va-bird
Received From Subject
7/21/17 1:42 pm C. Michael Stinson via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] birder behavior
7/21/17 7:18 am goshawk--- via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Roseate Spoonbills
7/21/17 7:02 am Arun Bose via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Shirley Plantation
7/20/17 8:51 am Marshall Faintich via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] 9 warbler species
7/20/17 5:43 am Jeffrey Blalock via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Shiny Cowbird
7/20/17 5:30 am Shea Tiller via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Why the spoonbills are here and throughout the mid-atlantic/northeast--ABA blog
7/19/17 2:03 pm Harry Armistead via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] South Point Marsh (Accomack County), Smith Island (MD), Ferry Neck (MD), July 8-16, 2017.
7/19/17 9:36 am Bryan Henson via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] RFI: Charles City Spoonbills at Shirley Plantation seen?
7/19/17 6:36 am Eirlys Barker via va-bird <va-bird...> Re: [Va-bird] Great egrets near Middleburg
7/19/17 6:06 am Quinn Emmering via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Photo - Mystery pet crate on Fenwick Bridge
7/19/17 6:03 am Emily Southgate via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Great egrets near Middleburg
7/19/17 5:49 am Quinn Emmering via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] The Mystery of the Fenwick Bridge Pet Crate
7/18/17 7:38 pm Andrew Baldelli via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Pelagic Trip September 9th. Rudee Inlet Virginia
7/18/17 9:39 am Gabriel Mapel via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Roseate Spoonbills yes
7/18/17 5:02 am Kurt via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Blockbusting
7/18/17 4:51 am Les Willis via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Roseate Spoonbills - Shirley Plantation - Monday, 7/17, 3pm
7/18/17 4:32 am Harry Glasgow via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk
7/17/17 7:05 am Amanda Dymacek via va-bird <va-bird...> Re: [Va-bird] Roseate Spoonbills, Charles City Co. 07/16/17
7/16/17 5:53 pm Ned Brinkley via va-bird <va-bird...> Re: [Va-bird] The Next Fifteen (Bird) Species for Virginia?
7/16/17 2:13 pm Shea Tiller via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Access Question: Roanoke Sewage Treatment Plant, Roanoke
7/16/17 12:57 pm Kristine Lansing via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Great Falls NP Bird Walk 07/16/2017 (Fairfax County)
7/16/17 12:54 pm Marshall Faintich via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Possible Warbler Hybird
7/16/17 12:51 pm akb via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Roseate Spoonbills, Charles City Co. 07/16/17
7/16/17 12:15 pm Jeff Blalock via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Fwd: eBird Report - Shirley Plantation, Jul 16, 2017
7/16/17 11:59 am Marshall Faintich via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Crozet Connector Trail; 7/16/17
7/16/17 10:23 am Thomas Nardone via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] eBird -- Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve -- Jul 16, 2017
7/15/17 1:34 pm Dave Youker via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Anhingas Nesting at Harwoods Mill Reservoir
7/14/17 5:57 pm Bill McGovern via va-bird <va-bird...> Re: [Va-bird] The Next Fifteen (Bird) Species for Virginia?
7/14/17 3:05 pm Ned Brinkley via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] The Next Fifteen (Bird) Species for Virginia?
7/14/17 10:49 am Ashley Peele via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Mid-July Atlas Update: Maps, Data, and Atlas All-stars
7/14/17 7:56 am etrelawn--- via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Shenandoah Co. rare sighting
7/13/17 7:29 am Stauffer Miller via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Blue-headed Vireo, Frederick County
7/12/17 7:34 am Marshall Faintich via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] 10 warbler species
7/11/17 9:33 am Patti Reum via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Canada Geese behavior in Highland County
7/10/17 7:12 pm Rowe, Richard A, 'Dick' via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Blue Ridge Parkway birding on Monday
7/10/17 6:51 pm janet anderson via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Mississippi Kites in Arlington, VA - Nesting Failure
7/10/17 6:02 pm Karen Beatty via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Roseate Tern - Virginia Beach 7-9-17
7/10/17 3:35 pm Harry Glasgow via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk
7/10/17 4:51 am Shea Tiller via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] NOVA--some hits, some misses
7/9/17 10:13 am Dendroica--- via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Great Falls NP Bird Walk 07/09/17 (Fairfax County)
7/9/17 9:50 am Larry Cartwright via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Dyke Marsh breeders and terns on the move.
7/9/17 9:14 am Stephen Johnson via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] question about an odd cuckoo call, Fairfax County
7/9/17 7:30 am Donald Sweig via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Arlington Kites : ?? Nest Failure ??
7/9/17 4:32 am Stauffer Miller via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Least Sandpipers Winchester
7/8/17 5:27 pm Paul Glass via va-bird <va-bird...> Re: [Va-bird] flycatchers @ Back Bay NWR
7/8/17 3:21 pm Michael C via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Where to Find Summer Tanagers in NoVA
7/8/17 2:40 pm Peter Frechtel via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] worm-eating warbler, Bull Run Mountains
7/8/17 2:14 pm Joe Coleman via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Banshee Reeks (Lo Co) bird walk Sat. July 8
7/8/17 11:52 am Marshall Faintich via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] 7 warbler species
7/8/17 11:04 am David Gibson via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] flycatchers @ Back Bay NWR
7/8/17 11:02 am Stuart via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Cliff swallows at Old Yates Ford Rd (Bridge) and other avians (?)
7/7/17 9:05 am Ashley Peele via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] July Birding and Block Completion
7/6/17 2:24 pm juliekazz--- via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Celebrating the life of Margaret O'Bryan: Saturday 15 July 2017
7/6/17 2:21 pm David Gibson via va-bird <va-bird...> Re: [Va-bird] Ruddy Quail-Dove
7/6/17 2:15 pm Marc Ribaudo via va-bird <va-bird...> Re: [Va-bird] Ruddy Quail-Dove
7/6/17 12:06 pm Wes Teets via va-bird <va-bird...> Re: [Va-bird] Ruddy Quail-Dove
7/6/17 11:02 am Janet Paisley via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Ruddy Quail-Dove
7/6/17 7:31 am Rich Rieger via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] drones vs birds... Fairfax Co. -please read - tx
7/6/17 6:40 am Diane L via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Yellow-rumped Warbler fledgling: Big Meadows, Shenandoah National Park, 7/3
7/6/17 4:45 am Michael Schultz via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Fork-tail flycatcher
7/5/17 9:07 am David Young via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Ravens in Reston
7/4/17 6:57 pm Claire Kluskens via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Cliff Swallow site access - Fairfax Co.
7/4/17 3:19 pm James Fox via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Dickcissels in southern Clarke County
7/4/17 5:56 am Dave Youker via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Kiptopeke Challenge 2017
7/4/17 5:46 am Larry Cartwright via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] W
7/3/17 2:15 pm Harry Glasgow via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk
7/3/17 12:28 pm Stephen Johnson via va-bird <va-bird...> Re: [Va-bird] Cliff Swallow site access: Caution
7/3/17 5:48 am Wendy Ealding via va-bird <va-bird...> Re: [Va-bird] Seaside Sparrows singing times
7/3/17 4:45 am Matthew Bender via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Late report - Mississippi Kite in Herndon, Fairfax Co.
7/2/17 8:13 pm janet anderson via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Mississippi Kite seen again in Springfield, Fairfax County, VA
7/2/17 3:51 pm Stuart via va-bird <va-bird...> Re: [Va-bird] Cliff Swallow site access: Caution
7/2/17 2:00 pm Shea Tiller via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Seaside Sparrows singing times
7/2/17 12:31 pm William Leigh via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Fork-tailed Flycatcher
7/2/17 12:26 pm Larry Meade via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Dyke Marsh, Jul 2, 2017
7/2/17 12:14 pm Kristine Lansing via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Great Falls NP Bird Walk 07/02/2017 (Fairfax County)
7/2/17 9:11 am Stephen Johnson via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Wash. Post article: Eagles raising a Hawk
7/2/17 6:34 am Scott Priebe via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] [va-bird] Burke-Springfield area - Mississippi Kite
7/1/17 7:28 pm Donald Sweig via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] OUT OF AREA: NIGHT BIRD??
7/1/17 1:39 pm Russell W Taylor via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Fork-tailed and Scissor-tailed Flycatchers at Back Bay NWR
7/1/17 10:55 am Larry Meade via va-bird <va-bird...> Re: [Va-bird] Bull Run Marina Cliff Swallows(Fairfax Co.)
7/1/17 6:33 am Shea Tiller via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Fork-tailed flycatcher RFI
7/1/17 5:55 am Rich Rieger via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Bull Run Marina Cliff Swallows(Fairfax Co.)
6/30/17 8:08 pm Dave Larsen - Birding via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Fork-tailed Flycatcher?
6/30/17 9:52 am Larry Meade via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Cliff Swallows nesting in Fairfax County
6/30/17 8:42 am Marshall Faintich via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] 12 Warbler species
6/29/17 7:06 am Gregory Luce via va-bird <va-bird...> Re: [Va-bird] Peregrine falcon near 14th St bridge
6/28/17 8:38 pm Tony Futcher via va-bird <va-bird...> Re: [Va-bird] ID help with hawk today - check out this plumage
6/28/17 3:17 pm Stephen Johnson via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] ID help with hawk today - check out this plumage
6/28/17 2:41 pm Rowe, Richard A, 'Dick' via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Blue Ridge Parkway on Tuesday
6/28/17 7:36 am Paul Pisano via va-bird <va-bird...> Re: [Va-bird] Peregrine Falcon Near 14th Street Bridge
6/27/17 4:09 pm Paul Hamilton via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Peregrine Falcon Near 14th Street Bridge
6/27/17 8:18 am Gerry Hawkins via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Voice of the Naturalist, Greater DC Area - Resending due to formatting issues with initial distribution
6/27/17 7:24 am Gerry Hawkins via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Voice of the Naturalist, Greater DC Area, Week Ending 6/26/17
6/27/17 6:04 am Vineeta Anand via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Bald Eagle
6/26/17 7:58 pm Rowe, Richard A, 'Dick' via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Dickcissels in Rockbridge County
6/26/17 2:12 pm Harry Glasgow via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk
6/26/17 5:34 am Mary Ann Good via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] summer No. Harrier in Loudoun Co., June 25
6/26/17 4:02 am Brian Taber via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Kiptopeke Birding Weekend
6/25/17 4:50 pm Marc Ribaudo via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Dyke Marsh - least bittern, marsh wren
6/25/17 3:41 pm Donald Sweig via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Arlington Mississippi Kite: NEST
6/25/17 3:20 pm Lori Keeler via va-bird <va-bird...> Re: [Va-bird] Great Falls NP Bird Walk 06/25/2017 (Fairfax County)
6/25/17 12:43 pm Kristine Lansing via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Great Falls NP Bird Walk 06/25/2017 (Fairfax County)
6/25/17 12:12 pm Harry Glasgow via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Merrimac Farm
6/25/17 11:42 am Shea Tiller via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Cormorant at AT James River Footbridge in Amherst County
6/25/17 6:38 am Ellie Simonson via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Not receiving emails from the listserve
6/24/17 3:23 pm Larry Meade via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] NVBC on Skyline Drive
6/24/17 3:00 pm Joe Coleman via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Birds observed Blue Ridge Center (Lo Co) June 24
6/24/17 2:57 pm nicholas via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] late report of Common Nighthawk in Portsmouth, 6/20/2017
6/24/17 7:55 am Shea Tiller via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Sentara Martha Jefferson Hospital Pond--some info on the swan
6/24/17 7:13 am Karen Roberts via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Swallow-tailed kite on Blackwater Rd in VB
6/24/17 6:23 am Carol Evans via va-bird <va-bird...> Re: [Va-bird] [Va-bird} Mourning Warblers!
6/23/17 7:55 pm Ron Kingston via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] CANCELLATION!--SAT. 6/24 FIELD DAY IN LOUISA, CANCELLED
6/23/17 4:40 pm Don Peterson via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Mississippi kite in Mount Vernon District
6/23/17 3:25 pm Wendy Ealding via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Richmond Audubon field trip to Powhatan State Park 6/24/17
6/23/17 10:39 am David Boltz via va-bird <va-bird...> Re: [Va-bird] Dickcissels, Bobolinks / Clarke Co. + Dickcissels on Featherbed Road, Clarke Co.
6/23/17 9:43 am Marshall Faintich via va-bird <va-bird...> Re: [Va-bird] Mourning Warblers!
6/23/17 8:04 am Eirlys Barker via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] warblers
6/23/17 7:57 am Carol Evans via va-bird <va-bird...> Re: [Va-bird] va-bird Digest, Vol 122, Issue 24
6/23/17 3:13 am Marshall Faintich via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Mourning Warblers!
6/22/17 5:59 pm janet anderson via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Mississippi Kite in Arlington, VA - 6/21/2017
6/22/17 10:28 am Jon Little via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Dickcissels, Bobolinks / Clarke Co.
6/22/17 9:11 am Jim B via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] AUTO: Jim Bernat is out of the office (returning 06/28/2017)
6/22/17 6:10 am Ashley Peele via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Mid-Summer VABBA2 Updates
6/21/17 5:31 pm Stephen Johnson via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] summer updates on breeding birds, Loudoun County
6/21/17 4:27 pm Marti Eisentraut via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Fork Tailed Flycatcher
6/21/17 9:47 am David Gibson via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] recording birds/submitting to ebird
6/21/17 9:20 am Jeff Blalock via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] No FT Fly
6/21/17 8:38 am Wendy Ealding via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Richmond Audubon field trip to Powhatan SP 6/24/17
6/21/17 6:13 am John Greenwood via va-bird <va-bird...> [Va-bird] Great Egret at Lake Accotink
 
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Date: 7/21/17 1:42 pm
From: C. Michael Stinson via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] birder behavior
Hello everyone -

Please note that although I am posting the letter below using my account,
it has three signatories and expresses the views of all three of us.

Thanks -

Mike


Probably most of us have been given a gift we didn’t particularly like, and
as children we learned that “it’s the thought that counts” and we should
say thank you anyway. In other words, we’ve been taught that gratitude is a
proper response to any gift – even the ones we don’t really like or want.

When someone finds a rare bird and posts the information on where to see
it, you’re being given a gift – at least two of them, in fact. The gift of
information regarding where the bird is, and the gift of access, so that
you can visit the property where the bird is. We might even step back a bit
and think of all birds themselves, as well as the time we have to devote to
them, as gifts, even aside from their rarity.

Unfortunately, it seems that some birders are not saying “thank you.” In
fact, many birders act as though they aren’t aware that what they’ve been
given is a gift at all. Instead, we’re concerned that the behavior of some
birders, especially when rare birds appear, implies that they are not
concerned about what impact what they’re doing will have on anyone besides
themselves. Repeated actions by some birders in recent years, especially
when rarities appear, indicate to us that too many birders are willing to
put their own desires to see and photograph birds ahead of the welfare of
birds, the stated desires of property owners (and in some cases, the law),
and the interests of other birders in seeing the same birds.

The birds that we are often most anxious to see (rarities) are also often
ones that are especially stressed. They are typically in a strange
environment and so are coping with pressures to survive that are at least
partly foreign to them. Food, predators, and other components of the
habitat in which they’ve found themselves are not what they’re used to,
which makes them more vulnerable. Birders who pursue such birds too closely
are adding to their stress and are making them less likely to survive. This
is obviously not in the best interest of the birds, and it makes it less
likely that such birds will survive until other birders can see them. The
excuse that such birds “are going to die anyway” might often be true, but
it’s not a certainty, nor is it an excuse for irritating other birders or
property owners.

Property owners, whether individual or corporate, private or governmental,
have the right in this country to tell birders when and how they may access
their property. While it’s true that some restrictions might seem
unreasonable from a birder’s perspective, when they are clearly stated, we
risk their anger (if not legal retribution) when disregarding them. An
all-too-common response by landowners angered at birders is simply to
restrict or end access to their property. This is understandable, since it
is an efficient solution, much more efficient than trying to compile a list
of “good” vs. “bad” birders, i.e. those who follow the stated guidelines
and those who don’t. Restricting access to a site harms all birders, and
eliminates whatever value the scientific data contributed by birders might
have had.

Birders are people, and all people are not the same. To be frank, some care
more about other people, and some care less. Birder misbehavior that
threatens birds and angers property owners is also frustrating to other
birders, and it appears that some birders need to be reminded of this. Some
reasons have already been mentioned above: that birds might leave an area
or die prematurely due to stress, meaning that fewer birders see them, and
that access to good birding areas can be curtailed. And there are other
reasons.

One reason that has been mentioned before is that birding is common enough
that there can be such a thing as a “public perception of a birder.” To
give a similar example, consider any other label that we put on other
people: hunter, vegetarian, liberal, conservative, atheist, theist…. Each
of these carries certain biases and images, for better or worse, accurate
or inaccurate. What we do as birders contributes to the public image of a
birder. Rightly or wrongly, people often apply characteristics of the
extremists within a group to all the members of the group. If birders
tolerate a few trespassers who will do anything to get a better look at a
bird or a better photograph of a bird, we risk being categorized with them.
Your behavior as a birder reflects on other birders. Even if that is not
reasonable, it is the way people think.

It has been less than 100 years since ornithology that used a shotgun as a
primary tool evolved into birding that uses binoculars as a primary tool.
Now we’ve entered a time when our binoculars are routinely supplemented
with social media and digital photography. As with any new technology, this
combination has the potential for abuse, and we are particularly concerned
about the repeated abuse of information gained through social media by
birders generally, and by bird photographers in particular.

While we could tell numerous stories of particular offenses and offenders
from recent years, we do not want to engage in finger-pointing at
individuals. But the possession of expensive equipment does not exempt
anyone from the guidelines we’ve discussed above. Arguably, it gives one
even more responsibility, since it can give non-birders a stronger
impression of someone who has time and money to spend chasing birds than do
our binoculars. (The average member of the public probably can’t tell at a
glance the difference between a $200 pair of binoculars and a $2200 pair,
but they can tell the difference between a point-and-shoot and a DSLR with
a Canon 500mm f/4L IS lens.) Similarly, the misuse of sound recording and
broadcasting equipment remains a concern, especially since the field use of
phones with superb sound reproduction capabilities is now routine.

We want to remind all birders that behaviors that stress the birds we
purse, or stress the landowners on whose land the birds occur, or stress
other birders, should be avoided. Such incidents have the potential to
become even more common as birder numbers increase and we continue to use
social media. We also want to point out that in recent years, we have seen
incidents ourselves, and heard numerous other reports, indicating that bird
photographers are responsible for a large number of such incidents. And, we
want to encourage birders who do not engage in or condone such behaviors to
speak to, and speak out against, those who do.

Not all bird species are the same and not all respond to birder pressure
the same. Every situation is a little different. Seeing a rare storm-petrel
from a boat on a pelagic trip, seeing a rare hummingbird at a feeder on
someone’s porch, and seeing a rare wader on a private pond by a public road
are three distinctly different birding scenarios. And although we can agree
on general guidelines, they still have to be applied in particular birding
situations. What was not too close to a bird in one situation might be too
close in another, even when observing the same species of bird. We need to
help each other realize the subtleties of such situations. In many cases
birds are little bothered by our presence. But when large numbers of
birders crowd into a single spot, both birds and landowners are more likely
to be disturbed.

You might say that we are motivated by selfish concerns ourselves. We still
want to see rare birds, and we live with regret that formerly productive
birding sites such as the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel have had their
access severely curtailed or eliminated. While some blame for such
restrictions can be laid on post-911 caution / paranoia, that cannot
explain every limit we’ve been forced to live with. We are also active
birders who do not wish to be forced to take the position of never posting
the locations of rarities we find because we’re worried about the
likelihood of misbehavior by other birders. It’s reasonable to us that such
an attitude could become increasingly common if birders continue to
disregard the welfare of birds, the rights of property owners, and the
hopes of other birders.

Those who gain a reputation as offenders by repeatedly harassing birds and
disregarding the interests of landowners and other birders cannot be
surprised if they find themselves excluded from the news about rare birds
in the future; what they may gain instead is the ire of other birders who
are also not made aware of rarities when information about such birds is
kept away from social media. This is not an idle conceit; it has occurred
in some situations already. We are aware of birds now present in Virginia,
and others recently occurring here, whose presence was not made public due
to exactly the sort of concerns we are describing. We wish that this did
not have to be the case, and we are writing this letter in hopes that such
situations can be minimized in the future.

We live in the first era in the history of humanity in which information
about the presence of birds (and other wildlife) can be disseminated
instantaneously. It would be bitterly ironic if the technological
revolution that makes possible this interconnection between people
interested in birds were to result in a backlash in which such information
is routinely suppressed, all because of a few bad actors. For decades, the
American Birding Association has published a Code of Birding Ethics (
http://listing.aba.org/ethics/). The ABA regularly revises and discusses
this document. Whether one is a lister, a photographer, or a general
birding enthusiast, we the undersigned feel that it is the obligation of
birders to abide by the letter and the spirit of this document. If our
birding culture cannot be governed by what is, in the end, basic courtesy,
consideration, and common sense, then we risk losing the culture itself. At
the very least, communication about special places and special birds would
become much more limited and private than it is at this moment. We urge
everyone to read the ABA’s Code of Birding Ethics and take the Code to
heart.


Mike Stinson

Ned Brinkley

Todd Day


eBird reviewers





--
C. Michael Stinson
Dillwyn, VA
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Date: 7/21/17 7:18 am
From: goshawk--- via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Roseate Spoonbills
As of yesterday afternoon the Spoonbills were still present.

Tim Barry
(757) 575-7960
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Date: 7/21/17 7:02 am
From: Arun Bose via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Shirley Plantation
All,
I just received a call from the owner of Shirley Plantation. Apparently people have not been following the instructions I gave. He is not happy. PLEASE STAY ON THE MAIN DIRT RD. DO NOT WANDER INTO FIELDS OR AWAY FROM THE ROAD THAT LEADS DIRECTLY TO THE HOUSE.

Arun Bose
Richmond

Sent from my iCarrier Pigeon
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Date: 7/20/17 8:51 am
From: Marshall Faintich via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] 9 warbler species
Including some juveniles on Reddish Knob, VA; 1/19/17. Report and photos:



<http://www.faintich.net/Blog2017/2017_07_19.htm>
http://www.faintich.net/Blog2017/2017_07_19.htm



___________________________

Marshall Faintich

Crozet, VA

<marshall...>

www.faintich.net <http://www.faintich.net/>

In real life, the shortest distance between two points is never a straight
line, so you might as well enjoy the journey !!

____________________________________________________________________________
_______________________





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Date: 7/20/17 5:43 am
From: Jeffrey Blalock via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Shiny Cowbird
Greetings all

Even though it is in NC the Shiny Cowbird continues at Ft Macon SP just outside of Morehead City. It was just a little over a 4 hr drive for me this morning


A bonus bird not a Life but always enjoy seeing them was both a male and female Painted Bunting with the male singing his heart out.

The S Cowbird is just a NA bird not a Life Bird for me but it is a great bird to add to ones list. But then again what bird isn't a great bird to add.

From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-572-8619 Home
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>

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Date: 7/20/17 5:30 am
From: Shea Tiller via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Why the spoonbills are here and throughout the mid-atlantic/northeast--ABA blog
Some of you may have already seen this, but here is the blog's explanation
of the spoonbills popping up around the mid-atlantic.

http://blog.aba.org/2017/07/happening-now-wandering-wood-storks-and-spoonbills.html

Great birding,

Shea
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Date: 7/19/17 2:03 pm
From: Harry Armistead via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] South Point Marsh (Accomack County), Smith Island (MD), Ferry Neck (MD), July 8-16, 2017.
SMITH ISLAND, SOUTH POINT MARSH, FERRY NECK, JULY 8-16, 2017. Liz & Harry Armistead, John Weske. Unprecedented medical events: PVC (Premature Ventricular Contractions = irregular heart beat), dehydration, hypomagnesemia. Anyone having a tilt towards it will find grist for their Schadenfreude mill in this report.


JULY 8, SATURDAY. Arrive at Rigbys Folly, Ferry Neck, Talbot County, MD (family property) at 6:20 P.M. A small fawn and 2 does in Field 2. The Carolina Wren nest in a structure under the car port has been removed (Raccoons?). 1.2 in the rain gauge since last time. Eastern Cottontail 4. Wild Turkey, 5 in Field 4. 86 dropping to 83 degrees F. by 9:15 P.M., fair, SW 10, hot. New growths of weedy wheat 6 - 1 in all the fields in spite of being disked a few weeks ago.


JULY 9, SUNDAY. Cattle Egret 1, Bald Eagle 1 immature, Green Heron 2, Snowy Egret 1, Yellow-billed Cuckoo 1, BLACK SCOTER 1. A tight group of 3 Great Blue Herons at dusk presumably heading for Poplar Island. For the first time this year Cicadas are sounding off, big-time. Five bucks on the driveway between Fields 4 & 5 and a fawn and doe in Field 2. Diamondback Terrapin 25, as seen from Lucy Point. Good Firefly show. Circa 9:30 P.M. Liz hears a Great Horned Owl call 10 times, a funny time of year for that. 75-88, NW5+ becoming calm, clear, low humidity. BUTTERFLIES: Hackberry Emperor 3, Common Wood Nymph 1, Black Swallowtail caterpillars in the parsley.


CAROLINA WREN: a 4th off-the-wall breeding attempt this year, in a planter of Colius by the back porch, with 4 eggs. Previously this year there have been nests in a fold of the directors chair on the front porch, in the base of an old Osprey nest platform under the car port, and, finally, in the metal vent of the clothes dryer. In the past they have nested inside one of my white watermans boots, in the bicycle basket, over the front door sill, in an open bag inside the car accessed from the open hatchback, in my boats transom (several times), and other quixotic places.


JULY 10, MONDAY. 76-91, fair, SW10-15+. Cedar Waxwing 1, Snowy Egret 1, a Red Admiral, and a Least Tern. Single Laughing and 2 Ring-billed gulls are fall arrivals, after a fashion. An American Robin singing in the yard is unusual. They do not nest in our yard, that is very isolated (i.e., far from other yards/lawns) and I suspect has no earthworms. Have to do some digging to see.


JULY 11, TUESDAY. A new yard species, a 41 Red Drum, dead at the mouth of the cove, covered with flies, El Stinko Grande. a.k.a. Channel Bass, and, the smaller ones, Puppy Drum. Sciaenops ocellatus. On hand are Fishes of Chesapeake Bay by Samuel F. Hildebrand and William C. Schroeder (Smithsonian Institution Press, p. 276-288, 1928, reprinted 1972, 388pp.) and Life in the Chesapeake Bay by Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson (Johns Hopkins U. Pr., p. 190, 1984, 229pp.).


Neither source indicates by their illustrations that Red Drum have a notched tail, although Hildebrand states: slightly concave in larger fish. This dead ones tail was pronouncedly concave so if Id measured it to the outer tip of its caudal (tail) fin instead of the central, notched area, you could say the fish is 42 in length. Overall the fish was rosy-whitish in coloration. Big scales. Gross. Biggest one on record: 94 lbs. Id guess this one was c. 30 lbs. Some of the photographs via Google do show tails that are forked, but not as markedly so as this one. Wading out to it, c. 100 yards, it is delightful to find so much dense SAV, the most Ive ever seen in Poplar Cove. At waist depth the water is so much cooler than around the dock. See only 3 Sea Nettles.


Gray Squirrel 5 (including snowshoes, half-tail, and tail-half-red), Eastern Cottontail 5. BUTTERFLIES: Pearl Crescent, Eastern-tailed Blue, Buckeye. At 8:50 P.M., as I am wont to do, I dump chicken remains, popular with minnows, off the end of the dock; coming back I hear a sort of chortling, there between me and the base of the dock, on the dock, is a half-grown Raccoon. Thinking rabies, I blow hard on a whistle and, unimpressed, it slowly shambles off over the rip rap. 77-90, SW 5-10, fair, 86 degrees F. at 9:15 P.M.


JULY 12, WEDNESDAY. A 12 skink on the front porch. See Snowshoes. ROYAL OAK: 4 Cattle Egrets. Hook up with John Weske in Easton. CAMBRIDGE, 35 Canada Geese at Sailwinds Visitor Center. CRISFIELD: Rock Pigeon, 50 on the wires, Bald Eagle 1 adult, Barn Swallow 7, Royal Tern 3, Osprey 1.


SOUTH POINT MARSH, ACCOMACK COUNTY, VIRGINIA (a couple of miles south of Smith Island and the MD/VA line). John Weske and I reconnoiter the huge Brown Pelican colony here prior to the main event, banding of young pelis tomorrow, motoring out in Johns Boat, the Louna Sea, with its 115 horse Suzuki. In the south third of the colony I use the clicker, count 184 nests still with eggs. I think I noticed all of these there. Many either also have very small young (naked chicks, so to speak) and/or eggs that are pipping. With his net John catches, employing his classic, legendary 40-foot sprint, 2 adult pelicans banded previously (938-77877 and 938-65715).


I estimate 2,100 flight-capable Double-crested Cormorants in the entire S.P.M. area. Also at this south end: American Black Duck 1, Seaside Sparrow 1, Red-winged Blackbird 2, Yellow-crowned Night Heron 1, American Oystercatcher 11, 7 MUTE SWANS, Snowy Egret 5, Great Egret 2, Royal Tern 35 (intriguing, several carrying minnows), Laughing Gull 12, Great Black-backed Gull c. 85 (many large, fuzzy young), Herring Gull 125 (likewise some big young). Many of the cormorant nests are empty, the young already fledged, but there are still scores with eggs or very small young. Enough Royal Tern sightings to suggest there is a colony somewhere on the Eastern Shore of Virginia, Bayside. ?


In the central area of SPM there are also many nests still with eggs, 106. Also Great Egret 2, Snowy Egret 2, Tricolored Heron 1, Seaside Sparrow 2, American Oystercatcher 2. Up here and farther north are many large young (bruisers), about as big as adults. Overall Id say the SPM pelican colony, in toto, comprises well over 1,000 pairs. What with the many nests still with eggs and very small young, many 100s of pelicans will remain to be banded later.


SMITH ISLAND, MARYLAND, today, we pass all 3 of the towns: Little Blue Heron 3, Tricolored Heron 2, Great Egret 2, Snowy Egret 2, Yellow-crowned Night Heron 2, Fish Crow 16, Purple Martin 8, Barn Swallow 5, European Starling 5, Boat-tailed Grackle 4, Double-crested Cormorant 60, Brown Pelican 1, Osprey 6, Willet 5, Green Heron 1, Great Blue Heron 2, and Royal Tern 3.


JULY 13, THURSDAY. SOUTH POINT MARSH again: After 15 minutes ashore I become very weary and spend the rest of the time in a boat under its canopy (thank you APHIS) while the 33 others band 819 (preliminary, unofficial total) Brown Pelican chicks, 10:15 A.M. - 1:45 P.M. A flotilla of 6 boats. I notice 3 other folks, all c. 1/3 my age, come back to the landing area after about an hour and just sit there with their heads down, as well as a couple of older folks, also done in, to various degrees, by the heat. One estimate of the heat index is 110, that I think is much too high. My pulse, for the first time that I know, is irregular, beats 3 times then pauses, 3 times then pauses


While Im resting in the boat under its canopy in the shade and hydrating I do at least scan vigorously for birds other than gulls, pelicans, and cormorants, and see: American Oystercatcher 1, American Black Duck 4, Snowy Egret 6, Fish Crow 2, Little Blue Heron 2, Royal Tern 3, Tricolored Heron 6, Yellow-crowned Night Heron 1, Laughing Gull, 2, Great Egret 2, and Osprey 1. My high count of flight-capable Brown Pelicans in sight simultaneously from this vantage point is 570.


SMITH ISLAND, MD, (not seen yesterday): MUTE SWAN 3 (still a few not yet removed from the lower Bay), Glossy Ibis 1.


THE BIG MESS UPS. One of my very worst days, certainly the worst boating. Ive had over 50 years experience handling small boats, quite a bit of it in this area (where for 3 straight Junes I operated out of the refuge house in Ewell for a week each year), but today one wouldnt know that. I take some pride in my experience and seamanship abilities. I dont think any of the mistakes I make today are related to the onset of the several medical issues, although that would be a convenient excuse. I just dont know why they happen.


1st I make a wrong turn down towards Tylerton. 2nd I run aground out by the jetties west of Ewell. 3rd, and potentially very serious, I slam into a big, metal channel marker at 5,000 rpms in Big Thorofare. A glancing blow, but it could have broken Jackies arm had it been outside the boat. No damage is done to Johns boat save to some barely-detectable on the rub rail. I surrender the helm, but on the way back to Crisfield we cross a very rough wake and the boat slams down SO hard it feels as if my lower back is compressed in half. A very rough ride today and I am amazed not to have any resulting back discomfort. When I think of the collision, which is (too) often, I flinch, close my eyes, shake my head, and have feelings of shame and guilt.


JULY 14, FRIDAY. HEALTH REPORT. Spend from 10 A.M. - 4 P.M. at 2 health facilities in Easton, Maryland, with NO waiting at either place. First at Your Docs In (Doc-in-a-box) where an EKG reveals, in their words, that my heartbeat is all over place and the Dx is PVC (Premature Ventricular Contractions), a low magnesium level, and dehydration from yesterday. Then 4 hours in the Easton hospital ER where I receive an IV infusion of saline solution, a magnesium pill, have blood work done, and am closely monitored. It didnt help, and it would be a convenient excuse, but I do not believe any of this caused my sloppy boat handling on Thursday. True, the helm is somewhat unresponsive, and it is a boat Id never driven previously. At both medical places everyone on the staff is terrific.


Back at Rigbys Folly: 78-96, fair, SW10, a storm from 5:45 P.M., with scary winds of 35 m.p.h.+ and a brief deluge resulting in 0.7. The temperature drops from 96 to 74 in a few minutes during the storm. Fields 1 & 2 finally get planted, with 2 Cattle Egrets following the huge rig. Two CAEGs also seen with horses in Royal Oak. Four Painted Turtles in Frog Hollow. A 12 skink on the front porch. The rains stimulate 2 Fowlers Toads and a Copes Gray Tree Frog to call, after the rains stop. On the way down from Philadelphia Mary sees a double rainbow, probably unnoticed by her young David and Lucas, and, coincidentally the same day George photographs another doubler in Park City, Utah, where he is attending the annual Audubon Society meeting. John Weske overnights.


JULY 15, SATURDAY. Just take it easy. 74-90, fair, NW5+, hot but humidity not bad. Two American Crows bring smoke on an adult Bald Eagle. Mary and her children (David and Lucas) capture 20+ minnows of 3 species in the trap with leftover pork. A female Blue Grosbeak flies over the dock and lands in the marsh. Sit on the dock 3:30-4:30 and see a Forsters Tern, 2 Black Vultures, an imm. Bald Eagle in addition to the adult, and the grosbeak and crows. Eight Painted Turtles in Frog Hollow, their basking log finally exposed again.


BAD YEAR hereabouts for Cow-nosed Rays, bluets, Osprey nest sites unoccupied, Diamondback Terrapin, hummingbirds, Fowlers Toads, and Green Treefrogs. A good year for Eastern Cottontails. Today see BUTTERFLIES: a Tiger Swallowtail, a Red-spotted Purple, and a Hackberry Emperor.


JULY 16, SUNDAY. A 1/2 grown cottontail out on the drive in front of the house. Leave for PA at 8:45 A.M. Big group of 410 mid-morning Tree Swallows in a compact group on 2 adjacent wires E of Route 481 c. 1 mile NE of 481 X Route 309, a sure sign that fall migration is underway, albeit in subdued sort of way. But these are true fall arrivals since hardly any (perhaps none) breed in that area.


SMITH ISLAND (Maryland) can get in your blood. In the excellent (Chesapeake) Bay Journal, that everyone who cares about the Bay should subscribe to (the Bay Journal, P. O. Box 222, Jacobus, PA 17407-0222; its free but send at least $25 anyway), in the July-August 2017 issue, vol. 27, no. 5, pages 1, 32-33, is an article Smith Island losing land, population, and now its shepherd. Theres a whole bunch of other great articles on the Bay by distinguished authorities. Getting this is worth it just for the evocative photography of Dave Harp.


DAN CRISTOL ARTICLE. Hot off the press by an old friend, now Professor of Biology at William and Mary College. Age-related differences in foraging ability among clam-dropping Herring Gulls (Larus argentatus) by Daniel A. Cristol (lead author) and 5 others, the Wilson Journal of Ornithology, vol. 129, no. 2, June 2017, pages 301-310. Studies were done at Powhatan Creek where it enters the James River and Poquoson on the west shore of Chesapeake Bay.


HYDRATION: what I am hearing from my recent experience is that the best antidote to dehydration is simply plain water, but to add some flavor, Diet Gatorade and/or Smartwater, too. Pedialyte is also recommended, but it is sugary so, as an adult diabetic, I must avoid it. Important to get liquids that provide electrolytes. Two of my prescribed medications, Lisinopril-HCTZ 20-12.5 mg and Metformin HCL 1,000mg, are apparently somewhat dehydrating.


Best to all. - Harry Armistead, Philadelphia.
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Date: 7/19/17 9:36 am
From: Bryan Henson via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] RFI: Charles City Spoonbills at Shirley Plantation seen?
Any one see them today?

Thanks,
Bryan
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Date: 7/19/17 6:36 am
From: Eirlys Barker via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Great egrets near Middleburg
I actually saw about eight together at a tiny pond off Ark Road in
Gloucester, just South of US 17 yesterday about 10:40, but they were gone
when I passed later, around 4:00 p.m. I saw a male Prothonotary about 7:45
this morning.

Eirlys Barker,

Pinetta, Gloucester

On Wed, Jul 19, 2017 at 9:03 AM, Emily Southgate via va-bird <
<va-bird...> wrote:

> This morning while enjoying breakfast on my porch I was astonished to see a
> flock of about 12 great egrets flying by, heading north toward Aldie. Some
> other birds I saw or heard are listed below. Unfortunately, none of them
> was clearly carrying food or feeding fledglings! A lovely way to start the
> day regardless.
>
> 12 great egrets in flight
>
> ~15 hummingbirds at feeders
>
> 2 mourning doves
>
> 3 bluebirds
>
> several chipping sparrows
>
> at least 2 field sparrows
>
> 1 or 2 yellow-billed cuckoos
>
> 2 mockingbirds
>
> 1 crow being chased by a mockingbird
>
> 2 titmice
>
> 2 meadowlarks
>
> 4 barn swallows
>
> 3 goldfinches
>
> 1 cardinal
>
> 1catbird
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>
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Date: 7/19/17 6:06 am
From: Quinn Emmering via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Photo - Mystery pet crate on Fenwick Bridge
I forgot photos can not be attached to listserve emails. A photo of the
pet crate on the bridge can be viewed on the eBird checklist I submitted:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S38215790

Quinn
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Date: 7/19/17 6:03 am
From: Emily Southgate via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Great egrets near Middleburg
This morning while enjoying breakfast on my porch I was astonished to see a
flock of about 12 great egrets flying by, heading north toward Aldie. Some
other birds I saw or heard are listed below. Unfortunately, none of them
was clearly carrying food or feeding fledglings! A lovely way to start the
day regardless.

12 great egrets in flight

~15 hummingbirds at feeders

2 mourning doves

3 bluebirds

several chipping sparrows

at least 2 field sparrows

1 or 2 yellow-billed cuckoos

2 mockingbirds

1 crow being chased by a mockingbird

2 titmice

2 meadowlarks

4 barn swallows

3 goldfinches

1 cardinal

1catbird
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Date: 7/19/17 5:49 am
From: Quinn Emmering via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] The Mystery of the Fenwick Bridge Pet Crate
Late Tuesday afternoon, July 18, I was traveling back home to Alexandria on
the Metro yellow line. As usual, I checked the Fenwick Bridge trellis for
perched peregrine falcons, osprey, etc. Only a pair of osprey were there,
but in addition to the osprey was a large pet crate placed on the top of
the trellis. I know such crates are used to transport rehabilitated birds
such as raptors so maybe one was released from the bridge. However, I
don't quite understand why a bird would need to be released from the very
top of the trellis? It seems like an unnecessary and significant
undertaking, if this is indeed the case. If it wasn't used to release a
raptor then I am really dying to know why it's up there. Anyway, returning
back to work on the Metro this morning I captured a photo with my phone and
this time a peregrine was perched next to the crate (see attached).

Any thoughts, insights, or clues from the local community would be
appreciated to help unravel my small mystery.

Cheers!
Quinn Emmering
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Date: 7/18/17 7:38 pm
From: Andrew Baldelli via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Pelagic Trip September 9th. Rudee Inlet Virginia
I have organized a Pelagic Trip for Virginia Birders with Capt. Skip Feller from Rudee Tours, on September 9th. The boat will be the Rudee Angler a 90 foot long 22 foot wide Lydia Vessel , the boat has an upper deck and a large cabin with snack bar, website to view the boat is Rudeetours.com. The trip is for 35 people at 220 per person first come first serve .


The trip will leave Friday night September 8th. at 10pm boarding the boat will start at 8.30pm , we will be back at the Rudee dock around 7pm. Saturday night . We will head out to the edge of the continental shelf and begin chumming an hour before sunrise to attract a variety of seabirds . After working the chum slick we will cruise the waters along the shelf and Norfolk Canyon in search of more seabirds.


Checks can be made to Rudee Tours , all checks have to be in by August 20th. To avoid the hassle of refunds Capt. has agreed to not cash any checks till after the trip . The rain date for trip will be Sunday September 10th. boarding would begin same time Saturday night to depart by 10pm.


Mail checks to Andrew Baldelli 5569 Dunloe Drive apt. 103 Virginia beach ,Virginia 23455


Any questions please contact me at <Andrewbaldelli...> or 859-652-1090


Cheers

Andrew

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Date: 7/18/17 9:39 am
From: Gabriel Mapel via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Roseate Spoonbills yes
Both R. Spoonbills plus 2 Snowy Egrets continue at Shirley Plantation now.
Gabriel Mapel
New Hope

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 7/18/17 5:02 am
From: Kurt via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Blockbusting
Blockbusting.

No, I am not referring to real estate measures that affect communities. I am describing Breeding Bird Atlas activities where blockbusting refers to efforts to fill in the bird list for an area that deserves additional attention. The goal is to raise the species and breeding confirmation list to better levels. To achieve this goal, several teams of birders get together, define birding routes in an area called a “block” (which is 1/6th of a topographic map quad or about 9 square miles) and then try to tally the most bird species and breeding evidence for these in a day’s effort.

You see, it all started about a week ago. OK, maybe it really started back at the end of May, at least for me. That is about when I started getting serious in contributing to Virginia’s Atlas. I have plugged along and soon realized that many birders I knew were unfamiliar with the Atlas activities. So…why not try to gather a few birders to improve on a block? (You can see the status of all of Virginia’s blocks using E-bird’s Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas portal. Then, click on Explore data. To check on a county, just enter the county name and a summary sheet will appear, click on blocks and you can see the block summary. You can find where the blocks are located using VABBA2 Block Explorer tool: click the Maps and Block sign-up button on the Atlas Home page).

> So, I contacted a few people, who contacted a few more and…11 people showed up last Sunday morning at the Aden store in Nokesville. (Fleetwood and Aden Rds) Our goal was to blockbust the block known as Nokesville SE. We looked over the map, divided the block into 3 areas, and then went out and atlased! That means, not just hearing or seeing a bird, but trying to determine if it is a breeder. (The Atlas portal has a handbook with a wealth of information; atlasing is not just birding but observing bird behavior.)

The weather was surprisingly good (63F at 7am and partly cloudy) and everyone had a wonderful morning! Moreover, the Blockbusting was a great success. As a group, we found 66 species and confirmed 30 as breeders. Sure, we found a few that were previously confirmed as breeders, yet we really improved on the data. Eliminating the dups, we added 20 BREEDERS to the block! In addition, we added 12 new species. A great showing! The key to our success was an early start, well defined routes, multiple birding eyes per team, and a bit of enthusiasm.

All of us at Nokesville this past Sunday were pleased with our efforts and we hope to do it again. For this reason, I am sure we will organize a few more Blockbusting trips and hope that you can join us! And, although this year’s breeding season is nearly over, there are still opportunities for many blocks this season that have virtually no confirmed breeders – I am sure there is a block near you. This means I hope you can get out, try a little Atlasing, and add some breeders!

A big Thank You to the participants last Sunday:
Larry Meade, Elizabeth Krone, Rentz Hilyer, Michael Bishop
Dave Larsen, Chris White, Carol White, Phil Kenny,
Lynn Rafferty, Steve Johnson, Kurt Gaskill,
And a grateful Thank You to Kim Hosen for hospitality at Merrimac WMA.

Kurt Gaskill

Sent from my iPad
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Date: 7/18/17 4:51 am
From: Les Willis via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Roseate Spoonbills - Shirley Plantation - Monday, 7/17, 3pm
FYI - observed the 2 spoonbills around 3pm yesterday. Arrived at 2pm to find no birds, but they finally showed up... :-)

Les Willis
Proposal Coordinator/Capture Management

AGVIQ,  LLC
2809 S. Lynnhaven Rd. Suite 200
Virginia Beach, VA 23452-8518

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Date: 7/18/17 4:32 am
From: Harry Glasgow via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk
Please forgive this tardy report.  Thirty-one birders met at Huntley Meadow on July 17 for the regular Monday Morning Bird Walk. It was a warm, muggy, and generally sunny morning. The group spotted 54 species, a good total for what is often a slow time of year.  My great thanks to Stuart and Pam Davis for filling in for me while I was away.   Canada Goose     19Wood Duck         22Mallard                 6Pied-billed Grebe  1Great Blue Heron  9Great Egret           17Little Blue Heron   1Green Heron         12Osprey                    1Red-shouldered Hawk  2Rock Pigeon            1Mourning Dove       6Yellow-billed Cuckoo   6Chimney Swift         5Ruby-throated Hummingbird   6Belted Kingfisher     2Red-headed Woodpecker    1Red-bellied Woodpecker     6Downey Woodpecker          5Hairy Woodpecker               2Northern Flicker                   6Pileated Woodpecker            3Eastern Wood-pewee            3Acadian Flycatcher               8Eastern Phoebe                      7Eastern Kingbird                    6Red-eyed Vireo    8Blue Jay               4Fish Crow             1Crow Species        2Purple Martin        6Tree Swallow         5Northern Rough-winged Swallow    6Barn Swallow         2Carolina Chickadee    2Tufted Titmouse      6White-breasted Nuthatch     2Carolina Wren         10Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher     2Eastern Bluebird        6American Robin       21Gray Catbird               3Cedar Waxwing          3Prothonatary Warbler  1Common Yellowthroat   3Eastern Towhee            1Northern Cardinal         8Indigo Bunting              3Red-winged Blackbird 25Common Grackle           5Orchard Oriole                1House Finch                    3American Goldfinch      10House Sparrow                2
The Monday Morning Birdwalk has been a weekly event at Huntley Meadows since 1985. It takes place every week, rain or shine (except during electrical storms, strong winds, or icy trails), at 7AM (8AM from November through March), is free of charge, requires no reservation, and is open to all. Birders meet in the parking lot at the Park's entrance at 3701 Lockheed Blvd, Alexandria, VA. Questions should be directed to Park staff during normal business hours at (703)768-2525.  Our great thanks to Stuart and Pam Davis for filling in while we were away.  

Harry GlasgowFriends of Huntley Meadows Park
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Date: 7/17/17 7:05 am
From: Amanda Dymacek via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Roseate Spoonbills, Charles City Co. 07/16/17
Roseate Spoonbills continue in the company of several Great Egrets and four immature Little Blue Herons.

We had to wait for them to come over from their nightly roosting spot but it was worth the hour wait!

Amanda & Julian

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 16, 2017, at 3:51 PM, akb via va-bird <va-bird...> wrote:
>
> Found 2 Roseate Spoonbills at Shirley Plantation this morning. On the main
> impoundment; view from dirt road that leads to Plantation house.
>
> Location
> 37.34025,-77.24743
>
> Please do not enter fields or stray from this road as Richmond Audubon
> maintains good relations with property owners.
>
> Also if eBirding list add the above in comments.
>
> Thanks!
>
> Arun Bose
> Richmond
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Date: 7/16/17 5:53 pm
From: Ned Brinkley via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] The Next Fifteen (Bird) Species for Virginia?
Thanks, indeed!

And thanks for Bob Ake for reminding me that Lesser Goldfinch was missing
from the second sentence - I completely forgot about that great bird.

On Fri, Jul 14, 2017 at 8:57 PM, Bill McGovern <bmcgovern...> wrote:

> Ned:
> Ned, this is an amazing document--it must have taken weeks to compile
> the data, with countless re-writes!
> Thanks! I will keep it at the ready!
> Bill
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: va-bird [mailto:va-bird-bounces+bmcgovern=<cox.net...>] On
> Behalf Of Ned Brinkley via va-bird
> Sent: Friday, July 14, 2017 6:06 PM
> To: VA-BIRD <va-bird...>
> Subject: [Va-bird] The Next Fifteen (Bird) Species for Virginia?
>
> Virginia’s Next 15 Species?
>
> Every 10 years or so, I ask regional birders to help predict Virginia’ s
> “Next 20 Birds.” Ten years after the publication of the Gold Book (2007),
> many of the predicted species have now been detected and documented in the
> state, including Red-billed Tropicbird, Smith’s Longspur, Crested Caracara,
> Dusky Flycatcher, Townsend’s Solitaire (one report from Northern Virginia
> had not been accepted), Brown Noddy, Calliope Hummingbird, Roseate
> Spoonbill, Northern Lapwing, Ancient Murrelet, and Violet-green Swallow.
> Other species that were not predicted, mostly because their patterns of
> occurrence in the East were very weak, were nevertheless welcome additions
> to our avifauna: Zone-tailed Hawk, Prairie Falcon, Bulwer’s Petrel,
> Brewer’s (Timberline) Sparrow, Lucy’s Warbler, Brown-chested Martin, Lesser
> Sand-Plover. And of course, those great rarities no one saw coming have
> knocked our socks off, even if we might have missed them ourselves: Terek
> Sandpiper, White-crowned Pigeon, Violet-crowned Hummingbird. (In the
> business of predicting new species, being wrong is extraordinarily
> enjoyable.)
>
> Perhaps because pelagic trips are so few off our Commonwealth, Bermuda
> Petrel was not predicted to be detected, even though tracking devices
> indicate that these rare birds do transit the state’s waters routinely, and
> North Carolina birders have documented at least 31 there since 1993. But
> sharp-eyed Tom Johnson found one at sea far east of Rudee Inlet and managed
> to get good images from a research vessel, for Virginia’s first.
>
> Virginia has now added so many species with moderate to strong occurrence
> patterns in the East at this point that in predicting the next set of
> birds, I have limited the list to 15 rather than 20 species.
>
> Below are consideration of the various “groups” of birds (seabirds,
> raptors, passerines, etc.), with notes on the likelihood of occurrence of
> new species based on records from surrounding states as well as Canada
> (Ontario eastward) and Bermuda. The records mentioned for potential new
> species are not exhaustive by any means, just an indication of context for
> possible Virginia appearances.
>
> SEABIRDS
>
> Not all seabirds are seen from boats, but because Virginia has so few
> pelagic trips these days (1-2 per year lately), only one seabird is
> predicted to be among the Next 15 Birds added to the state list.
>
> North Carolina has multiple records of Black-bellied Storm-Petrel,
> Swinhoe’s Storm-Petrel, European Storm-Petrel, and Cape Verde Shearwater,
> while Georgia and South Carolina each have a record of Red-footed Booby (as
> does Nova Scotia). Records of Zino’s Petrel and White-chinned Petrel off
> North Carolina are essentially singular in the western North Atlantic,
> though Maine has a record of the latter. None of these birds above seem
> likely to be recorded in Virginia unless more pelagic trips are undertaken,
> though researchers might well encounter any of them. Masked Booby is
> recorded almost annually now off North Carolina, with single recent records
> from New Jersey, Maryland, Massachusetts, and New York, and I predict that
> Virginia will soon add that species, probably from a research vessel
> studying marine mammals.
>
> Lesser Frigatebird might have already occurred in Virginia; photographs of
> the Wythe County frigatebird from 1988 look very much like a Lesser to my
> eye. No measurements were taken of that bird, unfortunately. In North
> America, the species is known from Michigan, Maine, Wyoming, and California.
>
> Tufted Puffin, as well as other Pacific alcids, now have open seas in the
> higher latitudes in late summer, making plausible more Atlantic records in
> addition to Maine’s (and England’s) recent records. Long-billed Murrelet
> (two records each from North and South Carolina, three from Florida, and
> about seven each in there Midwest and Northeast) could occur on an inland
> Virginia lake in October/November, but inland records in North America have
> plummeted in recent years.
>
> We’d love to see an Arctic Loon (Ohio, Vermont, Colorado; possibly a few
> more) but far more likely is Yellow-billed Loon (Maine, Massachusetts,
> Pennsylvania, Georgia, Indiana, with multiples from New York, Tennessee,
> Kentucky, Illinois, Missouri, Iowa, and many in the Great Plains and
> Rockies)which makes my Next 15 List. If one is hoping to add new seabirds
> via “splits,” then Scopoli’s Shearwater and Madeiran Storm-Petrel would be
> the next likely additions for Virginia (these are currently treated as
> types of Cory’s Shearwater and Band-rumped Storm-Petrel). Both have been
> observed off Virginia in recent years. Barolo Shearwater, recorded a few
> times off Massachusetts and Nova Scotia, seems a long shot off Virginia;
> the species apparently forages in very deep waters and would potentially be
> seen only by researchers.
>
> WADERS
>
> Western Reef Heron has been photographed in New York, New Hampshire,
> Massachusetts, Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland, with others in the Caribbean,
> and it seems a good candidate to occur in Virginia some day, though records
> are still few and far between. Scarlet Ibis—hardly known in the United
> States except as escapees or released birds in Florida, with one found
> breeding in South Carolina in 2001—was recently reported in western
> Virginia with photographs, but the record is not accepted.
>
> WATERFOWL
>
> Pink-footed Goose! The Northeast has a lot of recent records, with the
> southernmost to Maryland (three records) and Delaware (at least two). Just
> a matter of time for Virginia then! Less likely, by far, would be a Tundra
> Bean-Goose (records from Nova Scotia and Quebec) or Lesser White-fronted
> Goose (W. L. Sladen reported one in Maryland many years ago), or Masked
> Duck (multiples in Florida, singles in North Carolina, Maryland, Georgia,
> Tennessee, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Wisconsin), or Smew (New York,
> Rhode Island, Illinois, Ontario), or Common Shelduck (records increasing in
> the Northeast, with records south to Delaware). Mottled Ducks, introduced
> to South Carolina, do not seem to be straying northward much, but Ontario
> has a record, and the species has strayed in North Carolina as Lake
> Mattamuskeet, so it should be looked for. See a funny-looking waterbird?
> Take a photo!
>
> RAPTORS
>
> Neighboring states have records of Snail Kite (North Carolina has had one,
> South Carolina two recently), Short-tailed Hawk (Georgia, Alabama; and
> Michigan!), Eurasian Kestrel (Florida, Massachusetts, Nova Scotia,
> Bermuda), Eurasian Hobby (Massachusetts), Red-footed Falcon (Massachusetts;
> sight record at Cape May). Cape May has a possible banding record of Hen
> Harrier, plus a sight report of Eurasian Sparrowhawk, to whet one’s
> studying. None of these make the Next 15 cut, but any could occur!
>
> CRANES AND RAILS
>
> Virginia already has a record of Paint-billed Crake, and there are few
> other rare rails we might add, though Corn Crake comes to mind (old records
> from Maryland, New Jersey, New York, recent Maine record, and a suggestion
> from Back Bay NWR’s first manager Romey Waterfield that he might have seen
> one there many years ago!). Pennsylvania and Texas have records of Spotted
> Rail, so almost anything in that family would be imaginable; Delaware and
> Georgia and Bermuda have records of Purple Swamphens, and New York has a
> record of Azure Gallinule, though some of these records are not favored by
> local committees.
>
> SHOREBIRDS
>
> This is a huge group of species, mostly migratory, but many that have not
> yet been reported in Virginia have weak patterns of vagrancy in the East.
> None of the following would make the cut: Southern Lapwing (Florida,
> Maryland), Wood Sandpiper (New York, Rhode Island, Delaware, Bermuda,
> Newfoundland), Great Knot (Maine, West Virginia), Broad-billed Sandpiper
> (New York, Massachusetts), Common Snipe (Newfoundland, Bermuda, and maybe
> Maryland), Gray-tailed Tattler (Massachusetts), Surfbird (Pennsylvania,
> twice in Florida, Maine, at least four times in Texas), and Greater
> Sand-Plover (Florida).
>
> More likely would be European Golden-Plover (Delaware, twice in New
> Jersey, Maine, many times in Atlantic Canada), Little Stint (multiples for
> New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, with singles
> for Rhode Island, Kentucky, Tennessee, Ontario….we need not continue),
> Spotted Redshank (North Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut,
> Massachusetts several times, ditto Ontario, with singles in Ohio, Indiana,
> Wisconsin, Kansas, Texas….), Pacific Golden-Plover (New York, New Jersey,
> Maine, Florida, Delaware, Vermont), and Common Ringed Plover (North
> Carolina, Massachusetts, New York, Maine, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland many
> times, Ontario). Of these, Little Stint and Pacific Golden-Plover seem most
> likely to be among the Next 15 Birds.
>
> GULLS & TERNS
>
> Certainly among Virginia’s Next 15 should be Slaty-backed Gull, now known
> from dozens of records in the Northeast and Midwest, with other records
> from Pennsylvania (two) and North Carolina. There have been reports already
> in Virginia of Ross’s Gull, Glaucous-winged Gull, and Ivory Gull, not
> currently accepted, but those could be probably the next most likely gulls
> to be found, with single records of Ross’s from Maryland and Delaware the
> closest to Virginia. Equally likely, perhaps, is Kelp Gull (Maryland,
> Delaware, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Indiana, with many more from
> the Gulf Coast states), but far less likely would be Belcher’s Gull
> (Olrog’s Gull? Florida has three records), Gray-hooded Gull (New York,
> Florida), and Gray Gull (Louisiana) could reach us. Large-billed Tern (old
> records from New Jersey, Ohio, Illinois, Bermuda) seems a pipe dream, but
> Whiskered Tern (two in New Jersey, one of those shared with Delaware) less
> so - though freshwater habitats near the coast in Virginia are sadly very
> limited in recent years. Cayenne Tern is not recognized in the United
> States as a distinct species, but it’s certainly a plausible visitor to the
> state; it has been photographed as close as Dare County, North Carolina.
>
> PIGEONS & DOVES
>
> Band-tailed Pigeon, an irruptive and migratory species, should be among
> Virginia’s Next 15, with oddly no reports from Maryland or Delaware but
> records from North Carolina, South Carolina, New Jersey, New York,
> Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, Maine, Ontario,
> Alabama, Kentucky, Tennessee, Illinois and many more from Ontario and parts
> farther west. Inca Dove seems less probable but still possible, with
> records from Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky, West Virginia, Maryland (but
> still none from the Carolinas), while European Turtle-Dove (Florida,
> Massachusetts) would be a shocker in Virginia.
>
> OWLS & NIGHTJARS
>
> With the warming of the planet, visits from Northern Hawk Owl, Great Gray
> Owl, or Boreal Owl seem less and less likely every year; records stop at
> about the latitude of New York City or north of it for these birds, but
> there is an odd report, not substantiated, of a hawk owl from West
> Virginia. Antillean Nighthawk, with two North Carolina records (and one
> from Louisiana), seems possible, but far more likely would be Lesser
> Nighthawk, recorded in New Jersey (twice), West Virginia, and many times in
> the Gulf Coast states. Lesser gets my vote.
>
> SWIFTS & SWALLOWS
>
> Hurricanes have produced (or been associated with) records for Common
> Swift in Massachusetts and Black Swift in New Jersey (and both have been
> seen in Bermuda after storms), and these are possible in Virginia, but the
> records are not yet numerous enough to get the nod. Virginia has recorded
> most if not all likely swallows and swifts; an addition to the Virginia
> avifauna from either group of aerialists would be a remarkable rarity,
> possibly from the Caribbean or Mexico but perhaps from Europe. Records of
> Alpine Swift from the Caribbean suggest that these powerful long-distance
> migrants can clearly survive the trans-Atlantic crossing.
>
> HUMMINGBIRDS
>
> Records of Violet-crowned and Magnificent Hummingbirds from the Virginia
> mountains are truly remarkable, but consider that Virginia is almost
> surrounded by records of Mexican Violetear (reported once in Virginia but
> without photographs; records from West Virginia, Maryland twice, New
> Jersey, Maine, Ohio, Tennessee, Indiana, Michigan, etc.), and we still lack
> an Anna’s Hummingbird record (3x in North Carolina, 2x each in
> Pennsylvania, Maryland, New York, Ohio). Both should be on the Next 15
> list. Likewise possible are Broad-tailed Hummingbird (North Carolina,
> Delaware, New Jersey, many times in Georgia), Buff-bellied Hummingbird
> (multiples for both Carolinas and for Georgia), Blue-throated Hummingbird
> (Georgia, Louisiana), Costa’s Hummingbird (Alabama, Florida, Michigan),
> White-eared Hummingbird (Alabama, Mississippi, Michigan), and Berylline
> Hummingbird (Michigan again!), or perhaps a Bahama Woodstar/Sheartail
> (Pennsylvania), Amethyst-throated Hummingbird (Texas, Quebec), or
> Green-breasted Mango (North Carolina, Georgia, Louisiana, Wisconsin)?
>
> The non-passerines don’t have many more other groups that would provide a
> likely vagrant, though New York has a record of Williamson’s Sapsucker, and
> Pennsylvania has some tantalizing older records of Black-backed Woodpecker.
>
> PASSERINES
>
> Although Virginia has made up some ground lately and added Dusky
> Flycatcher (and has a nice photographic record of Tropical/Couch’s
> Kingbird, probably Tropical), the Next 15 will almost certainly include a
> few new flycatchers, my guesses being Hammond’s Flycatcher, which is known
> from Maryland, Pennsylvania, New York, Florida, Alabama, Nova Scotia, and
> Massachusetts (four times!), and Tropical Kingbird, with three in North
> Carolina, one in Maryland, two each in Delaware and Pennsylvania, three in
> Massachusetts, one in Maine; the latter species has nested in Florida now,
> and records from Gulf Coast states are increasing. Couch’s Kingbird
> (Maryland, New York, Massachusetts, Michigan) and Cassin’s Kingbird (three
> each Massachusetts and Ontario, plus two in New York, many in Florida)
> would be next in line, but less likely, with Thick-billed Kingbird
> (Ontario, Texas) a dream-on sort of vagrant, and Great Kiskadee (New York,
> South Carolina, recently to South Dakota!) slightly less so. Gray
> Flycatcher (Massachusetts, Delaware, North Carolina, at least twice each in
> Ohio, Louisiana, Ontario) seems very likely to appear in Virginia, but
> records are not quite numerous enough to put it on the Next 15. The same is
> true for those streaky enigmatic Sulphur-bellied, Variegated, and Piratic
> Flycatchers, any of which could appear in Virginia, most likely in fall on
> the coast: records of vagrants are widespread but thin on the ground. A
> silky-flycatcher like Phainopepla (not a flycatcher, of course) would
> brighten birding in Virginia, but records of vagrants only reach Ontario,
> Wisconsin, and Massachusetts.
>
> Of the other passerine groups, thrushes, warblers, blackbirds, and finches
> are more likely than vireos or smaller taxonomic groups to produce new
> records, but White Wagtail is worth a mention: though there are only about
> nine U. S. records east of the Mississippi, three are from the Carolinas.
> Yellow-green Vireo also merits honorable mention, with records from
> Florida, South Carolina, and Massachusetts but many more from coastal Texas
> through Alabama.
>
> Of the thrushes, it is tempting to imagine a Fieldfare or Redwing in
> Virginia, but both are still represented by only a sprinkling of records in
> the Northeast. North American wood-warblers are more likely: Virginia’s
> Warbler would be especially appreciated in Virginia (Maryland, West
> Virginia, New York, Rhode Island, Maine, Georgia, with many more in the
> Midwest), but a Hermit Warbler (multiples for Connecticut, New York,
> Massachusetts, one for Maine), Grace’s Warbler (New York, Ontario,
> Illinois), or Red-faced Warbler (Georgia, Louisiana) would be fine, as
> would a Painted Redstart (New York, Massachusetts, Alabama, Ohio, Ontario,
> twice in Wisconsin). Unlikely, surely, is Golden-cheeked Warbler: single
> vagrants have made it to California, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Florida.
>
> Among sparrows, we still await our first Cassin’s Sparrow (North Carolina,
> New York, Massachusetts, Maryland, and many more) and Golden-crowned
> Sparrow, for which there are perhaps two-dozen records from Maryland to
> Maine, a similar number in the nearer Midwest, and singles from South
> Carolina and Tennessee. Both make my Next 15.
>
> In the blackbird family, a stealth vagrant, Western Meadowlark seems
> likely enough to get a vote for the Next 15, with multiples documented in
> North Carolina, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New York, etc. The slowly expanding
> Bronzed Cowbird, with a record north to South Carolina, could be a
> contender. Of the orioles (as a group, very much on the rise as vagrants in
> fall/winter), Scott’s Oriole (North Carolina, South Carolina, New York,
> Pennsylvania, Kentucky) and Hooded Oriole (Tennessee, Kentucky, Alabama,
> twice in Ontario) would be most likely, if not more likely than the
> meadowlark and cowbird, but there are far-flung records of Altamira Oriole
> (Mississippi) and Audubon’s Oriole (Indiana) and now Black-backed Oriole
> (Pennsylvania, Connecticut). We can dream. Finally, a Brambling or
> Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch or Eurasian Tree Sparrow could pop up at a feeder
> in winter, as there are increasing patterns beyond the West/Midwest for
> all. Georgia and Massachusetts have single records of McCown’s Longspur,
> and Tennessee has three; this bird seems unlikely to make the cut to me.
>
> We would be remiss in neglecting records from Bermuda, which is closer to
> us than is Chicago! There, Arctic Warbler, Dark-sided Flycatcher,
> Ferruginous Duck, Booted Eagle, White Tern, Eurasian Dotterel (a 2015
> record from Ontario provides some hope!), Caribbean Martin, Common
> House-Martin, among other gems. For veteran birders in Virginia, one of
> these species has probably been seen, if distantly, at Craney Island, way
> way back. Hmmmmm….
>
> So what does this give us for our list of the Next 15 Birds?
>
> Masked Booby
> Yellow-billed Loon
> Pink-footed Goose
> Pacific Golden-Plover
> Little Stint
> Slaty-backed Gull
> Band-tailed Pigeon
> Lesser Nighthawk
> Mexican Violetear
> Anna’s Hummingbird
> Hammond’s Flycatcher
> Tropical Kingbird
> Cassin’s Sparrow
> Golden-crowned Sparrow
> Western Meadowlark
>
> Most of these have been on previous rounds of “Next 20 Birds,” though not
> the Pink-footed Goose or Yellow-billed Loon. If one had to pick five more?
> A hummer, a flycatcher, a shorebird, a gull, and an oriole!
>
> Why do this exercise every decade or so? Careful study of the birds that
> are in front of us is greatly enriched when we are aware of all
> possibilities, even remote ones, and critically identify the birds we see,
> rather than logging the species we know to be most likely. Perhaps our
> state lacks records for Western Meadowlark because most of us assume all
> meadowlarks we see are Easterns? And perhaps we should pay more attention
> to plovers with rings or with gold tones above? When we study birds closely
> and we eliminate vagrants from consideration, we affirm these
> identifications more definitively, confidently. Naturally, we don’t have
> time to study every meadowlark we see to rule out Western, but when birding
> is slow, why not look and listen to them for a few minutes, or hours?
> They’re really beautiful birds to study for a good while, every now and
> then. And when we study birds closely, we learn not just about plumage and
> vocalizations but also about habits, habitat, and ultimately their status
> and distribution where we are birding. Part of picking out something new
> and unusual is learning the variation in the plumages, calls, and behaviors
> of the birds that are not unusual. We sometimes see aberrant plumages or
> even hybrids when we’re looking at each bird carefully, but often we learn
> a new vocalization or see a new behavior. Some describe bird identification
> as “educated guessing,” but careful birding can have a very high degree of
> accuracy, of course. Having a few silent meadowlarks recorded on our lists
> as “Eastern/Western” can remind us to spend more time looking and
> listening. We also benefit from knowing what birders in surrounding regions
> are seeing, as our planet changes and birds respond to these changes; we
> continue to witness profound shifts in bird populations, and this
> witnessing puts us in closer touch to our planet and our fellow species.
> And we can communicate what we see to members of our own species, perhaps.
> Finally, there is the particular thrill of seeing something we’ve never
> seen before, or never seen in our local area, and sharing the discovery
> with others.
>
> Ned Brinkley
> Cape Charles, Va.
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>
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Date: 7/16/17 2:13 pm
From: Shea Tiller via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Access Question: Roanoke Sewage Treatment Plant, Roanoke
Hello, all.

I have a couple of questions regarding the Roanoke Sewage Treatment Plant.
I have family in Lynchburg so I may be able to get down to the plant
sometimes when I can't see shorebirds otherwise.

First, I see there are two permit options: temporary and permanent. I see
that the permanent one requires that I be over 18 years old, which is not
something I am at this point. Does anyone know if the temporary one also
requires this? Secondly, does anyone know the length of the safety briefing
that you must receive following when you get a permit? If its a day permit,
would you have to get the briefing again the second, third, etc. time you
came?

Thanks,

Great birding (and good luck with the Shirley Plantation spoonbills if you
go look for them!)

Shea
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Date: 7/16/17 12:57 pm
From: Kristine Lansing via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Great Falls NP Bird Walk 07/16/2017 (Fairfax County)


Following is the tally from Sunday's weekly bird walk at Great Falls National Park, which identified 29 species.  The walk was quieter than in recent weeks, despite the milder temperature and low humidity.  Interestingly, no Great Crested Flycatchers were observed.  Larger numbers of Canada Geese and Cormorants, however, were sighted than has been the norm; among the geese were some decent-sized juveniles.
The group meets on Sunday mornings at 8:00 a.m. in front of the snack bar/concession stand of the Great Falls Park visitors' center.  All birders are welcome!
Canada Goose  40
Mallard  7
Double-crested Cormorant  20
Great Blue Heron  8
Black Vulture  17
Turkey Vulture  1
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Mourning Dove  1
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  1    Auditory
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  3
Red-bellied Woodpecker  2    Auditory
Pileated Woodpecker  1    Auditory
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1    Auditory
Red-eyed Vireo  3    Auditory
Blue Jay  5
American Crow  8
Tree Swallow  1
swallow sp.  2
Carolina Chickadee  1    Auditory
Tufted Titmouse  10
White-breasted Nuthatch  2
Carolina Wren  5
Eastern Bluebird  2
Wood Thrush  2    One visual, one auditory
Louisiana Waterthrush  1
Chipping Sparrow  2
Northern Cardinal  7
Indigo Bunting  1
Red-winged Blackbird  1
American Goldfinch  1

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S38169359

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



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Date: 7/16/17 12:54 pm
From: Marshall Faintich via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Possible Warbler Hybird
I just posted my report: Crozet Connector Trail; 7/16/17. One of the
interesting birds is a female American Redstart with a yellowish throat and
breast. I assumed that it was just a variation, but have since read that
hybrid Redstart x Northern Parula, and hybrid Redstart x Nashville Warblers
exist. I'd appreciate any of you that are hybrid experts to take a look and
let me know your opinion.



<http://www.faintich.net/Blog2017/2017_07_16.htm>
http://www.faintich.net/Blog2017/2017_07_16.htm



Thanks,



___________________________

Marshall Faintich

Crozet, VA

<marshall...>

www.faintich.net <http://www.faintich.net/>

In real life, the shortest distance between two points is never a straight
line, so you might as well enjoy the journey !!

____________________________________________________________________________
_______________________





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Date: 7/16/17 12:51 pm
From: akb via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Roseate Spoonbills, Charles City Co. 07/16/17
Found 2 Roseate Spoonbills at Shirley Plantation this morning. On the main
impoundment; view from dirt road that leads to Plantation house.

Location
37.34025,-77.24743

Please do not enter fields or stray from this road as Richmond Audubon
maintains good relations with property owners.

Also if eBirding list add the above in comments.

Thanks!

Arun Bose
Richmond
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Date: 7/16/17 12:15 pm
From: Jeff Blalock via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Fwd: eBird Report - Shirley Plantation, Jul 16, 2017


From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-572-8619 Home
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>


Begin forwarded message:

> From: <ebird-checklist...>
> Date: July 16, 2017 at 3:14:47 PM EDT
> To: <jcbabirder...>
> Subject: eBird Report - Shirley Plantation, Jul 16, 2017
>
> Shirley Plantation, Charles City, Virginia, US
> Jul 16, 2017 12:50 PM - 2:10 PM
> Protocol: Stationary
> Comments: After turning off of Hwy 156 (Roxbury Rd) onto Westbury Rd (a dirt road) drive 1.3 miles to pond on your left.
> 20 species
>
> Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) 1
> Great Blue Heron (Blue form) (Ardea herodias [herodias Group]) 1
> Great Egret (Ardea alba) 1
> Little Blue Heron (Egretta caerulea) 5
> Green Heron (Butorides virescens) 1
> Roseate Spoonbill (Platalea ajaja) 2 Will upload pictures
> Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura) 10
> Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) 1
> Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) 2
> Killdeer (Charadrius vociferus) 3
> Greater Yellowlegs (Tringa melanoleuca) 1
> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) (Columba livia (Feral Pigeon)) 25
> American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) 1
> Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica) 4
> Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus) 1
> Field Sparrow (Spizella pusilla) 1
> Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) 2
> Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) 1
> Dickcissel (Spiza americana) 1 Heard singing four times.
> Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) 10
>
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S38167624
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
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Date: 7/16/17 11:59 am
From: Marshall Faintich via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Crozet Connector Trail; 7/16/17
A few interesting birds. Report and photos:



<http://www.faintich.net/Blog2017/2017_07_16.htm>
http://www.faintich.net/Blog2017/2017_07_16.htm



___________________________

Marshall Faintich

Crozet, VA

<marshall...>

www.faintich.net <http://www.faintich.net/>

In real life, the shortest distance between two points is never a straight
line, so you might as well enjoy the journey !!

____________________________________________________________________________
_______________________





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Date: 7/16/17 10:23 am
From: Thomas Nardone via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] eBird -- Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve -- Jul 16, 2017
This morning, 9 people participated in the weekly bird walk at Dyke Marsh. We tallied 50 species and enjoyed the comfortable July weather. See list below.

The walk is sponsored by the Friends of Dyke Marsh and start at 8 AM. Everyone is welcome.


Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve
Jul 16, 2017
8:00 AM
Traveling
3.00 miles
180 Minutes

150 Canada Goose
75 Mallard
2 Double-crested Cormorant
35 Great Blue Heron
35 Great Egret
3 Turkey Vulture
15 Osprey
5 Bald Eagle
2 Ring-billed Gull
50 gull sp.
2 tern sp.
6 Mourning Dove
6 Chimney Swift
4 Red-bellied Woodpecker
1 Downy Woodpecker
1 Northern Flicker
1 Eastern Phoebe
1 Great Crested Flycatcher
1 Eastern Kingbird
3 Warbling Vireo
2 Red-eyed Vireo
5 Blue Jay
3 American Crow
3 Fish Crow
5 crow sp.
12 Purple Martin
1 Ruby Throated hummingbird
4 Tree Swallow
5 Barn Swallow
10 Carolina Chickadee
5 Tufted Titmouse
1 White-breasted Nuthatch
5 Carolina Wren
1 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
5 American Robin
2 Gray Catbird
10 Northern Mockingbird
12 European Starling
2 Common Yellowthroat
1 Yellow Warbler
1 Song Sparrow
12 Northern Cardinal
3 Indigo Bunting
40 Red-winged Blackbird
15 Common Grackle
1 Orchard Oriole
4 Baltimore Oriole
3 House Finch
2 American Goldfinch
2 House Sparrow

Number of Taxa: 50


Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 7/15/17 1:34 pm
From: Dave Youker via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Anhingas Nesting at Harwoods Mill Reservoir
This morning while checking my Prothonotary Warbler and Wood Duck boxes at
Harwoods Mill, I ran across a pair of Anhinga. Initially the male took
flight, and then the female emerged from some dense cover on a Bald Cypress.
Since this is the first time this year that I've seen them together, I
checked for a possible nest. Sure enough, low in the Bald Cypress was the
nest. I moved away, and the male eventually took his turn on the nest. A
nice addition to the Poquoson West SW block of the VA Breeding Bird Atlas!
Photo is at the link.

http://ebird.org/ebird/atlasva/view/checklist/S38148201

Dave Youker
Yorktown, VA
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Date: 7/14/17 5:57 pm
From: Bill McGovern via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] The Next Fifteen (Bird) Species for Virginia?
Ned:
Ned, this is an amazing document--it must have taken weeks to compile the data, with countless re-writes!
Thanks! I will keep it at the ready!
Bill

-----Original Message-----
From: va-bird [mailto:va-bird-bounces+bmcgovern=<cox.net...>] On Behalf Of Ned Brinkley via va-bird
Sent: Friday, July 14, 2017 6:06 PM
To: VA-BIRD <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] The Next Fifteen (Bird) Species for Virginia?

Virginia’s Next 15 Species?

Every 10 years or so, I ask regional birders to help predict Virginia’ s “Next 20 Birds.” Ten years after the publication of the Gold Book (2007), many of the predicted species have now been detected and documented in the state, including Red-billed Tropicbird, Smith’s Longspur, Crested Caracara, Dusky Flycatcher, Townsend’s Solitaire (one report from Northern Virginia had not been accepted), Brown Noddy, Calliope Hummingbird, Roseate Spoonbill, Northern Lapwing, Ancient Murrelet, and Violet-green Swallow.
Other species that were not predicted, mostly because their patterns of occurrence in the East were very weak, were nevertheless welcome additions to our avifauna: Zone-tailed Hawk, Prairie Falcon, Bulwer’s Petrel, Brewer’s (Timberline) Sparrow, Lucy’s Warbler, Brown-chested Martin, Lesser Sand-Plover. And of course, those great rarities no one saw coming have knocked our socks off, even if we might have missed them ourselves: Terek Sandpiper, White-crowned Pigeon, Violet-crowned Hummingbird. (In the business of predicting new species, being wrong is extraordinarily
enjoyable.)

Perhaps because pelagic trips are so few off our Commonwealth, Bermuda Petrel was not predicted to be detected, even though tracking devices indicate that these rare birds do transit the state’s waters routinely, and North Carolina birders have documented at least 31 there since 1993. But sharp-eyed Tom Johnson found one at sea far east of Rudee Inlet and managed to get good images from a research vessel, for Virginia’s first.

Virginia has now added so many species with moderate to strong occurrence patterns in the East at this point that in predicting the next set of birds, I have limited the list to 15 rather than 20 species.

Below are consideration of the various “groups” of birds (seabirds, raptors, passerines, etc.), with notes on the likelihood of occurrence of new species based on records from surrounding states as well as Canada (Ontario eastward) and Bermuda. The records mentioned for potential new species are not exhaustive by any means, just an indication of context for possible Virginia appearances.

SEABIRDS

Not all seabirds are seen from boats, but because Virginia has so few pelagic trips these days (1-2 per year lately), only one seabird is predicted to be among the Next 15 Birds added to the state list.

North Carolina has multiple records of Black-bellied Storm-Petrel, Swinhoe’s Storm-Petrel, European Storm-Petrel, and Cape Verde Shearwater, while Georgia and South Carolina each have a record of Red-footed Booby (as does Nova Scotia). Records of Zino’s Petrel and White-chinned Petrel off North Carolina are essentially singular in the western North Atlantic, though Maine has a record of the latter. None of these birds above seem likely to be recorded in Virginia unless more pelagic trips are undertaken, though researchers might well encounter any of them. Masked Booby is recorded almost annually now off North Carolina, with single recent records from New Jersey, Maryland, Massachusetts, and New York, and I predict that Virginia will soon add that species, probably from a research vessel studying marine mammals.

Lesser Frigatebird might have already occurred in Virginia; photographs of the Wythe County frigatebird from 1988 look very much like a Lesser to my eye. No measurements were taken of that bird, unfortunately. In North America, the species is known from Michigan, Maine, Wyoming, and California.

Tufted Puffin, as well as other Pacific alcids, now have open seas in the higher latitudes in late summer, making plausible more Atlantic records in addition to Maine’s (and England’s) recent records. Long-billed Murrelet (two records each from North and South Carolina, three from Florida, and about seven each in there Midwest and Northeast) could occur on an inland Virginia lake in October/November, but inland records in North America have plummeted in recent years.

We’d love to see an Arctic Loon (Ohio, Vermont, Colorado; possibly a few
more) but far more likely is Yellow-billed Loon (Maine, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Georgia, Indiana, with multiples from New York, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois, Missouri, Iowa, and many in the Great Plains and Rockies)which makes my Next 15 List. If one is hoping to add new seabirds via “splits,” then Scopoli’s Shearwater and Madeiran Storm-Petrel would be the next likely additions for Virginia (these are currently treated as types of Cory’s Shearwater and Band-rumped Storm-Petrel). Both have been observed off Virginia in recent years. Barolo Shearwater, recorded a few times off Massachusetts and Nova Scotia, seems a long shot off Virginia; the species apparently forages in very deep waters and would potentially be seen only by researchers.

WADERS

Western Reef Heron has been photographed in New York, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland, with others in the Caribbean, and it seems a good candidate to occur in Virginia some day, though records are still few and far between. Scarlet Ibis—hardly known in the United States except as escapees or released birds in Florida, with one found breeding in South Carolina in 2001—was recently reported in western Virginia with photographs, but the record is not accepted.

WATERFOWL

Pink-footed Goose! The Northeast has a lot of recent records, with the southernmost to Maryland (three records) and Delaware (at least two). Just a matter of time for Virginia then! Less likely, by far, would be a Tundra Bean-Goose (records from Nova Scotia and Quebec) or Lesser White-fronted Goose (W. L. Sladen reported one in Maryland many years ago), or Masked Duck (multiples in Florida, singles in North Carolina, Maryland, Georgia, Tennessee, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Wisconsin), or Smew (New York, Rhode Island, Illinois, Ontario), or Common Shelduck (records increasing in the Northeast, with records south to Delaware). Mottled Ducks, introduced to South Carolina, do not seem to be straying northward much, but Ontario has a record, and the species has strayed in North Carolina as Lake Mattamuskeet, so it should be looked for. See a funny-looking waterbird?
Take a photo!

RAPTORS

Neighboring states have records of Snail Kite (North Carolina has had one, South Carolina two recently), Short-tailed Hawk (Georgia, Alabama; and Michigan!), Eurasian Kestrel (Florida, Massachusetts, Nova Scotia, Bermuda), Eurasian Hobby (Massachusetts), Red-footed Falcon (Massachusetts; sight record at Cape May). Cape May has a possible banding record of Hen Harrier, plus a sight report of Eurasian Sparrowhawk, to whet one’s studying. None of these make the Next 15 cut, but any could occur!

CRANES AND RAILS

Virginia already has a record of Paint-billed Crake, and there are few other rare rails we might add, though Corn Crake comes to mind (old records from Maryland, New Jersey, New York, recent Maine record, and a suggestion from Back Bay NWR’s first manager Romey Waterfield that he might have seen one there many years ago!). Pennsylvania and Texas have records of Spotted Rail, so almost anything in that family would be imaginable; Delaware and Georgia and Bermuda have records of Purple Swamphens, and New York has a record of Azure Gallinule, though some of these records are not favored by local committees.

SHOREBIRDS

This is a huge group of species, mostly migratory, but many that have not yet been reported in Virginia have weak patterns of vagrancy in the East.
None of the following would make the cut: Southern Lapwing (Florida, Maryland), Wood Sandpiper (New York, Rhode Island, Delaware, Bermuda, Newfoundland), Great Knot (Maine, West Virginia), Broad-billed Sandpiper (New York, Massachusetts), Common Snipe (Newfoundland, Bermuda, and maybe Maryland), Gray-tailed Tattler (Massachusetts), Surfbird (Pennsylvania, twice in Florida, Maine, at least four times in Texas), and Greater Sand-Plover (Florida).

More likely would be European Golden-Plover (Delaware, twice in New Jersey, Maine, many times in Atlantic Canada), Little Stint (multiples for New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, with singles for Rhode Island, Kentucky, Tennessee, Ontario….we need not continue), Spotted Redshank (North Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts several times, ditto Ontario, with singles in Ohio, Indiana, Wisconsin, Kansas, Texas….), Pacific Golden-Plover (New York, New Jersey, Maine, Florida, Delaware, Vermont), and Common Ringed Plover (North Carolina, Massachusetts, New York, Maine, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland many times, Ontario). Of these, Little Stint and Pacific Golden-Plover seem most likely to be among the Next 15 Birds.

GULLS & TERNS

Certainly among Virginia’s Next 15 should be Slaty-backed Gull, now known from dozens of records in the Northeast and Midwest, with other records from Pennsylvania (two) and North Carolina. There have been reports already in Virginia of Ross’s Gull, Glaucous-winged Gull, and Ivory Gull, not currently accepted, but those could be probably the next most likely gulls to be found, with single records of Ross’s from Maryland and Delaware the closest to Virginia. Equally likely, perhaps, is Kelp Gull (Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Indiana, with many more from the Gulf Coast states), but far less likely would be Belcher’s Gull (Olrog’s Gull? Florida has three records), Gray-hooded Gull (New York, Florida), and Gray Gull (Louisiana) could reach us. Large-billed Tern (old records from New Jersey, Ohio, Illinois, Bermuda) seems a pipe dream, but Whiskered Tern (two in New Jersey, one of those shared with Delaware) less so - though freshwater habitats near the coast in Virginia are sadly very limited in recent years. Cayenne Tern is not recognized in the United States as a distinct species, but it’s certainly a plausible visitor to the state; it has been photographed as close as Dare County, North Carolina.

PIGEONS & DOVES

Band-tailed Pigeon, an irruptive and migratory species, should be among Virginia’s Next 15, with oddly no reports from Maryland or Delaware but records from North Carolina, South Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, Maine, Ontario, Alabama, Kentucky, Tennessee, Illinois and many more from Ontario and parts farther west. Inca Dove seems less probable but still possible, with records from Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky, West Virginia, Maryland (but still none from the Carolinas), while European Turtle-Dove (Florida,
Massachusetts) would be a shocker in Virginia.

OWLS & NIGHTJARS

With the warming of the planet, visits from Northern Hawk Owl, Great Gray Owl, or Boreal Owl seem less and less likely every year; records stop at about the latitude of New York City or north of it for these birds, but there is an odd report, not substantiated, of a hawk owl from West Virginia. Antillean Nighthawk, with two North Carolina records (and one from Louisiana), seems possible, but far more likely would be Lesser Nighthawk, recorded in New Jersey (twice), West Virginia, and many times in the Gulf Coast states. Lesser gets my vote.

SWIFTS & SWALLOWS

Hurricanes have produced (or been associated with) records for Common Swift in Massachusetts and Black Swift in New Jersey (and both have been seen in Bermuda after storms), and these are possible in Virginia, but the records are not yet numerous enough to get the nod. Virginia has recorded most if not all likely swallows and swifts; an addition to the Virginia avifauna from either group of aerialists would be a remarkable rarity, possibly from the Caribbean or Mexico but perhaps from Europe. Records of Alpine Swift from the Caribbean suggest that these powerful long-distance migrants can clearly survive the trans-Atlantic crossing.

HUMMINGBIRDS

Records of Violet-crowned and Magnificent Hummingbirds from the Virginia mountains are truly remarkable, but consider that Virginia is almost surrounded by records of Mexican Violetear (reported once in Virginia but without photographs; records from West Virginia, Maryland twice, New Jersey, Maine, Ohio, Tennessee, Indiana, Michigan, etc.), and we still lack an Anna’s Hummingbird record (3x in North Carolina, 2x each in Pennsylvania, Maryland, New York, Ohio). Both should be on the Next 15 list. Likewise possible are Broad-tailed Hummingbird (North Carolina, Delaware, New Jersey, many times in Georgia), Buff-bellied Hummingbird (multiples for both Carolinas and for Georgia), Blue-throated Hummingbird (Georgia, Louisiana), Costa’s Hummingbird (Alabama, Florida, Michigan), White-eared Hummingbird (Alabama, Mississippi, Michigan), and Berylline Hummingbird (Michigan again!), or perhaps a Bahama Woodstar/Sheartail (Pennsylvania), Amethyst-throated Hummingbird (Texas, Quebec), or Green-breasted Mango (North Carolina, Georgia, Louisiana, Wisconsin)?

The non-passerines don’t have many more other groups that would provide a likely vagrant, though New York has a record of Williamson’s Sapsucker, and Pennsylvania has some tantalizing older records of Black-backed Woodpecker.

PASSERINES

Although Virginia has made up some ground lately and added Dusky Flycatcher (and has a nice photographic record of Tropical/Couch’s Kingbird, probably Tropical), the Next 15 will almost certainly include a few new flycatchers, my guesses being Hammond’s Flycatcher, which is known from Maryland, Pennsylvania, New York, Florida, Alabama, Nova Scotia, and Massachusetts (four times!), and Tropical Kingbird, with three in North Carolina, one in Maryland, two each in Delaware and Pennsylvania, three in Massachusetts, one in Maine; the latter species has nested in Florida now, and records from Gulf Coast states are increasing. Couch’s Kingbird (Maryland, New York, Massachusetts, Michigan) and Cassin’s Kingbird (three each Massachusetts and Ontario, plus two in New York, many in Florida) would be next in line, but less likely, with Thick-billed Kingbird (Ontario, Texas) a dream-on sort of vagrant, and Great Kiskadee (New York, South Carolina, recently to South Dakota!) slightly less so. Gray Flycatcher (Massachusetts, Delaware, North Carolina, at least twice each in Ohio, Louisiana, Ontario) seems very likely to appear in Virginia, but records are not quite numerous enough to put it on the Next 15. The same is true for those streaky enigmatic Sulphur-bellied, Variegated, and Piratic Flycatchers, any of which could appear in Virginia, most likely in fall on the coast: records of vagrants are widespread but thin on the ground. A silky-flycatcher like Phainopepla (not a flycatcher, of course) would brighten birding in Virginia, but records of vagrants only reach Ontario, Wisconsin, and Massachusetts.

Of the other passerine groups, thrushes, warblers, blackbirds, and finches are more likely than vireos or smaller taxonomic groups to produce new records, but White Wagtail is worth a mention: though there are only about nine U. S. records east of the Mississippi, three are from the Carolinas.
Yellow-green Vireo also merits honorable mention, with records from Florida, South Carolina, and Massachusetts but many more from coastal Texas through Alabama.

Of the thrushes, it is tempting to imagine a Fieldfare or Redwing in Virginia, but both are still represented by only a sprinkling of records in the Northeast. North American wood-warblers are more likely: Virginia’s Warbler would be especially appreciated in Virginia (Maryland, West Virginia, New York, Rhode Island, Maine, Georgia, with many more in the Midwest), but a Hermit Warbler (multiples for Connecticut, New York, Massachusetts, one for Maine), Grace’s Warbler (New York, Ontario, Illinois), or Red-faced Warbler (Georgia, Louisiana) would be fine, as would a Painted Redstart (New York, Massachusetts, Alabama, Ohio, Ontario, twice in Wisconsin). Unlikely, surely, is Golden-cheeked Warbler: single vagrants have made it to California, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Florida.

Among sparrows, we still await our first Cassin’s Sparrow (North Carolina, New York, Massachusetts, Maryland, and many more) and Golden-crowned Sparrow, for which there are perhaps two-dozen records from Maryland to Maine, a similar number in the nearer Midwest, and singles from South Carolina and Tennessee. Both make my Next 15.

In the blackbird family, a stealth vagrant, Western Meadowlark seems likely enough to get a vote for the Next 15, with multiples documented in North Carolina, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New York, etc. The slowly expanding Bronzed Cowbird, with a record north to South Carolina, could be a contender. Of the orioles (as a group, very much on the rise as vagrants in fall/winter), Scott’s Oriole (North Carolina, South Carolina, New York, Pennsylvania, Kentucky) and Hooded Oriole (Tennessee, Kentucky, Alabama, twice in Ontario) would be most likely, if not more likely than the meadowlark and cowbird, but there are far-flung records of Altamira Oriole
(Mississippi) and Audubon’s Oriole (Indiana) and now Black-backed Oriole (Pennsylvania, Connecticut). We can dream. Finally, a Brambling or Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch or Eurasian Tree Sparrow could pop up at a feeder in winter, as there are increasing patterns beyond the West/Midwest for all. Georgia and Massachusetts have single records of McCown’s Longspur, and Tennessee has three; this bird seems unlikely to make the cut to me.

We would be remiss in neglecting records from Bermuda, which is closer to us than is Chicago! There, Arctic Warbler, Dark-sided Flycatcher, Ferruginous Duck, Booted Eagle, White Tern, Eurasian Dotterel (a 2015 record from Ontario provides some hope!), Caribbean Martin, Common House-Martin, among other gems. For veteran birders in Virginia, one of these species has probably been seen, if distantly, at Craney Island, way way back. Hmmmmm….

So what does this give us for our list of the Next 15 Birds?

Masked Booby
Yellow-billed Loon
Pink-footed Goose
Pacific Golden-Plover
Little Stint
Slaty-backed Gull
Band-tailed Pigeon
Lesser Nighthawk
Mexican Violetear
Anna’s Hummingbird
Hammond’s Flycatcher
Tropical Kingbird
Cassin’s Sparrow
Golden-crowned Sparrow
Western Meadowlark

Most of these have been on previous rounds of “Next 20 Birds,” though not the Pink-footed Goose or Yellow-billed Loon. If one had to pick five more?
A hummer, a flycatcher, a shorebird, a gull, and an oriole!

Why do this exercise every decade or so? Careful study of the birds that are in front of us is greatly enriched when we are aware of all possibilities, even remote ones, and critically identify the birds we see, rather than logging the species we know to be most likely. Perhaps our state lacks records for Western Meadowlark because most of us assume all meadowlarks we see are Easterns? And perhaps we should pay more attention to plovers with rings or with gold tones above? When we study birds closely and we eliminate vagrants from consideration, we affirm these identifications more definitively, confidently. Naturally, we don’t have time to study every meadowlark we see to rule out Western, but when birding is slow, why not look and listen to them for a few minutes, or hours?
They’re really beautiful birds to study for a good while, every now and then. And when we study birds closely, we learn not just about plumage and vocalizations but also about habits, habitat, and ultimately their status and distribution where we are birding. Part of picking out something new and unusual is learning the variation in the plumages, calls, and behaviors of the birds that are not unusual. We sometimes see aberrant plumages or even hybrids when we’re looking at each bird carefully, but often we learn a new vocalization or see a new behavior. Some describe bird identification as “educated guessing,” but careful birding can have a very high degree of accuracy, of course. Having a few silent meadowlarks recorded on our lists as “Eastern/Western” can remind us to spend more time looking and listening. We also benefit from knowing what birders in surrounding regions are seeing, as our planet changes and birds respond to these changes; we continue to witness profound shifts in bird populations, and this witnessing puts us in closer touch to our planet and our fellow species.
And we can communicate what we see to members of our own species, perhaps.
Finally, there is the particular thrill of seeing something we’ve never seen before, or never seen in our local area, and sharing the discovery with others.

Ned Brinkley
Cape Charles, Va.
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Date: 7/14/17 3:05 pm
From: Ned Brinkley via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] The Next Fifteen (Bird) Species for Virginia?
Virginia’s Next 15 Species?

Every 10 years or so, I ask regional birders to help predict Virginia’ s
“Next 20 Birds.” Ten years after the publication of the Gold Book (2007),
many of the predicted species have now been detected and documented in the
state, including Red-billed Tropicbird, Smith’s Longspur, Crested Caracara,
Dusky Flycatcher, Townsend’s Solitaire (one report from Northern Virginia
had not been accepted), Brown Noddy, Calliope Hummingbird, Roseate
Spoonbill, Northern Lapwing, Ancient Murrelet, and Violet-green Swallow.
Other species that were not predicted, mostly because their patterns of
occurrence in the East were very weak, were nevertheless welcome additions
to our avifauna: Zone-tailed Hawk, Prairie Falcon, Bulwer’s Petrel,
Brewer’s (Timberline) Sparrow, Lucy’s Warbler, Brown-chested Martin, Lesser
Sand-Plover. And of course, those great rarities no one saw coming have
knocked our socks off, even if we might have missed them ourselves: Terek
Sandpiper, White-crowned Pigeon, Violet-crowned Hummingbird. (In the
business of predicting new species, being wrong is extraordinarily
enjoyable.)

Perhaps because pelagic trips are so few off our Commonwealth, Bermuda
Petrel was not predicted to be detected, even though tracking devices
indicate that these rare birds do transit the state’s waters routinely, and
North Carolina birders have documented at least 31 there since 1993. But
sharp-eyed Tom Johnson found one at sea far east of Rudee Inlet and managed
to get good images from a research vessel, for Virginia’s first.

Virginia has now added so many species with moderate to strong occurrence
patterns in the East at this point that in predicting the next set of
birds, I have limited the list to 15 rather than 20 species.

Below are consideration of the various “groups” of birds (seabirds,
raptors, passerines, etc.), with notes on the likelihood of occurrence of
new species based on records from surrounding states as well as Canada
(Ontario eastward) and Bermuda. The records mentioned for potential new
species are not exhaustive by any means, just an indication of context for
possible Virginia appearances.

SEABIRDS

Not all seabirds are seen from boats, but because Virginia has so few
pelagic trips these days (1-2 per year lately), only one seabird is
predicted to be among the Next 15 Birds added to the state list.

North Carolina has multiple records of Black-bellied Storm-Petrel,
Swinhoe’s Storm-Petrel, European Storm-Petrel, and Cape Verde Shearwater,
while Georgia and South Carolina each have a record of Red-footed Booby (as
does Nova Scotia). Records of Zino’s Petrel and White-chinned Petrel off
North Carolina are essentially singular in the western North Atlantic,
though Maine has a record of the latter. None of these birds above seem
likely to be recorded in Virginia unless more pelagic trips are undertaken,
though researchers might well encounter any of them. Masked Booby is
recorded almost annually now off North Carolina, with single recent records
from New Jersey, Maryland, Massachusetts, and New York, and I predict that
Virginia will soon add that species, probably from a research vessel
studying marine mammals.

Lesser Frigatebird might have already occurred in Virginia; photographs of
the Wythe County frigatebird from 1988 look very much like a Lesser to my
eye. No measurements were taken of that bird, unfortunately. In North
America, the species is known from Michigan, Maine, Wyoming, and California.

Tufted Puffin, as well as other Pacific alcids, now have open seas in the
higher latitudes in late summer, making plausible more Atlantic records in
addition to Maine’s (and England’s) recent records. Long-billed Murrelet
(two records each from North and South Carolina, three from Florida, and
about seven each in there Midwest and Northeast) could occur on an inland
Virginia lake in October/November, but inland records in North America have
plummeted in recent years.

We’d love to see an Arctic Loon (Ohio, Vermont, Colorado; possibly a few
more) but far more likely is Yellow-billed Loon (Maine, Massachusetts,
Pennsylvania, Georgia, Indiana, with multiples from New York, Tennessee,
Kentucky, Illinois, Missouri, Iowa, and many in the Great Plains and
Rockies)which makes my Next 15 List. If one is hoping to add new seabirds
via “splits,” then Scopoli’s Shearwater and Madeiran Storm-Petrel would be
the next likely additions for Virginia (these are currently treated as
types of Cory’s Shearwater and Band-rumped Storm-Petrel). Both have been
observed off Virginia in recent years. Barolo Shearwater, recorded a few
times off Massachusetts and Nova Scotia, seems a long shot off Virginia;
the species apparently forages in very deep waters and would potentially be
seen only by researchers.

WADERS

Western Reef Heron has been photographed in New York, New Hampshire,
Massachusetts, Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland, with others in the Caribbean,
and it seems a good candidate to occur in Virginia some day, though records
are still few and far between. Scarlet Ibis—hardly known in the United
States except as escapees or released birds in Florida, with one found
breeding in South Carolina in 2001—was recently reported in western
Virginia with photographs, but the record is not accepted.

WATERFOWL

Pink-footed Goose! The Northeast has a lot of recent records, with the
southernmost to Maryland (three records) and Delaware (at least two). Just
a matter of time for Virginia then! Less likely, by far, would be a Tundra
Bean-Goose (records from Nova Scotia and Quebec) or Lesser White-fronted
Goose (W. L. Sladen reported one in Maryland many years ago), or Masked
Duck (multiples in Florida, singles in North Carolina, Maryland, Georgia,
Tennessee, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Wisconsin), or Smew (New York,
Rhode Island, Illinois, Ontario), or Common Shelduck (records increasing in
the Northeast, with records south to Delaware). Mottled Ducks, introduced
to South Carolina, do not seem to be straying northward much, but Ontario
has a record, and the species has strayed in North Carolina as Lake
Mattamuskeet, so it should be looked for. See a funny-looking waterbird?
Take a photo!

RAPTORS

Neighboring states have records of Snail Kite (North Carolina has had one,
South Carolina two recently), Short-tailed Hawk (Georgia, Alabama; and
Michigan!), Eurasian Kestrel (Florida, Massachusetts, Nova Scotia,
Bermuda), Eurasian Hobby (Massachusetts), Red-footed Falcon (Massachusetts;
sight record at Cape May). Cape May has a possible banding record of Hen
Harrier, plus a sight report of Eurasian Sparrowhawk, to whet one’s
studying. None of these make the Next 15 cut, but any could occur!

CRANES AND RAILS

Virginia already has a record of Paint-billed Crake, and there are few
other rare rails we might add, though Corn Crake comes to mind (old records
from Maryland, New Jersey, New York, recent Maine record, and a suggestion
from Back Bay NWR’s first manager Romey Waterfield that he might have seen
one there many years ago!). Pennsylvania and Texas have records of Spotted
Rail, so almost anything in that family would be imaginable; Delaware and
Georgia and Bermuda have records of Purple Swamphens, and New York has a
record of Azure Gallinule, though some of these records are not favored by
local committees.

SHOREBIRDS

This is a huge group of species, mostly migratory, but many that have not
yet been reported in Virginia have weak patterns of vagrancy in the East.
None of the following would make the cut: Southern Lapwing (Florida,
Maryland), Wood Sandpiper (New York, Rhode Island, Delaware, Bermuda,
Newfoundland), Great Knot (Maine, West Virginia), Broad-billed Sandpiper
(New York, Massachusetts), Common Snipe (Newfoundland, Bermuda, and maybe
Maryland), Gray-tailed Tattler (Massachusetts), Surfbird (Pennsylvania,
twice in Florida, Maine, at least four times in Texas), and Greater
Sand-Plover (Florida).

More likely would be European Golden-Plover (Delaware, twice in New Jersey,
Maine, many times in Atlantic Canada), Little Stint (multiples for New
York, New Jersey, Delaware, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, with singles for
Rhode Island, Kentucky, Tennessee, Ontario….we need not continue), Spotted
Redshank (North Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts
several times, ditto Ontario, with singles in Ohio, Indiana, Wisconsin,
Kansas, Texas….), Pacific Golden-Plover (New York, New Jersey, Maine,
Florida, Delaware, Vermont), and Common Ringed Plover (North Carolina,
Massachusetts, New York, Maine, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland many times,
Ontario). Of these, Little Stint and Pacific Golden-Plover seem most likely
to be among the Next 15 Birds.

GULLS & TERNS

Certainly among Virginia’s Next 15 should be Slaty-backed Gull, now known
from dozens of records in the Northeast and Midwest, with other records
from Pennsylvania (two) and North Carolina. There have been reports already
in Virginia of Ross’s Gull, Glaucous-winged Gull, and Ivory Gull, not
currently accepted, but those could be probably the next most likely gulls
to be found, with single records of Ross’s from Maryland and Delaware the
closest to Virginia. Equally likely, perhaps, is Kelp Gull (Maryland,
Delaware, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Indiana, with many more from
the Gulf Coast states), but far less likely would be Belcher’s Gull
(Olrog’s Gull? Florida has three records), Gray-hooded Gull (New York,
Florida), and Gray Gull (Louisiana) could reach us. Large-billed Tern (old
records from New Jersey, Ohio, Illinois, Bermuda) seems a pipe dream, but
Whiskered Tern (two in New Jersey, one of those shared with Delaware) less
so - though freshwater habitats near the coast in Virginia are sadly very
limited in recent years. Cayenne Tern is not recognized in the United
States as a distinct species, but it’s certainly a plausible visitor to the
state; it has been photographed as close as Dare County, North Carolina.

PIGEONS & DOVES

Band-tailed Pigeon, an irruptive and migratory species, should be among
Virginia’s Next 15, with oddly no reports from Maryland or Delaware but
records from North Carolina, South Carolina, New Jersey, New York,
Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, Maine, Ontario,
Alabama, Kentucky, Tennessee, Illinois and many more from Ontario and parts
farther west. Inca Dove seems less probable but still possible, with
records from Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky, West Virginia, Maryland (but
still none from the Carolinas), while European Turtle-Dove (Florida,
Massachusetts) would be a shocker in Virginia.

OWLS & NIGHTJARS

With the warming of the planet, visits from Northern Hawk Owl, Great Gray
Owl, or Boreal Owl seem less and less likely every year; records stop at
about the latitude of New York City or north of it for these birds, but
there is an odd report, not substantiated, of a hawk owl from West
Virginia. Antillean Nighthawk, with two North Carolina records (and one
from Louisiana), seems possible, but far more likely would be Lesser
Nighthawk, recorded in New Jersey (twice), West Virginia, and many times in
the Gulf Coast states. Lesser gets my vote.

SWIFTS & SWALLOWS

Hurricanes have produced (or been associated with) records for Common Swift
in Massachusetts and Black Swift in New Jersey (and both have been seen in
Bermuda after storms), and these are possible in Virginia, but the records
are not yet numerous enough to get the nod. Virginia has recorded most if
not all likely swallows and swifts; an addition to the Virginia avifauna
from either group of aerialists would be a remarkable rarity, possibly from
the Caribbean or Mexico but perhaps from Europe. Records of Alpine Swift
from the Caribbean suggest that these powerful long-distance migrants can
clearly survive the trans-Atlantic crossing.

HUMMINGBIRDS

Records of Violet-crowned and Magnificent Hummingbirds from the Virginia
mountains are truly remarkable, but consider that Virginia is almost
surrounded by records of Mexican Violetear (reported once in Virginia but
without photographs; records from West Virginia, Maryland twice, New
Jersey, Maine, Ohio, Tennessee, Indiana, Michigan, etc.), and we still lack
an Anna’s Hummingbird record (3x in North Carolina, 2x each in
Pennsylvania, Maryland, New York, Ohio). Both should be on the Next 15
list. Likewise possible are Broad-tailed Hummingbird (North Carolina,
Delaware, New Jersey, many times in Georgia), Buff-bellied Hummingbird
(multiples for both Carolinas and for Georgia), Blue-throated Hummingbird
(Georgia, Louisiana), Costa’s Hummingbird (Alabama, Florida, Michigan),
White-eared Hummingbird (Alabama, Mississippi, Michigan), and Berylline
Hummingbird (Michigan again!), or perhaps a Bahama Woodstar/Sheartail
(Pennsylvania), Amethyst-throated Hummingbird (Texas, Quebec), or
Green-breasted Mango (North Carolina, Georgia, Louisiana, Wisconsin)?

The non-passerines don’t have many more other groups that would provide a
likely vagrant, though New York has a record of Williamson’s Sapsucker, and
Pennsylvania has some tantalizing older records of Black-backed Woodpecker.

PASSERINES

Although Virginia has made up some ground lately and added Dusky Flycatcher
(and has a nice photographic record of Tropical/Couch’s Kingbird, probably
Tropical), the Next 15 will almost certainly include a few new flycatchers,
my guesses being Hammond’s Flycatcher, which is known from Maryland,
Pennsylvania, New York, Florida, Alabama, Nova Scotia, and Massachusetts
(four times!), and Tropical Kingbird, with three in North Carolina, one in
Maryland, two each in Delaware and Pennsylvania, three in Massachusetts,
one in Maine; the latter species has nested in Florida now, and records
from Gulf Coast states are increasing. Couch’s Kingbird (Maryland, New
York, Massachusetts, Michigan) and Cassin’s Kingbird (three each
Massachusetts and Ontario, plus two in New York, many in Florida) would be
next in line, but less likely, with Thick-billed Kingbird (Ontario, Texas)
a dream-on sort of vagrant, and Great Kiskadee (New York, South Carolina,
recently to South Dakota!) slightly less so. Gray Flycatcher
(Massachusetts, Delaware, North Carolina, at least twice each in Ohio,
Louisiana, Ontario) seems very likely to appear in Virginia, but records
are not quite numerous enough to put it on the Next 15. The same is true
for those streaky enigmatic Sulphur-bellied, Variegated, and Piratic
Flycatchers, any of which could appear in Virginia, most likely in fall on
the coast: records of vagrants are widespread but thin on the ground. A
silky-flycatcher like Phainopepla (not a flycatcher, of course) would
brighten birding in Virginia, but records of vagrants only reach Ontario,
Wisconsin, and Massachusetts.

Of the other passerine groups, thrushes, warblers, blackbirds, and finches
are more likely than vireos or smaller taxonomic groups to produce new
records, but White Wagtail is worth a mention: though there are only about
nine U. S. records east of the Mississippi, three are from the Carolinas.
Yellow-green Vireo also merits honorable mention, with records from
Florida, South Carolina, and Massachusetts but many more from coastal Texas
through Alabama.

Of the thrushes, it is tempting to imagine a Fieldfare or Redwing in
Virginia, but both are still represented by only a sprinkling of records in
the Northeast. North American wood-warblers are more likely: Virginia’s
Warbler would be especially appreciated in Virginia (Maryland, West
Virginia, New York, Rhode Island, Maine, Georgia, with many more in the
Midwest), but a Hermit Warbler (multiples for Connecticut, New York,
Massachusetts, one for Maine), Grace’s Warbler (New York, Ontario,
Illinois), or Red-faced Warbler (Georgia, Louisiana) would be fine, as
would a Painted Redstart (New York, Massachusetts, Alabama, Ohio, Ontario,
twice in Wisconsin). Unlikely, surely, is Golden-cheeked Warbler: single
vagrants have made it to California, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Florida.

Among sparrows, we still await our first Cassin’s Sparrow (North Carolina,
New York, Massachusetts, Maryland, and many more) and Golden-crowned
Sparrow, for which there are perhaps two-dozen records from Maryland to
Maine, a similar number in the nearer Midwest, and singles from South
Carolina and Tennessee. Both make my Next 15.

In the blackbird family, a stealth vagrant, Western Meadowlark seems likely
enough to get a vote for the Next 15, with multiples documented in North
Carolina, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New York, etc. The slowly expanding
Bronzed Cowbird, with a record north to South Carolina, could be a
contender. Of the orioles (as a group, very much on the rise as vagrants in
fall/winter), Scott’s Oriole (North Carolina, South Carolina, New York,
Pennsylvania, Kentucky) and Hooded Oriole (Tennessee, Kentucky, Alabama,
twice in Ontario) would be most likely, if not more likely than the
meadowlark and cowbird, but there are far-flung records of Altamira Oriole
(Mississippi) and Audubon’s Oriole (Indiana) and now Black-backed Oriole
(Pennsylvania, Connecticut). We can dream. Finally, a Brambling or
Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch or Eurasian Tree Sparrow could pop up at a feeder
in winter, as there are increasing patterns beyond the West/Midwest for
all. Georgia and Massachusetts have single records of McCown’s Longspur,
and Tennessee has three; this bird seems unlikely to make the cut to me.

We would be remiss in neglecting records from Bermuda, which is closer to
us than is Chicago! There, Arctic Warbler, Dark-sided Flycatcher,
Ferruginous Duck, Booted Eagle, White Tern, Eurasian Dotterel (a 2015
record from Ontario provides some hope!), Caribbean Martin, Common
House-Martin, among other gems. For veteran birders in Virginia, one of
these species has probably been seen, if distantly, at Craney Island, way
way back. Hmmmmm….

So what does this give us for our list of the Next 15 Birds?

Masked Booby
Yellow-billed Loon
Pink-footed Goose
Pacific Golden-Plover
Little Stint
Slaty-backed Gull
Band-tailed Pigeon
Lesser Nighthawk
Mexican Violetear
Anna’s Hummingbird
Hammond’s Flycatcher
Tropical Kingbird
Cassin’s Sparrow
Golden-crowned Sparrow
Western Meadowlark

Most of these have been on previous rounds of “Next 20 Birds,” though not
the Pink-footed Goose or Yellow-billed Loon. If one had to pick five more?
A hummer, a flycatcher, a shorebird, a gull, and an oriole!

Why do this exercise every decade or so? Careful study of the birds that
are in front of us is greatly enriched when we are aware of all
possibilities, even remote ones, and critically identify the birds we see,
rather than logging the species we know to be most likely. Perhaps our
state lacks records for Western Meadowlark because most of us assume all
meadowlarks we see are Easterns? And perhaps we should pay more attention
to plovers with rings or with gold tones above? When we study birds closely
and we eliminate vagrants from consideration, we affirm these
identifications more definitively, confidently. Naturally, we don’t have
time to study every meadowlark we see to rule out Western, but when birding
is slow, why not look and listen to them for a few minutes, or hours?
They’re really beautiful birds to study for a good while, every now and
then. And when we study birds closely, we learn not just about plumage and
vocalizations but also about habits, habitat, and ultimately their status
and distribution where we are birding. Part of picking out something new
and unusual is learning the variation in the plumages, calls, and behaviors
of the birds that are not unusual. We sometimes see aberrant plumages or
even hybrids when we’re looking at each bird carefully, but often we learn
a new vocalization or see a new behavior. Some describe bird identification
as “educated guessing,” but careful birding can have a very high degree of
accuracy, of course. Having a few silent meadowlarks recorded on our lists
as “Eastern/Western” can remind us to spend more time looking and
listening. We also benefit from knowing what birders in surrounding regions
are seeing, as our planet changes and birds respond to these changes; we
continue to witness profound shifts in bird populations, and this
witnessing puts us in closer touch to our planet and our fellow species.
And we can communicate what we see to members of our own species, perhaps.
Finally, there is the particular thrill of seeing something we’ve never
seen before, or never seen in our local area, and sharing the discovery
with others.

Ned Brinkley
Cape Charles, Va.
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Date: 7/14/17 10:49 am
From: Ashley Peele via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Mid-July Atlas Update: Maps, Data, and Atlas All-stars
Happy Friday, VA Birders.

Good Friday afternoon, Atlasers!

Just a quick message to share an updated Atlas resource and exciting new
data benchmarks.

First, we recently updated the regional coverage maps available via the *Maps
and Tools page *of the Atlas website (www.vabba2.org). These maps are an
up-to-date look at which Atlas blocks have actually been claimed in each
region. While this does not reflect data submission (many checklists
received for unassigned blocks in eBird), it does provide a sense of what
blocks are likely to be completed in the near future and where we are still
in significant need of breeding observations.

Second, this week we jumped over *35,000* checklists submitted to the Atlas
portal and received data in almost *70%* of the Atlas priority blocks!
This means that despite the heat of summer, folks are still out generating
breeding observations for the project. We appreciate those of you who are
braving the heat to get those high summer breeding confirmations. There
are plenty to be had! Check out the latest summary of Atlas data
collection results at:
http://ebird.org/ebird/atlasva/subnational1/US-VA?yr=all

Finally, a special shout out to our top contributors who have each managed
to confirm breeding of 70+ species: *Ellison Orcutt, Todd Day, David
Larsen, Kelly Krechmer, Jon and BJ Little, Candice Lowther, James Fox,
Diane Holsinger, Janice Frye, Cheryl Jacobson, Kurt Gaskill, Fred Atwood,
John Spahr, Bruce Hill, and Kim Harrell. *We appreciate all their and
every atlas volunteer's efforts to further our knowledge of VA's breeding
bird communities

Hope everyone has a great weekend,

Ashley Peele, PhD
Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas Coordinator
Conservation Management Institute - Virginia Tech
Office: 540-231-9182
Fax: 540-231-7019
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Date: 7/14/17 7:56 am
From: etrelawn--- via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Shenandoah Co. rare sighting
On July 12 I observed a Short-billed Dowitcher feeding at the Racetrack Rd. wetland ponds. Identified with scope and binoculars,also pics but not ID worthy. 
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Date: 7/13/17 7:29 am
From: Stauffer Miller via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Blue-headed Vireo, Frederick County
I was surprised to see several Blue-headed Vireos this morning at the top of Pinetop Road, southwest Frederick County. As best I can determine, the elevation there is around 1000 to 1200 ft, which seems low for nesting of this species. Stauffer Miller
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Date: 7/12/17 7:34 am
From: Marshall Faintich via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] 10 warbler species
On/near the Blue Ridge Parkway; 7/11/17. Report and photos:



<http://www.faintich.net/Blog2017/2017_07_11.htm>
http://www.faintich.net/Blog2017/2017_07_11.htm



___________________________

Marshall Faintich

Crozet, VA

<marshall...>

www.faintich.net <http://www.faintich.net/>

In real life, the shortest distance between two points is never a straight
line, so you might as well enjoy the journey !!

____________________________________________________________________________
_______________________





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Date: 7/11/17 9:33 am
From: Patti Reum via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Canada Geese behavior in Highland County
On Sunday morning, very early, I took my regular walk from New Hampden up
the Blue Grass Valley road towards Laurel Fork. Up ahead, I noticed a
rather large dead animal in the road. As I approached it, I saw that it
was a Canada Goose, probably hit by a car. I gently moved it off the road
so that it would not get mangled by traffic. Close by, in the mown grass,
there was another adult Canada, standing absolutely frozen and quiet. I
figured that this was probably the mate. I continued walking for about
another 1/2 hour and when I returned to this spot, there were 5 or 6 more
geese, probably the offspring of this pair. They were all standing frozen,
not uttering a sound, not the usually squawking and interaction of a family
of geese. It was a very moving moment where I realized these geese were
mourning the loss of one of their family. We hear about bird intelligence
and compassion- here was a first hand example!
I wasn't able to walk yesterday, but I did drive by later Monday
afternoon. All the geese were still congregated by the carcass, a full 35
hours later!
I have seen deer linger by their slain mates, but never as long as this
particular occasion with the geese. Made a big impression on me.


Patti Reum
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Date: 7/10/17 7:12 pm
From: Rowe, Richard A, 'Dick' via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Blue Ridge Parkway birding on Monday
I was able to get out and do a little birding on the Parkway this morning. It was lovely up there - cool with a breeze and the birds were active. I saw/heard Scarlet Tanagers, Wood Thrushes, Towhees, Ovenbirds, Indigo Buntings, Pine Warblers, Worm-eating Warblers, Black-and-white Warblers, Hooded Warblers, Chestnut-sided Warblers, Goldfinches, Carolina Chickadees, White-breasted Nuthatches, Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, Robins, Crows, Turkey Vultures, Brown Thrashers, Catbirds, Field Sparrows, and Barn Swallows. I am certain I heard a Red-breasted Nuthatch but I was distracted by a Hooded Warbler at the time and didn't pursue the RBNU. I've up-loaded some photos of a Pine Warbler and Hooded Warbler.


https://www.flickr.com/photos/vmibiology/


Dick Rowe
VMI Biology Dept.

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Date: 7/10/17 6:51 pm
From: janet anderson via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Mississippi Kites in Arlington, VA - Nesting Failure

July 10, 2017.

I went over to 18th and Utah Streets in Arlington, VA to see if any Kites
were around. I did not see any. I was stunned to see a low flying Sharp
Shinned Hawk flying in this area were the Kites used to be. on 18th Street.

Janet M. Anderson
City of Falls Church, VA
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Date: 7/10/17 6:02 pm
From: Karen Beatty via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Roseate Tern - Virginia Beach 7-9-17
Tom and I saw the ROST over the ocean flying north towards Croatan Beach &
Rudee Inlet around 10am. See our eBird report for pictures.

http://ebird.org/ebird/atlasva/view/checklist/S38046605

Karen Beatty
Virginia Beach
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Date: 7/10/17 3:35 pm
From: Harry Glasgow via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk
It was Great Blue Heron Day at the Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk this morning.  As we stepped onto the boardwalk, we were treated to a flock of Great Blues flying in a rough formation.  As the GBH flotilla descended and soared just overhead, we were treated to flight antics that reminded this writer of scenes from Jurassic Park style movies.  Twenty-nine birders watched with awe all morning as the Herons flew around the central wetland, and sustained harassment by Red-winged Blackbirds who seem to have no fear.  Green Herons added to the scene as they darted around the Great Blues.  Quite a scene.  For the third week in a row, the Yellow-crowned Night Heron was in residence.  This bird doesn't seem injured, so we can't figure why it hangs around.  Our final total was 51 species.
Canada Goose  3
Wood Duck  12
Great Blue Heron  10
Great Egret  3
Green Heron  12
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron  1
Osprey  1
Red-shouldered Hawk  2
Spotted Sandpiper  1
Ring-billed Gull  1
Mourning Dove  5
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  3
Barred Owl  1
Chimney Swift  4
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  4
Belted Kingfisher  2
Red-headed Woodpecker  2
Red-bellied Woodpecker  3
Downy Woodpecker  3
Hairy Woodpecker  2
Northern Flicker  3
Pileated Woodpecker  3
Eastern Wood-Pewee  4
Acadian Flycatcher  8
Eastern Phoebe  2
Great Crested Flycatcher  1
Eastern Kingbird  3
Red-eyed Vireo  4
Blue Jay  1
American Crow  5
Fish Crow  1
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  2
Purple Martin  1
Tree Swallow  4
Barn Swallow  3
Carolina Chickadee  7
Tufted Titmouse  12
White-breasted Nuthatch  2
Carolina Wren  8
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  1
Eastern Bluebird  5
American Robin  25
Gray Catbird  4
Prothonotary Warbler  1
Common Yellowthroat  3
Northern Cardinal  8
Indigo Bunting  2
Red-winged Blackbird  29
Common Grackle  4
House Finch  2
American Goldfinch  9

The Monday Morning Birdwalk has been a weekly event at Huntley Meadows since 1985. It takes place every week, rain or shine (except during electrical storms, strong winds, or icy trails), at 7AM (8AM from November through March), is free of charge, requires no reservation, and is open to all. Birders meet in the parking lot at the Park's entrance at 3701 Lockheed Blvd, Alexandria, VA. Questions should be directed to Park staff during normal business hours at (703)768-2525.

Harry GlasgowFriends of Huntley Meadows Park
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Date: 7/10/17 4:51 am
From: Shea Tiller via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] NOVA--some hits, some misses
Greetings, all

Yesterday I headed up to a few spots in Northern Virginia to look for some
previously reported birds. As shorebird migration has just begun as a
trickle, I drove by the Woodward Turf Farms, and kept a keen eye out, but
saw nothing. Nothing on the Savannah Branch Road mudflats either, except a
couple kind folks who asked if my car was broken down and if I needed help.

Next stop was Smithfield Farm in Clarke County. On the way, two fawns
crossed the road on Mt. Weather. Once at the farm, I quickly found a
dickcissel, which posed for views. There were a few other typical field
birds around, but the only other really good bird was my life loggerhead
shrike, which I got a poor back-end of view of before it flew off to
somewhere else--I don't know where, and scanning all of the surrounding
fields to the horizon didn't turn it up.

My third stop was the Discover Blvd. pond. I couldn't find the continuing
ruddy duck there, but I did see a female hooded merganser.

My last stop was Bull Run Regional Park. I saw barn swallows multiple times
entering nests under all areas of the bridge, but no swallows flying around
without a long forked tail. Maybe mid-afternoon is just the wrong time for
the cliff swallows?

Good birding,

Shea
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Date: 7/9/17 10:13 am
From: Dendroica--- via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Great Falls NP Bird Walk 07/09/17 (Fairfax County)
Our group of four led by Sally Wechsler tallied 42 species. The most
productive birding was in the picnic area and upriver near the dam. We meet
Sundays at 8 AM outside the visitors center Birders are welcome
The list follows.

Posted by Ralph Wall

The list:

Canada Goose 6
Wood Duck 2
American Black Duck 1
Mallard 10
Common Merganser 7
Double-crested Cormorant 10
Great Blue Heron 9
Black Vulture 12
Turkey Vulture 3
Spotted Sandpiper 3
Yellow-billed Cuckoo 2
Chimney Swift 4
Ruby-throated Hummingbird 2
Downy Woodpecker 1
Hairy Woodpecker 1
Pileated Woodpecker 1
Eastern Wood-Pewee 2
Acadian Flycatcher 1
Great Crested Flycatcher 3
Warbling Vireo 2
Red-eyed Vireo 2
Blue Jay 12
American Crow 3
Fish Crow 1
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 1
Carolina Chickadee 4
Tufted Titmouse 12
White-breasted Nuthatch 4
Carolina Wren 6
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 1
Eastern Bluebird 4
Wood Thrush 1
Louisiana Waterthrush 1
Northern Parula 1
Chipping Sparrow 5
Song Sparrow 2
Northern Cardinal 7
Indigo Bunting 1
Red-winged Blackbird 2
Common Grackle 2
Orchard Oriole 2
American Goldfinch 3

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S38048407

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
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Date: 7/9/17 9:50 am
From: Larry Cartwright via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Dyke Marsh breeders and terns on the move.
About 10 people joined me for today's walk at Dyke Marsh that is sponsored
by the Friends of Dyke Marsh and begins every Sunday at 8:00 AM except
during the Christmas Bird Count season. It was a bit slow today, but the
assembled group of birders had some interesting sightings. Ospreys have
fledged young from at least three nests and the fledged youngsters at the
marina nest have undertaken short distances forays around the marina and
south picnic area. House Finches were feeding fledged young in two
different family groups and we also found fledged Northern Mockingbirds,
Red-bellied Woodpeckers, and Gray Catbirds. A Marsh Wren sang near the
Little Gut. Alas, this individual is part of a remnant population. Marsh
Wrens have not bred at Dyke Marsh since 2014. Fall migration has started
for some Larids, with both Caspian and Forster's Terns seen today.



Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve, Fairfax, Virginia, US Jul 9, 2017 7:55 AM -
11:21 AM

Protocol: Traveling

1.3 mile(s)

51 species



Canada Goose 132

American Black Duck 1

Mallard 40

Double-crested Cormorant 4

Great Blue Heron (Blue form) 4

Great Egret 15

Osprey 17 Including fledged young from three nests.

Bald Eagle 4

Red-tailed Hawk 1

Ring-billed Gull 8

Caspian Tern 2

Forster's Tern 3

Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 4

Mourning Dove 5

Chimney Swift 20

Red-bellied Woodpecker 6 Including a fledged young.

Downy Woodpecker 6

Hairy Woodpecker 2

Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) 1

Great Crested Flycatcher 3

Eastern Kingbird 4

Warbling Vireo 4

Red-eyed Vireo 3

Blue Jay 2

Fish Crow 6

Northern Rough-winged Swallow 1

Purple Martin 4

Tree Swallow 2

Carolina Chickadee 7

Tufted Titmouse 3

White-breasted Nuthatch 3

Marsh Wren 1

Carolina Wren 12

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 3

American Robin 20

Gray Catbird 2 Including a fledged young

Northern Mockingbird 5 Including three fledged young at the marina.

European Starling 10

Cedar Waxwing 3

Common Yellowthroat 3

Yellow Warbler 1

Song Sparrow 1

Northern Cardinal 10

Indigo Bunting 3

Red-winged Blackbird 30

Common Grackle (Purple) 6

Orchard Oriole 4

Baltimore Oriole 3

House Finch 15 Including adults feeding fledged young in two family
groups.

American Goldfinch 7

House Sparrow 2



View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S38046918



This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



Larry Cartwright

<prowarbler...> <mailto:<prowarbler...>



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Date: 7/9/17 9:14 am
From: Stephen Johnson via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] question about an odd cuckoo call, Fairfax County

Hello birders,

Today Lynn and I visited Fraser Preserve, in northern Fairfax County (in the Seneca SE block for the breeding bird Atlas). This was our second visit in 7 days, so here are a couple of notes, in taxonomic order.

Mostly I want to ask you all, about a strange cuckoo call. At first I was reluctant to agree it was a Cuckoo, because it went on and on. Dozens or scores of contiguous notes, rather than the 5-10 consecutive notes I'm used to. Finally Lynn did see it fly from tree to tree several times, and we were able to track it, as the singing continued.

Besides the length of consecutive notes, the other odd aspect was that the string of consecutive monotone notes often began, and/or ended with, a lower tone note.

boop - beep - beep - beep - beep - beep .. etc., for maybe 40-50 straight notes; and/or, ending with the lower "boop".

Other than that, it was a typical Yellow-billed Cuckoo tone and pitch. Is this kind of note pattern familiar, to anyone else?

Last week we had two active Acadian Flycatcher nests, a low one with a big cowbird nestling, and the other much higher up, with two tiny (presumably Flycatcher) nestlings. They were near each other, right over the trail, both being fed by adults.

This week the cowbird nest was empty and shredded; and the other nest, much closer to the roof of the canopy, was completely gone. I can only assume that some of the recent heavy weather took out the nests. We still saw and heard several Acadian adults in the area.

This preserve is blessed with several singing Wood Thrushes, and we enjoyed them again this week.

We found an adult Parula singing by the trail, watched for awhile, but saw no others of its kind, and no food gathering behavior.

Finally, we saw and heard Scarlet Tanagers, male and female; but again, no behavior to confirm breeding.

Fraser Preserve is a beautiful patch of woods to visit, whether you confirm breeding or not. Congratulations Jean Tatalias - I saw that you confirmed a couple of species in this same block yesterday - that was a few we didn't have to concentrate on today, so thank you!!

Steve Johnson and Lynn Rafferty
Fairfax, Virginia

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Date: 7/9/17 7:30 am
From: Donald Sweig via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Arlington Kites : ?? Nest Failure ??
I stopped by 18th and Utah in North Arlington this morning to check on the Mississippi kite nest. I saw no perched or flying kites.
I managed to get a good scope view of the nest and I saw no evidence of an adult kite or chicks in or around the nest. After about five minutes I saw an American crow fly in, land on the edge of the nest, look into the nest and fly off. There was no evidence of any sort of nest defense by adult kites. I can't imagine that the adult kites would have left unhatched eggs or recently hatched chicks unattended in the open nest.
I have in past years seen Mississippi kites engage in vigorousness nest defense against crows and raptors, and I have seen crows predate and destroy Mississippi kite nests. My best assessment of what I saw this morning is that the nest either failed or was predated by the crows and that the adult kites have abandoned the nest.
Too bad.
If anyone sees any evidence of any Mississippi kites around this nest, I would appreciate a Va-bird post or send me note.
Thank You,
Donald Sweig
Falls Church, Virginia


Sent from my iPad
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Date: 7/9/17 4:32 am
From: Stauffer Miller via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Least Sandpipers Winchester
At a shallow retention pond off Apple Valley Road this morning, a pair of Least Sandpipers mixed with Killdeers. Stauffer Miller
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Date: 7/8/17 5:27 pm
From: Paul Glass via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] flycatchers @ Back Bay NWR
Any other reports from today positive or negative? I was thinking of going
down tomorrow, but I don't want to make the 3.5 hour drive if there were no
sightings today.

Paul Glass
South Boston, VA

-----Original Message-----
From: David Gibson via va-bird [mailto:<va-bird...>]
Sent: Saturday, July 08, 2017 2:04 PM
To: VA-BIRD
Subject: [Va-bird] flycatchers @ Back Bay NWR


No sign of any flycatchers anywhere from 8-11:30 a.m. I did however see 1
long slender silhouette, that may have been the target bird, heading west
just south of the Visitor Center. Good luck! Dave Gibson, Chesapeake
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Date: 7/8/17 3:21 pm
From: Michael C via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Where to Find Summer Tanagers in NoVA
Any chance we have Scarlet Tanagers within 30-45 minutes in/around Northern VA? Really want to capture in photos, if possible. Any advice would be most appreciated.


Mikie Catanzaro
Vienna/Tysons, VA

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Date: 7/8/17 2:40 pm
From: Peter Frechtel via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] worm-eating warbler, Bull Run Mountains
Hello VA-Birders,



I took a hike this morning in the Bull Run Mountains Natural Area Preserve,
in Prince William and Fauquier County. I was curious to see if there were
any summer residents there that I can't find closer to home at places like
Scotts Run and Huntley Meadows, both in Fairfax County. The only bird I'd
put in that category is a worm-eating warbler, heard singing in the
northwestern part of the preserve.



Also, I haven't seen the brown thrashers in Falls Church since that one week
in mid-June when they were out every day. They were in the grass next to the
W&OD bike path. They may still be there hanging out in the thick
shrubbery-there's plenty of that nearby. Maybe they were only out on the
grass exploiting some short-term food source (cicadas?). I noticed that when
they were out there, so were lots of other birds, mainly house and song
sparrows. It's not nearly as lively now.



Peter Frechtel

Falls Church

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Date: 7/8/17 2:14 pm
From: Joe Coleman via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Banshee Reeks (Lo Co) bird walk Sat. July 8
Ten of us had a nice bird walk at the Banshee Reeks Nature Preserve this
morning with several very active and vocal White-eyed Vireos and
Yellow-breasted Chats as the highlights of the walk. We also had several
Prairie Warblers and Field Sparrows singing in a variety of locations as
well as alarm call, a rapid whip call constantly repeating, that we did not
recognize but a couple of us thought might be from some kind of thrush.
Indigo Buntings were esp. vocal from a number of different perches and one
that was singing in the top of a tree next to the parking lot at 7:45 am was
still going strong at 11 am. While many of the birds were pretty active
until 9:15/9:30 am, they were much less so after that. Fortunately several
butterflies including a couple of Common Wood Nymphs and several swallowtail
species came along after that.



For a complete list of the birds observed at Banshee Reeks see the eBird
report below.



The regular monthly free bird walk (every 2nd Sat) at the Banshee Reeks
Nature preserve is sponsored by the Loudoun Wildlife Conservancy (
<http://www.loudounwildlife.org> www.loudounwildlife.org) & the Friends of
Banshee Reeks ( <http://www.bansheereeks.org> www.bansheereeks.org );
information on both and their upcoming events can be found on their
websites.



Good birding!

Joe Coleman, Jane Yocom, Del Sargent, & Mary Ann Good



Banshee Reeks Nature Preserve, Loudoun, Virginia, US Jul 8, 2017 7:45 AM -
10:45 AM

Protocol: Traveling

2.9 mile(s)

Comments: Regular monthly (every 2nd Sat.) bird walk by Loudoun Wildlife
and FOBR; led by Joe Coleman and Jane Yocom assisted by Del Sargent & Mary
Ann Good.

51 species



Black Vulture 6

Turkey Vulture 2

Red-shouldered Hawk 1

Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 6

Mourning Dove 4

Yellow-billed Cuckoo 4

Ruby-throated Hummingbird 4

Red-bellied Woodpecker 4

Downy Woodpecker 3

Hairy Woodpecker 1

Northern Flicker 1

Pileated Woodpecker 3

Eastern Wood-Pewee 6

Acadian Flycatcher 5

Eastern Phoebe 2

Great Crested Flycatcher 1

Eastern Kingbird 1

White-eyed Vireo 6

Red-eyed Vireo 6

Blue Jay 3

American Crow 2

Fish Crow 4

Tree Swallow 6

Carolina Chickadee 4

Tufted Titmouse 3

White-breasted Nuthatch 3

Carolina Wren 2

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 6

Eastern Bluebird 4

Wood Thrush 5

American Robin 7

Gray Catbird 1

Brown Thrasher 3

Northern Mockingbird 4

European Starling 6

Cedar Waxwing 1

Louisiana Waterthrush 1

Common Yellowthroat 4

Prairie Warbler 3

Yellow-breasted Chat 5

Chipping Sparrow 1

Field Sparrow 6

Eastern Towhee 3

Scarlet Tanager 1

Northern Cardinal 8

Blue Grosbeak 2

Indigo Bunting 8 A male that was singing at the top of a tree
bordering the parking lot was singing when we met at 7:45 am & was still
singing when we left at 11 am.

Common Grackle 2

Brown-headed Cowbird 1

Orchard Oriole 4

American Goldfinch 10



View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S38035167



This report was generated automatically by eBird v3
(http://ebird.org/content/atlasva)



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Date: 7/8/17 11:52 am
From: Marshall Faintich via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] 7 warbler species
On Skyline Drive, VA; 7/7/17. Report and photos:



<http://www.faintich.net/Blog2017/2017_07_07.htm>
http://www.faintich.net/Blog2017/2017_07_07.htm



___________________________

Marshall Faintich

Crozet, VA

<marshall...>

www.faintich.net <http://www.faintich.net/>

In real life, the shortest distance between two points is never a straight
line, so you might as well enjoy the journey !!

____________________________________________________________________________
_______________________





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Date: 7/8/17 11:04 am
From: David Gibson via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] flycatchers @ Back Bay NWR
No sign of any flycatchers anywhere from 8-11:30 a.m. I did however see 1
long slender silhouette, that may have been the target bird, heading west
just south of the Visitor Center. Good luck! Dave Gibson, Chesapeake
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Date: 7/8/17 11:02 am
From: Stuart via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Cliff swallows at Old Yates Ford Rd (Bridge) and other avians (?)
Hi all:

I understand that the allaboutbirds website is being reworked.  Hopefully there will be more images marked female.
Are the male and female cliff swallow identical?

Had a wonderful view with my scope of a parent cliff swallow bringing a black bug to the open beak of a youngster.

Has anybody had a way to count the nests of these colorful birds?

Other birds


All heard:

   Prothonotary warbler near boulder side of bridge in woods.

  Wood thrush alarm call

   Blue-grey gnatcatcher

   Barn Swallows

   Acadian Flycatcher






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Date: 7/7/17 9:05 am
From: Ashley Peele via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] July Birding and Block Completion
Hello Intrepid Atlas Volunteers!

First, a brief status update for July. Currently, the Atlas project is
sitting pretty with 34,000+ checklists submitted through the VABBA2 eBird
portal. To put that in context, this means *20,000+ checklists* have
already been submitted this season (compare to 14,000 in 2016). This alone
is a fantastic accomplishment!

However, when we also look at how this translates into effort hours, we've
gone from ~10,000 volunteer hours in 2016 to *14,000+ hours in 2017*! From
a broader citizen science perspective, this is *phenomenal*. Our Atlas
community is cranking out field time, which is important both for ensuring
future support and funding for this project, as well as accomplishing our
data collection goals.

I realize that I start sounding like a broken record, but as state
coordinator of this project, I want to extend a personal thank you to each
of our volunteers for this tremendous show of support for the VABBA2 thus
far in 2017.

On to other updates!

Check out the latest Atlas article with advice on completing your Atlas
block:
The Home Stretch -
http://ebird.org/content/atlasva/news/the-home-stretchg-an-atlas-block/
<http://ebird.org/content/atlasva/news/the-home-stretch-guidelines-for-completing-an-atlas-block/>
Many of you have asked great questions about the completion process in the
last couple weeks and this article hopefully provides many answers. If you
find you still have questions, please feel free to email your regional
coordinator or myself.

*A word of caution about the FL (Recently Fledged Young) code*. This code
is a common one at this time of year. Many of the canopy-nesting songbird
species are difficult to confirm until fledglings start jumping out of the
nest, moving around their natal area, and being fed by frantic parents.

However, it is EASY to misapply this code. For example, *FL code never
applies to juvenile colonial nesting species observed anywhere but the
natal colony*. The terns, gulls, herons, etc. that move around the eastern
part of the state should not be coded as FL, again unless observed at the
colony or in a block where a known colony exists.

Additionally, many songbird species are well into their second or even
third clutch of the season. This means that *there are a lot of dispersing
juveniles *(past fledgling status) moving around the landscape. So!
Volunteers should be careful when applying the FL code throughout the rest
of July and into August. Be sure that the young birds you observe are in
fact still fledglings (dependent on parents for food, protection). This
can be indicated by the presence of downy plumage, begging behavior, lack
of flight ability, short tail-length, etc. If you're not sure, then always
err on the side of caution.

Lastly, remember that the dog days of summer may be hot, but they are
excellent times to confirm breeding birds. *If you're sick of the swampy
heat of eastern VA, now is the time to come west and visit some of our
under-birded priority blocks in the western mountains.* It's a balmy 70
degrees on Mount Rogers and the western birders would love for you to
visit! ;)

All the best,

Ashley Peele, PhD
Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas Coordinator
Conservation Management Institute - Virginia Tech
Office: 540-231-9182
Fax: 540-231-7019
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Date: 7/6/17 2:24 pm
From: juliekazz--- via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Celebrating the life of Margaret O'Bryan: Saturday 15 July 2017

>
>
>
> What: Celebrating the life of Margaret O'Bryan. A friend of nature and conservation who always had an open door and an open heart for all at her beloved farm in Highland County.
>
>
> When: Saturday July 15, 2017 9am-2pm (open house)
>
>
> Where: Bramble Hill -Wimer Mtn. Road, Bluegrass, VA 24413
>
>
> Who: Open to any and all who knew and loved Margaret
>
>
> How: RSVP appreciated but not necessary. Bring your best memories and stories to share. Enjoy her beautiful garden and sounds of nature.
>
>
> Questions...please reply off the listserv to <juliekazz...> mailto:<juliekazz...>
>
>
> Hope to see you there,
>
> Julie Kacmarcik
>
>
>
>
>
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Date: 7/6/17 2:21 pm
From: David Gibson via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Ruddy Quail-Dove
And I agree with Janet, Wes and Marc.

On Thu, Jul 6, 2017 at 5:15 PM, Marc Ribaudo via va-bird <
<va-bird...> wrote:

> I agree with Wes.
>
> Marc Ribaudo
> Woodbridge
>
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE Droid
> On Jul 6, 2017 3:06 PM, Wes Teets via va-bird <va-bird...>
> wrote:
> >
> > Well, there's only one eBird report with no confirmation, no photos, and
> > no details, from someone I've personally never heard of. Now this
> > doesn't mean it's impossible there's an actual Ruddy Quail-Dove out
> > there, but the lack of supporting evidence leaves me nothing but doubt.
> >
> > Wes Teets
> > Richmond, VA
> >
> > On 07/06/2017 02:02 PM, Janet Paisley via va-bird wrote:
> > > Has anyone looked today for the Ruddy Quail-Dove that was reported
> yesterday in Madison County?
> > >
> > > Janet Paisley
> > > Charlottesville, VA
> > > *** You are subscribed to va-bird as <wesrtx...> If you wish to
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> > >
> > *** You are subscribed to va-bird as <moribaudo...> If you wish
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>
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Date: 7/6/17 2:15 pm
From: Marc Ribaudo via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Ruddy Quail-Dove
I agree with Wes.

Marc Ribaudo
Woodbridge

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE Droid
On Jul 6, 2017 3:06 PM, Wes Teets via va-bird <va-bird...> wrote:
>
> Well, there's only one eBird report with no confirmation, no photos, and
> no details, from someone I've personally never heard of. Now this
> doesn't mean it's impossible there's an actual Ruddy Quail-Dove out
> there, but the lack of supporting evidence leaves me nothing but doubt.
>
> Wes Teets
> Richmond, VA
>
> On 07/06/2017 02:02 PM, Janet Paisley via va-bird wrote:
> > Has anyone looked today for the Ruddy Quail-Dove that was reported yesterday in Madison County?
> >
> > Janet Paisley
> > Charlottesville, VA
> > *** You are subscribed to va-bird as <wesrtx...> If you wish to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
> >
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Date: 7/6/17 12:06 pm
From: Wes Teets via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Ruddy Quail-Dove
Well, there's only one eBird report with no confirmation, no photos, and
no details, from someone I've personally never heard of. Now this
doesn't mean it's impossible there's an actual Ruddy Quail-Dove out
there, but the lack of supporting evidence leaves me nothing but doubt.

Wes Teets
Richmond, VA

On 07/06/2017 02:02 PM, Janet Paisley via va-bird wrote:
> Has anyone looked today for the Ruddy Quail-Dove that was reported yesterday in Madison County?
>
> Janet Paisley
> Charlottesville, VA
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>
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Date: 7/6/17 11:02 am
From: Janet Paisley via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Ruddy Quail-Dove
Has anyone looked today for the Ruddy Quail-Dove that was reported yesterday in Madison County?

Janet Paisley
Charlottesville, VA
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Date: 7/6/17 7:31 am
From: Rich Rieger via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] drones vs birds... Fairfax Co. -please read - tx
Hi Folks -

The Fairfax Co. Park Authority will be holding a meeting on Wed. July 12 @ 7:30p.

Location is Herrity Bldg, 12055 Gov't Center Pkwy. Fairfax. Rm 941.

At this meeting, they will be discussing flying of drones and model airplanes at certain Fairfax Co. parks.

One of the fields under consideration is a field in Lorton, located between Lorton Rd and the Laurel Hill Golf Club. As some Fairfax Co birders know, this field has been allowed to grow this year and hosted quite a few Bobolinks in migration and Meadowlarks were confirmed breeders. It's a pretty nice grassland/meadow - habitat in short supply in Fairfax Co. The resource manager let me know that one problem w. fly zones is keeping people out of the active fly zone area. Since the grass is tall, that would be a natural deterrent to keep people on the tarmac.

Personally, I don't think birds mix w. drones and model airplanes. I was there one day while someone was flying an RC plane (illegally, as that field is not a designated "fly zone") and he told me that it had been "attacked" by some birds. Other birds dove for cover, thinking it was a raptor.

I appreciate that this "multi-use" mentality has permeated many minds, but it sure would be nice if this field could be multi used by birds, mammals, insects, etc w/o being buzzed by drones. Some day, according to the master plan, this field is slated to become soccer fields, but right now, it's not.

So if you can attend and make your voices heard, that would be great. I believe that birders in Fairfax Co. outnumber people who need to fly drones, so let's get vocal! ASNV and the No. VA Bird Club (along w. the ABC) have written to the Park Auth. voicing their concern, so FCPA knows we are out there.

Hope to see you there.
Thanks
Rich Rieger
Alexandria
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Date: 7/6/17 6:40 am
From: Diane L via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Yellow-rumped Warbler fledgling: Big Meadows, Shenandoah National Park, 7/3
It was a big surprise that a streaky-breasted youngster at the Meadow's east edge turned out to be a fledgling Yellow-rumped Warbler! An adult male was close by. Pretty neat confirming breeding there. Dave Wendelken and I were birding and hunting butterflies; we agreed the warbler was "critter of the day!" The birds were in a pine along with a fledgling Pine Warbler.

Diane Lepkowski
Harrisonburg
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Date: 7/6/17 4:45 am
From: Michael Schultz via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Fork-tail flycatcher



The ftfl is still at Back Bay NWR. I observed it yesterday, July 5, at 2:00 at the usual spot on the wires near the visitor center.
Mike SchultzNewport, VA 

Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE smartphone
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Date: 7/5/17 9:07 am
From: David Young via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Ravens in Reston
Just had two very vocal Common Ravens pass over our backyard in Reston.
They were heading SE, the rear Raven was being closely
pursued by two obviously smaller American Crows.


David Young
Reston, Virginia
<lcdyoung93...>

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Date: 7/4/17 6:57 pm
From: Claire Kluskens via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Cliff Swallow site access - Fairfax Co.
Thanks to everyone who posted about this. I went there today.

For those who might still want to go, here is a summary:

There are active Cliff Swallow nests on both the north and south sides of the bridge.

The north side is accessible from Bull Run Marina, which is public. It is operated by the Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority, and there are a couple parking lots intended for those with boats. The lots were pretty empty today, however. Here is the website: https://www.novaparks.com/parks/bull-run-marina

The south side is accessible from the trail on the south side of the road. There is a large public parking lot as others have mentioned. Walk on the paved trail down to the river; where the blacktop trail ends, keep going to the right (north) on the dirt trail. Stop before you get to the boulders. You can easily see the nests from there.

There is no need to climb on any boulders. (They are under the bridge abutment and a little beyond on each end.)

Obviously, be careful crossing the road on foot if you choose to do so!

Other highlights today were singing Northern Parula, Yellow-billed Cuckoo, and White-eyed Vireo.

Claire Kluskens
Fairfax Co.

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Date: 7/4/17 3:19 pm
From: James Fox via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Dickcissels in southern Clarke County
I found some more Dickcissels in Clarke county this afternoon along
Carter's Line Road east of White Post. I heard the male singing as I was
driving along the road and stopped and eventually got good looks at both a
male and a female perched on a wire over the field. I have included a
photo in my eBird checklist, and the pin is at the exact location I saw the
birds. https://ebird.org/ebird/atlasva/view/checklist/S37970256

James Fox
Front Royal
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Date: 7/4/17 5:56 am
From: Dave Youker via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Kiptopeke Challenge 2017

Hello VA-Birders,

It’s time again to start thinking about the Kiptopeke Challenge (KC).
This year the 23rd annual KC will be held on Saturday, September 23, 2017, and
the Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory (CVWO) invites birders of all
skill levels to participate.

The KC is a fun and friendly "Big Day" birding competition. Teams compete
to identify the greatest number of bird species in a single day within the
competition boundary. The boundary includes the Eastern Shore, Chesapeake
Bay Bridge-Tunnel, as well as the rest of the coastal plain of VA. The
purpose of the KC is to increase awareness of fall bird migration in eastern
Virginia, and to help raise funds for CVWO which is a non-profit
organization dedicated to avian research, habitat conservation and public education.

It is easy to get involved and there are several categories in which to
compete: 24-Hour, 3-Hour, Youth Team (age 18 and under), and Special Venue.
Last year the competition was tough, and the lone Youth Team entry won not
only their category but the 24-hour category as well. The KC is a great way
for participants to have fun birding while honing their birding skills at
some of Virginia’s great birding locations.
To register your team, simply send me a note with your team name and
members. For more information about the KC, visit the CVWO website at
_www.cvwo.org_ (http://www.cvwo.org/)
Sincerely,

Dave Youker
CVWO Kiptopeke Challenge Coordinator
Yorktown, VA
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Date: 7/4/17 5:46 am
From: Larry Cartwright via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] W
Y

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 7/3/17 2:15 pm
From: Harry Glasgow via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk
Although today wasn't the holiday, we drew 35 birders to the Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk.  It makes one wonder who was minding the store.  We tallied 50 species with the same Yellow-crowned Night Heron we had last week still hanging around.  A lone Orchard Oriole made a couple of our gang happy, and the full compliment of summer Woodpeckers filled out the list.
Canada Goose  15
Wood Duck  14
Mallard  4
Great Blue Heron  8
Great Egret  1
Green Heron  9
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron  1
Osprey  1
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Mourning Dove  4
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  4
Barred Owl  1
Chimney Swift  3
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  2
Red-headed Woodpecker  3
Red-bellied Woodpecker  5
Downy Woodpecker  4
Hairy Woodpecker  2
Northern Flicker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  2
Eastern Wood-Pewee  5
Acadian Flycatcher  6
Eastern Phoebe  5
Great Crested Flycatcher  5
Eastern Kingbird  7
Red-eyed Vireo  5
American Crow  1
Fish Crow  2
crow sp.  2
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  2
Tree Swallow  10
Barn Swallow  7
Carolina Chickadee  12
Tufted Titmouse  6
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
Carolina Wren  10
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  3
Eastern Bluebird  6
American Robin  26
Gray Catbird  2
Prothonotary Warbler  3
Common Yellowthroat  6
Eastern Towhee  2
Northern Cardinal  8
Indigo Bunting  3
Red-winged Blackbird  25
Common Grackle  15
Orchard Oriole  1
American Goldfinch  10
House Sparrow  2

The Monday Morning Birdwalk has been a weekly event at Huntley Meadows since 1985. It takes place every week, rain or shine (except during electrical storms, strong winds, or icy trails), at 7AM (8AM from November through March), is free of charge, requires no reservation, and is open to all. Birders meet in the parking lot at the Park's entrance at 3701 Lockheed Blvd, Alexandria, VA. Questions should be directed to Park staff during normal business hours at (703)768-2525.

Harry GlasgowFriends of Huntley Meadows Park
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Date: 7/3/17 12:28 pm
From: Stephen Johnson via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Cliff Swallow site access: Caution

Hi Birders,

I'm not sure where these boulders are. Yesterday I went down there and did not see any.

I parked in the publicly accessible lot on the S side of the road, that is Old Yates Ford Road, on the E side of the reservoir (Fairfax County side). From there I walked across to the N side of the road, to the gated parking lot. I walked down on the paved road on that side, to the boat put-in. I stood on the wooden dock there, N of the bridge, on the E side of the river. From there you can directly view 2-3 active Cliff Swallow nests, on the N side of the bridge.

Maybe the boulders are under the bridge, right next to the water. If you walk down to the river on the N side, you can avoid them.

The wooden dock is floating, and not completely stable underfoot. I don't think it rocks enough to shake your binoculars view. But from the stable ground on the shore, you can still get a decent view of the nests.

Cheers!

Steve Johnson
Fairfax, Virginia


On Jul 2, 2017, at 6:51 PM, Stuart via va-bird wrote:

> Hi all:
>
> Not to be a spoil sport, but the hiking access to see these birds is severely strewn with 1 1/2 foot boulders -
>
> making it difficult, if not downright dangerous. Anyone with balance issues (like me) might want to switch over to kayaking et al.
>
> Note: You can still see the Cliff Swallows zipping in and out under the bridge.
> It is looking at the nests that is the headache.
>
>
> Safe birding all.
>
> Stuart Merrelll.
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Date: 7/3/17 5:48 am
From: Wendy Ealding via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Seaside Sparrows singing times
Singing actively when I got there around 9 AM a week ago

http://ebird.org/ebird/atlasva/view/checklist/S37788559

Wendy Ealding
Midlothian

On Sun, Jul 2, 2017 at 5:00 PM, Shea Tiller via va-bird <
<va-bird...> wrote:

> Hello, all. This week, I plan to look for the seaside sparrows at Maryus
> Rd. in Gloucester County. Can anyone recommend the best time in the morning
> to look? I would like to know how early they start singing (first light,
> sunrise?), and when they start to quiet down.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Great birding,
>
> Shea
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>



--
Wendy Ealding
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Date: 7/3/17 4:45 am
From: Matthew Bender via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Late report - Mississippi Kite in Herndon, Fairfax Co.
Was very surprised to see a Mississippi Kite fly over my yard in the
Franklin Farm area of Herndon on the evening of Friday, June 30.

Matt Bender
Herndon, VA
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Date: 7/2/17 8:13 pm
From: janet anderson via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Mississippi Kite seen again in Springfield, Fairfax County, VA
July 2, 2017

1 Mississippi Kite seen in the Braddock Mews townhouse development at
Backlick Road and Braddock Road in Springfield, Fairfax County, VA . Kites
must be nesting in this area, as I have seen them in this location quite often
in the past 2 months.

Janet M. Anderson
City of Falls Church, VA
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Date: 7/2/17 3:51 pm
From: Stuart via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Cliff Swallow site access: Caution
Hi all:

Not to be a spoil sport, but the hiking access  to see these birds is severely strewn with 1 1/2  foot boulders -

making it difficult, if not downright dangerous.  Anyone with balance issues (like  me) might want to switch over to kayaking et al.

Note: You can still see the Cliff Swallows zipping in and out under the bridge.
          It is looking at the nests that is the headache.


Safe birding all.

Stuart Merrelll.
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Date: 7/2/17 2:00 pm
From: Shea Tiller via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Seaside Sparrows singing times
Hello, all. This week, I plan to look for the seaside sparrows at Maryus
Rd. in Gloucester County. Can anyone recommend the best time in the morning
to look? I would like to know how early they start singing (first light,
sunrise?), and when they start to quiet down.

Thanks,

Great birding,

Shea
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Date: 7/2/17 12:31 pm
From: William Leigh via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Fork-tailed Flycatcher
Seen today from 2:30 ish to 3:15 near visitor center. Have not seen scissor-tailed but thunderstorm hit hard soon after I arrived.

Sent from my iPhone
William Leigh
Bridgewater VA


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Date: 7/2/17 12:26 pm
From: Larry Meade via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Dyke Marsh, Jul 2, 2017
At least 20 people came out for the weekly bird walk at Dyke Marsh sponsored by the Friends of Dyke Marsh and free and open to all. It was a bit warm, but birds and their babies continued to be active. We found the three babies on the Osprey nest at the marina. They are ready to fledge any day now. We heard that they have already taken some short practice flights. At the beginning of Haul Road we encountered a family of Great-crested Flycatchers. Three fledglings were on a branch high in a tree lined up in a row waiting to be fed. We later watched Eastern Kingbirds coming to a nest to feed three very hungry babies who look like they were all mouth, Both typed of Oriole were around and we also heard a Marsh Wren,

Larry Meade
Vienna, VA



Subject: eBird Report - Dyke Marsh, Jul 2, 2017

Dyke Marsh, Fairfax, Virginia, US
Jul 2, 2017 8:00 AM - 11:20 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.3 mile(s)
47 species

Canada Goose 150
Mallard 40
Double-crested Cormorant 8
Great Blue Heron 10
Great Egret 26
Osprey 14
Bald Eagle 2
Ring-billed Gull 10
Caspian Tern 2
Mourning Dove 7
Yellow-billed Cuckoo 1 Heard only
Chimney Swift 4
Belted Kingfisher 1 Heard only
Red-bellied Woodpecker 5
Downy Woodpecker 3
Northern Flicker 1
Eastern Phoebe 1
Great Crested Flycatcher 7
Eastern Kingbird 15
Warbling Vireo 6
Red-eyed Vireo 2
Blue Jay 1
Fish Crow 6
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 13
Tree Swallow 4
Barn Swallow 10
Carolina Chickadee 8
Tufted Titmouse 6
White-breasted Nuthatch 3
Marsh Wren 1 Heard
Carolina Wren 7
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 15
American Robin 10
Northern Mockingbird 3
European Starling 12
Common Yellowthroat 1
Yellow Warbler 1
Song Sparrow 1
Northern Cardinal 16
Indigo Bunting 2
Red-winged Blackbird 20
Common Grackle 16
Orchard Oriole 2
Baltimore Oriole 6
House Finch 1
American Goldfinch 10
House Sparrow 7

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37930002

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/VA)

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Date: 7/2/17 12:14 pm
From: Kristine Lansing via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Great Falls NP Bird Walk 07/02/2017 (Fairfax County)

Following is the tally from Sunday's weekly bird walk at Great Falls National Park, which identified 38 species.  Worthy of particular note were the number of juvenile birds observed, particularly among the Great Crested Flycatchers and the Red-Eyed Vireos.  Also sighted:  a crayfish (sp. unknown, winter plumage?!) ambling along the woodland trail.
A REMINDER:  The group meets on Sunday mornings at 8:00 a.m. but, effective Sunday July 2, has started to kick off the walk in front of the snack bar/concession stand of the Great Falls Park visitors' center (instead of in the parking lot).  All birders are welcome!
Canada Goose  3
American Black Duck  2
Mallard  3
Double-crested Cormorant  5
Great Blue Heron  7
Black Vulture  17
Turkey Vulture  5
Ring-billed Gull  1
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  3    Auditory
Belted Kingfisher  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
Downy Woodpecker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1    Auditory
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
Eastern Phoebe  1
Great Crested Flycatcher  10    Among the great crested flycatchers were a number of juveniles.
Warbling Vireo  3    Auditory
Red-eyed Vireo  6    Most of the red-eyed vireo sightings were eyes on; among them were a number of juveniles.
American Crow  3
Fish Crow  3
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  4
Tree Swallow  6
Carolina Chickadee  3
Tufted Titmouse  9
White-breasted Nuthatch  2
Carolina Wren  7
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  5
Wood Thrush  1    Auditory
Northern Parula  1    Auditory
Chipping Sparrow  3    Auditory
Song Sparrow  2
Northern Cardinal  8
Indigo Bunting  2
Red-winged Blackbird  5    A mix of visual and auditory.
Common Grackle  3
Orchard Oriole  3
Baltimore Oriole  3
American Goldfinch  6

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37929469

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



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Date: 7/2/17 9:11 am
From: Stephen Johnson via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Wash. Post article: Eagles raising a Hawk

In today's print Washington Post - (might be yesterday's on-line) - there's an article entitled, "Eagles feed baby hawk, because parenthood makes you crazy", by Jason Bittel.

Fascinating account of nesting behavior in British Columbia, which started in May of this year and is ongoing.

more at washingtonpost.com/news/animalia

Steve Johnson
Fairfax, Virginia

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Date: 7/2/17 6:34 am
From: Scott Priebe via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] [va-bird] Burke-Springfield area - Mississippi Kite
I happened to be out on our deck at just the right moment this AM. A crow-sized bird came soaring over our house, back lit, but the profile was wrong for a crow. It circled behind a large Tulip Tree, and as it banked it I could now see color as well - Mississippi Kite, a new yard bird.


Scott D. Priebe
Springfield, VA
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Date: 7/1/17 7:28 pm
From: Donald Sweig via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] OUT OF AREA: NIGHT BIRD??
If you have a decent scope and are the least bit astronomically inclined, the planet Saturn is in the southeast sky almost all night these days. I just had a very nice look at the planet and its spectacular rings with my 65-power scope, in spite of all the light pollution in suburban Fairfax County. If you live someplace it's really dark you ought to get a great view. (If you live nearby and have a real astronomical scope, I would love to have the opportunity to get a better look at the planet.)
Donald Sweig
Falls Church, Virginia

Sent from my iPad
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Date: 7/1/17 1:39 pm
From: Russell W Taylor via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Fork-tailed and Scissor-tailed Flycatchers at Back Bay NWR
Both species seen on the entrance road, 3/4 of the way to the Visitors' Center. STFL first spotted by Ryan Corkill at 11am, and observed 3 more times over next few hours. FTFL spotted by Rob Bielawski at about 3pm (and reported this morning by Andrew Baldelli).

Many other spp present but oppressively hot for birders. But obviously well worth it.

Russ Taylor

Ineptly thumbed into my iPhone
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Date: 7/1/17 10:55 am
From: Larry Meade via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Bull Run Marina Cliff Swallows(Fairfax Co.)
i parked at the Bull Run Marina Park lot across the street from the marina and walked down the trails through the woods to the water and over to stand on the rocks underneath the bridge.

Larry Meade







-----Original Message-----
From: Rich Rieger via va-bird <va-bird...>
To: <va-bird...> birding <va-bird...>
Sent: Sat, Jul 1, 2017 1:01 pm
Subject: [Va-bird] Bull Run Marina Cliff Swallows(Fairfax Co.)

Tips for seeing Cliff Swallows at Bull Run Marina (Old Yates Ford Rd. bridge)

Marina is private and there is a locked gate going down to the river. There is a parking lot (look for big mulch pile) on the left as you approach Bull Run from Fairfax Co. side. You can park there and walk over to marina and down to docks. Road is fairly well traveled w. a narrow shoulder, be careful.

Two mud nests on the side of the bridge are visible from the docks at the marina. As of this morning, they are still occupied and birds are coming and going. As Larry Meade mentioned, Barn Swallows are nesting under the bridge as well.

I did not see any No Trespassing signs going into marina and the Bull Run Occoquan Trail passes thru there, so access to marina should be no problem.

There is one spot at the bridge (Fairfax Co. side) to park and a shoulder on the bridge wide enough to walk, but again, road is pretty well traveled.

Rich Rieger
Alexandria
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Date: 7/1/17 6:33 am
From: Shea Tiller via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Fork-tailed flycatcher RFI
Hello, all. This coming Tuesday, I may be able to go look for the
flycatcher at Back Bay NWR. Can people please keep me posted about their
searches for it, whether they were successful or not, and the exact
location where they observed the bird?

Thanks,

Great birding,

Shea
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Date: 7/1/17 5:55 am
From: Rich Rieger via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Bull Run Marina Cliff Swallows(Fairfax Co.)
Tips for seeing Cliff Swallows at Bull Run Marina (Old Yates Ford Rd. bridge)

Marina is private and there is a locked gate going down to the river. There is a parking lot (look for big mulch pile) on the left as you approach Bull Run from Fairfax Co. side. You can park there and walk over to marina and down to docks. Road is fairly well traveled w. a narrow shoulder, be careful.

Two mud nests on the side of the bridge are visible from the docks at the marina. As of this morning, they are still occupied and birds are coming and going. As Larry Meade mentioned, Barn Swallows are nesting under the bridge as well.

I did not see any No Trespassing signs going into marina and the Bull Run Occoquan Trail passes thru there, so access to marina should be no problem.

There is one spot at the bridge (Fairfax Co. side) to park and a shoulder on the bridge wide enough to walk, but again, road is pretty well traveled.

Rich Rieger
Alexandria
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Date: 6/30/17 8:08 pm
From: Dave Larsen - Birding via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Fork-tailed Flycatcher?
Is the flycatcher still being seen at Back Bay?

Heading to the Eastern Shore next week.

Dave Larsen
Haymarket

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 6/30/17 9:52 am
From: Larry Meade via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Cliff Swallows nesting in Fairfax County
I received an eBird alert that there were Cliff Swallows nesting at Bull Run Marina Regional Park, so I headed down there to check it out. I found three Cliff Swallow nests on the Yates Ford Road Bridge. The nests were on the outside of the bridge below the road. There were also Barn Swallows nesting on the bridge, but they were on the bottom of the bridge in the shade. These are my first Cliff Swallows for Fairfax County. Does anyone know if they have ever been known to nest in the county before? You can see my photo of a Cliff Swallow on its nest at http://ebird.org/ebird/atlasva/view/checklist/S37885106

Also of note was a singing Pine Warbler that I was able to see.

Larry Meade
Merrifield, VA
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Date: 6/30/17 8:42 am
From: Marshall Faintich via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] 12 Warbler species
On Reddish Knob, VA; 6/29/17. Report and photos:



<http://www.faintich.net/Blog2017/2017_06_29.htm>
http://www.faintich.net/Blog2017/2017_06_29.htm



___________________________

Marshall Faintich

Crozet, VA

<marshall...>

www.faintich.net <http://www.faintich.net/>

In real life, the shortest distance between two points is never a straight
line, so you might as well enjoy the journey !!

____________________________________________________________________________
_______________________





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Date: 6/29/17 7:06 am
From: Gregory Luce via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Peregrine falcon near 14th St bridge
I saw Peregrines frequently perching on the bridge throughout the winter.
Their disappearance coincided with the return of the Ospreys to their nest
on the bridge. I suspect the falcons are wary of the Ospreys, who are very
territorial and aggressive. I've seen them chase Bald eagles away.
--
Gregory Luce
"I put it down. You gotta pick it up."—Thelonious Monk

*https://dctexpoet.wordpress.com/ <https://dctexpoet.wordpress.com/>*

Follow me on Twitter: @dctexpoet
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Date: 6/28/17 8:38 pm
From: Tony Futcher via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] ID help with hawk today - check out this plumage
With that really distinct belly band of streaks, I don't see how it
could be anything but a Red-tailed Hawk.

Nice pix!

Tony Futcher
Hyattsville, MD

On 6/28/2017 6:17 PM, Stephen Johnson via va-bird wrote:
> This character perched right outside our window today, atop a 2-foot tall garden statue. Its cries (all afternoon, mostly from across the street) are quite different from our usual Red-Tailed, and nothing like Red-Shouldered.
>
> Can you folks please confirm - we think this is a strangely patterned, juvenile Red-Tailed Hawk. Right?
>
> http://ebird.org/ebird/atlasva/view/checklist/S37855310
>
> What seems odd to me is the beige / light chestnut wash on the upper chest; and the completely white legs. Also the tail is all white from underneath; although, when the bird turned around, the upper tail is gray-brown. No tail barring, either from below or above. Lots of downy fluff behind the legs, next to the tail.
>
> The bird spent most of the afternoon perched atop a dead snag, calling incessantly, apparently looking around for adults which have not yet shown up.
>
> Steve Johnson
> just a bit south of Reston (Fairfax County), Virginia
>
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>

--
Tony Futcher
Hyattsville, MD

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Date: 6/28/17 3:17 pm
From: Stephen Johnson via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] ID help with hawk today - check out this plumage

This character perched right outside our window today, atop a 2-foot tall garden statue. Its cries (all afternoon, mostly from across the street) are quite different from our usual Red-Tailed, and nothing like Red-Shouldered.

Can you folks please confirm - we think this is a strangely patterned, juvenile Red-Tailed Hawk. Right?

http://ebird.org/ebird/atlasva/view/checklist/S37855310

What seems odd to me is the beige / light chestnut wash on the upper chest; and the completely white legs. Also the tail is all white from underneath; although, when the bird turned around, the upper tail is gray-brown. No tail barring, either from below or above. Lots of downy fluff behind the legs, next to the tail.

The bird spent most of the afternoon perched atop a dead snag, calling incessantly, apparently looking around for adults which have not yet shown up.

Steve Johnson
just a bit south of Reston (Fairfax County), Virginia

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Date: 6/28/17 2:41 pm
From: Rowe, Richard A, 'Dick' via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Blue Ridge Parkway on Tuesday
On Tuesday, I went up on to the P'way to look for warblers, etc. While it was a nice cool morning (upper 50s), the wind made it difficult to bird. Most of the birds were either deep in the forest or were down low in the vegetation. As a result, I heard far more birds than I saw. I heard a number of Wood Thrushes (there are a lot of them this year), a few Veerys were starting to sing (they seem to start about 10 am), lots of Ovenbirds, Black-throated Green Warblers, Red-eyed Vireos, Blue-headed Vireos, Yellow-throated Vireos, Scarlet Tanagers, Indigo Bunting, Bluebird, Pine Warbler, a female Blackburian Warbler, Black-and-white Warblers. Worm-eating Warblers, Chipping Sparrow, Redstart, Cerulean Warbler, Red-tailed Hawk, Hooded Warbler, and Chestnut-sided Warbler.

I've up-loaded some photos of the Chestnut-sided Warbler and of a friend I came across.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/vmibiology/

Dick Rowe
VMI Biology Department

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Date: 6/28/17 7:36 am
From: Paul Pisano via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Peregrine Falcon Near 14th Street Bridge
Paul, et al,

Peregrines have been nesting on one of the bridges over the Potomac for years. They roost on the railroad bridge, but may be nesting under one of the others (I'm not sure). I try to enter into ebird my Peregrine sightings as I commute to and from work (usually via Metro). Here are my sightings from this year (fingers crossed that the formatting is retained). I haven't seen them for a few weeks and was wondering why. Based on Paul's email, I'm guessing that they're staying close to the fledged young and not hanging out on the bridge.

Best regards,
Paul Pisano
Arlington, VA

14th St. BridgeDistrict of Columbia, US-DC DATE#OBSERVER 2017-06-14 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-06-12 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-06-08 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-06-07 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-06-07 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-06-06 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-05-30 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-05-24 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-05-22 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-05-16 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-05-15 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-05-03 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-04-20 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-04-19 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-04-18 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-04-17 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-04-10 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-04-04 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-04-03 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-04-03 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-03-29 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-03-28 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-03-27 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-03-27 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-03-24 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-
03-21 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-03-20 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-03-20 2 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-03-17 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-03-17 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-03-10 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-03-08 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-03-01 2 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-02-28 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-02-27 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-02-27 2 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-02-24 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-02-23 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-02-15 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-02-14 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-02-08 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-02-06 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-02-06 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-02-01 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-02-01 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-01-13 1 Paul Pisano Checklist 2017-01-09 1 Paul Pisano Checklist
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Date: 6/27/17 4:09 pm
From: Paul Hamilton via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Peregrine Falcon Near 14th Street Bridge
While riding home from work on the Mount Vernon Trail on Friday, June 23, at
almost exactly 5:30 PM, I heard the unmistakable begging calls of a
peregrine falcon. I stopped and, following the sound, located a large
juvenile high in an adjacent tree, being fed by her mother. The tree is
located just north of the Metro span of the bridge and about 80 feet from
the trail. The prey was quite large - possibly a mallard duck or large gull.



After the meal was finished, the mother took off and circled the area giving
loud alarm calls. That was my cue to leave.



Does anyone know of a nest site in the area? There is an occupied osprey
nest on the nearby railway bridge, but no sign of falcon habitation.



Paul

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Date: 6/27/17 8:18 am
From: Gerry Hawkins via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Voice of the Naturalist, Greater DC Area - Resending due to formatting issues with initial distribution
Hotline: Voice of the Naturalist
Date: 6/27/2017
Coverage: MD/DC/VA/central and southern DE/WV panhandle
Reports, comments and questions: <voice...>
Compiler: Gerry Hawkins
Sponsor: Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central
Atlantic States (independent of NAS)
Transcriber: Steve Cordle

Please consider joining ANS, especially if you are a regular user of
the Voice of the Naturalist (Individual $50; Family $65; Nature
Steward $100; Audubon Advocate $200). The membership number is
301-652-9188, option 12; the address is 8940 Jones Mill Road, Chevy
Chase, MD 20815; and the web site is http://www.AudubonNaturalist.org
<http://www.audubonnaturalist.org/> .

This is the Voice of the Naturalist, a service of the Audubon
Naturalist Society. This report covers the week starting Tuesday, June
20 and was completed on Tuesday, June 27 at 9:00 a.m.

Information on noteworthy birds is presented below in taxonomic order,
as set forth in the American Ornithologists' Union Checklist for North
and Middle American birds, as revised through the 57th Supplement
(July 2016).

The top birds this week were WESTERN GREBE* in VA, NEOTROPIC
CORMORANT* in MD, LITTLE EGRET* in DE, SWALLOW-TAILED KITE in VA and
FORK-TAILED FLYCATCHER* in VA.

Other birds of interest this week included TUNDRA SWAN, GADWALL,
AMERICAN WIGEON, NORTHERN SHOVELER, NORTHERN PINTAIL, CANVASBACK,
RING-NECKED DUCK, GREATER SCAUP, COMMON EIDER, SURF and BLACK SCOTERS,
LONG-TAILED DUCK, RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, RUDDY DUCK, COMMON
GALLINULE, SANDHILL CRANE, AMERICAN AVOCET, BLACK-BELLIED and WILSON'S
PLOVERS, MARBLED GODWIT, DUNLIN, WHITE-RUMPED and SPOTTED SANDPIPERS,
LESSER YELLOWLEGS, LITTLE GULL, GULL-BILLED and CASPIAN TERNS,
RED-THROATED LOON, SOOTY and GREAT SHEARWATERS, WILSON'S STORM-PETREL,
ANHINGA, DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT, LEAST BITTERN, TRICOLORED HERON,
GLOSSY and WHITE-FACED IBIS, MISSISSIPPI KITE, NORTHERN HARRIER,
PURPLE FINCH, WHITE-THROATED SPARROW, CERULEAN WARBLER, DICKCISSEL and
BOBOLINK.

TOP BIRDS

On June 25 an experienced observer reported a WESTERN GREBE* off
Assawoman Island in Accomack Co, VA. This unusual sighting appears to
be the first June record in Virginia for this rare winter visitor to
the Virginia coastal plain.

On June 25 a NEOTROPIC CORMORANT* was photographed on the south jetty
at the Chesapeake Bay Marina in Calvert Co, MD before it flew over the
bay toward Poplar Island late in the day.

A LITTLE EGRET* found at Raymond Pool, Bombay Hook NWR, Kent Co, DE on
June 8 was seen on June 22-26.

On June 24 a SWALLOW-TAILED KITE was photographed in flight near 4617
Blackwater Road in Virginia Beach, VA.

Birders from near and far enjoyed watching a continuing FORK-TAILED
FLYCATCHER* at Back Bay NWR in Virginia Beach, VA all week. This bird
is the eighth record of this species in Virginia.

OTHER BIRDS OF INTEREST

A continuing TUNDRA SWAN along Green Dumpster Road in the Deal Island
WMA, Somerset Co, MD was most recently seen on June 23.

Waterfowl also included small numbers of many migratory duck species.
These included a single GADWALL spotted during the weekly survey at
the Craney Island Disposal Area (restricted access) in Portsmouth, VA
on June 22 and two GADWALLS, along with a NORTHERN PINTAIL and a
NORTHERN SHOVELER, found on Hart-Miller Island in Baltimore Co, MD on
June 26. Sightings of dabbling ducks also included an AMERICAN WIGEON
at Masonville Cove in Baltimore Co, MD on June 23 and 24.

Noteworthy diving ducks included a young male CANVASBACK off Kingman
Island in Washington, DC on June 25; an apparently injured RING-NECKED
DUCK at Lake Shenandoah in Rockingham Co, VA on June 20 and a
continued pair of RING-NECKED DUCKS at each of Culler Lake in Baker
Park in Frederick Co, MD through June 26 and the Monocacy National
Battlefield in Frederick Co, MD on June 24. A GREATER SCAUP was seen
at the Chesapeake Bay Environmental Center (Horsehead) in Queen Anne's
Co, MD on June 20. An apparently continuing COMMON EIDER was seen at
Metompkin Island, Accomack Co, VA on June 21. SURF SCOTERS were seen
at several locations, including a high of 17 individuals at Big Water
Farm (private) in Queen Anne's Co, MD on June 22, 23 and 25; a single
individual at Cabin Creek in Queen Anne's Co, MD on June 20; a high of
three individuals at Fort Story in Virginia Beach, VA on June 22 and
24; and one individual at Chincoteague NWR in Accomack Co, VA on June
23. BLACK SCOTERS also were observed at several locations, including
three individuals at Big Water Farm (private) in Queen Anne's Co, MD
on June 23; four individuals at the mouth of the Wye River in Queen
Anne's Co, MD on June 26; a single individual reported at the Ocean
City Inlet in Worcester Co, MD on June 20; and nine individuals at
Fort Story in Virginia Beach, VA on June 24. Four LONG-TAILED DUCKS
were seen at Poplar Island in Talbot Co, MD on June 22. A single
BUFFLEHEAD was seen at Twin Pines in Talbot Co, MD on June 25. A
single RED-BREASTED MERGANSER was at Big Water Farm (private) in Queen
Anne's Co, MD on June 20-23 and Bay Ridge in Anne Arundel Co, MD on
June 22. A continuing RUDDY DUCK was seen at Bombay Hook NWR, Kent Co,
DE on June 22, 25 and 26.

A COMMON GALLINULE was encountered along Green Dumpster Road in
Somerset Co, MD on June 23, Piney Hill Road in Talbot Co, MD on June
26 and Hart-Miller Island in Baltimore Co, MD on June 26.

On June 22 two birders reported a SANDHILL CRANE in low flight above
3795-3799 Indian River Road in Virginia Beach, VA.
Noteworthy sightings of shorebirds included a high of six AMERICAN
AVOCETS at Bombay Hook NWR, Kent Co, DE on June 20, 21 and 24-26, and
one AMERICAN AVOCET at the Craney Island Disposal Area (restricted
access) in Portsmouth, VA on June 22. On June 21 four WILSON'S
PLOVERS, including two chicks less than five days old, were observed
on Metompkin Island, Accomack Co, VA, which is one of the few places
in the reporting area that this species breeds. Sightings of various
other species of migratory shorebirds suggest early departures from
the breeding grounds. Sightings included a single BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER
at the Craney Island Disposal Area (restricted access) in Portsmouth,
VA and Back Bay NWR in Virginia Beach, VA on June 22 and 23,
respectively. A single MARBLED GODWIT was seen at Back Bay NWR in
Virginia Beach, VA on June 23 and 24. A single DUNLIN was spotted at
Bombay Hook NWR, Kent Co, DE on June 20, 22, 25 and 26. A WHITE-RUMPED
SANDPIPER was seen at several locations, including a single individual
at Bombay Hook NWR, Kent Co, DE on June 24; a single individual at
Back Bay NWR in Virginia Beach, VA on June 23; and four individuals at
the Craney Island Disposal Area (restricted access) in Portsmouth, VA
on June 22. A SPOTTED SANDPIPER was spotted at several locations,
including two individuals at Hart-Miller Island in Baltimore Co, MD on
June 26 and single individuals at Bombay Hook NWR, Kent Co, DE on June
24, the Riley Road wetlands in Fauquier Co, VA on June 24, Oyster,
Northampton Co, VA on June 25 and Back Bay NWR, Virginia Beach, VA on
June 26. A reporting area high 13 LESSER YELLOWLEGS were counted at
the Craney Island Disposal Area (restricted access) in Portsmouth, VA
on June 22.

A continuing LITTLE GULL was seen all week at Bombay Hook NWR, Kent
Co, DE. Multiple GULL-BILLED TERNS were seen at several locations in
the Virginia coastal plain, the only place in the reporting area at
which this species regularly breeds, including a reporting area high
14 individuals at the Craney Island Disposal Area (restricted access)
in Portsmouth on June 22; two individuals at Fort Monroe in Hampton on
June 21; and two individuals at Back Bay NWR in Virginia Beach on June
26. A single GULL-BILLED TERN was seen as far north as the Ted Harvey
WMA-Logan Land Tract Central in Kent Co, DE on June 21 and Bombay Hook
NWR, Kent Co, DE on June 22. Sightings of CASPIAN TERN included an
individual that flew by Hains Point in Washington, DC on June 24.

On June 22 a late RED-THROATED LOON was reported off Metompkin Island,
Accomack Co, VA.

During the week a single WILSON'S STORM-PETREL was observed in flight
from two locations in Virginia Beach, VA: the Atlantic Wildlife
Heritage Museum on June 21 and Fort Story on June 22. A birder also
reported a WILSON'S STORM-PETREL and a SOOTY SHEARWATER at the Ocean
City Inlet in Worcester Co, MD on June 20. On June 24 a GREAT
SHEARWATER was photographed in flight at Back Bay NWR in Virginia
Beach, VA, and two GREAT SHEARWATERS were reported at this location on
June 26.

On June 20 a possibly continuing ANHINGA was reported in flight over
the Carson Wetland in Prince George Co, VA.

On June 25 a DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT was seen from the Appalachian
Trail footbridge over the James River in Amherst Co, VA, which is a
relatively rare sighting of this species in the mountain/valleys
region of Virginia, especially outside of migration.

An area high six LEAST BITTERNS were encountered at Dyke Marsh WP in
Fairfax Co, VA on June 22. During the week 2-3 of the elusive LEAST
BITTERN also were encountered at Bear Swamp Pool in Bombay Hook, NWR,
Kent Co, DE on June 22; Hughes Hollow in Montgomery Co, MD on June 22;
Hart-Miller Island, Baltimore Co, MD on June 26; the Port Tobacco
Marina in Charles Co, MD on June 23; Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary in
Anne Arundel Co, MD on June 22 and 24; Gunpowder Marsh in Harford Co,
MD on June 25; and Back Bay NWR in Virginia Beach, VA on June 20.

A TRICOLORED HERON was found at Chesapeake Bay Environmental Center
(Horesehead), Queen Anne's Co, MD on June 20.

A WHITE-FACED IBIS found on June 13 along Green Dumpster Rd in the
Deal Island State WMA, Somerset Co, MD was most recently seen on June
23. A continuing WHITE-FACED IBIS at Bombay Hook NWR, Kent Co, DE was
last seen on June 22. Two and one GLOSSY IBIS were observed flying
north over Big Water Farm (private) in Queen Anne's Co, MD on June 26
and 23, respectively.

MISSISSIPPI KITES were observed at several locations in Virginia,
including three individuals over Huntsman Lake in Fairfax Co on June
21 and a pair observed engaging in nesting behavior on June 25 at the
same location in the Waverly Hills neighborhood of Arlington Co as
last year. Raptor highlights also included a rare summer record of
NORTHERN HARRIER in the Piedmont of Virginia, a male seen just north
of Paeonian Springs off Clarke's Gap Road in Loudoun Co on June 25.

A late male PURPLE FINCH continued to visit a feeder at Lake Linganore
in Frederick Co, MD through June 21.

A breeding stronghold of the CERULEAN WARBLER in the reporting area
appears to be along Taylor Creek in Heards, Albemarle Co, VA, where
seven singing males were counted on June 24.

A continuing late WHITE-THROATED SPARROW at a private yard in Hanover,
Anne Arundel Co, MD was last seen on June 25.

During the week there were many sightings of DICKCISSEL, a nomadic
migrant breeder in the reporting area. In Delaware five continuing
individuals were seen along Passwaters Farm Road in Sussex Co on June
21, 23-24 and 26, and 1-2 individuals were seen along the entrance
road to Prime Hook NWR in Sussex Co on June 21-26. Representative
sightings of DICKCISSEL in Maryland included an area high 13
individuals at the Oaks Landfill (private) in Montgomery Co on June
21; a high of four individuals at Sands Road Park in Anne Arundel Co
all week; a high of five individuals in the Underwood Road area in
Howard Co on June 21, 24, 25 and 26; a high of five individuals at
Patuxent River Park-Aquasco Farm in Prince George's Co on June 24 and
25; and a single individual along Burnt Store Road in Charles Co on
June 25. Encounters with DICKCISSELS in Virginia included a high of
five continuing individuals along Colvin Lane in Prince William Co on
June 20 and 25 and a high of four continuing individuals at the
Bristoe Station Battlefield in Prince William Co on June 21, 23, 24
and 25.

Sightings of BOBOLINK included an area high 20 continuing individuals
seen and heard from parking area three along North Appleton Road at
Fairhill NRMA in Cecil Co, MD on June 26.

***

This week's report was based on reports on the DE, MD, VA, and WV list
servers, eBird records and various birding pages on Facebook.

The Audubon Sanctuary Shop (301-652-3606, http://anshome.org/shop)is
an excellent source for guidebooks and many other nature-related
titles.

To report bird sightings, e-mail your report to <voice...>
Please post reports before midnight Monday, identify the county as
well as the state, and include your name and a Tuesday morning
contact, e-mail or phone.

Thank you for your interest, and enjoy the birds.

*Of interest to the applicable state records committee



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Date: 6/27/17 7:24 am
From: Gerry Hawkins via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Voice of the Naturalist, Greater DC Area, Week Ending 6/26/17
Hotline: Voice of the Naturalist
Date: 6/27/2017
Coverage: MD/DC/VA/central and southern DE/WV panhandle
Reports, comments and questions: <voice...>
Compiler: Gerry Hawkins
Sponsor: Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central
Atlantic States (independent of NAS)
Transcriber: Steve Cordle

Please consider joining ANS, especially if you are a regular user of the
Voice of the Naturalist (Individual $50; Family $65; Nature Steward $100;
Audubon Advocate $200). The membership number is 301-652-9188, option 12;
the address is 8940 Jones Mill Road, Chevy Chase, MD 20815; and the web site
is http://www.AudubonNaturalist.org.

This is the Voice of the Naturalist, a service of the Audubon Naturalist
Society. This report covers the week starting Tuesday, June 20 and was
completed on Tuesday, June 27 at 9:00 a.m.

Information on noteworthy birds is presented below in taxonomic order, as
set forth in the American Ornithologists Union Checklist for North and
Middle American birds, as revised through the 57th Supplement (July 2016).

The top birds this week were WESTERN GREBE* in VA, NEOTROPIC CORMORANT* in
MD, LITTLE EGRET* in DE, SWALLOW-TAILED KITE in VA and FORK-TAILED
FLYCATCHER* in VA.

Other birds of interest this week included TUNDRA SWAN, GADWALL, AMERICAN
WIGEON, NORTHERN SHOVELER, NORTHERN PINTAIL, CANVASBACK, RING-NECKED DUCK,
GREATER SCAUP, COMMON EIDER, SURF and BLACK SCOTERS, LONG-TAILED DUCK,
RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, RUDDY DUCK, COMMON GALLINULE, SANDHILL CRANE,
AMERICAN AVOCET, BLACK-BELLIED and WILSONS PLOVERS, MARBLED GODWIT, DUNLIN,
WHITE-RUMPED and SPOTTED SANDPIPERS, LESSER YELLOWLEGS, LITTLE GULL,
GULL-BILLED and CASPIAN TERNS, RED-THROATED LOON, SOOTY and GREAT
SHEARWATERS, WILSONS STORM-PETREL, ANHINGA, DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT, LEAST
BITTERN, TRICOLORED HERON, GLOSSY and WHITE-FACED IBIS, MISSISSIPPI KITE,
NORTHERN HARRIER, PURPLE FINCH, WHITE-THROATED SPARROW, CERULEAN WARBLER,
DICKCISSEL and BOBOLINK.

TOP BIRDS


On June 25 an experienced observer reported a WESTERN GREBE* off Assawoman
Island in Accomack Co, VA. This unusual sighting appears to be the first
June record in Virginia of this rare winter visitor to the Virginia coastal
plain.

On June 25 a NEOTROPIC CORMORANT* was photographed on the south jetty at the
Chesapeake Bay Marina in Calvert Co, MD before it flew over the bay toward
Poplar Island late in the day.

A LITTLE EGRET* found at Raymond Pool, Bombay Hook NWR, Kent Co, DE on June
8 was seen on June 22-26.

On June 24 a SWALLOW-TAILED KITE was photographed in flight near 4617
Blackwater Road in Virginia Beach, VA.

Birders from near and far enjoyed watching a continuing FORK-TAILED
FLYCATCHER* at Back Bay NWR in Virginia Beach, VA all week. This bird is the
eighth record of this species in Virginia.

OTHER BIRDS OF INTEREST

A continuing TUNDRA SWAN along Green Dumpster Road in the Deal Island WMA,
Somerset Co, MD was most recently seen on June 23.

Waterfowl also included small numbers of many migratory duck species. These
included a single GADWALL spotted during the weekly survey at the Craney
Island Disposal Area (restricted access) in Portsmouth, VA on June 22 and
two GADWALLS, along with a NORTHERN PINTAIL and a NORTHERN SHOVELER, found
on Hart-Miller Island in Baltimore Co, MD on June 26. Sightings of dabbling
ducks also included an AMERICAN WIGEON at Masonville Cove in Baltimore Co,
MD on June 23 and 24.

Noteworthy diving ducks included a young male CANVASBACK off Kingman Island
in Washington, DC on June 25; an apparently injured RING-NECKED DUCK at Lake
Shenandoah in Rockingham Co, VA on June 20 and a continued pair of
RING-NECKED DUCKS at each of Culler Lake in Baker Park in Frederick Co, MD
through June 26 and the Monocacy National Battlefield in Frederick Co, MD on
June 24. A GREATER SCAUP was seen at the Chesapeake Bay Environmental Center
(Horsehead) in Queen Annes Co, MD on June 20. An apparently continuing
COMMON EIDER was seen at Metompkin Island, Accomack Co, VA on June 21. SURF
SCOTERS were seen at several locations, including a high of 17 individuals
at Big Water Farm (private) in Queen Annes Co, MD on June 22, 23 and 25; a
single individual at Cabin Creek in Queen Annes Co, MD on June 20; a high
of three individuals at Fort Story in Virginia Beach, VA on June 22 and 24;
and one individual at Chincoteague NWR in Accomack Co, VA on June 23. BLACK
SCOTERS also were observed at several locations, including three individuals
at Big Water Farm (private) in Queen Annes Co, MD on June 23; four
individuals at the mouth of the Wye River in Queen Annes Co, MD on June 26;
a single individual reported at the Ocean City Inlet in Worcester Co, MD on
June 20; and nine individuals at Fort Story in Virginia Beach, VA on June
24. Four LONG-TAILED DUCKS were seen at Poplar Island in Talbot Co, MD on
June 22. A single BUFFLEHEAD was seen at Twin Pines in Talbot Co, MD on June
25. A single RED-BREASTED MERGANSER was at Big Water Farm (private) in Queen
Annes Co, MD on June 20-23 and Bay Ridge in Anne Arundel Co, MD on June 22.
A continuing RUDDY DUCK was seen at Bombay Hook NWR, Kent Co, DE on June 22,
25 and 26.

A COMMON GALLINULE was encountered along Green Dumpster Road in Somerset Co,
MD on June 23, Piney Hill Road in Talbot Co, MD on June 26 and Hart-Miller
Island in Baltimore Co, MD on June 26.

On June 22 two birders reported a SANDHILL CRANE in low flight above
3795-3799 Indian River Road in Virginia Beach, VA.

Noteworthy sightings of shorebirds included a high of six AMERICAN AVOCETS
at Bombay Hook NWR, Kent Co, DE on June 20, 21 and 24-26, and one AMERICAN
AVOCET at the Craney Island Disposal Area (restricted access) in Portsmouth,
VA on June 22. On June 21 four WILSONS PLOVERS, including two chicks less
than five days old, were observed on Metompkin Island, Accomack Co, VA,
which is one of the few places in the reporting area that this species
breeds. Sightings of various other species of migratory shorebirds suggest
early departures from the breeding grounds. Sightings included a single
BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER at the Craney Island Disposal Area (restricted access)
in Portsmouth, VA and Back Bay NWR in Virginia Beach, VA on June 22 and 23,
respectively. A single MARBLED GODWIT was seen at Back Bay NWR in Virginia
Beach, VA on June 23 and 24. A single DUNLIN was spotted at Bombay Hook NWR,
Kent Co, DE on June 20, 22, 25 and 26. A WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER was seen at
several locations, including a single individual at Bombay Hook NWR, Kent
Co, DE on June 24; a single individual at Back Bay NWR in Virginia Beach, VA
on June 23; and four individuals at the Craney Island Disposal Area
(restricted access) in Portsmouth, VA on June 22. A SPOTTED SANDPIPER was
spotted at several locations, including two individuals at Hart-Miller
Island in Baltimore Co, MD on June 26 and single individuals at Bombay Hook
NWR, Kent Co, DE on June 24, the Riley Road wetlands in Fauquier Co, VA on
June 24, Oyster, Northampton Co, VA on June 25 and Back Bay NWR, Virginia
Beach, VA on June 26. A reporting area high 13 LESSER YELLOWLEGS were
counted at the Craney Island Disposal Area (restricted access) in
Portsmouth, VA on June 22.

A continuing LITTLE GULL was seen all week at Bombay Hook NWR, Kent Co, DE.
Multiple GULL-BILLED TERNS were seen at several locations in the Virginia
coastal plain, the only place in the reporting area at which this species
regularly breeds, including a reporting area high 14 individuals at the
Craney Island Disposal Area (restricted access) in Portsmouth on June 22;
two individuals at Fort Monroe in Hampton on June 21; and two individuals at
Back Bay NWR in Virginia Beach on June 26. A single GULL-BILLED TERN was
seen as far north as the Ted Harvey WMA-Logan Land Tract Central in Kent Co,
DE on June 21 and Bombay Hook NWR, Kent Co, DE on June 22. Sightings of
CASPIAN TERN included an individual that flew by Hains Point in Washington,
DC on June 24.

On June 22 a late RED-THROATED LOON was reported off Metompkin Island,
Accomack Co, VA.

During the week a single WILSONS STORM-PETREL was observed in flight from
two locations in Virginia Beach, VA: the Atlantic Wildlife Heritage Museum
on June 21 and Fort Story on June 22. A birder also reported a WILSONS
STORM-PETREL and a SOOTY SHEARWATER at the Ocean City Inlet in Worcester Co,
MD on June 20. On June 24 a GREAT SHEARWATER was photographed in flight at
Back Bay NWR in Virginia Beach, VA, and two GREAT SHEARWATERS were reported
at this location on June 26.

On June 20 a possibly continuing ANHINGA was reported in flight over the
Carson Wetland in Prince George Co, VA.

On June 25 a DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT was seen from the Appalachian Trail
footbridge over the James River in Amherst Co, VA, which is a relatively
rare sighting of this species in the mountain/valleys region of Virginia,
especially outside of migration.

An area high six LEAST BITTERNS were encountered at Dyke Marsh WP in Fairfax
Co, VA on June 22. During the week 2-3 of the elusive LEAST BITTERN also
were encountered at Bear Swamp Pool in Bombay Hook, NWR, Kent Co, DE on June
22; Hughes Hollow in Montgomery Co, MD on June 22; Hart-Miller Island,
Baltimore Co, MD on June 26; the Port Tobacco Marina in Charles Co, MD on
June 23; Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary in Anne Arundel Co, MD on June 22 and
24; Gunpowder Marsh in Harford Co, MD on June 25; and Back Bay NWR in
Virginia Beach, VA on June 20.

A TRICOLORED HERON was found at Chesapeake Bay Environmental Center
(Horesehead), Queen Annes Co, MD on June 20.

A WHITE-FACED IBIS found on June 13 along Green Dumpster Rd in the Deal
Island State WMA, Somerset Co, MD was most recently seen on June 23. A
continuing WHITE-FACED IBIS at Bombay Hook NWR, Kent Co, DE was last seen on
June 22. Two and one GLOSSY IBIS were observed flying north over Big Water
Farm (private) in Queen Annes Co, MD on June 26 and 23, respectively.

MISSISSIPPI KITES were observed at several locations in Virginia, including
three individuals over Huntsman Lake in Fairfax Co on June 21 and a pair
observed engaging in nesting behavior on June 25 at the same location in the
Waverly Hills neighborhood of Arlington Co as last year. Raptor highlights
also included a rare summer record of NORTHERN HARRIER in the Piedmont of
Virginia, a male seen just north of Paeonian Springs off Clarkes Gap Road
in Loudoun Co on June 25.

A late male PURPLE FINCH continued to visit a feeder at Lake Linganore in
Frederick Co, MD through June 21.

A breeding stronghold of the CERULEAN WARBLER in the reporting area appears
to be along Taylor Creek in Heards, Albemarle Co, VA, where seven singing
males were counted on June 24.

A continuing late WHITE-THROATED SPARROW at a private yard in Hanover, Anne
Arundel Co, MD was last seen on June 25.

During the week there were many sightings of DICKCISSEL, a nomadic migrant
breeder in the reporting area. In Delaware five continuing individuals were
seen along Passwaters Farm Road in Sussex Co on June 21, 23-24 and 26, and
1-2 individuals were seen along the entrance road to Prime Hook NWR in
Sussex Co on June 21-26. Representative sightings of DICKCISSEL in Maryland
included an area high 13 individuals at the Oaks Landfill (private) in
Montgomery Co on June 21; a high of four individuals at Sands Road Park in
Anne Arundel Co all week; a high of five individuals in the Underwood Road
area in Howard Co on June 21, 24, 25 and 26; a high of five individuals at
Patuxent River Park-Aquasco Farm in Prince Georges Co on June 24 and 25;
and a single individual along Burnt Store Road in Charles Co on June 25.
Encounters with DICKCISSELS in Virginia included a high of five continuing
individuals along Colvin Lane in Prince William Co on June 20 and 25 and a
high of four continuing individuals at the Bristoe Station Battlefield in
Prince William Co on June 21, 23, 24 and 25.

Sightings of BOBOLINK included an area high 20 continuing individuals seen
and heard from parking area three along North Appleton Road at Fairhill NRMA
in Cecil Co, MD on June 26.

***

This weeks report was based on reports on the DE, MD, VA, and WV list
servers, eBird records and various birding pages on Facebook.

The Audubon Sanctuary Shop (301-652-3606, http://anshome.org/shop)is an
excellent source for guidebooks and many other nature-related titles.

To report bird sightings, e-mail your report to <voice...> Please
post reports before midnight Monday, identify the county as well as the
state, and include your name and a Tuesday morning contact, e-mail or phone.

Thank you for your interest, and enjoy the birds.

*Of interest to the applicable state records committee












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Date: 6/27/17 6:04 am
From: Vineeta Anand via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Bald Eagle
I saw an adult bald eagle sitting in a tree off Cameron Run in Alexandria
just after I got onto 495 South from the Telegraph Road exit at 8 a.m.
today. It made my day.
Vineeta
"Have patience. All things are difficult before they become easy." Saadi.
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Date: 6/26/17 7:58 pm
From: Rowe, Richard A, 'Dick' via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Dickcissels in Rockbridge County
All - Earlier today, I headed over to the house of one of our local birders to look for the Dickcissels that he has been seeing and hearing for the past week or so. After a few minutes, we heard the buzzy call of the male and finally located it in the pasture below his house. Both a male and female Dickcissel are present and hopefully they will nest. These birds are the second record for the county. In July and August of 2012, several Dickcissels were found along Hyde Rd south of Brownsburg. They were the first county records. It is unclear how many birds were in the Hyde Rd area but most likely there were 4-5. In addition to the Dickcissels, there was a very cooperative pair of Blue Grosbeaks who were willing to pose for photos. I've posted some photos of the Dickcissels and Blue Grosbeaks on Flickr.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/vmibiology/

Dick Rowe
VMI Biology Dept.

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Date: 6/26/17 2:12 pm
From: Harry Glasgow via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk

A large group assembled for today's Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk.  We had an exciting morning with a spirited debate over the identity of an immature Night Heron.  The bird has been in the Park for several days with fairly equal declarations of Yellow-Crowned or Black-Crowned Night Heron.  We believe this is a Yellow-Crowned based on the photographs included in the E-Bird report submitted for this outing.  Other highlights include a Warbling Vireo (unusual for Huntley Meadows), and the full compliment of woodpeckers found at Huntley in the summer. 

Canada Goose  19
Wood Duck  13
Mallard  8
Hooded Merganser  1
Pied-billed Grebe  1
Great Blue Heron  6
Great Egret  1
Green Heron  8
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron  1    
Turkey Vulture  1
Osprey  1
Red-shouldered Hawk  2
Mourning Dove  4
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  6
Chimney Swift  3
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  2
Belted Kingfisher  1
Red-headed Woodpecker  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  6
Downy Woodpecker  4
Hairy Woodpecker  2
Northern Flicker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  5
Eastern Wood-Pewee  2
Acadian Flycatcher  5
Eastern Phoebe  3
Great Crested Flycatcher  4
Eastern Kingbird  5
Yellow-throated Vireo  1
Warbling Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  4
Blue Jay  4
American Crow  1
Fish Crow  2
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  2
Tree Swallow  14
Barn Swallow  3
Carolina Chickadee  3
Tufted Titmouse  4
White-breasted Nuthatch  6
Carolina Wren  5
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  6
Eastern Bluebird  3
American Robin  20
Gray Catbird  6
European Starling  3
Cedar Waxwing  1
Prothonotary Warbler  4
Common Yellowthroat  3
Eastern Towhee  1
Scarlet Tanager  2
Northern Cardinal  8
Indigo Bunting  3
Red-winged Blackbird  35
Common Grackle  24
Brown-headed Cowbird  2
Orchard Oriole  1
House Finch  7
American Goldfinch  4


The Monday Morning Birdwalk has been a weekly event at Huntley Meadows since 1985. It takes place every week, rain or shine (except during electrical storms, strong winds, or icy trails), at 7AM (8AM from November through March), is free of charge, requires no reservation, and is open to all. Birders meet in the parking lot at the Park's entrance at 3701 Lockheed Blvd, Alexandria, VA. Questions should be directed to Park staff during normal business hours at (703)768-2525.

Harry GlasgowFriends of Huntley Meadows Park
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Date: 6/26/17 5:34 am
From: Mary Ann Good via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] summer No. Harrier in Loudoun Co., June 25
Hi birders,

While doing my annual 25-mile (with stops every half-mile) USGS Breeding
Bird Survey route from Taylorstown south to Hibbs Rd. in Loudoun Co.
yesterday morning, I was stunned to get great looks at a male No. Harrier
'Gray Ghost' just north of Paeonian Springs, on a short side road (Highland
View) off Clarke's Gap Rd. I was standing with a wide overlook of fields
sloping a bit away and with a wide sky view overhead. This guy came from
behind me out over a small stand of woods and nearly over my head fairly
low, then soared and flapped in a big arc over the fields and away south.
I had a long look at him in good distance. The big white rump was
immediately striking, as well as the patterning on the head, the gray
coloring with pale underneath, and the long wings and especially tail--big
guy. The VA Gold Book gives their Piedmont late date as April 30 and says
rare mid-summer records suggest the possibility of local breeding.

This is about 28 miles, as the harrier flies, from where one was reported
on the Voice on June 18 in Laytonsville, MD. It didn't state if this was a
male or female (nor did the source eBird reports).

Mary Ann Good
Purcellville
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Date: 6/26/17 4:02 am
From: Brian Taber via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Kiptopeke Birding Weekend
Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory is considering holding a birding weekend in late October, after the Birding Festival, with guided tours, presentations about birds and habitats and participants staying in one of the comfortable Kiptopeke lodges. We are assessing the level of interest and working on the costs, itinerary and other details. Anyone possibly interested may contact me directly for more information.


Brian Taber
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Date: 6/25/17 4:50 pm
From: Marc Ribaudo via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Dyke Marsh - least bittern, marsh wren
The weekly walk at Dyke Marsh, sponsored by the Friends of Dyke Marsh,
enjoyed very pleasant weather and a nice mix of birds. We tallied 49
species. Of note were 21 great egrets on the pilings at Porto Vecchio near
the mouth of Hunting Creek, a calling least bittern along Haul Road, a
singing marsh wren in the marsh to the south of Haul Rd; a pied-billed grebe
off the picnic area, and the usual mix of warbling vireo, Baltimore and
orchard orioles, and eastern kingbird in the picnic area and along Haul Rd.
Thanks to Ed Eder for sharing his vast knowledge of the flora and fauna of
the area. The complete list is below.

Marc Ribaudo


Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve, Fairfax, Virginia, US
Jun 25, 2017 7:22 AM - 10:59 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.2 mile(s)
49 species

Canada Goose 150
Mallard 3
Double-crested Cormorant 3
Least Bittern 1
Great Blue Heron 12
Great Egret 21
Osprey 12
Bald Eagle 1
Ring-billed Gull 1
Mourning Dove 4
Chimney Swift 1
Ruby-throated Hummingbird 1
Belted Kingfisher 1
Red-bellied Woodpecker 4
Downy Woodpecker 3
Northern Flicker 4
Great Crested Flycatcher 2
Eastern Kingbird 4
Warbling Vireo 3
Red-eyed Vireo 2
Blue Jay 2
Fish Crow 3
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 2
Tree Swallow 3
Barn Swallow 6
Carolina Chickadee 8
Tufted Titmouse 6
White-breasted Nuthatch 2
Marsh Wren 1
Carolina Wren 8
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 4
Eastern Bluebird 1
American Robin 5
Gray Catbird 2
Northern Mockingbird 4
European Starling 12
Cedar Waxwing 1
Common Yellowthroat 3
Yellow Warbler 2
Northern Cardinal 6
Indigo Bunting 3
Red-winged Blackbird 20
Common Grackle 12
Brown-headed Cowbird 3
Orchard Oriole 4
Baltimore Oriole 1
House Finch 10
American Goldfinch 6
House Sparrow 3

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37790095

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

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Date: 6/25/17 3:41 pm
From: Donald Sweig via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Arlington Mississippi Kite: NEST
I was in North Arlington this afternoon between 4:15 and 5:45 looking for Mississippi Kites. I saw one perched adult, observed four or five short flights, and thanks to a bird flying into a tree was able to locate the nest, which is in a large oak tree on the corner of north 18th and Utah. I would never have found the nest had I not seen the adult fly in. The nest is not easy to see and at present there's not much going on. Based on today's date and what I observed on the nest I think they're probably still sitting on eggs. If that's true, and if the eggs hatch successfully, there should be more to see with adults flying in and out and feeding the chicks around the third week of July.

If one wants to go and look for the nest now please remember this is a quiet residential neighborhood. Please be sure to stay on public property, do not go on private property, and try not to disturb the local residents. We don't want them annoyed at us when there's really something to see in late July and August.
Thanks.
Donald Sweig
Falls Church, Virginia

Sent from my iPad
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Date: 6/25/17 3:20 pm
From: Lori Keeler via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Great Falls NP Bird Walk 06/25/2017 (Fairfax County)
Many thanks to Kristine Lansing for taking the time to state which birds were "heard" birds.

Lori Keeler
Alexandria

--- Kristine Lansing via va-bird <va-bird...> wrote:

=============


Following is the tally from today's weekly bird walk at Great Falls National Park, which identified 36 species.  Worthy of particular note was a nice sighting of a wood thrush as it fed.
PLEASE NOTE CHANGE TO MEETUP LOCATION IN CAPS:  The group still meets on Sunday mornings at 8:00 a.m., but effective Sunday, July 2, we will now congregate IN FRONT OF THE SNACK BAR/CONCESSION STAND of the Great Falls Park visitors' center (instead of in the parking lot) to begin the walk.  All birders are welcome!  
Mallard  8
Double-crested Cormorant  4
Great Blue Heron  7
Black Vulture  2
Turkey Vulture  2
Bald Eagle  1    Juvenile
Mourning Dove  3
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  1    Auditory
Red-bellied Woodpecker  2    Auditory
Downy/Hairy Woodpecker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  2    Auditory
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1    Auditory
Great Crested Flycatcher  3    Auditory
Eastern Kingbird  1
Warbling Vireo  4    Auditory
Red-eyed Vireo  8    Auditory
Blue Jay  5
American Crow  6
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  2
Tree Swallow  8
Carolina Chickadee  5
Tufted Titmouse  10
White-breasted Nuthatch  6
Carolina Wren  3    Auditory
Wood Thrush  2    One in full view, the second auditory.
American Robin  2
Gray Catbird  1
Northern Mockingbird  1
Song Sparrow  1    Auditory
Scarlet Tanager  1    Auditory
Northern Cardinal  4
Indigo Bunting  1
Red-winged Blackbird  6
Common Grackle  4
Brown-headed Cowbird  1    Auditory
Baltimore Oriole  2
American Goldfinch  1

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37794027

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



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--
Lori Keeler
Alexandria
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Date: 6/25/17 12:43 pm
From: Kristine Lansing via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Great Falls NP Bird Walk 06/25/2017 (Fairfax County)


Following is the tally from today's weekly bird walk at Great Falls National Park, which identified 36 species.  Worthy of particular note was a nice sighting of a wood thrush as it fed.
PLEASE NOTE CHANGE TO MEETUP LOCATION IN CAPS:  The group still meets on Sunday mornings at 8:00 a.m., but effective Sunday, July 2, we will now congregate IN FRONT OF THE SNACK BAR/CONCESSION STAND of the Great Falls Park visitors' center (instead of in the parking lot) to begin the walk.  All birders are welcome!  
Mallard  8
Double-crested Cormorant  4
Great Blue Heron  7
Black Vulture  2
Turkey Vulture  2
Bald Eagle  1    Juvenile
Mourning Dove  3
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  1    Auditory
Red-bellied Woodpecker  2    Auditory
Downy/Hairy Woodpecker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  2    Auditory
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1    Auditory
Great Crested Flycatcher  3    Auditory
Eastern Kingbird  1
Warbling Vireo  4    Auditory
Red-eyed Vireo  8    Auditory
Blue Jay  5
American Crow  6
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  2
Tree Swallow  8
Carolina Chickadee  5
Tufted Titmouse  10
White-breasted Nuthatch  6
Carolina Wren  3    Auditory
Wood Thrush  2    One in full view, the second auditory.
American Robin  2
Gray Catbird  1
Northern Mockingbird  1
Song Sparrow  1    Auditory
Scarlet Tanager  1    Auditory
Northern Cardinal  4
Indigo Bunting  1
Red-winged Blackbird  6
Common Grackle  4
Brown-headed Cowbird  1    Auditory
Baltimore Oriole  2
American Goldfinch  1

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37794027

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



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Date: 6/25/17 12:12 pm
From: Harry Glasgow via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Merrimac Farm
Five birders made up the group on this morning's Merrimac Farm Last-Sunday-of-the-Month birdwalk sponsored by the Prince William Conservation Alliance.  We sighted 39 species with the highlights being many Yellow-breasted Chats, Prairie Warblers,  Wild Turkeys, and several Indigo Buntings.  
Wild Turkey  5
Turkey Vulture  2
Red-shouldered Hawk  2
Mourning Dove  1
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  6
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  3
Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
Downy Woodpecker  2
Eastern Wood-Pewee  3
Acadian Flycatcher  4
Eastern Phoebe  5
Great Crested Flycatcher  1
White-eyed Vireo  7
Red-eyed Vireo  6
Blue Jay  1
American Crow  6
Carolina Chickadee  2
Tufted Titmouse  4
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
House Wren  1
Carolina Wren  6
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  4
Wood Thrush  1
Northern Mockingbird  1
Cedar Waxwing  5
Ovenbird  4
Common Yellowthroat  3
American Redstart  1
Prairie Warbler  6
Yellow-breasted Chat  7
Field Sparrow  3
Song Sparrow  2
Eastern Towhee  2
Scarlet Tanager  1
Northern Cardinal  5
Indigo Bunting  5
Eastern Meadowlark  2
Brown-headed Cowbird  1
American Goldfinch  3

The Prince William Conservation Alliance birdwalks at the Merrimac Farm Wildlife Management Area in Nokesville take place at 8 AM on the final Sunday of every month.  Birders meet at the Area's entrance located at the stonehouse at the end of Deepwood Drive.  Questions may be directed to the Alliance at 703.499.4954,  or <alliance...>

Harry GlasgowNancy Vehrs



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Date: 6/25/17 11:42 am
From: Shea Tiller via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Cormorant at AT James River Footbridge in Amherst County
Hello, all.

This morning I saw a double-crested cormorant at the Appalachian Trail
James River Foot Bridge, which is a rare sighting for the mountains/valleys
portion of VA, especially outside of migration. It perched on a boundary
marker out in the river (the third from the left, looking toward the
parking lot). It then flew down the river. As I was driving back towards
Big Island, I saw the cormorant drying its wings on a boundary marker in
the river closer to the road.

While it seems unlikely that the bird will remain in sight of the foot
bridge, it is something to keep an eye out for if you're in that neck of
the woods.

eBird checklist with a photo:
https://ebird.org/ebird/atlasva/view/checklist/S37792846

Good birding,

Shea
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Date: 6/25/17 6:38 am
From: Ellie Simonson via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Not receiving emails from the listserve
For some reason I am no longer receiving messages that individuals have
posted. How do I
rectify this ?

<elliesimonson...>

<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon>
Virus-free.
www.avast.com
<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link>
<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
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Date: 6/24/17 3:23 pm
From: Larry Meade via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] NVBC on Skyline Drive
Today, 23 members of the Northern Virginia Bird Club explored the Limberlost Trail and a few other spots along Skyline Drive in Shenandoah National Park. Conditions were a bit windy which may have kept numbers down a bit, but we still had a nice day out birding. At Limberlost we found many American Redstarts, several Veery and Blue-headed Vireos, Black and White Warblers and a couple of Broad-winged Hawks. The Veery and Vireos were confirmed as breeders and I later included them in the Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas 2. At Skyland we had lunch and enjoyed singing Dark-eyed Juncos and Eastern Bluebirds. We then headed back north and stopped at some spots along the way. At Stony Man Overlook we found a Chestnut-sided Warbler carrying a caterpillar to a probable nest site. He gave everyone a nice view as he sang and went about his business. At Pinnacles Picnic area we found Great-crested Flycatchers carrying food and a recently fledged Dark-eyed Junco. Our last stop was Jewell Holl
ow Overlook where we had good looks at a singing Veery and a Brown Thrasher. One of the highlights of the trip happened when two male Scarlet Tanagers perched up fairly close to each other at the same time. We also found a fledged White-breasted Nuthatch here.

Larry Meade
Vienna, VA
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Date: 6/24/17 3:00 pm
From: Joe Coleman via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Birds observed Blue Ridge Center (Lo Co) June 24
Nine birders showed up at the Blue Ridge Center this morning for the Loudoun
Wildlife Conservancy's regular (every 4th Sat.) monthly bird walk there.
Forty-nine species of birds were found on a beautiful summer day after early
morning downpours. With nesting season well along, many of the birds were
heard and not seen but we did get great looks at a Yellow-throated Vireo,
three Bald Eagles soaring high over the ridge, a Yellow-billed Cuckoo,
Indigo Buntings, and the more common species. We found 7 warbler species
including Cerulean, Kentucky, and Northern Parula. A number of species which
were abundant earlier in the month, Great Crested Flycatcher, Red-shouldered
Hawk, Song Sparrow, were silent and not observed at all. For a complete list
of the birds pls see the eBIrd list below.



The real highlight of the walk was at least one and probably two bear cubs
whining (drawn out wha, wha calls) for their mother and scrambling quickly
through the undergrowth near Piney Run.



In addition to the birds there were several butterfly species and bees
nectaring on common milkweed which was fully in flower and smelled wonderful
as the breeze pushed its scent towards us: Spicebush Swallowtail, Zebra
Swallowtail, Eastern-tailed Blue, Great Spangled Fritillary, and Silver
Spotted Skipper.



The walk was led by Joe Coleman & Jane Yocom assisted by Elliot and Nancy
Kirschbaum and the others.



Information on the Blue Ridge Center for Environmental Stewardship can be
found at <http://www.blueridgecenter.org> http://www.blueridgecenter.org.

Information on the Loudoun Wildlife Conservancy and its many free activities
can be found at <http://www.loudounwildlife.org> www.loudounwildlife.org
<http://www.loudounwildlife.org> .



BRCES--Visitor Center, Loudoun, Virginia, US Jun 24, 2017 7:45 AM - 10:45 AM

Protocol: Traveling

2.5 mile(s)

Comments: Regular monthly walk at BRCES by Loudoun Wildlife Conservancy;
co-lead by Joe Coleman & Jane Yocom

49 species



Green Heron 1

Black Vulture 15

Turkey Vulture 15

Bald Eagle 3

Mourning Dove 2

Yellow-billed Cuckoo 3

Barred Owl 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker 1

Downy Woodpecker 4

Pileated Woodpecker 1

Eastern Wood-Pewee 7

Acadian Flycatcher 11

Eastern Phoebe 4

White-eyed Vireo 1

Yellow-throated Vireo 1

Red-eyed Vireo 9

American Crow 5

Fish Crow 1

Common Raven 1

Tree Swallow 5

Barn Swallow 2

Carolina Chickadee 2

Tufted Titmouse 4

White-breasted Nuthatch 3

Carolina Wren 7

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 12

Eastern Bluebird 12

Wood Thrush 2

American Robin 1

Brown Thrasher 4

Northern Mockingbird 2

European Starling 5

Ovenbird 3

Louisiana Waterthrush 2

Kentucky Warbler 2

Common Yellowthroat 3

Cerulean Warbler 1

Northern Parula 2

Yellow-breasted Chat 1

Chipping Sparrow 3

Field Sparrow 5

Eastern Towhee 2

Scarlet Tanager 5

Northern Cardinal 6

Indigo Bunting 5

Common Grackle 1

Brown-headed Cowbird 6

Baltimore Oriole 3

American Goldfinch 5



View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37778169



This report was generated automatically by eBird v3
(http://ebird.org/content/atlasva)



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Date: 6/24/17 2:57 pm
From: nicholas via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] late report of Common Nighthawk in Portsmouth, 6/20/2017
Hey all, around 8:00 PM on June 20 I heard a Common Nighthawk overhead in the Eagle Point neighborhood in Portsmouth, presumably a foraging bird from Craney Island.


Nick Flanders

Portsmouth, VA
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Date: 6/24/17 7:55 am
From: Shea Tiller via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Sentara Martha Jefferson Hospital Pond--some info on the swan
Hello, all.

If you don't bird or haven't birded in Albemarle County, this message
probably won't apply to you.

Recently, I have seen some reports of mute swan from the Sentara Martha
Jefferson Hospital Pond on eBird alerts. I am not sure if everybody is
aware, but this bird has clipped wings, and is a effectively captive. If
you do report this bird on your eBird checklist, please keep in mind that
it is good practice to submit it as "Swan Sp." rather than mute swan, and
say "mute swan" in the comments. That way, this not wild bird won't appear
on the bird alerts.

Great birding.

Shea
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Date: 6/24/17 7:13 am
From: Karen Roberts via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Swallow-tailed kite on Blackwater Rd in VB
Flying over trees and field by 4617 Blackwater Rd in Virginia Beach. 10:00am today 6/24.

Sent from my iPhone

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Date: 6/24/17 6:23 am
From: Carol Evans via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] [Va-bird} Mourning Warblers!
Dunn and Garrett's book, "Warblers, " reviewed and ordered! Sounds like a
fabulous resource for someone just starting to expand warbler knowledge.
Thanks for the steer, intended or not!

-----Original Message-----
From: va-bird [mailto:va-bird-bounces+evanscarol75=<gmail.com...>]
On Behalf Of <va-bird-request...>
Sent: Saturday, June 24, 2017 8:51 AM
To: <va-bird...>
Subject: va-bird Digest, Vol 122, Issue 25

Send va-bird mailing list submissions to
<va-bird...>

To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird
or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
<va-bird-request...>

You can reach the person managing the list at
<va-bird-owner...>

When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific than
"Re: Contents of va-bird digest..."


Today's Topics:

1. Re: va-bird Digest, Vol 122, Issue 24 (Carol Evans)
2. warblers (Eirlys Barker)
3. Re: Mourning Warblers! (Marshall Faintich)
4. Re: Dickcissels, Bobolinks / Clarke Co. + Dickcissels on
Featherbed Road, Clarke Co. (<david.boltz4...>)
5. Richmond Audubon field trip to Powhatan State Park 6/24/17
(Wendy Ealding)
6. Mississippi kite in Mount Vernon District (Don Peterson)
7. CANCELLATION!--SAT. 6/24 FIELD DAY IN LOUISA, CANCELLED
(Ron Kingston)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Fri, 23 Jun 2017 10:57:43 -0400
From: "Carol Evans" <evanscarol75...>
To: <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] va-bird Digest, Vol 122, Issue 24
Message-ID: <0b0f01d2ec31$11d5e9b0$3581bd10$@gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

"Well, I must say that this was a good birding trip!"
~Marshall Faintich

No kidding! Thank you for sharing those wonderful photos. It is now
cemented in my mind what a mourning warbler looks like.

The scruffy first-year redstart looks like he was dragged in off the street
somewhere! Which brings up a question: what exactly is "first year?" (vs
"juvenile" vs "fledgling") Actually, I think the photo plus your phrase
"first summer" answers my question about this one, but my question about how
"first year" is used remains.

Carol Evans

-----Original Message-----
From: va-bird [mailto:va-bird-bounces+evanscarol75=<gmail.com...>]
On Behalf Of <va-bird-request...>
Sent: Friday, June 23, 2017 8:51 AM
To: <va-bird...>
Subject: va-bird Digest, Vol 122, Issue 24

Send va-bird mailing list submissions to
<va-bird...>

To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird
or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
<va-bird-request...>

You can reach the person managing the list at
<va-bird-owner...>

When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific than
"Re: Contents of va-bird digest..."


Today's Topics:

1. Mid-Summer VABBA2 Updates (Ashley Peele)
2. AUTO: Jim Bernat is out of the office (returning 06/28/2017)
(<JBernat...>)
3. Dickcissels, Bobolinks / Clarke Co. (Jon Little)
4. Mississippi Kite in Arlington, VA - 6/21/2017
(<Janetmanderson5...>)
5. Mourning Warblers! (Marshall Faintich)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 09:09:51 -0400
From: Ashley Peele <ashpeele...>
To: "<va-bird...>" <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Mid-Summer VABBA2 Updates
Message-ID: <632EB24B-9C3F-4561-BA5D-2DBFA4CED07B...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"

Hi VA Birders,



Hope this finds you all enjoying the summer solstice, as well as some
beautiful summer days in the field.? Many of us at the Atlas project are
spending lots of our time in the field, rather than on our computers!? We
wanted to catch up on sharing some exciting milestones and updates from the
project over the past week or so...?



First, the Atlas project has now received over 32,000 checklists to the
Atlas eBird portal.? This equates to 18,000+ checklists submitted thus far
in 2017!? Our volunteers continue to generate excellent breeding data across
the state and we are so excited to see more data slowly coming in from rural
parts of the state.



Second, we wanted to recognize one of our top Atlas contributors and
hard-working Natural Heritage biologists, Ellison Orcutt.? He just blew past
the 100 confirmed breeding species mark, setting the current Atlas state
record at 102.? Ellison juggles his busy work schedule, atlasing, AND
serving as the region-5 coordinator for the Atlas project.? It makes you a
little tired just thinking about it all.? We appreciate him and his tireless
work on behalf of Virginia?s wildlife!



Third, a number of really interesting stories have been shared on the Atlas
Facebook group recently.? Many folks are now using this Atlas forum, where
we can more easily share photos with the group.? Thanks to all of you the
Atlas birders that have contributed.? Here are some interesting recent
highlights??



Veronica and Chuck Ratliff shared a rare find, a fully albino Tree Swallow
who was fledged from a box near their home in SW VA.? Partial albinism and
leucism are not uncommon in wild birds, but documenting a fully albino
individual is rare.? We appreciate them sharing this really interesting
breeding evidence with the group!



Some additional exciting breeding confirmations shared to the group include
Prothonotary Warbler fledglings at Back Bay NWR (Rob Bielawski), Hooded
Mergansers w/ a chick in western VA (Logan Anderson), an Ovenbird nest in
Highland County (Paul and Hannah Glass), Grasshopper Sparrow fledgling near
Winchester (James Fox), and Loggerhead Shrike fledglings in SW VA (Ashley
Peele).? We appreciate all the folks contributing their exciting breeding
confirmations and photos to this group.? If you?d like to check it out for
yourself, visit www.facebook.com/groups/vabba2.



Lastly, please check out the latest Atlas project article on tricky breeding
codes, Part 3: The Confirmations.? This is the final installment addressing
several breeding codes in the ?confirmed? category, which are easy to
misapply.? http://ebird.org/content/atlasva/?p=419%2F&preview=true



Atlas volunteers have been putting forth incredible effort for the Atlas
project in the first half of this summer.? Seeing what our growing community
has accomplished in just 1 (and a half) breeding seasons is inspiring.?
Thank you to these folks who are so tangibly demonstrating the efficacy and
value of citizen science.



Good summer birding,



Ashley Peele, PhD

Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas Coordinator

www.vabba2.org | ebird.org/atlasva

www.facebook.com/vabba2

---

Conservation Management Institute, Virginia Tech

1900 Kraft Drive, Suite 250

Blacksburg, VA 24061

(540) 231-9182 office

(540) 231-7019 fax

<ashpeele...>



------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 12:12:36 -0400
From: <JBernat...>
To: <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] AUTO: Jim Bernat is out of the office (returning
06/28/2017)
Message-ID:

<OFDB0EAAED.5DD9CCA6-ON85258147.00590B71-85258147.00590B71...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII


I am out of the office until 06/28/2017.

I will reply after I return.


Note: This is an automated response to your message "va-bird Digest, Vol
122, Issue 23" sent on 6/22/2017 8:50:48 AM.

This is the only notification you will receive while this person is away.



------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 13:28:23 -0400
From: "Jon Little" <littlejon48...>
To: <va-bird...>, <shenvalbirds...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Dickcissels, Bobolinks / Clarke Co.
Message-ID: <001401d2eb7c$f38f90f0$daaeb2d0$@comcast.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

I found 3 Dickcissels this AM in northern Clarke Co. Two calling males were
at Smithfield Farm, just off Wickliffe Rd. Smithfield Farm is a eBird Hot
Spot and open to the public. The owners are very involved with environmental
issues and encourage birders to use their property anytime. For anyone
interested, they also run a B&B in the old mansion house. Google their web
site to learn more, or check page 7 in the VA Birding & Wildlife Trail
booklet.



>From the entrance gate, drive .15 miles north to find a Birding Trail
>map on
the fence. From that spot, the first DICK was singing from a small tree, NW
in the field. The second bird was north on the driveway a bit, and near the
road. Also, there were 3 male Bobolinks in the same field - one even perched
alongside the DICK for a good while. The 3rd bird was along Wickliffe Rd,
1.75 miles SW of Smithfield.



Jon Little

Winchester



------------------------------

Message: 4
Date: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 20:59:05 -0400
From: <Janetmanderson5...>
To: <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Mississippi Kite in Arlington, VA - 6/21/2017
Message-ID: <ab7c2.4481d90c.467dc1d9...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"



1 Mississippi Kite seen at 18th Street and Taylor Street in Arlington VA on
June 21, 2017

Janet M. Anderson
City of Falls Church, VA

------------------------------

Message: 5
Date: Fri, 23 Jun 2017 06:13:10 -0400
From: "Marshall Faintich" <marshall...>
To: <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Mourning Warblers!
Message-ID: <002601d2ec09$51bd58b0$f5380a10$@faintich.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

On Paddy Knob; 6/22/17. Report and photos:



<http://www.faintich.net/Blog2017/2017_06_22.htm>
http://www.faintich.net/Blog2017/2017_06_22.htm



___________________________

Marshall Faintich

Crozet, VA

<marshall...>

www.faintich.net <http://www.faintich.net/>

In real life, the shortest distance between two points is never a straight
line, so you might as well enjoy the journey !!

____________________________________________________________________________
_______________________







------------------------------

Subject: Digest Footer

_______________________________________________
va-bird mailing list
<va-bird...>
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird


------------------------------

End of va-bird Digest, Vol 122, Issue 24
****************************************



------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Fri, 23 Jun 2017 11:04:15 -0400
From: Eirlys Barker <dreirlys...>
To: "Virginia Birds (E-mail)" <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] warblers
Message-ID:
<CABBLHOWXEuAEB0jSVj8geq4QFN01e4JYZP9JN8V=LQH+<-qdaXQ...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"

We had two Prothonotary Warblers on our deck around 8:30 this misty morning
and yesterday around 3:30 my husband saw and I had earlier thought I'd heard
a Yellow-throated Vireo.

Eirlys Barker,
Pinetta, Gloucester


------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Fri, 23 Jun 2017 12:42:54 -0400
From: "Marshall Faintich" <marshall...>
To: <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Mourning Warblers!
Message-ID: <000001d2ec3f$c34046b0$49c0d410$@faintich.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Carol Evans asked about the American Redstart "First summer" caption in one
of my photos. "First Spring" would have been a bit more informative.
According to Dunn and Garrett's book, "Warblers, " juvenile American
Redstarts are mostly olive-brown with some dull whitish under parts, and
rapidly molt out of juvenile plumage that is mostly complete while still in
the nest. "First fall" males look a lot like adult females with a few minor
differences. By their "First spring," males have few to many scattered black
feathers as they change into their adult male plumage. Hope this helps
clarify the description.



___________________________

Marshall Faintich

Crozet, VA

<marshall...>

www.faintich.net <http://www.faintich.net/>

In real life, the shortest distance between two points is never a straight
line, so you might as well enjoy the journey !!

____________________________________________________________________________
_______________________







------------------------------

Message: 4
Date: Fri, 23 Jun 2017 13:39:00 -0400
From: <david.boltz4...>
To: Jon Little <littlejon48...>
Cc: <shenvalbirds...>, <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Dickcissels, Bobolinks / Clarke Co. +
Dickcissels on Featherbed Road, Clarke Co.
Message-ID: <42699B3C-D6D2-4B10-B11D-9FADF0F2DD78...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

In route to Smithfield Farm this morning I stopped on Featherbed Rd., just
off Rt. 340 (Double Tollgate). Within 50 yards of turning onto Featherbed I
heard singing Bobolinks. I was able to see only 2 around mid-field, but it
sounded like there were probably more. There were also many Eastern
Meadowlarks and Grasshopper Sparrows.

When I arrived at Smithfield Farm the Dickcissel was not initially present
at the birding trail map spot that Jon mentioned, but a Bobolink was singing
in the small tree. I drove straight ahead another tenth of a mile or so and
heard 2 Dickcissels on either side of the road and eventually saw both. I
went back to the birding trail maps and turned onto that road. Within a
quarter mile or less I encountered a third Dickcissel, and this one even
perched on a fence post for a time.

Dave Boltz

Sent from my iPhone

On Jun 22, 2017, at 1:28 PM, Jon Little via va-bird <va-bird...>
wrote:

I found 3 Dickcissels this AM in northern Clarke Co. Two calling males were
at Smithfield Farm, just off Wickliffe Rd. Smithfield Farm is a eBird Hot
Spot and open to the public. The owners are very involved with environmental
issues and encourage birders to use their property anytime. For anyone
interested, they also run a B&B in the old mansion house. Google their web
site to learn more, or check page 7 in the VA Birding & Wildlife Trail
booklet.



From the entrance gate, drive .15 miles north to find a Birding Trail map on
the fence. From that spot, the first DICK was singing from a small tree, NW
in the field. The second bird was north on the driveway a bit, and near the
road. Also, there were 3 male Bobolinks in the same field - one even perched
alongside the DICK for a good while. The 3rd bird was along Wickliffe Rd,
1.75 miles SW of Smithfield.



Jon Little

Winchester

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------------------------------

Message: 5
Date: Fri, 23 Jun 2017 18:25:24 -0400
From: Wendy Ealding <wendy.ealding...>
To: Bird sightings in Virginia <va-bird...>, Richmond
Audubon Society mailing list <va-richmond-general...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Richmond Audubon field trip to Powhatan State Park
6/24/17
Message-ID:
<CAE0_JZOHUUB0oLrWCbybh-OnDpWUq-MCQfPoRy8o1DWV-VM0og...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"

We are on for tomorrow! Be prepared for possible rain, muddy conditions,
and mosquitoes! And Indigo Buntings, Yellow-breasted Chats, Field Sparrows
and for those with better hearing than mine, possible Grasshopper Sparrows

--
Wendy Ealding
Midlothian


------------------------------

Message: 6
Date: Fri, 23 Jun 2017 19:40:11 -0400
From: "Don Peterson" <donandannap...>
To: <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Mississippi kite in Mount Vernon District
Message-ID: <000001d2ec7a$0e4083c0$2ac18b40$@cs.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

An adult Mississippi kite flew over Waynewood subdivision near Fort Hunt at
7:20 this evening.



Don Peterson



------------------------------

Message: 7
Date: Fri, 23 Jun 2017 22:55:36 -0400
From: "Ron Kingston" <kingston...>
To: <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] CANCELLATION!--SAT. 6/24 FIELD DAY IN LOUISA,
CANCELLED
Message-ID: <000f01d2ec95$61c0c030$25424090$@cstone.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"



The 23rd Annual Purple Martin Field Day in Virginia
CANCELLED!

Due to the wet weather forecast, we deeply regret that we must cancel the
Purple Martin Field Day scheduled for this Saturday, June 24, 2017 at the
colony of Lance Wood in Louisa County, VA. If the Louisa area gets the rain
predicted from storm Cindy, the parking area (hay field) will be far too wet
to park cars, without getting stuck in the mud. We were really looking
forward to having the event and regret that we had to cancel, but we felt
this is the only responsible thing to do, based on the forecast; we want you
to have a good time and be safe, whenever you come. Mark your calendar for
Saturday, June 23, 2018, and plan to join us next year! We will hope for
better weather then!

http://www.purplemartinfieldday.org/index.html







------------------------------

Subject: Digest Footer

_______________________________________________
va-bird mailing list
<va-bird...>
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird


------------------------------

End of va-bird Digest, Vol 122, Issue 25
****************************************

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Date: 6/23/17 7:55 pm
From: Ron Kingston via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] CANCELLATION!--SAT. 6/24 FIELD DAY IN LOUISA, CANCELLED


The 23rd Annual Purple Martin Field Day in Virginia
CANCELLED!

Due to the wet weather forecast, we deeply regret that we must cancel the
Purple Martin Field Day scheduled for this Saturday, June 24, 2017 at the
colony of Lance Wood in Louisa County, VA. If the Louisa area gets the rain
predicted from storm Cindy, the parking area (hay field) will be far too wet
to park cars, without getting stuck in the mud. We were really looking
forward to having the event and regret that we had to cancel, but we felt
this is the only responsible thing to do, based on the forecast; we want you
to have a good time and be safe, whenever you come. Mark your calendar for
Saturday, June 23, 2018, and plan to join us next year! We will hope for
better weather then!

http://www.purplemartinfieldday.org/index.html





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Date: 6/23/17 4:40 pm
From: Don Peterson via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Mississippi kite in Mount Vernon District
An adult Mississippi kite flew over Waynewood subdivision near Fort Hunt at
7:20 this evening.



Don Peterson

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Date: 6/23/17 3:25 pm
From: Wendy Ealding via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Richmond Audubon field trip to Powhatan State Park 6/24/17
We are on for tomorrow! Be prepared for possible rain, muddy conditions,
and mosquitoes! And Indigo Buntings, Yellow-breasted Chats, Field Sparrows
and for those with better hearing than mine, possible Grasshopper Sparrows

--
Wendy Ealding
Midlothian
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Date: 6/23/17 10:39 am
From: David Boltz via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Dickcissels, Bobolinks / Clarke Co. + Dickcissels on Featherbed Road, Clarke Co.
In route to Smithfield Farm this morning I stopped on Featherbed Rd., just off Rt. 340 (Double Tollgate). Within 50 yards of turning onto Featherbed I heard singing Bobolinks. I was able to see only 2 around mid-field, but it sounded like there were probably more. There were also many Eastern Meadowlarks and Grasshopper Sparrows.

When I arrived at Smithfield Farm the Dickcissel was not initially present at the birding trail map spot that Jon mentioned, but a Bobolink was singing in the small tree. I drove straight ahead another tenth of a mile or so and heard 2 Dickcissels on either side of the road and eventually saw both. I went back to the birding trail maps and turned onto that road. Within a quarter mile or less I encountered a third Dickcissel, and this one even perched on a fence post for a time.

Dave Boltz

Sent from my iPhone

On Jun 22, 2017, at 1:28 PM, Jon Little via va-bird <va-bird...> wrote:

I found 3 Dickcissels this AM in northern Clarke Co. Two calling males were
at Smithfield Farm, just off Wickliffe Rd. Smithfield Farm is a eBird Hot
Spot and open to the public. The owners are very involved with environmental
issues and encourage birders to use their property anytime. For anyone
interested, they also run a B&B in the old mansion house. Google their web
site to learn more, or check page 7 in the VA Birding & Wildlife Trail
booklet.



From the entrance gate, drive .15 miles north to find a Birding Trail map on
the fence. From that spot, the first DICK was singing from a small tree, NW
in the field. The second bird was north on the driveway a bit, and near the
road. Also, there were 3 male Bobolinks in the same field - one even perched
alongside the DICK for a good while. The 3rd bird was along Wickliffe Rd,
1.75 miles SW of Smithfield.



Jon Little

Winchester

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Date: 6/23/17 9:43 am
From: Marshall Faintich via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Mourning Warblers!
Carol Evans asked about the American Redstart "First summer" caption in one
of my photos. "First Spring" would have been a bit more informative.
According to Dunn and Garrett's book, "Warblers, " juvenile American
Redstarts are mostly olive-brown with some dull whitish under parts, and
rapidly molt out of juvenile plumage that is mostly complete while still in
the nest. "First fall" males look a lot like adult females with a few minor
differences. By their "First spring," males have few to many scattered black
feathers as they change into their adult male plumage. Hope this helps
clarify the description.



___________________________

Marshall Faintich

Crozet, VA

<marshall...>

www.faintich.net <http://www.faintich.net/>

In real life, the shortest distance between two points is never a straight
line, so you might as well enjoy the journey !!

____________________________________________________________________________
_______________________





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Date: 6/23/17 8:04 am
From: Eirlys Barker via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] warblers
We had two Prothonotary Warblers on our deck around 8:30 this misty morning
and yesterday around 3:30 my husband saw and I had earlier thought I'd
heard a Yellow-throated Vireo.

Eirlys Barker,
Pinetta, Gloucester
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Date: 6/23/17 7:57 am
From: Carol Evans via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] va-bird Digest, Vol 122, Issue 24
"Well, I must say that this was a good birding trip!"
~Marshall Faintich

No kidding! Thank you for sharing those wonderful photos. It is now
cemented in my mind what a mourning warbler looks like.

The scruffy first-year redstart looks like he was dragged in off the street
somewhere! Which brings up a question: what exactly is "first year?" (vs
"juvenile" vs "fledgling") Actually, I think the photo plus your phrase
"first summer" answers my question about this one, but my question about how
"first year" is used remains.

Carol Evans

-----Original Message-----
From: va-bird [mailto:va-bird-bounces+evanscarol75=<gmail.com...>]
On Behalf Of <va-bird-request...>
Sent: Friday, June 23, 2017 8:51 AM
To: <va-bird...>
Subject: va-bird Digest, Vol 122, Issue 24

Send va-bird mailing list submissions to
<va-bird...>

To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
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When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific than
"Re: Contents of va-bird digest..."


Today's Topics:

1. Mid-Summer VABBA2 Updates (Ashley Peele)
2. AUTO: Jim Bernat is out of the office (returning 06/28/2017)
(<JBernat...>)
3. Dickcissels, Bobolinks / Clarke Co. (Jon Little)
4. Mississippi Kite in Arlington, VA - 6/21/2017
(<Janetmanderson5...>)
5. Mourning Warblers! (Marshall Faintich)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 09:09:51 -0400
From: Ashley Peele <ashpeele...>
To: "<va-bird...>" <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Mid-Summer VABBA2 Updates
Message-ID: <632EB24B-9C3F-4561-BA5D-2DBFA4CED07B...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"

Hi VA Birders,



Hope this finds you all enjoying the summer solstice, as well as some
beautiful summer days in the field.? Many of us at the Atlas project are
spending lots of our time in the field, rather than on our computers!? We
wanted to catch up on sharing some exciting milestones and updates from the
project over the past week or so...?



First, the Atlas project has now received over 32,000 checklists to the
Atlas eBird portal.? This equates to 18,000+ checklists submitted thus far
in 2017!? Our volunteers continue to generate excellent breeding data across
the state and we are so excited to see more data slowly coming in from rural
parts of the state.



Second, we wanted to recognize one of our top Atlas contributors and
hard-working Natural Heritage biologists, Ellison Orcutt.? He just blew past
the 100 confirmed breeding species mark, setting the current Atlas state
record at 102.? Ellison juggles his busy work schedule, atlasing, AND
serving as the region-5 coordinator for the Atlas project.? It makes you a
little tired just thinking about it all.? We appreciate him and his tireless
work on behalf of Virginia?s wildlife!



Third, a number of really interesting stories have been shared on the Atlas
Facebook group recently.? Many folks are now using this Atlas forum, where
we can more easily share photos with the group.? Thanks to all of you the
Atlas birders that have contributed.? Here are some interesting recent
highlights??



Veronica and Chuck Ratliff shared a rare find, a fully albino Tree Swallow
who was fledged from a box near their home in SW VA.? Partial albinism and
leucism are not uncommon in wild birds, but documenting a fully albino
individual is rare.? We appreciate them sharing this really interesting
breeding evidence with the group!



Some additional exciting breeding confirmations shared to the group include
Prothonotary Warbler fledglings at Back Bay NWR (Rob Bielawski), Hooded
Mergansers w/ a chick in western VA (Logan Anderson), an Ovenbird nest in
Highland County (Paul and Hannah Glass), Grasshopper Sparrow fledgling near
Winchester (James Fox), and Loggerhead Shrike fledglings in SW VA (Ashley
Peele).? We appreciate all the folks contributing their exciting breeding
confirmations and photos to this group.? If you?d like to check it out for
yourself, visit www.facebook.com/groups/vabba2.



Lastly, please check out the latest Atlas project article on tricky breeding
codes, Part 3: The Confirmations.? This is the final installment addressing
several breeding codes in the ?confirmed? category, which are easy to
misapply.? http://ebird.org/content/atlasva/?p=419%2F&preview=true



Atlas volunteers have been putting forth incredible effort for the Atlas
project in the first half of this summer.? Seeing what our growing community
has accomplished in just 1 (and a half) breeding seasons is inspiring.?
Thank you to these folks who are so tangibly demonstrating the efficacy and
value of citizen science.



Good summer birding,



Ashley Peele, PhD

Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas Coordinator

www.vabba2.org | ebird.org/atlasva

www.facebook.com/vabba2

---

Conservation Management Institute, Virginia Tech

1900 Kraft Drive, Suite 250

Blacksburg, VA 24061

(540) 231-9182 office

(540) 231-7019 fax

<ashpeele...>



------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 12:12:36 -0400
From: <JBernat...>
To: <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] AUTO: Jim Bernat is out of the office (returning
06/28/2017)
Message-ID:

<OFDB0EAAED.5DD9CCA6-ON85258147.00590B71-85258147.00590B71...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII


I am out of the office until 06/28/2017.

I will reply after I return.


Note: This is an automated response to your message "va-bird Digest, Vol
122, Issue 23" sent on 6/22/2017 8:50:48 AM.

This is the only notification you will receive while this person is away.



------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 13:28:23 -0400
From: "Jon Little" <littlejon48...>
To: <va-bird...>, <shenvalbirds...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Dickcissels, Bobolinks / Clarke Co.
Message-ID: <001401d2eb7c$f38f90f0$daaeb2d0$@comcast.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

I found 3 Dickcissels this AM in northern Clarke Co. Two calling males were
at Smithfield Farm, just off Wickliffe Rd. Smithfield Farm is a eBird Hot
Spot and open to the public. The owners are very involved with environmental
issues and encourage birders to use their property anytime. For anyone
interested, they also run a B&B in the old mansion house. Google their web
site to learn more, or check page 7 in the VA Birding & Wildlife Trail
booklet.



>From the entrance gate, drive .15 miles north to find a Birding Trail
>map on
the fence. From that spot, the first DICK was singing from a small tree, NW
in the field. The second bird was north on the driveway a bit, and near the
road. Also, there were 3 male Bobolinks in the same field - one even perched
alongside the DICK for a good while. The 3rd bird was along Wickliffe Rd,
1.75 miles SW of Smithfield.



Jon Little

Winchester



------------------------------

Message: 4
Date: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 20:59:05 -0400
From: <Janetmanderson5...>
To: <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Mississippi Kite in Arlington, VA - 6/21/2017
Message-ID: <ab7c2.4481d90c.467dc1d9...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"



1 Mississippi Kite seen at 18th Street and Taylor Street in Arlington VA on
June 21, 2017

Janet M. Anderson
City of Falls Church, VA

------------------------------

Message: 5
Date: Fri, 23 Jun 2017 06:13:10 -0400
From: "Marshall Faintich" <marshall...>
To: <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Mourning Warblers!
Message-ID: <002601d2ec09$51bd58b0$f5380a10$@faintich.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

On Paddy Knob; 6/22/17. Report and photos:



<http://www.faintich.net/Blog2017/2017_06_22.htm>
http://www.faintich.net/Blog2017/2017_06_22.htm



___________________________

Marshall Faintich

Crozet, VA

<marshall...>

www.faintich.net <http://www.faintich.net/>

In real life, the shortest distance between two points is never a straight
line, so you might as well enjoy the journey !!

____________________________________________________________________________
_______________________







------------------------------

Subject: Digest Footer

_______________________________________________
va-bird mailing list
<va-bird...>
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird


------------------------------

End of va-bird Digest, Vol 122, Issue 24
****************************************

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Date: 6/23/17 3:13 am
From: Marshall Faintich via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Mourning Warblers!
On Paddy Knob; 6/22/17. Report and photos:



<http://www.faintich.net/Blog2017/2017_06_22.htm>
http://www.faintich.net/Blog2017/2017_06_22.htm



___________________________

Marshall Faintich

Crozet, VA

<marshall...>

www.faintich.net <http://www.faintich.net/>

In real life, the shortest distance between two points is never a straight
line, so you might as well enjoy the journey !!

____________________________________________________________________________
_______________________





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Date: 6/22/17 5:59 pm
From: janet anderson via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Mississippi Kite in Arlington, VA - 6/21/2017


1 Mississippi Kite seen at 18th Street and Taylor Street in Arlington VA
on June 21, 2017

Janet M. Anderson
City of Falls Church, VA
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Date: 6/22/17 10:28 am
From: Jon Little via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Dickcissels, Bobolinks / Clarke Co.
I found 3 Dickcissels this AM in northern Clarke Co. Two calling males were
at Smithfield Farm, just off Wickliffe Rd. Smithfield Farm is a eBird Hot
Spot and open to the public. The owners are very involved with environmental
issues and encourage birders to use their property anytime. For anyone
interested, they also run a B&B in the old mansion house. Google their web
site to learn more, or check page 7 in the VA Birding & Wildlife Trail
booklet.



From the entrance gate, drive .15 miles north to find a Birding Trail map on
the fence. From that spot, the first DICK was singing from a small tree, NW
in the field. The second bird was north on the driveway a bit, and near the
road. Also, there were 3 male Bobolinks in the same field - one even perched
alongside the DICK for a good while. The 3rd bird was along Wickliffe Rd,
1.75 miles SW of Smithfield.



Jon Little

Winchester

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Date: 6/22/17 9:11 am
From: Jim B via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] AUTO: Jim Bernat is out of the office (returning 06/28/2017)

I am out of the office until 06/28/2017.

I will reply after I return.


Note: This is an automated response to your message "va-bird Digest, Vol
122, Issue 23" sent on 6/22/2017 8:50:48 AM.

This is the only notification you will receive while this person is away.

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Date: 6/22/17 6:10 am
From: Ashley Peele via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Mid-Summer VABBA2 Updates
Hi VA Birders,



Hope this finds you all enjoying the summer solstice, as well as some beautiful summer days in the field.  Many of us at the Atlas project are spending lots of our time in the field, rather than on our computers!  We wanted to catch up on sharing some exciting milestones and updates from the project over the past week or so... 



First, the Atlas project has now received over 32,000 checklists to the Atlas eBird portal.  This equates to 18,000+ checklists submitted thus far in 2017!  Our volunteers continue to generate excellent breeding data across the state and we are so excited to see more data slowly coming in from rural parts of the state.



Second, we wanted to recognize one of our top Atlas contributors and hard-working Natural Heritage biologists, Ellison Orcutt.  He just blew past the 100 confirmed breeding species mark, setting the current Atlas state record at 102.  Ellison juggles his busy work schedule, atlasing, AND serving as the region-5 coordinator for the Atlas project.  It makes you a little tired just thinking about it all.  We appreciate him and his tireless work on behalf of Virginia’s wildlife!



Third, a number of really interesting stories have been shared on the Atlas Facebook group recently.  Many folks are now using this Atlas forum, where we can more easily share photos with the group.  Thanks to all of you the Atlas birders that have contributed.  Here are some interesting recent highlights… 



Veronica and Chuck Ratliff shared a rare find, a fully albino Tree Swallow who was fledged from a box near their home in SW VA.  Partial albinism and leucism are not uncommon in wild birds, but documenting a fully albino individual is rare.  We appreciate them sharing this really interesting breeding evidence with the group!



Some additional exciting breeding confirmations shared to the group include Prothonotary Warbler fledglings at Back Bay NWR (Rob Bielawski), Hooded Mergansers w/ a chick in western VA (Logan Anderson), an Ovenbird nest in Highland County (Paul and Hannah Glass), Grasshopper Sparrow fledgling near Winchester (James Fox), and Loggerhead Shrike fledglings in SW VA (Ashley Peele).  We appreciate all the folks contributing their exciting breeding confirmations and photos to this group.  If you’d like to check it out for yourself, visit www.facebook.com/groups/vabba2.



Lastly, please check out the latest Atlas project article on tricky breeding codes, Part 3: The Confirmations.  This is the final installment addressing several breeding codes in the ‘confirmed’ category, which are easy to misapply.  http://ebird.org/content/atlasva/?p=419%2F&preview=true



Atlas volunteers have been putting forth incredible effort for the Atlas project in the first half of this summer.  Seeing what our growing community has accomplished in just 1 (and a half) breeding seasons is inspiring.  Thank you to these folks who are so tangibly demonstrating the efficacy and value of citizen science.



Good summer birding,



Ashley Peele, PhD

Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas Coordinator

www.vabba2.org | ebird.org/atlasva

www.facebook.com/vabba2

---

Conservation Management Institute, Virginia Tech

1900 Kraft Drive, Suite 250

Blacksburg, VA 24061

(540) 231-9182 office

(540) 231-7019 fax

<ashpeele...>

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Date: 6/21/17 5:31 pm
From: Stephen Johnson via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] summer updates on breeding birds, Loudoun County

Happy Solstice, Virginia birders!!

Today I was able to upgrade a few breeding statuses in Loudoun County, in the Arcola SE block, one of the priority blocks for the second Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas. Here are the upgrades.

Wild Turkey - at least one adult and 5+ small poults together in a field - "recently fledged young" fully confirms this as a breeder in the block.
Eastern Phoebe - a pair foraging together near Elklick Run (stream). "Pair in suitable habitat" counts as "Probable" breeding status.
White-eyed Vireo - male singing in the same location for more than 7 days, which ranks this species as "Probable".
American Goldfinch - male-female pair, female was "carrying nesting material" - confirmed breeding

The W-E Vireos here appear to be a repeat of my effort last year, in another priority block, Herndon SE. I went back at least 5-6 times during breeding season last year, and almost always found the bird singing. But nothing more - no carrying nesting material, no carrying food, no nest, no feeding young, etc.

We all have our frustration birds that we can never seem to find - I guess for Atlas surveying, we also have our bugaboo breeding birds. But it was rewarding to confirm the Turkeys!!

To submit reports for the Atlas, go to this web site:
http://ebird.org/ebird/atlasva/submit
When you enter a species there, click where it says "Add Breeding Code or Details". Look at the options, and pick the highest one on the list that applies. If the bird was simply in a reasonable habitat and nothing else, that would be "In Appropriate Habitat". It's not hard, give it a try.

For more information about the Atlas, and guidance for the breeding codes and surveying methods in general:
http://amjv.org/index.php/vabba2/about
http://ebird.org/content/atlasva/

Steve Johnson
Fairfax, Virginia

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Date: 6/21/17 4:27 pm
From: Marti Eisentraut via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Fork Tailed Flycatcher
Did anyone see it today, June 21? I'm thinking about driving from Arlington to see it tomorrow.
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Date: 6/21/17 9:47 am
From: David Gibson via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] recording birds/submitting to ebird
Hi all, Here's a copy of an email I sent recently to some folks on the
Massbird Listserv re: recording birds. Thought some here would be
interested.

Chris, Join the club (submitting sound files)! I've become hooked. Now when
I go into the field, I bring my binocs and Peterson Field Guide, as usual,
but now also bring along my recently purchased, but powerful, Tascam DR-05
recorder for recording bird songs and calls. I record uncompressed WAV
files (higher quality than MP3) using the recorder. I also use a windscreen
(eliminates wind noise) and sometimes attach a handle (eliminates handling
noise). I of course submit recordings to ebird, often after doing some
editing, usually in Audacity (free editing software), but often just using
my recorder.
Recording is a lot of fun. Sometimes I go out just to record, keeping the
recorder in my hand the whole time and only occasionally reaching for the
binocs. This kind of opens up a whole new dimension to birdwatching. It's
also something I can do when there's not much bird 'activity' and
sightings are few and far between. I can always record something. And it is
an unbelievable way to learn about bird vocalizations, and sound in
general. Just wait until you listen to your recordings and study those
sonograms!
Good luck! Dave Gibson (Boston native living in Chesapeake, VA, and missing
American Tree Sparrows, Warbling Vireos, Common Nighthawks, Snowy Owl
incursions, and the annual warbler waves)
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Date: 6/21/17 9:20 am
From: Jeff Blalock via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] No FT Fly
Greetings all.

Clyde Wilson and I have been at BB National Wildlife Refuge since 0850 and with three other birders we have not located the FT Fly as of 1220 hrs.

From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-572-8619 Home
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>



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Date: 6/21/17 8:38 am
From: Wendy Ealding via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Richmond Audubon field trip to Powhatan SP 6/24/17
A reminder about the upcoming field trip to Powhatan State Park. The start
time is 7 AM (not 8 AM) - the announcement in the Thrasher is incorrect and
the announcement on the web site is confusing in that regard. Also with
the recent rains, the trails will be muddy and I recommend insect
repellent. I am watching the weather forecast closely as Tropical Storm
Cindy may bring rain and thunderstorms and we won't want to be out there if
that happens.

Wendy Ealding
Midlothian
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Date: 6/21/17 6:13 am
From: John Greenwood via va-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [Va-bird] Great Egret at Lake Accotink
On the east side of the stream feeding the lake; approx 1/4 mile above the lake.

Jack Greenwood
Falls Church

Sent from my iPhone
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