tweeters
Received From Subject
8/7/22 8:29 am Raphael Fennimore <raphael.fennimore...> [Tweeters] HORNED PUFFIN, Seattle’s Discovery Park, Sunday Aug 07
8/7/22 6:40 am Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] M Street, Auburn, King County - 8.6.22
8/6/22 4:46 pm Tom and Carol Stoner <tcstonefam...> [Tweeters] American White Pelicans
8/6/22 3:11 pm Joan Miller <jemskink...> [Tweeters] Hummingbird behavior
8/6/22 11:45 am Eric Ellingson <esellingson...> [Tweeters] Ptarmigan at Artist Point, Mt Baker
8/6/22 6:36 am Mike Wagenbach <wagen...> Re: [Tweeters] Brown Sparrow ID
8/5/22 6:54 pm Mike Wagenbach <wagen...> [Tweeters] Brown sparrow ID?
8/5/22 2:56 pm Jenn Jarstad <jennjarstad...> Re: [Tweeters] So what plants?
8/5/22 2:01 pm Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] FIELD & STREAM: Bird Flu Threatens Britain's Traditional Partridge and Pheasant Shoots
8/5/22 12:51 pm <jimbetz...> [Tweeters] Where to show off Birding in the PNW?
8/5/22 12:42 pm <jimbetz...> [Tweeters] Native Plant Sources - THANKS!
8/5/22 12:31 pm Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] M Street in Auburn
8/5/22 12:04 pm Philip Dickinson <pdickins...> [Tweeters] Colombia hummingbird seen for third time ever
8/5/22 7:43 am <flick...> [Tweeters] White Salmon WA: Aug 4 status of Vaux's Swift NESTLINGS in old chimney
8/5/22 6:34 am Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] bird watching
8/5/22 6:27 am Steve Hampton <stevechampton...> Re: [Tweeters] Beyond Grass - WNPS Blog - Botanical Rambles
8/5/22 4:53 am Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] Beyond Grass - WNPS Blog - Botanical Rambles
8/4/22 11:46 pm Jenn Jarstad <jennjarstad...> Re: [Tweeters] MARTHA STEWART LIVING: Want to Attract Special Birds and Bees to Your Garden? Add Rare Plants to Your Backyard, a New Study Says
8/4/22 6:46 pm Lynn Wohlers <wohlers13...> Re: [Tweeters] So what plants?
8/4/22 5:26 pm Charles Easterberg <charleseasterberg...> [Tweeters] Pelicans
8/4/22 5:13 pm Cara Borre <cmborre1...> [Tweeters] Westport Seabirds Trip Report July 30, 2022
8/4/22 4:25 pm Doug Santoni <dougsantoni...> Re: [Tweeters] So what plants?
8/4/22 3:58 pm Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2022-08-04
8/4/22 3:10 pm B B <birder4184...> [Tweeters] Another Blog Post - Day 8 in the Amazon
8/4/22 2:44 pm <jimbetz...> Re: [Tweeters] So what plants?
8/4/22 2:34 pm Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...> Re: [Tweeters] So what plants?
8/4/22 1:26 pm Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...> [Tweeters] AOS Checklist supplement
8/4/22 1:18 pm Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...> [Tweeters] AOS Checklist supplement
8/4/22 12:49 pm <jimbetz...> [Tweeters] Wylie Slough - Closed to ALL access until the end of September
8/4/22 12:42 pm <jimbetz...> [Tweeters] So what plants?
8/4/22 11:57 am Jon. Anderson and Marty Chaney <festuca...> [Tweeters] Wednesday Walk at Nisqually NWR - 3 August 2022
8/4/22 7:45 am Ruth Richards <rgrichards66...> Re: [Tweeters] MARTHA STEWART LIVING: Want to Attract Special Birds and Bees to Your Garden? Add Rare Plants to Your Backyard, a New Study Says
8/4/22 12:35 am Sally Alhadeff <sallya...> Re: [Tweeters] MARTHA STEWART LIVING: Want to Attract Special Birds and Bees to Your Garden? Add Rare Plants to Your Backyard, a New Study Says
8/3/22 11:00 pm Steve Hampton <stevechampton...> Re: [Tweeters] MARTHA STEWART LIVING: Want to Attract Special Birds and Bees to Your Garden? Add Rare Plants to Your Backyard, a New Study Says
8/3/22 8:16 pm Paul Bannick <paul.bannick...> Re: [Tweeters] MARTHA STEWART LIVING: Want to Attract Special Birds and Bees to Your Garden? Add Rare Plants to Your Backyard, a New Study Says
8/3/22 3:39 pm Sharon Howard <clmssh...> [Tweeters] Leucistic American Gold Finch etc.
8/3/22 1:31 pm Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] MARTHA STEWART LIVING: Want to Attract Special Birds and Bees to Your Garden? Add Rare Plants to Your Backyard, a New Study Says
8/2/22 8:34 pm B B <birder4184...> [Tweeters] Ecuador Days 5, 6 and 7 Blog Posts
8/2/22 3:12 pm Bill Tweit <bill.tweit...> [Tweeters] ebird begins implementation of a new treatment for non-native species (long)
8/2/22 11:53 am Elaine Chuang <elc...> [Tweeters] Bird Lover's Day at the Locks (Sat, Aug 6, 2022)
8/1/22 10:39 am Edward Pullen <edwardpullen...> [Tweeters] Buff-breasted Sandpiper at Oyhut
8/1/22 5:33 am pan <panmail...> [Tweeters] bird information sources
8/1/22 12:35 am Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> Re: [Tweeters] pacific slope flycatcher nest above porchlight
8/1/22 12:17 am JODY BRECKENRIDGE <breckenridgej...> [Tweeters] pacific slope flycatcher nest above porchlight
7/31/22 4:51 pm Hubbell <ldhubbell...> [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } The Scrape Ceremony
7/31/22 3:44 pm Hank Heiberg <hank.heiberg...> [Tweeters] Ospreys Ready to Fly
7/31/22 1:52 pm Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...> Re: [Tweeters] quasi-pelagic birds in "Skagit"
7/31/22 1:29 pm <jimbetz...> Re: [Tweeters] quasi-pelagic birds in "Skagit"
7/31/22 12:22 pm Eric Ellingson <esellingson...> [Tweeters] Coot, Pied-billed Grebe & Ruddy Duck chicks - Winthrop
7/31/22 9:48 am Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] quasi-pelagic birds in "Skagit"
7/30/22 6:09 pm Dayna yalowicki <dlwicki...> Re: [Tweeters] Bird ID
7/30/22 11:36 am B B <birder4184...> [Tweeters] Ecuador Day 4 Blog Post - Refugio Paz de las Aves
7/30/22 9:42 am Josh Adams <xjoshx...> Re: [Tweeters] California Gull Migration
7/29/22 7:41 pm Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] California Gulls in the Skagit Valley
7/29/22 11:58 am Michelle Landis <asmalllife...> Re: [Tweeters] Nighthawk
7/29/22 11:01 am Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...> [Tweeters] Westport Seabirds July 27 pelagic trip report
7/29/22 10:15 am B B <birder4184...> [Tweeters] Blog Post - Day 3 in Ecuador - Mindo Area
7/29/22 10:11 am Kellie Sagen <kelliekvinne...> Re: [Tweeters] Eide Rd Pelicans
7/29/22 9:42 am Kellie Sagen <kelliekvinne...> [Tweeters] Eide Rd Pelicans
7/29/22 9:03 am Brian Zinke <zinke.pilchuck...> [Tweeters] Swifts Night Out in Monroe returns August 20th
7/28/22 9:51 pm Dayna yalowicki <dlwicki...> [Tweeters] Apologies
7/28/22 9:49 pm Dayna yalowicki <dlwicki...> [Tweeters] Bird ID
7/28/22 8:26 pm Nelson Briefer <nreiferb...> [Tweeters] Nighthawk
7/28/22 3:52 pm Josh Adams <xjoshx...> Re: [Tweeters] Manx Shearwater book recommendation + BC nesting?
7/28/22 2:30 pm Zora Monster <zoramon...> Re: [Tweeters] dead bird reporting -
7/28/22 2:17 pm Martha Jordan <mj.cygnus...> [Tweeters] dead bird reporting -
7/28/22 1:20 pm BRAD Liljequist <bradliljequist...> [Tweeters] Manx Shearwater book recommendation + BC nesting?
7/28/22 1:15 pm Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...> [Tweeters] The Birdbooker Report
7/28/22 12:39 pm Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2022-07-28
7/28/22 12:36 pm Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2022-07-28
7/28/22 11:21 am Steve Hampton <stevechampton...> [Tweeters] Short-tailed Shearwater from Pt Wilson
7/28/22 10:25 am Ed Newbold <ednewbold1...> [Tweeters] Congratulations to Brian and Darchelle on Manx Shearwater
7/28/22 10:25 am B B <birder4184...> [Tweeters] Ecuador Blog Post - First Day in the Western Andes
7/27/22 5:21 pm Shep Thorp <shepthorp...> [Tweeters] Billy Frank Jr Nisqually NWR, Wednesday Walk, for July 27, 2022
7/27/22 12:28 pm Ed Newbold <ednewbold1...> [Tweeters] I'm Richard Gere! It's Days of Heaven! Monsoon time in the SW
7/27/22 12:22 pm David A. Armstrong <davearm...> [Tweeters] dead white pelicans, Deer Lagoon
7/26/22 3:13 pm Edward Pullen <edwardpullen...> [Tweeters] Nice photos of the Nazca Booby
7/26/22 8:56 am Zora Monster <zoramon...> [Tweeters] Spotted sandpipers
7/25/22 10:03 am Dianna Moore <osdlm1945...> Re: [Tweeters] Yo-Yo Ma’s avian ensemble
7/25/22 3:18 am Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] Escape artists: Birds learn to avoid flashy, hard-to-catch butterflies and their lookalikes – Florida Museum Science
7/24/22 5:03 pm Richard James <rich...> Re: [Tweeters] Nazca Booby
7/24/22 3:42 pm Claudia Turner <cjmackturner1...> [Tweeters] Forward: Our Baby Robins are Gone?
7/24/22 1:16 pm Marcia Ian <gnudle...> [Tweeters] Yo-Yo Ma’s avian ensemble
7/24/22 12:24 pm B B <birder4184...> [Tweeters] Blog Post - Trip to Ecuador
7/24/22 8:50 am Patricia Taylor <pat.mary.taylor...> [Tweeters] Nazca Booby
7/24/22 7:45 am Hank Heiberg <hank.heiberg...> [Tweeters] Nuthatch at hummingbird feeder
7/24/22 3:55 am Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> Re: [Tweeters] Common nighthawk and nestlings
7/23/22 10:21 pm Steve Hampton <stevechampton...> Re: [Tweeters] Our Baby Robins are “gone” …
7/23/22 8:17 pm Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] Skagit Game Range to be closed for shorebird season
7/23/22 7:18 pm Lynn Wohlers <wohlers13...> [Tweeters] Common nighthawk and nestlings
7/23/22 6:38 pm Jenn Jarstad <jennjarstad...> [Tweeters] Birds accompany cello
7/23/22 4:30 pm Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] Birdwatching brings millions of dollars to Alaska: In 2016, nearly 300, 000 birders flocked to the state and spent about $378 million. -- ScienceDaily
7/23/22 3:54 pm Dayna yalowicki <dlwicki...> Re: [Tweeters] Our Baby Robins are “gone” …
7/23/22 3:52 pm Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] Not only are bird species going extinct, but they might also lose the features that make each species unique -- ScienceDaily
7/23/22 3:49 pm Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] Songbird can keep time with the best of them -- ScienceDaily
7/23/22 3:33 pm Shep Thorp <shepthorp...> [Tweeters] Billy Frank Jr Nisqually NWR Wednesday Walk for 7/20/2022
7/23/22 9:23 am Raphael Fennimore <raphael.fennimore...> [Tweeters] Manx Shearwater in Puget Sound, Saturday July 23
7/22/22 5:55 pm Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...> [Tweeters] Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course (GC) monthly bird walk - 7-21-2022
7/22/22 3:20 pm Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10...> Re: [Tweeters] Our Baby Robins are "gone" ....
7/22/22 1:57 pm <jimbetz...> [Tweeters] Our Baby Robins are "gone" ....
7/22/22 1:30 pm Josh Morris <joshm...> [Tweeters] Seeking community science volunteers for bird-window collision research
7/22/22 1:22 pm Ed Newbold <ednewbold1...> [Tweeters] Penny Koyama has a letter in today's Seattle Times
7/22/22 11:41 am PENNY & DAVID KOYAMA <plkoyama...> [Tweeters] Possible Ivory Gull?
7/22/22 11:04 am Martha Jordan <mj.cygnus...> [Tweeters] Water bird mortalities
7/21/22 8:22 pm Hubbell <ldhubbell...> [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Eagle Reunion
7/21/22 4:32 pm dave templeton <crazydave65...> [Tweeters] Swainson's thrush wingbars
7/21/22 3:24 pm Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2022-07-21
7/21/22 3:23 pm Michael Fleming <michaelfleming0607...> Re: [Tweeters] Aufwiedersehen, Skagit!
7/21/22 3:19 pm Michael Fleming <michaelfleming0607...> Re: [Tweeters] Aufwiedersehen, Skagit!
7/21/22 12:04 pm Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] Kent Valley Shorebirding 7.21.22
7/21/22 10:07 am Ellen Cohen <cohenellenr...> [Tweeters] re move to western NY
7/21/22 8:27 am Tom and Carol Stoner <tcstonefam...> [Tweeters] Oh no!
7/20/22 10:50 pm Alan Roedell <alanroedell...> Re: [Tweeters] Aufwiedersehen, Skagit!
7/20/22 9:11 pm Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] Aufwiedersehen, Skagit!
7/20/22 6:32 pm area weatherman <rufo.hill...> [Tweeters] Purple Martin Pre Dawn Behavior
7/20/22 9:45 am Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10...> [Tweeters] Harry Nehls passes
7/20/22 6:34 am Raphael Fennimore <raphael.fennimore...> [Tweeters] White SULID in Puget Sound, Wednesday July 20th
7/19/22 4:18 pm Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] Kent Valley shorebirding 7.19.22
7/19/22 9:51 am Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...> [Tweeters] JBLM Eagles Pride Golf Course Monthly Birdwalk - July 21
7/19/22 9:13 am Karen Deyerle <kldinseattle...> Re: [Tweeters] Injured Anna's Hummingbird
7/19/22 9:05 am Teresa Stokes <tlstokespoetry...> [Tweeters] Injured Anna's Hummingbird
7/18/22 10:06 pm Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] Skagit birds
7/18/22 3:06 pm Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] Kent Valley shorebirding 7.18.22
7/18/22 2:20 pm Lynn Wohlers <wohlers13...> Re: [Tweeters] White Pelicans
7/18/22 2:07 pm <jimbetz...> [Tweeters] White Pelicans
7/18/22 6:59 am Hank Heiberg <hank.heiberg...> [Tweeters] Injured Anna’s
7/17/22 4:13 pm <davearm...> [Tweeters] Deer lagoon, Whidbey
7/17/22 1:13 pm G M ARCHAMBAULT <gm72125...> Re: [Tweeters] Ecuador
7/17/22 11:07 am Jim Forrester <jimf...> Re: [Tweeters] Ecuador
7/16/22 2:50 pm Hubbell <ldhubbell...> [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Active Waiting
7/16/22 2:10 pm Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] Kent Valley birding (7.16.22)
7/15/22 2:03 pm <cohenellenr...> [Tweeters] Ecuador
7/14/22 6:35 pm Nadine Drisseq <drisseq.n...> [Tweeters] A woodpecker's brain takes a big hit with every peck: study
7/14/22 5:41 pm Cara Borre <cmborre1...> [Tweeters] North Carolina birding video link
7/14/22 5:21 pm <flick...> [Tweeters] Fwd & IMPORTANT EDIT: Merlin capturing a Bushtit
7/14/22 4:43 pm <flick...> [Tweeters] Merlin capturing a Bushtit
7/14/22 4:39 pm Buchanan, Joseph B (DFW) <Joseph.Buchanan...> [Tweeters] Caspian Terns at Rat Island
7/14/22 12:34 pm Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2022-07-14
7/14/22 10:22 am Shep Thorp <shepthorp...> [Tweeters] Billy Frank Jr Nisqually NWR Wednesday Walk 7/13/2023
7/13/22 9:20 pm Jeff Borsecnik <jeffborsecnik...> Re: [Tweeters] off topic: sea otter near Anacortes
7/13/22 7:34 pm Carlos Andersen <2carlosandersen...> Re: [Tweeters] off topic: sea otter near Anacortes
7/13/22 7:26 pm Carlos Andersen <2carlosandersen...> Re: [Tweeters] off topic: sea otter near Anacortes
7/13/22 6:38 pm Shelf Life Community Story Project <info...> Re: [Tweeters] off topic: sea otter near Anacortes
7/13/22 3:26 pm rw <rw...> Re: [Tweeters] Study examines memory in expert birdwatchers
7/13/22 2:26 pm Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10...> [Tweeters] Purple Martins - arboreal feeding
7/13/22 1:50 pm Jeff Borsecnik <JeffBorsecnik...> [Tweeters] off topic: sea otter near Anacortes
7/13/22 12:58 pm Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] M Street in Auburn
7/13/22 12:52 pm Cynthia Easterson <eastersonfamily...> [Tweeters] Beginning Bird Bander Training
7/13/22 12:37 pm Kellie Sagen <kelliekvinne...> Re: [Tweeters] Austin Texas Trip
7/13/22 11:21 am Diann MacRae <tvulture...> [Tweeters] non-turkey vulture report for June
7/13/22 7:31 am Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] bird magazines, anyone? Bueller?
7/12/22 8:26 pm Robert O'Brien <baro...> Re: [Tweeters] Barry - Merlins v Hummers
7/12/22 6:38 pm LMarkoff <canyoneagle...> Re: [Tweeters] Austin Texas Trip
7/12/22 4:08 pm Philip Dickinson <pdickins...> Re: [Tweeters] Austin Texas Trip
7/12/22 3:54 pm Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...> Re: [Tweeters] Study examines memory in expert birdwatchers
7/12/22 3:49 pm Gary Cummins <g.cummins40...> [Tweeters] Austin Texas Trip
7/12/22 3:25 pm Michelle Landis <asmalllife...> [Tweeters] Barry - Merlins v Hummers
7/12/22 2:47 pm Wood, Steven <woodsteven...> [Tweeters] Study examines memory in expert birdwatchers
7/12/22 2:29 pm Stan Bezimienny <grzebiuszkaziemna...> Re: [Tweeters] Pacific-slope Flycatcher in Garden
7/12/22 5:55 am Mason Flint <masonflint...> Re: [Tweeters] unusual unidentified wail
7/11/22 9:37 pm Kellie Sagen <kelliekvinne...> [Tweeters] Austin Texas Trip
7/11/22 4:40 pm Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...> Re: [Tweeters] Study examines memory in expert birdwatchers -- ScienceDaily
7/11/22 4:04 pm Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] M Street in Auburn, King County
7/11/22 2:35 pm Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] Study examines memory in expert birdwatchers -- ScienceDaily
7/11/22 2:32 pm Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...> [Tweeters] Washington Dept of Fish and Wildlife Wants You
7/11/22 2:31 pm Mary Bond <marybond11...> [Tweeters] Fwd: Brown Pelican on Rat Island
7/11/22 12:15 pm Christina Wilsdon <cwilsdon...> [Tweeters] Pacific-slope Flycatcher in Garden
7/11/22 10:31 am Tom Benedict <benedict.t...> Re: [Tweeters] large Caspian Tern colony near Pt Townsend
7/9/22 7:54 pm <lsr...> <lsr...> Re: [Tweeters] unusual unidentified wail
7/8/22 7:29 pm Hank Heiberg <hank.heiberg...> [Tweeters] Bobwhite at Stillwater
7/8/22 6:11 pm Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] Rebuilding an Iconic California State Park With Birds and Wildfire In Mind | Audubon
7/8/22 3:51 pm Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] Kent Valley shorebirds
7/8/22 10:31 am Brian Zinke <zinke.pilchuck...> [Tweeters] Up In Smoke: How will birds respond to smoke pollution in the age of megafires?
 
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Date: 8/7/22 8:29 am
From: Raphael Fennimore <raphael.fennimore...>
Subject: [Tweeters] HORNED PUFFIN, Seattle’s Discovery Park, Sunday Aug 07
To All Who Tweet,

I observed a HORNED PUFFIN flying south past Discovery Park in Seattle about 45 minutes ago (around 7:30), briefly landing on the water and diving/foraging to the south of the park before taking off again (I lost it when I attempted more photos). I’m still here hoping it’s still around!

Good birding!

Raphael
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Date: 8/7/22 6:40 am
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] M Street, Auburn, King County - 8.6.22
A very small puddle remained at M Street yesterday. It held a single juv LEAST SANDPIPER. The shorebird season is ramping up, but unfortunately, not at M Street. A SHARP-SHINNED HAWK strafed that sole shorebird, and later allowed nice views. When life hands you lemons...... [ https://flic.kr/ps/376fhN | https://flic.kr/ps/376fhN ] - four videos of that bird.

Three BANK SWALLOWS flew by in formation at close range.


Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>
Pbase Images : https://www.pbase.com/marvbreece
Flickr Videos : https://www.flickr.com/photos/138163614@N02/
Youtube : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHbkNzr4TaZ6ZBWfoJNvavw/featured

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Date: 8/6/22 4:46 pm
From: Tom and Carol Stoner <tcstonefam...>
Subject: [Tweeters] American White Pelicans
At 4:30 today I spotted a flock of 18 American White Pelicans circling over
the 7900 block of California Ave. SW in West Seattle. After gaining some
altitude, they headed northwest toward Alki and Puget Sound. My second
sighting of American White Pelicans here. Thrilling!

Carol Stoner
West Seattle

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Date: 8/6/22 3:11 pm
From: Joan Miller <jemskink...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Hummingbird behavior
Hi Tweets,

I have observed this more than once. I female Anna's hummingbird comes to
one of my potted plants on the deck, and after visiting the flowers, she
perches on the rim and pokes her bill into the dirt. She does this several
times. I can see her little tongue come out. Is she cleaning her bill or
what? It's not like she's getting tiny bugs.

Joan Miller
West Seattle
jemskink at gmail dot com

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Date: 8/6/22 11:45 am
From: Eric Ellingson <esellingson...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Ptarmigan at Artist Point, Mt Baker
After many years of unsuccessful attempts at finding the elusive ptarmigan,
I've finally had my second viewing, a couple of miles out from Artist
Point. I spent an hour with a family of 8. Mom and 7chicks. It was great
sitting, watching, photographing, and videoing them as they went about
their business. Much of the time all of them were actively foraging on the
buds of heather. On occasion, it looked like both Mom and chicks were
eating small, almost sandlike pebbles. I'll have to explore what that is
about. Other times there was the dust bath behavior, scratching around in
small dusty areas and fluttering about. When hikers came by Mom would get
to a higher spot to see what was out there. When Ravens flew over calling
they took cover, Mom went close to a big rock, mostly out of sight and the
chicks hunkered down in vegetation, except one chick who did not get the
memo and kept foraging. I'm not sure if it is a thing but it seemed they
were eating mostly white heather buds rather than the more abundant pink
buds. Has anyone noticed or
familiar with what that is about?

There was not much else up there bird-wise, other than a few American
Pipits, one viewing of a Gray-crowned Rosy-finch. Of note with one of the
pipits, one had a completely bald, dark-gray head. A mom who had it with
her kids and pulled her hair out? It was actively foraging, gathering
insects, and then heading off with them. I don't think bird photography
would be much of a thing if birds did not have feathers. It was quite an
ugly head.

Photos here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ericellingson/
The chick photos are first followed by the adult. Video not processed yet.


--
Eric Ellingson
<esellingson...>
360-820-6396

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Date: 8/6/22 6:36 am
From: Mike Wagenbach <wagen...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Brown Sparrow ID
A couple of people suggested Spotted Towhee fledgling, which looks spot-on
(pun intended).

Since Towhees are often around my home, you'd think I'd be familiar with
the juvenile, but either I've managed not to see them well previously, or,
more likely, I forgot, since I have the memory of an alcoholic toddler.

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Date: 8/5/22 6:54 pm
From: Mike Wagenbach <wagen...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Brown sparrow ID?
I just saw on my deck a bird that was more-or-less entirely chocolate
brown, weak wing bar, retrices brown but with a white spot at the tip on
the underside only. Beak was fairly robust. Probably as large as a Zono.
sparrow but a little smaller than a Spotted Towhee. I can't place it.
Suggestions?

Mike Wagenbach
Ballard

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Date: 8/5/22 2:56 pm
From: Jenn Jarstad <jennjarstad...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] So what plants?
If you're interested in contributing to habitat restoration, there is a
great group called Grow It Forward you might like. With only a little bit
of garden space, you can grow seedlings (provided by Grow It Forward) and
then donate those trees to habitat restoration in Washington State. Here's
a link for anyone interested: https://growitfwd.org/

Jenn Jarstad, Seattle, WA

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Date: 8/5/22 2:01 pm
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] FIELD & STREAM: Bird Flu Threatens Britain's Traditional Partridge and Pheasant Shoots

Bird Flu Threatens Britain's Traditional Partridge and Pheasant Shoots
Dozens of shoots have already been called off and many more may soon be because stocked birds originated from avian flu hotspots in France
Read in Field & Stream: https://apple.news/AMq9AQLU9Tqi8F5hi3AgTGg


Shared from Apple News



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Date: 8/5/22 12:51 pm
From: <jimbetz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Where to show off Birding in the PNW?
Hi all,

My nephew (50s from NYC) is coming to visit us next week.
I had planned to take him - again - to Wylie Slough ... but
that's closed. He's not a "birder" but is definitely
interested in all things nature. The last time he was here
we went to two trails in Newhalem and the time before we
did the falls trail behind the Diablo powerhouse. He is
a great photographer (used to be a tech support guy for
Nikon).
We are going to do a puffin tour out of Anacortes.

My other alternatives are perhaps Nisqually or the JB at
Ft. Lewis. I'm thinking for both of those I'd try to join
the weekly bird walks. I'm quite familiar with just about
all the locations here in Skagit County - but not anything
outside of this marvelous place.

===> Do you have other suggestions? (Day trips are best.)

- Jim in Burlington

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Date: 8/5/22 12:42 pm
From: <jimbetz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Native Plant Sources - THANKS!

Thanks to all. I have received an out-pouring of help and I
appreciate it. Both on list and off. We are well on our way to
adding some native and bird friendly items to our garden.
Our most likely first item will be some Serviceberry - I'm
pretty sure we have room for 2 or 3 and possibly more.
- Jim

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Date: 8/5/22 12:31 pm
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] M Street in Auburn
All water is nearly gone at M Street in Auburn. I believe it will be gone in a day or 2. But today there was a juvenile SOLITARY SANDPIPER and about a dozen LEAST SANDPIPERS. A MERLIN flew in and got the birds excited, but didn't take any of them.

One video of the solitary: [ https://flic.kr/p/2nCyXMV | https://flic.kr/p/2nCyXMV ]


Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>
Pbase Images : https://www.pbase.com/marvbreece
Flickr Videos : https://www.flickr.com/photos/138163614@N02/
Youtube : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHbkNzr4TaZ6ZBWfoJNvavw/featured

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Date: 8/5/22 12:04 pm
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Colombia hummingbird seen for third time ever
Interesting article on Santa Marta Sabrewing, seen only for the third time:

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2022/aug/05/rare-hummingbird-rediscovered-colombia-age-of-extinction

Phil Dickinson

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Date: 8/5/22 7:43 am
From: <flick...>
Subject: [Tweeters] White Salmon WA: Aug 4 status of Vaux's Swift NESTLINGS in old chimney
Last night AUG 4th at 20:53, Vaux's Swift nestlings actively food begging inside our tall brick chimney (1929 & without a liner). I believe the nestlings were prompted by my walking around on our creaky wooden floor boards in the living room --- so not fledged quite yet at this nest location.

White Salmon, WA (downtown)
Cathy Flick

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Date: 8/5/22 6:34 am
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] bird watching
One of the aspects of bird watching that appeals to me is the way it relates to human sensation & perception. As a rule, we humans do not understand our sensory tools all that well. Magicians have made a living by demonstrating this for eons.

Take this video, for example: [ https://flic.kr/p/2nCn4cK | https://flic.kr/p/2nCn4cK ] While looking at this video, if you focus your eyes on one section of ground and move around the video, you will not likely see the 3 sandpipers. But if you blur your vision, which is to say focus farther away, your eye will pick up the subtle movements of the 3 peeps, if blurred, and you will find them.

In the 1980s, there was an outdoorsman and author by the name of Tom Brown, who went into the Pine Barrens of New Jersey for lengthy periods of time and survived by truly living off the land. From one of his books, I learned his term "splatter vision". This term applies to the previous paragraph. I have no doubt that many birders use splatter vision, aware or not. Have you ever not seen a bird that was right in front of your nose, because though you were looking right at it, your eyes were focused in the distance? You were looking right through the bird and not seeing it. The human eye cannot focus on a very large area. Give splatter vision a try the next time you go birding and see what happens.

Being a bird watcher can teach you a lot about yourself.


Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>
Pbase Images : https://www.pbase.com/marvbreece
Flickr Videos : https://www.flickr.com/photos/138163614@N02/
Youtube : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHbkNzr4TaZ6ZBWfoJNvavw/featured

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Date: 8/5/22 6:27 am
From: Steve Hampton <stevechampton...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Beyond Grass - WNPS Blog - Botanical Rambles
Thanks, Dan, for your articles.

I'm in the process of converting a large lawn to native plants,
pollinators, and, yes, a few non-natives that attract birds -- crocosmia
and cotoneaster come to mind.

good birding,


On Fri, Aug 5, 2022 at 4:51 AM Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> wrote:

> Hello Tweeters,
> Great to see some discussion on Tweeters.
>
> I share some research and some news articles regarding birds with
> Tweeters. Some are from science journals, some from mass media sources. I
> enjoy the articles that others post as well.
> The Stewart article was found on my morning read of stories on Apple news.
> Because many people follow Apple news stories, I thought others could be
> interested in what a popular influencer, with some, person, is sharing with
> her readers and the press.
>
> When I post/ share an article, it doesn’t mean I endorse the content, only
> that I find it to be interesting and hope that some others on Tweeters may
> also.
>
> I am a big fan of native plants and have many.
>
> Anyone out there have a few non native plant species to attract
> hummingbirds?
>
> At one time, the speculation was that Anna’s Hummingbirds began over-
> wintering and eventually became year round residents, because of some
> people planting and maintaining some non-native “exotic” flowering plants
> among their native vegetation, and eventually adding that year-round nectar
> source- the hummingbird feeder. And I believe that Anna’s year round
> continue to be a wonderful addition to Western WA and a delight to many.
>
> We have a few Cisco recommend, hummingbird and insect attracting flowering
> plants on our deck. The hummers seem to love them and they provide nectar
> at times our native plants do not.
> Those are in addition to our native plants, not instead of or as
> replacements.
>
> Please see the link below regarding grasses and lawns.
> Are lawns in Western WA from native grass species?
> Lawns are replacements for native plants and often take up large areas of
> properties.
> I respect each individual’s choice regarding lawns.
> Has anyone tried the suggestions below? Or other options?
>
> With respect and
> Best regards,
> Dan Reiff
> MI
>
>
> https://www.wnps.org/blog/beyond-grass
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> _______________________________________________
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--
​Steve Hampton​
Port Townsend, WA (qatáy)

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Date: 8/5/22 4:53 am
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Beyond Grass - WNPS Blog - Botanical Rambles
Hello Tweeters,
Great to see some discussion on Tweeters.

I share some research and some news articles regarding birds with Tweeters. Some are from science journals, some from mass media sources. I enjoy the articles that others post as well.
The Stewart article was found on my morning read of stories on Apple news. Because many people follow Apple news stories, I thought others could be interested in what a popular influencer, with some, person, is sharing with her readers and the press.

When I post/ share an article, it doesn’t mean I endorse the content, only that I find it to be interesting and hope that some others on Tweeters may also.

I am a big fan of native plants and have many.

Anyone out there have a few non native plant species to attract hummingbirds?

At one time, the speculation was that Anna’s Hummingbirds began over- wintering and eventually became year round residents, because of some people planting and maintaining some non-native “exotic” flowering plants among their native vegetation, and eventually adding that year-round nectar source- the hummingbird feeder. And I believe that Anna’s year round continue to be a wonderful addition to Western WA and a delight to many.

We have a few Cisco recommend, hummingbird and insect attracting flowering plants on our deck. The hummers seem to love them and they provide nectar at times our native plants do not.
Those are in addition to our native plants, not instead of or as replacements.

Please see the link below regarding grasses and lawns.
Are lawns in Western WA from native grass species?
Lawns are replacements for native plants and often take up large areas of properties.
I respect each individual’s choice regarding lawns.
Has anyone tried the suggestions below? Or other options?

With respect and
Best regards,
Dan Reiff
MI


https://www.wnps.org/blog/beyond-grass


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Date: 8/4/22 11:46 pm
From: Jenn Jarstad <jennjarstad...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] MARTHA STEWART LIVING: Want to Attract Special Birds and Bees to Your Garden? Add Rare Plants to Your Backyard, a New Study Says
If the non-native plants require more water/energy to sustain them in our
climate, then we increase the contributions to climate change, which also
impacts our feathered friends.
Jenn Jarstad, Seattle, WA

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Date: 8/4/22 6:46 pm
From: Lynn Wohlers <wohlers13...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] So what plants?
Jim,

WNPS, <https://www.wnps.org/> the Washington Native Plant Society, is
another source of information. Here's a link
<https://wnps.org/content//documents/plants/gardening/native-plant-seed-source-32021.pdf>
to native plants and seed sources from their website. There are also plant
lists by habitat.
The local chapter for Burlington is called Salal. They have a big native
plant sale each spring - maybe there will be one in the fall, too. Just put
your name on the mailing list at this link. <https://www.wnps.org/salal>
They do the sales at the Discovery Garden just west of Mt. Vernon, which
should be convenient for you.

Lynn
Fidalgo Island

On Thu, Aug 4, 2022 at 4:23 PM Doug Santoni <dougsantoni...> wrote:

> Jim —
>
> A couple of great resources for native plants are the Audubon Society’s
> native plants website, where you can enter your zip code and get
> information on plants and plant retailers (
> https://www.audubon.org/native-plants). Check out the tab entitled
> “Local Resources.”
>
> The other great site with a lot of content is the Washington
> Ornithological Society page found at
> https://wos.org/wos-wp/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/native-plant-resources-v2.pdf
>
> I’m sure there are other good sources, but you might want to check these
> out!
>
> Doug Santoni
> Dougsantoni at gmail dot com
> Seattle, WA
>
> On Aug 4, 2022, at 12:39 PM, <jimbetz...> wrote:
>
> Hi,
>
> The talk about "plant native" is good. But how do I, a homeowner with
> some space where I can plant native species, find out which plants to
> put in, how to care for them until they are self-sufficient, and where
> to get them (seeds? starter plants?) ... ???
>
> - Jim in Burlington
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
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>
>
> _______________________________________________
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> <Tweeters...>
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>


--
Lynn Wohlers

Blogging at Bluebrightly <https://bluebrightly.com/>
Photography on Flickr <https://www.flickr.com/photos/lynnwohlers/>
And at Lynn Wohlers.com <http://lynn-wohlers.artistwebsites.com>

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Date: 8/4/22 5:26 pm
From: Charles Easterberg <charleseasterberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Pelicans
Hi, Tweets. Monday saw 1 brown pelican at Kingston as the ferry pulled into
the dock. It was on the barnacle-covered crossbar of the large triple-post
docking guides at low tide and very easy to see.
We (4 of us) saw a second (possibly the same bird) peli while eating supper
at Anthoy's in Edmonds at 6 pm.
Both were no-questions birds.
Charley Easterberg

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Date: 8/4/22 5:13 pm
From: Cara Borre <cmborre1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Westport Seabirds Trip Report July 30, 2022
Taking full advantage of midsummer's early daybreak, the Monte Carlo left
Westport at 5:30am with an excited group of birders, many having traveled
across the country to join us. To borrow Jim Danzenbaker’s alliteration
describing the midweek trip, “the fickle fingers of fog” unfortunately held
a tight grip on us for most of our outing. It wasn't until the end of the
voyage that fog's fingers finally relaxed and allowed some sunshine to
brighten the scene. Despite the constant fog, air temperature and sea
conditions couldn’t have been better.

Fog will affect bird numbers as the “horizon” isn’t visible and you are
confined to whatever small area of “clearing” the conditions afford you.
Our plan was to motor far offshore to intersect the shrimp fleet in hopes
of catching them hauling in their nets. No luck with net timing, though we
still enjoyed our greatest diversity of species, including the “gorilla in
the mist”, Black-footed Albatross (12 - day totals), Northern Fulmar (16),
Sooty (2110), Pink-footed (385), and Short-tailed (10) Shearwaters, as well
as Fork-tailed Storm-Petrels (14). We were able to point out
distinguishing field marks despite the poor contrast conditions, as the sea
and sky would at times blur into a single grayish void.

Red (28) and Red-necked (6) Phalaropes put in brief showings throughout the
day, with Reds still sporting a bit of that fantastic breeding plumage. As
we departed the shrimpers heading further west for our chum attempt, we
encountered a very close Humpback Whale and stayed to watch and listen to
it surfacing multiple times. While Humpback sightings are not uncommon on
our journeys, seeing this creature through the eyes of travelers without an
ocean coast made us appreciate how fortunate we are to be able to visit
this pelagic realm.

Moving on to our chum attempt, we were able to attract in a brief, but well
seen Leach’s Storm-Petrel (1), a deep water target at this time of the
year. That bird would be joined by a single Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel
leaving a windless chum stop less than climactic. We had come to the
midpoint of our trip, but the adventure was far from over as we turned and
headed home.

Alcids had been scarce, though we got looks at Cassin’s Auklet (12) and
good looks at Rhinoceros Auklet (21) with full plumes and horn. Pigeon
Guillemot (2) is typically seen close to shore and we usually have good
numbers of Common Murre (383) on the way out and back. Tufted Puffin (1)
is by no means a guarantee, but we are seeing them more reliably and
today’s bird was very cooperative sitting on the water a good while, diving
and resurfacing for all to see well. During our puffin stop we had a close
bow visitation from a juvenile Long-tailed Jaeger (1). Far from the “Skua
Slam” earlier in the week, this would be the only “skua” seen by all for
the day, apart from a “Pom(1) on a log” seen by few in the distance. So
many of our Jaeger/Skua sightings are distant birds in flight and today’s
conditions just weren’t going to allow that possibility. Indeed we were
lucky to eke out a few close flying Sabine’s Gull (5), their strikingly
patterned backs still showing well despite the gray surroundings.

If the constant mist was dampening any spirits, there was no sign of it
once we were joined by a large pod of Pacific White-sided Dolphins (89).
These charismatic animals are often the highlight of our trips and today
they certainly didn’t disappoint. At first it was a few dolphins
porpoising and approaching the boat, then their numbers increased as Phil
slowed the boat inviting them to ride along with us. Visibility was no
longer a problem. The dolphins were mere feet from us, on all sides of the
boat. While the air held a veil we would be straining all day to see
beyond, the water near the boat possessed magnificent clarity. We marveled
as the dolphins sliced through the surface again and again. We could
easily appreciate the intricate pattern of dark gray backs with lighter
gray patches on the sides and a thin racing stripe extending from the back
of the eye, widening to a larger patch on the flank. The caudal half of
the dorsal fin is also this lighter gray color, while the belly is whiter
still. The Pacific White-sided Dolphin is as handsome as it is
entertaining to watch. It was truly a delightful encounter for everyone on
board.

Other highlights included a rare sighting of a Guadalupe Fur Seal and many
Blue Sharks along the way with occasional Ocean Sunfish.


Thanks to Captain Phil Anderson and First Mate Chris Anderson for another
excellent trip into the big blue, despite its grayness today. Bruce LaBar,
Scott Mills, and I were on board to assist our participants with
identification and natural history information. Thanks to all near and far
travelers for sharing this offshore adventure with us.

Hope to sea you out there!

Cara Borre
Gig Harbor

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Date: 8/4/22 4:25 pm
From: Doug Santoni <dougsantoni...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] So what plants?
Jim —

A couple of great resources for native plants are the Audubon Society’s native plants website, where you can enter your zip code and get information on plants and plant retailers (https://www.audubon.org/native-plants <https://www.audubon.org/native-plants>). Check out the tab entitled “Local Resources.”

The other great site with a lot of content is the Washington Ornithological Society page found at https://wos.org/wos-wp/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/native-plant-resources-v2.pdf <https://wos.org/wos-wp/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/native-plant-resources-v2.pdf>

I’m sure there are other good sources, but you might want to check these out!

Doug Santoni
Dougsantoni at gmail dot com
Seattle, WA

> On Aug 4, 2022, at 12:39 PM, <jimbetz...> wrote:
>
> Hi,
>
> The talk about "plant native" is good. But how do I, a homeowner with
> some space where I can plant native species, find out which plants to
> put in, how to care for them until they are self-sufficient, and where
> to get them (seeds? starter plants?) ... ???
>
> - Jim in Burlington
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters


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Date: 8/4/22 3:58 pm
From: Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2022-08-04
Tweets - The weather was gray and unsettled, but the rain held off all
morning. Breeding is mostly done at Marymoor, with only the Osprey still
visibly feeding unfledged young. For a while it seemed like we were only
on the losing end of Post-breeding Dispersal, but by the end of the day,
we'd had a few post-breeding visitors ourselves.

Highlights:

- Hooded Merganser - One a Rowing Club was the first since May
- RED-NECKED GREBE - One on the lake, our earliest fall sighting ever
for this species
- American Coot - A late scan of the lake turned up one, first since
early May
- Spotted Sandpiper - Two unspotted birds on the weir
- California Gull - About 10 on the lake, many of them juveniles
- Caspian Tern - At least 4 over the lake
- Green Heron - One juvenile on the old Beaver lodge opposite Dog Central
- Cooper's Hawk - I had one after the survey
- Barn Owl - Matt had one pre-dawn from the Lake Platform (!)
- Western Screech-Owl - Matt heard one pre-dawn
- Cliff Swallow - Two in SE part of the park; first in 5 weeks
- Orange-crowned Warbler - One in nice mixed flock south of East Meadow
- Black-throated Gray Warbler - At least one in the same mixed flock
- Wilson's Warbler - At least one in the same mixed flock as well

Misses today included Killdeer, Warbling Vireo, Golden-crowned Kinglet,
Brown-headed Cowbird, and Black-headed Grosbeak.

We also missed Tree Swallows for the first time since early March, as
expected. We've only had about a dozen Tree Swallow sightings ever after
the end of July.

For the day, counting three species I added late, 59 species.

= Michael Hobbs
= www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
= <BirdMarymoor...>

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Date: 8/4/22 3:10 pm
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Another Blog Post - Day 8 in the Amazon
It started with a return to the Napo River and a visit to the Yasuni Clay Lick usually smothered by Parrots and Parakeets.  Not this time but lots of good birds elsewhere.
https://blairbirding.com/2022/08/04/ecuador-day-8-back-to-the-napo-river-and-more-rainforest/




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Date: 8/4/22 2:44 pm
From: <jimbetz...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] So what plants?
Denis,

Thanks. I live just a few miles from Bow. I called them and
they "only sell wholesale in quantity" ... but they said they
provide plants to the Skagit County CD and that there would be
a special sale coming up next March. She agreed that the
Serviceberry would be ideal for my needs. So I'll be looking
to pick up some and get them in the ground in March.

- Jim
Quoting Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...>:

> Check your county conservation district (CD) - I got all mine for
> the past 15 years from Pierce County CD. The plants for all CDs are
> raised in Bow (I believe that’s still the case). I’ve gotten shore
> pine, red currant, white pine, incense cedar, mock orange, Garry
> oak, etc. One year they even had ponderosa pine that were grown from
> seeds from Joint Base Lewis McChord (largest acreage of that species
> in western Washington) - thus native to where I live here in Roy. (I
> have about 15 of those growing here.)
>
> Cost is minimal. Definitely check with your local conservation district.
>
> May all your birds be identified,
> Denis DeSilvis
> avnacrs 4 birds at outlook dot com
> ________________________________
> From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> on
> behalf of <jimbetz...> <jimbetz...>
> Sent: Thursday, August 4, 2022 12:39:40 PM
> To: <tweeters...> <tweeters...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] So what plants?
>
> Hi,
>
> The talk about "plant native" is good. But how do I, a homeowner with
> some space where I can plant native species, find out which plants to
> put in, how to care for them until they are self-sufficient, and where
> to get them (seeds? starter plants?) ... ???
>
> - Jim in Burlington
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters



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Date: 8/4/22 2:34 pm
From: Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] So what plants?
Check your county conservation district (CD) - I got all mine for the past 15 years from Pierce County CD. The plants for all CDs are raised in Bow (I believe thats still the case). Ive gotten shore pine, red currant, white pine, incense cedar, mock orange, Garry oak, etc. One year they even had ponderosa pine that were grown from seeds from Joint Base Lewis McChord (largest acreage of that species in western Washington) - thus native to where I live here in Roy. (I have about 15 of those growing here.)

Cost is minimal. Definitely check with your local conservation district.

May all your birds be identified,
Denis DeSilvis
avnacrs 4 birds at outlook dot com
________________________________
From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> on behalf of <jimbetz...> <jimbetz...>
Sent: Thursday, August 4, 2022 12:39:40 PM
To: <tweeters...> <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] So what plants?

Hi,

The talk about "plant native" is good. But how do I, a homeowner with
some space where I can plant native species, find out which plants to
put in, how to care for them until they are self-sufficient, and where
to get them (seeds? starter plants?) ... ???

- Jim in Burlington

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Date: 8/4/22 1:26 pm
From: Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] AOS Checklist supplement
HI ALL:
The latest AOS Checklist supplement is out and the biggest change
to the ABA area is the split of the Eastern Meadowlark into two species
with the southwestern birds becoming Chihuahuan Meadowlark.

Details here:

https://www.aba.org/aos-supplement-redux-2022/

Ian Paulsen Bainbridge Island, WA, USA Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog
here: https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/
https://www.aba.org/aos-supplement-redux-2022/
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Date: 8/4/22 1:18 pm
From: Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] AOS Checklist supplement
HI ALL:
The latest AOS Ckecklist supplement is out and the biggest change to the
ABA area is the spilt of the Eastern Meadowlartk into two species with the
southwestern birds becoming Chihuahuan Meadowlark. Details here:

https://www.aba.org/aos-supplement-redux-2022/

sincerely
Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/
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Date: 8/4/22 12:49 pm
From: <jimbetz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Wylie Slough - Closed to ALL access until the end of September
Hi all,

In case you don't know this - they are working on the dike(s) at Wylie
Slough and the entire area is closed to all access. The posted schedule
says "August 1 to September 30" ... whether or not they will finish
early (or late) is unknown and I suspect we won't get much notice of
any changes ... perhaps only if we periodically go to the site and
check the posting at the gate at the end of Wylie Road.

****

On other news about Wylie - it appears to this observer that the
attempt to mitigate the cattails at Wylie is a total failure. I
can't tell any difference ... now.

What did happen, however, is that the habitat was seriously
impacted for several months and it is possible that it will take
more time for the birds that used to be so reliably present to
return to Wylie. On that score it will be "we shall see". Of
course we will have to wait until Wylie is re-opened after the
work on the dike is completed ... *sigh*.
- Jim

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Date: 8/4/22 12:42 pm
From: <jimbetz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] So what plants?
Hi,

The talk about "plant native" is good. But how do I, a homeowner with
some space where I can plant native species, find out which plants to
put in, how to care for them until they are self-sufficient, and where
to get them (seeds? starter plants?) ... ???

- Jim in Burlington

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Date: 8/4/22 11:57 am
From: Jon. Anderson and Marty Chaney <festuca...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Wednesday Walk at Nisqually NWR - 3 August 2022
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Date: 8/4/22 7:45 am
From: Ruth Richards <rgrichards66...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] MARTHA STEWART LIVING: Want to Attract Special Birds and Bees to Your Garden? Add Rare Plants to Your Backyard, a New Study Says
The Dartmouth conclusions seem to contradict those of Doug Tallamy, professor of entomology and wildlife ecology at Univ of Delaware. I’m not qualified to assess these two divergent conclusions for scientific accuracy, but it does make sense to me, intuitively, that, at least for birds, the bugs they need to thrive will be found on the native plants to which they are adapted.

Dr Tallamy is also the force behind the Homegrown National Park project to regenerate biodiversity in our own back yards, which I encourage all to look in to. HOMEGROWN NATIONAL PARK <https://homegrownnationalpark.org/> My lot is on the list!

Ruth Richards
Coupeville

> On Aug 3, 2022, at 10:57 PM, Steve Hampton <stevechampton...> wrote:
>
> Agreed 100%. Plant natives. There was a great webinar presentation sponsored by WOS or a local Audubon group a few months ago. The expert shared how chickadees need 6,000 to 10,000 moth caterpillars to fledge a nest of chicks. Wow! And where do they get these? Mostly from native alder, birch, and bitter cherry trees.
>
>
>
> On Wed, Aug 3, 2022 at 8:13 PM Paul Bannick <paul.bannick...> <mailto:<paul.bannick...>> wrote:
> Interesting BUT if you want to our increasingly threatened native birds, garden as much as possible with the native plants that these species rely upon for food, nesting, shelter. Gardening with our native plants allow you to provide not just for nesting and wintering birds but also migrating ones.
>
> They also help retain our declining insects that birds and many other animals rely upon.
>
> We must do this for our native birds or risk losing them.
>
> Paul
>
> On Wed, Aug 3, 2022 at 1:29 PM Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> <mailto:<dan.owl.reiff...>> wrote:
>
> Want to Attract Special Birds and Bees to Your Garden? Add Rare Plants to Your Backyard, a New Study Says
> Researchers out of Dartmouth College found that 50 percent of urban gardens in California counties have rare plants—and, in turn, they attract unique species of pollinators.
> Read in Martha Stewart Living: https://apple.news/AToTxWy4FTJGOmIXTHZfxrA <https://apple.news/AToTxWy4FTJGOmIXTHZfxrA>
>
> Shared from Apple News <https://www.apple.com/news>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...> <mailto:<Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters <http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters>
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>
>
> --
> ​Steve Hampton​
> Port Townsend, WA (qatáy)
>
>
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Date: 8/4/22 12:35 am
From: Sally Alhadeff <sallya...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] MARTHA STEWART LIVING: Want to Attract Special Birds and Bees to Your Garden? Add Rare Plants to Your Backyard, a New Study Says
I recently heard Douglas Tallamy the author of Nature’s Best Hope interviewed by a Spokane gardener. The author advocates for homeowners to turn their yards into conservation corridors and makes a compelling case for planting natives.

The subtitle is A New Approach to Conservation that Starts in Your Backyard.

Over the last 20+ years, my late husband and I planted thousands of native trees and shrubs in multiple corridors across our property in rural Thurston county. I can attest that it works.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Q5c7BJwQhN4

Sally Alhadeff
Tenino, WA

On Aug 3, 2022, at 8:14 PM, Paul Bannick <paul.bannick...> wrote:


Interesting BUT if you want to our increasingly threatened native birds, garden as much as possible with the native plants that these species rely upon for food, nesting, shelter. Gardening with our native plants allow you to provide not just for nesting and wintering birds but also migrating ones.

They also help retain our declining insects that birds and many other animals rely upon.

We must do this for our native birds or risk losing them.

Paul

On Wed, Aug 3, 2022 at 1:29 PM Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> wrote:
>
> Want to Attract Special Birds and Bees to Your Garden? Add Rare Plants to Your Backyard, a New Study Says
> Researchers out of Dartmouth College found that 50 percent of urban gardens in California counties have rare plants—and, in turn, they attract unique species of pollinators.
> Read in Martha Stewart Living: https://apple.news/AToTxWy4FTJGOmIXTHZfxrA
>
>
> Shared from Apple News
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
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Date: 8/3/22 11:00 pm
From: Steve Hampton <stevechampton...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] MARTHA STEWART LIVING: Want to Attract Special Birds and Bees to Your Garden? Add Rare Plants to Your Backyard, a New Study Says
Agreed 100%. Plant natives. There was a great webinar presentation
sponsored by WOS or a local Audubon group a few months ago. The expert
shared how chickadees need 6,000 to 10,000 moth caterpillars to fledge a
nest of chicks. Wow! And where do they get these? Mostly from native
alder, birch, and bitter cherry trees.



On Wed, Aug 3, 2022 at 8:13 PM Paul Bannick <paul.bannick...> wrote:

> Interesting BUT if you want to our increasingly threatened native birds,
> garden as much as possible with the native plants that these species rely
> upon for food, nesting, shelter. Gardening with our native plants allow
> you to provide not just for nesting and wintering birds but also migrating
> ones.
>
> They also help retain our declining insects that birds and many other
> animals rely upon.
>
> We must do this for our native birds or risk losing them.
>
> Paul
>
> On Wed, Aug 3, 2022 at 1:29 PM Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> wrote:
>
>>
>> *Want to Attract Special Birds and Bees to Your Garden? Add Rare Plants
>> to Your Backyard, a New Study Says*
>> Researchers out of Dartmouth College found that 50 percent of urban
>> gardens in California counties have rare plants—and, in turn, they attract
>> unique species of pollinators.
>>
>> Read in Martha Stewart Living: https://apple.news/AToTxWy4FTJGOmIXTHZfxrA
>>
>>
>> Shared from Apple News <https://www.apple.com/news>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>>
> --
> Sent from Gmail Mobile
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>


--
​Steve Hampton​
Port Townsend, WA (qatáy)

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Date: 8/3/22 8:16 pm
From: Paul Bannick <paul.bannick...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] MARTHA STEWART LIVING: Want to Attract Special Birds and Bees to Your Garden? Add Rare Plants to Your Backyard, a New Study Says
Interesting BUT if you want to our increasingly threatened native birds,
garden as much as possible with the native plants that these species rely
upon for food, nesting, shelter. Gardening with our native plants allow
you to provide not just for nesting and wintering birds but also migrating
ones.

They also help retain our declining insects that birds and many other
animals rely upon.

We must do this for our native birds or risk losing them.

Paul

On Wed, Aug 3, 2022 at 1:29 PM Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> wrote:

>
> *Want to Attract Special Birds and Bees to Your Garden? Add Rare Plants to
> Your Backyard, a New Study Says*
> Researchers out of Dartmouth College found that 50 percent of urban
> gardens in California counties have rare plants—and, in turn, they attract
> unique species of pollinators.
>
> Read in Martha Stewart Living: https://apple.news/AToTxWy4FTJGOmIXTHZfxrA
>
>
> Shared from Apple News <https://www.apple.com/news>
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
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Date: 8/3/22 3:39 pm
From: Sharon Howard <clmssh...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Leucistic American Gold Finch etc.
Report from South Sunset Hill/Ballard:
We have a leucistic American Gold Finch — it is all light gray where the yellow would normally be, but otherwise the same markings and quite lovely. It has been hanging around a couple weeks now. PLUS, we have one juvenile towhee without a tail— looks quite strange. Don’t know if it is molting or maybe escaped a predator. We also had 3 Black-headed grosbeaks visiting our feeder today.

Sharon Howard



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Date: 8/3/22 1:31 pm
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] MARTHA STEWART LIVING: Want to Attract Special Birds and Bees to Your Garden? Add Rare Plants to Your Backyard, a New Study Says

Want to Attract Special Birds and Bees to Your Garden? Add Rare Plants to Your Backyard, a New Study Says
Researchers out of Dartmouth College found that 50 percent of urban gardens in California counties have rare plants—and, in turn, they attract unique species of pollinators.
Read in Martha Stewart Living: https://apple.news/AToTxWy4FTJGOmIXTHZfxrA


Shared from Apple News



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Date: 8/2/22 8:34 pm
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Ecuador Days 5, 6 and 7 Blog Posts
These blog posts cover our last day in the Western Andes, our journey into the Amazon and our first day there at the wonderful Sacha Lodge
https://blairbirding.com/2022/08/01/ecuador-day-5-sachatamia-and-back-to-puembo


https://blairbirding.com/2022/08/02/into-the-amazon-ecuador-day-6



https://blairbirding.com/2022/08/03/ecuador-day-7-amazon-day-2-the-canopy-tower/

I hope these links work.  If not please let me know offline.  Thanks
Blair Bernson








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Date: 8/2/22 3:12 pm
From: Bill Tweit <bill.tweit...>
Subject: [Tweeters] ebird begins implementation of a new treatment for non-native species (long)
After a couple of years of development, eBird is beginning to implement a
new approach for handling records of non-native species, which will provide
significant improvements to our understanding of the spread of non-native
species across the globe. It will substantially improve the value of eBird
data for scientists, conservationists, land managers and others who study
and track impacts of non-native species on ecosystems, native species and
our environment.


*What will change?*

All species in eBird will be categorized as either *Native* or *Exotic* in
a region, depending on whether there is evidence that their occurrence is
due to anthropogenic means (Exotics) or whether their occurrence is as a
result of natural processes (Native). This distinction is important, as
typically the rate and the pace of human-assisted spread of species is much
greater than from natural processes, resulting in very different impacts to
ecosystems and native species. Species categorized as Exotic are further
separated into three candidates in each region: Naturalized, Provisional
and Escapee.


*Naturalized* species were introduced by humans in various ways, and have
subsequently established self-sustaining populations. They will continue to
count in eBird lists. In the Pacific Northwest, examples of Naturalized
species include European Starling, Chukar, and Rock Pigeon. Some species,
such as Mountain Quail are categorized as Native in Oregon and in the Blue
Mountains of southeast Washington, and as Naturalized in the Puget Trough,
based on historical records of occurrence and of releases.


*Provisional* species include two different types of records: either
species that were clearly introduced Northern Bobwhite on the prairies of
south Puget Sound, where small populations seem to persist but there is
likely ongoing supplementation from hunter releases, and of the latter the
historical reports of Mountain Quail in Klickitat, Skamania and Clark
counties which might have been the last vestiges of a native population or
might have been the results of failed release programs. Species listed as
Provisional will also count in eBird checklists.


*Escapees* are just that, birds that are known or considered highly likely
to be either intentionally or inadvertently released from captivity. One
frequent example is the numerous reports of Northern but have not clearly
become established or species whose origin is uncertain as the evidence
does not support either human-assisted occurrence or natural processes.
Examples of the former include Bobwhite from areas where hunters often use
them to train their dogs and another is the Monk Parakeets of Yacolt, which
appear to be a handful of survivors from a release years ago. There are
numerous other examples of this category, including Mandarin Duck, Indian
Peafowl and Northern Cardinal. Escapees will not count in eBird totals, but
will appear at the bottom of personal lists.


The initial categorization, as well as ongoing decisions about changes to
categories, are all made at the regional level, by the review teams. The
review team attempted to make the initial categorization as consistent as
possible with published Washington Bird Records Committee decisions, and
was largely successful at that. However, from a countability/listing
perspective, there are some differences at present. For example, the WBRC
treated the pair of Pink-footed Goose that wintered in Hoquaim in 2003/4 as
origin uncertain, so their eBird category is Provisional. If the WBRC
revises its treatment based on new information, the eBird category would be
changed to reflect the new WBRC decision. Similarly, the 2019 Eurasian Tree
Sparrow at Neah Bay is treated as Provisional in eBird, since the WBRC
determined the origin could not be determined with certainty. Neither
species appears on the state list maintained by the WBRC (
https://wos.org/records/checklist/), but both will appear on the eBird
state list as Exotic: Provisional. The WBRC has had some initial
discussions about this difference, but has not developed a position on it
yet.


*Implementation:*

The first area where eBirders will see these changes is in Illustrated
Checklists and the Species Maps. Provisional species will be displayed at
the end of the ‘main’ section of the Illustrated Checklist, which will
include Native and Naturalized species. Over time, the Illustrated
Checklists will also display hybrids, in a section following Provisional
species. The Species Maps will use different colors to display ranges,
Purple for Native and Orange for Exotics, and the user will be able to
specify whether to display records of Escapees, or just of Naturalized and
Provisional. These changes should be implemented in the next few weeks, and
will be announced and described on the eBird website.


In the coming months, listing displays will be changed as well, starting
with personal lists. The Provisional species will be listed after the
Natives and Naturalized, so if you don’t wish to count Provisionals, it is
a simple matter to stop counting at the end of the main list.


*Bottom Line:*

The bottom line is that this improvement is long awaited by many, and while
it may take some time to get used to the changes, the enhanced value of
eBird data and the increased flexibility for users make this worth the wait
and worth the adaptation. Why are these changes necessary? Scientists
currently rank the spread of non-native species as one of the top five
threat factors for threatened and endangered species, as well as a prime
threat to the integrity of ecosystems. The current eBird structure
discourages eBird users from reporting non-native species that have not
become established, since all species are added to an observer’s listing
totals. This has been an unfortunate weakness of eBird, as citizen science
projects like eBird provide a powerful tool for monitoring the spread and
establishment of non-native species.


As you begin to work with the new approach, the Washington eBird review
team welcomes your input on the initial designation of categories by
species by county. Our initial designations are based on historical
research, review of historical and current data, and WBRC decisions, but
that doesn’t mean that we got everything right on the first attempt and it
doesn’t mean that status and distribution aren’t changing, in some cases
rapidly. Your input will help make sure that the Exotics designations are
both accurate and current. We understand that eBird will provide a form for
suggestions, or drop a note to your local reviewer with suggestions.



Bill Tweit

<bill.tweit...>

August 1, 2022

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Date: 8/2/22 11:53 am
From: Elaine Chuang <elc...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bird Lover's Day at the Locks (Sat, Aug 6, 2022)
From 9A to 2P this Saturday, there’s going to be a free event organized by the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers at the Locks, “Bird Lover's Day.” It will be held on the grounds of the wonderful Hiram S. Chittendon Locks and Carl S. English Botanical Garden here in Seattle. Invited partners who will be participating are: Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team (COASST), Heron Habitat Helpers,
Seattle Audubon Society, Secret Garden Books and the Washington Ornithological Society. We representing WOS will have some introductory resources for the public on birds and birding, and a few activities, too.

You can find a schedule and a few more details here: https://www.facebook.com/Washington-Birding-137712199682582

Perhaps you know some nearby neophyte 'bird nutties' or folks who ‘don’t yet know they’ll fall in love with birds.’ Please feel free to pass the info along, or even to come by and say hi.

Elaine Chuang … for WOS (elc at uw dot edu)





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Date: 8/1/22 10:39 am
From: Edward Pullen <edwardpullen...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Buff-breasted Sandpiper at Oyhut
A BBSA flew right to Ken Brownnsnd me at the Oyhut game range. Half way into the area from the Tonquin entrance.

Sent from my iPhone. Ed Pullen
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Date: 8/1/22 5:33 am
From: pan <panmail...>
Subject: [Tweeters] bird information sources
Hi, Jody,

In addition to Birds of the World, for a different perspective, obviously dated, but surprising in its variable depth and quirkiness, if I'm still missing information it's worth checking Bent's Life Histories.  You can find them here.
http://birdaz.com/blog/basic-references-north-america/

Some of the other references on that page may help, as well.  For example, in Bendire's Life Histories at
https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/50299#page/316/mode/1up
on page 300 is mention of finding a Western Flycatcher nest on a low rafter in a barn, somewhat similar to your find. 

For your bird, Bent's Flycatchers, etc., is at

http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/32702#page/5/mode/1up
Species limits have changed, so for Pacific-slope you'd want to check Western Flycatcher and maybe San Lucas Flycatcher accounts, pages 246-54.  

Cheers,

Alan Grenon
Seattle
panmail AT mailfence.com

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Date: 8/1/22 12:35 am
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] pacific slope flycatcher nest above porchlight
Hello Jody,
You are fortunate to have had them nest nearby and be able to observe them during nesting.
I would highly recommend that you look at the species account for this flycatcher at Birdsoftheworld.org
I have subscribed for many years and find it to be a wealth of information.
After I film a species and it‘s behavior, I will next do a deep dive into their species account.
There is so much information about each bird species there, that I will return later and find even more that I didn’t find the first, second or third times.
There are many layers of information provided there from overviews to research.
I believe you can access it through your WOS membership and it is available through some libraries.
Thank you,
Dan Reiff
MI


Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 1, 2022, at 12:12 AM, JODY BRECKENRIDGE <breckenridgej...> wrote:
>
> 
> In mid-June I was pleasantly surprised to find an active Pacific Slope Flycatcher nest that had been constructed on my deck porchlight beneath the large awning that covers the deck. 4 eggs were produced; 3 hatched, and all 3 babies fledged around a week or two ago (specific date unknown). The 4th unhatched egg remains in the nest.
>
> If possible, I would like to talk with an ornithologist or researcher that has studied these birds. I am interested in learning more about their nesting and rearing patterns in western WA including: do they ever return to the same nest location in subsequent breeding seasons, and do they revisit or reuse old nests. The more I learned while observing them during the time they spent on my property (mostly by listening to song and call note patterns, with occasional visual sightings), the more questions I have about them. Conducting online searches and reviewing my assortment of field guides provided some general information but did not address all of my questions.
>
> Please contact me offline at: <breckenridgej...>
> if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions.
>
> Thank you.
>
> Jody Breckenridge, in the foothills northeast of Monroe WA, Snohomish County
>
>
>
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Date: 8/1/22 12:17 am
From: JODY BRECKENRIDGE <breckenridgej...>
Subject: [Tweeters] pacific slope flycatcher nest above porchlight
In mid-June I was pleasantly surprised to find an active Pacific Slope Flycatcher nest that had been constructed on my deck porchlight beneath the large awning that covers the deck. 4 eggs were produced; 3 hatched, and all 3 babies fledged around a week or two ago (specific date unknown). The 4th unhatched egg remains in the nest.

If possible, I would like to talk with an ornithologist or researcher that has studied these birds. I am interested in learning more about their nesting and rearing patterns in western WA including: do they ever return to the same nest location in subsequent breeding seasons, and do they revisit or reuse old nests. The more I learned while observing them during the time they spent on my property (mostly by listening to song and call note patterns, with occasional visual sightings), the more questions I have about them. Conducting online searches and reviewing my assortment of field guides provided some general information but did not address all of my questions.

Please contact me offline at: <breckenridgej...> mailto:<breckenridgej...>
if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions.

Thank you.

Jody Breckenridge, in the foothills northeast of Monroe WA, Snohomish County




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Date: 7/31/22 4:51 pm
From: Hubbell <ldhubbell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } The Scrape Ceremony
Tweeters,

This week's post shows photos of a Killdeer breeding ceremony. It centers around the nesting site with a focus on the Killdeer tail. I hope you enjoy it.

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2022/07/the-scrape-ceremony.html <https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2022/07/the-scrape-ceremony.html>

Have a great day on Union Bay, where nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net


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Date: 7/31/22 3:44 pm
From: Hank Heiberg <hank.heiberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Ospreys Ready to Fly

> Here is a link to a video taken today of 4 Ospreys that are prepping to leave the nest. Maybe by the time that you watch this video one or more of them will have flown.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/52254515433/in/dateposted/
>
> Hank Heiberg
> Issaquah, WA
>
> Sent from my iPad

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Date: 7/31/22 1:52 pm
From: Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] quasi-pelagic birds in "Skagit"
Jim - It does matter where the sightings are.

If we have accurate locations for birds like puffins, and those sightings
are gathered in a few places, it might mean that there are streams there
with good runs of smelt or herring or salmon. Being able to identify which
streams are producing important fish can help prioritize protection of
those streams.

Or perhaps there are healthy underwater conditions there that support small
and juvenile fish; again it could help in locating important areas for
protection. If a fish farm wanted to construct pens on a site with many
alcids feeding, that would be terrible.

Accurate data is inherently useful. Without it, scientists and
environmentalists have to start from scratch. Without existing data, it
may not be feasible to even investigate a site before approval is given.

= Michael Hobbs

On Sun, Jul 31, 2022 at 1:24 PM <jimbetz...> wrote:

> Gary,
>
> Help me out here. I have always thought that birds couldn't see the
> political boundary lines. And they have these things called "wings".
> Environmentally - in my mind - I don't see a meaningful difference
> between Western Skagit County, Island County, and San Juan County.
> County lines were defined without consideration for the ecological
> environment.
>
> I'm saying that it would seem that eBird checklists should be accepted
> "as is" ... with respect to the -locations- of these 3 areas.
>
> I am not saying that those birds were/were not sighted. I'm just
> saying that challenging them based upon the county lines doesn't make
> sense ... to me.
>
> And I'd like to understand why it matters to you.
>
> The waters of the greater Salish Sea area - from the mainland in
> Skagit County and all the way West to Vancouver Island and all the
> way North to somewhere around the Seymour Narrows (further) are,
> with respect to bird habitats, essentially the same.
> There are many local variations - such as the difference between
> the waters behind Whidbey and those up around Sucia - that are very
> different in terms of birds/wildlife/sea life that are expected
> to be encountered ... and these variations certainly do affect
> what birds are commonly seen in those areas.
> But the likelihood of a puffin in Skagit County waters (or not)
> does not seem to 'fit' with my understanding of why there are any
> puffins in our waters at all/anywhere. Aren't these same puffins
> seen in British Columbia and on both sides of Vancouver Island?
> How do they move from one area to the other without crossing the
> political boundaries?
>
> ****
>
> There are many different skill levels of birders/eBird users/tweeters.
> I don't consider myself to be "highly skilled". At all. And some of
> the eBirders certainly seem pretty casual about their accuracy/lack of.
> So challenging a report based upon the demonstrated skill level of the
> person doing the reporting is certainly valid.
>
> I, for one, take my eBird checklists pretty seriously. I try to not
> over report nor under report. I am careful about location. I am
> careful about the time of the checklist. Mostly I submit checklists
> "as I go/when I'm birding" - but, sometimes, I do a checklist quite
> some time later.
> I am NOT a "life lister" and I do not "seek out rare or uncommon
> birds". I'm perfectly happy just reporting what I do see.
>
> Having said all of the above - there was one time when I reported
> a bird at Ship and eBird challenged it ... even though it had been
> reported by several others on the same day and both before and
> after my checklist ... and on the days prior and following. To be
> perfectly honest that made me question eBird's handling of "uncommon"
> (it was not rare). My report was only accepted after I'd updated my
> checklist with a photo.
> I don't think that should have been required.
>
> So, this got long winded ... I don't think "which County" should be
> a concern.
> - Jim in Burlington
>
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Date: 7/31/22 1:29 pm
From: <jimbetz...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] quasi-pelagic birds in "Skagit"
Gary,

Help me out here. I have always thought that birds couldn't see the
political boundary lines. And they have these things called "wings".
Environmentally - in my mind - I don't see a meaningful difference
between Western Skagit County, Island County, and San Juan County.
County lines were defined without consideration for the ecological
environment.

I'm saying that it would seem that eBird checklists should be accepted
"as is" ... with respect to the -locations- of these 3 areas.

I am not saying that those birds were/were not sighted. I'm just
saying that challenging them based upon the county lines doesn't make
sense ... to me.

And I'd like to understand why it matters to you.

The waters of the greater Salish Sea area - from the mainland in
Skagit County and all the way West to Vancouver Island and all the
way North to somewhere around the Seymour Narrows (further) are,
with respect to bird habitats, essentially the same.
There are many local variations - such as the difference between
the waters behind Whidbey and those up around Sucia - that are very
different in terms of birds/wildlife/sea life that are expected
to be encountered ... and these variations certainly do affect
what birds are commonly seen in those areas.
But the likelihood of a puffin in Skagit County waters (or not)
does not seem to 'fit' with my understanding of why there are any
puffins in our waters at all/anywhere. Aren't these same puffins
seen in British Columbia and on both sides of Vancouver Island?
How do they move from one area to the other without crossing the
political boundaries?

****

There are many different skill levels of birders/eBird users/tweeters.
I don't consider myself to be "highly skilled". At all. And some of
the eBirders certainly seem pretty casual about their accuracy/lack of.
So challenging a report based upon the demonstrated skill level of the
person doing the reporting is certainly valid.

I, for one, take my eBird checklists pretty seriously. I try to not
over report nor under report. I am careful about location. I am
careful about the time of the checklist. Mostly I submit checklists
"as I go/when I'm birding" - but, sometimes, I do a checklist quite
some time later.
I am NOT a "life lister" and I do not "seek out rare or uncommon
birds". I'm perfectly happy just reporting what I do see.

Having said all of the above - there was one time when I reported
a bird at Ship and eBird challenged it ... even though it had been
reported by several others on the same day and both before and
after my checklist ... and on the days prior and following. To be
perfectly honest that made me question eBird's handling of "uncommon"
(it was not rare). My report was only accepted after I'd updated my
checklist with a photo.
I don't think that should have been required.

So, this got long winded ... I don't think "which County" should be
a concern.
- Jim in Burlington

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Date: 7/31/22 12:22 pm
From: Eric Ellingson <esellingson...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Coot, Pied-billed Grebe & Ruddy Duck chicks - Winthrop
It was a real treat last week to see a first-ever viewing of Pied-billed
Grebe & Ruddy Duck chicks. Also, present on the pond at Pearrygin Lake
State Park were American Coots with chicks.

https://flic.kr/p/2nB2G7c Grebe with chicks.

Not far away, on the way up to Hart's Pass, just pass Dead Horse Gulch is a
mineral lick that attracts Mountain Goats. Passing that way a few times I
saw anywhere from 0 - 15. From large adults to young.
https://flic.kr/p/2nAQyWf

Full photo album here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ericellingson/
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/ericellingson/>

--
Eric Ellingson
<esellingson...>
360-820-6396

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Date: 7/31/22 9:48 am
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] quasi-pelagic birds in "Skagit"
​Dear Tweeters,

This message will probably not reach the people who ought to see it, but here goes.

There are eBird reports coming in for seabirds observed in Skagit County. I suspect that most if not all of these quasi-pelagic rarity alerts that I am seeing are the result of birders on "puffin cruises" out to Smith and Minor Islands. They might be from birders in kayaks or small boats as well. Smith and Minor Islands are in Island County, quite far away from the Skagit County line.

The recent Tufted and Horned Puffins are, I believe, being seen in the kelp beds near these two islands. That is the reliable spot where the birds have been seen dating back to the 1980's. Over the years, the birds have also been seen in the waters of San Juan County.

There have been very, very few authentic sightings of puffins of any kind in Skagit County. In fact, on eBird, there is just one accepted sighting of the Tufted Puffin. In addition, a couple of friends of mine saw Tufted Puffins on two occasions at Williamson's Rocks (Skagit County), but my friends don't put their sightings on eBird. That makes three TUPU sightings, all time. Meanwhile, there are only two accepted sightings of Horned Puffins in Skagit County, all time.

One recent eBird checklist had the location as "Skagit County," but the push-pin ended up near Guemes and Cypress Islands. Another checklist was located simply as "Skagit County," with the push-pin placed by the northeast corner of Burrows Island, barely off the shoreline of Skyline in Anacortes. I suppose it is possible that the rare seabirds included on these checklists might have occurred at those locations, but it is very unlikely.

I believe that birders are just putting their eBird push-pin in whatever spot they happen to be in when they click the phone, rather than using the existing hotspots. There are separate eBird hotspots for both Smith and Minor Islands. Those would be good choices for birders on those cruises.

The late Wayne Weber used to put his sightings out there in a "private hotspot" called Smith and Minor Islands, presumably because he felt that it would be trivial to make separate lists of observations for two islets so close together. That is exactly the same way that I have always done my checklists out there. I have always harrumphed about the proliferation of hotspots into micro-sites that require numerous separate lists of birds every two hundred meters or so!

I am guessing that the birders who are misplacing these pushpins might be from out of the area, or perhaps casual birders who don't take the time to locate things with requisite precision. I wish the puffin boat(s) had a placard attached to the mizzenmast, showing which hotspots to use!

Oh, well, pretty soon I won't be dealing with puffin alerts--they are not found in Chautauqua County, New York!

Yours truly,

Gary Bletsch

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Date: 7/30/22 6:09 pm
From: Dayna yalowicki <dlwicki...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Bird ID
Well, many many of my birds are UILLB or Little Brown Jobs, but I have positively ID’s this one as a Bewick’s Wren! Someone suggested a BW so I listened online and it was an exact match. I don’t know why I didn’t think of it myself 🤦‍♀️. Thanks for your reply :)

Buy Free Range

On Jul 30, 2022, at 4:06 PM, <dgrainger...> wrote:


Perhaps a Junco danger-warning call. Otherwise, given what you wrote it is UILBB

Unidentified Little Brown Bird

On 2022-07-28 21:45, Dayna yalowicki wrote:
> I walked into my back yard this evening and heard a bird I’ve heard
> before (not often) but this time it’s call sounded quite urgent. I
> watched it flit from branch on a vine maple but it was dusk and I
> could not see it well. He stands out because he is small, about the
> size of a wren and sounds a bit like a chicken and a bit like a duck,
> with a loud, rapid cluck, cluck, cluck the whole time he was moving
> around. He just looked brown in the low light so I can’t help with
> appearance. Any ideas?
> Buy Free Range
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Date: 7/30/22 11:36 am
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Ecuador Day 4 Blog Post - Refugio Paz de las Aves
It was a great day - another one with the visit to Angel Paz's Refuge with a Cock of the Rock Lek and "tame" Antpittas being the highlight.
https://blairbirding.com/2022/07/30/ecuador-day-4-refugio-paz-and-more-mindo/




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Date: 7/30/22 9:42 am
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] California Gull Migration
Hello Tweets,
Gary's post reminded me of an experience I'd wanted to share from a
few weeks ago. Like Gary, I've often enjoyed flocks of California
gulls heading west over my home in July. I've always assumed these are
birds dispersing west to marine waters after they breed east of the
mountains, but I'd always been curious what this migration actually
looked like in the Cascades. On July 10th I was in Leavenworth eating
lunch with my family when my wife pointed out a large group of
circling birds over the river. It was, in fact, a group of over 100
California Gulls. They circled for a bit, gaining altitude, before
moving upriver and disappearing up Tumwater Canyon towards Steven's
Pass.

Josh Adams
Cathcart, WA
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Date: 7/29/22 7:41 pm
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] California Gulls in the Skagit Valley
Dear Tweeters,
This evening, the 29th of July, ten California Gulls flew over my house, heading west. The location is near Lyman in Skagit County. There were six adults and four juveniles. 
This species does this every summer. In springtime, March and April, I've seen them flying eastwards at least 5 times. In May, June, July, August, and September, every sighting has involved westbound birds. The great preponderance of sightings have come in July. It is easier to find them in summer as they head west, than in spring, as they fly east. It has always been one of the highlights of my summers to see these birds flying up and down the valley! 
Also of note the last few days have been flocks of Rough-winged Swallows. Yesterday I saw a flock in Hamilton. Today, there were at least ten at Cockreham Island. Later three flew over my house, possibly from the Cockreham Island flock. My guess is that most of the Rough-wings around here have finished breeding, and they are starting to migrate.
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch




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Date: 7/29/22 11:58 am
From: Michelle Landis <asmalllife...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Nighthawk
Are you sure it wasn't a Goshawk?

On Thu, Jul 28, 2022, 8:23 PM Nelson Briefer <nreiferb...> wrote:

> 1 Nighthawk over Anacortes, Saint Mary’s Church, at 8 in evening, hunting
> at about 1,000 feet altitude. Nelson Briefer- Anacortes.
> _______________________________________________
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Date: 7/29/22 11:01 am
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Westport Seabirds July 27 pelagic trip report
Hi Tweeters,

Experience has shown that the cure for the common heat wave is to go
coastal and beyond. With that in mind and expectations of pelagic wildlife
at the forefront, we gathered on the *Monte Carlo* in Westport for what
would prove to be a great day at sea. Briefings completed, we headed out
of the inner harbor under a flock of Marbled Godwits overhead and Pigeon
Guillemots (24) leading the way.

The fickle fingers of fog which seem to appear when it's very hot inland
were trying their best to form but never materialized enough to adversely
affect viewing so we were able to see what lay ahead. Large flocks of
Common Murres (881) were great to see as were Rhinoceros Auklets (69) and
Sooty Shearwaters (707).

The first highlight of the day cut the surface of the water for all to see
- a pod of 7 Orca(!), probably of the transient population which travels
along the Pacific Coast. The pod included one very young one - maybe a
first year Orca! Many photos were taken and instructions circulated to
send the photos to Orca researchers to determine their lineage and to add
them to the library of Orca photos. We motored onwards but not without a
brief stop for a Humpback Whale (3) and to view Red Phalaropes (78), some
showing quite a bit of rusty plumage. A far off South Polar Skua (6) was a
portent of things to come and a pair of fast moving sleek Dall's Porpoises
(9) raced in front of our bow.

We approached the shrimp fleet that had set their nets but were not yet
hauling them in so the Pink-footed (203), Sooty (707), and surprisingly
numerous Short-tailed Shearwaters (84) were mostly on the water waiting for
their meals to eventually be brought to the surface. We estimated that the
dark shearwaters were split 2/3 Sooty and 1/3 Short-tailed. Those of you
who were on Westport Seabirds trips last season might recognize this as a
repeat of the standout performance of Short-tailed Shearwaters.
Ordinarily, they should be in the Beaufort Sea right now so their
appearance off Washington in this quantity this early is great for birders
but probably doesn't bode well for the shearwaters. Hunger may have caused
their departure from Alaskan waters. Ordinarily, we might see a couple on
a late July trip. Black-footed Albatross (53) and Northern Fulmar (79)
rounded out the tubenose show which afforded excellent comparisons of size,
flight style, and plumage. Maybe the most unusual bird at the shrimp fleet
was a very fresh first cycle Heermann's Gull. This is a species that
usually doesn't wander more than a mile or so off shore so to see one, a
first cycle no less, at about 26 miles out was truly unusual. A variety of
California and Western/Glaucous-winged/gull soup gulls rounded out the show.

Our foray into the deep water off the edge of the Continental Shelf netted
our goal of Leach's Storm-Petrel (24) and a few Fork-tailed Storm-Petrels
(15) but the lack of a good breeze prevented our chum spot from attracting
very many birds. A beautiful adult Tufted Puffin (2) flew by close to the
delight of all but it didn't stop for a prolonged visit. A few Blue Sharks
(37) circled the boat while several Sabine's Gulls flew overhead. We
decided to return to the shelf. That's when things started to pop! A
flock of Sabine's Gulls (8) on the water included one first year bird.
Soon after, someone spied a bird on a log which turned out to be an
alternate plumaged Arctic Tern (1) - a great bird to see well. Then the
jaeger dam broke.

On our trip out, our only jaegers were very distant and unsatisfactory.
Now the fun was upped to another level. First a flock of 3 Long-tailed
Jaegers (12) were seen which was great but they didn't come close enough
for good photos. Then, the call of incoming jaeger had us looking upwards
and 1 Long-tailed Jaeger overhead turned into 2, then 3 then 4 then 5!
Many pixels were spent solidifying these memories. Not to be outdone, a
few Parasitic Jaegers (5) were also in the area. Finally, the seminal call
of "South Polar Skua" (6) was heard and we watched as it flew by - very
much the flying tank that separates it from all other species in the
marine realm. We were on the cusp of the skua slam which made the two
Pomarine Jaegers (1-2) seen a bit later even more appreciated. A few
jaegers were too distant to be identified (5). Not to be outdone, we
circled an adult Tufted Puffin on the water, more pixels being spent to
cement another memory.

Our trip back to shore had us motoring through mixed phalarope flocks with
a chance to compare Red-necked Phalarope (43) to Red Phalarope (78). A
surprising number of Mola Molas (8) were seen - all of them on the larger
side of the size spectrum. A Northern Elephant Seal corked on the water
for most to see and a Northern Fur Seal waved at us for a bit before
submerging. Diminutive Cassin's Auklets (33) were present but in a limited
quantity. Within about 5 miles of the jetties, we found a group of Gray
Whales (8) in an area where we've encountered them in previous years. A
few channel markers were draped with Steller's Sea Lions (4). The south
jetty held both Wandering Tattler (3) and Surfbird (1) as well as all three
cormorants (Double-crested - 8, Pelagic - 24, Brandt's - 92) and Brown
Pelicans (142). The inner harbor added Black Turnstone (4) and a view of
the growing flock of Marbled Godwits (157) and Whimbrel (5) on one of the
floats. As always, our return was noted by the watchful eyes of the
Harbour Seals.

Westport Seabirds thanks all of the enthusiastic participants who make
these trips a success. Also, accolades to Phil and Chris Anderson whose
professional, courteous, and friendly persona make everyone feel at ease.
Thanks also to our guides today who were Bill "hey, there's another South
Polar Skua" Shelmerdine, Bill Tweit, and yours truly. Bill Tweit is a
wealth of Washington marine life knowledge and I always feel privileged to
be on a boat with him.

Even though the Westport Seabirds schedule (
http://westportseabirds.com/2022-schedule/) shows all trips as full, it's
always a good idea to get on a waitlist and hope.

I hope to see you onboard!

Jim Danzenbaker for Westport Seabirds.
--
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
<jdanzenbaker...>

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Date: 7/29/22 10:15 am
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Blog Post - Day 3 in Ecuador - Mindo Area
https://blairbirding.com/2022/07/29/western-andes-day-2-rio-silanche-and-milpe-sanctuary/


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Date: 7/29/22 10:11 am
From: Kellie Sagen <kelliekvinne...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Eide Rd Pelicans
Nevermind, they just took off. My count was low due to not being able to see all of them in the group. When they took off it was a much more substantial flock than I thought. Looked to be between 85 and 95.

Best,
Kellie Sagen
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Date: 7/29/22 9:42 am
From: Kellie Sagen <kelliekvinne...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Eide Rd Pelicans
Hi Tweets,

There is a large flock of about 50 American White pelicans at Eide Rd/Leque Island right now. I have been watching them for over an hour. Easy viewing without binoculars from the parking lot and trail. Never seen them here before! Pretty cool.

Happy Birding!

Kellie Sagen
Lake Stevens, WA
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Date: 7/29/22 9:03 am
From: Brian Zinke <zinke.pilchuck...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Swifts Night Out in Monroe returns August 20th
Hi Tweets,

After a two-year hiatus due to the pandemic, we’re excited to be hosting
the annual Swifts Night Out event in Monroe in person again on August 20th.
From 4pm until dusk, nature lovers, community groups, families, and anyone
with an interest in the spectacular can enjoy an evening on the lawn to
watch the Vaux’s Swifts descend into their evening chimney roost at the
school. While waiting for the swifts to appear around sunset, there will be
children’s activities, vendor booths, and a presentation available in the
Wagner Center Auditorium.

For more information please visit our Swifts Night Out webpage:
https://www.pilchuckaudubon.org/swifts-night-out

Or RSVP/share the event on Facebook: https://fb.me/e/tCtWi4FBl

We hope to see you there!
Brian

--
[image: Logo] <https://www.pilchuckaudubon.org/>
Brian Zinke
Executive Director
phone: (425) 232-6811
email: <director...>
Pilchuck Audubon Society
1429 Avenue D, PMB 198, Snohomish, WA 98290
[image: Facebook icon] <https://www.facebook.com/pilchuckaudubon> [image:
Twitter icon] <https://twitter.com/PilchuckAudubon> [image: Instagram icon]
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Date: 7/28/22 9:51 pm
From: Dayna yalowicki <dlwicki...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Apologies
Sorry, forgot to include my name and location for that bird ID.

Dayna Yalowicki
Bothell

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Date: 7/28/22 9:49 pm
From: Dayna yalowicki <dlwicki...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bird ID
I walked into my back yard this evening and heard a bird I’ve heard before (not often) but this time it’s call sounded quite urgent. I watched it flit from branch on a vine maple but it was dusk and I could not see it well. He stands out because he is small, about the size of a wren and sounds a bit like a chicken and a bit like a duck, with a loud, rapid cluck, cluck, cluck the whole time he was moving around. He just looked brown in the low light so I can’t help with appearance. Any ideas?

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Date: 7/28/22 8:26 pm
From: Nelson Briefer <nreiferb...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Nighthawk
1 Nighthawk over Anacortes, Saint Mary’s Church, at 8 in evening, hunting
at about 1,000 feet altitude. Nelson Briefer- Anacortes.

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Date: 7/28/22 3:52 pm
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Manx Shearwater book recommendation + BC nesting?
While I cannot speak much on Manx Shearwaters breeding in Alaska or
BC, I'd bet a significant amount of money that this species breeds in
Washington (assuming it hasn't already been confirmed?). For years
they were seen fairly reliably near areas that supported breeding
seabirds on the central Washington coast. In more recent years, a
number of sightings in Puget Sound during the summer months were
certainly interesting. Sightings the last two summers near Protection
and Smith islands (both also full of breeding seabirds) may indicate
that they're breeding on those islands as well and the Puget Sound
birds are just wanderers from those colonies.


Josh Adams
Cathcart, WA
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Date: 7/28/22 2:30 pm
From: Zora Monster <zoramon...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] dead bird reporting -
I just used that site today to report a dead Canada goose I found on the beach at Discovery Park. The bird had no visible signs of trauma, so I assumed avian flu.

Zora Dermer
Seattle

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 28, 2022, at 2:07 PM, Martha Jordan <mj.cygnus...> wrote:
>
> 
> The sad fact is that avian influenza is here and seems to be just about everywhere.
> Wildlife rehabilitators are reporting this in the birds they are taking in from people -- song birds, waterfowl, waterbirds, raptors, owls,.... Testing is being done.
> David Armstrong is correct: DO NOT TOUCH or attempt to retrieve dead birds you find. If in your yard, put on gloves, scoop into a baggie and put it in the garbage. Do not bury it as if another animal digs it up, that can spread if the bird died of AI. Do not put them in your freezer or take them to a museum unless you are sure how they died. Again, this is a highly transmissible disease.
> That said, here is where WDFW recommends you can report dead birds you find:
> Report online using this link: https://survey123.arcgis.com/share/a384e90f69744f2e846135a9ce80027f.
> Alternatively, people can email <teammillcreek...> or call 360-902-2936
>
> Thank you for reporting.
>
> Martha Jordan
> Everett, WA
>
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Date: 7/28/22 2:17 pm
From: Martha Jordan <mj.cygnus...>
Subject: [Tweeters] dead bird reporting -
The sad fact is that avian influenza is here and seems to be just about
everywhere.
Wildlife rehabilitators are reporting this in the birds they are taking in
from people -- song birds, waterfowl, waterbirds, raptors, owls,....
Testing is being done.
David Armstrong is correct: DO NOT TOUCH or attempt to retrieve dead
birds you find. If in your yard, put on gloves, scoop into a baggie and put
it in the garbage. Do not bury it as if another animal digs it up, that can
spread if the bird died of AI. Do not put them in your freezer or take
them to a museum unless you are sure how they died. Again, this is a
highly transmissible disease.
That said, here is where WDFW recommends you can report dead birds you
find:
Report online using this link:
https://survey123.arcgis.com/share/a384e90f69744f2e846135a9ce80027f.
Alternatively, people can email <teammillcreek...> or call
360-902-2936

Thank you for reporting.

Martha Jordan
Everett, WA

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Date: 7/28/22 1:20 pm
From: BRAD Liljequist <bradliljequist...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Manx Shearwater book recommendation + BC nesting?
Hi Tweeters,

I highly recommend Roger Morgan-Grenville's Shearwater, a personal account and memoir of his investigations of the Manx Shearwater. Bought it at Phinney Books. I could not recommend it more highly - very readable, moving, well written, vulnerable. Terrific summer book - best in many years.

He very briefly mentions in passing the possibility of the Manx Shearwater nesting in BC/Alaska...don't know exactly what that is based on - but he has been interacting with academic experts on the bird, so who knows.

Now I want to see a Manxie here!!! Did see tons of them in the Minch a decade ago, they are neat birds!

Brad Liljequist
Phinney Ridge
Seattled


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Date: 7/28/22 1:15 pm
From: Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] The Birdbooker Report
HI ALL:
I posted about 5 bird and 2 non-bird books at my blog here:

https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/2022/07/new-titles.html

sincerely
Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/
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Date: 7/28/22 12:39 pm
From: Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2022-07-28
Tweets - It was sunny, hot, and quiet at the park this morning. 64 degrees
at the start, but pretty quickly into the mid-70s and maybe higher.
Remarkably free of ...

Highlights:

- Gadwall - at least one male in the slough, but tough ID in eclipse
plumage time
- Great Blue Heron - heard at least one juvenile on the nests still, but
very few (<10) GBHE total
- Green Heron - one juvenile just above the weir
- Barn Owl - Matt had one pre-dawn at the south end of the East Meadow
- Hairy Woodpecker - adult male at start of boardwalk
- Black-throated Gray Warbler - probably two, probably both juveniles,
across the slough from the Rowing Club dock
- Black-headed Grosbeak - one at east end of boardwalk. Had none last
week

Several juvenile BROWN-HEADED COWBIRDS being fed; towhee, song sparrow, and
junco may all have been subjected to this chore.

Very few swallows around (fewer than 15 birds combined). Our first week of
the summer without Bullock's Oriole, Lazuli Bunting.

Misses included Hooded Merganser, Rock Pigeon, Spotted Sandpiper, and
Violet-green Swallow.

Despite that short list of misses, just 56 species. That's why we call
these the summer doldrums.

= Michael Hobbs
= www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
= <BirdMarymoor...>

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Date: 7/28/22 12:36 pm
From: Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2022-07-28
Tweets - It was sunny, hot, and quiet at the park this morning. 64 degrees
at the start, but pretty quickly into the mid-70s and maybe higher.
Remarkably free of ...

Highlights:

- Gadwall - at least one male in the slough, but tough ID in eclipse
plumage time
- Great Blue Heron - heard at least one juvenile on the nests still, but
very few (<10) GBHE total
- Green Heron - one juvenile just above the weir
- Barn Owl - Matt had one pre-dawn at the south end of the East Meadow
- Hairy Woodpecker - adult male at start of boardwalk
- Black-throated Gray Warbler - probably two, probably both juveniles,
across the slough from the Rowing Club dock
- Black-headed Grosbeak - one at east end of boardwalk. Had none last
week

Several juvenile BROWN-HEADED COWBIRDS being fed; towhee, song sparrow, and
junco may all have been subjected to this chore.

Very few swallows around (fewer than 15 birds combined). Our first week of
the summer without Bullock's Oriole, Lazuli Bunting.

Misses included Hooded Merganser, Rock Pigeon, Spotted Sandpiper, and
Violet-green Swallow.

Despite that short list of misses, just 56 species. That's why we call
these the summer doldrums.

= Michael Hobbs
= www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
= <BirdMarymoor...>

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Date: 7/28/22 11:21 am
From: Steve Hampton <stevechampton...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Short-tailed Shearwater from Pt Wilson
This morning's seawatch at Pt Wilson, Port Townsend, produced a
SHORT-TAILED SHEARWATER at 9:45am, heading north from Puget Sound into the
Strait of Juan de Fuca.

Yesterday's Westport pelagic trip (which I presume you'll hear more about)
produced what I think was record numbers for the time of year, suggesting
another incursion of this species.

Full list and details here: https://ebird.org/checklist/S115915099

good birding,

--
Steve Hampton
Port Townsend, WA (qatáy)

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Date: 7/28/22 10:25 am
From: Ed Newbold <ednewbold1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Congratulations to Brian and Darchelle on Manx Shearwater


Hi all,
Between ramping up for a trip and having our power out due to electrical storms, Delia and I completely missed the news that Brian Pendleton and Darchelle Worley found and got photos of a Manx Shearwater on the Edmonds Ferry. 
Here is the ebird report:

eBird Checklist - 23 Jul 2022 - Edmonds-Kingston Ferry (Kitsap Co.) - 7 species


Brian's ebird report encapsulated the highs and lows of birdings all in a siingle sighting, as they initially thought Darchelle's photos had failed to find the bird and in lieu of them and had at first decided not to report it.
Having been birding in Washington state casually for the last 45 years, Manx Shearwater must be the resident bird that I've heard the least about, know the least about, have never seen, and now it is suddenly at the top of my wish list. Until this decade I had only ever heard of it being seen on pelagic trips, and I assumed, of course, that those birds were strays with an Irish or English accent.

Everyone should be aware of the amazing, heartbreaking efforts Brian and Darchelle go through to see birds and what an incredible, high-functioning pair they are. Thank you Brian and Darchelle for all you have done for birding and all you have taught me--and Delia--about how to live life.

Thanks all,
Ed Newbold





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Date: 7/28/22 10:25 am
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Ecuador Blog Post - First Day in the Western Andes
This blog post covers our afternoon birding at Puembo Birding Garden and then day 1 of our trip into the Western Andes of Ecuador birding at Yanacocha, along the Ecoruta and at Alambi reserve arriving at Sachatamia Lodge.
https://blairbirding.com/2022/07/28/ecuador-june-2022-our-start-at-puembo-birding-garden-and-day-1-on-the-western-slope-of-the-andes/






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Date: 7/27/22 5:21 pm
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Billy Frank Jr Nisqually NWR, Wednesday Walk, for July 27, 2022
Hi Tweets,

approximately 20 of us had a warm morning at the Refuge with temperatures
in the 60's to 80's degrees Fahrenheit. There was a Low -1.3ft Tide at
11:43am. Highlights included WOOD DUCK chicks in the Visitor Center Pond,
WILSON'S WARBLER and BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER along the west side of the
Twin Barns Loop Trail, PEREGRINE FALCON fly over at the Twin Barns, and
both GREATER YELLOWLEGS and LESSER YELLOWLEGS in the freshwater marsh along
the Nisqually Estuary Trail.

Starting out at 8am at the Visitor Center Pond Overlook, we had nice views
of the WOOD DUCK ducklings with hen in the pond. COMMON YELLOWTHROAT
WARBLER foraged along the edge of the pond. Both BARN SWALLOW and AMERICAN
ROBIN continue to nest in the breezeway.

The Orchard was good for PURPLE FINCH, YELLOW WARBLER, SWAINSON'S THRUSH,
CEDAR WAXWING, WESTERN WOOD-PEWEE, and MOURNING DOVE. Some observed
juvenile RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD and juvenile BEWICKS WREN. Both WARBLING VIREO
and BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK were heard. We had very nice looks at
BAND-TAILED PIGEON, including first year birds.

Along the Access Road, we had nice looks of WILLOW FLYCATCHER . TREE
SWALLOW were seen mixed in with numerous Barn Swallows.

The west side of the Twin Barns Loop Trail was great for juvenile birds and
migrating warblers. We had great observations of young YELLOW WARBLER,
SWAINSON'S THRUSH, WILLOW FLYCATCHER, ANNA'S HUMMINGBIRD and AMERICAN
GOLDFINCH. It was nice to see the return of WILSON'S WARBLER and
BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER migrating through.

The Twin Barns Overlook had a nice fly over of BELTED KINGFISHER and a
young PEREGRINE FALCON. A few VIOLET GREEN SWALLOWS were seen mixed in
with other swallows. BROWN CREEPERs were observed in the Oregon Ash and
Big-leaf Maple around the picnic tables.

Out on the new dike or Nisqually Estuary Trail we picked up our waterfowl
including HOODED MERGANSER, AMERICAN WIGEON, GREEN-WINGED TEAL and AMERICAN
COOT in additional to our expected MALLARD and CANADA GOOSE. There were
good numbers of GREATER YELLOWLEGS in the freshwater marsh and estuary
channels. For those that birded the dike before 8am, a single LESSER
YELLOWLEGS was seen with the GRYE. Approximately 400 peeps covered the
mudflats at 7am, including WESTERN SANDPIPER, LEAST SANDPIPER, and
SEMIPALMATED PLOVER. During the later morning, early afternoon we had nice
flyovers of OSPREY and BALD EAGLE. There were good numbers of GREAT BLUE
HERON foraging the estuary channels. MARSH WREN and VIRGINIA RAIL were
heard in the freshwater marsh.

Most of us turned around at the Observation Tower, a few brave souls walked
the Nisqually Estuary Boardwalk Trail from the Observation Tower to
McAllister Creek Observation Platform, picking up RING-BILLED GULL,
CALIFORNIA GULL, GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL, CASPIAN TERN, DOUBLE-CRESTED
CORMORANT and NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW.

On our return, we heard at least two PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHERS along the
east side of the Twin Barns Loop Trail, and there were good numbers of
WESTERN WOOD-PEWEEs calling and foraging.

For the day we had 68 species observed, and have 157 species for the year.
Mammals seen included Eastern Cotton-tailed Rabbit, Columbian Black-tailed
Deer, and Eastern Gray Squirrel.

Until next week, happy birding,
Shep


--
Shep Thorp
Browns Point
253-370-3742

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Date: 7/27/22 12:28 pm
From: Ed Newbold <ednewbold1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] I'm Richard Gere! It's Days of Heaven! Monsoon time in the SW
Hi all, 
OK, OK, the similarity to Richard Gere is related to the ultimate bad events that engulfed his character's future, not his physical appearance.
Even as our Earth and the Nature and the Creatures it holds face ever more dire threats, there can still be moments of boundless thrill at what still exists.
Delia and I drove out of Tucson in some despair. There the monsoon is failing. We began our journey to our base in the Southwest in the Bootheel of New Mexico on this bad note.
Instead of our usual route straight to St. David for a glimpse of Mississippi Kites and then to Cochise Lake in Willcox, we opted this time to detour straight south to Patagonia and then head back through Willcox and forego the productive Cochise Lake.
Not far out of Tucson the land started taking a wonderful turn toward the lush. By the time we got to Patagonia we were enthralled, we hadn't realized how rich the habitat was down there--Sonoran Desert compared to more Chihuahuan Desert of the Bootheel. At the Paton Hummingbird Center right in town we were surrounded by birds and bird song, happy to see Violet-crowned Hummers among many others, and drowned in bird song.
Next we headed for the roadside pulloff that was hosting nesting Rose-throated Becards, but made a wrong turn and photographed a Varied Bunting. Then we stopped a mile short of the pulloff, not sure where it was, and found an obliging Thick-billed Kingbird. Finally we found the right place and got a hundred shots of a Becard that are diagnostic but that's the only good thing you could say about them.
That night we stayed in town, Patagonia, at the Stagestop Inn. The guy who owns it turns out to be from Seattle. Birders should support Hoteliers who support Barn Swallows and refuse to support those who don't. We estimate over 60 Barn Swallows were relying on the Stagestop Inn for housing, building supplies, and Main-Partying-Spot. It reminded me of Old Seattle, now nearly devoid of its once-myriad Swallows.
The next morning we took the birding trail at Patagonia Lake State Park and were enchanted. "Singing" Chats surrounded us, along with Cardinals, Yellow and Lucy's Warblers and Yellowthroat, Bell's Vireos, Summer Tanagers and many others. We picked up Neotropic Cormorant, Green Heron, Painted Bunting and Common Ground-Dove and had a wonderful time, reminding us of the memorably birdy moments in our lives, like for me the time I went to the South Carolina coast in 1967.
Back in town we looked at all the trails we could take without leaving Patagonia. As we ate lunch in a picnic table in the town square we were thrilled to have two Mississippi Kites lazing high above us, our best view of Mississippi Kites ever in Arizona. And a Gray Hawk working the town square in this absurdly beautiful town.
On the drive on Route 10, Delia faced bare-knuckle driving conditions with rain so heavy it made it hard to see the traffic lanes. I-10 is known for it's semi truck densities.. Whenever we pass through Benson on I-10, we always pray for water in the San Pedro. Usually we are greeted instead with ORV tracks in dry dirt. But yesterday it was bank-to-bank and flowing like a Class 2 river.
As we headed up the canyon in the Peloncillo Mountains of New Mexico, we had to negotiate big puddles on the road. A Hepatic Tanager greeted us as we drove up to the house. Our first night, last night, it rained heavily for about an hour. We don't know whither the monsoon from here on out, this year or next, but there are clouds everywhere today and a breeze. The Agaves are blooming and we got a nice shot of our local specialty bird the Lucifer's Hummingbird.

It's Days of Heaven. Don't tell me about what's coming.


Cheers,
Ed Newbold, from down in the NM Bootheel with Delia Scholes.









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Date: 7/27/22 12:22 pm
From: David A. Armstrong <davearm...>
Subject: [Tweeters] dead white pelicans, Deer Lagoon
Whidbey Audubon has posted notices at entrance to Deer Lagoon trail that 3
dead white pelicans have been spotted on the freshwater side of Deer
Lagoon. WA Dept Fish and Wildlife has collected one bird that is being
tested for avian influenza (AI). They caution that no one should retrieve
or touch the dead birds. They are far off on a small mud bar, so unlikely
that people can approach them. Otherwise there were 100+ pelicans today
several 100s yards away from the dead birds.
Whidbey Audubon's alert also says that a dead trumpeter swan found in
wetlands on the south end of the island at Cultus Bay and French Rds tested
positive for AI.
david armstrong

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Date: 7/26/22 3:13 pm
From: Edward Pullen <edwardpullen...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Nice photos of the Nazca Booby
Matt Stolmeier is a boat captain of a whale watching boat out of Anacortes.
He is the nephew of my partner Marian, and posted these photos to
Facebook. The best I've seen of the booby being seen in the Puget Sound
recently.
https://www.facebook.com/mstolmeier/posts/pfbid0nwPLUbKEXoquwDuJZmcj3s1rhq4JvXkX45uJFt2hMEyiRxp3yWv8B6TQi1sUR4sxl


--
Ed Pullen
Listen to my podcast at The Bird Banter Podcast
<https://birdbanter.podbean.com/e/the-bird-banter-podcast-episode-2-with-ken-brown/>
available
on iTunes podcast store and other feeds.

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Date: 7/26/22 8:56 am
From: Zora Monster <zoramon...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Spotted sandpipers
Spotted: three spotted sandpipers at discovery north beach near the north beach trail. Constantly bobbing tails while picking through vegetation on the exposed rocks.

Kind regards,
Zora Dermer
Seattle
Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 7/25/22 10:03 am
From: Dianna Moore <osdlm1945...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Yo-Yo Ma’s avian ensemble
I have to agree!
Dianna Moore
Ocean Shores

On Sun, Jul 24, 2022 at 1:14 PM Marcia Ian <gnudle...> wrote:

> Exquisite!! Many thanks. I would say, though, that he is accompanying the
> birds, not the other way around.
>
> Marcia Ian
> Bellingham
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Date: 7/25/22 3:18 am
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Escape artists: Birds learn to avoid flashy, hard-to-catch butterflies and their lookalikes – Florida Museum Science

https://www.floridamuseum.ufl.edu/science/birds-avoid-hard-to-catch-butterflies-and-lookalikes/


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Date: 7/24/22 5:03 pm
From: Richard James <rich...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Nazca Booby

On 2022-07-24 12:01 p.m., <tweeters-request...> wrote:
> Message: 12

From: Patricia Taylor <pat.mary.taylor...>

> A sub-adult Nazca Booby was photographed south of Trail Iland
> Victoria BC on July 23 in the evening. It soon flew SE at a rapid
> pace. This is likely the same bird seen a few days ago in Pueget
> Sound and maybe heading back in that direction. See details at link
> below.

https://bcbirdalert.blogspot.com/2022/07/rba-nazca-booby-in-victoria-july-23rd.html

Relocated today at Race Rocks W of Victoria @ 4:12pm

--
Richard James
From an Island in the Pacific,
Victoria, BC

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Date: 7/24/22 3:42 pm
From: Claudia Turner <cjmackturner1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Forward: Our Baby Robins are Gone?
I live in Shoreline. After years of seeing fewer robins this has been a big year for them here on our block, including successful fledging. Yesterday I watched 3 fledglings glean the last of our raspberries, parent nearby. It seems like there are fewer crows in our neighborhood the last couple of years, perhaps this is why we’re seeing more babies? I don’t know why there might be fewer as I know alot of folks feed crows.

Claudia Turner
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Date: 7/24/22 1:16 pm
From: Marcia Ian <gnudle...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Yo-Yo Ma’s avian ensemble
Exquisite!! Many thanks. I would say, though, that he is accompanying the birds, not the other way around.

Marcia Ian
Bellingham
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Date: 7/24/22 12:24 pm
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Blog Post - Trip to Ecuador
Last month Cindy and I did a birding trip to Ecuador - great fun and lots of birds.  I have been posting photographs (many!!) on Facebook but have now finally finished one of what I expect to be 4 or 5 blog posts about the trip  The first one is an introduction and overview with chronological posts to follow.  It can be found at   https://blairbirding.com/2022/07/24/ecuador-june-2022-the-adventure-begins/
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Date: 7/24/22 8:50 am
From: Patricia Taylor <pat.mary.taylor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Nazca Booby
A sub-adult Nazca Booby was photographed south of Trail Iland Victoria BC
on July 23 in the evening. It soon flew SE at a rapid pace. This is likely
the same bird seen a few days ago in Pueget Sound and maybe heading back in
that direction. See details at link below.


https://bcbirdalert.blogspot.com/2022/07/rba-nazca-booby-in-victoria-july-23rd.html

Keith Taylor
Victoria BC

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Date: 7/24/22 7:45 am
From: Hank Heiberg <hank.heiberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Nuthatch at hummingbird feeder
I heard a Red-breasted Nuthatch and looked out the window. It was feeding at our hummingbird feeder. Never seen that before.

Hank Heiberg
Issaquah, WA

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Date: 7/24/22 3:55 am
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Common nighthawk and nestlings
Very neat, Lynn.
And no, this is not late for them to nest.
Thank you,
Dan Reiff

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 23, 2022, at 7:14 PM, Lynn Wohlers <wohlers13...> wrote:
>
> 
>
> I stumbled on a Common nighthawk this afternoon on Fidalgo Island (ACFL Sugarloaf area). The presumed female jumped from the nest to a spot about 5 ft away and did a distraction display while hissing at me. I was only 3 ft away when this happened and hadn't seen her. She held her wings out, stayed close to the ground, and hopped around while hissing.
> I felt bad about disturbing her and slowly backed away while taking as many quick photos as I could, including a few of the two nestlings huddled together on the ground. The sighting was a huge surprise since I've never seen one in 4 years of living here - but I don't go out much at night, either.
> ebird wasn't loading properly so I couldn't tell whether there have been recent sightings in Fidalgo - does anyone have information about nighthawks in this area? It also seems late for unfledged nestlings but I'm not knowledgeable about the species.
> (photos on request)
>
> Lynn Wohlers
> Fidalgo Island
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Date: 7/23/22 10:21 pm
From: Steve Hampton <stevechampton...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Our Baby Robins are “gone” …
Interesting observation about crows and juv robins. This is consistent with
research on that topic. I discuss some of it here.

The maddening truth: Feeding crows and jays harms other birds
https://thecottonwoodpost.net/2022/05/02/the-maddening-truth-feeding-crows-and-jays-harms-other-birds/

Here's an excerpt:
Malpass et al (2017) conducted an experiment in seven neighborhoods in
Ohio, adding bird feeders during the breeding season to some areas. The
neighborhoods with the most feeders had triple the numbers of American
Crows and Brown-headed Cowbirds compared to the neighborhoods with the
least feeders. American Robin nest success fell to just 1% in the
high-feeder neighborhoods, compared to 34% in the areas with the fewest
feeders.





On Sat, Jul 23, 2022 at 3:51 PM Dayna yalowicki <dlwicki...> wrote:

> You’re lucky to have baby robins, we have watched crows take them right as
> they fledge or are about to fledge every year for at least 10 years. The
> parents keep building nests under our deck and I swear the same crows come
> back each year and wait. I can see the crows behavior change as the babies
> get close to leaving the nest, they start walking the yard, singly but
> working together, 3 or 4 of them. One year, I had had enough and I was so
> upset about this that I sat close with a pellet gun, prepared to take out
> any crow that threatened the fledglings as they were staggering around
> underneath the nest. In the end, I couldn’t do it. Instead, I began chasing
> them away but they were fierce! One crow actually charged me and wouldn’t
> back down. While I dealt with this, another crow flew off with a baby and
> then another. Made me sick to see it and I had been defeated. So, these
> days, I ignore any nests. What will be will be and ignorance is bliss.
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>


--
​Steve Hampton​
Port Townsend, WA (qatáy)

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Date: 7/23/22 8:17 pm
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Skagit Game Range to be closed for shorebird season
Dear Tweeters,
Today, the 23rd July, at the Skagit Wildlife Management Area's Headquarters Unit, AKA Game Range or Wylie Slough, paper notices were tacked up here and there. They state that the unit will be closed from August 1 through September 30. It is some sort of dike maintenance or alteration project.
When shorebird season gets going, as it soon will, at least the Fir Island Farm Reserve ("Hayton") and Jensen Access will be open, as best I know.
The mud at the Game Range is being filled in with a thick growth of reedy plants now. One hopes that some shorebird habitat will remain.
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch






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Date: 7/23/22 7:18 pm
From: Lynn Wohlers <wohlers13...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Common nighthawk and nestlings
I stumbled on a Common nighthawk this afternoon on Fidalgo Island (ACFL
Sugarloaf area). The presumed female jumped from the nest to a spot about 5
ft away and did a distraction display while hissing at me. I was only 3 ft
away when this happened and hadn't seen her. She held her wings out, stayed
close to the ground, and hopped around while hissing.
I felt bad about disturbing her and slowly backed away while taking as many
quick photos as I could, including a few of the two nestlings huddled
together on the ground. The sighting was a huge surprise since I've never
seen one in 4 years of living here - but I don't go out much at night,
either.
ebird wasn't loading properly so I couldn't tell whether there have been
recent sightings in Fidalgo - does anyone have information about nighthawks
in this area? It also seems late for unfledged nestlings but I'm not
knowledgeable about the species.
(photos on request)

Lynn Wohlers
Fidalgo Island

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Date: 7/23/22 6:38 pm
From: Jenn Jarstad <jennjarstad...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Birds accompany cello
https://aeon.co/videos/yo-yo-ma-performs-a-work-for-cello-in-the-woods-accompanied-by-a-birdsong-chorus?utm_term=Autofeed&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Facebook&fbclid=IwAR3RrDuHCoyXP5YT0atEVivkTuBL59yn4jNsKhAJZlZ4XSo8z9KXJJ1QHBA#Echobox=1658226018

Jenn Jarstad, Seattle

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Date: 7/23/22 4:30 pm
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Birdwatching brings millions of dollars to Alaska: In 2016, nearly 300, 000 birders flocked to the state and spent about $378 million. -- ScienceDaily

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/07/220706165344.htm


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Date: 7/23/22 3:54 pm
From: Dayna yalowicki <dlwicki...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Our Baby Robins are “gone” …
You’re lucky to have baby robins, we have watched crows take them right as they fledge or are about to fledge every year for at least 10 years. The parents keep building nests under our deck and I swear the same crows come back each year and wait. I can see the crows behavior change as the babies get close to leaving the nest, they start walking the yard, singly but working together, 3 or 4 of them. One year, I had had enough and I was so upset about this that I sat close with a pellet gun, prepared to take out any crow that threatened the fledglings as they were staggering around underneath the nest. In the end, I couldn’t do it. Instead, I began chasing them away but they were fierce! One crow actually charged me and wouldn’t back down. While I dealt with this, another crow flew off with a baby and then another. Made me sick to see it and I had been defeated. So, these days, I ignore any nests. What will be will be and ignorance is bliss.



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Date: 7/23/22 3:52 pm
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Not only are bird species going extinct, but they might also lose the features that make each species unique -- ScienceDaily

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/07/220721132013.htm


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Date: 7/23/22 3:49 pm
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Songbird can keep time with the best of them -- ScienceDaily

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/07/220719162122.htm


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Date: 7/23/22 3:33 pm
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Billy Frank Jr Nisqually NWR Wednesday Walk for 7/20/2022
Hi Tweets,
approximately 22 of us had another beautiful day at the Refuge with sunny
skies and temperatures in the 60's to 80's degrees Fahrenheit. A 'low'
High 9.33ft Tide at 12:11pm gave us plenty of water's edge and mud to enjoy
shorebirds. Highlights included a singing RED-EYED VIREO behind the
Education Center and along the east side parking lot, fly by of the
AMERICAN BITTERN in the fields south of the Twin Barns, first of autumn
LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERS in the freshwater marsh, and continuing AMERICAN
WHITE PELICAN in the freshwater marsh and mouth of the Nisqually River. We
also had nice looks of an immature MERLIN hunting swallows over
the freshwater marsh. The morning chorus is petering out, we dipped on
hearing/seeing our Savannah Sparrow breeders, as we approach the summer
doldrums. Plenty of juveniles seen. Mink was seen in the Orchard, and we
have regularly seen Mink and Long-tailed Weasel along the west entrance to
the Twin Barns Loop Trail and between the Twin Barns and Twin Barns
Overlook. See eBird list pasted. We observed 67 species and have seen 157
species this year. Until next week, happy birding!
Shep

Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually NWR, Thurston, Washington, US
Jul 20, 2022 7:41 AM - 4:21 PM
Protocol: Traveling
6.871 mile(s)
Checklist Comments: Wednesday Walk. Sunny skies with temperatures in
the 60’s to 80’s degree Fahrenheit. A High 9.33ft Tide at 12:11pm. Mammals
seen Eastern Cotton-tailed Rabbit, Mink, Columbian Black-tailed Deer,
Muskrat, and Harbor Seal.
67 species (+4 other taxa)

Canada Goose 18
Wood Duck 15
Cinnamon Teal 2
Mallard 30
Hooded Merganser 7
Pied-billed Grebe 2
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 4
Band-tailed Pigeon 8
Eurasian Collared-Dove 1
Mourning Dove 2
Rufous Hummingbird 6
hummingbird sp. 3
Killdeer 3
Least Sandpiper 12
Western Sandpiper 60
Long-billed Dowitcher 2
Greater Yellowlegs 4
Greater/Lesser Yellowlegs 1
Ring-billed Gull 200
California Gull 300
Glaucous-winged Gull 15
Western x Glaucous-winged Gull (hybrid) 2
Larus sp. 200
Caspian Tern 50
Brandt's Cormorant 2
Double-crested Cormorant 300
American White Pelican 20 Previously reported. Five birds seen in
fresh water marsh and fifteen birds seen at mouth of Nisqually River.
American Bittern 1
Great Blue Heron 120
Osprey 1
Bald Eagle 15
Red-tailed Hawk 3
Belted Kingfisher 3
Downy Woodpecker 3
Hairy Woodpecker 1
Northern Flicker 3
Merlin 1
Western Wood-Pewee 9
Willow Flycatcher 8
Pacific-slope Flycatcher 2
Warbling Vireo 4
Red-eyed Vireo 1
Steller's Jay 2
American Crow 9
Black-capped Chickadee 17
Chestnut-backed Chickadee 1
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 2
Purple Martin 4
Tree Swallow 15
Violet-green Swallow 2
Bank Swallow 1
Barn Swallow 30
Cliff Swallow 17
Bushtit 2
Brown Creeper 4
Bewick's Wren 8
European Starling 400
Swainson's Thrush 41
American Robin 20
Cedar Waxwing 50
House Finch 2
Purple Finch 3
Pine Siskin 1
American Goldfinch 18
Song Sparrow 28
Spotted Towhee 2
Red-winged Blackbird 35
Brown-headed Cowbird 50
Common Yellowthroat 10
Yellow Warbler 20
Wilson's Warbler 1

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S115461724

--
Shep Thorp
Browns Point
253-370-3742

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Date: 7/23/22 9:23 am
From: Raphael Fennimore <raphael.fennimore...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Manx Shearwater in Puget Sound, Saturday July 23
Hi Tweetyboppers,

This morning a little after 6am I spotted a Manx Shearwater heading south from Discovery Park, Seattle (King County’s 3rd or 4th record, I believe). I have some poor video and observed it here with Dave Slager.

We haven’t seen the bird come north yet and believe that it’s likely still somewhere in the Sound.

Good birding!

Raphael
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Date: 7/22/22 5:55 pm
From: Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course (GC) monthly bird walk - 7-21-2022
Tweeters,

On Thursday, 7/21, 15 of us traversed the JBLM Eagles Pride GC under wonderful weather conditions (54degF-72degF start to finish) and several astounding (for us) sightings. Highlights include the following:

BULLOCK'S ORIOLE: Two adult birds feeding two juveniles in a willow at the maintenance pond. In May, we reported our first pair of orioles sighted for this walk, and it's likely that the pair nested nearby and at least two young fledged. (We spent about 15 minutes watching the adults coming and going with food - the crops of the young appeared full!) In addition, one of our group spotted four more adult orioles as flyovers.

GREAT HORNED OWL: Steller's Jays were causing a racket along the road and just past the Dupont housing area. Fortunately, Fred had the patience to check the area and sighted the roosting owl; subsequently, one of our group managed to get a scope on it and great looks were had by all.

HOUSE WREN: They're still here and we tallied 6 of them during the trek. At least one nest in the boxes at Hodge Lake had young being fed.

HUTTON'S VIREO: One of the two we scored was extremely vocal although we didn't see it.

NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW: The two we saw at the 13th hole pond were unusual in that we've only seen them at Hodge Lake previously.



Misses include Willow Flycatcher, American Crow, Violet-green Swallow, and any waterfowl except for Pied-billed Grebes.



The JBLM Eagles Pride GC birders meet the third Thursday of each month at 8:00AM. Starting point is Bldg # 1514, Driving Range Tee, Eagles Pride Golf Course, I-5 Exit 116, Mounts Road Exit. Upcoming walks include the following:

* August 18

* September 15

* October 20

Anyone is welcome to join us!



From the eBird PNW checklist:



48 species



Pied-billed Grebe 4 At Hodge Lake - the juveniles were almost as large as adults but with striping still on the head.

Band-tailed Pigeon 3

Mourning Dove 1

Anna's Hummingbird 4

Rufous Hummingbird 2

Red-tailed Hawk 2 One at the 9th hole pond and one at Hodge Lake. The Hodge Lake nest was empty - likely the year's brood has fledged.

Great Horned Owl 1 Along road past Dupont housing area - clued in from Steller's Jay mobbing calls.

Downy Woodpecker 1

Pileated Woodpecker 1

Northern Flicker 7

Western Wood-Pewee 17

Pacific-slope Flycatcher 2

Hutton's Vireo 2

Steller's Jay 4

California Scrub-Jay 1

Common Raven 2

Black-capped Chickadee 4

Chestnut-backed Chickadee 15

Northern Rough-winged Swallow 2 At 13th hole pond.

Tree Swallow 16 At Hodge Lake boxes - can't tell how many nestlings being fed.

Barn Swallow 30

Bushtit 2

Golden-crowned Kinglet 4

Red-breasted Nuthatch 11

Brown Creeper 3

House Wren 6 Unknown number of nestlings at Hodge Lake.

Pacific Wren 1

European Starling 13

Swainson's Thrush 10

American Robin 37

Cedar Waxwing 10

House Finch 1

Purple Finch 2

Pine Siskin 16

American Goldfinch 10

Chipping Sparrow 1

Dark-eyed Junco 16

White-crowned Sparrow 8

Song Sparrow 14

Spotted Towhee 10

Bullock's Oriole 8 Two juveniles and two adults at the Maintenance Pond (photos from Pete and Jerry). Four others seen as flyovers.

Red-winged Blackbird 3

Brown-headed Cowbird 9

Yellow Warbler 6

Yellow-rumped Warbler 1

Wilson's Warbler 3

Western Tanager 11

Black-headed Grosbeak 1



View this checklist online at https://nam12.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS115573526&amp;data=05%7C01%7C%7C561d32e0e8124a3ba6cb08da6c442483%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637941337172592004%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C3000%7C%7C%7C&amp;sdata=88katw7hcfYkkynDCDZJZlQii2Elw%2FuZFsYPIi7AKrQ%3D&amp;reserved=0



May all your birds be identified,
Denis DeSilvis
Avnacrs 4 birds at outlook dot com


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Date: 7/22/22 3:20 pm
From: Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Our Baby Robins are "gone" ....
If you are in an urban area with a lot of crows, they likely ate the baby robin. Though once a prolific breeder in Portland, now few if any are hatched or reach maturity. Crows used to be a wary country species there, but are now ubiquitous.



> On Jul 22, 2022, at 1:54 PM, <jimbetz...> wrote:
>
> Hi all,
>
> The robin's nest in the tree along side of our front door is
> empty - just today. And the fledglings are hanging out in the
> front yard ... mostly just sitting in the grass while Mom(?) hunts
> for worms nearby. One has been in a low bush - and another of
> the 3 has been on the lowest branches of the large tree.
> We never saw a second adult - so I'm guessing that the one
> that is here is the female.
> We're hoping the adults will choose to use the same nest
> again for their next clutch - we'll see.
>
> It does seem like if a pair has chosen a particular location
> for their nest that they will return to the same nest for the
> next time (that same year). I'm not talking about just robins
> here. However, some of the nearby nests have been "once onlys".
> Next year same tree/location - that seems to be less likely.
>
> As I think I've reported before - just about all of the
> species we've had at the seed feeder this year are showing up
> as young birds - first with an adult feeding them and then
> quickly them feeding themselves and finally where the new
> fledgling is present at the feeder and the adults are either
> not with them or ignoring them and just feeding themselves.
> More or less in frequency of visitors we've had House Sparrows,
> House Finches, Goldfinches, Purple Finches, Pine Siskins,
> Towhees, White-Crowned Sparrows, Cowbirds, Grosbeaks (both
> but more Black-headed), Robins (on the lawn), Mourning
> Doves (on the aggregate under the seed feeder), and some
> occasional visitors such as Flickers, Stellars, etc.
> For a few days about a month ago there was a Cooper's
> Hawk that came near the seed feeder "every day" but it
> stopped visiting (I guess it didn't catch another bird?).
>
> The frequency of Bald Eagles has dropped -way- off but
> we still see several Vultures a day. It's been a month
> or so since we've seen a Red-Tailed (here from the house).
> Trips to the Skagit and Samish Flats have produced a
> few raptors and very little else since about the middle of
> May. I guess I'm just missing the GBHs and others ...
> We did see two adults and one juvenile Bald Eagle - on
> the ground in a field - very near the corner of Best Rd.
> and McClean (where Christiansen's is) just last week. They
> were quite near the road and stayed long enough for me to
> go around the round-a-bout and come back to stop and get a
> long look and a couple of cell phone pictures.
>
> ****
>
> I'm saddened by Gary's move - it's his life and all that
> but he is an important part of local birding and he will be
> missed.
> - Jim in Burlington
>
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Date: 7/22/22 1:57 pm
From: <jimbetz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Our Baby Robins are "gone" ....
Hi all,

The robin's nest in the tree along side of our front door is
empty - just today. And the fledglings are hanging out in the
front yard ... mostly just sitting in the grass while Mom(?) hunts
for worms nearby. One has been in a low bush - and another of
the 3 has been on the lowest branches of the large tree.
We never saw a second adult - so I'm guessing that the one
that is here is the female.
We're hoping the adults will choose to use the same nest
again for their next clutch - we'll see.

It does seem like if a pair has chosen a particular location
for their nest that they will return to the same nest for the
next time (that same year). I'm not talking about just robins
here. However, some of the nearby nests have been "once onlys".
Next year same tree/location - that seems to be less likely.

As I think I've reported before - just about all of the
species we've had at the seed feeder this year are showing up
as young birds - first with an adult feeding them and then
quickly them feeding themselves and finally where the new
fledgling is present at the feeder and the adults are either
not with them or ignoring them and just feeding themselves.
More or less in frequency of visitors we've had House Sparrows,
House Finches, Goldfinches, Purple Finches, Pine Siskins,
Towhees, White-Crowned Sparrows, Cowbirds, Grosbeaks (both
but more Black-headed), Robins (on the lawn), Mourning
Doves (on the aggregate under the seed feeder), and some
occasional visitors such as Flickers, Stellars, etc.
For a few days about a month ago there was a Cooper's
Hawk that came near the seed feeder "every day" but it
stopped visiting (I guess it didn't catch another bird?).

The frequency of Bald Eagles has dropped -way- off but
we still see several Vultures a day. It's been a month
or so since we've seen a Red-Tailed (here from the house).
Trips to the Skagit and Samish Flats have produced a
few raptors and very little else since about the middle of
May. I guess I'm just missing the GBHs and others ...
We did see two adults and one juvenile Bald Eagle - on
the ground in a field - very near the corner of Best Rd.
and McClean (where Christiansen's is) just last week. They
were quite near the road and stayed long enough for me to
go around the round-a-bout and come back to stop and get a
long look and a couple of cell phone pictures.

****

I'm saddened by Gary's move - it's his life and all that
but he is an important part of local birding and he will be
missed.
- Jim in Burlington

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Date: 7/22/22 1:30 pm
From: Josh Morris <joshm...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Seeking community science volunteers for bird-window collision research
Hi Tweeters,

The Seattle Bird Collision Monitoring Project<https://seattleaudubon.org/our-work/conservation/urban-conservation/bird-safe-cities/seattle-bird-collision-monitors/> is gearing up for its fall 2022 field season. We are seeking community science volunteers to help us document bird-window collisions in Seattle.

I’m hosting a prospective volunteer information session<https://secure.everyaction.com/sp9RNyw5zkWMJ6hExzBzRw2#!> on August 10 from 6-7 PM if you’d like to learn more.
This fall, we will monitor a set of buildings in the Capitol Hill neighborhood of Seattle and on the University of Washington campus. The season will run for 45 days from September 8-Oct. 22. Volunteers will be asked to commit to complete a weekly monitoring shift between 8 am-12 pm.
Here are some other key dates/details about the upcoming season:
Volunteer info session
August 10, 6-7 PM (online, optional)
Volunteer orientation
August 24, 6-7 PM (online, optional)
Field Training
August 27. Various times. (in-person, required)
First day of monitoring
September 8
Last day of monitoring
October 22
Survey window
8:00 am-12:00 pm (suggested)
Survey locations
Capitol Hill, Seattle
University of Washington, South Campus
Carcass persistence study
Yes, time TBD
Fun bird outing
Oct. 8, time TBD (optional)
Thank you! Feel free to email me directly with any questions.
Sincerely,
Josh
Joshua Morris (he/him)
Urban Conservation Manager
Seattle Audubon<https://seattleaudubon.org/2022/07/21/moving-from-shameful-legacy-seattle-chapter-to-drop-audubon/>
(206) 523-8243 x113

Found a dead or injured bird? Submit a report at dbird.org<https://dbird.org/>


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Date: 7/22/22 1:22 pm
From: Ed Newbold <ednewbold1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Penny Koyama has a letter in today's Seattle Times

Hi all,
Long time readers of Tweeters will recognize the name Penny Koyama.She has the lead and only letter in the print edition of the Seattle Times today, on the subject of Chris Reykdal's support changing the benefiary of money from logging on DNR land.
Here is Penny's letter:
Kudos to Superintendent of Public Instruction Chris Reykdal for proposing that timber harvests be better managed and that sales money generated be directed to rural areas.

City people ourselves, we’ve traveled multiple times to all 39 counties for birding. It was heartbreaking to see an entire forested hillside near Cathlamet stripped clean for school construction, but equally heartbreaking to know that their high school hasn’t had extensive upgrade since the 1970s.
These rural areas, so much less populated than our urban areas and with lower property values, simply cannot raise the funds to keep their school modernized and safe. Directing timber-sales funds to the areas where they occur is simply logical and fair.
Thanks I love to see Tweeters getting involved in public issues as I think birders can have a different and valuable take on things.
Cheers,
Ed Newbold


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Date: 7/22/22 11:41 am
From: PENNY & DAVID KOYAMA <plkoyama...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Possible Ivory Gull?
Tweets,
Steve Dang just texted me to say he was at the Mukilteo ferry a few minutes ago, and saw a gull fly over that was completely white on the underside. He was wondering if it could be an Ivory, and asked me to "get the word out." He didn't say in what direction it was flying, or if he could see a black bill. I texted back to ask, but no answer yet. I imagine he is on the ferry en route to Whidbey, as usual. Will post if he provides more info as to size, etc.
Penny Koyama, Bothell

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Date: 7/22/22 11:04 am
From: Martha Jordan <mj.cygnus...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Water bird mortalities
As some of you are aware, avian influenza has become a regular part of life
out there in the bird world including parts of western Washington.
Mortalities are being reported, especially from south Whidbey Island and
now up in the Padilla Bay area and maybe more areas that are not being
reported. Several white pelicans have been found dead in both of these
areas in the past few days. One has been tested for AI and the results will
not be known for at least a week or more. If it is not AI then WDFW will
send it in for a full necropsy to hopefully determine why it died.

Meanwhile, here is the latest info from WDFW on what to do should you find
dead pelicans, ducks, shorebirds, etc:
1. Do not touch the bird. REPORT IT.
REPORT observations to the following:
Online reports use this link:
https://survey123.arcgis.com/share/a384e90f69744f2e846135a9ce80027f.

Alternatively, people can email <teammillcreek...> or call
360-902-2936.

This will be the fastest way for a response from WDFW. They are aware of
the pelican mortality issue, and the one dead Trumpeter Swan that did test
positive for AI (south Whidbey Is wetland).

Thank you for keeping watch for birds in distress. WDFW is working hard to
track this deadly disease.
Martha Jordan
Everett, WA
206-713-3684

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Date: 7/21/22 8:22 pm
From: Hubbell <ldhubbell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Eagle Reunion
Tweeters,

Sometimes reunions do not go exactly as planned. Read more at:

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2022/07/eagle-reunion.html <https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2022/07/eagle-reunion.html>

Have a great day on Union Bay, where nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net
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Date: 7/21/22 4:32 pm
From: dave templeton <crazydave65...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Swainson's thrush wingbars
Hi:

The young thrushes in North Bend, King County, Washington hanging around our yard have fairly strong wing bars. None of my reference books show anything like the bars I think I see. Some of the Hermit thrush representations have faint wing bars but nothing like these birds have. Can someone help me out on this?

Thanks.

Dave Templeton

crazydave 65 at
inbox.com


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Date: 7/21/22 3:24 pm
From: Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2022-07-21
Tweets - Another gorgeous summer day, with temps running from 60-70
degrees, and few clouds. Fairly birdy. We're just beginning to get the
start of post-breeding dispersal, so we had a few birds we haven't seen in
a while.

Highlights:

- Gadwall - One female with Mallards. We probably often overlook these,
since they are hard to ID at this time of year
- Pied-billed Grebe - Two from Lake Platform. First since mid-May
- Virginia Rail - At least 4, and we got to see the one on our side of
the slough near the start of the boardwalk. First since mid-May
- Spotted Sandpiper - One on weir. Our only other sighting for 2022 was
mid-May
- Green Heron - Finally, one below weir, one at Rowing Club. First of
Year (*FOY*)
- Red-breasted Sapsucker - At least three
- Hairy Woodpecker - Two, completing our 4 woodpecker species day
- Violet-green Swallow - ONLY ONE
- BANK SWALLOW - One from Lake Platform (*FOY*). Only our 13th record
for this species at Marymoor
- Swainson's Thrush - Still quite a bit of singing, plus saw about 3 on
bug catching on the trail
- Purple Finch - Some singing, plus 3-4 juveniles in the East Meadow
- Bullock's Oriole - Adult male(s), plus 1-2 more scattered around the
slough
- Black-throated Gray Warbler - Two between Dog Meadow and slough
- Western Tanager - One or more at the Rowing Club
- Lazuli Bunting - One singing male, northwest corner of Dog Meadow near
portapotties

Our mammal list included American Beaver, Raccoon, and Bat. We failed to
see a squirrel.

Misses today included Hooded Merganser, Rock Pigeon, Rufous Hummingbird,
Red-tailed Hawk, Barn Owl, Cliff Swallow, and Black-headed Grosbeak.

For the day, 60 species.

= Michael

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Date: 7/21/22 3:23 pm
From: Michael Fleming <michaelfleming0607...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Aufwiedersehen, Skagit!
Hey Gary;

Hope you like New York -- keep in contact with Tweeters...🤗




On Thu, Jul 21, 2022 at 3:15 PM Michael Fleming <
<michaelfleming0607...> wrote:

> Herr Bletsch;
>
> Auch nein, warum..
>
> On Wed, Jul 20, 2022 at 10:46 PM Alan Roedell <alanroedell...>
> wrote:
>
>> We'll miss you Gary! You are the top birder in the Northwest. Always
>> entertaining and accurate. Good luck!
>> Alan Roedell, Seattle
>>
>> On Wed, Jul 20, 2022, 9:08 PM Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> wrote:
>>
>>> Dear Tweeters,
>>>
>>> Mrs. Bletsch and I have listed our house for sale. Look for it tomorrow
>>> on Keller Williams; we're moving to Western New York.
>>>
>>> I might be skirting the bounds of propriety by posting a real-estate
>>> listing on Tweeters--but there is a connection to birding. The yard list
>>> here, over the past 19 years and 11 months, has reached 165 species! That
>>> has included Great Egret, Golden Eagle, Broad-winged Hawk, Rough-legged
>>> Hawk, Sora, Sandhill Crane, Whimbrel, Caspian Tern, Short-eared Owl,
>>> nesting Barn Owls, Black-chinned and Calliope Hummingbird, Lewis's
>>> Woodpecker, Dusky Flycatcher, Say's Phoebe, California Scrub Jay, Bohemian
>>> Waxwing, Brown Thrasher, Black-throated Sparrow, Brewer's Sparrow,
>>> Clay-colored Sparrow, Harris's Sparrow, Rose-breasted Grosbeak,
>>> Yellow-headed Blackbird, Common Grackle, Pine Grosbeak, Cassin's Finch, and
>>> Common Redpoll. Not bad for 1.49 acres halfway between Sedro-Woolley and
>>> Concrete.
>>>
>>> Somehow, we never did get a Mountain Bluebird or a Mountain Chickadee
>>> here. Go figure.
>>>
>>> Anyway, I hope that whoever buys the place likes birds!
>>>
>>> Thanks to Tweeters for two decades of jolly fun.
>>>
>>> Yours truly,
>>>
>>> Gary Bletsch
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> Tweeters mailing list
>>> <Tweeters...>
>>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>>
>
>
> --
> Michael Fleming
> Ballard, Washington
> MichaelFleming0607 AT gmail.com
>
>
>

--
Michael Fleming
Ballard, Washington
MichaelFleming0607 AT gmail.com

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Date: 7/21/22 3:19 pm
From: Michael Fleming <michaelfleming0607...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Aufwiedersehen, Skagit!
Herr Bletsch;

Auch nein, warum..

On Wed, Jul 20, 2022 at 10:46 PM Alan Roedell <alanroedell...> wrote:

> We'll miss you Gary! You are the top birder in the Northwest. Always
> entertaining and accurate. Good luck!
> Alan Roedell, Seattle
>
> On Wed, Jul 20, 2022, 9:08 PM Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> wrote:
>
>> Dear Tweeters,
>>
>> Mrs. Bletsch and I have listed our house for sale. Look for it tomorrow
>> on Keller Williams; we're moving to Western New York.
>>
>> I might be skirting the bounds of propriety by posting a real-estate
>> listing on Tweeters--but there is a connection to birding. The yard list
>> here, over the past 19 years and 11 months, has reached 165 species! That
>> has included Great Egret, Golden Eagle, Broad-winged Hawk, Rough-legged
>> Hawk, Sora, Sandhill Crane, Whimbrel, Caspian Tern, Short-eared Owl,
>> nesting Barn Owls, Black-chinned and Calliope Hummingbird, Lewis's
>> Woodpecker, Dusky Flycatcher, Say's Phoebe, California Scrub Jay, Bohemian
>> Waxwing, Brown Thrasher, Black-throated Sparrow, Brewer's Sparrow,
>> Clay-colored Sparrow, Harris's Sparrow, Rose-breasted Grosbeak,
>> Yellow-headed Blackbird, Common Grackle, Pine Grosbeak, Cassin's Finch, and
>> Common Redpoll. Not bad for 1.49 acres halfway between Sedro-Woolley and
>> Concrete.
>>
>> Somehow, we never did get a Mountain Bluebird or a Mountain Chickadee
>> here. Go figure.
>>
>> Anyway, I hope that whoever buys the place likes birds!
>>
>> Thanks to Tweeters for two decades of jolly fun.
>>
>> Yours truly,
>>
>> Gary Bletsch
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>


--
Michael Fleming
Ballard, Washington
MichaelFleming0607 AT gmail.com

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Date: 7/21/22 12:04 pm
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Kent Valley Shorebirding 7.21.22
The PECTORAL SANDPIPER remains at M Street in Auburn today along with 11 LEAST SANDPIPERS.

At S 204th Street in Kent, just west of Frager Rd, I was surprised to see another PECTORAL SANDPIPER today in the marsh. This bird was with 4 GREATER YELLOWLEGS.

Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>
Pbase Images : https://www.pbase.com/marvbreece
Flickr Videos : https://www.flickr.com/photos/138163614@N02/
Youtube : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHbkNzr4TaZ6ZBWfoJNvavw/featured

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Date: 7/21/22 10:07 am
From: Ellen Cohen <cohenellenr...>
Subject: [Tweeters] re move to western NY
Good luck with your move!Just in case you're not aware of this, here's a New York State list which encompasses the entire state.  There may be something more local, depending on where you're moving to.  I use this list in addition to a more local one for NYC as I travel back there several times a year:   <nysbirds-l...>

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Date: 7/21/22 8:27 am
From: Tom and Carol Stoner <tcstonefam...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Oh no!
Gary, you may be saying good-bye to Skagit, but I hope we still see your
name pop up on Tweeters when you spot something good.

Carol Stoner
West Seattle

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Date: 7/20/22 10:50 pm
From: Alan Roedell <alanroedell...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Aufwiedersehen, Skagit!
We'll miss you Gary! You are the top birder in the Northwest. Always
entertaining and accurate. Good luck!
Alan Roedell, Seattle

On Wed, Jul 20, 2022, 9:08 PM Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> wrote:

> Dear Tweeters,
>
> Mrs. Bletsch and I have listed our house for sale. Look for it tomorrow on
> Keller Williams; we're moving to Western New York.
>
> I might be skirting the bounds of propriety by posting a real-estate
> listing on Tweeters--but there is a connection to birding. The yard list
> here, over the past 19 years and 11 months, has reached 165 species! That
> has included Great Egret, Golden Eagle, Broad-winged Hawk, Rough-legged
> Hawk, Sora, Sandhill Crane, Whimbrel, Caspian Tern, Short-eared Owl,
> nesting Barn Owls, Black-chinned and Calliope Hummingbird, Lewis's
> Woodpecker, Dusky Flycatcher, Say's Phoebe, California Scrub Jay, Bohemian
> Waxwing, Brown Thrasher, Black-throated Sparrow, Brewer's Sparrow,
> Clay-colored Sparrow, Harris's Sparrow, Rose-breasted Grosbeak,
> Yellow-headed Blackbird, Common Grackle, Pine Grosbeak, Cassin's Finch, and
> Common Redpoll. Not bad for 1.49 acres halfway between Sedro-Woolley and
> Concrete.
>
> Somehow, we never did get a Mountain Bluebird or a Mountain Chickadee
> here. Go figure.
>
> Anyway, I hope that whoever buys the place likes birds!
>
> Thanks to Tweeters for two decades of jolly fun.
>
> Yours truly,
>
> Gary Bletsch
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>

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Date: 7/20/22 9:11 pm
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Aufwiedersehen, Skagit!
Dear Tweeters,
Mrs. Bletsch and I have listed our house for sale. Look for it tomorrow on Keller Williams; we're moving to Western New York.
I might be skirting the bounds of propriety by posting a real-estate listing on Tweeters--but there is a connection to birding. The yard list here, over the past 19 years and 11 months, has reached 165 species! That has included Great Egret, Golden Eagle, Broad-winged Hawk, Rough-legged Hawk, Sora, Sandhill Crane, Whimbrel, Caspian Tern, Short-eared Owl, nesting Barn Owls, Black-chinned and Calliope Hummingbird, Lewis's Woodpecker, Dusky Flycatcher, Say's Phoebe, California Scrub Jay, Bohemian Waxwing, Brown Thrasher, Black-throated Sparrow, Brewer's Sparrow, Clay-colored Sparrow, Harris's Sparrow, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Yellow-headed Blackbird, Common Grackle, Pine Grosbeak, Cassin's Finch, and Common Redpoll. Not bad for 1.49 acres halfway between Sedro-Woolley and Concrete.
Somehow, we never did get a Mountain Bluebird or a Mountain Chickadee here. Go figure.
Anyway, I hope that whoever buys the place likes birds!
Thanks to Tweeters for two decades of jolly fun.
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch
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Date: 7/20/22 6:32 pm
From: area weatherman <rufo.hill...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Purple Martin Pre Dawn Behavior
For the past few weeks members of my local Purple Martin colony have been taking flight at a ridiculously early hour. I'm used to swallows and like well before sunrise, but these ones have been chortling away as early as 3:50am a few hundred feet above my house, itself a hundred feet above their sea-level nests. I've read about martins stepping outside their nests early to do their attracting thing, but its dark at the beginning of nautical twilight. The stars are still bright!

Can anyone point me to a resource that explains how these birds are physically able to see when it's so dark? It's almost as if they know that if they go high enough - and chortle loudly enough - that they can just fly around blindly for some time. I hope they're not that desperate for reproductive attention!

Thanks - James


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Date: 7/20/22 9:45 am
From: Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Harry Nehls passes
Although long known for his contributions to birding in Oregon, he had Washington connections as well. He was the long-time co-editor of the Audubon Field Notes PAC NW summary, which included Washington. He sometimes birded in Washington as well. As a kid, I got a ride from him on a Portland Audubon field trip to the newly acquired Ledbetter Point section of what became Willapa NWR.. It was led by Dave Marshall, who over-saw its acquisition, as he had of the Julia Butler NWR, and others. Years later, Harry made what was then a shocking find of something like 18 breeding plumage Bar-tailed Godwits near the parking lot there in early June - if my memory serves me correctly.


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Date: 7/20/22 6:34 am
From: Raphael Fennimore <raphael.fennimore...>
Subject: [Tweeters] White SULID in Puget Sound, Wednesday July 20th
Hi Tweeties,

This morning a little before 6am I spotted a white Sulid heading south in Puget Sound from Discovery Park. I was with Alex Meilleur on south beach at the time, and Eric Hope also saw the bird from West Point. We’re confident that it wasn’t a Brown Booby, but we’re still trying to work out the ID from some digiscope videos I took (none of us have experience with Masked Booby, Nazca Booby, or light morph Red-footed).

It was hard to see at a distance (decent shimmer today - visibility not superb), and we lost it as it was heading south towards Alki. Hopefully it is seen by others, and I’m still here, hoping it comes back north!

Good birding!

Raphael Fennimore
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Date: 7/19/22 4:18 pm
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Kent Valley shorebirding 7.19.22
M Street, Auburn 7.19.22
Least Sandpiper - 14
Western Sandpiper - 4
LB Dowitcher - 3
Greater Yellowlegs - 1
Pectoral Sandpiper - 1 ; 1 video [ https://flic.kr/ps/376fhN | https://flic.kr/ps/376fhN ]


S 204th Street, Kent
Least Sandpiper - 4
LB Dowitcher - 2
Greater Yellowlegs - 1


Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>
Pbase Images : https://www.pbase.com/marvbreece
Flickr Videos : https://www.flickr.com/photos/138163614@N02/
Youtube : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHbkNzr4TaZ6ZBWfoJNvavw/featured

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Date: 7/19/22 9:51 am
From: Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] JBLM Eagles Pride Golf Course Monthly Birdwalk - July 21
Hi Tweeters,

The Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course (GC) birdwalk is scheduled for Thursday, July 21. The JBLM Eagles Pride GC birders meet the third Thursday of each month at 8:00AM. Starting point is Bldg # 1514, Driving Range Tee, Eagles Pride Golf Course, I-5 Exit 116, Mounts Road Exit.



Also, to remind folks that haven't been here before, you don't need any ID to attend these birdwalks. Hope you're able to make it!

May all your birds be identified,
Denis DeSilvis
Avnacrs 4 birds at outlook dot com

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Date: 7/19/22 9:13 am
From: Karen Deyerle <kldinseattle...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Injured Anna's Hummingbird
you could also take it to Sarvey Wildlife Center in Arlington, they are terrificSarvey Wildlife

|
|
| |
Sarvey Wildlife

Sarvey Wildlife


|

|

|





On Tuesday, July 19, 2022 at 09:01:36 AM PDT, Teresa Stokes <tlstokespoetry...> wrote:

Hal if you can catch it, take it to PAWS. We rescued a sick hummingbird and took it in to them. They were very professional and kind, updating us via email later. Ours did not make it. But at least it did not continue to suffer.

Good luck, hoping your Anna’s has a chance.

T.L. Stokes
Redmond


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Date: 7/19/22 9:05 am
From: Teresa Stokes <tlstokespoetry...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Injured Anna's Hummingbird
Hal if you can catch it, take it to PAWS. We rescued a sick hummingbird and took it in to them. They were very professional and kind, updating us via email later. Ours did not make it. But at least it did not continue to suffer.

Good luck, hoping your Anna’s has a chance.

T.L. Stokes
Redmond


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Date: 7/18/22 10:06 pm
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Skagit birds
Dear Tweeters,
Today, the eighteenth of July, there were quite a few interesting birds at Fir Island Farm Reserve.
Amongst the Canada Geese was a single CACKLING GOOSE. I have seen this species in Skagit County in September, but never before during June, July, or August.
Also present with the goose flock was the SWAN that has been reported by other observers. I am leaning toward Tundra Swan, but am not sure of this bird's ID. Maybe my photos will reveal something. The position of the eye relative to the bill, and the presence of a faint bit of yellowish on the bill, both suggest that the bird is a Tundra Swan, but I thought that the shape of the feathering where it meets the top of the bill on the forehead suggested that it could be a Trumpeter. That feathering did look a little "pointy" (or "Eddie-Munsterish"). Although it is worrisome that this bird should be here this time of year, it seems healthy. It chased after some Canada Geese that ventured too close a few times. It foraged actively, and spent some time preening, acting normal as far as I could tell.
As the tide came in, there were nine species of shorebirds: over 50 Black-bellied Plover, about twenty Killdeer, a single Semipalmated Plover, 9 Greater Yellowlegs, an adult Spotted Sandpiper (on the shore of the Reflecting Pool), close to 20 Long-billed Dowitchers (with some unidentified dowitchers), plus close to a thousand peeps, most of which were Westerns, but with a strong contingent of Least Sandpipers, plus a single Semipalmated Sandpiper.
There were very few ducks, other than Gadwall families, but there was a single Cinnamon Teal on the  Reflecting Pool.
Earlier in the day, I was able to see over 80 American White Pelicans at March Point. There were also a couple of Bullock's Orioles there, always a treat.
I also made a visit to the Fir Island Game Range during the heat of the day. Birding was as slow as one might expect.  What struck me was the enormous amount of marsh vegetation that is taking over the tidal lagoons here. I am wondering if shorebirds will continue to flock to the Game Range, if the place turns into the reedbed that it is rapidly becoming.
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch
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Date: 7/18/22 3:06 pm
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Kent Valley shorebirding 7.18.22
M Street, Auburn
Least Sandpiper - 15 or more
Western Sandpiper - 5
Long-billed Dowitcher - 9
Bank Swallow - 1

204th St, Kent
Least Sandpiper - 20 minimum
Western Sandpiper - only 1
Greater Yellowlegs - 1
Long-billed Dowitcher - 6
Solitary Sandpiper - 1
Green Heron - 2 adults


Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>
Pbase Images : https://www.pbase.com/marvbreece
Flickr Videos : https://www.flickr.com/photos/138163614@N02/
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Date: 7/18/22 2:20 pm
From: Lynn Wohlers <wohlers13...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] White Pelicans
March Point has been good for seeing Am. white pelicans...last month one
afternoon I saw a large flock of them flying in the distance with a long,
wavering line of about 100 Great blue herons (from the nearby rookery)
fishing in the foreground. And dozens of Caspian terns between the herons
and pelicans. The tide must have been just right.

Does anyone know if these pelicans are too young to reproduce? Maybe
they're subadults? I've been wondering if the large groups that congregate
at March Point and on Whidbey every summer are too young to nest.

Thanks!

On Mon, Jul 18, 2022 at 2:03 PM <jimbetz...> wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> We saw about 200-300 White Pelicans at the SE end of
> March Point (aka "Marches Point" back in the day) on
> Wednesday about 3 or so. A little ways away but
> easily identifiable using our 12x binoculars.
> - Jim and Loretta
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>


--
Lynn Wohlers

Blogging at Bluebrightly <https://bluebrightly.com/>
Photography on Flickr <https://www.flickr.com/photos/lynnwohlers/>
And at Lynn Wohlers.com <http://lynn-wohlers.artistwebsites.com>

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Date: 7/18/22 2:07 pm
From: <jimbetz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] White Pelicans
Hi all,

We saw about 200-300 White Pelicans at the SE end of
March Point (aka "Marches Point" back in the day) on
Wednesday about 3 or so. A little ways away but
easily identifiable using our 12x binoculars.
- Jim and Loretta

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Date: 7/18/22 6:59 am
From: Hank Heiberg <hank.heiberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Injured Anna’s
Yesterday I noticed an injured Anna’s Hummingbird crawling about our patio. It would crawl up to a flower and drink from it. I took one of our flying saucer shaped hummingbird feeders and placed it in front of the Anna’s. It managed to get up on the perch and feed. It seemed to gain strength and could fly about a foot. Last night it was gone. I hoped that it flew off. I moved the feeder to a table. This morning the Anna’s was back crawling around the patio. Again I put the feeder directly in front of it and it is on the feeder feeding and looking around the way that hummingbirds do. Sad situation.

Hank Heiberg
Issaquah, WA


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Date: 7/17/22 4:13 pm
From: <davearm...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Deer lagoon, Whidbey
White pelicans were back in force; at least 100+ on the freshwater side of the dike trail, and that many spread out over exposed tideflats just beyond the Deer Lagoon estuary on Useless Bay (an odd location for them).
Other highlights: 100+ caspian terns, 100s of swallows working extensive insect hatches (violet-green, tree, barn, bank, northern rough-wing), and arrival of some shorebirds ( greater yellow legs, whimbrel, long-billed dowitchers, semipalmated, least, and western sandpipers).
David Armstrong

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Date: 7/17/22 1:13 pm
From: G M ARCHAMBAULT <gm72125...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Ecuador

Hello, I just wanted to ask people to ask many questions about Refugio Paz de Aves, since this is the first I've heard of this recent fund-raising effort in the face of the most recent stated threat to the important site.  The problem is, there are no controls over ownership and protection of this site, and what is to prevent future similar threats and future similar appeals for more money?  Instead of an infusion of cash to the family, wouldn't it be preferable for the land to be placed in a trust and managed by a non-profit such as Nature Conservancy or BirdLife.org?  What safeguards exist for preventing yet another appeal for a cash infusion once the current owners again increase the size of their families?  My limited understand of the situation, based on a mere handful of visits, is that a lot of this is very money-driven.  Yes, the site is special, but in my experience, there is no limit on the appeals for regular cash infusions in this type of situation.  I'm sorry to throw iced water on the GoFundMe appeal, but It smells fishy to me without a change in ownership that would safeguard the land in perpetuity.  I'd like to know more. A lot more.  -Ken Archambault, Birmingham, Alabama On Sunday, July 17, 2022, 01:04:08 PM CDT, Jim Forrester <jimf...> wrote:

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Thank you for forwarding the link to the Refugio Paz de las Aves Go Fund me campaign.  We visited them in 2004, and it really is a magical place.  The Refugio is in the Mindo area not far from Quito, which is probably the best place in the world to see a huge number of hummingbird species, perhaps 40 in a week.  The Refugio is absolutely a can’t miss place there, and we can’t recommend it highly enough, so please support them and visit the Refugio if you get a chance.  Jim
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Date: 7/17/22 11:07 am
From: Jim Forrester <jimf...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Ecuador
Thank you for forwarding the link to the Refugio Paz de las Aves Go Fund me campaign. We visited them in 2004, and it really is a magical place. The Refugio is in the Mindo area not far from Quito, which is probably the best place in the world to see a huge number of hummingbird species, perhaps 40 in a week. The Refugio is absolutely a can't miss place there, and we can't recommend it highly enough, so please support them and visit the Refugio if you get a chance. Jim

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Date: 7/16/22 2:50 pm
From: Hubbell <ldhubbell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Active Waiting
Tweeters,

This week’s post is about two of our most easily identified Flycatchers. I hope you enjoy the post.

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2022/07/active-waiting.html <https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2022/07/active-waiting.html>

Have a great day on Union Bay, where nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net
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Date: 7/16/22 2:10 pm
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Kent Valley birding (7.16.22)
The main pond at M Street in Auburn is dry. In the water south of that pond were 11 LEAST SANDPIPERS & 1 WESTERN SANDPIPER.

At 204th Street in Kent (just west of Frager Rd) there was a GREEN HERON, and some CEDAR WAXWINGS & a BLACK PHOEBE hawking insects over the marsh.

Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>
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Flickr Videos : https://www.flickr.com/photos/138163614@N02/
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Date: 7/15/22 2:03 pm
From: <cohenellenr...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Ecuador
This is copied from a closed Manhattan (NYC) birding group (via GroupMe).

Sharing:

If you have been to Ecuador birding, or you have not, as I have not, you may be aware of Refugio Paz de las Aves. It is a bird refuge owned by a large family, the Paz family, which is one of the first places to preserve antpitta habitat in the world. The Giant Antpitta is one of several antpitta species at Angel Paz's farm, which has been a major birding site in Ecuador for a couple of decades now. For those of you who are not familiar with Antpitta habitat, they live in forests. And as a tangential aside, they are completely adorable! But this precious and sadly increasingly rare forest is about to be completely razed, unless we prevent it.


The matriarch of the family has died, and only two of the nine children wish to preserve the land. The others want to sell so that they can get their share now. The land will be turned into cattle farm, the forest clearcut, and the antpittas will be gone.

Luckily for us, the amount necessary to buy this land in in Ecuador is paltry compared to what such real estate would cost in the United States.


They have done a GoFundMe for the $155,000 the two siblings will need to buy out their family members. They have already raised $127,000 from birders all over the world! They only need about $30,000 remaining in order to buy out their siblings and save this land from complete destruction. Please consider helping save this family farm from being sold and destroyed.


More than 400 species of birds are routinely seen just on this refuge.


We only have until August 1 to help raise the money to save this wonderful place for future birders and all to enjoy. Even a small donation could help Vinicio Paz reach their fundraising goal. Five bucks, whatever you can give, will make a huge difference.


Read more about the family farm and the current situation at this site:


https://gofund.me/a4961f6d



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Date: 7/14/22 6:35 pm
From: Nadine Drisseq <drisseq.n...>
Subject: [Tweeters] A woodpecker's brain takes a big hit with every peck: study
https://www.npr.org/2022/07/14/1110581385/a-woodpeckers-brain-takes-a-big-hit-with-every-peck-study

https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(22)00855-7

The brain of a woodpecker experiences a seemingly catastrophic impact every
time beak meets wood.

"When you see these birds in action, hitting their head against a tree
quite violently, then as humans we start wondering how does this bird avoid
getting headaches or brain damage," says Sam Van Wassenbergh
<https://www.uantwerpen.be/en/staff/sam-vanwassenbergh/>, a researcher at
the University of Antwerp in Belgium.

In the past, scientists have suggested
<https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(76)91477-X/fulltext>
the
bird's brain is protected from the impacts, perhaps by a skull that acts as
a cushion
<https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/jsmea/49/3/49_3_390/_article>, or a
beak that absorbs some of the force, or a tongue that wraps around the
brain.

But Van Wassenberg wasn't convinced.

"Nobody has ever explained it very well, in my opinion," he says.

So Van Wassenbergh led a team that set out to settle the issue using high
speed video of woodpeckers in action.

"We went to four different zoos in Europe where they had woodpeckers and we
recorded them at very high frame rates, while they were pecking," he says.

The videos, part of a study published
<https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(22)00855-7> in
the journal *Current Biology,* revealed some remarkable details.

For example, "they close their eyes at the moment they impact the wood,"
Van Wassenbergh says, to protect their eyes from splinters.

The videos also showed that woodpeckers' beaks often get stuck in the wood.
But they break free almost instantly, thanks to a clever beak design that
provides independent motion of the upper and lower beak.

What the videos did not show is any sign that the woodpecker's brain is
somehow cushioned.

"The way we see the head behaving is very rigid, like you would use a
hammer hitting wood," Van Wassenbergh says.

That means the organ repeatedly experiences deceleration that would cause a
concussion in a human brain. Yet the woodpecker brain emerges unscathed,
even after thousands of impacts in a single day.

That is possible because a woodpecker's brain *is* protected — not by
cushioning, but by its tiny size and weight, Van Wassenbergh says.

"An animal that has a smaller size can withstand higher decelerations," he
says. "That's a biomechanical law."

That idea was suggested
<https://zslpublications.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1469-7998.2006.00166.x>
in
2006 by Lorna Gibson, a professor of biomechanical engineering at MIT. Now,
it has been confirmed by Van Wassenbergh's high-speed video.

A woodpecker's brain is about 700 times smaller than a human brain. "So
that is why even the hardest hits we observed are not expected to cause any
concussion," Van Wassenbergh says.

Or even a headache.

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Date: 7/14/22 5:41 pm
From: Cara Borre <cmborre1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] North Carolina birding video link
Hi Tweets:

Here's a video of our recent trip to North Carolina, which of course
features a pelagic. For us Westport Seabird fans, It will be strange to
see people in shorts on a pelagic, but this is the norm for the Gulf Stream.

Enjoy!

https://youtu.be/4Lugx7OceM8

Cara Borre
Gig Harbor

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Date: 7/14/22 5:21 pm
From: <flick...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fwd & IMPORTANT EDIT: Merlin capturing a Bushtit
TWEETERS EDITOR: Can you please replace my previous, original email post with this post and add into Tweeters for July 15, 2022?

I edited (below) the original post 'slightly' because I purposely brought a bird specialist & friend along with me on the three MERLIN follow-up visits to confirm my ID of prey birds and target MERLIN species.

_______________________


July 14, 2022


Hi Michelle,


I visually encountered a MERLIN adult female 'alarm calling' while conducting a Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) Route in WA - June, 2010.

I did three JULY follow-ups post-BBS to determine reproduction. I brought along my friend and bird specialist, Stuart Johnston, to confirm my ID calls because I knew most Tweeters did not know me from Eve.

On one of these three visits, a MERLIN adult brought back an immature Rufous hummingbird & also a Pine Siskin on the same morning (co-partner friend & bird specialist, Stuart Johnston, confirmed my bird prey IDs & target MERLIN ID).
It perched with a prey item in its bill waiting for a food-transfer to its partner, who flew by, captured the prey with its talons from its partner's bill, and then flew to the nest to feed nestlings (heard only by Stuart & myself).

Sooo, what I am suggesting with the described experience is that you may have also witnessed an adult MERLIN capturing a Bushtit to feed to its nestlings.


CJ FLICK
White Salmon, WA
<flick...>


---- OriginalMessage ----
From: <flick...>
To: <asmalllife...>
CC: <tweeters...>
Sent: Thu, Jul 14, 2022, 04:39 PM
Subject: Merlin capturing a Bushtit

July 14, 2022


Hi Michelle,


I visually encountered a MERLIN adult female 'alarm calling' while conducting a Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) Route in WA - June, 2010.

I did three JULY follow-ups post-BBS to determine reproduction.

On one of these three visits, a MERLIN adult brought back an immature (most likely Rufous for this specific area) hummingbird & also a Pine Siskin on the same morning, perched with each prey in its bill to wait for a food-transfer to its partner, who flew by, captured the prey with its talons from its partner's bill, and then flew to the nest to feed nestlings (heard only).

Sooo, what I am suggesting with this described experience is that you may have also witnessed an adult MERLIN capturing a Bushtit to feed to its nestlings.


CJ FLICK
White Salmon, WA

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Date: 7/14/22 4:43 pm
From: <flick...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Merlin capturing a Bushtit
July 14, 2022


Hi Michelle,


I visually encountered a MERLIN adult female 'alarm calling' while conducting a Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) Route in WA - June, 2010.

I did three JULY follow-ups post-BBS to determine reproduction.

On one of these three visits, a MERLIN adult brought back an immature (most likely Rufous for this specific area) hummingbird & also a Pine Siskin on the same morning, perched with each prey in its bill to wait for a food-transfer to its partner, who flew by, captured the prey with its talons from its partner's bill, and then flew to the nest to feed nestlings (heard only).

Sooo, what I am suggesting with this described experience is that you may have also witnessed an adult MERLIN capturing a Bushtit to feed to its nestlings.


CJ FLICK
White Salmon, WA

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Date: 7/14/22 4:39 pm
From: Buchanan, Joseph B (DFW) <Joseph.Buchanan...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Caspian Terns at Rat Island
Tweeters:
Recent posts on Tweeters have mentioned the Caspian Tern nesting colony at Rat Island, near the lower campground at Fort Flagler State Park. On behalf of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, we would like to add two points of importance to this thread.
First, the colony is on an island that is connected to the mainland only during very low tides. This means that access to the island, if by foot, should be assessed very carefully to avoid the possibility of becoming stranded. Relevant access information is available on the WDFW shellfish site webpage <https://wdfw.wa.gov/places-to-go/shellfish-beaches/250260>. Secondly, this is a good-sized colony of Caspian Terns, and like many wildlife species, the terns can be disturbed by human activity. Human disturbance can result from people being too close or in some other way altering the behavior of the incubating, brooding, or feeding adults at their nests. We have placed signs on the island to remind visitors to stay back from the colony to avoid disturbing the birds. Seal pups may also be present and should be given ample distance.
We ask that birders and others be cognizant of this information when they visit Rat Island.
Thank You
The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife


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Date: 7/14/22 12:34 pm
From: Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2022-07-14
Tweets - A gorgeous day, but it's mid-July when the bird list is pretty
much fixed. We already know what we're going to see and we know surprises
are hard to come by. Birds were not as visible today as last week, and
nesting season is visibly winding down.

Highlights:

- Wood Duck - A new clutch of 6 tiny ducklings
- Black Swift - Once again, 3 Blacks under clear skies. Still
unexpected given the wonderful weather
- Vaux'x Swift - Only 1
- Rufous Hummingbird - Two or three. These are clearing out
- Caspian Tern - Maybe 7 total. 5th week in a row, which is unusual for
Marymoor
- Great Blue Heron - Very few nests still active. Total numbers seen
WAY down
- Cooper's Hawk - One flew down Snag Row
- MERLIN - One eating a bird just south of Dog Central - First since
March
- Bullock's Oriole - Still 2-3, including an adult male

The other highlight today was a RACCOON just below the weir, our first
since 2019

Misses today included Hooded Merganser, Pied-billed Grebe, Rock Pigeon,
Green Heron, Cliff Swallow, and Golden-crowned Kinglet. With the exception
of the Kinglet, these have all been notably scarce this year (with Green
Heron yet to be recorded).

For the day, 56 species.

= Michael Hobbs
= www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
= <BirdMarymoor...>

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Date: 7/14/22 10:22 am
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Billy Frank Jr Nisqually NWR Wednesday Walk 7/13/2023
Hi Tweets,

A really nice summer's day at the Refuge with cloudy skies in the morning
and sunny skies in the afternoon and temperatures in the 60's-70's degrees
Fahrenheit. We had a huge tide swing with a Low -4.15ft Tide at 11:55am
and a High 14.5ft Tide at 7:31pm. So I split my day birding the Orchard,
Twin Barns Loop Trail and dike in the morning, and returned at 4:30pm to
bird the dike and Nisqually Estuary Boardwalk Trail in the late afternoon
and evening. Highlights included numerous baby birds, WILSON'S SNIPE in
the freshwater marsh, autumnal return of shorebirds including SEMIPALMATED
PLOVER, continuing AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN and breeding plumage RED-NECKED
GREBE.

The Visitor Center Pond Overlook continues to have good looks of WOOD DUCKS
with ducklings and nesting BARN SWALLOW. The Parking Lot had a pair of
juvenile HAIRY WOODPECKER, a few BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAKS, and ANNA'S
HUMMINGBIRD.

Overall, there are abundant sightings and vocalizations of YELLOW WARBLER,
SWAINSON'S THRUSH, CEDAR WAXWING, and AMERICAN GOLDFINCH.

The Orchard was good for PURPLE FINCH, BAND-TAILED PIGEON, MORNING DOVE,
RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD, and WILLOW FLYCATCHER. There is a WARBLING VIREO
breeding pair near the technician building. A WESTERN WOOD-PEWEE breeding
pair and nest over the restricted area access road south of the Orchard.
We had a fly over of a flock of CANADA GEESE with a single CACKLING GOOSE
which was out of season and unexpected.

The Access Road was good for CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEE, BEWICKS WREN,
COMMON YELLOWTHROAT - feeding young, and RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD. Numerous TREE
SWALLOWS foraged over the fields.

The Twin Barns Loop Trail had a Long-tailed Weasel at the entrance. The
west side had nice looks of WILLOW FLYCATCHER, HAIRY WOODPECKER, PINE
SISKIN, PURPLE FINCH, WOOD DUCK, BUSHTIT, BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE, and DOWNY
WOODPECKER. At the first double bench overlook a Wood Duck hen chased off
a Mink pursuing ducklings.

The Twin Barns Overlook and nice views of BAND-TAILED PIGEON, WILLOW
FLYCATCHER, TREE SWALLOW and COMMON YELLOWTHROAT.

The new dike or Nisqually Estuary Trail provided nice sightings of WILSON'S
SNIPE in the morning. We had quick flyovers of WESTERN SANDPIPER, GREATER
YELLOWLEGS, and KILLDEER.

The Nisqually River Overlook was quiet. We had great sightings of a
PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER at the Riparian Forest Overlook. As well an
AMERICAN ROBIN was observed feeding a frog to nestlings just west of the
observation platform.

On our return at 4:30pm, we had a nice tidal push along the Nisqually
Estuary Trail with good sightings of SAVANNAH SPARROW, LEAST SANDPIPER and
WESTERN SANDPIPER. A single SEMIPALMATED PLOVER called and was seen
adjacent to the dike in beautiful breeding plumage.

The Nisqually Estuary Boardwalk Trail was great for gulling, with many
birds adjacent to or on the boardwalk for great looks of RING-BILLED GULL,
CALIFORNIA GULL, GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL, WESTERN X GLAUCOUS-WINGED HYBRID
(OLYMPIC) GULL, and a continuing SHORT-BILLED GULL second year bird. We
observed numerous CASPIAN TERNS, GREAT BLUE HERONS, and DOUBLE-CRESTED
CORMORANTS. Along the way numerous swallow perches provided perched looks
at BANK SWALLOW, NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW, along with CLIFF SWALLOW,
BARN SWALLOW, TREE SWALLOW and VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOW. At the Puget Sound
Observation Platform or end of the boardwalk we had great looks of SPOTTED
SANDPIPER, WESTERN SANDPIPER, and LEAST SANDPIPER. An unexpected
RED-NECKED GREBE foraged within scoping distance on the Reach. We counted
upwards of 25 AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS at the mouth of the Nisqually.
Numerous Cliff Swallows are nesting in the covered observation decks.
Nesting PURPLE MARTIN were seen off Luhr Beach. Osprey hunted the estuary
on the high tide.

On our return a single NORTHERN PINTAIL eclipse male was observed flying
into the freshwater marsh.

We observed 70 species for the day, and have seen 155 species for the year
with Red-necked Grebe being new for the year. Mammals seen included
Eastern Cotton-tailed Rabbit, Long-tailed Weasel, Muskrat, Mink, Eastern
Gray Squirrel, Harbor Seal and Townsend's Chipmunk. We heard several
Coyotes calling in the morning.

Until next week, happy birding.

Shep

--
Shep Thorp
Browns Point
253-370-3742

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Date: 7/13/22 9:20 pm
From: Jeff Borsecnik <jeffborsecnik...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] off topic: sea otter near Anacortes
We are pretty sure, and we have a good pic. Thanks. (We have seen the river otters elsewhere in the San Juans.)
________________________________
From: Shelf Life Community Story Project <info...>
Sent: Wednesday, July 13, 2022 6:34 PM
To: Jeff Borsecnik <JeffBorsecnik...>
Cc: <tweeters...> <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] off topic: sea otter near Anacortes

Was it definitely a sea otter or perhaps a river otter in the sea (much more common around here)? If it was a positive ID for a sea otter (esp if you have pics), WA Fish and Wildlife would like to know (via their reporting form: https://wdfw.wa.gov/species-habitats/species/enhydra-lutris-kenyoni)

River otters spend a lot of time in the saltwater of the Salish Sea. They tend to swim face down whereas Sea Otters float on the backs.

Jill

On Jul 13, 2022, at 1:47 PM, Jeff Borsecnik <JeffBorsecnik...><mailto:<JeffBorsecnik...>> wrote:

We saw a sea otter Sunday evening, not far from Anacortes, at Bird Rocks. I was under the misimpression that there were no sea otters in the area. From the little I've read, it sounds like they are making a comeback in this area but are mostly found around the Olympic coast. It was interesting to see one pretty close to town, in Rosario Strait. Have others seen them around?
_______________________________________________
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Date: 7/13/22 7:34 pm
From: Carlos Andersen <2carlosandersen...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] off topic: sea otter near Anacortes
Hi Jill,
I had responded to Jeff’s question and then somehow got your email. We saw one last year in the same area! Sorry if that was confusing. Carlos on Whidbey

On Jul 13, 2022, at 18:35, Shelf Life Community Story Project <info...> wrote:

Was it definitely a sea otter or perhaps a river otter in the sea (much more common around here)? If it was a positive ID for a sea otter (esp if you have pics), WA Fish and Wildlife would like to know (via their reporting form: https://wdfw.wa.gov/species-habitats/species/enhydra-lutris-kenyoni)

River otters spend a lot of time in the saltwater of the Salish Sea. They tend to swim face down whereas Sea Otters float on the backs.

Jill

> On Jul 13, 2022, at 1:47 PM, Jeff Borsecnik <JeffBorsecnik...> wrote:
>
> We saw a sea otter Sunday evening, not far from Anacortes, at Bird Rocks. I was under the misimpression that there were no sea otters in the area. From the little I've read, it sounds like they are making a comeback in this area but are mostly found around the Olympic coast. It was interesting to see one pretty close to town, in Rosario Strait. Have others seen them around?
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

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Date: 7/13/22 7:26 pm
From: Carlos Andersen <2carlosandersen...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] off topic: sea otter near Anacortes
For sure it was a sea otter. I do have pics. We were on a puffin tour and the naturalist verified it was a sea otter. Very cool. Carlos

> On Jul 13, 2022, at 18:35, Shelf Life Community Story Project <info...> wrote:
>
> Was it definitely a sea otter or perhaps a river otter in the sea (much more common around here)? If it was a positive ID for a sea otter (esp if you have pics), WA Fish and Wildlife would like to know (via their reporting form: https://wdfw.wa.gov/species-habitats/species/enhydra-lutris-kenyoni)
>
> River otters spend a lot of time in the saltwater of the Salish Sea. They tend to swim face down whereas Sea Otters float on the backs.
>
> Jill
>
>> On Jul 13, 2022, at 1:47 PM, Jeff Borsecnik <JeffBorsecnik...> wrote:
>>
>> We saw a sea otter Sunday evening, not far from Anacortes, at Bird Rocks. I was under the misimpression that there were no sea otters in the area. From the little I've read, it sounds like they are making a comeback in this area but are mostly found around the Olympic coast. It was interesting to see one pretty close to town, in Rosario Strait. Have others seen them around?
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
> _______________________________________________
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> <Tweeters...>
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Back to top
Date: 7/13/22 6:38 pm
From: Shelf Life Community Story Project <info...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] off topic: sea otter near Anacortes
Was it definitely a sea otter or perhaps a river otter in the sea (much more common around here)? If it was a positive ID for a sea otter (esp if you have pics), WA Fish and Wildlife would like to know (via their reporting form: https://wdfw.wa.gov/species-habitats/species/enhydra-lutris-kenyoni <https://wdfw.wa.gov/species-habitats/species/enhydra-lutris-kenyoni>)

River otters spend a lot of time in the saltwater of the Salish Sea. They tend to swim face down whereas Sea Otters float on the backs.

Jill

> On Jul 13, 2022, at 1:47 PM, Jeff Borsecnik <JeffBorsecnik...> wrote:
>
> We saw a sea otter Sunday evening, not far from Anacortes, at Bird Rocks. I was under the misimpression that there were no sea otters in the area. From the little I've read, it sounds like they are making a comeback in this area but are mostly found around the Olympic coast. It was interesting to see one pretty close to town, in Rosario Strait. Have others seen them around?
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...> <mailto:<Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters <http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters>

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Date: 7/13/22 3:26 pm
From: rw <rw...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Study examines memory in expert birdwatchers
I found the article in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of
the United States of America, Vol. 119, Issue 26 (2022): article 2204172119.
This is in the (second?) Psychological and Cognitive Sciences section of
that issue.

Re Steven Wood question about sample size of the study:

Sample size: 66 experts (73% female) and 57 controls (75% female). All were
in the Toronto area. The experts, i.e., could identify more than 20 species
found in the local habitat and had bird knowledge beyond common backyard
species, had mean age 48.1 and a mean of 18.1 yrs education. The control
persons were outdoor enthusiasts (gardeners, fishers, hikers, etc.) who had
no local bird knowledge beyond common backyard species, and they had 47.9
yrs mean age and 17.6 yrs mean education.

-----Original Message-----
From: Tweeters On Behalf Of <tweeters-request...>
Sent: Wednesday, July 13, 2022 12:05 PM
To: <tweeters...>
Subject: Tweeters Digest, Vol 215, Issue 13

Send Tweeters mailing list submissions to
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To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
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When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific than
"Re: Contents of Tweeters digest..."


Today's Topics:

1. Re: Pacific-slope Flycatcher in Garden (Stan Bezimienny)
2. Study examines memory in expert birdwatchers (Wood, Steven)
3. Barry - Merlins v Hummers (Michelle Landis)
4. Austin Texas Trip (Gary Cummins)
5. Re: Study examines memory in expert birdwatchers
(Larry Schwitters)
6. Re: Austin Texas Trip (Philip Dickinson)
7. Re: Austin Texas Trip (LMarkoff)
8. Re: Barry - Merlins v Hummers (Robert O'Brien)
9. bird magazines, anyone? Bueller? (Gary Bletsch)
10. non-turkey vulture report for June (Diann MacRae)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Tue, 12 Jul 2022 14:26:19 -0700
From: Stan Bezimienny <grzebiuszkaziemna...>
To: <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Pacific-slope Flycatcher in Garden
Message-ID: <A674012D-EA85-4C04-8635-C2F0FC7707B5...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

I had Pacific-slope Flycatcher nesting *on* my house (literally, on the bend
of a downspout, 6 ft off the ground) - in Lake Forest Park twice. I was able
to extensively photograph parents and later juveniles from both outside and
inside of the house. And, I hear them every year in season from tall
conifers around the house.

Best,

Stan in LFP

> On Jul 12, 2022, at 12:08, <tweeters-request...>
wrote:
>
> Pacific-slope Flycatcher in Garden


------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Tue, 12 Jul 2022 21:44:01 +0000
From: "Wood, Steven" <woodsteven...>
To: "<tweeters...>" <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Study examines memory in expert birdwatchers
Message-ID:

<SJ0PR04MB7501A36768075643C584273BA7869...>
com>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




"The memory test centered on bird pictures.



Wonder how large a sample they had?



Who can find the published study? I haven?t looked very hard but have
looked."


The study is linked at the bottom of the ScienceDaily article, but a direct
link is here:

The structure of prior knowledge enhances memory in experts by reducing
interference | PNAS<https://www.pnas.org/doi/full/10.1073/pnas.2204172119>
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Message: 3
Date: Tue, 12 Jul 2022 15:21:42 -0700
From: Michelle Landis <asmalllife...>
To: tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Barry - Merlins v Hummers
Message-ID:
<CALYC4QgYP0odBK_DyQmKK2Fw3RMmrPoLPK2pZPRwKbsbCBj4Ug...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

While a Merlin could probably catch a hummingbird, I wonder about the
calorie math. A hummer can't be more than a few mouthfulls. The Merlin may
not be willing to engage in the incredible gyrations it would take for that
small a reward. As with anything in the bird world....it depends on how
hungry the bird is.

Michelle Landis
Coupeville
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Message: 4
Date: Tue, 12 Jul 2022 15:45:52 -0700
From: Gary Cummins <g.cummins40...>
To: <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Austin Texas Trip
Message-ID:
<CAK_gA=b8KLH=N42aVdptDzZx=Z1x5e9c=<5TG7XYmCSe98TWKxQ...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

Be sure to visit the Balcones NWR not far from Austin. Broken hill country.
Go in the morning, because Austin will be hot this time of year!
Gary Cummins
Port Townsend
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Message: 5
Date: Tue, 12 Jul 2022 15:48:35 -0700
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...>
To: "Wood, Steven" <woodsteven...>
Cc: <Tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Study examines memory in expert birdwatchers
Message-ID: <C0DBEE62-F6FB-4FB8-AC88-63BDE3BE0765...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

Thanks Steven.

Larry Schwitters
Issaquh

> On Jul 12, 2022, at 2:44 PM, Wood, Steven <woodsteven...> wrote:
>
>
>
> ?The memory test centered on bird pictures.
>
> Wonder how large a sample they had?
>
> Who can find the published study? I haven?t looked very hard but have
looked.?
>
>
> The study is linked at the bottom of the ScienceDaily article, but a
direct link is here:
>
> The structure of prior knowledge enhances memory in experts by
> reducing interference | PNAS
> <https://www.pnas.org/doi/full/10.1073/pnas.2204172119>_______________
> ________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...> <mailto:<Tweeters...>
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> <http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters>
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Message: 6
Date: Tue, 12 Jul 2022 16:04:35 -0700
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins...>
To: Kellie Sagen <kelliekvinne...>
Cc: "<tweeters...>" <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Austin Texas Trip
Message-ID:
<CAF7jaVfFukE1nfs4piVt-tD1nacuMhZsSYL57FBCYUany3RJ7A...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

I have birded several places around Austin over the years during family
visits. As Gary said, it will be hot for several weeks (currently over 100),
so get out very early in the morning wherever you go. My top two
recommendations are Hornsby Bend and Commons Ford Park, and they are the top
two species-wise in Travis County. Roy Guerrero Metro Park is also along the
river close in town, or just an early morning walk along the trail on the
south side of the river in town near the bats. Balcones Canyonlands is
great, but chances will be remote to find Golden-cheeked Warbler or
Black-capped Vireo in late summer. McKinney Falls SP just south of town is
another possibility. If you want to go north to Williamson County, you could
try Lake Creek Trail-West or Berry Springs. I suspect that Devine Lake and
Granger Lake would too hot in August.

Phil Dickinson

On Mon, Jul 11, 2022 at 9:34 PM Kellie Sagen <kelliekvinne...>
wrote:

> Hi Tweets,
>
> I am heading to Austin, TX in a few weeks to see the Mexican
> Free-tailed bat colony under the Congress Ave Bridge and want to do
> some birding during the few days I?m there. If anyone has
> recommendations of good spots in that area, I would love to hear them.
>
> Happy Birding!
>
> Kellie Sagen ?
> Lake Stevens, WA
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
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Message: 7
Date: Tue, 12 Jul 2022 18:34:37 -0700
From: "LMarkoff" <canyoneagle...>
To: <tweeters...>, "'Kellie Sagen'"
<kelliekvinne...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Austin Texas Trip
Message-ID: <000001d89658$b8da91d0$2a8fb570$@mycci.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

I lived in Austin for 7 years. I avoided birding places in or close to the
city because of the noise, tough to hear the birds. You also have to deal
with lots of traffic. But Phil?s suggestion of Hornsby Bend and Commons
Ford Park is a good one. He?s spot on about the heat. Wherever you go, get
there at dawn.



And if you have time, and are able to hike a bit, you might try Barton Creek
Wilderness Park where you might get lucky and see a Limpkin. Limpkins have
exploded and an amazing range expansion is happening. They are popping up
all over the central/eastern part of the country. Here are a couple of
ebird reports of the Limpkin at Barton Creek WP dated today.



https://ebird.org/checklist/S114931109

https://ebird.org/tx/checklist/S114930567



Best wishes for a happy and safe trip,



Lori Markoff



From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of
Philip Dickinson
Sent: Tuesday, July 12, 2022 4:05 PM
To: Kellie Sagen <kelliekvinne...>
Cc: <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Austin Texas Trip



I have birded several places around Austin over the years during family
visits. As Gary said, it will be hot for several weeks (currently over 100),
so get out very early in the morning wherever you go. My top two
recommendations are Hornsby Bend and Commons Ford Park, and they are the top
two species-wise in Travis County. Roy Guerrero Metro Park is also along the
river close in town, or just an early morning walk along the trail on the
south side of the river in town near the bats. Balcones Canyonlands is
great, but chances will be remote to find Golden-cheeked Warbler or
Black-capped Vireo in late summer. McKinney Falls SP just south of town is
another possibility. If you want to go north to Williamson County, you could
try Lake Creek Trail-West or Berry Springs. I suspect that Devine Lake and
Granger Lake would too hot in August.



Phil Dickinson



On Mon, Jul 11, 2022 at 9:34 PM Kellie Sagen <kelliekvinne...>
<mailto:<kelliekvinne...> > wrote:

Hi Tweets,

I am heading to Austin, TX in a few weeks to see the Mexican Free-tailed bat
colony under the Congress Ave Bridge and want to do some birding during the
few days I?m there. If anyone has recommendations of good spots in that
area, I would love to hear them.

Happy Birding!

Kellie Sagen ?
Lake Stevens, WA
_______________________________________________



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------------------------------

Message: 8
Date: Tue, 12 Jul 2022 20:22:13 -0700
From: "Robert O'Brien" <baro...>
To: Michelle Landis <asmalllife...>
Cc: tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Barry - Merlins v Hummers
Message-ID:
<CABL+5aE=<m0a8Sv9M6BOCsH5f4ihyNHZwAn4AYaGbyBcCFh2sCQ...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

On the other hand, what about an orderve? I once observed a Merlin fly in
casually from a long distance to land in the top of a gigantic oak tree on
Sauvie Island near Portland. As it happened a Bushtit flock was foraging
there. As the Merlin landed it casually reached out with a foot and nabbed
a Bushtit. No chasing was involved and I wondered if the capture was
planned or just a last-minute target of opportunity when landing.
Bob OBrien Portland

On Tue, Jul 12, 2022 at 3:22 PM Michelle Landis <asmalllife...>
wrote:

> While a Merlin could probably catch a hummingbird, I wonder about the
> calorie math. A hummer can't be more than a few mouthfulls. The
> Merlin may not be willing to engage in the incredible gyrations it
> would take for that small a reward. As with anything in the bird
> world....it depends on how hungry the bird is.
>
> Michelle Landis
> Coupeville
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
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Message: 9
Date: Wed, 13 Jul 2022 14:27:44 +0000 (UTC)
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
To: Tweeters Tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] bird magazines, anyone? Bueller?
Message-ID: <747558281.511898.1657722464779...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

Dear Tweeters,
My bookshelves are sagging! I think it is time for me to unload some bird
magazines. I have a big stack of? old issues of?Birding that I would hate to
toss in the dumpster, so if anyone wants them, please let me know. I also
have quite a few years' worth of Sandgrouse that should go. This is the
quarterly publication of OSME, the Ornithological Society of the Middle East
, the Caucasus, and Central Asia).
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch
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Message: 10
Date: Wed, 13 Jul 2022 20:16:37 +0200
From: Diann MacRae <tvulture...>
To: tweeters t <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] non-turkey vulture report for June
Message-ID:

<trinity-5f05ebc7-bf3f-40a7-b966-4e79378e80df-1657736197114@3c-app-mailcom-b
s07>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

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------------------------------

Subject: Digest Footer

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------------------------------

End of Tweeters Digest, Vol 215, Issue 13
*****************************************

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Date: 7/13/22 2:26 pm
From: Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Purple Martins - arboreal feeding
Two Purple Martins from the colony that nest on poles in the Illwaco, Pacific County boat basin, were feeding from the branches of the birches along the basin walkway. Two years ago there were often several martins engaging in that behavior. They get little caterpillars, both by hovering briefly and by landing on branches.

Jeff Gilligan
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Back to top
Date: 7/13/22 1:50 pm
From: Jeff Borsecnik <JeffBorsecnik...>
Subject: [Tweeters] off topic: sea otter near Anacortes
We saw a sea otter Sunday evening, not far from Anacortes, at Bird Rocks. I was under the misimpression that there were no sea otters in the area. From the little I've read, it sounds like they are making a comeback in this area but are mostly found around the Olympic coast. It was interesting to see one pretty close to town, in Rosario Strait. Have others seen them around?

_______________________________________________
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<Tweeters...>
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Back to top
Date: 7/13/22 12:58 pm
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] M Street in Auburn
This morning (7.13.22) the main pond at M Street is all but dry, and I saw no shorebirds whatsoever on it.

Water remains south of the main pond. There were about 65 peeps: about a dozen WESTERN SANDPIPERS and the balance LEAST SANDPIPERS. There was also one LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER.

Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>
Pbase Images : https://www.pbase.com/marvbreece
Flickr Videos : https://www.flickr.com/photos/138163614@N02/
Youtube : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHbkNzr4TaZ6ZBWfoJNvavw/featured

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Date: 7/13/22 12:52 pm
From: Cynthia Easterson <eastersonfamily...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Beginning Bird Bander Training
Learn the skills needed to participate in monitoring and research programs involving bird banding. Puget Sound Bird Observatory has a few spots open in our Beginning Bander Training. The course is a five-day hands-on training class that takes place over two weekends in August. Participants will learn the fundamentals of bird banding through a combination of classroom instruction and in-the-field banding across two locations, first in Edmonds and then in Shoreline, Washington.
For details and information about how to register please visit our website: Puget Sound Bird Observatory | Bird Banding Course | PSBO (pugetsoundbirds.org)<https://www.pugetsoundbirds.org/copy-of-banding-course-2021> or email Cindy Easterson at <contact...><mailto:<contact...>.






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Date: 7/13/22 12:37 pm
From: Kellie Sagen <kelliekvinne...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Austin Texas Trip
A big thank you to all the folks that have contacted me with recommendations! I am super excited to see some new species. Not excited about the heat though! Do they make cooling underwear? Ha!

Happy Birding,
Kellie Sagen
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Date: 7/13/22 11:21 am
From: Diann MacRae <tvulture...>
Subject: [Tweeters] non-turkey vulture report for June
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Date: 7/13/22 7:31 am
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] bird magazines, anyone? Bueller?
Dear Tweeters,
My bookshelves are sagging! I think it is time for me to unload some bird magazines. I have a big stack of  old issues of Birding that I would hate to toss in the dumpster, so if anyone wants them, please let me know. I also have quite a few years' worth of Sandgrouse that should go. This is the quarterly publication of OSME, the Ornithological Society of the Middle East , the Caucasus, and Central Asia).
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch
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Date: 7/12/22 8:26 pm
From: Robert O'Brien <baro...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Barry - Merlins v Hummers
On the other hand, what about an orderve? I once observed a Merlin fly in
casually from a long distance to land in the top of a gigantic oak tree on
Sauvie Island near Portland. As it happened a Bushtit flock was foraging
there. As the Merlin landed it casually reached out with a foot and nabbed
a Bushtit. No chasing was involved and I wondered if the capture was
planned or just a last-minute target of opportunity when landing.
Bob OBrien Portland

On Tue, Jul 12, 2022 at 3:22 PM Michelle Landis <asmalllife...>
wrote:

> While a Merlin could probably catch a hummingbird, I wonder about the
> calorie math. A hummer can't be more than a few mouthfulls. The Merlin
> may not be willing to engage in the incredible gyrations it would take for
> that small a reward. As with anything in the bird world....it depends on
> how hungry the bird is.
>
> Michelle Landis
> Coupeville
> _______________________________________________
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Date: 7/12/22 6:38 pm
From: LMarkoff <canyoneagle...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Austin Texas Trip
I lived in Austin for 7 years. I avoided birding places in or close to the city because of the noise, tough to hear the birds. You also have to deal with lots of traffic. But Phil’s suggestion of Hornsby Bend and Commons Ford Park is a good one. He’s spot on about the heat. Wherever you go, get there at dawn.



And if you have time, and are able to hike a bit, you might try Barton Creek Wilderness Park where you might get lucky and see a Limpkin. Limpkins have exploded and an amazing range expansion is happening. They are popping up all over the central/eastern part of the country. Here are a couple of ebird reports of the Limpkin at Barton Creek WP dated today.



https://ebird.org/checklist/S114931109

https://ebird.org/tx/checklist/S114930567



Best wishes for a happy and safe trip,



Lori Markoff



From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of Philip Dickinson
Sent: Tuesday, July 12, 2022 4:05 PM
To: Kellie Sagen <kelliekvinne...>
Cc: <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Austin Texas Trip



I have birded several places around Austin over the years during family visits. As Gary said, it will be hot for several weeks (currently over 100), so get out very early in the morning wherever you go. My top two recommendations are Hornsby Bend and Commons Ford Park, and they are the top two species-wise in Travis County. Roy Guerrero Metro Park is also along the river close in town, or just an early morning walk along the trail on the south side of the river in town near the bats. Balcones Canyonlands is great, but chances will be remote to find Golden-cheeked Warbler or Black-capped Vireo in late summer. McKinney Falls SP just south of town is another possibility. If you want to go north to Williamson County, you could try Lake Creek Trail-West or Berry Springs. I suspect that Devine Lake and Granger Lake would too hot in August.



Phil Dickinson



On Mon, Jul 11, 2022 at 9:34 PM Kellie Sagen <kelliekvinne...> <mailto:<kelliekvinne...> > wrote:

Hi Tweets,

I am heading to Austin, TX in a few weeks to see the Mexican Free-tailed bat colony under the Congress Ave Bridge and want to do some birding during the few days I’m there. If anyone has recommendations of good spots in that area, I would love to hear them.

Happy Birding!

Kellie Sagen 🦉
Lake Stevens, WA
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Date: 7/12/22 4:08 pm
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Austin Texas Trip
I have birded several places around Austin over the years during family
visits. As Gary said, it will be hot for several weeks (currently over
100), so get out very early in the morning wherever you go. My top two
recommendations are Hornsby Bend and Commons Ford Park, and they are the
top two species-wise in Travis County. Roy Guerrero Metro Park is also
along the river close in town, or just an early morning walk along the
trail on the south side of the river in town near the bats. Balcones
Canyonlands is great, but chances will be remote to find Golden-cheeked
Warbler or Black-capped Vireo in late summer. McKinney Falls SP just south
of town is another possibility. If you want to go north to Williamson
County, you could try Lake Creek Trail-West or Berry Springs. I suspect
that Devine Lake and Granger Lake would too hot in August.

Phil Dickinson

On Mon, Jul 11, 2022 at 9:34 PM Kellie Sagen <kelliekvinne...>
wrote:

> Hi Tweets,
>
> I am heading to Austin, TX in a few weeks to see the Mexican Free-tailed
> bat colony under the Congress Ave Bridge and want to do some birding during
> the few days I’m there. If anyone has recommendations of good spots in that
> area, I would love to hear them.
>
> Happy Birding!
>
> Kellie Sagen 🦉
> Lake Stevens, WA
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>

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Date: 7/12/22 3:54 pm
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Study examines memory in expert birdwatchers
Thanks Steven.

Larry Schwitters
Issaquh

> On Jul 12, 2022, at 2:44 PM, Wood, Steven <woodsteven...> wrote:
>
>
>
> “The memory test centered on bird pictures.
>
> Wonder how large a sample they had?
>
> Who can find the published study? I haven?t looked very hard but have looked.”
>
>
> The study is linked at the bottom of the ScienceDaily article, but a direct link is here:
>
> The structure of prior knowledge enhances memory in experts by reducing interference | PNAS <https://www.pnas.org/doi/full/10.1073/pnas.2204172119>_______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...> <mailto:<Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters <http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters>

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Date: 7/12/22 3:49 pm
From: Gary Cummins <g.cummins40...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Austin Texas Trip
Be sure to visit the Balcones NWR not far from Austin. Broken hill country.
Go in the morning, because Austin will be hot this time of year!
Gary Cummins
Port Townsend

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Date: 7/12/22 3:25 pm
From: Michelle Landis <asmalllife...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Barry - Merlins v Hummers
While a Merlin could probably catch a hummingbird, I wonder about the
calorie math. A hummer can't be more than a few mouthfulls. The Merlin
may not be willing to engage in the incredible gyrations it would take for
that small a reward. As with anything in the bird world....it depends on
how hungry the bird is.

Michelle Landis
Coupeville

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Date: 7/12/22 2:47 pm
From: Wood, Steven <woodsteven...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Study examines memory in expert birdwatchers



"The memory test centered on bird pictures.



Wonder how large a sample they had?



Who can find the published study? I haven?t looked very hard but have looked."


The study is linked at the bottom of the ScienceDaily article, but a direct link is here:

The structure of prior knowledge enhances memory in experts by reducing interference | PNAS<https://www.pnas.org/doi/full/10.1073/pnas.2204172119>

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Date: 7/12/22 2:29 pm
From: Stan Bezimienny <grzebiuszkaziemna...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Pacific-slope Flycatcher in Garden
I had Pacific-slope Flycatcher nesting *on* my house (literally, on the bend of a downspout, 6 ft off the ground) - in Lake Forest Park twice. I was able to extensively photograph parents and later juveniles from both outside and inside of the house. And, I hear them every year in season from tall conifers around the house.

Best,

Stan in LFP

> On Jul 12, 2022, at 12:08, <tweeters-request...> wrote:
>
> Pacific-slope Flycatcher in Garden
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Date: 7/12/22 5:55 am
From: Mason Flint <masonflint...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] unusual unidentified wail
That's so cool!

I'm in Peru right now with Naturalist Journeys - Penguins today but no wolves. 😀
________________________________
From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> on behalf of Scott Ramos <lsr...>
Sent: Friday, July 1, 2022 9:30:16 PM
To: Tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] unusual unidentified wail

While camping near Liberty a couple weeks ago, I was awakened close to midnight by a pair of Great Horned Owls dueting with their typical calls. Interspersed with their vocalizations was another call that I have never heard before. It took me a while to get my senses together and make a recording, still in my tent.

This audio has only two of the wails, but there were maybe a dozen that preceded these. I don't believe it is even a bird, even though it was happening during the owl conversation. None of my bird experts had any ideas, other than concern for my welfare!
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/122222759<https://nam12.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.inaturalist.org%2Fobservations%2F122222759&data=05%7C01%7C%7C70cfb5e6e9464092bb0608da5bd2fd34%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637923258986704389%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C3000%7C%7C%7C&sdata=SpIXWRO%2B3C3f7ZdJsz8rYhBppbn61eAq%2BV1WQXnn%2BaU%3D&reserved=0>

Any suggestions from our knowledgeable community?
Thanks,
Scott Ramos
Seattle

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Date: 7/11/22 9:37 pm
From: Kellie Sagen <kelliekvinne...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Austin Texas Trip
Hi Tweets,

I am heading to Austin, TX in a few weeks to see the Mexican Free-tailed bat colony under the Congress Ave Bridge and want to do some birding during the few days I’m there. If anyone has recommendations of good spots in that area, I would love to hear them.

Happy Birding!

Kellie Sagen 🦉
Lake Stevens, WA
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Date: 7/11/22 4:40 pm
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Study examines memory in expert birdwatchers -- ScienceDaily
Larry is no academic but this one doesn't smell right.

The memory test centered on bird pictures.

Wonder how large a sample they had?

Who can find the published study? I haven’t looked very hard but have looked.

Larry

> On Jul 11, 2022, at 2:31 PM, Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> wrote:
>
> Well, that is good news:
>
> https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/07/220707100910.htm
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
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Date: 7/11/22 4:04 pm
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] M Street in Auburn, King County
The main pond at M Street in Auburn is nearly dried up. But today (7.11.22) there were at least 60 peeps; about half LEAST SANDPIPERS & half WESTERN SANDPIPERS. There was also one SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER.

Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>
Pbase Images : https://www.pbase.com/marvbreece
Flickr Videos : https://www.flickr.com/photos/138163614@N02/
Youtube : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHbkNzr4TaZ6ZBWfoJNvavw/featured

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Date: 7/11/22 2:35 pm
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Study examines memory in expert birdwatchers -- ScienceDaily
Well, that is good news:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/07/220707100910.htm


Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 7/11/22 2:32 pm
From: Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Washington Dept of Fish and Wildlife Wants You
Tweeters,
The WDFW needs new members for the Wildlife Diversity Advisory Council (WDAC). Here's what we do:

The Wildlife Diversity Advisory Council advises the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife on keeping common species common and recovering sensitive, threatened, or endangered species. The council also recommends approaches for developing and maintaining the social, political, and financial support necessary to conserve wildlife species diversity in Washington.

Here's the request from the WDFW:


WDFW seeks applicants for Wildlife Diversity (non-game) Advisory Council

OLYMPIA - The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is seeking applicants for its Wildlife Diversity Advisory Council (WDAC).

The WDAC advises the Department on management of a wide range of non-game animals and their habitats such as songbirds, wolverines, butterflies, and killer whales.

The purpose of the WDAC is to advise the director on matters pertaining to Wildlife Diversity (non-game species and habitat). At the Department's request, the WDAC may focus on present or emerging issues as they relate to wildlife conservation. Examples include conservation priorities, species status recommendations, and wildlife area plans.

WDFW Director Kelly Susewind will appoint up to 15 new members to join incumbent members of the 20-member advisory council based on their interests in wildlife and their ability to communicate their perspectives in a productive manner to the Department and a broader group of stakeholders.

The Department is seeking applicants to represent a broad range of members with a demonstrated interest in wildlife diversity. All members of the public are invited to apply regardless of race, color, sex, age, national origin, language proficiency, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity and/or expression, status as a veteran, or basis of disability.

To ensure the WDAC represents a diversity of views, WDFW especially encourages applicants who can represent urban and rural communities, agricultural and timbered landscapes, eastern Washington, land trusts, hunters, anglers, wildlife enthusiasts, academia, and conservation organizations to apply.

Applicants can be affiliated with an organized group, but affiliation is not required. Applications must be submitted in writing with the following information:

* Applicant's name, address, telephone number, and email address.
* Explanation of interest and reasons for wanting to serve as a member of the advisory council.
* Demonstrated effectiveness in communication.
* Ability to attend weekday and weekend meetings, in person and virtually.

Applications must be submitted by Aug. 5, 2022 to Hannah Anderson, Wildlife Diversity Division Manager by email at <h.anderson...><mailto:<h.anderson...> or by mail at Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, PO Box 43141, Olympia, WA 98504-3141.

WDAC members are appointed to three-year terms. Each member is expected to serve on a sub-committee of the WDAC tasked with making progress and developing recommendations to the director on that topic.

The WDAC will hold at least two one-day meetings a year, one each in eastern and western Washington. Sub-committees will hold additional meetings as needed throughout the year. Most meetings will occur on weekdays, with occasional weekends. Members should be available for meetings beginning as early as September. Council members, upon request, will be reimbursed by WDFW for travel expenses to attend meetings.

As part of WDFW's efforts to advance respectful and inclusive work environments, the Department expects inclusivity as part of our professional interactions and communications. WDFW aims to ensure that all individuals feel welcome, and are treated fairly and respectfully.
May all your birds be identified,
Denis DeSilvis
Member, WDFW Wildlife Diversity Advisory Council
Avnacrs 4 birds at outlook dot com


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Date: 7/11/22 2:31 pm
From: Mary Bond <marybond11...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fwd: Brown Pelican on Rat Island
On a visit to Fort Flagler SP to see the aforementioned Caspian Terns, we
also saw a young brown pelican, two black oystercatchers, harlequin ducks,
rhinoceros auklets, and a river otter. 2:00 Monday July 11.

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Date: 7/11/22 12:15 pm
From: Christina Wilsdon <cwilsdon...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Pacific-slope Flycatcher in Garden
Hello! I hope everybody's enjoying a lovely, bird-filled summer. Just had
to share that a new (to my backyard) bird showed up for me: a Pacific-slope
Flycatcher. (In Cottage Lake area of Woodinville.) Not only does he sing
his signature song every few minutes, but he also landed on a mid-level
tree branch right above the chair I was reclining in, jumped off of it to
hawk an insect midair, and posed obligingly for several minutes. Bird ID
doesn't get easier than that!

best,
Christina

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Date: 7/11/22 10:31 am
From: Tom Benedict <benedict.t...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] large Caspian Tern colony near Pt Townsend
It appears that the colony has been around for some years. Here’s link to a photo which appears to be from 2014. No mention of colony size though. I’m interested in visiting it, so started a little research. Doesn’t look like it’s easy to get to. Kayak might be the best bet.

https://images.livingwilderness.com/image/I0000rSzNRrRcHxA

Tom Benedict
Seahurst, WA

From: Steve Hampton <stevechampton...> <mailto:<stevechampton...>>
Subject: [Tweeters] large Caspian Tern colony near Pt Townsend
Date: June 30, 2022 at 15:21:03 Pacific Time
To: TWEETERS tweeters <tweeters...> <mailto:<tweeters...>>

Today I counted 510 Caspian Terns and estimated probably 1000 attending a colony on Rat Island off the northern tip of Indian Island. This island is also called the Marrowstone Wildlife Mgmt Area on some maps. I was viewing from the tip of the spit at Ft Flagler campground on Marrowstone Island at a minus tide.

The colony was very active, with many birds making obvious provisioning flights, carrying fish and landing in the thick of the colony, which is largely hidden behind tall grasses along the top of the island.

Presumably these are terns relocated from the Columbia River and elsewhere.

Pics, including one of a prey fish, are here: https://ebird.org/checklist/S114112413 <https://ebird.org/checklist/S114112413>

good birding,

--
Steve Hampton


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Date: 7/9/22 7:54 pm
From: <lsr...> <lsr...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] unusual unidentified wail
Thanks to everyone who responded. The overwhelming consensus was wolf, although there were other mammal suggestions including cougar, fox and human.

Plus, several visceral comments:

I would've been terrified to hear that.
I'd have a hard time sleeping after hearing that.
You're just lucky whatever that thing was didn't find you in your tent.
I'd be happy to be alive.

Looking forward to the next encounter!
Scott



----------------------------------------
From: "Scott Ramos" <lsr...>
Sent: Friday, July 1, 2022 7:32 PM
To: "Tweeters" <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] unusual unidentified wail
While camping near Liberty a couple weeks ago, I was awakened close to midnight by a pair of Great Horned Owls dueting with their typical calls. Interspersed with their vocalizations was another call that I have never heard before. It took me a while to get my senses together and make a recording, still in my tent.

This audio has only two of the wails, but there were maybe a dozen that preceded these. I don't believe it is even a bird, even though it was happening during the owl conversation. None of my bird experts had any ideas, other than concern for my welfare!
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/122222759

Any suggestions from our knowledgeable community?
Thanks,
Scott Ramos
Seattle




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Date: 7/8/22 7:29 pm
From: Hank Heiberg <hank.heiberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bobwhite at Stillwater

> Even though the Northern Bobwhite at Stillwater north of Carnation in the Snoqualmie Valley is most likely a released or escaped bird, I thought that the following video might be of interest. (Make sure that your sound is up and you give the video time to load.)
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/52203068358/in/dateposted/
>
> Hank Heiberg
> Issaquah, WA
> Sent from my iPad

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Date: 7/8/22 6:11 pm
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Rebuilding an Iconic California State Park With Birds and Wildfire In Mind | Audubon

https://www.audubon.org/magazine/summer-2022/rebuilding-iconic-california-state-park-birds-and


Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 7/8/22 3:51 pm
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Kent Valley shorebirds
7.8.22 at M Street in Auburn
Least Sandpiper - 120
Western Sandpiper - 30
Semipalmated Sandpiper - 1
Long-billed Dowitcher - 7
Lesser Yellowlegs - 1

no Greater Yellowlegs or Solitary Sandpiper today at M Street

S 204th St in Kent
Least Sandpiper - 8
Greater Yellowlegs - 1 [ https://flic.kr/p/2nx1pRA | https://flic.kr/p/2nx1pRA ]
Lesser Yellowlegs - 1
LB Dowitcher - 1
Spotted Sandpiper - 1
Virginia Rail - seen and heard
Sora - seen and heard
Purple Martin - heard



Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>
Pbase Images : https://www.pbase.com/marvbreece
Flickr Videos : https://www.flickr.com/photos/138163614@N02/
Youtube : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHbkNzr4TaZ6ZBWfoJNvavw/featured

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Date: 7/8/22 10:31 am
From: Brian Zinke <zinke.pilchuck...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Up In Smoke: How will birds respond to smoke pollution in the age of megafires?
Hi all,

We invite you to tune in tonight at 7pm for our July program entitled, "Up
In Smoke: How will birds respond to smoke pollution in the age of
megafires?" presented by Dr. Olivia Sanderfoot.

All are welcome to join us for this free event, which will be on Zoom. Fore
more details and to register to attend, please visit the Pilchuck Audubon
programs webpage <https://www.pilchuckaudubon.org/monthly-programs>. We
hope to see you there!

Cheers,
Brian Zinke

--
[image: Logo] <https://www.pilchuckaudubon.org/>
Brian Zinke
Executive Director
phone: (425) 232-6811
email: <director...>
Pilchuck Audubon Society
1429 Avenue D, PMB 198, Snohomish, WA 98290
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