OKbirds
Received From Subject
9/21/17 8:45 pm Foundation Subscriber <drhal2...> Re: Tuesday Morning Bird Walk 9 /19
9/21/17 8:40 pm Foundation Subscriber <drhal2...> Tuesday Morning Bird Walk 9 /19
9/21/17 10:24 am Lewis Pond <breaker57...> Anybody going to Hackberry Flat?
9/20/17 2:30 pm EUGENE YOUNG <EUGENE.YOUNG...> Re: Turkey Vulture Roost
9/20/17 2:17 pm ok_forbs <ok_forbs...> Turkey Vulture Roost
9/20/17 9:14 am Doughty, Russell B. <russell.doughty...> Anyone have eBird Data for Oklahoma
9/19/17 6:20 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - Sept. 19
9/19/17 6:04 pm Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...> Hackberry Flat today
9/19/17 3:17 pm Cyndie Browning <gr8auntieokie...> 2017-09-18 News Update regarding Birding at Sooner Lake
9/18/17 7:28 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough today
9/18/17 9:43 am Mark A. Trainor <mtrain53...> Re: Tree Swallows
9/18/17 9:42 am Mark A. Trainor <mtrain53...> Re: Tree Swallows
9/18/17 8:24 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Tree Swallows
9/18/17 7:54 am Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...> Re: Tree Swallows
9/18/17 1:31 am William Diffin <okiebirder...> Ferruginous Hawk, Barred Owl at meeting tonight
9/17/17 5:45 pm Kristi Hendricks <hendricks.kristi...> Canon EF 400mm lens for sale
9/17/17 10:43 am Joe Grzybowski <j_grzybowski...> Masked duck at Hackberry
9/17/17 10:22 am Josh Engelbert <birdingokie...> Possible Frigatebird - Broken Arrow
9/12/17 4:40 am blaval <blaval...> Re: Birds in a hurricane
9/11/17 8:07 pm Steve Davis <spd8109...> Birds in a hurricane
9/11/17 6:12 pm Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...> Reddish Egret and New Photos
9/11/17 6:57 am Jo <jo.loyd...> Tulsa Birders
9/10/17 10:49 am William Diffin <okiebirder...> Wichita Mtns, BBCU
9/10/17 12:37 am William Diffin <okiebirder...> OOS Fall Meeting Info, Register ASAP
9/9/17 4:03 pm Foundation Subscriber <drhal2...> Re: OOS Fall Meeting Announcement
9/9/17 8:43 am Scott Loss <scottrloss...> Pine Siskin Irruption Year?
9/8/17 6:37 pm Melinda Droege <oklagranny26...> Spoonbills
9/6/17 4:20 pm Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...> American Golden Plovers, North Yukon
9/6/17 3:28 pm Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...> Oxley Nature Center on 9-6-2017
9/5/17 9:12 pm jana singletary <jssingletary...> Re: September Migration Report (2 of 2)
9/5/17 7:39 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Surey - Sept. 5
9/5/17 2:57 pm Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...> Black Mesa Area
9/5/17 10:28 am Terry Mitchell <terry...> Re: September Migration Report (2 of 2)
9/5/17 8:32 am Bird Watcher <russetdm...> Re: Destruction at Hefner Lake
9/5/17 7:21 am Steve Davis <spd8109...> Fwd: Trinidad & Tobago May 2018 for the AAST
9/4/17 6:31 pm Bird Watcher <russetdm...> Destruction at Hefner Lake
9/4/17 5:21 pm Jo <jo.loyd...> Tulsa Audubon Birders
9/3/17 10:23 am Dennis Porebski <dennis.porebski...> Re: September Migration Report (2 of 2)
9/2/17 6:34 pm Charles Lyon <lyon5516...> Fwd: eBird Report - Red Slough WMA, Sep 1, 2017
9/2/17 1:23 pm Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...> Re: Spoonbills
9/2/17 1:09 pm Rosemary Seidler <rseidler...> Re: Spoonbills
9/2/17 12:58 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Migrants
9/2/17 12:47 pm Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...> Spoonbills
9/2/17 9:01 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Birds, Other Wildlife and Automobiles
9/2/17 7:28 am Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...> Reddish Egret
9/1/17 8:46 pm William Diffin <okiebirder...> Call for Abstracts, OOS Fall Meeting
9/1/17 7:19 pm William Diffin <okiebirder...> OOS Fall Meeting Announcement
9/1/17 1:23 pm Dan Reinking <dan...> eclipse observations of birds
9/1/17 10:37 am Patricia Velte <pvelte...> September Migration Report (1 of 2)
9/1/17 10:37 am Patricia Velte <pvelte...> September Migration Report (2 of 2)
8/31/17 12:07 pm Rebecca John <becajohn_50...> Re: Birds, Insects and Spiders - There Is A Connection
8/31/17 11:29 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Birds, Insects and Spiders - There Is A Connection
8/31/17 11:00 am John Shackford <johnshackford...> Re: Birds, Insects and Spiders - There Is A Connection
8/31/17 10:18 am Melinda Droege <oklagranny26...> Re: Birds, Insects and Spiders - There Is A Connection
8/31/17 9:46 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Birds, Insects and Spiders - There Is A Connection
8/31/17 7:09 am David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Update
8/30/17 1:41 pm Ron Huebner <feralbirder...> Re: Birds, Trees, Hurricanes and Floods
8/30/17 10:01 am Jan Dolph <russetdm...> Re: Birds, Trees, Hurricanes and Floods
8/30/17 8:23 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Birds, Trees, Hurricanes and Floods
8/30/17 7:04 am David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough update - spoonbills
8/27/17 1:58 pm Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...> Olive-sided Flycatcher
8/26/17 6:50 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Fw: Hummingbird Pool Party
8/25/17 11:17 pm Steve Davis <spd8109...> Ecuador in March 2018
8/24/17 9:52 pm Bill Adams <ba1980...> Re: Inca Dove
8/24/17 7:35 pm Bob LaVal <blaval...> Inca Dove
8/23/17 7:50 pm Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...> Red Slough April, 2024
8/23/17 6:20 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Swallow-tailed Kite
8/23/17 5:10 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Swallow-tailed Kite
 
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Date: 9/21/17 8:45 pm
From: Foundation Subscriber <drhal2...>
Subject: Re: Tuesday Morning Bird Walk 9 /19
Correction : Next Tuesday's BIRD WALK is on 9/26 ( not 9/16)
Hal Yocum
---- Foundation Subscriber <drhal2...> wrote:
> Tues. morning Ester Kay and myself birded Yukon Park. We sighted 25 species.
> List included:
> Great blue heron
> blue jay
> red shouldered hawk- adults and at least 1 juv.
> a.crow
> chimney swifts- many
> mallard- wild and domestic
> tufted titmouse
> red-bellied woodpecker
> mourning dove
> great egret
> a. robin
> northern mockingbird
> yellow warbler (several all female or 1st fall)
> nashville warbler
> blue-gray gnatcatcher
> downy woodpecker
> eastern phoebe
> carolina chickadee
> miss. kite ( 1 juv)
> northern flicker
> hummingbird ( likely juv rubythroat)
> coopers hawk
> rock dove (pigeon)
> canada goose
> eastern blue bird
>
> Next Tues 9/16 , the morning the walk is at Joe Barnes Park in Midwest City. Meet at 7:30 at the north end parking lot just off E.Reno.
> Hal Yocum
 

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Date: 9/21/17 8:40 pm
From: Foundation Subscriber <drhal2...>
Subject: Tuesday Morning Bird Walk 9 /19
Tues. morning Ester Kay and myself birded Yukon Park. We sighted 25 species.
List included:
Great blue heron
blue jay
red shouldered hawk- adults and at least 1 juv.
a.crow
chimney swifts- many
mallard- wild and domestic
tufted titmouse
red-bellied woodpecker
mourning dove
great egret
a. robin
northern mockingbird
yellow warbler (several all female or 1st fall)
nashville warbler
blue-gray gnatcatcher
downy woodpecker
eastern phoebe
carolina chickadee
miss. kite ( 1 juv)
northern flicker
hummingbird ( likely juv rubythroat)
coopers hawk
rock dove (pigeon)
canada goose
eastern blue bird

Next Tues 9/16 , the morning the walk is at Joe Barnes Park in Midwest City. Meet at 7:30 at the north end parking lot just off E.Reno.
Hal Yocum
 

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Date: 9/21/17 10:24 am
From: Lewis Pond <breaker57...>
Subject: Anybody going to Hackberry Flat?
If anyone is going to Hackberry Flat from the Tulsa area this weekend, I would sure like to ride along. I have gas money!

Lewis Pond
 

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Date: 9/20/17 2:30 pm
From: EUGENE YOUNG <EUGENE.YOUNG...>
Subject: Re: Turkey Vulture Roost
Winfield, KS, has one as well. I've looked for others in Kay County, OK...no luck. Gene

Eugene A. Young


Agriculture, Science & Engineering
1220 E. Grand, PO Box 310
Tonkawa, OK, 74653-0310
Phone: 580-628-6482
Fax: 580-628-6209
E-Mail: <Eugene.Young...>
Website: www.noc.edu


-----Original Message-----
From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of ok_forbs
Sent: Wednesday, September 20, 2017 4:17 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Turkey Vulture Roost


I spent sometime in Oklahoma from Aug. 29 to the 30th.

While staying at the Cheyenne Motel in the town of Cheyenne in Roger Mills Co., we noticed a lot of TV's flying above a tall grain storage bin where feed is manufactured. The manufacturing process makes a fair amount noise, however this did not seem to deter the numerous TV's using it's various topmost structures as a roost.

By nightfall, we counted about 30 TV's using it as a roost. I would guess it's height to be about 80 to 100 feet tall. This is at the northern edge of town on U.S. Route 283.

We have stayed at this motel many times in the past over many years, and have never noticed any roost here before, so it is most likely new.

To my surprise, the two small towns that I frequent most, each have a TV roost within there city limits. The other town being Anthony Ks., which is my hometown.


Eddie Stegall
<Ok_Forb...>
Wichita, Ks.
 

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Date: 9/20/17 2:17 pm
From: ok_forbs <ok_forbs...>
Subject: Turkey Vulture Roost

I spent sometime in Oklahoma from Aug. 29 to the 30th.

While staying at the Cheyenne Motel in the town of Cheyenne in Roger Mills Co., we noticed a lot of TV's flying above a tall grain storage bin where feed is manufactured. The manufacturing process makes a fair amount noise, however this did not seem to deter the numerous TV's using it's various topmost structures as a roost.

By nightfall, we counted about 30 TV's using it as a roost. I would guess it's height to be about 80 to 100 feet tall. This is at the northern edge of town on U.S. Route 283.

We have stayed at this motel many times in the past over many years, and have never noticed any roost here before, so it is most likely new.

To my surprise, the two small towns that I frequent most, each have a TV roost within there city limits. The other town being Anthony Ks., which is my hometown.


Eddie Stegall
<Ok_Forb...>
Wichita, Ks.
 

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Date: 9/20/17 9:14 am
From: Doughty, Russell B. <russell.doughty...>
Subject: Anyone have eBird Data for Oklahoma
Crew,


I requested data from eBird a week ago, but haven't gotten a response. Please contact me if you have the data for Oklahoma and are willing to share it with me. I'm a PhD student and we intend to use it to conduct analysis on juniper encroachment and changes in bird communities.


Thanks,


Russ


---------------
Russell Doughty
PhD Graduate Assistant
Earth Observation and Modeling Facility
Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology
University of Oklahoma
101 David L. Boren Blvd.
Norman, OK 73019
Mobile: (918) 699-9215
www.eomf.ou.edu<http://www.eomf.ou.edu>

 

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Date: 9/19/17 6:20 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Sept. 19
Paul Miliotis (NH) and I surveyed birds today at Red Slough and found 63
species. It was partly cloudy and warm with a slight wind. Lots of
highlights today. The storks and spoonbills were in unit 27B. The storks
were seen as they left 27B and headed west toward their daytime roost
wherever that may be. Of special interest was the Cave Swallows we saw
mixed in with other swallows over Otter Lake. All our resident swallows
have migrated several weeks ago. The swallows we are seeing now are
migrants from further north. Why they contain Cave Swallows is a bit of a
mystery unless these Caves were post breeding dispersals that went way north
of us and our coming back through with the other swallow species. Here is
our list for today:



Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 33 (2 of these had a brood of newly hatched
chicks. Chicks were not included in the count total.)

Wood Duck - 137

Mallard - 4 (eclipse plumaged males.)

Blue-winged Teal - 194

Northern Shoveler - 4

Green-winged Teal - 6

Pied-billed Grebe - 22

Neotropic Cormorant - 2

Anhinga - 9 (also still one active nest with small chicks, and two near
fledging sized young out of their nest on a limb.)

Great-blue Heron - 11

Great Egret - 18

Snowy Egret - 25

Little-blue Heron - 23

Tricolored Heron - 1 juv.

Cattle Egret - 1500

Green Heron - 4

Black-crowned Night-Heron - 2

White Ibis - 18

"Dark" Ibis - 16

Roseate Spoonbill - 16

Wood Stork - 17

Black Vulture - 8

Turkey Vulture - 16

Northern Harrier - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Purple Gallinule - 13 (also one downy black chick.)

Common Gallinule - 25

American Coot - 8

Killdeer - 6

Solitary Sandpiper - 1

Least Sandpiper - 5

Pectoral Sandpiper - 7

Mourning Dove - 1

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 2

White-eyed Vireo - 6 (still singing)

Red-eyed Vireo - 1

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 6

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 4

Bank Swallow - 1

Cliff Swallow - 2

Cave Swallow - 4 (adult plumaged and near adult plumaged birds.)

Barn Swallow - 3

Carolina Chickadee - 3

Tufted Titmouse - 2

Carolina Wren - 7

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 2

Gray Catbird - 1

Brown Thrasher - 1

Yellow Warbler - 2

Black-throated Green Warbler - 1

Black-and-white Warbler - 2

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Wilson's Warbler - 1

Eastern Towhee - 1

Northern Cardinal - 10

Indigo Bunting - 13

Dickcissel - 3

Red-winged Blackbird - 501

American Goldfinch - 1





Odonates:



Fragile Forktail

Common Green Darner

Halloween Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Twelve-spotted Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Blue Dasher

Eastern Amberwing

Hyacinth Glider - 40

Wandering Glider

Black Saddlebags







Herps:



American Alligator

Gray Treefrog species

Southern Leopard Frog





Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR




























 

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Date: 9/19/17 6:04 pm
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...>
Subject: Hackberry Flat today
Lots of water in the Millet and Pintail units and more water in the
Weir unit as I've seen during last two visits. Still many dark Ibis
hanging around, a few GW Egrets and BW Teal. Finally, found that
Common Gallinule in the Weir unit keeping company with THE Masked Duck
and a female BW Teal. I expected more visitors than Valerie and Jimmy
Woodard.

Matt Jung, OKC
 

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Date: 9/19/17 3:17 pm
From: Cyndie Browning <gr8auntieokie...>
Subject: 2017-09-18 News Update regarding Birding at Sooner Lake
Our birdwatching access to the restricted areas of the Sooner Lake power
plant has been suspended, effective immediately, due to safety and security
concerns with the major construction project that is currently underway at
the plant. You can check with me or call the security guard shack at the
plant to see when these restrictions will be lifted. And in the meantime,
the public areas of the lake are still available for birdwatching.

--
Cyndie Browning
<vermilion_flycatcher...>
http://www.adimview.com/Tulsa_Birds_Firebird.html
Tulsa, OK

How do migrating birds know which one to follow?
What if the lead bird just wants to be alone?
-- Bill Bryson, "The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid: A Memoir" (2006)

 

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Date: 9/18/17 7:28 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough today
I toured a couple birders from Arkansas around Red Slough this afternoon.
We had 18 Roseate Spoonbills, 14 Dark Ibis, and 1 Tricolored Heron. All
these birds were in unit 27B in the south borrow ditch and the west borrow
ditch. This is the most spoonbills we have ever seen at Red Slough. Also
had about a dozen White Ibis too.



David Arbour

De Queen, AR


 

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Date: 9/18/17 9:43 am
From: Mark A. Trainor <mtrain53...>
Subject: Re: Tree Swallows
Tom, where did you move from? I moved to Nida two years ago from Tallahassee.

On Sep 18, 2017, at 9:55 AM, Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...><mailto:<tom.curtis...>> wrote:

I lived in Florida prior to moving to OK. In the winter, there were enormous flocks of tree swallows that descended on St. Marks NWR. In some cases, the flock just “rolled” along the ground. The best description I could come up with was that it looked like the output from a lawn-mower going through heavy grass

From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Monday, September 18, 2017 9:37 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...><mailto:<OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Tree Swallows

Three million tree swallows reminds me of our smaller scale Purple Martin migration congregation.

//www.youtube.com/watch?annotation_id=annotation_707677&feature=iv&src_vid=VhgvfhpGJRQ&v=EiTzoS1OZD0<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.youtube.com_watch-3Fannotation-5Fid-3Dannotation-5F707677-26feature-3Div-26src-5Fvid-3DVhgvfhpGJRQ-26v-3DEiTzoS1OZD0&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=mDN7JLizt6ZyEruEWeqcnnpkjpwbLzkA4jthPmGpodY&s=dOS8uGiHt_dwhqJrLEBTRLD2zRF7-POMyj2EK12vkSQ&e=>


Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR
 

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Date: 9/18/17 9:42 am
From: Mark A. Trainor <mtrain53...>
Subject: Re: Tree Swallows


Cheers, M>Train

On Sep 18, 2017, at 9:55 AM, Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...><mailto:<tom.curtis...>> wrote:

I lived in Florida prior to moving to OK. In the winter, there were enormous flocks of tree swallows that descended on St. Marks NWR. In some cases, the flock just “rolled” along the ground. The best description I could come up with was that it looked like the output from a lawn-mower going through heavy grass

From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Monday, September 18, 2017 9:37 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...><mailto:<OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Tree Swallows

Three million tree swallows reminds me of our smaller scale Purple Martin migration congregation.

//www.youtube.com/watch?annotation_id=annotation_707677&feature=iv&src_vid=VhgvfhpGJRQ&v=EiTzoS1OZD0<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.youtube.com_watch-3Fannotation-5Fid-3Dannotation-5F707677-26feature-3Div-26src-5Fvid-3DVhgvfhpGJRQ-26v-3DEiTzoS1OZD0&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=mDN7JLizt6ZyEruEWeqcnnpkjpwbLzkA4jthPmGpodY&s=dOS8uGiHt_dwhqJrLEBTRLD2zRF7-POMyj2EK12vkSQ&e=>


Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR
 

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Date: 9/18/17 8:24 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Tree Swallows
Thanks for sharing the insight. That natural event would be one to see.

Jerry


I lived in Florida prior to moving to OK. In the winter, there were
> enormous flocks of tree swallows that descended on St. Marks NWR. In some
> cases, the flock just “rolled” along the ground. The best description
> I could come up with was that it looked like the output from a lawn-mower
> going through heavy grass
>
> From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
> Sent: Monday, September 18, 2017 9:37 AM
> To: <OKBIRDS...>
> Subject: Tree Swallows
>
> Three million tree swallows reminds me of our smaller scale Purple Martin
> migration congregation.
>
> //www.youtube.com/watch?annotation_id=annotation_707677&feature=iv&src_vid=VhgvfhpGJRQ&v=EiTzoS1OZD0<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.youtube.com_watch-3Fannotation-5Fid-3Dannotation-5F707677-26feature-3Div-26src-5Fvid-3DVhgvfhpGJRQ-26v-3DEiTzoS1OZD0&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=mDN7JLizt6ZyEruEWeqcnnpkjpwbLzkA4jthPmGpodY&s=dOS8uGiHt_dwhqJrLEBTRLD2zRF7-POMyj2EK12vkSQ&e=>
>
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs, AR
>
 

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Date: 9/18/17 7:54 am
From: Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...>
Subject: Re: Tree Swallows
I lived in Florida prior to moving to OK. In the winter, there were enormous flocks of tree swallows that descended on St. Marks NWR. In some cases, the flock just “rolled” along the ground. The best description I could come up with was that it looked like the output from a lawn-mower going through heavy grass

From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Monday, September 18, 2017 9:37 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Tree Swallows

Three million tree swallows reminds me of our smaller scale Purple Martin migration congregation.

//www.youtube.com/watch?annotation_id=annotation_707677&feature=iv&src_vid=VhgvfhpGJRQ&v=EiTzoS1OZD0<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.youtube.com_watch-3Fannotation-5Fid-3Dannotation-5F707677-26feature-3Div-26src-5Fvid-3DVhgvfhpGJRQ-26v-3DEiTzoS1OZD0&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=mDN7JLizt6ZyEruEWeqcnnpkjpwbLzkA4jthPmGpodY&s=dOS8uGiHt_dwhqJrLEBTRLD2zRF7-POMyj2EK12vkSQ&e=>


Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR
 

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Date: 9/18/17 1:31 am
From: William Diffin <okiebirder...>
Subject: Ferruginous Hawk, Barred Owl at meeting tonight
At the OKC Audubon meeting tonight, Yong Brenneman will show a
Ferruginous Hawk and a Barred Owl. Yong has been a practicing falconer
and volunteer spokesperson for the USFWS since 2000 and has been
involved in raptor rehabilitation for 25 years. Through caring for
birds she has acquired an intimate knowledge of their personalities
and behavior which she will share at the meeting. Yong and her birds
are a frequent presence at the Wichita Mountains NWR Visitor's Center
where she enjoys answering questions from visitors, especially
students and Boy Scouts. Join us tonight for some special insights
into the lives of raptors. Anyone who is interested is welcome to
attend, particularly youngsters. For more background on our guest
speaker go to www.okc-audubon.org. The meeting will be 7-9 PM at the
Will Rogers Park Garden Exhibition Center at NW 36th St and I-44. Note
that the 36th St bridge over I-44 is currently closed for
construction. However the approach to the Garden Exhibition Center
from the west on NW 36th St is open, I used it Friday. Here is a link
to the info from ODOT thanks to Marion Homier,
https://ok.gov/triton/modules/newsroom/newsroom_article.php
id=277&article_id=35422.

The Oklahoma City Audubon Society
Bill Diffin, President
 

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Date: 9/17/17 5:45 pm
From: Kristi Hendricks <hendricks.kristi...>
Subject: Canon EF 400mm lens for sale
Hello, Birders:

I have one of these for sale:
https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/12129-USA/Canon_2526A004_400mm_f_5_6L_USM_Autofocus.html

It has been used a handful of times and is in great, cared-for condition.
Comes in original box and the zippered case that came with it.

I also have a Targus 58 inch tripod (extends 4.5 feet) I will throw in with
the lens. It has its original box, too, and carrying bag.

I'm thinking about $1,500, but, let me know of any other offers you may
have.

Thank you for looking/any interest!

Best Always,
Kristi

 

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Date: 9/17/17 10:43 am
From: Joe Grzybowski <j_grzybowski...>
Subject: Masked duck at Hackberry
From my iPhone fat finger message. But visited Hackberry. Had masked duck in Wier Unit below the visitor's center.
CHEERS. JOE Grzybowski

Sent from my iPhone

.
 

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Date: 9/17/17 10:22 am
From: Josh Engelbert <birdingokie...>
Subject: Possible Frigatebird - Broken Arrow
A friend of mine just asked me if any birds around here resemble a Frigatebird. He saw it flying low near Aspen and 101st in BA. I thought it would be worth posting in case anyone nearby has a chance to investigate.

Good luck!

Josh Engelbert
Copan, OK
 

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Date: 9/12/17 4:40 am
From: blaval <blaval...>
Subject: Re: Birds in a hurricane
Thanks for this article Steve. I knew they got trapped in the eye, but always wondered about the others.

Sent from my iPad

> On Sep 11, 2017, at 10:07 PM, Steve Davis <spd8109...> wrote:
>
> Interesting article:
>
> https://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2017/09/08/where-do-birds-go-in-a-hurricane/#169bd254254a

 

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Date: 9/11/17 8:07 pm
From: Steve Davis <spd8109...>
Subject: Birds in a hurricane
Interesting article:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2017/09/08/where-do-birds-go-in-a-hurricane/#169bd254254a

 

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Date: 9/11/17 6:12 pm
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...>
Subject: Reddish Egret and New Photos
Hello All,

Here is the link to the iNaturalist observation of a juvenile Reddish Egret
at Salt Plains on 09/02/17:

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/7829432

Also, I have added photos from July and August to the recent gallery on my
PBase site:

http://www.pbase.com/lctsimages/recent

In addition, I've added new galleries from a mid-August trip to SW New
Mexico and SE Arizona, along with a few from Black Mesa State Park. I
created a separate gallery for dragonflies and damselflies in order to post
the link on the SW Odes list:

http://www.pbase.com/lctsimages/nm_az_ok_8_17

http://www.pbase.com/lctsimages/tripodes2017

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK

 

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Date: 9/11/17 6:57 am
From: Jo <jo.loyd...>
Subject: Tulsa Birders
The Tulsa birding group is meeting in Broken Arrow at the Bass Pro parking
lot at 8 a.m. tomorrow, September 12 rather than LaFortune Park. Is you
need additional information, e-mail me off line.



Jo


 

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Date: 9/10/17 10:49 am
From: William Diffin <okiebirder...>
Subject: Wichita Mtns, BBCU
Hal Yocum reports a Black-billed Cuckoo at the following location yesterday,

"It was seen at the Educational Center on the north side of Quannah
Parker Lake along the paved path , past the bridge entrance and on
toward the end of the trail, just before the trail splits to make the
loop."

Bill Diffin, OKC
 

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Date: 9/10/17 12:37 am
From: William Diffin <okiebirder...>
Subject: OOS Fall Meeting Info, Register ASAP
As previously announced on OKbirds, the OOS Fall Meeting will be Oct.
13-15 at the Univerisity of Oklahoma Biological Station at Lake
Texoma. There are accomodations available at the station, but the
space is limited, and this will be a joint meeting with the Friends
organization for the station. Therefore please register ASAP if you
want to lodge at the station. It is particularly important to register
now if you want to stay in an "apartment" room rather than a "suite"
room, but it really applies no matter what type of room you choose.
Don't wait for the OOS newsletter to come out to register. It will be
too late. Download the mail-in registration form now from the OOS web
site or use the Pay Pal window. In any case the station needs to have
the final registration head counts for meals as well as rooms by the
end of September. This is earlier, i.e. two weeks before the meeting,
than we usually require registration. Please don't wait to register.

In addition to the usual OOS silent auction of field guides, nature
books and art, the Friends will have a merchandise sale as well as a
special live auction for premium items. Julia Yoshida, the organizer
of the Friends sales, provided the following info,

"We will have a live auction of the more desirable objects. Plus
on-going sales of things of lesser value such as jewelry, out of print
monographs from the Nuttall Ornithological Club, other
ornithology/bird/biology books, children’s books, genuine Hawaiian
aloha shirts, artist-contributed wildlife prints, sun protective hats
and shirts from Sun Precautions, etc. The "please no haggling" phrase
applies to the on-going sales. This sale begins at noon on Friday,
and ends before the auction."

Neither OOS nor the Friends take credit cards. Therefore be prepared
to deliver a check or cash for purchased items.

And don't forget to bring your binoculars. We have field trips to
Hagerman NWR and Tishomingo NWR scheduled for Saturday and Sunday
morning. There should be some excellent birding to go along with the
sales and the technical program. The banquet presentation is titled,
"Sea birds signal ocean changes: Elegant Terns respond to prey,
predators and heat in the eastern Pacific", and will be given by Dr.
Michael Horn of Cal State Fullerton, originally from northeastern
Oklahoma, Tahlequah and Stillwell.

The Oklahoma Ornithological Society
Bill Diffin, President-Elect
 

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Date: 9/9/17 4:03 pm
From: Foundation Subscriber <drhal2...>
Subject: Re: OOS Fall Meeting Announcement
Bill, do we have our first OKC Audubon fall meeting this month on the 18th?
Hal
---- William Diffin <okiebirder...> wrote:
> The Fall Meeting of Oklahoma Ornithological Society will be held Oct
> 13-15 at the University of Oklahoma Biological Station on the north
> shore of Lake Texoma. Attendance is open to non-members of OOS. This
> will be a joint meeting with the Friends of the University of Oklahoma
> Biological Station. The Fall Meeting of OOS is the annual technical
> meeting. The technical session will be on Saturday afternoon, October
> 14. It will consist of 15-minute presentations on research in
> ornithology, avian ecology and related fields. A 30-minute poster
> session will follow the presentations. This meeting will also feature
> a field trip to Hagerman NWR on Saturday morning, led by Dr. Wayne
> Meyer, and a filed trip to Tishomingo NWR on Sunday morning, led by
> Dr. Doug Wood. The guest speaker at the Saturday night banquet will be
> Dr. Michael Horn of California State Fullerton who will present
> findings from more than 20 years of research into the ecology of
> Elegant Terns, the most abundant coastal seabird in southern
> California. The title of the talk is "Seabirds signal ocean changes:
> Elegant Terns (Thalasseus elegans) respond to prey, predators and heat
> in the eastern Pacific". Dr. Horn was born in Tahlequah and received
> his early education in a two-room school in Stillwell. He later went
> on to receive degrees at Northeastern Oklahoma State, University of
> Oklahoma and Harvard University where he earned a PhD. At the Friday
> night check-in social at the station, Dr. Wood will conduct a bird
> quiz and some other activities based on the station's specimen
> collection. Attendees at the Fall Meeting may make reservations for
> meals and lodging at the station. The meeting registration fee is $10
> for non-students and $5 for students. Non-students who register using
> the Pay Pal window on the OOS website will receive a $5 discount on
> the registration fee. The full meeting announcement, schedule and
> registration form are available at www.okbirds.org. Anyone interested
> in birds, birding or ornithology is encouraged to attend this event.
>
> The Oklahoma Ornithological Society
> Bill Diffin, President Elect
 

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Date: 9/9/17 8:43 am
From: Scott Loss <scottrloss...>
Subject: Pine Siskin Irruption Year?
This morning, I had my 2nd abnormally early observation for the fall of
Pine Siskins migrating over our Stillwater yard, including 2 different
flyover birds (the 1st sighting was a single siskin back on August 27th).
Given these early sightings, I'm curious if we might be in for a big
irruption year for this species.

The vast majority of my siskin sightings are based on first hearing the
distinct 2 note "klee-er" flight call that they typically give every couple
of seconds. An example of the call can be found near the bottom of the
following page at the "calls #4" link:

http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/pine-siskin

Scott Loss
Stillwater

 

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Date: 9/8/17 6:37 pm
From: Melinda Droege <oklagranny26...>
Subject: Spoonbills
Just got back from a great trip to Red Slough...haven't been for quite a
while and it is even more wonderful than I remember. Anyway I didn't see
the Roseate Spoonbills at Red Slough...six of them were at Ward Lake about
10:00. No Wood Storks were seen at either place but that might just be me.

Saw all the usual suspects at Red Slough tho I didn't concentrate on
passerines...

go see the Spoonbills...they were all sitting in a dead tree at Ward Lake
and were beautiful...some were juvies and not so pink but two were truly
rosy!

Melinda Droege
Bartlesville

 

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Date: 9/6/17 4:20 pm
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...>
Subject: American Golden Plovers, North Yukon
Around 3 PM today two American Golden Plovers were feeding on the east
side of the playa along Mustang Road (the East Playa), about 1/2 mile
north of NW 50th. Both were still in good breeding plumage. Was able
to capture diagnostic photos from long distance.

A very late report; last week Thursday I found one juvenile White Ibis
at Hackberry Flat, in the Pintail Unit, about 1/4 mile west of the
road running between Pintail and Millet Units.


Matt Jung, OKC
 

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Date: 9/6/17 3:28 pm
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...>
Subject: Oxley Nature Center on 9-6-2017
Hello All,

Janet Young and I walked some of the trails at Oxley Nature Center in Tulsa this morning. It was cool, sunny and there were some migrants around. A nice mudflat is forming at the west end of Lake Sherry. Highlights included:


Blue-winged Teal-100+

American Wigeon-1

Snowy Egret-2

White-eyed Vireo-3

Blue-headed Vireo-1

Warbling Vireo-2

Red-eyed Vireo-2

House Wren-1

Northern Parula Warbler-1

Yellow Warbler-1

Nashville Warbler-1

Chestnut-sided Warbler-1

American Redstart-1

Wilson's Warbler-4


Mark Peterson

Bartlesville



 

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Date: 9/5/17 9:12 pm
From: jana singletary <jssingletary...>
Subject: Re: September Migration Report (2 of 2)
Yes, birders are allowed to go inside the Northside Wastewater Treatment Plant. You must stop at the office first and sign a waiver. Then you simply stop at the security booth and inform the guard that you have signed the waiver and have permission to bird.

Jana Singletary
Tulsa

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 5, 2017, at 12:27 PM, Terry Mitchell <terry...> wrote:
>
> In the Tulsa area we are dependent on rain for shore birds. After a heavy rain the 56th Street north, Bixby and Lenard sod farms can be spectacular. Without a heavy rain we don’t have much. You can sometimes get a few shorebirds on the apron at Yahola and if there’s been no rain for a while sometimes you can get some on Lake Sherry at Oxley. The sewage ponds on 56th street north used to be the best place for shorebirds but at one time we were banned because we might be terrorists, although someone told me recently that they got permission to go in again.
>
> Terry Mitchell
>
> From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Dennis Porebski
> Sent: Sunday, September 03, 2017 12:22 PM
> To: <OKBIRDS...>
> Subject: Re: September Migration Report (2 of 2)
>
> Hey all! I'm really wanting to see some migrating shorebirds here in Tulsa County before they move south. I know some of the sod farms are good places to search for them but does anyone have any hints or tips as to what time (during the day) is best to go? Due to my work schedule I only can go on weekends so I was wondering when the best use of my time would be and when I would be most likely to see some shorebirds. I know after a rainstorm is a good idea, especially in flooded areas, but I would really appreciate any help I can get from more experienced and seasoned birders. Thank you!
>
> Best,
>
> Dennis Porebski
>
> On Sep 1, 2017, at 12:37 PM, Patricia Velte <pvelte...> wrote:
>
> September Departures
>
> Mottled Duck September 6 - Rare in S. McCurtain Co. only
> Least Bittern September 29 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Tricolored Heron September 27 - Rare in Alfalfa Co. only in NW, Rare in Canadian and Oklahoma Cos, only in C, Rare in Johnston Co. only in SC, Rare in Bryan, Choctaw and S. McCurtain Cos. Only in SE
> White Ibis September 16 - C, SC
> Wood Stork September 27 - Johnston and Marshall Cos. Only in SC; Bryan, Choctaw and S. McCurtain Cos. Only in SE
> Mississippi Kite September 30 - ALL - East to Washington, Rogers, Wagoner and Muskogee Cos. Only
> Spotted Sandpiper September 27 - PAN
> Willet September 12 - ALL
> Upland Sandpiper September 10 - PAN and September 28 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Long-billed Curlew September 10 - PAN Cimarron and Texas Cos. Only
> Marbled Godwit September 20 - PAN, NW, SW, C, SC, NE
> Ruddy Turnstone September 28 - NW west to Alfalfa, Major and Blaine Cos. Only, SW west to Washita, Kiowa and Tillman Cos. Only, C, SC, NE, SE
> Common Gallinule September 15 - NW rare in Major Co only, SW Rare in Tillman Co. only, C, SC
> Black-necked Stilt September 16 - PAN, C, SC, SE rare in S. McCurtain Co only
> Piping Plover September 28 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE
> Least Tern September 21 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Buff-breasted Sandpiper September 24 - NW west to Woods, Woodward, Dewey and Custer cos only, SW west to Washita, Kiowa and Tillman cos only, C, SC, NE, SE
> Short-billed Dowitcher September 16 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Chuck-will's-widow September 12 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Black-chinned Hummingbird September 15 - PAN Cimarron Co only and September 20 - NW north to Blaine, Dewey and Roger Mills cos, SW, C east to Logan, Oklahoma and Cleveland Cos, SC rare in Stephens and Jefferson cos only
> Black-billed Cuckoo September 20 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Common Nighthawk September 28 - PAN
> Olive-sided Flycatcher September 30 - ALL
> Western Wood-Pewee September 26 - PAN Cimarron Co only
> Eastern Wood-Pewee September 30 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Yellow-bellied Flycatcher September 25 - SW west to Caddo, Comanche and Cotton cos only, C, SC, NE, SE
> Acadian Flycatcher September 1 - SC Pontotoc, Johnston and Marshall cos only, NE, SE
> Alder Flycatcher September 16 - C, SC, NE, SE
> Willow Flycatcher September 25 - ALL
> Hammond's Flycatcher September 26 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only
> Dusky Flycatcher September 26 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only
> Vermilion Flycatcher September 15 - PAN rare in northwestern Cimarron Co only
> Ash-throated Flycatcher September 2 - PAN Cimarron co and rare in Texas and Beaver cos; NW rare in Blaine Co only, SW west to Comanche and Tillman cos only
> Great Crested Flycatcher September 17 - PAN Texas and Beaver Cos only and September 25 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Cassin's Kingbird September 28 - PAN northwestern Cimarron Co only
> Western Kingbird September 29 - PAN
> Eastern Kingbird September 15 - PAN and September 21 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE
> Bell's Vireo September 26 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Black-capped Vireo September 28 - Comanche Co only
> Yellow-throated Vireo September 29 - C west to Payne, Oklahoma and Cleveland cos only, SC Pontotoc and Johnston cos only, NE, SE
> Plumbeous Vireo September 21 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only
> Cassin's Vireo September 7 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only
> Warbling Vireo September 30 - ALL
> Purple Martin September 12 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Tree Swallow September 20 - PAN, NW
> Northern Rough-winged Swallow September 20 - PAN
> Bank Swallow September 27 - ALL
> Cliff Swallow September 6 - PAN and September 28 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Cave Swallow September 10 - SW rare in Comanche and Kiowa cos only and September 10 - SE rare in south McCurtain co only
> Swainson's Thrush September 30 - ALL
> Northern Waterthrush September 21 - ALL
> Black-and-white Warbler September 27 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Prothonotary Warbler September 10 - NW Alfalfa and Major cos only, C, SC, NE, SE
> Swainson's Warbler September 4 - SE rare in McCurtain co only
> Virginia's Warbler September 15 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only
> MacGillivray's Warbler September 20 - PAN Cimarron Co only
> Kentucky Warbler September 26 - C west to Logan, Oklahoma and Cleveland cos only, SC Johnston and Pontotoc cos only, NE, SE
> Common Yellowthroat September 26 - PAN
> Hooded Warbler September 28 - SE Latimer, LeFlore, Pushmataha and McCurtain cos only
> American Redstart September 28 - ALL
> Bay-breasted Warbler September 27 - NE, SE
> Yellow Warbler September 12 - PAN and September 25 - NW, C, NE and September 20 - SW and September 30 - SE
> Chestnut-sided Warbler September 27 - SW rare in Comanche Co, C, SC, NE, SE
> Yellow-throated Warbler September 25 - C west to Payne, Lincoln and Cleveland Cos only, SC west to Pontotoc, Murray, Johnston and Love cos only, NE, SE
> Townsend's Warbler September 21 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only
> Canada Warbler September 23 - C, SC, NE, SE
> Yellow-breasted Chat September 9 - PAN and September 19 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Green-tailed Towhee September 29 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only
> Cassin's Sparrow September 2 - PAN, NW west to Alfalfa and Major cos only, SW, C rare in Canadian Co only, SC rare in Jefferson and Carter cos only
> Lark Sparrow September 22 - PAN
> Black-throated Sparrow September 16 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only
> Grasshopper Sparrow September 24 - PAN
> Western Tanager September 25 - PAN
> Black-headed Grosbeak September 21 - PAN
> Lazuli Bunting September 25 - PAN
> Painted Bunting September 23 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Bobolink September 27 - NW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Orchard Oriole September 11 - ALL
> Bullock's Oriole September 11 - PAN, NW Harper, Ellis and Roger Mills cos only, SW all counties except Caddo, east Comanche and Cotton cos.
> Baltimore Oriole September 25 - NW, SW all counties except Harmon, Greer and Jackson cos, C, SC, NE, SE
> Red Knot September 20 - NW rare in Alfalfa Co only, C, NE
>
>
> Pat Velte
> <pvelte...>
> Oklahoma City, OK
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/5/17 7:39 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Surey - Sept. 5
It was partly cloudy, warm, and a little windy on the survey today. 70
species were found. I was on the Pintail Lake observation platform early
this morning when I heard what sounded similar to the call of a
Black-bellied Whistling Duck but was a little different. I looked up and
here came a whistling duck from the NE but something wasn't quite right. I
put my glasses on it as it passed me on the platform and it turned out to be
a Fulvous Whistling Duck! It circled around the backside of Pintail Lake
then turned back east and kept going. Hopefully it will stay in the area.
As I worked my way south on the levee and reached the east levee of Lotus
Lake where I could view unit 27B to the east I found a large group of dark
ibis and shorebirds in the drying up borrow area. As I watched I saw a
spoonbill and a stork land way out in the unit. Then a crop duster plane
came flying low over the unit from the east and all the birds got up. There
were 11 Wood Storks and 9 Roseate Spoonbills and swarms of herons, egrets,
and shorebirds all in the air at once. Was quite a sight. The Purple
Gallinules are mostly gone now. They seem to be leaving early this year but
maybe that's good for them as hunting season is open on them and we had a
guy hunting them from a kayak this past weekend. Here is my list for today:



Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 6

Fulvous Whistling Duck - 1

Wood Duck - 36

Blue-winged Teal - 111

Pied-billed Grebe - 12

American White Pelican - 11

Neotropic Cormorant - 3

Anhinga - 16

Least Bittern - 1

Great-blue Heron - 7

Great Egret - 20

Snowy Egret - 22

Little-blue Heron - 22

Cattle Egret - ~2000

Green Heron - 8

White Ibis - 13

"Dark" Ibis - 29

Roseate Spoonbill - 9

Wood Stork - 11

Black Vulture - 7

Turkey Vulture - 28

Northern Harrier - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 1

Purple Gallinule - 5

Common Gallinule - 42

American Coot - 6

Killdeer - 9

Solitary Sandpiper - 7

Greater Yellowlegs - 1

Semipalmated Sandpiper - 1

Western Sandpiper - 1

Least Sandpiper - 75

Pectoral Sandpiper - 34

Buff-breasted Sandpiper - 1

Wilson's Snipe - 15

Mourning Dove - 3

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 2

Barred Owl - 1

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 5

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 4

Alder Flycatcher - 1

Willow Flycatcher - 1

Least Flycatcher - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 3

Loggerhead Shrike - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 7 (still singing)

Blue Jay - 2

American Crow - 9

Tree Swallow - 4

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 15

Cliff Swallow - 1

Barn Swallow - 9

Carolina Chickadee - 3

Tufted Titmouse - 1

Carolina Wren - 5

Yellow Warbler - 1

Black-and-white Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 2

Summer Tanager - 1

Eastern Towhee - 1

Northern Cardinal - 15

Indigo Bunting - 5

Dickcissel - 4

Red-winged Blackbird - 29

Baltimore Oriole - 1 adult male



Odonates:



Common Green Darner

Royal River Cruiser

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Twelve-spotted Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Blue Dasher

Hyacinth Glider - 3

Wandering Glider

Striped Saddlebags - 2

Black Saddlebags







Herps:



American Alligator

Green Treefrog

Bullfrog - calling





Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR
























 

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Date: 9/5/17 2:57 pm
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...>
Subject: Black Mesa Area
Hello All,

Made a quick run out west over the long weekend, ending up in the Black
Mesa area. No rarities, other than the previously posted juvenile Reddish
Egret at Salt Plains. In BM State park itself, I think that there were
literally more people than birds. Kenton was equally quiet. The one hot
spot was the beginning of the road to the Easter pageant site, highlights
following:

Chipping Sparrow
Brewer's Sparrow
Woodhouse's Scrub Jay
Pinyon Jay
Bushtit
Juniper Titmouse
Red-Breasted Nuthatch
Black-Headed Grosbeak
Macgillivray's Warbler
Wilson's Warbler
Rock Wren
Canyon Wren
Canyon Towhee
Rufous-Crowned Sparrow

Good Birding,

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK

 

Back to top
Date: 9/5/17 10:28 am
From: Terry Mitchell <terry...>
Subject: Re: September Migration Report (2 of 2)
In the Tulsa area we are dependent on rain for shore birds. After a heavy
rain the 56th Street north, Bixby and Lenard sod farms can be spectacular.
Without a heavy rain we don’t have much. You can sometimes get a few
shorebirds on the apron at Yahola and if there’s been no rain for a while
sometimes you can get some on Lake Sherry at Oxley. The sewage ponds on 56th
street north used to be the best place for shorebirds but at one time we
were banned because we might be terrorists, although someone told me
recently that they got permission to go in again.



Terry Mitchell



*From:* okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] *On Behalf Of *Dennis Porebski
*Sent:* Sunday, September 03, 2017 12:22 PM
*To:* <OKBIRDS...>
*Subject:* Re: September Migration Report (2 of 2)



Hey all! I'm really wanting to see some migrating shorebirds here in Tulsa
County before they move south. I know some of the sod farms are good places
to search for them but does anyone have any hints or tips as to what time
(during the day) is best to go? Due to my work schedule I only can go on
weekends so I was wondering when the best use of my time would be and when
I would be most likely to see some shorebirds. I know after a rainstorm is
a good idea, especially in flooded areas, but I would really appreciate any
help I can get from more experienced and seasoned birders. Thank you!

Best,



Dennis Porebski


On Sep 1, 2017, at 12:37 PM, Patricia Velte <pvelte...> wrote:

*September Departures*



Mottled Duck September 6 - Rare in S. McCurtain
Co. only

Least Bittern September 29 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE,
SE

Tricolored Heron September 27 - Rare in Alfalfa Co.
only in NW, Rare in Canadian and Oklahoma Cos, only in C, Rare in Johnston
Co. only in SC, Rare in Bryan, Choctaw and S. McCurtain Cos. Only in SE

White Ibis September 16 - C, SC

Wood Stork September 27 - Johnston and Marshall
Cos. Only in SC; Bryan, Choctaw and S. McCurtain Cos. Only in SE

Mississippi Kite September 30 - ALL - East to
Washington, Rogers, Wagoner and Muskogee Cos. Only

Spotted Sandpiper September 27 - PAN

Willet September 12 - ALL

Upland Sandpiper September 10 - PAN and September 28 -
NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Long-billed Curlew September 10 - PAN Cimarron and Texas
Cos. Only

Marbled Godwit September 20 - PAN, NW, SW, C, SC, NE

Ruddy Turnstone September 28 - NW west to Alfalfa, Major
and Blaine Cos. Only, SW west to Washita, Kiowa and Tillman Cos. Only, C,
SC, NE, SE

Common Gallinule September 15 - NW rare in Major Co only,
SW Rare in Tillman Co. only, C, SC

Black-necked Stilt September 16 - PAN, C, SC, SE rare in
S. McCurtain Co only

Piping Plover September 28 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE

Least Tern September 21 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE,
SE

Buff-breasted Sandpiper September 24 - NW west to Woods, Woodward,
Dewey and Custer cos only, SW west to Washita, Kiowa and Tillman cos only,
C, SC, NE, SE

Short-billed Dowitcher September 16 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Chuck-will's-widow September 12 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Black-chinned Hummingbird September 15 - PAN Cimarron Co only and
September 20 - NW north to Blaine, Dewey and Roger Mills cos, SW, C east to
Logan, Oklahoma and Cleveland Cos, SC rare in Stephens and Jefferson cos
only

Black-billed Cuckoo September 20 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Common Nighthawk September 28 - PAN

Olive-sided Flycatcher September 30 - ALL

Western Wood-Pewee September 26 - PAN Cimarron Co only

Eastern Wood-Pewee September 30 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Yellow-bellied Flycatcher September 25 - SW west to Caddo, Comanche
and Cotton cos only, C, SC, NE, SE

Acadian Flycatcher September 1 - SC Pontotoc, Johnston and
Marshall cos only, NE, SE

Alder Flycatcher September 16 - C, SC, NE, SE

Willow Flycatcher September 25 - ALL

Hammond's Flycatcher September 26 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only

Dusky Flycatcher September 26 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co
only

Vermilion Flycatcher September 15 - PAN rare in northwestern
Cimarron Co only

Ash-throated Flycatcher September 2 - PAN Cimarron co and rare in
Texas and Beaver cos; NW rare in Blaine Co only, SW west to Comanche and
Tillman cos only

Great Crested Flycatcher September 17 - PAN Texas and Beaver Cos only
and September 25 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Cassin's Kingbird September 28 - PAN northwestern
Cimarron Co only

Western Kingbird September 29 - PAN

Eastern Kingbird September 15 - PAN and September 21 -
NW, SW, C, SC, NE

Bell's Vireo September 26 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE,
SE

Black-capped Vireo September 28 - Comanche Co only

Yellow-throated Vireo September 29 - C west to Payne, Oklahoma
and Cleveland cos only, SC Pontotoc and Johnston cos only, NE, SE

Plumbeous Vireo September 21 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co
only

Cassin's Vireo September 7 - PAN rare in Cimarron
Co only

Warbling Vireo September 30 - ALL

Purple Martin September 12 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Tree Swallow September 20 - PAN, NW

Northern Rough-winged Swallow September 20 - PAN

Bank Swallow September 27 - ALL

Cliff Swallow September 6 - PAN and September 28
- NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Cave Swallow September 10 - SW rare in Comanche and
Kiowa cos only and September 10 - SE rare in south McCurtain co only

Swainson's Thrush September 30 - ALL

Northern Waterthrush September 21 - ALL

Black-and-white Warbler September 27 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Prothonotary Warbler September 10 - NW Alfalfa and Major cos
only, C, SC, NE, SE

Swainson's Warbler September 4 - SE rare in McCurtain co only

Virginia's Warbler September 15 - PAN rare in Cimarron
Co only

MacGillivray's Warbler September 20 - PAN Cimarron Co only

Kentucky Warbler September 26 - C west to Logan, Oklahoma
and Cleveland cos only, SC Johnston and Pontotoc cos only, NE, SE

Common Yellowthroat September 26 - PAN

Hooded Warbler September 28 - SE Latimer, LeFlore,
Pushmataha and McCurtain cos only

American Redstart September 28 - ALL

Bay-breasted Warbler September 27 - NE, SE

Yellow Warbler September 12 - PAN and September 25 -
NW, C, NE and September 20 - SW and September 30 - SE

Chestnut-sided Warbler September 27 - SW rare in Comanche Co, C,
SC, NE, SE

Yellow-throated Warbler September 25 - C west to Payne, Lincoln and
Cleveland Cos only, SC west to Pontotoc, Murray, Johnston and Love cos
only, NE, SE

Townsend's Warbler September 21 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only

Canada Warbler September 23 - C, SC, NE, SE

Yellow-breasted Chat September 9 - PAN and September 19 - NW,
SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Green-tailed Towhee September 29 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only

Cassin's Sparrow September 2 - PAN, NW west to Alfalfa
and Major cos only, SW, C rare in Canadian Co only, SC rare in Jefferson
and Carter cos only

Lark Sparrow September 22 - PAN

Black-throated Sparrow September 16 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only

Grasshopper Sparrow September 24 - PAN

Western Tanager September 25 - PAN

Black-headed Grosbeak September 21 - PAN

Lazuli Bunting September 25 - PAN

Painted Bunting September 23 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Bobolink September 27 - NW, C, SC, NE, SE

Orchard Oriole September 11 - ALL

Bullock's Oriole September 11 - PAN, NW Harper, Ellis
and Roger Mills cos only, SW all counties except Caddo, east Comanche and
Cotton cos.

Baltimore Oriole September 25 - NW, SW all counties
except Harmon, Greer and Jackson cos, C, SC, NE, SE

Red Knot September 20 - NW rare in Alfalfa
Co only, C, NE





Pat Velte

<pvelte...>

Oklahoma City, OK

 

Back to top
Date: 9/5/17 8:32 am
From: Bird Watcher <russetdm...>
Subject: Re: Destruction at Hefner Lake
Sent from my iPad

> On Sep 4, 2017, at 8:30 PM, Bird Watcher <russetdm...> wrote:
>
> Does anyone have a clue what Oklahoma City is doing at Hefner Lake? The area that at one time called Prairie Dog Point is all torn up. The road has been grated, trees are down, and brush is stacked. My car could hardly get around with the pot holes. Are they enlarging the road? I found no birds today. I would appreciate any information.
>
> Happy birding,
>
> Jan Dolph
>
> Sent from my iPad
 

Back to top
Date: 9/5/17 7:21 am
From: Steve Davis <spd8109...>
Subject: Fwd: Trinidad & Tobago May 2018 for the AAST
FYI--Dr Kannan, University of Arkansas-Ft Smith, asked me to pass this
along to OKbirds list-serv. Mary and I have been on this trip with him and
had a great time. All three islands have interesting habitat and birds.
Mary and I will be making a presentation about our experience there at the
November OCAS meeting.
--steve and mary



----- Forwarded message -----
*From:* Ragupathy Kannan: <ragupathy.kannan...>


Hi all, I will be leading a Trinidad & Tobago nature tour May 24 - 31,
2018, to raise funds for the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust, in which I
serve as a trustee. The trust, as you know, funds research and
conservation projects mostly in Arkansas.

Highlights of the Trinidad & Tobago tour include:

* Three nights in Asa Wright Nature Centre, Trinidad, one of the most
famous ecolodges in the world-- www.asawright.org
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.asawright.org_&d=AwMFaQ&c=JL-fUnQvtjNLb7dA39cQUcqmjBVITE8MbOdX7Lx6ge8&r=j30IsZEaAN8cssier9d4unVYPSaK9XrNTKmA-w9dzsw&m=96pHIyT-YVY3vC12OiHR_vmLDpb2S6HYzKDqbSjuuk4&s=4qJwmrCTrqNKjyjdTIbattk73zEdJBz7cP-WUNVwTbg&e=>
* Manakins, Bellbirds, Honeycreepers, Oropendolas, Euphonias, Tanagers,
Toucans.....a rainbow of tropical birds from a comfortable veranda (while
sipping rum punch!)
* About 10 species of hummingbirds, many hovering inches from your face!
* Trek to a riverine cave to see the strange Oilbirds
* Boating in Caroni Swamp to witness the spectacle of Scarlet Ibis coming
to roost *en masse*
* A night walk on a remote beach to encounter massive Leatherback Sea
turtles nesting
* Three nights in Blue Waters Inn, Tobago, a delightful and luxurious
beach-side resort (www.bluewatersinn.com
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.bluewatersinn.com_&d=AwMFaQ&c=JL-fUnQvtjNLb7dA39cQUcqmjBVITE8MbOdX7Lx6ge8&r=j30IsZEaAN8cssier9d4unVYPSaK9XrNTKmA-w9dzsw&m=96pHIyT-YVY3vC12OiHR_vmLDpb2S6HYzKDqbSjuuk4&s=wie-o5gyYP086RrQ7ygjOxDiyR7AXIPudKQz_98BELY&e=>
)
* Hike up Little Tobago island to see 2 species of boobies, tropic birds,
and other pelagics
* Glass bottom boating to view coral reefs
* About 150-200 species of birds, including the Trinidad & Tobago
endemic,Trinidad Motmot

Cost *excluding* international airfare will be $1545, which covers
comfortable accommodations for 7 nights, sumptuous food, local air travel
between the islands of Trinidad and Tobago, and all tours and activities.
You must be physically fit for easy to moderate walks in hot and humid
tropical weather, with temperatures usually in the 80s. This will be my 9th
tour of Trinidad & Tobago. Airfare is usually around $650 by AA from Fort
Smith, but if you fly United you can potentialy save about $250 because
they fly midnight out of POS to Houston, thereby avoiding the last night's
hotel. That fare is expected to be about $100 cheaper than AA.

Rough itinerary summary:

May 24 -- check into Asa Wright Nature Centre (AWNC)
May 25 -- early AM veranda birding; hike for manakins and bellbirds; PM
Arippo Savannah birding and Matura beach for sea turtles
May 26-- early AM veranda; optional Blanchisseuse trip at your expense (or)
hikes in AWNC; PM Trin city sewage ponds and Caroni Marsh boating for
Scarlet Ibis spectacle
May 27 -- early AM veranda; Oilbirds cave hike; and then off to Tobago.
Some birding en route Bluewaters Inn
May 28-- AM Little Tobago Island hike for pelagics; glassbottom boat coral
reefs viewing; PM relax at the beach or go birding, sea kayaking, etc.
May 29-- all day optional rain forest trip at your expense (or) relax at
the beach or go birding
May 30-- AM birding hikes to mop up Tobago endemics; PM fly back to Trinidad
May 31-- Back to the USA

For detailed itinerary and other information like past eBird lists, please
contact me. *Please indicate your background in birding and traveling, and
any health-related concerns.* This tour is for a maximum of 20 persons.

Cheers,
Kannan
-------------------
R. Kannan, Ph.D.,
Professor of Biology
University of Arkansas--Fort Smith
Tel: 479.788.7616
<rkannan...>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/4/17 6:31 pm
From: Bird Watcher <russetdm...>
Subject: Destruction at Hefner Lake
Does anyone have a clue what Oklahoma City is doing at Hefner Lake? The area that at one time called Prairie Dog Point is all torn up. The road has been grated, trees are down, and brush is stacked. My car could hardly get around with the pot holes. Are they enlarging the road? I found no birds today. I would appreciate any information.

Happy birding,

Jan Dolph

Sent from my iPad
 

Back to top
Date: 9/4/17 5:21 pm
From: Jo <jo.loyd...>
Subject: Tulsa Audubon Birders
The Tuesday Morning Birders will meet at 8 a.m. at LaFortune Park at the
Yale & 56 St. entrance until further notice. If you need additional
information, e-mail me off line. Thanks.

Jo Loyd


 

Back to top
Date: 9/3/17 10:23 am
From: Dennis Porebski <dennis.porebski...>
Subject: Re: September Migration Report (2 of 2)
Hey all! I'm really wanting to see some migrating shorebirds here in Tulsa County before they move south. I know some of the sod farms are good places to search for them but does anyone have any hints or tips as to what time (during the day) is best to go? Due to my work schedule I only can go on weekends so I was wondering when the best use of my time would be and when I would be most likely to see some shorebirds. I know after a rainstorm is a good idea, especially in flooded areas, but I would really appreciate any help I can get from more experienced and seasoned birders. Thank you!

Best,

Dennis Porebski

> On Sep 1, 2017, at 12:37 PM, Patricia Velte <pvelte...> wrote:
>
> September Departures
>
> Mottled Duck September 6 - Rare in S. McCurtain Co. only
> Least Bittern September 29 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Tricolored Heron September 27 - Rare in Alfalfa Co. only in NW, Rare in Canadian and Oklahoma Cos, only in C, Rare in Johnston Co. only in SC, Rare in Bryan, Choctaw and S. McCurtain Cos. Only in SE
> White Ibis September 16 - C, SC
> Wood Stork September 27 - Johnston and Marshall Cos. Only in SC; Bryan, Choctaw and S. McCurtain Cos. Only in SE
> Mississippi Kite September 30 - ALL - East to Washington, Rogers, Wagoner and Muskogee Cos. Only
> Spotted Sandpiper September 27 - PAN
> Willet September 12 - ALL
> Upland Sandpiper September 10 - PAN and September 28 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Long-billed Curlew September 10 - PAN Cimarron and Texas Cos. Only
> Marbled Godwit September 20 - PAN, NW, SW, C, SC, NE
> Ruddy Turnstone September 28 - NW west to Alfalfa, Major and Blaine Cos. Only, SW west to Washita, Kiowa and Tillman Cos. Only, C, SC, NE, SE
> Common Gallinule September 15 - NW rare in Major Co only, SW Rare in Tillman Co. only, C, SC
> Black-necked Stilt September 16 - PAN, C, SC, SE rare in S. McCurtain Co only
> Piping Plover September 28 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE
> Least Tern September 21 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Buff-breasted Sandpiper September 24 - NW west to Woods, Woodward, Dewey and Custer cos only, SW west to Washita, Kiowa and Tillman cos only, C, SC, NE, SE
> Short-billed Dowitcher September 16 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Chuck-will's-widow September 12 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Black-chinned Hummingbird September 15 - PAN Cimarron Co only and September 20 - NW north to Blaine, Dewey and Roger Mills cos, SW, C east to Logan, Oklahoma and Cleveland Cos, SC rare in Stephens and Jefferson cos only
> Black-billed Cuckoo September 20 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Common Nighthawk September 28 - PAN
> Olive-sided Flycatcher September 30 - ALL
> Western Wood-Pewee September 26 - PAN Cimarron Co only
> Eastern Wood-Pewee September 30 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Yellow-bellied Flycatcher September 25 - SW west to Caddo, Comanche and Cotton cos only, C, SC, NE, SE
> Acadian Flycatcher September 1 - SC Pontotoc, Johnston and Marshall cos only, NE, SE
> Alder Flycatcher September 16 - C, SC, NE, SE
> Willow Flycatcher September 25 - ALL
> Hammond's Flycatcher September 26 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only
> Dusky Flycatcher September 26 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only
> Vermilion Flycatcher September 15 - PAN rare in northwestern Cimarron Co only
> Ash-throated Flycatcher September 2 - PAN Cimarron co and rare in Texas and Beaver cos; NW rare in Blaine Co only, SW west to Comanche and Tillman cos only
> Great Crested Flycatcher September 17 - PAN Texas and Beaver Cos only and September 25 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Cassin's Kingbird September 28 - PAN northwestern Cimarron Co only
> Western Kingbird September 29 - PAN
> Eastern Kingbird September 15 - PAN and September 21 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE
> Bell's Vireo September 26 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Black-capped Vireo September 28 - Comanche Co only
> Yellow-throated Vireo September 29 - C west to Payne, Oklahoma and Cleveland cos only, SC Pontotoc and Johnston cos only, NE, SE
> Plumbeous Vireo September 21 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only
> Cassin's Vireo September 7 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only
> Warbling Vireo September 30 - ALL
> Purple Martin September 12 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Tree Swallow September 20 - PAN, NW
> Northern Rough-winged Swallow September 20 - PAN
> Bank Swallow September 27 - ALL
> Cliff Swallow September 6 - PAN and September 28 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Cave Swallow September 10 - SW rare in Comanche and Kiowa cos only and September 10 - SE rare in south McCurtain co only
> Swainson's Thrush September 30 - ALL
> Northern Waterthrush September 21 - ALL
> Black-and-white Warbler September 27 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Prothonotary Warbler September 10 - NW Alfalfa and Major cos only, C, SC, NE, SE
> Swainson's Warbler September 4 - SE rare in McCurtain co only
> Virginia's Warbler September 15 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only
> MacGillivray's Warbler September 20 - PAN Cimarron Co only
> Kentucky Warbler September 26 - C west to Logan, Oklahoma and Cleveland cos only, SC Johnston and Pontotoc cos only, NE, SE
> Common Yellowthroat September 26 - PAN
> Hooded Warbler September 28 - SE Latimer, LeFlore, Pushmataha and McCurtain cos only
> American Redstart September 28 - ALL
> Bay-breasted Warbler September 27 - NE, SE
> Yellow Warbler September 12 - PAN and September 25 - NW, C, NE and September 20 - SW and September 30 - SE
> Chestnut-sided Warbler September 27 - SW rare in Comanche Co, C, SC, NE, SE
> Yellow-throated Warbler September 25 - C west to Payne, Lincoln and Cleveland Cos only, SC west to Pontotoc, Murray, Johnston and Love cos only, NE, SE
> Townsend's Warbler September 21 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only
> Canada Warbler September 23 - C, SC, NE, SE
> Yellow-breasted Chat September 9 - PAN and September 19 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Green-tailed Towhee September 29 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only
> Cassin's Sparrow September 2 - PAN, NW west to Alfalfa and Major cos only, SW, C rare in Canadian Co only, SC rare in Jefferson and Carter cos only
> Lark Sparrow September 22 - PAN
> Black-throated Sparrow September 16 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only
> Grasshopper Sparrow September 24 - PAN
> Western Tanager September 25 - PAN
> Black-headed Grosbeak September 21 - PAN
> Lazuli Bunting September 25 - PAN
> Painted Bunting September 23 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Bobolink September 27 - NW, C, SC, NE, SE
> Orchard Oriole September 11 - ALL
> Bullock's Oriole September 11 - PAN, NW Harper, Ellis and Roger Mills cos only, SW all counties except Caddo, east Comanche and Cotton cos.
> Baltimore Oriole September 25 - NW, SW all counties except Harmon, Greer and Jackson cos, C, SC, NE, SE
> Red Knot September 20 - NW rare in Alfalfa Co only, C, NE
>
>
> Pat Velte
> <pvelte...>
> Oklahoma City, OK
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/17 6:34 pm
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516...>
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Red Slough WMA, Sep 1, 2017
OK-birders/Tom,
I should have gotten this out last night, but it was late when I compiled the list and submitted it to eBird. Migration is starting to kick in and we had a diversity of migrants including shorebirds, warblers, and a large number of Alder Flycatchers. The lone lingering Roseate Spoonbill was seen about 3/4 a mile west of Mudline Road (Red Slough Road) in unit 27B which is east of Lotus Lake. To see it would require about a mile walk along the levee heading west from the middle parking lot, cross the Push Creek foot bridge and walk the levee in the north side of the bridge eastward 1/4 mile. This general area is where we had most of the passerine and shorebird migrants, so even without the spoonbill, it's a great area to bird. To see the eBird list with embedded photos, click the link at the end of the list.
Charlie Lyon
Shreveport, LA

Sent from my iPhone. C Lyon

Begin forwarded message:

> From: <ebird-checklist...>
> Date: September 2, 2017 at 12:58:04 AM CDT
> To: <lyon5516...>
> Subject: eBird Report - Red Slough WMA, Sep 1, 2017
>
> Red Slough WMA, McCurtain, Oklahoma, US
> Sep 1, 2017 10:15 AM - 4:50 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 6.0 mile(s)
> Comments: with Jeff and Jean Trahan, Rosemary Seidler, and Ford Hendershot 78-86 degrees partly cloudy wind 4 mph NW
> 61 species
>
> Wood Duck 3
> Blue-winged Teal 7
> Pied-billed Grebe 5
> Anhinga 22 includes 4 dependent young
> Great Blue Heron 4
> Great Egret 11
> Snowy Egret 24
> Little Blue Heron 36
> Cattle Egret 45
> Green Heron 3
> Black-crowned Night-Heron 2
> White Ibis 7
> Roseate Spoonbill 1 continuing bird
> Black Vulture 9
> Turkey Vulture 14
> Cooper's Hawk 1
> Red-shouldered Hawk 2
> Red-tailed Hawk 1
> Common Gallinule 5
> American Coot 3
> Killdeer 5
> Least Sandpiper 14
> Pectoral Sandpiper 47
> Wilson's Snipe 1
> Solitary Sandpiper 5
> Mourning Dove 8
> Yellow-billed Cuckoo 1
> Barred Owl 1
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird 2
> Belted Kingfisher 1
> Downy Woodpecker 7
> Pileated Woodpecker 1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee 1
> Alder Flycatcher 10
> Eastern Phoebe 3
> Great Crested Flycatcher 2
> Eastern Kingbird 2
> Scissor-tailed Flycatcher 1
> Loggerhead Shrike 1
> White-eyed Vireo 13
> Yellow-throated Vireo 1
> Red-eyed Vireo 6
> Blue Jay 4
> American Crow 3
> Cliff Swallow 20
> Carolina Chickadee 21
> Tufted Titmouse 10
> Carolina Wren 5
> Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 12
> Northern Waterthrush 2
> Prothonotary Warbler 1
> Swainson's Warbler 1 Drab brownish warbler wiith pale breast and longish pointed bill seen well by 4 of 5 observers. It was a singing male that responded to playback. My camera was in the car.
> Common Yellowthroat 1
> Hooded Warbler 2 Both adult males with black cap, hood and chin accentuating yellow face and breast. Well seen by all observers. My camera was in the vehicle.
> Northern Parula 1
> Yellow Warbler 2
> Eastern Towhee 1 female with brown head, back, and wings with rufous sides giving distinctive chee-wink call notes. As per Ford Hensershot they breed here.
> Summer Tanager 2
> Northern Cardinal 14
> Indigo Bunting 16
> Painted Bunting 1
>
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S38949494
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/17 1:23 pm
From: Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...>
Subject: Re: Spoonbills
Thanks.

From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Rosemary Seidler
Sent: Saturday, September 02, 2017 2:59 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: Spoonbills


Tom,



We(with Ford Hendershot) had only 1 yesterday and it was a flyby.



Rosemary Seidler

Shreveport, LA





________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...><mailto:<OKBIRDS...>> on behalf of Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...><mailto:<tom.curtis...>>
Sent: Saturday, September 2, 2017 2:46:48 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...><mailto:<OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Spoonbills

If anyone sees the spoonbills at Red Slough today, can you post it to the list. I want to try for them tomorrow if they still are around.

Have fun,
Tom Curtis

 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/17 1:09 pm
From: Rosemary Seidler <rseidler...>
Subject: Re: Spoonbills
Tom,


We(with Ford Hendershot) had only 1 yesterday and it was a flyby.


Rosemary Seidler

Shreveport, LA



________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...>
Sent: Saturday, September 2, 2017 2:46:48 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Spoonbills

If anyone sees the spoonbills at Red Slough today, can you post it to the list. I want to try for them tomorrow if they still are around.

Have fun,
Tom Curtis

 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/17 12:58 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Migrants
It was wicked slow at Sequoyah NWR this morning. So very quiet. Tis the
season. But, American White Pelicans, Ring-billed Gulls, Forster's Terns,
and Caspian Terns were in. No shorebird habitat, so no shorebirds.

Sandy B.
FS, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/17 12:47 pm
From: Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...>
Subject: Spoonbills
If anyone sees the spoonbills at Red Slough today, can you post it to the list. I want to try for them tomorrow if they still are around.

Have fun,
Tom Curtis
 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/17 9:01 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Birds, Other Wildlife and Automobiles
Birds, Other Wildlife and Automobiles

Jerry Wayne Davis September 1, 2017

The first step in the scientific process is to recognize that a problem exists. If you do not recognize it you will not see it. Motor vehicles kill 100 million birds a year. Most people do not make an effort to kill birds but there is a YouTube video showing a driver intentionally speeding up to take out a flock of birds. Birds are very vulnerable when adults are frantically trying to find food for their young. These vehicle kills can take out the adults and the young in the nests. More consideration can be given in preventing the death of birds and other wildlife on our highways. Between 1972 and 1985 when I was the Forest Wildlife Biologist in Arizona my family and I identified and tallied road-kills on round-trips between Arizona and Texas. In those years even with fewer cars we saw road-kills every mile. In Central Texas deer kills on one side of the Interstate tallied one per mile and kills of smaller species were more numerous.

Our 264 million cars on 4 million miles of roads are killing one million vertebrate wildlife species per day, one every 11 seconds. We are eliminating wildlife from millions of acres. We do not see as many road-kills today, not because drivers are more considerate, but because we have killed most animals that exists. Even wildlife in our National Parks are not safe, even with slower speed limits. Motorist try to avoid large mammals that may damage their cars but there are still significant deer, elk, moose, bear, coyotes and antelope killed. But whoa be it for any smaller species to dare cross a road. Some people believe they are improving society and the world by killing every snake, turtle, armadillo, opossum, raccoon, rabbit, squirrel, or anything else that dares to cross. Even people opposed to hunting can be dedicated killers when they get in the drivers seat. I have seen drivers stop to remove box turtles from the road but too often we see the results of mindless idiots that play road games. They try to run over box turtles by hitting the back of their shells with their tires trying to flip them off the roads. We see their failed senseless act too often.

The Federal and State highway departments can help by improving road design and location. They have provided a few overpasses and underpasses for wildlife crossing. This helped in a few major migration routes in the west and in the Florida Everglades. This still leaves wildlife at risk with 4 million miles to cross. Some times even good intentions become major mistakes. When I was the Forest Wildlife Biologist on the Kaibab National Forest where wildlife water was always inadequate, wildlife had to travel miles for water. West of Williams, Arizona there was one spring that provided water for thousands of acres of habitat. This spring was south of Route 66. When Interstate 40 was constructed they designed the East and West lanes to go on both sides, leaving the spring in the middle. The problem could have been avoided by moving the interstate alignment 200 feet. The highway department's solution was to pipe the water from the spring under the east bound lanes to a spot south of I-40. They used cast iron pipe which burst and was useless after the first freeze. Today wildlife must still cross I-40 to get water and risk getting hit or die of thirst. Deer, elk, antelope, and bear are still killed today.

Highway design and location may help but the biggest change needs to be in the mental attitude and habits of drivers. Our 4 million miles of roads are covering over 28 million acres of habitat with concrete. The roads we drive are going through wildlife habitat and was habitat before it was a highway. Areas bordering roads are the only place our birds and other wildlife have to live. Birds cannot nest on the freeway. We are encroaching on their homes. Some road-kills are unavoidable but most can be prevented. If drivers are determine to kill every animal that crosses the road we will see nothing but our concrete walls and paved highways. We will see nothing but lifelessness. We must educate others and change their mental and driving attitudes and give wildlife a break and a brake.

 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/17 7:28 am
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...>
Subject: Reddish Egret
Hello all,

Just saw a juvenile Reddish Egret at the Sandpiper trail at Salt Plains.
Very skittish, took off just as I got it in my scope, circled a couple of
times then flew off to the east. Pictures, hopefully suitable for
documentation.

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK

 

Back to top
Date: 9/1/17 8:46 pm
From: William Diffin <okiebirder...>
Subject: Call for Abstracts, OOS Fall Meeting
Researchers in ornithology, avian ecology and related fields are
invited to submit abstracts for the technical session of the Fall
Meeting of the Oklahoma Ornithological Society, the afternoon of
October 14, at the University of Oklahoma Biological Station on the
north shore of Lake Texoma. For the purposes of this meeting, research
is broadly construed. Along with traditional research we also include
for example in-depth field observations by non-academics and
international field experiences. Technical presentations will be 15
minutes long and will follow the usual format of a 12-minute talk and
three minutes of question and answer. Researchers at all levels are
encouraged to participate. The abstract submission period is from now
until September 30. However it is possible to register for a
presentation without an abstract and receive an extension for abstract
submittal until October 7. Abstracts should follow the following
format:

1. Title
2. Name(s) of investigator(s) and advisor(s) if any
3. Any sponsoring organization, university or college
4. An email address for followup contacts
5. The body of the abstract, 250 words or less

Submit the abstract as a Word file attachement in an email to
<WilliamDiffin...> or <okiebirder...> A compendium of the
abstracts will be available to attendees at the technical session.

The meeting registration fee will be waived for speakers at the meeting.

A poster session will follow the presentation session. Register for
the poster session the same as for the presentation session but
include POSTER as the first word in the abstract.

A meeting announcement, schedule and registration form are available
on the OOS web site at www.okbirds.org. Also see the previous post for
a brief of the meeting.

The Oklahoma Ornithological Society
Bill Diffin, President Elect
 

Back to top
Date: 9/1/17 7:19 pm
From: William Diffin <okiebirder...>
Subject: OOS Fall Meeting Announcement
The Fall Meeting of Oklahoma Ornithological Society will be held Oct
13-15 at the University of Oklahoma Biological Station on the north
shore of Lake Texoma. Attendance is open to non-members of OOS. This
will be a joint meeting with the Friends of the University of Oklahoma
Biological Station. The Fall Meeting of OOS is the annual technical
meeting. The technical session will be on Saturday afternoon, October
14. It will consist of 15-minute presentations on research in
ornithology, avian ecology and related fields. A 30-minute poster
session will follow the presentations. This meeting will also feature
a field trip to Hagerman NWR on Saturday morning, led by Dr. Wayne
Meyer, and a filed trip to Tishomingo NWR on Sunday morning, led by
Dr. Doug Wood. The guest speaker at the Saturday night banquet will be
Dr. Michael Horn of California State Fullerton who will present
findings from more than 20 years of research into the ecology of
Elegant Terns, the most abundant coastal seabird in southern
California. The title of the talk is "Seabirds signal ocean changes:
Elegant Terns (Thalasseus elegans) respond to prey, predators and heat
in the eastern Pacific". Dr. Horn was born in Tahlequah and received
his early education in a two-room school in Stillwell. He later went
on to receive degrees at Northeastern Oklahoma State, University of
Oklahoma and Harvard University where he earned a PhD. At the Friday
night check-in social at the station, Dr. Wood will conduct a bird
quiz and some other activities based on the station's specimen
collection. Attendees at the Fall Meeting may make reservations for
meals and lodging at the station. The meeting registration fee is $10
for non-students and $5 for students. Non-students who register using
the Pay Pal window on the OOS website will receive a $5 discount on
the registration fee. The full meeting announcement, schedule and
registration form are available at www.okbirds.org. Anyone interested
in birds, birding or ornithology is encouraged to attend this event.

The Oklahoma Ornithological Society
Bill Diffin, President Elect
 

Back to top
Date: 9/1/17 1:23 pm
From: Dan Reinking <dan...>
Subject: eclipse observations of birds
http://birdcast.info/forecast/eclipse



http://www.tulsaworld.com/sportsextra/outdoors/birdwatch/bird-watch-eclipse-
timing-obscuration-lessened-chance-to-observe-change/article_e8075a93-b627-5
a29-a392-b1bd5c955dc6.html



Dan Reinking

Sutton Avian Research Center


 

Back to top
Date: 9/1/17 10:37 am
From: Patricia Velte <pvelte...>
Subject: September Migration Report (1 of 2)
Dear OKBirders,



The arrival and departure lists are long this month so I'm sending them in
separate messages.



September Arrivals



Northern Pintail September 1 - C, SC, NE,
SE

Lesser Scaup September 25 - ALL

Cinnamon Teal September 7 - PAN, NW, SW

Eared Grebe September 4 - ALL

Virginia Rail September 2 - ALL

Sharp-shinned Hawk September 12 - ALL

Sabine's Gull September 6 - PAN, NW,
C, SC, NE

Common Poorwill September 19 - C, SC, NE rare
east to Osage, Tulsa and Creek cos

Red-naped Sapsucker September 21 - PAN rare in
Cimarron Co only

Merlin September 2 - ALL

Prairie Falcon September 24 - ALL

Yellow-bellied Flycatcher September 3 - SW west to Caddo,
Comanche and Cotton cos only, C, SC, NE, SE

Plumbeous Vireo September 2 - PAN rare in
Cimarron Co only

Blue-headed Vireo September 1 - NW, SW, C, SC,
NE, SE

Philadelphia Vireo September 12 - C, SC, NE,
SE

Mountain Chickadee September 20 - ALL

Red-breasted Nuthatch September 10 - ALL

House Wren September 16 - SC, SE

Marsh Wren September 26 - ALL

Sedge Wren September 27 - C, SC

Ruby-crowned Kinglet September 10 - ALL

Mountain Bluebird September 27 - PAN

Townsend's Solitaire September 17 - PAN

Swainson's Thrush September 7 - PAN and
September 11 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Hermit Thrush September 22 - PAN

Sage Thrasher September 1 - PAN Cimarron
Co only

American Pipit September 25 - PAN and
September 29 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Cedar Waxwing September 9 - PAN and
September 24 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Ovenbird September 5 - NW, SW,
C, SC, NE, SE

Tennessee Warbler September 13 - NW, SW, C, SC,
NE, SE

Orange-crowned Warbler September 4 - PAN and September 22
- NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Nashville Warbler September 3 - ALL

Bay-breasted Warbler September 10 - NE, SE

Chestnut-sided Warbler September 6 - SW rare in
Comanche Co, C, SC, NE, SE

Palm Warbler September 29 - NE, SE

Yellow-rumped Warbler September 8 - PAN and September
29 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Townsend's Warbler September 1 - PAN rare in
Cimarron Co only

Green-tailed Towhee September 7 - PAN rare in
Cimarron Co only

Spotted Towhee September 25 - ALL

Eastern Towhee September 30 - SW rare in
Comanche co only, C rare west to Payne, Lincoln and Seminole Cos only, SC
Pontotoc, Johnston and Marshall cos rare in rest of SC, NE west to
Washington, Tulsa, Okmulgee and Okfuskee cos only, SE

Clay-colored Sparrow September 2 - NW, SW, C, SC,
NE, SE

Vesper Sparrow September 1 - PAN and
September 27 - NW, C, NE and September 27 - SW, SC, SE

Savannah Sparrow September 6 - PAN and September
14 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Nelson's Sparrow September 21 - NE, SE

Song Sparrow September 15 - PAN

Lincoln's Sparrow September 15 - PAN and
September 22 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

White-crowned Sparrow September 23 - PAN

Dark-eyed Junco September 27 - ALL

Western Tanager September 2 - PAN Cimarron Co
only

Rose-breasted Grosbeak September 17 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE,
SE

Bobolink September 1 - NW, C,
SC, NE, SE

Western Meadowlark September 16 - SC, NE, SE

Brewer's Blackbird September 17 - NW, SW, C,
SC, NE, SE





The information presented here comes from The Oklahoma Bird Records
Committee of the Oklahoma Ornithological Society, which publishes a Date
Guide to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma. This booklet divides Oklahoma
into 7 geographic regions, and lists the normal dates of occurrence for each
Oklahoma bird species within each region. Observers are urged to report
unusual species, or birds out of date or out of normal range in Oklahoma,
based on the information given in this publication.



The Oklahoma Ornithological Society and Oklahoma Bird Records Committee web
site, http://www.okbirds.org/, includes ordering information for the Date
Guide to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma, information on documenting
significant records, documentation forms, instructions, and a searchable
database for Oklahoma bird migration information. Birders are cordially
invited to join the Oklahoma Ornithological Society.



Happy birding!

Pat Velte

<pvelte...> <mailto:<pvelte...>

Oklahoma City, OK




 

Back to top
Date: 9/1/17 10:37 am
From: Patricia Velte <pvelte...>
Subject: September Migration Report (2 of 2)
September Departures



Mottled Duck September 6 - Rare in S. McCurtain Co.
only

Least Bittern September 29 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE,
SE

Tricolored Heron September 27 - Rare in Alfalfa Co. only
in NW, Rare in Canadian and Oklahoma Cos, only in C, Rare in Johnston Co.
only in SC, Rare in Bryan, Choctaw and S. McCurtain Cos. Only in SE

White Ibis September 16 - C, SC

Wood Stork September 27 - Johnston and Marshall
Cos. Only in SC; Bryan, Choctaw and S. McCurtain Cos. Only in SE

Mississippi Kite September 30 - ALL - East to
Washington, Rogers, Wagoner and Muskogee Cos. Only

Spotted Sandpiper September 27 - PAN

Willet September 12 - ALL

Upland Sandpiper September 10 - PAN and September 28 - NW,
SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Long-billed Curlew September 10 - PAN Cimarron and Texas
Cos. Only

Marbled Godwit September 20 - PAN, NW, SW, C, SC, NE

Ruddy Turnstone September 28 - NW west to Alfalfa, Major
and Blaine Cos. Only, SW west to Washita, Kiowa and Tillman Cos. Only, C,
SC, NE, SE

Common Gallinule September 15 - NW rare in Major Co only,
SW Rare in Tillman Co. only, C, SC

Black-necked Stilt September 16 - PAN, C, SC, SE rare in
S. McCurtain Co only

Piping Plover September 28 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE

Least Tern September 21 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE,
SE

Buff-breasted Sandpiper September 24 - NW west to Woods, Woodward,
Dewey and Custer cos only, SW west to Washita, Kiowa and Tillman cos only,
C, SC, NE, SE

Short-billed Dowitcher September 16 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Chuck-will's-widow September 12 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Black-chinned Hummingbird September 15 - PAN Cimarron Co only and September
20 - NW north to Blaine, Dewey and Roger Mills cos, SW, C east to Logan,
Oklahoma and Cleveland Cos, SC rare in Stephens and Jefferson cos only

Black-billed Cuckoo September 20 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Common Nighthawk September 28 - PAN

Olive-sided Flycatcher September 30 - ALL

Western Wood-Pewee September 26 - PAN Cimarron Co only

Eastern Wood-Pewee September 30 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Yellow-bellied Flycatcher September 25 - SW west to Caddo, Comanche
and Cotton cos only, C, SC, NE, SE

Acadian Flycatcher September 1 - SC Pontotoc, Johnston and
Marshall cos only, NE, SE

Alder Flycatcher September 16 - C, SC, NE, SE

Willow Flycatcher September 25 - ALL

Hammond's Flycatcher September 26 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only

Dusky Flycatcher September 26 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co
only

Vermilion Flycatcher September 15 - PAN rare in northwestern
Cimarron Co only

Ash-throated Flycatcher September 2 - PAN Cimarron co and rare in
Texas and Beaver cos; NW rare in Blaine Co only, SW west to Comanche and
Tillman cos only

Great Crested Flycatcher September 17 - PAN Texas and Beaver Cos only
and September 25 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Cassin's Kingbird September 28 - PAN northwestern
Cimarron Co only

Western Kingbird September 29 - PAN

Eastern Kingbird September 15 - PAN and September 21 -
NW, SW, C, SC, NE

Bell's Vireo September 26 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE,
SE

Black-capped Vireo September 28 - Comanche Co only

Yellow-throated Vireo September 29 - C west to Payne, Oklahoma
and Cleveland cos only, SC Pontotoc and Johnston cos only, NE, SE

Plumbeous Vireo September 21 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co
only

Cassin's Vireo September 7 - PAN rare in Cimarron
Co only

Warbling Vireo September 30 - ALL

Purple Martin September 12 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Tree Swallow September 20 - PAN, NW

Northern Rough-winged Swallow September 20 - PAN

Bank Swallow September 27 - ALL

Cliff Swallow September 6 - PAN and September 28 -
NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Cave Swallow September 10 - SW rare in Comanche and
Kiowa cos only and September 10 - SE rare in south McCurtain co only

Swainson's Thrush September 30 - ALL

Northern Waterthrush September 21 - ALL

Black-and-white Warbler September 27 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Prothonotary Warbler September 10 - NW Alfalfa and Major cos
only, C, SC, NE, SE

Swainson's Warbler September 4 - SE rare in McCurtain co only

Virginia's Warbler September 15 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co
only

MacGillivray's Warbler September 20 - PAN Cimarron Co only

Kentucky Warbler September 26 - C west to Logan, Oklahoma
and Cleveland cos only, SC Johnston and Pontotoc cos only, NE, SE

Common Yellowthroat September 26 - PAN

Hooded Warbler September 28 - SE Latimer, LeFlore,
Pushmataha and McCurtain cos only

American Redstart September 28 - ALL

Bay-breasted Warbler September 27 - NE, SE

Yellow Warbler September 12 - PAN and September 25 -
NW, C, NE and September 20 - SW and September 30 - SE

Chestnut-sided Warbler September 27 - SW rare in Comanche Co, C,
SC, NE, SE

Yellow-throated Warbler September 25 - C west to Payne, Lincoln and
Cleveland Cos only, SC west to Pontotoc, Murray, Johnston and Love cos only,
NE, SE

Townsend's Warbler September 21 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only

Canada Warbler September 23 - C, SC, NE, SE

Yellow-breasted Chat September 9 - PAN and September 19 - NW,
SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Green-tailed Towhee September 29 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only

Cassin's Sparrow September 2 - PAN, NW west to Alfalfa
and Major cos only, SW, C rare in Canadian Co only, SC rare in Jefferson and
Carter cos only

Lark Sparrow September 22 - PAN

Black-throated Sparrow September 16 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only

Grasshopper Sparrow September 24 - PAN

Western Tanager September 25 - PAN

Black-headed Grosbeak September 21 - PAN

Lazuli Bunting September 25 - PAN

Painted Bunting September 23 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Bobolink September 27 - NW, C, SC, NE, SE

Orchard Oriole September 11 - ALL

Bullock's Oriole September 11 - PAN, NW Harper, Ellis
and Roger Mills cos only, SW all counties except Caddo, east Comanche and
Cotton cos.

Baltimore Oriole September 25 - NW, SW all counties
except Harmon, Greer and Jackson cos, C, SC, NE, SE

Red Knot September 20 - NW rare in Alfalfa
Co only, C, NE





Pat Velte

<pvelte...> <mailto:<pvelte...>

Oklahoma City, OK






 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/17 12:07 pm
From: Rebecca John <becajohn_50...>
Subject: Re: Birds, Insects and Spiders - There Is A Connection
Amen!

On Aug 31, 2017, at 11:47 AM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...><mailto:<jwdavis...>> wrote:

Spiders Are A Good Thing To Have In Your Yard: Some people have arachnophobia and fear spiders and others want to eliminate everything wild. In the elite society of Europe spider webs were considered a cultural art form. The wealthy went into their yards and wood lots and capture spider webs between two pieces of plate glass, framed them and hung them. I have told you that native plants produce native insects that are eaten by 97% of our birds. Insects fuel the world. Most people do not have native plants in their yard but only non-native exotics that come from some foreign country and bought at the big box stores or put there by landscapers because they are cheap and available. Others are plant blind and would not know a native plant from an exotic introduced species. If you do not see spiders and spider webs in your yard this may be a indication that you do not have enough insects and a yard healthy enough to support spiders or birds. You need to readjust your thinking, your priorities, get rid of your pesticides, yard service, and non-native plants and do something for the birds. We are losing 4% of our birds per year and 40% fewer birds are crossing the Gulf than cross just 10 years ago. Our birds are blinking out of existence in your lifetime. You do not need to be part of the problem but part of the solution. Make your yard healthy for birds, insects, and spiders.


Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR
 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/17 11:29 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Birds, Insects and Spiders - There Is A Connection
Thank for your note. All need to also remember that hummingbirds use spider webs for their nests so if you don’t have spiders you don’t have this nest material.

Jerry

From: John Shackford
Sent: Thursday, August 31, 2017 12:49 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Birds, Insects and Spiders - There Is A Connection

I "second" Melinda's comments!

On Thu, Aug 31, 2017 at 12:18 PM, Melinda Droege <oklagranny26...> wrote:

Thanks Jerry....very well said. I appreciate and read all your posts and wish you were head of EPA!

Melinda Droege
Bartlesville

On Thu, Aug 31, 2017 at 11:46 AM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

Spiders Are A Good Thing To Have In Your Yard: Some people have arachnophobia and fear spiders and others want to eliminate everything wild. In the elite society of Europe spider webs were considered a cultural art form. The wealthy went into their yards and wood lots and capture spider webs between two pieces of plate glass, framed them and hung them. I have told you that native plants produce native insects that are eaten by 97% of our birds. Insects fuel the world. Most people do not have native plants in their yard but only non-native exotics that come from some foreign country and bought at the big box stores or put there by landscapers because they are cheap and available. Others are plant blind and would not know a native plant from an exotic introduced species. If you do not see spiders and spider webs in your yard this may be a indication that you do not have enough insects and a yard healthy enough to support spiders or birds. You need to readjust your thinking, your priorities, get rid of your pesticides, yard service, and non-native plants and do something for the birds. We are losing 4% of our birds per year and 40% fewer birds are crossing the Gulf than cross just 10 years ago. Our birds are blinking out of existence in your lifetime. You do not need to be part of the problem but part of the solution. Make your yard healthy for birds, insects, and spiders.


Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR


 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/17 11:00 am
From: John Shackford <johnshackford...>
Subject: Re: Birds, Insects and Spiders - There Is A Connection
I "second" Melinda's comments!

On Thu, Aug 31, 2017 at 12:18 PM, Melinda Droege <oklagranny26...>
wrote:

> Thanks Jerry....very well said. I appreciate and read all your posts and
> wish you were head of EPA!
>
> Melinda Droege
> Bartlesville
>
> On Thu, Aug 31, 2017 at 11:46 AM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
> wrote:
>
>> *Spiders Are A Good Thing To Have In Your Yard*: Some people have
>> arachnophobia and fear spiders and others want to eliminate everything
>> wild. In the elite society of Europe spider webs were considered a cultural
>> art form. The wealthy went into their yards and wood lots and capture
>> spider webs between two pieces of plate glass, framed them and hung them. I
>> have told you that native plants produce native insects that are eaten by
>> 97% of our birds. Insects fuel the world. Most people do not have native
>> plants in their yard but only non-native exotics that come from some
>> foreign country and bought at the big box stores or put there by
>> landscapers because they are cheap and available. Others are plant blind
>> and would not know a native plant from an exotic introduced species. If you
>> do not see spiders and spider webs in your yard this may be a indication
>> that you do not have enough insects and a yard healthy enough to support
>> spiders or birds. You need to readjust your thinking, your priorities, get
>> rid of your pesticides, yard service, and non-native plants and do
>> something for the birds. We are losing 4% of our birds per year and 40%
>> fewer birds are crossing the Gulf than cross just 10 years ago. Our birds
>> are blinking out of existence in your lifetime. You do not need to be part
>> of the problem but part of the solution. Make your yard healthy for birds,
>> insects, and spiders.
>>
>>
>> Jerry Wayne Davis
>> Hot Springs, AR
>>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/17 10:18 am
From: Melinda Droege <oklagranny26...>
Subject: Re: Birds, Insects and Spiders - There Is A Connection
Thanks Jerry....very well said. I appreciate and read all your posts and
wish you were head of EPA!

Melinda Droege
Bartlesville

On Thu, Aug 31, 2017 at 11:46 AM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

> *Spiders Are A Good Thing To Have In Your Yard*: Some people have
> arachnophobia and fear spiders and others want to eliminate everything
> wild. In the elite society of Europe spider webs were considered a cultural
> art form. The wealthy went into their yards and wood lots and capture
> spider webs between two pieces of plate glass, framed them and hung them. I
> have told you that native plants produce native insects that are eaten by
> 97% of our birds. Insects fuel the world. Most people do not have native
> plants in their yard but only non-native exotics that come from some
> foreign country and bought at the big box stores or put there by
> landscapers because they are cheap and available. Others are plant blind
> and would not know a native plant from an exotic introduced species. If you
> do not see spiders and spider webs in your yard this may be a indication
> that you do not have enough insects and a yard healthy enough to support
> spiders or birds. You need to readjust your thinking, your priorities, get
> rid of your pesticides, yard service, and non-native plants and do
> something for the birds. We are losing 4% of our birds per year and 40%
> fewer birds are crossing the Gulf than cross just 10 years ago. Our birds
> are blinking out of existence in your lifetime. You do not need to be part
> of the problem but part of the solution. Make your yard healthy for birds,
> insects, and spiders.
>
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs, AR
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/17 9:46 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Birds, Insects and Spiders - There Is A Connection
Spiders Are A Good Thing To Have In Your Yard: Some people have arachnophobia and fear spiders and others want to eliminate everything wild. In the elite society of Europe spider webs were considered a cultural art form. The wealthy went into their yards and wood lots and capture spider webs between two pieces of plate glass, framed them and hung them. I have told you that native plants produce native insects that are eaten by 97% of our birds. Insects fuel the world. Most people do not have native plants in their yard but only non-native exotics that come from some foreign country and bought at the big box stores or put there by landscapers because they are cheap and available. Others are plant blind and would not know a native plant from an exotic introduced species. If you do not see spiders and spider webs in your yard this may be a indication that you do not have enough insects and a yard healthy enough to support spiders or birds. You need to readjust your thinking, your priorities, get rid of your pesticides, yard service, and non-native plants and do something for the birds. We are losing 4% of our birds per year and 40% fewer birds are crossing the Gulf than cross just 10 years ago. Our birds are blinking out of existence in your lifetime. You do not need to be part of the problem but part of the solution. Make your yard healthy for birds, insects, and spiders.


Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR
 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/17 7:09 am
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Update
Yesterday at Red Slough there were 4 Caspian Terns on Otter Lake and the 7
Roseate Spoonbills were in the borrow area on the west side of unit 27b
across the levee from Lotus Lake. Also had an early Northern Harrier which
gives us a new early date by two days. Ford Hendershot reports a Wilson's
Snipe also from the same location as the spoonbills.



David Arbour

De Queen, AR


 

Back to top
Date: 8/30/17 1:41 pm
From: Ron Huebner <feralbirder...>
Subject: Re: Birds, Trees, Hurricanes and Floods
Getting reports that hummingbirds are frantically searching for flowers
along the Gulf Coast of Texas and finding none where hurricane Harvey
destroyed most flowers and flowering plants. I assume hummingbirds are more
affected than insectivores as the havoc of Harvey might actually
temporarily increase some insect populations and has exposed others that
were previously unavailable in rotting trees, etc. The hummers need the
energy to fatten up for the jump across the Gulf. I have heard from friends
who can't keep their feeders full due to the high drive-thru demand.

On Wed, Aug 30, 2017 at 12:01 PM, Jan Dolph <russetdm...> wrote:

> Has anything been done to help the birds at this time? The migration is on
> and they have no place to rest or land. I can’t find anything about the
> hot birding spots being damaged. Can you find out anything and please
> post? Was the Mission and McAllen, Texas areas damaged?
>
>
>
> Happing birding,
>
>
>
> Jan Dolph
>
>
>
> *From:* okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] *On Behalf Of *Jerry Davis
> *Sent:* Wednesday, August 30, 2017 10:23 AM
> *To:* <OKBIRDS...>
> *Subject:* Birds, Trees, Hurricanes and Floods
>
>
>
> In addition to the thousands of people that will lose everything due to
> flooding and no flood insurance, hundreds of thousands of trees are likely
> to be lost due to storm surge of saltwater inland and flood waters on trees
> longer than trees can stand. This lose of habitat will not be replaced in
> our lifetime. Houston Audubon Society still has not eliminated the Chinese
> privet invasion and damage at High Island and other bird sanctuaries after
> the last hurricanes. Birds cross the Gulf needing to be refueled and
> instead of native plants producing native insects the food source is
> compromised by Chinese privet, Chinese Tallow trees and other invasive
> species. Many of the giant live oaks that were not damaged by wind from
> previous hurricanes have died and others are very sick and just hanging on
> due to previous storm surges.
>
>
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
>
> Hot Springs, AR
>



--
Ron Huebner
<feralbirder...>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/30/17 10:01 am
From: Jan Dolph <russetdm...>
Subject: Re: Birds, Trees, Hurricanes and Floods
Has anything been done to help the birds at this time? The migration is on
and they have no place to rest or land. I can't find anything about the hot
birding spots being damaged. Can you find out anything and please post? Was
the Mission and McAllen, Texas areas damaged?



Happing birding,



Jan Dolph



From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Wednesday, August 30, 2017 10:23 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Birds, Trees, Hurricanes and Floods



In addition to the thousands of people that will lose everything due to
flooding and no flood insurance, hundreds of thousands of trees are likely
to be lost due to storm surge of saltwater inland and flood waters on trees
longer than trees can stand. This lose of habitat will not be replaced in
our lifetime. Houston Audubon Society still has not eliminated the Chinese
privet invasion and damage at High Island and other bird sanctuaries after
the last hurricanes. Birds cross the Gulf needing to be refueled and
instead of native plants producing native insects the food source is
compromised by Chinese privet, Chinese Tallow trees and other invasive
species. Many of the giant live oaks that were not damaged by wind from
previous hurricanes have died and others are very sick and just hanging on
due to previous storm surges.



Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs, AR


 

Back to top
Date: 8/30/17 8:23 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Birds, Trees, Hurricanes and Floods
In addition to the thousands of people that will lose everything due to flooding and no flood insurance, hundreds of thousands of trees are likely to be lost due to storm surge of saltwater inland and flood waters on trees longer than trees can stand. This lose of habitat will not be replaced in our lifetime. Houston Audubon Society still has not eliminated the Chinese privet invasion and damage at High Island and other bird sanctuaries after the last hurricanes. Birds cross the Gulf needing to be refueled and instead of native plants producing native insects the food source is compromised by Chinese privet, Chinese Tallow trees and other invasive species. Many of the giant live oaks that were not damaged by wind from previous hurricanes have died and others are very sick and just hanging on due to previous storm surges.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR
 

Back to top
Date: 8/30/17 7:04 am
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough update - spoonbills
7 Roseate Spoonbills showed up at Red Slough on Monday and were still
present yesterday. They are hanging out in unit 27B along the south levee.
Yesterday I had a singing Sedge Wren in unit 31. I put some pics up of the
spoonbills that you can see here:
http://www.pbase.com/red_slough_wma/recent_photos



David Arbour

De Queen, AR


 

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Date: 8/27/17 1:58 pm
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...>
Subject: Olive-sided Flycatcher
Hello All,

This morning on the Pathfinder Parkway in Bartlesville, I had an Olive-sided Flycatcher near the tanks and a least flycatcher along the river. There were also 2 warblers with yellow bellies, but they would not come out of the leaves to be identified.


Mark Peterson

Bartlesville

 

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Date: 8/26/17 6:50 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Fw: Hummingbird Pool Party
-----Original Message-----
From: Barry Haas
Sent: Friday, August 25, 2017 10:30 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Hummingbird Pool Party

Dear ARBIRDers,

For those interested in such things (courtesy of my brother):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YAer4rDnA6I

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock (where we have received a
whopping 8.12" of rain so far in August),
Barry Haas=
 

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Date: 8/25/17 11:17 pm
From: Steve Davis <spd8109...>
Subject: Ecuador in March 2018
FYI--Dr Ragupathy Kannan, University of Arkansas, Ft Smith, with whom Mary and I
have traveled on multiple happy trips to the Caribbean and Central America, has
organized a trip to Ecuador next spring. Dr Kannan is very knowledgeable and has
never failed to provide an enjoyable, informative and productive
birding experience.
Mary and I plan to attend this tour too and there are a few more slots
available.
Details about itinerary and costs are provided at the link below and
Dr Kannan can

provide more details. If you are interested in going on this trip,
please contact

Dr Kannan at his email address: <ragupathy.kannan...>


--steve d and mary l


Ecuador birding tour March 16-23, 2018

The tour is limited to 9-11 birders only. Price is $2500 (Air expected to be
around $900 from Fort Smith).

LINK TO ITINERARY:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5WudwnmH18nT3hoakRwazhzNGs/view?usp=drive_web

 

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Date: 8/24/17 9:52 pm
From: Bill Adams <ba1980...>
Subject: Re: Inca Dove
I had 2 at my dad's house in Poteau, OK in January 2008.
Bill AdamsDuncan, OK

From: Bob LaVal <blaval...>
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Sent: Thursday, August 24, 2017 9:57 PM
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Inca Dove

Heard one singing here in Heavener this morning.  First time I have heard or seen one here in my 45 years here.  It may be a little north of the normal range which includes extreme southern OK.  Anyone else know of sightings in this area? Bob LaVal
20367 Pine Mtn. LP
Heavener, OK 74937
Phone: 918-653-7921


 

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Date: 8/24/17 7:35 pm
From: Bob LaVal <blaval...>
Subject: Inca Dove
Heard one singing here in Heavener this morning. First time I have heard or seen one here in my 45 years here. It may be a little north of the normal range which includes extreme southern OK. Anyone else know of sightings in this area?

Bob LaVal
20367 Pine Mtn. LP
Heavener, OK 74937
Phone: 918-653-7921
 

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Date: 8/23/17 7:50 pm
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...>
Subject: Red Slough April, 2024
Hello All,

After viewing the eclipse last Monday in southern Nebraska I checked to see where the path of the next eclipse in 2024 goes and found that the middle of the path is near Haworth in southern McCurtain County. The total phase is supposed to last for over 4 minutes. The reactions of the wildlife in Red Slough could be interesting. In southern Nebraska, I heard a cricket start chirping at about 20% and a blue jay squawking and the call notes of a dickcissel during the total phase.


Mark Peterson

Bartlesville

 

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Date: 8/23/17 6:20 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Swallow-tailed Kite
They've been seen in Leflore county before. But not by me. sigh.

Do you know what time it was seen?

Sandy B.

On Wed, Aug 23, 2017 at 7:09 PM David Arbour <arbour...> wrote:

> I was just shown a photo of a Swallow-tailed Kite found today by Terry
> Stuart (ODWC Wildlife Technician) near Honobia, LeFlore County. It was
> seen flying from LeFlore County into McCurtain County. It was soaring with
> a flock of Mississippi Kites.
>
>
>
> David Arbour
>
> De Queen, AR
>

 

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Date: 8/23/17 5:10 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Swallow-tailed Kite
I was just shown a photo of a Swallow-tailed Kite found today by Terry
Stuart (ODWC Wildlife Technician) near Honobia, LeFlore County. It was seen
flying from LeFlore County into McCurtain County. It was soaring with a
flock of Mississippi Kites.



David Arbour

De Queen, AR


 

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