OKbirds
Received From Subject
7/24/17 8:20 pm harold Yocum <drhal2...> Re: "Is There Dusting At Your House?" June 7, 1990
7/24/17 5:34 pm Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...> Re: "Is There Dusting At Your House?" June 7, 1990
7/24/17 10:32 am Susanne Lutze <eztuls46...> Re: A Tufted Titmouse Observation
7/24/17 9:33 am Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...> Re: A Tufted Titmouse Observation
7/17/17 2:02 pm Gloria <oprakitas...> Re: Nursing Homes For The Birds?
7/17/17 1:25 pm Lisa Wiesbauer <lakehaven58...> Re: Hummingbird Facts
7/17/17 1:12 pm Peggie Mitchell <jpmitchellp...> Re: Hummingbird Facts
7/17/17 1:06 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Nursing Homes For The Birds?
7/17/17 12:44 pm Ian Brandenburg <0000008b6032aab8-dmarc-request...> Re: Hummingbird Facts
7/13/17 6:33 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Ameerican Ornithological Society Checklist Changes
7/13/17 7:55 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Red Sough is the Top Oklahoma Bird Hot Spots
7/13/17 7:33 am Tal Roberts <talrob2...> Re: Red Sough is the Top Oklahoma Bird Hot Spots
7/12/17 1:46 pm Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...> FW: [New post] Support Birders and Bird Conservation – Buy Your 2017 Duck Stamp Through the ABA
7/12/17 8:24 am Lewis Pond <breaker57...> Osprey in Sand Springs
7/11/17 5:24 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - July 11
7/9/17 2:31 pm Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn...> Re: New Red Slough Photos
7/9/17 1:47 pm David Arbour <arbour...> New Red Slough Photos
7/1/17 2:37 pm Patricia Velte <pvelte...> July Migration Report
7/1/17 12:04 pm Linda Adams <000000853e24127e-dmarc-request...> Re: white-wings
7/1/17 11:43 am Hollis Price <hollis...> Re: Bewick's wren
7/1/17 11:21 am Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...> Re: Bewick's wren
7/1/17 11:13 am Foundation Subscriber <drhal2...> Re: white-wings
7/1/17 11:04 am Paul Ribitzki <lribitzki...> white-wings
7/1/17 11:01 am harold Yocum <drhal2...> Re: Bewick's wren
7/1/17 10:57 am Hollis Price <hollis...> Re: Bewick's wren
7/1/17 9:14 am blaval <blaval...> Re: Bewick's wren
7/1/17 8:11 am Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...> Bewick's wren
6/30/17 7:07 am Poland, Zachary <zpoland...> Comanche Co. Wood Stork and White Ibis
6/29/17 7:39 pm Jim Jorgensen <hpah...> Re: test email/no birds
6/29/17 7:39 pm Jim Jorgensen <hpah...> Re: test email/no birds
6/29/17 8:28 am Terry Mitchell <terry...> Re: test email/no birds
6/29/17 8:26 am Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...> test email/no birds
6/28/17 6:57 pm Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...> Hackberry Flat today
6/27/17 8:02 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - June 27
6/27/17 9:09 am Jim Arterburn <JIMARTERBURN...> Baltimore and Orchard Oriole Photos
6/26/17 7:16 pm Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...> Re: New Red Slough photos
6/26/17 7:05 am Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...> Re: Wood Thrush
 
Back to top
Date: 7/24/17 8:20 pm
From: harold Yocum <drhal2...>
Subject: Re: "Is There Dusting At Your House?" June 7, 1990

My life bird vesper sparrow was dusting near one of the many feeders at Mitch Park back 10 years ago .

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 24, 2017, at 8:34 PM, Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...> wrote:
>
> I have tilled up several areas in both our front and back yards here in Midwest City. Almost every species of bird that visits our yard invariably will
> take a dust bath from time to time. We have a flock of 5-6 young Turkeys who visit the yard regularly. They have wallowed large holes in a few
> areas with their dust bathing.
>
> Jimmy Woodard
> Midwest City, OK
>
> From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
> Sent: Monday, July 24, 2017 12:01 PM
> To: <OKBIRDS...>
> Subject: [OKBIRDS] "Is There Dusting At Your House?" June 7, 1990
>
> Twenty seven years ago I wrote a paper dealing with bird dusting. Every day I observe my brown thrashers, Carolina wrens, Eastern Bluebirds, rabbits, chipmunks, squirrels, and other dusting in my back yard. I thought it might be time to send out a reminder of this need for birds that some of you may not have available in your yard. For the birds, get it done.
>
> Is There Dusting At Your House?
> Is there dusting going on at your house? No, I am not checking to see what kind of house keeper you are and if you have been running around with a rag and a can of Pledge or Endust.
> What I am asking is, do you have a place in your yard for the birds to do their dusting, sun bathing, and anting? We are not meeting our bird’s needs just by providing nest boxes, feeders and water. Dusting is important to help remove external parasites, dry feathers, and help realign feather barbs and barbules. And anting has been observed in over 250 species of birds and is said to rid or reduce bird external parasites and possible soothe skin irritations. You may have observed birds sun bathing by spreading their tail and wing feathers. This can also help drive out external parasites and increase body temperature.
> It is insightful for me to watch various resident and migratory birds going through the dusting and sun bathing behavior. I have even had a family of eastern cottontail rabbits and several species of lizards come on an almost daily basis to stretch out in the hot sand for maybe some of the same reasons.
> If you do not already have a dusting and sun bathing area for your birds, it may be time for you to consider it.
> Go into that beautiful green monoculture lawn that you have worked so hard to weed, feed, water, and mow. Select an area close to your bird bath(s) and / or feeders, where the birds are already coming. Pulverize the area to about a foot deep so that it looks similar to a horseshoe pitching trap; a size 4 feet by 4 feet square is a start. If you are lucky enough to already have sandy soil that is a plus. If not, you may need to dig out the fertile soil that you have cultivated so long, and replace it with fine white sand. The smaller the sand particles and the higher the reflective value, the better it will be for dusting and sun bathing. The sand is droughty enough to discourage grass and weeds, but if you need to retard grass encroachment, you can put a border around it and put a plant barrier like plastic or tar paper under it. If you do not have a natural source of sand, you can obtain mortar sand from a ready-mix company or use the play sand sold at home supply or landscape retailers. The finer the grain size the better it will be for dusting and the whiter it is the better for sun bathing and heat radiation.
> Once this is in place, sit back and enjoy the insight that you can gain from yet another element of the bird’s world and other wildlife use may be an extra bonus.
> Jerry W. Davis
> Certified Wildlife Biologist
> June 7, 1990
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/17 5:34 pm
From: Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...>
Subject: Re: "Is There Dusting At Your House?" June 7, 1990
I have tilled up several areas in both our front and back yards here in Midwest City. Almost every species of bird that visits our yard invariably will

take a dust bath from time to time. We have a flock of 5-6 young Turkeys who visit the yard regularly. They have wallowed large holes in a few

areas with their dust bathing.



Jimmy Woodard

Midwest City, OK



From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Monday, July 24, 2017 12:01 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] "Is There Dusting At Your House?" June 7, 1990



Twenty seven years ago I wrote a paper dealing with bird dusting. Every day I observe my brown thrashers, Carolina wrens, Eastern Bluebirds, rabbits, chipmunks, squirrels, and other dusting in my back yard. I thought it might be time to send out a reminder of this need for birds that some of you may not have available in your yard. For the birds, get it done.



Is There Dusting At Your House?

Is there dusting going on at your house? No, I am not checking to see what kind of house keeper you are and if you have been running around with a rag and a can of Pledge or Endust.

What I am asking is, do you have a place in your yard for the birds to do their dusting, sun bathing, and anting? We are not meeting our bird’s needs just by providing nest boxes, feeders and water. Dusting is important to help remove external parasites, dry feathers, and help realign feather barbs and barbules. And anting has been observed in over 250 species of birds and is said to rid or reduce bird external parasites and possible soothe skin irritations. You may have observed birds sun bathing by spreading their tail and wing feathers. This can also help drive out external parasites and increase body temperature.

It is insightful for me to watch various resident and migratory birds going through the dusting and sun bathing behavior. I have even had a family of eastern cottontail rabbits and several species of lizards come on an almost daily basis to stretch out in the hot sand for maybe some of the same reasons.

If you do not already have a dusting and sun bathing area for your birds, it may be time for you to consider it.

Go into that beautiful green monoculture lawn that you have worked so hard to weed, feed, water, and mow. Select an area close to your bird bath(s) and / or feeders, where the birds are already coming. Pulverize the area to about a foot deep so that it looks similar to a horseshoe pitching trap; a size 4 feet by 4 feet square is a start. If you are lucky enough to already have sandy soil that is a plus. If not, you may need to dig out the fertile soil that you have cultivated so long, and replace it with fine white sand. The smaller the sand particles and the higher the reflective value, the better it will be for dusting and sun bathing. The sand is droughty enough to discourage grass and weeds, but if you need to retard grass encroachment, you can put a border around it and put a plant barrier like plastic or tar paper under it. If you do not have a natural source of sand, you can obtain mortar sand from a ready-mix company or use the play sand sold at home supply or landscape retailers. The finer the grain size the better it will be for dusting and the whiter it is the better for sun bathing and heat radiation.

Once this is in place, sit back and enjoy the insight that you can gain from yet another element of the bird’s world and other wildlife use may be an extra bonus.

Jerry W. Davis

Certified Wildlife Biologist

June 7, 1990




 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/17 10:32 am
From: Susanne Lutze <eztuls46...>
Subject: Re: A Tufted Titmouse Observation
Fascinating!!!!

On Mon, Jul 24, 2017 at 11:33 AM Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...> wrote:

> if that behavior hasn’t already been described in the literature, it
> sounds like it might be worth a quick note in one of the various state
> “Academy of Science” type journals, or maybe Journal of Field Ornithology
>
>
>
> *From:* okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] *On Behalf Of *Jerry Davis
> *Sent:* Monday, July 24, 2017 11:18 AM
> *To:* <OKBIRDS...>
> *Subject:* A Tufted Titmouse Observation
>
>
>
>
>
> We have at least 6 Tufted Titmice that are daily visitors to our window
> sills, gutters and door ways and black oil sunflower and suet feeders.
> Yesterday at 5:40 PM I noticed a titmouse fly into one of my Yaupon bushes
> viewed through our back window. It had something white in its beak. After
> hopping to several limbs it settled on one where it snags it on a limb it
> was perched on and proceeded to pull and tear at the object. I watched for
> several minutes but could not determine what it was doing even with
> binoculars from 20 feet away. When the titmouse flew away I went out to
> inspect the white object still on the limb. It was a silk spider case that
> a spider had encapsulated a caught insect. The titmouse had apparently
> harvested it from one of the spider webs or caches and knew how to proceed
> to attach it to a gnarly limb and continue to open and eat the contents.
>
>
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
>
> Hot Springs, AR
>
--
" There is a pleasure in the pathless woods;
There is rapture on the lonely shore;
There is society, where none intrudes,
By the deep sea, and music in its roar:
I love not man the less, but Nature more...."

Lord Byron

 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/17 9:33 am
From: Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...>
Subject: Re: A Tufted Titmouse Observation
if that behavior hasn't already been described in the literature, it sounds like it might be worth a quick note in one of the various state "Academy of Science" type journals, or maybe Journal of Field Ornithology

From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Monday, July 24, 2017 11:18 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: A Tufted Titmouse Observation


We have at least 6 Tufted Titmice that are daily visitors to our window sills, gutters and door ways and black oil sunflower and suet feeders. Yesterday at 5:40 PM I noticed a titmouse fly into one of my Yaupon bushes viewed through our back window. It had something white in its beak. After hopping to several limbs it settled on one where it snags it on a limb it was perched on and proceeded to pull and tear at the object. I watched for several minutes but could not determine what it was doing even with binoculars from 20 feet away. When the titmouse flew away I went out to inspect the white object still on the limb. It was a silk spider case that a spider had encapsulated a caught insect. The titmouse had apparently harvested it from one of the spider webs or caches and knew how to proceed to attach it to a gnarly limb and continue to open and eat the contents.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/17 2:02 pm
From: Gloria <oprakitas...>
Subject: Re: Nursing Homes For The Birds?
PLEASE TAKE ME OFF THE MAILING LIST. I AM JUST TOO OLD TO CHECK MY COMPUTER MESSAGES. THANK YOU. GLORIA



From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Monday, July 17, 2017 3:06 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Nursing Homes For The Birds?



In 1989 I provided bird feeder information to the Galaxy Manor Nursing Center in Cleveland, TX At that time I was a Wildlife Biologist for the Sam Houston National Forest. When I transferred to Hot Springs in 1990, the Garland County Audubon supported such an idea for nursing homes in Hot Springs.



Many people in Nursing homes are birders that are deprived of the opportunity to enjoy and watch birds and the highlight of the day is looking forward to the next meal. The placement of bird feeders where they can watch birds and those still capable enough to fill the feeders, feed birds, adds interest, excitement, and purpose to their daily lives. Adding a bird field guide for their reference also provide interest and develops new bird enthusiast.



This was not a new concept but one that had been used in Missouri and Connecticut in the early 1980’s as part of their wildlife program. The unfortunate people in nursing homes are still alive and birds and bird feeders could add interest, purpose, and something to look forward to and talk about. Some of you with the opportunity and interest might help to expand and implement this idea to enhance life where your friends and family are staying..



Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs, AR


 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/17 1:25 pm
From: Lisa Wiesbauer <lakehaven58...>
Subject: Re: Hummingbird Facts
Loved it; thanks!

On Mon, Jul 17, 2017 at 15:12 Peggie Mitchell <jpmitchellp...> wrote:

> Thank you.😊 Totally enjoyed film. The one following it was also
> outstanding.
> Jerry and Peggie Mitchell
>
> On Jul 17, 2017 2:45 PM, "Ian Brandenburg" <
> <0000008b6032aab8-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
>> Thank you for sharing, I loved that video!
>>
>> On Mon, Jul 17, 2017 at 9:37 AM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> I think that even the most savvy birder can learn something from this
>>> video.
>>>
>>> https://biggeekdad.com/2017/07/hummingbird-facts/
>>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__biggeekdad.com_2017_07_hummingbird-2Dfacts_&d=DwMFAw&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=i1jBjJRWpyaPn-xXWxCt0aZokLlsCUyLpXaK15zaT-o&s=4unU6_12zJPpS1pj0xy7i2f-zlah1YOx3JUG8ZAiJOA&e=>
>>>
>>> Jerry Wayne Davis
>>> Hot Springs
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>> --
>> - Sincerely, Ian Brandenburg
>>
>> "Yesterday is history,
>> tomorrow is a mystery,
>> but today is a gift.
>> That is why it is called the present."
>> - Master Oogway
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/17 1:12 pm
From: Peggie Mitchell <jpmitchellp...>
Subject: Re: Hummingbird Facts
Thank you.😊 Totally enjoyed film. The one following it was also
outstanding.
Jerry and Peggie Mitchell

On Jul 17, 2017 2:45 PM, "Ian Brandenburg" <
<0000008b6032aab8-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Thank you for sharing, I loved that video!
>
> On Mon, Jul 17, 2017 at 9:37 AM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:
>
>> I think that even the most savvy birder can learn something from this
>> video.
>>
>> https://biggeekdad.com/2017/07/hummingbird-facts/
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__biggeekdad.com_2017_07_hummingbird-2Dfacts_&d=DwMFAw&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=i1jBjJRWpyaPn-xXWxCt0aZokLlsCUyLpXaK15zaT-o&s=4unU6_12zJPpS1pj0xy7i2f-zlah1YOx3JUG8ZAiJOA&e=>
>>
>> Jerry Wayne Davis
>> Hot Springs
>>
>>
>>
>>
> --
> - Sincerely, Ian Brandenburg
>
> "Yesterday is history,
> tomorrow is a mystery,
> but today is a gift.
> That is why it is called the present."
> - Master Oogway
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/17 1:06 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Nursing Homes For The Birds?
In 1989 I provided bird feeder information to the Galaxy Manor Nursing Center in Cleveland, TX At that time I was a Wildlife Biologist for the Sam Houston National Forest. When I transferred to Hot Springs in 1990, the Garland County Audubon supported such an idea for nursing homes in Hot Springs.

Many people in Nursing homes are birders that are deprived of the opportunity to enjoy and watch birds and the highlight of the day is looking forward to the next meal. The placement of bird feeders where they can watch birds and those still capable enough to fill the feeders, feed birds, adds interest, excitement, and purpose to their daily lives. Adding a bird field guide for their reference also provide interest and develops new bird enthusiast.

This was not a new concept but one that had been used in Missouri and Connecticut in the early 1980’s as part of their wildlife program. The unfortunate people in nursing homes are still alive and birds and bird feeders could add interest, purpose, and something to look forward to and talk about. Some of you with the opportunity and interest might help to expand and implement this idea to enhance life where your friends and family are staying..

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR
 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/17 12:44 pm
From: Ian Brandenburg <0000008b6032aab8-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Hummingbird Facts
Thank you for sharing, I loved that video!

On Mon, Jul 17, 2017 at 9:37 AM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

> I think that even the most savvy birder can learn something from this
> video.
>
> https://biggeekdad.com/2017/07/hummingbird-facts/
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__biggeekdad.com_2017_07_hummingbird-2Dfacts_&d=DwMFAw&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=i1jBjJRWpyaPn-xXWxCt0aZokLlsCUyLpXaK15zaT-o&s=4unU6_12zJPpS1pj0xy7i2f-zlah1YOx3JUG8ZAiJOA&e=>
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs
>
>
>
>
--
- Sincerely, Ian Brandenburg

"Yesterday is history,
tomorrow is a mystery,
but today is a gift.
That is why it is called the present."
- Master Oogway

 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/17 6:33 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Ameerican Ornithological Society Checklist Changes
The link to the AOS checklist changes is below.

http://blog.aba.org/2017/07/2017-aos-supplement.html

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/17 7:55 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Red Sough is the Top Oklahoma Bird Hot Spots
Thank you for your note. Robert Bastarache is the Wildlife Biologist for the Oklahoma Districts of the Ouachita National Forest and you are right, they and their work is underappreciated. I retired as Forest Wildlife Program Manager for the 1.8 million acre Ouachita National Forest in 2009. I know the dedication of Robert and Davis and how difficult it is every year to find the funds to continue work and surveys at Red Slough.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: Tal Roberts
Sent: Thursday, July 13, 2017 9:33 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Red Sough is the Top Oklahoma Bird Hot Spots

Hear, hear!



I do not know Mr. Bastarache, but I do know David and have long thought that his work at the Slough was, at best, underappreciated. Kudos to them both!



Tal Roberts

Dallas birder…and lover of the Slough





From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Thursday, July 13, 2017 8:58 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Red Sough is the Top Oklahoma Bird Hot Spots



Red Slough is the number one bird hot spot in the state of Oklahoma. This is documented by data collection and support by David Arbour and Robert Bastarache and funded by the Ouachita National Forest. The data collected are entered into the National ebird database by Dr. Dan Scheiman with Audubon Arkansas. Dan sees the significance of these data being in the ebird database.



For many that are not birders nor care about the documentation of bird habitat use by birds, this might go unnoticed. This however is significant and a highlight to the important work going on at the Red Slough Wildlife Management on the Ouachita National Forest and its significance to birds. Red Slough is also the site of the Red Slough Birding Festival that gets National attention and is attended by people from all over the United States and some Foreign countries.



Our birds are declining by four percent (4%) per year and 40% fewer birds are crossing the Gulf of Mexico than crossed just 10 years ago. Most people are either unaware or indifferent to this significant decline and the fact that our birds are fading out of existence. Those that watch and care about birds see this happening.



This needs to be a priority for a news release and get this information out to at least the Arkansas and Oklahoma newspapers. Red Slough is important and well known to people in almost all of the states and many foreign countries. Idabel and Broken Bow OK would be remiss if they do not see the value of this site to birds and their communities.



The link attached shows the ebird Hot Spot sites for Oklahoma and by clicking on Red Slough you can see these data that are entered there as well.





http://ebird.org/ebird/subnational1/US-OK/hotspots?yr=all&m=



Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs, AR



 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/17 7:33 am
From: Tal Roberts <talrob2...>
Subject: Re: Red Sough is the Top Oklahoma Bird Hot Spots
Hear, hear!



I do not know Mr. Bastarache, but I do know David and have long thought that
his work at the Slough was, at best, underappreciated. Kudos to them both!



Tal Roberts

Dallas birder.and lover of the Slough





From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Thursday, July 13, 2017 8:58 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Red Sough is the Top Oklahoma Bird Hot Spots



Red Slough is the number one bird hot spot in the state of Oklahoma. This is
documented by data collection and support by David Arbour and Robert
Bastarache and funded by the Ouachita National Forest. The data collected
are entered into the National ebird database by Dr. Dan Scheiman with
Audubon Arkansas. Dan sees the significance of these data being in the ebird
database.



For many that are not birders nor care about the documentation of bird
habitat use by birds, this might go unnoticed. This however is significant
and a highlight to the important work going on at the Red Slough Wildlife
Management on the Ouachita National Forest and its significance to birds.
Red Slough is also the site of the Red Slough Birding Festival that gets
National attention and is attended by people from all over the United States
and some Foreign countries.



Our birds are declining by four percent (4%) per year and 40% fewer birds
are crossing the Gulf of Mexico than crossed just 10 years ago. Most people
are either unaware or indifferent to this significant decline and the fact
that our birds are fading out of existence. Those that watch and care about
birds see this happening.



This needs to be a priority for a news release and get this information out
to at least the Arkansas and Oklahoma newspapers. Red Slough is important
and well known to people in almost all of the states and many foreign
countries. Idabel and Broken Bow OK would be remiss if they do not see the
value of this site to birds and their communities.



The link attached shows the ebird Hot Spot sites for Oklahoma and by
clicking on Red Slough you can see these data that are entered there as
well.






<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_subnati
onal1_US-2DOK_hotspots-3Fyr-3Dall-26m-3D&d=DwMFAw&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW
6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=ohtEL2rF
wdpnJ0yyWXVoM-4Ea8tvjHqwaKf1Nh3FWsE&s=kOKdirzdoTOT1UlWBxULF8pHLYgQm2GWhH_924
NT1cc&e=> http://ebird.org/ebird/subnational1/US-OK/hotspots?yr=all&m=



Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs, AR




 

Back to top
Date: 7/12/17 1:46 pm
From: Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...>
Subject: FW: [New post] Support Birders and Bird Conservation – Buy Your 2017 Duck Stamp Through the ABA
I would encourage all birders to consider supporting habitat conservation thru buying the Duck Stamp. I would also hope each of you would

purchase and Oklahoma Conservation Passport which gives you access to all the Wildlife Management Areas(WMA’s) in the state.



Jimmy Woodard

Midwest City, OK

OOS President 2017-18



From: ABA Blog [mailto:<donotreply...>]
Sent: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 7:30 AM
To: <j.woodard...>
Subject: [New post] Support Birders and Bird Conservation – Buy Your 2017 Duck Stamp Through the ABA




Nate Swick posted: "For the last few years, we at the ABA made the Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp, known far and wide as the Duck Stamp, available through our own store. We hoped this would give birders an opportunity to vote, as it were, for how they want the"









New post on ABA Blog

<http://s0.wp.com/i/emails/blavatar.png>






<http://blog.aba.org/?author=73>


<http://blog.aba.org/2017/07/support-birders-and-bird-conservation-buy-your-2017-duck-stamp-through-the-aba.html> Support Birders and Bird Conservation – Buy Your 2017 Duck Stamp Through the ABA


by <http://blog.aba.org/?author=73> Nate Swick

<http://blog.aba.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/Duck-stamp-2017-300x236.jpg> For the last few years, we at the ABA made the Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp, known far and wide as the Duck Stamp, <http://aba.org/stamp/> available through our own store. We hoped this would give birders an opportunity to vote, as it were, for how they want their voices to be heard as consumers of Wildlife Refuges in the US.

Last year, the ABA sold nearly 850 stamps, raising more than $21,000. This is money from birders that goes directly into the coffers of those who seek to make NWRs better places for wildlife. <http://aba.org/stamp/> And we’re doing it again in 2017.

This is not a fund-raiser for the ABA. We are not seeking to make any money doing this. We continue to promote the purchase of Duck Stamps through the ABA as an accounting of birders, in a way. Not just in numbers but in dollars and cents. And we know from countless members and friends that this is what birders want, too.

Duck Stamps officially went on sale earlier this month, and once again you can <http://aba.org/stamp/> purchase at our shop. Don’t just feel like you need to stop at one, either. Duck stamps make fantastic gifts for birders, young and old. You can use them as birthday or holiday gifts or bird clubs can sell them during their monthly meetings. Consider them for end-of-year appreciation gifts for bird club field trip leaders or awards for birders who go above and beyond. The possibilities are nearly endless.

We hope that you will help us. In doing so, you will not only help the birds that use National Wildlife Refuges, but we birders who care to have a voice about them.

<http://aba.org/stamp/> So purchase a Duck Stamp through the ABA. Be counted.



<http://blog.aba.org/?author=73> Nate Swick | July 12, 2017 at 8:00 am | Categories: <http://blog.aba.org/?taxonomy=category&term=aba-news> ABA News, <http://blog.aba.org/?taxonomy=category&term=action> Action, <http://blog.aba.org/?taxonomy=category&term=conservation> Conservation | URL: <http://wp.me/p4fXID-5AW> http://wp.me/p4fXID-5AW


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Back to top
Date: 7/12/17 8:24 am
From: Lewis Pond <breaker57...>
Subject: Osprey in Sand Springs
I had an Osprey fly right over me yesterday. I was in the parking lot of the BOK Sand Springs branch.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/17 5:24 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - July 11
Rob Sanders and I surveyed birds today at Red Slough and found 62 species.
It was mostly clear and hot with very little wind. Cattle Egrets have been
using the Anhinga rookery on Pintail lake as a night roost for a couple
months and there was about half a dozen Cattle Egrets that were actually
nesting there too. But today there was a large number of Cattle Egrets
carrying nesting material into the rookery. Don't know why they waited so
late to start nesting. I wonder if it has something to do with the big
flood event we had last week? Anhinga young are starting to fledge and
there are gallinule chicks (both species) all over the place. Water levels
are high in all our wetlands right now and this has pushed the White Ibis
out into neighboring cow pastures that are still partially flooded. All the
new fresh water has the Pied-billed Grebes all excited and yodeling. I
think they are going to try a second nesting. A lot of the Passerines have
stopped singing as its about that time of year. Buntings, chats, and
White-eyed Vireos still going strong. Here is our list for today:



Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 2

Wood Duck - 16

Pied-billed Grebe - 13

American White Pelican - 1

Neotropic Cormorant - 4

Anhinga - 49

Least Bittern - 2

Great-blue Heron - 5

Great Egret - 27

Snowy Egret - 3

Little-blue Heron - 9

Cattle Egret - 325

Green Heron - 8

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 2

White Ibis - 50

Black Vulture - 1

Turkey Vulture - 19

Mississippi Kite - 9

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 2

Purple Gallinule - 19

Common Gallinule - 32

American Coot - 5

Spotted Sandpiper - 1

Mourning Dove - 7

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 3

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 4

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Acadian Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 4

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 11

Bell's Vireo - 2

Red-eyed Vireo - 2

Blue Jay - 1

American Crow - 2

Fish Crow - 3

Purple Martin - 1

Tree Swallow - 10

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 2

Cliff Swallow - 1

Barn Swallow - 24

Carolina Chickadee - 3

Tufted Titmouse - 1

Carolina Wren - 7

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 2

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Yellow-throated Warbler - 2

Prothonotary Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 11

Yellow-breasted Chat - 9

Summer Tanager - 1

Eastern Towhee - 2

Northern Cardinal - 15

Indigo Bunting - 20

Painted Bunting - 14

Dickcissel - 9

Red-winged Blackbird - 18

Brown-headed Cowbird - 2

Orchard Oriole - 3





Odonates:





Swamp Darner

Regal Darner

Common Green Darner

Cyrano Darner

Royal River Cruiser

Prince Baskettail

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Roseate Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Eastern Amberwing

Hyacinth Glider - 2

Wandering Glider

Spot-winged Glider

Red Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags





Herps:



American Alligator

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Green Treefrog

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog





Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR










 

Back to top
Date: 7/9/17 2:31 pm
From: Jim Arterburn <jimarterburn...>
Subject: Re: New Red Slough Photos
David,

A very nice set of photos.

Jim

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 9, 2017, at 3:47 PM, David Arbour <arbour...> wrote:
>
> I just added a bunch of new photos to the Red Slough “Recent” photo gallery. Photos that were taken last week during a big flood event we had at Red Slough which really brought the birds and other wildlife out. To see pics click here: http://www.pbase.com/red_slough_wma/recent_photos .
>
> David Arbour
> De Queen, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 7/9/17 1:47 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: New Red Slough Photos
I just added a bunch of new photos to the Red Slough "Recent" photo gallery.
Photos that were taken last week during a big flood event we had at Red
Slough which really brought the birds and other wildlife out. To see pics
click here: http://www.pbase.com/red_slough_wma/recent_photos .



David Arbour

De Queen, AR


 

Back to top
Date: 7/1/17 2:37 pm
From: Patricia Velte <pvelte...>
Subject: July Migration Report
Dear OKBirders,



July brings the return of several shorebird species and the departure of
only one species. Both lists are included below.



ARRIVALS



Swainson's Hawk July 14 - SE

White-faced Ibis July 26 - SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Spotted Sandpiper July 4 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Solitary Sandpiper July 1 - ALL

Willet July 1 - ALL

Long-billed Curlew July 4 - NW, SW, C, SC

Marbled Godwit July 1 - PAN, NW, SW, C, SC, NE

Ruddy Turnstone July 26 - NW west to Alfalfa, Major and
Blaine Cos. Only, SW west to Washita, Kiowa and Tillman Cos. Only, C, SC,
NE, SE

Red Knot July 28 - NW rare in Alfalfa Co only,
C, NE

Stilt Sandpiper July 12 - ALL

Sanderling July 28 - ALL

American Avocet July 14 - C, SC, NE east to Nowata, Rogers,
Wagoner and Muskogee Cos. Only, SE east to Pittsburg, Atoka and McCurtain
Cos. Only

Snowy Plover July 19 - C, SC, NE

Piping Plover July 19 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE

Caspian Tern July 11- ALL

Forster's Tern July 10 - PAN, NW, SW

Baird's Sandpiper July 7 - ALL

Least Sandpiper July 1 - PAN

Buff-breasted Sandpiper July 26 - NW west to Woods, Woodward, Dewey and
Custer cos only, SW west to Washita, Kiowa and Tillman cos only, C, SC, NE,
SE

Pectoral Sandpiper July 9 - ALL

Semipalmated Sandpiper July 6 - ALL

Western Sandpiper July 6 - ALL

Short-billed Dowitcher July 1 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Long-billed Dowitcher July 10 - ALL

Wilson's Phalarope July 20 - SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Rufous Hummingbird July 22 - PAN, SW

Peregrine Falcon July 28 - ALL

Least Flycatcher July 15 - ALL

Bank Swallow July 27 - ALL

Sedge Wren July 25 - NE, SE

Yellow Warbler July 20 - SW and July 25 - SE

Yellow-headed Blackbird July 4 - PAN, NW, SW, C, SC, NE

Semipalmated Plover July 12 - ALL



DEPARTURES



Glossy Ibis July 28 - NW, SW, C, SE - Rare in
Alfalfa and Major Cos. Only in NW; Rare in Tillman Co. only in SW; Rare in
Kingfisher and Canadian Cos. Only in C; Rare in S. McCurtain Co only in SE





The information presented here comes from The Oklahoma Bird Records
Committee of the Oklahoma Ornithological Society, which publishes a Date
Guide to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma. This booklet divides Oklahoma
into 7 geographic regions, and lists the normal dates of occurrence for each
Oklahoma bird species within each region. Observers are urged to report
unusual species, or birds out of date or out of normal range in Oklahoma,
based on the information given in this publication.



The Oklahoma Ornithological Society and Oklahoma Bird Records Committee web
site, http://www.okbirds.org/, includes ordering information for the Date
Guide to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma, information on documenting
significant records, documentation forms, instructions, and a searchable
database for Oklahoma bird migration information. Birders are cordially
invited to join the Oklahoma Ornithological Society.



Happy birding!

Pat Velte

<pvelte...> <mailto:<pvelte...>

Oklahoma City, OK




 

Back to top
Date: 7/1/17 12:04 pm
From: Linda Adams <000000853e24127e-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: white-wings
I can share a few (or hundred) with you.  :)
Linda Adams

From: Paul Ribitzki <lribitzki...>
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Sent: Saturday, July 1, 2017 1:04 PM
Subject: [OKBIRDS] white-wings

#yiv0518991469 #yiv0518991469 -- _filtered #yiv0518991469 {panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4;} _filtered #yiv0518991469 {font-family:Calibri;panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;}#yiv0518991469 #yiv0518991469 p.yiv0518991469MsoNormal, #yiv0518991469 li.yiv0518991469MsoNormal, #yiv0518991469 div.yiv0518991469MsoNormal {margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:12.0pt;}#yiv0518991469 a:link, #yiv0518991469 span.yiv0518991469MsoHyperlink {color:blue;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv0518991469 a:visited, #yiv0518991469 span.yiv0518991469MsoHyperlinkFollowed {color:purple;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv0518991469 p {margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:12.0pt;}#yiv0518991469 span.yiv0518991469EmailStyle18 {color:#1F497D;}#yiv0518991469 .yiv0518991469MsoChpDefault {font-size:10.0pt;} _filtered #yiv0518991469 {margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}#yiv0518991469 div.yiv0518991469WordSection1 {}#yiv0518991469 Laurie looked out the kitchen window today and noticed our resident white-winged dove was on own sunflower seed hopper feeder instead of on the ground where it normally roams.  Shortly thereafter, a second white-wing joined it and then a third.  While I was watching those three another white-wing flew into the tree next to the feeder.  This was the first time there had been more than one present at any time.  Paul RLake Keystone area


 

Back to top
Date: 7/1/17 11:43 am
From: Hollis Price <hollis...>
Subject: Re: Bewick's wren
I also have both.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 1, 2017, at 1:01 PM, harold Yocum <drhal2...> wrote:
>
> I am lucky to have both Bewick's and Carolina wrens in my back yard in west Edmond. Hal Yocum
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Jul 1, 2017, at 12:57 PM, Hollis Price <hollis...> wrote:
>>
>> I have them regularly at our place NE of Jones. They nest in our wren houses.
>>
>> Hollis Price
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>> On Jul 1, 2017, at 11:13 AM, blaval <blaval...> wrote:
>>>
>>> I had one here in Leflore CO. 3 years ago in mid June. It stayed around a brush pile for about two weeks and then I didn't see it after that. I'm quite a bit east of you.
>>> Bob Laval
>>> Heavener
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPad.
>>>
>>>> On Jul 1, 2017, at 10:11 AM, Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> I'm not on e-bird, but for what it's worth, I just had a Bewick's wren on my porch in extreme western Tulsa Co. near the Keystone State Park. (36.148, -96.297).
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Have fun,
>>>>
>>>> Tom Curtis

 

Back to top
Date: 7/1/17 11:21 am
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...>
Subject: Re: Bewick's wren
That's about the only location in Tulsa county that I see them with any
regularity.

On Jul 1, 2017 10:11 AM, "Curtis, Tom" <tom.curtis...> wrote:

> I'm not on e-bird, but for what it's worth, I just had a Bewick's wren on
> my porch in extreme western Tulsa Co. near the Keystone State Park.
> (36.148, -96.297).
>
>
> Have fun,
>
> Tom Curtis
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/1/17 11:13 am
From: Foundation Subscriber <drhal2...>
Subject: Re: white-wings
HAD 1 IN MY BACKYARD THIS MORNING. THIS IS A RELATIVE RARE OCCURANCE HERE IN WEST EDMOND. HAL YOCUM
---- Paul Ribitzki <lribitzki...> wrote:
> Laurie looked out the kitchen window today and noticed our resident
> white-winged dove was on own sunflower seed hopper feeder instead of on the
> ground where it normally roams. Shortly thereafter, a second white-wing
> joined it and then a third. While I was watching those three another
> white-wing flew into the tree next to the feeder. This was the first time
> there had been more than one present at any time.
>
>
>
> Paul R
>
> Lake Keystone area
>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/1/17 11:04 am
From: Paul Ribitzki <lribitzki...>
Subject: white-wings
Laurie looked out the kitchen window today and noticed our resident
white-winged dove was on own sunflower seed hopper feeder instead of on the
ground where it normally roams. Shortly thereafter, a second white-wing
joined it and then a third. While I was watching those three another
white-wing flew into the tree next to the feeder. This was the first time
there had been more than one present at any time.



Paul R

Lake Keystone area


 

Back to top
Date: 7/1/17 11:01 am
From: harold Yocum <drhal2...>
Subject: Re: Bewick's wren
I am lucky to have both Bewick's and Carolina wrens in my back yard in west Edmond. Hal Yocum

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 1, 2017, at 12:57 PM, Hollis Price <hollis...> wrote:
>
> I have them regularly at our place NE of Jones. They nest in our wren houses.
>
> Hollis Price
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Jul 1, 2017, at 11:13 AM, blaval <blaval...> wrote:
>>
>> I had one here in Leflore CO. 3 years ago in mid June. It stayed around a brush pile for about two weeks and then I didn't see it after that. I'm quite a bit east of you.
>> Bob Laval
>> Heavener
>>
>> Sent from my iPad.
>>
>>> On Jul 1, 2017, at 10:11 AM, Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...> wrote:
>>>
>>> I'm not on e-bird, but for what it's worth, I just had a Bewick's wren on my porch in extreme western Tulsa Co. near the Keystone State Park. (36.148, -96.297).
>>>
>>>
>>> Have fun,
>>>
>>> Tom Curtis

 

Back to top
Date: 7/1/17 10:57 am
From: Hollis Price <hollis...>
Subject: Re: Bewick's wren
I have them regularly at our place NE of Jones. They nest in our wren houses.

Hollis Price

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 1, 2017, at 11:13 AM, blaval <blaval...> wrote:
>
> I had one here in Leflore CO. 3 years ago in mid June. It stayed around a brush pile for about two weeks and then I didn't see it after that. I'm quite a bit east of you.
> Bob Laval
> Heavener
>
> Sent from my iPad.
>
>> On Jul 1, 2017, at 10:11 AM, Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...> wrote:
>>
>> I'm not on e-bird, but for what it's worth, I just had a Bewick's wren on my porch in extreme western Tulsa Co. near the Keystone State Park. (36.148, -96.297).
>>
>>
>> Have fun,
>>
>> Tom Curtis

 

Back to top
Date: 7/1/17 9:14 am
From: blaval <blaval...>
Subject: Re: Bewick's wren
I had one here in Leflore CO. 3 years ago in mid June. It stayed around a brush pile for about two weeks and then I didn't see it after that. I'm quite a bit east of you.
Bob Laval
Heavener

Sent from my iPad.

> On Jul 1, 2017, at 10:11 AM, Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...> wrote:
>
> I'm not on e-bird, but for what it's worth, I just had a Bewick's wren on my porch in extreme western Tulsa Co. near the Keystone State Park. (36.148, -96.297).
>
>
> Have fun,
>
> Tom Curtis

 

Back to top
Date: 7/1/17 8:11 am
From: Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...>
Subject: Bewick's wren
I'm not on e-bird, but for what it's worth, I just had a Bewick's wren on my porch in extreme western Tulsa Co. near the Keystone State Park. (36.148, -96.297).


Have fun,

Tom Curtis

 

Back to top
Date: 6/30/17 7:07 am
From: Poland, Zachary <zpoland...>
Subject: Comanche Co. Wood Stork and White Ibis
The Comanche Co. (Tony Creek) Wood Stork continues. Also an immature White Ibis was observed in the same location today.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37882552

ZAP

Sent from my mobile device.
 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/17 7:39 pm
From: Jim Jorgensen <hpah...>
Subject: Re: test email/no birds
!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 29, 2017, at 10:28 AM, Terry Mitchell <terry...> wrote:
>
> We are trying to get rid of the unsavory elements here. Welcome Back.
>
> Terry Mitchell
> From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Jimmy Woodard
> Sent: Thursday, June 29, 2017 10:16 AM
> To: <OKBIRDS...>
> Subject: test email/no birds
>
> This is a test email to see if it will show up on the listserve. I was booted off recently. Sorry. Thanks for your patience.
>
> Jimmy Woodard
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/17 7:39 pm
From: Jim Jorgensen <hpah...>
Subject: Re: test email/no birds
!


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 29, 2017, at 10:16 AM, Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...> wrote:
>
> This is a test email to see if it will show up on the listserve. I was booted off recently. Sorry. Thanks for your patience.
>
> Jimmy Woodard
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/17 8:28 am
From: Terry Mitchell <terry...>
Subject: Re: test email/no birds
We are trying to get rid of the unsavory elements here. Welcome Back.



Terry Mitchell

*From:* okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] *On Behalf Of *Jimmy Woodard
*Sent:* Thursday, June 29, 2017 10:16 AM
*To:* <OKBIRDS...>
*Subject:* test email/no birds



This is a test email to see if it will show up on the
listserve. I was booted off recently. Sorry. Thanks for your patience.



Jimmy Woodard

 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/17 8:26 am
From: Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...>
Subject: test email/no birds
This is a test email to see if it will show up on the
listserve. I was booted off recently. Sorry. Thanks for your patience.



Jimmy Woodard




 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/17 6:57 pm
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...>
Subject: Hackberry Flat today
Folks;

The water in the units and the ditches is gone with just a very few
exceptions. Did not find the Common Gallinule (again) but was
surprised to hear a Yellow-billed Cuckoo near the reservoir in those
clumps of trees. There were two Blue Grosbeaks in the same area.

Matt Jung, OKC
 

Back to top
Date: 6/27/17 8:02 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 27


Rob Sanders (OK) and I surveyed birds today at Red Slough and found 65
species. It was partly cloudy and warm. Here is our list for today:



Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 5

Wood Duck - 13

Mallard - 3

Pied-billed Grebe - 3

American White Pelican - 1

Neotropic Cormorant - 14

Anhinga - 34

Great-blue Heron - 9

Great Egret - 25

Snowy Egret - 46

Little-blue Heron - 28

Cattle Egret - 144

Green Heron - 14

White Ibis - 36

Black Vulture - 105

Turkey Vulture - 24

Mississippi Kite - 10

Red-tailed Hawk - 3

Purple Gallinule - 20 (also one on a nest & a brood of 3 chicks)

Common Gallinule - 29 (a couple broods of chicks also.)

American Coot - 6

Least Tern - 2

Mourning Dove - 9

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 6

Barred Owl - 1

Chimney Swift - 1

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 2

Acadian Flycatcher - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 3

Eastern Kingbird - 2

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2

White-eyed Vireo - 12

Bell's Vireo - 1

Yellow-throated Vireo - 1

Red-eyed Vireo - 3

American Crow - 1

Fish Crow - 6

Tree Swallow - 16

Cliff Swallow - 6

Barn Swallow - 55

Carolina Chickadee - 6

Tufted Titmouse - 2

Carolina Wren - 14

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 6

Eastern Bluebird - 3

Northern Mockingbird - 2

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Pine Warbler - 1

Black-and-white Warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 6

Common Yellowthroat - 16

Yellow-breasted Chat - 11

Summer Tanager - 3

Eastern Towhee - 3

Northern Cardinal - 25

Blue Grosbeak - 1

Indigo Bunting - 32

Painted Bunting - 13

Dickcissel - 17

Red-winged Blackbird - 28

Common Grackle - 4

Brown-headed Cowbird - 4

Orchard Oriole - 6





Odonates:





Fragile Forktail

Swamp Darner

Regal Darner

Prince Baskettail

Stillwater Clubtail

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Golden-winged Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Eastern Amberwing

Blue Dasher

Wandering Glider

Spot-winged Glider

Black Saddlebags





Herps:



American Alligator

Broad-banded Watersnake

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Southern Leopard Frog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog







Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR






 

Back to top
Date: 6/27/17 9:09 am
From: Jim Arterburn <JIMARTERBURN...>
Subject: Baltimore and Orchard Oriole Photos
OKBirds,

&lt;meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0; URL=/?_fb_noscript=1" /&gt;
Here are a few photos of several different Baltimore Orioles and a
Orchard Oriole from Rogers County on May 13, 2017.

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds

Cheers,

Jim Arterburn

 

Back to top
Date: 6/26/17 7:16 pm
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...>
Subject: Re: New Red Slough photos
Great photos. Really enjoyed the Golden Eagle by Ford Hendershot! Matt


On 6/25/17, David Arbour <arbour...> wrote:
> I've added a bunch of new photos to the Red Slough "Recent Photos" gallery.
> Photos of Wood Stork, Roseate Spoonbill, Tricolored Heron, Anhinga,
> Neotropic Cormorants, pelicans, etc. See:
> http://www.pbase.com/red_slough_wma/recent_photos
>
>
>
> Enjoy!
>
>
>
> David Arbour
>
> De Queen, AR
>
>
 

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Date: 6/26/17 7:05 am
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...>
Subject: Re: Wood Thrush
On Saturday, June 24, I heard a Wood Thrush at Osage Hills State Park.

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK

On Tue, Jun 20, 2017 at 4:22 PM, Jo <jo.loyd...> wrote:

> The Tulsa birders heard a Wood Thrush singing this morning north of West
> 71 St. S. on South 61 St. West. We were unable to see the bird as it was
> in very dense woods. We considered this well west of it normal range in
> eastern Oklahoma.
>
>
>
> Jo Loyd
>

 

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