OKbirds
Received From Subject
11/18/18 5:50 pm HAROLD YOCUM <drhal2...> Fwd: Mitch Park Bird walk today 11/14/18- brief followup report
11/18/18 3:42 pm Lora Weber <weberloral...> Bald Eagles
11/18/18 9:24 am William Diffin <okiebirder...> WWSC at Hefner
11/17/18 8:21 am Poland, Zachary <zpoland...> Lake Hefner Scoters
11/16/18 6:24 pm Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...> Copan Wildlife Area on 11-16-2018
11/15/18 9:04 am Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...> Bald Eagle at Lake Hefner
11/12/18 3:09 pm Marilyn Loyd <jo.loyd...> Tulsa Birders
11/12/18 1:52 pm Brett Niland <bestguess...> Pond at Hampton South 74th and Garnett Tulsa Oklahoma
11/12/18 12:12 pm natrea <natrea...> Re: Red Rock Canyon State Park
11/12/18 9:33 am Dora Webb <owl112...> Red Rock Canyon State Park
11/12/18 7:27 am Tal Roberts <talrob2...> LeConte's Sparrow at Fort Towson
11/12/18 7:08 am Terry Mitchell <terry...> Tulsa Area
11/11/18 1:59 pm Nancy Vicars <nancy.vicars...> Northeast (Zoo) Lake in Oklahoma City
11/10/18 7:38 pm Judy Basham <judybasham...> Re: Red Breasted Nuthatch
11/10/18 3:06 pm Ron Huebner <feralbirder...> Re: Oklahoma Christmas Counts
11/10/18 1:53 pm Ellie Womack <e-womack...> Re: Hummingbird
11/10/18 1:38 pm Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...> Re: Hummingbird
11/10/18 12:43 pm Brett Niland <bestguess...> Re: Red Breasted Nuthatch
11/10/18 12:39 pm Brett Niland <bestguess...> Re: Hummingbird
11/10/18 9:35 am Kelly Godley <klgodley...> Hummingbird
11/10/18 8:26 am William Diffin <okiebirder...> eBird Essentials Cliff Notes
11/10/18 8:13 am William Diffin <okiebirder...> Re: online eBird course
11/10/18 8:09 am William Diffin <okiebirder...> Re: online eBird course
11/10/18 7:57 am Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...> Red Breasted Nuthatch
11/10/18 5:06 am Brett Niland <bestguess...> Re: Oklahoma Christmas Counts
11/10/18 4:12 am Ron Huebner <feralbirder...> Re: Oklahoma Christmas Counts
11/9/18 9:43 pm John Kennington <johnkennington...> Oklahoma Christmas Counts
11/8/18 11:39 am Dan Reinking <dan...> Re: online eBird course
11/8/18 9:49 am William Diffin <okiebirder...> Surf and Black Scoters, Hefner
11/7/18 4:02 pm O Connell, Tim <tim.oconnell...> Payne County Audubon November events - starting Saturday!
11/7/18 10:49 am Mia Revels <0000004e74e60ce3-dmarc-request...> Broken Bow Christmas Bird Count - Sunday, December 23, 2018
11/6/18 8:03 pm Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...> Rose Lake today
11/5/18 6:51 pm Kurt Meisenzahl <meisenzk...> Stephens County CBC
11/5/18 2:04 pm Brett Niland <bestguess...> Hooded mergansers up close.
11/5/18 2:01 pm Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...> Lake Hefner and Rose Lake Area
11/5/18 12:51 pm Brett Niland <bestguess...> Re: Tulsa Area
11/5/18 12:48 pm Terry Mitchell <terry...> Re: Tulsa Area
11/5/18 12:30 pm Brett Niland <bestguess...> Re: Tulsa Area
11/5/18 11:56 am Melinda Droege <oklagranny26...> Re: Tulsa Area
11/5/18 9:04 am Terry Mitchell <terry...> Tulsa Area
11/4/18 12:25 pm Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...> Rose Lake and vicinity the past 4 days
11/3/18 11:34 am Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...> Saturday Morning
11/2/18 2:10 pm Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...> Mitch Park today
11/2/18 11:05 am Moninya Mulder <oden_mulder...> Bird Behavior
11/2/18 7:36 am Susanne Lutze <eztuls46...> Mystery
11/1/18 3:30 pm Brett Niland <bestguess...> Lynn lane reservoir
11/1/18 9:31 am John Kennington <johnkennington...> Wood Stork in Tulsa
11/1/18 9:26 am Patricia Velte <pvelte...> November Migration Report
11/1/18 5:56 am Dan Reinking <dan...> Re: FOS birds
10/31/18 3:36 pm Susanne Lutze <eztuls46...> Re: FOS birds
10/31/18 3:27 pm NATHAN KUHNERT <nrkuhnert...> Re: RB Nuthatch
10/31/18 2:39 pm Larry Mays <larrymays1949...> FOS birds
10/31/18 12:42 pm Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...> RB Nuthatch
10/31/18 8:48 am Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...> The Panhandle, October 28-29, 2018.
10/30/18 5:04 pm Alton Patton <adewittpatton...> Re: Sad day
10/30/18 4:04 pm Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...> Sad day
10/30/18 1:36 pm Mia Revels <0000004e74e60ce3-dmarc-request...> Peru Amazon Birding Trip with Dr. Ragupathy Kannan!
10/30/18 6:09 am Dan Reinking <dan...> seeking Ardmore area birders
10/30/18 4:02 am Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...> Red Breasted Nuthatch
10/30/18 3:59 am Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...> Re: White-winged Dove in McCurtain County
10/29/18 7:40 pm David Arbour <arbour...> White-winged Dove in McCurtain County
10/29/18 7:25 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - October 29
10/29/18 5:28 pm Jim Arterburn <JIMARTERBURN...> New photos uploaded to my website
10/29/18 4:14 pm NATHAN KUHNERT <nrkuhnert...> Re: OOS Fall Meeting Abstracts
10/29/18 4:03 pm NATHAN KUHNERT <nrkuhnert...> Re: OOS Fall Meeting Abstracts
10/29/18 9:53 am Brett Niland <bestguess...> Re: Red Nuthatch
10/29/18 9:38 am Nancy Reed <reednancy1717...> Red Nuthatch
10/28/18 12:50 pm Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...> tall grass prairie
10/28/18 12:44 pm William Diffin <okiebirder...> OOS Fall Meeting Abstracts
10/28/18 12:39 pm William Diffin <okiebirder...> OOS Fall Meeting birding
10/26/18 2:49 pm Susanne Lutze <eztuls46...> Re: Hawks
10/26/18 2:26 pm Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...> Re: Pacific Loon
10/26/18 2:25 pm Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...> Re: Pacific Loon
10/26/18 1:17 pm Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...> Hawks
10/26/18 12:56 pm Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...> Pacific Loon
10/25/18 6:21 pm HAROLD YOCUM <drhal2...> Happenings at Mitch Park , Edmond
10/24/18 11:45 am Lisa Wiesbauer <lakehaven58...> Re: Red-breasted Nuthatch
10/24/18 10:32 am Susanne Lutze <eztuls46...> Re: Red-breasted Nuthatch
10/24/18 9:46 am m.b.ludewig <m.b.ludewig...> Red-breasted Nuthatch
10/23/18 7:47 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough today
10/23/18 2:24 pm Fran Britton <000000b18b85122c-dmarc-request...> Re: New Photos
10/23/18 7:30 am Cyndie Browning <gr8auntieokie...> Sooner Lake -- Update
10/22/18 4:36 pm Brett Niland <bestguess...> Re: Southeast Ok fall color and bird migration
10/22/18 3:54 pm Richrd Gunn <richardgunn1940...> FOS on South Jenkins
10/22/18 3:50 pm The Rudolphs <ksmrudolph...> Re: Southeast Ok fall color and bird migration
10/22/18 3:12 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Sequoyah NWR
10/22/18 2:06 pm Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...> Re: Southeast Ok fall color and bird migration
10/22/18 2:05 pm Brett Niland <bestguess...> Re: Southeast Ok fall color and bird migration
10/22/18 1:47 pm Dora Webb <owl112...> Southeast Ok fall color and bird migration
10/22/18 1:11 pm Lisa Wiesbauer <lakehaven58...> Ruby throat
10/22/18 6:44 am Terry Mitchell <terry...> Tulsa Area
 
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Date: 11/18/18 5:50 pm
From: HAROLD YOCUM <drhal2...>
Subject: Fwd: Mitch Park Bird walk today 11/14/18- brief followup report
The forwarded email covers things rather well as far as the Wed. morning bird walk went. There are a couple additions that I usually do not count- domestic goose and domestic Muscovy duck.

-------- Original Message ----------
From: HAROLD YOCUM <drhal2...>
To: <nancys.vicars...>
Cc: <elizabethhacker66...>, <drhal2...>
Date: November 14, 2018 at 11:53 PM
Subject: Mitch Park Bird walk today 11/14/18- brief followup report


Hi Nancy,

I had a very poor turnout today , only 3 birders ( Betz, Gracie and I) on what turned out to be a PERFECT BIRDING DAY! It started cold(26) , sunny, NO WIND, and finished at 44 degrees.

We birded 3 small local ponds around / near Mitch and then the central third of Mitch Park over 4 hours ( 8:30-12:30). We had at least 50 species by my notes and Gracie / Betz may have 2-3 more.

Best were: Bob white quail, yellow bellied sapsucker, red breasted nuthatch, belted kingfisher, cedar waxwing( FOS), sharp-shinned and Coopers hawks, buffle-head, hooded merganser, lesser scaup, canvasback, spotted and eastern towhee, Lincoln, fox and chipping sparrows, northern flicker ( both red and yellow-shafted), e. meadowlark,

Ducks-7, hawks-4, sparrows-7.

Once I receive Gracie's listings I will post on okbirds.

Another birder reported a great horned owl sighting to me.

Hal A. Yocum





 

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Date: 11/18/18 3:42 pm
From: Lora Weber <weberloral...>
Subject: Bald Eagles
I observed 2 adult Bald Eagle chaseing an Osprey late this afternoon at
Sahoma Lake in Sapulpa. Not sure if they were after it for food, trying to
take food from it or just trying to get it out of the area. It was pretty
interesting to watch.

 

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Date: 11/18/18 9:24 am
From: William Diffin <okiebirder...>
Subject: WWSC at Hefner
Observing 2 White-winged Scoters at Prairie Dog Pt, east side some little
north of shoreline trees.

Bill

 

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Date: 11/17/18 8:21 am
From: Poland, Zachary <zpoland...>
Subject: Lake Hefner Scoters
Both Surf and White-winged scoters at Hobie Point at Hefner in OKC. I would try for the scoter sweep and see if the Black Scoters are still around, but my 3 yr old wants to go to the park.

ZAP

Sent from my mobile device.
 

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Date: 11/16/18 6:24 pm
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...>
Subject: Copan Wildlife Area on 11-16-2018
Hello All,
I went up to Copan Wildlife Area north of Bartlesville this morning before this year's deer hunting season begins tomorrow. It was clear, cool and mostly calm. There were many sparrows to be seen. Highlights included:

Northern Harrier-5
Sedge Wren-6
Spotted Towhee-1
Field Sparrow-4
Savannah Sparrow-20
Le Conte's Sparrow-4
Fox Sparrow-6
Song Sparrow-30
Lincoln's Sparrow-1
Swamp Sparrow-10
White-throated Sparrow-2
White-crowned Sparrow-10
Harris's Sparrow-6
Dark-eyed Junco-4

Mark Peterson
Bartlesville




 

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Date: 11/15/18 9:04 am
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...>
Subject: Bald Eagle at Lake Hefner
At 9:00 am, at Prairie Dog Point, an adult Bald Eagle was sitting in a tree
and I was able to get a few photos.

Matt Jung, OKC

 

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Date: 11/12/18 3:09 pm
From: Marilyn Loyd <jo.loyd...>
Subject: Tulsa Birders
Tuesday Morning Birders will not meet this week on the 13th.
Jo Loyd
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 11/12/18 1:52 pm
From: Brett Niland <bestguess...>
Subject: Pond at Hampton South 74th and Garnett Tulsa Oklahoma
73~ish hooded mergansers and a ring neck!?! Also widgeon, shovelers and all the usual suspects. That’s an amazing sight.

Thank You,

Brett Niland
 

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Date: 11/12/18 12:12 pm
From: natrea <natrea...>
Subject: Re: Red Rock Canyon State Park
It's only just begun. What is your favorite state park, and are you sure it's still a state park?Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.
-------- Original message --------From: Dora Webb <owl112...> Date: 11/12/18 11:32 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <OKBIRDS...> Subject: Red Rock Canyon State Park


Folks, be sure to read Monday, 11-12-18 edition of The
Oklahoman newspaper.  Now in hands of private company. 
  It has a name change, plans to clear
brush, build a grocery store, improve bathroom facilities,
AND HAVE MOVIE NIGHTS AND CONCERTS. 
Movies and concerts  are  totally  wrong for this beautiful park,
in my opinion.  Even though they say they won’t charge for entrance, just
how long will that last?  We love it
as it is with it’s “overgrown” brush and natural landscape.  Let’s contact
our reps and give them “what-for”!
Dora Webb
Edmond,
OK
 

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Date: 11/12/18 9:33 am
From: Dora Webb <owl112...>
Subject: Red Rock Canyon State Park
Folks, be sure to read Monday, 11-12-18 edition of The Oklahoman newspaper. Now in hands of private company. It has a name change, plans to clear brush, build a grocery store, improve bathroom facilities, AND HAVE MOVIE NIGHTS AND CONCERTS. Movies and concerts are totally wrong for this beautiful park, in my opinion. Even though they say they won’t charge for entrance, just how long will that last? We love it as it is with it’s “overgrown” brush and natural landscape. Let’s contact our reps and give them “what-for”!
Dora Webb
Edmond, OK
 

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Date: 11/12/18 7:27 am
From: Tal Roberts <talrob2...>
Subject: LeConte's Sparrow at Fort Towson
Was surprised to see a LeConte's yesterday morning while walking the grounds
at Fort Towson Historical Site. A beautiful little bird that you can just
never see enough of.



Many thanks to Chris Lynch for his eBird checklists, without which I would
never have known of this wonderful spot.



Good birding,



Tal Roberts

Dallas


 

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Date: 11/12/18 7:08 am
From: Terry Mitchell <terry...>
Subject: Tulsa Area
Yesterday afternoon I went to Lynn Lane reservoir and had 9-Barn Swallows.
Last week Scissortails and this week Swallows. Somebody needs to get the
word out to these bug eaters it’s time to vamoose south.



Terry Mitchell

 

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Date: 11/11/18 1:59 pm
From: Nancy Vicars <nancy.vicars...>
Subject: Northeast (Zoo) Lake in Oklahoma City
The lake had quite an impressive variety of water fowl this afternoon.  I found Gadwall, Mallard, Northern Shoveler, Greater & Lesser Scaup, Bufflehead, Hooded Merganser, Ruddy and Wood Ducks. Lots of Double-crested Cormorants and Ring-billed Gulls, also a few Pied-Grebes and American Coots.
This is a small lake, easily accessed, and a great spot to study waterfowl up close and personal.
Nancy Vicars




| | Virus-free. www.avg.com |


 

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Date: 11/10/18 7:38 pm
From: Judy Basham <judybasham...>
Subject: Re: Red Breasted Nuthatch
We have a faithful trio of red-breasted nuthatches at our feeders near Kaw Lake. They have been here for the past 9 days. Goldfinch have arrived along with a few yellow-rumps. Kinda makes us welcome the arrival of cold weather.


> On Nov 10, 2018, at 2:42 PM, Brett Niland <bestguess...> wrote:
>
> That’s amazing. I’ve been surprised by the number this year as well. I’ve reported them multiple times this year and generally have several in sight or ear shot anyways.
>
> Enjoy them. They are one of my favorites.
>
> Thank You,
>
> Brett Niland
> Cell: (918) 200-1818
>
>> On Nov 10, 2018, at 9:57 AM, Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...> wrote:
>>
>> This must be the year of the RBN. I’ve been watching them this morning at the feeder. I have seen 3 at the same time in the feeder. They are coming every few seconds and only stay for about 3 seconds. I have seen two other individuals that I can recognize by their distinctive characteristics and they were not at the feeder with the other 3. I feel there are at least 6 using the feeder and maybe more. I normally have 1 or 2 each winter but skip a winter sometimes. My house and feeder are in a mature mixed pine hardwood forest so most of my yard birds are forest species. There is a large field 30 feet through a screen of woods, so I get a number of birds that use both habitats including the edge affect.
>>
>> Bob Laval
>> Heavener
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 11/10/18 3:06 pm
From: Ron Huebner <feralbirder...>
Subject: Re: Oklahoma Christmas Counts
Hey John, Have you sent me the link so I can edit and append the list of
CBC's? I've looked at your emails and don't see anything obvious. Let me
know. Elkhart need to be updated with 12/29/2018.

On Fri, Nov 9, 2018 at 11:37 PM John Kennington <johnkennington...>
wrote:

> Ron Huebner has been contacting CBC compilers around the state to compile
> dates and contact info for all of Oklahoma's CBCs. He has heard back from
> most, though we are still waiting on a few.
>
> The list is now available on the Tulsa Audubon website:
>
> http://www.tulsaaudubon.org/christmas-bird-count#state
>
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.tulsaaudubon.org_christmas-2Dbird-2Dcount-23state&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=MzGrj1ilGfmYMOOFNZT334N_g_g6i5E-m7q49AfVVtw&s=vxv6iPha7KVZT9_0KU_GPM4-tyzKeEzv5YYm9DPvTps&e=>
>
> If you have updates on your count, please send them to Ron at
> <feralbirder...> and we'll then add it to the master list on the
> website.
>
> Also, note I have updated and modernized the Tulsa Audubon website, and it
> will now work well on mobile devices. Of special interest to birders around
> the state is the Birding page:
>
> http://www.tulsaaudubon.org/birding
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.tulsaaudubon.org_birding&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=MzGrj1ilGfmYMOOFNZT334N_g_g6i5E-m7q49AfVVtw&s=wyUAatL-TCKlQmglA4oJWwd8-h6sbeRl1ixJQ2RZlu8&e=>
>
> It has lots of resources for birders, including an intro to birding for
> new birders, Jim Arterburn's program on shorebirds in northeast Oklahoma, Birding
> FAQS, Smith's Longspur info, and lots of other info.
>
> Some us old-timers might be interested in the Remembrances page:
>
> http://www.tulsaaudubon.org/remembrances
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.tulsaaudubon.org_remembrances&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=MzGrj1ilGfmYMOOFNZT334N_g_g6i5E-m7q49AfVVtw&s=Xzm1NStf8Bo0CYltftNmbvtJG9DNQ53803YQxUILpQU&e=>
>
> This has remembrances of a number of notable Oklahoma birders.
>
> John Kennington
> Tulsa Audubon
>


--
Ron Huebner
<feralbirder...>

 

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Date: 11/10/18 1:53 pm
From: Ellie Womack <e-womack...>
Subject: Re: Hummingbird
Any photos? A Black-chinned would be a neat record. I've had Rufous
overwinter, but have never had a black-chinned in Grove, OK.

Ellie Womack
Grove, OK

------ Original Message ------
From: "Kelly Godley" <klgodley...>
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Sent: 11/10/2018 11:25:17 AM
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Hummingbird

>Since November 1st I’ve had a male hummingbird. He looks like a mature
>Ruby-throated, but I guess he could be a Black-chinned. Other than
>offering sugar water, is there anything else I could do to help him?
>
>Any information would be appreciated.
>
>Kelly Godley
>Coweta, OK
>
>Sent from my iPad


---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

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Date: 11/10/18 1:38 pm
From: Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...>
Subject: Re: Hummingbird
Seems like someone in Norman had one stay into Jan. A few years ago. He put a heat light under the eve where there was a perch near the feeder and the bird used it in the cold weather snow and all. Finally disappeared.
Bob Laval
Heavener

Sent from my iPad

> On Nov 10, 2018, at 2:39 PM, Brett Niland <bestguess...> wrote:
>
> I’m shocked he’s still here. Mine left weeks ago.
>
> Hopefully he gets the message soon. He’ll be a living miracle if he winds up making his wintering location at this point.
>
> Thank You,
>
> Brett Niland
>
>> On Nov 10, 2018, at 11:35 AM, Kelly Godley <klgodley...> wrote:
>>
>> Since November 1st I’ve had a male hummingbird. He looks like a mature Ruby-throated, but I guess he could be a Black-chinned. Other than offering sugar water, is there anything else I could do to help him?
>>
>> Any information would be appreciated.
>>
>> Kelly Godley
>> Coweta, OK
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 11/10/18 12:43 pm
From: Brett Niland <bestguess...>
Subject: Re: Red Breasted Nuthatch
That’s amazing. I’ve been surprised by the number this year as well. I’ve reported them multiple times this year and generally have several in sight or ear shot anyways.

Enjoy them. They are one of my favorites.

Thank You,

Brett Niland
Cell: (918) 200-1818

> On Nov 10, 2018, at 9:57 AM, Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...> wrote:
>
> This must be the year of the RBN. I’ve been watching them this morning at the feeder. I have seen 3 at the same time in the feeder. They are coming every few seconds and only stay for about 3 seconds. I have seen two other individuals that I can recognize by their distinctive characteristics and they were not at the feeder with the other 3. I feel there are at least 6 using the feeder and maybe more. I normally have 1 or 2 each winter but skip a winter sometimes. My house and feeder are in a mature mixed pine hardwood forest so most of my yard birds are forest species. There is a large field 30 feet through a screen of woods, so I get a number of birds that use both habitats including the edge affect.
>
> Bob Laval
> Heavener
>
> Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 11/10/18 12:39 pm
From: Brett Niland <bestguess...>
Subject: Re: Hummingbird
I’m shocked he’s still here. Mine left weeks ago.

Hopefully he gets the message soon. He’ll be a living miracle if he winds up making his wintering location at this point.

Thank You,

Brett Niland

> On Nov 10, 2018, at 11:35 AM, Kelly Godley <klgodley...> wrote:
>
> Since November 1st I’ve had a male hummingbird. He looks like a mature Ruby-throated, but I guess he could be a Black-chinned. Other than offering sugar water, is there anything else I could do to help him?
>
> Any information would be appreciated.
>
> Kelly Godley
> Coweta, OK
>
> Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 11/10/18 9:35 am
From: Kelly Godley <klgodley...>
Subject: Hummingbird
Since November 1st I’ve had a male hummingbird. He looks like a mature Ruby-throated, but I guess he could be a Black-chinned. Other than offering sugar water, is there anything else I could do to help him?

Any information would be appreciated.

Kelly Godley
Coweta, OK

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 11/10/18 8:26 am
From: William Diffin <okiebirder...>
Subject: eBird Essentials Cliff Notes
Apologies again. Here is the complete Cliff Notes version of the eBird
Essentials course I tried to post earlier. Much of it did not get
through.

"When you go birding, you’ll need to decide how you’ll submit the data
to eBird. Specifically, should you submit one long checklist or
several shorter checklists? In general, checklists for shorter
distances and duration are always better, providing more precise
information about your sightings.

Here’s an easy guideline if you’re driving somewhere: start your
checklist when you get out of the car and stop the list when you get
back in."

"If you are traveling long distances on foot or by car and making many
stops along a road, you’ll need to decide when to stop tallying your
checklist and start a new one. Remember, checklists for shorter
distances and duration have the most value. Two guidelines will help:
keep checklist distance to 8km (5mi) or less, and start a new list
when you enter a new habitat. If you travel through fields for two
miles and then enter a patch of forest, it is the perfect time to stop
the current list and start a new one for the new habitat.

When reporting distance values, you should always report the unique
distance traveled. For example, walking out and back along a 5km (3mi)
trail should be reported as a 5km (3mi) checklist, not 10km (6mi). If
you’re using eBird Mobile tracking, you should keep a track for the
full checklist—just change the actual distance tally to reflect the
unique distance. It’s the same way with birds: report all of the
unique birds you encounter, but don’t double-count that same flock of
ducks in the pond by the trail on the way back."

"If your checklist falls into the incidental category, it means
birding was not your primary purpose. Another way to think about it is
that you were not able to give enough attention to compile a complete
checklist because of insufficient time or other distractions. This
could be while driving or hanging out with friends, but not really
birding. Incidental checklists add useful information to eBird, but if
you have the time and opportunity, try to focus on birding for even a
few minutes so that you can change that incidental to a complete list.
All you have to do is make a concerted effort to record the birds in
the area, even for as little as 5 to 10 minutes, then report either a
traveling or stationary count."

"For every eBird checklist you’ll answer the simple question, “Are you
reporting all species?” While simple, the answer is important. The
“complete checklist” is one of the most powerful aspects of eBird, and
we encourage you to submit complete checklists whenever possible.

If you answer “Yes,” it does not mean that you’re detecting every bird
that was present at the place you were birding—that’s pretty much
impossible! All it means is that you are reporting all species you
were able to identify, by sight and sound, to the best of your
ability. What the question really asks is: are you reporting
everything you identified, or just reporting a “highlight reel” of
some birds and intentionally omitting House Sparrows, Rock Pigeons, or
other common species? As long as you aren’t intentionally leaving
anything off the checklist, you’re submitting a complete checklist.

When you include all species and mark “Yes,” your checklist becomes
much more powerful. By including every bird you detected, researchers
can use your sightings to verify what birds are present at that time
and place (the birds you reported) and which birds are not detected at
that time and place (the species that are not on your complete
checklist). This turns every list into a survey of every bird in the
world: which species were detected on that checklist (e.g., 15
species), and which birds were not detected (e.g., 10,570 species)."

-- Bill
 

Back to top
Date: 11/10/18 8:13 am
From: William Diffin <okiebirder...>
Subject: Re: online eBird course
Apologies, but a big section of the post got left out. I'll have to give it
another try.

-- Bill

On Thu, Nov 8, 2018 at 1:39 PM Dan Reinking <dan...> wrote:

> Here is a blurb about the course:
> Introducing the Free Course That Will Make You an eBird Whiz
>
> Are you a birder, a bird watcher, or a bird lover? It doesn’t matter—this
> course is for you. Whether you watch birds at your feeder, on the way to
> work, or travel miles for that one bird you can’t wait to see, eBird can
> help. Discover how eBird can make finding, photographing, and sharing birds
> more enjoyable, and how your participation helps scientists understand and
> protect them, too. Learn more and dive in to the course
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__cornell.us2.list-2Dmanage.com_track_click-3Fu-3Db35ddb671faf4a16c0ce32406-26id-3D1e3cb2282b-26e-3Dca852be9d7&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=m1GGZ2LEFpacDUqnArTXyy_BleYy6mg1qbC_V0uDAMg&s=yi5YcFSeoVy2y36VsdIANM4RbnfLLm1C7erO-WmHs1c&e=>
> .
>
>
>
> *From:* okbirds <OKBIRDS...> *On Behalf Of *William Diffin
> *Sent:* Thursday, November 08, 2018 11:48 AM
> *To:* <OKBIRDS...>
> *Subject:* [OKBIRDS] Surf and Black Scoters, Hefner
>
>
>
> For those of you who do not get eBird rare bird reports, yesterday and
> this morning a Black Scoter and two Surf Scoters have been present at Lake
> Hefner. The Black Scoter has been in the Prairie Dog Point area. Yesterday
> when seen it was in the western cove between the cattails and the dam. This
> morning it was seen resting near the east end of Prairie Dog Point about 40
> yards north. The Surf Scoters were present yesterday at the far southeast
> end of the dam. This morning they were along the middle of the dam at the
> big bend where it turns from northeast to straight east. They were close to
> shore with coots.
>
>
>
> Last night I worked through the Bird Essentials free online course. It
> took about 30 minutes and was well worth the time. I learned about half a
> dozen useful new things even though I have decent experience with eBird
> mobile, around 1100 checklists. If every eBirder in Oklahoma went through
> it, the data from our state would be improved by a worthwhile margin, and
> effort would be saved at the same time through more efficient data input.
> The course includes among other things a couple of spectacular
> demonstrations of the power of citizen science data gathering. The annual
> occurrence and movement of Greater Yellowlegs and Wood Thrush are shown in
> time lapse form based on eBird sightings.
>
>
>
> Bill Diffin, OKC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/10/18 8:09 am
From: William Diffin <okiebirder...>
Subject: Re: online eBird course
Thanks, Dan. I bet some folks clicked on the link and took the course. What
follows is the Cliff Notes version for those who didn't.

For about a year, maybe longer, eBird has been encouraging us to submit
more granular data sufficient to distinguish bird occupancy in different
habitats. This is different than the trip list habit that most of us more
experienced birders have ingrained. eBird has also stressed the submission
of COMPLETE lists. What I have done below is pull quotes out of the course
that give more specific guidance on how granular the data should be and
what is meant exactly by a complete list. If any of this seems new, you
should really take the course to get the full detail and benefit of the
guidance. Also eBird puts a star by your name by issuing a certificate that
indicates you completed the course and passed the quiz.

"When you go birding, you’ll need to decide how you’ll submit the data to
eBird. Specifically, should you submit one long checklist or several
shorter checklists? In general, checklists for shorter distances and
duration are always better, providing more precise information about your

"For every eBird checklist you’ll answer the simple question, “Are you
reporting all species?” While simple, the answer is important. The
“complete checklist” is one of the most powerful aspects of eBird, and we
encourage you to submit complete checklists whenever possible.

If you answer “Yes,” it does *not* mean that you’re detecting every bird
that was present at the place you were birding—that’s pretty much
impossible! All it means is that you are reporting all species *you* were
able to identify, by sight and sound, to the best of *your* ability. What
the question really asks is: are you reporting everything you identified,
or just reporting a “highlight reel” of some birds and intentionally
omitting House Sparrows, Rock Pigeons, or other common species? As long as
you aren’t intentionally leaving anything off the checklist, you’re
submitting a complete checklist.

When you include all species and mark “Yes,” your checklist becomes much
more powerful. By including every bird you detected, researchers can use
your sightings to verify what birds *are* present at that time and place
(the birds you reported) and which birds *are not detected* at that time
and place (the species that are not on your complete checklist). This turns
every list into a survey of every bird in the world: which species were
detected on that checklist (e.g., 15 species), and which birds were not
detected (e.g., 10,570 species)."

Comment: The collective effort of eBirders represents a huge investment of
time, energy and skill. It makes sense to provide the data in as useful a
form as possible for the scientists whose job it is to interpret it.

-- Bill

On Thu, Nov 8, 2018 at 1:39 PM Dan Reinking <dan...> wrote:

> Here is a blurb about the course:
> Introducing the Free Course That Will Make You an eBird Whiz
>
> Are you a birder, a bird watcher, or a bird lover? It doesn’t matter—this
> course is for you. Whether you watch birds at your feeder, on the way to
> work, or travel miles for that one bird you can’t wait to see, eBird can
> help. Discover how eBird can make finding, photographing, and sharing birds
> more enjoyable, and how your participation helps scientists understand and
> protect them, too. Learn more and dive in to the course
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__cornell.us2.list-2Dmanage.com_track_click-3Fu-3Db35ddb671faf4a16c0ce32406-26id-3D1e3cb2282b-26e-3Dca852be9d7&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=m1GGZ2LEFpacDUqnArTXyy_BleYy6mg1qbC_V0uDAMg&s=yi5YcFSeoVy2y36VsdIANM4RbnfLLm1C7erO-WmHs1c&e=>
> .
>
>
>
> *From:* okbirds <OKBIRDS...> *On Behalf Of *William Diffin
> *Sent:* Thursday, November 08, 2018 11:48 AM
> *To:* <OKBIRDS...>
> *Subject:* [OKBIRDS] Surf and Black Scoters, Hefner
>
>
>
> For those of you who do not get eBird rare bird reports, yesterday and
> this morning a Black Scoter and two Surf Scoters have been present at Lake
> Hefner. The Black Scoter has been in the Prairie Dog Point area. Yesterday
> when seen it was in the western cove between the cattails and the dam. This
> morning it was seen resting near the east end of Prairie Dog Point about 40
> yards north. The Surf Scoters were present yesterday at the far southeast
> end of the dam. This morning they were along the middle of the dam at the
> big bend where it turns from northeast to straight east. They were close to
> shore with coots.
>
>
>
> Last night I worked through the Bird Essentials free online course. It
> took about 30 minutes and was well worth the time. I learned about half a
> dozen useful new things even though I have decent experience with eBird
> mobile, around 1100 checklists. If every eBirder in Oklahoma went through
> it, the data from our state would be improved by a worthwhile margin, and
> effort would be saved at the same time through more efficient data input.
> The course includes among other things a couple of spectacular
> demonstrations of the power of citizen science data gathering. The annual
> occurrence and movement of Greater Yellowlegs and Wood Thrush are shown in
> time lapse form based on eBird sightings.
>
>
>
> Bill Diffin, OKC
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/10/18 7:57 am
From: Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...>
Subject: Red Breasted Nuthatch
This must be the year of the RBN. I’ve been watching them this morning at the feeder. I have seen 3 at the same time in the feeder. They are coming every few seconds and only stay for about 3 seconds. I have seen two other individuals that I can recognize by their distinctive characteristics and they were not at the feeder with the other 3. I feel there are at least 6 using the feeder and maybe more. I normally have 1 or 2 each winter but skip a winter sometimes. My house and feeder are in a mature mixed pine hardwood forest so most of my yard birds are forest species. There is a large field 30 feet through a screen of woods, so I get a number of birds that use both habitats including the edge affect.

Bob Laval
Heavener

Sent from my iPad
 

Back to top
Date: 11/10/18 5:06 am
From: Brett Niland <bestguess...>
Subject: Re: Oklahoma Christmas Counts
Indeed! Just saw the site for the first time since the change. It is much enhanced. Content is far easier to find and it is much more attractive and complete.

Thanks for the huge effort and excellent resource!

Thank You,

Brett Niland
Cell: (918) 200-1818

On Nov 10, 2018, at 6:12 AM, Ron Huebner <feralbirder...><mailto:<feralbirder...>> wrote:

Just wanted to take a moment to thank John for the updated website, which is not only a great resource for birders in the Tulsa area, but has been designed to serve the entire state of Oklahoma. Please visit and enjoy John's great work!

On Fri, Nov 9, 2018 at 11:37 PM John Kennington <johnkennington...><mailto:<johnkennington...>> wrote:
Ron Huebner has been contacting CBC compilers around the state to compile dates and contact info for all of Oklahoma's CBCs. He has heard back from most, though we are still waiting on a few.

The list is now available on the Tulsa Audubon website:

http://www.tulsaaudubon.org/christmas-bird-count#state
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.tulsaaudubon.org_christmas-2Dbird-2Dcount-23state&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=MzGrj1ilGfmYMOOFNZT334N_g_g6i5E-m7q49AfVVtw&s=vxv6iPha7KVZT9_0KU_GPM4-tyzKeEzv5YYm9DPvTps&e=>

If you have updates on your count, please send them to Ron at <feralbirder...><mailto:<feralbirder...> and we'll then add it to the master list on the website.

Also, note I have updated and modernized the Tulsa Audubon website, and it will now work well on mobile devices. Of special interest to birders around the state is the Birding page:

http://www.tulsaaudubon.org/birding<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.tulsaaudubon.org_birding&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=MzGrj1ilGfmYMOOFNZT334N_g_g6i5E-m7q49AfVVtw&s=wyUAatL-TCKlQmglA4oJWwd8-h6sbeRl1ixJQ2RZlu8&e=>

It has lots of resources for birders, including an intro to birding for new birders, Jim Arterburn's program on shorebirds in northeast Oklahoma, Birding FAQS, Smith's Longspur info, and lots of other info.

Some us old-timers might be interested in the Remembrances page:

http://www.tulsaaudubon.org/remembrances<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.tulsaaudubon.org_remembrances&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=MzGrj1ilGfmYMOOFNZT334N_g_g6i5E-m7q49AfVVtw&s=Xzm1NStf8Bo0CYltftNmbvtJG9DNQ53803YQxUILpQU&e=>

This has remembrances of a number of notable Oklahoma birders.

John Kennington
Tulsa Audubon


--
Ron Huebner
<feralbirder...><mailto:<feralbirder...>
 

Back to top
Date: 11/10/18 4:12 am
From: Ron Huebner <feralbirder...>
Subject: Re: Oklahoma Christmas Counts
Just wanted to take a moment to thank John for the updated website, which
is not only a great resource for birders in the Tulsa area, but has been
designed to serve the entire state of Oklahoma. Please visit and enjoy
John's great work!

On Fri, Nov 9, 2018 at 11:37 PM John Kennington <johnkennington...>
wrote:

> Ron Huebner has been contacting CBC compilers around the state to compile
> dates and contact info for all of Oklahoma's CBCs. He has heard back from
> most, though we are still waiting on a few.
>
> The list is now available on the Tulsa Audubon website:
>
> http://www.tulsaaudubon.org/christmas-bird-count#state
>
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.tulsaaudubon.org_christmas-2Dbird-2Dcount-23state&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=MzGrj1ilGfmYMOOFNZT334N_g_g6i5E-m7q49AfVVtw&s=vxv6iPha7KVZT9_0KU_GPM4-tyzKeEzv5YYm9DPvTps&e=>
>
> If you have updates on your count, please send them to Ron at
> <feralbirder...> and we'll then add it to the master list on the
> website.
>
> Also, note I have updated and modernized the Tulsa Audubon website, and it
> will now work well on mobile devices. Of special interest to birders around
> the state is the Birding page:
>
> http://www.tulsaaudubon.org/birding
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.tulsaaudubon.org_birding&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=MzGrj1ilGfmYMOOFNZT334N_g_g6i5E-m7q49AfVVtw&s=wyUAatL-TCKlQmglA4oJWwd8-h6sbeRl1ixJQ2RZlu8&e=>
>
> It has lots of resources for birders, including an intro to birding for
> new birders, Jim Arterburn's program on shorebirds in northeast Oklahoma, Birding
> FAQS, Smith's Longspur info, and lots of other info.
>
> Some us old-timers might be interested in the Remembrances page:
>
> http://www.tulsaaudubon.org/remembrances
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.tulsaaudubon.org_remembrances&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=MzGrj1ilGfmYMOOFNZT334N_g_g6i5E-m7q49AfVVtw&s=Xzm1NStf8Bo0CYltftNmbvtJG9DNQ53803YQxUILpQU&e=>
>
> This has remembrances of a number of notable Oklahoma birders.
>
> John Kennington
> Tulsa Audubon
>


--
Ron Huebner
<feralbirder...>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/9/18 9:43 pm
From: John Kennington <johnkennington...>
Subject: Oklahoma Christmas Counts
Ron Huebner has been contacting CBC compilers around the state to compile
dates and contact info for all of Oklahoma's CBCs. He has heard back from
most, though we are still waiting on a few.

The list is now available on the Tulsa Audubon website:

http://www.tulsaaudubon.org/christmas-bird-count#state

If you have updates on your count, please send them to Ron at
<feralbirder...> and we'll then add it to the master list on the
website.

Also, note I have updated and modernized the Tulsa Audubon website, and it
will now work well on mobile devices. Of special interest to birders around
the state is the Birding page:

http://www.tulsaaudubon.org/birding

It has lots of resources for birders, including an intro to birding for new
birders, Jim Arterburn's program on shorebirds in northeast Oklahoma, Birding
FAQS, Smith's Longspur info, and lots of other info.

Some us old-timers might be interested in the Remembrances page:

http://www.tulsaaudubon.org/remembrances

This has remembrances of a number of notable Oklahoma birders.

John Kennington
Tulsa Audubon

 

Back to top
Date: 11/8/18 11:39 am
From: Dan Reinking <dan...>
Subject: Re: online eBird course
Here is a blurb about the course:


Introducing the Free Course That Will Make You an eBird Whiz


Are you a birder, a bird watcher, or a bird lover? It doesn’t matter—this course is for you. Whether you watch birds at your feeder, on the way to work, or travel miles for that one bird you can’t wait to see, eBird can help. Discover how eBird can make finding, photographing, and sharing birds more enjoyable, and how your participation helps scientists understand and protect them, too. <https://cornell.us2.list-manage.com/track/click?u=b35ddb671faf4a16c0ce32406&id=1e3cb2282b&e=ca852be9d7> Learn more and dive in to the course.



From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> On Behalf Of William Diffin
Sent: Thursday, November 08, 2018 11:48 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Surf and Black Scoters, Hefner



For those of you who do not get eBird rare bird reports, yesterday and this morning a Black Scoter and two Surf Scoters have been present at Lake Hefner. The Black Scoter has been in the Prairie Dog Point area. Yesterday when seen it was in the western cove between the cattails and the dam. This morning it was seen resting near the east end of Prairie Dog Point about 40 yards north. The Surf Scoters were present yesterday at the far southeast end of the dam. This morning they were along the middle of the dam at the big bend where it turns from northeast to straight east. They were close to shore with coots.



Last night I worked through the Bird Essentials free online course. It took about 30 minutes and was well worth the time. I learned about half a dozen useful new things even though I have decent experience with eBird mobile, around 1100 checklists. If every eBirder in Oklahoma went through it, the data from our state would be improved by a worthwhile margin, and effort would be saved at the same time through more efficient data input. The course includes among other things a couple of spectacular demonstrations of the power of citizen science data gathering. The annual occurrence and movement of Greater Yellowlegs and Wood Thrush are shown in time lapse form based on eBird sightings.



Bill Diffin, OKC


 

Back to top
Date: 11/8/18 9:49 am
From: William Diffin <okiebirder...>
Subject: Surf and Black Scoters, Hefner
For those of you who do not get eBird rare bird reports, yesterday and this
morning a Black Scoter and two Surf Scoters have been present at Lake
Hefner. The Black Scoter has been in the Prairie Dog Point area. Yesterday
when seen it was in the western cove between the cattails and the dam. This
morning it was seen resting near the east end of Prairie Dog Point about 40
yards north. The Surf Scoters were present yesterday at the far southeast
end of the dam. This morning they were along the middle of the dam at the
big bend where it turns from northeast to straight east. They were close to
shore with coots.

Last night I worked through the Bird Essentials free online course. It took
about 30 minutes and was well worth the time. I learned about half a dozen
useful new things even though I have decent experience with eBird mobile,
around 1100 checklists. If every eBirder in Oklahoma went through it, the
data from our state would be improved by a worthwhile margin, and effort
would be saved at the same time through more efficient data input. The
course includes among other things a couple of spectacular demonstrations
of the power of citizen science data gathering. The annual occurrence and
movement of Greater Yellowlegs and Wood Thrush are shown in time lapse form
based on eBird sightings.

Bill Diffin, OKC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/7/18 4:02 pm
From: O Connell, Tim <tim.oconnell...>
Subject: Payne County Audubon November events - starting Saturday!
Dear Friends and Supporters of the Payne County Audubon Society,

November reminds us that birds occupy an important place in our history, but there is more to enjoy than turkey. We have TWO field trips this month and hope you can join us for one or both:


A. First, we’ll travel to exotic Ripley, OK for a driving/light walking tour of Ghost Hollow and the Cimarron River, this Saturday afternoon, Nov. 10th. Ghost Hollow is a road through mature, deciduous forest that should provide great opportunities to see chickadees, sparrows, woodpeckers, etc., and the potential for harder-to-find species such as Winter Wren, Hermit Thrush, and Fox Sparrow. We will have at least two vehicles available for carpooling from Stillwater. If you’d like to join in, we’ll meet on the OSU campus on the WEST side of Ag Hall, which is at the corner of Monroe St. and Farm Rd. There’s sort of an upper and lower parking lot on the west side of Ag Hall; I’ll check both to make sure I don’t overlook anyone who wants a ride. If you’d like to come along but don’t need a ride, then please send an email to Jim Shaw (<jim.shaw...><mailto:<jim.shaw...>) and Jim Cowley (<cowunit...><mailto:<cowunit...>) to identify our rendezvous location in Ripley.

Meeting time will be 1:00 pm at Ag Hall if carpooling from Stillwater and 1:30 if you’re heading straight to Ripley on your own. (Bedlam football in Norman kicks off at 2:30; I expect the carpool will make it back to Stillwater by 3:30.)


B. On Saturday, Nov. 24th, John Couch (<jrcouch60...><mailto:<jrcouch60...>) is planning to lead to a field trip to Sooner Lake to do some scouting for the upcoming Christmas Bird Count there. This trip traditionally meets at Bill’s Corner (routes 177N and 64W). Time is TBD to avoid conflict with the OSU/TCU football game; please check the website for details: https://paynecountyaudubonsociety.com/whats-new/.


C. Finally, we have no Thursday evening meeting in November. We will next meet Thursday, Dec. 1 at 7:00 pm in the Stillwater Public Library. The topic for this meeting will be advance planning for the Stillwater and Sooner Lake Christmas Bird Counts. All are welcome; beginners especially so!

That’s all for now. I hope to see you in the field this weekend! Wishing you good birding,
~Tim

Tim O’Connell
PCAS President
https://paynecountyaudubonsociety.com/




 

Back to top
Date: 11/7/18 10:49 am
From: Mia Revels <0000004e74e60ce3-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Broken Bow Christmas Bird Count - Sunday, December 23, 2018
The Broken Bow Christmas Bird Count this year will be on Sunday, December
23, 2018.

Saturday evening, December 22, we will meet at Papa Poblano's Restaurant at
7:00 pm to make plans and visit! Papa Poblano's is just north of the
traffic light east of Idabel. I will make reservations for 7:00 pm, which
will allow time to eat and then to hand out checklists, maps, and other
information for the count. I will provide maps showing the various
sections, and we will determine who covers which area.

On Sunday, December 23 (count day) each group will bird their assigned area
until the lunchtime tally. We will meet for lunch at Steven's Gap
Restaurant at 1:00 PM. This Restaurant is on the west side of Hwy 259 in
Hochatown, just south of the road that goes into Steven's Gap. The catfish
is amazing, but so are the cheeseburgers - oh, and they have homemade
desserts too! After lunch we will conduct a preliminary species tally and
see what we have missed. Those who are staying will then go back out,
ending at sundown in Unit 2 of the Little River National Wildlife Refuge
where we will watch the waterfowl come to roost, and hope for a Woodcock.

This CBC takes place in one of the loveliest parts of Oklahoma, and
includes the Little River National Wildlife Refuge.
https://www.fws.gov/refuge/little_river/

Please consider joining us! It is a remote section of the state, and we
need all the help we can get. You won't regret it.
Contact me at <revels...> if you need more information, or just to let
me know that you are planning to come.
Hope to see you there!

Mia Revels


--
Mia Revels, Ph.D.
Professor of Biology
Northeastern State University
611 Grand Ave.
Tahlequah, Oklahoma
(918) 444-3824
<revels...>


***CONFIDENTIALITY*** -This e-mail (including any attachments) may contain
confidential, proprietary and privileged information. Any unauthorized
disclosure or use of this information is prohibited.

 

Back to top
Date: 11/6/18 8:03 pm
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...>
Subject: Rose Lake today
A little diversity has been added to the duck species: Redheads, Mallards
and Hooded Merganser. Other birds on the water were Pied-billed Grebe, lots
of A. Coots, Ring-billed and Franklin's Gulls.

Matt Jung, OKC

 

Back to top
Date: 11/5/18 6:51 pm
From: Kurt Meisenzahl <meisenzk...>
Subject: Stephens County CBC
The Stephens County CBC will be on Thursday, Dec 27th, 2018.
We will meet in Duncan at the Day Break Diner, 116 South Hwy 81, at 6:30.
Contact me by email or phone (580-585-0199 for more information/area assignments.
Kurt MeisenzahlLawton, OK
 

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Date: 11/5/18 2:04 pm
From: Brett Niland <bestguess...>
Subject: Hooded mergansers up close.
There’s a groups of hoodeds at the retention pond at Garnett at 74th~ish in Tulsa.

Also widgeon, shovelers, gadwalls, grebe. All the usual suspects.

Cool for an in town stop.

Thank You,

Brett Niland
Cell: (918) 200-1818
 

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Date: 11/5/18 2:01 pm
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...>
Subject: Lake Hefner and Rose Lake Area
Had FOS Horned Grebe mixed in a flock of Greater Scaup and Ruddy Ducks.

At Rose Lake saw FOS Northern Shoveler along with lots of coots, Gadwall
and a few wigeons. One mile west on the east playa were 4 A. Avocets with a
few G. Yellowlegs and Least Sandpipers.

Matt Jung, OKC

 

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Date: 11/5/18 12:51 pm
From: Brett Niland <bestguess...>
Subject: Re: Tulsa Area
Just one in our instance. We didn't spot a second eagle at all. Indeed, even though unsuccessful for the birds, your sounds like the better observation.

I always feel privileged to have witnessed such an event.

Regards,

Brett
________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Terry Mitchell <terry...>
Sent: Monday, November 5, 2018 2:48 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Tulsa Area


Was it one Bald Eagle. It was interesting seeing two work together. Even though they failed to catch it.



Terry Mitchell

From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...><mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Brett Niland
Sent: Monday, November 05, 2018 2:30 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...><mailto:<OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: Tulsa Area



Hi Terry,



We met recently at monument point on lake yahola.



My wife and I watched a bald eagle take a franklins gull off the water on Lynn Lane reservoir Thursday Nov 1st.



We were scanning with binocs and a scope when almost every bird on the lake came up. Seconds later we saw the eagle take the gull off the surface.



Very cool. Looks like that'll be a hunting pattern at that location...it was spectacular.



Brett

________________________________

From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...><mailto:<OKBIRDS...>> on behalf of Melinda Droege <oklagranny26...><mailto:<oklagranny26...>>
Sent: Monday, November 5, 2018 1:56 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...><mailto:<OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Tulsa Area



Strange, but fun to read about....



On Mon, Nov 5, 2018 at 12:09 PM Terry Mitchell <terry...><mailto:<terry...>> wrote:

I had a strange afternoon at Lynn Lane on Sunday. I got there at 3:30 and scanned the Lake for Waterfowl, the lake is usually loaded with ducks, grebes and gulls. The whole time I was there I never found a duck and besides 2 Pie-billed Grebes, 150 Franklins Gulls and 2-Scissortailed Fly Catchers that was it. Wait 2-Scissortails? That was fun. I got some very nice photos so Ebird would believe me. As I was leaving all the Franklins Gulls took off except one. The Lone Franklins started splashing around and as I tried to figure out what it was doing, one than two Bald Eagles dove on it and barley missed it. They dove several more times and it evaded them somehow. Finally the Gull took off and feebly tried to fly away. Obviously something was wrong with the gull as it was flying weakly. The two Bald Eagles tried time after time to snag the gull out of midair, but every time it evaded them. The Gull couldnt fly well enough to get away and the Eagles tried for at least five minutes to grab it. Many times I thought they had it but it somehow persevered. I was rooting for the gull by the way. Finally the Eagles started flying off and the Gull flew right up behind them. I thought go the other way dummy, but the Eagles paid it no mind. No ducks, 2-Scissortails and thrilling aerial combat, a strange afternoon at Lynn Lane Indeed.



Terry Mitchell



 

Back to top
Date: 11/5/18 12:48 pm
From: Terry Mitchell <terry...>
Subject: Re: Tulsa Area
Was it one Bald Eagle. It was interesting seeing two work together. Even
though they failed to catch it.



Terry Mitchell

*From:* okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] *On Behalf Of *Brett Niland
*Sent:* Monday, November 05, 2018 2:30 PM
*To:* <OKBIRDS...>
*Subject:* Re: Tulsa Area



Hi Terry,



We met recently at monument point on lake yahola.



My wife and I watched a bald eagle take a franklins gull off the water on
Lynn Lane reservoir Thursday Nov 1st.



We were scanning with binocs and a scope when almost every bird on the lake
came up. Seconds later we saw the eagle take the gull off the surface.



Very cool. Looks like that'll be a hunting pattern at that location...it
was spectacular.



Brett
------------------------------

*From:* okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Melinda Droege <
<oklagranny26...>
*Sent:* Monday, November 5, 2018 1:56 PM
*To:* <OKBIRDS...>
*Subject:* Re: [OKBIRDS] Tulsa Area



Strange, but fun to read about....



On Mon, Nov 5, 2018 at 12:09 PM Terry Mitchell <terry...> wrote:

I had a strange afternoon at Lynn Lane on Sunday. I got there at 3:30 and
scanned the Lake for Waterfowl, the lake is usually loaded with ducks,
grebes and gulls. The whole time I was there I never found a duck and
besides 2 Pie-billed Grebes, 150 Franklin’s Gulls and 2-Scissortailed Fly
Catchers that was it. Wait 2-Scissortails? That was fun. I got some very
nice photos so Ebird would believe me. As I was leaving all the Franklins
Gulls took off except one. The Lone Franklin’s started splashing around and
as I tried to figure out what it was doing, one than two Bald Eagles dove
on it and barley missed it. They dove several more times and it evaded them
somehow. Finally the Gull took off and feebly tried to fly away. Obviously
something was wrong with the gull as it was flying weakly. The two Bald
Eagles tried time after time to snag the gull out of midair, but every time
it evaded them. The Gull couldn’t fly well enough to get away and the
Eagles tried for at least five minutes to grab it. Many times I thought
they had it but it somehow persevered. I was rooting for the gull by the
way. Finally the Eagles started flying off and the Gull flew right up
behind them. I thought go the other way dummy, but the Eagles paid it no
mind. No ducks, 2-Scissortails and thrilling aerial combat, a strange
afternoon at Lynn Lane Indeed.



Terry Mitchell

 

Back to top
Date: 11/5/18 12:30 pm
From: Brett Niland <bestguess...>
Subject: Re: Tulsa Area
Hi Terry,

We met recently at monument point on lake yahola.

My wife and I watched a bald eagle take a franklins gull off the water on Lynn Lane reservoir Thursday Nov 1st.

We were scanning with binocs and a scope when almost every bird on the lake came up. Seconds later we saw the eagle take the gull off the surface.

Very cool. Looks like that'll be a hunting pattern at that location...it was spectacular.

Brett
________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Melinda Droege <oklagranny26...>
Sent: Monday, November 5, 2018 1:56 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Tulsa Area

Strange, but fun to read about....

On Mon, Nov 5, 2018 at 12:09 PM Terry Mitchell <terry...><mailto:<terry...>> wrote:

I had a strange afternoon at Lynn Lane on Sunday. I got there at 3:30 and scanned the Lake for Waterfowl, the lake is usually loaded with ducks, grebes and gulls. The whole time I was there I never found a duck and besides 2 Pie-billed Grebes, 150 Franklins Gulls and 2-Scissortailed Fly Catchers that was it. Wait 2-Scissortails? That was fun. I got some very nice photos so Ebird would believe me. As I was leaving all the Franklins Gulls took off except one. The Lone Franklins started splashing around and as I tried to figure out what it was doing, one than two Bald Eagles dove on it and barley missed it. They dove several more times and it evaded them somehow. Finally the Gull took off and feebly tried to fly away. Obviously something was wrong with the gull as it was flying weakly. The two Bald Eagles tried time after time to snag the gull out of midair, but every time it evaded them. The Gull couldnt fly well enough to get away and the Eagles tried for at least five minutes to grab it. Many times I thought they had it but it somehow persevered. I was rooting for the gull by the way. Finally the Eagles started flying off and the Gull flew right up behind them. I thought go the other way dummy, but the Eagles paid it no mind. No ducks, 2-Scissortails and thrilling aerial combat, a strange afternoon at Lynn Lane Indeed.



Terry Mitchell



 

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Date: 11/5/18 11:56 am
From: Melinda Droege <oklagranny26...>
Subject: Re: Tulsa Area
Strange, but fun to read about....

On Mon, Nov 5, 2018 at 12:09 PM Terry Mitchell <terry...> wrote:

> I had a strange afternoon at Lynn Lane on Sunday. I got there at 3:30 and
> scanned the Lake for Waterfowl, the lake is usually loaded with ducks,
> grebes and gulls. The whole time I was there I never found a duck and
> besides 2 Pie-billed Grebes, 150 Franklin’s Gulls and 2-Scissortailed Fly
> Catchers that was it. Wait 2-Scissortails? That was fun. I got some very
> nice photos so Ebird would believe me. As I was leaving all the Franklins
> Gulls took off except one. The Lone Franklin’s started splashing around and
> as I tried to figure out what it was doing, one than two Bald Eagles dove
> on it and barley missed it. They dove several more times and it evaded them
> somehow. Finally the Gull took off and feebly tried to fly away. Obviously
> something was wrong with the gull as it was flying weakly. The two Bald
> Eagles tried time after time to snag the gull out of midair, but every time
> it evaded them. The Gull couldn’t fly well enough to get away and the
> Eagles tried for at least five minutes to grab it. Many times I thought
> they had it but it somehow persevered. I was rooting for the gull by the
> way. Finally the Eagles started flying off and the Gull flew right up
> behind them. I thought go the other way dummy, but the Eagles paid it no
> mind. No ducks, 2-Scissortails and thrilling aerial combat, a strange
> afternoon at Lynn Lane Indeed.
>
>
>
> Terry Mitchell
>
>
>

 

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Date: 11/5/18 9:04 am
From: Terry Mitchell <terry...>
Subject: Tulsa Area
I had a strange afternoon at Lynn Lane on Sunday. I got there at 3:30 and
scanned the Lake for Waterfowl, the lake is usually loaded with ducks,
grebes and gulls. The whole time I was there I never found a duck and
besides 2 Pie-billed Grebes, 150 Franklin’s Gulls and 2-Scissortailed Fly
Catchers that was it. Wait 2-Scissortails? That was fun. I got some very
nice photos so Ebird would believe me. As I was leaving all the Franklins
Gulls took off except one. The Lone Franklin’s started splashing around and
as I tried to figure out what it was doing, one than two Bald Eagles dove
on it and barley missed it. They dove several more times and it evaded them
somehow. Finally the Gull took off and feebly tried to fly away. Obviously
something was wrong with the gull as it was flying weakly. The two Bald
Eagles tried time after time to snag the gull out of midair, but every time
it evaded them. The Gull couldn’t fly well enough to get away and the
Eagles tried for at least five minutes to grab it. Many times I thought
they had it but it somehow persevered. I was rooting for the gull by the
way. Finally the Eagles started flying off and the Gull flew right up
behind them. I thought go the other way dummy, but the Eagles paid it no
mind. No ducks, 2-Scissortails and thrilling aerial combat, a strange
afternoon at Lynn Lane Indeed.



Terry Mitchell

 

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Date: 11/4/18 12:25 pm
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...>
Subject: Rose Lake and vicinity the past 4 days
Coots and Gadwall dominate at Rose Lake with a sprinkling of American
Wigeons. Had my FOS Song Sparrow on Friday plus a WC Sparrow. The playas
one mile west have been barren with exception of a few Greater Yellowlegs
and Least Sandpipers. Yesterday I found two kestrels, two RT Hawks, and one
each Swainson's Hawk (juv.) plus RS Hawk. During fall migration, shore
birds have been absent - at least for me. Matt Jung, OKC

 

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Date: 11/3/18 11:34 am
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...>
Subject: Saturday Morning
Hello All,

A couple of highlights from this morning, an FOS Common Loon on Lake
Yahola, and 8 Purple Finches at Oxley.

Good Birding,
Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK

 

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Date: 11/2/18 2:10 pm
From: Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...>
Subject: Mitch Park today
Thirty species today.
Eastern bluebird
Eu.starling
Am. Crow
House sparrow
Harris. “
White throated. “
Lincoln’s. “
Song “
Dark eyed junco
N. Cardinal
N. Mockingbird
Carolina wren
Carolina chickadee
Red breasted nuthatch (4)
Tufted titmouse
R.c. Kinglet
M. Dove
E. C . Dove
Red S. Hawk
Red T hawk
Coopers Hawk
Spotted Towhee
Blue jay
Canada goose
Pigeon
Y. r. Warbler
O. C. Warbler
Am. Goldfinch
N. Flicker( y s)
House finch
Hal Yocum



Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 11/2/18 11:05 am
From: Moninya Mulder <oden_mulder...>
Subject: Bird Behavior
OMGoodness! I have had the same thing happen to me with a Cardinal but now
it is a woodpecker. Ladder-back. She has become so insistent that I fill the
feeder. If I go inside she looks in the windows. If outside she flies up and
down near me fussing and fussing. The Cardinal use to knock on window where
I sat to let me know the feeders were out. The Woodpecker is so much more
aggressive. When I fill the feeder she doesn't go far but does her nearby up
and down, back and forth on the tree! Has anyone had a woodpecker be so near
people? Also the Pileated Woodpeckers are back.


 

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Date: 11/2/18 7:36 am
From: Susanne Lutze <eztuls46...>
Subject: Mystery
I recently posted about my total lack of songbirds at NW 150 and MacArthur.
Yesterday I emptied and tossed all the older sunflower seeds, scrubbed the
feeders and gave away 2 old feeders and got more ones. Filled feeders with
fresh seed and this morning, my birds are BACK. Bluejays, Cardinals, Red
Winged Bkackbirds, Juncos, doves,
It had to be something about the seeds or disease ......but I am so
thrilled.
--
" There is a pleasure in the pathless woods;
There is rapture on the lonely shore;
There is society, where none intrudes,
By the deep sea, and music in its roar:
I love not man the less, but Nature more...."

Lord Byron

 

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Date: 11/1/18 3:30 pm
From: Brett Niland <bestguess...>
Subject: Lynn lane reservoir
Just watched a bald eagle take a franklins gull off of Lynn lane reservoir. Very cool.

Thank You,

Brett Niland
Cell: (918) 200-1818
 

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Date: 11/1/18 9:31 am
From: John Kennington <johnkennington...>
Subject: Wood Stork in Tulsa
Pat Vawter photographed a Wood Stork in Tulsa's Mohawk Park on 10/31. She
posted the pics on her Facebook page, and I've shared it on the Tulsa
Audubon and OOS Facebook pages.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/18864377410/

John Kennington

 

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Date: 11/1/18 9:26 am
From: Patricia Velte <pvelte...>
Subject: November Migration Report
Dear OKBirders,



A shorter list this month! Both arrivals and departures are listed here.



November Arrivals



White-winged Scoter November 5 - C, NE

Black Scoter November
11 - NE

Long-tailed Duck November 20 -
PAN, NW, SW, C, SC, NE

Common Goldeneye November 8 - ALL

Common Merganser November 6 - ALL

Ross's Goose November 9
- ALL

Trumpeter Swan November 15 -
NW, SW, C, NE

Tundra Swan November 15
- ALL

Red-throated Loon November 8 - C, NE

Pacific Loon November
10 - C, NE

Northern Goshawk November 26 - PAN

Thayer's Gull November
15 - NW, C, NE, SE rare in Le Flore Co. only

Glaucous Gull November 11
- NW, C, NE

Northern Shrike November 24 -
PAN

Lapland Longspur November 6 -
ALL

Smith's Longspur November 4 -
SW rare in Comanche Co only, C, NE

American Tree Sparrow November 2 - PAN, NW
and November 8 - C, NE

Harris's Sparrow November 6 -
SW, SC, SE

Cassin's Finch November
25 - PAN rare in Cimarron Co only

Red Crossbill November
4 - ALL



November Departures



Blue-winged Teal November 1 -
PAN

American White Pelican November 26 - PAN

American Bittern November 25 -
ALL

Great Egret November
18 - PAN, NW

Little Blue Heron November 5 -
SE

Cattle Egret November
6 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE, Texas and Beaver Cos. Only in PAN

Black-crowned Night-Heron November 18 - NW, SW, C, NE

Neotropic Cormorant November 4 - S.
McCurtain Co. only

King Rail
November 25 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Sora
November 14 - PAN, NW, SW, C, SC, NE

Turkey Vulture November 12
- PAN, NW, SW, C, NE

Osprey
November 27 - ALL

Greater Yellowlegs November 16 -
PAN

Lesser Yellowlegs November 10 -
NW, C, SC, NE and November20 - SW, SE

Common Gallinule November 16 - SE
Rare in Bryan, Choctaw, S. McCurtain Co

Sandhill Crane November 30
- PAN, C, SC, NE

Whooping Crane November 10 - NW
rare in Alfalfa Co. only, SW rare in Tillman Co. only

American Avocet November 30 -
NW, SW, C, SC, NE east to Nowata, Rogers, Wagoner and Muskogee Cos. Only, SE
east to Pittsburg, Atoka and McCurtain Cos. Only

Black-bellied Plover November 15 -
ALL

American Golden-Plover November 15 - NW, SW, C,
SC, NE, SE

Forster's Tern November 4
- PAN, NW, SW

Baird's Sandpiper November 15 -
ALL

Least Sandpiper November 1 -
PAN

Pectoral Sandpiper November 8 - ALL

Long-billed Dowitcher November 15 - PAN,
NW, C, NE

Wilson's Snipe November 25
- PAN

Rufous Hummingbird November 20 - PAN, SW

Peregrine Falcon November 8 -
ALL

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher November 18 - NW,
SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Blue-headed Vireo November 1 - NW,
SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Fish Crow
November 1 - C west to Payne, Oklahoma, Cleveland and McClain cos only, SC
Pontotoc, Johnston and Marshall cos only, NE, SE

Tree Swallow November 1
- SW, C, SC, NE, SE

House Wren November 6
- PAN, NW

Common Yellowthroat November 8 - SW, C, NE

Chipping Sparrow November 22 -
PAN, NW

Vesper Sparrow November 23 -
NW, C, NE

Lark Sparrow November 1
- NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Savannah Sparrow November 1 - PAN

Grasshopper Sparrow November 2 - NW, C,
NE

Nelson's Sparrow November 1 -
NE, SE



The information presented here comes from The Oklahoma Bird Records
Committee of the Oklahoma Ornithological Society, which publishes a Date
Guide to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma. This booklet divides Oklahoma
into 7 geographic regions, and lists the normal dates of occurrence for each
Oklahoma bird species within each region. Observers are urged to report
unusual species, or birds out of date or out of normal range in Oklahoma,
based on the information given in this publication.



The Oklahoma Ornithological Society and Oklahoma Bird Records Committee web
site, http://www.okbirds.org/
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.okbirds.org_&d=DwMF
Ag&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWK
XWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=Yj3fweyojP_0Y9yjmPCXd75u214fozEC_-jTlzL9kzg&s=EsJcdtCSO
QHnOwitg5ZFloUTYeF6gDv7rIy5AzM7o20&e=> , includes ordering information for
the Date Guide to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma, information on
documenting significant records, documentation forms, instructions, and a
searchable database for Oklahoma bird migration information. Birders are
cordially invited to join the Oklahoma Ornithological Society.



Happy birding!

Pat Velte

<pvelte...> <mailto:<pvelte...>

Oklahoma City, OK




 

Back to top
Date: 11/1/18 5:56 am
From: Dan Reinking <dan...>
Subject: Re: FOS birds
No need to panic. In my experience, October is one of the “least birdy” months in Oklahoma. Most migratory nesting species have left, and most migratory wintering species haven’t arrived yet in large numbers. The weather is usually mild, and there is an abundance of natural foods at this time of year. Within a few more weeks, many more migrants will have arrived, some colder weather will probably set in, and you will likely start seeing a lot more birds at feeders.

Dan Reinking

Sutton Avian Research Center



From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> On Behalf Of Susanne Lutze
Sent: Wednesday, October 31, 2018 5:36 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] FOS birds



Help Please. I live at NW 150th and MasArthus. I have loved the birds for over 50 years. I filled my feeders a month ago with black oiled sunflower seeds. I have a small platform feeder near my patio which I put sunflower seed chips. NO birds. I always have 20- 30 songbirds ar this time of the year but the only ones who show up occasionally are 5 Eurasian Collard Doves? I am depressed! What could it be?



On Wed, Oct 31, 2018 at 4:39 PM Larry Mays <larrymays1949...> <mailto:<larrymays1949...> > wrote:



Suddenly I'm seeing juncos, Harris's Slarrows and White-crowned Sparrows at the feeders. Seems they all came in on this frontal system. At least they weren't here yesterday.





Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Note5, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone



-------- Original message --------

From: Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...> <mailto:<blnllaval...> >

Date: 10/31/18 2:42 PM (GMT-06:00)

To: <OKBIRDS...> <mailto:<OKBIRDS...>

Subject: [OKBIRDS] RB Nuthatch



After the window kill yesterday of a male RBN that had been coming to the feeder, I figured that I wouldn’t be seeing any more. Today I have a male and female making trip after trip to the feeder. I suspect there are more in the area but hard to count because they only stay in the feeder for about 4 seconds.
Bob Laval
Heavener

Sent from my iPad

--

" There is a pleasure in the pathless woods;

There is rapture on the lonely shore;

There is society, where none intrudes,

By the deep sea, and music in its roar:

I love not man the less, but Nature more...."



Lord Byron




 

Back to top
Date: 10/31/18 3:36 pm
From: Susanne Lutze <eztuls46...>
Subject: Re: FOS birds
Help Please. I live at NW 150th and MasArthus. I have loved the birds for
over 50 years. I filled my feeders a month ago with black oiled sunflower
seeds. I have a small platform feeder near my patio which I put sunflower
seed chips. NO birds. I always have 20- 30 songbirds ar this time of the
year but the only ones who show up occasionally are 5 Eurasian Collard
Doves? I am depressed! What could it be?

On Wed, Oct 31, 2018 at 4:39 PM Larry Mays <larrymays1949...> wrote:

>
> Suddenly I'm seeing juncos, Harris's Slarrows and White-crowned Sparrows
> at the feeders. Seems they all came in on this frontal system. At least
> they weren't here yesterday.
>
>
> Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Note5, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...>
> Date: 10/31/18 2:42 PM (GMT-06:00)
> To: <OKBIRDS...>
> Subject: [OKBIRDS] RB Nuthatch
>
> After the window kill yesterday of a male RBN that had been coming to the
> feeder, I figured that I wouldn’t be seeing any more. Today I have a male
> and female making trip after trip to the feeder. I suspect there are more
> in the area but hard to count because they only stay in the feeder for
> about 4 seconds.
> Bob Laval
> Heavener
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
--
" There is a pleasure in the pathless woods;
There is rapture on the lonely shore;
There is society, where none intrudes,
By the deep sea, and music in its roar:
I love not man the less, but Nature more...."

Lord Byron

 

Back to top
Date: 10/31/18 3:27 pm
From: NATHAN KUHNERT <nrkuhnert...>
Subject: Re: RB Nuthatch
Hi Bob,
Glad that you have more RBNUs around to enjoy this winter but I am still sorry to hear about the one that died hitting your window! I remember what a beautiful view you have looking out toward the back yard! I got some extra ABC Bird Tape I can send you in the mail tomorrow if you want to give it a try. I think it looks pretty good on windows.
Thank you.
Nathan
Solutions to Birds Hitting Windows

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Solutions to Birds Hitting Windows
Although birds hitting windows is a big problem, there are more solutions than ever before. Explore a few of the... | |

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On Wednesday, October 31, 2018 2:43 PM, Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...> wrote:


After the window kill yesterday of a male RBN that had been coming to the feeder, I figured that I wouldn’t be seeing any more.  Today I have a male and female making trip after trip to the feeder.  I suspect there are more in the area but hard to count because they only stay in the feeder for about 4 seconds.
Bob Laval
Heavener

Sent from my iPad


 

Back to top
Date: 10/31/18 2:39 pm
From: Larry Mays <larrymays1949...>
Subject: FOS birds

 Suddenly I'm seeing juncos, Harris's Slarrows and White-crowned Sparrows at the feeders. Seems they all came in on this frontal system.  At least they weren't here yesterday.

Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Note5, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...> Date: 10/31/18 2:42 PM (GMT-06:00) To: <OKBIRDS...> Subject: [OKBIRDS] RB Nuthatch
After the window kill yesterday of a male RBN that had been coming to the feeder, I figured that I wouldn’t be seeing any more.  Today I have a male and female making trip after trip to the feeder.  I suspect there are more in the area but hard to count because they only stay in the feeder for about 4 seconds.
Bob Laval
Heavener

Sent from my iPad
 

Back to top
Date: 10/31/18 12:42 pm
From: Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...>
Subject: RB Nuthatch
After the window kill yesterday of a male RBN that had been coming to the feeder, I figured that I wouldn’t be seeing any more. Today I have a male and female making trip after trip to the feeder. I suspect there are more in the area but hard to count because they only stay in the feeder for about 4 seconds.
Bob Laval
Heavener

Sent from my iPad
 

Back to top
Date: 10/31/18 8:48 am
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...>
Subject: The Panhandle, October 28-29, 2018.
Hello All,
Mary and I spent the night at the Black Mesa Bed and Breakfast on the way home from a trip to Arizona and New Mexico. We stopped at Ramsey and Madera Canyons, the Desert Museum and Petrified Forest National Park. For anyone interested, the Ramsey Canyon Bed and Breakfast is for sale for $1,199,000. Highlights from the Panhandle included:

Western Grebe-2 at Lake Etling,
Horned Grebe-2 at Lake Etling
Neotropic Cormorant-1 below the dam at Salt Plains Lake
Golden Eagle-1 just east of Boise City
Scaled Quail-10-15 at the end of the driveway at the bed and breakfast
Mountain Bluebird-50+ from the state park and west
Townsend's Solitaire-3
Curve-billed Thrasher-2

Mark Peteron
Bartlesville



 

Back to top
Date: 10/30/18 5:04 pm
From: Alton Patton <adewittpatton...>
Subject: Re: Sad day
That's why I put up vertical interior blinds. No bird strikes since I did that but a number before.

Get Outlook for Android<https://aka.ms/ghei36>

________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...>
Sent: Tuesday, October 30, 2018 6:03:55 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Sad day

The Red Breasted Nuthatch that I reported yesterday flew into the back window and died today. Its been a couple of years since a window kill here.
BobLaval
Heavener
Sent from my iPad

 

Back to top
Date: 10/30/18 4:04 pm
From: Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...>
Subject: Sad day
The Red Breasted Nuthatch that I reported yesterday flew into the back window and died today. It’s been a couple of years since a window kill here.
BobLaval
Heavener
Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 10/30/18 1:36 pm
From: Mia Revels <0000004e74e60ce3-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Peru Amazon Birding Trip with Dr. Ragupathy Kannan!
posted by Mia Revels, Tahlequah OK, for Dr. Kannan:

Hi all, I will lead a PERU AMAZON fund-raising tour for the Arkansas
Audubon Society Trust March 23-31, 2019. Please see itinerary and bird
list attached. Land costs without flights will be $1669 per person in
double rooms, $1658 per person in triple rooms and $1745 per person in
single rooms. Tour limited to 10 birders only.

That would include all accommodations, airport transfers in Iquitos, all
transport in Iquitos area from arrival till departure, all guide services,
all meals, except for dinner in Lima (if needed) and Iquitos. It does not
include bottled soft drinks and beer at the lodge (it does include coffee,
fruit juices, good drinking water)

We will be staying in two remote (and rather spartan) lodges to maximize
our coverage of habitats. The main lodge has 12 rooms with private
bathrooms and 7 with shared bathrooms and the Research Center has 12 rooms,
all with shared bathrooms (one block for men and one for women). They have
individual compartments with showers and toilets for privacy – not like a
locker room with open showers. Both lodges are too remote to be on the
electricity grid, but they have generators and solar power for some
basics. No A/C or fans. So obviously this tour is for the more hardy
folks.

The local arrangements will be done by Amazon Adventures (
www.amazonadventures.com) based in Austin. They came highly recommended by
a UA Fayetteville professor and colleague.

Please contact me offline if interested.

R. Kannan
Professor of Biology
University of Arkansas--Fort Smith
Tel: 479.788.7616
email: <ragupathy.kannan...>

*Arkansas Audubon Society Amazon Birding Tour*



*March 23* – depart U.S., arrive Lima in evening, overnight at Holiday Inn
at airport



*March 24 (trip starts after arrival of people on LA 2240, scheduled to
arrive just past noon)*

Look for our booth in the baggage area of Iquitos Airport, by the
restrooms, with our logo (head of a

hoatzin bird in a diamond shape). Afternoon birding in The Allpahuayo
Mishana National reserve

(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allpahuayo-Mishana_National_Reserve) , a
unique sagebrush varillal

forest on white sand that is home to several species of birds known only
from this forest, including the

Ancient Antwren, Mishana Tyrannulet, Allpahuayo Antbird, Northern
Chestnut=tailed Antbird,

Pompadour Cotinga, and Saffron-crested Tyrant Manakin.
Evening hotel room in Iquitos *Lunch, Dinner*



*Mar 25* - Iquitos to main lodge

After breakfast departure from the port of Iquitos by speedboat

En route stop to bird on islands at the mouth of the Tahuayo River - a
great place for sandpipers, herons, terns, skimmers, stilts, plovers and
others.

Box lunch provided

Continuing up the Tahuayo River to the main Lodge for dinner

Evening power point presentation by birding biologist Andy Bicerra (has
presented and published papers on Tahuayo region birds in ornithological
symposia)



*March 26* - At the main Lodge

After dawn birding along the Tahuayo River

After breakfast looking at understory species such as trogons and manakins
in igapo forest ecosystem

Afternoon in tahuampa ecosystem (flooded forest) looking at hoatzin,
wattled jacana, horned screamer and other birds

Evening looking for nocturnal birds (weather permitting)

Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner



*March 27 *At the main Lodge

Full day birding with picnic lunch in terra firme forest

Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner



*March 28* At Amazon Research Center lodge, ARC

Dawn to early morning birding in a backwater stream (quebrada), then
continue birding up the Tahuayo River to the remote research center
lodge Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner



*March 29* - At Amazon Research Center lodge, ARC

After dawn birding along the Tahuayo River

After breakfast birding along high and low restinga forest

Afternoon birding in Dolphin Lake Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner



*March 30* – return to main lodge and on to Iquitos and Lima

Morning return to the main lodge. Afternoon boat to Iquitos and transfer to
airport for flight back to Lima Breakfast, Lunch

A note on our two lodges



*The main lodge (Tahuayo)*

Cabins have private bathrooms

A greater variety of activities



*The Research Center Peru Lodge (ARC)*

Cabins have shared bathrooms

Better hiking, over 50 miles of trails through a variety of ecosystems

More wildlife

The lodge is more remote, in more pristine forest




Provisional List of Birds of the Rio Tahuauyo area, Loreto, Peru

Compiled by Carol R. Foss, Ph.D. and Josias Tello Huanaquiri, Guide

Status based on expeditions from Amazonia Lodge and Research Center


TINAMIFORMES: Tinamidae

1. Great Tinamou (Tinamus major)

2. White-throated Tinamou (Tinamus guttatus)

3. Cinereous Tinamou (Crypturellus cinereus)

4. Little Tinamou (Crypturellus soui)

5. Undulated Tinamou (Crypturellus undulates)

6. Brazilian Tinamou (Crypturellus strigulosus)

7. Variegated Tinamou (Crypturellus variegatus)

8. Bartlett’s Tinamou (Crypturellus bartletti)

ANSERIFORMES: Anhimidae

9. Horned Screamer (Anhima cornuta)

ANSERIFORMES: Anatidae

10. Muscovy Duck (Cairina moschata)

11. Blue-winged Teal (Anas discors)

12. Masked Duck (Nomonyx dominicus)

13. Black-Bellied Whistling Duck (Dendrocygna autumnalis)

GALLIFORMES: Cracidae

14. Spix’s Guan (Penelope jacquacu)

15. Blue-throated Piping-Guan (Pipile cumanensis)

16. Speckled Chachalaca (Ortalis guttata)

17. Wattled Curassow (Crax globulosa)

18. Razor-billed Curassow (Mitu tuberosum)

GALLIFORMES: Odontophoridae

19. Marbled Wood-Quall (Odontophorus gujanensis)

20. Starred Wood-Quall (Odontophorus stellatus)

PELECANIFORMES: Phalacrocoracidae

21. Neotropic Cormorant (Phalacrocorax brasilianus)

PELECANIFORMES: Anhingidae

22. Anhinga (Anhinga anhinga)

CICONIIFORMES: Ardeidae

23. Rufescent Tiger-Heron (Tigrisoma lineatum)

24. Agami Heron (Agamia agami)

25. Boat-billed Heron (Cochlearius cochlearius)

26. Zigzag Heron (Zebrilus undulatus)

27. Black-crowned Night-Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax)

28. Striated Heron (Butorides striata)

29. Cattle Egret (Bubulcus ibis)

30. Cocoi Heron (Ardea cocoi)

31. Great Egret (Ardea alba)

32. Capped Heron (Pilherodius pileatus)

33. Snowy Egret (Egretta thula)

34. Little Blue Heron (Egretta caerulea)

CICONIIFORMES: Threskiornithidae

35. Green Ibis (Mesembrinibis cayennensis)

36. Roseate Spoonbill (Platalea ajaja)

CICONIIFORMES: Ciconiidae

37. Jabiru (Jabiru mycteria)

38. Wood Stork (Mycteria americana)

CICONIIFORMES: Cathartidae

39. Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura)

40. Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture (Cathartes burrovianus)

41. Greater Yellow-headed vulture (Cathartes melambrotus)

42. Black Vulture (Coragyps atratus)

43. King Vulture (Sarcoramphus atratus)

FALCANIFORMES: Pandionidae

44. Osprey (Pandion haliaetus)

FALCANIFORMES: Accipitridae

45. Gray-headed kite (Leptodon cayanensis)

46. Hook-billed kite (Chondrohierax uncinatus)

47. Swallow-tailed kite (Elanoides forficatus)

48. Pearl kite (Gampsonyx swainsonii)

49. Snail kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis)

50. Slender-billed kite (Helicolestes hamatus)

51. Double-toothed kite (Harpagus bidentatus)

52. Plumbeous kite (Accipiter poliogaster)

53. Tiny Hawk (Accipiter superciliosus)

54. Bicolored Hawk (Accipiter bicolor)

55. Crane Hawk (Geranospiza caerulescens)

56. Slate-colored Hawk (Buteogallus schistaceus)

57. White-browed Hawk (Leucopternis kuhli)

58. Great black-Hawk (Buteogallus urubitinga)

59. Black-collared Hawk (Busarellus nigricollis)

60. Roadside Hawk (Rupornis Magnirostris)

61. Broad-winged Hawk (Buteo platypterus)

62. Gray Hawk (Buteo nitidus)

63. Short-tailed Hawk (Buteo brachyurus)

64. Zone-talled Hawk (Buteo albonotatus)

65. Crested Eagle (Morphnus guianensis)

66. Harpy Eagle (Harpia harpyja)

67. Black-and-white Hawk-Eagle (Spizaetus melanoleucus)

68. Black Hawk-Eagle (Spizaetus tyrannus)

69. Ornate Hawk-Eagle (Spizaetus ornatus)

FALCANIFORMES: Falconidae

70. Laughing Falcon (Herpetotheres cachinnas)

71. Barred Forest-Falcon (Micrastur ruficollis)

72. Lined Forest-Falcon (Micrastur gilvicollis)

73. Slaty-backed Forest-Falcon (Micrastur mirandollei)

74. Collared Forest-Falcon (Micrastur semitorquatus)

75. Buckley’s Forest-Falcon (Micrastur buckleyi)

76. Red-throated caracara (Ibycter americanus)

77. Black caracara (Daptrius ater)

78. Yellow-headed caracara (Milvago chimachima)

79. Bat Falcon (Falco rufigularis)

80. Orange-breasted Falcon (Falco deiroleucus)

81. Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus)

GRUIFORMES: Aramidae

82. Limpkin (Aramus guarauna)

GRUIFORMES: Psophiidae

83. Pale-winged Trumpeter (Psophia leucoptera)

GRUIFORMES: Rallidae

84. Gray-necked Wood-Rail (Aramides cajanea)

85. Red-winged Wood-Rail (Aramides calopterus)

86. Uniform crake (Amaurolimnas castaneiceps)

87. Chestnut-headed Crake (Anurolimnas castaneiceps)

88. Black-banded Crake (Anurolimnas fasciatus)

89. Rufous-sided crake (Laterallus exilis)

90. Gray-breasted crake (Laterallus exilis)

91. Common Gallinule (Gallinula galeata)

92. Purple Gallinule (Porphyrio martinica)

93. Azure Gallinule (Porphyrio flavirostris)

GRUIFORMES: Heliornithidae

94. Sungrebe (Heliornis fulica)

GRUIFORMES: Eurypygidae

95. Sunbittern (Eurypyga helias)

CHARADRIIFORMES: Charadriidae

96. Pied Lapwing (Vanellus cayanus)

97. Southern Lapwing (Vanellus chilensis)

98. American Golden-plover (Pluvialis dominica)

99. Collared Plover (Charadrius collaris)

CHARADRIIFORMES: Recurvirostridae

100. Black-necked Stit (Himantopus mexicanus)

CHARADRIIFORMES: Scolopcidae

101. South American Snipe (Gallinago paraguaiae)

102. Upland Sandpiper (Bartramia longicauda)

103. Spotted Sandpiper (Actitis macularius)

104. Greater Yellowlegs (Tringa melanoleuca)

105. Lesser Yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes)

106. Solitary Sandpiper (Tringa solitaria)

107. White-rumped Sandpiper (Calidris fuscicollis)

108. Pectoral Sandpiper (Calidris himantopus)

109. Stilt Sandpiper (Calidris himantopus)

110. Buff-breasted Sandpiper (Tryngites subruficollis)

CHARADRIIFORMES: Jacanidae

111. Wattled Jacana (Jacana jacana)

CHARADRIIFORMES: Laridae

112. Yellow-billed Tern (Sternula superciliaris)

113. Large-billed Tern (Phaetusa simplex)

CHARADIIFORMES: Rynchopidae

114. Black Skimmer (Rynchops niger)

COLUMBIFORMES: Columbidae

115. Ruddy Ground-Dove (Columbina talpacoti)

116. Blue Ground-Dove (Claravis pretiosa)

117. Pale-vented pigeon (Patagioenas cayennensis)

118. Plumbeous Pigeon (Patagioenas subvinacea)

119. Ruddy Pigeon (Leptotila rufaxilia)

120. White-tipped Dove (Leptotila rufaxilia)

121. Grey –fronted Dove (Leptotila rufaxilla)

122. Sapphire Quail-dove (Geotrygon saphirini)

123. Ruddy Quail-Dove (Geotrygon saphirina)

PSITTACIFORMES: Psittacidae

124. Blue-and-yellow Macaw (Ara ararauna)

125. Scarlet Macaw (Ara macao)

126. Red-and-green Macaw (Ara chloropterus)

127. Chestnut-fronted Macaw (Ara severus)

128. Red-bellied Macaw (Orthopsittica manilata)

129. White-eyed Parakeet (Aratinga leucophthalma)

130. Dusky-headed Parakeet (Aratinga weddellii)

131. Rose-fronted Parakeet (Pyrrhura roseifrons)

132. Blue-winged Parrotlet (Forpus xanthopterygius)

133. Dusky-billed Parrotlet (Forpus sclateri)

134. White-winged Parakeet (Brotogeris versicolurus)

135. Cobalt-winged Parakeet (Brotogeris cyanoptera)

136. Tui Parakeet (Brotogeris sanctithomae)

137. Scarlet-shouldered Parrotlet (Touit huetii)

138. Sapphire-rumped Parrotlet (Touit purpuratus)

139. Black-headed Parrot (Pionites melanocephalus)

140. White-bellied Parrot (Pionites leucogaster)

141. Orange-cheeked Parrot (Pyrilia barrabandi)

142. Short-tailed Parrot (Graydidascalus brachyurus)

143. Blue-headed Parrot (Pionites leucogaster)

144. Festive Parrot (Amazona festiva)

145. Yellow-crowned Parrot (Amazona ochrocephala)

146. Orange-winged Parrot (Amazona amazonica)

147. Mealy Parrot (Amazona farinose)

OPISTHCOMIFOORMES: Opisthocomidae

148. Hoatzin (Opisthocomus hoazin)

CUCULIFORMES: Cuculidae

149. Little cuckoo (Coccycua minuta)

150. Squirrel cuckoo (Piaya cayana)

151. Black-bellied Cuckoo (Piaya melanogaster)

152. Dark-billedcuckoo (Coccyzus melacoryphus)

153. Yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus)

154. Greater Ani (Crotophaga major)

155. Smooth-billed Ani (Crotophaga ani)

156. Striped cuckoo (Tapera naevia)

157. Pheasant cuckoo (Dromococcyx phasianellus)

158. Pavonine cuckoo (Dromococcyx pavoninus)

159. Red-billed Ground-cuckoo (Neomorphus puckeranii)

STRIGIFORMES: Strigidae

160. Tropical Screech-owl (Megascops choliba)

161. Tawny-bellied Screech-owl (Megascops watsonii)

162. Crested owl (Lophostrix cristata)

163. Spectacled owl (Pulsatrix perspicillata)

164. Mottled owl (Ciccaba virgate)

165. Black-banded owl (Ciccaba huhula)

166. Amazonian Pygmy-owl (Glaucidium hardyi)

167. Ferruginous Pygmy-owl (Glaucidium brasilianum)

168. Striped owl (Pseudoscops clamator)

CAPRIMULGIFORMES: Nyctibiidae

169. Great Potoo (Nyctibius grandisn)

170. Long-tailed Potoo (Nyctibius aethereus)

171. Common Potoo (Nyctibius griseus)

172. Rufous Potoo (Nyctibius brocteatus)

CAPRIMULGIFORMES: Caprimulgidae

173. Short-tailed Nighthawk (Lurocalis semitorquatus)

174. Sand-colored Nighthawk (Chordeiles rupestris)

175. Common Nigthawk (Chordeilles minor)

176. Band-tailed Nighthawk (Nyctiprogne leucopyga)

177. Nacunda Nighthawk (Podager nacunda)

178. Common Pauraque (Nyctidromus albicollis)

179. Ocellated Poorwill (Nyctiphrynus ocellatus)

180. Blackish Nightjar (Caprimulgus nigrescens)

181. Ladder-tailed Nightjar (Hydropsalis climacocerca)

APODIFORMES: Apodidae

182. White-collared Swift (Streptoprocne zonaris)

183. Gray-rumped Swift (Chaetura cinereiventris)

184. Pale-rumped Swift (Chaetura egregia)

185. Chimney Swift (Chaetura pelagica)

186. Amazonian Swift (Chaetura viridipennis)

187. Short-tailed Swift (Chaetura brachyuran)

188. Fork-tailed Palm-Swift (Tachornis squamata)

189. Lesser Swallow-tailed Swift (Panyptila cayenensis)

APODIFORMES: Trochilidae

190. Fiery Topaz (Topaza pyra)

191. White-necked Jacobien (Florisuga mellivora)

192. Rufous-breasted Hermit (Glaucis hirsutus)

193. Pale-tailed barbtHroat (Threnetes leucurus)

194. Black-throated Hermit (Phaethornis atrimentalis)

195. Reddish Hermit (Phaethornis ruber)

196. White-bearded Hermit (Phaethornis hispidus)

197. Needle-billed Hermit (Phaethornis philippii)

198. Straight-tailed Hermit (Phaethornis bourcieri)

199. Black-eared Fairy (Heliothryx auritus)

200. Black-throated Mango (Anthracothorax nigricollis)

201. Black-bellied Thorntail (Discosura langsdorffi)

202. Festive coquette (Lophornis chalybeus)

203. Black-throated brilliant (Heliodoxa schreibersii)

204. Gould’s Jewelfront (Heliodoxa aurescens)

205. Long-billed Starthroat (Heliomaster longirostris)

206. Amethyst Woodstar (Calliphlox amethystine)

207. Blue-tailed Emerald (Chlorostilbon mellisugus)

208. Blue-chinned Sapphire (Chloreste notata)

209. Gray-breasted Sabrewing (Campylopterus largipennis)

210. Fork-tailed Woodnymph (Thalurania furcate)

211. Glitterring-throated Emerald (Amazilia fimbriata)

212. Golden-tailed Sapphire (Chrysuronia oenone)

213. White-chinned Sapphire (Hylocharis cyanus)

TROGONIFORMES: Trogonidae

214. Pavonine Quetzal (Pharomachrus pavoninus)

215. Black-tailed Trogon (Trogon melanurus)

216. White-tailed Trogon (Trogon viridis)

217. Violaceous Trogon (Trogon violaceus)

218. Blue-crowned Trogon (Trogon curucui)

219. Black-throated Trogon (Trogon rufus)

220. Collared Trogon (Trogon collaris)

CORACIIFORMES: Alcedinidae

221. Ringed Kingfisher (Megaceryle torquata)

222. Amazon Kingfisher (Chloroceryle amazona)

223. Green Kingfisher (Chloroceryle americana)

224. Green-and-rufous Kingsher (Chloroceryle inda)

225. American Pygmy Kingsher (Chloroceryle aenea)

CORACIIFORMES: Momotidae

226. Broad-billed Motmot (Electron platyrhynchum)

227. Rufous Motmot (Baryphthengus martii)

228. Blue-crowned Motmot (Momotus momota)

GALBULIFORMES: Galbulidae

229. White-eared Jacamar (Galbalcyrhynchus leucotis)

230. White-throated Jacamar (Brachygalba albogularis)

231. Blue-cheeked Jacamar (Galbula cyanicollis)

232. Bluish-fronted Jacamar (Galbula cyanescens)

233. Purplish Jacamar (Galbula chalcothorax)

234. Paradise Jacamar (Galbula dea)

235. Great Jacamar (Jacamerops aureus)

GALBULIFORMES: Bucconidae

236. White-necked puffbird (Notharchus hyperrhynchus)

237. Brown-banded puffbird (Notharchus ordii)

238. Pied puffbird (Notharchus tectus)

239. Chestnut-capped puffbbird (Bucco macrodactylus)

240. Spotted Puffbird (Bucco tamatia)

241. Collared Puffbird (Bucco capensis)

242. Striolated Puffbird (Nystalus striolatus)

243. Semicollared Puffbird (Malacoptila semicincta)

244. Rufous-necked Puffbird (Malacoptila rufa)

245. Lanceolated Monklet (Micromonacha lanceolata)

246. Rusty-breasted Nunlet (Nonnula rubecula)

247. Rufous-capped Nunlet (Nonnula ruficapilla)

248. Black-fronted Nunbird (Monasa nigrifrons)

249. White-fronted Nunbird (Monasa morphoeus)

250. Swallow-winged Puffbird (Chelidoptera tenebrosa)

PICIFORMES: Capitonidae

251. Scarlet-crowned Barbet (Capito aurovirens)

252. Gilded barbet (Capito auratus)

253. Lemon-throated Barbet (Eubucco richardsoni)

PICIFORMES: Ramphastidae

254. White-throated Toucan (Ramphastos tucanus)

255. Channel-billed Toucan (Ramphastos vitellinus)

256. Golden-collared Toucanet (Selenidera reinwardtii)

257. Lettered Aracari (Pteroglossus inscriptus)

258. Ivory-billed Aracari (Pteroglossus azara)

259. Chestnut-eared Aracari (Pteroglossus castanotis)

260. Curl-crested Aracari (Pteroglossus beauharnaesii)

PICIFORMES: Picidae

261. Bar-breasted Piculet (Picumnus aurifrons)

262. Rufous-breasted Piculet (Picumnus rufiventris)

263. Plain-breasted Piculet (Picumnus castelnau)

264. Yellow-tufted Woodpecker (Melanerpes cruentatus)

265. Little Woodpecker (Veniliornis passerines)

266. Red-stained Woodpecker (Veniliornis affinis)

267. Yellow-throated Woodpecker (Piculus flavigula)

268. Golden-green Woodpecker (Piculus chrysochloros)

269. Spot-breasted Woodpecker (Colaptes punctiguia)

270. Scale-breasted Woodpecker (Celeus grammicus)

271. Chestnut Woodpecker (Celeus elegans)

272. Cream-colored Woodpecker (Celeus flavus)

273. Rufous-headed Woodpecker (Celeus spectabilis)

274. Ringed Woodpecker (Celeus torquatus)

275. Lineated Woodpecker (Dryocopus lineatus)

276. Red-necked Woodpecker (Campephilus rubricollis)

277. Crimson-crested Woodprcker (Campephilus melanoleucos)

PASSERIFORMES: Furnariidae

278. Tawny-throated Leaftosser (Sclerurus mexicanus)

279. Short-billed Leaftosser (Sclerurus rufigularis)

280. Black-tailed Leaftosser (Sclerurus caudacutus)

281. Pale-legged Hornero (Furnarius leucopus)

282. Pale-billed Hornero (Furnarius torridus)

283. Lesser Hornero (Furnarius minor)

284. Dark-breasted Spinetil (Synallaxis albigularis)

285. Ruddy Spinetail (Synallaxis rutilans)

286. White-bellied Spinetail (Synallaxis propinqua)

287. Plain-crowned Spinetail (Synallaxis gujanensis)

288. Parker’s Spinetail (Cranioleuca vulpecula)

289. Speckled Spinetail (Cranioleuca gutturata)

290. Red-and-white Spinetail (Certhiaxis mustelinus)

291. Plain Softtail (Thripophaga fusciceps)

292. Orange-fronted Plushcrown (Metopothrix aurantiaca)

293. Point-tailed Palmcreeper (Berlepschia rikeri)

294. Chestnut-winged Hookbill (Ancistrops strigilatus)

295. Striped Woodhaunter (Hyloctistes strigilatus)

296. Rufous-tailed Foliage-gleaner (Philydor ruficaudatum)

297. Rufous-rumped Foliage-gleaner (Philydor erythrocercum)

298. Chestnut-winged Foliage-gleaner (Philydor erythropterum)

299. Cinnamon-rumped Foliage-gleaner (Philydor pyrrhodes)

300. Buff-throated Foliage-gleaner (Automolus ochrolaemus)

301. Olive-backed Foliage-gleaner (Automolus infuscatus)

302. Ruddy Foliage-gleaner (Automolus rubiginosus)

303. Chestnut-crowned Foliafe-gleaner (Automolus rufipileatus)

304. Rufous-tailed xenops (Xenops milleri)

305. Slender-billed xenops (Xenops tenuirostris)

306. Plain xenops (Dendrocincla minutus)

307. Plain-brown Woodcreeper (Dendrocincla fuliginosa)

308. White-chinned Woodcreeper (Dendrocincla merula)

309. Long-tailed Woodcreeper (Deconychura longicauda)

310. Spot-throated Woodcreeper (Certhiasomus stictolaemus)

311. Olivaceous Woodcreeper (Sittasomus griseicapillus)

312. Wedge-billed Woodcreeper (Glyphorynchus spirurus)

313. Long-billed Woodcreeper (Nasica longirostris)

314. Cinnamon-throated Woodcreeper (Dendrexetastes rufigula)

315. Strong-billed Woodcreeper (Xiphocopaltes promeropirhynchus)

316. Amazonian barred-woodcreeper (Dendrocolaptes certhia)

317. Black-banded woodcreeper (Dendrocolaptes picumnus)

318. Straight-billed Woodcreeper (Xiphorhynchus picus)

319. Zimmer’s Woodcreeper (Xiphorhynchus kienerii)

320. Striped Woodcreeper (Xiphorhynchus obsoletus)

321. Ocellated Woodcreeper (Xiphorhynchus ocellatus)

322. Elegant Woodcreeper (Xiphorhynchus elegans)

323. Buff-throated Woodcreeper (Xiphorhynchus guttatus)

324. Lineated Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes albolineatus)

325. Red-billed Scythebill (Campylorhamphus trochilirostris)

PASSERIFORMES: Thamnophilidae

326. Fasciated Antshrike (Cymbilaimus lineatus)

327. Undulated Antshrike (Frederickena unduligera)

328. Great Antshrike (Taraba major)

329. Black-crested Antshrike (Sakesphilus canadensis)

330. Barred Antshrike (Thamnophilus doliatus)

331. Plain-winged Antshrike (Thamnophilus schistaceus)

332. Mouse-colored Antshrike (Thamnophilus murinus)

333. Castelnau’s Antshrike (Thamnophilus cryptoleucus)

334. White-shouldered Antshrike (Thamnophilus aethiops)

335. Amazonian Antshrike (Thamnophilus amazonicus)

336. Black bushbird (Neoctantes niger)

337. Saturnine Antshrike (Thamnomanes saturninus)

338. Bluish-slate Antshrike (Thamnomanes shistogynus)

339. Spot-winged Antshrike (Pygiptila stellaris)

340. Stipple-throated Antwren (Epinecrophylla haematonota)

341. Moustached Antwewn (Myrmotherula ignota)

342. Rufous-tailed Antwren (Epinecrophylla erythrura)

343. Pygmy Antwren (Myrmotherula brachyuran)

344. Stripe-chested Antwren (Myrmotherula longicauda)

345. Sclater’s Antwren (Myrmotherula sclateri)

346. Amazonian Streaked Antwren (Myrmotherula multostriata)

347. Plain-throated Antwren (Myrmotherula hauxwelli)

348. White-flanked Antwren (Myrmotherula axillaris)

349. Long-winged Antwren (Myrmotherula longipennis)

350. Gray Antwren (Myrmotherula menetriesii)

351. Leaden Antwren (Myrmotherula assimilis)

352. Banded Antbird (Dichrozona cincta)

353. Dot-winged Antwren (Microrhopias quixensis)

354. Peruvian warbling-Antbird (Hypocnemis peruviana)

355. Yellow-browed Antbird (Hypocnemis hypoxantha)

356. Chestnut-shouldered Antwren (Terenura humeralis)

357. Gray Antbird (Cercomacra cinerascens)

358. Blackish Antbird (Cercomacra nigrescens)

359. Black Antbird (Cercomacra serva)

360. White-browed Antbird (Myrmoborus leucophrys)

361. Ash-breasted Antbird (Myrmoborus lugubris)

362. Black-faced Antbird (Myrmoborus myotherinus)

363. Black-tailed Antbird (Myrmoborus melanurus)

364. Band-tailed Antbird (Hypocnemoides maculicauda)

365. Black-and-white Antbird (Myrmochanes hemileucus)

366. Silvered Antbird (Sclateria naevia)

367. Slate-colored Antbird (Schistocichla shistacea)

368. Spot-winged Antbird (Schistocichla leucostigma)

369. Chestnut-tailed Antbird (Myrtmeciza hemimelaena)

370. Black-throated Antbird (Myrtmeciza atrothorax)

371. White-shouldered Antbird (Myrtmeciza melanoceps)

372. Plumbeous Antbird (Myrtmeciza hyperythra)

373. Sooty Antbird (Myrtmeciza fortis)

374. White-throated Antbird (Gymnopithys salvini)

375. Hairy-crested Antbird (Rhegmatorhina melanosticta)

376. Spot-backed Antbird (Hylophylax naevius)

377. Dot-backed Antbird (Hylophylax punctulatus)

378. Scale-backed Antbird (Dichropogon poecilinotus)

379. Black-spotted bare-eye (Phlegopsis nigromaculata)

380. Reddish-winged bare-eye (Phlegopsis erythroptera)

PASSERIFORMES: Formicariidae

381. Rufous-capped Antthurush (Formicarius colma)

382. Black-faced Antthrush (Formicarius analis)

383. Striated Antthrush (Chamaeza nobilis)

PASSERIFORMES: Grallariidae

384. Thrush like Antpitta (Myrmothera campanisona)

385. Elusive Antpitta (Grallaria eludens)

386. Spotted Antpitta (Hylopezus macularius)

PASSERIFORMES: Conopophagidae

387. Chestnut-belted Gnateater (Conopophaga aurita)

388. Ash-throated Gnateater (Conopophaga peruviana)

PASSERIFORMES: Rhinocryptidae

389. Rusty-belted Tapaculo (Liosceles thoracicus)

PASSERIFORMES: Tyrannidae

390. Yellow-crowned Tyrannulet (Tyrannulus elatus)

391. Forest Elaenia (Myiopagis gaimardii)

392. Gray Elaenia (Myiopagis caniceps)

393. Yellow-crowned Elaenia (Myiopagis flavivertex)

394. Large Elaenia (Elaenia spectabilis)

395. Small-billed Elaenia (Elaenia parvirostris)

396. Slaty Elaenia (Elaenia strepera)

397. Brownish Elaenia (Elaenia pelzelni)

398. White-lored Tyrannulet (Ornithion inerme)

399. Southern beardless-Tyrannulet (Camptostoma obsoletum)

400. River Tyrannulet (Serpophaga hypoleuca)

401. Mouse-colored Tyrannulet (Phaeomyias murina)

402. Yellow Tyrannulet (Capsiempis flavela)

403. Ringed Antpipit (Corythopis torquatus)

404. Lesser wagtail-Tyrant (Stigmatura napensis)

405. Slender-footed Tyrannulet (Zimmerius gracilipes)

406. Ochre-bellied flycatcher (Mionectes oleaginous)

407. Sepia Capped Flycatcher (Leptopogon amaurocephalus)

408. Greenish Elaenia (Myiopagis viridicata)

409. Amazonian Scrub-flycatcher (Sublegatus obscurior)

410. Short-tailed Pygmy-Tyrant (Myionis ecaudatus)

411. Double-banded Pygmy-Tyrant (Lophtriccus vitiosus)

412. White-bellied Tody-Tyrant (Hemitriccus griseipectus)

413. Johannes’s Tody-Tyrant (Hemitriccus iohannis)

414. Zimmer’s Tody-Tyrant (Hemitriccus minimus)

415. Rusty-fronted Tody-flycatcher (Poecilotriccus
latirostris)

416. Spotted Tody-flycatcher (Todirostrum maculatum)

417. Yellow-browed Tody-flycatcher (Todirostrum
chrysocrotaphum)

418. Brownish Twistwing (Cnipodectes subbrunneus)

419. Olivaceous Flatbill (Rhynchocyclus olivaceus)

420. Yellow-olive Flycatcher (Tolmomyias sulphurescens)

421. Yellow-margined Flycatcher (Tolmomyias assimilis)

422. Gray-crowned Flycatcher (Tolmomyias poliocephalus)

423. Yellow-breasted Flycatchher (Tolmomyias flaviventris)

424. Golden-crowned Spadebill (Platyrinchus coronatus)

425. White Crested Spadebill (Platyrinchus platyrhynchos)

426. Royal Flycatcher (Onychorhynchus coronatus)

427. Bran-colored Flycatcher (Myiophbus fasciatus)

428. Sulphur-rumped Flycatcher (Myiobius barbatus)

429. Black-tailed Flycatcher (Myiobius atricaudus)

430. Ruddy-tailed Flycatcher (Terenotriccus erythrurus)

431. Cinnamon Tyrant (Neopipo cinnamomea)

432. Euler’s Flycatcher (Lathrotriccus euleri)

433. Fuscous Flycatcher (Cnemotriccus fuscatus)

434. Alder flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum)

435. Eastern wood-Pewee (Contopus virens)

436. Vermilion Flycatcher (Pyrocephalus ribinus)

437. Amazonian black-Tyrant (Knipolegus poecilocercus)

438. Riverside Tyrant (Knipolegus orenocensis)

439. Drab water-Tyrant (Ochthornis littoralis)

440. Black-backed Water-Tyrant (Fluvicola pica)

441. White-headed Marsh-Tyrant (Arundinicola leucocephala)

442. Piratic Flycatcher (Legatus leucophaius)

443. Social Flycatcher (Myiozetetes similis)

444. Gray-capped Flycatcher (Myiozetetes granadensis)

445. Dusky-chested Flycatcher (Myiozetetes luteiventris)

446. Great kiskadee (Pitangus sulphuratus)

447. Lesser kiskadee (Pitangus lictor)

448. Yellow-throated Flycatchher (Conopias parvus)

449. Sulphur-bellied Flycatcher (Myiodynastes luteiventris)

450. Streaked Flycatcher (Myiodynastes maculatus)

451. Boat-billed Flycatcher (Megarynchus pitangua)

452. Sulphury Flycatcher (Tyrannopsis sulphurea)

453. Variegated Flycatcher (Empidonomus varius)

454. Crowned slaty-Flycatcher (Empidonomus
aurantioatrocristatus)

455. White-throated kingbird (Tyrannus albogularis)

456. Tropical kingbird (Tyrannus melancholicus)

457. Fork-tailed Flycatcher (Tyrannus savana)

458. Eastern kingbird (Tyrannus tyrannus)

459. Grayish Mourner (Rhytipterna simplex)

460. Sirystes (Sirystes sibilator)

461. Dusky-capped Flycatcher (Myiarchus tuberculifer)

462. Swainson’s Flycacher (Myiarchus swainsoni)

463. Short-crested Flycatcher (Myiarchus ferox)

464. Rufous-tailed flatbill (Ramphotrigon ruficauda)

465. Dusky-tailed Flatbill (Rhamphotrigon megacephalum)

466. Dusky-Tailed flatbill (Ramphotrigon fuscicauda)

467. Cinnamon Attila (Attila cinnamomeus)

468. Citron-bellied Attila (Attila citriniventris)

469. Dull-capped Attila (Attila bolivianus)

470. Bright-rumped Attila (Attila spadiceus)

PASSERIFORMES: Cotingidae

471. Plum-throated cotinga (Cotinga maynana)

472. Spangled cotinga (Cotinga cayana)

473. Screaming Piha (Lipaugus vociferans)

474. Purple-throated cotinga (Porphrolaema porhyrolaema)

475. Bare-necked Fruitcrow (Gymnoderus foetidus)

476. Purple-throated Fruitcrow (Querula purpurata)

477. Amazonian umbrellabird (Cephaloperus omotusmale)

PASSERIFORMES: Pipridae

478. Dwarf Tyrant-Manakin (Tyranneutes stolzmanni)

479. Striped Manakin (Machaeropterus regulus)

480. Blue-crowned Manakin (Lepidothrix coronate)

481. White-bearded Manakin (Manacus manacus)

482. Sulphur-bellied Tyrant manakin (Neopelma chrysocephalun)

483. Orange-crowned Manakin (Heterocercus aurantiivertex)

484. Blue-backed Manakin (Chiroxiphia pareola)

485. White-crowned Manakin (Pipra pipra)

486. Wire-tailed Manakin (Pipra filicauda)

487. Red-headed Manakin (Pipra rubrocapilla)

PASSERIFORMES: Incertae sedis

488. Black-crowned Tityra (Tityra inquisitos)

489. Black-tailed Tityra (Tityra cayana)

490. Masked Tityra (Tityra semifasciata)

491. Varzea Schiffornis (Schiffornis major)

492. Thrush-like Schiffornis (Schiffornis turdina)

493. Cinereous Mourner (Laniocerca hypopyrra)

494. White Browed Purpletuff (Iodopleura isabellae)

495. Cinereous becard (Pachyramphus rufus)

496. Chestnut-crowned becard (Pachyramphus castaneus)

497. White-winged becard (Pachyramphus polychopterus)

498. Black-capped becard (Pachyramphus marginatus)

499. Pink-throated becard (Pachyramphus minor)

500. Wing-barred Manakin (Piprites chloris)

PASSERIFORMES: Vireonidae

501. Rufous-browed Peppershrike (Cyclarhis gujanensis)

502. Slaty-capped Shrike-Vireo (Vireolanius leucotis)

503. Red-eyed vireo (Vireo olivaceus)

504. Yellow-green vireo (Vireo flavoviridis)

505. Lemon-chested Greenlet (Hylophilus thoracicus)

506. Gray-chested Greenlet (Hylophilus semicinereus)

507. Dusky-capped Greenlet (Hylophilus hypoxanthus)

508. Tawny-crowned Greenlet (Hylophilus ochraceiceps)

PASSERIFORMES: Corvidae

509. Violaceous Jay (Cyanocorax violaceus)

PASSERIFORMES: Hirundinidae

510. Blue-and-white Swallow (Pygochelidon cyanoleuca)

511. White-banded Swallow (Atticora fasciata)

512. White-thighed Swallow (Atticora tibialis)

513. Southern Rough-winged Swallow (Stelgidopteryx
ruficollis)

514. Brown-chested Martin (Progne tapera)

515. Purple Martin (Progne subis)

516. Gray-breasted Martin (Progne chalybea)

517. Southern Marin (Progne elegans)

518. White-winged Swallow (Tachycineta albiventer)

519. Bank Swallow (Riparia riparia)

520. Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica)

521. Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota)

PASSERIFOORMES: Troglodytidae

522. Scaly-breasted Wren (Microcerculus marginatus)

523. House Wren (Troglodytes aedon)

524. Thrush-like Wren (Campylorhynchus turdinus)

525. Moustached Wren (Pheugopedius genibarbis))

526. Buff-breasted Wren (Cantorchilus leucotis)

527. Musician Wren (Cyphorhinus arada)

PASSERIFORMES: Polioptilidae

528. Long-billed Gnatwren (Ramphocaenus melanurus)

529. Tropical Gnatcatcher (Polioptila plumbea)

PASSERIFORMES: Incertae sedis

530. Black-capped Donacobius (Donacobius atricapilla)

PASSERIFORMES: Turdidae

531. Gray-cheeked Thrush (Catharus minimus)

532. Swainson’s Thrush (Catharus ustulatus)

533. Hauxwell’s Thrush (Turdus hauxwelli)

534. Lawrence’s Thrush (Turdus lawrencii)

535. Black-billed Thrush (Turdus ignobilis)

536. White-necked Thrush (Turdus albicollis)

PASSERIFORMES: Thraupidae

537. Red-capped cardinal (Paroaria gularis)

538. Magpie Tanager (Cissopis leverianus)

539. Red-billed Pied Tanager (Lamprospiza melanoleuca)

540. Hooded Tanager (Nemosia pileata)

541. Orange-headed Tanager (Thypopsis sordida)

542. Gray-headed Tanager (Eucometis penicillata)

543. Yellow-crested Tanager (Tachyphonus rufiventer)

544. Fulvous-crested Tanager (Tachyphonus surinamus)

545. White-shouldered Tanager (Tachyphonus luctuosus)

546. White-winged Shrike-Tanager (Lanio versicolor)

547. Masked Tanager (Ramphocelus nigrogularis)

548. Silver-beaked Tanager (Ramphocelus carbo)

549. Blue-gray Tanager (Thraupis episcopus)

550. Palm Tanager (Tharaupis palmarum)

551. Masked Tanager (Tangara nigrocincta)

552. Yellow-bellied Tanager (Tangara xanthogastra)

553. Turquoise Tanager (Tangara mexicana)

554. Paradise Tanager (Tangara chilensis)

555. Opal-rumped Tanager (Tangara velia)

556. Opal-crowned Tanager (Tangara callophrys)

557. Bay-headed Tanager (Tangara gyrola)

558. Green-and-gold Tanager (Tangara schrankii)

559. Swallow Tanager (Tersina viridis)

560. White-bellied Dacnis (Dacnis albiventris)

561. Black-faced Dacnis (Dacnis lineata)

562. Yellow-bellied Dacnis (Dacnis flaviventer)

563. Blue Dacnis (Dacnis cayana)

564. Short-billed Honeycreeper (Cyanerpes nitidus)

565. Purple Honeycreeper (Cyanerpes caeruleus)

566. Red-legged Honeycreeper (Cyanerpes cyaneus)

567. Green Honeycreeper (Chlorophanes spiza)

568. Guira Tanager (Hemithraupis guira)

569. Yellow-backed Tanager (Hemithraupis flavicollis)

570. Bicolored conebill (Conirostrum bicolor)

571. Pearly-breasted conebill (Conirostrum margaritae)

PASSERIFORMES: Incertae sedis

572. Bananaquit (Coereba flaveola)

PASSERIFORMES: Cardinalidae

573. Slate-colored Grosbeak (Saltator grossus)

574. Buff-throated Saltator (Saltator maximus)

575. Grayish Saltator (Saltator coerulescens)

576. Yellow-shouldered Grosbeak (Parkerthraustes humeralis)

PASSERIFORMES: Emberizidae

577. Yellow-browed Sparrow (Ammodramus aurifrons)

578. Blue-black Grassquit (Volatinia jacarina)

579. Caqueta Seedeater (Sporophila murallae)

580. Lesson’s Seedeater (Sporophila bouvronides)

581. Lined seedeater (Sporophila lineola)

582. Black-and-white Seedeater (Sporophila luctuosa)

583. Chestnut-bellied Seedeater (Sporophila castaneiventris)

584. Chestnut-billed Seed-Finch (Oryzoborus castaneiventris)

585. Large-bellied Seed-Finch (Oryzoborus angolensis)

PASSERIFORMES: Cardinalidae

586. Summer Tanager (Piranga rubra)

587. Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea)

588. Red-crowned Ant-Tanager (Habia rubica)

589. Blue-black Grosbeak (Cyanocompssa cyanoides)

PASSERIFORMES: Parulidae

590. Blackpoll Warbler (Dendroica striata)

591. Buff-rumped Warbler (Phaeothlpis fulvicauda)

PASSERIFORMES: Icteridae

592. Russet-backed oropendola (Psarocolius angustifrons)

593. Green Oropendola (Psarocolius viridis)

594. Crested Oropendola (Psarocolius decumanus)

595. Olive Oropendola (Psarocolius bifasciatus)

596. Casqued Oropendola (Clypicterus oseryi)

597. Band-tailed Oropendola (Ocyalus latirostris)

598. Solitary black Cacique (Cacicus solitarius)

599. Yellow-rumped Cacique (Cacicus cela)

600. Red-rumped Cacique (Cacicus haemorrhous)

601. Orange-backed Troupial (Icterus croconotus)

602. Epaulet Oriole (Icterus cayanensis)

603. Oriole blackbird (Gymnomystax mexicanus)

604. Velvet-fronted Grackle (Lampropsar tanagrinus)

605. Yellow-hooded blackbird (Chrysomus icterocephalus)

606. Giant Cowbird (Molothrus oryzivorus)

607. Shiny Cowbird (Molothrus bonariensis)

608. Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryziv)


PASSERIFORMES: Fringillidae

609. Purple-throated Euphonia (Euphonia chlorotica)

610. Thick-billed Euphonia (Euphonia laniirostris)

611. Golden-bellied Euphonia (Euphonia chrysopasta)

612. White-vented Euphonia (Euphonia minuta)

613. Orange-bellied Euphonia (Euphonia xanthogaster)

614. Rufous-bellied Euphonia (Euphonia rufiventris)




--
Mia Revels, Ph.D.
Professor of Biology
Northeastern State University
611 Grand Ave.
Tahlequah, Oklahoma
(918) 444-3824
<revels...>


***CONFIDENTIALITY*** -This e-mail (including any attachments) may contain
confidential, proprietary and privileged information. Any unauthorized
disclosure or use of this information is prohibited.

 

Back to top
Date: 10/30/18 6:09 am
From: Dan Reinking <dan...>
Subject: seeking Ardmore area birders
See message below, and please respond directly to Elaine if you have
suggestions.

Dan



<< I live in the Shenandoah Valley of Va., I am also a member of our local
Augusta County bird club, and I will be traveling with my husband to Ardmore
for the Weimaraner National Field trial starting the first week in December,
we will be flying in on the 3rd and leaving on the 9th, my husband will be
judging at this event and I would like to do some Oklahoma birding while
there. It has been about 10 years since my last trip there. I have birded
there in the past but on my own, I do not know if there are any local clubs
there that I could find out if they will be having a walk or if anyone would
be interested in showing a non-local some of their favorite locations and
maybe some new birds. I have been to Reno and Fort Worth and have met some
really nice people via the list serve and are still in contact with most of
them, was able to see some great country and got some great life birds.

I you have any connections I would appreciate any help or at
least permission to post a small version of the above paragraph.



Thanking you in advance



Elaine Carwile

<ecarwile...> <mailto:<ecarwile...> >>




 

Back to top
Date: 10/30/18 4:02 am
From: Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...>
Subject: Red Breasted Nuthatch
Saw the first one yesterday at the feeder. A male.
Bob Laval
Heavener

Sent from my iPad
 

Back to top
Date: 10/30/18 3:59 am
From: Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...>
Subject: Re: White-winged Dove in McCurtain County
Good find David, I’ve been watching for them with the Collards but none yet. We have a large population of Collards here in Heavener because of spilled corn along the rail road.

Bob.Laval
Heavener

Sent from my iPad

> On Oct 29, 2018, at 9:41 PM, David Arbour <arbour...> wrote:
>
> Had a White-winged Dove today in Haworth which is 6 miles north of Red Slough. It was hanging out with a Eurasian Collared-Dove. This species is still rare in this part of the state.
>
> David

 

Back to top
Date: 10/29/18 7:40 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: White-winged Dove in McCurtain County
Had a White-winged Dove today in Haworth which is 6 miles north of Red
Slough. It was hanging out with a Eurasian Collared-Dove. This species is
still rare in this part of the state.



David


 

Back to top
Date: 10/29/18 7:25 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - October 29
Brent Spink (MN), Bill Wood (LA), and I surveyed birds today at Red Slough
and found 71 species. Several of our summering species are still lingering.
Sparrow numbers are increasing. Geese were on the move today. Here is our
list for today:



Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 1

Greater White-fronted Geese - 161

Snow Geese - 28

Ross' Geese - 4

Gadwall - 390

American Wigeon - 1

Mallard - 11

Northern Shoveler - 5

Green-winged Teal - 2

Canvasback - 1

Ring-necked Duck - 1445

Ruddy Duck - 6

Pied-billed Grebe - 3

Double-crested Cormorant - 18

Great-blue Heron - 3

Great Egret - 2

White Ibis - 1 juv.

Black Vulture - 8

Turkey Vulture - 74

Northern Harrier - 1

Sharp-shinned Hawk - 1

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 2

American Kestrel - 1

Purple Gallinule - 1 juv.

Common Gallinule - 3

American Coot - 650

Killdeer - 1

Greater Yellowlegs - 23

Least Sandpiper - 1

Wilson's Snipe - 25

Mourning Dove - 1

Belted Kingfisher - 3

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 7

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Northern Flicker - 6

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 15

American Crow - 7

Fish Crow - 9

Carolina Chickadee - 3

Tufted Titmouse - 1

Carolina Wren - 7

House Wren - 1

Winter Wren - 1

Sedge Wren - 1

Marsh Wren - 6

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 5

Eastern Bluebird - 3

Hermit Thrush - 2

American Robin - 8

Brown Thrasher - 2

European Starling - 5

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 30

Pine Warbler - 2

Eastern Towhee - 2

Chipping Sparrow - 25

Field Sparrow - 2

Savannah Sparrow - 13

Grasshopper Sparrow - 1

Song Sparrow - 11

Swamp Sparrow - 12

White-throated Sparrow - 8

Dark-eyed Junco - 5

Northern Cardinal - 9

Red-winged Blackbird - 67

Eastern Meadowlark - 4

Common Grackle - 3

American Goldfinch - 10





Odonates:



Familiar Bluet

Common Green Darner

Eastern Pondhawk

Eastern Amberwing

Variegated Meadowhawk

Black Saddlebags





Herps:



Red-eared Slider

Broad-banded Watersnake

Blanchard's Cricket Frog



Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR








 

Back to top
Date: 10/29/18 5:28 pm
From: Jim Arterburn <JIMARTERBURN...>
Subject: New photos uploaded to my website
OKBirds,

I have added a few recent photos to my PBase website. Some of the
species added include Northern Harrier, Cooper's Hawk, Red-shouldered
Hawk and a couple different Red-tailed Hawks, a Common Loon flyover,
several duck species along with several other species.. The link to the
new photos is below.

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds

Cheers,

Jim Arterburn
 

Back to top
Date: 10/29/18 4:14 pm
From: NATHAN KUHNERT <nrkuhnert...>
Subject: Re: OOS Fall Meeting Abstracts
I am afraid my own reply got flagged because I included the link that used "PDF" in the address and it will soon be sent to Spam again. It did get posted on to birding.aba.org like the original post. 

On Monday, October 29, 2018 6:01 PM, NATHAN KUHNERT <nrkuhnert...> wrote:


Thank you Bill for compiling the abstracts and providing a link! I do not know if it just happened to me but this particular post got sent to my Spam account. I use Yahoo Mail for OKBIRDS. My guess is that the link is what got flagged.
Thanks again Bill.
Nathan


 

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Date: 10/29/18 4:03 pm
From: NATHAN KUHNERT <nrkuhnert...>
Subject: Re: OOS Fall Meeting Abstracts
Thank you Bill for compiling the abstracts and providing a link! I do not know if it just happened to me but this particular post got sent to my Spam account. I use Yahoo Mail for OKBIRDS. My guess is that the link is what got flagged.
Thanks again Bill.
Nathan

On Sunday, October 28, 2018 2:44 PM, William Diffin <okiebirder...> wrote:


Did you know that northeastern Oklahoma was once the core breeding range of Henslow's Sparrow? That Northern Rough-winged Swallows and Bank Swallows are breeding without apparent ill effect in the contaminated chat piles at the Tat Creek Superfund site in far northeastern Oklahoma? That increases in light levels due to cutting of giant trees in the Amazon is correlated with drastic changes in bird species occurrence in the rainforest?
Did you know that Oklahoma researchers are tracking migrating Bald Eagles to gauge their exposure to dangerous encounters with tall structures? Or that graduate students are using advanced methods to unravel the mystery of Red-cockaded Woodpecker nest site selection and Eastern Bluebird nestling success? Or that migration can be monitored by devices that count birds at night as they cross the face of the moon? If you attended last weekend's OOS Fall Meeting you learned about these amazing things and many more as 19 Oklahoma scientists and conservation experts explained their ongoing work. 
A compilation of the presentation abstracts can be seen or downloaded at www.okbirds.org/OOSFall18Abstracts.pdf.
Attendees were universally complimentary on the content of the conference. Thanks to all the speakers who presented their work and made the conference such a wonderful experience for Oklahoma's birding and ornithology community.
The Oklahoma Ornithological SocietyWilliam Diffin, President Elect


 

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Date: 10/29/18 9:53 am
From: Brett Niland <bestguess...>
Subject: Re: Red Nuthatch
That is very cool. I would love to have such a distinguished visitor in my yard.

Enjoy!

Brett
________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Nancy Reed <reednancy1717...>
Sent: Monday, October 29, 2018 11:38 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Red Nuthatch

I have a beautiful Red Nuthatch at my feeder. He has been in my yard for a week.
Nancy Reed
Norman, Oklahoma


Sent from my iPhone

 

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Date: 10/29/18 9:38 am
From: Nancy Reed <reednancy1717...>
Subject: Red Nuthatch
I have a beautiful Red Nuthatch at my feeder. He has been in my yard for a week.
Nancy Reed
Norman, Oklahoma


Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 10/28/18 12:50 pm
From: Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...>
Subject: tall grass prairie
Birded the tall grass prairie for a couple of hours today. With exception of harriers (13+), and savannah sparrows (several dozen), there was no not much activity. Highlight was seeing not one but two western Massasaugua rattlesnakes. They were within about 100 yards from each other.


Have fun,

Tom Curtis

 

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Date: 10/28/18 12:44 pm
From: William Diffin <okiebirder...>
Subject: OOS Fall Meeting Abstracts
Did you know that northeastern Oklahoma was once the core breeding range of
Henslow's Sparrow? That Northern Rough-winged Swallows and Bank Swallows
are breeding without apparent ill effect in the contaminated chat piles at
the Tat Creek Superfund site in far northeastern Oklahoma? That increases
in light levels due to cutting of giant trees in the Amazon is correlated
with drastic changes in bird species occurrence in the rainforest?

Did you know that Oklahoma researchers are tracking migrating Bald Eagles
to gauge their exposure to dangerous encounters with tall structures? Or
that graduate students are using advanced methods to unravel the mystery of
Red-cockaded Woodpecker nest site selection and Eastern Bluebird nestling
success? Or that migration can be monitored by devices that count birds at
night as they cross the face of the moon? If you attended last weekend's
OOS Fall Meeting you learned about these amazing things and many more as 19
Oklahoma scientists and conservation experts explained their ongoing work.

A compilation of the presentation abstracts can be seen or downloaded at
www.okbirds.org/OOSFall18Abstracts.pdf.

Attendees were universally complimentary on the content of the
conference. Thanks
to all the speakers who presented their work and made the conference such a
wonderful experience for Oklahoma's birding and ornithology community.

The Oklahoma Ornithological Society
William Diffin, President Elect

 

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Date: 10/28/18 12:39 pm
From: William Diffin <okiebirder...>
Subject: OOS Fall Meeting birding
The OOS Fall Meeting was held last weekend October 19-21 at UCO. The
meeting opened Friday evening with a challenging ID quiz organized by Dr.
Chris Butler from specimens in UCO's museum collection. The meeting
concluded on Sunday morning with field trips to the Myriad Gardens and the
NW OKC Sludge Lagoon. In between Friday and Sunday participants recorded
incidental sightings on the meeting's bulletin board checklist. Birds of
note were a late Wilson's Warbler and a first surge of winter residents
including Eared Grebe, Hermit Thrush, waterfowl and sparrows. 50 species
were listed in all. For photos of some of the birds see the links below the
list which follows.

Canada Goose
Northern Shoveler
Gadwall
Redhead
Lesser Scaup
Bufflehead
Ruddy Duck
Eared Grebe
Pied-billed Grebe
Double-crested Cormorant
Turkey Vulture
Cooper’s Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
American Coot
Killdeer
Least Sandpiper
Franklin's Gull
Ring-billed Gull
Forster's Tern
Rock Pigeon
Eurasian Collared Dove
Mourning Dove
Great Horned Owl
Red-bellied WP
Downy WP
Eastern Phoebe
Scissortail Flycatcher
Blue Jay
American Crow
Carolina Chickadee
Brown Creeper
Carolina Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Hermit Thrush
Eastern Bluebird
American Robin
European Starling
Orange-crowned Warbler
Wilson's Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
White-throated Sparrow
Lincoln's Sparrow
Spotted Towhee
Dark-eyed Junco
Great-tailed Grackle
Red-winged Blackbird
Brown-headed Cowbird
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow

Below are links to eBird checklists from Sunday morning with uploaded
photos thanks to Steve Davis:

Myriad Gardens -- https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49357871

NW OKC Lagoon --
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49357850

Good Birding,

The Oklahoma Ornithological Society
William Diffin, President Elect

 

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Date: 10/26/18 2:49 pm
From: Susanne Lutze <eztuls46...>
Subject: Re: Hawks
Usually this time of the year I have 20-30 birds with several types. I have
4 birds this Fall! 😱

On Fri, Oct 26, 2018 at 3:17 PM Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...>
wrote:

> Well, I’ve had a couple of Sharp Shined hawks around my feeder fairly
> often but today a Coopers stopped by. For some reason the feeder birds are
> very scarce.
> Bob Laval
> Heavener
>
> Sent from my iPad

--
" There is a pleasure in the pathless woods;
There is rapture on the lonely shore;
There is society, where none intrudes,
By the deep sea, and music in its roar:
I love not man the less, but Nature more...."

Lord Byron

 

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Date: 10/26/18 2:26 pm
From: Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...>
Subject: Re: Pacific Loon
Went to check out Bill's loon. Found it about 3:30 and had in in the scope for about ten minutes, and then lost it. Looks like a post-breeding adult. There was pretty good contrast between the dark throat and and the side of the neck at some angles, a small amount of white at the chin and at the waterline in the front. A bit of white on the back, and a small amount of white on the sides at the waterline. It was doing a lot of preening, and occasionally put its face underwater.


Great find, Bill. Thanks for posting it.


Have fun,

Tom Curtis


________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...>
Sent: Friday, October 26, 2018 2:55 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Pacific Loon

Seen at Lake Yahola this afternoon, still present at 3:00.

 

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Date: 10/26/18 2:25 pm
From: Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...>
Subject: Re: Pacific Loon
Went to check out Bill's loon. Found it about 3:30 and had in in the scope for about ten minutes, and then lost it. Looks like a post-breeding adult. There was visible contrast between the dark throat and and the side of the neck at some angles, a small amount of white at the chin and at the waterline in the front. A bit of white on the back, and a small amount of white on the sides at the waterline. No hint of a neck ring. It was doing a lot of preening, and occasionally put its face underwater.


Great find, Bill. Thanks for posting it.


Have fun,

Tom Curtis


________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...>
Sent: Friday, October 26, 2018 2:55 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Pacific Loon

Seen at Lake Yahola this afternoon, still present at 3:00.

 

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Date: 10/26/18 1:17 pm
From: Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...>
Subject: Hawks
Well, I’ve had a couple of Sharp Shined hawks around my feeder fairly often but today a Coopers stopped by. For some reason the feeder birds are very scarce.
Bob Laval
Heavener

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 10/26/18 12:56 pm
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...>
Subject: Pacific Loon
Seen at Lake Yahola this afternoon, still present at 3:00.

 

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Date: 10/25/18 6:21 pm
From: HAROLD YOCUM <drhal2...>
Subject: Happenings at Mitch Park , Edmond
Mitch Park is always a nice place to bird. Nice trails, many feeding stations( thus areas to see the birds).

Within the last week many winter birds have moved in. Sparrows are up. So far we have seen- chipping, white throated, white crowned, Lincoln's, clay colored, vesper. No Harris yet, but soon they will be the most common sparrow in the park.

S. Towhees are seen and calling at several locations. The past few years we have had a number of eastern towhees as well.

Today I saw FOS red breasted nuthatch.

Hawks are on the rise- red shouldered. red tailed, Am. Kestrel and Coopers so far. Sharpies are soon to be seen there. I have one visiting my yard checking out my birds already. In winter months we have visiting N. Harriers.

Kinglets have arrived.

Still a few warblers- yesterday I saw a Nashville and an orange crowned. Yellow rumps have returned in mass.

Consider a visit soon.

Hal A. Yocum
 

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Date: 10/24/18 11:45 am
From: Lisa Wiesbauer <lakehaven58...>
Subject: Re: Red-breasted Nuthatch
We haven’t seen any of our Fall numbers at Okemah Lake either and
shockingly 0 goldfinches and we should be covered in them

On Wed, Oct 24, 2018 at 12:32 Susanne Lutze <eztuls46...> wrote:

> Lived in OK for over 35 yrs. Never have seen a Fall with almost no
> songbirds at my feeders at 150th and MacArthur. Weird. Warning? Climate
> change with a change in migratory patterns? I have always had so many
> birds to put food out for and have seen a decline over the last few
> years. But.....
>
> On Wed, Oct 24, 2018 at 11:45 AM m.b.ludewig <m.b.ludewig...>
> wrote:
>
>>
>> Saw the second RBN in the yard today. First one was over 3 weeks ago!
>>
>> Mike Ludewig
>> Claremore
>>
>>
>> Sent from my U.S. Cellular® Smartphone
>>
>

 

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Date: 10/24/18 10:32 am
From: Susanne Lutze <eztuls46...>
Subject: Re: Red-breasted Nuthatch
Lived in OK for over 35 yrs. Never have seen a Fall with almost no
songbirds at my feeders at 150th and MacArthur. Weird. Warning? Climate
change with a change in migratory patterns? I have always had so many
birds to put food out for and have seen a decline over the last few
years. But.....

On Wed, Oct 24, 2018 at 11:45 AM m.b.ludewig <m.b.ludewig...>
wrote:

>
> Saw the second RBN in the yard today. First one was over 3 weeks ago!
>
> Mike Ludewig
> Claremore
>
>
> Sent from my U.S. Cellular® Smartphone
>

 

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Date: 10/24/18 9:46 am
From: m.b.ludewig <m.b.ludewig...>
Subject: Red-breasted Nuthatch

Saw the second RBN in the yard today. First one was over 3 weeks ago! 
Mike Ludewig Claremore 

Sent from my U.S. Cellular® Smartphone
 

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Date: 10/23/18 7:47 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough today
There won't be a bird survey this week but I did give a tour to some guys
from Texas, Minnesota, and Michigan today. Before I met them they found a
Least Bittern (very late but they described it well.) and after I hooked up
with them we found a juvenile Purple Gallinule and a couple Common
Gallinules. Lots of sparrows everywhere including one Vesper Sparrow. Lots
of Marsh and Sedge Wrens also. Saw the first migrant Mallards to show up
this season also.



David Arbour

De Queen, AR


 

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Date: 10/23/18 2:24 pm
From: Fran Britton <000000b18b85122c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: New Photos
Beautiful photos!!!! Thanks for sharing!!!!!!
Fran Britton

On Tuesday, October 2, 2018, 11:26:39 AM CDT, Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...> wrote:

Hello All,
Just added a large gallery from my recent trip to Arizona and New Mexico, as well as western Oklahoma (there are some Oklahoma birds in there, just to keep it on topic). of particular interest are lot's of dragonfly and damselfly photos, mostly from Sabino Canyon and Bass Canyon in AZ, for those of you who are in to that sort of thing:
http://www.pbase.com/lctsimages/oknmaz18

Also added a few September photos to my recent gallery here:
http://www.pbase.com/lctsimages/recent


Good Birding (and whatever else you're looking at),
Bill CarrellTulsa, OK
 

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Date: 10/23/18 7:30 am
From: Cyndie Browning <gr8auntieokie...>
Subject: Sooner Lake -- Update
As promised, I contacted Sooner Lake/OG&E yester-morning, and learned the
following:

<< The major construction project at Sooner is a multi-year project [begun
in Sept. 2017] and it is still underway so the security concerns have not
changed. >>

They will contact me if/when they're ready to restore our access to the
areas of the plant around the west and north ends of the property.

In the meantime, all of the public areas around the lake, where hunting and
fishing are permitted, are open to birders, too---please obey all signs and
warnings!!---but until further notice, the security guards absolutely will
NOT let you through the gates to bird inside the security fences. As soon
as I hear anything different, I'll let you know.

Cyndie Browning
<vermilion_flycatcher...>
http://www.adimview.com/Tulsa_Birds_Firebird.html
Tulsa, OK

How do migrating birds know which one to follow?
What if the lead bird just wants to be alone?
-- Bill Bryson, "The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid: A Memoir" (2006)

 

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Date: 10/22/18 4:36 pm
From: Brett Niland <bestguess...>
Subject: Re: Southeast Ok fall color and bird migration
We stop at various places. NWR’s, state parks, public access. We got a ton of stuff just keeping our eyes open.

For instance, The wife shouted for me to turn around and pull into a church parking lot where we spent an hour watching close to a hundred siskin’s, warblers and sparrows flitting from tree to ground and back. Not sure what they liked about that particular spot but it was rife with little birds. They all split when a sharpie and a red shouldered had a shouting match from the nearby trees.

It was a fun trip. We were in the area from Wednesday through Sunday.

Thank You,

Brett Niland
Cell: (918) 200-1818

On Oct 22, 2018, at 5:50 PM, The Rudolphs <ksmrudolph...><mailto:<ksmrudolph...>> wrote:

Do you just see the birds as you’re driving, or do you stop at certain spots?

From: Brett Niland<mailto:<bestguess...>
Sent: Monday, October 22, 2018 4:05 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...><mailto:<OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Southeast Ok fall color and bird migration

We were there this weekend.

Just starting to turn. Barely.

We got a black billed cuckoo, blue headed vireo, black throated green, load and loads of pine warblers and siskins, and many of the winter sparrows and warblers.

Thank You,

Brett Niland
918-200-1818

On Oct 22, 2018, at 3:47 PM, Dora Webb <owl112...><mailto:<owl112...>> wrote:

How is the fall color on the Talamina drive and bird migration in the area?
 

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Date: 10/22/18 3:54 pm
From: Richrd Gunn <richardgunn1940...>
Subject: FOS on South Jenkins
Been out of town for about a week and found that autumn happened while I
was gone. New birds were eastern meadowlark, YB sapsucker, savannah
sparrow, and pine siskens. Pretty. morning.

 

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Date: 10/22/18 3:50 pm
From: The Rudolphs <ksmrudolph...>
Subject: Re: Southeast Ok fall color and bird migration
Do you just see the birds as you’re driving, or do you stop at certain spots?

From: Brett Niland
Sent: Monday, October 22, 2018 4:05 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Southeast Ok fall color and bird migration

We were there this weekend.

Just starting to turn. Barely.

We got a black billed cuckoo, blue headed vireo, black throated green, load and loads of pine warblers and siskins, and many of the winter sparrows and warblers.

Thank You,

Brett Niland
918-200-1818

On Oct 22, 2018, at 3:47 PM, Dora Webb <owl112...> wrote:


How is the fall color on the Talamina drive and bird migration in the area?
 

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Date: 10/22/18 3:12 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Sequoyah NWR
I had 55 species at the refuge this morning. I really had to work to get
that number. It was 40 degrees at 8:30. The birds were slow to move. By
noon it was "too nice" and they continued, for the most part, to stay low
and slow. Cormorants and White Pelicans were the only big flocks on the
move. No geese. Very few ducks.

My favorite bird of the day was Western Meadowlark. They're not very common
in eastern OK. I just love their song, and they were singing.

Four warbler species were present. Tennessee, Orange-crowned, Nashville and
Yellow-rumped.
I had six raptor species.

If anyone is interested, the eagle cam is up and running again.
Suttoncenter.org

Sandy B

 

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Date: 10/22/18 2:06 pm
From: Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...>
Subject: Re: Southeast Ok fall color and bird migration
Birding slow. First Junco today. 10 days till good color on Drive.
Bob Laval
Heavener

Sent from my iPad

> On Oct 22, 2018, at 3:47 PM, Dora Webb <owl112...> wrote:
>
> How is the fall color on the Talamina drive and bird migration in the area?

 

Back to top
Date: 10/22/18 2:05 pm
From: Brett Niland <bestguess...>
Subject: Re: Southeast Ok fall color and bird migration
We were there this weekend.

Just starting to turn. Barely.

We got a black billed cuckoo, blue headed vireo, black throated green, load and loads of pine warblers and siskins, and many of the winter sparrows and warblers.

Thank You,

Brett Niland
918-200-1818

On Oct 22, 2018, at 3:47 PM, Dora Webb <owl112...><mailto:<owl112...>> wrote:

How is the fall color on the Talamina drive and bird migration in the area?
 

Back to top
Date: 10/22/18 1:47 pm
From: Dora Webb <owl112...>
Subject: Southeast Ok fall color and bird migration
How is the fall color on the Talamina drive and bird migration in the area?
 

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Date: 10/22/18 1:11 pm
From: Lisa Wiesbauer <lakehaven58...>
Subject: Ruby throat
Just saw a female at our feeder here at Okemah Lake!! Sure am glad I left
1 feeder out and had just changed it

 

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Date: 10/22/18 6:44 am
From: Terry Mitchell <terry...>
Subject: Tulsa Area
This weekend at Oxley there were some interesting birds. I had a
Black-billed Cuckoo, Summer Tanager, Warbling Vireo, Baltimore Oriole and
several Nashville Warblers.



Terry Mitchell

Plastic Engineering

918-622-9660

 

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