tweeters
Received From Subject
11/15/19 1:24 pm Jeremy Schwartz <jschwartz1124...> [Tweeters] Cackling Goose Turned Mallard in Bothell
11/15/19 1:17 pm Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...> [Tweeters] Possible Black-tailed Gull in Edmonds
11/15/19 10:54 am Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...> [Tweeters] Sex Bias In Conservation Efforts Further Endangers Rare Birds
11/15/19 9:26 am Robert Gray <robertgary02...> [Tweeters] Rough-Legged Hawks
11/14/19 5:09 pm <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2019-11-14
11/14/19 3:17 pm dan&erika <danerika...> Re: [Tweeters] Immature Northern Shrike/Nisqually NWR
11/14/19 2:23 pm dan&erika <danerika...> [Tweeters] Immature Northern Shrike/Nisqually NWR
11/14/19 12:53 pm Brad Waggoner <wagtail24...> [Tweeters] The Neah Bay Eurasian Tree Sparrow Scenario - Another Interesting Development
11/13/19 11:36 pm Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...> Re: [Tweeters] No Gyrfalcon at Hayton Reserve, but maybe further down the road.
11/13/19 10:29 pm Eric Ellingson <abriteway...> [Tweeters] No Gyrfalcon at Hayton Reserve, but maybe further down the road.
11/13/19 7:16 pm Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] Skagit Golden Eagle and Swamp Sparrow
11/13/19 5:53 pm Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...> [Tweeters] Lesser Goldfinch at our Seattle seed feeder
11/13/19 5:03 pm Tom and Carol Stoner <tcstonefam...> [Tweeters] Swans in West Seattle
11/13/19 4:58 pm Jon Houghton <jon.houghton...> [Tweeters] Unimpeachable birding today!
11/13/19 2:09 pm B B <birder4184...> [Tweeters] Birding in Kansas Blog Post
11/13/19 8:17 am Larry S. Goodhew <lsg...> [Tweeters] Harris's Sparrow
11/12/19 7:10 pm Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] halfway decent Skagit birding
11/12/19 11:49 am Larry S. Goodhew <lsg...> [Tweeters] Red-shouldered Hawk
11/11/19 10:33 pm Forrest Gamble <fhgamble...> [Tweeters] ID Help
11/11/19 4:06 pm Forrest Gamble <fhgamble...> [Tweeters] ID Help
11/11/19 3:57 pm mombiwheeler <mombiwheeler...> [Tweeters] Short-eard owls at Lummi Flats
11/11/19 2:17 pm Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1...> [Tweeters] RFI / Biologist friend in need of job... / Caryn/Wedgwood
11/11/19 11:57 am mombiwheeler <mombiwheeler...> [Tweeters] Snow Buntings at Sandy Point, Whatcom County
11/10/19 8:20 pm pan <panmail...> [Tweeters] Seattle's Montlake Fill this morning
11/10/19 1:51 pm B P Bell <bellasoc...> [Tweeters] WOS Samish trip - 22 Nov 2019
11/10/19 1:31 pm Hubbell <ldhubbell...> [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Goldie?
11/10/19 12:17 pm Louis Kreemer <lpkreemer...> [Tweeters] Gyr at Hayton
11/10/19 9:32 am <byers345...> [Tweeters] More birds from Fir Island
11/10/19 9:07 am B P Bell <bellasoc...> [Tweeters] Seattle Audubon to Whidbey 9 Nov 2019
11/9/19 7:37 pm B B <birder4184...> [Tweeters] Mission Accomplished
11/9/19 3:07 pm William Brooks <willbrooks.0...> [Tweeters] Ross’s Goose - Vancouver wa
11/9/19 2:09 pm Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] Hayton Gyr now
11/9/19 12:05 pm Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...> [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Nov 10., 2019
11/9/19 9:33 am AMK17 <amk17...> [Tweeters] Zono hybrids
11/8/19 8:10 pm Douglas Brown <modernwrld53...> [Tweeters] Lummi Flats
11/8/19 6:20 pm Dave Hayden <dtvhm...> [Tweeters] Pacific Co. birding /Black Phoebe
11/8/19 2:01 pm Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...> [Tweeters] Why Do Parrots Waste Most Of What You Feed Them?
11/7/19 5:33 pm Mark Ahlness <mahlness...> Re: [Tweeters] Fir Island
11/7/19 3:00 pm Shep Thorp <shepthorp...> [Tweeters] Sharp-tailed Sandpiper at Nisqually NWR.
11/7/19 2:21 pm Philip Dickinson <pdickins...> Re: [Tweeters] Fir Island
11/7/19 1:45 pm David Hutchinson <florafaunabooks...> [Tweeters] Fir Island
11/6/19 7:33 pm Hank H <h.heiberg...> [Tweeters] Cle Elum today
11/6/19 7:01 pm Phil Kelley <scrubjay323...> [Tweeters] NIsqually NWR 11/6/19
11/6/19 8:12 am Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] Fir Island Gyrfalcon continues (Skagit County)
11/5/19 8:20 pm Wayne Weber <contopus...> [Tweeters] Two new birds for my King County life list
11/5/19 8:17 pm Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...> [Tweeters] leucistic chickadee
11/5/19 5:36 pm Brokaw, Loren (DFW) <Loren.Brokaw...> [Tweeters] Leque Island/Eide Rd
11/5/19 5:33 pm Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...> Re: [Tweeters] Flicker variations
11/5/19 5:17 pm Hartmut Peters <tuoichen...> [Tweeters] not a new entry...
11/5/19 2:33 pm dick <dick...> [Tweeters] European Tree Sparrow
11/5/19 12:21 pm David Poortinga <dpoortinga...> [Tweeters] Dunlin, Chelan Co.
11/5/19 11:20 am Diann MacRae <tvulture...> [Tweeters] #4 Fall 2019 turkey vultures (long)
11/5/19 9:33 am Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...> [Tweeters] Snohomish County Snow Buntings
11/4/19 6:52 pm Robert O'Brien <baro...> Re: [Tweeters] Flicker variations
11/4/19 12:01 pm Joan Miller <jemskink...> [Tweeters] Flicker variations
11/4/19 4:54 am Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...> [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Nov 3., 2019
11/3/19 4:10 pm Constance Sidles <constancesidles...> [Tweeters] Pinnacle adventure
11/3/19 1:21 pm Beth Thompson <calliopehb...> Re: [Tweeters] The state's Christimas Bird Count information is up on the WOS website
11/3/19 1:09 pm Hubbell <ldhubbell...> [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Louis' Debut
11/3/19 1:07 pm Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...> [Tweeters] The state's Christimas Bird Count information is up on the WOS website
11/3/19 12:45 pm Mark Robinson <blobbybirdman...> [Tweeters] Magnuson Park Goshawk
11/2/19 6:33 pm cynthia burrell <cinnyb...> [Tweeters] WOS meeting Mon Nov 4-- Will Brooks, White-crowned Sparrow hybridization study
11/2/19 4:35 pm <merdave...> [Tweeters] Blue Jay in Douglas County
11/2/19 2:37 pm Phil and Julie Mattern <philjul61...> [Tweeters] Bittern in Kent
11/2/19 1:06 pm Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...> [Tweeters] Edmonds Roundup - Sep-Oct 2019
11/2/19 1:05 pm Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson...> [Tweeters] woodpecker weirdness
11/1/19 9:01 pm Mike M <strix.nebulosa1987...> Re: [Tweeters] Current list of upcoming CBCs
11/1/19 8:50 pm Patricia Quyle Grainger <paq...> Re: [Tweeters] Bird ID
11/1/19 8:06 pm <byers345...> [Tweeters] ID of sick bird resolved
11/1/19 6:57 pm <byers345...> [Tweeters] Bird ID
11/1/19 4:41 pm Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...> [Tweeters] Current list of upcoming CBCs
11/1/19 1:35 pm Wilson Cady <gorgebirds...> [Tweeters] Skamania County Birds
11/1/19 1:06 pm Hilary Barnes <habarnes...> [Tweeters] Spotted Sandpiper at Lake Samm St. Park, Tibbets Beach
11/1/19 10:25 am Alan Roedell <alanroedell...> Re: [Tweeters] the amazing Hayton Reserve 10.31.19
11/1/19 8:53 am Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] the amazing Hayton Reserve 10.31.19
10/31/19 11:57 pm Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] Fwd: Ash Canyon Nature Sanctuary
10/31/19 9:33 pm Jon Houghton <jon.houghton...> [Tweeters] Neah Bay two-day
10/31/19 9:22 pm Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] Skagit Gyrfalcon
10/31/19 6:53 pm pan <panmail...> [Tweeters] American Tree Sparrow - no (Seattle)
10/31/19 3:45 pm Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2019-10-31
10/31/19 10:58 am Dana Greeley <djgreel1...> [Tweeters] Bird of paradise
10/30/19 10:57 pm Wilson Cady <gorgebirds...> Re: [Tweeters] Windy Skamania County--Surf Scoter, Ruddy Duck
10/30/19 6:33 pm Brad Waggoner <wagtail24...> Re: [Tweeters] Eurasian Tree Sparrow Origin (and Neah Bay/La Push news)
10/30/19 6:10 pm Izzy & Kendrick <gobirder...> [Tweeters] Brown Booby
10/30/19 6:05 pm Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...> [Tweeters] Red-throated Pipit
10/30/19 5:25 pm <plkoyama...> [Tweeters] Windy Skamania County--Surf Scoter, Ruddy Duck
10/30/19 4:30 pm Izzy & Kendrick <gobirder...> [Tweeters] Brown Booby
10/30/19 1:37 pm Timothy Barksdale <timothy.barksdale...> [Tweeters] Eurasian Tree Sparrows in MO
10/30/19 8:41 am Louise Rutter <louise.rutter...> [Tweeters] Swainson's Thrush
10/29/19 5:16 pm Tom Merritt <birders.2341...> Re: [Tweeters] Discovery Parking
10/29/19 5:04 pm Nadine Drisseq <drisseq.n...> [Tweeters] More Osprey
10/29/19 4:19 pm Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...> Re: [Tweeters] Discovery Parking
10/29/19 4:08 pm Matt Dufort <matt.dufort...> Re: [Tweeters] Discovery Parking
10/29/19 3:13 pm Jay Adams <protectionisland8.9...> [Tweeters] Possible Red-throated Pipit
10/29/19 2:16 pm Allison Reak <areak823...> Re: [Tweeters] Seattle Discovery Park - how to get to the lighthouse
10/29/19 1:16 pm Dave Slager <dave.slager...> Re: [Tweeters] Eurasian Tree Sparrow Origin
10/29/19 12:57 pm <christopherwarlow...> Re: [Tweeters] Eurasian Tree Sparrow origin.
10/29/19 12:49 pm Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson...> Re: [Tweeters] Fwd: Eurasian Tree Sparrow Origin
10/29/19 12:46 pm Marty <namaste...> Re: [Tweeters] Maps of birding areas
10/29/19 12:25 pm Elston Hill <elstonh...> [Tweeters] Discovery Parking
10/29/19 11:25 am <christopherwarlow...> Re: [Tweeters] Eurasian Tree Sparrow origin.
10/29/19 10:37 am Vicki Biltz <vickibiltz...> [Tweeters] Monday, Snow Geese Kelly Farms
10/29/19 9:21 am Jon Houghton <jon.houghton...> [Tweeters] Neah Bay this week
10/29/19 8:57 am KenandTina <kenandtina...> [Tweeters] Mountain Chickadee in North Bend
10/29/19 7:06 am HAL MICHAEL <ucd880...> Re: [Tweeters] Eurasian Tree Sparrow Origin
10/29/19 5:17 am Matt Bartels <mattxyz...> Re: [Tweeters] Eurasian Tree Sparrow Origin
10/29/19 5:12 am Matt Bartels <mattxyz...> [Tweeters] Fwd: Eurasian Tree Sparrow Origin
10/28/19 9:16 pm pan <panmail...> [Tweeters] Tropical Kingbird report -- Olympic Peninsula
10/28/19 8:49 pm John Puschock <g_g_allin...> Re: [Tweeters] Eurasian Tree Sparrow Origin
10/28/19 8:33 pm Brad Waggoner <wagtail24...> [Tweeters] Eurasian Tree Sparrow Origin
10/28/19 6:56 pm Bevbowe1 <bevbowe1...> Re: [Tweeters] Discovery Park - how to get to the lighthouse
10/28/19 5:54 pm Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...> [Tweeters] Maps of birding areas
10/28/19 5:35 pm Hartmut Peters <tuoichen...> [Tweeters] Discovery Park - how to get to the lighthouse
10/28/19 11:21 am Kevin Lucas <vikingcove...> [Tweeters] Snow Buntings @ Rimrock Lake, Yakima County
10/28/19 7:57 am Stephen Chase <schasecredo...> Re: [Tweeters] Dark-eyed Junco ID Question
10/27/19 10:54 pm <christopherwarlow...> [Tweeters] Eurasian Tree Sparrow at Neah Bay.
10/27/19 6:13 pm Catherine Alexander <cma...> [Tweeters] Western Tanager in south Seattle this morning
10/27/19 5:46 pm Marcus Vorwaller <marcus...> [Tweeters] White Pelican at the Montlake Fill
10/27/19 4:31 pm Elston Hill <elstonh...> [Tweeters] Discovery Park
10/27/19 2:05 pm Rachel Hudson <lightningdash09...> [Tweeters] Chehalis/Centralia Snow Bunting
10/27/19 9:44 am Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...> [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Oct. 27, 2019
10/27/19 9:13 am Olyclarinet <olyclarinet...> [Tweeters] Help with goose ID: Tumwater Historical Park
10/27/19 7:50 am Hank H <h.heiberg...> [Tweeters] Dark-eyed Junco ID Question
10/27/19 5:26 am Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...> [Tweeters] Bird Migration Is Written In Their Genes
10/26/19 8:59 am mombiwheeler <mombiwheeler...> [Tweeters] Alki Rock Wren present
10/25/19 6:49 pm Clare McLean <clareishere...> [Tweeters] Epson printer for sale
10/24/19 6:15 pm Stephen <schasecredo...> [Tweeters] Snow Geese Galore
10/24/19 3:35 pm <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2019-10-24
10/24/19 3:19 pm Joyce Meyer <meyer2j...> [Tweeters] The Scope
10/24/19 12:12 pm Joyce Meyer <meyer2j...> [Tweeters] Scope For Sale
10/24/19 11:25 am Kenneth Brown <kenbrownpls...> [Tweeters] Nisqually NWR Wednesday walk, 10/23/2019
10/23/19 9:53 pm Hans-Joachim Feddern <thefedderns...> [Tweeters] FOS Bufflehead
10/23/19 4:33 pm rw <rw...> [Tweeters] Loudest bird in the world
10/23/19 4:30 pm Deanna Snow <ZeeSnowBird...> [Tweeters] Neah Bay Washington Birds
10/23/19 3:22 pm Stefan Schlick <greenfant...> [Tweeters] Fw: [obol] Blue Jays, not Eastern Bluebirds near Rosalia, Washington
10/23/19 2:57 pm pan <panmail...> [Tweeters] Carkeek Park (Seattle) today
10/23/19 2:41 pm Stefan Schlick <greenfant...> [Tweeters] Fw: [obol] Eastern Bluebirds in Washington
10/23/19 1:09 pm Diane Yorgason-Quinn <avosetta...> Re: [Tweeters] A little off-topic, But what a good Win-Win!
10/23/19 1:01 pm Faye McAdams Hands <zest4parus...> [Tweeters] A little off-topic, But what a good Win-Win!
10/23/19 11:10 am Russ Koppendrayer <russkope...> Re: [Tweeters] Heerman's Gull at Kalama
10/23/19 10:42 am Russ Koppendrayer <russkope...> [Tweeters] Heerman's Gull at Kalama
10/23/19 8:09 am Izzy Wong <gobirder...> [Tweeters] Update on Cattle Egret
10/22/19 9:05 pm cynthia burrell <cinnyb...> [Tweeters] WOS meeting, Monday Nov 4
10/22/19 8:49 pm Larry S. Goodhew <lsg...> [Tweeters] Osprey
10/22/19 8:05 pm Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] Skagit Elephant Seal, off-topic
10/22/19 5:01 pm Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...> Re: [Tweeters] RFI - Skagit River and North Cascades NP birding, around Thanksgiving
10/22/19 4:19 pm pan <panmail...> [Tweeters] Discovery Park (Seattle) Horned Lark
10/22/19 3:49 pm Izzy & Kendrick <gobirder...> [Tweeters] Cattle Egret
10/22/19 2:09 pm Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...> [Tweeters] dark morph imm Broad-winged Hawk over Battle Ground, Clark County
10/22/19 12:58 pm Ron Rabin <rjayrabin...> [Tweeters] Opening Mime Attachment on iPhone
10/22/19 12:33 pm Ryan Merrill <rjm284...> [Tweeters] Carkeek Lesser Black-backed Gull
10/22/19 12:31 pm Timothy Barksdale <timothy.barksdale...> [Tweeters] "Loudest Bird in the World"
10/22/19 11:21 am Nagi Aboulenein <nagi.aboulenein...> [Tweeters] RFI - Skagit River and North Cascades NP birding around Thanksgiving
10/22/19 11:03 am Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] World's 'loudest bird': Meet the white bellbird - BBC News
10/21/19 2:17 pm Robert Gray <robertgary02...> [Tweeters] Scrub Jay
10/21/19 12:25 pm Teri Martine <terimartine...> [Tweeters] Preventing window collisions
10/21/19 11:37 am Steve Pink <pirangas...> [Tweeters] Yellow-browed Warbler still at Vancouver Island
10/21/19 10:58 am Mason Flint <masonflint...> [Tweeters] Yellow-browed warbler still present at Panama Flats near Victoria, BC
10/21/19 7:57 am Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...> Re: [Tweeters] Preventing bird collisions
10/21/19 6:37 am Cara Borre <cmborre1...> [Tweeters] Neah Bay is rocking already
10/20/19 8:29 pm Ruth Richards <rgrichards7...> Re: [Tweeters] Preventing bird collisions
10/20/19 3:41 pm <c.boatsman...> [Tweeters] Preventing bird collisions
10/20/19 1:53 pm Hubbell <ldhubbell...> [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } The Odd Waterfowl
10/20/19 11:57 am B B <birder4184...> [Tweeters] Additional Info about Yellow-browed Warbler
10/20/19 11:50 am AnnMarie Wood <amw.5737...> [Tweeters] Yellow-browed Warbler continuing
10/20/19 9:34 am Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...> Re: [Tweeters] Port Townsend -- no Black-tailed Gull yesterday
10/20/19 8:28 am Steve Hampton <stevechampton...> [Tweeters] Port Townsend -- no Black-tailed Gull yesterday
10/20/19 12:36 am Hans-Joachim Feddern <thefedderns...> [Tweeters] RFI -Puerto Vallarta
10/19/19 11:05 pm Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] NPR article regarding the name change ("by six votes"), including a voice recording of how to pronounce the name.
10/19/19 8:35 pm Naomi Himley <naomihimley...> Re: [Tweeters] Recommendations for Guide In Barrow
10/19/19 7:25 pm Faye McAdams Hands <zest4parus...> Re: [Tweeters] Recommendations for Guide In Barrow
10/19/19 6:06 pm Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...> [Tweeters] Black-tailed Gull
10/19/19 5:48 pm Jack Nolan <jacknolan62...> [Tweeters] Odd Triumvirate
10/19/19 4:25 pm Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] Seven Worlds, One Planet: Have a look at the stunning images from Sir David Attenborough's new documentary series - CBBC Newsround
10/19/19 2:06 pm Sam Sudar <sudar.sam...> Re: [Tweeters] Recommendations for Guide In Barrow
10/19/19 1:51 pm Naomi Himley <naomihimley...> Re: [Tweeters] Recommendations for Guide In Barrow
10/19/19 12:30 pm Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] Fir Island, Skagit County birding 10.18.19
10/19/19 12:05 pm Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...> [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Oct. 20, 2019
10/18/19 6:13 pm B B <birder4184...> [Tweeters] RBA on the Yellow Browed Warbler in Victoria
10/18/19 5:48 pm B B <birder4184...> [Tweeters] Yellow Browed Warbler in Victoria
10/18/19 4:26 pm John Puschock <g_g_allin...> [Tweeters] Lots of California Gulls moving
10/18/19 3:26 pm <merdave...> [Tweeters] Atkins Lake, Douglas Co.
10/18/19 3:10 pm William Brooks <willbrooks.0...> [Tweeters] Possible Black-tailed Gull - Port Townsend
10/18/19 12:30 pm Elizabeth McManus <eliz.mcmanus...> [Tweeters] Recommendations for Guide In Barrow,
10/18/19 8:46 am Megan Ward <meganward28...> [Tweeters] Dead hawk
10/17/19 6:50 pm Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...> [Tweeters] Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course monthly bird walk - 10 -17-2019
10/17/19 5:41 pm David Hutchinson <florafaunabooks...> [Tweeters] Historic Birds in Discovery Park
10/17/19 5:23 pm <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2019-10-17
10/17/19 2:24 pm Douglas Irle Will <diwill...> [Tweeters] Barred Owls
10/17/19 2:01 pm Steve Loitz <steveloitz...> Re: [Tweeters] Possible Rough-legged Hawk in Bothell?
10/17/19 1:13 pm Jeremy Schwartz <jschwartz1124...> [Tweeters] Possible Rough-legged Hawk in Bothell?
10/17/19 12:37 pm Stan Bezimienny <grzebiuszkaziemna...> [Tweeters] Tweeters] Fir Island, October 14, 2019
10/17/19 12:13 pm Jeffrey Bryant <jbryant_68...> [Tweeters] Alki Rock Wren
10/17/19 9:21 am J. Acker <owler...> Re: [Tweeters] Owls
10/17/19 5:37 am Tim Brennan <tsbrennan...> [Tweeters] Owls
10/16/19 9:19 pm Larry S. Goodhew <lsg...> [Tweeters] LeConte's Sparrow
10/16/19 4:42 pm <byers345...> [Tweeters] Fir Island, October 14, 2019
10/16/19 8:33 am pan <panmail...> [Tweeters] Seattle Mountain Chickadee
 
Back to top
Date: 11/15/19 1:24 pm
From: Jeremy Schwartz <jschwartz1124...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Cackling Goose Turned Mallard in Bothell
Hello Tweeters!

I've been keeping tabs on a single Cackling Goose that I've spotted for at
least the last two weeks mingling with a large group of Mallards at the
Canyon Park Wetlands hotspot north of Bothell. Here's a link to the hotspot:

https://ebird.org/hotspot/L1122256

I first saw what I can only guess was this same bird Oct. 25 as it flew
over in the morning, calling. At the risk of anthropomorphizing, it
appeared to be looking around as it flew, as if it was searching for its
flock.

Days later I saw it again, this time with the usual group of Mallards seen
foraging on the west side of the wetland. I've since returned seven times
and found the Cackler in this same spot on six of these visits.

Each time since I've been able to get quite close to it, as if it's taken
on the general nonchalance toward humans of its Mallard cousins. It appears
to walk and forage just fine, though I've yet to see it take off from
ground or water.

If anyone wants some good close ups of a Cackling Goose that may very well
think it's a Mallard, I'd make a visit to the Canyon Park Wetlands. I've
used it as an opportunity to study its features in detail. I'll never
mistake a small Canada Goose for a true Cackler again!

Keep watching the skies (and wetlands)!

Jeremy
Lake Forest Park
jschwartz1124 AT gmail DOT com

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Date: 11/15/19 1:17 pm
From: Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Possible Black-tailed Gull in Edmonds
One of our local birders had a close fly-by at the public pier this morning of what he thinks is a Black-tailed Gull. It's not surprising, given the October 17th gull at Port Townsend's Point Hudson. It may still be among Edmonds gulls or have continued on south. Birders in Edmonds and points south, particularly those of you with cameras, please keep your eye out for this gull. Thanks.

Carol Riddell
Edmonds, WA
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Date: 11/15/19 10:54 am
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Sex Bias In Conservation Efforts Further Endangers Rare Birds
Hello everyone,

Did you know that many migratory animals will occupy different habitats or
landscapes during the nonbreeding season? ok, most of you know this, but
did you know that conservation plans almost never consider this well-known
fact when devising action plans? since this means that female-dominated
habitats are rarely provided the same level of protection as those
dominated by males, it doesn't take a rocket scientist to understand the
developing conservation problem, particularly because males tend to be much
more populous when populations are in decline.

this new study goes in to some depth to investigate this widespread problem
for neotropical migratory birds, and focuses on the golden-winged warbler
as a case study.

Sex Bias In Conservation Efforts Further Endangers Rare Birds
https://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2019/11/15/sex-bias-in-conservation-efforts-further-endangers-rare-birds/
tinyURL: https://tinyurl.com/tftx6ep

As always, please do share this piece with all your bird-loving friends and
colleagues, and encourage them to share widely via social media, twitter
and email.

--
GrrlScientist | @GrrlScientist <https://twitter.com/GrrlScientist>
<grrlscientist...>
Blogs: Forbes <http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/> | Medium
<https://medium.com/@GrrlScientist>
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Back to top
Date: 11/15/19 9:26 am
From: Robert Gray <robertgary02...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Rough-Legged Hawks
I observed good numbers of Rough-Legged Hawks along Bayview-Edison and Samish Island Roads on 11/14/2019. One of them exhibited dominant behavior over a Red-Tailed Hawk.
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Date: 11/14/19 5:09 pm
From: <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2019-11-14
Tweets – It started out quite foggy this morning, and though it cleared, the birds remained quiet. Or perhaps they were quiet *because* it was such a mellow day of weather. In any case, the morning seemed rather ho hum, though it was not without birds entirely.

Highlights:
a.. Greater White-fronted Goose – for the 3rd straight week, what appear to be the same four juveniles were with the Cacklers
b.. Cackling Goose – at least 1000 birds on Fields 7-8-9
c.. Ring-necked Pheasant – the lone male has now been at Marymoor for an entire year
d.. Wilson’s Snipe – at least 11 below the weir
e.. Green Heron – adult on the flank of the beaver lodge, across from the Dog Central dog beach, a favorite spot
f.. Sharp-shinned Hawk – adult at Rowing Club
g.. Pileated Woodpecker – one in snags on west side of the slough
h.. Northern Shrike – juvenile continues; today at south end of East Meadow
i.. White-throated Sparrow – one along east edge of Dog Meadow, with Golden-crowned Sparrows
No First-Of-Fall birds today. Still hoping to add Brant, Tundra Swan, Greater Scaup, Western Grebe, Western Gull, Common Raven, Red Crossbill, and Swamp Sparrow to our 2019 list...

Misses today included Ring-necked Duck, Western Grebe, Rock Pigeon, Purple Finch, American Goldfinch, and Lincoln’s Sparrow.

A late scan of the lake added BUFFLEHEAD, COMMON GOLDENEYE, and DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT, all otherwise missed. This brought our day total to a more respectable 56 species.

= Michael Hobbs
= www,marymoor,org/birding.htm
= <BirdMarymoor...>
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Date: 11/14/19 3:17 pm
From: dan&erika <danerika...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Immature Northern Shrike/Nisqually NWR
Yes, that shrike was yesterday, 13 NOVEMBER, not May. Thank you.

On Thu, Nov 14, 2019 at 2:54 PM G M ARCHAMBAULT <gm72125...>
wrote:

> You said May. :) -Ken in Alabama
> On Thursday, November 14, 2019, 4:23:48 PM CST, dan&erika <
> <danerika...> wrote:
>
>
> Hi Tweets—I meant to share with you a photograph of an immature Northern
> Shrike taken yesterday, 13 May 2019, near the end of the dike at the Billy
> Frank Jr. Nisqually NWR in Thurston Co. Note the extensive brown forehead
> and brownish stain to the bird’s back.
>
> https://dantallmansbirdblog.blogspot.com/2019/11/northern-shrike.html
>
> Dan
>
> --
> Dan or Erika Tallman
> Olympia, Washington
> <danerika...>
>
> http://dantallmansbirdblog.blogspot.com
>
> ".... the best shod travel with wet feet...Beware of all enterprises that
> require new clothes ....”—H. D. Thoreau
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--
Dan or Erika Tallman
Olympia, Washington
<danerika...>

http://dantallmansbirdblog.blogspot.com

".... the best shod travel with wet feet...Beware of all enterprises that
require new clothes ....”—H. D. Thoreau

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Date: 11/14/19 2:23 pm
From: dan&erika <danerika...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Immature Northern Shrike/Nisqually NWR
Hi Tweets—I meant to share with you a photograph of an immature Northern
Shrike taken yesterday, 13 May 2019, near the end of the dike at the Billy
Frank Jr. Nisqually NWR in Thurston Co. Note the extensive brown forehead
and brownish stain to the bird’s back.

https://dantallmansbirdblog.blogspot.com/2019/11/northern-shrike.html

Dan

--
Dan or Erika Tallman
Olympia, Washington
<danerika...>

http://dantallmansbirdblog.blogspot.com

".... the best shod travel with wet feet...Beware of all enterprises that
require new clothes ....”—H. D. Thoreau

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Date: 11/14/19 12:53 pm
From: Brad Waggoner <wagtail24...>
Subject: [Tweeters] The Neah Bay Eurasian Tree Sparrow Scenario - Another Interesting Development
Hi All,

No matter how the Eurasian Tree Sparrow ended up in the town of Neah
Bay, the new additional mystery is perhaps how long has it been there?!!
Visiting California birder, Steve Hampton, has nicely captured photos on
November 10 of what is near certainly a House Sparrow X Eurasian Tree
Sparrow hybrid. Check it out at this link to Steve's eBird submission on
the 10th.

https://ebird.org/checklist/S61338077

This bird is somewhat similar in appearance to the pure bird, but as
Steve points out the apparent hybrid has a gray forecrown, less
pronounced dark cheek spot, and more pale in the lower mandible. It does
sure seem most plausible that local breeding took place for such a result.

It would be nice to see if we could gather a bit more possible
photographic evidence of this hybrid or even if there are other hybrid
individuals. Birder's that took photos the last couple of weeks or
months give them a look-see and report back if you have something of
interest. And, those heading to Neah Bay in upcoming days or weeks, be
on the look out. I know, it is not all that often that we pay a great
deal of attention to House Sparrows!

Cheers and good birding,

Brad Waggoner



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Date: 11/13/19 11:36 pm
From: Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] No Gyrfalcon at Hayton Reserve, but maybe further down the road.
Eric,Great photos.  I was there on Monday and saw that bird, but too far for a good photo.  When we arrived, someone pointed it out as the gyrfalcon, which seemed unlikely once I got a look at my photos.  Another person suggested the "tundra" subspecies of peregrine -- based on the white cheek.  So I am very curious to know what others think.  I did include my hideous photo in my eBird checklist (11/11/2019 Skagit Hayton Reserve) as an unidentified falcon, in hopes someone would recognize it.  I also saw a "traditional" peregrine, clearly not the same bird.
Peggy MundyBothell, WA
On Wednesday, November 13, 2019, 10:27:59 p.m. PST, Eric Ellingson <abriteway...> wrote:

Not being familiar with Gryfalcon or the Hayton Reserve area I mostly took photos while listening to those around me debate about what we were seeing Peregrine or Gyrfalcon. A falcon was diving into a huge flock of Dunlin doing their amazing flight murmuration thing. It did manage to take one Dunlin down and carry it off while we were watching. The debate was about wing/tail length mostly of the falcons. But in addition, the falcon's mustache was quite fine and not much if any of a dark hood.  The consensus was a Peregrine of a lighter subspecies possibly.
Then leaving the area heading east toward I-5, a bit before the white church a large gray raptor type bird flew in front of us, across the road and staying low with fast wingbeats heading north away into the fields.  I mention this for others to keep an eye out for the Gyrfalcon in that area as well. It was getting too dark and too far away by the time we got binocs on it to get anything other than the giz of it.
Photos of the Peregrine are on my eBird posting for Hayton Reserve, 11/13. Shot from quite away but shows the rather fine/light markings good enough. Any thoughts on the possible subspecies/maturity of the Peregrine would be appreciated.
A bonus shot of a Merlin with an interesting pose: https://flic.kr/p/2hKxCVt
Eric Ellingson
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Date: 11/13/19 10:29 pm
From: Eric Ellingson <abriteway...>
Subject: [Tweeters] No Gyrfalcon at Hayton Reserve, but maybe further down the road.
Not being familiar with Gryfalcon or the Hayton Reserve area I mostly took photos while listening to those around me debate about what we were seeing Peregrine or Gyrfalcon. A falcon was diving into a huge flock of Dunlin doing their amazing flight murmuration thing. It did manage to take one Dunlin down and carry it off while we were watching. The debate was about wing/tail length mostly of the falcons. But in addition, the falcon's mustache was quite fine and not much if any of a dark hood. The consensus was a Peregrine of a lighter subspecies possibly.

Then leaving the area heading east toward I-5, a bit before the white church a large gray raptor type bird flew in front of us, across the road and staying low with fast wingbeats heading north away into the fields. I mention this for others to keep an eye out for the Gyrfalcon in that area as well. It was getting too dark and too far away by the time we got binocs on it to get anything other than the giz of it.

Photos of the Peregrine are on my eBird posting for Hayton Reserve, 11/13. Shot from quite away but shows the rather fine/light markings good enough. Any thoughts on the possible subspecies/maturity of the Peregrine would be appreciated.

A bonus shot of a Merlin with an interesting pose: https://flic.kr/p/2hKxCVt

Eric Ellingson


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Date: 11/13/19 7:16 pm
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Skagit Golden Eagle and Swamp Sparrow
Dear Tweeters,
Today (the thirteenth November) a juvenile GOLDEN EAGLE showed up at Beaver Lake, Skagit County. It was patrolling the rocky hillside to the east, over some big power lines. A couple of Common Ravens sortied after it, but I got to watch the trio soaring for quite a few minutes.
After considering the paucity of Swamp Sparrows being reported of late, I tried for them today at a few spots, including Beaver Lake. Finally, at dusk today, at northern State Recreation Area, just east of Sedro-Woolley, there was one SWAMP SPARROW calling from the marsh, very close to the parking spot near the corner of Helmick Road and SR 20. Some people would call this "Hansen Creek Restoration Area." I may have glimpsed the bird, but Song Sparrows  and Marsh Wrens were also hopping around in the vegetation in bad light, and I could not tell which birds were which. The "chip!" note was the characteristic allowing for the ID. This spot has produced a Swamp Sparrow at least once before.
Here is some interesting news about DeBay Slough. This excellent birding area (and waterfowl hunting area) near Clear Lake now has five fewer trees. I don't know if the WDFW had the five large deciduous trees cut down for some reason of its own, or whether some wildcat logging has gone on. The trees were there when I last birded the site couple of months ago, as I recall. These were shade trees that, until recently, graced the circular parking area at the west end of the entry road. This site is where the old farmhouse was, until the 1990's. Such old farmsteads, with a variety of shade trees and ornamental shrubs, yet surrounded by fields, are often very good for birds, this site being no exception. I hope that at least the wonderful black walnut tree is spared. This time of year, I usually have a sackful of its excellent nuts drying for Thanksgiving--although this year I didn't get around to collecting any. 
On a more positive note, I noted improvements in the little circular trail at DeBay Slough today. This is an unsigned, sort of quasi-semi-non-official trail that enters the woods just east of that farmstead parking area, accessed through a gap in the fence that appears to be designed for trail access. Someone cut this trail through the brushy woods a few years ago, but the trail has always tended to be overgrown by blackberries. Now someone has come back through with a machine and cleared the trail to its original width. A little side trail was added, cut into swampy woodland from the north end of the circular trail; this new trail just leads down into the reedbed, but gives quite a few views onto some heretofore nearly un-birdable parts of the site. Once the rains start (if they ever do), the low part of this trail will fill up with a few inches of black water. Right now, it is a welcome addition, especially since this part of the site is within the safety zone (no hunting).
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch




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Date: 11/13/19 5:53 pm
From: Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Lesser Goldfinch at our Seattle seed feeder
Dear Tweetsters - I just wanted to report that for the last five or so
days, we've had  two Lesser Goldfinches at our backyard seed feeder
about six blocks south of the UW Arboretum. One is a 1st year male and
the other is a female of unknown age. They show up singly, together or
with American Goldfinches.

We are using pure hulled sunflower seeds in the feeder, which is
extremely popular with the passerines.

There have been a fair number of sightings of Lesser Goldfinch reported
in recent years in Western Washington but few in Seattle. Gene Hunn
reported three King County sightings as of his 2012 book but none was in
Seattle. eBird shows only two other Seattle reports, both by the same
person in 2014 a few weeks apart, so unclear if that was two sightings
of the same bird. So it appears ours could be the second or the third
sighting in Seattle, based on Gene Hunn and eBird.

However, as described by Ryan Merrill in an Aug 11, 2014 Tweeters post,
Lesser Goldfinches have been rapidly expanding northward on both sides
of the Cascades in recent years.

While on the subject of touting our backyard sightings, I might as well
mention that several weeks ago, we had a Pileated Woodpecker show up at
our suet feeder for two days running. We have lived here 33 years and
that was the first time we've had Pileated in our backyard.

You can see pictures of the two Lesser Goldfinch at my husband's eBird
report:

https://ebird.org/pnw/checklist/S61354450

Jane Hadley

Seattle, WA



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Date: 11/13/19 5:03 pm
From: Tom and Carol Stoner <tcstonefam...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Swans in West Seattle
At noon today I spotted a flock of 6 - 8 swans (sp.) above Alki Avenue
just north of the Statue of Liberty heading for Duwamish Head.

Delightful surprise--
Carol Stoner

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Date: 11/13/19 4:58 pm
From: Jon Houghton <jon.houghton...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Unimpeachable birding today!
Hi Tweets! To avoid going crazy watching the saga playing out on the tube today, I spent most of the morning with one eye on the proceedings and the rest or me going from window to window, looking at the myriad of birds active in the yard. I've never really paid so much continuous attention to the yard birds and ended the morning with 23 species. Highlights were three Zonos, including two White-throated Sparrows (one tan and one white-striped, the latter with hints of yellow in the lores). The single White-crowned Sparrow was actually a greater rarity for the yard over the last two winters. Another unusual moment was finding a Sharp-shinned Hawk on the side yard path on top of an unfortunate Am. Robin (not counted in the 23 species total, even though he probably still had a pulse). The hawk was being harassed by about 5 crows and eventually flew into some denser shrubs to finish his meal. We spent the mostly sunny afternoon on a nice walk up and down the hills in Yost Park (Edmonds) where we found a good selection of the usual winter birds, many of them in a single large but diffuse mixed flock, mostly in alders and shrubs along the upper part of the creek trail. Happy Birding! - Jon Houghton, Edmonds

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Date: 11/13/19 2:09 pm
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Birding in Kansas Blog Post
My post on birding in Kansas with Tom Ewert.  We had 81 species including a fun visit to highly recommended Quivira NWR.  State # 48 with 50 species in a single day.  Oklahoma and Arkansas still to come.
https://blairbirding.com/2019/11/13/no-jayhawks-and-no-seahawks-birding-in-kansas/

Blair Bernson

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Date: 11/13/19 8:17 am
From: Larry S. Goodhew <lsg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Harris's Sparrow
Had a Harris's Sparrow at the feeder this am.   2 miles south of College
Place, WA.

Larry and Jacque Goodhew

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Date: 11/12/19 7:10 pm
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] halfway decent Skagit birding
Dear Tweeters,
Today (the twelfth) was supposed to be rainy, but it turned out to be a reasonably fair day, with just a bit of light drizzle occasionally. I birded a few spots in Skagit County, and saw some fun birds. Here are a few highlights.
--Winter birds are returning to Minkler Flats; there was a good-sized flock of gulls, mostly Mew Gulls. I am hoping that some of the less common gulls can join the flocks here.
--Perched in a deciduous tree overlooking the south end of Padilla Bay, a dark Harlan's Hawk was at the campground of the Swinomish Casino today. It was less skittish than Harlan's Hawks usually are, and allowed me to drive fairly close for some bad photos.
--There was a Northern Shrike at March Point. Goodly flocks of Buffleheads and Common Goldeneyes are now appearing on the bays, and both species were easy to observe today. 
--At Green Point was a single Heermann's Gull and a little band of seven Harlequin Ducks. There were large numbers of Brandt's Cormorants and Pigeon Guillemots out there, in the hundreds.
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch
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Date: 11/12/19 11:49 am
From: Larry S. Goodhew <lsg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Red-shouldered Hawk
the Red-shouldered Hawk  was on the tall tower near Clinton St and Hwy
12  north edge of Walla Walla, at 11 am.  11/12/19

Larry and Jacque Goodhew

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Date: 11/11/19 10:33 pm
From: Forrest Gamble <fhgamble...>
Subject: [Tweeters] ID Help
Thanks everyone. The consensus seems to be a female house sparrow.

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Date: 11/11/19 4:06 pm
From: Forrest Gamble <fhgamble...>
Subject: [Tweeters] ID Help
This bird was at the south rim of the Grand Canyon. Could use some ID
help. Thanks.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/97014851@N02/?

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Date: 11/11/19 3:57 pm
From: mombiwheeler <mombiwheeler...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Short-eard owls at Lummi Flats
Hi Tweeters, I'm currently watching four Short- eared Owls flying around Lummi Flats. Sometimes  having duels with Northern Harriers.  This is really cool😁Lonnie SomerSeattleSent from my Sprint Samsung Galaxy S® 6._______________________________________________
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Date: 11/11/19 2:17 pm
From: Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] RFI / Biologist friend in need of job... / Caryn/Wedgwood
Hello Birders!

A friend who had to quit her job to take care of mother (and her position was filled in her absence) and is in need of a new job.

Basically she is a biologist with a Masters in wetland science / 20 years experience.

If anyone out there has any ideas of where she could apply, please contact me directly and I can send her info. I know she will greatly appreciate any referrals.

Thank you!


Hermit Thrush today.

Caryn / Wedgwood

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Date: 11/11/19 11:57 am
From: mombiwheeler <mombiwheeler...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Snow Buntings at Sandy Point, Whatcom County
Hi Tweeters,There's a flock of 11 Snow Buntings moving around on the shore on the lagoon side.Good birding,Lonnie Somer Seattle Sent from my Sprint Samsung Galaxy S® 6._______________________________________________
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Date: 11/10/19 8:20 pm
From: pan <panmail...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Seattle's Montlake Fill this morning
Hi, Tweets,

Three highlights from this morning at the Fill:

several Common Goldeneye, my first of autumn, on the lake and in flight, the latter with audible wing whistle taking me back to Nebraska winters;

a Peregrine Falcon catching a white pigeon over Lake Washington, then dropping it as a pair of Bald Eagles, and then another adult, closed on its position. The pigeon flew off at a downward angle, but we couldn't confirm its fate. None of the raptors made to retrieve it, so I presume it didn't hit the water;

and my best of the day, a female Ruddy Duck in the cove at the mouth of the creek/slough.

10 November, 2019,

Alan Grenon
Seattle
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Date: 11/10/19 1:51 pm
From: B P Bell <bellasoc...>
Subject: [Tweeters] WOS Samish trip - 22 Nov 2019
Hi Tweets



The Washington Ornithological Society just posted a Nov. 22nd (Fri) trip to
the Samish/Skagit Flats. You can go to the WOS website for information about
this trip.



Brian H Bell

Woodinville WA


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Date: 11/10/19 1:31 pm
From: Hubbell <ldhubbell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Goldie?
Tweeters,

Is our local Pileated Woodpecker pair still in business as winter approaches? Can you identify the lost feather?

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2019/11/goldie.html <https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2019/11/goldie.html>

Have a great day on Union Bay, where nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net
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Date: 11/10/19 12:17 pm
From: Louis Kreemer <lpkreemer...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Gyr at Hayton
Hi Tweets,

We’re looking at the juvenile Gyrfalcon at Hayton Reserve on Fir Island
now.

Louis Kreemer

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Date: 11/10/19 9:32 am
From: <byers345...>
Subject: [Tweeters] More birds from Fir Island
Hello Tweeters,

Bill and I spent several pleasant hours on Fir Island
earlier this week. The weather was sunny and not too cold. There were many
of the usual birds--lots of eagles, hawks, shorebirds and Snow Geese. I put
the best pictures from this outing in my Fir Island Flickr album. The new
photos are at the beginning. When you get to the picture of Mt. Baker,
that's the end of the photos from this trip. Almost all these pictures are
Bill's, he's the birds in flight specialist.



https://www.flickr.com/photos/29258421@N07/albums/72157701301766265



Happy birding,

Charlotte Byers, Edmonds






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Date: 11/10/19 9:07 am
From: B P Bell <bellasoc...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Seattle Audubon to Whidbey 9 Nov 2019
Hi Tweets



Yesterday, Seattle Audubon took a trip to Whidbey Island. As we met, we
hoped the rain would avoid Whidbey, and it seemed like it might. It was
overcast and about 48F when we arrived at the Mukilteo ferry terminal, and
saw a number of birds while waiting for the ferry - GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL,
ROCK PIGEON, AMERICAN CROW, EUROPEAN STARLING, SURF SCOTER, BARROW'S
GOLDENEYE, WESTERN GREBE, MARBLED MURRELET, GREAT BLUE HERON, DOUBLE-CRESTED
CORMORANT, RHINOCEROUS AUKLET, BELTED KINGFISHER, KILLDEER and a possible
COOPER'S HAWK. We may have had a group of Common Goldenye but just then the
ferry arrived and it started raining, and that was the theme for the rest of
the day.



At Clinton we saw SURF SCOTER, PIGEON GUILLEMOT, DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT,
BRANDT'S CORMORANT, and from Clinton Beach Park we added BONAPARTE'S GULL,
GLACOUS-WINGED GULL, PELAGIC CORMORANT (sitting next to a Double-crested so
nice size comparison), BELTED KINGFISHER, ROCK PIGEON, COMMON LOON, BALD
EAGLE, HORNED GREBE and RED-NECKED GREBE - all while hiding under cover from
the rain.



Deer Lake seemed quiet to start, but we did see HOODED MERGANSER, CANADA
GOOSE, BUFFLEHEAD, PIED-BILLED GREBE, MALLARD, RING-NECKED DUCK and AMERICAN
CROW. Down the road to Rollinghill Road where we picked up CHESTNUT-BACKED
CHICKADEE, BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE, BEWICK'S WREN, SONG SPARROW, RUBY-CROWNED
KINGLET, GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET (a nice flock), BUSHTIT and SPOTTED TOWHEE -
still raining.



At Dave Mackie Park and Maxwellton we found MALLARD, COMMON GOLDENEYE,
AMERICAN WIGEON (distant), NORTHERN PINTAIL, BUFFLEHEAD, KILLDEER (a flock
of 14), AMERICAN CROW, DARK-EYED JUNCO, BONAPARTE'S GULL, COMMON RAVEN,
NORTHERN FLICKER, MEW GULL, GREATER SCAUP, RED-NECKED GREBE, EURASIAN
COLLARED-DOVE, AMERICAN ROBIN and BALD EAGLE.



The Ewing Road wetlands finally had water and MALLARD, GREEN-WINGED TEAL,
NORTHERN PINTAIL, AMERICAN WIGEON, GREAT BLUE HERON, AMERICAN KESTREL and
RED-TAILED HAWK (not surprisingly perched with the cold rainy weather),
GADWALL, NORTHERN SHOVELER and RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD.



The tide was reasonably high when we arrived at Deer Lagoon on Sunlight
Beach Rd. and we saw DARK-EYED JUNCO, HOUSE FINCH, MALLARD, GREEN-WINGED
TEAL, NORTHERN PINTAIL, RING-BILLED GULL, GREAT BLUE HERON, GLAUCOUS-WINGED
GULL and probably 3-4 thousand AMERICAN WIGEON crammed into the lagood -
they were everywhere. But try as we might we couldn't find a Eurasian (but
then many of the birds were so tightly grouped that wasn't too surprising).
At the Useless Bay end of the access we found BRANT, BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER,
DUNLIN and SANDERLING. We did make a quick pass at the western part of Deer
Lagoon, but the water was so high it pretty well explained why the birds
were over on the Sunlight Beach side (but we did have two COMMON RAVEN
perched along Millman Rd.



We made our lunch stop (in the cars because of the rain - is the pattern
well established?) - and saw CANADA GOOSE, WESTEN GREBE, COMMON LOON,
BUFFLEHEAD, GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL, AMERICAN CROW, GOMMON GOLDENEYE, HORNED
GREBE, BARROW'S GOLDENEYE, MALLARD and DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT.



At Bush Point we saw WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW, DARK-EYED JUNCO, SPOTTED TOWHEE
EUROPEAN STARLING and AMERICAN CROW as we arrived, and then braved the rain
and saw ROCK PIGEON, COMMON LOON, BRANDT'S CORMORANT, DOUBLE-CRESTED
CORMORANT, RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, PIGEON GUILLEMOT, BUFFLEHEAD, PELAGIC
CORMORANT, GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL.



The tide was in and high at Crockett Lake but we did pick up EUROPEAN
STARLING, BALD EAGLE (on the ground consuming something), GREAT BLUE HERON,
several GREATER YELLOWLEGS, a couple of distant unidentified Dowitchers,
GREEN-WINGED TEAL, GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL, DUNLIN, MALLARD, NORTHERN HARRIER,
BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER BUFFLEHEAD, HOODED MERGANSER and ROCK PIGEON. Down the
road at Keystone there were WESTERN GREBE, RHINOCEROUS AUKLET,
DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT, PELAGIC CORMORANT, HARLEQUIN DUCK, BALD EAGLE,
RED-BREASTED MERGANSER and ROCK PIGEON. We felt ourselves lucky as it was
only misting.



At Libby Beach it was still misting but we did see more HARLEQUIN DUCK,
DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT, HORNED GREBE, and best of all a small group of
LONG-TAILED DUCK. The Hastie Lake Rd. access had still more HARLEQUIN DUCK
and BUFFLEHEAD. When we arrived at Bos Lake (with the rain resuming) we saw
BUFFLEHEAD, AMERICAN WIGEON, many RUDDY DUCK, GREAT BLUE HERON. On the wires
overhead there were RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD, BREWER'S BLACKBIRD, HOUSE FINCH,
EUROPEAN STARLING and a GLACOUS-WINGED GULL. Along Swantown Rd. there was a
perched RED-TAILED HAWK.



At the Oak Harbor Marina we had a couple of very tightly packed groups of
BLACK TURNSTONES (hard to estimate the numbers) and at least three SURFBIRDS
in with them. Further out in the bay were big numbers of COMMON GOLDENEYE,
BUFFLEHEAD, some GLACOUS-WINGED GULLs, DOUBLE- CRESTED CORMORANT and a
single PIED-BILLED GREBE.



When we turned south from SR20 toward Laconner there was a RED-TAILED HAWK.
Along Dodge Valley Rd. there were BREWER'S BLACKBIRDs and EUROPEAN
STARLINGs.



We finished the day at the north end of Fir Island with a field of a couple
of hundred TRUMPETER SWAN, SNOW GOOSE and at least one TUNDRA SWAN.



In spite of the rain, cool temperatures and windy weather it was a good day
with a good group. We finished with 73 species.



Brian H. Bell

Woodinville WA

Mail to bell asoc a t iso me dia dot com










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Date: 11/9/19 7:37 pm
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Mission Accomplished
With 70 species today in Arkansas including multiple Leconte's Sparrows and Sedge Wrens (very nice photographs) I have concluded my 50/50/50 Adventure seeing 50 species on single days in each of the 50 states.  
Incredible birds and people along the way!! Blog posts for last 3 states: Kansas, Oklahoma and Arkansas with lots of photos will be done next week.  Heading home tomorrow.
I owe big thanks to many in our wonderful birding community.
Blair Bernson

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
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Date: 11/9/19 3:07 pm
From: William Brooks <willbrooks.0...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Ross’s Goose - Vancouver wa
Hey All,

Peter Wimberger and I are looking at an adult Ross’s goose from lower river toad. It’s with a big flock of snow, cackling and Canada geese East of road just before entrance to Frenchman’s bar Reg Park.

Also mixed in is an egret with a black bill tip and short gape. Those are both characteristics of intermediate egret.

Best,
Will Brooks
Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 11/9/19 2:09 pm
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Hayton Gyr now
In eagle nest tree.

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 11/9/19 12:05 pm
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...>
Subject: [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Nov 10., 2019
Hey, Tweeters,

Last week on BirdNote:
* Common Redpoll - An Uncommon Survivor
http://bit.ly/2CVNcWx
* Shrike... Butcherbird!
http://bit.ly/32w2s5q
* The Haunting Voice of the Common Loon
http://bit.ly/2NvRUPS
* The Return of Snowbird
http://bit.ly/2JycD1w
* Anna's Hummingbird: Thriving in Our Shadow
http://bit.ly/2NuCJ9f
* As the Crow Flies -- And Other Strange Bird Sayings
http://bit.ly/TH3r8g
* Downy and Hairy Woodpeckers -
How Do You Tell Them Apart?
http://bit.ly/2A5y3gC
=========================
Next week on BirdNote: "The Eyes Have It" - Goldeneyes,
Eagle Eyes, The Eyes of an Owl, and more!
http://bit.ly/2Q0A7lj
-------------------------
Did you have a favorite story this week? Another comment?
Please let us know. mailto:<info...>
------------------------------------------------
BirdNote is now in print. Check out BirdNote, the book:
https://www.birdnote.org/birdnote-book
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
or Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/birdnoteradio/
Listen on Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find 1500+ episodes and more than 1200 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
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Date: 11/9/19 9:33 am
From: AMK17 <amk17...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Zono hybrids
Morning Tweets,

For the past few weeks an odd sparrow has been a regular visitor to my yard. At first, I thought it was a white-throated sparrow then a golden crowned and then a white-crowned. It is possible it is a hybrid white-crowned x golden crowned sparrow.

It has white head stripes and a golden forecrown, plain breast, strong brown stripes (no white throat). Sometimes it appears to have yellow lores but I can't seem to get a photograph of the bird in good light.

Interesting sparrow that I can't quite figure out.

Poorly lit photos at https://ebird.org/checklist/S61298403 if you care to provide an opinion on the sparrow as I would be interested. Probably a non breeding goldencrowned but it does have white facial stripes in good light.

Cheers,
AKopitov
Seattle, WA

AMK17


AMK17
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Date: 11/8/19 8:10 pm
From: Douglas Brown <modernwrld53...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Lummi Flats
Chirp,

Our favorite winter birds have been arriving in the Northwest corner. Some of the birds seen on recent visits to the Lummi Flats include ..

Short-eared Owls, Peregrine Falcon, Merlin, American Kestrel, Trumpeter Swans, Snow Geese, Northern Shrike, Western Meadowlarks, Rough-legged Hawks and others.
On Wednesday, I watched as a Rough-legged Hawk flew from its perch and grabbed a rodent. It quickly consumed the prey before another RLHA zoomed in, attempting to steal the prey. It was too late and was followed closely by an adult Bald Eagle, also interested in a free meal. See photos through links below ….

Also of note …. On a recent visit to the San Juan Islands, Marion and I found a Red-naped Sapsucker.
Perhaps even more surprising, we spent some time with two Humpback Whales in President’s Channel, near Orcas Island.

cheers, db

https://www.flickr.com/photos/146696747@N03/page1 <https://www.flickr.com/photos/146696747@N03/page1>

http://www.douglaslbrownphotography.com/ <http://www.douglaslbrownphotography.com/>



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Date: 11/8/19 6:20 pm
From: Dave Hayden <dtvhm...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Pacific Co. birding /Black Phoebe
Gary Wiles and I  spent the day birding Pacific County and our best bird was a BLACK PHOEBE at the intersect of Camp One Rd. and Mill Creek Rd. in east Raymond.
We started the day walking the Willipa Hills Trail in Pulvius where we had a large flock of both chickadee's and both kinglet's, FOX SPARROWS, BUSHTITS, and 2 EVENING GROSBEAKS.
Further west in Holcomb, we drove along Oxbow Rd. where we picked up several SCRUB JAYS, an AMERICAN KESTREL, and a fly by PEREGRINE FALCON. 
After birding the Raymond area, we continued on to Tokeland. Here we had MARBLED GODWITS, WILLETS, DUNLIN, BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, at least a 1000 AMERICAN WIGEON, and several thousand NORTHERN PINTAILS in Willipa Bay.

Dave Hayden
dtvhm AT nwrain .com
Centralia WA
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Date: 11/8/19 2:01 pm
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Why Do Parrots Waste Most Of What You Feed Them?
Hello everyone,

I ran across an interesting paper that looks to behaviour in the wild to
explain a widespread behaviour that's long been commented upon in captive
parrots: basically, why do parrots waste so much food?

Why Do Parrots Waste Most Of What You Feed Them?
https://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2019/11/08/why-do-parrots-waste-most-of-what-you-feed-them/
tinyURL: https://tinyurl.com/yyhoqcne

I hope you find this piece to be informative. I also encourage you to share
it widely amongst your bird friends, on social media and on twitter.

as always, thank you for reading.

--
GrrlScientist | @GrrlScientist <https://twitter.com/GrrlScientist>
<grrlscientist...>
Blogs: Forbes <http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/>
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Date: 11/7/19 5:33 pm
From: Mark Ahlness <mahlness...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Fir Island
We were up there last Saturday. Some swans, but not in big numbers yet. The
snow geese were in a huge flock just off Polson Rd. They flew over Hayton
at sunset. Thousands. A full minute video will give you an idea... make
sure your sound is on: https://flic.kr/p/2hEPEfV

Mark Ahlness
Seattle

On Thu, Nov 7, 2019 at 2:16 PM Philip Dickinson <pdickins...> wrote:

> Snow Geese have been there for awhile. Sometimes near Hayton Reserve.
> Swans should be coming in, as I have seen about 200 further south in the
> Stillsguamish valley
>
> Phil Dickinson
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Nov 7, 2019, at 1:42 PM, David Hutchinson <florafaunabooks...>
> wrote:
>
> 
> Hi everyone. I am wondering if there yet is a good build up of
> Snow Geese and Swans on the island? Have a friend coming from out of town
> who is interested. Thanks, David Hutchinson
>
>
> _______________________________________________
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> <Tweeters...>
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>
> _______________________________________________
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> <Tweeters...>
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--
Mark Ahlness
<mahlness...>
Seattle, WA

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Date: 11/7/19 3:00 pm
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Sharp-tailed Sandpiper at Nisqually NWR.
Ryan Munes and I are on a Sharp-tailed Sandpiper in the flooded field just south of the Twin Barns at Nisqually. Bird is roosting in field with large flock of Killdeer. Photos taken. 3pm Thursday 11/7.

Shep Thorp

Shep Thorp, VMD
Emergency Clinician
BluePearl Veterinary Partners
253.370.3742 mobile
253.474.0791 Tacoma
bluepearlvet.com




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Date: 11/7/19 2:21 pm
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Fir Island
Snow Geese have been there for awhile. Sometimes near Hayton Reserve. Swans should be coming in, as I have seen about 200 further south in the Stillsguamish valley

Phil Dickinson

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 7, 2019, at 1:42 PM, David Hutchinson <florafaunabooks...> wrote:
>
> 
> Hi everyone. I am wondering if there yet is a good build up of
> Snow Geese and Swans on the island? Have a friend coming from out of town
> who is interested. Thanks, David Hutchinson
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

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Date: 11/7/19 1:45 pm
From: David Hutchinson <florafaunabooks...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fir Island
Hi everyone. I am wondering if there yet is a good build up of
Snow Geese and Swans on the island? Have a friend coming from out of town
who is interested. Thanks, David Hutchinson



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Date: 11/6/19 7:33 pm
From: Hank H <h.heiberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Cle Elum today

> Today we birded in the Cle Elum area. There is often a Rough-legged Hawk at the intersection of Red Bridge and Teanaway Roads. It was there again today. It is not at all skittish.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/49026805742/
>
> Also along Red Bridge Road was a feeding covey of 24 California Quail that didn't mind that we stopped directly across the road from them. Here is a video.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/49026119103/
>
> On the way up to Swauk Prairie we watched a Common Raven pursue an American Kestrel. The Raven put in a mighty effort, but finally gave up at which point a Black-billed Magpie took up the pursuit. The two birds went out of view, but our guess is that the Magpie gave up also. Swauk Prairie had a wide variety of raptors.
>
> We were surprised to see two Snow Geese in with a large flock of Canada Geese along Masterson Road just prior to Red Bridge Road.
>
> Here is the album of photos for the day.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/albums/72157711674468146
>
> To see the most recent eBird reports for Kittitas County (including ours) use Washington Dashboard
>
> http://birdingwashington.info/dashboard/wa/
>
> Then select Kittitas County and Recent Checklists.
>
> Hank & Karen Heiberg
> Issaquah, WA
>
>
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPad

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Date: 11/6/19 7:01 pm
From: Phil Kelley <scrubjay323...>
Subject: [Tweeters] NIsqually NWR 11/6/19
Tweets,

Today 35 of us enjoyed a good walk at Nisqually. We had high overcast
and cool temps, but it was a good day. We had a 13.2 high tide at 1:57
so we had good viewing out on the surge plain.

Highlights included great views of LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERS, GREATER
YELLOWLEGS, and wintering waterfowl, including first of the season
BUFFLEHEAD and RING-NECKED DUCK and the RED-SHOULDERED HAWK.

The orchard was again very active with ROBINS, FLICKERS, STARLINGS,
both CHICKADEES, BROWN CREEPER, and KINGLETS very active.

Raptors were present in good numbers including several BALD EAGLES,
RED-TAILED HAWKS, NORTHERN HARRIERS, including 1 male, PEREGRINE
FALCON, and the RED-SHOULDERED HAWK flying over the marsh near the old
McAllister Creek trail.

The incoming tide put LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERS and GREATER YELLOWLEGS
right up to the dike while DUNLIN flew about a little further out. A
PEREGRINE dove on the DUNLIN but didn't appear to be successful.

Off the twin barns overlook we had about 15 WILSON'S SNIPE working the
edge of the pond.

The estuary boardwalk continues to be closed as the contractor
finishes up the bridge replacement. The boardwalk should reopen soon.

For the day I had 40 species and now have 124 for the year. Mammals
seen were BLACK-TAILED DEER and GRAY SQUIRRELS.

Until next week....

Phil Kelley
<scrubjay323...>
Lacey, WA
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Date: 11/6/19 8:12 am
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fir Island Gyrfalcon continues (Skagit County)
Yesterday (11.05.19) the Fir Island GYRFALCON appeared again at Hayton Reserve on Fir Island. Once at 9AM & again at around noon. Each time the bird perched on the eagle nest tree close to the parking lot. This time, the bird is much closer in these 2 videos. [ https://www.flickr.com/photos/138163614@N02/ | https://www.flickr.com/photos/138163614@N02/ ]

Also seen were DUNLIN in murmuration, DARK MORPH WESTERN RED-TAILED HAWK, LIGHT MORPH HARLAN'S RED-TAILED HAWK, PEREGRINE FALCON as well as several species of ducks, geese and shorebirds.

Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>


"Don't believe everything you read on the internet."
- Thomas Jefferson


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Date: 11/5/19 8:20 pm
From: Wayne Weber <contopus...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Two new birds for my King County life list
Tweeters,



Yesterday, November 4, I decided to attend the WOS monthly meeting in
Seattle, and did some birding in Snohomish and King Counties on the way
there. There are several recently-seen species, I thought, that should not
be too hard to add to my King County life list. So I decided to try for two
of these- Snow Goose and Rock Wren. I found them both, but one was a
slam-dunk, and the other one I nearly missed.



It appeared that there was a small flock of Snow Geese remaining in the
Sikes Lake area near Carnation. This was one of the easiest county "ticks" I
have ever experienced. As I drove south on the West Snoqualmie Valley Road
from Duvall, there was the Snow Goose flock feeding in the fields, only 300
yards or so from the road. I counted 84 birds in the flock, and more than
75% were juveniles. This was the first species I saw in the Sikes Lake area!



The other species, Rock Wren, was not quite so easy. As many of you know,
there has been a Rock Wren near the Alki Point lighthouse ever since October
9th. Should be easy, not so? I walked along the beach twice from the
lighthouse south to the second beach access ramp to the south (about two
city blocks), with no sign of the bird. However, a second Rock Wren was
found about two days ago along Alki Avenue two miles to the east. By now it
was sunset, so I decided to look for the second bird, with my hopes fading.



I arrived at the 2300 block Alki Avenue about 5 PM, and walked along the
seawall for at least a city block, scouring the riprap along the shore where
the bird had been seen. No luck! Ready to give up, I suddenly heard the
"cher-wee, cher-wee" call of a Rock Wren across the road, on the landward
side of Alki Avenue! There was the bird, hopping along the sidewalk in front
of 2222 Alki Avenue. I didn't even have time to lift my binoculars to my
eyes when the wren hopped into the shrubbery and disappeared. Must have been
his last little burst of activity before turning in for the night. However,
I know the call well, and a Rock Wren it was. Talk about just finding a rare
bird by the skin of your teeth! Success at the last possible second!



Rock Wrens are always rarities on the west side of the Cascades. I have seen
Rock Wrens once in Whatcom County and twice in Skagit. However, I have had a
chequered history in chasing this species in western WA. I tried and failed
to find a Rock Wren on Whidbey Island, some years ago, after a mile-long
walk down the west beach. I dipped out on a bird seen on Ediz Hook near Port
Angeles. I couldn't even find a Rock Wren two winters ago that spent several
weeks in the beach logs at Birch Bay State Park, despite three tries to find
it. I was danged if I was going to miss this bird in King County.
Persistence sometimes pays off!



Ain't birding fun?



Wayne C. Weber

Delta, BC

<contopus...>




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Date: 11/5/19 8:17 pm
From: Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...>
Subject: [Tweeters] leucistic chickadee
I had a lot of birds in my yard and at my feeders today, but a leucistic black-capped chickadee really caught my attention.  My first leucistic sighting!!  Photo in my ebird checklist.  Bothell WA.eBird Checklist - 5 Nov 2019 - Shelton View (my yard) - 11 species


|
|
|
| | |

|

|
|
| |
eBird Checklist - 5 Nov 2019 - Shelton View (my yard) - 11 species

Submitted by Peggy Mundy.
|

|

|




Peggy MundyBothell, WA
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Date: 11/5/19 5:36 pm
From: Brokaw, Loren (DFW) <Loren.Brokaw...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Leque Island/Eide Rd
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Date: 11/5/19 5:33 pm
From: Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Flicker variations
In response to another Tweeters post, Robert L. O'Brien wrote that eBird
had a webpage with an interesting and detailed description of flicker
variations.

Robert's memory is good! That article appeared on the Northwest portal
to eBird and can be found here:

http://ebird.org/content/nw/news/northern-flicker-red-shafted-yellow-shafted-intergrades-which-do-you-have/

Jane Hadley

Seattle, WA


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Date: 11/5/19 5:17 pm
From: Hartmut Peters <tuoichen...>
Subject: [Tweeters] not a new entry...
Hoy All,

I am new to Tweeter, and I am not a "real" Birder. However, I'd like to
share this sighting of a male Downy woodpecker at Discovery Park (on the
Hidden Valley Trail). If this guy was just excavating a night shelter for
himself, I'd still admire the perfectly circular shape of the hole!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bh6lgb9ooog

Seen on 10/4/2019

--
Hartmut Peters
Seattle, Washington; tuoichen AT gmail.com

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Date: 11/5/19 2:33 pm
From: dick <dick...>
Subject: [Tweeters] European Tree Sparrow
The European Tree Sparrow has disappeared from eBird Clallam County information.   Wondering what happened after Brad Waggoner repost of Paul Lehmans comments?  Was this an eBird decision,  or the Bird Records Committee, or ??DickSent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone_______________________________________________
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Date: 11/5/19 12:21 pm
From: David Poortinga <dpoortinga...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Dunlin, Chelan Co.
At Walla Walla Point Park in Wenatchee, there is a Dunlin with Killdeer in the cove to the left of the gull spit. Also a Mew Gull with the other gulls roosting on the spit.

David PoortingaArlington, WA
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Date: 11/5/19 11:20 am
From: Diann MacRae <tvulture...>
Subject: [Tweeters] #4 Fall 2019 turkey vultures (long)
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Date: 11/5/19 9:33 am
From: Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Snohomish County Snow Buntings
Yesterday afternoon I found and photographed four Snow Buntings at Eide Road, also known as Leque Island, near Stanwood. WDFW has not yet reopened the site. I was in the vicinity and stopped because there were no workers present and I was able to snug my car up against the road closure signs, safely away from SR 532 traffic.

The new parking lot is just below the 532 bridge and does not look like it will accommodate as many cars as the old parking area. The dike trail is wide enough for authorized vehicles but visitors will be limited to walking. There are benches at the beginning and end of the dike trail and only one intermediate bench. This could be problematic for those with pulmonary or ambulatory issues. Benches aren't that expensive. With all the money that has gone into recreating this site for salmon, a couple of more benches would not have broken the bank. It looks like access to the area will be limited to the new dike trail. All of the brush along the old Eide Road has been removed.

Back to the buntings. The four were foraging on seeds in the straw that has been strewn along the river side of the dike. They weren't terribly skittish so I got good looks up close. If you go looking for them, have a Plan B in case workers are on the site. I think it is still a week or two away from the reopening and there are obvious projects they need to complete. One photo is in this eBird checklist. More to follow.

https://ebird.org/checklist/S61192921

Right now, at high tide, it looks like The Great Salt Lake of Leque Island. Time will tell whether this location will produce the good shorebirds that show up at Fir Island's Hayton Reserve. I can't imagine Short-eared Owls will find this site productive. Will we lose SEOWs in Snohomish County or will they find productive hunting along Thomle or Boe Roads? Anybody's guess at this point.

Carol Riddell
Edmonds, WA
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Date: 11/4/19 6:52 pm
From: Robert O'Brien <baro...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Flicker variations
EBird has a page with an interesting and detailed description of different
flicker variations. It could probably be found with a Google search.
Bob O'Brien Portland

On Monday, November 4, 2019, Joan Miller <jemskink...> wrote:

> Hi Tweets,
>
> I know there are numerous variations in our flickers. It's interesting to
> see that at least one of the males that come to my feeders has a red patch
> on the nape, while others do not. This is supposedly a mark commonly found
> on the eastern yellow-shafted flickers.
>
> Mix n'match flickers!
>
> Joan Miller
> West Seattle
> jemskink at gmail dot com
>
>

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Date: 11/4/19 12:01 pm
From: Joan Miller <jemskink...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Flicker variations
Hi Tweets,

I know there are numerous variations in our flickers. It's interesting to
see that at least one of the males that come to my feeders has a red patch
on the nape, while others do not. This is supposedly a mark commonly found
on the eastern yellow-shafted flickers.

Mix n'match flickers!

Joan Miller
West Seattle
jemskink at gmail dot com

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Date: 11/4/19 4:54 am
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...>
Subject: [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Nov 3., 2019
Hello, Tweeters,

Last week on BirdNote:
* Time to Clean Your Nestboxes
http://bit.ly/2fYd5ZH
* What the Pacific Wren Hears - Check this out!
We slow the wren's song down to 1/4 speed. Listen!
http://bit.ly/Pacific-Wren-Song
* Ptarmigan Toes
http://bit.ly/2NyrnzZ
* Ring-necked Pheasants in the Wild
http://bit.ly/2yDM72Y
* Spooky Shearwaters on Halloween!
http://bit.ly/2hV79AQ
* The Strange and Stealthy Shoebill
http://bit.ly/2fFr3yd
* Birds in the Winter Garden - Put Your Garden to Work
http://bit.ly/2Nyl13N
=========================
Next week on BirdNote: The Haunting Voice of the Common Loon
and more: http://bit.ly/2N9XLd6
-------------------------
Did you have a favorite story this week? Another comment?
Please let us know. mailto:<info...>
------------------------------------------------
BirdNote is now in print. Check out BirdNote, the book:
https://www.birdnote.org/birdnote-book
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
or Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/birdnoteradio/
Listen on Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find 1500+ episodes and more than 1200 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
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Date: 11/3/19 4:10 pm
From: Constance Sidles <constancesidles...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Pinnacle adventure
Hey tweets, Here's a report on another adventure in my Year of Adventure:

If you're going to take a trip to Pinnacles National Park in central California, you'd better pack up your sense of beauty and take it along with you. You'll need it, for Pinnacles is a "not quite" kind of place:

It has rock formations rising up from the valley floor - a result of an ancient volcano erupting 23 millions years ago and then getting moved nearly 200 miles north by the San Andreas Fault - but the formations are dully colored and shaped, not quite like the wildly beautiful rock formations of Zion or Bryce Canyon.

The hills stretch out for miles but are covered with scrubby chaparral, not quite as eye-stretching as the waving prairies of Grasslands or the silvery-green sage of eastern Washington.

It's a hot, dry place, with ocean breezes blocked by the San Lucia Mountains to the west, but it's not quite the sere, pure heat of a true desert, where the plants all have thorns to protect their inner water resources and the risk of drying up and blowing away is real and exciting.

Pinnacles is just a drab place most famous for its talus caves, 13 species of bats - and condors. We were here on another one of our adventures, this time trying to find California Condors in the wild. Pinnacles is one of the first places where aptively bred condors were released back in 1991 and 1992. Now some are breeding here. We had seen wild condors in the Grand Canyon area in Arizona earlier in the year, but you can never see too many condors.

Our first stop was the ranger station on the east side of the park. Pinnacles can be accessed either from the east entrance or the west, but there is no connecting road across the center of the park. To get to one unit, you must drive all the way around the park either north or south, a distance of some 65 miles. "Where would we find condors?" we asked the ranger.

"Well," he said, "this is what you do. At four o'clock in the afternoon, you come to the campground on the other side of the parking lot here and look up at the ridge. The condors will be soaring there, along with Turkey Vultures."

So at four o'clock in early September, I set up my camp stool in the middle of the campground. It was blazing hot - over 100 degrees F. The campground was nothing more than a gravel parking lot with some hookups for RVs. The ranger had shut himself up in the visitor center with a couple of fans. Otherwise, the place was deserted. All was quiet except for a slight breeze that scraped a few dry leaves across the gravel and
made me feel like I was baking in a convection oven.

"I'm going to hike up the creek," said John, who hates sittiing around waiting for mythical birds to put in an appearance. Neither one of us could quite believe the ranger.

After he disappeared into the bushes, I decided to move my stool over to the live oak trees struggling to survive along the sluggish, mostly evaporated creek bed. Their canopy provided some welcome shade, so that's where I sat trying to get a little cool until my husband John got back from his sweaty hike. "What's that sign say over there?" he asked, pointing to a little white sign several meters away. I raised my binoculars: "Danger. Do not sit under these trees. Branches can break off without warning." I sighed and moved back into the brazen sun.

Time crawled by and the light began to change to a softer gold. California Quail ventured out from the bushes to peck at the gravel and some scrub-jays showed up to eye me hopefully. Idly, I glanced up at the towering ridge and noticed kettles of Turkey Vultures had appread out of some collapsed supernova. Such graceful flyers, gliding back and forth over the ridge with scarecly a flap.

Then, at four o'clock on the dot, a distant black speck in the blue sky grew large, larger - and largest. A California Condor joined the vultures and sailed the blue sky-sea as effortlessly as any albatross crossing the ocean. Soon another appeared, and then another, until half a dozen filled the air. They made no noise. Occasionally, one would lower its pink and yellow face to look at us, perhaps wondering if we were dead enough to eat, just as its ancestors must have done in Pleistocene times. We were transported out of the present and back to the time when dire wolves roamed these hills and giant ground sloths sat on their haunches to eat the canopy leaves.

For an hour, we shared the planet with these magical birds, and then they were gone as silently as they had come. I took a breath I didn't know I'd been holding. My eyes were changed. They had looked into the condor's face, and I will never see the same way again. Far from drab, Pinnacles is a fragment of time long gone elsewhere but forever alive here.

As we drove past a stand of marsh plants on our way out, a Phainopepla sang us farewell. I was left with memories of pure beauty of the most wonderful kind: wild, secret, and free.

Bird list:
California Quail
Wild Turkey
Mourning Dove
California Condor
Turkey Vulture
Swainson's Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Acorn Woodpecker
American Kestrel
Prairie Falcon
Hammond's Flycatcher
Say's Phoebe
Loggerhead Shrike
Steller's Jay
California Scrub-Jay
Yellow-billed Magpie
American Crow
Common Raven
Oak Titmouse
Bushtit
White-breasted Nuthatch
Bewick's Wren
California Towhee
S;potted Towhee
Western Meadowlark
Northern Mockingbird
Western Bluebird
Phainopepla
Lark Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Western Tanager

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Date: 11/3/19 1:21 pm
From: Beth Thompson <calliopehb...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] The state's Christimas Bird Count information is up on the WOS website
Hi, the Padilla Bay area is not shown on the list. It's being held on December 28th. FYI
Happily birding,
Beth Thompson
Arlington WA

Sent from my Verizon Motorola Smartphone
On Nov 3, 2019 1:04 PM, Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...> wrote:
>
> Hello Birders - The Christmas Bird Count information for this year for Washington (and some areas in Oregon) are up on the WOS web site.
>
> Thanks to Jim Danzenbaker for compiling this information.
>
> You can find the information at: http://wos.org/cbc/
>
> Jane Hadley
>
> Seattle, WA
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Date: 11/3/19 1:09 pm
From: Hubbell <ldhubbell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Louis' Debut
Tweeters,

This week’s post covers a new visitor to Union Bay. I hope you enjoy the post!

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2019/11/louis-debut.html <https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2019/11/louis-debut.html>

Have a great day on Union Bay, where nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net



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Date: 11/3/19 1:07 pm
From: Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...>
Subject: [Tweeters] The state's Christimas Bird Count information is up on the WOS website
Hello Birders - The Christmas Bird Count information for this year for
Washington (and some areas in Oregon) are up on the WOS web site.

Thanks to Jim Danzenbaker for compiling this information.

You can find the information at: http://wos.org/cbc/

Jane Hadley

Seattle, WA


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Date: 11/3/19 12:45 pm
From: Mark Robinson <blobbybirdman...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Magnuson Park Goshawk
Found a Juvenile Northern Goshawk around 12:30 today, just south of the soccer fields at Magnuson Park, Seattle. The bird eventually flew off south trailed by several hundred angry crows

Mark

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 11/2/19 6:33 pm
From: cynthia burrell <cinnyb...>
Subject: [Tweeters] WOS meeting Mon Nov 4-- Will Brooks, White-crowned Sparrow hybridization study
Hello Birders,
The Washington Ornithological Society holds its monthly meeting on Monday Nov 4 at The UW Center for Urban Horticulture. Join us this month to hear Will Brooks present on his studies of White Crowned Sparrows in the Cascade Mountains.  Will has spent the past two summers in the overlapping breeding zones of sub species Z.I. pugetensis and Z.I. gambelli. Using song recognition experiments and genetic analysis he has been  better able to understand if there is interbreeding between the two sub-species. Will is currently a senior biology major at University of Puget Sound, and plans to continue on the academic path and pursue more fieldwork opportunities. He was the recipient of the Patrick Sullivan Young Birders Award From The WA Ornithological Society in 2018.
If you are in the Seattle area Monday night, join us at the Center for Urban Horticulture 3501 NE 41st St, Seattle, WA 98105. Socialize with fellow birders before the meeting from 7-7:30PM. Meeting begins at 7:30PM. All are welcome at WOS meetings.
(Attend virtually via GoToMeeting. Must be a member to attend virtually. Sign up at WOS.org)
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Date: 11/2/19 4:35 pm
From: <merdave...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Blue Jay in Douglas County

What a nice surprise I had this morning when a friend called to tell me
she had a Blue Jay at her feeder. I went right down, and saw it about 20
min. later. Turns out HER neighbor has been seeing two for about a week!
Last one reported in the county was 2012 from Mansfield. Last one I saw
was 15 years ago!! Now, will it stay around for our CBC???? Meredith
Spencer, Bridgeport

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Date: 11/2/19 2:37 pm
From: Phil and Julie Mattern <philjul61...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bittern in Kent

Am. Bittern seen at Puget Power Trail near 64th Ave S, Green River Natural Area, 2:25 pm today.
--
Phil & Julie Mattern
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Date: 11/2/19 1:06 pm
From: Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Edmonds Roundup - Sep-Oct 2019
Greetings Tweeters,

We have had a relatively decent two months in Edmonds. Birds we have added to our year list include: American White Pelican (code 4), 9-5-2019; Ring-billed Gull (code 3) at Shell Creek beach 9-10-2019; Red-necked Phalarope (code 3) 9-10-2019; Long-tailed Duck (code 3) 9-23-19; Common Tern (code 3) 9-24-2019; Broad-winged Hawk (code 5) 9-29-19 near Chase Lake; Ancient Murrelet (code 2) 10-6-2019; Northern Harrier (code 3) 10-7-2019 in the Pine Ridge neighborhood; Northern Shrike (code 3) 10-10-2019 at Edmonds marsh; Snow Goose (code 3) 10-14-2019 over a south Edmonds neighborhood; American Tree Sparrow (code 5) 10-19-2019 at Edmonds marsh; Tundra Swan (code 4) 10-29-2019 in north Edmonds.

We are at 176 species for the year. A big thanks to all of you who share your Edmonds sightings with me. They really help us develop an accurate year list. The year list is maintained in the bird information display case at the Olympic Beach Visitor Station at the base of the public pier.

Of interest: A dead Sora (code 5) was found on the pavement near a birder’s home in north Edmonds on 8-26-2019. It apparently fell out of the sky on migration. Photos showed no obvious sign of injury. Since it was found dead, it has not been added to our year list. A kettle of twelve Turkey Vultures headed south through Edmonds on 10-1-2019. It was the third Turkey Vulture sighting this year but it was unique because it was a migrating kettle, a very rare sight for Edmonds these days. In the last couple of weeks there has been a return of Surfbirds (code 4) to the marina breakwater.

I recently learned that an October 2018 report of a Slaty-backed Gull on the roof at Haines Wharf Park was approved by the Washington Bird Records Committee. That species, along with American Tree Sparrow, will be added to the 2020 Edmonds checklist, bringing our species total up to 276. But the year still has two months! Hopefully someone will find another new species.

Good birding,

Carol Riddell
Edmonds, WA

Abundance codes: (1) Common, (2) Uncommon, (3) Harder to find, usually seen annually, (4) Rare, 5+ records, (5) Fewer than 5 records
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Date: 11/2/19 1:05 pm
From: Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson...>
Subject: [Tweeters] woodpecker weirdness
Hello, tweets.

After not having seen either of them in the yard for months, just now there was a Downy Woodpecker at a feeder in the back yard and a Hairy Woodpecker at a feeder in the front yard simultaneously. I feel like I’m in the twilight zone.

That’s my exciting bird news for today.

Dennis Paulson
1724 NE 98 St.
Seattle
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Date: 11/1/19 9:01 pm
From: Mike M <strix.nebulosa1987...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Current list of upcoming CBCs
Jim,



Chewelah is Saturday Jan 4.



Mike



From: Tweeters [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Jim Danzenbaker
Sent: Friday, November 1, 2019 4:36 PM
To: tweeters tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Current list of upcoming CBCs



Hi Tweeters,



It's that time of the year when the weather has turned cooler which only means one thing - Christmas Bird Counts are on the horizon! Just as I have done over the last two years, I've compiled, via feedback from CBC organizers, a list of all of the CBCs that are scheduled to occur or partially occur in the State of Washington this December-January. Currently, I have all but a few of them. I am listing those that have communicated with me so that you can see when your local CBC will be held. Sorry they aren't in alphabetical order.



The purpose of this e-mail is to find out if there are other CBCs that I do not know of which should be added to this list - brand new CBCs or CBCs that may not have occurred for several years but will be this season. If you see one that's missing, please let me know at your earliest convenience - I greatly appreciate it!



Eventually, the entire list with dates and contact information will be posted on the WOS.org website and tweeters will be alerted when this has happened.




Admiralty Audubon - Saturday, December 14

Eastside Audubon - Saturday, December 14

Edmonds/South Snohomish County - Saturday, December 14

Camas Prairie - Trout Lake - Saturday, December 14

Ellensburg - Saturday, December 14

Kitsap Audubon - Saturday, December 14

Moscow - Pullman - Saturday, December 14

Oak Harbor - Saturday, December 14

San Juan Ferry Transect - Saturday, December 14

Toppenish - Saturday, December 14

Walla Walla - Saturday, December 14

Cheney - Sunday, December 15

San Juan Islands. Archipelago - Sunday, December 15

Lyle - Sunday, December 15

Bellingham - Sunday, December 15

Olympia - Sunday, December 15

Yeah Bay - Sunday, December 15

Sauvie Island and Ridgefield - Sunday, December 15

Sequim-Dungeness- Monday, December 16

Cle Elum- Monday, December 16

Leavenworth- Tuesday, December 17

Lewis County- Friday, December 20

Bridgeport- Saturday, December 21

Port Gamble (North Kitsap)- Saturday, December 21

Tahoma Audubon- Saturday, December 21

Seattle - Saturday, December 28

Yakima Valley - Saturday, December 28

Everett - Marysville - Saturday, December 28

Port Angeles - Saturday, December 28

Wenatchee - Saturday, December 28

Try-Cities - Saturday, December 28

Columbia Hills - Sunday, December 29

Spokane - Sunday, December 29

Okanogan/Omak - Sunday, December 29

Rainier Audubon - Sunday, December 29

Wahkiakum - Monday, December 30

Cowlitz - Columbia - Wednesday, January 1

Skagit Bay - Wednesday, January 1

Chelan - Saturday, January 4

Grays Harbor - Saturday, January 4

Vashon - Sunday, January 5



Active communication with organizers but awaiting final information:



Leadbetter Point



No communication yet. If you are the organizer for any of these CBCs, please send me an e-mail as I may not have your correct e-mail address:



Chewelah

Twisp



Thanks for any feedback.



Jim

--

Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
<jdanzenbaker...> <mailto:<jdanzenbaker...>


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Date: 11/1/19 8:50 pm
From: Patricia Quyle Grainger <paq...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Bird ID
I could not come up with the bird by following your Flickr. Am I the only one? I'd like to help, but...

Pat Grainger
Port Townsend



Sent from my iPad

> On Nov 1, 2019, at 6:53 PM, <byers345...> <byers345...> wrote:
>
> Hello Tweeters,
> I am reluctant to ask for help on this bird’s ID because it is so obviously seriously ill. It turned up on a friend’s feeder. The friend says it is bigger than a House Finch. That ID wouldn’t work anyway because the beak is grosbeak-like and the culmen is straight. But it can’t be a grosbeak….
> Could it be a juvenile crossbill without a very crossed bill?
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/29258421@N07/
>
> I feel like I should be able to ID this bird right away, but am flummoxed. Charlotte Byers, Edmonds.
> _______________________________________________
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> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

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Date: 11/1/19 8:06 pm
From: <byers345...>
Subject: [Tweeters] ID of sick bird resolved
Hello Tweeters,

The bird whose picture I posted a while ago was identified
as a House Finch. Aside from the large-looking bill, that's certainly what
the bird appears to be. Thanks to Phil, Randy, Bob, Ryan, and Kevin for
weighing in on this bird. Charlotte Byers, Edmonds


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Date: 11/1/19 6:57 pm
From: <byers345...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bird ID
Hello Tweeters,

I am reluctant to ask for help on this bird's ID because it
is so obviously seriously ill. It turned up on a friend's feeder. The
friend says it is bigger than a House Finch. That ID wouldn't work anyway
because the beak is grosbeak-like and the culmen is straight. But it can't
be a grosbeak..

Could it be a juvenile crossbill without a very crossed bill?



https://www.flickr.com/photos/29258421@N07/



I feel like I should be able to ID this bird right away, but
am flummoxed. Charlotte Byers, Edmonds.


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Date: 11/1/19 4:41 pm
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Current list of upcoming CBCs
Hi Tweeters,

It's that time of the year when the weather has turned cooler which only
means one thing - Christmas Bird Counts are on the horizon! Just as I have
done over the last two years, I've compiled, via feedback from CBC
organizers, a list of all of the CBCs that are scheduled to occur or
partially occur in the State of Washington this December-January.
Currently, I have all but a few of them. I am listing those that have
communicated with me so that you can see when your local CBC will be held.
Sorry they aren't in alphabetical order.

The purpose of this e-mail is to find out if there are other CBCs that I do
not know of which should be added to this list - brand new CBCs or CBCs
that may not have occurred for several years but will be this season. If
you see one that's missing, please let me know at your earliest convenience
- I greatly appreciate it!

Eventually, the entire list with dates and contact information will be
posted on the WOS.org website and tweeters will be alerted when this has
happened.

Admiralty Audubon - Saturday, December 14
Eastside Audubon - Saturday, December 14
Edmonds/South Snohomish County - Saturday, December 14
Camas Prairie - Trout Lake - Saturday, December 14
Ellensburg - Saturday, December 14
Kitsap Audubon - Saturday, December 14
Moscow - Pullman - Saturday, December 14
Oak Harbor - Saturday, December 14
San Juan Ferry Transect - Saturday, December 14
Toppenish - Saturday, December 14
Walla Walla - Saturday, December 14
Cheney - Sunday, December 15
San Juan Islands. Archipelago - Sunday, December 15
Lyle - Sunday, December 15
Bellingham - Sunday, December 15
Olympia - Sunday, December 15
Yeah Bay - Sunday, December 15
Sauvie Island and Ridgefield - Sunday, December 15
Sequim-Dungeness- Monday, December 16
Cle Elum- Monday, December 16
Leavenworth- Tuesday, December 17
Lewis County- Friday, December 20
Bridgeport- Saturday, December 21
Port Gamble (North Kitsap)- Saturday, December 21
Tahoma Audubon- Saturday, December 21
Seattle - Saturday, December 28
Yakima Valley - Saturday, December 28
Everett - Marysville - Saturday, December 28
Port Angeles - Saturday, December 28
Wenatchee - Saturday, December 28
Try-Cities - Saturday, December 28
Columbia Hills - Sunday, December 29
Spokane - Sunday, December 29
Okanogan/Omak - Sunday, December 29
Rainier Audubon - Sunday, December 29
Wahkiakum - Monday, December 30
Cowlitz - Columbia - Wednesday, January 1
Skagit Bay - Wednesday, January 1
Chelan - Saturday, January 4
Grays Harbor - Saturday, January 4
Vashon - Sunday, January 5

Active communication with organizers but awaiting final information:

Leadbetter Point

No communication yet. If you are the organizer for any of these CBCs,
please send me an e-mail as I may not have your correct e-mail address:

Chewelah
Twisp

Thanks for any feedback.

Jim
--
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
<jdanzenbaker...>

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Date: 11/1/19 1:35 pm
From: Wilson Cady <gorgebirds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Skamania County Birds
Yesterday, after a morning of watching birds on our property where the best sightings were a RUFFED GROUSE and a calling NORTHERN PYGMY-OWL we did a little birding along Highway 14 in the Columbia River Gorge between Clark County and Stevenson when we went up to pay are property taxes. It was a warm and sunny day with only a very light breeze, a nice respite after a week of cold east winds. A stop at the Franz Lake NWR overlook produced a small flock of TUNDRA SWANS along the shoreline below the overlook that contained two family groups of TRUMPETER SWANS that were easy to locate by their calls and very obvious size difference. At the now drained pond at Skamania Landing there was a huge mixed flock of AMERICA WIGEON and GREEN-WINGED TEAL that contained one male EURASIAN WIGEON. Wilson Cady
Columbia River Gorge, WA
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Date: 11/1/19 1:06 pm
From: Hilary Barnes <habarnes...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Spotted Sandpiper at Lake Samm St. Park, Tibbets Beach
Wednesday afternoon Sally Lawrence and went for a walk at Lake Sammamish State Park- I know, not the best time for birding. After noting a Bald Eagle hanging out- where it often does- in a tree on that point near the Paddle Sports storage unit- we observed a non-killdeer shorebird feeding along the waterline, solo, tipping it's tail end up and down. It had dull orange legs, bill maybe just a tisch longer that it's head, and a grey-brown "lapel" around a little keyhole of white extending from its breast. White eyeline. No photo.

I realize that this is probably small potatoes, for ya'll expert birders, but I thought I'd mention it as
I just checked the October occurrence list for Oct./Nov. for Marymoor, and see that it a "rare" sighting.

Low-count birding means lots of time to ponder over the few that obligingly allows longer observation. Now we can ID the Spotted Sandpiper, minus the spots!

Again- sorry, no photo. But we got a lot of practice noticing salient characteristics!

Have a birdy day!

Hilary Barnes
<habarnes...>
206-331-6058 cell
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Date: 11/1/19 10:25 am
From: Alan Roedell <alanroedell...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] the amazing Hayton Reserve 10.31.19
Fabulous videos!
Thanks for sharing.
Alan Roedell, Seattle

On Fri, Nov 1, 2019, 8:51 AM Marv Breece <marvbreece...> wrote:

> Although I birded several locations in Skagit County yesterday, Hayton
> Reserve on Fir Island was by far the most productive. This post is about
> Hayton only.
>
> At 4PM I noticed a juv gray GYRFALCON perched on a root wad. On first
> glance I knew the mantle color was wrong for any plumage of peregrine;
> neither was it right for prairie. But I wouldn't allow my head to go to
> gyr until I saw that the wing tips fell far short of the tail tip on this
> perched bird. In my experience, an October gyr is not to be expected. The
> locals were unhappy with the new visitor, as the gyr was repeatedly strafed
> by harriers and at least 1 peregrine. When it took to the air, the gyr
> had to fight for air space with one of the peregrines. It was quite a
> show. I didn't see the gyr leave the area last night & don't know if it
> will remain. I hope so.
>
> The adult LIGHT MORPH HARLAN'S RED-TAILED HAWK first appeared perched in a
> distant tree across the big pond. It took me a while to be confident it
> was a Harlan's and not a juv Western Red-tail. This Harlan's has obvious
> spectacles. It is very white below. And although most of the tail is red,
> a close look will reveal white at the base of the tail. This may be the
> same bird I observed 6 times between October 10 & November 29, 2017. I did
> not see it in 2018.
>
> Finally, a word about sunset and snows last night. The spectacular
> sunset, with the sight and sound of thousands of SNOW GEESE overhead, en
> route to roost for as far as the eye can see, was something to behold.
>
> 5 videos of the day: https://www.flickr.com/photos/138163614@N02/
>
>
> Marv Breece
> Tukwila, WA
> <marvbreece...>
>
>
> "Don't believe everything you read on the internet."
> - Thomas Jefferson
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>

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Date: 11/1/19 8:53 am
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] the amazing Hayton Reserve 10.31.19
Although I birded several locations in Skagit County yesterday, Hayton Reserve on Fir Island was by far the most productive. This post is about Hayton only.

At 4PM I noticed a juv gray GYRFALCON perched on a root wad. On first glance I knew the mantle color was wrong for any plumage of peregrine; neither was it right for prairie. But I wouldn't allow my head to go to gyr until I saw that the wing tips fell far short of the tail tip on this perched bird. In my experience, an October gyr is not to be expected. The locals were unhappy with the new visitor, as the gyr was repeatedly strafed by harriers and at least 1 peregrine. When it took to the air, the gyr had to fight for air space with one of the peregrines. It was quite a show. I didn't see the gyr leave the area last night & don't know if it will remain. I hope so.

The adult LIGHT MORPH HARLAN'S RED-TAILED HAWK first appeared perched in a distant tree across the big pond. It took me a while to be confident it was a Harlan's and not a juv Western Red-tail. This Harlan's has obvious spectacles. It is very white below. And although most of the tail is red, a close look will reveal white at the base of the tail. This may be the same bird I observed 6 times between October 10 & November 29, 2017. I did not see it in 2018.

Finally, a word about sunset and snows last night. The spectacular sunset, with the sight and sound of thousands of SNOW GEESE overhead, en route to roost for as far as the eye can see, was something to behold.

5 videos of the day: [ https://www.flickr.com/photos/138163614@N02/ | https://www.flickr.com/photos/138163614@N02/ ]


Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>


"Don't believe everything you read on the internet."
- Thomas Jefferson


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Date: 10/31/19 11:57 pm
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fwd: Ash Canyon Nature Sanctuary
Hello Tweeters community,

Great news regarding Ash Canyon from my friend Tony Battiste in Arizona.
See letter below, which is also attached.

Dan Reiff
Mercer Island

Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Tony Battiste <tony.battiste...>
> Date: October 31, 2019 at 1:10:15 PM PDT
>
> Subject: Fw: Ash Canyon Nature Sanctuary
>
>
> ----- Forwarded Message -----
> From: Tony Battiste <tony.battiste...>
> To: Tony Battiste <tony.battiste...>
> Sent: Thursday, October 31, 2019, 01:00:41 PM MST
> Subject: Fw: Ash Canyon Nature Sanctuary
>
>
> Subject: Ash Canyon Nature Sanctuary
>
> Hello Dear Friends
>
> Please read the attached letter. Since the death of our dear friend Mary Jo Ballator on May 25th, I've worked tirelessly to find a way to save the nature sanctuary she devoted her life to creating. Thanks to a generous donation by Dr Mario Molina and wife, Therese, as of tomorrow, Ash Canyon will now be in the hands of the Southeast AZ Bird Observatory.
>
> Please read in its entirety
>
> Tony
>
Hello Dear Family and Friends

Most of you are already aware of the untimely passing of our dearest friend, Mary Jo Ballator on May 25th. Mary Jo was the creator and steward of the Ash Canyon Nature Center, previously, Ash Canyon B&B. Since her passing, we, the birding community here is SE Arizona, have worked feverishly to acquire the capital to fund the purchase price of the property, so as to be able to continue the operation of the sanctuary that Mary Jo created over almost 20 years of passionate toil.

Well, I'm ecstatic to report that as of Nov 1, 2019, ASH CANYON NATURE SANCTUARY has been acquired by the SOUTHEASTERN BIRD OBSERVATORY, (SABO).
SABO is a local nonprofit, 501(c)3, dedicated to the conservation of birds, and their habitats, is known for its hummingbird research, environmental and educational outreach. Tom Wood and Sheri Williamson are the directors and I am one of the newest members to their board of directors.

After the death of Mary Jo, the garden was closed to day visitors. But after meeting with her daughter, Debra Lindes and her son, David, it became apparent that they wished to carry on their mother's desire that Ash Canyon would continued to be operated as a nature sanctuary in perpetuity. At that point, a Go Fund Me account was opened with two objectives. 1: In the short term, to re-open as soon as possible so as to have continuity for the birds and the visiting public. 2: To try to find a way to purchase the property for sterwadship through a nonpofit organization. Thanks to Robert Gallucci, GFM organizer, the short term goal was accommplished through donations sufficeint enough to pay for feeding the birds through the summer. The long term goal was reached when a philanthropist friend in Calif, agreed to fund the purchase of Ash Canyon with a MAJOR donation to SABO. Although, Dr. Joseph Mario Molina and wife, Therese Flynn-Molina, would prefer no special acknowledgement for their generoisty, I feel if is of utmost importance to do so here.

But now, the hard work really begins. After years of Mary Jo's struggles to just make ends meet, the home and property fell in need of much infrastructure repairs. The exterior of the straw-baled home has cracks and holes that need repair. The swamp cooler is beyond its usable life. Both bathrooms need tile work to complete. The 4 burner stove has only one functional burner. The raidiant floor heating system hook up has never been completed. Two sliding doors to the exterior need repair or replacement. The perimeter of the yard needs 6 Ft field fencing to deter intrusion by bear and javelina..

SABO has no operating capital to remedy these major issues, so I'm reaching out to you, some for the first time, and others that have previously responded to my appeal by donating to the GFM, to give deep consideration to making a major donation to SABO. A donation of $150, the Lucifer Hummingbird level, give free addmission for a year, Donations of $151-$499, $500-$999, 1000-$4999 and $5000 and up, all will have special designations and will be acknowledged through SABO's webpage, www.sabo.org, and at the sanctuary with appropriate plaques. Those of you that wish to send your check to me, please make them out to SABO then in the memo section, Ash Canyon Nature Sanctuary or ACNS. Those that want to charge their donations, go to www.sabo.org and click on SUPPORT SABO, then click on MAKE a DONATION. Scroll to bottom to DONATE TO ASH CANYON BIRD SANCTUARY, enter your generous amount.

Our mailing address for those sending checks is:4700 Robert Smith Ln
Hereford AZ 85615

THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU

Tony and Julie Battiste
> Tony and Julie Battiste
> Battiste Bed, Breakfast and Birds
>
> 4700 Robert Smith Ln
> Hereford AZ 85615
> Phone: 520-335-1030
> www.battistebedandbirds.com
>
>
>
> To all day birders that may want to visit our feeder station, please phone ahead of your intended visit. Donations graciously accepted.
>



Hello Dear Family and Friends

Most of you are already aware of the untimely passing of our dearest friend, Mary Jo Ballator on May 25th. Mary Jo was the creator and steward of the Ash Canyon Nature Center, previously, Ash Canyon B&B. Since her passing, we, the birding community here is SE Arizona, have worked feverishly to acquire the capital to fund the purchase price of the property, so as to be able to continue the operation of the sanctuary that Mary Jo created over almost 20 years of passionate toil.

Well, I'm ecstatic to report that as of Nov 1, 2019, ASH CANYON NATURE SANCTUARY has been acquired by the SOUTHEASTERN BIRD OBSERVATORY, (SABO).
SABO is a local nonprofit, 501(c)3, dedicated to the conservation of birds, and their habitats, is known for its hummingbird research, environmental and educational outreach. Tom Wood and Sheri Williamson are the directors and I am one of the newest members to their board of directors.

After the death of Mary Jo, the garden was closed to day visitors. But after meeting with her daughter, Debra Lindes and her son, David, it became apparent that they wished to carry on their mother's desire that Ash Canyon would continued to be operated as a nature sanctuary in perpetuity. At that point, a Go Fund Me account was opened with two objectives. 1: In the short term, to re-open as soon as possible so as to have continuity for the birds and the visiting public. 2: To try to find a way to purchase the property for sterwadship through a nonpofit organization. Thanks to Robert Gallucci, GFM organizer, the short term goal was accommplished through donations sufficeint enough to pay for feeding the birds through the summer. The long term goal was reached when a philanthropist friend in Calif, agreed to fund the purchase of Ash Canyon with a MAJOR donation to SABO. Although, Dr. Joseph Mario Molina and wife, Therese Flynn-Molina, would prefer no special acknowledgement for their generoisty, I feel if is of utmost importance to do so here.

But now, the hard work really begins. After years of Mary Jo's struggles to just make ends meet, the home and property fell in need of much infrastructure repairs. The exterior of the straw-baled home has cracks and holes that need repair. The swamp cooler is beyond its usable life. Both bathrooms need tile work to complete. The 4 burner stove has only one functional burner. The raidiant floor heating system hook up has never been completed. Two sliding doors to the exterior need repair or replacement. The perimeter of the yard needs 6 Ft field fencing to deter intrusion by bear and javelina..

SABO has no operating capital to remedy these major issues, so I'm reaching out to you, some for the first time, and others that have previously responded to my appeal by donating to the GFM, to give deep consideration to making a major donation to SABO. A donation of $150, the Lucifer Hummingbird level, give free addmission for a year, Donations of $151-$499, $500-$999, 1000-$4999 and $5000 and up, all will have special designations and will be acknowledged through SABO's webpage, www.sabo.org, and at the sanctuary with appropriate plaques. Those of you that wish to send your check to me, please make them out to SABO then in the memo section, Ash Canyon Nature Sanctuary or ACNS. Those that want to charge their donations, go to www.sabo.org and click on SUPPORT SABO, then click on MAKE a DONATION. Scroll to bottom to DONATE TO ASH CANYON BIRD SANCTUARY, enter your generous amount.

Our mailing address for those sending checks is:4700 Robert Smith Ln
Hereford AZ 85615

THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU

Tony and Julie Battiste
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Date: 10/31/19 9:33 pm
From: Jon Houghton <jon.houghton...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Neah Bay two-day
Hi Tweets - Just returned from a gala 2-day to Neah Bay. Weather was extremely benign with frosty mornings and sunny, wind-free days. Highlights were a Black-Legged Kittiwake at the gull washing creek mouth and the continuing Tropical Kingbird, finally located this morning in shrubs, and later on wires in the vicinity of 1st and Lincoln. This is just behind the Bayview and Lincoln feeder house where this morning and again in the early afternoon, the errant and much-discussed Eurasian Tree Sparrow offered great looks - I think Ann Marie even got some photos. Despite these nice FOY, the best part of the trip were two wonderful, sunny, wind- and people-free walks on Hobuck Beach (yesterday, with Pipets, Snow Bunting, and Palm Warblers), and Tsoo-Yess Beach (today with Pipets, Palm Warbler, and rock pipers - Surfbird, Black Turnstone, Black Oystercatcher). About 4 miles total with no sandblasting!! Only disappointment of the trip was our inability to locate the Swamp Sparrow, Rusty Blackbird, and Orchard Oriole reported around town in recent days. Happy Birding - Jon Houghton, Edmonds

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Date: 10/31/19 9:22 pm
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Skagit Gyrfalcon
Today at Hayton Reserve on Fir Island there was a juvenile Gyrfalcon. I watched the bird from 4PM to 5PM as it perched on a root wad in the main pond. There were also at least 2 PEREGRINE FALCONS as well as an adult LIGHT MORPH HARLAN'S RED-TAILED HAWK. In the morning, also at Hayton, there was a SHORT-EARED OWL. Photos of the Gyr to follow tomorrow.

Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>


"Don't believe everything you read on the internet."
- Thomas Jefferson



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Date: 10/31/19 6:53 pm
From: pan <panmail...>
Subject: [Tweeters] American Tree Sparrow - no (Seattle)
Tweets,

I spent a couple hours on Alki this morning, primarily haunting the Armeni boat ramp on the north side where a tree sparrow had been reported yesterday. I found a flock of White-crowned and Golden-crowned Sparrows, among them one with rust on the cap and eye line, white wing bars, smaller than the adult White-crowneds and chased by them, with dark on the upper bill and an orange lower mandible, but it was an immature White-crowned.

A few Dunlin have joined the Sanderlings and Black Turnstones on the south side the last couple days.

31 October, 2019,

Alan Grenon
Seattle

(Boo)
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Date: 10/31/19 3:45 pm
From: Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2019-10-31
A frosty Halloween morning today. Once the sun came up, very thin overcast
was sufficient to keep things cold for a long time. I'm *still* cold. It
was a good morning for birds, though, and that made up for it.

Biggest highlight came before the official start of the walk. For several
minutes, just as the dawn brightened, we were treated to the sight of two
SHORT-EARED OWLS hunting the East Meadow. Before it was bright enough to
see the wing markings, the different flight style made me pretty sure it
wasn't Barn Owls. The erratic nature of their flight made it very hard to
track them in the dimness. But before they disappeared, the morning had
gotten bright enough to see both of them well.

Other highlights:

- Greater White-fronted Goose - four with mixed Cackling/Canada flocks
- Hooded Merganser - nine at the Rowing Club pond
- Green Heron - one at Rowing Club pond
- Northern Harrier - juvenile flew past the Lake Platform
- Short-eared Owl - two; see above - First for 2019
- NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWL - twice in the darkness, Matt had responses; the
first time was at the east end of the boardwalk - First of Fall
- Hairy Woodpecker - one distant bird
- Northern Shrike - two sightings, both fairly near the slough; 2nd
time, a shrike flew across the slough to the Rowing Club. Not their usual
haunt.
- Varied Thrush - a few poor sightings, but several birds around
- EVENING GROSBEAK - flyby of four birds
- Western Meadowlark - two north of fields 7-8-9
- Townsend's Warbler - one near park office

Misses today included Western Grebe, Pacific Wren, Cedar Waxwing, and
American Goldfinch. And we only had one unidentified gull with black wing
tips; all other gulls were Glaucous-winged and/or "Olympic" Gulls.

For the day, 60 species if you count that extra gull.

= Michael Hobbs
= www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
= <birdmarymoor...>

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Date: 10/31/19 10:58 am
From: Dana Greeley <djgreel1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bird of paradise
For those of you still looking for a costume.... Hopefully this link works:
https://twitter.com/JeffreyMWard/status/1189917342848995329?s=20

-Dana, Seattle and La Conner

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Date: 10/30/19 10:57 pm
From: Wilson Cady <gorgebirds...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Windy Skamania County--Surf Scoter, Ruddy Duck
Penny and Tweets, Congratulations on the Surf Scoter and the Ruddy Duck, both difficult birds to find in Skamania County. This year we have had all three scoters and a King Eider (Oregon side of the river) in the Gorge. Surf Scoters are more common here than the Ruddy Duck you saw, I have only seen a handful of Ruddys over the fifty years I have been birding here. The pond at Skamania Landing looks like it would be an excellent shorebird spot but that isn't the case. The pond was created by damming a creek that had a Chum Salmon run in it, an endangered species in the Columbia River. A couple of decades ago the WDF&W ruled that the dam had to be removed or modified to allow salmon passage. The homeowners association replaced the dam with one that could be completely opened to drain the lake and agreed to do this every year before the fish return in November and close the dam only after the young salmon leave in early spring. So those mudflats aren't there during either the spring or fall shorebird migration periods. There are very few people who bird this county during the winter due to the east winds, we live across the river and 300" higher from the weather reporting station at the Vista House in Oregon where they recorded a top wind of 82mph today. Wilson Cady
Columbia River Gorge, WA

---------- Original Message ----------
From: <plkoyama...>
To: "Tweeters" <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Windy Skamania County--Surf Scoter, Ruddy Duck
Date: Wed, 30 Oct 2019 17:21:36 -0700


Tweets,This has no doubt already been reported, but David and I were away for much of Oct and it took a while to get back on our various notifications&mdash;we picked this up from e-bird. The young male Surf Scoter remains at Rock Creek Park in Stevenson, at what I call the &ldquo;far end&rdquo; of the lake (and which e-bird calls Rock Creek Mill Pond) but well west of where the creek enters the park. It was alone, and actively feeding. Also present, and previously listed on e-bird by John Bishop (thank you very much) were 3 White-fronted Geese, 2 with several Cackling Geese on the lawn and 1 with the domestic Graylag and hybrid types at the water&rsquo;s edge. There was a single Ruddy Duck in the middle of the lake, as well. All of these were good birds for us in Skamania. On the way to Stevenson we stopped at Skamania Landing, where a Surf Scoter had also been reported. It was super-windy there, really hold-onto-your-scope stuff. Many of the usual water fowl were on the water, which, by the way, was the lowest we&rsquo;ve ever seen it with lots of mud exposed&mdash;it might have been great for shorebird migration in a county where those birds are hard to come by. We couldn&rsquo;t locate the SUSC that had been reported there, though it&rsquo;s hard to see much of the deeper water due to everything but the road being private property. But from the bridge, there were 2 Snow Geese, which we saw fly off and 3 Great Egrets. There was also a Great Egret at Home Valley Park. And it was really nice to see several pair of Varied Thrush at various sites, just a code 1, but I love them! There really should be a law against that kind of wind, though...Penny Koyama, Bothell
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Date: 10/30/19 6:33 pm
From: Brad Waggoner <wagtail24...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Eurasian Tree Sparrow Origin (and Neah Bay/La Push news)
Hi all,

Here is some follow up comments from visiting Paul Lehman on the Neah
Bay Eurasian Tree Sparrow.

Brad

Just spent a couple days around Neah Bay and vic. (including La Push)
with Brad W. Highlights included today's (Weds) Rusty Blackbird and
female/imm. Orchard Oriole (probably a new bird based on plumage) in
Neah Bay, as well as regionally rare C. Scrub-Jay in Neah Bay on Monday
and a female Redhead at La Push on Tuesday. We saw the Eurasian Tree
Sparrow (ETS) on both Monday and Tuesday. This bird is ca. 99% likely a
trans-Pacific ship-assist, which presumably got on a ship at some port
in China, Japan, Korea, etc. and rode all the way to the first land
sighted at the mouth of the Strait of Juan de Fuca and jumped ship. This
is NOT an especially migratory species, so it is very unlikely that it
was out over the ocean already before landing on the ship. There is a
ca. 1% chance it is an escaped pet bird, and a 0.00000001 % chance that
it wandered to Neah Bay from the introduced population in IL, MO, IA,
from where a few individuals have wandered to nearby states and
provinces. There are indeed a few other records of ETSs in other
international port areas, such as at Los Angeles harbor, but birders and
the records committee there have largely ignored that bird, although it
has been present now for a couple years. And yes, there is a record from
Cape May NJ which the NJ records committee accepted (rightly or
wrongly), but that bird is more likely to have also been a ship-assist
rather than a wanderer from the population in the Midwest. Cape May is
located right at the mouth of Delaware Bay, where good numbers of
trans-Atlantic shipping passes on its way to the port of Philadelphia
and to refineries in n. Delaware. A Hooded Crow turned up  ca.10 years
ago on the east shore of Staten Island, right next to the entrance to
New York harbor (that record was NOT accepted), and the list goes on and
on. A Hawfinch was documented on a container ship from a day or two out
of Korea to just off the CA coast, within sight of the coast near Santa
Barbara, kept alive by a birder on board feeding it seed; but the CA
records committee did not accept it to the state's main list. One of the
more classic such records was the Sheathbill which turned up at a
British naval port in the U.K. associated with the Falklands war. And
one or two or three Humboldt Penguins have turned up along the North
American west coast. A contemporary issue in North America also involves
the occurrence of many Nazca and Red-footed Boobies in western U.S.
waters, which a good percent of them likely rode a ship at least a PART
of the way north from the tropics, if not a large chunk of the way.
(Most, but not all, folks aren't too bothered by this, as "that's what
boobies do.") Anyway, records committees and individual birders have
struggled for decades with how to deal with such ship-assist records.
Almost everyone agrees that if the bird was "restrained" during some or
all of the voyage that it should not count, but in most cases how does
one know if such restraint occurred? A non-restrained ETS could probably
survive the trans-Pacific crossing eating food scraps and dead insects
(e.g., moths) it found on board. This Washington bird, a normally
non-migratory species, probably rode the ship all the way from the Asian
port to the WA mainland and it may not sit too well with a fair number
of folks, whereas others will be OK with it. Certainly placing such
records on a "provisional list" in some sort of state list appendix may
be the best way to go.

--Paul Lehman, San Diego



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Date: 10/30/19 6:10 pm
From: Izzy & Kendrick <gobirder...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Brown Booby
I did receive word from Ryan Merrill that the adult Brown Booby on Waldron was confirmed. I don’t know if it’s still in the area, however.

thanks,
izzy wong


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Date: 10/30/19 6:05 pm
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Red-throated Pipit
Only one other guy in a white Tesla looking for a Red-throated Pipit at Crocket Lake today. There are still pipits hanging out there, maybe even a rare one, but it’s going to take a ton of luck to see one on the ground. So if you go for it take your largest rabbit’s foot.

Larry Schwitters
Issaquah
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Date: 10/30/19 5:25 pm
From: <plkoyama...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Windy Skamania County--Surf Scoter, Ruddy Duck
Tweets,
This has no doubt already been reported, but David and I were away for much of Oct and it took a while to get back on our various notifications—we picked this up from e-bird.

The young male Surf Scoter remains at Rock Creek Park in Stevenson, at what I call the “far end” of the lake (and which e-bird calls Rock Creek Mill Pond) but well west of where the creek enters the park. It was alone, and actively feeding. Also present, and previously listed on e-bird by John Bishop (thank you very much) were 3 White-fronted Geese, 2 with several Cackling Geese on the lawn and 1 with the domestic Graylag and hybrid types at the water’s edge. There was a single Ruddy Duck in the middle of the lake, as well. All of these were good birds for us in Skamania.

On the way to Stevenson we stopped at Skamania Landing, where a Surf Scoter had also been reported. It was super-windy there, really hold-onto-your-scope stuff. Many of the usual water fowl were on the water, which, by the way, was the lowest we’ve ever seen it with lots of mud exposed—it might have been great for shorebird migration in a county where those birds are hard to come by. We couldn’t locate the SUSC that had been reported there, though it’s hard to see much of the deeper water due to everything but the road being private property. But from the bridge, there were 2 Snow Geese, which we saw fly off and 3 Great Egrets. There was also a Great Egret at Home Valley Park. And it was really nice to see several pair of Varied Thrush at various sites, just a code 1, but I love them! There really should be a law against that kind of wind, though...
Penny Koyama, Bothell


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Date: 10/30/19 4:30 pm
From: Izzy & Kendrick <gobirder...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Brown Booby
Has anyone confirmed the Brown Booby on Waldron Is. in the San Juans?

I just heard about it, but don’t know of a positive id.

thanks,
izzy wong
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Date: 10/30/19 1:37 pm
From: Timothy Barksdale <timothy.barksdale...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Eurasian Tree Sparrows in MO
Dear Tweets,

As a native St. Louisan, and back to being a current (if only a possibly fully-returned) Missourian, I am intrigued by this sighting at Neah Bay.

Eurasian Tree Sparrows (or ETS- as we call them in STL) remained relatively stable and resident within a small radius of St. Louis Missouri and the adjacent county, for a large number of years. Beginning in the late 1970’s the population began to get a larger hold. This species is not a junk food feeder like House Sparrows. In the St. Louis area ETS’s have become rural residents, in winter congregating around farmsteads and sometimes feedlots. But they are much less intrusive and “gentle”. By the mid 1980’s this species was expanding more rapidly and especially northward. Quincy, Illinois became another stronghold about this time. As others have noted, the birds do wander but again given the un-obnoxious mannerisms, they might be expanding further than we know.

They have not expanded in large numbers due west of St. Louis to our knowledge, nor to the south. Occasional sightings in areas like Columbia,MO are not followed up with massive Eurasian Collared Dove explosions in population. Illinois has been colonizing area but again primarily in a generally northward direction. There have been some recent sightings in Duluth, MN area too.

As I began working on the new projects in Missouri, I noted that suburbs were being readily colonized. ETS do not tend to be rat-like Starling ( for a nest- any hole will do) invaders. They will use bluebird boxes and smaller holes. The calls are quite distinct from House Sparrow and in several neighborhoods where I ran or walked, there were good numbers and it was not uncommon to hear 15-20 in a morning.

This is a distinct increase from the 1990’s when I lived full time in Missouri. And it may represent a 3x -4x increase. However, I am not aware of any specific censusing directed at determining the overall population levels of Eurasian Tree Sparrows in Missouri or Illinois. They are not pests either and so fall between the cracks - more or less.

I hope this assessment is helpful.

Tim

Timothy Barksdale

Montana:
Birdman Productions LLC
P.O.Box 1124
69 Mountain View Dr.
Choteau, MT 59422

Missouri Production address:
Birdman Adventures LLC
7903 Mo State Rt 94
Mokane, MO 65059

Timothy dot barksdale -at- gmail dot com

=======

Message: 5
Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2019 05:52:09 +0000 (UTC)
From: <christopherwarlow...> <mailto:<christopherwarlow...>
To: Tweeters <tweeters...> <mailto:<tweeters...>>
Subject: [Tweeters] Eurasian Tree Sparrow at Neah Bay.
Message-ID: <437210131.1189918.1572241929088...> <mailto:<437210131.1189918.1572241929088...>>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"


Today (Sunday) at 1:40 we found a Eurasian Tree Sparrow at Butler?s Hotel in Neah Bay.?
Initially it was in the brambles across the street but then it flew to the feeders. It was very skittish in comparison to the house sparrows that it was with. It held back in the brush and flushed at any movement of blackbirds or jays.?
We got clear but short views over about 5 minutes but failed to get a photo. We then waited for several hours for it to return. Eventually we moved on and relocated the Eurasian Tree Sparrow at 3:40 with the large flock of House Sparrows by the hummingbird feeder on Lincoln and Bay View. Again we didn?t get a photo and the flock dispersed.?
The bird is clearly identified from the House, White-Crowned and Golden-Crowned in the area. It has a full rufous cap, clean bright white cheeks with a black spot on the cheek.?

Chris WarlowOlympia?
=======


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Date: 10/30/19 8:41 am
From: Louise Rutter <louise.rutter...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Swainson's Thrush
Just had a Swainson's thrush in my yard. It seems a bit late, they usually
come through in September and early October. That little bird still has a
long way to go.



Louise Rutter

Kirkland


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Date: 10/29/19 5:16 pm
From: Tom Merritt <birders.2341...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Discovery Parking
All:



Permits are issued for short term use at the Visitor's Center. The permits are restricted, are good for 3 hours and the criteria per the Discovery Park website (https://www.seattle.gov/parks/find/centers/discovery-park-environmental-learning-center/parking-and-beach-shuttles) is stated below. To obtain a permit stop by the visitor's center front desk and ask for a permit. They will ask for your license plate number and perhaps some ID. That is all there is to obtaining a permit.



"Beach permits are only for those who otherwise would not be able to walk to the beach - families with children under 6, people over 62, and others who are not physically able to walk to the beach due to an injury, illness or some other physical condition."



My partner and myself are both over 70 and have been doing the monthly COASST survey on the North Beach for over three years. The only time we have obtained permits is when the weather is very bad, or we have been extremely restricted for time due to family health issues or some other concerns. We normally do the loop walk and use it as a good outing, combined with birding. And like all good birders we do not let a bit of rain dissuade us. This is despite some serious health issues with which we have dealt. During that period, we missed two surveys. I fully concur with the comments by Matt Dufort, Michael Hobbs and others. Las summer during high traffic periods shuttles were used to allow people to access the beaches.



Tom Merritt





From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of Matt Dufort
Sent: Tuesday, October 29, 2019 16:05
To: Elston Hill <elstonh...>
Cc: Tweeters Newsgroup <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Discovery Parking



Elston et al.,



What's being missed in this conversation is that the road to the lighthouse is officially closed to public access. The permits that are loaned out at the visitor center are not parking permits - they are access permits that include parking. There are big signs pointing this out where Discovery Park Boulevard splits from the road going down to the north parking lot. Those signs are widely ignored, but that is still the rule.



The park is intended to be largely vehicle-free, with the exception of access to the main parking lots and residential and water treatment plant in-holdings. The permits provide access to people who would otherwise have difficulty getting to the beach area. The park's original 1972 master plan features this explanation: "There will be great pressures to open up the park to automobiles, motorcycles and motor bikes. One of the greatest values of the park is, however, that it will afford the people a refuge from the noise, air pollution and danger of the automobile. We believe, therefore, that park patrons should not be permitted to drive their private vehicles through the park." There's more detail on implementation of this principle in the 1986 Development Plan, which you can find here: https://www.seattle.gov/Documents/Departments/ParksAndRecreation/Parks/MasterPlan1986.pdf.



As for how to get to the lighthouse, there are lots of potential routes. For pre-dawn visits, I take one of two approaches. The first starts at the south parking lot, and goes north along the west side of the parade grounds to Discovery Park Boulevard, then generally west down the road to the point. The second starts at the visitor center parking lot, and goes west along either Discovery Park Boulevard or the paved roads/trails that largely parallel it a little to the south until those trails hit the road at the north end of the parade grounds. On either route, keep your eyes and ears out for Barn and Barred Owls. Also, in addition to the park map that Jane Hadley shared, I created a birding map of the park, which you can find here: https://tinyurl.com/y8dv2axr.



I hope this is helpful.



Matt Dufort

Seattle



On Tue, Oct 29, 2019 at 12:21 PM Elston Hill <elstonh...> <mailto:<elstonh...> > wrote:

>
> Message: 1
> Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2019 17:27:32 -0700
> From: Hartmut Peters <tuoichen...> <mailto:<tuoichen...> >
> To: birders wa <tweeters...> <mailto:<tweeters...> >
> Subject: [Tweeters] Discovery Park - how to get to the lighthouse
> Message-ID:
> <CALv4JExwRzxVwuc=FoTY+6=<QNOS_h-Y-mLpUtmLP-ZLh05_cSQ...> <mailto:<QNOS_h-Y-mLpUtmLP-ZLh05_cSQ...> >
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> The small parking lot down at the South Beach is by permit only for most
> excellent reasons. If you are able-bodied, it will NOT hurt you to walk the
> mile to the beach and the lighthouse from the south parking lot. We
> regulars do it all the time. It helps keeping up our health. Walking from
> the south parking lot is easier than from the north parking lot. For
> navigation, google Discovery Park and get the park map - or get it at any
> one of the parking lots on paper. Also, all the trails in Discovery Park
> have posts marking trails and destinations. Look for "South Beach".
>
> --
> Hartmut Peters
> Seattle, Washington; tuoichen AT gmail.com <http://gmail.com>

As someone who does hike a lot, I appreciate the benefits of hiking.

BUT, I think I raised some legitimate issues. What is the point of restricting the parking so that no one can use the parking lot by the lighthouse when the visitor center is not open? There are many reasons that people who are fit and like to hike might like to be able to use those parking spaces when they are just sitting empty. For example, stopping by on the way to work when one does not have the time to hike two miles both ways.

Sometimes government gets obsessed with rules that make no sense. For example, one person replied to me that the park did not want to allow early morning parking because of a problem with break ins. Somehow it seems to me that a car parked nearby at the lighthouse in the dark is less like to be broken into than a car left in the south parking lot in the dark.

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Date: 10/29/19 5:04 pm
From: Nadine Drisseq <drisseq.n...>
Subject: [Tweeters] More Osprey
Two Osprey here at Lake Kathleen. Fishing.
Nadine
--

*Biologist,*
*Bear Smart WA*

*Follow us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BearSmartWA/
<https://www.facebook.com/BearSmartWA/>*

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Date: 10/29/19 4:19 pm
From: Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Discovery Parking
Last I saw, there was a Metro bus to the North parking lot, where it idles
for a long time. It would be so very excellent if it ran down to West
Point instead of just sitting there!

- Michael Hobbs

On Tue, Oct 29, 2019, 4:07 PM Matt Dufort <matt.dufort...> wrote:

> Elston et al.,
>
> What's being missed in this conversation is that the *road* to the
> lighthouse is officially closed to public access. The permits that are
> loaned out at the visitor center are not parking permits - they are access
> permits that include parking. There are big signs pointing this out where
> Discovery Park Boulevard splits from the road going down to the north
> parking lot. Those signs are widely ignored, but that is still the rule.
>
> The park is intended to be largely vehicle-free, with the exception of
> access to the main parking lots and residential and water treatment plant
> in-holdings. The permits provide access to people who would otherwise have
> difficulty getting to the beach area. The park's original 1972 master plan
> features this explanation: "There will be great pressures to open up the
> park to automobiles, motorcycles and motor bikes. One of the greatest
> values of the park is, however, that it will afford the people a refuge
> from the noise, air pollution and danger of the automobile. We believe,
> therefore, that park patrons should not be permitted to drive their private
> vehicles through the park." There's more detail on implementation of this
> principle in the 1986 Development Plan, which you can find here:
> https://www.seattle.gov/Documents/Departments/ParksAndRecreation/Parks/MasterPlan1986.pdf
> .
>
> As for how to get to the lighthouse, there are lots of potential routes.
> For pre-dawn visits, I take one of two approaches. The first starts at the
> south parking lot, and goes north along the west side of the parade grounds
> to Discovery Park Boulevard, then generally west down the road to the
> point. The second starts at the visitor center parking lot, and goes west
> along either Discovery Park Boulevard or the paved roads/trails that
> largely parallel it a little to the south until those trails hit the road
> at the north end of the parade grounds. On either route, keep your eyes
> and ears out for Barn and Barred Owls. Also, in addition to the park map
> that Jane Hadley shared, I created a birding map of the park, which you can
> find here: https://tinyurl.com/y8dv2axr.
>
> I hope this is helpful.
>
> Matt Dufort
> Seattle
>
> On Tue, Oct 29, 2019 at 12:21 PM Elston Hill <elstonh...> wrote:
>
>> >
>> > Message: 1
>> > Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2019 17:27:32 -0700
>> > From: Hartmut Peters <tuoichen...>
>> > To: birders wa <tweeters...>
>> > Subject: [Tweeters] Discovery Park - how to get to the lighthouse
>> > Message-ID:
>> > <CALv4JExwRzxVwuc=FoTY+6=
>> <QNOS_h-Y-mLpUtmLP-ZLh05_cSQ...>
>> > Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>> >
>> > The small parking lot down at the South Beach is by permit only for most
>> > excellent reasons. If you are able-bodied, it will NOT hurt you to walk
>> the
>> > mile to the beach and the lighthouse from the south parking lot. We
>> > regulars do it all the time. It helps keeping up our health. Walking
>> from
>> > the south parking lot is easier than from the north parking lot. For
>> > navigation, google Discovery Park and get the park map - or get it at
>> any
>> > one of the parking lots on paper. Also, all the trails in Discovery Park
>> > have posts marking trails and destinations. Look for "South Beach".
>> >
>> > --
>> > Hartmut Peters
>> > Seattle, Washington; tuoichen AT gmail.com
>>
>> As someone who does hike a lot, I appreciate the benefits of hiking.
>>
>> BUT, I think I raised some legitimate issues. What is the point of
>> restricting the parking so that no one can use the parking lot by the
>> lighthouse when the visitor center is not open? There are many reasons that
>> people who are fit and like to hike might like to be able to use those
>> parking spaces when they are just sitting empty. For example, stopping by
>> on the way to work when one does not have the time to hike two miles both
>> ways.
>>
>> Sometimes government gets obsessed with rules that make no sense. For
>> example, one person replied to me that the park did not want to allow early
>> morning parking because of a problem with break ins. Somehow it seems to me
>> that a car parked nearby at the lighthouse in the dark is less like to be
>> broken into than a car left in the south parking lot in the dark.
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>

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Date: 10/29/19 4:08 pm
From: Matt Dufort <matt.dufort...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Discovery Parking
Elston et al.,

What's being missed in this conversation is that the *road* to the
lighthouse is officially closed to public access. The permits that are
loaned out at the visitor center are not parking permits - they are access
permits that include parking. There are big signs pointing this out where
Discovery Park Boulevard splits from the road going down to the north
parking lot. Those signs are widely ignored, but that is still the rule.

The park is intended to be largely vehicle-free, with the exception of
access to the main parking lots and residential and water treatment plant
in-holdings. The permits provide access to people who would otherwise have
difficulty getting to the beach area. The park's original 1972 master plan
features this explanation: "There will be great pressures to open up the
park to automobiles, motorcycles and motor bikes. One of the greatest
values of the park is, however, that it will afford the people a refuge
from the noise, air pollution and danger of the automobile. We believe,
therefore, that park patrons should not be permitted to drive their private
vehicles through the park." There's more detail on implementation of this
principle in the 1986 Development Plan, which you can find here:
https://www.seattle.gov/Documents/Departments/ParksAndRecreation/Parks/MasterPlan1986.pdf
.

As for how to get to the lighthouse, there are lots of potential routes.
For pre-dawn visits, I take one of two approaches. The first starts at the
south parking lot, and goes north along the west side of the parade grounds
to Discovery Park Boulevard, then generally west down the road to the
point. The second starts at the visitor center parking lot, and goes west
along either Discovery Park Boulevard or the paved roads/trails that
largely parallel it a little to the south until those trails hit the road
at the north end of the parade grounds. On either route, keep your eyes
and ears out for Barn and Barred Owls. Also, in addition to the park map
that Jane Hadley shared, I created a birding map of the park, which you can
find here: https://tinyurl.com/y8dv2axr.

I hope this is helpful.

Matt Dufort
Seattle

On Tue, Oct 29, 2019 at 12:21 PM Elston Hill <elstonh...> wrote:

> >
> > Message: 1
> > Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2019 17:27:32 -0700
> > From: Hartmut Peters <tuoichen...>
> > To: birders wa <tweeters...>
> > Subject: [Tweeters] Discovery Park - how to get to the lighthouse
> > Message-ID:
> > <CALv4JExwRzxVwuc=FoTY+6=
> <QNOS_h-Y-mLpUtmLP-ZLh05_cSQ...>
> > Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
> >
> > The small parking lot down at the South Beach is by permit only for most
> > excellent reasons. If you are able-bodied, it will NOT hurt you to walk
> the
> > mile to the beach and the lighthouse from the south parking lot. We
> > regulars do it all the time. It helps keeping up our health. Walking from
> > the south parking lot is easier than from the north parking lot. For
> > navigation, google Discovery Park and get the park map - or get it at any
> > one of the parking lots on paper. Also, all the trails in Discovery Park
> > have posts marking trails and destinations. Look for "South Beach".
> >
> > --
> > Hartmut Peters
> > Seattle, Washington; tuoichen AT gmail.com
>
> As someone who does hike a lot, I appreciate the benefits of hiking.
>
> BUT, I think I raised some legitimate issues. What is the point of
> restricting the parking so that no one can use the parking lot by the
> lighthouse when the visitor center is not open? There are many reasons that
> people who are fit and like to hike might like to be able to use those
> parking spaces when they are just sitting empty. For example, stopping by
> on the way to work when one does not have the time to hike two miles both
> ways.
>
> Sometimes government gets obsessed with rules that make no sense. For
> example, one person replied to me that the park did not want to allow early
> morning parking because of a problem with break ins. Somehow it seems to me
> that a car parked nearby at the lighthouse in the dark is less like to be
> broken into than a car left in the south parking lot in the dark.
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>

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Date: 10/29/19 3:13 pm
From: Jay Adams <protectionisland8.9...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Possible Red-throated Pipit
While birding this morning at Crockett Lake, I and others encountered a
pipit-sized bird in the thin grassy strip between the east end of the lake
and the road leading to the Port Townsend Ferry. The bird was grayish
overall - lighter below and darker above. The underparts were conspicuously
streaked. The upperparts less obviously so. The bird had a cleanish face
with a narrow eyering. As soon as we approach, the bird would consistently
flush, flying in a manner similar to American Pipit - a kind of bouncy,
climbing flight style. Maybe most important, when first flushed the bird
gave a soft rattle - as in prrrrt. But once on the air, the bird resorted
to a single-noted high thin flight call, nothing at all like the flight
calls of American Pipit, which were plentiful in the area while we watched
the bird in questions.
Sorry, no photos were possible.
Jay Adams
Coupeville

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Date: 10/29/19 2:16 pm
From: Allison Reak <areak823...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Seattle Discovery Park - how to get to the lighthouse
There is no public parking lot at the West Point lighthouse--parking permits
are issued only for temporary/short-term access to the sewage treatment
plant (STP) and lighthouse for scheduled business. The (no) parking area is
located at the plant entrance and the plant is staffed 24/7 and monitored,
so you can't even sneak a quick trip down without being seen within a few
minutes of arrival. And if you drive down just to check it out, you can't
see over the shore berm to the beach and water's edge from your car. That
said, there once were two handicapped spaces near the sidewalk to
lighthouse, but I don't know the current situation and you may still need a
day-use permit to use the handicapped parking because the STP is a
high-security infrastructure facility. Protecting our shit, so to speak.
Allison

Message: 3
Date: Tue, 29 Oct 2019 01:53:36 +0000 (UTC)
From: Bevbowe1 <bevbowe1...>
To: <tuoichen...>, <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Discovery Park - how to get to the lighthouse
Message-ID: <177081309.3567912.1572314016638...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

Is there an issue with people who don't have permits parking down there?Bev

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Date: 10/29/19 1:16 pm
From: Dave Slager <dave.slager...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Eurasian Tree Sparrow Origin
Hi all,

Although a ship-assisted bird is possible, remember that there is also
an established introduced Eurasian Tree Sparrow population in the
Midwest. Birds presumably originating from this population have
reached in our direction as far as North Dakota and Saskatchewan, and
in the other direction as far as Cape May, New Jersey, where accepted
by the NJ bird records committee. Worth noting is that most vagrants
to the Upper Midwest area are in spring, which goes against the timing
of this Neah Bay bird. So although it's hard to know the origin of the
Neah Bay bird, the probability of it being a wanderer from the Midwest
population seems at least greater than zero.

Dave

On Mon, Oct 28, 2019 at 8:32 PM Brad Waggoner <wagtail24...> wrote:
>
> Hi all,
>
> The “countability” of this recent Neah Bay Eurasian Tree Sparrow has come up in a few private communications to me. While I can’t say with certainty on how the WBRC will rule on this record, I have a pretty good hunch. California and Oregon have two records each and none of them have been accepted by their BRC’s. The likelihood that this Eurasian Tree Sparrow arrived to Neah Bay without “ship assistance” is close to zero.
>
> So, should you crank up the chase wagon and come give it a look see? Sure, why not, it is a handsome-looking bird. And, plus it is in Neah Bay in Fall and most of us now know what that means. Can you count it? It is your list!
>
> Cheers and good birding,
>
> Brad Waggoner
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
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Date: 10/29/19 12:57 pm
From: <christopherwarlow...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Eurasian Tree Sparrow origin.

I suspect the sparrow found the feeders at Butlers after joining to House Sparrow flock at the waterfront. I saw it with the flock on Bay View, not back in the woods.
Chris Warlow Olympia 


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Date: 10/29/19 12:49 pm
From: Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Fwd: Eurasian Tree Sparrow Origin
Eurasian Tree Sparrows are common on the Pacific coast of Asia, so getting onto a ship is not at all unlikely, but it would have had to find food for that long journey (one estimate is 19 days from Xiamen, China, to Seattle).

To me, a question that is just as interesting is how, no matter where it came from, a bird like that finds feeders such as those at Butler’s, nestled back in the woodland. Think about it.

Dennis Paulson
Seattle

> On Oct 29, 2019, at 12:01 PM, <tweeters-request...> wrote:
>
> Date: Tue, 29 Oct 2019 05:09:43 -0700
> From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz...> <mailto:<mattxyz...>>
> To: tweeters <tweeters...> <mailto:<tweeters...>>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Fwd: Eurasian Tree Sparrow Origin
> Message-ID: <9CD1DF41-6F39-41B2-96B9-F0407F95F32A...> <mailto:<9CD1DF41-6F39-41B2-96B9-F0407F95F32A...>>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> Hi hi -
> I?ll chime in on this one :
> The WBRC follows the ABA in its determination of ?countable? birds ? So, yes, by ABA rules, ?ship assisted? alone doesn?t make a bird uncountable.
> Here?s the section from the ABA listing rules [http://listing.aba.org/aba-recording-rules/ <http://listing.aba.org/aba-recording-rules/> <http://listing.aba.org/aba-recording-rules/ <http://listing.aba.org/aba-recording-rules/>> ]
>
> Rule 3 part a:
> (i) An otherwise wild bird that voluntarily uses or is attracted to a feeder, nest box, audio playback, ship at sea, or other nonnatural device, without being captured, is still considered wild. Physical contact between an observer and a bird does not automatically preclude a bird from being counted, as there are situations where wild birds have learned to eat from outstretched hands or have used people as temporary perches.
>
> However, the question is whether it is more likely that a bird alighted on a ship and stayed there unassisted for a journey ? for example, the Brown Booby that rode into Edmonds on a sailboat was free to go at any time, so it was countable.But when a House Swift was found dead in BC in 2017, it was ultimately judged more likely that it had been trapped in a container for the cross-Pacific journey than that it had freely crossed on its own.
>
> With Eurasian Tree Sparrow, I imagine it will be worth a discussion of whether a bird like that [a] is more likely to have wandered west from its core range in MO or [b] if it came from Asia if it was more likely to have freely sat on a ship for the journey or perhaps been stuck inside a container, like House Sparrows in a big WalMart.
>
> It will be worth a discussion, for sure!
>
> Matt Bartels
> Secretary, WBRC
> Seattle, WA


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Date: 10/29/19 12:46 pm
From: Marty <namaste...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Maps of birding areas
Thank you very much for this
Marty in Port Orchard

@ www.martykramerimages.com
Every day is an opportunity to do, touch and taste something new.

> On Oct 29, 2019, at 12:03, <tweeters-request...> wrote:
>
> Maps of birding areas

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Date: 10/29/19 12:25 pm
From: Elston Hill <elstonh...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Discovery Parking
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2019 17:27:32 -0700
> From: Hartmut Peters <tuoichen...>
> To: birders wa <tweeters...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Discovery Park - how to get to the lighthouse
> Message-ID:
> <CALv4JExwRzxVwuc=FoTY+6=<QNOS_h-Y-mLpUtmLP-ZLh05_cSQ...>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> The small parking lot down at the South Beach is by permit only for most
> excellent reasons. If you are able-bodied, it will NOT hurt you to walk the
> mile to the beach and the lighthouse from the south parking lot. We
> regulars do it all the time. It helps keeping up our health. Walking from
> the south parking lot is easier than from the north parking lot. For
> navigation, google Discovery Park and get the park map - or get it at any
> one of the parking lots on paper. Also, all the trails in Discovery Park
> have posts marking trails and destinations. Look for "South Beach".
>
> --
> Hartmut Peters
> Seattle, Washington; tuoichen AT gmail.com

As someone who does hike a lot, I appreciate the benefits of hiking.

BUT, I think I raised some legitimate issues. What is the point of restricting the parking so that no one can use the parking lot by the lighthouse when the visitor center is not open? There are many reasons that people who are fit and like to hike might like to be able to use those parking spaces when they are just sitting empty. For example, stopping by on the way to work when one does not have the time to hike two miles both ways.

Sometimes government gets obsessed with rules that make no sense. For example, one person replied to me that the park did not want to allow early morning parking because of a problem with break ins. Somehow it seems to me that a car parked nearby at the lighthouse in the dark is less like to be broken into than a car left in the south parking lot in the dark.

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Date: 10/29/19 11:25 am
From: <christopherwarlow...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Eurasian Tree Sparrow origin.

While ship assisted definitely seems highly likely I would dispute the idea that it was “trapped in a container” and not free to leave the boat. 
If trapped in a container it would be much more likely to have appeared in a location where the container was unloaded or at the very least opened. The fact that it was found at a location that was probably the first chance it got to fly off the boat to dry land suggests to me that it made the choice not to fly into the ocean on its way over but was free to fly off the boat when offered a real opportunity. 
Clearly I want this bird to be accepted by the WRBC. But apart from that I can’t see how a bird would have escaped captivity as such a location. 

Chris WarlowOlympia
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Date: 10/29/19 10:37 am
From: Vicki Biltz <vickibiltz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Monday, Snow Geese Kelly Farms
Hi! Was so happy to count 14 Snow Geese in the field on Sumner Buckley
Highway, in the Kelly Farms area. Have been watching. Spend all day at our
office in Sumner, and flying home, saw an additional 20+ in flight while
exiting north out of Sumner, (can’t remember road name). I’ve been waiting
and they are here. Soon I should be seeing our wonderful Swans.
Fall is my favorite time of the year!
Happy Birding,
Vicki Biltz
<Vickibiltz...>
Buckley, WA 98321
--



<vickibiltz...>
http://www.flickr.com/photos/saw-whets_new/

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Date: 10/29/19 9:21 am
From: Jon Houghton <jon.houghton...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Neah Bay this week
Hi Tweeterdom - Despite the fact that the super birds found by the WBRC gang last week seem to have gone back into the bushes, this clear cool fall weather has convinced me to head for the Bay Area (the one not on fire) tomorrow and Thursday. I'd be pleased to share real time sightings with others in the area by text or phone (206) 601-0773. Hope to see some of you (and some fun birds) there! - Jon Houghton, Edmonds

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Date: 10/29/19 8:57 am
From: KenandTina <kenandtina...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Mountain Chickadee in North Bend
Hey,

I have a Mountain Chickadee coming to my feeder with other
chickadees(Black-capped, Chestnut-backed). It's feeding on black oil
sunflower seeds.

Nice new yard bird!



Ken Grant

North Bend(cold and blustery)


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Date: 10/29/19 7:06 am
From: HAL MICHAEL <ucd880...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Eurasian Tree Sparrow Origin
Years ago we used to keep and breed some exotic finches; Zebras, Cutthroats, Common Waxbills. Don't think we ever had an escape but we did put plastic bands on each to track for breeding/parentage/etc. I know that there are marking requirements for captive waterfowl. Perhaps the same should be done for any captive birds (other than probably chickens/turkeys). A simple plastic ring at the minimum. Might help in situations like this.

Hal Michael
Science Outreach Director, Sustainable Fisheries Foundation
Olympia WA
360-459-4005
360-791-7702 (C)
<ucd880...>

> On October 29, 2019 at 5:12 AM Matt Bartels <mattxyz...> wrote:
>
> Or , for that matter, whether it is more likely it was purchased by a bird fancier and escaped — here’s a Vancouver WA site with them for sale for $56.99 - https://thefinchfarm.com/eurasian-tree-sparrow/ Makes a great gift for the holidays!
>
> Matt Bartels
> Seattle, WA
>
>
> > > On Oct 29, 2019, at 5:09 AM, Matt Bartels < <mattxyz...> mailto:<mattxyz...> > wrote:
> >
> > Hi hi -
> > I’ll chime in on this one :
> > The WBRC follows the ABA in its determination of ‘countable’ birds — So, yes, by ABA rules, ’ship assisted’ alone doesn’t make a bird uncountable.
> > Here’s the section from the ABA listing rules [ http://listing.aba.org/aba-recording-rules/ ]
> >
> > Rule 3 part a:
> > (i) An otherwise wild bird that voluntarily uses or is attracted to a feeder, nest box, audio playback, ship at sea, or other nonnatural device, without being captured, is still considered wild. Physical contact between an observer and a bird does not automatically preclude a bird from being counted, as there are situations where wild birds have learned to eat from outstretched hands or have used people as temporary perches.
> >
> > However, the question is whether it is more likely that a bird alighted on a ship and stayed there unassisted for a journey — for example, the Brown Booby that rode into Edmonds on a sailboat was free to go at any time, so it was countable.But when a House Swift was found dead in BC in 2017, it was ultimately judged more likely that it had been trapped in a container for the cross-Pacific journey than that it had freely crossed on its own.
> >
> > With Eurasian Tree Sparrow, I imagine it will be worth a discussion of whether a bird like that [a] is more likely to have wandered west from its core range in MO or [b] if it came from Asia if it was more likely to have freely sat on a ship for the journey or perhaps been stuck inside a container, like House Sparrows in a big WalMart.
> >
> > It will be worth a discussion, for sure!
> >
> > Matt Bartels
> > Secretary, WBRC
> > Seattle, WA
> >
> >
> >
> > > > > Begin forwarded message:
> > >
> > > From: John Puschock <g_g_allin...> mailto:<g_g_allin...> >
> > > Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Eurasian Tree Sparrow Origin
> > > Date: October 28, 2019 at 8:47:25 PM PDT
> > > To: Tweeters Tweeters <tweeters...> mailto:<tweeters...> >
> > >
> > > Does the WBRC have an explicit "no ship-assistance" rule or policy? By ABA listing standards, ship-assisted birds are countable (or at least the last time I checked that was true).
> > >
> > > John Puschock
> > > Seattle
> > > _______________________________________________
> > > Tweeters mailing list
> > > <Tweeters...> mailto:<Tweeters...>
> > > http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
> > >
> > > > >
> >
> > >
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>



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Date: 10/29/19 5:17 am
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Eurasian Tree Sparrow Origin
Or , for that matter, whether it is more likely it was purchased by a bird fancier and escaped — here’s a Vancouver WA site with them for sale for $56.99 - https://thefinchfarm.com/eurasian-tree-sparrow/ <https://thefinchfarm.com/eurasian-tree-sparrow/> Makes a great gift for the holidays!

Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA

> On Oct 29, 2019, at 5:09 AM, Matt Bartels <mattxyz...> wrote:
>
> Hi hi -
> I’ll chime in on this one :
> The WBRC follows the ABA in its determination of ‘countable’ birds — So, yes, by ABA rules, ’ship assisted’ alone doesn’t make a bird uncountable.
> Here’s the section from the ABA listing rules [http://listing.aba.org/aba-recording-rules/ <http://listing.aba.org/aba-recording-rules/> ]
>
> Rule 3 part a:
> (i) An otherwise wild bird that voluntarily uses or is attracted to a feeder, nest box, audio playback, ship at sea, or other nonnatural device, without being captured, is still considered wild. Physical contact between an observer and a bird does not automatically preclude a bird from being counted, as there are situations where wild birds have learned to eat from outstretched hands or have used people as temporary perches.
>
> However, the question is whether it is more likely that a bird alighted on a ship and stayed there unassisted for a journey — for example, the Brown Booby that rode into Edmonds on a sailboat was free to go at any time, so it was countable.But when a House Swift was found dead in BC in 2017, it was ultimately judged more likely that it had been trapped in a container for the cross-Pacific journey than that it had freely crossed on its own.
>
> With Eurasian Tree Sparrow, I imagine it will be worth a discussion of whether a bird like that [a] is more likely to have wandered west from its core range in MO or [b] if it came from Asia if it was more likely to have freely sat on a ship for the journey or perhaps been stuck inside a container, like House Sparrows in a big WalMart.
>
> It will be worth a discussion, for sure!
>
> Matt Bartels
> Secretary, WBRC
> Seattle, WA
>
>
>> Begin forwarded message:
>>
>> From: John Puschock <g_g_allin...> <mailto:<g_g_allin...>>
>> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Eurasian Tree Sparrow Origin
>> Date: October 28, 2019 at 8:47:25 PM PDT
>> To: Tweeters Tweeters <tweeters...> <mailto:<tweeters...>>
>>
>> Does the WBRC have an explicit "no ship-assistance" rule or policy? By ABA listing standards, ship-assisted birds are countable (or at least the last time I checked that was true).
>>
>> John Puschock
>> Seattle
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...> <mailto:<Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters <http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters>


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Date: 10/29/19 5:12 am
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fwd: Eurasian Tree Sparrow Origin
Hi hi -
I’ll chime in on this one :
The WBRC follows the ABA in its determination of ‘countable’ birds — So, yes, by ABA rules, ’ship assisted’ alone doesn’t make a bird uncountable.
Here’s the section from the ABA listing rules [http://listing.aba.org/aba-recording-rules/ <http://listing.aba.org/aba-recording-rules/> ]

Rule 3 part a:
(i) An otherwise wild bird that voluntarily uses or is attracted to a feeder, nest box, audio playback, ship at sea, or other nonnatural device, without being captured, is still considered wild. Physical contact between an observer and a bird does not automatically preclude a bird from being counted, as there are situations where wild birds have learned to eat from outstretched hands or have used people as temporary perches.

However, the question is whether it is more likely that a bird alighted on a ship and stayed there unassisted for a journey — for example, the Brown Booby that rode into Edmonds on a sailboat was free to go at any time, so it was countable.But when a House Swift was found dead in BC in 2017, it was ultimately judged more likely that it had been trapped in a container for the cross-Pacific journey than that it had freely crossed on its own.

With Eurasian Tree Sparrow, I imagine it will be worth a discussion of whether a bird like that [a] is more likely to have wandered west from its core range in MO or [b] if it came from Asia if it was more likely to have freely sat on a ship for the journey or perhaps been stuck inside a container, like House Sparrows in a big WalMart.

It will be worth a discussion, for sure!

Matt Bartels
Secretary, WBRC
Seattle, WA


> Begin forwarded message:
>
> From: John Puschock <g_g_allin...>
> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Eurasian Tree Sparrow Origin
> Date: October 28, 2019 at 8:47:25 PM PDT
> To: Tweeters Tweeters <tweeters...>
>
> Does the WBRC have an explicit "no ship-assistance" rule or policy? By ABA listing standards, ship-assisted birds are countable (or at least the last time I checked that was true).
>
> John Puschock
> Seattle
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...> <mailto:<Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters <http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters>

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Date: 10/28/19 9:16 pm
From: pan <panmail...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Tropical Kingbird report -- Olympic Peninsula
Tweets,

I pass on a report I trust of a Tropical Kingbird today "in front of the Kalaloch Mercantile." (Not mine -- I was missing birds on Alki Point.)

28 October, 2019,

Alan Grenon
Seattle
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Date: 10/28/19 8:49 pm
From: John Puschock <g_g_allin...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Eurasian Tree Sparrow Origin
Does the WBRC have an explicit "no ship-assistance" rule or policy? By ABA listing standards, ship-assisted birds are countable (or at least the last time I checked that was true).

John Puschock
Seattle

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Date: 10/28/19 8:33 pm
From: Brad Waggoner <wagtail24...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Eurasian Tree Sparrow Origin
Hi all,

The “countability” of this recent Neah Bay Eurasian Tree Sparrow has come up in a few private communications to me. While I can’t say with certainty on how the WBRC will rule on this record, I have a pretty good hunch. California and Oregon have two records each and none of them have been accepted by their BRC’s. The likelihood that this Eurasian Tree Sparrow arrived to Neah Bay without “ship assistance” is close to zero.

So, should you crank up the chase wagon and come give it a look see? Sure, why not, it is a handsome-looking bird. And, plus it is in Neah Bay in Fall and most of us now know what that means. Can you count it? It is your list!

Cheers and good birding,

Brad Waggoner



Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 10/28/19 6:56 pm
From: Bevbowe1 <bevbowe1...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Discovery Park - how to get to the lighthouse
Is there an issue with people who don't have permits parking down there?Bev

-----Original Message-----
From: Hartmut Peters <tuoichen...>
To: birders wa <tweeters...>
Sent: Mon, Oct 28, 2019 5:28 pm
Subject: [Tweeters] Discovery Park - how to get to the lighthouse

The small parking lot down at the South Beach is by permit only for most excellent reasons. If you are able-bodied, it will NOT hurt you to walk the mile to the beach and the lighthouse from the south parking lot. We regulars do it all the time. It helps keeping up our health. Walking from the south parking lot is easier than from the north parking lot. For navigation, google Discovery Park and get the park map - or get it at any one of the parking lots on paper. Also, all the trails in Discovery Park have posts marking trails and destinations. Look for "South Beach".

--
Hartmut Peters
Seattle, Washington; tuoichen AT gmail.com_______________________________________________
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Date: 10/28/19 5:54 pm
From: Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Maps of birding areas
Hello All - The WOS website has added a few maps of some birding sites.
These include Magnuson Park, Discovery Park, Marymoor and other spots.
The link to the maps page is found on the Birding Resources page:
http://wos.org/birding-locations/

If any of you know of other good maps of birding areas, please let me
know at <webmaster...> and I will add them.

Thanks,

Jane Hadley

Seattle, WA





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Date: 10/28/19 5:35 pm
From: Hartmut Peters <tuoichen...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Discovery Park - how to get to the lighthouse
The small parking lot down at the South Beach is by permit only for most
excellent reasons. If you are able-bodied, it will NOT hurt you to walk the
mile to the beach and the lighthouse from the south parking lot. We
regulars do it all the time. It helps keeping up our health. Walking from
the south parking lot is easier than from the north parking lot. For
navigation, google Discovery Park and get the park map - or get it at any
one of the parking lots on paper. Also, all the trails in Discovery Park
have posts marking trails and destinations. Look for "South Beach".

--
Hartmut Peters
Seattle, Washington; tuoichen AT gmail.com

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Date: 10/28/19 11:21 am
From: Kevin Lucas <vikingcove...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Snow Buntings @ Rimrock Lake, Yakima County
I just found 4 Snow Buntings foraging together along the flotsam line of
the inlet creek at the west end of Rimrock Lake. I'd also share this on
Yakima County's BirdYak listserv, but am still blocked from posting by
Denny Grandstand due to my efforts to strongly discourage unethical bird
listing practices.

Good Birding,
Kevin Lucas
Selah, Yakima County, WA

Sent with AquaMail for Android
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Date: 10/28/19 7:57 am
From: Stephen Chase <schasecredo...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Dark-eyed Junco ID Question
Hank,
Here's what I've gathered about our local juncos:

Slate-colored will show no difference in shade from the crown to the nape
to the back. It'll be slate gray all the way through.
Cassiar's (which many believe is a intergrade between Oregon and
Slate-colored, although its currently considered a unique subspecies) shows
a change of color on the back compared to the nape. It's not nearly as
pronounced as the "hood" on an Oregon junco, but it's there none-the-less.
Sometimes it takes seeing the bird from different angles or with different
light sources to notice the hood line. Sometimes the back is lighter gray
than the hood, sometimes browner. Your bird shows brown on the back, so it
looks good to me for Cassiar's.
On eBird, Cassiar's Junco is called "Dark Eyed Junco (cismontanus). You
also might have the spuh option of Slate-colored/cismontanus if you don't
get enough of a look to confirm one or the other.

In Everson,
Stephen Chase




On Sun, 27 Oct 2019 at 07:48, Hank H <h.heiberg...> wrote:

>
> Is the Dark-eyed Junco in the following photo Slate-colored or Cassiar or
> Oregon or ....? If it is Cassiar, how do I report it on eBird.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/48955364603/
>
> Thank you.
> Hank Heiberg
> Issaquah, WA
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> _______________________________________________
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> <Tweeters...>
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Date: 10/27/19 10:54 pm
From: <christopherwarlow...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Eurasian Tree Sparrow at Neah Bay.

Today (Sunday) at 1:40 we found a Eurasian Tree Sparrow at Butler’s Hotel in Neah Bay. 
Initially it was in the brambles across the street but then it flew to the feeders. It was very skittish in comparison to the house sparrows that it was with. It held back in the brush and flushed at any movement of blackbirds or jays. 
We got clear but short views over about 5 minutes but failed to get a photo. We then waited for several hours for it to return. Eventually we moved on and relocated the Eurasian Tree Sparrow at 3:40 with the large flock of House Sparrows by the hummingbird feeder on Lincoln and Bay View. Again we didn’t get a photo and the flock dispersed. 
The bird is clearly identified from the House, White-Crowned and Golden-Crowned in the area. It has a full rufous cap, clean bright white cheeks with a black spot on the cheek. 

Chris WarlowOlympia 
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Date: 10/27/19 6:13 pm
From: Catherine Alexander <cma...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Western Tanager in south Seattle this morning
I was surprised to hear a familiar summer song from the front yard about 11 am this morning, looked out and saw a Western Tanager flitting between our big Dog Fir and the grape arbor. Quite the straggler, though a real treat this time of year.

It seems to have moved on since then.

Catherine Alexander
Lakewood Neighborhood
South Seattle

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 10/27/19 5:46 pm
From: Marcus Vorwaller <marcus...>
Subject: [Tweeters] White Pelican at the Montlake Fill
South of Yesler Swamp visible from the loop trail
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Date: 10/27/19 4:31 pm
From: Elston Hill <elstonh...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Discovery Park
I keep reading the accounts of birders at the lighthouse at Discovery Park. I have so wanted to experience this area. This morning we set out to visit the lighthouse area hoping for great birds and lighthouse at sunrise. I carried my 600mm Canon lens anticipating a two mile hike each way. My wife and I arrived at the South Parking lot! We arrived in the dark and set out for the lighthouse. Ultimately I realized we were not going in the right direction based on the direction of sunrise. We ultimately gave up and used the GPS on my phone to get back to the car. We then drove down to the lighthouse parking lot and then went to the Ballard Locks where we saw a tree full of cormorants.

First, does anyone have advice for a first timer trying to arrive at sunrise? Which parking lot. Best way for a first timer to find their way to the lighthouse and not get lost. I would love to accomplish this goal this week since sunrise is so late.

Second, I must say that the parking restrictions at the lighthouse make no sense to me. It says permits only. But at 6;00 a.m., there is no one giving out permits. It seems to me that the permit restriction should only apply to those hours when the visitor center is open to give out permits. It should be like the City of Seattle where parking meters only apply from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Elston
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Date: 10/27/19 2:05 pm
From: Rachel Hudson <lightningdash09...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Chehalis/Centralia Snow Bunting
Hello, Tweets!
Dropping in to report a SNOW BUNTING I saw at about 12:30 PM on the North end of NW Airport Road in Chehalis. Not chase-able to that specific spot, as it was flying overhead nonstop from SE to NW, but it could continue in the immediate agricultural area on the West side of I-5 with other field birds, such as the American Pipits that are common there. More details and poor but ID-able photos on my checklist here: https://ebird.org/checklist/S60973994
According to eBird data alone, it would be a first Lewis County record. I do not know if others have been seen in Lewis County before that have not been submitted to eBird.
Also, hi, everyone! This is my first post, so my apologies if anything goes wrong. I have been reading your posts from the online ABA Tweeters link for about 7 years, so I know all of you lovely people, but have never had the occasion to post personally.
Happy birding!
~Rachel HudsonChehalis, WAlightningdash 09 at yahoo dot com
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Date: 10/27/19 9:44 am
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...>
Subject: [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Oct. 27, 2019
Hey, Tweeters!

Last week on BirdNote:
* The Great Missoula Floods Create Scablands & Plunge Pools
http://bit.ly/OplanG
* Look Up - A Family of Falconers
http://bit.ly/2NicVfd
* Pinyon Jays
http://bit.ly/1ezlkmg
* Swallows and Mud - A Myth?
http://bit.ly/2fUww4Y
* A World of Parrots
http://bit.ly/2PiZqP4
* Geese in V-formation
http://bit.ly/UJxmU3
* Purple Martins Head South to the Amazon
http://bit.ly/HiCj0Q
=========================
Next week on BirdNote: Ptarmigan Toes, Ring-necked Pheasants,
Spooky Shearwaters, and more! http://bit.ly/2MPzut1
-------------------------
Did you have a favorite story this week? Another comment?
Please let us know. mailto:<info...>
------------------------------------------------
BirdNote is now in print. Check out BirdNote, the book:
https://www.birdnote.org/birdnote-book
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
or Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/birdnoteradio/
Listen on Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find 1500+ episodes and more than 1200 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
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Date: 10/27/19 9:13 am
From: Olyclarinet <olyclarinet...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Help with goose ID: Tumwater Historical Park
We are seeing this morning one lone goose in the middle of the lawn, eating grass. Smaller than Canada Goose, black bill, pale chest and undersides, back/wings white and black, black cap with black running down back of neck but neck otherwise pale.

Any ideas? We are assuming this is a juvenile. First guess was a snow goose except would not expect bill black.

Deborah
From Tumwater Historical Park
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Date: 10/27/19 7:50 am
From: Hank H <h.heiberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Dark-eyed Junco ID Question

> Is the Dark-eyed Junco in the following photo Slate-colored or Cassiar or Oregon or ....? If it is Cassiar, how do I report it on eBird.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/48955364603/
>
> Thank you.
> Hank Heiberg
> Issaquah, WA
>
> Sent from my iPad

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Date: 10/27/19 5:26 am
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bird Migration Is Written In Their Genes
Hello everyone,

as migration is winding down for the year, I thought you might be
interested to learn that birds use several different strategies to follow
their migration routes. The first strategy is for young-of-the-year to
learn their route and final destination from their parents in autumnal
migration, as seen in waterfowl and shorebirds. The second strategy is
rather mysterious, and has been know to basically result from a bird's
genes. (But which genes?) This strategy is relied upon by many small
songbirds.

It may interest you to learn that a recent study came out that identifies a
gene -- actually, just ONE gene variant -- as playing a big role in
migration in neotropical warblers.

you can read more about this study, this gene and how the researchers
figured this out in this piece i wrote for Forbes:

Bird Migration Is Written In Their Genes
https://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2019/10/25/bird-migration-is-written-in-their-genes/
tinyURL: https://tinyurl.com/y2ow9td8

As always, thank you for reading, and for sharing my work widely amongst
your birdie colleagues, on social media, and on twitter.

--
GrrlScientist | @GrrlScientist <https://twitter.com/GrrlScientist>
<grrlscientist...>
Blogs: Forbes <http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/> | Medium
<https://medium.com/@GrrlScientist>
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Date: 10/26/19 8:59 am
From: mombiwheeler <mombiwheeler...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Alki Rock Wren present
Hi Tweeters,Looking at it now on the rocks off of the lighthouse lawn.  Low tide is soon, so now is the time to try for it.Lonnie SomerSeattleSent from my Sprint Samsung Galaxy S® 6._______________________________________________
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Date: 10/25/19 6:49 pm
From: Clare McLean <clareishere...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Epson printer for sale
For those bird photographers making prints, I have a never-used Epson Stylus Pro 3880 for sale. In original box, never even assembled. Includes inks and paper samples. $850 cash OBO. If interested, please contact me at <clareishere...>

Clare McLean
Mountlake Terrace, WA


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Date: 10/24/19 6:15 pm
From: Stephen <schasecredo...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Snow Geese Galore
At 5:40 pm, four huge flocks of Snow Geese passed over my Everson house about a minute apart. Maybe 1000 in each of the first three flocks, fewer in the fourth. One probable Ross' Goose about half the size but otherwise identical.

Stephen Chase
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Date: 10/24/19 3:35 pm
From: <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2019-10-24
Tweets – Excellent day at Marymoor today – no rain, no wind, not cold. It wasn’t even too cloudy, too foggy, or too sunny. Just about perfect, and quite birdy. Those of us doing the survey did not find Eric’s CATTLE EGRET, but still...

Highlights:
a.. Green-winged Teal – four below weir; First of Fall
b.. Bufflehead – about seven far out on lake; First of Fall
c.. Common Merganser – a couple of small flyby flocks
d.. Ring-necked Pheasant – heard calling after three weeks escaping detection
e.. American Coot – first big fall flock 200+ at lake
f.. BONAPARTE’S GULL – brief sighting of three flying down the slough – First since 2016!
g.. Mew Gull – a few in the gull flock on the grass soccer fields – First of Fall
h.. Green Heron – one at Rowing Club
i.. Barn Owl – one hunting East Meadow until after 7am
j.. Pileated Woodpecker – on across slough
k.. Northern Shrike – juvenile north of grass soccer fields
l.. Pacific Wren – one singing at south end of Dog Meadow – First of Fall
m.. Varied Thrush – 1-2 at south end of Dog Meadow, one singing
n.. American Pipit – flyover of flock of 6
o.. Pine Siskin – first real flocks – maybe 35 total
p.. Western Meadowlark – two at north end of East Meadow
Eric’s CATTLE EGRET is the second report for Marymoor Park that I am aware of. The first report was from November 15, 1994, by Bob Dolphin, as listed (probably in Washington Field Notes) in WOSNews 35. Really excellent to have a second report for the site after almost exactly 25 years.

Last week was notable for the accipiters (at least 5 individuals, many sightings) and Merlin (probably 1 bird, three sightings). Today, we saw none of these. Today, the little birds seemed carefree and visible. Coincidence? I don’t think so...

Misses today included Hooded Merganser, Western Grebe, Cooper’s Hawk, Bushtit, and American Goldfinch.

For the day, we had 62 species – adding Eric’s egret makes 63 species – a really good total, I think.

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== <BirdMarymoor...>
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Date: 10/24/19 3:19 pm
From: Joyce Meyer <meyer2j...>
Subject: [Tweeters] The Scope
Hello. Tweets:
I’ve had several inquiries regarding the Swarovski scope for sale. I consider it sold.
Good birding—-
Joyce Meyer
Redmond, WA

Sent from my iPhone 6, Joyce
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Date: 10/24/19 12:12 pm
From: Joyce Meyer <meyer2j...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Scope For Sale
Hello Tweets:

I'm selling a well cared for scope with tripod. Gently used gray Swarovski Habicht AT80 HD, angled viewing, spotting scope. Includes 20-60 zoom eyepiece as well as a 30ww eyepiece plus weatherproof cover, mounted on a Bogen Monfrotto 3130 tripod. Excellent condition. $600.00 for the unit. Used exclusively for birding. Fall is in the air. The ducks, geese, swans and winter raptors are beginning to arrive.  Prefer to sell locally. Note:For reference, the web has many examples of the Habicht AT80 HD.

You may contact me by email (not through Tweeters).Joyce <Meyermeyer2j...>, WA

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Date: 10/24/19 11:25 am
From: Kenneth Brown <kenbrownpls...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Nisqually NWR Wednesday walk, 10/23/2019
It was cool in the morning but a beautiful day at the refuge. 20 or so started out at 8am for our typical route, finishing up around 1:30pm. The tide was low at the start and still low when we arrived on the dike. The end of the dike and McCallister Creek Boardwalk are still closed off for bridge replacement.

One unusual finding was 18 Wilson's Snipe all in close proximity to each other acting like peeps, on the edge of the open muddy pond on the west side of the Twin Barns access road. One Cackling Goose had a yellow neck collar with "9%" in black lettering.

The list of species follows:

Greater White-fronted Goose 18
Cackling Goose 1200
Canada Goose 4
Cinnamon Teal 1
American Wigeon 60
Mallard 50
Northern Pintail 100
Green-winged Teal 40
Hooded Merganser 2
Anna's Hummingbird 3
Killdeer 1
peep sp. 20
Long-billed Dowitcher 12
Wilson's Snipe 18
Greater Yellowlegs 3
Ring-billed Gull 24
Glaucous-winged Gull 2
Western x Glaucous-winged Gull (hybrid) 2
Double-crested Cormorant 8
Great Blue Heron 10
Osprey 1 observed by several people, photo
to follow.
Northern Harrier 1
Bald Eagle 5
Red-tailed Hawk 1
Great Horned Owl 1
Belted Kingfisher 3
Red-breasted Sapsucker 2
Downy Woodpecker 4
Pileated Woodpecker 1
Northern Flicker 15
American Kestrel 1
Merlin 1
Peregrine Falcon 1
American Crow 250
Common Raven 3
Black-capped Chickadee 24
Chestnut-backed Chickadee 6
Golden-crowned Kinglet 12
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 9
Brown Creeper 3
Pacific Wren 1
Bewick's Wren 2
European Starling 24
Varied Thrush 2
American Robin 25
Cedar Waxwing 4
Pine Siskin 60
American Goldfinch 2
Golden-crowned Sparrow 6
Song Sparrow 15
Lincoln's Sparrow 1
Spotted Towhee 2
Western Meadowlark 5
Common Yellowthroat 1
Yellow-rumped Warbler 5

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S60871824

Three of us walked back out to the dike to check the tidal push in the afternoon and found duplicate and additional species as follows:

Cackling Goose 500
Northern Shoveler 2
American Wigeon 2000
Mallard 50
Northern Pintail 150
Green-winged Teal 1500
Hooded Merganser 2
Black-bellied Plover 5
Killdeer 10
Marbled Godwit 1
Dunlin 4
Greater Yellowlegs 3
Mew Gull 1
Ring-billed Gull 50
gull sp. 200
Great Blue Heron 1
Belted Kingfisher 1
Peregrine Falcon 1
Black-capped Chickadee 2
Bushtit 12
Golden-crowned Kinglet 2
Cedar Waxwing 3
Golden-crowned Sparrow 4
Song Sparrow 2
Spotted Towhee 1
Western Meadowlark 2
Red-winged Blackbird 1

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S60875550

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Date: 10/23/19 9:53 pm
From: Hans-Joachim Feddern <thefedderns...>
Subject: [Tweeters] FOS Bufflehead
I had my first-of-season male Bufflehead on Lake Jeanne/Twin Lakes this
morning.

Good Birding!

hans

--
*Hans Feddern*
Twin Lakes/Federal Way, WA
<thefedderns...>

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Date: 10/23/19 4:33 pm
From: rw <rw...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Loudest bird in the world
How about Capuchinbird? I saw and heard it in Brazil last week. It's
larger than Bearded Bellbird -- 40 cm vs 28 cm -- and sounds like a
chainsaw. Undoubtedly, someone has measured its decibels.



Ray White






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Date: 10/23/19 4:30 pm
From: Deanna Snow <ZeeSnowBird...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Neah Bay Washington Birds
Does anyone know if the Indigo Bunting, Orchard Oriole, or any of the other recent rare birds mentioned have been spotted in the last couple of days? I am looking to venture up there this weekend, if there are any of them still being seen.

Thank you,
Deanna Snow
Longview Wa

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Date: 10/23/19 3:22 pm
From: Stefan Schlick <greenfant...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fw: [obol] Blue Jays, not Eastern Bluebirds near Rosalia, Washington
Forwarding again. Sorry, false alarm.

________________________________________
From: <obol-bounce...> <obol-bounce...> on behalf of Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10...>
Sent: Wednesday, October 23, 2019 3:00 PM
To: obol
Subject: [obol] Blue Jays, not Eastern Bluebirds near Rosalia, Washington

I talked with the property owner. There had been a miscommunication somehow.

Jeff Gilligan


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Date: 10/23/19 2:57 pm
From: pan <panmail...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Carkeek Park (Seattle) today
Hi, Tweets,

Three of us did a long watch at the beach at Carkeek this morning -- no black-backed gull. We did have an assortment of gulls and ducks, an Eared Grebe, distant Black Scoters, and a bit of raptor movement, including a Peregrine Falcon. Biggest surprise for me was a meadowlark flying overhead from the north, turning inland.

23 October, 2019,

Alan Grenon
Seattle
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Date: 10/23/19 2:41 pm
From: Stefan Schlick <greenfant...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fw: [obol] Eastern Bluebirds in Washington
Forwarding from OBOL ...

________________________________________
From: <obol-bounce...> <obol-bounce...> on behalf of Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10...>
Sent: Wednesday, October 23, 2019 11:04 AM
To: obol
Subject: [obol] Eastern Bluebirds in Washington

I was told yesterday by a friend who is a casual birder, that his friend, who is a casual birder, that the he has had two Eastern Bluebirds on his private nature reserve near Rosalia, Washington. His home is on the property. The property was formerly used for wheat production, but several years ago was allowed to return to native habitat, and the creek through it was restored. The creek on either side of the property is piped, as I recall.

I am trying to get more information, and photographs. I should know more in a day or so. The birds arrived about a month ago and have been consistently on the property, which is Washingtons Palouse. The property is surrounded by wheat fields.

The property owner asked my friend to ask me if Eastern Bluebirds are rare in Washington State, because he had only seen Westerns before. He reportedly had seen Eastern Bluebirds before in the Eastern US, and had considered the identification factors.

One of my questions to him will be if he will allow access for Washington birders to see them, and what kind of restrictions he would put on access if he allows it.

Jeff Gilligan


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Date: 10/23/19 1:09 pm
From: Diane Yorgason-Quinn <avosetta...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] A little off-topic, But what a good Win-Win!

Yummy!
[cid:07cfa796-2828-4168-ba8e-6fd38f1b50a8]
________________________________
From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> on behalf of Faye McAdams Hands <zest4parus...>
Sent: Wednesday, October 23, 2019 12:57 PM
To: <tweeters...> <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] A little off-topic, But what a good Win-Win!

https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddrink/foodnews/this-almond-roca-candy-factory-leftover-will-go-to-hungry-bees/ar-AAJeOku<https://eur02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.msn.com%2Fen-us%2Ffoodanddrink%2Ffoodnews%2Fthis-almond-roca-candy-factory-leftover-will-go-to-hungry-bees%2Far-AAJeOku&data=02%7C01%7C%7C0afc9b4e24ba4ff58f2908d757f3565c%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637074574973748128&sdata=DDjlyEFFiuFUpTIiBVZyF103gBXsp8VJTvViO2NA5lY%3D&reserved=0>
[https://static-entertainment-wus-s-msn-com.akamaized.net/sc/c6/519670.jpg]<https://eur02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.msn.com%2Fen-us%2Ffoodanddrink%2Ffoodnews%2Fthis-almond-roca-candy-factory-leftover-will-go-to-hungry-bees%2Far-AAJeOku&data=02%7C01%7C%7C0afc9b4e24ba4ff58f2908d757f3565c%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637074574973758139&sdata=r4Scaa5vuxZpVDwZUHI05jd1w8NR1%2FvQhel1%2BMDT7PE%3D&reserved=0>
This Almond Roca candy factory leftover will go to hungry bees<https://eur02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.msn.com%2Fen-us%2Ffoodanddrink%2Ffoodnews%2Fthis-almond-roca-candy-factory-leftover-will-go-to-hungry-bees%2Far-AAJeOku&data=02%7C01%7C%7C0afc9b4e24ba4ff58f2908d757f3565c%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637074574973778155&sdata=Id%2BAkUi3okpGBg9AxoOXdsZQTpcemWl4X9j88Icyzdg%3D&reserved=0>
It takes a lot of sugar to make the sweet Tacoma treat called Almond Roca -- 4 million pounds a year, according to maker Brown & Haley. Now, honey bees can get in on the sweet tradition. On ...
www.msn.com
What a Sweet Story!

Happy Birding,
Faye
Belfair, WA

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Date: 10/23/19 1:01 pm
From: Faye McAdams Hands <zest4parus...>
Subject: [Tweeters] A little off-topic, But what a good Win-Win!
https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddrink/foodnews/this-almond-roca-candy-factory-leftover-will-go-to-hungry-bees/ar-AAJeOku
[https://static-entertainment-wus-s-msn-com.akamaized.net/sc/c6/519670.jpg]<https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddrink/foodnews/this-almond-roca-candy-factory-leftover-will-go-to-hungry-bees/ar-AAJeOku>
This Almond Roca candy factory leftover will go to hungry bees<https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddrink/foodnews/this-almond-roca-candy-factory-leftover-will-go-to-hungry-bees/ar-AAJeOku>
It takes a lot of sugar to make the sweet Tacoma treat called Almond Roca -- 4 million pounds a year, according to maker Brown & Haley. Now, honey bees can get in on the sweet tradition. On ...
www.msn.com
What a Sweet Story!

Happy Birding,
Faye
Belfair, WA

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Date: 10/23/19 11:10 am
From: Russ Koppendrayer <russkope...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Heerman's Gull at Kalama
It disappeared when my attention was diverted with the incoming tide. Will
post if I refind. It could still be around or come back.

Russ Koppendrayer

On Wed, Oct 23, 2019, 10:39 AM Russ Koppendrayer <russkope...> wrote:

> Hi Tweeters,
>
> At 10:30am there's a Heerman's Gull roosting with a gull flock at the end
> of Sportsman Club Rd. Access from Kalama River Rd. Very rare this far
> upstream on the Columbia.
>
> Russ Koppendrayer
> Longview, WA
>

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Date: 10/23/19 10:42 am
From: Russ Koppendrayer <russkope...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Heerman's Gull at Kalama
Hi Tweeters,

At 10:30am there's a Heerman's Gull roosting with a gull flock at the end
of Sportsman Club Rd. Access from Kalama River Rd. Very rare this far
upstream on the Columbia.

Russ Koppendrayer
Longview, WA

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Date: 10/23/19 8:09 am
From: Izzy Wong <gobirder...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Update on Cattle Egret

I just received notice that the Cattle Egret hasn’t been seen since Monday.

It was seen near Shelton, where fresh water Mill Creek meets Hammersly Inlet, south side of the inlet.

Izzy Arévalo Wong


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Date: 10/22/19 9:05 pm
From: cynthia burrell <cinnyb...>
Subject: [Tweeters] WOS meeting, Monday Nov 4
"Song Recognition and Hybridization in a New White-Crowned Sparrow Contact Zone"

In the Cascade Mountains of Washington, White-crowned Sparrow sub-species, ZI pugetensis, and ZI gambelii have been found to breed in the same location for the first time. Over the past two summers, Will Brooks, a senior at the University of Puget Sound, has been observing whether the two subspecies interbreed and what factors, such as song recognition, effect interbreeding.

WOS meetings are held the first Monday the month Oct-June.
Social begins at 7:00pm, meeting begins at 7:30PM.
The Center for Urban Horticulture, 3501 NE 41st Seattle, WA 98105
Meetings are open to everyone. Members can attend remotely via GoToMeeting (go to WOS.org to join)
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Date: 10/22/19 8:49 pm
From: Larry S. Goodhew <lsg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Osprey
Had a fly over Osprey today , seems a bit late. 2 miles south of College
Place, WA.

Larry Goodhew

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Date: 10/22/19 8:05 pm
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Skagit Elephant Seal, off-topic
Dear Tweeters,
Today (22 October) at Rosario Head, there were new, temporary signs, reminding people of the laws protecting pinnipeds. At the picnic spot on the little isthmus, near the statue of the Indian maiden, there was a semicircle of orange traffic cones. Snuggled up next to the wooden rail fence was an elephant seal pup, hence the signage and conage! People were being good about giving this wayward animal space. One would hope that continues.
Nearby, a covey of 17 California Quail included the famous leucistic one, giving great views as they foraged by the picnic tables!
Later, on Samish Flats, I saw my first Rough-legged Hawks of the season, at the West Ninety, and my first Short-eared Owl of the season, at the East Ninety.
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch
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Date: 10/22/19 5:01 pm
From: Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] RFI - Skagit River and North Cascades NP birding, around Thanksgiving
Hello Nagi and Taghrid -

A Birder's Guide to Washington 2nd Edition discusses birding along the
North Cascades Highway and the national park. The guide is now online
and freely available for all to consult. You can read about birding
along the North Cascades Highway at:
https://wabirdguide.org/north-cascades-highway/

If you notice that anything has changed since the guide was published
(2015), please enter a comment at the website so that others will know
about it.

Good luck with your birding.

Jane Hadley

Seattle, Washington



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Date: 10/22/19 4:19 pm
From: pan <panmail...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Discovery Park (Seattle) Horned Lark
Tweets,

I was watching gulls, but didn't see anything rarer than Bonaparte's and Heermann's this morning. I did see the Horned Lark reported the last couple of days on the south beach. When last seen, it was circling high over West Point as a Cooper's Hawk hunted low over same. Earlier, I had a few hundred Snow Geese flying back and forth (concealing their actual number) over the park in a few flocks in the mist. A fair number of loons were passing, and a few returning diving ducks. I'm glad I didn't know the forecast had changed (to continuing rainy).

For loud birds, I'd nominate Noisy Scrub-bird. I used to work with them in southwestern Australia, and they use their song defensively (or rather, offensively). When you walk into a territory (in coastal heath), the male will stay out of sight, but walk to within a few feet of you and blast you with song. It's so loud it's painful. They may not win in absolute terms, but when that close, it may beat what we hear of other species at more usual distances.

22 October, 2019,

Alan Grenon
Seattle
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Date: 10/22/19 3:49 pm
From: Izzy & Kendrick <gobirder...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Cattle Egret
Last night a non-birder acquaintance sent me a photo of a Cattle Egret in Hammersly Bay (Inlet) near Shelton. I haven’t had a chance to check it out, but thought I’d post this in case anyone has the inclination.

Unfortunately, I don’t have any specifics as to the exact location other than what I have shared here.
I will update if I hear anything else from her about this bird

thanks, and good luck to anyone who goes on the search for it.
izzy

izzy arévalo wong
seattle, wa
<gobirder...>


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Date: 10/22/19 2:09 pm
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] dark morph imm Broad-winged Hawk over Battle Ground, Clark County
Wow, totally unexpected to have a great view of an immature dark morph
BROAD-WINGED HAWK only about 150 feet over my Battle Ground, Clark County
yard about 15 minutes ago!!! It was, predictably, heading south.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward and sometimes you find something surprising!

Jim
--
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
<jdanzenbaker...>

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Date: 10/22/19 12:58 pm
From: Ron Rabin <rjayrabin...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Opening Mime Attachment on iPhone
I’m posting this because I’m guessing I’m not the only one struggling with this. The tweeters attachments have always come as mime and continue to do so. They would always then open as pdf. My new iPhone 11 Pro won’t open the tweeters attachments. I’m hoping someone knows the secret.
Thanks,
Ron Rabin


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Date: 10/22/19 12:33 pm
From: Ryan Merrill <rjm284...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Carkeek Lesser Black-backed Gull
Sarah Peden found an adult Lesser Black-backed Gull at the creek mouth at
Carkeek Park in Seattle. Ten minutes ago a train flushed it and it flew
south passing over Golden Gardens but still fairly high up, so maybe The
Locks would be a good place to look for it?

Good birding,
Ryan Merrill

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Date: 10/22/19 12:31 pm
From: Timothy Barksdale <timothy.barksdale...>
Subject: [Tweeters] "Loudest Bird in the World"
Hi Tweets!

I disagree with the article.

I have filmed all of the Bellbirds. While the White is clearly very loud, I was disoriented by Bearded Bellbirds. So I looked into this and as we recorded the sounds we attempted to establish this exact answer to the question - which is the loudest bird in the world. When “All Bird TV” was in production we were doing a show on this.

As I recall - We concluded that Bearded was louder than White.

There are 4 species of Bellbirds: This is where I have found them:

Costa Rica-
3 wattled Bellbird
White Bellbird

Brazil-
Bare-throated Bellbird

Trinidad & Tobago-
Bearded Bellbird

Also- as I later pondered this question- some of the other subtropical species are incurably LOUD!
Lyrebird has also Not been eliminated from the competition. Screaming Phia is not exactly quiet. I have filmed them in Venezuela.

I’d love to hear some of your nominees in the category .

=======
Re: Message: 3
Date: Tue, 22 Oct 2019 11:01:39 -0700
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> <mailto:<dan.owl.reiff...>>
To: <tweeters...> <mailto:<tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] World's 'loudest bird': Meet the white bellbird -
BBC News
Message-ID: <A69B1C64-2946-4CE7-8EEF-16A2EC34D24C...> <mailto:<A69B1C64-2946-4CE7-8EEF-16A2EC34D24C...>>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii


https://www.bbc.com/news/av/newsbeat-50135578/world-s-loudest-bird-meet-the-white-bellbird <https://www.bbc.com/news/av/newsbeat-50135578/world-s-loudest-bird-meet-the-white-bellbird>


Sent from my iPhone
======


Timothy Barksdale
Birdman Productions LLC
P.O.Box 1124
69 Mountain View Dr.
Choteau, MT 59422

Missouri: Birdman Adventures LLC

Timothy dot barksdale at gmail dot .com


The information transmitted (including attachments) is covered by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, 18 U.S.C. 2510-2521, is intended only for the person(s) or entity/entities to which it is addressed and might contain confidential and/or privileged material. Any review, retransmission, dissemination or other use of, or taking of any action in reliance upon, this information by persons or entities other than the intended recipient(s) is prohibited. If you received this in error, please contact the sender and delete the material from any computer.

In addition to the above, you may be receiving copyrighted material and be subject to violation of United States Laws.

Birdman Productions LLC and Birdman Adventures LLC will vigorously defend intellectual material, proprietary material and prosecute theft, or plagiarism to the fullest extent of the law.


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Date: 10/22/19 11:21 am
From: Nagi Aboulenein <nagi.aboulenein...>
Subject: [Tweeters] RFI - Skagit River and North Cascades NP birding around Thanksgiving
Hello Tweeters,

We’re considering a trip to the Skagit River and North Cascades NP areas around Thanksgiving, and were hoping for some info about whether that would be a good time of year to visit, must-see places/hotspots, etc. Main targets would be eagles, raptors and owls, but we usually put out the welcome mat to any and all feathered friends :-).

Any and all information will be greatly appreciated!

Good birding,

Nagi & Taghrid

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Date: 10/22/19 11:03 am
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] World's 'loudest bird': Meet the white bellbird - BBC News

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/newsbeat-50135578/world-s-loudest-bird-meet-the-white-bellbird


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Date: 10/21/19 2:17 pm
From: Robert Gray <robertgary02...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Scrub Jay
Very active Scrub Jay at Fryelands Park, Monroe over the weekend.
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Date: 10/21/19 12:25 pm
From: Teri Martine <terimartine...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Preventing window collisions
I’ve been very happy with 6x6” window decals ordered from abirdseyeview.com <http://abirdseyeview.com/> . You can place on the inside of window, can easily move and re-position them if needed, and (at my house) I only needed a few on each window and they seem to be 100% effective.
Teri Martine
Seattle
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Date: 10/21/19 11:37 am
From: Steve Pink <pirangas...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Yellow-browed Warbler still at Vancouver Island

Hi,

We had a few glimpses of the bird at Panama Flats this morning. Eventually diagnostic view obtained.

Cheers Steve
Edmonds, WA

Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S9+, an AT&T 5G Evolution capable smartphone
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Date: 10/21/19 10:58 am
From: Mason Flint <masonflint...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Yellow-browed warbler still present at Panama Flats near Victoria, BC
Seen off and on this morning until we left a few minutes ago. Very active, kinglet-like behavior, occasionally appearing to chase or be chased by Ruby-crowned kinglet.

Mason Flint
Bellevue

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Date: 10/21/19 7:57 am
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Preventing bird collisions
this bird-window collision problem has me baffled. I also have birds
crashing into my windows -- even with the blinds closed. (no kills,
thankfully.) weirdly, I've also watched birds crash into the house itself.
now why on earth would they do that? i wondered. are these youngsters who
are unskilled flyers? or adults who are interested to learn about the
material that the house is made of?

i'm not sure of the answer to that observation, but it's long mystified me.
has anyone else seen this?


On Mon, Oct 21, 2019 at 5:25 AM Ruth Richards <rgrichards7...>
wrote:

> The paint pens are called Posca Pens - any good art or craft store should
> have them. And, we tried a different brand before we found Posca; they
> weren’t as good, so it’s worth finding Poscas.
>
> They come in a variety of widths. We used a PC-5M for the first attempt,
> because that was the recommendation, and we weren’t sure how it would be to
> look through the window once it is striped. We’d recommend a slightly
> thicker line for a bit of extra insurance. We have a PC-7M that we’ll try
> next.
>
> We used a straight edge after measuring the window for vertical lines
> about 3.5” apart, on the exterior surface.
> Because our feeders are set away from the house and there’s a lot of brush
> nearby, we hadn’t been getting many strikes that killed, but we would get a
> collision now and then. Since striping the windows, we’ve had none. And,
> one becomes accustomed to looking through the window and barely noticing
> the striping after a while. The fact that it is effective makes it easy to
> love!
>
> Ruth Richards
> Coupeville
>
> > On Oct 20, 2019, at 3:38 PM, <c.boatsman...> wrote:
> >
> > There was a list last week about how to prevent bird collisions with
> windows. I watched the video. I think the type of pen used to draw the
> lines on the window was not specified. Anyone know? Also brief review of
> how to mark the windows would be appreciated. Have others tried it? Thank
> you.
> >
>
>
--
GrrlScientist | @GrrlScientist <https://twitter.com/GrrlScientist>
<grrlscientist...>
Blogs: Forbes <http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/>
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Date: 10/21/19 6:37 am
From: Cara Borre <cmborre1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Neah Bay is rocking already
Just a quick note to alert you that Neah Bay had some good birds this
weekend including Tropical Kingbird, Ash-throated Flycatcher, Indigo
Bunting, Orchard Oriole and Hooded Oriole.

We saw TRKI and ATFL together at the Greenhouse on Saturday. I could not
find them on Sunday and I'm not sure if anyone saw them yesterday as the
weather was poor. Indigo Bunting was at Butler's feeders where it seems to
prefer the far left feeder and would flush readily with motion.

Hooded Oriole was coming to the hummingbird feeder house which is at
Bayview and Lincoln. Seen by some both days. The Orchard Oriole was in an
area west of Calvin's then in back of that area near the policemen's house
(sometimes his car is out front and he has a black shepherd-like dog) and
the creek. This bird was tough as we tried to find it on Sunday. It would
stay low in the blackberries, then fly up at times becoming more visible.

And so it begins...

Cara Borre
Gig Harbor

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Date: 10/20/19 8:29 pm
From: Ruth Richards <rgrichards7...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Preventing bird collisions
The paint pens are called Posca Pens - any good art or craft store should have them. And, we tried a different brand before we found Posca; they weren’t as good, so it’s worth finding Poscas.

They come in a variety of widths. We used a PC-5M for the first attempt, because that was the recommendation, and we weren’t sure how it would be to look through the window once it is striped. We’d recommend a slightly thicker line for a bit of extra insurance. We have a PC-7M that we’ll try next.

We used a straight edge after measuring the window for vertical lines about 3.5” apart, on the exterior surface.
Because our feeders are set away from the house and there’s a lot of brush nearby, we hadn’t been getting many strikes that killed, but we would get a collision now and then. Since striping the windows, we’ve had none. And, one becomes accustomed to looking through the window and barely noticing the striping after a while. The fact that it is effective makes it easy to love!

Ruth Richards
Coupeville

> On Oct 20, 2019, at 3:38 PM, <c.boatsman...> wrote:
>
> There was a list last week about how to prevent bird collisions with windows. I watched the video. I think the type of pen used to draw the lines on the window was not specified. Anyone know? Also brief review of how to mark the windows would be appreciated. Have others tried it? Thank you.
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

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Date: 10/20/19 3:41 pm
From: <c.boatsman...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Preventing bird collisions
There was a list last week about how to prevent bird collisions with windows. I watched the video. I think the type of pen used to draw the lines on the window was not specified. Anyone know? Also brief review of how to mark the windows would be appreciated. Have others tried it? Thank you.

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Date: 10/20/19 1:53 pm
From: Hubbell <ldhubbell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } The Odd Waterfowl
Tweeters,

This weeks post will challenge you to know the difference between ducks and geese. Good Luck!

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2019/10/the-odd-waterfowl.html <https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2019/10/the-odd-waterfowl.html>

Have a great day on Union Bay, where nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net
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Date: 10/20/19 11:57 am
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Additional Info about Yellow-browed Warbler
Some added info after Ann Marie's post.  
It was seen yesterday ONLY from 7:45 a.m. until 10:40 a.m.  Many birders were there for remainder of day and not seen.
This morning a similar pattern.  Seen at 8ish until 10 but so far not since.  May be a "morning bird" only.
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Date: 10/20/19 11:50 am
From: AnnMarie Wood <amw.5737...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Yellow-browed Warbler continuing
This Mega Rarity found at the Panama Flats, Victoria, B C on Friday, 10/18/19 is still present this morning.

Ann Marie Wood
Mountlake Terrace, WA

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Date: 10/20/19 9:34 am
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Port Townsend -- no Black-tailed Gull yesterday
Thank you for the gull report Steve Hampton. Now we don’t have to miss two other species today, Ravens and Sea Hawks.

I second Western Tanager.

Larry Schwitters
Issaquah

> On Oct 20, 2019, at 8:26 AM, Steve Hampton <stevechampton...> wrote:
>
> Several of us looked for the Black-tailed Gull at Point Hudson (by Hudson Marina) yesterday at low tide-- no luck. The gravel spit there becomes a small gull and shorebird roost at low tide. We checked some other gull spots without success, but will look again today.
>
> An Orchard Oriole was reported at Chetzemoka Park. The photos at https://ebird.org/pnw/checklist/S60764501 <https://ebird.org/pnw/checklist/S60764501> suggest Western Tanager.
>
> good birding,
>
> --
> Steve Hampton
> Davis, CA
> _______________________________________________
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> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters


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Date: 10/20/19 8:28 am
From: Steve Hampton <stevechampton...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Port Townsend -- no Black-tailed Gull yesterday
Several of us looked for the Black-tailed Gull at Point Hudson (by Hudson
Marina) yesterday at low tide-- no luck. The gravel spit there becomes a
small gull and shorebird roost at low tide. We checked some other gull
spots without success, but will look again today.

An Orchard Oriole was reported at Chetzemoka Park. The photos at
https://ebird.org/pnw/checklist/S60764501 suggest Western Tanager.

good birding,

--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA

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Date: 10/20/19 12:36 am
From: Hans-Joachim Feddern <thefedderns...>
Subject: [Tweeters] RFI -Puerto Vallarta
Does anybody have any recommendations for a birding tour operator or - tour
guide in Puerto Vallarta?

Please reply to my below e-mail.

Thanks,

Hans

--
*Hans Feddern*
Twin Lakes/Federal Way, WA
<thefedderns...>

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Date: 10/19/19 11:05 pm
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] NPR article regarding the name change ("by six votes"), including a voice recording of how to pronounce the name.
https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/12/01/503979353/barrow-alaska-changes-its-name-back-to-its-original-utqiagvik

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Date: 10/19/19 8:35 pm
From: Naomi Himley <naomihimley...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Recommendations for Guide In Barrow
UUT-kee-AH-vik is the phonetic for it that I’ve seen.

> On Oct 19, 2019, at 19:22, Faye McAdams Hands <zest4parus...> wrote:
>
> Good to know Naomi!
> Not living in Alaska, or traveling up there in the past few years, I did not know about this name change.
>
> Can you please offer a phonetic pronunciation of Utqiagvik?
> That would be very helpful.
>
> Thank you and Happy Birding,
> Faye
>
> Faye McAdams Hands
> Life is Simple -- Eat, Sleep, Bird.
>
> From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> on behalf of Naomi Himley <naomihimley...>
> Sent: Saturday, October 19, 2019 1:47 PM
> To: <tweeters...> <tweeters...>
> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Recommendations for Guide In Barrow
>
> Barrow has been known as Utqiagvik since time immemorial by its indigenous inhabitants and adopted as the official name by the city in 2016. Of all groups the birding community should be the most used to adjusting to name changes due to the often shifting taxonomic discoveries and debates. These changes can be slight and even seem inane to us but we learn and adapt to them. Let’s try to take decolonization and indigenous land acknowledgements with at least the same sincerity.
> _______________________________________________
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> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

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Date: 10/19/19 7:25 pm
From: Faye McAdams Hands <zest4parus...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Recommendations for Guide In Barrow
Good to know Naomi!
Not living in Alaska, or traveling up there in the past few years, I did not know about this name change.

Can you please offer a phonetic pronunciation of Utqiagvik?
That would be very helpful.

Thank you and Happy Birding,
Faye


Faye McAdams Hands

Life is Simple -- Eat, Sleep, Bird.

________________________________
From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> on behalf of Naomi Himley <naomihimley...>
Sent: Saturday, October 19, 2019 1:47 PM
To: <tweeters...> <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Recommendations for Guide In Barrow

Barrow has been known as Utqiagvik since time immemorial by its indigenous inhabitants and adopted as the official name by the city in 2016. Of all groups the birding community should be the most used to adjusting to name changes due to the often shifting taxonomic discoveries and debates. These changes can be slight and even seem inane to us but we learn and adapt to them. Lets try to take decolonization and indigenous land acknowledgements with at least the same sincerity.
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Date: 10/19/19 6:06 pm
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Black-tailed Gull
Has anyone looked for the Port Townsend Black-tailed Gull?

Larry Schwitters
Issaquah
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Date: 10/19/19 5:48 pm
From: Jack Nolan <jacknolan62...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Odd Triumvirate
Today in Westcott Bay on San Juan Island I saw a Canada Goose , a snow Goose and some other Goose I couldn’t identify. It may have been a stray domestic. At first I thought it was an Emperor but the colors weren’t very defined and I didn’t get a good enough look. Maybe an immature Snow?Odd group though.

Sent from my iPhone. Pardon my brevity and typos.
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Date: 10/19/19 4:25 pm
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Seven Worlds, One Planet: Have a look at the stunning images from Sir David Attenborough's new documentary series - CBBC Newsround
Looking forward to this series.
Dan Reiff

https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/50097863


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Date: 10/19/19 2:06 pm
From: Sam Sudar <sudar.sam...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Recommendations for Guide In Barrow
As Utqiagvik increases in common usage I will adapt. In the meantime I will
accept previous common usage without assuming anyone is intentionally
dismissing or belittling anyone else's efforts.

I can't suggest any guides in Barrow/Utqiagvik, but good luck!

On Sat, Oct 19, 2019, 1:48 PM Naomi Himley <naomihimley...> wrote:

> Barrow has been known as Utqiagvik since time immemorial by its indigenous
> inhabitants and adopted as the official name by the city in 2016. Of all
> groups the birding community should be the most used to adjusting to name
> changes due to the often shifting taxonomic discoveries and debates. These
> changes can be slight and even seem inane to us but we learn and adapt to
> them. Let’s try to take decolonization and indigenous land acknowledgements
> with at least the same sincerity.
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>

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Date: 10/19/19 1:51 pm
From: Naomi Himley <naomihimley...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Recommendations for Guide In Barrow
Barrow has been known as Utqiagvik since time immemorial by its indigenous inhabitants and adopted as the official name by the city in 2016. Of all groups the birding community should be the most used to adjusting to name changes due to the often shifting taxonomic discoveries and debates. These changes can be slight and even seem inane to us but we learn and adapt to them. Let’s try to take decolonization and indigenous land acknowledgements with at least the same sincerity.
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Date: 10/19/19 12:30 pm
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fir Island, Skagit County birding 10.18.19
At Hayton Reserve yesterday, a wounded SNOW GOOSE was trying in vain to take flight from the small pond. As it struggled, a River Otter swam up to the goose and attacked it. The goose put up a good fight until the otter managed to grab the bird by its neck. The struggle took a little over a minute and a half & I captured it in a distant video. I had to split it into 2 smaller videos in order to load onto Flickr. Here are links to the 2 videos:
h [ https://www.flickr.com/photos/138163614@N02/48925035616/in/datetaken-family/ | ttps://www.flickr.com/photos/138163614@N02/48925035616/in/datetaken-family/ ]
[ https://www.flickr.com/photos/138163614@N02/48925335522/in/datetaken-family/ | https://www.flickr.com/photos/138163614@N02/48925335522/in/datetaken-family/ ]

Earlier in the day at the exact same location there were about a dozen GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE. One of them was noticeably larger then the others and may have been a Tule Goose, a larger subspecie of white-front.

Also at Hayton yesterday was a NORTHERN SHRIKE & 3 PEREGRINE FALCONS, all 3 seen at the same time. There are now thousands of SNOW GEESE, among which there were 2 adult and 1 juv Blue Geese.

At the Game Range (Wylie Slough) was a flock of mostly juv CEDAR WAXWINGS, as well as a few BARN SWALLOWS & AMERICAN PIPITS. A MERLIN of the taiga subspecies flew in and landed close by for a fine look.

Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>


"Don't believe everything you read on the internet."
- Thomas Jefferson



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Date: 10/19/19 12:05 pm
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...>
Subject: [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Oct. 20, 2019
Hello, Tweeters,

Last week on BirdNote:
* Full Moon! The Moon of Falling Leaves
http://bit.ly/2wpV5gY
* Spark Bird: A Lifetime in Science, with Gordon Orians
http://bit.ly/2qpBDCJ
* Who Likes Suet?
http://bit.ly/2xUHX35
* Shorebirds Aren't Always on the Shore
http://bit.ly/2l6bK7M
* Meet the Blue Jay
http://bit.ly/2AfrdrV
* Big She, Little He (in Raptors)
http://bit.ly/2Bt5o7O
* Clark's Nutcracker - Nature's Arborist
http://bit.ly/2e0Npun
=========================
Next week on BirdNote: A Family of Falconers,
Pinyon Jays, Parrots, Purple Martins, and more!
http://bit.ly/32tumAb
-------------------------
Did you have a favorite story this week? A comment?
Please let us know. mailto:<info...>
------------------------------------------------
BirdNote is now in print. Check out BirdNote, the book:
https://www.birdnote.org/birdnote-book
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
or Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/birdnoteradio/
Listen on Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find 1500+ episodes and more than 1200 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
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Date: 10/18/19 6:13 pm
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: [Tweeters] RBA on the Yellow Browed Warbler in Victoria

RBA: Probable YELLOW-BROWED WARBLER in Victoria - Oct 18th
At 4:15 pm on Oct 18-2019, Jeff Gaskin and Geoffrey Newell found and photographed an apparent Yellow-browed Warbler at Panama Flats.

The bird was along the SE dyke at Panama Flats south of the metal building off Carey Rd.
bcbirdalert.blogpsot.com

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Date: 10/18/19 5:48 pm
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Yellow Browed Warbler in Victoria
Just got word from Vancouver friend Melissa Hafting that there is a Yellow Browed Warbler in Victoria, B.C.
Info will be on B.C. RBA soon.

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
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Date: 10/18/19 4:26 pm
From: John Puschock <g_g_allin...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Lots of California Gulls moving
Hi all,

I did a couple short seawatches at Kayu Kayu Ac Park, Richmond Beach, King County yesterday and today. There were a lot of California Gulls moving both days, along with a few Iceland (Thayer's) and Herring gulls. There were more Heermann's Gulls today than yesterday.

I'm bringing this up because of the possible Black-tailed Gull in Pt. Townsend. This is the time of year the Black-tailed Gull in Tacoma was present for a couple of years, and it was in the flock of California Gulls. I was looking through the gulls passing Richmond Beach as best I could, hoping to pick one out. It's definitely the time to be looking for one.

John Puschock
Seattle

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Date: 10/18/19 3:26 pm
From: <merdave...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Atkins Lake, Douglas Co.

Hi, fall birders: Last Tues. 400 Snow Geese were reported at Atkins Lake.
Today there were probably between 250 and 300. One "blue phase" was
seen, and one all black bird.... Tried hard to make it a Brant, but don't
think so. Meredith Spencer, Bridgeport

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Date: 10/18/19 3:10 pm
From: William Brooks <willbrooks.0...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Possible Black-tailed Gull - Port Townsend
Hey all,

Just saw this posted on the NA Gulls Facebook page:

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/34537913

Any way someone can check this out? It looks good for a black-tailed gull.

Good Birding,
Will Brooks
Tacoma, WA
Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 10/18/19 12:30 pm
From: Elizabeth McManus <eliz.mcmanus...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Recommendations for Guide In Barrow,
Hello - I would like to travel to Barrow, AK this spring for Eiders. I'll
be traveling with a 12 yr old avid birder. (Barrow is his priority
destination.) I would appreciate any recommendations for guides/trips. The
options are a little overwhelming. Thank you very much.

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Date: 10/18/19 8:46 am
From: Megan Ward <meganward28...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Dead hawk
Hi all, my friend (the same friend in the Echo lake area of Snohomish who
had the Great Gray Owl in her backyard) found a dead hawk in her backyard
with no obvious signs of trauma. She is asking me what she should do with
it?

Also- thanks for all the responses for my daughter Emily about backyard
landscape improvements and water features for birds. Things have gotten
busy around here so I apologize if I dropped the ball on responding. She
has had a stack of helpful reading material to go through, and is still
working on coming up with her master plan. ;)

Thanks,
Megan Ward

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Date: 10/17/19 6:50 pm
From: Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course monthly bird walk - 10 -17-2019
Tweeters,

Initially it was cool (49degF) and rainy, but the precip quit soon after we started and held off until just before we stopped, although it remained cool (52degF) and slightly breezy at the JBLM Eagles Pride Golf Course. Not much bird activity that the 13 of us saw for the first hour or so, but it definitely picked up toward the end, especially around Hodge Lake, where we had the first-of-season (FOS) AMERICAN WIGEON, along with the other usual waterbirds. Three standout species for today: a well-studied immature COOPER'S HAWK near the Dupont housing development; 20 BAND-TAILED PIGEONS (the latest occurrence of and most of this species we've documented) in a couple of trees alongside the 13th fairway; and also at Hodge Lake, a very cooperative HERMIT THRUSH (bird-of-the-day!) that not only posed in front of us, but also called several times. The six VARIED THRUSHES feeding near the 16th green were FOS and a visual bonus.



The JBLM Eagles Pride GC birders meet the third Thursday of each month at 8:00AM. Starting point is Bldg # 1514, Driving Range Tee, Eagles Pride Golf Course, I-5 Exit 116, Mounts Road Exit. Upcoming walks include the following:

* November 21

* December 19

* January 16 (2020!)

Anyone is welcome to join us!



From the eBird PNW report:



34 species (+1 other taxa)



Cackling Goose 25

Canada Goose 15

American Wigeon 4 Hodge Lake

Mallard 22 Hodge Lake

Ring-necked Duck 9 Hodge Lake

Hooded Merganser 1 Hodge Lake

Pied-billed Grebe 2 Hodge Lake

Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 20

Band-tailed Pigeon 20 In two trees alongside fairway of 13th hole.

Anna's Hummingbird 2

Cooper's Hawk 1 In a tree near Dupont housing development -- from large size, likely a female, but unable to validate this supposition.

Red-tailed Hawk 1

Downy Woodpecker 1

Northern Flicker 9

Steller's Jay 15

American/Northwestern Crow 35

Common Raven 2

Black-capped Chickadee 6

Chestnut-backed Chickadee 31

Bushtit 22

Golden-crowned Kinglet 14

Ruby-crowned Kinglet 8

Red-breasted Nuthatch 4

Pacific Wren 2

European Starling 3

Varied Thrush 6 In one group feeding near the 16th green

Hermit Thrush 1 Hodge Lake

American Robin 7

Pine Siskin 2

Fox Sparrow 1

Dark-eyed Junco 26

Golden-crowned Sparrow 7

Song Sparrow 4

Spotted Towhee 2

Red-winged Blackbird 6


View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S60706363

May all your birds be identified,

Denis DeSilvis
avnacrs 4 birds at outlook dot com


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Date: 10/17/19 5:41 pm
From: David Hutchinson <florafaunabooks...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Historic Birds in Discovery Park
To my infinite joy Clark's Grebe and Clark's Nutcracker appeared in the space of three days in Discovery Park, to add to my old sighting of Lewis's Woodpecker. I know it is simply a nod to US History and the Corps of Discovery, but I am pumped!
Boastful Birder, Dave Hutchinson

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Date: 10/17/19 5:23 pm
From: <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2019-10-17
Tweets – the weather report was pretty dismal, but we had very little precipitation this morning, and only a little wind. It was rather dark, but it was warm. Also, I’m afraid, somewhat lacking in birds. We’re still waiting for many of the winter waterfowl to return, but we’ve lost almost all of the summer birds. Still, not a bad day.

Highlights:
a.. Ring-billed Gull – several, for the first time this fall, along with California’s and GWGUs
b.. Sharp-shinned Hawk – probably two
c.. Cooper’s Hawk – at least three
d.. Barn Owl – Matt had one in the East Meadow until around 7 a.m.
e.. Hairy Woodpecker – one, heard only; first in 5 weeks
f.. Merlin – three sightings. At one point it chased a Sharpie that was going for House FInches
g.. Northern Shrike – Juvenile in NE corner of East Meadow
h.. Savannah Sparrow – still one, north of Fields 7-8-9
i.. Lincoln’s Sparrow – one in Pea Patch
j.. WHITE-THROATED SPARROW – one SW of Pea Patch, later in SW corner of Pea Patch, with White-crowned Sparrows. Probably the same bird as last week
k.. WESTERN MEADOWLARK – FIrst of Fall for us; one or maybe two north of Fields 7-8-9
l.. Yellow-rumped Warbler – two; our only warblers
We had many accipiter sightings, plus the Merlin sightings, and the Northern Shrike, so perhaps low numbers of small passerines should not have surprised us – a good day to make yourself scarce at the park if small and tasty.

Misses included Western Grebe, Rock Pigeon, American Coot, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Pacific Wren, and Purple Finch.

For the day, 55 species.

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== <BirdMarymoor...>
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Date: 10/17/19 2:24 pm
From: Douglas Irle Will <diwill...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Barred Owls
In Lake Forest Park on McAleer Creek we're hearing Barred Owls regularly
(several times a week when not nightly). Looks like we might have a
breeding pair for each square mile. Plus juveniles trying to squeeze in or
disperse. I think that's about what Jamie Acker sees on Bainbridge. ??

Doug Will
UW and LFP

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Date: 10/17/19 2:01 pm
From: Steve Loitz <steveloitz...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Possible Rough-legged Hawk in Bothell?
Could be, although it'd be earlier than I've ever seen a RLHA west of the
Cascades. IME, it's possible for experienced eyes to mistake a dark juvie
RTHA for a RLHA.

FWIW, I positively ID'd a dark RLHA on Saturday 10/12 closely south of the
Columbia River, NE of Grand Coulee, flying over a high shrub steppe basin,
a long way from you. I have not yet seen a RLHA this fall near our home in
Ellensburg.
--
Steve Loitz
Ellensburg, WA
<steveloitz...>

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Date: 10/17/19 1:13 pm
From: Jeremy Schwartz <jschwartz1124...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Possible Rough-legged Hawk in Bothell?
Hello Tweeters!

I have a possible ID I'd love run by you all. Walking the North Creek trail
in an office park not far from 405 in Bothell today, Oct. 17, I looked to
the windy, overcast skies to the east see a soaring, Red-tailed-Hawk-shaped
hawk. I suspect it might have been a Rough-legged Hawk. Here's my story.

I got my bins on it a soon as I could because something about it didn't
seem quite right for a red-tail. For one, no red tail, but a darkish tail
with white at the base (but not, to my eyes, as extensively white as many
photos I've looked up for Rough-legged Hawk) . It overall looked smaller
then the typical red-tails I see in this area, with slightly thinner wings.
The belly band appeared to be there, but I didn't get close enough looks at
the underwings. I tried to swing my camera up in enough time to get some
shots, but it dipped below the nearby office buildings and into a nearby
forested area, going beyond my sight after about 5 minutes.

eBird reports make this a possibility this season, with Ryan Merrill
reporting one in Carkeek Park Sept. 30 and Blair Bernson reporting one Oct.
16 in Edmonds. Ryan's Sept. 30 sighting notes match pretty well with what I
was seeing.

What does anyone here think?

Keep watching the (windy) skies,

Jeremy Schwartz
Lake Forest Park
jschwartz1124 AT gmail DOT com

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Date: 10/17/19 12:37 pm
From: Stan Bezimienny <grzebiuszkaziemna...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Tweeters] Fir Island, October 14, 2019
I have seen the ibis fly by on Sunday 10/13, and shot a few frames. Poor light, overcast skies, fairly far before I managed to focus, only good enough to ID.

Many thanks to fellow birders for calling them out.

Stan


Subject: [Tweeters] Fir Island, October 14, 2019
Message-ID: <001001d5847b$13890b90$3a9b22b0$@comcast.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hello Tweeters,

Over the weekend there were a number of tantalizing reports
of interesting birds on Fir Island, just west of Conway, WA. People saw and
got photos and videos of 6 White-faced Ibis and a Sharp-tailed Sandpiper.
There were flyovers of American White Pelicans, Franklin's Gull, and I
forget what all else. Moreover, just a few miles south there was a Sandhill
Crane not far from Stanwood. We couldn't resist going up to see which of
these cool birds we could find. To make a long story short, the answer is
"none."

However in our attempts to find these birds at Hayton
Reserve, Wylie Slough, and the North Fork Access, we had a great day out
birding and got a few interesting pictures. I have put our best shots in an
album called "Fir Island." The first 18 are from this last trip. The last
15 or so are from last year and I already shared them here on Tweeters.

When we arrived at Hayton Reserve at about 8:20 am it was
barely light enough to see because there were low clouds almost up to the
foothills. But sun was glinting under the clouds, illuminating hundreds of
Snow Geese and other waterfowl and shorebirds in front of us. I know these
birds are commonplace, but we had fun trying to get an interesting shot
anyway. Over at Wylie Slough, we failed to find the Sharp-tailed Sandpiper,
but did get some interesting shots of a Pectoral Sandpiper on a log with
Long-billed Dowitchers. More and more dowitchers kept showing up and, as
the log got crowded, the dowitchers started pecking on the PESA's head!
Finally the Pectoral Sandpiper disappeared. There are a few shots of these
birds. Finally out at the North Fork Access, which we had entirely to
ourselves, we found a Northern Shrike, a fairly reliable bird here. All
these and more are in the Flickr link below. I think I saw more dowitchers
at Hayton Reserve than I have ever seen at one time before. Hard to
estimate numbers.



https://www.flickr.com/photos/29258421@N07/albums/72157701301766265



Perhaps I should add that hunting season has started. When
we first arrived at Hayton Reserve, I thought we might have accidentally
stepped into a war zone. Shotgun blasts were reverberating around us. But
we weren't the target and by noon, most of the hunters had called it a day.
And another addendum, to see Hayton Reserve at its best, try to arrive a
couple hours before to a couple hours after high tide. At low tide it's a
vast desert.

All the best, Charlotte Byers, Edmonds

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Date: 10/17/19 12:13 pm
From: Jeffrey Bryant <jbryant_68...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Alki Rock Wren
Continues in driftwood and rocks on south side of lighthouse point. Watching it now 12:10


Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 10/17/19 9:21 am
From: J. Acker <owler...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Owls
Hey Tim & Tweeters,

'Tis the season. Dispersion and migration are underway. Resident owls are
announcing claimed territory, while the young of the year are moving about
to find their own turf, or at least exist stealthily on someone else's.
Barred Owls are particularly vocal at this time of year. Great Horned Owls
will be starting courtship next month, and established pairs may already be
gearing up. As for Northern Saw-whet Owls, this year seems to be a very big
year for them in the Puget Sound area. I have banded nearly 50 of them to
date, well more than I did all of last year, and their migration season
isn't half started. Another indicator of their success this past season is
that 85% of the birds I have handled have been hatch year birds, as opposed
to the 23% that 2018 experienced.

-Jamie



J. Acker

<owler...> <mailto:<owler...>

Bainbridge Island, WA



From: Tweeters [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On
Behalf Of Tim Brennan
Sent: Thursday, October 17, 2019 5:33 AM
To: Tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Owls



Hey Tweets,



About a week back, my son and I drove past a Barred Owl on a telephone wire
near dusk. This morning I'm being serenaded by a Great Horned Owl. Anyone
else been getting more activity from owls lately? Always fun in seasons when
they're out and about and calling.



Cheers,



Tim Brennan

Renton


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Date: 10/17/19 5:37 am
From: Tim Brennan <tsbrennan...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Owls
Hey Tweets,

About a week back, my son and I drove past a Barred Owl on a telephone wire near dusk. This morning I'm being serenaded by a Great Horned Owl. Anyone else been getting more activity from owls lately? Always fun in seasons when they're out and about and calling.

Cheers,

Tim Brennan
Renton

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Date: 10/16/19 9:19 pm
From: Larry S. Goodhew <lsg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] LeConte's Sparrow
Several of us watched the area were it was seen yesterday, for over 3
hours. About to go home I  walked around a brush area behind us and
there was the LeConte's Sparrow. It was not very still and none of got a
picture. the bird then flew across the open area to the south and went
into the weeds in that long row of tangles . It poped up once then went
down and was not seen again buy our group.

Larry and Jacque Goodhew  Walla Walla

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Date: 10/16/19 4:42 pm
From: <byers345...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fir Island, October 14, 2019
Hello Tweeters,

Over the weekend there were a number of tantalizing reports
of interesting birds on Fir Island, just west of Conway, WA. People saw and
got photos and videos of 6 White-faced Ibis and a Sharp-tailed Sandpiper.
There were flyovers of American White Pelicans, Franklin's Gull, and I
forget what all else. Moreover, just a few miles south there was a Sandhill
Crane not far from Stanwood. We couldn't resist going up to see which of
these cool birds we could find. To make a long story short, the answer is
"none."

However in our attempts to find these birds at Hayton
Reserve, Wylie Slough, and the North Fork Access, we had a great day out
birding and got a few interesting pictures. I have put our best shots in an
album called "Fir Island." The first 18 are from this last trip. The last
15 or so are from last year and I already shared them here on Tweeters.

When we arrived at Hayton Reserve at about 8:20 am it was
barely light enough to see because there were low clouds almost up to the
foothills. But sun was glinting under the clouds, illuminating hundreds of
Snow Geese and other waterfowl and shorebirds in front of us. I know these
birds are commonplace, but we had fun trying to get an interesting shot
anyway. Over at Wylie Slough, we failed to find the Sharp-tailed Sandpiper,
but did get some interesting shots of a Pectoral Sandpiper on a log with
Long-billed Dowitchers. More and more dowitchers kept showing up and, as
the log got crowded, the dowitchers started pecking on the PESA's head!
Finally the Pectoral Sandpiper disappeared. There are a few shots of these
birds. Finally out at the North Fork Access, which we had entirely to
ourselves, we found a Northern Shrike, a fairly reliable bird here. All
these and more are in the Flickr link below. I think I saw more dowitchers
at Hayton Reserve than I have ever seen at one time before. Hard to
estimate numbers.



https://www.flickr.com/photos/29258421@N07/albums/72157701301766265



Perhaps I should add that hunting season has started. When
we first arrived at Hayton Reserve, I thought we might have accidentally
stepped into a war zone. Shotgun blasts were reverberating around us. But
we weren't the target and by noon, most of the hunters had called it a day.
And another addendum, to see Hayton Reserve at its best, try to arrive a
couple hours before to a couple hours after high tide. At low tide it's a
vast desert.

All the best, Charlotte Byers, Edmonds


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Date: 10/16/19 8:33 am
From: pan <panmail...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Seattle Mountain Chickadee
Tweets,

Yesterday morning, a couple of other birders and I saw the Mountain Chickadee on the south side of Alki Point (West Seattle), in the pines behind the brick water treatment facility, near where it had been reported the previous day. The cool south wind probably influenced its location away from the road. It was not with other chickadees this time. If it's like the same that have occupied that patch in previous years, it may linger. I did not hear of any success finding the other goodies recently reported nearby (Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch, Rock Wren, Long-tailed Duck, Black Scoter, ...). My apologies, I thought I'd sent this note yesterday.

Before I could look for birds, I'd seen big splashes as I was arriving, and thought, "whales!" Sure enough, I got to watch a couple dozen orcas in four small groups, spread from the next county to nearby, some of the close ones flipper slapping and partially breaching. When they rounded the point to the north, the handful of accumulated photographers followed, and I stayed to start birding.

Of 15 October, 2019,

Alan Grenon
Seattle
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