tweeters
Received From Subject
7/17/18 9:08 am Dayna yalowicki <dlwicki...> [Tweeters] Crow with Blue Beak
7/17/18 7:01 am Beverly Osband <beveb...> [Tweeters] ?Blue-throated or Magnificent Hummingbird in Ravenna
7/16/18 10:53 pm Dalton Spencer <offthehookflyshop...> [Tweeters] Kitsap Birding
7/16/18 10:32 pm Dan Reiff, PhD <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] Hummingbird Feeder That does not attract bees
7/16/18 5:41 pm Darcy Thomas <darcy424...> [Tweeters] Virginia Rail Chicks
7/16/18 4:08 pm Victoria Moffatt <vlmoffatt3...> [Tweeters] Birding trips over Christmas vacation
7/16/18 4:04 pm <rwlawson...> [Tweeters] Lesser Goldfinches, Washtucna
7/16/18 1:59 pm Cara Borre <cmborre1...> [Tweeters] Westport Seabirds trip report Saturday July 14
7/16/18 1:45 pm Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...> [Tweeters] Non -breeding Vaux's Swifts
7/16/18 7:16 am Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...> Re: [Tweeters] Birding at Paradise
7/15/18 11:32 pm Josh Adams <xjoshx...> Re: [Tweeters] RFI: Sightings of White-tailed Ptarmigan at Mt. Rainier?
7/15/18 10:01 pm Vicki King <vkbirder...> [Tweeters] RFI: Sightings of White-tailed Ptarmigan at Mt. Rainier?
7/15/18 9:48 pm Dave Slager <dave.slager...> [Tweeters] Ruff on San Juan Island
7/15/18 5:53 pm Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...> [Tweeters] Edmonds marsh 7-14-18: Dowitcher and mystery sandpiper
7/15/18 5:06 pm Sharon Cormier-Aagaard <scormieraa001...> [Tweeters] Black Phoebe, Grays Harbor County, 7/15/18, 7:50 am
7/15/18 2:49 pm Bert Bartleson <bartlesonfsc...> [Tweeters] Juvenile coots in Olympia?
7/15/18 2:14 pm Bert Bartleson <bartlesonfsc...> [Tweeters] Birding at Paradise, Mt. Rainier N. P.
7/15/18 10:36 am Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...> [Tweeters] The Birdbooker Report
7/15/18 9:27 am Dan Reiff, PhD <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] The Cassia Crossbill- Idaho's New Endemic Bird Species|Idaho Birds
7/14/18 11:25 pm Dalton Spencer <offthehookflyshop...> [Tweeters] Birding at Paradise, Mt Rainier
7/14/18 4:05 pm Steve Noseworthy <stephenose...> [Tweeters] American Bittern
7/14/18 3:01 pm Hubbell <ldhubbell...> [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Duck, Duck, Heron
7/14/18 11:03 am Will's Email <yekramw...> [Tweeters] Fwd: Baby hummingbirds life cycle from start to finish. Must see! Awesome! 
7/13/18 11:41 pm Dan Reiff, PhD <dan.owl.reiff...> Re: [Tweeters] Cassia Crossbill Article
7/13/18 11:31 pm Dan Reiff, PhD <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] Cassia Crossbill Article
7/13/18 9:19 pm Marvin S Hoekstra <marvin.hoekstra...> [Tweeters] Cassia Crossbill
7/13/18 3:34 pm Doug <dcsimonsen...> Re: [Tweeters] Deer Question
7/13/18 1:09 pm Christine Southwick <clsouth...> [Tweeters] Swainson Thrush passing through Shoreline
7/13/18 1:01 pm Shep Thorp <shepthorp...> [Tweeters] Nisqually NWR Wednesday Walk for July 11th, 2018
7/13/18 11:15 am <mcallisters4...> Re: [Tweeters] Deer question
7/13/18 11:01 am Vicki Biltz <vickibiltz...> [Tweeters] Deer question
7/12/18 4:36 pm Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2018-07-12
7/12/18 2:15 pm B&PBell <bellasoc...> [Tweeters] Eastside Audubon Whidbey trip 7-11-18
7/12/18 11:53 am Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...> [Tweeters] What Makes Parrots So Intelligent?
7/11/18 6:20 pm STEVEN ELLIS <sremse...> [Tweeters] O.T. ARF Update
7/11/18 3:32 pm Hank H <h.heiberg...> [Tweeters] Godwit....oops!
7/11/18 12:13 pm H Heiberg <h.heiberg...> [Tweeters] Godwit & other birds at Cherry Valley
7/11/18 7:18 am Stephen Chase <schasecredo...> [Tweeters] Methow Lifers
7/10/18 6:49 am mary hrudkaj <mch1096...> Re: [Tweeters] OT Western Washington Lizard
7/10/18 12:06 am Al n Donna <alndonna...> [Tweeters] OT Western Washington Lizard
7/9/18 9:55 pm Benjamin Johnson <tiger80...> [Tweeters] Request for merlin sightings
7/9/18 2:33 pm Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] Hayton shorebirds
7/9/18 8:18 am Pam Cahn <puc...> [Tweeters] NOBO at 3 Forks
7/9/18 2:11 am Tim Brennan <tsbrennan...> [Tweeters] Lewis County birding 7/8
7/8/18 4:02 pm Hank H <h.heiberg...> Re: [Tweeters] American Goldfinch feeding on a windblown plant
7/8/18 2:56 pm Stewart Wechsler <ecostewart...> Re: [Tweeters] American Goldfinch feeding on a windblown plant
7/8/18 12:49 pm Marcia Ian <gnudle...> [Tweeters] Trailhead break-in
7/8/18 12:48 pm Hubbell <ldhubbell...> [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Eaglets Troubles
7/8/18 9:24 am B B <birder4184...> [Tweeters] White Pelican Impact Questions
7/7/18 10:13 pm Hank H <h.heiberg...> [Tweeters] American Goldfinch feeding on a windblown plant, Kittitas County
7/7/18 8:39 pm Anthony <birds...> [Tweeters] Car Breakins Thwarted at Various Trailheads
7/7/18 7:03 pm Eric Ellingson <abriteway...> [Tweeters] Brown Pelican, Semiahmoo, Blaine WA
7/7/18 11:54 am Sharon Cormier-Aagaard <scormieraa001...> [Tweeters] Lake Sammamish State Park monthly bird walk – 7/6/18
7/7/18 10:55 am Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] White Pelican movement hypothesis
7/7/18 9:45 am George Heleker <earthman1950...> [Tweeters] Whidbey Island American White Pelicans
7/7/18 9:43 am Roger Moyer <rogermoyer1...> [Tweeters] Lewis County Eastern Kingbird
7/7/18 9:05 am Jeff Kozma <jcr_5105...> Re: [Tweeters] [Fwd: Banded Harlequin]
7/7/18 9:04 am Jeff Kozma <jcr_5105...> Re: [Tweeters] [Fwd: Banded Harlequin]
7/7/18 8:43 am Robert Gray <robertgary02...> [Tweeters] Western Tanager
7/7/18 7:40 am Pamela Myers <pamelapiwo6813...> [Tweeters] Cassia Crossbills
7/6/18 8:48 pm Hal Michael <ucd880...> Re: [Tweeters] [Fwd: Banded Harlequin]
7/6/18 8:39 pm Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...> [Tweeters] Edmonds brown pelican 7-6-18 (photos)
7/6/18 7:45 pm <merdave...> [Tweeters] [Fwd: Banded Harlequin]
7/6/18 7:37 pm Rick Taylor <taylorrl...> [Tweeters] Edmonds Brown pelican at Stamm Overlook
7/6/18 5:43 pm Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...> [Tweeters] Edmonds brown pelican 7-6-18 (2nd try)
7/6/18 2:53 pm Janeanne Houston <houstojc...> [Tweeters] Belated Common Nighthawk Report
7/6/18 2:00 pm Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Silly bird prediction game - Marymoor Park
7/6/18 12:25 pm B Boekelheide <bboek...> [Tweeters] 2018 Neah Bay pelagic outings
7/6/18 9:49 am Robert Gray <robertgary02...> [Tweeters] Mercer Island Nighthawk
7/6/18 9:17 am Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...> [Tweeters] Parrots Use Chemistry And Physics To Create Brilliantly Colorful Plumage
7/6/18 9:09 am <festuca...> Re: [Tweeters] Is Cinnamon Harmful to Birds?
7/5/18 6:05 pm Stewart Wechsler <ecostewart...> Re: [Tweeters] Another Seattle Nighthawk sighting--what's the deal?
7/5/18 5:28 pm Josh Adams <xjoshx...> [Tweeters] Jetty Island, Everett - Marbled Godwit, etc.
7/5/18 5:21 pm Lonnie Somer <mombiwheeler...> [Tweeters] Marbled Murrelets at Discovery Park
7/5/18 5:10 pm Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2018-07-05
7/5/18 4:05 pm Phil Kelley <scrubjay323...> [Tweeters] Nisqually NWR 7/4/18
7/5/18 12:50 pm Jennifer Jarstad <jennjarstad...> Re: [Tweeters] Another Seattle Nighthawk sighting--what's the deal?
7/5/18 8:11 am James Fiero <james.fiero51...> [Tweeters] Great Egret at the fill
7/4/18 6:09 pm Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant...> Re: [Tweeters] Another Seattle Nighthawk sighting--what's the deal?
7/4/18 4:35 pm Ed Newbold <ednewbold1...> [Tweeters] Another Seattle Nighthawk sighting--what's the deal?
7/4/18 10:33 am John Leszczynski <jrleszczynski...> [Tweeters] Brown Pelican at Discovery Park
7/4/18 7:01 am mary hrudkaj <mch1096...> [Tweeters] More on UW birds during Special Olympics
7/3/18 10:35 pm Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] Kittitas County birding
7/3/18 5:07 pm Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1...> [Tweeters] Adult Red-tailed hawk / Caryn / Wedgwood
7/3/18 3:17 pm Hank H <h.heiberg...> [Tweeters] Juvenile Spotted Sandpiper video (Redmond, WA)
7/3/18 11:37 am Michelle Maani <lamoustique...> [Tweeters] Is cinnamon harmful to birds?
7/3/18 7:37 am George Neavoll <gneavoll...> Re: [Tweeters] Banded Harlequin
7/3/18 7:10 am Hal Michael <ucd880...> Re: [Tweeters] Banded Harlequin
7/3/18 6:57 am Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...> [Tweeters] Fwd: [BIRDCHAT] Article on Maryland pelagic history and award to Richard A. Rowlett
7/3/18 6:45 am Hal Michael <ucd880...> Re: [Tweeters] House finches at my house
7/3/18 6:45 am Jeff Kozma <jcr_5105...> Re: [Tweeters] Banded Harlequin
7/3/18 12:33 am Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...> [Tweeters] Re A little help with bird song or call
7/3/18 12:33 am Vaughn Rhoden <vrhoden...> [Tweeters] House finches at my house
7/2/18 10:16 pm B Boekelheide <bboek...> Re: [Tweeters] A little help with bird song or call
7/2/18 9:47 pm <merdave...> [Tweeters] Banded Harlequin
7/2/18 3:26 pm mary hrudkaj <mch1096...> [Tweeters] Baby Mountain Quail and Special Olympics Opening Ceremony Unofficial Flyover
7/2/18 9:38 am Hank H <h.heiberg...> [Tweeters] Virginia Rail Video (Stillwater)
7/2/18 9:20 am Carol Schulz <carol.schulz50...> [Tweeters] "Hawk Attack" near Kennewick, WA
7/1/18 9:14 pm Sammy Catiis <Hikersammy...> Re: [Tweeters] Nesting Black Throated Gray Warbler?
7/1/18 7:15 pm James Karr <jrkarr...> Re: [Tweeters] Why Don't Birds Have Teeth?
7/1/18 6:53 pm Will's Email <yekramw...> Re: [Tweeters] Why Don't Birds Have Teeth?
7/1/18 1:13 pm Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...> [Tweeters] Why Don't Birds Have Teeth?
7/1/18 12:55 pm Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...> [Tweeters] Wagner swifts
7/1/18 12:53 pm Marcia Ian <gnudle...> [Tweeters] Mini mallard
7/1/18 12:48 pm Janet Ray <janetlaura...> Re: [Tweeters] Nesting Black Throated Gray Warbler?
7/1/18 12:35 pm Barry Brugman <bbrug15...> [Tweeters] Fall shorebird migration at Edmonds Marsh
7/1/18 12:16 pm Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...> [Tweeters] A little help with bird song or call
7/1/18 12:09 pm Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...> [Tweeters] The Birdbooker Report
7/1/18 7:33 am Matt Bartels <mattxyz...> [Tweeters] Gray catbird in newhalem- July 1 7:30am
6/30/18 5:53 pm Pat <pcoddin...> [Tweeters] Nesting Black Throated Gray Warbler?
6/30/18 12:30 pm Hubbell <ldhubbell...> [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Duckling Distraction
6/30/18 12:05 pm Ellen Blackstone <ellen...> [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of July 1, 2018
6/28/18 4:54 pm Megan Ward <meganward28...> [Tweeters] Great Gray Owl update
6/28/18 12:45 pm Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign15...> [Tweeters] Tsunami Spray and Crab Soup
6/28/18 12:40 pm Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2018-06-28
6/28/18 9:50 am Michelle Maani <lamoustique...> Re: [Tweeters] Asking for an audio ID
6/28/18 8:42 am <festuca...> [Tweeters] "Summer Tanager" reported at Nisqually NWR
6/28/18 7:21 am Megan Ward <meganward28...> [Tweeters] Great grey owl- echo lake area
6/27/18 9:18 pm Shep Thorp <shepthorp...> [Tweeters] Nisqually NWR Wednesday Walk for 6/27/2018
6/27/18 7:12 pm Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...> [Tweeters] Fall Shorebirds - Edmonds
6/27/18 8:25 am Bob Sundstrom <ixoreus...> Re: [Tweeters] Asking for an audio ID
6/26/18 10:33 pm Kenneth Brown <kenbrownpls...> [Tweeters] Common Nighthawks
6/26/18 5:36 pm Dee Dee <deedeeknit...> Re: [Tweeters] White Pelicans Nisqually (John Whitehead)
6/26/18 5:29 pm Michelle Maani <lamoustique...> [Tweeters] Asking for an audio ID
6/26/18 3:50 pm Dave Slager <dave.slager...> Re: [Tweeters] White Pelicans Nisqually
6/26/18 3:34 pm B B <birder4184...> [Tweeters] Alder Flycatcher at Bacon Creek Road and SR 20
6/26/18 1:03 pm Tom and Carol Stoner <tcstonefam...> [Tweeters] Soaring Cooper's
6/26/18 8:53 am Josh Adams <xjoshx...> [Tweeters] Skagit Alder Flycatcher - Yes
6/25/18 10:13 pm Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...> [Tweeters] Article on Puget Sound White Pelicans
6/25/18 4:49 pm John Whitehead <jirvingw...> [Tweeters] White Pelicans Nisqually
6/25/18 11:18 am Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...> [Tweeters] How Do Young Birds Know When To Leave The Nest?
6/25/18 5:22 am Russ Koppendrayer <russkope...> Re: [Tweeters] More on today's Eastern Phoebe [in Wahkiakum County]
6/24/18 9:44 pm Kevin Black <kevblack787...> Re: [Tweeters] More on today's Eastern Phoebe [in Wahkiakum County]
6/24/18 8:53 pm Matt Bartels <mattxyz...> [Tweeters] More on today's Eastern Phoebe [in Wahkiakum County]
6/24/18 8:49 pm Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] Skagit Alder Flycatcher
6/24/18 8:25 pm Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...> [Tweeters] AOS Checklist supplement
6/24/18 7:18 pm Nelson Briefer <nrieferb...> [Tweeters] White Pelicans
6/24/18 6:49 pm Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...> [Tweeters] Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course monthly bird walk -6-21-2018
6/24/18 5:49 pm Bruce LaBar <blabar...> [Tweeters] Westport Pelagic Trip, June 23, 2018
6/24/18 3:25 pm Penny L Koyama <plkoyama...> Re: [Tweeters] Eastern phoebe at Julia butler Hanson NWr wahkiakum co
6/24/18 2:05 pm Hubbell <ldhubbell...> [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Baby Crows
6/24/18 2:01 pm Jen McKeirnan <j1975mck...> [Tweeters] Mercer Slough Birding - Eastern Kingbird
6/24/18 12:41 pm Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...> [Tweeters] The Birdbooker Report
6/24/18 11:56 am Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...> [Tweeters] NO Lesser Black-backed Gull
6/24/18 11:29 am Matt Bartels <mattxyz...> [Tweeters] Eastern phoebe at Julia butler Hanson NWr wahkiakum co
6/23/18 5:53 pm Tom Mansfield <birds...> Re: [Tweeters] Pacific County Ratities
6/23/18 12:07 pm Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...> [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of June 24, 2018
6/23/18 11:09 am Tom Mansfield <birds...> [Tweeters] Pacific County Ratities
6/23/18 8:25 am Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant...> [Tweeters] Pt. No Pt. Lesser Black-backed Gull
6/22/18 6:48 pm Tim Brennan <tsbrennan...> [Tweeters] Lewis County Harlequin Duck
6/22/18 5:01 pm Daniel R Froehlich <danielfroehlich...> [Tweeters] Pacific County Lazuli Bunting and Black Phoebe
6/22/18 1:21 pm Shep Thorp <shepthorp...> [Tweeters] Nisqually NWR, Wednesday Walk for 6/20/2018
6/22/18 8:40 am J. Acker <owler...> [Tweeters] Endangered/Threatened/Sensitive Species and the use of Playback
6/21/18 4:51 pm Marcus Roening <marcus...> [Tweeters] Quilomene WRA is burning.
6/21/18 4:32 pm Steve Pink <pirangas...> [Tweeters] Cassia Crossbill Trip
6/21/18 3:37 pm Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2018-06-21
6/21/18 2:41 pm Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1...> [Tweeters] RFI: Digiscoping info / Caryn / Wedgwood
6/21/18 2:22 pm noelle c <noellesculpt...> Re: [Tweeters] Pileated Woodpecker eating huckleberries
6/21/18 2:14 pm Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...> Re: [Tweeters] Fwd: Brewer's Sparrow
6/21/18 1:39 pm Robert O'Brien <baro...> Re: [Tweeters] Pileated Woodpecker eating huckleberries
6/21/18 11:21 am Christine Southwick <clsouth...> Re: [Tweeters] Pileated Woodpecker eating huckleberries
6/21/18 11:14 am Diane Yorgason-Quinn <avosetta...> Re: [Tweeters] Pileated on blue elderberries
6/21/18 11:09 am Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny...> Re: [Tweeters] Pileated Woodpecker eating huckleberries
6/21/18 11:05 am Christine Southwick <clsouth...> [Tweeters] Pileated on blue elderberries
6/21/18 10:51 am Robert O'Brien <baro...> [Tweeters] Fwd: Brewer's Sparrow at Rainy Pass
6/21/18 10:38 am Pterodroma <pterodroma...> Re: [Tweeters] Pileated Woodpecker eating huckleberries
6/21/18 10:05 am Robert O'Brien <baro...> Re: [Tweeters] Brewer's Sparrow at Rainy Pass
6/21/18 8:18 am <enhunn323...> Re: [Tweeters] Brewer's Sparrow at Rainy Pass
6/21/18 12:41 am Robert O'Brien <baro...> Re: [Tweeters] Brewer's Sparrow at Rainy Pass
6/20/18 11:17 pm Anne O. <harelde...> [Tweeters] Pileated Woodpecker eating huckleberries
6/20/18 10:45 pm Hans-Joachim Feddern <thefedderns...> Re: [Tweeters] Northern Mockingbird in Bothell?
6/20/18 9:52 pm William Byers <byers345...> [Tweeters] Black-tailed Gull really California Gull
6/20/18 5:33 pm William Byers <byers345...> [Tweeters] Black-tailed Gull
6/20/18 3:36 pm LELAND JONES <virwin...> [Tweeters] Reminder: Katrina van Grouw on Bainbridge Island
6/20/18 1:37 pm Wilson Cady <gorgebirds...> Re: [Tweeters] Birdbath dive bombing flycatcher
6/20/18 12:56 pm Janet Ray <janetlaura...> Re: [Tweeters] Birdbath dive bombing flycatcher
6/20/18 10:12 am byers345 <byers345...> [Tweeters] Black-tailed Gull ? on Kingston ferry
6/20/18 8:25 am Philip Dickinson <pdickins...> Re: [Tweeters] Northern Mockingbird in Bothell?
6/20/18 8:13 am Jeremy Schwartz <jschwartz1124...> [Tweeters] Northern Mockingbird in Bothell?
6/19/18 5:05 pm Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...> [Tweeters] Lazuli Bunting - Roy
6/19/18 3:50 pm Anna <amk17...> [Tweeters] Birdbath dive bombing flycatcher
6/19/18 3:20 pm STEVE KOHL M.D. <stkohl...> [Tweeters] Eastern Kingbird at Magnuson Park, Seattle
6/19/18 1:57 pm Robert DeCandido PhD <rdcny...> [Tweeters] Request for information - Owls
6/19/18 12:18 pm Jack Nolan <jacknolan62...> [Tweeters] American White Pelicans
6/19/18 8:26 am Sharon Cormier-Aagaard <scormieraa001...> [Tweeters] YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT AT STILLWATER
6/19/18 8:12 am KenandTina <kenandtina...> [Tweeters] Dipper Nest
6/18/18 9:43 pm B B <birder4184...> [Tweeters] Sprague Lake and Pend Oreille County - including a Possible Alder Flycatcher
6/18/18 10:42 am Diann MacRae <tvulture...> [Tweeters] bat flight
6/18/18 7:49 am Dave Parent <dpdvm...> [Tweeters] Brewer's Sparrow at Rainy Pass
 
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Date: 7/17/18 9:08 am
From: Dayna yalowicki <dlwicki...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Crow with Blue Beak
Someone on the facebook Bothell community page noticed a crow with a bright blue beak. It was in a group of other crows that had black beaks. There is a photo but it’s a closed group, so I can’t share the post. Has this been seen before and does anyone have knowledge of what this could be?

Dayna Yalowicki
Bothell

Buy Free Range
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Date: 7/17/18 7:01 am
From: Beverly Osband <beveb...>
Subject: [Tweeters] ?Blue-throated or Magnificent Hummingbird in Ravenna
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Date: 7/16/18 10:53 pm
From: Dalton Spencer <offthehookflyshop...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Kitsap Birding
Thanks all,

To everybody who gave me information on birding at Paradise, Thank You!
Enough people have told me that the snow is too much of a hindrance that we are postponing the trip until August. Instead we are going to the Kitsap Peninsula. After a morning in Tahuya we will probably visit Theler Wetlands.
My question to Tweeterdom is, Where is the best place on the Kitsap Pen. to find shorebirds. We are mainly looking for Pectoral Sandpiper, Semipalmated Sandpiper, Tringa sp, and the rocky shore sandpipers. Bonaprtes Gull is another need for the trip.
I know high tide is at 5:30pm so shorebirding wouldn't be good until probably 2 or 3.
I know nothing about the area do any information is good information.

Thanks,

Dalton SpencerChehalis, Washington
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
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Date: 7/16/18 10:32 pm
From: Dan Reiff, PhD <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Hummingbird Feeder That does not attract bees
T’s,
We have had what appear to be honey bees- lots of them- take over our hummer feeders this and the past few years. The adults avoid the feeders when bees are near or on them. Young hummers- at times-will feed anyway. I am not sure if this puts them at risk for injury.
However, my wife, who loves hummingbirds and tends the feeders, found a “solution”-this type of feeder- that bees 🐝 don’t use.
It seems to have solved the problem.
Hope this helps some of you that have had this situation.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005F5NGYW/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Best,
Dan Reiff
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Date: 7/16/18 5:41 pm
From: Darcy Thomas <darcy424...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Virginia Rail Chicks
Hi everyone,
I thought you might like to know I saw two little Virginia Rail chicks with their parent at Edmond’s Marsh today. They kept going in and out of the marsh grasses following their mom. They were covered in black down. Very cute.

Darcy Thomas
Brier
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Date: 7/16/18 4:08 pm
From: Victoria Moffatt <vlmoffatt3...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Birding trips over Christmas vacation
Hello all I am trying to plan a vacation somewhere to enjoy birding along with some landscape photography preferably somewhere sunnier the the PNW in late December early January.

Thoughts on Cuba?

Victoria

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 7/16/18 4:04 pm
From: <rwlawson...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Lesser Goldfinches, Washtucna
Lesser Goldfinches sightings seem to be increasing, so I am not sure whether
this counts as unusual anymore, but Joseph Brown and I saw 2 Lesser
Goldfinches in Bassett Park in Washtucna on 11 July. One male was singing
from a wire, so he seems to be on territory.



Rachel Lawson

Seattle

<rwlawson...> <mailto:<rwlawson...>




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Date: 7/16/18 1:59 pm
From: Cara Borre <cmborre1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Westport Seabirds trip report Saturday July 14
*Westport Seabirds headed out on another trip Saturday, July 14 with the
team of Captain Phil Anderson, First Mate Chris Anderson, my fellow
spotters Scott Mills and Bill Shelmerdine, and 20 birders. Though bar
crossing conditions were a bit exciting due to an outgoing tide and seas a
bit bumpy on the way out, it was a beautiful, sunny, almost windless
day.Our first treat was a long, close look at a juvenile Cassin’s Auklet on
the water, a species often hard to see well as they fly away from the boat.
We had our first close looks at many "usual" species, including
Black-footed Albatross, Northern Fulmar, Pink-footed Shearwater, and
Fork-Tailed Storm-Petrels at a shrimp boat near the edge of the continental
shelf. These mid-summer pelagics are great for storm-petrels and this trip
was no exception. Later we had excellent looks at good numbers of both
Fork-tailed and Leach’s Storm-Petrels visiting our chum in deep water. Our
South Polar Skua experience was also quite remarkable. We ended up with 6
sightings, the most memorable two being one that flew directly over the
boat and another which landed very close to the boat. We all enjoyed great
looks and photo ops of this striking bird. The most unusual bird we had
for the day was a Short-tailed Shearwater which was seen near a shrimp boat
on our way back. Short-tails are not uncommon in the winter or fall off the
Washington coast, but quire rare this time of year. Here’s the complete
trip list for the day:Surf Scoter-8White-winged Scoter-1 Black-footed
Albatross-90 Northern Fulmar-150 Pink-footed Shearwater-106Sooty
Shearwater-2176 Short-tailed Shearwater-1Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel-96Leach’s
Storm-Petrel-71 Brandt’s Cormorant-104Double-crested Cormorant-7Pelagic
Cormorant-16Brown Pelican-1149Western Sandpiper-25Red-necked Phalaropes-11
South Polar Skua-6Pomarine Jaeger-1 Common Murre-141 Pigeon Guillemot-20
Cassin’s Auklet-3 Rhinoceros Auklet-31 Sabine’s Gull-1Heermann’s Gull-454
California Gull-17 Glaucous-winged/Western Gull-585 Small tern sp-2Harbor
Porpoise-1Harbor Seal-5Northern Fur Seal-1Elephant Seal-1California
Sea-Lion-1 Steller’s Sea Lion-3Blue Shark-2 The next Westport Seabirds
pelagic trips are scheduled for July 25 and August 4. To inquire about
reservations, schedules, and all other information, please visit our
website at www.westportseabirds.com <http://www.westportseabirds.com/> Hope
to sea you out there soon!Cara BorreGig Harbor, WA *

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Date: 7/16/18 1:45 pm
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Non -breeding Vaux's Swifts
We know of three Washington State roosts now with significant numbers of Vaux’s Swifts. 57 used the Port Angeles Catholic Church last night and Monroe Wagner and Selleck have been checked every night since mid-April and always have swifts.

This time of the year 50-150 of the wee birds can put on a pretty good show.

Larry Schwitters
Issaquah
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Date: 7/16/18 7:16 am
From: Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Birding at Paradise
Hi Dalton - Suggest you check out sightings at Rainier at Birders
Dashboard either by clicking on Hotspots or Choose any location or by
searching for a particular species. Here is the link:
http://birdingwashington.info/dashboard/wa


Also suggest you check out the section on birding Mt Rainier in A Birder's
be Guide to Wawshington, Second Edition, which is now online, at this
address:
http://wabirdguide.org/mount-rainier/

Jane Hadley
Seattle, WA

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Date: 7/15/18 11:32 pm
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] RFI: Sightings of White-tailed Ptarmigan at Mt. Rainier?
Hello Vicki,
To the best of my knowledge (and someone *please* correct me if I'm wrong),
no WT Ptarmigan have been observed on the Fremont Lookout in several years
with no shortage of people trying. If it was me, I would pursue one of the
other alpine hikes from Sunrise and hope for the best if Paradise is still
under snow.

Josh Adams
Cathcart, WA

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Date: 7/15/18 10:01 pm
From: Vicki King <vkbirder...>
Subject: [Tweeters] RFI: Sightings of White-tailed Ptarmigan at Mt. Rainier?
An Australian birding friend will be visiting Seattle next weekend for only
a few days and would like to see a White-tailed Ptarmigan while he's in
our area. We've decided to spend next Sunday at Mt. Rainier. Based on
recent reports at the WTA website, we assume that our chances of spotting
Ptarmigan will be better at the Fremont Lookout, which is already melted
out, than along the Skyline Trail/Panarama Point at Paradise, which still
seems to have a lot of snow cover.

I would be grateful for any current sightings, recommendations or advice on
how to maximize our chances of seeing Ptarmigan at Mt. Rainier.

Thanks for your consideration,

Vicki King
Seattle

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Date: 7/15/18 9:48 pm
From: Dave Slager <dave.slager...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Ruff on San Juan Island
Greetings,

This morning Breck Tyler photographed a Ruff at First Lagoon on San
Juan Island. It was still present at 9pm this evening.

First Lagoon is the obvious pond visible from the well marked Jakle's
Lagoon Trail parking area near American Camp on the south end of San
Juan Island.

There were also 2 Pectoral Sandpipers.

Good birding,

Dave Slager
Seattle, WA
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Date: 7/15/18 5:53 pm
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Edmonds marsh 7-14-18: Dowitcher and mystery sandpiper
Saturday evening I photographed a dowitcher and a mystery sandpiper at the Edmonds marsh.  Spotting and photography at the marsh is getting difficult due to the explosion of growth of the foliage.  I appreciate Tweetsters helping me ID the sandpiper.   Photos are at the bottom pf page 11:
http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum/index.php?threads/wildlife-of-edmonds-wa-2018.16307/page-11
Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA
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Date: 7/15/18 5:06 pm
From: Sharon Cormier-Aagaard <scormieraa001...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Black Phoebe, Grays Harbor County, 7/15/18, 7:50 am
Hi Tweets,

My friend Milt Vine just returned from Saturday's pelagic trip, with the Black Phoebe photo on his camera and limited internet access. He just asked me to put this code 5 bird fir Grays Harbor County on Tweeters for him. Location details are in the following link to his eBird report:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47208310

Happy trails,
Sharon Aagaard





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Date: 7/15/18 2:49 pm
From: Bert Bartleson <bartlesonfsc...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Juvenile coots in Olympia?
Hi Tweeters,

I was surprised this morning to see at the pond edge, through my scope, two
birds that I didn't recognize at first look. They were quite large [size of
a chicken], gray mostly except for a lighter belly. Their heads appeared to
be very small in comparison to their body, short beaks. They were about 500
M. away so I didn't get great looks. I was stumped at first, but they
walked like they were clumsy. I thought maybe rail and got out my book and
stumbled on the image in Sibley of juvenile coots. That seemed to be what I
had seen. In the past, coots do come to the pond during Winter, but they
are gone in Spring. I note on E-bird that nobody reports any coot
observations since the end of May this year in Thurston County. This pond
is near a nature preserve wetland area so it's possible these birds were
recent fledglings from a nest there. Where do coots usually nest? Does
this seem likely that my identification is correct? Thanks.

Bert Bartleson, Olympia


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Date: 7/15/18 2:14 pm
From: Bert Bartleson <bartlesonfsc...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Birding at Paradise, Mt. Rainier N. P.
Hi Dalton,

I went birding at the Paradise area last July 27th. The flowers were
astounding! We hiked up the Skyline Trail until it was covered by snow at
about 6700'. In the snow fields beside the trail we saw two groups of 8
gray crowned rosy-finches [lifer's for me]. In addition, we saw 2 Clark's
nutcrackers at the visitor's center after the hike [one on the roof and one
in the parking lot]. So those are two birds on your list that you might
find there. Arrive early because there are too many people and too little
parking, so the lot gets full.

Bert Bartleson, Olympia


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Date: 7/15/18 10:36 am
From: Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] The Birdbooker Report
HI ALL:
This week's titles are:

1) The Wonderful Mr. Willughby

https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/2018/07/new-title.html

2) Walker's Mammals of the World

https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/2018/07/new-title_12.html

sincerely
--

Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/
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Date: 7/15/18 9:27 am
From: Dan Reiff, PhD <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] The Cassia Crossbill- Idaho's New Endemic Bird Species|Idaho Birds
Tweets,
I found this to be an interesting article.
Dan Reiff


https://idahobirds.net/birding-idaho/cassia-crossbill/

Cassia Crossbill
The Cassia Crossbill – Idaho’s New Endemic Species



Male Cassia Crossbill. Photo by Craig Benkman
Formerly one of the 10 call types of Red Crossbill (Loxia curvirostra) in North America, the Cassia Crossbill (Loxia sinesciuris) was recently recognized to warrant species status by the American Ornithological Society (58th supplement to the AOS Check-list of North American Birds), giving Idaho its sole endemic species.

The Red Crossbill call types are distinguished by their vocalizations, especially their contact calls, and by their bill and body sizes and associated conifer preferences, and thus areas where they most commonly reside. General information on the call types can be found here: North American Red Crossbill Types

Most crossbills are nomadic and therefore cannot be found reliably in any single area. This is not true for the sedentary Cassia Crossbill, which relies on the stable seed production of Rocky Mountain lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta latifolia) in the South Hills and Albion Mountains year-round. Indeed, the Cassia Crossbill is the only crossbill in North America that you can count on finding year-round, year after year in the same forest.

A Unique Evolution

Key to the evolution of the Cassia Crossbill is the absence of red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) from the lodgepole pine forests in the South Hills and Albion Mountains. Here, Cassia Crossbills are about 20 times more abundant than Red Crossbills in similar forests in the Rocky Mountains. Unlike in the South Hills and Albions, one can walk several days in the lodgepole pine forests in the Rocky Mountains and not see or hear a crossbill. Moreover, many of the above-ground and open-cup nesting song birds are about twice as abundant as in the lodgepole pine forests in the Rocky Mountains, presumably in part because of the absence of red squirrels as nest predators.

Crossbills are seed predators, so trees that deter foraging crossbills have a reproductive advantage. Because crossbills occur in higher densities and consume more seeds in the South Hills and Albions than in lodgepole pine forests elsewhere, crossbills are especially important natural selective agents on the cones. Crossbills avoid foraging on cones having thicker scales at the distal end of the cone where most of the seeds are located (crossbills have greater difficulty spreading apart thicker scales to expose the underlying seeds). This favors the evolution of cones with thicker distal scales, which distinguishes the lodgepole pine cones in the South Hills and Albions from those elsewhere. The thicker cone scales in turn explain why the Cassia Crossbill has evolved a bill that averages about 0.6 mm deeper than that of Type 5, which specializes on lodgepole pine where red squirrels are present. This coevolutionary arms race between crossbills and pine in the South Hills and Albions has ultimately favored the evolution of the Cassia Crossbill.

Distribution

The small area of lodgepole pine in the South Hills and Albions limits the distribution of the Cassia Crossbill to about 70 km2 of forest. Even with relatively high densities, they number only about 6,000 individuals. This limited distribution and small population size makes them especially vulnerable to environmental change, such as more frequent and larger fires. Fortunately, pine beetle outbreaks have been more limited than in other lodgepole pine forests, perhaps because of the higher densities of insectivorous birds including the very abundant Hairy Woodpecker. See this paper Benkman_2016.pdf for more information about the natural history of the Cassia Crossbill.

How to Identify Cassia Crossbills


The lower mandible crosses to the right, as in this male Cassia Crossbill, in about half the crossbills, and to the left in the other half. Photo by Craig Benkman.
Along with Cassia Crossbills there are two other call types that occur regularly in summer in the South Hills, Type 2 (generally ponderosa pine associated) and Type 5 (Rocky Mountain lodgepole pine associated outside of the South Hills and Albions). Both of these call types average smaller than the Cassia Crossbill (bill depths average 0.3 and 0.6 mm less than in the Cassia Crossbill, respectively), but, because of extensive size overlap and no consistent plumage differences, one needs to rely on vocalizations.

Cassia Crossbill contact call:

Download File (.wav) Recording by Julie Smith

Type 2 Red Crossbill contact call:

Download File (.wav) Recording by Julie Smith

Type 5 Red Crossbill contact call:

Download File (.wav) Recording by Julie Smith

Playing these calls to try to get a response from the Crossbills does not work, you just have to listen for them.

Like many birds, crossbills are most active in the morning, relatively quiet by late morning, and then more active in the mid to late afternoon and then often quiet in the evening when other birds are active.

Where to find Cassia Crossbills


Lodgepole pine near the Porcupine Springs area in the South Hills . Photo by Craig Benkman.
Older and more open stands of lodgepole pine are preferred by Cassia Crossbills; they are uncommon in dense young stands as these crossbills rely mostly on seeds in old (gray) serotinous cones (such cones remain closed until heated, usually by fire), which accumulate for 10, 20 or more years on the branches.

Below are several recommended areas to search for crossbills. Weekdays (Monday to Thursday) are best because ATV traffic (and the dust) can be considerable on weekends. Avoid holidays: Memorial Day, the 4th of July, and Labor Day.

1- The most accessible location to find them in the South Hills is to drive to the end of the paved road – G3 – south from Hansen and Rock Creek (directions are in the Forest Service links following each campground). The lodgepole pine around Porcupine Springs Campground and Diamondfield Jack at the end of the paved road have been good areas to see crossbills although they are not as common there as they used to be 10 plus years ago.

Recently, a more reliable location has been in the lodgepole pine off the dirt road to Pike Mountain. Just before Diamondfield Jack, a dirt road branches off of G3 to the east (to Pike Mountain where the view from the top provides a good perspective on the landscape and the isolation of the South Hills and Albion Mountains [tallest range to east]). Take this road and then take the first left (only about ~150 meters from G3) and drive ~150 meters further to where the pine forest starts. Park here and walk north along the dirt road along the west edge of the forest. Crossbills often forage on the serotinous lodgepole pine cones on fallen branches by the edge of the forest that open in summer when in direct sunlight.

2- Bostetter Campground and Father and Sons Campground are better but less accessible than those at the south end of Rock Creek. Crossbills often go for water in the creek that starts near Father and Sons and runs down the valley to Bostetter. The lodgepole pine in both campgrounds and in between are excellent areas to see Cassia Crossbills. You can access these two campgrounds from either the west (starting at Diamondfield Jack; this road is not passable until late June or July) or from the east (Forest Service Road 500, Oakley – Rogerson Road) starting from Oakley. If driving from the west, the lodgepole pine where forest roads 538 and 533 intersect is often excellent too.

3- In the Albion Mountains, the lodgepole pine in and around Thompson Flat Campground is an excellent location, especially when there are leaks in the water faucets that provide a water source for the crossbills.

Photographs of Banded Crossbills Wanted

If you have photographs of crossbills in the South Hills that show the bands on their legs, and you can see both legs and their bill in the photograph, please send high resolution copies to Craig Benkman [cbenkman [at] uwyo.edu] with information on the date and location. Resighting information is valuable for studies on survivorship of these birds. Thank you.
Banded Cassia Crossbills

Additional Information

Craig Benkman contributed the above information. He discovered the Cassia Crossbill in 1997, and he and his students have been studying them since. For further information on the Cassia and other crossbills visit his website uwyo.edu/benkman/publications.html for access to scientific papers.

Below are links to a podcast, articles, and a teaching module about the Cassia Crossbill (formerly South Hills Crossbill).

For the Birds Radio Program: Cassia Crossbills: of pinecones and squirrels

High Country News: The West’s Newest Species

Wired Magazine: https://www.wired.com/2016/09/bird-evolving-seriously-bizarre-way/

CourseSource: http://www.coursesource.org/courses/coevolution-or-not-crossbills-squirrels-and-pinecones


Female Cassia Crossbill removing seed from a cone. Photo by Craig Benkman

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Date: 7/14/18 11:25 pm
From: Dalton Spencer <offthehookflyshop...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Birding at Paradise, Mt Rainier
Hi all,
Kathleen Snyder and I will be birding the Paradise area of Mt. Rainier later in the month as a part of my Western Washington Big Year. I have very little birding knowledge of the park and was curios if anybody in Tweeterdom had experience in the area. I am mainly looking for recommendations on where to look for birds like Clark's Nutcracker, Red Crossbill, Cassins Finch, and if we are lucky enough Ptarmigan and Rosy Finch. We are not opposed to hiking in order to see some birds but I would rather not spend all day on just one trail. 
Thanks,
Dalton Spencer Chehalis, Washington 
PS if there are any known American Three Toed Woodpecker and/or Black Backed Woodpecker nests to which the location is shareable I would love to know. Obviously I would not go blabbing to others about where the best is due to over harassing the birds.

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
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Date: 7/14/18 4:05 pm
From: Steve Noseworthy <stephenose...>
Subject: [Tweeters] American Bittern
Hi All
I found an AMBI at the Montlake fill this morning around 7. It was in the
inlet between the island and the mainland at the end of the loop on the
south side of Carp Pond. I sent a couple of birders to refind it, I don't
know if they did. Here is a link to a marginal photo.

https://1drv.ms/u/s!AsejN6HwD-6j4lZjNDSD2WjOY_cP

Steve Noseworthy
Redmond
<stephenose...>

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Date: 7/14/18 3:01 pm
From: Hubbell <ldhubbell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Duck, Duck, Heron
Tweeters,

This week I was surprised by the behavior of a Great Blue Heron. It inspired me to search my database for answers. I wonder if your experience aligns with my conclusions? There is only one way to find out:

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2018/07/duck-duck-heron.html <https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2018/07/duck-duck-heron.html>

I hope you enjoy the post!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbel at comcast dot net
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Date: 7/14/18 11:03 am
From: Will's Email <yekramw...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fwd: Baby hummingbirds life cycle from start to finish. Must see! Awesome! 
Every once in awhile Mel’s daily video has one related to birding. Some great video of mother Rufus and her babies. 10 minutes, but I enjoyed it!

Will Markey
General Adjuster
Cell - 253-569-8455
Sent from my IPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Mel's Video Of The Day! <melsvideooftheday...>
> Date: July 14, 2018 at 04:00:28 PDT
> To: Will <yekramw...>
> Subject: Baby hummingbirds life cycle from start to finish. Must see! Awesome!
> Reply-To: Mel's Video Of The Day! <melsvideooftheday...>
>
>
> Email not displaying correctly? View it in your browser.
>
> Date: Saturday, July 14, 2018
>
> Hello Will,
>
> Baby hummingbirds life cycle from start to finish. Must see! Awesome!
>
>
>
> The life cycle of Rufous hummingbirds from nest building to raising and teaching their young. Will, I learned a LOT from this video and I bet you will as well. Enjoy!
>
> If you like today's video please share it with your family and friends.
>
> Baby hummingbirds life cycle from start to finish. Must see! Awesome!
>
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> Today's T-shirt
> I Love Hummingbirds
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> Thanks for watching and sharing the videos!
>
> Mel
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Date: 7/13/18 11:41 pm
From: Dan Reiff, PhD <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Cassia Crossbill Article
Ts,
Also note the links at the end of this article.
For example the One in Wired magazine.
Dan

> On Jul 13, 2018, at 11:28 PM, Dan Reiff, PhD <dan.owl.reiff...> wrote:
>
> Tweets,
> I found this to be an interesting article.
> Best regards,
> Dan Reiff
>
>
> https://idahobirds.net/birding-idaho/cassia-crossbill/

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Date: 7/13/18 11:31 pm
From: Dan Reiff, PhD <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Cassia Crossbill Article
Tweets,
I found this to be an interesting article.
Best regards,
Dan Reiff


https://idahobirds.net/birding-idaho/cassia-crossbill/

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Date: 7/13/18 9:19 pm
From: Marvin S Hoekstra <marvin.hoekstra...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Cassia Crossbill
tweeters,

Has anyone gone to Idaho to find and identify the Cassia Crossbill? If you are willing to share your experience, you can contact me directly.

Thanks,
Marvin Hoekstra
marvin.hoekstra AT frontier.com
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Date: 7/13/18 3:34 pm
From: Doug <dcsimonsen...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Deer Question
Vicki,



The deer you saw is almost certainly a Columbian black-tailed deer. They
are by far the most common deer on the west side of the Cascades. The tail
is smaller than that of a white-tailed deer, but similarly white on the
underside, and typically raised to display the white "flag" when the deer is
running.



The WDFW website has a good overview of Washington deer species
<https://wdfw.wa.gov/living/deer.html> .



Doug Simonsen

Anacortes




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Date: 7/13/18 1:09 pm
From: Christine Southwick <clsouth...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Swainson Thrush passing through Shoreline
At about 05:00 this morning, I heard a Swainson's Thrush. Seems a little early to be heading south, but who knows, maybe it just likes all the water features I have.

Christine Southwick
NE 163 and 28 Ave NE, Shoreline
<clsouthwick...>


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Date: 7/13/18 1:01 pm
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Nisqually NWR Wednesday Walk for July 11th, 2018
Hi Tweets,

thirty of us had a good day at Nisqually, with temperatures in the 60's to
70's degrees Fahrenheit and a Low -2.67ft Tide at 10:38am. Highlights
included many baby birds and the return of Peeps. We observed recently
fledged WOOD DUCK, MALLARD, HOODED-MERGANSER, BALD EAGLE, VIRGINIA RAIL,
WESTERN WOOD-PEWEE, WILLOW FLYCATCHER, DOWNY WOODPECKER, BARN SWALLOW, TREE
SWALLOW, BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE, SONG SPARROW, and AMERICAN GOLDFINCH. We
watched four different species feed juvenile BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD CHICKS
including WARBLING VIREO, YELLOW WARBLER, BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK, and COMMON
YELLOWTHROAT.

Starting out at 8am at the Visitor Center Overlook, we had great looks at
WOOD DUCK with recently fledged young. As well a pair of BAND-TAILED
PIGEON.

The Orchard was hopping with baby BROWN-HEADED COWBIRDS and the four
variety of foster species we observed. There is also nesting CEDAR WAXWING
and AMERICAN GOLDFINCH in the area.

The Access Road was great for WILLOW FLYCATCHER, WESTERN WOOD-PEWEE and
PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER. This is where we saw a Coyote approximately 3
months old, no doubt parent nearby. The Access Road is good for scoping
the OSPREY nest south of I5 and RED-TAILED HAWK. The front of the group
picked up a quick fly by of the PEREGRINE FALCON.

The fields west of the Access Road and south of the Twin Barns was nice for
swallow watching, 7 species seen, BARN SWALLOW, TREE SWALLOW, VIOLET-GREEN
SWALLOW, CLIFF SWALLOW, NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW, BANK SWALLOW and
PURPLE MARTIN.

The west side of the Twin Barns Loop Trail was good for SPOTTED TOWHEE,
BEWICKS WREN, BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE, SONGS SPARROW, YELLOW WARBLER, COMMON
YELLOWTHROAT and MALLARD. We had fantastic looks at SWAINSON'S THRUSH
hunting for aquatic damselfly like insects off the lily pads of the pond,
and picked up fly by of VAUX'S SWIFT. Many PACIFIC CHORAL FROGS were
observed on vegetation.

The Twin Barns Overlook was quiet with a fly by EURASIAN COLLARED DOVE.

Out on the new dike or Nisqually Estuary Trail we added AMERICAN KESTREL,
RING-BILLED GULL, DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT and juvenile VIRGINIA RAIL to
our list.

On the Nisqually Estuary Boardwalk Trail we enjoyed the return of Peeps,
LEAST SANDPIPER'S, about a dozen foraging on the mudflats. The south side
BALD EAGLE nest still has one juvenile, along the west side of McAllister
Creek. BELTED KINGFISHER continue to raise there young near the mouth of
McAllister Creek. We had nice looks of CALIFORNIA GULL, GLAUCOUS-WINGED
GULL, WESTERN X GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL hybrid and CASPIAN TERN. Many CANADA
GEESE and GREAT BLUE HERON were out on the reach.

On our return we picked up immature WILLOW FLYCATCHER and WESTERN
WOOD-PEWEE along the east side of the Twin Barns Loop Trail. We observed a
BROWN CREEPER sunning itself on the side of trunk. And ended the day
locating two immature HOODED-MERGANSER eating polliwogs at the Visitor
Center Pond Overlook.

Not a bad summer's day with 61 species observed, we have seen 144 species
for the year on the Wednesday Walk.

Mammals seen included Eastern Cotton-tailed Rabbit, Long-tailed Weasel or
maybe it was a Mink, Coyote, Columbia Black-tailed Deer and Harbor Seal.

Until next week, happy birding!

Shep
--
Shep Thorp
Browns Point
253-370-3742

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Date: 7/13/18 11:15 am
From: <mcallisters4...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Deer question
Not a dumb question. I’ve seen black-tailed deer (the only deer known to occur in your area) run off with their tail up high and they give the impression of the well known white flag appearance of a fleeing white-tailed deer. In western Washington there are Columbian White-tailed Deer and they have been translocated from the Cathlamet area to the Ridgefield and Longview area along the Columbia River and very near the mouth of the Cowlitz River. They have moved about and expanded from these release sites but there is no evidence that they’ve expanded even as far north as Lewis County, so far.



Kelly McAllister

Olympia



From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of Vicki Biltz
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 10:57 AM
To: Tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Deer question



Hi Tweeters,

A few minutes ago my old dog chased a doe out of our back garden and into the forest. The deer have never run off before as we are careful not to spook them. What I find odd is the deer had a very white flagged tail when she sprinted out of here. Not as long as the normal White Tails I grew up with in Kansas.

I’ve never paid much attention to the particular deer we have, so I don’t know who else has a white tail.

Any ideas would be appreciated. I know it’s a dumb question

Bty the Lesser Goldfinch are still here, but the last week they have been less consistent in the feeders



Vicki Biltz

<vickibiltz...> <mailto:<vickibiltz...>

Buckley Wa

--







<vickibiltz...> <mailto:<vickibiltz...>

http://www.flickr.com/photos/saw-whets_new/




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Date: 7/13/18 11:01 am
From: Vicki Biltz <vickibiltz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Deer question
Hi Tweeters,
A few minutes ago my old dog chased a doe out of our back garden and into
the forest. The deer have never run off before as we are careful not to
spook them. What I find odd is the deer had a very white flagged tail
when she sprinted out of here. Not as long as the normal White Tails I
grew up with in Kansas.
I’ve never paid much attention to the particular deer we have, so I don’t
know who else has a white tail.
Any ideas would be appreciated. I know it’s a dumb question
Bty the Lesser Goldfinch are still here, but the last week they have been
less consistent in the feeders

Vicki Biltz
<vickibiltz...>
Buckley Wa
--



<vickibiltz...>
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Date: 7/12/18 4:36 pm
From: Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2018-07-12
Tweets – a gorgeous summer day, with clear skies and temps that reached 75 degrees before 11 a.m. Maybe too nice for really good birding, but still a good day. Our species list was VERY similar to last week’s – 64 species each of the two days, with 60 species in common between them, which is what I’d expect this time of year.

Highlights:
a.. Canada Goose – at least 5, not seen last week
b.. Wood Duck – each week there seems to be a new clutch of ducklings
c.. Killdeer – adult with three tiny babies below weir
d.. Glaucous-winged Gull – 2 that looked to be hybrids – not seen last week
e.. Green Heron – juvenile below weir
f.. Pileated Woodpecker – at least 2; adult foraging and feeding a young bird near mansion
g.. Orange-crowned Warbler – at least one, silent
h.. Yellow-warbler – only two heard singing (one glimpsed)
i.. BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER – two males in cottonwoods near Dog Central – New for 2018
j.. Western Tanager – one heard, one glimpsed – not seen last week
Great looks at birds were scarcer than last week; the PILEATED WOODPECKERS were best of show, as we watched the two birds forage all around the mansion area, with them mostly staying low to the ground.

Critters included American Beaver and Muskrat. (Forgot to mention that, last week, Matt had pre-dawn bats to go along with bunnies, beaver, bucks, and bullfrogs).

Misses today included Pied-billed Grebe, Rock Pigeon, Spotted Sandpiper (seen last week), and Warbling Vireo (seen last week). The other two species seen last week but not this week were Peregrine Falcon and Red-breasted Sapsucker. Tree Swallow numbers were down last week, and way down this week; they are likely to depart soon for the year.

For the day, 64 species. Adding Black-throated Gray Warbler, the 2018 Marymoor Park list is up to 142 species.

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== <BirdMarymoor...>
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Date: 7/12/18 2:15 pm
From: B&PBell <bellasoc...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Eastside Audubon Whidbey trip 7-11-18
Hi Tweets



Yesterday, Eastside Audubon took a field trip to Whidbey Island. The day
started out early with cool (52F) temperatures and clear skies. Those were
the conditions that we had all day.



In the Kingsgate P&R we had AMERICAN ROBIN, AMERICAN CROW and
CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEE. As we passed thru Everett on I-5 we saw ROCK
PIGEON. At the Smokey Point Rest Area there were HOUSE SPARROW and
WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW. As we turned onto Fir Island there were ROCK PIGEON
and COMMON RAVEN.



Our first official stop was at the Hayton Reserve where we picked up a good
number of birds including: RED-WINGED and BREWER'S BLACKBIRDs, SAVANNAH
SPARROW, BALD EAGLE (being dive-bombed by a putative Peregrine Falcon - but
not a good enough view to add to the list), NORTHERN HARRIER, BELTED
KINGFISHER, GREAT BLUE HERON (several), KILLDEER (distant looks), MARSH
WREN, GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL, BARN SWALLOW, TREE SWALLOW, AMERICAN ROBIN,
EUROPEAN STARLING, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, MALLARD, SONG SPARROW, WHITE-CROWNED
SPARROW, and CANADA GOOSE.



Making our way north on Dodge Valley Road we saw EURASIAN COLLARED-DOVE.
Just where SR20 makes the turn to go to Whidbey Island there was a
RED-TAILED HAWK.



At Rosario Beach we saw or heard, DARK-EYED JUNCO and PACIFIC WREN (on the
way in just outside the gate), OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER, SPOTTED TOWHEE,
WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW, BLACK OYSTERCATCHER, BARN SWALLOW, HOUSE SPARROW,
SWAINSON'S THRUSH, PELAGIC COMORANT, PIGEON GUILLEMOT, AMERICAN CROW,
BUSHTITs, ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER, AMERICAN GOLDFINCH, MARBLED MURRELET,
DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT, DOWNY WOODPECKER, BEWICK'S WREN, ANNA'S
HUMMINGBIRD, SONG SPARROW, YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER, and NORTHERN FLICKER. At
this point we became aware that there was an extremely low tide - many of
what are normally 'island' rocks were now fully exposed with no water around
them. This continued throughout the day.



Across onto Whidbey itself and Cornet Bay where we picked up CANADA GOOSE,
GREAT BLUE HERONs, GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL, BALD EAGLE, WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW,
AMERICAN ROBIN, SWAINSON'S THRUSH, CHESNUT-BACKED CHICKADEE, WILSON'S
WARBLER, PURPLE FINCH, TURKEY TULTURE, and PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER. At the
western beach in Deception Pass State Park we had SWAINSON'S THRUSH,
AMERICAN ROBIN, PIGEON GUILLEMOT, RHINOCEROS AUKLET, PELAGIC CORMORANT,
COMMON MURRE, and CALIFORNIA GULL.



On to the NE corner of Whidbey and GLAUCOU-WINGED GULL, EURASIAN
COLLARED-DOVE, AMERICAN ROBIN, AMERICAN GOLDFINCH, DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT,
PIGEON GUILLEMOT, and BARN SWALLOW. At DUGUALLA LAKE we saw CANADA GOOSE,
BARN SWALLOW, NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW, (a possible Bank Swallow - but
it was not added to the list), KILLDEER, RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD, BELTED
KINGFISHER, OSPREY, GREATER YELLOWLEGS, LESSER YELLOWLEGS, PIED-BILLED
GREBE, TREE SWALLOW, and VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOW.



At the Oak Harbor Marina there were RING-BILLED GULL, DOUBLE-CRESTED
CORMORANT, and CALIFORNIA GULL.



We made an extremely pleasant lunch stop at Joseph Whidbey State Park and
saw AMERICAN ROBIN, SURF SCOTER, AMERICAN CROW, and RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD. On
Bos Lake there were RUDDY DUCK, LESSER SCAUP, GREAT BLUE HERON, GREATER
SCAUP, MALLARD, NORTHERN PINTAIL (a single female), and a small flock of
LEAST SANDPIPERs.



At Hastie Lake Road we saw PIGEON GUILLEMOT and HARLEQUIN DUCK. At Libby
Beach (Point Partridge) there were PIGEON GUILLMOT and MARBLED MURRLET. We
walked the picnic area at Fort Casey State Park and saw RED-BREASTED
NUTHATCH, NORTHERN FLICKER, AMERICAN CROW, SONG SPARROW, AMERICAN GOLDFINCH,
BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE, YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER, RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD, HOUSE
FINCH, HOUSE WREN, BROWN CREEPER, SWAINSON'S THRUSH, EUROPEAN STARLING and
BARN SWALLOW.



At the Keystone ferry landing the old structure had is almost always usual
DOUBLE-CRESTED, PELAGIC and BRANDT'S CORMORANTs, PIGEON GUILLEMOT, ROCK
PIGEON, AMERICAN CROW and nice flock of WESTERN SANDPIPERs along the beach
water edge. Leaving Keystone we cruised along Crockett Lake and saw PURPLE
MARTIN, a large (about 5-600) flock of WESTERN and LEAST SANDPIPERs (there
could have been some others, but they were too distant), GLAUCOUS-WINGED
GULL, CALIFORNIA GULL, BALD EAGLE, BARN SWALLOW, GREAT BLUE HERON.



We walked the path out to Deer Lagoon with a flock of over 100 WHITE
PELICANs, NORTHRN FLICKER, ANNA'S HUMMINGBIRD, RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD, WESTERN
WOOD-PEWEE, SONG SPARROW, EUROPEAN STARLING, EURASIAN COLLARED-DOVE, CANADA
GOOSE, KILLDEER, VIRGINIA RAIL, CASPIAN TERN, GREAT BLUED HERON, WESTERN
GULL, BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD, and CALIFORNIA QUAIL.



Early we had a STELLER'S JAY at an unrecorded location.



We had an excellent day with ideal temperature and weather conditions -
maybe a very list breeze at the end of the day. We finished with 85 species
and a great birding day!



Brian H. Bell

Woodinville WA



mail to bell asoc a t iso me dia dot com


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Date: 7/12/18 11:53 am
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...>
Subject: [Tweeters] What Makes Parrots So Intelligent?
hello everyone,

I hope your summer is going well.

a recently published paper finds that parrot brains are very similar to
primate brains: parrots have a large region that acts as an information
superhighway between the two main areas of the brain

What Makes Parrots So Intelligent?
http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2018/07/12/what-makes-parrots-so-intelligent/
tinyURL: https://tinyurl.com/yao9569k

you may find this piece illuminating, and of course, you may wish to share
it with your friends, family and bird-loving colleagues.

--
GrrlScientist | @GrrlScientist <https://twitter.com/GrrlScientist>
<grrlscientist...>
Blogs: Forbes <http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/> | Evolution
Institute <https://evolution-institute.org/profile/grrlscientist/?source=> |
Medium <https://medium.com/@GrrlScientist>
Podcasts: BirdNote Radio <http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist>
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter <https://tinyletter.com/grrlscientist>
Tiny bio: about.me <https://about.me/grrlscientist>
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Date: 7/11/18 6:20 pm
From: STEVEN ELLIS <sremse...>
Subject: [Tweeters] O.T. ARF Update
I've been conducting an Amphibian, Reptile and Fish Big Year (ARF) to see what's possible for an intended Vertebrate Big Year when I retire in a couple of years. A 3 week roadtrip to the southwest added several species. The totals to date are:


Amphibians: 10 (5 salamanders, 1 newt, 3 frogs, 1 toad)

Reptiles: 9 (6 lizards, 2 snakes & 1 turtle)

Fish: 22 (none caught by hook)

Total 41


Lifers include such species as Tiger Salamander & Longnose Dace.


I still need several "local" species including Cascade Frog, Western Toad, Long-toed and Red-backed Salamanders, Western Fence Lizard, any freshwater sculpin and/or sucker. Thanks for any help you can give me!!


For the record, I've also found:

Birds: 201

Mammals: 30

Total Vertebrates: 272 ( I'm counting sharks, rays and lampreys as "honorary vertebrates".


Steve Ellis

Coupeville, Wa.

<sremse...>




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Date: 7/11/18 3:32 pm
From: Hank H <h.heiberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Godwit....oops!
I was told that the "Godwit" that I posted about earlier was a Spotted Sandpiper. Well, at least the other ID's were correct.

Hank Heiberg
Issaquah, WA

Sent from my iPad
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Date: 7/11/18 12:13 pm
From: H Heiberg <h.heiberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Godwit & other birds at Cherry Valley
We have a photo of a (Hudsonian?) Godwit (?) at Cherry Valley Conservation Area north of Duvall. The bird has a long, yellow upturned bill, a light eyebrow and a darkish line in front of the eye. We will upload the photo and ask for help with the ID when we get home. There were also 3 Greater Yellowlegs in the same wetlands and an Eastern Kingbird on the fence by the wetlands. To get to the wetlands follow the mowed path straight out from the parking lot. Discover Pass required. Scope not necessary, but would help.

Hank & Karen Heiberg
Issaquah, WA

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 7/11/18 7:18 am
From: Stephen Chase <schasecredo...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Methow Lifers
Hello all,
I hope to be in Winthrop next week looking for a few birds I've not yet
seen. I've done some eBird researching and have picked out ideal locations
for quite a few of the birds I hope to find. Sometimes, though, the reports
were few and far between and no location stood out. I'd appreciate some
advice for the following potential lifers: Black-chinned Hummingbird, Lark
Sparrow, Pygmy Nuthatch, Brewer's Sparrow, and Gray Flycatcher. Do you know
of any reliable location in the Winthrop/Twisp area for these birds? As
well, I'd love any other advice for birding the area. So far, my itinerary
includes Washington Pass, Beaver Pond Trail/Sun Mountain Lodge, and Methow
Community Trail. Any other must-visit stops nearby?
Thanks for considering,
Stephen Chase, Everson

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Date: 7/10/18 6:49 am
From: mary hrudkaj <mch1096...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] OT Western Washington Lizard

Nice Western Fence Lizard. I've seen them sunning themselves on the exposed embankments on the west side of the Tahuya-Blacksmith Rd in the past. You usually don't notice them unless they move.

Several years ago I had a family of them in an old railroad tie in the yard. They had 2 tiny little babies that were best seen through binoculars at about 10 feet away. The little ones were only about an inch long and cute as all get out. Since then the ties has rotten away and I haven't seen WF lizards in a couple years.

Sometimes binoculars are useful for more than just birds.

BTW - my neice got gold in Women's shot put in the Special Olympics USA Games.

Mary Hrudkaj
Belfair/Tahuya

________________________________
From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> on behalf of Al n Donna <alndonna...>
Sent: Tuesday, July 10, 2018 12:01 AM
To: <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] OT Western Washington Lizard




Following Mary Hrudkajs July 2 post of Mountain Quails in her yard, we went to the nearby Ebird hotspot Tahuya Blacksmith Road again today in search of this elusive bird. No quails today. It wasnt very birdy except for robins and western wood pewees, but I did photograph the very first Western Washington lizard that Ive ever seen. It was 4-5 inches long, probably a Western Fence Lizard. If interested, my photograph is at

http://www.pbase.com/image/167787515<https://nam02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.pbase.com%2Fimage%2F167787515&data=02%7C01%7C%7C61eac4f029eb4cbff3d208d5e6332eb2%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636668029899031712&sdata=4P2awqUmqQnr6uMOZ5tu2%2FfA%2F8E09xYnZ3aQBAloY1w%3D&reserved=0>



Al in Tacoma




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Date: 7/10/18 12:06 am
From: Al n Donna <alndonna...>
Subject: [Tweeters] OT Western Washington Lizard

Following Mary Hrudkaj’s July 2 post of Mountain Quails in her yard, we went to the nearby Ebird hotspot “Tahuya Blacksmith Road” again today in search of this elusive bird. No quails today. It wasn’t very birdy except for robins and western wood pewees, but I did photograph the very first Western Washington lizard that I’ve ever seen. It was 4-5 inches long, probably a Western Fence Lizard. If interested, my photograph is at
http://www.pbase.com/image/167787515

Al in Tacoma



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Date: 7/9/18 9:55 pm
From: Benjamin Johnson <tiger80...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Request for merlin sightings
Hello All. We've been monitoring 15 merlin nests in the Puget Sound area this summer. Most of these nests have recently fledged, or will soon fledge, so keep an eye (and ear) open for groups of young merlins begging and practicing their flying skills. They are a lot of fun to watch. This can be a great time to find new territories that we didn't locate in spring since the young are so active and vocal. We'd greatly appreciate any tips you can provide on evidence of merlin breeding actiivity, such as the presence of groups of recently fledged merlins. It will help us fill in some of the gaps in our study area.

As always, keep an eye out for banded merlins, we'd love to hear about any resightings of banded merlins you may have.

If you are so inclined to share your observations please contact Ben Vang-Johnson (bvjohnson87 at gmail dot com) or Kim McCormick (kim.mccormick at comcast dot net). We'll keep any information shared with us confidential, and we greatly appreciate any help you can provide.

Thanks!

Ben

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Date: 7/9/18 2:33 pm
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Hayton shorebirds
There were shorebirds yesterday at Hayton Reserve on Fir Island in Skagit County. I put one shorebird video on Flickr.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/138163614@N02/42587799104/in/datetaken-family/

The flock consisted of more than 30 birds at the water's edge of the channel just north of the main pond. Most were WESTERN SANDPIPERS. In the video, the first bird to land is a SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER. There are 2 or 3 more semis. Near the end of the video a LEAST SANDPIPER appears in the lower left corner.

Immediately after taking this video, I replaced the camera on the tripod with a scope. While observing this flock thru 60 power from about 75 feet, an adult PEREGRINE FALCON appeared in my view and grabbed one of the peeps before any of these birds reacted to the attack. The falcon flew in and took the bird from the ground. Before any of the peeps could react. About 10 minutes later, while I was observing a flock of 20 LEAST SANDPIPERS in flight over the main pond, an adult peregrine flew into the flock and left with another one.

--
Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>

Concepts shape our world.
Concepts are not hard wired.


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Date: 7/9/18 8:18 am
From: Pam Cahn <puc...>
Subject: [Tweeters] NOBO at 3 Forks
Etta Cosey and I just heard, then saw, a Northern Bobwhite at 3 Forks in Snoqualmie. It was calling for a while and then seen briefly at 7:53 on the dike trail between the main trail and the golf course. Clear view! Too far for a phone picture but got a recording of the call on a video.

Pam Cahn
Seattle
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Date: 7/9/18 2:11 am
From: Tim Brennan <tsbrennan...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Lewis County birding 7/8
Hey Tweets,


Kevin Black and I met up dark and early in Packwood this morning, hoping to enjoy the amazing weather and find some good Lewis County birds together. We met the morning twilight on FR 1270 a little east of Packwood, and heard Common Nighthawks well before the sun came up. I've made some trips without Kevin, so we made a quick side trip to Thompson Road nearby to listen to the morning chorus at a clear cut. House Wrens, MacGillivray's Warblers, White-crowned Sparrows, and Hammond's Flycatchers were among the birds heard there.


We went back up Highway 12 to 123 and up just past Ohanapecosh Campground to set out on the Three Lakes hike on Laughingwater Trail. Hike summary for those interested - it's a 6 mile hike (although with side explorations and backtracking, and the morning walks, and I ended up with 15 miles on his fitbit) up and 6 back, with a few steep points, but very few. The trail is soft and even rock free for most of the hike, and there was snow only when we reached the top (which kept us from continuing towards the Pacific Crest Trail - just a little over a mile further). The creek is far enough away from the trail that it makes for really good listening.


Nearly constant on the trip: Thrushes (Varied and Hermit), Townsend's Warblers, Dark-eyed Junco, Hammond's and Pacific-slope Flycatchers, Vaux's Swift, Brown Creeper, Red-breasted Nuthatch, and Golden-crowned Kinglets.


We had a Hairy Woodpecker early on, and another woodpecker about a mile short of the Three Lakes that was heard only for 5-6 rounds of a rattle call. Kevin and I agree that it was a good woodpecker, but we never saw the bird, and we disagree on whether it sounded like a Black-backed or American Three-toed.


At the lakes themselves, we tried to call in a Pygmy Owl, and ended up getting responses from a Northern Goshawk instead. Definitely the bird of the day for us.


After picking Kevin's car back up, we hit Peter's Road wetland which still holds scads of blackbirds, a few Lazuli Bunting, and a few Bank Swallows. From the Cowlitz Falls Day use area not too far from there on Falls Road, I was able to find a Purple Martin, Spotted Sandpiper, and a Hutton's Vireo who apparently hadn't been told that it was late afternoon on a warm July day as it zuwee'd away.


Happy birding!


Tim Brennan

Renton

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Date: 7/8/18 4:02 pm
From: Hank H <h.heiberg...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] American Goldfinch feeding on a windblown plant
Thanks to Stewart and everyone else who replied identifying the plant that the Goldfinch was eating. The answers were unanimous...Yellow Salsify.

Hank Heiberg
Issaquah, WA

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 8, 2018, at 2:44 PM, Stewart Wechsler <ecostewart...> wrote:
>
> Hank's plant with is Goldfinch feeding as it waves in the wind is almost surely Tragopogon dubius - Yellow Salsify a common non-native plant, more common in eastern WA than in Western WA. Alternately, there is a much smaller chance it would be Tragopogon pratensis - Meadow Salsify, (also alien) which I believe is much less widespread in our area.
>
> I know that I am more of a plant guy than most of "Tweeterdom", so I thought I should post my reply for those who were curious about the answer.
>
> -Stewart Wechsler
> www.stewardshipadventures.com
>
>> Message: 3
>> Date: Sat, 7 Jul 2018 22:00:16 -0700
>> From: Hank H <h.heiberg...>
>> To: Tweeters <tweeters...>
>> Subject: [Tweeters] American Goldfinch feeding on a windblown plant,
>> Kittitas County
>
>
>> >> Take your dramamine before watching this video
>> >
>> > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/42550378264/in/dateposted/
>> >
>> >> of an American Goldfinch feeding on the seeds from this plant:
>> >>
>> >> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/42549940624/in/photostream/
>> >>
>> >> in the wind in Cle Elum. An ID of the plant would be appreciated.
>> >
>> >> Hank Heiberg
>> >> Issaquah, WA
> _______________________________________________
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Date: 7/8/18 2:56 pm
From: Stewart Wechsler <ecostewart...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] American Goldfinch feeding on a windblown plant
Hank's plant with is Goldfinch feeding as it waves in the wind is almost
surely Tragopogon dubius
<http://www.botany.hawaii.edu/faculty/carr/ofp/tra_dub.htm> - Yellow Salsify
<http://biology.burke.washington.edu/herbarium/imagecollection.php?Genus=Tragopogon&Species=dubius>
a
common non-native plant, more common in eastern WA than in Western WA.
Alternately, there is a much smaller chance it would be Tragopogon pratensis
<http://www.botany.hawaii.edu/faculty/carr/ofp/tra_pra.htm> - Meadow Salsify
<http://biology.burke.washington.edu/herbarium/imagecollection.php?Genus=Tragopogon&Species=pratensis>,
(also alien) which I believe is much less widespread in our area.

I know that I am more of a plant guy than most of "Tweeterdom", so I
thought I should post my reply for those who were curious about the answer.

-Stewart Wechsler
www.stewardshipadventures.com


> Message: 3
> Date: Sat, 7 Jul 2018 22:00:16 -0700
> From: Hank H <h.heiberg...>
> To: Tweeters <tweeters...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] American Goldfinch feeding on a windblown plant,
> Kittitas County
>



> >> Take your dramamine before watching this video
> >
> > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/42550378264/in/dateposted/
> >
> >> of an American Goldfinch feeding on the seeds from this plant:
> >>
> >> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/42549940624/in/photostream/
> >>
> >> in the wind in Cle Elum. An ID of the plant would be appreciated.
> >
> >> Hank Heiberg
> >> Issaquah, WA

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Date: 7/8/18 12:49 pm
From: Marcia Ian <gnudle...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Trailhead break-in
My car was broken into while parked in the trailhead lot at Lake Whatcom County Park. The rear passenger window was smashed and items stolen that I had wrapped in a blanket. (A purse, etc. I won’t do that again.) I worked with police, who told me that this had become quite a racket. They arrested a young woman caught on camera using my credit card to buy food. She was just one of a crew, but at that time the guy in charge wasn’t caught.

Marcia Ian
Bellingham WA
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Date: 7/8/18 12:48 pm
From: Hubbell <ldhubbell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Eaglets Troubles
Tweeters,

Monty and Marsha, the newest eagle pair on Union Bay, are having troubles. Their untested nest has partially failed it initial run. A major portion of the new nest shifted and partially fell, also on Thursday one of the juvenile eaglets ended up on the ground. I do not have all the latest information, but this post relays everything I currently know. Thank you for your concern.

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2018/07/eaglet-troubles.html <https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2018/07/eaglet-troubles.html>

Have a great day on Union Bay, where nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net
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Date: 7/8/18 9:24 am
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: [Tweeters] White Pelican Impact Questions
I enjoyed reading the posts by George and Gary about the masking of White Pelicans at Deer Lagoon.  Gary's tie in to the fireworks is certainly interesting.  
A question that comes to my mind is the impact of such a large number of large birds on a new ecosystem.   The pelicans are relatively new to Deer Lagoon.  These are huge birds and must consume a large number of fish.  Are they feeding elsewhere and then just resting in the Lagoon?  If not what is their impact on the Deer Lagoon ecosystem.
For that matter, I think these birds are relatively new to Puget Sound period.  What has been there impact on Padilla Bay fish stocks?  In general it has been Brown Pelicans in salt water while White Pelicans have favored fresh or brackish water.  What is the explanation?

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
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Date: 7/7/18 10:13 pm
From: Hank H <h.heiberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] American Goldfinch feeding on a windblown plant, Kittitas County

>> Take your dramamine before watching this video
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/42550378264/in/dateposted/
>
>> of an American Goldfinch feeding on the seeds from this plant:
>>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/42549940624/in/photostream/
>>
>> in the wind in Cle Elum. An ID of the plant would be appreciated.
>
>> Hank Heiberg
>> Issaquah, WA

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Date: 7/7/18 8:39 pm
From: Anthony <birds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Car Breakins Thwarted at Various Trailheads
If any of you have suffered car breakins at various trailheads off Hwy 20
from June 11 forward, this was in the Methow Valley News on July 6th



http://methowvalleynews.com/2018/07/06/three-arrested-in-connection-with-tra
ilhead-vehicle-break-ins/



Many items have been recovered



Anthony G.

Camano Island


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Date: 7/7/18 7:03 pm
From: Eric Ellingson <abriteway...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Brown Pelican, Semiahmoo, Blaine WA
An unusual visitor was seen today at Semiahmoo Spit, a Brown Pelican.

It was hanging out on one of the pilings, then would fly up and choose another nearby.

I last saw one here on the Blaine side of the channel April 28th of 2009!

Thank you Phile C. for bringing this to my attention.



https://flic.kr/p/27PRj1w

[cid:3285b1b7-9cef-4fe8-aeda-213d7f049f8f]Brown Pelican<https://flic.kr/p/27PRj1w>
A rare visitor to the shores of Semiahmoo Spit, Blaine WA. I've only seen one other about 7 years ago here. However, the local captain of the Plover says he usually sees one almost every year. It's been seen here on/off for a few days now. Thank you, Phil C., for calling me about this!

[https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1804/42548329534_daf8b51d7f_b.jpg] <https://www.flickr.com/photos/ericellingson/42548329534/>
[https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1804/42548329534_daf8b51d7f_b.jpg]






Eric Ellingson

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Date: 7/7/18 11:54 am
From: Sharon Cormier-Aagaard <scormieraa001...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Lake Sammamish State Park monthly bird walk – 7/6/18
Sharon and Stan were joined by 17 other birders on July 6, 2018 for Eastside Audubon's monthly bird walk at Lake Sammamish State Park. Weather was sunny 61-72F, 2-6 1-2 mph winds. The species count was 57 species, 125 for the year.

HIGHLIGHTS:
**A female Common Merganser successfully navigated potentially rough waters (comprised of several anchored power boats, and families with children playing on a nearby sandbar). She managed to lead the string of tiny Merganser-lings right through the center of it all, and onto calmer waters.
**A family(?) of 5 Spotted Sandpipers were bopping around a sandbar along Issaquah Creek.
**Two sightings of juvenile Red-breasted Sapsuckers, and an adult.
**3 vireo species, all 3 singing and 2 seen.... Hutton's, Red-eyed and Warbling
**A female with 2 young Black-throated Gray Warblers close up in Willow Trees at the Old Orchard was an unexpected surprise
**Good looks of a female Bullock's Oriole foraging low in Cottonwood leaves and branches.
**Only a few of us has a brief sighting of a distant, perched Western Kingbird.

The next bird walk is AUGUST 3, 2018, 6:30-11:30 am. This is a state park and a Discover Pass is required to park here ($35 annual or $10 daily)

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47037695

Sharon Aagaard
Bellevue, WA


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Date: 7/7/18 10:55 am
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] White Pelican movement hypothesis
Dear Tweeters,
Maybe fireworks might have something to do with the movement of American White Pelicans from Padilla Bay to Whidbey Island. This is only a hunch, but I noticed a large number of spent rocket tubes on the shoreline of Padilla Bay, on a visit there a few days after the Fourth of July. It seems most likely that these fireworks had been shot off toward the bay, rather than inland or toward the refinery. The dredge-spoil islands are right in the direction where they would have been fired. I could find no pelicans, although they had been reported there as recently as the first of July. 
Fireworks are sold right nearby. Since large-caliber fireworks had been shot off about three hundred meters from the dredge-spoils, perhaps the birds were scared off?
One might also wonder what effect the fireworks would have on the heronry nearby.
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch
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Date: 7/7/18 9:45 am
From: George Heleker <earthman1950...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Whidbey Island American White Pelicans
As occurred the past two years, there has been a sharp increase in pelicans
at Deer Lagoon in July. The two previous years saw the increase on the 13th
of July, and this year, after the numbers were usually less than 50, and on
some days none at all, the increase started on the 5th of July and
continued to grow to 210 this morning, the 7th of July, about the same
number as the past two years. Also, over the past two years, it appeared
that the large increase in numbers in July was the result of many of the
Padilla Bay birds flying to the lagoon to join the others for the rest of
the summer. I wouldn't be surprised if that's what happened again. It is
impossible to count these birds accurately when they are all gathered on an
island..........there are always more than there appears to be, but if one
wants to count them accurately, they can hope that the birds will fly from
one location to another in the marsh in several groups which makes them
easy to count.

George Heleker
Whidbey Island



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Date: 7/7/18 9:43 am
From: Roger Moyer <rogermoyer1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Lewis County Eastern Kingbird

Winson Rockwell found an Eastern Kingbird in the south Chehalis area two or thre days ago. Subsaquent attempts to relocate it have been unsuccessful.

Roger Moyer
Chehalis, WA


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
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Date: 7/7/18 9:05 am
From: Jeff Kozma <jcr_5105...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] [Fwd: Banded Harlequin]
Yup, males go where the female goes! This works that way for most
waterfowl, as females are philopatric and return to the place they were
hatched or the place they previously nested (as you mentioned). Thus a
male, once paired with a female, will follow her to where she will breed.
This is why most waterfowl pair during the winter, so males can follow the
females as they return to their natal area during spring migration.

Jeff Kozma

Yakima

-----Original Message-----
From: Tweeters [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On
Behalf Of Hal Michael
Sent: Friday, July 6, 2018 8:36 PM
To: <merdave...>; <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] [Fwd: Banded Harlequin]

When was taking Gamebird Biology in college the prof had a neat story about
Long-tailed Duck migration. He said that the pair on the wintering grounds
and then return to where the female was hatched. The example he gave was a
male, hatched in Alaska. Wintered off the Pacific Coast, travelled with his
mate to Hudson's Bay. Wintered off of Cape Cad, met a new female and went to
Iceland. Then wintered in Europe and went north to Scandinavia. Eventually,
he ended up back in Alaska having not only circled the globe but brought
genetic variation to a lot of populations.

Hal Michael
Science Outreach Director, Sustainable Fisheries Foundation Olympia WA
360-459-4005
360-791-7702 (C)
<ucd880...>


> On July 6, 2018 at 7:42 PM <merdave...> wrote:
>
>
>
> Hi, Tweeters, I thought some of you might want to hear the outcome of the
> banded Harlequin Duck..... Meredith Spencer, Bridgeport
>
> Hi,
>
> The banded Harlequin male I saw far up the Chewuch River was banded as
> a chick in 2012 in the upper MacDonald Creek area of Glacier National
Park.
> He was most likely headed to the coast.
>
> Interestingly, the researcher said two of her Harlequins were observed
> on Lake Erie and the ATLANTIC ocean!!
>
> Libby Schreiner
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
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Date: 7/7/18 9:04 am
From: Jeff Kozma <jcr_5105...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] [Fwd: Banded Harlequin]
That's awesome! Thanks for following up and letting us know the history on
this bird.

Jeff Kozma


-----Original Message-----
From: Tweeters [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On
Behalf Of <merdave...>
Sent: Friday, July 6, 2018 7:42 PM
To: <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] [Fwd: Banded Harlequin]


Hi, Tweeters, I thought some of you might want to hear the outcome of the
banded Harlequin Duck..... Meredith Spencer, Bridgeport

Hi,

The banded Harlequin male I saw far up the Chewuch River was banded as a
chick in 2012 in the upper MacDonald Creek area of Glacier National Park.
He was most likely headed to the coast.

Interestingly, the researcher said two of her Harlequins were observed on
Lake Erie and the ATLANTIC ocean!!

Libby Schreiner

Sent from my iPad


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Date: 7/7/18 8:43 am
From: Robert Gray <robertgary02...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Western Tanager
Large numbers of Western Tanagers seen from the bridge at the Green River Gorge Resort, mostly upstream. Also, three possible Eurasian Collared Doves at the same spot but we're not certain about that. They seemed to be significantly lighter in color than the Band Tailed Pigeons we're familiar with.
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Date: 7/7/18 7:40 am
From: Pamela Myers <pamelapiwo6813...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Cassia Crossbills

Some friends from out of state want to visit me in early Sept. and then drive to Idaho to try to find Cassia Crossbills. Are they equally easy/difficult to find then as they are earlier in the summer? I see that WINGS has a tour early in August 2019 to find them. Any help will be appreciated. Thanks,



Pam Myers


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Date: 7/6/18 8:48 pm
From: Hal Michael <ucd880...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] [Fwd: Banded Harlequin]
When was taking Gamebird Biology in college the prof had a neat story about Long-tailed Duck migration. He said that the pair on the wintering grounds and then return to where the female was hatched. The example he gave was a male, hatched in Alaska. Wintered off the Pacific Coast, travelled with his mate to Hudson's Bay. Wintered off of Cape Cad, met a new female and went to Iceland. Then wintered in Europe and went north to Scandinavia. Eventually, he ended up back in Alaska having not only circled the globe but brought genetic variation to a lot of populations.

Hal Michael
Science Outreach Director, Sustainable Fisheries Foundation
Olympia WA
360-459-4005
360-791-7702 (C)
<ucd880...>


> On July 6, 2018 at 7:42 PM <merdave...> wrote:
>
>
>
> Hi, Tweeters, I thought some of you might want to hear the outcome of the
> banded Harlequin Duck..... Meredith Spencer, Bridgeport
>
> Hi,
>
> The banded Harlequin male I saw far up the Chewuch River was banded as a
> chick in 2012 in the upper MacDonald Creek area of Glacier National Park.
> He was most likely headed to the coast.
>
> Interestingly, the researcher said two of her Harlequins were observed on
> Lake Erie and the ATLANTIC ocean!!
>
> Libby Schreiner
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
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Date: 7/6/18 8:39 pm
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Edmonds brown pelican 7-6-18 (photos)

Scroll down page 10 for my shots of the brown pelican.


http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum/index.php?threads/wildlife-of-edmonds-wa-2018.16307/page-10

Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA
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Date: 7/6/18 7:45 pm
From: <merdave...>
Subject: [Tweeters] [Fwd: Banded Harlequin]

Hi, Tweeters, I thought some of you might want to hear the outcome of the
banded Harlequin Duck..... Meredith Spencer, Bridgeport

Hi,

The banded Harlequin male I saw far up the Chewuch River was banded as a
chick in 2012 in the upper MacDonald Creek area of Glacier National Park.
He was most likely headed to the coast.

Interestingly, the researcher said two of her Harlequins were observed on
Lake Erie and the ATLANTIC ocean!!

Libby Schreiner

Sent from my iPad


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Date: 7/6/18 7:37 pm
From: Rick Taylor <taylorrl...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Edmonds Brown pelican at Stamm Overlook
The Brown Pelican reported earlier this afternoon by Bill Anderson was seen from Stamm Overlook at the intersection of High St and Olympic View Dr. at 7:15pm July 6.

It was sleeping on the water and drifting with the current. Although I spotted it with the bins, the scope was necessary to ID it.

Rick

Rick Taylor
Everett, WA

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Date: 7/6/18 5:43 pm
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Edmonds brown pelican 7-6-18 (2nd try)
Not sure if my first post went out. Second try.

About 3:15pm today (Friday, 7/6) a lone brown pelican flew in across Puget Sound from the northwest, made a circle off the Edmonds fishing pier, then headed north.  As of 5:00pm it was floating north with the tide off Ocean Ave.  Bring binos or a scope if you want to brave the Friday afternoon rush hour to view it.

I'll post up my photos later tonight.

Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA

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Date: 7/6/18 2:53 pm
From: Janeanne Houston <houstojc...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Belated Common Nighthawk Report
I apologize for not posting this earlier. This is for you, Ed Newbold! 😊 On June 23rd, I was outside watering at 9:50 p.m., and heard a Common Nighthawk call three times. It was flying west over our home in the Gatewood neighborhood of West Seattle, which isn’t far from Lincoln Park. I hesitated to post, since I only heard it. We saw one fly over on 2016 Solstice, but had not seen/heard one since then. Joy to my midwestern heart. I’ve enjoyed the recent Nighthawk thread, and would love it if they returned to the Seattle area.



In other heard- but -not- seen news, we heard a Eurasian Collared Dove in Lincoln Park today. First time for us there, although one stopped by our home briefly in the spring.



Janeanne Houston

West Seattle

<houstojc...>


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Date: 7/6/18 2:00 pm
From: Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Silly bird prediction game - Marymoor Park
Tweets – For years now, I’ve been running “Name That Next Marymoor Bird”, a friendly competition where people send me their guesses as to what new species will be added next to the Marymoor Park list. With the Long-billed Curlew, we’re now at 234 species for the park, and the curlew also ended the last round of NTNMB (won by Bob Asanoma). If you think you might be interested in playing in the upcoming round of NTNMB, drop me a note, and I’ll send you an email with details of how the game works.

Please note that NTNMB is run under the auspices of the Marymoor Bird Records Committee (aka yours truly), and the MBRC determines which species comprise the Marymoor Park List. All rulings are final, though I reserve the right to change my mind. :)

Anyway, if you’re interested in playing, drop me an email before the Next New Marymoor Bird is reported!

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== <BirdMarymoor...>
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Date: 7/6/18 12:25 pm
From: B Boekelheide <bboek...>
Subject: [Tweeters] 2018 Neah Bay pelagic outings
2018 Neah Bay Pelagic Trips:

Trip dates: July 14, August 18 & Sept 15

Once again we are organizing pelagic trips this summer aboard the M/V Windsong out of Neah Bay. We will travel through the west entrance of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, move W by NW to Swiftsure Bank, and then S by SW along the edge of the Juan de Fuca Canyon. Our return route travels by Umatilla Reef and seabird colonies at Flattery Rocks and Tatoosh Island, before returning to Neah Bay. This route explores areas of the renowned Juan de Fuca Eddy. Target birds include a variety of tubenoses and alcids, along with early migrant jaegers, terns, gulls, phalaropes, and others from northern nesting areas. Every year is different, of course, but in past years we have discovered big feeding flocks of seabirds, along with concentrations of marine mammals, at the margins of Swiftsure Bank and the edges of the J de F Canyon.

We start boarding at 7:30 am and depart when all are aboard, with an estimated return to harbor around 4 pm. Departure from NB is always weather-dependent, at the discretion of Windsong's skipper - fingers crossed, cancellations won't happen. Fees are variable and will be collected when boarding: x1 trip $160; x2 outings $140 ea; x3 outings $120 ea. Neah Bay and Hobuck Beach have a variety of motels, cabins, and a campground, if you want to stay out there before or after the trip.

For reservations and more info contact Denny [dennyvanhorn AT gmail.com] and an informational flyer will quickly be sent to you. See you out there July 14th, August 18th and/or September 15th, eh!

Good birding,
Denny Van Horn & Bob Boekelheide
Dungeness
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Date: 7/6/18 9:49 am
From: Robert Gray <robertgary02...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Mercer Island Nighthawk
Nighthawk seen over Mercer Island 7/05/18 around 3:00 PM from our boat.
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Date: 7/6/18 9:17 am
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Parrots Use Chemistry And Physics To Create Brilliantly Colorful Plumage
Hello everyone,

as birders, many of us are aware that birds have two ways that they colour
their plumage: they either make use of structural colours (violet, blue,
white, and super-black) or they colour their feathers using pigments.
Brilliant pigments, such as red and yellow, are obtained from a bird's diet
and packed into its growing feathers during moult. For this reason, colour
is often used by females to assess the health of potential mates.

But parrots are different. You may know that parrots are the only group of
birds that create their own brilliant colours, the psittacofulvins. But a
recent study found that when psittacofulvins are extracted from either red
or yellow feathers, they are orange in solution. This raises the question:
WHUT??

This piece tells a little about newly-published research into how parrot
feathers that are magenta, red, orange or yellow all use the same
chromophores to create perfectly distinct colours.


Parrots Use Chemistry And Physics To Create Brilliantly Colorful Plumage
http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2018/07/06/parrots-use-chemistry-and-physics-to-create-brilliantly-colorful-plumage/
tinyURL: https://tinyurl.com/y8k5896r


of course, I am still waiting to learn the answer to the fundamental
question: why did parrots evolve their own system for creating the
so-called "warm colours" when their ancestors got their plumage pigment
molecules from their diets? is it the diet aspect of the equation the thing
that made it adaptive for parrots to create their plumage colours?

i hope your summer is going well!

--
GrrlScientist | @GrrlScientist <https://twitter.com/GrrlScientist>
<grrlscientist...>
Blogs: Forbes <http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/> | Evolution
Institute <https://evolution-institute.org/profile/grrlscientist/?source=> |
Medium <https://medium.com/@GrrlScientist>
Podcasts: BirdNote Radio <http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist>
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter <https://tinyletter.com/grrlscientist>
Tiny bio: about.me <https://about.me/grrlscientist>
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Date: 7/6/18 9:09 am
From: <festuca...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Is Cinnamon Harmful to Birds?
Michelle wrote: "I accidentally mixed cinnamon in with my birdseed this morning instead of pepper. It smells nice. Since I use rather expensive birdseed I'd rather not throw it out, so I'd like to know if it can harm the birds. I don't want to test it to find out."

Hi Michelle,

Your query made me realize that I had no idea, so I let my fingers do the walking through the information (and mis-information) to be found on the inter-webs.

Most of the pet health and nutrition and wild-bird pages don't address cinnamon. One chat group (Precisely Parrots https://www.preciselyparrots.com/showthread.php?6315-ALERT-Caution-Required-Concerning-Variety-of-Cinnamon-Sticks-Offered-to-Birds ) did have this message:

We've seen many people lately posting about offering their parrots cinnamon sticks, and for the most part, pictures of those sticks (or quills) have been of the cheaper and toxic variety, cassia cinnamon. These SHOULD NOT be offered to ANY pet due to the very high levels of the toxin coumarin. Cassia quills are only suitable for making your home smell nice, NOT given as enrichment for your parrot. Coumarin is heavily documented as being highly toxic to both our liver and kidneys, but also many species of cold and warm blooded animals, including birds. ***Edited to add*** There have been some queries concerning scientific evidence behind this graphic - as with everything of an educational nature which we post on this page, thorough research is done to ensure the information is both accurate and up to date. For those interested in the factual content behind this, we offer the following references:

There is a significant amount of pertinent scientific evidence - coumarin is WELL documented as toxic to various species, but here are some very specific studies and quotes for very reputable sources concerning avian toxicity:

Harrison GJ: Toxicology. In Harrison GJ, Harrison LR (eds): Clinical Avian Medicine and Surgery. Philadelphia, WB Saunders Co, (1986), pp 491-499.
Lists Courmarin as toxic, with the potential toxic effect of fatal hemorrhage.

Yuassa N, et al: Isolation and some characteristics of an agent inducing anemia in chicks. Avian Dis 23:366-385, (1978)
Coumarin used as an agent causing coagulopathy through depletion of vitamin K in the liver.

Terry W. Campbell in his academic text "Exotic Animal Hematology and Cytology" 4th Edition (2015) notes that 'Coagulopathies are usually acquired and are often associated with toxicities such as aflatoxicosis or coumarin poisoning, or with severe liver diseases such as papovavirus infections.'





That got me looking at what "cinnamon" is. There are four types of cinnamon, but two are the most popular and most commonly used: Ceylon cinnamon and Cassia cinnamon. Not to worry, I didn't know that either.



Cassia cinnamon is found and produced in Indonesia. It has a stronger smell and sharper flavor of the two types and it is less expensive than Ceylon cinnamon. Cassia, the less expensive kind, is the variety is what we usually find in grocery stores to put on oatmeal or bake into our cinnamon toast. The more expensive Ceylon cinnamon, mostly produced in Sri Lanka, has a less pungent aroma and a sweeter flavor than Cassia cinnamon. It's popular for baked items such as sweet rolls, and is best used in coffee or hot chocolate.



Due to the blood-thinning component coumarin, which could damage the liver if taken in huge amounts, European health agencies have warned against consuming high amounts of cassia. Other bioactive compounds found in the bark, powder and essential oils of C. cassia are cinnamaldehyde and styrene. In high doses these substances can also be toxic for humans.



Long story short, it doesn't seem that having a little cinnamon in the birds' (or our) diets will cause any issues. If I had a $1,500 African Grey Parrot, I wouldn't leave a cinnamon stick in his cage, but a little cinnamon in the bird feed shouldn't hurt them.



Hope this helps,



- Jon. Anderson

Olympia

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Date: 7/5/18 6:05 pm
From: Stewart Wechsler <ecostewart...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Another Seattle Nighthawk sighting--what's the deal?
Ed,

You asked about how the Nighthawks are doing in the nearby foothills with
rocky balds, (where Nighthawks might be happy nesting).

This last June 15th I got a chance to go to a spot near the NE corner of
the Olympic Peninsula, in an area with rocky balds in the foothills of the
Olympics, and next to one of the rocky balds, but not quite at the bald
top. I was quite pleased to hear, then see a Nighthawk, and like you,
missing the days, about 40 - 38 years ago, that we Seattleites could see
and hear them on summer evenings at Green Lake.

Though it was exciting to me to hear and see this bird, it didn't seem
worth reporting until, thanks to your inquiry, I could report it as an
answer to a question. I only imagined that these birds were regularly seen
and heard, in this area where I was, but hadn't been to in about a decade.
(I can't quite remember if I was seeing and hearing Nighthawks there at
that time, when I was doing surveys there of both plants, and the
endangered Taylor's Checkerspot butterfly. I better remember the Great
Horned Owl there that I was talking to, but who then stopped talking to me
that night, and refused to respond to me the following night, after my
hooting while walking, which I knew was probably not wise. I expect their
triangulation hearing, made it clear that this human was the one hooting,
not another GHO.)

-Stewart
www.stewardshipadventures.com



> Message: 1
> Date: Wed, 4 Jul 2018 23:31:54 +0000 (UTC)
> From: Ed Newbold <ednewbold1...>
> To: Tweeters Tweeters <tweeters...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Another Seattle Nighthawk sighting--what's the
> deal?
> Message-ID: <320689767.2611815.1530747114355...>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> Hi all,
> I was delighted to hear of Mary Hrudkaj's audio-sightings of Seattle
> Nighthawks in her wonderful Special Olympics post. Thanks Mary!
>
> Our friend Mark Moon also reported a very recent Seattle sighting, a bird
> continuously beeping over the Safeway on Capitol Hill at 15th and John on
> Monday July 2nd around 10 pm.
> When Mark told me this I began to brim with an unwise amount of optimism
> that this could maybe be a bird on territory!
> (Like many, I burn a candle that the Nighthawk might return to Seattle
> some day as a breeder. It is 38-40 years gone now.)
> To informally test out the bird-on-territory hypothesis we went over to
> the Safeway last night and spent some quality time around 10 pm in the
> parking lot and walking around on the sidewalks as July 4 revelry proceeded
> in the drinking establishments filled with people mostly younger than us
> and not thinking "It's passed my bed-time."
> Unfortunately, we neither saw nor heard any Nighthawks.? But I'm curious
> about these sightings.? It's late in the season, is it not, for the regular
> migration of Nighthawks??
> Is it possible that Nighthawks are slightly prospering in the nearby
> clearcuts and balds of the lowland foothills? A more pessimistic
> explanation is these could be wandering refugees from the drought in OR and
> CA.
> I'm always interested in what the erudite readership of Tweeters might
> have to say on about this,
>
>
>
> Thanks all,Ed Newbold? Beacon Hill

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Date: 7/5/18 5:28 pm
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Jetty Island, Everett - Marbled Godwit, etc.
Hello Tweets,
I took the first Jetty Island Ferry of the season this morning to go look
for shorebirds. I've been keeping tabs on this location through a scope
from the mainland for a few weeks, but it was nice to see those tiny little
dots a bit closer.

On the outer beach I found a group of Whimbrels and a Marbled Godwit. I
first spotted this Godwit on 6/24 so it's been here at least since then.
The Whimbrels have been around since the beginning of June and are
presumably non-breeders. Inside the lagoon on the north half of the island
were good numbers of small shorebirds and a few more Whimbrel. The most
numerous bird here were Western Sandpipers, but the were a good number of
Semipalmated Sandpipers, a few Least Sandpipers, and one or two
Semipalmated Plovers. Killdeer and Spotted Sandpipers were all over the
island as well and there were a few *tiny* Spotted Sandpiper babies running
around the mudflats.

I worked my way south tip of the island and found about 15 Bonaparte's
Gulls and 10 Black-Bellied Plovers. Offshore there was a surprisingly large
group of Surf Scoters for this time of year, at least 25.

The ferry runs many times daily until Labor Day. Parking is $3 a day, but
the ferry is suggested donation of $2 per person only. It does get very
busy, especially on weekends.
https://everettwa.gov/Facilities/Facility/Details/Jetty-Island-82

Josh Adams

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Date: 7/5/18 5:21 pm
From: Lonnie Somer <mombiwheeler...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marbled Murrelets at Discovery Park
Hi Tweeters,

There were three pairs of Marbled Murrelets spread out not too far offshore
off of the North Beach Trail this afternoon. They repeatedly dove for food
mostly, ignoring the boaters, paddle boarders, and kayakers enjoying the
nice weather all around them. I haven't often seen them in their breeding
plumage (although one appeared to be starting to molt already), being more
of a winter species for me. Typically, when one dove its partner would
dive almost simultaneously, but once one of them must have been distracted;
its partner dove without its noticing and when it realized it was alone, it
repeatedly gave off a piercing cry until the other popped back up. I
realized that I had never heard this species vocalize before. Pretty cool.

Good birding,

Lonnie Somer
Seattle

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Date: 7/5/18 5:10 pm
From: Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2018-07-05
Well, the doldrums are here. Our most unexpected bird was a Peregrine Falcon, and I believe that 56 of our 63 species are ones for which we have confirmed breeding evidence within the park, with several more clearly nesting nearby annually. But just because the bird list is very predictable at this time of year doesn’t mean there’s nothing to see. For a change, several “hard to see” species put on great shows for us. The weather was gorgeous too, with a few clouds to make for a memorable sunrise, and then clearing (but temps maxing out below 75 degrees). Mammals and dragonflies added to the interesting things to oogle this morning.

Highlights:
a.. Wood Duck – again, many clutches of babies
b.. Killdeer – young baby below the weir
c.. Spotted Sandpiper – still at least 1 adult below weir
d.. – Black-wing-tipped Gull sp. – one
e.. Green Heron – adult and juvenile posed for great looks below weir
f.. Cooper’s Hawk – one flew right past us with prey, heading towards Big Cottonwood Forest
g.. Red-tailed Hawk – Nest west of Rowing Club may have fledged 2
h.. Barn Owl – Matt heard baby in windmill in the middle of the night, again
i.. WESTERN SCREECH-OWL – Matt had 2 near east end of boardwalk; at least 1 was juvenile
j.. Pileated Woodpecker – one heard
k.. PEREGRINE FALCON – nice, close flyover. Heavily speckled, dark bird
l.. Purple Martin – active at gourds
m.. Swainson’s Thrush – many singing – great looks
n.. Bullock’s Oriole – Adult male gave fabulous looks; first year male and a female seen near a nest
o.. Orange-crowned Warbler – heard one singing
p.. Lazuli Bunting – at least 1 male, one female and/or juvenile chased by male at 5:20 a.m.
Mammals: many Eastern Cottontail, American Beaver pre-dawn, Mule Deer (large buck pre-dawn, doe at Rowing Club), Eastern Gray Squirrel

Near Dog Central, a SWAINSON’S THRUSH was gathering insects in the gravel of the path and carrying them to an unseen nest near the slough. We got great close-up looks, and very nice to get breeding confirmation of a very secretive nester.

Earlier, we had an adult male BULLOCK’S ORIOLE in all of his glory also feeding on the gravel path. Got to watch him at close range for over a minute. Just past Dog Central, we had a first-year male singing, and then spotted him with a drab oriole visiting a nest in a cottonwood.

As I said, for the day, 63 species. Misses were pretty much limited to Canada Goose, Pied-billed Grebe, and Rock Pigeon.

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== <BirdMarymoor...>

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Date: 7/5/18 4:05 pm
From: Phil Kelley <scrubjay323...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Nisqually NWR 7/4/18
Tweets,

Yesterday almost 50 of us enjoyed a productive walk at Nisqually. We
started in high overcast and finished with bright sunshine. the birds
were out early and we had a nice surprise. We had a 9.4 high tide at
9:57 so there wasn't much water in the reclamation area, but that
worked to our advantage.

As we walked the estuary dike I spotted a large brown bird soaring
toward the sound and watched it land an probe the mud with its large,
decurved beak. It was a LONG-BILLED CURLEW, the first I've seen on the
refuge. It stayed in the area for some time allowing good scope views
by many of the participants. The only other shorebirds I saw were a
couple of GREATER YELLOWLEGS that flew over the interior boardwalk as
we headed toward the twin barns.

There is little visible water on the interior of the refuge so
waterfowl were basically non-existent, but there were plenty of YELLOW
WARBLERS and COMMON YELLOWTHROAT about.

We did have two sightings of AMERICAN BITTERN popping out of the
cattails and relocating nearby and Jon Anderson had a male
YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD on the way back from the estuary boardwalk.

For the day I had 40 species and now have 110 for the year. Mammals
seen included COTTON-TAILED RABBIT, GRAY SQUIRREL, and a very healthy
looking COYOTE pup.

Until next week....

Phil Kelley
<scrubjay323...>
Lacey, WA
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Date: 7/5/18 12:50 pm
From: Jennifer Jarstad <jennjarstad...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Another Seattle Nighthawk sighting--what's the deal?
I wonder if you could view the Safeway roof top from a higher floor in the
Kaiser building across the street. Might be worth a try.

Jenn Jarstad
Seattle, WA

> On Jul 4, 2018, at 4:31 PM, Ed Newbold <ednewbold1...> wrote:
>
> Hi all,
>
> I was delighted to hear of Mary Hrudkaj's audio-sightings of Seattle
Nighthawks in her wonderful Special Olympics post. Thanks Mary!
>
>
> Our friend Mark Moon also reported a very recent Seattle sighting, a bird
continuously beeping over the Safeway on Capitol Hill at 15th and John on
Monday July 2nd around 10 pm.
>
> When Mark told me this I began to brim with an unwise amount of optimism
that this could maybe be a bird on territory!
>
> (Like many, I burn a candle that the Nighthawk might return to Seattle
some day as a breeder. It is 38-40 years gone now.)
>
> To informally test out the bird-on-territory hypothesis we went over to
the Safeway last night and spent some quality time around 10 pm in the
parking lot and walking around on the sidewalks as July 4 revelry proceeded
in the drinking establishments filled with people mostly younger than us
and not thinking "It's passed my bed-time."
>
> Unfortunately, we neither saw nor heard any Nighthawks. But I'm curious
about these sightings. It's late in the season, is it not, for the regular
migration of Nighthawks?
>
> Is it possible that Nighthawks are slightly prospering in the nearby
clearcuts and balds of the lowland foothills? A more pessimistic
explanation is these could be wandering refugees from the drought in OR and
CA.
>
> I'm always interested in what the erudite readership of Tweeters might
have to say on about this,
>
>
>
>
> Thanks all,
> Ed Newbold Beacon Hill
>
>
> PS Also, I've been trying to research the big solar projects that are
coming into Eastern Washington and I don't seem to be able to ascertain if
these are just an array of solar collectors or the special solar plants
that concentrate rays and trap and burn birds. Does anyone know?
>
> PPS Richard Rowlett is also the person who had the most surprising (to
me) Tweeter-sighting of the year last year, when he witnessed a
Black-crowned Night Heron fleeing the Fourth of July madness on Lake Union.
>

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Date: 7/5/18 8:11 am
From: James Fiero <james.fiero51...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Great Egret at the fill

Just across from Osprey platform, to the South sitting next to a Great Blue Heron. Also some scrawny little necks reaching up for food on the platform

Jim Fiero

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 7/4/18 6:09 pm
From: Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Another Seattle Nighthawk sighting--what's the deal?
Hi Ed,

I saw 4 nighthawks feeding over a clearcut near Ravensdale two days ago, so I would say your latter hypothesis is pretty apt. I believe that gravel rooftops would have to stage a comeback before urban nighthawks could.

Good birding,
Joshua Glant

> On Jul 4, 2018, at 4:31 PM, Ed Newbold <ednewbold1...> wrote:
>
> Hi all,
>
> I was delighted to hear of Mary Hrudkaj's audio-sightings of Seattle Nighthawks in her wonderful Special Olympics post. Thanks Mary!
>
>
> Our friend Mark Moon also reported a very recent Seattle sighting, a bird continuously beeping over the Safeway on Capitol Hill at 15th and John on Monday July 2nd around 10 pm.
>
> When Mark told me this I began to brim with an unwise amount of optimism that this could maybe be a bird on territory!
>
> (Like many, I burn a candle that the Nighthawk might return to Seattle some day as a breeder. It is 38-40 years gone now.)
>
> To informally test out the bird-on-territory hypothesis we went over to the Safeway last night and spent some quality time around 10 pm in the parking lot and walking around on the sidewalks as July 4 revelry proceeded in the drinking establishments filled with people mostly younger than us and not thinking "It's passed my bed-time."
>
> Unfortunately, we neither saw nor heard any Nighthawks. But I'm curious about these sightings. It's late in the season, is it not, for the regular migration of Nighthawks?
>
> Is it possible that Nighthawks are slightly prospering in the nearby clearcuts and balds of the lowland foothills? A more pessimistic explanation is these could be wandering refugees from the drought in OR and CA.
>
> I'm always interested in what the erudite readership of Tweeters might have to say on about this,
>
>
>
>
> Thanks all,
> Ed Newbold Beacon Hill
>
>
> PS Also, I've been trying to research the big solar projects that are coming into Eastern Washington and I don't seem to be able to ascertain if these are just an array of solar collectors or the special solar plants that concentrate rays and trap and burn birds. Does anyone know?
>
> PPS Richard Rowlett is also the person who had the most surprising (to me) Tweeter-sighting of the year last year, when he witnessed a Black-crowned Night Heron fleeing the Fourth of July madness on Lake Union.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

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Date: 7/4/18 4:35 pm
From: Ed Newbold <ednewbold1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Another Seattle Nighthawk sighting--what's the deal?
Hi all,
I was delighted to hear of Mary Hrudkaj's audio-sightings of Seattle Nighthawks in her wonderful Special Olympics post. Thanks Mary!

Our friend Mark Moon also reported a very recent Seattle sighting, a bird continuously beeping over the Safeway on Capitol Hill at 15th and John on Monday July 2nd around 10 pm.
When Mark told me this I began to brim with an unwise amount of optimism that this could maybe be a bird on territory!
(Like many, I burn a candle that the Nighthawk might return to Seattle some day as a breeder. It is 38-40 years gone now.)
To informally test out the bird-on-territory hypothesis we went over to the Safeway last night and spent some quality time around 10 pm in the parking lot and walking around on the sidewalks as July 4 revelry proceeded in the drinking establishments filled with people mostly younger than us and not thinking "It's passed my bed-time."
Unfortunately, we neither saw nor heard any Nighthawks.  But I'm curious about these sightings.  It's late in the season, is it not, for the regular migration of Nighthawks? 
Is it possible that Nighthawks are slightly prospering in the nearby clearcuts and balds of the lowland foothills? A more pessimistic explanation is these could be wandering refugees from the drought in OR and CA.
I'm always interested in what the erudite readership of Tweeters might have to say on about this,



Thanks all,Ed Newbold  Beacon Hill

PS Also, I've been trying to research the big solar projects that are coming into Eastern Washington and I don't seem to be able to ascertain if these are just an array of solar collectors or the special solar plants that concentrate rays and trap and burn birds.  Does anyone know?
PPS  Richard Rowlett is also the person who had the most surprising (to me) Tweeter-sighting of the year last year, when he witnessed a Black-crowned Night Heron fleeing the Fourth of July madness on Lake Union.









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Date: 7/4/18 10:33 am
From: John Leszczynski <jrleszczynski...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Brown Pelican at Discovery Park
There's a Brown Pelican flying around and landing on the water near West
Point in Discovery Park! It hasn't stayed in one place for very long but
keeps returning. At one point it flew far to the south into Elliott Bay
towards downtown but was back at the lighthouse 15 minutes later. Currently
it is fishing near the point.

Also I've seen several groups of Heermann's Gulls passing by, all headed
north.

John Leszczynski
Seattle

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Date: 7/4/18 7:01 am
From: mary hrudkaj <mch1096...>
Subject: [Tweeters] More on UW birds during Special Olympics
Tuesday was a long at a UW's sports area. Some of the time was spent listening for and watching birds in the area.


On the way across Puget Sound Purple Martins were singing and flying around the ferry docks at Vashon Island. Later at UW's track area a small flock of Barn Swallows flitted above the crowd. In our many meanderings we saw and hear Osprey, Chickadees, Crows, Stellar's Jays, Canada Geese, and unidentified gulls. Between 6 and 7 we were sitting down on one of the floats at the rent-a-canoe area. While there we heard Nighthawks twice, saw another Oprey and watched a Bald Eagle hanging out in a tree. A gull spent a couple minutes harassing the eagle which was great to watch.


The day ended nicely with my niece getting a Silver medal in the Women's 800 meter fast walk. Another team member of hers from the south Kitsap area took Bronze which was fantastic all the way around. It's always uplifting to see people so physically and mentally challenged try so hard and often win. If you get a chance go watch some games. There Special Olympics USA 2018 website has a list of events, times and locations (all throughout the Seattle area).


Mary Hrudkaj

Belfair/Tahuya

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Date: 7/3/18 10:35 pm
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Kittitas County birding
This evening, after birding Reecer Canyon (north of Ellensburg) I stopped at a small pond on Reecer Creek Road. To my surprise there was a SPOTTED SANDPIPER, 2 LEAST SANDPIPERS & a SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER.

In Reecer Canyon there was a RED-EYED VIREO near the bottom of the canyon in the riparian area and a BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKER at the intersection of 3500 & Table Mountain Road. Also many other birds.

To reach the pond, travel north on Reecer Creek Rd as though you were heading into the canyon. Travel 1/2 mile north of the point where the complex of high-towered power lines crosses the road. The pond is on the east side. A scope is essential.

--
Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>

Concepts shape our world.
Concepts are not hard wired.


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Date: 7/3/18 5:07 pm
From: Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Adult Red-tailed hawk / Caryn / Wedgwood
Hi Birders,

With a crow skirmish in the front fir earlier this afternoon, I wasn’t sure what might be bringing them in. Suddenly a flush and a raptor flew to a neighboring fir.

Got a scope on it and determined it to be a red-tailed hawk. An expert — you know who you are… help to confirm it further as an adult a red-tailed hawk. Those crows do give us good information at times. Thanks to all.

Caryn / Wedgwood
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Date: 7/3/18 3:17 pm
From: Hank H <h.heiberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Juvenile Spotted Sandpiper video (Redmond, WA)

> There are several juvenile Spotted Sandpipers, as well as adults, on the shores of the Redmond Retention Ponds. To access the ponds park along NE 95th Street in Redmond, just west of 195th Ave NE and enter past the large cement blocks. Here is a video of one of the juvenile Spotted Sandpipers already proficient in the bobbing motion.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/43132042832/in/dateposted/
>
> Hank Heiberg
> Issaquah, WA

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Date: 7/3/18 11:37 am
From: Michelle Maani <lamoustique...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Is cinnamon harmful to birds?
I accidentally mixed cinnamon in with my birdseed this morning instead of pepper.  It smells nice. Since I use rather expensive birdseed I'd rather not throw it out, so I'd like to know if it can harm the birds.  I don't want to test it to find out.
Michelle Maani
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Date: 7/3/18 7:37 am
From: George Neavoll <gneavoll...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Banded Harlequin
Does anyone remember Jack Miner, who banded Canada Geese with Bible verses at his farm in Ontario? (This was years ago.) The bands came back to him from all over. He was a pioneer in bird banding!

The Jack Miner Sanctuary (near Point Pelee) still exists.

George Neavoll
S.W. Portland

> On Jul 3, 2018, at 7:06 AM, Hal Michael <ucd880...> wrote:
>
> It is also possible that the bird is an escapee. Owners can get metal bands with personally unique numbers and also use color bands for easy ID purposes. These numbers are not reported to USGS. There i also the possibility that the bird was banded outside the US. A co-worker recovered a Pintail banded in Japan. Lots of possibilities.
>
>
> Hal Michael
> Science Outreach Director, Sustainable Fisheries Foundation
> Olympia WA
> 360-459-4005
> 360-791-7702 (C)
> <ucd880...>
>
>
>> On July 3, 2018 at 6:41 AM Jeff Kozma <jcr_5105...> wrote:
>>
>>
>> You can report banded birds here:
>> https://www.fws.gov/birds/surveys-and-data/bird-banding/reporting-banded-bir
>> ds.php
>>
>> Anyone banding wild birds in the U.S. has to have a federal banding permit
>> and must report their banding efforts to USGS. Anyone that sees or finds a
>> banded bird can report the information to the USGS using their online form.
>> This is important because once the banded bird is reported, the bander is
>> notified of the relocation/sighting and the information on the band return
>> is recorded by USGS and the bander in order to track the movements of banded
>> birds. In turn, the person who reports the banded bird gets a certificate
>> in the mail with information one where and when the bird was originally
>> banded. It's a win win for everyone.
>>
>> Jeff Kozma
>>
>> Yakima
>>
>> J c r underscore 5105 at charter dot net
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Tweeters [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On
>> Behalf Of <merdave...>
>> Sent: Monday, July 2, 2018 9:44 PM
>> To: <tweeters...>
>> Subject: [Tweeters] Banded Harlequin
>>
>> -----------------------------------------------------
>> Subject: Harlequin
>> From: "R Victor Glick" <libbyvictor...>
>>
>>
>> ----I received this message today. R. Glick lives in Winthrop. Meredith
>> Spencer---------------------------------------------------------------------
>> -
>>
>>
>>
>> We found a banded male Harlequin 20 miles north of Winthrop, WA, sitting on
>> a rock in the Chewuch River with two females. He had a blue band on his
>> left leg with the letters JP. An aluminum band was on the right leg, with
>> the first two numbers being 71. Does anyone know of harlequins being banded
>> in the Pacific Northwest? Thanks, Libby Schreiner
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

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Date: 7/3/18 7:10 am
From: Hal Michael <ucd880...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Banded Harlequin
It is also possible that the bird is an escapee. Owners can get metal bands with personally unique numbers and also use color bands for easy ID purposes. These numbers are not reported to USGS. There i also the possibility that the bird was banded outside the US. A co-worker recovered a Pintail banded in Japan. Lots of possibilities.


Hal Michael
Science Outreach Director, Sustainable Fisheries Foundation
Olympia WA
360-459-4005
360-791-7702 (C)
<ucd880...>


> On July 3, 2018 at 6:41 AM Jeff Kozma <jcr_5105...> wrote:
>
>
> You can report banded birds here:
> https://www.fws.gov/birds/surveys-and-data/bird-banding/reporting-banded-bir
> ds.php
>
> Anyone banding wild birds in the U.S. has to have a federal banding permit
> and must report their banding efforts to USGS. Anyone that sees or finds a
> banded bird can report the information to the USGS using their online form.
> This is important because once the banded bird is reported, the bander is
> notified of the relocation/sighting and the information on the band return
> is recorded by USGS and the bander in order to track the movements of banded
> birds. In turn, the person who reports the banded bird gets a certificate
> in the mail with information one where and when the bird was originally
> banded. It's a win win for everyone.
>
> Jeff Kozma
>
> Yakima
>
> J c r underscore 5105 at charter dot net
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Tweeters [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On
> Behalf Of <merdave...>
> Sent: Monday, July 2, 2018 9:44 PM
> To: <tweeters...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Banded Harlequin
>
> -----------------------------------------------------
> Subject: Harlequin
> From: "R Victor Glick" <libbyvictor...>
>
>
> ----I received this message today. R. Glick lives in Winthrop. Meredith
> Spencer---------------------------------------------------------------------
> -
>
>
>
> We found a banded male Harlequin 20 miles north of Winthrop, WA, sitting on
> a rock in the Chewuch River with two females. He had a blue band on his
> left leg with the letters JP. An aluminum band was on the right leg, with
> the first two numbers being 71. Does anyone know of harlequins being banded
> in the Pacific Northwest? Thanks, Libby Schreiner
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
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Date: 7/3/18 6:57 am
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fwd: [BIRDCHAT] Article on Maryland pelagic history and award to Richard A. Rowlett
HEY!! we know this guy! i sure do miss his many informative messages sent
to tweeters ....


nomadic birder and invisible scientist
devorah


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Phil Davis <pdavis...>
Date: Tue, Jul 3, 2018 at 12:06 PM
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Article on Maryland pelagic history and award to
Richard A. Rowlett
To: <BIRDCHAT...>


Birdchat/Seabirds:

In the current issue of the Maryland Ornithological Society's
journal, Maryland Birdlife, is an article, penned by yours truly,
entitled, "The Maryland/District of Columbia Records Committee
Presents the First Richard A. Rowlett Field Excellence Award to
Richard A. Rowlett."

Rich Rowlett was a powerhouse birder in Maryland during the decade of
the 1970s. Among other claims to fame, Rich pioneered Maryland
pelagic birding with many notable regional accomplishments. However,
most contemporary east coast birders know virtually nothing about
Rich since he left our area in 1981. Rich is now retired and lives in
the Seattle area.

A few years ago, our records committee established an award to
recognize field birders who have risen above and beyond the call of
duty to find, document, and publish information on regional rarities.
The first award is being presented to Rich and henceforth the award
will be named after him.

The article that appears in Maryland Birdlife is an abridged version
of a very complete and detailed compendium of Rich's activities,
records, and publications from the 1970s. Hopefully, the unabridged
version can serve as a valuable reference covering Maryland and
regional birding during the 1970s through the prism of Rich's
experiences. The manuscript focuses on Maryland; however, it also
covers, in detail, Rich's activities in Virginia, North Carolina, and
Delaware.

The link, below, will enable you download either the abridged or
unabridged PDF documents:

https://mddcrcresources.wordpress.com/2018/03/31/richard-a-
rowlett-contributions-to-middle-atlantic-birding-during-the-1970s/

Abridged version = 21 pages, approx. 6,500 words, 79
references

Unabridged version = 126 pages, approx. 54,000
words, 243 references (!!)

The current issue of Maryland Birdlife is the first of a two-part
series on pelagic birding (Gene Scarpulla, editor). The second part
will be published in the fall.

Phil


===================================================
Phil Davis, Secretary
MD/DC Records Committee
2549 Vale Court
Davidsonville, Maryland 21035 USA
301-261-0184
mailto:<PDavis...>

MD/DCRC Web site: http://www.MDBirds.org/mddcrc/rcindex.html

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Date: 7/3/18 6:45 am
From: Hal Michael <ucd880...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] House finches at my house
This is "Fledgling Time" with all the young of the year out and about. Most will look like females. Like most teenagers they will be hungry, reasonably clueless, and entertaining. BTW, we had an absolutely gorgeous male House Finch at the feeder a few days ago. The red was, somehow, smoother and more even than normally see.


Hal Michael
Science Outreach Director, Sustainable Fisheries Foundation
Olympia WA
360-459-4005
360-791-7702 (C)
<ucd880...>

> On July 3, 2018 at 12:30 AM Vaughn Rhoden <vrhoden...> wrote:
>
>
> For the last few weeks I have had more House Finches at my place in Vancouver since, well, forever.
>
> I have seen as many as a dozen in the trees in my yard. They are quite tame. They will come sit on the railing of our deck and check us out while we are sitting out there.
>
> They have been hammering our sunflower feeder. They leave the thistle to the Goldfinches.
>
> I don’t know if food is otherwise scarce or what.
>
> There seem to be more females than males but there is one really nice male with cardinal red on his head and breast.
>
> It’s been a pretty birdy late spring/early summer. In the last week we have had Am and Lesser Goldfinch, House Finch, Steller’s Jay, our resident Anna’s, Red Breasted Nutcracker, a resident Towhee, Robins, Bushtits, very vocal Crows, song sparrow and what I believe was a peregrine falcon. It was high over the neighborhood and giving a rapid up-slurred call, and would kite like a kestrel, but it seemed to be considerably larger than a kestrel. It was gone before I could retrieve my binoculars.
>
>
>


> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>


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Date: 7/3/18 6:45 am
From: Jeff Kozma <jcr_5105...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Banded Harlequin
You can report banded birds here:
https://www.fws.gov/birds/surveys-and-data/bird-banding/reporting-banded-bir
ds.php

Anyone banding wild birds in the U.S. has to have a federal banding permit
and must report their banding efforts to USGS. Anyone that sees or finds a
banded bird can report the information to the USGS using their online form.
This is important because once the banded bird is reported, the bander is
notified of the relocation/sighting and the information on the band return
is recorded by USGS and the bander in order to track the movements of banded
birds. In turn, the person who reports the banded bird gets a certificate
in the mail with information one where and when the bird was originally
banded. It's a win win for everyone.

Jeff Kozma

Yakima

J c r underscore 5105 at charter dot net

-----Original Message-----
From: Tweeters [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On
Behalf Of <merdave...>
Sent: Monday, July 2, 2018 9:44 PM
To: <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Banded Harlequin

-----------------------------------------------------
Subject: Harlequin
From: "R Victor Glick" <libbyvictor...>


----I received this message today. R. Glick lives in Winthrop. Meredith
Spencer---------------------------------------------------------------------
-



We found a banded male Harlequin 20 miles north of Winthrop, WA, sitting on
a rock in the Chewuch River with two females. He had a blue band on his
left leg with the letters JP. An aluminum band was on the right leg, with
the first two numbers being 71. Does anyone know of harlequins being banded
in the Pacific Northwest? Thanks, Libby Schreiner




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Date: 7/3/18 12:33 am
From: Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Re A little help with bird song or call
Hello All - The Tweeters community once again has come through
beautifully in helping me to identify a bird.

This is a bird that I recorded with my Android phone in Neah Bay on
September 7, 2016. Unfortunately, for whatever reason, I fell down on
the job and failed to write down the location, habitat and other
pertinent details of the recording. I now cannot remember where in Neah
Bay I recorded this nor the habitat. Let that be a lesson to me.

Tweetsters had much to offer.

For example, Tweetster Bruce Lagerquist very kindly provided me with a
cleaned-up version of my original recording that makes it much easier to
hear the bird. You can listen to his improved version at:

http://janehadley.net/Tweeters/AudioRecord_4a%20Neah%20Bay.mp3

Bruce also produced a sonogram of the recording, which you can see at:

http://janehadley.net/Tweeters/AudioRecord_4a%20Neah%20Bay%20Sono.png

The sonogram is useful for comparing with sonograms at Xeno-Canto. More
about that later.

I heard from 10 people. Three of them said they didn't know what it was,
two asked for habitat information, and four said they believed the bird
is Purple Martin. The 10th person said he thought it might be
White-winged Crossbill but was not sure about it.

The four identifying it as Purple Martin were Dave Slager, Stuart
Johnston, Cathy Flick, and Bob Boekelheide.

Stuart provided this interesting commentary:

"It sounds like a Purple Martin to me, though it lacks the deep musical
gurgling quality of PUMA "song", say when a martin is flying around
making normal conversation. This bird's calls, repeated over and over
again, remind me of the "angry-sounding" calls martins make when giving
chase to aerial predators, or perhaps even ground animals that pose a
threat, like a cat."

Bob Boekelheide said a similar thing:

"call of Purple Martin?  Maybe a agitated or mobbing call?"

And Bruce Lagerquist sleuthed his way to a recording at Xeno-Canto that
matched in audio and sonogram our bird:

https://www.xeno-canto.org/379258

Note the remarks of the person who made this recording: She describes
the Purple Martin calls as "agitated" and part of a mobbing operation
that she was observing.

Soooo, the consensus seems to be agitated, mobbing calls by a Purple Martin.

Thanks much to the Tweeters community from whom I never cease to learn.

Jane Hadley

Seattle, WA




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Date: 7/3/18 12:33 am
From: Vaughn Rhoden <vrhoden...>
Subject: [Tweeters] House finches at my house
For the last few weeks I have had more House Finches at my place in
Vancouver since, well, forever.

I have seen as many as a dozen in the trees in my yard. They are quite tame.
They will come sit on the railing of our deck and check us out while we are
sitting out there.

They have been hammering our sunflower feeder. They leave the thistle to the
Goldfinches.

I don't know if food is otherwise scarce or what.

There seem to be more females than males but there is one really nice male
with cardinal red on his head and breast.

It's been a pretty birdy late spring/early summer. In the last week we have
had Am and Lesser Goldfinch, House Finch, Steller's Jay, our resident
Anna's, Red Breasted Nutcracker, a resident Towhee, Robins, Bushtits, very
vocal Crows, song sparrow and what I believe was a peregrine falcon. It was
high over the neighborhood and giving a rapid up-slurred call, and would
kite like a kestrel, but it seemed to be considerably larger than a kestrel.
It was gone before I could retrieve my binoculars.




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Date: 7/2/18 10:16 pm
From: B Boekelheide <bboek...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] A little help with bird song or call
Hi, Jane —

I’ll take a stab — call of Purple Martin? Maybe a agitated or mobbing call? Sept 7 seems late, but maybe not.

Bob Boekelheide
Dungeness



From: Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...> <mailto:<hadleyj1725...>>
Subject: [Tweeters] A little help with bird song or call
Date: July 1, 2018 at 12:13:37 PM PDT
To: "Tweeters, Dear" <tweeters...> <mailto:<tweeters...>>


Hello Tweeters - Bird sounds are not my strong suit. It would be great if I could get some help from the Tweeters community in identifying a bird call or song.
It was recorded with my Android phone on September 7, 2016 in Neah Bay. (Can't remember exactly where in Neah Bay.)
You will have to turn up your volume to hear it, but once you do that, you should be able to hear it well, especially starting about 11 or 12 seconds into the recording. It's a 29-second recording. (I removed wind and other extraneous noises from the original recording to produce this shortened version.)
You can listen to it at:
http://janehadley.net/Tweeters/AudioRecord_4a.wav <http://janehadley.net/Tweeters/AudioRecord_4a.wav>
Thanks for your suggestions as to which bird this might be.
Jane Hadley
Seattle, WA


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Date: 7/2/18 9:47 pm
From: <merdave...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Banded Harlequin
-----------------------------------------------------
Subject: Harlequin
From: "R Victor Glick" <libbyvictor...>


----I received this message today. R. Glick lives in Winthrop. Meredith
Spencer----------------------------------------------------------------------



We found a banded male Harlequin 20 miles north of Winthrop, WA, sitting
on a rock in the Chewuch River with two females. He had a blue band on
his left leg with the letters JP. An aluminum band was on the right leg,
with the first two numbers being 71. Does anyone know of harlequins being
banded in the Pacific Northwest? Thanks,
Libby Schreiner




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Date: 7/2/18 3:26 pm
From: mary hrudkaj <mch1096...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Baby Mountain Quail and Special Olympics Opening Ceremony Unofficial Flyover
Just had Mama mountain quail stop by for a visit with her six chicks. There may have been a couple more who showed up after the group left the feeding area but, between every one moving about and shrubbery in the way, there may have been one or two more.


Today is the first I've seen the babies since I was gone all day Sunday to the opening ceremonies of the Special Olympics USA Games at Husky Stadium. During the ceremony there were at least three species of dragon or damsel flies zooming just over the heads of all the viewers in the stands. Just after the raising of the Special Olympics flag a Great Blue Heron came in from Lake Washington and flew the length of the stadium. Our family is calling it the 'official' flyover since no aircraft other than float planes made themselves evident.


Mary Hrudkaj

Belfair/Tahuya

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Date: 7/2/18 9:38 am
From: Hank H <h.heiberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Virginia Rail Video (Stillwater)

> Yesterday Karen and I and birding friends Pat and Dave re-found the Virginia Rail family that they had seen in the prior week at Stillwater in the Snoqualmie Valley north of Carnation. From the Stillwater parking lot turn left onto the trail. The Rail family travels close to & parallel to the trail in the marsh area on the right (side away from the highway) no further than the first bridge.
>
> Here is a video of a parent and two chicks:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/28284796647/in/dateposted/
>
> Here is a photo of a parent attending to a chick (down and to the left). Sometimes my camera won't focus on a bird right in front of me. This time amazingly the camera focused on the rail even though grass was in the way.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/28284796367/in/dateposted/
>
> Here is a photo of a chick following its parent by scurrying across open water.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/28284796487/in/dateposted/
>
> Here are some photos of the chicks. Check out the toes in the first photo.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/28284796447/in/dateposted/
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/28284796407/in/dateposted/
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/28284796397/in/dateposted/
>
> Hank Heiberg
> Issaquah, WA

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Date: 7/2/18 9:20 am
From: Carol Schulz <carol.schulz50...>
Subject: [Tweeters] "Hawk Attack" near Kennewick, WA
Hi Tweets:
My sister Marilyn sent an interesting msg yesterday.  She lives in
Kennewick, WA and visited a large park 5-miles down the Columbia River
from her home.  It is 273-acre Two Rivers Park.  A small part of it is
well developed and very popular, but most of it is primitive.  It is on
the south side of the Columbia River at the confluence with the Snake River.
Here is her story:

Carol, here's a real surprising story for you... something I've never
seen or heard in 15-20 years of birdwatching:

It happened this morning [June 1] in the Finley Woods (Two Rivers
Park).   I was out there to warm up the car & hopefully see a few more
Monarch butterflies and a hummingbird or two.     I did accomplish that
-- even saw two gray catbirds as well -- but in the process wound up
getting a very surprising series of 'attacks' from tall trees overhead,
by a very loud and raucous bird.   'Riparian' area very silent; no
people near, when suddenly this all happened.

The bird kept swooping around me from on high (dryland fairly tall
cottonwoods etc.).   I struggled to see what it was, thinking it might
be an eagle or  great horned owl because I used to see a nest or two
years ago.    Finally, it came to a stop high up where I could actually
see it.  Of all things, it was just a Cooper's Hawk.  (I was really
amazed.  I'd seen them over the years but just perched, nothing special.)

Couldn't see any indication of a nest or any 'nestlings'    As I would
look up and all around in this racket, it was hard to see through the
leaves to see any bird at all.    (July 1 seems a little late for any
nesting around here, I'd think. )   But finally the bird stood out on a
high location where I could actually see it, and was stunned to discover
it was an adult Cooper's Hawk.

I continued on through the woods to get to the milkweed fields and more
greenery, where I was pleased to find a few more Monarchs  plus a
Western Tiger Swallowtail, even a Bewick's wren.  Then as I came back
through the main trail in the woods, the hawk again made a few more
dive-bombing passes at me.  There were repeated numbers of swoops --
can't believe one person walking in the woods would have stirred up all
that.     As one book described it, the bird's sounds were "Loud,
repeated, high 'kek kek kek kek' call during alarm..."

P.S.   With all the action around my head & shoulders, I would have
thought this was some monster predator... Never would have guessed it
was a relatively small Cooper's til I actually saw the colors on its
front...  Just like the Kaufman pg 117 pix. P.P.S.  A Kaufman quote: 
"Voice -- largely silent, except around nest; fast, barking,
woodpecker-like cac-cac-car, in alarm."     That's just how it started
out.  I remember thinking of 'woodpecker'.

So that's my birding report for the year... That's my story and I'm
sticking to it, as someone once said!
              Happy Summertime to everyone, from Marilyn

Reported by Carol Schulz, Des Moines
Here is Des Moines, I have been near Cooper's Hawks nests, but have
never experienced anything like this. Could there have been a juvenile
bird somewhere down near the trail?



<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link>



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Date: 7/1/18 9:14 pm
From: Sammy Catiis <Hikersammy...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Nesting Black Throated Gray Warbler?


I had a pair of BL Throated Gray Warblers nest in my yard every single year for like 3 years straight.. I can only hope and assume they nested there again this year.. I recently moved.. so I won't know.

That was in Arlington/LkStevens area.

Sammy Catiis
________________________________
From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> on behalf of Janet Ray <janetlaura...>
Sent: Sunday, July 1, 2018 12:43 PM
To: Pat
Cc: <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Nesting Black Throated Gray Warbler?

Over the years we have seen them feeding young (including the dreaded cowbird) in Preston. Dont know whether they actually nested in the area or were just passing through.
However this year we have some coming to our pond almost every afternoon so chances are good that they are nesting locally.
Jan Ray


> On Jun 30, 2018, at 5:50 PM, Pat <pcoddin...> wrote:
>
> What is the probability that Black Throated Gray Warblers would be nesting in the Puget Sound area? Everything Ive been reading on them says they prefer dry habitat, with oak or juniper, but Im 99% certain I saw a pair feeding a juvenile at the Tacoma Nature Center. Unfortunately, the juvenile looked like a Brown Headed Cowbird. They do show up as fairly widespread this time of year on E-Bird.
>
> Pat Coddington
> Fife, WA

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Date: 7/1/18 7:15 pm
From: James Karr <jrkarr...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Why Don't Birds Have Teeth?
Don’t forget the bats. Bat species do well flying with teeth capable of dealing with diets from invertebrates to small birds and mammals.

Jim Karr

"The fabric of democracy is always fragile everywhere because it depends on the will of citizens to protect it,
and when they become scared, when it becomes dangerous for them to defend it, it can go very quickly."

Margaret Atwood, writer and poet









> On Jul 1, 2018, at 6:47 PM, Will's Email <yekramw...> wrote:
>
> I would add that weight-savings is another important reason. Hard to fly with fangs! Makes one kind of front-heavy too!
>
> Will Markey
> Cell - 253-569-8455
> Sent from my IPhone
>
> On Jul 1, 2018, at 13:08, Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...> <mailto:<birdologist...>> wrote:
>
>>
>> hello everyone,
>>
>> the question, why birds don't have teeth, has occupied many scientists through the years, and has generated a variety of hypotheses. But a new idea has been proposed that may explain both why birds don't have teeth and why they underwent such an explosive radiation after the extinction of all non-avian dinosaurs. The hypothesis needs more work, but it's a paradigm shift that will trigger a lot of new research.
>>
>> Why Don't Birds Have Teeth?
>> http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2018/06/30/why-dont-birds-have-teeth/ <http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2018/06/30/why-dont-birds-have-teeth/>
>> tinyURL: https://tinyurl.com/ybegb5z8 <https://tinyurl.com/ybegb5z8>
>>
>> I hope you enjoy the piece and share it with your friends via social media and twitter.
>>
>> --
>> GrrlScientist | @GrrlScientist <https://twitter.com/GrrlScientist>
>> <grrlscientist...> <mailto:<grrlscientist...>
>> Blogs: Forbes <http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/> | Evolution Institute <https://evolution-institute.org/profile/grrlscientist/?source=> | Medium <https://medium.com/@GrrlScientist>
>> Podcasts: BirdNote Radio <http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist>
>> Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter <https://tinyletter.com/grrlscientist>
>> Tiny bio: about.me <https://about.me/grrlscientist>
>> sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...> <mailto:<Tweeters...>
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Date: 7/1/18 6:53 pm
From: Will's Email <yekramw...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Why Don't Birds Have Teeth?
I would add that weight-savings is another important reason. Hard to fly with fangs! Makes one kind of front-heavy too!

Will Markey
Cell - 253-569-8455
Sent from my IPhone

> On Jul 1, 2018, at 13:08, Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...> wrote:
>
>
> hello everyone,
>
> the question, why birds don't have teeth, has occupied many scientists through the years, and has generated a variety of hypotheses. But a new idea has been proposed that may explain both why birds don't have teeth and why they underwent such an explosive radiation after the extinction of all non-avian dinosaurs. The hypothesis needs more work, but it's a paradigm shift that will trigger a lot of new research.
>
> Why Don't Birds Have Teeth?
> http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2018/06/30/why-dont-birds-have-teeth/
> tinyURL: https://tinyurl.com/ybegb5z8
>
> I hope you enjoy the piece and share it with your friends via social media and twitter.
>
> --
> GrrlScientist | @GrrlScientist
> <grrlscientist...>
> Blogs: Forbes | Evolution Institute | Medium
> Podcasts: BirdNote Radio
> Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter
> Tiny bio: about.me
> sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

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Date: 7/1/18 1:13 pm
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Why Don't Birds Have Teeth?
hello everyone,

the question, why birds don't have teeth, has occupied many scientists
through the years, and has generated a variety of hypotheses. But a new
idea has been proposed that may explain both why birds don't have teeth and
why they underwent such an explosive radiation after the extinction of all
non-avian dinosaurs. The hypothesis needs more work, but it's a paradigm
shift that will trigger a lot of new research.

Why Don't Birds Have Teeth?
http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2018/06/30/why-dont-birds-have-teeth/
tinyURL: https://tinyurl.com/ybegb5z8

I hope you enjoy the piece and share it with your friends via social media
and twitter.

--
GrrlScientist | @GrrlScientist <https://twitter.com/GrrlScientist>
<grrlscientist...>
Blogs: Forbes <http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/> | Evolution
Institute <https://evolution-institute.org/profile/grrlscientist/?source=> |
Medium <https://medium.com/@GrrlScientist>
Podcasts: BirdNote Radio <http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist>
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter <https://tinyletter.com/grrlscientist>
Tiny bio: about.me <https://about.me/grrlscientist>
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Date: 7/1/18 12:55 pm
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Wagner swifts
Six hundred Vaux’s Swifts spent last night in the Monroe Wagner roost and began leaving at 5:41 this morning. That's early. Perhaps a response to their being holed up for 11 hours.

Selleck hosted 117.

JBLM probably didn’t have any.

Larry Schwitters
Issaquah


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Date: 7/1/18 12:53 pm
From: Marcia Ian <gnudle...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Mini mallard
Hi Larry and Tweeters All,

Have you ever seen call ducks? Call ducks are mini ducks bred “for decoration”, or to serve as living decoys for hunters. Some years ago three call ducks showed up at the little pond behind my suburban NJ house, located in a densely populated area, two males and a female, which I assumed someone abandoned there, as others had abandoned Pekins and Muscovy ducks. They were just adorable, and best described as miniature mallards. They looked identical to mallards, only small. Some evil doer killed the female but I was able to find a safer home for the two males, as I had for other abandoned domestics. I wonder if they might have been call ducks?

Marcia Ian
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Date: 7/1/18 12:48 pm
From: Janet Ray <janetlaura...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Nesting Black Throated Gray Warbler?
Over the years we have seen them feeding young (including the dreaded cowbird) in Preston. Don’t know whether they actually nested in the area or were just passing through.
However this year we have some coming to our pond almost every afternoon so chances are good that they are nesting locally.
Jan Ray


> On Jun 30, 2018, at 5:50 PM, Pat <pcoddin...> wrote:
>
> What is the probability that Black Throated Gray Warblers would be nesting in the Puget Sound area? Everything I’ve been reading on them says they prefer dry habitat, with oak or juniper, but I’m 99% certain I saw a pair feeding a juvenile at the Tacoma Nature Center. Unfortunately, the juvenile looked like a Brown Headed Cowbird. They do show up as fairly widespread this time of year on E-Bird.
>
> Pat Coddington
> Fife, WA

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Date: 7/1/18 12:35 pm
From: Barry Brugman <bbrug15...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fall shorebird migration at Edmonds Marsh
This morning at about 11:30 there were approximately nine Western
Sandpipers and one Least Sandpiper feeding on the mud at the Edmonds
Marsh. I viewed them from the lookout platform by the tennis courts. I
had seen the report of Least Sandpipers this past week, but I haven't seen
any reports of Western Sandpiper there yet this summer, so I thought I
would pass this info on. Maybe migration is starting a little early this
year.

Barry Brugman
Kirkland

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Date: 7/1/18 12:16 pm
From: Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...>
Subject: [Tweeters] A little help with bird song or call
Hello Tweeters - Bird sounds are not my strong suit. It would be great
if I could get some help from the Tweeters community in identifying a
bird call or song.

It was recorded with my Android phone on September 7, 2016 in Neah Bay.
(Can't remember exactly where in Neah Bay.)

You will have to turn up your volume to hear it, but once you do that,
you should be able to hear it well, especially starting about 11 or 12
seconds into the recording. It's a 29-second recording. (I removed wind
and other extraneous noises from the original recording to produce this
shortened version.)

You can listen to it at:

http://janehadley.net/Tweeters/AudioRecord_4a.wav

Thanks for your suggestions as to which bird this might be.

Jane Hadley

Seattle, WA


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Date: 7/1/18 12:09 pm
From: Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] The Birdbooker Report
HI ALL:
This week's titles are:

1) Swifts in a Tower

https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/2018/06/new-title_25.html

2) Birds of Chile: A Photo Guide
3) Wildlife of Madeira and the Canary Islands
4) Snakes of Europe, North Africa and the Middle East: A Photographic
Guide

https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/2018/06/new-titles.html

5) Birds of Prey of the East/West: A Field Guide

https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/2018/06/new-title_28.html

sincerely
--

Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/
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Date: 7/1/18 7:33 am
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Gray catbird in newhalem- July 1 7:30am
After poor but ok views of the apparent alder flycatcher at bacon creek this morning, I came across a gray catbird on the way into newhalem just now(7:15-7:30). It is singing away on the north side of the highway, just past the old workers buildings and before you get to the main part of town with all the lawns

Matt Bartels
Seattle wa

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 6/30/18 5:53 pm
From: Pat <pcoddin...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Nesting Black Throated Gray Warbler?
What is the probability that Black Throated Gray Warblers would be nesting
in the Puget Sound area? Everything I’ve been reading on them says they
prefer dry habitat, with oak or juniper, but I’m 99% certain I saw a pair
feeding a juvenile at the Tacoma Nature Center. Unfortunately, the juvenile
looked like a Brown Headed Cowbird. They do show up as fairly widespread
this time of year on E-Bird.

Pat Coddington
Fife, WA

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Date: 6/30/18 12:30 pm
From: Hubbell <ldhubbell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Duckling Distraction
Tweeters,

Mallards have to be one of the most common ducks in the world. I have watched them for years. This week it felt like the Mallards united to show me the most distracting and confusing set of characteristics I have ever seen. Please take a look for yourself. Hopefully, you find my conclusions logical, however, I am always happy to learn more if anyone can point out information or knowledge I have overlooked. Thank you!

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2018/06/duckling-distraction.html <https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2018/06/duckling-distraction.html>

Have a great day on Union Bay, where nature bewilders a city!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net
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Date: 6/30/18 12:05 pm
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen...>
Subject: [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of July 1, 2018
Hey, Tweets,

-------------------------------------------------
Last week on BirdNote:

* Naturalist/Author Tony Angell Watches a Peregrine Falcon Fledge

http://bit.ly/2lkV9KR

* Birds Move from Fresh to Salt Water

http://bit.ly/2MJ4Saw

* California Quail, Up and Running

http://bit.ly/2ysLWK5

* Summer Tanagers: Wasp Hunters

http://bit.ly/2K1mQ61

* How Do Birds Brake from Flight?

http://bit.ly/2tqoK9v

* Begging Sounds and Postures

http://bit.ly/2yvmHqo

* Tallgrass Prairie

http://bit.ly/2yz1MT8

———————————————————
Check out next week's shows — The Weirdest Noise in the Woods, and more...

http://bit.ly/2Ki9syE

---------------------------------------------
BirdNote is now in print. Check out our new book:
https://www.birdnote.org/birdnote-book
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:<info...>
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts

... or follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a 
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related 
resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find nearly 1500 episodes and more than 1000 videos in the archive

Thanks for listening, 

Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
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Date: 6/28/18 4:54 pm
From: Megan Ward <meganward28...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Great Gray Owl update
Hi all, thank you so much for all of your responses and information! Here
is a quick update:

-everyone confirms the ID as a Great Gray Owl
-it was in my friend’s backyard (on her sons’s playground equipment! :-0
)at 8:30pm yesterday which is when the photo was taken (she just sent it to
me for my daughter to ID this AM)
-the owl has moved on and is no longer in their yard
-it seems that this is an unusual/rare time for this species to show up
here (echo lake, snohomish)
-I emailed Steve Pink who does county documentation (if I’m remembering
AnnMarie Wood’s email correctly)
-my friend is willing to talk to someone if anything else is needed for
documentation.

They will keep an eye out in case it returns- I will post again if it shows
back up. Thank you again everyone!

Megan Ward (&Emily, age 8)
Kirkland

PS-For anyone who didn’t email to ask for the photo, here is a link:



https://photos.app.goo.gl/HaCn46pSUFbv1wob8

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Date: 6/28/18 12:45 pm
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign15...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Tsunami Spray and Crab Soup
There has been sort of slow-motion tsunami washing over Port Townsend ,as
high as the highest hills, this month of June. It happens every year,
leaving behind flecks foam clinging to forest and shore. No one was hurt in
the passing of this wave, in fact it's still going on: the blooming of
Ocean Spray.

Yes, June is Ocean Spray month although it continues into July. Ocean Spray
(aka Holodiscus discolor) is a large flowering deciduous shrub that is
abundant in PT - very obviously now when it blooms- a real tower of Flower
Power, it is covered with masses of creamy flower clusters which are
popular with insects, and birds.After blooming it produces masses of brown
seedheads which hold on into winter, also good for the birds. Native
Americans used to make arrows out of the long shoots of this plant as it,
while easier to cut when green gets very hard as it cures( I found that out
by cutting out deadwood on mine in Everett) and even harder when heated
over a fire. It had lot's of uses.

Meanwhile, over at Kah Tai Prairie (located within the golf course), the
very showy flowers of May have turned to a showy , although a bit more
subtle display in a background of tan grasses. Most obvious are compact
clumps of Showy Fleabane (with mauve/purple flowers), Oregon Sunshine
(bright yellow-gold with gray leaves), white Yarrow, and a few other
things. My favorite was the delicate Harvest Brodiaea - a dainty
blue-violet flower about 7"tall- which I haven't noted here before. Neato.
Saw one Lorquin's Admiral, and the seem to be lots of Swallowtail
Butterflys about town this year. Savannah Sparrows making their bug-like
chirp.

Down at the pier at Fort Worden, the waters have been exciting, changing
daily - who knows what tomorrow will bring - as usual. One day, about ten
days ago, it was crab soup, the plankton- murky water swarming with
Megalops - the second larval stage of a crab. One day there were up to
about 10+ per sq. ft of water. It was hard to quantify because these tiny
little larvae (2 to 3 mm long) were really zooming all over the place - the
Megalops swim quite well. While most adult crabs have the abdomen tucked
beneath the carapace, the megalops abdomen sticks straight out behind and
acts like a flapping propeller.

In fact, these little guys are so zippy, that I was have trouble getting a
good binocular ID on them, so I just cupped several into my hand - tiny
little crabs with pincers and everything. So now that I've got a handle on
them, I can recognize them by movement - handy with a lot of little
zooplankton, Now what *kind* of crab it was, is a whole other story.

Your'e maybe wondering by now, if not sooner, what about the birds? Well,
lately it's been kind of quiet down at the pier, but last afternoon late,
my Ma and I were down there and were treated to close-up alcid comparisons,
as the usual guillemots were joined by several Rhinoceros Auklets, and a
single Marbled Murrelet, all fishing near the dock. Lot's Herring around
these days. Just sayin'

PS: yesterday found a dead Orange-crown Warbler on the deck at home:
prognosis "death by window". While I have banded birds in years past (like
about 30 yrs ago) I'd forgotten just how tiny and light they are in hand.

Jeff Gibson
Port Townsend WA

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Date: 6/28/18 12:40 pm
From: Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2018-06-28
A nice, if mostly cloudy day today. Lots of baby birds, but still many males singing.

Highlights:
a.. Band-tailed Pigeon – adults and at least 1 juvenile
b.. Eurasian Collared-Dove – juvenile in Pea Patch
c.. Spotted Sandpiper – at least 2 near weir
d.. Caspian Tern – one flying down the river
e.. VIRGINIA RAIL – adult and 3 babies across slough
f.. Barn Owl – baby(s) inside windmill, heard 3:30am
g.. Western Screech-Owl – Matt even got photos this morning around 4am
h.. Black Swift – three above south end of Dog Meadow
i.. Lazuli Bunting – 2 males singing, one north and one south of Fields 7-8-9
j.. Bullock’s Oriole – female/juvenile in large cottonwood
The VIRGINIA RAILS were the big highlight. We haven’t even heard a rail since April, but today we heard what Matt thought were rail noises from across the river a little south of the Dog Meadow. About a minute after I played the call and got a response, Karen noticed an adult rail on mud across the river. As we watched over the next few minutes we spotted one, two, and then three black puffball babies following the adult around. Dare I say “cute”?

Earlier, we were happy to find TREE SWALLOWS feeding a baby in a hole in a cottonwood snag. Many pairs nest in boxes and gourds each year, but seeing them nest in natural holes is quite uncommon at Marymoor.

Immature birds noted today included DOWNY WOODPECKER, MARSH WREN, SPOTTED TOWHEE, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, and BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK, and at least 16 additional species.

For the day, 63 species. Last Thursday evening, my wife and I heard a COMMON NIGHTHAWK, new for 2018. I believe that brings the park year list to 141 species.

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== <BirdMarymoor...>



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Date: 6/28/18 9:50 am
From: Michelle Maani <lamoustique...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Asking for an audio ID
Thank you to all the people that answered. When I heard the sparrow out in the open, there was an acoustic quality that on the fourth note that I hadn't heard before. Maybe it was something that the bowl of trees it was in created.  It confused me. When I posted the recording, that quality was missing. The back of my mind said, that sounds like a song sparrow, but maybe it isn't. (I'm always hoping for zebras when I hear hoofbeats, but even if I usually get horses, sometimes I get donkeys!) Has anyone counted all the variations of song sparrow songs? I'm curious.
Michelle Maani

https://www.flickr.com/photos/11815777@N07/42313390224/in/dateposted/




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Date: 6/28/18 8:42 am
From: <festuca...>
Subject: [Tweeters] "Summer Tanager" reported at Nisqually NWR
Hi all -

I usually don't pass on potentially-spurious sightings, but thought you might want to keep an ear out. I checked in at the Nisqually Visitors' Center this afternoon just before they closed, and noted that a visiting birder had reported a Summer Tanager along the:

"Twin Barns Loop Boardwalk, Riparian Side"

I mentioned it to the volunteers, and they said that a woman had come in to report it this afternoon, and was adamant that she was familiar with this species from the South, and had clearly seen an "all-red" tanager with a yellow bill. The volunteers at the Center had no other information on where, exactly, the bird had been seen along the walk.

I returned back along the boardwalk to look and listen, but could not turn any of the Robins and Black-headed Grosbeaks' calls into a Tanager. But, anyone there might want to keep their eyes & ears open.

Good luck, and let us know if you find it! ;-{)

- Jon. Anderson
OlyWA

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Date: 6/28/18 7:21 am
From: Megan Ward <meganward28...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Great grey owl- echo lake area
Good morning all. My friend, who lives in the Echo Lake area of Snohomish,
sent me a picture of a “huge owl” just chilling out on her son’s playset,
asking for ID (from my 8yr old daughter who is the real birder of the
family). Looks unmistakeable for a great grey owl. They are very private
people and not likely to want birders on their property, although I have
asked her (not heard back yet). But thought it might be of interest anyway
to the birding community and also for folks in that area to keep an eye
out. Feel free to email if interested in the photo.

Thanks!
Megan Ward

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Date: 6/27/18 9:18 pm
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Nisqually NWR Wednesday Walk for 6/27/2018
Hi Tweets,

a very pleasant summers day at Nisqually for 30 plus bird watchers, with
cloudy skies and temperatures in the 60's degrees Fahrenheit. We had a Low
-1.59ft Tide at 12:03pm. Highlights included many babies, HOODED
MERGANSER, BALD EAGLE, DOWNY WOODPECKER, TREE SPARROW, RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD,
WILLOW FLYCATCHER and YELLOW WARBLER. We also had many males singing on
territory. Jon Anderson reports another visitor reported a Summer Tanager
on the Riparian Side of the Twin Barns area, but we did not see this
species on our way through. Jon did give it a second try, but was not able
to confirm.

Starting out at the Visitor Center Pond Overlook, there were 5 baby HOODED
MERGANSER with a hen in the pond and many recently fledged TREE SWALLOW
learning to fly over the pond. BARN SWALLOW were nesting in the Visitor
Center. We also observed NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW foraging.

The Orchard was good for nesting CEDAR WAXWING, YELLOW WARBLER and AMERICAN
GOLDFINCH. We also had good looks of RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKER, BLACK-HEADED
GROSBEAK, WILLOW FLYCATCHER and juvenile DOWNY WOODPECKER.

The Access Road was good for SAVANNAH SPARROW, PURPLE FINCH, both variety
of CHICKADEE, and a large flock of BUSHTIT.

The west entrance to the Twin Barns Loop Trail provided nice observation of
SWAINSON'S THRUSH, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD, BEWICK'S
WREN, MARSH WREN and RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD.

The Twin Barns Overlook had two juvenile WILLOW FLYCATCHERS that were
really just fly chasing and not quite ready for graduation. The grass in
the field is tall with no visible water, so waterfowl viewing only exists
with something flying in or something flushed out by an eagle fly over.

Out on the dike or Nisqually Estuary Trail, we had nice observation of
CINNAMON TEAL with quick looks at VIRGINIA RAIL and BANK SWALLOW. A flock
of 10 plus GADWALL flew into the fresh water marsh. There were many more
CLIFF SWALLOW over the marsh, along with good numbers of RED-WINGED
BLACKBIRDS.

The Nisqually Estuary Boardwalk Trail was good for BALD EAGLE,
DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT, GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL, CALIFORNIA GULL,
RING-BILLED GULL and GREAT BLUE HERON. BELTED KINGFISHER and CASPIAN TERN
were seen along the way, and PURPLE MARTIN was observed off Luhr Beach.

On our return we picked up BROWN CREEPER, WESTERN WOOD-PEWEE, PACIFIC-SLOPE
FLYCATCHER, and WARBLING VIREO along the east side of the Twin Barns Loop
Trail.

For the day we had 62 species with 143 species for the year so far.

Until next week when we meet again at 8am at the Visitor Center Pond
Overlook,

happy birding,

Shep

--
Shep Thorp
Browns Point
253-370-3742

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Date: 6/27/18 7:12 pm
From: Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fall Shorebirds - Edmonds
The first fall shorebirds, two Least Sandpipers, arrived in the Edmonds marsh late this afternoon. Along with a Pacific-slope Flycatcher, it looks like the start of southbound migration for this location.

Carol Riddell
Edmonds, WA
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Date: 6/27/18 8:25 am
From: Bob Sundstrom <ixoreus...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Asking for an audio ID
Hi Michelle,

Good recording of a singing Song Sparrow. They sing multiple song patterns, nearly always with the rich, unhurried feel of this example.

Thanks for sharing, Bob Sundstrom

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 26, 2018, at 5:25 PM, Michelle Maani <lamoustique...> wrote:
>
> I've heard this bird before but never seen it. Brush Prairie, Washington.
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/11815777@N07/42313390224/in/dateposted/
>
> Michelle Maani
>
>
>
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Date: 6/26/18 10:33 pm
From: Kenneth Brown <kenbrownpls...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Common Nighthawks
With gratitude to Anders Price for posting about these birds, and meeting me on-site tonight. Shortly after arriving, roughly 9 pm, we heard the "boom" (sounded more like a honk to me) of the male mating display dive. This was repeated several times and a second bird appeared rather quickly. A third bird was hanging in the area but the primary activity was what appeared to be a mated pair, at times closely following each other, sometimes separate but nearby. They were over a recent clear cut replanted in christmas trees, on the south side of 78th Ave NW, off Gallager Cove Rd. Thanks again Anders.


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Date: 6/26/18 5:36 pm
From: Dee Dee <deedeeknit...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] White Pelicans Nisqually (John Whitehead)
Found this article on-line by Oklahoma Dept. of Wildlife Conservation that states —

“Birds that are mature enough to reproduce will develop “nuptial tubercles,” or large ridges on top of their bills, and ornamental plumes atop their head. Once chick feeding begins, the ridges fall off and the birds develop black feathers on the back of the head. Their eye color also changes from dark to light as their breeding status changes.”

Interesting picture you took, Thanks for posting the link. I have seen White Pelicans now and again in various locales around the country but never happened to see this phase before.

https://www.wildlifedepartment.com/wildlifemgmt/species/americanwhite.htm

Dee W
Edmonds, WA


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Date: 6/26/18 5:29 pm
From: Michelle Maani <lamoustique...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Asking for an audio ID
I've heard this bird before but never seen it.  Brush Prairie, Washington. 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/11815777@N07/42313390224/in/dateposted/

Michelle Maani



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Date: 6/26/18 3:50 pm
From: Dave Slager <dave.slager...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] White Pelicans Nisqually
Hi John,

This time of year American White Pelicans undergo a presupplemental
head molt. Some individuals get an impressive amount of blackish on
the head and neck, and your photo is a great example of the variation
seen among individuals. The timing of this molt generally coincides
with the loss of the bill horn during the breeding season. You can
read more about it here:

https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/condor/v077n03/p0356-p0359.pdf

Good birding,

Dave Slager
Seattle, WA

On Mon, Jun 25, 2018 at 4:43 PM, John Whitehead <jirvingw...> wrote:
> A flock of some 28 American White Pelicans way out off Nisqually Reach. I
> noticed several had black caps. One had black on almost its whole head and
> neck. I did a brief online search found nothing like that. Some Brown
> Pelicans are some what dark on the back of the neck. ???? Juveniles?
> Hybrids ? Photos on my Fliker page
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/jirvingw/42960088542/in/dateposted-public/ .
>
> John
>
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Date: 6/26/18 3:34 pm
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Alder Flycatcher at Bacon Creek Road and SR 20
The Alder Flycatcher found by Gary Bletsch (and Mike Nelson) at Bacon Creek Road just off SR 20 continues as of 3:15 today.  Gary's directions are fantastic.  Going east on SR 20, turn right onto Bacon Creek Road.  In less than 100 yards park just before the yellow gate.  Walk 50 uards down the gravel road to the right.  Gary left a pink ribbon on a stump there.  
The Alder FC favors the shrubs and small trees in that immediate area but ranges all the way back to and across Bacon Creek Road but I never saw it cross SR 20.
It is very active and gives what Gary descibed as "wee buhr" two note call frequently.  It is similar to but very different from the burrier and differently accented "fitz bew" of the Willow FC.  (There was one across SR 20).
I heard it eithin 1 minute of arriving and saw it several times, but it took 20 minutes to get a photo.
Thanks Gary
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
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Date: 6/26/18 1:03 pm
From: Tom and Carol Stoner <tcstonefam...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Soaring Cooper's
I just spotted a Cooper's Hawk soaring near Gatewood Hill in West Seattle.
The binoculars revealed it was being followed by a hummingbird that seemed
to want it to move on.

Carol Stoner
West Seattle

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Date: 6/26/18 8:53 am
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Skagit Alder Flycatcher - Yes
The Alder Flycatcher Gary reported Sunday is singing fairly frequently
under the power lines along Bacon Creek Road, immediately south of SR 20.
For the time I've been here it has stayed close to the paved road.

Josh Adams
Cathcart WA

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Date: 6/25/18 10:13 pm
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Article on Puget Sound White Pelicans
Interesting OPB article on the white pelicans in Puget Sound.Puget Sound Has New Climate Refugees. They’re Pelicans.

|
|
|
| | |

|

|
|
| |
Puget Sound Has New Climate Refugees. They’re Pelicans.

Katie Campbell

Hundreds of American white pelicans have suddenly shown up in Puget Sound after disappearing from more arid plac...
|

|

|




Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA
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Date: 6/25/18 4:49 pm
From: John Whitehead <jirvingw...>
Subject: [Tweeters] White Pelicans Nisqually
A flock of some 28 American White Pelicans way out off Nisqually Reach.
I noticed several had black caps. One had black on almost its whole head
and neck. I did a brief online search found nothing like that. Some
Brown Pelicans are some what dark on the back of the neck.   ????
Juveniles? Hybrids ?  Photos on my Fliker page
https://www.flickr.com/photos/jirvingw/42960088542/in/dateposted-public/ .

John

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Date: 6/25/18 11:18 am
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...>
Subject: [Tweeters] How Do Young Birds Know When To Leave The Nest?
Hello everyone,

I just published a piece about a cute little Science Advances paper that
describes the nature of a previously unrecognised conflict between parent
birds and their offspring: when to leave the nest.

Basically, the age when young birds leave their nest is the evolutionary
compromise between parents, who want their chicks to leave as soon as
possible, and offspring, who want to leave as late as possible -- does this
sound familiar?

How Do Young Birds Know When To Leave The Nest?
http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2018/06/25/how-do-young-birds-know-when-to-leave-the-nest/
tinyURL: https://tinyurl.com/yas5duhc

As always, please share this piece with your colleagues, friends, and
family as well as on social media and twitter.

hope your summer is going well.

--
GrrlScientist | @GrrlScientist <https://twitter.com/GrrlScientist>
<grrlscientist...>
Blogs: Forbes <http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/> | Evolution
Institute <https://evolution-institute.org/profile/grrlscientist/?source=> |
Medium <https://medium.com/@GrrlScientist>
Podcasts: BirdNote Radio <http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist>
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter <https://tinyletter.com/grrlscientist>
Tiny bio: about.me <https://about.me/grrlscientist>
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Date: 6/25/18 5:22 am
From: Russ Koppendrayer <russkope...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] More on today's Eastern Phoebe [in Wahkiakum County]
Great find Matt, and with just a phone it seems like good documentation.
Congrats.
I just thought I'd enter in on the access to the Center Road. While it is
true that the road goes all the way through, there is no public access at
the east or headquarters side. If you come from the west as you did , when
you get near the HQ side there is signage telling you no public access past
that point. Starting form the east end access (which is not obvious) would
be through the maintenance buildings yard which is fenced and gated. They
don't want people in the maintenance building yard (possibly insurance
driven? or just potential vandalism to equipment). A real downer for me as
I enjoyed the Center Road and Steamboat Slough Rd loop hike when I started
birding there in the '90s and then these maintenance building were built
and the loop cut off. By the way your find was much closer to the west end
anyway.

Russ Koppendrayer
Longview, WA

On Sun, Jun 24, 2018 at 9:41 PM, Kevin Black <kevblack787...> wrote:

> Hello All,
>
> Congrats on a great find Matt! I searched the Center Road Trail, walking
> .6 miles into the trail and back without finding the Eastern Phoebe.
>
> I also drove Brooks Slough Road and found two Black Phoebes near one of
> the levee gates. There was a nest in one of the gate’sthe eave, which could
> have been the Phoebes’ nest.
>
> Good Birding,
>
> Kevin Black
> Vancouver, WA
>
> On Sun, Jun 24, 2018 at 8:50 PM Matt Bartels <mattxyz...>
> wrote:
>
>> Hi all-
>> A little more on the Eastern Phoebe today.
>> I didn’t realize you could access the Center Road Trail at JBH from more
>> than one place — I started from the west side [the entrance you reach when
>> coming in from Skamokawa, no the HQ side. I walked the trail ~4/10 of a
>> mile and the Phoebe was moving from fence posts to the isolated trees along
>> the trail side.
>>
>> After posting, I got my scope and digiscope attachment from my car with
>> hopes of getting better photos for the documentation — alas, no luck
>> relocating the bird in another hour of looking.
>> That trail covers a lot of open area with lots of fence line, so I’d bet
>> the Phoebe is still out there somewhere.
>>
>> With the caveat that these are all just handheld phone shots, here is a
>> link to a folder with a couple videos and photos — blow the photos up and
>> you can pretty much see the bird…. and one has a decent recording of
>> vocalizations —
>>
>> https://www.dropbox.com/sh/b4pob3ad06h1hfi/AAAaSTeNOwTLkzw9TFYa3GQga?dl=0
>>
>> Hope the bird cooperates for others to get a look at — It vocalized only
>> for a short time — perhaps earlier in the day it would be more cooperative?
>>
>> Pending approval, this would be the 13th for the state - 3rd for Western
>> WA, and the first summer record west of the mountains [the two previous
>> westside records were both in December]. In contrast, nine of the ten
>> Eastern WA records fall between May 21 and July 3 — consistent with this
>> time particular bird.
>>
>> Matt Bartels
>> Seattle, WA
>>
>>
>> Begin forwarded message:
>>
>> *From: *Matt Bartels <mattxyz...>
>> *Subject: **[Tweeters] Eastern phoebe at Julia butler Hanson NWr
>> wahkiakum co*
>> *Date: *June 24, 2018 at 11:22:51 AM PDT
>> *To: *<tweeters...>
>>
>> Hi all
>> I just stumbled across Eastern Phoebe at Julia Butler Hanson nwr— it is
>> about 0.4 miles out the center road trail— the seasonal trail only open in
>> summer. I think this link will give the approx location.
>>
>>
>> Dropped Pin
>> near Unnamed Road, Washington <https://goo.gl/maps/MyfPsVXJt1w>
>>
>> Matt Bartels
>> Seattle wa
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>>
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>>
> --
> Kevin Black
> Vancouver, WA
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
>

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Date: 6/24/18 9:44 pm
From: Kevin Black <kevblack787...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] More on today's Eastern Phoebe [in Wahkiakum County]
Hello All,

Congrats on a great find Matt! I searched the Center Road Trail, walking .6
miles into the trail and back without finding the Eastern Phoebe.

I also drove Brooks Slough Road and found two Black Phoebes near one of the
levee gates. There was a nest in one of the gate’sthe eave, which could
have been the Phoebes’ nest.

Good Birding,

Kevin Black
Vancouver, WA

On Sun, Jun 24, 2018 at 8:50 PM Matt Bartels <mattxyz...> wrote:

> Hi all-
> A little more on the Eastern Phoebe today.
> I didn’t realize you could access the Center Road Trail at JBH from more
> than one place — I started from the west side [the entrance you reach when
> coming in from Skamokawa, no the HQ side. I walked the trail ~4/10 of a
> mile and the Phoebe was moving from fence posts to the isolated trees along
> the trail side.
>
> After posting, I got my scope and digiscope attachment from my car with
> hopes of getting better photos for the documentation — alas, no luck
> relocating the bird in another hour of looking.
> That trail covers a lot of open area with lots of fence line, so I’d bet
> the Phoebe is still out there somewhere.
>
> With the caveat that these are all just handheld phone shots, here is a
> link to a folder with a couple videos and photos — blow the photos up and
> you can pretty much see the bird…. and one has a decent recording of
> vocalizations —
>
> https://www.dropbox.com/sh/b4pob3ad06h1hfi/AAAaSTeNOwTLkzw9TFYa3GQga?dl=0
>
> Hope the bird cooperates for others to get a look at — It vocalized only
> for a short time — perhaps earlier in the day it would be more cooperative?
>
> Pending approval, this would be the 13th for the state - 3rd for Western
> WA, and the first summer record west of the mountains [the two previous
> westside records were both in December]. In contrast, nine of the ten
> Eastern WA records fall between May 21 and July 3 — consistent with this
> time particular bird.
>
> Matt Bartels
> Seattle, WA
>
>
> Begin forwarded message:
>
> *From: *Matt Bartels <mattxyz...>
> *Subject: **[Tweeters] Eastern phoebe at Julia butler Hanson NWr
> wahkiakum co*
> *Date: *June 24, 2018 at 11:22:51 AM PDT
> *To: *<tweeters...>
>
> Hi all
> I just stumbled across Eastern Phoebe at Julia Butler Hanson nwr— it is
> about 0.4 miles out the center road trail— the seasonal trail only open in
> summer. I think this link will give the approx location.
>
>
> Dropped Pin
> near Unnamed Road, Washington <https://goo.gl/maps/MyfPsVXJt1w>
>
> Matt Bartels
> Seattle wa
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
--
Kevin Black
Vancouver, WA

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Date: 6/24/18 8:53 pm
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] More on today's Eastern Phoebe [in Wahkiakum County]
Hi all-
A little more on the Eastern Phoebe today.
I didn’t realize you could access the Center Road Trail at JBH from more than one place — I started from the west side [the entrance you reach when coming in from Skamokawa, no the HQ side. I walked the trail ~4/10 of a mile and the Phoebe was moving from fence posts to the isolated trees along the trail side.

After posting, I got my scope and digiscope attachment from my car with hopes of getting better photos for the documentation — alas, no luck relocating the bird in another hour of looking.
That trail covers a lot of open area with lots of fence line, so I’d bet the Phoebe is still out there somewhere.

With the caveat that these are all just handheld phone shots, here is a link to a folder with a couple videos and photos — blow the photos up and you can pretty much see the bird…. and one has a decent recording of vocalizations —

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/b4pob3ad06h1hfi/AAAaSTeNOwTLkzw9TFYa3GQga?dl=0 <https://www.dropbox.com/sh/b4pob3ad06h1hfi/AAAaSTeNOwTLkzw9TFYa3GQga?dl=0>

Hope the bird cooperates for others to get a look at — It vocalized only for a short time — perhaps earlier in the day it would be more cooperative?

Pending approval, this would be the 13th for the state - 3rd for Western WA, and the first summer record west of the mountains [the two previous westside records were both in December]. In contrast, nine of the ten Eastern WA records fall between May 21 and July 3 — consistent with this time particular bird.

Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA

>
>> Begin forwarded message:
>>
>> From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz...> <mailto:<mattxyz...>>
>> Subject: [Tweeters] Eastern phoebe at Julia butler Hanson NWr wahkiakum co
>> Date: June 24, 2018 at 11:22:51 AM PDT
>> To: <tweeters...> <mailto:<tweeters...>
>>
>> Hi all
>> I just stumbled across Eastern Phoebe at Julia Butler Hanson nwr— it is about 0.4 miles out the center road trail— the seasonal trail only open in summer. I think this link will give the approx location.
>>
>>
>> Dropped Pin
>> near Unnamed Road, Washington <https://goo.gl/maps/MyfPsVXJt1w>
>>
>> Matt Bartels
>> Seattle wa
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...> <mailto:<Tweeters...>
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Date: 6/24/18 8:49 pm
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Skagit Alder Flycatcher
Dear Tweeters,
This afternoon, 24 June 2018, Mike Nelson and I found a singing ALDER FLYCATCHER at Bacon Creek, Skagit County. This is not far upriver from Marblemount. 
We found the bird on the Skagit River side of SR 20, along the power-line road that goes westwards back toward Bacon Creek. I put a bit of pink ribbon on a stump here, with the word "Empid" written on it, plus a little cairn. If you are standing on this gravel road, looking over the stump and the pink ribbon, and looking toward the stop sign that warns you that you are leaving the power-line road and going onto SR 20, you will be looking into the center of the little territory where the flycatcher was singing "weebeeur!" and calling "peep" (instead of the "fitzbew" and "wit" that a Willow Flycatcher was singing and calling, respectively, just a few yards toward the creek, simultaneously). 
Mike and I observed this bird for about an hour, 1740-1840 or so. It was very skittish, singing, then flying to a different perch, and never giving us a chance for a photo. I believe I was able to capture the song by taking some video with my camera. My cell-phone battery died before I could take a video with it, and before I could text people!
We also found two American Three-toed Woodpeckers about half a mile up the trail from Rainy Pass, as one heads toward Cutthroat Pass. A raging torrent at trail mile 1.0 blocked us from hiking farther, although Mike did find a log over which a more stalward birder than I might be able to cross it! The woodpeckers were drumming, calling, and foraging right along the trail.
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch
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Date: 6/24/18 8:25 pm
From: Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] AOS Checklist supplement
HI ALL:
Here's a summary of the latest AOS Checklist supplement:

http://blog.aba.org/2018/06/aos2018.html

The most noteworthy change for WA State is that the Gray Jay is now Canada
Jay.

sincerely
--

Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/
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Date: 6/24/18 7:18 pm
From: Nelson Briefer <nrieferb...>
Subject: [Tweeters] White Pelicans
23 White Pelicans at Whitmarsh Junction, Anacortes. This area is on the
South-east corner of the refinery property. The birds were soaring, about
2:45 pm. On Sunday 24th. Good Birding- Nelson Briefer.

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Date: 6/24/18 6:49 pm
From: Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course monthly bird walk -6-21-2018
Tweeters,

Sorry for the delayed reporting, but a birthday sojourn kept this from getting out there sooner. I wasn't at the Eagles Pride monthly bird walk, but Russ Smith and others kept this one going strong. Russ's (edited) notes are pretty easy to follow!


It's hard to compare with past June trips as the last 2 ('16, '17) were both rainy. Today was a sudden low pressure and change in weather from Wednesday's heat and it was overcast.....but the birds seemed to like that (as Nathanael predicted) and were quite active and vocal....perfect!!!

I (Russ) asked at the end for "bird of the day" and got a variety of choices ranging from the MACGILLIVRAY'S, the CEDAR WAXWINGS, the fledgling RED-TAILED HAWK teetering in the nest, the 8 species of warblers, to the WESTERN TANAGERS.

Per Dave's suggestion, we found CEDAR WAXWINGS in the shoreline willows around the small pond with aeration (hole #9). We had a very vocal HOUSE WREN near the maintenance yard light post nest (3rd year) and suspected fledglings nearby. What I call the Slot or Power Line Alley produced lots of birds including the TOWNSEND'S WARBLER high. While calling it to show others, a MACGILLIVRAY'S WARBLER flushed from low and gave us long views from several locations. Mitch had a visual sighting of a BULLOCK'S ORIOLE. I later confirmed it with a single callback reply.

We had flycatchers vocalizations throughout the day including PACIFIC-SLOPE, WILLOW, and WESTERN WOOD-PEWEE with visual sightings often as well on all 3 species. As we left the golf course (#4) toward the residential backyard with waterfall, we immediately picked up a BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER and then a HUTTON'S VIREO. The backyard gave us multiple RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRDS (family) and lots of BUSHTITS. From the northern boundary road overlooking Hodge Lake we had a sighting of the RED-TAILED HAWK nest with adult (who left) and a downy-covered fledgling teetering around the edge of the nest flaying its wings. We picked up our only CALIFORNIA SCRUB-JAYS and STELLAR'S JAYS as well as some MOURNING DOVES there. We had WILSON'S WARBLER'S in the low spot a little east of there with the small wetland south of the boundary road and understory brush perfect for Wilson's.

We continued to sporadically pick up WESTERN TANAGERS, seemingly always in breeding pairs, first by sound and then visually throughout the day...beautiful birds and the consensus favorite.

Approaching the 12th hole (water), while waiting for the stragglers to catch up before calling for the frequently found MACGILLIVRAY'S there in the past, a CASSIN'S VIREO sounded off with most of us getting challenging views of a pair over 5 minutes as they moved about.

Approaching Hodge Lake, we not only got lots of VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOWS, but also several NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOWS to complement the ones found earlier at the maintenance yard pond. Lots of BARN SWALLOWS all day, following us at low (2 ft) elevations as we crossed grassy areas.

A great group of birders and a great day of birding!


The JBLM Eagles Pride GC birders meet the third Thursday of each month at 8:00AM. Starting point is Bldg # 1514, Driving Range Tee, Eagles Pride Golf Course, I-5 Exit 116, Mounts Road Exit. Upcoming walks include the following:

July 19

August 16

September 20

Anyone is welcome to join us!


Temp in the low-mid 60's, overcast
52 species (+1 other taxa)

Red-tailed Hawk 3 one adult flyover, 2nd adult on nest, fledgling standing up within nest (NE of Hodge Lake, seen from roadway along north edge of course property)
Glaucous-winged Gull 1
Band-tailed Pigeon 4
Mourning Dove 3
Anna's Hummingbird 1
Rufous Hummingbird 6
Northern Flicker (Red-shafted) 5
Western Wood-Pewee 10 heard throughout the day and area, some visually verified
Willow Flycatcher 7
Pacific-slope Flycatcher 11
Hutton's Vireo 3
Cassin's Vireo 2
Warbling Vireo (Western) 1
Steller's Jay 1
California Scrub-Jay 2
American/Northwestern Crow 7
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 5
Tree Swallow 9
Violet-green Swallow 20
Barn Swallow 60
Black-capped Chickadee 6
Chestnut-backed Chickadee 14
Bushtit (Pacific) 17
Red-breasted Nuthatch 13
Brown Creeper 3
House Wren 5 seen in 3 different locations
Pacific Wren 1
Bewick's Wren 4
Golden-crowned Kinglet 8
Swainson's Thrush 30
American Robin 80
European Starling 24
Cedar Waxwing 20
Orange-crowned Warbler (lutescens) 3
MacGillivray's Warbler 2 found in "power line alley", ironically flushed when calling for Townsend's Warbler. Multiple, long views
Common Yellowthroat 4
Yellow Warbler 6
Yellow-rumped Warbler 2
Black-throated Gray Warbler 1
Townsend's Warbler 1
Wilson's Warbler 2
Chipping Sparrow 1
Dark-eyed Junco (Oregon) 2
White-crowned Sparrow (pugetensis) 17
Song Sparrow 12
Spotted Towhee (oregonus Group) 16
Western Tanager 8
Black-headed Grosbeak 6
Bullock's Oriole 1 sighted at SW end of power line alley, later on west outside had single callback
Red-winged Blackbird 6
Brown-headed Cowbird 6
Purple Finch (Western) 10
American Goldfinch 5

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46719697

May all your birds be identified,

Denis DeSilvis

<avnacrs4birds...>


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Date: 6/24/18 5:49 pm
From: Bruce LaBar <blabar...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Westport Pelagic Trip, June 23, 2018
Yesterday’s pelagic trip out of Westport was a great success, especially with great numbers of mammals observed. We began boarding the Monte Carlo around 5:00 a.m. It was Pirate Days all along the marina streets which made it somewhat surreal walking among so many skulls and cross bone flags, ARRR.

The day was mostly overcast with some bumpy seas going out. Coming back was pretty smooth. June’s an interesting time because of the low number of birds and little diversity. Many of our pelagic birds are breeding in the Arctic and others from the South Pacific haven’t arrived yet. However, we had some excellent sightings and good numbers of some of the pelagic birds.

Highlights: 393 Black-footed Albatross, 746 Pink-footed Shearwaters, 2935 Sooty Shearwaters, 1 Short-tailed Shearwater, 27 Fork-tailed Storm Petrels, 5 Leach’s Storm Petrels (our first of the year), 1 South Polar Skua, 60 Cassin’s Auklets, 305 Heermann’s Gulls and 523 Brown Pelicans.

The day’s biggest event was the mammal show. 11 species were observed! 13 Humpback Whales (some breaching), 8 Orca ( no large males, 2 young), 6 Dall’s Porpoise, 1 Harbor Porpoise, 42 Risso’s Dolphins, 10 Pacific White-sided Dolphins, 15 Northern Right Whale Dolphins, Harbor Seal, Northern Fur Seal, California Sea Lion and Steller’s Sea Lion.

Our next pelagic trip is July 14. For more information and to make reservations, please check our website at www.westportseabirds.com

Spotters for the trip were Scott Mills and Bruce LaBar. Boat personnel/spotters were Phil and Chris Anderson.

Bruce LaBar
Tacoma, WA
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Date: 6/24/18 3:25 pm
From: Penny L Koyama <plkoyama...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Eastern phoebe at Julia butler Hanson NWr wahkiakum co


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 24, 2018, at 11:22 AM, Matt Bartels <mattxyz...> wrote:
>
> Hi all
> I just stumbled across Eastern Phoebe at Julia Butler Hanson nwr— it is about 0.4 miles out the center road trail— the seasonal trail only open in summer. I think this link will give the approx location.
>
>
> Dropped Pin
> near Unnamed Road, Washington
>
> Matt Bartels
> Seattle wa
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> _______________________________________________
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Date: 6/24/18 2:05 pm
From: Hubbell <ldhubbell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Baby Crows
Tweeters,

Over the last few weeks my friend Whitney has enabled me to visit and observe an active crow’s nest. I was truly lucky to watch the process and document the changes as the young birds grew. I hope you enjoy sharing in my good fortune.

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2018/06/baby-crows.html <https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2018/06/baby-crows.html>


Have a great day on Union Bay, where natures lives in the city!


Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net


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Date: 6/24/18 2:01 pm
From: Jen McKeirnan <j1975mck...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Mercer Slough Birding - Eastern Kingbird
Today I explored Mercer Slough by kayak for the first time. Its a
beautiful wetland water trail that is approximately 4 miles round trip from
where we launched at Enatai Beach Park, started at 8am to beat the crowds.
It took us 2.5 hours. There is also the Cascade Canoe & Kayak Center
located there for rentals. We saw and heard 32 different birds species
(see below). My favorite find was the Eastern Kingbird, my first sighting
in western WA. It was at the top of a dead tree, clear white tail tip
seen. It was just before the canoe trail loop. When we returned 30min
later it was still in the tree. Like most flycatchers, it may stay put in
the area for a bit. If you are interested in finding it, you can also walk
in to the same area by taking the Heritage Loop Trail.
Coordinates for its location: 47.592549, -122.188699
The Black-headed Grosbeak was found directly across on the other side of
the water.

Water Trails Map
https://parks.bellevuewa.gov/UserFiles/Servers/Server_
4779004/File/pdf/Parks/enatai_mercer_slough_water_trail_map.pdf

Walking Trail Map
https://parks.bellevuewa.gov/UserFiles/Servers/Server_
4779004/File/Parks%20&%20Community%20Services/Natural-Resources/Trails/
mercer-slough-nature-park-trail-map.pdf

eBird list:
30 Canada Goose
20 Wood Duck
12 Gadwall
12 Mallard
5 Great Blue Heron
1 Green Heron
1 Osprey
1 Bald Eagle
2 Caspian Tern
1 Eurasian Collared-Dove
1 Downy Woodpecker
1 Northern Flicker
3 Willow Flycatcher
1 Eastern Kingbird
2 Steller's Jay
3 American Crow
6 Tree Swallow
6 Violet-green Swallow
30 Barn Swallow
2 Black-capped Chickadee
3 Marsh Wren
3 Swainson's Thrush
25 American Robin
12 European Starling
10 Cedar Waxwing
1 Common Yellowthroat
1 Yellow Warbler
6 Song Sparrow
1 Black-headed Grosbeak -- Male
12 Red-winged Blackbird
2 Brown-headed Cowbird
4 Purple Finch

Number of Taxa: 32

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Date: 6/24/18 12:41 pm
From: Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] The Birdbooker Report
HI ALL:
This week's titles are:

1) Smilodon: The Iconic Sabertooth

https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/2018/06/new-title.html

2) North American Ducks, Geese and Swans: Identification Guide

https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/2018/06/new-title_20.html

sincerely
--

Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/
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Date: 6/24/18 11:56 am
From: Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] NO Lesser Black-backed Gull
HI ALL:
I spent about 2.5 hours this morning at Pt. No Pt. looking for the LBB
Gull with NO luck!

sincerely
--

Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/
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Date: 6/24/18 11:29 am
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Eastern phoebe at Julia butler Hanson NWr wahkiakum co
Hi all
I just stumbled across Eastern Phoebe at Julia Butler Hanson nwr— it is about 0.4 miles out the center road trail— the seasonal trail only open in summer. I think this link will give the approx location.


Dropped Pin
near Unnamed Road, Washington

Matt Bartels
Seattle wa


Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 6/23/18 5:53 pm
From: Tom Mansfield <birds...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Pacific County Ratities
Tweets - I've taken a little good-natured ribbing off-line about my Pacific County typo - I can assure you none of these rare birds today had RATITE breastbones like the flightless wonders emu, ostrich and kiwi!

Tom Mansfield always happy to learn something gnu.

-----Original Message-----
From: Tweeters [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Tom Mansfield
Sent: Saturday, June 23, 2018 11:06 AM
To: Tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] Pacific County Ratities

Thanks to Dan Froehlich for his astuteness in finding the Lazuli Bunting (LAZB) and Black Phoebe (BLPH) in Pacific. I relocated both Code 5 birds this morning using Dan’s excellent directions/comments. And can confirm that the BLPH are nesting in the eve of the milking parlor next to the barn at Willariver Dairy. The dairyman Jerry is a birder and says the pair has been around for a month. Ask before entering barnyard. LAZB is on the curve just past 103 Elk Plain and singing loudly.

Tom Mansfield happy to be twitching Pacific

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 6/23/18 12:07 pm
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...>
Subject: [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of June 24, 2018
Hey, Tweeters,
-------------------------------------------------
Last week on BirdNote:
* Henry David Thoreau and the Wood Thrush
http://bit.ly/2l65PNe
* Roseate Spoonbill
http://bit.ly/2MqlhjZ
* How Geese Made History
http://bit.ly/2t6Cp5o
* Dawn in the Marsh
http://bit.ly/2HLhPMY
* The Longest Day of the Year
http://bit.ly/2lc34u9
* Songs and Calls - They're Not the Same
http://bit.ly/2Mo1Fgd
* Cuckoos - Tent Caterpillar Birds
http://bit.ly/2JQZKSY
———————————————————
Check out next week's shows, including How Birds "Hit the Brakes"
http://bit.ly/2MjE93l
---------------------------------------------
BirdNote is now in print. Check out our new book:
https://www.birdnote.org/birdnote-book
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:<info...>
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts

... or follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a 
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related 
resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find nearly 1500 episodes and more than 1000 videos in the archive

Thanks for listening, 

Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
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Date: 6/23/18 11:09 am
From: Tom Mansfield <birds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Pacific County Ratities
Thanks to Dan Froehlich for his astuteness in finding the Lazuli Bunting (LAZB) and Black Phoebe (BLPH) in Pacific. I relocated both Code 5 birds this morning using Dan’s excellent directions/comments. And can confirm that the BLPH are nesting in the eve of the milking parlor next to the barn at Willariver Dairy. The dairyman Jerry is a birder and says the pair has been around for a month. Ask before entering barnyard. LAZB is on the curve just past 103 Elk Plain and singing loudly.

Tom Mansfield happy to be twitching Pacific

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 6/23/18 8:25 am
From: Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Pt. No Pt. Lesser Black-backed Gull
Good morning Tweets,

I am currently watching the continuing Lesser Black-backed Gull found by Bradley Waggoner preening on the beach amidst a flock north of the lighthouse. Drizzly weather, high spirits. A handsome lifer! Didn’t expect to get it in June in western Washington, but I’m hardly complaining.

Good birding, Joshua Glant
Mercer Island, WA
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Date: 6/22/18 6:48 pm
From: Tim Brennan <tsbrennan...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Lewis County Harlequin Duck
Hey Tweets,


A biologist from Mount Rainier NP had pointed me in the direction of Skate Creek to look for Harlequin Ducks in Lewis County, and that did turn one up today - a female viewed for ten minutes from 50 feet or so away, preening on a rock, then playing in the rapids. I believe this was 5-10 miles up from Packwood. Sorry for not having a better location, but I didn't check my miles on the way up. Lots of good habitat, anyway, and he said there are quite a few of them likely breeding along that road.


Happy birding,


Tim Brennan

Renton

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Date: 6/22/18 5:01 pm
From: Daniel R Froehlich <danielfroehlich...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Pacific County Lazuli Bunting and Black Phoebe
Incidental to running a Breeding Bird Survey Route around Raymond in
Pacific County, I found a singing Lazuli Bunting and a suspicious Black
Phoebe.

The Lazuli Bunting was across from a defunct farmstead in riparian trees
along the Willapa River on Elk Prairie Road pretty much due south of the
hamlet of Frances on hwy 6 when viewed on a map. This is not far from the
Lewis County line. Careful, a passel of Goldfinches are also in
full-throated song at the same place with varying sounds, occasionally
resembling the Bunting. I was surprised that this is apparently the first
LAZB on eBird for Pacific County!

The Black Phoebe persisted from yesterday to today at the southernmost
ranch on Lilly-Wheaton Road just in from the junction with Highway 6. I
found it active in the barnyard among equipment, fencing and gates,
sallying even inside the sheds and barns. Both yesterday and today it
disappeared for several minutes up into the eaves of the old farmhouse at
the barn, across the barnyard from a tall, giant vat (labelled "Storeslurry
System").

Neither did I see a second bird, nor could I confirm that the individual
was carrying food, so I couldn't confirm breeding, but it was awfully
suspicious. If there isn't yet a breeding record for Pacific County, it
might be worth it to ask farm-workers present to have a look under the
eaves. Both times I was there, there was no one about. I'm heading back
north to conduct another BBS route tomorrow morning.

Good birding!
Dan Froehlich
Poulsbo, WA

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Date: 6/22/18 1:21 pm
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Nisqually NWR, Wednesday Walk for 6/20/2018
Hi Tweets,

approximately 35 of us had a beautiful warm day at the Refuge with
temperatures in the 70 to 80's degrees Fahrenheit and a High 9.49ft Tide at
11:48am. The morning chorus was fabulous. Highlights included nice views
of many male birds singing on territory, nesting BALD EAGLE, BELTED
KINGFISHER, BARN SWALLOW, TREE SWALLOW, CLIFF SWALLOW, CEDAR WAXWING, and
SWAINSON'S THRUSH. We have had an influx of second cycle CALIFORNIA GULL
and three banded CASPIAN TERN out on the tide flats.

Starting out at the Visitor Center Pond Overlook at 8am, we saw many
nesting BARN SWALLOW in the Visitor Center. TREE SWALLOW and NORTHERN
ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW were foraging over the pond and we had nice looks of
HOODED MERGANSER, MALLARD, COMMON YELLOW-THROAT, and SONG SPARROW.

The Orchard was good for both RUFOUS and ANNA'S HUMMINGBIRD, WESTERN WOOD
PEWEE, SWAINSON'S THRUSH, YELLOW WARBLER, SPOTTED TOWHEE, DARK-EYED JUNCO
and AMERICAN GOLDFINCH. CEDAR WAXWING was located on multiple nest sites.
Many BROWN-HEADED COWBIRDS were heard and seen.

Along the Access Road we picked up BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE, BUSHTIT, BEWICKS
WREN, and CLIFF SWALLOW. There is an OSPREY on the nest in a cell phone
tower south of I5 on the ridge along the west bank of McAllister Creek. A
male BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK is singing on territory adjacent to the west
parking lot.

The west entrance to the Twin Barns Loop Trail is great for woodpeckers,
swallows, warblers, flycatchers and wrens. We added WILLOW FLYCATCHER,
PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER, DOWNY WOODPECKER, HAIRY WOODPECKER, RED-BREASTED
SAPSUCKER, ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER, BEWICKS WREN and MARSH WREN to our
list. VIRGINIA RAIL was heard. The cut off for the Twin Barns has been
good for BROWN CREEPER.

The Twin Barns Overlook was good for swallows. The grass in the fields has
grown high, and water is no longer visible. For the day we had 6 MALLARD,
2 HOODED MERGANSER, and 20 CANADA GEESE. Probable my personal lowest water
fowl count. I suspect many are there hiding in the grass and marsh raising
young.

Out on the new dike or Nisqually Estuary Trail, the 9ft high tide pushed
many gulls and terns, for closer viewing. We observed a high count of
second cycle CALIFORNIA GULL, as well many CASPIAN TERNS. Three terns were
banded and will be report to the BBS. There were large flocks of
DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT, 200-300, and GREAT BLUE HERON, 200-300, foraging
along the channels. As the eagle flies, so did all the birds on the mud
flats. In the fresh water marsh we had nice looks of RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD,
KILLDEER, WILSON'S SNIPE, MARSH WREN, and SAVANNAH SPARROW. VIRGINIA RAIL
was heard.

From the McAllister Creek Viewing Platform on the Nisqually Estuary
Boardwalk Trail, you can get great scope views of the BALD EAGLE nest with
two chicks. The nest is along the west bank of the McAllister Creek just
south and west of the Viewing Platform. The Puget Sound Viewing Platform
was good for picking up PURPLE MARTIN off Luhr Beach and BRANDT CORMORANT
on the channel marker north of the Nisqually River. We observed two
juvenile BELTED KINGFISHER, with parents along the banks of the McAllister
Creek.

On our return, we picked up WARBLING VIREO and CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEE
along the east side of the Twin Barns Loop Trail. As well a nesting
SWAINSON'S THRUSH along the Riparian Forest Overlook.

We had 62 species for the day, and the walk has 143 species for the year.
Mammals seen included Eastern Cotton-tailed Rabbit, Columbian Black-tailed
Deer, Eastern Gray Squirrel and Harbor Seal.

Until next week, when we meet again at 8am at the Visitor Center Pond
Overlook, happy birding!

Shep Thorp
--
Shep Thorp
Browns Point
253-370-3742

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Date: 6/22/18 8:40 am
From: J. Acker <owler...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Endangered/Threatened/Sensitive Species and the use of Playback
Tweeters,



A reminder that the use of playback (electronic or vocal) targeted against
Endangered or Threatened Species is considered harassment, and is a
violation of the Endangered Species Act as well as in violation of the WOS
and ABA Birding Code of Ethics. For additional information, please see the
June/July 2011 WOS News 133: http://wos.org/documents/wosnws/issue133.pdf

ABA Code of Ethics: http://listing.aba.org/ethics/



J. Acker

<owler...> <mailto:<owler...>

Bainbridge Island, WA




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Date: 6/21/18 4:51 pm
From: Marcus Roening <marcus...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Quilomene WRA is burning.
Hi Tweets,

Early this morning a fire started on Old Vantage Highway between Kittitas and Vantage and the Highway was closed.

The overlook interpretive center was open and at 10 am we watched the fire crest the ridge to the north. Some Sagebrush survives and others were a stark pile of white ash.

Recreation Road to the campground was closed, but from above we were able to watch a Yellow-breasted Chat singing - a surreal juxtaposition.

Good birding,

Marcus Roening
Tacoma WA

Sent from my iPhone


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Date: 6/21/18 4:32 pm
From: Steve Pink <pirangas...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Cassia Crossbill Trip
Hi,


Three Edmonds birders made the 3day trip to the South Hills in southern Idaho for the Cassia Crossbill. We drove about 750 miles on Monday and stayed in a motel near Twin Falls. It took about an hour to get to the first site, Diamondfield Jack Campground Parking lot. Cassia Crossbills were evident almost as soon as we arrived. We saw at least 6 birds. Only views were on treetops of Lodgepole Pine feeding on cones We were not lucky enough to find any on the ground.


The birds frequently called and, from the recordings we had listened to prior to the trip, confirmed the identification. Bills appeared on the larger side compared to Red Crossbill.


Then a more relaxed journey back.


Cheers, Steve




Steve Pink Edmonds, WA mailto: <pirangas...>

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Date: 6/21/18 3:37 pm
From: Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2018-06-21
Tweets – Predictably for the PNW, the hot sunny weather took a break for our Mid-Summer’s Day survey. We had a sold layer of overcast, and several times it felt like it might sprinkle this morning, but it never did. Lots of babies, lots of singing. Not many warblers. Beginning to feel like we’re heading into the Summer Doldrums soon.

Highlights:
a.. Wood Duck – Several clutches of various sizes
b.. Hooded Merganser – 5 at Rowing Club; adult male, adult female, 3 juveniles?
c.. Black Swift – at least 2; hoped for more, and for better looks
d.. Spotted Sandpiper – two below weir
e.. CASPIAN TERN – two flying towards lake over East Meadow. New for 2018
f.. Barn Owl – Matt saw one leave the windmill before 4am
g.. Steller’s Jay – 2 at Rowing Club – not often seen in the Weeks 25-27
h.. Purple Martin – active at 3 of the gourds; Tree swallow babies in 4th
i.. Orange-crowned Warbler – drab male singing in “Mysterious Thicket” area
j.. Western Tanager – male across from Rowing Club dock
k.. Lazuli Bunting – at least 1 male singing from wetland north of Fields 7-8-9
l.. Mule Deer (Black-tailed Deer) – two bucks in East Meadow beginning to grow antlers
The timing of the CASPIAN TERNS today was notable in how predictable they were. We have scattered sightings of Caspians from mid-April through August, but no week has had more than 4 sightings in 25+ years, except for the period centered on the summer solstice. We’ve now had them 12 times on Week 25 (this week), with 7 sightings each for weeks 24 and 26, and 5 each for weeks 23 and 27. Quite a bell curve! For the entire year, the only other week with more than 4 records is Week 29 in late July, with 7 sightings.

For the day, 61 species. Misses today included Canada Goose, Rock Pigeon, and Green Heron.

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== <BirdMarymoor...>
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Date: 6/21/18 2:41 pm
From: Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] RFI: Digiscoping info / Caryn / Wedgwood
Hi Birders,

Anyone out there using PhoneSkope brand for disgiscoping for iphones? Please advise (privately, pls) if satisfied, or other product suggestions. Finally getting around to it.
When I was in the TriCities, had a heck of a time getting my phone focused on the nighthawk. Got one decent one though!

Caryn / Wedgwood
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Date: 6/21/18 2:22 pm
From: noelle c <noellesculpt...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Pileated Woodpecker eating huckleberries
YES, was going to add dogwood - in this case, Red-osier. I had to take a triple-take, watched these similar antics near the Teanaway River. Just seemed so incongruous with the usual comportment of these neat woodworkers...not to mention how uber unwieldy.(They were even occasionally distracted by Snowberry popcorn, of all things...)



Noelle Congdon - Beasts, Bones & Stone Studio
Artist/Naturalist
www.noellecongdon.com

"In the end, our society will be defined not only by what we create but by what we refuse to destroy" - John Sawhill
“The nation behaves well if it treats its natural resources as assets which it must turn over to the next generation increased, and not impaired, in value.” – Theodore Roosevelt




On Thursday, June 21, 2018 11:08 AM, Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny...> wrote:


I lived many years in Pennsylvania and our Pileated Woodpeckers would really go after the dogwood berries behind our home - hanging upside down a lot.  In between feeding on large pieces of suet straight from the slaughterhouse. MerryLynn
--
Mike & MerryLynn Denny
Birding the Beautiful Walla Walla Valley
"If you haven't gone birding, you haven't lived" _______________________________________________
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Date: 6/21/18 2:14 pm
From: Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Fwd: Brewer's Sparrow
Bob O'Brien had a frustrating experience at eBird.org looking up
Brewer's Sparrow occurrences in Washington. It turned out that he had
inadvertently clicked on a subspecies of Brewer's Sparrow and so was
shown a different (and much smaller) set of data than for the species as
a whole. Bob admirably reported this back to Tweeters.

Don't beat yourself up, Bob. I think inadvertent clicks are the bane of
all who use computers and the Internet! (I base this mainly on on
myself, but also on colleagues at work whom I once trained on new software.)

Jane Hadley

Seattle, WA

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Date: 6/21/18 1:39 pm
From: Robert O'Brien <baro...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Pileated Woodpecker eating huckleberries
They also favor English Hawthorne berries around Portland, helping to
spread this non-native invasive tree, which appears to reproduce much more
abundantly than the native Douglas Hawthorne. They are much outnumbered by
Cedar Waxwings however..
Bob OBrien PDX

On Wed, Jun 20, 2018 at 11:12 PM, Anne O. <harelde...> wrote:

> I'd never seen a pileated woodpecker eat berries off a bush until today.
> This afternoon, I watched one of these birds fly down repeatedly into a red
> huckleberry bush in my backyard and pluck berries from it. The whole
> bush was swaying under the weight of the woodpecker as it perched
> precariously on the small branches. It was 89 degree F at the time and the
> bird was panting. Maybe it found the berries refreshing.
>
> Anne Outlaw (Monroe, WA)
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
>

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Date: 6/21/18 11:21 am
From: Christine Southwick <clsouth...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Pileated Woodpecker eating huckleberries
When I first started my adventures in birding, the first time I ID’d a Pileated was when one was eating apples in a neighbor’s yard on apple trees that had apples throughout the wintertime. It kept coming back, much to my delight. The remembrance always makes me grin….

Christine Southwick
<clsouthwick...>

From: Tweeters [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Mike & MerryLynn
Sent: Thursday, June 21, 2018 11:12 AM
To: <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Pileated Woodpecker eating huckleberries


I lived many years in Pennsylvania and our Pileated Woodpeckers would really go after the dogwood berries behind our home - hanging upside down a lot. In between feeding on large pieces of suet straight from the slaughterhouse.

MerryLynn

--

Mike & MerryLynn Denny

Birding the Beautiful Walla Walla Valley

"If you haven't gone birding, you haven't lived"
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Date: 6/21/18 11:14 am
From: Diane Yorgason-Quinn <avosetta...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Pileated on blue elderberries
Love these stories. In early September I regularly get multiple Pileateds (family group?) on my Pacific Dogwood buttons (berries). As Christine says, they are comical to watch, and I wonder whether those buttons have turned to bird wine. They are very noisy, so even if I'm in the house I'll know they're out there. Flickers will come when the Pileateds aren't there.


Diane Yorgason-Quinn

Wauna, WA

<Avosetta...>


________________________________
From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> on behalf of Christine Southwick <clsouth...>
Sent: Thursday, June 21, 2018 11:01 AM
To: Tweeters (<tweeters...>)
Subject: [Tweeters] Pileated on blue elderberries


Last year (these berries arent ripe yet this year), I had a first year Pileated (PIWO) eating Blue Elderberries.

The berries are far out on the slender limbs of the blue elderberry, so it was rather comical to watch, with loud flapping and rustling, as the PIWO would fly to the berries, try to land, and beat his wings while he attempted to eat a berry or two.

He let out a couple of squawksI thought in frustration, but he kept coming back four or five times, so he must have been successful some of the time.



Christine Southwick
N Seattle/Shoreline

<clsouthwick...>



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Date: 6/21/18 11:09 am
From: Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Pileated Woodpecker eating huckleberries
I lived many years in Pennsylvania and our Pileated Woodpeckers would
really go after the dogwood berries behind our home - hanging upside
down a lot.  In between feeding on large pieces of suet straight from
the slaughterhouse.

MerryLynn

--
Mike & MerryLynn Denny
Birding the Beautiful Walla Walla Valley
"If you haven't gone birding, you haven't lived"


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Date: 6/21/18 11:05 am
From: Christine Southwick <clsouth...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Pileated on blue elderberries
Last year (these berries aren't ripe yet this year), I had a first year Pileated (PIWO) eating Blue Elderberries.
The berries are far out on the slender limbs of the blue elderberry, so it was rather comical to watch, with loud flapping and rustling, as the PIWO would fly to the berries, try to land, and beat his wings while he attempted to eat a berry or two.
He let out a couple of squawks-I thought in frustration, but he kept coming back four or five times, so he must have been successful some of the time.

Christine Southwick
N Seattle/Shoreline
<clsouthwick...>


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Date: 6/21/18 10:51 am
From: Robert O'Brien <baro...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fwd: Brewer's Sparrow at Rainy Pass
Several people informed me as below. They're right. I was (am?)
confused. I simply made a bad click on the nominate subspecies when I
wanted ALL the Brewers Sparrows including all subspecies which are indeed
correctly listed under the species (with no subspecies specified). That is,
all subspecies are listed twice. Once under that subspecies and again under
the species with subspecies not specified.
Thanks for the clarifications. Bob OBrien

PS Now, as for the hybrids, might they be listed 1.5 times? (Hee hee,
just kidding).

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Mark Robinson <blobbybirdman...>
Date: Thu, Jun 21, 2018 at 10:08 AM
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Brewer's Sparrow at Rainy Pass
To: Robert O'Brien <baro...>


Hi Bob,

I’m fairly sure this IS how eBird has implemented it. To replicate what you
saw I had to select the timberline subspecies, the full species shows
everything as expected

Mark

Sent from my iPhone

On Jun 21, 2018, at 10:00 AM, Robert O'Brien <baro...> wrote:

Well at least I sparked some responses (maybe?).

This is the second time I've fallen for this anomaly in eBird. When a
species has subspecies there are several listings in eBird. One for each
subspecies (hybrids as well)
and one for the 'species'. Now by my own reasoning, all the subspecies
should ALSO be listed among the species listing because that is exactly
what they are.
Thus when you select to map the 'species' you get all of them not just the
ones where the observer had failed to specify subspecies. Subspecies would
be included but are also listed separately. If this change was made I
wouldn't have screwed this up for the 2nd time. (Vaux's Swift was my first
screwup). I must be a slow learner. Hopefully eBird was make this change,
which seems wholly rational to me) so that I don't strike out with a 3rd
Screwup. Bob OBrien Portland

On Thu, Jun 21, 2018 at 9:41 AM, Rick Taylor <taylorrl...> wrote:

> When I pull up the map for Brewers Sparrow in eBird, there are thousands
> of reports.
>
>
>
> Explore -> Species Maps -> type Brewer’s Sparrow in the species box in the
> upper left, ensure Date: is set to year around, all years.
>
>
>
> Or
>
>
>
> https://ebird.org/map/brespa?neg=true&env.minX=&env.minY=&en
> v.maxX=&env.maxY=&zh=false&gp=false&ev=Z&mr=1-12&bmo=1&emo=
> 12&yr=all&byr=1900&eyr=2018
>
>
>
> Rick
>
>
>
>
>
> *Rick Taylor*
>
> Everett, WA
>
>
>
> *From:* Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> *On Behalf
> Of *Robert O'Brien
> *Sent:* Thursday, June 21, 2018 12:40 AM
> *To:* Dave Parent <dpdvm...>
> *Cc:* tweeters <tweeters...>
> *Subject:* Re: [Tweeters] Brewer's Sparrow at Rainy Pass
>
>
>
> I was interested in the answer to Dave's question and when none appeared
> (so far) I checked eBird
>
> for Brewers Sparrow. Only 5 or so records (?) for WA state for all time;
> a few likely migrants on the west side
>
> and a few likely breeders on the east side. None for Timberline Sparrow
> nor any Brewer's at high elevation.
>
> Bob OBrien Portland
>
>
>
> On Mon, Jun 18, 2018 at 7:46 AM, Dave Parent <dpdvm...> wrote:
>
> Tweeters,
>
>
>
> On the afternoon of Saturday, June 16, after a birding trip to the Methow
> we stopped at the Rainy Pass parking lot at the southbound Pacific Crest
> Trail access. Behind the restroom there is a tangle of slide alder. While
> pishing there, a very confiding Brewer's Sparrow popped up about ten feet
> away and gave a short version of its song before disappearing back into the
> alder thicket.
>
> Are Timberline Sparrows, S.b.taverni, known to nest in the North Cascades
> or was this a possible migrant?
>
>
>
> Dave Parent, Freeland WA, <dpdvm...>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
> <https://eur02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fmailman11.u.washington.edu%2Fmailman%2Flistinfo%2Ftweeters&data=02%7C01%7C%7C22463888fb31459f232b08d5d74ac767%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636651638528877939&sdata=iAqN0Bw7fE68etMr6Kk%2FiHMtEiVnfu1mtOcxX0YUYKg%3D&reserved=0>
>
>
>

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Date: 6/21/18 10:38 am
From: Pterodroma <pterodroma...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Pileated Woodpecker eating huckleberries

It wasn't a Pileated Woodpecker here (yet), but I do currently have a recently fledged Northern Flicker doing exactly the same thing in one of my Red Huckleberry (Vaccinium parvifolium). I have never seen this behavior before from any largish woodpecker and the show is quite an entertaining hoot. As clumsy and awkward as it appears, the flicker is pretty good at targeting the next red ripe berry with intense fervor, then like the lightning strike of a rattlesnake, strikes to reach and grab the berry, hold it in it's beak for a second or two before swallowing it, all the while managing to remain balanced on some pretty flimsy branches and twigs while eyeing the next targeted berry.

Richard Rowlett
Bellevue (Easatgate), WA

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Date: 6/21/18 10:05 am
From: Robert O'Brien <baro...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Brewer's Sparrow at Rainy Pass
Well at least I sparked some responses (maybe?).

This is the second time I've fallen for this anomaly in eBird. When a
species has subspecies there are several listings in eBird. One for each
subspecies (hybrids as well)
and one for the 'species'. Now by my own reasoning, all the subspecies
should ALSO be listed among the species listing because that is exactly
what they are.
Thus when you select to map the 'species' you get all of them not just the
ones where the observer had failed to specify subspecies. Subspecies would
be included but are also listed separately. If this change was made I
wouldn't have screwed this up for the 2nd time. (Vaux's Swift was my first
screwup). I must be a slow learner. Hopefully eBird was make this change,
which seems wholly rational to me) so that I don't strike out with a 3rd
Screwup. Bob OBrien Portland

On Thu, Jun 21, 2018 at 9:41 AM, Rick Taylor <taylorrl...> wrote:

> When I pull up the map for Brewers Sparrow in eBird, there are thousands
> of reports.
>
>
>
> Explore -> Species Maps -> type Brewer’s Sparrow in the species box in the
> upper left, ensure Date: is set to year around, all years.
>
>
>
> Or
>
>
>
> https://ebird.org/map/brespa?neg=true&env.minX=&env.minY=&
> env.maxX=&env.maxY=&zh=false&gp=false&ev=Z&mr=1-12&bmo=1&
> emo=12&yr=all&byr=1900&eyr=2018
>
>
>
> Rick
>
>
>
>
>
> *Rick Taylor*
>
> Everett, WA
>
>
>
> *From:* Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> *On Behalf
> Of *Robert O'Brien
> *Sent:* Thursday, June 21, 2018 12:40 AM
> *To:* Dave Parent <dpdvm...>
> *Cc:* tweeters <tweeters...>
> *Subject:* Re: [Tweeters] Brewer's Sparrow at Rainy Pass
>
>
>
> I was interested in the answer to Dave's question and when none appeared
> (so far) I checked eBird
>
> for Brewers Sparrow. Only 5 or so records (?) for WA state for all time;
> a few likely migrants on the west side
>
> and a few likely breeders on the east side. None for Timberline Sparrow
> nor any Brewer's at high elevation.
>
> Bob OBrien Portland
>
>
>
> On Mon, Jun 18, 2018 at 7:46 AM, Dave Parent <dpdvm...> wrote:
>
> Tweeters,
>
>
>
> On the afternoon of Saturday, June 16, after a birding trip to the Methow
> we stopped at the Rainy Pass parking lot at the southbound Pacific Crest
> Trail access. Behind the restroom there is a tangle of slide alder. While
> pishing there, a very confiding Brewer's Sparrow popped up about ten feet
> away and gave a short version of its song before disappearing back into the
> alder thicket.
>
> Are Timberline Sparrows, S.b.taverni, known to nest in the North Cascades
> or was this a possible migrant?
>
>
>
> Dave Parent, Freeland WA, <dpdvm...>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
> <https://eur02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fmailman11.u.washington.edu%2Fmailman%2Flistinfo%2Ftweeters&data=02%7C01%7C%7C22463888fb31459f232b08d5d74ac767%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636651638528877939&sdata=iAqN0Bw7fE68etMr6Kk%2FiHMtEiVnfu1mtOcxX0YUYKg%3D&reserved=0>
>
>
>

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Date: 6/21/18 8:18 am
From: <enhunn323...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Brewer's Sparrow at Rainy Pass
Tweets,

E-bird is lacking. Brewer's Sparrows are widespread and common breeders throughout the sage steppe and up into the transition grasslands (e.g. Steptoe Butte) as well as at least occasional breeders in subalpine situations. I had them singing high in the Blue Mountains at the Wenatchee Guard Station (maybe June 1973). They turned up with some regularity as post-breeding birds at Naches Pass at ca. 5000 feet. On one occasion Matt Bartels and I studied a fall migrant there that we suspected was taverneri but didn't get a photo. It is likely that taverneri is an occasional migrant but I believe even the high elevation nesting birds in Washington could be the nominate race.

Gene Hunn
Petaluma, CA

----- Original Message -----

From: "Robert O'Brien" <baro...>
To: "Dave Parent" <dpdvm...>
Cc: "tweeters" <tweeters...>
Sent: Thursday, June 21, 2018 12:39:36 AM
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Brewer's Sparrow at Rainy Pass

I was interested in the answer to Dave's question and when none appeared (so far) I checked eBird
for Brewers Sparrow. Only 5 or so records (?) for WA state for all time; a few likely migrants on the west side
and a few likely breeders on the east side. None for Timberline Sparrow nor any Brewer's at high elevation.
Bob OBrien Portland

On Mon, Jun 18, 2018 at 7:46 AM, Dave Parent < <dpdvm...> > wrote:





Tweeters,



On the afternoon of Saturday, June 16, after a birding trip to the Methow we stopped at the Rainy Pass parking lot at the southbound Pacific Crest Trail access. Behind the restroom there is a tangle of slide alder. While pishing there, a very confiding Brewer's Sparrow popped up about ten feet away and gave a short version of its song before disappearing back into the alder thicket.

Are Timberline Sparrows, S.b.taverni, known to nest in the North Cascades or was this a possible migrant?



Dave Parent, Freeland WA, <dpdvm...>

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Date: 6/21/18 12:41 am
From: Robert O'Brien <baro...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Brewer's Sparrow at Rainy Pass
I was interested in the answer to Dave's question and when none appeared
(so far) I checked eBird
for Brewers Sparrow. Only 5 or so records (?) for WA state for all time; a
few likely migrants on the west side
and a few likely breeders on the east side. None for Timberline Sparrow
nor any Brewer's at high elevation.
Bob OBrien Portland

On Mon, Jun 18, 2018 at 7:46 AM, Dave Parent <dpdvm...> wrote:

> Tweeters,
>
>
>
> On the afternoon of Saturday, June 16, after a birding trip to the Methow
> we stopped at the Rainy Pass parking lot at the southbound Pacific Crest
> Trail access. Behind the restroom there is a tangle of slide alder. While
> pishing there, a very confiding Brewer's Sparrow popped up about ten feet
> away and gave a short version of its song before disappearing back into the
> alder thicket.
>
> Are Timberline Sparrows, S.b.taverni, known to nest in the North Cascades
> or was this a possible migrant?
>
>
>
> Dave Parent, Freeland WA, <dpdvm...>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
>

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Date: 6/20/18 11:17 pm
From: Anne O. <harelde...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Pileated Woodpecker eating huckleberries
I'd never seen a pileated woodpecker eat berries off a bush until today. This afternoon, I watched one of these birds fly down repeatedly into a red huckleberry bush in my backyard and pluck berries from it. The whole bush was swaying under the weight of the woodpecker as it perched precariously on the small branches. It was 89 degree F at the time and the bird was panting. Maybe it found the berries refreshing.

Anne Outlaw (Monroe, WA)

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Date: 6/20/18 10:45 pm
From: Hans-Joachim Feddern <thefedderns...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Northern Mockingbird in Bothell?
I found a Northern Mockingbird on May 24th, 2018 near the Chinese Pagoda on
Ruston Way in Tacoma. It appears that it was not relocated. Having lived on
the East Coast, I am quite familiar with mockingbirds. I also saw a few in
California in March and a lot of them in Texas in April.

Hans

On Wed, Jun 20, 2018 at 8:21 AM, Philip Dickinson <pdickins...>
wrote:

> Northern Mockingbird is rare west of the mountains but possible. One was
> seen briefly near Darrington a few weeks ago. Your description sounds good.
>
> Phil Dickinson
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Jun 20, 2018, at 8:09 AM, Jeremy Schwartz <jschwartz1124...>
> wrote:
> >
> > Hello tweeters!
> >
> > How likely is a Northern Mockingbird in Bothell?
> >
> > I just got done with a brief bird walk around a small pond in the North
> Creek area of Bothell before work. I was wrapping things up, when I saw a
> gray-brownish bird with what looked to be white wing patches on each wing
> land in a tree. I got very quick looks at it through binoculars before it
> changed the position, making it harder to see.
> >
> > I chased it for a little bit around the pond, and once again saw two
> white wing patches as it flitted from ground to a large tree. I was not
> able to find it again this morning, mostly because I had to go to work.
> >
> > eBird lists it as rare for this area, but is there anything else it
> could have been? Again, it was a light brown-gray bird, roughly
> robin-sized, with very obvious white wing patches clearly seen as it took
> off.
> >
> > Any help would be greatly appreciated!
> >
> > Keep watching the skies,
> >
> > Jeremy Schwartz
> > Lake Forest Park
> > jschwartz1124 at gmail dot com
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > Tweeters mailing list
> > <Tweeters...>
> > http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>



--
*Hans Feddern*
Twin Lakes/Federal Way, WA
<thefedderns...>

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Date: 6/20/18 9:52 pm
From: William Byers <byers345...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Black-tailed Gull really California Gull
Hi Tweeters,

According to several of you, the gull I was excited the see
this morning was a California Gull (third cycle). Thanks to all of you for
having a look and helping me out! Charlotte


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Date: 6/20/18 5:33 pm
From: William Byers <byers345...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Black-tailed Gull
Hello Tweeters,

Earlier today I posted to say that I thought we had seen a
Black-tailed Gull on the Edmonds-Kingston ferry crossing. Now I have
processed the pictures Bill took. I really don't think this bird is a
California Gull, despite the coloration on the bill. Nonetheless, I await
the comments of the cognoscenti in our local birding community to set me
straight. There are some other interesting things about the bird's plumage.
On the dorsal side, which is the only side we can see, there are some white
feathers at the bend in the wing and a black spot. Maybe the bird is going
through a plumage change? Also, it is difficult to see the bird's eye, but
it doesn't look pale, which it should if it were a Black-tailed Gull.



https://www.flickr.com/photos/29258421@N07/sets/72157692418085100



Anyway, I find gull identification challenging and look
forward to hearing from anyone who thinks he/she knows what this bird is.
Thanks, Charlotte Byers, Edmonds


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Date: 6/20/18 3:36 pm
From: LELAND JONES <virwin...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Reminder: Katrina van Grouw on Bainbridge Island
Please join us at the Bainbridge Island Museum of Art tomorrow evening, June 21, at 6:30pm to hear a lecture/presentation by nature illustrator and natural historian Katrina van Grouw. For Seattle folks, the museum is right off the BI ferry terminal, so you could walk on. Or ride share! There is free parking at the museum. This is her only appearance in the Seattle area.


https://www.eagleharborbooks.com/event/bima-unnatural-selection-katrina-van-grouw


Thanks!


Victoria Irwin

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Date: 6/20/18 1:37 pm
From: Wilson Cady <gorgebirds...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Birdbath dive bombing flycatcher
Flycatchers are one of several families that bathe on the wing, we see vireos doing the same thing. If you set up a misting station they will love it along with the hummers. All you need is a drip irrigation line attached to a garden hose with a mister head on the end of it, they love it, we have two set up at our place. Wilson Cady
Columbia River Gorge, WA

---------- Original Message ----------
From: Janet Ray <janetlaura...>
To: Anna <amk17...>
Cc: <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Birdbath dive bombing flycatcher
Date: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 12:53:00 -0700

We have a Pacific slope FC who bathes this way every afternoon. Very fun to watch
Jan
Preston WA

> On Jun 19, 2018, at 3:46 PM, Anna <amk17...> wrote:
>
> Amusing observation of a flycatcher repeatedly dive bombing the birdbath. No idea what species as it stays for split second before disappering into hedgerow. One way to take a bath I suppose. Pacslope or peewee best guess.
>
> AKopitov
> Phinney Ridge
>
> Sent from my iPhone with all the auto correct quirks.
>

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Date: 6/20/18 12:56 pm
From: Janet Ray <janetlaura...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Birdbath dive bombing flycatcher
We have a Pacific slope FC who bathes this way every afternoon. Very fun to watch
Jan
Preston WA

> On Jun 19, 2018, at 3:46 PM, Anna <amk17...> wrote:
>
> Amusing observation of a flycatcher repeatedly dive bombing the birdbath. No idea what species as it stays for split second before disappering into hedgerow. One way to take a bath I suppose. Pacslope or peewee best guess.
>
> AKopitov
> Phinney Ridge
>
> Sent from my iPhone with all the auto correct quirks.
>

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Date: 6/20/18 10:12 am
From: byers345 <byers345...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Black-tailed Gull ? on Kingston ferry


Hi Tweeters,  As we were crossing  from Edmonds to Kingston this morning, Bill photographed a gull that looked almost identical to the picture in Sibley of a Black-tailed Gull.  The tail was exactly right--a black band.  The wing tips were exactly right--all black.  The only difference  is in the bill.  Instead of black then red, the bill looked more like a California gull's.  I will post a picture later today, but I mention this now in case any of you are in the area.  It was heading  north, maybe up to the Hansville area.
Charlotte  Byers, Edmonds 
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Date: 6/20/18 8:25 am
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Northern Mockingbird in Bothell?
Northern Mockingbird is rare west of the mountains but possible. One was seen briefly near Darrington a few weeks ago. Your description sounds good.

Phil Dickinson

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 20, 2018, at 8:09 AM, Jeremy Schwartz <jschwartz1124...> wrote:
>
> Hello tweeters!
>
> How likely is a Northern Mockingbird in Bothell?
>
> I just got done with a brief bird walk around a small pond in the North Creek area of Bothell before work. I was wrapping things up, when I saw a gray-brownish bird with what looked to be white wing patches on each wing land in a tree. I got very quick looks at it through binoculars before it changed the position, making it harder to see.
>
> I chased it for a little bit around the pond, and once again saw two white wing patches as it flitted from ground to a large tree. I was not able to find it again this morning, mostly because I had to go to work.
>
> eBird lists it as rare for this area, but is there anything else it could have been? Again, it was a light brown-gray bird, roughly robin-sized, with very obvious white wing patches clearly seen as it took off.
>
> Any help would be greatly appreciated!
>
> Keep watching the skies,
>
> Jeremy Schwartz
> Lake Forest Park
> jschwartz1124 at gmail dot com
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
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Date: 6/20/18 8:13 am
From: Jeremy Schwartz <jschwartz1124...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Northern Mockingbird in Bothell?
Hello tweeters!

How likely is a Northern Mockingbird in Bothell?

I just got done with a brief bird walk around a small pond in the North
Creek area of Bothell before work. I was wrapping things up, when I saw a
gray-brownish bird with what looked to be white wing patches on each wing
land in a tree. I got very quick looks at it through binoculars before it
changed the position, making it harder to see.

I chased it for a little bit around the pond, and once again saw two white
wing patches as it flitted from ground to a large tree. I was not able to
find it again this morning, mostly because I had to go to work.

eBird lists it as rare for this area, but is there anything else it could
have been? Again, it was a light brown-gray bird, roughly robin-sized, with
very obvious white wing patches clearly seen as it took off.

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Keep watching the skies,

Jeremy Schwartz
Lake Forest Park
jschwartz1124 at gmail dot com

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Date: 6/19/18 5:05 pm
From: Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Lazuli Bunting - Roy
Tweeters,
First Lazuli Bunting at Roy since 2016. Male singing at a spot where we’ve had a pair nesting in 2015 and 2016. (Heard, then spotted while having a martini on our back deck.) Nice day!

May all your birds be identified,
Denis DeSilvis
<avnacrs4birds...>

Avian Acres 🦉
Roy, WA
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Date: 6/19/18 3:50 pm
From: Anna <amk17...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Birdbath dive bombing flycatcher
Amusing observation of a flycatcher repeatedly dive bombing the birdbath. No idea what species as it stays for split second before disappering into hedgerow. One way to take a bath I suppose. Pacslope or peewee best guess.

AKopitov
Phinney Ridge

Sent from my iPhone with all the auto correct quirks.
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Date: 6/19/18 3:20 pm
From: STEVE KOHL M.D. <stkohl...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Eastern Kingbird at Magnuson Park, Seattle
Thanks Jack for spotting it
Promontory ponds, 2 pm today
Steve and Sybil Kohl
Seattle

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Date: 6/19/18 1:57 pm
From: Robert DeCandido PhD <rdcny...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Request for information - Owls
Hello Tweeters,

Deborah Allen and I will be visiting Bellingham from about 11 July
through 2 August...and we are interested in hearing about any good
locations in that area for Flammulated Owl (Otus flammeolus), Boreal
Owl (Aegolius funereus) as well as Western Screech-owl (Otus
kennicottii). We would like to know the best places to look for these
two species - for example what parks/trails near Bellingham (within
100 - 200 miles) have people found any of these species?

Yes we realize/know how controversial telling anyone about owl
locations can be...but we are scientists with a bunch of
ornithology/botany publications on international topics (raptor
migration in Thailand, Malaysia and Nepal - we have worked there
since 1998) and other scientific papers about birds/plants where we
live in NYC. We have two publications on owls...The Owls of NYC
1860-present and the History of the Eastern Screech-owl in NYC from
1860-present...email us if interested to know/read more.

For the folks that might be perturbed at this request see this
article:
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/12/opinion/sunday/owl-watching.html -
The delicate politics of chasing owls. Also, some might be familiar
with Kevin McGowan PhD at Cornell - see his comments below.

Deborah Allen
Robert DeCandido PhD

www.BirdingBob.com
===========================
Re:[nysbirds-l] The delicate politics of chasing owls.
Kevin J. McGowan Sat, 20 Jan 2018 17:14:43 -0800
https://www.mail-archive.com/<nysbirds-l...>/msg23408.html

I agree with the logic of this article, and have made the same
argument for years. Owls are not particularly vulnerable to
disturbance, and they are spectacular ambassadors to non-birders. Do
you know how many Northern Saw-whet and Boreal owls exist in the
world, and how few ever encounter people (other than, perhaps,
over-exuberant banders ;^))? One in a publicly-available spot can
generate so much goodwill that, as an educator, I would argue to
disturb its sleep a few times so that people can experience it.

It's boils down to the old saw: people only protect what they love,
and they don't love anything they don't know. And, I would add that
the best way to learn to love owls is to actually see one
face-to-face in the wild.

But, from my experience on this issue, people seem to have become
almost as religious in their views as the cats-as-predators one. I am
happy to see a logical, not emotional public piece about it, nonetheless.

That's my humble opinion, and I don't expect everyone to agree. Just saying...

Kevin
========================






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Date: 6/19/18 12:18 pm
From: Jack Nolan <jacknolan62...>
Subject: [Tweeters] American White Pelicans
Huge flock over the swinomish channel. 12:11 on Tuesday. 50 birds at least.

Jack Nolan
Shoreline

Sent from my iPhone. Pardon my brevity and typos.
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Date: 6/19/18 8:26 am
From: Sharon Cormier-Aagaard <scormieraa001...>
Subject: [Tweeters] YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT AT STILLWATER
8:10--Heard distinctive vocalizations, then saw perched at top of Willow, about 500 ft north of grassy trail. Photo coming. LOCATION: In the open field (at second patch of black plastic along left side of grassy trail) on the river overlook trail. 8:17-now singing 10 feet away in short Alders, next to where the black plastic ends at west side. Milt is recording the songs.

Sharon Aagaard, Liz Cormier, Milt Vine

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Date: 6/19/18 8:12 am
From: KenandTina <kenandtina...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Dipper Nest
Hey,

While hiking from the Twin Falls trailhead(North Bend, exit 34), the trail
goes along the Snoqualmie River. The dippers were very active collecting
food and flying off up and down the river. I was able to find my first ever
Dipper nest with the parents busily feeding young. It was located in the
rock face about 6Ft above the first big pool. You do need a Discovery Pass
for this trail.



Enjoy, it is beautiful out here



Ken Grant

North Bend


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Date: 6/18/18 9:43 pm
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Sprague Lake and Pend Oreille County - including a Possible Alder Flycatcher
On Saturday I did a crazy long day of birding that included a great stop at Sprague Lake (Both Lincoln and Adams Counties) and then on to Pend Oreille County.  I try to do this every year both for special birds of interest and also because it is such a beautiful area.
Highlights at Sprague Lake included 9 duck species, my first ever view (and very cute photo) of a baby Black Necked Stilt, a close up of a White Faced Ibis, a Black Crowned Night Heron, 3 Common Nighthawks, Grasshopper and Vesper Sparrows and 13 easy to find Black Terns in the marshy area at the west end of the Lake in Adams County.  
In Pend Oreille County I birded around Calispell Lake and then north to the area around Cusick and Usk and a few miles north.  This area is always good for Red Eyed Vireo, Northern Waterthrush (at the bridge on Westside Calispell Road) and American Redstart.  There were more than I usually find of all of these on Saturday.  Usually I can find a hummingbird feeder with a good chance of Black Chinned Hummingbird.  Of the five feeders I found only one had any hummers - a single Black Chinned.  I spoke with the homeowners (very bird friendly) and they said that the hummers were fewer this year than usual.
The fields in and around Usk and Cusick are my go to spot for Bobolinks - a very favorite bird.  I found several displaying and singing in several locations.  One field has a "For Sale" sign and I have a picture of one Bobolink on the sign - the second year in a row with a bird on the same sign.
Near Cusick I had a flycatcher that seemed too small for Western Wood Pewee but my photo said that is what it had to be.  I had heard many previously.  This one was silent and did not respond to playback.  A bit further north on Kirchan Road I heard what at the time seemed to be a "different" Willow Flycatcher. I had heardothers earlier in the day and was concentrating more on finding more Bobolinks. When I heard this call I playedWillow Flycatcher and got no response or movement. After I stopped playing, a fewminutes later it called again and it sounded more like "fits - ber"than "fitz - bew" but I was not thinking of anything other thanWillow so left it at that and moved on. 
This morning I saw the following message and report from Jon Isacoffregarding an Alder Flycatcher he had seen and recorded at a location in thevicinity where I heard this flycatcher (but across and thus on the east side ofthe Pend Oreille River). "Adding to a niceregional trend I located a singing ALDER FLYCATCHER in Pend Oreille Co. thismorning.  The location is on the Dike Rd., 4 miles North of CalispellTribal headquarters in Usk.  The bird is at the North corner (90 degreeturn South) of the road.  This location is tribal property so please berespectful for any seeking to chase the bird.  If accepted by the WBRCthis would be the 5th record for WA and the 2nd for Pend Oreille Co., where thelast bird was found in 2014.  (Apologies — location is 2 miles North of the Tribal HQ and 4miles North of the Usk bridge)."
Shame on me, but I had not thought about Alder Flycatcher on Saturday -my error as I have actually seen one with Jon in 2013 and then another in theScotia area in 2014 as well as many in Maine. I have listened to Jon'srecordings and to the recordings on IBird Pro and Sibley's. It would have beenfar better to have listened to them contemporaneously in the field on Saturday- but at least at this time, the calls sound similar to what I thought I heardon Saturday. If I had not read Jon's report, I would not have even thoughtabout Alder Flycatcher - but the place and timing are at least coincidental -so at best this is a "maybe", but Tweeters readers should know about Jon's find in any event.  There have also been reports from nearby Idaho. - Not a definitive ID for sure, but maybe if someone is in thearea, they can check it out.  Definitely check Jon's.
In any event, I highly recommend the Pend Oreille area - really beautiful and very birdy.  All told I had over 70 species for the day without trying for a high count.



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Date: 6/18/18 10:42 am
From: Diann MacRae <tvulture...>
Subject: [Tweeters] bat flight
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Date: 6/18/18 7:49 am
From: Dave Parent <dpdvm...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Brewer's Sparrow at Rainy Pass
Tweeters,



On the afternoon of Saturday, June 16, after a birding trip to the Methow we
stopped at the Rainy Pass parking lot at the southbound Pacific Crest Trail
access. Behind the restroom there is a tangle of slide alder. While pishing
there, a very confiding Brewer's Sparrow popped up about ten feet away and
gave a short version of its song before disappearing back into the alder
thicket.

Are Timberline Sparrows, S.b.taverni, known to nest in the North Cascades or
was this a possible migrant?



Dave Parent, Freeland WA, <dpdvm...>


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