana singletary <jssingletary...> Date: 5/24/19 11:24 PM (GMT-06:00) To: <OKBIRDS...> Subject: Re: Tulsa area Terry, was that 145th E. Ave. or 129th E. Ave.?  I had three Caspian Terns on 129th E. Ave., but the other birds must’ve come in after that because they weren’t present when I was there between 2:00 and 3:00. I’m really sorry I didn’t hang around longer.  Jana Singletary Sent from my iPhoneOn May 24, 2019, at 9:23 PM, terry <terry...> wrote:This evening in a flooded field on 145th east ave  between 141st and 151st at the Bixby sod farm. I had 3-Caspian Terns.  8 Black-bellied Plovers   1-Black necked stilt and 1- White-faced Ibis.Sent from my U.S.Cellular© Smartphone
 

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Date: 5/25/19 3:39 pm
From: J.B. Tibbits <jeff_osu...>
Subject: Re: 2019 Oklahoma Birder Survey
Hello all!
Thank you to the 100 respondents thus far!

Quick reminder that the poll will be closed on Friday, May 31, so if you haven't taken the poll yet but would like to, please do.

https://arcg.is/1u04qH<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__arcg.is_1u04qH&d=DwMFAw&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=StfaDk-exy8L05YCDmFA0j3E9JXfn9Xy5sNtbZzfSOk&s=WWJiOcyIvmb0YFA5i6OnjfAMZzkuZ8I-Y6PRwrdpDSc&e=>

Thanks,
Jeff Tibbits

________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of J.B. Tibbits <jeff_osu...>
Sent: Friday, May 17, 2019 12:45 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] 2019 Oklahoma Birder Survey

Hello all!

The Oklahoma Birder survey is an ongoing survey to monitor Oklahoma's birders. Results will be reviewed by the Oklahoma Ornithological Society and Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation to help better meet the needs of Oklahoma birders. All responses are confidential and participation is voluntary.


The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation received federal funds from the Farm Bill to create a voluntary public access program, The Oklahoma Land Access Program (OLAP<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.wildlifedepartment.com_olap&d=DwMFAw&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=StfaDk-exy8L05YCDmFA0j3E9JXfn9Xy5sNtbZzfSOk&s=eWbXcO6LOq8KYDPBLkiWnT1XRETd-J6ZWA0D6gOW5Zw&e=>). The OLAP's goals are to lease private land to allow public access for hunting, fishing, and wildlife-viewing. We are interested in learning more about the awareness, demographics, and activities of birders in Oklahoma. Your responses will help us consider the concerns and interests of Oklahoma birders and incorporate these insights into the OLAP.


Thank you to all of those who filled out the 2016 Oklahoma Birder Survey, these results provided the justification for the Eldorado OLAP Wildlife-viewing Areas<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__wildlifedepartment.com_sites_default_files_Jackson-5FW001-5FW002-5F0.pdf&d=DwMFAw&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=StfaDk-exy8L05YCDmFA0j3E9JXfn9Xy5sNtbZzfSOk&s=3xgsUvVpvURYLIgzEIJWwirTiIE1F7PdDK_unrcuMqQ&e=>


Please take 5 minutes to fill out the below survey:

https://arcg.is/1u04qH<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__arcg.is_1u04qH&d=DwMFAw&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=StfaDk-exy8L05YCDmFA0j3E9JXfn9Xy5sNtbZzfSOk&s=WWJiOcyIvmb0YFA5i6OnjfAMZzkuZ8I-Y6PRwrdpDSc&e=>

Best regards,
Jeff Tibbits


 

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Date: 5/25/19 8:24 am
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...>
Subject: Cimarron County from 5-20-19 to 5-23-2019.
Hello All,
Mary and I went out to the Panhandle earlier this week to escape the rain. We had to go through periods of heavy rain from west of Altus to Guymon and then dense fog from west of Guymon to Boise City. Most of the Salt Plains were flooded on the way out with lots of peeps, but not much else on Sandpiper Trail. It cleared for part of the day on Tuesday, but there were still periodic showers. We stayed at the Hoot Owl Ranch for 2 nights and had a nice tour of the petroglyphs on the ranch. The wind was almost calm on Tuesday night, but was gusty again on Wednesday. On the way back, showers were encountered from Boise City to Buffalo. The Salt plains were very flooded on the way back. Sandpiper Trail was inaccessible. The water was almost level from below the dam and downstream. Highlights included:

Ring-necked Pheasant-2 north of Boise City
Scaled Quail-0
Ferruginous Hawk-1 west of Boise City
Long-billed Curlew-2 Pairs west of Boise City
Hudsonian Godwit-5 in a flooded area between Pond Creek and Lamont
Least Tern-3 flying below the Salt Plains dam
Greater Roadrunner-0
Burrowing Owl-3 about a mile northeast of Boise City
Common Poorwill-1 at the usual spot north of the state park and 1 at the Hoot Owl Ranch
Black-chinned Hummingbird-Several at the Hoot Owl Ranch
Ladder-backed Woodpecker-Several
Western Wood-Pewee-Several at the state park and at Hoot Owl Ranch
Say's Phoebe-Several
Ash-throated Flycatcher-Several
Cassin's Kingbird-Several
Pinyon Jay-1 at Easter Pageant
Chihuahuan Raven-2 in Texas County
Common Raven-Many
Bushtit-5
Rock Wren-2
Canyon Wren-Several
Curve-billed Thrasher-0
Spotted Towhee-Several
Canyon Towhee-Several
Cassin's Sparrow-Many
Rufous-crowned Sparrow-Several
Black-headed Grosbeak-2
Bullock's Oriole-Many
Pine Siskin-Several
Lesser Goldfinch-Several in Kenton and 2 at Hoot Owl Ranch

Mark Peterson
Bartlesville



 

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Date: 5/24/19 9:25 pm
From: jana singletary <jssingletary...>
Subject: Re: Tulsa area
Terry, was that 145th E. Ave. or 129th E. Ave.? I had three Caspian Terns on 129th E. Ave., but the other birds must’ve come in after that because they weren’t present when I was there between 2:00 and 3:00. I’m really sorry I didn’t hang around longer.

Jana Singletary


Sent from my iPhone

> On May 24, 2019, at 9:23 PM, terry <terry...> wrote:
>
>
> This evening in a flooded field on 145th east ave between 141st and 151st at the Bixby sod farm. I had 3-Caspian Terns. 8 Black-bellied Plovers 1-Black necked stilt and 1- White-faced Ibis.
>
>
>
> Sent from my U.S.Cellular© Smartphone

 

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Date: 5/24/19 7:23 pm
From: terry <terry...>
Subject: Tulsa area
This evening in a flooded field on 145th east ave  between 141st and 151st at the Bixby sod farm. I had 3-Caspian Terns.  8 Black-bellied Plovers   1-Black necked stilt and 1- White-faced Ibis.Sent from my U.S.Cellular© Smartphone
 

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Date: 5/23/19 6:59 pm
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...>
Subject: Re: Leonard
I've seen a couple of Hudsonians around here, and a couple of weeks ago I
had a good sized flock just east of Jet.

Bill

On Thu, May 23, 2019 at 5:36 PM Melinda Droege <oklagranny26...>
wrote:

>
> Thank you Bill and Sandy for telling which roads are closed. I'm still
> waiting for the mother lode of shorebirds around Bartlesville.
> Noticed there are very few godwits seen and we haven't had any!!!!! We
> usually get a nice little flock. Do people think they are ok? I have
> never had a spring without Hudsonians up here.
>
> Thanks to everyone for posting good birds and closed roads.
>
> Melinda D
> Bville
>
> On Thu, May 23, 2019 at 5:10 PM Bill Carrell <
> <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...> wrote:
>
>> Hello All,
>>
>> As of this evening, still 5 Dunlin at Leonard sod farms, along with lot's
>> of distant peeps, Pectorals and phalaropes. Everything east of 177th is
>> under water. Also, 56th St N is inaccessible from both directions.
>>
>> Bill Carrell
>> Tulsa, OK
>>
>

 

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Date: 5/23/19 4:09 pm
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...>
Subject: Re: Sequoyah NWR
As of early this morning, Mohawk park including Lake Yahola are closed due
to Bird Creek flooding.

On Thu, May 23, 2019, 3:29 PM Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:

> The refuge is closed because of the Arkansas River flooding.
>
> Sandy B.
>

 

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Date: 5/23/19 3:36 pm
From: Melinda Droege <oklagranny26...>
Subject: Re: Leonard
Thank you Bill and Sandy for telling which roads are closed. I'm still
waiting for the mother lode of shorebirds around Bartlesville.
Noticed there are very few godwits seen and we haven't had any!!!!! We
usually get a nice little flock. Do people think they are ok? I have
never had a spring without Hudsonians up here.

Thanks to everyone for posting good birds and closed roads.

Melinda D
Bville

On Thu, May 23, 2019 at 5:10 PM Bill Carrell <
<cyanocitta.tachopteryx...> wrote:

> Hello All,
>
> As of this evening, still 5 Dunlin at Leonard sod farms, along with lot's
> of distant peeps, Pectorals and phalaropes. Everything east of 177th is
> under water. Also, 56th St N is inaccessible from both directions.
>
> Bill Carrell
> Tulsa, OK
>

 

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Date: 5/23/19 3:10 pm
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...>
Subject: Leonard
Hello All,

As of this evening, still 5 Dunlin at Leonard sod farms, along with lot's
of distant peeps, Pectorals and phalaropes. Everything east of 177th is
under water. Also, 56th St N is inaccessible from both directions.

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK

 

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Date: 5/23/19 1:29 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Sequoyah NWR
The refuge is closed because of the Arkansas River flooding.

Sandy B.

 

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Date: 5/22/19 7:42 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Belated report: Red Slough Bird Survey - May 21
It was windy and stormy on the bird survey yesterday. 65 species were
found. Hardly any migrants were found and very little singing was heard.
Here is my list:



Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 4

Wood Duck - 9

Gadwall - 1

Mallard - 2

Hooded Merganser - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 2

Neotropic Cormorant - 12 (7 nests now.)

Double-crested Cormorant - 1 imm.

Anhinga - 129

Least Bittern - 2

Great-blue Heron - 2

Great Egret - 28

Snowy Egret - 2

Little-blue Heron - 3

Cattle Egret - 500

Green Heron - 6

White Ibis - 51

Black Vulture - 311 (massive flight heading SW as storms approached.)

Turkey Vulture - 27

Mississippi Kite - 3

Purple Gallinule - 36 (3 on nests.)

Common Gallinule - 25 (1 on nest.)

Least Tern - 6

Black Tern - 1

Mourning Dove - 4

Rock Pigeon - 2

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 4

Chimney Swift - 4

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 2

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 2

Acadian Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 3

White-eyed Vireo - 5

Warbling Vireo - 1

Red-eyed Vireo - 1

American Crow - 1

Tree Swallow - 19

Bank Swallow - 7

Cliff Swallow - 6

Barn Swallow - 17

Carolina Chickadee - 1

Tufted Titmouse - 2

Carolina Wren - 5

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3

Eastern Bluebird - 3

Northern Mockingbird - 3

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Pine Warbler - 2

Black-and-white Warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 3

Common Yellowthroat - 12

Yellow-breasted Chat - 4

Summer Tanager - 2

Northern Cardinal - 7

Indigo Bunting - 5

Painted Bunting - 2

Dickcissel - 10

Red-winged Blackbird - 15

Common Grackle - 12

Brown-headed Cowbird - 9

Orchard Oriole - 3





Odonates:



Regal Darner

Prince Baskettail

Stillwater Clubtail

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Common Whitetail

Spot-winged Glider

Black Saddlebags





Herps:



American Alligator

Musk Turtle

Mississippi Mud Turtle

Red-eared Slider

Yellow-bellied Watersnake

Orange-striped Ribbon Snake

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Green Treefrog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog





Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR






 

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Date: 5/22/19 1:54 pm
From: Jim Arterburn <JIMARTERBURN...>
Subject: Red-necked Phalarope and other late shorebird migrants
OKBirds,

I went looking for shorebirds around the Bixby, Leonard and Wagoner
County sod farms from two until six and I wasn't disappointed. The
winds were from the south at 30-35 mph. When I did find shorebirds
there was a nice mix of the late migrants. I saw more Dunlin in one day
than ever for NE Oklahoma. See the lists below.

Leonard sod farms:

Black-bellied Plover - 6
American Golden Plover - 1 (mostly breeding plumage)
Killdeer - 2
Spotted Sandpiper - 1
Greater Yellowlegs - 1
Lesser Yellowlegs - 3
Hudsonian Godwit - 2
Ruddy Turnstone - 7
Stilt Sandpiper - 41
Sanderling - 16
Dunlin - 19
Least Sandpiper - 6
White-rumped Sandpiper - 450
Buff-breasted Sandpiper - 2
Pectoral Sandpiper - 8
Semipalmated Sandpiper - 100
Wilson's Phalarope - 35

Wagoner County sod farms:

Ruddy Turnstone - 3
Stilt Sandpiper - 44
Sanderling - 27
Dunlin - 18
Baird's Sandpiper - 3
White-rumped Sandpiper - 200
Pectoral Sandpiper - 4
Semipalmated Sandpiper - 30
Wilson's Phalarope - 65
Red-necked Phalarope - 1 (female in breeding plumage)

121st & S. Sheridan Road:

Killdeer - 2
Lesser Yellowlegs - 3
Willet - 1
Ruddy Turnstone - 1
Stilt Sandpiper - 38
Sanderling - 11
Dunlin - 48
Least Sandpiper - 10
White-rumped Sandpiper - 500
Pectoral Sandpiper - 6
Semipalmated Sandpiper - 150
Wilson's Phalarope - 46


When I get some time I will post photos of some of these species on my
website.

Jim Arterburn
 

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Date: 5/22/19 12:45 pm
From: O Connell, Tim <tim.oconnell...>
Subject: Payne County Audubon Society – TWO field trips coming up!
Dear Friends and Supporters of the Payne County Audubon Society,

After a wild couple of weather days this week you might be itching to get outside and see how our local birds survived the tornadoes and floods. Over the next two weekends the Payne County Audubon Society will be here to sponsor two opportunities to do just that:

• Sunday, 26 May, 2:00 pm: Jessica Torres will show us around her facilities at Nature’s Vein Wildlife Rescue and Education. This will be a wonderful opportunity to both learn more about wildlife rehabilitation and see firsthand how a large bird flight cage would aid this important conservation work in our community. Following the tour, we will bird some local hotspots around Perkins. Meeting location: 416 W French St., Perkins, OK. Directions: Heading south on Rt. 177 from Rt. 33 in Perkins, French Street is 2 blocks south of the traffic light at W Freeman/E Kirk. Take a right on French St. and travel 3 blocks west of Rt. 177 to get to Nature’s Vein at 416 W French St. If you lose your way, telephone 405-665-0091.

• Saturday, 1 June, 7:30 am: Dwayne Elmore will lead us on a field trip to the OSU Cross-Timbers Experimental Range on Coyle Rd., west of Stillwater. Meeting location: We will meet at the OSU Range Research Station headquarters. Directions: To get there proceed west from Stillwater on OK 51. Turn left/south on Coyle Rd, which is 1.5 miles west of the entrance to Lake Carl Blackwell. Travel south on Coyle Rd. 2.5 miles; the headquarters will be on the west side of Coyle Rd. This is 1/2 mile south of 44th street.

Please join us in the field for one or both of these trips: free, open to the public, and beginners most welcomed!

For more information: https://paynecountyaudubonsociety.com/whats-new/



Other News
I. On Thursday April 4th we gathered for pizza and programming at The Hideaway. We enjoyed brief presentations from Abbey Ramirez, 2018 recipient of the Helen Miller Award, who discussed results of her 3-year study of wintering Northern Saw-Whet Owls in Oklahoma. We also heard from Jared Elmore, 2018 recipient of the Edwin Glover Award, who described the role that scent plays in helping Red-cockaded Woodpecker avoid predation by rat snakes. We also celebrated three new research awards for 2019:


1. 2019 Edwin Glover Award: Emily Geest, Department of Integrative Biology, Oklahoma State University. The impact of fire on grassland butterfly communities in the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve.
2. 2019 Helen Miller Award: Elisa Henderson, University of California, Riverside. Do humans drive hybridization? A genomic study of hummingbird species pairs.
3. 2019 Payne County Audubon Society Award: Matt Ridenour, Department of Integrative Biology, Oklahoma State University. Mechanisms of nestling growth mediated by sibling rivalry in Eastern Bluebirds.

II. Thanks to the following folks who registered the following teams to compete in the 2019 Big Day for BIRDATHON:

• Here for the Checklists: Cameron Sherbon, Lane Navarro, Madeleine Griffin, and 2 pups [40 species]
• No Egrets: Eric Duell, Justin Agan, Samantha Cady, and Dave Londe [104 species]
• Cowunitbird: Jim Cowley and Les Imboden
• Tainted Bunting: Jared Elmore, Scott Loss, Georgia Riggs, Nic McMillan, and Tim O’Connell [130 species]
• Nature’s Vein Supreme Ruler: Jess Torres [87 species]
• Lords of the Wings: Tori Depuy, Logan Dickinson, Lauren Montalbano, and James Kowaleski [75 species]
• Chickathree: Amanda Boyle, Lindsey Chaffin, and Craig Davis (McCurtain County) [66 species]
• Well, This is Hawkward: Tiana Sanders, Breanne Otto, and Christopher Perez (McCurtain County)
• Cheep Dates: Erin Caldwell, Denise Hall, Christine Lord, and Kayleigh Locke (McCurtain County)

My records suggest that we had 29 volunteers birding on 9 teams – thanks to all participants.

***Now you can be the hero: Pick your favorite team from the list above and DONATE today! BIRDATHON is our ONE fundraising campaign each year and 100% of this year’s proceeds will go to support the contruction of a large bird flight cage at Nature’s Vein Wildlife Rescue and Education. ***

III. Finally, we need you. Do you love Stillwater and our other communities in Payne County? Would you like to help promote science-based conservation work in those communities? Do you like native birds, plants, insects, and other living things? Would you like to learn more about them and help educate others too? Then why not join our governing board of the Payne County Audubon Society? We could really use your help and we welcome folks from all walks of life. Students this means you, too! Need a community organization to which you can donate time for those sweet scholarships you’d like to have? Why not us? The more help we have the more we can do, right here in Payne County. (If you think you might be interested in a position on our board, just shoot me an email and we can chat about it: <tim.oconnell...><mailto:<tim.oconnell...>.)
This is an exciting time of year for anyone interested in the great outdoors. We hope to spend some of that time with you, exploring and celebrating our Payne County Audubon Society. Wishing you good birding,

~Tim O’Connell
PCAS President







 

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Date: 5/22/19 11:46 am
From: Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...>
Subject: Re: Inca Dove
I’ve been looking and listening for white wings but nothing yet.

Sent from my iPad

> On May 22, 2019, at 10:03 AM, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:
>
> I realize this is from slightly over the border, but Inca Doves are residents of my yard and neighborhood and have been for many years. So they may be in your neighborhood to stay, Bob. White-winged Doves are permanent fixtures too.
>
> Sandy B.
> Fort Smith, AR
>
>> On Wed, May 22, 2019 at 9:43 AM Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...> wrote:
>> Just heard an Inca Dove here in Heavener. Slightly north of its range. Very rare here in Heavener, but did see one last year at about this same time.
>>
>> Bob Laval
>> Heavener
>>
>> Sent from my iPad

 

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Date: 5/22/19 11:36 am
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...>
Subject: Re: Whimbrels
I was just at 121st around 10:30 and no Whimbrels. Guess they just made a
brief stop. Yesterday evening there were several hundred shorebirds there,
mostly peeps and mostly White-Rumped and Semipalmated. Also Wilson's
Phlalaropes, Stilt Sandpipers and a Willet. As Skiatook library was closed
yesterday (a boat was required to get there), I had some time off. At
Woodward Park, saw Yellow-Bellied Flycatcher, Gray-Cheeked Thrush, American
Redstart and Common Yellowthroat, the latter two the first warblers I've
seen in the park this spring. Also saw another Yellow-Bellied Flycatcher
and a Mourning Warbler on the Midland Valley trail at 21st. At Yahola, a
possible Common Tern flying with a mob of Black Terns.

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK

On Tue, May 21, 2019 at 4:37 PM Brett Niland <bestguess...> wrote:

> Be advised that 56th street just west of Yale is in deep water. Go around
> please and stay safe.
>
> Thank You,
>
> Brett Niland
> Cell: (918) 200-1818
>
> > On May 21, 2019, at 12:50 PM, jana singletary <
> <jssingletary...> wrote:
> >
> > I just had four Whimbrels at 121st and Sheridan. They took off to the
> north at 12:42. Maybe they’ll stop again at the 56th St. N. sod farms.
> Keep an eye out for them.
> >
> > Jana Singletary
> > Tulsa
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
>

 

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Date: 5/22/19 8:05 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Inca Dove
I realize this is from slightly over the border, but Inca Doves are
residents of my yard and neighborhood and have been for many years. So they
may be in your neighborhood to stay, Bob. White-winged Doves are permanent
fixtures too.

Sandy B.
Fort Smith, AR

On Wed, May 22, 2019 at 9:43 AM Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...>
wrote:

> Just heard an Inca Dove here in Heavener. Slightly north of its range.
> Very rare here in Heavener, but did see one last year at about this same
> time.
>
> Bob Laval
> Heavener
>
> Sent from my iPad

 

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Date: 5/22/19 7:44 am
From: Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...>
Subject: Inca Dove
Just heard an Inca Dove here in Heavener. Slightly north of its range. Very rare here in Heavener, but did see one last year at about this same time.

Bob Laval
Heavener

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 5/21/19 2:37 pm
From: Brett Niland <bestguess...>
Subject: Re: Whimbrels
Be advised that 56th street just west of Yale is in deep water. Go around please and stay safe.

Thank You,

Brett Niland
Cell: (918) 200-1818

> On May 21, 2019, at 12:50 PM, jana singletary <jssingletary...> wrote:
>
> I just had four Whimbrels at 121st and Sheridan. They took off to the north at 12:42. Maybe they’ll stop again at the 56th St. N. sod farms. Keep an eye out for them.
>
> Jana Singletary
> Tulsa
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/21/19 2:12 pm
From: Brett Niland <bestguess...>
Subject: Re: Whimbrels
Got a good sized group of black terns on 56th just west bird creek. No Whimbrels yet.

Thank You,

Brett Niland
Cell: (918) 200-1818

> On May 21, 2019, at 12:50 PM, jana singletary <jssingletary...> wrote:
>
> I just had four Whimbrels at 121st and Sheridan. They took off to the north at 12:42. Maybe they’ll stop again at the 56th St. N. sod farms. Keep an eye out for them.
>
> Jana Singletary
> Tulsa
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/21/19 10:51 am
From: jana singletary <jssingletary...>
Subject: Whimbrels
I just had four Whimbrels at 121st and Sheridan. They took off to the north at 12:42. Maybe they’ll stop again at the 56th St. N. sod farms. Keep an eye out for them.

Jana Singletary
Tulsa

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/20/19 11:25 am
From: Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...>
Subject: Re: A Few Weekend Birds
Swainson’s thrushes are still being seen nearly everywhere I birded in the OK/Norman/ Edmond area this past week .
I saw them in Stillwater on last Monday, Yukon on Tues. , Midwest City Wed. And daily in Mitch Park ( Edmond), even this morning.
All but the last of the yellow warblers have moved on over here, although I did see 2 BTG Warblers last Monday in Stillwater (Couch Park). To my surprise saw a Scarlet Tanager in Stillwater as well last Monday.
Hal Yocum ( Edmond).

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 20, 2019, at 11:15 AM, Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...> wrote:
>
> Hello All,
>
> Saturday morning Terry Mitchell and I saw a Canada Warbler in the Oxley North Woods. In the afternoon, saw three wet Upland Sandpipers at Bixby sod farms and a Black-Bellied Plover at Leonard. On Sunday, there was one Buff-Breasted Sandpiper at 56th st N sod Farms in the morning, and 14 Sanderlings at Leonard in the afternoon. Visited several locations on Sunday, and apart from Cedar Waxwings and one Yellow Warbler, saw no passerine migrants, not even a Swainson's Thrush. I suspect that there will be another small wave passing through this week after the weather breaks.
>
> Good Birding,
>
> Bill Carrell
> Tulsa, OK
>
 

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Date: 5/20/19 9:16 am
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...>
Subject: A Few Weekend Birds
Hello All,

Saturday morning Terry Mitchell and I saw a Canada Warbler in the Oxley
North Woods. In the afternoon, saw three wet Upland Sandpipers at Bixby sod
farms and a Black-Bellied Plover at Leonard. On Sunday, there was one
Buff-Breasted Sandpiper at 56th st N sod Farms in the morning, and 14
Sanderlings at Leonard in the afternoon. Visited several locations on
Sunday, and apart from Cedar Waxwings and one Yellow Warbler, saw no
passerine migrants, not even a Swainson's Thrush. I suspect that there will
be another small wave passing through this week after the weather breaks.

Good Birding,

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK

 

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