tweeters
Received From Subject
12/18/18 8:09 pm <m.denny...> [Tweeters] Walla Walla CBC results
12/18/18 7:31 pm Martha Jordan <mj.cygnus...> [Tweeters] Need help with swan sightings-
12/18/18 4:49 pm Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...> [Tweeters] Fw: FYI: Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) listings and delistings
12/18/18 3:10 pm cynthia burrell <cinnyb...> [Tweeters] WOS meeting Mon. Jan 7, 2019
12/18/18 12:14 pm Toby Ross <TobyR...> [Tweeters] Seattle CBC Feeder Watchers NEEDED!
12/17/18 10:32 pm Al n Donna <alndonna...> Re: [Tweeters] Skagit Monday Dec 17
12/17/18 9:29 pm Tim Brennan <tsbrennan...> [Tweeters] Lewis County birding 12/17
12/17/18 9:21 pm Al n Donna <alndonna...> [Tweeters] Skagit Monday Dec 17
12/17/18 8:29 am pat.mary.taylor <pat.mary.taylor...> [Tweeters] Field fare BC Okanagan
12/16/18 8:41 pm Elston Hill <elstonh...> [Tweeters] Pleasantly surprised to see my Mallard photo in the Sunday Seattle Times under Reaer's Lens
12/16/18 7:49 pm Ed Swan <EdSwan2...> [Tweeters] Whatcom County Barn Swallow and Harlan's Hawk
12/16/18 3:46 pm Matt Bartels <mattxyz...> [Tweeters] San Juan Red Phalarope, Camano Swamp Sparrow, and Vermilion Flycatcher in Stanwood
12/16/18 3:01 pm Faye McAdams Hands <zest4parus...> [Tweeters] Lesser Goldfinch at Hylebos, Fife
12/16/18 2:53 pm Hubbell <ldhubbell...> [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Marsha
12/16/18 2:40 pm Diann MacRae <tvulture...> [Tweeters] quork!
12/16/18 2:14 pm Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...> [Tweeters] The Birdbooker Report
12/16/18 7:57 am Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] Skagit Great Egret
12/15/18 7:45 pm Dalton Spencer <offthehookflyshop...> [Tweeters] Swamp Sparrows in Western Washington
12/15/18 7:21 pm Hank H <h.heiberg...> [Tweeters] Duvall Prairie Falcon - no; 5 American Kestrels - yes
12/15/18 5:53 pm Marcia Ian <gnudle...> [Tweeters] Heated hummingbird feeders
12/15/18 5:45 pm BRAD Liljequist <bradliljequist...> [Tweeters] Female Ruddy Duck west Green Lake
12/15/18 5:13 pm Carl Haynie <hayncarl...> [Tweeters] Snowy Plover at Griffiths-Priday SP
12/15/18 12:25 pm Ryan Merrill <rjm284...> [Tweeters] Neah Bay Arctic Loon, Indigo Bunting
12/15/18 12:05 pm Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...> [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Dec. 16, 2018
12/15/18 10:05 am <wallydavis3...> Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
12/15/18 10:03 am Jeff Kozma <jcr_5105...> Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
12/15/18 8:17 am HAL MICHAEL <ucd880...> Re: [Tweeters] Wintering Anna's Hummingbirds... from retired University of Oregon ornithology instructor
12/14/18 11:49 pm Wild Birds Unlimited of Eugene <eugenewbu...> [Tweeters] Part 2, Wintering Anna's Hummingbirds... from retired University of Oregon ornithology instructor
12/14/18 11:44 pm Wild Birds Unlimited of Eugene <eugenewbu...> [Tweeters] Wintering Anna's Hummingbirds... from retired University of Oregon ornithology instructor
12/14/18 9:26 pm Scott Ramos <lsr...> [Tweeters] Magnuson Park, 14 December 2018
12/14/18 9:01 pm Ed Swan <edswan2...> [Tweeters] need help for boat CBC count of Quartermaster Harbor, Vashon Island, Sunday December 30
12/14/18 6:02 pm Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...> Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
12/14/18 5:42 pm Diane Yorgason-Quinn <avosetta...> Re: [Tweeters] Unusual sighting in Tacoma
12/14/18 5:21 pm Max Warner <maxcamf4...> [Tweeters] Unusual sighting in Tacoma
12/14/18 1:17 pm Jeremy Schwartz <jschwartz1124...> [Tweeters] Storm Wigeon in Bothell, North Creek area
12/14/18 12:45 pm Michelle Maani <lamoustique...> Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
12/14/18 9:53 am Vicki Biltz <vickibiltz...> Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
12/14/18 9:50 am Allison Reak <areak823...> Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
12/14/18 7:37 am HAL MICHAEL <ucd880...> Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
12/13/18 10:25 pm Rick Taylor <taylorrl...> Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
12/13/18 6:17 pm Kenneth Brown <kenbrownpls...> Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
12/13/18 5:41 pm Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2018-12-13
12/13/18 5:40 pm Jeff Kozma <jcr_5105...> Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
12/13/18 4:59 pm creinsch <creinsch...> Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
12/13/18 4:33 pm <wallydavis3...> Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
12/13/18 4:31 pm Kenneth Brown <kenbrownpls...> Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
12/13/18 4:20 pm <wallydavis3...> Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
12/13/18 4:17 pm <wallydavis3...> Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
12/13/18 1:29 pm Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...> Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
12/13/18 1:05 pm Mark Myers <myersmark7...> Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
12/13/18 11:42 am mombiwheeler <mombiwheeler...> [Tweeters] Duvall Prairie Falcon
12/13/18 9:33 am Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...> Re: [Tweeters] Fwd: Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
12/13/18 9:18 am Jill Freidberg <jill.freidberg...> Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
12/13/18 9:17 am George Neavoll <gneavoll...> [Tweeters] Fwd: Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
12/12/18 10:21 pm Robert Gray <robertgary02...> [Tweeters] Harlan's Red Tail.
12/12/18 6:41 pm Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...> [Tweeters] Fwd: Snoqualmie Valley Prairie Falcon Continuing Today
12/12/18 4:57 pm Jon Houghton <jon.houghton...> [Tweeters] Most unlikely bird in the State (?) survives the chill, so far!
12/12/18 3:57 pm Phil Kelley <scrubjay323...> [Tweeters] NIsqually NWR 12/12/18
12/12/18 12:58 pm Jordan Roderick <jordan...> [Tweeters] Duvall prairie falcon - yes
12/12/18 12:37 pm Pat Britain <patbrit...> [Tweeters] Bud Anderson and Bill Clark will lead winter raptor classes beginning soon!
12/12/18 12:13 pm Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...> [Tweeters] Snoqualmie Valley Prairie Falcon Continuing Today
12/12/18 10:32 am Martha Jordan <mj.cygnus...> [Tweeters] Bittern at Shadow Lake
12/12/18 9:32 am Byers <byers345...> [Tweeters] Off topic--trip to SE Brazil
12/11/18 8:37 pm HAL MICHAEL <ucd880...> Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
12/11/18 3:57 pm Tim Brennan <tsbrennan...> [Tweeters] Duvall Prairie Falcon - Yes!
12/11/18 2:45 pm Edwin Lamb <edsplace2...> Re: [Tweeters] Hybridization between Northwestern and American crows
12/11/18 2:21 pm Teresa Michelsen <teresa...> Re: [Tweeters] Hybridization between Northwestern and American crows
12/11/18 2:09 pm Dave Slager <dave.slager...> [Tweeters] Hybridization between Northwestern and American crows
12/11/18 12:50 pm Dee Dee <deedeeknit...> [Tweeters] Non-GMO bird food available?
12/11/18 11:15 am Hal Opperman UW <halop...> [Tweeters] ADMINISTRATIVE - Planned service outage December 16th
12/11/18 8:01 am Christine Southwick <clsouth...> [Tweeters] needing pictures
12/10/18 9:45 pm Matt Dufort <matt.dufort...> [Tweeters] King County December big day, Dec. 8
12/10/18 4:01 pm Constance Sidles <constancesidles...> [Tweeters] W. Tanager at Fill
12/10/18 11:50 am Philip Dickinson <pdickins...> [Tweeters] Lake Stevens Canvasbacks
12/10/18 11:37 am Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign15...> [Tweeters] A Still Evening At Point Wilson
12/10/18 11:21 am Toby Ross <TobyR...> [Tweeters] Seattle CBC
12/10/18 6:49 am Hank H <h.heiberg...> [Tweeters] Duvall Prairie Falcon - no
12/10/18 1:37 am Debbie Mcleod <skepsou...> [Tweeters] Trumpeters Juanita Bay
12/9/18 4:09 pm Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] Prairie Falcon yes
12/9/18 2:01 pm Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...> [Tweeters] Best Bird Books of 2018
12/9/18 1:15 pm Rick Tyler <rhtyler...> Re: [Tweeters] Duvall Prairie Falcon continues
12/9/18 1:00 pm Vicki Biltz <vickibiltz...> [Tweeters] Spain AND Kenya ( Angama?) then Zimbabwe if time.
12/9/18 12:48 pm <wallydavis3...> Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
12/9/18 8:53 am Rex Takasugi <RexTak...> Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
12/9/18 8:24 am Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant...> [Tweeters] Duvall Prairie Falcon continues
12/8/18 5:33 pm Anthony <birds...> [Tweeters] Vermilion Flycatcher 12/8 late afternoon
12/8/18 4:17 pm Lonnie Somer <mombiwheeler...> [Tweeters] Heermaan's Gull flock at Kingston Ferry Terminal
12/8/18 3:33 pm Tom Mansfield <birds...> [Tweeters] Duvall Prairie Falcon (PRFA)
12/8/18 1:13 pm Hubbell <ldhubbell...> [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Swans
12/8/18 12:05 pm Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...> [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Dec. 9, 2018
12/8/18 9:53 am Samuel Terry <samgterry...> [Tweeters] Duvall Prairie Falcon
12/8/18 6:42 am STEVEN ELLIS <sremse...> [Tweeters] O.T. ARF Wrapup
12/8/18 6:25 am heidi narte <heidi...> [Tweeters] WDFW South Puget Sound Wildlife Plan - December 19 Public Meeting
12/7/18 8:00 pm Tom Mansfield <birds...> Re: [Tweeters] Stanwood reminder
12/7/18 7:29 pm todd Entrikin <shmodd_...> [Tweeters] Stanwood reminder
12/7/18 3:32 pm Jill Freidberg <jill.freidberg...> [Tweeters] Off topic: Vermillion Flycatchers, Black Phoebes, and Phainopeplas?
12/7/18 2:33 pm Jon. Anderson and Marty Chaney <festuca...> [Tweeters] Vermilion Flycatcher - Yes.
12/7/18 12:09 pm Ronda Stark <rondastark18...> Re: [Tweeters] Stanwood incident - 12/4/18
12/7/18 11:37 am Cara Borre <cmborre1...> [Tweeters] Marbled Murrelet survey deadline today
12/7/18 11:37 am Christopher Clark <cjbirdmanclark...> Re: [Tweeters] Palm Warbler numbers (throwing in Swamp Sparrow too)
12/7/18 10:21 am Shep Thorp <shepthorp...> [Tweeters] Nisqually NWR Wednesday Walk for 12.5.2018
12/6/18 10:21 pm Randy <re_hill...> Re: [Tweeters] Palm Warbler at Eide Road
12/6/18 8:21 pm Hank H <h.heiberg...> [Tweeters] Palm Warbler at Eide Road; Northern Waterthrush at Wylie Slough
12/6/18 7:17 pm Rick Taylor <taylorrl...> Re: [Tweeters] Stanwood Birding situation
12/6/18 6:53 pm Nadine Drisseq <drisseq.n...> [Tweeters] Stanwood: a CORRECTION - and IMPORTANT UPDATE from Stanwood PD.
12/6/18 6:45 pm <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2018-12-06
12/6/18 6:26 pm Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...> [Tweeters] Job Openings in Wildlife Conservation (WDFW)
12/6/18 4:59 pm John Puschock <g_g_allin...> Re: [Tweeters] Stanwood Incident
12/6/18 3:29 pm Jon. Anderson and Marty Chaney <festuca...> Re: [Tweeters] Stanwood Incident
12/6/18 2:28 pm <wallydavis3...> Re: [Tweeters] Stanwood incident - 12/4/18
12/6/18 2:27 pm Nadine Drisseq <drisseq.n...> [Tweeters] Stanwood Birding situation
12/6/18 1:57 pm Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...> Re: [Tweeters] Stanwood incident - 12/4/18
12/6/18 1:25 pm Will's Email <yekramw...> Re: [Tweeters] Stanwood incident - 12/4/18
12/6/18 11:46 am AnnMarie Wood <amw.5737...> [Tweeters] Stanwood incident - 12/4/18
12/6/18 11:33 am H Heiberg <h.heiberg...> [Tweeters] Palm Warbler at Eide Road
12/6/18 8:57 am Tom Mansfield <birds...> Re: [Tweeters] Stanwood birding situation Vermillion Flycatcher
12/6/18 8:56 am Izzy Wong <gobirder...> Re: [Tweeters] Stanwood birding situation
12/5/18 10:17 pm Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] Stanwood birding situation
12/5/18 8:07 pm Sharon Cormier-Aagaard <scormieraa001...> [Tweeters] eBird Report - Lake Sammamish State Park, Dec 5, 2018
12/5/18 3:13 pm Philip Dickinson <pdickins...> Re: [Tweeters] Do Common merganser raft?
12/5/18 1:05 pm tredick christina <cjt37...> [Tweeters] Do Common merganser raft?
12/5/18 11:37 am Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant...> Re: [Tweeters] Stanwood vermillion flycatcher
12/5/18 11:13 am Jordan Roderick <jordan...> [Tweeters] Wylie Slough waterthrush
12/5/18 9:45 am Jordan Roderick <jordan...> [Tweeters] Stanwood vermillion flycatcher
12/4/18 8:42 pm Hank H <h.heiberg...> [Tweeters] Langlois Lake: Trumpeter Swans, Snow Geese and a Pacific Wren
12/4/18 7:01 pm B P Bell <bellasoc...> [Tweeters] EAS Samish trip 4 Dec 2018
12/4/18 3:34 pm Rick Tyler <rhtyler...> Re: [Tweeters] Mega sighting on eBird
12/4/18 3:28 pm Matt Bartels <mattxyz...> Re: [Tweeters] Mega sighting on eBird
12/4/18 1:30 pm Mark Robinson <blobbybirdman...> Re: [Tweeters] Mega sighting on eBird
12/4/18 1:20 pm Rick Tyler <rhtyler...> [Tweeters] Mega sighting on eBird
12/4/18 8:25 am Russ Koppendrayer <russkope...> Re: [Tweeters] Stan the hawk
12/4/18 8:16 am Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] Stan the hawk
12/4/18 12:12 am Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...> [Tweeters] Samish Flats and Fir Island 12-3-18
12/3/18 10:33 pm Josh Adams <xjoshx...> [Tweeters] Snohomish County Big Year Help
12/3/18 9:12 pm Hank H <h.heiberg...> [Tweeters] Trumpeter Swans on Langlois Lake
12/3/18 5:29 pm B B <birder4184...> [Tweeters] Tundra Bean Goose in Oregon - Blog Post
12/3/18 6:46 am Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign15...> [Tweeters] Earthshine Alert
12/3/18 5:25 am Matt Bartels <mattxyz...> [Tweeters] San Juan Swamp Sparrow, Sunday 2 Dec 2018
12/2/18 6:17 pm Bob <rflores_2...> [Tweeters] Email address for Nancy and Bill LaFramboise?
12/2/18 12:13 pm Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...> [Tweeters] The Birdbooker Report
12/2/18 11:29 am BRAD Liljequist <bradliljequist...> [Tweeters] Townsends solitaire phinney ridge
12/2/18 4:29 am John M Allinger <jmikeallinger...> [Tweeters] Peregrine Falcon Harasses Trumpeter Swan
12/1/18 2:05 pm Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...> [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Dec. 2, 2018
12/1/18 9:10 am AnnMarie Wood <amw.5737...> [Tweeters] Wiley Slough search for missing 2 year old
11/30/18 9:13 pm Jeffrey Bryant <jbryant_68...> [Tweeters] Sanderling photo request correction
11/30/18 9:05 pm Soo Goh-Baus <demeaus3...> [Tweeters] Add me to the mailing list
11/30/18 7:09 pm Jeffrey Bryant <jbryant_68...> [Tweeters] CALLING ALL PHOTOGRAPHERS
11/30/18 3:05 pm HAL MICHAEL <ucd880...> Re: [Tweeters] Blue Morph Snow Goose
11/30/18 2:45 pm Vicki Biltz <vickibiltz...> [Tweeters] Australia or where?
11/30/18 1:41 pm Christopher Clark <cjbirdmanclark...> Re: [Tweeters] Blue Morph Snow Goose
11/30/18 1:40 pm Hubbell <ldhubbell...> [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Freedom
11/30/18 1:34 pm Roland van der Vliet <rollie_nl...> [Tweeters] unsubscribing: thank you for all your help
11/30/18 12:45 pm Susan McDougall <podicepswa...> [Tweeters] blue morph Snow goose
11/30/18 11:00 am Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] Skagit Birding
11/29/18 9:39 pm Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] Skagit Rusty Blackbird
11/29/18 7:57 pm Philip Dickinson <pdickins...> [Tweeters] Rare birds at Wiley Slough
11/29/18 5:33 pm Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2018-11-29
11/29/18 5:17 pm Jon Houghton <jon.houghton...> Re: [Tweeters] Tides at Night; Who's calling?
11/29/18 3:49 pm Nan Evans <nanswaltz...> Re: [Tweeters] Tides at Night
11/29/18 1:53 pm Teresa Michelsen <teresa...> Re: [Tweeters] Did You Fall or Was You Pushed
11/29/18 1:49 pm Tim Brennan <tsbrennan...> [Tweeters] Snow Geese over Renton
11/29/18 1:13 pm Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign15...> [Tweeters] Did You Fall or Was You Pushed
11/28/18 7:53 pm Shep Thorp <shepthorp...> [Tweeters] Nisqually NWR Wednesday Walk for 11/28/2018
11/28/18 7:51 pm cynthia burrell <cinnyb...> [Tweeters] Reminder: Monday Dec 3 WOS meeting
11/28/18 1:52 pm Jeffrey Bryant <jbryant_68...> [Tweeters] M street marsh (Auburn) AMERICAN TREE SPARROW
11/28/18 12:59 pm Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign15...> [Tweeters] Tides of Night Report
11/28/18 12:38 pm Christopher Clark <cjbirdmanclark...> [Tweeters] Geese and Swans in Puyallup today
11/28/18 11:07 am Constance Sidles <constancesidles...> [Tweeters] Fill news
11/27/18 2:33 pm Vicki Biltz <vickibiltz...> [Tweeters] Trumpeter swans, new yard bird!
11/27/18 1:18 pm Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...> [Tweeters] ducks along the Columbia Rover in Clark County
11/26/18 4:14 pm Jon Houghton <jon.houghton...> [Tweeters] Hawk on hawk violence
11/26/18 2:11 pm Hubbell <ldhubbell...> [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Persistence
11/26/18 1:10 pm Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...> [Tweeters] American Tree Sparrow
11/25/18 4:37 pm Michelle Maani <lamoustique...> [Tweeters] American Robin invasion
11/25/18 3:09 pm David A. Armstrong <davearm...> [Tweeters] Deer Lagoon and Useless Bay: lots there
11/25/18 11:09 am Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign15...> [Tweeters] Night Tides
11/25/18 11:05 am Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1...> [Tweeters] NOVA / Peregrines
11/24/18 7:09 pm Martha Jordan <mj.cygnus...> [Tweeters] birding bonanza-swans
11/24/18 1:34 pm Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign15...> [Tweeters] Searching For Gold
11/24/18 12:09 pm Robert O'Brien <baro...> Re: [Tweeters] Merlin snagged Starling in yard / Caryn / Wedgwood
11/24/18 12:06 pm Ellen Blackstone <ellen...> [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Nov. 25, 2018
11/24/18 12:05 am Dan Reiff, PhD <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] BBC nature film crew breaks "no interference" rule to rescue baby penguins in Antartica - CBS News
11/23/18 7:47 pm Matt Bartels <mattxyz...> [Tweeters] Wahkiakum County birds 11/22 & 23
11/23/18 3:21 pm Andrew McCormick <andy_mcc...> [Tweeters] Clay-colored Sparrow on 134th Ave E, Puyallup
11/22/18 2:53 pm Elston Hill <elstonh...> [Tweeters] Amazing Fir Island
11/22/18 1:43 pm Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...> Re: [Tweeters] Merlin snagged Starling in yard / Caryn / Wedgwood
11/22/18 12:41 pm Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1...> [Tweeters] Merlin snagged Starling in yard / Caryn / Wedgwood
11/22/18 12:34 pm Valerie Anderson <valhikes...> [Tweeters] Binocular repair?
11/22/18 12:07 pm John Puschock <g_g_allin...> [Tweeters] Late report: American Tree Sparrow at UBNA, Seattle
11/21/18 8:58 pm Pterodroma <pterodroma...> [Tweeters] the "twelfie" Red-tailed Hawk in Bellevue Eastgate
11/21/18 8:04 pm Hank H <h.heiberg...> [Tweeters] Sequim Trip Highlights 11/18 -> 11/20
11/21/18 4:47 pm Phil Kelley <scrubjay323...> [Tweeters] Nisqually NWR 11/21/18
11/21/18 3:24 pm beneteau <beneteau...> [Tweeters] Surf Scoter behaviou
11/21/18 2:53 pm Mary klein <marytweetz...> [Tweeters] Snow Geese
11/21/18 2:05 pm Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2018-11-21
11/21/18 2:05 pm Constance Sidles <constancesidles...> [Tweeters] Off topic: Survey re invasive species
11/21/18 11:09 am Pterodroma <pterodroma...> [Tweeters] shoulder tagged Red-tailed Hawk, Bellevue Eastgate
11/21/18 12:21 am Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...> [Tweeters] Fir Island 11-19-18
11/20/18 6:31 pm Jill Freidberg <jill.freidberg...> Re: [Tweeters] crow with avian keratin disorder
11/20/18 3:45 pm J Christian Kessler <1northraven...> [Tweeters] crow with avian keratin disorder
11/20/18 2:17 pm Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...> [Tweeters] For Birds-of-Paradise, Being Hot Is Not Enough to Win a Mate, They Must Also Have The Moves
11/20/18 8:18 am B P Bell <bellasoc...> [Tweeters] Eastside Audubon Whidbey Island trip 19 Nov 2018
11/19/18 11:57 pm Dan Reiff, PhD <dan.owl.reiff...> [Tweeters] Snowies on the Move - Project SNOWstorm
11/19/18 1:44 pm randy collins <rancol23...> Re: [Tweeters] Where did all the Western Grebes go, anyway?
11/19/18 12:32 pm Michelle Maani <lamoustique...> [Tweeters] Black Phoebe and RSH at Ridgefield, and where are the migrants?
11/19/18 11:48 am stan Kostka lynn Schmidt <lynnandstan...> Re: [Tweeters] Western Bluebirds near Bryant (Snohomish Co.)
11/19/18 11:44 am mary hrudkaj <mch1096...> [Tweeters] Quail Carcass going to UPS
11/19/18 8:39 am Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign15...> [Tweeters] Shadow Birding
11/19/18 8:10 am Hank H <h.heiberg...> Re: [Tweeters] identification help Western sandpiper
11/19/18 7:57 am <amk17...> Re: [Tweeters] identification help Western sandpiper
11/19/18 6:41 am <amk17...> [Tweeters] identification help
 
Back to top
Date: 12/18/18 8:09 pm
From: <m.denny...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Walla Walla CBC results
Hello all,The 45th Walla Walla Christmas Bird Count was held on
December 15 - happily a NICE day between many days of wind and rain.
76 Species were found with SANDHILL CRANE new to the count.Several
records were broken - the expected ones like Eurasian Collared-Dove -
414 compared to 392 last year. Lesser Goldfinches continue to expand
with 223 found this year - real increase over 97 last year. 6 Anna's
Hummingbirds were reported - not surprising in this mild weather.And
lastly over 12000 starlings were reported - SE Walla Walla is
inundated with huge flocks of these birds - because of the
vineyards.Fifteen Western Bluebirds were a nice find on Biscuit Ridge
Rd and the Bennington Lake counters were treated to great views of an
adult Northern Goshawk.Misses - Pileated Woodpecker, C. Goldeneye -
first miss in 10 years, and Bufflehead - usually found in open water
years.Happy CBC'ing, MerryLynn


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Back to top
Date: 12/18/18 7:31 pm
From: Martha Jordan <mj.cygnus...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Need help with swan sightings-
Hello birders in the Enumclaw/Sumner/Auburn/Lake Tapps zone.
It is really important that we know where swans have been over the past
three weeks. If you have seen swans anywhere in this general zone. Please
send me an email with the exact location, number of swans and the date.
We are beginning to see mortality on the night roost site, likely from
lead poisoning (not confirmed).
If you see live, healthy swans let me know where they are via email.
If you see a sick, injured or dead swan please call me at 206-713-3684.

Thank you. Happy birding and Season's Greetings

Martha Jordan
NW Swan Conservation Association
Everett, WA

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Date: 12/18/18 4:49 pm
From: Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fw: FYI: Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) listings and delistings
Tweeters,

I received the message below (I cut out some names, etc.) from some folks I work with at JBLM - some of you might be interested in it.


May all your birds be identified,

Denis


Denis DeSilvis

<avnacrs4birds...>

________________________________


-----Original Message-----
From: USARMY ID-READINESS (USA)
Sent: Monday, December 17, 2018 11:14 AM

REVISED LIST OF MIGRATORY BIRDS. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is
proposing to revise the list of migratory birds protected by the Migratory
Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) by both adding and removing species (83 FR 61288
<https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2018-11-28/html/2018-25634.htm> ).
Federal Register, Volume 83 Issue 229 (Wednesday, November 28, 2018) - gpo.gov<https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2018-11-28/html/2018-25634.htm>
www.gpo.gov
[Federal Register Volume 83, Number 229 (Wednesday, November 28, 2018)] [Proposed Rules] [Pages 61288-61307] From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov] [FR Doc No: 2018-25634] [[Page 61287]] Vol. 83 Wednesday, No. 229 November 28, 2018 Part IV Department of the Interior ----- Fish and Wildlife Service ----- 50 CFR Part 10 General Provisions; Revised ...


Revisions include adding species based on new taxonomy and new evidence of
natural occurrence in the U.S. or U.S. territories, removing species no
longer known to occur within the U.S. or U.S. territories, and changing
names to conform to accepted use. The net increase of 59 species (66 added
and seven removed) would bring the total number of species protected by the
MBTA to 1,085. See the Federal Register notice for the full list. Comments
are due by 28 JAN 19.

DRAFT LIST OF BIRD SPECIES TO WHICH MBTA DOES NOT APPLY. FWS has published a
draft list of the non-native bird species introduced into the U.S. or U.S.
territories solely as a result of intentional or unintentional
human-assisted introductions, and to which the MBTA does not apply (83 FR
61161 <https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2018-11-28/html/2018-25631.htm> ).
The Migratory Bird Treaty Reform Act of 2004 amends the MBTA by stating that
the MBTA applies only to migratory bird species that are native to the U.S.
or U.S. territories. The list, containing 120 species in 27 families, is an
update to the list published in 2005. See the Federal Register notice for
the full list. Comments are due by 28 JAN 19.

In my quick glance, I didn't notice any species being delisted that occur on
JBLM. There is another battle going on between some states and the DOI
regarding the interpretation of the Act, but that is not addressed in these
proposals.

Joint Base Lewis-McChord, WA 98433-9500






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Date: 12/18/18 3:10 pm
From: cynthia burrell <cinnyb...>
Subject: [Tweeters] WOS meeting Mon. Jan 7, 2019
Washington Ornithological Society Meeting-- Member Photo Night, Monday Jan 7, 2019.
Start off the new year by sharing some of your photos with an audience of fellow birders. Photos nights are held in January and June, and are a great opportunity to share your pictures with the birding community. Bring photos on a thumb drive and please keep your presentation to less than 10 minutes.
WOS meetings are held the first Monday of the month at The Center for Urban Horticulture 3501 NE 41st St, Seattle, WA. 7pm social, 7:30 meeting begins. Hope to see you there!
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Date: 12/18/18 12:14 pm
From: Toby Ross <TobyR...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Seattle CBC Feeder Watchers NEEDED!
Half of Seattle's Christmas Bird Count circle is residentially zoned. In an effort to improve the accuracy of the Seattle count, we would like to increase the number of people taking part in the count as a Feeder Watcher. You would need to watch your feeders on the day of the count - December 29 - and you can watch for as little as 10 minutes. If you, or someone you know would be interested in taking part, first check that your feeder is located within the count circle (http://bit.ly/2zn1gpw) and then register for the count by Dec 27 (http://bit.ly/2zn1gpw). If you have any questions, please get in touch with the count coordinator <cbc...><mailto:<cbc...>.

Don't forget, there are many other CBCs in the region that always need help - as a field counter, but feeder watchers would also be greatly received. Check the Washington Ornithological Society website<http://wos.org/cbc/> (http://wos.org/cbc/) for a list of CBCs and dates.

Toby Ross
Senior Science Manager
Seattle Audubon Society
8050 35th Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98115
(206) 523-8243 ext. 102
<tobyr...><mailto:<tobyr...>
www.seattleaudubon.org<http://www.seattleaudubon.org/>
[SeattleAudubon_tagline_color_EMAIL]


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Date: 12/17/18 10:32 pm
From: Al n Donna <alndonna...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Skagit Monday Dec 17

For a closeup of the leg band, see:
http://www.pbase.com/alndonna/image/168554057


Great Rough-Legged Hawk picture at:

http://www.pbase.com/alndonna/image/168553732

Al in Tacoma
<alndonna...>



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Date: 12/17/18 9:29 pm
From: Tim Brennan <tsbrennan...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Lewis County birding 12/17
Hi Tweets,

I spent the latter half of the day on (likely) my last run down to Lewis County this year, adding one more bird for the year, as Mew Gulls came out of the woodworks to play in the flooded fields at Goodrich and Galvin Roads. That made 170 for the year - a bit short of the goal, but it was awesome getting to see so much of Lewis County this year, and to see Dave and Dalton pushing the new county record higher even into December!

After hitting those ponds (which also had a single Snow Goose - at Galvin Road), I drove a little ways up Lincoln Creek... then a little farther... and kept running into more and more flooded fields. I had hopes that the open fields and clear cuts would land me some Tundra Swans, or maybe a Northern Shrike. A pair of Trumpeter Swans and miles of beautiful scenery was all I got out of it, and I eventually circled around to Bunker Creek Road, and down to Highway 6 near Adna.

Heading east from that junction, I saw a raptor zoom by in the opposite direction on the south side of the highway. My best hunch is that it was a Gyrfalcon - falcon because of the high speed and stiff powerful wingbeats, and Gyr based partly on size, but mostly on proportions. Yes, it seemed like a big bird, but more importantly, in profile, it just seemed way too bulky to be a Peregrine. The size of the chest in proportion to its length seemed completely off. I pulled over as quickly and safely as I could, but the bird had melted into the scenery and was not relocated. This would have been a lifer for me, and unfortunately I don't think I'm heading down again this year, but I hope someone is able to relocate it! If I remember correctly, this is not so far from where a Gyr was found on Pleasant Valley Road a few years back.

They don't need much more down there for the year, but if anyone goes down, a Bonaparte's Gull would sure be nice, maybe an American Tree Sparrow? Palm Warbler??

Happy birding,


Tim Brennan
Renton

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Date: 12/17/18 9:21 pm
From: Al n Donna <alndonna...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Skagit Monday Dec 17

No Northern Waterthrush. I watched the hidden pond just north of the boat ramp from 9:30-11:30 and from 1:30-2:15 and only found a song sparrow, 5 chickadees, 15 juncos and 50 robins. Thanks to Maxine Reid for verifying that I watched the right place. The cold, stiff breeze didn’t help, although the rain didn’t begin until after I left.

A nice consolation was the gorgeous Rough-Legged Hawk on the wire along the road about 2 miles east of West 90 (only Harriers, Eagles, Brewers Blackbirds and Black-Bellied Plovers).

Great Rough-Legged Hawk picture at:

http://www.pbase.com/alndonna/image/168553732

Al in Tacoma
<alndonna...>


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Date: 12/17/18 8:29 am
From: pat.mary.taylor <pat.mary.taylor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Field fare BC Okanagan
A Fieldfare was found south of Salmon Arm Dec 16. Details on BC rare bird alert.

Keith Taylor

Sent from my iPad
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Date: 12/16/18 8:41 pm
From: Elston Hill <elstonh...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Pleasantly surprised to see my Mallard photo in the Sunday Seattle Times under Reaer's Lens
Pleasantly surprised to see my photo from Nisqually in the Seattle Times. My wife paid me the ultimate comment by saying she was surprised that a photo of a female Mallard could win the contest.

https://www.seattletimes.com/life/outdoors/readers-lens-a-well-timed-portrait-of-a-mallard/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=article_left_1.1


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Date: 12/16/18 7:49 pm
From: Ed Swan <EdSwan2...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Whatcom County Barn Swallow and Harlan's Hawk
Today on the Bellingham CBC my crew saw a Barn Swallow on the edge of the
Lummi Flats. Our area racked up 60 species for the day and we were happy to
not be blasted off the dike by wind and rain this year. We saw a flock of
100 Black Scoters which is one of the largest concentrations of that species
that I've seen. We didn't see much that was unusual other than the swallow,
just had a good steady day of adding up the species and their numbers.



Outside of our territory, I showed others some of the good Lummi Flats areas
on the way back to their vehicles. A really nice bird we saw on Red River
Road was a Harlan's Hawk sitting on a branch on the edge of the slough. I
later talked to the birders covering that area and they also saw that
particular hawk and one other as well as Short-eared Owls. I later saw a
nice Rough-legged Hawk and a Northern Shrike as well. This was my first
Whatcom County Harlan's Hawk and I was able to take some photos so I was
pretty pleased with that quick little side jaunt.



Ed



Ed Swan

Nature writer and guide

<http://www.theswancompany.com/> www.theswancompany.com

<mailto:<edswan2...> <edswan2...>

206.949.3545




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Date: 12/16/18 3:46 pm
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] San Juan Red Phalarope, Camano Swamp Sparrow, and Vermilion Flycatcher in Stanwood
Birding this weekend, a few good birds to report —

Saturday 16 Dec
2-3 Red Phalarope off Cattle Point on San Juan Island —
After the windy night, not super surprising to have them blow in, but still a good San Juan Co bird — 2-3 off Cattle Point, near Goose Island. Otherwise, mostly what I found in a day on the island were many wind gusts.


Sunday 17 Dec
Vermilion Flycatcher — I checked Stanwood STP at 11:00 - no luck. Came back just before 1:00, and the Vermilion Flycatcher was sitting where recently reported, along the fence line visible from the driveway into the Stanwood STP — no need to drive further down 98th, and no bad interactions with the neighbors to report. The previously reported Black Phoebe was also preset near the same spot.

Swamp Sparrow — in between tries for the VEFL, I went over to Iverson Spit on Camano Island — hoping for a Swamp Sparrow [after being reminded of a sighting there thanks to Dalton Spencer’s recent post] — sure enough, on the main trail where it crosses the corner of the marsh, a Swamp Sparrow was calling away, and gave nice views.

A good weekend of birding - but I did manage to miss the Duvall Prairie Falcon once again to keep excitement in check!

Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA


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Date: 12/16/18 3:01 pm
From: Faye McAdams Hands <zest4parus...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Lesser Goldfinch at Hylebos, Fife
During our Christmas Bird Count for TahomaAudubon
yesterday we had a Lesser Goldfinch.
Male Lesser seen with female American Goldfinch and 2 other Americans.
Seen at Hylebos where trail empties out onto street at
62nd Ave E and 8th St E in Fife.
Seen well by 3 on our team. Responded (and sounded like) Lesser call on Sibley app.

Happy Birding
Faye

Get Outlook for iOS<https://aka.ms/o0ukef>

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Date: 12/16/18 2:53 pm
From: Hubbell <ldhubbell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Marsha
Tweeters,

In this week’s post, Can you determine what the eagle is eating by looking closely at the initial photos? Also, if you would like a bit of an identification challenge do not miss the bird in the Going Native section at the end of the post.

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2018/12/marsha.html <https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2018/12/marsha.html>

Have a great day on Union Bay where nature lives in the city.

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net
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Date: 12/16/18 2:40 pm
From: Diann MacRae <tvulture...>
Subject: [Tweeters] quork!
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Date: 12/16/18 2:14 pm
From: Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] The Birdbooker Report
HI ALL:
This week's titles are:

1) Flora of the Pacific Northwest (2nd Edition)

https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/2018/12/new-title.html

2) Birds of Vietnam
3) Where to Watch Bird in Sardinia
4) King of the Dinosaur Hunters

https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/2018/12/new-titles.html

sincerely
--

Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/
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Date: 12/16/18 7:57 am
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Skagit Great Egret
Yesterday there was a GREAT EGRET in a field at the intersection of Best & Chilberg Roads in Skagit County.

short video: https://www.flickr.com/photos/138163614@N02/

--
Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>

The past and the present are not disjunct domains.


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Date: 12/15/18 7:45 pm
From: Dalton Spencer <offthehookflyshop...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Swamp Sparrows in Western Washington
Hi all,
This has been a crazy year in a lot of aspects. I know of at least two counties whose big year records have been broken this year and the shear number of Swamp Sparrows and Palm Warblers this fall and winter has been unbelievable. 
Kitsap County seems to be the only Western Washington Counties without any Swamp Sparrows being seen. There was a Swamp Sparrow that spent last winter on Kitsap Lake but as of yet has not been seen this winter. 
The Western half of the state has not been the only half with Swamp Sparrows. I know of several and at least one county first in Walla Walla. 
Assembled here is the list of birds either reported on eBird or on Tweeters:
Skamania- November 3 Home Valley Park near StevensonClark- November 6- 24 Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge, November 6 Meadowbrook Marsh Park, Cowlitz- November 15 48th Ave in LongviewWahkiakum- November 23 Steamboat Slough Rd near Skamokawa Lewis- December 15 Riverside Golf Course in ChehalisPacific- November 19 Springtown Road near IlwacoThurston- November 24 Chehalis River near Rochester, November 7- 28 Nisqually National Wildlife RefugeGrays Harbor- October 25 Chehalis Wildlife Refuge near SatsopPierce- at least 4 first one showing up on October 25th and the last sighting was November 30thKing- 22 total birds minimum! The first showing up on October 13 at Lake Sammamish State Park and the other on December 12 near Duvall
Snohomish- October 22 at Crescent Lake Wildlife Managemant Area and Snohomish Treatment Ponds on October 29thSkagit- 10 birds! Birds spanning three months and from the coast to the mountains. Whatcom- November 13 Connelly Creek Park in Bellingham, and November 25 on Mack Rd, and November 28 Chuckanut Pocket Estuary November 28- December 1Island- October 20 Dugualla Bay, October 20- November 3 at Deer Lagoon and another one at Iverson Spit on Camano Island on November 25San Juan- December 2 Roche Harbor Rd on San Juan Island Mason- November 16 near SkokomishJefferson- November 17 near LelandClallam- November 23- December 7 near Sequim and 8 in the Neah Bay area
Our pleasure of having a multitude of Sparrows is not restricted to us. Montana, Idaho, and Oregon have all had extremely impressive numbers of the species with one place near Florence, Oregon having at least 10 Swamp Sparrows. 
I hope everyone else enjoys looking through this list and hopefully more are seen. It is CBC season so who knows how more could show up then.
Dalton SpencerChehalis, Washington


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Date: 12/15/18 7:21 pm
From: Hank H <h.heiberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Duvall Prairie Falcon - no; 5 American Kestrels - yes

> We have lost count of how many times we have looked for the Duvall Prairie Falcon. There are two large dogs at a house on W. Snoqualmie River Road that used to bark and track our car as we drove slowly by their house. Now they look at us and yawn. Today we tried both sides of the valley and saw many raptors including a Rough-legged Hawk, but no Prairie Falcon. We did see an American Kestrel at each of our birding stops: Sikes Lake, W. Snoqualmie River Road, W. Snoqualmie Valley Road, Tualco Loop Road and Lake Tye (Monroe). We had a good time with the birds and birder friends, new and old.
>
> Hank & Karen Heiberg
> Issaquah, WA
>
> Sent from my iPad

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Date: 12/15/18 5:53 pm
From: Marcia Ian <gnudle...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Heated hummingbird feeders
I started using these last year, and they are excellent. Each uses one 7w bulb, quite a cheery sight by night, and even cheerier when the hummingbirds use them by day.
https://hummersheateddelight.com/xcart/heated-feeders/

Marcia Ian
Bellingham
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Date: 12/15/18 5:45 pm
From: BRAD Liljequist <bradliljequist...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Female Ruddy Duck west Green Lake
At about 3pm today there was a female Ruddy Duck, exactly next to the pedestrian crossing at 70th Street.

Brad Liljequist
Phinney Ridge, Seattle

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Date: 12/15/18 5:13 pm
From: Carl Haynie <hayncarl...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Snowy Plover at Griffiths-Priday SP
Hi Tweets,

This afternoon there was an adult Snowy Plover on the beach at
Griffiths-Priday State Park. The bird was loosely associating with
Sanderling and Dunlin north of the line of signs marking the “no driving”
area. Technically, this is part of the Copalis Spit Natural Area.

To reach this stretch of beach, one needs to park along Heath Rd that forms
the southern border to the state park, walk across the foot bridge to the
beach, then walk north. You will see the large signage mentioned above.

Photo in my eBird checklist:
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50693712?share=true

Good birding.

Carl Haynie
Sammamish, WA

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Date: 12/15/18 12:25 pm
From: Ryan Merrill <rjm284...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Neah Bay Arctic Loon, Indigo Bunting
It’s been a great morning at Neah Bay so far! There is a close Arctic Loon
hanging out just off the Ba’adah Loop Road at the east end of town. Then
now at Butler’s Motel there is an Indigo Bunting. Also Palm and
Orange-crowned Warblers and half a dozen American Goldfinches.

Good birding,
Ryan Merrill & Sam Terry

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Date: 12/15/18 12:05 pm
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...>
Subject: [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Dec. 16, 2018
Hello, Tweets,

Last week on BirdNote:
* Not Just Any Nectar Will Do
http://bit.ly/2RigpPC
* Wilson's Warblers Benefit from Shade-Grown Coffee
http://bit.ly/2S9sxTd
* Surf Scoters Stand Out
http://bit.ly/2AlW3xV
* Freeway Hawks
http://bit.ly/2KvSnhR
* Snow Geese: Too Much of a Good Thing?
http://bit.ly/2DVcnK3
* The Avocets of Bolivar Flats
http://bit.ly/2FCg6Ot
* Do Male and Female Birds Always Look Different? Nope...
http://bit.ly/2DVZUGg
-----------------------------------------------
Check out next week's stories:
The Legendary Phoenix, Northern Goshawk, Spruce Grouse, and more...
http://bit.ly/2Ligwsq
-------------------------
BirdNote is now in print. Check out BirdNote, the book:
https://www.birdnote.org/birdnote-book
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Did you have a favorite story this week? Please let us know.
mailto:<info...>
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
or Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/birdnoteradio/
Listen on Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find 1500+ episodes and more than 1000 videos in the archive.
Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
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Date: 12/15/18 10:05 am
From: <wallydavis3...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
Hi Jill,



Personally I mix up 4:1 sugar water solution which I keep in the refrigerator. I take about 4 oz at a time and warm it up (not hot) then add half a scoop of the Gerbers. I change this every 2 – 3 days. If your feeder is heated to the point that it keeps the mix warm, I wouldn’t leave it more than 2 days.



Good luck,

Wally



From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of Jill Freidberg
Sent: Tuesday, December 11, 2018 12:06 PM
To: <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds



So I just want to make sure I get this right before I start adding the formula to my feeder.



Mine is heated. With a heated feeder, I should add 2 ounces from the 8 ounce mix of formula/water to the existing mix of 4:1 sugar water and not let it sit in the feeder for longer than 3 days? And the remaining unused formula is good in the fridge for another week?



Thanks!

Jill









On Dec 8, 2018, at 11:27 AM, Rex Takasugi <RexTak...> <mailto:<RexTak...> > wrote:



Subject: Question on winter feeding of hummingbirds



We've been following the advice of Wally Davis for winter hummingbird feeding--thanks for the great information! This year I noticed that the Gerber Good Start Gentle has probiotics included (maybe it was this way before and I didn't notice). Any thoughts on whether Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium could be detrimental for hummingbirds? They shouldn't be pathogenic for the birds, but could provide competition for the hummer's normal flora.



Thanks!

Joyce & Rex





From: <mailto:<tweeters-bounces...> <tweeters-bounces...> [ <mailto:<tweeters-bounces...> mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Wally Davis
Sent: Thursday, January 28, 2016 6:46 AM
To: <mailto:<tweeters...> <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds



Many years ago as a graduate student in zoology at UC Berkeley, I studied hummingbird behavior using both wild and captive birds as subjects. Species I studied included Anna’s (Calypte anna), Black-chin (Archilochus alexandri), Allen’s (Selasphorus sasin), and Rufous (Selasphorus rufus). Most of the time I kept my captive hummingbirds in an 8’ x 8’ by 8’ outdoor enclosure sheathed in window screen.



Rather than feed simple sugar syrup, I fed a mixture containing sugar, vitamin drops, protein, and other nutrients. In addition, I maintained a colony of fruit flies and a couple of times a week would release a large quantity of them into the hummingbird cages. It was amazing to watch the action when the fruit flies were released. All of the hummingbirds took to wing and deftly plucked the fruit flies out of the air or any surface they happened to land on. The fruit flies didn’t stand a chance and were quickly devoured. Using this approach I kept my captive hummingbirds healthy for over a year and even fledged and raised two Allen’s hummingbirds which I collected in order to study learned vs. instinctive feeding behavior.



In 1999 I moved to Snohomish, WA where I put up a bird feeder, hung blocks of suet and, of course, hummingbird feeders. Many Rufous hummingbirds visited from spring to mid-summer and even nested in the shrubs on my property, but I didn’t see my first Anna’s hummingbird until 2011. By 2013 they became year-round residents and were breeding on my property. When the Anna’s showed up I maintained a 4:1 sugar syrup all winter. When temperatures dropped below the mid 20s I kept the food from freezing with a ball of small Christmas lights. As a few years passed, I observed that there were fewer birds in late winter than in early winter. Two possible reasons for this are that the birds leave and go somewhere else or they do not survive. Because little natural food is available in the winter, I believe it is unlikely that the birds leave. It is important to note that, once you attract hummingbirds for the winter, you must keep it up even if you are out of town or the birds may starve.



Both of my birding books from the 1960s, Peterson’s A Field Guide to Western Birds (1961) and Robbins, Bruun and Zim’s Birds of North America (1966), placed the north end of the range of the Anna’s hummingbird in California. Since that time they have moved north as residents more than 400 miles. According to the National Audubon Society, winter feeding and home gardens have probably supported this movement ( <https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fbirds.audubon.org%2Fbirds%2Fannas-hummingbird&data=02%7C01%7C%7C18e15d95b18b44edaaea08d65b84f213%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636797023882051109&sdata=ZWZORsit6RfUiocOEn3qydaU6RcErROrtwHIKz6hWZs%3D&reserved=0> http://birds.audubon.org/birds/annas-hummingbird).



While sugar syrup may be fine to attract wild hummingbirds during the summer, it is not a sufficient diet for captive hummingbirds or, in my opinion, wild hummingbirds lured by feeding to stay in cold climates north of their native range. While normal winter mortality will cause loss of some birds, I believe the winter diet likely contributes to a reduction in overall fitness. In the near absence of insects and spiders, their primary source of protein and other nutrients is largely missing. Imagine what it would do to our health if we consumed mostly sugar water with just an occasional nutritionally rich food for 3 or 4 months.



In late 2014 I changed my winter feeding program soon after the first frost; a time when I expect the availability of insects and spiders to be greatly reduced. At first I tried to replicate the formula I used as a graduate student but found the ingredients are no longer available. One of the ingredients I did use was baby formula and, consequently, reviewed the nutrients in all of the baby formulas I could find. Eventually I selected Gerber Good Start gentle as my supplement. A key reason for this choice is that whey protein is the first ingredient. Most baby formulas on the shelves at my grocery store use soy protein which is of vegetable rather than animal origin. The formula also contains a good selection of vitamins and other nutrients.



The recipe on the Gerber can calls for “1 unpacked level scoop (8.9g)” per 2 ounces of water. Given the high quantity of sugar needed to maintain body temperature, I was concerned that feeding at this rate would provide too much protein and, consequently, settled on 1 level scoop per 8 ounces of 4:1 sugar syrup. The instructions also say that you can refrigerate for up 24 hours and discard unused formula after 1 hour. While this level of caution may be reasonable for infants, I have not found it to be necessary for hummingbird food. I typically mix up 8 ounces at a time then put 2 ounces in each of two small feeders placed fairly far apart (hummingbirds don’t like to share). The Anna’s hummingbirds which are using my feeders consume this quantity of food in about 3 days. In cold weather there is no sign of spoilage of the food outside. After a week in the refrigerator it still tastes and smells as fresh as when it was made up. As the weather warms up I will probably change the food more often and, when I see insects I will switch back to just sugar water.



At the end of last winter it appeared to me that there were as many Anna’s hummingbirds as at the beginning. This gives me confidence that there isn’t a downside to adding baby formula; it also gives me one subjective data point that the formula I use promotes winter survival. Time will tell whether this pattern continues in the future. At least I can feel confident that I am providing the hummingbirds with a more nutritious diet then they would otherwise be able to obtain, and they will hopefully be healthier coming out of winter.



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Date: 12/15/18 10:03 am
From: Jeff Kozma <jcr_5105...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
It doesn’t make sense to add this to sugar water. Baby formula contains lactose, something birds can’t digest because they don’t drink milk! In humans, lactose intolerance is an uncomfortable and painful condition. Why feed lactose to hummingbirds, regardless of the concentration. Wild birds are free ranging and particularly in western WA are perfectly capable of finding insects during the winter. Even over here in eastern WA, when temps get above 40 F, small flying gnats and other insects are visible in my yard. They can find the protein they need and will survive on sugar water and their stored fat reserves during cold spells.



Jeff Kozma

Yakima



From: Tweeters [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Jill Freidberg
Sent: Tuesday, December 11, 2018 12:06 PM
To: <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds



So I just want to make sure I get this right before I start adding the formula to my feeder.



Mine is heated. With a heated feeder, I should add 2 ounces from the 8 ounce mix of formula/water to the existing mix of 4:1 sugar water and not let it sit in the feeder for longer than 3 days? And the remaining unused formula is good in the fridge for another week?



Thanks!

Jill









On Dec 8, 2018, at 11:27 AM, Rex Takasugi <RexTak...> <mailto:<RexTak...> > wrote:



Subject: Question on winter feeding of hummingbirds



We've been following the advice of Wally Davis for winter hummingbird feeding--thanks for the great information! This year I noticed that the Gerber Good Start Gentle has probiotics included (maybe it was this way before and I didn't notice). Any thoughts on whether Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium could be detrimental for hummingbirds? They shouldn't be pathogenic for the birds, but could provide competition for the hummer's normal flora.



Thanks!

Joyce & Rex





From: <mailto:<tweeters-bounces...> <tweeters-bounces...> [ <mailto:<tweeters-bounces...> mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Wally Davis
Sent: Thursday, January 28, 2016 6:46 AM
To: <mailto:<tweeters...> <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds



Many years ago as a graduate student in zoology at UC Berkeley, I studied hummingbird behavior using both wild and captive birds as subjects. Species I studied included Anna’s (Calypte anna), Black-chin (Archilochus alexandri), Allen’s (Selasphorus sasin), and Rufous (Selasphorus rufus). Most of the time I kept my captive hummingbirds in an 8’ x 8’ by 8’ outdoor enclosure sheathed in window screen.



Rather than feed simple sugar syrup, I fed a mixture containing sugar, vitamin drops, protein, and other nutrients. In addition, I maintained a colony of fruit flies and a couple of times a week would release a large quantity of them into the hummingbird cages. It was amazing to watch the action when the fruit flies were released. All of the hummingbirds took to wing and deftly plucked the fruit flies out of the air or any surface they happened to land on. The fruit flies didn’t stand a chance and were quickly devoured. Using this approach I kept my captive hummingbirds healthy for over a year and even fledged and raised two Allen’s hummingbirds which I collected in order to study learned vs. instinctive feeding behavior.



In 1999 I moved to Snohomish, WA where I put up a bird feeder, hung blocks of suet and, of course, hummingbird feeders. Many Rufous hummingbirds visited from spring to mid-summer and even nested in the shrubs on my property, but I didn’t see my first Anna’s hummingbird until 2011. By 2013 they became year-round residents and were breeding on my property. When the Anna’s showed up I maintained a 4:1 sugar syrup all winter. When temperatures dropped below the mid 20s I kept the food from freezing with a ball of small Christmas lights. As a few years passed, I observed that there were fewer birds in late winter than in early winter. Two possible reasons for this are that the birds leave and go somewhere else or they do not survive. Because little natural food is available in the winter, I believe it is unlikely that the birds leave. It is important to note that, once you attract hummingbirds for the winter, you must keep it up even if you are out of town or the birds may starve.



Both of my birding books from the 1960s, Peterson’s A Field Guide to Western Birds (1961) and Robbins, Bruun and Zim’s Birds of North America (1966), placed the north end of the range of the Anna’s hummingbird in California. Since that time they have moved north as residents more than 400 miles. According to the National Audubon Society, winter feeding and home gardens have probably supported this movement ( <https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fbirds.audubon.org%2Fbirds%2Fannas-hummingbird&data=02%7C01%7C%7C18e15d95b18b44edaaea08d65b84f213%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636797023882051109&sdata=ZWZORsit6RfUiocOEn3qydaU6RcErROrtwHIKz6hWZs%3D&reserved=0> http://birds.audubon.org/birds/annas-hummingbird).



While sugar syrup may be fine to attract wild hummingbirds during the summer, it is not a sufficient diet for captive hummingbirds or, in my opinion, wild hummingbirds lured by feeding to stay in cold climates north of their native range. While normal winter mortality will cause loss of some birds, I believe the winter diet likely contributes to a reduction in overall fitness. In the near absence of insects and spiders, their primary source of protein and other nutrients is largely missing. Imagine what it would do to our health if we consumed mostly sugar water with just an occasional nutritionally rich food for 3 or 4 months.



In late 2014 I changed my winter feeding program soon after the first frost; a time when I expect the availability of insects and spiders to be greatly reduced. At first I tried to replicate the formula I used as a graduate student but found the ingredients are no longer available. One of the ingredients I did use was baby formula and, consequently, reviewed the nutrients in all of the baby formulas I could find. Eventually I selected Gerber Good Start gentle as my supplement. A key reason for this choice is that whey protein is the first ingredient. Most baby formulas on the shelves at my grocery store use soy protein which is of vegetable rather than animal origin. The formula also contains a good selection of vitamins and other nutrients.



The recipe on the Gerber can calls for “1 unpacked level scoop (8.9g)” per 2 ounces of water. Given the high quantity of sugar needed to maintain body temperature, I was concerned that feeding at this rate would provide too much protein and, consequently, settled on 1 level scoop per 8 ounces of 4:1 sugar syrup. The instructions also say that you can refrigerate for up 24 hours and discard unused formula after 1 hour. While this level of caution may be reasonable for infants, I have not found it to be necessary for hummingbird food. I typically mix up 8 ounces at a time then put 2 ounces in each of two small feeders placed fairly far apart (hummingbirds don’t like to share). The Anna’s hummingbirds which are using my feeders consume this quantity of food in about 3 days. In cold weather there is no sign of spoilage of the food outside. After a week in the refrigerator it still tastes and smells as fresh as when it was made up. As the weather warms up I will probably change the food more often and, when I see insects I will switch back to just sugar water.



At the end of last winter it appeared to me that there were as many Anna’s hummingbirds as at the beginning. This gives me confidence that there isn’t a downside to adding baby formula; it also gives me one subjective data point that the formula I use promotes winter survival. Time will tell whether this pattern continues in the future. At least I can feel confident that I am providing the hummingbirds with a more nutritious diet then they would otherwise be able to obtain, and they will hopefully be healthier coming out of winter.



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Date: 12/15/18 8:17 am
From: HAL MICHAEL <ucd880...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Wintering Anna's Hummingbirds... from retired University of Oregon ornithology instructor
Hummingbirds (probably Anna's because of the time of year) have been observed feeding on and around salmon carcasses. It was not determined if they were catching small bugs or eating something derived directly from the carcass. Just another food source they exploit when available.

Hal Michael
<ucd880...>
Olympia WA


> On December 14, 2018 at 11:41 PM Wild Birds Unlimited of Eugene <eugenewbu...> wrote:
>
> This is part 1 of an article, written by Daniel Gleason, retired University of Oregon Field Ornithology instructor, in response to the forwarding of remarks on Tweeters that recently were published.
>
> Anna’s Hummingbirds: Surviving Winter…At one time, Anna’s hummingbirds ranged from northern Baja California north to the San Francisco Bay area. Over the past 100 years, their range began to expand north and east, and they are now found as far north as southern British Columbia and along the coast into southern Alaska. The eastward expansion has taken these birds into western Texas. Northern populations (Oregon and north) have slowly expanded eastward in recent years, and are now found in Boise, Idaho, in winter.
>
> Range Expansion: It is not known for certain all factors that prompt birds’ range expansion but it is thought that, begun, an increase of exotic plants aided the Anna’s Hummingbirds’ expansion. They were already seen year-round in California but much of the land east of California did not have supportive plants and habitat. As white settlers moved into these lands, they planted exotic plants, many which proved attractive to Anna’s Hummingbirds, both in terms of providing nectar as well as attracting insects that the birds could also eat. Much later, it people began to put out and maintain hummingbird feeders.
>
> Food Needed: But, all hummingbirds need more than just nectar to survive. They need proteins and other micronutrients that they get from insects, eggs on plants, and spiders, all an important part of their diet.
>
> People mistakenly assume that insects and spiders are not available during the cold winter months, but that is not the case. Actively flying insects are dramatically reduced during long cold periods, but many other insects can be found, and birds find over-wintering egg masses and larvae. We large humans are not good at noticing such small insects.
>
> Studies of captive Anna’s Hummingbirds show that they can exist on pure sugar water for 10 days, but they show significant weight loss. So more than sugar is needed and these other nutrients come from insects, spiders and their eggs throughout the year.
>
> Recently, in Washington, a couple of individuals have tried adding all manner of unresearched and untested products (baby formula!) to hummingbird feeders. Unless you have conclusive, scientifically-researched, proven data to support the beneficial use of such products, do not use them! If you care about hummingbirds, attempting to provide extra nutrients besides nectar is to possibly put the birds at risk!
>
> Why? Hummingbirds have very tiny bodies and providing even small amounts of micronutrients could be far in excess of what is needed. The quantity of such nutrients (boron, copper, etc.) would have to be measured in 10-thousandths of a gram. To weigh out such a small amount requires an analytical balance costing several thousand dollars—not something you have around home. Such small quantities are easily obtainable in a hummingbird’s daily diet, even in winter’s cold. Proteins are also obtained daily from the insects and spiders. Providing more is completely unnecessary and the excess could put the birds at risk. These products contain food ingredients humming birds would never come in contact with, and could in fact, cause poisoning to the birds due to their tiny bodies being unable to process these substances.
>
> Dan & Barbara Gleason
>
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> <Tweeters...>
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>


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Date: 12/14/18 11:49 pm
From: Wild Birds Unlimited of Eugene <eugenewbu...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Part 2, Wintering Anna's Hummingbirds... from retired University of Oregon ornithology instructor
Part 2 of Dan Gleason's article:

*Anna's Hummingbirds' Movements: *Anna’s Hummingbirds are the only
hummingbirds north of Mexico that do not migrate latitudinally: north to
south. Since they are in various places within their range all year long,
it is easy to assume that the birds at your feeders during the spring and
summer are the same birds you see in the winter. Many studies now show that
that may not be the case: many birds may move about during different parts
of the year. There is much about Anna’s Hummingbirds and their movements
that we still do not know, but it is clear that many populations do have
annual movements, which may vary from population to population. There are
Anna’s Hummingbirds in southern California that move eastward into the
mountains after breeding. Some populations in the central portions of
California may be sedentary, but others may wander to unknown areas.
Migratory movements of birds north of California are largely not
understood; some appear to move eastward and it’s thought that some move to
coastal areas. Aside from whole populations moving, individuals are known
to move to different locations from season to season. So don’t assume that
if the number of hummingbirds at your feeders diminishes over the course of
the winter that it means some birds have died. It is much more likely that
individuals have simply flown off to a different location.



*Activity Changes: *After breeding and after juveniles have fledged, many
people see a decrease in activity at their feeders. From mid to late
summer, this may be in part because there remains an abundance of flowers
and insects available and feeders are less important. But, it could also be
because some of the birds have left your area and moved to a different
location. Birds returning in late summer to fall may actually have bred
elsewhere and have only recently found your feeding station. They may stay
through the winter or they may move elsewhere later.



*Erroneous Assumptions? *Additionally, assuming that cold weather has
killed many Anna’s Hummingbirds is likely an erroneous assumption in most
cases. These are very hardy birds that are able to survive very cold
weather remarkably well. Not many years ago, there was a period of
prolonged sub-freezing temperatures in Eugene, Oregon. There was fear that
many hummingbirds would die from the cold and decreased food supply.
However, just a couple of weeks after the bitter cold ceased, the annual
local Christmas Count found a record number of Anna’s Hummingbirds. So
these birds survived quite well. During cold weather, hummingbirds may
depend on feeders more than at warmer times, but other foods are still
found and relatively few birds are lost.



If you keep your feeder up, fresh with nectar, making sure it does not
freeze in extremely cold weather may be important at that time. Such
conditions are hard for the birds to survive for long periods of time.
Using a heated feeder that keeps the nectar from freezing is often a good
idea in really cold weather. Other ways to be sure your nectar doesn't
freeze include having two feeders on hand then swapping them before dawn
works, thawing nectar each morning and replacing it before putting a thawed
feeder out, putting a heating device near the feeder, like a shop light or
Christmas lights, are all known strategies for making sure the nectar
doesn't freeze. There is even a hummingbird feeder heater called the *Hummer
Hearth*, designed and made by a retired Northwest engineer that keeps the
nectar from freezing.



Enjoy the hummingbirds that come to your yard, but do not mistakenly think
your knowledge or ideas are superior to Mother Nature’s, when she has made
sure that hummingbirds have expanded their range without much help from
well-meaning but misguided humans.



Dan & Barbara Gleason

<eugenewbu...>

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Date: 12/14/18 11:44 pm
From: Wild Birds Unlimited of Eugene <eugenewbu...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Wintering Anna's Hummingbirds... from retired University of Oregon ornithology instructor
This is part 1 of an article, written by Daniel Gleason, retired University
of Oregon Field Ornithology instructor, in response to the forwarding of
remarks on Tweeters that recently were published.



*Anna’s Hummingbirds: Surviving Winter*…At one time, Anna’s hummingbirds
ranged from northern Baja California north to the San Francisco Bay area.
Over the past 100 years, their range began to expand north and east, and
they are now found as far north as southern British Columbia and along the
coast into southern Alaska. The eastward expansion has taken these birds
into western Texas. Northern populations (Oregon and north) have slowly
expanded eastward in recent years, and are now found in Boise, Idaho, in
winter.



*Range Expansion:* It is not known for certain all factors that prompt
birds’ range expansion but it is thought that, begun, an increase of exotic
plants aided the Anna’s Hummingbirds’ expansion. They were already seen
year-round in California but much of the land east of California did not
have supportive plants and habitat. As white settlers moved into these
lands, they planted exotic plants, many which proved attractive to Anna’s
Hummingbirds, both in terms of providing nectar as well as attracting
insects that the birds could also eat. Much later, it people began to put
out and maintain hummingbird feeders.



*Food Needed:* But, all hummingbirds need more than just nectar to survive.
They need proteins and other micronutrients that they get from insects,
eggs on plants, and spiders, all an important part of their diet.



People mistakenly assume that insects and spiders are not available during
the cold winter months, but that is *not* the case. Actively *flying* insects
are dramatically reduced during long cold periods, but many other insects
can be found, and birds find over-wintering egg masses and larvae. We large
humans are not good at noticing such small insects.



Studies of captive Anna’s Hummingbirds show that they can exist on pure
sugar water for 10 days, but they show significant weight loss. So more
than sugar is needed and these other nutrients come from insects, spiders
and their eggs throughout the year.



Recently, in Washington, a couple of individuals have tried adding all
manner of unresearched and untested products (baby formula!) to hummingbird
feeders. Unless you have conclusive, scientifically-researched, proven data
to support the beneficial use of such products, do not use them!* If you
care about hummingbirds, attempting to provide extra nutrients besides
nectar is to possibly put the birds at risk!*



Why? Hummingbirds have very tiny bodies and providing even small amounts of
micronutrients could be far in excess of what is needed. The quantity of
such nutrients (boron, copper, etc.) would have to be measured in
10-thousandths of a gram. To weigh out such a small amount requires an
analytical balance costing several thousand dollars—not something you have
around home. Such small quantities are easily obtainable in a hummingbird’s
daily diet, even in winter’s cold. Proteins are also obtained daily from
the insects and spiders. Providing more is completely unnecessary and the
excess could put the birds at risk. These products contain food ingredients
humming birds would never come in contact with, and could in fact, cause
poisoning to the birds due to their tiny bodies being unable to process
these substances.

Dan & Barbara Gleason

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Date: 12/14/18 9:26 pm
From: Scott Ramos <lsr...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Magnuson Park, 14 December 2018
Fortunately, the forecast winds did not arrive until late in the day, so the morning was actually pleasant for this time of year, 40 F to start, overcast and just slight breezes. The ponds are now mostly full but the ducks seem to be avoiding them, opting instead for the lake. On the other hand, the resident beaver(s) have been very active recently, cutting down some fairly large trees, then cutting them into smaller pieces for transport to their lodge. We’re into winter birds, for the most part, although the scaup have yet to return. Birds of note:

Cackling Goose - cacklers are only infrequent visitors to Magnuson but a couple have joined the resident flock of Canadas for the last couple of weeks, one of each of the expected sub-species:
Minima - https://goo.gl/9bEkJa
Taverner’s - https://goo.gl/eYp6Am
Eurasian Wigeon - one calling before dawn in the large AMWI flock; surprisingly, first of year for me
Red-breasted Merganser - 3 birds; another species uncommon at the park
Grebes - a dozen Pied-billed, NO Horned, a single Red-necked and about 400 Western, these were out in the middle of the lake in one long flock
Wilson’s Snipe - several, calling early from the meadows
Herring Gull - one on the swim platform with the typical dozens of Mews
Cooper’s Hawk - one immature and both female and male adults
Red-tailed Hawk - perched, early, on one of the light poles
Hermit Thrush - calling early from the meadows
Most active birds: a large mixed flock of dozens each of American Robin, Cedar Waxwing and European Starling were in the north end, between the dog run and Kite Hill

For the day, 50 species.
Scott Ramos
Seattle


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Date: 12/14/18 9:01 pm
From: Ed Swan <edswan2...>
Subject: [Tweeters] need help for boat CBC count of Quartermaster Harbor, Vashon Island, Sunday December 30

Hi all, if anyone is interested in joining us on the MV Vashona, a very comfortable boat of Mosquito fleet vintage, we could use the help of someone who would like to bird and take down the numbers as spotters call out species and numbers.  This would be for Sunday the 30th from about 8:30am to 1pm.  You would have to catch the 7:35 ferry from Fauntleroy, the 7:35 ferry from Pt. Defiance or the 7:40 ferry from Southworth.  It would be possible to carpool with me, I’ll be catching the Fauntleroy boat.  I’ll be staying to cover a land based territory in the afternoon where more help is welcome or one could return on an afternoon ferry to the mainland.
 We generally see 45-55 species including three loon, four grebe, three cormorant and several waterfowl, shorebird, alcid, gull and raptor species in the Quartermaster Harbor section of the count.  We’ll definitely see Eared Grebes and probably Black Scoters for those working on their King Co. list. 
Ed
 Ed Swan
Nature writer and guide
www.theswancompany.com
<edswan2...>
206.949.3545


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Date: 12/14/18 6:02 pm
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
I mentioned seeing hummingbirds feeding on small flying insects at the Edmonds marsh after a cold snap.  Today I noticed both live and dead small flying insects in my hummingbird feeders as I was cleaning and refilling them.   I have no concern that winter hummers in my backyard are finding adequate protein without my help.

Scroll down page 17 for photos.
http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum/index.php?threads/wildlife-of-edmonds-wa-2018.16307/page-17

Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA

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Date: 12/14/18 5:42 pm
From: Diane Yorgason-Quinn <avosetta...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Unusual sighting in Tacoma
It must be winter! I'll start looking for Harlequins now, too. We sometimes get them in the winter near the Purdy spit, but it's still an occasion when we do!

I don't understand all these people who go south in the winter. That's when a lot of the good birds show up here.

Christmas Bird Count tomorrow.

Diane

________________________________
From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> on behalf of Max Warner <maxcamf4...>
Sent: Friday, December 14, 2018 5:19 PM
To: <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Unusual sighting in Tacoma

This afternoon observed male Harlequin Duck foraging close to shore in company with Barrows Golden eyes just east of Silver Cloud Hotel on Ruston way. Photo confirmed.

Also noted small group of red-necked mergansers offshore in vicinity of Pt. Ruston Ferryboat/office.

Max Warner

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Date: 12/14/18 5:21 pm
From: Max Warner <maxcamf4...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Unusual sighting in Tacoma
This afternoon observed male Harlequin Duck foraging close to shore in
company with Barrows Golden eyes just east of Silver Cloud Hotel on Ruston
way. Photo confirmed.

Also noted small group of red-necked mergansers offshore in vicinity of Pt.
Ruston Ferryboat/office.

Max Warner

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Date: 12/14/18 1:17 pm
From: Jeremy Schwartz <jschwartz1124...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Storm Wigeon in Bothell, North Creek area
Hello Tweeters!

During a lunch walk in the North Creek area, a colleague of mine and I saw
a "Storm" variant of a male American Wigeon. He was spotted with another
male and one female on the small pond near the Residence Inn at the
intersection of 120th Ave and NE 195th. I snagged a photo and added it my
eBird checklist for the walk:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50660296

Keep watching the skies (and the ponds)!

Jeremy
Lake Forest Park
jschwartz1124 at gmail dot com

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Date: 12/14/18 12:45 pm
From: Michelle Maani <lamoustique...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
When I go walking out in the wildlife refuges in the area, where there are no feeders, I sometimes see Anna's hummingbirds in winter. I think their northward migration may have to do with other factors than feeders.  Perhaps climate change has made the insects they feed on more available to them. When the sun hits just right outside my window (which abuts the Salmon Creek greenbelt) I can see lots of little insects flying around even in the dead of winter. Most of the time they are too small to see with the naked eye.  Their flight patterns make it clear that they are not dust motes...and the fact that they are caught in spider webs.I would hesitate to put something with mammalian proteins or probiotics into a hummingbird feeder. Whey comes from milk.  I do not know how well a hummingbird's digestive system reacts to whey, or what the long-term effects of adding a protein  made to feed a mammal to a hummingbird's diet may be.
Michelle MaaniSalmon CreekVancouver, Washington

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Date: 12/14/18 9:53 am
From: Vicki Biltz <vickibiltz...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
The only data Wally actually gives, is his own experience with captive
birds. I do believe that Anna’s increase partially because of human
intervention, but no one has mentioned anything about global warming
attributing to this situation.
I see NO endorsement from any legitimate scientist, or Audubon, or
Cornell, validating your conclusions on feeding additional food. You cite
an article you wrote. That doesn’t mean you were correct. Who knows what
type of long term affects does this have on a wild population.
This is a dangerous game, playing the Flim Flam man. It’s it’s not broken,
why fix it?
Vicki Biltz....(my blood is boiling at the moment, so I’m going to resist
reading any of Wally’s arguments now.)

On Thu, Dec 13, 2018 at 6:15 PM Kenneth Brown <kenbrownpls...>
wrote:

> Perhaps I missed something, where do I find an article you wrote citing a
> study conducted by Audubon or specific books?
>
>
> On December 13, 2018 at 4:30 PM <wallydavis3...> wrote:
>
> Please go back and re read my article. I cited both Audubon and bird
> books.
>
>
>
> *From:* Kenneth Brown <kenbrownpls...>
> *Sent:* Thursday, December 13, 2018 4:28 PM
> *To:* <wallydavis3...>; Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...>;
> Tweeters <tweeters...>
> *Subject:* Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
>
>
>
> Is there a study to back up your assertion? Assuming that you are correct
> about Anna's range having moved 500 miles north, how do you know is a
> result of artificial feeding? Is that why California Scrub-jays range has
> expanded too?
>
>
> On December 13, 2018 at 4:08 PM <wallydavis3...> wrote:
>
> We’ll have to agree to disagree Michael. Anna’s hummingbirds have spread
> more than 500 miles north of their native range as a result of artificial
> feeding. I raised hummingbirds to adulthood from before they fledged by
> hand feeding and maintained birds alive in captivity for more than a year.
> I did this using an artificial diet that included baby formula. In
> developing what I used, I consulted with the San Diego zoo and even
> provided them with numerous birds of several species. While some early
> insects might come out in late winter, there certainly isn’t enough nectar
> available to maintain the birds. If everyone quit winter feeding it is
> likely that the north end of the range of Anna’s would move 500 miles
> south. I haven’t been seeing seasonal decreases at my feeders.
>
>
>
> Wally Davis,
>
> Snohomish
>
>
>
> *From:* Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> *On Behalf
> Of *Michael Hobbs
> *Sent:* Thursday, December 13, 2018 1:25 PM
> *To:* Tweeters <tweeters...>
> *Subject:* Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
>
>
>
> Another thing to remember is that Anna's Hummingbirds begin to nest very
> early. I've seen a female gathering nest materials in early February, and
> have seen several active nests in early March.
>
>
>
> They wouldn't be nesting so early if there wasn't good food to eat.
>
>
>
> Also, there's no reason to believe that seasonal decreases in feeder use
> are caused by population decreases. Breeding will change daily routines
> significantly. Also, early season natural food sources may be appearing -
> blooming non-native plants, hatching insects - and it would be unsurprising
> if the Anna's wouldn't take a bit of a break from feeders if there's other
> food available.
>
>
>
> I'd be very reluctant to put more than just sugar into hummingbird
> feeders. My feeling is that the chance of the juice "going bad" would be
> far greater than the chance you'd actually be supplying critical nutrients.
>
>
>
> - Michael Hobbs, Kirkland
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
>
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
--



<vickibiltz...>
http://www.flickr.com/photos/saw-whets_new/

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Date: 12/14/18 9:50 am
From: Allison Reak <areak823...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
Feeding diluted whey protein with live bacteria and yeast to a hummingbird
is an experiment to which one can never know the answer because you (in
general, not personally directed) aren't looking for a result, you're just
doing something that makes you feel good. Why would whey--a long-chained
dairy protein that is difficult for humans to digest--be OK for hummingbirds
that have no adaptation to digesting milk or milk proteins? Why would live
bacteria species found in human guts (aka probiotics) be beneficial to
animals that have evolved a different digestive system? How would
hummingbirds become adapted to digest a "probiotic" fungus that ferments
grains, if they never eat fresh or fermented grain?

Hopefully, a dilute solution of human food mixed with sugar water and good
intentions will cause no harm. However, you will never know how those
additives affected their kidney or liver functions, or un-balanced their
intestinal flora and fauna, leading to a shortened life span and pre-mature
death. Aren't these the same concerns that have prompted people to stop
adding red dye to their feeders?

Another way to consider the adulterated nectar feeding experiment is this:
If my infant daughter were hungry, would I mix up a supplemental liquid of
sugar water and ground-up spiders as a quick snack? Maybe add some wild
bacteria from the bird bath? It's perfect for hummingbirds, so it must be
good for humans, right? And if she doesn't die from regular doses of the
concoction, does that mean it's beneficial? But alas, unlike a hummingbird,
an infant can't fly herself 100 miles a day to find a warmer zone with
better food sources.

Allison Reak



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Date: 12/14/18 7:37 am
From: HAL MICHAEL <ucd880...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
My second edition Peterson's Western Birds (1961) mentions that Anna's had nested in BC and that some birds were noted north of California so they were moving north in the 50s.




Hal Michael
Science Outreach Director, Sustainable Fisheries Foundation
Olympia WA
360-459-4005
360-791-7702 (C)
<ucd880...>

> On December 13, 2018 at 10:22 PM Rick Taylor <taylorrl...> wrote:
>
>
> All,
>
>
>
> Here is some local data on Anna’s Hummingbirds populations from the Edmond’s CBC. The Edmonds CBC has been run annually since 1984. There were NO observations until 1998 when one was observed during count week. In 2017 we counted 249 Anna’s Hummingbirds. Data by year is below:
>
> 1998 - 1
>
> 1999 - 3
>
> 2000 - 6
>
> 2001 - 7
>
> 2002 - 5
>
> 2003 - 17
>
> 2004 - 8
>
> 2005 - 19
>
> 2006 - 49
>
> 2007 - 22
>
> 2008 - 28
>
> 2009 - 31
>
> 2010 - 40
>
> 2011 - 91
>
> 2012 - 77
>
> 2013 - 133
>
> 2014 - 134
>
> 2015 - 167
>
> 2016 - 161
>
> 2017 - 249
>
>
>
> The growth in numbers seems to indicated that they are making it through the winters just fine.
>
>
>
> Rick
>
>
>
> Rick Taylor
>
> Everett, WA
>
>
>
> From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of Mark Myers
> Sent: Thursday, December 13, 2018 1:01 PM
> To: <tweeters...>
> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
>
>
>
> I just wanted to chime in on this conversation since some of the ideas being floated here are concerning.
>
> Most important, to believe that the survival of our regional Anna's hummingbirds (or any bird species) in the winter is dependent upon humans offering/maintaining feeders is very flawed. Where is the evidence to support that belief? As was mentioned in a response posted today, many birds, including hummers, glean small inverts from seemingly bare trees and plants. If you just watch your kinglets and creepers, they expend a lot of energy working the branches and trunks of trees in search of food. They wouldn't do that if they weren't finding inverts. Us humans can't see those inverts, but birds have pretty good search images.
>
> The reality is that hummers are equally adept at finding food in the absence of feeders. If they don't, they will perish, but that's true for all animals.
>
> I've been banding Anna's (and other hummers) for many years in our region, during all seasons. I've never experienced a hummer that is in poor body weight or condition even in the middle of winter. And, I routinely recapture birds that I banded at my house years ago. And, my feeders go dry on a regular basis when I travel.
>
> I realize hummers bring out strong emotions in those of us that watch them and feed them. But, they are probably one of the hardiest of birds. If our feeders run dry, they will not die (it's possible some may travel elsewhere to find food, but their absence doesn't mean they're dead...).
>
> There have been questions as to whether offering probiotics or Gerber supplements may be harmful to wild hummers. My answer: if you can't answer that question with 100% certainty, DON'T OFFER probiotics or Gerber supplements in the nectar. I can say with 100% certainty that if you don't offer them, the birds won't be harmed.
>
> My 2+ cents.
>
>
>
> Mark Myers,
>
> Bothell, WA
>
>
>




> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>




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Date: 12/13/18 10:25 pm
From: Rick Taylor <taylorrl...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
All,

Here is some local data on Anna’s Hummingbirds populations from the Edmond’s CBC. The Edmonds CBC has been run annually since 1984. There were NO observations until 1998 when one was observed during count week. In 2017 we counted 249 Anna’s Hummingbirds. Data by year is below:
1998 - 1
1999 - 3
2000 - 6
2001 - 7
2002 - 5
2003 - 17
2004 - 8
2005 - 19
2006 - 49
2007 - 22
2008 - 28
2009 - 31
2010 - 40
2011 - 91
2012 - 77
2013 - 133
2014 - 134
2015 - 167
2016 - 161
2017 - 249

The growth in numbers seems to indicated that they are making it through the winters just fine.

Rick

Rick Taylor
Everett, WA

From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of Mark Myers
Sent: Thursday, December 13, 2018 1:01 PM
To: <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds

I just wanted to chime in on this conversation since some of the ideas being floated here are concerning.
Most important, to believe that the survival of our regional Anna's hummingbirds (or any bird species) in the winter is dependent upon humans offering/maintaining feeders is very flawed. Where is the evidence to support that belief? As was mentioned in a response posted today, many birds, including hummers, glean small inverts from seemingly bare trees and plants. If you just watch your kinglets and creepers, they expend a lot of energy working the branches and trunks of trees in search of food. They wouldn't do that if they weren't finding inverts. Us humans can't see those inverts, but birds have pretty good search images.
The reality is that hummers are equally adept at finding food in the absence of feeders. If they don't, they will perish, but that's true for all animals.
I've been banding Anna's (and other hummers) for many years in our region, during all seasons. I've never experienced a hummer that is in poor body weight or condition even in the middle of winter. And, I routinely recapture birds that I banded at my house years ago. And, my feeders go dry on a regular basis when I travel.
I realize hummers bring out strong emotions in those of us that watch them and feed them. But, they are probably one of the hardiest of birds. If our feeders run dry, they will not die (it's possible some may travel elsewhere to find food, but their absence doesn't mean they're dead...).
There have been questions as to whether offering probiotics or Gerber supplements may be harmful to wild hummers. My answer: if you can't answer that question with 100% certainty, DON'T OFFER probiotics or Gerber supplements in the nectar. I can say with 100% certainty that if you don't offer them, the birds won't be harmed.
My 2+ cents.

Mark Myers,
Bothell, WA

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Date: 12/13/18 6:17 pm
From: Kenneth Brown <kenbrownpls...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
Perhaps I missed something, where do I find an article you wrote citing a study conducted by Audubon or specific books?


> On December 13, 2018 at 4:30 PM <wallydavis3...> wrote:
>
>
> Please go back and re read my article. I cited both Audubon and bird books.
>
>
>
> From: Kenneth Brown <kenbrownpls...>
> Sent: Thursday, December 13, 2018 4:28 PM
> To: <wallydavis3...>; Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...>; Tweeters <tweeters...>
> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
>
>
>
> Is there a study to back up your assertion? Assuming that you are correct about Anna's range having moved 500 miles north, how do you know is a result of artificial feeding? Is that why California Scrub-jays range has expanded too?
>
>
>
> > >
> > On December 13, 2018 at 4:08 PM <wallydavis3...> mailto:<wallydavis3...> wrote:
> >
> > We’ll have to agree to disagree Michael. Anna’s hummingbirds have spread more than 500 miles north of their native range as a result of artificial feeding. I raised hummingbirds to adulthood from before they fledged by hand feeding and maintained birds alive in captivity for more than a year. I did this using an artificial diet that included baby formula. In developing what I used, I consulted with the San Diego zoo and even provided them with numerous birds of several species. While some early insects might come out in late winter, there certainly isn’t enough nectar available to maintain the birds. If everyone quit winter feeding it is likely that the north end of the range of Anna’s would move 500 miles south. I haven’t been seeing seasonal decreases at my feeders.
> >
> >
> >
> > Wally Davis,
> >
> > Snohomish
> >
> >
> >
> > From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> mailto:<tweeters-bounces...> > On Behalf Of Michael Hobbs
> > Sent: Thursday, December 13, 2018 1:25 PM
> > To: Tweeters <tweeters...> mailto:<tweeters...> >
> > Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
> >
> >
> >
> > Another thing to remember is that Anna's Hummingbirds begin to nest very early. I've seen a female gathering nest materials in early February, and have seen several active nests in early March.
> >
> >
> >
> > They wouldn't be nesting so early if there wasn't good food to eat.
> >
> >
> >
> > Also, there's no reason to believe that seasonal decreases in feeder use are caused by population decreases. Breeding will change daily routines significantly. Also, early season natural food sources may be appearing - blooming non-native plants, hatching insects - and it would be unsurprising if the Anna's wouldn't take a bit of a break from feeders if there's other food available.
> >
> >
> >
> > I'd be very reluctant to put more than just sugar into hummingbird feeders. My feeling is that the chance of the juice "going bad" would be far greater than the chance you'd actually be supplying critical nutrients.
> >
> >
> >
> > - Michael Hobbs, Kirkland
> >
> > >
>
>
>
> > >
> > _______________________________________________
> > Tweeters mailing list
> > <Tweeters...> mailto:<Tweeters...>
> > http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
> >
> > >
>
>
>


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Date: 12/13/18 5:41 pm
From: Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2018-12-13
Well, there have to be a few bad weeks to make the rest of birding look good. Today was dark, damp, and devoid of birds, though things picked up a little at the end.

Highlights?
a.. Greater White-fronted Goose – two with one of the many flocks of Cacklers
b.. Ring-necked Pheasant – Lonesome George the 2nd in Pea Patch again
c.. Mew Gull – probably close to 100, all seen in flight
d.. Green Heron - Brian saw one a the Rowing Club
e.. Cooper’s Hawk – 2-3 sightings, probably all the same juvenile
f.. Hairy Woodpecker – one female at Rowing Club
g.. NORTHERN SHRIKE – continuing adult, NE of Viewing Mound
h.. Purple Finch – one male south of windmill
i.. Pine Siskin – a dozen at the Rowing Club
j.. American Goldfinch – ditto
All of those highlights came from the East Meadow and after...

Mammals included a BEAVER from the Lake Platform and a River Otter in the Rowing Club pond.

Misses today included Green-winged Teal, Ring-necked Duck, Wilson’s Snipe, Ring-billed Gull, Brown Creeper, Lincoln’s Sparrow, and Red-winged Blackbird. Those were almost joined by NORTHERN FLICKER, not seen until our way out of the Rowing Club.

I’ll be back Saturday morning for the Eastside Audubon CBC, so maybe the week list will improve. Until then, it’s at 52 species today (which included “Pinwidgeons” – a flock of American Wigeon and/or Northern Pintail).

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== <BirdMarymoor...>
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Date: 12/13/18 5:40 pm
From: Jeff Kozma <jcr_5105...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
Great information Charles and Mark. Thank you. I also wanted to point out that Baby formula contains lactose, something birds can’t digest because they don’t drink milk and don’t’ have the enzymes/bacteria in their gut to process it and break it down. In humans, lactose intolerance is an uncomfortable and painful condition. Why feed something containing lactose to hummingbirds, regardless of the concentration, when it has the potential to harm them. Wild birds are free ranging and particularly in western WA are perfectly capable of finding insects during the winter. Even over here in eastern WA, when temps get above 40 F, small flying gnats and other insects are visible in my yard. They can find the protein they need and will survive on sugar water and their stored fat reserves during cold spells.



A version of this post might show again. Apparently my last one was too long because it had everyone’s previous posts on it and awaits moderator approval. Sorry if it shows up again.



Jeff Kozma

Yakima





From: Tweeters [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of creinsch
Sent: Thursday, December 13, 2018 4:57 PM
To: <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds



Mark,

I wanted to thank you for writing this. I had very similar concerns. In the past, the folks at HUMNET, including banders, ornithologists and biologists, have consistently advised against mixing supplements of any kind into feeder nectar to be offered wild birds. Rehab facilities that know how to administer and use supplements may have valid reasons to use them with captive or injured birds, but the average person with a home feeder has no reason to.

As to the "evidence" that it does not harm the population of wild birds, it all appears to be anecdotal: "At the end of last winter it appeared to me that there were as many Anna's hummingbirds as at the beginning." Unless the birds are banded and recaptured, it is absurd to think they are the same birds.

In my experience most people, at least in the Seattle area, assume that all hummingbirds are migratory, and are surprised to learn that some are resident. Which is to say they take their feeders down in the winter when they think the birds have left. I've even read some bizarre advice that one should take the feeder down in the winter, so that the hummer is not persuaded to overstay. This is nuts. Instinct is much more persuasive than sugar water.

Charles Reinsch
Seattle

On 12/13/2018 1:01 PM, Mark Myers wrote:

I just wanted to chime in on this conversation since some of the ideas being floated here are concerning.

Most important, to believe that the survival of our regional Anna's hummingbirds (or any bird species) in the winter is dependent upon humans offering/maintaining feeders is very flawed. Where is the evidence to support that belief? As was mentioned in a response posted today, many birds, including hummers, glean small inverts from seemingly bare trees and plants. If you just watch your kinglets and creepers, they expend a lot of energy working the branches and trunks of trees in search of food. They wouldn't do that if they weren't finding inverts. Us humans can't see those inverts, but birds have pretty good search images.

The reality is that hummers are equally adept at finding food in the absence of feeders. If they don't, they will perish, but that's true for all animals.

I've been banding Anna's (and other hummers) for many years in our region, during all seasons. I've never experienced a hummer that is in poor body weight or condition even in the middle of winter. And, I routinely recapture birds that I banded at my house years ago. And, my feeders go dry on a regular basis when I travel.

I realize hummers bring out strong emotions in those of us that watch them and feed them. But, they are probably one of the hardiest of birds. If our feeders run dry, they will not die (it's possible some may travel elsewhere to find food, but their absence doesn't mean they're dead...).

There have been questions as to whether offering probiotics or Gerber supplements may be harmful to wild hummers. My answer: if you can't answer that question with 100% certainty, DON'T OFFER probiotics or Gerber supplements in the nectar. I can say with 100% certainty that if you don't offer them, the birds won't be harmed.

My 2+ cents.



Mark Myers,

Bothell, WA








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Date: 12/13/18 4:59 pm
From: creinsch <creinsch...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
Mark,

I wanted to thank you for writing this.  I had very similar concerns. 
In the past, the folks at HUMNET, including banders, ornithologists and
biologists, have consistently advised against mixing supplements of any
kind into feeder nectar to be offered wild birds.  Rehab facilities that
know how to administer and use supplements may have valid reasons to use
them with captive or injured birds, but the average person with a home
feeder has no reason to.

As to the "evidence" that it does not harm the population of wild birds,
it all appears to be anecdotal: "At the end of last winter it appeared
to me that there were as many Anna's hummingbirds as at the beginning." 
Unless the birds are banded and recaptured, it is absurd to think they
are the same birds.

In my experience most people, at least in the Seattle area, assume that
all hummingbirds are migratory, and are surprised to learn that some are
resident.  Which is to say they take their feeders down in the winter
when they think the birds have left.  I've even read some bizarre advice
that one should take the feeder down in the winter, so that the hummer
is not persuaded to overstay.  This is nuts.  Instinct is much more
persuasive than sugar water.

Charles Reinsch
Seattle

On 12/13/2018 1:01 PM, Mark Myers wrote:
> I just wanted to chime in on this conversation since some of the ideas
> being floated here are concerning.
> Most important, to believe that the survival of our regional Anna's
> hummingbirds (or any bird species) in the winter is dependent upon
> humans offering/maintaining feeders is very flawed. Where is the
> evidence to support that belief? As was mentioned in a response posted
> today, many birds, including hummers, glean small inverts from
> seemingly bare trees and plants.  If you just watch your kinglets and
> creepers, they expend a lot of energy working the branches and trunks
> of trees in search of food.  They wouldn't do that if they weren't
> finding inverts.  Us humans can't see those inverts, but birds have
> pretty good search images.
> The reality is that hummers are equally adept at finding food in the
> absence of feeders.  If they don't, they will perish, but that's true
> for all animals.
> I've been banding Anna's (and other hummers) for many years in our
> region, during all seasons.  I've never experienced a hummer that is
> in poor body weight or condition even in the middle of winter.  And, I
> routinely recapture birds that I banded at my house years ago.  And,
> my feeders go dry on a regular basis when I travel.
> I realize hummers bring out strong emotions in those of us that watch
> them and feed them.  But, they are probably one of the hardiest of
> birds.  If our feeders run dry, they will not die (it's possible some
> may travel elsewhere to find food, but their absence doesn't mean
> they're dead...).
> There have been questions as to whether offering probiotics or Gerber
> supplements may be harmful to wild hummers.  My answer: if you can't
> answer that question with 100% certainty, DON'T OFFER probiotics or
> Gerber supplements in the nectar.  I can say with 100% certainty that
> if you don't offer them, the birds won't be harmed.
> My 2+ cents.
>
> Mark Myers,
> Bothell, WA
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters


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Date: 12/13/18 4:33 pm
From: <wallydavis3...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
Please go back and re read my article. I cited both Audubon and bird books.



From: Kenneth Brown <kenbrownpls...>
Sent: Thursday, December 13, 2018 4:28 PM
To: <wallydavis3...>; Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...>; Tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds



Is there a study to back up your assertion? Assuming that you are correct about Anna's range having moved 500 miles north, how do you know is a result of artificial feeding? Is that why California Scrub-jays range has expanded too?




On December 13, 2018 at 4:08 PM <wallydavis3...> <mailto:<wallydavis3...> wrote:

We’ll have to agree to disagree Michael. Anna’s hummingbirds have spread more than 500 miles north of their native range as a result of artificial feeding. I raised hummingbirds to adulthood from before they fledged by hand feeding and maintained birds alive in captivity for more than a year. I did this using an artificial diet that included baby formula. In developing what I used, I consulted with the San Diego zoo and even provided them with numerous birds of several species. While some early insects might come out in late winter, there certainly isn’t enough nectar available to maintain the birds. If everyone quit winter feeding it is likely that the north end of the range of Anna’s would move 500 miles south. I haven’t been seeing seasonal decreases at my feeders.



Wally Davis,

Snohomish



From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> <mailto:<tweeters-bounces...> > On Behalf Of Michael Hobbs
Sent: Thursday, December 13, 2018 1:25 PM
To: Tweeters <tweeters...> <mailto:<tweeters...> >
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds



Another thing to remember is that Anna's Hummingbirds begin to nest very early. I've seen a female gathering nest materials in early February, and have seen several active nests in early March.



They wouldn't be nesting so early if there wasn't good food to eat.



Also, there's no reason to believe that seasonal decreases in feeder use are caused by population decreases. Breeding will change daily routines significantly. Also, early season natural food sources may be appearing - blooming non-native plants, hatching insects - and it would be unsurprising if the Anna's wouldn't take a bit of a break from feeders if there's other food available.



I'd be very reluctant to put more than just sugar into hummingbird feeders. My feeling is that the chance of the juice "going bad" would be far greater than the chance you'd actually be supplying critical nutrients.



- Michael Hobbs, Kirkland




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<Tweeters...> <mailto:<Tweeters...>
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Date: 12/13/18 4:31 pm
From: Kenneth Brown <kenbrownpls...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
Is there a study to back up your assertion? Assuming that you are correct about Anna's range having moved 500 miles north, how do you know is a result of artificial feeding? Is that why California Scrub-jays range has expanded too?


> On December 13, 2018 at 4:08 PM <wallydavis3...> wrote:
>
>
> We’ll have to agree to disagree Michael. Anna’s hummingbirds have spread more than 500 miles north of their native range as a result of artificial feeding. I raised hummingbirds to adulthood from before they fledged by hand feeding and maintained birds alive in captivity for more than a year. I did this using an artificial diet that included baby formula. In developing what I used, I consulted with the San Diego zoo and even provided them with numerous birds of several species. While some early insects might come out in late winter, there certainly isn’t enough nectar available to maintain the birds. If everyone quit winter feeding it is likely that the north end of the range of Anna’s would move 500 miles south. I haven’t been seeing seasonal decreases at my feeders.
>
>
>
> Wally Davis,
>
> Snohomish
>
>
>
> From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of Michael Hobbs
> Sent: Thursday, December 13, 2018 1:25 PM
> To: Tweeters <tweeters...>
> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
>
>
>
> Another thing to remember is that Anna's Hummingbirds begin to nest very early. I've seen a female gathering nest materials in early February, and have seen several active nests in early March.
>
>
>
> They wouldn't be nesting so early if there wasn't good food to eat.
>
>
>
> Also, there's no reason to believe that seasonal decreases in feeder use are caused by population decreases. Breeding will change daily routines significantly. Also, early season natural food sources may be appearing - blooming non-native plants, hatching insects - and it would be unsurprising if the Anna's wouldn't take a bit of a break from feeders if there's other food available.
>
>
>
> I'd be very reluctant to put more than just sugar into hummingbird feeders. My feeling is that the chance of the juice "going bad" would be far greater than the chance you'd actually be supplying critical nutrients.
>
>
>
> - Michael Hobbs, Kirkland
>


> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>


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Date: 12/13/18 4:20 pm
From: <wallydavis3...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
As I cited in my “Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds”, there is very strong evidence that existence of Anna’s hummingbirds in both Oregon and Washington is a direct result of human feeding. Both the advancing range and Audubon support this.



Wally Davis,

Snohomish



From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of Mark Myers
Sent: Thursday, December 13, 2018 1:01 PM
To: <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds



I just wanted to chime in on this conversation since some of the ideas being floated here are concerning.

Most important, to believe that the survival of our regional Anna's hummingbirds (or any bird species) in the winter is dependent upon humans offering/maintaining feeders is very flawed. Where is the evidence to support that belief? As was mentioned in a response posted today, many birds, including hummers, glean small inverts from seemingly bare trees and plants. If you just watch your kinglets and creepers, they expend a lot of energy working the branches and trunks of trees in search of food. They wouldn't do that if they weren't finding inverts. Us humans can't see those inverts, but birds have pretty good search images.

The reality is that hummers are equally adept at finding food in the absence of feeders. If they don't, they will perish, but that's true for all animals.

I've been banding Anna's (and other hummers) for many years in our region, during all seasons. I've never experienced a hummer that is in poor body weight or condition even in the middle of winter. And, I routinely recapture birds that I banded at my house years ago. And, my feeders go dry on a regular basis when I travel.

I realize hummers bring out strong emotions in those of us that watch them and feed them. But, they are probably one of the hardiest of birds. If our feeders run dry, they will not die (it's possible some may travel elsewhere to find food, but their absence doesn't mean they're dead...).

There have been questions as to whether offering probiotics or Gerber supplements may be harmful to wild hummers. My answer: if you can't answer that question with 100% certainty, DON'T OFFER probiotics or Gerber supplements in the nectar. I can say with 100% certainty that if you don't offer them, the birds won't be harmed.

My 2+ cents.



Mark Myers,

Bothell, WA




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Date: 12/13/18 4:17 pm
From: <wallydavis3...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
We’ll have to agree to disagree Michael. Anna’s hummingbirds have spread more than 500 miles north of their native range as a result of artificial feeding. I raised hummingbirds to adulthood from before they fledged by hand feeding and maintained birds alive in captivity for more than a year. I did this using an artificial diet that included baby formula. In developing what I used, I consulted with the San Diego zoo and even provided them with numerous birds of several species. While some early insects might come out in late winter, there certainly isn’t enough nectar available to maintain the birds. If everyone quit winter feeding it is likely that the north end of the range of Anna’s would move 500 miles south. I haven’t been seeing seasonal decreases at my feeders.



Wally Davis,

Snohomish



From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of Michael Hobbs
Sent: Thursday, December 13, 2018 1:25 PM
To: Tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds



Another thing to remember is that Anna's Hummingbirds begin to nest very early. I've seen a female gathering nest materials in early February, and have seen several active nests in early March.



They wouldn't be nesting so early if there wasn't good food to eat.



Also, there's no reason to believe that seasonal decreases in feeder use are caused by population decreases. Breeding will change daily routines significantly. Also, early season natural food sources may be appearing - blooming non-native plants, hatching insects - and it would be unsurprising if the Anna's wouldn't take a bit of a break from feeders if there's other food available.



I'd be very reluctant to put more than just sugar into hummingbird feeders. My feeling is that the chance of the juice "going bad" would be far greater than the chance you'd actually be supplying critical nutrients.



- Michael Hobbs, Kirkland


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<Tweeters...>
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Date: 12/13/18 1:29 pm
From: Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
Another thing to remember is that Anna's Hummingbirds begin to nest very
early. I've seen a female gathering nest materials in early February, and
have seen several active nests in early March.

They wouldn't be nesting so early if there wasn't good food to eat.

Also, there's no reason to believe that seasonal decreases in feeder use
are caused by population decreases. Breeding will change daily routines
significantly. Also, early season natural food sources may be appearing -
blooming non-native plants, hatching insects - and it would be unsurprising
if the Anna's wouldn't take a bit of a break from feeders if there's other
food available.

I'd be very reluctant to put more than just sugar into hummingbird
feeders. My feeling is that the chance of the juice "going bad" would be
far greater than the chance you'd actually be supplying critical nutrients.

- Michael Hobbs, Kirkland

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

 

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Date: 12/13/18 1:05 pm
From: Mark Myers <myersmark7...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
I just wanted to chime in on this conversation since some of the ideas
being floated here are concerning.
Most important, to believe that the survival of our regional Anna's
hummingbirds (or any bird species) in the winter is dependent upon humans
offering/maintaining feeders is very flawed. Where is the evidence to
support that belief? As was mentioned in a response posted today, many
birds, including hummers, glean small inverts from seemingly bare trees and
plants. If you just watch your kinglets and creepers, they expend a lot of
energy working the branches and trunks of trees in search of food. They
wouldn't do that if they weren't finding inverts. Us humans can't see
those inverts, but birds have pretty good search images.
The reality is that hummers are equally adept at finding food in the
absence of feeders. If they don't, they will perish, but that's true for
all animals.
I've been banding Anna's (and other hummers) for many years in our region,
during all seasons. I've never experienced a hummer that is in poor body
weight or condition even in the middle of winter. And, I routinely
recapture birds that I banded at my house years ago. And, my feeders go
dry on a regular basis when I travel.
I realize hummers bring out strong emotions in those of us that watch them
and feed them. But, they are probably one of the hardiest of birds. If
our feeders run dry, they will not die (it's possible some may travel
elsewhere to find food, but their absence doesn't mean they're dead...).
There have been questions as to whether offering probiotics or Gerber
supplements may be harmful to wild hummers. My answer: if you can't answer
that question with 100% certainty, DON'T OFFER probiotics or Gerber
supplements in the nectar. I can say with 100% certainty that if you don't
offer them, the birds won't be harmed.
My 2+ cents.

Mark Myers,
Bothell, WA

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Date: 12/13/18 11:42 am
From: mombiwheeler <mombiwheeler...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Duvall Prairie Falcon
Looking at him off of Snoqalmie Valley Rd.  Need a scope to really see it.
Lonnie SomerSeattle 


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Date: 12/13/18 9:33 am
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Fwd: Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
I have seen the same thing at the Edmonds marsh.  Gnats seem very adept at surviving cold weather and will be flying around the evergreens at the marsh immediately after it warms up after a cold snap.  The resident Anna's will be hovering up there with them and picking them off. 

Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA

From: George Neavoll <gneavoll...>
To: tweeters <tweeters...>
Sent: Thursday, December 13, 2018 9:15 AM
Subject: [Tweeters] Fwd: Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds

Hummingbirds are great gleaners. I’ve seen Anna’s hummers gleaning tiny insects and spiders from the shrubs around our high-rise apartment building in the dead of winter. 
George NeavollS.W. Portland


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Date: 12/13/18 9:18 am
From: Jill Freidberg <jill.freidberg...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
So I just want to make sure I get this right before I start adding the formula to my feeder.

Mine is heated. With a heated feeder, I should add 2 ounces from the 8 ounce mix of formula/water to the existing mix of 4:1 sugar water and not let it sit in the feeder for longer than 3 days? And the remaining unused formula is good in the fridge for another week?

Thanks!
Jill



> On Dec 8, 2018, at 11:27 AM, Rex Takasugi <RexTak...> wrote:
>
> Subject: Question on winter feeding of hummingbirds
>
> We've been following the advice of Wally Davis for winter hummingbird feeding--thanks for the great information! This year I noticed that the Gerber Good Start Gentle has probiotics included (maybe it was this way before and I didn't notice). Any thoughts on whether Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium could be detrimental for hummingbirds? They shouldn't be pathogenic for the birds, but could provide competition for the hummer's normal flora.
>
> Thanks!
> Joyce & Rex
>
>
> From: <tweeters-bounces...> <mailto:<tweeters-bounces...> [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...> <mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Wally Davis
> Sent: Thursday, January 28, 2016 6:46 AM
> To: <tweeters...> <mailto:<tweeters...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
>
>
>
> Many years ago as a graduate student in zoology at UC Berkeley, I studied hummingbird behavior using both wild and captive birds as subjects. Species I studied included Anna’s (Calypte anna), Black-chin (Archilochus alexandri), Allen’s (Selasphorus sasin), and Rufous (Selasphorus rufus). Most of the time I kept my captive hummingbirds in an 8’ x 8’ by 8’ outdoor enclosure sheathed in window screen.
>
>
>
> Rather than feed simple sugar syrup, I fed a mixture containing sugar, vitamin drops, protein, and other nutrients. In addition, I maintained a colony of fruit flies and a couple of times a week would release a large quantity of them into the hummingbird cages. It was amazing to watch the action when the fruit flies were released. All of the hummingbirds took to wing and deftly plucked the fruit flies out of the air or any surface they happened to land on. The fruit flies didn’t stand a chance and were quickly devoured. Using this approach I kept my captive hummingbirds healthy for over a year and even fledged and raised two Allen’s hummingbirds which I collected in order to study learned vs. instinctive feeding behavior.
>
>
>
> In 1999 I moved to Snohomish, WA where I put up a bird feeder, hung blocks of suet and, of course, hummingbird feeders. Many Rufous hummingbirds visited from spring to mid-summer and even nested in the shrubs on my property, but I didn’t see my first Anna’s hummingbird until 2011. By 2013 they became year-round residents and were breeding on my property. When the Anna’s showed up I maintained a 4:1 sugar syrup all winter. When temperatures dropped below the mid 20s I kept the food from freezing with a ball of small Christmas lights. As a few years passed, I observed that there were fewer birds in late winter than in early winter. Two possible reasons for this are that the birds leave and go somewhere else or they do not survive. Because little natural food is available in the winter, I believe it is unlikely that the birds leave. It is important to note that, once you attract hummingbirds for the winter, you must keep it up even if you are out of town or the birds may starve.
>
>
>
> Both of my birding books from the 1960s, Peterson’s A Field Guide to Western Birds (1961) and Robbins, Bruun and Zim’s Birds of North America (1966), placed the north end of the range of the Anna’s hummingbird in California. Since that time they have moved north as residents more than 400 miles. According to the National Audubon Society, winter feeding and home gardens have probably supported this movement (http://birds.audubon.org/birds/annas-hummingbird <https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fbirds.audubon.org%2Fbirds%2Fannas-hummingbird&data=02%7C01%7C%7C18e15d95b18b44edaaea08d65b84f213%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636797023882051109&sdata=ZWZORsit6RfUiocOEn3qydaU6RcErROrtwHIKz6hWZs%3D&reserved=0>).
>
>
>
> While sugar syrup may be fine to attract wild hummingbirds during the summer, it is not a sufficient diet for captive hummingbirds or, in my opinion, wild hummingbirds lured by feeding to stay in cold climates north of their native range. While normal winter mortality will cause loss of some birds, I believe the winter diet likely contributes to a reduction in overall fitness. In the near absence of insects and spiders, their primary source of protein and other nutrients is largely missing. Imagine what it would do to our health if we consumed mostly sugar water with just an occasional nutritionally rich food for 3 or 4 months.
>
>
>
> In late 2014 I changed my winter feeding program soon after the first frost; a time when I expect the availability of insects and spiders to be greatly reduced. At first I tried to replicate the formula I used as a graduate student but found the ingredients are no longer available. One of the ingredients I did use was baby formula and, consequently, reviewed the nutrients in all of the baby formulas I could find. Eventually I selected Gerber Good Start gentle as my supplement. A key reason for this choice is that whey protein is the first ingredient. Most baby formulas on the shelves at my grocery store use soy protein which is of vegetable rather than animal origin. The formula also contains a good selection of vitamins and other nutrients.
>
>
>
> The recipe on the Gerber can calls for “1 unpacked level scoop (8.9g)” per 2 ounces of water. Given the high quantity of sugar needed to maintain body temperature, I was concerned that feeding at this rate would provide too much protein and, consequently, settled on 1 level scoop per 8 ounces of 4:1 sugar syrup. The instructions also say that you can refrigerate for up 24 hours and discard unused formula after 1 hour. While this level of caution may be reasonable for infants, I have not found it to be necessary for hummingbird food. I typically mix up 8 ounces at a time then put 2 ounces in each of two small feeders placed fairly far apart (hummingbirds don’t like to share). The Anna’s hummingbirds which are using my feeders consume this quantity of food in about 3 days. In cold weather there is no sign of spoilage of the food outside. After a week in the refrigerator it still tastes and smells as fresh as when it was made up. As the weather warms up I will probably change the food more often and, when I see insects I will switch back to just sugar water.
>
>
>
> At the end of last winter it appeared to me that there were as many Anna’s hummingbirds as at the beginning. This gives me confidence that there isn’t a downside to adding baby formula; it also gives me one subjective data point that the formula I use promotes winter survival. Time will tell whether this pattern continues in the future. At least I can feel confident that I am providing the hummingbirds with a more nutritious diet then they would otherwise be able to obtain, and they will hopefully be healthier coming out of winter.
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...> <mailto:<Tweeters...>
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Date: 12/13/18 9:17 am
From: George Neavoll <gneavoll...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fwd: Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
Hummingbirds are great gleaners. I’ve seen Anna’s hummers gleaning tiny insects and spiders from the shrubs around our high-rise apartment building in the dead of winter.

George Neavoll
S.W. Portland

> Begin forwarded message:
>
> From: HAL MICHAEL <ucd880...>
> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
> Date: December 11, 2018 at 8:34:01 PM PST
> To: <wallydavis3...>, Rex Takasugi <RexTak...>, <tweeters...>
>
> Seems to me we are kind of overthinking this. We have been feeding just sugar water plus have lots of flowering plants around. Hummers can't survive on sugar water alone and the fact that they are around here year around means that they are getting all the foods they need. I don't know if all the added stuff is necessary (probably not) but if folks have been using these things and the birds are still around then it is probably OK, just not necessary.
>
>
>
> Hal Michael
> Science Outreach Director, Sustainable Fisheries Foundation
> Olympia WA
> 360-459-4005
> 360-791-7702 (C)
> <ucd880...>
>> On December 9, 2018 at 12:45 PM <wallydavis3...> wrote:
>>
>> It would surprise me if probiotics harmed the hummingbirds. I started feeding the Good Start Gentle last week.
>>
>>
>> Wally
>>
>>
>> From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of Rex Takasugi
>> Sent: Saturday, December 8, 2018 11:28 AM
>> To: <tweeters...>
>> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
>>
>>
>> Subject: Question on winter feeding of hummingbirds
>>
>>
>> We've been following the advice of Wally Davis for winter hummingbird feeding--thanks for the great information! This year I noticed that the Gerber Good Start Gentle has probiotics included (maybe it was this way before and I didn't notice). Any thoughts on whether Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium could be detrimental for hummingbirds? They shouldn't be pathogenic for the birds, but could provide competition for the hummer's normal flora.
>>
>>
>> Thanks!
>>
>> Joyce & Rex
>>
>>
>>
>> From: <tweeters-bounces...> <mailto:<tweeters-bounces...> [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...> <mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Wally Davis
>> Sent: Thursday, January 28, 2016 6:46 AM
>> To: <tweeters...> <mailto:<tweeters...>
>> Subject: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
>>
>>
>> Many years ago as a graduate student in zoology at UC Berkeley, I studied hummingbird behavior using both wild and captive birds as subjects. Species I studied included Anna’s (Calypte anna), Black-chin (Archilochus alexandri), Allen’s (Selasphorus sasin), and Rufous (Selasphorus rufus). Most of the time I kept my captive hummingbirds in an 8’ x 8’ by 8’ outdoor enclosure sheathed in window screen.
>>
>>
>> Rather than feed simple sugar syrup, I fed a mixture containing sugar, vitamin drops, protein, and other nutrients. In addition, I maintained a colony of fruit flies and a couple of times a week would release a large quantity of them into the hummingbird cages. It was amazing to watch the action when the fruit flies were released. All of the hummingbirds took to wing and deftly plucked the fruit flies out of the air or any surface they happened to land on. The fruit flies didn’t stand a chance and were quickly devoured. Using this approach I kept my captive hummingbirds healthy for over a year and even fledged and raised two Allen’s hummingbirds which I collected in order to study learned vs. instinctive feeding behavior.
>>
>>
>> In 1999 I moved to Snohomish, WA where I put up a bird feeder, hung blocks of suet and, of course, hummingbird feeders. Many Rufous hummingbirds visited from spring to mid-summer and even nested in the shrubs on my property, but I didn’t see my first Anna’s hummingbird until 2011. By 2013 they became year-round residents and were breeding on my property. When the Anna’s showed up I maintained a 4:1 sugar syrup all winter. When temperatures dropped below the mid 20s I kept the food from freezing with a ball of small Christmas lights. As a few years passed, I observed that there were fewer birds in late winter than in early winter. Two possible reasons for this are that the birds leave and go somewhere else or they do not survive. Because little natural food is available in the winter, I believe it is unlikely that the birds leave. It is important to note that, once you attract hummingbirds for the winter, you must keep it up even if you are out of town or the birds may starve.
>>
>>
>> Both of my birding books from the 1960s, Peterson’s A Field Guide to Western Birds (1961) and Robbins, Bruun and Zim’s Birds of North America (1966), placed the north end of the range of the Anna’s hummingbird in California. Since that time they have moved north as residents more than 400 miles. According to the National Audubon Society, winter feeding and home gardens have probably supported this movement (http://birds.audubon.org/birds/annas-hummingbird <https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fbirds.audubon.org%2Fbirds%2Fannas-hummingbird&data=02%7C01%7C%7C18e15d95b18b44edaaea08d65b84f213%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636797023882051109&sdata=ZWZORsit6RfUiocOEn3qydaU6RcErROrtwHIKz6hWZs%3D&reserved=0>).
>>
>>
>> While sugar syrup may be fine to attract wild hummingbirds during the summer, it is not a sufficient diet for captive hummingbirds or, in my opinion, wild hummingbirds lured by feeding to stay in cold climates north of their native range. While normal winter mortality will cause loss of some birds, I believe the winter diet likely contributes to a reduction in overall fitness. In the near absence of insects and spiders, their primary source of protein and other nutrients is largely missing. Imagine what it would do to our health if we consumed mostly sugar water with just an occasional nutritionally rich food for 3 or 4 months.
>>
>>
>> In late 2014 I changed my winter feeding program soon after the first frost; a time when I expect the availability of insects and spiders to be greatly reduced. At first I tried to replicate the formula I used as a graduate student but found the ingredients are no longer available. One of the ingredients I did use was baby formula and, consequently, reviewed the nutrients in all of the baby formulas I could find. Eventually I selected Gerber Good Start gentle as my supplement. A key reason for this choice is that whey protein is the first ingredient. Most baby formulas on the shelves at my grocery store use soy protein which is of vegetable rather than animal origin. The formula also contains a good selection of vitamins and other nutrients.
>>
>>
>> The recipe on the Gerber can calls for “1 unpacked level scoop (8.9g)” per 2 ounces of water. Given the high quantity of sugar needed to maintain body temperature, I was concerned that feeding at this rate would provide too much protein and, consequently, settled on 1 level scoop per 8 ounces of 4:1 sugar syrup. The instructions also say that you can refrigerate for up 24 hours and discard unused formula after 1 hour. While this level of caution may be reasonable for infants, I have not found it to be necessary for hummingbird food. I typically mix up 8 ounces at a time then put 2 ounces in each of two small feeders placed fairly far apart (hummingbirds don’t like to share). The Anna’s hummingbirds which are using my feeders consume this quantity of food in about 3 days. In cold weather there is no sign of spoilage of the food outside. After a week in the refrigerator it still tastes and smells as fresh as when it was made up. As the weather warms up I will probably change the food more often and, when I see insects I will switch back to just sugar water.
>>
>>
>> At the end of last winter it appeared to me that there were as many Anna’s hummingbirds as at the beginning. This gives me confidence that there isn’t a downside to adding baby formula; it also gives me one subjective data point that the formula I use promotes winter survival. Time will tell whether this pattern continues in the future. At least I can feel confident that I am providing the hummingbirds with a more nutritious diet then they would otherwise be able to obtain, and they will hopefully be healthier coming out of winter.
>>
>>
>
>
>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
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> <Tweeters...>
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Date: 12/12/18 10:21 pm
From: Robert Gray <robertgary02...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Harlan's Red Tail.
In addition to the Prairie Falcon there was also a very vocal Harlan's Red Tail moving around in the area. 
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Date: 12/12/18 6:41 pm
From: Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fwd: Snoqualmie Valley Prairie Falcon Continuing Today
When I entered an eBird checklist this afternoon, I realized that others are seeing the Prairie Falcon from W Snoqualmie River Road NE, using a public hotspot on that road. I got it in my head that it was being seen from the W Snoqualmie Valley Road NE and that is where I saw it today. No wonder the farmer waved back. He probably hadn't seen any birders around. Nevertheless, there is not a great distance distance between the two roads and the farm fields extend from one road to the other. As I eventually saw the falcon from the most westerly road, it obviously moves around that area. If you look for it from the River Road and don't find it there, go to the Valley Road and look for it from the pullouts along that farm. Use the 19605 W Snoqualmie River Road NE address with your GPS to get to the location from which I observed it late this morning.

Carol Riddell
Edmonds, WA

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...>
> Date: December 12, 2018 at 12:08:59 PM PST
> To: <Tweeters...>
> Subject: Snoqualmie Valley Prairie Falcon Continuing Today
>
> It took about 40 minutes of scanning the fields with my scope but finally watched the Prairie Falcon about 11:30 a.m. It was quite distant, way beyond camera range, but well seen by scope. I watched it hunt twice and return to a tall post to eat. There are several pullouts along the farm, which is at 19605 W. Snoqualmie Valley Rd NE. I waved to the farmer as he passed me on his tractor and he waved back so I guess he is not irritated by falcon watchers. Thanks to all who have reported this bird.
>
> Carol Riddell
> Edmonds, WA

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Date: 12/12/18 4:57 pm
From: Jon Houghton <jon.houghton...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Most unlikely bird in the State (?) survives the chill, so far!
Hi Tweeterdom - Today I made my fourth visit to the Stanwood STP environs to try once more for the unlikely VERMILLION FLYCATCHER. I was getting a little discouraged after 3 unsuccessful visits and with no reports from yesterday. Upon arrival at 98th Ave West, I first stopped just past the drainage canal to look at the chain-link fence where it was last reported. After about 5 minutes there, I drove south past the 90-degree bend and searched the apple tree and fences behind the next to last house. Again, no luck. I drove back to the area west of the STP and voila! There it was, flycatching from the fence, but quickly went out of sight. Hoping for a photo, I parked at the far (east) edge of the strip mall east of the street entrance and walked back over the canal. The bird was back at it, providing great but distant views as it flew to the ground, back to the fence, over to a snag north of the first house on the east side of the road, and then, tantalizingly into the back side of the bushes right next to the road (out of view, of course). So this third (at least AZ visitor to the state is hangin' in there through the early part of winter at least, perhaps proving himself tougher than our other two most-unusual sub-tropicals this year (Phainopepla, and Painted Redstart) who didn't seem to like our cooling fall weather. Happy Birding! - Jon Houghton, Edmonds

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Date: 12/12/18 3:57 pm
From: Phil Kelley <scrubjay323...>
Subject: [Tweeters] NIsqually NWR 12/12/18
Tweets,

Today 22 of us enjoyed a great day at Nisqually. We had a 14.4 high
tide at 9:30 and it was clear and in the 40s all day. And the birds
cooperated.

Highlights included 17 SNOW GEESE and a pair of PEREGRINE FALCON on a
snag out over the surge plain. Passerines were pretty abundant also.

At the visitor center we had a PEREGRINE in the big fir tree and a
pair of HOODED MERGANSERS on the pond.

The orchard was productive with RED BREASTED SAPSUCKER, DOWNEY
WOODPECKER, 2 ANNA'S HUMMINGBIRDS, SONG, FOX and GOLDEN-CROWNED
SPARROWS, both KINGLETS and BROWN CREEPER.

The SNOW GEESE flew into the pond area south of the twin barns where
they joined the usual waterfowl in the area. Most of the waterfowl
departed as several BALD EAGLES flew over the area.

Along the boardwalk we had more sparrows and passerines and added
BEWICK'S WREN to our list. At the twin barns we observed the usual
waterfowl but nothing new.

Out on the estuary dike we observed the pair of PEREGRINE FALCONS out
in the restoration area and saw at least 18 BALD EAGLES, mostly along
the Nisqually River. We did have RED-TAILED HAWK and NORTHERN HARRIER
in the area.

The final birds I saw were 3 GREATER YELLOWLEGS in the slough by the
entrance gate as I was leaving the refuge. Look for Shep Thorpe's
ebird report for a complete list of everything seen after I left.

For the day I had 40 species and have 128 for the year. Mammals seen
included COYOTE, spike BLACK-TAILED DEER, and a GRAY SQUIRREL that
decided to join us on the twin barns overlook.

Until next week....

Phil Kelley
<scrubjay323...>
Lacey, WA
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Date: 12/12/18 12:58 pm
From: Jordan Roderick <jordan...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Duvall prairie falcon - yes
The bird was in its usual field at noon today, flying between fence posts. It was harassed off one of its perches by a harrier.

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 12/12/18 12:37 pm
From: Pat Britain <patbrit...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bud Anderson and Bill Clark will lead winter raptor classes beginning soon!
Bud Anderson, Falcon Research Group founder, will be leading "Hawkwatching
in Western Washington" both in Bellingham and at the Padilla Bay Reserve in
Skagit County.

The course includes 5 two-hour evening classes and a day-long weekend field
trip. The Bellingham class begins on Thursday, Jan. 3, and at the Padilla
Bay Reserve class begins on Tuesday, Jan 8. For more information about the
classes and registration, visit the FRG website at
https://www.falconresearch.org/raptor-classes



Bill Clark, co-author of the Peterson Field Guide "Hawks of North America",
returns to our area to teach "Advanced Raptor Identification" on Feb. 15, 16
and 17 at the Padilla Bay Interpretive Center. Bill is one of the world's
leading authorities on raptor identification and taxonomy. For more
information about the class and registration, visit the FRG website at
https://www.falconresearch.org/raptoridclass This class is limited to 25
participants.



Pat Britain

(360)733-6060


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Date: 12/12/18 12:13 pm
From: Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Snoqualmie Valley Prairie Falcon Continuing Today
It took about 40 minutes of scanning the fields with my scope but finally watched the Prairie Falcon about 11:30 a.m. It was quite distant, way beyond camera range, but well seen by scope. I watched it hunt twice and return to a tall post to eat. There are several pullouts along the farm, which is at 19605 W. Snoqualmie Valley Rd NE. I waved to the farmer as he passed me on his tractor and he waved back so I guess he is not irritated by falcon watchers. Thanks to all who have reported this bird.

Carol Riddell
Edmonds, WA
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Date: 12/12/18 10:32 am
From: Martha Jordan <mj.cygnus...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bittern at Shadow Lake
What a wonderful surprise on my recent visit to Shadow Lake at the Bob
Heirman Wildlife Park south of Snohomish. A bittern flew in along the
shoreline vegetation, stayed for a few minutes doing a variety of poses,
then stepped into the grass morass and disappeared.
It was too far for photos as it was all the way across the lake.

Many waterbird species: Trumpeter Swan (1 during day), Canada Goose,
Mallard, Pintail, Am. Wigeon, Eur Wigeon, Gadwall, Ring-necked Duck,
Shoveler, Green-winged Teal, Bufflehead, Common Merganser, Hooded
Merganser, Pied-billed Grebe, and Coot. Also a Bald Eagle was hunting the
area.

The evening is still a major roost site for both Trumpeter and Tundra
Swans, about 1,100 mostly Trumpeters each evening.

Martha Jordan
Everett, WA

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Date: 12/12/18 9:32 am
From: Byers <byers345...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Off topic--trip to SE Brazil
Hello Tweeters,

Bill and I flew to Sao Paolo in early November and joined a
group there to bird south to Porto Alegre. After that 2-week tour, we flew
to Iguazu Falls and birded a further 5 days. Our aim in the first part of
the trip was to find birds in the Serra do Mar, or coastal range. We did
dip down to the coast a few times to look for special birds there. For the
first 4 days of the trip, we stayed in Intervales State Park, a huge park in
southern Sao Paolo state. It was quite wet there and wet off and on during
the rest of the trip. But the birds don't care and we did succeed in seeing
quite a few. And we did get some lovely sunny weather in the second half.

I've put together an album of pictures on Flickr, which you
can access via the link here:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/29258421@N07/albums/72157674026782557

The photos are arranged in phylogenetic order instead of chronological
order. But I did throw in some scenic shots to give some idea of the kind
of terrain we were birding in. So in the album, you hit the ducks first and
a few more common birds before you get to birds we don't see in North
America like puffbirds, woodcreepers, cinclodes, reed haunters, tody-tyrants
(my favorite!) and on and on.

There are over 300 pictures in the album (!) so you won't be
able to look at it in one minute.

Best wishes for happy birding in the coming year!

Charlotte Byers, Edmonds


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Date: 12/11/18 8:37 pm
From: HAL MICHAEL <ucd880...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
Seems to me we are kind of overthinking this. We have been feeding just sugar water plus have lots of flowering plants around. Hummers can't survive on sugar water alone and the fact that they are around here year around means that they are getting all the foods they need. I don't know if all the added stuff is necessary (probably not) but if folks have been using these things and the birds are still around then it is probably OK, just not necessary.


Hal Michael
Science Outreach Director, Sustainable Fisheries Foundation
Olympia WA
360-459-4005
360-791-7702 (C)
<ucd880...>

> On December 9, 2018 at 12:45 PM <wallydavis3...> wrote:
>
>
> It would surprise me if probiotics harmed the hummingbirds. I started feeding the Good Start Gentle last week.
>
>
>
> Wally
>
>
>
> From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of Rex Takasugi
> Sent: Saturday, December 8, 2018 11:28 AM
> To: <tweeters...>
> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
>
>
>
> Subject: Question on winter feeding of hummingbirds
>
>
>
> We've been following the advice of Wally Davis for winter hummingbird feeding--thanks for the great information! This year I noticed that the Gerber Good Start Gentle has probiotics included (maybe it was this way before and I didn't notice). Any thoughts on whether Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium could be detrimental for hummingbirds? They shouldn't be pathogenic for the birds, but could provide competition for the hummer's normal flora.
>
>
>
> Thanks!
>
> Joyce & Rex
>
>
>
>
>
> From: <tweeters-bounces...> mailto:<tweeters-bounces...> [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Wally Davis
> Sent: Thursday, January 28, 2016 6:46 AM
> To: <tweeters...> mailto:<tweeters...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
>
>
>
> Many years ago as a graduate student in zoology at UC Berkeley, I studied hummingbird behavior using both wild and captive birds as subjects. Species I studied included Anna’s (Calypte anna), Black-chin (Archilochus alexandri), Allen’s (Selasphorus sasin), and Rufous (Selasphorus rufus). Most of the time I kept my captive hummingbirds in an 8’ x 8’ by 8’ outdoor enclosure sheathed in window screen.
>
>
>
> Rather than feed simple sugar syrup, I fed a mixture containing sugar, vitamin drops, protein, and other nutrients. In addition, I maintained a colony of fruit flies and a couple of times a week would release a large quantity of them into the hummingbird cages. It was amazing to watch the action when the fruit flies were released. All of the hummingbirds took to wing and deftly plucked the fruit flies out of the air or any surface they happened to land on. The fruit flies didn’t stand a chance and were quickly devoured. Using this approach I kept my captive hummingbirds healthy for over a year and even fledged and raised two Allen’s hummingbirds which I collected in order to study learned vs. instinctive feeding behavior.
>
>
>
> In 1999 I moved to Snohomish, WA where I put up a bird feeder, hung blocks of suet and, of course, hummingbird feeders. Many Rufous hummingbirds visited from spring to mid-summer and even nested in the shrubs on my property, but I didn’t see my first Anna’s hummingbird until 2011. By 2013 they became year-round residents and were breeding on my property. When the Anna’s showed up I maintained a 4:1 sugar syrup all winter. When temperatures dropped below the mid 20s I kept the food from freezing with a ball of small Christmas lights. As a few years passed, I observed that there were fewer birds in late winter than in early winter. Two possible reasons for this are that the birds leave and go somewhere else or they do not survive. Because little natural food is available in the winter, I believe it is unlikely that the birds leave. It is important to note that, once you attract hummingbirds for the winter, you must keep it up even if you are out of town or the birds may starve.
>
>
>
> Both of my birding books from the 1960s, Peterson’s A Field Guide to Western Birds (1961) and Robbins, Bruun and Zim’s Birds of North America (1966), placed the north end of the range of the Anna’s hummingbird in California. Since that time they have moved north as residents more than 400 miles. According to the National Audubon Society, winter feeding and home gardens have probably supported this movement (http://birds.audubon.org/birds/annas-hummingbird https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fbirds.audubon.org%2Fbirds%2Fannas-hummingbird&data=02%7C01%7C%7C18e15d95b18b44edaaea08d65b84f213%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636797023882051109&sdata=ZWZORsit6RfUiocOEn3qydaU6RcErROrtwHIKz6hWZs%3D&reserved=0 ).
>
>
>
> While sugar syrup may be fine to attract wild hummingbirds during the summer, it is not a sufficient diet for captive hummingbirds or, in my opinion, wild hummingbirds lured by feeding to stay in cold climates north of their native range. While normal winter mortality will cause loss of some birds, I believe the winter diet likely contributes to a reduction in overall fitness. In the near absence of insects and spiders, their primary source of protein and other nutrients is largely missing. Imagine what it would do to our health if we consumed mostly sugar water with just an occasional nutritionally rich food for 3 or 4 months.
>
>
>
> In late 2014 I changed my winter feeding program soon after the first frost; a time when I expect the availability of insects and spiders to be greatly reduced. At first I tried to replicate the formula I used as a graduate student but found the ingredients are no longer available. One of the ingredients I did use was baby formula and, consequently, reviewed the nutrients in all of the baby formulas I could find. Eventually I selected Gerber Good Start gentle as my supplement. A key reason for this choice is that whey protein is the first ingredient. Most baby formulas on the shelves at my grocery store use soy protein which is of vegetable rather than animal origin. The formula also contains a good selection of vitamins and other nutrients.
>
>
>
> The recipe on the Gerber can calls for “1 unpacked level scoop (8.9g)” per 2 ounces of water. Given the high quantity of sugar needed to maintain body temperature, I was concerned that feeding at this rate would provide too much protein and, consequently, settled on 1 level scoop per 8 ounces of 4:1 sugar syrup. The instructions also say that you can refrigerate for up 24 hours and discard unused formula after 1 hour. While this level of caution may be reasonable for infants, I have not found it to be necessary for hummingbird food. I typically mix up 8 ounces at a time then put 2 ounces in each of two small feeders placed fairly far apart (hummingbirds don’t like to share). The Anna’s hummingbirds which are using my feeders consume this quantity of food in about 3 days. In cold weather there is no sign of spoilage of the food outside. After a week in the refrigerator it still tastes and smells as fresh as when it was made up. As the weather warms up I will probably change the food more often and, when I see insects I will switch back to just sugar water.
>
>
>
> At the end of last winter it appeared to me that there were as many Anna’s hummingbirds as at the beginning. This gives me confidence that there isn’t a downside to adding baby formula; it also gives me one subjective data point that the formula I use promotes winter survival. Time will tell whether this pattern continues in the future. At least I can feel confident that I am providing the hummingbirds with a more nutritious diet then they would otherwise be able to obtain, and they will hopefully be healthier coming out of winter.
>
>
>




> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>




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Date: 12/11/18 3:57 pm
From: Tim Brennan <tsbrennan...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Duvall Prairie Falcon - Yes!
Hey tweets,

The Prairie Falcon found in Duvall on the 8th is still hanging around - a little bit off of the road but on fenceposts as advertised. Trumpeter Swans and a Northern Harrier were also seen. It feels like a long time coming, but the PRFA was my 250th King County bird! Thanks to Sam, Matt, and Jason for finding and posting, and to the 100 or so other birders who helped me find the others along the way.

Happy birding!

Tim Brennan
Renton, WA

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Date: 12/11/18 2:45 pm
From: Edwin Lamb <edsplace2...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Hybridization between Northwestern and American crows
A crow is a crow is a crow----unless it is bigger and makes funny croaking
sounds----then it might be a Raven.

Ed Lamb
Bellevue, WA

-----Original Message-----
From: Tweeters [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On
Behalf Of Dave Slager
Sent: Tuesday, December 11, 2018 2:06 PM
To: Tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] Hybridization between Northwestern and American crows

Hi Tweeters,

Some of you might be interested in reading about our recent UW
research on the American Crow / Northwestern Crow hybrid zone, which
is currently in the peer review process.

Short version: Our crows are hybrids!

I posted a summary explanation on Twitter here:
https://twitter.com/dlslager/status/1072353359041085440

For those interested in the nitty gritty, you can read the full
manuscript for free by going to this link and clicking "Download PDF"
<https://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2018/12/10/491654>.

Happy crow watching,

Dave Slager
Seattle, WA
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Date: 12/11/18 2:21 pm
From: Teresa Michelsen <teresa...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Hybridization between Northwestern and American crows
I appreciated (and resemble) this quote:

"Can't tell American and Northwestern crows apart? Don't feel bad, because neither can they."

Teresa Michelsen
Port Townsend, WA

-----Original Message-----
From: Tweeters [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Dave Slager
Sent: December 11, 2018 2:06 PM
To: Tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Hybridization between Northwestern and American crows

Hi Tweeters,

Some of you might be interested in reading about our recent UW research on the American Crow / Northwestern Crow hybrid zone, which is currently in the peer review process.

Short version: Our crows are hybrids!

I posted a summary explanation on Twitter here:
https://twitter.com/dlslager/status/1072353359041085440

For those interested in the nitty gritty, you can read the full manuscript for free by going to this link and clicking "Download PDF"
<https://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2018/12/10/491654>.

Happy crow watching,

Dave Slager
Seattle, WA
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Date: 12/11/18 2:09 pm
From: Dave Slager <dave.slager...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Hybridization between Northwestern and American crows
Hi Tweeters,

Some of you might be interested in reading about our recent UW
research on the American Crow / Northwestern Crow hybrid zone, which
is currently in the peer review process.

Short version: Our crows are hybrids!

I posted a summary explanation on Twitter here:
https://twitter.com/dlslager/status/1072353359041085440

For those interested in the nitty gritty, you can read the full
manuscript for free by going to this link and clicking "Download PDF"
<https://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2018/12/10/491654>.

Happy crow watching,

Dave Slager
Seattle, WA
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Date: 12/11/18 12:50 pm
From: Dee Dee <deedeeknit...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Non-GMO bird food available?
Since I don’t want to feed myself or family GMO foods, the idea of feeding GM corn, or GM anything to wildlife, concerns me.
Wondering if anyone has found a source of bird food that is sensitive to supplying non-GMO product? Preferably locally (S Snohomish Cty/ N King Cty) but am also open to other sources and interested in general whether anyone is working this problem.
Thanks!

Dee
Edmonds
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Date: 12/11/18 11:15 am
From: Hal Opperman UW <halop...>
Subject: [Tweeters] ADMINISTRATIVE - Planned service outage December 16th
On Sunday December 16th, from 8:00 am to 6:00 pm, the Mailman service on which the Tweeters list resides will be temporarily offline while important maintenance is being performed. Mail sent to the list during this planned outage will queued to be delivered once service is fully restored.

[Notice from UW-IT Service Center]
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Date: 12/11/18 8:01 am
From: Christine Southwick <clsouth...>
Subject: [Tweeters] needing pictures
I am writing an article about a cut down tree, and I am wanting pictures of birds that I know used it.

I am looking for:
Band-tailed Pigeon,
(group of American Robins),
Bushtits in group or flying,
Pine Siskins-group.

The article will be published in the Shoreline Area News, under the heading "For the Birds".
Any picture I use will have photo acknowledgement.

Thanking all who take the time to look for requested photos.

Good Birding

Christine Southwick



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Date: 12/10/18 9:45 pm
From: Matt Dufort <matt.dufort...>
Subject: [Tweeters] King County December big day, Dec. 8
Hi tweets,

On Saturday, Spencer Hildie, Sam Terry, and I (joined for half the day by
Josh Glant) took on a big day on one of the shortest days of the year. The
main challenge was the lack of daylight - we ended the day with quite a few
reasonable targets remaining, but no time to get to them. We finished with
102 species, exceeding my expectations despite missing quite a few common
species.

Highlights:

Finding 4 owl species despite none of them vocalizing.

W Snoqualmie River Rd NE in Duvall, with Prairie Falcon, multiple
Rough-legged Hawks, two Northern Shrikes, Short-eared Owl, and much more.
The falcon was only a couple hundred yards from where we found a
Long-billed Curlew on our spring big day, proving again what a gem this
spot is.

Sikes Lake, with a cooperative Swamp Sparrow, and thousands of ducks,
geese, and swans moving overhead through the valley. Two blue Snow Geese
in these flocks were the first I’ve seen in King County.

West Seattle providing tons of saltwater birds and the hoped-for rockpipers.

A number of successful quick stops for a few targets: Barrow’s Goldeneye
and lingering Heermann’s Gulls below the Ballard Locks, Cinnamon Teal and
Least Sandpiper at 212th St in Kent, and conifer-forest passerines at the
Discovery Park ELC.

Misses were numerous, as mentioned above, and included Red-breasted
Nuthatch(!), any pigeon/dove other than Rock Pigeon, most woodpeckers,
Varied and Hermit Thrushes, Purple Finch, the list goes on.

Overall, a fantastic day that only whetted my appetite for more winter big
day efforts. Thanks to Sam, Spencer, and Josh for keeping up the pace,
enthusiasm, and fun throughout the long day!

Good birding,
Matt Dufort

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Date: 12/10/18 4:01 pm
From: Constance Sidles <constancesidles...>
Subject: [Tweeters] W. Tanager at Fill
Hey tweets, Kit, a fellow birder, has just sent me an email to say he has found a male Western Tanager at Yesler Swamp, the easternmost part of Montlake Fill. I've never seen one here this late. I guess with this crazy-warm weather we're having now, maybe some of the insectivores are encouraged to stick with us.

FYI, we did our weekly shorebird count (part of our outcome studies to see how WSDOT's mitigation is really playing out for the birds, rather than theoretically as the WSDOT folks say it will) on Friday. We found 2 Wilson's Snipe and 3 Killdeer. Paltry numbers compared to the glory days of the past, when shorebird habitat really did exist at the Fill. We've been doing these shorebird counts once a week for nearly 2 years now and hope to continue to do them for at least one more year. Preliminary analysis shows that what we've been saying to WSDOT all along is true:

When freshwater mudflats, shallow pools/ponds, or shoreline mud exist with open line-of-sight, shorebirds of many species will come to forage. These birds include migrants, winter residents, and year-round breeders. If the ponds, pools, or shoreline mudflats are closed up with shrubs, trees, or other foliage that might harbor predators - notably, hawks or falcons - then the shorebirds tend to abandon the site.

We saw this partiality for open line-of-sight habitat in particular this fall when mud islands appeared (as many as 7 in Union Bay) as the water level of Lake Washington fell (controlled by the Ballard Lockmaster). These mud islands were all out in the open waters of the lake, with 360-degree line of sight. They hosted shorebirds such as numerous Killdeer, Dunlin, Long-billed dowitchers, Westerns, Leasts, a Semipalmated, some Baird's, and a Red-necked Phalarope.

WSDOT's ecologist had told us a couple years ago that all these species were already gone from the Fill and so creating any more habitat for them was fruitless because they wouldn't come back. History has shown, though, that Nature can return from devastated areas much faster and more thoroughly than we thought. Two such examples spring to mind: Mt. St. Helens after the latest eruption, and the Elwha River after the dams were taken out. Our Fill observations are suggesting that the same thing would happen at the Fill, if only we could provide good habitat for these birds. - Connie, Seattle

<constancesidles...> <mailto:<constancesidles...>
<csidles...> <mailto:<csidles...>


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Date: 12/10/18 11:50 am
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Lake Stevens Canvasbacks
Some scanning of Lake Stevens this morning revealed a group of at least 10
Canvasbacks among the hundreds of American Coots. Visible from North Cove
Park behind the library downtown. Also some Common Mergansers, Hooded
Mergansers and Buffleheads.

Phil Dickinson

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Date: 12/10/18 11:37 am
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign15...>
Subject: [Tweeters] A Still Evening At Point Wilson
On Wednesday December 5th, I needed a walk so I walked up and around Fort
Worden's Artillery Hill. It was a quiet sunny late afternoon in the forest.
Few birds, but I came across one of those mixed flocks of forest birds
foraging down low in the trees and shrubs;First was a single Hutton's
Vireo, then quite a few Ruby-crowned and Golden-crowned Kinglet's, three
Brown Creepers, and a Pacific Wren. Nice.

Afterwards, I toodled down to Point Wilson. It was sort of strange down
there: Not a breath of wind - even the finest blades of dune grass still as
can be. It was remarkable that the only sound (besides a bird or two) was
the quiet gurgle of the tidal current, gently lapping around the rocky
point as it slipped out to sea. The water on the Sound side of the point
was flowing like a clear mountain creek along the sandy shore, floating
driftwood and kelp going by at about the speed of a fast walk.

It was just an hour or so after high tide and 98% of Puget Sounds outflow
was flowing by; on this particular tide dropping about 10' to the nighttime
low of -1. Imagine the top ten feet of the 1,020 square miles of Puget
Sound going by in 6 hours. Well, it was off to a quiet start. I did get a
late ID on my mystery bird call that I'd heard on my last (2) night tide
patrols, as 3 Black Oystercatchers flew by several 100' offshore, one
calling - quite different sound quality than my previous Oystercatcher
hearing ( farther down this same beach) of one incredibly loud individual.

Next sighting was of a big Sea Monster! OK, so it was only a huge male
California Sea Lion, with it's blocky head, foraging very close (50' or so)
to shore, but pretty impressive so close. It foraged for quite awhile right
at the point, it's pink maw clearly visible in the low rays of the sun. I
was hard to track, as it surfaced and dove rapidly. While I was trying to
spot the big guy I managed to get my only view of a breaching Sea Lion - a
dark sleek female (or young male maybe) about 6' long. It flew clear out of
the the water in a smooth arc and blooped back in without a sound. Pretty
cool. Never saw it again.

Also, right at the point, 6 Red-Breasted Mergansers dove continuously the
whole time I was there, managing to hold together in one spot despite the
current. With the sun to my back, all the critter sightings were great.
Several Common Murre's zipped by, always nice to see, Surf Scoter's,
Pelagic and Double- crested Cormorant's. And droopy loons - some
Red-throated, some Pacific.

Back in my Anchor Pub days, I thought "THE DROOPY LOON" would make a good
bar name. I had an image for the sign: Several loons drooping over their
beers, maybe with a long pointed wing around drooped around the shoulder of
the next loon buddy at the bar. I used to be one of those birds. I'm still
kind of a droopy loon, but for different reasons.

Moving right along... As I was watching the Scene from atop the big rip-rap
boulders at the point, two Pacific Loons zoomed right below me. Flying
fast, and cutting the point pretty close, they didn't see me up there until
the last second and pulled off a very graceful dodge. I hadn't ever seen
flying loons so close before and had never noted how long and pointy their
wings are. Usually I've just seen them flying by a ways off, with their
heads and tails hanging low. Maybe it's all them solid bones they're
hauling around that make them look sort of weary, but maybe they're hangin'
low for aerodynamic reasons.

Jeff Gibson
a droopy loon in
Port Townsend Wa

PS: Forgot to mention the mountains, from Baker and Shuksan down to Rainier
all glowing pink in the late light. And the islands all fading off in the
distance. Looking down the straits I could look right through the mirage of
Dungeness
Spit to Neah Bay. (or to nearby Bahokus Peak, 1,400' anyhoo). It was that
clear out. Just sayin'

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Date: 12/10/18 11:21 am
From: Toby Ross <TobyR...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Seattle CBC
The Seattle Christmas Bird Count will take place on Saturday, December 29. If you'd like to take part, please register here: https://my.seattleaudubon.org/cbc2018. Registration closes this coming Sunday, December 16.

This year we want to expand the Feeder Watch portion of the count. Seattle has a lot of residential areas where few birds are counted by field teams. Help us improve the accuracy of our data by counting the birds at your feeders. It's really easy, and can take as little as 10 minutes of your day. Register for Feeder Watch at the same link above.

There are many other CBCs in our region, so if you're unable to take part in the Seattle count, perhaps you'll consider helping with another one near you. Find dates and contact details here: http://wos.org/cbc/

Questions? Get in touch with Toby <tobyr...>

Toby Ross
Senior Science Manager
Seattle Audubon


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Date: 12/10/18 6:49 am
From: Hank H <h.heiberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Duvall Prairie Falcon - no

> We scoured W. Snoqualmie River Road NE both before and after lunch, but failed to find the Prairie Falcon. We did see an American Kestrel just north of the Christmas tree farm and a Rough-legged Hawk a little further north near the house with the two barking dogs. Here is a photo of the Rough-legged Hawk. The rain was heavy and photos were difficult.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/45338194225
>
> We will try again today.
>
> Hank & Karen Heiberg
> Issaquah, WA
>

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Date: 12/10/18 1:37 am
From: Debbie Mcleod <skepsou...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Trumpeters Juanita Bay
This question was recently posted to the Be Neighborly Kirkland FaceBook group, and is generating some discussion.

"There's an article about the endangered trumpeter swans in Yellowstone that made me wonder who is stewarding the well being of the trumpeter swans in Juanita Bay? Does anyone (public sector, non-profit or individual volunteers) formally track their comings and goings, numbers, mating pairs, habitat, food sources, survival rates, etc.? I hope we do and that we are trying to protect them in every way."

I supplied the link to the NW Swan Conservation Association page, and shared this 2011 article (shout-out to Martha Jordan!):
https://patch.com/washington/kirkland/trumpeter-swans-return-to-juanita-bay

I also said I would pass the question on to Tweeterdom and report back.

Hurrah for neighbors caring about the birds they see on their local walks!

Debbie in Kirklandia



Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 12/9/18 4:09 pm
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Prairie Falcon yes
This morning I drove W Snoqualmie River Rd NE just before first light & saw a BARN OWL. When I returned later, I came upon Josh and Adrian who had the PRAIRIE FALCON already in their scope. Thank you! They also put me on a dark morph HARLAN'S HAWK along the same road.

Later I saw 2 RUSTY BLACKBIRDS in a large mixed flock of blackbirds along Tualco Loop Rd in Snohomish County south of Monroe.

--
Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>

The past and the present are not disjunct domains.


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Date: 12/9/18 2:01 pm
From: Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Best Bird Books of 2018
HI ALL:
My Best Bird Books of 2018 can be found at my blog here:

https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/2018/12/best-bird-books-of-2018.html

sincerely
--

Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/
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Date: 12/9/18 1:15 pm
From: Rick Tyler <rhtyler...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Duvall Prairie Falcon continues
Still there at 1, about 200 yards past (north of) the Christmas tree farm.

Rick

On Sun, Dec 9, 2018, 8:23 AM Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant...> wrote:

> The Prairie Falcon on W Snoqualmie River Rd NE is currently sitting on a
> post in the middle of the field, looking directly west from the bend in the
> road at about 19605 W Snoqualmie River Rd NE.
>
> Thanks again to Matt, Spencer and Sam!
>
> Good birding,
> Joshua Glant
> _______________________________________________
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> <Tweeters...>
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>

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Date: 12/9/18 1:00 pm
From: Vicki Biltz <vickibiltz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Spain AND Kenya ( Angama?) then Zimbabwe if time.
Wow, just saw an email I missed from Donna. I may be gone longer than I
thought. I do have several South Africa bird books, am hoping I’ll they
will work for the other two countries, then hopefully I’ll get to see
Victoria Falls, which is such a dream.
I think my head is going to blow up any minute. I need a glass of
wine. She’s got friends who are bush pilots, and that’s why she’s picking
these locations. I’m not going to complain! Believe ME!
We will be going on safaris from the angama lodge
Anyway, several have asked me if I ever found out the plans, and this is
it.... I may never come home!

Vicki Biltz
<vickibiltz...>
Buckley,(seems like a little place now) WA
--



<vickibiltz...>
http://www.flickr.com/photos/saw-whets_new/

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Date: 12/9/18 12:48 pm
From: <wallydavis3...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
It would surprise me if probiotics harmed the hummingbirds. I started feeding the Good Start Gentle last week.



Wally



From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of Rex Takasugi
Sent: Saturday, December 8, 2018 11:28 AM
To: <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds



Subject: Question on winter feeding of hummingbirds



We've been following the advice of Wally Davis for winter hummingbird feeding--thanks for the great information! This year I noticed that the Gerber Good Start Gentle has probiotics included (maybe it was this way before and I didn't notice). Any thoughts on whether Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium could be detrimental for hummingbirds? They shouldn't be pathogenic for the birds, but could provide competition for the hummer's normal flora.



Thanks!

Joyce & Rex





From: <tweeters-bounces...> <mailto:<tweeters-bounces...> [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Wally Davis
Sent: Thursday, January 28, 2016 6:46 AM
To: <tweeters...> <mailto:<tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds



Many years ago as a graduate student in zoology at UC Berkeley, I studied hummingbird behavior using both wild and captive birds as subjects. Species I studied included Anna’s (Calypte anna), Black-chin (Archilochus alexandri), Allen’s (Selasphorus sasin), and Rufous (Selasphorus rufus). Most of the time I kept my captive hummingbirds in an 8’ x 8’ by 8’ outdoor enclosure sheathed in window screen.



Rather than feed simple sugar syrup, I fed a mixture containing sugar, vitamin drops, protein, and other nutrients. In addition, I maintained a colony of fruit flies and a couple of times a week would release a large quantity of them into the hummingbird cages. It was amazing to watch the action when the fruit flies were released. All of the hummingbirds took to wing and deftly plucked the fruit flies out of the air or any surface they happened to land on. The fruit flies didn’t stand a chance and were quickly devoured. Using this approach I kept my captive hummingbirds healthy for over a year and even fledged and raised two Allen’s hummingbirds which I collected in order to study learned vs. instinctive feeding behavior.



In 1999 I moved to Snohomish, WA where I put up a bird feeder, hung blocks of suet and, of course, hummingbird feeders. Many Rufous hummingbirds visited from spring to mid-summer and even nested in the shrubs on my property, but I didn’t see my first Anna’s hummingbird until 2011. By 2013 they became year-round residents and were breeding on my property. When the Anna’s showed up I maintained a 4:1 sugar syrup all winter. When temperatures dropped below the mid 20s I kept the food from freezing with a ball of small Christmas lights. As a few years passed, I observed that there were fewer birds in late winter than in early winter. Two possible reasons for this are that the birds leave and go somewhere else or they do not survive. Because little natural food is available in the winter, I believe it is unlikely that the birds leave. It is important to note that, once you attract hummingbirds for the winter, you must keep it up even if you are out of town or the birds may starve.



Both of my birding books from the 1960s, Peterson’s A Field Guide to Western Birds (1961) and Robbins, Bruun and Zim’s Birds of North America (1966), placed the north end of the range of the Anna’s hummingbird in California. Since that time they have moved north as residents more than 400 miles. According to the National Audubon Society, winter feeding and home gardens have probably supported this movement (http://birds.audubon.org/birds/annas-hummingbird <https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fbirds.audubon.org%2Fbirds%2Fannas-hummingbird&data=02%7C01%7C%7C18e15d95b18b44edaaea08d65b84f213%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636797023882051109&sdata=ZWZORsit6RfUiocOEn3qydaU6RcErROrtwHIKz6hWZs%3D&reserved=0> ).



While sugar syrup may be fine to attract wild hummingbirds during the summer, it is not a sufficient diet for captive hummingbirds or, in my opinion, wild hummingbirds lured by feeding to stay in cold climates north of their native range. While normal winter mortality will cause loss of some birds, I believe the winter diet likely contributes to a reduction in overall fitness. In the near absence of insects and spiders, their primary source of protein and other nutrients is largely missing. Imagine what it would do to our health if we consumed mostly sugar water with just an occasional nutritionally rich food for 3 or 4 months.



In late 2014 I changed my winter feeding program soon after the first frost; a time when I expect the availability of insects and spiders to be greatly reduced. At first I tried to replicate the formula I used as a graduate student but found the ingredients are no longer available. One of the ingredients I did use was baby formula and, consequently, reviewed the nutrients in all of the baby formulas I could find. Eventually I selected Gerber Good Start gentle as my supplement. A key reason for this choice is that whey protein is the first ingredient. Most baby formulas on the shelves at my grocery store use soy protein which is of vegetable rather than animal origin. The formula also contains a good selection of vitamins and other nutrients.



The recipe on the Gerber can calls for “1 unpacked level scoop (8.9g)” per 2 ounces of water. Given the high quantity of sugar needed to maintain body temperature, I was concerned that feeding at this rate would provide too much protein and, consequently, settled on 1 level scoop per 8 ounces of 4:1 sugar syrup. The instructions also say that you can refrigerate for up 24 hours and discard unused formula after 1 hour. While this level of caution may be reasonable for infants, I have not found it to be necessary for hummingbird food. I typically mix up 8 ounces at a time then put 2 ounces in each of two small feeders placed fairly far apart (hummingbirds don’t like to share). The Anna’s hummingbirds which are using my feeders consume this quantity of food in about 3 days. In cold weather there is no sign of spoilage of the food outside. After a week in the refrigerator it still tastes and smells as fresh as when it was made up. As the weather warms up I will probably change the food more often and, when I see insects I will switch back to just sugar water.



At the end of last winter it appeared to me that there were as many Anna’s hummingbirds as at the beginning. This gives me confidence that there isn’t a downside to adding baby formula; it also gives me one subjective data point that the formula I use promotes winter survival. Time will tell whether this pattern continues in the future. At least I can feel confident that I am providing the hummingbirds with a more nutritious diet then they would otherwise be able to obtain, and they will hopefully be healthier coming out of winter.




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Date: 12/9/18 8:53 am
From: Rex Takasugi <RexTak...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds
Subject: Question on winter feeding of hummingbirds

We've been following the advice of Wally Davis for winter hummingbird feeding--thanks for the great information! This year I noticed that the Gerber Good Start Gentle has probiotics included (maybe it was this way before and I didn't notice). Any thoughts on whether Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium could be detrimental for hummingbirds? They shouldn't be pathogenic for the birds, but could provide competition for the hummer's normal flora.

Thanks!
Joyce & Rex



From: <tweeters-bounces...> [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Wally Davis
Sent: Thursday, January 28, 2016 6:46 AM
To: <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Winter Feeding of Hummingbirds



Many years ago as a graduate student in zoology at UC Berkeley, I studied hummingbird behavior using both wild and captive birds as subjects. Species I studied included Anna’s (Calypte anna), Black-chin (Archilochus alexandri), Allen’s (Selasphorus sasin), and Rufous (Selasphorus rufus). Most of the time I kept my captive hummingbirds in an 8’ x 8’ by 8’ outdoor enclosure sheathed in window screen.



Rather than feed simple sugar syrup, I fed a mixture containing sugar, vitamin drops, protein, and other nutrients. In addition, I maintained a colony of fruit flies and a couple of times a week would release a large quantity of them into the hummingbird cages. It was amazing to watch the action when the fruit flies were released. All of the hummingbirds took to wing and deftly plucked the fruit flies out of the air or any surface they happened to land on. The fruit flies didn’t stand a chance and were quickly devoured. Using this approach I kept my captive hummingbirds healthy for over a year and even fledged and raised two Allen’s hummingbirds which I collected in order to study learned vs. instinctive feeding behavior.



In 1999 I moved to Snohomish, WA where I put up a bird feeder, hung blocks of suet and, of course, hummingbird feeders. Many Rufous hummingbirds visited from spring to mid-summer and even nested in the shrubs on my property, but I didn’t see my first Anna’s hummingbird until 2011. By 2013 they became year-round residents and were breeding on my property. When the Anna’s showed up I maintained a 4:1 sugar syrup all winter. When temperatures dropped below the mid 20s I kept the food from freezing with a ball of small Christmas lights. As a few years passed, I observed that there were fewer birds in late winter than in early winter. Two possible reasons for this are that the birds leave and go somewhere else or they do not survive. Because little natural food is available in the winter, I believe it is unlikely that the birds leave. It is important to note that, once you attract hummingbirds for the winter, you must keep it up even if you are out of town or the birds may starve.



Both of my birding books from the 1960s, Peterson’s A Field Guide to Western Birds (1961) and Robbins, Bruun and Zim’s Birds of North America (1966), placed the north end of the range of the Anna’s hummingbird in California. Since that time they have moved north as residents more than 400 miles. According to the National Audubon Society, winter feeding and home gardens have probably supported this movement (http://birds.audubon.org/birds/annas-hummingbird<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fbirds.audubon.org%2Fbirds%2Fannas-hummingbird&data=02%7C01%7C%7C18e15d95b18b44edaaea08d65b84f213%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636797023882051109&sdata=ZWZORsit6RfUiocOEn3qydaU6RcErROrtwHIKz6hWZs%3D&reserved=0>).



While sugar syrup may be fine to attract wild hummingbirds during the summer, it is not a sufficient diet for captive hummingbirds or, in my opinion, wild hummingbirds lured by feeding to stay in cold climates north of their native range. While normal winter mortality will cause loss of some birds, I believe the winter diet likely contributes to a reduction in overall fitness. In the near absence of insects and spiders, their primary source of protein and other nutrients is largely missing. Imagine what it would do to our health if we consumed mostly sugar water with just an occasional nutritionally rich food for 3 or 4 months.



In late 2014 I changed my winter feeding program soon after the first frost; a time when I expect the availability of insects and spiders to be greatly reduced. At first I tried to replicate the formula I used as a graduate student but found the ingredients are no longer available. One of the ingredients I did use was baby formula and, consequently, reviewed the nutrients in all of the baby formulas I could find. Eventually I selected Gerber Good Start gentle as my supplement. A key reason for this choice is that whey protein is the first ingredient. Most baby formulas on the shelves at my grocery store use soy protein which is of vegetable rather than animal origin. The formula also contains a good selection of vitamins and other nutrients.



The recipe on the Gerber can calls for “1 unpacked level scoop (8.9g)” per 2 ounces of water. Given the high quantity of sugar needed to maintain body temperature, I was concerned that feeding at this rate would provide too much protein and, consequently, settled on 1 level scoop per 8 ounces of 4:1 sugar syrup. The instructions also say that you can refrigerate for up 24 hours and discard unused formula after 1 hour. While this level of caution may be reasonable for infants, I have not found it to be necessary for hummingbird food. I typically mix up 8 ounces at a time then put 2 ounces in each of two small feeders placed fairly far apart (hummingbirds don’t like to share). The Anna’s hummingbirds which are using my feeders consume this quantity of food in about 3 days. In cold weather there is no sign of spoilage of the food outside. After a week in the refrigerator it still tastes and smells as fresh as when it was made up. As the weather warms up I will probably change the food more often and, when I see insects I will switch back to just sugar water.



At the end of last winter it appeared to me that there were as many Anna’s hummingbirds as at the beginning. This gives me confidence that there isn’t a downside to adding baby formula; it also gives me one subjective data point that the formula I use promotes winter survival. Time will tell whether this pattern continues in the future. At least I can feel confident that I am providing the hummingbirds with a more nutritious diet then they would otherwise be able to obtain, and they will hopefully be healthier coming out of winter.


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Date: 12/9/18 8:24 am
From: Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Duvall Prairie Falcon continues
The Prairie Falcon on W Snoqualmie River Rd NE is currently sitting on a post in the middle of the field, looking directly west from the bend in the road at about 19605 W Snoqualmie River Rd NE.

Thanks again to Matt, Spencer and Sam!

Good birding,
Joshua Glant
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Date: 12/8/18 5:33 pm
From: Anthony <birds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Vermilion Flycatcher 12/8 late afternoon
Dear Tweeters,



Hope this may help some of you contemplating a visit to Stanwood for the
Vermilion Flycatcher.



I got there about 3pm and met a few folks but unfortunately missed seeing
the flycatcher by a few minutes as it was seen on the north end of 98th NW
but before Route 532.



A gentleman had shown me his camera of which was the Vermilion Flycatcher.



Here is a web link (off my defunct web site) to a marked up image map with
green Park notations, post 3pm Sighting location and areas to Avoid
loitering [red markings]



https://ocbirds.com/?page_id=2600



Thanks to Maxine Reid and Nadine Drisseq for the kind assistance.



Anthony Gliozzo

Camano Island, WA






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Date: 12/8/18 4:17 pm
From: Lonnie Somer <mombiwheeler...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Heermaan's Gull flock at Kingston Ferry Terminal
Hi Tweeters,

I did some birding while waiting for the ferry to arrive at the Kingston
Terminal in Kitsap County. I was surprised to see a flock of 95 (or so)
Heermaan's Gulls roosting on the outer side of the marina jetty. My eBird
app didn't even provide this as a check list choice for this time of year.

Good birding,

Lonnie Somer
Seattle

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Date: 12/8/18 3:33 pm
From: Tom Mansfield <birds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Duvall Prairie Falcon (PRFA)
As of the time of this post (Sat 12/8 3:30 pm) the PRFA is perched in a lone snag In the pasture east of 17949 W Snoqualmie River Rd NE. Thanks to Sam and Spencer for reporting this morning. Also 2 Short-eared Owl flapping around.

Tom Mansfield headed home

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 12/8/18 1:13 pm
From: Hubbell <ldhubbell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Swans
Tweeters,

This week’s post covers a surprisingly small irritant to our wintering Trumpeter Swans.

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2018/12/swans.html <https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2018/12/swans.html>

Have a great day on Union Bay…where nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
<ldhubbell...>
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Date: 12/8/18 12:05 pm
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...>
Subject: [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Dec. 9, 2018
Hello, Tweeters,

Last week on BirdNote:
* Some Birds Sing in the Winter
http://bit.ly/2BljuY4
* Daffy Duck, A Cartoon Original
http://bit.ly/2zyZK3R
* Social Challenges Favor Complex Bird Brains
http://bit.ly/2KvepBg
* Waxwing Nightlight
http://bit.ly/2PPAHmY
* Anniversary of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
http://bit.ly/2zD6YBN
* No Pounding Headache
http://bit.ly/2RhqIDW
* Three Worldwide Raptors
http://bit.ly/2zpFdOM
-----------------------------------------------
Check out next week's stories:
Snow Geese... Too Much of a Good Thing? and more --
http://bit.ly/2PqdUcD
-------------------------
BirdNote is now in print. Check out BirdNote, the book:
https://www.birdnote.org/birdnote-book
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Did you have a favorite story this week? Please let us know.
mailto:<info...>
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
or Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/birdnoteradio/
Listen on Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find 1500+ episodes and more than 1000 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
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Date: 12/8/18 9:53 am
From: Samuel Terry <samgterry...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Duvall Prairie Falcon
Hi tweeters,

Matt Dufort, Spencer Hildie and I just found a Prarie Falcon on West
Snoqualmie River Rd NE in Duvall. We first saw it by the big bend in the
road north of the slaughter house and lost it when it flew off to the
southwest.

Good birding,

Sam Terry
Seattle

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Date: 12/8/18 6:42 am
From: STEVEN ELLIS <sremse...>
Subject: [Tweeters] O.T. ARF Wrapup
My Amphibian, Reptile & Fish Big Year is necessarily over since the herps have gone to cover and the fish have mostly pulled into deep water. Here are the results:

Amphibians: 14

Reptiles: 10

Fish: 31 (None caught on hook and line but I did use a dip net)

55 was the final total- not great but not too bad for someone who works full time. Since there's no record of another ARF Big Year, I assume I hold the state, national, international and galactic records for now. I also added 206 birds and 34 mammals for a total of 295 vertebrates during this dress rehearsal for a Vertebrate Big Year (VBY) I hope to do in 2021.


Some thoughts

*There are 9.7 gazillion Shiner Perch in Western Washington in late summer. They are easily the most numerous native vertebrate in the area.

* Fish are delightfully difficult to identify. Peeps and flycatchers are quite easy compared to fish. You get funny looks from people when they see you using binoculars to stare into the water.

*Favorites: Any salamander ( 6 plus 1 newt); Tailed Frog; Tube Snout (fish)

*Biggest misses: Cascade Frog ( poor time management on my part plus smoke from wildfires kept me from going the one weekend I set aside for a visit to Mt. Rainier- not good for my asthma)

Western Fence Lizard-I wandered around a Mason County clearcut for a couple of hours and did see movement but couldn't say for sure I'd seen a lizard. I also missed the North Cascades Institute snake weekend due to vehicle trouble.

Any sucker species- I was amazed the Sate Fish & Wildlife people couldn't say where and when suckers spawn.



Thanks for everyone who contributed suggestions on where, when and how to see these delighful creatures! A list can be sent to anyone who requests it. I'll be back in a couple of years to beg & wheedle for info to help with my VBY(I'm also considering a Tree Big Year in the future).

Steve Ellis

<sremse...> mailto:<sremse...>

Coupeville, Wa (Whidbey island)
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Date: 12/8/18 6:25 am
From: heidi narte <heidi...>
Subject: [Tweeters] WDFW South Puget Sound Wildlife Plan - December 19 Public Meeting
Hello,

I noticed WDFW staff are seeking public input about how residents
recreate in south Puget Sound at their December 19 meeting. If you'd
like to provide information to WDFW staff about how you use these areas,
consider attending. Passive recreationists are often underrepresented
in public land management decisions. See the December 7 Press Release
on this webpage: https://wdfw.wa.gov/news/

Have a birdy New Year! :) ~hn

Burien, WA

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Date: 12/7/18 8:00 pm
From: Tom Mansfield <birds...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Stanwood reminder
Tweets - I was up there today in Stanwood and, ironically, a participant in the sad event you memorialize from Brewster (is that my photo?). Today, several of us at Stanwood met the brother of the threatening guy firing his gun; the brother lives with the shooter and thinks, after spending more than a half hour with us in the cold looking for the flycatcher, that his brother is a little more understanding now; admittedly, still a little excitable. The Brewster situation was way different occurring on the Colville Reservation and involving a member of that nation who felt his privileges were different. I think as long as birders are aware that this is an “off the main road” kind of place, there is no parking, people who live there like their “privacy,” and then think about how you would feel with strangers looking into YOUR living space, and – most importantly –are respectful of the locals – all will be well. DO NOT block the road with your cars! Good luck.

Tom Mansfield in Seattle.

From: Tweeters [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of todd Entrikin
Sent: Friday, December 07, 2018 7:26 PM
To: <Tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Stanwood reminder

Just a reminder of how similar events have unfolded in recent history in this group.

https://www.audubon.org/news/a-rare-owl-turned-dead-are-birders-blame
[https://cdn.audubon.org/cdn/farfuture/InpxoDzNQHTw8DPt6wtRG3EEZTjRuzac8ZqGU9q1b0c/mtime:1486698096/sites/default/files/styles/social_media_photo/public/sfw_christynielsen.jpg?itok=sPwMKpLt]<https://www.audubon.org/news/a-rare-owl-turned-dead-are-birders-blame>

A Rare Owl Turned Up Dead—Are Birders To Blame? | Audubon<https://www.audubon.org/news/a-rare-owl-turned-dead-are-birders-blame>
A rare bird alert is usually a fortunate event: But not so for a Northern Hawk Owl that turned up dead in rural Washington earlier this month. To avoid tensions from rising, it’s important to give back to the local community by supporting it—either by getting lunch in town or shopping at local ...
www.audubon.org



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Virus-free. www.avast.com<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link>


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Date: 12/7/18 7:29 pm
From: todd Entrikin <shmodd_...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Stanwood reminder
Just a reminder of how similar events have unfolded in recent history in this group.

https://www.audubon.org/news/a-rare-owl-turned-dead-are-birders-blame
[https://cdn.audubon.org/cdn/farfuture/InpxoDzNQHTw8DPt6wtRG3EEZTjRuzac8ZqGU9q1b0c/mtime:1486698096/sites/default/files/styles/social_media_photo/public/sfw_christynielsen.jpg?itok=sPwMKpLt]<https://www.audubon.org/news/a-rare-owl-turned-dead-are-birders-blame>

A Rare Owl Turned Up DeadAre Birders To Blame? | Audubon<https://www.audubon.org/news/a-rare-owl-turned-dead-are-birders-blame>
A rare bird alert is usually a fortunate event: But not so for a Northern Hawk Owl that turned up dead in rural Washington earlier this month. To avoid tensions from rising, its important to give back to the local community by supporting iteither by getting lunch in town or shopping at local ...
www.audubon.org



[https://ipmcdn.avast.com/images/icons/icon-envelope-tick-round-orange-animated-no-repeat-v1.gif]<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon> Virus-free. www.avast.com<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link>

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Date: 12/7/18 3:32 pm
From: Jill Freidberg <jill.freidberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Off topic: Vermillion Flycatchers, Black Phoebes, and Phainopeplas?
One of you snowbirds needs to figure out how to take these poor creatures south with you. They should be in Arizona. Especially the poor VFC. They are such show offs, for the ladies, but there’s no ladies here to show off to!

I’m kidding, of course.

But is this an increasing trend that these SW birds are showing up here? And if it’s a fluke, how do they get so far off course?

Jill


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Date: 12/7/18 2:33 pm
From: Jon. Anderson and Marty Chaney <festuca...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Vermilion Flycatcher - Yes.
I am watching the bird now, in the yard and chain-link fence at 26425 - 98th Ave in Stanwood.

Remember to be respectful of the neighbors

Jon. Anderson
Olympia


Sent from Xfinity Connect Application
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Date: 12/7/18 12:09 pm
From: Ronda Stark <rondastark18...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Stanwood incident - 12/4/18
This is a potentially life threatening situation-- PLEASE confirm you have
reported this incident --including address and name of person responsible
for discharging firearm-- to the police.

Ronda

On Thu, Dec 6, 2018 at 2:33 PM <wallydavis3...> wrote:

> Discharging a firearm in that manner is likely a felony and should be
> reported to the sheriff.
>
> Wally Davis
>
>
>
> *From:* Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> *On Behalf
> Of *AnnMarie Wood
> *Sent:* Thursday, December 6, 2018 11:44 AM
> *To:* Tweeters <tweeters...>
> *Subject:* [Tweeters] Stanwood incident - 12/4/18
>
>
>
> Yesterday morning I was confronted by a VERY angry couple on 98th NW. At
> the time 8-10 Birders were walking the short stretch of road in search of
> the VEFL. I had already seen the bird and was just an extra pair of eyes,
> and transportation, for a friend.
>
>
>
> This road certainly fits the description of a sensitive area. There are no
> shoulders or pullouts, and property on both sides of the road is private,
> posted, and closely monitored. This includes the dike! There is no place
> to park, or turn around, on without encroaching on private property.
>
>
>
> Yesterday, in an attempt to avoid a garbage truck and several walkers I
> made a quick turn around in the first driveway on the left. The property
> owners drove in right behind the garbage truck, were incensed by my
> “trespassing” and that of increasing numbers birders, and spent the next
> 15-20 minutes shouting accusations at me and the birders walking along 98th
> NW.
>
>
>
> My apology for using their driveway was finally accepted by Mrs. B. who
> agreed the my turnaround wasn’t the main concern and asked me to put out
> the word that our presence was bad for the wildlife in the area and a
> problem for many of the residents on 98th NW.
>
>
>
> Unfortunately, her husband was so angry that he retrieved a shotgun from
> his car, aimed it upwards, and discharged it repeatedly, both from the
> street and the dike, while yelling at everyone still on the street. The
> threatening behavior was disturbing and the message clear: BIRDERS ARE NOT
> WELCOME AND TRESSPASSING WILL NOT BE TOLERATED.
>
>
>
>
>
> Ann Marie Wood
>
> Mountlake Terrace, WA
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
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> <Tweeters...>
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Date: 12/7/18 11:37 am
From: Cara Borre <cmborre1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marbled Murrelet survey deadline today
Hi Tweets:

I am forwarding an email I received from Carla Mingione regarding Marbled
Murrelet conservation. I completed the short survey and included my
thoughts on why this little bird is so worthy of our protection. Seeing a
MAMU, often with its life-long mate, always brings a smile and respect for
what it goes through to reproduce. If you find the time, and value our
murrelets, please let the DNR know and share the survey information with
those who may be interested.

Cheers,
Cara Borre
Gig Harbor

Hi All,
I’m sending a reminder out, if you want to comment, today is the last day
to submit a public comment to the Department of Natural Resources which
will be considered in the choosing of a plan for a long term conservation
for the marbled murrelet. (& the deadline for that today is 5pm).

Here is a link for more info:
http://www.wecprotects.org/marbled-murrelet

Via Facebook: Murrelet Survival Project

Link to survey:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/MMLTCSRDEIS

I think all comments great or small are taken in.
Cheers. Hope you’re all having a really good break. Thank you.
Carla Mingione

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Date: 12/7/18 11:37 am
From: Christopher Clark <cjbirdmanclark...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Palm Warbler numbers (throwing in Swamp Sparrow too)
It's been an abnormally good year for both Palm Warbler and Swamp Sparrow
here in the PNW. Plenty of reports of both species from all over the place,
even with some east of the Cascades! Not sure what the cause is, but I
wouldn't be opposed to this trend continuing in the coming years :)

Christopher Clark
Sumner, WA

Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/155731005@N03/
Instagram: @birdmanclarkphotography

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Date: 12/7/18 10:21 am
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Nisqually NWR Wednesday Walk for 12.5.2018
HI Tweets,

twenty of us enjoyed a cold one with temperatures in the 30's to 40's and
sunny skies. Highlights included HUTTON'S VIREO, TRUMPETER SWAN, PINE
SISKIN, VIRGINIA RAIL, SNOW GOOSE and PEREGRINE FALCON.

We started the morning at the Visitor Center Pond Overlook at 8am and had
nice observations of RING-NECKED DUCK, HOODED MERGANSER and BUFFLEHEAD.

The Orchard was good for GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW, FOX SPARROW, and
RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKER. Our group found a large mixed flock of
BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE, CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEE, both KINGLET, and BROWN
CREEPER. In this group Kyle found a HUTTON'S VIREO which presented well
for many in our group, we also had nice looks of HAIRY WOODPECKER.

The flooded fields had good numbers of CACKLING GEESE, both minima and
taverner's. We enjoyed nice looks of RED-TAILED HAWK, and RUBY-CROWNED
KINGLET. A single gorgeous TRUMPETER SWAN circled around the fresh water
area within the dike but did not land for a visit.

The west side of the Twin Barns Loop Tail was good for BEWICK'S WREN,
SPOTTED TOWHEE, GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW, DOWNY WOODPECKER, BUSHTIT, BROWN
CREEPER, both KINGLET and DARK-EYED JUNCO. We observed several flocks of
AMERICAN GOLDFINCH with a few PINE SISKIN mixed in! The VIRGINIA RAIL
could be heard just north of the last observation platform before the
cut-off and seen walking on frozen pond ice around the Sedges. The Twin
Barns Observation Platform and area was good for NORTHERN HARRIER, NORTHERN
FLICKER, and YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER.

Out on the new dike or Nisqually Estuary Trail, we appreciated increased
numbers of BALD EAGLE. Last week we had 10-15 birds and this week we had
20-25 birds with many immature Eagles. According to Jon, Nisqually River
has one of latest Chum Salmon Runs in the world, and December is a great
time to see upwards 50 Bald Eagle around the Refuge from now until the end
of the year. An immature PEREGRINE FALCON with dark brown plumage and
prominent supercilium was seen in the area of the surge plain, along with
AMERICAN KESTREL, NORTHERN HARRIER, RED-TAILED HAWK, COOPER'S HAWK, WESTERN
MEADOWLARK and LINCOLN SPARROW. With the high low tide of 6ft at 10am and
a high high tide of 14ft at 3pm, we were able to enjoy the overwhelming
numbers of AMERICAN GREEN-WINGED TEAL and AMERICAN WIGEON be gently pushed
closer towards the Trail and the edges of Leschi Slough. We estimated
approximately 4-5,000 Teal and 2-3,000 Wigeon. In the group we observed
two EURASIAN WIGEON and two AMERCIAN X EURASIAN WIGEON hybrids, we also
observed good numbers of MALLARD, NORTHERN PINTAIL and GADWALL. A few
NORTHERN SHOVELERS were seen as well. On the inside or fresh water side we
enjoyed three SNOW GEESE as well additional CACKLING and CANADA GEESE.

With plenty of waters edge and receding mud flats, 9-11ft is a great time
to enjoy the movement of Shorebirds and Gulls on the Nisqually Estuary
Boardwalk Trail. We had great observation of hundreds of DUNLIN and LEAST
SANDPIPER, presumed to be winter residents. As well, terrific looks at
many GREATER YELLOWLEGS and SPOTTED SANDPIPER. We had good looks of
DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT, COMMON GOLDENEYE, BUFFLEHEAD, RING-BILLED GULL,
MEW GULL, GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL, and WESTERN X GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL hybrid.
From the closure gate 700ft short of the Puget Sound Viewing Platform, we
scoped RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, SURF SCOTER, and BRANDT'S CORMORANT on the
Channel Marker. The wreck just north of Red Salmon Slough and south of
Dupont was covered in Sea Lions, I suspect Steller's Sea Lions. Both
McAllister Creek and Nisqually River had California Sea Lions and Harbor
Seals indicative of the fish run. Gull were observed eating Salmon carcass
along the way.

A PEREGRINE FALCON swooped through and picked up a LEAST SANDPIPER prey,
flushing Waterfowl and Shorebirds. We enjoyed several displays of large
flocks fleeing predators or moving with the tide to forage prior to high
tide. Very nice murmurations of Dunlin.

On our return we picked up the GREAT HORNED OWL on the inside of the east
Twin Barns Loop Trail just north of the Beaver Dam. Bob had photo's
earlier in the week of two Owls, our breeding pair, so we hope for
successful breeding and incubation this winter. A Muskrat was foraging at
the base of the Beaver Dam. An additional WILSON'S SNIPE was observed
foraging in the area of the spring just to the right of the Visitor Center
Pond Overlook to help wrap up our walk.

Overall another beautiful day at the Refuge. Upwards of 70 species
observed with 167 species seen thus far on the Wednesday Walk for 2018.
Until we meet again next week at the Visitor Center Pond Overlook...

Good birding!

Shep


--
Shep Thorp
Browns Point
253-370-3742

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Date: 12/6/18 10:21 pm
From: Randy <re_hill...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Palm Warbler at Eide Road
Has there been a jump in Palm Warblers this fall? My wanderings over the
last week included 3 (maybe as many as 5) Saturday at Seaside, Clatsop Co.
OR; 1 (and probably more) Monday afternoon at the Hoquiam WTP, Grays Harbor
County; 2 (maybe more) yesterday at the Bay Center turnoff from 101 in
Pacific County. Probably more around, my ears aren't very helpful.

Randy Hill
Ridgefield

-----Original Message-----
From: Tweeters [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On
Behalf Of H Heiberg
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 11:31 AM
To: Tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] Palm Warbler at Eide Road

Just saw a Palm Warbler at the entrance to Eide Road. Also seen by the
Pinks.

Hank Heiberg
Issaquah, WA

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 12/6/18 8:21 pm
From: Hank H <h.heiberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Palm Warbler at Eide Road; Northern Waterthrush at Wylie Slough

> We started the day at Eide Road and immediately saw a Palm Warbler foraging on the grassy slope to our left as we descended from the highway. It was within a few feet of the guard rail. It flew east and was seen by Steve and Connie Pink and then returned to where we had seen it. Here is a photo.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/44394396230/in/photostream/
>
> Later at Wylie Slough we saw the Northern Waterthrush. We think that the ice on the ponds helped us observe the Waterthrush because the Waterthrush went out on the ice to forage so was out in the open. Here is a photo
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/46161001082/in/photostream/
>
> and a video
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/46161001182/in/photostream/

> Please give the video time to load so that it runs smoothly.

> Hank & Karen Heiberg
> Issaquah, WA

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Date: 12/6/18 7:17 pm
From: Rick Taylor <taylorrl...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Stanwood Birding situation
It was *NOT* the house with the US Army flag. The incident was at the first house on 98th with a faded hand lettered sign above the garage reading “Swede’s Funny Farm Shop” Tina and I talked to a number of the homeowners as they came and left. The guy in the last house on the road, where the bird has been seen most frequently, is very friendly. He came out both days that were there and talked about the bird and warned us about the “crazy guy with the shot gun”. We talked to the guy at the second from the last house and told him about the bird. He was non-committal. We never saw anyone at the house of the Veteran with the US Army flag. We talked to the folks that live in a farmstead at the end of the road. They described Swede as “bat-shit crazy”.

Then of course there is ‘Swede’ – the resident at the first house on 98th Ave NW with the “Swede’s Funny Farm Shop” sign. My wife Tina was walking up the road right behind Ann Marie’s car when the incident started, and I was walking along the road about 100ft in front her car. The guy and his wife were both yelling, and Ann Marie was apologizing for pulling into their drive to let the truck and other car pass. Ann Marie and Tina got his wife calmed down very quickly. I decided not to engage in the rant as Tina and Ann Marie had it under control, and injecting another party was not going to help. ‘Swede’ retrieved a shot-gun and mounted the dike and fired at least 3 rounds in the direction of the river. He then went into his driveway and fired three rounds from the hip into bushes on his property along the road. He then unloaded and put the shot-gun into his vehicle and resumed his rant. His wife got visibly nervous and pointed out that it was hunting season and that he had a valid hunting license and could legally hunt on their property. He eventually ranted himself out and he and his wife left in the vehicle. I did not see him point the weapon at anyone nor did I hear him threaten anyone nor did I observe any unsafe weapons handling. My impression was that he was trying to scare away birds so that we would all leave.

If you want to chase the bird, remember that there is no parking anywhere along the road. There are no sidewalks, so walk on the edge of the road. The dike is private and posted with no trespassing signs, so stay off it. All the property is private, so stay on the road. I recommend parking in Stanwood and walking. It’s not far.

Rick

Rick Taylor
Everett, WA

From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of Nadine Drisseq
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 2:28 PM
To: <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Stanwood Birding situation

I saw the bird after Steve G had left the area yesterday Dec 5th, between 3 and 4.30pm. (I know this because I waved goodbye to Steve when he left.) I saw both the Black Phoebe and the Vermilion Flycatcher near the house that was shooting into the air and blowing off fire crackers,(US Army Flag in yard). I got shots of it at the house next door with the apple tree where the owner seemed much more agreeable. I made sure I didn't point my camera at the house but just at the bird. The shooting seemed to be coming from the house with the US army flag but I'm not 100% on that - can someone confirm?
It was about 10 shots total, but pretty far from where I was. However, I really hate bullies, and I wasn't doing anything wrong - just walking slowly down the road with my lens under my arm and looking mostly with my eyes, and it sounded more like he was trying to scare the birds away from his house. I wasn't even looking in people's yards until I saw the bird fly into the yard of the US Army flag, to the right of the house. That was actually the first time I saw it. It was sallying from the eaves/shingles and then flying to the next yard. The other residents I spoke to were ok with having birders. I spoke to the man at the house at the end on the corner with all the house sparrows in his hedge - he was very nice. The person in the house with the apple tree waved and smiled back when I called and thanked them for their patience. Another stopped in his car and asked what was going on and I explained it was a rare bird and he was very nice too. It was just this one guy spoiling it for everyone else so do be aware of this house with the flags if you go. (I'm fairly sure it was that house)

BTW If that person is serious about disturbing wildlife perhaps he shouldn't be shooting at/in the environs of a rare bird. I certainly will report him if I find out the area is not ok for discharging weapons as soon as I get the chance.

Stanwood Police non emergency line is:
425-407-3999

Does anyone have this man's full name so I can report him fully?
Can they confirm that it was the house with the flags that was discharging a firearm?
I tried not look at the house where the shooting was coming from and move away from it, so I wasn't entirely sure.
The shooting stopped after I just ignored it. It took me an hour to find the bird and I wasn't going to give up after driving 2 hours to get there, and also no chance of seeing another one in my lifetime probably. I left after I got some shots of the bird but I returned to show it to another birder at dusk.

Nadine

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Date: 12/6/18 6:53 pm
From: Nadine Drisseq <drisseq.n...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Stanwood: a CORRECTION - and IMPORTANT UPDATE from Stanwood PD.
Hi Tweets!

I just spoke with Stanwood police dept. They asked me to update Birders
with the following important information to avoid conflict and be able to
Bird safely:

Be aware that the area south of the highway is county property which allows
property owners to brandish and fire on their own property (but not point
weapons at people). There is also a lot of arial shooting property where
hunters are allowed to shoot ducks etc.

First off, my mistake, it is NOT the house with the US ARMY flag that is
the 'dangerous' house. It is a property owner who is north of that house.
Ann Marie was able to correct me on this (Thank you, dear.)

The three houses on the end of the road towards the corner with Leque rd,
"seemed ok" with having viewers walking past the house. They knew they had
a rare bird on their property. They have also had to deal with having
birders around before (maybe owl season) and also duck hunters, so being
respectful and friendly, smiling at people. and waving hello helps
dissolve conflict.

One particular property owner owns part of the dyke or steep bank on the
side by the river, and I think he owns the empty lot or pull off on the
right side of the road opposite the gates to the water treatment site. He
seems to own at least 4 properties that aren't built on and look like
vacant land. There is a No Trespassing sign by the pull out that has fallen
over, which is also where many birders were parking. Do not assume that
because other birders are parking somewhere, that it is legal. That was my
mistake. I had to pick up the No Trespassing sign to read it. I understand
that ALL of the property that is not paved County road is private. SO if
you want to see the bird it is recommended:

1. Keep to the paved road. If you MUST pull over because you have trouble
walking far, just do towards the end of the road near where it takes a 90*
angle and turns into Leque Rd, and again, KEEP TO THE PAVED ROAD. I can't
stress this last point enough.

2. You are allowed to pull over on this road (as per Stanwood police) as
long as you are not blocking the road, but I do not recommend it unless
necessary. When one car pulls over, others do so too. Even 3 cars pulled
over would be really annoying for residents to have so many cars in front
of their houses.

3. Do not park in any of the the pull outs. If you want to park, find
somewhere legal back on the main highway by a business perhaps where you
won't be towed. Ask permission of business owners if possible. Then walk up
the road keeping on the pavement i.e. road itself.

4. DO NOT CLIMB THE DYKE OR BANK of the river. That is private property. Do
NOT even walk on any grass verge. I did hear shots while I was just walking
on the paved road so I don't know what that was about. It could have been
duck hunting.

The police officer said that the property owner may have had to deal with
photographers, birders or hunters, who in the past, trespassed and littered
or did not respect his land in some way. He is well within his rights to
sound off his shotgun on his property. Birders may be preventing ducks from
flying over and affecting hunting i.e. affecting wildlife in his opinion.

There were at least two incidents involving shooting in the air yesterday.
One in the morning (which sounded really scary because face to face
brandishing and shooting in the air, was involved) and one in the afternoon
(mild annoyance). It is very easy to walk on some private property without
realizing and set off this guy's trigger finger so be careful and be safe.

I thought that last three houses by the 98th and Leque intersection, were
pretty friendly and safe to view the bird from the road from and so far the
bird has been seen here in small shrubs and even on breeze blocks half a
foot off the ground. This is also where the Black Phoebe has been seen.
Check out the shrubs near the house.

I recommend talking to the residents without disturbing them, and asking
them permission if you can photo or view the bird while it is on their
property just to be polite. I wouldn't ring doorbells to do so, but just if
you get the opportunity when they are in speaking range and look as though
they don't mind interacting.

This is a quiet road and the residents appreciate the wildlife.

I hope you all get to see this bird in harmony with residents.
*Stay warm, drive safe.*
*Nadine Drisseq*

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Date: 12/6/18 6:45 pm
From: <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2018-12-06
Tweets – It was a gorgeous day; though it dawned a bitter 23 degrees, it was fogless and sunny, with only occasional winds. During the morning, it warmed 19 degrees by the time we finished at the Rowing Club. It was birdy too, especially for the first few hours. And several birds, that were previously MIA this winter, decided to show up.

After the walk, I went back to the Pea Patch, and after a half an hour of searching, I finally spotted the PALM WARBLER working the sunny side of the wall between the Pea Patch and the Pet Garden. This bird was first seen by Hank Heiberg about 10 days ago, and not noted again to my knowledge until yesterday morning. It is a very drab juvenile, showing only a trace of a reddish crown, and a hint of an eye line. The breast has a lot of blurry streaking. The undertail coverts are bright yellow, though, up the white spot at the end of the underside of the tail.

Highlights:
a.. Greater White-fronted Goose – at least 1 juvenile in with a couple of thousand Cacklers – First of Fall, finally
b.. TRUMPETER SWAN – five adults in a slow fly-over. Thankfully they called – First of Fall
c.. Northern Shoveler – four at lake – first since late October
d.. - 8 species of duck total – nothing notable, except this is the best showing we’ve had. Included both Common and Hooded Mergansers
e.. Ring-necked Pheasant – male at Pea Patch again
f.. Horned Grebe – one on lake
g.. Green Heron – far side of slough, north of last dog swim area
h.. Northern Saw-whet Owl – Matt heard one well pre-dawn
i.. Merlin – Mark saw one near the mansion
j.. Northern Shrike – adult, 2 sightings
k.. PINE SISKIN – suddenly everywhere – maybe 100. First of Fall
l.. Western Meadowlark – one for the group near the Viewing Mound. Six for me just before 8 am
m.. PALM WARBLER – after the walk; see notes above
Our only big misses today were American Wigeon and Mew Gull. A really good day, with 63 species (counting the Palm Warbler).

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== <BirdMarymoor...>
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Date: 12/6/18 6:26 pm
From: Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Job Openings in Wildlife Conservation (WDFW)
Tweeters,
The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) currently has two positions open working in Wildlife Conservation. I've attached below the (edited) wording from a message I received this afternoon:

"We are hiring two important positions and would really appreciate your help spreading the word and finding excellent candidates. The two positions are a Landscape Conservation Section Manager in the Diversity Division in Wildlife Program ... and a Land Use & Policy Section Manager in the Ecosystem Services Division in Habitat Program. Both positions would focus on advancing WDFW conservation priorities ... .


"Please share with your networks links below."


https://www.governmentjobs.com/careers/washington/jobs/2284563/natural-resource-scientist-4-11956w<https://eur03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.governmentjobs.com%2Fcareers%2Fwashington%2Fjobs%2F2284563%2Fnatural-resource-scientist-4-11956w&data=02%7C01%7C%7C166a438014b44a0b6e6108d65bc705e4%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636797307687715130&sdata=akVAFnZ6xC5LlTft4npn7L2GJ0tJ4bE7jxHNIO%2BeIa0%3D&reserved=0>

https://www.governmentjobs.com/careers/washington/jobs/2284661/environmental-planner-5-11962h<https://eur03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.governmentjobs.com%2Fcareers%2Fwashington%2Fjobs%2F2284661%2Fenvironmental-planner-5-11962h&data=02%7C01%7C%7C166a438014b44a0b6e6108d65bc705e4%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636797307687715130&sdata=7nqAmJIGiyiWCHW6vqhMGzouTlQSgKaUrsYpGeGyAh4%3D&reserved=0>

May all your birds be identified,
Denis DeSilvis
<avnacrs4birds...>


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Date: 12/6/18 4:59 pm
From: John Puschock <g_g_allin...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Stanwood Incident
I went to Stanwood today for the Vermilion Flycatcher. I had heard previously that there was only one resident who had problems with birders, though now it sounds like there may be more. I hadn't been on that road before, so I decided to at least drive down it and see if it was possible to avoid that house and not cause problems. I made one pass of the area in my vehicle without seeing the bird and decided to head over to Eide Road. I ran into some other birders there who said they had seen the Vermilion on 98th Avenue a short time before and that the residents of the two houses closest to the bend of the paved road didn't mind birders. (I won't name the birders just in case they don't want responsibility for this info.) I then returned and parked near the west end of Leque Rd. (this is where 98th Avenue appears to turn 90 degrees to the east but actually continues south as a dirt road). From here I could see the location where the flycatcher has been seen most frequently -- the yard with short apple trees -- but out of sight of the house with flags on the porch. (In his eBird checklist from a few days ago, Josh Adams recommended parking in this area to minimize conflicts.)

The flycatcher appeared after about 10-15 minutes. I wasn't interested in photographs beyond a record shot for documentation for my eBird checklist, so I didn't bother trying to get closer on 98th Avenue. I left shortly after that.

If you want to look for the bird, this approach may be the best way to avoid any unpleasant situations. Walking up 98th might open you up to conflict. A scope might be helpful if you want to see the bird well. Obviously, obey any no parking and no trespassing signs. I know that sounds like a no brainer, but some have problems with that.

John Puschock
Matthews Beach, Seattle

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Date: 12/6/18 3:29 pm
From: Jon. Anderson and Marty Chaney <festuca...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Stanwood Incident
I was thinking of running up to see the bird, but now I'm vacillating. I did email the 'incident report' to the Stanwood City Police, and was informed that it was not in their jurisdiction, but rather should be reported to the Snohomish County Sheriffs office.


The number they gave me was not answered, but I went on-line and found the email for the Sheriff & Undersheriff, so forwarded it to them. Hopefully, no one gets hurt because of an out-of-control resident. If accosted, keep calm, back away, and dial 911


- jon. anderson

olywa

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Date: 12/6/18 2:28 pm
From: <wallydavis3...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Stanwood incident - 12/4/18
Discharging a firearm in that manner is likely a felony and should be reported to the sheriff.

Wally Davis



From: Tweeters <tweeters-bounces...> On Behalf Of AnnMarie Wood
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 11:44 AM
To: Tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Stanwood incident - 12/4/18



Yesterday morning I was confronted by a VERY angry couple on 98th NW. At the time 8-10 Birders were walking the short stretch of road in search of the VEFL. I had already seen the bird and was just an extra pair of eyes, and transportation, for a friend.



This road certainly fits the description of a sensitive area. There are no shoulders or pullouts, and property on both sides of the road is private, posted, and closely monitored. This includes the dike! There is no place to park, or turn around, on without encroaching on private property.



Yesterday, in an attempt to avoid a garbage truck and several walkers I made a quick turn around in the first driveway on the left. The property owners drove in right behind the garbage truck, were incensed by my “trespassing” and that of increasing numbers birders, and spent the next 15-20 minutes shouting accusations at me and the birders walking along 98th NW.



My apology for using their driveway was finally accepted by Mrs. B. who agreed the my turnaround wasn’t the main concern and asked me to put out the word that our presence was bad for the wildlife in the area and a problem for many of the residents on 98th NW.



Unfortunately, her husband was so angry that he retrieved a shotgun from his car, aimed it upwards, and discharged it repeatedly, both from the street and the dike, while yelling at everyone still on the street. The threatening behavior was disturbing and the message clear: BIRDERS ARE NOT WELCOME AND TRESSPASSING WILL NOT BE TOLERATED.





Ann Marie Wood

Mountlake Terrace, WA










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Date: 12/6/18 2:27 pm
From: Nadine Drisseq <drisseq.n...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Stanwood Birding situation
I saw the bird after Steve G had left the area yesterday Dec 5th, between 3
and 4.30pm. (I know this because I waved goodbye to Steve when he left.) I
saw both the Black Phoebe and the Vermilion Flycatcher near the house that
was shooting into the air and blowing off fire crackers,(US Army Flag in
yard). I got shots of it at the house next door with the apple tree where
the owner seemed much more agreeable. I made sure I didn't point my camera
at the house but just at the bird. The shooting seemed to be coming from
the house with the US army flag but I'm not 100% on that - can someone
confirm?
It was about 10 shots total, but pretty far from where I was. However, I
really hate bullies, and I wasn't doing anything wrong - just walking
slowly down the road with my lens under my arm and looking mostly with my
eyes, and it sounded more like he was trying to scare the birds away from
his house. I wasn't even looking in people's yards until I saw the bird fly
into the yard of the US Army flag, to the right of the house. That was
actually the first time I saw it. It was sallying from the eaves/shingles
and then flying to the next yard. The other residents I spoke to were ok
with having birders. I spoke to the man at the house at the end on the
corner with all the house sparrows in his hedge - he was very nice. The
person in the house with the apple tree waved and smiled back when I called
and thanked them for their patience. Another stopped in his car and asked
what was going on and I explained it was a rare bird and he was very nice
too. It was just this one guy spoiling it for everyone else so do be aware
of this house with the flags if you go. (I'm fairly sure it was that house)

BTW If that person is serious about disturbing wildlife perhaps he
shouldn't be shooting at/in the environs of a rare bird. I certainly will
report him if I find out the area is not ok for discharging weapons as soon
as I get the chance.

Stanwood Police non emergency line is:
*425-407-3999*

Does anyone have this man's full name so I can report him fully?
Can they confirm that it was the house with the flags that was discharging
a firearm?
I tried not look at the house where the shooting was coming from and move
away from it, so I wasn't entirely sure.
The shooting stopped after I just ignored it. It took me an hour to find
the bird and I wasn't going to give up after driving 2 hours to get there,
and also no chance of seeing another one in my lifetime probably. I left
after I got some shots of the bird but I returned to show it to another
birder at dusk.


*Nadine*

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Date: 12/6/18 1:57 pm
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Stanwood incident - 12/4/18
Is the stretch of road public or private property?  If it is public property, birders (or anyone else for that matter) certainly have a right to walk on it without someone pulling out and discharging a shotgun. 

I agree with the earlier post that the incident should be reported to the appropriate law enforcement agency.   Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA

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Date: 12/6/18 1:25 pm
From: Will's Email <yekramw...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Stanwood incident - 12/4/18
Did anyone call the police? Someone should have, even now. It would be great is someone got a video to show the police. Multiple people reporting the incident would be helpful too.

What if the failure of one of the birders who was there to report this incident leads to the next birder that goes to the area getting shot?

I see no difference between this incident and a person who does not reporting a deranged kid who later takes a gun to school.......

It isn’t too late to report it.

Will Markey
General Adjuster
Cell - 253-569-8455
Sent from my IPhone

> On Dec 6, 2018, at 11:44, AnnMarie Wood <amw.5737...> wrote:
>
> Yesterday morning I was confronted by a VERY angry couple on 98th NW. At the time 8-10 Birders were walking the short stretch of road in search of the VEFL. I had already seen the bird and was just an extra pair of eyes, and transportation, for a friend.
>
> This road certainly fits the description of a sensitive area. There are no shoulders or pullouts, and property on both sides of the road is private, posted, and closely monitored. This includes the dike! There is no place to park, or turn around, on without encroaching on private property.
>
> Yesterday, in an attempt to avoid a garbage truck and several walkers I made a quick turn around in the first driveway on the left. The property owners drove in right behind the garbage truck, were incensed by my “trespassing” and that of increasing numbers birders, and spent the next 15-20 minutes shouting accusations at me and the birders walking along 98th NW.
>
> My apology for using their driveway was finally accepted by Mrs. B. who agreed the my turnaround wasn’t the main concern and asked me to put out the word that our presence was bad for the wildlife in the area and a problem for many of the residents on 98th NW.
>
> Unfortunately, her husband was so angry that he retrieved a shotgun from his car, aimed it upwards, and discharged it repeatedly, both from the street and the dike, while yelling at everyone still on the street. The threatening behavior was disturbing and the message clear: BIRDERS ARE NOT WELCOME AND TRESSPASSING WILL NOT BE TOLERATED.
>
>
> Ann Marie Wood
> Mountlake Terrace, WA
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
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> <Tweeters...>
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Date: 12/6/18 11:46 am
From: AnnMarie Wood <amw.5737...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Stanwood incident - 12/4/18
Yesterday morning I was confronted by a VERY angry couple on 98th NW. At
the time 8-10 Birders were walking the short stretch of road in search of
the VEFL. I had already seen the bird and was just an extra pair of eyes,
and transportation, for a friend.

This road certainly fits the description of a sensitive area. There are no
shoulders or pullouts, and property on both sides of the road is private,
posted, and closely monitored. This includes the dike! There is no place
to park, or turn around, on without encroaching on private property.

Yesterday, in an attempt to avoid a garbage truck and several walkers I
made a quick turn around in the first driveway on the left. The property
owners drove in right behind the garbage truck, were incensed by my
“trespassing” and that of increasing numbers birders, and spent the next
15-20 minutes shouting accusations at me and the birders walking along 98th
NW.

My apology for using their driveway was finally accepted by Mrs. B. who
agreed the my turnaround wasn’t the main concern and asked me to put out
the word that our presence was bad for the wildlife in the area and a
problem for many of the residents on 98th NW.

Unfortunately, her husband was so angry that he retrieved a shotgun from
his car, aimed it upwards, and discharged it repeatedly, both from the
street and the dike, while yelling at everyone still on the street. The
threatening behavior was disturbing and the message clear: BIRDERS ARE NOT
WELCOME AND TRESSPASSING WILL NOT BE TOLERATED.


Ann Marie Wood
Mountlake Terrace, WA

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Date: 12/6/18 11:33 am
From: H Heiberg <h.heiberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Palm Warbler at Eide Road
Just saw a Palm Warbler at the entrance to Eide Road. Also seen by the Pinks.

Hank Heiberg
Issaquah, WA

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 12/6/18 8:57 am
From: Tom Mansfield <birds...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Stanwood birding situation Vermillion Flycatcher
Tweets – the problem may have been solved if the flycatcher split for Eide Road per Steve’s eBird report. If anyone sees it today, please post!

Tom Mansfield in Seattle



Vermilion Flycatcher (Pyrocephalus rubinus) (1)

- Reported Dec 05, 2018 14:10 by steve giles

- 98th Ave NW, Snohomish, Washington

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=48.2381546,-122.3661658&ll=48.2381546,-122.3661658

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50463086

- Media: 1 Photo

- Comments: "continuing bird-at the end of 98th flew up into a tree for 30 seconds and then flew off towards Eide Rd"



From: Tweeters [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Marv Breece
Sent: Wednesday, December 05, 2018 10:10 PM
To: Tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] Stanwood birding situation

Some of the residents in Stanwood are not pleased with recent birder visits to their neighborhood. One of the residents has discharged his shotgun in the presence of birders. I believe this is a situation that could get very ugly and should be taken seriously.

I suggest you bird elsewhere. If you choose to visit this Stanwood location, tread very lightly.

--
Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>

"what are the costs to a society of an entire population conditioned to spend so much of their waking lives not in concentration and focus but rather in fragmentary awareness and subject to constant interruption?" - The Attention Merchants by Tim Wu
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Date: 12/6/18 8:56 am
From: Izzy Wong <gobirder...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Stanwood birding situation
Thanks Marv and Joshua for the heads up about the displeasure of at least one resident in the Vermillion Flycatcher area. I would hate to see anyone get caught in an unsafe situation.
I’m okay not chasing this bird.

Izzy Arévalo Wong
Seattle
<gobirder...>

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Date: 12/5/18 10:17 pm
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Stanwood birding situation
Some of the residents in Stanwood are not pleased with recent birder visits to their neighborhood. One of the residents has discharged his shotgun in the presence of birders. I believe this is a situation that could get very ugly and should be taken seriously.

I suggest you bird elsewhere. If you choose to visit this Stanwood location, tread very lightly.

--
Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>

"what are the costs to a society of an entire population conditioned to spend so much of their waking lives not in concentration and focus but rather in fragmentary awareness and subject to constant interruption?" - The Attention Merchants by Tim Wu


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Date: 12/5/18 8:07 pm
From: Sharon Cormier-Aagaard <scormieraa001...>
Subject: [Tweeters] eBird Report - Lake Sammamish State Park, Dec 5, 2018
Hi Tweets,

Here's my report of the birds we saw today at the monthly bird walk for Eastside Audubon:

Lake Sammamish State Park, King, Washington, US
Dec 5, 2018 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
3.3 mile(s)
Comments: Sharon and Stan were joined by 17 other birders on December 5, 2018 for Eastside Audubon's monthly bird walk at Lake Sammamish State Park. Weather was sunny, 27-34F, 0-1 mph winds. The species count was 43, 141 for the year. The birds were quiet and we had a surprising lower species count than expected.

HIGHLIGHTS
**we didn't have a repeat from last month's large variety of waterfowl among the 100s of American Coots at Sunset Beach and the boat launch--far less variety this time: 1 Ring-necked Duck, 6 Lesser Scaups, 2 Buffleheads, an American Wigeon, Mallards, a Common Merganser, 4 Pied-billed Grebes, and 6 distant Western Grebes (Redhead, Ruddy Duck and Canvasback were reported here a couple days ago)
**Gulls: Mew, Ring-billed, California, Glacous-winged and WesternXGlaucous Winged. The recent Herring Gull could not be found.
**a single Swan flew from the Sunset Beach area, and we got brief looks as it flew out of the fog to the northwest
**just 2 woodpecker species today: Hairy & Northern Flicker
**other species of note: a Sharp-shined Hawk, an immature Snow Goose with 100s of Cacklers and several Canadas, 27 Killdeer

The next bird walk is JANUARY 7, 2019, 8am to noon. This is a state park and a Discover Pass is required to park here ($35 annual or $10 daily).

Sharon Aagaard
Bellevue WA
<scormieraa001...>

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Date: 12/5/18 3:13 pm
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Do Common merganser raft?
Yes, they can. For example, I have seen large groups or rafts at Tulalip
Bay near Marysville. Log Boom also can be a good spot to see several dozen
Canvasbacks, however.

Phil Dickinson

On Wed, Dec 5, 2018 at 1:04 PM tredick christina <cjt37...> wrote:

> Hello all, I've discovered log boom park off highway 522 in Kenmore. Great
> place to see common merganser. I was there Sunday and had a raft of some
> birds I couldn't be sure of. I know they weren't scaup or ring neck ducks.
> Do common merganser raft?
> Happy Holidays!
> Christina Woodinville
> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
> <https://go.onelink.me/107872968?pid=InProduct&c=Global_Internal_YGrowth_AndroidEmailSig__AndroidUsers&af_wl=ym&af_sub1=Internal&af_sub2=Global_YGrowth&af_sub3=EmailSignature>
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Date: 12/5/18 1:05 pm
From: tredick christina <cjt37...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Do Common merganser raft?
Hello all, I've discovered log boom park off highway 522 in Kenmore. Great place to see common merganser. I was there Sunday and had a raft of some birds I couldn't be sure of. I know they weren't scaup or ring neck ducks. Do common merganser raft?Happy Holidays!
Christina Woodinville
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
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Date: 12/5/18 11:37 am
From: Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Stanwood vermillion flycatcher
Still flycatching along the fence at 11, seeming to head northward gradually.

Just make sure you don’t hang around the corner too long — homeowners are getting uncomfortable! Stanwood Police even popped by to make sure everything we alright. He seemed content at the birding explanation, but be warned!

Good birding, Joshua Glant

> On Dec 5, 2018, at 9:41 AM, Jordan Roderick <jordan...> wrote:
>
> The continuing rarity was seen in his regular spot on 98th Avenue at 9:30 AM. Despite the sub-freezing temps he appeared to be successfully flycatching.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 12/5/18 11:13 am
From: Jordan Roderick <jordan...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Wylie Slough waterthrush
The northern waterthrush was seen and heard foraging in the small pond across from the boat ramp at 11 AM

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Date: 12/5/18 9:45 am
From: Jordan Roderick <jordan...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Stanwood vermillion flycatcher
The continuing rarity was seen in his regular spot on 98th Avenue at 9:30 AM. Despite the sub-freezing temps he appeared to be successfully flycatching.

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Date: 12/4/18 8:42 pm
From: Hank H <h.heiberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Langlois Lake: Trumpeter Swans, Snow Geese and a Pacific Wren

>> Today we returned to Langlois Lake on what is the 54th anniversary of our meeting on a blind date. It is appropriate that a granddaughter clued us in to the birds on the lake. We had an outstanding day. Instead of fog we had sunshine. Here is a photo of the sun peaking over the ridge behind us.
>>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/44366104740/in/dateposted/
>>
>> The air was cold so there was beautiful hoarfrost on some of the branches.
>>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/44366104790/in/photostream/
>>
>> The Trumpeter Swans were active again today. (Please give the videos time to load so that they run smoothly and turn up the sound for the full effect.)
>>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/46183745831/in/photostream/
>>
>> The highlight of the day was about 1000 Snow Geese coming in for a landing.
>>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/46133577322/in/photostream/
>>
>> When we were about to leave, we had another delightful surprise. A Pacific Wren popped out of the blackberries a few feet from us. We are not sure what the wren was doing.
>>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/45272144615/in/dateposted/
>>
>> Here is an album of all of the photos and videos from the two days at Langlois Lake.
>>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/albums/72157701066217972
>>
>> Hank & Karen Heiberg
>> Issaquah, WA
>>

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Date: 12/4/18 7:01 pm
From: B P Bell <bellasoc...>
Subject: [Tweeters] EAS Samish trip 4 Dec 2018
Hi Tweets



Today, EAS took a trip up to the Samish & Skagit Flats. The day started out
bright and early, cold (28F) and totally clear. No wind!



As we made our way up I-5 we saw AMERICAN CROW, RED-TAILED HAWK, BALD EAGLE,
DARK-EYED JUNCO, EUROPEAN STARLING, a flyover swan (all at the Smokey Point
Rest Area).. As we came down into the Skagit Valley the field south of the
Conway exit had a large group of swans, unfortunately there is not good
location from which to study them here. As we turned onto Pulver Rd., off of
Chuckanut Dr. we found RED-TAILED HAWK, BALD EAGLE (the first of probably
close to 60 for the day), COMMON RAVEN and EUROPEAN STARLING, with ROCK
PIGEON at the Conway exit.



On Ershig Rd. we saw AMERICAN CROW, EUROPEAN STARLING, AMERICAN ROBIN, and
GREAT BLUE HERON. On Worline Rd. there were EURASIAN COLLARED-DOVE, MOURNING
DOVE, DARK-EYED JUNCO, WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW, BREWER'S BLACKBIRD and a house
with at least 15 ANNA'S HUMMINGBIRDs fighting over the feeders. At the house
with feeders on Bow Cemetary Rd. there were WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW, DARK-EYED
JUNCO, NORTHERN FLICKER and SPOTTED TOWHEE, a flyover TRUMPETER SWAN, and
AMERICAN ROBIN, and DOWNY WOODPECKER. On Bow Hill Rd. we saw HOUSE FINCH,
MALLARD and RED-TAILED HAWK. The weather continued clear, cold and windless.



On Chuckanut Dr. there were BALD EAGLE, NORTHERN HARRIER, ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK,
RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD, ROCK PIGEON, GREAT BLUE HERON, RED-TAILED HAWK and
AMERICAN KESTREL. Blanchard Rd. gave us BUFFLEHEAD and GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL
( a single MEW GULL) on the lagoon, and BALD EAGLE, STELLER'S JAY, SONG
SPARROW, HOUSE SPARROW and BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE. We saw EUROPEAN STARLING
on Colony Rd.



Smith Rd. in Edison had HOUSE SPARROW, SONG SPARROW, DARK-EYED JUNCO. A
Birch tree had a beautiful PEREGRINE FALCON and NORTHERN FLICKER. The slough
had many GREEN-WINGED TEAL and a RED-TAILED HAWK. We had BEWICK'S WREN and
DARK-EYED JUNCO on Ewing Rd. In Edison we saw GREEN-WINGED TEAL and
RED-TAILED HAWK.



Along Bayview Edison Rd. we saw MALLARD, AMERICAN WIGEON, BALD EAGLE
(several), KILLDEER, COMMON RAVEN, swans, RED-TAILED HAWK, DOUBLE-CRESTED
CORMORANT, HOUSE FINCH, ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK, NORTHERN HARRIER. On Samish
Island Rd. there were TRUMPETER SWAN, RED-TAILED HAWK, DUNLIN and
ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK.



At the W-90 we saw SONG SPARROW, LINCOLN'S SPARROW, BALD EAGLE (probably
15), RED-TAILED HAWK, a group of MEW GULLS, NORTHERN HARRIER (5), EUROPEAN
STARLING, WESTERN MEADOWLARK and AMERICAN KESTREL. At the spot on Wharf Rd.
we scanned the Bay and found BUFFLEHEAD, COMMON GOLDENEYE, LONG-TAILED DUCK
(8), BRANT (Many), RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH, SURF SCOTER, WHITE-WINGED SCOTER,
RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, RED-NECKED GREBE, CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEE,
DARK-EYED JUNCO, COMMON LOON, BRANDT'S CORMORANT, MERLIN, ANNA'S
HUMMINGBIRD, RING-BILLED GULL, CALIFORNIA GULL.



Back on Bayview-Edison Rd. - BALD EAGLE, RED-TAILED HAWK, GREAT BLUE HERON,
PEREGRINE FALCON. At Bayview State Park - NORTHERN PINTAIL, BUFFLEHEAD,
AMERICAN WIGEON, PIED-BILLED GREBE, and ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK.



At Valentine Ranch - there were BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE, CHESTNUT-BACKED
CHICKADEE, GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW, FOX SPARROW, DARK-EYED JUNCO, HOUSE
SPARROW, SPOTTED TOWHEE, DOWNY WOODPECKER, NORTHERN FLICKER, HOUSE FINCH,
ANNA'S HUMMINGBIRD, AMERICAN ROBIN, COMMON RAVEN, BALD EAGLE.



Along Rawlins Rd. we saw KILLDEER, TUNDRA SWAN, TRUMPETER SWAN, GREAT BLUE
HERON, DUNLIN. On Maupin Rd. WESTERN MEADOWLARK, a decent sized flock of
SNOW GEESE.



At the Hayton Preserve we saw WILSON'S SNIPE, MALLARD, AMERICAN WIGEON,
NORTHERN PINTAIL, GREEN-WINGED TEAL, a big flock of SNOW GEESE, MARSH WREN,
SONG SPARROW, GREATER YELLOWLEGS, and BALD EAGLE.



At the Game Range - RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, SPOTTED TOWHEE, HAIRY WOODPECKER,
EURASIAN COLLARED-DOVE, RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD, FOX SPARROW, BROWN CREEPER and
2 PEREGRINE FALCONs.



It was a great day in some always good areas, with neat friends!.



Brian H. Bell

Woodinville WA

Mail to bell asoc a t I s o me dia dot com


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Date: 12/4/18 3:34 pm
From: Rick Tyler <rhtyler...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Mega sighting on eBird
I thought it might have been a longitude issue, but I don't think so.
Taipei is 121.6 degrees east latitude, and Seattle is 122.3 west, which is
close, but the latitudes aren't. Like Matt suggests, probably just a
dropped pin in the wrong spot.

Rick Tyler

On Tue, Dec 4, 2018 at 3:25 PM Matt Bartels <mattxyz...> wrote:

>
> The text in Chinese gives a clue:
> Location is Xinhu Elementary [which google maps conveniently places in
> Taibei on Taiwan]
> Comments say 'I often see them'
>
> Together with the list coming through the Taiwan portal for eBird, I'd say
> someone had an unfortunate location plotting episode
>
> Matt Bartels
> Seattle, Wa
>
> -----Original Message-----
> >From: Mark Robinson <blobbybirdman...>
> >Sent: Dec 4, 2018 1:26 PM
> >To: Rick Tyler <rhtyler...>
> >Cc: Tweeters <tweeters...>
> >Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Mega sighting on eBird
> >
> >I couldn't decide if the sighting was wrong or the location was wrong
> >
> >On Tue, 4 Dec 2018 at 13:18, Rick Tyler <rhtyler...> wrote:
> >
> >> Taiwan Blue-Magpie in central Seattle? I wonder if a visitor saw a scrub
> >> jay?
> >>
> >> Rick
> >>
> >> ---------- Forwarded message ---------
> >> From: <ebird-alert...>
> >> Date: Tue, Dec 4, 2018 at 11:59 AM
> >> Subject: [eBird Alert] Year Needs Alert for King County <daily>
> >> (...)
> >> - Taiwan Blue-Magpie (1 report)
> >>
> >> (...)
> >>
> >> Taiwan Blue-Magpie (Urocissa caerulea) (5)
> >> - Reported Dec 03, 2018 06:40 by ximentin chuang
> >> - 新湖國小, King, Washington
> >> - Map:
> >>
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.610201,-122.323325&ll=47.610201,-122.323325
> >> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50411506
> >> - Comments: "經常會看到。"
> >>
> >> (...)
> >> _______________________________________________
> >> Tweeters mailing list
> >> <Tweeters...>
> >> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
> >>
> _______________________________________________
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> <Tweeters...>
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>


--
Rick Tyler

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Date: 12/4/18 3:28 pm
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Mega sighting on eBird

The text in Chinese gives a clue:
Location is Xinhu Elementary [which google maps conveniently places in Taibei on Taiwan]
Comments say 'I often see them'

Together with the list coming through the Taiwan portal for eBird, I'd say someone had an unfortunate location plotting episode

Matt Bartels
Seattle, Wa

-----Original Message-----
>From: Mark Robinson <blobbybirdman...>
>Sent: Dec 4, 2018 1:26 PM
>To: Rick Tyler <rhtyler...>
>Cc: Tweeters <tweeters...>
>Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Mega sighting on eBird
>
>I couldn't decide if the sighting was wrong or the location was wrong
>
>On Tue, 4 Dec 2018 at 13:18, Rick Tyler <rhtyler...> wrote:
>
>> Taiwan Blue-Magpie in central Seattle? I wonder if a visitor saw a scrub
>> jay?
>>
>> Rick
>>
>> ---------- Forwarded message ---------
>> From: <ebird-alert...>
>> Date: Tue, Dec 4, 2018 at 11:59 AM
>> Subject: [eBird Alert] Year Needs Alert for King County <daily>
>> (...)
>> - Taiwan Blue-Magpie (1 report)
>>
>> (...)
>>
>> Taiwan Blue-Magpie (Urocissa caerulea) (5)
>> - Reported Dec 03, 2018 06:40 by ximentin chuang
>> - 新湖國小, King, Washington
>> - Map:
>> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.610201,-122.323325&ll=47.610201,-122.323325
>> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50411506
>> - Comments: "經常會看到。"
>>
>> (...)
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>>
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Date: 12/4/18 1:30 pm
From: Mark Robinson <blobbybirdman...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Mega sighting on eBird
I couldn't decide if the sighting was wrong or the location was wrong

On Tue, 4 Dec 2018 at 13:18, Rick Tyler <rhtyler...> wrote:

> Taiwan Blue-Magpie in central Seattle? I wonder if a visitor saw a scrub
> jay?
>
> Rick
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ---------
> From: <ebird-alert...>
> Date: Tue, Dec 4, 2018 at 11:59 AM
> Subject: [eBird Alert] Year Needs Alert for King County <daily>
> (...)
> - Taiwan Blue-Magpie (1 report)
>
> (...)
>
> Taiwan Blue-Magpie (Urocissa caerulea) (5)
> - Reported Dec 03, 2018 06:40 by ximentin chuang
> - 新湖國小, King, Washington
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.610201,-122.323325&ll=47.610201,-122.323325
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50411506
> - Comments: "經常會看到。"
>
> (...)
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>

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Date: 12/4/18 1:20 pm
From: Rick Tyler <rhtyler...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Mega sighting on eBird
Taiwan Blue-Magpie in central Seattle? I wonder if a visitor saw a scrub
jay?

Rick

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: <ebird-alert...>
Date: Tue, Dec 4, 2018 at 11:59 AM
Subject: [eBird Alert] Year Needs Alert for King County <daily>
(...)
- Taiwan Blue-Magpie (1 report)

(...)

Taiwan Blue-Magpie (Urocissa caerulea) (5)
- Reported Dec 03, 2018 06:40 by ximentin chuang
- 新湖國小, King, Washington
- Map:
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.610201,-122.323325&ll=47.610201,-122.323325
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50411506
- Comments: "經常會看到。"

(...)

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Date: 12/4/18 8:25 am
From: Russ Koppendrayer <russkope...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Stan the hawk
As someone who grew up in Minnesota as a non-birder this makes perfect
sense to me.

Russ Koppendrayer
Longview, WA

On Tue, Dec 4, 2018 at 8:13 AM Marv Breece <marvbreece...> wrote:

> Just gotta share this.
>
> A few years ago, my sister & brother-in-law moved from Bellingham to
> Maine. Recently they learned of a Great Black Hawk in Portland (Maine) and
> drove there to see it. They had great looks at the bird. They sent me the
> following from a local Facebook group.
>
> "Went to Portland cause I heard The Great Black Hawk was there. I totally
> thought I was going to meet Stan Mikita...the greatest Black Hawk to lace
> up a pair of hockey skates. Apparently I was wrong and it was just some
> bird from away. I named him Stan so I could consider the morning a win !"
>
>
> --
> Marv Breece
> Tukwila, WA
> <marvbreece...>
>
> "what are the costs to a society of an entire population conditioned to
> spend so much of their waking lives not in concentration and focus but
> rather in fragmentary awareness and subject to constant interruption?" -
> The Attention Merchants by Tim Wu
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>

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Date: 12/4/18 8:16 am
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Stan the hawk
Just gotta share this.

A few years ago, my sister & brother-in-law moved from Bellingham to Maine. Recently they learned of a Great Black Hawk in Portland (Maine) and drove there to see it. They had great looks at the bird. They sent me the following from a local Facebook group.

"Went to Portland cause I heard The Great Black Hawk was there. I totally thought I was going to meet Stan Mikita...the greatest Black Hawk to lace up a pair of hockey skates. Apparently I was wrong and it was just some bird from away. I named him Stan so I could consider the morning a win !"


--
Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>

"what are the costs to a society of an entire population conditioned to spend so much of their waking lives not in concentration and focus but rather in fragmentary awareness and subject to constant interruption?" - The Attention Merchants by Tim Wu


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Date: 12/4/18 12:12 am
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Samish Flats and Fir Island 12-3-18
Monday my son and I paid a visit to the West 90 on the Samish Flats and the end of Rawlings Road on Fir Island.  We saw a male northern harrier at the West 90, the third year I have seen  one at that location. 

Photos and narrative are here:
http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum/index.php?threads/samish-flats-and-fir-island-12-03-18.20201/

Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA
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Date: 12/3/18 10:33 pm
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Snohomish County Big Year Help
Hello Tweets,
At some point this spring I realized that I'd picked up quite a few good
birds in Snohomish county this year and that if I got really lucky I might
have a chance of breaking Dennis Duffy's county big year record of 234
species from 2003. To make a long, exhausting story short I've managed to
luck out and break even my highest expectations and I currently have 247
species with 28 days left to go. With that said, there are still a handful
of possible species that could plausibly turn up this time of year. If any
of you happen to encounter one of the below species or anything else rare
that I might not have for the year I'd love to hear about it. You can email
me at <xjoshx...> or text/call 425-273-5278.

Long-Tailed Duck
Sandhill Crane
American White Pelican (One was seen yesterday darn near within site of my
house so perhaps its hanging around somewhere)
Mountain Chickadee (occasionally show up at feeders in winter)
Northern Goshawk
Palm Warbler
Lesser Goldfinch
Glaucous Gull
Gyrfalcon
Rusty Blackbird
Long-Eared Owl

Thanks,

Josh Adams
Cathcart, WA

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Date: 12/3/18 9:12 pm
From: Hank H <h.heiberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Trumpeter Swans on Langlois Lake

> One of our granddaughters spent two days and nights at a Girl Scout camp on Langlois Lake southeast of Carnation, WA. where she saw many Trumpeter Swans and some Snow Geese. There are Trumpeter Swans up and down the Snoqualmie Valley, but seeing them on Langlois Lake seemed special because the lake has a remote, wild feeling and we enjoyed seeing them gliding on the lake versus in corn fields down in the valley.
>
> The lake was packed with swans when we arrived at 9:30 this morning. Conditions were pretty foggy, but not as bad as in the valley.
>
> Photo: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/45446653074/in/photostream/
>
> Video: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/45446653204/in/photostream/
>
> The birds starting leaving around 10 a.m. to feed in the valley, but some birds stayed longer.
>
> Video: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/46119861472/in/photostream/
>
> We returned in the afternoon and swans started returning around 4:15.
>
> Video: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/45446657134/in/photostream/
>
> To access Lake Langlois head south out of Carnation and turn left on NE 24th Street. Proceed 1.6 miles to the road on the left that accesses the boat ramp. The road is closed for the winter so park outside the gate and walk down the hill using care because the road is slippery with fallen leaves. If you have trouble with steep hills, it would be better not to go.
>
> Hank & Karen Heiberg
> Issaquah, WA

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Date: 12/3/18 5:29 pm
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Tundra Bean Goose in Oregon - Blog Post
On Monday last week I made the trek to William L. Finley NWR just south of Corvallis, OR hoping to find the Tundra Bean Goose that had been reported there the day before.  20 other birders and I failed to find it.  But it was found and reported for the next several days, so I elected to try again.  Yesterday - December 2, I was there at first light and found the goose and had the bonus of showing it to some others.
This blog post chronicles the two visits and also questions why we "chase"...
https://wp.me/p79yl0-5yX

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Date: 12/3/18 6:46 am
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign15...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Earthshine Alert
For early rising tweeters, you might wanna go outside right now (6:45 am)
and get a load of that earthshine. Just look SE

Earthshine is the light of the sun (coming up soon!) reflecting off the
Earth and lighting up the Moon - best seen during a crescent moon, when the
darker part of the moon face has that subtle glow . It's pretty cool.

By the way, the bright shiny object just below the Moon is the planet
Venus, sometimes referred to as the "morning star".

Jeff Gibson
Space Cadet in
Port Townsend Wa

PS: good luck with the clouds

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Date: 12/3/18 5:25 am
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] San Juan Swamp Sparrow, Sunday 2 Dec 2018
Hi Tweets -
I spent the weekend on San Juan & Orcas Islands in San Juan County. Highlight was a Swamp Sparrow — it took a while to lure in, especially given that the location includes a lot of traffic noise — but still a good bird for the county, and yet another place they’ve shown up this winter.

Location: Roche Harbor Rd. at mp 1 — there’s a guard rail along the south edge of the road at mp 1 overlooking a big marshy field. I pulled off at the wide shoulder to the east of the guard rail, and mostly watched and played from there. Eventually the Swamp Sparrow came in for great looks. I’d definitely recommend aiming to visit when traffic is lightest.

Good birding!

Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA


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Date: 12/2/18 6:17 pm
From: Bob <rflores_2...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Email address for Nancy and Bill LaFramboise?
Any help would be appreciated.

Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA
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Date: 12/2/18 12:13 pm
From: Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] The Birdbooker Report
HI ALL:
This week's titles are:

1) Noah's Ravens

https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/2018/11/new-title.html

2) The Ascent of Birds

3) Where the Crawdads Sing

https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/2018/11/new-titles_28.html

sincerely
--

Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/
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Date: 12/2/18 11:29 am
From: BRAD Liljequist <bradliljequist...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Townsends solitaire phinney ridge
enjoyed long views intersection of 53rd and 2nd nw in juniper tree on e side of street across from small triangle shaped park

brad liljequist
phinney ridge

Get Outlook for Android<https://aka.ms/ghei36>


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Date: 12/2/18 4:29 am
From: John M Allinger <jmikeallinger...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Peregrine Falcon Harasses Trumpeter Swan
Saturday, Dec 1st at noon – Trumpeter Swans on Carty Lake were vocalizing a lot. Stopped on foot access bridge at Carty Unit, Ridgefield NWR to listen and watch. The Trumpeters seemed to be leaving the Lake in small groups based on the what I was hearing and seeing. Then one swan separated from the others, so I got my binocular view on it and soon was aware that it was being closely escorted by a Peregrine Falcon. They flew around the north end Carty Lake in large circles that included going through or behind a few trees. I watched them make three circles, the lone Trumpeter Swan squawking in its deep voice the entire time, before the pursuit or escorting by the Peregrine Falcon was broken off and the swan was permitted to go on its way.
---John Allinger, Clark County, Washington
Sent from Mail for Windows 10


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Date: 12/1/18 2:05 pm
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...>
Subject: [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Dec. 2, 2018
Hey, Tweeters,

Last week on BirdNote:
* The Lowly Starling
http://bit.ly/2Jxv2vu
* Birding with Grandpa -- Taking the Kids Outdoors
http://bit.ly/2CXNCLV
* The Return of Snowbird
http://bit.ly/2JycD1w
* Winter Birds Love Suet
http://bit.ly/2JxvtpC
* There’s Something About Penguins
http://bit.ly/2Olb0Fc
* Bird Feeders and Whaling Ships
http://bit.ly/2SE1TTE
* South Polar Skuas
http://bit.ly/2B2fDRp
-----------------------------------------------
Check out next week's stories, from the sublime to the mundane:
Waxwing Nightlight to .... Daffy Duck! http://bit.ly/2KOuZw8
-------------------------
BirdNote is now in print. Check out BirdNote, the book:
https://www.birdnote.org/birdnote-book
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Did you have a favorite story this week? Please let us know.
mailto:<info...>
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
or Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/birdnoteradio/
Listen on Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find 1500+ episodes and more than 1000 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,

Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
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Date: 12/1/18 9:10 am
From: AnnMarie Wood <amw.5737...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Wiley Slough search for missing 2 year old
FYI:

Tweets, yesterday morning while looking for the Northern Waterthrush, I
encountered the local sheriff, search teams, and media representatives at
the boat launch. Helicopters hovered overhead as divers searched the river
for the 2 year old whose electric car was found two days ago at the edge of
the river beyond the gated private road.

News reports that the recovery efforts have been unsuccessful and will
resume today, Saturday.

Ann Marie Wood

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Date: 11/30/18 9:13 pm
From: Jeffrey Bryant <jbryant_68...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Sanderling photo request correction
I now see that I took the unintentional liberty of renaming the magazine the photos would appear in! Oops. Hope the editor of WASHINGTON Coast Magazine doesn’t see that! Thanks to all who have already sent pics!
Jeff Bryant
Seattle
Jbryant_68 at yahoo

Sent from my iPad
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Date: 11/30/18 9:05 pm
From: Soo Goh-Baus <demeaus3...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Add me to the mailing list
My new email address <soogohbaus99...> youSoo Baus


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone

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Date: 11/30/18 7:09 pm
From: Jeffrey Bryant <jbryant_68...>
Subject: [Tweeters] CALLING ALL PHOTOGRAPHERS
Do you have a great shot or two of the ubiquitous yet mysterious SANDERLING?
I am putting together a short piece about that species for inclusion in the spring edition of Pacific Coast Magazine, put out by the fine folks at The Daily World in Aberdeen. Writing I can do, but photography...
we would need 2 or 3 high-quality shots, preferably of our own North American subspecies, doing whatever you caught them doing.
This is no get-rich-quick scheme—the only compensation I can offer is your own copy of that slick, glossy magazine with your credited photos inside. The deadline is January 13. Anyone who’s got the goods and wants to see them published, please send me a note with some of your favorite Sanderling pics.
Please, please, and thank you,
Jeff Bryant
Seattle
Jbryant_68 AT yahoo

Sent from my iPad


Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 11/30/18 3:05 pm
From: HAL MICHAEL <ucd880...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Blue Morph Snow Goose
Blue morph is most common on the Central Flyway. I think they are the most common morph there. Decline a bunch as one moves west. Saw quite a few in New Mexico (Bosque del Apache); not common but quite a few.


They seem to be getting more common on the Pacific Coast, at least in WA. If that is the case, and numbers aren't also showing up in CA, then the Blues are coming only off of Wrangell Island.


Years and years ago I read that the blue morph was a response to decrease snow cover on the breeding grounds. Less snow, more dark background, and the dark morph is favored.

Hal Michael
Science Outreach Director, Sustainable Fisheries Foundation
Olympia WA
360-459-4005
360-791-7702 (C)
<ucd880...>

> On November 30, 2018 at 1:36 PM Christopher Clark <cjbirdmanclark...> wrote:
>
> Nice find! Every paper source I've looked at states that the blue morph is rare, not just in the northwest, but in west coast popluations overall. I wonder if anyone knows of a more definite source on their abundance in our region... Ebird doesn't appear to have an option to list the blue morph separately.
>
> Though I haven't paid too much attention to Snow Goose reports, there are 3 records I am aware of from the past few weeks... The one you saw, one I saw a couple days ago, and one seen on the outer coast a couple weeks back. Stunning birds for sure!
>
> Christopher Clark
> Sumner, WA
>
> Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/155731005@N03/
> Instagram: @birdmanclarkphotography
> _______________________________________________
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> <Tweeters...>
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Date: 11/30/18 2:45 pm
From: Vicki Biltz <vickibiltz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Australia or where?
Ok, hello again!
My friend who wants to fly me to Australia, is now looking for the best of
guides in several countries and all continents not covered with snow.
Being from the Mountains of Alaska, she chooses not to go to snow.
So I don’t know where I’ll be going. And now I’m worried about getting
a bird ID book for the area. Just a warning, I may be looking for a used
book I can buy at the last minute. And I might have some bird guides brand
new, for Australia. And a map.
So the adventure is going to be a secret to me, I just hope I find out
in time for a book!
Cheers,
Vicki Biltz
Buckley, WA.
<vickibiltz...>
--



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Date: 11/30/18 1:41 pm
From: Christopher Clark <cjbirdmanclark...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Blue Morph Snow Goose
Nice find! Every paper source I've looked at states that the blue morph is
rare, not just in the northwest, but in west coast popluations overall. I
wonder if anyone knows of a more definite source on their abundance in our
region... Ebird doesn't appear to have an option to list the blue morph
separately.

Though I haven't paid too much attention to Snow Goose reports, there are 3
records I am aware of from the past few weeks... The one you saw, one I saw
a couple days ago, and one seen on the outer coast a couple weeks back.
Stunning birds for sure!

Christopher Clark
Sumner, WA

Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/155731005@N03/
Instagram: @birdmanclarkphotography

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Date: 11/30/18 1:40 pm
From: Hubbell <ldhubbell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Freedom
Tweeters,

How does an eagle, who hatched out above Montlake Cut, makes its first free flight and end up in the Skagit River? The answer is this week's post:

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2018/11/freedom.html <https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2018/11/freedom.html>

Have a great day on Union Bay, where nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net
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Date: 11/30/18 1:34 pm
From: Roland van der Vliet <rollie_nl...>
Subject: [Tweeters] unsubscribing: thank you for all your help
Tweeters,This autumn, my family-in-law decided to move back to the Netherlands. This means that I won't be visiting Washington state anymore, at least not on a regular basis. In the end, I visited Washington twice and have fond memories on both visits. During the first visit, I had an excellent pelagic trip from Westport where I saw all species I had wished for, and more. My second visit was most memorable for my long-distance twitch of the Northern Saw-whet Owl in Nisqually. And in hindsight I am happy that we decided to visit Hawaii as well because it is quite a distance away from Europe. I want thank all of you who made my two trips a success, including answering my questions promptly. Whenever you are in the Netherlands, please let me know and I hope I can help you out with any questions you have.All the best,Roland van der Vlietthe Netherlands
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Date: 11/30/18 12:45 pm
From: Susan McDougall <podicepswa...>
Subject: [Tweeters] blue morph Snow goose

Hello,

Yesterday my husband and I saw an adult blue morph Snow goose in the Skagit Valley. I do not know if this color form is particularly unusual, but it was quite distinctive.

Susan McDougall
Sent from Mail for Windows 10



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Date: 11/30/18 11:00 am
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Skagit Birding
Yesterday (11.29.18) was another fabulous birding day in western Skagit County. Hayton Reserve on Fir Island was full of the usual shorebirds as well as a SHORT-EARED OWL, which seems to be showing up there more than in the past. There was also a NORTHERN SHRIKE.

On the Samish Flats there was a "frosty" BALD EAGLE at the West 90. This is probably the same bird that wintered there last year.

I saw 3 ROUGH-LEGGED HAWKS from Sunset Rd looking to the south and a DARK MORPH HARLAN'S RED-TAILED HAWK. This is most likely the same Harlan's I have seen a few times this season from Field Road.

Between the East 90 (degree bend in the road) and the "eagle tree", another DARK MORPH HARLAN'S RED-TAILED HAWK & a WESTERN RED-TAILED HAWK had a dustup, probably over hunting territory. I took video hand-holding the camera from inside the car to avoid spooking the birds. No chance to use a tripod.

Along D'Arcy Rd was a perched MALE TAIGA MERLIN. The same bird, or another, was perched along Bayview Cemetery Rd near Padilla Bay HQ.

On the way back south, a small flock of BREWER'S BLACKBIRDS held a female RUSTY BLACKBIRD. This was along Best Rd, where Calhoun goes east and Chilberg goes west.

At the Skagit Game Range (aka Wiley Slough), I was fortunate to see one of the previously reported SWAMP SPARROWS. Didn't see the Tree Sparrow.

Videos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/138163614@N02/
Images: http://www.pbase.com/marvbreece/new_images

It was a good day.

--
Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>

"what are the costs to a society of an entire population conditioned to spend so much of their waking lives not in concentration and focus but rather in fragmentary awareness and subject to constant interruption?" - The Attention Merchants by Tim Wu


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Date: 11/29/18 9:39 pm
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Skagit Rusty Blackbird

Today there was a RUSTY BLACKBIRD with a small flock of BREWERS BLACKBIRDS at the intersection of Best Rd and Calhoun/Chilberg Rd in Skagit County.

--
Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>

"what are the costs to a society of an entire population conditioned to spend so much of their waking lives not in concentration and focus but rather in fragmentary awareness and subject to constant interruption?" - The Attention Merchants by Tim Wu


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Date: 11/29/18 7:57 pm
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Rare birds at Wiley Slough
This morning, several birders were able to watch the continuing Black
Phoebe, the American Tree Sparrow and a pair of Swamp Sparrows. Yes, there
were two! These and several other species were in the grass and low growth
on the north side of the dike to the west of the bridge. In this same area,
I also saw Fox, Lincoln, White-crowned and Song Sparrows, Juncos, Marsh and
Bewick's Wrens, among others. Over by the boat launch, I heard the Northern
Waterthrush chipping but never did see it.

Phil Dickinson
Lake Stevens

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Date: 11/29/18 5:33 pm
From: Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2018-11-29
Tweets – we had views of Venus and the moon in the early pre-dawn, but then the fog rolled in from about 7am-9am, before rising, and then clearing. More overcast moved in later in the morning, but we never had wind or precipitation, and we did have birds! Many of our common winter birds seemed especially numerous, and gave us some really fantastic looks. Best Bird of the day was a SWAMP SPARROW that really showed off below the Viewing Mound.

Highlights:
a.. Cackling Goose – hard to count, but maybe 2500, on grass soccer fields
b.. Horned Grebe – one or two very far out on the lake
c.. Virginia Rail – one responded from along the boardwalk
d.. California Gull – 1 or 2, seen late
e.. Green Heron – 1 on beaver lodge across the slough from Dog Central
f.. Western Screech-Owl – one heard east of boardwalk around 6:30 a.m.
g.. Great Horned Owl – Matt heard one west of the park entrance just after 5 a.m.
h.. Hairy Woodpecker – pair came in right near us, for awkwardly close looks
i.. PILEATED WOODPECKER – two flew north far across slough; later one very close near Park Office
j.. Northern Shrike – First seen inside a hawthorn pre-dawn; roost tree? Adult seen near Viewing Mound during the regular walk
k.. Bushtit – one flock of 20-25
l.. Kinglets – many seen in mixed flocks, GCKI and RCKI both plentiful and giving us excellent eye-level views
m.. Lincoln’s Sparrow – one seen briefly below Viewing Mound
n.. SWAMP SPARROW – one gave fabulous looks below Viewing Mound
o.. Western Meadowlark - 10+ near Viewing Mound
Misses today included Ring-necked Duck, mergansers, Ring-billed Gull (probable, but fog-obscured), Pine Siskin.

This winter is unusual. Duck numbers, both of species and of individuals, are remarkably low. Diving ducks have been almost completely absent. Even adding in a late scan of the whole north end of the lake today, I could only find about 2 dozen BUFFLEHEAD and 2 COMMON GOLDENEYE. We’ve had no more than 4 RING-NECKED DUCKS on any day yet, no Scaup at all, and only 1-2 mergansers at most each week. Only twice have we had a Hooded Merganser since the end of August.

Besides Scaup, we’ve also had no Swans, Greater White-fronted Geeese, Ruddy Duck, large gulls besides GWGU, no Kestrel, Raven, Hermit Thrush, Varied Thrush, Red Crossbill, or Pine Siskin. And we’ve only had Northern Shoveler once (mid-October), one Short-eared Owl (mid October), one Northern Saw-whet Owl (mid-October), one flock of Evening Grosbeak (late September), one White-throated Sparrow (in early October), and one Townsend’s Warbler (early November).

An ebird report from Hank Heiberg includes photos of a BRANT with Cackling Geese, and a PALM WARBLER in the Pea Patch. The later is a new bird for Marymoor Park!!! We were not able to find either species today.

For today, we ended up with 57 species.

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== <BirdMarymoor...>



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Date: 11/29/18 5:17 pm
From: Jon Houghton <jon.houghton...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Tides at Night; Who's calling?
During night time intertidal sampling in the winter during the 1970s, both in Puget Sound and Washington, we used to continually hear the somewhat eerie but strangely comforting contact calls of both Western Grebes and Marbled Murrelets. It was always nice to know they were out there! The Sibley phone app has something pretty like what we heard, although I recall it as a single note, repeated irregularly. For scary night bird calls, I doubt you can beat this one: I was walking alone along the upper beach on the south side of Kiket Island (now the Kokutuli Reserve in Skagit Bay, and part of Deception Pass SP). It was a pretty dark night but there was enough light so that I wasn't using a light. I walked under a tree, hanging out horizontally from the high bluff and was highly startled when a Great Blue Heron took off squawking mightily, as only they can squawk, from about 3 feet above my head. I believe I had to clean both the inside and outside of my chest waders after that one! As a side note, at the time, I was involved in baseline studies for a saltwater-cooled nuclear power project proposed for the Island. Fortunately, that project (which would have been nicely visible from the Deception Pass Bridge!) was not built, but several of us got our graduate degrees in the process. The Island is now open for walking/birding with an access on Snee-Oosh Road on south Fidalgo Island. Happy Birding! Jon Houghton, Edmonds

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Date: 11/29/18 3:49 pm
From: Nan Evans <nanswaltz...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Tides at Night
Saturday night Wendy Feltham and I went tidepooling at North Beach, Port Townsend. Warm evening with a full moon and no wind - great fun. Standard equipment for me - rubber boots, headlamp, flashlight and one hiking stick (need to have one hand free to explore). Wendy posted photos of some of the critters we saw on her iNaturalist page - check them out. https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/wendy5

The highlights were spotting a Tidepool Sculpin with incredible coloration that mimicked the rocks and coralline algae and a small Buffalo Sculpin - in crevices on a boulder about 5 feet in the air above the water level. (That boulder is a favorite low tide spot for us). We also enjoyed the amazing shrimp with bright sparkling eyes and antenna tips.

We also heard that strange single bird call - neither of us could identify it. I thought it might be an Oyster Catcher, but the absence of repeats made me unsure.

Nan Evans


Sent from my iPad

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Date: 11/29/18 1:53 pm
From: Teresa Michelsen <teresa...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Did You Fall or Was You Pushed
Ha – you were more intrepid than me. I stayed safely in my house all day Monday. It was quite a view of the neighborhood amidst the howling winds…

Teresa Michelsen
Port Townsend

From: Tweeters [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Jeff Gibson
Sent: November 29, 2018 1:10 PM
To: <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Did You Fall or Was You Pushed

On Monday morning, after my midnight low- tide adventures, I woke up to howling winds - the Sound wild with waves. So I thought I'd go down to Pt. Wilson to check out the scene - to see how those fir tree's down there achieved such wild shapes. Well the answer my friend is blowin' in the wind and you don't need a weatherman to tell which way the wind blows if you just take a walk.

My first stop, as usual, was the Marine Science Center pier, which was exciting. The tide was pretty high by now, and the waves pretty big, for here, and thrashing in at a rapid pace. The beach was loaded with all sorts of flotsam and jetsam at the high tide mark.
I was trying to judge the wave height, which was difficult by eyeballing - a lone Pelagic Cormorant was the only bird I saw on the water and provided somewhat of a size reference - I guess the waves were around 4' tall or so. Despite the conditions, the cormorant kept diving around the pier pilings.

The wind was pushing and shoving me around as I walked - didn't fall over - and a little kid on a little bike having fun on the pier was achieving impressive speeds without pedaling, just by being blown downwind. It was blowing steady in the low 30's with higher gusts.

The high winds didn't deter the pier Rock Doves from flying in formation, though they did have problems on the ground. In one of those 2 or 3 second visual vignettes, I saw one Pigeon valiantly grabbing onto the turf to keep from blowing up up and away, while it's neighbor just plain blew over. I've never seen a Pigeon pushover before, that I can remember.

The fairly good-sized firs out on the point are fine examples of non- resistance while holding your ground - sort of a tricky thing. Wind stress makes them stronger, but one can only be so strong in the face of raging winds - sometimes they gotta drop a branch to let the wind blow through, creating the open forms of these trees.Quite beautiful, these wind - pruned trees.

Out on the Strait side of the point the vast incoming tide had flattened out all that wild Puget Sound stuff, The Red-Alders protected by the tall till bluffs along North Beach were still showing alot of green leaves, but those on the windward side of the hill had lost alot of 'em in the wind. Back at the ranch, the hedgerow Douglas Hawthorne had most of it's orange-red leaves pushed off by the wind finally, while the gold willow leaves mostly hang on.

Also at home the wind was no detriment to the neighbor Eagles in the air, but they avoided their exposed viewing tree and hung out in more sheltering trees by the nest. In the evening a single dark Merlin zoomed through the 'hood, as the Eagles provided loud background music.

Jeff Gibson
hangin' on, in
Port Townsend, Wa
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Date: 11/29/18 1:49 pm
From: Tim Brennan <tsbrennan...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Snow Geese over Renton
Hey Tweets,

I was birding at Coulon Beach Park in Renton today, and had a flock of geese, mostly Snow, that sounds remarkably like the one described by Christopher Clark from down in Puyallup yesterday. Just a flyover, but there was definitely a dark goose sticking out like a sore thumb that may have been the blue juvenile, and a couple smaller ones that may have been cacklers. The whole flock was about 40 geese.

Happy birding,

Tim Brennan
Renton

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Date: 11/29/18 1:13 pm
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign15...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Did You Fall or Was You Pushed
On Monday morning, after my midnight low- tide adventures, I woke up to
howling winds - the Sound wild with waves. So I thought I'd go down to Pt.
Wilson to check out the scene - to see how those fir tree's down there
achieved such wild shapes. Well the answer my friend is blowin' in the wind
and you don't need a weatherman to tell which way the wind blows if you
just take a walk.

My first stop, as usual, was the Marine Science Center pier, which was
exciting. The tide was pretty high by now, and the waves pretty big, for
here, and thrashing in at a rapid pace. The beach was loaded with all sorts
of flotsam and jetsam at the high tide mark.

I was trying to judge the wave height, which was difficult by eyeballing -
a lone Pelagic Cormorant was the only bird I saw on the water and provided
somewhat of a size reference - I guess the waves were around 4' tall or
so. Despite the conditions, the cormorant kept diving around the pier
pilings.

The wind was pushing and shoving me around as I walked - didn't fall over -
and a little kid on a little bike having fun on the pier was achieving
impressive speeds without pedaling, just by being blown downwind. It was
blowing steady in the low 30's with higher gusts.

The high winds didn't deter the pier Rock Doves from flying in formation,
though they did have problems on the ground. In one of those 2 or 3 second
visual vignettes, I saw one Pigeon valiantly grabbing onto the turf to keep
from blowing up up and away, while it's neighbor just plain blew over. I've
never seen a Pigeon pushover before, that I can remember.

The fairly good-sized firs out on the point are fine examples of non-
resistance while holding your ground - sort of a tricky thing. Wind stress
makes them stronger, but one can only be so strong in the face of raging
winds - sometimes they gotta drop a branch to let the wind blow through,
creating the open forms of these trees.Quite beautiful, these wind - pruned
trees.

Out on the Strait side of the point the vast incoming tide had flattened
out all that wild Puget Sound stuff, The Red-Alders protected by the tall
till bluffs along North Beach were still showing alot of green leaves, but
those on the windward side of the hill had lost alot of 'em in the wind.
Back at the ranch, the hedgerow Douglas Hawthorne had most of it's
orange-red leaves pushed off by the wind finally, while the gold willow
leaves mostly hang on.

Also at home the wind was no detriment to the neighbor Eagles in the air,
but they avoided their exposed viewing tree and hung out in more sheltering
trees by the nest. In the evening a single dark Merlin zoomed through the
'hood, as the Eagles provided loud background music.

Jeff Gibson
hangin' on, in
Port Townsend, Wa

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Date: 11/28/18 7:53 pm
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Nisqually NWR Wednesday Walk for 11/28/2018
Hi Tweets,

about 20 of us enjoyed a wet one today at the Refuge with temperatures in
the 50's degrees Fahrenheit and a High 14.78ft Tide at 10:08am. Highlights
included SNOW GEESE, an accommodating NORTHERN SHRIKE and many RAPTORS.

Starting out at the Visitor Center Pond Overlook we had nice views of
BUFFLEHEAD, RING-NECKED DUCK and RED-TAILED HAWK. A WILSONS SNIPE was
flushed from adjacent to the observation platform.

The Orchard was good for RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKER, NORTHERN FLICKER,
GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW and FOX SPARROW. It has been several weeks since
we've seen the White-throated Sparrow in this area.

The fields along the entrance road and access road are finally flooding
nicely with our more recent rain over the last week. We had terrific looks
at CACKLING GEESE, both minimas and taverners, SNOW GEESE, NORTHERN
SHOVELER, NORTHERN PINTAIL and AMERICAN COOT.

The west side of the Twin Barns Loop Trail had nice mixed flocks of
RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET, BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE, BROWN
CREEPER, DOWNY WOODPECKER and HAIRY WOODPECKER. The SWAMP SPARROW was
heard vocalizing a distinctive hard metallic chip contact call where it was
previously seen in the area where the access road intersects with the board
walk at the north end of the Visitor Center Pond.

The Twin Barns Observation Platform is a great spot to survey the waterfowl
and we had nice observations of NORTHERN HARRIER and heard AMERICAN
GOLDFINCH.

Out on the new dike or Nisqually Estuary Trail we counted over 5000
AMERICAN GREEN WINGED TEAL and over 2000 AMERICAN WIGEON in the surge plain
and the mudflats. An adult COOPERS HAWK was perched by the Nisqually River
Overlook, a bonded pair of PEREGRINE FALCON used the snags to scan the
estuary, as well as a female AMERICAN KESTREL. Many BALD EAGLE were seen
as well as additional RTHA and NOHA. A very cooperative NORTHERN SHRIKE
hunted along the dike. We had good looks at GREATER YELLOWLEGS,
LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER, MEW GULL and RING-BILLED GULL. Both AMERICAN
BITTERN and VIRGINIA RAIL were seen in the fresh water marsh on the inside
of the dike.

On the Nisqually Estuary Boardwalk Trail we observed 2 of 4 EURASIAN
WIGEON, DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT, COMMON GOLDENEYE, COMMON LOON, HORNED
GREBE and SPOTTED SANDPIPER. From the trail closure gate, 700 feet from
the Puget Sound Viewing Platform, we were able to scope RED-BREASTED
MERGANSER, SURF SCOTER, DUNLIN, and BRANDT CORMORANT. ON our way back we
enjoyed a nice flock of LEAST SANDPIPER.

On our return, we picked up the GREAT HORNED OWL along the east side of the
Twin Barns Loop Trail on the inside of the board walk between the double
bench overlook and the beaver dam. We also had great looks of an adult
SHARP-SHINNED HAWK at the Riparian Forest Overlook.

We had 71 species for the day, and the Wednesday Walk has 166 species for
the year. Mammals seen included Eastern Gray Squirrel, Columbian
Black-tailed Deer and Harbor Seal.

Until next week when we meet again at 8am, happy birding!

Shep
eBird list pasted below, click on list to see photos.
--
Shep Thorp
Browns Point
253-370-3742


Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually NWR, Thurston, Washington, US
Nov 28, 2018 7:50 AM - 3:25 PM
Protocol: Traveling
5.782 mile(s)
Comments: Wednesday Walk. Cloudy, intermittent rain. Temperatures in
the 50’s degrees Fahrenheit. High 14.78ft Tide at 10:08am. Mammals seen
Eastern Gray Squirrel, Colombian Black-tailed Deer, Harbor Seal.
71 species (+5 other taxa)

Snow Goose 17
Cackling Goose (minima) 800
Cackling Goose (Taverner's) 22
Canada Goose (moffitti/maxima) 6
Northern Shoveler 100
Gadwall 30
Eurasian Wigeon 4
American Wigeon 2500
Mallard 300
Northern Pintail 500
Green-winged Teal 5000 Counted, probably more. Observed by multiple
bird watchers in group.
Ring-necked Duck 7
Surf Scoter 10
Bufflehead 100
Common Goldeneye 30
Hooded Merganser 7
Red-breasted Merganser 15
Horned Grebe 3
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 2
Band-tailed Pigeon 3
Mourning Dove 1
Virginia Rail 1
American Coot 4
Dunlin 300
Least Sandpiper 170
Long-billed Dowitcher 30
Wilson's Snipe 2
Spotted Sandpiper 2
Greater Yellowlegs 15
Mew Gull (American) 130
Ring-billed Gull 40
Glaucous-winged Gull 3
Western x Glaucous-winged Gull (hybrid) 6
Western/Glaucous-winged Gull 75
Larus sp. 100
Common Loon 2
Brandt's Cormorant 6
Double-crested Cormorant 25
American Bittern 1
Great Blue Heron 20
Northern Harrier 3
Sharp-shinned Hawk 1
Cooper's Hawk 1
Bald Eagle 10
Red-tailed Hawk 3
Great Horned Owl 1 Seen along the east side of Twin Barns Loop Trail
just north of the observation platform with two benches on the inside of
the trail.
Belted Kingfisher 4
Red-breasted Sapsucker 1
Downy Woodpecker 2
Hairy Woodpecker 1
Northern Flicker (Red-shafted) 4
American Kestrel 1
Peregrine Falcon 2
Northern Shrike 1
American/Northwestern Crow 250
Common Raven 1
Black-capped Chickadee 15
Bushtit (Pacific) 10
Brown Creeper 3
Pacific Wren 2
Marsh Wren 4
Bewick's Wren 1
Golden-crowned Kinglet 15
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 5
American Robin 30
European Starling 200
American Pipit 1
House Finch 1
American Goldfinch 10
Fox Sparrow (Sooty) 3
Golden-crowned Sparrow 15
Song Sparrow 20
Swamp Sparrow 1 Heard only. Previously reported rarity in this area,
north side of Visitor Center Pond along the west side of the Twin Barns
Loop Trail. Last seen 3 weeks ago. Loud metallic chip note, repeated,
distinctive, heard by several birders in group.
Spotted Towhee 4
Western Meadowlark 11
Red-winged Blackbird 50

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50288861

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Date: 11/28/18 7:51 pm
From: cynthia burrell <cinnyb...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Reminder: Monday Dec 3 WOS meeting
"Unravelling the Mysteries of the Marbled Murrelet"
Martin Raphael, retired senior research biologist with the USFS, has studied Marbled Murrelets for over 20 years; He will present his team's findings and give an update on status and population trends in the Pacific Northwest at the Dec 3 Washington Ornithological Society meeting. Martin's research includes habitat relationships of forest wildlife, ecology of marbled murrelet and American Marten, and investigations into the roles of riparian habitat for terrestrial and aquatic organisms. He recently led an effort to synthesize information on science related to murrelet biology and conservation.
(Note: Public Comment period has been extended to Dec 6 for the Habitat Conservation Plan. More info: WECPROTECTS.ORG/MARBLED-MURRELET/)
WOS meetings are held the first Monday of the month at the Center for Urban Horticulture, 3501 NE 41st St, Seattle, WA 98105. Social begins at 7, meeting begins at 7:30pm. All are welcome.
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Date: 11/28/18 1:52 pm
From: Jeffrey Bryant <jbryant_68...>
Subject: [Tweeters] M street marsh (Auburn) AMERICAN TREE SPARROW
Just completed full circle around main pond. Careful where you step! At north end, near adjacent farm, is a large patch of willow saplings surrounded by wet grass/brush. Between willows and farm fence is a walkable path. From that side, I found a largish flock of mostly Sparrows (in order of abundance: song, GC, Lincoln’s and one American Tree Sparrow, foraging mostly on small patches of short grass tucked into weeds. Very flighty bunch. Best birds until the sparrow were pipit, shrike, snow goose
Jeff Bryant
Seattle
Jbryant_68 at yahoo

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 11/28/18 12:59 pm
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign15...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Tides of Night Report
Having done my civic duty by posting a PSA about low-tide at night on
midnight last Monday, I figured I ought'a get down there myself to see what
I could see. The weather forecast wasn't promising.

Sure enough, after a nap I woke up at 11pm to rain and wind at the
window."Aw, it a'int *too *bad" I thought, as I geared up with my
close-focusing binocs, rubber boots, a warm coat and my cane, and drove the
long ten minutes down to Point Hudson. PT just about a ghost town at that
hour.

You see, in the last few years I've acquired a case of Parkinson's Disease
(is it a disease or a syndrome? I don't know, but it is a hassle) and
that's what the cane was for; the big PS (oh, and by the way, your balance
now sucks!). Oh well. Walking helps.

Actually it wasn't too bad, at least not cold, and the rain stopped. But I
didn't account for the wind in my plans - my eyes soon teared up badly, and
it was hard to see clearly. I could've used some safety glasses. Binocs
were useless. "Well i'm not leaving 'till I see some tidepool critters!" I
said to myself. So I staggered carefully down the dark and windy beach to
the bouldery beach at Chetzemoka Park. Where I found some tide pools. Most
of the water, while clear, looked like a fast moving stream in the wind,
but I found a few sheltered behind tall rocks, which helped.

I did see a few things; a cool Sea Anemone, a pretty green Shore Crab with
strikingly patterned carapace, and lots of shrimp about 1 1/2 " long with
eyes glowing orange-red in the flashlight beams. Since binoculars were
useless in the wind, I got down on my knees for a close look and saw many
tiny amphipods swimming around - they, the crab and the various types of
shrimp more active at night- that's the fun part for me. After a few
minutes of this, I'd enjoyed about enough of this wind and watery eyes as I
could stand, and staggered into the wind back to the truck.

One thing I did note, which was unusual. A bird called briefly - once - and
it sounded alot like a male Wigeon, but just called once. I heard exactly
the same sound when doing my last night beach patrol several years ago here
in PT, at North Beach. It also only called briefly. I've never seen Wigeons
either place, on open salt water, in daylight that I remember, but of
course many on sheltered brackish water at Kah Tai, and China Pond. Any
ideas?

Next time, I'm gonna get some of them trekking poles for balance amongst
the slimy rocks, and a good headlamp to free my hands for binocluar use.
What kind of nut uses binocs in the dark you might wonder. Well,
close-focusing binocs (6' or so) combined with a good light, allows great
looks at tidepool stuff, at least on a calm night,

Jeff Gibson
the trembling tweeeeter
Port Townsend Wa

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Date: 11/28/18 12:38 pm
From: Christopher Clark <cjbirdmanclark...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Geese and Swans in Puyallup today
Hey everyone, just a quick note, on the side of Hwy 162, heading out of
Sumner towards Orting, was a large flock of geese and swans. Lots of
Cackling and Snow Geese, with a young "Blue" Goose mixed in too! There were
also at least 2 Tundra Swans mixed in with the Trumpeters. Ebird checklist
with photos:

https://ebird.org/pnw/view/checklist/S50278545

The spot on ebird says "90th st E", but the field they were in was right on
the side of Hwy 162, just past the E Pioneer intersection heading towards
Orting. If you stop here, please make sure to pull all the way off the
road, as there are plenty of cars and trucks that fly by.

Christopher Clark
Sumner, WA

Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/155731005@N03/
Instagram: @birdmanclarkphotography

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Date: 11/28/18 11:07 am
From: Constance Sidles <constancesidles...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fill news
Hey tweets, some young birders and I are trying our best to set a new record for most birds seen at the Fill in one year. The record is 175, and we are very close.

We missed some species that should have been automatic (or at least doable) but weren't, and I was wondering if any of you in the birding community saw some? If you can document a sighting, when did you see it?

Here's a list of our misses:
Sora
Pectoral Sandpiper
Lesser Yellowlegs
Wilson's Phalarope
Olive-sided Flycatcher
Townsend's Warbler
MacGilivray's Warbler
Evening Grosbeak

P.S. It should noted that when I speak of setting a record, that would include only the years between now and the mid-1980s, when I began to keep such records. People before the 1980s apparently didn't record total species seen in a year. It's entirely possible that more than 175 species were seen in earlier years, partly because there were just more birds then, but also because Seattle itself was less built up and had more bird habitat.

On the other hand, though we have lost a heartbreaking amount of shorebird and prairie bird habitat at the Fill in recent years (and thus no longer host such species), natural succession and human plantings have increased certain habitats such as groves of tall trees, fruit- and berry-bearing plants, and denser riparian cover, thus bringing us birds that were not present in earlier days. Hutton's Vireo is one such example, as is Red-breasted Nuthatch.

Altogether since 1898, there are have 262 species found at the Fill.

- Connie, Seattle

<csidles...> <mailto:<csidles...>
<constancesidles...> <mailto:<constancesidles...>


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Date: 11/27/18 2:33 pm
From: Vicki Biltz <vickibiltz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Trumpeter swans, new yard bird!
Hi, I had four all adult trumpeters fly over head, while I was outside.
They were flying low interest-rate low and straight. Hopefully I’ll be able
to locate them tomorrow when I have a free day. Shouldn’t be too far from
my home.
Happy birding
Vicki Biltz

--



<vickibiltz...>
http://www.flickr.com/photos/saw-whets_new/

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Date: 11/27/18 1:18 pm
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] ducks along the Columbia Rover in Clark County
Tweeters,

Duck numbers are on the increase along the Columbia River in Clark County
with White-winged Scoters bering the most surprising. Yesterday, there
were 16, today there are 22!

Viewed from Wintler Park in Vancouver (half way between 1-5 and I-205) on
November 26-November 27:

Scaup (both Lesser, Greater, and unidentified: grew from 120-500
WHITE-WINGED SCOTER: 16-22 (all in two flocks about a 1/2 mile north of
Winter Park on the Washington side
Horned Grebe: 3-20
Common Goldeneye: 120-145

I also saw a female BLACK SCOTER fly upriver with a flock of scaup this
morning from Frenchman's Bar which is west of the I-5 bridge.

Jim
--
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
<jdanzenbaker...>

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Date: 11/26/18 4:14 pm
From: Jon Houghton <jon.houghton...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Hawk on hawk violence
Hi Tweeterdom! Last weekend, my neighbors (in Edmonds) reported the following that may be of interest to some: They were alerted to something going on by an uproar of crows in their front garden. In taking a look, they saw a large hawk on top of and subduing a smaller bird. They got a pretty cool photo of the scene that allowed identification of the aggressor as a Cooper's and the victim as a juvenile Sharp-shinned. Shortly after the photo, the Coop flew off with the Sharpie in its talons, hotly pursued by the crows. If you'd like to see the carnage, email me and I'll forward image. - Jon Houghton, Edmonds

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Date: 11/26/18 2:11 pm
From: Hubbell <ldhubbell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Persistence
Tweeters,

This week we follow a young, male Cooper’s Hawk as he attempts to subdue a creature which maybe close to his own body weight. The result is not a foregone conclusion. More at:

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2018/11/persistence.html <https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2018/11/persistence.html>

Have a great day on Union Bay, where nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net
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Date: 11/26/18 1:10 pm
From: Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...>
Subject: [Tweeters] American Tree Sparrow
My husband Randy Robinson found an American Tree Sparrow yesterday
(Sunday Nov 25) at the Skagit Game Range (aka Wylie Slough, Skagit
Wildlife Area Headquarters Unit, and no doubt several other names).

You can go to this link (below) to find the exact location of the sighting:

http://maps.google.com/maps?q=48.322509,-122.385067

It was in shrubs and small trees on your right as you walk along the
dike out towards the bay.

Also, I've posted six pictures that I took in the Skagit yesterday (most
at Wylie Slough), including the American Tree Sparrow at:

https://photos.app.goo.gl/3UxoFzGx3g7ARpjM8

According to the Annotated Checklist of the Second Edition of A Birder's
Guide to Washington,

> American Tree Sparrow Spizella arborea — Uncommon (east) to rare
> (west) win-
> ter resident of cattail-marsh edges, brushy habitats. Most frequent
> November–De-
> cember around Molson, West Foster Creek, Potholes, Big Flat HMU. West of
> Cascades, most reports from mixed-species sparrow flocks at Skagit
> Game Range,
> Snoqualmie Valley.
You can see the Annotated Checklist, which was revised for the Second
Edition by Matt Bartels, at :

http://wabirdguide.org/annotated-checklist/

Jane Hadley

Seattle, WA


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Date: 11/25/18 4:37 pm
From: Michelle Maani <lamoustique...>
Subject: [Tweeters] American Robin invasion
A flock of 500+ American Robins landed in the berry trees at the Wildlife Botanical Gardens in Brush Prairie. They stayed for at least an hour, and then, as if on signal, they took off together toward the trees to the west. Lots of berries left, they might return.
Michelle MaaniSallmon CreekVancouver, WA
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Date: 11/25/18 3:09 pm
From: David A. Armstrong <davearm...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Deer Lagoon and Useless Bay: lots there
A great day Sunday at Deer Lagoon. Even though a fairly high tide (~6')
there was enough open tideflats and water otherwise to draw 1000s of birds.
Species in the many 100s: American wigeons, northern pintails, buffleheads,
mew gulls, dunlins
Species less abundant but common: hooded mergansers, black bellied plovers,
northern shoveler, sanderlings, pied billed grebe, glaucus winged gulls,
green winged teals
Highlight was 200+ black brandt at confluence where Deer Lagoon drains into
Useless Bay. They were onshore, very active and vocal.

David Armstrong

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Date: 11/25/18 11:09 am
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign15...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Night Tides
This a Public Service Announcement to general nature nuts (like me) out
there in Tweeterland.

Maybe you like looking at tidepools but haven't noticed too many lately.
That may be because this time of year the lowest tides are at night, I was
just checking my tidechart for sorta not high tides for a beach walk, when
I noted a large dip in the daily plot. Way low this evening - a minus 2.4
around midnight.

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Date: 11/25/18 11:05 am
From: Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] NOVA / Peregrines
Fastest Animal on earth...
On at 11am on PBS. Now!!
Repeat but never tire of watching this incredible falcon!!
Caryn/ Wedgwood



Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 11/24/18 7:09 pm
From: Martha Jordan <mj.cygnus...>
Subject: [Tweeters] birding bonanza-swans
If you have a hankering for an amazing photo opportunity or just want to
surround yourself with a symphony of swans and geese on a night roost, the
Bob Heirman Wildlife Park just south of Snohomish is the place this week.
In fact, tomorrow morning and evening as it likely will not be raining.
Tonight, 1,068 swans came into the roost, some flying directly
overhead no more than 100 feet up. The vast majority were Trumpeter Swans.
Their wing sounds, the swooshing, the loud trumpeting calls.... all kept
repeating over and over as small groups came in from several directions
over an 45 minute period. I really enjoyed a rarely heard sound: when
swans flip up to loose speed and altitude quickly, their wings make a loud
whuuummmp sound in addition to the wing whistle. When they land you can
hear their feet and swoosh of water, and all of their socializing calls
echo around.

The group had a few tundra swans and a few Canada Geese.

The next spectacle will be tomorrow morning as they all take off from the
roost for their daily feeding. That is another spectacle.

So for those of you with good to great cameras and lenses, get out there
and enjoy a different view of swans.

Let me know what you find when you visit the site. (Off Connelly Road,
south of the Kenwanda Golf Course- go under the railroad trestle, then the
next left is the park.)
Martha

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Date: 11/24/18 1:34 pm
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign15...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Searching For Gold
On Monday I left Port Townsend : Searching for gold.

Actually gold found me, along hwy 101 on the way to Sequim to do an errand,
where I was surprised and pleased to find bright gold in them thar hills
above the road. Cottonwood gold.

Now Port Townsend has some fine gold things going on also, but Sequim was a
bit brighter in the gold department, tree-wise that is. Sort of a amateur
color connoisseur I started noticing somewhat brighter colors the farther I
got from PT. The thimbleberry's, salmonberry's, willows, etc all noticeably
brighter. Finally, nearing Sequim many real bright cottonwoods. Even the
Scoulers Willows and other willows were a brighter hue than in PT. Sequim
is so quirky.

The real reason for my being in Sequim was to pick up my resurrected iphone
which died in a horrible work accident (I sat on it while crawling around
on a boat). I'm kinda slow to transfer to the digital world, so don't have
a digital SLR camera - I have depended on my iphone camera which is quite
good for most of my needs. It even works well for bird photography - as
long as the bird is dead or otherwise available for close-ups.

Back in October 2017 I got some great photos of bright gold Cottonwoods
lining the Dungeness River, so I thought I'd check out that scene. Well,
the Cottonwood were mostly done there, but did provide some cool fallen
leaves. A Great Blue Heron was lurking about on the river. A river,
something else you won't find in Port Townsend. As I was leaving the River
Bridge Park a big Vee of funny-sounding geese flew over heading West;
roughly 80 White-fronted Geese, a bit late for so many I thought.

Back in Port Townsend, I thought I may have been giving short shrift to PT
with my color comments, so I searched around town awhile lookin' for bright
gold and found some. For one thing, there are darn few cottonwoods in this
town, there being a dearth of surface water around here. But I found a few
- fairly bright. Then I went to Chetzemoka Park, home of the Mother Of All
PT Cottonwoods - a huge ol' thing, a huge specimen with a trunk near 6' in
diameter, growing straight up to at least 100' tall or so. You can see it
all the way from Pt. Wilson; a truly impressive vegetable, which was going
a not so bright gold. I suppose it's achieving it's great size by slurping
on spring there.

Now that I've enjoyed real bright gold elsewhere, the subtler golds of PT
seem just fine. Some pretty bright really- lots of willows are.

In my search for gold I did find some yellow here in town. First the
Western Meadowlark down at Pt, Wilson toodling away. Thanks to Hank
Heiberg's video of this bird recently posted, I no longer have to go out
there to listen to it. But I probably will anyhow. And nearing the last
cottonwood on my search, down on the Larry Scott Trail, I noted 8 or so
Goldfinches, which were gold in name only since they were in winter drab
clothing.Some will be yellow one day, and not real gold which is good since
they'd be too heavy to get off the ground.

What is gold the color anyhoo? It's sorta an orange - yellow. In the
hedgerow across the street a willow (sp. unknown) is turning a respectable
gold, while right next to it a Douglas Hawthorne is turning an orange-red,
brighter than I've ever seen it, in a sorta subtle way. You get to dance
with the one your'e looking at, so to speak. Watch the thorns.

Jeff Gibson
miner
Port Townsend, WA

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Date: 11/24/18 12:09 pm
From: Robert O'Brien <baro...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Merlin snagged Starling in yard / Caryn / Wedgwood
Had a similar experience at Long Beach WA years ago. Was staying at a
friend's house and stepped outside onto the porch just as
a Merlin was flying close by. The Merlin swerved upward, dropping a
defunct Starling at my feet. I placed the Starling on a railing in
plain sight as I left the house, but the Merlin didn't return. I guess
there were plenty more 'live ones' out there.
Bob OBrien Portland

On Thu, Nov 22, 2018 at 12:40 PM Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1...>
wrote:

> Happy Thanksgiving to all — near and far!
>
> Just happened to see a male Merlin at base of feeders after just getting a
> starling! Got some fairly good photos.
>
> Sat in same spot for several minutes before flying off with his prey.
>
> Have a great bird day!!
>
> Caryn / Wedgwood
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>

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Date: 11/24/18 12:06 pm
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen...>
Subject: [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Nov. 25, 2018
Hello, Tweeters!

Last week on BirdNote:
* Goldeneyes... and Whistling Wings
http://bit.ly/2EWwetD
* American Wigeon, Feathered Lawnmower
http://bit.ly/2SCb5Yu
* Big Bird - America's Favorite Flightless Bird
How do you pronounce ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ?
http://bit.ly/2P6xRd6
* Eurasian Collared-Doves' Sense of Direction
http://bit.ly/2SFzFYO
* Fancy Ducks
http://bit.ly/2SEFGEM
* Blind Snakes and Screech-Owls
http://bit.ly/2yRp0QZ
* Common Redpoll
http://bit.ly/2CVNcWx
-----------------------------------------------
Check out next week's stories:
There's Something About Penguins... and more!
http://bit.ly/2AixbHd
-------------------------
BirdNote is now in print. Check out BirdNote, the book:
https://www.birdnote.org/birdnote-book
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Did you have a favorite story this week? Please let us know.
mailto:<info...>
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
or Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/birdnoteradio/
Listen on Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find 1500+ episodes and more than 1000 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
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Date: 11/24/18 12:05 am
From: Dan Reiff, PhD <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] BBC nature film crew breaks "no interference" rule to rescue baby penguins in Antartica - CBS News
Interesting discussion.
Dan Reiff:

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/bbc-nature-film-crew-breaks-no-interference-rule-to-rescue-baby-penguins-antarctica/





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Date: 11/23/18 7:47 pm
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Wahkiakum County birds 11/22 & 23
Hi all -
I spent some time in Wahkiakum County Thursday morning and all day Friday.
Between showers, a few good birds showed up:

Long-tailed Duck - one Friday at Altoona in large scoter flock

Lesser Yellowlegs - late [and hard to find anytime in this county] - 1 on Thursday at Altoona, with a group of Greater Yellowlegs. Other shorebirds in the area included Long-billed Dowitchers, Black-bellied Plovers and Wilson’s Snipe.

Northern Mockingbird - Thursday - still present on Puget Island at 94 E Birnie Slough.

Swamp Sparrow - at least 2 Friday @ Julia Butler Hanson NWR - one close to the dike trail around half way along the route. Another off the end of the road at the dike break from the Skamakowa entrance.

White-throated Sparrow - one Friday along Steamboat Slough Rd near Skamokawa , west of the Brooks Slough intersection at a pull off by a green shipping container.

Good birding,

Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA



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Date: 11/23/18 3:21 pm
From: Andrew McCormick <andy_mcc...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Clay-colored Sparrow on 134th Ave E, Puyallup
Hello Tweets,

We saw the Clay-Colored Sparrow at about 3:00 p.m. today in the blackberry along the dirt road about 50 yards from the gravel parking area. It perched up well for us.

Andy McCormick
Bellevue, WA


Sent from my iPhone. Please pardon any typos and brevity.
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Date: 11/22/18 2:53 pm
From: Elston Hill <elstonh...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Amazing Fir Island
My wife and I had an amazing trip to Fir Island this last weekend motivated by the weather. We stayed two nights. The best part was going to the reserve at sunrise and sunset. Sunrise was the most spectacular with surge after surge of snow geese making a huge noise long before they became visible. At sunrise, most of the activity was in the hour after sunrise and in the evening the activity was after sunset so it pays to stick around. This is a link to some of our photos from this wonderful weekend. Sunrise is the best time as almost no one comes out at that time of day.

http://elstonhill.com/FirIsland.html <http://elstonhill.com/FirIsland.html>



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Date: 11/22/18 1:43 pm
From: Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Merlin snagged Starling in yard / Caryn / Wedgwood
Wonderful, Caryn!  I was very surprised to see a starling at my seed feeder earlier this week.  I generally don't see them (nor Engish house sparrows) at my home in Bothell.
Peggy
On Thursday, November 22, 2018, 12:38:37 p.m. PST, Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1...> wrote:

Happy Thanksgiving to all — near and far!

Just happened to see a male Merlin at base of feeders after just getting a starling! Got some fairly good photos.

Sat in same spot for several minutes before flying off with his prey.

Have a great bird day!!

Caryn / Wedgwood




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Date: 11/22/18 12:41 pm
From: Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Merlin snagged Starling in yard / Caryn / Wedgwood
Happy Thanksgiving to all — near and far!

Just happened to see a male Merlin at base of feeders after just getting a starling! Got some fairly good photos.

Sat in same spot for several minutes before flying off with his prey.

Have a great bird day!!

Caryn / Wedgwood




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Date: 11/22/18 12:34 pm
From: Valerie Anderson <valhikes...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Binocular repair?
Hi Tweets,
Does anyone have suggestions for a good place to get my binoculars
repaired? I live in Olympia. Thanks.
Valerie Anderson <valhikes...>

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Date: 11/22/18 12:07 pm
From: John Puschock <g_g_allin...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Late report: American Tree Sparrow at UBNA, Seattle
I have to apologize for the late report. On Sunday afternoon (Nov 18), I was following up on the report of the Harris's Sparrow at the Fill. No success with that, but shortly after I arrived, I saw a sparrow in a small flock of juncos that I suspected was an American Tree Sparrow. I got a few bad photos before it disappeared behind a clump of grass and then flushed as some pedestrians passed by. I wrote it off as a poorly seen immature White-crowned Sparrow after I failed to refind it despite looking through quite a few juncos and White-crowneds (the image on the back of my camera was too small to discern anything at the time). I finally remembered to look at the photos on a large screen just now, and there it was - American Tree Sparrow. So, again, sorry for waiting until now to report it.

It was west of the intersection of Wahkiakum Lane and Franklin Road, just north of Shoveler Pond and then flushed towards Central Pond.

John Puschock
Matthews Beach, Seattle

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Date: 11/21/18 8:58 pm
From: Pterodroma <pterodroma...>
Subject: [Tweeters] the "twelfie" Red-tailed Hawk in Bellevue Eastgate
Had I curbed my initial excitement and bothered to launch a google search BEFORE posting this morning about the blue patagial tagged Red-tailed Hawk bearing the black number "12" on blue, I would have learned that the bird indeed was caught at SeaTac, was a juvenile at the time, and probably released up in Skagit County near Bow https://www.facebook.com/notes/western-washington-birders/reporting-wing-tagged-raptors/1660532240924474/   Research so far hasn't revealed any other details or when this bird might have been caught, tagged, and relocated.  Also in my haste and first gut impression, I saw the bird with a blue tag on it's "shoulder" which is the way it appears to the viewer when perched (kind of like in the name "red-shouldered hawk") when the most accurate description to the type of tag and it's location is the patagium or patagial wing tag https://www.thespruce.com/bird-wing-parts-387365    The bird is presumably long gone now, unconfirmed reports suggest this "twelfie" may be heading east toward Charlotte and indeed, dressed to rumble.
This morning about 10 hours ago, I wrote:  Just now spied an adult Red-tailed Hawk with a blue tag on it's right shoulder bearing the number "12" in big black numerals that landed in a big mature Douglas Fir just outside the front window while I am right now eating a late breakfast.  Maybe just another "twelfie" roaming the neighborhood??? ….or maybe something caught and tagged recently at SeaTac, or perhaps some other origin?  If anyone knows anything about this bird, Bud Anderson might, I am just curious, please let me know if it ain't too much trouble.  Thanks.
Richard RowlettBellevue, Eastgate0.8mi south of I-90, elev 574ft 
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Date: 11/21/18 8:04 pm
From: Hank H <h.heiberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Sequim Trip Highlights 11/18 -> 11/20

>> We had beautiful sunny weather with no wind. Here are the highlights.
>>
>> Dungeness Spit: We watched a Great Blue Heron do kelp surfing on the west side of the spit. Here is a video.
>>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/45916329432/in/dateposted/
>>
>> We scoped Long-tailed Ducks at Dungeness Spit as well as at Dungeness Landing Park in Sequim.
>>
>> Fort Worden State Park: We saw two Western Meadowlarks near the radar tower, one of which vocalized from the fence on the south side of the tower..
>>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/45077235775/in/dateposted/
>>
>> Also at Fort Worden we encountered a large, mixed flock of small birds feeding around us, apparently unaware of our presence. The Golden-crowned Sparrows were practically walking on top of our shoes. Here are a couple of close-up photos.
>>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/32117676958/in/dateposted/
>>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/32117677028/in/dateposted/
>>
>> Shirley Browning Park (Port Townsend):
>>
>> We watched a Peregrine Falcon chase a flock of Sanderlings and in turn be chased by a gull.
>>
>> Ediz Hook (Port Angeles): Very birdy including 49 Western Grebes, 25 Common Murres and a mixed flock of Black-bellied Plovers, Black Turnstones, Sanderlings and Dunlins.
>
>> Here is the album of all photos from the trip.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/albums/72157703728097394
>
>> Besides the birding excitement, I (Hank) happen to be awake Monday morning at about 3:00 when a 4.1 earthquake hit the Olympic Peninsula. I felt the floor roll under my feet.
>>
>> Happy Thanksgiving to all. We are thankful for all of the birders who have helped us throughout the years.
>> Hank & Karen Heiberg
>> Issaquah, WA
>>

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Date: 11/21/18 4:47 pm
From: Phil Kelley <scrubjay323...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Nisqually NWR 11/21/18
Tweets,

Today 15 of us walked Nisqually. It was in the 40s and off and on rain
so folks dropped out early (me included). It was pretty quiet and we
had a 5.5 tide at 10:01 so mostly mud in the reclamation area.

Highlights included a VIRGINIA RAIL inside the twin barns boardwalk
near the turn off to the twin barns. One has been seen in this area
for the last several weeks along with SORA and WILSON'S SNIPE.

Another highlight was 4 SNOW GEESE along the McAllister Creek access
road across from the parking lot. Another SNOW GOOSE was seen inside
the estuary dike.

We did get to watch a GREAT BLUE HERON catch and swallow an adult BULL
FROG. It didn't go down easy but eventually it did.

Out on the mud flats we had DUNLIN, LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERS and GREATER
YELLOWLEGS. There was a PEREGRINE FALCON roosting in a tree there
also.

Passerine numbers were down due to the weather except for a couple of
flocks of GOLDFINCH.

For the day I had 39 species and now have 128 for the year. The only
mammal I saw was a BLACK-TAILED DEER and fawn.

For a complete list see Shep's ebird report.

Until next week...HAPPY THANKSGIVING.

Phil Kelley
<scrubjay323...>
Lacey, WA
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Date: 11/21/18 3:24 pm
From: beneteau <beneteau...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Surf Scoter behaviou
On Tuesday, some of the PAS birders went to the Tulalip Skate Park area
to look at the water birds on the bay. Near the shore were about 60 Surf
Scoters displaying interesting behavior: they were lined up nearly
shoulder to shoulder (ok, wing to wing) in a straight line and all swam
slowly in the same direction. It looked for all the world like a police
search of an area. They went in all four directions and only once did I
notice them all suddenly group together and all dive at once. When they
came back up, they again formed a line and slowly swam along at the same
pace. A couple of times something scared them up out of the water but
they came back and repeated the behavior. Lasted for at least a half
hour or more. Other Scoters farther away were not doing this.

I thought Scoters fed off the bottom, mainly; do they sometimes act
similarly to Shovelers and "herd" their food?  Has anyone observed this
behavior before?  Or do they have a secret drill team?

--
Jim Beneteau
Arlington, Wa

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Date: 11/21/18 2:53 pm
From: Mary klein <marytweetz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Snow Geese
Yesterday I saw a flock of 6 snow geese flying over the Clear Creek
Trail in Silverdale.

Mary

--

Mary Klein
Central Kitsap WA
marytweetz at gmail dot com
catbird54 at comcast dot net (for off-list replies, etc.)
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Date: 11/21/18 2:05 pm
From: Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2018-11-21
Tweets – At Thanksgiving, the survey is run a day early. Today featured a rumpled overcast the occasionally dripped on us, but it was in the high 40’s, and the total accumulation was just a trace. Birds didn’t seem to want to fly much today, and there were long quiet stretches. Not that many birders (i.e. Matt had to work), and but a pretty good show of birds.

Highlights:
a.. Cackling Goose – around 2000 flew around, then landed on the grass soccer fields, where they spent the morning. Quite a sight!
b.. American Wigeon – lone female at the weir
c.. Green-winged Teal – below weir and at Rowing Club, 4 or more.
d.. RING-NECKED PHEASANT – male flew to Pea Patch from the west. First since 2011. Likely not of wild origin.
e.. Green Heron – one remains at Rowing Club pond
f.. – All 5 standard Woodpeckers – including an apparently pure Red-breasted Sapsucker this week
g.. Northern Shrike – adult north of Viewing Mound
h.. RIVER OTTER – 4 or 5 on lake, 1+ in slough, 1 at Rowing Club pond
Few misses to report today; just Hooded Merganser, accipiters, Pine Siskin, and Lincoln’s Sparrow. In my short pre-dawn search, I had no owls. Last week’s might have been the final Cedar Waxwings for the year.

We’d had no diving ducks at all, but a late lake view turned up 4 Ring-necked Ducks, 2 Bufflehead, and 2 Common Merganser.

With those three ducks, that made 57 species for the day.

Back to Thursday next week :)

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== <BirdMarymoor...>
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Date: 11/21/18 2:05 pm
From: Constance Sidles <constancesidles...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Off topic: Survey re invasive species
Hey tweets, see below if you're interested in making your voice heard about the use of pesticides on invasive species. I filled it out because of my interest in Montlake Fill, which has had a long history of invasive plants and various efforts (both good and bad) to control them. - Connie, Seattle

<csidles...> <mailto:<csidles...>
<constancesidles...>

>
>
>
>
> Good day!
>
> WSU Extension, the University of Alaska, and the Washington State Department of Agriculture are conducting a survey to assess public perceptions about classical biological control, or the use of natural enemies to control pests and weeds. The survey should take 15 to 20 minutes for most participants, and includes an introduction and some background information to orient participants.
>
> We would greatly appreciate hearing your thoughts on invasive species and classical biological control. If you have questions while taking the survey, please contact Jennifer Andreas (<jandreas...> <mailto:<jandreas...> or 253.651.2197) or Chris Looney (<clooney...> <mailto:<clooney...> or 360.902.2042). Participation is voluntary and anonymous.
>
> Here is a link to the survey:
> http://uaa.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_b2TiEKKA7POakC1 <http://uaa.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_b2TiEKKA7POakC1>
>
> Thank you so much for your input!
>
> Jennifer Andreas (Washington State University)
> Chris Looney (Washington State Department of Agriculture)
> Shannon Donovan (University of Alaska)
>
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Date: 11/21/18 11:09 am
From: Pterodroma <pterodroma...>
Subject: [Tweeters] shoulder tagged Red-tailed Hawk, Bellevue Eastgate
Just now spied an adult Red-tailed Hawk with a blue tag on it's right shoulder bearing the number "12" in big black numerals that landed in a big mature Douglas Fir just outside the front window while I am right now eating a late breakfast.  Maybe just another "twelfie" roaming the neighborhood??? ….or maybe something caught and tagged recently at SeaTac, or perhaps some other origin?  If anyone knows anything about this bird, Bud Anderson might, I am just curious, please let me know if it ain't too much trouble.  Thanks.
Richard RowlettBellevue, Eastgate0.8mi south of I-90, elev 574ft 
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Date: 11/21/18 12:21 am
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fir Island 11-19-18
My son and I made a return trip to Fir Island Monday with stops at Wylie Slough and Hayton.  Photos and further narrative are at this link:
http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum/index.php?threads/fir-island-11-19-2018.20094/
 
Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA
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Date: 11/20/18 6:31 pm
From: Jill Freidberg <jill.freidberg...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] crow with avian keratin disorder
You can report them here
> https://www.usgs.gov/centers/asc/science/beak-deformities-landbirds?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects <https://www.usgs.gov/centers/asc/science/beak-deformities-landbirds?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects>
Or email Caroline Van Hemert.
<cvanhemert...> <mailto:<cvanhemert...>

Jill

> On Nov 20, 2018, at 3:37 PM, J Christian Kessler <1northraven...> wrote:
>
> just saw a crow at Matthews Beach park with avian keratin disorder, bill long, thin, and hooked. I seem to recall a note on Tweeters indicating that such sightings should be reported to some site, but do not recall more than that. Can someone remind me of whether and where to report this?
>
> Otherwise just the normal birds -- Am. Wigeon, Mallard, Gadwall, Canada Geese, Double-crested Cormorant, Pied-billed Grebe, Common Merganser, and CA Gull. surprisingly few gulls.
>
> Chris,
> Seattle
>
> --
> "moderation in everything, including moderation"
> Rustin Thompson
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Date: 11/20/18 3:45 pm
From: J Christian Kessler <1northraven...>
Subject: [Tweeters] crow with avian keratin disorder
just saw a crow at Matthews Beach park with avian keratin disorder, bill
long, thin, and hooked. I seem to recall a note on Tweeters indicating
that such sightings should be reported to some site, but do not recall more
than that. Can someone remind me of whether and where to report this?

Otherwise just the normal birds -- Am. Wigeon, Mallard, Gadwall, Canada
Geese, Double-crested Cormorant, Pied-billed Grebe, Common Merganser, and
CA Gull. surprisingly few gulls.

Chris,
Seattle

--
"moderation in everything, including moderation"
Rustin Thompson

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Date: 11/20/18 2:17 pm
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...>
Subject: [Tweeters] For Birds-of-Paradise, Being Hot Is Not Enough to Win a Mate, They Must Also Have The Moves
hello everyone,

i just published a piece about a hot-off-the-presses PLoS Biology paper
that describes a number of interesting and imaginative experiments used
to show that physical and vocal traits and behaviors evolve together --
which is contrary to what we think we are seeing for most songbirds:

For Birds-of-Paradise, Being Hot Is Not Enough to Win a Mate, They Must
Also Have The Moves
http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2018/11/20/for-birds-of-paradise-being-hot-is-not-enough-to-win-a-mate-they-must-also-have-the-moves/
tinyURL: https://tinyurl.com/ydd9g2lh

I hope you find this piece to be interesting and educational, and of
course, I hope you share it widely amongst your friends and family, and on
social media and twitter.

as always, thank you for reading.

--
GrrlScientist | @GrrlScientist <https://twitter.com/GrrlScientist>
<grrlscientist...>
Blogs: Forbes <http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/> | Evolution
Institute <https://evolution-institute.org/profile/grrlscientist/?source=> |
Medium <https://medium.com/@GrrlScientist>
Podcasts: BirdNote Radio <http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist>
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter <https://tinyletter.com/grrlscientist>
Tiny bio: about.me <https://about.me/grrlscientist>
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Date: 11/20/18 8:18 am
From: B P Bell <bellasoc...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Eastside Audubon Whidbey Island trip 19 Nov 2018
Hi Tweets



Yesterday, Eastside Audubon took a trip to Whidbey Island. The day started
out cold (35F) and clear with no wind. While we waited for the next ferry at
Mukilteo we walked out on the dock and saw BARROW'S GOLDENEYE, ROCK PIGEON,
EUROPEAN STARLING, GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL, GREAT BLUE HERON, DOUBLE-CRESTED
CORMORANT, PELAGIC CORMORANT, AMERICAN CROW, BELTED KINGFISHER and SURF
SCOTER. It was nice to have calm surface conditions so we could scan out at
a distance.



On the ferry we saw GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL, CALIFORNIA GULL, BARROW'S
GOLDENEYE, 2 pairs of MARBLED MURRELETs, BONAPARTE'S GULL, DOUBLE-CRESTED
CORMORANT, RED-BREASTED MERGANSERs and SURF SCOTER. Arriving at Clinton, we
stopped at the small Clinton Beach Park and picked up COMMON LOON,
RED-NECKED GREBE, HORNED GREBE, BUFFLEHEAD, BELTED KINGFISHER,
DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT, PELAGIC CORMORANT, BARROW'S GOLDENEYE, HOUSE
SPARROW, AMERICAN CROW, ROCK PIGEON and BALD EAGLE. We were closer to the
water so the temperature had climbed to 38F, and the clear calm conditions
were promising for a good day.



We stopped at Deer Lake and being a bit more inland our temperature dropped
to 34F and there was some fog over part of the lake making visibility
harder. But, we still managed to see BUFFLEHEAD, HOODED MERGANSER, COMMON
MERGANSER, ROCK PIGEON, AMERICAN CROW, AMERICAN ROBIN, YELLOW-RUMPED
WARBLER, FOX SPARROW, NORTHERN FLICKER, DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT, and heard
RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET and PACIFIC WREN.



At Rollinghill Road it was quiet when we first arrived, but picked up and we
saw SPOTTED TOWHEE, NORTHERN FLICKER, DARK-EYED JUNCO, EURASIAN
COLLARED-DOVE, AMERICAN ROBIN, RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH, FOX SPARROW, HOUSE
SPARROW, SONG SPARROW, ANNA'S HUMMINGBIRD, COMMON RAVEN, our first of season
of a nice flock of PINE SISKIN (about 50), HOUSE FINCH and EUROPEAN
STARLING.



As we drove along French Road we had a STELLER'S JAY fly across and into a
tree. In Maxwellton we had EURASIAN COLLARED-DOVE, ANNA'S HUMMINGBIRD,
AMERICAN GOLDFINCH, SPOTTED TOWHEE, WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW and CANADA GOOSE.
At Dave Mackie Park there was a COOPER'S HAWK perched in a tree. Offshore
there were BUFFLEHEAD, COMMON LOON, PACIFIC LOON, HORNED GREBE, SURF SCOTER,
RED-NECKED GREBE, AMERICAN WIGEON (too far away to really scan for any
possible Eurasian), WESTERN GREBE. At one of the houses with a feeder we saw
DARK-EYED JUNCO, ANNA'S HUMMINGBIRD and a bright ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER
(kind of a surprise for the month and at the feeder).



On Ewing Road at the wetlands (right now ponds), there were lots of MALLARDs
and also GADWALL, NORTHERN PINTAIL, GREEN-WINGED TEAL, NORTHERN SHOVELER
(females), COMMON GOLDENEYE, EUROPEAN STARLING, RED-TAILED HAWK, RING-NECKED
DUCK, AMERICAN COOT (a single bird hiding back in the rushes) and AMERICAN
WIGEON. On the way to Sunlight Beach we saw two VARIED THRUSH at the side of
the road. The temperature had climbed to 39 and we started to joke about
tropical conditions in November.



At Sunlight Beach Rd/Deer Lagoon there were DUNLIN, BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER,
MALLARD, AMERICAN WIGEON, GREEN-WINGED TEAL, GREAT BLUE HERON, RING-BILLED
GULL, MEW GULL, CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEE (on the way in at a feeder), BALD
EAGLE (took something fairly small), AMERICAN CROW, LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER
(about 8, and close enough to definitely identify). We walked out the public
access path to view Useless Bay, and saw BRANT, RED-BREASTED MERGANSER,
DUNLIN, BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, COMMON LOON, COMMON GOLDENEYE and a
WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW.



We made a lunch stop at Double Bluff on the way out we picked up a single
BREWER'S BLACKBIRD, it was nice to have clear, calm conditions for lunch,
and saw BALD EAGLE, GREAT BLUE HERON, RED-TAILED HAWK, AMERICAN ROBIN,
ANNA'S HUMMINGBIRD, SONG SPARROW and PACIFIC WREN.



We walked out the path at Deer Lagoon (lots and lots of ducks) and saw
MALLARD, AMERICAN WIGEON (at least several hundred), NORTHERN PINTAIL,
BUFFLEHEAD, HOODED MERGANSER, GADWALL, AMERICAN COOT, heard VIRGINIA RAIL,
SPOTTED TOWHEE, WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW, HOUSE FINCH, SONG SPARROW, HOODED
MERGANSER, PIED-BILLED GREBE, NORTHERN HARRIER, MARSH WREN, NORTHERN FLICKER
and BLACK-CAPPED and CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEE. By now the temperature had
climbed to 45, it was still windless and ciear and we were enjoying a most
unusual winter November day.



At Crockett Lake we saw BUFFLEHEAD, COMMON GOLDENEYE, GREATER SCAUP (all at
the two small ponds) and many ducks at a distance across the lake. Closer we
hadGREEN-WINGED TEAL, GREAT BLUE HERON, DUNLIN (a couple of small groups), a
single WESTERN SANDPIPER, NORTHERN PINTAIL, HOODED MERGANSER, and two
GREATER YELLLOWLEGS.



At Keystone we scanned the old platform and at first could only see
DOUBLE-CRESTED and PELAGIC CORMORANTs, but finally managed to find a single
BRANDT'S CORMORANT. There were also BELTED KINGFISHER, RED-BREASTED
MERGANSER, GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL, PIGEON GUILLEMOT and a single HARLEQUIN
DUCK. As we drove up toward Coupeville we saw RED-TAILED HAWK (it made a
dive into the grass and caught a small bird), BALD EAGLE, AMERICAN ROBIN.



At Libby Beach there were two LONG-TAILED DUCKs, our first of the season and
very nice to see. Also, SURF SCOTER, PELAGIC CORMORANT, RED-NECKED GREBE,
COMMON LOON, PIGEON GUILLEMOT, HORNED GREBE, AMERICAN ROBIN and RED
CROSSBILL. At the Hastie Lake access point there were BUFFLEHEAD, HORNED
GREBE, RED-TAILED HAWK, EUROPEAN STARLING, EURASIAN COLLARED -DOVE and
COMMON LOON.



At Bos Lake we picked up GREAT BLUE HERON, BUFFLHEAD, AMERICAN WIGEON,
NORTHERN PINTAIL, RUDDY DUCK and a GREATER YELLOWLEGS. As we continued north
we added another RED-TAILED HAWK and the temperature was up to 53F.



At Dugualla Lake, even though we had to look into the sun we saw about 50
TRUMPETER SWANs, a CANVASBACK, BUFFLEHEAD, RING-NECKED DUCK and AMERICAN
GOLDFINCH.



On the way home we saw a flock of SNOW GEESE, finally had a single KILLDEER,




All in all it was a great birding day with clear, sunny and finally almost
warm conditions and good friends. We finished with 83 species.



Brian H. Bell

Woodinville WA

mail to bell asoc a t iso med ia dot com


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Date: 11/19/18 11:57 pm
From: Dan Reiff, PhD <dan.owl.reiff...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Snowies on the Move - Project SNOWstorm
Hello Tweeters,
Snowy owls have arrived back East.
So hope we have some here this year.
Could be here soon, if at all.

https://www.projectsnowstorm.org/posts/snowies-on-the-move/

Best regards,
Dan Reiff


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Date: 11/19/18 1:44 pm
From: randy collins <rancol23...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Where did all the Western Grebes go, anyway?
Hi all,

Enjoyed watching two western grebes swimming and diving close to shore near the pedestrian bridge just north of SAM Sculpture Park. Monday Nov 19, approx 10am.

Randy Collins
Seattle, WA

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Date: 11/19/18 12:32 pm
From: Michelle Maani <lamoustique...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Black Phoebe and RSH at Ridgefield, and where are the migrants?
I went to Ridgefield NWR today...for November it is strangely empty.  Where is everybody? Yes, there are a few Tundra Swans, a few Canada Geese, a few Cackling Geese, a few of this or that duck you usually see. But when I say a few,  a mean a very few compared to the numbers I usually see this time of year. It would be nice to think this is just on the River S drive and not elsewhere, but my other haunts are similarly depopulated.  Even the small birdies like the Golden-crowned Sparrows seem to be in lower numbers than usual.  I keep hoping it's just a late migration pattern, but it's December next week!
On the plus side, I saw a Black Phoebe near marker #2. It was in the marshy areas on both sides of the road (it flew across).  I also saw a Red-shouldered Hawk, which made its presence known with loud vocalizations (marker #5). 
Michelle MaaniSalmon Creek, Vancouver, WA
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Date: 11/19/18 11:48 am
From: stan Kostka lynn Schmidt <lynnandstan...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Western Bluebirds near Bryant (Snohomish Co.)
Hi Wayne,

Thanks for that report. That’s totally cool, I’ve never seen a bluebird around here so late.

Regarding what we did, in the spring of 2002 we observed several bluebirds on three occasions in a new clearcut on Kunde Road. We put up four nestboxes there that spring, and bluebirds nested in one box. Between 2002 and 2008 we put up 30 nestboxes at 10 different clearcuts east of Bryant. We were thrilled at how successful the project was. All ten sites had bluebirds nesting, some sites more than one pair, and many nestboxes had double broods. Almost all nestboxes not used by bluebirds were used by either violet green or tree swallows. Never saw a House Sparrow. So, new clearcuts apparently are great bluebird habitat.

Problem with running a bluebird trail in clearcuts is that the cuts grow back fast. All were replanted and within five years or so the new trees and brush overtake the boxes and access disappears. If you want to know what I mean, try going for a walk through a six year old clearcut sometime. Here in lowland western Washington the vegetation gets pretty much impenetrable over a few seasons.

One thing we did learn is that when you repeatedly visit nestboxes to inspect contents, you are creating and reinforcing a scent trail, that will be followed by potential nest predators. One of our first nestboxes on Kunde Road was visited by some predator that killed the female and all nestlings. Whatever it was got through an inch and a half round hole. After that we put climbing predator guards on all the nestboxes we installed and never again recorded any predation events.

I stopped collecting data after the 2010 season. Many of the cuts were growing up, my energy for the project was waning, and we had satisfied our curiosity. I’ve never written up the results, probably should sometime.

I still walk and mountain bike the roads and trails around here and there is one site where I moved one of the boxes to an open area next to a four way road intersection. This one box had bluebirds using it this past summer. I have no info on any of the other old sites, they are all pretty much grown over now.

Stan Kostka
lynnandstan at earthlink.net
Arlington (East of Bryant)



Subject: Western Bluebirds near Bryant (Snohomish Co.)
Date: Sat Nov 3 2018 1:58 am
From: contopus AT telus.net

Tweeters,

Late this afternoon, while birding in the NW part of Snohomish County, I was
surprised to discover a flock of 5 WESTERN BLUEBIRDS near the small
community of Bryant (located directly east of Stanwood and just east of
I-5). The exact location was on 59th Avenue NE, very close to 1 mile north
of Grandview Road. At one point all 5 were perched in the top of a small
dead tree, and I got good scope views; later, 1 or 2 were on fencelines
close to the road. It appeared to be a family group, although I did not see
an adult male- all were females or immatures.

The link to my eBird list
(https://ebird.org/view/checkli... ) may

help others to wish to look for these birds.
This is a species not seen too often in Snohomish County. In 2007, a pair

nested in a box along Kunde Road, less than 10 miles away, and was seen by
me and others. (If I recall correctly, this box and several others were put
up by Stan Kostka in the hope of attracting Western Bluebirds, which was
successful!) There have been a few more recent sightings along Kunde Road,
but I'm not sure if the bluebirds ever nested there again.

One of the odd things about my sighting was that it was in November-perhaps
the first-ever November sighting in Snohomish County. This suggests that the
birds may winter in the area. In Washington, the great majority of Western

Bluebirds head south for the winter, although in the Okanagan Valley of BC,
where Western Bluebirds are quite common, a large percentage stay all
winter.

Anyway, others may wish to check this location to see if the bluebirds stay
all winter. If so, it may be worth putting up more nest boxes in the area in
hopes that the population will increase.

Wayne C. Weber
Delta, BC
<contopus...>


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Date: 11/19/18 11:44 am
From: mary hrudkaj <mch1096...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Quail Carcass going to UPS
Thanks to everyone with info on what to do with and where to take bird carcasses. Faye will be meeting me on Friday so she can take the bird to UPS in Tacoma (not the delivery folks). I'm sure it will be put to a good use.


Mary Hrudkaj

Tahuya/Belfair

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Date: 11/19/18 8:39 am
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign15...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Shadow Birding
Just now, while sitting at my computer, I noted a shadow on the window - it
was moving! A bird!

I guess this is sort of an advertisement for the benefits of not washing
your windows (I do have other excuses). Right now the morning sunlight is
slanting across the dirty window mainly highlighting all the dirt. The
shadow of the Wisteria outside projects quite nicely on this dirty sunlit
screen,

And then the bird. The shadow was moving on the window and instantly I
identified it as a Bewicks Wren, typical lurker around here. Small, pointy
bill,perky tail, etc. Snooping wren-like thru the bush.

The bird soon moved into view and was revealed to be a Red-breasted
Nuthatch. Shadow birding is fun if not a bit dubious. Of course there is
the beauty associated with having a crystal clear view out of a clean
window. I think I'll just clean one side and enjoy both shadow birding and
clear seeing.

Just Sayin'
Jeff Gibson
Port Townsend Wa

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Date: 11/19/18 8:10 am
From: Hank H <h.heiberg...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] identification help Western sandpiper
Early morning birder. Isn't that almost redundant?!

Hank Heiberg
Issaquah

Sent from my iPad

> On Nov 19, 2018, at 7:50 AM, <amk17...> <amk17...> wrote:
>
> Hi Tweets,
>
> The sandpiper was identified as a western. Thanks for all of the early morning birders for helping me out!
>
> AKopitov
> Seattle, WA
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Date: 11/19/18 7:57 am
From: <amk17...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] identification help Western sandpiper
Hi Tweets,

The sandpiper was identified as a western. Thanks for all of the early morning birders for helping me out!

AKopitov
Seattle, WA
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Date: 11/19/18 6:41 am
From: <amk17...>
Subject: [Tweeters] identification help
Hi

I was looking at photos of dunlin from this past weekend and noticed a sandpiper that landed with a group of about 50 or so dunlin. The photo is cropped. The peep is on the left side of the photo. Western? Semipalm? Any id help would be greatly appreciated as I am peeped out. Feel free to email me directly or post on flickr.

https://www.flickr.com/gp/105361713@N07/3BHiPg

Thanks!
AKopitov
Seattle, WA
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