tweeters
Received From Subject
7/13/20 10:02 pm Brad Waggoner <wagtail24...> [Tweeters] Alcids in Washington
7/13/20 9:46 pm Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...> Re: [Tweeters] Bald Eagle eating live Dungeness Crab
7/13/20 7:54 pm <mcallisters4...> Re: [Tweeters] Bank Swallow Colonies
7/13/20 6:58 pm <EdSwan2...> [Tweeters] Bald Eagle eating live Dungeness Crab
7/13/20 5:22 pm Garrett Haynes <garrettwhaynes...> Re: [Tweeters] M Street Marsh Shorebirds
7/13/20 4:27 pm Roger Moyer <rogermoyer1...> [Tweeters] Bank Swallow Colonies
7/13/20 3:57 pm Garrett Haynes <garrettwhaynes...> [Tweeters] M Street Marsh Shorebirds
7/13/20 3:04 pm Mike Wagenbach <wagen...> Re: [Tweeters] Alcids in Washington
7/13/20 2:35 pm Hubbell <ldhubbell...> [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Social Distancing
7/13/20 1:59 pm Diann MacRae <tvulture...> [Tweeters] truncated posts
7/13/20 1:22 pm Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...> Re: [Tweeters] Found caterpillar in my garden help w id
7/13/20 12:58 pm Christina <joannabird413...> [Tweeters] Found caterpillar in my garden help w id
7/13/20 12:46 pm Dayna yalowicki <dlwicki...> Re: [Tweeters] digest mide truncates info
7/13/20 12:23 pm B B <birder4184...> Re: [Tweeters] Alcids in Washington
7/13/20 12:07 pm B Boekelheide <bboek...> Re: [Tweeters] Alcids in Washington
7/13/20 8:42 am Eric Ellingson <abriteway...> Re: [Tweeters] Alcids in Washington;
7/12/20 3:44 pm Martha Jordan <mj.cygnus...> [Tweeters] digest mode truncates info
7/12/20 3:03 pm Mike Wagenbach <wagen...> Re: [Tweeters] Alcids in Washington
7/12/20 12:44 pm Janet Ray <janetlaura...> Re: [Tweeters] Amplifying the voice of a Black female birder
7/12/20 10:19 am ED DEAL <falcophile...> [Tweeters] Seattle Cooper's Hawks
7/12/20 7:35 am Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> Re: [Tweeters] Alcids in Washington; pelican
7/11/20 8:46 pm Mike Wagenbach <wagen...> [Tweeters] Alcids in Washington; pelican
7/11/20 6:46 pm <jmyb...> [Tweeters] Yellow-breasted Chat near Steilacoom
7/11/20 6:00 pm David Parent <dpdvm...> [Tweeters] Juvenile Brown Pelican Port Townsend and Island County
7/11/20 3:58 pm Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] dogs that dislike certain birds
7/11/20 3:24 pm Izzy & Kendrick <gobirder...> [Tweeters] Amplifying the voice of a Black female birder
7/11/20 1:51 pm Diann MacRae <tvulture...> [Tweeters] my owl-chasing dog . . .
7/11/20 12:07 pm Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...> [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of July 12, 2020
7/11/20 10:35 am Diann MacRae <tvulture...> [Tweeters] oops!
7/11/20 10:28 am Diann MacRae <tvulture...> [Tweeters] June 2020 TUVU report
7/10/20 5:45 pm Marcia Ian <gnudle...> [Tweeters] Parakeet at my feeders
7/10/20 4:07 pm J Crouch <dipper2c...> Re: [Tweeters] Strange warbler family in Seattle
7/10/20 1:15 pm Peter H Wimberger <pwimberger...> [Tweeters] Pelican - Inner Quartermaster Harbor
7/10/20 10:19 am Dave Slager <dave.slager...> Re: [Tweeters] Strange warbler family in Seattle
7/10/20 9:52 am <plkoyama...> [Tweeters] Ferry County Peregrine Falcon and Swainson's Hawk
7/9/20 6:54 pm <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2020-07-09
7/9/20 4:54 pm <jstewart...> Re: [Tweeters] fledglings returning to nest
7/9/20 3:47 pm Mary Saylor <birder...> Re: [Tweeters] fledglings returning to nest
7/9/20 12:47 pm HAL MICHAEL <ucd880...> Re: [Tweeters] fledglings returning to nest
7/9/20 12:38 pm Lynn Wohlers <wohlers13...> Re: [Tweeters] Parakeet at my feeders
7/9/20 11:31 am James Karr <jrkarr...> Re: [Tweeters] fledglings returning to nest
7/9/20 11:07 am Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...> Re: [Tweeters] Parakeet at my feeders
7/9/20 10:51 am Diane Weinstein <diane_weinstein...> Re: [Tweeters] Parakeet at my feeders
7/9/20 10:06 am Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] fledglings returning to nest
7/9/20 7:54 am Joan Miller <jemskink...> [Tweeters] Brief visit by Cooper's Hawk
7/9/20 2:58 am Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...> Re: [Tweeters] Strange warbler family in Seattle
7/8/20 3:42 pm B Boekelheide <bboek...> Re: [Tweeters] Strange warbler family in Seattle
7/8/20 2:10 pm <dgrainger...> [Tweeters] Red Crossbills at our bird-mound feeders
7/8/20 2:00 pm Christina <joannabird413...> [Tweeters] Parakeet at my feeders
7/8/20 12:26 pm Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...> [Tweeters] Bird artist at Cornell
7/7/20 10:10 pm <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Sawmill Creek Burn, Veazie Marsh - SE King County at its best
7/7/20 9:31 pm Sammy Catiis <hikersammy...> Re: [Tweeters] Strange warbler family in Seattle
7/7/20 6:47 pm Diann MacRae <tvulture...> [Tweeters] June 2020 TUVU report
7/7/20 2:14 pm Matt Bartels <mattxyz...> Re: [Tweeters] Strange warbler family in Seattle
7/7/20 1:58 pm Jennifer Jarstad <jennjarstad...> Re: [Tweeters] Two dead Chickadees
7/7/20 10:38 am Dave Slager <dave.slager...> [Tweeters] Strange warbler family in Seattle
7/7/20 10:03 am Bruce LaBar <blabar...> [Tweeters] Westport Pelagic Trip
7/7/20 9:47 am Robert Gray <robertgary02...> [Tweeters] Murmuration
7/6/20 9:57 pm Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] Skagit Long-billed Curlew
7/6/20 8:06 pm <dgrainger...> Re: [Tweeters] Two dead Chickadees
7/6/20 3:51 pm Lynn Wohlers <wohlers13...> [Tweeters] Two dead Chickadees
7/6/20 3:10 pm Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] USA TODAY: White woman who called police on Black bird watcher charged with filing false report
7/6/20 2:35 pm Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] The Atlantic: Lockdowns Could Be the ‘Biggest Conservation Action’ in a Century
7/6/20 1:34 pm Elston Hill <elstonh...> [Tweeters] Canon Service
7/6/20 10:38 am Clare McLean <clareishere...> [Tweeters] KUOW Birding While Black
7/5/20 9:57 pm <strix.nebulosa1987...> Re: [Tweeters] Goodbye Northwestern Crow
7/5/20 7:42 pm Nadine Drisseq <drisseq.n...> Re: [Tweeters] Canon repair experience?
7/5/20 4:34 pm <byers345...> [Tweeters] Birds east of the Columbia River
7/5/20 3:22 pm <dgrainger...> Re: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Freedom and Flames
7/5/20 1:45 pm Hubbell <ldhubbell...> [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Freedom and Flames
7/5/20 12:38 pm Tim Brennan <tsbrennan...> [Tweeters] Hermit, Townsend's, and Black-throated Gray for that matter
7/5/20 11:06 am Martha Jordan <mj.cygnus...> [Tweeters] Bird tracks in the sky
7/5/20 9:22 am B B <birder4184...> [Tweeters] A Puffin Cruise to Smith Island and Lost Opportunities in Arizona
7/4/20 10:15 pm D R <somegum2...> [Tweeters] Cordilleran Flycatcher Question
7/4/20 8:30 pm Dave Templeton <crazydave65...> [Tweeters] Sno Falls Peregrines
7/4/20 3:12 pm Alan Knue <temnurus...> [Tweeters] Hermit X Townsend's Warbler Hybrids in WA
7/4/20 3:07 pm Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] Image of the Day: Flock in the Night | The Scientist Magazine®
7/4/20 3:00 pm Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] WIRED: A Bird’s Epic Migration Stuns Scientists and Wins Online Fans
7/4/20 2:58 pm Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] National Geographic: Horseshoe crab blood is key to making a COVID-19 vaccine—but the ecosystem may suffer.
7/4/20 1:48 pm AnthonyG. <birds...> Re: [Tweeters] Canon repair experience?
7/4/20 1:02 pm Marty <namaste...> Re: [Tweeters] Canon repair experience?
7/4/20 12:54 pm Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] Make that TWO Chats!
7/4/20 12:26 pm Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] Skagit Chat
7/4/20 12:06 pm Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...> [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of July 5, 2020
7/4/20 10:54 am Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] Oops, I mean millimeters!
7/4/20 10:32 am Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] egg question
7/4/20 10:18 am <dgrainger...> Re: [Tweeters] Canon repair experience?
7/4/20 9:46 am Wayne Weber <contopus...> Re: [Tweeters] Canon repair experience?
7/4/20 9:26 am Jill Freidberg <jill.freidberg...> [Tweeters] Corvid question
7/4/20 8:37 am Doug Santoni <dougsantoni...> Re: [Tweeters] Link to a 4-minute video of some Seattle birds seen July 1 & 3
7/4/20 8:02 am Dave Slager <dave.slager...> [Tweeters] probable dark murrelet sp. on Lake Washington, King Co.
7/3/20 8:57 pm Al Wagar <jalanwagar...> [Tweeters] Link to a 4-minute video of some Seattle birds seen July 1 & 3
7/3/20 6:50 pm Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...> [Tweeters] Four Northern Bobwhite at Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM)
7/3/20 1:23 pm Douglas Irle Will <diwill...> [Tweeters] Feather Atlas link
7/3/20 12:25 pm Mike Wagenbach <wagen...> [Tweeters] Canon repair experience?
7/2/20 8:47 pm Roger Moyer <rogermoyer1...> [Tweeters] Binocular cleaning
7/2/20 6:46 pm cynthia burrell <cinnyb...> [Tweeters] This Monday July 6th, WOS meeting with Kaeli Swift
7/2/20 4:14 pm Steve Loitz <steveloitz...> Re: [Tweeters] Binoc repair service - Zeiss [a good report!!]
7/2/20 3:54 pm <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2020-07-02
7/2/20 3:26 pm Dalton Spencer <offthehookflyshop...> [Tweeters] Great-tailed Grackle at Para Ponds
7/2/20 2:54 pm Matt Bartels <mattxyz...> [Tweeters] Binoc repair service - Zeiss [a good report!!]
7/2/20 2:34 pm Devon Comstock <devonc78...> Re: [Tweeters] Feather id
7/2/20 2:31 pm Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...> Re: [Tweeters] Feather id
7/2/20 2:30 pm Christina <joannabird413...> [Tweeters] Feather id
7/2/20 11:58 am Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] National Geographic: Sparrows are singing a new song, in a rapid, unprecedented shift
7/2/20 10:21 am Al n Donna <alndonna...> [Tweeters] Parking to view shorebirds at Dune Peninsula at Pt Defiance Park
7/2/20 10:07 am J Christian Kessler <1northraven...> Re: [Tweeters] eBird's new "My eBird" page
7/2/20 9:15 am Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...> [Tweeters] Monroe Swifts II
7/2/20 8:19 am Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] eBird's new "My eBird" page
7/2/20 1:09 am Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...> [Tweeters] Drone Light Shows “Way Cooler” (and more bird-friendly) Than Fireworks
7/1/20 12:27 pm Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...> [Tweeters] Lots of swifts
6/30/20 8:38 pm J Christian Kessler <1northraven...> Re: [Tweeters] Goodbye Northwestern Crow
6/30/20 6:19 pm Robert O'Brien <baro...> Re: [Tweeters] Goodbye Northwestern Crow
6/30/20 5:39 pm Constance Sidles <constancesidles...> Re: [Tweeters] Goodbye Northwestern Crow
6/30/20 5:26 pm Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson...> Re: [Tweeters] Goodbye Northwestern Crow
6/30/20 5:10 pm Catherine Joy <catherinejoymusic...> Re: [Tweeters] Goodbye Northwestern Crow
6/30/20 4:33 pm Hans-Joachim Feddern <thefedderns...> Re: [Tweeters] Goodbye Northwestern Crow
6/30/20 2:17 pm dick <dick...> [Tweeters] Goodbye Northwestern Crow
6/30/20 12:47 pm Dee Dee <deedeeknit...> Re: [Tweeters] Help with Bird Identification
6/30/20 11:11 am Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...> [Tweeters] Bye bye Northwestern Crow
6/29/20 10:10 pm Marilyncooley <marilyncooley...> Re: [Tweeters] Help with bird identification ?
6/29/20 8:54 pm Sharon Howard <clmssh...> [Tweeters] Help with bird identification ?
6/29/20 7:43 pm Mary Saylor <birder...> Re: [Tweeters] Great Horned Owl-- but still maybe Barred (was unknown night bird)
6/29/20 5:51 pm Mary Saylor <birder...> [Tweeters] Great Horned Owl-- but still maybe Barred (was unknown night bird)
6/29/20 3:18 pm dick <dick...> Re: [Tweeters] off topic
6/29/20 2:39 pm Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...> Re: [Tweeters] websites for Ridgefield and Dungeness refuges
6/29/20 2:22 pm <dgrainger...> [Tweeters] Fwd: Re: redstart scroll bar anomaly
6/29/20 2:20 pm <dgrainger...> Re: [Tweeters] drone light show for 4th of july?
6/29/20 1:10 pm Greg Pluth <gjpluth...> [Tweeters] off topic
6/29/20 11:47 am Christina <joannabird413...> [Tweeters] Table mountain burn
6/29/20 10:54 am Josh Adams <xjoshx...> Re: [Tweeters] Whatcom Redstarts on eBird
6/29/20 10:52 am Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] redstart scroll bar anomaly
6/29/20 8:54 am Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] Whatcom Redstarts on eBird
6/29/20 7:49 am Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...> [Tweeters] drone light show for 4th of july?
6/28/20 11:54 pm Josh Adams <xjoshx...> Re: [Tweeters] Unknown night birds
6/28/20 11:15 pm <snyder.greg...> Re: [Tweeters] Unknown night birds
6/28/20 10:27 pm Mary Saylor <birder...> [Tweeters] Unknown night birds
6/28/20 4:02 pm Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...> Re: [Tweeters] Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge--Website
6/28/20 3:34 pm Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] Oops I mean 28th June
6/28/20 3:27 pm Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...> Re: [Tweeters] injurred Red Tail
6/28/20 3:23 pm Lyn Topinka <pointers...> [Tweeters] injurred Red Tail
6/28/20 1:22 pm Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] Another Skagit Ch sided Warbler
6/28/20 11:22 am Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...> [Tweeters] Wagner swifts
6/28/20 10:50 am Deborah West <olyclarinet...> [Tweeters] Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge--Website
6/28/20 9:51 am Al Wagar <jalanwagar...> [Tweeters] Short videos of recent birding in Seattle
6/27/20 5:30 pm Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...> [Tweeters] About those ants
6/27/20 5:22 pm Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...> [Tweeters] Old Business
6/27/20 12:40 pm Marcus Roening <marcus...> [Tweeters] Government Meadows snow status
6/27/20 12:21 pm Hubbell <ldhubbell...> [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Survival Skills
6/27/20 12:07 pm Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...> [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of June 28, 2020
6/26/20 12:23 pm Dave Templeton <crazydave65...> [Tweeters] Optics repair
6/26/20 9:11 am Jeffrey Bryant <jbryant_68...> [Tweeters] CORVID PHOTOS NEEDED
6/26/20 7:43 am Doug Santoni <dougsantoni...> Re: [Tweeters] Swarovski Scope Repair Experience
6/25/20 9:17 pm Tom Merritt <birders.2341...> Re: [Tweeters] Swarovski Scope Repair Experience
6/25/20 9:03 pm ED DEAL <falcophile...> [Tweeters] Swarovski Scope Repair Experience
6/25/20 7:42 pm <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2020-06-25
6/25/20 1:50 pm Shep Thorp <shepthorp...> [Tweeters] Six Marbled Murrelets off Browns Point, Tacoma Washington - Great Views!
6/25/20 12:27 pm Sharon Howard <clmssh...> [Tweeters] Bald eagle nest on North Magnolia, Seattle
6/25/20 11:11 am B B <birder4184...> [Tweeters] Burrowing Owl Blog Post - Dedicated to the "Owl Whisperer", aka Khanh Tran
6/25/20 8:28 am J Christian Kessler <1northraven...> Re: [Tweeters] Harlequin Duck siblings
6/25/20 7:38 am Susan McDougall <podicepswa...> [Tweeters] Harlequin Duck siblings
6/24/20 7:38 pm Darwin Alonso <dovalonso...> [Tweeters] Bullock's oriole at Marymoor
6/24/20 3:11 pm ck park <travelgirl.fics...> Re: [Tweeters] Owls
6/24/20 2:11 pm Rex Takasugi <RexTak...> [Tweeters] American White Pelicans at John Day Dam on the Columbia River
6/24/20 12:41 pm Eleanor Boba <eleanorboba...> Re: [Tweeters] Owls
6/24/20 6:22 am Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...> [Tweeters] Color Differences Between The Sexes Driven By Simple Molecular Mechanisms
6/23/20 8:56 pm <dgrainger...> [Tweeters] Crossbill
6/23/20 6:59 pm benjamin menzies <bentoddm...> Re: [Tweeters] Birding and "Black Lives Matter" (Paul Bannick)
6/23/20 4:34 pm Nadine Drisseq <drisseq.n...> [Tweeters] White Pelican on Lake Sammamish this morning
6/23/20 2:55 pm Lynne Kelly <BLynneKelly...> [Tweeters] Owls
6/23/20 12:58 pm Chris Rurik <chrisrurik...> [Tweeters] Black swift phenomenon
6/23/20 11:46 am B B <birder4184...> [Tweeters] Grant County Burrowing Owls
6/23/20 11:23 am <dgrainger...> Re: [Tweeters] bird movement now (?)
6/23/20 10:42 am Marcy D'Addio <marcydaddio89...> Re: [Tweeters] bird movement now (?)
6/23/20 10:13 am pan <panmail...> [Tweeters] bird movement now (?)
6/23/20 10:03 am Hank Heiberg <hank.heiberg...> [Tweeters] Neal Road (Fall City, WA) Redstart
6/23/20 7:16 am Gene Revelas <grevelas...> [Tweeters] Westport Seabirds Trip Report - June 20, 2020 - We're back!
6/22/20 8:22 pm Whitney Neufeld-Kaiser <whitney.n.k...> [Tweeters] Uplifting Birders of Color
6/22/20 5:22 pm Ed Newbold <ednewbold1...> [Tweeters] Let's catch up with Football, Baseball, Basketball and NASCAR
6/22/20 3:42 pm Tucker, Trileigh <TRI...> Re: [Tweeters] BNA (now Birds of the World) access through Sno-Isle
6/22/20 3:05 pm Paul Bannick <paul.bannick...> Re: [Tweeters] Birding and "Black Lives Matter"
6/22/20 12:30 pm pan <panmail...> [Tweeters] Seattle Northern Parula (more inf.)
6/22/20 11:26 am Tucker, Trileigh <TRI...> [Tweeters] BNA (now Birds of the World) access through Sno-Isle
6/22/20 11:04 am Izzy & Kendrick <gobirder...> [Tweeters] Uplifting Birders of Color
6/22/20 10:31 am Thomas M Leschine <tml...> [Tweeters] Birding and "Black Lives Matter"
6/22/20 8:58 am Spencer Hildie <shildie...> [Tweeters] Northern Parula at Seattle Arboretum
6/22/20 12:44 am Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] Study on shorebirds suggests that when conserving species, not all land is equal -- ScienceDaily
6/21/20 11:47 pm Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] NPR: 'One Of The Best Nature Shows': A River Transformed After Dams Come Down
6/21/20 3:09 pm Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] Scientific American: Slimy Mudflat Biofilms Feed Migratory Birds--and Could Be Threatened
6/21/20 1:42 pm Carolyn Eagan <carolyn.a.eagan...> [Tweeters] White Pelicans
6/21/20 1:22 pm <dgrainger...> Re: [Tweeters] House Finch or Purple finch
6/21/20 12:14 pm Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...> [Tweeters] Skagit area leucistic eagle update?
6/21/20 10:50 am Josh Adams <xjoshx...> Re: [Tweeters] Black-and-White Warbler in Winthrop - No
6/21/20 7:22 am Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] eBird, rarities, and other matters
6/20/20 8:58 pm D R <somegum2...> [Tweeters] Costa's Hummingbird at Carrie Blake Park ?
6/20/20 7:46 pm Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...> [Tweeters] Birding related research projects in Washington State
6/20/20 4:02 pm Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...> [Tweeters] The Birdbooker Report
6/20/20 3:04 pm <dgrainger...> [Tweeters] House Finch or Purple finch
6/20/20 2:23 pm Hubbell <ldhubbell...> [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Le Coup d'Etat
6/20/20 12:06 pm Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...> [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of June 21, 2020
6/20/20 10:02 am Tim Brennan <tsbrennan...> [Tweeters] Sawmill Creek - 7030 washout query
6/20/20 8:55 am Scott Downes <downess...> [Tweeters] Elk Eastern Phoebe
6/19/20 4:36 pm Scott Atkinson <scottratkinson...> [Tweeters] Least Flycatcher, Costa's Hummingbird: Clallam County firsts, both found mid-day at Carrie Blake Park
6/19/20 3:49 pm Garrett Haynes <garrettwhaynes...> [Tweeters] Sawmill Creek Burn Update 6-19-20
6/19/20 12:39 pm Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...> [Tweeters] Chat’s back
6/19/20 11:59 am Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...> [Tweeters] Yellow-breasted Chat at Roy
6/19/20 7:35 am Jim Forrester <jimf...> [Tweeters] OT: We need your help / Necesitamos tu ayuda - COLOMBIA
6/18/20 8:26 pm Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...> [Tweeters] Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course monthly bird walk - 06-18-2020
6/18/20 8:12 pm Mike Wagenbach <wagen...> [Tweeters] Buntings at Marymoor?
6/18/20 7:14 pm Stephen Chase <schasecredo...> Re: [Tweeters] mystery bird ID'd
6/18/20 5:11 pm <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2020-06-18
6/18/20 2:37 pm Stephen Chase <schasecredo...> Re: [Tweeters] mystery bird ID'd
6/18/20 2:10 pm susan carmelprop.com <susan...> [Tweeters] mystery bird ID'd
6/18/20 12:59 pm Susan Love <susan...> [Tweeters] Help w ID?
6/17/20 8:51 pm <itomas...> [Tweeters] Bird Fight in Fall City
6/17/20 8:29 pm Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant...> [Tweeters] Common Nighthawks on Mercer Island
6/17/20 6:50 pm Matt Dufort <matt.dufort...> [Tweeters] Sawmill Creek Burn in southeast King County
6/17/20 3:58 pm Eric Ellingson <abriteway...> [Tweeters] Hart's Pass - FYI still snow at campground and above
6/17/20 11:40 am Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...> [Tweeters] Australia’s Night Parrots Can’t See At Night
6/17/20 11:23 am Teri Martine <terimartine...> [Tweeters] Beyond rare ...
6/17/20 10:44 am Louise Rutter <louise.rutter...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Indigo Bunting
6/17/20 8:32 am D R <somegum2...> Re: [Tweeters] Montlake Fill Map
6/17/20 7:09 am mary hrudkaj <mch1096...> [Tweeters] Kittitas County Magpies, or lack thereof
6/16/20 7:56 pm Zora Monster <zoramon...> [Tweeters] Indigo Bunting
6/16/20 7:55 pm Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...> [Tweeters] Skagit Chestnut-sided Warbler
6/16/20 5:55 pm Debra Lewis <goofyone...> Re: [Tweeters] Kittitas County question
6/16/20 1:38 pm Philip Dickinson <pdickins...> Re: [Tweeters] Kittitas County question
6/16/20 1:21 pm David A. Armstrong <davearm...> [Tweeters] white pelicans at Deer Lagoon
6/16/20 1:15 pm B B <birder4184...> Re: [Tweeters] Kittitas County question
6/16/20 12:54 pm cynthia burrell <cinnyb...> [Tweeters] WOS monthly meeting, Mon. July 6
6/16/20 12:42 pm Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] Skagit Catbird
6/16/20 12:09 pm Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] Chestnut sided Warbler Skagit
6/16/20 12:08 pm mombiwheeler <mombiwheeler...> [Tweeters] Marymoor indigo bunting still present
6/16/20 10:50 am J Christian Kessler <1northraven...> [Tweeters] Kittitas County question
6/16/20 9:58 am Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...> [Tweeters] Wagner swifts
6/16/20 8:55 am Doug Santoni <dougsantoni...> [Tweeters] Black Swifts (Seattle)!
6/16/20 8:07 am Philip Dickinson <pdickins...> Re: [Tweeters] More black swift sightings, Skagit and Snohomish counties.
6/16/20 7:17 am Filip Tkaczyk <pathwithaheart...> [Tweeters] Huge flock of Black Swifts over Seattle!!
6/16/20 7:06 am Maxine Reid <max2012mike...> [Tweeters] More black swift sightings, Skagit and Snohomish counties.
6/16/20 5:37 am Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> Re: [Tweeters] North Seattle Black Swifts
6/16/20 12:50 am Matt Dufort <matt.dufort...> Re: [Tweeters] North Seattle Black Swifts
6/15/20 11:34 pm D R <somegum2...> Re: [Tweeters] Common Nighthawk heard in Seattle
6/15/20 11:34 pm D R <somegum2...> Re: [Tweeters] Common Nighthawk heard in Seattle
6/15/20 10:54 pm Robert O'Brien <baro...> Re: [Tweeters] North Seattle Black Swifts
6/15/20 9:39 pm Gibbins/ Crockett <binary_star85...> [Tweeters] Common Nighthawks at Lake Joy
6/15/20 9:06 pm Thomas M Leschine <tml...> [Tweeters] Common Nighthawk heard in Seattle
6/15/20 9:00 pm Louis Kreemer <lpkreemer...> Re: [Tweeters] North Seattle Black Swifts
6/15/20 8:46 pm Roland <roland_kilcher...> Re: [Tweeters] North Seattle Black Swifts
6/15/20 8:26 pm Dave Slager <dave.slager...> Re: [Tweeters] North Seattle Black Swifts
6/15/20 8:01 pm Ryan Merrill <rjm284...> [Tweeters] North Seattle Black Swifts
6/15/20 5:01 pm <merdave...> [Tweeters] Willet at Atkins Lake
6/15/20 2:22 pm Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] National Geographic: Hummingbirds see colors we can’t even imagine
6/15/20 2:14 pm Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...> [Tweeters] Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course Birdwalk set for June 18
6/15/20 12:50 pm Vicki King <vkbirder...> [Tweeters] Audubon Encyclopedia offered earlier today has been claimed
6/15/20 9:31 am Jim Neitzel <jim.neitzel...> [Tweeters] Harlequin Duck brood, Upper Satsop River
6/15/20 6:52 am Vicki King <vkbirder...> [Tweeters] Another free copy of the 1980 edition of Audubon Encyclopedia of N American Birds
6/15/20 5:07 am mark girling <markgirling...> [Tweeters] Boeing Peregrin Falcons.
6/14/20 8:59 pm Richard Hibpshman <hibpshman...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park Indigo Bunting
6/14/20 8:14 pm Alan Knue <temnurus...> Re: [Tweeters] Blue Jay at Point-no-Point
6/14/20 5:07 pm Hubbell <ldhubbell...> [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Owlets and the Art of Feather Maintenance
6/14/20 4:42 pm Al Wagar <jalanwagar...> [Tweeters] Encyclopedia of N American Birds is gone
6/14/20 2:58 pm Al Wagar <jalanwagar...> [Tweeters] Anyone want 1980 edition of Audubon Encyclopedia of N American Birds?
6/14/20 2:56 pm Jordan Roderick <jordan...> [Tweeters] Marymoor indigo bunting - yes
6/14/20 2:14 pm Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] Birds aren't all singing the same song. They have dialects, too - CNN
6/14/20 11:50 am LSR <lsr...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Indigo Bunting
6/14/20 11:06 am Bevbowe1 <bevbowe1...> Re: [Tweeters] Is Cornell Labs Birds of North America/World On-line available through Seattle or King Co. Public Libraries?
6/14/20 10:54 am Bevbowe1 <bevbowe1...> Re: [Tweeters] The intersection of racism and birding
6/14/20 10:38 am Whitney Neufeld-Kaiser <whitney.n.k...> [Tweeters] The intersection of racism and birding
6/14/20 10:38 am Alan Knue <temnurus...> [Tweeters] Blue Jay at Point-no-Point
6/14/20 9:02 am Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...> [Tweeters] Vaux's Happening
6/14/20 8:06 am Bruce Lagerquist <runningdoggie...> [Tweeters] When Eastern Meadowlarks sound like Northern Cardinals
 
Back to top
Date: 7/13/20 10:02 pm
From: Brad Waggoner <wagtail24...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Alcids in Washington
Hi Mike, Gary, Bob and All,

Though I don't do any formal surveying of alcids in northern Puget
Sound, I might be able to add a little local north Puget Sound
perspective to further Bob's excellent and informative alcid survey
results in the Protection Island Aquatic Reserve of the Strait. I
sea-watch quite frequently off of Point no Point (PNP) and alcids just
happen to provide a great deal of the waterbird activity for me.

Puffins - Mike, since I have yet to record a Puffin (of either species)
off of PNP or anywhere south of Admiralty Inlet in many years of
looking, I will go with "they are local and uncommon" as to your
question as to whether they influx as with other alcids. That is not to
say that they are absent from showing up in the Puget Sound as a few do
seemingly every year, but I wouldn't really label these few as some sort
of expected "influx".

Marbled Murrelets - PNP just happens to be one of those very good
"local" places to observe Marbled Murrelets during the summer months. I
really expect to tally anywhere from 10 to 20+ during decent viewing
conditions from the lighthouse at the point. Spots along the north Hood
Canal where I bird often also normally produce Marbled Murrelets on a
regular basis as well. I can only speculate that the feeding conditions
in these north Puget Sound spots make it worth while to fly a fair
distance from their old growth breeding trees.

Rhinos - It was interesting to have Bob say that this was one of his
best survey years for Rhinos in his Preserve area. I have felt that I
have been seeing lower numbers heading into feed as in past summers. I
probably could get some of my eBird numbers to back this up, but it does
really seem they were more plentiful in recent summers. Rhinos finding
food closer to Protection Island sounds like a very reasonable theory to me.

Common Murres - Low time of year for this species in Puget Sound as
well. I do feel lucky to see a lone Common Murre or two in any June and
most of July sea-watching effort off of PNP. However, that changes quite
dramatically in August and September. I have convinced myself given
seeing them seemingly flightless at this time of year, that they move
into the central Puget Sound to molt flight feathers. They can be in
large rafts numbering in the few hundreds and with multiple rafts this
can mean numbers in the few thousands. Waters off of Jeff Head in
central Puget Sound seem a typical location for them during that fall event.

Commentary on Ancient Murrelets and Cassin's Auklets, at least as to
their expected presence and seasonal appearance in Puget Sound can be
saved for the next time.

Cheers and good birding,

Brad Waggoner



_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/20 9:46 pm
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Bald Eagle eating live Dungeness Crab
 I have observed eagles in Edmonds catching and eating crabs. In  one case an eagle scooped up a crab that was floating on or near the surface of the water.

Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA

On Monday, July 13, 2020, 6:53:18 PM PDT, <edswan2...> wrote:


This morning I saw a Bald Eagle land on a low perch at the top of the bluff near Pt. Whitehorn (between Cherry Point and Birch Bay in Whatcom Co.).  It often sits high up in another tree a few meters away.  It was quickly apparent that it was feeding on something, but I didn't see any feathers from a bird, they often eat seagulls here, and I couldn't figure out the strange shape with my binoculars.  I got my scope on the bird and saw that it was ripping apart a very large Dungeness Crab.  The crab was still alive and feebly waving it's big claws to no effect.

 

The time was near low tide, but not a really low tide.  the crabs sometimes walk across a sandbar that would have been very shallow, I wonder if this is how the eagle was able to see and grab the crab.

 

Good birding, 

Ed

Ed Swan

Nature writer and guide

www.theswancompany.com

<edswan2...>

206.949.3545

 
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/20 7:54 pm
From: <mcallisters4...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Bank Swallow Colonies
Thanks Roger. Gary Wiles (copied here) has been doing a most wonderful inventory of colonies in western Washington. Colonies in the Mt St Helens blast zone have been suggested as likely but, to my knowledge, this might be the first one actually documented. The conditions created by the accumulations of ash/sand would seem to be good for attracting colonization by this species.



Kelly McAllister

Olympia



From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of Roger Moyer
Sent: Monday, July 13, 2020 4:23 PM
To: <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bank Swallow Colonies







Someone asked about locations about Bank Swallow Colonies. I came across a large colony on Coldwater Lake up b Mt. St. Helens memorial. It's on an island in the lake.



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone




_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/20 6:58 pm
From: <EdSwan2...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bald Eagle eating live Dungeness Crab
This morning I saw a Bald Eagle land on a low perch at the top of the bluff
near Pt. Whitehorn (between Cherry Point and Birch Bay in Whatcom Co.). It
often sits high up in another tree a few meters away. It was quickly
apparent that it was feeding on something, but I didn't see any feathers
from a bird, they often eat seagulls here, and I couldn't figure out the
strange shape with my binoculars. I got my scope on the bird and saw that
it was ripping apart a very large Dungeness Crab. The crab was still alive
and feebly waving it's big claws to no effect.



The time was near low tide, but not a really low tide. the crabs sometimes
walk across a sandbar that would have been very shallow, I wonder if this is
how the eagle was able to see and grab the crab.



Good birding,

Ed

Ed Swan

Nature writer and guide

<http://www.theswancompany.com/> www.theswancompany.com

<edswan2...>

206.949.3545




_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/20 5:22 pm
From: Garrett Haynes <garrettwhaynes...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] M Street Marsh Shorebirds
My apologies. I made a mistake in saying that they are juvenile shorebirds this time of year and Marv Breece graciously corrected me. I listened to a podcast recently that talked about shorebird migration and I must have misheard what they explained. Although I did have it correct in my head that adults and juveniles migrate separately, it is the adults who start migrating back first and then the juveniles later.  Always learning and thankful to our great birders in the community who we can all learn from!


Garrett Haynes



On July 13, 2020 at 3:51 PM, Garrett Haynes <garrettwhaynes...> wrote:


Hello Tweets,


M Street is a good place right now for juvenile shorebirds making their first journey south. The water in the main pond is drying up which is providing lots of good shallow water and mud for them. This morning there were:


- ~150 peeps: majority least sandpipers and a small percentage of western sandpipers
- 16 Long Billed Dowitchers (I really studied two that were off by themselves almost the whole time hoping I could ID them as short-billed as they seemed different at first, but ending up concluding in the end that they were long-billed. Somebody go prove me wrong!)
- 11 Greater Yellowlegs
- 5 Killdeer
- 1 Spotted Sandpiper


There was also a Semipalmated Sandpiper that was at M Street recently although I couldn't find one today. Hopefully other interesting shorebirds will start showing up too.


Happy Birding!


Garrett Haynes
Auburn, WA 
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/20 4:27 pm
From: Roger Moyer <rogermoyer1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bank Swallow Colonies


Someone asked about locations about Bank Swallow Colonies. I came across a large colony on Coldwater Lake up b Mt. St. Helens memorial. It's on an island in the lake.

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/20 3:57 pm
From: Garrett Haynes <garrettwhaynes...>
Subject: [Tweeters] M Street Marsh Shorebirds
Hello Tweets,


M Street is a good place right now for juvenile shorebirds making their first journey south. The water in the main pond is drying up which is providing lots of good shallow water and mud for them. This morning there were:


- ~150 peeps: majority least sandpipers and a small percentage of western sandpipers
- 16 Long Billed Dowitchers (I really studied two that were off by themselves almost the whole time hoping I could ID them as short-billed as they seemed different at first, but ending up concluding in the end that they were long-billed. Somebody go prove me wrong!)
- 11 Greater Yellowlegs
- 5 Killdeer
- 1 Spotted Sandpiper


There was also a Semipalmated Sandpiper that was at M Street recently although I couldn't find one today. Hopefully other interesting shorebirds will start showing up too.


Happy Birding!


Garrett Haynes
Auburn, WA 
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/20 3:04 pm
From: Mike Wagenbach <wagen...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Alcids in Washington
Thanks for the details survey results, Bob! I did not realize Common
Murres were so seasonal in the inland waters. I'll have to remember to get
out there in late September or October to enjoy seeing them in larger
numbers.

Is there any similar influx of Puffins at any time, or are they always
uncommon? I've seen them along the south side of Lopez, but I think
probably only twice in all the times I've been down there.


On Mon, Jul 13, 2020 at 12:00 PM B Boekelheide <bboek...> wrote:

> Hello Mike, Gary, and Tweeters,
>
> I can add a few alcid tidbits from the southeastern Strait of Juan de
> Fuca. Since 2016, we have done a monthly boat survey in the Protection
> Island Aquatic Reserve, covering a 25 mi transect route each time. On our
> May, June, and July surveys this year, we have had the highest densities of
> Rhino Auklets for the last 4 years within the PI Aquatic Reserve. We are
> also seeing lots of local feeding flocks of Rhinos and gulls in the Strait
> for this time year, both within the aquatic reserve and to the north and
> west of Dungeness Spit. My guess is the auklets are finding food closer to
> their Protection Island nesting colony this year, so they’re not flying as
> far to feed and you are seeing fewer of them to the north. In past years,
> particularly in 2019, we observed much lower auklet densities within the
> Aquatic Reserve in June and July, and Rhinos appeared to be flying further
> north in the Strait in the direction of Smith Island and Rosario Strait,
> and more into Admiralty Inlet and Puget Sound to get food.
>
> On our July survey last Friday, the highest concentration of Rhinos was
> around the edges of Dallas Bank north of Protection Island, where their
> densities were over 200 birds per sq km. Many of the birds were just
> loafing at the surface, looking fat and sassy. Others actively participated
> in the feeding flocks. What are they eating? Forage fish of some sort. I’ve
> heard rumors that there are good numbers of immature herring this year, but
> I really have no idea.
>
> This is the low time of year for murres in the Strait. This year we
> counted very few murres during our June and July surveys. In early summer
> murres are at nesting colonies off the west coast and those left in the
> eastern Strait are likely young pre-breeders. Typically the highest
> densities of murres in the eastern Strait occur between August and
> November, when they migrate into the Strait from their nesting colonies and
> become the most abundant bird in the PI Aquatic Reserve. On our past
> surveys in September and October, sometimes over half the birds in the
> aquatic reserve were murres, including fathers with chicks. So I suspect
> the murres will be here soon, unless they, too, find more food somewhere
> else.
>
> Like Gary says, Marbled Murrelets are local. Their highest densities in
> the PI Aquatic Reserve are from Jan thru Mar. This time of year they are
> more abundant on saltwater further west, like between Port Angeles and
> Clallam Bay, likely birds that nest in old-growth forests in Olympic
> National Park.
>
> Thanks!
> Bob Boekelheide
> Dungeness
>
>
> *From: *Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
> *Subject: **Re: [Tweeters] Alcids in Washington; pelican*
> *Date: *July 12, 2020 at 7:29:35 AM PDT
>
> Dear Mike and Tweeters,
>
> Mike Wagenbach raises an interesting question about alcid numbers.
> Three days ago, I made my first visit since January to Washington Park in
> Anacortes. There at Green Point, I saw at least 60 Rhinoceros Auklets, plus
> one Common Murre, 15 Pigeon Guillemots, and 10 Marbled Murrelets.
>
> I just checked my summertime records for the last few years; the above
> totals appear typical, matching up with alcid numbers that I have observed
> at Washington Park over the last ten summers. On some July visits during
> that span, I have missed the Common Murre entirely, so seeing just one is
> about normal--at least, normal in the context of the low numbers we have
> these days.
>
> Still, older birders I talk to in Washington all say that the numbers of
> alcids and other fish-eating seabirds are far lower today, compared to two
> or three generations ago.
>
> Marbled Murrelets are a special case. At least in Skagit, they are very
> local. At Rosario Head, I miss them more often than not. That goes for most
> other Skagit sea watch places. Green Point at Washington Park is by far the
> most reliable public site in Skagit that I know for this species. Over the
> last 30 years, in July and early August, I have seen the Marbled Murrelet
> 48 times at Green Point, 5 times at Samish Island Public Beach, and only 4
> times at Rosario Head. There are presumably other good spots, perhaps on
> Guemes Island or Cypress Island, but those would require a ferry or boat.
>
> Yours truly, Gary Bletsch
>
> On Saturday, July 11, 2020, 08:43:37 PM PDT, Mike Wagenbach <wagen...>
> wrote:
>
>
> I've sea kayaked in Rosario Strait and the Strait of Juan de Fuca almost
> every year since 1999. This summer, I've gone out from Washington Park in
> Anacortes three times: once as far as Swirl Island and back, once to
> Iceberg Point and back, and once all the way around Lopez Island (on
> July 7).
>
> I've not seen a single Marbled Murrelet this year, and fewer Rhino Auklets
> that I seem to remember on average. RAs are there, just not in impressive
> numbers. OTOH, Pigeon Guillemots seem quite abundant.
>
> Are there any trends in alcid numbers or is this just random variation? I
> saw a good number of Murrelets last year, I thought.
>
> On July 7, a couple of other uncommon observations: a Peregrine Falcon
> stooped down from the cliff on the south side of Castle Island at a Pigeon
> Guillemot, without success, and as I came back across Rosario Strait from
> Lopez Pass in the evening, I saw a single Brown Pelican.
>
>

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/20 2:35 pm
From: Hubbell <ldhubbell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Social Distancing
Tweeters,

Sometimes even the birds realize there is a need to keep an appropriate distance between fellow lifeforms. More in this week’s post:

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2020/07/social-distancing.html <https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2020/07/social-distancing.html>

Have a great day on Union Bay, where Black Birders are welcome!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/20 1:59 pm
From: Diann MacRae <tvulture...>
Subject: [Tweeters] truncated posts
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/20 1:22 pm
From: Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Found caterpillar in my garden help w id
If you are on facebook, there is a group called Pacific Northwest Bugs, often helpful.If you aren't on facebook, I could post your photo for you, just email it to me <peggy_busby...>
Peggy MundyBothell, WA



On Monday, July 13, 2020, 12:55:43 p.m. PDT, Christina <joannabird413...> wrote:

If you are interested or have an idea of what it might be I'll show you a pic offline

Christina TredickWoodinville_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/20 12:58 pm
From: Christina <joannabird413...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Found caterpillar in my garden help w id
If you are interested or have an idea of what it might be I'll show you a
pic offline

Christina Tredick
Woodinville

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/20 12:46 pm
From: Dayna yalowicki <dlwicki...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] digest mide truncates info
I have the same problem but I’ve only noticed it with Diann MacRae’s posts. If I click on the scrubbed code (or whatever it’s called), I can read it but not easily. I always thought it might be because I get tweeters by digest and read on an old Ipad. No offense to Diann!

Dayna Yalowicki
Bothell, Wa

Buy Free Range
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/20 12:23 pm
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Alcids in Washington
All of these responses have been much appreciated and enjoyed.  Some more info.
On July 3rd, I joined many others on the Puffin Cruise from Bellingham to Smith Island.  Alcid observations were approximately thus:
Ancient Murrelets - zero.Marbled Murrelets - 6 to 10.Horned Puffins - zeroTufted Puffins - 25 to 30Pigeon Guillemots - 60 to 70Rhinoceros Auklets - 300 to 400.  Widespread but large concentration near Smith Island.Common Murre - 1 to 5.
I have given a range because I heard others call out individuals I missed.
Blair Bernson 
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Mon, Jul 13, 2020 at 12:00 PM, B Boekelheide<bboek...> wrote: Hello Mike, Gary, and Tweeters,
I can add a few alcid tidbits from the southeastern Strait of Juan de Fuca. Since 2016, we have done a monthly boat survey in the Protection Island Aquatic Reserve, covering a 25 mi transect route each time. On our May, June, and July surveys this year, we have had the highest densities of Rhino Auklets for the last 4 years within the PI Aquatic Reserve. We are also seeing lots of local feeding flocks of Rhinos and gulls in the Strait for this time year, both within the aquatic reserve and to the north and west of Dungeness Spit.  My guess is the auklets are finding food closer to their Protection Island nesting colony this year, so they’re not flying as far to feed and you are seeing fewer of them to the north.  In past years, particularly in 2019, we observed much lower auklet densities within the Aquatic Reserve in June and July, and Rhinos appeared to be flying further north in the Strait in the direction of Smith Island and Rosario Strait, and more into Admiralty Inlet and Puget Sound to get food.
On our July survey last Friday, the highest concentration of Rhinos was around the edges of Dallas Bank north of Protection Island, where their densities were over 200 birds per sq km. Many of the birds were just loafing at the surface, looking fat and sassy. Others actively participated in the feeding flocks. What are they eating? Forage fish of some sort. I’ve heard rumors that there are good numbers of immature herring this year, but I really have no idea.   This is the low time of year for murres in the Strait. This year we counted very few murres during our June and July surveys. In early summer murres are at nesting colonies off the west coast and those left in the eastern Strait are likely young pre-breeders. Typically the highest densities of murres in the eastern Strait occur between August and November, when they migrate into the Strait from their nesting colonies and become the most abundant bird in the PI Aquatic Reserve. On our past surveys in September and October, sometimes over half the birds in the aquatic reserve were murres, including fathers with chicks.  So I suspect the murres will be here soon, unless they, too, find more food somewhere else.  
Like Gary says, Marbled Murrelets are local. Their highest densities in the PI Aquatic Reserve are from Jan thru Mar.  This time of year they are more abundant on saltwater further west, like between Port Angeles and Clallam Bay, likely birds that nest in old-growth forests in Olympic National Park.  
Thanks!Bob BoekelheideDungeness

From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Alcids in Washington; pelican
Date: July 12, 2020 at 7:29:35 AM PDT

Dear Mike and Tweeters,

Mike Wagenbach raises an interesting question about alcid numbers.Three days ago, I made my first visit since January to Washington Park in Anacortes. There at Green Point, I saw at least 60 Rhinoceros Auklets, plus one Common Murre, 15 Pigeon Guillemots, and 10 Marbled Murrelets.
I just checked my summertime records for the last few years; the above totals appear typical, matching up with alcid numbers that I have observed at Washington Park over the last ten summers. On some July visits during that span, I have missed the Common Murre entirely, so seeing just one is about normal--at least, normal in the context of the low numbers we have these days. 
Still, older birders I talk to in Washington all say that the numbers of alcids and other fish-eating seabirds are far lower today, compared to two or three generations ago.
Marbled Murrelets are a special case. At least in Skagit, they are very local. At Rosario Head, I miss them more often than not. That goes for most other Skagit sea watch places. Green Point at Washington Park is by far the most reliable public site in Skagit that I know for this species. Over the last 30 years, in July and early August, I have seen the Marbled Murrelet 48 times at Green Point, 5 times at Samish Island Public Beach, and only 4 times at Rosario Head. There are presumably other good spots, perhaps on Guemes Island or Cypress Island, but those would require a ferry or boat.
Yours truly, Gary Bletsch
On Saturday, July 11, 2020, 08:43:37 PM PDT, Mike Wagenbach <wagen...> wrote:

I've sea kayaked in Rosario Strait and the Strait of Juan de Fuca almost every year since 1999.  This summer, I've gone out from Washington Park in Anacortes three times: once as far as Swirl Island and back, once to Iceberg Point and back, and once all the way around Lopez Island (on July 7).
I've not seen a single Marbled Murrelet this year, and fewer Rhino Auklets that I seem to remember on average.  RAs are there, just not in impressive numbers.  OTOH, Pigeon Guillemots seem quite abundant.
Are there any trends in alcid numbers or is this just random variation?  I saw a good number of Murrelets last year, I thought.
On July 7, a couple of other uncommon observations: a Peregrine Falcon stooped down from the cliff on the south side of Castle Island at a Pigeon Guillemot, without success, and as I came back across Rosario Strait from Lopez Pass in the evening, I saw a single Brown Pelican.
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/20 12:07 pm
From: B Boekelheide <bboek...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Alcids in Washington
Hello Mike, Gary, and Tweeters,

I can add a few alcid tidbits from the southeastern Strait of Juan de Fuca. Since 2016, we have done a monthly boat survey in the Protection Island Aquatic Reserve, covering a 25 mi transect route each time. On our May, June, and July surveys this year, we have had the highest densities of Rhino Auklets for the last 4 years within the PI Aquatic Reserve. We are also seeing lots of local feeding flocks of Rhinos and gulls in the Strait for this time year, both within the aquatic reserve and to the north and west of Dungeness Spit. My guess is the auklets are finding food closer to their Protection Island nesting colony this year, so they’re not flying as far to feed and you are seeing fewer of them to the north. In past years, particularly in 2019, we observed much lower auklet densities within the Aquatic Reserve in June and July, and Rhinos appeared to be flying further north in the Strait in the direction of Smith Island and Rosario Strait, and more into Admiralty Inlet and Puget Sound to get food.

On our July survey last Friday, the highest concentration of Rhinos was around the edges of Dallas Bank north of Protection Island, where their densities were over 200 birds per sq km. Many of the birds were just loafing at the surface, looking fat and sassy. Others actively participated in the feeding flocks. What are they eating? Forage fish of some sort. I’ve heard rumors that there are good numbers of immature herring this year, but I really have no idea.

This is the low time of year for murres in the Strait. This year we counted very few murres during our June and July surveys. In early summer murres are at nesting colonies off the west coast and those left in the eastern Strait are likely young pre-breeders. Typically the highest densities of murres in the eastern Strait occur between August and November, when they migrate into the Strait from their nesting colonies and become the most abundant bird in the PI Aquatic Reserve. On our past surveys in September and October, sometimes over half the birds in the aquatic reserve were murres, including fathers with chicks. So I suspect the murres will be here soon, unless they, too, find more food somewhere else.

Like Gary says, Marbled Murrelets are local. Their highest densities in the PI Aquatic Reserve are from Jan thru Mar. This time of year they are more abundant on saltwater further west, like between Port Angeles and Clallam Bay, likely birds that nest in old-growth forests in Olympic National Park.

Thanks!
Bob Boekelheide
Dungeness


From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> <mailto:<garybletsch...>>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Alcids in Washington; pelican
Date: July 12, 2020 at 7:29:35 AM PDT

Dear Mike and Tweeters,

Mike Wagenbach raises an interesting question about alcid numbers.
Three days ago, I made my first visit since January to Washington Park in Anacortes. There at Green Point, I saw at least 60 Rhinoceros Auklets, plus one Common Murre, 15 Pigeon Guillemots, and 10 Marbled Murrelets.

I just checked my summertime records for the last few years; the above totals appear typical, matching up with alcid numbers that I have observed at Washington Park over the last ten summers. On some July visits during that span, I have missed the Common Murre entirely, so seeing just one is about normal--at least, normal in the context of the low numbers we have these days.

Still, older birders I talk to in Washington all say that the numbers of alcids and other fish-eating seabirds are far lower today, compared to two or three generations ago.

Marbled Murrelets are a special case. At least in Skagit, they are very local. At Rosario Head, I miss them more often than not. That goes for most other Skagit sea watch places. Green Point at Washington Park is by far the most reliable public site in Skagit that I know for this species. Over the last 30 years, in July and early August, I have seen the Marbled Murrelet 48 times at Green Point, 5 times at Samish Island Public Beach, and only 4 times at Rosario Head. There are presumably other good spots, perhaps on Guemes Island or Cypress Island, but those would require a ferry or boat.

Yours truly, Gary Bletsch

On Saturday, July 11, 2020, 08:43:37 PM PDT, Mike Wagenbach <wagen...> <mailto:<wagen...>> wrote:


I've sea kayaked in Rosario Strait and the Strait of Juan de Fuca almost every year since 1999. This summer, I've gone out from Washington Park in Anacortes three times: once as far as Swirl Island and back, once to Iceberg Point and back, and once all the way around Lopez Island (on July 7).

I've not seen a single Marbled Murrelet this year, and fewer Rhino Auklets that I seem to remember on average. RAs are there, just not in impressive numbers. OTOH, Pigeon Guillemots seem quite abundant.

Are there any trends in alcid numbers or is this just random variation? I saw a good number of Murrelets last year, I thought.

On July 7, a couple of other uncommon observations: a Peregrine Falcon stooped down from the cliff on the south side of Castle Island at a Pigeon Guillemot, without success, and as I came back across Rosario Strait from Lopez Pass in the evening, I saw a single Brown Pelican.


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/20 8:42 am
From: Eric Ellingson <abriteway...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Alcids in Washington;
Having gone out from Anacortes a couple of times the past month I've seen 6 Marbled Murrelets off Burrows Island on one trip, a hundred Rhino's near Smith Island. Rhino's do seem to be the most numerous birds on the water right now, except for bays with breeding Pigeon Guillemots. I did see only 4 Common Murre yesterday near Alden Bank, between Pt Whitehorn & Matia. Does anyone know there the Common Murre are?

Side note: Matia Island is very birdy right now. Lots of adults feeding juveniles: Pileated, Townsend's Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Pacific-slope Flycatchers, Chestnut-backed Chickadee, Pigeon Guillemot (taking food to nest). eBird list: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71414221

Eric Ellingson
https://www.flickr.com/photos/ericellingson/

________________________________


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/12/20 3:44 pm
From: Martha Jordan <mj.cygnus...>
Subject: [Tweeters] digest mode truncates info
Is anyone else seemingly experiencing the truncation or scrubbed emails
from folks that I know are regular to tweeters. Most recently is the post
from Diann MacRae about her owl chasing dog. It was scrubbed from my digest
version. Then I saw a response to her post...which is when I realized my
digest form is getting truncated. This is an ongoing problem.
Any ideas for a fix?

Thanks.

Martha

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/12/20 3:03 pm
From: Mike Wagenbach <wagen...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Alcids in Washington
Gary,

Glad to hear your count. I always start off to the NW for a few minutes to
get well out into the current, so I don't usually get a look near Green
Point. Now that I think about it, it's odd that there almost never seem to
be any birds in the eddyline directly in front of the beach at Washington
Park. Maybe the frequent coming and going of power boats from the boat
ramp disperse them.

The south side of Pt. Colville has been a fairly hot spot for seeing
Marbled Murrelets. Not every time, but I've seen one to a half-dozen there
often enough that I was surprised to see none three times in a row this
year. I hope to get down there again at the beginning of next months, so I
hope the fourth time is the charm.

One funny thing Tuesday evening as I came back across Rosario Strait was
that the small group of Rhino Auklets I saw NE of Bird Rocks all had one or
two small fish dangling from their bills. This made them look either like
they had much bulkier bills (so for a moment I thought maybe I was seeing a
puffin) or that they had a white spot of plumage on their chins.

Mike

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/12/20 12:44 pm
From: Janet Ray <janetlaura...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Amplifying the voice of a Black female birder
This is a wonderful story. Thanks for sharing it.
I’ve found all the messages relating to the topic of black birders to be informative and welcome. I hope they keep coming.

I also wonder about other groups that may not see themselves as well represented in our local birding community. Washington is fortunate to be home to many minority populations. I’d love to hear from those folks as well.
Jan Ray
Preston WA


> On Jul 11, 2020, at 3:19 PM, Izzy & Kendrick <gobirder...> wrote:
>
> Thought I would share this interview with BC birder Melissa Hafting, who is also an eBird reviewer.
>
> https://ebird.org/news/ebird-reviewer-spotlight-melissa-hafting?utm_content=buffer2f02c&utm&
>
> best birding to all,
> izzy arevalo wong
> seattle, wa

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 7/12/20 10:19 am
From: ED DEAL <falcophile...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Seattle Cooper's Hawks
Yo Tweets,

We are at peak fledging season for the 48 known active Cooper's Hawk nests in Seattle. Nests we missed in our Spring surveys are most easily detected by hearing a pack of food-begging juveniles. Listen to the "squeaky whistle" juvenile food-begging call at:
https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/coopers-hawk
Or to hear it live, visit one of the s everal nests regularly reported on ebird. I'd appreciate your off-line reports of other nests inside the Seattle city limits.

Thank you,
Ed Deal
Seattle Cooper's Hawk Project
falcophile AT comcast.net
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/12/20 7:35 am
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Alcids in Washington; pelican
Dear Mike and Tweeters,
Mike Wagenbach raises an interesting question about alcid numbers.
Three days ago, I made my first visit since January to Washington Park in Anacortes. There at Green Point, I saw at least 60 Rhinoceros Auklets, plus one Common Murre, 15 Pigeon Guillemots, and 10 Marbled Murrelets.
I just checked my summertime records for the last few years; the above totals appear typical, matching up with alcid numbers that I have observed at Washington Park over the last ten summers. On some July visits during that span, I have missed the Common Murre entirely, so seeing just one is about normal--at least, normal in the context of the low numbers we have these days. 
Still, older birders I talk to in Washington all say that the numbers of alcids and other fish-eating seabirds are far lower today, compared to two or three generations ago.
Marbled Murrelets are a special case. At least in Skagit, they are very local. At Rosario Head, I miss them more often than not. That goes for most other Skagit sea watch places. Green Point at Washington Park is by far the most reliable public site in Skagit that I know for this species. Over the last 30 years, in July and early August, I have seen the Marbled Murrelet 48 times at Green Point, 5 times at Samish Island Public Beach, and only 4 times at Rosario Head. There are presumably other good spots, perhaps on Guemes Island or Cypress Island, but those would require a ferry or boat.
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch




On Saturday, July 11, 2020, 08:43:37 PM PDT, Mike Wagenbach <wagen...> wrote:

I've sea kayaked in Rosario Strait and the Strait of Juan de Fuca almost every year since 1999.  This summer, I've gone out from Washington Park in Anacortes three times: once as far as Swirl Island and back, once to Iceberg Point and back, and once all the way around Lopez Island (on July 7).
I've not seen a single Marbled Murrelet this year, and fewer Rhino Auklets that I seem to remember on average.  RAs are there, just not in impressive numbers.  OTOH, Pigeon Guillemots seem quite abundant.
Are there any trends in alcid numbers or is this just random variation?  I saw a good number of Murrelets last year, I thought.
On July 7, a couple of other uncommon observations: a Peregrine Falcon stooped down from the cliff on the south side of Castle Island at a Pigeon Guillemot, without success, and as I came back across Rosario Strait from Lopez Pass in the evening, I saw a single Brown Pelican._______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/20 8:46 pm
From: Mike Wagenbach <wagen...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Alcids in Washington; pelican
I've sea kayaked in Rosario Strait and the Strait of Juan de Fuca almost
every year since 1999. This summer, I've gone out from Washington Park in
Anacortes three times: once as far as Swirl Island and back, once to
Iceberg Point and back, and once all the way around Lopez Island (on
July 7).

I've not seen a single Marbled Murrelet this year, and fewer Rhino Auklets
that I seem to remember on average. RAs are there, just not in impressive
numbers. OTOH, Pigeon Guillemots seem quite abundant.

Are there any trends in alcid numbers or is this just random variation? I
saw a good number of Murrelets last year, I thought.

On July 7, a couple of other uncommon observations: a Peregrine Falcon
stooped down from the cliff on the south side of Castle Island at a Pigeon
Guillemot, without success, and as I came back across Rosario Strait from
Lopez Pass in the evening, I saw a single Brown Pelican.

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/20 6:46 pm
From: <jmyb...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Yellow-breasted Chat near Steilacoom
Chat seen in small shrubby trees among open field grass near the east side of Waughop Lake in Steilacoom Park.
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/20 6:00 pm
From: David Parent <dpdvm...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Juvenile Brown Pelican Port Townsend and Island County
At 1145 today I observed a juvenile Brown Pelican associating with a large flock of Heerman’s and California Gulls on the gravel spit on the Admiralty Inlet side of the Point Hudson Marina, Port Townsend. The bird was still present at 2:30 but missing when the 3:30 ferry left PT. I relocated it feeding at a baitball about a quarter mile from Fort Casey, Whidbey Island. Is this possibly the same bird previously reported by Peter Wimberger? I have a very poor photo if anyone is interested.

Sent from my iPad
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/20 3:58 pm
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] dogs that dislike certain birds
Dear Tweeters,
Diann's post reminded me of a wonderful dog I used to have. Tina was half Labrador and half Rottweiler, but her personality was more friendly, gentle Labrador than guard-dog Rottweiler.
Right after we got Tina, I saw a Great Blue Heron eating goldfish out of our trough. I sicced Tina on the heron, and she chased it off. For the rest of her life, Tina knew that species of bird very well. If I took her on a birding walk by a shoreline with herons, she'd try to go after them. Maybe this was a little bit of the Rottweiler coming out in her--herons being categorized as the enemy!
Later, I had started having trouble with Bald Eagles going after our chickens and our smaller dogs. It took only one instance for Tina to figure out that Bald Eagles were the foe. She'd chase after them, leaping into the air and barking. Interestingly, she knew the difference between a Turkey Vulture and an eagle. She would ignore the vultures, but spring into action the moment an eagle flew over.
Good old Tina!
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/20 3:24 pm
From: Izzy & Kendrick <gobirder...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Amplifying the voice of a Black female birder
Thought I would share this interview with BC birder Melissa Hafting, who is also an eBird reviewer.

https://ebird.org/news/ebird-reviewer-spotlight-melissa-hafting?utm_content=buffer2f02c&utm&

best birding to all,
izzy arevalo wong
seattle, wa
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/20 1:51 pm
From: Diann MacRae <tvulture...>
Subject: [Tweeters] my owl-chasing dog . . .
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/20 12:07 pm
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...>
Subject: [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of July 12, 2020
Hello, Tweeters,

Ready for an escape? Check out the full eight episodes of Sound Escapes, Season 2, with recordings from all over the world -- including Pipestone Canyon in Eastern Washington -- by Gordon Hempton:
https://www.birdnote.org/soundescapes-s2
========================
Heard last week on BirdNote:
* Are Birds' Nests Reused?
http://bit.ly/1LiXmil
* White-throated Swifts
http://bit.ly/1J7dF01
* Sounds of the Boreal Forest
http://bit.ly/N403nS
* Grosbeaks and Monarchs
http://bit.ly/MVBnhs
* Kentucky Warbler - The Bird with Sideburns
https://bit.ly/2BXjfHq
* Birds That Say Their Own Names
http://bit.ly/P9K9eA
* Birdwatching 104 - A Summary
http://bit.ly/U6VPU9
=========================
Next week on BirdNote: "A Little Bird Told Me"...
+ An evening with A.A. Allen in Sapsucker Woods,
+ Kestrels and Nestboxes
... and more: https://bit.ly/2BYS7YH
--------------------------------------
Did you have a favorite story this week? Another comment?
Please let us know. mailto:<info...>
------------------------------------------------
Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
or Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/birdnoteradio/
Listen on Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
BirdNote is in print. Check out BirdNote, the book:
https://www.birdnote.org/birdnote-book
There's a journal, too -- for your notes and sketches and lists:
http://bit.ly/BirdNote-journal
-----------------------------------------------------------------
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find 1600+ episodes and more than 1200 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/20 10:35 am
From: Diann MacRae <tvulture...>
Subject: [Tweeters] oops!
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/20 10:28 am
From: Diann MacRae <tvulture...>
Subject: [Tweeters] June 2020 TUVU report
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/10/20 5:45 pm
From: Marcia Ian <gnudle...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Parakeet at my feeders
About 15 years ago in New Jersey, an all yellow parakeet showed up at my backyard feeders. I noticed a grackle eyeing him, and feared that soon the grackle would decapitate the budgie as had happened to a couple finches out there. I caught the budgie by throwing a towel over the caged feeder he was using, and brought him into my screened in porch while I got a suitable cage ready. Long story short, after a course of meds for the pseudomonas infection he was suffering from, and a reasonable search for his ostensible owners, he became the most delightful and enlivening pet for the following 12+ years. Solomon Wallace Wigwam, aka Solly, freely flew from play tree to play tree in our spacious home office, and especially enjoyed bathing in moist green leaf lettuce leaves that I held in my hand for him. He travelled out here with us in his travel cage, sharing the back seat of the car with our cockamamie cockapoo Curly. If a parakeet ever shows up here, I’ll be ready for him (or her).

Marcia Ian
Bellingham
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 7/10/20 4:07 pm
From: J Crouch <dipper2c...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Strange warbler family in Seattle
No, but as I watched back to back nest boxes, one had Titmouse and one had
Chickadees, the Titmouse and Chickadee were feeding each other's
nestlings. Going into each of the boxes with food.

JCrouch
Central Texas

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/10/20 1:15 pm
From: Peter H Wimberger <pwimberger...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Pelican - Inner Quartermaster Harbor
Hi Tweets,
A friend texted that there is pelican in Inner Quartermaster Harbor on Vashon Island. He thought maybe a Brown, but isn't a birder and not sure. If you're on the island, might be fun to take a gander.

Peter Wimberger
Tacoma
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 7/10/20 10:19 am
From: Dave Slager <dave.slager...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Strange warbler family in Seattle
Tweeters,

Today the indefatigable Ryan Merrill got photos of the Wilson's Warbler
feeding the baby Black-throated Gray Warbler!

https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/248608511

Dave Slager
Seattle

On Tue, Jul 7, 2020 at 10:31 AM Dave Slager <dave.slager...> wrote:

> Tweeters,
>
> This morning I saw a real oddity at Carkeek Park in Seattle: An adult
> Wilson's Warbler feeding a fledgling Black-throated Gray Warbler. At first
> I thought my eyes must be making a mistake, but I watched 7 feeding events,
> so it was the real deal. The youngster did not appear to be a hybrid.
>
> I can think of a few ways this might have come about, but they all sound
> pretty far-fetched. I've never seen anything like this before. Has anyone
> out there in Tweeterdom seen something like this, or heard about an
> instance?
>
> In case anyone is interested in looking for it, it was right by the Honey
> Bucket in the middle of Carkeek Park, just below the water treatment
> facility.
>
> Dave Slager
> Seattle, WA
>

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/10/20 9:52 am
From: <plkoyama...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Ferry County Peregrine Falcon and Swainson's Hawk
Tweets,
David and I poked around Ferry County on Wed 7/10 and Thurs 7/11. We missed many of the Code 1/easy (ha ha) birds we were seeking such as Vesper Sparrow, Canada Jay, and GC Kinglet (insert sad face emoji) in spite of prancing around areas where eBird listers had indicated potential success. We do miss the finer details that Tweeters posts often provide.

We came across a couple of surprise Code 5 raptors on 7/10, including a Swainson’s Hawk on Silver Creek Rd and a Peregrine Falcon on Bridge Creek Rd. We were alerted to the SWHA by loud bird calls from our open window and a screeching noise I thought might be a “baby” raptor, but was the response to being mobbed—a sound that IBird Pro calls a “keeeeooo call.” We saw it perched and watched it take off, while making the typical SWHA call. The area was wooded on the south side of the road, with a steep, sloping field on the opposite side, probably 10 or 12 miles east of Inchilium. Not far from there, in an area of tall conifers, we had a pair of Code 3 Pine Grosbeaks.

The Peregrine Falcon, also 7/10, was seen at its nest on a rock face full of holes less than a mile from the bridge and not far off Hwy 21. We had stopped to play for Canyon and Rock Wren (no luck) and I kept hearing a sound like the wind blowing through wires, but there was neither wind nor wires. David saw a falcon fly in and both of us spotted it feeding a dark young in one of the rock cavities. This pock-marked rock face has a number of vertical seams, and this seam was to the right of the lone conifer at the center of the top. The nest is in a crescent-shaped cavity to the right of the seam, in the rock face that has more than a dozen holes. We didn’t get a timely scope on the birds, but thought it looked good for a Peregrine, as opposed to a Prairie, and this was confirmed by further calls, which iBirdPro describes as “Screeh.” The bird flew off over the top of the cliff, and we waited around for several minutes, but guess it takes a while to catch suitable prey!

Other fun birds on 7/11 were a flock of 20 Red Crossbills feeding on the gravel drive at the CCC Camp Historical Site near the sculpture of the worker (more damaged every trip—now he’s missing his pick, along with the fingers on one hand.) This must be good gravel, as when we stopped there in 6/2019 there were a dozen Evening Grosbeaks picking away at the same area! We also had a lone baby Barrow’s Goldeneye on Fish Lake off Gold Creek Rd/Rd 53 and 7 Common Loons—2 on Ferry Lake, 2 on Long Lake with 2 young, 1 on Fish Lake.

It was a good trip for us with several new county birds and good weather.
Penny Koyama, Bothell


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/9/20 6:54 pm
From: <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2020-07-09
Tweets – It was gray and moist this morning. No real rain, and only a minute or two of drizzle. But lots of spitting mist. Rather dark too, but warm. We did well for July, seeing pretty much everything we’d expect.

Biggest news is that the INDIGO BUNTING was singing away, this time due east of the heronry in the off-leash area.

Highlights:
a.. Gadwall – female with 7 small ducklings at Lake Platform
b.. American Coot – one at lake platform
c.. Spotted Sandpiper – one at weir – first in 5 weeks
d.. Caspian Tern – twice saw single birds flying downstream
e.. Great Blue Heron – heronry is emptying out. Only a few left in the nests. Not terribly many seen fishing either, so total count way down from recent months
f.. Green Heron – juvenile seen from Lake Platform
g.. Osprey – two babies on ballfield light nest in NE part of the park
h.. Cooper’s Hawk – one before 5:30 from Viewing Mound
i.. Barn Owl – one in East Meadow as late as 5:18
j.. Western Screech-Owl – one near east end of boardwalk, early
k.. Hairy Woodpecker – one east of the slough
l.. Swainson’s Thrush – MANY sightings today; they kept landing on the trails. Juveniles? Still lots of singing too
m.. Yellow Warbler – only one, heard singing. Only warbler besides Common Yellowthroat
n.. INDIGO BUNTING – for a while, it seemed to be associating with two juvenile buntings. Could the juvies be hybrids???
Major misses today were limited to just Pied-billed Grebe, Rock Pigeon, Steller’s Jay, and Cliff Swallow.

For the day, 62 species.

= Michael Hobbs
= www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
= <BirdMarymoor...>
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/9/20 4:54 pm
From: <jstewart...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] fledglings returning to nest
My observations are the same as May Saylor's

Wings,
Jan

Jan Stewart
922 E. Spruce Street
Sequim, WA 98382-3518
(360) 681-2827
<jstewart...>

-----Original Message-----
From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of Mary Saylor
Sent: Thursday, July 09, 2020 3:40 PM
To: James Karr <jrkarr...>
Cc: Tweeters Tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] fledglings returning to nest

My observations are not as detailed as Jim’s, but I have also been watching a violet-green swallow nest box on our house for years, and I’ve definitely seen the fledglings go back into (and on top of) the next box after they start to fly. I couldn’t say for how long they do that, my guess is a day or two. Perhaps this is the year for me to observe more closely and find out. Currently we have three begging nestlings in the nest.

Mary Saylor
Issaquah

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 7/9/20 3:47 pm
From: Mary Saylor <birder...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] fledglings returning to nest
My observations are not as detailed as Jim’s, but I have also been watching a violet-green swallow nest box on our house for years, and I’ve definitely seen the fledglings go back into (and on top of) the next box after they start to fly. I couldn’t say for how long they do that, my guess is a day or two. Perhaps this is the year for me to observe more closely and find out. Currently we have three begging nestlings in the nest.

Mary Saylor
Issaquah

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 7/9/20 12:47 pm
From: HAL MICHAEL <ucd880...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] fledglings returning to nest
I never watched my boxes closely enough to see if the nestlings came back; I banded them and then they left. They could have come back for a day or two.

But, one year I had a nest of Starlings. Banded all the young. Checked the box a couple days later and found a young one. Unbanded. My supposition, based on egg and fledgling counts in the box over time, is that this was from another nest and seeking overnight accommodations. Only time I have ever seen that.

Hal Michael

Olympia WA
360-459-4005
360-791-7702 (C)
<ucd880...>

> On 07/09/2020 11:26 AM James Karr <jrkarr...> wrote:
>
>
> Dear Gary and Tweeters -
>
> I have several relevant experiences in the last decade where I now live in Sequim. One involves a Violet-green Swallow nest box on the front porch of my house. In the last 6 years nesting attempts have been made every year with successful fledging in three of those years. This year two young first showed in the opening 1 July and by late afternoon 3 July two fledglings were out flying about and returning to the box. Awkward flight dynamics had them landing on the roof, front of the box, and entering the box. Two perched for long periods between flights until dusk. Those two and a third begging from inside the box were regularly fed by the adults. The nestlings then spent the night in the box and were calling for food in the early am, 6:00 to 7:00. By shortly after 7 am all had departed and have not returned.
>
> A couple years ago and in the same nest box, the young returned to the box for several days, spending the night with a sibling that could not be coaxed to leave the nest despite valiant efforts by the adults. After three days the reluctant fledgling and all others left without any subsequent returns.
>
> One other observation at this nest is worthy of note. One year the crows found the nest and persisted for a day trying to scare the adults or nestlings to panic and fly away. They came in under the roof overhang on the porch, struck the box, and tried to hang onto the box a number of times. I chased them away and the group eventually gave up.
>
> I have had other nests occupied by VG Swallows but none have ever fledged. My subjective impression is that unsuccessful nest years had inclement weather that influenced foraging success and perhaps insect abundances.
>
> Finally, a decade ago (2008) and at a different location in Sequim, Barn Swallows built a nest just above the front door of my house. Nest constructions began 18 May and was completed by 24 May. By 4-5 July first two and eventually 4 nestlings could be seen perched on the edge of the nest. By 7 July they were flying about and perching on the roof of the house throughout the day. They returned to the nest in the late afternoon and spent the night there. I cannot say when they finally left; I recall that they were present for the next day or so before finally disappearing.
>
> Best wishes and stay healthy to all!
>
> Jim Karr
>
>
>
> > > On Jul 9, 2020, at 10:02 AM, Gary Bletsch < <garybletsch...> mailto:<garybletsch...> > wrote:
> > Dear Tweeters,
> >
> > The Barn Swallows in my barn produced four chicks. About a week ago, one fell out of the nest; it was dead (and headless) when I found it on the barn floor. I am guessing that a small mammal ate part of the bird after it fell.
> >
> > The three remaining chicks throve. Yesterday (8th July), when I went into the barn, there were no chicks in the nest, and there were quite a few Barn Swallows flying all around me in the barn, calling. They were moving so fast that I could not count them; I could not tell if they were adults or juveniles. I assumed that the young had fledged successfully, and were flying around inside the barn.
> >
> > A few hours later, toward dusk, I went back to the barn, and all three young Barn Swallows were back in the nest! I don't remember ever seeing a fledged songbird return to a nest before. Checking online, I had to sort through a lot of junk websites, but did see several reasonably good sources that stated that this is rare, but not unheard of. Not as rare as a warbler feeding another species' fledgling, but still pretty cool!
> >
> > Now, back to a question from a week or two ago, about an egg that I'd found on my gravel driveway. No one ventured a guess, so I will venture mine. I think that the white egg was from a Eurasian Collared Dove. I suppose it could have been from a Red-breasted Sapsucker, but there are already juvenile Red-breasted Sapsuckers in my yard, and I have read that this species raises but one brood per year. I can't think of any other birds in my neighborhood that might lay such an egg, but I might be missing a species or two.
> >
> > Yours truly,
> >
> > Gary Bletsch
> > _______________________________________________
> > Tweeters mailing list
> > <Tweeters...> mailto:<Tweeters...>
> > http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
> >
> > >
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/9/20 12:38 pm
From: Lynn Wohlers <wohlers13...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Parakeet at my feeders
What a great story about the captured parakeet and its friend. I lived for
many years in NYC, and one summer morning, a parakeet flew through the open
window of my 5th-floor apartment on the Upper West Side. A friend helped me
lure him into a birdcage she gave me later that day. He became a beloved
pet, sometimes perching on my plate in the morning to peck at my toast, or
flying in the hallway while singing. A few years alter he caught a chill,
unfortunately, and the vet couldn't save him. The serendipity of that
little bird flying into my apartment was a great experience.

Lynn
Anacortes

On Thu, Jul 9, 2020 at 10:49 AM Diane Weinstein <diane_weinstein...>
wrote:

> Christina,
>
> A few years ago a friend had a parakeet coming to her feeder. She was
> concerned that he would not survive the coming winter. With the advice of
> a rescue group (probably PAWS) she was able to capture the bird and keep
> him as a pet. To keep him company, she also adopted another parakeet from a
> shelter in Seattle. The other parakeet had also been an escapee who had
> been caught in the wild. The two escapees quickly became fast friends and
> talked up a storm presumably about their adventures in the wild.
>
> If the parakeet continues to come to your feeder, you may want to consider
> trapping him.
>
> Diane Weinstein
> Sammamish
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> on behalf
> of Christina <joannabird413...>
> *Sent:* Wednesday, July 8, 2020 1:55 PM
> *To:* Tweeters <tweeters...>
> *Subject:* [Tweeters] Parakeet at my feeders
>
> Hello all,
> Sittin at the feeder and surprise, a parakeet! Green belly, yellow face,
> and indigo blue tail. Very pretty and healthy looking
>
> Christina Tredick
> Woodinville
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>


--
Lynn Wohlers

Blogging at Bluebrightly <https://bluebrightly.com/>
Photography on Flickr <https://www.flickr.com/photos/lynnwohlers/>
And at Lynn Wohlers.com <http://lynn-wohlers.artistwebsites.com>

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/9/20 11:31 am
From: James Karr <jrkarr...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] fledglings returning to nest
Dear Gary and Tweeters -

I have several relevant experiences in the last decade where I now live in Sequim. One involves a Violet-green Swallow nest box on the front porch of my house. In the last 6 years nesting attempts have been made every year with successful fledging in three of those years. This year two young first showed in the opening 1 July and by late afternoon 3 July two fledglings were out flying about and returning to the box. Awkward flight dynamics had them landing on the roof, front of the box, and entering the box. Two perched for long periods between flights until dusk. Those two and a third begging from inside the box were regularly fed by the adults. The nestlings then spent the night in the box and were calling for food in the early am, 6:00 to 7:00. By shortly after 7 am all had departed and have not returned.

A couple years ago and in the same nest box, the young returned to the box for several days, spending the night with a sibling that could not be coaxed to leave the nest despite valiant efforts by the adults. After three days the reluctant fledgling and all others left without any subsequent returns.

One other observation at this nest is worthy of note. One year the crows found the nest and persisted for a day trying to scare the adults or nestlings to panic and fly away. They came in under the roof overhang on the porch, struck the box, and tried to hang onto the box a number of times. I chased them away and the group eventually gave up.

I have had other nests occupied by VG Swallows but none have ever fledged. My subjective impression is that unsuccessful nest years had inclement weather that influenced foraging success and perhaps insect abundances.

Finally, a decade ago (2008) and at a different location in Sequim, Barn Swallows built a nest just above the front door of my house. Nest constructions began 18 May and was completed by 24 May. By 4-5 July first two and eventually 4 nestlings could be seen perched on the edge of the nest. By 7 July they were flying about and perching on the roof of the house throughout the day. They returned to the nest in the late afternoon and spent the night there. I cannot say when they finally left; I recall that they were present for the next day or so before finally disappearing.

Best wishes and stay healthy to all!

Jim Karr


> On Jul 9, 2020, at 10:02 AM, Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> wrote:
>
> Dear Tweeters,
>
> The Barn Swallows in my barn produced four chicks. About a week ago, one fell out of the nest; it was dead (and headless) when I found it on the barn floor. I am guessing that a small mammal ate part of the bird after it fell.
>
> The three remaining chicks throve. Yesterday (8th July), when I went into the barn, there were no chicks in the nest, and there were quite a few Barn Swallows flying all around me in the barn, calling. They were moving so fast that I could not count them; I could not tell if they were adults or juveniles. I assumed that the young had fledged successfully, and were flying around inside the barn.
>
> A few hours later, toward dusk, I went back to the barn, and all three young Barn Swallows were back in the nest! I don't remember ever seeing a fledged songbird return to a nest before. Checking online, I had to sort through a lot of junk websites, but did see several reasonably good sources that stated that this is rare, but not unheard of. Not as rare as a warbler feeding another species' fledgling, but still pretty cool!
>
> Now, back to a question from a week or two ago, about an egg that I'd found on my gravel driveway. No one ventured a guess, so I will venture mine. I think that the white egg was from a Eurasian Collared Dove. I suppose it could have been from a Red-breasted Sapsucker, but there are already juvenile Red-breasted Sapsuckers in my yard, and I have read that this species raises but one brood per year. I can't think of any other birds in my neighborhood that might lay such an egg, but I might be missing a species or two.
>
> Yours truly,
>
> Gary Bletsch
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/9/20 11:07 am
From: Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Parakeet at my feeders
Another thought, if you have a local community group or lost pets group on facebook, you might check to see if someone is looking for their parakeet.  I had one escape once and was pretty upset until it, fortunately, returned.
Peggy



On Thursday, July 9, 2020, 10:48:02 a.m. PDT, Diane Weinstein <diane_weinstein...> wrote:

Christina,
A few years ago a friend had a parakeet coming to her feeder.  She was concerned that he would not survive the coming winter.  With the advice of a rescue group (probably PAWS) she was able to capture the bird and keep him as a pet. To keep him company, she also adopted another parakeet from a shelter in Seattle.  The other parakeet had also been an escapee who had been caught in the wild.  The two escapees quickly became fast friends and talked up a storm presumably about their adventures in the wild.
If the parakeet continues to come to your feeder, you may want to consider trapping him.
Diane WeinsteinSammamish
From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> on behalf of Christina <joannabird413...>
Sent: Wednesday, July 8, 2020 1:55 PM
To: Tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Parakeet at my feeders Hello all,Sittin at the feeder and surprise, a parakeet! Green belly, yellow face, and indigo blue tail. Very pretty and healthy looking

Christina TredickWoodinville_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/9/20 10:51 am
From: Diane Weinstein <diane_weinstein...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Parakeet at my feeders
Christina,

A few years ago a friend had a parakeet coming to her feeder. She was concerned that he would not survive the coming winter. With the advice of a rescue group (probably PAWS) she was able to capture the bird and keep him as a pet. To keep him company, she also adopted another parakeet from a shelter in Seattle. The other parakeet had also been an escapee who had been caught in the wild. The two escapees quickly became fast friends and talked up a storm presumably about their adventures in the wild.

If the parakeet continues to come to your feeder, you may want to consider trapping him.

Diane Weinstein
Sammamish

________________________________
From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> on behalf of Christina <joannabird413...>
Sent: Wednesday, July 8, 2020 1:55 PM
To: Tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Parakeet at my feeders

Hello all,
Sittin at the feeder and surprise, a parakeet! Green belly, yellow face, and indigo blue tail. Very pretty and healthy looking

Christina Tredick
Woodinville

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/9/20 10:06 am
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] fledglings returning to nest
Dear Tweeters,
The Barn Swallows in my barn produced four chicks. About a week ago, one fell out of the nest; it was dead (and headless) when I found it on the barn floor. I am guessing that a small mammal ate part of the bird after it fell.
The three remaining chicks throve. Yesterday (8th July), when I went into the barn, there were no chicks in the nest, and there were quite a few Barn Swallows flying all around me in the barn, calling. They were moving so fast that I could not count them; I could not tell if they were adults or juveniles. I assumed that the young had fledged successfully, and were flying around inside the barn.
A few hours later, toward dusk, I went back to the barn, and all three young Barn Swallows were back in the nest! I don't remember ever seeing a fledged songbird return to a nest before. Checking online, I had to sort through a lot of junk websites, but did see several reasonably good sources that stated that this is rare, but not unheard of. Not as rare as a warbler feeding another species' fledgling, but still pretty cool!
Now, back to a question from a week or two ago, about an egg that I'd found on my gravel driveway. No one ventured a guess, so I will venture mine. I think that the white egg was from a Eurasian Collared Dove. I suppose it could have been from a Red-breasted Sapsucker, but there are already juvenile Red-breasted Sapsuckers in my yard, and I have read that this species raises but one brood per year. I can't think of any other birds in my neighborhood that might lay such an egg, but I might be missing a species or two.
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/9/20 7:54 am
From: Joan Miller <jemskink...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Brief visit by Cooper's Hawk
Hello Tweets,

Yesterday I was enjoying the weather and a good book on my deck, when two
flickers suddenly dashed by. Then another similarly sized bird flew by and
landed on a telephone pole next to my house. Assuming it was a flicker, I
glanced over. To my surprise, it was a raptor! A young Cooper's Hawk, no
doubt from one of the nearby nests. It sat there for a few minutes, looking
around. Then it flew off into a tree. A few minutes later another flicker
came screeching by and I thought, oh no, not the flicker! The hawk came
flying out but did not pursue the flicker. It again took to the pole. Then
it flew off to the south of my house. Glad I was present for the brief
drama!

Joan Miller
West Seattle
jemskink at gmail dot com

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/9/20 2:58 am
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Strange warbler family in Seattle
birds are particularly strange when choosing who to feed. for example,
here's a video of a black-headed cardinal feeding koi:

https://youtu.be/qtWcb7TwClo

a video of a black swan feeding koi:

https://youtu.be/S9nk9_ms0z0

and a video of a canada goose (accidentally) feeding koi:

https://youtu.be/VNC91V_KDPk



On Thu, Jul 9, 2020 at 12:45 AM B Boekelheide <bboek...> wrote:

> Hello, Dave, and Tweeters,
>
> Thanks for your warbler story. It reminds me of an occurrence at the
> Farallon Islands many years ago. In the colony below our murre blind both
> Common Murres and Brandt’s Cormorants nested right next to each other, with
> the murres just out of pecking distance of the cormorants. One time we
> watched a murre egg roll away from an incubating murre right into a nearby
> Brandt’s Cormorant nest. The cormorant pair then incubated the murre egg
> along with their own eggs all the way until it hatched. After hatching,
> the cormorants tried to feed the murre chick their usual way, by opening
> their bills and expecting the chick to retrieve food out of their mouths.
> Unfortunately the little murre chick never figured it out and eventually
> died.
>
> I suspect nature is full of mistakes like these, but we don’t get a chance
> to witness them too often because they usually have bad endings.
>
> Bob Boekelheide
> Dungeness
>
>
> On Jul 7, 2020, at 10:31 AM, Dave Slager <dave.slager...> wrote:
>
> Tweeters,
>
> This morning I saw a real oddity at Carkeek Park in Seattle: An adult
> Wilson's Warbler feeding a fledgling Black-throated Gray Warbler. At first
> I thought my eyes must be making a mistake, but I watched 7 feeding events,
> so it was the real deal. The youngster did not appear to be a hybrid.
>
> I can think of a few ways this might have come about, but they all sound
> pretty far-fetched. I've never seen anything like this before. Has anyone
> out there in Tweeterdom seen something like this, or heard about an
> instance?
>
> In case anyone is interested in looking for it, it was right by the Honey
> Bucket in the middle of Carkeek Park, just below the water treatment
> facility.
>
> Dave Slager
> Seattle, WA
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>


--
GrrlScientist | @GrrlScientist <https://twitter.com/GrrlScientist>
<grrlscientist...>
Words: Forbes <http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/> | Medium
<https://medium.com/@GrrlScientist>
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/8/20 3:42 pm
From: B Boekelheide <bboek...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Strange warbler family in Seattle
Hello, Dave, and Tweeters,

Thanks for your warbler story. It reminds me of an occurrence at the Farallon Islands many years ago. In the colony below our murre blind both Common Murres and Brandt’s Cormorants nested right next to each other, with the murres just out of pecking distance of the cormorants. One time we watched a murre egg roll away from an incubating murre right into a nearby Brandt’s Cormorant nest. The cormorant pair then incubated the murre egg along with their own eggs all the way until it hatched. After hatching, the cormorants tried to feed the murre chick their usual way, by opening their bills and expecting the chick to retrieve food out of their mouths. Unfortunately the little murre chick never figured it out and eventually died.

I suspect nature is full of mistakes like these, but we don’t get a chance to witness them too often because they usually have bad endings.

Bob Boekelheide
Dungeness


> On Jul 7, 2020, at 10:31 AM, Dave Slager <dave.slager...> <mailto:<dave.slager...>> wrote:
>
> Tweeters,
>
> This morning I saw a real oddity at Carkeek Park in Seattle: An adult Wilson's Warbler feeding a fledgling Black-throated Gray Warbler. At first I thought my eyes must be making a mistake, but I watched 7 feeding events, so it was the real deal. The youngster did not appear to be a hybrid.
>
> I can think of a few ways this might have come about, but they all sound pretty far-fetched. I've never seen anything like this before. Has anyone out there in Tweeterdom seen something like this, or heard about an instance?
>
> In case anyone is interested in looking for it, it was right by the Honey Bucket in the middle of Carkeek Park, just below the water treatment facility.
>
> Dave Slager
> Seattle, WA

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/8/20 2:10 pm
From: <dgrainger...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Red Crossbills at our bird-mound feeders
A pair, last few evenings... they seem to like the Wild Birds Unlimited
mix of fruit and seed. I was able to get a number of photos; posted one
on website birdsbydave.com.
(due to constraints of the site, I have things in only eight categories
which makes for some odd mixes of birds, but, Oh Well! they are on it to
be seen...
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 7/8/20 2:00 pm
From: Christina <joannabird413...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Parakeet at my feeders
Hello all,
Sittin at the feeder and surprise, a parakeet! Green belly, yellow face,
and indigo blue tail. Very pretty and healthy looking

Christina Tredick
Woodinville

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/8/20 12:26 pm
From: Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bird artist at Cornell
Tweeters,
I don’t have social media accounts, and I’m not normally one to pass on this sort of information, but.... I was at Virginia Mason recently, and a resident surgeon spotted my Seattle Audubon shirt and we started talking about birding. It turns out his brother, Bryce Robinson, is a PhD candidate at Cornell. However, more than that, he’s a bird artist. His doctor brother gave me Bryce’s Instagram account “ornithologi” and I recently decided to sign up for my first social media account to check out Bryce’s work. It’s amazing!

If you have an Instagram account, I think it’s worthwhile to check his work. That’s ornithologi with an “i” at the end instead of a “y”.

Denis DeSilvis
<avianacres...>

Avian Acres 🦉
Roy, WA
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/7/20 10:10 pm
From: <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Sawmill Creek Burn, Veazie Marsh - SE King County at its best
Tweets – Yesterday, I drove up to the Sawmill Creek Burn in extreme SE King County. This is between Windy Gap and Kelly Butte, and is accessed off Hwy 410 near Greenwater by taking FR-70 to FR-7030 to FR-7034.

FR-7030 gets off to a really bad start with a failed culvert leading to flowing water over the roadway – could get ugly. But the rest of the way was quite passable. I would suggest a higher clearance vehicle – don’t try to take your Prius.

The directions to the hotspot I was following placed me at the top of the burn, where there are a couple of spurs with viewpoints. Most of the best parts of the burn are down below, but it’s pretty easy to find the way down. There was no snow, so I was fully able to drive around all of the lumber roads riddling the burn. It was salvage logged, but the topography meant they skipped many groves of trees.

Highlights:
a.. Sooty Grouse – heard one up at the top of the burn site
b.. Osprey – odd to see this as a flyover in high elevation King County
c.. BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKER – at least 3 in one grove of large burned trees: male drumming, female feeding at least one juvenile. Had 1-2 BBWO at another grove at the very bottom of the burn
d.. Olive-sided Flycatcher – several singing
e.. Canada Jay – adults feeding young in the upper part of the burn
f.. Warbling Vireo, Orange-crowned Warbler, MacGillivray’s Warbler, Townsend’s Warbler, Wilson’s Warbler, Western Tanager – great looks in some of the unburned deciduous groves
g.. Rock Wren – calling from the rocky cliffs well above
h.. House Wren – 1 or 2 singing in the lowest parts of the burn
i.. Western Bluebird – 1 or 2 pairs
j.. Mountain Bluebird – at least 10
k.. Townsend’s Solitaire – several calling and singing from high perches
l.. Hermit Thrush – all over, giving great looks, nice singing
m.. Evening Grosbeak – one close look at a pair, several flyovers
n.. CASSIN’S FINCH – quite a bit of singing, plus a great look at a pair at eye level
o.. “Slate-colored” Fox Sparrow – singing and calling at the high part of the burn
I had a total of three SNOWSHOE HARE sightings, two at separate locations in the burn, and one on my way up.

It was a very enjoyable way to spend a morning. In the afternoon, after I made my way down to Enumclaw, I “discovered” what turned out to be an eBird Hotspot named the “Veazie marsh and fields” east of Enumclaw, north of Hwy 410, before 410 starts up into the hills. There is a pullout on the west side of the road at the south end of the two marsh ponds. Viewing is limited to walking the side of the road. Being tall is an advantage, as is a scope. But MY OH MY it was filled with birds.

Highlights:
a.. Wood Duck and Mallard families
b.. Pied-billed Grebe – pair with young chicks being fed
c.. American Coot – adult and two independent chicks
d.. Virginia Rail – at least 3 heard
e.. SORA – saw one adult, saw one independent juvenile, heard a third bird whinny!
f.. Least Sandpiper – at least 3
g.. Wilson’s Snipe – at least 1
h.. LESSER YELLOWLEGS – one. All shorebirds were seen on the far edge of the ponds
i.. Tree Swallow – HUGE FLOCK, with a few adults, but at least 120 that appeared to be brownish juveniles. Spent a lot of time roosting together on wire fences. Presumed pre-migration flock
j.. BANK SWALLOW – maybe 50, mixed in with the Tree Swallows, making for a very difficult identification challenge. Maybe 50-50 adults and juveniles. In flight, they were often flying in formation (known and very useful field mark) Perched adult birds were easily identified by their crisp neck bands and by the white wrapping more towards the back of the neck than on the Tree Swallows
The longer I looked, the more species I turned up.

It was a real swallow fest, with five species and many, many birds (plus 10+ Vaux’s Swifts flying low)

A really good day.

= Michael Hobbs
= www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
= <BirdMarymoor...>
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/7/20 9:31 pm
From: Sammy Catiis <hikersammy...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Strange warbler family in Seattle
I have seen a lot of crazy stuff, one which included a Black-throated Gray Warbler keeping company with a Lazuli Bunting 😮 During the breeding period, we did learn that both were using the same bush to nest in but separate families. I do know that the instinct to feed is very strong so it's not unlikely that this Warbler got mixed up and seen an adult with food, and naturally, the adult fed it. This happens across bird species. I have a photo (witnessed and took) of an adult Western Tanager begging a worm from an adult Robin? Now in this case it was not fed haha Coincidently, it was the same week / same place as the above encounter. I have also seen an accidental fledging of an Osprey that landed in another nest down the river.. the parent came back and fed it.. waited till it was done before chasing off. 😮 So, this is very cool.. and wonderful documentation of yet another way the bird world adapts and survives. Thank you for this story and for being so observant. Remember the Red Tail chick raised by the Eagles a few years back? (or was that last year cause my memory sucks)

Sammy
Sequim

________________________________
From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> on behalf of Dave Slager <dave.slager...>
Sent: Tuesday, July 7, 2020 10:31 AM
To: Tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Strange warbler family in Seattle

Tweeters,

This morning I saw a real oddity at Carkeek Park in Seattle: An adult Wilson's Warbler feeding a fledgling Black-throated Gray Warbler. At first I thought my eyes must be making a mistake, but I watched 7 feeding events, so it was the real deal. The youngster did not appear to be a hybrid.

I can think of a few ways this might have come about, but they all sound pretty far-fetched. I've never seen anything like this before. Has anyone out there in Tweeterdom seen something like this, or heard about an instance?

In case anyone is interested in looking for it, it was right by the Honey Bucket in the middle of Carkeek Park, just below the water treatment facility.

Dave Slager
Seattle, WA
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/7/20 6:47 pm
From: Diann MacRae <tvulture...>
Subject: [Tweeters] June 2020 TUVU report
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/7/20 2:14 pm
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Strange warbler family in Seattle
First you took our crows away, now you are going to lump all our warblers - I knew it!
That Slager…..

Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA

> On Jul 7, 2020, at 10:31 AM, Dave Slager <dave.slager...> wrote:
>
> Tweeters,
>
> This morning I saw a real oddity at Carkeek Park in Seattle: An adult Wilson's Warbler feeding a fledgling Black-throated Gray Warbler. At first I thought my eyes must be making a mistake, but I watched 7 feeding events, so it was the real deal. The youngster did not appear to be a hybrid.
>
> I can think of a few ways this might have come about, but they all sound pretty far-fetched. I've never seen anything like this before. Has anyone out there in Tweeterdom seen something like this, or heard about an instance?
>
> In case anyone is interested in looking for it, it was right by the Honey Bucket in the middle of Carkeek Park, just below the water treatment facility.
>
> Dave Slager
> Seattle, WA
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/7/20 1:58 pm
From: Jennifer Jarstad <jennjarstad...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Two dead Chickadees
I don't know about Chickadees, but I do know that Pine Siskins are very
vulnerable to disease from feeders that are not cleaned regularly.

Jenn Jarstad
Seattle, WA

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/7/20 10:38 am
From: Dave Slager <dave.slager...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Strange warbler family in Seattle
Tweeters,

This morning I saw a real oddity at Carkeek Park in Seattle: An adult
Wilson's Warbler feeding a fledgling Black-throated Gray Warbler. At first
I thought my eyes must be making a mistake, but I watched 7 feeding events,
so it was the real deal. The youngster did not appear to be a hybrid.

I can think of a few ways this might have come about, but they all sound
pretty far-fetched. I've never seen anything like this before. Has anyone
out there in Tweeterdom seen something like this, or heard about an
instance?

In case anyone is interested in looking for it, it was right by the Honey
Bucket in the middle of Carkeek Park, just below the water treatment
facility.

Dave Slager
Seattle, WA

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/7/20 10:03 am
From: Bruce LaBar <blabar...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Westport Pelagic Trip
This coming Saturday, there are a few spots remaining for any of you seafarers out there. Covid protocols are followed.
Weather looks great.
For further information and to make reservations, please visit the website at www.westportseabirds.com
Bruce LaBar
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 7/7/20 9:47 am
From: Robert Gray <robertgary02...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Murmuration
We witnessed an enormous flock of large white birds, believed to be Terns, performing elaborate murmuration maneuvers near Goat Island on 7/04/20. This would be the Goat Island near La Conner. They were 3 or so miles from our vantage point on Whydby Island so identification was impossible but they were large, white and performed with the same precision you see with Dunlins.
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/20 9:57 pm
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Skagit Long-billed Curlew
Dear Tweeters,
This afternoon (sixth July) there was a Long-billed Curlew at Hayton Reserve. It was foraging out by the break in the dike, in and out of which the tidewaters flow. It stayed with a small flock of Greater Yellowlegs for a time, then disappeared.
Other cool Skagit birds today included the continuing YB Chat west of Hamilton, a Red Crossbill flying over my house, and three Purple Martins at Fox Road.
Once I had seen a few nifty birds in my neighborhood this morning, I decided to try to best the July big-day record for Skagit County, which was 77 species. I think I ended up with 98 for the day. If I had not gotten off to such a late start (0800), I likely would have made it to a hundred species--but even tardy birders gets a few worms. 
Good old Ken Knittle. If it were not for Ken and Washington Birder, I would not have known about that 77, would not have decided to go chasing it today, and would not have seen all the cool birds that were out there! Wherever you are, Ken, thanks!
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/20 8:06 pm
From: <dgrainger...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Two dead Chickadees

Certainly hope this is not the same infection that hit the Pine Siskins
so hard last year! Anybody expert in that field out there with info?
________________________________________________________________
On 2020-07-06 15:44, Lynn Wohlers wrote:
> We just found a dead Chickadee under our feeders, the second one in
> about 7 days. I didn't see any injuries in either bird. I believe both
> were Black-capped. The first one we found was very disheveled, and I
> had noticed a disheveled, weak-looking Chickadee at the feeder the day
> before. That was the day we had pretty heavy rain all day (we're in
> Anacortes).
>
> It seems unusual for two birds to die in the same spot so close in
> time. We have Barred owls but they would have made off with a meal,
> and a cursory look showed no injuries.
>
> Does anyone have an idea why this would happen? A dirty feeder
> possibly? We do have a big Chickadee population (Black-capped &
> Chestnut-backed).
>
> Thanks!
>
> --
>
> Lynn Wohlers
>
> Blogging at Bluebrightly [1]
> Photography on Flickr [2]
> And at Lynn Wohlers.com [3]
>
>
>
> Links:
> ------
> [1] https://bluebrightly.com/
> [2] https://www.flickr.com/photos/lynnwohlers/
> [3] http://lynn-wohlers.artistwebsites.com
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/20 3:51 pm
From: Lynn Wohlers <wohlers13...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Two dead Chickadees
We just found a dead Chickadee under our feeders, the second one in about 7
days. I didn't see any injuries in either bird. I believe both were
Black-capped. The first one we found was very disheveled, and I had noticed
a disheveled, weak-looking Chickadee at the feeder the day before. That was
the day we had pretty heavy rain all day (we're in Anacortes).
It seems unusual for two birds to die in the same spot so close in time. We
have Barred owls but they would have made off with a meal, and a cursory
look showed no injuries.
Does anyone have an idea why this would happen? A dirty feeder possibly? We
do have a big Chickadee population (Black-capped & Chestnut-backed).
Thanks!

--
Lynn Wohlers

Blogging at Bluebrightly <https://bluebrightly.com/>
Photography on Flickr <https://www.flickr.com/photos/lynnwohlers/>
And at Lynn Wohlers.com <http://lynn-wohlers.artistwebsites.com>

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/20 3:10 pm
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] USA TODAY: White woman who called police on Black bird watcher charged with filing false report

White woman who called police on Black bird watcher charged with filing false report
Cooper is facing a misdemeanor charge of filing a false report, Manhattan's district attorney announced Monday.

Read in USA TODAY: https://apple.news/Az6bzXSE-R6m_y9jYZXc0RQ


Shared from Apple News


Sent from my iPhone
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/20 2:35 pm
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] The Atlantic: Lockdowns Could Be the ‘Biggest Conservation Action’ in a Century

Lockdowns Could Be the ‘Biggest Conservation Action’ in a Century
Acknowledging the virus’s silver linings can feel ghoulish. But mounting evidence suggests that we’re in the midst of an unprecedented roadkill reprieve.

Read in The Atlantic: https://apple.news/AMx5I4JY7QsaJqVnQf28iFA


Shared from Apple News


Sent from my iPhone
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/20 1:34 pm
From: Elston Hill <elstonh...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Canon Service
Just want to say my experience with Canon does not jive with the last email about sending in a 7D.

I send in Canon cameras and lenses to Canon several times a year. They usually turn around my orders in one day. Prior to using Canon, I took my 7d Mark ii to the local repair shop which is very reputable. They quoted me $600 for a repair. I then sent the 7D to Canon which charged me $70. I damaged a new lens which was under warranty with blowing sand down in the Falklands. I sent the lens in to Canon expecting to be billed and they repaired it under warranty even though the warranty did not cover damage to the lens.

The Sony might disappoint you. Slower and less reliable focus. If you are aiming for a mirrorless camera, rumor has it that the Canon R5 coming out in a couple months will be much superior to any other mirrorless currently on the market.

Elston
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/20 10:38 am
From: Clare McLean <clareishere...>
Subject: [Tweeters] KUOW Birding While Black

A very belated thanks to Whitney Neufeld-Kaiser for bringing out attention to how some birding communities have responded to posts and conversations re: Black Birders' Week, Birding While Black, etc. (her original post was a few weeks ago).

Here's yesterday's segment on KUOW about the subject--a good, fair-minded overview of recent events and conversations. It also mentions of some of the groups and individuals that explicitly aim to make birding communities more inclusive and open to discussion, rather than shutting down conversations:

https://www.kuow.org/stories/black-birders-ruffle-feathers-on-facebook


Clare McLean
Mountlake Terrace, WA
<clareishere...>


**Please excuse typos or weird formatting due to unruly voice recognition software.**
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/20 9:57 pm
From: <strix.nebulosa1987...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Goodbye Northwestern Crow
Actually all native Corvids including crows are protected under the Migratory Bid treaty Act and their take outside of an authorized hunting season is illegal. Some sates do have hunting seasons on crows just like they do on waterfowl. As with waterfowl, crow seasons are tightly regulated when they are authorized. If you want to see the official list see this link.

https://www.fws.gov/birds/management/managed-species/migratory-bird-treaty-act-protected-species.php#alphabetical



Mike





From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of J Christian Kessler
Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2020 8:32 PM
To: Robert O'Brien <baro...>
Cc: TWEETERS tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Goodbye Northwestern Crow



Starlings, as an introduced species, are not covered by the Migratory Bird Treaty & Act, and many states classify them as vermin. Crows are excluded from the Treaty/Act and most states also classify them as vermin. In most states there are no restrictions on shooting vermin (whether birds or rodents) - only restrictions on where one can discharge a firearm (populated areas, from roads, etc), but animals classified as vermin are vulnerable all days & seasons in most states. Deer & Elk know when & where hunting them is permitted, I think Crows are smarter ...



Chris Kessler

Seattle



On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 6:14 PM Robert O'Brien <baro...> <mailto:<baro...> > wrote:

I agree with Dennis about the wrong end of the gun. An adjacent property owner had a teenage son. This is a rural area and they were hunters.

The son spent a lot of time shooting Starlings which was assumed to be quasi legal. I suspect he shot Crows when he could.

This was more than 25 years ago, before we purchased that property. To this day I have _never_ seen a crow on the ground anywhere in the area, even though flocks fly overhead all the time. There are about 100 acres of farmland in the area. Fallow some years and in the winter. Never on the ground. A few days ago, I was amazed that a few were mobbing a Barred Owl in a large cedar tree on the property. Maybe they heard the Robins/Steller's Jays? I don't recall ever having seen them even land in a tree before in all these years.

Crows have long memories. But, they quite happily walk around on my daughter's tiny lawn in Portland. Not a care in the world there. Crows are smart, but that's not news.

Another interesting factoid. So far as is known the (former) Northwestern Crow never made it to Oregon. BUT, the beach crows here are also very small and seem to be confined to the beach areas, often congregating on tidal flats. Wish I was a good enough birder to have compared these crows with the larger, inland ones or with NW Crows. I guess that could be easily done through the Macaulay Library. And by inland, I don't mean far inland. I just mean a few miles from the beach where the crows appear quite a bit larger. And less prone to moving around in flocks. (Hopefully, this last paragraph isn't a Fake Factoid, a part of my imagination).



Bob OBrien Portland



On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 5:22 PM Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson...> <mailto:<dennispaulson...> > wrote:

Northwestern Crows are thought to have evolved in coastal areas with Native American villages, thus adapted to living around people. Why the eastern crows didn’t do the same, I don’t know, except that crows have been agricultural pests in the East for a very long time and were often sighted at the end of a gun barrel. That may be why they aren’t so tame.



Dennis Paulson

Seattle



On Jun 30, 2020, at 5:03 PM, Catherine Joy <catherinejoymusic...> <mailto:<catherinejoymusic...> > wrote:



Behaviorally, I have noticed the crows on the West coast are more "tame" than East coast birds. I would never see crows just walking around with the pedestrians on busy city streets out East. And I never was able to approach crows so closely until moving here.



On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 4:26 PM Hans-Joachim Feddern <thefedderns...> <mailto:<thefedderns...> > wrote:

This has been a long time in coming and is based on scientific data. Personally I feel there is a difference in vocalization with American Crows and the size difference can be quite obvious. Also habitat: "Northwestern" Crows are rarely found too far from shore. To me there also is a difference between calls of American Crows here in the Northwest and birds on the East Coast. I have never heard a crow in Maryland doing the "meow" call you can hear here frequently. Another interesting observation, is that I have never seen a roadkill-ed crow on the East Coast, but see many around here! Just thinking!



On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 12:55 PM dick <dick...> <mailto:<dick...> > wrote:



The 2020 AOS Supplement is out! - American Birding Association





https://www.aba.org/2020-aos-supplement/









Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone



_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...> <mailto:<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters






--

Hans Feddern
Twin Lakes/Federal Way, WA
<thefedderns...> <mailto:<thefedderns...>

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...> <mailto:<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...> <mailto:<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters



_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...> <mailto:<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...> <mailto:<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters



--

"moderation in everything, including moderation"
Rustin Thompson


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/20 7:42 pm
From: Nadine Drisseq <drisseq.n...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Canon repair experience?
My 7DII was damaged in an accident. I sent it to the Costa Mesa location
for repair as the corner of the lcd screen was chipped and I wanted to
ensure the internal electronics checked out ok too. They replaced the
screen but with a tiny bubble. I was glad to have the camera back after 6
weeks of waiting, and thought not much of a small bubble in the lcd. A year
later the bubble had grown to ¼ cm squared, so I called Canon, but the
warranty on the repair is only 6 months and they told me I was out of luck.
Two years on the bubble is now about a cm2. It's super annoying. I should
have sent it back within 6 months but I didn't want to wait another 6
weeks. I will probably get it repaired locally. Won't be using Canon repair
again unless I have no other choice. Honestly, I am looking at ditching
Canon entirely, and going with a mirrorless Sony for a future body. Sooner
than later, I hope.

Nadine

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/20 4:34 pm
From: <byers345...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Birds east of the Columbia River
Hello Tweeters,

Since we don't feel comfortable spending a night away from
home yet, we decided to do a long one-day trip to eastern Washington to
visit Grant and Adams counties. Our first stop was the County Line Ponds on
Hwy 26, a few miles this side of Othello. There were a few American
Avocets, Black-necked Stilts, and Wilson's Phalaropes on the north side of
the highway. Our presence didn't seem to bother the birds at all and they
began to interact with one another, flying around, calling, wading, feeding.
These birds are all so graceful and beautiful, it almost doesn't matter what
they do. They are wonderful to observe. The light wasn't very good but we
took lots of pictures.

Following the County Line Ponds, we headed to the Para
Ponds. A Long-tailed Grackle had been seen there on July 2. It wasn't
there on July 3, but we had a good look at the American White Pelicans, a
few Tricolored Blackbirds, and other birds that were hanging out there. We
drove up through the Columbia NWR to Potholes State Park for lunch. There
we saw some distant Forster's Terns among the usual birds that live there.
Finally we stopped at Martha Lake (right near George, WA) and then headed
home.

I have put the best of these photos in a small album
commemorating the day if you are interested in seeing some of these birds.



https://www.flickr.com/photos/29258421@N07/albums/72157714985946848/with/500
80443293/



Happy safe birding, Charlotte Byers, Edmonds


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/20 3:22 pm
From: <dgrainger...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Freedom and Flames

On that set of Flicker photos, Pat and I especially like your 2015 photo
of the bird on tree trunk looking up at a burl structure that looks for
all the world like a monkey face!


On 2020-07-05 13:40, Hubbell wrote:
> Tweeters,
>
> The title of this week’s post may not remind you of a local bird.
> However, I hope enjoy my efforts to link the ideas to the birds.
>
> https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2020/07/freedom-and-flames.html
>
> Have a great day on Union Bay, where Black Birders are welcome!
>
> Larry Hubbell
> ldhubbell at comcast dot net
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/20 1:45 pm
From: Hubbell <ldhubbell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Freedom and Flames
Tweeters,

The title of this week’s post may not remind you of a local bird. However, I hope enjoy my efforts to link the ideas to the birds.

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2020/07/freedom-and-flames.html <https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2020/07/freedom-and-flames.html>

Have a great day on Union Bay, where Black Birders are welcome!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/20 12:38 pm
From: Tim Brennan <tsbrennan...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Hermit, Townsend's, and Black-throated Gray for that matter
Hey tweets,

To piggy-back on Alan's post about those Hermit x Townsend's hybrids: I want to highlight the song pitfall with a comparison to Townsend's and Black-throated Gray Warblers. The songs for those two warblers are fairly variable, and it leads to some songs that essentially overlap in too many ways (cadence, quality, etc.), for an identification, or even a guess worth a nickel. However, within that variability, there are also some songs that are more classic BTGW or TOWA, where . . . I just don't remember putting binoculars on the bird and finding that I'd been fooled. The overlap exists, for sure, but there's some songs from individuals of both species that make for easier identifications for sure.

These other guys, in part because of the hybridization, and in part because of normal variability, just aren't even remotely friendly. I've heard a song that was perfect textbook Hermit Warbler stuff from a bird that had (as far as I could see?) every field mark you would want from a Townsend's Warbler. I don't even know what that means?? My ears still enjoy the different song from Hermits - it's like hearing an accent that you don't get to hear often - but I've just come to understand that this accent may be giving me zero information about the identity of that bird.

May all of your birds be identified enjoyed!

Tim Brennan
Renton

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/20 11:06 am
From: Martha Jordan <mj.cygnus...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bird tracks in the sky
This is a recent National Geographic article on "If birds left tracks in
the sky, they'd look like this"
Truly something to see.
I hope this link works:
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2018/01/photo-journal-birds-paths-migration-starling/?cmpid=org=ngp::mc=crm-email::src=ngp::cmp=editorial::add=SpecialEdition_Escape_20200702&rid=7895D5EA7EB4A7B2F6D9118CA15D2825



Martha Jordan
Everett, WA

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/20 9:22 am
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: [Tweeters] A Puffin Cruise to Smith Island and Lost Opportunities in Arizona
COVID-19 has affected us all - making every birding trip a calculation of risk, protection and reward.  After exploring precautions taken by San Juan Cruises out of Bellingham, I signed on for a "Puffin Cruise" to smith Island on July 3rd.  The large boat was at less than 50% capacity, seating was socially isolated, and masks were required of all aboard.  Less than perfect weather but very calm seas and some clearing when we reached our destination.
Bottom line was more than 2 dozen Tufted Puffins, NO Horned Puffin and many other nice birds.  Details and photos are in the following blog post.  The COVID-19 risk/reward calculation was favorable for that excursion but not so for a hoped for trip to Arizona where there was a good chance to add a number of specialties and rarities to my ABA Life List.  Photos by others of the "opportunities lost" are also in the Post.
I stress that while I am disappointed in missing the trip to Arizona (as well as others), I have no right to complain as so many others are hit so much harder by this terrible Pandemic and its mishandling in the U.S.  I am thankful that my glass is more than half full.
 https://blairbirding.com/2020/07/05/my-glass-less-than-half-empty-and-more-than-half-full/



_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/20 10:15 pm
From: D R <somegum2...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Cordilleran Flycatcher Question
Hi there,
Yesterday, I noticed that someone reported a Cordilleran Flycatcher sighting on eBird on July 3, complete with sound recording. Now, when I search for it under ‘Explore Species”, I am finding no COFL sightings from after early June. Normally, I would think that this would mean that the record was under review, but when I use the alerts tools for ‘Washington Needs’ or for ‘Washington Rare’, the sighting does not come up, despite many other ‘unconfirmed’ sightings appearing on the list. I dug further and found the actual checklist (under ‘recent visits’ to the ‘Mt. Spokane SP--XC Ski Trails’ hotspot) that does indeed still show COFL on the list (thus it was not removed or changed by the eBirder). Does this mean that the COFL sighting was rejected? Even despite that audio evidence? And if there is a ‘policy-level’ decision to reject COFLs, then why have other records made it though this year?
Thanks,
Dave Robichaud
Seattle WA
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/20 8:30 pm
From: Dave Templeton <crazydave65...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Sno Falls Peregrines
Hi

Got a note from Scott Dodson he finally got to the falls. He saw two
fledglings and one adult. Adult is probably the male he calls velocity.
They probably used the scrape site farthest to the right but they are
already out of the nest. I drove by but just kept going. Too crowded for
my taste.

Others might want to give it a shot later in the week.

Regards,

T

crazydave65
At
Gmail daught commie

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/20 3:12 pm
From: Alan Knue <temnurus...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Hermit X Townsend's Warbler Hybrids in WA
Hello All,

On a recent visit to Mt. Walker near Quilcene, I encountered several Hermit
X Townsend's Warbler hybrids, including one that looked very good for
Hermit until I got a good look at it's front and saw a faint wash of yellow
below the black throat. In fact every bird I saw well at this location was
a hybrid which prompts me to bring up what I believe to be an
underappreciated ID pitfall in WA. There are two hybrid zones in WA, one on
the eastern side of the Olympics near the border of Clallam and
Jefferson counties (where Mt. Walker is located) and the second one in a
broad swath of the Cascades south of Mt. Rainier to nearly the Columbia
River. These are well described in this paper by two prominent
ornithologists, Sievert Rohwer and Chris Wood, affiliated with the Burke
Museum:

https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/auk/v115n02/p0284-p0310.pdf

This paper also provides the methods they used to score the plumages of
specimens to ascertain whether they were looking at either species or a
hybrid. They discovered the hybrids are highly variable. They can look very
similar to either parent species- like a Hermit Warbler but with a faint
wash of yellow just below the black throat or like a Townsend's with a
faint wash of yellow or mostly white on the underparts. Hybrids can
have practically
every combination of characteristics in between the two species. The
hybrid types are not well illustrated in most field guides with only one
type illustrated in both the National Geographic and Sibley Guides and none
in Peterson's Guide. There is a great illustration on the cover of the
issue of the Auk where the paper referenced above appears. WA
ornithologist, Dale Herter, painted this illustration and it provides 6
examples of hybrid plumages plus both parents; it is a great reference to
familiarize yourself with:

https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/auk/v115n02/front.pdf

Also note that in these hybrid zones both songs and calls are highly
variable with no consistent differences and the two species and their
hybrids cannot be reliably identified on vocalizations alone. Having birded
in both of these zones, I can vouch for having been fooled or no idea which
species or hybrid was singing until I had a visual. So it would be best to
leave unseen birds unidentified to specific species.

If anyone is interested in studying these hybrids, some great locations to
try, in addition to Mt. Walker mentioned earlier, are along Highway 123
north of Packwood and the west side of Mt. Adams including the Takhlakh and
Horseshoe Lakes area along Forest Service Road 2329 off of Forest Service
Road 23 which runs between Randle and Trout Lake. But be aware, use extra
caution when recording either of the two parent species in these areas.

Good Birding,

Alan Knue
Edmons, WA

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/20 3:07 pm
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Image of the Day: Flock in the Night | The Scientist Magazine®

https://www.the-scientist.com/image-of-the-day/image-of-the-day--flock-in-the-night-67123


Sent from my iPhone
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/20 3:00 pm
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] WIRED: A Bird’s Epic Migration Stuns Scientists and Wins Online Fans

A Bird’s Epic Migration Stuns Scientists and Wins Online Fans
As researchers tracked his flight over 27 countries, a cuckoo became a celebrity and raised questions about how climate change could affect his species’ travel.

Read in WIRED: https://apple.news/AF8RbahHiQWS2fbPHU4iR-A


Shared from Apple News


Sent from my iPhone
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/20 2:58 pm
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] National Geographic: Horseshoe crab blood is key to making a COVID-19 vaccine—but the ecosystem may suffer.

Horseshoe crab blood is key to making a COVID-19 vaccine—but the ecosystem may suffer.
Conservationists worry the crustaceans, which are vital food sources for many species along the U.S. East Coast, will decline in number.

Read in National Geographic: https://apple.news/Avy0lAZv6QFifZuL-oC2pQw


Shared from Apple News


Sent from my iPhone
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/20 1:48 pm
From: AnthonyG. <birds...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Canon repair experience?
Hello Mike & Tweeters,



I joined the Canon CPS program though unsure of the specifics and how this applies to binoculars (may wish to investigate). I have used Canon CPS repair service several times with a full frame camera and handful of lenses mostly for routine maintenance and 2 repairs over 10 years. Once on a 1.4 version III teleconverter which had presented a malfunction. After 3 attempts they were unable to repair successfully thus I was sent a brand new one at no charge.

There are 3 CPS levels (silver, gold and platinum) worth looking into as various discounts apply depending on CPS contract. There’s also free shipping overnight both ways with the Platinum that will absorb some of the costs and a max 30% discount on Canon’s repair prices. My experience is solely with their cameras and lenses.



The work has been quite good however they are undoubtedly the most expensive of all the repair shops.



My repairs went to the Costa Mesa, California location.



Of recent, please take note of all service centers being closed except Newport News, VA for USA repairs.



https://www.usa.canon.com/internet/portal/us/home/support/canon-professional-services



If you do go with the Platinum, you may wish to search online for 10% promo on Canon CPS Platinum discounts by being a member of other photography web sites. They will ask for a membership # of that site you joined, that is all.



Anthony G.

Camano Island



From: Tweeters [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Mike Wagenbach
Sent: Friday, July 3, 2020 12:20 PM
To: <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Canon repair experience?



Since the subject of binocular service has come up, has anyone sent optics back to Canon for repair?



I have their 15 x 50 image-stabilized binocs, purchased at Captain's Nautical in 2001. I've been super-happy with them. Some time in the last year, I noticed that the image in the right barrel doesn't seem as sharp as the left. It's not my eye, because flipping them upside down moves the imperfection to the left eye. I don't remember dropping or banging them, but I suspect something has shifted out of alignment in the optics. I have been procrastinating about sending them for service since the problem is not extreme.


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/20 1:02 pm
From: Marty <namaste...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Canon repair experience?
I have use canon repair services twice. After you contact Canon and mail the camera and or Lynn’s to them they will contact you with the cost for repair, refurbishment or cleaning.
Once they receive the payment they will take action on your request and mail the camera back to you.
Both of my experiences were very good. They completed the process quickly and completely. I would use them again.
I am in the Seattle area and I used Glazer’s Camera ones with the same results. The only difference was hand drop off and personally picking it up.

Marty - Port Orchard

@ www.martykramerimages.com
Every day is an opportunity to do, touch and taste something new.


On Jul 4, 2020, at 12:05 PM, <tweeters-request...> wrote:

Canon repair experience?
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/20 12:54 pm
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Make that TWO Chats!
There are two YB Chats singing simultaneously in same spot!

Sent from my iPhone
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/20 12:26 pm
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Skagit Chat
Singing now Fourth of July YBCH same place asa year or two ago along Rails to Trails by Skagit River just S of S end of Cabin Creek Road and maybe 80 meters west.

Sent from my iPhone
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/20 12:06 pm
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...>
Subject: [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of July 5, 2020
Hello, Tweeters!

Heard last week on BirdNote:
* Olive-Sided Flycatcher - A Unique Voice
http://bit.ly/1aWXxMe
* Crow Parents, Fearless Defenders
http://bit.ly/13e3rYS
* Migration and Fat
https://bit.ly/2Zy15nD
* What Do Desert Birds Drink?
http://bit.ly/2O4Cujt
* Rufous Hummingbirds in Summer
https://bit.ly/2Ztxj36
* The Painted Bunting
http://bit.ly/29Gk47j
* National Symbol - Turkey vs. Eagle
http://bit.ly/1w7vVSt
=========================
Next week on BirdNote: A bird with sideburns?
and more! https://bit.ly/38utkHY
--------------------------------------
Did you have a favorite story this week? Another comment?
Please let us know. mailto:<info...>
------------------------------------------------
BirdNote is in print. Check out BirdNote, the book:
https://www.birdnote.org/birdnote-book
There's a journal, too -- for your notes and sketches and lists:
http://bit.ly/BirdNote-journal
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
or Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/birdnoteradio/
Listen on Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find 1600+ episodes and more than 1200 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/20 10:54 am
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Oops, I mean millimeters!
Sorry, Tweeters...once again I’ve bungled a measurement...the egg in my driveway was about thirty millimeters long, not centimeters! Rocs don’t breed here!

That’s two mistakes with numbers, and today is only the fortieth of July!

—Gary Bletsch

Sent from my iPhone
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/20 10:32 am
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] egg question
Dear Tweeters,
This morning (the 4th of July) there was a bird's egg on my gravel driveway. Actually, it was just two thirds of an eggshell. It looks like  it comes from the "big end" of the shell, as a Blefuscudian might have called it. The shell is an ivory color, white with just a tiny hint of creamy color. I estimate that the intact egg would have been about 30 cm long, and 22 cm broad at its broadest. The eggshell was not there on Friday afternoon, so I am guessing that it was dropped there late yesterday evening or early this morning, either by a parent bird, or by a nest predator. Inside of the eggshell, remnants of a network of membrane is visible, mostly blood-colored; the inside of the eggshell is the same color as the outside.
I have a guess as to what species this came from, but I thought I'd put it out for other Tweeters' suggestions. If I'm not mistaken, most of the birds in my neck of the woods, near Lyman in Skagit County, would lay colored eggs.
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/20 10:18 am
From: <dgrainger...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Canon repair experience?

I have used Midwest Camera Repair, 318 Oak St, Wyandotte, MI with
excellent results over the years. website is midwestcamerarepair.com

Fast turn around and factory trained official repair shop for many
brands. I shoot Nikon for which they are very capable as well.

I call them, give them details, they they send a form via email and
shipping instructions. I have had them work on lenses as well


On 2020-07-04 09:42, Wayne Weber wrote:
> Mike and Tweeters,
>
> I have a Canon camera that needs repairs. When I checked their website
> a few weeks ago, it said their repair shop was closed because of
> Covid-19. Phooey! They are happy to sell you a new camera (which I
> was forced to do), but were not prepared to do repairs on a camera I
> already own.
>
> Wayne Weber
>
> Delta, BC
>
> <contopus...>
>
> From: Tweeters [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On
> Behalf Of Mike Wagenbach
> Sent: Friday, July 03, 2020 12:20 PM
> To: <tweeters...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Canon repair experience?
>
> Since the subject of binocular service has come up, has anyone sent
> optics back to Canon for repair?
>
> I have their 15 x 50 image-stabilized binocs, purchased at Captain's
> Nautical in 2001. I've been super-happy with them. Some time in the
> last year, I noticed that the image in the right barrel doesn't seem
> as sharp as the left. It's not my eye, because flipping them upside
> down moves the imperfection to the left eye. I don't remember
> dropping or banging them, but I suspect something has shifted out of
> alignment in the optics. I have been procrastinating about sending
> them for service since the problem is not extreme.
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/20 9:46 am
From: Wayne Weber <contopus...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Canon repair experience?
Mike and Tweeters,



I have a Canon camera that needs repairs. When I checked their website a few weeks ago, it said their repair shop was closed because of Covid-19. Phooey! They are happy to sell you a new camera (which I was forced to do), but were not prepared to do repairs on a camera I already own.



Wayne Weber

Delta, BC

<contopus...>









From: Tweeters [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Mike Wagenbach
Sent: Friday, July 03, 2020 12:20 PM
To: <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Canon repair experience?



Since the subject of binocular service has come up, has anyone sent optics back to Canon for repair?



I have their 15 x 50 image-stabilized binocs, purchased at Captain's Nautical in 2001. I've been super-happy with them. Some time in the last year, I noticed that the image in the right barrel doesn't seem as sharp as the left. It's not my eye, because flipping them upside down moves the imperfection to the left eye. I don't remember dropping or banging them, but I suspect something has shifted out of alignment in the optics. I have been procrastinating about sending them for service since the problem is not extreme.


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/20 9:26 am
From: Jill Freidberg <jill.freidberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Corvid question
During a family picnic near Seward Park last night, we saw the famous
Seward Park Brown Crow. He or she had three healthy fledglings following
her and begging. That seems like a lot of fledglings for one crow. Is it
normal for that many to survive? Or, do corvids feed the young of extended
family? BTW, the fledglings were all black despite possibly having a brown
parent.
Jill

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/20 8:37 am
From: Doug Santoni <dougsantoni...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Link to a 4-minute video of some Seattle birds seen July 1 & 3
Thank you, Al! The images of butterflies and dragonflies were a nice bonus!

Doug Santoni
Seattle

> On Jul 3, 2020, at 8:51 PM, Al Wagar <jalanwagar...> wrote:
>
> If interested in some vicarious birding, these are from Yesler Swamp, Montlake fill, and Magnuson park.
>
> https://youtu.be/JqKjCg5mlzM <https://youtu.be/JqKjCg5mlzM>
>
> Al
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/20 8:02 am
From: Dave Slager <dave.slager...>
Subject: [Tweeters] probable dark murrelet sp. on Lake Washington, King Co.
Tweeters,

This morning July 4 around 6:30am, I saw what was likely a dark *Brachyramphus
*murrelet flying north past Magnuson Park. I was birding binocs only and it
was fairly far out. I lost it when it was out in the direction of Juanita
Bay, so I'm not sure if it landed or continued flying north on the lake.

A dark murrelet on freshwater would be really interesting, because not only
are Marbled Murrelet very rare away from saltwater, but this is also the
time of year when Long-billed Murrelet is possible, and vagrants of that
species sometimes show up on fresh water.

Although I'm not positive on this sighting, I'm not really sure what else
it would have been. Just getting the word out that it may be worth scoping
northern Lake Washington today if you happen to be in the area.

Good birding,
Dave Slager
Seattle

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/3/20 8:57 pm
From: Al Wagar <jalanwagar...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Link to a 4-minute video of some Seattle birds seen July 1 & 3
If interested in some vicarious birding, these are from Yesler Swamp, Montlake fill, and Magnuson park.

https://youtu.be/JqKjCg5mlzM <https://youtu.be/JqKjCg5mlzM>

Al
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/3/20 6:50 pm
From: Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Four Northern Bobwhite at Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM)
Tweeters,

At the Coyote Bridge (named per a JBLM biologist I know) over Muck Creek on Joint Base Lewis McChord (47deg 0' 20.83"N, -122deg 33'25.42"W), I was looking for a Yellow-breasted Chat (on the off-chance one was there), when I heard four different NORTHERN BOBWHITES (NOBO) singing. All were singing from markedly different directions. As I walked back to my car, one NOBO came in from the east and landed on the concrete barrier on the bridge (see not-good photos on the eBird checklist below). I've tallied Northern Bobwhite quite a few times over the past 40 years at this location, but this was the first instance I've had four different singing Bobwhites at the same time.



View checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S71104747



Also, I've searched for the (or a) Yellow-breasted Chat since I found one on my property at Roy on June 19, but I've not heard it since just after noon that day. I've looked on Training Area 13 (between 8th Ave S and SR 507) along Muck Creek, as well as in other likely areas on JBLM, but no luck.

May all your birds be identified,

Denis DeSilvis
avnacrs 4 birds at outlook dot com


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/3/20 1:23 pm
From: Douglas Irle Will <diwill...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Feather Atlas link
Try

https://www.fws.gov/lab/featheratlas/idtool.php

which worked for me.

Doug Will
UW and Lake Forest Park

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/3/20 12:25 pm
From: Mike Wagenbach <wagen...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Canon repair experience?
Since the subject of binocular service has come up, has anyone sent optics
back to Canon for repair?

I have their 15 x 50 image-stabilized binocs, purchased at Captain's
Nautical in 2001. I've been super-happy with them. Some time in the last
year, I noticed that the image in the right barrel doesn't seem as sharp as
the left. It's not my eye, because flipping them upside down moves the
imperfection to the left eye. I don't remember dropping or banging them,
but I suspect something has shifted out of alignment in the optics. I have
been procrastinating about sending them for service since the problem is
not extreme.

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/20 8:47 pm
From: Roger Moyer <rogermoyer1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Binocular cleaning
Can someone recommend a good place in western Washington to get my binoculars professionally cleaned.

Roger Moyer
Chehalis, WA


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/20 6:46 pm
From: cynthia burrell <cinnyb...>
Subject: [Tweeters] This Monday July 6th, WOS meeting with Kaeli Swift
WOS Monthly Meeting—this Monday!

“When the Freezer Breaks: How Climate Might be Impacting Canada Jays”
Monday July 6, 2020 with Dr Kaeli Swift

“Whether you know them as Whisky Jacks, Camp Robbers, Gray Jays, or Canada Jays, these hardy birds are some of the most charismatic residents of the boreal forest. Join us July 6th, when avian ecologist Dr. Kaeli Swift will be talking about what she's learned about the foraging ecology of jays by following them through Denali National Park.”

Time: 7:30 PM
Date: Monday July 6, 2020
Where: From the comfort of your own home (On-line only)
How: Please go to the monthly meetings page http://wos.org/about-wos/monthly-meetings/ for log in info.

During the pandemic, WOS is hosting a couple of extra meetings during the summer months. All are welcome to “attend” (priority given to members); we hope this gives more folks an opportunity to learn about birds while still staying safe. (In August, we will hear from Dennis Paulson on birding SE Oregon/ Malheur National Wildlife Refuge.)

Happy Birding, all, and stay safe!

Cinny
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/20 4:14 pm
From: Steve Loitz <steveloitz...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Binoc repair service - Zeiss [a good report!!]
Good to hear. My experience with Zeiss warranty service was similarly
positive and prompt (roughly 1 week), on par with Nikon's excellent and
prompt warranty service.

Steve Loitz
Ellensburg

On Thu, Jul 2, 2020 at 2:51 PM Matt Bartels <mattxyz...> wrote:

> Hi all -
> A couple years back, I reported on how Leica took a year to replace my
> scope when I sent it in — pretty miserable service, and I’m glad recent
> reports here seem to show Leica has improved.
> But today a much different story.
> In March, I broke my Zeiss binocs — the hinge broke and I had 2
> monoculars. I emailed Zeiss and they said ‘send them in, we’ll replace’
> ...Then Covid hit, and I didn’t want to go near a Post Office.
> ...Then I forgot [having an old pair of binocs made it less urgent]
> ...Finally, I took action.
> On Saturday June 27, I mailed my binocs to Zeiss.
> Today, July 2 , 5 days later, a new pair of replacement binocs appeared at
> my door.
>
> Five days from mailing to receiving the replacement — that’s pretty
> astounding. I just transit to and from Kentucky would have to have taken
> most of that time.
>
> So, 5 stars for Zeiss repair services.
>
>
> Matt Bartels
> Seattle, WA
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>


--
Steve Loitz
Ellensburg, WA
<steveloitz...>

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/20 3:54 pm
From: <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2020-07-02
Tweets – not the nicest of mornings, though not terrible. Cool, dark, and breezy, but no rain. Many birds have reduced or even stopped singing for the season. Some may have moved on already. So not terribly birdy, though some of that feeling is because the light was bad for much of the morning.

Highlights:
a.. Wood Duck – one clutch of 5 ducklings
b.. Mallard – at least 4 clutches of ducklings, plus a small flotilla of presumed “teens”
c.. Hooded Merganser – one at the Rowing Club
d.. Black Swift – brief look at two from the Rowing Club; they swiftly disappeared
e.. American Coot – lone bird remains. Really wonder if it can’t fly
f.. Caspian Tern – at least 4 from the Lake Platform
g.. Cooper’s Hawk – Matt saw one about 5:15 a.m.
h.. Barn Owl – Matt saw one over East Meadow very early
i.. Western Screech-Owl – Matt saw one near east end of boardwalk very early
j.. Hairy Woodpecker – one on far side of slough, south of Rowing Club
k.. HUTTON’S VIREO – one at the Rowing Club parking lot right at 10 a.m.
l.. Purple Martin – we only saw two, both males sitting inside gourds
m.. Northern Rough-winged Swallow – two below weir
n.. Swainson’s Thrush – still LOTS of singing
o.. White-crowned Sparrow – first juveniles of the season
p.. Dark-eyed Junco – overrun with juvies, especially in the northern half of the park
q.. Bullock’s Oriole – probably 4 seen
r.. Brown-headed Cowbird – babies being fed by Swainson’s Thrush and Bewick’s Wren
s.. Yellow Warbler – maybe just one singing male
t.. Wilson’s Warbler – one unseen singing male at the Rowing Club
u.. Lazuli Bunting – still 2-3 males seen
No sign of the Indigo Bunting. The last eBird reports seem to be from last Thursday, June 25th.

Based on the last several weeks of glimpses, I think it’s likely BULLOCK’S ORIOLES nested in the grove just east of the weir, and may have fledged one or more young this week. Bullock’s Orioles, Lazuli Buntings, and Tree Swallows are all likely finishing up breeding, and will be gone from the park after about the first week in August if not sooner. They are the first to leave.

Misses today included Canada Goose, Rock Pigeon, Green Heron, Red-breasted Sapsucker, Red-eyed Vireo, Cliff Swallow, and Yellow-rumped Warbler.

For the day, 64 species.

= Michael Hobbs
= www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
= <BirdMarymoor...>
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/20 3:26 pm
From: Dalton Spencer <offthehookflyshop...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Great-tailed Grackle at Para Ponds
Hi all! 
After spending the last 6 weeks working in the Eastern Montana prairies I was very excited to come home and bird. My second stop in Washington at Para/McCain Ponds near Othello turned out to be phenomenal stop. 
I just photographed a female GREAT-TAILED GRACKLE in the area of the first pond! Last I saw her she dove into a patch of Bulrush on the other side of the first pond on the south road. Nesting is not out of the question...
Also, lots Tricoloreds in the area as well.
Good luck! 
Dalton SpencerCentralia, Washington 
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/20 2:54 pm
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Binoc repair service - Zeiss [a good report!!]
Hi all -
A couple years back, I reported on how Leica took a year to replace my scope when I sent it in — pretty miserable service, and I’m glad recent reports here seem to show Leica has improved.
But today a much different story.
In March, I broke my Zeiss binocs — the hinge broke and I had 2 monoculars. I emailed Zeiss and they said ‘send them in, we’ll replace’
...Then Covid hit, and I didn’t want to go near a Post Office.
...Then I forgot [having an old pair of binocs made it less urgent]
...Finally, I took action.
On Saturday June 27, I mailed my binocs to Zeiss.
Today, July 2 , 5 days later, a new pair of replacement binocs appeared at my door.

Five days from mailing to receiving the replacement — that’s pretty astounding. I just transit to and from Kentucky would have to have taken most of that time.

So, 5 stars for Zeiss repair services.


Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/20 2:34 pm
From: Devon Comstock <devonc78...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Feather id
Feather atlas!!!

https://www.fws.gov/lab/featheratlas/

On Thu, Jul 2, 2020, 14:27 Christina <joannabird413...> wrote:

> Hey all,
> I am looking for a way to identify feathers, hopefully online.
> Thank
> Christina Woodinville
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/20 2:31 pm
From: Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Feather id
The USFWS has an online Feather Atlashttps://www.fws.gov/lab/featheratlas/

Peggy MundyBothell, WA



On Thursday, July 2, 2020, 02:27:05 p.m. PDT, Christina <joannabird413...> wrote:

Hey all,I am looking for a way to identify feathers, hopefully online.ThankChristina Woodinville_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/20 2:30 pm
From: Christina <joannabird413...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Feather id
Hey all,
I am looking for a way to identify feathers, hopefully online.
Thank
Christina Woodinville

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/20 11:58 am
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] National Geographic: Sparrows are singing a new song, in a rapid, unprecedented shift

Sparrows are singing a new song, in a rapid, unprecedented shift
White-throated sparrows across Canada are abandoning an old song in exchange for a trendy new tune. The reason remains a mystery.

Read in National Geographic: https://apple.news/AtNhQ4I1aQfa7l9tp2fZKGQ


Shared from Apple News


Sent from my iPhone
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/20 10:21 am
From: Al n Donna <alndonna...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Parking to view shorebirds at Dune Peninsula at Pt Defiance Park
To view the Semipalmated Sandpiper and other shorebirds reported yesterday on ebird, do you park near the ferry dock or park in the pay lot at the extreme south pay lot ($11/2hrs) and then walk the full length of the peninsula.

Al in Tacoma


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/20 10:07 am
From: J Christian Kessler <1northraven...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] eBird's new "My eBird" page
this new page is very much about the global competitive birder, which
ultimately is to say its about fund raising. sadly but for very good
reasons, this is normal behavior by NGOs of all stripes. gotta have the
money to support staff and programs.

Chris Kessler,
Seattle

On Thu, Jul 2, 2020 at 8:14 AM Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> wrote:

> Dear Tweeters,
>
> Okay, class, raise your hand if you prefer the new "My eBird" to the old!
>
> Bueller? Anyone?
>
> Yours truly,
>
> Gary
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>


--
"moderation in everything, including moderation"
Rustin Thompson

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/20 9:15 am
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Monroe Swifts II
Last night we remotely welcomed three thousandish Vaux’s Swifts into their Monroe Wagner roost. The July record is 6500 7/3/2012.

Larry Schwitters
Issaquah
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/20 8:19 am
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] eBird's new "My eBird" page
Dear Tweeters,
Okay, class, raise your hand if you prefer the new "My eBird" to the old!
Bueller? Anyone?
Yours truly,
Gary
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/20 1:09 am
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Drone Light Shows “Way Cooler” (and more bird-friendly) Than Fireworks
Hello everyone,

once again, it is time for my semi-annual rant against the
evils/terrors/toxins resulting from fireworks and fireworks shows, and this
year is no different. But for this 4th of July, instead of talking about
some of the harms resulting from fireworks, I focused on drones designed to
create these light shows. (It's useful to note that drones are increasingly
being used to monitor wildlife and nesting bird colonies, so this is a
useful technology whose many different applications are only starting to be
explored.) Basically, in this piece, I argue that, if China — where
fireworks were invented — is hosting massive celebratory public drone light
shows instead of fireworks, why can’t the USA?


Drone Light Shows “Way Cooler” Than Fireworks
https://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2020/06/30/drone-light-shows-way-cooler-than-fireworks/
tinyURL: https://tinyurl.com/ycveblat


As always, please share this piece with your friends, colleagues and
others, especially your local elected officials, and on social media and
twitter. If we can get enough people talking about this as one of several
environmentally-friendly alternatives to fireworks, perhaps we can make a
sweeping change in how things are done.

thank you.

--
GrrlScientist | @GrrlScientist <https://twitter.com/GrrlScientist>
<grrlscientist...>
Words: Forbes <http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/> | Medium
<https://medium.com/@GrrlScientist>
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 7/1/20 12:27 pm
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Lots of swifts
A thousand Vaux’s Swifts came out of the Monroe Wagner roost this morning. As most of you know it’s July.

Any Black Swifts around?

Larry Schwitters
Issaquah
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/30/20 8:38 pm
From: J Christian Kessler <1northraven...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Goodbye Northwestern Crow
Starlings, as an introduced species, are not covered by the Migratory Bird
Treaty & Act, and many states classify them as vermin. Crows are excluded
from the Treaty/Act and most states also classify them as vermin. In most
states there are no restrictions on shooting vermin (whether birds or
rodents) - only restrictions on where one can discharge a firearm
(populated areas, from roads, etc), but animals classified as vermin are
vulnerable all days & seasons in most states. Deer & Elk know when & where
hunting them is permitted, I think Crows are smarter ...

Chris Kessler
Seattle

On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 6:14 PM Robert O'Brien <baro...> wrote:

> I agree with Dennis about the wrong end of the gun. An adjacent property
> owner had a teenage son. This is a rural area and they were hunters.
> The son spent a lot of time shooting Starlings which was assumed to be
> quasi legal. I suspect he shot Crows when he could.
> This was more than 25 years ago, before we purchased that property. To
> this day I have _never_ seen a crow on the ground anywhere in the area,
> even though flocks fly overhead all the time. There are about 100 acres of
> farmland in the area. Fallow some years and in the winter. Never on the
> ground. A few days ago, I was amazed that a few were mobbing a Barred Owl
> in a large cedar tree on the property. Maybe they heard the
> Robins/Steller's Jays? I don't recall ever having seen them even land in a
> tree before in all these years.
> Crows have long memories. But, they quite happily walk around on my
> daughter's tiny lawn in Portland. Not a care in the world there. Crows are
> smart, but that's not news.
> Another interesting factoid. So far as is known the (former) Northwestern
> Crow never made it to Oregon. BUT, the beach crows here are also very
> small and seem to be confined to the beach areas, often congregating on
> tidal flats. Wish I was a good enough birder to have compared these crows
> with the larger, inland ones or with NW Crows. I guess that could be
> easily done through the Macaulay Library. And by inland, I don't mean far
> inland. I just mean a few miles from the beach where the crows appear
> quite a bit larger. And less prone to moving around in flocks. (Hopefully,
> this last paragraph isn't a Fake Factoid, a part of my imagination).
>
> Bob OBrien Portland
>
> On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 5:22 PM Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson...>
> wrote:
>
>> Northwestern Crows are thought to have evolved in coastal areas with
>> Native American villages, thus adapted to living around people. Why the
>> eastern crows didn’t do the same, I don’t know, except that crows have been
>> agricultural pests in the East for a very long time and were often sighted
>> at the end of a gun barrel. That may be why they aren’t so tame.
>>
>> Dennis Paulson
>> Seattle
>>
>> On Jun 30, 2020, at 5:03 PM, Catherine Joy <catherinejoymusic...>
>> wrote:
>>
>> Behaviorally, I have noticed the crows on the West coast are more "tame"
>> than East coast birds. I would never see crows just walking around with the
>> pedestrians on busy city streets out East. And I never was able to approach
>> crows so closely until moving here.
>>
>> On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 4:26 PM Hans-Joachim Feddern <
>> <thefedderns...> wrote:
>>
>>> This has been a long time in coming and is based on scientific data.
>>> Personally I feel there is a difference in vocalization with American Crows
>>> and the size difference can be quite obvious. Also habitat: "Northwestern"
>>> Crows are rarely found too far from shore. To me there also is a difference
>>> between calls of American Crows here in the Northwest and birds on the East
>>> Coast. I have never heard a crow in Maryland doing the "meow" call you can
>>> hear here frequently. Another interesting observation, is that I have never
>>> seen a roadkill-ed crow on the East Coast, but see many around here! Just
>>> thinking!
>>>
>>> On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 12:55 PM dick <dick...> wrote:
>>>
>>>>
>>>> The 2020 AOS Supplement is out! - American Birding Association
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> https://www.aba.org/2020-aos-supplement/
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>>>>
>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>> Tweeters mailing list
>>>> <Tweeters...>
>>>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> *Hans Feddern*
>>> Twin Lakes/Federal Way, WA
>>> <thefedderns...>
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> Tweeters mailing list
>>> <Tweeters...>
>>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>


--
"moderation in everything, including moderation"
Rustin Thompson

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/30/20 6:19 pm
From: Robert O'Brien <baro...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Goodbye Northwestern Crow
I agree with Dennis about the wrong end of the gun. An adjacent property
owner had a teenage son. This is a rural area and they were hunters.
The son spent a lot of time shooting Starlings which was assumed to be
quasi legal. I suspect he shot Crows when he could.
This was more than 25 years ago, before we purchased that property. To
this day I have _never_ seen a crow on the ground anywhere in the area,
even though flocks fly overhead all the time. There are about 100 acres of
farmland in the area. Fallow some years and in the winter. Never on the
ground. A few days ago, I was amazed that a few were mobbing a Barred Owl
in a large cedar tree on the property. Maybe they heard the
Robins/Steller's Jays? I don't recall ever having seen them even land in a
tree before in all these years.
Crows have long memories. But, they quite happily walk around on my
daughter's tiny lawn in Portland. Not a care in the world there. Crows are
smart, but that's not news.
Another interesting factoid. So far as is known the (former) Northwestern
Crow never made it to Oregon. BUT, the beach crows here are also very
small and seem to be confined to the beach areas, often congregating on
tidal flats. Wish I was a good enough birder to have compared these crows
with the larger, inland ones or with NW Crows. I guess that could be
easily done through the Macaulay Library. And by inland, I don't mean far
inland. I just mean a few miles from the beach where the crows appear
quite a bit larger. And less prone to moving around in flocks. (Hopefully,
this last paragraph isn't a Fake Factoid, a part of my imagination).

Bob OBrien Portland

On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 5:22 PM Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson...>
wrote:

> Northwestern Crows are thought to have evolved in coastal areas with
> Native American villages, thus adapted to living around people. Why the
> eastern crows didn’t do the same, I don’t know, except that crows have been
> agricultural pests in the East for a very long time and were often sighted
> at the end of a gun barrel. That may be why they aren’t so tame.
>
> Dennis Paulson
> Seattle
>
> On Jun 30, 2020, at 5:03 PM, Catherine Joy <catherinejoymusic...>
> wrote:
>
> Behaviorally, I have noticed the crows on the West coast are more "tame"
> than East coast birds. I would never see crows just walking around with the
> pedestrians on busy city streets out East. And I never was able to approach
> crows so closely until moving here.
>
> On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 4:26 PM Hans-Joachim Feddern <
> <thefedderns...> wrote:
>
>> This has been a long time in coming and is based on scientific data.
>> Personally I feel there is a difference in vocalization with American Crows
>> and the size difference can be quite obvious. Also habitat: "Northwestern"
>> Crows are rarely found too far from shore. To me there also is a difference
>> between calls of American Crows here in the Northwest and birds on the East
>> Coast. I have never heard a crow in Maryland doing the "meow" call you can
>> hear here frequently. Another interesting observation, is that I have never
>> seen a roadkill-ed crow on the East Coast, but see many around here! Just
>> thinking!
>>
>> On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 12:55 PM dick <dick...> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> The 2020 AOS Supplement is out! - American Birding Association
>>>
>>>
>>> https://www.aba.org/2020-aos-supplement/
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>>>
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> Tweeters mailing list
>>> <Tweeters...>
>>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> *Hans Feddern*
>> Twin Lakes/Federal Way, WA
>> <thefedderns...>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/30/20 5:39 pm
From: Constance Sidles <constancesidles...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Goodbye Northwestern Crow
Hey tweets, all this makes me wonder whether we are witnessing the creation and now destruction of a new species. Perhaps NW Crows have been on a path to differentiate themselves from American Crows because of the separation of their populations due to geography, topography, and ecology. But with the arrival of European-style habitation, the two crow populations were linked back together again, re-mixing the gene pool so that an identifiable, separate population of NW Crows (smaller, different voice, etc.) disappeared as a population.

Perhaps the same thing is happening to Hermit Warblers, as their genes mix with Townsend's.

And perhaps a different outcome will result from the migratory separation of Swainson's Thrushes, where the population that winters to the east does not reproductively mix with the population that winters to the west. The summer ranges of these populations come together only in a very narrow band in BC, where it does not appear that easterners and westerners interbreed.

We see only a short snapshot in time. Longer events that move in geologic slow-motion can only be seen by us through the lens of the past. The future is hidden from us and unknown. - Connie, Seattle

<csidles...>
<constancesidles...>


> On Jun 30, 2020, at 5:22 PM, Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson...> wrote:
>
> Northwestern Crows are thought to have evolved in coastal areas with Native American villages, thus adapted to living around people. Why the eastern crows didn’t do the same, I don’t know, except that crows have been agricultural pests in the East for a very long time and were often sighted at the end of a gun barrel. That may be why they aren’t so tame.
>
> Dennis Paulson
> Seattle
>
>> On Jun 30, 2020, at 5:03 PM, Catherine Joy <catherinejoymusic...> <mailto:<catherinejoymusic...>> wrote:
>>
>> Behaviorally, I have noticed the crows on the West coast are more "tame" than East coast birds. I would never see crows just walking around with the pedestrians on busy city streets out East. And I never was able to approach crows so closely until moving here.
>>
>> On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 4:26 PM Hans-Joachim Feddern <thefedderns...> <mailto:<thefedderns...>> wrote:
>> This has been a long time in coming and is based on scientific data. Personally I feel there is a difference in vocalization with American Crows and the size difference can be quite obvious. Also habitat: "Northwestern" Crows are rarely found too far from shore. To me there also is a difference between calls of American Crows here in the Northwest and birds on the East Coast. I have never heard a crow in Maryland doing the "meow" call you can hear here frequently. Another interesting observation, is that I have never seen a roadkill-ed crow on the East Coast, but see many around here! Just thinking!
>>
>> On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 12:55 PM dick <dick...> <mailto:<dick...>> wrote:
>>
>> The 2020 AOS Supplement is out! - American Birding Association
>>
>>
>> https://www.aba.org/2020-aos-supplement/ <https://www.aba.org/2020-aos-supplement/>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...> <mailto:<Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters <http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Hans Feddern
>> Twin Lakes/Federal Way, WA
>> <thefedderns...> <mailto:<thefedderns...>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...> <mailto:<Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters <http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...> <mailto:<Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/30/20 5:26 pm
From: Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Goodbye Northwestern Crow
Northwestern Crows are thought to have evolved in coastal areas with Native American villages, thus adapted to living around people. Why the eastern crows didn’t do the same, I don’t know, except that crows have been agricultural pests in the East for a very long time and were often sighted at the end of a gun barrel. That may be why they aren’t so tame.

Dennis Paulson
Seattle

> On Jun 30, 2020, at 5:03 PM, Catherine Joy <catherinejoymusic...> wrote:
>
> Behaviorally, I have noticed the crows on the West coast are more "tame" than East coast birds. I would never see crows just walking around with the pedestrians on busy city streets out East. And I never was able to approach crows so closely until moving here.
>
> On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 4:26 PM Hans-Joachim Feddern <thefedderns...> <mailto:<thefedderns...>> wrote:
> This has been a long time in coming and is based on scientific data. Personally I feel there is a difference in vocalization with American Crows and the size difference can be quite obvious. Also habitat: "Northwestern" Crows are rarely found too far from shore. To me there also is a difference between calls of American Crows here in the Northwest and birds on the East Coast. I have never heard a crow in Maryland doing the "meow" call you can hear here frequently. Another interesting observation, is that I have never seen a roadkill-ed crow on the East Coast, but see many around here! Just thinking!
>
> On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 12:55 PM dick <dick...> <mailto:<dick...>> wrote:
>
> The 2020 AOS Supplement is out! - American Birding Association
>
>
> https://www.aba.org/2020-aos-supplement/ <https://www.aba.org/2020-aos-supplement/>
>
>
>
>
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...> <mailto:<Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters <http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters>
>
>
> --
> Hans Feddern
> Twin Lakes/Federal Way, WA
> <thefedderns...> <mailto:<thefedderns...>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...> <mailto:<Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters <http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/30/20 5:10 pm
From: Catherine Joy <catherinejoymusic...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Goodbye Northwestern Crow
Behaviorally, I have noticed the crows on the West coast are more "tame"
than East coast birds. I would never see crows just walking around with the
pedestrians on busy city streets out East. And I never was able to approach
crows so closely until moving here.

On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 4:26 PM Hans-Joachim Feddern <thefedderns...>
wrote:

> This has been a long time in coming and is based on scientific data.
> Personally I feel there is a difference in vocalization with American Crows
> and the size difference can be quite obvious. Also habitat: "Northwestern"
> Crows are rarely found too far from shore. To me there also is a difference
> between calls of American Crows here in the Northwest and birds on the East
> Coast. I have never heard a crow in Maryland doing the "meow" call you can
> hear here frequently. Another interesting observation, is that I have never
> seen a roadkill-ed crow on the East Coast, but see many around here! Just
> thinking!
>
> On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 12:55 PM dick <dick...> wrote:
>
>>
>> The 2020 AOS Supplement is out! - American Birding Association
>>
>>
>> https://www.aba.org/2020-aos-supplement/
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>>
>
>
> --
> *Hans Feddern*
> Twin Lakes/Federal Way, WA
> <thefedderns...>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/30/20 4:33 pm
From: Hans-Joachim Feddern <thefedderns...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Goodbye Northwestern Crow
This has been a long time in coming and is based on scientific data.
Personally I feel there is a difference in vocalization with American Crows
and the size difference can be quite obvious. Also habitat: "Northwestern"
Crows are rarely found too far from shore. To me there also is a difference
between calls of American Crows here in the Northwest and birds on the East
Coast. I have never heard a crow in Maryland doing the "meow" call you can
hear here frequently. Another interesting observation, is that I have never
seen a roadkill-ed crow on the East Coast, but see many around here! Just
thinking!

On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 12:55 PM dick <dick...> wrote:

>
> The 2020 AOS Supplement is out! - American Birding Association
>
>
> https://www.aba.org/2020-aos-supplement/
>
>
>
>
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>


--
*Hans Feddern*
Twin Lakes/Federal Way, WA
<thefedderns...>

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/30/20 2:17 pm
From: dick <dick...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Goodbye Northwestern Crow
The 2020 AOS Supplement is out! - American Birding Associationhttps://www.aba.org/2020-aos-supplement/Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/30/20 12:47 pm
From: Dee Dee <deedeeknit...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Help with Bird Identification
.immature Starling...?

> Message: 8
> Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2020 20:51:00 -0700
> From: Sharon Howard <clmssh...>
> To: <tweeters...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Help with bird identification ?
> Message-ID: <FC53D88F-DFFD-4504-B196-87A98674627C...>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8
>
>
> Recently there has been a single bird at our feeder in Lower Sunset Hill that is larger than a finch or a sparrow that spends a lot of time at our feeder. It is roughly the size of an American Robin. It is a grayish buff all over with dark eyes and a bill a bit darker than the rest of the bird, but not black. It has wing bars that are bit darker than the rest of the bird and a darker brown under the tail. The wing bars are not a color in strong contrast to the rest of the bird. I think it may be a female cow bird, but am not sure and welcome any suggestions or ideas. I have photos, but they are not great and couldn?t load for this submission. I can email if that would help. Thank you for any help.
>
> Sharon Howard

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/30/20 11:11 am
From: Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bye bye Northwestern Crow
HI:
From the AOS: The latest supplement to AOS's Checklist of North and
Middle American Birds, published today in The Auk: Ornithological
Advances, includes several major updates to the organization of the
continents bird species, including the addition of the Mexican Duck and
the removal of the Northwestern Crow.
https://americanornithology.org/goodbye-northwestern-crow-hello-mexican-duck/

A lump nearly 60 years in the making!

sincerely
Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/20 10:10 pm
From: Marilyncooley <marilyncooley...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Help with bird identification ?
Gray Catbird?

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 29, 2020, at 9:51 PM, Sharon Howard <clmssh...> wrote:
>
> 
> Recently there has been a single bird at our feeder in Lower Sunset Hill that is larger than a finch or a sparrow that spends a lot of time at our feeder. It is roughly the size of an American Robin. It is a grayish buff all over with dark eyes and a bill a bit darker than the rest of the bird, but not black. It has wing bars that are bit darker than the rest of the bird and a darker brown under the tail. The wing bars are not a color in strong contrast to the rest of the bird. I think it may be a female cow bird, but am not sure and welcome any suggestions or ideas. I have photos, but they are not great and couldn’t load for this submission. I can email if that would help. Thank you for any help.
>
> Sharon Howard
> Ballard
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/20 8:54 pm
From: Sharon Howard <clmssh...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Help with bird identification ?

Recently there has been a single bird at our feeder in Lower Sunset Hill that is larger than a finch or a sparrow that spends a lot of time at our feeder. It is roughly the size of an American Robin. It is a grayish buff all over with dark eyes and a bill a bit darker than the rest of the bird, but not black. It has wing bars that are bit darker than the rest of the bird and a darker brown under the tail. The wing bars are not a color in strong contrast to the rest of the bird. I think it may be a female cow bird, but am not sure and welcome any suggestions or ideas. I have photos, but they are not great and couldn’t load for this submission. I can email if that would help. Thank you for any help.

Sharon Howard
Ballard
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/20 7:43 pm
From: Mary Saylor <birder...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Great Horned Owl-- but still maybe Barred (was unknown night bird)
Kelly I think you must be right! Thanks!

Mary

> On Jun 29, 2020, at 6:09 PM, <mcallisters4...> wrote:
>
> Mary, For what it’s worth I went through a similar effort to identify a screeching owl at Woodard Bay probably 30 years ago. I spent a couple of hours, at night, at Al Wald’s house, listening to the screeching sound and, eventually seeing more than one owl in flight. I remember concluding that the screeching bird was a flighted juvenile. I feel fairly certain it was trying to get one of its parents to bring it food and it would occasionally fly in pursuit of one of the parents. When I listened to your recordings I thought they sounded similar to the screeching I heard way back when. However, I wasn’t certain. In any case, I think you’re on the right track.
>
> Kelly McAllister
> Olympia
>
> From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of Mary Saylor
> Sent: Monday, June 29, 2020 5:44 PM
> To: tweeters <tweeters...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Great Horned Owl-- but still maybe Barred (was unknown night bird)
>
> Hi Tweeters,
>
> I got some great help both on and off list about my unknown night bird, which helped me narrow it down to either Barred or Great Horned Owl. It’s definitely not young Barred Owl begging calls. The young Great Horned owl begging calls I’ve listened to online are closer, but still not quite right. I’m thinking it was upset adult owls, although the time is certainly right for begging young owls. In the first clip I shared you can also hear a lot of what I’ve realized is bill clacking:
>
> https://www.dropbox.com/s/q7h22924e5bk03c/Calls1.mp3?dl=0 <https://www.dropbox.com/s/q7h22924e5bk03c/Calls1.mp3?dl=0>
>
> We saw the owls fly over while I recorded the clip above, so it’s definitely either adults or flighted young ones. I don’t know whether they still make begging calls when they are capable of flight, but I’m guessing yes.
>
> I’m leaning toward Great Horned Owl. I regularly hear Great Horned Owls singing their duet in our neighborhood in late winter/early spring.
>
> Here are some adult owls screeching:
>
> Barred Owl:
>
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dMY9WjcmEk0 <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dMY9WjcmEk0>
>
> Great Horned Owl (screeching and bill clapping):
>
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FiQerxpxB2s <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FiQerxpxB2s>
>
> Further thoughts and opinions welcome! And thanks Tweeters friends for joining in on figuring out these birds with me.
>
> Mary


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/20 5:51 pm
From: Mary Saylor <birder...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Great Horned Owl-- but still maybe Barred (was unknown night bird)
Hi Tweeters,

I got some great help both on and off list about my unknown night bird, which helped me narrow it down to either Barred or Great Horned Owl. It’s definitely not young Barred Owl begging calls. The young Great Horned owl begging calls I’ve listened to online are closer, but still not quite right. I’m thinking it was upset adult owls, although the time is certainly right for begging young owls. In the first clip I shared you can also hear a lot of what I’ve realized is bill clacking:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/q7h22924e5bk03c/Calls1.mp3?dl=0 <https://www.dropbox.com/s/q7h22924e5bk03c/Calls1.mp3?dl=0>

We saw the owls fly over while I recorded the clip above, so it’s definitely either adults or flighted young ones. I don’t know whether they still make begging calls when they are capable of flight, but I’m guessing yes.

I’m leaning toward Great Horned Owl. I regularly hear Great Horned Owls singing their duet in our neighborhood in late winter/early spring.

Here are some adult owls screeching:

Barred Owl:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dMY9WjcmEk0 <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dMY9WjcmEk0>

Great Horned Owl (screeching and bill clapping):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FiQerxpxB2s <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FiQerxpxB2s>

Further thoughts and opinions welcome! And thanks Tweeters friends for joining in on figuring out these birds with me.

Mary
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/20 3:18 pm
From: dick <dick...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] off topic
Congratulations, Ellen.  Greg, thanks for alerting us.Dick Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Greg Pluth <gjpluth...> Date: 6/29/20 1:10 PM (GMT-08:00) To: tweeters <tweeters...> Subject: [Tweeters] off topic Hi Tweets -Kudos and applause to BirdNoter Ellen Blackstone for her excellent showing on NPR's Sunday Puzzle yesterday! In case you missed it, click the link to listen and play along:https://www.npr.org/2020/06/28/884245289/sunday-puzzle-starting-a-new-phraseGreg PluthUniversity Place
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/20 2:39 pm
From: Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] websites for Ridgefield and Dungeness refuges
Deborah West asked whether the websites for Ridgefield and Dungeness
National Wildlife Refuges have moved. I cannot answer that, but here are
links that are working for me for those two refuges:

https://www.fws.gov/refuge/ridgefield/

https://www.fws.gov/refuge/dungeness/

On cursory glance, these appeared to be somewhat minimalist sites, so
you might well be better off supplementing with the Friends sites,
whenever they exist.

https://ridgefieldfriends.org/

http://www.fodnwr.org/


Jane Hadley

Seattle, Wa



_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/20 2:22 pm
From: <dgrainger...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fwd: Re: redstart scroll bar anomaly


-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] redstart scroll bar anomaly
Date: 2020-06-29 14:09
From: <dgrainger...>
To: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>

RE Edge browser: Microsoft pushed that out and are still in the process
of doing so,and they found a way to do it as an Update even if you have
Auto Updates turned off. The thing runs on Chromium (NOT Google Chrome)
with which I have found a lot of malware like problems. To get rid of
it: use msconfig and kill the running process called Microsoft Edge.
Next go into Control Panel and Uninstall the Microsoft Edge Updater
program (else the beast will return) and then reboot. BTW, Internet
Explorer is NOT removed, just the tray icon during the Edge
installation. You can either find the exe file in the Internet Explorer
directory or find Internet Explorer under All Programs and then re-link
it to the task bar.

This campaign by Microsoft is to increase their abilities to gather data
about your use of the internet, data that guides Directed Advertising
campaigns; it is self serving for them and does the consumer no favors.

I recommend not using Internet Explorer anyway...



n 2020-06-29 10:46, Gary Bletsch wrote:
> Dear Tweeters,
>
> Sorry for wasting people's time on the matter of redstarts at the Agg
> Ponds. I restarted my computer, and now suddenly the redstarts appear
> as normal.
>
> I suspect that the problem stems from the "improved" Microsoft Edge
> browser. This browser has recently forced its way onto my computer and
> ousted Explorer, during an update that I did not request. Scroll bars
> have been acting up on various applications ever since this
> "improvement."
>
> Thanks to Scott and Ryan for their suggestions on this.
>
> Yours truly,
>
> Gary Bletsch
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/20 2:20 pm
From: <dgrainger...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] drone light show for 4th of july?
FAA regulations recently enacted which require license for each drone
operator and restrictions regarding flight over habitations and altitude
and line-of-sight operation would make such a show very unlikely to
receive approvals needed.


On 2020-06-29 07:46, Devorah the Ornithologist wrote:
> Hello everyone,
>
> I'm researching a piece about drone light shows (versus fireworks) for
> 4th of July and ran across mention that Bainbridge Island wanted to
> host a large drone light show in 2019 but was unable to get
> sponsorship to cover the costs, but they remain hopeful for a drone
> show in 2020. Does anyone know if this drone light show is going to
> happen?
>
> I'm also interested to talk (via email because I'm based in Norway) to
> other municipalities that are hosting a drone light show instead of
> fireworks. My deadline is 30 June 2020 so interested people should
> email me at <grrlscientist...> as soon as possible.
>
> thank you.
>
> --
>
> GrrlScientist | @GrrlScientist [1]
> <grrlscientist...>
>
> Words: Forbes [2]
>
> sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt._ _[Virgil, Aeneid]
>
> grrlscientist
> about.me/grrlscientist
>
>
>
> Links:
> ------
> [1] https://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
> [2] http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/20 1:10 pm
From: Greg Pluth <gjpluth...>
Subject: [Tweeters] off topic
Hi Tweets -
Kudos and applause to BirdNoter Ellen Blackstone for her excellent showing
on NPR's Sunday Puzzle yesterday! In case you missed it, click the link to
listen and play along:
https://www.npr.org/2020/06/28/884245289/sunday-puzzle-starting-a-new-phrase

Greg Pluth
University Place

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/20 11:47 am
From: Christina <joannabird413...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Table mountain burn
Hi everyone,
Has anyone birded the table mountain burn?
Christina Woodinville

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/20 10:54 am
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Whatcom Redstarts on eBird
Hello Tweeters and Gary,
I think this may just be a temporary issue you experienced with eBird. When
I look at this hotspot I see several dozen reports from the Whatcom Nehalem
hotspot including the 12 from you. I've seen similar issues happen before
where the Range Map tool silently fails to load all the data that should be
there. I'll include a link at the bottom for others who might want to check
to see if they see accurate data.

Link for those who want to check for themselves. Zoom in around Newhalem.
https://ebird.org/map/amered?bmo=1&emo=12&byr=1900&eyr=2020&env.minX=-123.092&env.minY=48.639&env.maxX=-120.653&env.maxY=49.004&gp=true

Josh Adams
Cathcart, WA

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/20 10:52 am
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] redstart scroll bar anomaly
Dear Tweeters,
Sorry for wasting people's time on the matter of redstarts at the Agg Ponds. I restarted my computer, and now suddenly the redstarts appear as normal.
I suspect that the problem stems from the "improved" Microsoft Edge browser. This browser has recently forced its way onto my computer and ousted Explorer, during an update that I did not request. Scroll bars have been acting up on various applications ever since this "improvement."
Thanks to Scott and Ryan for their suggestions on this.
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/20 8:54 am
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Whatcom Redstarts on eBird
Dear Tweeters,
The "Explore Data" tools of eBird offer much of interest, but sometimes the data can present as many questions as they do answers. 
I just noticed that Whatcom County's best spot for American Redstarts shows only eight records of the American Redstart. This spot is the Newhalem Agg Ponds, way up in the Skagit Valley. The 8 eBird records for American Redstart at Newhalem Agg Ponds that do show up are all dated between 7-01-2019 and 6-07-2020. This can be seen by doing a "Species Map" for AMRE and zooming in to the Newhalem area. There are lots of other sightings from the area near the Agg Ponds, but the hotspot itself shows only those eight sightings.
Meanwhile, if I go to "My eBird" and look up my own personal sightings of American Redstarts at the Newhalem Agg Ponds--which is a "public hotspot"--I see that I myself have seen the species 12 times at Newhalem Agg Ponds. None of those sightings show up on the "Explore Species" map. Moreover, on at least some of those visits to the Agg Ponds, I was birding with other birders who also use eBird. I would expect to see those other birders' sightings of this species on the "Species Map," but those don't show up, either. Hmmm...
I'd love to hear an explanation of this apparent "eighteen-and-a-half-minute gap!"
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/20 7:49 am
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...>
Subject: [Tweeters] drone light show for 4th of july?
Hello everyone,

I'm researching a piece about drone light shows (versus fireworks) for 4th
of July and ran across mention that Bainbridge Island wanted to host a
large drone light show in 2019 but was unable to get sponsorship to cover
the costs, but they remain hopeful for a drone show in 2020. Does anyone
know if this drone light show is going to happen?

I'm also interested to talk (via email because I'm based in Norway) to
other municipalities that are hosting a drone light show instead of
fireworks. My deadline is 30 June 2020 so interested people should email me
at <grrlscientist...> as soon as possible.

thank you.

--
GrrlScientist | @GrrlScientist <https://twitter.com/GrrlScientist>
<grrlscientist...>
Words: Forbes <http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/>
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]


[image: --]

grrlscientist
[image: https://]about.me/grrlscientist
<https://about.me/grrlscientist?promo=email_sig&utm_source=product&utm_medium=email_sig&utm_campaign=chrome_ext>

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/20 11:54 pm
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Unknown night birds
I actually recorded a pair of birds at dusk Saturday evening giving this
exact same call. I believe it is a juvenile owl begging call, likely either
Great-Horned or Barred, but hopefully someone with some authoritative
knowledge can pop in and narrow it down to species.

Josh Adams
Cathcart, WA

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/20 11:15 pm
From: <snyder.greg...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Unknown night birds
Sounds a bit like a Common Nighthawk.

-----Original Message-----
From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of Mary Saylor
Sent: Sunday, June 28, 2020 10:23 PM
To: Tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Unknown night birds

Hi Tweeters,.

My husband and I were walking in our Issaquah Highlands neighborhood about 9:45 p.m. last night and heard these bird sounds— I guess I’d call them whistle-like shrieks. Here are links to the sound files:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/q7h22924e5bk03c/Calls1.mp3?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/4ugkbknyrm0lgv2/Calls2.mp3?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/qyb37bjpbev81q9/Calls3.mp3?dl=0

Eventually we saw two of them fly overhead. They were large-ish with wide wings that appeared light gray underneath with darker gray leading and trailing edges. Wish I could include a sketch. I hope the sound files come through. We heard them again tonight.

Mary Saylor
Issaquah
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/20 10:27 pm
From: Mary Saylor <birder...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Unknown night birds
Hi Tweeters,.

My husband and I were walking in our Issaquah Highlands neighborhood about 9:45 p.m. last night and heard these bird sounds— I guess I’d call them whistle-like shrieks. Here are links to the sound files:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/q7h22924e5bk03c/Calls1.mp3?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/4ugkbknyrm0lgv2/Calls2.mp3?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/qyb37bjpbev81q9/Calls3.mp3?dl=0

Eventually we saw two of them fly overhead. They were large-ish with wide wings that appeared light gray underneath with darker gray leading and trailing edges. Wish I could include a sketch. I hope the sound files come through. We heard them again tonight.

Mary Saylor
Issaquah
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/20 4:02 pm
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge--Website
I could not find the official government website for the Ridgefield NWR, but I did find the Friends of Ridgefield website. Perhaps you can get the info you seek from it.
https://www.ridgefieldfriends.org/RidgefieldNWRMain.html

Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA

On Sunday, June 28, 2020, 10:47:50 AM PDT, Deborah West <olyclarinet...> wrote:

Anyone know whether the website has moved? I have tried both the Ridgefield and Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge websites and keep getting page not found.

Deborah
Olympia


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/20 3:34 pm
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Oops I mean 28th June
 Dear Tweeters,
Sorry for the confusion on the date of the Chestnut-sided Warbler at Marblemount Boat Launch. I saw it there today, Sunday, 28th June 2020. There is no such thing as the 38th of June...although this year, it does seem that every month is closer to 48 days long than 38, come to think of it.
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/20 3:27 pm
From: Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] injurred Red Tail
WDFW has a website where you can search for licensed wildlife reabbers by county:How to find a licensed wildlife rehabilitator | Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife

|
|
| |
How to find a licensed wildlife rehabilitator | Washington Department of...

Contact a wildlife rehabilitator as soon as possible if you find a wild animal in distress.
|

|

|


Peggy MundyBothell, WA





On Sunday, June 28, 2020, 03:20:28 p.m. PDT, Lyn Topinka <pointers...> wrote:

hi all ... a friend has an injured Red Tail on her property (Vancouver, Washington) ... she's going to call Portland Audubon but was wondering if there was a more Vancouver centered place ...
thanks,Lyn




Lyn TopinkaVancouver, Wa.
NorthwestJourney.comColumbiaRiverImages.comNorthwestBirding.com
Sent from my Galaxy Tab A_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/20 3:23 pm
From: Lyn Topinka <pointers...>
Subject: [Tweeters] injurred Red Tail
hi all ... a friend has an injured Red Tail on her property (Vancouver, Washington) ... she's going to call Portland Audubon but was wondering if there was a more Vancouver centered place ...
thanks,Lyn




Lyn TopinkaVancouver, Wa.
NorthwestJourney.comColumbiaRiverImages.comNorthwestBirding.com
Sent from my Galaxy Tab A_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/20 1:22 pm
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Another Skagit Ch sided Warbler
Seen at Marblemount Boat Launch today 1300 on 38th June ...see eBird checklist...expect hordes of motorists and mosquitoes.

Sent from my iPhone
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/20 11:22 am
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Wagner swifts
Close to 3000 Vaux’s Swifts spent last night in the Monroe Wagner roost. Their last exit was 9:22-9:33.

Larry Schwitters
Issaquah
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/20 10:50 am
From: Deborah West <olyclarinet...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge--Website
Anyone know whether the website has moved? I have tried both the Ridgefield and Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge websites and keep getting page not found.

Deborah
Olympia


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/20 9:51 am
From: Al Wagar <jalanwagar...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Short videos of recent birding in Seattle
A few friends have enjoyed short videos of solo birding excursions in Seattle. If you are also interested in some vicarious birding during this lock-down period, here are three.

(When visiting the martin colony at Point Shilshole Beach, I wasn’t thinking of posting, already had good video clips, and settled for distant shots. It was a minus tide and I could have walked much closer for better shots. Sorry.)

Anyhow, here are links to the short videos.

Al Wagar
Shoreline

June 18 at Montlake Fill
https://www.yout <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6vk2e6WRO40>be.com/watch?v=6vk2e6WRO40 <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6vk2e6WRO40>u <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6vk2e6WRO40>

June 22 at Golden Gardens and Point Shilshole Beach
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=02VVrCZB3Gk <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=02VVrCZB3Gk>

June 26 at Montlake Fill
https://youtu.be/jTMytXarhNI <https://youtu.be/jTMytXarhNI>


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/27/20 5:30 pm
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] About those ants
"Flying ants will swarm in late spring and early summer. They have to have bright sunlight, low winds, high humidity, and warm temperatures to swarm. They prefer to swarm after there has been 3 to 5 days of rain. BEHAVIOR: Flying ants swarm for the same reasons as termites – to reproduce and expand their colonies."

Thank you Northwest Exterminating 2020

Larry Schwitters
Issaquah
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/27/20 5:22 pm
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Old Business
A closer look at the North Seattle Black Swifts of June 15 and 16.

16 North Seattle Black Swift locations were eBird reported June 15, 2020. These represented 486 BLSW.
12 North Seattle Black Swift locations were eBird reported June 16, 2020. These represented 234 BLSW.

North Seattle is usually good for 3 or 4 sightings and less than 10 BLSW the entire month of June. Last year it was 4 and 9.

I figured their migration should be over mid-June. Apparently not.

What were they doing? Catching flying ants? Do flying ants fly on rainy days?

Where did they roost? The Colorado guys who got the data off 3 Black Swift geolocators say migration roosting is on steep rocky river banks. Are there any of those around? Anyone out at Snoqualmie Falls the night of 6/15? Is that place open?

Watched a couple hundred Vaux’s come out of the Wagner roost this afternoon.

Good chance they will be going back in come sunset or rain, or both.

Larry Schwitters.
Issaquah
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/27/20 12:40 pm
From: Marcus Roening <marcus...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Government Meadows snow status
Hi Tweets,

Heather and I went to Government Meadows on the Cascade crest out of Greenwater WA FSR70 this past Thursday and 2 weeks ago - on the same day as Tim Brennan :-). We approached from the Pierce County Horse Camp access to get to the PacCrest Trail and north to the Meadows. On the first trip we walked on a foot of snow the whole way, along with a mile of access road to get to Horse Camp. This past Thursday, the access roads were free of snow and the PacCrest Trail was down to numerous small patches of snow and melt water.

We sadly didn’t find our target birds of Pine Grosbeak or Three-toed Woodpeckers, but they have been seen. For county listers, the cabin is in King County and the nearby small Creek is pretty darn close to being the Pierce county line.

On weekends, be mentally prepared for lots of ORV traffic up the Naches Trail access in King County starting late June, not allowed out of Horse Camp. And there is a target shooting quarry you pass on your way up that can get a bit loud on the weekends.

And since I’m doing the snow report- Paradise on Mt Rainer NP is open and has an amazing 6’ plus of snow at the parking lot.

Good birding,

Marcus Roening
Tacoma WA

Sent from my iPhone


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/27/20 12:21 pm
From: Hubbell <ldhubbell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Survival Skills
Tweeters,

Young Barred Owls have a lot to learn and so do young rats, rabbits and squirrels. It is a race to survival.

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2020/06/survival-skills.html <https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2020/06/survival-skills.html>

Have a great day on Union Bay, where Black Birders are welcome.

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/27/20 12:07 pm
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...>
Subject: [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of June 28, 2020
Hello, Tweeters!

Enjoy the latest episode of Sound Escapes with Gordon Hempton:
Mark Twain's Memories of a Limpid Brook https://bit.ly/2Z9g0Eu
============================
Heard last week on BirdNote:
* Common Potoo with Nancy Rumbel of Tingstad & Rumbel
http://bit.ly/2xOVEpB
* The White-headed Woodpecker
http://bit.ly/1nRWBfx
* What’s Behind Those Lustrous Red Feathers?
The Redder, the Better? https://bit.ly/2YBqc9z
* American Golden-Plover Lays Claim to the Tundra
http://bit.ly/13smFnG
* Mysterious Disappearance of Evening Grosbeaks
https://bit.ly/2Voms9B
* Band-tail - Pigeon of the Woods
http://bit.ly/LZ3Q3J
* Thick-billed Euphonia - Deceitful Mimic
http://bit.ly/1LN5btn
=========================
Next week on BirdNote: The Amazing Painted Bunting,
Crow Parents: Fearless Defenders, What Do Desert Birds Drink?
+ What's That About Our National Bird? -- and more!
https://bit.ly/382MDrB
--------------------------------------
Did you have a favorite story this week? Another comment?
Please let us know. mailto:<info...>
------------------------------------------------
BirdNote is in print. Check out BirdNote, the book:
https://www.birdnote.org/birdnote-book
There's a journal, too -- for your notes and sketches and lists:
http://bit.ly/BirdNote-journal
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
or Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/birdnoteradio/
Listen on Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find 1500+ episodes and more than 1200 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/26/20 12:23 pm
From: Dave Templeton <crazydave65...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Optics repair
It's good to hear at least some of the time the high end guys come
through. My experience with Zeiss was totally negative and expensive. I
highly do NOT recommend them.

Best regards,

Dave Templeton


Crazydave 6 5 at inbox daught com

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/26/20 9:11 am
From: Jeffrey Bryant <jbryant_68...>
Subject: [Tweeters] CORVID PHOTOS NEEDED
Again, I must reach out to Tweeters for help with an upcoming project for Washington Coast Magazine. The mag has suddenly been resurrected from its COVID-induced death, and I’ll need to provide an article by July 16. Intended topic: the wily corvids of WA’s outer coast. The article practically writes itself, but I have NOT had time to amass amazing photos of the local corvids, namely COMMON RAVEN, AMERICAN CROW, STELLER’S JAY, CALIFORNIA SCRUB-JAY.
I desperately need magazine-quality shots of these magnificent birds doing all the things we (I can’t be the only one) love them for. Particularly desirable would be pics of a winter crow roost (or large flocks en route,) corvids mobbing a predator, an occupied nest, or the grail shot: side-by-side comparison of crow and raven. Any shots of corvids doing wacky stuff are great, too! I once watched a raven repeatedly tobogganing down a snowdrift at the Grand Canyon, for example, but have no photographic proof…
PLEASE send full-size photo files without stamps/watermarks to me at <jbryant_68...> As always, there’s no cash prize, just the satisfaction of seeing your photo, properly credited, in print. Of course, you’d also get a free copy of the magazine when it comes out in September.
The Tweeters community has proved a great resource before. Tweets, don’t fail me now!

jeff Bryant
Seattle
<jbryant_68...>



_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/26/20 7:43 am
From: Doug Santoni <dougsantoni...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Swarovski Scope Repair Experience
Like Tom, I took my Leica binoculars in to the Leica shop at Bellevue Square. The people working there were helpful and responsive. I’d had the binoculars for over 20 years, and there were a few issues. The binoculars came back to me more quickly than promised, and I was thrilled with the results. (This was in the past six months.)

Doug



> On Jun 25, 2020, at 9:13 PM, Tom Merritt <birders.2341...> wrote:
>
> I’ve had very good luck with Swarovski. Last summer I sent my spotting scope in for repair via Seattle Audubon. The scope was returned in a few weeks.
>
> After having the scope repaired, I sent my Leica Ultravid Binoculars in for renewal and some repair work. I used the Leica shop in Bellevue Square. A 90- day turnaround was promised. The actual repair time was approximately 60-days with no charge. Several years ago, I had a similar experience with Leica. They totally messed up the repair. They finally ended up replacing the binoculars, with the UltraVids. The shop told me that the repair service had been improved and it definitely has been.
>
> Tom Merritt
>
> From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> <mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>> On Behalf Of ED DEAL
> Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2020 20:58
> To: tweeters <tweeters...> <mailto:<tweeters...>>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Swarovski Scope Repair Experience
>
> Yo Tweets,
>
> 4 weeks ago, in a moment of carelessness, my tripod fell over. The impact snapped the tripod attachment cleat off at the barrel of my Swarovski spotting scope, but fortunately didn't damage the optics. I resigned myself to several months without a scope, right in the middle of Cooper's Hawk season. To my amazement, the turnaround on the repair done at Swarovski's Rhode Island office was a mere 22 days from shipping to receipt of the fully repaired scope. And this in the time of COVID. Very impressive customer service.
> I'll contrast that to 18 months ago, when my Leica binoculars needed a sticky focus wheel lubricated. That took 4 months and near the end, some complaining to get them back.
> Ed Deal
> falcophile AT comcast.net <http://comcast.net/>_______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...> <mailto:<Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters <http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters>

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/25/20 9:17 pm
From: Tom Merritt <birders.2341...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Swarovski Scope Repair Experience
I’ve had very good luck with Swarovski. Last summer I sent my spotting scope in for repair via Seattle Audubon. The scope was returned in a few weeks.



After having the scope repaired, I sent my Leica Ultravid Binoculars in for renewal and some repair work. I used the Leica shop in Bellevue Square. A 90- day turnaround was promised. The actual repair time was approximately 60-days with no charge. Several years ago, I had a similar experience with Leica. They totally messed up the repair. They finally ended up replacing the binoculars, with the UltraVids. The shop told me that the repair service had been improved and it definitely has been.



Tom Merritt



From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of ED DEAL
Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2020 20:58
To: tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Swarovski Scope Repair Experience



Yo Tweets,



4 weeks ago, in a moment of carelessness, my tripod fell over. The impact snapped the tripod attachment cleat off at the barrel of my Swarovski spotting scope, but fortunately didn't damage the optics. I resigned myself to several months without a scope, right in the middle of Cooper's Hawk season. To my amazement, the turnaround on the repair done at Swarovski's Rhode Island office was a mere 22 days from shipping to receipt of the fully repaired scope. And this in the time of COVID. Very impressive customer service.

I'll contrast that to 18 months ago, when my Leica binoculars needed a sticky focus wheel lubricated. That took 4 months and near the end, some complaining to get them back.

Ed Deal

falcophile AT comcast.net


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/25/20 9:03 pm
From: ED DEAL <falcophile...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Swarovski Scope Repair Experience
Yo Tweets,

4 weeks ago, in a moment of carelessness, my tripod fell over. The impact snapped the tripod attachment cleat off at the barrel of my Swarovski spotting scope, but fortunately didn't damage the optics. I resigned myself to several months without a scope, right in the middle of Cooper's Hawk season. To my amazement, the turnaround on the repair done at Swarovski's Rhode Island office was a mere 22 days from shipping to receipt of the fully repaired scope. And this in the time of COVID. Very impressive customer service.
I'll contrast that to 18 months ago, when my Leica binoculars needed a sticky focus wheel lubricated. That took 4 months and near the end, some complaining to get them back.
Ed Deal
falcophile AT comcast.net
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/25/20 7:42 pm
From: <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2020-06-25
Tweets – We had a very nice morning for our walk today. As usual for this time of year, not many surprises, except for a few seasonally unusual birds. But all in all, a pretty good day.

Highlights:
a.. Wood Ducks – three clutches of ducklings
b.. Mallard – FIVE clutches of ducklings
c.. Virginia Rail – one responded to clapping briefly from across the slough
d.. American Coot – lone bird remains near Lake Platform
e.. Great Blue Heron – first week seeing apparent juveniles out of the nest and along the slough
f.. Green Heron – one flew up the slough
g.. Osprey – birds at both nests, 6-8 birds total
h.. Barn Owl – Matt had one in the East Meadow prior to 4:30 a.m.
i.. Western Screech-Owl – Matt had one near the east end of the boardwalk before 4:30 a.m.
j.. Pileated Woodpecker – one heard just after 5:30 a.m. Not at all common in June
k.. Bullock’s Oriole – First-year and full adult males seen
l.. Orange-crowned Warbler – Matt heard one pre-dawn; we may have seen another along the edge of the Dog Meadow
m.. Wilson’s Warbler – Male singing and seen at Rowing Club; first ever for Week 26
n.. Lazuli Bunting – our best estimate was 3-4 males, 2-3 females, with the higher value probable for both
o.. INDIGO BUNTING – singing male continues in the trees and shrubs in the spirea area in the center of the Dog Meadow
Below the weir, a COYOTE on the far shore caused the Mallards to sound like a synchronized chorus of bullfrogs. They were definitely concerned.

At the Rowing Club, a TOWNSEND’S MOLE tried desperately to burrow into the edge of the gravel path as we approached. It refused an attempt to guide it to softer ground.

And we had at least a dozen EUROPEAN COTTONTAIL.

For the day, 64 species of bird.

= Michael Hobbs
= www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
= <BirdMarymoor...>
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/25/20 1:50 pm
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Six Marbled Murrelets off Browns Point, Tacoma Washington - Great Views!
Hi Tweets,

on our lunch time dog walk in the Browns Point Lighthouse Park on a falling
tide near low tide, we saw 6 MARBLED MURRELETS foraging and calling. Many
excellent sightings less then 50 feet from shore. On multiple occasions
birds popped up from a dive within 30 feet of my dog fetching the ball from
the sound. I've heard murrelets calling the last 4 weeks, have had several
sightings, but it was awesome to see them so close to shore on a falling
low tide. Great views.

Happy birding,
Shep

--
Shep Thorp
Browns Point
253-370-3742

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/25/20 12:27 pm
From: Sharon Howard <clmssh...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bald eagle nest on North Magnolia, Seattle
For several weeks from our home in Lower Sunset Hill in Ballard I have been using my husband’s scope and watching a huge bald eagle nest. It is in the crotch of a double crowned and tallest tree on North Magnolia. For weeks I’ve seen the parents coming and going, and a few days ago I saw one parent bring in some prey with long dangling legs, I could not identify, but it may have been a juvenile heron as there is the Great Blue Heron rookery next to the Locks with dozens of young. Couldn’t be sure. At that time I could see the parent feed young in the nest, but could not see the juvenile(s). Today when I checked there were two juveniles standing together on the south side of the nest. Soon a parent arrived and the juveniles jumped into/onto the center of the nest and mom or dad provided lunch. I did not see what was on the menu. It is such a treat to be able to on my patio and look across the water at bald eagles sharing lunch.
We also had a Cooper’s hawk come sit on our fence today, but the small birds at the feeders flushed into the trees and the hawk left.

Bonne journée,
Sharon Howard
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/25/20 11:11 am
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Burrowing Owl Blog Post - Dedicated to the "Owl Whisperer", aka Khanh Tran
I posted some details of my visit to Grant County where I had 7 Burrowing Owls on Tweeters earlier this week.  I finished a blog post about the visit (and the earlier stop at Bullfrog Pond) yesterday - lots of photos.  Said only partially tongue in cheek, it did feel like what Khanh Tran must feel like every time he gets those incredible owl photos.  He works a lot harder at it than I did on this day.  Sure was fun.

https://blairbirding.com/2020/06/25/a-khanh-tran-kind-of-day/

Blair Bernson







_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/25/20 8:28 am
From: J Christian Kessler <1northraven...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Harlequin Duck siblings
striking how closely they resemble the rocks in front. very effective.

Chris Kessler
Seattle

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 7:36 AM Susan McDougall <podicepswa...>
wrote:

> Hi,
>
>
>
> We saw five Harlequin Duck siblings on the Queets River. Truly a nice
> surprise.
>
>
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/treeperson/50036849833/in/dateposted-public/
>
>
>
> Susan McDougall
>
> <podicepswa...>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for
> Windows 10
>
>
>
>
> <http://www.avg.com/email-signature?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient> Virus-free.
> www.avg.com
> <http://www.avg.com/email-signature?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient>
> <#m_-1550672038394248582_DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>


--
"moderation in everything, including moderation"
Rustin Thompson

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/25/20 7:38 am
From: Susan McDougall <podicepswa...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Harlequin Duck siblings
Hi,

We saw five Harlequin Duck siblings on the Queets River. Truly a nice surprise.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/treeperson/50036849833/in/dateposted-public/

Susan McDougall
<podicepswa...>



Sent from Mail for Windows 10



--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/24/20 7:38 pm
From: Darwin Alonso <dovalonso...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bullock's oriole at Marymoor
There was a female Bullock's Oriole just "inland" from the western most dog
swimming area (Wed 24th noonish). I got a good view right next to a very
visible Swainson's Thrush that was persistently singing up a storm. I
whiffed on the Buntings and Kingbirds, but did manage to see 5 new birds
for my Seattle based human(me)-powered year. Personal high points were the
Oriel, best ever views of a Yellow Warbler, Band-tailed Pigeons and
Black-headed Grosbeaks(lots). I cycled out there from the Ravenna area in
Seattle, and by the time I got there the Audubon Loop seemed completely
empty of birders. The Burke-Gilman/Samamish trail was wonderfully empty on
the way out to Marymoor, but irritatingly crowded on the way back. By in
large the dog-walkers we petty good about wearing masks, imo.

--
Darwin Alonso
Seattle,WA 98105

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/24/20 3:11 pm
From: ck park <travelgirl.fics...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Owls
barred owls can be found around beaver lake (east sammamish)... i believe
michael regularly has barn owls at marymoor, and i'm pretty sure you can
find them at farrell-mcwhirter farm/park in redmond...

i have barred and, i believe, western screech, in the wetland behind my
home, but i've just heard them, never seen them there...

00 caren
ParkGallery.org
george davis creek, north fork


On Wed, Jun 24, 2020 at 12:38 PM Eleanor Boba <eleanorboba...>
wrote:

> There are owls in Ravenna Park. I was told they are nesting on the south
> side of the park near the pedestrian bridges.
>
> *From:* Lynne Kelly
> *Sent:* Tuesday, June 23, 2020 2:48 PM
> *To:* <tweeters...>
> *Subject:* [Tweeters] Owls
>
>
> Hello Tweeters, I have been a mostly silent member since the Crested
> Caracara appeared in Skykomish a few years back. I am hoping you might help
> me find owls I can observe now while I have a little time. Have any of you
> had luck spotting them with any regularity? I will be driving from Index on
> Highway 2. Lately I have been searching the Arboretum and Interlaken Park
> and Ravenna Park but no luck.
>
> Any guidance is much appreciated. Thank you!
>
> Lynne Kelly
>
>
>
> Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for
> Windows 10
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/24/20 2:11 pm
From: Rex Takasugi <RexTak...>
Subject: [Tweeters] American White Pelicans at John Day Dam on the Columbia River
While fly fishing for shad below the John Day Dam on Monday evening and Tuesday morning, I saw the largest group of American White Pelicans I've ever seen. There were at least 150 of those big birds below the dam, I presume feeding on the remains of shad that get flushed into the turbines, as most of the pelicans were close to the bottom of the dam. Quite a sight to see this many huge birds in one spot! The shad runs have been at record levels the past several years and I wonder if the increases in the number of shad have resulted in increases in the population of the pelicans?

When leaving on Tuesday morning, I stopped by the boat launch just to take a look and heard a bird singing in a tall tree behind the outhouse, but I didn't recognize the song. I got out my binoculars and it turned out to be a colorful Lazuli Bunting, which was a nice surprise.

Good birding!

Rex Takasugi
Kent, WA


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/24/20 12:41 pm
From: Eleanor Boba <eleanorboba...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Owls
There are owls in Ravenna Park. I was told they are nesting on the south side of the park near the pedestrian bridges.

From: Lynne Kelly
Sent: Tuesday, June 23, 2020 2:48 PM
To: <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Owls

Hello Tweeters, I have been a mostly silent member since the Crested Caracara appeared in Skykomish a few years back. I am hoping you might help me find owls I can observe now while I have a little time. Have any of you had luck spotting them with any regularity? I will be driving from Index on Highway 2. Lately I have been searching the Arboretum and Interlaken Park and Ravenna Park but no luck.

Any guidance is much appreciated. Thank you!

Lynne Kelly



Sent from Mail for Windows 10



_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/24/20 6:22 am
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Color Differences Between The Sexes Driven By Simple Molecular Mechanisms
Color Differences Between The Sexes Driven By Simple Molecular Mechanisms
Hello everyone,

have you ever wondered how male and female can look different from each
other despite sharing the same genes? Recently, a study was published that
looked at one particularly common trait in birds: dichromatism (where males
and females have plumage of different colors, color patterns or
ornamentation). This study found that this sex difference in birds -- even
when it's a dramatic difference as seen in eclectus parrots -- is driven by
surprisingly simple molecular mechanisms -- and explains how dichromatism
arises quickly amongst birds.

Color Differences Between The Sexes Driven By Simple Molecular Mechanisms
https://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2020/06/23/color-differences-between-the-sexes-driven-by-simple-molecular-mechanisms/
<https://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2020/06/23/color-differences-between-the-sexes-driven-by-simple-molecular-mechanisms/#554d3e5116f3>
tinyURL: https://tinyurl.com/ydh6742f

As always, thanks for reading and please do share widely amongst your bird
colleagues and friends, on social media and, of course, on twitter.

--
GrrlScientist | @GrrlScientist <https://twitter.com/GrrlScientist>
<grrlscientist...>
Words: Forbes <http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/> | Medium
<https://medium.com/@GrrlScientist>
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/20 8:56 pm
From: <dgrainger...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Crossbill
Port Towsend... About 5:00PM today had a female crossbill arrive and use
our birdbath, stayed a few minutes, bu I couldn't get camera in play in
time
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/20 6:59 pm
From: benjamin menzies <bentoddm...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Birding and "Black Lives Matter" (Paul Bannick)

Hi Tweets,

This terrific podcast episode linked below is apropos, and a really enjoyable listen, I think:

https://thisislovepodcast.com/episode-22-prairie-warbler

Cheers

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/20 4:34 pm
From: Nadine Drisseq <drisseq.n...>
Subject: [Tweeters] White Pelican on Lake Sammamish this morning
Did anyone else see it?
I didn't see it but the photo of it 'apparently' basking on the lake is up
there on our Washington Birders group (which promoted the important topic
blackbirdersweek)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/WAbirdphoto/permalink/895190577657898/

N

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/20 2:55 pm
From: Lynne Kelly <BLynneKelly...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Owls
Hello Tweeters, I have been a mostly silent member since the Crested Caracara appeared in Skykomish a few years back. I am hoping you might help me find owls I can observe now while I have a little time. Have any of you had luck spotting them with any regularity? I will be driving from Index on Highway 2. Lately I have been searching the Arboretum and Interlaken Park and Ravenna Park but no luck.
Any guidance is much appreciated. Thank you!
Lynne Kelly

Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/20 12:58 pm
From: Chris Rurik <chrisrurik...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Black swift phenomenon
[I tried to send this last week. Better late than never.]

Tweeters,

I too spent an hour [on June 15] transfixed by the black swift phenomenon.
From my perch near NE Seattle's Magnuson Park I could see ~50 concentrated
over Promontory Point, and small groups were almost always breaking away to
arc over the surrounding neighborhoods. At times they were within 50-100
feet of my head. Once or twice I heard the whooshing of their wings. Never
did I expect to have such a wonderful opportunity to study black swifts.

Pondering what might have caused the event has raised a number of questions
for me:

What were they eating? The general black swift birding knowledge around
Puget Sound, in my experience, goes like this: lowland black swift
sightings are the result of weather conditions. Namely low dark cloud cover
that makes foraging impossible in the mountains. Is there more nuance to
the expected weather conditions? For example, last night was incredibly
calm in terms of wind.

In the literature summarized by Birds of the World, far more attention is
paid to prey conditions than climatic conditions (though weather is
mentioned as playing a role in black swift foraging grounds). A number of
studies from different parts of their range show that black swifts
opportunistically seek out areas where flying insects are swarming or at
least abundant. Flying ants are mentioned a number of times as particularly
favored. Often flying swarms of insects are ephemeral mating events lasting
a few days at most and sometimes just an evening. Though black swifts will
take a wide variety of insect types (67 families documented), gut contents
of individual black swifts often show many prey items of a single species,
reinforcing the idea that they seek out areas where a single insect is
having a mass flight event. What could they have been eating last night?
Was there an insect flight event, or were they eating a variety of species?
In my experience you know if an ant flight is on, and I have not seen any
flying ants on the ground yesterday or today. There were a few small clouds
of some tiny insect near my balcony, but I was unable to sample them. When
the black swifts were flying low around me I failed to see any flying
insect activity around them. But they were moving fast and light conditions
were not great. Or perhaps the prey was on the smaller side.

Anyone have any idea what they were eating? Perhaps if we learn what
attracted them here (if it is not merely weather) we can be on the lookout
in the future. Stomach contents of black swifts taken in Washington have
included flying ants, wasps, caddisflies, crane flies, other flies,
beetles, termites, aphids, leafhoppers, treehoppers, moths, and even
spiders (presumably ballooning spiders?).

Did others notice them concentrating over certain spots like the "sky
island" of Promontory Point, where a certain type of prey may have been
originating?

Others reported common nighthawks in Seattle. Were these typical migrants
that were seen because more observers than usual were looking up? Or were
they too attracted by whatever attracted the black swifts?

In response to Larry's question, I did see one Vaux's swift among the black
swifts. From one to five Vaux's swifts has been a near guarantee at
Magnuson Park for at least the last month. I did not see any interaction
between black and Vaux's swift.

Those black swifts sure electrified the sky. The last stragglers departed
by 9:15. On a brief walk the following morning I did not see any swift
action, though it sounds like there were some down by the arboretum. The
sky felt empty without them.

Chris Rurik
Seattle


--
*Chris Rurik*
Writer / Naturalist
(253) 225-7104
<chrisrurik...>

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/20 11:46 am
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Grant County Burrowing Owls
I ventured to Grant County yesterday looking for Burrowing Owls.  They have been reported somewhat recently along Highway 17, along Hatchery Road heading into Rocky Ford and near Rocky Ford.  I had a nice stop first at Bullfrog Pond and nearby Wood Duck Road finding the usual suspects.  I was approaching the "target area" a bit after 9 and my phone GPS took me along what I thought was a bit of an indirect way taking Road A off of Highway 283 and then to Road 9 and then to Highway 17 before turning onto Hatchery Road.  
It turned out to be a fortuitous change as I found NO Burrowing Owls along Hatchery Road or at Rocky Ford but found SIX (6) along the way.  The first one was on a telephone wire along Road 9 just before reaching Dodson Road.  (It was at the same place when I returned several hours later).  The next one was on a rock outcropping at the intersection of Road A and Road 12.3.  (It, too, was on the same outcropping when I retraced steps heading home).
Then on Highway 17 a photographer was looking at a burrow nest where there were three Burrowing Owls - adult and two young.  A very brief look only.  They were not evident during a 20 minute wait on my return.
The last one was also on Highway 17 (47.308, -119.479) on the opposite side from the burrow nest.
This is significantly more Burrowing Owls than I have ever seen in a day...must be like Khanh Tranh feels every day .
At Rocky Ford I heard a Sora and heard 2 or 3 Virginia Rails with a decent photo of one.
Blair Bernson
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/20 11:23 am
From: <dgrainger...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] bird movement now (?)
Port Townsend WA: we have a pair of Towhees that have been here a long
time; I think they are the same couple that were here last summer and
spring. Obviously a mated pair, but they have yet to bring their kids to
visit...
--------------------------------------------------------------
On 2020-06-23 10:37, Marcy D'Addio wrote:
> I believe I have 2 juvenile Pine Siskins at my feeder in Redmond, WA.
> I don't recall seeing them before. And our solitary juv Spotted
> Towhee has been around for a week.
> -Marcy D'Addio
> Redmond, WA
>
> On Tue, Jun 23, 2020 at 10:09 AM pan <panmail...> wrote:
>
>> Tweets,
>>
>> My urban Seattle yard has only had one towhee I know of, for a few
>> moments in passing. So just now, I was surprised to hear a high
>> buzzing I didn't know, then see the source: a juvenile Spotted
>> Towhee, all brown and mottley, barely recognizable save for the long
>> tail with white spots when it flew a bit. They do not breed in this
>> neighborhood, though probably in Volunteer Park for or five blocks
>> away. Perhaps now is a good time for a youngster of a resident
>> species barely grown to leave its family to find its own spot (?).
>> On reflection, I do see a lot of young robins moving about in late
>> spring/early summer, not all from known local pairs, but they have
>> more complicated seasonal movements. Birds of the World on line
>> does say immature towhees stay on and near parents' territories for
>> awhile (sounds like a matter of weeks), then disappear, but nothing
>> much more.
>>
>> 23 July, 2020,
>>
>> Alan Grenon
>> Seattle
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/20 10:42 am
From: Marcy D'Addio <marcydaddio89...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] bird movement now (?)
I believe I have 2 juvenile Pine Siskins at my feeder in Redmond, WA. I
don't recall seeing them before. And our solitary juv Spotted Towhee has
been around for a week.
-Marcy D'Addio
Redmond, WA

On Tue, Jun 23, 2020 at 10:09 AM pan <panmail...> wrote:

> Tweets,
>
> My urban Seattle yard has only had one towhee I know of, for a few moments
> in passing. So just now, I was surprised to hear a high buzzing I didn't
> know, then see the source: a juvenile Spotted Towhee, all brown and
> mottley, barely recognizable save for the long tail with white spots when
> it flew a bit. They do not breed in this neighborhood, though probably in
> Volunteer Park for or five blocks away. Perhaps now is a good time for a
> youngster of a resident species barely grown to leave its family to find
> its own spot (?). On reflection, I do see a lot of young robins moving
> about in late spring/early summer, not all from known local pairs, but they
> have more complicated seasonal movements. Birds of the World on line does
> say immature towhees stay on and near parents' territories for awhile
> (sounds like a matter of weeks), then disappear, but nothing much more.
>
> 23 July, 2020,
>
> Alan Grenon
> Seattle
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/20 10:13 am
From: pan <panmail...>
Subject: [Tweeters] bird movement now (?)
Tweets,

My urban Seattle yard has only had one towhee I know of, for a few moments in passing. So just now, I was surprised to hear a high buzzing I didn't know, then see the source: a juvenile Spotted Towhee, all brown and mottley, barely recognizable save for the long tail with white spots when it flew a bit. They do not breed in this neighborhood, though probably in Volunteer Park for or five blocks away. Perhaps now is a good time for a youngster of a resident species barely grown to leave its family to find its own spot (?). On reflection, I do see a lot of young robins moving about in late spring/early summer, not all from known local pairs, but they have more complicated seasonal movements. Birds of the World on line does say immature towhees stay on and near parents' territories for awhile (sounds like a matter of weeks), then disappear, but nothing much more.

23 July, 2020,

Alan Grenon
Seattle
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/20 10:03 am
From: Hank Heiberg <hank.heiberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Neal Road (Fall City, WA) Redstart
Just saw and photographed the American Redstart first reported by Adrian Lee. John Pushcock’s description in his eBird checklist of where to stand was very helpful. Looked like a female to us.

There’s a big white house being renovated on the right (East) side of Neal Road. A little further along there’s a blue natural area sign. We stood 25 paces south of that sign so that we could see into the clearing on the west side of the road.

Hank Heiberg
Issaquah, WA



Sent from my iPhone
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/20 7:16 am
From: Gene Revelas <grevelas...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Westport Seabirds Trip Report - June 20, 2020 - We're back!
Hi Tweets,



On Saturday, June 20th, Westport Seabirds kicked off its abbreviated 2020 season with a really satisfying trip offshore. Given these challenging times, it would have been a great trip if all we saw was the ocean, but the birds are still there and we were thrilled to be back in their presence. We left the marina at 5:30 am on the longest day of the year and headed due west along our usual route to Grays Canyon. The forecast was good and although we tolerated a light drizzle much of the day, the seas were manageable and the air temperature was comfortable. Inshore birding was uneventful, but Captain Phil Anderson knew that the shrimpers were on the outer shelf directly in our path. The first good find was a cooperative Tufted Puffin just offshore as the Sooty and Pink-footed Shearwater numbers began to increase. Other regulars included Rhinoceros Auklets, unusually low numbers of Common Murres, and two Humpback Whales (we would end up seeing eight Humpbacks for the day, including two whales that fully breached).



At the first shrimper, we picked up more than 1000 Pink-foots, over 2000 Sooty's, our first of 83 Black-footed Albatross for the day, several Fork-tailed Storm-Petrels, a quickly disappearing Pomarine Jaeger, and a very accommodating South Polar Skua. The other three shrimpers added lots of birds, but no new species other than a pod of about 20 Pacific White-sided Dolphins that swam towards us and then under and around the boat.



We eventually left the shrimpers and headed to our usual chum spot at 125 degrees west picking up the first of the 52 Leach's Storm-Petrels for the day, and a Northern Fur Seal. The chum attracted a Storm-Petrel show with dozens of both Fork-tails and Leach's moving in and around the slick for over 30 minutes. A slow flyby sub-adult Arctic Tern was a nice surprise. The chum also provided great photo ops for both Black-footed Albatross and Northern Fulmar.



The return trip provided included additional time with the shrimpers. We added another sub-adult tern, sitting on a log, a Common Tern this time, and a fur seal pup that we believe was a Guadalupe Fur Seal. Back in the harbor, we added both Brown Pelicans and Heerman's Gulls back from their southern wintering and breeding grounds, both California and Steller's Sea Lions and a Harbor Porpoise. We ended up with more than 7000 total birds for the day. The final numbers and complete species list is posted on Westport Seabirds.com and the trip lists are on ebird. Spotters for the trip were Bill Tweit, Gene Revelas, and Scott Mills. Captain Phil Anderson and first mate Chris provided their usual great customer service, including extra health and safety efforts related to the COVID-19 pandemic.


If you are interested in joining us, please check the Westport Seabirds website (http://westportseabirds.com/) for information on upcoming trips and availability. The website also includes our COVID-19 Safety Plan designed to make the Monte Carlo as safe as possible for our customers and staff. Our 2020 season runs through the first weekend in October.
Hope to see you out there soon.
Gene Revelas
Olympia, WA


Gene Revelas | Senior Consultant
Tel: 360.705.3534,418 | Cell: 360.870.4950
1205 West Bay Drive NW | Olympia | WA 98502
<grevelas...> | www.integral-corp.com

[cid:Integral-Logo_9733dd41-3a5c-4af6-b821-47718bfb1269.jpg]

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/22/20 8:22 pm
From: Whitney Neufeld-Kaiser <whitney.n.k...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Uplifting Birders of Color
Corina Newsome, an ornithology doctoral student and Black birder, was
featured by National Audubon as well:
https://www.audubon.org/news/its-time-build-truly-inclusive-outdoors

And much closer to home, an article featuring the voices of Joey Manson and
Armand Lucas:
https://southseattleemerald.com/2020/06/04/the-joys-and-risks-of-being-a-black-birdwatcher-in-rainier-beach/

Best,
Whitney Neufeld-Kaiser
Seattle

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: <tweeters-request...>
Date: Mon, Jun 22, 2020 at 12:02 PM
Subject: Tweeters Digest, Vol 190, Issue 22
To: <tweeters...>

Message: 9
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2020 10:56:26 -0700
From: Izzy & Kendrick <gobirder...>
To: <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Uplifting Birders of Color
Message-ID: <C5BB1618-4FFD-452B-B315-DFDD9A83C5D2...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8

Hello,everyone,

I thought this article would be of interest:

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2020/06/29/corina-newsome-and-the-black-birders-movement?fbclid=IwAR0hyJ9y-QfONP_vGaV5cNFawF_TlGt-z4gF0vFzVLlB1Cmrfmy84OKkb5c

It?s way past time to recognize and amplify BIPOC (Black, indigenous,
people of color) who bird.

Good birding to all,
izzy arevalo wong
seattle wa

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/22/20 5:22 pm
From: Ed Newbold <ednewbold1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Let's catch up with Football, Baseball, Basketball and NASCAR

 Hi all

Birders can’t make Black Lives Matter go away, nor shouldthey want to.  We need to join the sportslisted in the subject line and make it eminently clear that we joyously welcomeBlack birders to our ranks, we understand the risks they take and we hope thatwe can have their back.

 

The color bar in Baseball fell in 1947 with the heroism ofJackie Robinson, backed up by the determination of Dodger President BranchRickey to do the right thing.

 

For those of us who think of ourselves as white, now is thetime we must channel that spirit of Branch Rickey but in a sport that will probablybe the very last that will ever be able to say, unequivocally, that its colorbar has been totally broken—birding involves the whole country and all of its people.

 

We must do this for the sake of these wonderful youngbirders, and we must do it for the planet.

 

Thanks all,

 

Ed Newbold


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/22/20 3:42 pm
From: Tucker, Trileigh <TRI...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] BNA (now Birds of the World) access through Sno-Isle
Hi again Tweets,

Someones question leads me to note that when you search the Sno-Isle library catalog, you still have to use the name Birds of North America Online. Strangely, a search for Birds of the World doesnt yield the result.

Happy summer birding,
Trileigh

* * * * *
Trileigh Tucker
Professor Emerita of Environmental Studies, Seattle University
NaturalPresenceArts.com<https://naturalpresencearts.com/>

From: Trileigh Tucker <tri...><mailto:<tri...>>
Date: Monday, June 22, 2020 at 11:22 AM
To: "<tweeters...><mailto:<tweeters...>" <tweeters...><mailto:<tweeters...>>
Subject: BNA (now Birds of the World) access through Sno-Isle

Hi Tweets,

I am delighted to report that through a simple registration process, I am able to access Birds of the World through the Sno-Isle library system<https://www.sno-isle.org/getacard>. Thought many of you might want that as well.

Good birding,
Trileigh

* * * * *
Trileigh Tucker
Professor Emerita of Environmental Studies, Seattle University
NaturalPresenceArts.com<https://naturalpresencearts.com/>


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/22/20 3:05 pm
From: Paul Bannick <paul.bannick...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Birding and "Black Lives Matter"
Thanks Tom, Whitney and Izzy for having the courage to bring these critical
issues to mind.



On Mon, Jun 22, 2020 at 10:24 AM Thomas M Leschine <tml...> wrote:

> Dear Tweets,
> Recent events and a few related related Tweeters posts remind me that we
> do not pursue our passion for birding in isolation from other, broader
> forces that shape society. On Memorial Day, New York City birder Chris
> Cooper had his infamous Central Park encounter, the same day that George
> Floyd was killed while in police custody in Minneapolis. Many of us in the
> birding community found ourselves confronting more directly than ever the
> question, what does it mean to be a birder—white vs. person of color or
> other difference that may influence how some others view us. Should any of
> these distinctions even matter? Yet clearly, they do.
>
> I don’t know whether or not Tweeters is the right forum for discussion of
> such questions; like you, I bet, I come to Tweeters mostly because I want
> to know where the birds are. I’m just asking, as was asked in one of those
> earlier posts, where such discussion *should* take place.
>
> I don’t believe we as a community can afford to say, “Not our business”,
> if ever we could. We should care both about birds and the environmental
> quality that supports them. Conservation efforts and “environmental
> justice” are increasingly viewed as needing to go down the road together if
> either is ultimately to succeed. Weakened environmental rules likely
> affect communities of color disproportionately, even as more land and water
> become less hospitable to wildlife.
>
> Discourse on Tweeters is remarkably well mannered, something all “Tweets”
> can be proud of (and thank the listserv monitors for). Occasionally the
> topic turns to lost birding opportunity—that new road closure or that “No
> Trespassing” sign that didn’t used to be there. Conceptually at least,
> it’s not that big a leap to the topic of birding opportunity that is more
> available to some than to others by reason of skin color or other personal
> traits. As I said above, I’m not advocating that Tweeters specifically
> open up this way, but I am asking, as others have, where such a
> conversation should occur, as I believe it must.
>
> If you have a response, please send it to me directly rather than to the
> full Tweeters list.
>
> Tom Leschine
> Seattle
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>


--
Now Available:
Owl: A Year in the Lives of North American Owls at:
http://paulbannick.com/shop/owl-a-year-in-the-lives-of-north-american-owls/


Paul Bannick Photography
www.paulbannick.com
206-940-7835

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/22/20 12:30 pm
From: pan <panmail...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Seattle Northern Parula (more inf.)
Hello, Tweets,

To my knowledge the bird has not been detected since about 9:10 this morning.

I arrived at the Washington Park Arboretum in Seattle at 7:30, and by 7:40 was at the Pacific Connections garden, hearing a familiar song from my years in the East coming from the golf course border area. I spent the next half hour listening to the Northern Parula and trying to see it. Eventually I got one view of it about 100' up in the cottonwood where it seemed to spend the entire time, seeing it deliver a couple songs. There were many young and scruffy Golden-crowned Kinglets (wing bars!), two chickadee species, creepers, juncos, Song Sparrows, and nuthatch up there to distract, so be careful. There were also several (at least four) loud machines blaring most of the time from the golf course maintenance nearby, then when they let up some, arboretum maintenance began. Mowing, blowing, pushing a tree over, sawing. It sounded like being on the flightline of an operating airport.

Many birders arrived after 9:30, and we await news.

22 June, 2020,

Alan Grenon
Seattle
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/22/20 11:26 am
From: Tucker, Trileigh <TRI...>
Subject: [Tweeters] BNA (now Birds of the World) access through Sno-Isle
Hi Tweets,

I am delighted to report that through a simple registration process, I am able to access Birds of the World through the Sno-Isle library system<https://www.sno-isle.org/getacard>. Thought many of you might want that as well.

Good birding,
Trileigh

* * * * *
Trileigh Tucker
Professor Emerita of Environmental Studies, Seattle University
NaturalPresenceArts.com<https://naturalpresencearts.com/>


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/22/20 11:04 am
From: Izzy & Kendrick <gobirder...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Uplifting Birders of Color
Hello,everyone,

I thought this article would be of interest:

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2020/06/29/corina-newsome-and-the-black-birders-movement?fbclid=IwAR0hyJ9y-QfONP_vGaV5cNFawF_TlGt-z4gF0vFzVLlB1Cmrfmy84OKkb5c

It’s way past time to recognize and amplify BIPOC (Black, indigenous, people of color) who bird.

Good birding to all,
izzy arevalo wong
seattle wa

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/22/20 10:31 am
From: Thomas M Leschine <tml...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Birding and "Black Lives Matter"
Dear Tweets,
Recent events and a few related related Tweeters posts remind me that we do not pursue our passion for birding in isolation from other, broader forces that shape society. On Memorial Day, New York City birder Chris Cooper had his infamous Central Park encounter, the same day that George Floyd was killed while in police custody in Minneapolis. Many of us in the birding community found ourselves confronting more directly than ever the question, what does it mean to be a birder—white vs. person of color or other difference that may influence how some others view us. Should any of these distinctions even matter? Yet clearly, they do.

I don’t know whether or not Tweeters is the right forum for discussion of such questions; like you, I bet, I come to Tweeters mostly because I want to know where the birds are. I’m just asking, as was asked in one of those earlier posts, where such discussion *should* take place.

I don’t believe we as a community can afford to say, “Not our business”, if ever we could. We should care both about birds and the environmental quality that supports them. Conservation efforts and “environmental justice” are increasingly viewed as needing to go down the road together if either is ultimately to succeed. Weakened environmental rules likely affect communities of color disproportionately, even as more land and water become less hospitable to wildlife.

Discourse on Tweeters is remarkably well mannered, something all “Tweets” can be proud of (and thank the listserv monitors for). Occasionally the topic turns to lost birding opportunity—that new road closure or that “No Trespassing” sign that didn’t used to be there. Conceptually at least, it’s not that big a leap to the topic of birding opportunity that is more available to some than to others by reason of skin color or other personal traits. As I said above, I’m not advocating that Tweeters specifically open up this way, but I am asking, as others have, where such a conversation should occur, as I believe it must.

If you have a response, please send it to me directly rather than to the full Tweeters list.

Tom Leschine
Seattle
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/22/20 8:58 am
From: Spencer Hildie <shildie...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Northern Parula at Seattle Arboretum
Alan Grenon reports finding a singing male Northern Parula at the Washington Park Arboretum in Seattle around 8:15 am. Located in “cottonwoods on golf course border of Pacific Connections.”

Spencer Hildie
Seattle, WA
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/22/20 12:44 am
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Study on shorebirds suggests that when conserving species, not all land is equal -- ScienceDaily

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/06/200609130020.htm


Sent from my iPhone
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/21/20 11:47 pm
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] NPR: 'One Of The Best Nature Shows': A River Transformed After Dams Come Down
Well, here is some Good News!:

'One Of The Best Nature Shows': A River Transformed After Dams Come Down
In a growing trend, dozens of aging dams are removed from U.S. rivers every year. In Maine, this has meant the return of millions of migratory fish, plus bald eagles and other birds who eat them.

Read in NPR: https://apple.news/AzaMXD2YvS6OIfAwr4eafBQ


Shared from Apple News


Sent from my iPhone
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/21/20 3:09 pm
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Scientific American: Slimy Mudflat Biofilms Feed Migratory Birds--and Could Be Threatened

Slimy Mudflat Biofilms Feed Migratory Birds--and Could Be Threatened
The mud on Roberts Bank at the southern end of the Fraser River Delta in British Columbia is deep—and smelly. Exposed at low tide, it ranges for kilometers, and looks devoid of life. But across some sections, sunlight reflects with a slightly greenish luminescence. Those places are where you see flocks of plump little brown-and-white western sandpipers (Calidris mauri), and they are slurping up the shimmering material with their bristly tongue. They are eating a biofilm, a goo only a few

Read in Scientific American: https://apple.news/AYbaZH2AuQ2aApKXaOyoZJw


Shared from Apple News


Sent from my iPhone
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/21/20 1:42 pm
From: Carolyn Eagan <carolyn.a.eagan...>
Subject: [Tweeters] White Pelicans

There are six White Pelicans on a tiny sand bar at the north end of Hood Canal. Tide was very low today, and where the are right now will be under water soon.

Carolyn Eagan


Sent from my iPhone
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/21/20 1:22 pm
From: <dgrainger...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] House Finch or Purple finch
Thanks, Doug! A number of people have responded, and 100% consensus now
is that it IS a house finch and not purple finch. I learned from this
discussion too, including that the shape of the tail is square in the
house finch but a V on the Purple...


On 2020-06-21 12:53, Doug Santoni wrote:
> Thank you! I found it! It’s a beautiful picture!
>
> Doug
>
>
>> On Jun 20, 2020, at 3:01 PM, <dgrainger...> wrote:
>>
>> I tried to post photo here, and discovered the small limit for upload
>> wouldn't let it post, so I placed on the web (birdsbydave.com) a photo
>> I took today (June 20) in brambles near Water Street in Port
>> Townsend... It is a finch, but color is so intense that I couldn't
>> tell whether was a House Finch or a Purple Finch...
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/21/20 12:14 pm
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Skagit area leucistic eagle update?
I recall past postings on Tweeters about the presence of one or more leucistic bald eagles in the Skagit area.  Can anyone provide an update? 
A member of a photography site that I belong to recently posted photos of what looks like an adult leucistic adult bald eagle in that area.  I wonder if it could be one previously reported that has matured and found a mate.
Flight shot:
https://pnwphotos.com/forum/index.php?threads/white-morph.25706/
Perched shots with a second eagle: 
https://pnwphotos.com/forum/index.php?threads/eagle-pair-greeting-one-another.25714/#post-71191
Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/21/20 10:50 am
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Black-and-White Warbler in Winthrop - No
I made a fairly quick try for the BAWW Michael found yesterday. I heard a
couple interesting songs, but nothing ever panned out. Best animal of the
day was a small Black Bear which popped out of the brush about 10ft away
from me.

Josh Adams
Cathcart WA

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/21/20 7:22 am
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] eBird, rarities, and other matters
Dear Dave and Tweeters,
Anytime there is a rare bird on an eBird checklist, the eBird reviewers have to ("get to") rule on it. In fact, the eBird reviewers have to ("get to") decide ahead of time what's rare and what isn't, and what's an" unusually large quantity" and what isn't. Once a bird (or a count) that has been deemed rare should appear on a checklist, a decision must be rendered. Sometimes that happens very quickly, in a matter of hours. Sometimes it takes days. In the case of rarities submitted in far-flung countries, it can take years, because those countries might have only a very few reviewers covering an entire country.
I once got mixed up on a four-letter code, and my Common Buzzard in Sweden ended up as a Corn Bunting. It took about five years before I learned that my Sweden life list was 99 and not 100! I hated to see that list drop to the two-digit level, but was happy that somebody caught my error, even if it did take a long time.
The review is a two-edged sword. If eBird did not have this vetting process, the data set would be so contaminated with misidentifications, pranks, hoped-for but specious rarities, and typographical errors, as to be nearly useless. The vetting process that eBird does use causes delays, though, and sometimes hard feelings. There are times when a bird would seem rare, but does not get flagged; there are other times when a bird might seem common enough for eBird to dispense with the rarity label, but that does not always happen. 
The hard feelings can come when a bird gets rejected. I can think of at least two Old-World warblers that I saw in Saudi Arabia, which the eBird reviewers have rejected. After a few e-mails back and forth, I could tell that the eBird reviewer was not going to accept them--but that's okay with me. I know what I saw, and I am not going to take it as some sort of personal affront if a few of my observations don't make it onto a computerized map.
Many birders are scratching their heads on the Black Phoebe situation in Skagit County. The phoebes showed up here in August of 2010, and began to breed on Fir Island a few years later. They are still flagged as rare on eBird, even though hundreds or perhaps thousands of birders have seen these birds, and even their nest and young. It is likely that the eBird reviewers have chosen to leave it as rare because there is exactly one site in Skagit County where this species breeds, and it is almost impossible to find them anywhere else in the county.
As best I can figure, eBird has broken down the editing responsibility largely on a state-by-state basis. Each state seems to have its local and regional reviewers. Recent discussions with birders from out of state make me think that this process is handled somewhat differently in some states, compared to Washington. I've heard that some states seem to have a more laissez-faire eBird review process, while others have more vigorous ones, with checklists flagged for all sorts of reasons.
Just yesterday, I noticed that the Kansas eBird reviewers do not like a certain checklist that I submitted almost three years ago. On that checklist is a Red-headed Woodpecker that I photographed in the little town of Concordia, back in August of 2017. Last night I realized that eBird had a problem with my checklist, because my woodpecker photo comes up with a little flag, saying "unconfirmed." There are other RHWO records from that county of Kansas for that same month and year, and they don't have flags.I figured out that the eBird reviewers' disapproval comes from the location of my observation, not the species. I had birded for 50 minutes, travelling 5.5 miles. The flag comes with this verbiage: 
Location issue. This checklist has been flagged because there is a problem with the location, such as an incorrect or imprecise location or Traveling Count covering multiple ecosystems or a very long distance. This checklist and its observations do not appear in public eBird outputs. 
I would think that 5.5 miles is not such a long slog; I have submitted hundreds or thousands of similar checklists in Washington, and not had them flagged for this sort of reason. Good thing I'm not in Kansas anymore!

In the case of the reported Costa's Hummingbird, only time will tell if the report is accepted or not. 
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch




On Saturday, June 20, 2020, 08:56:01 PM PDT, D R <somegum2...> wrote:

Hi tweets,
Why does the June 19 report of Costa’s Hummingbird in Clallam not show up on my eBird-generated rare bird or needs alerts?  I can find it using ‘recent visits’ so it still exists, and if it were unconfirmed it would still show on the rare bird alerts. I guess maybe it was rejected, but the description sounded good to me. Does anyone know?
Dave Robichaud
East Fremont.
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/20/20 8:58 pm
From: D R <somegum2...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Costa's Hummingbird at Carrie Blake Park ?
Hi tweets,
Why does the June 19 report of Costa’s Hummingbird in Clallam not show up on my eBird-generated rare bird or needs alerts? I can find it using ‘recent visits’ so it still exists, and if it were unconfirmed it would still show on the rare bird alerts. I guess maybe it was rejected, but the description sounded good to me. Does anyone know?
Dave Robichaud
East Fremont.
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/20/20 7:46 pm
From: Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Birding related research projects in Washington State
Dear Tweetsters - I have just added the Great Blue Heron Colonies
research project of the Wildlife Conservation Trust and Pilchuck Audubon
Society to the Research page on the Washington Ornithological Society
(WOS) website.

I thought I would remind people that this webpage describes a number of
birding-related research projects that need volunteers or sightings or
other kinds of information from the public.

Check it out at: http://wos.org/research/

Jane Hadley

WOS webmaster


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/20/20 4:02 pm
From: Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] The Birdbooker Report
HI ALL:
This week's titles are:

1) Birds of the West Indies (2nd edition)
2) After the Blast
3) The Language of Butterflies

https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/2020/06/new-titles.html

sincerely
Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/20/20 3:04 pm
From: <dgrainger...>
Subject: [Tweeters] House Finch or Purple finch
I tried to post photo here, and discovered the small limit for upload
wouldn't let it post, so I placed on the web (birdsbydave.com) a photo I
took today (June 20) in brambles near Water Street in Port Townsend...
It is a finch, but color is so intense that I couldn't tell whether was
a House Finch or a Purple Finch...
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/20/20 2:23 pm
From: Hubbell <ldhubbell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Le Coup d'Etat
Tweeters,

This week’s post covers the initial adventures of young pileated woodpeckers in an ever changing world. I hope you enjoy it.

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2020/05/coexisting-piwo.html <https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2020/05/coexisting-piwo.html>

Have a great day on Union Bay…where Black Birders are always welcome!

Black Lives Matter,
Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net



_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/20/20 12:06 pm
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...>
Subject: [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of June 21, 2020
Hello, Tweeters! Happy Summer Solstice 2020!

And Happy Fathers Day to all the fathers out there, avian and otherwise!
https://bit.ly/2V1dQWp
-- With a photo of Stewart, the Peregrine that nested on the "WAMU Tower" in downtown Seattle for several years, starting in 1994 -- Photo by Ruth Taylor

Enjoy the latest episode of Sound Escapes with Gordon Hempton --
The Song of the Paddle: https://bit.ly/3hNjwg8
Travel by canoe through Voyageurs National Park in northern Minnesota
============================
Heard last week on BirdNote:
* Instrumental Bird Sounds
http://bit.ly/1hFAKLG
* Do Woodpeckers Harpoon Their Prey?
http://bit.ly/1IBQ5q4
* Paradise-Whydah Puts on Its Party Clothes!
https://bit.ly/3fHDszc
* How Much Do Birds Sing?
http://bit.ly/Mk9kV0
* Two Meadowlarks and a Poem
https://bit.ly/2YevKXA
* Hermit Thrush: Ethereal Singer
http://bit.ly/1IkkFUZ
* Summer Solstice - Dawn Songs
http://bit.ly/2sno5Vk
=========================
Next week on BirdNote:
When It Comes to Feathers... The Redder, the Better?
+ An Uncommonly Fine Duet: The Common Potoo & Nancy Rumbel
+ A Tiny Bird That Plays a Big Trick
-- and more!
Check 'em out! https://bit.ly/2V2e6UR
==============
Did you have a favorite story this week? Another comment?
Please let us know. mailto:<info...>
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
or Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/birdnoteradio/
Listen on Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find 1500+ episodes and more than 1200 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/20/20 10:02 am
From: Tim Brennan <tsbrennan...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Sawmill Creek - 7030 washout query
Hey Garrett,

Thanks for the update! I was up in that general area, although I stopped even earlier on 7030 because of the washout at the bottom. I've taken my poor Taurus on some pretty bad roads, and just kind of chickened out from driving through the rocky stream bed that 7030 had become. It was only about 30 feet of sketchy stuff, and I saw other cars had made it through - How was that washout looking yesterday?

For everyone else, I can give updates on Government Meadows. I haven't been up there in nearly ten years, but was largely able to find my way up. At one point I did park the car on 7080 and just hiked the Naches Trail to the meadows. This was about three miles up and back, and passed a lot of nice wet meadow habitat. Lincoln's and Chipping Sparrows were pretty plentiful, and I found FOY Gray Jays and Pine Grosbeak (a county lifer that I have neglected to go up and get for a few years now!) The trail itself was pretty manageable, despite being covered in snow in places - it was firm enough to just walk over it. In places where the trail was a muddy stream, there were usually other options as well. The other highlight was a family of Elk - vocalizing. . . but not bugling?? I'm not sure how those calls are classified, but I know it was fun to hear them!

Checklist: https://ebird.org/pnw/checklist/S70445391

Cheers,

Tim Brennan
Renton

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/20/20 8:55 am
From: Scott Downes <downess...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Elk Eastern Phoebe
Hadn’t seen reports of the Eastern Phoebe near Elk (north of Spokane) but we stopped by the bridge this morning and it is still present. Only perched a few times, spent most of its time downstream of the bridge and never called. Did manage a few photos and report is on eBird. Just wanted to send a note in case others were still wanting to try for it. I’d recommend patience as it would disappear for 20 minutes before reappearing.

Scott Downes
<Downess...>
Yakima Wa
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/19/20 4:36 pm
From: Scott Atkinson <scottratkinson...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Least Flycatcher, Costa's Hummingbird: Clallam County firsts, both found mid-day at Carrie Blake Park
Tweeters:

Carrie Blake Park was alive with birds today, and I started just after 12 noon.

The first surprise was a Least Flycatcher, giving its relentless "che-bek" song from the east-edge willows/cottonwoods overlooking the small pond, before flying east to the Quaking Aspen grove visible east of N. Rhodefer, the road that borders Carrie Blake along the east edge. I obtained both photos and an audio recording of this bird (the latter is being uploaded to flickr presently). When I left over two hours later, the bird was still singing. This clip includes two "che-beks" if you listen closely:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14115261@N05/50024127736/in/dateposted-public/

Then, even more surprising, an imm. female Costa's Hummingbird, which I could not photograph, was at the northeast corner of the ball field/public area. I had a frontal view from about 20 ft, at eye level; rather than give all the details again, here is EBird for both birds:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S70611453


Scott Atkinson


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/19/20 3:49 pm
From: Garrett Haynes <garrettwhaynes...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Sawmill Creek Burn Update 6-19-20
Hello Tweeters,

First off a thank you to Matt Dufort and Sam Terry for letting everyone else on to this area and the King county rarities there.

I went up there this morning to check it out and getting there is as Matt described it and I should have planned for a longer walk, but I wasn't prepared and decided not to go the whole way there. Here are the details:

You can't drive all the way to the turn off road for the hotspot due to snow on NF-7034 where the road peaks at Sawmill Ridge. I parked where the snow started and started walking in. From there Google maps showed that it was 1.5 miles from the snow to where the Sawmill Creek Burn Road turns off on the west hand side and wiggles its way down to the burn area. If you use google maps to direct you, it doesn't take you directly to the hotspot but directs you further down NF-7034 about .7 miles past the turn. So, the burn road is 1.5 miles from the snow spot, and .7 miles before the end of Google maps directions. Hope that makes sense?

The walk to the burn is downhill the whole way and probably about 4 miles from where you have to park, so if you want to go all the way there plan for about an 8 mile round trip walk, where the whole way back is uphill.

Once the snow clears off the road in the next couple weeks, you could drive all the way there. However bring someone with you as there are at least three small trees that will need to be dragged off the road and some sizable rocks moved in order to drive down. I am looking forward to going out there again once it's drive-able and hopefully seeing some of those rare birds.

Happy birding!

Garrett Haynes
Auburn, WA

Sent from my iPhone
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/19/20 12:39 pm
From: Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Chat’s back
The Yellow-breasted Chat is now singing just to the north of our property along the west side of the wetland. It’d be interesting if it stuck around here!

May all your birds be identified,
Denis

Denis DeSilvis
<avnacrs4birds...>

Avian Acres 🦉
Roy, WA
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/19/20 11:59 am
From: Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Yellow-breasted Chat at Roy
Tweeters,
I just heard, then saw, a YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT next to the wetlands on our property in Roy.

I was out back when I heard a Chat singing at the south edge of our property, east of our house and west of the wetland there. I yelled to my wife, grabbed bins and headed down there. The Chat continued singing but moved north along the wetland. As I chased it, it moved over to my neighbor’s property and up into some trees bordering the wetland (which is extensive- about 3 miles long bordering 48th Ave S in Roy). I went to the other side of the trees and then got a brief view of it. My wife then said “It’s over here!” It had popped back to the wetland side of the trees right in front of her. (It made a few muted calls a couple of times, but mostly continued singing off-and-on.) It flew off north to some trees, sang a few times, and then flew even further north along the west side of the wetland and out of our sight and hearing.

The wetlands here are mostly reed-canary grass with an extensive overstory of a couple willow species in the middle.

I’ll keep checking as I work outside, but think this was a bird passing north to the JBLM (Ft. Lewis) training area 13 or more likely 15.

This was the first sighting I’ve had of this species here, although it was on my possibles list because the wetland habitat is typical and we’re in the prairie zone of south Puget Sound down here.

May all your birds be identified,
Denis

<avnacrs4birds...>

Avian Acres 🦉
Roy, WA
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/19/20 7:35 am
From: Jim Forrester <jimf...>
Subject: [Tweeters] OT: We need your help / Necesitamos tu ayuda - COLOMBIA
I am forwarding this from my friend Diego in Colombia. Coronavirus is tougher on those with few resources, and this is a good reminder of that. The things he says about the local people in Colombia are no doubt true all over the world, and for those of us who have traveled to these destinations meeting these people has been among the highlights.

From: Diego Calderón COLOMBIA Birding [mailto:<diegocolombiabirding...>]
Sent: Friday, June 19, 2020 7:20 AM
Subject: We need your help / Necesitamos tu ayuda - COLOMBIA


… dear COLOMBIA Birding friends and clients, hope you are all doing well and coping with these strange times we all are living; here all is good fortunately, and I have to say spending the lockdown in the mountains above Medellin is not been so hard really… some green, clean air, veggies garden, and some birding. Birding tours totally stopped and are postponed for next year, but that’s another story, and the main purpose of this email is not me, but our LOCAL Colombian people that most of you have been locally guided by, or have showed you amazing birds at their places and fed you delicious meals:

To make a long story short, basically most of the Colombian birding tour companies have been recently talking and we just joined efforts together to make this campaign to help these local people I mentioned above… as you can imagine, with tourism coming to a halt, all the local people that offers us their services (plenty of local guides and drivers, and all the beautiful places that feed the birds and feed us when we visit!), are having really rally tough times these months with no income coming from bird-related tourism… so basically, more than 20 small to medium size LOCAL Colombian birding tour companies (including us of course!) started this crowdfunding campaign to get money and be able to help these people during hopefully some 5 months… we want to send money to around 150 families that will help them with their daily expenses and will allow them to survive this crisis so those sites, and those local guides, will be still available and alive in business for when the crisis kinda fades and we start to re-gain our normal lives and to visit them again and start to crank up the local economies again.

If you are receiving this email from me, is because quite most likely you have already come with me on tours around Colombia; so, for you to have an idea, we are going for example going to help those brilliant indigenous guides like Miguel in Mitu and Pushaina in Guajira, all those local antpitta whisperers like Lucía, Daniel, and the Río Blanco guys, the local drivers like Toño or Cacique that always brings us up to Santa Marta, and also the excellent local driver/guides like Johan and Giancarlo for example; places where we have enjoyed so much the birds, the food and the warmth of those families like Anchicaya’s Doña Dora, the local places we stop at with flowering plants when going up to Santa Marta to get the endemic hummers, Jardin’s Cock-of-the-rock lek of course, and plenty of other small hummingbird and fruit feeders places all over the country we normally have stop at, are all going to receive help from our campaign.

I know these are crazy times and most of us are dealing with the economical mayhem on our lives and for our own businesses, but even a small contribution you could do will count, no doubt!... we have set up this local crowdfunding at Vaki (https://en.vaki.co/vaki/1591551223119) that is a completely secure website and works as any other crowdfunding you have used before… it’s actually used to collect thousands of dollars for local campaigns in Colombia. It is easy and quick, works both in English and Spanish and you can choose any currency you want to use; no worries, your personal info will be safe there and you could even donate anonymously if you prefer so… if for any reason, you feel like you want to send a good amount for the campaign, but that you would prefer sending a bank transfer, that’s also an option and just let me know so we can coordinate the details.

THANKS a lot indeed if you have read all this stuff all the way here… we need you now!, and I do know you are a soul more than happy to give a hand to our most fragile people at the basis of the birding tourism chain in Colombia. You know several of them, you’ve seen lifers because of them; we’ve been fed together by them, or spent the night at their places when going to look for a rare bird in beautiful rural Colombia… and if you haven’t yet, you will when you come birding with me in the future ;-)

Thanks a million again, keep safe and healthy, and I do hope we can go birding soon to all those dreamt places waiting for us…

hugs!,
Diego.

ps. thanks for sharing this with your birding friends and families, and with the people you think could want to help our campaing

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/18/20 8:26 pm
From: Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course monthly bird walk - 06-18-2020
Tweeters,

Dawning sunny (54degF) and warming up nicely (67degF at end) as we traversed the usual route (using Covid-19 and JBLM Garrison guidelines), the 17 of us were treated to a fine day of birding around the Eagles Pride Golf Course (GC). Highlights of the 55 species (and 1 taxa) found include the following:

1. Two BALD EAGLES (one of which was earlier being harassed by a Red-tailed Hawk).

2. Once again tallying three forest vireos: HUTTON'S, CASSIN'S, and WARBLING.

3. Sighting 8 HOUSE WRENS.

4. Tallying 8 warbler species: ORANGE-CROWNED, MACGILLIVRAY'S, YELLOW, YELLOW-RUMPED, BLACK-THROATED GRAY, HERMIT, and WILSON'S, as well as COMMON YELLOWTHROAT.

5. Two RED CROSSBILLS were a pleasant surprise.



Sometimes eBird doesn't accept some of our individual species counts, such as last month's 11 House Wrens. However, the JBLM Eagles Pride GC is not a small birding site: it consists of about 540 acres including the three 9-hole layouts. Of the acreage, about 60% is forest or undeveloped land. It's a very spread-out area, and our birdwalk takes us along a 3.2-mile trek, crossing or paralleling just a few holes of the course. The habitat is mixed, with Douglas-fir, Garry oak, and vine and big-leaf maples predominating the overstory, with an understory typical of Northwest forests. It's a nice place to bird for forest and edge species. And the House Wrens have found the few metal and wood power poles, as well as a few "natural" sites, to be just right for finding small openings for their respective nests.



The JBLM Eagles Pride GC birders meet the third Thursday of each month at 8:00AM. Starting point is Bldg # 1514, Driving Range Tee, Eagles Pride Golf Course, I-5 Exit 116, Mounts Road Exit. Upcoming walks include the following:

* July 16

* August 20

* September 17

Anyone is welcome to join us!



55 species (+1 other taxa)



Pied-billed Grebe 1 Hodge Lake

Band-tailed Pigeon 7

Mourning Dove 2

Anna's Hummingbird 7

Rufous Hummingbird 3

Turkey Vulture 2

Bald Eagle 2

Red-tailed Hawk 4

Downy Woodpecker 1

Northern Flicker 7

Olive-sided Flycatcher 4

Western Wood-Pewee 16

Willow Flycatcher 9

Pacific-slope Flycatcher 6

Hutton's Vireo 3

Cassin's Vireo 3

Warbling Vireo 2

Steller's Jay 5

American/Northwestern Crow 1

Black-capped Chickadee 13

Chestnut-backed Chickadee 21

Tree Swallow 18 Most at the nest-box array at Hodge Lake

Violet-green Swallow 8

Barn Swallow 32

Bushtit 4

Golden-crowned Kinglet 7

Red-breasted Nuthatch 9

Brown Creeper 2

House Wren 8

Bewick's Wren 1

European Starling 8

Swainson's Thrush 8

American Robin 41

Cedar Waxwing 21

House Finch 3

Purple Finch 7

Red Crossbill 2

Pine Siskin 3

American Goldfinch 2

Chipping Sparrow 3

Dark-eyed Junco 17

White-crowned Sparrow 20

Song Sparrow 22

Spotted Towhee 9

Red-winged Blackbird 6

Brown-headed Cowbird 9

Orange-crowned Warbler 9

MacGillivray's Warbler 3

Common Yellowthroat 4

Yellow Warbler 4

Yellow-rumped Warbler 2

Black-throated Gray Warbler 2

Hermit Warbler 2

Wilson's Warbler 16

Western Tanager 13

Black-headed Grosbeak 11



View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S70586131

May all your birds be identified,

Denis DeSilvis
avnacrs 4 birds at outlook dot com


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/18/20 8:12 pm
From: Mike Wagenbach <wagen...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Buntings at Marymoor?
Can anyone provide coordinates for both Lazuli and Indigo Buntings at
Marymoor. We failed to find any. Will try to arrive earlier next time...

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/18/20 7:14 pm
From: Stephen Chase <schasecredo...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] mystery bird ID'd
Hi again Tweeters,
Thanks for the responses offline. I received suggestions of Pacific-slope
Flycatcher and Western Wood-Pewee, for a nice flycatcher theme. I could not
find sonograms in the Macaulay Library for either species that match this
call. I did, however, find a recorded call of Eastern Wood-Pewee that is
very, very close. As far as I can tell, Eastern Wood-Pewee would be a BC
first provincial record.
For reference, here's my recording again:
https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/244202711
In my research, I found that most Eastern Wood-Pewee calls begin the call
with a clear "divot" on the sonogram (example
<https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/172175671>), but my recording doesn't
show that. However, here's a similar recording of Eastern Wood-Pewee that
does not show the divot: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/183842481. I
found other examples where the divot is almost or altogether nonexistent.
I'm not a member of any online BC birding communities, but I know there are
a few on Tweeters who are. Perhaps they can chime in as well. If the ID is
accurate, the bird could be chaseable for those on the BC side of the
border.
Stephen Chase
Everson, WA

On Thu, 18 Jun 2020 at 14:33, Stephen Chase <schasecredo...> wrote:

> Since we're in the mystery bird ID mood...
>
> Help me with this one, please. It was in Langley, BC at lunchtime today.
>
> https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/244202711
>
> A Spotted Towhee was singing in the same tree a few minutes later.
>
> On Thu, 18 Jun 2020 at 14:07, susan carmelprop.com <susan...>
> wrote:
>
>> Tweeters, It's unanimous-a brown headed cowbird. thanks to all who
>> weighed in!
>> -Susan love
>> Woodway
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>>
>

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/18/20 5:11 pm
From: <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2020-06-18
Tweets – the weather was gorgeous today for this almost-solstice walk. Pre-dawn had some low-lying fog, but from the Viewing Mound, Mt. Rainier was stunningly clear in the orange light. The moon was a thin waning crescent. To the left, and a little below the moon, Venus was the thinnest of waxing crescents like a mini-me for the moon. Stunning in the scope. Lots of singing today, and lots of baby birds and baby bird sounds.

Highlights:
a.. Gadwall – male, and I think one female. These are only occasionally seen at Marymoor in late-June through August
b.. Pied-billed Grebe – TWO across the slough from the Lake Platform, with one possibly sitting on a nest amongst the cattails
c.. Eurasian Collared-Dove – one landed in a tree near the East Kiosk
d.. Virginia Rail – one making calls near the Lake Platform. Only Eric saw it, though
e.. American Coot – lone bird remains at the Lake Platform – our first ever for Week 25th. They are mostly absent June-August
f.. Barn Owl – Matt heard what sounded like a juvenile calling across the slough from the windmill VERY EARLY this morning
g.. Red-breasted Sapsucker – three juveniles chasing each other around a tree
h.. Downy Woodpecker – parent feeding young
i.. Hairy Woodpecker – one north of the east end of the boardwalk
j.. Red-eyed Vireo – one heard singing, while we were looking at the Indigo Bunting
k.. Northern Rough-winged Swallow – several seen
l.. EVENING GROSBEAK – six flew south, calling, over the mansion
m.. INDIGO BUNTING – continuing 1st-year male, singing frequently, flying from tree-to-tree in the middle of the off-leash area, east of Dog Central
Misses today included Green Heron and Cliff Swallow. We were disappointed not to see either species of Kingbird, after both were repeatedly seen between our last survey and today’s.

For the day, 68 species.

= Michael Hobbs
= www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
= <BirdMarymoor...>
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/18/20 2:37 pm
From: Stephen Chase <schasecredo...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] mystery bird ID'd
Since we're in the mystery bird ID mood...

Help me with this one, please. It was in Langley, BC at lunchtime today.

https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/244202711

A Spotted Towhee was singing in the same tree a few minutes later.

On Thu, 18 Jun 2020 at 14:07, susan carmelprop.com <susan...>
wrote:

> Tweeters, It's unanimous-a brown headed cowbird. thanks to all who
> weighed in!
> -Susan love
> Woodway
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/18/20 2:10 pm
From: susan carmelprop.com <susan...>
Subject: [Tweeters] mystery bird ID'd
Tweeters, It's unanimous-a brown headed cowbird. thanks to all who weighed in!
-Susan love
Woodway

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/18/20 12:59 pm
From: Susan Love <susan...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Help w ID?
Tweeters, I have had a bird hanging around my feeders for a week or so. I can’t figure out what it is. It seems to be a juvenile. It’s larger than the usual birds I get; chickadees, juncos, nuthatches, the odd song sparrow or goldfinch, etc. I have an idea but I want to see what other people think. I’ll be happy to send the pics that I took ( not great, just iPhone pix- no result from Merlin- but not terrible either). I couldn’t get them onto tweeters..
Thanks in advance!
Susan Love
Woodway
<Sucarlove...>


Sent from my iPhone
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/17/20 8:51 pm
From: <itomas...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bird Fight in Fall City
Today, there was a lengthy, aerial fight in my yard between a Stellar's jay and an Evening Grosbeak. Is this common? I haven't seen such a thing in all these twenty years at my house across from the Rutherford Slough.

Tom&aring;s Walsh
Fall City
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/17/20 8:29 pm
From: Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Common Nighthawks on Mercer Island
Good evening,

I added a new yardbird just a few minutes ago! I was out barbecuing on the back patio when I heard a loud “peent” and looked up to see two nighthawks bouncing by overhead!

They disappeared over the southern horizon pretty quickly, but not before I got a good binocular view of a species I’ve wanted on the Island for a long while.

Good birding (and good to be back from a sort of hiatus), Joshua Glant
Mercer Island, WA
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/17/20 6:50 pm
From: Matt Dufort <matt.dufort...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Sawmill Creek Burn in southeast King County
Hi tweets,

On Sunday, Sam Terry and I birded the Sawmill Creek burn in far
southeastern King County. This is a patch of mid- to high-elevation
coniferous forest and clearcuts that burned in fall 2017. It's northeast
of Kelly Butte and southeast of the former town of Lester. A rough outline
of the burned area can be found here
<https://ftp.nifc.gov/public/incident_specific_data/pacific_nw/Z_2017_HISTORIC/2017_Incidents_Washington/2017_Sawmill_Creek_SPS_000177/GIS/products/20170912/PIO_11x17_land_20170909_SawmillCreek_WA-SPS701.pdf>
-
note that the linked map also shows the much larger Norse Peak fire to the
south.

Sam and I had each made visits to the burn late last fall, and found small
numbers of Black-backed Woodpeckers. Our trip on Sunday turned up one
Black-backed as well as a bunch of other species uncommon in King County -
numerous House Wrens, several Rock Wrens, Western Bluebird, Nashville
Warbler. Details in this eBird checklist:
https://ebird.org/pnw/checklist/S70453519. There is tons of interesting
habitat in the area, with a great variety of tree sizes and burn
intensities interspersed with clearcuts.

As of Sunday, the road to the burn was snow-covered at its high point along
Sawmill Ridge, so getting there required a substantial hike along the
forest service road. In a few weeks the snow should melt off, though there
is a deteriorating wash-out along FR 7030 on the way there, which may close
the road entirely if it is not fixed soon. To get there, follow FR 7030
north from FR 70 for 4 miles to the T and turn left towards Kelly Butte.
Immediately turn right instead of continuing straight toward Kelly Butte,
and follow the road for an additional 3.3 mile until a smaller road breaks
off downhill to the left. This smaller road takes you into the burn.
Google maps directions to the eBird checklist above will get you most of
the way there. Barring snow and the wash-out, the road is driveable all the
way to the burn.

I'm posting this in hopes that it spurs other folks to explore this spot.
I think it has great potential for additional birds more typical of the
east side of the Cascades. And if anyone does head up there, I would love
to hear about it.

Good birding,
Matt Dufort

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/17/20 3:58 pm
From: Eric Ellingson <abriteway...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Hart's Pass - FYI still snow at campground and above
FYI for anyone heading up to Harts Pass, as of June 11th the end of the road for a normal vehicle was just at the campground area due to snow covering the road.
The road up to this point was fine. No 4WD needed.
It was 44 and light drizzle when I was up there at one point. The birds came out more once it brightened up more.

Nice trip doing the Cascade Loop except coming back from Leavenworth, 45 minutes doing about 5mph due to traffic heading west Sunday night.
Winthrop was busy but not the usual. Masks worn often at donut shop and such.

Common Nighthawk and a couple of Chukar in the hills above Wenatchee.
Lewis's Woodpeckers along the road heading to Chelan
Bighorn Sheep - about a dozen near the road from Chelan to Winthrop

As usual, a few pics to share. Best view ever of the Common Nighthawk.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/ericellingson

Cheers

Eric

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/17/20 11:40 am
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Australia’s Night Parrots Can’t See At Night
Hello everyone,

as an evolutionary ecologist, I am absolutely fascinated by animals that
have not evolved to fit their niche. Such is the case for a bird: A recent
study reports that the night parrot, an elusive and critically endangered
nocturnal parrot that lives in the middle of Australia’s arid outback, ‘has
not evolved to see in the dark’, putting it at risk of crashing into
fences, and possibly contributing to its endangered status. Needless to
say, this finding will stimulate countless more studies in the future into
this truly weird situation.

Australia’s Night Parrots Can’t See At Night
https://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2020/06/17/australias-night-parrots-cant-see-at-night/
tinyURL: https://tinyurl.com/ybggcqwf

I hope you found this piece to be informative and educational, and I
encourage you to share it widely amongst your friends and bird-loving
colleagues, on social media and via twitter.

thank you for reading.

--
GrrlScientist | @GrrlScientist <https://twitter.com/GrrlScientist>
<grrlscientist...>
Words: Forbes <http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/> | Medium
<https://medium.com/@GrrlScientist>
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/17/20 11:23 am
From: Teri Martine <terimartine...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Beyond rare ...
Thank you Whitney Neufeld-Kaiser for your June 14 post to Tweeters about the intersection of racism and birding, and promoting awareness and discussion. Thank you Kaeli Swift and the other admins and moderators of the new “West Coast Birders” group on Facebook, described as: “... a community of people who share a love for birds and a desire to make birding accessible, safe, and enjoyable for everyone. This site serves as both a celebration of West Coast birds and a place to 'find common cause in a bird' as noted in the Birds of North America conversation between Jason Ward and Dr. Drew Lanham. We invite your West Coast bird photos, stories and questions, as well as your reflections on how we can do better for both our birds and our birders.” I appreciate this approach, as well as the transparency on the site about who is involved. If you haven’t yet, check out West Coast Birders at https://www.facebook.com/groups/2405914046366868/members <https://www.facebook.com/groups/2405914046366868/members> The "Birds of North America with Jason Ward” conversation (referenced above) is part of his fine series of short episodes, at https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZVnnAt5_5lbqaQNNg-LEPwdRbj_nf5hU <https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZVnnAt5_5lbqaQNNg-LEPwdRbj_nf5hU> I hope our passion for birds encompasses more than the latest rarity, ID questions, and pretty photos.

Teri Martine
Seattle


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/17/20 10:44 am
From: Louise Rutter <louise.rutter...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Indigo Bunting
Was present and singing this morning when I got there, just before 9. It
sang from three different trees, then after about 10-15 mins it went quiet
and I lost it.



Louise Rutter

Kirkland


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/17/20 8:32 am
From: D R <somegum2...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Montlake Fill Map
Hi there,
I just wanted to thank everyone who responded to my questions about place names at Montlake Fill, both here and privately. The responses were quick and thorough. The bird was not refound, but not for looking in the wrong places.
Thanks again,
Dave Robichaud
East Fremont.
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/17/20 7:09 am
From: mary hrudkaj <mch1096...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Kittitas County Magpies, or lack thereof
Tuesday the 16th we traveled through the area mentioned in the other posts. We consider ourselves lucky seeing one along Hwy 10 between Cle Elum and Ellensburg. It wasn't a birding trip but we kept our eyes out for birds on the way up to rock hunting on top of Saddle Mountain. The fires on the Wahluke slope side took out hundreds of acres of prime birding habitat but making it good for rock hunting and flower finding. (The pink Mariposa Lilies are in bloom now.)

It is magpie nesting season so are not so vocal or obvious to predators (human or non-human).

Mary Hrudkaj
Belfair/Tahuya

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/16/20 7:56 pm
From: Zora Monster <zoramon...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Indigo Bunting
Found the indigo bunting today at the Marymoor Dog Park south of the ditch in the general area of the blackberry bushes. He was moving about quite a bit, but he was easy to find when singing. Here is a link to pictures I took today: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/0ai8gcuh04n6qae/AAA2yf67o3j8i2WrhUB_UDpEa?dl=0 <https://www.dropbox.com/sh/0ai8gcuh04n6qae/AAA2yf67o3j8i2WrhUB_UDpEa?dl=0>. All pictures are highly cropped and edited to improve sharpness. Feel free to download and share.

Also saw the Eastern kingbird. Two lifers in one day!

And if anyone is interested, here is a link to a video featuring a series of images of a male tree swallow feeding a nestling at the bird loop: https://vimeo.com/429829628

Zora
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/16/20 7:55 pm
From: Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Skagit Chestnut-sided Warbler
Just thought I would note that the Chestnut-sided Warbler on Martin Road near Rockport was still moving about and singing at 7 p.m. That might bode well for those who want to try for it in the morning. As Gary Bletsch said in his eBird report, it is moving about on the west side of the slough, which is between the WDFW access and the Rockport-Darrington Highway. It was still singing and staying fairly high up in tall trees when I observed it.

Carol Riddell
Edmonds, WA
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/16/20 5:55 pm
From: Debra Lewis <goofyone...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Kittitas County question
We’ve been living in Ellensburg for the past year and we see them every day! On a recent outing we saw at least 50 out on the Colockum Rd where the pavement ends and the dirt road begins. My Brittany sits out in the back yard and watches them and dares them to land.
Have a safe day

D Lewis

Sent from my iPhone

On Jun 16, 2020, at 10:48 AM, J Christian Kessler <1northraven...> wrote:


Sunday I birded Kittitas Co. from west of Cle Elum (2 sites) to east of Kittitas (the town), including Quilomene (where I got Sage Thrashers & one Brewers Sparrow despite the winds of over 20 mph). But I never saw a single Magpie anywhere. Weather on iPhone said winds were 22 mph in Ellensburg, I would think more like 25 mph out on the prairie, but still saw crows, one battered TV, but nary a Magpie even in the cottonwood along Parke Creek Rd or Stevens Rd (where the Yellow-headed Blackbirds seem to have relocated). I'd be interested in thoughts as to why no Magpies.

Chris Kessler
Seattle

--
"moderation in everything, including moderation"
Rustin Thompson
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/16/20 1:38 pm
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Kittitas County question
Nesting? Four of us saw several in Yakima Canyon and on Umptanum Rd. Last Thursday.

Phil Dickinson

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 16, 2020, at 10:47 AM, J Christian Kessler <1northraven...> wrote:
>
> 
> Sunday I birded Kittitas Co. from west of Cle Elum (2 sites) to east of Kittitas (the town), including Quilomene (where I got Sage Thrashers & one Brewers Sparrow despite the winds of over 20 mph). But I never saw a single Magpie anywhere. Weather on iPhone said winds were 22 mph in Ellensburg, I would think more like 25 mph out on the prairie, but still saw crows, one battered TV, but nary a Magpie even in the cottonwood along Parke Creek Rd or Stevens Rd (where the Yellow-headed Blackbirds seem to have relocated). I'd be interested in thoughts as to why no Magpies.
>
> Chris Kessler
> Seattle
>
> --
> "moderation in everything, including moderation"
> Rustin Thompson
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/16/20 1:21 pm
From: David A. Armstrong <davearm...>
Subject: [Tweeters] white pelicans at Deer Lagoon
A group of about 30 white pelicans are back at Deer Lagoon. They"re in the
water on the northern freshwater side, but some fly over the estuarine
portion to the south. Very pretty group of birds.
david armsrong

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/16/20 1:15 pm
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Kittitas County question
On Sunday we drove I90 to I82 to 97 all the way to the Columbia and did not see a single Magpie. Surprising.

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Tue, Jun 16, 2020 at 10:47 AM, J Christian Kessler<1northraven...> wrote: Sunday I birded Kittitas Co. from west of Cle Elum (2 sites) to east of Kittitas (the town), including Quilomene (where I got Sage Thrashers & one Brewers Sparrow despite the winds of over 20 mph).  But I never saw a single Magpie anywhere.  Weather on iPhone said winds were 22 mph in Ellensburg, I would think more like 25 mph out on the prairie, but still saw crows, one battered TV, but nary a Magpie even in the cottonwood along Parke Creek Rd or Stevens Rd (where the Yellow-headed Blackbirds seem to have relocated).  I'd be interested in thoughts as to why no Magpies.
Chris KesslerSeattle

--
"moderation in everything, including moderation"
Rustin Thompson
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/16/20 12:54 pm
From: cynthia burrell <cinnyb...>
Subject: [Tweeters] WOS monthly meeting, Mon. July 6
“When the Freezer Breaks: How Climate Might be Impacting Canada Jays”
Monday July 6, WOS presentation with Dr Kaeli Swift

Whether you know them as Whisky Jacks, Camp Robbers, Gray Jays, or Canada Jays, these hardy birds are some of the most charismatic residents of the boreal forest. Join us July 6th, when avian ecologist Dr. Kaeli Swift will be talking about what she's learned about the foraging ecology of jays by following them through Denali National Park.

Time: 7:30 PM
Date: Monday July 6, 2020
Where: From the comfort of your own home (On-line only)
How: Please go to the monthly meetings page at www.wos.org for log-in info

During the pandemic, WOS has decided to host a few extra meetings during the summer months; we hope this gives more folks an opportunity to learn about birds while still staying safe. (In August we will hear from Dennis Paulson on Birding SE Oregon.)

Happy Birding, all!
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/16/20 12:42 pm
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Skagit Catbird
Five of us just relocated the Catbird Martin Road...see eBird checklist for details.

Sent from my iPhone
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/16/20 12:09 pm
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Chestnut sided Warbler Skagit
Found by Adrian Lee now singing Martin Road near Rockport just east of the Darrington Highway, west of the slough and well west of the WDFW access.

Sent from my iPhone
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/16/20 12:08 pm
From: mombiwheeler <mombiwheeler...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor indigo bunting still present
Indigo bunting is still being seen at Marymoor Park. It's being seen at the previously noted location in the dog run by stand of willow trees. It also pops up by blackberry bushes to the south of it. Very on and off. Was singing a lot this morning. I also had one black Swift among the swallows East Meadow.Sent from my Sprint Samsung Galaxy S® 6._______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/16/20 10:50 am
From: J Christian Kessler <1northraven...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Kittitas County question
Sunday I birded Kittitas Co. from west of Cle Elum (2 sites) to east of
Kittitas (the town), including Quilomene (where I got Sage Thrashers & one
Brewers Sparrow despite the winds of over 20 mph). But I never saw a
single Magpie anywhere. Weather on iPhone said winds were 22 mph in
Ellensburg, I would think more like 25 mph out on the prairie, but still
saw crows, one battered TV, but nary a Magpie even in the cottonwood along
Parke Creek Rd or Stevens Rd (where the Yellow-headed Blackbirds seem to
have relocated). I'd be interested in thoughts as to why no Magpies.

Chris Kessler
Seattle

--
"moderation in everything, including moderation"
Rustin Thompson

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/16/20 9:58 am
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Wagner swifts
With all the Black Swifts seen last night was Judy Alles the only one who documented any Vaux’s?

She had 10,000 plus in Monroe. Good chance the wee birds are still there.

Larry Schwitters
Issaquah
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/16/20 8:55 am
From: Doug Santoni <dougsantoni...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Black Swifts (Seattle)!
Thank you, tweeters, for the timely reports of Black Swifts. I live in Seattle, just east of the Arboretum. I saw several Seattle area reports last night, but I did not see any flying over my house. This morning, I saw the report from Filip Tkaczyk of a large flock seen from the U.W. Campus at 7:00 a.m. I stepped out on my patio at 8:20 a.m. and found at least 40 birds flying overhead! Really cool (and a new yard bird!).

Doug Santoni
Seattle, WA
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/16/20 8:07 am
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] More black swift sightings, Skagit and Snohomish counties.
On June 8, they were a first for me in Lake Stevens when 10 flew low over my home near Highway 9

Phil Dickinson

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 16, 2020, at 7:02 AM, Maxine Reid <max2012mike...> wrote:
>
> Hi tweeters:
> On the 12th of June , there were 6 black swifts at Hayton about 6:00pm.
> Then yesterday,15 June, there were about 6 at Tulalip bay, above the STP settling ponds.Big surprise!
> This was a first for me at Tulalip and my take was the cool mountain air has forced them
> To lower altitudes where there could be greater numbers of insects.
> The Seattle number is astonishing.
> Maxine Reid.
>
> Sent from my iPad
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/16/20 7:17 am
From: Filip Tkaczyk <pathwithaheart...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Huge flock of Black Swifts over Seattle!!
I just saw a huge flock of black swifts flying over UW in Seattle (7:00 am). I counted close to 50 birds! They were swarming in the area around South campus and the Stadium. I suspect they are migrating through.

I recognized them with their very long, crescent shaped wings, rapid wing beats (but noticeably slower than Vauxs swifts).

A very special treat!

Filip T.

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/16/20 7:06 am
From: Maxine Reid <max2012mike...>
Subject: [Tweeters] More black swift sightings, Skagit and Snohomish counties.
Hi tweeters:
On the 12th of June , there were 6 black swifts at Hayton about 6:00pm.
Then yesterday,15 June, there were about 6 at Tulalip bay, above the STP settling ponds.Big surprise!
This was a first for me at Tulalip and my take was the cool mountain air has forced them
To lower altitudes where there could be greater numbers of insects.
The Seattle number is astonishing.
Maxine Reid.

Sent from my iPad
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/16/20 5:37 am
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] North Seattle Black Swifts
Also may be Northern migration into our state and beyond to BC.
I also saw a group of about 35-40 last night.
They were flying 40-80 feet above me, then later at 8:40-9:00 PM, 80-150 feet up.
Was able to film some zooming around above the trees.
Very neat to see.
Dan Reiff

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 16, 2020, at 1:59 AM, Matt Dufort <matt.dufort...> wrote:
>
> 
> Bob et al.,
>
> It's definitely weather related. Black Swifts are known to move to lowlands to forage when the weather is not good in the mountains, and they also often fly so high on clear days that they are very difficult to detect. The concentration over north Seattle today seems likely due to a large swarm of flying insects, as it was apparently pretty localized. I live just a few miles south of these reports, and saw 0 swifts despite scanning the sky in every direction multiple times while others were seeing them.
>
> Regarding the high counts, those eBird numbers you listed are incorrect - I suspect they're based on the buggy / confusing "High Counts" interface in eBird. If you go to Explore a Region, then select High Counts, you'll get more reliable results. Washington has a previous count of 500 Black Swifts in eBird (here), as well as a report of 150 from earlier this year (here).
>
> Black Swifts are amazing and enigmatic birds. It's always a thrill to see them.
>
> Good birding,
> Matt Dufort
>
>> On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 11:00 PM Robert O'Brien <baro...> wrote:
>>
>>
>> Wow. Is this somehow weather related? I know it is stormy these days in Seattle,
>> but has it been raining today/this afternoon? How much? When?
>>
>> The highest eBird counts are below. (There may be higher, just not in eBird)
>>
>> Bob OBrien Portland
>>
>> The highest Washington count on eBird is:
>>
>>
>> Black Swift
>> 20
>> Paul Mackenzie
>> Lighthouse Marine Park, Point Roberts (map)
>> Jul 21, 1963
>>
>> For Oregon, only in northbound migration since there is very very little nesting, the highest is
>>
>>
>> Black Swift
>> 272
>> Don Henise
>> Bullards Beach SP (map)
>> May 23, 2020
>>
>> However, British Columbia (where they mostly nest) beats them all
>>
>>
>> Black Swift
>> 700
>> Jason Straka
>> Rod & Gun--Parksville (map)
>> Jun 7, 2018
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>> On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 8:23 PM Dave Slager <dave.slager...> wrote:
>>> There are at least a dozen hanging out over my yard right now as well in NE Seattle. Look up!
>>>
>>> Dave
>>>
>>>> On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 7:57 PM Ryan Merrill <rjm284...> wrote:
>>>> There are currently over 400 Black Swifts swirling above Greenwood Ave N and N 127th St in northwest Seattle! Also just a few individual VG Swallows.
>>>>
>>>> Ryan
>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>> Tweeters mailing list
>>>> <Tweeters...>
>>>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> Tweeters mailing list
>>> <Tweeters...>
>>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/16/20 12:50 am
From: Matt Dufort <matt.dufort...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] North Seattle Black Swifts
Bob et al.,

It's definitely weather related. Black Swifts are known to move to
lowlands to forage when the weather is not good in the mountains, and they
also often fly so high on clear days that they are very difficult to
detect. The concentration over north Seattle today seems likely due to a
large swarm of flying insects, as it was apparently pretty localized. I
live just a few miles south of these reports, and saw 0 swifts despite
scanning the sky in every direction multiple times while others were
seeing them.

Regarding the high counts, those eBird numbers you listed are incorrect - I
suspect they're based on the buggy / confusing "High Counts" interface in
eBird. If you go to Explore a Region, then select High Counts, you'll get
more reliable results. Washington has a previous count of 500 Black Swifts
in eBird (here <https://ebird.org/checklist/S11801210>), as well as a
report of 150 from earlier this year (here
<https://ebird.org/checklist/S70247604>).

Black Swifts are amazing and enigmatic birds. It's always a thrill to see
them.

Good birding,
Matt Dufort

On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 11:00 PM Robert O'Brien <baro...> wrote:

>
> Wow. Is this somehow weather related? I know it is stormy these days
> in Seattle,
>
> *but has it been raining today/this afternoon? How much? When?*
>
>
>
> The highest eBird counts are below. (There may be higher, just not in
> eBird)
>
>
>
> Bob OBrien Portland
>
>
>
> The highest Washington count on eBird is:
>
>
>
> Black Swift
>
> 20
>
> Paul Mackenzie
>
> Lighthouse Marine Park, Point Roberts (map
> <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=48.9722422,-123.0836705&ll=48.9722422,-123.0836705>
> )
>
> Jul 21, 1963
>
>
>
> For Oregon, only in northbound migration since there is very very little
> nesting, the highest is
>
>
>
> Black Swift
>
> 272
>
> Don Henise
>
> Bullards Beach SP (map
> <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=43.1497598,-124.4026532&ll=43.1497598,-124.4026532>
> )
>
> May 23, 2020
>
>
>
> However, British Columbia (where they mostly nest) beats them all
>
>
>
> Black Swift
>
> 700
>
> Jason Straka
>
> Rod & Gun--Parksville (map
> <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=49.3198054,-124.3137278&ll=49.3198054,-124.3137278>
> )
>
> Jun 7, 2018
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 8:23 PM Dave Slager <dave.slager...> wrote:
>
>> There are at least a dozen hanging out over my yard right now as well in
>> NE Seattle. Look up!
>>
>> Dave
>>
>> On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 7:57 PM Ryan Merrill <rjm284...> wrote:
>>
>>> There are currently over 400 Black Swifts swirling above Greenwood Ave N
>>> and N 127th St in northwest Seattle! Also just a few individual VG Swallows.
>>>
>>> Ryan
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> Tweeters mailing list
>>> <Tweeters...>
>>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/15/20 11:34 pm
From: D R <somegum2...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Common Nighthawk heard in Seattle
I also heard Nighthawks tonight, at 10:57 PM over East Fremont (Midvale Ave and N 42nd St.).
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/15/20 11:34 pm
From: D R <somegum2...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Common Nighthawk heard in Seattle
Forgot to sign my previous message...
Dave Robichaud,
East Fremont.
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/15/20 10:54 pm
From: Robert O'Brien <baro...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] North Seattle Black Swifts
Wow. Is this somehow weather related? I know it is stormy these days
in Seattle,

*but has it been raining today/this afternoon? How much? When?*



The highest eBird counts are below. (There may be higher, just not in
eBird)



Bob OBrien Portland



The highest Washington count on eBird is:



Black Swift

20

Paul Mackenzie

Lighthouse Marine Park, Point Roberts (map
<http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=48.9722422,-123.0836705&ll=48.9722422,-123.0836705>
)

Jul 21, 1963



For Oregon, only in northbound migration since there is very very little
nesting, the highest is



Black Swift

272

Don Henise

Bullards Beach SP (map
<http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=43.1497598,-124.4026532&ll=43.1497598,-124.4026532>
)

May 23, 2020



However, British Columbia (where they mostly nest) beats them all



Black Swift

700

Jason Straka

Rod & Gun--Parksville (map
<http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=49.3198054,-124.3137278&ll=49.3198054,-124.3137278>
)

Jun 7, 2018






On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 8:23 PM Dave Slager <dave.slager...> wrote:

> There are at least a dozen hanging out over my yard right now as well in
> NE Seattle. Look up!
>
> Dave
>
> On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 7:57 PM Ryan Merrill <rjm284...> wrote:
>
>> There are currently over 400 Black Swifts swirling above Greenwood Ave N
>> and N 127th St in northwest Seattle! Also just a few individual VG Swallows.
>>
>> Ryan
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/15/20 9:39 pm
From: Gibbins/ Crockett <binary_star85...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Common Nighthawks at Lake Joy
Hi Tweets,
A neighbor alerted me to what she thought might be Common Nighthawks flying over her side of the lake. I headed down to our dock with my scope—sure enough! Ten at first, and then twenty! I’ve never seen that many anywhere. Checked my records for the lake: I heard one on 6/12/19 and saw one on 6/20/18.
Cheers,
Paula Crockett
Lake Joy (near Carnation)
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/15/20 9:06 pm
From: Thomas M Leschine <tml...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Common Nighthawk heard in Seattle
At about 8:45 pm I heard the distinctive “peert” call of a Common Nighthawk coming from overhead, on the top of West Queen Anne Hill, Seattle. I heard 5-6 calls in all but never saw the bird. Judging from the way the sound was fading it was moving to the South.

Tom Leschine
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/15/20 9:00 pm
From: Louis Kreemer <lpkreemer...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] North Seattle Black Swifts
At least 30 over Greenwood and 77th now, very low.

Louis Kreemer

On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 8:42 PM Roland <roland_kilcher...> wrote:

> About 30 over Greenwood and 85th now. Nice.
>
> Roland
>
> On Jun 15, 2020, at 8:23 PM, Dave Slager <dave.slager...> wrote:
>
> 
> There are at least a dozen hanging out over my yard right now as well in
> NE Seattle. Look up!
>
> Dave
>
> On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 7:57 PM Ryan Merrill <rjm284...> wrote:
>
>> There are currently over 400 Black Swifts swirling above Greenwood Ave N
>> and N 127th St in northwest Seattle! Also just a few individual VG Swallows.
>>
>> Ryan
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>> <https://eur04.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fmailman11.u.washington.edu%2Fmailman%2Flistinfo%2Ftweeters&data=02%7C01%7C%7C363a1b4739de4561341808d811a4ae2e%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637278746278666869&sdata=CO88U0nSGQypp55Z%2B1hc%2F2Crew0SzZYWSpZw0Y%2FZJNw%3D&reserved=0>
>>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
>
> https://eur04.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fmailman11.u.washington.edu%2Fmailman%2Flistinfo%2Ftweeters&amp;data=02%7C01%7C%7C363a1b4739de4561341808d811a4ae2e%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637278746278696868&amp;sdata=hTjA9TBc6QR2gPinhvPkYZ2jG6IMcaMn%2FrWNuwz3iXs%3D&amp;reserved=0
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/15/20 8:46 pm
From: Roland <roland_kilcher...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] North Seattle Black Swifts
About 30 over Greenwood and 85th now. Nice.

Roland

> On Jun 15, 2020, at 8:23 PM, Dave Slager <dave.slager...> wrote:
>
> 
> There are at least a dozen hanging out over my yard right now as well in NE Seattle. Look up!
>
> Dave
>
>> On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 7:57 PM Ryan Merrill <rjm284...> wrote:
>> There are currently over 400 Black Swifts swirling above Greenwood Ave N and N 127th St in northwest Seattle! Also just a few individual VG Swallows.
>>
>> Ryan
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> https://eur04.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fmailman11.u.washington.edu%2Fmailman%2Flistinfo%2Ftweeters&amp;data=02%7C01%7C%7C363a1b4739de4561341808d811a4ae2e%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637278746278696868&amp;sdata=hTjA9TBc6QR2gPinhvPkYZ2jG6IMcaMn%2FrWNuwz3iXs%3D&amp;reserved=0

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/15/20 8:26 pm
From: Dave Slager <dave.slager...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] North Seattle Black Swifts
There are at least a dozen hanging out over my yard right now as well in NE
Seattle. Look up!

Dave

On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 7:57 PM Ryan Merrill <rjm284...> wrote:

> There are currently over 400 Black Swifts swirling above Greenwood Ave N
> and N 127th St in northwest Seattle! Also just a few individual VG Swallows.
>
> Ryan
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/15/20 8:01 pm
From: Ryan Merrill <rjm284...>
Subject: [Tweeters] North Seattle Black Swifts
There are currently over 400 Black Swifts swirling above Greenwood Ave N
and N 127th St in northwest Seattle! Also just a few individual VG Swallows.

Ryan

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/15/20 5:01 pm
From: <merdave...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Willet at Atkins Lake

Hi, Fellow Birders. Some of you may have seen the ebird report from last
Sat. of a Willet at Atkins Lake. I went there today and saw 2 birds that
look like those posted. Will be a life bird for me. Certainly they did
not look like anything I've ever seen. Hope some more folks see and
photograph them, esp. with their wings open. I watched them, in the rain,
for about 45 min., and they never opened their wings. Three of my photos
show a small plover that I never noticed. I'd guess Semipalmated. Happy
Birding. Meredith Spencer, Bridgeport

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/15/20 2:22 pm
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] National Geographic: Hummingbirds see colors we can’t even imagine

Hummingbirds see colors we can’t even imagine
The tiny birds’ ability to see colors outside the rainbow is “one of the most exciting things I’ve ever witnessed,” one scientist says.

Read in National Geographic: https://apple.news/AomarhvzyQZWOFq36rka4aQ


Shared from Apple News


Sent from my iPhone
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/15/20 2:14 pm
From: Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course Birdwalk set for June 18
Tweeters,
We're all set for the JBLM Eagles Pride Golf Course (GC) birdwalk this Thursday, June 18, but, per the Garrison Commander's guidance, we must follow the prescribed rules:

1. Maintain social distancing throughout the walk.
2. Do not share birding or other gear, including scopes, binoculars, etc.

The use of cloth masks is encouraged, but is not mandatory as long as we absolutely maintain social distancing. I, for one, will likely wear a mask even with social distancing. On our birdwalk on May 18, ALL of the participants wore masks, and we managed to maintain social distancing during the entire walk. (We had a great time birding, even with the current guidelines. I think this shows that birders are adaptable!) I hope to see you out there.


The JBLM Eagles Pride GC birders meet the third Thursday of each month at 8:00AM. Starting point is Bldg # 1514, Driving Range Tee, Eagles Pride Golf Course, I-5 Exit 116, Mounts Road Exit. Upcoming walks include the following:

* June 18

* July 16

* August 20

Stay safe, and may all your birds be identified,
Denis

Denis DeSilvis
avnacrs 4 birds at outlook dot com


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/15/20 12:50 pm
From: Vicki King <vkbirder...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Audubon Encyclopedia offered earlier today has been claimed
The Audubon Encyclopedia I offered this morning has found a new owner.

Thanks,
Vicki King
Seattle

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/15/20 9:31 am
From: Jim Neitzel <jim.neitzel...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Harlequin Duck brood, Upper Satsop River
On Sunday afternoon did a traverse of the south side of the Olympics via FS
roads 22/23. At a bridge (pretty sure Middle Fork of Satsop) on 23, we
spotted a female Harlequin Duck swimming upstream with 4 good sized young
following along. (As best I can tell, this is right along the Grays
Harbor/Mason county line.) A very unexpected and pleasant surprise! Other
fun sightings were a pair of pileated woodpeckers and some sooty grouse.
-JIm
--
James Neitzel, Ph.D.
Member of the Faculty, Biochemistry
The Evergreen State College

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/15/20 6:52 am
From: Vicki King <vkbirder...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Another free copy of the 1980 edition of Audubon Encyclopedia of N American Birds
I also have a copy of the 1980 edition of this Encyclopedia that I will
happily pass along to someone who would like to have it. It's in excellent
condition.

Please contact me offline.

Thank you,
Vicki King
Seattle

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/15/20 5:07 am
From: mark girling <markgirling...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Boeing Peregrin Falcons.
4:45 am watching a Peregrin Falcon show its mastery of the air. Our big doors are open about 2ft. The falcon flew a loop inside the factory and swooped towards the door. Not much space from the wing tips to the door as it flew at speed through the gap to go out on the hunt.Great entertainment for a birder at work.
<markgirling...> Woodridge

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/14/20 8:59 pm
From: Richard Hibpshman <hibpshman...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park Indigo Bunting
The Marymoor Park Indigo Bunting was seen and heard by several birders around 5:30PM, 14JUN.

Photo: https://www.flickr.com/photos/crappywildlifephotography/50007591636/

Rick
Issaquah


Sent from Outlook<http://aka.ms/weboutlook>

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/14/20 8:14 pm
From: Alan Knue <temnurus...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Blue Jay at Point-no-Point
Hello All,

Sorry for the quick message earlier today- I even forgot to add a signature
block to the message- sorry!


A few more details- Charles Enlow and I visited Point-No-Point starting
around 8:40am this morning. We ran into a pair of birders who mentioned
seeing a large group of Steller's Jays moving around the area with a
California Scrub-Jay with them. After visiting the headland forest and
birding the more open area beyond to the south, we came back north and saw
quite a few Steller's Jays in the tops of the trees back at the headlands
and in the trees and scrub around the lighthouse. We were doubly surprised
to see a Blue Jay moving with a large group of Steller’s Jays from the
headland forest to the lighthouse. This was around 10:30am. It perched in
the top of the row of cedars near the lighthouse buildings for a minute
or so, before flying back to the headland forest where it perched in the
tops of a couple of tall trees before disappearing. A few other birders
were nearby. Charles managed some record shots both in flight and perched
which will be uploaded to eBird. We waited for another 30 or so minutes
before deciding to move on.


After seeing both Cyanocitta jays, we headed to Mt. Walker (which was our
original destination this morning) where we saw at least 11 Canada Jays at
the top of the mountain, including several immatures in nice sooty plumage.
Feeling we were on a roll, we made a swing down near my office on the UW
campus and surprisingly found "my" pair of California Scrub-Jays within a
few minutes of arriving. They aren't always this easy. They were in their
usual spot near the Ocean Sciences Building.


Never dreamed we'd manage a grand slam of jays in Washington State in June!


Good birding!


Alan Knue

Edmonds, WA

On Sun, Jun 14, 2020 at 10:33 AM Alan Knue <temnurus...> wrote:

> Just a quick alert- flew from forest to the light house with 39-40
> Steller’s. Then flew back south to the forest.
>

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/14/20 5:07 pm
From: Hubbell <ldhubbell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Owlets and the Art of Feather Maintenance
Tweeters,

The week's post takes a look at some of our young Barred Owls and their feathers. I hope you find it to be more than a fluff piece.

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2020/06/owlets-and-art-of-feather-maintenance.html <https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2020/06/owlets-and-art-of-feather-maintenance.html>

Have a great day on Union Bay…while sharing the view with Black Birders!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/14/20 4:42 pm
From: Al Wagar <jalanwagar...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Encyclopedia of N American Birds is gone
Thanks for your interest, but the book has been claimed. Received a request about 5 minutes after posting its availability.

Al Wagar
Shoreline
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/14/20 2:58 pm
From: Al Wagar <jalanwagar...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Anyone want 1980 edition of Audubon Encyclopedia of N American Birds?
It’s dated but in mint condition, and the color plates are beautiful. It’s big, weighs nearly 8 pounds.

The price (free) is right if you’d like it.

Al Wagar
Shoreline
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/14/20 2:56 pm
From: Jordan Roderick <jordan...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor indigo bunting - yes
At 2:45 singing in the spirea in the off-leash area where we found him on Thursday morning.

Sent from my iPhone
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/14/20 2:14 pm
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Birds aren't all singing the same song. They have dialects, too - CNN
Have you heard this?

https://www.cnn.com/2020/06/13/asia/bird-dialects-song-intl-hnk/index.html


Sent from my iPhone
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/14/20 11:50 am
From: LSR <lsr...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Indigo Bunting
The Indigo Bunting reported for a few days now continues. Was seen in company of a female Lazuli Bunting in the east meadow about 40 m south of shed. But did not stay long and could not relocate. Approximate location:
47.6575370, -122.1096548

Also, several Lazuli Buntings and a pair of Eastern Kingbird.

Scott Ramos
Seattle

Sent from my iPhone


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/14/20 11:06 am
From: Bevbowe1 <bevbowe1...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Is Cornell Labs Birds of North America/World On-line available through Seattle or King Co. Public Libraries?
It is also available in the  Sno-Isle Library system,Bev

-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Merritt <birders.2341...>
To: <EdSwan2...>; <tweeters...>
Sent: Sat, Jun 13, 2020 5:47 pm
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Is Cornell Labs Birds of North America/World On-line available through Seattle or King Co. Public Libraries?

#yiv0189059895 #yiv0189059895 -- _filtered {} _filtered {}#yiv0189059895 #yiv0189059895 p.yiv0189059895MsoNormal, #yiv0189059895 li.yiv0189059895MsoNormal, #yiv0189059895 div.yiv0189059895MsoNormal {margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:11.0pt;font-family:sans-serif;}#yiv0189059895 a:link, #yiv0189059895 span.yiv0189059895MsoHyperlink {color:#0563C1;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv0189059895 span.yiv0189059895EmailStyle21 {font-family:sans-serif;color:windowtext;}#yiv0189059895 .yiv0189059895MsoChpDefault {font-size:10.0pt;} _filtered {}#yiv0189059895 div.yiv0189059895WordSection1 {}#yiv0189059895 Ed,  If you have a Seattle Public Library account, it is available.  Find at this link.  I do not know regarding King County.  Tom Merritt  From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of <EdSwan2...>
Sent: Saturday, June 13, 2020 15:56
To: <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Is Cornell Labs Birds of North America/World On-line available through Seattle or King Co. Public Libraries?  I have a membership for myself but I was checking for someone who can’t afford it to see if this great resource was available through the library.  I tried to find it myself but failed and thought I would see if others have been able to use it through the library.  Good birding,EdEd SwanNature writer and <guidewww.theswancompany.comedswan2...>  _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/14/20 10:54 am
From: Bevbowe1 <bevbowe1...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] The intersection of racism and birding
Hi Whitney, and thank you for this thoughtful post.  What current WWB members may not know is that when the group came back online with the "Welcome Back" message, not all were allowed along for the ride.  Some members (including me) were removed from and blocked by WWB in the archived period.  I never posted about Black birders Week, but I did "like" a post that was on the board, and also commented, something like "this is a great video, with lots of cool link embedded; check it out!"  In discussions with other ex-members booted during the WWB recess, it appears that many of us only liked or commented on one of those posts.  I'm very troubled at WWB's lack of transparency regarding how they handled this matter.  I would never have even known about being blocked unless a fried had posted the WWB return message - I had assumed they were still archived.West Coast Birders is a great group, and I have happily joined it.  Another area birding Facebook group that encourages diversity and inclusion is Washington Birding; I have joined them both!Good birding to you all,Bev <Bowebevbowe1...>
-----Original Message-----
From: Whitney Neufeld-Kaiser <whitney.n.k...>
To: Tweeters <tweeters...>
Sent: Sun, Jun 14, 2020 10:33 am
Subject: [Tweeters] The intersection of racism and birding

Tweeters - 
OnJune 9, the Facebook group Western Washington Birders (WWB) was archived by theadministrators, with this announcement, “Dear Ones, today Western Washington Birders endured a coordinatedassault for our No Politics policy.  We have had to archive the groupuntil we can address the matter.  We hope this will be temporary.” This was in response to several people posting tothe group about #BlackBirdersWeek (https://twitter.com/hashtag/BlackBirdersWeek) and aboutthe assault on Christian Cooper (a Black birder)in Central Park by a white woman after he asked her to leash her dog (awell-known rule in that part of the park). The posts were all deleted by the admins and, in some cases, the peopletrying to share the information with the birding community were removed fromthe group. On June 12, the group was re-activated with this message, “Dear Ones, thank you forallowing this breathing space.  To stayon topic, all posts will be held for moderation.  Welcome back!” WWBhas 10,878 members.  The administratorscould have used their influence and that platform to moderate a much-neededconversation about the very real intersection between racism and birding.  Instead, they shut it down and are nowcensoring the group. Racismis a political issue because it is institutionalized in our country.  In our government, in our education andhealthcare systems.  The birdingcommunity is not immune, which is an uncomfortable reality for white birderslike me to face.  But racism is not apartisan issue, it’s an issue of human rights and dignity.  For white people like me to remain silent,for white people to ask that we keep the discourse about the birds, is whitecomplicity. Facebook is a challenging way to have a dialogue.  It’s too easy to misconstrue what someone hasposted, too easy to be disrespectful, because we’re not in the same roomtalking face-to-face.  This listserv may not be a good way to have a dialogue either, but in this time of pandemic andsocial distancing, it’s one of the best tools we have.  Sam Terry led the way last week with hisposting asking white birders to be sensitive to the complexity of looking forthe Black-Billed Magpie in the New Holly neighborhood.  Can we continue the conversation?  The birds need us to do this work.  The efforts to conserve ecosystems, to bringbirds back from their steep decline, need everyone.  Everyone caring, everyone having safe andequal access to the beauty of the natural world and the birds that live in it. IfFacebook is part of your life, consider leaving WWB (as several folks includingme already have) and joining West Coast Birders, a group created on May 28 with the explicit goal of building a “…community of people who share a love for birds and a desire to makebirding accessible, safe, and enjoyable for everyone.”  The group “serves as both a celebration of West Coast birds and a placeto discuss the challenges to birding. The challenges are diverse and intersectcomplex topics that are ecological, social, and political.”
Best,Whitney <Neufeld-Kaiserwhitney.n.k...>
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/14/20 10:38 am
From: Whitney Neufeld-Kaiser <whitney.n.k...>
Subject: [Tweeters] The intersection of racism and birding
Tweeters -


On June 9, the Facebook group Western Washington Birders (WWB) was archived
by the administrators, with this announcement, “Dear Ones, today Western
Washington Birders endured a coordinated assault for our No Politics
policy. We have had to archive the group until we can address the matter.
We hope this will be temporary.”



This was in response to several people posting to the group about
#BlackBirdersWeek (https://twitter.com/hashtag/BlackBirdersWeek) and about

the assault on Christian Cooper (a Black birder) in Central Park by a white
woman after he asked her to leash her dog (a well-known rule in that part
of the park). The posts were all deleted by the admins and, in some cases,
the people trying to share the information with the birding community were
removed from the group.



On June 12, the group was re-activated with this message, “Dear Ones, thank
you for allowing this breathing space. To stay on topic, all posts will be
held for moderation. Welcome back!”



WWB has 10,878 members. The administrators could have used their influence
and that platform to moderate a much-needed conversation about the very
real intersection between racism and birding. Instead, they shut it down
and are now censoring the group.



Racism is a political issue because it is institutionalized in our
country. In our government, in our education and healthcare systems. The
birding community is not immune, which is an uncomfortable reality for
white birders like me to face. But racism is not a partisan issue, it’s an
issue of human rights and dignity. For white people like me to remain
silent, for white people to ask that we keep the discourse about the birds,
is white complicity.



Facebook is a challenging way to have a dialogue. It’s too easy to
misconstrue what someone has posted, too easy to be disrespectful, because
we’re not in the same room talking face-to-face. This listserv may not be
a good way to have a dialogue either, but in this time of pandemic and
social distancing, it’s one of the best tools we have. Sam Terry led the
way last week with his posting asking white birders to be sensitive to the
complexity of looking for the Black-Billed Magpie in the New Holly
neighborhood. Can we continue the conversation? The birds need us to do
this work. The efforts to conserve ecosystems, to bring birds back from
their steep decline, need everyone. Everyone caring, everyone having safe
and equal access to the beauty of the natural world and the birds that live
in it.



If Facebook is part of your life, consider leaving WWB (as several folks
including me already have) and joining West Coast Birders, a group created
on May 28 with the explicit goal of building a “…community of people who
share a love for birds and a desire to make birding accessible, safe, and
enjoyable for everyone.” The group “serves as both a celebration of West
Coast birds and a place to discuss the challenges to birding. The
challenges are diverse and intersect complex topics that are ecological,
social, and political.”


Best,

Whitney Neufeld-Kaiser

<whitney.n.k...>

Seattle

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/14/20 10:38 am
From: Alan Knue <temnurus...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Blue Jay at Point-no-Point
Just a quick alert- flew from forest to the light house with 39-40
Steller’s. Then flew back south to the forest.

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Back to top
Date: 6/14/20 9:02 am
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Vaux's Happening
It was a good night to be watching Vaux’s Swifts come into their brick roosts. Best approach being observer alone in the vehicle with the windows rolled up.

Eugene Agate 474
Prairie City 796
Selleck 2283
Monroe Wagner 6458

Larry Schwitters
Issaquah
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 

Back to top
Date: 6/14/20 8:06 am
From: Bruce Lagerquist <runningdoggie...>
Subject: [Tweeters] When Eastern Meadowlarks sound like Northern Cardinals
Tweets,

Who would have thought an Eastern Meadowlark could learn Cardenalize and speak it so well. This originally popped up on a Xeno-canto forum as a sound question, the recordist was nice enough to go out and get a bit of visual. Though those of you who have birded in environs east of here and heard these birds sing iconic songs might find this interesting. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i6oo7HwjbL0&feature=youtu.be

Bruce Lagerquist
Seattle Wa

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

Join us on Facebook!