tweeters
Received From Subject
2/27/20 11:58 am Shep Thorp <shepthorp...> [Tweeters] Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually NWR, Wednesday Walk for 2/26/2020
2/27/20 10:22 am Josh Adams <xjoshx...> [Tweeters] Snohomish (Mountain?) Bluebird
2/26/20 11:06 pm Nadine Drisseq <drisseq.n...> [Tweeters] Something to Crow About!
2/26/20 5:22 pm Candace C. Plant <plantcan...> [Tweeters] Siberian Accenter
2/26/20 3:06 pm pan <panmail...> [Tweeters] Seattle Sora
2/26/20 1:59 pm Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...> [Tweeters] male Rufous Hummingbird
2/26/20 12:38 pm Samuel Terry <samgterry...> [Tweeters] Alki Norther Fulmar (killed by Bald Eagle)
2/26/20 7:54 am J Christian Kessler <1northraven...> Re: [Tweeters] a suggestion
2/26/20 6:50 am Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...> [Tweeters] 46,000 Year Old Bird Found ‘Frozen In Time’ In Siberia
2/25/20 9:42 pm B B <birder4184...> [Tweeters] Virginia Rails at Night
2/25/20 8:37 pm AnthonyG. <birds...> Re: [Tweeters] a suggestion / location + GPS usage
2/25/20 7:58 pm Ann Nightingale <motmot...> [Tweeters] Avian Monitoring and Bird Banding Workshop in Victoria, BC
2/25/20 3:58 pm Michelle Maani <lamoustique...> Re: [Tweeters] a suggestion
2/25/20 11:38 am Vicki Biltz <vickibiltz...> [Tweeters] EBird question
2/25/20 10:50 am Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...> [Tweeters] a suggestion
2/25/20 9:10 am Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] thanks for help with audio
2/25/20 7:57 am Michelle Savoie <savoiemr...> [Tweeters] Possible Laysans albatross Luna park
2/24/20 11:58 pm ck park <travelgirl.fics...> Re: [Tweeters] eBird audio question
2/24/20 11:26 pm <birders...> Re: [Tweeters] eBird audio question
2/24/20 9:58 pm Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...> [Tweeters] A nest of sticks & spit
2/24/20 7:01 pm AnthonyG. <birds...> Re: [Tweeters] eBird audio question
2/24/20 4:39 pm John Puschock <g_g_allin...> Re: [Tweeters] eBird audio question
2/24/20 4:22 pm Ray Korpi <rkorpi...> [Tweeters] Gull/Kittiwake Report from Cowlitz-Columbia
2/24/20 3:34 pm AnthonyG. <birds...> Re: [Tweeters] eBird audio question
2/24/20 2:05 pm Anthony @ OC Birds <birds...> Re: [Tweeters] eBird audio question
2/24/20 1:50 pm Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...> [Tweeters] Black-legged Kittiwake - Cowlitz County
2/24/20 8:55 am Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] eBird audio question
2/24/20 7:10 am re_hill <re_hill...> Re: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor Continues
2/23/20 7:06 pm Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] Skagit Surfbirds and swallows
2/23/20 1:22 pm Hubbell <ldhubbell...> [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Silent and Subtle
2/23/20 12:02 pm Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...> [Tweeters] The Birdbooker Report
2/23/20 10:30 am vrhoden <vrhoden...> [Tweeters] Black Phoebe at Ridgefield River S
2/23/20 10:18 am <byers345...> [Tweeters] Off topic: Birds of Thailand, mid-Jan, 2020 to Feb 6
2/22/20 12:06 pm Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...> [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Feb. 23, 2020
2/22/20 11:18 am Brian Pendleton <kc7wpd...> [Tweeters] Apparent American Wigeon x Green-winged Teal hybrid at Three Crabs yesterday (2/21)
2/22/20 6:58 am Scott Downes <downess...> [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor Continues
2/21/20 5:06 pm Chazz Hesselein <chazz...> [Tweeters] Nice two-fer, razor clan limit and Glaucous Gull
2/21/20 1:43 pm Jeremy Schwartz <jschwartz1124...> [Tweeters] Anyone In the Bothell Area Want to Collect a Dead Cooper's Hawk?
2/21/20 9:51 am Peter H Wimberger <pwimberger...> [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
2/21/20 7:02 am Bob <rflores_2...> [Tweeters] Eurasian wigeon, Clark Co, WA
2/20/20 8:10 pm Hank H <hank.heiberg...> [Tweeters] Skagit County Birding
2/20/20 7:30 pm <merdave...> [Tweeters] Snowy Owls
2/20/20 6:22 pm Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...> [Tweeters] Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course monthly bird walk - 02-20-2020
2/20/20 5:18 pm AMK17 <amk17...> [Tweeters] EBird update
2/20/20 4:55 pm <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2020-02-20
2/20/20 3:54 pm Richard Walker <RichardAWalker...> [Tweeters] Black Ducks?
2/20/20 3:45 pm Richard Walker <RichardAWalker...> [Tweeters] Black Ducks?
2/20/20 3:06 pm David Heath <drheath82...> Re: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
2/20/20 10:55 am Shep Thorp <shepthorp...> [Tweeters] Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually NWR Wednesday Walk on 2/19/2020
2/20/20 10:50 am Brian Zinke <zinke.pilchuck...> [Tweeters] Birding By Ear Class
2/20/20 8:11 am Teri Martine <terimartine...> [Tweeters] Seattle Audubon Master Birder info meeting
2/20/20 5:43 am Vicki Biltz <vickibiltz...> [Tweeters] Goose Island and drive between heading to Alamo Inn
2/19/20 2:58 pm Faye McAdams Hands <zest4parus...> Re: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor yesterday
2/19/20 1:06 pm Anna <amk17...> [Tweeters] Nesting activity
2/18/20 8:50 pm B B <birder4184...> [Tweeters] Program in Tacoma - Birding in the Disunited States of America
2/18/20 6:59 pm Vicki King <vkbirder...> [Tweeters] RFI: Birding Tulalip Bay
2/18/20 4:10 pm Diane Weinstein <diane_weinstein...> [Tweeters] Town Hall Seattle - Pacific Flyway Wed. 2/19
2/18/20 10:03 am Shep Thorp <shepthorp...> [Tweeters] WOS Winter Trip 2/15-2/17 to Okanogan Highlands and Waterville Plateau
2/18/20 8:54 am Brian Zinke <zinke.pilchuck...> [Tweeters] Birding 101 Class (kid & adult friendly)
2/18/20 8:30 am byers345 <byers345...> [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
2/18/20 8:03 am Constance Sidles <constancesidles...> [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor yesterday
2/17/20 10:07 pm Ian Young <ianyoung...> [Tweeters] Trip advice sought for Puerto Vallarta
2/17/20 9:57 pm Megan Lyden <meganlyden...> [Tweeters] thanks Will and Louise for directions re: Siberian Accentor
2/17/20 8:39 pm Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] Fir Island Gyrfalcon, etc
2/17/20 6:38 pm Patti Loesche <patti.loesche...> Re: [Tweeters] Zeiss customer service - excellent
2/17/20 6:38 pm Robert O'Brien <baro...> Re: [Tweeters] Bird migration video
2/17/20 6:34 pm Robert O'Brien <baro...> Re: [Tweeters] Bird migration video
2/17/20 5:25 pm Jennifer Jarstad <jennjarstad...> [Tweeters] Bird migration video
2/17/20 2:02 pm J Christian Kessler <1northraven...> Re: [Tweeters] Zeiss post
2/17/20 1:21 pm crazydave65 <crazydave65...> [Tweeters] Zeiss post
2/17/20 12:42 pm Jim Forrester <jimf...> [Tweeters] Zeiss customer service - the other side of the coin
2/17/20 9:58 am crazydave65 <crazydave65...> [Tweeters] Zeiss customer service, an oxymoron
2/16/20 11:13 pm Dee Dee <deedeeknit...> [Tweeters] Swift-like bird—thoughts?
2/16/20 10:06 pm Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...> Re: [Tweeters] Night Bird ID
2/16/20 9:10 pm Dayna yalowicki <dlwicki...> [Tweeters] Night Bird ID
2/16/20 6:38 pm Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] Skagit Eared Grebe
2/16/20 4:50 pm Dave Slager <dave.slager...> [Tweeters] Long-tailed Duck at Green Lake is dead
2/16/20 12:46 pm Michael Eaton <meeato01...> [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
2/16/20 12:02 pm Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...> [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
2/16/20 8:05 am Joyce Meyer <meyer2j...> [Tweeters] WFO Research Grant Program
2/16/20 7:58 am Joyce Meyer <meyer2j...> [Tweeters] WFO Student Essay Contest
2/16/20 12:18 am Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] National Parks Traveler: Former Interior Officials Urge Bernhardt Not To Change Migratory Bird Act
2/15/20 11:44 pm Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] The Oklahoman: Lesser Prairie Chicken program undergoing changes
2/15/20 11:13 pm James David Greene <merlinblu...> [Tweeters] Spotting scope for sale
2/15/20 10:30 pm Louise Rutter <louise.rutter...> Re: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor?
2/15/20 9:27 pm Michael Eaton <meeato01...> [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor?
2/15/20 5:42 pm Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] Car ‘splatometer’ tests reveal huge decline in number of insects | Environment | The Guardian
2/15/20 2:26 pm Wayne Weber <contopus...> Re: [Tweeters] Puget Sound Bird Festival-- is it defunct?
2/15/20 2:14 pm Nancy Morrison <weedsrus1...> Re: [Tweeters] entangled Grebe
2/15/20 1:48 pm Brian Zinke <zinke.pilchuck...> Re: [Tweeters] Puget Sound Bird Festival-- is it defunct?
2/15/20 1:14 pm Wayne Weber <contopus...> [Tweeters] Puget Sound Bird Festival-- is it defunct?
2/15/20 12:06 pm Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...> [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Feb. 16, 2020
2/15/20 10:07 am Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...> [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
2/14/20 10:42 pm Shep Thorp <shepthorp...> [Tweeters] Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually NWR Wednesday Walk for 2/12/2020
2/14/20 10:34 pm Karen Stephens <1917ks...> Re: [Tweeters] Octopus and bald eagle
2/14/20 11:50 am Jon. Anderson and Marty Chaney <festuca...> [Tweeters] Fwd: National Invasive Species Information Center - Giant Asian Hornet
2/14/20 10:26 am Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...> [Tweeters] Accentor - Yes!
2/13/20 10:17 pm Scott Ramos <lsr...> [Tweeters] Birding in Ecuador
2/13/20 5:02 pm <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2020-02-13
2/13/20 1:42 pm Robert C. Faucett <rfaucett...> Re: [Tweeters] NOAA Sand Point in Seattle? -- entangled grebe
2/13/20 1:34 pm Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...> [Tweeters] NOAA Sand Point in Seattle? -- entangled grebe
2/13/20 1:05 pm Keith Williamson <keithwilliamson8...> [Tweeters] selling my Swarovski EL 10x32 SwaroVision Binocular
2/13/20 10:34 am Vicki Biltz <vickibiltz...> [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor, 7:10 this morning
2/13/20 7:51 am Vicki King <vkbirder...> [Tweeters] Siberian accentor still here
2/13/20 12:56 am Nadine Drisseq <drisseq.n...> [Tweeters] March's WOS Meeting: Something to Crow About
2/12/20 6:49 pm John Puschock <g_g_allin...> Re: [Tweeters] Second coming of "Bob" OR Tim Brennan's gull
2/12/20 6:42 pm Al n Donna <alndonna...> [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor Wednesday afternoon
2/12/20 6:29 pm Roger Craik <r_craik...> Re: [Tweeters] Octopus and bald eagle
2/12/20 6:17 pm Christina <joannabird413...> [Tweeters] Octopus and bald eagle
2/12/20 5:01 pm Jeffrey Bryant <jbryant_68...> [Tweeters] Second coming of "Bob" OR Tim Brennan's gull
2/12/20 1:30 pm Tim Brennan <tsbrennan...> [Tweeters] Updates on "Rey"
2/12/20 1:29 pm Doug Santoni <dougsantoni...> Re: [Tweeters] What birding area are Caribbean countries in?
2/12/20 12:22 pm Mark Oberle <oberle...> Re: [Tweeters] What birding area are Caribbean countries in?
2/12/20 12:09 pm Vicki King <vkbirder...> [Tweeters] Trying for the Accentor tomorrow morning
2/12/20 11:09 am LSR <lsr...> [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor continues
2/12/20 10:53 am Dave Slager <dave.slager...> [Tweeters] Northwestern Crow hybrid zone study published
2/12/20 10:13 am Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...> [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
2/12/20 9:53 am Robert O'Brien <baro...> [Tweeters] Kumlien's Iceland Gulls in the Pacific NW
2/12/20 9:46 am Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> Re: [Tweeters] What birding area are Caribbean countries in?
2/12/20 9:40 am Robert O'Brien <baro...> Re: [Tweeters] Glaucous Gull or. . . ?
2/12/20 5:05 am Tim Brennan <tsbrennan...> [Tweeters] Glaucous Gull or. . . ?
2/11/20 10:45 pm Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] NPR: Nature's 'Brita Filter' Is Dying And Nobody Knows Why
2/11/20 10:29 pm Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] Perhaps the Octopus was friends with the Ross’s Gull—-Video shows bald eagle entangled with octopus as salmon farmers come to the rescue
2/11/20 8:45 pm Philip Dickinson <pdickins...> Re: [Tweeters] What birding area are Caribbean countries in?
2/11/20 8:33 pm <EdSwan2...> [Tweeters] What birding area are Caribbean countries in?
2/11/20 1:37 pm B B <birder4184...> [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor - Thank You Russ Koppendreyer
2/11/20 10:06 am Witter, Michael <Michael.Witter...> [Tweeters] Ghana Birding
2/11/20 9:14 am Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...> [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor photos
2/11/20 7:30 am Shep Thorp <shepthorp...> [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
2/10/20 9:09 pm Vicki Biltz <vickibiltz...> [Tweeters] Going after Accentor Thursday from Buckley
2/10/20 7:37 pm Louise Rutter <louise.rutter...> Re: [Tweeters] Sunday Accentor (UNCLASSIFIED)
2/10/20 7:09 pm HAL MICHAEL <ucd880...> Re: [Tweeters] Sunday Accentor (UNCLASSIFIED)
2/10/20 7:01 pm Mary klein <marytweetz...> Re: [Tweeters] Sunday Accentor (UNCLASSIFIED)
2/10/20 3:01 pm Hans-Joachim Feddern <thefedderns...> [Tweeters] Chasing the accentor
2/10/20 1:48 pm Paul Bannick <paul.bannick...> [Tweeters] The Coopers Hawk and the Rat
2/10/20 1:32 pm Dave Templeton <crazydave65...> [Tweeters] Gyrfalcon near Thorp
2/10/20 1:29 pm Scuderi, Michael R CIV USARMY CENWS (US) <Michael.R.Scuderi...> Re: [Tweeters] Sunday Accentor (UNCLASSIFIED)
2/10/20 12:58 pm Tim Brennan <tsbrennan...> [Tweeters] Glaucous Gull Cedar River Mouth
2/10/20 9:18 am louiserutter1000 <louiserutter1000...> [Tweeters] Accentor continues
2/10/20 8:45 am <nightwings406...> [Tweeters] Evening Grosbeak
2/9/20 9:59 pm BRAD Liljequist <bradliljequist...> [Tweeters] Short Eared Owl and American Pipit on Lopez Island
2/9/20 9:29 pm Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...> [Tweeters] Sunday Accentor
2/9/20 7:22 pm Tom Mansfield <birds...> Re: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
2/9/20 6:37 pm Ed Swan <edswan2...> Re: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
2/9/20 2:05 pm Martha Jordan <mj.cygnus...> [Tweeters] Swan at Steilacoom/Chambers Bay
2/9/20 12:31 pm Hubbell <ldhubbell...> [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } An Eagle's IQ
2/9/20 9:22 am Ken Trease <krtrease...> [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
2/9/20 8:29 am Ryan Merrill <rjm284...> [Tweeters] Black-legged Kittiwake at Carkeek
2/9/20 7:26 am Bruce LaBar <blabar...> [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
2/8/20 9:37 pm Dayna yalowicki <dlwicki...> [Tweeters] Nancy Jo Wagner’s Passing - Jan. 16, 2020
2/8/20 3:34 pm Ryan Merrill <rjm284...> [Tweeters] Northern Fulmar at Carkeek Park
2/8/20 3:01 pm Brad Waggoner <wagtail24...> [Tweeters] PNP Sea-watching this morning
2/8/20 2:41 pm Scott Ramos <lsr...> [Tweeters] Magnuson Park, 7 February 2020
2/8/20 2:33 pm JEFF MILLS <jeffandsuekm...> [Tweeters] Woodland Accentor
2/8/20 12:05 pm Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...> [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Feb. 9, 2020
2/8/20 11:04 am Joe Sweeney <sweeneyfit...> [Tweeters] Shearwater Richmond beach
2/8/20 10:01 am Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...> [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
2/7/20 6:57 pm Edward Pullen <edwardpullen...> [Tweeters] meeting Mary Gustafson
2/7/20 3:25 pm Mary klein <marytweetz...> [Tweeters] Attn Kitsapers, re Siberian Accentor
2/7/20 3:10 pm Bob Sundstrom <ixoreus...> [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
2/7/20 9:37 am Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Ascentor - yes
2/6/20 5:25 pm Russ Koppendrayer <russkope...> [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
2/6/20 2:54 pm Randy <re_hill...> Re: [Tweeters] SIBERIAN ACCENTOR @ Woodland
2/6/20 1:53 pm <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2020-02-06
2/6/20 12:37 pm Shep Thorp <shepthorp...> [Tweeters] Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually NWR, Wednesday Walk for 2/5/2020.
2/6/20 12:21 pm Tiffany Linbo <tiffany.linbo...> [Tweeters] U.S. industries are no longer liable for accidental bird deaths. At what cost?
2/6/20 12:13 pm Russ Koppendrayer <russkope...> [Tweeters] SIBERIAN ACCENTOR @ Woodland
2/6/20 10:42 am Jon Houghton <jon.houghton...> [Tweeters] Okanogan Day 3
2/5/20 11:52 pm Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] Jackass penguin call shares traits of human speech, scientists say | Science | The Guardian
2/5/20 9:18 pm Teri Martine <terimartine...> [Tweeters] Morocco birding opportunity April 2020
2/5/20 9:38 am AMK17 <amk17...> [Tweeters] Quick drive by Okanogan and Douglas County Birding
2/4/20 10:19 pm B B <birder4184...> [Tweeters] What Goes Into a Chase
2/4/20 7:33 pm Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] Fir Island Gyrfalcon, Burlington odd duck
2/4/20 6:29 pm Jon Houghton <jon.houghton...> [Tweeters] Okanogan Highlands today
2/4/20 2:53 pm washingtonbirder.Ken Knittle <washingtonbirder...> [Tweeters] memorial service Ken Knittle
2/3/20 9:57 pm Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] SCIENMAG: Feeding bluebirds helps fend off parasites
2/3/20 7:33 pm B B <birder4184...> [Tweeters] Ivory Gull at Flathead Lake Montana
2/3/20 6:41 pm Jon Houghton <jon.houghton...> [Tweeters] Okanogan 2020 - Day 1
2/3/20 5:07 pm <merdave...> [Tweeters] FINALLY! Snowy Owls
2/3/20 12:37 pm Joan Miller <jemskink...> [Tweeters] Flicker frenzy
2/2/20 8:13 pm Randy <re_hill...> [Tweeters] Clark County late winter WOS field trip 2/28, 2/29, 3/1
2/2/20 2:24 pm Catherine Alexander <cma...> [Tweeters] Golden Eagle over So Seattle???
2/1/20 10:39 pm <jeffjendro...> [Tweeters] Possible Baird's Sandpiper Cowlitz County
2/1/20 5:21 pm Ed Newbold <ednewbold1...> [Tweeters] Probably the ame unusual-appearing Barn Swallow back at Union Bay
2/1/20 3:47 pm Tom Merritt <birders.2341...> Re: [Tweeters] scope/iPhone question
2/1/20 2:45 pm Tim Brennan <tsbrennan...> [Tweeters] Greater White-fronted Geese query - Renton
2/1/20 2:16 pm Ryan Merrill <rjm284...> [Tweeters] Short-tailed Shearwater from Carkeek
2/1/20 2:06 pm Becky Galloway <beckyg.sea...> [Tweeters] Scope/iPhone question
2/1/20 2:00 pm Todd Sahl <toddsahl...> Re: [Tweeters] scope/iPhone question
2/1/20 1:17 pm Hubbell <ldhubbell...> [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Leap Frog
2/1/20 12:06 pm Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...> [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Feb. 2, 2020
2/1/20 11:45 am Jon. Anderson and Marty Chaney <festuca...> Re: [Tweeters] RFI - Okanogan Area - Sno Park
2/1/20 11:09 am Tom Merritt <birders.2341...> Re: [Tweeters] scope/iPhone question
2/1/20 10:52 am Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson...> [Tweeters] scope/iPhone question
1/31/20 8:17 pm J Christian Kessler <1northraven...> [Tweeters] greater white fronted geese at gene coulon park
1/31/20 5:01 pm Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...> Re: [Tweeters] Albuquerque, New Mexico: Request for Birding Recommendations
1/31/20 10:07 am Brian Zinke <zinke.pilchuck...> [Tweeters] Marine Bird Identification Class
1/30/20 11:09 pm Nadine Drisseq <drisseq.n...> [Tweeters] WOS lecture this Monday!
1/30/20 8:21 pm <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2020-01-30
1/30/20 1:00 pm B B <birder4184...> [Tweeters] Dovekie, Great Cormorant and Barnacle Goose - Birding in Cold Massachusetts
1/30/20 12:41 pm ck park <travelgirl.fics...> Re: [Tweeters] Tweeters] Pine Sisken in a feeder
1/30/20 12:33 pm Diane Weinstein <diane_weinstein...> Re: [Tweeters] Tweeters] Pine Sisken in a feeder
1/30/20 8:01 am Hank H <h.heiberg...> [Tweeters] Tweeters] Pine Sisken in a feeder
1/30/20 7:41 am mary hrudkaj <mch1096...> [Tweeters] Pine Sisken in a feeder
1/29/20 9:17 pm Shep Thorp <shepthorp...> [Tweeters] Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually NWR, Wednesday Walk for 1/29/2020
1/29/20 6:43 pm Mitchell Von Rotz <biglou22...> [Tweeters] RFI - Okanogan Area
1/29/20 12:41 pm Adrian Wolf <awolf...> [Tweeters] Bird banding class - 25-27 April and 2-4 May 2020
1/29/20 10:11 am Todd Sahl <toddsahl...> Re: [Tweeters] Albuquerque, New Mexico: Request for Birding Recommendations
1/29/20 9:35 am Mason Flint <masonflint...> Re: [Tweeters] Albuquerque, New Mexico: Request for Birding Recommendations
1/29/20 8:37 am info <info...> [Tweeters] Washington Birder List Reporting
1/28/20 10:38 pm Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...> Re: [Tweeters] Albuquerque, New Mexico: Request for Birding Recommendations
1/28/20 10:17 pm Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] Albuquerque, New Mexico: Request for Birding Recommendations
1/28/20 10:05 pm STEVEN ELLIS <sremse...> [Tweeters] Owls ( and a falling mouse)
1/28/20 8:29 pm Khanh Tran <khanhbatran...> [Tweeters] Okanogan Highlands and Waterville Plateau Bird Report and Gratitude (longish)
1/28/20 7:45 pm Darwin Alonso <dovalonso...> [Tweeters] Swallow at the Fill <- was Swallows on Edmonds Waterfront
1/28/20 2:33 pm William Driskell <bdriskell...> [Tweeters] Swallows at Union Bay Fill today
1/28/20 1:36 pm AMK17 <amk17...> [Tweeters] Okanogan Trip
1/28/20 1:36 pm Wood, Steven <woodsteven...> [Tweeters] Code of Ethics, playback sounds
1/28/20 8:05 am pan <panmail...> [Tweeters] Renton falcon news (King Cty.)
1/28/20 1:03 am Shep Thorp <shepthorp...> [Tweeters] Bridgeport Hill, Washburn Island and Waterville Plateau Scout update 1/27
 
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Date: 2/27/20 11:58 am
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually NWR, Wednesday Walk for 2/26/2020
Hi Tweets,

twenty of us enjoyed a nice day at the Refuge with cloudy skies in the
morning and partly cloudy skies in the afternoon, temperatures between the
40's to 50's degrees Fahrenheit. There was a High 13.94ft Tide at 7:36am
and a Low 3.91ft Tide at 1:44pm, so we decided to chase the tide by walking
the west side of the Twin Barns Loop Trail, Twin Barns Observatory
Platform, Nisqually Estuary Trail - or new dike, and the Nisqually Estuary
Boardwalk Trail before doing the Orchard and flooded fields. Highlights of
the day included FOY VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOW, with continuing rare sightings
of BARN SWALLOW, WESTERN SANDPIPER, and RED-SHOULDERED HAWK. We also had
fun looks at WILSON SNIPE, nesting BALD EAGLE, WESTERN MEADOWLARK, flying
VIRGINIA RAIL and singing and showing HUTTON'S VIREO.

Starting out at the Visitor Center Pond Overlook at 8am, we had great looks
at WILSON SNIPE, PIED-BILLED GREBE, HOODED MERGANSER, RING-NECKED DUCK,
GADWALL, MALLARD, and a bonded pair of CANADA GEESE.

The west side of the Twin Barns Loop Trail was good for mixed flocks of
BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE, RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, GOLDEN CROWNED KINGLET and
BROWN CREEPER. We had nice sightings of SONG SPARROW, FOX SPARROW,
GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW and PACIFIC WREN.

The Twin Barns Observation Platform was great for RED-TAILED HAWK, NORTHERN
SHOVELER, NORTHERN PINTAIL, AMERICAN WIGEON, GREEN-WINGED TEAL and AMERICAN
COOT. Flying over the flooded fields and overhead we observed 75+ TREE
SWALLOW, with a few FOY VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOW in the mix. Two BARN SWALLOWS
were seen which is considered rare on eBird.

Out on the new dike or Nisqually Estuary Trail, a pair of BALD EAGLE
continue to work on a nest half way up a large Cottonwood Tree
approximately 1/4 mile out on the west side of the Nisqually River in the
area of the old "ring dike". We had nice looks of WESTERN MEADOWLARK in
the grassy area of the surge plain, and many swallows continued to fly
overhead. There is an intergrade NORTHERN FLICKER continuing in the snags
around the surge plain. Several GREAT BLUE HERON were roosting in trees
along the Nisqually River. West of Leschi Slough on the dike continued
great looks of waterfowl. The 700+ CACKLING GEESE counted flew out early
before the walk up into the Nisqually Valley. We observed two AMERCIAN X
EURASIAN WIGEON hybrids, and had great looks at GREATER YELLOWLEGS,
RING-BILLED GULL and MEW GULL. MARSH WREN were numerous in the fresh water
marsh.

On the Nisqually Estuary Boardwalk Trail we had fabulous looks of
BUFFLEHEAD, COMMON GOLDENEYE, RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, SURF SCOTER, and
DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT. We relocated two WESTERN SANDPIPER's which is
considered rare in eBird with a flock of LEAST SANDPIPER, and had nice
looks of DUNLIN. A RED-THROATED LOON was hunting the McAllister Creek
confluence and mouth which was fun to see. We picked up STELLER'S JAY,
BELTED KINGFISHER, and SPOTTED SANDPIPER along the west bank of McAllister
Creek. The Puget Sound Viewing Platform or terminus was good for GREATER
SCAUP, HORNED GREBE and COMMON LOON. The BRANT GEESE were not visible to
all as they swam south of Luhr Beach with American Wigeon.

On our return, it warmed up in the early afternoon and we relocated the
RED-SHOULDERED HAWK in the trees along old McAllister Creek Access Road
hunting, presumably for Garter Snakes, distant digiscope photos were added
to the eBird report. We also had a nice sightings of VIRGINIA RAIL flying
through the marsh adjacent to the dike.

The Nisqually River Overlook was good for COMMON MERGANSER and COMMON
GOLDENEYE. We also had great looks at a MINK. On our return, the east
side of the Twin Barns Loop Trail had a great mixed flock of BROWN CREEPER,
BUSHTIT, BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE, CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEE, GOLDEN-CROWNED
KINGLET, BEWICK'S WREN and DOWNY WOODPECKER.

We located three HUTTON'S VIREO singing and showing, two near the Visitor
Center and another in a mixed flock in the stand of riparian trees across
the entrance road from the Orchard. The Orchard was good for
GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW and KINGLET. We picked up KILLDEER in the flooded
field across the entrance road from the Orchard.

We observed 67 species for the day, and have seen 92 species for the year.
Mammals seen were Eastern Gray Squirrel, Harbor Seal, Columbia Black-tailed
Deer and Mink.

Until next week, happy birding,

Shep

--
Shep Thorp
Browns Point
253-370-3742

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Date: 2/27/20 10:22 am
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Snohomish (Mountain?) Bluebird
Hello Tweets,
Earlier this morning I found a bluebird in the field with the radio towers
along Shorts School Road near Snohomish. I'm 95% confident it was a
Mountain Bluebird, but I've been burned by distant bluebirds in this exact
field in previous years. The bird was exceptionally drab, with a gray
breast, white undertail. The blue coloration was not apparent when the bird
was perched, only in flight, but seemed to be the lighter shade of blue of
Mountain Bluebird.

This is the 3rd year out of the last 4 years that I've found a bluebirds
along this road. All the others have been found in the middle of March.
Say's Phoebe's have shown up in this field the last two years as well.

Josh Adams
Cathcart, WA

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Date: 2/26/20 11:06 pm
From: Nadine Drisseq <drisseq.n...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Something to Crow About!
Hi all!
Don't miss the WOS (Washington Ornithological Society) meeting,
THIS Monday, March 2nd 2020!

Something to Crow About
with Dr Kaeli Swift, Ph.D.

Crows and ravens are found on nearly every continent where they
routinely infiltrate the hearts and minds of the humans who share
their space. Dr.
Kaeli Swift will discuss some of the general aspects about crows that
contribute to our affinity (and sometimes hatred) for them, with a
particular emphasis on concepts that are the most frequent questions people
have about crows including play, tool use, communal roosting and funerals.

Dr. Swift received her Ph.D. from the University of Washington in 2018,
where she studied American crow thanatology. She is currently a lecturer in
the UW's School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, where she teaches
ornithology, conservation and wildlife ecology. You can read her popular
science articles on her blog - corvidresearch.blog. You can also find her
on twitter, instagram, and facebook at the @corvidresearch handle.

WOS meetings are held the first Monday of the month, Oct-June at:
The Center for Urban Horticulture, 3501 NE 41st ST Seattle, 98105

Socialize with fellow birders before the meeting 7-7:30pm :)

Meeting begins at 7:30PM. All are welcome to attend. Can't make it to the
meeting in person? Members may attend virtually via GoToMeeting. You can
join on-line anytime at:
http://wos.org/about-wos/membership/
or in person at the meeting.

Hope to see you there!

Nadine Drisseqwww.wos.org

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Date: 2/26/20 5:22 pm
From: Candace C. Plant <plantcan...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Siberian Accenter
Driving up to Woodland Bottom tomorrow to see Siberian Accenter. Anyone see it today. I see no postings.

Thanks
Candy Plant
Wilsonville, Or

Get Outlook for iOS<https://aka.ms/o0ukef>

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Date: 2/26/20 3:06 pm
From: pan <panmail...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Seattle Sora
Hi, Tweets,

Following a recent report of a rail at Green Lake, I walked along the southwestern shore late this morning. After 15 or 20 minutes, I did see a rail foraging in the cattails, but it was a Sora (!). I got great views of the beast as dozens of walkers, runners, bicyclists, and dogs passed behind me. This may be the first I've actually seen in King County. (I've heard them.) This could become one of those unusually cooperative rails for a time, and I recommend looking. You're not going to add any disturbance if you just hang out quietly. To find the spot, follow the sound of Red-winged Blackbirds, as a small cluster is setting up territories there.

For the first time in awhile, I did not find any Eurasian Wigeon, and all the geese I saw were Canadas.

26 February, 2020,

Alan Grenon
Seattle
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Date: 2/26/20 1:59 pm
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] male Rufous Hummingbird
....just graced my feeders in Battle Ground, Clark County. It didn't stick
around so heads up everyone to the north!

Cheers.

Jim
--
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
<jdanzenbaker...>

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Date: 2/26/20 12:38 pm
From: Samuel Terry <samgterry...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Alki Norther Fulmar (killed by Bald Eagle)
Hi tweeters,

On Monday Feb 24th 2020 I got to see a pretty amazing thing while scoping
the sound from Alki in West Seattle. The short version is that I found a
Northern Fulmar out on the water, it was then caught by a Bald Eagle,
changed hands four times between several eagles and was eventually brought
to land just south me where I was eventually able to recover it's head.

There are photos (some of them gruesome) and some more details in my ebird
checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S65149907

Good birding,

Sam Terry
Seattle

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Date: 2/26/20 7:54 am
From: J Christian Kessler <1northraven...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] a suggestion
as I've searched for locations identified on Tweeters, too often GoogleMaps
does not recognize that name. *A Birder's Guide to Washington* may include
that site in the index, or in the text, but even it may not use the same
name as listed in the posting, or include the site at all.

Chris Kessler
Seattle

On Tue, Feb 25, 2020 at 3:54 PM Michelle Maani <lamoustique...>
wrote:

> I agree with Jim, that city and county should be included. "Just Google
> it" does not work when there are multiple locations with the same name, or
> the name is accidentally misspelled in the tweet. I actually ran into that
> once here on tweeters,when I googled a location and found out that there
> were three ponds with the same name in Washington state. Apparently humans
> are not very original when they name places.
>
> Michelle Maani
> Salmon Creek, Vancouver, WA (case in point, there are two places named
> Vancouver, one just north of Washington state and one in Washington across
> the river from Portland, Oregon.)
> _______________________________________________
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> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>


--
"moderation in everything, including moderation"
Rustin Thompson

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Date: 2/26/20 6:50 am
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...>
Subject: [Tweeters] 46,000 Year Old Bird Found ‘Frozen In Time’ In Siberia
Hello everyone,


A horned lark discovered in northeastern Siberia was recently found to have
died during the last Ice Age and is now providing a crucial glimpse into
evolution and into the effects of climate change.


46,000 Year Old Bird Found ‘Frozen In Time’ In Siberia

https://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2020/02/26/46000-year-old-bird-found-frozen-in-time-in-siberia/

tinyURL: https://tinyurl.com/s9eorw8


I hope you enjoy this piece. Please, as always, feel free to share widely
amongst your friends, family and other contacts.


GrrlScientist | @GrrlScientist <https://twitter.com/GrrlScientist>
<grrlscientist...>
Blogs: Forbes <http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/> | Medium
<https://medium.com/@GrrlScientist>
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Date: 2/25/20 9:42 pm
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Virginia Rails at Night
There's a small retention pond  below the Point Edwards Condominiums in Edmonds that has Virginia Rails. On Sunday and again tonight around 9:00 p.m. while out walking the dog, at least one Rail was giving its very loud "kiddick" calls.  I know some rails are active at night  but I had not heard any calls at night before.

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
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Date: 2/25/20 8:37 pm
From: AnthonyG. <birds...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] a suggestion / location + GPS usage
Hello Jim



I agree. And in public places a GPS is also appropriate and most efficient and could save many of us hours of time in some circumstances.



Here’s how (in this thread there’s a deliberate space between the . and com)



1)If you wish, on your computer, simply go to the park or public place location within: maps.google. com



2)Zoom in and drag around the screen until you find the location to where you saw the species.



3)once you have found your “close to” or precise spot, Right Click with your mouse (as in Windows) and choose “What’s Here”



4) a small popup occurs showing the GPS coordinates



5)now, go ahead and click the coordinates itself. a new popup occurs likely on the left of your screen



6)you’ll see two strings of numbers:



7)highlight then copy and paste the lower string of numbers into your Tweeters email for your bird location, you are done.



Now the rest of us simply ‘copy and paste’ those coordinates at maps.google. com and we all know precisely where the species was seen.



Option Two while out in the Field:



There are a handful of free GPS apps for iPhone and Android. A great one I use is simply called: GPS Coordinates (for android) it’s a red and white icon.



Once its installed Tap the app (that’s all) it displays the GPS coordinates. It’s a bunch of numbers with periods and commas and dashes. That’s not important to decipher (unless determined).



Note the Copy button on the same exact screen.
Tap the COPY button.
Go to your eBird app locate your entry for the species you wish to share (such as an entry for Lapland Longspur, Song sparrow etc). Note the comments section. Push on your screen and Choose Paste. Done. Takes a few seconds for the entire process.



Now anyone that sees the eBird report simply has to copy and paste those coordinates at: maps.google.calm on their computer or their phone.. this also takes a few seconds.



The viewers now know exactly where the original birder was literally standing vs ‘seen on the dike’ as an example



If you’d like to go one step further try this additional step;



Open the Google Maps app when you’re at the public location such as Hayton Preserve in Skagit. Paste in the same coordinates for that Lapland Longspur and start walking. Google Maps will lead you right to the exact (within a few feet accurate) location of where the bird was seen by the OP.



No more worries about following directions such NW SW NE types of directions. Or if you prefer include both as the GPS coordinates and the compass like directions as the GPS coordinates don’t take up many spaces within a text field.



This is merely the same exact principle when you use Google Maps in your vehicle to get somewhere.



I sure hope this helps everyone. I was turned onto to this almost a decade ago by a few birders in Orange County and have found it saved myself and many others hours of time when users share this type of data. Quite handy especially at a large park or an unknown area for some of us which one has not experienced prior or has limited knowledge.



Cheers



Anthony G.
Camano Island





From: Tweeters [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Jim Danzenbaker
Sent: Tuesday, February 25, 2020 10:46 AM
To: tweeters tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] a suggestion



Hi Tweeters,



I first of all want to thank everyone in this online birding community for your willingness to share information about birds whether it be sightings, technology to help us with our birding hobby, locations to visit, and guides that can help us when we travel domestically or abroad.



I do have a favor to ask. When you are reporting a bird or talking about a location that you've visited, please include the name of the city and the county to go along with the name of the location. Many of us on tweeters are not fluent in every location in Washington State. Including more location information would help us tremendously in determining where you saw the birds that you are reporting.



I have spoken about this to several people in the past and a response that I received was ... just google it. That's all well and good but if there are 50 people out there googling the same information, in my humble opinion it would be better to initially include the information.



Thanks for your time.



Now lets go out and bird!




Jim

--

Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, Clark Cty, WA
360-702-9395
<jdanzenbaker...>


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Date: 2/25/20 7:58 pm
From: Ann Nightingale <motmot...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Avian Monitoring and Bird Banding Workshop in Victoria, BC
Hi All,

Rocky Point Bird Observatory is offering an introductory bird monitoring and
banding workshop at Royal Roads University in Victoria, BC, on April 3-5,
2020. The 3-day workshop will focus on bird identification, monitoring
procedures and techniques, sexing and ageing. Components this year will
include an owl monitoring and banding demo. The program has been developed
for people with little or no bird handling and/or banding experience, but
those with intermediate skills will also find the workshop a good way to
build knowledge.

This is an excellent opportunity for undergraduates, graduate students, bird
observatory volunteers and naturalists to explore aspects of the operation
of an avian monitoring project, including bird safety, mist netting, data
collection, bird banding, identification, sexing and ageing. This is an
introductory course and participants should not expect to emerge from this
short workshop as qualified banders. Much of the work will be with frozen
and dried bird specimens although there will be some opportunities to work
with live birds to learn safe bird handling and basic banding techniques.
Skills practiced in this workshop will be beneficial for a variety of
projects including productivity, survivorship and migration monitoring field
work.

North American Banding Council certified trainer, Eric Demers, PhD, RPBio,
will be the primary instructor, assisted by several other licensed banders
and instructors.

Workshop goes ahead rain or shine. In inclement weather, more time will be
spent working with specimens.

For more information, please visit http://rpbo.org/rpboworkshop20.php



Ann Nightingale

Victoria, BC




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Date: 2/25/20 3:58 pm
From: Michelle Maani <lamoustique...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] a suggestion
I agree with Jim, that city and county should be included. "Just Google it" does not work when there are multiple locations with the same name, or the name is accidentally misspelled in the tweet.  I actually ran into that once here on tweeters,when I googled a location and found out that there were three ponds with the same name in Washington state.  Apparently humans are not very original when they name places.
Michelle MaaniSalmon Creek, Vancouver, WA  (case in point, there are two places named Vancouver, one just north of Washington state and one in Washington across the river from Portland, Oregon.)
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Date: 2/25/20 11:38 am
From: Vicki Biltz <vickibiltz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] EBird question
Hi, I’m still in Texas using eBird and Birdseye. I tried to post several
times, one for a pair of Aplomado Falcons, and it’s not showing up on
Birdseye. This has happened a number of times now. I went into both
programs and was unable to figure out how to link my reports with
Birdseye. It’s too bad for others looking for the Falcon or a Pine
Warbler, etc.
Any ideas or references would be helpful.
Thank you,
Vicki Biltz
Currently on Padre Island looking for Mangrove Warbler.
--



<vickibiltz...>
http://www.flickr.com/photos/saw-whets_new/

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Date: 2/25/20 10:50 am
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] a suggestion
Hi Tweeters,

I first of all want to thank everyone in this online birding community for
your willingness to share information about birds whether it be sightings,
technology to help us with our birding hobby, locations to visit, and
guides that can help us when we travel domestically or abroad.

I do have a favor to ask. When you are reporting a bird or talking about a
location that you've visited, please include the name of the city and the
county to go along with the name of the location. Many of us on tweeters
are not fluent in every location in Washington State. Including more
location information would help us tremendously in determining where you
saw the birds that you are reporting.

I have spoken about this to several people in the past and a response that
I received was ... just google it. That's all well and good but if there
are 50 people out there googling the same information, in my humble
opinion it would be better to initially include the information.

Thanks for your time.

Now lets go out and bird!

Jim
--
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, Clark Cty, WA
360-702-9395
<jdanzenbaker...>

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Date: 2/25/20 9:10 am
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] thanks for help with audio
Dear Tweeters,
Thanks to one and all who wrote back about audio-to-eBird methodology.
I now have more homework to do than even my students used to have!
With a little luck, I hope to have some audio on my eBird checklists by Charles Boyer's birthday, at the latest!
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch
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Date: 2/25/20 7:57 am
From: Michelle Savoie <savoiemr...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Possible Laysans albatross Luna park
This morning at 6:43 I heard an unusual guttural call coming for a bird
overhead. When I looked up I observed a bird with long pointy grey wings,
white breast, and usually bulky, stocky, yellow bill pointed downward. It
was flying just ahead of a flock of gulls. Direction of travel was east
word towards Jack Block Park. Unfortunately, I did not have binoculars to
get a confirmation of ID. But the bill and wings were very distinctly
different than the gulls flying with it. The call matched those of
recordings of Laysons Albatross...hoping someone can get eyes on it to
confirm.

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Date: 2/24/20 11:58 pm
From: ck park <travelgirl.fics...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] eBird audio question
AnthonyG said something about Audacity being for audio only, unable to
handle video files. he's right about "audio only" with regard to output,
but audacity can extract/handle video files, depending on the codecs being
used. as an example, i have audacity 2.3.3 for windows 10, and i just
dragged and dropped an mp4 video file without hassle. saving as WMA, WAV,
MP3, OGG, and several other formats is a snap.

freac (a small multi-OS app) will also accept mp4 files (once again,
depending on the codecs) and output audio in most "normal" audio formats
(lossy and loss-less)...

00 caren
ParkGallery.org
george davis creek, north fork


On Mon, Feb 24, 2020 at 11:22 PM <birders...> wrote:

> Hi All,
>
>
>
> FWIW, I was intrigued by this question and after a little searching
> located a freeware project called Pazera Free Audio Extractor. It seems
> pretty straight forward to use and produced reasonable results using
> default settings as far as I could determine.
>
>
>
> I’m always a bit leery of new freeware tools, but a Kaspersky antivirus
> scan reported the 64-bit portable version that I downloaded to be free of
> malware. And, while I don’t have any historical experience with this
> particular tool, its license indicates use of the FFMpeg and MediaInfo
> projects which are used in other freeware software tools that I’ve used for
> quite a long time.
>
>
>
> Kirk Scarbrough
>
> Woodinville WA
> _______________________________________________
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Date: 2/24/20 11:26 pm
From: <birders...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] eBird audio question
Hi All,



FWIW, I was intrigued by this question and after a little searching located
a freeware project called Pazera Free Audio Extractor. It seems pretty
straight forward to use and produced reasonable results using default
settings as far as I could determine.



I'm always a bit leery of new freeware tools, but a Kaspersky antivirus scan
reported the 64-bit portable version that I downloaded to be free of
malware. And, while I don't have any historical experience with this
particular tool, its license indicates use of the FFMpeg and MediaInfo
projects which are used in other freeware software tools that I've used for
quite a long time.



Kirk Scarbrough

Woodinville WA


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Date: 2/24/20 9:58 pm
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] A nest of sticks & spit
I’ve got a friend who has a chance to score a Chimney Swift nest. Any one know if you need a permit to possess and/or put one of these in the mail?

Larry Schwitters
Issaquah
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Date: 2/24/20 7:01 pm
From: AnthonyG. <birds...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] eBird audio question
Hello John / Gary /Tweeters



VLC Player (aka VLAN) is truly a wonderful software (Open Source as you
state) program that can play virtually any video file type. As you
rightfully point out, the audio file can be extracted. In the past though,
I've had limited success with the quality of the final output. I haven't
used this method in a while and its certainly possible it's been improved.



Audacity on the other hand, is solely intended for Audio playback and
editing. It is not capable of loading a Video file.



FFMpeg is Command Prompt (DOS like) only and I don't believe there is a User
Interface. It's for the techies who enjoy DOS Command's



One other easy to use option in Gary's situation is to upload the video to
Youtube and then extract the audio.

A free Youtube account needs to be created (if not already) to upload
videos.



You can then mark the video as:

-Public

-Private

-or Unlisted



Here's the Step by Step start to finish



Step 1 upload video to your Youtube account. You will be presented a youtube
link when done. It's a permanent link and accessibly anytime.

Step 2 would be to install the free software called "4K Downloader" from
4kdownload._com < there's a download section on this web site - no
Underscore before Com

Step 3 get the newly created Youtube link for your video

Step 4 open 4Kdownloader software

Step 5 Now choose "Paste link" this will paste the youtube link for your
video in the 4k downloader software

Step 6 4K downloader will auto parse the youtube link..may take a moment

Step 7 Once the link is parsed, a popup will occur. From the drop down menu
choose "Extract Audio". Choose MP3 and Original Audio. On this same popup,
note the PATH i.e. location of where the Audio extract will reside or choose
your own destination such as My Music



Step 8 the newly created MP3 file is now on your hard drive.

Step 9 Login to eBird account and locate the eBird list you wish to attach
the Audio file

Step 10 choose Manage Media button from within the eBird list

Step 11 locate the newly extracted Audio MP3 media file in My Music as in
the above example and upload to your eBird list



Anthony G.

Camano Island



From: Tweeters [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On
Behalf Of John Puschock
Sent: Monday, February 24, 2020 4:34 PM
To: Tweeters Tweeters
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] eBird audio question



VLC Media Player, another free open-source program, can convert the audio
track from a video file to mp3, WAV, and some other file formats. It's easy,
though the process isn't 100% intuitive, but once you figure it out, it just
takes five seconds to get it started. However, it doesn't have editing
capabilities like Audacity (which I do use for editing), but I don't have to
re-record the sound.

I just tried opening a video file in Audacity, which didn't work, but it
suggested using FFmpeg, another program that I didn't know about until just
now, so I don't know if this is an alternative for isolating the audio track
into a new file or not.



If you do choose to record the sound on Audacity as a playback, switch the
source to computer playback if possible rather than using your computer's
microphone for better audio quality. See
https://manual.audacityteam.org/man/tutorial_recording_audio_playing_on_the_
computer.html for more info about that.



John Puschock

Seattle


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Date: 2/24/20 4:39 pm
From: John Puschock <g_g_allin...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] eBird audio question
VLC Media Player, another free open-source program, can convert the audio track from a video file to mp3, WAV, and some other file formats. It's easy, though the process isn't 100% intuitive, but once you figure it out, it just takes five seconds to get it started. However, it doesn't have editing capabilities like Audacity (which I do use for editing), but I don't have to re-record the sound.

I just tried opening a video file in Audacity, which didn't work, but it suggested using FFmpeg, another program that I didn't know about until just now, so I don't know if this is an alternative for isolating the audio track into a new file or not.

If you do choose to record the sound on Audacity as a playback, switch the source to computer playback if possible rather than using your computer's microphone for better audio quality. See https://manual.audacityteam.org/man/tutorial_recording_audio_playing_on_the_computer.html for more info about that.

John Puschock
Seattle

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Date: 2/24/20 4:22 pm
From: Ray Korpi <rkorpi...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Gull/Kittiwake Report from Cowlitz-Columbia
All,
I'm not surprised at the Kittiwake report at the Cowlitz. I was going down I-5 today and there were at least 1000 gulls where the interstate parallels the river just north of Kalama.
Ray Korpi
Vancouver, WA


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Date: 2/24/20 3:34 pm
From: AnthonyG. <birds...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] eBird audio question
One other possible option, is to install Audacity on your Windows 10. Play the video in Windows Media Player which comes preinstalled with Windows 10 and have Audacity record the audio track only.

 

Here’s how:

 

1) download and install Audacity (software is here > https://www.audacityteam.org/download/)

2)Open Windows Media Player and load your video file

3)Play the video file and switch back to Audacity and hit the Red record button. You should see the colorful meters registering and the file being recorded

4)when done, use the Stop button in Audacity and save the file as a WAV or MP3 (Mp3’s are smaller in size and compressed).  For simplicity use WAV as this is what Cornell prefers (over MP3)

5)login to your eBird account where you have saved the ebird list that you wish to add the audio file

6)choose the Manage Media button and locate the newly saved WAV or MP3 file on your Windows 10

 

This should do the trick with your current Video files and saving only the audio.

 

Anthony G.

Camano Island


--
Please excuse my brevity.
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Date: 2/24/20 2:05 pm
From: Anthony @ OC Birds <birds...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] eBird audio question
Dear Gary & Tweeters



Demuxing (the term used to separate audio and video / or combining both streams would be remux) the audio stream from a video clip is possible. This is typically done on a computer (MAC or PC) that offers video editing software. There are numerous choices such as Corel Video Studio for the PC in which you have the option of stripping only the audio and saving as an MP3, AIFF or WAV file as some examples.



The far easier option is using Voice Recording software that likely came with your iPhone. It’s called Voice Memo. Locate the app, do a recording, then save the file as an MP3 or WAV (ebird’s only two options).

WAV files are usually much larger and of better quality.



If you prefer, you can go one step further with the newly recorded file (vs. uploading to ebird straight off your phone) and send to your PC or MAC. Then cleanup the file in a variety of ways such as increasing the volume, cleaning up wind or simply truncating the file. An excellent software program for this is Audacity which works on many OS’s such as Windows, MAC, Linux and so on. Best of all it’s a free download with numerous free plugins.



Lastly, if you are seeking perhaps the best option of all, this would be to get a hand held recorder which is far superior than what’s on an iPhone or Android. The one I use is a 4 track hand held recorder by Zoom , model H4N. It comes with a wind screen, built in mics that swivel to 90 degrees or 120 degrees with the option of adding 2 more mics, a cone handle (to hold the device) but also has a tripod mount and USB cord. The newer model is an H4N Pro but there’s also an H5 and H6 which you may wish to investigate. The sound off this device is simply remarkable. It serves well for a variety of uses such as band practice, speeches, bird vocalizations, etc.
It uses a SD card and double AA batteries. You can simply eject the SD card and place in your computer’s card reader or use the USB cable that comes with the kit and connect to a computer.



The device offers 24bit x 96K high resolution WAV files for the ultimate sound as well as the lesser quality MP3 files in either stereo or mono recording.



If this has your interest, you can read more here: https://www.zoom-na.com/products/field-video-recording/field-recording/zoom-h4n-handy-recorder



Anthony G.

Camano Island



From: Tweeters [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Gary Bletsch
Sent: Monday, February 24, 2020 8:43 AM
To: Tweeters Tweeters; Gary Bletsch
Subject: [Tweeters] eBird audio question



Dear Tweeters,



It seems easy to add photos to eBird. Adding audio is another story. I have tried to read up on this topic, in eBird's own help menu and FAQ's, but I don't see a simple set of instructions. Searching online, I do see all sorts of YouTube videos, but I think that YouTube video is a poor way to instruct people, compared to a set of written instructions.



The two things that I would like to do are these:



1. take audio from a video recording made with my camera, and put it into an eBird checklist;



2. take audio from a video made with my iPhone, and put that into an eBird checklist.



I have zero knowledge or experience with handling videos and audios with a computer. My computer is has Windows 10, and I do see that it comes with Microsoft Photos, which supposedly includes something called Video Editor, which supposedly allows one to convert a file to a WAV file. It seems that eBird accepts only audio recordings in the form of WAV files. What that means is Greek to me, however. Meanwhile, I have quite a few interesting audio recordings of various birds from all over the world, sitting in computer files, heard by no one!



Is there a set of instructions somewhere?



Any hints would be appreciated.



Yours truly,



Gary Bletsch


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Date: 2/24/20 1:50 pm
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Black-legged Kittiwake - Cowlitz County
Hi Tweeters,

At 10:20 this morning, Randy Hill and I found an adult Black-legged
Kittiwake at Gearhart Gardens Park on Freedom Road in Longview, Cowlitz
County. It was in a flock of 400+ gulls that were attracted to a smelt run
on the Cowlitz River. We only saw it once - it continued
downstream towards the confluence of the Cowlitz with the Columbia River.
This is a second Cowlitz County record. Other birds of note included two
Glaucous Gulls and an apparent Glaucous x Glaucous-winged Gull.

Good birding,

Jim
--
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
<jdanzenbaker...>

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Date: 2/24/20 8:55 am
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] eBird audio question
Dear Tweeters,
It seems easy to add photos to eBird. Adding audio is another story. I have tried to read up on this topic, in eBird's own help menu and FAQ's, but I don't see a simple set of instructions. Searching online, I do see all sorts of YouTube videos, but I think that YouTube video is a poor way to instruct people, compared to a set of written instructions. 
The two things that I would like to do are these: 
1. take audio from a video recording made with my camera, and put it into an eBird checklist;
2. take audio from a video made with my iPhone, and put that into an eBird checklist.
I have zero knowledge or experience with handling videos and audios with a computer. My computer is has Windows 10, and I do see that it comes with Microsoft Photos, which supposedly includes something called Video Editor, which supposedly allows one to convert a file to a WAV file. It seems that eBird accepts only audio recordings in the form of WAV files. What that means is Greek to me, however. Meanwhile, I have quite a few interesting audio recordings of various birds from all over the world, sitting in computer files, heard by no one!
Is there a set of instructions somewhere?
Any hints would be appreciated.
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch
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Date: 2/24/20 7:10 am
From: re_hill <re_hill...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor Continues
The Siberian Accentor perched for 3 of us in the apple tree for 7 minutes this morning,  beginning at 06:50.Randy Hill Ridgefield. Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Scott Downes <downess...> Date: 2/22/20 6:52 AM (GMT-08:00) To: <tweeters...> Subject: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor Continues Seen at 6:43 in the apple tree this morning.Scott <DownesDowness...> Wa_______________________________________________Tweeters mailing <listTweeters...>://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters_______________________________________________
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Date: 2/23/20 7:06 pm
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Skagit Surfbirds and swallows
Dear Tweeters,
Today (the 23rd February 2020), there was a cooperative flock of 8 Black Turnstones and 7 Surfbirds at Rosario Head (Skagit County side of Deception Pass State Park). The weather was unpleasant (cold temperatures, rain, light to gentle breeze). Maybe the lack of beach-walkers was what convinced the 14 birds in this little flock to fly over to the closest rocks to the shoreline, just a stone's throw north of the Indian maiden statue. I looked and looked for about forty minutes, but could not find any other shorebirds with them. Just as I was leaving, some people decided it would be a good idea to start throwing a stick toward the rocks where the flock was, so that their dog could retrieve it; the flock flew out to the back side of the more distant rocks, out of sight.
At Campbell Lake boat launch, I was surprised to see a flock of 8 Violet-green Swallows foraging over the chilly waters of the lake. Boots were necessary; one had to wade out onto the flooded boat-launch to get a view over the lake.
At Big Indian Slough, two swallows foraged over the fields just north of the pumping station. They were very drab, and lacked streamers. It took me a while before I could ID them, even in the scope, but was finally able to see the white spots in the tail feathers and the dark throats.
I cannot remember a year where I'd seen Barn and Violet-Green Swallows before Tree Swallows, but I'm sure the Tree Swallows will turn up for me one of these days!
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch
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Date: 2/23/20 1:22 pm
From: Hubbell <ldhubbell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Silent and Subtle
Tweeters,

This week’s post is about one of the smartest birds seen in sky around Union Bay. I hope you enjoy the post!

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2020/02/silent-and-subtle.html <https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2020/02/silent-and-subtle.html>

Have a great day on Union Bay, where nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net


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Date: 2/23/20 12:02 pm
From: Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] The Birdbooker Report
HI ALL:
This week's titles are:

1) Birds of Paradise and Bowerbirds
2) Handbook of Whales, Dolphins and Porpoises of the World
3) White Feathers
4) The Falcon Thief
5) The Kingdon Pocket Guide to African Mammals, 2nd edition
6) Reptiles and Amphibians of New Zealand

https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/2020/02/new-titles.html

sincerely
Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/
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Date: 2/23/20 10:30 am
From: vrhoden <vrhoden...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Black Phoebe at Ridgefield River S
Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE DeviceFly catching at the boundary sign right before the blind parking lot._______________________________________________
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Date: 2/23/20 10:18 am
From: <byers345...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Off topic: Birds of Thailand, mid-Jan, 2020 to Feb 6
Hello Tweeters,

We got back from Thailand over two weeks ago, traveling
through airports where almost everyone of the thousands of people there were
wearing masks to avoid coronavirus. Just three weeks earlier, before
birding started, we had taken a city tour in Bangkok, where we visited the
Grand Palace. Coronavirus was already an issue in China, but in Bangkok,
neither we nor the zillions of other tourists there wore face masks. We
remain concerned about everyone we encountered on our trip!

However, while in Thailand on our birding tour, we mainly
concentrated on birding and were far away from crowds. We were generally in
our van ready to head out at 6 am and didn't return to our hotel until after
dark. The pace for us septuagenarians was grueling. We had already been
told that we were the oldest people on the trip, so we muttered privately,
but were determined to keep going. A plus on this tour, though, is that we
had a team that traveled with us and prepared lovely Thai mid-morning
snacks, with coffee (!), and they prepared hot lunches when we were far away
from restaurants. They also followed us around in the afternoon with more
snacks, cakes, fresh fruit, and the like. Talk about being spoiled. The
food in the hotels where we stayed was also generally very good.



https://www.flickr.com/photos/29258421@N07/albums/72157713193644983



This is probably also age-related, but the older I get, the
more I like to have a picture of a bird to remind me what I saw. Sometimes
the processed picture, enlarged and brightened a bit, is much better than my
original look at a bird, period. Thus, we always look forward to a chance
to go through whatever images we manage to get on a birding trip. I do use
the pictures to illustrate our ebird lists, but I also enjoy sharing the
final album with those of you on Tweeters. So the link above gets you to
our Thailand birds album. I put a description of the trip at the top of the
album, so I won't repeat it here. There are 200 photos in the album.
Overall on the trip we saw almost 450 birds. Three-hundred and fifty were
lifers!

I always make mistakes in identifying birds. Please, if any
of you spot an error, please don't hesitate to let me know.



Charlotte Byers, Edmonds


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Date: 2/22/20 12:06 pm
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...>
Subject: [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Feb. 23, 2020
Hey, Tweeters,

BirdNote turned 15 on February 21. Here are 15 things you might not have known about the program:
https://www.birdnote.org/blog/2020/02/birdnote-turns-15
============================
Heard last week on BirdNote:
* The Crane Wife
http://bit.ly/1PHfbc5
* The Regal Great Blue Heron
http://bit.ly/1vI3oCw
* Mockingbirds Are Southerners
http://bit.ly/38PFt9x
* Cranes' Voices Across the Globe
http://bit.ly/2CueNdu
* Nest Cavities - Book Early! Limited Supply!
http://bit.ly/2G3A5RE
* Pigeons Love Cities - But We Loved Them First
http://bit.ly/2Tii6PF
* How Birds' Names Change
http://bit.ly/2ltKC24
=========================
Next week on BirdNote: Crow Funerals,
Kirtland's Warbler - A Conservation Success,
Lily-trotters ... Jacanas! -- and more
http://bit.ly/38NeH1K
--------------------------------------
Did you have a favorite story this week? Another comment?
Please let us know. mailto:<info...>
------------------------------------------------
BirdNote is in print. Check out BirdNote, the book:
https://www.birdnote.org/birdnote-book
There's a journal, too -- for your notes and sketches and lists:
http://bit.ly/BirdNote-journal
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
or Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/birdnoteradio/
Listen on Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find 1500+ episodes and more than 1200 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
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Date: 2/22/20 11:18 am
From: Brian Pendleton <kc7wpd...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Apparent American Wigeon x Green-winged Teal hybrid at Three Crabs yesterday (2/21)
Ed Newbold, Delia Scholes and I observed an apparent American Wigeon x Green-winged Teal hybrid at Three Crabs yesterday. The bird was a male swimming with several American Wigeon not far off the beach. It was slightly smaller than the wigeon with smaller and darker bill. Overall pattern similar to wigeon but with uniform tan head (including the crown), pinkish gray breast, gray flanks, pale gray bar separating breast from sides, black pointed tail like wigeon but with much more limited and grayish white in front of the black of the tail. The green of the face was slightly more bluish than on American Wigeon. Speculum not seen.
We were not able to get good photos.

Brian Pendleton

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Date: 2/22/20 6:58 am
From: Scott Downes <downess...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor Continues

Seen at 6:43 in the apple tree this morning.

Scott Downes
<Downess...>
Yakima Wa
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Date: 2/21/20 5:06 pm
From: Chazz Hesselein <chazz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Nice two-fer, razor clan limit and Glaucous Gull
I’m at the Grayland State Beach beach vehicle access looking at a Glaucous Gull after getting a quick limit of razor clams. Nice two-fer for the last day of the fishing license year.

Chazz Hesselein
Port Orchard
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Date: 2/21/20 1:43 pm
From: Jeremy Schwartz <jschwartz1124...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Anyone In the Bothell Area Want to Collect a Dead Cooper's Hawk?
Hi Tweeters,

I work in the North Creek area of Bothell, not far from the UW Bothell
Campus. I'm just east of 405 from the campus.

On a lunch walk just now I discovered a dead Cooper's Hawk in the grass
along one of the stretches of gravel path that threads through the office
park. It looks to be an adult and pretty well intact. No predation that I
can see. There are no windows immediately near the trail, but it could have
theoretically bounced off a nearby office window, flew to a nearby tree and
then collapsed.

I've called the Burke Museum and Seattle Audubon offices, but they both
would require me to keep it and deliver it to them, which is not as
feasible right now with me being at work. Anyone living nearby who might be
able to take it? If anyone is interested, reply to me individually and I
can share my cell phone number.

Thanks, and keep watching the skies!
Jeremy in Bothell
jschwartz1124 AT gmail DOT com

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Date: 2/21/20 9:51 am
From: Peter H Wimberger <pwimberger...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
Tweets,
The accentor was seen by a small group this morning at 702 in the Apple tree with some juncos. It flew off shortly afterwards. This may have already been suggested, but I wonder if it likes that spot because the huge clump of bamboo behind the house is similar to some vegetation in the normal China wintering areas?
Peter Wimberger
Tacoma

Phone sent - so short


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Date: 2/21/20 7:02 am
From: Bob <rflores_2...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Eurasian wigeon, Clark Co, WA
Had a male yesterday at 1:30 in a mixed group of waterfowl across Lower River Road from Frenchman's Bar Regional Park.

Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA
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Date: 2/20/20 8:10 pm
From: Hank H <hank.heiberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Skagit County Birding

> Yesterday we returned from a two day birding trip to Skagit County with a stop in Stanwood on the way. The weather was beautiful and the birds were very co-operative. Here are some of our favorite sightings.
>
> Wiley Slough:
> Northern Waterthrush (no photo) and 2 Black Phoebes.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/49555133076/
>
> March Point near Anacortes.
> Very long scoped view of Long-tailed Ducks.
>
> Intersection of Avon Allen & Josh Wilson Roads west of Burlington:
> Golden Eagle.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/49559489636/
>
> Across the road from 8840 Thomle Road south of Stanwood.
> 2 Yellow-headed Blackbirds.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/49555358012/
>
> Bay View State Park.
> Hermit Thrush (missed 2 photo ops!) and a Hutton's Vireo.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/49559525656/
>
> Photo album for the trip.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/albums/72157713192404172
>
> Hank & Karen Heiberg
> Issaquah, WA
>

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Date: 2/20/20 7:30 pm
From: <merdave...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Snowy Owls

Hi, I was wondering if anyone has seen a Snowy Owl near Atkins Lake this
week? Thanks, Meredith Spencer, Bridgeport

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Date: 2/20/20 6:22 pm
From: Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course monthly bird walk - 02-20-2020
Tweeters,

It was a gorgeous day for a walk around the frosty JBLM Eagles Pride Golf Course - 26degF start to 47degF finish. The major highlight for the nine of us was seeing two RED-TAILED HAWKS carrying nesting material to the established nest at Hodge Lake. (Two young fledged from this nest last year.) In addition, we saw ducks at three different water sites on the course. In addition to the birds, we spotted 12 black-tailed deer (in groups of 4-5-3); one raccoon; and one Douglas squirrel.



Of note for this this week: A JBLM employee showed us a photo of an owl that had been found recently on the ground near the maintenance shed. Rather than the Great Horned Owl we were expecting to see, it was a Barred Owl. Only one Barred Owl has been seen on the JBLM bird walks since 2013, so this might be a species for which we should be on the alert.



The JBLM Eagles Pride GC birders meet the third Thursday of each month at 8:00AM. Starting point is Bldg # 1514, Driving Range Tee, Eagles Pride Golf Course, I-5 Exit 116, Mounts Road Exit. Upcoming walks include the following:

* March 19

* April 16

* May 21

Anyone is welcome to join us!



From the eBird report:

32 species (+1 other taxa)



Canada Goose 4 On ground near the maintenance pond.

American Wigeon 5 Hodge Lake

Mallard 8 Hodge Lake and Maintenance Pond

Ring-necked Duck 9 Pond at 9th hole green and Hodge Lake

Bufflehead 12 Pond at 9th hole green; Hodge Lake; and Maintenance Pond

Anna's Hummingbird 5

Red-tailed Hawk 2 Two adult birds carrying nesting material to established nest at Hodge Lake.

Downy Woodpecker 1

Pileated Woodpecker 1

Northern Flicker 3

Hutton's Vireo 3

Steller's Jay 16

California Scrub-Jay 2

American/Northwestern Crow 12

Black-capped Chickadee 12

Chestnut-backed Chickadee 5

Bushtit 10

Golden-crowned Kinglet 10

Ruby-crowned Kinglet 10 All feeding together in one loose flock near 13th tee.

Red-breasted Nuthatch 5

Brown Creeper 1

Pacific Wren 8

Bewick's Wren 1

European Starling 4

Varied Thrush 1

American Robin 35

House Finch 7

Fox Sparrow 1

Dark-eyed Junco 16

Golden-crowned Sparrow 1

Song Sparrow 13

Spotted Towhee 4

Red-winged Blackbird 20 Maintenance Pond, then flying north in one flock



View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S64803472

May all your birds be identified,

Denis DeSilvis
avnacrs 4 birds at outlook dot com


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Date: 2/20/20 5:18 pm
From: AMK17 <amk17...>
Subject: [Tweeters] EBird update
Any comments on the eBird ap update? I am not impressed and it makes using the ap an unfriendly annoying experience. Is there away to restore the old ap as an option? Does anyone know?

Thanks
AKopitov
Seattle

AMK17
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Date: 2/20/20 4:55 pm
From: <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2020-02-20
Tweets – it was a frosty 29 degrees to start the walk, but it warmed due to no wind and bright sunshine. It feels unfamiliar to even type “sun”. Pretty birdy at times too. The water has mostly receded, though the southern end of the off-leash Dog Area is still closed. But we were able to get to the boardwalk from the east end. The boardwalk had only a little water over one section (2”), but had a fair amount of debris left from the flooding. Luckily, while much of it was actually floating for about a week, it managed to settle relatively level.

Highlights:
a.. Cackling Goose – probably 2000 total, with many landing on the grass soccer fields
b.. American Wigeon – still a half-dozen in the slough; the remaining interior ponds were iced over
c.. Common Merganser – 1 or 2 female-type
d.. Green Heron – one at the Rowing Club
e.. Cooper’s Hawk – several sightings, at least 2 birds
f.. Barn Owl – distant views from the Viewing Mound
g.. Short-eared/Long-eared Owl – since we’ve had sightings of both species this year already, I can’t presume the species from the brief views we had from the Viewing Mound
h.. Hairy Woodpecker – male at Rowing Club
i.. Northern Shrike – juvenile in East Meadow
j.. House Finch – Three flyovers – probably at least 4 birds! Shocking that that’s shocking
k.. Pine Siskin – small flock(s), making for a 2-finch day!
l.. Western Meadowlark – 7-10 in the East Meadow, with singing heard
m.. TOWNSEND’S WARBLER – one flycatching NE of the Clise Mansion (over the Art Barn). First of Year
We also saw American Beaver predawn, and a dead possum in the Dog Meadow. At the Rowing Club, we had our first RED-EARED SLIDER of the year (first turtle of any kind).

Misses today included Ring-necked Duck, Hooded Merganser, and Purple Finch.

For the day, 57 species.

= Michael Hobbs
= www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
= <BirdMarymoor...>
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Date: 2/20/20 3:54 pm
From: Richard Walker <RichardAWalker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Black Ducks?
Sorry for the second post, just read the guidelines about including location and email.
Richard Walker
richardawalker at outlook dot com
Olympia WA


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Date: 2/20/20 3:45 pm
From: Richard Walker <RichardAWalker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Black Ducks?
Hello,
Newby here, both on this site and to the world of birding.
Today (2/20/20) my wife and I visited Fort Borst Park in Centralia.
Among the 75 gulls, and about 30 Mallards was a pair of all nearly black ducks.
Their bills were yellow/orange like a Mallard, although not as bright.
When I got a closer look at one of them in direct sunlight, I could see a slight greenish hue to the head, and some slight colors in its wing feather. The other stayed in the shadow of a small bush for the most part, but had the same slight colors to the parts of the wings in the sunlight. Feet were orange-ish, not as bright as the Mallards.
The closest I could find on line is Cayuga Ducks, a domesticated duck.
I did get several good photos but no idea if its possible or how to upload photos here.
Any help?
Thanks,
Richard Walker





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Date: 2/20/20 3:06 pm
From: David Heath <drheath82...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
I was particularly struck by Connie's description of the Accentor taking
flight. Serendipitously, I just happened to catch exactly such a moment
the day I went to gawk at the bird. For those who haven't seen it on
OBOL, here's the link:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/drheath/49511867993/in/album-72157623929659272/

David
Portland


> And it was. Dark face mask, buffy supercilium, tawny breast, warbler-like bill, plumped-up body, a bird bearing the whiff of Siberian birch and conifer forests. It paused in the tangle of apple branches, then hopped up to the top of the T, just as it has always done. There it surveyed the landscape, taking its time, giving us all fantastic looks, long enough for three people to share my scope. I think our smiles must have brightened the sky itself. Then it spread its wings, pushed off with its tiny feet, and blasted away at great speed into dense vegetation. Oh, oh.
>
> Sometimes chases are the sublimest form of happiness. - Connie, Seattle
>
> <constancesidles...><mailto:<constancesidles...>
>
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Date: 2/20/20 10:55 am
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually NWR Wednesday Walk on 2/19/2020
Dear Tweets,

we had great weather yesterday for our Wednesday Walk with sunny skies and
temperatures in the 30's to 50's degrees Fahrenheit. There was a Low
7.83ft Tide at 9:35am and a High 12.14ft Tide at 1:51pm. Highlights
included good numbers and singing HUTTON'S VIREO, re-found and showy
RED-SHOULDERED HAWK, nesting BALD EAGLEs, transient TREE SWALLOWs, high
count LEAST SANDPIPER with WESTERN SANDPIPER in the mix, and GREAT HORNED
OWL.

Starting out at the Visitor Center Pond Overlook at 8am, we had nice looks
of RING-NECKED DUCK, GADWALL, BUFFLEHEAD, and HOODED MERGANSER.

The Orchard was fairly active with good sightings of BLACK-CAPPED
CHICKADEE, BROWN CREEPER, RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET, and
DOWNY WOODPECKER. There were several HUTTON'S VIREOS singing in the area
and we got good looks of at least three individuals, one perched and
preened and provided great observation for 5 minutes. Other species seen
included GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW.

The flooded fields along the Access Road south and west were great for
CACKLING GEESE, NORTHERN SHOVELER, NORTHERN PINTAIL, AMERICAN WIGEON,
GREEN-WINGED TEAL, MALLARD and AMERICAN COOT. Eric re-found our
RED-SHOULDERED HAWK in the tree line along the restricted central access
road in between the old McAllister Creek Road and the Twin Barns. The hawk
was observed perched, hunting and flying providing great looks at
approximately 1/8th mile distance. Since seeing this bird in December,
it's plumage has changed and looks much more adult with red-brown coverts
over the carpi giving a "red-shouldered" appearance. As well, the barring
on the tail and wings is more contrasted than previously seen. As the bird
flew from the hunting grounds to the stand southeast of the access road,
the white translucent crescents of the primaries were prominent and flashy,
helping to demonstrate the more rapid and shallower wing beat of this small
buteo in contrast to the many Red-tailed Hawk at the Refuge. I suspect
that with the warmer weather, the Garter Snakes are sun bathing adjacent to
all our access roads and dikes, providing a improved source of prey for the
Red-shouldered Hawk, in contrast to the very cold and wet weather of late
December, January and early February, were this individual might need to
hunt elsewhere...

The Twin Barns Loop Trail was good for PIED-BILLED GREBE, SPOTTED TOWHEE,
PACIFIC WREN, MARSH WREN and DOWNY WOODPECKER. Its been a couple weeks
since we have seen any Sora or Virginia Rail south of the cut-off to the
Twin Barns.

The Twin Barns Overlook has had some recent work with pressure washing and
the removal of some Alder Trees north across the slough. This allows for
improved visibility onto the surge plain and much better traction for
walking. We had great looks of SONG SPARROW, FOX SPARROW, and additional
Northern Pintail, Green Winged Teal, Northern Shoveler, American Wigeon and
American Coot. We have not been able to relocate the Eurasian Green-winged
Teal seen a few weeks ago.

Out on the new dike or Nisqually Estuary Trail, a pair of BALD EAGLES from
the south nest sites along McAllister Creek are building a new nest in a
tall Cottonwood along the Nisqually River northeast of the surge plain.
Without leaves, the looks are golden right now, as the pair bonds and
steadfastly reinforces their new "chosen" nest site. Depending on the
tides, best observed between 9ft to 12ft, the surge plain is great for
GREATER YELLOWLEGS, DUNLIN, RING-BILLED GULL, MEW GULL, GREEN-WINGED TEAL,
AMERICAN WIGEON, GADWALL and NORTHERN SHOVELER. In general, the Norther
Shoveler and Northern Pintail tend to prefer the fresh water flooded fields
over the estuary, but depending on the water level, good numbers of
shovelers can be seen in the surge plain and pintail are seen in the
flooded mudflats west of Leschi Slough. Green winged Teal and American
Wigeon prefer the tidally influenced areas and number vary depending on the
tides. In general, as birds begin to migrate, we might be seeing the
beginning in decline of our winter resident numbers as they take flight
north. We also had great looks at NORTHERN HARRIER, WESTERN MEADOWLARK x
2, and approximately 4 TREE SWALLOWS flew overhead. A lot of MARSH WREN
are very active in the fresh water marsh, as well RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD. We
may have seen a LINCOLN'S SPARROW along the outside of the dike as we
walked along.

The Nisqually Estuary Boardwalk Trail is also having work done. As many of
you already know, our new longer bridge (from 45ft to 140ft) is in place
over the tributary channel from the mud flats to Shannon Slough. As well,
the photo blind is gone and replaced by an observation deck, to prevent
misuse of this space. From the boards, we had very nice looks of COMMON
GOLDENEYE, BUFFLEHEAD, SURF SCOTER, DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT, RED-BREASTED
MERGANSER, COMMON MERGANSER, HOODED MERGANSER and BELTED KINGFISHER. The
incoming high tide of 12ft at 1:50pm, while we walked 12p-2p, was perfect
for counting and evaluating high counts of LEAST SANDPIPER approximately
400. From the Observation Tower at the start, to the Puget Sound Viewing
Platform at the terminus, Least Sandpipers were everywhere at the waters
edge. Motivated to find something rare, we picked out 5 WESTERN SANDPIPERs
and 1 DUNLIN in the mix. I suspect this high count is reflective of early
migrants arriving at the Refuge, but I don't know... From the Puget Sound
Viewing Platform we observed good numbers of BLACK BRANT, BRANDT'S
CORMORANT, COMMON LOON, RED-THROATED LOON, HORNED GREBE, GREATER SCAUP,
GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL, "OLYMPIC" GULL, and many GREAT BLUE HERONS.

On our return, we picked up GREAT HORNED OWL in a large Y shaped Cottonwood
Tree on the inside of the Twin Barns Loop Trail, east side, across from the
"beaver deceiver dam". Only one adult has been seen with no evidence of
young this year, yet...

We observed 66 species and have 91 species for the year. Early spring is
in the air with the arrival of Tree Swallows and singing Hutton's Vireos.
Mammals seen include Eastern Gray Squirrel, and Harbor Seal. Several
Garter Snakes were observed and frogs were croaking.

Until next Wednesday when we will do it all over again, happy birding!

Shep and the Wednesday Walk

--
Shep Thorp
Browns Point
253-370-3742

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Date: 2/20/20 10:50 am
From: Brian Zinke <zinke.pilchuck...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Birding By Ear Class
Greetings all!

Pilchuck Audubon Society is hosting a Birding By Ear class in Everett, WA
on April 21 & 28 (2-part lecture) with an optional field trip on April 26.

For more information on the class and how to register, please use the links
below:

Pilchuck Audubon website:
https://www.pilchuckaudubon.org/classes

Pilchuck Audubon Facebook event:
https://www.facebook.com/events/227250051770973/

Thanks,

Brian Zinke
Everett, WA
<zinke.pilchuck...>

--
Brian Zinke
Executive Director
Pilchuck Audubon Society
<director...>
www.pilchuckaudubon.org
c: (425) 232-6811

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Date: 2/20/20 8:11 am
From: Teri Martine <terimartine...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Seattle Audubon Master Birder info meeting
Dear birders. If you’re interested in Seattle Audubon’s Master Birder class taught by Dennis Paulson, a one-hour information meeting is coming up this Monday, Feb. 24, 7 p.m. at the Wedgwood Presbyterian Church, 8008 35th NE, at the south end of Seattle Audubon’s block but enter from the cross street, NE 80th. Details about the Master Birder program are on the Seattle Audubon website at https://www.seattleaudubon.org/sas/About/EnvironmentalEducation/MasterBirderProgram.aspx Be sure to read the sidebar at the right side of the webpage for upcoming dates, including the March 7 application deadline.The information meeting is an opportunity to learn more about this exceptional program and what it involves. Cheers and good birding,
Teri Martine
Seattle Audubon volunteer
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Date: 2/20/20 5:43 am
From: Vicki Biltz <vickibiltz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Goose Island and drive between heading to Alamo Inn
Hi Tweets, Susan and I Started from San Antonio to The Goose Island State
Park area, and then to Alamo Inn on Monday, Feb 17th.
Birds
Great Tailed Grackles, whose counting?
Black Vultures
Turkey Vultures
Red Tail Hawks
White Tailed Hawk
Harris Hawks
Sandhill Cranes 6 or more
Whooping Cranes 8 total
American White Pelicans
Brown Pelicans 2
Curlews 4-5
Greater Yellowlegs 2
Vermillion Flycatcher. 1
Roseate Spoinbills. 30 one location
Yellow Crowned Night Heron juvenile 1
Snowy Egrets a lot
Great Egrets 20 +
Killdeer several pairs
Spotted Sandpiper 1 juvenile
Anhinga 3
Red Headed Ducks. 50+
Blue Winged Teals 30 total
Gadwalls.
Northern Shovelers
Mallard. 1 pair
Pie Billed Grebe 3
American Coots. Large rafts
Ruby Crowned Kinglet 3
Black Crested titmouse. 5 +
Northern cardinals 7+
Great Kiskadee 8-10
Couches Kingbird 1
Eastern Bluebird, 1 pair
Yellow Rumps 10+
Crested Caracaras
Ospreys
Ladder Backed Woodpeckers 1 pair
Laughing Gulls numerous
Herring Gull 1
Eastern phoebe
Mockingbirds many!!!
Brown Headed Cowbirds 6
This was in the little town before you enter the park.
The following day we were accompanied by Mary Beth as our guide and that
list should be on my E-Bird.
That would be the 18.
Yesterday the 19, highlights were
Red Crowned Parrot 5 Valley Nature center
Butterfly Museum was recorded on my EBird as well, 3Audubon orioles being
the highlight, as well as McCalls Eastern Screech Owl.
White Tailed Kite
On the way out of Butterfly Museum

The rest of the day was chilly and damp. Not as much bird activity.
Today it’s rainy so far, so we’re getting a later start. only my cameras
have raincoats
Vicki Biltz
Buckley Wa 97321

Currently We (Susan Davison and I) are at Alamo Inn.
Happy birding





--



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http://www.flickr.com/photos/saw-whets_new/

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Date: 2/19/20 2:58 pm
From: Faye McAdams Hands <zest4parus...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor yesterday
Thank you Connie!
As always, I could see and enjoy every word!

Happy Birding,
Faye


Faye McAdams Hands

Life is Simple -- Eat, Sleep, Bird.

________________________________
From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> on behalf of Constance Sidles <constancesidles...>
Sent: Tuesday, February 18, 2020 8:00 AM
To: Tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor yesterday

Hey tweets, John and I made our second (and successful) try for the Siberian Accentor early yesterday morning, leaving Seattle at 3:15 a.m. to be sure to arrive before 7:00, when the bird was reliably reported to pop out of hiding on the car side of the road, leap into the apple tree of the poor guy who owns it, perch at the top of a t-shaped branch for a few minutes, then rocket off to other bushes, trees, and stumps, where it would appear briefly to tanatalize birders for the rest of the day.

Our first attempt happened on Saturday, when I led a small group of Birds in Flight intermediate birders on a field trip to Nisqually to study flapping patterns of waterfowl and raptors. Not finding many such flappers on site - a local birder told us the fields have become so flooded that grazing waterfowl have departed for parts unknown, followed by the raptors - we debated about what to do. One student decided to join another group of birders and explore Nisqually, but our car decided to drive over to Woodland Bottoms to find the accentor. Half of us had never chased a bird before; the other half had done so only too many times but didn't want to discourage the newbies by telling the many times we had chased, only to be told:
you should have been here 10 minutes ago;
the bird you want to find is nothing more than an escapee;
the bird is right over there in that tree (one of thousands), you know, the tree with all those branches - can't you see it? Oops, there it goes.

We arrived in a driving rainstorm and joined a group of rather forlorn birders who had missed the bird by 3 minutes, 10 minutes, an hour - the times varied but the facial expressions did not. As we slowly got soaked and cold, a tiny bird way off in a willow tree hopped out briefly among a troop of juncos, then dove back into the brush. I thought it might be the accentor, but my glasses were foggy, my scope was drippy, the light was bad, and the distance was great. Humph.

We waited around for another hour, then climbed back into the car to head for home. "So, that was a chase," remarked one of our passengers. "Now I can say I've been on my first chase. It will also be my last chase."

It takes a special kind of birder to appreciate a rarity chase. For one thing, you have to accept that some chases, even many chases, will end up in disappointment. No bird. And even when you see the bird, the experience is somewhat lacking: you aren't seeing the bird in its accustomed habitat, so you get no sense of how it really lives. You don't understand its being, and for me anyway, this diminishes the sense of connection to the wild that I value so much. If you're a chaser, you're probably also a lister, meaning, you find it fun to tick off new birds on your life list. For dedicated listers, this is enough.

I am a lister. I have always been a lister. I suppressed my list lust for two decades, as I became more and more attached to Montlake Fill and to the birds who come here. In the process, I grew to feel deeply connected to a place. I belong to the Fill. It is my spiritual home. It is where I learn about human nature as well as wild nature. It inspires my writing. The birds here lift me out of my material existence to a plane of pure beauty and joy. But I still love to list.

I've asked myself why this is so. The best answer I can give is, finding new species comforts me when I worry about the impact we humans are having on nature. We are destroying so much that took nature millions of years to create. What sadness, regret, guilt. I yearn to travel back in time to see wonders that no longer exist. Yet the world is still filled with diversity. Life is abundant, resilient. There is hope.

These thoughts ran through my mind as we drove in the dark yesterday. The fat crescent of the moon spilled golden light across the sky, lighting our way. When we reached Stenerson Road, no one stirred. We had arrived a full hour before first light. The night was quiet, with only the occasional train whistle sending lonely cries into the dark. We huddled in the car and tried to sleep, but we were too keyed up. What lay ahead, we did not know: the day could produce a radiant smile on my face, or the little brave smile I paste over my disappointment so the other birders think I am a serious adult.

As the sky began to pale, more birders showed up, until there were nine cars lined up behind us. Then the first note of the dawn chorus sounded, and I sprang out of the car, set up my camp stool and scope, and awaited developments. The light slowly grew brighter, and the fog that clung to the fields drifted over toward us, veiling the grasses and low bushes. A pair of Sandhill Cranes passed overhead, misty swirls of gray parting the fog briefly before disappearing. The sky turned pink, and small birds began to arrive in the apple tree - juncos, a robin, a Song Sparrow, then, "It's him!" cried one of birders.

And it was. Dark face mask, buffy supercilium, tawny breast, warbler-like bill, plumped-up body, a bird bearing the whiff of Siberian birch and conifer forests. It paused in the tangle of apple branches, then hopped up to the top of the T, just as it has always done. There it surveyed the landscape, taking its time, giving us all fantastic looks, long enough for three people to share my scope. I think our smiles must have brightened the sky itself. Then it spread its wings, pushed off with its tiny feet, and blasted away at great speed into dense vegetation. Oh, oh.

Sometimes chases are the sublimest form of happiness. - Connie, Seattle

<constancesidles...><mailto:<constancesidles...>
<csidles...><mailto:<csidles...>


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Date: 2/19/20 1:06 pm
From: Anna <amk17...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Nesting activity
About 4 weeks ago, juncos were gathering nesting material from the yard. Today, a pair if Bewick’s wrens we’re cautiously constructing a nest in an old kitchen vent that I thought wAs closed enough for house sparrows. But the industrious wrens managed to find just enough room to squeeze in. Amusing wAtching them try to enter with small twigs but they manage!

Happy birding.

AKopitov
Seattle

Sent from my iPhone with all the auto correct quirks.
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Date: 2/18/20 8:50 pm
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Program in Tacoma - Birding in the Disunited States of America
After an unexpected change in plans of the original speaker, I will be giving a Presentation to Tacoma's ABC Group tomorrow (Wednesday February 18).  The Program starts at 6:45 p.m. at the UPlace Library. The address is 3609 Market Place W, Suite 100, University Place, WA.
The program is "50/50/50:  A Passionate Birding Adventure" and is an account and reflection of my search for diversity and commonality as I looked for 50 species on single days in each of the 50 states in the company of local birders.  Everyone is welcome.
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Date: 2/18/20 6:59 pm
From: Vicki King <vkbirder...>
Subject: [Tweeters] RFI: Birding Tulalip Bay
If anyone has birded Tulalip Bay, I would appreciate any information you
can share about what birding there is like.

Thank you,
Vicki King,

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Date: 2/18/20 4:10 pm
From: Diane Weinstein <diane_weinstein...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Town Hall Seattle - Pacific Flyway Wed. 2/19
I just learned of the Pacific Flyway Town Hall Seattle event tomorrow evening. It looks like it will be an interesting and informative program.

Diane Weinstein
Sammamish

https://townhallseattle.org/event/pacific-flyway/
[https://122g2g321ipu7384u15dtr81-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/event-image-audrey-delella-benedict.jpg]<https://townhallseattle.org/event/pacific-flyway/>
Pacific Flyway (2/19) Town Hall Seattle<https://townhallseattle.org/event/pacific-flyway/>
Located in the Forum, The OTTO Bar is a great spot to meet with friends before an event or keep the conversation going afterward. You can purchase beer, wine, and non-alcoholic beverages or bring in your own snacks and non-alcoholic drinks to enjoy.
townhallseattle.org


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Date: 2/18/20 10:03 am
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp...>
Subject: [Tweeters] WOS Winter Trip 2/15-2/17 to Okanogan Highlands and Waterville Plateau
Hi Tweets!

quick update on another super fun Washington Ornithological Society Winter
Trip to Okanogan Highlands and Waterville Plateau Saturday February 15th
through Monday February 17th. Highlights included CHUKAR, GOLDEN EAGLE,
ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK, NORTHERN PYGMY-OWL, SNOW BUNTING, GRAY-CROWNED ROSY
FINCH, NORTHERN-SAW-WHET OWL and SNOWY OWL. Misses... for the first time
in the last 10 years we observed NO Sharp-tailed Grouse, and could not
locate Gray Partridge despite extra efforts.

Scott Ramos and I led 19 members of WOS on this annual trip, and really
enjoyed our time in this wonderful region of our great state, the birding
was great and the collaboration and camaraderie was even more rewarding.
Thanks to all the participants for their energy and dedication.

Sat. 2/15: CHUKAR and GOLDEN EAGLE at *Fancher Road* off the
*Tonasket-Havillah
Road*. There are two eagle nests, same breeding pair, on the south east
face of the butte, great photos in morning light. Prairie Falcon was seen
by another group over the weekend. *Siwash Creek Road* was good for PYGMY
NUTHATCH, WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH, CLARKS NUTCRACKER, and low numbers of
RED-CROSSBILL. We observed three NORTHERN-PYGMY OWL on *Havillah
Road*, *Highland
SnoPark*, and *Hungry-Hollow Road*. 400+ SNOW BUNTING seen on *Nealy
Road* around
the first homestead after the turn off from *Havillah Road*, *WARNING- *owner
of homestead is disgruntled with birders stopping adjacent to home and
using optics- recommend stopping before or after the homestead. 200+ SNOW
BUNTING and MERLIN on *Teas Road*. 10+ AMERICAN TREE SPARROW in draw south
of *Chesaw Road* in between *Old Burnham Road* and *This A Way Road*.
On *Davies
Road,* in between *Fields Road *and *Brugh Road,* we observed a fly over of
100 GRAY-CROWNED ROSY-FINCH. Fantastic looks at ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK in all
locations. Despite historical reports, we dipped on Gray Partridge,
Townsends Solitaire, Bohemian Waxwing, and Pine Grosbeak. I've not seen
Sharp-tailed Grouse on Siwash Creek Road this year.

Sun. 2/16: 50+ TURKEYS and 2 NORTHERN PYGMY-OWL in *Conconully*.We located
a 150+ flock of GRAY-CROWNED ROSY-FINCH at the cattle paddock/pasture
across the road from Hess Lake Road. These birds were perched, flying
around, and foraging from the Beech Trees to the pasture, to the gulches on
the slope just west of Hess Lake north of *Conconully Road* - good photos.
Great looks at ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK, RED-TAILED HAWK, and NORTHERN HARRIER.
We dipped on Red Crossbills, California Quail, and Pine Grosbeaks in
Conconully and could not find Sharp-tailed Grouse in *Scotch Creek
Wildlife* area
across from *Happy Hill Road* area (seen previously on scout trip three
weeks earlier) - another birder reported seeing 4 grouse at 3pm. The north
side of *Cameron Lake Road* had two RED CROSSBILLS, the only Crossbills
seen on the entire trip. *Washburn Island* was good for CASSIN'S FINCH,
PURPLE FINCH, WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW, WESTERN MEADOWLARK and water
fowl. *Bridgeport
State Park* was good for two GREAT HORNED OWL and two NORTHERN SAW-WHET
OWL. Many passerines including YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER.

Mon. 2/17: 2 SNOWY OWLS around *Atkins Lake*, 4 AMERICAN TREE SPARROW and
NORTHERN SHRIKE at the abandoned farm on *Heritage Road just south of 172*.
Many ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK, RED-TAILED HAWK, and AMERICAN KESTREL on the
plateau, but the HORNED LARK are difficult to observe because there is NO
snow on *Waterville Plateau*. A single HARLANS HAWK was seen on *O Road
north of Waterville*. We also saw GREAT HORNED OWL. We dipped on
Sharp-tailed Grouse on Bridgeport Hill (which were seen on the scout trip
three weeks earlier). We could not relocate the 5 LONG-EARED OWL we
observed at the *Lamoine Windbreak* on 2/14 as I accidentally flushed them
by being too invasive in my search. Please consider birding the windbreak
with a birding buddy from either side of the tree line instead of walking
down the middle to prevent disruption of roosting birds (silence is
golden!). Despite three reports of Gyrfalcon in the northern plateau, we
were not able to relocate this sought after species. We also dipped on
Gray Partridge and Prairie Falcon (seen on scout three weeks earlier).

On 2/14 there were reports of 7 Snowy Owl around Atkins Lake, on 2/16 there
were reports of 4 birds, on 2/17 I could only find 2 birds. No snow and
warm and sunny conditions...

That's the quick report! I hope you have a chance to get out there and
enjoy Waterville Plateau and Okanogan Highlands this winter. Be careful,
drive safely, birding buddy up!

Happy birding,

Shep Thorp and the WOS Winter Trip
--
Shep Thorp
Browns Point
253-370-3742

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Date: 2/18/20 8:54 am
From: Brian Zinke <zinke.pilchuck...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Birding 101 Class (kid & adult friendly)
Greetings all!

Pilchuck Audubon Society is hosting a Birding 101 class in Edmonds, WA on
March 21 with a short field trip as the latter portion of the class. This a
kid friendly class (ages 8 and up), so please pass this along to any
friends and family who may be new to birding or interested in learning more.

For more information on the class and how to register, please use the links
below:

Pilchuck Audubon website:
https://www.pilchuckaudubon.org/classes

Pilchuck Audubon Facebook event:
https://www.facebook.com/events/1079632772413546/
Thanks,

Brian Zinke
Everett, WA
<zinke.pilchuck...>

--
Brian Zinke
Executive Director
Pilchuck Audubon Society
<director...>
www.pilchuckaudubon.org
c: (425) 232-6811

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Date: 2/18/20 8:30 am
From: byers345 <byers345...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
Hi Tweeters. The Siberian Accentor showed up at about 8:00 am in a tree at the corner of the fenced lot to the northeast of where we were standing at the end of Stenerson road.  Charlotte  Byers, EdmondsSent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone_______________________________________________
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Date: 2/18/20 8:03 am
From: Constance Sidles <constancesidles...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor yesterday
Hey tweets, John and I made our second (and successful) try for the Siberian Accentor early yesterday morning, leaving Seattle at 3:15 a.m. to be sure to arrive before 7:00, when the bird was reliably reported to pop out of hiding on the car side of the road, leap into the apple tree of the poor guy who owns it, perch at the top of a t-shaped branch for a few minutes, then rocket off to other bushes, trees, and stumps, where it would appear briefly to tanatalize birders for the rest of the day.

Our first attempt happened on Saturday, when I led a small group of Birds in Flight intermediate birders on a field trip to Nisqually to study flapping patterns of waterfowl and raptors. Not finding many such flappers on site - a local birder told us the fields have become so flooded that grazing waterfowl have departed for parts unknown, followed by the raptors - we debated about what to do. One student decided to join another group of birders and explore Nisqually, but our car decided to drive over to Woodland Bottoms to find the accentor. Half of us had never chased a bird before; the other half had done so only too many times but didn't want to discourage the newbies by telling the many times we had chased, only to be told:
• you should have been here 10 minutes ago;
• the bird you want to find is nothing more than an escapee;
• the bird is right over there in that tree (one of thousands), you know, the tree with all those branches - can't you see it? Oops, there it goes.

We arrived in a driving rainstorm and joined a group of rather forlorn birders who had missed the bird by 3 minutes, 10 minutes, an hour - the times varied but the facial expressions did not. As we slowly got soaked and cold, a tiny bird way off in a willow tree hopped out briefly among a troop of juncos, then dove back into the brush. I thought it might be the accentor, but my glasses were foggy, my scope was drippy, the light was bad, and the distance was great. Humph.

We waited around for another hour, then climbed back into the car to head for home. "So, that was a chase," remarked one of our passengers. "Now I can say I've been on my first chase. It will also be my last chase."

It takes a special kind of birder to appreciate a rarity chase. For one thing, you have to accept that some chases, even many chases, will end up in disappointment. No bird. And even when you see the bird, the experience is somewhat lacking: you aren't seeing the bird in its accustomed habitat, so you get no sense of how it really lives. You don't understand its being, and for me anyway, this diminishes the sense of connection to the wild that I value so much. If you're a chaser, you're probably also a lister, meaning, you find it fun to tick off new birds on your life list. For dedicated listers, this is enough.

I am a lister. I have always been a lister. I suppressed my list lust for two decades, as I became more and more attached to Montlake Fill and to the birds who come here. In the process, I grew to feel deeply connected to a place. I belong to the Fill. It is my spiritual home. It is where I learn about human nature as well as wild nature. It inspires my writing. The birds here lift me out of my material existence to a plane of pure beauty and joy. But I still love to list.

I've asked myself why this is so. The best answer I can give is, finding new species comforts me when I worry about the impact we humans are having on nature. We are destroying so much that took nature millions of years to create. What sadness, regret, guilt. I yearn to travel back in time to see wonders that no longer exist. Yet the world is still filled with diversity. Life is abundant, resilient. There is hope.

These thoughts ran through my mind as we drove in the dark yesterday. The fat crescent of the moon spilled golden light across the sky, lighting our way. When we reached Stenerson Road, no one stirred. We had arrived a full hour before first light. The night was quiet, with only the occasional train whistle sending lonely cries into the dark. We huddled in the car and tried to sleep, but we were too keyed up. What lay ahead, we did not know: the day could produce a radiant smile on my face, or the little brave smile I paste over my disappointment so the other birders think I am a serious adult.

As the sky began to pale, more birders showed up, until there were nine cars lined up behind us. Then the first note of the dawn chorus sounded, and I sprang out of the car, set up my camp stool and scope, and awaited developments. The light slowly grew brighter, and the fog that clung to the fields drifted over toward us, veiling the grasses and low bushes. A pair of Sandhill Cranes passed overhead, misty swirls of gray parting the fog briefly before disappearing. The sky turned pink, and small birds began to arrive in the apple tree - juncos, a robin, a Song Sparrow, then, "It's him!" cried one of birders.

And it was. Dark face mask, buffy supercilium, tawny breast, warbler-like bill, plumped-up body, a bird bearing the whiff of Siberian birch and conifer forests. It paused in the tangle of apple branches, then hopped up to the top of the T, just as it has always done. There it surveyed the landscape, taking its time, giving us all fantastic looks, long enough for three people to share my scope. I think our smiles must have brightened the sky itself. Then it spread its wings, pushed off with its tiny feet, and blasted away at great speed into dense vegetation. Oh, oh.

Sometimes chases are the sublimest form of happiness. - Connie, Seattle

<constancesidles...> <mailto:<constancesidles...>
<csidles...> <mailto:<csidles...>


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Date: 2/17/20 10:07 pm
From: Ian Young <ianyoung...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Trip advice sought for Puerto Vallarta
Hey Tweets,
My wife and I are planning a trip to Puerta Vallarta, Mexico and I am looking for suggestions of birding places to visit and places to avoid. We will have a car. Please let me know of any suggestions you have by replying to my email. I will tally all results and post them with my trip report.
Thanks in advance,
Ian Young

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Date: 2/17/20 9:57 pm
From: Megan Lyden <meganlyden...>
Subject: [Tweeters] thanks Will and Louise for directions re: Siberian Accentor
Thanks, Will Clemons and Louise Rutter, for such good road directions to the "Accentor" spot...and thanks for details about the bird's movements, Louise....it was a big help! Of course we knew we were in the right spot when we saw the 30+ birders...that's always reassuring! Got three good looks at the bird around 11:20 today, in "the apple tree" next to the road and in the trees across the street from the house. Fantastic! Thanks, everyone!

Megan Lyden
Bellevue, WA

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Date: 2/17/20 8:39 pm
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fir Island Gyrfalcon, etc
Dear Tweeters,
Today (17 February 2020), Stefan Schlick, April Brown and I birded various spots on Fir Island. Some time around four in the afternoon, Stefan and I had pretty good looks at a Gyrfalcon. We were scanning from the Moore Road Access, and could see the Gyrfalcon flying up and down a road to the south of us, and then fly up and disappear behind a distant row of large conifers.
Before meeting up with Stefan and April, I birded Clear Lake. At the boat launch, a Swamp Sparrow was calling. This was at the same spot where one was a few weeks ago, at the boat launch.
Hutton's Vireos were singing today at both Judy Reservoir and Clear Lake Boat Launch.
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch
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Date: 2/17/20 6:38 pm
From: Patti Loesche <patti.loesche...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Zeiss customer service - excellent
My three experiences with Zeiss customer service have been terrific. Twice in the past I called technical support for minor service for my Victory SF 10x42s (worn eyecups). Both times, I reached a Zeiss rep immediately, who promptly sent replacements, the second time an upgrade.

Recently something "went bad" (technical term). Again I reached tech support (Bill Graham) right away. Bill asked if something in particular had happened to the bins but I could only claim general hard use. He advised me to send them to their Kentucky location for assessment, sent me a shipping label, and offered to ship me loaner bins as soon as they received mine.

I then remembered that Seattle Audubon is a Zeiss dealer and took my binoculars there. Melissa said they would ship to Zeiss and oversee the order, and meanwhile she loaned me a pair of Swarovski 10x42s.

Today, only a few days after Zeiss received my bins, David from Seattle Audubon forwarded me their assessment: my bins must be shipped to Germany for repair (6-12 weeks), under warranty. Again Zeiss offered me a loaner. However, wonderful Audubon is allowing me to continue to use their Swarovskis (thanks, David and Melissa!). I couldn’t be happier with the swift, super support I’ve received from both Zeiss and Sea Audubon.

Patti Loesche
Seattle


> On Feb 17, 2020, at 9:52 AM, crazydave65 <crazydave65...> wrote:
>
> I remember the first time I looked thru a disco from the old perch at sno falls. Wow! What great glass!
>
> Recently I have had to deal with zeiss customer service. Wow! Boy do they suck!
>
> Should you decide to take the plunge and throw decent bucks out for optics please be certain to include customer service in the decision making process when you make your choice. Then include a zero or negative number in the Ziess column.
>
> My own story is long and boring and I see from a quick net search it is by no means unusual. Forewarned is forarmed.
>
> Regards,
>
> T
>
>
> Crazydave 6 5 at inbox daught com
>
>
>
>
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
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Date: 2/17/20 6:38 pm
From: Robert O'Brien <baro...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Bird migration video
Neotropicsl

On Monday, February 17, 2020, Robert O'Brien <baro...> wrote:

> Just happened to see it on the evening news. Absolutely incredible. What
> species can be migrating in such numbers so early? The main near tropical
> migrants aren't for at least another month? Bob O'Brien Portland
>
> On Monday, February 17, 2020, Jennifer Jarstad <jennjarstad...>
> wrote:
>
>> Cool video of bird migration from the National Weather Service.
>>
>> https://www.tampabay.com/news/environment/2020/02/17/weather
>> -service-radar-captures-massive-bird-migration-over-key-west/
>>
>> Jennifer Jarstad
>> Seattle, WA
>>
>

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Date: 2/17/20 6:34 pm
From: Robert O'Brien <baro...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Bird migration video
Just happened to see it on the evening news. Absolutely incredible. What
species can be migrating in such numbers so early? The main near tropical
migrants aren't for at least another month? Bob O'Brien Portland

On Monday, February 17, 2020, Jennifer Jarstad <jennjarstad...>
wrote:

> Cool video of bird migration from the National Weather Service.
>
> https://www.tampabay.com/news/environment/2020/02/17/
> weather-service-radar-captures-massive-bird-migration-over-key-west/
>
> Jennifer Jarstad
> Seattle, WA
>

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Date: 2/17/20 5:25 pm
From: Jennifer Jarstad <jennjarstad...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bird migration video
Cool video of bird migration from the National Weather Service.

https://www.tampabay.com/news/environment/2020/02/17/weather-service-radar-captures-massive-bird-migration-over-key-west/

Jennifer Jarstad
Seattle, WA

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Date: 2/17/20 2:02 pm
From: J Christian Kessler <1northraven...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Zeiss post
yeah, I was wondering what that word had been before Spell Check had
uncorrected it.

Chris Kessler

On Mon, Feb 17, 2020 at 1:17 PM crazydave65 <crazydave65...> wrote:

> Diascope, not disco.
>
> Sheesh.
>
> T
>
>
>
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>
> _______________________________________________
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> <Tweeters...>
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>


--
"moderation in everything, including moderation"
Rustin Thompson

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Date: 2/17/20 1:21 pm
From: crazydave65 <crazydave65...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Zeiss post
Diascope, not disco.Sheesh.TSent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone_______________________________________________
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Date: 2/17/20 12:42 pm
From: Jim Forrester <jimf...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Zeiss customer service - the other side of the coin
It was a little surprising to read crazydave65's description of poor Zeiss customer service. That's unfortunate, as ours was top notch! My wife purchased a pair of mid-range Zeiss 8x40 binoculars in 2003 for around $800, and went on dozens of international and domestic trips with them. The optics were always excellent, but the body basically melted from bug repellent, sweat, and whatever else. We sent these binoculars to Zeiss customer service last month to see if they could repair the body. They wrote back to inform us that the binoculars could not be repaired, but, because they had a lifetime warranty, they could replace them with a new pair of Conquest HD 10x42 binoculars with full warranty at no cost to us! We received the new Conquest HDs last week, and they're excellent - not top-of-the-line, but at $1000 street price, they're more expensive than the ones we bought all those years ago.

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Date: 2/17/20 9:58 am
From: crazydave65 <crazydave65...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Zeiss customer service, an oxymoron
I remember the first time I looked thru a disco from the old perch at sno falls.  Wow!  What great glass!Recently I have had to deal with zeiss customer service.  Wow!  Boy do they suck!  Should you decide to take the plunge and throw decent bucks out for optics please be certain to include customer service in the decision making process when you make your choice.  Then include a zero or negative number in the Ziess column.My own story is long and boring and I see from a quick net search it is by no means unusual.  Forewarned is forarmed.Regards,TCrazydave 6 5 at inbox daught comSent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone_______________________________________________
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Date: 2/16/20 11:13 pm
From: Dee Dee <deedeeknit...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Swift-like bird—thoughts?
Sunday morning (16th) just after 8am, the sky was an even mix of blue and clouds with morning sun lighting up the yard, the air calm after Saturday’s blowing. I was sitting at a north-facing, 2nd story window in my home doing GBBC observations of my yard. I noticed a dark-colored bird a block or two off flying rapidly south towards the house; as it approached, my interest immediately picked up as I better saw the style of its flight. When flapping, there was the appearance that just the outer half/ends of the wings were moving almost in a blur—extremely rapidly. Not sure what it was, I grabbed my little 8x binoculars and had a good look for the moments before it disappeared over the roof and out of my view. It appeared completely dark in color the entire time; the light was good, morning sun coming in low from the east, and the bird was relatively close/low but also somewhat silhouetted against the sky. At one point it made a bit of a stall maneuver, turned a bit, glided a moment and then resumed flapping and gliding in an arcing turn that took it from a SSE heading to more of SSW. Unfortunately I was not able to get a photo.

Watching it both with and without binoculars, my first impression/thought was “oh-my-gosh it’s a Swift!” I had a clear view of it’s outline as it flew low almost directly overhead...very narrow, back-curving wings, small head relative to length...it just did not speak to me of anything else in those moments, even though seeing a swift was the last thing I was thinking of that morning. I am always on the lookout for early Spring swallows and knew that juvenile Barn Swallows were recently reported...but that is not what the bird I saw evoked. The narrow wings and flight did not seem right for that. I’ve seen swifts many times, in Europe mostly, and Vaux once up in Monroe. I grew up in a local rural setting and have seen Barn Swallows all my life, and bats in flight on numerous occasions including in good light. I can unequivocally say this was not a bat. This bird also seemed just a bit larger than a Barn Swallow.

So...having learned that Black Swifts are still supposed to be over 2500 miles south of the Puget Sound area at this time of year, I am at a loss what to think and am wondering if anybody else has had a “near-swift” experience recently, or has any thoughts to share on this situation? Given the wonky status of climate/Mother Nature in general lately, I firmly believe anything is possible, while also realizing there might be a Non-Swift explanation; I am open to input and information.

Dee Warnock
Edmonds
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Date: 2/16/20 10:06 pm
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Night Bird ID
The crows that fly in to roost nightly at the UW Bothell campus?

Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA

On Sunday, February 16, 2020, 9:08:11 PM PST, Dayna yalowicki <dlwicki...> wrote:

Over the Safeway parking lot in Bothell near the former Country Village, at about 6 p.m. there was a group of birds circling overhead loudly calling. They sounded like Seagulls.  Because of the bright lights, I unfortunately  couldn’t see them but they never stopped vocalizing. I looked all over the web, listened to bats, swifts and others but didn’t find anything that sounded the same. I’ll feel silly if it’s Seagulls but do they fly around at night and call in groups like that? If not, what were they?

Dayna Yalowicki
Bothell, Wa
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Date: 2/16/20 9:10 pm
From: Dayna yalowicki <dlwicki...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Night Bird ID
Over the Safeway parking lot in Bothell near the former Country Village, at about 6 p.m. there was a group of birds circling overhead loudly calling. They sounded like Seagulls. Because of the bright lights, I unfortunately couldn’t see them but they never stopped vocalizing. I looked all over the web, listened to bats, swifts and others but didn’t find anything that sounded the same. I’ll feel silly if it’s Seagulls but do they fly around at night and call in groups like that? If not, what were they?

Dayna Yalowicki
Bothell, Wa
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Date: 2/16/20 6:38 pm
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Skagit Eared Grebe
Dear Tweeters,
Today (16 February 2020) there was an Eared Grebe at March Point. The bird was foraging with a bunch of Horned Grebes and other birds, feeding on some slender fish that might have been Sand Launce. The flock was visible from the big, paved pullout on the Fidalgo Bay side--the one that offers a nice view of a long line of black railway oil tank cars. I can't remember the last year when I saw my first Skagit Eared Grebe before my first Western Grebe, but that's the kind of year it's been so far.
Mike Nelson got to see the Eared Grebe, and then he helped me to find a Western Sandpiper that was with a flock of Black-bellied Plover and a couple of Dunlin. This was in a muddy field a few hundred meters south of the Farmhouse Inn Restaurant, on the west side of LaConner-Whitney Road. This wintering flock is usually closer to the dwelling that is south of the restaurant, than it is to the restaurant itself, and that was the case today.
Finally, on Fir Island today, I saw an odd Mew Gull. It was exactly like all the other Mew Gulls in a big flock of them, except that the mantle was about the same color as that of an adult Ring-billed Gull. I had never seen albinism, leucism, or even dilute plumage in a Mew Gull before. This flock was about two hundred meters due north of the Game Range.
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch
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Date: 2/16/20 4:50 pm
From: Dave Slager <dave.slager...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Long-tailed Duck at Green Lake is dead
Hi Tweeters,

Thought I'd report that the male Long-tailed Duck reported to eBird
yesterday at Green Lake in Seattle is now dead.

It was looking very unhealthy when seen alive yesterday. I was able to
retrieve the carcass today thanks to a tip-off from Michael E. and will
bring it to the Burke museum on Tuesday.

Dave Slager
Seattle

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Date: 2/16/20 12:46 pm
From: Michael Eaton <meeato01...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
Hey Tweeters,

Bird was there again this morning. we saw it first at 7 a.m. on the Apple
tree near the front yard. bird wasn't seen again until somewhere between 10
to 10:15 on some larger trees in the back portion of the person's yard.
needed scope to see it at that point. Lifer for me!

Michael Eaton
Seattle, WA
<meeato01...>
3176253072

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Date: 2/16/20 12:02 pm
From: Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
HI:
The bird was reported again today 16 Feb. 2020, if anyone is still
interested.

sincerely
Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/
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Date: 2/16/20 8:05 am
From: Joyce Meyer <meyer2j...>
Subject: [Tweeters] WFO Research Grant Program
Hello Tweets:

Western Field Ornithologists is pleased to announce a new Research Grant Program to support student research and internships in the field biology of birds. Two grants of $1,500 each may be awarded in 2020. Information about criteria for applying and application form are found at: https://www.westernfieldornithologists.org/scholarship.php. The application deadline for 2020 is March 31,2020. For further information contact John Harris at <johnh...>
Joyce MeyerRedmond, <WAmeyer2j...>
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Date: 2/16/20 7:58 am
From: Joyce Meyer <meyer2j...>
Subject: [Tweeters] WFO Student Essay Contest
Hello Tweets;

Western Field Ornithologists is holding an essay contest in 2020 for grades 9 through 12. The theme of the essay contest is the impact of climate change on bird populations. The student who submits the winning essay will win a pair of either Zeiss 8X42 "Terra ED" binoculars or Nikon 8X42 "Monarch 7" binoculars.  Deadline is May 24, 2020. For details and guidelines, go to --https://www.westernfieldornithologists.org/docs/2020/WFO_2020_HS_Student_Essay_Contest.pdf
Joyce MeyerRedmond,<WAmeyer2j...>
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Date: 2/16/20 12:18 am
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] National Parks Traveler: Former Interior Officials Urge Bernhardt Not To Change Migratory Bird Act

Former Interior Officials Urge Bernhardt Not To Change Migratory Bird Act
Interior Secretary David Bernhardt is being urged by a bipartisan collection of former Interior Department officials not to alter the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

Read in National Parks Traveler: https://apple.news/A3Cjwt3EGTB6AS9U8jJj8Og


Shared from Apple News


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Date: 2/15/20 11:44 pm
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] The Oklahoman: Lesser Prairie Chicken program undergoing changes

Lesser Prairie Chicken program undergoing changes
The Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies promotes the region's outdoorsman lifestyle.

Read in The Oklahoman: https://apple.news/A5c1ExklBS7CIKxhRILn04g


Shared from Apple News


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Date: 2/15/20 11:13 pm
From: James David Greene <merlinblu...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Spotting scope for sale
I have new, still in the box, Nikon Monarch 82mm angled spotting scope for sale. I have two. Long story.This is a great scope. Wide angle 20 - 60 power eyepiece. The angled format is very comfortable to use. And it is somewhat compact for 82mm. I've got some great digiscoping shots with it.Retail is $1599 plus tax. I'm selling it for $1300.Call or text James at 206 406 1343Happy birding 
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Date: 2/15/20 10:30 pm
From: Louise Rutter <louise.rutter...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor?
The accentor covers a large-ish area in the trees and bushes around the house at the end of the road. Sometimes it may be seen a considerable distance away - the furthest trees behind the house and field definitely requiring a scope (that’s where I got my first look at it). At other times, it may turn up in a tree right by the roadside. If you need the closer look, you may have to wait longer to get it, there are no guarantees on where it will pop up at any given time.



Louise Rutter

Kirkland



From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of Michael Eaton
Sent: 15 February 2020 21:19
To: Tweeters WA <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor?



Hi Tweeters,



I'm considering driving down from Seattle tomorrow to chase the Siberian Accentor. Is the bird in a location where I'll need a spotting scope or will I be able to ID with my 10x42 binoculars? I don't own a scope and didn't want to make the drive if it was going to be impossible to see it from the road with binoculars. Thanks!


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Date: 2/15/20 9:27 pm
From: Michael Eaton <meeato01...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor?
Hi Tweeters,

I'm considering driving down from Seattle tomorrow to chase the Siberian
Accentor. Is the bird in a location where I'll need a spotting scope or
will I be able to ID with my 10x42 binoculars? I don't own a scope and
didn't want to make the drive if it was going to be impossible to see it
from the road with binoculars. Thanks!

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Date: 2/15/20 5:42 pm
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Car ‘splatometer’ tests reveal huge decline in number of insects | Environment | The Guardian

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/feb/12/car-splatometer-tests-reveal-huge-decline-number-insects


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Date: 2/15/20 2:26 pm
From: Wayne Weber <contopus...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Puget Sound Bird Festival-- is it defunct?
Brian,



Thanks very much for your response! I made a mistake in typing the URL of the website, so of course it wouldn’t open. I now have the info on the 2020 Puget Sound Bird Festival and it will be included in the BCFO listing of upcoming events.



Wayne C. Weber

Delta, BC

<contopus...>





From: Brian Zinke [mailto:<zinke.pilchuck...>]
Sent: Saturday, February 15, 2020 1:45 PM
To: Wayne Weber
Cc: TWEETERS
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Puget Sound Bird Festival-- is it defunct?



The Puget Sound Bird Fest is still alive and well! The web address is: http://www.pugetsoundbirdfest.com/. Not sure why Google lists it as closed. If you need more information I can point you to some folks who are involved with it.



Thanks for checking in on it!



Brian Zinke

Executive Director, Pilchuck Audubon Society

Snohomish, WA

<director...>







On Sat, Feb 15, 2020 at 1:12 PM Wayne Weber <contopus...> wrote:

Tweeters,



Is the Puget Sound Bird Festival, formerly held every September in Edmonds, now defunct? The website they used last year no longer exists, and Google reports the festival as being “Permanently closed”.



Because I am the person who provides a listing of bird festivals and meetings every 3 months for BC Field Ornithologists, it would be very helpful to know if this festival still exists, but has just changed its website or something like that.



Thanks to anyone who can update me on the situation.



Wayne C. Weber

Delta, BC

<contopus...>



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--

Brian Zinke

Executive Director

Pilchuck Audubon Society

<director...>

www.pilchuckaudubon.org

c: (425) 232-6811




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Date: 2/15/20 2:14 pm
From: Nancy Morrison <weedsrus1...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] entangled Grebe
I wonder if this is the same Grebe a number of us observed last summer? I
watched that bird for quite a while, and confirmed that it was able to feed
itself. I hope this is the same bird, and that it is thriving just fine.

Nancy Morrison.

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Date: 2/15/20 1:48 pm
From: Brian Zinke <zinke.pilchuck...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Puget Sound Bird Festival-- is it defunct?
The Puget Sound Bird Fest is still alive and well! The web address is:
http://www.pugetsoundbirdfest.com/. Not sure why Google lists it as closed.
If you need more information I can point you to some folks who are involved
with it.

Thanks for checking in on it!

Brian Zinke
Executive Director, Pilchuck Audubon Society
Snohomish, WA
<director...>



On Sat, Feb 15, 2020 at 1:12 PM Wayne Weber <contopus...> wrote:

> Tweeters,
>
>
>
> Is the Puget Sound Bird Festival, formerly held every September in
> Edmonds, now defunct? The website they used last year no longer exists,
> and Google reports the festival as being “Permanently closed”.
>
>
>
> Because I am the person who provides a listing of bird festivals and
> meetings every 3 months for BC Field Ornithologists, it would be very
> helpful to know if this festival still exists, but has just changed its
> website or something like that.
>
>
>
> Thanks to anyone who can update me on the situation.
>
>
>
> Wayne C. Weber
>
> Delta, BC
>
> <contopus...>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>


--
Brian Zinke
Executive Director
Pilchuck Audubon Society
<director...>
www.pilchuckaudubon.org
c: (425) 232-6811

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Date: 2/15/20 1:14 pm
From: Wayne Weber <contopus...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Puget Sound Bird Festival-- is it defunct?
Tweeters,



Is the Puget Sound Bird Festival, formerly held every September in Edmonds,
now defunct? The website they used last year no longer exists, and Google
reports the festival as being "Permanently closed".



Because I am the person who provides a listing of bird festivals and
meetings every 3 months for BC Field Ornithologists, it would be very
helpful to know if this festival still exists, but has just changed its
website or something like that.



Thanks to anyone who can update me on the situation.



Wayne C. Weber

Delta, BC

<contopus...>




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Date: 2/15/20 12:06 pm
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...>
Subject: [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Feb. 16, 2020
Hello, Tweeters!

Heard last week on BirdNote:
* Left Foot or Right? Handedness in Birds
http://bit.ly/2RSNmGZ
* Common Poorwills Can "Hibernate"
http://bit.ly/2UcBiwM
* When Does a Crossbill's Bill Cross?
http://bit.ly/31X6kho
* Charles Darwin and the White Tern
http://bit.ly/39CkaIM
* Conserving Canada's Boreal Forests
http://bit.ly/3bDAdb1
* Annual Great Backyard Bird Count
- There's still time to sign up and COUNT!
http://bit.ly/2H3iNp5
* Northern Saw-whet Owls - Common but Unknown
http://bit.ly/NGMiQn
=========================
Next week on BirdNote: Northern Mockingbird -
A Northern Bird with a Southern Accent? +
Pigeons Love Cities - A History +
cranes and herons and more!
http://bit.ly/2vyqWk0
--------------------------------------
Did you have a favorite story this week? Another comment?
Please let us know. mailto:<info...>
------------------------------------------------
BirdNote is in print. Check out BirdNote, the book:
https://www.birdnote.org/birdnote-book
There's a journal, too -- for your notes and sketches and lists:
http://bit.ly/BirdNote-journal
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
or Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/birdnoteradio/
Listen on Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find 1500+ episodes and more than 1200 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
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Date: 2/15/20 10:07 am
From: Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
HI:
The bird was reported again today, 15 Feb. 2020.

sincerely
Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/
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Date: 2/14/20 10:42 pm
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually NWR Wednesday Walk for 2/12/2020
Hi Tweets,

sorry for the delay. Approximately 25 of us had a very nice walk at the
Refuge with partly sunny skies and temperatures in the 40's to 50's degrees
Fahrenheit. There was a High 15.45 Tide at 8:05am, so we decided to do the
walk backwards heading out to the dike and Nisqually Estuary Boardwalk
Trail first to catch the falling tide. Highlights included upwards of 30
TREE SWALLOW, 1 EARED GREBE from the Puget Sound viewing platform, 3
WESTERN SANDPIPER mixed in with LEAST SANDPIPER on the Nisqually Estuary
Boardwalk Trail, and refound RED-SHOULDERED HAWK hunting where the old
McAllister Creek Road meets the new south dike that is restricted access.
We observed 67 species for the day, and have seen 90 species this year thus
far. Mammals seen Columbia Black-tailed Deer, Eastern Gray Squirrel, and
Harbor Seal. A Mink was seen last week.

Until next week when we meet again at 8am, happy birding,
Shep
see eBird list below.

--
Shep Thorp
Browns Point
253-370-3742

Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually NWR, Thurston, Washington, US
Feb 12, 2020 7:43 AM - 4:02 PM
Protocol: Traveling
8.031 mile(s)
Checklist Comments: Wednesday walk.
67 species (+8 other taxa)

Brant (Black) 45
Cackling Goose (minima) 1000
Cackling Goose (Taverner's) 40
Canada Goose (moffitti/maxima) 6
Northern Shoveler 201
Gadwall 50
Eurasian Wigeon 1
American Wigeon 500
Eurasian x American Wigeon (hybrid) 1
Mallard 200
Northern Pintail 300
Green-winged Teal 300
Greater Scaup 10
Surf Scoter 20
Bufflehead 75
Common Goldeneye 50
Hooded Merganser 8
Common Merganser 10
Red-breasted Merganser 30
Pied-billed Grebe 1
Horned Grebe 1
Eared Grebe 1
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 1
Anna's Hummingbird 1
hummingbird sp. 1
Virginia Rail 1
American Coot 40
Killdeer 1
Dunlin 1
Least Sandpiper 100
Western Sandpiper 3 Foraging on mudflat with Least Sandpiper. Black
legs, thicker bill, and white throat. Just bigger than WESA and smaller
than Dunlin. 100 feet with 60x spotting scope. Photos.
Spotted Sandpiper 2
Greater Yellowlegs 15
Mew Gull 75
Ring-billed Gull 40
Glaucous-winged Gull 2
Western x Glaucous-winged Gull (hybrid) 15
Larus sp. 50
Red-throated Loon 3
Common Loon 4
Brandt's Cormorant 6
Double-crested Cormorant 15
Great Blue Heron 20
Northern Harrier 2
Bald Eagle 15
Red-shouldered Hawk 1 Refound immature bird. Hunting unaccessible
south dike where the old McAllister Creek Rd joins dike. Barred tail, long
tail. Crescents in primary while flying. This is probably the same bird
last seen in December.
Red-tailed Hawk 3
Belted Kingfisher 2
Downy Woodpecker 2
Hairy Woodpecker 1
Northern Flicker (Red-shafted) 2
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted x Red-shafted) 1
Steller's Jay 2
American/Northwestern Crow 150
Common Raven 3
Black-capped Chickadee 10
Tree Swallow 30
Bushtit 10
Golden-crowned Kinglet 5
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 2
Brown Creeper 4
Marsh Wren 6
Bewick's Wren 5
European Starling 50
American Robin 50
Fox Sparrow 3
White-crowned Sparrow (Gambel's) 1
Golden-crowned Sparrow 15
Song Sparrow 25
Lincoln's Sparrow 1
Spotted Towhee 4
Western Meadowlark 3
Red-winged Blackbird (Red-winged) 30
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) 1
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Audubon's) 2

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S64484483

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)

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Date: 2/14/20 10:34 pm
From: Karen Stephens <1917ks...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Octopus and bald eagle
https://youtu.be/xgfkbntVI_w
Posted last November.


On Wed, Feb 12, 2020 at 6:16 PM Christina <joannabird413...> wrote:

> Hi all,
> Does anyone know if octopus have tried to eat bald eagles ?
> Christina Woodinville
> _______________________________________________
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Date: 2/14/20 11:50 am
From: Jon. Anderson and Marty Chaney <festuca...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fwd: National Invasive Species Information Center - Giant Asian Hornet
So, these aren't 'birds', although they fly and they're larger than the usual yellow jackets we're used to seeing during the summer around the State. But, they are darned near as big as some of our birds, and have the potential to wreak havoc among our native species - and I imagine getting stung by something that size has just *got* to hurt!

WSDA reported: " On Dec. 8, a resident in Blaine near the Canadian border reported an unusually large hornet they found on their property. Two days later, WSDA visited the site, collected the specimen, which was dead, and confirmed its identity a short time later. The resident also reported seeing a live giant hornet at a humming bird feeder before it retreated into a nearby forest."

I believe that we Birders owe it to our Birds and to our fellow citizens to keep an eye out for this invasive bee this year, and report any sightings to the appropriate agencies (Wash. Dept. of Agriculture in our State):
https://agr.wa.gov/departments/insects-pests-and-weeds/insects/hornets
https://wastatedeptag.blogspot.com/2019/12/pest-alert-asian-giant-hornet.html

In British Columbia, report this Nasty One to The Invasive Species Council of B.C.:

https://www2.gov.bc.ca/assets/gov/farming-natural-resources-and-industry/agriculture-and-seafood/animal-and-crops/plant-health/pest_alert_asian_hornet.pdf

Best,
Jon. A
OlyWA
https://jonsperegrination.blogspot.com/ https://jonsperegrination.blogspot.com/


From: Pendergrass, Kathy - NRCS, Portland, OR
Sent: Friday, February 14, 2020 9:56 AM
Subject: FW: National Invasive Species Information Center - What's New

Fyi…



Pest Alert: Asian Giant Hornet https://gcc02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http:%2F%2Ffeedproxy.google.com%2F~r%2Fnisic%2F~3%2F4ZyrKNq2YVw%2Fpest_alert_asian_hornet.pdf%3Futm_source%3Dfeedburner%26utm_medium%3Demail&data=02%7C01%7C%7C38fee672ea7c4d42ba2408d7b17736c4%7Ced5b36e701ee4ebc867ee03cfa0d4697%7C0%7C0%7C637172997889483825&sdata=ap5s7JWjT%2FEITzAH3T3nOLUGagh5YstTljYxLTs16%2F0%3D&reserved=0

Discovered in British Columbia
Three Asian Hornets (Vespa mandarinia) were found in the Nanaimo area on Vancouver Island in mid-August. The identification has been confirmed by Canadian and international experts. This is the first time this insect has been found in British Columbia. [They eat honeybees and give a vicious sting.]

Pest Alert: Asian Giant Hornet https://gcc02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http:%2F%2Ffeedproxy.google.com%2F~r%2Fnisic%2F~3%2F95rA5-cFYXA%2Fpest-alert-asian-giant-hornet.html%3Futm_source%3Dfeedburner%26utm_medium%3Demail&data=02%7C01%7C%7C38fee672ea7c4d42ba2408d7b17736c4%7Ced5b36e701ee4ebc867ee03cfa0d4697%7C0%7C0%7C637172997889483825&sdata=NrqwIXSmyp1oLTtkikWUq1u%2BpHiDgzwKIbzxwXuswKc%3D&reserved=0
Discovered in Washington State
Asian giant hornet is the world's largest species of hornet. In December 2019, WSDA received and verified four reports of Asian giant hornet near Blaine and Bellingham. These are the first-ever sighting in the U.S. Canada had also discovered Asian giant hornet in two locations in British Columbia in the fall of 2019. If it becomes established, this hornet will have serious negative impacts on the environment, economy, and public health of Washington State. If you think you may have spotted an Asian giant hornet, report it using the Hornet Watch Report Form https://gcc02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.maps.arcgis.com%2Fapps%2FGeoForm%2Findex.html%3Fappid%3De3720c303c414210967920b07bad13f5&data=02%7C01%7C%7C38fee672ea7c4d42ba2408d7b17736c4%7Ced5b36e701ee4ebc867ee03cfa0d4697%7C0%7C0%7C637172997889493783&sdata=WFKVHm0nrpdgN9Aiu9jtiq0HrbfWzrAZxurcxmNRCvs%3D&reserved=0 .
Also see: Asian Giant Hornet https://gcc02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fagr.wa.gov%2Fdepartments%2Finsects-pests-and-weeds%2Finsects%2Fhornets&data=02%7C01%7C%7C38fee672ea7c4d42ba2408d7b17736c4%7Ced5b36e701ee4ebc867ee03cfa0d4697%7C0%7C0%7C637172997889493783&sdata=8TITUfm2s5mSkhIY82vgIk5Exz%2BB4CfLU0Pnv6EtQZQ%3D&reserved=0



Thanks,

Kathy Pendergrass

USDA-NRCS

Oregon Plant Material Specialist



“Without plants, there is no life. The functioning of the planet, and our survival, depends upon plants.”

Global Strategy for Plant Conservation https://gcc02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cbd.int%2Fgspc%2Fdefault.shtml&data=02%7C01%7C%7C38fee672ea7c4d42ba2408d7b17736c4%7Ced5b36e701ee4ebc867ee03cfa0d4697%7C0%7C0%7C637172997889503737&sdata=n4PSEEv%2FBEA2CESDTLgZ6U8qDfNmZPSeqIzctQQhCUs%3D&reserved=0

Convention on Biological Diversit



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Date: 2/14/20 10:26 am
From: Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Accentor - Yes!
At 10:05 / about 25 of us got great views of the Siberian Accentor bathing in standing water next to the RV beyond the Apple tree. Scott, a guy who came in last night from Rhode Island spotted it first. Folks with cameras all seemed to have good photos of it.

May all your birds be identified,

Denis DeSilvis
<avnacrs4birds...>

Avian Acres 🦉
Roy, WA
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Date: 2/13/20 10:17 pm
From: Scott Ramos <lsr...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Birding in Ecuador
Wet winter weather is a good time to catch up on tasks, so finally I was able to set up a Flickr album with photos from a trip to Ecuador that Dave Swayne and I did last November. We spent nearly two weeks with an energetic guide who shepherded us to habitats in dry forest and rain forest, from 1000 feet elevation at the Peruvian border to nearly 14,000 feet in the páramo. We stayed in upscale birding lodges and in practical hotels in small towns to facilitate travel to about a dozen different locations. With a half day visiting the Antisana outside of Quito to start, we ended up with nearly 450 species on the trip, well over 100 species as lifers for both of us. The Ecuador 2019 album (https://flic.kr/s/aHsmK3DLzD) contains good and mediocre photos of many of these species, illustrating the diversity that Ecuador has to offer. In addition, a few dozen butterflies and moths are included as more examples of the beauty of fauna in the tropics. Hope you enjoy!

Scott Ramos
Seattle

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Date: 2/13/20 5:02 pm
From: <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2020-02-13
Tweets – A nice morning, mostly not too cold, mostly not raining, and mostly not too windy. There was a brief squall that did combine cold, rain, and wind, just to keep us believing it’s still not really spring.

The record flooding continues. I’m failing to completely correlate official lake level data with what we’ve manually read from the lake gauge just above the weir, but it appears the lake high water occurred over the weekend. It rose at least one, and maybe as much as two feet above our Thursday survey, over the weekend. The lake level has dropped back some, but flooding in the park is much more extensive than last Thursday. This is definitely the biggest flood since 2007, and may have exceeded the January 1997 flood.

What this meant for us is that we couldn’t get to much of the area we normally survey. The Off-leash Dog Area is split into two pieces; the slough trail is closed just south of Dog Central, and from the east side, you can’t go south of the East Meadow. The boardwalk and trails to it are entirely flooded. The entire middle of the dog park is a large pond, and many other portions of the park are underwater too. Made for a very different walk.

Highlights:
a.. Cackling Goose – maybe 1000 flew past; not many landed in the park
b.. American Wigeon – 2-3 seen
c.. Ring-necked Pheasant – the Pea Patch was underwater over the weekend; Lonesome George II apparently fled to higher ground; he was eating seed at the Park Office
d.. Virginia Rail – at least 2 heard from east of the East Meadow, predawn
e.. HERRING GULL – one in the pond on the grass soccer fields – First of Year (FOY)
f.. Green Heron – one at the Rowing Club – first sighting in 4 weeks
g.. Barn Owl – several sightings pre-dawn
h.. LONG-EARED OWL – Matt got great looks at one at the south end of the East Meadow before 6 a.m.; FOY for us, but one was photographed in the East Meadow on 2020-01-20
i.. Pileated Woodpecker – one landed near us at Dog Central
j.. COMMON RAVEN – three flew over the East Meadow; FOY. This was our first raven sighting since December 2018, but there are several 2019 records on eBird, and one from 2020-01-20 as well
k.. Western Meadowlark – flock of around 6; we thought we saw some fly to the East Meadow, and later found a very similar sized flock just north of Fields 7-8-9
We only had 8 species of waterfowl, with only Bufflehead and Common Goldeneye representing divers. I wonder if turbidity in the lake and river have driven most diving ducks elsewhere? Our only American Coots were in the interior “lake”.

For the 3rd week already this year, we had ZERO FINCHES.

Misses for the day included Ring-necked Duck, Hooded Merganser, Common Merganser, Bushtit, Marsh Wren, House Finch, Purple Finch, and Lincoln’s Sparrow

For the day 51 species.

= Michael Hobbs
= www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
= <BirdMarymoor...>
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Date: 2/13/20 1:42 pm
From: Robert C. Faucett <rfaucett...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] NOAA Sand Point in Seattle? -- entangled grebe
I can call somebody. Can you call me?

Will report back.



--
Robert C. Faucett
Collections Manager
Ornithology
Burke Museum
Box 353010
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195-3010
Office: 206-543-1668
Cell: 206-619-5569
Fax: 206-685-3039
<rfaucett...><mailto:<rfaucett...>

https://www.burkemuseum.org/collections-and-research/biology/ornithology
https://www.burkemuseum.org/collections-and-research/biology/genetic-resources


From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> on behalf of Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...>
Date: Thursday, February 13, 2020 at 1:31 PM
To: Tweeters Tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] NOAA Sand Point in Seattle? -- entangled grebe

Does anyone else on Tweeters work on NOAA's Sand Point campus in Seattle?
Yesterday, I saw a pied-billed grebe that is entangled in green netting. I talked to PAWS about it, problem is I am going out of town and won't be able to monitor the bird for the next week. Hoping to get someone to help with monitoring the situation.

Peggy Mundy
Bothell
<peggy_busby...>
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Date: 2/13/20 1:34 pm
From: Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...>
Subject: [Tweeters] NOAA Sand Point in Seattle? -- entangled grebe
Does anyone else on Tweeters work on NOAA's Sand Point campus in Seattle?Yesterday, I saw a pied-billed grebe that is entangled in green netting.  I talked to PAWS about it, problem is I am going out of town and won't be able to monitor the bird for the next week.  Hoping to get someone to help with monitoring the situation.
Peggy <MundyBothellpeggy_busby...>
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Date: 2/13/20 1:05 pm
From: Keith Williamson <keithwilliamson8...>
Subject: [Tweeters] selling my Swarovski EL 10x32 SwaroVision Binocular
I am selling a Swarovski EL 10x32 SwaroVision Binocular, in excellent
condition.

My price is $1,600. If you want more information on this sale, please see:

https://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/1634413

Please send me an e-mail is you have any interest in this.

Thanks for your time and consideration!



Keith Williamson

Camano Island, WA

http://kwilliam8.smugmug.com/




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Date: 2/13/20 10:34 am
From: Vicki Biltz <vickibiltz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor, 7:10 this morning
Hi,
The Accentor was spotted yesterday afternoon about 30 minutes before I got
there. I waited until dark, to head to the hotel. There was a photographer
who got great shots.
I arrived at the spot at 6:30, after coming up empty on coffee at the
hotel.
It was freezing.
Just at sunrise a young couple from Ashford showed up. After just a few
minutes she spotted the Accentor. He was just under a branch at the top on
the left, that had a noticeable crook in it.
I was informed by another birder that he usually sits on the crooked branch
rather than just under.
I got bad photos but at least I know I got to see him.
Now I can go on with my life 😁
Vicki Biltz
Buckley, Wa
<vickibiltz...>
--



<vickibiltz...>
http://www.flickr.com/photos/saw-whets_new/

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Date: 2/13/20 7:51 am
From: Vicki King <vkbirder...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Siberian accentor still here
I just missed seeing the Accentor when I arrived on Stenerson Road at 7:25 so it's still here. Four people who were her before I arrived saw it.

Vicki

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Date: 2/13/20 12:56 am
From: Nadine Drisseq <drisseq.n...>
Subject: [Tweeters] March's WOS Meeting: Something to Crow About
Hi Tweets!

Mark your calendars for WOS meeting, Monday, March 2nd 2020!



‘Something to Crow About’

with Dr Kaeli Swift, Ph.D.

Crows and ravens are found on nearly every continent where they routinely
infiltrate the hearts and minds of the humans who share their space. Dr.
Kaeli Swift will discuss some of the general aspects about crows that
contribute to our affinity (and sometimes hatred) for them, with a
particular emphasis on concepts that are the most frequent questions people
have about crows including play, tool use, communal roosting and funerals.

Dr. Swift received her Ph.D. from the University of Washington in 2018,
where she studied American crow thanatology. She is currently a lecturer in
the UW’s School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, where she teaches
ornithology, conservation and wildlife ecology. You can read her popular
science articles on her blog - corvidresearch.blog. You can also find her
on twitter, instagram, and facebook at the @corvidresearch handle.



WOS meetings are held the first Monday of the month, Oct-June at

The Center for Urban Horticulture, 3501 NE 41st ST Seattle, 98105.

Socialize with fellow birders before the meeting 7-7:30PM.

Meeting begins at 7:30PM. All are welcome to attend. Can’t make it to the

meeting in person? Members may attend virtually via GoToMeeting. You can

join on-line anytime at:

http://wos.org/about-wos/membership/


or in person at the meeting.

Hope to see you there!

Nadine Drisseq

Program co-chair at WOS



www.wos.org

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Date: 2/12/20 6:49 pm
From: John Puschock <g_g_allin...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Second coming of "Bob" OR Tim Brennan's gull
This gull may be the same one I saw on January 28 at the Cedar River mouth, though the written description differes somewhat. I saw red and dark marks on the bill, I described the size as similar to Glaucous-winged, not Thayer's, and I though the bill looked a bit thick for Glaucous, but the following points may still apply. I reported the bird I saw as a Glaucous Gull, but apparently the eBird reviewer didn't agree with me because it doesn't appear to be in the results when you search for Glaucous Gull. The checklist is at https://ebird.org/checklist/S63920585

I still think it's a Glaucous Gull. I would say it's definitely not any form of Iceland Gull. It's too bulky and big for that, particularly glaucoides. Glaucous Gull and glaucoides Iceland Gull have similar mantle colors, and both are paler than most other species. Kumlien's should be a little darker, closer to Thayer's. The gull in question has a very pale mantle.

As I mention in the comments on the eBird checklist, some of the primaries looked to be tan, which gave me some hesitation, but I looked closer at my photos, and it appears that the tan is on parts of the primaries that are covered by other primaries when the wing is folded. (Sorry, that was a long sentence.) So I think we're seeing a bird that's between second and third cycle (though red on the bill might throw a wrench in that hypothesis), and the parts of the primaries that are more exposed have been bleached to white.

The bird was small and compact, but I don't think it was outside the range I've seen in quite a few birds in northern Alaska. Otherwise, I didn't see anything else that was clearly *not* Glaucous. The eye was obviously pale, and I figured the influence of other species should have affected the eye and/or primary color. So I'm sticking with Glaucous.

John Puschock

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Date: 2/12/20 6:42 pm
From: Al n Donna <alndonna...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor Wednesday afternoon
About a dozen birders got lucky about 2:30 when the bird landed in the apple tree. My close shot may be found at

https://pbase.com/alndonna/image/170419251


Al in Tacoma


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Date: 2/12/20 6:29 pm
From: Roger Craik <r_craik...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Octopus and bald eagle
An eagle can certainly bite off more than it can chew.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xgfkbntVI_w

Roger Craik

Maple Ridge BC

On 2020-02-12 6:14 p.m., Christina wrote:
> Hi all,
> Does anyone know if octopus have tried to eat bald eagles ?
> Christina Woodinville
>
> _______________________________________________
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> <Tweeters...>
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Date: 2/12/20 6:17 pm
From: Christina <joannabird413...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Octopus and bald eagle
Hi all,
Does anyone know if octopus have tried to eat bald eagles ?
Christina Woodinville

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Date: 2/12/20 5:01 pm
From: Jeffrey Bryant <jbryant_68...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Second coming of "Bob" OR Tim Brennan's gull
Today, I saw what was undoubtedly the same gull Tim Brennan reported at Cedar River Mouth in Renton a couple or three days ago. I encourage everyone to check out the photos of “gull sp.” in this checklist:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S64401164 <https://ebird.org/checklist/S64401164>
and opine on its ID. Don’t hold it against me that i can’t afford a better camera.
Coloration of feet and various plumage details, even apparent shape of bill change subtly from pic to pic.
I tried to include as many other gull species as possible for size (and other) comparisons, but the bird wasn’t terribly social, for the most part.
Bill seems too long for glaucoides Iceland Gull, but, like Tim, I'd love to be proven wrong.

Jeff Bryant
Seattle
jbryant_68 AT yahoo




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Date: 2/12/20 1:30 pm
From: Tim Brennan <tsbrennan...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Updates on "Rey"
Hey Tweets,

I needed a nickname for the unidentified gull at the Cedar River Mouth, and Bob was already taken a few years back for a GWXGLGU, so I went with Rey. At any rate, the bird is apparently being viewed right now by Jeff Bryant, with pics to come on eBird. His impression was that it's too small for Glaucous, so I'm optimistically calling the gull Rey, short for Reykjavik. Iceland subspecies Iceland Gull is still possible. Something leuci... albi... something that's just missing some pigment is still possible as well, however.

Cheers,

Tim Brennan
Renton



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Date: 2/12/20 1:29 pm
From: Doug Santoni <dougsantoni...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] What birding area are Caribbean countries in?
Someone may have shared this already, but the James Bond character was named for the bird book author while Ian Fleming was living in Jamaica.

Doug Santoni
Ph 305-962-4226
<DougSantoni...>

> On Feb 12, 2020, at 12:18 PM, Mark Oberle <oberle...> wrote:
>
> I agree with Gary Bletsch's summary. One detail. Trinidad and Tobago as well as the ABC islands (Aruba, Bonaire and Curacao) were excluded from the very early West Indies bird guide book by James Bond . There is a nice map in his book showing the "Bond line" defining the biological boundary of the West Indies islands. Subsequent guide books follow James Bond's geographical limits for the West Indies, including our latest book that was published last year: "Birds of the West Indies" https://www.lynxeds.com/product/birds-of-the-west-indies/ which also covers Turks and Caicos.
> _______________________________________________
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Date: 2/12/20 12:22 pm
From: Mark Oberle <oberle...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] What birding area are Caribbean countries in?
I agree with Gary Bletsch's summary. One detail. Trinidad and Tobago
as well as the ABC islands (Aruba, Bonaire and Curacao) were excluded
from the very early West Indies bird guide book by James Bond
. There is a nice map in his book showing the "Bond line" defining
the biological boundary of the West Indies islands. Subsequent guide
books follow James Bond's geographical limits for the West Indies,
including our latest book that was published last year: "Birds of the
West Indies"
https://www.lynxeds.com/product/birds-of-the-west-indies/ which also
covers Turks and Caicos.

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Date: 2/12/20 12:09 pm
From: Vicki King <vkbirder...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Trying for the Accentor tomorrow morning
I plan to leave Seattle early tomorrow morning, around 5 am, to get to
Stenerson Road by 7:30 or 8 am in hopes the bird will still be there.

I can take several passengers. I live in NE Seattle and could meet someone
at the Ravenna P&R or some other convenient location along I-5 going south.


Please let me know if you are interested.

Thanks,
Vicki King
Seattle

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Date: 2/12/20 11:09 am
From: LSR <lsr...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor continues
The Accentor showed for a few people about 7 this morning, then again for a slightly larger group about 10 and again at 10:30. First and third time in last small tree north side of road, second time in the bare willow behind the red barn.

Good birding.
Scott Ramos
Seattle

Sent from my iPhone


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Date: 2/12/20 10:53 am
From: Dave Slager <dave.slager...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Northwestern Crow hybrid zone study published
Hi Tweeters,

Since I know many of you are very interested in this topic, I'm happy
to pass along the word that my UW PhD research on the
American/Northwestern crow hybrid zone has now been peer reviewed and
published in a scientific journal. If you're interested in reading the
full research article, email me and I'll gladly send you a PDF copy.

It was also picked up yesterday by the online news site Gizmodo, which
wrote up a pretty nice summary of the research under the very
memorable headline "These Crows Evolved Into a New Species, Boned the
Old Species Too Much, Now Back Where They Started".

https://gizmodo.com/these-crows-evolved-into-a-new-species-boned-the-old-s-1841608425

Many of you are probably wondering what this means for listing crows
in Washington. Now that it's published, the American Ornithological
Society checklist committee will soon weigh whether it might be best
to lump Northwestern Crow into American Crow. If they decide to do
this (around July), eBird would automatically lump crow records
(around August), similar to what happened with Thayer's Gull a while
back. Until then, it's probably best to just stay the course and
report your sightings of American, Northwestern, or
American/Northwestern crows to eBird in your usual way.

Good birding,
Dave Slager
Seattle
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Date: 2/12/20 10:13 am
From: Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
HI:
Reported again today 12 Feb. 2020.

sincerely
Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/
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Date: 2/12/20 9:53 am
From: Robert O'Brien <baro...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Kumlien's Iceland Gulls in the Pacific NW
A discussion of this now subspecies recently happened in Oregon.
I'm sending some of my comments in that discussion to Tweeters in reference
to the recent Glaucous/Iceland posts.

I'm always happy that people are still looking for Kumlein's Gull, nowadays
Iceland (Kumlein's) Gull, my favorite gull.
Here is what to look for.
http://www2.rdrop.com/users/green/icgu/ICGU.html
http://www2.rdrop.com/users/green/icgu/ICGU2.html
<http://www2.rdrop.com/users/green/icgu/ICGU.html>

Bob OBrien Carver OR

PS There are 6 or 7 species present here, but you won't have any trouble
finding Kumlein's. which make up about 90% of the Gulls in these photos.
Note that Adult Iceland (Kumlien's) Gull can look somewhat like Iceland
(Thayer's) Gull with dark-marked primaries,
but at least 50% have all white*-tipped* primaries, visible in flight,
while in adult Glaucous the entire primaries are white.
This can be hard to tell when the wings are folded so flight photos really
help.
And I agree that a white iris is a good mark for either, but it is not
definitive.

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Date: 2/12/20 9:46 am
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] What birding area are Caribbean countries in?
Dear Ed,
The short answer is that the Turks and Caicos are not in South America.
On eBird, the entire world is broken up into 22 "Major Regions," which include the World itself, the Western and Eastern Hemispheres, plus nineteen other regions. One of those 19 is called the West Indies; the Turks and Caicos are included in that region. I am not sure how well the ABA's geographical listing criteria match up with eBird's, but I think they are close. This listing area is definitely not in South America.
The Turks and Caicos are also included in a bird-listing region that we used to call the AOU Area. That area is bigger than the ABA Area. The ABA Area consisted of, until very recently, the 49 Continental United States, Canada, and the two little islands that still France owns (just off the coast of the Canadian Maritimes)--but excluding Mexico, Greenland, Hawaii, and the Caribbean and West Indian nations. Very recently, I think last year, the ABA decided (contrary to what I would have done!) to add the state of Hawaii to the ABA Area, thus changing a listing criterion that had held more or less consistent for about half a century.
The term "AOU Area" still appears on some listing documents, but it should be noted that the American Ornithologists Union merged with the Cooper Ornithological Society in 2016; the new organization is called the American Ornithological Society, or AOS. As I understand it, the AOU Area (presumably now called the AOS Area), is roughly equal to the ABA Area, plus Greenland, Mexico, Central America (all the way down to the border of Panama and Colombia), plus almost all of the islands in what we'd call the West Indies or Caribbean. 
As I understand it, the island nation of Trinidad and Tobago is not considered part of the AOU Area, nor is it in the ABA's "West Indies" listing area. There are other islands that are in the Caribbean Sea, but which belong to South American lands, such as Colombia and French Guiana, for example. Such islands, including Devil's Island, would have to be considered part of South America. In addition, there are still some islands belonging to former European colonial powers, such as Aruba, that are considered to be in South America, for bird listing purposes.
I will admit that I have spent far too much time playing silly online trivia games on Sporcle; my favorite is the one where the player has to label all 197 countries of the world on a map,  in a specified time. One learns a lot playing it. In the game, Trinidad and Tobago is considered a South American nation, not a "North American" one. All of the other twelve independent nations in the West Indies are considered to be in North America in that infernally addictive game! 
In addition, there are lots of other islands in the West Indies that belong to those former European colonial powers, including the British West Indies and Guadeloupe; those are in the West Indies, not South America.
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch
On Tuesday, February 11, 2020, 08:28:41 PM PST, <edswan2...> wrote:


Are the Caribbean countries considered part of South America for bird listing purposes?  Specifically the Turks and Caicos Islands?

Thanks,

Ed

Ed Swan

Nature writer and guide

www.theswancompany.com

<edswan2...>

206.949.3545

 

 
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Date: 2/12/20 9:40 am
From: Robert O'Brien <baro...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Glaucous Gull or. . . ?
Adult Glaucous Gulls are rare in the Pacific NW in winter but Iceland gulls
with white-tipped primaries are extremely rare.
Highly unlikely to be Iceland Gull And in flight, the Iceland Gulls have
only white-tipped primaries, not entirely white primarie as Glaucous have.
This could be hard to distinguish unless in flight. I will separately
forward to Tweeters an email I sent recently to OBOL, the Oregon Lists
Server.regarding
Iceland Gulls.
Bob OBrien Portland

On Wed, Feb 12, 2020 at 5:04 AM Tim Brennan <tsbrennan...> wrote:

> Hey Tweets,
>
> I posted a Glaucous Gull sighting on the 10th from the mouth of the Cedar
> River, but am pulling that identification. At the time, the only confusion
> species I considered was a hybrid Glaucous x Glaucous-winged, and the pale
> iris made that easy to rule out. Looking on eBird, the sightings of adult
> Glaucous Gulls were pretty infrequent, so I was poking around looking for
> anything else, and came across this:
>
> https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Glaucous_Gull/species-compare/39522551
>
> <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Glaucous_Gull/species-compare/39522551>
> Glaucous Gull Similar Species to, All About Birds, Cornell Lab of
> Ornithology
> <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Glaucous_Gull/species-compare/39522551>
> Similar looking birds to Glaucous Gull: Glaucous-winged Gull Nonbreeding
> adult, Glaucous-winged Gull First winter, Iceland Gull Adult (Iceland),
> Iceland Gull Nonbreeding adult (Thayer's), Iceland Gull First winter
> (Iceland), Herring Gull Nonbreeding adult (American)
> www.allaboutbirds.org
>
> Iceland Gull (Iceland) was not something I had considered at the time, and
> is an even more disastrous ID (insomuch as there aren't any sightings of
> these guys in the state). That said I can speak to the 3 or 4 features that
> would help with the ID. I am running off of this image, and any other
> crumbs I could find off of the Internet, and about 10-15 minutes of scope
> views of the gull at 150-200 feet in excellent lighting.
>
> Mantle: I was looking at how pale the mantle was, in trying to rule out
> Glaucous x Glaucous-winged. My Sibley's said that the mantle would be
> slightly darker in a hybrid than in a pure Glaucous Gull, and my thought
> was "How can what I'm looking at be darker than anything?" It wasn't white,
> but such a pale pale grey. The images show the lighter mantle of the
> Iceland (Iceland) almost melting into the white around it, and that fit the
> impression I got from the bird. The Internet gave me a range for Glaucous
> Gull - usually slightly darker, and usually a better delineation of the
> mantle, but not always.
>
> Bill: Those bills both have the red spot I noted. I did not note the color
> in the sighting, but the Glaucous appears to have a pretty heavy bill that
> tends a little towards school bus orange/yellow. This wasn't true of all of
> the images I found for the species (color wise), but my impression overall
> was that the bill seemed fairly "normal" and also has me leaning towards
> Iceland (Iceland).
>
> Facial expression: The sum of the iris, head shape, orbital - seems to add
> up to a friendlier expression on Iceland (Iceland), something that seems
> helpful when sorting Thayer's and Herring. This bird did not seem angry.
>
> Size: Would have helped . . . but it was in the water, and was not
> something I was looking for.
>
> I hope it shows up again, and someone gets a picture. Gulls are, for me, a
> mess. There are so many hybrids running around, and subtle differences to
> sort one out from the other. They are usually more frustrating than
> enjoyable. Look closely at a gull. . . ? Why would I do that, and ruin a
> perfectly fine day of birding?? But this one was striking, whatever it was.
> With any luck, someone more pay-attentiocal than I will have a go at IDing
> it, although there were a few eBird lists from the mouth yesterday that
> didn't turn it up.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Tim Brennan
> Renton
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
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Date: 2/12/20 5:05 am
From: Tim Brennan <tsbrennan...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Glaucous Gull or. . . ?
Hey Tweets,

I posted a Glaucous Gull sighting on the 10th from the mouth of the Cedar River, but am pulling that identification. At the time, the only confusion species I considered was a hybrid Glaucous x Glaucous-winged, and the pale iris made that easy to rule out. Looking on eBird, the sightings of adult Glaucous Gulls were pretty infrequent, so I was poking around looking for anything else, and came across this:

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Glaucous_Gull/species-compare/39522551
[https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/assets/og/75239011-1200px.jpg]<https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Glaucous_Gull/species-compare/39522551>
Glaucous Gull Similar Species to, All About Birds, Cornell Lab of Ornithology<https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Glaucous_Gull/species-compare/39522551>
Similar looking birds to Glaucous Gull: Glaucous-winged Gull Nonbreeding adult, Glaucous-winged Gull First winter, Iceland Gull Adult (Iceland), Iceland Gull Nonbreeding adult (Thayer's), Iceland Gull First winter (Iceland), Herring Gull Nonbreeding adult (American)
www.allaboutbirds.org

Iceland Gull (Iceland) was not something I had considered at the time, and is an even more disastrous ID (insomuch as there aren't any sightings of these guys in the state). That said I can speak to the 3 or 4 features that would help with the ID. I am running off of this image, and any other crumbs I could find off of the Internet, and about 10-15 minutes of scope views of the gull at 150-200 feet in excellent lighting.

Mantle: I was looking at how pale the mantle was, in trying to rule out Glaucous x Glaucous-winged. My Sibley's said that the mantle would be slightly darker in a hybrid than in a pure Glaucous Gull, and my thought was "How can what I'm looking at be darker than anything?" It wasn't white, but such a pale pale grey. The images show the lighter mantle of the Iceland (Iceland) almost melting into the white around it, and that fit the impression I got from the bird. The Internet gave me a range for Glaucous Gull - usually slightly darker, and usually a better delineation of the mantle, but not always.

Bill: Those bills both have the red spot I noted. I did not note the color in the sighting, but the Glaucous appears to have a pretty heavy bill that tends a little towards school bus orange/yellow. This wasn't true of all of the images I found for the species (color wise), but my impression overall was that the bill seemed fairly "normal" and also has me leaning towards Iceland (Iceland).

Facial expression: The sum of the iris, head shape, orbital - seems to add up to a friendlier expression on Iceland (Iceland), something that seems helpful when sorting Thayer's and Herring. This bird did not seem angry.

Size: Would have helped . . . but it was in the water, and was not something I was looking for.

I hope it shows up again, and someone gets a picture. Gulls are, for me, a mess. There are so many hybrids running around, and subtle differences to sort one out from the other. They are usually more frustrating than enjoyable. Look closely at a gull. . . ? Why would I do that, and ruin a perfectly fine day of birding?? But this one was striking, whatever it was. With any luck, someone more pay-attentiocal than I will have a go at IDing it, although there were a few eBird lists from the mouth yesterday that didn't turn it up.

Cheers,

Tim Brennan
Renton

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Date: 2/11/20 10:45 pm
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] NPR: Nature's 'Brita Filter' Is Dying And Nobody Knows Why
This article mentions the Pacific Northwest as one of the areas where this problem exists. Have any of you noticed this problem in our local fresh waters?

Nature's 'Brita Filter' Is Dying And Nobody Knows Why
A mysterious die-off of freshwater mussels has scientists scrambling to find a cause. Freshwater mussels clean water and provide habitat to countless other species.

Read in NPR: https://apple.news/AZn9NdYKGQ9WvZwzVqAwcjg


Shared from Apple News


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Date: 2/11/20 10:29 pm
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Perhaps the Octopus was friends with the Ross’s Gull—-Video shows bald eagle entangled with octopus as salmon farmers come to the rescue

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/video-shows-bald-eagle-entangled-octopus-fishermen-come-rescue-n1101421


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Date: 2/11/20 8:45 pm
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] What birding area are Caribbean countries in?
They are in the same AOU area as North and Central America. On EBird, West Indies is a separate major region

Phil Dickinson

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 11, 2020, at 8:28 PM, <EdSwan2...> wrote:
>
> 
> Are the Caribbean countries considered part of South America for bird listing purposes? Specifically the Turks and Caicos Islands?
> Thanks,
> Ed
> Ed Swan
> Nature writer and guide
> www.theswancompany.com
> <edswan2...>
> 206.949.3545
>
>
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Date: 2/11/20 8:33 pm
From: <EdSwan2...>
Subject: [Tweeters] What birding area are Caribbean countries in?
Are the Caribbean countries considered part of South America for bird
listing purposes? Specifically the Turks and Caicos Islands?

Thanks,

Ed

Ed Swan

Nature writer and guide

<http://www.theswancompany.com> www.theswancompany.com

<mailto:<edswan2...> <edswan2...>

206.949.3545






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Date: 2/11/20 1:37 pm
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor - Thank You Russ Koppendreyer
So many people have gotten to see this great bird in Washington.  Great find by Russ Koppendreyer.  Thanks for sharing so quickly.
Had to include this bird and the thanks to Russ in  a blog post:  https://blairbirding.com/2020/02/11/thank-you-russ-koppendreyer/

Blair BernsonEdmonds, WAblairbirding.com



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Date: 2/11/20 10:06 am
From: Witter, Michael <Michael.Witter...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Ghana Birding
Hi - all knowing and powerful tweeters. Do any of you have any experience (good or bad) with birding guides in Ghana? I have The Birds of Ghana field guide and have been getting fired up for a trip in a few months. Thanks in advance. Mike

Michael Witter
Senior Environmental Scientist
HDR
600 Unviversity Street, Suite 500
Seattle, WA 98101-4123
D 206-826-4728 M 206-909-7187
<michael.witter...>
hdrinc.com/follow-us<http://hdrinc.com/follow-us>


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Date: 2/11/20 9:14 am
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor photos
A friend of mine got some photos of the Siberian Accentor which he posted here:
Siberian accentor

|
|
| |
Siberian accentor

This is a VERY rare bird in Washington... only the third recorded sighting in the state. These birds are native ...
|

|

|

Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA
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Date: 2/11/20 7:30 am
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
Still showing 7:25 in Apple Tree by brown house on Stenerson Road, yippee!
Shep

Shep Thorp, VMD
Emergency Clinician
BluePearl Veterinary Partners
253.370.3742 mobile
253.474.0791 Tacoma
bluepearlvet.com




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Date: 2/10/20 9:09 pm
From: Vicki Biltz <vickibiltz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Going after Accentor Thursday from Buckley
If the bird is still there, I’ll be running down early Thursday. I’m not
sure how long I can be there, just get the accentor and come back. I gave
to pack for our 2wk trip to the Rio Grande.
If anyone wants to join me from Enumclaw through Bonney Lake, let me
know. I can also pick up someone on the way to I-5
Vicki Biltz

--



<vickibiltz...>
http://www.flickr.com/photos/saw-whets_new/

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Date: 2/10/20 7:37 pm
From: Louise Rutter <louise.rutter...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Sunday Accentor (UNCLASSIFIED)
I-5 exit 22, Dike Access Road. Go right at the end of the ramp and then across another roundabout. Left onto Burke Rd, then right onto Stenerson Rd. The area is on the map as Woodland.

At the end of Stenerson road, there's a house on the north side of the road. The accentor has most often been seen in the trees and bushes around that property, but it does sometimes cross over into the trees on the south side of the road too.

My first sighting of it this morning was in the trees at the far side of the property, fitting the descriptions of 'distant scope views' and 'brief, unsatisfying looks' that I've heard from other people. 45 minutes later, it sat up in the bare apple tree right by the road and stayed there for about 30 seconds, giving great looks to the people who got onto it before it flew over the road and vanished into the trees. You have to be quick with this one!

Louise Rutter
Kirkland

-----Original Message-----
From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of Mary klein
Sent: 10 February 2020 18:57
To: Scuderi, Michael R CIV USARMY CENWS (US) <Michael.R.Scuderi...>
Cc: tweeters tweeters <Tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Sunday Accentor (UNCLASSIFIED)

Is the accentor easy to find by doing a MapQuest search? If not, will someone kindly post directions to the list?

Thanks,
Mary

Mary Klein
Bremerton WA
marytweetz at gmail dot com


On Mon, Feb 10, 2020 at 1:28 PM Scuderi, Michael R CIV USARMY CENWS
(US) <Michael.R.Scuderi...> wrote:
>
> CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED
>
> I have to agree with Larry, that this was one of the most orderly and helpful scope lines I have ever seen at a stakeout.
>
> Good job everyone. Please keep up the courtesy!
>
> The two times it showed up briefly while I was there on Saturday it frequented the row of small cedars next to the house. It was very useful to reference the bird's location to the large stumps on the ground parallel to the row of cedars, and the antenna on the trailer parked on the other side of the row of cedars. Good luck everyone.
>
> Mike Scuderi
> Kent, WA
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Larry Schwitters [mailto:<leschwitters...>]
> Sent: Sunday, February 9, 2020 9:26 PM
> To: tweeters tweeters <Tweeters...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Sunday Accentor
>
> The Woodland Accentor made an appearance near the end of Stenerson Rd about once every two hours this afternoon. This was the least rowdy scope line I’ve ever witnessed, with up to 40 humanoids in it. Our visitor from Siberia doesn’t come easy. It’s shy and doesn’t stay long. When it does show not everyone is able to get on it. Difficult to get a good photo. Was last and best seen 5:00 PMish.
>
> If you go be prepared to stay a while. The good news is it keeps showing up at the same location.
>
> Larry Schwitters
> Issaquah
> CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters



--

Mary Klein
Central Kitsap WA
marytweetz at gmail dot com
catbird54 at comcast dot net (for off-list replies, etc.) _______________________________________________
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Date: 2/10/20 7:09 pm
From: HAL MICHAEL <ucd880...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Sunday Accentor (UNCLASSIFIED)
Just go to ebird. The map is clear, it is seen from a paved road.

Hal Michael

Olympia WA
360-459-4005
360-791-7702 (C)
<ucd880...>

> On February 10, 2020 at 6:56 PM Mary klein <marytweetz...> wrote:
>
>
> Is the accentor easy to find by doing a MapQuest search? If not, will
> someone kindly post directions to the list?
>
> Thanks,
> Mary
>
> Mary Klein
> Bremerton WA
> marytweetz at gmail dot com
>
>
> On Mon, Feb 10, 2020 at 1:28 PM Scuderi, Michael R CIV USARMY CENWS
> (US) <Michael.R.Scuderi...> wrote:
> >
> > CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED
> >
> > I have to agree with Larry, that this was one of the most orderly and helpful scope lines I have ever seen at a stakeout.
> >
> > Good job everyone. Please keep up the courtesy!
> >
> > The two times it showed up briefly while I was there on Saturday it frequented the row of small cedars next to the house. It was very useful to reference the bird's location to the large stumps on the ground parallel to the row of cedars, and the antenna on the trailer parked on the other side of the row of cedars. Good luck everyone.
> >
> > Mike Scuderi
> > Kent, WA
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Larry Schwitters [mailto:<leschwitters...>]
> > Sent: Sunday, February 9, 2020 9:26 PM
> > To: tweeters tweeters <Tweeters...>
> > Subject: [Tweeters] Sunday Accentor
> >
> > The Woodland Accentor made an appearance near the end of Stenerson Rd about once every two hours this afternoon. This was the least rowdy scope line I’ve ever witnessed, with up to 40 humanoids in it. Our visitor from Siberia doesn’t come easy. It’s shy and doesn’t stay long. When it does show not everyone is able to get on it. Difficult to get a good photo. Was last and best seen 5:00 PMish.
> >
> > If you go be prepared to stay a while. The good news is it keeps showing up at the same location.
> >
> > Larry Schwitters
> > Issaquah
> > CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED
> > _______________________________________________
> > Tweeters mailing list
> > <Tweeters...>
> > http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
>
>
> --
>
> Mary Klein
> Central Kitsap WA
> marytweetz at gmail dot com
> catbird54 at comcast dot net (for off-list replies, etc.)
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
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Date: 2/10/20 7:01 pm
From: Mary klein <marytweetz...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Sunday Accentor (UNCLASSIFIED)
Is the accentor easy to find by doing a MapQuest search? If not, will
someone kindly post directions to the list?

Thanks,
Mary

Mary Klein
Bremerton WA
marytweetz at gmail dot com


On Mon, Feb 10, 2020 at 1:28 PM Scuderi, Michael R CIV USARMY CENWS
(US) <Michael.R.Scuderi...> wrote:
>
> CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED
>
> I have to agree with Larry, that this was one of the most orderly and helpful scope lines I have ever seen at a stakeout.
>
> Good job everyone. Please keep up the courtesy!
>
> The two times it showed up briefly while I was there on Saturday it frequented the row of small cedars next to the house. It was very useful to reference the bird's location to the large stumps on the ground parallel to the row of cedars, and the antenna on the trailer parked on the other side of the row of cedars. Good luck everyone.
>
> Mike Scuderi
> Kent, WA
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Larry Schwitters [mailto:<leschwitters...>]
> Sent: Sunday, February 9, 2020 9:26 PM
> To: tweeters tweeters <Tweeters...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Sunday Accentor
>
> The Woodland Accentor made an appearance near the end of Stenerson Rd about once every two hours this afternoon. This was the least rowdy scope line I’ve ever witnessed, with up to 40 humanoids in it. Our visitor from Siberia doesn’t come easy. It’s shy and doesn’t stay long. When it does show not everyone is able to get on it. Difficult to get a good photo. Was last and best seen 5:00 PMish.
>
> If you go be prepared to stay a while. The good news is it keeps showing up at the same location.
>
> Larry Schwitters
> Issaquah
> CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters



--

Mary Klein
Central Kitsap WA
marytweetz at gmail dot com
catbird54 at comcast dot net (for off-list replies, etc.)
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Date: 2/10/20 3:01 pm
From: Hans-Joachim Feddern <thefedderns...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Chasing the accentor
I am planning on chasing the Siberian Accentor tomorrow, Tuesday. I live in
Federal Way and if anyone needs a ride, please contact me at below e-mail!

Hans

--
*Hans Feddern*
Twin Lakes/Federal Way, WA
<thefedderns...>

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Date: 2/10/20 1:48 pm
From: Paul Bannick <paul.bannick...>
Subject: [Tweeters] The Coopers Hawk and the Rat
While walking in Discovery Park last night, I was startled by a Cooper's
Hawk that flew by me carrying prey so heavy that the hawk could barely fly
inches above the ground. After following the bird I found it mantling
perhaps the biggest Norway Rat I have ever seen. The rat looked to be
about 10-11 inches long.

Perhaps their ability to capture rats has helped enable their increasing
presence in our urban environments?

--
Now Available:
Owl: A Year in the Lives of North American Owls at:
http://paulbannick.com/shop/owl-a-year-in-the-lives-of-north-american-owls/


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Date: 2/10/20 1:32 pm
From: Dave Templeton <crazydave65...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Gyrfalcon near Thorp
Hi. Just saw a gyrfalcon near Thorp in kittitas county. About 1 pm.
Close to the DFW pavilion at Taneum Creek Rd. Almost as big around as the
utility pole it was perched on.

Regards

T


Crazy Dave 6 5

At. Inbox

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Date: 2/10/20 1:29 pm
From: Scuderi, Michael R CIV USARMY CENWS (US) <Michael.R.Scuderi...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Sunday Accentor (UNCLASSIFIED)
CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED

I have to agree with Larry, that this was one of the most orderly and helpful scope lines I have ever seen at a stakeout.

Good job everyone. Please keep up the courtesy!

The two times it showed up briefly while I was there on Saturday it frequented the row of small cedars next to the house. It was very useful to reference the bird's location to the large stumps on the ground parallel to the row of cedars, and the antenna on the trailer parked on the other side of the row of cedars. Good luck everyone.

Mike Scuderi
Kent, WA

-----Original Message-----
From: Larry Schwitters [mailto:<leschwitters...>]
Sent: Sunday, February 9, 2020 9:26 PM
To: tweeters tweeters <Tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Sunday Accentor

The Woodland Accentor made an appearance near the end of Stenerson Rd about once every two hours this afternoon. This was the least rowdy scope line I’ve ever witnessed, with up to 40 humanoids in it. Our visitor from Siberia doesn’t come easy. It’s shy and doesn’t stay long. When it does show not everyone is able to get on it. Difficult to get a good photo. Was last and best seen 5:00 PMish.

If you go be prepared to stay a while. The good news is it keeps showing up at the same location.

Larry Schwitters
Issaquah
CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED
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Date: 2/10/20 12:58 pm
From: Tim Brennan <tsbrennan...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Glaucous Gull Cedar River Mouth
Hey Tweets,

I went to the Cedar River Mouth today, and found what appears to be an adult Glaucous Gull. Good lighting and pretty close in, and I had my Sibs, thank gosh. Clean clean clean white primaries, pale iris with no apparent smudging around the eye, nearly white mantle, red spot on the bill. Gorgeous bird! I think this makes two GLGUs down at the south end of Lake Washington, as an immature has been seen down there over the last month or two as well.

Happy birding!

Tim Brennan
Renton

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Date: 2/10/20 9:18 am
From: louiserutter1000 <louiserutter1000...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Accentor continues
Being seen again this morning, same location.Sent via the Samsung Galaxy A6, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone_______________________________________________
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Date: 2/10/20 8:45 am
From: <nightwings406...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Evening Grosbeak
We had our first Evening Grosbeak show up at our feeders today. So nice to see them come back!Donna FerrillSnohomish, WA
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Date: 2/9/20 9:59 pm
From: BRAD Liljequist <bradliljequist...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Short Eared Owl and American Pipit on Lopez Island
On Saturday, around 11am, a Short Eared Owl was hunting in the fields just south of Horse Drawn Farms on Port Stanley Road. Seeing now zero ebird reports for SEOs ever on Lopez, I wish I'd sent out an immediate post on this. I see recent ebird reports of one over at American Camp on San Juan Island, so perhaps it was this bird, or perhaps one of the Samish birds out for a ramble during the stormy weather. Also, a spunky, bobby American Pipit is on the Fisherman's Bay spit north of Otis Perkins Park. We saw it twice, both times around mid-spit, most recently early afternoon today.

Brad Liljequist
Phinney Ridge
Seattle, WA

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Date: 2/9/20 9:29 pm
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Sunday Accentor
The Woodland Accentor made an appearance near the end of Stenerson Rd about once every two hours this afternoon. This was the least rowdy scope line I’ve ever witnessed, with up to 40 humanoids in it. Our visitor from Siberia doesn’t come easy. It’s shy and doesn’t stay long. When it does show not everyone is able to get on it. Difficult to get a good photo. Was last and best seen 5:00 PMish.

If you go be prepared to stay a while. The good news is it keeps showing up at the same location.

Larry Schwitters
Issaquah
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Date: 2/9/20 7:22 pm
From: Tom Mansfield <birds...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
Ed – I’ve sent you privately my compilation of reports. I haven’t seen it but, mobility permitting, may try on Tuesday. Cheers, tm.

From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of Ed Swan
Sent: Sunday, February 9, 2020 6:32 PM
To: Ken Trease <krtrease...>; tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor

I have lost directions to the bird and I’m trying for it tomorrow. Could you send them to me?
Best regards,
Ed

Ed Swan
Nature writer and guide
www.theswancompany.com<http://www.theswancompany.com>
<edswan2...><mailto:<edswan2...>
206.949.3545


On Sun, Feb 9, 2020 at 9:25 AM -0800, "Ken Trease" <krtrease...><mailto:<krtrease...>> wrote:

Present now



Sent from my iPhone

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Date: 2/9/20 6:37 pm
From: Ed Swan <edswan2...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor





I have lost directions to the bird and I’m trying for it tomorrow. Could you send them to me?Best regards,Ed



Ed SwanNature writer and <guidewww.theswancompany.comedswan2...>






On Sun, Feb 9, 2020 at 9:25 AM -0800, "Ken Trease" <krtrease...> wrote:










Present now

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 2/9/20 2:05 pm
From: Martha Jordan <mj.cygnus...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Swan at Steilacoom/Chambers Bay
I got word that the single swan has moved from Chambers Bay to Lake Waughop
at Fort Steilacoom Park.
I appreciate the updates from all those sending them in. Keep me posted
if something else changes.

Martha Jordan
Everett
NW Swan Conservation Association

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Date: 2/9/20 12:31 pm
From: Hubbell <ldhubbell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } An Eagle's IQ
Tweeters,

How smart are Bald Eagles? Are Monty and Marsha smarter than average? Review the evidence in this week’s post at:

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2020/02/an-eagles-iq.html <https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2020/02/an-eagles-iq.html>

Have a great day on Union Bay, where nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net
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Date: 2/9/20 9:22 am
From: Ken Trease <krtrease...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
Present now

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 2/9/20 8:29 am
From: Ryan Merrill <rjm284...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Black-legged Kittiwake at Carkeek
A Black-legged Kittiwake just flew north past Carkeek Park in Seattle. It’s
approaching Richmond Beach now steadily flying north.

Ryan

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Date: 2/9/20 7:26 am
From: Bruce LaBar <blabar...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
Jim Danzenbaker asked me to post that the Accentor was seen again this morning!


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Date: 2/8/20 9:37 pm
From: Dayna yalowicki <dlwicki...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Nancy Jo Wagner’s Passing - Jan. 16, 2020
Forgive me if this has been posted previously, I looked but couldn’t see where it had. I know her as an occasional poster on Tweeters and a very talented wildlife photographer.

Dayna Yalowicki
Bothell, Wa



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Date: 2/8/20 3:34 pm
From: Ryan Merrill <rjm284...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Northern Fulmar at Carkeek Park
This afternoon shortly before 12:30 I spotted a dark Northern Fulmar flying
north past the yellow buoy off Carkeek Park in Seattle. It soon landed on
the water for close to twenty minutes before spending another ten minutes
flying around going back and forth in the central part of the sound before
I lost it just before 1:00pm.

Good birding,
Ryan Merrill
Seattle

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Date: 2/8/20 3:01 pm
From: Brad Waggoner <wagtail24...>
Subject: [Tweeters] PNP Sea-watching this morning
Hi All,

If you are not on a trek to see that wonderful Siberian Accentor in
Woodland Bottoms, I might suggest spending a bit of scoping,
sea-watching time looking out over Puget Sound. This morning produced a
number of interesting birds, most specifically tubenoses, off of the
lighthouse area of Point no Point. And, I did hear word of similar
results further into Puget Sound at spots like Carkeek Park.

Here were the highlights:

Short-tailed Shearwater - At about 8:00 within my first 15 minutes of
sea-watching. Heading northwest.

Northern Fulmar - one gray morph eastbound into the sound toward Whidbey
Is. at about 10:30. It actually landed on the water and then was not
observed again.

Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel - One just before noon east of lighthouse

Black-legged Kittiwakes - 3 total. One adult and 2 first year birds.
These were close in with gull flock near point sometime shortly after 10:30

Ancient Murrelet - At least 3 if not 5. Three early on in flight and
then two on the water east of point close to noon. I think of them as
"late" when viewed in February in the central Sound.

Common Murre - In good numbers! 500-1000

Gulls - Just a very good mix in general. Mews and Bonies were in their
typical good numbers, but what was unusual was to have decent numbers of
California, Herring, and Iceland (Thayer's). The latter three are not
all that expected off of PNP in numbers such as today at this time of year

Cheers and good sea-watching,

Brad Waggoner


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Date: 2/8/20 2:41 pm
From: Scott Ramos <lsr...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Magnuson Park, 7 February 2020
Although it was only a drizzle this morning, it was one of those ‘dense’ drizzles where you can still get soaked. Fortunately, it was only in the mid-40s with little wind, so that by mid-morning, when the rain stopped for a spell, there was a chance to dry out. But, then the winds picked up, creating white-caps on the lake. So, the day was a challenge. Yet, there were still many birds to see, many of them singing, with a good variety for February.

Green-winged Teal - a few; past years there have been many more than this year so it was nice to actually see some
Canvasback - north shore; nice that some have dispersed from Montlake Fill
Scaup - the flock of Greaters are now well over 100; just a handful of Lessers
Red-breasted Merganser - a single male still hanging out with other divers, just south of the swim platform
Western Grebe - a single bird visible, but with the chop on the lake, there could have been many more that could not be seen from shore
Virginia Rail - single bird shrieking and grunting; first of year
Herring Gull - one bird on the swim platform with the dozens of Mews; FOY
Bald Eagle - 4 were on Promontory Point at the same time, 2 adults and 2 immature. One of the latter was consuming an unidentifiable snack with a group of crows showing their distress. But, the crows did not engage in active harassment of the eagle, perhaps because there was another eagle in the next tree over.
Barn Owl - 2 birds, one in the front porch box on 62nd
Barred Owl - one in a day roost
Hutton’s Vireo - at least two—watched one while another was singing nearby; FOY
Black-capped Chickadee - lots, many singing including this one:
https://youtu.be/A9JSptUG5HU
Warblers - 1 Orange-crowned, FOY; and many Audubon’s

For the day, 55 species.
Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S64213974
Scott Ramos
Seattle
Magnuson Park hotspots: http://tinyurl.com/mvftzl6 <http://tinyurl.com/mvftzl6>


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Date: 2/8/20 2:33 pm
From: JEFF MILLS <jeffandsuekm...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Woodland Accentor
Short notice, I know, but I'm heading down that way Sunday morning. I'll be leaving Mount Vernon about 4 AM and I'll have room for 2 and their gear. Can meet anywhere between here and there, I suppose.

Jeff
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Date: 2/8/20 12:05 pm
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...>
Subject: [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Feb. 9, 2020
Hello, Tweeters!

Last week on BirdNote:
* Storks and Babies - What's the Connection?
http://bit.ly/1vKEcvA
* Franklin's Gull - The Half-time "Seagull"
http://bit.ly/2ETxQRs
* Habitat and the Tipping Point - How Can We Prepare
Birds and Their Habitats to Meet Climate Change?
http://bit.ly/ONrtUH
* Great Blue Heron Meets T. Rex
http://bit.ly/2OCXv77
* Ecuador’s Nature Reserves - With Paul Greenfield
http://bit.ly/NiP91L
* Who, or What, Was Mother Goose?
http://bit.ly/2HEtiU4
* Riding with Red-tails: Relocating Raptors
Away from Airports --
With Bud Anderson of the Falcon Research Group
http://bit.ly/2Gjvb3M
=========================
Next week on BirdNote: When Does a Crossbill's Bill Cross?
+ Conserving Canada's Boreal Forests, Poorwills That Hibernate,
and more: http://bit.ly/2ScfaEV
--------------------------------------
Did you have a favorite story this week? Another comment?
Please let us know. mailto:<info...>
------------------------------------------------
Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
or Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/birdnoteradio/
Listen on Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
------------------------------------------
BirdNote is in print. Check out BirdNote, the book:
https://www.birdnote.org/birdnote-book
There's a journal, too -- for your notes and sketches and lists:
http://bit.ly/BirdNote-journal
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find 1500+ episodes and more than 1200 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
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Date: 2/8/20 11:04 am
From: Joe Sweeney <sweeneyfit...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Shearwater Richmond beach
At 10:50 AM a Shearwater flying south well offshore of Richmond Beach may be visible in a few minutes from discovery Park.
Joe Sweeney

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Date: 2/8/20 10:01 am
From: Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
HI:
Still present this morning Saturday 8 Feb. 2020.

sincerely
Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/
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Date: 2/7/20 6:57 pm
From: Edward Pullen <edwardpullen...>
Subject: [Tweeters] meeting Mary Gustafson
Last week during my month of visiting and birding in the lower Rio Grande
Valley I got the chance to meet Mary Gustafson. Some of you who have been
around may know Mary from her time at UPS, or as a top ABA birder and
ornithologist. What a treat to meet her and hear her story. You can find
the episode in various ways on my blog post about the episode. As an aside
Mary has been great since meeting her, sending me tips on local hot birds
before I might have found them on eBird. Today she got me onto the
Rose-throate Becard at Benston Rio.
http://birdbanter.com/index.php/2020/02/08/the-bird-banter-podcast-episode-48-with-mary-guatafson-notes/



--
Ed Pullen
Listen to my podcast at The Bird Banter Podcast
<https://birdbanter.podbean.com/e/the-bird-banter-podcast-episode-2-with-ken-brown/>
available
on iTunes podcast store and other feeds.

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Date: 2/7/20 3:25 pm
From: Mary klein <marytweetz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Attn Kitsapers, re Siberian Accentor
I'm thinking about chasing this bird tomorrow and am wondering if
anyone from Kitsap Co. would like to join me. I can take 2-3 people.

Plz let me know ASAP if you're interested, as I'll need to swamp out my car.

Thanks,
Mary

--

Mary Klein
Central Kitsap WA
marytweetz at gmail dot com
catbird54 at comcast dot net (for off-list replies, etc.)
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Date: 2/7/20 3:10 pm
From: Bob Sundstrom <ixoreus...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
Seen again near end of Stenerson Rd 2:45p and later several times.

Bob Sundstrom
Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 2/7/20 9:37 am
From: Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Ascentor - yes
Tweets - the Siberian Ascentor in Woodland Bottoms is being seen in the
same trees as yesterday. End of Stenerson Rd in willows to the north.
Distant scope views when it occasionally pops out. Not raining

- Michael Hobbs

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Date: 2/6/20 5:25 pm
From: Russ Koppendrayer <russkope...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor
Hi Tweeters,

I just got a text that it was seen again late in the afternoon by at least
four more birders. I just wanted to add for the expected crowd in the next
few days to respect private property and bird from the road without
blocking any driveways. While the locals we talked to today were friendly
and curious, at least one expressed concern about people trespassing. It
would be great to stay in the good graces of the locals in this superb
birding area. Thank for your cooperation.

Russ Koppendrayer
Longview, WA

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Date: 2/6/20 2:54 pm
From: Randy <re_hill...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] SIBERIAN ACCENTOR @ Woodland
Was seen again about 5 minutes ago, shortly after I returned home for an appointment!



Randy Hill

Ridgefield



From: Tweeters [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Russ Koppendrayer
Sent: Thursday, February 6, 2020 12:11 PM
To: Tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] SIBERIAN ACCENTOR @ Woodland



Hi Tweeters,



I just found what I believe to be a Siberian Accentor at the west end of Stenerson Rd in the Woodland Bottoms. Photo sent to expert, but confident enough to get the word out. In leafless tree on north side of road with Juncoes, then flew behind the west most house on north side of the road.



Russ Koppendrayer

Longview, WA


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Date: 2/6/20 1:53 pm
From: <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2020-02-06
Tweets – A bit of an understatement to say it was damp at the park today. Lake Sammamish is now at about 29.4 feet lake level. At 28 feet, we start to see notable flooding at the park. Anything over 29 feet is major flooding. Water levels were so high that we were unable to get even within view of either end of the boardwalk, and thus had no looks at the lake at all. We had to skip the whole south end of the park.

But there were plenty of “lakes”, such as the flooding that filled the center portion of the Dog Area, and the large pond at the NE corner of the grass soccer fields. Lots of room for ducks, and they were spread thinly but widely. But few little birds, especially in the steady rain, despite the warm and windless conditions.

Highlights:
a.. Only 9 species of waterfowl! So not very good diversity, despite the huge amount of habitat
b.. Ring-necked Pheasant – Lonesome George II lives on in the Pea Patch
c.. Accipiter sp. – Brief look at one bird; maybe a male Cooper’s Hawk?
d.. BROWN-HEADED BLACKBIRD – near NE baseball fields – First of Year
This is our first BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD for January, February, or the first half of March (and we’ve only had ten March sightings total). In Fall, we’ve only had four September, one November and one December sighting. So a very unusual sighting today. Possibly the bird was flooded out of whatever agricultural land it had been wintering on.

We did hear 9 species singing today, including BROWN CREEPER and GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET.

Misses today included Ring-necked Duck, Hooded Merganser, Common Merganser, Virginia Rail, Northern Shrike, Marsh Wren, House Finch, and Purple Finch. WE HAD NO FINCHES. We also missed squirrel and bunny.

For the day, 46 species.

= Michael Hobbs
= www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
= <BirdMarymoor...>
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Date: 2/6/20 12:37 pm
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually NWR, Wednesday Walk for 2/5/2020.
Hi Tweets,

fourteen of us had a pleasant and breezy day at the Refuge with cloudy
skies, occasional light rain, and temperatures in the 40's to 50's degrees
Fahrenheit. There was a Low 8.83ft Tide at 8:57am and a High 12.52ft Tide
at 1:25pm. The entire length of the Nisqually Estuary Boardwalk Trail is
now open with the closure of hunting season. Highlights included first of
year YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER, ANNA'S HUMMINGBIRD, HERRING GULL and WESTERN
GULL. We also had great looks of PACIFIC LOON in McAllister Creek,
EURASIAN WIGEON on the estuary board walk trail, and over 25 COMMON
MERGANSER from the Nisqually Overlook.

Starting out at 8am at the Visitor Center Pond Overlook, we had nice looks
of the predominantly male RING-NECKED DUCK flock of 6, and GADWALL.

The Orchard was quiet with a mixed flock of BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE,
CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEE, BROWN CREEPER, DOWNY WOODPECKER, BEWICK'S WREN,
GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET and RUBY CROWNED KINGLET. The flooded field across
the entrance road from the orchard also had PIED-BILLED GREBE and KILLDEER
in addition to MALLARD.

The flooded fields south and west of the Access Road had good numbers of
CACKLING GEESE, NORTHERN SHOVELER, NORTHERN PINTAIL and AMERICAN COOT. A
pair of BALD EAGLE were perched on either side of the fields. NORTHERN
HARRIER was spotted hunting the inaccessible central access road. A good
size flock of 15 plus GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROWS continues to forage along the
Access Road to the Twin Barns.

Our first of many YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER was observed in the big willow in
the middle of the field west of the parking lot. The "butter-butts" seen
were predominantly Myrtle variety, which I suspect are early migrants (Over
the past 10 years I've observed audubon's variety being the subspecies most
likely to stay over the winter.). Yellow-rumped Warblers were also seen in
the Maple Trees by the Twin Barns and the tall mixed deciduous trees at the
northeast corner of the Twin Barns Loop Trail at the cut-off for the
Nisqually Overlook.

The Twin Barns Loop Trail on the west side was productive with nice looks
of FOX SPARROW in the bramble just left of the boards. We had another
mixed winter flock of passerines near the cut off to the Access Road.
Pacific Wren was heard and seen near the north twin bench overlook.

The fields are fully flooded with our recent rains. Both the Twin Barns
Overlook and the Nisqually Estuary Trail, or new dike, were excellent for
observing hundreds of GREEN-WINGED TEAL, AMERICAN WIGEON, Northern Pintail,
and Northern Shovelers. Depending on the weather conditions, there is good
opportunity to search for Eurasian Wigeon and Eurasian Green-winged Teal.
The surge plain is also good for MEW GULL, RING-BILLED GULL, and GREATER
YELLOWLEGS. There is a new Bald Eagle nest in a tall Cottonwood Tree on
the far side of the plain. The fresh water marsh on the inside of the new
dike is were we pick up MARSH WREN.

The Nisqually Estuary Boardwalk Trail provided great looks of BUFFLEHEAD,
COMMON GOLDENEYE, DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT, HOODED MERGANSER, RED-BREASTED
MERGANSER, and SURF SCOTER. Between the McAllister Creek Viewing Platform
and the Puget Sound Viewing Platform we had great looks of two PACIFIC LOON
in McAllister Creek and EURASIAN WIGEON. There is a small flock of LEAST
SANDPIPER hanging around the pickle weed marsh plain just south of the
closure gate. We got scope views of COMMON LOON, RED-THROATED LOON, and
BRANDT'S CORMORANT form the terminus or Puget Sound Viewing Platform.
There is a nice flock of 50 BLACK BRANT on the marsh plain of the reach.
We also spotted a FOY HERRING GULL foraging on the salt water marsh.
Another discovery was a Bufflehead carcass suspected to be a Bald Eagle
prey due to the surrounding talon prints in the sand.

The Nisqually River Overlook was a real treat with over two dozen COMMON
MERGANSERS, they seem to collect or stage in this area the second half of
winter.

We have not seen the Great Horned Owl in many weeks. Hopefully they are
nesting, but we don't know...

We observed 61 species for the day, and have seen 83 species for the walk
this year. Mammals seen were Columbia Black-tailed Deer, Coyote, and
Harbor Seal.

Until nest week when we will meet again at 8am, happy birding!

Shep

--
Shep Thorp
Browns Point
253-370-3742

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Date: 2/6/20 12:21 pm
From: Tiffany Linbo <tiffany.linbo...>
Subject: [Tweeters] U.S. industries are no longer liable for accidental bird deaths. At what cost?
Changes to the implementation of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act take away
the threat of penalties, at a time when bird numbers are plummeting.

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2020/02/accidental-bird-deaths-law/

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Date: 2/6/20 12:13 pm
From: Russ Koppendrayer <russkope...>
Subject: [Tweeters] SIBERIAN ACCENTOR @ Woodland
Hi Tweeters,

I just found what I believe to be a Siberian Accentor at the west end of
Stenerson Rd in the Woodland Bottoms. Photo sent to expert, but confident
enough to get the word out. In leafless tree on north side of road with
Juncoes, then flew behind the west most house on north side of the road.

Russ Koppendrayer
Longview, WA

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Date: 2/6/20 10:42 am
From: Jon Houghton <jon.houghton...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Okanogan Day 3
Hi Tweets - Yesterday morning it was snowing in Omak, with just enough on the ground to give me hope that the Sharp-tailed Grouse would be out in the water birch and cottonwoods along Scotch Creek. Indeed they were! Eight were near the fire equipment station opposite the start of Happy Hill (formerly happy, pretty sad since the fires) Road. On into Conconully, it was remarkably bird free. In town, the ONLY birds we could find were (not so) Wild Turkeys that were everywhere, wandering the streets with the deer; not a single passerine there in about an hour of cruising the streets!?! The feeders at a house along the West Fork Rd. were empty, so not even any birds there. Giving up on Conconully, we headed back downhill. The snow had stopped and the Sharp-tailed gang had moved upstream and grown to 28 birds offering much better views in trees right at the WDFW field station. Over Happy Hill (several RT and RL Hawks) we finally found a couple of Mountain Chickadees for our first little birds of the day (there had been one No. Shrike and one Steller's Jay in the outskirts of Conconully). Salmon Creek Rd was pretty in the new snow but highly unbirdy. About 1030, we headed up Cameron Lk. Road out of Okanogan (the town) and took a short side trip on the Cameron Loop Rd. A stop in the pines at the third small lake was immediately rewarded with both Pygmy and RB Nuthatches, very close, and an overflight with brief pauses in the tree tops, by a flock of Red Crossbills. From there on, the Plateau had very little snow cover; despite about an inch of fresh, the fields and sage had much vegetation and ground showing. As a result, there were no Gray Partridges and only few Horned Larks showing; no Snow Buntings, not even a single bird at the Timentwa Rd. farm that usually has had hundreds. A flock of Wild Turkeys in a copse of cottonwood just before the Tree Sparrow place (just north of Timentwa Rd), showed up as rare on ebird! My go-to Tree Sparrow place disappointed with but one lone Song Sparrow and a couple of Magpies. From there, we saw no birds (couple of coyotes) for miles until just after the first farm in the area where the road takes several 90-degree bends. There, we caught a glimpse of a small bird in the grass and we quickly coaxed two into a small bush where they proved to be the sought after Am. Tree Sparrow. A few more Horned Larks along the road from there down into the apple orchards. One final look around the junction of 97 and 17 turned up a hundred or more House Finches in the cottonwoods both at the junction and down the road toward Washburn Is.; where have the waxwings gone? So, we left the sunshine and headed west into over snowy Stevens Pass and into the wet. As usual, despite the many miles between birds, this is a great area to bird in the winter! Best of luck to those fortunate enough to be headed there with the upcoming WOS trip, and Happy Birding to all! - Jon Houghton, Edmonds

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Date: 2/5/20 11:52 pm
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Jackass penguin call shares traits of human speech, scientists say | Science | The Guardian

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2020/feb/05/jackass-penguin-call-shares-traits-of-human-speech-scientists-say


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Date: 2/5/20 9:18 pm
From: Teri Martine <terimartine...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Morocco birding opportunity April 2020
Hello Tweeters. I was looking forward to a 3 week, small group birding trip in Morocco this April, with excellent guide John Sterling and a local guide (they do this trip every spring). Unfortunately I won’t be able to go, due to a family situation. I’d love to find someone to take my place, and would offer a discount. If interested, let me know and I’ll send more details.
Teri Martine
Seattle
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Date: 2/5/20 9:38 am
From: AMK17 <amk17...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Quick drive by Okanogan and Douglas County Birding
Hi,

We had a quick trip through Waterville Plateau and a day visiting Okanogan Highlands last weekend. Highlights included Prairie Falcon on 172 while driving through the Plateau and many light adult Rough Legged hawks. We also had a small flock of Horned Larks.

On Saturday and Sunday we drove a lot to try to find birds. The winds were high and blustery and the birds were absent. We did manage to find a few highlights that made our day. A flock of about 500 Gray-crowned Rosy Finches on Mary Ann Creek Road and a smaller flock of about 50 on Nealey Road. A few Gray Partridge at Fancher Flats, a Ruffed Grouse on Cameron Lake Road (at dusk). Red crossbills in Conconully and a Northern Pygmy Owl on the road in (which flew into the rear passenger side door but did right itself and fly back up into the trees. We stopped to check on it and had great views but it was unnerving to say the least - probably more so for the tiny owl). Chukar at the junction of Conconully Road and Riverside Dr.

On Conconully Road before and opposite Scotch Creek overlook in water birches, a small flock of Sharp tailed Grouse feeding at the top of water birches.

The trip was exhausting but we managed 3 lifers for my visiting California friend.

Other highlights were a muskrat meandering down the center of Chesaw Road and a group of bighorn sheep on the railroad tracks as we drove out on 97. Never saw a muskrat out of water so very interesting - it was not happy as I approached it to gently coax it off the road and oncoming traffic.

Happy birding,
AKopitov

Seattle
AMK17
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Date: 2/4/20 10:19 pm
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: [Tweeters] What Goes Into a Chase
https://blairbirding.com/2020/02/05/an-ivory-gull-at-flathead-lake-whats-behind-a-complicated-chase/

Blair Bernsonblairbirding.com



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Date: 2/4/20 7:33 pm
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fir Island Gyrfalcon, Burlington odd duck
Dear Tweeters,
My friend Mike saw a Gyrfalcon at Jensen Access on Fir Island (Skagit County) on Groundhog's Day, so I spent several hours searching the area the next day, to no avail.
Today (the fourth February) I went back to Fir Island, and found the Gyrfalcon immediately upon arriving at Hayton Reserve. The bird was perched near the Bald Eagle nest tree, but flew off toward Jensen Access as soon as I drove up.
I went over to Jensen to look for it, but did not see it.
This bird takes patience! Today was my sixth Fir Island visit this year. Same with the Samish Flats Prairie Falcon--it took me lots of searching to locate that falcon as well.
Also of interest today was a strange Mallard-like duck at the K-Mart Pond, or Walnut Street Pond, in Burlington. This little pond is just south of the south end of the K-Mart parking area. The duck in question was with six Mallards. It looked just like any normal female Mallard, except that its bill was a dull greenish-grey. I had thought it was blackish grey, but the photos I took show a bit of olive-drab color to the bill. There was nothing about this duck that suggested (to me at least) that it was a domestic duck or some other species. I will put the photos on my eBird checklist shortly. I was wondering if it might have been an eclipse male that failed to moult out of that plumage, or an "intersex" bird, or possibly some kind of hybrid.
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch
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Date: 2/4/20 6:29 pm
From: Jon Houghton <jon.houghton...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Okanogan Highlands today
Hi Tweets - chilly morning in the Highlands today, with temperatures down to about 9 degrees. First stop was Fancher Rd. which was snow free. A single Chukar was scoped on the ridgeline and a Prairie Falcon on a light pole out on the flats gave us great views. Siwash Rd was a little disappointing with not much more interesting than a Great Blue Heron inexplicably flying up the canyon?? The road up to the Havillah SnoPark was treacherously frozen ice ruts. We made it to the parking lot where we chatted with the ski track groomer and learned that one of the area's Great Gray's got whacked by a vehicle on Havillah Rd recently. Discouraged by this, the lack of birds in the area, and the beginning snowfall, we crept slowly down the ice and back to Havillah Rd. On to Nealy Rd, there was the usual number of Rough-legged Hawks and Ravens but little else, even at the feeders. Chesaw was equally barren and with the Tav closed, we looked for birds at the creek (3 starling) and on to the cemetery ( nada). After turning and heading back to town, I caught a glimpse of what might be a bird on a snag behind the 'nature sanctuary'. Scoping through the thickening snow, it was a beautiful adult Goshawk! Just as I turned the scope over to Kathleen, the only vehicle we saw on this stretch of road came by and the bird disappeared into the snow. Back at Chesaw, we had a nice hot lunch at the Tavern (recommended for all birders, closed Monday). After lunch, Bolster Rd was pretty bird free but we did find Shep's Townsend's Solitaire in trees by the bridge. Mary Ann Cr. Rd. was mostly bird free (despite squeaking for Am. Tree Sparrow at multiple likely looking places). Near Molson, where it meets Molson Rd. we found a small flock of Gray-crowned Rosy Finches that others had recently seen along Mary Ann Creek. The last amazing sighting of the day was on Teas Rd. off Havillah Rd. (All-wheel drive strongly recommended to go up this road that is badly rutted by the recent big melt and now refrozen.) But! The huge flock of previously reported Snow Buntings is worth the climb!! I guessed near a thousand birds but I couldn't see them all. They were actively feeding in the wake of cattle that were breaking up the crusty snow exposing some underlying grasses. Off to Conconully and Timentwa Plateau tomorrow. Happy Birding! - Jon Houghton, Edmonds

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Date: 2/4/20 2:53 pm
From: washingtonbirder.Ken Knittle <washingtonbirder...>
Subject: [Tweeters] memorial service Ken Knittle
There will be a Memorial Service for Ken Knittle in Vancouver, WA, Saturday afternoon, February 15.


For more information or directions, please contact me off list.



Laurie Knittle

360 574 2590

Vancouver WA 98665

<mailto:<washingtonbirder...>mailto:<washingtonbirder...>



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Date: 2/3/20 9:57 pm
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] SCIENMAG: Feeding bluebirds helps fend off parasites

Feeding bluebirds helps fend off parasites
Credit: Becky Boyd If you feed the birds in your backyard, you may be doing more than just making sure they have a source of food: you may be helping baby birds give parasites the boot. New research published in the Journal of Applied Ecology from UConn assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology Sarah Knutie shows that feeding bluebirds can have a significant impact on parasitic nest flies feeding on baby bluebirds. Parasitic flies can be found in the nests of many bird species, and

Read in SCIENMAG: https://apple.news/AYyJHK3CESB2htcAo1mx_4g


Shared from Apple News


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Date: 2/3/20 7:33 pm
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Ivory Gull at Flathead Lake Montana
I just got back from a marathon trip to Flathead Lake in Montana having left after the Super Bowl yesterday.
The quest was an immature Ivory Gull that was discovered there on Thursday, seen again on Friday and then missed (probably due to very high winds) on Saturday before returning Sunday and then again today.  It has been very consistent coming to forage around the boat launch at the entry to Blue Bay at Flathead Lake.  Not at all shy, it literally walked to me this morning twice coming within 25 feet.  I was there before first light and had to wait a couple of hours before it flew in.  There are NO other gulls there and almost no other birds.  An amazing bird.
No guarantees of course but it does seem to favor the one spot and has now been seen by many (including Ken Trease on Sunday after his long drive over on Saturday when it was not seen).  It is Montana's first record.
My ebird report with lots of photos is at    https://ebird.org/checklist/S64090127
Blair Bernson (and yes I keep my psychiatrist advised of all such insane adventures)




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Date: 2/3/20 6:41 pm
From: Jon Houghton <jon.houghton...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Okanogan 2020 - Day 1
Hi Tweets - Well, here we are again: Omak. Inspired by recent reports from Shep and Khan, and forecast of a little cooler weather, we headed over Snowy Stevens Pass this morning. True to form, sunshine broke out about Cole's Corner and stayed with us all day. Temps were in the mid 30s and snow pretty much disappeared by Casmere. Over Badger Mt. birds had also disappeared. Undeterred, we headed east from Waterville on RT. 2 to the Atkins Lk. area and turned north on L, an area where we had seen a Snowy Owl last winter. Very quickly, where Woods Rd. crosses 1st NE, we spotted one, then 2 owls, standing out quite starkly against the brown landscape. (Later in the day, Mitchell Von Rotz found 5 in the area!!) That was the highlight of the day. A Shrike, few scattered Horned Larks, and quite a few Rough-legged Hawks were the only special birds on the Plateau. On Bridgeport Hill Rd, the sunny weather and bare ground kept the Sharp-tailed Grouse out of the water birch. There were NO waxwings in sight near the junction of 97 and 17 where we'd had them in December and Shep's group had them last week. At Bainbridge St. Pk., we had an easy time (30 sec from getting out of the car) finding a Northern Sawwhet in the exact same perch where he was sitting in December! After a bit more searching, we flushed a large owl that flew a ways away and began hooting, proving it to be a Great-horned. So that was it: three FOY, all owls! Curious. Highlands tomorrow. Happy Birding! - Jon Houghton, Edmonds

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Date: 2/3/20 5:07 pm
From: <merdave...>
Subject: [Tweeters] FINALLY! Snowy Owls

Hi, Fellow Owl lovers. I've met several people looking for Snowy Owls
this season and today I became one of the few who have seen one. In fact
I saw 4 birds at Atkins Lake, Douglas County. Two were on rock piles on
the east side of L Rd., near the intersection with One Rd. The other 2
were on the edge of the ice, one off One Rd., going east from L. Rd. The
last one was on the edge of the lake on the west side of M Rd. Made my
day. Don't give up, try try again. Meredith Spencer, Bridgeport


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Date: 2/3/20 12:37 pm
From: Joan Miller <jemskink...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Flicker frenzy
Hi Tweets,

The flickers have long been clustering at my suet feeders, and I love them.
But lately there is frequent drumming on my house! What's going on? Is it
mating season, or just spring fever? I don't mind it. It makes me laugh.

Joan Miller
West Seattle
jemskink at gmail dot com

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Date: 2/2/20 8:13 pm
From: Randy <re_hill...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Clark County late winter WOS field trip 2/28, 2/29, 3/1
I've already had several responses for the WOS/Vancouver Audubon field trip
weekend that includes Friday afternoon, all day Saturday, and Sunday
morning. The Saturday trip is full but I will maintain a wait list. Friday
afternoon (Woodland Bottoms) and Sunday morning still have spaces.



Randy Hill

Ridgefield


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Date: 2/2/20 2:24 pm
From: Catherine Alexander <cma...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Golden Eagle over So Seattle???
Is there any possibility that I just saw a juvenile Golden Eagle soaring east of my house around 1:45 this afternoon. It was high enough that I needed binocs to definitely make out field marks, but I got a good couple minutes of watching with them. Got good views from underneath and a bit of a view of head and neck when it banked. It was headed to the south roughly along the shore of Lake Washington when I lost sight of it.

My first impression without binocs was juv BAEA but not quite, or maybe Red-tail Hawk, but not quite.

So with binocs.
From underneath
-Pale windows on underside of wings.
-White strip at base of tail.
-Flash of red-gold on neck
-Dark belly

When banking.
-Gorgeous red-gold head/nape
-White strip at base of tail

Nothing matched either BAEA or RTH, even though I was looking for those familiar field marks. I just kept thinking that this was a bird I’d never seen before.

I realize that Goldens are rare on this side of the mountains and am almost embarrassed to imagine that I might have seen one. Any thoughts from the experts out there? I’m open to anything.

Catherine Alexander
Lakewood Neighborhood
South Seattle


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Date: 2/1/20 10:39 pm
From: <jeffjendro...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Possible Baird's Sandpiper Cowlitz County
Possible Baird's Sandpiper seen from about 30 feet on beach at Willow Grove Park.  Bird worked the shoreline north eventually off park property.  By the time second observer arrived the bird was distant enough that he only could confirm it was a sandpiper.

The bird appeared larger than a Western Sandpiper, had black legs, black narrow bill, dark head and neck that had a marked transition to a pure white breast.  The wing tips appeared to extend beyond the tail.  The photo by Andre Birch on eBird is almost exactly the bird I saw.

Jeff Jendro 
Longview, WA

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Date: 2/1/20 5:21 pm
From: Ed Newbold <ednewbold1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Probably the ame unusual-appearing Barn Swallow back at Union Bay
Hi all,

Delia Scholes and I had a pale seemingly colorless juvenal Barn Swallow that perfectly fits the description by David Slager of his bird from Jan 28 from Union Bay.  Our bird was foraging and being somewhat loyal to the Wood Duck Pond by the Osprey nesting platform between about 3 and 3:20 this afternoon.  This bird doesn't look like any Barn Swallow I've ever seen, but since I know nothing really about Barn Swallow morphology, I'll quit my own conjecture right there. David wrote that it was probably an American bird and not a Eurasian. 


Also a Lincoln's Sparrow there and an army of Yellow-rumps.

Best wishes,     <ednewbold1...>
Ed Newbold





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Date: 2/1/20 3:47 pm
From: Tom Merritt <birders.2341...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] scope/iPhone question
I originally had the problem of the adapter not fitting on my scope, but I emailed PhoneSkope and they sent me a slightly smaller adapter that fit at no charge.

Tom Merritt
Seattle, WA

-----Original Message-----
From: Todd Sahl <toddsahl...>
Sent: Saturday, February 01, 2020 13:58
To: Tom Merritt <birders.2341...>
Cc: Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson...>; TWEETERS tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] scope/iPhone question

Hi Dennis,

I also recommend using the PhoneSkope adapters, with the following notes:

1. They work better with the regular sized iPhones. With the Plus sized phones with multiple camera lenses, a couple things are less ideal. First, the way the two pieces of the adapter mate together is different and not as solid. Second, the phone is longer and heavier and exerts more torque on the adaper. Put those two things together and the whole system can flex enough that unwanted light can creep in the corner of your images.

2. The piece of the adapter that mates to your scope eyepiece is made in some increment of diameters - maybe .1 or .2mm, and the best one may or may not fit your scope eyepiece really well. On my older model Vortex Razor scope the fit is fantastic, but I know of others that have had to use sandpaper on the adapter to get a fit that wasn’t too tight. It would be ideal to get feedback from someone that has the same model scope that you do.

Todd Sahl
Bellevue, WA

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 1, 2020, at 11:08 AM, Tom Merritt <birders.2341...> wrote:
>
> PhoneSkope seems to be the best choice for attaching a cell phone to a scope. It consists of a base for the cell phone and an adapter to slip over the eye piece. The link is:
>
> https://www.phoneskope.com/store/?gclid=Cj0KCQiA4NTxBRDxARIsAHyp6gBL94CQE09tvrbLNHD_bHWJe7qpOj04VCAjwRFB6gnNssJrgPbo
>
> I have been using it with a Swarovski HD AT 80 mm scope and a Samsung S8+ phone.
>
> Tom Merritt
> Seattle
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of Dennis Paulson
> Sent: Saturday, February 01, 2020 10:48
> To: TWEETERS tweeters <tweeters...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] scope/iPhone question
>
> Hello tweets,
>
> I’m thinking of getting a spotting scope that can have an adapter added to it to take photos with an iPhone 8 through the scope. Does anyone have any advice about this, i.e., actually owning and using such a scope? I’ll bet that might even be of general interest.
>
> Thanks!
>
> Dennis Paulson
> Seattle
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
> _______________________________________________
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> <Tweeters...>
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Date: 2/1/20 2:45 pm
From: Tim Brennan <tsbrennan...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Greater White-fronted Geese query - Renton
Hey Chris,

The geese at Gene Coulon have been seen off and on since November or so, including on some recent visits. We had about 15-20 for many winters, and then they mostly disappeared, but this group looks like they should be here through the winter. They can be found anywhere from the lawns near Ivar's/Kidd Valley to Bird Island on the west end of the park.

Cheers,

Tim Brennan
Renton

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Date: 2/1/20 2:16 pm
From: Ryan Merrill <rjm284...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Short-tailed Shearwater from Carkeek
Sarah Peden and I just watched a Short-tailed Shearwater flying south from
Carkeek Park in Seattle. There was also a male Redhead on the water that
Sarah spotted off the creek mouth that flew off to the north.

Good birding,
Ryan Merrill
Seattle

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Date: 2/1/20 2:06 pm
From: Becky Galloway <beckyg.sea...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Scope/iPhone question
I tried and returned an adapter from the Audubon Nature Center, mostly
because for best results my phone needed to stay in the adapter, which made
it hard to use for directions, phone calls, etc. Also the quality of
pictures wasn't that great, but that might be because I stuck to an older,
smaller model, iPhone 5S, because I want to be able to use it with one
hand. I have a small round handle suction-cupped to the back to aid in
handling, which was also a drawback in working with the adapter. I'm sorry
I don't remember the name of it, but the Nature Center was great to work
with!

--
Becky Galloway
Shoreline

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Date: 2/1/20 2:00 pm
From: Todd Sahl <toddsahl...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] scope/iPhone question
Hi Dennis,

I also recommend using the PhoneSkope adapters, with the following notes:

1. They work better with the regular sized iPhones. With the Plus sized phones with multiple camera lenses, a couple things are less ideal. First, the way the two pieces of the adapter mate together is different and not as solid. Second, the phone is longer and heavier and exerts more torque on the adaper. Put those two things together and the whole system can flex enough that unwanted light can creep in the corner of your images.

2. The piece of the adapter that mates to your scope eyepiece is made in some increment of diameters - maybe .1 or .2mm, and the best one may or may not fit your scope eyepiece really well. On my older model Vortex Razor scope the fit is fantastic, but I know of others that have had to use sandpaper on the adapter to get a fit that wasn’t too tight. It would be ideal to get feedback from someone that has the same model scope that you do.

Todd Sahl
Bellevue, WA

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 1, 2020, at 11:08 AM, Tom Merritt <birders.2341...> wrote:
>
> PhoneSkope seems to be the best choice for attaching a cell phone to a scope. It consists of a base for the cell phone and an adapter to slip over the eye piece. The link is:
>
> https://www.phoneskope.com/store/?gclid=Cj0KCQiA4NTxBRDxARIsAHyp6gBL94CQE09tvrbLNHD_bHWJe7qpOj04VCAjwRFB6gnNssJrgPbo
>
> I have been using it with a Swarovski HD AT 80 mm scope and a Samsung S8+ phone.
>
> Tom Merritt
> Seattle
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of Dennis Paulson
> Sent: Saturday, February 01, 2020 10:48
> To: TWEETERS tweeters <tweeters...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] scope/iPhone question
>
> Hello tweets,
>
> I’m thinking of getting a spotting scope that can have an adapter added to it to take photos with an iPhone 8 through the scope. Does anyone have any advice about this, i.e., actually owning and using such a scope? I’ll bet that might even be of general interest.
>
> Thanks!
>
> Dennis Paulson
> Seattle
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
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Date: 2/1/20 1:17 pm
From: Hubbell <ldhubbell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Leap Frog
Tweeters,

Can you guess which local, winter bird inspired the name for this week's post? 'Leap Frog' was certainly not the first title that came to mind. Find out whether you guessed right by reading this week’s post at:

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2020/02/leap-frog.html <https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2020/02/leap-frog.html>

Have a great day on Union Bay, where nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast.net
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Date: 2/1/20 12:06 pm
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...>
Subject: [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Feb. 2, 2020
Hello, Tweeters,

** Please note that the BirdNote website will be down intermittently over the next few days, for scheduled maintenance. Thanks for your patience.**
------------------------------------------------
Last week on BirdNote:
* Laysan Albatrosses Nest at Midway Atoll
http://bit.ly/VyuKDn
* Sounds of the Amazon
http://bit.ly/XI0ZT9
* Recording Cerulean Warblers for Science
-- with Charlotte Goedsche
http://bit.ly/1cBZV8y
* Wing-clapping
http://bit.ly/2iM0pIG
* Rhea Nesting Is Mind-boggling
http://bit.ly/36MDxgl
* Winter Brings Falcons
http://bit.ly/2yV0X1V
* Ecosystem Engineers on America's Serengeti
http://bit.ly/WnJ1W0
=========================
Next week on BirdNote: Great Blue Heron Meets T. Rex,
Red-tails Ride the Bus, Who Was Mother Goose? -- and more!
http://bit.ly/2tfVaY2
--------------------------------------
Did you have a favorite story this week? Another comment?
Please let us know. mailto:<info...>
------------------------------------------------
BirdNote is in print. Check out BirdNote, the book:
https://www.birdnote.org/birdnote-book
There's a journal, too -- for your notes and sketches and lists:
http://bit.ly/BirdNote-journal
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Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
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... or follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
or Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/birdnoteradio/
Listen on Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find 1500+ episodes and more than 1200 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
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Date: 2/1/20 11:45 am
From: Jon. Anderson and Marty Chaney <festuca...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] RFI - Okanogan Area - Sno Park
Mitchell asked: "I have seen comments about a location usually just referenced as the Sno-Park (I believe Khanh Tran just posted about it), can anyone clarify what or where that location is? I haven't been able to find it in the Birder's Guide."

Hi Mitchell, the Highlands Sno-Park is a little over 2 miles south of Havillah. There is a mandatory Sno-Park Permit ($20 for a one-day pass, or $40 for the season) to park there. More information at http://highlandsnordicsnopark.com/

Hope this helps,
Jon. A
OlyWA
https://jonsperegrination.blogspot.com/

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Date: 2/1/20 11:09 am
From: Tom Merritt <birders.2341...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] scope/iPhone question
PhoneSkope seems to be the best choice for attaching a cell phone to a scope. It consists of a base for the cell phone and an adapter to slip over the eye piece. The link is:

https://www.phoneskope.com/store/?gclid=Cj0KCQiA4NTxBRDxARIsAHyp6gBL94CQE09tvrbLNHD_bHWJe7qpOj04VCAjwRFB6gnNssJrgPbo

I have been using it with a Swarovski HD AT 80 mm scope and a Samsung S8+ phone.

Tom Merritt
Seattle

-----Original Message-----
From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of Dennis Paulson
Sent: Saturday, February 01, 2020 10:48
To: TWEETERS tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] scope/iPhone question

Hello tweets,

I’m thinking of getting a spotting scope that can have an adapter added to it to take photos with an iPhone 8 through the scope. Does anyone have any advice about this, i.e., actually owning and using such a scope? I’ll bet that might even be of general interest.

Thanks!

Dennis Paulson
Seattle
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Date: 2/1/20 10:52 am
From: Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson...>
Subject: [Tweeters] scope/iPhone question
Hello tweets,

I’m thinking of getting a spotting scope that can have an adapter added to it to take photos with an iPhone 8 through the scope. Does anyone have any advice about this, i.e., actually owning and using such a scope? I’ll bet that might even be of general interest.

Thanks!

Dennis Paulson
Seattle
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Date: 1/31/20 8:17 pm
From: J Christian Kessler <1northraven...>
Subject: [Tweeters] greater white fronted geese at gene coulon park
can anyone tell me if these geese are still at this park in renton?

Chris Kessler

--
"moderation in everything, including moderation"
Rustin Thompson

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Date: 1/31/20 5:01 pm
From: Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Albuquerque, New Mexico: Request for Birding Recommendations
Another suggestion, is the Bernardo Waterfowl Management Area of the Ladd S. Gordon Waterfowl Complex.  I see a lot of posts from there, and it is about half the distance from Albuquerque to Bosque del Apache.  Hope you got my previous reply, too!https://www.socorronm.org/attractions/ladd-s-gordon-waterfowl-complex-bernardo-waterfowl-area/

Peggy MundyBothell
On Wednesday, January 29, 2020, 09:32:10 a.m. PST, Mason Flint <masonflint...> wrote:

You should still have a decent chance of seeing all three species of Rosy-Finch at Sandia Crest in March. That’s about an hour drive from Albuquerque, despite being visible from anywhere in town. 
March should also still be good at Bosque del Apache NWR which is a world class spot for wintering waterfowl, cranes, raptors and lots of other birds. It’s about 90 minutes from Albuquerque.  You’ll want to arrive before dawn so may want to spend the night in nearby Socorro if you go. 
If you go to Santa Fe, the Santa Fe Canyon Preserve is nice. Juniper Titmouse, bluebirds, reasonable chance for Pinyon Jay. Stop at The Shed for lunch and order a #5  - arrive early or walk around the plaza while you wait for a table. 
Reach out if you want a recommendation for a guide. I have a friend who lives near Albuquerque who guides and will likely show you around if he’s not guiding somewhere out of state. 

March isn’t peak birding season there but I’m a big fan of New Mexico for birding, beauty and culture. I’ve reminded my birding pals more than once that the New Mexico list trails only California, Texas, and Arizona in accepted species. It’s hard to stand out when you have Arizona on your left and Texas on your right but more people should check New Mexico out. 😁
Mason FlintBellevue
From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> on behalf of Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Sent: Tuesday, January 28, 2020 10:13:24 PM
To: Tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Albuquerque, New Mexico: Request for Birding Recommendations Hello Tweeters,I may have an opportunity to visit Albuquerque in late March.This would be my first trip to NM.
I would be grateful for information regarding birds and locations and guides for that area and state.Thank you,Dan Reiff_______________________________________________
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Date: 1/31/20 10:07 am
From: Brian Zinke <zinke.pilchuck...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marine Bird Identification Class
Greetings all!

Pilchuck Audubon Society is hosting a marine bird identification class in
Everett on February 11th, with field trip opportunities February 16th and
17th (Sunday and Monday of President's Day weekend).

For more information on the class and how to register, please use the links
below:

Pilchuck Audubon website:
https://www.pilchuckaudubon.org/classes

Pilchuck Audubon Facebook event:
https://www.facebook.com/events/2442917485982422/

Thanks,

Brian Zinke
Everett, WA
<zinke.pilchuck...>

--
Brian Zinke
Executive Director
Pilchuck Audubon Society
<director...>
www.pilchuckaudubon.org
c: (425) 232-6811

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Date: 1/30/20 11:09 pm
From: Nadine Drisseq <drisseq.n...>
Subject: [Tweeters] WOS lecture this Monday!
*Hi Tweets!Washington Ornithological Society's m**onthly meeting is this*

*Monday, February 3, 2020!*


*“Watching After Waterfowl: Research, Conservation and Management of the
Pacific Flyway’s Ducks, Geese and Swans”*


*with Kyle Spragens*



As Waterfowl Section Manager for the WDFW, Kyle Spragens is a major player
in managing and studying migratory waterfowl throughout the Pacific
Flyway and beyond.*


Come learn the what, how, and why of activities here in Washington, and
more importantly, cooperative efforts throughout the Flyway.


Washington Ornithological Society monthly meetings are held at:
The UW Center for Urban Horticulture, 3501 NE 41st Street, Seattle

Social starts at 7pm, and the formal program begins at 7:30pm.

Meetings are the first Monday of the month, October through June. All are
welcome! Hope to see you there!



GoTo Meeting Information
WOS members may join our monthly meetings remotely by using the
videoconferencing program, GoToMeeting (GTM).


Please join our meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/317726909
<http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=001VpmgPT05p83bqhltA_QVG9jdR5cr4imwgEuajAJcSTFzTFdaUzvrlbFL6c5nUoyv3JMEmgeuYidPrw2xmtaryFqTyP6esKtcWpV6vTJ_qHPekTsCYH-jDbPYfmt5uZ32_lPnPuwYsp5-QVOEktTmOHDCMjtwApZA67irS2y226-UrQbYRIu0gA==&c=7lhUa-RfU_FnyDiFi3dP-uf5OtJyk_Zpfw_mcffaWzMbtTw2Nw4kLQ==&ch=LfgasbvEfIZ0QohpWRjLpdnfW7ZqV8Akg44tWW73rvLZjl373Bak6Q==>


You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (872) 240-3311

Access Code: 317-726-909

New to GoToMeeting? Get the app now and be ready when your first meeting
starts:
https://global.gotomeeting.com/install/317726909
<http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=001VpmgPT05p83bqhltA_QVG9jdR5cr4imwgEuajAJcSTFzTFdaUzvrlbFL6c5nUoyveg22HHGe-seR74Rtx-fkhEgfJPfb5_CINhwi9Py3TFcfNDr3RvEkBrixZNqzJQKOJJzRu8jHUnbXkjY1Ac6fznICE3jwdXrTl7I3aMlMg1qUBdH0PQJ59Q==&c=7lhUa-RfU_FnyDiFi3dP-uf5OtJyk_Zpfw_mcffaWzMbtTw2Nw4kLQ==&ch=LfgasbvEfIZ0QohpWRjLpdnfW7ZqV8Akg44tWW73rvLZjl373Bak6Q==>


*Kyle Spragens is the Statewide Waterfowl Section Manager for the
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, and serves as liaison to the
Pacific flyway council. He is a graduate of Humboldt State University (BSc
& MSc) with an emphasis in Natural Resources and Wildlife Management. His
previous waterfowl ecology adventures have spanned from the Canadian Arctic
tundra to lagoons along the Black Sea in Turkey to fishponds in Hong Kong’s
Pearl River Delta; including six years as a Wildlife Biologist for the
USGS-San Francisco Bay Estuary Field Station and three years as Senior
Waterfowl Biologist for the USFWS-Yukon Delta NWR in Bethel, Alaska. His
background has focused on cooperation with partners across the Pacific and
East Asian-Australasian Flyways conducting monitoring and research projects
related to nesting waterfowl, migration chronology, sea-level rise impacts
to migratory bird habitats, and spatio-temporal dynamics in habitat use.
ReplyForward

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Date: 1/30/20 8:21 pm
From: <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2020-01-30
Tweets – It was a beautiful morning, and we had several BARN OWL sightings from the Viewing Mound before the sunrise exploded in pink, orange, purple and blue. Mt. Rainier was showing for good measure. No rain, some sunlight and shadows, no wind, not cold, muddy, and with a partially (slightly) flooded boardwalk.

Highlights:
a.. Cackling Goose – a couple of hundred, probably. We’ve been having much smaller numbers since December
b.. Greater Scaup – lone female again
c.. Great Blue Heron – one carried a stick to the nests, a pair copulated
d.. Belted Kingfisher – seen trying to swallow a too-big fish
e.. Northern Shrike – north of fields 7-8-9
f.. Bushtit – just two – First of the Year
g.. European Starling – 200-300 birds in a murmuration at 7:30
h.. Pine Sisklin – one or two relatively small swirls. Our only finches for the day
i.. Western Meadowlark – SINGING in East Meadow
j.. American Beavers, Muskrat (First of Year), Pacific Tree Frogs heard in January
Singing birds included Anna’s Hummingbird, Black-capped Chickadee, Pacific Wren, Bewick’s Wren, American Robin, Song Sparrow, Golden-crowned Sparrow, Dark-eyed Junco, Red-winged Blackbird, and Western Meadowlark

Misses included Ring-necked Duck, Hooded Merganser, Cooper’s Hawk, Marsh Wren, and House Finch

For the day, 51 species.

= Michael Hobbs
= www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
= <BirdMarymoor...>

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Date: 1/30/20 1:00 pm
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Dovekie, Great Cormorant and Barnacle Goose - Birding in Cold Massachusetts
Earlier in the month I visited my daughter, son-in-law and grandson in Massachusetts.  Very cold and some snow and I was fighting a cold most of the time, but was able to get out to chase two Lifers - BARNACLE GOOSE and DOVEKIE.  Was fortunate and also added a much improved ABA photo of a Great Cormorant.  Stories in these blog posts.
https://blairbirding.com/2020/01/22/a-dovekie-after-the-goose-and-a-great-cormorant-after-the-dovekie/




https://blairbirding.com/2020/01/20/wild-goose-chases-second-times-a-charm/





Blair BernsonEdmonds 
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Date: 1/30/20 12:41 pm
From: ck park <travelgirl.fics...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Tweeters] Pine Sisken in a feeder
i had this happen with a black-capped chickadee a few years back. photo
available upon request (unless tweeters' attachment policy has changed
(unlikely)) :)

00 caren
ParkGallery.org
george davis creek, north fork


On Thu, Jan 30, 2020 at 12:32 PM Diane Weinstein <diane_weinstein...>
wrote:

> Several years ago I had a Pine Sisken trapped in a tube feeder. He flew
> away when I opened it up. I mentioned it to the salesperson at Wild Birds
> Unlimited and she said that some of the small birds, especially small
> juveniles will fall into the ports trying to reach the seed.
>
> Diane Weinstein
> Sammamish
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> on behalf
> of Hank H <h.heiberg...>
> *Sent:* Thursday, January 30, 2020 7:58 AM
> *To:* Tweeters <tweeters...>
> *Subject:* [Tweeters] Tweeters] Pine Sisken in a feeder
>
> At Marymoor Park in Redmond, we saw a Chestnut-backed Chickadee inside the
> cylindrical seed feeder located on the east side of the park office
> building. There was a Black-capped Chickadee on the feeder poking its head
> in the feeder openings. After a short period, the Chestnut-backed
> Chickadee escaped out of a side hole and both chickadees flew off. The top
> was on the feeder the whole time.
>
> Hank Heiberg
> Issaquah, WA
>
> *From:* mary hrudkaj <mch1096...>
> *Date:* January 30, 2020 at 7:39:12 AM PST
> *To:* Tweeters Tweeters Bird Chat <tweeters...>
> *Subject:* *[Tweeters] Pine Sisken in a feeder*
>
> When I went out to put out feed for all the feathered folks in the yard I
> got a surprise when I took the metal lid off the sunflower feeder. Out
> flew a pine sisken! Fortunately it flew off into the trees and not into my
> face. Sure would like to know how that little guy managed to get the lid
> open. At least it had a comfortable abode for the night. Plenty of food,
> shelter from the rain and predators. Maybe the other siskens dared it to
> go in. You never know what siskens might do.
>
> Mary Hrudkaj
> Belfair/Tahuya
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>

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Date: 1/30/20 12:33 pm
From: Diane Weinstein <diane_weinstein...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Tweeters] Pine Sisken in a feeder
Several years ago I had a Pine Sisken trapped in a tube feeder. He flew away when I opened it up. I mentioned it to the salesperson at Wild Birds Unlimited and she said that some of the small birds, especially small juveniles will fall into the ports trying to reach the seed.

Diane Weinstein
Sammamish

________________________________
From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> on behalf of Hank H <h.heiberg...>
Sent: Thursday, January 30, 2020 7:58 AM
To: Tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Tweeters] Pine Sisken in a feeder

At Marymoor Park in Redmond, we saw a Chestnut-backed Chickadee inside the cylindrical seed feeder located on the east side of the park office building. There was a Black-capped Chickadee on the feeder poking its head in the feeder openings. After a short period, the Chestnut-backed Chickadee escaped out of a side hole and both chickadees flew off. The top was on the feeder the whole time.

Hank Heiberg
Issaquah, WA

From: mary hrudkaj <mch1096...><mailto:<mch1096...>>
Date: January 30, 2020 at 7:39:12 AM PST
To: Tweeters Tweeters Bird Chat <tweeters...><mailto:<tweeters...>>
Subject: [Tweeters] Pine Sisken in a feeder

When I went out to put out feed for all the feathered folks in the yard I got a surprise when I took the metal lid off the sunflower feeder. Out flew a pine sisken! Fortunately it flew off into the trees and not into my face. Sure would like to know how that little guy managed to get the lid open. At least it had a comfortable abode for the night. Plenty of food, shelter from the rain and predators. Maybe the other siskens dared it to go in. You never know what siskens might do.

Mary Hrudkaj
Belfair/Tahuya
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Date: 1/30/20 8:01 am
From: Hank H <h.heiberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Tweeters] Pine Sisken in a feeder
At Marymoor Park in Redmond, we saw a Chestnut-backed Chickadee inside the cylindrical seed feeder located on the east side of the park office building. There was a Black-capped Chickadee on the feeder poking its head in the feeder openings. After a short period, the Chestnut-backed Chickadee escaped out of a side hole and both chickadees flew off. The top was on the feeder the whole time.

Hank Heiberg
Issaquah, WA

>> From: mary hrudkaj <mch1096...>
>> Date: January 30, 2020 at 7:39:12 AM PST
>> To: Tweeters Tweeters Bird Chat <tweeters...>
>> Subject: [Tweeters] Pine Sisken in a feeder
>>
>> When I went out to put out feed for all the feathered folks in the yard I got a surprise when I took the metal lid off the sunflower feeder. Out flew a pine sisken! Fortunately it flew off into the trees and not into my face. Sure would like to know how that little guy managed to get the lid open. At least it had a comfortable abode for the night. Plenty of food, shelter from the rain and predators. Maybe the other siskens dared it to go in. You never know what siskens might do.
>>
>> Mary Hrudkaj
>> Belfair/Tahuya
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

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Date: 1/30/20 7:41 am
From: mary hrudkaj <mch1096...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Pine Sisken in a feeder
When I went out to put out feed for all the feathered folks in the yard I got a surprise when I took the metal lid off the sunflower feeder. Out flew a pine sisken! Fortunately it flew off into the trees and not into my face. Sure would like to know how that little guy managed to get the lid open. At least it had a comfortable abode for the night. Plenty of food, shelter from the rain and predators. Maybe the other siskens dared it to go in. You never know what siskens might do.

Mary Hrudkaj
Belfair/Tahuya

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Date: 1/29/20 9:17 pm
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually NWR, Wednesday Walk for 1/29/2020
Hi Tweets,

approximately 15 of us endured a wet one at the Refuge with cloudy skies,
rain, windy conditions and temperatures in the 40's to 50's degrees
Fahrenheit. There was a High 14.38ft Tide at 08:46am, so we chased the
tide and rerouted our walk to the Nisqually Estuary Trail and Nisqually
Estuary Boardwalk earlier in the day. Highlights included FOY GREEN-WINGED
TEAL (Eurasian) and BARN SWALLOW.

Starting out at 08:00am at the Visitor Center Pond Overlook we had nice
looks at GADWALL, RING-NECKED DUCK, BUFFLEHEAD and HOODED MERGANSER. I was
very excited to see our FOY PIED-BILLED GREBE, as this species had been
very difficult for us to find on the Refuge with the recent low water
levels.

We proceeded to the west entrance to the Twin Barns Loop Trail, and found
GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW in the bramble between the boards and the access
road. The flooded fields west and south of the Twin Barns were great for
NORTHERN SHOVELER, NORTHERN PINTAIL, AMERICAN WIGEON, GREEN-WINGED TEAL and
AMERICAN COOT. A RED-TAILED HAWK was scoped in the Willow Trees along the
central access road. Continuing on our way we observed BLACK-CAPPED
CHICKADEE, DOWNY WOODPECKER and HAIRY WOODPECKER.

The Twin Barns Overlook was very productive. With all the rain the flooded
fields were very wet with large pooled ponds. We observed good numbers of
Northern Shoveler, Northern Pintail, American Wigeon, Green-winged Teal,
American Coot and Mallard. Annually we see GREEN-WINGED TEAL (EURASIAN),
and we located one in the hundreds of American Green-winged Teal.
Unexpectedly, we also observed two intergrade teal.

Out on the dike or Nisqually Estuary Trail, we enjoyed SONG SPARROW, FOX
SPARROW, DARK-EYED JUNCO, and SPOTTED TOWHEE on the inside of the trail in
the bramble adjacent to the fresh water slough. RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET,
BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE, and BUSHTIT were also seen. On the salt water side
we had good looks of WESTERN MEADOWLARK in the grassy portions of the
restored surge plain, and NORTHERN HARRIER.

With the high tide, rain, and wind, there was plenty of water. An early
unexpected BARN SWALLOW, made a fast flying appearance through the Refuge.
GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL, "OLYMPIC" GULL", RING-BILLED GULL and MEW GULL were
seen in good numbers. Two flocks of approximately 50 DUNLIN were scoped
out on the reach, and several GREATER YELLOWLEGS were seen. We observed
approximately 15 BALD EAGLES.

The Nisqually Estuary Boardwalk Trail was good for DOUBLE-CRESTED
CORMORANT, BRANDT'S COMORANT, BRANT GEESE, SURF SCOTER, COMMON GOLDENEYE,
and RED-BREASTED MERGANSER.

At the Nisqually River Overlook, 10 COMMON MERGANSER were seen. The
Orchard was good for GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW and RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKER.

We observed 54 species for day, with 79 species for the year. Mammals seen
included American Beaver and Eastern Gray Squirrel.

Until next week, when it hopefully will be a bit dryer.

Happy birding,
Shep

--
Shep Thorp
Browns Point
253-370-3742

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Date: 1/29/20 6:43 pm
From: Mitchell Von Rotz <biglou22...>
Subject: [Tweeters] RFI - Okanogan Area
Greetings Tweeters,
I finally have plans to check out the Okanogan area for the first time this coming Monday. I have always paid attention to everyone’s posts about their trips to this area and made notes to go along with the Birder’s Guide, however, I have seen comments about a location usually just referenced as the Sno-Park (I believe Khanh Tran just posted about it), can anyone clarify what or where that location is? I haven't been able to find it in the Birder’s Guide. Thanks and good birding!

Mitchell Von Rotz

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Date: 1/29/20 12:41 pm
From: Adrian Wolf <awolf...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bird banding class - 25-27 April and 2-4 May 2020
Helo Tweeters,

In late-April and early May, The Center for Natural Lands Management, in
collaboration with The Evergreen State College, will host its eighth annual
bird banding training camp, located at Glacial Heritage Preserve in
Thurston County, Washington. The training, to be proctored by Dan Froehlich
(OrnithoLogistcs), will include all the aspects of setting up and
running a MAPS
(Monitoring Avian Survivorship and Productivity) station and would provide,
as a goal, banders who could extract birds captured, record data, and
perform most aging and sexing of the common species. The focus of the
training course will be on aging by wing feather patterns, sexing, and
skulling with the goal of separating adults from juveniles. The intention
is for each student to band and process 12-16 small to medium sized birds
typically found in terrestrial habitats. This includes many species of
passerines such as sparrows, finches, thrushes, wrens, chickadees,
nuthatches, creepers, flycatchers, and warblers. Small to medium-sized
non-passerines may also be studied (e.g. woodpeckers, and pigeons).

The training will comprise of six mornings of fieldwork, and six afternoons
of lectures over two weekends (25-27 April, and 2-4 May 2020). The camp
cost is $500, which includes a copy of the Pyle Guide, Part I (cost is $450
if you provide your own copy). The Black Hills Audubon Society is offering
two scholarships, which will cover $450 of the class. Recipients of the
scholarship will be expected to make a presentation at a BHAS meeting.
Please visit their website (www.blackhillsaudubon.com) and Echo newsletter
for the announcement and application information. Graduates of the class
will be able to implement their newly acquired skills at two local MAPS
stations (one located at Glacial Heritage Preserve, Thurston County; and
the other located in Graham, Pierce County).

If you are interested in securing a spot in the training or need more
details, please contact Adrian Wolf at <awolf...> Please do not delay
because there is an enrollment limit, and the class fills quickly.

--
Adrian Wolf
Conservation Biologist
Center for Natural Lands Management
120 Union Ave SE #215
Olympia, WA 98501

Tel. 360-888-4369
<awolf...>
www.southsoundprairies.org

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Date: 1/29/20 10:11 am
From: Todd Sahl <toddsahl...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Albuquerque, New Mexico: Request for Birding Recommendations
Hi Dan,
Your timing is fortunate!  If you have a rental car you can visit the Sandia Crest House in the mountains east of the city and see all three species of Rosy-Finch coming to feeders:
https://ebird.org/hotspot/L1404918

No guide needed. These birds depart this location the first week of April and don't return until November. 
Todd SahlBellevue, WA

On Tuesday, January 28, 2020, 10:14:35 PM PST, Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> wrote:

Hello Tweeters,I may have an opportunity to visit Albuquerque in late March.This would be my first trip to NM.
I would be grateful for information regarding birds and locations and guides for that area and state.Thank you,Dan Reiff_______________________________________________
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Date: 1/29/20 9:35 am
From: Mason Flint <masonflint...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Albuquerque, New Mexico: Request for Birding Recommendations
You should still have a decent chance of seeing all three species of Rosy-Finch at Sandia Crest in March. That’s about an hour drive from Albuquerque, despite being visible from anywhere in town.

March should also still be good at Bosque del Apache NWR which is a world class spot for wintering waterfowl, cranes, raptors and lots of other birds. It’s about 90 minutes from Albuquerque. You’ll want to arrive before dawn so may want to spend the night in nearby Socorro if you go.

If you go to Santa Fe, the Santa Fe Canyon Preserve is nice. Juniper Titmouse, bluebirds, reasonable chance for Pinyon Jay. Stop at The Shed for lunch and order a #5 - arrive early or walk around the plaza while you wait for a table.

Reach out if you want a recommendation for a guide. I have a friend who lives near Albuquerque who guides and will likely show you around if he’s not guiding somewhere out of state.

March isn’t peak birding season there but I’m a big fan of New Mexico for birding, beauty and culture. I’ve reminded my birding pals more than once that the New Mexico list trails only California, Texas, and Arizona in accepted species. It’s hard to stand out when you have Arizona on your left and Texas on your right but more people should check New Mexico out. 😁

Mason Flint
Bellevue

________________________________
From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> on behalf of Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Sent: Tuesday, January 28, 2020 10:13:24 PM
To: Tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Albuquerque, New Mexico: Request for Birding Recommendations

Hello Tweeters,
I may have an opportunity to visit Albuquerque in late March.
This would be my first trip to NM.
I would be grateful for information regarding birds and locations and guides for that area and state.
Thank you,
Dan Reiff
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Date: 1/29/20 8:37 am
From: info <info...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Washington Birder List Reporting
A reminder that the end of January, which is the deadline for sending 2019 List and Big Day Reports to Washington Birder, is quickly approaching.

Please send List Reports using the form at: http://wabirder.com/forms.html by January 31.

This year, I hope to have the Reports compiled by the end of February and up on the website soon after.

If you have any questions, please email me off-list.

Laurie Knittle
Vancouver, WA
<info...> mailto:<info...>

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Date: 1/28/20 10:38 pm
From: Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Albuquerque, New Mexico: Request for Birding Recommendations
I visited NM for the first time in December.  Are you strictly going to be in Albuquerque or farther afield?  I can definitely recommend the Rio Grande Nature Center State Park in Albuquerque  http://www.emnrd.state.nm.us/SPD/riograndenaturecenterstatepark.html
I don't know if the rosy-finches will still be at Sandia Crest House that late, might be worth some research, it's a great view, if nothing else https://www.sandiacresthouse.com/
A few months before my trip, I joined the Birding New Mexico facebook group to get ideas of places to go https://www.facebook.com/groups/birdingNM/
Peggy MundyBothell
On Tuesday, January 28, 2020, 10:14:35 p.m. PST, Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> wrote:

Hello Tweeters,I may have an opportunity to visit Albuquerque in late March.This would be my first trip to NM.
I would be grateful for information regarding birds and locations and guides for that area and state.Thank you,Dan Reiff_______________________________________________
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Date: 1/28/20 10:17 pm
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Albuquerque, New Mexico: Request for Birding Recommendations
Hello Tweeters,
I may have an opportunity to visit Albuquerque in late March.
This would be my first trip to NM.
I would be grateful for information regarding birds and locations and
guides for that area and state.
Thank you,
Dan Reiff

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Date: 1/28/20 10:05 pm
From: STEVEN ELLIS <sremse...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Owls ( and a falling mouse)
My wife and I just got back (9:15pm) from our usual evening stroll from our house. We could hear 6 Great-horned Owls- 3 to the east and 3 to the west.

While walking the road shoulder a Deer Mouse fell about 4 feet in front of us. It quickly scurried into the nearby salal. It either fell from the power line or was dropped by a 7th owl. It also could have fallen from a tree but that would have been a drop of 30'+. In any case, it shrugged off the hard ;landing and seemed uninjured.
----Steve Ellis
<sremse...> mailto:<sremse...>
Coupeville (beware of falling rodents), Wa
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Date: 1/28/20 8:29 pm
From: Khanh Tran <khanhbatran...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Okanogan Highlands and Waterville Plateau Bird Report and Gratitude (longish)
Hi Tweeters and Happy 2020!

The magical Okanogan Highlands and Waterville Plateau always deliver if you are persistent, patient, and have faith! Despite lower numbers in some species, the diversity is great. The last two trips have produced high,quality birds. Highlights are seeing several species of owls, cooperative pine grosbeaks feeding right at eye level, and many fancy chickens.

I had to work extremely hard the last few years to find these wintering, target birds and this year is no different;compared to the greater number of birds during the 2003-2008 time frame. Understanding how these nomadic birds move each week, as they wander and deplete various food sources, can be helpful. Feeding behavior and time of day is also key.

Bohemian Waxwings were here in late October starting at higher elevations (above 6000 ft) and trickled down to lower elevations in November near towns with orchards. Pine Grosbeaks were common in late fall (Okanogan and Ferry County at 3500-6000 ft elevation ) and we saw them at almost at every stop while looking for spruce grouse. They became tougher to track down when the heavy snow hit! Gray-crowned Rosy-finches use to be at a few, staked out feeders in the Highlands but have almost vanished from here. Have the burns affected them? Or was there was a disruption from the owners not providing seed for days and the birds departed elsewhere to find food and have'n't returned in years? They have high metabolism and have to constantly eat during the winter. Prior to seeing them at feeders, I would see them roaming near grassy hillsides and fields. Today, there were 500 gray-crowned rosy-finches seen feeding along the hillside in the Okanogan Highlands!

Here is the report from the last two trips....

Great Gray Owl- two birds hunting in calm conditions near the Sno-Park.

Short -eared Owl-singleton birds on Havillah Rd and Hwy 2 and Hwy 172

Long eared Owls-small parliament of birds in Okanogan and Waterville Plateau--at one point up to ten birds

Northern Pygmy Owls-a good year for them about 6 different wintering territories in Okanogan Highlands and a couple in Conconully

Northern Saw-Whet- up to three birds at Bridgeport State Park

Barn Owl-near Omak Airport

Snowy Owl-there are now TWO birds (one heavily spotted and an intermediate one) on the Waterville Plateau near Mansfield

Great Horned-several at dusk

Sharp tailed Grouse- at traditional feeding places near Happy Hill Rd and Bridgeport Hill Rd (up to 6 birds at a time)

Gray Partridge-three coveys of 6-12 birds on Okanogan Highlands near Bolster, Havillah Church, and Nealy Rd

Sage Grouse- a couple of birds along K NE near Mansfield

Ruffed Grouse-in small numbers along Mary Ann Creek RD

Black Backed Woodpecker-Sno-Park

Bohemian Waxwings-small flocks near Hwy 17 and Hwy 97 popular, small groups near Hungry Hollow Rd and Mary Ann Creek Rd. Largest flock
about 75 birds.

Gray Crowned Rosyfinches- largest flock near Riverside Cut Rd -cliffs (Roughly 200 birds at first light), a couple mixed in with Horned Larks along Hwy 172 on Waterville Plateau. And a flock of 500 birds along the hillside of Mary Ann Creek Rd this past weekend!

Snow Buntings-started out as a small flock of about 200 birds along Hungry Hollow Rd in November, now counted about 1000 birds near Teas Rd this past weekend

American Tree Sparrows-everywhere near tree copse and brushy areas! Mostly groups of 6-12 birds

Common Redpolls-small group of 3-5 birds along Hertiage Rd

Pine Grosbeaks-small flocks of 3-20 birds along Fields Rd, Mary Ann Creek Rd and Hungry Hollow Rd

Townsend's Solitaire-one in the town of Chesaw.

I also wanted to express my gratitude for Paul and Barbara Webster for inspiring to explore the Methow Valley in the winter; it sparkled my interest circa 2003 and prompted me to explore the Okanogan Highlands as a result. Can't forget Patrick and Ruth Sullivan for extensively covering the Waterville Plateau area . And also, the trip reports from the WOS trips leaders Shep Thorp, Stefan Schlick, and Ken Brown over the years. A special acknowledgement to Shep Thorp for his amazing leadership, kindness, and birding skills to find so many goodies while managingsuch a big group! AND a big thank you for Andy Stepniewski for providing general birding locations in the WA Birder Guide. Hats off for all your contributions!

I wouldn't be as successful as a person without all the influences and support from birders and locals. I feel very proud to have inspired many birders to explore this area through my detailed, trip reports/photos for years before I became a professional bird guide! I feel all my hard work has paid off trying to understand the ecology of these beautiful and interesting birds.

Thank you from the bottom of my heart. The Okanogan is a special place in my heart and mind. It's my second home and I always feel euphoric after a visit!

Be optimistic, observant,patient, and sharing and the Magical Okanogan will reward and delight you!

Peace, love, and good birding karma!

Khanh
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Date: 1/28/20 7:45 pm
From: Darwin Alonso <dovalonso...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Swallow at the Fill <- was Swallows on Edmonds Waterfront
Sunday the 26th I saw a single swallow flitting around over the University
Slough Lagoon. Same description as Barry Burgman's from Edmonds "They
looked like juvenile Barn Swallows to me - dark on top, white underneath,
with slightly forked tails. " For no good reason, I was thinking Tree, but
I think Barry's call of juvenile Barn is better (deeper fork on the tail).

--
Darwin Alonso
Seattle,WA 98105

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Date: 1/28/20 2:33 pm
From: William Driskell <bdriskell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Swallows at Union Bay Fill today
Responding to Barry Brugman's comment on Edmond's' swallows, I've had a
single swallow at the Fill (SW corner) since yesterday.  My eyes have
not been able to convince me re juv. Barn vs Tree.  I'm currently
leaning toward Tree but younger retinas may pick up more detail.

Also today was a juv eagle chasing a peregrine, followed by a raven
(heard the call) chasing an eagle, and then...crow chasing the raven
across UW campus.  This was the first raven I've personally seen at the
Fill.

Lastly, a hermit thrush dropped by to pose next to the loop trail.

Best of all, the clouds parted for a moment of sun (really, I saw it
myself!).

--
William Driskell
Seattle WA
206-522-5930 h/o

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Date: 1/28/20 1:36 pm
From: AMK17 <amk17...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Okanogan Trip
Hi Tweets,

I'll be visiting Okanogan this weekend and wondering if other birders might be there as well. Any interest in exchanging phone numbers to report birds, exchange info? Taking a cue from Jon Houghton on networking while there.

Please email me directly.

Thanks!
AKopitov
Seattle, WA


AMK17
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Date: 1/28/20 1:36 pm
From: Wood, Steven <woodsteven...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Code of Ethics, playback sounds
If anyone is interested in more in-depth reading about bird responses to artificial playback of sounds, there is a somewhat sparse, but interesting, body of scientific literature (I haven't read all this, just highlighting a couple bits):



"Pishing and playback treatments altered bird behavior in similar ways; both increased vocalization behavior and decreased foraging and movement behaviors (Figure 3). Pishing also reduced self-maintenance behaviors, tending to induce more dramatic and prolonged changes in vocalization behavior than did playback, and reduced foraging for a longer period than did playback (Figure 3). Pishing is thought to increase the detectability of birds by inducing a generalized mobbing response in the birds that hear it (Zimmerling and Ankney 2000, Langham et al. 2006). Because pishing induces a generalized response in bird communities (Langham et al. 2006), more species are likely to respond to pishing (Zimmerling and Ankney 2000, Zimmerling 2005, Langham et al. 2006) than would respond to a species-specific song. Although we did not consider the response of different species during the observation periods, the behavioral response to playback may have been driven primarily by cardinals, whereas the response to pishing is likely to have been driven by the response of multiple species. This may explain why pishing altered more behaviors and some behavioral categories for a longer period of time than did playback. Additional research that follows the responses of different species to pishing and playback is needed to assess this possibility. Playback of predator calls could induce a mobbing response in some species (Lynch 1995, Wilkins and Husak 2006); however, we used eastern screech-owl song during playback exposure only once and after we played northern cardinal songs. Birds may have a stronger response to repeated predator song playback, and this also warrants further investigation.
Potentially, the behavioral changes observed in all simulated birder exposures could reduce the probability of overwinter survival, with the greatest potential for negative impacts found in the pishing treatment and the least in the birder treatment. Altered vocal activity may indicate increased stress (Harris and Haskell 2013), aggression (Amy et al. 2010, Jacobs et al. 2014), or fear (De Haas et al. 2012) and could increase energy mobilization through activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (i.e., stress response; Wingfield et al. 1998). Additionally, vocal activity can attract and expose individuals to predators (Millard et al. 2011). Reduced foraging activity implies that birds spent less time gathering food at a time of increased energy use from increased vocal activity (Oberweger and Goller 2001) and potential stress responses. Reduced self-maintenance behaviors, such as preening, may increase damage inflicted by ectoparasites (Clayton et al. 2010). However, birds may have compensated by increasing foraging and self-maintenance behaviors after we concluded observations. As such, brief changes in behavior (15-30 min) may not have a significant impact on survival or subsequent fitness, unless birds were already under duress. Longer post-treatment observation periods are needed to determine how long the treatment altered the birds' behavior and if birds eventually compensate by increasing foraging or self-maintenance behaviors. Birds also would need to be tracked to determine if survival or fitness was compromised in comparison to untreated birds"

http://www.seafwa.org/Documents%20and%20Settings/46/Site%20Documents/2018%20Journal/J5_19ManessandJohnson136-143.pdf - Johnson and Maness, 2018, "Response of Wintering Birds to Simulated Birder Playback and Pishing" in Journal of the Southeast Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies


"The repeated playback experiments suggest that Plain-tailed Wrens may habituate to repeated short bouts of birdwatchers' playback after just 12 days of playback. This finding suggests that repeated playback may not have stronger effects on wren vocal behavior than single bout playback. It is possible that repeated short bouts of birdwatchers' playback could lead to birds treating playback as normal neighbors, as was apparently the case in Ward and Schlossberg's [19] long-term experiments. The wren nest building that we observed near the playback speaker supports this possibility. Habituation could explain why particular bird pairs that are repeatedly targeted by birdwatchers with playback stop responding and seem to "disappear" [45]. Considering the above, irregular playback could potentially have a greater impact on bird behavior if individuals do not encounter playback often enough to habituate, and respond strongly in each instance of playback. On the other hand, if habituated birds show less pronounced responses, they might be less effective at defending their territories from true rivals [46]. These alternative hypotheses require further investigation.
Our findings are from a limited sample of 12 groups of antpittas and 24 groups of wrens. Furthermore, playback impacts may vary depending on taxonomic group, song complexity, social behavior, and time of year (e.g. [12]), so additional studies in other taxa are needed to establish the generality of our findings. Although our data show that bird behavior changes in response to playback, we did not measure the effects of playback on components of fitness such as survival or reproductive success.
Our results indicate that birdwatchers' playback affects the vocal behavior of two species of Neotropical songbirds. This result suggests that playback could negatively affect species if they become stressed, expend energy, or take time away from other activities to respond to playback. By contrast, the habituation results we present suggest that frequent birdwatchers' playback may have minimal impacts on wren behavior."

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3797570/ - Harris and Haskell, 2013, "Simulated Birdwatchers' Playback Affects the Behavior of Two Tropical Birds" in PLoS One



"There were no significant differences in behaviour during the pre-playback phase between these two groups of males when the speaker, dummy male, and observers were within the territory of a target individual but the song playback had not yet begun. This suggests that both naive and experienced birds do not treat a human presence in their territory as a threat in itself, at least during the pre-playback phase. We also observed no significant differences in the number of flights and latency to the first flight or vocal response during the playback phase (3 min, during which a song of a foreign male was played back from the speaker). These two measures of a bird's response-number of flights and latency to response-are often used to describe birds' behaviour during playback experiments (e.g. Skierczyski et al. 2007; Brumm and Ritschard 2011), and here, these measures were independent of the previous experience of tested males. It seems that, after an acoustic intrusion, the territory holders tried to locate the intruder as fast as possible, regardless of any previous experience of lure by playback and capture by humans. However, this pattern seems to be species specific, since in the Willow Warbler, capture-experienced males increased latency to response to playback compared to naive males (Linhart et al. 2012)."

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10336-019-01647-w - Budka et al., 2019, "Experienced Males Modify Their Behavior During Playback: The Case of the Chaffinch" in Journal of Ornithology



The sense I get from skimming these articles is that the responses of birds to playbacks of alarm calls and songs varies not only be species, but within species by gender, age, and experience with humans. Some effects of playback sounds are not harmful, while others are harmful, and it may be difficult to tell which is likely to be which in advance. That's not to say playback sounds should never be used, but that it might be easy to overdo it and cause unwanted harm.

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Date: 1/28/20 8:05 am
From: pan <panmail...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Renton falcon news (King Cty.)
Hi, Tweets,

Those who know birding at the mouth of the Cedar River may be interested to read this article about the resident Peregrine Falcons.

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/boeings-assembly-plant-is-shuttered-amid-737-max-crisis-now-the-company-has-a-falcon-problem/

Myself, I was at Carkeek Park yesterday, seeing one Black Scoter, which seems harder to find in recent years. Also: a few Red-throated Loons, and while I was in the woods, a northbound goose flock that I'm fairly sure was Snow. Anyone else see such sometime after 11?

of 27 January, 2020,

Alan Grenon
Seattle
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Date: 1/28/20 1:03 am
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bridgeport Hill, Washburn Island and Waterville Plateau Scout update 1/27
Hi Tweets,

Our scout trip had a nice showing of Sharp-tailed Grouse on Bridgeport Hill, as well as Long-eared Owl inadvertently flushed from a large Sagebrush.

The Bohemian Waxwings finally showed up in the area around the weigh station where 17 intersects with 97, many Cedar Waxwings were there as well.

Washburn Island was very productive with diversity. Lots of fun waterfowl to enjoy including Eared Grebe and can you believe it... a Snow Goose with Canada Geese. We picked up American Tree Sparrow and Lincoln’s Sparrow among the large flock of White-crowned Sparrows. Purple Finch was photographed We also had a Barn Owl!

The Waterville Plateau was good for many Rough-legged Hawk. We also saw three Prairie Falcons.

Thanks to all who helped me with a really fun scout trip

Overall a good diversity of species, a very enjoyable winter trip where I’m super excited for the WOS Trip Presidents Day Weekend. Many locals in Douglas and Okanogan are very worried about their perception of diminished diversity and diminished numbers. I’m concerned about their concerns and plan to be attentive and responsive.

Happy birding,
Shep Thorp

Shep Thorp, VMD
Emergency Clinician
BluePearl Veterinary Partners
253.370.3742 mobile
253.474.0791 Tacoma
bluepearlvet.com




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