OKbirds
Received From Subject
1/18/21 11:06 am Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...> Re: Bald Eagle on the nest--Tulsa
1/18/21 7:17 am Brett Niland <bestguess...> Re: Bald Eagle on the nest--Tulsa
1/18/21 7:02 am John Sterling <prairie...> Re: Bald Eagle on the nest--Tulsa
1/18/21 6:53 am Cyndie Browning <gr8auntieokie...> Bald Eagle on the nest--Tulsa
1/17/21 10:06 am Scott Loss <scottrloss...> Tulsa Gathering Place - Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
1/14/21 10:55 am Braden Farris <000000ce876b119d-dmarc-request...> Mountain Bluebirds near south Douglas, Draper lake area Okc
1/13/21 7:10 pm Harold yocum <drhal2...> Re: Finches
1/13/21 3:08 pm Paul Ribitzki <lribitzki...> Re: Finches
1/13/21 2:46 pm Harold yocum <drhal2...> Re: Lake Hefner and Overholser
1/13/21 2:25 pm Doug Wood <DWood...> Re: Lake Hefner and Overholser
1/13/21 2:07 pm Jacob Crissup <jcrissup...> Re: Lake Hefner and Overholser
1/13/21 1:38 pm Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...> Re: Lake Hefner and Overholser
1/13/21 12:26 pm Doug Wood <DWood...> Lake Hefner and Overholser
1/13/21 7:44 am Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...> Re: Finches
1/13/21 7:05 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Fwd: Finches
1/12/21 8:21 pm Harold yocum <drhal2...> Eagles back at north Yukon parkway
1/12/21 6:47 pm Harold yocum <drhal2...> Bald Eagles on the next again
1/12/21 8:13 am JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski...> Re: Caracara in Atoka Co
1/11/21 2:38 pm JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski...> Re: Caracara in Atoka Co
1/11/21 11:00 am Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...> November/December Photos
1/10/21 6:57 am Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...> OKC Lakes on 1-9-2021
1/6/21 12:12 pm Ron Huebner <feralbirder...> Feral Birder Virtual Birding Calendar
1/5/21 11:12 am James Hubbell <hubmutt...> Pelicans
1/3/21 5:01 pm John Sterling <prairie...> Re: Cactus Wren (not Oklahoma)
1/3/21 4:48 pm Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...> Lake Yahola and Oxley North Woods on 1-3-2021
1/3/21 4:39 pm Larry Mays <larrymays1949...> Re: Cactus Wren (not Oklahoma)
1/3/21 6:55 am Larry Mays <larrymays1949...> Re: Cactus Wren (not Oklahoma)
1/3/21 6:33 am Zach Poland <zachapoland...> Cactus Wren (not Oklahoma)
1/2/21 2:59 pm Landon Neumann <landonneumann25...> Lewis’s Woodpecker - Witchita Mts
1/1/21 4:00 pm Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...> Re: Phoebe
1/1/21 3:47 pm Alton Patton <adewittpatton...> Sequoyah NWP
1/1/21 2:40 pm Richrd Gunn <richardgunn1940...> Re: Phoebe
1/1/21 2:27 pm Feldt, Andrew <Andrew.Feldt...> Re: Phoebe
1/1/21 2:26 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Phoebe
1/1/21 2:22 pm Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...> Phoebe
1/1/21 7:32 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Sequoyah NWR
12/29/20 8:49 pm <jrwinner...> Re: FW: eBird Report - Wagoner County, OK, US, Dec 28, 2020
12/29/20 2:26 pm Brent Barnes <00000113f4c02191-dmarc-request...> Tall Grass Prairie
12/29/20 10:47 am Jeanine Lackey <jeanine.dinan...> Lesser Goldfinch
12/29/20 9:14 am John Kennington <johnkennington...> Re: Nest Cam Hardware?
12/29/20 9:10 am Jeff Cox <jeffacox54...> Re: Nest Cam Hardware?
12/29/20 9:05 am Jim Deming <birdbrain.jim...> Re: Nest Cam Hardware?
12/29/20 8:38 am John Kennington <johnkennington...> Nest Cam Hardware?
12/29/20 7:39 am Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...> FW: eBird Report - Wagoner County, OK, US, Dec 28, 2020
12/29/20 7:03 am Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...> Black Vultures/Midwest City
12/28/20 8:34 pm Marta B. Harris <harrismarta8...> Re: Feeder Watch
12/28/20 7:23 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough today
12/26/20 7:03 pm HAROLD YOCUM <drhal2...> Re: Swan at Overholser Lake OKC
12/26/20 5:14 pm John Sterling <prairie...> Re: Swan at Overholser Lake OKC
12/26/20 4:45 pm Harold yocum <drhal2...> Re: Swan at Overholser Lake OKC
12/26/20 4:11 pm Juliette Hulen <00000056647f7088-dmarc-request...> Swan at Overholser Lake OKC
12/26/20 3:50 pm Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...> Feeder Watch
12/23/20 8:11 pm Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...> BC Night0Herins
12/23/20 2:56 pm Jim Arterburn <JIMARTERBURN...> Re: Recent Photos
12/23/20 2:51 pm Jim Arterburn <JIMARTERBURN...> Recent Photos
12/22/20 6:08 pm Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...> Lake Hefner Today
12/22/20 10:25 am Landon Neumann <landonneumann25...> Pacific Loon, Long-tailed Duck, Surf Scoters
 
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Date: 1/18/21 11:06 am
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...>
Subject: Re: Bald Eagle on the nest--Tulsa
Cindy---Mary and I drove by Sooner Lake on Saturday. I was wondering what the status for birders is on the north and west sides of Sooner Lake--Mark Peterson Bartlesville

________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Cyndie Browning <gr8auntieokie...>
Sent: Monday, January 18, 2021 8:50 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...> <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Bald Eagle on the nest--Tulsa

Hello, Oklahoma ~

I drive up and down Riverside Avenue everyday on my way to and from work, and for the past week, I've noticed the big white head of an adult Bald Eagle in the trees at the northwest corner of the junction of Riverside and I-44, on the north side of the I-44 bridge over the River, near where Skelly dumps into Riverside Ave. The nest doesn't look big enough to attract eagles and I've never seen a Bald Eagle nesting in those trees (and I've been living here for 20 years!!), but there's no doubt that's an eagle's white head popped up above the edge of the nest. Have you seen it??

Cyndie Browning
<vermilion_flycatcher...><mailto:<vermilion_flycatcher...>
http://www.adimview.com/Tulsa_Birds_Firebird.html<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?<u...>&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=-zMMKEaV3apACRUAMzJgRuotQ__mFF5FzbgkwHu61Ho&s=kDMoRtd_6ssi1DXbEaL-keO-gArBtGVExf_2IZ5BiVg&e=>
Tulsa, OK

How do migrating birds know which one to follow?
What if the lead bird just wants to be alone?
-- Bill Bryson, "The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid: A Memoir" (2006)


 

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Date: 1/18/21 7:17 am
From: Brett Niland <bestguess...>
Subject: Re: Bald Eagle on the nest--Tulsa
I’ll keep an eye out. Thanks for the tip.

There is a nest that has produced offspring the last several years at highway 75 and the Creek turnpike. Northwest corner of the exchange. You can’t miss it.

Thank You,

Brett Niland
Cell: (918) 200-1818

On Jan 18, 2021, at 8:51 AM, Cyndie Browning <gr8auntieokie...> wrote:


Hello, Oklahoma ~

I drive up and down Riverside Avenue everyday on my way to and from work, and for the past week, I've noticed the big white head of an adult Bald Eagle in the trees at the northwest corner of the junction of Riverside and I-44, on the north side of the I-44 bridge over the River, near where Skelly dumps into Riverside Ave. The nest doesn't look big enough to attract eagles and I've never seen a Bald Eagle nesting in those trees (and I've been living here for 20 years!!), but there's no doubt that's an eagle's white head popped up above the edge of the nest. Have you seen it??

Cyndie Browning
<vermilion_flycatcher...><mailto:<vermilion_flycatcher...>
http://www.adimview.com/Tulsa_Birds_Firebird.html<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?<u...>&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=-zMMKEaV3apACRUAMzJgRuotQ__mFF5FzbgkwHu61Ho&s=kDMoRtd_6ssi1DXbEaL-keO-gArBtGVExf_2IZ5BiVg&e=>
Tulsa, OK

How do migrating birds know which one to follow?
What if the lead bird just wants to be alone?
-- Bill Bryson, "The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid: A Memoir" (2006)

 

Back to top
Date: 1/18/21 7:02 am
From: John Sterling <prairie...>
Subject: Re: Bald Eagle on the nest--Tulsa
Great to hear from you!

Sent from my iPad

> On Jan 18, 2021, at 8:50 AM, Cyndie Browning <gr8auntieokie...> wrote:
>
> Hello, Oklahoma ~
>
> I drive up and down Riverside Avenue everyday on my way to and from work, and for the past week, I've noticed the big white head of an adult Bald Eagle in the trees at the northwest corner of the junction of Riverside and I-44, on the north side of the I-44 bridge over the River, near where Skelly dumps into Riverside Ave. The nest doesn't look big enough to attract eagles and I've never seen a Bald Eagle nesting in those trees (and I've been living here for 20 years!!), but there's no doubt that's an eagle's white head popped up above the edge of the nest. Have you seen it??
>
> Cyndie Browning
> <vermilion_flycatcher...>
> http://www.adimview.com/Tulsa_Birds_Firebird.html
> Tulsa, OK
>
> How do migrating birds know which one to follow?
> What if the lead bird just wants to be alone?
> -- Bill Bryson, "The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid: A Memoir" (2006)
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/18/21 6:53 am
From: Cyndie Browning <gr8auntieokie...>
Subject: Bald Eagle on the nest--Tulsa
Hello, Oklahoma ~

I drive up and down Riverside Avenue everyday on my way to and from work,
and for the past week, I've noticed the big white head of an adult Bald
Eagle in the trees at the northwest corner of the junction of Riverside and
I-44, on the north side of the I-44 bridge over the River, near where
Skelly dumps into Riverside Ave. The nest doesn't look big enough to
attract eagles and I've never seen a Bald Eagle nesting in those trees (and
I've been living here for 20 years!!), but there's no doubt that's an
eagle's white head popped up above the edge of the nest. Have you seen it??

Cyndie Browning
<vermilion_flycatcher...>
http://www.adimview.com/Tulsa_Birds_Firebird.html
Tulsa, OK

How do migrating birds know which one to follow?
What if the lead bird just wants to be alone?
-- Bill Bryson, "The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid: A Memoir" (2006)

 

Back to top
Date: 1/17/21 10:06 am
From: Scott Loss <scottrloss...>
Subject: Tulsa Gathering Place - Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
I just found a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher at the Tulsa Gathering Place by the
swing play area (near the sw corner of the park). Also, just a note that
masks are required in the park.

Scott Loss
Stillwater

 

Back to top
Date: 1/14/21 10:55 am
From: Braden Farris <000000ce876b119d-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Mountain Bluebirds near south Douglas, Draper lake area Okc
Late this morning I stepped outside of work for lunch and tallied 95 Mountain Bluebirds streaming low from south to north into strong winds. Many times they would be not 20 feet right above my head. There are plenty of cedars, fields, and fence lines in the area. Not sure if there is an undetected build up in this area or if the front from the NW brought in new birds.

Braden Farris
 

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Date: 1/13/21 7:10 pm
From: Harold yocum <drhal2...>
Subject: Re: Finches
I have not yet found dead birds in Mitch Park in Edmond or my yard.
I will keep looking for sure.
Hal Yocum, Edmond.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 13, 2021, at 5:08 PM, Paul Ribitzki <lribitzki...> wrote:
>
> 
> I was wondering what was happening. I keep 12 feeders going year around. Here in far eastern Pawnee County on Keystone Lake, we have had a large irruption of Pine Siskins. Some days there could be 3 dozen on the three thistle, three platform type feeders, and the ground below. In the past 3 weeks we have found 6 dead Pine Siskins either laying on the platforms or on the ground. Also, there always seems to be 2 or 3 sickly looking ones feeding. You can walk right up to them and they will only fly if you reach out.
> None of the other birds seem to have problems. Some days the ground is covered with juncos and cardinals and there are just as many goldfinch as siskins. These other species don’t seem to have any issues.
> As recommended below, I am going to bring in the feeders and clean them. In a couple weeks I’ll put them back out to see if I still have the problem.
> Paul
>
>
> From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Sandy Berger
> Sent: Wednesday, January 13, 2021 9:03 AM
> To: <OKBIRDS...>
> Subject: Fwd: Finches
>
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ---------
> From: Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...>
> Date: Wed, Jan 13, 2021 at 8:48 AM
> Subject: Finches
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>
>
> My Brother in Bremerton, WA sent this article this morning. I thought it might be of interest here.
>
> Sick and dead finches reported in Kitsap County and across Washington state
>
> Jessie Darland
> Kitsap Sun
> 01-12-2021
>
> Birds in Kitsap and beyond are showing up dead or sick at backyard bird feeders, prompting the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife to ask the public to take down their feeders for now.
>
> An "irruption" of winter-roaming finches is likely causing an exacerbation of the spread of salmonellosis.
>
> An “irruption” is an anomaly that occurs some years where finches and other songbirds that normally spend their winter in the boreal forest in Canada and far north move south to places like Washington. This phenomenon has to do with seed crops and spread, which birds seek out for food.
>
> Just as it’s important for humans to socially distance during the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s important for birds to spread out while this disease looms.
>
> “It's like anything else, you know, if you're around a lot of people you have a bigger chance of catching or spreading something,” said Staci Lehman, WDFW communications manager.
>
> Kitsap residents were some of the first to report dead and sick birds in their yards along with those in King, Skagit, Snohomish and Thurston counties. But now other areas in Washington and Canada have reported dead or sick birds as well. WDFW doesn’t have a formal wild bird tracking program, so it relies on anecdotal evidence from people across the state.
>
> An irruption year doesn’t necessarily mean a salmonellosis outbreak will happen, but there is a larger chance with the higher number of birds in an area at one time.
>
> "When birds flock together in large numbers at feeders, they can transmit the disease through droppings and saliva,” said Kristin Mansfield, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife veterinarian.
>
> Finches like pine siskins and other songbirds from farther north are the ones being affected by salmonellosis, a common and usually fatal bird disease caused by the salmonella bacteria. Though uncommon, it’s possible for the disease to spread to humans through direct contact with infected birds, droppings or domestic cats that catch sick birds. Pets or farm birds like chickens or ducks could also catch the disease.
>
> To help ease the problem and lower the number of birds congregating in one area, WDFW asks the public to take down bird feeders, including hummingbird feeders as hummingbirds can contract and spread the disease, too. This request is in place until at least February to encourage the birds to disperse and forage naturally, according to a press release.
>
> People across the state have been asking what the cause is and what they should do, Lehman said. While many want to help sick birds in their yard, it’s best not to take them to a vet or wildlife rehabilitator to avoid spreading the disease to other animals.
>
> “The first indication of the disease for bird watchers to look for is often a seemingly tame bird on or near a feeder. The birds become very lethargic, fluff out their feathers, and are easy to approach. This kind of behavior is generally uncommon to birds,” Mansfield said. "Unfortunately, at this point, there is very little people can do to treat them. The best course is to leave the birds alone.”
>
> If people don’t want to remove their bird feeders, they are encouraged to clean them daily by rinsing the feeder well with warm soapy water then dunking in a solution of nine parts water and one part bleach. Finish by rinsing and drying before refilling. Keep the ground below the feeder clean by raking or shoveling up feces and seed casings, according to the press release.
>
> Reducing the number of feeders in a yard or using feeders that accommodate fewer birds, such as tubes rather than platform feeders, will also encourage disbursement. It’s also important to keep birdbaths and fountains clean, according to WDFW.
>
> If salmonellosis continues to spread, the short-term consequence is a lot of dead birds, Lehman said. Long-term it’s hard to say what the consequence could be, but these birds have a role in the ecosystem just like everything else, she said. Birds help spread seeds that grow into plants, and in turn, help the pollinator populations, which have their own vital contributions to the ecosystem.
>
> WDFW requests that if possible, avoid handling a sick or dead bird. When handling a bird, bird feeder or birdbath, one should wear gloves and wash their hands afterward.
>
> People are also encouraged to bring cats inside if sick or dead birds are found near their home. WDFW would like the public to report dead birds online at https://wdfw.wa.gov/get-involved/report-observations.
>
>
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1

 

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Date: 1/13/21 3:08 pm
From: Paul Ribitzki <lribitzki...>
Subject: Re: Finches
I was wondering what was happening. I keep 12 feeders going year around. Here in far eastern Pawnee County on Keystone Lake, we have had a large irruption of Pine Siskins. Some days there could be 3 dozen on the three thistle, three platform type feeders, and the ground below. In the past 3 weeks we have found 6 dead Pine Siskins either laying on the platforms or on the ground. Also, there always seems to be 2 or 3 sickly looking ones feeding. You can walk right up to them and they will only fly if you reach out.

None of the other birds seem to have problems. Some days the ground is covered with juncos and cardinals and there are just as many goldfinch as siskins. These other species don’t seem to have any issues.

As recommended below, I am going to bring in the feeders and clean them. In a couple weeks I’ll put them back out to see if I still have the problem.

Paul





From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Sandy Berger
Sent: Wednesday, January 13, 2021 9:03 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Fwd: Finches





---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...>
Date: Wed, Jan 13, 2021 at 8:48 AM
Subject: Finches
To: <ARBIRD-L...>



My Brother in Bremerton, WA sent this article this morning. I thought it might be of interest here.




Sick and dead finches reported in Kitsap County and across Washington state


Jessie Darland <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?<u...>&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=22i_4SO29Ke5RnnXROoS1I1vMixkE6eNSp6mdWCOmRs&s=3xyARUaSRNapzd1S16Kms-PtnsBJ0_RoSl3DJU7MZ8g&e=>

Kitsap Sun

01-12-2021



Birds in Kitsap and beyond are showing up dead or sick at backyard bird feeders, prompting the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife to ask the public to take down their feeders for now.



An "irruption" of winter-roaming finches is likely causing an exacerbation of the spread of salmonellosis.



An “irruption” is an anomaly that occurs some years where finches and other songbirds that normally spend their winter in the boreal forest in Canada and far north move south to places like Washington. This phenomenon has to do with seed crops and spread, which birds seek out for food.



Just as it’s important for humans to socially distance during the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s important for birds to spread out while this disease looms.



“It's like anything else, you know, if you're around a lot of people you have a bigger chance of catching or spreading something,” said Staci Lehman, WDFW communications manager.



Kitsap residents were some of the first to report dead and sick birds in their yards along with those in King, Skagit, Snohomish and Thurston counties. But now other areas in Washington and Canada have reported dead or sick birds as well. WDFW doesn’t have a formal wild bird tracking program, so it relies on anecdotal evidence from people across the state.



An irruption year doesn’t necessarily mean a salmonellosis outbreak will happen, but there is a larger chance with the higher number of birds in an area at one time.



"When birds flock together in large numbers at feeders, they can transmit the disease through droppings and saliva,” said Kristin Mansfield, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife veterinarian.



Finches like pine siskins and other songbirds from farther north are the ones being affected by salmonellosis, a common and usually fatal bird disease caused by the salmonella bacteria. Though uncommon, it’s possible for the disease to spread to humans through direct contact with infected birds, droppings or domestic cats that catch sick birds. Pets or farm birds like chickens or ducks could also catch the disease.



To help ease the problem and lower the number of birds congregating in one area, WDFW asks the public to take down bird feeders, including hummingbird feeders as hummingbirds can contract and spread the disease, too. This request is in place until at least February to encourage the birds to disperse and forage naturally, according to a press release.



People across the state have been asking what the cause is and what they should do, Lehman said. While many want to help sick birds in their yard, it’s best not to take them to a vet or wildlife rehabilitator to avoid spreading the disease to other animals.



“The first indication of the disease for bird watchers to look for is often a seemingly tame bird on or near a feeder. The birds become very lethargic, fluff out their feathers, and are easy to approach. This kind of behavior is generally uncommon to birds,” Mansfield said. "Unfortunately, at this point, there is very little people can do to treat them. The best course is to leave the birds alone.”



If people don’t want to remove their bird feeders, they are encouraged to clean them daily by rinsing the feeder well with warm soapy water then dunking in a solution of nine parts water and one part bleach. Finish by rinsing and drying before refilling. Keep the ground below the feeder clean by raking or shoveling up feces and seed casings, according to the press release.



Reducing the number of feeders in a yard or using feeders that accommodate fewer birds, such as tubes rather than platform feeders, will also encourage disbursement. It’s also important to keep birdbaths and fountains clean, according to WDFW.



If salmonellosis continues to spread, the short-term consequence is a lot of dead birds, Lehman said. Long-term it’s hard to say what the consequence could be, but these birds have a role in the ecosystem just like everything else, she said. Birds help spread seeds that grow into plants, and in turn, help the pollinator populations, which have their own vital contributions to the ecosystem.



WDFW requests that if possible, avoid handling a sick or dead bird. When handling a bird, bird feeder or birdbath, one should wear gloves and wash their hands afterward.



People are also encouraged to bring cats inside if sick or dead birds are found near their home. WDFW would like the public to report dead birds online at https://wdfw.wa.gov/get-involved/report-observations <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?<u...>&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=22i_4SO29Ke5RnnXROoS1I1vMixkE6eNSp6mdWCOmRs&s=UP4xPc80po9LY2CBdZ899teH0knREad63jFj8gbEIoQ&e=> .





_____

To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?<u...>&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=22i_4SO29Ke5RnnXROoS1I1vMixkE6eNSp6mdWCOmRs&s=q0I0ddmbCFrJJEk9plOd1kwPZyKQu-js5K0vCuUGxqg&e=> &A=1


 

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Date: 1/13/21 2:46 pm
From: Harold yocum <drhal2...>
Subject: Re: Lake Hefner and Overholser
I can affirm that once around either lake is not enough. Persistence wins the day!
Hal Yocum

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 13, 2021, at 4:26 PM, Doug Wood <DWood...> wrote:
>
> 
> Thanks Matt and Jacob. Sounds like a couple laps helps 🙂!
> Doug.
>
> From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Jacob Crissup <jcrissup...>
> Sent: Wednesday, January 13, 2021 4:05 PM
> To: <OKBIRDS...> <OKBIRDS...>
> Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Lake Hefner and Overholser
>
> WARNING: The sender of this email could not be validated and may not match the person in the "From" field.
> **External Email**
>
> I’ll piggy-back off of Matt’s response and say that I found the Black Scoter just north of that fishing pier mixed in with DCCOs & RBGUs, and the Surf Scoter just south but by itself further out. I missed the WWSCs on the first run. When I came back the WWSCs and SUSC were all together so the WWSCs must’ve been under water. I also would not have been able to identify the WWSCs or SUSC without my scope.. they were +150 yards off the shoreline on that day (1/10/2021). ALL were on that SW corner of the lake.
>
> With the RNGR, I wasn’t sure if it was at PDP or the Docks but drove straight to the docks and found it on the north end next to the golf course, and just as LMays stated prior, was mixed in with a ton of PBGRs.
>
> JACOB CRISSUP
> 405.826.3024
> <jcrissup...>
>
>>> On Jan 13, 2021, at 3:36 PM, Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...> wrote:
>>>
>> 
>> I birded both lakes today, yesterday, and day before yesterday. Saw and photographed a pair of WW Scoters yesterday at Overholser and saw these today ~1/4 mile south of the fishing pier. Lots of scaup & C-Goldeneye, did not find the reported Black Scoters and did not look for the Mute Swan below the dam.
>>
>> Found the RN Grebe today north of the 2nd fishing pier as you drive toward Lake Hefner north of the harbor. Looked for the LT Duck north of Stars & Stripes Park and did not see it. Lots of Horned Grebe at Prairie Dog Point, did not see any Eared Grebe this week. You will find several Common Loon, yet to locate the reported Pacific Loon. I'm using binoculars only, no scope (own two !).
>>
>> Matt Jung, OKC
>>
>> On Wed, Jan 13, 2021 at 2:23 PM Doug Wood <DWood...> wrote:
>> Hi All. If anyone birds Lakes Hefner and Overholser tomorrow or Friday, would you post your list? I'm thinking about heading up there Saturday if the scoters and red-necked grebe hang around. Thanks, Doug.
>>
>>
>> Douglas R. Wood, Ph.D.
>> Professor of Biological Sciences
>> Southeastern Oklahoma State University
>> <dwood...>
>> 580.745.2272
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/13/21 2:25 pm
From: Doug Wood <DWood...>
Subject: Re: Lake Hefner and Overholser
Thanks Matt and Jacob. Sounds like a couple laps helps 🙂!
Doug.

________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Jacob Crissup <jcrissup...>
Sent: Wednesday, January 13, 2021 4:05 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...> <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Lake Hefner and Overholser

WARNING: The sender of this email could not be validated and may not match the person in the "From" field.
**External Email**

I’ll piggy-back off of Matt’s response and say that I found the Black Scoter just north of that fishing pier mixed in with DCCOs & RBGUs, and the Surf Scoter just south but by itself further out. I missed the WWSCs on the first run. When I came back the WWSCs and SUSC were all together so the WWSCs must’ve been under water. I also would not have been able to identify the WWSCs or SUSC without my scope.. they were +150 yards off the shoreline on that day (1/10/2021). ALL were on that SW corner of the lake.

With the RNGR, I wasn’t sure if it was at PDP or the Docks but drove straight to the docks and found it on the north end next to the golf course, and just as LMays stated prior, was mixed in with a ton of PBGRs.

JACOB CRISSUP
405.826.3024
<jcrissup...>

On Jan 13, 2021, at 3:36 PM, Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...> wrote:


I birded both lakes today, yesterday, and day before yesterday. Saw and photographed a pair of WW Scoters yesterday at Overholser and saw these today ~1/4 mile south of the fishing pier. Lots of scaup & C-Goldeneye, did not find the reported Black Scoters and did not look for the Mute Swan below the dam.

Found the RN Grebe today north of the 2nd fishing pier as you drive toward Lake Hefner north of the harbor. Looked for the LT Duck north of Stars & Stripes Park and did not see it. Lots of Horned Grebe at Prairie Dog Point, did not see any Eared Grebe this week. You will find several Common Loon, yet to locate the reported Pacific Loon. I'm using binoculars only, no scope (own two !).

Matt Jung, OKC

On Wed, Jan 13, 2021 at 2:23 PM Doug Wood <DWood...><mailto:<DWood...>> wrote:
Hi All. If anyone birds Lakes Hefner and Overholser tomorrow or Friday, would you post your list? I'm thinking about heading up there Saturday if the scoters and red-necked grebe hang around. Thanks, Doug.


Douglas R. Wood, Ph.D.
Professor of Biological Sciences
Southeastern Oklahoma State University
<dwood...><mailto:<dwood...>
580.745.2272

 

Back to top
Date: 1/13/21 2:07 pm
From: Jacob Crissup <jcrissup...>
Subject: Re: Lake Hefner and Overholser
I’ll piggy-back off of Matt’s response and say that I found the Black Scoter just north of that fishing pier mixed in with DCCOs & RBGUs, and the Surf Scoter just south but by itself further out. I missed the WWSCs on the first run. When I came back the WWSCs and SUSC were all together so the WWSCs must’ve been under water. I also would not have been able to identify the WWSCs or SUSC without my scope.. they were +150 yards off the shoreline on that day (1/10/2021). ALL were on that SW corner of the lake.

With the RNGR, I wasn’t sure if it was at PDP or the Docks but drove straight to the docks and found it on the north end next to the golf course, and just as LMays stated prior, was mixed in with a ton of PBGRs.

JACOB CRISSUP
405.826.3024
<jcrissup...>

On Jan 13, 2021, at 3:36 PM, Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...> wrote:


I birded both lakes today, yesterday, and day before yesterday. Saw and photographed a pair of WW Scoters yesterday at Overholser and saw these today ~1/4 mile south of the fishing pier. Lots of scaup & C-Goldeneye, did not find the reported Black Scoters and did not look for the Mute Swan below the dam.

Found the RN Grebe today north of the 2nd fishing pier as you drive toward Lake Hefner north of the harbor. Looked for the LT Duck north of Stars & Stripes Park and did not see it. Lots of Horned Grebe at Prairie Dog Point, did not see any Eared Grebe this week. You will find several Common Loon, yet to locate the reported Pacific Loon. I'm using binoculars only, no scope (own two !).

Matt Jung, OKC

On Wed, Jan 13, 2021 at 2:23 PM Doug Wood <DWood...><mailto:<DWood...>> wrote:
Hi All. If anyone birds Lakes Hefner and Overholser tomorrow or Friday, would you post your list? I'm thinking about heading up there Saturday if the scoters and red-necked grebe hang around. Thanks, Doug.


Douglas R. Wood, Ph.D.
Professor of Biological Sciences
Southeastern Oklahoma State University
<dwood...><mailto:<dwood...>
580.745.2272

 

Back to top
Date: 1/13/21 1:38 pm
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...>
Subject: Re: Lake Hefner and Overholser
I birded both lakes today, yesterday, and day before yesterday. Saw and
photographed a pair of WW Scoters yesterday at Overholser and saw these
today ~1/4 mile south of the fishing pier. Lots of scaup & C-Goldeneye,
did not find the reported Black Scoters and did not look for the Mute Swan
below the dam.

Found the RN Grebe today north of the 2nd fishing pier as you drive toward
Lake Hefner north of the harbor. Looked for the LT Duck north of Stars &
Stripes Park and did not see it. Lots of Horned Grebe at Prairie Dog Point,
did not see any Eared Grebe this week. You will find several Common Loon,
yet to locate the reported Pacific Loon. I'm using binoculars only, no
scope (own two !).

Matt Jung, OKC

On Wed, Jan 13, 2021 at 2:23 PM Doug Wood <DWood...> wrote:

> Hi All. If anyone birds Lakes Hefner and Overholser tomorrow or Friday,
> would you post your list? I'm thinking about heading up there Saturday if
> the scoters and red-necked grebe hang around. Thanks, Doug.
>
>
> Douglas R. Wood, Ph.D.
> Professor of Biological Sciences
> Southeastern Oklahoma State University
> <dwood...>
> 580.745.2272
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/13/21 12:26 pm
From: Doug Wood <DWood...>
Subject: Lake Hefner and Overholser
Hi All. If anyone birds Lakes Hefner and Overholser tomorrow or Friday, would you post your list? I'm thinking about heading up there Saturday if the scoters and red-necked grebe hang around. Thanks, Doug.


Douglas R. Wood, Ph.D.
Professor of Biological Sciences
Southeastern Oklahoma State University
<dwood...>
580.745.2272


 

Back to top
Date: 1/13/21 7:44 am
From: Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...>
Subject: Re: Finches
Thanks for the heads-up Sandy. I’m watching my finches for the eye disease. So far only one case of that.
Bob Laval
Heavener

Sent from my iPad

> On Jan 13, 2021, at 9:05 AM, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:
>
> 
>
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ---------
> From: Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...>
> Date: Wed, Jan 13, 2021 at 8:48 AM
> Subject: Finches
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>
>
> My Brother in Bremerton, WA sent this article this morning. I thought it might be of interest here.
>
> Sick and dead finches reported in Kitsap County and across Washington state
>
> Jessie Darland
> Kitsap Sun
> 01-12-2021
>
> Birds in Kitsap and beyond are showing up dead or sick at backyard bird feeders, prompting the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife to ask the public to take down their feeders for now.
>
> An "irruption" of winter-roaming finches is likely causing an exacerbation of the spread of salmonellosis.
>
> An “irruption” is an anomaly that occurs some years where finches and other songbirds that normally spend their winter in the boreal forest in Canada and far north move south to places like Washington. This phenomenon has to do with seed crops and spread, which birds seek out for food.
>
> Just as it’s important for humans to socially distance during the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s important for birds to spread out while this disease looms.
>
> “It's like anything else, you know, if you're around a lot of people you have a bigger chance of catching or spreading something,” said Staci Lehman, WDFW communications manager.
>
> Kitsap residents were some of the first to report dead and sick birds in their yards along with those in King, Skagit, Snohomish and Thurston counties. But now other areas in Washington and Canada have reported dead or sick birds as well. WDFW doesn’t have a formal wild bird tracking program, so it relies on anecdotal evidence from people across the state.
>
> An irruption year doesn’t necessarily mean a salmonellosis outbreak will happen, but there is a larger chance with the higher number of birds in an area at one time.
>
> "When birds flock together in large numbers at feeders, they can transmit the disease through droppings and saliva,” said Kristin Mansfield, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife veterinarian.
>
> Finches like pine siskins and other songbirds from farther north are the ones being affected by salmonellosis, a common and usually fatal bird disease caused by the salmonella bacteria. Though uncommon, it’s possible for the disease to spread to humans through direct contact with infected birds, droppings or domestic cats that catch sick birds. Pets or farm birds like chickens or ducks could also catch the disease.
>
> To help ease the problem and lower the number of birds congregating in one area, WDFW asks the public to take down bird feeders, including hummingbird feeders as hummingbirds can contract and spread the disease, too. This request is in place until at least February to encourage the birds to disperse and forage naturally, according to a press release.
>
> People across the state have been asking what the cause is and what they should do, Lehman said. While many want to help sick birds in their yard, it’s best not to take them to a vet or wildlife rehabilitator to avoid spreading the disease to other animals.
>
> “The first indication of the disease for bird watchers to look for is often a seemingly tame bird on or near a feeder. The birds become very lethargic, fluff out their feathers, and are easy to approach. This kind of behavior is generally uncommon to birds,” Mansfield said. "Unfortunately, at this point, there is very little people can do to treat them. The best course is to leave the birds alone.”
>
> If people don’t want to remove their bird feeders, they are encouraged to clean them daily by rinsing the feeder well with warm soapy water then dunking in a solution of nine parts water and one part bleach. Finish by rinsing and drying before refilling. Keep the ground below the feeder clean by raking or shoveling up feces and seed casings, according to the press release.
>
> Reducing the number of feeders in a yard or using feeders that accommodate fewer birds, such as tubes rather than platform feeders, will also encourage disbursement. It’s also important to keep birdbaths and fountains clean, according to WDFW.
>
> If salmonellosis continues to spread, the short-term consequence is a lot of dead birds, Lehman said. Long-term it’s hard to say what the consequence could be, but these birds have a role in the ecosystem just like everything else, she said. Birds help spread seeds that grow into plants, and in turn, help the pollinator populations, which have their own vital contributions to the ecosystem.
>
> WDFW requests that if possible, avoid handling a sick or dead bird. When handling a bird, bird feeder or birdbath, one should wear gloves and wash their hands afterward.
>
> People are also encouraged to bring cats inside if sick or dead birds are found near their home. WDFW would like the public to report dead birds online at https://wdfw.wa.gov/get-involved/report-observations.
>
>
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1

 

Back to top
Date: 1/13/21 7:05 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Fwd: Finches
---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...>
Date: Wed, Jan 13, 2021 at 8:48 AM
Subject: Finches
To: <ARBIRD-L...>


My Brother in Bremerton, WA sent this article this morning. I thought it
might be of interest here.

Sick and dead finches reported in Kitsap County and across Washington state
*Jessie Darland
<https://www.kitsapsun.com/staff/4406725002/jessie-darland/>*
*Kitsap Sun*
01-12-2021

Birds in Kitsap and beyond are showing up dead or sick at backyard bird
feeders, prompting the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife to ask
the public to take down their feeders for now.

An "irruption" of winter-roaming finches is likely causing an exacerbation
of the spread of salmonellosis.

An “irruption” is an anomaly that occurs some years where finches and other
songbirds that normally spend their winter in the boreal forest in Canada
and far north move south to places like Washington. This phenomenon has to
do with seed crops and spread, which birds seek out for food.

Just as it’s important for humans to socially distance during the COVID-19
pandemic, it’s important for birds to spread out while this disease looms.

“It's like anything else, you know, if you're around a lot of people you
have a bigger chance of catching or spreading something,” said Staci
Lehman, WDFW communications manager.

Kitsap residents were some of the first to report dead and sick birds in
their yards along with those in King, Skagit, Snohomish and Thurston
counties. But now other areas in Washington and Canada have reported dead
or sick birds as well. WDFW doesn’t have a formal wild bird tracking
program, so it relies on anecdotal evidence from people across the state.

An irruption year doesn’t necessarily mean a salmonellosis outbreak will
happen, but there is a larger chance with the higher number of birds in an
area at one time.

"When birds flock together in large numbers at feeders, they can transmit
the disease through droppings and saliva,” said Kristin Mansfield,
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife veterinarian.

Finches like pine siskins and other songbirds from farther north are the
ones being affected by salmonellosis, a common and usually fatal bird
disease caused by the salmonella bacteria. Though uncommon, it’s possible
for the disease to spread to humans through direct contact with infected
birds, droppings or domestic cats that catch sick birds. Pets or farm birds
like chickens or ducks could also catch the disease.

To help ease the problem and lower the number of birds congregating in one
area, WDFW asks the public to take down bird feeders, including hummingbird
feeders as hummingbirds can contract and spread the disease, too. This
request is in place until at least February to encourage the birds to
disperse and forage naturally, according to a press release.

People across the state have been asking what the cause is and what they
should do, Lehman said. While many want to help sick birds in their yard,
it’s best not to take them to a vet or wildlife rehabilitator to avoid
spreading the disease to other animals.

“The first indication of the disease for bird watchers to look for is often
a seemingly tame bird on or near a feeder. The birds become very lethargic,
fluff out their feathers, and are easy to approach. This kind of behavior
is generally uncommon to birds,” Mansfield said. "Unfortunately, at this
point, there is very little people can do to treat them. The best course is
to leave the birds alone.”

If people don’t want to remove their bird feeders, they are encouraged to
clean them daily by rinsing the feeder well with warm soapy water then
dunking in a solution of nine parts water and one part bleach. Finish by
rinsing and drying before refilling. Keep the ground below the feeder clean
by raking or shoveling up feces and seed casings, according to the press
release.

Reducing the number of feeders in a yard or using feeders that accommodate
fewer birds, such as tubes rather than platform feeders, will also
encourage disbursement. It’s also important to keep birdbaths and fountains
clean, according to WDFW.

If salmonellosis continues to spread, the short-term consequence is a lot
of dead birds, Lehman said. Long-term it’s hard to say what the consequence
could be, but these birds have a role in the ecosystem just like everything
else, she said. Birds help spread seeds that grow into plants, and in turn,
help the pollinator populations, which have their own vital contributions
to the ecosystem.

WDFW requests that if possible, avoid handling a sick or dead bird. When
handling a bird, bird feeder or birdbath, one should wear gloves and wash
their hands afterward.

People are also encouraged to bring cats inside if sick or dead birds are
found near their home. WDFW would like the public to report dead birds
online at https://wdfw.wa.gov/get-involved/report-observations.


------------------------------

To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1

 

Back to top
Date: 1/12/21 8:21 pm
From: Harold yocum <drhal2...>
Subject: Eagles back at north Yukon parkway
I checked the large eagle nest at the very north end of Yukon Parkway and to the west. First time I have seen both Eagles back this year.
Today 1 Eagle on the nest and one sitting about 20 feet away.
Visible with binoculars, but a scope is much better.
Directions: drive all the way to the very north end of Yukon Parkway. There is a pull-off at a gate. Look to the west and the large nest is visible in a tall, old cottonwood.
Hal Yocum

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 1/12/21 6:47 pm
From: Harold yocum <drhal2...>
Subject: Bald Eagles on the next again
Today I saw the the pair of bald eagles have returned to the large nest at the north end of Yukon Parkway and off to the west. It ( the large nest) us easily visible as one approaches the very north end of the Yukon Parkway. Visible birds with binoculars but a scope is much better. Today one was on the nest and other one 20 feet away in the tree( a very large, tall, old cottonwood).
Hal Yocum

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 1/12/21 8:13 am
From: JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski...>
Subject: Re: Caracara in Atoka Co
Hello,     Yes, sorry for the post to okbirds, but have straightened this out.     Thanks for the "heads-ups".
CHEERS,          JOE Grzybowski
On Monday, January 11, 2021, 04:36:04 PM CST, JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski...> wrote:

Hi Mike,   Going through OBRC (Oklahoma Bird Records Committee) files, and this was an entry for 2018 left unfinished.
   Do you still have those photos, and could you provide them for the OBRC?
   Hope all is well.
CHEERS,                              JOE Grzybowski   
On Sunday, January 21, 2018, 04:39:58 PM CST, mike <m.b.ludewig...> wrote:

#yiv4997251968 #yiv4997251968 -- filtered {}#yiv4997251968 filtered {}#yiv4997251968 p.yiv4997251968MsoNormal, #yiv4997251968 li.yiv4997251968MsoNormal, #yiv4997251968 div.yiv4997251968MsoNormal {margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:11.0pt;font-family:sans-serif;}#yiv4997251968 a:link, #yiv4997251968 span.yiv4997251968MsoHyperlink {color:#0563C1;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv4997251968 a:visited, #yiv4997251968 span.yiv4997251968MsoHyperlinkFollowed {color:#954F72;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv4997251968 span.yiv4997251968EmailStyle17 {font-family:sans-serif;color:windowtext;}#yiv4997251968 .yiv4997251968MsoChpDefault {font-family:sans-serif;}#yiv4997251968 filtered {}#yiv4997251968 div.yiv4997251968WordSection1 {}#yiv4997251968
Today about 1pm, my wife and I spotted a Crested Caracara west of McGee Creek Lake (which is about 3 miles north of Farris, OK which is about half way on an E-W line between Atoka and Antlers).  The bird was sitting in a tree near several circling vultures.  I’m assuming that there was carrion on the ground.  From the pictures I took from ~ 100 yds, I believe it was an immature bird.  Although my pictures aren’t great, they are good enough for an absolute identification of the bird.

 

Mike Ludewig

At Farris, OK

 

PS:  If you would like to see a picture, please reply and I will send you one.

 

Back to top
Date: 1/11/21 2:38 pm
From: JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski...>
Subject: Re: Caracara in Atoka Co
Hi Mike,   Going through OBRC (Oklahoma Bird Records Committee) files, and this was an entry for 2018 left unfinished.
   Do you still have those photos, and could you provide them for the OBRC?
   Hope all is well.
CHEERS,                              JOE Grzybowski   
On Sunday, January 21, 2018, 04:39:58 PM CST, mike <m.b.ludewig...> wrote:

<!--#yiv0854829523 _filtered {} _filtered {}#yiv0854829523 #yiv0854829523 p.yiv0854829523MsoNormal, #yiv0854829523 li.yiv0854829523MsoNormal, #yiv0854829523 div.yiv0854829523MsoNormal {margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri", sans-serif;}#yiv0854829523 a:link, #yiv0854829523 span.yiv0854829523MsoHyperlink {color:#0563C1;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv0854829523 a:visited, #yiv0854829523 span.yiv0854829523MsoHyperlinkFollowed {color:#954F72;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv0854829523 span.yiv0854829523EmailStyle17 {font-family:"Calibri", sans-serif;color:windowtext;}#yiv0854829523 .yiv0854829523MsoChpDefault {font-family:"Calibri", sans-serif;} _filtered {}#yiv0854829523 div.yiv0854829523WordSection1 {}-->
Today about 1pm, my wife and I spotted a Crested Caracara west of McGee Creek Lake (which is about 3 miles north of Farris, OK which is about half way on an E-W line between Atoka and Antlers).  The bird was sitting in a tree near several circling vultures.  I’m assuming that there was carrion on the ground.  From the pictures I took from ~ 100 yds, I believe it was an immature bird.  Although my pictures aren’t great, they are good enough for an absolute identification of the bird.

 

Mike Ludewig

At Farris, OK

 

PS:  If you would like to see a picture, please reply and I will send you one.

 

Back to top
Date: 1/11/21 11:00 am
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...>
Subject: November/December Photos
Hello All,

I've recently added photos from November and December to my Pbase site.
Included are Clark's and Red-Necked Grebe from Lake Hefner, Pacific and
Common Loon from Lake Tenkiller, and a Pine Warbler at my
apartment complex, and some Thanksgiving weekend shots from Cimarron County:

https://pbase.com/lctsimages/recent&page=1


Good Birding,

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK

 

Back to top
Date: 1/10/21 6:57 am
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...>
Subject: OKC Lakes on 1-9-2021

Hello All,
Mary and I took a ride down to Oklahoma City yesterday. It was partly cloudy and cool with light winds. I have rarely seen Lakes Hefner and Overholser as calm as they were for most of the day yesterday. We started at the grassy area on the NE corner of Lake Hefner. There were many ring-billed gulls and a few Herring gulls and Forster's terns on the grass and 3 common loons out on the lake. The next stop was Stars and Stripes on the SE corner of the lake. The long-tailed duck was found less than 100 feet from the flagpole. It quietly swam just out from the car. An inlet between there and the golf course had 13 great egrets sitting in the trees. The red-necked grebe was in a bay by the fishing dock with several pied-billed grebes. The bay west of Prairie Dog Point had a group of 4 eared grebes swimming near 20 or so horned grebes.
Next, we went down to Lake Overholser. The light winds continued, making it easy to see the thousands of birds on the lake. An adult lesser black-backed gull was seen circling on the water in the NE corner of the Lake. A red-throated loon was found swimming several hundred yards out from the police station. The mute swan was swimming in the shallow water below the dam. Finally, the 3 white-winged scoters were found close to shore about 200 yards south of the fishing dock on the SW side of the lake. It was mid-afternoon, so we headed back to Bartlesville.

Mark Peterson
Bartlesville

 

Back to top
Date: 1/6/21 12:12 pm
From: Ron Huebner <feralbirder...>
Subject: Feral Birder Virtual Birding Calendar
Hi all. With all the restrictions due to Covid, I have found that virtual
birding events are exploding. As such, I am maintaining a public google
calendar that lists all these free events. You can find it on the Tulsa
Audubon website.
Each calendar event will have a link to Register in Advance. I do NOT vet
these events. Some are tremendously interesting while others are not so
much. But it's a great way to interact with birders, both close and
distant, and feels at least a bit like in person socializing.

To date, just for January there are over 85 virtual events listed from all
over the country. And the listings are still coming in. I will be updating
them on a regular basis, so check back often.

If you have additional information or questions, please let me know at the
following email address:
<feralbirdercalendar...>

I can supply an embed code for those who would like to include the calendar
on a website as well.

Bird ON!
--
Ron Huebner
<feralbirdercalendar...>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/5/21 11:12 am
From: James Hubbell <hubmutt...>
Subject: Pelicans
Very cool site right now. Large group of pelicans circling Hefner lake. Over the dam.
Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 1/3/21 5:01 pm
From: John Sterling <prairie...>
Subject: Re: Cactus Wren (not Oklahoma)
Zip, just checked the Oklahoma side. Nothing but over grazed short grass prairie and plowed fields. No suitable habituate for the wrens. Stopped several places and played the call, nothing.

Sent from my iPad

> On Jan 3, 2021, at 6:37 PM, Larry Mays <larrymays1949...> wrote:
>
> When I left Kenton today John Sterling was cruising the state line down by Felt.
>
>
>
> Sent from my Galaxy
>
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Zach Poland <zachapoland...>
> Date: 1/3/21 8:30 AM (GMT-06:00)
> To: <OKBIRDS...>
> Subject: [OKBIRDS] Cactus Wren (not Oklahoma)
>
> Not an OK sighting.
>
> FYI, there was another CACW report from the TX panhandle, very close to OK.
>
> https://ebird.org/checklist/S78320572
>
> Soon, I think.
>
>
> ZAP

 

Back to top
Date: 1/3/21 4:48 pm
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...>
Subject: Lake Yahola and Oxley North Woods on 1-3-2021
Hello All,
It was a nice day, so I decided to take a walk around Lake Yahola in Tulsa. Mary dropped me off at the monument and drove to the start of the North Woods trail. There were many gulls standing on the submerged causeway and quite a few ducks on the north side of the lake. I walked west from the monument, then north along highway 75 and then east along the north side of the lake and into North Woods. Highlights included:

Bufflehead-1female
Eared Grebe-2 about halfway between highway 75 and the North Woods trail
Herring Gull-4
Brown Thrasher-1 in North Woods
Spotted Towhee-2 in North Woods

Mark Peterson
Bartlesville

 

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Date: 1/3/21 4:39 pm
From: Larry Mays <larrymays1949...>
Subject: Re: Cactus Wren (not Oklahoma)
When I left Kenton today John Sterling was cruising the state line down by Felt.Sent from my Galaxy
-------- Original message --------From: Zach Poland <zachapoland...> Date: 1/3/21 8:30 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <OKBIRDS...> Subject: [OKBIRDS] Cactus Wren (not Oklahoma) Not an OK sighting.FYI, there was another CACW report from the TX panhandle, very close to OK. https://ebird.org/checklist/S78320572Soon, I think.ZAP
 

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Date: 1/3/21 6:55 am
From: Larry Mays <larrymays1949...>
Subject: Re: Cactus Wren (not Oklahoma)
Hope!Sent from my Galaxy
-------- Original message --------From: Zach Poland <zachapoland...> Date: 1/3/21 8:30 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <OKBIRDS...> Subject: [OKBIRDS] Cactus Wren (not Oklahoma) Not an OK sighting.FYI, there was another CACW report from the TX panhandle, very close to OK. https://ebird.org/checklist/S78320572Soon, I think.ZAP
 

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Date: 1/3/21 6:33 am
From: Zach Poland <zachapoland...>
Subject: Cactus Wren (not Oklahoma)
Not an OK sighting.

FYI, there was another CACW report from the TX panhandle, very close to OK.

https://ebird.org/checklist/S78320572

Soon, I think.


ZAP
 

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Date: 1/2/21 2:59 pm
From: Landon Neumann <landonneumann25...>
Subject: Lewis’s Woodpecker - Witchita Mts
Tried for the Lewis’s Woodpecker that has been wintering at the refuge
today. Bird still present. Bird is at the dirt path by gate along main road
on the north side just past the environmental education center entrance.
Had to wait at the gate for 40 minutes but it offered nice views at 10 am.

Landon Neumann
Stillwater

 

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Date: 1/1/21 4:00 pm
From: Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...>
Subject: Re: Phoebe
OK, thanks for the input.
________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Richrd Gunn <richardgunn1940...>
Sent: Friday, January 1, 2021 4:39 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...> <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: Phoebe

CAUTION: This email originated from outside of the organization. Do not click links or open attachments unless you recognize the sender and know the content is safe
We always have them year round on S. Jenkins. Especially along the outlet creek.
D.

On Fri, Jan 1, 2021, 4:24 PM Feldt, Andrew <Andrew.Feldt...><mailto:<Andrew.Feldt...>> wrote:
Tom,

The current date guide shows Eastern Phoebe as year round in Oklahoma except for the northwest and panhandle regions.

Andy Feldt
Sent from mobile device

On Jan 1, 2021, at 4:20 PM, Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...><mailto:<tom.curtis...>> wrote:


Just saw an Eastern Phoebe in extreme western Tulsa Co. Don't know if it is a late bird or an early one.

Have fun,
Tom Curtis
 

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Date: 1/1/21 3:47 pm
From: Alton Patton <adewittpatton...>
Subject: Sequoyah NWP
Saw and photographed a light morph rough legged hawk and Harris' sparrows this afternoon.

Alton D Patton
Fort Smith

Get Outlook for Android<https://aka.ms/ghei36>

 

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Date: 1/1/21 2:40 pm
From: Richrd Gunn <richardgunn1940...>
Subject: Re: Phoebe
We always have them year round on S. Jenkins. Especially along the outlet
creek.
D.

On Fri, Jan 1, 2021, 4:24 PM Feldt, Andrew <Andrew.Feldt...>
wrote:

> Tom,
>
> The current date guide shows Eastern Phoebe as year round in Oklahoma
> except for the northwest and panhandle regions.
>
> Andy Feldt
> Sent from mobile device
>
> On Jan 1, 2021, at 4:20 PM, Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...> wrote:
>
> 
> Just saw an Eastern Phoebe in extreme western Tulsa Co. Don't know if it
> is a late bird or an early one.
>
> Have fun,
> Tom Curtis
>
>

 

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Date: 1/1/21 2:27 pm
From: Feldt, Andrew <Andrew.Feldt...>
Subject: Re: Phoebe
Tom,

The current date guide shows Eastern Phoebe as year round in Oklahoma except for the northwest and panhandle regions.

Andy Feldt
Sent from mobile device

On Jan 1, 2021, at 4:20 PM, Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...> wrote:


Just saw an Eastern Phoebe in extreme western Tulsa Co. Don't know if it is a late bird or an early one.

Have fun,
Tom Curtis
 

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Date: 1/1/21 2:26 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Phoebe
I saw four at Sequoyah NWR today. Sometimes they stay all winter.

Sandy B

On Fri, Jan 1, 2021 at 4:20 PM Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...> wrote:

> Just saw an Eastern Phoebe in extreme western Tulsa Co. Don't know if it
> is a late bird or an early one.
>
> Have fun,
> Tom Curtis
>

 

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Date: 1/1/21 2:22 pm
From: Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...>
Subject: Phoebe
Just saw an Eastern Phoebe in extreme western Tulsa Co. Don't know if it is a late bird or an early one.

Have fun,
Tom Curtis

 

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Date: 1/1/21 7:32 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Sequoyah NWR
The first two species I just now saw at the refuge was a Bald Eagle and a
flock of Turkeys. Two species considered for our national bird. How cool is
that.

Sandy B.

 

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Date: 12/29/20 8:49 pm
From: <jrwinner...>
Subject: Re: FW: eBird Report - Wagoner County, OK, US, Dec 28, 2020
---- Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...> wrote:
> Here is our report from area 7 of the Ft Gibson CBC that was held yesterday. The weather was great as temps went from 28 to 52. Winds
>
> were mostly non-existent to about 10mph later in the day. We found 79 species in our area. Doug Wood found 79 in his area too.
>
>
>
> Currently, the CBC cumulative total is 102 species. We are still waiting on results from a couple of teams who birded the lake and Sequoyah
>
> State Park. Doug Wood found two displaying Woodcocks before daybreak on the west side of the dam.
>
>
>
>
>
> Jimmy Woodard
>
> Midwest City
>
>
>
>
>
> Wagoner County, OK, US, Wagoner, Oklahoma, US Dec 28, 2020 6:45 AM - 2:55 PM
>
> Protocol: Traveling
>
> 90.0 mile(s)
>
> Checklist Comments: These observations were conducted during the 2020 Ft Gibson CBC. Totals are cumulative for area #7 which runs from the Arkansas River north to Wagoner and from Hwy 16 west to Tullahassee.
>
> 79 species
>
>
>
> Snow Goose 2500
>
> Ross's Goose 20
>
> Greater White-fronted Goose 4
>
> Canada Goose 22
>
> Wood Duck 4
>
> Gadwall 8
>
> Mallard 300
>
> Northern Pintail 28
>
> Green-winged Teal 100
>
> Ruddy Duck 3
>
> Pied-billed Grebe 27
>
> Eurasian Collared-Dove 1
>
> Mourning Dove 2
>
> American Coot 4
>
> Killdeer 10
>
> Wilson's Snipe 30 undercount. many seen in two different playas and at Vann's Marsh.
>
> Greater Yellowlegs 3
>
> Bonaparte's Gull 11
>
> Ring-billed Gull 450
>
> Double-crested Cormorant 300
>
> American White Pelican 31
>
> Great Blue Heron 15
>
> Black Vulture 9
>
> Turkey Vulture 10
>
> Northern Harrier 1
>
> Bald Eagle 4
>
> Red-shouldered Hawk 14
>
> Red-tailed Hawk 22
>
> Barred Owl 1
>
> Belted Kingfisher 2
>
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 4
>
> Red-headed Woodpecker 15
>
> Red-bellied Woodpecker 12
>
> Downy Woodpecker 7
>
> Hairy Woodpecker 1
>
> Pileated Woodpecker 3
>
> Northern Flicker 21
>
> American Kestrel 13
>
> Eastern Phoebe 2
>
> Loggerhead Shrike 6
>
> Blue Jay 55
>
> American Crow 120
>
> Carolina Chickadee 35
>
> Tufted Titmouse 31
>
> Golden-crowned Kinglet 11
>
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet 9
>
> Brown Creeper 1
>
> Winter Wren 3
>
> Marsh Wren 3
>
> Carolina Wren 23
>
> Bewick's Wren 1
>
> European Starling 250
>
> Brown Thrasher 4
>
> Northern Mockingbird 25
>
> Eastern Bluebird 45
>
> Hermit Thrush 3
>
> American Robin 500
>
> Cedar Waxwing 40
>
> House Sparrow 15
>
> Purple Finch 3
>
> Pine Siskin 4
>
> American Goldfinch 23
>
> Lapland Longspur 1
>
> Fox Sparrow 5
>
> Dark-eyed Junco 150
>
> White-crowned Sparrow 50
>
> Harris's Sparrow 50
>
> White-throated Sparrow 105
>
> Savannah Sparrow 15
>
> Song Sparrow 22
>
> Swamp Sparrow 3
>
> Eastern Towhee 2
>
> Eastern Meadowlark 110
>
> Red-winged Blackbird 4000
>
> Rusty Blackbird 60
>
> Common Grackle 900
>
> Common Yellowthroat 2
>
> Yellow-rumped Warbler 30
>
> Northern Cardinal 90 Heavy undercount.
>
>
>
> View this checklist online at <https://ebird.org/checklist/S78200627> https://ebird.org/checklist/S78200627
>
>
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 ( <https://ebird.org/home> https://ebird.org/home)
>
Jim Winner - Muskogee Area CBC Dec 28, 2020 44 mi. 8.hr. (52 species)
pied-bill grebe 2 , d.c. cormorant 8 , great blue heron 7 , canada goose 72 , mallard 18 , gadwall 12 , black vulture 2 , turkey vulture 6 , bald eagle 2 , harrrier 1 , * sharp shinned hawk 1 , red shoulder hawk 2 , *coopers hawk 1 , red tailed hawk 10, american kestrel 9 , *wild turkey 8 , kildeer 8 , r/b gull 4 , *rock dove 84, mourning dove 14 , red bellied wdpk. 4 , downy wdpk. 6 , northern flicker 4, blue jay 10 , Am. Crow 110 , car.ckdee 7 , titmouse 2 , car wren 6 , winter wren 2 , eastern bluebird 16 , amer,robin 44 , mkbrd 12 , brown thrasher 2 , Eu.starling 2400 , n,cardinal 90 , fled sparr. 2 , savann sparr. 10 , song sparr. 4 , linc.sparr. 18 , wthr.sparr. 44, wcr sparr. 12 , harris sparr. 6 , junco 44 , lapland longspur 30 , redwng blkbrd 200 east.mdlrk. 60 graclke 270 , brnhd cowbrd 2 house finch 24 , goldfinch 4 , house sparr. 2
note : sharpshinned hawk, wild turkey, lapland longspur and rock dove
 

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Date: 12/29/20 2:26 pm
From: Brent Barnes <00000113f4c02191-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Tall Grass Prairie
First time post on this list, though I have followed the list for over a year. 
Birded the Tall Grass Prairie at Pawhuska on Sunday afternoon (the 27th). Saw a total of 8 Tundra Swan on the large pond just to the west of the intersection of the road where you turn right to go to the  Visitor Center and Nature Trail and turn  left to go  to Foraker. The pond is about a quarter of a mile west on the way to Foraker. There were clearly eight swan on the pond, I got out to photograph them and they flew south west though I suspect they will circle back to the pond as I saw four Tundra Swan at the same pond last year. This is the most I have ever seen at once. I posted photographs on my submission to Ebird. 
I also saw an adult bald eagle circling over the prairie and moving southwest along with many Red-Tailed Hawks, a Red-Shouldered Hawk and more Northern Harriers than I could ever consider counting. 
But the highlight occurred just after 5 PM, about 20 minutes before sunset. The Northern Harriers were suddenly replaced by a group of 14 Short-Eared Owls who hunt in a similar fashion to the Harriers. I stopped my car and watched them hunt the tall grass for over 40 minutes until it was completely dark. Got several photos and they are attached to my Ebird submission. 
For those who have not seen a group of Short Eared Owls hunting an area, it is a sight. They have a very eerie call that sounds like a screeching cat. They are prolific hunters, as I noted that most of the time when they would dip into the tall grass they would come up with rodent prey in their grasp. I sat in my car watching them until long after dark and could still hear their cat - like shrieks as they hunted around my parked car even when it was so dark I could not see anything. I concluded that dusk must be a time of terror for the rodents scurrying around in the grass - it must be terrifying to have a dozen or so of those formidable predators flying above you and shrieking constantly as they hunt!
By the way, on a separate note, I am trying to photograph all four longspur species this winter. I got the Chestnut Collared Longspur easily last week at the Wichita Mountains near Lawton. Surprisingly, I could not find any Smiths Longspur walking the fields near Boomer Lake north of Stillwater or walking the fields in the Tall Grass Prairie on Sunday. Anybody having luck with the Smith's Longspur near the Embassy Suites field in Norman or elsewhere? Any good sightings of McCown's or Laplands? I have read the extensive blog on finding Longspurs in Oklahoma based from the Tulsa Audobon Society that ran from about 2000 - 2010 or so. It appears the Kitzer feeders west of Altus are no more. Any other reliable places to see the McCown's in southwestern Oklahoma?
Brent BarnesEdmond, OK


-----Original Message-----
From: Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...>
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Sent: Tue, Dec 29, 2020 9:00 am
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Black Vultures/Midwest City

<!--#yiv4428386508 _filtered {} _filtered {} _filtered {}#yiv4428386508 #yiv4428386508 p.yiv4428386508MsoNormal, #yiv4428386508 li.yiv4428386508MsoNormal, #yiv4428386508 div.yiv4428386508MsoNormal {margin:0in;font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri", sans-serif;}#yiv4428386508 span.yiv4428386508EmailStyle17 {font-family:"Calibri", sans-serif;color:windowtext;}#yiv4428386508 .yiv4428386508MsoChpDefault {font-family:"Calibri", sans-serif;} _filtered {}#yiv4428386508 div.yiv4428386508WordSection1 {}-->                                At about 8:10AM this morning, I saw eight Black Vultures fly over our yard in Midwest City. The birds were very low and were using a flap/            glide flight style to evidently migrate from north to south. Most years, there is a big vulture roost in the trees along Crutcho Creek near the             large dumps between NE 23rd and NE 36th between Sooner Road and Midwest Boulevard.                          Jimmy Woodard            Midwest City
 

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Date: 12/29/20 10:47 am
From: Jeanine Lackey <jeanine.dinan...>
Subject: Lesser Goldfinch
Noticed a Lesser Goldfinch at the thistle feeder today, along with Pine
Siskins, and lots of goldfinches. I have a few not-so-good photos of the
LEGO.

Jeanine Lackey
Murray County

--

 

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Date: 12/29/20 9:14 am
From: John Kennington <johnkennington...>
Subject: Re: Nest Cam Hardware?
Inside the box.

On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 11:07 AM Jeff Cox <jeffacox54...> wrote:

> I have no knowledge , just want to clarify if they want a camera for
> inside the box or outside?
>
> Jeff Cox
> Tulsa, OK
> 918-629-2140
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Dec 29, 2020, at 10:36 AM, John Kennington <johnkennington...>
> wrote:
> >
> > 
> > I've been asked for recommendations for a nest cam for a Screech Owl
> box, from someone in Tulsa who has had them nesting in boxes in their yard
> in the past. It would be within wifi range
> >
> > Does anyone have any experience with this, or have recommendations?
> >
> > Would some of the new security cameras work? I believe Jim Deming was
> using them (Arlo?) to see what was at his feeder at night, so I think that
> had some night vision capabilities?
> >
> > Thanks
> > John Kennington
>

 

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Date: 12/29/20 9:10 am
From: Jeff Cox <jeffacox54...>
Subject: Re: Nest Cam Hardware?
I have no knowledge , just want to clarify if they want a camera for inside the box or outside?

Jeff Cox
Tulsa, OK
918-629-2140
Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 29, 2020, at 10:36 AM, John Kennington <johnkennington...> wrote:
>
> 
> I've been asked for recommendations for a nest cam for a Screech Owl box, from someone in Tulsa who has had them nesting in boxes in their yard in the past. It would be within wifi range
>
> Does anyone have any experience with this, or have recommendations?
>
> Would some of the new security cameras work? I believe Jim Deming was using them (Arlo?) to see what was at his feeder at night, so I think that had some night vision capabilities?
>
> Thanks
> John Kennington
 

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Date: 12/29/20 9:05 am
From: Jim Deming <birdbrain.jim...>
Subject: Re: Nest Cam Hardware?
My Arlo cameras are adequate to identify critters in my back yard at night (raccoons, opossums, feral cats) with motion sensing lights. During the daytime, they are sometimes activated by birds on the feeder, but the image isn’t adequate for identification. I don’t know how that would work in a nest box.
Mine have rechargeable batteries, but can be hard wired.

Sent from my iPad

> On Dec 29, 2020, at 10:39 AM, John Kennington <johnkennington...> wrote:
>
> 
> I've been asked for recommendations for a nest cam for a Screech Owl box, from someone in Tulsa who has had them nesting in boxes in their yard in the past. It would be within wifi range
>
> Does anyone have any experience with this, or have recommendations?
>
> Would some of the new security cameras work? I believe Jim Deming was using them (Arlo?) to see what was at his feeder at night, so I think that had some night vision capabilities?
>
> Thanks
> John Kennington
 

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Date: 12/29/20 8:38 am
From: John Kennington <johnkennington...>
Subject: Nest Cam Hardware?
I've been asked for recommendations for a nest cam for a Screech Owl box,
from someone in Tulsa who has had them nesting in boxes in their yard in
the past. It would be within wifi range

Does anyone have any experience with this, or have recommendations?

Would some of the new security cameras work? I believe Jim Deming was using
them (Arlo?) to see what was at his feeder at night, so I think that had
some night vision capabilities?

Thanks
John Kennington

 

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Date: 12/29/20 7:39 am
From: Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...>
Subject: FW: eBird Report - Wagoner County, OK, US, Dec 28, 2020
Here is our report from area 7 of the Ft Gibson CBC that was held yesterday. The weather was great as temps went from 28 to 52. Winds

were mostly non-existent to about 10mph later in the day. We found 79 species in our area. Doug Wood found 79 in his area too.



Currently, the CBC cumulative total is 102 species. We are still waiting on results from a couple of teams who birded the lake and Sequoyah

State Park. Doug Wood found two displaying Woodcocks before daybreak on the west side of the dam.





Jimmy Woodard

Midwest City





Wagoner County, OK, US, Wagoner, Oklahoma, US Dec 28, 2020 6:45 AM - 2:55 PM

Protocol: Traveling

90.0 mile(s)

Checklist Comments: These observations were conducted during the 2020 Ft Gibson CBC. Totals are cumulative for area #7 which runs from the Arkansas River north to Wagoner and from Hwy 16 west to Tullahassee.

79 species



Snow Goose 2500

Ross's Goose 20

Greater White-fronted Goose 4

Canada Goose 22

Wood Duck 4

Gadwall 8

Mallard 300

Northern Pintail 28

Green-winged Teal 100

Ruddy Duck 3

Pied-billed Grebe 27

Eurasian Collared-Dove 1

Mourning Dove 2

American Coot 4

Killdeer 10

Wilson's Snipe 30 undercount. many seen in two different playas and at Vann's Marsh.

Greater Yellowlegs 3

Bonaparte's Gull 11

Ring-billed Gull 450

Double-crested Cormorant 300

American White Pelican 31

Great Blue Heron 15

Black Vulture 9

Turkey Vulture 10

Northern Harrier 1

Bald Eagle 4

Red-shouldered Hawk 14

Red-tailed Hawk 22

Barred Owl 1

Belted Kingfisher 2

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 4

Red-headed Woodpecker 15

Red-bellied Woodpecker 12

Downy Woodpecker 7

Hairy Woodpecker 1

Pileated Woodpecker 3

Northern Flicker 21

American Kestrel 13

Eastern Phoebe 2

Loggerhead Shrike 6

Blue Jay 55

American Crow 120

Carolina Chickadee 35

Tufted Titmouse 31

Golden-crowned Kinglet 11

Ruby-crowned Kinglet 9

Brown Creeper 1

Winter Wren 3

Marsh Wren 3

Carolina Wren 23

Bewick's Wren 1

European Starling 250

Brown Thrasher 4

Northern Mockingbird 25

Eastern Bluebird 45

Hermit Thrush 3

American Robin 500

Cedar Waxwing 40

House Sparrow 15

Purple Finch 3

Pine Siskin 4

American Goldfinch 23

Lapland Longspur 1

Fox Sparrow 5

Dark-eyed Junco 150

White-crowned Sparrow 50

Harris's Sparrow 50

White-throated Sparrow 105

Savannah Sparrow 15

Song Sparrow 22

Swamp Sparrow 3

Eastern Towhee 2

Eastern Meadowlark 110

Red-winged Blackbird 4000

Rusty Blackbird 60

Common Grackle 900

Common Yellowthroat 2

Yellow-rumped Warbler 30

Northern Cardinal 90 Heavy undercount.



View this checklist online at <https://ebird.org/checklist/S78200627> https://ebird.org/checklist/S78200627



This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 ( <https://ebird.org/home> https://ebird.org/home)


 

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Date: 12/29/20 7:03 am
From: Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...>
Subject: Black Vultures/Midwest City
At about 8:10AM this morning, I saw eight
Black Vultures fly over our yard in Midwest City. The birds were very low
and were using a flap/

glide flight style to evidently migrate from north to south.
Most years, there is a big vulture roost in the trees along Crutcho Creek
near the

large dumps between NE 23rd and NE 36th between Sooner Road and
Midwest Boulevard.





Jimmy Woodard

Midwest City


 

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Date: 12/28/20 8:34 pm
From: Marta B. Harris <harrismarta8...>
Subject: Re: Feeder Watch
We've had a similar thing in our neighborhood. A pair seem to have nested across the street for at least 2 seasons. This is a heavily wooded area & the houses across the street have a creek in their backyards.

I miss the passerines, but love to see the sharpie young every spring. Everything has its place. :-)


Suzy Harris
Bartlesvillu

On December 26, 2020, at 5:49 PM, Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...> wrote:

I take part in Feeder Watch each winter. This winter I have noticed a marked decrease in the number of birds using my feeders. It seems to be due to a Sharp Shined Hawk that visits often. I can tell when it is close by when all the usual feeder birds disappear. Today , not a single bird came to the feeder until about noon when a lone Goldfinch came to a hanging feeder and a Sapsucker was on the side of a hard maple about 10’ away. As I was looking at them the hawk tried to catch both of them without success. No more birds came to the feeders until dusk when most returned including 14 Cardinals. I assume the hawk had gone elsewhere. If it stays around it is going to make this winters count look strange compared to past winters records.
Bob Laval
Heavener

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 12/28/20 7:23 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough today
While working at Red Slough today I stopped for a lunch break at the NE
corner of Bittern Lake. While eating my lunch a couple birds flew up in the
trees next to me. I grabbed my binos and was pleasantly surprised to see
the leucistic Yellow-bellied Sapsucker that was first found on our CBC.
This is the third time I have seen it. I then checked out the other bird
and was again surprised to see a Blue-headed Vireo. This is the first one I
have seen in winter away from mature bottomland forest habitat. The habitat
was basically just trees along the creek out in the middle of open
shrub/scrub habitat at least a mile from any woodlands. Hopefully I can
re-find them on my bird survey tomorrow.



David Arbour

De Queen, AR


 

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Date: 12/26/20 7:03 pm
From: HAROLD YOCUM <drhal2...>
Subject: Re: Swan at Overholser Lake OKC
Whoever covered that are on the CBC surely must have seen it and had it in his count. It seems to eat , drink and sleep there at the base of the dam. I think the first I knew of it was from a post by Brian Marra at least a week or more ago. I had not been out there to see it until Monday this week.
Hal Yocum
> On December 26, 2020 at 8:12 PM John Sterling <prairie...> wrote:
>
>
> The big question, is it countable? Nathan said he would check it out. Anyone got opinion? Very interested as that would make five new state birds for the year.
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> > On Dec 26, 2020, at 6:42 PM, Harold yocum <drhal2...> wrote:
> >
> > I saw it on Monday and think it had been there for a couple weeks. It is a mute swan. Beautiful bird.
> > Hal Yocum , Edmond
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
> >
> >> On Dec 26, 2020, at 6:09 PM, Juliette Hulen <00000056647f7088-dmarc-request...> wrote:
> >>
> >> Saw a swan below the (south of) the Overholser dam from the NW 10th St bridge around 2:30 pm Dec 26.
> >>
> >> Juliette Hulen
> >>
> >> Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 12/26/20 5:14 pm
From: John Sterling <prairie...>
Subject: Re: Swan at Overholser Lake OKC
The big question, is it countable? Nathan said he would check it out. Anyone got opinion? Very interested as that would make five new state birds for the year.

Sent from my iPad

> On Dec 26, 2020, at 6:42 PM, Harold yocum <drhal2...> wrote:
>
> I saw it on Monday and think it had been there for a couple weeks. It is a mute swan. Beautiful bird.
> Hal Yocum , Edmond
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Dec 26, 2020, at 6:09 PM, Juliette Hulen <00000056647f7088-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>
>> Saw a swan below the (south of) the Overholser dam from the NW 10th St bridge around 2:30 pm Dec 26.
>>
>> Juliette Hulen
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 12/26/20 4:45 pm
From: Harold yocum <drhal2...>
Subject: Re: Swan at Overholser Lake OKC
I saw it on Monday and think it had been there for a couple weeks. It is a mute swan. Beautiful bird.
Hal Yocum , Edmond

Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 26, 2020, at 6:09 PM, Juliette Hulen <00000056647f7088-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> Saw a swan below the (south of) the Overholser dam from the NW 10th St bridge around 2:30 pm Dec 26.
>
> Juliette Hulen
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 12/26/20 4:11 pm
From: Juliette Hulen <00000056647f7088-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Swan at Overholser Lake OKC
Saw a swan below the (south of) the Overholser dam from the NW 10th St bridge around 2:30 pm Dec 26.

Juliette Hulen

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 12/26/20 3:50 pm
From: Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...>
Subject: Feeder Watch
I take part in Feeder Watch each winter. This winter I have noticed a marked decrease in the number of birds using my feeders. It seems to be due to a Sharp Shined Hawk that visits often. I can tell when it is close by when all the usual feeder birds disappear. Today , not a single bird came to the feeder until about noon when a lone Goldfinch came to a hanging feeder and a Sapsucker was on the side of a hard maple about 10’ away. As I was looking at them the hawk tried to catch both of them without success. No more birds came to the feeders until dusk when most returned including 14 Cardinals. I assume the hawk had gone elsewhere. If it stays around it is going to make this winters count look strange compared to past winters records.
Bob Laval
Heavener

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 12/23/20 8:11 pm
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...>
Subject: BC Night0Herins
There were 8 Black-crowned Night-Herons at Lake Herons today, location was
the cove behind the Fire Station. Matt Jung, OKC

 

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Date: 12/23/20 2:56 pm
From: Jim Arterburn <JIMARTERBURN...>
Subject: Re: Recent Photos

Here is the corrected link

https://pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds


Jim Arterburn



------ Original Message ------
From: "Jim Arterburn" <JIMARTERBURN...>
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Sent: 12/23/2020 4:48:30 PM
Subject: Recent Photos

>OKBirds,
>
>I have added a few recent photos to my website. Some of the species
>added include Bald Eagle, Bonaparte's Gull, Cedar Waxwing, Mountain
>Bluebird, Orange-crowned Warbler and Harlan's Red-tailed Hawk among
>others. See the link to these photos below.
>
>https://pbase.com/edit_gallery/oklahomabirder/recentbirds
><https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?<u...>&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=FTn3msZYjQz9kT1es-08yHG25TBpZURN6gDxwIvmwRo&s=CPbmFRR_1AqqQMtnwLFjFKEUfFPXLKBQez3m8RMVWsE&e=>
>
>Cheers,
>
>Jim Arterburn
 

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Date: 12/23/20 2:51 pm
From: Jim Arterburn <JIMARTERBURN...>
Subject: Recent Photos
OKBirds,

I have added a few recent photos to my website. Some of the species
added include Bald Eagle, Bonaparte's Gull, Cedar Waxwing, Mountain
Bluebird, Orange-crowned Warbler and Harlan's Red-tailed Hawk among
others. See the link to these photos below.

https://pbase.com/edit_gallery/oklahomabirder/recentbirds

Cheers,

Jim Arterburn
 

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Date: 12/22/20 6:08 pm
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...>
Subject: Lake Hefner Today
Hello All,

This Morning at Lake Hefner, saw the previously reported Long-Tailed Duck
from Stars and Stripes Park. Also saw a Red-Necked Grebe to the west of
Hobie Point.

Good Birding,

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK

 

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Date: 12/22/20 10:25 am
From: Landon Neumann <landonneumann25...>
Subject: Pacific Loon, Long-tailed Duck, Surf Scoters
Birded Lake Hefner this morning. Highlights below

Surf Scoters 3 - just north of light house on NE side of lake.
Long-tailed duck - Stars and Stripes Park
Pacific Loon - along west shoreline drive just east of the big metal bridge.

Also had four Lesser Black-backed Gulls throughout the lake. 2 adults and 2
1st cycles.

Landon Neumann
Stillwater OK

 

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