va-bird
Received From Subject
7/16/18 6:44 pm Steve Johnson via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Tales from the Atlas trail in SW Virginia
7/16/18 3:30 pm Steve Johnson via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] Rockingham County migrants
7/16/18 11:05 am Anderson, Janet M. DCARO via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] 7/16/18 - 3 Mississippi Kites in Alexandria, VA
7/15/18 7:18 pm Ed Wallace via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Barn Owls at Fort Scott Park in Arlington
7/15/18 5:40 pm Shea Tiller via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Bobwhite at Ragged Island, Isle of Wight co; a few migrant shorebirds Grandview Nature Preserve notes
7/15/18 4:49 pm kurtcapt87--- via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] nice day working on Virginia's Breeding Bird Atlas
7/15/18 4:19 pm Diane L via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Rockingham County migrants
7/15/18 3:12 pm David Young via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Virginia listing
7/15/18 3:07 pm Kristine Lansing via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Great Falls NP Bird Walk 07/15/2018 (Fairfax County)
7/15/18 2:57 pm David Young via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] (no subject)
7/15/18 2:14 pm dcharlesl--- via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] American Avocet - Dyke Marsh/Belle Haven Picnic Area, Alexandria
7/15/18 2:01 pm Vineeta Anand via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] A fabulous morning
7/15/18 1:09 pm Vineeta Anand via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] A fabulous morning
7/15/18 10:08 am Larry Cartwright via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Dyke Marsh walk and breeding birds
7/15/18 9:07 am m b via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] Subject: List guidelines from your administrator
7/15/18 8:30 am m b via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Actual reading required on purpose of list
7/15/18 7:55 am Russell Taylor via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Fwd: [Va-bird] List guidelines from your administrator
7/15/18 7:36 am Peggy Welty via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] purpose of list
7/14/18 5:10 pm Marlene A Condon via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] purpose of list
7/14/18 2:12 pm Donald Sweig via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] MISSISSIPPI KITES
7/14/18 12:45 pm Scott Priebe via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] purpose of list
7/14/18 12:40 pm David Gibson via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] purpose of list
7/14/18 11:59 am Steve Johnson via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] purpose of list
7/14/18 11:47 am Jeff Blalock via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] eBird -- Staunton View Public Use Area -- Jul 14, 2018
7/13/18 1:41 pm krae1010--- via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Riverbend Park Bird Walk, 07/13/2018
7/12/18 6:12 pm Dolores Keeler via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Request for informaton
7/12/18 6:56 am Marc Ribaudo via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Least bitterns, Neabsco Creek
7/11/18 6:35 pm Patrick Malone via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] extra-territorial -- bird expedition in northern NM
7/11/18 6:16 pm David Gibson via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] interesting bird sightings and grammar
7/11/18 4:48 pm David White via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] interesting bird sightings and grammar
7/11/18 12:15 pm m b via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Further reflections on interesting bird sightings and grammar
7/11/18 9:42 am Claire Kluskens via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] purpose of list; immature Red-eyed Vireo (Culpeper)
7/11/18 9:35 am Shea Tiller via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] purpose of list; dead male RTHU
7/11/18 8:21 am Vineeta Anand via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] interesting bird sightings and grammar
7/11/18 8:20 am Steve Johnson via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] Pine Siskin in Covington (Alleghany county)
7/11/18 7:55 am Janice Frye via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] purpose of list; dead male RTHU
7/11/18 7:54 am m b via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] oops on "interesting bird sightings and grammar"
7/11/18 7:51 am m b via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] interesting bird sightings and grammar
7/11/18 5:33 am Marshall Faintich via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] purpose of list; dead male RTHU
7/10/18 5:20 pm Rob Bielawski via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Early July Bird Observations & Atlasing Records for Virginia Beach
7/10/18 5:02 pm C. Michael Stinson via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] purpose of list; dead male RTHU
7/10/18 10:13 am John Greenwood via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Fwd: Owls See the World Much Like We Do - The New York Times
7/10/18 9:10 am Gerry Hawkins via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Voice of the Naturalist, Greater DC area, week ending 7/9/18
7/9/18 7:18 pm Harry Glasgow via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk
7/9/18 12:24 pm Marshall Faintich via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Canadian Maritime Provinces
7/9/18 11:49 am Steve Johnson via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Pine Siskin in Covington (Alleghany county)
7/8/18 7:26 pm Scott Bastian via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Willets, late post (+ Red-cockaded)
7/8/18 5:04 pm Stauffer Miller via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] nighthawks
7/8/18 12:07 pm krae1010--- via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Great Falls NP Bird Walk 07/08/2018 (Fairfax County)
7/8/18 9:40 am Marc Ribaudo via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Mississippi Kite, Dyke Marsh
7/8/18 9:16 am Russell Taylor via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Germanna Bridge SE 7-7-2018 blockbusting
7/8/18 4:12 am Kurt Gaskill via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] Richardsville SE Atlas blockbusting
7/7/18 11:56 am Marc Ribaudo via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Richardsville SE Atlas blockbusting
7/5/18 9:59 am Anderson, Janet M. DCARO via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Birds Seen July 4, 2018 and July 5, 2018
7/5/18 7:50 am Eirlys Barker via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] Ruby Throated Hummingbirds
7/5/18 4:15 am Jeff Blalock via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Common Grackles Flyover
7/4/18 1:08 pm Charles Woodrich via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Ruby Throated Hummingbirds
7/3/18 8:40 pm Howard Wu via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] (extralimital) The Galapagos Islands (May 2018)
7/3/18 4:59 pm John Greenwood via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Fwd: NYTimes.com: Can Crows Make Mental Pictures of Tools?
7/2/18 8:02 pm Harry Glasgow via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwal
7/2/18 6:22 pm kurtcapt87--- via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Upperville SE Blockbuster (Fauquier Co) Report, Saturday 30 June 2018
7/2/18 10:46 am Connie Sale via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Bird ID needed for Rehabber - is a BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER!
7/2/18 10:03 am Marlene A Condon via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] about disappearance of Tree Swallows in my area
7/2/18 9:05 am Janet Paisley via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] about disappearance of Tree Swallows in my area
7/2/18 8:28 am m b via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] drones are a bird list issue
7/2/18 7:51 am Marlene A Condon via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] about disappearance of Tree Swallows in my area
7/2/18 4:21 am Ann via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] (no subject)
7/1/18 3:03 pm Dan Huddleston via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] duck ID
7/1/18 2:22 pm Shea Tiller via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] Bird ID needed for rehabber
7/1/18 1:48 pm Barbara Farron via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] Bird ID needed for rehabber
7/1/18 1:34 pm Nancy Young via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] Bird ID needed for rehabber
7/1/18 12:38 pm Connie Sale via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Bird ID needed for rehabber
7/1/18 12:34 pm Connie Sale via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Bird ID needed for rehabber
7/1/18 12:26 pm Colt Gregory via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Great Fall National Park Sunday Bird Walk
7/1/18 12:01 pm Rob Bielawski via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Late June Observations for Virginia Beach & Some Atlasing Information
7/1/18 11:57 am grm0803 via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Mississippi Kites, Lake Mercer, Fairfax Station
7/1/18 10:48 am David Engelen via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Reminder - this is a Bird list!
7/1/18 8:48 am Thomas Nardone via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Fwd: eBird Report - Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve, Jul 1, 2018
6/30/18 1:53 pm Stephen Eccles via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Possible Broad-winged Hawks, Fairfax County
6/30/18 12:36 pm Steve Johnson via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] relative distribution of several common species in Virginia
6/30/18 9:40 am Walter Hadlock via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] distribution (disappearance ) of Tree Swallows
6/30/18 9:29 am Marlene A Condon via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] distribution (disappearance ) of Tree Swallows
6/30/18 7:59 am Thomas L Blackburn via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] VA-bird Digest, Vol 134, Issue 30
6/30/18 3:52 am Steve Johnson via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] distribution of several common species in Virginia
6/29/18 11:46 pm Gerry Neal Weinberger via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] (no subject)
6/29/18 6:37 pm barb22030--- via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Hot birds (Fairfax & vicinity)
6/29/18 2:10 pm Steve Johnson via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] List of "NoFly" parks - Fairfax Co.
6/29/18 2:08 pm Steve Johnson via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] List of "NoFly" parks - Fairfax Co.
6/29/18 2:07 pm Jeff Blalock via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Heat
6/29/18 2:00 pm Jeff Blalock via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] eBird Trip Summary -- Trip
6/29/18 3:38 am Jeff Blalock via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Dickcissel in Campell Co
6/28/18 7:28 pm kurtcapt87--- via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Reminder of upcoming VA Breeding Bird Atlas Blockbuster for Upperville SE Saturday, 30 June
6/28/18 6:50 pm Rich Rieger via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] List of "NoFly" parks - Fairfax Co.
6/28/18 5:32 pm Rich Rieger via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] here come the drones
6/28/18 11:56 am David Matson via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Gannet
6/28/18 11:36 am Ralph via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] (no subject)
6/28/18 9:52 am Bryan H via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] Selden Island, Potomac River (MD/VA line)
6/28/18 9:21 am Sinclair, Kristen E. via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Selden Island, Potomac River (MD/VA line)
6/27/18 9:07 am Marc Ribaudo via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Mississippi Kite, Prince William Co. Landfill
6/27/18 6:50 am Ashley Peele via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] New VA BBA Maps now on eBird
6/27/18 2:01 am Nylia via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] (no subject)
6/26/18 11:22 pm Karen Cooper via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Madidi NP, Bolivia
6/26/18 4:51 pm Larry Meade via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] Dyke marsh walk reports
6/26/18 2:26 pm Antonio Quezon via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Mississippi Kites in Fairfax Station
6/26/18 11:34 am m b via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Dyke marsh walk reports
6/26/18 6:59 am Joe Coleman via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] FW: DC Area, 6/26/2018
6/26/18 6:03 am Jeff Blalock via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Birding along the Southside Border
6/26/18 5:57 am Bill McGovern via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] PROTHONOTARY FAMILY at OBNWR, Prince William County
6/25/18 7:48 pm Vineeta Anand via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] PROTHONOTARY FAMILY at OBNWR, Prince William County
6/25/18 7:19 pm barb22030--- via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] PROTHONOTARY FAMILY at OBNWR, Prince William County
6/25/18 3:26 pm Ian Gale via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk
6/25/18 12:31 pm Harry Glasgow via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk
6/25/18 7:51 am John Greenwood via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Fwd: Birders in the Big Apple
6/25/18 6:38 am Joe Coppock via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Charleston, SC birding
6/25/18 5:18 am kurtcapt87--- via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Another Block-buster Party! June 30th for Upperville SE
6/24/18 8:15 pm Colt Gregory via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] VA-bird Digest, Vol 134, Issue 23
6/24/18 5:21 pm dcharlesl--- via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas Block Busting Field Trip - Stafford County
6/24/18 11:03 am Kristine Lansing via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Great Falls NP Bird Walk 06/24/2018 (Fairfax County)
6/24/18 8:14 am Vineeta Anand via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Huntley Meadows Sightings
6/23/18 7:52 pm m b via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Dead bald eagle
6/23/18 10:27 am Janice Frye via VA-bird <va-bird...> Re: [VA-bird] dead Bald Eagle
6/23/18 9:57 am Barbara Slatcher via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Looking for rough winged swallow flocks around Richmond
6/23/18 8:45 am David Gibson via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] dead Bald Eagle
6/23/18 6:08 am Stephen Tabone via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Unsubscribe me, please
6/22/18 6:33 pm Ron Kingston via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] 24th Annual PURPLE MARTIN FIELD DAY Will be held tomorrow ! ! ! ! 23JUN
6/22/18 2:21 pm Kristine Lansing via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Riverbend Park Bird Walk 06/22/2018
6/21/18 2:34 pm John Greenwood via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Fwd: Everything you think you know about bald eagles is wrong | Popular Science
6/21/18 1:30 pm Phil Silas via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] VABBA2 Blockbusting in Prince William County
6/21/18 8:04 am John Greenwood via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Bats in the library, not the belfry!
6/20/18 8:58 am Patti Reum via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] VSO Conservation Grants
6/19/18 8:13 pm Penny Warren via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Report
6/19/18 8:02 pm Joe Coleman via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] FW: DC Area, 6/19/2018
6/19/18 4:18 pm Vineeta Anand via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Bald eagle
6/19/18 11:09 am Roger Mayhorn via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Pine Siskin in Buchanan County - video
6/19/18 5:56 am Art Drauglis via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Hogweed
6/18/18 3:12 pm Harry Glasgow via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Huntley Meadows[ Monday morning Birdwalk.
6/18/18 2:13 pm Jeff Blalock via VA-bird <va-bird...> [VA-bird] Birding after the Atlas Project in Halifax.
 
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Date: 7/16/18 6:44 pm
From: Steve Johnson via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Tales from the Atlas trail in SW Virginia



Hello Birders,


Lynn and I have just returned from a 9-day trip to SW Virginia, visiting Priority blocks for the Breeding Bird Atlas in the vicinity of Douthat State Park, and then Natural Tunnel State Park. Doing is learning, and we did a lot of "doing". Here are some of our experiences.


Douthat is located within a buffer zone (several miles in every direction) of National Forest land - in that regard it is a bit like some of the National Parks in the western U.S. The park itself is in a Priority block which is already well covered for the Atlas, so we tackled nearby blocks called Covington SE, Clifton Forge SE, and Bath Alum SE.


Natural Tunnel is located in the karst folded landscape of alternating long hills and long valleys. Surveying blocks around there requires more navigational pre-planning than elsewhere, because (transplanting the wrong regional dialect) quite often "you cahn't get theah from heah."


One day, Lynn heard a different kind of unfamiliar bird call, and insisted we had to stop and look for the source. We found an unfamiliar young bird which we studied and eventually narrowed down to a probable Cowbird. Then we saw an adult Phoebe fly up beside. The Cowbird begged and its "foster" mother (about the same size or slightly smaller) fed it.


This yielded two confirms at once: Brown-headed Cowbird and Phoebe, both ranked as "Recently Fledged Young". But then for a bonus prize, a fledgling Phoebe appeared, also begging. So, an interesting case where the baby Cowbird did not crowd out all of its siblings.


The key here to collect this data was 1) "That's an unfamiliar bird call"; and then 2) "We need to find out what it is."


We frequently rejected fledgling birds as merely "Appropriate habitat", which only counts as "Possible", because there were no adults around and they were foraging independently. They could well have fledged elsewhere, outside of the block. On the other hand, when we saw two fresh fledglings perched close together, not foraging, and an adult nearby, that was obviously "Recently Fledged Young", which counts as "Confirmed".


Another common theme was finding both male and female birds of a species, e.g. Scarlet Tanager, along the same road, but a considerable distance apart. That is just coincidence, and we recorded that as a count of 2 birds, code "H (appropriate habitat)". Of course one or both of them are probably members of breeding pairs, but we did not see that, so did not record it. Whenever we did find a male-female pair together of course, that was "P - Pair in suitable habitat", which counts as "Probable".


We were again struck by apparent trends from our usual stomping grounds (No. Virginia) to further south (Appomattox and Smith Mountain Lake areas, on our previous trip), to our latest visit further west and southwest (Douthat and Natural Tunnel).


In surveying 7 blocks near Appomattox and Smith Mtn Lake, we were struck by the paucity of Song Sparrows. This was not the case in our more recent target areas near Douthat, nor near Natural Tunnel - we saw good numbers of them there, just like at home in No. Virginia. And indeed in the eBird species map, there are sort of "holes" around both Appomattox and Smith Mtn Lake; it supports our impressions.


eBird also correctly predicted that we would find more Summer Tanagers and Yellow-throated Vireos than we're used to around Fairfax. It really is an impressive database tool. Our only "miss" based on eBird expectations was Hooded Warbler - relatively common in these areas according to eBird, but we found none. Perhaps they are all quietly nesting and foraging behind bushes at this time??


This email is intended as a very junior cousin to Kurt Gaskill's "how-to" posts about surveying to support the Atlas effort. We're mostly through the 3rd of 5 years here, but there's still some time to contribute valuable sightings over the next few weeks. There's a lot of territory out there still to cover, so if you think you can recognize a Robin that is carrying a mouthful of worms around, or a baby Cardinal begging from its parent, or a male and female Goldfinch together in a likely field, you can contribute in many places.


Steve Johnson and Lynn Rafferty
Fairfax


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Date: 7/16/18 3:30 pm
From: Steve Johnson via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] Rockingham County migrants
Hi Diane,
It's always fun to find unexpected birds. Lynn and I recently visited several Priority blocks in the vicinity of Douthat State Park, all in GW&J National Forest lands. Never having birded near there, and we really didn't know what to expect.


We found Worm-eating several times in that area, roughly 60 miles SW of the closest tip of Shenandoah NP. eBird did predict (before our trip) that in those counties, WE Warbler was relatively common, occurring at roughly the 25-30% level in July. We thought we might have heard Redstarts once or twice, but never saw one, and never heard them well enough to report a "sighting".


Steve Johnson and Lynn Rafferty
returned now to our normal habitat, Fairfax






-----Original Message-----
From: Diane L via VA-bird <va-bird...>
To: Shenvalbirds <shenvalbirds...>; Va-bird Birding <va-bird...>
Sent: Sun, Jul 15, 2018 7:19 pm
Subject: [VA-bird] Rockingham County migrants

Caution flag noted for atlasing here in western Virginia! Last weekend, Dave Wendelken & I were excited to confirm White-eyed Vireo at a known breeding site. But we also found two species unlikely to breed there: Worm-eating Warbler & male & female A. Redstart. The site is close to Shenandoah National Park where both do breed. Today, in the central Shenandoah Valley near Harrisonburg, found Yellow-billed Cuckoo both at home and at Lake Shenandoah with Greg Moyers. Nearby, at Leonard's Pond, two Least Sandpipers.Diane LepkowskiHarrisonburg*** You are subscribed to VA-bird as <stevejohnson2...> If you wish to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
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Date: 7/16/18 11:05 am
From: Anderson, Janet M. DCARO via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] 7/16/18 - 3 Mississippi Kites in Alexandria, VA
July 16, 2018

3 Mississippi Kites seen at Enderby Street and Old Dominion Boulevard in Alexandria, City of Alexandria, VA.

Janet M. Anderson
City of Falls Church, VA
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Date: 7/15/18 7:18 pm
From: Ed Wallace via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Barn Owls at Fort Scott Park in Arlington
All,

while taking my daughter out for a project on the phases of the moon, we distinctly heard two barn owls calling. One was directly over the footpath that takes you to S. Ives Street and the second was about 20 yards South of us deeper in the woods. I am fairly sure on the calls because I can't think of anything that makes the kind of high-pitched screeching noises we were hearing.

When I got home to put it in e-bird, I was surprised to see if got flagged. A search of e-bird indicates that they are rare in the area.

I did not get photos nor did we actually see them. The path is not lit and it was pitch black looking up through the trees. My kids and I thing the one over our heads was probably 15 or 20 feet away. The second one it was calling to was a little farther away.

I have some familiarity with barn owls in Louisiana, where you do find them from time to time.

I will try to get back there in the near future with a camera to see if I can get photos.

Note this was a Virginia bird for me.

Ed Wallace
Arlington, VA
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Date: 7/15/18 5:40 pm
From: Shea Tiller via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Bobwhite at Ragged Island, Isle of Wight co; a few migrant shorebirds Grandview Nature Preserve notes
Hi, all.

This morning for a half hour there was a bobwhite singing from the small
area of pine forest at Ragged Island WMA in Isle of Wight county. These
aren’t common in the area (there’s no previous reports from the wma; there
are reports from a few years ago in the vicinity). Perhaps this individual
failed to breed nearby in rural Isle of Wight co., and went looking for
unclaimed territories. Also possible that it was an escapee bird or
released bird, but it did not exhibit the unusual tameness that most feral
bobwhite do; in fact I couldn’t lay eyes on it, and it didn’t sound like it
was singing from an open perch.

The usual species of interest were all active; seaside sparrows, clapper
rails, and blue grosbeak.

Grandview Nature Preserve yielded a few arrivals in the way of shorebirds;
sb dowitcher, willet, and least sandpipers accompanied the most common
species. I thought that Factory Point was roped off in the summer;
apparently not...in any case, I turned back as soon as soon as the birds of
the Factory Point Colony paid me mind.

Great birding,

Shea
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Date: 7/15/18 4:49 pm
From: kurtcapt87--- via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] nice day working on Virginia's Breeding Bird Atlas
VA BIRDers.



Marc Ribaudo, David Ledwith and myself did some Atlas-ing today (opinion:
the most important thing in VA birding this summer). We managed a
confirmation of Kentucky Warbler up along the Freezeland - Fire Trail Rd
area today (this access road straddles Clarke, Warren and Fauquier
Counties). Other confirms were White-eyed V, Tufted Titmouse, White-breasted
Nuthatch, Gray Catbird and Eastern Towhee. We also noted at least one
Broad-winged Hawk calling repeatedly up there - it may have been two
different birds (and, admittedly, we are still considering making a pair
argument). Numerous upgrades to probable were recorded including YB Chat.



After the ridge, we moved through the piedmont, adding an upgrade to
Grasshopper Sparrow (to probable) in Upperville SE. We passed through
Thoroughfare Gap NW using Hopewell Rd and went searching for more
Grasshoppers. We failed at that, but found a nice group of Wood Ducks, incl
nearly grown juvs, plus a Timber Rattlesnake crossing a paved private road.
Nearby Creel Lane produced more YB Chats (but just S here) plus confirms for
Field Sparrow and Blue-gray Gnatcatcher. Further up that road into the next
block was a Red-headed WP.



All-in-all, a fine day!



Kurt Gaskill

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Date: 7/15/18 4:19 pm
From: Diane L via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Rockingham County migrants
Caution flag noted for atlasing here in western Virginia!  Last weekend, Dave Wendelken & I were excited to confirm White-eyed Vireo at a known breeding site. But we also found two species unlikely to breed there: Worm-eating Warbler & male & female A. Redstart.   The site is close to Shenandoah National Park where both do breed.  Today, in the central Shenandoah Valley near Harrisonburg, found Yellow-billed Cuckoo both at home and at Lake Shenandoah with Greg Moyers.  Nearby, at Leonard's Pond, two Least Sandpipers.
Diane LepkowskiHarrisonburg
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Date: 7/15/18 3:12 pm
From: David Young via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Virginia listing
I apologize for reposting but I forgot a topic and auto correct edited my email address. Been out in the sun too long today and should have left this topic untouched. And alone I guess.

On Sunday, July 15, 2018, David Young <lcdyoung93...> wrote:

I am currently out of town for the month and spending it in Cape May,NJ before moving up to Maine for August, how's that for non essential Information on the Va List, and I have no urge to report to you on Cape May birding, I'll put that on the Jersey site.
One consideration that I don't see mentioned in this mess of comments that are being made is the out of state birder who simply wants to efficiently look at multiple states to familiarize and develope a plan of birding. If I visit a states list and see thee sort through threads that have nothing to do with what is being seen and have zero to do with actual day to day birding in that state I move on. Individuals hopefully look for a quick reported synopsis of what is being SEEN recently in our State, not New Mexico or Maritimes or Galapagos.
I would be embarrassed to even recommend Virginia list to an out of state or new birder at this point , since it's bordering on useless. The guidelines are quite clear and the stated purpose of reporting is too. It's simple. If Va list is morphing into something else so be it but it is ashame. Visitors coming to Virginia should look elsewhere if they haven't already. I apologize for wasting space here as well but needed to add that aspect. Dave Young , Reston, Va - <Lcdyoung...>

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Date: 7/15/18 3:07 pm
From: Kristine Lansing via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Great Falls NP Bird Walk 07/15/2018 (Fairfax County)
Following is the count from Sunday's weekly bird walk at Great Falls National Park, which identified approximately 38 species and included 8 participants. Yellow-billed Cuckoos were heard more frequently than Red-eyed Vireos, with at least one cuckoo sighting. Acadian Flycatchers were notably silent. A "mystery bird" -- a duck -- was sighted near the aqueduct dam; despite participants' best efforts, it remains unidentified.  (Should this tickle your interest, a photo has been posted to eBird.)
This walk meets at 8:00 a.m. on Sunday mornings, rain or shine, in front of the snack bar/concession stand of the Great Falls National Park Visitors' center; it does not take place, though, during electrical storms, heavy snows, or when the trails are icy. All those with an interest in the natural world -- beginning and experienced birders alike -- please join us.


Canada Goose 7
Mallard 24
Common Merganser 1 Observed preening on a rock upstream from the park visitors’ center.  Adults with young have been observed in this general location from time to time in years past. (Photo on eBird.)
duck sp. 1 Absolutely stumped by this fellow, photographed a significant distance away, in calm water above the falls. (Photo on eBird.)
Double-crested Cormorant 30
Great Blue Heron 15
Green Heron 1
Black Vulture 16
Turkey Vulture 9
Bald Eagle 1 Adult observed in flight near Conn Island - with several American Crows apparently mobbing it.
Mourning Dove 3
Yellow-billed Cuckoo 4
Chimney Swift 9
Red-bellied Woodpecker 2
Downy Woodpecker 4
Pileated Woodpecker 3
Eastern Wood-Pewee 3
Great Crested Flycatcher 7
Warbling Vireo 2 Heard
Blue Jay 14
American Crow  6
Fish Crow 1 Heard
crow sp. 7
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 14
Tree Swallow 6
Carolina Chickadee 8
Tufted Titmouse 6
White-breasted Nuthatch 2
Carolina Wren 9
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 2 Heard
Eastern Bluebird  4
Northern Parula  1
Chipping Sparrow  2
Song Sparrow 1 Heard
Northern Cardinal 10
Indigo Bunting 3
Orchard Oriole 3
Red-winged Blackbird 2
Common Grackle 4
American Goldfinch 7

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47212175

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)


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Date: 7/15/18 2:57 pm
From: David Young via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] (no subject)
I am currently out of town for the month and spending it in Cape May,NJ before moving up to Maine for August, how's that for non essential Information on the Va List, and I have no urge to report to you on Cape May birding, I'll put that on the Jersey site.
One consideration that I don't see mentioned in this mess of comments that are being made is the out of state birder who simply wants to efficiently look at multiple states to familiarize and develope a plan of birding. If I visit a states list and see thee sort through threads that have nothing to do with what is being seen and have zero to do with actual day to day birding in that state I move on. Individuals hopefully look for a quick reported synopsis of what is being SEEN recently in our State, not New Mexico or Maritimes or Galapagos.
I would be embarrassed to even recommend Virginia list to an out of state or new birder at this point , since it's bordering on useless. The guidelines are quite clear and the stated purpose of reporting is too. It's simple. If Va list is morphing into something else so be it but it is ashame. Visitors coming to Virginia should look elsewhere if they haven't already. I apologize for wasting space here as well but needed to add that aspect. Dave Young , Reston, Va - <Lcdyoung93...>

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Date: 7/15/18 2:14 pm
From: dcharlesl--- via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] American Avocet - Dyke Marsh/Belle Haven Picnic Area, Alexandria
There is an American Avocet on the mudflats being viewed from the northernmost parking area. It is currently on the far right end of the mudflats.

David Ledwith
Falls Church, VA
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Date: 7/15/18 2:01 pm
From: Vineeta Anand via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] A fabulous morning
For those who keep track of numbers, I apologize for my freewheeling style
of reporting sightings.
Here is an accounting:
1. Prothonotary warbler. Male. 1.
2. Common Yellowthroat. Heard. I don't know the sex.
3. Northern Flicker, 1. Male.
4. GBH, 4. Sex could not be determined. Rather, I'm not a good enough
birder to sex them. Yet.
5. The chicks were not GBH. They were mallards.
6. Eastern bluebirds. Two male.
7. A flock of mallard ducklings snapping up some smelly breakfast in the
mud. Possibly Green-winged teal.
8. Osprey. 1. Sex undetermined. Tired. Very hungry. And grumpy after not
catching any fish. At least not while I was there. It sat in a snag for an
awfully long time contemplating its next move.
9.The birds at Belle Haven Marina were osprey. One parent. Two fledged
chicks.
I promise to do a better job next time.
Vineeta

On Sun, Jul 15, 2018 at 4:08 PM, Vineeta Anand <vineetaa...> wrote:

> A friend and I were at Huntley Meadows from 8 a.m to a little after 10 a.m
> We were greeted by a Prothonotary warbler at the beginning of the
> boardwalk, and then we headed to see the Osprey and GBH catching breakfast.
> There were eight chicks near one of the GBH, and I assume they belonged to
> the one who was doing the hunt and peck, hunt and peck...
> There were the usual red-wing blackbirds, whom we ignored; two bluebirds
> at their separate nests--the first at the nest vacated by the Northern
> Flicker, the second in a snag near the beginning of the boardwalk; also a
> Common Yellowthroat singing away.
> A crow was harassing the Northern Flicker at its new nest in a snag, and I
> couldn't bear to watch after a while because the crow was sticking its craw
> where it doesn't belong. I realize they have to eat, and they have some
> redeeming qualities, but I'm no fan.
> There were other species of wildlife too but after the very animated
> debate about what belongs on this listserv, I will refrain from mentioning
> what they were. Email me if you want to know. It was a *very* good morning.
> Then, I headed to the Belle View Marina where the two chicks were feeding
> with one parent.
> Happy birding.
> Vineeta
>
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Date: 7/15/18 1:09 pm
From: Vineeta Anand via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] A fabulous morning
A friend and I were at Huntley Meadows from 8 a.m to a little after 10 a.m
We were greeted by a Prothonotary warbler at the beginning of the
boardwalk, and then we headed to see the Osprey and GBH catching breakfast.
There were eight chicks near one of the GBH, and I assume they belonged to
the one who was doing the hunt and peck, hunt and peck...
There were the usual red-wing blackbirds, whom we ignored; two bluebirds at
their separate nests--the first at the nest vacated by the Northern
Flicker, the second in a snag near the beginning of the boardwalk; also a
Common Yellowthroat singing away.
A crow was harassing the Northern Flicker at its new nest in a snag, and I
couldn't bear to watch after a while because the crow was sticking its craw
where it doesn't belong. I realize they have to eat, and they have some
redeeming qualities, but I'm no fan.
There were other species of wildlife too but after the very animated debate
about what belongs on this listserv, I will refrain from mentioning what
they were. Email me if you want to know. It was a *very* good morning.
Then, I headed to the Belle View Marina where the two chicks were feeding
with one parent.
Happy birding.
Vineeta
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Date: 7/15/18 10:08 am
From: Larry Cartwright via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Dyke Marsh walk and breeding birds
Nine people joined me today for the regular Dyke marsh Sunday morning walk,
conducted weekly at 8:00 AM except during the Christmas Bird Count season. A
scan of the river revealed the first Laughing Gull, at least for me of the
summer as well as the usual suspects of Mallards and Canada Geese. Evidence
of breeding consisted of fledged young from two Osprey nests, a Mallard hen
with two young roughly one week old, an Eastern Kingbird feeding a huge
dragonfly (a saddlebag I believe) to a fledged youngster, a meal that took
the young bird some time to consume, a family group of Tufted Titmice and
Carolina Wrens, the former with begging young, and finally a Gray Catbird
carrying food. The group was pleased at great views of a Brown Thrasher as
well.



Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve, Fairfax, Virginia, US Jul 15, 2018 7:58 AM -
11:00 AM

Protocol: Traveling

1.2 mile(s)

45 species



Canada Goose 140

Mallard 60 Includes a hen with two precocial young about 1 week old

Double-crested Cormorant 13

Great Blue Heron (Blue form) 2

Great Egret 1

Green Heron 1

Osprey 15 Includes fledged young from two nests

Bald Eagle 2

Spotted Sandpiper 1

Laughing Gull 1

Ring-billed Gull 11

Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 1

Mourning Dove 8

Chimney Swift 5

Ruby-throated Hummingbird 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker 4

Downy Woodpecker 3

Northern Flicker 1

Pileated Woodpecker 2

Great Crested Flycatcher 6

Eastern Kingbird 7 Includes an adult feeding a fledged young a
dragonfly

Warbling Vireo 8

Blue Jay 2

Fish Crow 4

Purple Martin 4

Tree Swallow 3

Barn Swallow 7

Carolina Chickadee 2

Tufted Titmouse 6 Includes a family group with at least two fledged
young

White-breasted Nuthatch 1

Carolina Wren 9 Includes a family group with at least one fledged young

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 2

American Robin 6

Gray Catbird 2 Includes one bird carrying food

Brown Thrasher 1

Northern Mockingbird 4

European Starling 20

Common Yellowthroat 4

Northern Cardinal 6

Orchard Oriole 3

Baltimore Oriole 2

Red-winged Blackbird 40

Common Grackle (Purple) 17

American Goldfinch 1

House Sparrow 4



View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47207704



This report was generated automatically by eBird v3
(http://ebird.org/content/atlasva)



Larry Cartwright

<prowarbler...> <mailto:<prowarbler...>



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Date: 7/15/18 9:07 am
From: m b via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] Subject: List guidelines from your administrator
Thank you! Now perhaps we can get back to the business at hand; birding!

Mb from nova

sent from my phone so please excuse all typos, gibberish, and horrifying misspellings

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Date: 7/15/18 8:30 am
From: m b via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Actual reading required on purpose of list
Just to be clear, what I in fact said about the VSO running this listserve was that to me, bird sightings include habitat and behavior. And that such information, as I see it, actually assists in people sighting birds. I also said that the VSO, in my view, by making the list about bird sightings, was not limiting the list to directing people straight to a bird, as if it was a tourist board directing people to a restaurant. That bird habitat and behavior information assists in sighting birds, and, as I see it, both are proper fodder for discussion on this list.

Before posting negative comments on someone else's posts (such as on mine in this case) I think it is helpful to actually read the post.

Here is my exact quote:

"And is "bird sightings" limited to its most narrow meaning, or does bird behavior and habitat, (loss, gain, or location) thus informing one where one most likely might sight a bird, and why, fall under the rubric of bird sighting? I would suggest it is the broader meaning. The list is run by the Virginia Society of Ornithology, not the local tourist board. It does not direct one to local restaurants. It helps people see birds, and will do less well at that task in the absence of context."

Remember, the original poster complained not only about trip postings outside of Virginia, but about postings of news or scientific articles on bird behavior. And the original poster posted both about bird habitat and behavior in his post complaining about people posting articles about bird habitat and behavior. (And trips)

Questions regarding how often hummingbirds get their bills stuck in screens, and die as a result, are questions on both bird behavior and habitat. Questions as to whether we should therefore move bird feeders further away from screens to avoid such deaths in future is also a habitat question.

Additionally, I would like to point out that we are supposed to be kind and decent adults. To me that does not include publicly excoriating someone who has innocently posted something you may not wish to read. The number of posts about trips outside of the region has been very few. In recent months I can remember possibly three.

The original poster complained immediately after there was a post about a trip to the Canadian Maritimes. I happened to find that post very informative, as I was considering a trip there. But that aside, as far as I'm concerned, the poster of the information about that trip did not need to be publicly upbraided for daring to post something bird related, that many on this list post once in a while, and that many others find informative. Even if someone forgot to label their post "extralimital", the subject line clearly informed that it was.

Also, in my view, the poster of the article regarding barn owls did not need to be publicly upbraided for daring to post an article about behavior of birds that, in fact, do nest in Virginia. I found that article very interesting, but again, my personal interests aside, complaining about what one does not want to read, instead of expressing gratitude for seeing a bird because of someone else taking the time to post, in my view, is the more useful commentary.

We also have a wonderful moderator who can take care of any posts that are deemed to be far enough off-topic as to need removing. If the moderator decides that the occasional trip post, short, and limited to a link to the information for those who are interested, is so far off the purpose of the list that it needs to be removed, it will be removed.

I don't think individual members need to be policing what goes on the list unless it is something so clearly far off the topic as to be an advertisement for protein shakes or something of the like. Unless we are being spammed, in my view there is no need for unkindness.

I personally did not intend to say more on this topic, but as I was so badly and hilariously misquoted, I thought I'd respond. I hope we can get back to the business of birding. And that people will judiciously use the digest, and if necessary the delete button, to deal with posts they do not wish to read. And my personal hope is that people will post more gratitude and fewer complaints.

Best to all, and happy birding.

Mb from nova


sent from my phone so please excuse all typos, gibberish, and horrifying misspellings

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Date: 7/15/18 7:55 am
From: Russell Taylor via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Fwd: [Va-bird] List guidelines from your administrator
For reference, here are the VA Bird list guidelines. Please stop the
discussion of the list purpose and scope.
Thanks,
Russ Taylor

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Spears, David (DMME) via va-bird <va-bird...>
Date: Fri, Mar 16, 2018 at 12:19 PM
Subject: [Va-bird] List guidelines from your administrator
To: "<va-bird...>" <va-bird...>


Kevin in Reston reminds me that I haven't distributed the VA-Bird list
guidelines in quite some time. These were developed when the Virginia
Society of Ornithology first adopted this list in 2007. Note that the
guidelines do not require the posting of the exact locations of birds, and
in fact discourage the posting of exact locations for birds that might be
disturbed by undue attention and for rare birds on private land. Most
people who find a "good bird" in a place accessible to the public do a
pretty good job of describing the location, so this notice is just a
reminder of the VSO's intent in maintaining this list.

The guidelines are below.

David Spears
VA-Bird List Administrator for the Virginia Society of Ornithology

VA-Bird List Guidelines

1. The primary purpose of this list is to share interesting sightings of
wild birds in Virginia with other birders.

2. Questions and limited discussions on topics such as bird behavior,
identification, conservation, and distribution, especially as these
subjects relate to birds in Virginia, are allowed at the discretion of the
List Moderator. Announcements of noncommercial birding events, such as
bird walks or bird-a-thons, are allowed. If you have a question about
whether or not a particular subject is appropriate, please first seek
permission from the List Moderator at <va-bird-owner...><mailto:
<va-bird-owner...>

3. The welfare of birds and their habitat should always come first.
Carefully consider the implications of posting the exact location of a bird
that might be disturbed by undue attention. If you find a rare bird on
private land, do not post its exact location unless you have explicit
permission from the landowner to do so. If in doubt, please refer to the
VSO's Principles of Birding Ethics -
http://www.virginiabirds.org/publications/birding-ethics/

4. The preferred way to post a sighting is to list the common name of the
species and the general location in the subject line, for example, "Barn
Owl, Louisa County". If the report is of an exceptionally rare bird,
please post the common name in ALL CAPS, for example, "BROWN BOOBY, Pulaski
County".

5. Please sign all posts with your name and general address, for example,
David Spears
Dillwyn, VA

6. Personal attacks and abusive language are absolutely forbidden. Anyone
making such statements will be immediately removed from the list.

7. Personal messages or private replies to a single list member should not
be sent to the entire list. Check your destination address before sending
your message.

8. Commercial, religious, or politically charged messages as well as any
offensive material are absolutely prohibited.

9. Do not direct subscription-related questions to the list. Changes to
your settings can be made with your password on the list website -
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird

10. DELETE KEY. The subscribers of Va-Bird are a diverse group, but we're
all here for the same reason: we love birds and birding. If a particular
posting or thread is bothersome to you, use your DELETE KEY first. If it
continues to bother you, CONTACT THE LISTOWNER at
<va-bird-owner...><mailto:<va-bird-owner...>. Let the
listowner or moderator determine what is appropriate or inappropriate for
the list.

11. If any subscriber feels that another subscriber is violating any of
the list rules, do not direct comments to the entire list. Any comments or
concerns should be directed to <va-bird-owner...><mailto:
<va-bird-owner...>.

12. The List Moderator retains the right to permanently reject postings by
anyone who violates these rules. Except in extreme cases, removal from the
list will not take place without giving the subscriber a warning.
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Date: 7/15/18 7:36 am
From: Peggy Welty via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] purpose of list
I am a novice birder and came to this list via the Loudoun bird list when it was discontinued. I would be really disappointed if the “localness” of this lists sightings stopped. I try to check it each morning to see what’s happening near by. And I also appreciate sightings of unusual birds even if they are a few hours away. One of my special birding memories for me my children was because of this list. A Snowy Owl had been hanging out in Harrisonburg a few years ago. I loaded the kids in the van and we headed out. We got to see the owl thanks to other birders who had better high powered equipment than we did and they were more than willing to share. My children still talk about that adventure.

I vote for keeping things as they are and I don’t mind when the talk drifts onto other nature study talk. When it gets a little too preachy for me I just close the email. No big deal. I love nature sightings and try to share this excitement with my children. This list has been a great help. In fact, I wish someone would share an otter sighting in Loudoun!

Thank you to all who are willing to share your knowledge and love of creation:)
Peggy

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 7/14/18 5:10 pm
From: Marlene A Condon via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] purpose of list
Hi Steve,
 
Perhaps being "in the minority" suggests most folks like the way the list serve is working, and it's a bit hard to argue with that.  That is, if the list serve exists for birders and most of them are happy with it, then perhaps "it ain't broke" and needs no fixing, especially as the folks who think it does need fixing admit they participate in the very things they are dissing!
 
Sincerely,
Marlene      
 
In a message dated 7/14/2018 2:59:40 PM US Eastern Standard Time, <va-bird...> writes:

 

I have read all of the recent posts on this topic and thought about the points made in each one. I was not going to add to the discussion; however I seem to be in the minority, exemplified by Mike Stinson's post. And so I want to speak up.

As one person pointed out, the list is sponsored by the VSO. But in a classic case of argument by false dichotomy, that was equated with "so the list is not for local / regional interests." Of course it is. It's not sponsored by the ABA or by any worldwide organization. The first word in our sponsor organization's name, which apparently we need to point out here, is "Virginia".

Birds that have been sighted in Virginia, might be sighted in Virginia, were formerly sighted in Virginia, etc. That is the obvious meaning of the charter without resorting to grammatical cleverness.

There are dozens (at least) of forums and listservs for national and international bird sightings and news. Three of them (at least) are associated with, and can be found online by searching for, Cornell, ABA, and BirdLife. I recommend them for the purpose of sharing cool bird facts and news, and extra-limital sightings.

Having said that, I do myself occasionally make extra-limital and off-topic posts here. I try to do so very seldom, and only when I really need to for some reason. I always mark them "extra-limital" in the subject line, and always ask people to reply directly to me, off the list.

Thank you for hearing my vote to keep the "VA" in VA-Bird.

Steve Johnson
Fairfax, Virginia


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Date: 7/14/18 2:12 pm
From: Donald Sweig via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] MISSISSIPPI KITES
I drove over to the area around Green Spring Gardens Park in Fairfax County this morning to look for a Mississippi kite. And I found one. It appeared to be a male and I watched it soaring, flying, occasionally hunting at various altitudes, in and out of the trees for about an hour. At one point, a second adult kite appeared in the same area of the sky (there was no interaction); they both flew around for about two minutes and then the second kite disappeared. I did not notice any feather molt on either bird. However, the upperwing coverts, close to the body, were prominently very light-gray or white on the soaring male kite. More than I remember seeing on other flying Mississippi kites. At no point did I see any evidence of hunting and/or returning to a nest with food/prey.
I do not know where the nest is this year. It is surely not where it was the last two years. I did not get out of the car and walk around to try to find the nest as I’m still recovering from some surgery.
I mostly watched the birds from the car, but had good looks nonetheless.
It’s always fun to see an adult Mississippi kite float around in the sky. And a nice birthday treat as well!
Donald Sweig
Falls Church,Virginia


Sent from my iPad
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Date: 7/14/18 12:45 pm
From: Scott Priebe via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] purpose of list
If I recall correctly, sightings close to Virginia in adjacent states are also within scope.
A current example is a Roseate Spoonbill in Maryland (Pautuxent). For those who are not monitoring eBird sightings, reporting such a relatively nearby sighting on va-bird might be welcome.

Scott D. Priebe
Springfield, VA

________________________________
From: VA-bird <va-bird-bounces+falco57=<msn.com...> on behalf of David Gibson via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2018 3:40 PM
To: Steve Johnson
Cc: VA-BIRD
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] purpose of list

Steve, I think then it's fair to say that each of us can occasionally make
extralimital and off-topic posts here (that hopefully relate to some aspect
of birding in VA). If I'm reading everything correctly, I think that that's
what some folks would like to do. So I don't really see a problem, then. I
could be wrong, but that's how I see it. Best--and best to all, Dave
Gibson, Chesapeake, VA

Dave Gibson
www.elizabethriver.org/wildlife-reports<http://www.elizabethriver.org/wildlife-reports>

On Sat, Jul 14, 2018 at 2:59 PM, Steve Johnson via VA-bird <
<va-bird...> wrote:

>
> I have read all of the recent posts on this topic and thought about the
> points made in each one. I was not going to add to the discussion; however
> I seem to be in the minority, exemplified by Mike Stinson's post. And so I
> want to speak up.
>
> As one person pointed out, the list is sponsored by the VSO. But in a
> classic case of argument by false dichotomy, that was equated with "so the
> list is not for local / regional interests." Of course it is. It's not
> sponsored by the ABA or by any worldwide organization. The first word in
> our sponsor organization's name, which apparently we need to point out
> here, is "Virginia".
>
> Birds that have been sighted in Virginia, might be sighted in Virginia,
> were formerly sighted in Virginia, etc. That is the obvious meaning of the
> charter without resorting to grammatical cleverness.
>
> There are dozens (at least) of forums and listservs for national and
> international bird sightings and news. Three of them (at least) are
> associated with, and can be found online by searching for, Cornell, ABA,
> and BirdLife. I recommend them for the purpose of sharing cool bird facts
> and news, and extra-limital sightings.
>
> Having said that, I do myself occasionally make extra-limital and
> off-topic posts here. I try to do so very seldom, and only when I really
> need to for some reason. I always mark them "extra-limital" in the subject
> line, and always ask people to reply directly to me, off the list.
>
> Thank you for hearing my vote to keep the "VA" in VA-Bird.
>
> Steve Johnson
> Fairfax, Virginia
>
>
> *** You are subscribed to VA-bird as <20cabot...> If you wish to
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
>
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Date: 7/14/18 12:40 pm
From: David Gibson via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] purpose of list
Steve, I think then it's fair to say that each of us can occasionally make
extralimital and off-topic posts here (that hopefully relate to some aspect
of birding in VA). If I'm reading everything correctly, I think that that's
what some folks would like to do. So I don't really see a problem, then. I
could be wrong, but that's how I see it. Best--and best to all, Dave
Gibson, Chesapeake, VA

Dave Gibson
www.elizabethriver.org/wildlife-reports

On Sat, Jul 14, 2018 at 2:59 PM, Steve Johnson via VA-bird <
<va-bird...> wrote:

>
> I have read all of the recent posts on this topic and thought about the
> points made in each one. I was not going to add to the discussion; however
> I seem to be in the minority, exemplified by Mike Stinson's post. And so I
> want to speak up.
>
> As one person pointed out, the list is sponsored by the VSO. But in a
> classic case of argument by false dichotomy, that was equated with "so the
> list is not for local / regional interests." Of course it is. It's not
> sponsored by the ABA or by any worldwide organization. The first word in
> our sponsor organization's name, which apparently we need to point out
> here, is "Virginia".
>
> Birds that have been sighted in Virginia, might be sighted in Virginia,
> were formerly sighted in Virginia, etc. That is the obvious meaning of the
> charter without resorting to grammatical cleverness.
>
> There are dozens (at least) of forums and listservs for national and
> international bird sightings and news. Three of them (at least) are
> associated with, and can be found online by searching for, Cornell, ABA,
> and BirdLife. I recommend them for the purpose of sharing cool bird facts
> and news, and extra-limital sightings.
>
> Having said that, I do myself occasionally make extra-limital and
> off-topic posts here. I try to do so very seldom, and only when I really
> need to for some reason. I always mark them "extra-limital" in the subject
> line, and always ask people to reply directly to me, off the list.
>
> Thank you for hearing my vote to keep the "VA" in VA-Bird.
>
> Steve Johnson
> Fairfax, Virginia
>
>
> *** You are subscribed to VA-bird as <20cabot...> If you wish to
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
>
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Date: 7/14/18 11:59 am
From: Steve Johnson via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] purpose of list

I have read all of the recent posts on this topic and thought about the points made in each one. I was not going to add to the discussion; however I seem to be in the minority, exemplified by Mike Stinson's post. And so I want to speak up.

As one person pointed out, the list is sponsored by the VSO. But in a classic case of argument by false dichotomy, that was equated with "so the list is not for local / regional interests." Of course it is. It's not sponsored by the ABA or by any worldwide organization. The first word in our sponsor organization's name, which apparently we need to point out here, is "Virginia".

Birds that have been sighted in Virginia, might be sighted in Virginia, were formerly sighted in Virginia, etc. That is the obvious meaning of the charter without resorting to grammatical cleverness.

There are dozens (at least) of forums and listservs for national and international bird sightings and news. Three of them (at least) are associated with, and can be found online by searching for, Cornell, ABA, and BirdLife. I recommend them for the purpose of sharing cool bird facts and news, and extra-limital sightings.

Having said that, I do myself occasionally make extra-limital and off-topic posts here. I try to do so very seldom, and only when I really need to for some reason. I always mark them "extra-limital" in the subject line, and always ask people to reply directly to me, off the list.

Thank you for hearing my vote to keep the "VA" in VA-Bird.

Steve Johnson
Fairfax, Virginia


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Date: 7/14/18 11:47 am
From: Jeff Blalock via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] eBird -- Staunton View Public Use Area -- Jul 14, 2018
Greetings all

Went to Staunton View Public Use Area this morning to look for shorebirds and found Spotted Sandpipers and a Caspian Tern.

But the best was two American Avocets flying down the Staunton River towards Clarksville.

Staunton View Public Use Area
Jul 14, 2018
6:30 AM
Traveling
0.25 miles
110 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.6.5 Build 36

8 Canada Goose
11 Wood Duck -- 4 Adults - of which one adult was with 7 chicks about 2 weeks old.
4 Double-crested Cormorant
6 Great Blue Heron (Blue form) -- Saw one Immature but at this time of year it could have been from anywhere.
5 Great Egret
3 Osprey
4 Bald Eagle -- 1 - Adult 2 - Juvenile 1 - Immature Too early in year for winter birds to show up therefore the 2 Juvenile are from nearby nest.
2 American Avocet -- Large mostly white shorebird with black and white upper wing pattern and white tail feathers. Birds flew from up the Staunton River and went by me and kept flying down river to Clarksville
13 Killdeer
4 Spotted Sandpiper
1 Caspian Tern
3 Mourning Dove
3 Yellow-billed Cuckoo
1 Great Crested Flycatcher
2 White-eyed Vireo
1 Red-eyed Vireo
3 American Crow -- Heard young American Crows calling.
2 Carolina Chickadee
2 Tufted Titmouse
3 Carolina Wren
6 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
2 Eastern Bluebird
1 Ovenbird
1 Eastern Towhee
3 Northern Cardinal
1 Red-winged Blackbird
2 Common Grackle
3 American Goldfinch

Number of Taxa: 28

Good Birding Always

From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>



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Date: 7/13/18 1:41 pm
From: krae1010--- via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Riverbend Park Bird Walk, 07/13/2018
Following is the tally from the July 13 bird walk at Riverbend Park, which identified 23 species and included six participants. Cormorants and Great Blue Herons were in abundance, loafing along the lazy river, and a male Indigo Bunting spent a few minutes showing off for the group in full sun. The route began at the Visitors' Center and comprised sections of the River/Potomac Heritage Trail, the Hollows Trail, and Madison's Escape Trail. The next walk will meet at 8:00 a.m. on Saturday, July 21st, in the parking lot at the Riverbend Park Nature Center (note - not the Visitors' Center); please contact Riverbend Park on 703-759-9018 to register. As the route varies from one outing to the next, participants should be prepared to walk about 2 miles in comfortable, closed-toed shoes. There likely will be gentle uphill and downhill stretches on slightly uneven terrain. All those with an interest in the natural world - beginning or experienced birders - please join us.
Canada Goose 2
Mallard 6
Double-crested Cormorant 50
Great Blue Heron 10
Mourning Dove 5
Yellow-billed Cuckoo 1 Heard
Red-bellied Woodpecker 3
Downy Woodpecker 4
Pileated Woodpecker 1
Eastern Wood-Pewee 9 Heard
Acadian Flycatcher 5
Great Crested Flycatcher 1 Heard
Red-eyed Vireo 7 Heard
Blue Jay 5
Carolina Chickadee 6 Heard
Tufted Titmouse 3 Heard
White-breasted Nuthatch 5 Heard
Carolina Wren 9
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 2 Heard
Wood Thrush 2 Heard
Northern Parula 1 Heard
Northern Cardinal 4
Indigo Bunting 2

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47168554

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

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Date: 7/12/18 6:12 pm
From: Dolores Keeler via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Request for informaton
I sincerely hope this request is acceptable for va-bird.

I plan to visit Meadowood Recreation Area in Lorton, VA but would like to duplicate the trails taken on a trip I attended with the Northern Virginia Bird club in May of 2013. The e-bird report for that trip states that the group walked the Hidden Pond "Loop". I visited the site last week. I found Hidden Pond easily. From the pond, I followed a trail that led to a meadow. At that point, I could not figure out what might constitute the "Hidden Pond Loop.

If anyone can give me information on trails to follow from Hidden Pond, I would be very grateful.

Please answer me directly.

Lori Keeler



Lori Keeler
Alexandria
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Date: 7/12/18 6:56 am
From: Marc Ribaudo via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Least bitterns, Neabsco Creek
I heard and saw 3 least bitterns during a 15 minute stop at Neabsco Creek in Woodbridge this morning.  One was calling from the vegetation close to the road.  Two more were flying over the marsh. 

Marc Ribaudo

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE Droid
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Date: 7/11/18 6:35 pm
From: Patrick Malone via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] extra-territorial -- bird expedition in northern NM
Encouraged by Marla’s recent post, I am posting this album of photos taken on a recent half-day expedition in NM - the Galisteo bosque, a tiny patch of woods south of Santa Fe, and the Pecos River area east of Santa Fe.

https://flic.kr/s/aHsmnXZ1dP

The cliff swallows that you will see in the Pecos River pix are on a ranch south of the town of the same name - very interesting nests made from mud and bird spit. Among other creatures I got several shots of a violet-green swallow and baby in a tree hollow nest and a very pretty little bird i’d never heard of called a yellow-breasted chat.

If anyone takes a trip to northern NM — non-stop flights from BWI to ABQ! - let me know and I will put you in touch with my fabulous bird guide Bill West who knows all the cool spots.


Patrick Malone
<pmalone...>



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Date: 7/11/18 6:16 pm
From: David Gibson via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] interesting bird sightings and grammar
I want to second what David said. Marlabeth shared some great insights, and
provided real food for thought. Kudos to her--and what a pleasure reading!

Dave Gibson
www.elizabethriver.org/wildlife-reports

On Wed, Jul 11, 2018 at 7:48 PM, David White via VA-bird <
<va-bird...> wrote:

> Thank you. Your opinion and your willingness to express it so “reasonably”
> and in such a reasoned way is appreciated.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> David I. White, Jr.
> <dizoo...>
>
> > On Jul 11, 2018, at 11:20 AM, Vineeta Anand via VA-bird <
> <va-bird...> wrote:
> >
> > Hear, hear, Marla!
> > I came late to birding, so I am happy to learn as much as I can about
> bird
> > behavior and habitat. I also find the travel information invaluable I go
> on
> > a birding trip in India every year. But I don't post any information
> about
> > the places I go to, the guides I used, the places I stayed at, because I
> > think the distance makes it unlikely that many people from the VA bird
> list
> > would find that interesting.
> > The delete button works as it was intended.
> > So, I say if it ain't broke, don't fix it.
> >
> > Vineeta Anand in Alexandria.
> >
> >
> > On Wed, Jul 11, 2018 at 10:50 AM, m b via VA-bird <va-bird...>
> >
> > wrote:
> >
> >> I suppose it could be said that the meaning of: “Va-bird is a forum for
> >> reporting interesting bird sightings in Virginia” is the same as:
> >>
> >>
> >> “VA-bird is a forum in Virginia for reporting interesting bird
> sightings.”
> >>
> >> Grammar – does the placement of the clause change the meaning? And is
> >> "bird sightings" limited to its most narrow meaning, or does bird
> behavior
> >> and habitat, (loss, gain, or location) thus informing one where one most
> >> likely might sight a bird, and why, fall under the rubric of bird
> sighting?
> >> I would suggest it is the broader meaning. The list is run by the
> Virginia
> >> Society of Ornithology, not the local tourist board. It does not direct
> one
> >> to local restaurants. It helps people see birds, and will do less well
> at
> >> that task in the absence of context.
> >>
> >> If the grammar does change the meaning, and the VSO has an unbelievably
> >> narrow mandate for this list, how picky must we readers be, when we have
> >> the wonderful "delete" button, and can simply delete those emails in
> which
> >> we are uninterested? I think that is what the delete button is for. Not
> >> reading things one has no interest in reading. And subject headings on
> this
> >> list are usually quite clear enough for one to decide if one is
> interested,
> >> without ever clicking on "open".
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> If one feels inundated by email, on birds or any topic, the digest is a
> >> great way to find out what is happening on VA-Bird without receiving
> >> multiple emails per day on bird-related topics. Then one can just scroll
> >> through the digest, and click on only those things one finds
> interesting.
> >> Also, just bookmarking the page and scrolling through every day or two
> is a
> >> great way to keep up with what is happening without receiving too many
> >> emails, whatever that number is for a given person. I think yesterday,
> >> there were three total posts. Not a burden, even if one does not get the
> >> digest format.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> I have been very grateful to be able to post from Puerto Rico when I was
> >> having unexpected last minute difficulty getting a bird guide, and
> received
> >> many kind and immediate responses from VA-bird list members as to whom
> to
> >> contact, as many people had birded there and knew members of the Puerto
> >> Rico Society of Ornithology. Were it not for the kind and generous
> people
> >> of Va-Bird, I might not have found an available guide while on my trip,
> >> though I had done much research toward that end before I left. Thank you
> >> again to all those who assisted me in my time of birding need.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> I am definitely very grateful when someone posts an article about bird
> >> behavior. Normally, as in this recent case about barn owls, the birds
> >> posted about are birds found in Virginia. Many migrating birds find
> their
> >> way through Virginia, so unless the post is about a ground hornbill, the
> >> likelihood that the article is pertinent to Virginia, or birds ever
> found
> >> in Virginia, is quite high.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> I am also grateful when someone posts about a trip. I can ignore those,
> or
> >> use them. As with the most recent trip post, I learned not only what I
> had
> >> suspected in recently considering a trip to the Canadian Maritimes,
> (I’ve
> >> been to New Brunswick, but was considering Cape Breton) which is that I
> >> will likely not see many life birds. I also learned where best to go to
> see
> >> the ones I have not seen. Almost every bird mentioned in that post is
> seen
> >> in Virginia, either because it breeds here like yellow warblers, or
> because
> >> it migrates through. And I benefited from months of research done by a
> >> fellow member of VA-Bird. Thank you for that!
> >>
> >>
> >> The trip posts are rare enough that they do not interfere with the list
> in
> >> my view. And they can be so helpful if a Virginia birder is planning or
> >> considering going to that spot to bird, that I would miss them terribly.
> >> And I don't read every one. In fact, I read very few, but the ones I
> read
> >> have helped immeasurably. Again, the digest and that good ole' delete
> >> button solve the issue for me.
> >>
> >>
> >> Finally, the term "extralimital" before the post is often used on bird
> >> lists such as these to indicate a post slightly off topic, but of
> interest
> >> to many readers. This alerts one, if one can't already tell by the
> posted
> >> topic heading, that this might or might not be of interest. Just like it
> >> might or might not be of interest to me if an interesting bird was
> sighted
> >> at the VA-/North Carolina border, 8 hours from my home. That post would
> >> unquestionably be under the very narrow rubric of birds sighted in
> >> Virginia, but it is not of interest to me.
> >>
> >>
> >> This list has been operating just fine, for a very long time, with
> people
> >> using the delete button and digest combination to avoid reading things
> in
> >> which they are not interested. I see the meaning of the stated purpose
> of
> >> the list as the broader view I suggest above. The Society and most of
> its
> >> members are interested in bird habitat, behavior, and not just getting
> >> directions to a possible bird they might be able to see if they chase it
> >> down. This is not the "big year" direction list. It is a Virginia forum
> in
> >> which people exchange information about birds. If one wants the last
> known
> >> sighting of a given bird, I think e-bird is a good place for that.
> >>
> >>
> >> The list as it is currently used has been a blessing and a benefit to
> many
> >> of us who have gained much by the few "extralimital" posts. I highly
> >> recommend the delete button and the digest format to deal with one's own
> >> preferences.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> *** You are subscribed to VA-bird as <vineetaa...> If you wish to
> >> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> >> https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
> >>
> > *** You are subscribed to VA-bird as <dizoo...> If you wish to
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
>
> *** You are subscribed to VA-bird as <20cabot...> If you wish to
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
>
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Date: 7/11/18 4:48 pm
From: David White via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] interesting bird sightings and grammar
Thank you. Your opinion and your willingness to express it so “reasonably” and in such a reasoned way is appreciated.

Sent from my iPhone
David I. White, Jr.
<dizoo...>

> On Jul 11, 2018, at 11:20 AM, Vineeta Anand via VA-bird <va-bird...> wrote:
>
> Hear, hear, Marla!
> I came late to birding, so I am happy to learn as much as I can about bird
> behavior and habitat. I also find the travel information invaluable I go on
> a birding trip in India every year. But I don't post any information about
> the places I go to, the guides I used, the places I stayed at, because I
> think the distance makes it unlikely that many people from the VA bird list
> would find that interesting.
> The delete button works as it was intended.
> So, I say if it ain't broke, don't fix it.
>
> Vineeta Anand in Alexandria.
>
>
> On Wed, Jul 11, 2018 at 10:50 AM, m b via VA-bird <va-bird...>
> wrote:
>
>> I suppose it could be said that the meaning of: “Va-bird is a forum for
>> reporting interesting bird sightings in Virginia” is the same as:
>>
>>
>> “VA-bird is a forum in Virginia for reporting interesting bird sightings.”
>>
>> Grammar – does the placement of the clause change the meaning? And is
>> "bird sightings" limited to its most narrow meaning, or does bird behavior
>> and habitat, (loss, gain, or location) thus informing one where one most
>> likely might sight a bird, and why, fall under the rubric of bird sighting?
>> I would suggest it is the broader meaning. The list is run by the Virginia
>> Society of Ornithology, not the local tourist board. It does not direct one
>> to local restaurants. It helps people see birds, and will do less well at
>> that task in the absence of context.
>>
>> If the grammar does change the meaning, and the VSO has an unbelievably
>> narrow mandate for this list, how picky must we readers be, when we have
>> the wonderful "delete" button, and can simply delete those emails in which
>> we are uninterested? I think that is what the delete button is for. Not
>> reading things one has no interest in reading. And subject headings on this
>> list are usually quite clear enough for one to decide if one is interested,
>> without ever clicking on "open".
>>
>>
>>
>> If one feels inundated by email, on birds or any topic, the digest is a
>> great way to find out what is happening on VA-Bird without receiving
>> multiple emails per day on bird-related topics. Then one can just scroll
>> through the digest, and click on only those things one finds interesting.
>> Also, just bookmarking the page and scrolling through every day or two is a
>> great way to keep up with what is happening without receiving too many
>> emails, whatever that number is for a given person. I think yesterday,
>> there were three total posts. Not a burden, even if one does not get the
>> digest format.
>>
>>
>>
>> I have been very grateful to be able to post from Puerto Rico when I was
>> having unexpected last minute difficulty getting a bird guide, and received
>> many kind and immediate responses from VA-bird list members as to whom to
>> contact, as many people had birded there and knew members of the Puerto
>> Rico Society of Ornithology. Were it not for the kind and generous people
>> of Va-Bird, I might not have found an available guide while on my trip,
>> though I had done much research toward that end before I left. Thank you
>> again to all those who assisted me in my time of birding need.
>>
>>
>>
>> I am definitely very grateful when someone posts an article about bird
>> behavior. Normally, as in this recent case about barn owls, the birds
>> posted about are birds found in Virginia. Many migrating birds find their
>> way through Virginia, so unless the post is about a ground hornbill, the
>> likelihood that the article is pertinent to Virginia, or birds ever found
>> in Virginia, is quite high.
>>
>>
>>
>> I am also grateful when someone posts about a trip. I can ignore those, or
>> use them. As with the most recent trip post, I learned not only what I had
>> suspected in recently considering a trip to the Canadian Maritimes, (I’ve
>> been to New Brunswick, but was considering Cape Breton) which is that I
>> will likely not see many life birds. I also learned where best to go to see
>> the ones I have not seen. Almost every bird mentioned in that post is seen
>> in Virginia, either because it breeds here like yellow warblers, or because
>> it migrates through. And I benefited from months of research done by a
>> fellow member of VA-Bird. Thank you for that!
>>
>>
>> The trip posts are rare enough that they do not interfere with the list in
>> my view. And they can be so helpful if a Virginia birder is planning or
>> considering going to that spot to bird, that I would miss them terribly.
>> And I don't read every one. In fact, I read very few, but the ones I read
>> have helped immeasurably. Again, the digest and that good ole' delete
>> button solve the issue for me.
>>
>>
>> Finally, the term "extralimital" before the post is often used on bird
>> lists such as these to indicate a post slightly off topic, but of interest
>> to many readers. This alerts one, if one can't already tell by the posted
>> topic heading, that this might or might not be of interest. Just like it
>> might or might not be of interest to me if an interesting bird was sighted
>> at the VA-/North Carolina border, 8 hours from my home. That post would
>> unquestionably be under the very narrow rubric of birds sighted in
>> Virginia, but it is not of interest to me.
>>
>>
>> This list has been operating just fine, for a very long time, with people
>> using the delete button and digest combination to avoid reading things in
>> which they are not interested. I see the meaning of the stated purpose of
>> the list as the broader view I suggest above. The Society and most of its
>> members are interested in bird habitat, behavior, and not just getting
>> directions to a possible bird they might be able to see if they chase it
>> down. This is not the "big year" direction list. It is a Virginia forum in
>> which people exchange information about birds. If one wants the last known
>> sighting of a given bird, I think e-bird is a good place for that.
>>
>>
>> The list as it is currently used has been a blessing and a benefit to many
>> of us who have gained much by the few "extralimital" posts. I highly
>> recommend the delete button and the digest format to deal with one's own
>> preferences.
>>
>>
>>
>> *** You are subscribed to VA-bird as <vineetaa...> If you wish to
>> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
>> https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
>>
> *** You are subscribed to VA-bird as <dizoo...> If you wish to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***

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Date: 7/11/18 12:15 pm
From: m b via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Further reflections on interesting bird sightings and grammar
The funny thing is, if you think about it, the question of "I wonder how often this happens" regarding hummingbirds stuck in screens is actually outside the narrow realm of strictly "Virginia bird sightings".

Because how often hummingbirds get their bills stuck in screens is a bird behavioral issue. And a habitat issue.

And if we were then to further discuss the question of: "should hummingbird feeders be placed further away from screens, to avoid this problem in future", that would not only be a bird behavioral and habitat issue but a human behavioral issue. Neither of those things are specifically, narrowly, to do with the sighting of a bird.

I think this clearly speaks in support of a reasonably broad interpretation of the purpose of this list. The idea that someone would be off-topic if they asked either of those questions, upon being shown a dead hummingbird which got its bill caught in a house screen, is really unnecessarily limiting, in my view.

Bird habitat, bird behavior, dangers to birds, and extralimital info on where to see birds not in Virginia, for those Virginians who might wish to do so, (and might wish to be spared months of research,) I think are all wonderful parts of this list; information to which I always look forward to receiving.

Mb from NoVa




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Date: 7/11/18 9:42 am
From: Claire Kluskens via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] purpose of list; immature Red-eyed Vireo (Culpeper)
In addition, this listserv should serve as a means to connect and bring Virginia birders together, not to divide us…

…. and for the bird, Kurt Gaskill and I found a very young immature Red-eyed Vireo while working on the Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas II in Richardsville SE in Culpeper County on Saturday, July 7, 2018. Checklist with photos at https://ebird.org/atlasva/view/checklist/S47052645 <https://ebird.org/atlasva/view/checklist/S47052645>

Claire Kluskens
Alexandria/Fairfax Co.

> On Jul 11, 2018, at 12:29 PM, Shea Tiller via VA-bird <va-bird...> wrote:
>
> Greetings all.
>
> Can I offer a thought on this discussion?
>
> Groups on Facebook (and communities on other social media) may not seem
> like an option to some people due to the excessive amounts of data
> collection that Facebook engages in, and the commitment to using that form
> of social media. Otherwise, the Facebook groups would be a great solution
> for everyone.
>
> Shea
>
> On Wed, Jul 11, 2018 at 11:14 AM Janice Frye via VA-bird <
> <va-bird...> wrote:
>
>> Facebook. There are multiple groups for bird ID, Birding _________ for
>> other Virginia and states, VABBA2, multiple groups for organizations,
>> groups like Birding California and the West, etc. No need to violate the [remainder deleted]….

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Date: 7/11/18 9:35 am
From: Shea Tiller via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] purpose of list; dead male RTHU
Greetings all.

Can I offer a thought on this discussion?

Groups on Facebook (and communities on other social media) may not seem
like an option to some people due to the excessive amounts of data
collection that Facebook engages in, and the commitment to using that form
of social media. Otherwise, the Facebook groups would be a great solution
for everyone.

Shea

On Wed, Jul 11, 2018 at 11:14 AM Janice Frye via VA-bird <
<va-bird...> wrote:

> Facebook. There are multiple groups for bird ID, Birding _________ for
> other Virginia and states, VABBA2, multiple groups for organizations,
> groups like Birding California and the West, etc. No need to violate the
> rules for a listserve, and do please read group rules and descriptions.
> What's This Bird? IS on Facebook (also Reddit, but I wouldn't recommend it
> after a quick look), so you kinda answered your own query. Type in a
> search phrase like "bird id" or "birding Canada" on Facebook and you get
> useful sites filled with people who want to be there. Just spend a little
> time learning the personality of the group before posting anything. Some
> are very serious, some laid back. And please, please, please-- do not
> expect seriousness from the groups devoted to mis-identification or memes.
> Do bring a sense of humor though.
>
> Another thing you might try is keeping a special mailing list of people
> interested in certain regions or any travel and send them write ups of your
> trips. I have a treasured friendship with someone who does this, and
> really enjoy reading them. Know that many of us delete digests and replies
> to digests without even looking at them because so many do not heed the
> instructions. Most of us are short on time.
>
> Jan Frye
> Richmond
>
>
> On Wed, Jul 11, 2018, 9:48 AM Marshall Faintich via VA-bird <
> <va-bird...> wrote:
>
> > Mike Stinson posted:
> >
> >
> >
> > "The information page for this list
> >
> > ( at https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird )
> states
> > that "Va-bird is a forum for reporting interesting bird sightings in
> >
> > Virginia."
> >
> > Not interesting bird sightings from somewhere else.
> >
> > Not articles about birds that you happen to run across.
> >
> > Not a report on a vacation to somewhere else besides Virginia.
> >
> > Not a forum for political discussions.
> >
> > I get enough email about birds and other things that I'd really rather
> not
> > have any extra messages from Va-bird that don't fit the stated purpose of
> > the list. . ."
> >
> >
> >
> > I recently posted a trip report to the Canadian Maritime Provinces, and
> on
> > one hand, do understand that it was out of scope for the VA-bird list
> > server. On the other hand, however, I have received more than a dozen
> > emails
> > from Virginia birders thanking me for the posting, both for bringing back
> > memories from birders who have been there, and from birders planning on
> > going there. Over the years, I have met and developed relationships with
> > other Virginia birders whom I would not have met otherwise because of my
> > postings. I also enjoy reading the postings from other Virginia birders
> > about their birding travels outside of Virginia.
> >
> >
> >
> > Perhaps the VSO can create a separate list server for out of scope
> > postings,
> > such as the ABA has for different aspects of birding, such as "What's
> this
> > bird?" and other pages for different birding topics.
> >
> >
> >
> > Alternatively, anyone who is a member of this list server can opt for
> > digest
> > mode. Then they can get multiple postings lumped into a single email, and
> > choose not to read any postings that are not of interest to them. My
> choice
> > is to read the posting of interest to me from either the ABA web site
> that
> > re-posts VA-bird postings, or directly from the VA-bird Archives, and do
> > not
> > get any emails about VA-bird postings.
> >
> >
> >
> > Mike Stinson is certainly correct making the statements in his posting
> > about
> > out of scope postings. Perhaps he would like to suggest an alternative
> for
> > us Virginia birders who would like to learn about out of state birding.
> >
> >
> >
> > ___________________________
> >
> > Marshall Faintich
> >
> > Crozet, VA
> >
> > <marshall...>
> >
> > www.faintich.net <http://www.faintich.net/>
> >
> > In real life, the shortest distance between two points is never a
> straight
> > line, so you might as well enjoy the journey !!
> >
> >
> >
> ____________________________________________________________________________
> > _______________________
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > *** You are subscribed to VA-bird as <byrdnyrd33...> If you wish
> to
> > unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> > https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
> >
> *** You are subscribed to VA-bird as <sheagordontiller...> If you
> wish to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
>
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Date: 7/11/18 8:21 am
From: Vineeta Anand via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] interesting bird sightings and grammar
Hear, hear, Marla!
I came late to birding, so I am happy to learn as much as I can about bird
behavior and habitat. I also find the travel information invaluable I go on
a birding trip in India every year. But I don't post any information about
the places I go to, the guides I used, the places I stayed at, because I
think the distance makes it unlikely that many people from the VA bird list
would find that interesting.
The delete button works as it was intended.
So, I say if it ain't broke, don't fix it.

Vineeta Anand in Alexandria.


On Wed, Jul 11, 2018 at 10:50 AM, m b via VA-bird <va-bird...>
wrote:

> I suppose it could be said that the meaning of: “Va-bird is a forum for
> reporting interesting bird sightings in Virginia” is the same as:
>
>
> “VA-bird is a forum in Virginia for reporting interesting bird sightings.”
>
> Grammar – does the placement of the clause change the meaning? And is
> "bird sightings" limited to its most narrow meaning, or does bird behavior
> and habitat, (loss, gain, or location) thus informing one where one most
> likely might sight a bird, and why, fall under the rubric of bird sighting?
> I would suggest it is the broader meaning. The list is run by the Virginia
> Society of Ornithology, not the local tourist board. It does not direct one
> to local restaurants. It helps people see birds, and will do less well at
> that task in the absence of context.
>
> If the grammar does change the meaning, and the VSO has an unbelievably
> narrow mandate for this list, how picky must we readers be, when we have
> the wonderful "delete" button, and can simply delete those emails in which
> we are uninterested? I think that is what the delete button is for. Not
> reading things one has no interest in reading. And subject headings on this
> list are usually quite clear enough for one to decide if one is interested,
> without ever clicking on "open".
>
>
>
> If one feels inundated by email, on birds or any topic, the digest is a
> great way to find out what is happening on VA-Bird without receiving
> multiple emails per day on bird-related topics. Then one can just scroll
> through the digest, and click on only those things one finds interesting.
> Also, just bookmarking the page and scrolling through every day or two is a
> great way to keep up with what is happening without receiving too many
> emails, whatever that number is for a given person. I think yesterday,
> there were three total posts. Not a burden, even if one does not get the
> digest format.
>
>
>
> I have been very grateful to be able to post from Puerto Rico when I was
> having unexpected last minute difficulty getting a bird guide, and received
> many kind and immediate responses from VA-bird list members as to whom to
> contact, as many people had birded there and knew members of the Puerto
> Rico Society of Ornithology. Were it not for the kind and generous people
> of Va-Bird, I might not have found an available guide while on my trip,
> though I had done much research toward that end before I left. Thank you
> again to all those who assisted me in my time of birding need.
>
>
>
> I am definitely very grateful when someone posts an article about bird
> behavior. Normally, as in this recent case about barn owls, the birds
> posted about are birds found in Virginia. Many migrating birds find their
> way through Virginia, so unless the post is about a ground hornbill, the
> likelihood that the article is pertinent to Virginia, or birds ever found
> in Virginia, is quite high.
>
>
>
> I am also grateful when someone posts about a trip. I can ignore those, or
> use them. As with the most recent trip post, I learned not only what I had
> suspected in recently considering a trip to the Canadian Maritimes, (I’ve
> been to New Brunswick, but was considering Cape Breton) which is that I
> will likely not see many life birds. I also learned where best to go to see
> the ones I have not seen. Almost every bird mentioned in that post is seen
> in Virginia, either because it breeds here like yellow warblers, or because
> it migrates through. And I benefited from months of research done by a
> fellow member of VA-Bird. Thank you for that!
>
>
> The trip posts are rare enough that they do not interfere with the list in
> my view. And they can be so helpful if a Virginia birder is planning or
> considering going to that spot to bird, that I would miss them terribly.
> And I don't read every one. In fact, I read very few, but the ones I read
> have helped immeasurably. Again, the digest and that good ole' delete
> button solve the issue for me.
>
>
> Finally, the term "extralimital" before the post is often used on bird
> lists such as these to indicate a post slightly off topic, but of interest
> to many readers. This alerts one, if one can't already tell by the posted
> topic heading, that this might or might not be of interest. Just like it
> might or might not be of interest to me if an interesting bird was sighted
> at the VA-/North Carolina border, 8 hours from my home. That post would
> unquestionably be under the very narrow rubric of birds sighted in
> Virginia, but it is not of interest to me.
>
>
> This list has been operating just fine, for a very long time, with people
> using the delete button and digest combination to avoid reading things in
> which they are not interested. I see the meaning of the stated purpose of
> the list as the broader view I suggest above. The Society and most of its
> members are interested in bird habitat, behavior, and not just getting
> directions to a possible bird they might be able to see if they chase it
> down. This is not the "big year" direction list. It is a Virginia forum in
> which people exchange information about birds. If one wants the last known
> sighting of a given bird, I think e-bird is a good place for that.
>
>
> The list as it is currently used has been a blessing and a benefit to many
> of us who have gained much by the few "extralimital" posts. I highly
> recommend the delete button and the digest format to deal with one's own
> preferences.
>
>
>
> *** You are subscribed to VA-bird as <vineetaa...> If you wish to
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
>
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Date: 7/11/18 8:20 am
From: Steve Johnson via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] Pine Siskin in Covington (Alleghany county)
Lynn's photo is now at our checklist:

https://ebird.org/atlasva/view/checklist/S47131300

-Steve Johnson and Lynn Rafferty

Sent from my iPad
> On Jul 9, 2018, at 2:45 PM, Steve Johnson <stevejohnson2...> wrote:
>
> Today while surveying breeding birds in Alleghany County, Lynn and I found a Pine Siskin at a millet feeder. Clear photos will be submitted much later with eBird report. Absolute certain ID, compared side by side with Goldfinch (for size) and female House Finch (bill size, plumage, etc.)
>
> Bird returned repeatedly to feeder in front of apartment building. Just N of I-64, roughly 5 miles E of Covington or 2 miles W of Low Moor. Route 1107 aka Mountaineer Drive, just S of Alleghany H.S., apartments on E side of road.
>
> Steve Johnson and Lynn Rafferty
>
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Date: 7/11/18 7:55 am
From: Janice Frye via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] purpose of list; dead male RTHU
Facebook. There are multiple groups for bird ID, Birding _________ for
other Virginia and states, VABBA2, multiple groups for organizations,
groups like Birding California and the West, etc. No need to violate the
rules for a listserve, and do please read group rules and descriptions.
What's This Bird? IS on Facebook (also Reddit, but I wouldn't recommend it
after a quick look), so you kinda answered your own query. Type in a
search phrase like "bird id" or "birding Canada" on Facebook and you get
useful sites filled with people who want to be there. Just spend a little
time learning the personality of the group before posting anything. Some
are very serious, some laid back. And please, please, please-- do not
expect seriousness from the groups devoted to mis-identification or memes.
Do bring a sense of humor though.

Another thing you might try is keeping a special mailing list of people
interested in certain regions or any travel and send them write ups of your
trips. I have a treasured friendship with someone who does this, and
really enjoy reading them. Know that many of us delete digests and replies
to digests without even looking at them because so many do not heed the
instructions. Most of us are short on time.

Jan Frye
Richmond


On Wed, Jul 11, 2018, 9:48 AM Marshall Faintich via VA-bird <
<va-bird...> wrote:

> Mike Stinson posted:
>
>
>
> "The information page for this list
>
> ( at https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ) states
> that "Va-bird is a forum for reporting interesting bird sightings in
>
> Virginia."
>
> Not interesting bird sightings from somewhere else.
>
> Not articles about birds that you happen to run across.
>
> Not a report on a vacation to somewhere else besides Virginia.
>
> Not a forum for political discussions.
>
> I get enough email about birds and other things that I'd really rather not
> have any extra messages from Va-bird that don't fit the stated purpose of
> the list. . ."
>
>
>
> I recently posted a trip report to the Canadian Maritime Provinces, and on
> one hand, do understand that it was out of scope for the VA-bird list
> server. On the other hand, however, I have received more than a dozen
> emails
> from Virginia birders thanking me for the posting, both for bringing back
> memories from birders who have been there, and from birders planning on
> going there. Over the years, I have met and developed relationships with
> other Virginia birders whom I would not have met otherwise because of my
> postings. I also enjoy reading the postings from other Virginia birders
> about their birding travels outside of Virginia.
>
>
>
> Perhaps the VSO can create a separate list server for out of scope
> postings,
> such as the ABA has for different aspects of birding, such as "What's this
> bird?" and other pages for different birding topics.
>
>
>
> Alternatively, anyone who is a member of this list server can opt for
> digest
> mode. Then they can get multiple postings lumped into a single email, and
> choose not to read any postings that are not of interest to them. My choice
> is to read the posting of interest to me from either the ABA web site that
> re-posts VA-bird postings, or directly from the VA-bird Archives, and do
> not
> get any emails about VA-bird postings.
>
>
>
> Mike Stinson is certainly correct making the statements in his posting
> about
> out of scope postings. Perhaps he would like to suggest an alternative for
> us Virginia birders who would like to learn about out of state birding.
>
>
>
> ___________________________
>
> Marshall Faintich
>
> Crozet, VA
>
> <marshall...>
>
> www.faintich.net <http://www.faintich.net/>
>
> In real life, the shortest distance between two points is never a straight
> line, so you might as well enjoy the journey !!
>
>
> ____________________________________________________________________________
> _______________________
>
>
>
>
>
> *** You are subscribed to VA-bird as <byrdnyrd33...> If you wish to
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
>
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Date: 7/11/18 7:54 am
From: m b via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] oops on "interesting bird sightings and grammar"
Most importantly, I left my name and location off the post by mistake:

mb from NoVa
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Date: 7/11/18 7:51 am
From: m b via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] interesting bird sightings and grammar
I suppose it could be said that the meaning of: Va-bird is a forum for reporting interesting bird sightings in Virginia is the same as:


VA-bird is a forum in Virginia for reporting interesting bird sightings.

Grammar does the placement of the clause change the meaning? And is "bird sightings" limited to its most narrow meaning, or does bird behavior and habitat, (loss, gain, or location) thus informing one where one most likely might sight a bird, and why, fall under the rubric of bird sighting? I would suggest it is the broader meaning. The list is run by the Virginia Society of Ornithology, not the local tourist board. It does not direct one to local restaurants. It helps people see birds, and will do less well at that task in the absence of context.

If the grammar does change the meaning, and the VSO has an unbelievably narrow mandate for this list, how picky must we readers be, when we have the wonderful "delete" button, and can simply delete those emails in which we are uninterested? I think that is what the delete button is for. Not reading things one has no interest in reading. And subject headings on this list are usually quite clear enough for one to decide if one is interested, without ever clicking on "open".



If one feels inundated by email, on birds or any topic, the digest is a great way to find out what is happening on VA-Bird without receiving multiple emails per day on bird-related topics. Then one can just scroll through the digest, and click on only those things one finds interesting. Also, just bookmarking the page and scrolling through every day or two is a great way to keep up with what is happening without receiving too many emails, whatever that number is for a given person. I think yesterday, there were three total posts. Not a burden, even if one does not get the digest format.



I have been very grateful to be able to post from Puerto Rico when I was having unexpected last minute difficulty getting a bird guide, and received many kind and immediate responses from VA-bird list members as to whom to contact, as many people had birded there and knew members of the Puerto Rico Society of Ornithology. Were it not for the kind and generous people of Va-Bird, I might not have found an available guide while on my trip, though I had done much research toward that end before I left. Thank you again to all those who assisted me in my time of birding need.



I am definitely very grateful when someone posts an article about bird behavior. Normally, as in this recent case about barn owls, the birds posted about are birds found in Virginia. Many migrating birds find their way through Virginia, so unless the post is about a ground hornbill, the likelihood that the article is pertinent to Virginia, or birds ever found in Virginia, is quite high.



I am also grateful when someone posts about a trip. I can ignore those, or use them. As with the most recent trip post, I learned not only what I had suspected in recently considering a trip to the Canadian Maritimes, (Ive been to New Brunswick, but was considering Cape Breton) which is that I will likely not see many life birds. I also learned where best to go to see the ones I have not seen. Almost every bird mentioned in that post is seen in Virginia, either because it breeds here like yellow warblers, or because it migrates through. And I benefited from months of research done by a fellow member of VA-Bird. Thank you for that!


The trip posts are rare enough that they do not interfere with the list in my view. And they can be so helpful if a Virginia birder is planning or considering going to that spot to bird, that I would miss them terribly. And I don't read every one. In fact, I read very few, but the ones I read have helped immeasurably. Again, the digest and that good ole' delete button solve the issue for me.


Finally, the term "extralimital" before the post is often used on bird lists such as these to indicate a post slightly off topic, but of interest to many readers. This alerts one, if one can't already tell by the posted topic heading, that this might or might not be of interest. Just like it might or might not be of interest to me if an interesting bird was sighted at the VA-/North Carolina border, 8 hours from my home. That post would unquestionably be under the very narrow rubric of birds sighted in Virginia, but it is not of interest to me.


This list has been operating just fine, for a very long time, with people using the delete button and digest combination to avoid reading things in which they are not interested. I see the meaning of the stated purpose of the list as the broader view I suggest above. The Society and most of its members are interested in bird habitat, behavior, and not just getting directions to a possible bird they might be able to see if they chase it down. This is not the "big year" direction list. It is a Virginia forum in which people exchange information about birds. If one wants the last known sighting of a given bird, I think e-bird is a good place for that.


The list as it is currently used has been a blessing and a benefit to many of us who have gained much by the few "extralimital" posts. I highly recommend the delete button and the digest format to deal with one's own preferences.



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Date: 7/11/18 5:33 am
From: Marshall Faintich via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] purpose of list; dead male RTHU
Mike Stinson posted:



"The information page for this list

( at https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ) states
that "Va-bird is a forum for reporting interesting bird sightings in

Virginia."

Not interesting bird sightings from somewhere else.

Not articles about birds that you happen to run across.

Not a report on a vacation to somewhere else besides Virginia.

Not a forum for political discussions.

I get enough email about birds and other things that I'd really rather not
have any extra messages from Va-bird that don't fit the stated purpose of
the list. . ."



I recently posted a trip report to the Canadian Maritime Provinces, and on
one hand, do understand that it was out of scope for the VA-bird list
server. On the other hand, however, I have received more than a dozen emails
from Virginia birders thanking me for the posting, both for bringing back
memories from birders who have been there, and from birders planning on
going there. Over the years, I have met and developed relationships with
other Virginia birders whom I would not have met otherwise because of my
postings. I also enjoy reading the postings from other Virginia birders
about their birding travels outside of Virginia.



Perhaps the VSO can create a separate list server for out of scope postings,
such as the ABA has for different aspects of birding, such as "What's this
bird?" and other pages for different birding topics.



Alternatively, anyone who is a member of this list server can opt for digest
mode. Then they can get multiple postings lumped into a single email, and
choose not to read any postings that are not of interest to them. My choice
is to read the posting of interest to me from either the ABA web site that
re-posts VA-bird postings, or directly from the VA-bird Archives, and do not
get any emails about VA-bird postings.



Mike Stinson is certainly correct making the statements in his posting about
out of scope postings. Perhaps he would like to suggest an alternative for
us Virginia birders who would like to learn about out of state birding.



___________________________

Marshall Faintich

Crozet, VA

<marshall...>

www.faintich.net <http://www.faintich.net/>

In real life, the shortest distance between two points is never a straight
line, so you might as well enjoy the journey !!

____________________________________________________________________________
_______________________





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Date: 7/10/18 5:20 pm
From: Rob Bielawski via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Early July Bird Observations & Atlasing Records for Virginia Beach
Fellow Birders,

The fully formatted write-up with 54 photographs and hyperlinks to all the
cited eBird reports is available on the web here:
http://www.beachbirding.com/journal/pe-20180710 Past entries of this
thrice-monthly report are available here: http://www.beachbirding.
com/journal-index/ Text only version is below, since all email servers
handle embedded links differently they're simply removed here.
------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------
Carrying over from June, high temperatures and extreme humidity brought
this expectedly uncomfortable weather into early July, but thanks primarily
to a tropical system, we did experience a lovely cooldown for the latter
half of the reporting period. On 7 Jul, strong northeast winds began
buffeting our coastline as a low pressure cell churned counterclockwise to
the south of Cape Hatteras, being quickly upgraded to Tropical Depression
#3, then temporarily to Tropical Storm Chris on 8 Jul before attaining
hurricane status on 10 Jul. The associated winds brought a much-needed
cooldown to the region, keeping daily high temperatures in the 70s through
the remainder of the period. Additionally, the direction of airflow
provided for some suitable shorebird habitat, and we started to see the
rudimentary beginnings of the fall migration, right on time! Top records
for early July in Virginia Beach included first-of-year reports for
WILSON’S STORM-PETREL, new unseasonal reports for PIED-BILLED GREBE and
continuing reports for TUNDRA SWAN and AMERICAN COOT. Additionally, we saw
early first-of-season arrivals for BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, as well as on-time
arrivals for SPOTTED SANDPIPER, GULL-BILLED TERN, SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER &
LEAST SANDPIPER.

Two reports of WILSON’S STORM-PETRELS surfaced early on this period, with
the first occurring 3 Jul off the coast of Cape Henry (obs. Andrew
Hawkins), and an additional record the following day in the same general
area during one of the Virginia Beach Aquarium boat trips (ph. Justin
Fuller). This time of year, Wilson’s Storm-Petrels are annually observed
entering the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay, but are much more easily viewed
while at sea. Shore-based observations are much more difficult to come by
and given that the vast majority of eBird checklists in Virginia Beach come
from land-based observers, this species needs to flag as a rarity to ensure
only those in proper habitat are validated into the public database.
Essentially, the farther offshore one goes during the summer, the more
members of this species likely to be encountered. Many of our land-based
records come from the first island of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel,
however, that formerly public space has been closed to construction since
the end of October 2017. Fort Story JEB, and the beaches of the North End
(roughly 80th Street and north) tend to produce a couple of records each
summer, so these are worthwhile stops if you can’t find a boat to get you
offshore. Usually, records line up pretty well with easterly or
southeasterly winds that help drive these tiny seabirds in closer to land.
Of course, birding the coastline in the wake of tropical cyclones tends to
be the best setup for finding them. Lacking that weather phenomenon though,
the aquarium’s dolphin tours seem to be a productive, and cost effective,
means to get into the proper habitat for this species, so it’s nice to have
a public option to try for this species.

Unusual for early July, a single PIED-BILLED GREBE was discovered near
Marina Shores in northern Virginia Beach on the third (ph. June McDaniels).
This is a species that could potentially breed here in proper habitat, like
the impoundments of Back Bay NWR, but tends to be very shy in the summer
months and thus, difficult to record. Ironically, a Pied-billed Grebe was
found 11 Jul 2016 at this exact location (obs. Andrew Baldelli) and one
wonders if this could somehow be the same individual returning for a quick
July stop. It appears likely that the 2018 individual was simply an early
migrant rather than a breeder, as it was only observed through 4 Jul (obs.
June McDaniels, ph. Rob Bielawski) at this location and no mate, or
fledglings were observed unfortunately. Another individual was present on
25 Jun at Back Bay NWR, but otherwise, the last records for this species
occurred all the way back on 7 May when an individual was viewed at
Princess Anne WMA’s Whitehurst Tract. While we may have a stray record in
the summer months, this is certainly a species that requires tracking in
eBird, and requires well-documented records as a result.

Making for a first ever July occurrence here for the species (according to
eBird at least), the continuing TUNDRA SWAN at Back Bay NWR was detected
throughout the reporting period, with documented photographs on 1 Jul (ph.
Rob Bielawski) and on 8 Jul (also ph. Rob Bielawski), and a most recent
observation on 9 Jul (obs. Andrew Baldelli). Since this individual
continues to inhabitat the eastern fringe of the C Storage Pool, it has
remained too distant from the public viewing area along the West Dike to
confirm if an injury exists. However, it has long been presumed that it has
a wing injury as Tundra Swans typically depart the region by early April,
and if it were healthy enough to fly, it surely would have left long ago.
Fortunately, the C Storage Pool has provided several grassy islands and
deep water on the edges to keep this bird safe from would-be-predators, but
with the strong northeast winds beginning 7 Jul, the waters of Back Bay,
and by extension those of the pool, receded and left much of the area dry.
With the water levels expected to stay low until the winds switch to
southerly, it might allow for a predator to move in, but we’ll know more
next period as to whether it has continued to linger or not. Interestingly
there are no eBird records for this species between the period close date
and 1 Sep in any past years, so each day this bird persists makes a small
bit of history for those of us who obsess over such trivialities. Also
nearby at the refuge, an AMERICAN COOT was reported during the early July
impoundment survey on the 5th, but there is no detail provided regarding
the identification details or the specific location where was observed.
It’s possible, or even likely that the observation occurred on a
non-accessible portion of the A, B, or C Pools given their habitat is
perfect for an individual to summer within, but that’s just a guess on my
part.

With north winds, and several areas of suitable habitat suddenly available,
the shorebird fall migration got off to a grand start this period with
several exciting arrivals! The first SPOTTED SANDPIPER of the fall was
photographed on 1 Jul near a dock on Lake Tecumseh (ph. Mary Catherine
Miguez) during a kayak outing. While we did have two individuals recorded
during June, these were likely birds that stayed put rather than late
spring or early fall migrants. By the very end of June, we start seeing the
true southbound migrants, so this fellow was right on time. The next to be
observed occurred a few days later, also a first year bird, at Back Bay NWR
on 7 Jul (ph. Rob Bielawski). Early for the species, three BLACK-BELLIED
PLOVERS were also observed at Back Bay NWR on the freshly drained C Storage
Pool on 7 Jul (obs. Andrew Baldelli). With an average arrival date of 15
Jul, this was the only of our truly early arrivals for the period. With
typical arrival dates of 5 Jul, GULL-BILLED TERNS observed over the ocean
from 85th Street Beach on 5 Jul (obs. Andrew Baldelli) were exactly on
time. Showing very thick black bills, and a fully black cap, these birds
are often confused with distant Sandwich Terns, so it is important to note
these features while viewing. The yellow tip of a Sandwich Tern’s bill
often becomes invisible at a distance, and the ‘missing’ tip can make the
bill appear shorter and stockier than it truly is. Just a word of caution
when it comes to separating the two species! Two other first-of-fall
arrivals occurred inside their average expected arrival date of 5 Jul, with
two flocks of SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS total 13 individuals observed on the
mudflats off Pleasure House Point NA on 7 Jul (obs. Rob Bielawski) and
individual LEAST SANDPIPERS popping up on 8 Jul at Back Bay NWR (ph. Rob
Bielawski) and also at Princess Anne WMA’s Whitehurst Tract later in the
morning (also ph. Rob Bielawski).

Breeding bird observations were still going strong through early July and
the 2nd Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas has continued to steam ahead with full
momentum! Scattered breeding bird confirmations were photographically
documented around the city this period as follows: a recently fledged
RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD at Back Bay NWR on 1 Jul (ph. Rob Bielawski); an adult
EASTERN BLUEBIRD feeding young at Ashville Park on 1 Jul (ph. Cindy
Hamilton & June McDaniels); recently fledged TUFTED TITMOUSE at Stumpy Lake
NA on 1 Jul (ph. Rob Bielawski); an adult NORTHERN CARDINAL carrying
nesting material at Back Bay NWR on 2 Jul (ph. Charlie Bruggemann);
recently fledged MALLARDS at Marina Shores on 2 Jul (ph. June McDaniels);
recently fledged PROTHONOTARY WARBLER at First Landing SP on 4 Jul (ph.
June McDaniels); recently fledged CLAPPER RAILS at Pleasure House Point NA
on 5 Jul (ph. Charlie Bruggemann); an adult NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD carrying
food on Dinwiddie Dr. on 7 Jul (ph. Rob Bielawski); adult PURPLE MARTINS
feeding young on 8 Jul at Back Bay NWR (ph. Mary Catherine Miguez) and a
nest with young OSPREYS on 10 Jul at Seatack North Park (ph. Laura Mae).
Keep up all the great work Atlasing folks, and please remember, if you have
any questions regarding the project, please check out the 2nd Virginia
Breeding Bird Atlas Website, the official AtlasFacebook Page, or the
Facebook Group for more information!

WEATHER: Picking up right where late June left off, extreme heat and
humidity blanketed the early half of the reporting period, but thanks to a
cold front and our proximity to a tropical cyclone (Hurricane Chris as of
this writing), the latter few days of the period boasted much cooler than
average temperatures and very dry air, a true blessing at this point in the
summer season. Over all, average daily high temperatures dropped 1.5° from
87.1° F to 85.6° (-2.5° from prior 10-year average), with average daily low
temperatures also falling, 1.9° from 72.4° to 70.5° F (-1.6° from prior
10-year average). Daytime temperatures ranged from a minimum of 57° F (10
Jul) to a maximum of 91° (1, 2 & 6 Jul). Interestingly, the low temperature
of 60° F on 9 Jul was a new record low temperature on this date at Oceana
NAS’ weather station. A total of 0.71” of rain fell during the period,
spread across three days with measurement amounts, with a maximum of 0.63”
falling on Friday, 6 Jul. Maximum sustained winds at Oceana this period
were 35 mph and gusts reached 49 mph (6 Jul) as a very strong cold front
passed over the region. No significant tidal surge events (2’ or greater)
impacted the Sewell’s Point tide gauge during this reporting period.
However, the extended period of strong northeasterly winds associated with
Hurricane Chris pushed a large volume of water into the Lynnhaven River and
caused localized flooding. Additionally, the same windfield pushed a
significant percentage of Back Bay’s water southward, revealing expansive
mudflats and allowing for the draining of the C and C Storage Pools.
Sunrise/sunsets varied from 5:49 AM/8:28 PM (1 Jul) to 5:54 AM/8:26 PM (10
Jul), which means we lost 7 minutes of daylight during this period with a
total of 14 hours, 31 minutes of ‘Length of Day’ to close the period.

For those hoping to view every photograph submitted for Virginia Beach
during this period, please see the complete listing for the month of July
located on eBird’s Media explorer by clicking here! Please remember, anyone
with an eBird account also has the ability to rate these photographs (1-5
stars), and based on the average rating, this is how eBird populates
anything media-driven on the website, particularly the Illustrated
Checklists! So, if you're one of the many folks who enjoy looking at
photographs of birds, take some time to click them all and rate them, it
helps make eBird better and better each day!

LOOKAHEAD: With the start of shorebird migration underway, we have new
arrivals to look forward to each period from now through November and given
we won’t start seeing species depart for a while, the overall diversity of
birds will continue to rise moving forward. All of our summer breeding
species are still present, but keep in mind that many of the songbirds will
likely stop singing fairly soon (if they haven’t already) so it is best to
try and log observations for birds like Acadian Flycatcher and Wood Thrush
while you still can; they’re much harder to locate in the thick summer
vegetation when they’re silent! With regard to annually expected fall
arrivals, as of the reporting period close date, we have not yet logged
first arrivals for WESTERN SANDPIPER, WHIMBREL, BLACK TERN, LESSER
YELLOWLEGS & RUDDY TURNSTONE (all 10 Jul average expected arrivals), PIPING
PLOVER & SEMIPALMATED PLOVER (15 Jul), RED KNOT, SOLITARY SANDPIPER, STILT
SANDPIPER & PECTORAL SANDPIPER (20 Jul) and DUNLIN (30 Jul). Since
passerines aren’t yet on the move, this month is truly dedicated to a
search for shorebirds! The coastal beaches of First Landing SP, the Resort
Area & North End, Little Island Park and Back Bay NWR, as well as any
low-tide marshes like those at Pleasure House Point NA and flooded fields
will become highly sought-after locations to search for shorebirds as we
move deeper into July. Following days and nights with sustained northerly
winds, the water levels in Back Bay NWR’s C Storage Pool will afford a
perfect landing ground for shorebirds, and the northern cell in Princess
Anne WMA Whitehurst Tract’s southern half is presently prime habitat (just
remember to wear rubber boots here due to thick vegetation on the trails
and a healthy population of Eastern Cottonmouths in the area).

For further information regarding this thrice-monthly, online publication,
please visit the Journal Overview Page which provides an in-depth
explanation of the format, layout and composition of the journal. As
always, thank you for reading, and please leave me a comment below (you may
use your Facebook, Gmail or other accounts to easily do so), or just click
the Heart icon to the lower right of this post to let me know you stopped
in!

Thanks All,

Rob Bielawski
Virginia Beach, VA
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Back to top
Date: 7/10/18 5:02 pm
From: C. Michael Stinson via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] purpose of list; dead male RTHU
The information page for this list
( at https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ) states
that "Va-bird is a forum for reporting interesting bird sightings in
Virginia."

Not interesting bird sightings from somewhere else.

Not articles about birds that you happen to run across.

Not a report on a vacation to somewhere else besides Virginia.

Not a forum for political discussions.

I get enough email about birds and other things that I'd really rather not
have any extra messages from Va-bird that don't fit the stated purpose of
the list.

So this note will fit the guideline itself, I'll report that two days ago I
was shown a freshly dead adult male Ruby-throated Hummingbird (in
Curdsville, Buckingham County) that had been found dead after flying into a
screen door, getting its bill stuck in the wire mesh of the screen, and
then dying before it could extricate itself. Since screen doors are
common, and hummingbird feeders near screen doors are not too uncommon, I
wonder how frequently this happens.

Thanks -

Mike

--
C. Michael Stinson
Dillwyn, VA
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Date: 7/10/18 10:13 am
From: John Greenwood via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Fwd: Owls See the World Much Like We Do - The New York Times
John Greenwood, Falls Church

> Subject: Owls See the World Much Like We Do - The New York Times
>
>
> https://mobile.nytimes.com/2018/07/03/science/owls-vision-brain.html?em_pos=medium&emc=edit_sc_20180710&nl=science-times&nl_art=6&nlid=53591947emc%3Dedit_sc_20180710&ref=headline&te=1
>
> Owls See the World Much Like We Do
> Barn owls have simpler brains than primates, but they can process information about things moving in their environment in a similarly complex way.
>
> July 3, 2018
>
> Even though barn owls have simple brains, a new study suggests they can visually process objects in ways similar to that of animals with more sophisticated perception.Jean-Christophe Verhaegen/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
> Owl eyes are round, but not spherical. These immobile, tubular structures sit on the front of an owl’s face like a pair of built-in binoculars. They allow the birds to focus in on prey and see in three dimensions, kind of like humans — except we don’t have to turn our whole heads to spot a slice of pizza beside us.
>
> Although owls and humans both have binocular vision, it has been unclear whether these birds of prey process information they collect from their environments like humans, because their brains aren’t as complex. But in a study published in the Journal of Neuroscience on Monday, scientists tested the ability of barn owls to find a moving target among various shifting backgrounds, a visual processing task earlier tested only in primates.
>
> The research suggests that barn owls, with far simpler brains than humans and other primates, also group together different elements as they move in the same direction, to make sense of the world around them.
>
> “Humans are not so different from birds as you may think,” said Yoram Gutfreund, a neuroscientist at Technion Israel Institute of Technology who led the study with colleagues from his university and RWTH Aachen University in Germany.
>
> [Like the Science Times page on Facebook. | Sign up for the Science Times newsletter.]
>
> A critical part of perception is being able to distinguish an object from its background. One way humans do this is by grouping elements of a scene together to perceive each part as a whole. In some cases, that means combining objects that move similarly, like birds flying in a flock, or the single bird that breaks away from it.
>
> Scientists have generally considered this type of visual processing as a higher level task that requires complex brain structures. As such, they’ve only studied it in humans and primates.
>
> But Dr. Gutfreund and his team believed this ability was more basic — like seeing past camouflage. A barn owl, for example, might have evolved a similar mechanism to detect a mouse moving in a meadow as wind blows the grass in the same direction.
>
> To test visual detection tactics in their feathered subjects, they showed barn owls screens of black, moving dots on a gray background and attached cameras to their heads to track their gazes. Then the team measured how long it took the birds to turn their heads toward a target dot, moving in a different direction than numerous other shifting dots.
>
> The owls were able to spot the target. They were better at finding it when the contrasting dot direction was uniform rather than scattered. Even though the elements were all black dots, the direction they were moving made a big difference in the owl’s perception of the world — and how its brain responded.
>
> The researchers also recorded activity from the ocular tectum, a brain area involved in basic visual processing in owls and many other vertebrates. They found that it activated more or less depending on the movement of the dots, suggesting it was responsible for performing this seemingly complex task.
>
> “What we find is considered higher level processing in an area that is not traditionally considered a higher level area,” Dr. Gutfreund said. He thinks this ability was conserved through evolution in a similar part of the human brain called the superior colliculus, which helps direct attention among other functions.
>
> The researchers found that an owl's ocular tectum, a brain area involved in basic visual processing in vertebrates, activated according to the movement of dots in the experiment.Ronaldo Schemidt/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
> But how the ability evolved, or how it may play out differently in birds and mammals is still a mystery, Dr. Gutfreund said. For now, they want to determine the path traveled through the owl’s brain by these movement-grouping signals.
>
> “It’s not so easy to do these experiments,” said Dr. Gutfreund, but he believes this motion grouping ability is widespread in the animal kingdom. “I think that the visual system basically evolved to identify targets for behavior. This is why we have the brain.”
>
> A version of this article appears in print on July 10, 2018, on Page D2 of the New York edition with the headline: In Focus: Why Owls See Things From Your Point of View. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
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Back to top
Date: 7/10/18 9:10 am
From: Gerry Hawkins via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Voice of the Naturalist, Greater DC area, week ending 7/9/18
Hotline: Voice of the Naturalist
Date: 7/10/2018
Coverage: MD/DC/VA/central and southern DE/WV panhandle
Reports, comments and questions: <voice...>
Compiler: Gerry Hawkins
Sponsor: Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central
Atlantic States (independent of NAS)
Transcriber: Steve Cordle

Please consider joining ANS, especially if you are a regular user of
the Voice of the Naturalist (Individual $50; Family $65; Nature
Steward $100; Audubon Advocate $200). The membership number is
301-652-9188, option 12; the address is 8940 Jones Mill Road, Chevy
Chase, MD 20815; and the web site is http://www.anshome.org
<http://www.anshome.org/> .

This is the Voice of the Naturalist, a service of the Audubon
Naturalist Society. This report covers the week starting Tuesday, July
3 and was completed on Tuesday, July 10 at 7:45 a.m.

Information on noteworthy birds is presented below in taxonomic order,
as set forth in the American Ornithological Society Checklist for
North and Middle American Birds, as revised through the 59th
Supplement (June 2018).

The top birds this week were RUFF in DE, ROSEATE TERN* in MD, GREAT
WHITE HERON (white form of the GREAT BLUE HERON)* in MD and ROSEATE
SPOONBILL* in MD.

Other birds of interest this week included TUNDRA SWAN, NORTHERN
SHOVELER, RING-NECKED DUCK, SURF and BLACK SCOTERS, HOODED MERGANSER,
RUDDY DUCK, HORNED GREBE, VIRGINIA RAIL, SORA, AMERICAN COOT, SANDHILL
CRANE, AMERICAN AVOCET, BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, BONAPARTE'S GULL,
GULL-BILLED TERN, COMMON LOON, WILSON'S STORM-PETREL, ANHINGA,
AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN, AMERICAN and LEAST BITTERNS, WHITE IBIS,
NORTHERN HARRIER, SHARP-SHINNED HAWK, MISSISSIPPI KITE, PEREGRINE
FALCON, RED-BREASTED and BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCHES, PINE SISKIN,
BOBOLINK, SUMMER TANAGER, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK and DICKCISSEL.

TOP BIRDS

One of at least two continuing RUFFS was seen at Bombay Hook NWR, Kent
Co, DE on July 4, 5, 6 and 9.

A ROSEATE TERN* was photographed at Assateague Island NS in Worcester
Co, MD on July 3 and on Skimmer Island in Ocean City, Worcester Co, MD
on July 5.

A continuing GREAT WHITE HERON (a distinct white form of the GREAT
BLUE HERON)* was last seen on July 5 at Israel Creek along Route 26 a
short distance east of the intersection with Route 194 in Frederick
Co, MD.

A continuing young ROSEATE SPOONBILL* first found on June 17 at the
North Beach marsh and nearby Walton Beach Nature Preserve in Calvert
Co, MD was last seen at this location early in the morning on July 6.
On January 8 presumably this same bird showed up at Jug Bay Wetlands
Sanctuary in Anne Arundel Co, MD, where a ROSEATE SPOONBILL also was
photographed on June 13, and later in this same day it was seen at
nearby Patuxent River Park-Mt. Calvert in Prince George's Co, MD.
According to a reliable second-hand report a ROSEATE SPOONBILL also
was seen at Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary in the morning on July 9.
Whether one bird, as seems likely, or two, the result is that a
ROSEATE SPOONBILL has visited at least four Maryland counties in
recent weeks (the fourth being Dorchester on June 24).

OTHER BIRDS OF INTEREST

A continuing TUNDRA SWAN was at Back Bay NWR-Impoundments in Virginia
Beach, VA on July 5, 7 and 8. Out-of-season ducks included a NORTHERN
SHOVELER and a RUDDY DUCK at the Little Creek Wildlife Area in Kent
Co, DE on July 8; and a RING-NECKED DUCK at Breaks Interstate Park in
Dickinson Co, VA on July 5, an apparent first summer record for
southwestern VA, Black Hill RP in Montgomery Co, MD on July 7, Duvall
Farm Ponds in Talbot Co, MD on July 7 and Loch Raven Reservoir in
Baltimore Co, MD on July 8. In addition, two continuing SURF SCOTERS
were seen off Hog Island in Queen Anne's Co, MD on July 8, a BLACK
SCOTER was seen off North Beach in Calvert Co, MD on July 6 and six
HOODED MERGANSERS were at Berlin Falls Park in Worcester Co, MD on
July 9.

A continuing HORNED GREBE was seen most recently at Big Water Farm
(private) in Queen Anne's Co, MD on July 3, and likely this same bird
was seen on the other side of Prospect Bay in Queen Anne's Co on July
9.

Highlights of a survey of the Little Creek Wildlife Area in Kent Co,
DE on July 8 included a SORA and three continuing AMERICAN COOT.
Highlights at the Shenandoah Wetlands Bank along Cold Springs Road in
Augusta Co, VA during the week included a continuing first county
record breeding VIRGINIA RAIL on July 7 and 9 and a SORA on July 7. A
single AMERICAN COOT continues at Constitution Gardens in Washington,
DC.

On July 7 two SANDHILL CRANES were seen again along Sunset Drive a
short distance south of the intersection with Cedar Run Trail in
Broadway, Rockingham Co, VA.

On July 5 a week high 64 and 69 AMERICAN AVOCETS were counted at
Bombay Hook NWR, Kent Co, DE and the Craney Island Disposal Area
(restricted/no public access) in Portsmouth, VA, respectively,
presumed migrants as this species no longer breeds in eastern North
America. The early stage of shorebird migration was indicated by a
small number of BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS at several locations, including
an area high 38 individuals at Chincoteague NWR, Accomack Co, VA on
July 5, as well as small numbers of several other migratory shorebird
species, including LEAST and SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS, SHORT-BILLED
DOWITCHER and GREATER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS at expected locations
(such as Bombay Hook NWR in DE and Chincoteague NWR in VA).

A continuing BONAPARTE'S GULL was seen most recently at Bombay Hook
NWR, Kent Co, DE on July 9. A single BONAPARTE'S GULL also was found
at Cape Henlopen SP, Sussex Co, DE on July 9.

During the week a small number of GULL-BILLED TERNS was seen at
several locations in southeastern Virginia, where this species is an
uncommon breeder, including the Craney Island Disposal Area
(restricted/no public access) in Portsmouth, the 85th Street Beach in
Virginia Beach and Metompkin Island in Accomack Co.

On July 5 a COMMON LOON was seen off Lewes in Sussex Co, DE.

A total of three WILSON'S STORM-PETRELS were spotted off the north end
of coastal Virginia Beach, VA on July 3 and 4.

ANHINGAS continue to visit the Carson Wetlands in Prince George Co,
VA, with two individuals seen on July 4.

A single AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN continues to linger along Wildlife
Drive at Blackwater NWR, Dorchester Co, MD, with the most recent
sighting on July 8.

On July 8 an AMERICAN BITTERN was heard uttering its distinctive
pumping vocalization near Deal Island State WMA along Game Reserve
Road in Somerset Co, MD. On July 8 at least 12 LEAST BITTERNS were
counted during a survey by kayak of the Little Creek Wildlife Area in
Kent Co, DE. Far away a single LEAST BITTERN was encountered at the
Shenandoah Wetlands Bank in Augusta Co, VA on July 3, 7 and 9. A
YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON continues to be seen flying up and down the
Potomac River near Chain Bridge in Washington, DC, with the most
recent sighting on July 4.

The northernmost sighting of WHITE IBIS in the reporting area during
the week was at Delaware Seashore SP-Savages Ditch Road in Sussex Co,
DE, where a high of 21 individuals were counted on July 3 and 5.

Raptor highlights during the week included a NORTHERN HARRIER
photographed along Research Road in Prince George's Co, MD on July 7,
and a juvenile SHARP-SHINNED HAWK photographed at David W. Force Park
in Howard Co, MD on July 8. A highlight of the regular Sunday morning
walk at Dyke Marsh WP in Fairfax Co, VA on July 8 was a soaring
MISSISSIPPI KITE, which perhaps was one of the individuals nesting
near nearby Monticello Park in Alexandria, VA. Local MISSISSIPPI KITE
sightings also included an individual reported along Route 118 near
Richter Farm Road in Montgomery Co, MD on July 4.

On July 5 the Maryland Department of Natural Resources-Wildlife and
Heritage Service announced on its Facebook page that for the first
time since 1950 a pair of PEREGRINE FALCONS has successfully nested on
a natural cliff site in Maryland, at an undisclosed location in
Allegany County. PEREGRINE FALCONS resumed breeding in Maryland in the
1980s following the ban of the pesticide DDT and reintroduction
efforts, but until recently breeding has occurred mainly on bridges,
water towers and skyscrapers in urban settings.

Out-of-season RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES were encountered at two
locations in Cecil Co, MD: a single individual at a residential feeder
in Whitaker Woods on July 6 and 7, and 2-3 individuals at Elk Neck
State Forest on July 7 and 8. The Milford Neck Wildlife Area-Big Stone
Beach Road in Kent Co, DE continues to be a reliable location for
BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH, with 3-4 individuals encountered there on July
7 and 8. In Virginia a single BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH was found in pine
trees at Mountain Run Lake Park in Culpeper on July 5 and 9.

Another possible sign of an upcoming irruptive finch season was a
single PINE SISKIN observed on July 9 visiting a feeder in front of an
apartment building on the east side of Route 1107 (Mountaineer Drive)
just south of Alleghany High School in Covington, VA.

Early BOBOLINKS included at least ten individuals in a field along
3249 Hyser Road in Taneytown, Carroll Co, MD on July 8, 11 individuals
at the Chester River Field Research Center (Chino Farms) (private) in
Queen Anne's Co, MD on July 9 and a single individual at Bombay Hook
NWR, Kent Co, DE on July 7.

On July 4 a SUMMER TANAGER was seen and heard singing at Soldiers
Delight NEA in Baltimore Co, MD.

On July 4 two ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS were encountered along
Freezeland Road in Fauquier Co, VA.

DICKCISSELS continued at several locations in the reporting area, with
multiple (three or more) individuals encountered along Underwood Road
in Howard Co, MD on July 3, 4, 5 and 8; Bristoe Station Battlefield
Park in Prince William Co, VA on July 5; Mountain Run Farm (private)
in Bedford Co, VA on July 6; and a private property along Milton
Highway in Ringgold, Pittsylvania Co, VA on July 4. In Delaware, a
single DICKCISSEL was seen along the entrance road to the visitors'
center at Prime Hook NWR in Sussex Co on July 4-5 and 7-9.

***

This week's report was based on reports on the DE, MD, VA, and WV list
servers, eBird records and various birding pages on Facebook.

The Audubon Sanctuary Shop (301-652-3606,
https://anshome.org/naturalist-shop)is an excellent source for
guidebooks and many other nature-related titles.

To report bird sightings, e-mail your report to <voice...>
Please post reports before midnight Monday, identify the county as
well as the state, and include your name and a Tuesday morning
contact, e-mail or phone.

Thank you for your interest, and enjoy the birds.

*Of interest to the applicable state records committee



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Date: 7/9/18 7:18 pm
From: Harry Glasgow via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk
A beautiful, cool, dry morning welcomed the 30 or so birders on today's Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk.  We tallied 49 species with notables being the persistent Mallard Hybrid pair we are told is called a Cayuga hybrid.  We were visited by several children who sere fascinated by Herons, both Great Blue and Green.  We hold the belief that introducing children to birding while exploring nature is the greatest service our group  can provide



Canada Goose  41
Wood Duck  11
Mallard  11
Mallard x American Black Duck (hybrid)  2    Great Blue Heron  8
Green Heron  9
Osprey  1
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Mourning Dove  5
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  3
Chimney Swift  20
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  3
Belted Kingfisher  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  3
Downy Woodpecker  2
Northern Flicker  2
Pileated Woodpecker  3
Eastern Wood-Pewee  2
Acadian Flycatcher  5
Eastern Phoebe  2
Great Crested Flycatcher  1
Eastern Kingbird  5
Red-eyed Vireo  4
Blue Jay  1
American Crow  2
Fish Crow  20
Tree Swallow  2
Barn Swallow  25
Carolina Chickadee  2
Tufted Titmouse  4
White-breasted Nuthatch  3
Carolina Wren  6
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  3
Eastern Bluebird  3
American Robin  12
Gray Catbird  2
European Starling  2
Prothonotary Warbler  4
Common Yellowthroat  7
Yellow Warbler  1
Northern Cardinal  7
Blue Grosbeak  2
Indigo Bunting  4
Red-winged Blackbird  21
Brown-headed Cowbird  1
Common Grackle  15
House Finch  2
American Goldfinch  11


The Monday Morning Birdwalk has been a weekly event at Huntley Meadows since 1985. It takes place every week, rain or shine (except during electrical storms, strong winds, or icy trails), at 7AM (8AM from October through April), is free of charge, requires no reservation, and is open to all. Birders meet in the parking lot at the Park's entrance at 3701 Lockheed Blvd, Alexandria, VA. Questions should be directed to Park staff during normal business hours at (703)768-2525.

Harry Glasgow
Nancy VehrsFriends of Huntley Meadows Park

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Date: 7/9/18 12:24 pm
From: Marshall Faintich via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Canadian Maritime Provinces
Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and New Brunswick; 6/26 to 7/5 2018.
Report and photos:



<http://www.faintich.net/Blog2018/2018_06_26.htm>
http://www.faintich.net/Blog2018/2018_06_26.htm



___________________________

Marshall Faintich

Crozet, VA

<marshall...>

www.faintich.net <http://www.faintich.net/>

In real life, the shortest distance between two points is never a straight
line, so you might as well enjoy the journey !!

____________________________________________________________________________
_______________________





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Date: 7/9/18 11:49 am
From: Steve Johnson via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Pine Siskin in Covington (Alleghany county)
Today while surveying breeding birds in Alleghany County, Lynn and I found a Pine Siskin at a millet feeder. Clear photos will be submitted much later with eBird report. Absolute certain ID, compared side by side with Goldfinch (for size) and female House Finch (bill size, plumage, etc.)

Bird returned repeatedly to feeder in front of apartment building. Just N of I-64, roughly 5 miles E of Covington or 2 miles W of Low Moor. Route 1107 aka Mountaineer Drive, just S of Alleghany H.S., apartments on E side of road.

Steve Johnson and Lynn Rafferty


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Date: 7/8/18 7:26 pm
From: Scott Bastian via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Willets, late post (+ Red-cockaded)
Hi VA Birders;

Last week at the beach in Sandbridge did not turn much up of note.
First Willet was Thursday July 5 and another appeared on July 6.
No Sanderlings seen all week.
Did finally observe Red-Cockaded Woodpecker near Wakefield Piney Grove TNC
after many years of stops (visits were usually in the heat of the day) on
the way to the beach. This single male appeared shortly after noon --
thanks to Stacey Maggard for the assist.
Enjoy,

Scott Bastian
Friedens, PA (SW PA)
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Date: 7/8/18 5:04 pm
From: Stauffer Miller via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] nighthawks
This evening around 6:30 pm three calling Common Nighthawks flew over the Orchard Ridge retirement facility west of Winchester. I have heard a few here through June but not seen any until this evening. Since much of the roof of this facility is gravel, they may nest on it.. Stauffer Miller
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Date: 7/8/18 12:07 pm
From: krae1010--- via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Great Falls NP Bird Walk 07/08/2018 (Fairfax County)
Following is the count from Sunday's weekly bird walk at Great Falls National Park, which identified approximately 45 species and included 12 participants. The weather was tailor-made to order, with bright sun, clear skies, moderate temperatures, and low humidity. Skinks and dragonflies were in abundance, as were, well, birds.  Among the many highlights were Red-shouldered and Red-tailed Hawks, Great Crested Flycatchers, and Indigo Buntings. Also seen by several participants were five Wood Ducks -- including likely juveniles -- lounging on a log.
This walk meets at 8:00 a.m. on Sunday mornings, rain or shine, in front of the snack bar/concession stand of the Great Falls National Park Visitors' center; it does not take place, though, during electrical storms, heavy snows, or when the trails are icy. All those with an interest in the natural world, beginning or experienced birders, or those interested in nice walk in a beautiful setting, please join us.
Canada Goose 9
Wood Duck 5
Mallard 11
Double-crested Cormorant 26
Great Blue Heron 15
Great Egret 2
Green Heron 1
Black Vulture 15
Turkey Vulture 9
Bald Eagle 1 Adult, perched in the canopy adjacent to the Conn Island nest.
Red-shouldered Hawk 1
Red-tailed Hawk 2
Mourning Dove 2
Yellow-billed Cuckoo 1 Heard
Chimney Swift 5
Red-bellied Woodpecker 5 Included one juvenile, being fed.
Downy Woodpecker 4
Hairy Woodpecker 2
Pileated Woodpecker 3
Eastern Wood-Pewee 3
Great Crested Flycatcher 8
Eastern Kingbird  2 Heard
Yellow-throated Vireo 1
Red-eyed Vireo 3
Blue Jay 14
American Crow 2
crow sp.  2
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 8
Tree Swallow 6
Barn Swallow 1
swallow sp. 2
Carolina Chickadee 7
Tufted Titmouse 11
White-breasted Nuthatch 4
Carolina Wren 11
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 5
Eastern Bluebird 1 Juvenile
American Robin 2
Northern Parula 1 Heard
Song Sparrow 3
Northern Cardinal 8
Indigo Bunting 4
Orchard Oriole 2
Red-winged Blackbird 3
Brown-headed Cowbird 2
Common Grackle 2
American Goldfinch 6

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47069811

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

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Date: 7/8/18 9:40 am
From: Marc Ribaudo via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Mississippi Kite, Dyke Marsh
The weekly walk at Dyke Marsh in Alexandria enjoyed splendid weather and a rather typical list for early summer, meaning things were on the quiet side. The notable exception was a distant Mississippi kite, being mobbed by crows in the vicinity of the eagle nest on Tulane Drive. Identification was based on the buoyant flight, pointed wings, longish tail, and gray upperparts. The other notable sighting was a female-plumaged common merganser, seen in the vicinity of the Hunting Creek bridge and then flying over the picnic area. A complete list for today's walk is below. The walk is sponsored by the Friends of Dyke Marsh, is open to all, and takes place on Sundays at 8am, starting from the Belle Haven picnic area.


Marc Ribaudo
<moribaudo...>




Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve, Fairfax, Virginia, US
Jul 8, 2018 7:41 AM - 10:07 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.7 mile(s)
45 species

Canada Goose 20
Mallard 60
Common Merganser 1 Female. Rufous head, slick-backed crest, gray body. White chin.
Double-crested Cormorant 8
Great Blue Heron 4
Black Vulture 1
Turkey Vulture 3
Osprey 17 Ten in the air at once soaring to the south of the boardwalk.
Mississippi Kite 1 Saw flying in distance in vicinity of Tulane Drive. Bouyant-flying raptor with pointed wings, longish tail and gray upperparts. Being mobbed by crows.
Bald Eagle 2
Ring-billed Gull 63
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 2
Mourning Dove 3
Chimney Swift 4
Red-bellied Woodpecker 2
Downy Woodpecker 2
Pileated Woodpecker 1
Great Crested Flycatcher 1
Eastern Kingbird 3
Warbling Vireo 2
Blue Jay 3
Fish Crow 4
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 6
Purple Martin 1
Tree Swallow 2
Barn Swallow 5
Carolina Chickadee 5
Tufted Titmouse 4
White-breasted Nuthatch 1
Carolina Wren 2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 1
American Robin 2
Gray Catbird 1
Northern Mockingbird 1
European Starling 4
Common Yellowthroat 1
Northern Cardinal 4
Orchard Oriole 3
Baltimore Oriole 1
Red-winged Blackbird 6
Brown-headed Cowbird 2
Common Grackle 3
House Finch 3
American Goldfinch 2
House Sparrow 2

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47065949

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

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Date: 7/8/18 9:16 am
From: Russell Taylor via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Germanna Bridge SE 7-7-2018 blockbusting
Germanna Bridge is named for an early German immigrant community that
settled there. The block has fields, mature woods, suburbs, golf course,
crop land, and some significant stretches of the Rapidan River. It is in
Culpepper and Orange Counties, for those of you who keep track of such
things.

The weather yesterday was beautiful. Early on it was cool and overcast,
with some breeze, clearing later but with the temperature still pleasant at
11am. So the birds remained pretty active, not collapsing into panting
heaps by 9am as in the past few weeks. Ten of us, on 3 teams, spent about 5
hours each covering this priority block. Prior to yesterday's push there
had only been 3 or so fairly brief visits to the block, so the additional
effort significantly changed the block statistics.

Particularly interesting species from yesterday included: 10 species of
warbler with 3 new confirmed breeders (Black-and-white, Prairie, and Common
Yellowthroat), Red-headed Woodpeckers, White-eyed, Yellow-throated, and
Red-eyed vireos in multiple locations, Chats, and a non-avian but
surprising arboreal groundhog (per Bryan, way up a tree). For raptors only
Bald Eagle, Red-tailed Hawk, and Osprey were seen, though there was
certainly habitat to support others.

Block stats: VABBA 1 / VABBA 2 before blockbusting / after blockbusting
(these may get revised but as of Sunday morning):
Observed - 6 / 5 / 0
Possible - 51 / 24 / 33
Probable - 9 / 10 / 14
Confirmed - 7 / 7 / 22
Total - 73 / 46 / 69

The net would be that one day of focused blockbusting put this block into
pretty good shape (though nocturnal hours are still needed). It also points
out how little coverage some blocks got in the first breeding bird atlas;
some very talented birders passed that 30 year old probable/confirm record
in just a few hours on visits prior to yesterday's blockbusting. Here are
the current confirmed species for this priority block (those marked with a
P were confirmed prior to the blockbusting effort):

Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Chimney Swift
Northern Flicker (P)
Eastern Kingbird (P)
Red-eyed Vireo
American Crow
Barn Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
Carolina Wren
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Eastern Bluebird (P)
American Robin (P)
Brown Thrasher (P)
Black-and-white Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Pine Warbler (P)
Prairie Warbler (P)
Chipping Sparrow
Eastern Towhee
Indigo Bunting
Orchard Oriole

Part of the reason for all this detail is to encourage interest in this
block ... if you have read this far then the punchline is that there are
still a lot of birds identified as "possible" based on "S" singing heard
either July 4th or yesterday. A visit next weekend that re-heard those
species in the same locations would move them to S7, singing 7 or more
days, a much preferred "Probable" status. So a chance to be a hero without
working too hard :-). The complexity in this block (and I assume many rural
low-density blocks) is determining whether access is permissible at some of
the more attractive birding locations.

The group I was with covered south of Rt 3 to the west and south of the
Rapidan to the east; our best stop was the Germanna Visitor's Center. The
VC was closed but we parked at the Germanna Community College next to it
and walked a wooded trail to the VC area. From there we walked the edge
areas and then trails down to the river edge. You have to be a little
careful as this is right on the south boundary of the block (the line is
through the Germanna CC parking lot). Another good stop with no obvious
access concerns was Kirkpatrick Park south of Rt 3, on the ROW cut for a
buried gas pipeline (it is just west of a recycling center on Rt 3). The
park seems to still be under development and had a locked entrance gate. We
parked on the side of Rt 3 and walked in. We headed south through the woods
(no trail but quite open, allowed us to monitor the gas line cut to the
left and the fields to the right, in addition to the woods. All the other
areas we visited were subdivisions.

The team covering the north part of the block (Sally Knight, Dave Larson,
and Candace Lowther) had good success. They mostly birded along Eleys Ford
Road, turning out wherever there was a safe pull off. From Dave: "Starting
at the west end, side road Bre Z Way Lane, gas line right of way, Sunset
Hill Drive, then a huge clear cut tract. There is a road blocked by a cable
leading through this cut that we walked for a mile and a half that
eventually comes to Lick Creek. However, there was a partially hidden No
Trespassing sign near the cable. Further along on Eleys Ford there is
Field Mill Road, White Rock Drive and Tower Drive. We birded all three. We
got two confirmations on White Rock where the road goes through woods and
then a power line cut."

Bryan's team birded the center of the block and I know had some challenges
with finding spots that were not marked private property. I will let him
add any highlights and recommendations that he has for subsequent visits,
as a follow-up.

Hope everyone is out and enjoying this change in the weather!
Good birds,
Russ Taylor
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Date: 7/8/18 4:12 am
From: Kurt Gaskill via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] Richardsville SE Atlas blockbusting
VA Birders,

Claire Kluskens and I were the other ground team for Richardsville SE yesterday. We confirmed 12 species : Downy WP, White-eyed Vireo (very young fledgling), E Phoebe, Blue Jay, Am Crow, Tufted Titmouse, White-breasted Nuthatch, B&W Warbler, Common Yellowthroat, Pine Warbler, Indigo Bunting and Summer Tanager. For probable, we added Ovenbird and LA Waterthrush. The dust has not all settled but the priority block should be well over 50species. Interesting possibles were E. Screech and Kentucky Warbler.

KG. (Ok, really, using initials? It’s Kurt Gaskill; have fun out there!)

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 7, 2018, at 2:56 PM, Marc Ribaudo via VA-bird <va-bird...> wrote:
>
>
> Phil Silas and I birded in Richardsville SE Atlas block this morning, in Culpepper Co. This block is quite isolated and surrounded by the Rappahannock and Rapidan rivers. Mostly wooded with some cut-over pine plantations(?). We tallied 44 species and confirmed breeding for 11. Highlights were a yellow-billed cuckoo sitting on a nest, a male northern parula feeding a fledgling, a family of orchard orioles, a fledgling scarlet tanager with a few downy feathers still present, and a female black-and-white warbler.
>
>
>
> Marc Ribaudo
> <moribaudo...>
>
> *** You are subscribed to VA-bird as <kurtcapt87...> If you wish to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***

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Date: 7/7/18 11:56 am
From: Marc Ribaudo via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Richardsville SE Atlas blockbusting

Phil Silas and I birded in Richardsville SE Atlas block this morning, in Culpepper Co. This block is quite isolated and surrounded by the Rappahannock and Rapidan rivers. Mostly wooded with some cut-over pine plantations(?). We tallied 44 species and confirmed breeding for 11. Highlights were a yellow-billed cuckoo sitting on a nest, a male northern parula feeding a fledgling, a family of orchard orioles, a fledgling scarlet tanager with a few downy feathers still present, and a female black-and-white warbler.



Marc Ribaudo
<moribaudo...>

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Date: 7/5/18 9:59 am
From: Anderson, Janet M. DCARO via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Birds Seen July 4, 2018 and July 5, 2018
July 4, 2018

1 Adult Mississippi Kite - along Emory Street and Elmdale Street off of Braddock Road in Annandale, Fairfax County, VA

1 Common Nighthawk near the same area


July 5, 2018

1 Adult Mississippi Kite seen near Marionet Street and Vale Street in Annandale, Fairfax County, VA off of Braddock Road

Janet M. Anderson
City of Falls Church, VA
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Date: 7/5/18 7:50 am
From: Eirlys Barker via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] Ruby Throated Hummingbirds
We have four feeders and lots of often belligerent Ruby-throats. Numbers
are high and constant. Yet, a neighbor about 2 miles away just sent me a
photo of three at a feeder, one male, and says that's usual at her house.

Eirlys Barker, Pinetta, Gloucester

On Wed, Jul 4, 2018 at 4:08 PM, Charles Woodrich via VA-bird <
<va-bird...> wrote:

> Just a general observation. Normally in past years there’s been a fair
> amount of competition between the males at the feeder; one defending and
> others trying to help themselves. This year there’s one pair (male &
> female) and that’s it; no competition at the feeder. Are the numbers down
> this year or am I just having an odd year?
>
> Charlie
> *** You are subscribed to VA-bird as <dreirlys...> If you wish to
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Date: 7/5/18 4:15 am
From: Jeff Blalock via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Common Grackles Flyover
Greetings all:

Yesterday and this morning I had a count of over 4500 Common Grackles flyover within sight of my house.

Most have flown over from 0600 to 0630 Hrs. There were mixture of small and very large flocks.

Happy Birding Always

From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>



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Date: 7/4/18 1:08 pm
From: Charles Woodrich via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Ruby Throated Hummingbirds
Just a general observation. Normally in past years there’s been a fair amount of competition between the males at the feeder; one defending and others trying to help themselves. This year there’s one pair (male & female) and that’s it; no competition at the feeder. Are the numbers down this year or am I just having an odd year?

Charlie
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Date: 7/3/18 8:40 pm
From: Howard Wu via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] (extralimital) The Galapagos Islands (May 2018)
Hi, all:

In May I took a trip to the Galapagos (an 8-day cruise), then mainland
Ecuador (for about 10 days). This was a fantastic trip which I am sure some
of you have taken before. I have put up a web page for the Galapagos
portion of this trip below (the mainland portion will take some more time):

http://www.travelerathome.com/2018_galapagos.html

(I somewhat hastily put up these pages, they may still contain some typos
and identification errors.)

A couple of random notes (most of which related to birds):

This was not a birding-only trip, and the Galapagos actually has relatively
low biodiversity (but it has a high percentage of endemics). In the end, I
tallied 28 new species, highlights of which include: 3 species of boobies
(Nazca, Red-footed and Blue-footed), my first penguin in the wild
(Galapagos Penguin), several species of Darwin's Finches, 2 species of
mockingbirds (pictures of some pelagic birds were fuzzy and are not shown
on these pages). I am sure one who takes more birding-oriented trips would
have gotten quite a few more.

Also interesting is that there is one warbler species, the Yellow Warbler,
that is almost ubiquitous in coastal habitats -- not only in the mangroves,
but also in towns. Obviously, it is a bird that is pretty common in
Virginia also (I sometimes can see it in my backyard), and seeing it in the
far-flung islands in the middle of the Pacific Ocean is like running into
an old friend. But, more relevantly, here at home, it does not seem that
different from other warblers. Of course, each warbler species has its own
niche in nature, what I mean is that its habitat is somewhat similar to, or
at least overlaps with, that of other species; I can think of Prothonotary
Warbler and Common Yellowthroat for example. But why is that only this one
warbler species established itself in the Galapagos?

I hope you enjoy. Thanks and have a nice July 4th!

Howard Wu
Herndon, VA
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Date: 7/3/18 4:59 pm
From: John Greenwood via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Fwd: NYTimes.com: Can Crows Make Mental Pictures of Tools?
They’re smart birds for sure

Jack Greenwood
>
> New Caledonian crows were trained to seek rewards by tearing paper of a certain size, demonstrating what researchers say is advanced toolmaking.
>
> https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/28/science/crows-toolmaking.html
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone

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Date: 7/2/18 8:02 pm
From: Harry Glasgow via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwal


Twenty-six birders gathered in oppressive heat for today's Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk,and they counted 48 species.  Our highlights included another week of the Mallard/AmericanBlack Duck hybrid that has been at Huntley for the past several weeks.   Other than that, it was a fairly ordinary day.  The summer doldrums seem to be setting in.  



Canada Goose  41
Wood Duck  12
Mallard/American Black Duck  2
Hooded Merganser  9
Wild Turkey  1
Great Blue Heron  6
Green Heron  3
Osprey  1
Red-shouldered Hawk  2
Killdeer  2
Mourning Dove  5
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  3
Chimney Swift  1
Belted Kingfisher  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
Downy/Hairy Woodpecker  4
Northern Flicker  2
Pileated Woodpecker  2
Eastern Wood-Pewee  8
Acadian Flycatcher  5
Eastern Phoebe  2
Great Crested Flycatcher  3
Eastern Kingbird  3
Red-eyed Vireo  6
Blue Jay  3
American Crow  3
Fish Crow  5
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  3
Tree Swallow  3
Barn Swallow  7
Carolina Chickadee  4
Tufted Titmouse  5
White-breasted Nuthatch  2
Carolina Wren  4
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  6
Eastern Bluebird  4
American Robin  15
Gray Catbird  4
Prothonotary Warbler  2
Common Yellowthroat  9
Northern Cardinal  4
Indigo Bunting  2
Red-winged Blackbird  21
Brown-headed Cowbird  2
Common Grackle  13
House Finch  2
American Goldfinch  6


The Monday Morning Birdwalk has been a weekly event at Huntley Meadows since 1985. It takes place every week, rain or shine (except during electrical storms, strong winds, or icy trails), at 7AM (8AM from October through April), is free of charge, requires no reservation, and is open to all. Birders meet in the parking lot at the Park's entrance at 3701 Lockheed Blvd, Alexandria, VA. Questions should be directed to Park staff during normal business hours at (703)768-2525.

Harry Glasgow
Nancy VehrsFriends of Huntley Meadows Park

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Date: 7/2/18 6:22 pm
From: kurtcapt87--- via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Upperville SE Blockbuster (Fauquier Co) Report, Saturday 30 June 2018
VA Birders,

Upperville SE Blockbuster (Fauquier Co) Report, Saturday 30 June 2018

13 people gathered for the Blockbuster - established Atlas hands Marc
Ribuado, Dave Larsen, David Ledwith, Carole Miller, Andy Martin, Jane Yocum,
Mary Ann Good, Dave Boltz, and Bill Parkin anchored the crew. Plus, we were
joined by two young birders and their parents (whose names escape me - my
apologies) who stuck it out to nearly the end! We ran 4 teams and delivered
a great punch - an increase of 14 species to the list of potential breeders
and a dozen more to the breeder pool (= probable plus confirmed species);
that's over a 20% improvement in both categories! Upperville SE is now
poised for completion, only requiring some nocturnal hours.

Highlight was undoubtably the female Summer Tanager David Ledwith found. An
unusual bird in the foothills of the northern Shenandoah/Blue Ridge.
Confirmation list highlights were American Kestrel, Killdeer, Red-headed WP,
Warbling Vireo, and Scarlet Tanager. Pine Warbler, Willow Flycatcher and
Yellow Warbler were notables for the Probable breeders. New additions to
the Possible breeder list such as Cooper's Hawk, RT Hummer, Worm-eating
Warbler, American Redstart, YB Chat, and Blue Grosbeak were most welcome.

It looks like one or two blocks in Culpeper - Richardsville SE and Germanna
Bridge SE (if we get enough teams) are the targets for Saturday July 8. We
can always use some help or another team - drops us line if you are
interested in joining. Thank you!

But, more importantly, a Special Thank You to the volunteers who came out to
Upperville SE last Saturday - a great effort that really made a difference.

Wishing You All Good Birds,

Linda Millington and Kurt Gaskill



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Date: 7/2/18 10:46 am
From: Connie Sale via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Bird ID needed for Rehabber - is a BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER!
Hi List Members,


Thank you all for your prompt responses! The overwhelming consensus is that it is a blue-gray gnatcatcher fledgling!


Bird is doing well and will be released back into his home territory as soon as he flies strong.


Connie & Wilton Sale
<humnchirp...>
Hummingbirds and Songbirds
State and Federal Permits
NWRA, IWRC



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Date: 7/2/18 10:03 am
From: Marlene A Condon via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] about disappearance of Tree Swallows in my area
Hi Janet,
 
Thanks so much for writing.  Here's what I recommend for dealing with paper wasp nests:
 
In spring, when morning temperatures are in the 40s or below, wasps are sluggish.  This is a safe time to knock down small nests inside bird boxes or on other structures, such as your house.  However, you must take action before the structure gets sunlight on it to warm up the insect(s).
 
You can kill the wasp(s) on the ground (they won't be able to fly at these temps), although with their numbers being down, I would ask that you consider leaving them be.  All organisms exist to perform "jobs" that help to keep the environment functioning properly, so we don't want to eliminate them.
 
It's possible the female will again attempt to build a nest in the same location, or she may immediately move on.  In my experience, a nest does not get rebuilt more than once in the same spot.
 
If you do a weekly (or daily) inspection in spring, you can pretty-much eliminate your wasp problem.   By the time morning temperatures are pretty-much always in the 50s or above (sometime in May, usually, in our area), wasps are generally all nesting somewhere and won't be starting new nests (although very rarely you may get a female later than usual still trying to get a nest started).   
 
I've been doing this type of morning patrol for years now and found it to be quite effective.
 
Sincerely,
Marlene   
 
 
 
In a message dated 7/2/2018 12:08:51 PM US Eastern Standard Time, <janetpaisley...> writes:
 
My Bluebird trail on Garth Road in Albemarle County, has fledged 2 boxes of TRSW, with 5 fledglings each, so far this year, out of 14 boxes.

So far 38 Bluebirds have fledged, and the birds are on their second nests. I, too, am having less trouble with paper wasps this year, a constant problem for 10 years on the trail on this farm. I’ve tried everything.

I used to have 22 boxes, but 6 have been crushed by bears in the last couple of years on this trail! Bears have been the most efficient way to deal with the wasps that I’ve found, until the weather of this Spring!

Janet Paisley
Charlottesville, VA

> On Jul 2, 2018, at 10:50 AM, Marlene A Condon via VA-bird <va-bird...> wrote:
>
>
> Thanks so much to everyone who replied to my question about Tree Swallows. No one reported around the state lower numbers of these birds, as is the case in my immediate area where there have been none since spring.
>
> I'm thinking that the problem may have been a dearth of flying insects about the time the swallows moved through here in April. Our area was especially hard hit by drought last year, which can seriously impact the breeding success and survival of insects. For example, I had very few paper wasps flying this spring in my yard and very few nests built on my house as compared to previous years. While some species of insects seem to be fine, others are quite limited in number this year.
>
> If anyone has any other thoughts on the matter, I would deeply appreciate hearing them. Thanks ever so much!
>
> Gratefully,
> Marlene
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *** You are subscribed to VA-bird as <janetpaisley...> If you wish to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***


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Date: 7/2/18 9:05 am
From: Janet Paisley via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] about disappearance of Tree Swallows in my area
My Bluebird trail on Garth Road in Albemarle County, has fledged 2 boxes of TRSW, with 5 fledglings each, so far this year, out of 14 boxes.

So far 38 Bluebirds have fledged, and the birds are on their second nests. I, too, am having less trouble with paper wasps this year, a constant problem for 10 years on the trail on this farm. I’ve tried everything.

I used to have 22 boxes, but 6 have been crushed by bears in the last couple of years on this trail! Bears have been the most efficient way to deal with the wasps that I’ve found, until the weather of this Spring!

Janet Paisley
Charlottesville, VA

> On Jul 2, 2018, at 10:50 AM, Marlene A Condon via VA-bird <va-bird...> wrote:
>
>
> Thanks so much to everyone who replied to my question about Tree Swallows. No one reported around the state lower numbers of these birds, as is the case in my immediate area where there have been none since spring.
>
> I'm thinking that the problem may have been a dearth of flying insects about the time the swallows moved through here in April. Our area was especially hard hit by drought last year, which can seriously impact the breeding success and survival of insects. For example, I had very few paper wasps flying this spring in my yard and very few nests built on my house as compared to previous years. While some species of insects seem to be fine, others are quite limited in number this year.
>
> If anyone has any other thoughts on the matter, I would deeply appreciate hearing them. Thanks ever so much!
>
> Gratefully,
> Marlene
>
>
>
>
>
>
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Date: 7/2/18 8:28 am
From: m b via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] drones are a bird list issue
Setting aside the territorial impact drones have on many birds, with the most famous instance recently being a hawk videoed enthusiastically attacking a drone in its space,(hawk won) there are other already demonstrated impacts.

Such as:

"A recent observation of a drone deployed to 20m altitude for recreational photography on the beach in Maputo scaring Whimbrel up to 400m away, suggests that some birds may be very sensitive to drones. "

And this is before there has even been time to do extensive studies on the matter.

Of course, there are also the impacts on birders. I have had a couple of teenagers hover a drone right above my head on the shores of Lake Michigan as I was observing redheads migrating in spring. Luckily I had a tripod and was able to smack that drone right out of my airspace. And call the cops, as I knew that drones were not allowed there.

Personally, I would like to see drones and the lovely people who fly them anywhere but their own backyard banned to an inner circle of hell for eternity. I would make exceptions for scientists using them to access remote areas for conservation purposes without damaging the fragile areas by walking in them. Business, greed, selfishness, and money always winning, plus hell having someone other than myself in charge, if it exists, I doubt that will happen.

But the idea that is somehow antithetical to the subject matter to post locations where drones are and are not legally allowed in regularly birded areas on a list dedicated to bird information is incorrect. It is absolutely on point.

Thanks to those who posted with this most necessary information. Now we know when we can and should call for enforcement and when and where we can't.

mb from nova
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Date: 7/2/18 7:51 am
From: Marlene A Condon via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] about disappearance of Tree Swallows in my area

Thanks so much to everyone who replied to my question about Tree Swallows.  No one reported around the state lower numbers of these birds, as is the case in my immediate area where there have been none since spring.
 
I'm thinking that the problem may have been a dearth of flying insects about the time the swallows moved through here in April.  Our area was especially hard hit by drought last year, which can seriously impact the breeding success and survival of insects.  For example, I had very few paper wasps flying this spring in my yard and very few nests built on my house as compared to previous years.  While some species of insects seem to be fine, others are quite limited in number this year.
 
If anyone has any other thoughts on the matter, I would deeply appreciate hearing them.  Thanks ever so much!
 
Gratefully,
Marlene
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Date: 7/2/18 4:21 am
From: Ann via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] (no subject)
http://success.michaelstanway.ca

Ann



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Date: 7/1/18 3:03 pm
From: Dan Huddleston via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] duck ID
I have checked three books and don't have a clue what this one is. Here
is a front shot and a profile. She "that is a guess" has a duckling, she
is shading from the heat in the standing shot.

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Date: 7/1/18 2:22 pm
From: Shea Tiller via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] Bird ID needed for rehabber
That appears to be a blue-gray gnatcatcher--the dark and light tail pattern
is exactly right, the beak is the right length and shape, and on top of the
general color being correct, the eye ring is also a giveaway.

Shea

On Sun, Jul 1, 2018 at 4:48 PM, Barbara Farron via VA-bird <
<va-bird...> wrote:

> Hi Connie,
>
> I'm not an expert--but I think it's a young white-breasted nuthatch,
> titmouse, or (as suggested by Nancy Young), a blue-gray gnat catcher.
> Hopefully, one of the experienced birders will let all of us know soon!
>
> Barbara Farron
> Fairfax, VA
>
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>
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Date: 7/1/18 1:48 pm
From: Barbara Farron via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] Bird ID needed for rehabber
Hi Connie,

I'm not an expert--but I think it's a young white-breasted nuthatch,
titmouse, or (as suggested by Nancy Young), a blue-gray gnat catcher. 
Hopefully, one of the experienced birders will let all of us know soon!

Barbara Farron
Fairfax, VA
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Date: 7/1/18 1:34 pm
From: Nancy Young via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] Bird ID needed for rehabber
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher maybe?

Nancy Young
Botetourt County

-----Original Message-----
From: Connie Sale via VA-bird
Sent: Sunday, July 1, 2018 3:34 PM
To: <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Bird ID needed for rehabber

Hi Birders,


This little fledgie was saved from drowning by a fisherman. What is it?


http://i272.photobucket.com/albums/jj193/humnchirp/Mystery%20bird%202_zpsscxyesyp.jpg



Connie & Wilton Sale
<humnchirp...>
Hummingbirds and Songbirds
State and Federal Permits
NWRA, IWRC



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Date: 7/1/18 12:38 pm
From: Connie Sale via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Bird ID needed for rehabber
Hi Birders,


This little fledgie was saved from drowning by a fisherman. What is it?


http://i272.photobucket.com/albums/jj193/humnchirp/Mystery%20bird%202_zpsscxyesyp.jpg



Connie & Wilton Sale
<humnchirp...>
Hummingbirds and Songbirds
State and Federal Permits
NWRA, IWRC



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Date: 7/1/18 12:34 pm
From: Connie Sale via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Bird ID needed for rehabber
Hi Birders,


This little fledgie was saved from drowning by a fisherman. What is it?


http://i272.photobucket.com/albums/jj193/humnchirp/Mystery%20bird%202_zpsscxyesyp.jpg



Connie & Wilton Sale
<humnchirp...>
Hummingbirds and Songbirds
State and Federal Permits
NWRA, IWRC



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Date: 7/1/18 12:26 pm
From: Colt Gregory via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Great Fall National Park Sunday Bird Walk
Following is the count from Sunday's weekly bird walk at Great Falls National Park, which identified 33 species and included 10 participants. Our 8:00am start helped but did not avoid the heat of the morning. We saw a red-tailed fox trotting down the entrance road who cut into the woods, avoiding the entrance fee. We shared a shady resting log with a juvenile Common 5-lined skink with a long blue tail. The most beautiful find of the day were 4 Baltimore Orioles including a male/female set.

This walk meets at 8:00 a.m. on Sunday mornings, rain or shine, in front of the snack bar/concession stand of the Great Falls National Park Visitors' center; it does not take place, though, during electrical storms, heavy snows, or when the trails are icy. All those with an interest in the natural world, beginning or experienced birders, or those interested in nice walk in a beautiful setting, please join us.

Species and Count


Canada Goose 7


Mallard 5


Double-crested Cormorant 2


Great Blue Heron 24


Black Vulture 8


Turkey Vulture 2


Chimney Swift 1


Red-bellied Woodpecker 7


Downy Woodpecker 4


Eastern Wood-Pewee 5


Great Crested Flycatcher 13


Eastern Kingbird 4 Seen at Great Falls picnic center. Open area near the Potomac River. Appears larger adult Kingbird is feed a smaller fledging.


Warbling Vireo 1


Red-eyed Vireo 1


Blue Jay 10


American Crow 5


crow sp. 4


Tree Swallow 1


Carolina Chickadee 5


Tufted Titmouse 8


White-breasted Nuthatch 7


Carolina Wren 8


Eastern Bluebird 4


Wood Thrush 2


American Robin 2


European Starling 2


Northern Parula 2


Chipping Sparrow 2


Song Sparrow 2


Northern Cardinal 11


Indigo Bunting 5


Baltimore Oriole 4 A male and female. Either courting behavior or feeding a fledgling?


Red-winged Blackbird 1


Common Grackle 5





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Date: 7/1/18 12:01 pm
From: Rob Bielawski via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Late June Observations for Virginia Beach & Some Atlasing Information
Fellow Birders,

The full write-up with photographs and hyperlinks to all the mentioned
eBird reports / sources is available on the web here:
http://www.beachbirding.com/journal/pe-20180630 Past entries of this
thrice-monthly report are available here: http://www.beachbirding.
com/journal-index/
------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------
Extreme heat and humidity permeated the region throughout late June, easily
notching a new high mark for the average of daily high temperatures for a
thrice-monthly period this year. Pop-up thunderstorms were common,
occurring most evenings, with torrential downpours and impressive lightning
storms noted along with high winds on several occasions. The unstable
weather didn’t appear to dampen the efforts of local birds however, as the
number of eBird submissions did rise over the doldrums of mid-June. Unusual
finds were hard to come by, as expected during this time frame, but,
knowing fall migration for shorebirds is about to begin, it’s hard to feel
anything other than anticipation. Top records for late June in Virginia
Beach included continuing rarity reports for the Ashville Park WARBLING
VIREO as well as unseasonal occurrences for RUDDY DUCK, PIED-BILLED GREBE
and TUNDRA SWAN. Only one late species was noted, with a single report for
RED-BREASTED MERGANSER to kick off the period.

Continuing from the mid-June reporting period, the WARBLING VIREO first
detected along Ashville Park Boulevard on 14 Jun (a.r. Michael Linz & Patty
McLean), managed to stay in the same general area all the way through 26
Jun (obs. Karen & Tom Beatty). All observations of this remarkable
individual have occurred in the willow oak trees just east of the clock
tower roundabout (the first traffic circle east of Princess Anne Road).
While the bird has, at times, been observed in flight crossing the storm
water pond on the north side of the road, it hasn’t spent much time in the
sycamore trees there before returning to the boulevard’s tree-lined edges.
Given this remains the only summer individual of its kind so far noted in
eBird on the coast south of Delaware, it seems highly worth the effort of
continuing to track its presence. Virginia Beach has never had a July
record for Warbling Vireo, and come Sunday, we may have our first
legitimate shot at one!

A big surprise this period was the emergence of a report from Mt. Trashmore
Park detailing a single RUDDY DUCK present on the lake on 27 Jun (obs. Kent
Millham; later ph. Rob Bielawski). Highly unusual this time of year, with
the last records for this species in the city occurring way back on 18 Apr
(obs. Steve Myers). Interestingly, the last few spring reports all
originated at this same location, and it makes me wonder if this individual
actually stayed here all this time and was just never noticed. The other
explanation would be that it is a dispersal bird from perhaps Craney Island
in Portsmouth or Chincoteague NWR in Accomack, as these two locations see
summer reports of individuals almost annually. Whatever the case, it is
certainly a waterfowl species that we don’t expect to find here in summer,
with the last Jun/Jul record occurring back in 2014, and the only others in
2002. Perhaps like the Warbling Vireo mentioned above, we’ll see this bird
linger into July at this location.

During the late June impoundment survey at Back Bay NWR, a pair of
waterbirds turned up that really shouldn’t be present at this point in the
year. The first, a true surprise, was a single PIED-BILLED GREBE noted on
the Back Bay NWR eBird account as being identified by Bob Ake. June records
are difficult to come by for this species, but Back Bay surely provides the
best habitat we have in the city for one to over-summer or attempt to
breed. Usually by mid-to-late July, we’re starting to see these popping up
again in the region, but this record stands out for being the only late
June record since 2014. Additionally, the (likely) injured TUNDRA SWAN that
has been present at Back Bay for about a month now appears to continue,
having showed up also in the impoundment survey report. Just a couple of
more days, and we could be documenting the first occurrence of this species
here in the month of July.

At least one RED-BREASTED MERGANSER persisted into late June in Virginia
Beach, while as many as three were noted in the early part of the month.
The Gold Book notes the summer month distribution of this species as,
“Small numbers often linger into late May and early June; relatively rare
summer visitor along the coast (very rare inland)”, so given we’re now
about to hit July, if one pops up again, it will be noted here as an
unseasonal occurrence rather than simply a late bird, because at this
point, it’s like the bird is going to attempt summering rather than simply
being a late straggler. While the only report of a single female occurred
at Pleasure House Point NA on 21 Jun (ph. Andrew Baldelli), it’s possible
that we’ll see this one, or other again moving forward…there’s a lot of
water out there, and even more vegetation to hide among. In an average
year, we don’t typically see this species returning to the area until late
October, so any reports between now and then will certainly be noted.

Now that we’re in the heat of summer, it feels important to remind all
birders in Virginia Beach that the 2nd Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas is
moving full-steam ahead into its third season of data collection. For those
folks who aren’t familiar, this five year project is aimed at mapping out
the breeding ranges for every bird species that nests within the state of
Virginia. It is intended to provide a comparison with data from the 1st
Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas, which took place in the 1980s, to identify
species whose populations have deteriorated, and to use this knowledge to
build plans on how these species-in-need might be better assisted by
federal agencies and conservation organizations. Co-sponsored by the
Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fishers, the Virginia Society of
Ornithology and the Conservation Management Institute at Virginia Tech,
this project relies heavily on volunteers for data input using eBird, so if
you’re already an eBird user, this project is a great way to help make your
checklists potentially count for more than just numbers on your personal
life list, by helping document the shifting distributional patterns of
species that can directly benefit from your observations! A large array of
information regarding the project is available online, with the Atlas
Website being a great starting point for anyone who might be interested, as
well as the Atlas eBird Portal News Page. Additionally, I help run the
Atlas’ Public Facebook Page (where information is shared to the broader
community of those folks who have shown an interest in the project), as
well as the Atlas’ Facebook Group (where active Atlasers can share their
sightings and discuss various aspects of the project with one another).

All that said, we had some great confirmations documented for the project
during late June in Virginia Beach. Most notable was the that of a highly
interesting record submitted for a species rarely seen outside of an
expected portion of the city. While birding-by-kayak in the Lynnhaven
Estuary just south of Pleasure House Point NA on 21 Jun, Andrew
Baldellidiscovered an adult LEAST BITTERN vocalizing from one of the
marshy-vegetated islands that are inaccessible by any other means. While
searching for the bird, it flushed along with a juvenile, which was then
fed by the adult, allowing for the first confirmed breeding record for this
species in the city for the 2nd Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas! Least Bittern
is a species known to inhabitat the marshes that surround Back Bay, but it
is very rarely reported away from the southern portion of the city. To not
only get a positive sighting documented by an audio recording, but to then
get a breeding confirmation at this location is nothing short of
incredible. Additionally, other scattered breeding bird confirmations were
photographically documented around the city this period as follows:
recently fledged WOOD DUCKS and MALLARDS in Southgate on 22 Jun (ph. Karen
& Tom Beatty); an adult WHITE-EYED VIREO carrying food at Princess Anne
WMA’s Whitehurst Tract on 23 Jun (ph. Rob Bielawski); an occupied nest of
OSPREY, recently fledged KING RAILS, and an adult BLUE GROSBEAK carrying
food at Back Bay NWR on 25 Jun (ph. Charlie Bruggemann); recently fledged
KILLDEER at Camp Pendleton SMR on 26 Jun (ph. Mary Catherine Miguez); an
occupied GREEN HERON nest in Kings Grant on 29 Jun (ph. Pamela Monahan); a
female RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD carrying food at Pleasure House Point NA on 30
Jun (ph. Rob Bielawski) and lastly, a recently fledged RED-BELLIED
WOODPECKER at Dam Neck NA on 30 Jun (ph. Karen & Tom Beatty). Keep up all
the great work Atlasing folks!

WEATHER: Easily our warmest reporting period for 2018 so far, and perhaps
expectedly so as temperatures are typically on the rise from February
through July, before dropping from August through January. The Summer
Solstice occurred on 21 Jun, being our longest day and shortest night in
the northern hemisphere. That said, we’re now on a path that will have us
losing precious minutes of daylight until we reach the Winter Solstice in
late December. Over all, average daily high temperatures rose 2.6° from
84.5° F to 87.1° (-0.1° from prior 10-year average), with average daily low
temperatures also increasing, 4.4° from 68.0° to 72.4° F (+1.7° from prior
10-year average). Daytime temperatures ranged from a minimum of 70° F (26
Jun) to a maximum of 91° (23, 24 & 30 Jun). A total of 2.06” of rain fell
during the period, spread across seven days with measurement amounts, with
a maximum of 1.41” falling on Saturday, 23 Jun. Maximum sustained winds at
Oceana this period were 29 mph and gusts reached 37 mph (24 Jun) as a
strong front passed over the region. No significant tidal surge events (2’
or greater) impacted the Sewell’s Point tide gauge during this reporting
period. Sunrise/sunsets varied from 5:46 AM/8:27 PM (21 Jun) to 5:49
AM/8:28 PM (30 Jun), which, for the first time in 2018 means we lost 2
minutes of daylight during this period (due to the Summer Solstice
occurring) with a total of 14 hours, 39 minutes of ‘Length of Day’ to close
the period.

For those hoping to view every photograph submitted for Virginia Beach
during this period, please see the complete listing for the month of June
located on eBird’s Media explorer by clicking here! Please remember, anyone
with an eBird account also has the ability to rate these photographs (1-5
stars), and based on the average rating, this is how eBird populates
anything media-driven on the website, particularly the Illustrated
Checklists! So, if you're one of the many folks who enjoy looking at
photographs of birds, take some time to click them all and rate them, it
helps make eBird better and better each day!

LOOKAHEAD: Ironically, what makes late June such an exciting period, is
that it officially ends the periods lacking in excitment! Moving forward,
we finally have fall arrivals to look forward to from early July all the
way through November. The month of July is typically dominated by
observations of arriving shorebirds, which have already started departing
from their breeding grounds in the Canadian tundra. Technically speaking,
SPOTTED SANDPIPER is set as a 30 Jun arrival (our only June arrival for
that matter), and while we did have two records for the species in June, we
should expect far more moving forward into July. Additionally, during early
July we have expected arrivals for GULL-BILLED TERN, SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER
& LEAST SANDPIPER (5 Jul average expected arrival date) and WESTERN
SANDPIPER, WHIMBREL, BLACK TERN, LESSER YELLOWLEGS & RUDDY TURNSTONE (10
Jul). The coastal beaches, as well as any low-tide marshes and flooded
fields will become highly sought after locations to search for shorebirds
during July. So, please pay close attention to the weather, and to the
status of crops in fields throughout southern Virginia Beach, as fall
migration is now almost upon us!

For further information regarding this thrice-monthly, online publication,
please visit the Journal Overview Page which provides an in-depth
explanation of the format, layout and composition of the journal. As
always, thank you for reading, and please leave me a comment below (you may
use your Facebook, Gmail or other accounts to easily do so), or just click
the Heart icon to the lower right of this post to let me know you stopped
in!

Thanks All,

Rob Bielawski
Virginia Beach, VA
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Date: 7/1/18 11:57 am
From: grm0803 via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Mississippi Kites, Lake Mercer, Fairfax Station
Around 2:15 PM today, I saw two Mississippi Kites soaring over the trees on the south side of South Run, near where the creek widens to form Lake Mercer.
George Martin
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Date: 7/1/18 10:48 am
From: David Engelen via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Reminder - this is a Bird list!
Hey,

I appreciate the curiosity and wealth of information on drones and no-fly zones, but is this the purpose of this listing? Are we going to start seeing posts of trails needing maintenance and Katerina’s that need care?

There is a venue for this type of communication, but I’d hope the VA Bird List server be just that.

Just a thought.

David

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 7/1/18 8:48 am
From: Thomas Nardone via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Fwd: eBird Report - Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve, Jul 1, 2018
Seven birders participated in the weekly walk at Dyke Marsh sponsored by the Friends of Dyke Marsh.

We observed 36 species. The highlight was a juvenile bald eagle perched in a relatively low tree within 30-40 of the broad walk.

The complete list is shown below.



>
> Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve, Fairfax, Virginia, US
> Jul 1, 2018 8:00 AM - 10:44 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 2.448 mile(s)
> 36 species
>
> Canada Goose 12
> Mallard 20
> Double-crested Cormorant 8
> Great Blue Heron 1
> Osprey 9
> Bald Eagle 6 3 adults and three juveniles
> Mourning Dove 3
> Chimney Swift 6
> Red-bellied Woodpecker 2
> Downy Woodpecker 2
> Northern Flicker 1 Heard
> Great Crested Flycatcher 3
> Eastern Kingbird 3
> Warbling Vireo 4 Heard
> Blue Jay 8
> Fish Crow 4
> Northern Rough-winged Swallow 8
> Purple Martin 5
> Tree Swallow 6
> Carolina Chickadee 3
> Carolina Wren 2 Heard
> Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 1 Heard
> American Robin 6
> Northern Mockingbird 1
> European Starling 10
> Common Yellowthroat 1 Heard
> Northern Parula 1 Heard
> Yellow Warbler 1
> Northern Cardinal 6
> Orchard Oriole 7
> Baltimore Oriole 2
> Red-winged Blackbird 15
> Brown-headed Cowbird 1
> Common Grackle 4
> House Finch 4
> American Goldfinch 1 Heard
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46916369
>
>

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Date: 6/30/18 1:53 pm
From: Stephen Eccles via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Possible Broad-winged Hawks, Fairfax County
Around 10.30 this morning, near Rutherford Park (where Guinea Road crosses
Long Branch), Fairfax County, I saw a buteo circling high overhead. I
checked it out, expecting a Red-shouldered, a common breeders here. The sun
was strong, making viewing quite difficult. Nevertheless, the tail pattern
was quite clearly that of a Broad-winged. Then I spotted another bird,
somewhat higher still. Same thing - a clear Broad-winged tail pattern.

Broad-wings do breed occasionally in the general area, but I haven't seen
one in the breeding season Fairfax County for many, many years (and then
only in the Clifton area). I do see a few in migration each year, though.

Because of the lighting conditions, and the relative rarity of this species
here during the breeding season, I am reluctant to record this sighting for
the Virginia Breeding Atlas, unless I find them again, or someone else has
also spotted this species in this general area..

Stephen Eccles
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Date: 6/30/18 12:36 pm
From: Steve Johnson via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] relative distribution of several common species in Virginia



Hello birders,


This could be confusing to some, at least it was to me. I was interested in discussing the relative distribution, not disappearance, of several different species around the state. The subject line got changed to "disappearance of Tree Swallows".


This is an important topic also, because I have also gotten the impression of fewer Tree Swallows in Fairfax County, particularly a high incidence of nest box mortality at bluebird trails here.


At the same time, I wanted to reassert the intent of the original thread. I'm still interested in any thoughts from anyone about the relative distributions around the state, of Warbling Vireos, Tree Swallows, Chickadees, and Song Sparrows, only because they seemed rather "missing" from the areas we recently surveyed.



Steve Johnson
<stevejohnson2...>




-----Original Message-----
From: Marlene A Condon <marlenecondon...>
To: stevejohnson2 <stevejohnson2...>; va-bird <va-bird...>
Sent: Sat, Jun 30, 2018 12:29 pm
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] distribution (disappearance ) of Tree Swallows




Hi Steve,


Thanks so much for your post. I'd been wanting to ask folks if they'd noticed a dearth of Tree Swallows this year.


We had Tree Swallows in our area, as usual, this spring. However, and very strangely, they all left the rural area where I live in western Albemarle and never returned. A neighbor, about a mile from my yard as the crow flies, always has Tree Swallows in her bird boxes, but hers disappeared, and I haven't seen them at another bird box in the opposite direction from here either. Also, these birds seem to have disappeared from my mother-in-law's area in Waynesboro.


It's worrisome. They were here (including at my house), and then every last one disappeared before breeding had yet to begin.


I would really appreciate hearing from others (in Virginia, or other states to the north, especially) as to what you've noticed as regards Tree Swallows this year.


Thanks ever so much.


Sincerely,
Marlene







In a message dated 6/30/2018 6:52:57 AM US Eastern Standard Time, <va-bird...> writes:



Hello birders,


During the past 10 days, Lynn and I surveyed for the Breeding Bird Atlas in different parts of the state, than the No. Virginia areas we are accustomed to. We were struck by the scarcity of a few species, and we're curious if others can confirm our impressions.


We had 4 days around Appomattox (E of Lynchburg), and 5 days around Smith Mountain Lake (SE of Roanoke), and focused on 9 Priority blocks for the Atlas.


I looked at eBird histogram data before our trip, and so I anticipated seeing some of the "relatively more common" species where we went. And indeed, Yellow-throated Vireo and Summer Tanager did not disappoint - seldom seen around Fairfax County, we found many, which was delightful.


But .. .. on the entire trip we did not see or hear a single Song Sparrow. Also very few Tree Swallows and Chickadees - at least by our No. Virginia standards. I know these are all widespread birds in the Eastern U.S. Is this a local phenomenon that people are aware of?


In terms of similar species, everywhere we went was swarming with Chipping Sparrows, Barn Swallows, and Titmice. So the habitats were reasonably appropriate for these 3 other "missing" species. Any thoughts?


On the threatened species front, it was heartening to find multiple Bobwhite quail and Kestrels - and LOTS of Grasshopper Sparrows.


Steve Johnson
<stevejohnson2...>

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Date: 6/30/18 9:40 am
From: Walter Hadlock via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] distribution (disappearance ) of Tree Swallows
Greetings,

I thought I would chime in on this topic.

My wife and I, along with another couple, monitor a 10 nest box Bluebird trail at the Herndon, VA golf course. For the first time in at least two years, two of our boxes hosted nesting tree swallows. The six babies in one box have fledged, and the other box has four babies.

The dearth of them in areas around the Commonwealth is a mystery, but we were happy to welcome them back.

Attempts have been made to keep Canada Geese off the course. Even though we have not seen much in the way of Canada Geese on the course, the two TS nests included a plentiful supply of Canada Goose feathers.

Here’s to you getting other reports about TS activity/non-activity.

Jay Hadlock
Herndon, VA

On Jun 30, 2018, at 12:29 PM, Marlene A Condon via VA-bird <va-bird...> wrote:

Hi Steve,

Thanks so much for your post. I'd been wanting to ask folks if they'd noticed a dearth of Tree Swallows this year.

We had Tree Swallows in our area, as usual, this spring. However, and very strangely, they all left the rural area where I live in western Albemarle and never returned. A neighbor, about a mile from my yard as the crow flies, always has Tree Swallows in her bird boxes, but hers disappeared, and I haven't seen them at another bird box in the opposite direction from here either. Also, these birds seem to have disappeared from my mother-in-law's area in Waynesboro.

It's worrisome. They were here (including at my house), and then every last one disappeared before breeding had yet to begin.

I would really appreciate hearing from others (in Virginia, or other states to the north, especially) as to what you've noticed as regards Tree Swallows this year.

Thanks ever so much.

Sincerely,
Marlene



In a message dated 6/30/2018 6:52:57 AM US Eastern Standard Time, <va-bird...> writes:


Hello birders,


During the past 10 days, Lynn and I surveyed for the Breeding Bird Atlas in different parts of the state, than the No. Virginia areas we are accustomed to. We were struck by the scarcity of a few species, and we're curious if others can confirm our impressions.


We had 4 days around Appomattox (E of Lynchburg), and 5 days around Smith Mountain Lake (SE of Roanoke), and focused on 9 Priority blocks for the Atlas.


I looked at eBird histogram data before our trip, and so I anticipated seeing some of the "relatively more common" species where we went. And indeed, Yellow-throated Vireo and Summer Tanager did not disappoint - seldom seen around Fairfax County, we found many, which was delightful.


But .. .. on the entire trip we did not see or hear a single Song Sparrow. Also very few Tree Swallows and Chickadees - at least by our No. Virginia standards. I know these are all widespread birds in the Eastern U.S. Is this a local phenomenon that people are aware of?


In terms of similar species, everywhere we went was swarming with Chipping Sparrows, Barn Swallows, and Titmice. So the habitats were reasonably appropriate for these 3 other "missing" species. Any thoughts?


On the threatened species front, it was heartening to find multiple Bobwhite quail and Kestrels - and LOTS of Grasshopper Sparrows.


Steve Johnson
<stevejohnson2...>

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Date: 6/30/18 9:29 am
From: Marlene A Condon via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] distribution (disappearance ) of Tree Swallows
Hi Steve,
 
Thanks so much for your post.  I'd been wanting to ask folks if they'd noticed a dearth of Tree Swallows this year.
 
We had Tree Swallows in our area, as usual, this spring.  However, and very strangely, they all left the rural area where I live in western Albemarle and never returned.  A neighbor, about a mile from my yard as the crow flies, always has Tree Swallows in her bird boxes, but hers disappeared, and I haven't seen them at another bird box in the opposite direction from here either.  Also, these birds seem to have disappeared from my mother-in-law's area in Waynesboro.
 
It's worrisome.  They were here (including at my house), and then every last one disappeared before breeding had yet to begin.
 
I would really appreciate hearing from others (in Virginia, or other states to the north, especially) as to what you've noticed as regards Tree Swallows this year.
 
Thanks ever so much.
 
Sincerely,
Marlene  
 
 
 
In a message dated 6/30/2018 6:52:57 AM US Eastern Standard Time, <va-bird...> writes:

 
Hello birders,


During the past 10 days, Lynn and I surveyed for the Breeding Bird Atlas in different parts of the state, than the No. Virginia areas we are accustomed to. We were struck by the scarcity of a few species, and we're curious if others can confirm our impressions.


We had 4 days around Appomattox (E of Lynchburg), and 5 days around Smith Mountain Lake (SE of Roanoke), and focused on 9 Priority blocks for the Atlas.


I looked at eBird histogram data before our trip, and so I anticipated seeing some of the "relatively more common" species where we went. And indeed, Yellow-throated Vireo and Summer Tanager did not disappoint - seldom seen around Fairfax County, we found many, which was delightful.


But .. .. on the entire trip we did not see or hear a single Song Sparrow. Also very few Tree Swallows and Chickadees - at least by our No. Virginia standards. I know these are all widespread birds in the Eastern U.S. Is this a local phenomenon that people are aware of?


In terms of similar species, everywhere we went was swarming with Chipping Sparrows, Barn Swallows, and Titmice. So the habitats were reasonably appropriate for these 3 other "missing" species. Any thoughts?


On the threatened species front, it was heartening to find multiple Bobwhite quail and Kestrels - and LOTS of Grasshopper Sparrows.


Steve Johnson
<stevejohnson2...>

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Date: 6/30/18 7:59 am
From: Thomas L Blackburn via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] VA-bird Digest, Vol 134, Issue 30
On May 18, 2018 the following statute became law:

15.2-926.3. (Expires July 1, 2019) Local regulation of certain
aircraft.
No locality may regulate the use of a privately owned, unmanned
aircraft system as defined in 19.2-60.1 within its boundaries.

Evidently, the state is allowing a one-year period for unregulated flying of
drones, and expects a report on the experience by November 1, 2019. This
statute does not override other statues that prohibit trespass on private
property by drones.

Fairfax County announced a new policy on drones in compliance with the
statute. Its website states as follows:

Effective July 1, 2018, the use of unmanned aircraft (drones) is
allowed on Park Authority lands. Pilots are expected to abide by all
applicable FAA regulations, safety guidance, and airspace restrictions.

Although the Park Authority is not able to regulate the use of
drones, we are hopeful that operators will respect other park users, stay
clear of wildlife and natural and cultural resource areas and generally, be
respectful in their use of unmanned aircraft over parkland.

The state statute does not affect the applicability of Federal restrictions.
Therefore, drones may not be flown in any parks that are within the FAA
no-fly zone or restricted use zones. An explanation of the zones and maps
of the restricted areas can be found at

https://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/parks/sites/parks/files/assets/documents/pland
ev/unmanned-aircraft-study.pdf


-----Original Message-----
From: VA-bird <va-bird-bounces+tomlblackburn=<gmail.com...> On
Behalf Of <va-bird-request...>
Sent: Saturday, June 30, 2018 8:51 AM
To: <va-bird...>
Subject: VA-bird Digest, Vol 134, Issue 30

Send VA-bird mailing list submissions to
<va-bird...>

To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird
or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
<va-bird-request...>

You can reach the person managing the list at
<va-bird-owner...>

When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific than
"Re: Contents of VA-bird digest..."


Today's Topics:

1. eBird Trip Summary -- Trip (Jeff Blalock)
2. Heat (Jeff Blalock)
3. Re: List of "NoFly" parks - Fairfax Co. (Steve Johnson)
4. Re: List of "NoFly" parks - Fairfax Co. (Steve Johnson)
5. Hot birds (Fairfax & vicinity) (<barb22030...>)
6. (no subject) (Gerry Neal Weinberger)
7. distribution of several common species in Virginia (Steve Johnson)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Fri, 29 Jun 2018 16:59:29 -0400
From: Jeff Blalock <jcbabirder...>
To: VA-BIRD <va-bird...>, <davey54...>
Subject: [VA-bird] eBird Trip Summary -- Trip
Message-ID: <11B40C2C-22A8-43B8-A7BC-9376D440F6EB...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8

Greetings All

Yesterday David Pennebaker and I tried for a good part of yesterday morning
trying to find the Mississippi Kites at Runt?s farm without any luck.

After we split up I came home to cut grass while David went on to Long
Island in Campell Co and reported 4 singing Dickcissels. He called me to
let me know and so today I got up early and making my way there stopping to
try to find a Chuck Will Widow in both Pittsylvania and Campell Counties but
had no luck on them but did get an EWPW at 3 stops.

At Long Island at 0530 Hrs I heard a Dickcissel calling as I got out of my
car. While waiting for more light I saw a Bald Eagle and then tried for the
Dickcissels to get a look at them and maybe even a picture. I found two
along side of the road one in a 30ft dead tree and the forth in the grass to
the left of the dead tree.

As so go good looks at a pair of Grasshopper Sparrows.

Heard a Bobwhite from Long Island Rd and two at Long Island Park and a
fourth Epsons Rd.

Also had Common Raven from 3 locations. 2 of them was just heard while one
was well seen before it crocked out.

Below is the complete list for the day and only wished that I hadn?t gotten
hungry and it was getting muggy. Heat was bad.

Good Birding Always.

jeffblalock
eBird Checklist Summary for: Jun 29, 2018 at 4:00 AM to Jun 29, 2018 at 3:00
PM

Number of Checklists: 13
Number of Taxa: 60

Checklists included in this summary:
(1): 2751?3029 Cody Rd, Gretna US-VA (36.9917,-79.1136)
Date: Jun 29, 2018 at 4:42 AM
(2): Cody Rd, Long Island US-VA (37.0071,-79.1260)
Date: Jun 29, 2018 at 4:57 AM
(3): 7020 Straightstone Rd, Long Island US-VA (37.0405,-79.1201)
Date: Jun 29, 2018 at 5:16 AM
(4): 7219?7241 Long Island Rd, Long Island US-VA (37.0757,-79.1014)
Date: Jun 29, 2018 at 5:30 AM
(5): 394?1016 Epsons Rd, Long Island US-VA (37.0722,-79.0867)
Date: Jun 29, 2018 at 9:52 AM
(6): 3563?3691 Epsons Rd, Gladys US-VA (37.0702,-79.0479)
Date: Jun 29, 2018 at 10:37 AM
(7): 174 Dry Fork Rd, Gladys US-VA (37.0618,-79.0425)
Date: Jun 29, 2018 at 10:45 AM
(8): McIver Ferry Rd, Gladys US-VA (37.0505,-79.0193)
Date: Jun 29, 2018 at 11:05 AM
(9): 3234?3298 McIver Ferry Rd, Gladys US-VA (37.0556,-79.0073)
Date: Jun 29, 2018 at 11:40 AM
(10): Brookneal Park, Brookneal US-VA (37.0579,-78.9429)
Date: Jun 29, 2018 at 12:25 PM
(11): 5993 Straightstone Rd, Long Island US-VA (37.0315,-79.1339)
Date: Jun 29, 2018 at 5:10 AM
(12): Long Island Park and Boat Ramp
Date: Jun 29, 2018 at 7:30 AM
(13): 6111 Epsons Rd, Gladys US-VA (37.0583,-79.0070)
Date: Jun 29, 2018 at 12:10 PM

2 duck sp. -- (12)
5 Northern Bobwhite -- (4),(5),(12)
1 Great Blue Heron (Blue form) -- (4)
3 Black Vulture -- (5)
11 Turkey Vulture -- (5),(7),(10)
1 Bald Eagle -- (4)
1 Red-shouldered Hawk -- (12)
1 Red-tailed Hawk -- (7)
3 Killdeer -- (4),(12)
10 Mourning Dove -- (3),(4),(5),(9),(10),(12)
7 Yellow-billed Cuckoo -- (4),(8),(9),(10),(12)
3 Eastern Whip-poor-will -- (2),(3),(11)
5 Chimney Swift -- (4),(10)
3 Red-headed Woodpecker -- (8)
7 Red-bellied Woodpecker -- (5),(10),(12)
1 Downy Woodpecker (Eastern) -- (10)
1 Pileated Woodpecker -- (10)
1 Eastern Wood-Pewee -- (10)
4 Eastern Phoebe -- (10),(12)
2 White-eyed Vireo -- (12)
1 Yellow-throated Vireo -- (10)
5 Red-eyed Vireo -- (6),(9),(10),(12),(13)
4 Blue Jay -- (7),(10),(12)
24 American Crow -- (4),(5),(7),(9),(10),(12)
1 Fish Crow -- (10)
3 Common Raven -- (4),(5),(8)
6 Purple Martin -- (4),(12)
4 Tree Swallow -- (12)
25 Barn Swallow -- (4),(11),(12)
10 Cliff Swallow -- (4)
6 Tufted Titmouse -- (10),(12)
2 White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern) -- (10)
5 Carolina Wren -- (4),(5),(8),(12)
2 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher -- (9),(12)
14 Eastern Bluebird -- (4),(7),(10),(11),(12),(13)
1 Wood Thrush -- (10)
8 American Robin -- (10),(12)
2 Brown Thrasher -- (12)
4 Northern Mockingbird -- (4),(12)
1 Cedar Waxwing -- (12)
1 Ovenbird -- (10)
4 Common Yellowthroat -- (4),(7),(9)
1 Hooded Warbler -- (13)
1 Pine Warbler -- (8)
2 Grasshopper Sparrow -- (4)
9 Chipping Sparrow -- (5),(7),(10),(12)
1 Field Sparrow -- (12)
2 Eastern Towhee -- (3),(4)
3 Yellow-breasted Chat -- (1),(2),(8)
19 Northern Cardinal -- (3),(6),(9),(10),(12)
4 Blue Grosbeak -- (3),(4),(9),(12)
11 Indigo Bunting -- (2),(4),(5),(7),(10),(12)
4 Dickcissel -- (4)
13 Eastern Meadowlark (Eastern) -- (4),(5),(7)
6 Orchard Oriole -- (4),(9),(12)
10 Red-winged Blackbird -- (4)
15 Brown-headed Cowbird -- (4),(5),(12)
10 Common Grackle -- (4),(9),(12)
3 House Finch -- (10),(12)
10 American Goldfinch -- (5),(10),(12)

This trip summary was created using the eBird app for iPhone and iPad.
See eBird for more information.


From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>



------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Fri, 29 Jun 2018 17:06:37 -0400
From: Jeff Blalock <jcbabirder...>
To: VA-BIRD <va-bird...>, <davey54...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Heat
Message-ID: <74244DF1-613B-440A-9E61-4435D44C14A5...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8

Meant to say heat wasn?t bad.

From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>





------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Fri, 29 Jun 2018 17:07:43 -0400
From: Steve Johnson <stevejohnson2...>
To: <appleadayonsite...>, <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] List of "NoFly" parks - Fairfax Co.
Message-ID: <1644d5f83fd-c91-13905...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8

Rich, please tell me where this list was published. The reason I ask is
this:


Fairfax Park Authority people have told me several times that the sole, ONLY
park in the county approved for RC vehicle use is Poplar Ford Park. They
have told me it is prohibited at ALL other Fairfax County parks.


However this list and the text preceding it implies that it is permitted in
many other parks, where it has already been a problem. I need to know where
this was originally published so we can correct this.


Steve Johnson
<stevejohnson2...>




-----Original Message-----
From: Rich Rieger via VA-bird <va-bird...>
To: VA-BIRD birding <va-bird...>
Sent: Thu, Jun 28, 2018 9:50 pm
Subject: [VA-bird] List of "NoFly" parks - Fairfax Co.

Folks - here's a list of parks that fall in the 15 mile No Fly zone of Nat'l
Airport - please report violations to Fairfax Co Police -

Non-Emergency 703-691-2131

ALSO!! please report violations to Fairfax Co. Park Authority at
<parkmail...>

Not sure if any environmental group was given a heads up on this pending
legislation - unfortunate that... Public Hearing after the fact doesn't do
much good in my opinion...

Where to Fly (and What's Off Limits)
The Model Aircraft Site at Poplar Ford Park is the recommended site for
drone use.

Per Virginia Code ?19.2-926.3, park visitors in possession of a UAS may not
enter areas where they would otherwise not be able to go (such as posted
areas, construction zones, and park facilities - such as athletic fields -
reserved for use by others). Please observe the established park operating
hours and any posted signage.

To protect Fairfax County?s valuable natural and cultural resources, pilots
are encouraged to select sites in areas actively maintained for recreational
use, such as mowed fields. Pilots should select sites that fully allow FAA
requirements and safety recommendations to be met.

The airspace around Washington, DC is more restricted than in any other part
of the country. The following Park Authority properties are underneath the
15-mile DC Flight Restricted Zone, or airspace where the FAA generally
prohibits drone flights without specific authorization. This list is
provided as guidance only and accuracy is not guaranteed; all pilots should
follow the appropriate FAA rules in place at the location and time of
flight.

Fairfax County Park Authority Properties under the Washington, DC Flight
Restricted Zone

For Information/Guidance Only ? Accuracy not Guaranteed

July 1, 2018

Alexandria ? 22303

Burgundy Park
Farrington Park
Heritage Hill Park
Huntington Park
Jefferson Manor Park
Loftridge Park
Mount Eagle Park
Alexandria ? 22306

Bucknell Manor Park
Creighton Square Park
Groveton Heights Park
Historic Huntley
Hollins Meadows Park
Huntley Meadows Park
Hybla Valley Park
Lenclair Park
Little Hunting Creek Park
Martin Luther King, Jr. Park
North Hill Park
South Kings Forest Park
Stephen Foster School Site (Walt Whitman) Stoneybrooke Park Alexandria ?
22307

Belle Haven Park
Fort Willard Historic Site
Gilbert S. McCutcheon Park
Mount Vernon District Park
Westgrove Park
White Oaks Park
Alexandria ? 22308

Carl Sandburg School Site
Collingwood Park
Fort Hunt Park
Hollin Hall Park
John Byers Park
Kirk Park
Stratford Landing Park
Alexandria ? 22309

George Washington Park
Grist Mill Park
McNaughton Fields Park
Mount Vernon Manor Park
Mount Vernon Woods Park
Mount Zephyr Park
Muddy Hole Farm Park
Old Mount Vernon School Site
Pole Road Park
Summers Cemetery
Vernon Heights Park
Washington Mill Park
Woodlawn Park
Woodley Hills Park
Alexandria ? 22310

Bush Hill Park
Clermont Park
Franconia Forest Park
Greendale Golf Course
Lee District Park
Manchester Lakes Park
Mark Twain Park
Ridgeview Park
Tara Village Park
Virginia Hills School Site
Wilton Woods School Site
Alexandria ? 22311

Dowden Terrace Park
Alexandria ? 22312

Backlick Run Park
Bren Mar Park
Glasgow Park
Glen Hills Park
Green Spring Gardens
Heywood Glen Park
Joseph F. Barnes Battery Park
Monch Farm Park
Mulberry Hill Park
Parklawn Park
Pinecrest Golf Course
Alexandria ? 22315

Amberleigh Park
Beulah Park
Hayfield Park
Island Creek Park
Kingstowne Park
Olander & Margaret Banks Park
Wickford Park
Annandale ? 22003

Americana Park
Annandale Park
Backlick Park
Barcroft Knolls Park
Broyhill Crest Park
Camelot School Site
Canterbury Woods Park
Eakin Community Park
Fairfax Hills Park
Fitzhugh Park
Howrey Field Park
Kendale Woods Park
Larchmont Park
Long Branch Falls Park
Manassas Gap Railroad Park
Mason District Park
Masonville Park
Oak Hill Park
Ossian Hall Park
Pine Ridge Park
Poe Terrace Park
Red Fox Forest Park
Valley Crest Park
Wakefield Chapel Park
Wakefield Park
Wilburdale Park
Willow Woods Park
Winterset Varsity Park
Bailey?s Crossroads - 22041

Belvedere Park
Burke ? 22015

Burke Ridge Park
Burke Station Park
Lake Braddock Park
Rolling Valley West Park
Silas Burke Park
Fairfax ? 22031

Armistead Park
Briarwood Park
Eakin Park (Mantua Section)
East Blake Lane Park
Hideaway Park
Mosby Woods Park
Sally Ormsby Park
Towers Park
Villa D?Este Park
Villa Lee Park
Fairfax ? 22032

Ashford East Park
Crooked Creek Park
George Mason Park
Greenfield Park
Herzell Woods Park
Kings Park West Park
Lakeside Park
Monticello Park
Olde Forge Park
Rolling Woods Estates Park
Royal Lake Park
Rutherford Park
Smokewood Park
Surry Square Park
Twinbrook Road Park
University Park
Fairfax Station ? 22039

Burke Lake Park/Golf Course (part)
Lake Mercer Park
Falls Church ? 22041

Bailey?s Elementary School Site
Bailey?s Park
Boyd & Charlotte Hogge Park
Clark House at Barcroft Mews
Lillian Carey Park
Munson Hill Park
Skyline Park
Spring Lane Park
Falls Church ? 22042

Azalea Park
Bel Air Park
Broyhill Park
Devonshire Park
James Lee School Site
Jefferson District Park
Jefferson Village Park
John & Margaret White Gardens
John Mastenbrook/Greenway Downs Park
Larry Graves Park
Luria Park
Merrifield Park
Pine Spring Park
Providence RECenter
Rose Lane Park
Roundtree Park
Sleepy Hollow Park
Tyler Park
Walnut Hill School Site
Westlawn School Site
Woodburn School Site
Falls Church ? 22043

Fisher Park
Griffith Park
Hartland Green Park
Haycock-Longfellow Park
Hollywood Road Park
Idylwood Park
Lee Landing Park
Lemon Road Park
Lisle Park
Longfellow School Site
Mount Royal Park
Olney Park
Pimmit Hills Park
Pimmit View Park
Ruckstuhl Park
Tysons Pimmit Park
Westgate Park
Falls Church ? 22044

J.E.B. Stuart Park
Falls Church ? 22045

Pimmit Barn
Great Falls ? 22066

Colvin Run Mill Park
Great Falls Grange Park
Hickory Run School Site
Lexington Estates Park
Riverbend Park
Lorton ? 22079

Laurel Hill Park (part)
Levelle W. Dupell Park
Lorton Park
Lower Potomac Park
Mount Air Historic Site
Newington Commons Park
Newington Heights Park
Pohick Estates Park
Southgate Park
McLean ? 22101

Alfred Odrick Homesite
Bryn Mawr Park
Chesterbrook School Site
Churchill Road Park
Clemyjontri Park
Cooper Intermediate School Site
Dolley Madison Estates Park
Franklin Woods Park
Kent Gardens Park
Kirby Park
Langley Fork Park
Langley Oaks Park
Lewinsville Center Park
Lewinsville Park
Linway Terrace Park
Marie Butler Leven Preserve
McLean Central Park
McLean Knolls Park
Potomac Hills Park
Salona Park
Saucy Branch (McLean High) Park
McLean ? 22102

Falstaff Park
Greenway Heights Park
Holladay Field
Ken Lawrence Park
McLean Hamlet Park
McLean Hunt Estates Park
Park at Tysons II
Scotts Run Nature Preserve
Spring Hill Park
Timberly Park
Tollbrook Ridge Park
Oakton ? 22124

Blake Lane School Site
Borge Street Park
Oakborough Square Park
Oakton Community Park
Springfield ? 22150

Brookfield Park
Byron Avenue Park
Franconia Park
Hooes Road Park
Lake Accotink Park
Lee High Park
Loisdale Park
Lynbrook Park
Monticello Woods Park
Springfield Forest Park
Springvale Park
Trailside Park
Springfield ? 22151

Deerlick Park
Edsall Park
Flag Run Park
Kings Park
Leewood Park
North Springfield Park
Royal Ridge Park
Springfield ? 22152

Cardinal Forest Park
Carrleigh Parkway Park
Fairfax Park
Greentree Village Park
Hidden Pond Park
Hunter Village Park
Orange Hunt Estates Park
Rolling Forest Park
Shannon Station Park
West Springfield Park
West Springfield Village Park
Springfield ? 22153

Chapel Acres Park
Cherry Run Park
Huntsman Park
Rollingwood School Site
Saratoga Park
South Run District Park
Vienna ? 22027

Dunn Loring Park
Vienna ? 22180

Cunningham Park
Peterson Lane Park
Vienna ? 22181

Ashlawn Park
Fox Hunters Park
Kemper Park
Lawyers Road Park
Nottoway Park
Vienna ? 22182

Ashgrove Historic Site
Briarcliff Park
Clarks Crossing Park
Eudora Park
Foxstone Park
Freedom Hill Park
Heritage Resources Park
Lahey Lost Valley Park
Raglan Road Park
Symphony Hills Park
Tamarack Park
Tysons Woods Park
Waverly Park
Wolf Trails Park
*** You are subscribed to VA-bird as <stevejohnson2...> If you wish
to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***



------------------------------

Message: 4
Date: Fri, 29 Jun 2018 17:10:34 -0400
From: Steve Johnson <stevejohnson2...>
To: <appleadayonsite...>, <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] List of "NoFly" parks - Fairfax Co.
Message-ID: <1644d6220ed-6109-1284d...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8




Ok, sorry everyone, I failed here to read ALL of my email, before sending
this. Now I see Rich's previous email, which explained the situation fully.
You can ignore my email here.


At the same time I will register my extreme disappointment in the state of
Virginia which has enacted a law which is causing our county here to change
what was a fairly reasonable policy.


Steve Johnson
<stevejohnson2...>




-----Original Message-----
From: Steve Johnson <stevejohnson2...>
To: appleadayonsite <appleadayonsite...>; va-bird
<va-bird...>
Sent: Fri, Jun 29, 2018 5:07 pm
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] List of "NoFly" parks - Fairfax Co.


Rich, please tell me where this list was published. The reason I ask is
this:


Fairfax Park Authority people have told me several times that the sole, ONLY
park in the county approved for RC vehicle use is Poplar Ford Park. They
have told me it is prohibited at ALL other Fairfax County parks.


However this list and the text preceding it implies that it is permitted in
many other parks, where it has already been a problem. I need to know where
this was originally published so we can correct this.


Steve Johnson
<stevejohnson2...>




-----Original Message-----
From: Rich Rieger via VA-bird <va-bird...>
To: VA-BIRD birding <va-bird...>
Sent: Thu, Jun 28, 2018 9:50 pm
Subject: [VA-bird] List of "NoFly" parks - Fairfax Co.

Folks - here's a list of parks that fall in the 15 mile No Fly zone of Nat'l
Airport - please report violations to Fairfax Co Police -

Non-Emergency 703-691-2131

ALSO!! please report violations to Fairfax Co. Park Authority at
<parkmail...>

Not sure if any environmental group was given a heads up on this pending
legislation - unfortunate that... Public Hearing after the fact doesn't do
much good in my opinion...

Where to Fly (and What's Off Limits)
The Model Aircraft Site at Poplar Ford Park is the recommended site for
drone use.

Per Virginia Code ?19.2-926.3, park visitors in possession of a UAS may not
enter areas where they would otherwise not be able to go (such as posted
areas, construction zones, and park facilities - such as athletic fields -
reserved for use by others). Please observe the established park operating
hours and any posted signage.

To protect Fairfax County?s valuable natural and cultural resources, pilots
are encouraged to select sites in areas actively maintained for recreational
use, such as mowed fields. Pilots should select sites that fully allow FAA
requirements and safety recommendations to be met.

The airspace around Washington, DC is more restricted than in any other part
of the country. The following Park Authority properties are underneath the
15-mile DC Flight Restricted Zone, or airspace where the FAA generally
prohibits drone flights without specific authorization. This list is
provided as guidance only and accuracy is not guaranteed; all pilots should
follow the appropriate FAA rules in place at the location and time of
flight.

Fairfax County Park Authority Properties under the Washington, DC Flight
Restricted Zone

For Information/Guidance Only ? Accuracy not Guaranteed

July 1, 2018

Alexandria ? 22303

Burgundy Park
Farrington Park
Heritage Hill Park
Huntington Park
Jefferson Manor Park
Loftridge Park
Mount Eagle Park
Alexandria ? 22306

Bucknell Manor Park
Creighton Square Park
Groveton Heights Park
Historic Huntley
Hollins Meadows Park
Huntley Meadows Park
Hybla Valley Park
Lenclair Park
Little Hunting Creek Park
Martin Luther King, Jr. Park
North Hill Park
South Kings Forest Park
Stephen Foster School Site (Walt Whitman) Stoneybrooke Park Alexandria ?
22307

Belle Haven Park
Fort Willard Historic Site
Gilbert S. McCutcheon Park
Mount Vernon District Park
Westgrove Park
White Oaks Park
Alexandria ? 22308

Carl Sandburg School Site
Collingwood Park
Fort Hunt Park
Hollin Hall Park
John Byers Park
Kirk Park
Stratford Landing Park
Alexandria ? 22309

George Washington Park
Grist Mill Park
McNaughton Fields Park
Mount Vernon Manor Park
Mount Vernon Woods Park
Mount Zephyr Park
Muddy Hole Farm Park
Old Mount Vernon School Site
Pole Road Park
Summers Cemetery
Vernon Heights Park
Washington Mill Park
Woodlawn Park
Woodley Hills Park
Alexandria ? 22310

Bush Hill Park
Clermont Park
Franconia Forest Park
Greendale Golf Course
Lee District Park
Manchester Lakes Park
Mark Twain Park
Ridgeview Park
Tara Village Park
Virginia Hills School Site
Wilton Woods School Site
Alexandria ? 22311

Dowden Terrace Park
Alexandria ? 22312

Backlick Run Park
Bren Mar Park
Glasgow Park
Glen Hills Park
Green Spring Gardens
Heywood Glen Park
Joseph F. Barnes Battery Park
Monch Farm Park
Mulberry Hill Park
Parklawn Park
Pinecrest Golf Course
Alexandria ? 22315

Amberleigh Park
Beulah Park
Hayfield Park
Island Creek Park
Kingstowne Park
Olander & Margaret Banks Park
Wickford Park
Annandale ? 22003

Americana Park
Annandale Park
Backlick Park
Barcroft Knolls Park
Broyhill Crest Park
Camelot School Site
Canterbury Woods Park
Eakin Community Park
Fairfax Hills Park
Fitzhugh Park
Howrey Field Park
Kendale Woods Park
Larchmont Park
Long Branch Falls Park
Manassas Gap Railroad Park
Mason District Park
Masonville Park
Oak Hill Park
Ossian Hall Park
Pine Ridge Park
Poe Terrace Park
Red Fox Forest Park
Valley Crest Park
Wakefield Chapel Park
Wakefield Park
Wilburdale Park
Willow Woods Park
Winterset Varsity Park
Bailey?s Crossroads - 22041

Belvedere Park
Burke ? 22015

Burke Ridge Park
Burke Station Park
Lake Braddock Park
Rolling Valley West Park
Silas Burke Park
Fairfax ? 22031

Armistead Park
Briarwood Park
Eakin Park (Mantua Section)
East Blake Lane Park
Hideaway Park
Mosby Woods Park
Sally Ormsby Park
Towers Park
Villa D?Este Park
Villa Lee Park
Fairfax ? 22032

Ashford East Park
Crooked Creek Park
George Mason Park
Greenfield Park
Herzell Woods Park
Kings Park West Park
Lakeside Park
Monticello Park
Olde Forge Park
Rolling Woods Estates Park
Royal Lake Park
Rutherford Park
Smokewood Park
Surry Square Park
Twinbrook Road Park
University Park
Fairfax Station ? 22039

Burke Lake Park/Golf Course (part)
Lake Mercer Park
Falls Church ? 22041

Bailey?s Elementary School Site
Bailey?s Park
Boyd & Charlotte Hogge Park
Clark House at Barcroft Mews
Lillian Carey Park
Munson Hill Park
Skyline Park
Spring Lane Park
Falls Church ? 22042

Azalea Park
Bel Air Park
Broyhill Park
Devonshire Park
James Lee School Site
Jefferson District Park
Jefferson Village Park
John & Margaret White Gardens
John Mastenbrook/Greenway Downs Park
Larry Graves Park
Luria Park
Merrifield Park
Pine Spring Park
Providence RECenter
Rose Lane Park
Roundtree Park
Sleepy Hollow Park
Tyler Park
Walnut Hill School Site
Westlawn School Site
Woodburn School Site
Falls Church ? 22043

Fisher Park
Griffith Park
Hartland Green Park
Haycock-Longfellow Park
Hollywood Road Park
Idylwood Park
Lee Landing Park
Lemon Road Park
Lisle Park
Longfellow School Site
Mount Royal Park
Olney Park
Pimmit Hills Park
Pimmit View Park
Ruckstuhl Park
Tysons Pimmit Park
Westgate Park
Falls Church ? 22044

J.E.B. Stuart Park
Falls Church ? 22045

Pimmit Barn
Great Falls ? 22066

Colvin Run Mill Park
Great Falls Grange Park
Hickory Run School Site
Lexington Estates Park
Riverbend Park
Lorton ? 22079

Laurel Hill Park (part)
Levelle W. Dupell Park
Lorton Park
Lower Potomac Park
Mount Air Historic Site
Newington Commons Park
Newington Heights Park
Pohick Estates Park
Southgate Park
McLean ? 22101

Alfred Odrick Homesite
Bryn Mawr Park
Chesterbrook School Site
Churchill Road Park
Clemyjontri Park
Cooper Intermediate School Site
Dolley Madison Estates Park
Franklin Woods Park
Kent Gardens Park
Kirby Park
Langley Fork Park
Langley Oaks Park
Lewinsville Center Park
Lewinsville Park
Linway Terrace Park
Marie Butler Leven Preserve
McLean Central Park
McLean Knolls Park
Potomac Hills Park
Salona Park
Saucy Branch (McLean High) Park
McLean ? 22102

Falstaff Park
Greenway Heights Park
Holladay Field
Ken Lawrence Park
McLean Hamlet Park
McLean Hunt Estates Park
Park at Tysons II
Scotts Run Nature Preserve
Spring Hill Park
Timberly Park
Tollbrook Ridge Park
Oakton ? 22124

Blake Lane School Site
Borge Street Park
Oakborough Square Park
Oakton Community Park
Springfield ? 22150

Brookfield Park
Byron Avenue Park
Franconia Park
Hooes Road Park
Lake Accotink Park
Lee High Park
Loisdale Park
Lynbrook Park
Monticello Woods Park
Springfield Forest Park
Springvale Park
Trailside Park
Springfield ? 22151

Deerlick Park
Edsall Park
Flag Run Park
Kings Park
Leewood Park
North Springfield Park
Royal Ridge Park
Springfield ? 22152

Cardinal Forest Park
Carrleigh Parkway Park
Fairfax Park
Greentree Village Park
Hidden Pond Park
Hunter Village Park
Orange Hunt Estates Park
Rolling Forest Park
Shannon Station Park
West Springfield Park
West Springfield Village Park
Springfield ? 22153

Chapel Acres Park
Cherry Run Park
Huntsman Park
Rollingwood School Site
Saratoga Park
South Run District Park
Vienna ? 22027

Dunn Loring Park
Vienna ? 22180

Cunningham Park
Peterson Lane Park
Vienna ? 22181

Ashlawn Park
Fox Hunters Park
Kemper Park
Lawyers Road Park
Nottoway Park
Vienna ? 22182

Ashgrove Historic Site
Briarcliff Park
Clarks Crossing Park
Eudora Park
Foxstone Park
Freedom Hill Park
Heritage Resources Park
Lahey Lost Valley Park
Raglan Road Park
Symphony Hills Park
Tamarack Park
Tysons Woods Park
Waverly Park
Wolf Trails Park
*** You are subscribed to VA-bird as <stevejohnson2...> If you wish
to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***





------------------------------

Message: 5
Date: Sat, 30 Jun 2018 01:37:12 +0000 (UTC)
From: "<barb22030...>" <barb22030...>
To: Virginia Birding <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Hot birds (Fairfax & vicinity)
Message-ID: <478385583.654131.1530322632258...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8

Birds really know how to love/handle today's 95ish degree heat.I
photographed a puffed-out Northern Cardinal along the W&OD Trail in?Vienna
today, a Common Yellowthroat enjoying a bath there -- and?farther afield (at
Battlefield Cypress Swamp Sanctuary in Prince?Frederick, MD) -- a puffy
Prothonotary Warbler enjoying its sultry swamp.My private pix are
temporarily posted here:?https://www.flickr.com/gp/olympusbjs/57crHb

- Barb, Fairfax


------------------------------

Message: 6
Date: Fri, 29 Jun 2018 22:45:54 -0800
From: Gerry Neal Weinberger <gwbirds37...>
To: travelstudy <travelstudy...>, trishahardin
<trishahardin...>, turner smith <turner.smith...>,
turner smith <turner.smith...>, va bird
<va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] (no subject)
Message-ID: <1530341158.Z9dufMqpbrgBOZ9dufX3tA@mf-smf-ucb021c1>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"


http://what.fastlanegermantuning.com
Gerry Neal Weinberger





------------------------------

Message: 7
Date: Sat, 30 Jun 2018 06:51:39 -0400
From: Steve Johnson <stevejohnson2...>
To: <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] distribution of several common species in Virginia
Message-ID: <1645051dd07-c92-f5db...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8

Hello birders,


During the past 10 days, Lynn and I surveyed for the Breeding Bird Atlas in
different parts of the state, than the No. Virginia areas we are accustomed
to. We were struck by the scarcity of a few species, and we're curious if
others can confirm our impressions.


We had 4 days around Appomattox (E of Lynchburg), and 5 days around Smith
Mountain Lake (SE of Roanoke), and focused on 9 Priority blocks for the
Atlas.


I looked at eBird histogram data before our trip, and so I anticipated
seeing some of the "relatively more common" species where we went. And
indeed, Yellow-throated Vireo and Summer Tanager did not disappoint - seldom
seen around Fairfax County, we found many, which was delightful.


But .. .. on the entire trip we did not see or hear a single Song Sparrow.
Also very few Tree Swallows and Chickadees - at least by our No. Virginia
standards. I know these are all widespread birds in the Eastern U.S. Is
this a local phenomenon that people are aware of?


In terms of similar species, everywhere we went was swarming with Chipping
Sparrows, Barn Swallows, and Titmice. So the habitats were reasonably
appropriate for these 3 other "missing" species. Any thoughts?


On the threatened species front, it was heartening to find multiple Bobwhite
quail and Kestrels - and LOTS of Grasshopper Sparrows.


Steve Johnson
<stevejohnson2...>



------------------------------

Subject: Digest Footer

_______________________________________________
VA-bird mailing list
<VA-bird...>
https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird


------------------------------

End of VA-bird Digest, Vol 134, Issue 30
****************************************

*** You are subscribed to VA-bird as <lists...> If you wish to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
 

Back to top
Date: 6/30/18 3:52 am
From: Steve Johnson via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] distribution of several common species in Virginia
Hello birders,


During the past 10 days, Lynn and I surveyed for the Breeding Bird Atlas in different parts of the state, than the No. Virginia areas we are accustomed to. We were struck by the scarcity of a few species, and we're curious if others can confirm our impressions.


We had 4 days around Appomattox (E of Lynchburg), and 5 days around Smith Mountain Lake (SE of Roanoke), and focused on 9 Priority blocks for the Atlas.


I looked at eBird histogram data before our trip, and so I anticipated seeing some of the "relatively more common" species where we went. And indeed, Yellow-throated Vireo and Summer Tanager did not disappoint - seldom seen around Fairfax County, we found many, which was delightful.


But .. .. on the entire trip we did not see or hear a single Song Sparrow. Also very few Tree Swallows and Chickadees - at least by our No. Virginia standards. I know these are all widespread birds in the Eastern U.S. Is this a local phenomenon that people are aware of?


In terms of similar species, everywhere we went was swarming with Chipping Sparrows, Barn Swallows, and Titmice. So the habitats were reasonably appropriate for these 3 other "missing" species. Any thoughts?


On the threatened species front, it was heartening to find multiple Bobwhite quail and Kestrels - and LOTS of Grasshopper Sparrows.


Steve Johnson
<stevejohnson2...>

*** You are subscribed to VA-bird as <lists...> If you wish to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/18 11:46 pm
From: Gerry Neal Weinberger via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] (no subject)

http://what.fastlanegermantuning.com
Gerry Neal Weinberger



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Date: 6/29/18 6:37 pm
From: barb22030--- via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Hot birds (Fairfax & vicinity)
Birds really know how to love/handle today's 95ish degree heat.I photographed a puffed-out Northern Cardinal along the W&OD Trail in Vienna today, a Common Yellowthroat enjoying a bath there -- and farther afield (at Battlefield Cypress Swamp Sanctuary in Prince Frederick, MD) -- a puffy Prothonotary Warbler enjoying its sultry swamp.My private pix are temporarily posted here: https://www.flickr.com/gp/olympusbjs/57crHb

- Barb, Fairfax
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Date: 6/29/18 2:10 pm
From: Steve Johnson via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] List of "NoFly" parks - Fairfax Co.



Ok, sorry everyone, I failed here to read ALL of my email, before sending this. Now I see Rich's previous email, which explained the situation fully. You can ignore my email here.


At the same time I will register my extreme disappointment in the state of Virginia which has enacted a law which is causing our county here to change what was a fairly reasonable policy.


Steve Johnson
<stevejohnson2...>




-----Original Message-----
From: Steve Johnson <stevejohnson2...>
To: appleadayonsite <appleadayonsite...>; va-bird <va-bird...>
Sent: Fri, Jun 29, 2018 5:07 pm
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] List of "NoFly" parks - Fairfax Co.


Rich, please tell me where this list was published. The reason I ask is this:


Fairfax Park Authority people have told me several times that the sole, ONLY park in the county approved for RC vehicle use is Poplar Ford Park. They have told me it is prohibited at ALL other Fairfax County parks.


However this list and the text preceding it implies that it is permitted in many other parks, where it has already been a problem. I need to know where this was originally published so we can correct this.


Steve Johnson
<stevejohnson2...>




-----Original Message-----
From: Rich Rieger via VA-bird <va-bird...>
To: VA-BIRD birding <va-bird...>
Sent: Thu, Jun 28, 2018 9:50 pm
Subject: [VA-bird] List of "NoFly" parks - Fairfax Co.

Folks - here's a list of parks that fall in the 15 mile No Fly zone of Nat'l Airport - please report violations to Fairfax Co Police -

Non-Emergency 703-691-2131

ALSO!! please report violations to Fairfax Co. Park Authority at <parkmail...>

Not sure if any environmental group was given a heads up on this pending legislation - unfortunate that... Public Hearing after the fact doesn't do much good in my opinion...

Where to Fly (and What's Off Limits)
The Model Aircraft Site at Poplar Ford Park is the recommended site for drone use.

Per Virginia Code §19.2-926.3, park visitors in possession of a UAS may not enter areas where they would otherwise not be able to go (such as posted areas, construction zones, and park facilities - such as athletic fields - reserved for use by others). Please observe the established park operating hours and any posted signage.

To protect Fairfax County’s valuable natural and cultural resources, pilots are encouraged to select sites in areas actively maintained for recreational use, such as mowed fields. Pilots should select sites that fully allow FAA requirements and safety recommendations to be met.

The airspace around Washington, DC is more restricted than in any other part of the country. The following Park Authority properties are underneath the 15-mile DC Flight Restricted Zone, or airspace where the FAA generally prohibits drone flights without specific authorization. This list is provided as guidance only and accuracy is not guaranteed; all pilots should follow the appropriate FAA rules in place at the location and time of flight.

Fairfax County Park Authority Properties under the Washington, DC Flight Restricted Zone

For Information/Guidance Only – Accuracy not Guaranteed

July 1, 2018

Alexandria – 22303

Burgundy Park
Farrington Park
Heritage Hill Park
Huntington Park
Jefferson Manor Park
Loftridge Park
Mount Eagle Park
Alexandria – 22306

Bucknell Manor Park
Creighton Square Park
Groveton Heights Park
Historic Huntley
Hollins Meadows Park
Huntley Meadows Park
Hybla Valley Park
Lenclair Park
Little Hunting Creek Park
Martin Luther King, Jr. Park
North Hill Park
South Kings Forest Park
Stephen Foster School Site (Walt Whitman)
Stoneybrooke Park
Alexandria – 22307

Belle Haven Park
Fort Willard Historic Site
Gilbert S. McCutcheon Park
Mount Vernon District Park
Westgrove Park
White Oaks Park
Alexandria – 22308

Carl Sandburg School Site
Collingwood Park
Fort Hunt Park
Hollin Hall Park
John Byers Park
Kirk Park
Stratford Landing Park
Alexandria – 22309

George Washington Park
Grist Mill Park
McNaughton Fields Park
Mount Vernon Manor Park
Mount Vernon Woods Park
Mount Zephyr Park
Muddy Hole Farm Park
Old Mount Vernon School Site
Pole Road Park
Summers Cemetery
Vernon Heights Park
Washington Mill Park
Woodlawn Park
Woodley Hills Park
Alexandria – 22310

Bush Hill Park
Clermont Park
Franconia Forest Park
Greendale Golf Course
Lee District Park
Manchester Lakes Park
Mark Twain Park
Ridgeview Park
Tara Village Park
Virginia Hills School Site
Wilton Woods School Site
Alexandria – 22311

Dowden Terrace Park
Alexandria – 22312

Backlick Run Park
Bren Mar Park
Glasgow Park
Glen Hills Park
Green Spring Gardens
Heywood Glen Park
Joseph F. Barnes Battery Park
Monch Farm Park
Mulberry Hill Park
Parklawn Park
Pinecrest Golf Course
Alexandria – 22315

Amberleigh Park
Beulah Park
Hayfield Park
Island Creek Park
Kingstowne Park
Olander & Margaret Banks Park
Wickford Park
Annandale – 22003

Americana Park
Annandale Park
Backlick Park
Barcroft Knolls Park
Broyhill Crest Park
Camelot School Site
Canterbury Woods Park
Eakin Community Park
Fairfax Hills Park
Fitzhugh Park
Howrey Field Park
Kendale Woods Park
Larchmont Park
Long Branch Falls Park
Manassas Gap Railroad Park
Mason District Park
Masonville Park
Oak Hill Park
Ossian Hall Park
Pine Ridge Park
Poe Terrace Park
Red Fox Forest Park
Valley Crest Park
Wakefield Chapel Park
Wakefield Park
Wilburdale Park
Willow Woods Park
Winterset Varsity Park
Bailey’s Crossroads - 22041

Belvedere Park
Burke – 22015

Burke Ridge Park
Burke Station Park
Lake Braddock Park
Rolling Valley West Park
Silas Burke Park
Fairfax – 22031

Armistead Park
Briarwood Park
Eakin Park (Mantua Section)
East Blake Lane Park
Hideaway Park
Mosby Woods Park
Sally Ormsby Park
Towers Park
Villa D’Este Park
Villa Lee Park
Fairfax – 22032

Ashford East Park
Crooked Creek Park
George Mason Park
Greenfield Park
Herzell Woods Park
Kings Park West Park
Lakeside Park
Monticello Park
Olde Forge Park
Rolling Woods Estates Park
Royal Lake Park
Rutherford Park
Smokewood Park
Surry Square Park
Twinbrook Road Park
University Park
Fairfax Station – 22039

Burke Lake Park/Golf Course (part)
Lake Mercer Park
Falls Church – 22041

Bailey’s Elementary School Site
Bailey’s Park
Boyd & Charlotte Hogge Park
Clark House at Barcroft Mews
Lillian Carey Park
Munson Hill Park
Skyline Park
Spring Lane Park
Falls Church – 22042

Azalea Park
Bel Air Park
Broyhill Park
Devonshire Park
James Lee School Site
Jefferson District Park
Jefferson Village Park
John & Margaret White Gardens
John Mastenbrook/Greenway Downs Park
Larry Graves Park
Luria Park
Merrifield Park
Pine Spring Park
Providence RECenter
Rose Lane Park
Roundtree Park
Sleepy Hollow Park
Tyler Park
Walnut Hill School Site
Westlawn School Site
Woodburn School Site
Falls Church – 22043

Fisher Park
Griffith Park
Hartland Green Park
Haycock-Longfellow Park
Hollywood Road Park
Idylwood Park
Lee Landing Park
Lemon Road Park
Lisle Park
Longfellow School Site
Mount Royal Park
Olney Park
Pimmit Hills Park
Pimmit View Park
Ruckstuhl Park
Tysons Pimmit Park
Westgate Park
Falls Church – 22044

J.E.B. Stuart Park
Falls Church – 22045

Pimmit Barn
Great Falls – 22066

Colvin Run Mill Park
Great Falls Grange Park
Hickory Run School Site
Lexington Estates Park
Riverbend Park
Lorton – 22079

Laurel Hill Park (part)
Levelle W. Dupell Park
Lorton Park
Lower Potomac Park
Mount Air Historic Site
Newington Commons Park
Newington Heights Park
Pohick Estates Park
Southgate Park
McLean – 22101

Alfred Odrick Homesite
Bryn Mawr Park
Chesterbrook School Site
Churchill Road Park
Clemyjontri Park
Cooper Intermediate School Site
Dolley Madison Estates Park
Franklin Woods Park
Kent Gardens Park
Kirby Park
Langley Fork Park
Langley Oaks Park
Lewinsville Center Park
Lewinsville Park
Linway Terrace Park
Marie Butler Leven Preserve
McLean Central Park
McLean Knolls Park
Potomac Hills Park
Salona Park
Saucy Branch (McLean High) Park
McLean – 22102

Falstaff Park
Greenway Heights Park
Holladay Field
Ken Lawrence Park
McLean Hamlet Park
McLean Hunt Estates Park
Park at Tysons II
Scotts Run Nature Preserve
Spring Hill Park
Timberly Park
Tollbrook Ridge Park
Oakton – 22124

Blake Lane School Site
Borge Street Park
Oakborough Square Park
Oakton Community Park
Springfield – 22150

Brookfield Park
Byron Avenue Park
Franconia Park
Hooes Road Park
Lake Accotink Park
Lee High Park
Loisdale Park
Lynbrook Park
Monticello Woods Park
Springfield Forest Park
Springvale Park
Trailside Park
Springfield – 22151

Deerlick Park
Edsall Park
Flag Run Park
Kings Park
Leewood Park
North Springfield Park
Royal Ridge Park
Springfield – 22152

Cardinal Forest Park
Carrleigh Parkway Park
Fairfax Park
Greentree Village Park
Hidden Pond Park
Hunter Village Park
Orange Hunt Estates Park
Rolling Forest Park
Shannon Station Park
West Springfield Park
West Springfield Village Park
Springfield – 22153

Chapel Acres Park
Cherry Run Park
Huntsman Park
Rollingwood School Site
Saratoga Park
South Run District Park
Vienna – 22027

Dunn Loring Park
Vienna – 22180

Cunningham Park
Peterson Lane Park
Vienna – 22181

Ashlawn Park
Fox Hunters Park
Kemper Park
Lawyers Road Park
Nottoway Park
Vienna – 22182

Ashgrove Historic Site
Briarcliff Park
Clarks Crossing Park
Eudora Park
Foxstone Park
Freedom Hill Park
Heritage Resources Park
Lahey Lost Valley Park
Raglan Road Park
Symphony Hills Park
Tamarack Park
Tysons Woods Park
Waverly Park
Wolf Trails Park
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Date: 6/29/18 2:08 pm
From: Steve Johnson via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] List of "NoFly" parks - Fairfax Co.
Rich, please tell me where this list was published. The reason I ask is this:


Fairfax Park Authority people have told me several times that the sole, ONLY park in the county approved for RC vehicle use is Poplar Ford Park. They have told me it is prohibited at ALL other Fairfax County parks.


However this list and the text preceding it implies that it is permitted in many other parks, where it has already been a problem. I need to know where this was originally published so we can correct this.


Steve Johnson
<stevejohnson2...>




-----Original Message-----
From: Rich Rieger via VA-bird <va-bird...>
To: VA-BIRD birding <va-bird...>
Sent: Thu, Jun 28, 2018 9:50 pm
Subject: [VA-bird] List of "NoFly" parks - Fairfax Co.

Folks - here's a list of parks that fall in the 15 mile No Fly zone of Nat'l Airport - please report violations to Fairfax Co Police -

Non-Emergency 703-691-2131

ALSO!! please report violations to Fairfax Co. Park Authority at <parkmail...>

Not sure if any environmental group was given a heads up on this pending legislation - unfortunate that... Public Hearing after the fact doesn't do much good in my opinion...

Where to Fly (and What's Off Limits)
The Model Aircraft Site at Poplar Ford Park is the recommended site for drone use.

Per Virginia Code §19.2-926.3, park visitors in possession of a UAS may not enter areas where they would otherwise not be able to go (such as posted areas, construction zones, and park facilities - such as athletic fields - reserved for use by others). Please observe the established park operating hours and any posted signage.

To protect Fairfax County’s valuable natural and cultural resources, pilots are encouraged to select sites in areas actively maintained for recreational use, such as mowed fields. Pilots should select sites that fully allow FAA requirements and safety recommendations to be met.

The airspace around Washington, DC is more restricted than in any other part of the country. The following Park Authority properties are underneath the 15-mile DC Flight Restricted Zone, or airspace where the FAA generally prohibits drone flights without specific authorization. This list is provided as guidance only and accuracy is not guaranteed; all pilots should follow the appropriate FAA rules in place at the location and time of flight.

Fairfax County Park Authority Properties under the Washington, DC Flight Restricted Zone

For Information/Guidance Only – Accuracy not Guaranteed

July 1, 2018

Alexandria – 22303

Burgundy Park
Farrington Park
Heritage Hill Park
Huntington Park
Jefferson Manor Park
Loftridge Park
Mount Eagle Park
Alexandria – 22306

Bucknell Manor Park
Creighton Square Park
Groveton Heights Park
Historic Huntley
Hollins Meadows Park
Huntley Meadows Park
Hybla Valley Park
Lenclair Park
Little Hunting Creek Park
Martin Luther King, Jr. Park
North Hill Park
South Kings Forest Park
Stephen Foster School Site (Walt Whitman)
Stoneybrooke Park
Alexandria – 22307

Belle Haven Park
Fort Willard Historic Site
Gilbert S. McCutcheon Park
Mount Vernon District Park
Westgrove Park
White Oaks Park
Alexandria – 22308

Carl Sandburg School Site
Collingwood Park
Fort Hunt Park
Hollin Hall Park
John Byers Park
Kirk Park
Stratford Landing Park
Alexandria – 22309

George Washington Park
Grist Mill Park
McNaughton Fields Park
Mount Vernon Manor Park
Mount Vernon Woods Park
Mount Zephyr Park
Muddy Hole Farm Park
Old Mount Vernon School Site
Pole Road Park
Summers Cemetery
Vernon Heights Park
Washington Mill Park
Woodlawn Park
Woodley Hills Park
Alexandria – 22310

Bush Hill Park
Clermont Park
Franconia Forest Park
Greendale Golf Course
Lee District Park
Manchester Lakes Park
Mark Twain Park
Ridgeview Park
Tara Village Park
Virginia Hills School Site
Wilton Woods School Site
Alexandria – 22311

Dowden Terrace Park
Alexandria – 22312

Backlick Run Park
Bren Mar Park
Glasgow Park
Glen Hills Park
Green Spring Gardens
Heywood Glen Park
Joseph F. Barnes Battery Park
Monch Farm Park
Mulberry Hill Park
Parklawn Park
Pinecrest Golf Course
Alexandria – 22315

Amberleigh Park
Beulah Park
Hayfield Park
Island Creek Park
Kingstowne Park
Olander & Margaret Banks Park
Wickford Park
Annandale – 22003

Americana Park
Annandale Park
Backlick Park
Barcroft Knolls Park
Broyhill Crest Park
Camelot School Site
Canterbury Woods Park
Eakin Community Park
Fairfax Hills Park
Fitzhugh Park
Howrey Field Park
Kendale Woods Park
Larchmont Park
Long Branch Falls Park
Manassas Gap Railroad Park
Mason District Park
Masonville Park
Oak Hill Park
Ossian Hall Park
Pine Ridge Park
Poe Terrace Park
Red Fox Forest Park
Valley Crest Park
Wakefield Chapel Park
Wakefield Park
Wilburdale Park
Willow Woods Park
Winterset Varsity Park
Bailey’s Crossroads - 22041

Belvedere Park
Burke – 22015

Burke Ridge Park
Burke Station Park
Lake Braddock Park
Rolling Valley West Park
Silas Burke Park
Fairfax – 22031

Armistead Park
Briarwood Park
Eakin Park (Mantua Section)
East Blake Lane Park
Hideaway Park
Mosby Woods Park
Sally Ormsby Park
Towers Park
Villa D’Este Park
Villa Lee Park
Fairfax – 22032

Ashford East Park
Crooked Creek Park
George Mason Park
Greenfield Park
Herzell Woods Park
Kings Park West Park
Lakeside Park
Monticello Park
Olde Forge Park
Rolling Woods Estates Park
Royal Lake Park
Rutherford Park
Smokewood Park
Surry Square Park
Twinbrook Road Park
University Park
Fairfax Station – 22039

Burke Lake Park/Golf Course (part)
Lake Mercer Park
Falls Church – 22041

Bailey’s Elementary School Site
Bailey’s Park
Boyd & Charlotte Hogge Park
Clark House at Barcroft Mews
Lillian Carey Park
Munson Hill Park
Skyline Park
Spring Lane Park
Falls Church – 22042

Azalea Park
Bel Air Park
Broyhill Park
Devonshire Park
James Lee School Site
Jefferson District Park
Jefferson Village Park
John & Margaret White Gardens
John Mastenbrook/Greenway Downs Park
Larry Graves Park
Luria Park
Merrifield Park
Pine Spring Park
Providence RECenter
Rose Lane Park
Roundtree Park
Sleepy Hollow Park
Tyler Park
Walnut Hill School Site
Westlawn School Site
Woodburn School Site
Falls Church – 22043

Fisher Park
Griffith Park
Hartland Green Park
Haycock-Longfellow Park
Hollywood Road Park
Idylwood Park
Lee Landing Park
Lemon Road Park
Lisle Park
Longfellow School Site
Mount Royal Park
Olney Park
Pimmit Hills Park
Pimmit View Park
Ruckstuhl Park
Tysons Pimmit Park
Westgate Park
Falls Church – 22044

J.E.B. Stuart Park
Falls Church – 22045

Pimmit Barn
Great Falls – 22066

Colvin Run Mill Park
Great Falls Grange Park
Hickory Run School Site
Lexington Estates Park
Riverbend Park
Lorton – 22079

Laurel Hill Park (part)
Levelle W. Dupell Park
Lorton Park
Lower Potomac Park
Mount Air Historic Site
Newington Commons Park
Newington Heights Park
Pohick Estates Park
Southgate Park
McLean – 22101

Alfred Odrick Homesite
Bryn Mawr Park
Chesterbrook School Site
Churchill Road Park
Clemyjontri Park
Cooper Intermediate School Site
Dolley Madison Estates Park
Franklin Woods Park
Kent Gardens Park
Kirby Park
Langley Fork Park
Langley Oaks Park
Lewinsville Center Park
Lewinsville Park
Linway Terrace Park
Marie Butler Leven Preserve
McLean Central Park
McLean Knolls Park
Potomac Hills Park
Salona Park
Saucy Branch (McLean High) Park
McLean – 22102

Falstaff Park
Greenway Heights Park
Holladay Field
Ken Lawrence Park
McLean Hamlet Park
McLean Hunt Estates Park
Park at Tysons II
Scotts Run Nature Preserve
Spring Hill Park
Timberly Park
Tollbrook Ridge Park
Oakton – 22124

Blake Lane School Site
Borge Street Park
Oakborough Square Park
Oakton Community Park
Springfield – 22150

Brookfield Park
Byron Avenue Park
Franconia Park
Hooes Road Park
Lake Accotink Park
Lee High Park
Loisdale Park
Lynbrook Park
Monticello Woods Park
Springfield Forest Park
Springvale Park
Trailside Park
Springfield – 22151

Deerlick Park
Edsall Park
Flag Run Park
Kings Park
Leewood Park
North Springfield Park
Royal Ridge Park
Springfield – 22152

Cardinal Forest Park
Carrleigh Parkway Park
Fairfax Park
Greentree Village Park
Hidden Pond Park
Hunter Village Park
Orange Hunt Estates Park
Rolling Forest Park
Shannon Station Park
West Springfield Park
West Springfield Village Park
Springfield – 22153

Chapel Acres Park
Cherry Run Park
Huntsman Park
Rollingwood School Site
Saratoga Park
South Run District Park
Vienna – 22027

Dunn Loring Park
Vienna – 22180

Cunningham Park
Peterson Lane Park
Vienna – 22181

Ashlawn Park
Fox Hunters Park
Kemper Park
Lawyers Road Park
Nottoway Park
Vienna – 22182

Ashgrove Historic Site
Briarcliff Park
Clarks Crossing Park
Eudora Park
Foxstone Park
Freedom Hill Park
Heritage Resources Park
Lahey Lost Valley Park
Raglan Road Park
Symphony Hills Park
Tamarack Park
Tysons Woods Park
Waverly Park
Wolf Trails Park
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Date: 6/29/18 2:07 pm
From: Jeff Blalock via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Heat
Meant to say heat wasn’t bad.

From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>



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Date: 6/29/18 2:00 pm
From: Jeff Blalock via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] eBird Trip Summary -- Trip
Greetings All

Yesterday David Pennebaker and I tried for a good part of yesterday morning trying to find the Mississippi Kites at Runt’s farm without any luck.

After we split up I came home to cut grass while David went on to Long Island in Campell Co and reported 4 singing Dickcissels. He called me to let me know and so today I got up early and making my way there stopping to try to find a Chuck Will Widow in both Pittsylvania and Campell Counties but had no luck on them but did get an EWPW at 3 stops.

At Long Island at 0530 Hrs I heard a Dickcissel calling as I got out of my car. While waiting for more light I saw a Bald Eagle and then tried for the Dickcissels to get a look at them and maybe even a picture. I found two along side of the road one in a 30ft dead tree and the forth in the grass to the left of the dead tree.

As so go good looks at a pair of Grasshopper Sparrows.

Heard a Bobwhite from Long Island Rd and two at Long Island Park and a fourth Epsons Rd.

Also had Common Raven from 3 locations. 2 of them was just heard while one was well seen before it crocked out.

Below is the complete list for the day and only wished that I hadn’t gotten hungry and it was getting muggy. Heat was bad.

Good Birding Always.

jeffblalock
eBird Checklist Summary for: Jun 29, 2018 at 4:00 AM to Jun 29, 2018 at 3:00 PM

Number of Checklists: 13
Number of Taxa: 60

Checklists included in this summary:
(1): 2751–3029 Cody Rd, Gretna US-VA (36.9917,-79.1136)
Date: Jun 29, 2018 at 4:42 AM
(2): Cody Rd, Long Island US-VA (37.0071,-79.1260)
Date: Jun 29, 2018 at 4:57 AM
(3): 7020 Straightstone Rd, Long Island US-VA (37.0405,-79.1201)
Date: Jun 29, 2018 at 5:16 AM
(4): 7219–7241 Long Island Rd, Long Island US-VA (37.0757,-79.1014)
Date: Jun 29, 2018 at 5:30 AM
(5): 394–1016 Epsons Rd, Long Island US-VA (37.0722,-79.0867)
Date: Jun 29, 2018 at 9:52 AM
(6): 3563–3691 Epsons Rd, Gladys US-VA (37.0702,-79.0479)
Date: Jun 29, 2018 at 10:37 AM
(7): 174 Dry Fork Rd, Gladys US-VA (37.0618,-79.0425)
Date: Jun 29, 2018 at 10:45 AM
(8): McIver Ferry Rd, Gladys US-VA (37.0505,-79.0193)
Date: Jun 29, 2018 at 11:05 AM
(9): 3234–3298 McIver Ferry Rd, Gladys US-VA (37.0556,-79.0073)
Date: Jun 29, 2018 at 11:40 AM
(10): Brookneal Park, Brookneal US-VA (37.0579,-78.9429)
Date: Jun 29, 2018 at 12:25 PM
(11): 5993 Straightstone Rd, Long Island US-VA (37.0315,-79.1339)
Date: Jun 29, 2018 at 5:10 AM
(12): Long Island Park and Boat Ramp
Date: Jun 29, 2018 at 7:30 AM
(13): 6111 Epsons Rd, Gladys US-VA (37.0583,-79.0070)
Date: Jun 29, 2018 at 12:10 PM

2 duck sp. -- (12)
5 Northern Bobwhite -- (4),(5),(12)
1 Great Blue Heron (Blue form) -- (4)
3 Black Vulture -- (5)
11 Turkey Vulture -- (5),(7),(10)
1 Bald Eagle -- (4)
1 Red-shouldered Hawk -- (12)
1 Red-tailed Hawk -- (7)
3 Killdeer -- (4),(12)
10 Mourning Dove -- (3),(4),(5),(9),(10),(12)
7 Yellow-billed Cuckoo -- (4),(8),(9),(10),(12)
3 Eastern Whip-poor-will -- (2),(3),(11)
5 Chimney Swift -- (4),(10)
3 Red-headed Woodpecker -- (8)
7 Red-bellied Woodpecker -- (5),(10),(12)
1 Downy Woodpecker (Eastern) -- (10)
1 Pileated Woodpecker -- (10)
1 Eastern Wood-Pewee -- (10)
4 Eastern Phoebe -- (10),(12)
2 White-eyed Vireo -- (12)
1 Yellow-throated Vireo -- (10)
5 Red-eyed Vireo -- (6),(9),(10),(12),(13)
4 Blue Jay -- (7),(10),(12)
24 American Crow -- (4),(5),(7),(9),(10),(12)
1 Fish Crow -- (10)
3 Common Raven -- (4),(5),(8)
6 Purple Martin -- (4),(12)
4 Tree Swallow -- (12)
25 Barn Swallow -- (4),(11),(12)
10 Cliff Swallow -- (4)
6 Tufted Titmouse -- (10),(12)
2 White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern) -- (10)
5 Carolina Wren -- (4),(5),(8),(12)
2 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher -- (9),(12)
14 Eastern Bluebird -- (4),(7),(10),(11),(12),(13)
1 Wood Thrush -- (10)
8 American Robin -- (10),(12)
2 Brown Thrasher -- (12)
4 Northern Mockingbird -- (4),(12)
1 Cedar Waxwing -- (12)
1 Ovenbird -- (10)
4 Common Yellowthroat -- (4),(7),(9)
1 Hooded Warbler -- (13)
1 Pine Warbler -- (8)
2 Grasshopper Sparrow -- (4)
9 Chipping Sparrow -- (5),(7),(10),(12)
1 Field Sparrow -- (12)
2 Eastern Towhee -- (3),(4)
3 Yellow-breasted Chat -- (1),(2),(8)
19 Northern Cardinal -- (3),(6),(9),(10),(12)
4 Blue Grosbeak -- (3),(4),(9),(12)
11 Indigo Bunting -- (2),(4),(5),(7),(10),(12)
4 Dickcissel -- (4)
13 Eastern Meadowlark (Eastern) -- (4),(5),(7)
6 Orchard Oriole -- (4),(9),(12)
10 Red-winged Blackbird -- (4)
15 Brown-headed Cowbird -- (4),(5),(12)
10 Common Grackle -- (4),(9),(12)
3 House Finch -- (10),(12)
10 American Goldfinch -- (5),(10),(12)

This trip summary was created using the eBird app for iPhone and iPad.
See eBird for more information.


From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>

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Date: 6/29/18 3:38 am
From: Jeff Blalock via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Dickcissel in Campell Co
Greetings all

The Dickcissels reported by David Pennebaker yesterday on Long Island Rd in Campell County along the hedge row on the right just after crossing over the Staunton River is confirmed by me this morning as I got here at 0530 Hrs and hear one and just now heard one again and I was able to get a picture of it.

Thanks for calling me yesterday David and reporting it on eBird.

Happy Birding Always

From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>



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Date: 6/28/18 7:28 pm
From: kurtcapt87--- via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Reminder of upcoming VA Breeding Bird Atlas Blockbuster for Upperville SE Saturday, 30 June
VA BIRDers,



A note of reminder that we are planning a Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas
Blockbuster this coming Saturday. We can use a few birders to fill out the
routes. Please join Linda Millington (<millington.linda...>
<mailto:<millington.linda...> ) and Kurt Gaskill for a block-busting
morning on Saturday, June 30th in Upperville SE. We will meet at the
Emmanuel Episcopal Church at 9670 Maidstone Road, Delaplane, VA, which is
just off I-66 using the exit to Rt 17 North. There is a commuter parking lot
across from the church, so we can leave cars there, and carpool as we
explore the block. Let's meet at 6:45 as it will take a bit of time to plan
routes. There are four wineries in the block, so we plan to do our tally and
story exchange at one of them. We hope that you will join us. Thank you!



Linda Millington and Kurt Gaskill



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Date: 6/28/18 6:50 pm
From: Rich Rieger via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] List of "NoFly" parks - Fairfax Co.
Folks - here's a list of parks that fall in the 15 mile No Fly zone of Nat'l Airport - please report violations to Fairfax Co Police -

Non-Emergency 703-691-2131

ALSO!! please report violations to Fairfax Co. Park Authority at <parkmail...>

Not sure if any environmental group was given a heads up on this pending legislation - unfortunate that... Public Hearing after the fact doesn't do much good in my opinion...

Where to Fly (and What's Off Limits)
The Model Aircraft Site at Poplar Ford Park is the recommended site for drone use.

Per Virginia Code 19.2-926.3, park visitors in possession of a UAS may not enter areas where they would otherwise not be able to go (such as posted areas, construction zones, and park facilities - such as athletic fields - reserved for use by others). Please observe the established park operating hours and any posted signage.

To protect Fairfax Countys valuable natural and cultural resources, pilots are encouraged to select sites in areas actively maintained for recreational use, such as mowed fields. Pilots should select sites that fully allow FAA requirements and safety recommendations to be met.

The airspace around Washington, DC is more restricted than in any other part of the country. The following Park Authority properties are underneath the 15-mile DC Flight Restricted Zone, or airspace where the FAA generally prohibits drone flights without specific authorization. This list is provided as guidance only and accuracy is not guaranteed; all pilots should follow the appropriate FAA rules in place at the location and time of flight.

Fairfax County Park Authority Properties under the Washington, DC Flight Restricted Zone

For Information/Guidance Only Accuracy not Guaranteed

July 1, 2018

Alexandria 22303

Burgundy Park
Farrington Park
Heritage Hill Park
Huntington Park
Jefferson Manor Park
Loftridge Park
Mount Eagle Park
Alexandria 22306

Bucknell Manor Park
Creighton Square Park
Groveton Heights Park
Historic Huntley
Hollins Meadows Park
Huntley Meadows Park
Hybla Valley Park
Lenclair Park
Little Hunting Creek Park
Martin Luther King, Jr. Park
North Hill Park
South Kings Forest Park
Stephen Foster School Site (Walt Whitman)
Stoneybrooke Park
Alexandria 22307

Belle Haven Park
Fort Willard Historic Site
Gilbert S. McCutcheon Park
Mount Vernon District Park
Westgrove Park
White Oaks Park
Alexandria 22308

Carl Sandburg School Site
Collingwood Park
Fort Hunt Park
Hollin Hall Park
John Byers Park
Kirk Park
Stratford Landing Park
Alexandria 22309

George Washington Park
Grist Mill Park
McNaughton Fields Park
Mount Vernon Manor Park
Mount Vernon Woods Park
Mount Zephyr Park
Muddy Hole Farm Park
Old Mount Vernon School Site
Pole Road Park
Summers Cemetery
Vernon Heights Park
Washington Mill Park
Woodlawn Park
Woodley Hills Park
Alexandria 22310

Bush Hill Park
Clermont Park
Franconia Forest Park
Greendale Golf Course
Lee District Park
Manchester Lakes Park
Mark Twain Park
Ridgeview Park
Tara Village Park
Virginia Hills School Site
Wilton Woods School Site
Alexandria 22311

Dowden Terrace Park
Alexandria 22312

Backlick Run Park
Bren Mar Park
Glasgow Park
Glen Hills Park
Green Spring Gardens
Heywood Glen Park
Joseph F. Barnes Battery Park
Monch Farm Park
Mulberry Hill Park
Parklawn Park
Pinecrest Golf Course
Alexandria 22315

Amberleigh Park
Beulah Park
Hayfield Park
Island Creek Park
Kingstowne Park
Olander & Margaret Banks Park
Wickford Park
Annandale 22003

Americana Park
Annandale Park
Backlick Park
Barcroft Knolls Park
Broyhill Crest Park
Camelot School Site
Canterbury Woods Park
Eakin Community Park
Fairfax Hills Park
Fitzhugh Park
Howrey Field Park
Kendale Woods Park
Larchmont Park
Long Branch Falls Park
Manassas Gap Railroad Park
Mason District Park
Masonville Park
Oak Hill Park
Ossian Hall Park
Pine Ridge Park
Poe Terrace Park
Red Fox Forest Park
Valley Crest Park
Wakefield Chapel Park
Wakefield Park
Wilburdale Park
Willow Woods Park
Winterset Varsity Park
Baileys Crossroads - 22041

Belvedere Park
Burke 22015

Burke Ridge Park
Burke Station Park
Lake Braddock Park
Rolling Valley West Park
Silas Burke Park
Fairfax 22031

Armistead Park
Briarwood Park
Eakin Park (Mantua Section)
East Blake Lane Park
Hideaway Park
Mosby Woods Park
Sally Ormsby Park
Towers Park
Villa DEste Park
Villa Lee Park
Fairfax 22032

Ashford East Park
Crooked Creek Park
George Mason Park
Greenfield Park
Herzell Woods Park
Kings Park West Park
Lakeside Park
Monticello Park
Olde Forge Park
Rolling Woods Estates Park
Royal Lake Park
Rutherford Park
Smokewood Park
Surry Square Park
Twinbrook Road Park
University Park
Fairfax Station 22039

Burke Lake Park/Golf Course (part)
Lake Mercer Park
Falls Church 22041

Baileys Elementary School Site
Baileys Park
Boyd & Charlotte Hogge Park
Clark House at Barcroft Mews
Lillian Carey Park
Munson Hill Park
Skyline Park
Spring Lane Park
Falls Church 22042

Azalea Park
Bel Air Park
Broyhill Park
Devonshire Park
James Lee School Site
Jefferson District Park
Jefferson Village Park
John & Margaret White Gardens
John Mastenbrook/Greenway Downs Park
Larry Graves Park
Luria Park
Merrifield Park
Pine Spring Park
Providence RECenter
Rose Lane Park
Roundtree Park
Sleepy Hollow Park
Tyler Park
Walnut Hill School Site
Westlawn School Site
Woodburn School Site
Falls Church 22043

Fisher Park
Griffith Park
Hartland Green Park
Haycock-Longfellow Park
Hollywood Road Park
Idylwood Park
Lee Landing Park
Lemon Road Park
Lisle Park
Longfellow School Site
Mount Royal Park
Olney Park
Pimmit Hills Park
Pimmit View Park
Ruckstuhl Park
Tysons Pimmit Park
Westgate Park
Falls Church 22044

J.E.B. Stuart Park
Falls Church 22045

Pimmit Barn
Great Falls 22066

Colvin Run Mill Park
Great Falls Grange Park
Hickory Run School Site
Lexington Estates Park
Riverbend Park
Lorton 22079

Laurel Hill Park (part)
Levelle W. Dupell Park
Lorton Park
Lower Potomac Park
Mount Air Historic Site
Newington Commons Park
Newington Heights Park
Pohick Estates Park
Southgate Park
McLean 22101

Alfred Odrick Homesite
Bryn Mawr Park
Chesterbrook School Site
Churchill Road Park
Clemyjontri Park
Cooper Intermediate School Site
Dolley Madison Estates Park
Franklin Woods Park
Kent Gardens Park
Kirby Park
Langley Fork Park
Langley Oaks Park
Lewinsville Center Park
Lewinsville Park
Linway Terrace Park
Marie Butler Leven Preserve
McLean Central Park
McLean Knolls Park
Potomac Hills Park
Salona Park
Saucy Branch (McLean High) Park
McLean 22102

Falstaff Park
Greenway Heights Park
Holladay Field
Ken Lawrence Park
McLean Hamlet Park
McLean Hunt Estates Park
Park at Tysons II
Scotts Run Nature Preserve
Spring Hill Park
Timberly Park
Tollbrook Ridge Park
Oakton 22124

Blake Lane School Site
Borge Street Park
Oakborough Square Park
Oakton Community Park
Springfield 22150

Brookfield Park
Byron Avenue Park
Franconia Park
Hooes Road Park
Lake Accotink Park
Lee High Park
Loisdale Park
Lynbrook Park
Monticello Woods Park
Springfield Forest Park
Springvale Park
Trailside Park
Springfield 22151

Deerlick Park
Edsall Park
Flag Run Park
Kings Park
Leewood Park
North Springfield Park
Royal Ridge Park
Springfield 22152

Cardinal Forest Park
Carrleigh Parkway Park
Fairfax Park
Greentree Village Park
Hidden Pond Park
Hunter Village Park
Orange Hunt Estates Park
Rolling Forest Park
Shannon Station Park
West Springfield Park
West Springfield Village Park
Springfield 22153

Chapel Acres Park
Cherry Run Park
Huntsman Park
Rollingwood School Site
Saratoga Park
South Run District Park
Vienna 22027

Dunn Loring Park
Vienna 22180

Cunningham Park
Peterson Lane Park
Vienna 22181

Ashlawn Park
Fox Hunters Park
Kemper Park
Lawyers Road Park
Nottoway Park
Vienna 22182

Ashgrove Historic Site
Briarcliff Park
Clarks Crossing Park
Eudora Park
Foxstone Park
Freedom Hill Park
Heritage Resources Park
Lahey Lost Valley Park
Raglan Road Park
Symphony Hills Park
Tamarack Park
Tysons Woods Park
Waverly Park
Wolf Trails Park
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Date: 6/28/18 5:32 pm
From: Rich Rieger via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] here come the drones
Not sure how this will play out in other counties, but this was an issue here in Fairfax Co last year. Looks like the model aircraft people took their case to the state - I've had to "redact" a few links in the original email, but you get the gist... at least the FCPA is "hopeful", me, not so much. Rich Rieger, Alexandria

Hello!

Youre receiving this email because youve expressed an interest in the Fairfax County Park Authoritys unmanned aircraft/drone initiative or attended a public meeting on the topic. If you no longer wish to hear about this, please reply with unsubscribe and we will remove you from the list.

As you might know, the Park Authoritys further consideration of a future unmanned aircraft/drone program was placed on hold while the General Assembly considered House Bill 638 and Senate Bill 526 concerning the local regulation of privately owned unmanned aircraft. The legislation was adopted, with the change in law (Va. Code 19.2-926.3) effective July 1, 2018.

In compliance with state law, the use of drones on Park Authority properties is allowed starting July 1. Pilots are expected to abide by all applicable Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations, safety guidance, and airspace restrictions. We are hopeful that operators will respect other park users, stay clear of wildlife and natural and cultural resource areas and generally, be respectful in their use of unmanned aircraft over parkland.

The Park Authoritys website has been updated with the latest information, including guidance for pilots and the public.

This change in the law necessitates an update of the Park Authoritys regulations on remote-controlled vehicles in the parks. A public meeting and comment period, in coordination with is being planned for this Fall. We will send out more information once the details have been finalized, and we look forward to your participation.

Thank you for your interest and involvement in this ongoing effort! Please feel free to contact us with any questions .

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Date: 6/28/18 11:56 am
From: David Matson via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Gannet
Birders:

A Gannet was present on June 23 at the Godwin Bridge (Highway 13) over the
Nansemond River, near its mouth.

Gannets are not unusual in March at this location, when Gannets follow the
"bait fish" up rivers, upon the bait fish Spring migration from ocean to
Summer grounds.

A Gannet at this location at this time of year is unusual.

David Matson
--
David Matson
Suffolk, Virginia
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Date: 6/28/18 11:36 am
From: Ralph via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] (no subject)

http://seven.theprimehealthdiet.org

Ralph

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Date: 6/28/18 9:52 am
From: Bryan H via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] Selden Island, Potomac River (MD/VA line)
We have birded out there occasionally (usually late in the day after work)
with a friend of ours who works at Janelia. I believe there is also a
sector of the Seneca CBC (Jim Nelson is compiler) that birds the island -
Warren W. is the typical sector leader for that sector. No idea about the
management plans. Our friend may know who to ask if you would like to
inquire.

Hope that helps,
Bryan Henson
Sterling, VA

On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 12:21 PM, Sinclair, Kristen E. via VA-bird <
<va-bird...> wrote:

> Greetings,
>
> One of my colleagues was out birding 400-acre Selden Island this past
> weekend, near Lansdowne, VA. It's owned by the Howard Hughes Medical
> Institute/Janelia Research Campus and was formerly a sod farm; apparently
> the ownership changed in 2004. He saw numerous Grasshopper Sparrows and
> Eastern Meadowlarks in the grassy fields, and eBird has some reports from
> 2017. While he was visiting, the entire island was being mowed, right in
> the middle of the breeding season. He thinks from past visits that they
> also mow in mid- to late summer and possibly the fall, and the grass is
> always kept short. We were curious if anyone had information about the
> long-term management plans for the island, or if anyone else has birded out
> here. There is a bridge from the VA side only.
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> ---------------
> Kristen Sinclair, Ecologist III
> Inventory and Planning Program Manager
> Natural Resources Branch || Resource Management Division
> Fairfax County Park Authority
> Phone: (703) 324-8559
>
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> wish to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
>
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Date: 6/28/18 9:21 am
From: Sinclair, Kristen E. via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Selden Island, Potomac River (MD/VA line)
Greetings,

One of my colleagues was out birding 400-acre Selden Island this past weekend, near Lansdowne, VA. It's owned by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute/Janelia Research Campus and was formerly a sod farm; apparently the ownership changed in 2004. He saw numerous Grasshopper Sparrows and Eastern Meadowlarks in the grassy fields, and eBird has some reports from 2017. While he was visiting, the entire island was being mowed, right in the middle of the breeding season. He thinks from past visits that they also mow in mid- to late summer and possibly the fall, and the grass is always kept short. We were curious if anyone had information about the long-term management plans for the island, or if anyone else has birded out here. There is a bridge from the VA side only.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Kristen Sinclair, Ecologist III
Inventory and Planning Program Manager
Natural Resources Branch || Resource Management Division
Fairfax County Park Authority
Phone: (703) 324-8559

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Date: 6/27/18 9:07 am
From: Marc Ribaudo via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Mississippi Kite, Prince William Co. Landfill
I saw a Mississippi Kite soaring and diving over the Prince William County Landfill this morning. 

Marc Ribaudo

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE Droid
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Date: 6/27/18 6:50 am
From: Ashley Peele via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] New VA BBA Maps now on eBird
Good morning, Birders!

An exciting new VABBA2 mapping tool has just launched on the project's
eBird portal (ebird.org/atlasva)! The active Atlas projects (including us
(VA) and WI) have been developing this set of tools with Cornell for a long
time and are very excited to now be able to share it with you all.

Using the VABBA2 portal's Explore page, you can now navigate to a series of
Effort Maps (https://ebird.org/atlasva/effortmap), which allow you to
visualize various data layers by Atlas block. For example, you can now see
a map of diurnal effort, coded species, and confirmed species updated
daily. When you zoom in on these maps, you will be able to see Priority
blocks for your region.

https://ebird.org/atlasva/effortmap

Please take a few minutes to check out this great new tool. Our hope is
that this will make it much easier for our volunteers to see *where* and *what
type* of Atlas effort, e.g. nocturnal surveys, additional breeding codes,
etc., is still needed in their region OR in a region that they are
interested in visiting.

This summer, our volunteer community has been bringing it's A-game to help
us begin filling major gaps in the state, getting data in those empty
priority blocks, and working to close out well-surveyed priority blocks. *The
response to our various calls for help and the number of people we have
seen stepping up to take on active Atlas roles in their communities has
been nothing short of inspiring. *

Thanks to you all from both myself and all of our local and regional
coordinators!

Ashley Peele, PhD
Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas Coordinator
Conservation Management Institute - Virginia Tech
Office: 540-231-9182
Fax: 540-231-7019
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Date: 6/27/18 2:01 am
From: Nylia via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] (no subject)
http://account.acidbelly.com

Nylia



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Date: 6/26/18 11:22 pm
From: Karen Cooper via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Madidi NP, Bolivia
Hi all!

I live in Germany now, so haven't been active in the group for a while.

However, a birding guide (and friend) in Argentina is organizing a trip to
the Madidi NP in Bolivia in January 2019. Madidi is thought to be the
*most* biodiverse region in the world.

Find out more about the trip and Madidi here
<https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/find-out-whats-going-madidi-guy-cox?trk=v-feed>.

(
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/find-out-whats-going-madidi-guy-cox?trk=v-feed)


Please share with anyone you think is interested.

Thank you,
Karen Cooper

--
I haven't been everywhere, but it's on my list.
- Susan Sontag
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Date: 6/26/18 4:51 pm
From: Larry Meade via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] Dyke marsh walk reports

The Dyke Marsh walks are absolutely still on. These walks are sponsored by the Friends of Dyke Marsh and everyone is welcome to participate with no signup required. The walk meets every Sunday at 8:00 AM at the Belle Haven Park picnic area in Fairfax County. Just look for people with scopes out by the river. You can also find recent checklists from Dyke Marsh on eBird.


Larry Meade
Merrifield, VA







-----Original Message-----
From: m b via VA-bird <va-bird...>
To: va-bird <va-bird...>
Sent: Tue, Jun 26, 2018 2:34 pm
Subject: [VA-bird] Dyke marsh walk reports

Are the Sunday dyke marsh walks still going? I realize everyone leading them is a volunteer, so if you can't post reports i completely understand. But i do rely on them to see what to look for when I'm there many days each week. And frankly, to persuade my lazy butt to get out early to go on a Sunday expert birder-led walk there, when i see in the report what I'm missing. If the walks are still happening, and if anyone can manage to post a weekly report, I'd be grateful. And again, if you just don't have time to report on what you've seen, i understand, and am grateful for your service in leading the walks.

Mb from nova




sent from my phone so please excuse all typos, gibberish, and horrifying misspellings

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Date: 6/26/18 2:26 pm
From: Antonio Quezon via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Mississippi Kites in Fairfax Station
Suzanne Miller and I saw Mississippi Kites on two occasions today over our house on Yates Ford Road in Fairfax Station. Late this morning before noon and around 5:00 PM.

TonyQ
www.TonyQandSuzanne.com
Sent from my LaZBoy
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Date: 6/26/18 11:34 am
From: m b via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Dyke marsh walk reports
Are the Sunday dyke marsh walks still going? I realize everyone leading them is a volunteer, so if you can't post reports i completely understand. But i do rely on them to see what to look for when I'm there many days each week. And frankly, to persuade my lazy butt to get out early to go on a Sunday expert birder-led walk there, when i see in the report what I'm missing. If the walks are still happening, and if anyone can manage to post a weekly report, I'd be grateful. And again, if you just don't have time to report on what you've seen, i understand, and am grateful for your service in leading the walks.

Mb from nova




sent from my phone so please excuse all typos, gibberish, and horrifying misspellings

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Date: 6/26/18 6:59 am
From: Joe Coleman via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] FW: DC Area, 6/26/2018
FYI Joe Coleman

-----Original Message-----
Hotline: Voice of the Naturalist
Date: 6/26/2018
Coverage: MD/DC/VA/central and southern DE/WV panhandle
Reports, comments, questions: <voice...>
Compilers: Rick and Nancy Sussman
Sponsor: Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central
Atlantic States (independent of NAS)
Transcriber: Steve Cordle

Please consider joining ANS, especially if you are a regular user of the
Voice of the Naturalist (Individual $50; Family $65; Nature Steward $100;
Audubon Advocate $200). The membership number is 301-652 9188, option 12;
the address is 8940 Jones Mill Road, Chevy Chase, MD 20815; and the web site
is http://www.anshome.org.

This is the Voice of the Naturalist, a service of the Audubon Naturalist
Society. This report covers the week starting Tuesday, June 19, and was
completed on Tuesday, June 26, at 8:00 a.m.

Information on noteworthy birds is presented below in taxonomic order, as
set forth in the American Ornithological Society Checklist for North and
Middle American Birds, as revised through the 58th Supplement (July 2017).

TOP BIRDS: GREAT BLUE HERON (White Form) in MD, ROSEATE SPOONBILL* in MD

OTHER BIRDS OF INTEREST: lingering waterfowl, NORTHERN BOBWHITE, HORNED
GREBE, SORA, SANDHILL CRANE, shorebirds, gulls and terns, loons, ANHINGA,
LEAST BITTERN, YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON, MISSISSIPPI KITE, COMMON RAVEN,
BOBOLINK, BLUE GROSBEAK, DICKCISSEL.

TOP BIRDS

A GREAT BLUE HERON, white form ("GREAT WHITE HERON"), was found on June 21
feeding in a flooded field on the north side of Liberty Rd (Rt. 26), about a
mile east of the intersection with MD 194 right near Israel Creek, in
Frederick Co, MD. It was seen again on June 23 and 25, in the same general
area.

A ROSEATE SPOONBILL*, first found on June 17, was seen every day throughout
the week, in the marsh at North Beach, Calvert Co, MD, most recently on June
23. It was not seen at all on June 24, but one showed up at Blackwater NWR,
Dorchester Co, MD, across the Chesapeake Bay from that site, on June 24 and
was later seen flying south, leading to speculation that it was the same
bird. It was not relocated.

OTHER BIRDS OF INTEREST

Waterfowl lingering into summer included an AMERICAN BLACK DUCK in the marsh
at North Beach, Calvert Co, MD on June 21-24, and another at the Washington
Sailing Marina, SW DC on June 21 and 24. A survey of Poplar Island, Talbot
Co, MD on June 21, turned up a male GREEN-WINGED TEAL, a female GREATER
SCAUP, a pair of WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS, and four LONG-TAILED DUCKS. A male
SURF SCOTER was a surprising find at Chincoteague NWR, Accomack Co, VA on
June 21, while two pairs of SURF SCOTERS were seen at Big Water Farm
(private)in Queen Anne's Co, MD on June 24, and a male BLACK SCOTER was
spotted at the marsh at North Beach in Calvert Co, MD on June 23. A
continuing female BUFFLEHEAD was seen again at the Konterra Dr fields and
ponds (restricted access), Prince George's Co, MD on June 21. RED-BREASTED
MERGANSERS were seen at Allens Fresh, Charles Co, MD and at Pleasure House
Point Natural Area, Virginia Beach, VA, both on June 21.

HORNED GREBES were seen at the North Beach fishing pier, Calvert Co and at
Claiborne Landing, Dorchester Co, both in MD on June 24.

A NORTHERN BOBWHITE was seen and heard on a path through the apple orchard
at Homestead Farm (restricted access), in Montgomery Co, MD on June 22.

A SORA continued to be seen at the Shenandoah Wetlands in Augusta Co, VA on
June 23.

A pair of SANDHILL CRANES were seen on private property in Broadway,
Rockingham Co, VA on June 20, 22, and 24.

Shorebirds seen this week included a SEMIPALMATED PLOVER in the parking lot
at Lilypons Water Gardens, Frederick Co, MD on June 23, and on June 21, the
survey of Poplar Island in Talbot Co, MD turned up two DUNLIN, two LEAST
SANDPIPERS, seven WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERS, and 26 SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS. A
WILSON'S PHALAROPE was seen at Bombay Hook NWR, Kent Co, DE on June 25.

A BONAPARTE'S GULL was seen on Poplar Island, in Talbot Co, MD and another
at Bombay Hook NWR, Kent Co, DE, both on June 21. An adult LESSER
BLACK-BACKED GULL was seen at Poplar Island, Talbot Co, MD on June 19, and
as many as seven LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS were seen at the Salisbury
Landfill, Wicomico Co, MD on June 21.

Two COMMON TERNS were seen at Little Creek Wildlife Area, Kent Co, DE on
June 21. Another late or lingering COMMON TERN was seen flying up the
Potomac River, at 8:15 am, from Violette's Lock, C&O Canal, Montgomery Co,
MD on June 23. A GULL-BILLED TERN was seen at Little Creek Wildlife Area,
Kent Co, DE on June 21.

On June 21, a possibly injured COMMON LOON in basic plumage, was spotted
oceanside at Dewey Beach, Sussex Co, DE. On June 22, a continuing
RED-THROATED LOON was seen again on Little Seneca Lake, Black Hill Regional
Park, Montgomery Co, MD.

Two ANHINGAS were seen at Carson Wetland, Prince George Co, VA on June 19.

A secretive LEAST BITTERN was spotted again at the Shenandoah Wetlands in
Augusta Co, VA on June 23. An adult YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON was seen
standing at a nest in New Windsor, Carroll Co, MD on June 22.

On June 20, birders enjoyed watching a (continuing) MISSISSIPPI KITE as it
flew in from the Fort Marcy area and over mansions just north of Chain
Bridge, from the C&O Canal National Historic Park, NW DC.

A COMMON RAVEN was seen flying from a lamp post on the bridge under the GW
Parkway, C&O Canal-Chain Bridge area NW DC, on June 19. Also on June 19, two
Common Ravens were spotted as they soared on a thermal heading south, from
the C&O Canal National Historic Park, NW DC. On June 20, a continuing COMMON
RAVEN was heard calling at Terrapin Nature Park, Queen Anne's Co, MD.

Two different male BOBOLINKS were seen and heard at the Clifton
Institute-Adams Pasture area (restricted access), in Fauquier Co, VA, on
June 19. On June 25, five BOBOLINKS were seen at Fairhill NRMA in Cecil Co,
MD.

A BLUE GROSBEAK was reported from Russell Rd, Garrett Co, MD on June 21.

DICKCISSEL reports this week came from Waverly, Sussex Co, VA and Bristoe
Station Battlefield, Prince William Co, VA on June 19, from the Oaks
Landfill, Montgomery Co, MD on June 20, and on June 21, 23, and 25 from the
Underwood Rd area, Howard Co, MD.

***

This week's report was based on reports on the DE, MD, VA, and WV list
servers, eBird records and various birding pages on Facebook.

The Audubon Sanctuary Shop (301-652-3606,
http://anshome.org/naturalist-shop) is an excellent source for guidebooks
and many other nature-related titles.

To report bird sightings, e-mail your report to <voice...>
Please post reports before midnight Monday, identify the county as well as
the state, and include your name and a Tuesday morning contact, e-mail or
phone.

Thank you for your interest, and enjoy the birds.

*Of interest to the applicable state records committee

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Date: 6/26/18 6:03 am
From: Jeff Blalock via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Birding along the Southside Border
Greetings all

On Sunday 24 June 2018, I started birding in Brunswick Co along Hwy 58E towards Emporia and made a few stops trying to hear owls and Goatsuckers but didn’t get any until I got into Greensville Co making my way south along some country roads. At one stop I did get 3 EWPW calling and at another stop I reported 2 Barred Owls but I really think it could have been 3 calling.

As I made my way south I made several stops finding both RE and WE Vireos and Pine, Prairie, Common Yellowthroat, Hooded, Ovenbird and Prothonotary Warblers.

My favorite stop of all was on Creek Rd at the creek which is as wide as some rivers. There was a pull off just before the bridge on the right and as soon as I stopped the car was covered with Deer Flies. Boy I thought that this was going to be fun. But the flies stayed at the car and I didn’t have a single bite from them. At the creek it was nice and cool and not a bug one. Here I saw Downy, RB Woodpecker, a GB Heron and a confirmed breeding BG Gnatcatcher. I scanned all around the creek and along both sides of the roads looking for YCNH as Freddy Collins and myself saw one in the month of June one year about 30 years ago when we were trying to find the MIKIs in the area of which we never got them but Shirley and I went down and found one on a dirt road in Virginia and followed it into NC. Unfortunately it wasn’t a Life Bird having seen my first MIKI at Cape Romain NWR in SC so I didn’t record the date only adding a 1 onto my Excel Spreadsheet that I use to keep up with the birds seen in each state. This was way before eBird and I used it to get my totals for my reporting my Total Species seen in each state for the ABA.

So after leaving the creek and as I was driving the road slowly with my windows down I heard a Tanager and so I stopped hoping to confirm Breeding but only could record sing male. Before getting back in the car I scanned the skies and found a flock of Vultures flying around and with them nearby were 2 Mississippi Kites. Got you for Greensville Co now almost were I saw them 30 years ago.

I followed the county roads and soon made my way into Northampton Co NC which is south of Southampton VA.

I birded along Hwy 186 starting at the VA/NC border and drove west making a few stops and at one I got my eBird MIKI for NC.

After a few miles I made a 180 and drove back to the VA border entering Southampton Co and I drove some of the county roads stopping where I could find a safe place to pull partly off the road.

I found another wonderful creek on Clarksbury Rd with two good pull offs and I looked on both sides of the road and did get a GB Heron and heard my only 2 Wood Thrush for the day.

Other highlights include
A calling Northern Bobwhite at the intersection of 622 & 625 Creek Rd

A RS Hawk at the Creek on Creek Rd and a RT Hawk on Hwy 186 in NC

By the time I started to head for home and something to eat as I left without eating my breakfast and only eating my snack bars it was getting a little warm at 95 degrees but the humidity was low and I haven’t even worked up a sweat but overall a much enjoyable day but felt that if I stayed longer I might have been able to get a few birds that I would have like to have seen but didn’t such as Osprey and Bald Eagle.

Oh well now that gives me a reason to return.

Good Birding Always

From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>



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Date: 6/26/18 5:57 am
From: Bill McGovern via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] PROTHONOTARY FAMILY at OBNWR, Prince William County
About your bird that "resembles a yellow warbler," it looks like a prairie warbler.

-----Original Message-----
From: VA-bird <va-bird-bounces+bmcgovern=<cox.net...> On Behalf Of barb22030--- via VA-bird
Sent: Monday, June 25, 2018 10:19 PM
To: Virginia Birding <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] PROTHONOTARY FAMILY at OBNWR, Prince William County


Looks like one pair of Occoquan Bay NWR's prothonotary warblers already have little ones or they are getting ready for a family. I photographed one "diving"


into the box on Easy Road today. (Photos attached.) If you look at the photos, please help me ID a bird that resembles a yellow warbler. I also saw male northern parulas, immature male orchard orioles, male indigo buntings, blue-grey gnatcatchers, ospreys, and more -- and heard a bald eagle and yellow-billed cuckoos.

https://www.flickr.com/gp/olympusbjs/xC1144
- Barb, Fairfax

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Date: 6/25/18 7:48 pm
From: Vineeta Anand via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] PROTHONOTARY FAMILY at OBNWR, Prince William County
Barb, you're an amazing photographer. I loved your photos.
Vineeta

On Mon, Jun 25, 2018 at 10:18 PM, barb22030--- via VA-bird <
<va-bird...> wrote:

>
> Looks like one pair of Occoquan Bay NWR's prothonotary warblers already
> have little ones or they are getting ready for a family. I photographed
> one "diving"
>
>
> into the box on Easy Road today. (Photos attached.) If you look at the
> photos, please help me ID a bird that resembles a yellow warbler. I also
> saw male northern parulas, immature male orchard orioles, male indigo
> buntings, blue-grey gnatcatchers, ospreys, and more -- and heard a bald
> eagle and yellow-billed cuckoos.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/gp/olympusbjs/xC1144
> - Barb, Fairfax
>
> *** You are subscribed to VA-bird as <vineetaa...> If you wish to
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
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Date: 6/25/18 7:19 pm
From: barb22030--- via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] PROTHONOTARY FAMILY at OBNWR, Prince William County

Looks like one pair of Occoquan Bay NWR's prothonotary warblers already have little ones or they are getting ready for a family.  I photographed one "diving" 


into the box on Easy Road today.  (Photos attached.)  If you look at the photos, please help me ID a bird that resembles a yellow warbler.   I also saw male northern parulas, immature male orchard orioles, male indigo buntings, blue-grey gnatcatchers, ospreys, and more -- and heard a bald eagle and yellow-billed cuckoos. 

      https://www.flickr.com/gp/olympusbjs/xC1144
- Barb, Fairfax
 
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Date: 6/25/18 3:26 pm
From: Ian Gale via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk

Hello Harry The tall man who announced the cake
Asked me to send him some photos and that I could find his email on your s
Could you pls send it to me.
Thanks
Ian

> On Jun 25, 2018, at 3:30 PM, Harry Glasgow via VA-bird <va-bird...> wrote:
>
> The highlights of today's birding at the Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk included Osprey,Woodpeckers, Great Crested Flycatchers, and the usual large collection of Red-winged Blackbirds.It was a beautiful mostly sunny day.
>
>
> Canada Goose 39
> Wood Duck 8
> Mallard 7
> American Black Duck 2
> Hooded Merganser 1
> Great Blue Heron 8
> Green Heron 4
> Black Vulture 1
> Turkey Vulture 1
> Osprey 6
> Cooper's Hawk 1
> Red-shouldered Hawk 1
> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 1
> Mourning Dove 4
> Yellow-billed Cuckoo 3
> Chimney Swift 1
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird 3
> Belted Kingfisher 1
> Red-headed Woodpecker 1
> Red-bellied Woodpecker 8
> Downy Woodpecker 4
> Hairy Woodpecker 1
> Northern Flicker 2
> Pileated Woodpecker 2
> Eastern Wood-Pewee 3
> Acadian Flycatcher 4
> Eastern Phoebe 1
> Great Crested Flycatcher 2
> Eastern Kingbird 1
> Warbling Vireo 1
> Red-eyed Vireo 6
> Blue Jay 1
> American Crow 3
> Fish Crow 6
> crow sp. 2
> Tree Swallow 6
> Barn Swallow 5
> Carolina Chickadee 2
> Tufted Titmouse 4
> White-breasted Nuthatch 5
> Carolina Wren 5
> Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 8
> Eastern Bluebird 8
> American Robin 10
> Ovenbird 1
> Prothonotary Warbler 1
> Common Yellowthroat 5
> Scarlet Tanager 1
> Northern Cardinal 8
> Indigo Bunting 2
> Red-winged Blackbird 24
> Brown-headed Cowbird 2
> Common Grackle 8
> House Finch 2
> American Goldfinch 8
>
>
> The Monday Morning Birdwalk has been a weekly event at Huntley Meadows since 1985. It takes place every week, rain or shine (except during electrical storms, strong winds, or icy trails), at 7AM (8AM from October through April), is free of charge, requires no reservation, and is open to all. Birders meet in the parking lot at the Park's entrance at 3701 Lockheed Blvd, Alexandria, VA. Questions should be directed to Park staff during normal business hours at (703)768-2525.
>
> Harry Glasgow
> Nancy VehrsFriends of Huntley Meadows Park
> *** You are subscribed to VA-bird as <igaleian...> If you wish to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***

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Date: 6/25/18 12:31 pm
From: Harry Glasgow via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk
The highlights of today's birding at the Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk included Osprey,Woodpeckers, Great Crested Flycatchers, and the usual large collection of Red-winged Blackbirds.It was a beautiful mostly sunny day.


Canada Goose  39
Wood Duck  8
Mallard  7
American Black Duck  2
Hooded Merganser  1
Great Blue Heron  8
Green Heron  4
Black Vulture  1
Turkey Vulture  1
Osprey  6
Cooper's Hawk  1
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  1
Mourning Dove  4
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  3
Chimney Swift  1
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  3
Belted Kingfisher  1
Red-headed Woodpecker  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  8
Downy Woodpecker  4
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  2
Pileated Woodpecker  2
Eastern Wood-Pewee  3
Acadian Flycatcher  4
Eastern Phoebe  1
Great Crested Flycatcher  2
Eastern Kingbird  1
Warbling Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  6
Blue Jay  1
American Crow  3
Fish Crow  6
crow sp.  2
Tree Swallow  6
Barn Swallow  5
Carolina Chickadee  2
Tufted Titmouse  4
White-breasted Nuthatch  5
Carolina Wren  5
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  8
Eastern Bluebird  8
American Robin  10
Ovenbird  1
Prothonotary Warbler  1
Common Yellowthroat  5
Scarlet Tanager  1
Northern Cardinal  8
Indigo Bunting  2
Red-winged Blackbird  24
Brown-headed Cowbird  2
Common Grackle  8
House Finch  2
American Goldfinch  8


The Monday Morning Birdwalk has been a weekly event at Huntley Meadows since 1985. It takes place every week, rain or shine (except during electrical storms, strong winds, or icy trails), at 7AM (8AM from October through April), is free of charge, requires no reservation, and is open to all. Birders meet in the parking lot at the Park's entrance at 3701 Lockheed Blvd, Alexandria, VA. Questions should be directed to Park staff during normal business hours at (703)768-2525.

Harry Glasgow
Nancy VehrsFriends of Huntley Meadows Park
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Date: 6/25/18 7:51 am
From: John Greenwood via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Fwd: Birders in the Big Apple
An interesting article in Sunday’s N.Y. Times

Jack Greenwood
Falls Church
>
> https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/23/style/birds-are-cool.html?login=email&auth=login-email
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Date: 6/25/18 6:38 am
From: Joe Coppock via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Charleston, SC birding
Ventured out of state for a long weekend and did some birding in the Charleston, SC area. The night-heron rookery at White Point Garden/Battery Park is worth a visit. Other highlights out on the islands (James, Kiawah, Sullivan’s) included Painted Bunting, Wood Stork, Anhinga, Tricolored Heron, and Wilson’s Plover. A variety of egrets and herons can be seen easily all over the tidal flats. Also saw several Mississippi Kites over neighborhoods in the city as well as a couple out on the islands. Saw one from I95 in southern NC, but none in Virginia unfortunately.

Some photos can be seen on my Flickr page: https://www.flickr.com/photos/111697331@N02/

Joe Coppock
Charlottesville, VA
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Date: 6/25/18 5:18 am
From: kurtcapt87--- via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Another Block-buster Party! June 30th for Upperville SE
VA BIRDers,



Please join Linda Millington (<millington.linda...>) and Kurt Gaskill
for a block-busting morning on Saturday, June 30th in Upperville SE. We will
meet at the Emmanuel Episcopal Church at 9670 Maidstone Road, Delaplane, VA,
which is just off I-66 for the exit to Rt 17 North. There is a commuter
parking lot across from the church, so we can leave cars there, and carpool
as we explore the block. Let's meet at 6:45 as it will take a bit of time to
plan routes. There are four wineries in the block, so we plan to do our
tally and story exchange at one of them. We hope that you will join us.



Linda Millington and Kurt Gaskill

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Date: 6/24/18 8:15 pm
From: Colt Gregory via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] VA-bird Digest, Vol 134, Issue 23
Kris - I got a GBH stick bird in the Chesapeake shoreline. I'm sure they are in the area and you count it!

Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Smartphone

----- Reply message -----
From: <va-bird-request...>
To: <va-bird...>
Subject: VA-bird Digest, Vol 134, Issue 23
Date: Sat, Jun 23, 2018 8:50 AM


Send VA-bird mailing list submissions to
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than "Re: Contents of VA-bird digest..."


Today's Topics:

1. Riverbend Park Bird Walk 06/22/2018 (Kristine Lansing)
2. 24th Annual PURPLE MARTIN FIELD DAY Will be held tomorrow ! !
! ! 23JUN (Ron Kingston)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Fri, 22 Jun 2018 21:20:48 +0000 (UTC)
From: Kristine Lansing <krae1010...>
To: Va-bird Birding <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Riverbend Park Bird Walk 06/22/2018
Message-ID: <1155591361.1065266.1529702448364...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8

Following is the tally from the June 22 bird walk at Riverbend Park, which identified only 12 species -- excluding the omnipresent rain birds, stick birds and snag birds. Three intrepid participants hiked today's route, which began at the Visitors' Center and comprised sections of the canopied Hollows Trail and the River/Potomac Heritage Trail. Much of the companionable activity took place in a driving rain, with only brief respites of light drizzle.?
The next walk will meet at 8:00 a.m. on Friday July 13th, rain or shine (let's hope it shines), at the Riverbend Park Visitors' Center;?please contact Riverbend Park on 703-759-9018 to register. As the route will vary from one walk to the next, participants should?be prepared to walk about 2 miles in comfortable, closed-toed shoes. There likely will be gentle uphill and downhill stretches on slightly uneven terrain.?All birders are welcome!


Canada Goose 9
Double-crested Cormorant 23
Great Blue Heron 3
Downy Woodpecker 1
Eastern Wood-Pewee 1 ?Heard
Acadian Flycatcher 3
Red-eyed Vireo 1 Heard
Carolina Chickadee 1 Heard
Carolina Wren 3 Heard
Chipping Sparrow 1
Northern Cardinal 3 Heard
Indigo Bunting 1 Heard singing in a clearing as the rain briefly subsided.

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46723745

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)




------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Fri, 22 Jun 2018 21:32:55 -0400
From: "Ron Kingston" <kingston...>
To: <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] 24th Annual PURPLE MARTIN FIELD DAY Will be held
tomorrow ! ! ! ! 23JUN
Message-ID: <002901d40a92$248ed370$6dac7a50$@cstone.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"



We ARE planning on having the event, but we cannot park
at the site - the parking field is mud. See Website for instructions



the 24th Annual Purple Martin Field Day

Date: Tomorrow, June 23, 2018


<http://www.purplemartinfieldday.org>
www.purplemartinfieldday.org<http://www.purplemartinfieldday.org>



We are scheduling a full program! Plan to arrive before 11:00 a.m. so you
won't miss the Door Prize give-away (including free GOURDS!) and the
beginning of the presentations.



Lance Wood and several other speakers will teach you how to get martins, get
more martins, and manage them properly so you won't lose them.

Which martin housing is the safest?-gourds or houses? Do Virginia martins
like gourds or houses better? COME AND FIND OUT!!!

You will learn how to protect martins from snakes, hawks, owls, raccoons,
House Sparrows, Starlings, wind damage, and lightning, as well as how to
grow gourds and turn them into martin homes. You'll receive free equipment
catalogs and literature about martin attraction and management. Bring a bag
lunch to eat while you listen to the presentations and watch the martins
feeding their nestlings! Then visit with other martin-lovers!-including
landlords who post on the PMCA Forum and Facebook page!



See <http://www.purplemartinfieldday.org> www.purplemartinfieldday.org<http://www.purplemartinfieldday.org> for
directions, photos, and to find out what to bring (and NOT to bring!)







------------------------------

Subject: Digest Footer

_______________________________________________
VA-bird mailing list
<VA-bird...>
https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird


------------------------------

End of VA-bird Digest, Vol 134, Issue 23
****************************************

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Date: 6/24/18 5:21 pm
From: dcharlesl--- via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas Block Busting Field Trip - Stafford County
Yesterday was the Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas Block Busting Field Trip to Stafford County. The group of birders assembled at the VRE train station were pleasantly surprised how well the weather cooperated, despite a forecast of rain that didn't happen. The cloud cover kept temperatures very nice through the morning. We split up into teams to cover the Stafford SE Atlas Block.


The most memorable moment for me was being dive-bombed by an Eastern Kingbird when I got out of the car at the Stafford Hospital parking lot. How was I to know that a nearby tree held the bird's nest. Glad I was at the hospital in case I needed their services. I'm sure those watching me repeatedly duck had a good laugh! Other team highlights included watching a young Ovenbird with a parent, a surprise female Black-and-white Warbler, and an Indigo Bunting nest. We added 7 new Confirmed breeders to the Atlas block list.


More Block Busting Field Trips are listed at www.nvabc.org<http://www.nvabc.org/>.

David Ledwith

Falls Church, VA
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Date: 6/24/18 11:03 am
From: Kristine Lansing via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Great Falls NP Bird Walk 06/24/2018 (Fairfax County)
Following is the tally from Sunday's weekly bird walk at Great Falls National Park, which identified approximately 28 species and included 7 participants. Only the first segment of the walk was completed, as the trail leading upstream from the visitors' center was closed due to high water. Noteworthy sightings, however, included: what appeared to be a Great Crested Flycatcher family cavorting in the trees; Wood Ducks cautiously navigating the river current; and a siege of Great Blue Herons perched atop the highest rocks adjacent to the overlook, perhaps in the hope that a random fish might be cast their way.
The walk meets at 8:00 a.m. on Sunday mornings, rain or shine, in front of the snack bar/concession stand of the Great Falls Park visitors' center; it does not take place, though, during electrical storms, heavy snows, or when the trails are icy. All birders are welcome!
Canada Goose 19
Wood Duck 3
Mallard 2
Double-crested Cormorant 1
Great Blue Heron 8
Black Vulture  6
Turkey Vulture 15
Yellow-billed Cuckoo 1 Heard
Downy Woodpecker 1
Pileated Woodpecker 3
Eastern Wood-Pewee 2 Heard
Great Crested Flycatcher 7
Red-eyed Vireo 5 Heard
Blue Jay 2
American Crow 5
crow sp. 1
Carolina Chickadee 1 Heard
Tufted Titmouse 8
Carolina Wren 4
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 3
Eastern Bluebird 6
American Robin 1
Louisiana Waterthrush 1
Chipping Sparrow 2
Scarlet Tanager 2 Heard
Northern Cardinal 4
Indigo Bunting 2
Common Grackle 3
American Goldfinch 1

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46763753

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



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Date: 6/24/18 8:14 am
From: Vineeta Anand via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Huntley Meadows Sightings
This morning at Huntley meadows there was an Eastern Phoebe posing for
photographers and a gaggle of children; a pair of crows harassed a
yellow-shafted Northern Flicker as it tried to feed its chicks inside the
nest; a female wood duck meditated on a log, and a couple of GBH and osprey
put on quite a show.

Vineeta Anand
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Date: 6/23/18 7:52 pm
From: m b via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Dead bald eagle
Apparently fish and wildlife will get involved. At least pre 2017. There is a big fine if someone did it and they can find who.

https://www.livescience.com/62891-pesticide-killed-13-bald-eagles.html

Mb from nova



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Date: 6/23/18 10:27 am
From: Janice Frye via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: Re: [VA-bird] dead Bald Eagle
I think it was DGIF that came out when I found a female OSPR that died
hanging upside down from landscape fabric used in a nest up on a cell
tower. This was years ago, but pretty sure they will help.

Jan

On Sat, Jun 23, 2018, 11:45 AM David Gibson via VA-bird <
<va-bird...> wrote:

> It appears I've found a dead adult Bald Eagle in a cell tower and just feet
> away from an active (w/nestlings) Osprey nest. I was looking over photos
> taken on 6/21 and discovered what looks like the above. The photo is here:
> http://www.osprey-watch.org/nests/7187 (last photo on right). Whom should
> I
> contact? Thanks, Dave Gibson, Chesapeake
> Dave Gibson
> www.elizabethriver.org/wildlife-reports
> *** You are subscribed to VA-bird as <byrdnyrd33...> If you wish to
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> https://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
>
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Date: 6/23/18 9:57 am
From: Barbara Slatcher via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Looking for rough winged swallow flocks around Richmond
Hi all, I have 5 young rough winged swallows in rehab that are flying well and starting to hunt. I see on BNA that fledges form flocks, so just trying to figure out where they might be. Bryan Park and Chamberlayne Swamp have some indivduals I know. Mine came from the exhaust pipe of a towed truck to the dealership so no going back there.

I'm enjoying them and in no real rush, but they will be ready soon.


Thanks,

Barb Slatcher

<bgslatcher...>
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Date: 6/23/18 8:45 am
From: David Gibson via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] dead Bald Eagle
It appears I've found a dead adult Bald Eagle in a cell tower and just feet
away from an active (w/nestlings) Osprey nest. I was looking over photos
taken on 6/21 and discovered what looks like the above. The photo is here:
http://www.osprey-watch.org/nests/7187 (last photo on right). Whom should I
contact? Thanks, Dave Gibson, Chesapeake
Dave Gibson
www.elizabethriver.org/wildlife-reports
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Date: 6/23/18 6:08 am
From: Stephen Tabone via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Unsubscribe me, please
I no longer live in VA or anywhere near VA. Please remove me from the email list.

(Sent from my iPad)

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Date: 6/22/18 6:33 pm
From: Ron Kingston via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] 24th Annual PURPLE MARTIN FIELD DAY Will be held tomorrow ! ! ! ! 23JUN


We ARE planning on having the event, but we cannot park
at the site - the parking field is mud. See Website for instructions



the 24th Annual Purple Martin Field Day

Date: Tomorrow, June 23, 2018


<http://www.purplemartinfieldday.org>
www.purplemartinfieldday.org



We are scheduling a full program! Plan to arrive before 11:00 a.m. so you
won't miss the Door Prize give-away (including free GOURDS!) and the
beginning of the presentations.



Lance Wood and several other speakers will teach you how to get martins, get
more martins, and manage them properly so you won't lose them.

Which martin housing is the safest?-gourds or houses? Do Virginia martins
like gourds or houses better? COME AND FIND OUT!!!

You will learn how to protect martins from snakes, hawks, owls, raccoons,
House Sparrows, Starlings, wind damage, and lightning, as well as how to
grow gourds and turn them into martin homes. You'll receive free equipment
catalogs and literature about martin attraction and management. Bring a bag
lunch to eat while you listen to the presentations and watch the martins
feeding their nestlings! Then visit with other martin-lovers!-including
landlords who post on the PMCA Forum and Facebook page!



See <http://www.purplemartinfieldday.org> www.purplemartinfieldday.org for
directions, photos, and to find out what to bring (and NOT to bring!)





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Date: 6/22/18 2:21 pm
From: Kristine Lansing via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Riverbend Park Bird Walk 06/22/2018
Following is the tally from the June 22 bird walk at Riverbend Park, which identified only 12 species -- excluding the omnipresent rain birds, stick birds and snag birds. Three intrepid participants hiked today's route, which began at the Visitors' Center and comprised sections of the canopied Hollows Trail and the River/Potomac Heritage Trail. Much of the companionable activity took place in a driving rain, with only brief respites of light drizzle. 
The next walk will meet at 8:00 a.m. on Friday July 13th, rain or shine (let's hope it shines), at the Riverbend Park Visitors' Center; please contact Riverbend Park on 703-759-9018 to register. As the route will vary from one walk to the next, participants should be prepared to walk about 2 miles in comfortable, closed-toed shoes. There likely will be gentle uphill and downhill stretches on slightly uneven terrain. All birders are welcome!


Canada Goose 9
Double-crested Cormorant 23
Great Blue Heron 3
Downy Woodpecker 1
Eastern Wood-Pewee 1  Heard
Acadian Flycatcher 3
Red-eyed Vireo 1 Heard
Carolina Chickadee 1 Heard
Carolina Wren 3 Heard
Chipping Sparrow 1
Northern Cardinal 3 Heard
Indigo Bunting 1 Heard singing in a clearing as the rain briefly subsided.

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46723745

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



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Date: 6/21/18 2:34 pm
From: John Greenwood via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Fwd: Everything you think you know about bald eagles is wrong | Popular Science
I think most birders already know this

Jack Greenwood
>
>
> https://www.popsci.com/bald-eagles-facts?CMPID=ene062118#page-2
>
> Everything you think you know about bald eagles is wrong
> They’re whiney moochers, for starters.
>
> Bald eagles look awesome. Heck, all eagles look awesome. It’s why they’re a good national symbol—they seem so fearsome and regal.
>
> But despite their image being absolutely freakin’ everywhere, the average American probably doesn’t know a whole lot about them. And as today is National American Eagle Day, we thought we’d bring you up to speed.
>
> Bald eagles actually sound pitiful
>
> You know the sound you hear every time there’s a bald eagle in a movie or TV show? Yeah, that’s not a bald eagle. This little fact became more widespread knowledge in 2012, when NPR published a story about how widespread this Hollywood mixup is.
>
> See, bald eagles don’t sound impressive. They sound like a small bird you’d find in your yard or perhaps like a small turkey. The Cornell Lab of Ornithology calls it “a high, weak-sounding whinny”—you can listen here.
>
> Know what does sound impressive? A red-tailed hawk. Their cries are piercing—and so that’s almost always what movies use in place of a real bald eagle call.
>
> You mostly see pictures of the females
>
> Female bald eagles are about 25 to 33 percent bigger than the males, sitting about three inches taller and having a five-inch-broader wingspan—that puts the average female at about three feet tall with a 7.5-foot wingspan. For this reason, eagle expert Connie Stanger told NPR that most of the images you see of bald eagles are of females. This is true of most birds of prey, though ornithologists aren’t quite sure why. The females tend to protect the nest and are often the more dominant of the mating pair, so it may be that larger mothers are more beneficial. Some ornithologists have also theorized that having a size difference allows each bird in the pair to hunt slightly different animals—the males can get smaller, more agile prey while the females snatch up larger animals—expanding their available food sources.
>
> There are other possible reasons for the size difference too. Maybe the female needs more nutritional reserves to produce her eggs. Maybe lighter males who can hunt smaller prey are, in the end, better providers. Whatever the reason, know that the scariest bald eagle is pretty much always the lady.
>
> They often mooch off other birds and eat trash
>
> Sure, they look like terrifying birds of prey, but bald eagles tend to skip the actual work of hunting and instead steal from other animals. The Cornell Lab of Ornithology notes that bald eagles will harass an osprey with prey in its talons until it drops the food, allowing the eagle to literally swoop in and snatch the fish. They’ll even try to rip the prey straight out of the osprey’s claws, relying on their much larger body size to intimidate and overpower the smaller osprey. Sometimes they'll nab prey from mammals, too, as you can see in this alarming video (don't worry—the fox is okay!):
>
> This is, incidentally, why Benjamin Franklin didn’t think America’s symbol should be an eagle. It’s a popular myth that he wanted the turkey instead (the Smithsonian says he just suggested that the bird on the proposed American seal looked like it was a turkey and that turkeys were more respectable bird), but he did write that the bald eagle “is a Bird of bad moral Character.” Furthermore, he wrote, “He does not get his Living honestly. You may have seen him perched on some dead Tree near the River, where, too lazy to fish for himself, he watches the Labour of the Fishing Hawk; and when that diligent Bird has at length taken a Fish, and is bearing it to his Nest for the Support of his Mate and young Ones, the Bald Eagle pursues him and takes it from him.”
>
> That being said, bald eagles have been known to take down deer fawns, seal pups, and full-grown beavers. Sometimes they’ll even go after turtles. Most of these, you’ll notice, are not particularly dangerous creatures—overall,bald eagles prefer the lazy route. Lots of times, that means eating already-dead fish or mammals, or even scavenging whale carcasses.
>
> It’s hard to blame them, though—you’d go for the dead salmon lying conveniently on the banks of a river too if you had to track down every calorie you ingested.
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 6/21/18 1:30 pm
From: Phil Silas via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] VABBA2 Blockbusting in Prince William County


VA-Birders,
Had the pleasure of trying the concept of a concentrated atlasing effort in a particular block this morning. The 4 of us split into 2 teams to cover walking and driving routes in the Independent Hill SE priority block. Statistics are still being processed and it is estimated we upgraded 20 species to either Possible, Probable or Confirmed breeders. The most enjoyable feature was observing young birds. My favorites were a Pileated Woodpecker with a head full of new red spiky feathers that hadn't yet feathered; a pair of Killdeer going in opposite directions with their broken-wing display while their 2 too cute chicks tried to be ignored; and a Red-shouldered Hawk that was on the ground and flew clumsily into a low bush, and perched with a branch pushing its tail up higher than its head. Oh, and finally, a Red-bellied Woodpecker nobody could ever call a Red-headed Woodpecker as there was not yet ANY red on the head. Concept validated, more opportunities available at nvabc.org.
Phil Silas, Woodbridge


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Date: 6/21/18 8:04 am
From: John Greenwood via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Bats in the library, not the belfry!
Since bird reports are rather slow these days, I thought a nice bat article might be of interest; after all, they do fly

Jack Greenwood
Falls Church
>
>
>
>
> Hi,
> I thought this article from The Wall Street Journal would interest you.
>
>
> A colony of book-protecting bats lives in Portugal’s historic Joanina Library. Best not to ask the librarians about them.
> Patricia Kowsmann
>
> A 300-year-old library’s resident bats eat the bugs that devour glue and paper, but they’re attracting more interest than the literature; ‘The questions are nonstop’
> Read full article →
> Related Articles
>
> Portuguese Lessons for Spain and Italy
>
> As Nashville Rapidly Expands, Residents Worry the Metropolis Is Growing Too Fast
>
> Microsoft Is Fixing Office, But Not Fast Enough
> Follow WSJ
>
> CONTACT US• PRIVACY POLICY• COOKIE POLICY
> For further assistance, please contact Customer Service at <support...>
>
>
>
> Copyright 2018 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
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Date: 6/20/18 8:58 am
From: Patti Reum via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] VSO Conservation Grants
Every year, the Virginia Society of Ornithology awards conservation grants
to worthy candidates conducting research in the field of bird conservation
with potential benefits to Virginia species and habitats. The VSO Board of
Directors has budgeted $2,500.00 annually. Awards are usually $500.00,
$1,000.00 or occasionally more if the project is deemed especially worthy.

Applicants are encouraged to submit a request in writing to the
Conservation Committee Chair. Each application should include:

1. A short research proposal describing benefits to our knowledge of
Virginia’s avifauna and/or its habitat

2. Requested funding level

3. Detailed budget for requested funding



The Conservation Committee will then consider each application and confer
with the entire Board of the VSO. Just to be clear, there are 2 separate
competitions for these awards; this is not a two-step process. Recipients
are asked to report their findings to the VSO board and members at the
completion of their project, specifically at the VSO Annual Meeting.

There are two deadlines for application: *July 31 *and *January 31*.

Please submit your application for a grant to Patti Reum (Conservation
Chair of the VSO) at <pareum...> .
Patti Reum
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Date: 6/19/18 8:13 pm
From: Penny Warren via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Report
Hi Joe,

I see where you noted our sora and least bittern at the Shenandoah Wetlands Bank but no mention of the breeding VA Rail ... the first confirmed record for Augusta County. Perhaps breeding records don’t come into play for what you list, but I thought I would emphasize it in a personal email to you.

Thanks for all that you do to bring sightings to our attention!

penny Warren

Sent from my iPad
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Date: 6/19/18 8:02 pm
From: Joe Coleman via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] FW: DC Area, 6/19/2018
FYI
Joe Coleman

-----Original Message-----
Hotline: Voice of the Naturalist
Date: 6/19/2018
Coverage: MD/DC/VA/central and southern DE/WV panhandle
Reports, comments and questions: <voice...>
Compiler: Joe Coleman
Sponsor: Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central
Atlantic States (independent of NAS)
Transcriber: Steve Cordle

Please consider joining ANS, especially if you are a regular user of the
Voice of the Naturalist (Individual $50; Family $65; Nature Steward $100;
Audubon Advocate $200). The membership number is 301-652-9188, option 12;
the address is 8940 Jones Mill Road, Chevy Chase, MD 20815; and the web site
is http://www.anshome.org.

This is the Voice of the Naturalist, a service of the Audubon Naturalist
Society. This report covers the week starting Tuesday, June
12 and was completed on Tuesday, June 19 at 9:00 a.m.

Information on noteworthy birds is presented below in taxonomic order, as
set forth in the American Ornithological Society Checklist for North and
Middle American Birds, as revised through the 58th Supplement (July 2017).

The top birds this week were WHITE-WINGED DOVE in VA and ROSEATE SPOONBILL*
in DE and MD.

Other birds of interest this week included waterfowl, rails, SANDHILL CRANE,
shorebirds, terns, loons, ANHINGA, LEAST BITTERN, YELLOW-CROWNED
NIGHT-HERON, MISSISSIPPI KITE, PEREGRINE FALCON, COMMON RAVEN, sparrows,
MOURNING WARBLER, EASTERN MEADOWLARK and DICKCISSEL.

TOP BIRDS

A WHITE-WINGED DOVE was photographed June 12 in the Martin Yard,
Chincoteague, Accomack Co, VA and seen again on the 13th.

A ROSEATE SPOONBILL* was seen June 13 at Big Stone Beach, Kent Co, DE; one
was also seen June 15 at Ted Harvey WMA, Kent Co, DE. A ROSEATE SPOONBILL*
was found June 17 in the marsh at North Beach, Calvert Co, MD and was seen
again on June 18. While it has been moving around several viewers have
reported getting good looks at it from the guardrail on Rte 261 (Bay Ave).

OTHER BIRDS OF INTEREST

Out-of-season waterfowl included a report of 10 SNOW GEESE mixed in with
Canada Geese at Ocean Pines, Worcester Co, MD on June 17. Four TRUMPETER
SWANS, two of which appeared to be first year birds, were seen June 15 at
Wooton's Landing, Patuxent River Park, Anne Arundel Co, MD before flying
north. A continuing TUNDRA SWAN was seen June 15 at Kinder farm Park, Anne
Arundel Co, MD. One was also seen June 18 at Southwest Area Park, Baltimore
Co, MD. The continuing TUNDRA SWAN at Back Bay NWR, Virginia Beach, VA was
seen throughout the week.

Other lingering waterfowl this past week included a SURF SCOTER on June 12
and 14 at Swan Creek Wetland/Cox Creek DMCF, Anne Arundel Co, MD; a BLACK
SCOTER on June 14 on Hog Island, Queen Anne's Co, MD; a LONG-TAILED DUCK at
Beverly-Triton Beach, Anne Arundel Co, MD on June 15; and BUFFLEHEADS in a
variety of locations. Lingering ducks in VA included a REDHEAD seen June 16
at Tailrace Park, John H. Kerr Reservoir, Mecklenburg, Co, VA and a
RED-BREASTED MERGANSER June 12 at First Landing SP, Virginia Beach, VA.

A SORA was seen June 13 at the Shenandoah Wetlands (Cold Springs Rd),
Augusta Co, VA. A COMMON GALLINULE was seen June 16 on Hart-Miller Island,
Baltimore Co, MD.

Two SANDHILL CRANES were seen June 16 along Woodlands Church Rd, Rockingham
Co, VA.

The two WILSON'S PLOVERS on Metompkin Island in Accomack Co, VA were seen
again on June 17. A PIPING PLOVER was reported June 16 at Grandview Nature
Preserve, Hampton Co, VA.

A single GULL-BILLED TERN was seen June 18 flying over Shearness Pool,
Bombay Hook NWR, Kent Co, DE. A COMMON TERN was seen again at Rocky Gap SP
in Allegany Co, MD on June 14.

A RED-THROATED LOON was seen June 18 at Point Comfort station, Cape Henlopen
SP, Sussex Co, DE. A COMMON LOON was seen June 15 just upstream from the dam
on Smith Mountain Lake, Bedford Co, VA.

A male and female ANHINGA were seen together and photographed June 17 at the
Carson Wetland, Prince George Co, VA.

A LEAST BITTERN was heard at the Shenandoah Wetlands (Cool Springs Rd),
Augusta Co, VA on June 13. Another LEAST BITTERN was heard June 14 at Ragged
Island WMA, Isle of Wight Co, VA.

On June 13 and 18 a single YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON was seen flying
upstream from the C&O Canal, NW DC. On June 17 one was seen at Hains Point,
East Potomac Park, SW DC.

MISSISSIPPI KITES continue to be seen in a wide variety of locations
including one seen June 16 from the C&O Canal, Glen Echo, Montgomery Co, MD.
Another was seen throughout the week in NW DC from a grassy area across from
5525-5529 Potomac Ave.

Two PEREGRINE FALCONS were seen June 14 at the Loudoun Water Authority,
Loudoun Co, VA.

The COMMON RAVENS at Bateau Pond in Terrapin Nature Park in Queen Anne's Co,
MD were seen again on June 12 and 13.

A lingering WHITE-THROATED SPARROW was seen again on June 12, 14, and 17 at
the Chester River Field Research Center (private), Queen Anne's Co, MD. A
continuing VESPER SPARROW was seen June 12 and 17 along E Ruhl Rd near
Peterman Rd, Baltimore Co, MD.

Three MOURNING WARBLERS were seen June 15 on Upper Sapling Ridge, Highland
Co, VA. Also in Highland Co, two MOURNING WARBLERS were seen June 16 on the
Virginia side of Paddy Knob.

DICKCISSELS continued in healthy numbers at a number of locations in the
reporting area, with sightings along Passwaters Farm Rd, Sussex Co, DE on
June 15 and 18; Ironshire Station Rd, Worcester Co, MD throughout the week;
Underwood Rd, Howard Co, MD on June 12 and 14; at Oaks Landfill (private),
Montgomery Co, MD, on June 16; at 30628 State Rte 613, Waverly, Sussex Co,
VA on June 13; in Bristoe Station Battlefield, Prince William Co, VA on June
15; at T. Clay Wood School, Prince William Co, VA on June 16; at 31019
Petersburg Rd, Sussex Co, VA on June 17; and near the junction of Swan and
Silo Rds, Appomattox
Co, VA on June 14 and 17.

***

This week's report was based on reports on the DE, MD, VA, and WV list
servers, and eBird records.

The Audubon Sanctuary Shop (301-652-3606,
http://anshome.org/naturalist-shop)is an excellent source for guidebooks and
many other nature-related titles.

To report bird sightings, e-mail your report to <voice...>
Please post reports before midnight Monday, identify the county as well as
the state, and include your name and a Tuesday morning contact, e-mail or
phone.

Thank you for your interest, and enjoy the birds.

*Of interest to the applicable state records committee

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Date: 6/19/18 4:18 pm
From: Vineeta Anand via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Bald eagle
At 5:55 p.m. I saw a bald eagle perched on a snag off GW Parkway, near
where a pair of bald eagles raised two chicks. I was driving and could not
tell if it was a juvenile eagle or one of the parents.
Vineeta
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Date: 6/19/18 11:09 am
From: Roger Mayhorn via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Pine Siskin in Buchanan County - video
A Pine Siskin came to our yard stream today, here on Compton Mountain. It
was really a surprise since they don't nest this far south.

Here is a video link https://youtu.be/5hW5_nFDz24



Roger Mayhorn

Compton Mountain

Buchanan County

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Date: 6/19/18 5:56 am
From: Art Drauglis via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Hogweed
In addition to ticks, poison ivy, nettles, and brambles, we now have hogweed
to look out for when we’re in the field.
https://www.sciencealert.com/invasive-toxic-giant-hogweed-burns-skin-blindness-virginia-clarke-county <https://www.sciencealert.com/invasive-toxic-giant-hogweed-burns-skin-blindness-virginia-clarke-county>

Get familiar with it and avoid it at all costs.


Art D.
W. DC
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Date: 6/18/18 3:12 pm
From: Harry Glasgow via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Huntley Meadows[ Monday morning Birdwalk.
On the first really hot day in Northern Virginia today, 20 stalwart birders totaled up 44 species on the Huntley Meadows[ Monday morning Birdwalk.    Our highlights included a flock 12 Great Blue Herons loitering around the central wetland; a couple of brilliant Prothonatary Warblers; and a large group among Flycatchers.



Canada Goose  25
Wood Duck  3
Mallard  3
Hooded Merganser  9
Great Blue Heron  12
Green Heron  4
Osprey  2
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
shorebird sp.  1
Mourning Dove  4
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  2
Chimney Swift  3
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  3
Downy Woodpecker  6
Northern Flicker  2
Pileated Woodpecker  2
Eastern Wood-Pewee  5
Acadian Flycatcher  3
Eastern Phoebe  4
Great Crested Flycatcher  3
Eastern Kingbird  2
Red-eyed Vireo  2
Blue Jay  2
American Crow  5
Fish Crow  4
crow sp.  1
Tree Swallow  10
Barn Swallow  12
Carolina Chickadee  4
Tufted Titmouse  3
White-breasted Nuthatch  2
Carolina Wren  2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  6
Eastern Bluebird  5
American Robin  6
Prothonotary Warbler  2
Common Yellowthroat  6
Northern Cardinal  4
Indigo Bunting  2
Orchard Oriole  1
Red-winged Blackbird  23
Common Grackle  10
American Goldfinch  15sandpiper sp   1

The Monday Morning Birdwalk has been a weekly event at Huntley Meadows since 1985. It takes place every week, rain or shine (except during electrical storms, strong winds, or icy trails), at 7AM (8AM from October through April), is free of charge, requires no reservation, and is open to all. Birders meet in the parking lot at the Park's entrance at 3701 Lockheed Blvd, Alexandria, VA. Questions should be directed to Park staff during normal business hours at (703)768-2525.

Harry Glasgow
Friends of Huntley Meadows Park
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Date: 6/18/18 2:13 pm
From: Jeff Blalock via VA-bird <va-bird...>
Subject: [VA-bird] Birding after the Atlas Project in Halifax.
Greetings all

One would think that after spending three long days in the heat out for this past weekend working on the VSO Atlas Project
that I would stay home today and rest.

Wrong went to Chapel Hill and saw YCNH with chicks in nest in the front yard of a very nice lady. This is the third year for them nesting there. A NC Lifer for eBird for me although I have seen them in NC before but it wasn’t a Lifer so didn't record the date

Then I went to Raleigh where Susan Campell had reported a MIKI yesterday stayed almost an hour no kite. Then went to another location only 13 minutes away at Crabtree Creek that had a kite reported yesterday, my first time there and it is really a great place to bird only wish I lived closer.
So I missed the kites at both locations but saw one of the two Roseate Spoonbills.

Saw a ROSP last year in Orange County NC now this was for Wake County.

Got to cut grass tomorrow no matter what.

Good Birding Always

From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-470-4352 Cell
<jcbabirder...>



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