OKbirds
Received From Subject
10/22/19 4:25 pm JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski...> Re: Kingbirds in Lawton
10/22/19 6:58 am Joe Grzybowski <j_grzybowski...> Re: Kingbirds in Lawton
10/22/19 6:55 am Joe Grzybowski <j_grzybowski...> Kingbirds in Lawton
10/21/19 5:56 pm J.B. Tibbits <jeff_osu...> LAST REMINDER - FALL OOS MEETING
10/19/19 2:29 pm J.B. Tibbits <jeff_osu...> 2019 FALL OOS MEETING - MON OCT 21 REGISTRATION DEADLINE
10/19/19 1:25 pm Sharon Henthorn <shenthorn205...> Scissortails; crayfish
10/18/19 5:46 am Thompson, David M. (HSC) <David-Thompson...> Sandhill Cranes at WMWR
10/16/19 11:42 am Richrd Gunn <richardgunn1940...> Weird Crow
10/16/19 11:16 am Kurt Meisenzahl <meisenzk...> Re: White Throat
10/16/19 10:34 am Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...> White Throat
10/16/19 6:53 am Larry Mays <larrymays1949...> Re: Midwest City Big Sit on Wednesday 16th
10/16/19 6:05 am Susie Ruby <seruby...> crow migration
10/15/19 5:39 pm Devin Bosler <devinbosler...> late Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - Edmond, Oklahoma Co.
10/15/19 3:31 pm Larry Mays <larrymays1949...> Re: Midwest City Big Sit on Wednesday 16th
10/15/19 9:56 am J.B. Tibbits <jeff_osu...> 2019 OOS Fall Technical Meeting
10/15/19 9:45 am J.B. Tibbits <jeff_osu...> OOS Call for Presentations
10/15/19 4:13 am Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...> Midwest City Big Sit on Wednesday 16th
10/12/19 7:48 am Peggie Mitchell <00000005c088321b-dmarc-request...> Re: OKBIRDS Digest - 10 Oct 2019 to 11 Oct 2019 (#2019-243)
10/11/19 9:51 am Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...> Slightly off topic
10/10/19 5:36 am Ernie <elsabbado...> Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - Oct. 9
10/10/19 4:27 am Richrd Gunn <richardgunn1940...> strange behavior
10/10/19 4:13 am Richrd Gunn <richardgunn1940...> Scary but interesting
10/9/19 9:42 am Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...> Pathfinder Parkway on 10-9-2019.
10/8/19 5:41 pm Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...> Re: Pine Siskin
10/8/19 5:25 pm Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...> Re: Pine Siskin
10/8/19 5:05 pm Braden Farris <000000ce876b119d-dmarc-request...> Stars and Stripes Park, Lake Hefner OKC Report
10/8/19 1:10 pm Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...> Re: Pine Siskin
10/8/19 10:43 am J.B. Tibbits <jeff_osu...> OOS - Call for presentations
10/8/19 9:46 am Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...> Pine Siskin
10/8/19 4:08 am Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...> Midwest City Big Sit postponed to Wed Oct 16th
10/7/19 4:40 pm Kurt Meisenzahl <meisenzk...> Re: Max Fuller passes away
10/7/19 6:27 am Terry Mitchell <terry...> Re: Max Fuller passes away
10/6/19 6:50 pm Jan Dolph <russetdm...> Re: Black-oil sunflower seeds
10/6/19 6:39 pm JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski...> Re: Max Fuller passes away
10/6/19 6:18 pm John Shackford <johnshackford...> Sunflower seeds
10/6/19 6:16 pm John Shackford <johnshackford...> Sunflower seeds
10/6/19 3:47 pm Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...> Max Fuller passes away
10/6/19 1:30 pm Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...> Re: Black-oil sunflower seeds
10/6/19 1:15 pm John Shackford <johnshackford...> Black-oil sunflower seeds
10/6/19 10:54 am Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...> snow geese
10/6/19 8:04 am Jim Arterburn <JIMARTERBURN...> Photos from late September added to my PBase website
10/4/19 6:27 pm Judy Basham <judybasham...> Re: Birds Need Your Leaves
10/3/19 5:42 pm O Connell, Tim <tim.oconnell...> Re: Very late Mississippi Kite, Yellow-crowned Night-Heron, Black Tern - Lake Hefner, OKC
10/3/19 5:33 pm Devin Bosler <devinbosler...> Very late Mississippi Kite, Yellow-crowned Night-Heron, Black Tern - Lake Hefner, OKC
10/3/19 5:12 pm Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...> FW: eBird Report - MWC House, Oct 3, 2019
10/3/19 12:47 pm Poland, Zachary <zpoland...> Re: 8 Warbler Species Day- Downtown Tulsa
10/3/19 11:24 am Poland, Zachary <zpoland...> 8 Warbler Species Day- Downtown Tulsa
10/3/19 5:33 am Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...> Re: Birds, Tent Caterpillars and Fall Webworms
10/3/19 5:30 am Patty Kirk <PKirk...> Re: Birds, Tent Caterpillars and Fall Webworms
10/2/19 5:37 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Birds, Tent Caterpillars and Fall Webworms
10/2/19 1:34 pm Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...> Re: Midwest City Big Sit on Thursday October 10th
10/2/19 1:33 pm Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...> Re: Birds, Tent Caterpillars and Fall Webworms
10/2/19 1:01 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Birds, Tent Caterpillars and Fall Webworms
10/2/19 12:58 pm Zach DuFran <zdufran...> Re: Birds, Tent Caterpillars and Fall Webworms
10/2/19 11:50 am Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...> Midwest City Big Sit on Thursday October 10th
10/2/19 10:11 am Brett Niland <bestguess...> Re: Smith's Longspur in winter
10/2/19 7:29 am JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski...> Re: Smith's Longspur in winter
10/2/19 6:47 am Brett Niland <bestguess...> Re: Smith's Longspur in winter
10/1/19 7:59 pm Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...> Re: Smith's Longspur in winter
10/1/19 7:12 pm Brett Niland <bestguess...> Re: Smith's Longspur in winter
10/1/19 4:24 pm James Purcell <jpurcell1616...> Smith's Longspur in winter
10/1/19 4:14 pm Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...> Pathfinder Parkway and Yard on 10-1-2019.
10/1/19 10:22 am Patricia Velte <pvelte...> October Migration Report (2 of 2)
10/1/19 10:17 am Patricia Velte <pvelte...> October Migration Report (1 of 2)
9/30/19 5:43 am Judy Basham <judybasham...> Re: Virginia Rail
9/29/19 12:27 pm Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...> Lake Hefnerlue Jay -
9/28/19 10:50 am Rodney Hartsfield <bassangler73...> Re: Sequoyah NWR
9/28/19 10:12 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Sequoyah NWR
9/28/19 7:58 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Fw: [OKBIRDS] A White-breasted Nuthatch Solving A Problem
9/28/19 7:39 am Rodney Hartsfield <bassangler73...> Sequoyah NWR
9/28/19 7:24 am Brett Niland <bestguess...> Re: Fw: [OKBIRDS] A White-breasted Nuthatch Solving A Problem
9/28/19 7:11 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Fw: [OKBIRDS] A White-breasted Nuthatch Solving A Problem
9/28/19 6:02 am Brett Niland <bestguess...> Re: A White-breasted Nuthatch Solving A Problem
9/28/19 5:27 am Patty Kirk <PKirk...> Re: A White-breasted Nuthatch Solving A Problem
9/28/19 4:28 am John Hurd <jackhurd...> Re: Virginia Rail
9/27/19 11:40 am Terry Mitchell <terry...> Re: Virginia Rail
9/27/19 11:04 am Brett Niland <bestguess...> Re: Virginia Rail
9/27/19 10:45 am Patricia Seibert <plseibert...> Re: Virginia Rail
9/27/19 9:36 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> A White-breasted Nuthatch Solving A Problem
9/27/19 9:27 am Terry Mitchell <terry...> Re: Virginia Rail
9/27/19 8:40 am Patricia Seibert <plseibert...> Re: Virginia Rail
9/27/19 8:06 am Terry Mitchell <terry...> Virginia Rail
9/26/19 3:43 pm John Shackford <johnshackford...> Re: Couch Park
9/26/19 2:29 pm Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...> Roman Nose State Park bird question
9/26/19 2:25 pm O Connell, Tim <tim.oconnell...> Re: Couch Park
9/26/19 2:19 pm Richrd Gunn <richardgunn1940...> South Jenkins
9/26/19 2:15 pm Poland, Zachary <zpoland...> Re: Empid at William’s Green Tulsa—Potential Hammond’s
9/26/19 2:06 pm John Shackford <johnshackford...> Couch Park
9/26/19 12:33 pm Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...> Re: Empid at William’s Green Tulsa—Potential Hammond’s
9/26/19 11:08 am Poland, Zachary <zpoland...> Re: Empid at William’s Green Tulsa—Potential Hammond’s
9/26/19 10:58 am Poland, Zachary <zpoland...> Empid at William’s Green Tulsa—Potential Hammond’s
9/25/19 6:36 pm Landon Neumann <landonneumann25...> Stillwater Warblers
9/25/19 11:47 am Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...> Re: Death of an Egret
9/25/19 9:27 am Susanne Lutze <eztuls46...> Re: Death of an Egret
9/25/19 8:27 am Ernie <elsabbado...> Re: Death of an Egret
9/25/19 6:46 am Harmon, Vonceil <vcharmon...> Re: Death of an Egret
9/25/19 6:09 am Richrd Gunn <richardgunn1940...> Re: Death of an Egret
9/25/19 6:00 am David Arbour <arbour...> Death of an Egret
9/24/19 10:21 am Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...> Tuesday Morning
9/23/19 8:26 am Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...> Pathfinder Parkway on 9-23-2019
9/23/19 7:17 am janis blanton <janis.blanton...> Tall grass prairie today
 
Back to top
Date: 10/22/19 4:25 pm
From: JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski...>
Subject: Re: Kingbirds in Lawton
I should make a correction on location.  It was at Elmer Thomas Park in Lawton near the corner of Lake Helen in the park.
There is a Lake Elmer Thomas on the Refuge and Fort Sill.   NOT THERE.
Sorry if any confusion.
CHEERS,                             JOE
On Tuesday, October 22, 2019, 08:54:58 AM CDT, Joe Grzybowski <j_grzybowski...> wrote:

Following up on Facebook report,  there are two TRKI/COKIs at Lake Elmer Thomas in Lawton

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 10/22/19 6:58 am
From: Joe Grzybowski <j_grzybowski...>
Subject: Re: Kingbirds in Lawton
Just called. There are three. All Couch's Kingbirds

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 22, 2019, at 8:54 AM, Joe Grzybowski <j_grzybowski...> wrote:
>
> Following up on Facebook report, there are two TRKI/COKIs at Lake Elmer Thomas in Lawton
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 10/22/19 6:55 am
From: Joe Grzybowski <j_grzybowski...>
Subject: Kingbirds in Lawton
Following up on Facebook report, there are two TRKI/COKIs at Lake Elmer Thomas in Lawton

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 10/21/19 5:56 pm
From: J.B. Tibbits <jeff_osu...>
Subject: LAST REMINDER - FALL OOS MEETING
Hi all,
Last reminder, banquet registration is due at 10:00 pm tonight!

Register online at http://okbirds.org/<http://okbirds.org/>

The Oklahoma Ornithological Society Fall Meeting will be held Friday evening to Sunday noon, October 25-27 on the OU campus in Norman. The online reservation deadline for the banquet is this coming Monday, October 21, 10 PM. Register for the meeting on the OOS website, www.okbirds.org<http://www.okbirds.org/>. To try and obtain a reservation after the deadline, you will need to contact Nadine Varner, <gallinuelofpurple...><mailto:<gallinuelofpurple...> Some extra meals will be ordered for late registrants, but there is no guarantee that one will be available for everyone who might choose to register late.

The OOS Fall Meeting is the yearly technical meeting, but there will also be a Friday night workshop and a Sunday morning field trip. An outline of the schedule is given below (detailed schedule on the OOS website).

Friday Night Citizen Science Workshop

-- Learn about eBird, recording audio in the field and more.

Saturday Morning Keynote Address

-- "Putting data into action: integrated monitoring as a strong foundation for bird conservation", Dr. David Pavlacky, Faculty Affiliate, Dept. of Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Biology, Warner College of Natural Resources, Colorado State University.

Saturday Technical Session

1. Northern Saw-whet Owl migration in Oklahoma: Natural history and capture efficiency. Abbey Ramirez and Mia Revels. Northeastern State University

2. Masked Bobwhite captive breeding and reintroduction. Brittney Tayrien, Don Wolfe and Sarah Harren. George Miksch Sutton Avian Research Center.

3. Distribution of the Rufous-crowned Sparrow along the Phroso Breeding Bird Survey Route, Major County, OK: Response to land cover change as a result of wildfire. Zachary A. Poland and Pete Janzen.

4. Social networking of wintering Chestnut-collared Longspurs in Oklahoma's grassland. Nuwanthika Perera, John Muller and Jeremy Ross. University of Oklahoma.

5. Distribution and phylogenetic relationships of the Andean Wood Wren. Luis Enrique Cueto Aparicio and Jeremy Ross. University of Oklahoma.

6. Insights from a plumage aberration on wintering ground movements of Painted Buntings. Elizabeth Besozzi and Andrea Contina. University of Oklahoma.

7. Status of Lesser and Greater Prairie-chickens in Oklahoma. Brett Cooper. University of Oklahoma

8. Black-capped Vireo movements during the post-breeding period in Oklahoma. Paula Cimprich. University of Oklahoma

9. 2019 Oklahoma Birder Survey. Jeff Tibbits. Oklahoma Land Access Program, Oklahoma Dept. of Wildlife Conservation.

10. Higher noise levels increased parental investment and nestling stress in Eastern Bluebirds. Meelyn M. Pandit, D. Proppe, A. Moreno, J. Ruyle, J. Willheim and E. S. Bridge. University of Oklahoma.

11. Habitat associations and distributions of Oklahoma's wintering longspurs. John A. Muller, Gamage "Nu" Perera and Jeremy Ross. University of Oklahoma.

12. Poster Session

Saturday Meetings

-- OOS Quarterly Executive Board Meeting
-- OOS Annual Business Meeting

Saturday Evening Banquet Speaker's Presentation

-- "Studying speciation using hybrid zones: a case study with seasonal migration", Dr. Kira Delmore, Principal Investigator, Delmore Lab, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology degree program, Dept. of Biology, Texas A&M University.

Sunday Morning Field Trip

-- Local parks, trails and lakes in the Norman area. To be led by Norman resident and expert birder, Nathan Kuhnert.

Sincerely,
Jeff Tibbits
President-elect


 

Back to top
Date: 10/19/19 2:29 pm
From: J.B. Tibbits <jeff_osu...>
Subject: 2019 FALL OOS MEETING - MON OCT 21 REGISTRATION DEADLINE
Hello all!

The deadline for online registration for the 2019 Fall OOS Technical Meeting has been extended to MONDAY, OCT 21 (10:00 pm)

You can register online at http://okbirds.org/

Please note: We have switched rooms for Friday night and Saturday to Adams 255 (same building).

We have a great schedule of events lined up, including:

* Friday Night Citizen Science Workshop
* Learn about eBird, recording audio in the field, and more

* 2 Keynote Speakers on Saturday
* Dr. David Pavlacky: "Putting data into action: integrated monitoring as a strong foundation for bird conservation" (Saturday morning)
* Dr. Kira Delmore: "Studying speciation using hybrid zones; a case study with seasonal migration" (Saturday evening banquet)

* 11 Technical Session Presentations on topics including:
* Northern Saw-whew Owl
* Masked Bobwhite Reintroduction
* Distribution of Rufous-Crowned Sparrow
* Longspur research
* Distribution of Andead Wood Wren
* Painted Bunting migration
* Status of Prairie-chickens in Oklahoma
* Black-capped Vireo movement
* Results from 2019 OK Birder Survey
* Nesting Eastern Bluebird and noise levels

* Poster Session

* Sunday Morning field trip, led by Nathan Kuhnert
* Great for birders of all skill levels
* Locations in Norman area

Please join us for a great weekend of birding, education, and

Best regards,
Jeff Tibbits
President-elect




 

Back to top
Date: 10/19/19 1:25 pm
From: Sharon Henthorn <shenthorn205...>
Subject: Scissortails; crayfish
I've found a wealth of scissortails today in the one location that I've seen
them lately. I saw seven of them dancing around between fence wires and
telephone lines on SW 15th St just west of MacArthur on the way to Crystal
Lake. All had full color and full tail feathers, and seemed to be all
males.



For those of you that I haven't shown yet, I have photographic evidence of
crayfish crossing the gravel road at Sara Rd and NW 63rd from about two
months ago. I counted at least six of them crossing, and each seemed to be
headed from the inside corner waterways toward the outside flooded fields.
I was puzzled, so I googled the question. Apparently crayfish will search
for less crowded waters where more food might be found when they see the
need.



Today I decided to check out the bike trail south and east of Crystal Lake
for birding. It took me about an hour for the round trip. I walked the
bike trail south of 15th toward the east and under the river bridge for
about a half hour until the bike trail crossed the street again about half
the way to Meridian. I returned by way of the paved road and all the way to
the intersection at MacArthur, about two blocks north of the bridge. Good
variety of woods, grasses, river dredging equipment, concrete fill. Only
traffic was bicycles.

The highlight birds were the scissortails and a kingfisher hovering over the
river. A few birds heard and seen, but not many. It'll be easier when the
leaves fall. Worth checking it out later in the season.



Sharon Henthorn






 

Back to top
Date: 10/18/19 5:46 am
From: Thompson, David M. (HSC) <David-Thompson...>
Subject: Sandhill Cranes at WMWR
Wednesday around 6 PM, south of Caddo Lake in the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge, I saw a flight of Sandhills headed south. I hung around the refuge most of Thursday, but didn't see other groups. However, Thursday was windier and it would have been harder to hear them and know where to scan the skies.

Dave Thompson

 

Back to top
Date: 10/16/19 11:42 am
From: Richrd Gunn <richardgunn1940...>
Subject: Weird Crow
Leaving my neighborhood just west of Loyd Noble Center in Norman this
morning, I saw a couple of crowlike birds one of which looked decidedly
magpie-like. With lots of white on the wings.Closer examination showed it
to be a American ?(there have been some Fish Crows nesting in the
neighborhood) Crow with large patches of white on its wings and tail. A
distinctive bird, it would be interesting to see if anyone else sees it
around Norman.
D.

 

Back to top
Date: 10/16/19 11:16 am
From: Kurt Meisenzahl <meisenzk...>
Subject: Re: White Throat
Two White throated Sparrows, a Song Sparrow and 3 Spotted Towhees in our yard this morning.

Kurt & Sharon Meisenzahl
Lawton, OK

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 16, 2019, at 12:30 PM, Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...> wrote:
>
> First white throat of season at feeder today.
> Bob Laval
> Heavener
>
> Sent from my iPad
 

Back to top
Date: 10/16/19 10:34 am
From: Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...>
Subject: White Throat
First white throat of season at feeder today.
Bob Laval
Heavener

Sent from my iPad
 

Back to top
Date: 10/16/19 6:53 am
From: Larry Mays <larrymays1949...>
Subject: Re: Midwest City Big Sit on Wednesday 16th
...after the dentists.:(Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.
-------- Original message --------From: Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...> Date: 10/15/19 6:12 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <OKBIRDS...> Subject: [OKBIRDS] Midwest City Big Sit on Wednesday 16th                Come join us on the Big Sit tomorrow from 9AM to 5PM. Bring a chair and any select food and drink you want.               Please bring enough to share. I will provide some light snacks, drinks, and a lunch course of chili.               Also bring your binoculars, bird books and scope if you want.                Please let me know if you plan to attend either by email, <j.woodard...> or call 405-365-5685.                Jimmy               7845 NE 18th St.               Midwest City, OK
 

Back to top
Date: 10/16/19 6:05 am
From: Susie Ruby <seruby...>
Subject: crow migration
I had the thrill of observing Am Crow migration 10/15/19 as the cold front moved in. Between 2 and 3 pm I estimated 500 Am Crow flying SSW along the leading edge of the front. I went inside thinking the show was over. Shortly thereafter I went back out and had the thrill of some 7500 AMCR flying over. Nearly froze standing in shorts in the now arrived cold front. I counted as they crossed behind our power pole. The power pole was a good marker. They went through in loose flocks of 20-100.  My question is, "where are they going?" Sperry, Oklahoma

Susie Ruby,  MS Artist/Naturalist Scissortail Fine Arts Studio <scissortailfinearts46...> <seruby...> 
"To keep every cog and wheel is the first precaution of intelligent tinkering.”--Aldo Leopold.

 

Back to top
Date: 10/15/19 5:39 pm
From: Devin Bosler <devinbosler...>
Subject: late Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - Edmond, Oklahoma Co.
Hi OK Birders,

My townhome/ condominium complex here off Memorial Rd. in Edmond is still hosting a late juvenile YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON at our drainage ditch/ creek. I haven’t seen it for about one week until this evening again. This is now the latest fall season departure date that I have for the species in the metro area.

Cheers,
Devin Bosler
Edmond, OK
 

Back to top
Date: 10/15/19 3:31 pm
From: Larry Mays <larrymays1949...>
Subject: Re: Midwest City Big Sit on Wednesday 16th
Yaaz, I will drop by for a bit. Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.
-------- Original message --------From: Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...> Date: 10/15/19 6:12 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <OKBIRDS...> Subject: [OKBIRDS] Midwest City Big Sit on Wednesday 16th                Come join us on the Big Sit tomorrow from 9AM to 5PM. Bring a chair and any select food and drink you want.               Please bring enough to share. I will provide some light snacks, drinks, and a lunch course of chili.               Also bring your binoculars, bird books and scope if you want.                Please let me know if you plan to attend either by email, <j.woodard...> or call 405-365-5685.                Jimmy               7845 NE 18th St.               Midwest City, OK
 

Back to top
Date: 10/15/19 9:56 am
From: J.B. Tibbits <jeff_osu...>
Subject: 2019 OOS Fall Technical Meeting
Hello all!

Reminder that the registration deadline for banquet dinner is October 18.

The Oklahoma Ornithological Society Fall 2019 Meeting will be held October 25-27 at the University of Oklahoma in Norman. Registration is available on the OOS webpage<http://okbirds.org/>, and mail-in registration materials will also be included in the fall newsletter.

Full announcement and agenda: http://okbirds.org/2019_OOS_Fall_Meeting.pdf

The Saturday morning keynote address will be given by Dr. David Pavlacky of the Bird Conservancy of the Rockies and is entitled Putting data into action: integrated monitoring as a strong foundation for bird conservation. The Saturday night banquet keynote address will be given by Dr. Kira Delmore of Texas A&M and is entitled Studying speciation using hybrid zones; a case study with seasonal migration.

The Fall Meeting is the technical meeting. Presentations on avian field studies and scientific research from all across the state will be given at the meeting. Non-members are welcome to attend.

To inquire about presenting or to reserve a slot, please contact:
Jeff Tibbits
President Elect
<jeff.tibbits...>


 

Back to top
Date: 10/15/19 9:45 am
From: J.B. Tibbits <jeff_osu...>
Subject: OOS Call for Presentations
Hello,

Please plan to join us for the Oklahoma Ornithological Society fall meeting at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, October 25-27.

The agenda can be found online at this link<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__okbirds.org_2019-5FOOS-5FFall-5FMeeting.pdf&d=DwMFAw&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=LILo6wRCYScuhgesYLFWXYtq0wbLj_9Xh9Fn57ImeT8&s=z7cpxgvw8KwgupIzPUsX2F95AdXviNaHRI3wCNaOHI0&e=>. On line registration is available on the OOS website, www.okbirds.org<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.okbirds.org_&d=DwMFAw&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=LILo6wRCYScuhgesYLFWXYtq0wbLj_9Xh9Fn57ImeT8&s=qD2WBkyCRBOraCN0506N2jWGOfQb7SOa-hr6jTH94vk&e=>
.

15 minutes will be scheduled for each technical presentation. The usual format is 12 minutes for the presentation and three minutes for questions. Presented research can be either completed or ongoing.

The period for submission of abstracts is from now until October 18.

Abstracts should be Word files. The following information should be included:

1. Title
2. Name(s) of investigator(s) and any advisor(s)
3. Name of the sponsoring organization, college or university
4. One or more email addresses for follow up contacts
5. Body of the abstract, 250 words or less

A compilation of the abstracts will be available to attendees at the Technical Session. The compilation will also be posted on the OOS website.

The meeting registration fee is waived for speakers at this event.

A poster session will follow the presentations. Register for the poster session using the abstract format above except include POSTER at the top of the page.

Email abstracts to: <jeff.tibbits...><mailto:<jeff.tibbits...> Direct any questions to the same.

We hope you can participate in this year's event.

Sincerely Yours,

The Oklahoma Ornithological Society

Jeff Tibbits, President Elect


 

Back to top
Date: 10/15/19 4:13 am
From: Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...>
Subject: Midwest City Big Sit on Wednesday 16th
Come join us on the Big Sit tomorrow from 9AM to 5PM. Bring a
chair and any select food and drink you want.

Please bring enough to share. I will provide some light
snacks, drinks, and a lunch course of chili.

Also bring your binoculars, bird books and scope if you want.


Please let me know if you plan to attend either by email,
<j.woodard...> or call 405-365-5685.



Jimmy

7845 NE 18th St.

Midwest City, OK


 

Back to top
Date: 10/12/19 7:48 am
From: Peggie Mitchell <00000005c088321b-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: OKBIRDS Digest - 10 Oct 2019 to 11 Oct 2019 (#2019-243)



-----Original Message-----
From: OKBIRDS automatic digest system <LISTSERV...>
To: OKBIRDS <OKBIRDS...>
Sent: Fri, Oct 11, 2019 11:52 PM
Subject: OKBIRDS Digest - 10 Oct 2019 to 11 Oct 2019 (#2019-243)


There are 2 messages totaling 110 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

  1. The Human Dimension of Birdwatchers
  2. Slightly off topic

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 11 Oct 2019 11:08:48 -0500
From:    Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: The Human Dimension of Birdwatchers

Some interesting insight into birders, why they do it and their interest and support. Insight for wildlife managers into how to meet birders wants and needs. For those with a Facebook attention  span, this presentation is longer than 20 seconds.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR


https://tws.sclivelearningcenter.com/MVSite/MVVideo.aspx?SessionID=2395

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 11 Oct 2019 16:50:18 +0000
From:    "Curtis, Tom" <tom.curtis...>
Subject: Slightly off topic

For any OK birders who may wish to bird overseas, check out the you tube "videos for cats".  A number of them involve "birdcams" aimed at backyard feeders in Great Britain and other places in Europe.  They provide an opportunity to hone your ID skills (at least for the more common backyard birds) for European spp.  One of the nice things is that you can pause and back up if you need more time.  There also is a web site called viewbirds.com with live feeds, but they are pretty hit and miss for activity.

Have fun,
Tom Curtis

------------------------------

End of OKBIRDS Digest - 10 Oct 2019 to 11 Oct 2019 (#2019-243)
**************************************************************
 

Back to top
Date: 10/11/19 9:51 am
From: Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...>
Subject: Slightly off topic
For any OK birders who may wish to bird overseas, check out the you tube "videos for cats". A number of them involve "birdcams" aimed at backyard feeders in Great Britain and other places in Europe. They provide an opportunity to hone your ID skills (at least for the more common backyard birds) for European spp. One of the nice things is that you can pause and back up if you need more time. There also is a web site called viewbirds.com with live feeds, but they are pretty hit and miss for activity.

Have fun,
Tom Curtis

 

Back to top
Date: 10/10/19 5:36 am
From: Ernie <elsabbado...>
Subject: Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - Oct. 9
Wished I could have been there with you

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 9, 2019, at 11:55 PM, David Arbour <arbour...> wrote:
>
> 
> Steve Metz, Kevin Flanagan, and I surveyed birds today at Red Slough and found 51 species. It was partly cloudy and mild, with a little wind. Wader numbers have sharply declined. Gallinule numbers are way down too. A few winter birds are showing up now. Here is our list from today:
>
> Black-bellied Whistling Duck – ~150
> Greater White-fronted Goose - 6
> Wood Duck – 65
> Blue-winged Teal - ~95
> Northern Shoveler – 5
> Wild Turkey - 1
> Pied-billed Grebe – 9
> Neotropic Cormorant – 6
> Double-crested Cormorant - 2
> Anhinga – 4
> Great-blue Heron - 5
> Great Egret – 5
> Snowy Egret – 7
> Little-blue Heron – 4
> Cattle Egret – 14
> White Ibis – 14
> Dark Ibis species - 1
> Black Vulture – 12
> Turkey Vulture – 30
> Red-shouldered Hawk – 3
> American Kestrel - 1
> Purple Gallinule – 5
> Common Gallinule – 21
> American Coot – 41
> Mourning Dove - 5
> Chimney Swift - 5
> Belted Kingfisher – 4
> Red-bellied Woodpecker - 5
> Downy Woodpecker – 1
> Hairy Woodpecker – 2
> Northern Flicker - 5
> Pileated Woodpecker - 3
> Eastern Phoebe – 10
> White-eyed Vireo – 1
> Blue Jay - 12
> American Crow – 8
> Tree Swallow - 2
> Carolina Chickadee – 4
> Tufted Titmouse - 1
> Carolina Wren – 6
> Marsh Wren – 5
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 1
> Gray Catbird – 3
> Northern Mockingbird – 2
> Brown Thrasher – 14
> Yellow-rumped Warbler - 1
> Common Yellowthroat – 6
> Swamp Sparrow - 2
> Northern Cardinal – 12
> Indigo Bunting – 19
> Red-winged Blackbird – 22
>
>
> Odonates:
>
> Fragile Forktail
> Common Green Darner
> Eastern Pondhawk
> Twelve-spotted Skimmer
> Little-blue Dragonlet
> Eastern Amberwing
> Hyacinth Glider
> Wandering Glider
> Red Saddlebags
> Black Saddlebags
>
> Herps:
>
> American Alligator
> Broad-banded Watersnake
> Western Cottonmouth (two neck fighting.)
> Broad-headed Skink
> Little Brown Skink
> Spotted Salamander
> Blanchard’s Cricket Frog
> Southern Leopard Frog
>
> Good birding!
>
> David Arbour
> De Queen, AR
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 10/10/19 4:27 am
From: Richrd Gunn <richardgunn1940...>
Subject: strange behavior
Yesterday morning, I saw two deer, possibly a mother and half grown fawn,
feeding on a fresh cut hay field. There were several American crows
scattered across the field as well and one crow took issue with the younger
deer and hazed for 30 seconds or so. The bird flew at the deer and tried to
peck it. The deer scampered out of the way but the bird persisted and
chased it just out of pure cussedness. There was lots of hayfield to share
and no apparent reason for this "attack."
Several years ago, in Texas I saw a flock of turkeys chase a couple of
two-year old Whitetail bucks off a corn feeder. There at least there was a
finite resource to compete for. Nature's hierarchy never ceases to amaze me.
D.

 

Back to top
Date: 10/10/19 4:13 am
From: Richrd Gunn <richardgunn1940...>
Subject: Scary but interesting
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/10/climate/state-birds-climate-change.html?action=click&module=Top%20Stories&pgtype=Homepage

 

Back to top
Date: 10/9/19 9:42 am
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...>
Subject: Pathfinder Parkway on 10-9-2019.
Hello All,
Hal Yokum and I walked the Pathfinder Parkway in Bartlesville this morning from the high school to the tanks and back. It was cloudy and cool with occasional showers. Highlights included:

Yellow-billed Cuckoo-1
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker-1
Blue-headed Vireo-2
Ruby-crowned Kinglet-3
Nashville Warbler-3
Magnolia Warbler-1
Black-throated Green Warbler-3
White-throated Sparrow-3

Mark Peterson
Bartlesville

 

Back to top
Date: 10/8/19 5:41 pm
From: Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...>
Subject: Re: Pine Siskin
Thanks, I hope to see you about 8AM. Hal

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 8, 2019, at 7:24 PM, Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...> wrote:
>
> 
> I will be there in the morning unless it is raining. I have a little Ford Fiesta.
> From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...>
> Sent: Tuesday, October 8, 2019 3:06 PM
> To: <OKBIRDS...> <OKBIRDS...>
> Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Pine Siskin
>
> Hi Mark,
> I am with the OKC Audubon and decided to come up to Tulsa and Bartlesville to check on migrants.
> Today I am in Tulsa
> Tomorrow I was planning to be at Pathfinders Parkway about 8 AM there at the Hi School south parking lot where there is a trail entrance. If you go down there to morning look for me- Hal Yocum. I drive a white Hyundai Santa Fe sport. If sunny I wear a straw hat . If really cold a brown and tan baseball cap. Black
> OU Medicine fleece.
> I walked it a couple times before, but never in fall migrant time.
> Thanks , Hal Yocum ( Edmond)
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>>> On Oct 8, 2019, at 11:45 AM, Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...> wrote:
>>>
>> 
>> Hello All,
>> I heard a pine siskin calling as it flew over while I was on the Pathfinder Parkway in Bartlesville this morning. I also saw a yellow-bellied sapsucker and a white-throated sparrow. It was in the mid-40's in Bartlesville this morning.
>>
>> Mark Peterson
>> Bartlesville

 

Back to top
Date: 10/8/19 5:25 pm
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...>
Subject: Re: Pine Siskin
I will be there in the morning unless it is raining. I have a little Ford Fiesta.
________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...>
Sent: Tuesday, October 8, 2019 3:06 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...> <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Pine Siskin

Hi Mark,
I am with the OKC Audubon and decided to come up to Tulsa and Bartlesville to check on migrants.
Today I am in Tulsa
Tomorrow I was planning to be at Pathfinders Parkway about 8 AM there at the Hi School south parking lot where there is a trail entrance. If you go down there to morning look for me- Hal Yocum. I drive a white Hyundai Santa Fe sport. If sunny I wear a straw hat . If really cold a brown and tan baseball cap. Black
OU Medicine fleece.
I walked it a couple times before, but never in fall migrant time.
Thanks , Hal Yocum ( Edmond)

Sent from my iPhone

On Oct 8, 2019, at 11:45 AM, Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...> wrote:


Hello All,
I heard a pine siskin calling as it flew over while I was on the Pathfinder Parkway in Bartlesville this morning. I also saw a yellow-bellied sapsucker and a white-throated sparrow. It was in the mid-40's in Bartlesville this morning.

Mark Peterson
Bartlesville
 

Back to top
Date: 10/8/19 5:05 pm
From: Braden Farris <000000ce876b119d-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Stars and Stripes Park, Lake Hefner OKC Report
Hello all,

This evening I checked out Stars and Stripes Park on Lake Hefner and was pleased to see a variety of duck species. All of the ducks observed were on the east side of the flagpole, except for the Hooded Merganser which was directly on line with it.

1 Hooded Merganser (female observed diving and came up with a crayfish which it ate)

1 Redhead (female)

1 Gadwall (male)

2 Ruddy Ducks (non-breeding male and female)

4 American Widgeon (all breeding colored males)

160 Mallards

100 Canada Geese

85 American Coots

2 Pie Billed Grebes

1 Yellow-crowned Night-Heron

Also the typical birds usually seen here were present.

Thanks

Braden Farris, OKC
 

Back to top
Date: 10/8/19 1:10 pm
From: Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...>
Subject: Re: Pine Siskin
Hi Mark,
I am with the OKC Audubon and decided to come up to Tulsa and Bartlesville to check on migrants.
Today I am in Tulsa
Tomorrow I was planning to be at Pathfinders Parkway about 8 AM there at the Hi School south parking lot where there is a trail entrance. If you go down there to morning look for me- Hal Yocum. I drive a white Hyundai Santa Fe sport. If sunny I wear a straw hat . If really cold a brown and tan baseball cap. Black
OU Medicine fleece.
I walked it a couple times before, but never in fall migrant time.
Thanks , Hal Yocum ( Edmond)

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 8, 2019, at 11:45 AM, Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...> wrote:
>
> 
> Hello All,
> I heard a pine siskin calling as it flew over while I was on the Pathfinder Parkway in Bartlesville this morning. I also saw a yellow-bellied sapsucker and a white-throated sparrow. It was in the mid-40's in Bartlesville this morning.
>
> Mark Peterson
> Bartlesville

 

Back to top
Date: 10/8/19 10:43 am
From: J.B. Tibbits <jeff_osu...>
Subject: OOS - Call for presentations
Hello,

Please plan to join us for the Oklahoma Ornithological Society fall meeting at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, October 25-27.

The agenda can be found online at this link<http://okbirds.org/2019_OOS_Fall_Meeting.pdf>. On line registration is available on the OOS website, www.okbirds.org<http://www.okbirds.org/>
.

15 minutes will be scheduled for each technical presentation. The usual format is 12 minutes for the presentation and three minutes for questions. Presented research can be either completed or ongoing.

The period for submission of abstracts is from now until October 18.

Abstracts should be Word files. The following information should be included:

1. Title
2. Name(s) of investigator(s) and any advisor(s)
3. Name of the sponsoring organization, college or university
4. One or more email addresses for follow up contacts
5. Body of the abstract, 250 words or less

A compilation of the abstracts will be available to attendees at the Technical Session. The compilation will also be posted on the OOS website.

The meeting registration fee is waived for speakers at this event.

A poster session will follow the presentations. Register for the poster session using the abstract format above except include POSTER at the top of the page.

Email abstracts to: <jeff.tibbits...><mailto:<jeff.tibbits...> Direct any questions to the same.

We hope you can participate in this year's event.

Sincerely Yours,

The Oklahoma Ornithological Society

Jeff Tibbits, President Elect


 

Back to top
Date: 10/8/19 9:46 am
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...>
Subject: Pine Siskin
Hello All,
I heard a pine siskin calling as it flew over while I was on the Pathfinder Parkway in Bartlesville this morning. I also saw a yellow-bellied sapsucker and a white-throated sparrow. It was in the mid-40's in Bartlesville this morning.

Mark Peterson
Bartlesville

 

Back to top
Date: 10/8/19 4:08 am
From: Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...>
Subject: Midwest City Big Sit postponed to Wed Oct 16th
I am postponing the Big Sit to Wednesday October 16th. I will
be

attending the funeral for Max Fuller this Thursday the 10th, the

original big sit day.

Also, the forecast is for heavy rain and storms for Thursday so
that is

another reason to move the event.

Sorry for any difficulties this may cause the attendees.



Jimmy Woodard

Midwest City


 

Back to top
Date: 10/7/19 4:40 pm
From: Kurt Meisenzahl <meisenzk...>
Subject: Re: Max Fuller passes away
Jimmy,

Good memories birdied Hackberry with you, Max and Nealand. He was one of the good guys.

Kurt

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 6, 2019, at 8:38 PM, JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski...> wrote:
>
> Sorry to hear.
> Have not seen him for a while, but remember him in the light in which you portray him.
>
> JOE
>
> On Sunday, October 6, 2019, 05:46:51 PM CDT, Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...> wrote:
>
>
> A long time Okie birder, Max Fuller of El Reno, has passed away.
>
> Max got into birding late in life after he retired from the railroad.
>
>
>
> He, Nealand Hill(deceased), Jerry Vanbebber and I went on many a
>
> bird chase at the drop of a hat. We also took many birding trips to
>
> TX, FL, AZ, NM, CO, SD, ND, MN, MI, VT, NH, ME and many other
>
> places in OK and closer to home.
>
>
>
> Max was the kind of guy who would give someone the shirt off his
>
> back. Also, he did want to owe anyone or feel beholden in any way.
>
>
>
> I remember one trip where he owed me $57.50 for his part of the
>
> room bill. I told him $50 or $55 was good enough. Nope. He paid me
>
> $60 and wouldn’t take back his change. That’s the kind of guy he was.
>
>
>
> As good a birding pal as he was, he was an even better friend. I will
>
> miss you Max.
>
>
>
> Jimmy Woodard
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 10/7/19 6:27 am
From: Terry Mitchell <terry...>
Subject: Re: Max Fuller passes away
I to went on a few trips with Max. One trip Max and I spent a week in the
spring touring the state. It was one of my most enjoyable trips I had in a
long time. We were on the road right next to Black Mesa and a Golden Eagle
started circling right over our heads for several minutes and when it
finally drifted off Max looked at me and said "that's why I out here
birding". I wish I had seen him more in the last few years, goodbye my
friend.


Terry Mitchell


On Sun, Oct 6, 2019 at 5:47 PM Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...> wrote:

> A long time Okie birder, Max Fuller of El Reno, has passed
> away.
>
> Max got into birding late in life after he retired from the
> railroad.
>
>
>
> He, Nealand Hill(deceased), Jerry Vanbebber and I went on many a
>
> bird chase at the drop of a hat. We also took many birding trips
> to
>
> TX, FL, AZ, NM, CO, SD, ND, MN, MI, VT, NH, ME and many other
>
> places in OK and closer to home.
>
>
>
> Max was the kind of guy who would give someone the shirt off his
>
> back. Also, he did want to owe anyone or feel beholden in any way.
>
>
>
> I remember one trip where he owed me $57.50 for his part of the
>
> room bill. I told him $50 or $55 was good enough. Nope. He paid me
>
> $60 and wouldn’t take back his change. That’s the kind of guy he
> was.
>
>
>
> As good a birding pal as he was, he was an even better friend. I
> will
>
> miss you Max.
>
>
>
> Jimmy Woodard
>
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 10/6/19 6:50 pm
From: Jan Dolph <russetdm...>
Subject: Re: Black-oil sunflower seeds
I have been buying 20 pound bag of sunflower hearts from Tractor Supply. They are fresh and are large. I was tired of cleaning up the shells for the last 35 years. Don’t buy the hearts or sunflower seeds from Walmart. My birds wouldn’t eat them half the time. I did some research and found one company supplies all the places. Their less quality seeds go to Walmart. I use to buy from Bethany Feed Store regular sunflower seeds. But, the quality has gone down. Home Depot sunflower hearts are good. Still the same supplier. Just a different label. I actually talked to the owner. She told me all the retail stores they supplied. I hope this helps.

Happy birding,
Jan Dolph
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma


> On Oct 6, 2019, at 3:30 PM, Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...> wrote:
>
> I have found Atwood’s price to be about average unless on sale but they have only 40 lb. bags. I get 50 lb. bags from the farmers coop for around $20.
> Bob Laval
> Heavener
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>> On Oct 6, 2019, at 3:14 PM, John Shackford <johnshackford...> wrote:
>>
>> Where in OKC (or nearby) is a good place to buy cheap black-oil sunflower seeds?
>>
>> John Shackford
 

Back to top
Date: 10/6/19 6:39 pm
From: JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski...>
Subject: Re: Max Fuller passes away
Sorry to hear.  Have not seen him for a while, but remember him in the light in which you portray him.
JOE
On Sunday, October 6, 2019, 05:46:51 PM CDT, Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...> wrote:

<!--#yiv2449523014 _filtered #yiv2449523014 {font-family:"Cambria Math";panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4;} _filtered #yiv2449523014 {font-family:Calibri;panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;} _filtered #yiv2449523014 {font-family:"Bodoni MT Black";panose-1:2 7 10 3 8 6 6 2 2 3;}#yiv2449523014 #yiv2449523014 p.yiv2449523014MsoNormal, #yiv2449523014 li.yiv2449523014MsoNormal, #yiv2449523014 div.yiv2449523014MsoNormal {margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri", "sans-serif";}#yiv2449523014 a:link, #yiv2449523014 span.yiv2449523014MsoHyperlink {color:blue;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv2449523014 a:visited, #yiv2449523014 span.yiv2449523014MsoHyperlinkFollowed {color:purple;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv2449523014 span.yiv2449523014EmailStyle17 {font-family:"Calibri", "sans-serif";color:windowtext;}#yiv2449523014 .yiv2449523014MsoChpDefault {} _filtered #yiv2449523014 {margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}#yiv2449523014 div.yiv2449523014WordSection1 {}-->
               A long time Okie birder, Max Fuller of El Reno, has passed away.

         Max got into birding late in life after he retired from the railroad.

 

         He, Nealand Hill(deceased), Jerry Vanbebber and I went on many a

         bird chase at the drop of a hat. We also took many birding trips to

         TX, FL, AZ, NM, CO, SD, ND, MN, MI, VT, NH, ME and many other

         places in OK and closer to home.

 

         Max was the kind of guy who would give someone the shirt off his

         back. Also, he did want to owe anyone or feel beholden in any way.

 

         I remember one trip where he owed me $57.50 for his part of the

         room bill. I told him $50 or $55 was good enough. Nope. He paid me

         $60 and wouldn’t take back his change. That’s the kind of guy he was.

 

         As good a birding pal as he was, he was an even better friend. I will

         miss you Max.

 

         Jimmy Woodard

 

        

 

Back to top
Date: 10/6/19 6:18 pm
From: John Shackford <johnshackford...>
Subject: Sunflower seeds
Thanks for the tips on sunflower seeds. It helped me solve a problem!

John Shackford
 

Back to top
Date: 10/6/19 6:16 pm
From: John Shackford <johnshackford...>
Subject: Sunflower seeds
Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 10/6/19 3:47 pm
From: Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...>
Subject: Max Fuller passes away
A long time Okie birder, Max Fuller of El Reno, has passed
away.

Max got into birding late in life after he retired from the
railroad.



He, Nealand Hill(deceased), Jerry Vanbebber and I went on many a

bird chase at the drop of a hat. We also took many birding trips to

TX, FL, AZ, NM, CO, SD, ND, MN, MI, VT, NH, ME and many other

places in OK and closer to home.



Max was the kind of guy who would give someone the shirt off his

back. Also, he did want to owe anyone or feel beholden in any way.



I remember one trip where he owed me $57.50 for his part of the

room bill. I told him $50 or $55 was good enough. Nope. He paid me

$60 and wouldn't take back his change. That's the kind of guy he
was.



As good a birding pal as he was, he was an even better friend. I
will

miss you Max.



Jimmy Woodard






 

Back to top
Date: 10/6/19 1:30 pm
From: Bob And Nancy <blnllaval...>
Subject: Re: Black-oil sunflower seeds
I have found Atwood’s price to be about average unless on sale but they have only 40 lb. bags. I get 50 lb. bags from the farmers coop for around $20.
Bob Laval
Heavener

Sent from my iPad

> On Oct 6, 2019, at 3:14 PM, John Shackford <johnshackford...> wrote:
>
> Where in OKC (or nearby) is a good place to buy cheap black-oil sunflower seeds?
>
> John Shackford
 

Back to top
Date: 10/6/19 1:15 pm
From: John Shackford <johnshackford...>
Subject: Black-oil sunflower seeds
Where in OKC (or nearby) is a good place to buy cheap black-oil sunflower seeds?

John Shackford
 

Back to top
Date: 10/6/19 10:54 am
From: Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...>
Subject: snow geese
Just had my first large flock of snow geese for the fall fly over Keystone Lake.

Have fin,
To Curtis

 

Back to top
Date: 10/6/19 8:04 am
From: Jim Arterburn <JIMARTERBURN...>
Subject: Photos from late September added to my PBase website
OKBirds,

I have added some photos of juvenile/first-winter Forster's Terns and
Common Tern in flight showing the similarity between the two species. I
have also added a few photos of juvenile Caspian Terns including one
with an open mouth begging call when he saw one of the parents land with
food. Also included are photos of a third-cycle nonbreeding Laughing
Gull as well as a first-cycle Laughing Gull that have been present at
Taylor Ferry North on Ft. Gibson Lake since early August, a juvenile
Ring-billed Gull still in mostly juvenile plumage as of 10/04 and
Franklin's Gulls. I have also added a couple more photos of the Mountain
Plover from September 25 & 27. I relocated the bird about three quarters
of a mile (two fields) due west of its first location. Also included are
photos of American Golden-Plover, Black-bellied Plover, Buff-breasted
Sandpiper, Long-billed Dowitcher, Solitary Sandpiper, Red-necked
Phalarope, Marbled Godwit and American Avocet. I have also added a few
photos of the most beautiful juvenile Pectoral Sandpiper that I have
ever seen. I have also added some comparison photos of Glossy Ibis and
White-faced Ibis adults in winter plumage. For land birds I have added
photos of Northern Flicker, Blue Grosbeak, Indigo Bunting, Carolina
Chickadee and Wilson's Warbler among others.

These photos can be seen at top of the link below.

https://pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds


 

Back to top
Date: 10/4/19 6:27 pm
From: Judy Basham <judybasham...>
Subject: Re: Birds Need Your Leaves
Thanks, Jerry, for the reminder and information.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 4, 2019, at 9:19 AM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:
>
>
> Birds Need Your Leaves
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> October 3, 2019
> The Flash Drought has started the leaves falling earlier than normal. But I suppose with drought 8 of the last 9 years it is difficult to remember what normal is and this may be the new normal. This is not the time to get out the rake and leaf blower and start removing your leaves. It is time to leave your leaves for birds, other wildlife and plants until next Spring when you can mulch them under the mower. The tree nutrients are tied up in the leaves and leaving and mulching them later helps soil fertility and benefits wildlife. Also skip the last mowing so winter birds have seed heads and habitat for the winter.
> Those that observe birds in the Fall and Winter have notice the American Robin, Common Grackles, Blackbirds and other species flipping leaves in the yard. The American Robin flipping leaves at a speed faster than 1/100 of a second may not be as noticeable as the waves of winter grackles and blackbirds foraging like a moving black army rolling across the landscape. When one area is searched they fly over other birds to the front for a new area to search for insects and other invertebrate.
> Leaves on the grass surface provides a hiding place for insects and invertebrates like beetles, earthworms and millipedes. Leaves provide insulation and a place to hide and helps them survive in winter. They keep moisture at the top for earthworms to stay closer to the surface. Leaves help retain soil moisture for grasses for root development in winter and an early response when growing season arrives.
> It is difficult for birds to find insects and invertebrates to survive in winter. Having a leaf cover improves their odds of finding invertebrates that hide under the security of leaves. This is the best way to bank food for birds. Leaves also provide habitat for amphibians like toads, frogs, salamanders and reptiles like lizards and box turtles. In my yard I have found box turtles burrowed under leaves in winter. Leaf litter also hides and provides food for these as well.
> Some may have a well manicured yard and cringe at the thought of having leaves on your lawn - “what will the neighbors think”? If they do not know why you are leaving your leaves, it is an opportunity for educating them. Yes, I have heard about the rabid Home Owners Associations and they do not care that we are losing 4% of our birds per year and 40% fewer birds cross the Gulf than crossed just 10 years ago. It is time to educated them also but many will remain indifferent to these losses. Those that feel insecure in leaving leaves on the front yard, at least try adjust your mental mindset and leave them in the backyard where it is less obvious.
> Yes some have heard the horror stories about leaving leaves on your lawn. Lawn service businesses want to perpetuate this fear. I have not had a problem leaving leaves for 40 years. My leaves are on the lawn just as they fall but winter winds keeps them from piling and compacting. I never use fertilizer, mulch or water fir my grass. My lawn is for the birds and other wildlife.
> According to the National Wildlife Federation Naturalist David Mizejewski, fallen leaves offer a double benefit. “Leaves form a natural mulch that helps suppress weeds and fertilizes the soil as it breaks down. Why spend money of fertilizer and mulch when you already have your own”?
> Birds need the whole leaves through the Fall and Winter. You can mow and mulch them in the Spring. So consider overcoming your anxieties about leaving the leaves on your lawn for the birds, other wildlife, invertebrates, and plants. Find something else to do like go birding with all the days you save not raking, blowing, mulching, bagging and hauling leaves to the compost pile or dump. Leaves are for the birds.
> The photo is an American Robin is flipping leaves in my yard looking for earthworms, insects and other invertebrates. The white is melting snow. This picture and article is posted on Facebook since pictures cannot be included on the bird list serve.

 

Back to top
Date: 10/3/19 5:42 pm
From: O Connell, Tim <tim.oconnell...>
Subject: Re: Very late Mississippi Kite, Yellow-crowned Night-Heron, Black Tern - Lake Hefner, OKC
I had 5 here in Stillwater Monday morning. Haven’t seen any since.
~tim


> On Oct 3, 2019, at 7:32 PM, Devin Bosler <devinbosler...> wrote:
>
> **External Email - Please verify sender email address before responding.**
>
> Hi OK Birders,
>
> A 1-hour, post-frontal passage lake-watch from the west side of Lake Hefner (Britton Rd. access) off W. Lake Hefner Dr. this evening, Thursday, 3 October, produced a very late adult-looking MISSISSIPPI KITE kiting over the woodlots to the south of Prairie Dog Point. I had multiple Cooper’s Hawks soaring around the vicinity, and then I was shocked to have a MIKI appear in my spotting scope as I was scanning the southern horizon. My latest-ever fall departure date for Oklahoma.
>
> Also of note out at Lake Hefner were migrant influxes of 19 Pied-billed Grebes, 72 American Coots, 1 late adult YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON (perched up in canopy on south side), 24+ Franklin’s Gulls, 75 Ring-billed Gulls (I had upwards of 65 pre-front), 4 Ospreys, and 1 adult Peregrine Falcon (gliding high overhead going N-S at dusk).
>
> Other migrant landbirds included a small flight of Scissor-tailed Flycatchers (32) and modest movement of American Robins (115) during the latter half of the hour vigil. A couple of Chimney Swifts still hanging on locally.
>
> The cooler temperatures and north winds were much anticipated today. If it wasn’t for work, I would’ve been out birding more today!
>
> Cheers,
> Devin Bosler
> Edmond, OK
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 10/3/19 5:33 pm
From: Devin Bosler <devinbosler...>
Subject: Very late Mississippi Kite, Yellow-crowned Night-Heron, Black Tern - Lake Hefner, OKC
Hi OK Birders,

A 1-hour, post-frontal passage lake-watch from the west side of Lake Hefner (Britton Rd. access) off W. Lake Hefner Dr. this evening, Thursday, 3 October, produced a very late adult-looking MISSISSIPPI KITE kiting over the woodlots to the south of Prairie Dog Point. I had multiple Cooper’s Hawks soaring around the vicinity, and then I was shocked to have a MIKI appear in my spotting scope as I was scanning the southern horizon. My latest-ever fall departure date for Oklahoma.

Also of note out at Lake Hefner were migrant influxes of 19 Pied-billed Grebes, 72 American Coots, 1 late adult YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON (perched up in canopy on south side), 24+ Franklin’s Gulls, 75 Ring-billed Gulls (I had upwards of 65 pre-front), 4 Ospreys, and 1 adult Peregrine Falcon (gliding high overhead going N-S at dusk).

Other migrant landbirds included a small flight of Scissor-tailed Flycatchers (32) and modest movement of American Robins (115) during the latter half of the hour vigil. A couple of Chimney Swifts still hanging on locally.

The cooler temperatures and north winds were much anticipated today. If it wasn’t for work, I would’ve been out birding more today!

Cheers,
Devin Bosler
Edmond, OK



Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 10/3/19 5:12 pm
From: Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...>
Subject: FW: eBird Report - MWC House, Oct 3, 2019
There was a major increase in migrating birds today, especially this afternoon.
Most of the birds reported on the list were seen between 3:30 and 5:30 pm. Many were
coming to the water features in the yard.

Jimmy Woodard
Midwest City, OK


MWC House, Oklahoma, Oklahoma, US
Oct 3, 2019 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Protocol: Stationary
Comments: Scattered observations through out the day.
29 species (+1 other taxa)

Eurasian Collared-Dove 15
White-winged Dove 2
Mourning Dove 10
Turkey Vulture 4
Red-shouldered Hawk 1
Red-tailed Hawk 2
Red-bellied Woodpecker 3
Downy Woodpecker 2
Northern Flicker 4
Eastern Phoebe 2
Blue Jay 14
American Crow 6
Carolina Chickadee 7
Tufted Titmouse 2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 1
Carolina Wren 2
European Starling 4
Gray Catbird 2
Brown Thrasher 2
Northern Mockingbird 3
Eastern Bluebird 2
American Robin 9
House Sparrow 20
House Finch 4
Orchard Oriole 1 one possible fall first year male with a limited amount of blackish feathering on the throat. Greenish yellowish underneath with white wing bars.
Baltimore Oriole 5 one male and four fall male/female types with varying amounts of yellow/green on the underparts. all had white wing bars.
Nashville Warbler 12
warbler sp. (Parulidae sp.) 2
Northern Cardinal 20
Blue Grosbeak 1 one brownish fall female seen up close at the bird bath. large silver gray bill. two buffy wing bars. smaller than the cardinals but bigger than the house sparrows.

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S60321087

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)
 

Back to top
Date: 10/3/19 12:47 pm
From: Poland, Zachary <zpoland...>
Subject: Re: 8 Warbler Species Day- Downtown Tulsa
The most casualties are found at street level across the road to the north. I don’t do as good of a job walking that area as I should.

ZAP

On Oct 3, 2019, at 2:04 PM, NATHAN KUHNERT <nrkuhnert...><mailto:<nrkuhnert...>> wrote:

**External Email - Please verify sender email address before responding.**
Impressive! Any casualties? R u already noticing a difference in warblers between Tulsa and OKC?

On Thursday, October 3, 2019, 1:24:32 PM CDT, Poland, Zachary <zpoland...><mailto:<zpoland...>> wrote:


At Williams Green today in downtown Tulsa, I had 8 warbler species. A very good flight with the front last night. Warbler species I found are below along with a link to my eBird checklist.

BAWW
OCWA
COYE
AMRE
YEWA
CSWA
YRWA


https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S60313959<https://nam04.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Furldefense.proofpoint.com%2Fv2%2Furl%3Fu%3Dhttps-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S60313959%26d%3DDwMGaQ%26c%3DqKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk%26r%3DWtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0%26m%3DZopiOJhWTzOX8ADMH0yC_gUEQhTDyehUQbW7W4b5fGA%26s%3D6P54E5OJSWhu65yU0ZJABvQ-yvHOeTdGd_Q0dcG6bR0%26e%3D&data=02%7C01%<7Czpoland...>%7C5301000a7c214a80d1aa08d748348f95%7C2a69c91de8494e34a230cdf8b27e1964%7C0%7C0%7C637057262889270957&sdata=s74B3qDdK8Kg5bv1qv5B3vOKRHvz9cqeb76VTQEv2tc%3D&reserved=0>

ZAP
 

Back to top
Date: 10/3/19 11:24 am
From: Poland, Zachary <zpoland...>
Subject: 8 Warbler Species Day- Downtown Tulsa
At Williams Green today in downtown Tulsa, I had 8 warbler species. A very good flight with the front last night. Warbler species I found are below along with a link to my eBird checklist.

BAWW
OCWA
COYE
AMRE
YEWA
CSWA
YRWA


https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S60313959

ZAP
 

Back to top
Date: 10/3/19 5:33 am
From: Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...>
Subject: Re: Birds, Tent Caterpillars and Fall Webworms
Great comment Patty.
Hal Yocum, Edmond

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 3, 2019, at 7:29 AM, Patty Kirk <PKirk...> wrote:
>
> ​It's the highlight of my morning to read the latest offerings from you OK birders! Today's gave me an unexpected appreciation for a species I don't often find extolled: ​children and teenagers. As a farm-owning, nature-loving professor of creative writing who routinely has to control her frustrations with both not-yet-adults and bagworms (also the dreadful hornworms that turn into those pretty hummingbird moths I love but also eat up all my tomato plants in the fall), I plan to memorialize this sentence of Jerry Davis's somewhere in my consciousness: "What you need to remember is that if you are going to have butterflies and moths you have to have the caterpillars just as you have to tolerate infants and teenagers if you are going to have adults.​"
>
>
>
> Keep your lovely posts coming!
>
>
>
> patty
>
>
> From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
> Sent: Wednesday, October 2, 2019 2:42 PM
> To: <OKBIRDS...>
> Subject: [OKBIRDS] Birds, Tent Caterpillars and Fall Webworms
>
> Birds - Tent Caterpillars and Fall Web-worms
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> October 2, 2019
> This is the time of year that some people get a bur under their blanket and get upset about the webworms that can be seen in their trees. We have tent caterpillars (6 species) in the Spring that build their tents around the nodes of limbs and feed on the young leaves. The Fall webworms build a tent around mature leaves.
> This is part of a natural process that is an important part of the yearly cycle. The tent caterpillar tents can be seen in the Spring. The Black-billed and Yellow-billed cuckoos arrive late April to mid May from the tropics at the time of this event. They have specialized bills for ripping into the tents to eat the caterpillars.
> What you need to remember is that if you are going to have butterflies and moths you have to have the caterpillars just as you have to tolerate infants and teenagers if you are going to have adults.
> These caterpillars feed birds in all stages of development as caterpillars and adults. Another aspect to consider is that leaves contain most of the nutrients taken up by the trees. When the leaves fall they decompose but it may take several months or years to provide nutrients to be recycled back into plant development. Although leaves fall they are not readily usable for plants. The leaves eaten by the caterpillars are rapidly cycled through the digestive track of the caterpillars, droppings fall to the ground and are available to the plant in an accelerated process.
> These Spring and Fall events are good for providing food for the birds and plants. The next time you get in a tizzy and your underwear all twisted up because you think the tents and webs are unsightly, relax and realize that this is a good thing. Try to control you dislike for what you perceive as unsightly and remember the positive benefits for the birds and plants.
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 10/3/19 5:30 am
From: Patty Kirk <PKirk...>
Subject: Re: Birds, Tent Caterpillars and Fall Webworms
?It's the highlight of my morning to read the latest offerings from you OK birders! Today's gave me an unexpected appreciation for a species I don't often find extolled: ?children and teenagers. As a farm-owning, nature-loving professor of creative writing who routinely has to control her frustrations with both not-yet-adults and bagworms (also the dreadful hornworms that turn into those pretty hummingbird moths I love but also eat up all my tomato plants in the fall), I plan to memorialize this sentence of Jerry Davis's somewhere in my consciousness: "What you need to remember is that if you are going to have butterflies and moths you have to have the caterpillars just as you have to tolerate infants and teenagers if you are going to have adults.?"


Keep your lovely posts coming!


patty

________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Sent: Wednesday, October 2, 2019 2:42 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Birds, Tent Caterpillars and Fall Webworms


Birds - Tent Caterpillars and Fall Web-worms

Jerry Wayne Davis

October 2, 2019

This is the time of year that some people get a bur under their blanket and get upset about the webworms that can be seen in their trees. We have tent caterpillars (6 species) in the Spring that build their tents around the nodes of limbs and feed on the young leaves. The Fall webworms build a tent around mature leaves.

This is part of a natural process that is an important part of the yearly cycle. The tent caterpillar tents can be seen in the Spring. The Black-billed and Yellow-billed cuckoos arrive late April to mid May from the tropics at the time of this event. They have specialized bills for ripping into the tents to eat the caterpillars.

What you need to remember is that if you are going to have butterflies and moths you have to have the caterpillars just as you have to tolerate infants and teenagers if you are going to have adults.

These caterpillars feed birds in all stages of development as caterpillars and adults. Another aspect to consider is that leaves contain most of the nutrients taken up by the trees. When the leaves fall they decompose but it may take several months or years to provide nutrients to be recycled back into plant development. Although leaves fall they are not readily usable for plants. The leaves eaten by the caterpillars are rapidly cycled through the digestive track of the caterpillars, droppings fall to the ground and are available to the plant in an accelerated process.

These Spring and Fall events are good for providing food for the birds and plants. The next time you get in a tizzy and your underwear all twisted up because you think the tents and webs are unsightly, relax and realize that this is a good thing. Try to control you dislike for what you perceive as unsightly and remember the positive benefits for the birds and plants.

Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 10/2/19 5:37 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Birds, Tent Caterpillars and Fall Webworms
Thanks for sharing your insight and observations. About a year ago I posted the items below to remind all that although the female mosquito need blood for her egg development, The male mosquitoes are important as plant pollinators.
Birds and Mosquitoes – There Are Connections



Most are aware that mosquitoes are an important food source for birds like swallows, nighthawks and mammals such as bats and even fish but there are other connections other than being important as food. In the past three years, Alaska has been in a significant drought as has most states in the lower 48 states with drought lasting for decades in the west. The glaciers are retreating rapidly and the tundra is on fire. This drought has created a shortage of mosquitoes that need water for reproduction. Some of you will think this is great, but a few will understand the reason why it is not so great from the standpoint of birds and other wildlife.

When I was looking for the Arctic Warbler along the Denali Highway a few days ago, it was difficult to think that so many mosquitoes was a good thing although ecologically I knew how important they were to the ecosystem. Even though I sprayed down with DEET, they got under may glasses to my eyes and eyelids and in my ears and for birders needing to use binoculars and a camera, a head-net is not a very practical option.

With the drought and the decline of mosquitoes and other insects it impacted everything from birds to bears. In high school you learned that female mosquitoes are the ones that bite and need blood for egg development. The males mosquito feeds on plants and are a key plant pollinator. With the mosquito population down during the dry years, the berry and fruit production was down. This impacted the food sources from birds to bears. Wildlife depending on fruits and berries did not have adequate food and fat reserves going into the winter and had to forage over greater areas to survive and they produced fewer young and more reproductive failures.

I know that most will not be cheering on the mosquitoes. At least remember that they are important to birds, other wildlife, plant pollination and plant reproduction, and are important in sustaining wildlife and wildlife habitat. Jerry Wayne Davis July 9, 2018

Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs, AR 71901

From: Harold A. Yocum
Sent: Wednesday, October 2, 2019 3:32 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Birds, Tent Caterpillars and Fall Webworms

As a farm kid I was raised end educated by my Dad, for the most part, that the insects came in at least 2 varieties - (1) good - those that did things we wanted done to lead to great hay, grain and garden crops. (2) bad- those that damaged our crops. I asked about that the ones that could hurt us like mosquitos , bees and wasps and ones that bite or sting.
They were part of the bad insects as they hindered us or kept us from doing our work.
I started elementary birding at age 15-16 and soon realized that from the birds point of view most were good and were good. Later in entomology 101 I discovered another viewpoint- all insects were interesting to study - both good and bad.
Gave up that possible career in entomology to go to medical school and became a surgeon. I learned a whole new approach to insects and other little, very little and microscopic forms of life that are associated with human illness and disease.
Now as an old gesser I just look at them as as part of “ the great circle/ cycle of life”. I know that we still complain about such things, but we could not live without them either. It all balances.
I still look at all of them and am amazed. Several of us located a “bee tree” in Mitch Park recently. It is near a park bench where I often stop to sit and listen in the shade. Very cool to watch.
Thanks , Hal Yocum ( Edmond)


Sent from my iPhone

On Oct 2, 2019, at 2:59 PM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:


I appreciate your dedication to moths and other insects and your championing their value to the ecosystem. We need 300 million more with your interest and dedication.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs,

From: Zach DuFran
Sent: Wednesday, October 2, 2019 2:56 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Birds, Tent Caterpillars and Fall Webworms

Well put, Jerry!

I have become quite interested in moths over the last few years, and have photographed 530 species in my modest backyard in suburban Norman. I get discouraged when I hear people talking about various insects eating their plants and how to get rid of them. The insects are an important part of the ecosystem and holes in your leaves is a good sign. A yard free of insects is not a healthy ecosystem.

Zach DuFran

On Wed, Oct 2, 2019 at 2:43 PM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

Birds - Tent Caterpillars and Fall Web-worms

Jerry Wayne Davis

October 2, 2019

This is the time of year that some people get a bur under their blanket and get upset about the webworms that can be seen in their trees. We have tent caterpillars (6 species) in the Spring that build their tents around the nodes of limbs and feed on the young leaves. The Fall webworms build a tent around mature leaves.

This is part of a natural process that is an important part of the yearly cycle. The tent caterpillar tents can be seen in the Spring. The Black-billed and Yellow-billed cuckoos arrive late April to mid May from the tropics at the time of this event. They have specialized bills for ripping into the tents to eat the caterpillars.

What you need to remember is that if you are going to have butterflies and moths you have to have the caterpillars just as you have to tolerate infants and teenagers if you are going to have adults.

These caterpillars feed birds in all stages of development as caterpillars and adults. Another aspect to consider is that leaves contain most of the nutrients taken up by the trees. When the leaves fall they decompose but it may take several months or years to provide nutrients to be recycled back into plant development. Although leaves fall they are not readily usable for plants. The leaves eaten by the caterpillars are rapidly cycled through the digestive track of the caterpillars, droppings fall to the ground and are available to the plant in an accelerated process.

These Spring and Fall events are good for providing food for the birds and plants. The next time you get in a tizzy and your underwear all twisted up because you think the tents and webs are unsightly, relax and realize that this is a good thing. Try to control you dislike for what you perceive as unsightly and remember the positive benefits for the birds and plants.

Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 10/2/19 1:34 pm
From: Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...>
Subject: Re: Midwest City Big Sit on Thursday October 10th
Got you on my calendar . Hal

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 2, 2019, at 1:49 PM, Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...> wrote:
>
> Nadine and I will be hosting birders for an unofficial big sit on Thursday October 10th. Birders are welcome to
> come by between 9AM and 5PM.
>
> We will provide a limited array of snacks and drinks and also a lunch item like chili or soup. Please bring food and
> drink and your own chairs. Please consider bringing enough to share with others.
>
> Since we are not an officially sanctioned sit, we roam around the yard and the neighborhood to search for birds.
>
> Please RSVP to me by 5PM on Wednesday the 9th. You can reach me at 405-365-5685 or <j.woodard...>
>
> Thanks.
>
> Jimmy
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 10/2/19 1:33 pm
From: Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...>
Subject: Re: Birds, Tent Caterpillars and Fall Webworms
As a farm kid I was raised end educated by my Dad, for the most part, that the insects came in at least 2 varieties - (1) good - those that did things we wanted done to lead to great hay, grain and garden crops. (2) bad- those that damaged our crops. I asked about that the ones that could hurt us like mosquitos , bees and wasps and ones that bite or sting.
They were part of the bad insects as they hindered us or kept us from doing our work.
I started elementary birding at age 15-16 and soon realized that from the birds point of view most were good and were good. Later in entomology 101 I discovered another viewpoint- all insects were interesting to study - both good and bad.
Gave up that possible career in entomology to go to medical school and became a surgeon. I learned a whole new approach to insects and other little, very little and microscopic forms of life that are associated with human illness and disease.
Now as an old gesser I just look at them as as part of “ the great circle/ cycle of life”. I know that we still complain about such things, but we could not live without them either. It all balances.
I still look at all of them and am amazed. Several of us located a “bee tree” in Mitch Park recently. It is near a park bench where I often stop to sit and listen in the shade. Very cool to watch.
Thanks , Hal Yocum ( Edmond)


Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 2, 2019, at 2:59 PM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:
>
> I appreciate your dedication to moths and other insects and your championing their value to the ecosystem. We need 300 million more with your interest and dedication.
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs,
>
> From: Zach DuFran
> Sent: Wednesday, October 2, 2019 2:56 PM
> To: <OKBIRDS...>
> Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Birds, Tent Caterpillars and Fall Webworms
>
> Well put, Jerry!
>
> I have become quite interested in moths over the last few years, and have photographed 530 species in my modest backyard in suburban Norman. I get discouraged when I hear people talking about various insects eating their plants and how to get rid of them. The insects are an important part of the ecosystem and holes in your leaves is a good sign. A yard free of insects is not a healthy ecosystem.
>
> Zach DuFran
>
>> On Wed, Oct 2, 2019 at 2:43 PM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:
>> Birds - Tent Caterpillars and Fall Web-worms
>> Jerry Wayne Davis
>> October 2, 2019
>> This is the time of year that some people get a bur under their blanket and get upset about the webworms that can be seen in their trees. We have tent caterpillars (6 species) in the Spring that build their tents around the nodes of limbs and feed on the young leaves. The Fall webworms build a tent around mature leaves.
>> This is part of a natural process that is an important part of the yearly cycle. The tent caterpillar tents can be seen in the Spring. The Black-billed and Yellow-billed cuckoos arrive late April to mid May from the tropics at the time of this event. They have specialized bills for ripping into the tents to eat the caterpillars.
>> What you need to remember is that if you are going to have butterflies and moths you have to have the caterpillars just as you have to tolerate infants and teenagers if you are going to have adults.
>> These caterpillars feed birds in all stages of development as caterpillars and adults. Another aspect to consider is that leaves contain most of the nutrients taken up by the trees. When the leaves fall they decompose but it may take several months or years to provide nutrients to be recycled back into plant development. Although leaves fall they are not readily usable for plants. The leaves eaten by the caterpillars are rapidly cycled through the digestive track of the caterpillars, droppings fall to the ground and are available to the plant in an accelerated process.
>> These Spring and Fall events are good for providing food for the birds and plants. The next time you get in a tizzy and your underwear all twisted up because you think the tents and webs are unsightly, relax and realize that this is a good thing. Try to control you dislike for what you perceive as unsightly and remember the positive benefits for the birds and plants.
>> Jerry Wayne Davis
>> Hot Springs, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 10/2/19 1:01 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Birds, Tent Caterpillars and Fall Webworms
I appreciate your dedication to moths and other insects and your championing their value to the ecosystem. We need 300 million more with your interest and dedication.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs,

From: Zach DuFran
Sent: Wednesday, October 2, 2019 2:56 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Birds, Tent Caterpillars and Fall Webworms

Well put, Jerry!

I have become quite interested in moths over the last few years, and have photographed 530 species in my modest backyard in suburban Norman. I get discouraged when I hear people talking about various insects eating their plants and how to get rid of them. The insects are an important part of the ecosystem and holes in your leaves is a good sign. A yard free of insects is not a healthy ecosystem.

Zach DuFran

On Wed, Oct 2, 2019 at 2:43 PM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

Birds - Tent Caterpillars and Fall Web-worms

Jerry Wayne Davis

October 2, 2019

This is the time of year that some people get a bur under their blanket and get upset about the webworms that can be seen in their trees. We have tent caterpillars (6 species) in the Spring that build their tents around the nodes of limbs and feed on the young leaves. The Fall webworms build a tent around mature leaves.

This is part of a natural process that is an important part of the yearly cycle. The tent caterpillar tents can be seen in the Spring. The Black-billed and Yellow-billed cuckoos arrive late April to mid May from the tropics at the time of this event. They have specialized bills for ripping into the tents to eat the caterpillars.

What you need to remember is that if you are going to have butterflies and moths you have to have the caterpillars just as you have to tolerate infants and teenagers if you are going to have adults.

These caterpillars feed birds in all stages of development as caterpillars and adults. Another aspect to consider is that leaves contain most of the nutrients taken up by the trees. When the leaves fall they decompose but it may take several months or years to provide nutrients to be recycled back into plant development. Although leaves fall they are not readily usable for plants. The leaves eaten by the caterpillars are rapidly cycled through the digestive track of the caterpillars, droppings fall to the ground and are available to the plant in an accelerated process.

These Spring and Fall events are good for providing food for the birds and plants. The next time you get in a tizzy and your underwear all twisted up because you think the tents and webs are unsightly, relax and realize that this is a good thing. Try to control you dislike for what you perceive as unsightly and remember the positive benefits for the birds and plants.

Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 10/2/19 12:58 pm
From: Zach DuFran <zdufran...>
Subject: Re: Birds, Tent Caterpillars and Fall Webworms
Well put, Jerry!

I have become quite interested in moths over the last few years, and have
photographed 530 species in my modest backyard in suburban Norman. I get
discouraged when I hear people talking about various insects eating their
plants and how to get rid of them. The insects are an important part of the
ecosystem and holes in your leaves is a good sign. A yard free of insects
is not a healthy ecosystem.

Zach DuFran

On Wed, Oct 2, 2019 at 2:43 PM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

> *Birds - Tent Caterpillars and Fall Web-worms*
>
> *Jerry Wayne Davis*
>
> *October 2, 2019*
>
> *This is the time of year that some people get a bur under their blanket
> and get upset about the webworms that can be seen in their trees. We have
> tent caterpillars (6 species) in the Spring that build their tents around
> the nodes of limbs and feed on the young leaves. The Fall webworms build a
> tent around mature leaves. *
>
> *This is part of a natural process that is an important part of the yearly
> cycle. The tent caterpillar tents can be seen in the Spring. The
> Black-billed and Yellow-billed cuckoos arrive late April to mid May from
> the tropics at the time of this event. They have specialized bills for
> ripping into the tents to eat the caterpillars. *
>
> *What you need to remember is that if you are going to have butterflies
> and moths you have to have the caterpillars just as you have to tolerate
> infants and teenagers if you are going to have adults. *
>
> *These caterpillars feed birds in all stages of development as
> caterpillars and adults. Another aspect to consider is that leaves contain
> most of the nutrients taken up by the trees. When the leaves fall they
> decompose but it may take several months or years to provide nutrients to
> be recycled back into plant development. Although leaves fall they are not
> readily usable for plants. The leaves eaten by the caterpillars are rapidly
> cycled through the digestive track of the caterpillars, droppings fall to
> the ground and are available to the plant in an accelerated process. *
>
> *These Spring and Fall events are good for providing food for the birds
> and plants. The next time you get in a tizzy and your underwear all twisted
> up because you think the tents and webs are unsightly, relax and realize
> that this is a good thing. Try to control you dislike for what you perceive
> as unsightly and remember the positive benefits for the birds and plants. *
>
> *Jerry Wayne Davis*
>
> *Hot Springs, AR*
>

 

Back to top
Date: 10/2/19 11:50 am
From: Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...>
Subject: Midwest City Big Sit on Thursday October 10th
Nadine and I will be hosting birders for an unofficial big
sit on Thursday October 10th. Birders are welcome to

come by between 9AM and 5PM.



We will provide a limited array of snacks and drinks and also
a lunch item like chili or soup. Please bring food and

drink and your own chairs. Please consider bringing enough to
share with others.



Since we are not an officially sanctioned sit, we roam around
the yard and the neighborhood to search for birds.



Please RSVP to me by 5PM on Wednesday the 9th. You can reach
me at 405-365-5685 or <j.woodard...>



Thanks.



Jimmy






 

Back to top
Date: 10/2/19 10:11 am
From: Brett Niland <bestguess...>
Subject: Re: Smith's Longspur in winter
Fantastic information Joe!

Thanks again for providing insight.

Regards,

Brett
________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski...>
Sent: Wednesday, October 2, 2019 9:27 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...> <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Smith's Longspur in winter

Hello,
Smith's should be in grasslands of ne Oklahoma by mid-late November, and stay into early March.
In central Oklahoma, they show a little later (by late November-early December), and leave almost a month earlier (early to mid February)--bigger numbers usually don't arrive until mid-December. They get pretty scarce by west-central Oklahoma.
Sooner Lake, n. Tulsa County and and Tallgrass Prairie are good places. And they are common in the right habitat.
The sporadic reporting comes from their being out in the grass; need to walk out to flush them. Won't flush them off the roads.
They like fields with a short pale-tan grass call three-awn (Aristida) (at least patches of such). If you can walk out into an open field in ne OK (even down to the I-40 area), and through those patches, have good chance to flush some. Access and private property should be respected.

Have to know how to identify them in flight, as those may be the best looks you get. Their rattle calls, and the buff bellies, white outer tail feathers, males with show black and white shoulders, and high flight flocking are what to notice.

But in that habitat (Aristida) in ne OK, only longspur species. Laplands like agricultural plowed areas (like Horned Larks), and Chestnut-collared Longspurs are rare that far east (and have a very different call). In that habitat, may also have a chance for Sprague's Pipit, although their numbers are crashing.

CHEERS, JOE Grzybowski

On Tuesday, October 1, 2019, 06:24:12 PM CDT, James Purcell <jpurcell1616...> wrote:


Hello OK birders,

I'm a birder from CT and I'll be passing through eastern OK in December. I'm hoping to connect with Smith's Longspur while I'm there, and I was wondering if anybody had any decently reliable spots for them at that time of year.

I checked eBird and it looks like they're somewhat sporadic, but I wanted to check if anybody has any spots that have been good for turning them up somewhat frequently.

Thanks in advance!

James Purcell
Fairfield, CT

 

Back to top
Date: 10/2/19 7:29 am
From: JOS GRZYBOWSKI <j_grzybowski...>
Subject: Re: Smith's Longspur in winter
Hello,   Smith's should be in grasslands of ne Oklahoma by mid-late November, and stay into early March.   In central Oklahoma, they show a little later (by late November-early December), and leave almost a month earlier (early to mid February)--bigger numbers usually don't arrive until mid-December.  They get pretty scarce by west-central Oklahoma.   Sooner Lake, n. Tulsa County and and Tallgrass Prairie are good places.  And they are common in the right habitat.     The sporadic reporting comes from their being out in the grass; need to walk out to flush them.  Won't flush them off the roads.      They like fields with a short pale-tan grass call three-awn (Aristida) (at least patches of such).  If you can walk out into an open field in ne OK (even down to the I-40 area), and through those patches, have good chance to flush some.  Access and private property should be respected.  
    Have to know how to identify them in flight, as those may be the best looks you get.  Their rattle calls, and the buff bellies, white outer tail feathers, males with show black and white shoulders, and high flight flocking are what to notice.
    But in that habitat (Aristida) in ne OK, only longspur species.  Laplands like agricultural plowed areas (like Horned Larks), and Chestnut-collared Longspurs are rare that far east (and have a very different call).  In that habitat, may also have a chance for Sprague's Pipit, although their numbers are crashing.
CHEERS,              JOE Grzybowski
On Tuesday, October 1, 2019, 06:24:12 PM CDT, James Purcell <jpurcell1616...> wrote:

Hello OK birders,
I'm a birder from CT and I'll be passing through eastern OK in December. I'm hoping to connect with Smith's Longspur while I'm there, and I was wondering if anybody had any decently reliable spots for them at that time of year.
I checked eBird and it looks like they're somewhat sporadic, but I wanted to check if anybody has any spots that have been good for turning them up somewhat frequently.
Thanks in advance!
James PurcellFairfield, CT
 

Back to top
Date: 10/2/19 6:47 am
From: Brett Niland <bestguess...>
Subject: Re: Smith's Longspur in winter
Hal,

My in-laws are in Bartlesville, and we tend to get up that way during the holidays, so I know they are there by mid/late November.

We've also seen them along 412 during winter trips to the panhandle and up to Colorado. Timing there was ~Christmas and early January.

Sorry I don't visit those areas with enough frequency to pin it down more closely.

Brett
________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...>
Sent: Tuesday, October 1, 2019 9:58 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...> <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Smith's Longspur in winter

Bret,
When do the arrive?
We have a pretty reliable spot in central OK in north Norman along I- 35 . Contact Jimmy Woodard and get exact details . Not sure of timing- Jan- Feb?
Hal Yocum

Sent from my iPhone

On Oct 1, 2019, at 9:11 PM, Brett Niland <bestguess...><mailto:<bestguess...>> wrote:

Hi James,

Ive spotted them with decent frequency in tall grass prairie preserve. Generally while driving the pasture areas north of the nature conservancy center.

I fear that it may take some doing to make a sighting as they are hit and miss. Im sure they are always there, its just a huge area, and youd need them close. Typical birders quandary.

The wife and I are trying to make 230 species in Tulsa county this year. Well need the smiths longspur to make that goal. Ill keep you posted if we get a regular hit on them.

Good luck and let us know how it turns out.

Thank You,

Brett Niland
918-200-1818

On Oct 1, 2019, at 6:24 PM, James Purcell <jpurcell1616...><mailto:<jpurcell1616...>> wrote:

Hello OK birders,

I'm a birder from CT and I'll be passing through eastern OK in December. I'm hoping to connect with Smith's Longspur while I'm there, and I was wondering if anybody had any decently reliable spots for them at that time of year.

I checked eBird and it looks like they're somewhat sporadic, but I wanted to check if anybody has any spots that have been good for turning them up somewhatfrequently.

Thanks in advance!

James Purcell
Fairfield, CT

 

Back to top
Date: 10/1/19 7:59 pm
From: Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...>
Subject: Re: Smith's Longspur in winter
Bret,
When do the arrive?
We have a pretty reliable spot in central OK in north Norman along I- 35 . Contact Jimmy Woodard and get exact details . Not sure of timing- Jan- Feb?
Hal Yocum

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 1, 2019, at 9:11 PM, Brett Niland <bestguess...> wrote:
>
> Hi James,
>
> I’ve spotted them with decent frequency in tall grass prairie preserve. Generally while driving the pasture areas north of the nature conservancy center.
>
> I fear that it may take some doing to make a sighting as they are hit and miss. I’m sure they are always there, it’s just a huge area, and you’d need them close. Typical birders quandary.
>
> The wife and I are trying to make 230 species in Tulsa county this year. We’ll need the smiths longspur to make that goal. I’ll keep you posted if we get a regular hit on them.
>
> Good luck and let us know how it turns out.
>
> Thank You,
>
> Brett Niland
> 918-200-1818
>
> On Oct 1, 2019, at 6:24 PM, James Purcell <jpurcell1616...> wrote:
>
>> Hello OK birders,
>>
>> I'm a birder from CT and I'll be passing through eastern OK in December. I'm hoping to connect with Smith's Longspur while I'm there, and I was wondering if anybody had any decently reliable spots for them at that time of year.
>>
>> I checked eBird and it looks like they're somewhat sporadic, but I wanted to check if anybody has any spots that have been good for turning them up somewhatfrequently.
>>
>> Thanks in advance!
>>
>> James Purcell
>> Fairfield, CT

 

Back to top
Date: 10/1/19 7:12 pm
From: Brett Niland <bestguess...>
Subject: Re: Smith's Longspur in winter
Hi James,

I’ve spotted them with decent frequency in tall grass prairie preserve. Generally while driving the pasture areas north of the nature conservancy center.

I fear that it may take some doing to make a sighting as they are hit and miss. I’m sure they are always there, it’s just a huge area, and you’d need them close. Typical birders quandary.

The wife and I are trying to make 230 species in Tulsa county this year. We’ll need the smiths longspur to make that goal. I’ll keep you posted if we get a regular hit on them.

Good luck and let us know how it turns out.

Thank You,

Brett Niland
918-200-1818

On Oct 1, 2019, at 6:24 PM, James Purcell <jpurcell1616...><mailto:<jpurcell1616...>> wrote:

Hello OK birders,

I'm a birder from CT and I'll be passing through eastern OK in December. I'm hoping to connect with Smith's Longspur while I'm there, and I was wondering if anybody had any decently reliable spots for them at that time of year.

I checked eBird and it looks like they're somewhat sporadic, but I wanted to check if anybody has any spots that have been good for turning them up somewhatfrequently.

Thanks in advance!

James Purcell
Fairfield, CT
 

Back to top
Date: 10/1/19 4:24 pm
From: James Purcell <jpurcell1616...>
Subject: Smith's Longspur in winter
Hello OK birders,

I'm a birder from CT and I'll be passing through eastern OK in December.
I'm hoping to connect with Smith's Longspur while I'm there, and I was
wondering if anybody had any decently reliable spots for them at that time
of year.

I checked eBird and it looks like they're somewhat sporadic, but I wanted
to check if anybody has any spots that have been good for turning them up
somewhat frequently.

Thanks in advance!

James Purcell
Fairfield, CT

 

Back to top
Date: 10/1/19 4:14 pm
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...>
Subject: Pathfinder Parkway and Yard on 10-1-2019.
Hello All,
I spent some time in my back yard and also on the Pathfinder Parkway in Bartlesville this morning. I still heard the songs of 2 Acadian flycatchers, although they will probably be gone when the cold front passes tomorrow night. Highlights included:

Common Nighthawk-1 flying over yard
Yellow-billed Cuckoo-2 on Pathfinder
Acadian Flycatcher-2 on Pathfinder
Yellow-throated Vireo-1 heard from yard
Blue-headed Vireo-1 seen on Pathfinder
Nashville Warbler-1 on Pathfinder
Black and White Warbler-1 on Pathfinder
American Redstart-2 on Pathfinder
Northern Waterthrush-1 heard from yard
Summer Tanager-1 seen on Pathfinder and 1 heard from yard

Mark Peterson
Bartlesville


 

Back to top
Date: 10/1/19 10:22 am
From: Patricia Velte <pvelte...>
Subject: October Migration Report (2 of 2)
OkBirders,



Here is the October DEPARTURES list



Black-bellied Whistling-Duck October 28 - Southern
McCurtain Co. only

Cinnamon Teal October 8 -
PAN, NW, SW

Anhinga October 29
- S. McCurtain Co. only

Snowy Egret October 24 -
ALL

Little Blue Heron October 15 -
NW, SW, C, SC, NE

Green Heron October 2 -
PAN and October 21 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Black-crowned Night-Heron October 5 - PAN

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron October 10 - NW, SW, C,
SC, NE, SE

White Ibis October 28
- McCurtain Co. only

Neotropic Cormorant October 5 - NW, SW,
C, SC, SE

Broad-winged Hawk October 15 - C, SC,
NE, SE - Rare west to Alfalfa, Major, Dewey and Blaine Cos. Only in NW;
Caddo and Comanche Cos. Only in SW

Swainson's Hawk October 19 - ALL

White-faced Ibis October 5 -
PAN, NW and October 26 - SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Roseate Spoonbill October 8 - Rare
in Johnston and Marshall Cos. Only in SC; Rare in S. McCurtain Co. only in
SE; Rare in Bryan Co. only in SE

Spotted Sandpiper October 31 - NW,
SW, C, SC, NE

Solitary Sandpiper October 7 - ALL

Lesser Yellowlegs October 7 - PAN

Long-billed Curlew October 10 - NW,
SW, C, SC

Stilt Sandpiper October 24 -
ALL

Sanderling October 19
- ALL

Purple Gallinule October 15 -
SE Rare in Bryan and S. McCurtain Cos. Only

Black-necked Stilt October 15 -
NW, SW, Kingfisher Co. only

American Avocet October 14 - PAN


Snowy Plover October 1 -
PAN, NW, SW, C, SC, NE

Mountain Plover October 5 - PAN
rare in Cimarron Co. only

Sabine's Gull October 23 -
PAN, NW, C, SC, NE

Laughing Gull October 31 -
NW, C, SC, NE, SE

Caspian Tern October 17 -
ALL

Black Tern October 4 -
ALL

Common Tern October 19 - NW,
C, SC, NE

Semipalmated Sandpiper October 6 - ALL

Western Sandpiper October 10 - ALL

Wilson's Phalarope October 1 - ALL

Red-necked Phalarope October 19 - ALL

Common Poorwill October 14 - PAN,
NW east to Woods, Ellis and Roger Mills cos, SW all except Cotton Co, C,
SC, NE rare east to Osage, Tulsa and Creek cos

Eastern Whip-poor-will October 1 - NE west
to Osage, Tulsa and Okmulgee cos, SE west to Pittsburg, Atoka and Choctaw
cos.

Chimney Swift October 24 -
ALL

Ruby-throated Hummingbird October 18 - NW, SW, C,
SC, NE, SE

Red-headed Woodpecker October 20 - PAN

Yellow-billed Cuckoo October 15 - ALL

Common Nighthawk October 18 - NW, SW,
C, SC, NE, SE

Red-naped Sapsucker October 5 rare in
Cimarron Co only

Least Flycatcher October 8 -
ALL

Eastern Phoebe October 14 -
PAN and October 30 - NW

Say's Phoebe October 5 -
PAN

Eastern Kingbird October 1 - SE

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher October 12 - PAN

White-eyed Vireo October 8 - NW
west to Alfalfa, Major and Blaine cos only, SW Caddo, Comanche and Cotton
cos only, C, SC, NE, SE

Philadelphia Vireo October 9 - C,
SC, NE, SE

Red-eyed Vireo October 10 -
NW, SW west to Washita, Kiowa and Tillman cos only, C, SC, NE, SE

Northern Rough-winged Swallow October 28 - NW, SW, C, SC,
NE, SE

Barn Swallow October 4 -
PAN and October 30 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher October 8 - ALL

Gray Catbird October 19 -
ALL

Ovenbird October 9 -
NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE and October 9 - NE Delaware and Adair cos only, SE Le
Flore and McCurtain cos only

Tennessee Warbler October 12 - NW,
SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Orange-crowned Warbler October 15 - PAN

Nashville Warbler October 12 - PAN
and October 25 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Mourning Warbler October 4 - C, SC,
NE, SE

Common Yellowthroat October 10 - NW

Northern Parula October 8 - NW
rare west to Alfalfa and Blaine cos only, SW rare in Comanche co only, C
west to Logan, Oklahoma and Cleveland cos only, SC, NE, SE

Palm Warbler October 24 -
NE, SE

Yellow-rumped Warbler October 31 - PAN

Black-throated Green Warbler October 26 - ALL

Wilson's Warbler October 9 - ALL

Clay-colored Sparrow October 5 - PAN and
October 29 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Brewer's Sparrow October 1 - PAN
Cimarron Co only

Vesper Sparrow October 29 - PAN

Henslow's Sparrow October 15 - NE
Osage, Washington, Nowata and Craig cos only

Lincoln's Sparrow October 24 -
PAN

Summer Tanager October 10 - NW,
SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Rose-breasted Grosbeak October 7 - NW, SW,
C, SC, NE, SE

Blue Grosbeak October 1 -
ALL

Indigo Bunting October 28 -
NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Dickcissel October 10
- ALL

Yellow-headed Blackbird October 15 - PAN, NW,
SW, C, SC, NE

Great-tailed Grackle October 15 - PAN

Lesser Goldfinch October 28 -
PAN Cimarron Co only, SW rare in Caddo and Comanche cos only

Semipalmated Plover October 17 - ALL



##




 

Back to top
Date: 10/1/19 10:17 am
From: Patricia Velte <pvelte...>
Subject: October Migration Report (1 of 2)
Dear OKBirders,



Long lists again this month! Here is the October ARRIVALS list. The
Departures list will be sent separately.



Canvasback October 20 - ALL

Redhead October 1 - C, SC, NE,
SE

Ring-necked Duck October 3 - ALL

Greater Scaup October 22 - PAN, NW, SW, C,
SC, NE

Surf Scoter October 30 - NW, C, SE

Bufflehead October 22 - ALL

Hooded Merganser October 21 - PAN, SW, C, SC

Red-breasted Merganser October 26 - NW, SW,C, SC, NE

Ruddy Duck October 2 - C, SC, NE, SE

Greater White-fronted Goose October 8 - ALL

Snow Goose October 10 - ALL

Cackling Goose October 22 - ALL

Common Loon October 15 - ALL

Horned Grebe October 14 - All

Western Grebe October 12 - PAN, NW, SW, C,
SC, NE - Rare east to Washington, Tulsa and Okmulgee Cos.

Ferruginous Hawk October 22 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE,
SE - Rare east to Washington, Tulsa and Okmulgee Cos. Only

Rough-legged Hawk October 18 - PAN, NW, NE and October
28 - SW, C

Golden Eagle October 25 - PAN, NW, SW,
SC, NE, SE - Rare in Kay and Noble Cos. East to Washington Co; rare in
Sequoyah Co.

Yellow Rail October 3 - Rare in S.
McCurtain Co only

Bald Eagle October 8 - PAN, NW,
SW, SC

Sandhill Crane October 18 - PAN, C, SC, NE
and October 8 - NW, SW, SE

Whooping Crane October 17 - NW rare in Alfalfa
Co. only, SW rare in Tillman Co. only

Bonaparte's Gull October 20 - ALL

Little Gull October 11 - C, SC,
NE

Herring Gull October 4 - NW, SW, C,
SC, NE, SE

Lesser Black-backed Gull October 6 - C in Canadian and Oklahoma
Cos only, NE rare in Tulsa Co. only

Dunlin October 9 - NW, SW,
C, SC, NE, SE

American Woodcock October 18 - NW, SW, C, SC<br>All
Year - C west to Logan, Oklahoma, Cleveland and McClain cos only, NE, SE

Long-eared Owl October 18 - PAN, NW, C, NE

Short-eared Owl October 11 - ALL

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker October 3 - ALL

Steller's Jay October 20 - PAN rare
in northwestern Cimarron Co only

Brown Creeper October 1 - ALL

Winter Wren October 3 - NW, SW, C, SC,
NE, SE

Golden-crowned Kinglet October 4 - ALL

Mountain Bluebird October 18 - NW, SW, C rare east
to Kingfisher, Canadian and Grady cos only

Townsend's Solitaire October 30 - NW, SW, C rare east
to Logan, Oklahoma and Cleveland cos only

Hermit Thrush October 11 - NW, SW, C, SC,
NE, SE

Sage Thrasher October 10 - SW rare in
Harmon, Greer, Jackson, Kiowa and Comanche cos only

Sprague's Pipit October 2 - ALL

Chestnut-collared Longspur October 15 - PAN, NW, SW, C, SC, NE rare
east to Osage and Pawnee cos only

McCown's Longspur October 26 - PAN, NW, SW, C rare
east to Kingfisher, Oklahoma and Cleveland cos only

Lark Bunting October 27 - NW east to
Woods, Woodward, Dewey and Custer Cos only, SW east to Washita, Kiowa and
Tillman Cos only

Henslow's Sparrow October 15 - SE rare in south
McCurtain Co only

Le Conte's Sparrow October 10 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE,
SE

Fox Sparrow October 19 - NW, SW, C,
SC, NE, SE

Song Sparrow October 1 - NW, SW, C, NE
and October 8 - SC, SE

Swamp Sparrow October 1 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE,
SE

White-throated Sparrow October 7 - PAN and October 3 - NW, SW,
C, SC, NE, SE

Harris's Sparrow October 19 - PAN, NW, C, NE

White-crowned Sparrow October 1 - NW, SW, C, NE and October 18
- SC, SE

Rusty Blackbird October 20 - NW, SW, C, SC,
NE, SE

Purple Finch October 25 - NW rare west
to Alfalfa, Major and Blaine Cos only, SW rare in Caddo and Comanche cos
only, C, SC, NE, SE

Pine Siskin October 1 - ALL



The information presented here comes from The Oklahoma Bird Records
Committee of the Oklahoma Ornithological Society, which publishes a Date
Guide to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma. This booklet divides Oklahoma
into 7 geographic regions, and lists the normal dates of occurrence for each
Oklahoma bird species within each region. Observers are urged to report
unusual species, or birds out of date or out of normal range in Oklahoma,
based on the information given in this publication.



The Oklahoma Ornithological Society and Oklahoma Bird Records Committee web
site, http://www.okbirds.org/
<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.okbirds.org_&d=DwMF
Ag&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWK
XWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=YiVTX-OFZ60zLHqw9EoQwRqGRz2BGZ-YtewNX5N-UeU&s=ir1TMZTW6
eMCuLsCKJita17xXmRkSC8G5Vv_1AVh6Gs&e=> , includes ordering information for
the Date Guide to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma, information on
documenting significant records, documentation forms, instructions, and a
searchable database for Oklahoma bird migration information. Birders are
cordially invited to join the Oklahoma Ornithological Society.



Happy birding!

Pat Velte

<pvelte...> <mailto:<pvelte...>

Oklahoma City, OK


 

Back to top
Date: 9/30/19 5:43 am
From: Judy Basham <judybasham...>
Subject: Re: Virginia Rail
Nice work, Terry. Thanks.

On Sep 27, 2019, at 11:39 AM, Terry Mitchell <terry...>
wrote:
Well it's at the vet. Before I dropped it off I stuck my finger
in there and promptly got nipped. When I picked it up it didn't
move so maybe it's doing better.


Terry MitchellPlastic Engineering918-622-9660

On Fri, Sep 27, 2019 at 1:04 PM Brett Niland <bestguess...>
wrote:

+1 on Dr. Welch.
Good guy.
Brett

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Patricia
Seibert <plseibert...>
Sent: Friday, September 27, 2019 12:44 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...> <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Virginia Rail Good of you to save it,
sounds like something was not quite right.... Paul Welch!

Pat
On Sep 27, 2019, at 11:26 AM, Terry Mitchell <terry...>
wrote:

It ended up sitting out in the open baking in the sun, so
I caught it. I'll take it to the vet this afternoon.


Terry Mitchell Plastic Engineering918-622-9660

On Fri, Sep 27, 2019 at 10:40 AM Patricia Seibert <plseibert...>
wrote:

Terry, If the rail seems alert, not dazed or anything,
I think I’d leave it alone. I had one years ago duck
into my neighbors azalea bushes. I wasn’t sure what
I had seen, as I approached it I flushed it, have
regretted it ever since. It was perfectly
content……and healthy.

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Terry Mitchell
Sent: Friday, September 27, 2019 10:04 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Virginia Rail

I work near 41st and Sheridan in Tulsa. A few minutes
ago my boss was walking her dog in the front yard of
the business and her dog found a Virginia Rail sitting
on the grass next to a railroad tie. When I got close
to it, it got down next to the tie as to where you
can hardly see it. The bird is alert and when I got
real close it started moving around like it was going
to take off. I backed off then. What does everybody
think, leave it alone and hope its just waiting for
darkness to migrate or try to catch it and take it to
a rehaber. It doesn't look hurt but I know that
doesn't mean anything.



Terry Mitchell

Plastic Engineering

918-622-9660
 

Back to top
Date: 9/29/19 12:27 pm
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...>
Subject: Lake Hefnerlue Jay -
To summarize what I've seen at Lake Hefner the last three days:
GB Heron - 7
Green Heron - 3
YC Night Heron - 5
BC Night-Heron - 2
Great Egret - 13
Snowy Egret - 1
Bald Eagle - 1
Osprey - 4
Mississippi Kite - 1 (today)
Mallards - many
BW Teal - 25
Pied-billed Grebe - 5
American Coot - 30
Common Merganser - 1 female
AW Pelican - 1
Belted Kingfisher - 2
RB Gull - 8
Brown Thrasher - 1
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 3
Blue Jay - 6
Carolina Wren - 2 heard
A. Crow - 6
Spotted Sandpiper - 1

Matt Jung, OKC

 

Back to top
Date: 9/28/19 10:50 am
From: Rodney Hartsfield <bassangler73...>
Subject: Re: Sequoyah NWR
Thanks you very much Sandy!! I'm just getting shutter fever to early ha ha..I guess I will drive up to Jasper and photo the Elk



Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S7, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Date: 9/28/19 12:12 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Sequoyah NWR

I went Wednesday. Didnt have a chance to post. It was very slow. Its just so hot still. Not a thing in the sky. Some skulkers. Very quiet. Maybe 35 species.

Sandy B.

On Sat, Sep 28, 2019 at 9:38 AM Rodney Hartsfield <bassangler73...><mailto:<bassangler73...>> wrote:
I was wondering if anyone had been to Sequoyah NWR recently and if so how the birding was?.Thanks for any info!

 

Back to top
Date: 9/28/19 10:12 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Sequoyah NWR
I went Wednesday. Didn’t have a chance to post. It was very slow. It’s just
so hot still. Not a thing in the sky. Some skulkers. Very quiet. Maybe 35
species.

Sandy B.

On Sat, Sep 28, 2019 at 9:38 AM Rodney Hartsfield <bassangler73...>
wrote:

> I was wondering if anyone had been to Sequoyah NWR recently and if so how
> the birding was?.Thanks for any info!
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/28/19 7:58 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Fw: [OKBIRDS] A White-breasted Nuthatch Solving A Problem
Thanks Bret for sharing the parrot link. Also what many people do not know is that the illegal bird trade sends 60,000 parrots from the wild to oriental and European markets per year and most die on the way. Trappers in Mexico and Central America trap and sell birds of color like painted buntings, indigo buntings and others for such markets. The trappers did get $.50 cents per bird in the 1990s price and I am not sure the price now but it takes a huge toll on our birds when they are on the winter range. This does not count the millions that are trapped for food. You saw the 3 billion bird loss headlines and keep in mind that we are losing 4% of our birds per year and in just 10 years 40% fewer birds are crossing the Gulf. Any birder afield has noticed this without a study. We are at the point that everything detrimental is making a significant impact. Birders know what is causing these impacts but many sit in indifference and apathy and do not do their part for recovery.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: Brett Niland
Sent: Saturday, September 28, 2019 9:23 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Fw: [OKBIRDS] A White-breasted Nuthatch Solving A Problem

Thanks for the share. I’ve got it on order now.

The donkeys guide to bird life and behavior was informative. I bet this one will be more interesting. :)

I also loved this one.

Thinking Like a Parrot: Perspectives from the Wild https://www.amazon.com/dp/022624878X/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_iZ2JDb8CC1P37


Thank You,

Brett Niland
Cell: (918) 200-1818

On Sep 28, 2019, at 9:10 AM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:




Brett, thanks for sharing. Yes I have seen crows drop pecans onto a parking lot to break before feeding. Since my post I was told about a book The genius of Birds.

https://www.amazon.com/Genius-Birds-Jennifer-Ackerman/dp/0399563121/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=The+Genius+of+Birds+by+Jennifer+Ackerman&qid=1569620079&s=gateway&sr=8-1

Thanks for sharing.

jerry

From: Brett Niland
Sent: Saturday, September 28, 2019 8:01 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] A White-breasted Nuthatch Solving A Problem

That’s an amazing report Jerry. I love the observations reported on this listserve.

There are numerous reports and even film of crows and gulls carrying mollusks aloft and dropping them on hard surfaces to crack the shells.

Add to that tool making abilities in crows and psittacines and I’d submit there is more going on in our bird brained friends heads than even we give them credit for.


Thank You,

Brett Niland
918-200-1818

On Sep 28, 2019, at 7:27 AM, Patty Kirk <PKirk...> wrote:


When there​'s a hard freeze in winter and my bird bath freezes over, I have observed more than once a squirrel spreading itself across the ice in the birdbath for hours to melt it enough with its body heat to get a drink. Could be instinct, and it's not a bird, but it seems like problem solving to me.





----------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Sent: Friday, September 27, 2019 11:34 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] A White-breasted Nuthatch Solving A Problem

I could not post the pictures with this site but they can be seen on my Facebook page. The message in text form is below.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs

A White-breasted Nuthatch Solving A Problem

Jerry Wayne Davis

September 26, 2019

On May 7, 2015 Barbara and I were birding in Madeira Canyon in Southeast Arizona south of Tucson. We had seen many species of birds that were in the process of nesting or preparing for a second nesting. One of those species was a pair of White-breasted nuthatches. This species is a cavity nester which means they are one of the 85 species of birds that nest in holes in snags or hollow trees. There is a worldwide shortage of snags and cavities because people cut down snags and trees with cavities. In the case in my yard nuthatches build a nest in one of the 26 bird nest boxes I have for various species. yard.

The White-breasted nuthatch lines the bottom of its nest cavity with short broken pieces of bark that serves as a filter and keeps the eggs off of the bottom of the box or nest cavity. Other birds like bluebirds use grass and pine straw and a Carolina chickadee and Tufted Titmouse uses mosses, a tree swallow might include feathers and hummingbirds use spider webs. Yarn, and man made materials should not be put out for these birds, they absorb moisture and contaminate the nest. They find grasses, straw, and mosses and hair for their material.

The nuthatches we were watching were gathering small pieces of bark they broke from the loose bark of a mesquite tree. They took the small pieces and placed then in the nest cavity. We then noticed the male flying with a very long strip of bark. It was so long that it seemed make flying awkward. He took the bark to a series of granite boulders that had irregular surfaces and place the long piece of bark over an uneven surface with space below the middle of the bark. He proceeded to hit the bark with its beak. It used this action to break the longer piece of bark into smaller pieces and took them to it nest cavity.

I call this process problem solving. When I took psychology in the last millennium psychologist said that animals could not solve problems and only reacted with instinctive behavior. I am not sure they have now moved beyond this unenlightened mindset and think they now recognize that animals do solve problems. This observation with the white-breasted nuthatch and other species I have observed solving problem over the years makes me believe that humans have a lot to learn by observing wildlife.

 

Back to top
Date: 9/28/19 7:39 am
From: Rodney Hartsfield <bassangler73...>
Subject: Sequoyah NWR
I was wondering if anyone had been to Sequoyah NWR recently and if so how the birding was?.Thanks for any info!
 

Back to top
Date: 9/28/19 7:24 am
From: Brett Niland <bestguess...>
Subject: Re: Fw: [OKBIRDS] A White-breasted Nuthatch Solving A Problem
Thanks for the share. I’ve got it on order now.

The donkeys guide to bird life and behavior was informative. I bet this one will be more interesting. :)

I also loved this one.

Thinking Like a Parrot: Perspectives from the Wild https://www.amazon.com/dp/022624878X/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_iZ2JDb8CC1P37

Thank You,

Brett Niland
Cell: (918) 200-1818

On Sep 28, 2019, at 9:10 AM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...><mailto:<jwdavis...>> wrote:



Brett, thanks for sharing. Yes I have seen crows drop pecans onto a parking lot to break before feeding. Since my post I was told about a book The genius of Birds.

https://www.amazon.com/Genius-Birds-Jennifer-Ackerman/dp/0399563121/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=The+Genius+of+Birds+by+Jennifer+Ackerman&qid=1569620079&s=gateway&sr=8-1<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.amazon.com_Genius-2DBirds-2DJennifer-2DAckerman_dp_0399563121_ref-3Dsr-5F1-5F1-3Fkeywords-3DThe-2BGenius-2Bof-2BBirds-2Bby-2BJennifer-2BAckerman-26qid-3D1569620079-26s-3Dgateway-26sr-3D8-2D1&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=IZArdIkHj44AuPuwL-4P9bdEbcMuxPAXFLTDpGLKK8E&s=kLT_-vOBdReBTYz-HM2-1jN0eGzRX9aqDMPE-5Y5aE4&e=>

Thanks for sharing.

jerry

From: Brett Niland
Sent: Saturday, September 28, 2019 8:01 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] A White-breasted Nuthatch Solving A Problem

That’s an amazing report Jerry. I love the observations reported on this listserve.

There are numerous reports and even film of crows and gulls carrying mollusks aloft and dropping them on hard surfaces to crack the shells.

Add to that tool making abilities in crows and psittacines and I’d submit there is more going on in our bird brained friends heads than even we give them credit for.

Thank You,

Brett Niland
918-200-1818

On Sep 28, 2019, at 7:27 AM, Patty Kirk <PKirk...> wrote:


When there​'s a hard freeze in winter and my bird bath freezes over, I have observed more than once a squirrel spreading itself across the ice in the birdbath for hours to melt it enough with its body heat to get a drink. Could be instinct, and it's not a bird, but it seems like problem solving to me.



________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Sent: Friday, September 27, 2019 11:34 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] A White-breasted Nuthatch Solving A Problem

I could not post the pictures with this site but they can be seen on my Facebook page. The message in text form is below.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs


A White-breasted Nuthatch Solving A Problem

Jerry Wayne Davis

September 26, 2019

On May 7, 2015 Barbara and I were birding in Madeira Canyon in Southeast Arizona south of Tucson. We had seen many species of birds that were in the process of nesting or preparing for a second nesting. One of those species was a pair of White-breasted nuthatches. This species is a cavity nester which means they are one of the 85 species of birds that nest in holes in snags or hollow trees. There is a worldwide shortage of snags and cavities because people cut down snags and trees with cavities. In the case in my yard nuthatches build a nest in one of the 26 bird nest boxes I have for various species. yard.

The White-breasted nuthatch lines the bottom of its nest cavity with short broken pieces of bark that serves as a filter and keeps the eggs off of the bottom of the box or nest cavity. Other birds like bluebirds use grass and pine straw and a Carolina chickadee and Tufted Titmouse uses mosses, a tree swallow might include feathers and hummingbirds use spider webs. Yarn, and man made materials should not be put out for these birds, they absorb moisture and contaminate the nest. They find grasses, straw, and mosses and hair for their material.

The nuthatches we were watching were gathering small pieces of bark they broke from the loose bark of a mesquite tree. They took the small pieces and placed then in the nest cavity. We then noticed the male flying with a very long strip of bark. It was so long that it seemed make flying awkward. He took the bark to a series of granite boulders that had irregular surfaces and place the long piece of bark over an uneven surface with space below the middle of the bark. He proceeded to hit the bark with its beak. It used this action to break the longer piece of bark into smaller pieces and took them to it nest cavity.

I call this process problem solving. When I took psychology in the last millennium psychologist said that animals could not solve problems and only reacted with instinctive behavior. I am not sure they have now moved beyond this unenlightened mindset and think they now recognize that animals do solve problems. This observation with the white-breasted nuthatch and other species I have observed solving problem over the years makes me believe that humans have a lot to learn by observing wildlife.
 

Back to top
Date: 9/28/19 7:11 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Fw: [OKBIRDS] A White-breasted Nuthatch Solving A Problem


Brett, thanks for sharing. Yes I have seen crows drop pecans onto a parking lot to break before feeding. Since my post I was told about a book The genius of Birds.

https://www.amazon.com/Genius-Birds-Jennifer-Ackerman/dp/0399563121/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=The+Genius+of+Birds+by+Jennifer+Ackerman&qid=1569620079&s=gateway&sr=8-1

Thanks for sharing.

jerry

From: Brett Niland
Sent: Saturday, September 28, 2019 8:01 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] A White-breasted Nuthatch Solving A Problem

That’s an amazing report Jerry. I love the observations reported on this listserve.

There are numerous reports and even film of crows and gulls carrying mollusks aloft and dropping them on hard surfaces to crack the shells.

Add to that tool making abilities in crows and psittacines and I’d submit there is more going on in our bird brained friends heads than even we give them credit for.


Thank You,

Brett Niland
918-200-1818

On Sep 28, 2019, at 7:27 AM, Patty Kirk <PKirk...> wrote:


When there​'s a hard freeze in winter and my bird bath freezes over, I have observed more than once a squirrel spreading itself across the ice in the birdbath for hours to melt it enough with its body heat to get a drink. Could be instinct, and it's not a bird, but it seems like problem solving to me.





------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Sent: Friday, September 27, 2019 11:34 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] A White-breasted Nuthatch Solving A Problem

I could not post the pictures with this site but they can be seen on my Facebook page. The message in text form is below.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs

A White-breasted Nuthatch Solving A Problem

Jerry Wayne Davis

September 26, 2019

On May 7, 2015 Barbara and I were birding in Madeira Canyon in Southeast Arizona south of Tucson. We had seen many species of birds that were in the process of nesting or preparing for a second nesting. One of those species was a pair of White-breasted nuthatches. This species is a cavity nester which means they are one of the 85 species of birds that nest in holes in snags or hollow trees. There is a worldwide shortage of snags and cavities because people cut down snags and trees with cavities. In the case in my yard nuthatches build a nest in one of the 26 bird nest boxes I have for various species. yard.

The White-breasted nuthatch lines the bottom of its nest cavity with short broken pieces of bark that serves as a filter and keeps the eggs off of the bottom of the box or nest cavity. Other birds like bluebirds use grass and pine straw and a Carolina chickadee and Tufted Titmouse uses mosses, a tree swallow might include feathers and hummingbirds use spider webs. Yarn, and man made materials should not be put out for these birds, they absorb moisture and contaminate the nest. They find grasses, straw, and mosses and hair for their material.

The nuthatches we were watching were gathering small pieces of bark they broke from the loose bark of a mesquite tree. They took the small pieces and placed then in the nest cavity. We then noticed the male flying with a very long strip of bark. It was so long that it seemed make flying awkward. He took the bark to a series of granite boulders that had irregular surfaces and place the long piece of bark over an uneven surface with space below the middle of the bark. He proceeded to hit the bark with its beak. It used this action to break the longer piece of bark into smaller pieces and took them to it nest cavity.

I call this process problem solving. When I took psychology in the last millennium psychologist said that animals could not solve problems and only reacted with instinctive behavior. I am not sure they have now moved beyond this unenlightened mindset and think they now recognize that animals do solve problems. This observation with the white-breasted nuthatch and other species I have observed solving problem over the years makes me believe that humans have a lot to learn by observing wildlife.

 

Back to top
Date: 9/28/19 6:02 am
From: Brett Niland <bestguess...>
Subject: Re: A White-breasted Nuthatch Solving A Problem
That’s an amazing report Jerry. I love the observations reported on this listserve.

There are numerous reports and even film of crows and gulls carrying mollusks aloft and dropping them on hard surfaces to crack the shells.

Add to that tool making abilities in crows and psittacines and I’d submit there is more going on in our bird brained friends heads than even we give them credit for.

Thank You,

Brett Niland
918-200-1818

On Sep 28, 2019, at 7:27 AM, Patty Kirk <PKirk...><mailto:<PKirk...>> wrote:


When there​'s a hard freeze in winter and my bird bath freezes over, I have observed more than once a squirrel spreading itself across the ice in the birdbath for hours to melt it enough with its body heat to get a drink. Could be instinct, and it's not a bird, but it seems like problem solving to me.


________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...><mailto:<OKBIRDS...>> on behalf of Jerry Davis <jwdavis...><mailto:<jwdavis...>>
Sent: Friday, September 27, 2019 11:34 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...><mailto:<OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] A White-breasted Nuthatch Solving A Problem

I could not post the pictures with this site but they can be seen on my Facebook page. The message in text form is below.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs


A White-breasted Nuthatch Solving A Problem

Jerry Wayne Davis

September 26, 2019

On May 7, 2015 Barbara and I were birding in Madeira Canyon in Southeast Arizona south of Tucson. We had seen many species of birds that were in the process of nesting or preparing for a second nesting. One of those species was a pair of White-breasted nuthatches. This species is a cavity nester which means they are one of the 85 species of birds that nest in holes in snags or hollow trees. There is a worldwide shortage of snags and cavities because people cut down snags and trees with cavities. In the case in my yard nuthatches build a nest in one of the 26 bird nest boxes I have for various species. yard.

The White-breasted nuthatch lines the bottom of its nest cavity with short broken pieces of bark that serves as a filter and keeps the eggs off of the bottom of the box or nest cavity. Other birds like bluebirds use grass and pine straw and a Carolina chickadee and Tufted Titmouse uses mosses, a tree swallow might include feathers and hummingbirds use spider webs. Yarn, and man made materials should not be put out for these birds, they absorb moisture and contaminate the nest. They find grasses, straw, and mosses and hair for their material.

The nuthatches we were watching were gathering small pieces of bark they broke from the loose bark of a mesquite tree. They took the small pieces and placed then in the nest cavity. We then noticed the male flying with a very long strip of bark. It was so long that it seemed make flying awkward. He took the bark to a series of granite boulders that had irregular surfaces and place the long piece of bark over an uneven surface with space below the middle of the bark. He proceeded to hit the bark with its beak. It used this action to break the longer piece of bark into smaller pieces and took them to it nest cavity.

I call this process problem solving. When I took psychology in the last millennium psychologist said that animals could not solve problems and only reacted with instinctive behavior. I am not sure they have now moved beyond this unenlightened mindset and think they now recognize that animals do solve problems. This observation with the white-breasted nuthatch and other species I have observed solving problem over the years makes me believe that humans have a lot to learn by observing wildlife.
 

Back to top
Date: 9/28/19 5:27 am
From: Patty Kirk <PKirk...>
Subject: Re: A White-breasted Nuthatch Solving A Problem
When there?'s a hard freeze in winter and my bird bath freezes over, I have observed more than once a squirrel spreading itself across the ice in the birdbath for hours to melt it enough with its body heat to get a drink. Could be instinct, and it's not a bird, but it seems like problem solving to me.


________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Sent: Friday, September 27, 2019 11:34 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] A White-breasted Nuthatch Solving A Problem

I could not post the pictures with this site but they can be seen on my Facebook page. The message in text form is below.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs


A White-breasted Nuthatch Solving A Problem

Jerry Wayne Davis

September 26, 2019

On May 7, 2015 Barbara and I were birding in Madeira Canyon in Southeast Arizona south of Tucson. We had seen many species of birds that were in the process of nesting or preparing for a second nesting. One of those species was a pair of White-breasted nuthatches. This species is a cavity nester which means they are one of the 85 species of birds that nest in holes in snags or hollow trees. There is a worldwide shortage of snags and cavities because people cut down snags and trees with cavities. In the case in my yard nuthatches build a nest in one of the 26 bird nest boxes I have for various species. yard.

The White-breasted nuthatch lines the bottom of its nest cavity with short broken pieces of bark that serves as a filter and keeps the eggs off of the bottom of the box or nest cavity. Other birds like bluebirds use grass and pine straw and a Carolina chickadee and Tufted Titmouse uses mosses, a tree swallow might include feathers and hummingbirds use spider webs. Yarn, and man made materials should not be put out for these birds, they absorb moisture and contaminate the nest. They find grasses, straw, and mosses and hair for their material.

The nuthatches we were watching were gathering small pieces of bark they broke from the loose bark of a mesquite tree. They took the small pieces and placed then in the nest cavity. We then noticed the male flying with a very long strip of bark. It was so long that it seemed make flying awkward. He took the bark to a series of granite boulders that had irregular surfaces and place the long piece of bark over an uneven surface with space below the middle of the bark. He proceeded to hit the bark with its beak. It used this action to break the longer piece of bark into smaller pieces and took them to it nest cavity.

I call this process problem solving. When I took psychology in the last millennium psychologist said that animals could not solve problems and only reacted with instinctive behavior. I am not sure they have now moved beyond this unenlightened mindset and think they now recognize that animals do solve problems. This observation with the white-breasted nuthatch and other species I have observed solving problem over the years makes me believe that humans have a lot to learn by observing wildlife.

 

Back to top
Date: 9/28/19 4:28 am
From: John Hurd <jackhurd...>
Subject: Re: Virginia Rail
Had a similar situation with a Sora a few years back, it was also this time of year. It flew off in less than an hour. I think your right that they get tired of migrating on their short wings and fall out for a rest in less than desirable habitat.
Perhaps best to let it rest and observe, only catch if it is endangered by cars/cats dogs. Then if it does not get back on its way again after a day catch and bring to the rehaber.

Is it still hanging out?

Jack
OKC

________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Patricia Seibert <plseibert...>
Sent: Friday, September 27, 2019 10:39 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...> <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Virginia Rail


Terry, If the rail seems alert, not dazed or anything, I think Id leave it alone. I had one years ago duck into my neighbors azalea bushes. I wasnt sure what I had seen, as I approached it I flushed it, have regretted it ever since. It was perfectly contentand healthy.



Sent from Mail<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__go.microsoft.com_fwlink_-3FLinkId-3D550986&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=P93pPJxR9h-NZdGEeHEnoyLCB5YpvOT6PRR-ZwSzTXA&s=BqJ1AkWTBQuW5wMpeoYhMTeDD2RPak7LyMnoEtERfcc&e=> for Windows 10



From: Terry Mitchell<mailto:<terry...>
Sent: Friday, September 27, 2019 10:04 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...><mailto:<OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Virginia Rail



I work near 41st and Sheridan in Tulsa. A few minutes ago my boss was walking her dog in the front yard of the business and her dog found a Virginia Rail sitting on the grass next to a railroad tie. When I got close to it, it got down next to the tie as to where you can hardly see it. The bird is alert and when I got real close it started moving around like it was going to take off. I backed off then. What does everybody think, leave it alone and hope its just waiting for darkness to migrate or try to catch it and take it to a rehaber. It doesn't look hurt but I know that doesn't mean anything.








Terry Mitchell

Plastic Engineering

918-622-9660



 

Back to top
Date: 9/27/19 11:40 am
From: Terry Mitchell <terry...>
Subject: Re: Virginia Rail
Well it's at the vet. Before I dropped it off I stuck my finger in there
and promptly got nipped. When I picked it up it didn't move so maybe it's
doing better.



Terry Mitchell
Plastic Engineering
918-622-9660


On Fri, Sep 27, 2019 at 1:04 PM Brett Niland <bestguess...> wrote:

> +1 on Dr. Welch.
>
> Good guy.
>
> Brett
> ------------------------------
> *From:* okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Patricia Seibert <
> <plseibert...>
> *Sent:* Friday, September 27, 2019 12:44 PM
> *To:* <OKBIRDS...> <OKBIRDS...>
> *Subject:* Re: [OKBIRDS] Virginia Rail
>
> Good of you to save it, sounds like something was not quite right....
> Paul Welch!
>
> Pat
>
> On Sep 27, 2019, at 11:26 AM, Terry Mitchell <terry...> wrote:
>
> It ended up sitting out in the open baking in the sun, so I caught it.
> I'll take it to the vet this afternoon.
>
>
>
> Terry Mitchell
> Plastic Engineering
> 918-622-9660
>
>
> On Fri, Sep 27, 2019 at 10:40 AM Patricia Seibert <plseibert...>
> wrote:
>
> Terry, If the rail seems alert, not dazed or anything, I think I’d leave
> it alone. I had one years ago duck into my neighbors azalea bushes. I
> wasn’t sure what I had seen, as I approached it I flushed it, have
> regretted it ever since. It was perfectly content……and healthy.
>
>
>
> Sent from Mail
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__go.microsoft.com_fwlink_-3FLinkId-3D550986&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=P93pPJxR9h-NZdGEeHEnoyLCB5YpvOT6PRR-ZwSzTXA&s=BqJ1AkWTBQuW5wMpeoYhMTeDD2RPak7LyMnoEtERfcc&e=>
> for Windows 10
>
>
>
> *From: *Terry Mitchell <terry...>
> *Sent: *Friday, September 27, 2019 10:04 AM
> *To: *<OKBIRDS...>
> *Subject: *[OKBIRDS] Virginia Rail
>
>
>
> I work near 41st and Sheridan in Tulsa. A few minutes ago my boss was
> walking her dog in the front yard of the business and her dog found a
> Virginia Rail sitting on the grass next to a railroad tie. When I got close
> to it, it got down next to the tie as to where you can hardly see it. The
> bird is alert and when I got real close it started moving around like it
> was going to take off. I backed off then. What does everybody think, leave
> it alone and hope its just waiting for darkness to migrate or try to catch
> it and take it to a rehaber. It doesn't look hurt but I know that doesn't
> mean anything.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Terry Mitchell
>
> Plastic Engineering
>
> 918-622-9660
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/27/19 11:04 am
From: Brett Niland <bestguess...>
Subject: Re: Virginia Rail
+1 on Dr. Welch.

Good guy.

Brett
________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Patricia Seibert <plseibert...>
Sent: Friday, September 27, 2019 12:44 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...> <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Virginia Rail

Good of you to save it, sounds like something was not quite right....
Paul Welch!

Pat

On Sep 27, 2019, at 11:26 AM, Terry Mitchell <terry...><mailto:<terry...>> wrote:

It ended up sitting out in the open baking in the sun, so I caught it. I'll take it to the vet this afternoon.



Terry Mitchell
Plastic Engineering
918-622-9660


On Fri, Sep 27, 2019 at 10:40 AM Patricia Seibert <plseibert...><mailto:<plseibert...>> wrote:

Terry, If the rail seems alert, not dazed or anything, I think Id leave it alone. I had one years ago duck into my neighbors azalea bushes. I wasnt sure what I had seen, as I approached it I flushed it, have regretted it ever since. It was perfectly contentand healthy.



Sent from Mail<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__go.microsoft.com_fwlink_-3FLinkId-3D550986&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=P93pPJxR9h-NZdGEeHEnoyLCB5YpvOT6PRR-ZwSzTXA&s=BqJ1AkWTBQuW5wMpeoYhMTeDD2RPak7LyMnoEtERfcc&e=> for Windows 10



From: Terry Mitchell<mailto:<terry...>
Sent: Friday, September 27, 2019 10:04 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...><mailto:<OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Virginia Rail



I work near 41st and Sheridan in Tulsa. A few minutes ago my boss was walking her dog in the front yard of the business and her dog found a Virginia Rail sitting on the grass next to a railroad tie. When I got close to it, it got down next to the tie as to where you can hardly see it. The bird is alert and when I got real close it started moving around like it was going to take off. I backed off then. What does everybody think, leave it alone and hope its just waiting for darkness to migrate or try to catch it and take it to a rehaber. It doesn't look hurt but I know that doesn't mean anything.








Terry Mitchell

Plastic Engineering

918-622-9660



 

Back to top
Date: 9/27/19 10:45 am
From: Patricia Seibert <plseibert...>
Subject: Re: Virginia Rail
Good of you to save it, sounds like something was not quite right....
Paul Welch!

Pat

> On Sep 27, 2019, at 11:26 AM, Terry Mitchell <terry...> wrote:
>
> It ended up sitting out in the open baking in the sun, so I caught it. I'll take it to the vet this afternoon.
>
>
>
> Terry Mitchell
> Plastic Engineering
> 918-622-9660
>
>
>> On Fri, Sep 27, 2019 at 10:40 AM Patricia Seibert <plseibert...> wrote:
>> Terry, If the rail seems alert, not dazed or anything, I think I’d leave it alone. I had one years ago duck into my neighbors azalea bushes. I wasn’t sure what I had seen, as I approached it I flushed it, have regretted it ever since. It was perfectly content……and healthy.
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from Mail for Windows 10
>>
>>
>>
>> From: Terry Mitchell
>> Sent: Friday, September 27, 2019 10:04 AM
>> To: <OKBIRDS...>
>> Subject: [OKBIRDS] Virginia Rail
>>
>>
>>
>> I work near 41st and Sheridan in Tulsa. A few minutes ago my boss was walking her dog in the front yard of the business and her dog found a Virginia Rail sitting on the grass next to a railroad tie. When I got close to it, it got down next to the tie as to where you can hardly see it. The bird is alert and when I got real close it started moving around like it was going to take off. I backed off then. What does everybody think, leave it alone and hope its just waiting for darkness to migrate or try to catch it and take it to a rehaber. It doesn't look hurt but I know that doesn't mean anything.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Terry Mitchell
>>
>> Plastic Engineering
>>
>> 918-622-9660
>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/27/19 9:36 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: A White-breasted Nuthatch Solving A Problem
I could not post the pictures with this site but they can be seen on my Facebook page. The message in text form is below.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs

A White-breasted Nuthatch Solving A Problem

Jerry Wayne Davis

September 26, 2019

On May 7, 2015 Barbara and I were birding in Madeira Canyon in Southeast Arizona south of Tucson. We had seen many species of birds that were in the process of nesting or preparing for a second nesting. One of those species was a pair of White-breasted nuthatches. This species is a cavity nester which means they are one of the 85 species of birds that nest in holes in snags or hollow trees. There is a worldwide shortage of snags and cavities because people cut down snags and trees with cavities. In the case in my yard nuthatches build a nest in one of the 26 bird nest boxes I have for various species. yard.

The White-breasted nuthatch lines the bottom of its nest cavity with short broken pieces of bark that serves as a filter and keeps the eggs off of the bottom of the box or nest cavity. Other birds like bluebirds use grass and pine straw and a Carolina chickadee and Tufted Titmouse uses mosses, a tree swallow might include feathers and hummingbirds use spider webs. Yarn, and man made materials should not be put out for these birds, they absorb moisture and contaminate the nest. They find grasses, straw, and mosses and hair for their material.

The nuthatches we were watching were gathering small pieces of bark they broke from the loose bark of a mesquite tree. They took the small pieces and placed then in the nest cavity. We then noticed the male flying with a very long strip of bark. It was so long that it seemed make flying awkward. He took the bark to a series of granite boulders that had irregular surfaces and place the long piece of bark over an uneven surface with space below the middle of the bark. He proceeded to hit the bark with its beak. It used this action to break the longer piece of bark into smaller pieces and took them to it nest cavity.

I call this process problem solving. When I took psychology in the last millennium psychologist said that animals could not solve problems and only reacted with instinctive behavior. I am not sure they have now moved beyond this unenlightened mindset and think they now recognize that animals do solve problems. This observation with the white-breasted nuthatch and other species I have observed solving problem over the years makes me believe that humans have a lot to learn by observing wildlife.

 

Back to top
Date: 9/27/19 9:27 am
From: Terry Mitchell <terry...>
Subject: Re: Virginia Rail
It ended up sitting out in the open baking in the sun, so I caught it. I'll
take it to the vet this afternoon.



Terry Mitchell
Plastic Engineering
918-622-9660


On Fri, Sep 27, 2019 at 10:40 AM Patricia Seibert <plseibert...>
wrote:

> Terry, If the rail seems alert, not dazed or anything, I think I’d leave
> it alone. I had one years ago duck into my neighbors azalea bushes. I
> wasn’t sure what I had seen, as I approached it I flushed it, have
> regretted it ever since. It was perfectly content……and healthy.
>
>
>
> Sent from Mail
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__go.microsoft.com_fwlink_-3FLinkId-3D550986&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=P93pPJxR9h-NZdGEeHEnoyLCB5YpvOT6PRR-ZwSzTXA&s=BqJ1AkWTBQuW5wMpeoYhMTeDD2RPak7LyMnoEtERfcc&e=>
> for Windows 10
>
>
>
> *From: *Terry Mitchell <terry...>
> *Sent: *Friday, September 27, 2019 10:04 AM
> *To: *<OKBIRDS...>
> *Subject: *[OKBIRDS] Virginia Rail
>
>
>
> I work near 41st and Sheridan in Tulsa. A few minutes ago my boss was
> walking her dog in the front yard of the business and her dog found a
> Virginia Rail sitting on the grass next to a railroad tie. When I got close
> to it, it got down next to the tie as to where you can hardly see it. The
> bird is alert and when I got real close it started moving around like it
> was going to take off. I backed off then. What does everybody think, leave
> it alone and hope its just waiting for darkness to migrate or try to catch
> it and take it to a rehaber. It doesn't look hurt but I know that doesn't
> mean anything.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Terry Mitchell
>
> Plastic Engineering
>
> 918-622-9660
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/27/19 8:40 am
From: Patricia Seibert <plseibert...>
Subject: Re: Virginia Rail
Terry, If the rail seems alert, not dazed or anything, I think I’d leave it alone. I had one years ago duck into my neighbors azalea bushes. I wasn’t sure what I had seen, as I approached it I flushed it, have regretted it ever since. It was perfectly content……and healthy.

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Terry Mitchell
Sent: Friday, September 27, 2019 10:04 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Virginia Rail

 I work near 41st and Sheridan in Tulsa. A few minutes ago my boss was walking her dog in the front yard of the business and her dog found a Virginia Rail sitting on the grass next to a railroad tie. When I got close to it, it  got down next to the tie as to where you can hardly see it. The bird is alert and when I got real close it started moving around like it was going to take off. I backed off then. What does everybody think, leave it alone and hope its just waiting for darkness to migrate or try to catch it and take it to a rehaber. It doesn't look hurt but I know that doesn't mean anything.

  



Terry Mitchell
Plastic Engineering
918-622-9660


 

Back to top
Date: 9/27/19 8:06 am
From: Terry Mitchell <terry...>
Subject: Virginia Rail
I work near 41st and Sheridan in Tulsa. A few minutes ago my boss was
walking her dog in the front yard of the business and her dog found a
Virginia Rail sitting on the grass next to a railroad tie. When I got close
to it, it got down next to the tie as to where you can hardly see it. The
bird is alert and when I got real close it started moving around like it
was going to take off. I backed off then. What does everybody think, leave
it alone and hope its just waiting for darkness to migrate or try to catch
it and take it to a rehaber. It doesn't look hurt but I know that doesn't
mean anything.




Terry Mitchell
Plastic Engineering
918-622-9660

 

Back to top
Date: 9/26/19 3:43 pm
From: John Shackford <johnshackford...>
Subject: Re: Couch Park
Good name! Good guy! Good strategy!


> On Sep 26, 2019, at 4:24 PM, O Connell, Tim <tim.oconnell...> wrote:
>
>
>> On Sep 26, 2019, at 4:04 PM, John Shackford <johnshackford...> wrote:
>>
>> **External Email - Please verify sender email address before responding.**
>>
>> Is Couch Park in Stillwater, where 6 species of warblers were recently reported from, named after John Couch? Kudos to the city of Stillwater if it is. Just wondering.
>>
>> John Shackford
>
> That’s what we tell him when we want him to lead a field trip there! ; >
> ~t
 

Back to top
Date: 9/26/19 2:29 pm
From: Jimmy Woodard <j.woodard...>
Subject: Roman Nose State Park bird question
I met a Midwest City official today who asked me about a
recent sighting of a Bald Eagle at Roman Nose State

Park.

Has anyone birded the park in Blaine County recently and seen
a Bald Eagle there? I checked Ebird records and

Did not see any recent sightings of eagles up there.

Thanks.



Jimmy Woodard

Midwest City, OK


 

Back to top
Date: 9/26/19 2:25 pm
From: O Connell, Tim <tim.oconnell...>
Subject: Re: Couch Park

> On Sep 26, 2019, at 4:04 PM, John Shackford <johnshackford...> wrote:
>
> **External Email - Please verify sender email address before responding.**
>
> Is Couch Park in Stillwater, where 6 species of warblers were recently reported from, named after John Couch? Kudos to the city of Stillwater if it is. Just wondering.
>
> John Shackford

That’s what we tell him when we want him to lead a field trip there! ; >
~t
 

Back to top
Date: 9/26/19 2:19 pm
From: Richrd Gunn <richardgunn1940...>
Subject: South Jenkins
Been slow but this morning I saw a veritable flock of kestels (6) and we
still Mississippi kites. Wednesday I saw an olive sided flycatcher as well.
D.

 

Back to top
Date: 9/26/19 2:15 pm
From: Poland, Zachary <zpoland...>
Subject: Re: Empid at William’s Green Tulsa—Potential Hammond’s
Hal,

Based on your description I’d say Least. Tail length, wing length/primary projection are other good things to note. Thanks for your sighting.

ZAP

On Sep 26, 2019, at 2:33 PM, Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...><mailto:<drhal2...>> wrote:

**External Email - Please verify sender email address before responding.**
I saw an empidonax this morning in Mitch Park in Chinese pastache trees near the 2 shelters down near the small wooden bridge (parking lot near the big playground).
It was viewed at 20 feet. Green gray back , lots of yellow wash on the breast, whitish throat, lower bill proximal half dull orange, visible eye ring.
Thoughts?
Hal Yocum
Sent from my iPhone

On Sep 26, 2019, at 1:07 PM, Poland, Zachary <zpoland...><mailto:<zpoland...>> wrote:

I prematurely sent the previous email. I don’t want to be flippant in the ID of Hammond’s, but I believe it is a very strong candidate.

ZAP

On Sep 26, 2019, at 12:59 PM, Poland, Zachary <zpoland...><mailto:<zpoland...>> wrote:

Empid Flycatcher at William’s Green, downtown Tulsa. Potential Hammond’s Flycatcher.

In trees around globe statue.

Description:


Eye ring mostly absent. Almost completely dark lower mandible. Bill relatively narrow from below. Long primary projection. Distinct dark vest on flanks of breast. Uniformly gray above. Relatively high in trees. I think Hammond’s.

ZAP
 

Back to top
Date: 9/26/19 2:06 pm
From: John Shackford <johnshackford...>
Subject: Couch Park
Is Couch Park in Stillwater, where 6 species of warblers were recently reported from, named after John Couch? Kudos to the city of Stillwater if it is. Just wondering.

John Shackford
 

Back to top
Date: 9/26/19 12:33 pm
From: Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...>
Subject: Re: Empid at William’s Green Tulsa—Potential Hammond’s
I saw an empidonax this morning in Mitch Park in Chinese pastache trees near the 2 shelters down near the small wooden bridge (parking lot near the big playground).
It was viewed at 20 feet. Green gray back , lots of yellow wash on the breast, whitish throat, lower bill proximal half dull orange, visible eye ring.
Thoughts?
Hal Yocum
Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 26, 2019, at 1:07 PM, Poland, Zachary <zpoland...> wrote:
>
> I prematurely sent the previous email. I don’t want to be flippant in the ID of Hammond’s, but I believe it is a very strong candidate.
>
> ZAP
>
> On Sep 26, 2019, at 12:59 PM, Poland, Zachary <zpoland...> wrote:
>
>> Empid Flycatcher at William’s Green, downtown Tulsa. Potential Hammond’s Flycatcher.
>>
>> In trees around globe statue.
>>
>> Description:
>>
>> Eye ring mostly absent. Almost completely dark lower mandible. Bill relatively narrow from below. Long primary projection. Distinct dark vest on flanks of breast. Uniformly gray above. Relatively high in trees. I think Hammond’s.
>>
>> ZAP

 

Back to top
Date: 9/26/19 11:08 am
From: Poland, Zachary <zpoland...>
Subject: Re: Empid at William’s Green Tulsa—Potential Hammond’s
I prematurely sent the previous email. I don’t want to be flippant in the ID of Hammond’s, but I believe it is a very strong candidate.

ZAP

On Sep 26, 2019, at 12:59 PM, Poland, Zachary <zpoland...><mailto:<zpoland...>> wrote:

Empid Flycatcher at William’s Green, downtown Tulsa. Potential Hammond’s Flycatcher.

In trees around globe statue.

Description:


Eye ring mostly absent. Almost completely dark lower mandible. Bill relatively narrow from below. Long primary projection. Distinct dark vest on flanks of breast. Uniformly gray above. Relatively high in trees. I think Hammond’s.

ZAP
 

Back to top
Date: 9/26/19 10:58 am
From: Poland, Zachary <zpoland...>
Subject: Empid at William’s Green Tulsa—Potential Hammond’s
Empid Flycatcher at William’s Green, downtown Tulsa. Potential Hammond’s Flycatcher.

In trees around globe statue.

Description:


Eye ring mostly absent. Almost completely dark lower mandible. Bill relatively narrow from below. Long primary projection. Distinct dark vest on flanks of breast. Uniformly gray above. Relatively high in trees. I think Hammond’s.

ZAP
 

Back to top
Date: 9/25/19 6:36 pm
From: Landon Neumann <landonneumann25...>
Subject: Stillwater Warblers
Songbird migration has been very slow in Stillwater this Fall until this
morning. Had 6 species of warblers at Couch Park in Stillwater.

Yellow Warbler 2
Black-and-white Warbler 1
Black-throated Green Warbler 2
Magnolia Warbler 1
Nashville Warbler 12
Northern Parula

Landon Neumann
Stillwater, OK

 

Back to top
Date: 9/25/19 11:47 am
From: Harold A. Yocum <drhal2...>
Subject: Re: Death of an Egret
Once I was birding at the North Woods at Oxley Nature Center in Tulsa and we found a “floundering “ coot . We discovered that a large snapping turtle had it by 1 leg. It was unfortunately a long ordeal for the coot. The snapper literally just hung on until the coot was exhausted trying to get free and eventually pulled it underwater and dragged it into the depths of the pond.
Hal Yocum ( Edmond)

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 25, 2019, at 7:45 AM, Harmon, Vonceil <vcharmon...> wrote:
>
> Thank you David! That is really fascinating and I am sure quite a bit of entertainment value for you. Really appreciate your observations on the benefits of the cattle egrets as well.
>
>
> Vonceil Harmon
> Highway Biologist
> Oklahoma Department of Transportation
> Oklahoma Biological Survey
> 111 E Chesapeake St
> Norman, Oklahoma, 73019
> tel) 405.249.5130
> fax) 405.325.7702
> <vcharmon...>
>
>
>
> From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of David Arbour <arbour...>
> Sent: Wednesday, September 25, 2019 7:59 AM
> To: <OKBIRDS...> <OKBIRDS...>
> Subject: [OKBIRDS] Death of an Egret
>
> While working at Red Slough yesterday I drove into Pintail Lake and parked near the photo blind and facing toward the Otter Lake spillway. There was a group of Cattle Egrets feeding by the spillway on the levee. While I was messing with some of my gear, I noticed a sudden movement out of the corner of my eye and looked up to see the Cattle Egrets flushing, and noticed one of the egrets had a large brown blob, bigger than it was, hanging on to it as it flew. The bird and blob were 10 feet in the air and suddenly plummeted to the ground. As they hit the ground they went out of sight in some tall vegetation at the edge of the lake. As I watched, out popped a small bobcat with the struggling egret in its mouth. It quickly dispatched the egret and ran off down the levee to the north with its prey. I have seen this small bobcat hanging around this area all summer apparently trying to catch gallinules from the shore cover. Having 20,000+ Cattle Egrets nesting and roosting on the lake has been a boon for predators this year with not only the bobcats benefitting, but the gators have been hanging out under the nests in the lakes and getting their share too. From the pile of egret feathers on the ground underneath the railings of the Observation platforms, it appears the Great-horned Owls have been having a feast too. The Cattle Egrets, although not native to North America originally, seem to provide a benefit to cattle ranchers by feeding on grass competing grasshoppers and ridding the cows of horse flies. They also eat a lot of beneficial stuff too as I have noticed while working on the tractor at Red Slough. Mostly I see them eating grasshoppers but I see them eat quite a few frogs and snakes too, and I’m sure they will eat mice and small birds. They seem to benefit other waders as they appear to be the first waders to start a heronry which attracts our other native waders to join them.
>
> David Arbour
> De Queen, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 9/25/19 9:27 am
From: Susanne Lutze <eztuls46...>
Subject: Re: Death of an Egret
Fascinating observations. I need Cattle Egrets in my back yard as I have
hordes of grasshoppers in my back gardens as I live on a weedy greenbelt.
They are HUGE.


" There is a pleasure in the pathless woods;
There is rapture on the lonely shore;
There is society, where none intrudes,
By the deep sea, and music in its roar:
I love not man the less, but Nature more...."

Lord Byron




On Wed, Sep 25, 2019 at 10:26 AM Ernie <elsabbado...> wrote:

> Very interesting
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Sep 25, 2019, at 7:59 AM, David Arbour <arbour...> wrote:
> >
> > Arbour
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/25/19 8:27 am
From: Ernie <elsabbado...>
Subject: Re: Death of an Egret
Very interesting

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 25, 2019, at 7:59 AM, David Arbour <arbour...> wrote:
>
> Arbour
 

Back to top
Date: 9/25/19 6:46 am
From: Harmon, Vonceil <vcharmon...>
Subject: Re: Death of an Egret
Thank you David! That is really fascinating and I am sure quite a bit of entertainment value for you. Really appreciate your observations on the benefits of the cattle egrets as well.


Vonceil Harmon
Highway Biologist
Oklahoma Department of Transportation
Oklahoma Biological Survey
111 E Chesapeake St
Norman, Oklahoma, 73019
tel) 405.249.5130
fax) 405.325.7702
<vcharmon...>


________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of David Arbour <arbour...>
Sent: Wednesday, September 25, 2019 7:59 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...> <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Death of an Egret


While working at Red Slough yesterday I drove into Pintail Lake and parked near the photo blind and facing toward the Otter Lake spillway. There was a group of Cattle Egrets feeding by the spillway on the levee. While I was messing with some of my gear, I noticed a sudden movement out of the corner of my eye and looked up to see the Cattle Egrets flushing, and noticed one of the egrets had a large brown blob, bigger than it was, hanging on to it as it flew. The bird and blob were 10 feet in the air and suddenly plummeted to the ground. As they hit the ground they went out of sight in some tall vegetation at the edge of the lake. As I watched, out popped a small bobcat with the struggling egret in its mouth. It quickly dispatched the egret and ran off down the levee to the north with its prey. I have seen this small bobcat hanging around this area all summer apparently trying to catch gallinules from the shore cover. Having 20,000+ Cattle Egrets nesting and roosting on the lake has been a boon for predators this year with not only the bobcats benefitting, but the gators have been hanging out under the nests in the lakes and getting their share too. From the pile of egret feathers on the ground underneath the railings of the Observation platforms, it appears the Great-horned Owls have been having a feast too. The Cattle Egrets, although not native to North America originally, seem to provide a benefit to cattle ranchers by feeding on grass competing grasshoppers and ridding the cows of horse flies. They also eat a lot of beneficial stuff too as I have noticed while working on the tractor at Red Slough. Mostly I see them eating grasshoppers but I see them eat quite a few frogs and snakes too, and Im sure they will eat mice and small birds. They seem to benefit other waders as they appear to be the first waders to start a heronry which attracts our other native waders to join them.



David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 9/25/19 6:09 am
From: Richrd Gunn <richardgunn1940...>
Subject: Re: Death of an Egret
Way cool. I love the fact that the egret was strong enough to actually
carry the cat before it fell. Great report.

On Wed, Sep 25, 2019, 7:59 AM David Arbour <arbour...> wrote:

> While working at Red Slough yesterday I drove into Pintail Lake and parked
> near the photo blind and facing toward the Otter Lake spillway. There was
> a group of Cattle Egrets feeding by the spillway on the levee. While I was
> messing with some of my gear, I noticed a sudden movement out of the corner
> of my eye and looked up to see the Cattle Egrets flushing, and noticed one
> of the egrets had a large brown blob, bigger than it was, hanging on to it
> as it flew. The bird and blob were 10 feet in the air and suddenly
> plummeted to the ground. As they hit the ground they went out of sight in
> some tall vegetation at the edge of the lake. As I watched, out popped a
> small bobcat with the struggling egret in its mouth. It quickly dispatched
> the egret and ran off down the levee to the north with its prey. I have
> seen this small bobcat hanging around this area all summer apparently
> trying to catch gallinules from the shore cover. Having 20,000+ Cattle
> Egrets nesting and roosting on the lake has been a boon for predators this
> year with not only the bobcats benefitting, but the gators have been
> hanging out under the nests in the lakes and getting their share too. From
> the pile of egret feathers on the ground underneath the railings of the
> Observation platforms, it appears the Great-horned Owls have been having a
> feast too. The Cattle Egrets, although not native to North America
> originally, seem to provide a benefit to cattle ranchers by feeding on
> grass competing grasshoppers and ridding the cows of horse flies. They
> also eat a lot of beneficial stuff too as I have noticed while working on
> the tractor at Red Slough. Mostly I see them eating grasshoppers but I see
> them eat quite a few frogs and snakes too, and I’m sure they will eat mice
> and small birds. They seem to benefit other waders as they appear to be
> the first waders to start a heronry which attracts our other native waders
> to join them.
>
>
>
> David Arbour
>
> De Queen, AR
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/25/19 6:00 am
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Death of an Egret
While working at Red Slough yesterday I drove into Pintail Lake and parked
near the photo blind and facing toward the Otter Lake spillway. There was a
group of Cattle Egrets feeding by the spillway on the levee. While I was
messing with some of my gear, I noticed a sudden movement out of the corner
of my eye and looked up to see the Cattle Egrets flushing, and noticed one
of the egrets had a large brown blob, bigger than it was, hanging on to it
as it flew. The bird and blob were 10 feet in the air and suddenly
plummeted to the ground. As they hit the ground they went out of sight in
some tall vegetation at the edge of the lake. As I watched, out popped a
small bobcat with the struggling egret in its mouth. It quickly dispatched
the egret and ran off down the levee to the north with its prey. I have
seen this small bobcat hanging around this area all summer apparently trying
to catch gallinules from the shore cover. Having 20,000+ Cattle Egrets
nesting and roosting on the lake has been a boon for predators this year
with not only the bobcats benefitting, but the gators have been hanging out
under the nests in the lakes and getting their share too. From the pile of
egret feathers on the ground underneath the railings of the Observation
platforms, it appears the Great-horned Owls have been having a feast too.
The Cattle Egrets, although not native to North America originally, seem to
provide a benefit to cattle ranchers by feeding on grass competing
grasshoppers and ridding the cows of horse flies. They also eat a lot of
beneficial stuff too as I have noticed while working on the tractor at Red
Slough. Mostly I see them eating grasshoppers but I see them eat quite a
few frogs and snakes too, and I'm sure they will eat mice and small birds.
They seem to benefit other waders as they appear to be the first waders to
start a heronry which attracts our other native waders to join them.



David Arbour

De Queen, AR


 

Back to top
Date: 9/24/19 10:21 am
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...>
Subject: Tuesday Morning
Hello All,

This morning there were three American Avocets on Lake Yahola, along with
Black Terns, Blue-Winged Teal and Pied-Billed Grebes.

Also, the section of the Mohawk Park road from Oxley Nature Center to the
North Woods and Yahola has been reopened.

Good Birding,

Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK

 

Back to top
Date: 9/23/19 8:26 am
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...>
Subject: Pathfinder Parkway on 9-23-2019
Hello All,
I walked the Pathfinder Parkway in Bartlesville this morning from Silver Lake Road to the high school and back. It was sunny and cooler. Leopard frogs were calling loudly in 4 different places. Highlights included:

Yellow-billed Cuckoo-1
Acadian Flycatcher-4 still singing or calling
Eastern Phoebe-3
Great Crested Flycatcher-1
White-eyed Vireo-1
Blue-headed Vireo-1
Red-eyed Vireo-1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet-1
Wilson's Warbler-2
Indigo Bunting-3 brown ones

Mark Peterson
Bartlesville

 

Back to top
Date: 9/23/19 7:17 am
From: janis blanton <janis.blanton...>
Subject: Tall grass prairie today
Saw 15 kestrels and 10 yellow shafted Flickers this morning on bison loop

Janis Blanton
 

Join us on Facebook!