OKbirds
Received From Subject
6/20/17 2:22 pm Jo <jo.loyd...> Wood Thrush
6/19/17 8:00 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - June 19
6/19/17 9:21 am blaval <blaval...> Re: Phoebe
6/19/17 8:11 am Sylvias Serpentine <sylvias.serpentine...> Re: Phoebe
6/19/17 8:10 am Jan Dolph <russetdm...> Re: Phoebe
6/19/17 8:09 am Larry Mays <larrymays1949...> Re: Phoebe
6/19/17 2:05 am William Diffin <okiebirder...> Saw-whet Owls in Oklahoma
6/18/17 11:54 am Mia Revels <0000004e74e60ce3-dmarc-request...> Re: U. S. Open Birds
6/18/17 11:14 am Steve Schafer <steve...> Re: U. S. Open Birds
6/18/17 10:30 am Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...> Re: U. S. Open Birds
6/17/17 2:16 pm Jim Arterburn <JIMARTERBURN...> New Photos Added
6/17/17 10:09 am Mia Revels <0000004e74e60ce3-dmarc-request...> Re: U. S. Open Birds
6/17/17 8:46 am Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...> U. S. Open Birds
6/17/17 8:07 am Gloria <oprakitas...> Re: Phoebe
6/17/17 4:26 am Bob LaVal <blaval...> Phoebe
6/15/17 4:53 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Storks and spoonbill
6/14/17 5:38 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Wood Storks at Red Slough
6/14/17 11:02 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Bird Nest Box Management
6/14/17 10:48 am Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...> Re: Bird Nest Box Management
6/12/17 8:05 pm Jim Arterburn <JIMARTERBURN...> New Photos added to website
6/12/17 5:32 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Update: storks, spoonbill, etc.
6/6/17 6:30 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Update
6/5/17 2:03 pm Dora Webb <owl112...> Re: Eastern Bluebirds - A Note
6/5/17 10:27 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Eastern Bluebirds - A Note
6/4/17 8:08 am Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...> Late Osprey and Photos
6/3/17 7:25 am Ann Gordon <chesterann...> Re: Fwd: Costa Rica AAST fund-raiser tour
6/3/17 6:51 am Steve Davis <spd8109...> Re: Fwd: Costa Rica AAST fund-raiser tour
6/3/17 2:26 am Lisa Wiesbauer <lakehaven58...> Re: Fwd: Costa Rica AAST fund-raiser tour
6/2/17 2:09 pm Mia Revels <0000004e74e60ce3-dmarc-request...> Fwd: Costa Rica AAST fund-raiser tour
6/2/17 10:57 am Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...> Hackberry Flat last Wednesday
6/2/17 9:45 am Linda Adams <000000853e24127e-dmarc-request...> Re: OOS Membership Dues
6/2/17 8:36 am mphilips13 <mphilips13...> Re: Oklahoma Breeding Bird Survey volunteers badly needed
6/2/17 8:06 am Dan Reinking <dan...> Oklahoma Breeding Bird Survey volunteers badly needed
6/2/17 7:17 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Fw: Bewick's Wren data needed from Arkansas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Kansas
6/1/17 7:33 pm Linda Adams <000000853e24127e-dmarc-request...> OOS Membership Dues
6/1/17 9:50 am Patricia Velte <pvelte...> June Migration Report
6/1/17 7:10 am Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...> Hackberry Flat yesterday
5/31/17 7:18 am Mary Tate <mary.d.tate...> removal
5/30/17 8:24 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red slough Bird Survey - May 30
5/30/17 7:30 am Dustin Meadows <Dustin_Meadows...> Remove from list
5/26/17 3:00 pm blaval <blaval...> Re: Acorn Woodpecker Insight
5/26/17 9:54 am Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...> Re: Acorn Woodpecker Insight
5/26/17 9:31 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Acorn Woodpecker Insight
5/25/17 11:17 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Henslow's Sparrow information
5/25/17 10:48 am Dan Reinking <dan...> Re: Henslow's Sparrow information
5/25/17 10:44 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Henslow's Sparrow information
5/25/17 10:40 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Henslow's Sparrow information
5/25/17 6:06 am Dan Reinking <dan...> Henslow's Sparrow information
5/24/17 3:09 pm harold Yocum <drhal2...> Re: Help with bird ID
5/24/17 12:58 pm Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...> Re: Help with bird ID
5/24/17 11:29 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Red-necked Phalarope
5/24/17 11:10 am Dora Webb <owl112...> Help with bird ID
5/23/17 11:59 am Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...> The Panhandle from 5-19 to 5-22-2017
 
Back to top
Date: 6/20/17 2:22 pm
From: Jo <jo.loyd...>
Subject: Wood Thrush
The Tulsa birders heard a Wood Thrush singing this morning north of West 71
St. S. on South 61 St. West. We were unable to see the bird as it was in
very dense woods. We considered this well west of it normal range in
eastern Oklahoma.



Jo Loyd


 

Back to top
Date: 6/19/17 8:00 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 19
It was mostly overcast and cool today with a little wind. 68 species were
found. I was at the photo blind on Pintail Lake this morning when I heard
the song "Oh Sam Pea-body". I couldn't believe my ears. I listened but did
not hear it again and was wondering if I was hearing things. A few minutes
later I heard it again, this time much closer and louder. There was no
doubt what I was hearing. I grabbed my callback device and headed to where
I heard the call coming from and played the call of the White-throated
Sparrow. I played it several times then suddenly I was hearing call notes.
I headed toward the calls and scanned across a flooded ditch and there he
was sitting in a willow tree. A beautiful breeding plumaged White-throated
Sparrow. I have no idea what he was doing here this time of year. Storks
and spoonbill were fairly easy this morning south of the SE corner of Otter
Lake in unit 27A. A little later the spoonbill and one stork were sitting
in the roost/rookery on Pintail Lake. Lots of other good birds today
including Cave Swallow. Here is my list for today:



Wood Duck - 12

Mallard - 4 males

Northern Shoveler - 3

Pied-billed Grebe - 3 (also a brood of 4 chicks)

American White Pelican - 5

Neotropic Cormorant - 10

Anhinga - 30

Least Bittern - 1

Great-blue Heron - 6

Great Egret - 25

Snowy Egret - 26

Little-blue Heron - 18

Tricolored Heron - 1

Cattle Egret - 103

Green Heron - 7

White Ibis - 29

Roseate Spoonbill - 1

Wood Stork - 5

Black Vulture - 50

Turkey Vulture - 9

Mississippi Kite - 10

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Purple Gallinule - 23 (also a brood of 4 chicks)

Common Gallinule - 17 (a couple broods of chicks also.)

American Coot - 5

Killdeer - 4

Mourning Dove - 3

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 9

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 3

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Acadian Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 3

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2

White-eyed Vireo - 9

Bell's Vireo - 7

Red-eyed Vireo - 1

American Crow - 4

Fish Crow - 2

Purple Martin - 3

Tree Swallow - 16

Cliff Swallow - 11

Cave Swallow - 1

Barn Swallow - 41

Carolina Chickadee - 2

Tufted Titmouse - 4

Carolina Wren - 4

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 6

Wood Thrush - 1

Gray Catbird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 3

Pine Warbler - 3

Prothonotary Warbler - 4

Kentucky Warbler - 2

Common Yellowthroat - 12

Yellow-breasted Chat - 10

Summer Tanager - 1

Eastern Towhee - 3

White-throated Sparrow - 1 (singing male in alternate plumage)

Northern Cardinal - 14

Blue Grosbeak - 1

Indigo Bunting - 26

Painted Bunting - 9

Dickcissel - 15

Red-winged Blackbird - 25

Common Grackle - 3

Brown-headed Cowbird - 6

Orchard Oriole - 6





Odonates:





Fragile Forktail

Citrine Forktail

Lilypad Forktail

Skimming Bluet

Southern Spreadwing

Swamp Darner

Regal Darner

Prince Baskettail

Jade Clubtail

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Eastern Amberwing

Blue Dasher

Hyacinth Glider - 11

Spot-winged Glider

Black Saddlebags





Herps:



American Alligator

Red-eared Slider

Broad-banded Watersnake

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Bronze Frog







Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR












 

Back to top
Date: 6/19/17 9:21 am
From: blaval <blaval...>
Subject: Re: Phoebe
I didn't answer Jan's comment about snakes as I suspected it would start a whole new thread about snakes. Interesting!

Sent from my iPad

> On Jun 19, 2017, at 10:10 AM, Sylvias Serpentine <sylvias.serpentine...> wrote:
>
> Squirrels, other birds, raccoons, snakes, cats. There are a whole host of animals that could prey on the nest, many of which can get to places you wouldn't expect.
> If it is a natural event (in other words, NOT a cat) best thing is to just let nature take its course. If mom can't raise babies there she will eventually move. Nest predation is a natural event and we should not get involved unless it was human caused (like cats).
> Certainly don't go around killing every snake or other predator you come across. They are all just trying to survive as well.
>
> ~Jessica Torres
> naturesvein.com
> Education Through Interaction
> Wildlife Rescue and Education
>
>> On Jun 19, 2017 10:04 AM, "Jan Dolph" <russetdm...> wrote:
>> Sounds like you have a snake problem. I would suggest killing the snakes when you see them. You could remove them. But snake bites are not a welcome event.
>>
>>
>>
>> Jan Dolph
>>
>>
>>
>> From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Gloria
>> Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 10:07 AM
>> To: <OKBIRDS...>
>> Subject: Re: Phoebe
>>
>>
>>
>> I love and feed my raccoons, but they will get into a bird nest if at all possible. I leave a dog on the deck at night to discourage the raccoons and have moved the nesting boxes to the outer supports of my decks.
>>
>>
>>
>> From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Bob LaVal
>> Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 6:26 AM
>> To: <OKBIRDS...>
>> Subject: [OKBIRDS] Phoebe
>>
>>
>>
>> I have a Phoebe nesting platform on my front porch which has been used most summers. This year the first nesting fledged 4 with no problems. I am able to watch what goes on from my easy chair in the living room and enjoy the activities. After they fledged I torn down the first nest. Three days later she began her second nest and completed it in 6 days and laid 4 eggs and began to sit on them. They hatched in normal time and she began to feed them. The third day all the young disappeared. I suspect a small snake but saw nothing. The nest would be impossible for a large snake to reach because of the location. One year the birds were about to fledge and there was a lot of activity in the nest. Suddenly the adults were having a fit about something. I went out and found 2, 5’ black rat snakes on the porch trying to figure how to get up to the nest. They were vanquished to the woods. Another time I found what I think was a young Prairie King snake about 8” long, actually in the nest with all the eggs gone. A big snakes can’t get to the nest because the approach route is only about 1/8” wide. Does anyone know of anything else that might prey on a nest. How about squirrels? They could possibly jump to the nest from the porch rail.
>>
>>
>>
>> Bob and Nancy LaVal
>> 20367 Pine Mtn. LP
>> Heavener, OK 74937
>> Phone: 918-653-7921

 

Back to top
Date: 6/19/17 8:11 am
From: Sylvias Serpentine <sylvias.serpentine...>
Subject: Re: Phoebe
Squirrels, other birds, raccoons, snakes, cats. There are a whole host of
animals that could prey on the nest, many of which can get to places you
wouldn't expect.
If it is a natural event (in other words, NOT a cat) best thing is to just
let nature take its course. If mom can't raise babies there she will
eventually move. Nest predation is a natural event and we should not get
involved unless it was human caused (like cats).
Certainly don't go around killing every snake or other predator you come
across. They are all just trying to survive as well.

~Jessica Torres
naturesvein.com
Education Through Interaction
Wildlife Rescue and Education

On Jun 19, 2017 10:04 AM, "Jan Dolph" <russetdm...> wrote:

> Sounds like you have a snake problem. I would suggest killing the snakes
> when you see them. You could remove them. But snake bites are not a
> welcome event.
>
>
>
> Jan Dolph
>
>
>
> *From:* okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] *On Behalf Of *Gloria
> *Sent:* Saturday, June 17, 2017 10:07 AM
> *To:* <OKBIRDS...>
> *Subject:* Re: Phoebe
>
>
>
> I love and feed my raccoons, but they will get into a bird nest if at all
> possible. I leave a dog on the deck at night to discourage the raccoons
> and have moved the nesting boxes to the outer supports of my decks.
>
>
>
> *From:* okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...> <OKBIRDS...>] *On
> Behalf Of *Bob LaVal
> *Sent:* Saturday, June 17, 2017 6:26 AM
> *To:* <OKBIRDS...>
> *Subject:* [OKBIRDS] Phoebe
>
>
>
> I have a Phoebe nesting platform on my front porch which has been used
> most summers. This year the first nesting fledged 4 with no problems. I
> am able to watch what goes on from my easy chair in the living room and
> enjoy the activities. After they fledged I torn down the first nest.
> Three days later she began her second nest and completed it in 6 days and
> laid 4 eggs and began to sit on them. They hatched in normal time and she
> began to feed them. The third day all the young disappeared. I suspect a
> small snake but saw nothing. The nest would be impossible for a large
> snake to reach because of the location. One year the birds were about to
> fledge and there was a lot of activity in the nest. Suddenly the adults
> were having a fit about something. I went out and found 2, 5’ black rat
> snakes on the porch trying to figure how to get up to the nest. They were
> vanquished to the woods. Another time I found what I think was a young
> Prairie King snake about 8” long, actually in the nest with all the eggs
> gone. A big snakes can’t get to the nest because the approach route is
> only about 1/8” wide. Does anyone know of anything else that might prey on
> a nest. How about squirrels? They could possibly jump to the nest from
> the porch rail.
>
>
>
> Bob and Nancy LaVal
> 20367 Pine Mtn. LP
> Heavener, OK 74937
> Phone: 918-653-7921 <(918)%20653-7921>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/19/17 8:10 am
From: Jan Dolph <russetdm...>
Subject: Re: Phoebe
Sounds like you have a snake problem. I would suggest killing the snakes when you see them. You could remove them. But snake bites are not a welcome event.



Jan Dolph



From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Gloria
Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 10:07 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: Phoebe



I love and feed my raccoons, but they will get into a bird nest if at all possible. I leave a dog on the deck at night to discourage the raccoons and have moved the nesting boxes to the outer supports of my decks.



From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Bob LaVal
Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 6:26 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...> <mailto:<OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Phoebe



I have a Phoebe nesting platform on my front porch which has been used most summers. This year the first nesting fledged 4 with no problems. I am able to watch what goes on from my easy chair in the living room and enjoy the activities. After they fledged I torn down the first nest. Three days later she began her second nest and completed it in 6 days and laid 4 eggs and began to sit on them. They hatched in normal time and she began to feed them. The third day all the young disappeared. I suspect a small snake but saw nothing. The nest would be impossible for a large snake to reach because of the location. One year the birds were about to fledge and there was a lot of activity in the nest. Suddenly the adults were having a fit about something. I went out and found 2, 5’ black rat snakes on the porch trying to figure how to get up to the nest. They were vanquished to the woods. Another time I found what I think was a young Prairie King snake about 8” long, actually in the nest with all the eggs gone. A big snakes can’t get to the nest because the approach route is only about 1/8” wide. Does anyone know of anything else that might prey on a nest. How about squirrels? They could possibly jump to the nest from the porch rail.



Bob and Nancy LaVal
20367 Pine Mtn. LP
Heavener, OK 74937
Phone: 918-653-7921


 

Back to top
Date: 6/19/17 8:09 am
From: Larry Mays <larrymays1949...>
Subject: Re: Phoebe
Nooooooo! Snakes are only birds, but without legs and wings, etc. Give
them some peace! Let's change the subject...to CATS! I'll start. Snakes
Good, cats Bad.

On Jun 19, 2017 10:04 AM, "Jan Dolph" <russetdm...> wrote:

> Sounds like you have a snake problem. I would suggest killing the snakes
> when you see them. You could remove them. But snake bites are not a
> welcome event.
>
>
>
> Jan Dolph
>
>
>
> *From:* okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] *On Behalf Of *Gloria
> *Sent:* Saturday, June 17, 2017 10:07 AM
> *To:* <OKBIRDS...>
> *Subject:* Re: Phoebe
>
>
>
> I love and feed my raccoons, but they will get into a bird nest if at all
> possible. I leave a dog on the deck at night to discourage the raccoons
> and have moved the nesting boxes to the outer supports of my decks.
>
>
>
> *From:* okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...> <OKBIRDS...>] *On
> Behalf Of *Bob LaVal
> *Sent:* Saturday, June 17, 2017 6:26 AM
> *To:* <OKBIRDS...>
> *Subject:* [OKBIRDS] Phoebe
>
>
>
> I have a Phoebe nesting platform on my front porch which has been used
> most summers. This year the first nesting fledged 4 with no problems. I
> am able to watch what goes on from my easy chair in the living room and
> enjoy the activities. After they fledged I torn down the first nest.
> Three days later she began her second nest and completed it in 6 days and
> laid 4 eggs and began to sit on them. They hatched in normal time and she
> began to feed them. The third day all the young disappeared. I suspect a
> small snake but saw nothing. The nest would be impossible for a large
> snake to reach because of the location. One year the birds were about to
> fledge and there was a lot of activity in the nest. Suddenly the adults
> were having a fit about something. I went out and found 2, 5’ black rat
> snakes on the porch trying to figure how to get up to the nest. They were
> vanquished to the woods. Another time I found what I think was a young
> Prairie King snake about 8” long, actually in the nest with all the eggs
> gone. A big snakes can’t get to the nest because the approach route is
> only about 1/8” wide. Does anyone know of anything else that might prey on
> a nest. How about squirrels? They could possibly jump to the nest from
> the porch rail.
>
>
>
> Bob and Nancy LaVal
> 20367 Pine Mtn. LP
> Heavener, OK 74937
> Phone: 918-653-7921 <(918)%20653-7921>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/19/17 2:05 am
From: William Diffin <okiebirder...>
Subject: Saw-whet Owls in Oklahoma
At tonight's meeting of the Oklahoma City Audubon Society, Abbey Ramirez
will talk about her work banding Northern Saw-whet Owls at the JT Nickel
Preserve near Tahlequah. Abbey is a graduate student at Northeastern State
University working toward a Masters Degree under Dr. Mia Revels. The
surprising success of the Saw-whet banding program has made many birders
curious to know more about the presence of the owls in Oklahoma. Abbey's
talk will cover the history of Saw-whet records in Oklahoma, the results of
the banding program and the methods used to capture and process the owls.
All those interested in the subject are invited to attend the meeting. Our
meetings are held in the Garden Exhibition Center at Will Rogers Park, NW
36th St and I-44, 7 to 9 PM, the third Monday of the month, September to
June, except when shifted a week later due to a legal holiday.

The Oklahoma City Audubon Society

 

Back to top
Date: 6/18/17 11:54 am
From: Mia Revels <0000004e74e60ce3-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: U. S. Open Birds
Mark and Steve,
Sounds as though improvements are being made.
Good!
Mia

On Sun, Jun 18, 2017 at 1:14 PM, Steve Schafer <steve...> wrote:

> On Sun, 18 Jun 2017 17:30:48 +0000, you wrote:
>
> >I have heard that in the past, in fact, one year at the Western Open in
> >Northern Illinois, they piped in the song of a white-throated sparrow,
> >which is not very likely there in mid-summer. These bird songs, though
> >sound legitimate at the U. S. Open. They are right for the habitat and
> >have been more frequent in the mornings than in the afternoons. Besides
> >the previously mentioned birds, I have also heard a rose-breasted
> >grosbeak and an indigo bunting.
>
> Having been caught playing the wrong bird songs in the past, they do now
> make an effor to capture the bird song "live." However, it's still
> recorded separately, using dedicated microphones, far from the "action."
>
> -Steve
>



--
Mia Revels, Ph.D.
Professor of Biology
Northeastern State University
611 Grand Ave.
Tahlequah, Oklahoma
(918) 444-3824
<revels...>


***CONFIDENTIALITY*** -This e-mail (including any attachments) may contain
confidential, proprietary and privileged information. Any unauthorized
disclosure or use of this information is prohibited.

 

Back to top
Date: 6/18/17 11:14 am
From: Steve Schafer <steve...>
Subject: Re: U. S. Open Birds
On Sun, 18 Jun 2017 17:30:48 +0000, you wrote:

>I have heard that in the past, in fact, one year at the Western Open in
>Northern Illinois, they piped in the song of a white-throated sparrow,
>which is not very likely there in mid-summer. These bird songs, though
>sound legitimate at the U. S. Open. They are right for the habitat and
>have been more frequent in the mornings than in the afternoons. Besides
>the previously mentioned birds, I have also heard a rose-breasted
>grosbeak and an indigo bunting.

Having been caught playing the wrong bird songs in the past, they do now
make an effor to capture the bird song "live." However, it's still
recorded separately, using dedicated microphones, far from the "action."

-Steve
 

Back to top
Date: 6/18/17 10:30 am
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...>
Subject: Re: U. S. Open Birds
I have heard that in the past, in fact, one year at the Western Open in Northern Illinois, they piped in the song of a white-throated sparrow, which is not very likely there in mid-summer. These bird songs, though sound legitimate at the U. S. Open. They are right for the habitat and have been more frequent in the mornings than in the afternoons. Besides the previously mentioned birds, I have also heard a rose-breasted grosbeak and an indigo bunting.


________________________________
From: okbirds <OKBIRDS...> on behalf of Mia Revels <0000004e74e60ce3-dmarc-request...>
Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 12:09 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] U. S. Open Birds

Mark,

I've heard in the past that the bird songs on the golf games are pre-recorded/soundtrack type things. It was a frequent birder complaint. I wonder if that still happens?

https://bustedcoverage.com/2016/04/07/masters-birds-chirping-sounds-cbs-fake/<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__bustedcoverage.com_2016_04_07_masters-2Dbirds-2Dchirping-2Dsounds-2Dcbs-2Dfake_&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=Slip4ZTezPo6fXDgsyI8tyDwrj3djps0RknB4Dg7IzE&s=SUX_O8DINVjfNHfYjwN6Qe0yWQ7kjZ_UKjK1GSmD3D8&e=>

Mia Revels
Tahlequah, OK


On Sat, Jun 17, 2017 at 10:46 AM, Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...><mailto:<m_mpeterson...>> wrote:

Hello All,

As a native of Wisconsin, I have been interested in the scenery and birds at this year's U. S. Open. They must have turned up the sound, because birds can be heard easily at most of the holes. Most have been common yellowthroats and song sparrows, but I have also heard horned larks, yellow warblers, eastern meadowlarks and at the first hole, which is next to a cattail marsh, a swamp sparrow, a marsh wren and a red-winged blackbird. They have also shown holy hill, which is a two-steeple church I remember seeing 60 years ago as a 6 year old.


Mark Peterson

Bartlesville



--
Mia Revels, Ph.D.
Professor of Biology
Northeastern State University
611 Grand Ave.
Tahlequah, Oklahoma
(918) 444-3824
<revels...><mailto:<revels...>


**CONFIDENTIALITY** -This e-mail (including any attachments) may contain confidential, proprietary and privileged information. Any unauthorized disclosure or use of this information is prohibited.


 

Back to top
Date: 6/17/17 2:16 pm
From: Jim Arterburn <JIMARTERBURN...>
Subject: New Photos Added
OKBirds,

I have added some more spring photos to my Recent Birds gallery on PBase
website. Species added include Bell's vireo, Clay-colored Sparrow,
Common Yellowthroat, Dickcissel, Downy Woodpecker, Eastern Phoebe,
Eurasian Collared-Dove, Gray Catbird, Harris's Sparrow, Hairy
Woodpecker, Indigo Bunting, Least Flycatcher, Northern Mockingbird,
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, Tufted Titmouse, Yellow Warbler and
White-crowned Sparrow.

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds

Cheers,

Jim Arterburn
 

Back to top
Date: 6/17/17 10:09 am
From: Mia Revels <0000004e74e60ce3-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: U. S. Open Birds
Mark,

I've heard in the past that the bird songs on the golf games are
pre-recorded/soundtrack type things. It was a frequent birder complaint. I
wonder if that still happens?

https://bustedcoverage.com/2016/04/07/masters-birds-chirping-sounds-cbs-fake/

Mia Revels
Tahlequah, OK


On Sat, Jun 17, 2017 at 10:46 AM, Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...>
wrote:

> Hello All,
>
> As a native of Wisconsin, I have been interested in the scenery and
> birds at this year's U. S. Open. They must have turned up the sound,
> because birds can be heard easily at most of the holes. Most have been
> common yellowthroats and song sparrows, but I have also heard horned larks,
> yellow warblers, eastern meadowlarks and at the first hole, which is next
> to a cattail marsh, a swamp sparrow, a marsh wren and a red-winged
> blackbird. They have also shown holy hill, which is a two-steeple church I
> remember seeing 60 years ago as a 6 year old.
>
>
> Mark Peterson
>
> Bartlesville
>



--
Mia Revels, Ph.D.
Professor of Biology
Northeastern State University
611 Grand Ave.
Tahlequah, Oklahoma
(918) 444-3824
<revels...>


***CONFIDENTIALITY*** -This e-mail (including any attachments) may contain
confidential, proprietary and privileged information. Any unauthorized
disclosure or use of this information is prohibited.

 

Back to top
Date: 6/17/17 8:46 am
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...>
Subject: U. S. Open Birds
Hello All,

As a native of Wisconsin, I have been interested in the scenery and birds at this year's U. S. Open. They must have turned up the sound, because birds can be heard easily at most of the holes. Most have been common yellowthroats and song sparrows, but I have also heard horned larks, yellow warblers, eastern meadowlarks and at the first hole, which is next to a cattail marsh, a swamp sparrow, a marsh wren and a red-winged blackbird. They have also shown holy hill, which is a two-steeple church I remember seeing 60 years ago as a 6 year old.


Mark Peterson

Bartlesville

 

Back to top
Date: 6/17/17 8:07 am
From: Gloria <oprakitas...>
Subject: Re: Phoebe
I love and feed my raccoons, but they will get into a bird nest if at all possible. I leave a dog on the deck at night to discourage the raccoons and have moved the nesting boxes to the outer supports of my decks.



From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Bob LaVal
Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 6:26 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Phoebe



I have a Phoebe nesting platform on my front porch which has been used most summers. This year the first nesting fledged 4 with no problems. I am able to watch what goes on from my easy chair in the living room and enjoy the activities. After they fledged I torn down the first nest. Three days later she began her second nest and completed it in 6 days and laid 4 eggs and began to sit on them. They hatched in normal time and she began to feed them. The third day all the young disappeared. I suspect a small snake but saw nothing. The nest would be impossible for a large snake to reach because of the location. One year the birds were about to fledge and there was a lot of activity in the nest. Suddenly the adults were having a fit about something. I went out and found 2, 5’ black rat snakes on the porch trying to figure how to get up to the nest. They were vanquished to the woods. Another time I found what I think was a young Prairie King snake about 8” long, actually in the nest with all the eggs gone. A big snakes can’t get to the nest because the approach route is only about 1/8” wide. Does anyone know of anything else that might prey on a nest. How about squirrels? They could possibly jump to the nest from the porch rail.



Bob and Nancy LaVal
20367 Pine Mtn. LP
Heavener, OK 74937
Phone: 918-653-7921


 

Back to top
Date: 6/17/17 4:26 am
From: Bob LaVal <blaval...>
Subject: Phoebe
I have a Phoebe nesting platform on my front porch which has been used most summers. This year the first nesting fledged 4 with no problems. I am able to watch what goes on from my easy chair in the living room and enjoy the activities. After they fledged I torn down the first nest. Three days later she began her second nest and completed it in 6 days and laid 4 eggs and began to sit on them. They hatched in normal time and she began to feed them. The third day all the young disappeared. I suspect a small snake but saw nothing. The nest would be impossible for a large snake to reach because of the location. One year the birds were about to fledge and there was a lot of activity in the nest. Suddenly the adults were having a fit about something. I went out and found 2, 5’ black rat snakes on the porch trying to figure how to get up to the nest. They were vanquished to the woods. Another time I found what I think was a young Prairie King snake about 8” long, actually in the nest with all the eggs gone. A big snakes can’t get to the nest because the approach route is only about 1/8” wide. Does anyone know of anything else that might prey on a nest. How about squirrels? They could possibly jump to the nest from the porch rail.

Bob and Nancy LaVal
20367 Pine Mtn. LP
Heavener, OK 74937
Phone: 918-653-7921
 

Back to top
Date: 6/15/17 4:53 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Storks and spoonbill
Ford Hendershot reports seeing 3 Wood Storks and one Roseate Spoonbill at
Red Slough this morning. All were visible from Red Slough road looking west
into unit 27A (south part) where the mudflats were last month. He reports
that the spoonbill relocated to the roost on Pintail Lake about mid-morning.



David Arbour

De Queen, AR


 

Back to top
Date: 6/14/17 5:38 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Wood Storks at Red Slough
There were 5 Wood Storks feeding in unit 30E by the observation platform
this morning. They let me drive right by them within 50 ft. without
flushing. An hour later when I came back by they were gone. Later in the
afternoon we saw two storks come flying in from the NW and land in unit 27A.




David Arbour

De Queen, AR


 

Back to top
Date: 6/14/17 11:02 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Bird Nest Box Management
I am glad you checked out the site. You have some good questions. Most of the spacing requirements I know about is based on an area that competing pairs will defend against other of the same species. There are data results on some species that show the less food availability the greater the home range. Maybe someone has research answers for this.

Jerry

From: Curtis, Tom
Sent: Wednesday, June 14, 2017 12:48 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Bird Nest Box Management

I checked out the suggested web site and noticed that the recommended spacing is 650 feet for Black-capped Chickadee and on 30 feet for Carolina Chickadee. Does this represent average spacing across the whole range? I can imagine that Black-caps might need larger foraging areas at higher latitudes with shorter days. Would the spacing be greater further north and closer near the southern edge of their range? By the same logic, should Carolina boxes be more widely spaced at the northern edge of their range?



In a similar vein, the spacing for Screech and Barn owls are only 100 feet. Does this reflect the possibility for multiple pairs nesting very close together, or does the close spacing help to attract a pair, and they then defend a larger territory?



Inquiring minds want to know.



Have fun,

Tom Curtis



From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Wednesday, June 14, 2017 12:11 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Bird Nest Box Management



Bird Nest Box Management

Cornell Lab of Ornithology has revised their site and added information about nest boxes – calling it “All About Birdhouses”. http://nestwatch.org/learn/all-about-birdhouses/.

I think visiting this site will be very informative and even if you do not have nest boxes you need to be aware of the information available. It answers many questions that people have about size and placement of boxes specific to species.

About 10 years ago I notified Wood links, the supplier of nest boxes for Wal-mart and others chain stores about a problem of selling nest boxes labeled for wrens, chickadees, nuthatches and titmice. The boxes had a one inch hole and sometimes a 7/8 inch hole. None of the birds mentioned could use these boxes. People bought and placed them expecting bird use and most often only helped wasps This box was sold in areas that only had Carolina wrens and the box could be used only by house wrens at best. At that time the recommended hole size for Carolina wrens was 1 ½ inch holes. This hole size has now been revised to 2 ½ inch by 5 inches.

Wood-links modified their production design and the revised hole size was sold in Wal-mart and some other retailers within the range of the Carolina wren. This improvement and change did not last very many years before the small hole size boxes were put back on the shelves.

Some of you may have in your possession or have bought and given as gifts, wren boxes with a one inch hole. These boxes are completely worthless for Carolina wrens, chickadees, titmice and nuthatches.

Not only are retailers selling boxes with hole sizes too small but some are selling boxes with perches. Nest boxes should never have a perch because in increases the occupation by unwanted bird species like house sparrows and European starlings. Cartoonist continue to perpetuate pictures of best boxes with perches. If you have a nest box with a perch, break it off. Cavity nesters have claws to cling to wooden boxes. If you have nest boxes it is easy to become a nest box slum lord by omitting maintenance, improper placement, no predator protection and permitting house sparrows and starlings to use them.

Those active in the recovery of birds need to confront retailers that are selling next boxes that are not appropriate for the intended species. Our birds need all the help they can get.

Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 6/14/17 10:48 am
From: Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...>
Subject: Re: Bird Nest Box Management
I checked out the suggested web site and noticed that the recommended spacing is 650 feet for Black-capped Chickadee and on 30 feet for Carolina Chickadee. Does this represent average spacing across the whole range? I can imagine that Black-caps might need larger foraging areas at higher latitudes with shorter days. Would the spacing be greater further north and closer near the southern edge of their range? By the same logic, should Carolina boxes be more widely spaced at the northern edge of their range?

In a similar vein, the spacing for Screech and Barn owls are only 100 feet. Does this reflect the possibility for multiple pairs nesting very close together, or does the close spacing help to attract a pair, and they then defend a larger territory?

Inquiring minds want to know.

Have fun,
Tom Curtis

From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Wednesday, June 14, 2017 12:11 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Bird Nest Box Management


Bird Nest Box Management

Cornell Lab of Ornithology has revised their site and added information about nest boxes – calling it “All About Birdhouses”. http://nestwatch.org/learn/all-about-birdhouses/.

I think visiting this site will be very informative and even if you do not have nest boxes you need to be aware of the information available. It answers many questions that people have about size and placement of boxes specific to species.

About 10 years ago I notified Wood links, the supplier of nest boxes for Wal-mart and others chain stores about a problem of selling nest boxes labeled for wrens, chickadees, nuthatches and titmice. The boxes had a one inch hole and sometimes a 7/8 inch hole. None of the birds mentioned could use these boxes. People bought and placed them expecting bird use and most often only helped wasps This box was sold in areas that only had Carolina wrens and the box could be used only by house wrens at best. At that time the recommended hole size for Carolina wrens was 1 ½ inch holes. This hole size has now been revised to 2 ½ inch by 5 inches.

Wood-links modified their production design and the revised hole size was sold in Wal-mart and some other retailers within the range of the Carolina wren. This improvement and change did not last very many years before the small hole size boxes were put back on the shelves.

Some of you may have in your possession or have bought and given as gifts, wren boxes with a one inch hole. These boxes are completely worthless for Carolina wrens, chickadees, titmice and nuthatches.

Not only are retailers selling boxes with hole sizes too small but some are selling boxes with perches. Nest boxes should never have a perch because in increases the occupation by unwanted bird species like house sparrows and European starlings. Cartoonist continue to perpetuate pictures of best boxes with perches. If you have a nest box with a perch, break it off. Cavity nesters have claws to cling to wooden boxes. If you have nest boxes it is easy to become a nest box slum lord by omitting maintenance, improper placement, no predator protection and permitting house sparrows and starlings to use them.

Those active in the recovery of birds need to confront retailers that are selling next boxes that are not appropriate for the intended species. Our birds need all the help they can get.

Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs, AR
 

Back to top
Date: 6/12/17 8:05 pm
From: Jim Arterburn <JIMARTERBURN...>
Subject: New Photos added to website
OKBirds,

I have added some recent photos of Cattle Egret, Blue-winged Teal,
Common Nighthawk, Eastern & Western Kingbirds, including an eastern and
a western in the same tree, Henslow's Sparrow and Bobolink. I have also
added a distant photo of a very pale coyote. I don't believe that it is
an albino or leucistic individual, just a very pale individual. I have
also added photos of a Prairie Kingsnake. See below for the links.

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentbirds

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentherps

http://www.pbase.com/oklahomabirder/recentmammals

I hope you enjoy.

Cheers,

Jim
 

Back to top
Date: 6/12/17 5:32 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Update: storks, spoonbill, etc.
Today while working at Red Slough WMA down in southern McCurtain County I
watched 3 Wood Storks come soaring in from the northwest and land in a
drying up ditch in unit 27b. They were still feeding there when I left.
The Roseate Spoonbill was in his usual spot, roosting during the middle of
the day with the Cattle Egrets in Pintail Lake. You may have to view this
roost from several different spots along the Pintail Lake east levee before
you spot him as he is often hidden by branches. Lots of Anhingas, and
Purple and Common Gallinules still easily visible in Pintail and Lotus
Lakes, and Neotropic Cormorants and White Ibis seem to be everywhere. Two
Interior Least Terns were feeding on Otter Lake today also. A male
Green-winged Teal and a pair of Northern Shovelers were lingering on the
mudflats in unit 27a as well as a small flock of pelicans.



David Arbour

De Queen, AR


 

Back to top
Date: 6/6/17 6:30 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Update
For the last 3 days I have seen the 2nd year Roseate Spoonbill roosting on
Pintail Lake at Red Slough WMA. He is frequently in with the Cattle Egrets
that day roost in the willows in the east central part of the lake. This
area is best viewed from the east levee of Pintail Lake about 200 yards
south of the photo blind/observation platform. In the mornings and
evenings he is usually feeding in unit 27B. There are a couple Tricolored
Herons around also, but I haven't seen them since last Thursday. The
Purple Gallinules are abundant on Pintail and Lotus Lakes this year with our
numbers about double normal. This may be a result of the levee breaching at
Ward Lake to the east of us, draining most of the lake. Neotropic Cormorant
numbers are up this year too with at least 3 active nests on Pintail Lake.
Plenty of nesting Anhingas on Pintail too. Least Bittern numbers are way
down this year as well as Pied-billed Grebe numbers. Common Gallinule
numbers seem about normal. There are at least 3 pairs of Black-bellied
Whistling Ducks in the area as well. Best area to bird right now is Pintail
Lake. Lots of White Ibis feeding in units 27A, 27B, and 30E too as well as
most heron and egret species.



David Arbour

De Queen, AR


 

Back to top
Date: 6/5/17 2:03 pm
From: Dora Webb <owl112...>
Subject: Re: Eastern Bluebirds - A Note
Hi Jerry, well said and I thank you. I would say 99% of people are ignorant about birds and their needs. The neighborhood I live in has an association and they always want to cut down dead trees, living trees. It seems that those who are not birders are oblivious to wildlife needs.
I’ve had nest boxes on our property the 18 years we’ve lived here. Last month one pair of bluebirds used a next box at the end of our patio. Fledged three successfully and hoping the neighborhood cats did not get them. My neighbor said he sees bird feathers every day in his yard.
Presently a second pair of bluebirds are using the same nest. Counted four eggs and expected them to hatch possibly beginning June 6. But Saturday I noticed the birds, especially the male was very agitated, on top of the box, looking around, peering inside, going inside and back out. Then the female doing about the same. I became aware of second male and believe it was the second male that persuaded the female to fly to another nest box across the yard. She checked out that box. I thought how weird she would do that when she already has eggs in the first box. So I thought perhaps the second male had a mate and they were trying to take over the first box. A bit later the two males were on the ground fighting to the death.
I banged on the window to get them to stop, they continued fighting as the fell off the deck. I couldn’t see what happened after that. However, I didn’t see them after that. I did go out to open the box to check the eggs, and found five instead of four. Napped after church on Sunday, so didn’t do a good job of monitor activity. Late morning today I saw a female at the box. So hoping peace and quiet has returned to bluebird villa. Interesting behavior.
Dora Webb
Edmond, OK

From: Jerry Davis
Sent: Monday, June 05, 2017 12:27 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Eastern Bluebirds - A Note

Eastern Bluebird – A Note

This year is the first year in 27 years that I did not have at least two pairs of bluebirds nesting in my yard in April and even going through a second nesting by now. When the middle of May came two pair began the nesting process. I now have one pair feeding young and another sitting on four eggs.

Bluebirds are cavity nesters as is 85 species of birds and 49 species of mammals and numerous species of reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates. There is a habitat and housing shortage for cavity nesters. When I was the wildlife biologist on the Sam Houston National Forest I met John Grivich in Huntsville, Texas. John was known as Mr. Bluebird and TV stations and school children came to his house to hear the story. John had a goal of putting out 10,000 bluebird boxes in Walker County and when he died of a stroke he had put out almost 7,000 bluebird boxes.

I have often wondered why people that say they are interested in and care about birds refuse to help cavity nesters by putting out nest boxes and saving snags. Nest boxes are not as good as snags but help fill the gap for a shortage of habitat. It takes about 100 years to get a tree big enough to be a good cavity tree and 30 years for fungi to convert the heartwood to conditions that might be useable for cavity nesters. Secondary cavity nesters like bluebirds need primary cavity nesters like woodpeckers to first make the cavity which they use when the woodpeckers are gone. Many people do not like dead trees and cut them down. When I was the Forest Wildlife Biologist on the Kaibab National Forest, I was asked why we let dead trees stand in the Forest? The Kaibab National Forest had 64 species of wildlife that needed snags.

Snags provide habitat for wildlife to meet basic behavioral and physiological needs. Such needs include but are not limited to:

Singing, Viewing, Pecking, Seeking, Capturing, Hawking, Drumming, Grooming, Excavating, Incubating, Reproducing, Hibernating, Hunting, Landing, Loafing, Regulating, Nesting, Constructing, Aestivating, Plucking, Resting, Enticing, Courting, Competing, Defending, Rearing, Escaping, Rearing, Wedging, Communicating, Hiding, Observing, Storing, Climbing, Raking, Perching, Brooding, Roosting,Feeding, and Gleaming.

Every species of birds need a John Grivich in every county in this country. Our birds need people that can retain snags, provide nest boxes and take up a cause, a soapbox standing cause to start returning our habitat and bird populations to a healthy number.

Research and surveys have shown that only one percent of the population is willing to do anything to make a difference. Many labels on medication tubes state one percent active ingredients and 99% inert filler. Our birds need you to be that one percent of active ingredients and not just filler living a life of doing nothing more that taking care of your biological needs. The habitat problems were created one person at a time and will have to be solved the same way. If you are not doing your part the job is not getting done. If you are not going to do more for birds in this lifetime, what lifetime do you plan to start?

Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 6/5/17 10:27 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Eastern Bluebirds - A Note
Eastern Bluebird – A Note

This year is the first year in 27 years that I did not have at least two pairs of bluebirds nesting in my yard in April and even going through a second nesting by now. When the middle of May came two pair began the nesting process. I now have one pair feeding young and another sitting on four eggs.

Bluebirds are cavity nesters as is 85 species of birds and 49 species of mammals and numerous species of reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates. There is a habitat and housing shortage for cavity nesters. When I was the wildlife biologist on the Sam Houston National Forest I met John Grivich in Huntsville, Texas. John was known as Mr. Bluebird and TV stations and school children came to his house to hear the story. John had a goal of putting out 10,000 bluebird boxes in Walker County and when he died of a stroke he had put out almost 7,000 bluebird boxes.

I have often wondered why people that say they are interested in and care about birds refuse to help cavity nesters by putting out nest boxes and saving snags. Nest boxes are not as good as snags but help fill the gap for a shortage of habitat. It takes about 100 years to get a tree big enough to be a good cavity tree and 30 years for fungi to convert the heartwood to conditions that might be useable for cavity nesters. Secondary cavity nesters like bluebirds need primary cavity nesters like woodpeckers to first make the cavity which they use when the woodpeckers are gone. Many people do not like dead trees and cut them down. When I was the Forest Wildlife Biologist on the Kaibab National Forest, I was asked why we let dead trees stand in the Forest? The Kaibab National Forest had 64 species of wildlife that needed snags.

Snags provide habitat for wildlife to meet basic behavioral and physiological needs. Such needs include but are not limited to:

Singing, Viewing, Pecking, Seeking, Capturing, Hawking, Drumming, Grooming, Excavating, Incubating, Reproducing, Hibernating, Hunting, Landing, Loafing, Regulating, Nesting, Constructing, Aestivating, Plucking, Resting, Enticing, Courting, Competing, Defending, Rearing, Escaping, Rearing, Wedging, Communicating, Hiding, Observing, Storing, Climbing, Raking, Perching, Brooding, Roosting,Feeding, and Gleaming.

Every species of birds need a John Grivich in every county in this country. Our birds need people that can retain snags, provide nest boxes and take up a cause, a soapbox standing cause to start returning our habitat and bird populations to a healthy number.

Research and surveys have shown that only one percent of the population is willing to do anything to make a difference. Many labels on medication tubes state one percent active ingredients and 99% inert filler. Our birds need you to be that one percent of active ingredients and not just filler living a life of doing nothing more that taking care of your biological needs. The habitat problems were created one person at a time and will have to be solved the same way. If you are not doing your part the job is not getting done. If you are not going to do more for birds in this lifetime, what lifetime do you plan to start?

Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 6/4/17 8:08 am
From: Bill Carrell <cyanocitta.tachopteryx...>
Subject: Late Osprey and Photos
Hello All,

Saturday, saw an Osprey chowing down on a large fish in the Oxley North
Woods. Certainly late for a migrant, possibly too late to start nesting,
but worth keeping an eye on.

Also, just updated the "Recent" gallery on my P-base site. As usual.
something for everyone, quite a few from my May trip to the OK panhandle,
including Cassin's and Black-Throated Sparrows, Ash-Throated Flycatcher,
Lark Bunting, White-Winged Dove and a Bullock's X Baltimore Oriole in
Beaver county:

http://www.pbase.com/lctsimages/recent

Good Birding,
Bill Carrell
Tulsa, OK

 

Back to top
Date: 6/3/17 7:25 am
From: Ann Gordon <chesterann...>
Subject: Re: Fwd: Costa Rica AAST fund-raiser tour
This "Arkie" will chime in as well. Wonderful birding with great folks!
Capping off the trip with great views of a male Resplendent Quetzal
feeding a nestling put us all over the moon! And Costa Rica's role in
protecting our neo-tropical migrants is much appreciated.

On Sat, Jun 3, 2017 at 8:50 AM, Steve Davis <spd8109...> wrote:

> Yes, the birding was great, the country was beautiful and the water was
> potable! Drs Kannan and Smith arranged a great sampler of habitats and we
> had a great bunch of birders from OK and AR to travel with. Our guide,
> Esteban Biamonte, showed us lots of birds and other critters, and gave us
> information about the culture and people as well. Mary and I are already
> looking forward to going again some day.
> --steve d and mary l
>
> On Jun 3, 2017 4:26 AM, "Lisa Wiesbauer" <lakehaven58...> wrote:
>
>> Sounds like an outstanding trip!
>>
>> On Fri, Jun 2, 2017 at 4:08 PM, Mia Revels <0000004e74e60ce3-dmarc-reques
>> <t...> wrote:
>>
>>> OK-Birders, I just returned from the trip described below by one of the
>>> trip leaders, my good friend Dr. Ragupathy Kannan. I am glad that he
>>> summed it up, because I do not have any words right now. It was AMAZING.
>>> Several other Oklahoma bird folks were on the trip if they wish to chime
>>> in. Thanks Kannan!
>>>
>>>
>>> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
>>> From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill...>
>>> Date: Fri, Jun 2, 2017 at 11:52 AM
>>> Subject: Fw: Costa Rica AAST fund-raiser tour
>>> To: Mia Revels <revels...>
>>>
>>> ​
>>> Kim Smith and I led a Costa Rica birding tour May 24-June 1, to raise
>>> funds for the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust. The tour was a grand
>>> success, with over 300 species of birds, and $1200 raised for the trust
>>> endowment.
>>>
>>> Highlights of the tour included:
>>>
>>> 1. Spectacular views and stunning videos of a Resplendent Quetzal at
>>> nest in the cloud forests
>>> 2. Tracking down an Unspotted Saw-whet Owl in the Paramo at 10,000 feet
>>> elevation
>>> 3. 27 species of hummingbirds, including many high-altitude endemics
>>> 4. Great views of Scarlet and Great Green Macaws (over ten species of
>>> psittacids!)
>>> 5. 15 species of Tanagers, and,
>>> 6. Great nightly encounters with poison-dart frogs and many other
>>> rainforest herps.
>>>
>>> Many thanks to the 20 wonderful birders (who came from all over the
>>> country) for participating!
>>>
>>> Kannan
>>> --
>>> Mia Revels, Ph.D.
>>> Professor of Biology
>>> Northeastern State University
>>> 611 Grand Ave.
>>> Tahlequah, Oklahoma
>>> (918) 444-3824
>>> <revels...>
>>>
>>>
>>> ***CONFIDENTIALITY*** -This e-mail (including any attachments) may
>>> contain confidential, proprietary and privileged information. Any
>>> unauthorized disclosure or use of this information is prohibited.
>>>
>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/3/17 6:51 am
From: Steve Davis <spd8109...>
Subject: Re: Fwd: Costa Rica AAST fund-raiser tour
Yes, the birding was great, the country was beautiful and the water was
potable! Drs Kannan and Smith arranged a great sampler of habitats and we
had a great bunch of birders from OK and AR to travel with. Our guide,
Esteban Biamonte, showed us lots of birds and other critters, and gave us
information about the culture and people as well. Mary and I are already
looking forward to going again some day.
--steve d and mary l

On Jun 3, 2017 4:26 AM, "Lisa Wiesbauer" <lakehaven58...> wrote:

> Sounds like an outstanding trip!
>
> On Fri, Jun 2, 2017 at 4:08 PM, Mia Revels <0000004e74e60ce3-dmarc-
> <request...> wrote:
>
>> OK-Birders, I just returned from the trip described below by one of the
>> trip leaders, my good friend Dr. Ragupathy Kannan. I am glad that he
>> summed it up, because I do not have any words right now. It was AMAZING.
>> Several other Oklahoma bird folks were on the trip if they wish to chime
>> in. Thanks Kannan!
>>
>>
>> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
>> From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill...>
>> Date: Fri, Jun 2, 2017 at 11:52 AM
>> Subject: Fw: Costa Rica AAST fund-raiser tour
>> To: Mia Revels <revels...>
>>
>> ​
>> Kim Smith and I led a Costa Rica birding tour May 24-June 1, to raise
>> funds for the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust. The tour was a grand
>> success, with over 300 species of birds, and $1200 raised for the trust
>> endowment.
>>
>> Highlights of the tour included:
>>
>> 1. Spectacular views and stunning videos of a Resplendent Quetzal at nest
>> in the cloud forests
>> 2. Tracking down an Unspotted Saw-whet Owl in the Paramo at 10,000 feet
>> elevation
>> 3. 27 species of hummingbirds, including many high-altitude endemics
>> 4. Great views of Scarlet and Great Green Macaws (over ten species of
>> psittacids!)
>> 5. 15 species of Tanagers, and,
>> 6. Great nightly encounters with poison-dart frogs and many other
>> rainforest herps.
>>
>> Many thanks to the 20 wonderful birders (who came from all over the
>> country) for participating!
>>
>> Kannan
>> --
>> Mia Revels, Ph.D.
>> Professor of Biology
>> Northeastern State University
>> 611 Grand Ave.
>> Tahlequah, Oklahoma
>> (918) 444-3824
>> <revels...>
>>
>>
>> ***CONFIDENTIALITY*** -This e-mail (including any attachments) may
>> contain confidential, proprietary and privileged information. Any
>> unauthorized disclosure or use of this information is prohibited.
>>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/3/17 2:26 am
From: Lisa Wiesbauer <lakehaven58...>
Subject: Re: Fwd: Costa Rica AAST fund-raiser tour
Sounds like an outstanding trip!

On Fri, Jun 2, 2017 at 4:08 PM, Mia Revels <
<0000004e74e60ce3-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> OK-Birders, I just returned from the trip described below by one of the
> trip leaders, my good friend Dr. Ragupathy Kannan. I am glad that he
> summed it up, because I do not have any words right now. It was AMAZING.
> Several other Oklahoma bird folks were on the trip if they wish to chime
> in. Thanks Kannan!
>
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill...>
> Date: Fri, Jun 2, 2017 at 11:52 AM
> Subject: Fw: Costa Rica AAST fund-raiser tour
> To: Mia Revels <revels...>
>
> ​
> Kim Smith and I led a Costa Rica birding tour May 24-June 1, to raise
> funds for the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust. The tour was a grand
> success, with over 300 species of birds, and $1200 raised for the trust
> endowment.
>
> Highlights of the tour included:
>
> 1. Spectacular views and stunning videos of a Resplendent Quetzal at nest
> in the cloud forests
> 2. Tracking down an Unspotted Saw-whet Owl in the Paramo at 10,000 feet
> elevation
> 3. 27 species of hummingbirds, including many high-altitude endemics
> 4. Great views of Scarlet and Great Green Macaws (over ten species of
> psittacids!)
> 5. 15 species of Tanagers, and,
> 6. Great nightly encounters with poison-dart frogs and many other
> rainforest herps.
>
> Many thanks to the 20 wonderful birders (who came from all over the
> country) for participating!
>
> Kannan
> --
> Mia Revels, Ph.D.
> Professor of Biology
> Northeastern State University
> 611 Grand Ave.
> Tahlequah, Oklahoma
> (918) 444-3824
> <revels...>
>
>
> ***CONFIDENTIALITY*** -This e-mail (including any attachments) may
> contain confidential, proprietary and privileged information. Any
> unauthorized disclosure or use of this information is prohibited.
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/2/17 2:09 pm
From: Mia Revels <0000004e74e60ce3-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Fwd: Costa Rica AAST fund-raiser tour
OK-Birders, I just returned from the trip described below by one of the
trip leaders, my good friend Dr. Ragupathy Kannan. I am glad that he
summed it up, because I do not have any words right now. It was AMAZING.
Several other Oklahoma bird folks were on the trip if they wish to chime
in. Thanks Kannan!


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill...>
Date: Fri, Jun 2, 2017 at 11:52 AM
Subject: Fw: Costa Rica AAST fund-raiser tour
To: Mia Revels <revels...>


Kim Smith and I led a Costa Rica birding tour May 24-June 1, to raise funds
for the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust. The tour was a grand success, with
over 300 species of birds, and $1200 raised for the trust endowment.

Highlights of the tour included:

1. Spectacular views and stunning videos of a Resplendent Quetzal at nest
in the cloud forests
2. Tracking down an Unspotted Saw-whet Owl in the Paramo at 10,000 feet
elevation
3. 27 species of hummingbirds, including many high-altitude endemics
4. Great views of Scarlet and Great Green Macaws (over ten species of
psittacids!)
5. 15 species of Tanagers, and,
6. Great nightly encounters with poison-dart frogs and many other
rainforest herps.

Many thanks to the 20 wonderful birders (who came from all over the
country) for participating!

Kannan
--
Mia Revels, Ph.D.
Professor of Biology
Northeastern State University
611 Grand Ave.
Tahlequah, Oklahoma
(918) 444-3824
<revels...>


***CONFIDENTIALITY*** -This e-mail (including any attachments) may contain
confidential, proprietary and privileged information. Any unauthorized
disclosure or use of this information is prohibited.

 

Back to top
Date: 6/2/17 10:57 am
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...>
Subject: Hackberry Flat last Wednesday
Scrolling my photos in detail, I took a just barely diagnostic frame
of a single Whimbrel in the Egret Unit. Other birds of note were 3
King Rails and one Least Bittern, all heard.

Matt Junf, OKC
 

Back to top
Date: 6/2/17 9:45 am
From: Linda Adams <000000853e24127e-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: OOS Membership Dues
Correction to my e-mail address.  I guess I can't type.
<lindafay...>
Thanks,Linda


From: Linda Adams <doglover_73533...>
To: Okbirds <okbirds...>
Sent: Thursday, June 1, 2017 9:28 PM
Subject: OOS Membership Dues

I've got quite a few 2016 OOS members who have not yet sent their 2017 dues.  The June mailing will be going out soon and if you haven't renewed, I'll have to drop you from the mailing list.  If you're unsure of your status, please e-mail me  <lindaday...>
Thanks,Linda



 

Back to top
Date: 6/2/17 8:36 am
From: mphilips13 <mphilips13...>
Subject: Re: Oklahoma Breeding Bird Survey volunteers badly needed
Hi Dan,
I would like to volunteer this June. Keetonville would be my first choice.
Thanks!Megan


Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S7 edge, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Dan Reinking <dan...> Date: 6/2/17 10:06 (GMT-06:00) To: <OKBIRDS...> Subject: [OKBIRDS] Oklahoma Breeding Bird Survey volunteers badly needed
OKbirders,If you can help by doing a Breeding Bird Survey route this June, please let me know ASAP. A large and growing number of routes are currently unassigned in Oklahoma. Phillips (Coal County)Ardmore (Carter County)Randlett (Cotton County)Cookietown (Cotton County)Indianola (Pittsburg County)Verden (Caddo County)Eagle City (Blaine County)Tegarden (Woods County)Lookout (Woods County)Rosston (Harper County)Beaver (Beaver County)Sandbluff (Choctaw County)Matoy (Atoka County)Wainwright (Muskogee County)Cashion (Kingfisher County)Arapaho (Custer County)Keetonville (Rogers County)Hunter (Garfield County) https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs/participate/Please visit the link above or contact me if you can help.Dan ReinkingSutton Avian Research <Centerdan...>  
 

Back to top
Date: 6/2/17 8:06 am
From: Dan Reinking <dan...>
Subject: Oklahoma Breeding Bird Survey volunteers badly needed
OKbirders,

If you can help by doing a Breeding Bird Survey route this June, please let
me know ASAP.



A large and growing number of routes are currently unassigned in Oklahoma.



Phillips (Coal County)

Ardmore (Carter County)

Randlett (Cotton County)

Cookietown (Cotton County)

Indianola (Pittsburg County)

Verden (Caddo County)

Eagle City (Blaine County)

Tegarden (Woods County)

Lookout (Woods County)

Rosston (Harper County)

Beaver (Beaver County)

Sandbluff (Choctaw County)

Matoy (Atoka County)

Wainwright (Muskogee County)

Cashion (Kingfisher County)

Arapaho (Custer County)

Keetonville (Rogers County)

Hunter (Garfield County)



https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs/participate/

Please visit the link above or contact me if you can help.

Dan Reinking

Sutton Avian Research Center

<dan...> <mailto:<dan...>






 

Back to top
Date: 6/2/17 7:17 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Fw: Bewick's Wren data needed from Arkansas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Kansas


From: Kimberly G. Smith
Sent: Friday, June 2, 2017 7:36 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Bewick's Wren data needed from Arkansas

From the American Bird Conservancy June newsletter:



eBird Investigation: Eastern Bewick’s Wren in Decline



The Eastern population of the Bewick’s Wren has been in decline for decades, and bird conservationists want your help to find out why. Until now, the decline of the Eastern Bewick’s Wren has been a mystery. It has variously been thought to result from habitat loss or competition with House Wrens – yet plenty of apparently good habitat still exists. Bewick’s Wrens have disappeared from some areas where House Wrens are absent and remained in some Western areas where they are present – so no explanation yet appears to definitively explain the species’ disappearance from large parts of the East.



By gathering data on remaining Bewick’s Wren populations in Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas, Oklahoma, and points east of these states, we hope to discover more about their habitat needs and potential threats to help inform conservation planning for the species. The power of eBird combined with your birding expertise could be the key to unlock this mystery!



Please help us search for Bewick’s Wrens in the aforementioned states through the breeding season. We are hoping for photographs, song recordings, details about habitat use, and any information on nest site locations or other potentially interesting observations of behavior or potential threats. Armed with this data, conservation scientists will be better placed to launch an in-depth study of Bewick’s habitat preferences that could help inform land management decisions in the region to benefit the wren.



********************************

Kimberly G. Smith

Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences

Department of Biological Sciences

University of Arkansas

Fayetteville, AR 72701

Phone: 479-575-6359 fax: 479-575-4010

Email: <kgsmith...>

********************************



 

Back to top
Date: 6/1/17 7:33 pm
From: Linda Adams <000000853e24127e-dmarc-request...>
Subject: OOS Membership Dues
I've got quite a few 2016 OOS members who have not yet sent their 2017 dues.  The June mailing will be going out soon and if you haven't renewed, I'll have to drop you from the mailing list.  If you're unsure of your status, please e-mail me  <lindaday...>
Thanks,Linda

 

Back to top
Date: 6/1/17 9:50 am
From: Patricia Velte <pvelte...>
Subject: June Migration Report
Dear OKBirders,



A much shorter list this month! Below are the arrival and departure lists
for June.



ARRIVALS



Wood Stork June 7 - Johnston and
Marshall Cos. Only in SC; Bryan, Choctaw and S. McCurtain Cos. Only in SE

Roseate Spoonbill June 7 - Rare in Johnston and
Marshall Cos. Only in SC; Rare in S. McCurtain Co. only in SE; Rare in Bryan
Co. only in SE

Greater Yellowlegs June 28 - ALL

Lesser Yellowlegs June 26 - ALL

Upland Sandpiper June 22 - NW, SW, C, SC, SE


Cave Swallow June 30 - SE rare in south
McCurtain co only



DEPARTURES



Eared Grebe June 1 - ALL

Swainson's Hawk June 1 - SE

Spotted Sandpiper June 4 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Lesser Yellowlegs June 1 - NW, C, SC, NE and
June 4 - PAN, SW, SE

Ruddy Turnstone June 1 - NW west to Alfalfa,
Major and Blaine Cos. Only, SW west to Washita, Kiowa and Tillman Cos. Only,
C, SC, NE, SE

Stilt Sandpiper June 1 - ALL

Sanderling June 1 - ALL

American Golden-Plover June 1 - NW, SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Forster's Tern June 1 - PAN, NW, SW

Least Sandpiper June 7 - PAN

White-rumped Sandpiper June 20 - ALL

Pectoral Sandpiper June 12 - ALL

Semipalmated Sandpiper June 5 - ALL

Wilson's Phalarope June 5 - SW, C, SC, NE, SE

Olive-sided Flycatcher June 3 - ALL

Western Wood-Pewee June 5 - PAN Cimarron Co only

Alder Flycatcher June 1 - C, SC, NE, SE

Willow Flycatcher June 2 - ALL

Least Flycatcher June 1 - ALL

Swainson's Thrush June 4 - ALL

Cedar Waxwing June 4 - ALL

Cerulean Warbler June 30 - NE rare in Delaware
and Cherokee cos only, SE rare in LeFlore and McCurtain cos only

Lazuli Bunting June 4 - PAN

Indigo Bunting June 2 - PAN

Pine Siskin June 1 - ALL



The information presented here comes from The Oklahoma Bird Records
Committee of the Oklahoma Ornithological Society, which publishes a Date
Guide to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma. This booklet divides Oklahoma
into 7 geographic regions, and lists the normal dates of occurrence for each
Oklahoma bird species within each region. Observers are urged to report
unusual species, or birds out of date or out of normal range in Oklahoma,
based on the information given in this publication.



The Oklahoma Ornithological Society and Oklahoma Bird Records Committee web
site, http://www.okbirds.org/, includes ordering information for the Date
Guide to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma, information on documenting
significant records, documentation forms, instructions, and a searchable
database for Oklahoma bird migration information. Birders are cordially
invited to join the Oklahoma Ornithological Society.



Happy birding!

Pat Velte

<pvelte...> <mailto:<pvelte...>

Oklahoma City, OK




 

Back to top
Date: 6/1/17 7:10 am
From: Matthew Jung <mpjung5125...>
Subject: Hackberry Flat yesterday
After reading about the whistling ducks and Mottled Duck, I tried
again yesterday to find the 2 species I missed there last week Monday.
I did photograph the Fulvous Whistling Duck then but the Black-bellied
and the Mottled Duck escaped me.

Yesterday did find the Black-bellied Whistling Ducks preening in the
Weir Unit but the Mottled Duck escaped me again. The curious find was
a single male Canvasback.

Matt Jung, OKC
 

Back to top
Date: 5/31/17 7:18 am
From: Mary Tate <mary.d.tate...>
Subject: removal
Please remove me from the list.

Thanks
Mary

 

Back to top
Date: 5/30/17 8:24 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red slough Bird Survey - May 30
Rosemary Seidler (LA), Jeff & Jean Trahan(LA), and I surveyed birds today at
Red Slough and found 76 species. It was mostly clear and very warm.
Instead of focusing on passerines early on like I have been doing lately, we
started surveying the reservoirs which resulted in a really high count on
Purple Gallinules and finding a Roseate Spoonbill. Here is our list for
today:



Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 3



Wood Duck - 17



Mallard - 7



Blue-winged Teal - 6



Northern Shoveler - 3



Green-winged Teal - 1 male



Pied-billed Grebe - 5 (2 individuals with single chicks.)



American White Pelican - 7



Neotropic Cormorant - 13



Anhinga - 20



Least Bittern - 1



Great-blue Heron - 28



Great Egret - 74



Snowy Egret - 47



Little-blue Heron - 32



Cattle Egret - 20



Green Heron - 13



Black-crowned Night-Heron - 2



Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 1



White Ibis - 220



Roseate Spoonbill - 1 immature



Black Vulture - 65



Turkey Vulture - 32



Mississippi Kite - 2



Red-tailed Hawk - 1



Purple Gallinule - 35 (new high count!)



Common Gallinule - 37



American Coot - 5



Killdeer - 4



Mourning Dove - 3



Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 9



Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2



Downy Woodpecker - 1



Pileated Woodpecker - 1



Acadian Flycatcher - 1



Eastern Phoebe - 3



Great-crested Flycatcher - 1



Eastern Kingbird - 6



Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2



White-eyed Vireo - 8



Bell's Vireo - 4



Yellow-throated Vireo - 2



Red-eyed Vireo - 6



American Crow - 6



Fish Crow - 1



Purple Martin - 3



Tree Swallow - 23



Cliff Swallow - 2



Barn Swallow - 28



Carolina Chickadee - 2



Tufted Titmouse - 5



Carolina Wren - 4



Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 2



Eastern Bluebird - 2



Gray Catbird - 1



Northern Mockingbird - 1



Yellow-throated Warbler - 2



Pine Warbler - 4



Prairie Warbler - 1



Black-and-white Warbler - 2



Prothonotary Warbler - 6



Kentucky Warbler - 2



Common Yellowthroat - 11



Yellow-breasted Chat - 8



Summer Tanager - 3



Eastern Towhee - 2



Northern Cardinal - 16



Blue Grosbeak - 1



Indigo Bunting - 16



Painted Bunting - 3



Dickcissel - 15



Red-winged Blackbird - 10



Eastern Meadowlark - 1



Common Grackle - 13



Brown-headed Cowbird - 3



Orchard Oriole - 7





Odonates:





Fragile Forktail



Lilypad Forktail



Citrine Forktail



Slender Bluet



Swamp Darner



Cyrano Darner



Prince Baskettail



Stillwater Clubtail



Jade Clubtail



Eastern Pondhawk



Slaty Skimmer



Common Whitetail



Blue Dasher



Eastern Amberwing



Spot-winged Glider



Wandering Glider



Carolina Saddlebags



Black Saddlebags







Herps:





American Alligator



Orange-striped Ribbonsnake



Broad-banded Watersnake



Yellow-bellied Watersnake



Little Brown Skink



Green Treefrog



Blanchard's Cricket Frog



Southern Leopard Frog



Bronze Frog



Bullfrog







Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR






 

Back to top
Date: 5/30/17 7:30 am
From: Dustin Meadows <Dustin_Meadows...>
Subject: Remove from list
Remove me from the list, please.
Notice: This e-mail may contain privileged and/or confidential information and is intended only for the addressee. If you are not the addressee or the person responsible for delivering it to the addressee, you may not copy or distribute this communication to anyone else. If you received this communication in error, please notify us immediately by telephone or return e-mail and promptly delete the original message from your system.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/26/17 3:00 pm
From: blaval <blaval...>
Subject: Re: Acorn Woodpecker Insight
Thanks for the pictures Jerry. A very handsome woodpecker.

Sent from my iPad

> On May 26, 2017, at 11:54 AM, Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...> wrote:
>
> Any guess how many generations that represents?
>
> From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
> Sent: Friday, May 26, 2017 11:31 AM
> To: <OKBIRDS...>
> Subject: Acorn Woodpecker Insight
>
> When I was the Forest Wildlife Biologist on the Kaibab National Forest, Acorn woodpeckers had a granary tree beside the loop road near Jackass Flat. It was a large virgin ponderosa pine 30 inches dbh. By sampling the surface area and the size of the tree I calculated that there were over 125,000 acorn woodpecker holes with acorns in the thick bark. A snag adjacent to the storage tree had a family of acorn woodpeckers that also used it as a nest site and in the granary tree was an active goshawk nest.
>
>
> http://blog.nature.org/science/2017/04/24/acorn-woodpecker-the-fascinating-life-of-the-master-hoarder/?src=e.nature.loc_b&lu=4364135&autologin=true
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs, AR
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/26/17 9:54 am
From: Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...>
Subject: Re: Acorn Woodpecker Insight
Any guess how many generations that represents?

From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Friday, May 26, 2017 11:31 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Acorn Woodpecker Insight

When I was the Forest Wildlife Biologist on the Kaibab National Forest, Acorn woodpeckers had a granary tree beside the loop road near Jackass Flat. It was a large virgin ponderosa pine 30 inches dbh. By sampling the surface area and the size of the tree I calculated that there were over 125,000 acorn woodpecker holes with acorns in the thick bark. A snag adjacent to the storage tree had a family of acorn woodpeckers that also used it as a nest site and in the granary tree was an active goshawk nest.


http://blog.nature.org/science/2017/04/24/acorn-woodpecker-the-fascinating-life-of-the-master-hoarder/?src=e.nature.loc_b&lu=4364135&autologin=true<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__blog.nature.org_science_2017_04_24_acorn-2Dwoodpecker-2Dthe-2Dfascinating-2Dlife-2Dof-2Dthe-2Dmaster-2Dhoarder_-3Fsrc-3De.nature.loc-5Fb-26lu-3D4364135-26autologin-3Dtrue&d=DwMFAw&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=tLUfbR2MbRxK_FrDh4UxEeB22LFl4vr-mCkUCqh6WrA&s=c7HL35ziZ-RnVU7O9vHjp7NYteAm2ZLlWYU1G1yL9z4&e=>

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR


 

Back to top
Date: 5/26/17 9:31 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Acorn Woodpecker Insight
When I was the Forest Wildlife Biologist on the Kaibab National Forest, Acorn woodpeckers had a granary tree beside the loop road near Jackass Flat. It was a large virgin ponderosa pine 30 inches dbh. By sampling the surface area and the size of the tree I calculated that there were over 125,000 acorn woodpecker holes with acorns in the thick bark. A snag adjacent to the storage tree had a family of acorn woodpeckers that also used it as a nest site and in the granary tree was an active goshawk nest.


http://blog.nature.org/science/2017/04/24/acorn-woodpecker-the-fascinating-life-of-the-master-hoarder/?src=e.nature.loc_b&lu=4364135&autologin=true

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 5/25/17 11:17 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Henslow's Sparrow information
Thanks Dan. I wonder if there's any habitat left to support them.
On Thu, May 25, 2017 at 12:47 PM Dan Reinking <dan...> wrote:

> Yes, there were records from Osage (primary location for this species in
> OK), Washington, Nowata, Rogers, Tulsa and Kay Counties in 1996, plus
> records from Noble, Alfalfa and Muskogee Counties in 1997 and/or 1998.
>
> Dan
>
>
>
> *From:* okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] *On Behalf Of *Sandy Berger
> *Sent:* Thursday, May 25, 2017 12:40 PM
> *To:* <OKBIRDS...>
> *Subject:* Re: [OKBIRDS] Henslow's Sparrow information
>
>
>
> Were there any in eastern Oklahoma in 1996?
>
>
>
> Sandy Berger
>
> Fort Smith
>
>
>
>
>
> On Thu, May 25, 2017 at 8:06 AM Dan Reinking <dan...> wrote:
>
> OKbirders,
>
> I am seeking Oklahoma reports of Henslow’s Sparrows this spring and summer
> for a survey project I am working on. I will be comparing their 2017
> distribution in Oklahoma with that from 1996. If you find any Henslow’s
> Sparrows, I would appreciate receiving either good directions or GPS
> coordinates for the locations.
>
> Thanks!
>
> Dan Reinking
>
> Sutton Avian Research Center
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.suttoncenter.org_&d=DwMFAg&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=cMEuNAosPCCQSVNlRWxMqnhESKjSxUHLLPCYYesR0yU&s=5fwQMwNsEgmUstPIVLzsd7cNiS-PI1Epjiik4Yx0ixE&e=>
>
> <dan...>
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/25/17 10:48 am
From: Dan Reinking <dan...>
Subject: Re: Henslow's Sparrow information
Yes, there were records from Osage (primary location for this species in OK), Washington, Nowata, Rogers, Tulsa and Kay Counties in 1996, plus records from Noble, Alfalfa and Muskogee Counties in 1997 and/or 1998.

Dan



From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Sandy Berger
Sent: Thursday, May 25, 2017 12:40 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Henslow's Sparrow information



Were there any in eastern Oklahoma in 1996?



Sandy Berger

Fort Smith





On Thu, May 25, 2017 at 8:06 AM Dan Reinking <dan...> <mailto:<dan...> > wrote:

OKbirders,

I am seeking Oklahoma reports of Henslow’s Sparrows this spring and summer for a survey project I am working on. I will be comparing their 2017 distribution in Oklahoma with that from 1996. If you find any Henslow’s Sparrows, I would appreciate receiving either good directions or GPS coordinates for the locations.

Thanks!

Dan Reinking

Sutton Avian Research Center <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.suttoncenter.org_&d=DwMFAg&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=cMEuNAosPCCQSVNlRWxMqnhESKjSxUHLLPCYYesR0yU&s=5fwQMwNsEgmUstPIVLzsd7cNiS-PI1Epjiik4Yx0ixE&e=>

<dan...> <mailto:<dan...>




 

Back to top
Date: 5/25/17 10:44 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Henslow's Sparrow information
My apologies. Didn't see the links. Reading.

Sandy

On Thu, May 25, 2017 at 12:39 PM Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:

> Were there any in eastern Oklahoma in 1996?
>
> Sandy Berger
> Fort Smith
>
>
> On Thu, May 25, 2017 at 8:06 AM Dan Reinking <dan...> wrote:
>
>> OKbirders,
>>
>> I am seeking Oklahoma reports of Henslow’s Sparrows this spring and
>> summer for a survey project I am working on. I will be comparing their 2017
>> distribution in Oklahoma with that from 1996. If you find any Henslow’s
>> Sparrows, I would appreciate receiving either good directions or GPS
>> coordinates for the locations.
>>
>> Thanks!
>>
>> Dan Reinking
>>
>> Sutton Avian Research Center
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.suttoncenter.org_&d=DwMFAg&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=cMEuNAosPCCQSVNlRWxMqnhESKjSxUHLLPCYYesR0yU&s=5fwQMwNsEgmUstPIVLzsd7cNiS-PI1Epjiik4Yx0ixE&e=>
>>
>> <dan...>
>>
>>
>>
>> Reinking DL, Hendricks DP (1993) Occurrence and nesting of Henslow’s
>> Sparrow in Oklahoma.
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.suttoncenter.org_wp-2Dcontent_uploads_pdfs_publications_1993-2520Reinking-2520and-2520Hendricks-2520Henslow-2527sSparrow.pdf&d=DwMFAg&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=cMEuNAosPCCQSVNlRWxMqnhESKjSxUHLLPCYYesR0yU&s=wz-Hgs510g24LpKwss0qTKbLg4quVpadWuDx8AtBsZg&e=>
>> Bulletin of the Oklahoma Ornithological Society 26:33-36.
>>
>> Reinking DL, Wiedenfeld DA, Wolfe DH, Rohrbaugh RW jr (2000) Distribution,
>> habitat use, and nesting success of Henslow’s Sparrow in Oklahoma.
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.suttoncenter.org_wp-2Dcontent_uploads_pdfs_publications_2000-2520Reinking-2520EtAl-2520Henslow-2527s.pdf&d=DwMFAg&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=cMEuNAosPCCQSVNlRWxMqnhESKjSxUHLLPCYYesR0yU&s=uW_IWWbjfHGZDWETYztfPWrQWppjiLme7amkgsJYPsM&e=>
>> Prairie Naturalist 32:219-232.
>>
>> Reinking DL (2002) A Closer Look: Henslow’s Sparrow
>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.suttoncenter.org_wp-2Dcontent_uploads_2015_09_Henslows-2DSparrow-2DBirding-2Dmagazine.pdf&d=DwMFAg&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=cMEuNAosPCCQSVNlRWxMqnhESKjSxUHLLPCYYesR0yU&s=n4J3QDUkYWLGyvN7GWYDAaT7lQurSFY9fbm5oVx29-M&e=>.
>> Birding 34:146-153.
>>
>>
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/25/17 10:40 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Henslow's Sparrow information
Were there any in eastern Oklahoma in 1996?

Sandy Berger
Fort Smith


On Thu, May 25, 2017 at 8:06 AM Dan Reinking <dan...> wrote:

> OKbirders,
>
> I am seeking Oklahoma reports of Henslow’s Sparrows this spring and summer
> for a survey project I am working on. I will be comparing their 2017
> distribution in Oklahoma with that from 1996. If you find any Henslow’s
> Sparrows, I would appreciate receiving either good directions or GPS
> coordinates for the locations.
>
> Thanks!
>
> Dan Reinking
>
> Sutton Avian Research Center
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.suttoncenter.org_&d=DwMFAg&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=cMEuNAosPCCQSVNlRWxMqnhESKjSxUHLLPCYYesR0yU&s=5fwQMwNsEgmUstPIVLzsd7cNiS-PI1Epjiik4Yx0ixE&e=>
>
> <dan...>
>
>
>
> Reinking DL, Hendricks DP (1993) Occurrence and nesting of Henslow’s
> Sparrow in Oklahoma.
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.suttoncenter.org_wp-2Dcontent_uploads_pdfs_publications_1993-2520Reinking-2520and-2520Hendricks-2520Henslow-2527sSparrow.pdf&d=DwMFAg&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=cMEuNAosPCCQSVNlRWxMqnhESKjSxUHLLPCYYesR0yU&s=wz-Hgs510g24LpKwss0qTKbLg4quVpadWuDx8AtBsZg&e=>
> Bulletin of the Oklahoma Ornithological Society 26:33-36.
>
> Reinking DL, Wiedenfeld DA, Wolfe DH, Rohrbaugh RW jr (2000) Distribution,
> habitat use, and nesting success of Henslow’s Sparrow in Oklahoma.
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.suttoncenter.org_wp-2Dcontent_uploads_pdfs_publications_2000-2520Reinking-2520EtAl-2520Henslow-2527s.pdf&d=DwMFAg&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=cMEuNAosPCCQSVNlRWxMqnhESKjSxUHLLPCYYesR0yU&s=uW_IWWbjfHGZDWETYztfPWrQWppjiLme7amkgsJYPsM&e=>
> Prairie Naturalist 32:219-232.
>
> Reinking DL (2002) A Closer Look: Henslow’s Sparrow
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.suttoncenter.org_wp-2Dcontent_uploads_2015_09_Henslows-2DSparrow-2DBirding-2Dmagazine.pdf&d=DwMFAg&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=cMEuNAosPCCQSVNlRWxMqnhESKjSxUHLLPCYYesR0yU&s=n4J3QDUkYWLGyvN7GWYDAaT7lQurSFY9fbm5oVx29-M&e=>.
> Birding 34:146-153.
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/25/17 6:06 am
From: Dan Reinking <dan...>
Subject: Henslow's Sparrow information
OKbirders,

I am seeking Oklahoma reports of Henslow's Sparrows this spring and summer
for a survey project I am working on. I will be comparing their 2017
distribution in Oklahoma with that from 1996. If you find any Henslow's
Sparrows, I would appreciate receiving either good directions or GPS
coordinates for the locations.

Thanks!

Dan Reinking

Sutton Avian Research Center <http://www.suttoncenter.org/>

<dan...> <mailto:<dan...>



Reinking DL, Hendricks DP (1993) Occurrence and nesting of Henslow
<http://www.suttoncenter.org/wp-content/uploads/pdfs/publications/1993%20Rei
nking%20and%20Hendricks%20Henslow%27sSparrow.pdf> 's Sparrow in Oklahoma.
Bulletin of the Oklahoma Ornithological Society 26:33-36.

Reinking DL, Wiedenfeld DA, Wolfe DH, Rohrbaugh RW jr (2000) Distribution,
habitat use, and nesting success of Henslow
<http://www.suttoncenter.org/wp-content/uploads/pdfs/publications/2000%20Rei
nking%20EtAl%20Henslow%27s.pdf> 's Sparrow in Oklahoma. Prairie Naturalist
32:219-232.

Reinking DL (2002) A Closer Look: Henslow
<http://www.suttoncenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Henslows-Sparrow-Bir
ding-magazine.pdf> 's Sparrow. Birding 34:146-153.




 

Back to top
Date: 5/24/17 3:09 pm
From: harold Yocum <drhal2...>
Subject: Re: Help with bird ID
No photo attached. Hal Yocum

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 24, 2017, at 2:08 PM, Dora Webb <owl112...> wrote:
>
> My neighbor sent me a photo of a bird that looks like a robin, size, shape. But he says it has a white chest. I can’t see a broken eye ring on the bird, and do see what looks like a black necklace on the upper chest. Help, please.
> I took the photo into Corel, lightened it a bit and cropped.
> Dora Webb
> Edmond, OK

 

Back to top
Date: 5/24/17 12:58 pm
From: Curtis, Tom <tom.curtis...>
Subject: Re: Help with bird ID
Don’t see the picture, but could it be one of the brown thrushes?

From: okbirds [mailto:<OKBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Dora Webb
Sent: Wednesday, May 24, 2017 1:08 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Help with bird ID

My neighbor sent me a photo of a bird that looks like a robin, size, shape. But he says it has a white chest. I can’t see a broken eye ring on the bird, and do see what looks like a black necklace on the upper chest. Help, please.
I took the photo into Corel, lightened it a bit and cropped.
Dora Webb
Edmond, OK
 

Back to top
Date: 5/24/17 11:29 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Red-necked Phalarope
Moffett Bottoms. Female in breeding plumage with mixed flock of peeps, and
one Stilt.

Sandy B.

 

Back to top
Date: 5/24/17 11:10 am
From: Dora Webb <owl112...>
Subject: Help with bird ID
My neighbor sent me a photo of a bird that looks like a robin, size, shape. But he says it has a white chest. I can’t see a broken eye ring on the bird, and do see what looks like a black necklace on the upper chest. Help, please.
I took the photo into Corel, lightened it a bit and cropped.
Dora Webb
Edmond, OK
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/17 11:59 am
From: Mary Peterson <m_mpeterson...>
Subject: The Panhandle from 5-19 to 5-22-2017
Hello All,

Bob and Janet Young, Mary and I went out to the Panhandle from Friday to Monday. The weather was cool and varied from cloudy to clear. Winds were mostly light. It rained 1 to 2 inches late Sunday afternoon. We saw Lou and Mary Truex, Kurt Meizenzahl, and Dan and Melinda Droege while we were out there. The dinosaur tracks are again visible, although muddy. Birding was good. Highlights included:


Cinnamon Teal-A pair at Highway 64 and Mile 4 playa in Texas County

Western Grebe-1 on Lake Etling

Osprey-1 at Lake Etling

Ring-necked Pheasant-At least 5 in the Panhandle

Long-billed Curlew-1 at the curve 15 miles west of Boise City

Ruddy Turnstone-1 at Sandpiper Trail at the Salt Plains

Least Tern-2 at Sandpiper Trail at the Salt Plains

Western Screech Owl-2 about 1 1/2 miles north of Black Mesa Bed and Breakfast

Burrowing Owl-5 about 6 miles north of Boise City

White-winged Dove-1 at the state park and 1 in Kenton

Greater Roadrunner-Several in the Kenton Area

Common Poorwill-2 about a mile north of the state park

Black-chinned Hummingbird-Many at the feeders in Kenton

Ladder-backed Woodpecker-2 in the Kenton Area

Vermilion Flycatcher-1 very active male in Kenton and another male seen briefly at the state park

Western Wood-Pewee-Several at the state park in in the Kenton area

Ash-throated Flycatcher-Several in the Kenton Area

Say's Phoebe-Several in the Kenton Area

Cassin's Kingbird-Several At the state park

Scrub Jay-1 at The Easter Pageant

Black-billed Magpie-At least 3 about 1/2 mile west of Kenton on Saturday and Monday

Common Raven-Many as far east as western Texas County

Bushtit-5 at Camp Billy Joe

Rock Wren-Found at Camp Billy Joe and at the Easter Pageant

Canyon Wren-Heard at Camp Billy Joe and the Easter Pageant

Curve-billed Thrasher-1 seen at the Easter Pageant

Spotted Towhee-Several heard and seen at Camp Billy Joe

Canyon Towhee-Several in the Kenton Area

Cassin's Sparrow-Many seen and heard in the Kenton Area

Black-throated Sparrow-Found at the Easter Pageant

Lark Bunting-At least 20 seen and heard on Road NS33 NE of Boise City

Black-headed Grosbeak-1 very vocal male found at the Easter Pageant on Saturday and Monday

Lazuli Bunting-1 male seen in Kenton and 1 at the Camp Host's feeders at the state park

Bullock's Oriole-Many seen throughout the area

Lesser Goldfinch-At least 8 seen near the Hitchin' Post and at a feeder just south of the Mercantile in Kenton


Mark Peterson

Bartlesville





 

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