tweeters
Received From Subject
10/17/17 7:41 am Jeff Kozma <jcr_5105...> RE: [Tweeters] Book Recommendations?
10/16/17 11:48 pm Hans-Joachim Feddern <thefedderns...> [Tweeters] Point-no-Point Today
10/16/17 9:55 pm Mary Metz <maryjmetz...> [Tweeters] Book recommendations
10/16/17 8:53 pm Hans-Joachim Feddern <thefedderns...> [Tweeters] Another Steller's Jay Movement
10/16/17 6:06 pm Eric Ellingson <abriteway...> [Tweeters] Snow Geese flock in Ferndale field and a single in Birch Bay
10/16/17 3:54 pm Diann MacRae <tvulture...> Re: [Tweeters] Book Recommendation
10/16/17 3:11 pm KAREN JONES <tokajo4...> [Tweeters] Book recommendation
10/16/17 11:55 am Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...> [Tweeters] Drone Research Shows Why Albatross Wings Are Black
10/16/17 9:54 am Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...> Re: [Tweeters] Tagged Red-tailed Hawk
10/16/17 9:41 am Dave Parent <dpdvm...> [Tweeters] Tagged Red-tailed Hawk
10/16/17 8:43 am Wally Davis <wallydavis3...> [Tweeters] Merlin Photo ID
10/16/17 6:13 am Stephen Chase <schasecredo...> [Tweeters] Re: Book Recommendation
10/15/17 11:33 pm C Snyder <cb.tdsnyder...> Re: [Tweeters] Book Recommendation
10/15/17 9:57 pm Teresa Michelsen <teresa...> RE: [Tweeters] Book Recommendation
10/15/17 9:54 pm Philip Dickinson <pdickins...> [Tweeters] Book Recommendation
10/15/17 9:43 pm Devon Comstock <devonc78...> Re: [Tweeters] Book Recommendation
10/15/17 9:33 pm Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] Snohomish/Skagit
10/15/17 8:49 pm Donna Koerker <djkoerk...> [Tweeters] RE: Tweeters Book suggestions
10/15/17 7:59 pm Patti Loesche <loes...> Re: [Tweeters] Book Recommendation
10/15/17 7:21 pm Wilson Cady <gorgebirds...> Re: [Tweeters] Book Recommendation
10/15/17 4:27 pm Scott Downes <downess...> [Tweeters] Blue-gray Gnatcatcher at Neah Bay
10/15/17 2:57 pm Philip Dickinson <pdickins...> Re: [Tweeters] Book Recommendation
10/15/17 2:50 pm J Christian Kessler <1northraven...> Re: [Tweeters] Book Recommendations?
10/15/17 2:14 pm Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...> [Tweeters] Book Recommendation
10/15/17 11:56 am Todd Wren <catherpes.mexicanus...> Re: [Tweeters] Book Recommendations?
10/15/17 11:49 am Elizabeth Bacher <eebacher...> Re: [Tweeters] Book Recommendations?
10/15/17 11:49 am Diane Cavaness <scrapbird...> RE: [Tweeters] Book Recommendations?
10/15/17 11:45 am Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...> [Tweeters] The Birdbooker Report
10/15/17 11:18 am Jeff Kozma <jcr_5105...> RE: [Tweeters] Book Recommendations?
10/15/17 9:25 am Spencer Hildie <shildie...> [Tweeters] Mountain Chickadee at Green Lake
10/15/17 4:53 am Michael Conner <tfedge1809...> Re: [Tweeters] Skagit birding and a question
10/14/17 10:13 pm Hank H <h.heiberg...> [Tweeters] Kittitas County trip
10/14/17 8:46 pm Stephen <schasecredo...> [Tweeters] Book Recommendations?
10/14/17 7:45 pm Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] Skagit birding and a question
10/14/17 7:17 pm Josh Hayes <Coralliophila...> [Tweeters] Our Sapsucker returns
10/14/17 6:07 pm Diane Weinstein <Diane_Weinstein...> [Tweeters] Really Weird Looking Red-winged Blackbird
10/14/17 12:50 pm Hubbell <ldhubbell...> [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } The Boring Bittern
10/14/17 12:05 pm Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...> [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Oct. 15, 2017
10/14/17 11:55 am Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...> Re: [Tweeters] Little Gull
10/14/17 11:48 am Russ Koppendrayer <russkope...> Re: [Tweeters] Little Gull
10/14/17 11:45 am Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...> [Tweeters] Little Gull
10/14/17 10:09 am Twink Coffman <wilber4818...> [Tweeters] NCAS with Ed Deal
10/14/17 5:53 am Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...> [Tweeters] welp! get ready to say goodbye to Australia's orange-bellied parrot
10/13/17 10:12 pm <quetsal48...> [Tweeters] Beer and Birds
10/13/17 9:33 pm Josh Adams <xjoshx...> [Tweeters] Snohomish Yard Birding
10/13/17 7:13 pm JERRY D AND MARCENE D'ADDIO <jmdaddio...> [Tweeters] Bar-tailed Godwit, in search of
10/13/17 6:42 pm Scott Downes <downess...> [Tweeters] Little Gull still present at Hansville
10/13/17 2:22 pm Doug Plummer <2doug...> [Tweeters] Mitred Conure in Bryant, Seattle
10/13/17 12:25 pm Ryan Merrill <rjm284...> [Tweeters] Little Gull near Point No Point
10/13/17 12:06 pm Ron Post <ronpost4...> [Tweeters] photo favorites
10/13/17 8:29 am LARRY BAXTER <natural.world.explorer...> [Tweeters] snow geese arrive
10/13/17 7:27 am Walter Szeliga <walter.szeliga...> [Tweeters] Southbound (Gyr?)falcon, Ellensburg
10/12/17 10:09 pm Randy <re_hill...> [Tweeters] SW WA yesterday and today
10/12/17 8:26 pm Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2017-10-12
10/12/17 6:05 pm <ehagstrom13...> [Tweeters] For Sale used Swarovski EL 8.5x42 SV Binoculars
10/12/17 4:51 pm Ron Post <ronpost4...> [Tweeters] newsletter posted
10/12/17 2:38 pm Maxine Reid <max2012mike...> [Tweeters] Mountain chickadee photos
10/12/17 1:00 pm Wilson Cady <gorgebirds...> RE: [Tweeters] Minor Mountain Chickadee (and Clark's Nutcracker) dispe rsal
10/12/17 12:35 pm Jeremy Schwartz <jschwartz1124...> [Tweeters] Raining Mallards
10/12/17 11:45 am Shep Thorp <shepthorp...> [Tweeters] Nisqually NWR Wednesday Walk 10/11/2017
10/12/17 11:27 am Jeff Kozma <jcr_5105...> RE: [Tweeters] Minor Mountain Chickadee (and Clark's Nutcracker) dispersal
10/12/17 11:10 am Wayne Weber <contopus...> RE: [Tweeters] Minor Mountain Chickadee (and Clark's Nutcracker) dispersal
10/12/17 9:37 am <clsouth...> Re: [Tweeters] Re: Hummingbird banding in WA state
10/12/17 8:29 am randy collins <rancol23...> [Tweeters] Re: Hummingbird banding in WA state
10/12/17 8:28 am Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant...> [Tweeters] Minor Mountain Chickadee dispersal
10/11/17 9:01 pm Ed Swan <Edswan2...> [Tweeters] Bummed no more Thayer's Gulls
10/11/17 5:05 pm Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...> [Tweeters] recent Battle Ground (Clark County) yard birding
10/11/17 4:32 pm Bob <rflores_2...> [Tweeters] Lower Vancouver Bottoms this afternoon.
10/11/17 4:11 pm William <wrboyington...> [Tweeters] Jaeger this afternoon off Richmond Beach, Shoreline
10/11/17 2:57 pm Maxine Reid <max2012mike...> [Tweeters] Mountain chickadee , Tulalip,11 oct.2017
10/11/17 2:34 pm Stewart Wechsler <ecostewart...> Re: [Tweeters] Re: Barred owl behavior ()
10/11/17 2:27 pm Tom Leschine <tml...> [Tweeters] Snow Geese over South Whidbey
10/11/17 2:10 pm Kevin Lucas <vikingcove...> [Tweeters] 6 Anna's; Automated remote camera triggering
10/11/17 2:05 pm Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl...> [Tweeters] Dead Varied Thrush
10/11/17 1:59 pm Sam G Terry <sgt3...> [Tweeters] King County Gulls
10/11/17 1:49 pm Mary Chamberlin <mechamberlin...> [Tweeters] Re: Snow Geese over Bellingham/ Blaine
10/11/17 1:18 pm LARRY BAXTER <natural.world.explorer...> [Tweeters] Snow Geese at Big Ditch north of Stanwood.
10/11/17 10:29 am Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...> Re: [Tweeters] Re: Barred owl behavior ()
10/11/17 10:17 am Stewart Wechsler <ecostewart...> [Tweeters] Re: Barred owl behavior ()
10/10/17 8:49 pm Eric Ellingson <abriteway...> [Tweeters] Snow Geese over Bellingham/ Blaine
10/10/17 8:24 pm Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] Fir Island
10/10/17 6:39 pm Louis Kreemer <lpkreemer...> [Tweeters] Snow Geese over Green Lake
10/10/17 4:09 pm D R <somegum2...> [Tweeters] Snow Geese over Wallingford
10/10/17 2:23 pm Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...> [Tweeters] Varied thrush, Pine Ridge Park, Edmonds, 10-10-17
10/10/17 1:05 pm Susan wepking <smwepking...> [Tweeters] Hummingbird banding in WA state
10/10/17 8:36 am T Varela <tvarela...> [Tweeters] South Sound American Golden Plover
10/10/17 7:49 am Matt Bartels <mattxyz...> [Tweeters] Correction to Whidbey report on Golden-Plovers [10/9]
10/9/17 11:14 pm Scott <scottratkinson...> [Tweeters] A little birding in the Russian Far East and northeast China on the fly
10/9/17 9:40 pm Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...> [Tweeters] Brackett's Landing (Edmonds) merlin 10-9-17
10/9/17 9:37 pm Nadine Drisseq <bearsmartwa...> [Tweeters] Northern Shrike at Discovery Pk
10/9/17 7:31 pm Twink Coffman <wilber4818...> [Tweeters] field trip Fairhaven Park, Padden Creek and Estuary, Marine Park, and Woodstock Farm
10/9/17 6:45 pm Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl...> [Tweeters] false courtship in fall (birds)
10/9/17 2:13 pm Jeffrey Bryant <jbryant_68...> [Tweeters] Pierce Co Franklin’s Gull
10/9/17 1:39 pm Neil and Carleen Zimmerman <n3zims...> [Tweeters] Big Sit
10/9/17 1:25 pm Kevin Lucas <vikingcove...> [Tweeters] Re: Black-headed Grosbeak at Poppoff
10/9/17 1:12 pm Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...> [Tweeters] Edmonds marsh sharp-tailed(?) and least sandpipers, 10-8-17
10/9/17 12:49 pm <whitney.n.k...> [Tweeters] Barred owl behavior
10/9/17 10:26 am Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...> [Tweeters] Edmonds marsh pectoral(?) and least sandpipers, 10-8-17
10/9/17 8:44 am Kevin Lucas <vikingcove...> [Tweeters] Black-headed Grosbeak at Poppoff
10/9/17 5:43 am Matt Bartels <mattxyz...> [Tweeters] Sunday [10/9] birding in Jefferson & Island Co
10/8/17 11:04 pm Mary Bond <marybond11...> [Tweeters] UBNA Bittern, Green Heron
10/8/17 10:08 pm <heapbigdoc...> [Tweeters] Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch
10/8/17 4:01 pm James P. Beneteau <beneteau...> [Tweeters] Nuthatch visit
10/8/17 1:38 pm Hans-Joachim Feddern <thefedderns...> Fwd: [Tweeters] Dash Point Park. Franklin's Gull
10/8/17 1:21 pm Jack Falskow <cjfalskow...> [Tweeters] Western Scrub Jay
10/8/17 1:05 pm Kevin Lucas <vikingcove...> Re: [Tweeters] Bald Eagle in our tree! / Caryn / Wedgwood
10/8/17 12:51 pm Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1...> [Tweeters] Bald Eagle in our tree! / Caryn / Wedgwood
10/8/17 10:10 am William <wrboyington...> [Tweeters] Dash Point Park. Franklin's Gull
10/7/17 5:11 pm Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...> [Tweeters] Pierce County Lesser Black-backed Gull Status
10/7/17 2:53 pm Richard Wright <rjw103146...> [Tweeters] Early Pine Siskins
10/7/17 2:27 pm Hubbell <ldhubbell...> [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } It Takes A Village
10/7/17 12:25 pm Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl...> [Tweeters] birds seen or heard near my yard recently
10/7/17 12:05 pm Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...> [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Oct. 8, 2017
10/7/17 10:09 am Sammy Catiis <Hikersammy...> Re: [Tweeters] Leque Is. restoration
10/6/17 5:45 pm Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl...> [Tweeters] Bob Kothenbeutel's response and update to the Leque Is. issue
10/6/17 5:25 pm Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl...> [Tweeters] Leque Is. restoration
10/6/17 5:14 pm <viper.bob...> <viper.bob...> Re: [Tweeters] RFI - Eide Rd/Leque Is mitigation situation/closure
10/6/17 4:17 pm Dan Victor <dvictor06...> [Tweeters] Oceans shores this weekend?
10/6/17 4:09 pm Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl...> [Tweeters] RFI - Eide Rd/Leque Is mitigation situation/closure
10/6/17 3:47 pm Robert C. Faucett <rfaucett...> Re: [Tweeters] Where to post Swarovski Binocs for sale
10/6/17 3:45 pm <ehagstrom13...> [Tweeters] Where to post Swarovski Binocs for sale
10/6/17 2:02 pm H Heiberg <h.heiberg...> [Tweeters] Golden-Plovers @ Crockett Lake
10/6/17 12:37 pm Bruce <blabar...> [Tweeters] Lesser black-backed Gull, Tacoma
10/6/17 12:10 pm Josh Adams <xjoshx...> RE: [Tweeters] Early Pine Siskins
10/6/17 12:09 pm LARRY BAXTER <natural.world.explorer...> [Tweeters] Varied Thrush arrive on Camano
10/6/17 9:25 am Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...> RE: [Tweeters] Early Pine Siskins
10/6/17 9:05 am AnnMarie Wood <amw.5737...> [Tweeters] Lesser Black-Backed Gull?
10/5/17 10:45 pm Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl...> [Tweeters] Skagit Snow Geese, Corn & Full Moon - 10/4/17
10/5/17 10:39 pm Michael Fleming <michaelfleming01...> [Tweeters] Discovery Park Produces Rose-breasted Grosbeak
10/5/17 9:21 pm Teresa Michelsen <teresa...> RE: [Tweeters] Early Pine Siskins
10/5/17 8:53 pm Tom and Carol Stoner <tcstonefam...> Re: [Tweeters] Early Pine Siskins
10/5/17 8:07 pm Linda Phillips <linda_phillips1252...> [Tweeters] Early Pine Siskins
10/5/17 6:01 pm Paul Webster <paul.webster...> [Tweeters] Whidbey Island, October 4
10/5/17 4:45 pm Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...> Re: [Tweeters] Re: Odd hummer behavior?
10/5/17 3:49 pm Dave Slager <dave.slager...> Re: [Tweeters] status of Sandwich Tern change to Cabot's Tern?
10/5/17 3:35 pm Ed Swan <Edswan2...> [Tweeters] status of Sandwich Tern change to Cabot's Tern?
10/5/17 2:28 pm Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2017-10-05
10/5/17 2:21 pm Carla Corin <cw_corin...> [Tweeters] Re: Odd hummer behavior?
10/5/17 2:21 pm Mitch <biglou22...> [Tweeters] Sparrow solved
10/5/17 2:01 pm Mitch <biglou22...> [Tweeters] Montlake Sparrow ID help
10/5/17 1:14 pm pat.mary.taylor <pat.mary.taylor...> [Tweeters] Black Vulture Vancouver Island
10/5/17 12:26 pm Scuderi, Michael R CIV USARMY CENWS (US) <Michael.R.Scuderi...> RE: [Tweeters] Browns Point Caspian Tern
10/5/17 12:17 pm Will Brooks <willjaponicus...> [Tweeters] Lesser Black-backed Gull - Tacoma
10/5/17 9:09 am Byers <byers345...> [Tweeters] Robins migrating
10/4/17 10:57 pm Donna Koerker <djkoerk...> [Tweeters] brown booby?
10/4/17 10:45 pm Gene Beall <gene.beall...> [Tweeters] radar images
10/4/17 9:41 pm Hans-Joachim Feddern <thefedderns...> [Tweeters] Browns Point Caspian Tern
10/4/17 6:01 pm Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...> [Tweeters] Cowlitz County vulture watching
10/4/17 2:28 pm Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1...> [Tweeters] Odd hummer behavior? / Caryn / Wedgwood
10/4/17 1:49 pm Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1...> [Tweeters] White Throated Sparrow / Caryn Wedgwood
10/4/17 12:38 pm Jim Ullrich <jimullrich...> [Tweeters] Ridgefield NWR "Birds n' Blues" Festival
10/3/17 6:57 pm Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...> [Tweeters] Larch Mountain, Clark County birding
10/3/17 6:45 pm Dee Dee <deedeeknit...> [Tweeters] Sparrows coming (as well as those who’ve been here)
10/3/17 5:04 pm Christopher Clark <cjbirdmanclark...> [Tweeters] No Brown Booby today
10/3/17 3:58 pm Cara Borre <cmborre1...> [Tweeters] Westport Seabirds Trip Report Saturday 9-30-17
10/3/17 12:49 pm Phil Wegener <WEGENER2511...> [Tweeters] sagebrush sparrow
10/3/17 12:06 pm Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...> Re: [Tweeters] Re: The sparrows are coming!
10/3/17 10:38 am Steve Loitz <steveloitz...> Re: [Tweeters] Northeast Seattle Rough-legged Hawk
10/3/17 10:33 am Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...> [Tweeters] Brown Booby Status Tuesday?
10/3/17 10:17 am John Puschock <g_g_allin...> [Tweeters] Northeast Seattle Rough-legged Hawk
10/3/17 8:49 am Joan Miller <jemskink...> [Tweeters] Re: The sparrows are coming!
10/2/17 7:45 pm Kristin <KristinStewart01...> [Tweeters] TVs
10/2/17 5:49 pm <amk17...> [Tweeters] northern harrier over Phinney, Seattle
10/2/17 5:45 pm <amk17...> [Tweeters] Skagit Preserve sage sparrow and sharp-tailed sandpiper
10/2/17 5:17 pm Will Brooks <willjaponicus...> Re: [Tweeters] Brown Booby
10/2/17 4:28 pm BRAD <bradliljequist...> [Tweeters] Just to pile on with TVs
10/2/17 3:54 pm Jon Sieker <jon.sieker...> [Tweeters] Barn Owl Denny Park
10/2/17 3:41 pm Constance Sidles <constancesidles...> [Tweeters] Fantastic Fill
10/2/17 3:05 pm Dayna yalowicki <dlwicki...> [Tweeters] Brown Pelicans
10/2/17 1:06 pm Bruce <blabar...> Re: [Tweeters] Brown Booby
10/2/17 12:21 pm Bruce <blabar...> [Tweeters] Brown Booby
10/2/17 11:49 am Bruce <blabar...> [Tweeters] Brown Booby
10/2/17 11:42 am Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] Snohomish/Skagit birding; SAGEBRUSH SPARROW
10/2/17 10:28 am Buchanan, Joseph B (DFW) <Joseph.Buchanan...> [Tweeters] Turkey Vultures
10/2/17 10:14 am Tom Leschine <tml...> [Tweeters] TUVUs over West Queen Anne
10/2/17 8:44 am Jim Lawrence <jlmotmot...> [Tweeters] Black Phoebe
10/1/17 11:09 pm <notcalm...> [Tweeters] Red-breasted Sapsuckers- Mercer Island
10/1/17 10:49 pm Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] Skagit Sagebrush Sparrow
10/1/17 10:45 pm <notcalm...> Re: Mercer Island Scrubs--Re: [Tweeters] Re: Wandering Scrub Jays in Seattle
10/1/17 9:03 pm Josh Adams <xjoshx...> [Tweeters] Snohomish Turkey Vultures, WTSP, etc.
10/1/17 6:02 pm Abbi Gomersall <adgomersall...> Re: [Tweeters] California Scrub-Jay Occurrence in Marysville
10/1/17 5:29 pm Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...> [Tweeters] Battle Ground Turkey Vultures
10/1/17 5:21 pm Byers <byers345...> [Tweeters] One more factoid about TVs
10/1/17 5:09 pm Philip Dickinson <pdickins...> Re: [Tweeters] California Scrub-Jay Occurrence in Marysville
10/1/17 5:09 pm Byers <byers345...> [Tweeters] forgot to sign
10/1/17 5:07 pm Byers <byers345...> [Tweeters] TVs in Edmonds
10/1/17 4:49 pm Pamela Myers <pamelapiwo6813...> Re: [Tweeters] California Scrub-Jay Occurrence in Marysville
10/1/17 4:45 pm <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] Hayton Sagebrush Sparrow
10/1/17 4:38 pm Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...> [Tweeters] California Scrub-Jay Occurrence in Marysville
10/1/17 3:09 pm Phil Kelley <scrubjay323...> [Tweeters] Fall Migration
10/1/17 2:54 pm Diann MacRae <tvulture...> [Tweeters] varied thrush
10/1/17 2:22 pm Hank H <h.heiberg...> [Tweeters] Stilt Sandpiper @ Redmond Retention Ponds
10/1/17 2:12 pm Pamela Myers <pamelapiwo6813...> Re: [Tweeters] California Scrub-Jay Occurrence
10/1/17 1:59 pm Jim Lawrence <jlmotmot...> [Tweeters] Red-shouldered Hawk
10/1/17 12:45 pm Ed Swan <edswan2...> Re: [Tweeters] the sparrows are coming, the sparrows are coming
10/1/17 12:33 pm H Heiberg <h.heiberg...> Fwd: [Tweeters] Re: Redmond Stilt Sandpiper
10/1/17 12:28 pm Carol Schulz <carol.schulz50...> [Tweeters] Turkey Vulture migrants in Des Moines - Sun, Oct 1.
10/1/17 12:10 pm Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...> [Tweeters] The Birdbooker Report
10/1/17 11:43 am Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson...> [Tweeters] the sparrows are coming, the sparrows are coming
10/1/17 11:43 am Matt Dufort <matt.dufort...> [Tweeters] Discovery Park Palm Warbler continues
10/1/17 10:17 am Tom Mansfield <birds...> [Tweeters] Re: Redmond Stilt Sandpiper
10/1/17 10:15 am Tom Mansfield <birds...> [Tweeters] Redmond Stilt Sandpiper
10/1/17 6:59 am Gene Revelas <grevelas...> [Tweeters] September 23rd Westport Seabirds Pelagic Trip - Laysan Albatross, Flesh-footed Shearwater, and Marine Mammals
9/30/17 10:40 pm Nagi Aboulenein <nagi.aboulenein...> Re: [Tweeters] Red-breasted Sapsucker
9/30/17 10:03 pm Linda Phillips <linda_phillips1252...> [Tweeters] Red-breasted Sapsucker
9/30/17 6:09 pm Kristi Hein <khc...> [Tweeters] migrating geese over Samish Flats -- and Varied Thrush
9/30/17 5:24 pm Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...> [Tweeters] Battle Ground, Clark County yard birding
9/30/17 4:13 pm Hubbell <ldhubbell...> [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Beauty and The Beast - Update
9/30/17 3:33 pm Maxine Reid <max2012mike...> [Tweeters] 1 Mute swan at stanwood STPond,30 sept.2017
9/30/17 3:21 pm <notcalm...> [Tweeters] “Bold Eagles: Angry Birds Are Ripping Drones Out of the Sky “
9/30/17 1:45 pm Louis Kreemer <lpkreemer...> [Tweeters] PAWA and BASA still at Discovery
9/30/17 1:08 pm Hubbell <ldhubbell...> [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Beauty and The Beast
9/30/17 12:31 pm ck park <travelgirl.fics...> Re: [Tweeters] Birds of the Camargue and northern Pyrenees--out of area bird trip report
9/30/17 12:05 pm Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...> [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Oct. 1, 2017
9/29/17 9:18 pm Byers <byers345...> [Tweeters] Birds of the Camargue and northern Pyrenees--out of area bird trip report
9/29/17 7:21 pm Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...> [Tweeters] Field guides
9/29/17 4:16 pm Roger Moyer <rogermoyer1...> Re: [Tweeters] Re: Thoughts on Skamania County Jay and Lewis's Woodpecker migration
9/29/17 3:38 pm Bob Hansen <bobhansen...> [Tweeters] Re: Thoughts on Skamania County Jay and Lewis's Woodpecker migration
9/29/17 2:13 pm Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...> Re: [Tweeters] Say's Phoebe in Beacon Hill yesterday
9/29/17 1:53 pm Wilson Cady <gorgebirds...> [Tweeters] Thoughts on Skamania County Jay and Lewis's Woodpecker migration
9/29/17 12:48 pm James Rufo Hill <rufo.hill...> Re: [Tweeters] Say's Phoebe in Beacon Hill yesterday
9/29/17 10:38 am Jeff Birek <jeff.birek...> [Tweeters] Say's Phoebe in Beacon Hill yesterday
9/29/17 10:37 am Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant...> Re: [Tweeters] Palm Warbler at Discovery Park
9/29/17 9:51 am Matt Dufort <matt.dufort...> [Tweeters] Palm Warbler at Discovery Park
9/29/17 8:29 am Stewart Wechsler <ecostewart...> Re: [Tweeters] Might someone want to map our expanding Scrub Jay population?
9/29/17 4:36 am Matt Bartels <mattxyz...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2017-09-28
9/28/17 10:01 pm Josh Adams <xjoshx...> [Tweeters] California Scrub-Jay Occurrence
9/28/17 6:47 pm <festuca...> [Tweeters] Nisqually eBird Report for 27th Sept.
9/28/17 5:57 pm Maxine Reid <baconmf...> [Tweeters] Re : 3 golden plovers at Tulalip
9/28/17 4:05 pm Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...> Re: [Tweeters] 3 golden plovers at Tulalip today
9/28/17 3:44 pm Maxine Reid <baconmf...> [Tweeters] 3 golden plovers at Tulalip today
9/28/17 8:05 am <festuca...> [Tweeters] eBird Report - Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually NWR, Sep 27, 2017
9/27/17 9:17 pm Matt Dufort <matt.dufort...> [Tweeters] Black Vulture on Vancouver Island
9/27/17 8:04 pm Phil Kelley <scrubjay323...> [Tweeters] NIsqually NWR 9/27/17
9/27/17 6:02 pm Hank H <h.heiberg...> [Tweeters] Woodpecker magnet at Lake Joy
9/27/17 4:23 pm Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...> [Tweeters] Cackling Goose Lynnwood 9/26/17
9/27/17 1:45 pm Wilson Cady <gorgebirds...> Re: [Tweeters] Jay Migration at St. Cloud on Sept. 24th
9/27/17 12:41 pm Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson...> Re: [Tweeters] did anyone figure out the subspecies of the Horned Larks at Sandy Pt. in Whatcom County?
9/27/17 8:41 am Ryan Merrill <rjm284...> Re: [Tweeters] Might someone want to map our expanding Scrub Jay population?
9/27/17 8:21 am Stewart Wechsler <ecostewart...> [Tweeters] Might someone want to map our expanding Scrub Jay population?
9/27/17 7:36 am Louise Rutter <louise.rutter...> RE: [Tweeters] did anyone figure out the subspecies of the Horned Larks at Sandy Pt. in Whatcom County?
9/26/17 9:08 pm Wayne Weber <contopus...> RE: [Tweeters] did anyone figure out the subspecies of the Horned Larks at Sandy Pt. in Whatcom County?
9/26/17 4:18 pm Ed Swan <Edswan2...> [Tweeters] did anyone figure out the subspecies of the Horned Larks at Sandy Pt. in Whatcom County?
9/26/17 3:33 pm Philip Dickinson <pdickins...> [Tweeters] Norther Shrike
9/26/17 3:24 pm Wilson Cady <gorgebirds...> Re: [Tweeters] Jay Migration at St. Cloud on Sept. 24th
9/26/17 1:31 pm Maxine Reid <baconmf...> [Tweeters] Red Knot.,Tulalip bay spit,26 September 2017
9/26/17 12:49 pm David Hutchinson <florafaunabooks...> [Tweeters] Latest National Geographic F.G.
9/26/17 11:29 am Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...> Re: [Tweeters] Jay Migration at St. Cloud on Sept. 24th
9/26/17 10:41 am John Puschock <g_g_allin...> [Tweeters] Scrub-Jays in northeast Seattle
9/25/17 10:27 pm Ed Newbold <ednewbold1...> [Tweeters] Mama told me not to brag: Butyl Creek Blackpoll gone with the rest
9/25/17 8:34 pm Michael Donahue <bfalbatross...> [Tweeters] Westport Seabirds trip report, Sunday, September 24, 2017
9/25/17 8:14 pm Linda Talman <linda.talman...> [Tweeters] Night Migration
9/25/17 7:21 pm <dlmoor2...> [Tweeters] birding Long Beach link
9/25/17 6:21 pm Kelly McAllister <mcallisters4...> [Tweeters] Brandt's Cormorants nesting on human-made structures
9/25/17 5:47 pm cjflick <flick...> [Tweeters] Jay Migration at St. Cloud on Sept. 24th
9/25/17 5:14 pm Matt Dufort <matt.dufort...> Re: [Tweeters] Western Scrub-Jays
9/25/17 4:55 pm Hugh <h2ouzel...> Re: [Tweeters] Western Scrub-Jays
9/25/17 4:02 pm Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...> [Tweeters] Edmonds parasitic Jaeger 9-25-17
9/25/17 3:49 pm Devon Comstock <devonc78...> Re: [Tweeters] Western Scrub-Jays
9/25/17 2:37 pm Hugh <h2ouzel...> [Tweeters] Western Scrub-Jays
9/25/17 2:14 pm Louise Rutter <louise.rutter...> [Tweeters] Blackpoll warbler not this morning
9/25/17 1:26 pm Hubbell <ldhubbell...> [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Gone Wild
9/25/17 12:39 pm Dayna yalowicki <dlwicki...> [Tweeters] Scrub Jay in Edmonds
9/25/17 11:38 am Qinglin Ma <qinglineric...> [Tweeters] American White Pelican at Crockett Lake
9/25/17 9:11 am <amk17...> [Tweeters] Hoquiam STP
9/25/17 7:13 am Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...> [Tweeters] Washington Ornithological Society monthly meetings
9/25/17 1:45 am J. Acker <owler...> [Tweeters] Northern Saw-whet Owls
9/24/17 8:21 pm BRAD <bradliljequist...> [Tweeters] Perhaps not quite Tweeters worthy, but of note - Hermit and Varied Thrush on Phinney Ridge
9/24/17 7:09 pm Richard Wright <rjw103146...> [Tweeters] Western Scrub Jays in Lake Forest Park
9/24/17 4:27 pm Isaiah n <isaiahn0919...> [Tweeters] Blackpoll Warbler still at Point Whitehorn
9/24/17 3:43 pm Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...> Re: [Tweeters] Scrub Jay in Kenmore
9/24/17 3:09 pm Linda Phillips <linda_phillips1252...> [Tweeters] Scrub Jay in Kenmore
9/24/17 12:53 pm <dlmoor2...> [Tweeters] Long Beach peninsula birding
9/24/17 11:33 am Ed Newbold <ednewbold1...> [Tweeters] Butyl Creek record so far (27) Blackpoll shots
9/24/17 11:25 am Gudalewicz Dasha <dasha...> [Tweeters] 3 Pectoral Sandpipers at Hoquiam STP
9/24/17 10:53 am Jeremy Schwartz <jschwartz1124...> [Tweeters] Bird's Eye View
9/24/17 10:29 am Eric Heisey <magicman32...> [Tweeters] Gray's Harbor Clay-colored Sparrow
9/24/17 9:43 am Ed Newbold <ednewbold1...> [Tweeters] This must be the fires; Blackpoll at Butyl Creek
9/23/17 10:12 pm Rocky <wrockwel01...> [Tweeters] Yellow-bellied sapsucker
9/23/17 8:29 pm Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] Skagit Game Range N Waterthrush
9/23/17 6:13 pm Shep Thorp <shepthorp...> [Tweeters] Blackpoll re-found Whitehorn Point Marine Reserve, Blaine.
9/23/17 5:48 pm Kevin Lucas <vikingcove...> [Tweeters] Nighthawk
9/23/17 5:46 pm Blake Hough <evergreenthinker...> [Tweeters] Black-and-white Warbler at Montlake Fill
9/23/17 4:47 pm Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...> Re: [Tweeters] Swallow-tailed Gull article
9/23/17 4:25 pm Ryan Merrill <rjm284...> [Tweeters] Swallow-tailed Gull article
9/23/17 2:58 pm Lyn Topinka <pointers...> [Tweeters] Lewiss WP Beacon Eock SP
9/23/17 1:21 pm Spencer Hildie <shildie...> [Tweeters] Horned Lark at Marymoor Park
9/23/17 12:54 pm Louis Kreemer <lpkreemer...> [Tweeters] Rare Sapsucker False Alarm
9/23/17 12:21 pm Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] Fir Island birding, Skagit County
9/23/17 12:09 pm <amk17...> [Tweeters] RFI Day trip Seattle to Westport
9/23/17 12:05 pm Ellen Blackstone <ellen...> [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Sep. 24, 2017
9/23/17 11:26 am Sammy Catiis <Hikersammy...> [Tweeters] Morning Breakfast with a Pygmy
9/23/17 10:57 am Louis Kreemer <lpkreemer...> [Tweeters] Red-naped/Yellow-bellied Sapsucker at Green Lake?
9/23/17 9:57 am Ryan Merrill <rjm284...> [Tweeters] Chestnut-sided Warbler at Neah Bay
9/23/17 9:23 am <kayliningalls...> [Tweeters] Yellow-bellied Sapsucker still at Juanita
9/23/17 5:37 am Jon Houghton <jon.houghton...> [Tweeters] Re: Fine Friday for Heading West!
9/22/17 11:35 pm Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...> [Tweeters] Edmonds Sunset Ave. 9-22-17
9/22/17 9:18 pm Jon Houghton <jon.houghton...> [Tweeters] Fine Friday for Heading West!
9/22/17 8:17 pm <johntubbs...> [Tweeters] Changes (not good for birding) at Hawks Prairie Settling Ponds (HPP)
9/22/17 7:44 pm Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...> Re: [Tweeters] Fox Sparrows Arrive
9/22/17 4:46 pm Brien Meilleur <brienm...> [Tweeters] Black Scoters at Edmonds ferry
9/22/17 4:40 pm Philip Dickinson <pdickins...> [Tweeters] Lapland Longspur on Boe Rd.
9/22/17 4:37 pm Joan Miller <jemskink...> [Tweeters] Fox Sparrows Arrive
9/22/17 4:21 pm Chris <christopherwarlow...> [Tweeters] Brown Booby San Juan Island.
9/22/17 4:13 pm Adam Crutcher <acrut44...> [Tweeters] Juanita Bay Park 9/22
9/22/17 3:53 pm B B <birder4184...> Re: [Tweeters] Western Scrub Jays in Lake Forest Park
9/22/17 3:48 pm David Poortinga <dpoortinga...> [Tweeters] Juanita Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - yes
9/22/17 3:21 pm Margaret Sandelin <msand47...> [Tweeters] Pacific wren
9/22/17 12:33 pm Ned McGarry <ned_mcgarry...> [Tweeters] Brown Booby / San Juan Island
9/22/17 12:29 pm Brien Meilleur <brienm...> [Tweeters] Western Scrub Jays in Lake Forest Park
9/22/17 12:27 pm Sam G Terry <sgt3...> [Tweeters] Alki Point Sabine's Gull
9/22/17 12:18 pm Linda Talman <linda.talman...> [Tweeters] .
9/22/17 11:45 am Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...> [Tweeters] Edmonds marsh mystery duck 9-21-17
9/22/17 10:50 am Patti Loesche <loes...> Re: [Tweeters] Winter wren in Seattle?
9/22/17 10:01 am Adam Crutcher <acrut44...> [Tweeters] Yellow-bellied sapsucker @ Juanita
9/22/17 9:13 am Margaret Sandelin <msand47...> [Tweeters] Winter wren in Seattle?
9/21/17 10:13 pm B B <birder4184...> [Tweeters] Visit to Coast this Morning
9/21/17 9:33 pm Scott Ramos <lsr...> [Tweeters] Magnuson Park, 21 September 2017
9/21/17 9:29 pm <mgfrrstr...> [Tweeters] Where are the female flickers?
9/21/17 7:57 pm Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...> [Tweeters] Sharp-shinned Hawk at Roy (Avian Acres) gets no respect
9/21/17 7:29 pm Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...> [Tweeters] Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course monthly bird walk - 9-21-2017
9/21/17 2:53 pm Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...> [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2017-09-21
9/21/17 1:17 pm Hal Michael <ucd880...> Re: [Tweeters] spotted towhees and their spots
9/21/17 12:41 pm Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] cacklers
9/21/17 12:01 pm Marv Breece <marvbreece...> [Tweeters] Snohomish & Skagit birding 9.20.17
9/21/17 11:57 am <amk17...> [Tweeters] spotted towhees and their spots
9/21/17 6:00 am Shep Thorp <shepthorp...> [Tweeters] Nisqually NWR Wednesday Walk 9/20/17
9/20/17 8:00 pm Betty <bettinab39...> RE: [Tweeters] Where are the female flickers?
9/20/17 7:13 pm Ed Newbold <ednewbold1...> [Tweeters] four firsts-of-fall at Butyl Creek today
9/20/17 5:57 pm Jeffrey Bryant <jbryant_68...> [Tweeters] Re: Migrating geese
9/20/17 3:19 pm <dlmoor2...> [Tweeters] O.S. migrating geese correction
9/20/17 1:57 pm Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...> Re: [Tweeters] Where are the female flickers?
9/20/17 1:40 pm Philip Dickinson <pdickins...> Re: [Tweeters] Where are the female flickers?
9/20/17 1:25 pm Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...> [Tweeters] Where are the female flickers?
9/20/17 1:03 pm Bob Sundstrom <ixoreus...> [Tweeters] Black-legged Kittiwake at Hoquiam ponds
9/20/17 11:57 am <dlmoor2...> [Tweeters] migrating geese
9/20/17 10:13 am Pam Cahn <puc...> [Tweeters] Red-Necked Phalarope at Lake Sammamish
9/19/17 8:37 pm Mary Bond <marybond11...> [Tweeters] Western Grebe pair at UBNA
9/19/17 8:25 pm Eric Ellingson <abriteway...> [Tweeters] Parasitic Jaegers continue at Point Roberts
9/19/17 5:09 pm Tucker, Trileigh <TRI...> [Tweeters] 3-woodpecker *minute*
9/19/17 3:46 pm Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...> [Tweeters] gull search 9-19-19
9/19/17 12:45 pm Tucker, Trileigh <TRI...> [Tweeters] Arrivals: Varied Thrush pair, goldfinches
9/19/17 11:06 am Bob Pearson <rrpearson...> Re: [Tweeters] Owl Attack
9/19/17 11:02 am Charles Easterberg <easterbg...> [Tweeters] Gull Update
9/19/17 9:13 am Mason Flint <masonflint...> [Tweeters] Ride available for Ocean Shores birding on Saturday, Westport Pelagic on Sunday
9/18/17 11:40 pm Gene Beall <gene.beall...> [Tweeters] Shorebirds at Ocean Shores
9/18/17 11:12 pm Josh Adams <xjoshx...> RE: [Tweeters] Gull hunting
9/18/17 7:43 pm Jennifer DeSelle <jendeselle...> [Tweeters] re: seeking swifts
9/18/17 5:01 pm Michelle Maani <lamoustique...> [Tweeters] Chicken at Ridgefield NWR?
9/18/17 4:17 pm John Puschock <g_g_allin...> [Tweeters] Gull hunting
9/18/17 10:53 am Russ Koppendrayer <russkope...> [Tweeters] Sabine's Gull at Woodland Bottoms
9/18/17 10:08 am Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...> [Tweeters] Seeking swifts
9/18/17 7:36 am Mary klein <marytweetz...> [Tweeters] Turkey Vultures
9/17/17 10:09 pm Wayne Weber <contopus...> RE: [Tweeters] CORRECTION: Curlew Sandpiper at BOUNDARY BAY, not Point Roberts
9/17/17 9:05 pm Stephen <schasecredo...> Re: [Tweeters] CORRECTION: Curlew Sandpiper at BOUNDARY BAY, not Point Roberts
9/17/17 8:43 pm Wayne Weber <contopus...> [Tweeters] CORRECTION: Curlew Sandpiper at BOUNDARY BAY, not Point Roberts
9/17/17 7:53 pm Hal Opperman <halop...> [Tweeters] Fwd: BC Rare Bird Alert: RBA: CURLEW SANDPIPER relocated in Point Roberts! - Sept 16th
9/17/17 6:15 pm Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> [Tweeters] Skagit Sharp-tailed Sandpiper(s) yes Sunday
9/17/17 4:45 pm pan <panmail...> [Tweeters] Seattle jaeger
9/17/17 2:57 pm littlebirder <littlebirder...> Re: [Tweeters] Sabine's gull Woodland River bottom
9/17/17 2:14 pm Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1...> [Tweeters] Long Beach shorebirds/Plover id ? and one "shore" Yellowthroat! / Caryn / Wedgwood
9/17/17 1:12 pm B&PBell <bellasoc...> [Tweeters] Eastside Audubon trip to Grays Harbor area Sept 16 2017
9/17/17 1:01 pm noelle c <noellesculpt...> Re: [Tweeters] Owl Attack
9/17/17 11:47 am Margee Cooper <margeecooper...> [Tweeters] Sabine's gull Woodland River bottom
9/17/17 10:53 am Paul Bannick <paul.bannick...> Re: [Tweeters] Owl Attack
9/17/17 10:13 am Mike Wagenbach <wagen...> [Tweeters] Goshawk in Ballard? I must be crazy...
9/17/17 10:09 am Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...> Fw: [Tweeters] Fwd: BC Rare Bird Alert: RBA: CURLEW SANDPIPER relocated in Point Roberts! - Sept 16th
9/17/17 6:14 am Hal Opperman <halop...> [Tweeters] Fwd: BC Rare Bird Alert: RBA: CURLEW SANDPIPER relocated in Point Roberts! - Sept 16th
9/17/17 6:13 am B B <birder4184...> [Tweeters] Curlew Sandpiper Relocated Yesterday at Pt. Roberts
 
Back to top
Date: 10/17/17 7:41 am
From: Jeff Kozma <jcr_5105...>
Subject: RE: [Tweeters] Book Recommendations?
Yes, his raven books are great! I even loved “Bumblebee Economics”. A must for any interested in our native pollinators.



Jeff Kozma



Yakima



From: J Christian Kessler [mailto:<1northraven...>]
Sent: Sunday, October 15, 2017 2:49 PM
To: Jeff Kozma <jcr_5105...>
Cc: Stephen <schasecredo...>; Tweeters (E-mail) <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Book Recommendations?



I second Jeff's recommendations, among other things Heinrich is a very good writer as well as an old-fashioned scientist (bit of naturalist -- individuals of other species have individual identities/personalities). "One Wild Bird at a Time" is a series of stories/reports from that perspective. all of his other books should be on such a list too, his two Raven books are must reads for anyone who spends time in the high country here.



Chris Kessler

Seattle



On Sun, Oct 15, 2017 at 11:16 AM, Jeff Kozma <jcr_5105...> <mailto:<jcr_5105...> > wrote:

I recommend "One Wild Bird at a Time" and "The Nesting Season", both by
Bernd Heinrich.

Jeff Kozma

Yakima

J c r underscore 1505 at charter dot net

-----Original Message-----
From: <tweeters-bounces...> <mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>
[mailto:<tweeters-bounces...> <mailto:<tweeters-bounces...> ] On Behalf Of Stephen
Sent: Saturday, October 14, 2017 8:45 PM
To: <tweeters...> <mailto:<tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Book Recommendations?

Hi Tweeters,
Fewer daylight hours outside of work means less time to go birding myself,
but I can still enjoy it vicariously. I'd like to build up an inventory of
good winter reading. I'm looking for some book recommendations of great
birding stories. I've enjoyed the Big Year themes (Kingbird Highway, The Big
Year, Birding Without Birders, Lost Among the Birds, etc...). I'm hoping for
some more of the same - preferably less of the journal compilations and more
along the lines of great stories about birds, bird discoveries, bird
research stories, or anything remotely close to those.
Thanks for considering,
Stephen in Everson


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--

"moderation in everything, including moderation"
Rustin Thompson


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Back to top
Date: 10/16/17 11:48 pm
From: Hans-Joachim Feddern <thefedderns...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Point-no-Point Today
We birded the Point-no-Point - and other Hansville areas today, but did not
find the previously reported Little Gull. There were many Bonaparte's Gulls
present and as soon as we pulled into the parking lot by the lighthouse, we
found two Parasitic Jaegers harassing the Bonaparte's Gulls. Surprisingly,
we did not see any alcids at all at Point-no-Point. We did however, find
two pairs of Marbled Murrelets further out on the water on Hood Canal,
viewed at the end of NE Twin Spits Road.

Good Birding!

Hans

--
*Hans Feddern*
Twin Lakes/Federal Way, WA
<thefedderns...>

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Back to top
Date: 10/16/17 9:55 pm
From: Mary Metz <maryjmetz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Book recommendations
 Maria Mudd Ruth's Rare Bird (http://www.mariaruthbooks.net/rare-bird/) is an entertaining and, if you don't already know everything there is to know about marbled murrelets, educational read. The Scott Weidensaul book recommendation reminds me of a book that is more of a coffee table book, but it also includes a great essay by Scott, as well some nice pieces by Barbara Kingsolver and Lyanda Lynn Haupt, among others: The Living Bird (https://www.birdnote.org/blog/2015/11/living-bird-new-book-cornell-gerrit-vyn-others). Gerrit Vyn's photos can perk up a drab winter too.
-Mary Metz

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Back to top
Date: 10/16/17 8:53 pm
From: Hans-Joachim Feddern <thefedderns...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Another Steller's Jay Movement
This afternoon I watched 30 or more Steller's Jays flying east past the
flagpole at the waterfront at Port Gamble.

--
*Hans Feddern*
Twin Lakes/Federal Way, WA
<thefedderns...>

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Back to top
Date: 10/16/17 6:06 pm
From: Eric Ellingson <abriteway...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Snow Geese flock in Ferndale field and a single in Birch Bay
A small flock of Snow Geese, only 10 of 50 were adults showed up in Ferndale corn fields today. I'd been seeing hundreds flying over the past week or so. My first local sighting recently of landed geese this season.


A real surprise was finding one in Birch Bay along the shoreline eating sea grass like a Brandt would. I don't recall seeing one do this before. Anyone know if this is common elsewhere. I usually see them if muddy fields. https://flic.kr/p/ZvmGva

Photos of the colorful juvenile Snow Geese also, a bit down the photostream link. Photo was taken from my car window ... raining a bit much.

[X]Snow Goose<https://flic.kr/p/ZvmGva>
a lone Snow Goose among dozens of Canada Geese and hundreds of ducks and scoters eating at the shoreline of Birch Bay, WA

[https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4507/37744552651_10d2418032_b.jpg] <https://www.flickr.com/photos/ericellingson/37744552651/>
[https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4507/37744552651_10d2418032_b.jpg]





Eric Ellingson

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Back to top
Date: 10/16/17 3:54 pm
From: Diann MacRae <tvulture...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Book Recommendation
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Back to top
Date: 10/16/17 3:11 pm
From: KAREN JONES <tokajo4...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Book recommendation
"Rare Bird: Pursuing The Mystery of the Marbled Murrelet."

Get Outlook for iOS<https://aka.ms/o0ukef>

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Back to top
Date: 10/16/17 11:55 am
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Drone Research Shows Why Albatross Wings Are Black
Hello everyone,

have you ever noticed how birds that soar for long distances tend to have
the same wing colour pattern: dark on top and pale underneath? I recently
stumbled across a paper by a team of aerospace engineers based at New
Mexico State University that provides a really interesting explanation for
why this colour pattern is seen so often:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2017/10/16/
albatross-are-teaching-scientists-how-to-build-better-drones/

I hope you enjoy this story, and that you share it amongst your bird pals,
friends and colleagues.

thank you.

--
GrrlScientist | @GrrlScientist <https://twitter.com/GrrlScientist>
<grrlscientist...>
Blogs: Forbes <http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/> | Evolution
Institute <https://evolution-institute.org/profile/grrlscientist/?source=> |
Medium <https://medium.com/@GrrlScientist>
Podcasts: BirdNote Radio <http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist>
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter <https://tinyletter.com/grrlscientist>
Tiny bio: about.me <https://about.me/grrlscientist>
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Back to top
Date: 10/16/17 9:54 am
From: Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Tagged Red-tailed Hawk
You can report the sighting online at the link below.  I reported a tagged turkey vulture over the summer and was provided with interesting history on the bird.  Rather fun.
https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/bbl/


Peggy MundyBothell, WA

From: Dave Parent <dpdvm...>
To: <tweeters...>
Sent: Monday, October 16, 2017 9:38 AM
Subject: [Tweeters] Tagged Red-tailed Hawk

<!--#yiv9318389892 _filtered #yiv9318389892 {font-family:"Cambria Math";panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4;} _filtered #yiv9318389892 {font-family:Calibri;panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;}#yiv9318389892 #yiv9318389892 p.yiv9318389892MsoNormal, #yiv9318389892 li.yiv9318389892MsoNormal, #yiv9318389892 div.yiv9318389892MsoNormal {margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri", sans-serif;}#yiv9318389892 a:link, #yiv9318389892 span.yiv9318389892MsoHyperlink {color:#0563C1;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv9318389892 a:visited, #yiv9318389892 span.yiv9318389892MsoHyperlinkFollowed {color:#954F72;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv9318389892 span.yiv9318389892EmailStyle17 {font-family:"Calibri", sans-serif;color:windowtext;}#yiv9318389892 .yiv9318389892MsoChpDefault {font-family:"Calibri", sans-serif;} _filtered #yiv9318389892 {margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}#yiv9318389892 div.yiv9318389892WordSection1 {}-->On October 13, 2:15pm, I observed an adult Red-tailed Hawk on a post near the corner of Chilberg and Best Roads, LaConner. It had a right sided, blue patagial tag #50. Please forward to interested parties.Thanks!Dave Parent, Freeland, WA dpdvmatwhidbey.com_______________________________________________
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Date: 10/16/17 9:41 am
From: Dave Parent <dpdvm...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Tagged Red-tailed Hawk
On October 13, 2:15pm, I observed an adult Red-tailed Hawk on a post near
the corner of Chilberg and Best Roads, LaConner. It had a right sided, blue
patagial tag #50.

Please forward to interested parties.

Thanks!

Dave Parent, Freeland, WA dpdvmatwhidbey.com


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Date: 10/16/17 8:43 am
From: Wally Davis <wallydavis3...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Merlin Photo ID
I'm in Cancun and seeing a lot of birds which I'm not sure of the
identity. Cell phone camera isn't good for long telephoto. I've found that
I can take a photo with my SLR then take a photo of the camera's view
screen with my cell. Merlin is then batting 1000 on ID.

Wally Davis
Snohomish

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Date: 10/16/17 6:13 am
From: Stephen Chase <schasecredo...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Re: Book Recommendation
Hi again Tweeters,

I am overwhelmed by the number of responses I received - dozens of books
recommended, and almost every recommendation was a new one. Thank you very
much - I'm ready to take on the next El Niño winter with this stash. When I
get a chance to collate everything, I'll e-mail out to everyone a list of
all the books that were recommended.

Stephen in Everson

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Date: 10/15/17 11:33 pm
From: C Snyder <cb.tdsnyder...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Book Recommendation
Another "older" book (a good read!)...
On the Wing: To the Edge of the Earth with the Peregrine Falcon, by Alan Tennant.

Tate and Curtis Snyder
Seattle/Menlo Park, CA

> On Oct 15, 2017, at 9:52 PM, Philip Dickinson <pdickins...> wrote:
>
> An older book, but one of the best about migration: Living on the Wind, by Scott Weidensaul.
>
> Phil Dickinson
> Lake Stevens
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Date: 10/15/17 9:57 pm
From: Teresa Michelsen <teresa...>
Subject: RE: [Tweeters] Book Recommendation
Love seeing all these. To these I would add:



Birding Babylon – A Soldier’s Journey from Iraq

https://www.amazon.com/Birding-Babylon-Soldiers-Journal-Iraq/dp/1578051312



A Parrot with No Name – The Search for the Last Unknown Birds on Earth

https://www.amazon.com/Parrot-Without-Name-Search-Birds/dp/0292765290



The Search for the Pink-Headed Duck

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01EW5P2M4/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8 <https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01EW5P2M4/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1> &btkr=1



I like true stories about birds in exotic places that it is unlikely I will ever be able to visit… if you hadn’t noticed :D



Teresa Michelsen

Snoqualmie (soon to be Port Townsend) WA



From: <tweeters-bounces...> [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Devon Comstock
Sent: October 15, 2017 9:41 PM
To: Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...>
Cc: <Tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Book Recommendation



The Wind Masters by Pete Sibley



How Birds Migrate, Paul Kerlinger



On Oct 15, 2017 2:13 PM, "Carol Riddell" <cariddellwa...> <mailto:<cariddellwa...> > wrote:

"Soaring with Fidel", by David Gessner (2007), is the story of one man following the southbound migration of the Eastern population of Ospreys from Massachusetts to Cuba. It's a really good read and appropriate as fall migration begins to wind down and cold days and nights are upon us. I wouldn't mind following our Ospreys on their southbound journey, but a vicarious following will do.

Carol Riddell
Edmonds, WA_______________________________________________
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Date: 10/15/17 9:54 pm
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Book Recommendation
An older book, but one of the best about migration: Living on the Wind, by
Scott Weidensaul.

Phil Dickinson
Lake Stevens

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Date: 10/15/17 9:43 pm
From: Devon Comstock <devonc78...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Book Recommendation
The Wind Masters by Pete Sibley

How Birds Migrate, Paul Kerlinger

On Oct 15, 2017 2:13 PM, "Carol Riddell" <cariddellwa...> wrote:

> "Soaring with Fidel", by David Gessner (2007), is the story of one man
> following the southbound migration of the Eastern population of Ospreys
> from Massachusetts to Cuba. It's a really good read and appropriate as fall
> migration begins to wind down and cold days and nights are upon us. I
> wouldn't mind following our Ospreys on their southbound journey, but a
> vicarious following will do.
>
> Carol Riddell
> Edmonds, WA_______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>

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Date: 10/15/17 9:33 pm
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Snohomish/Skagit
The SHARP-TAILED SANDPIPER was at Hayton Preserve on Fir Island this afternoon. It was alone on a disappearing island a couple of hours before high tide.


Saw 3 NORTHERN SHRIKES today. One at Boe Rd south of Stanwood, another at Channel Drive & a third at Hayton.


The LIGHT MORPH HARLAN'S RED-TAILED HAWK was once again at Hayton. I saw it or another perched along Dry Slough Rd a short distance north of Moore Road on Fir Island.


For the day 5 AMERICAN KESTRELS & 3 PEREGRINE FALCONS.


It was a good day.



Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>

Concepts shape our world.
Concepts are not hard wired.




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Date: 10/15/17 8:49 pm
From: Donna Koerker <djkoerk...>
Subject: [Tweeters] RE: Tweeters Book suggestions
My favorite book by Bernd Heinrich is "the snoring bird". His others are
excellent as well.



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Date: 10/15/17 7:59 pm
From: Patti Loesche <loes...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Book Recommendation
Raptor: A Journey Through Birds, by James Macdonald Lockhart (University of Chicago Press, 2017).

https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/james-macdonald-lockhart/raptor-journey/
https://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/feb/21/raptor-journey-through-birds-james-macdonald-lockhart

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Date: 10/15/17 7:21 pm
From: Wilson Cady <gorgebirds...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Book Recommendation
Noah Strycker's newest book, Birding Without Borders, the story about his big year is now out: http://ymlpsend.com/yaoaebbusaaawqyafaymee/click.php Wilson Cady
Columbia River Gorge, WA

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Date: 10/15/17 4:27 pm
From: Scott Downes <downess...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Blue-gray Gnatcatcher at Neah Bay
This morning just after 11, Sierra and I had a VERY brief sighting of a blue-gray gnatcatcher on Ba'Adah Village Loop Rd in Neah Bay while searching for the Palm Warblers (unsuccessfully) seen yesterday. How brief? About a 5 second pop up view on the fence near the crab pots before it flew. Despite looking for it for more than 30 minutes, we weren't able to relocate. The Wagoneer brothers were still searching when we left just after noon.

Scott Downes
<Downess...>
Yakima Wa
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Date: 10/15/17 2:57 pm
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Book Recommendation
I concur with Carol's recommendation. Although it deals with East Coast
Osprey migration, it is a fascinating read. Rob Biergaard has put radio
transmitters on eastern Ospreys to track their migration all the way to
South America, and has put his tracking up on the internet.

Phil Dickinson

On Sun, Oct 15, 2017 at 2:09 PM, Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...>
wrote:

> "Soaring with Fidel", by David Gessner (2007), is the story of one man
> following the southbound migration of the Eastern population of Ospreys
> from Massachusetts to Cuba. It's a really good read and appropriate as fall
> migration begins to wind down and cold days and nights are upon us. I
> wouldn't mind following our Ospreys on their southbound journey, but a
> vicarious following will do.
>
> Carol Riddell
> Edmonds, WA_______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>

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Date: 10/15/17 2:50 pm
From: J Christian Kessler <1northraven...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Book Recommendations?
I second Jeff's recommendations, among other things Heinrich is a very good
writer as well as an old-fashioned scientist (bit of naturalist --
individuals of other species have individual identities/personalities).
"One Wild Bird at a Time" is a series of stories/reports from that
perspective. all of his other books should be on such a list too, his two
Raven books are must reads for anyone who spends time in the high country
here.

Chris Kessler
Seattle

On Sun, Oct 15, 2017 at 11:16 AM, Jeff Kozma <jcr_5105...> wrote:

> I recommend "One Wild Bird at a Time" and "The Nesting Season", both by
> Bernd Heinrich.
>
> Jeff Kozma
>
> Yakima
>
> J c r underscore 1505 at charter dot net
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: <tweeters-bounces...>
> [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Stephen
> Sent: Saturday, October 14, 2017 8:45 PM
> To: <tweeters...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Book Recommendations?
>
> Hi Tweeters,
> Fewer daylight hours outside of work means less time to go birding myself,
> but I can still enjoy it vicariously. I'd like to build up an inventory of
> good winter reading. I'm looking for some book recommendations of great
> birding stories. I've enjoyed the Big Year themes (Kingbird Highway, The
> Big
> Year, Birding Without Birders, Lost Among the Birds, etc...). I'm hoping
> for
> some more of the same - preferably less of the journal compilations and
> more
> along the lines of great stories about birds, bird discoveries, bird
> research stories, or anything remotely close to those.
> Thanks for considering,
> Stephen in Everson
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>



--
"moderation in everything, including moderation"
Rustin Thompson

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Date: 10/15/17 2:14 pm
From: Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Book Recommendation
"Soaring with Fidel", by David Gessner (2007), is the story of one man following the southbound migration of the Eastern population of Ospreys from Massachusetts to Cuba. It's a really good read and appropriate as fall migration begins to wind down and cold days and nights are upon us. I wouldn't mind following our Ospreys on their southbound journey, but a vicarious following will do.

Carol Riddell
Edmonds, WA_______________________________________________
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Date: 10/15/17 11:56 am
From: Todd Wren <catherpes.mexicanus...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Book Recommendations?
The Birds of Tropical America by Steven Hilty is a fantastic book.

Todd Sahl
Redmond

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 15, 2017, at 2:44 PM, Elizabeth Bacher <eebacher...> wrote:
>
> I recommend The Thing With Feathers by Noah Stryker.
> -Elizabeth Bacher, Seattle
>
>> On Sun, Oct 15, 2017 at 11:16 AM, Jeff Kozma <jcr_5105...> wrote:
>> I recommend "One Wild Bird at a Time" and "The Nesting Season", both by
>> Bernd Heinrich.
>>
>> Jeff Kozma
>>
>> Yakima
>>
>> J c r underscore 1505 at charter dot net
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: <tweeters-bounces...>
>> [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Stephen
>> Sent: Saturday, October 14, 2017 8:45 PM
>> To: <tweeters...>
>> Subject: [Tweeters] Book Recommendations?
>>
>> Hi Tweeters,
>> Fewer daylight hours outside of work means less time to go birding myself,
>> but I can still enjoy it vicariously. I'd like to build up an inventory of
>> good winter reading. I'm looking for some book recommendations of great
>> birding stories. I've enjoyed the Big Year themes (Kingbird Highway, The Big
>> Year, Birding Without Birders, Lost Among the Birds, etc...). I'm hoping for
>> some more of the same - preferably less of the journal compilations and more
>> along the lines of great stories about birds, bird discoveries, bird
>> research stories, or anything remotely close to those.
>> Thanks for considering,
>> Stephen in Everson
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

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Date: 10/15/17 11:49 am
From: Elizabeth Bacher <eebacher...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Book Recommendations?
I recommend The Thing With Feathers by Noah Stryker.
-Elizabeth Bacher, Seattle

On Sun, Oct 15, 2017 at 11:16 AM, Jeff Kozma <jcr_5105...> wrote:

> I recommend "One Wild Bird at a Time" and "The Nesting Season", both by
> Bernd Heinrich.
>
> Jeff Kozma
>
> Yakima
>
> J c r underscore 1505 at charter dot net
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: <tweeters-bounces...>
> [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Stephen
> Sent: Saturday, October 14, 2017 8:45 PM
> To: <tweeters...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Book Recommendations?
>
> Hi Tweeters,
> Fewer daylight hours outside of work means less time to go birding myself,
> but I can still enjoy it vicariously. I'd like to build up an inventory of
> good winter reading. I'm looking for some book recommendations of great
> birding stories. I've enjoyed the Big Year themes (Kingbird Highway, The
> Big
> Year, Birding Without Birders, Lost Among the Birds, etc...). I'm hoping
> for
> some more of the same - preferably less of the journal compilations and
> more
> along the lines of great stories about birds, bird discoveries, bird
> research stories, or anything remotely close to those.
> Thanks for considering,
> Stephen in Everson
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>

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Date: 10/15/17 11:49 am
From: Diane Cavaness <scrapbird...>
Subject: RE: [Tweeters] Book Recommendations?
"Listening to a Continent Sing" by Donald Kroodsma.

On Oct 15, 2017 11:17 AM, "Jeff Kozma" <jcr_5105...> wrote:

> I recommend "One Wild Bird at a Time" and "The Nesting Season", both by
> Bernd Heinrich.
>
> Jeff Kozma
>
> Yakima
>
> J c r underscore 1505 at charter dot net
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: <tweeters-bounces...>
> [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Stephen
> Sent: Saturday, October 14, 2017 8:45 PM
> To: <tweeters...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Book Recommendations?
>
> Hi Tweeters,
> Fewer daylight hours outside of work means less time to go birding myself,
> but I can still enjoy it vicariously. I'd like to build up an inventory of
> good winter reading. I'm looking for some book recommendations of great
> birding stories. I've enjoyed the Big Year themes (Kingbird Highway, The
> Big
> Year, Birding Without Birders, Lost Among the Birds, etc...). I'm hoping
> for
> some more of the same - preferably less of the journal compilations and
> more
> along the lines of great stories about birds, bird discoveries, bird
> research stories, or anything remotely close to those.
> Thanks for considering,
> Stephen in Everson
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>

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Date: 10/15/17 11:45 am
From: Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] The Birdbooker Report
HI ALL:
This week's titles are:

1) Oceans of Kansas

https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/2017/10/new-title.html

2) Woodpecker

https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/2017/10/new-title_12.html

sincerely
--

Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/
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Date: 10/15/17 11:18 am
From: Jeff Kozma <jcr_5105...>
Subject: RE: [Tweeters] Book Recommendations?
I recommend "One Wild Bird at a Time" and "The Nesting Season", both by
Bernd Heinrich.

Jeff Kozma

Yakima

J c r underscore 1505 at charter dot net

-----Original Message-----
From: <tweeters-bounces...>
[mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Stephen
Sent: Saturday, October 14, 2017 8:45 PM
To: <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Book Recommendations?

Hi Tweeters,
Fewer daylight hours outside of work means less time to go birding myself,
but I can still enjoy it vicariously. I'd like to build up an inventory of
good winter reading. I'm looking for some book recommendations of great
birding stories. I've enjoyed the Big Year themes (Kingbird Highway, The Big
Year, Birding Without Birders, Lost Among the Birds, etc...). I'm hoping for
some more of the same - preferably less of the journal compilations and more
along the lines of great stories about birds, bird discoveries, bird
research stories, or anything remotely close to those.
Thanks for considering,
Stephen in Everson


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Date: 10/15/17 9:25 am
From: Spencer Hildie <shildie...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Mountain Chickadee at Green Lake
Currently looking at a Mountain Chickadee in large mixed flock of chickadees and kinglets. In conifer stand on west side of the lake at intersection of W Green Lake Dr and Aurora and moving north.

Spencer Hildie
Seattle
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Date: 10/15/17 4:53 am
From: Michael Conner <tfedge1809...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Skagit birding and a question
I, too, have had close encounters with birds at this site. I have never
seen anyone actually feeding birds in this location, but I have seen
birdseed on the ground there. I don't remember if I've seen that this year,
but have in previous years.

Michael Conner



On Sat, Oct 14, 2017 at 7:42 PM, Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...> wrote:

> Dear Tweeters,
>
> Since today (14th October) marks the first day of waterfowl-slaughter, I
> decided to stay away from Fir Island. That proved fortuitous. Here are a
> few highlights.
>
> March Point--although the presence of a dozen or more camo-clad men on the
> dredge-spoil islands has apparently scared off the pelicans, there was a
> nice flock of Semipalmated Plovers on the mud near Whitmarsh.
>
> Rosario Head--a single ANCIENT MURRELET could be seen amongst the large
> numbers of Common Murres. There were also two Pacific Loons.
>
> Lake Erie--all five regular *Aythya *ducks were present, with quite a few
> Ring-necked Ducks and Lesser Scaup, two Greater Scaup, a drake Canvasback,
> and a female REDHEAD. There was also a single Ruddy Duck and my first
> Bufflehead of the fall.
>
> Washington Park--here's the question. Do people hand-feed birds at the
> memorial Carroll Louise Newport bench--the one overlooking Green Point? I
> refer to the bench by the concrete steps leading down to the beach just
> around the corner from Green Point itself. At this spot, I always see
> passerines very close in. Today, a CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEE landed on my
> scope, then pecked my hand! Meanwhile, Spotted Towhees, Song Sparrows, a
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet, some Oregon Juncos, and a Pacific Wren disported
> themselves within a meter of me, as they almost always do at this location.
> Oh, another very cool thing here was a Pacific Wren trying very hard to
> convince me that it was a Brown Creeper, creeping up and up the trunk of a
> conifer, foraging on the bark, and staying there for a good five minutes,
> before descending in a pretty good imitation of a creeper's spiraling
> downward flight!
>
> Bay View State Park--a PARASITIC JAEGER was harassing the Bonaparte's
> Gulls out in the bay. There were a couple of Red-breasted Mergansers, too.
>
> Samish Island Public Beach--there were a few more Buffleheads and
> Red-breasted Mergansers here, plus a very spiffy-looking Pacific Loon.
>
> Yours truly,
>
> Gary Bletsch
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
>

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Date: 10/14/17 10:13 pm
From: Hank H <h.heiberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Kittitas County trip

>
> We just returned from a few days in Kittitas County. We birded a few of our usual spots: Swauk Prairie, Umptanum Road, Gingko Petrified Forest State Park and Wanapum State Park. Swauk Prairie was slow, but the valley below Swauk Prairie had some nice birds as did the other three locations. Our lists are all available on eBird. Our favorite way to access eBird data is Washington Dashboard.. Here is a link.
>
> http://birdingwashington.info/dashboard/wa/
>
> Here are two videos and the album of photos from the trip.
>
> Golden-crowned Sparrow using its entire body to extract seeds from a bush:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/37404220740/in/photostream/
>
> Black-billed Magpie eating a rodent:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/36991609193/in/photostream/
>
> Photo album:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/sets/72157687248137970
>
> Warning of sorts....we came back Friday midday and were shocked how bad the eastbound traffic was. It was backed up from Snoqualmie Pass almost to North Bend.
>
> Hank and Karen Heiberg
> Lake Joy
> N.E. of Carnation, WA
>
>
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPad

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Date: 10/14/17 8:46 pm
From: Stephen <schasecredo...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Book Recommendations?
Hi Tweeters,
Fewer daylight hours outside of work means less time to go birding myself, but I can still enjoy it vicariously. I'd like to build up an inventory of good winter reading. I'm looking for some book recommendations of great birding stories. I've enjoyed the Big Year themes (Kingbird Highway, The Big Year, Birding Without Birders, Lost Among the Birds, etc...). I'm hoping for some more of the same - preferably less of the journal compilations and more along the lines of great stories about birds, bird discoveries, bird research stories, or anything remotely close to those.
Thanks for considering,
Stephen in Everson


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Date: 10/14/17 7:45 pm
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Skagit birding and a question
Dear Tweeters,
Since today (14th October) marks the first day of waterfowl-slaughter, I decided to stay away from Fir Island. That proved fortuitous. Here are a few highlights.
March Point--although the presence of a dozen or more camo-clad men on the dredge-spoil islands has apparently scared off the pelicans, there was a nice flock of Semipalmated Plovers on the mud near Whitmarsh.
Rosario Head--a single ANCIENT MURRELET could be seen amongst the large numbers of Common Murres. There were also two Pacific Loons.
Lake Erie--all five regular Aythya ducks were present, with quite a few Ring-necked Ducks and Lesser Scaup, two Greater Scaup, a drake Canvasback, and a female REDHEAD. There was also a single Ruddy Duck and my first Bufflehead of the fall.
Washington Park--here's the question. Do people hand-feed birds at the memorial Carroll Louise Newport bench--the one overlooking Green Point? I refer to the bench by the concrete steps leading down to the beach just around the corner from Green Point itself. At this spot, I always see passerines very close in. Today, a CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEE landed on my scope, then pecked my hand! Meanwhile, Spotted Towhees, Song Sparrows, a Ruby-crowned Kinglet, some Oregon Juncos, and a Pacific Wren disported themselves within a meter of me, as they almost always do at this location. Oh, another very cool thing here was a Pacific Wren trying very hard to convince me that it was a Brown Creeper, creeping up and up the trunk of a conifer, foraging on the bark, and staying there for a good five minutes, before descending in a pretty good imitation of a creeper's spiraling downward flight!
Bay View State Park--a PARASITIC JAEGER was harassing the Bonaparte's Gulls out in the bay. There were a couple of Red-breasted Mergansers, too.
Samish Island Public Beach--there were a few more Buffleheads and Red-breasted Mergansers here, plus a very spiffy-looking Pacific Loon.
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch






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Date: 10/14/17 7:17 pm
From: Josh Hayes <Coralliophila...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Our Sapsucker returns
I guess it's the cold snap, but our resident-for-the-last-two-years Red-breasted Sapsucker has returned and is busily banging on the pine in the backyard. I wondered if he would use the same holes as last year, but apparently not: he's drilling a new lattice. He's also completely uninterested in us down on the ground, only 15 or 20 feet down. Just keeps working while we work in the yard.


Not the most newsworthy bird, but a sign of the season for sure. Our resident front-yard song sparrow has been singing his little heart out for a week or two, for some reason. Fall is here, but he's not taking any chances.


Josh in the gloaming of Licton Springs

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Date: 10/14/17 6:07 pm
From: Diane Weinstein <Diane_Weinstein...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Really Weird Looking Red-winged Blackbird
There was a really weird looking Red-winged Blackbird at the feeder today. I only got a quick look before a Coopers Hawk came in and scared everyone away. He has a white rump and a whitish breast with reddish/golden brown streaks. Other than that he looked like a normal adult male. If he comes back I will try to get pictures.


Diane Weinstein

Issaquah

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Date: 10/14/17 12:50 pm
From: Hubbell <ldhubbell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } The Boring Bittern
Tweeters,

Please excuse my title. Personally, I find seeing an American Bittern on Union Bay (or anywhere else for that matter) thrilling and exciting. I hope you have had a chance to observe this visitor during the last week or two. If not here are photos from Wednesday morning. I hope you enjoy the post!

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2017/10/the-boring-bittern.html <https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2017/10/the-boring-bittern.html>

Have a great day on Union Bay, where nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net
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Date: 10/14/17 12:05 pm
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...>
Subject: [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Oct. 15, 2017
Hey, Tweeters,

Here are the BirdNote stories from last week:
* Open the Door - Barry Lopez
http://bit.ly/2y1yMj5
* Is It the Same Robin?
http://bit.ly/2gkrZJE
* Seagull Calling Contest
http://bit.ly/2fTHqbi
* October Migrants - Look Who's Back!
http://bit.ly/2gkA2qb
* When Starlings Cheat
http://bit.ly/2hTISyG
* The Sparrow of Ulm, Germany
http://bit.ly/2y1l6ax
* Swallows and Mud - A Myth?
http://bit.ly/2fUww4Y
——————
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2xFiB9v
----------------------------
Have a comment or complaint?
mailto:<info...>
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org
You'll find nearly 1500 episodes and nearly 1000 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
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Date: 10/14/17 11:55 am
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Little Gull
Appreciate the swift response. Seems as I remember a couple other Puget Sound Little Gulls that ended up only being seen for one day. Was this a first winter individual?

Larry Schwitters
Issaquah
> On Oct 14, 2017, at 11:45 AM, Russ Koppendrayer <russkope...> wrote:
>
> There's about 10 of us here, but no sightings as of yet.
>
> Russ Koppendrayer
> Longview, WA
>
> On Oct 14, 2017 11:42 AM, "Larry Schwitters" <leschwitters...> <mailto:<leschwitters...>> wrote:
> Anyone been looking for the Little Gull this morning?
>
> Larry Schwitters
> Issaquah
> _______________________________________________
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> <Tweeters...> <mailto:<Tweeters...>
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Date: 10/14/17 11:48 am
From: Russ Koppendrayer <russkope...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Little Gull
There's about 10 of us here, but no sightings as of yet.

Russ Koppendrayer
Longview, WA

On Oct 14, 2017 11:42 AM, "Larry Schwitters" <leschwitters...> wrote:

> Anyone been looking for the Little Gull this morning?
>
> Larry Schwitters
> Issaquah
> _______________________________________________
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Date: 10/14/17 11:45 am
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Little Gull
Anyone been looking for the Little Gull this morning?

Larry Schwitters
Issaquah
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Date: 10/14/17 10:09 am
From: Twink Coffman <wilber4818...>
Subject: [Tweeters] NCAS with Ed Deal
*October 24th, 7pm at the Whatcom Museum,** free & open to the public!*

*Seattle’s Adaptable Urban Cooper’s Hawks. *25 years ago, Cooper’s hawks
began colonizing urban and suburban landscapes throughout the United
States, developing a tolerance for living in proximity to humans. Ed Deal,
from the Seattle Cooper’s Hawk Project (SCHP), will provide insights into
these common but elusive raptors through photos and videos taken during the
breeding season. The SCHP study, one of several in large U.S. cities (e.g.,
Tucson, Milwaukee and Albuquerque), is monitoring the Seattle population’s
nesting density and annual productivity. In addition, a banding program
looks at fledgling dispersal, longevity, and adult breeding and winter site
fidelity. The results show annual increases in productivity, little
evidence of migration, strong site fidelity, and (mostly) short dispersal
distances by offspring.

MORE INFO at website

http://www.northcascadesaudubon.org



-
happy birding
Twink
<wilber4818...>
Ferndale, WA
in Whatcom County
out on the beach

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Date: 10/14/17 5:53 am
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist...>
Subject: [Tweeters] welp! get ready to say goodbye to Australia's orange-bellied parrot
absolutely sickened by this story:

http://www.smh.com.au/environment/has-the-orangebellied-parrot-lurched-closer-towards-extinction-20171014-gz0yhh.html

--
GrrlScientist | @GrrlScientist <https://twitter.com/GrrlScientist>
<grrlscientist...>
Blogs: Forbes <http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/> | Evolution
Institute <https://evolution-institute.org/profile/grrlscientist/?source=> |
Medium <https://medium.com/@GrrlScientist>
Podcasts: BirdNote Radio <http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist>
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter <https://tinyletter.com/grrlscientist>
Tiny bio: about.me <https://about.me/grrlscientist>
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Date: 10/13/17 10:12 pm
From: <quetsal48...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Beer and Birds
Hi Birders!

Fall is upon us and it's time to get together and share stories and
sightings. Come by the Fish Tail Brew Pub in Olympia on Monday the 16th
starting at 4:30 and share yours. See you there.



Craig

Olympia


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Date: 10/13/17 9:33 pm
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Snohomish Yard Birding
Hello Tweets,

It's been a good week yard birding from my house south of Snohomish.
The week started with a new yard bird (#143), a California Scrub-Jay
briefly landed in a high conifer above my house before continuing
south. I haven't seen it since, so perhaps it was just passing through
looking for greener pastures (or an oak tree with acorns). Later that
day I had two Scrub-Jays in the town of Snohomish, one in the oaks by
the library and one just north of 2nd Ave. I checked the library later
in the week and found two there.

The big theme of the week has been gulls. Pink Salmon are dying off
post spawn and the river side is full of the dead and dying fish and
the gulls are taking advantage of the easy meal. The vast majority are
Glaucous-Winged and hybrids, I had 7 gull species this week including
a Herring Gull, a couple apparently pure Western Gulls, and a couple
(Thayer's) Iceland Gulls. Mew Gulls begain trickling up the valley,
but I never saw any near the river so they must be feeding in fields.

Surprisingly enough the Turkey Vulture's desire to migrate is
apparently greater than their desire for an easy meal as they have
disappeared from the river. I did have 3 TV's migrating south this
evening, my latest sighting ever in the county.

Violet-Green Swallows are still hanging around. They'll disappear for
a few days and then be back with a vengeance. Yesterday they were
present in huge numbers, today completely absent.

Geese numbers seemed to have thinned out a bit since their peak in the
third week of September, but I still had at least 500 Cackling Geese
this week and maybe a hundred Canada Geese. Their evening commute
happens after sundown so accurate counts can be hard to get. Since
moving here, I've actually been shocked at how much waterfowl move at
night. I had three groups of Cackling Geese wake my up at various
points in the middle of the night. At least I think they were
Cackling. I wouldn't swear to my ability to ID geese by call through a
window in the middle of the night. I had my first Snow Geese of the
season on Wednesday and another flyover flock today. Oddly enough,
despite seeing over a thousand individual white-cheeked geese in a day
this year I still haven't found a Greater White-Fronted among them.

Last but not least, I had my first Northern Shrike of the season last night.

Josh Adams
Cathcart, WA
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Date: 10/13/17 7:13 pm
From: JERRY D AND MARCENE D'ADDIO <jmdaddio...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bar-tailed Godwit, in search of
Last e-bird entry for Bar-tailed Godwit at Westport was last Saturday. Has anyone seen it in the last day or two?

-Marcy D'Addio
Redmond, WA

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Date: 10/13/17 6:42 pm
From: Scott Downes <downess...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Little Gull still present at Hansville
The Little Gull was seen in a large flock of Bonaparte's at about 6:10 from Norwegian point. The entire flock flew west at about 6:15.

Scott Downes
<Downess...>
Yakima Wa
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Date: 10/13/17 2:22 pm
From: Doug Plummer <2doug...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Mitred Conure in Bryant, Seattle
On Wednesday I nabbed a first ever yard bird, a Mitred Conure, squawking in my cedar tree. I thought it was a neighbor with an out of control piece of machinery at first. It flew to a tall lookout for me to get a quick, good view through binos, and then it headed off to the north. I’m so glad it came alone, and that it was just passing through.

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Date: 10/13/17 12:25 pm
From: Ryan Merrill <rjm284...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Little Gull near Point No Point
Around 10AM this morning Kelly Beach and a WDFW survey crew found a Little
Gull just west of Hansville near Point No Point. It's with a few hundred
Bonaparte's Gulls and is still present as of noon.

Good birding,
Ryan Merrill
Seattle

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Date: 10/13/17 12:06 pm
From: Ron Post <ronpost4...>
Subject: [Tweeters] photo favorites
Hello, sometime between now and Thanksgiving, if you'd like to send in a
couple or three of your favorite birding photos taken this year, to be
published in the end-of-the-year WOSNews, please feel free! Probably best
they are taken in Washington state or very close by and sized between a
half-megabyte and two megs. You can use my personal email, just include the
spelling of your name for attribution, the bird species, and a statement
allowing WOS (one time) use of the photos. Thanks!
Ron Post
WOSNews editor,
<ronpost4...>

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Date: 10/13/17 8:29 am
From: LARRY BAXTER <natural.world.explorer...>
Subject: [Tweeters] snow geese arrive
8:21 this morning, several chevrons of Snow Geese flying over Stanwood.
Large flock in field just south of Big Ditch Rd .

Larry Baxter
<Mthiker57...>

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Date: 10/13/17 7:27 am
From: Walter Szeliga <walter.szeliga...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Southbound (Gyr?)falcon, Ellensburg
Hi Tweeters,
While returning to my office around 4:15PM on the CWU campus in Ellensburg yesterday (10/12), I was waylaid by another faculty member. While talking, we both noticed a large falcon circling and making its way southward across campus, barely above the tops of Science Phase II and the Student Union (SURC). These buildings are on the order of 50–60 ft tall.

This bird was at least Red-tailed Hawk size in girth, length and wing span, with long, pointed wings which were narrow for its body size (it was sufficiently long-tailed to give the appearance of narrow wings). The head projection (from the shoulders) seemed long as well, adding to the narrow winged effect. The bird maneuvered in circles with a flared, wedge-shaped tail and had the wildest, snappiest wing-beat cadence I’ve ever seen; very powerful, but almost awkward with quite a bit of wrist motion. Due to the heavy overcast with light drizzle, all coloration was lost. The wing motion and size were so large that not only did my conversation partner (a non-birder) comment, but at least half a dozen students along the Walnut Mall had also stopped and were commenting on the bird. It takes a heck of a sight to get college students to pick up their heads!

Other raptors were in the sky at the same time, including 2 Red-tailed Hawks, and a Northern Harrier, all of whom were much higher up. After about 5 minutes of approach from the north mixed with circling, the (Gyr?)falcon gained altitude and loosely joined the other raptors, heading south and angling towards Manastash. Over the next few minutes, at least two Cooper’s Hawks also circled and flew by—southbound.

I understand that large Peregrine females can overlap with small male Gyr’s, and we are still about a week and a half early for Gyrfalcons (and they are rare as heck), but it was an exciting and intriguing sighting nonetheless. I would say points for Gyrfalcon would be the shear size, stiff, but falcon-like wing beat, large body, and broad tail. Points for (large) Peregrine would be the narrow appearance of the wings and the observation date and abundance relative to Gyrfalcon. Points for (very large) Prairie Falcon would be the stiff wing beat and abundance relative to Gyrfalcon.

Cheers,
Walter Szeliga
Ellensburg, WA
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Date: 10/12/17 10:09 pm
From: Randy <re_hill...>
Subject: [Tweeters] SW WA yesterday and today
Elaine and I headed to the coast yesterday for a few nights in Pacific
County. A few notes from observations so far:



Wednesday at Julia Butler Hansen NWR, a sparrow flock along Brooks Slough
included several Lincoln's Sparrows and an adult Chipping Sparrow. At
headquarters was a continuing Black Phoebe and a silent Red-shouldered Hawk.
And a pretty good shower of hail!

A little south of Willapa NWR headquarters a male Eurasian Wigeon was among
hundreds, approaching thousands more wigeon and pintails tucked out of the
wind along shore.

At Nahcotta we saw 25 Marbled Godwits and 7 Black Turnstones on floating
logs/debris approaching high tide. Today there were 36 and 14 respectively,
with a Red-necked Grebe and 2 Horned Grebes nearby that still had
substantial breeding colors.



Today at Leadbetter Point I saw 3 Peregrine Falcons among 5 during the day.
Also heard calling north of the trail access parking lot was a Gray Jay. Am
I missing something or was the last ebird report there for this species in
1998; there was one reported this spring at Cape Disappointment.

At the North Jetty a single Lapland Longspur was still showing some black
underneath.

Looking offshore from the jetty, a flock of more than 100 shearwaters was
visible more than a mile out.



Randy Hill

Ridgefield


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Date: 10/12/17 8:26 pm
From: Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2017-10-12
Tweets – It was drizzly and sometimes breezy, rather chilly and damp, and not totally pleasant this morning. The birds felt the same way, and generally hid inside the bushes, except for the American Robins which streamed and swirled overhead in large numbers all day – hundreds of them. Still, we managed to find low numbers of quite a few species.

Highlights:
a.. Ring-necked Duck – Four from the Lake Platform – First of Fall (FOF)
b.. Common Merganser – one at weir again
c.. Virginia Rail – at least one heard across the slough near the start of the boardwalk
d.. Double-crested Cormorants – 2nd of fall, and numbers perhaps beginning to ramp up
e.. Bald Eagle – more than just our local pair – perhaps 7 birds
f.. Cooper’s Hawk – multiple sightings
g.. Barn Owl – one giving us nice looks until about 7:00 a.m., East Meadow
h.. Merlin – one seen twice, or two
i.. PEREGRINE FALCON – one doing lazy circles over the Rowing Club
j.. VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOW – at least 6, briefly seen over Big Cottonwood Forest
k.. Varied Thrush – a couple near the mansion, at least 5 at Rowing Club
l.. PINE SISKIN – first confirmed flock of Fall
m.. COMMON YELLOWTHROAT – still one heard, one seen
n.. Yellow-rumped Warbler – a few about, Audubon’s for sure, maybe a Myrtle’s
o.. WESTERN MEADOWLARK – five on fields near eastern softball fields
Good day for mammals, with AMERICAN BEAVER heard pre-dawn from the slough, a mother and fawn MULE DEER seen from the Lake Platform, and at least 2 RIVER OTTERS at the Rowing Club pond. Plus the usual Eastern Gray Squirrels and and Eastern Cottontail.

For the day, an even 60 species of bird. Not bad for drizzly, breezy weather in mid-October. Misses included Hooded Merganser, Green Heron, Northern Harrier (often a migrant at this time of year), Red-breasted Nuthatch, and Purple Finch.

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== <BirdMarymoor...>
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Date: 10/12/17 6:05 pm
From: <ehagstrom13...>
Subject: [Tweeters] For Sale used Swarovski EL 8.5x42 SV Binoculars
Tweets



I am selling my well cared for pair of Swarovski EL 8.5x42 SV binoculars.
They are in 9+ condition. I can send images. Glass is all clean and mark
free. The body shows some wear on the attachment rings, but otherwise in
excellent condition. I bought them new in December of 2012. They come with
original box, case, straps, manuals and warranty card. I'm selling them
because I use my 10x more than I do these. I would rather sell them to a
local birder before I put them up on eBay. I'm local in the Woodinville
area. Asking $1550.



If interested, please email me directly so as to not blast Tweeters!



thanks



Erik

Ehagstrom13 at gmail dot com




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Date: 10/12/17 4:51 pm
From: Ron Post <ronpost4...>
Subject: [Tweeters] newsletter posted
The latest edition of WOSNews is now online at wos.org

Ron Post
<ronpost4...>

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Date: 10/12/17 2:38 pm
From: Maxine Reid <max2012mike...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Mountain chickadee photos
Hi Tweets
It was interesting to read others comments about the MOCH.
Although I could not refind this bird,I did put photos on ebird,
Washington . look at recent sightings, 11 October,11.30 am,Maxine reid,
Tulalip, snohomish county for them.
Hoping that others find one.
Also,there is a snow system for the next few days in the cascades.
Good birding,Maxine Reid
Sent from my iPad
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Date: 10/12/17 1:00 pm
From: Wilson Cady <gorgebirds...>
Subject: RE: [Tweeters] Minor Mountain Chickadee (and Clark's Nutcracker) dispe rsal
Wayne and Tweeters, There have been two reports of Clark's Nutcrackers in Clark County including one in a low elevation location and three reports this year of them along the Columbia River in Skamania County this year, but no out of place Mountain Chickadees yet. I looked on this year's Clark's Nutcracker map on the eBird Bar Charts page and it shows few low elevation sighting reports this year. Wilson Cady
Columbia River Gorge, WA

---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Wayne Weber" <contopus...>
To: "TWEETERS" <tweeters...>
Subject: RE: [Tweeters] Minor Mountain Chickadee (and Clark's Nutcracker) dispersal
Date: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 11:01:32 -0700


Joshua and Tweeters,

Your comments about recent Mountain Chickadee sightings in the Puget Sound Lowlands are quite astute, and I second your recommendation that birders keep their eyes (and ears) open for this species in the coming weeks and months.

The bird at a feeder in Coquitlam, BC is still being seen through today, October 12 (although not recently reported to eBird). In addition, 2 Mountain Chickadees were reported on October 4 at Blackie Spit Park in Surrey, BC, and one of these was photographed.

Small invasions of Mountain Chickadees into the Puget Sound Lowlands have occurred about once or twice per decade going back at least to the 1960s, and this may prove to be one of those years.

There has also been an outbreak of Clark&rsquo;s Nutcrackers into areas far to the west of the Cascade crest, where they are not usually seen. In recent weeks, there have been Clark&rsquo;s Nutcracker reports from Seattle, the San Juan Islands, Hurricane Ridge near Port Angeles, Sauk Mountain east of Concrete, and in the Mount Baker area.

In the past, irruptions of Clark&rsquo;s Nutcrackers and Mountain Chickadees have sometimes occurred in the same year, although movements of nutcrackers into the lowlands are much less frequent than those of Mountain Chickadees. The reasons for these movements are not clear, although I suspect it is related to food availability, especially for the seed-eating nutcrackers.

Good birding, and here&rsquo;s hoping for more nutcracker and Mountain Chickadee sightings!

Wayne C. Weber
Delta, BC
<contopus...>




From: <tweeters-bounces...> [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Joshua Glant
Sent: Thursday, October 12, 2017 8:24 AM
To: <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Minor Mountain Chickadee dispersal

Hello Tweets,

Maxine Reid's sighting of a Mountain Chickadee in Tulalip Bay yesterday reminded me of two other recent sightings of Mountain Chickadee in the Salish Sea area within the past two weeks: one bird at a feeder in Coquitlam, BC at the beginning of this month; and one at the base of Ediz Hook in Clallam Co. on October 6th. To me, this seems to indicate a minor movement of the species into the Puget Sound area, though the cause is not quite clear. For this reason, I recommend that birders check all their chickadees especially closely in the coming weeks -- you never know when you will stumble on that white-eyebrowed, wheezy-voiced individual! Coastal stands of Douglas firs seem to be a major point of attraction for wandering Mountains.

Good birding, Joshua Glant
Mercer Island, WA

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Date: 10/12/17 12:35 pm
From: Jeremy Schwartz <jschwartz1124...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Raining Mallards
Hi Tweeters!

Every so often, I'll see something while out birding that just makes me go
"Wow."

I had such an experience about a week ago, while birding at a stretch of
wetlands not far from my work just north of Bothell. It was early morning,
with the sun just peaking over the trees of the eastern horizon. The
October morning air had a tangible nip to it.

The area is one I bird regularly. It's a plot of wetlands referred to as
the Canyon Park wetlands in eBird, adjacent to an office park and a tract
of homes and bisected by a paved walking and biking path. The birding here
has been good lately. The morning in question, I nabbed 20 individual
species in about 45 minutes. That's a personal record for this particular
spot. My eBird checklist for the morning can be found here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39546715

The day was full of ducks. Males are out in their full regalia, looking for
someone to make babies with. I nabbed five duck species for the morning,
including some great looks at a group of Hooded Mergansers. With my
allotted time before I had to head to work winding down, I started to head
back to my car. The sun was higher now, warming my face and exposed hands
as I meandered eastward.

Then a flash of motion made me look to my left, across one of the larger
marshy areas. Dozens of Mallards, female and males, came floating in
seemingly out of nowhere. Each landed with a soft splash on the water,
quacking to each other as the clumped together.

Then it happened again. And again. I would barely finish counting one group
when another came flying in from the west, each 12-13 ducks strong. In all,
70-80 Mallards landed in front of my eyes within a span of maybe 10 minutes.

I could do nothing but stand there in awe. Mallards, of course, are not
rare. But the shear mass of life, of living things grouped together, left
me speechless.

It's these moments that keep my coming back, again and again, to birding.

Keep watching the skies!

Jeremy Schwartz
Lake Forest Park
jschwartz1124 at gmail dot com

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Date: 10/12/17 11:45 am
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Nisqually NWR Wednesday Walk 10/11/2017
Hi Tweets

twenty five of us or so had a very nice day at the Refuge with partly
cloudy skies and temperatures in the 40's to 60's degrees Fahrenheit.
Highlights included the return of the PINE SISKIN with high counts of
200+. Large flocks of CACKLING GEESE 1000+. Good shorebirds with the
return of DUNLIN in non-breeding plumage. Late CASPIAN TERN x 4 with
juvenile, and AMERICAN BITTERN sighting as well.

Starting out at the Visitor Center Pond Overlook at 8am we observed FOS
RING-NECKED DUCK with AMERICAN WIGEON and HOODED MERGANSER.

The Orchard was good for hundreds of PINE SISKIN, DOWNY WOODPECKER, ANNA'S
HUMMINGBIRD, BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER, AMERICAN ROBIN, and VARIED THRUSH.

The fields along the entrance road and south of the access road are being
flooded as they usually are this time of year. Providing great habitat for
CACKLING GEESE, both minimas and taverners, GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE,
MALLARD and NORTHERN SHOVELER. Good numbers of YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER were
observed along the slough next to the access road with good looks at both
varieties, typical wintering Audubons and typical migrating Myrtle. An
immature intergrade was spotted with a nice white smile up behind the ear
and no white eyebrow.

The access road west of the parking lot was great for sparrows. Good looks
of GOLDEN-CROWNED, SAVANNAH, SONG SPARROW, DARK-EYE JUNCO and SPOTTED
TOWHEE. We observed a Cassiar/Slate-colored type Junco, mostly gray with
small amount of brown on the wings, no obvious hood, gray on the sides and
concave demarcation on the breast. Best guess might be immature
Slate-colored Dark-eyed Junco. BALD EAGLE, NORTHERN HARRIER, CEDAR WAXWING
were also seen, with dozens of AMERICAN PIPITs flying over the fields.

The west side of the Twin Barns Loop trail was good for both GOLDEN-CROWNED
KINGLET and RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET. We had nice looks at HERMIT THRUSH and
WILSON SNIPE.

We had AMERICAN GOLDFINCH at the Twin Barns Overlook. And good looks of
ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER and LINCOLN'S SPARROW where the access road joins
the new dike or Nisqually Estuary Trail.

Out on the Nisqually Estuary Trail, the restored surge plain was covered in
waterfowl. Mostly GREEN-WINGED TEAL, AMERICAN WIGEON, and now the NORTHERN
PINTAIL have shown up in good numbers. Several RING-BILLED GULL were
foraging with plunge diving technique. PEREGRINE FALCON and AMERICAN
KESTREL were observed hunting. WESTERN MEADOWLARK was seen along Leschi
Slough. When we first arrived on the dike, it was high tide with little
mud. Roosting with gulls, we found a small flock of DUNLIN (FOS) and
WESTERN SANDPIPER. On the freshwater side we observed MARSH WREN,
RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD and possibly heard SWAMP SPARROW near the green gate.
To our surprise, we saw a VARIED THRUSH in the marsh. An AMERICAN BITTERN
was flushed and seen by some of our group.

On the Nisqually Estuary Boardwalk Trail, during the falling tide, we
observed DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT, BRANDT CORMORANT, PELAGIC CORMORANT,
RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, COMMON MERGANSER, COMMON LOON, SURF SCOTER, WESTERN
GREBE, HORNED GREBE, CALIFORNIA GULL, MEW GULL, GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL,
WESTERN GULL, WESTERN X GLAUCOUS-WINGED hybrid GULL, GREAT BLUE HERON, good
numbers of LEAST SANDPIPER and WESTERN SANDPIPER, BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER,
SEMI-PALMATED PLOVER, DUNLIN and GREATER YELLOWLEGS.

On our return, on the east side of the Twin Barns Loop Trail, just north of
the beaver dam, we had a nice mixed flock of BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE,
CHESTNUT SIDED CHICKADEE, BROWN CREEPER, DOWNY WOODPECKER, BUSHTIT,
RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET, ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER -
including gray headed variety, and TOWNSEND'S WARBLER. FOX SPARROW was
also seen.

For the day we had 83 species, with 163 species for the year.

Mammals seen included Eastern Gray Squirrel, and Harbor Seal.

Until next week when Phil returns to lead the walk again, good birding!

Shep



--
Shep Thorp
Browns Point
253-370-3742

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Date: 10/12/17 11:27 am
From: Jeff Kozma <jcr_5105...>
Subject: RE: [Tweeters] Minor Mountain Chickadee (and Clark's Nutcracker) dispersal
Tweeters,



A biologist who works on the Yakama Reservation and is trying to collect whitebark pine seeds (main food of Clark’s Nutcrackers) said there are few to no cones this year in many areas they were searching for seed. In the Wenas area where I study White-headed Woodpeckers, there is pretty much a failure of ponderosa pine cones this year as well, another food source of Clark’s Nutcrackers (and Red Crossbills, which are virtually absent this year) when cones are abundant. We have also seen a movement of Steller’s Jays into areas of Selah and Yakima this fall. I checked out some oak trees along the Tieton River and there are very few if any acorns. Looks like many of the mast trees may not be producing this year. Would be interesting to know if other conifers are also showing the same thing.



I’ve also had Red-breasted Nuthatches and Pine Siskins (one flock of 12 and numerous single birds) in my neighborhood this fall and even a dispersing Hairy Woodpecker that flew over my yard after leaving my neighbors tree!



Jeff Kozma



Yakima



J c r underscore 5105 at charter dot net



From: <tweeters-bounces...> [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Wayne Weber
Sent: Thursday, October 12, 2017 11:02 AM
To: TWEETERS <tweeters...>
Subject: RE: [Tweeters] Minor Mountain Chickadee (and Clark's Nutcracker) dispersal



Joshua and Tweeters,



Your comments about recent Mountain Chickadee sightings in the Puget Sound Lowlands are quite astute, and I second your recommendation that birders keep their eyes (and ears) open for this species in the coming weeks and months.



The bird at a feeder in Coquitlam, BC is still being seen through today, October 12 (although not recently reported to eBird). In addition, 2 Mountain Chickadees were reported on October 4 at Blackie Spit Park in Surrey, BC, and one of these was photographed.



Small invasions of Mountain Chickadees into the Puget Sound Lowlands have occurred about once or twice per decade going back at least to the 1960s, and this may prove to be one of those years.



There has also been an outbreak of Clark’s Nutcrackers into areas far to the west of the Cascade crest, where they are not usually seen. In recent weeks, there have been Clark’s Nutcracker reports from Seattle, the San Juan Islands, Hurricane Ridge near Port Angeles, Sauk Mountain east of Concrete, and in the Mount Baker area.



In the past, irruptions of Clark’s Nutcrackers and Mountain Chickadees have sometimes occurred in the same year, although movements of nutcrackers into the lowlands are much less frequent than those of Mountain Chickadees. The reasons for these movements are not clear, although I suspect it is related to food availability, especially for the seed-eating nutcrackers.



Good birding, and here’s hoping for more nutcracker and Mountain Chickadee sightings!



Wayne C. Weber

Delta, BC

<contopus...> <mailto:<contopus...>









From: <tweeters-bounces...> <mailto:<tweeters-bounces...> [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Joshua Glant
Sent: Thursday, October 12, 2017 8:24 AM
To: <tweeters...> <mailto:<tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Minor Mountain Chickadee dispersal



Hello Tweets,



Maxine Reid's sighting of a Mountain Chickadee in Tulalip Bay yesterday reminded me of two other recent sightings of Mountain Chickadee in the Salish Sea area within the past two weeks: one bird at a feeder in Coquitlam, BC at the beginning of this month; and one at the base of Ediz Hook in Clallam Co. on October 6th. To me, this seems to indicate a minor movement of the species into the Puget Sound area, though the cause is not quite clear. For this reason, I recommend that birders check all their chickadees especially closely in the coming weeks -- you never know when you will stumble on that white-eyebrowed, wheezy-voiced individual! Coastal stands of Douglas firs seem to be a major point of attraction for wandering Mountains.



Good birding, Joshua Glant

Mercer Island, WA


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Date: 10/12/17 11:10 am
From: Wayne Weber <contopus...>
Subject: RE: [Tweeters] Minor Mountain Chickadee (and Clark's Nutcracker) dispersal
Joshua and Tweeters,



Your comments about recent Mountain Chickadee sightings in the Puget Sound Lowlands are quite astute, and I second your recommendation that birders keep their eyes (and ears) open for this species in the coming weeks and months.



The bird at a feeder in Coquitlam, BC is still being seen through today, October 12 (although not recently reported to eBird). In addition, 2 Mountain Chickadees were reported on October 4 at Blackie Spit Park in Surrey, BC, and one of these was photographed.



Small invasions of Mountain Chickadees into the Puget Sound Lowlands have occurred about once or twice per decade going back at least to the 1960s, and this may prove to be one of those years.



There has also been an outbreak of Clark’s Nutcrackers into areas far to the west of the Cascade crest, where they are not usually seen. In recent weeks, there have been Clark’s Nutcracker reports from Seattle, the San Juan Islands, Hurricane Ridge near Port Angeles, Sauk Mountain east of Concrete, and in the Mount Baker area.



In the past, irruptions of Clark’s Nutcrackers and Mountain Chickadees have sometimes occurred in the same year, although movements of nutcrackers into the lowlands are much less frequent than those of Mountain Chickadees. The reasons for these movements are not clear, although I suspect it is related to food availability, especially for the seed-eating nutcrackers.



Good birding, and here’s hoping for more nutcracker and Mountain Chickadee sightings!



Wayne C. Weber

Delta, BC

<contopus...>









From: <tweeters-bounces...> [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Joshua Glant
Sent: Thursday, October 12, 2017 8:24 AM
To: <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Minor Mountain Chickadee dispersal



Hello Tweets,



Maxine Reid's sighting of a Mountain Chickadee in Tulalip Bay yesterday reminded me of two other recent sightings of Mountain Chickadee in the Salish Sea area within the past two weeks: one bird at a feeder in Coquitlam, BC at the beginning of this month; and one at the base of Ediz Hook in Clallam Co. on October 6th. To me, this seems to indicate a minor movement of the species into the Puget Sound area, though the cause is not quite clear. For this reason, I recommend that birders check all their chickadees especially closely in the coming weeks -- you never know when you will stumble on that white-eyebrowed, wheezy-voiced individual! Coastal stands of Douglas firs seem to be a major point of attraction for wandering Mountains.



Good birding, Joshua Glant

Mercer Island, WA


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Date: 10/12/17 9:37 am
From: <clsouth...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Re: Hummingbird banding in WA state
Puget Sound Bird Observatory teaches banding classes for passerine birds, banding under our master bander's permit, Don Norman.
None of our members has a banding permit to band hummingbirds.

The master bander in this area who has a hummingbird permit is Dan Harville. I did assist him back in 2005/2006, and talked about those experiences and the sizing of the bands. Since I have had experience removing hummingbirds from nets and cages, I requested that newbies get me to release any caught hummingbirds.

Dan Harville has banded more than 11,000 hummingbirds and lives in the Edmonds area.

Christine Southwick
President,
Puget Sound Bird Observatory

eOn Thu, 12 Oct 2017, randy collins wrote:

> Date: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 15:24:56 +0000 (UTC)
> From: randy collins <rancol23...>
> To: <tweeters...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Re: Hummingbird banding in WA state
>
> Hi,
>
> I took a bird banding class from Puget Sound Bird Observatory ( http://www.pugetsoundbirds.org). I recall one of the trainers
> saying that they had experience with banding hummingbirds. They wisely told us beginners to defer to them if we happened to
> catch any hummingbirds in our mist nets :)
>
> Randy
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Tue, 10 Oct 2017 13:03:00 -0700
> From: Susan wepking <smwepking...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Hummingbird banding in WA state
> To: <tweeters...>
> Message-ID:
> <CAJBjuXd2CRsRSKfsFtp2L78yQvM=15MovnCfjwCno+<zbP0K-WA...>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> Hi all,
>
> I am wondering if anyone knows who I may get in contact with to learn how
> to band hummingbirds in Washington state?
>
> Thank you for any and all feedback,
>
> Susan
>
>
>

Christine Southwick
Pharmacy Administration
University of Washington Medical Center
Box 356015
1959 NE Pacific Street
Seattle, WA 98195-6015
phone: 206-598-7398; fax 206-598-6075



This electronic message transmission contains information which may be
confidential or privileged. The information is intended to be for the
use of the individual or entity named above. If you are not the intended
recipient, be aware that any disclosure, copying, distribution or use of
the contents of this information is prohibited. If you have received this
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Date: 10/12/17 8:29 am
From: randy collins <rancol23...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Re: Hummingbird banding in WA state
Hi,
I took a bird banding class from Puget Sound Bird Observatory ( http://www.pugetsoundbirds.org). I recall one of the trainers saying that they had experience with banding hummingbirds. They wisely told us beginners to defer to them if we happened to catch any hummingbirds in our mist nets :)
Randy


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Tue, 10 Oct 2017 13:03:00 -0700
From: Susan wepking <smwepking...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Hummingbird banding in WA state
To: <tweeters...>
Message-ID:
    <CAJBjuXd2CRsRSKfsFtp2L78yQvM=15MovnCfjwCno+<zbP0K-WA...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

Hi all,

I am wondering if anyone knows who I may get in contact with to learn how
to band hummingbirds in Washington state?

Thank you for any and all feedback,

Susan


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Date: 10/12/17 8:28 am
From: Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Minor Mountain Chickadee dispersal
Hello Tweets,

Maxine Reid's sighting of a Mountain Chickadee in Tulalip Bay yesterday
reminded me of two other recent sightings of Mountain Chickadee in the
Salish Sea area within the past two weeks: one bird at a feeder in
Coquitlam, BC at the beginning of this month; and one at the base of Ediz
Hook in Clallam Co. on October 6th. To me, this seems to indicate a minor
movement of the species into the Puget Sound area, though the cause is not
quite clear. For this reason, I recommend that birders check all their
chickadees especially closely in the coming weeks -- you never know when
you will stumble on that white-eyebrowed, wheezy-voiced individual! Coastal
stands of Douglas firs seem to be a major point of attraction for wandering
Mountains.

Good birding, Joshua Glant
Mercer Island, WA

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Date: 10/11/17 9:01 pm
From: Ed Swan <Edswan2...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bummed no more Thayer's Gulls
Just realizing the AOS' latest supplement not only added a new species for
me by splitting Northern Harrier from Hen Harrier but then I lost one with
Thayer's Gull being lumped into Iceland Gull. It's going to be hard
thinking of the local Thayer's Gulls as Iceland Gulls which were formerly
rare here.



Ed



Ed Swan

Nature writer and guide

<edswan2...> <mailto:<edswan2...>

206.949.3545

www.theswancompany.com




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Date: 10/11/17 5:05 pm
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] recent Battle Ground (Clark County) yard birding
Tweeters,

A few surprises recently in(from) my Battle Ground, Clark County yard:

Turkey Vulture - 18 (October 11)
Black-throated Gray Warbler - 1 (October 10)
Western Meadowlark - 4 (October 10) - flyovers. my last ones from the yard
were on November 24, 2011!
White-throated Sparrow - 1 bright white striper - October 10 and 11 - my
last one in the yard was on April 19, 2013!
Fox Sparrow - 1 (October 11) - very infrequent in the yard.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward.

Jim
--
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
<jdanzenbaker...>

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Date: 10/11/17 4:32 pm
From: Bob <rflores_2...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Lower Vancouver Bottoms this afternoon.
I found the following
Vancouver Lake
Awpe 145
Sacr 1
Greg 32
Wesa 10
Wegr 8
Lbdo 57
Pesa 5
Grye 10
All the shorebirds, except all but 2 lbdo, were at the end of La Framboise Rd. The lbdo were in the cove by flushing channel with a few grye.

Fazio feedlot
Bhco 110
Yhbl 1

The pond at the end of Lower River Rd and the one by the port had no shorebirds. There was a partial albino cackler on La Framboise Rd.
Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA_______________________________________________
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Date: 10/11/17 4:11 pm
From: William <wrboyington...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Jaeger this afternoon off Richmond Beach, Shoreline
Tweeters,

>From between 2:50 and 3:20 pm today, I watched a juvenile jaeger engaging in some chases of a few Mew Gulls here, and occasionally being chased itself by a gull or two. It was successful a couple times in getting a gull to drop sometime that the jaeger went down to the water to pick up.

As I look at the 1st edition Sibleys that I keep in my car, it mostly resembled an intermediate juvenile Long-tailed, with a uniformly gray head and neck that did not looked streaked to me on the nape in my scope views. Also, the barring of the flanks at the rear was pretty prominent dark and light, when viewed while it was sitting on the water. However, the bill did not look stubby, as shown in Sibleys, leading me to conclude it's a Parasitic Jaeger. Around 3:20, when gulls moved away, some to the north, it did, too, in that direction.

Bill Boyington
Shoreline, WA

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Date: 10/11/17 2:57 pm
From: Maxine Reid <max2012mike...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Mountain chickadee , Tulalip,11 oct.2017
Hi tweets at 12:00 pm today I saw a very light bellied chickadee
While I was walking on mission beach road. It was in a tall Douglas fir tree.
Above a mail box with address 3307 on it.
It looked suspicious for. MOUNTAIN ,.it responded quickly to my Audubon bird call.
With its wheezy chickadee call.
Definite white eyebrow.
First time at Tulalip for MOCH.code 4 bird for snohomish county.
Pictures taken, will be on ebird later today.

As well , at a 9 foot tide the spit produced some nice shorebirds:
~300 black bellied plovers.
1 juvenile American golden plover.
6 black turnstones
7 short billed dowitchers
3 red knots- one adult still red(continuing bird) and 2 juveniles
1 dunlin
50 western sandpipers
10 killdeers on our dock and beach front.

Cheers and good birding,
Maxine Reid


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Date: 10/11/17 2:34 pm
From: Stewart Wechsler <ecostewart...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Re: Barred owl behavior ()
Thanks for the pellet coughing video Larry!

At times I see smaller "lesser pellets" in the same place as the standard
cat fur-ball sized ones under owl roosts. I'm still just guessing that the
owl in the original video posted by Whitney was an attempt to cough up a
pellet, but now I am amending that to suspect that there was a "lesser
pellet" that the owl she videoed was trying to cough up, but had failed in
the tries she saw. I'll still be interested in any additional opinions.

-Stewart

On Wed, Oct 11, 2017 at 10:26 AM, Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...>
wrote:

> Here’s a YouTube.
>
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PTLaxqmcYeY
>
> Larry Schwitters
> Issaquah
>
> On Oct 11, 2017, at 10:12 AM, Stewart Wechsler <ecostewart...>
> wrote:
>
> I've spent a good amount of time over the last 17 years watching Barred
> Owls, and was pleased to once see one cough up a pellet. Though I can't
> say I remember just how much what I saw looked like what you videoed, I
> seem to remember the head moving more forward than up. Though it is only a
> guess, my best guess is that your owl was trying to cough up a pellet, but
> didn't succeed on the tries that you witnessed. I will be happy to hear
> anyone else's thoughts on this.
>
> As some of you know, I have also lead many owl walks in Seattle, and
> though I haven't set up for the public lately, I will always lead for
> groups, or individuals on request.
>
> -Stewart Wechsler
> www.stewardshipadventures.com
> 206 932-7225 <(206)%20932-7225> (currently only land line)
>
>
>
>
> Date: Mon, 9 Oct 2017 12:47:00 -0700
>> From: <whitney.n.k...>
>> Subject: [Tweeters] Barred owl behavior
>> To: Tweeters <tweeters...>
>> Message-ID: <538DA795-8BE6-4134-9F5F-4CBAE34BFCCB...>
>> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>>
>> Hi, Tweeters! Yesterday morning, Andy Jacobson and I were at Discovery
>> Park and had the great fortune of encountering a Barred Owl. After about 5
>> minutes of us watching it, the owl began to open its mouth and bend its
>> head backwards. Repeatedly. Andy caught this on video with his iPhone and
>> scope (quick thinking!) which is here:
>>
>> https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=2rPGrhUdEck
>>
>> Does anyone know what this owl is doing? We kind of expected a pellet to
>> come up, but we never saw one. Is it a food-in-crop manipulation to help
>> with digestion? Or...?
>>
>> Thanks for your ideas,
>> Whitney Neufeld-Kaiser
>> Seattle***************************************
>>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
>
>

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Date: 10/11/17 2:27 pm
From: Tom Leschine <tml...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Snow Geese over South Whidbey
Interesting to see so many reports on snow geese overflights from yesterday, 10/10. I was out and about on South Whidbey mid-morning yesterday and saw what I estimated to be 400 birds in all in 4 separate flocks, the smallest 30, the largest about 250, all within a space of about 1 1/2 hrs. All were on the same trajectory, heading south. I was in and out the rest of the day but caught another large flock disappearing over the horizon in early afternoon, too obscured by vegetation for a good look. Sounds like yesterday was flight day for snow geese. I suspect that with more consistent attention I would have seen many more birds than I did.

Tom Leschine




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Date: 10/11/17 2:10 pm
From: Kevin Lucas <vikingcove...>
Subject: [Tweeters] 6 Anna's; Automated remote camera triggering
Today there are at least 6 Anna's Hummingbirds visiting our feeders. That's
happened before here, but over 3 trips eBird's confirmation flag here in
Selah, in eastern Washington. Today I've managed to get photos of 6, maybe
more. It's been difficult, but a fun challenge. I can see all four feeders
from a spot in our kitchen. I finally set one camera on a tripod,
pre-focused at the front feeder, with a wireless remote shutter trigger. I
have a point-and-shoot superzoom Canon SX-50 HS I'm using handheld for
video and stills of hummers at the other feeders. I'm interested automated
triggering of a camera's shutter. There's CHDK software
http://chdk.wikia.com/wiki/CHDK for my Canon point-and-shoot cameras that
can use motion detection, and there are light beam interruptions systems.
Does anyone have, or know someone who has, experience using either of those
or other methods, who can offer me guidance? A home made solution is what
I'm interested in now, to fit my budget, but I could use ideas based on
prefabricated solutions to fabricate and cobble together electrical,
electronic, software, and hardware components, as I've done to make my
digiscoping contraption.

I'm not worried about the birds being "countable" on a personal list. I'd
like to be able to document individuals. It would be a special prize for me
to be able to distinguish between individual adult males.

Thank you for any tips or leads you can provide.

Good Birding,
Kevin Lucas
Selah, WA
https://www.aba.org/about/ethics.html

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Date: 10/11/17 2:05 pm
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Dead Varied Thrush
I bagged up a beautiful adult female Varied Thrush I found in front of my door around noon. In pretty good shape. A cat had been tossing it around after it hit a window. Anyone know if it might be wanted by the Burke? I put it in the freezer, double-bagged. Sad...

Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
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Date: 10/11/17 1:59 pm
From: Sam G Terry <sgt3...>
Subject: [Tweeters] King County Gulls
Hi tweeters,

Yesterday (10/10/17) at 2:45pm I saw the Dash Point Franklin's Gull at the
creek outlet at Dash Point State Park in King County. If you go to the pier
and don't see it flying around scope the creek mouth to the east. Or drive
over for closer looks.

At the Cedar Rive mouth in Renton between 4:30-5pm there was a hybrid
Glaucous x Glaucous-winged Gull. It was a very pale and washed out first
year bird with a pale eye and a pink bill with smudging extending up from
the black tip. Thanks to Ryan Merril for helping me sort out that this
points to it being a hybrid and not just a messy looking Glaucous.

Good birding,

Sam Terry
Seattle

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Date: 10/11/17 1:49 pm
From: Mary Chamberlin <mechamberlin...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Re: Snow Geese over Bellingham/ Blaine
A flock flew over Sandy Point yesterday.


Mary Chamberlin
Ferndale, WA


________________________________
From: <owner-whatcombirds...> <owner-whatcombirds...> on behalf of Eric Ellingson <abriteway...>
Sent: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 8:44 PM
To: tweeters; Whatcom Bird List
Subject: Snow Geese over Bellingham/ Blaine


Today around noon about 200 Snow Geese in one large flock flew high over the Fairhaven area of Bellingham.

Later walking Semiahmoo Spit, Blaine, nearing sunset, four noisy flocks of 20-60 geese in each group flew over.

And finally, about 7:00 while out on my deck BBQing near Birch Bay, I heard another flock of Snow Geese.


Also a couple Bald Eagle pairs have been seen today and the past week in the Blaine area.


Eric Ellingson

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Date: 10/11/17 1:18 pm
From: LARRY BAXTER <natural.world.explorer...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Snow Geese at Big Ditch north of Stanwood.
Last week we saw snow geese in the field on the north side of the Big Ditch
road north of stanwood.

Larry Baxter,
Camano Island
<Mthiker57...>

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Date: 10/11/17 10:29 am
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Re: Barred owl behavior ()
Here’s a YouTube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PTLaxqmcYeY <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PTLaxqmcYeY>

Larry Schwitters
Issaquah
> On Oct 11, 2017, at 10:12 AM, Stewart Wechsler <ecostewart...> wrote:
>
> I've spent a good amount of time over the last 17 years watching Barred Owls, and was pleased to once see one cough up a pellet. Though I can't say I remember just how much what I saw looked like what you videoed, I seem to remember the head moving more forward than up. Though it is only a guess, my best guess is that your owl was trying to cough up a pellet, but didn't succeed on the tries that you witnessed. I will be happy to hear anyone else's thoughts on this.
>
> As some of you know, I have also lead many owl walks in Seattle, and though I haven't set up for the public lately, I will always lead for groups, or individuals on request.
>
> -Stewart Wechsler
> www.stewardshipadventures.com <http://www.stewardshipadventures.com/>
> 206 932-7225 (currently only land line)
>
>
>
>
> Date: Mon, 9 Oct 2017 12:47:00 -0700
> From: <whitney.n.k...> <mailto:<whitney.n.k...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Barred owl behavior
> To: Tweeters <tweeters...> <mailto:<tweeters...>>
> Message-ID: <538DA795-8BE6-4134-9F5F-4CBAE34BFCCB...> <mailto:<538DA795-8BE6-4134-9F5F-4CBAE34BFCCB...>>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
> Hi, Tweeters! Yesterday morning, Andy Jacobson and I were at Discovery Park and had the great fortune of encountering a Barred Owl. After about 5 minutes of us watching it, the owl began to open its mouth and bend its head backwards. Repeatedly. Andy caught this on video with his iPhone and scope (quick thinking!) which is here:
>
> https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=2rPGrhUdEck <https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=2rPGrhUdEck>
>
> Does anyone know what this owl is doing? We kind of expected a pellet to come up, but we never saw one. Is it a food-in-crop manipulation to help with digestion? Or...?
>
> Thanks for your ideas,
> Whitney Neufeld-Kaiser
> Seattle***************************************
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters


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Date: 10/11/17 10:17 am
From: Stewart Wechsler <ecostewart...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Re: Barred owl behavior ()
I've spent a good amount of time over the last 17 years watching Barred
Owls, and was pleased to once see one cough up a pellet. Though I can't
say I remember just how much what I saw looked like what you videoed, I
seem to remember the head moving more forward than up. Though it is only a
guess, my best guess is that your owl was trying to cough up a pellet, but
didn't succeed on the tries that you witnessed. I will be happy to hear
anyone else's thoughts on this.

As some of you know, I have also lead many owl walks in Seattle, and though
I haven't set up for the public lately, I will always lead for groups, or
individuals on request.

-Stewart Wechsler
www.stewardshipadventures.com
206 932-7225 (currently only land line)




Date: Mon, 9 Oct 2017 12:47:00 -0700
> From: <whitney.n.k...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Barred owl behavior
> To: Tweeters <tweeters...>
> Message-ID: <538DA795-8BE6-4134-9F5F-4CBAE34BFCCB...>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
> Hi, Tweeters! Yesterday morning, Andy Jacobson and I were at Discovery
> Park and had the great fortune of encountering a Barred Owl. After about 5
> minutes of us watching it, the owl began to open its mouth and bend its
> head backwards. Repeatedly. Andy caught this on video with his iPhone and
> scope (quick thinking!) which is here:
>
> https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=2rPGrhUdEck
>
> Does anyone know what this owl is doing? We kind of expected a pellet to
> come up, but we never saw one. Is it a food-in-crop manipulation to help
> with digestion? Or...?
>
> Thanks for your ideas,
> Whitney Neufeld-Kaiser
> Seattle***************************************
>

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Date: 10/10/17 8:49 pm
From: Eric Ellingson <abriteway...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Snow Geese over Bellingham/ Blaine
Today around noon about 200 Snow Geese in one large flock flew high over the Fairhaven area of Bellingham.

Later walking Semiahmoo Spit, Blaine, nearing sunset, four noisy flocks of 20-60 geese in each group flew over.

And finally, about 7:00 while out on my deck BBQing near Birch Bay, I heard another flock of Snow Geese.


Also a couple Bald Eagle pairs have been seen today and the past week in the Blaine area.


Eric Ellingson

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Date: 10/10/17 8:24 pm
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fir Island
Today on Fir Island (Skagit County), I saw no unusual shorebirds, sparrows or warblers. But buteos were in abundance. First of season for me ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK at the Game Range and LIGHT MORPH HARLAN'S RED-TAILED HAWK at Hayton Preserve.


It was a good day.


Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>

Concepts shape our world.
Concepts are not hard wired.




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Date: 10/10/17 6:39 pm
From: Louis Kreemer <lpkreemer...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Snow Geese over Green Lake
Hi Tweeters,

This afternoon Alexander Sowers and I had a couple flocks of Snow Geese
flyover at Green Lake at around 4:30, so different birds than Dave
Robichaud had. One of about 60, another of 170. They were headed
South-West.

Louis Kreemer
Seattle

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Date: 10/10/17 4:09 pm
From: D R <somegum2...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Snow Geese over Wallingford
150 Snow Geese just flew overhead.


Dave Robichaud

Seattle


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Date: 10/10/17 2:23 pm
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Varied thrush, Pine Ridge Park, Edmonds, 10-10-17
I saw a pair of varied thrush, my first of the season, this morning in Edmonds' Pine Ridge Park. Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA
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Date: 10/10/17 1:05 pm
From: Susan wepking <smwepking...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Hummingbird banding in WA state
Hi all,

I am wondering if anyone knows who I may get in contact with to learn how
to band hummingbirds in Washington state?

Thank you for any and all feedback,

Susan

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Date: 10/10/17 8:36 am
From: T Varela <tvarela...>
Subject: [Tweeters] South Sound American Golden Plover
Greetings tweets, the American Golden plover that has been at Billy Frank Jr. /Nisqually NWR for over a week is continuing. Several of us enjoyed excellent views on an outgoing tide Monday morning. The AMGP was with a group of 14 or more Black-bellied plover, there were also sandpiper, dowitcher, and yelllow legs present.

https://flic.kr/p/YVe4H9

On a different topic, Ive been feeding backyard birds in the South Sound for over ten years now. This morning I had the first ever California Scrub Jays at my suet feeders. A nice surprise and hope they continue visiting.


Tony Varela
South Puget Sound, WA
tvarela at hotmail dot com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/tony-v


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Date: 10/10/17 7:49 am
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Correction to Whidbey report on Golden-Plovers [10/9]
Hi all -
After reviewing photos and getting some helpful insight from others, I wanted to send out a note correcting my id on Sunday. Rather than seeing one Pacific and one American Golden-Plover at Crockett Lake, the two birds are both American Golden-Plovers. The one I was calling a Pacific is much brighter yellow than the 'droopy winged' American, but photos show a nice ling wing projection that is definitive for American.

Thanks for the input from all, good learning experience on this side-by-side pair.

Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA


-----Original Message-----
>From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz...>
>Sent: Oct 9, 2017 5:40 AM
>To: TWEETERS <tweeters...>
>Subject: [Tweeters] Sunday [10/9] birding in Jefferson & Island Co
>
>Hi Tweets -
>I birded a bit in Jefferson and then Island Co this Sunday, and some good birds popped up:
>
>Fort Flagler:
>Horned Lark - one along the start of the spit, white one, with no trace of yellow on the throat
>
>Mystery Bay State Park:
>White-throated Sparrow - one tan-striped bird, among the Golden-crowned Sparrows
>
>Port Townsend - Food Co-op at the far end of Kah Tai Lagoon -
>California Scrub-Jays - 4 or more? - as reported the day before on eBird, these were feeding in the trees above the Co-op.
>
>Ft. Worden SP -
>Pacific-Golden Plover - one on the beach
>Ancient Murrelet - several far out on the water
>
>Over on Whidbey Island I ran into Carol Riddell and we walked the area across from Crockett Lake between the beach and SR 20 , looking for longspurs and Horned Larks - last weekend, three cooperative LALO were present [and at least 1 more was heard distantly] — after a lot of walking, a cooperative Lapland Longspur popped up and posed for a bit on a log.
>
>On Crockett Lake, 5 Snow Geese were a surprise.
>and late in the wandering, I finally relocated the lingering golden-plovers. One Pacific, one American, huddled by a log across from the raised viewing platform, roughly.
>
>Add to this a couple easy ferry crossings [no waits!] and it was a good day
>
>Matt Bartels
>Seattle, WA_______________________________________________
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Date: 10/9/17 11:14 pm
From: Scott <scottratkinson...>
Subject: [Tweeters] A little birding in the Russian Far East and northeast China on the fly
For you East Asian birding fans out there:


It has been awhile since I posted, but: just had another Russian Far East business trip, this via Beijing and Changchun, China, this might be of interest. The business itinerary was tight, but per tradition I took maximum advantage of first light and eves, and especially weekends (2). This resulted in 107 species seen between the two countries last week Sept-first week Oct. Highlights:


A PALLAS'S LEAF WARBLER, hard to get to sit still, and a personal favorite of mine passing in large numbers recently, this one in Changchun, China (Jilin, northeast China), link to EBird overall list at bottom:


https://www.flickr.com/photos/14115261@N05/37552980472/in/dateposted-public/


Kamchatka birding was less eventful, but this provisional GLAUCOUS-WINGED x SLATY-BACKED GULL might provoke interest. I get the feeling that the notion of SLATY-BACKED GULL hybridization with other gulls is widely accepted, but I have been reluctant because (as yet) these cases seem mostly conjectural, not based on first-hand visual reports of hybridization and/or lacking support in Russian-language ornithological sources (at least the ones I've checked):


https://www.flickr.com/photos/14115261@N05/37328008740/in/dateposted-public/


For Sakhalin Island to the south, a very approachable WHITE-TAILED (SEA) EAGLE allowed for better photos than I've had previously. This species has been increasing here. As before, the Ebird link for the full site list is at bottom:


https://www.flickr.com/photos/14115261@N05/37570149292/in/dateposted-public/


Last but not least, the Primorskii Krai (Vladivostok area) seemed to have much fewer birds than usual, although I had the least time here to look. The best bird was found during a 35-minute layover at Artem Airport inbound, a female (EASTERN) BLACK REDSTART, although no good photo could be obtained:


http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39379046


Scott Atkinson

Lake Stevens

<scottratkinson...>





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Date: 10/9/17 9:40 pm
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Brackett's Landing (Edmonds) merlin 10-9-17



No sandpipers today, but I did get some grab shots of a merlin being chased by gulls around the jetty and beach at Brackett's Landing north of the ferry dock.  Scroll down page 24 for grab shots:
http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum/showthread.php?14796-Wildlife-of-Edmonds-WA-2017/page24
 Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA
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Date: 10/9/17 9:37 pm
From: Nadine Drisseq <bearsmartwa...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Northern Shrike at Discovery Pk
I know it's not a rarity but it's still a nice bird to find.

Northern Shrike at Discovery Park this evening. Behind the lighthouse area
in the bushes/shrubs/trees. A nice birding surprise! <3

Here are pics:
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=473743066339746&set=pcb.473743359673050&type=3&theater


But I lost my blue and purple wooly hat in the parking lot - so if anyone
see it please pick it up for me and I will come and collect it. :P Chers

Cheers!
*Nadine Drisseq*
*Biologist, **Bear Smart WA*

*PO Box 152*
*Issaquah, WA. 98027*

Tel: (530) 628-7787 (call / text)
<bearsmartwa...>
https://www.facebook.com/BearSmartWA/

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Date: 10/9/17 7:31 pm
From: Twink Coffman <wilber4818...>
Subject: [Tweeters] field trip Fairhaven Park, Padden Creek and Estuary, Marine Park, and Woodstock Farm
*Thursday, October 12*, Fairhaven Park, Padden Creek and Estuary, Marine
Park, and Woodstock Farm

*Time*: 8:30 – 11:30 AM at the entrance to Fairhaven Park

*Contact*: Bob Myhr at <romyhr...> or 360-933-4352

After meeting at Fairhaven Park we’ll be carpooling to additional sites.
All levels of birders are welcome. We’ll be encountering local resident
species, late shore migrants, and arriving winter marine birds. Come with
binoculars and dressed for the weather.


--
happy birding
Twink
<wilber4818...>
Ferndale, WA
in Whatcom County
out on the beach

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Date: 10/9/17 6:45 pm
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl...>
Subject: [Tweeters] false courtship in fall (birds)
Digital Tradition Mirror

The Autumnal Recrudescence of the Amatory Urge


The Autumnal Recrudescence of the Amatory Urge

When the birds are cacaphonic in the trees and on the verge
Of the fields in mid-October when the cold is like a scourge.
It is not delight in winter that makes feathered voices surge,
But autumnal recrudescence of the amatory urge.

When the frost is on the punkin' and when leaf and branch diverge,
Birds with hormones reawakened sing a paean, not a dirge.
What's the reason for their warbling? Why on earth this late-year
splurge?
The autumnal recrudescence of the amatory urge.

-----------------------------------------------------------------

Written by Susan Stiles, copyright December 1973

DC
Thanks to Mudcat for the Digital Tradition!
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Date: 10/9/17 2:13 pm
From: Jeffrey Bryant <jbryant_68...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Pierce Co Franklin’s Gull
Still here at Dash Point Park on Beach St. Saw it on water next to pier before even getting out of car

Jeff Bryant
Seattle
Jbryant_68 at yahoo


Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 10/9/17 1:39 pm
From: Neil and Carleen Zimmerman <n3zims...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Big Sit
Hello Tweeters,

On Sunday the 8th, four of us spent the day at Discovery Park in Seattle doing our 9th Big Sit. Kathy and Arn Slettebak, Ruth Mynar and myself spent 9 hours at the South Bluff which over looks the Sound, south meadow and some wooded areas.

We enjoyed a fantastic day in the park overlooking the meadow and the waters of Puget Sound. The morning started out fast with sightings of sparrows in the bushes and water birds on the water below us. We had a look at a Northern Shrike which are not unusual in the park during winter but this was the first sighting this fall. Good day for raptors. Peregrine Falcon, N Harrier, Sharp-shinned and Cooper's Hawk, Red-tailed Hawk and a lone Bald Eagle. A couple of flocks of woodland birds gave us time to look through them for warblers. Orange-crowned, Yellow-rumped and Black-throated Gray were mixed in with the chickadees and kinglets. We had really nice looks at a couple of Hermit and Varied Thrushes. For the day, we had 45 Steller's Jay moving south along the bluff in small groups. One group was larger. Almost 20 birds and the last jay in the group was a CA Scrub-Jay which are still relatively rare in the park. Late afternoon we found two Belted Kingfishers cruising around. 56 s!
pecies ties our high count for the Sit. We had a slight wind out of the north so we were hoping for some flocks of waterfowl or other migrants but nothing flew by. Discovery Park is the biggest and probably busiest park in Seattle. When you visit, you can see why. The park was full of people enjoying the weather. We were set up along the main trail and spent a lot of time explaining what we were doing. We got the "you're crazy look" but most people were interested and many couldn't believe we could see more than 50 species of birds sitting (standing mostly) in one spot. We enjoyed taking to the people and some were generous enough to make a donation. Rather than explain what the Big Sit is, I have included this link which explains it better than I can.


https://www.birdwatchersdigest.com/bwdsite/connect/bigsit/about.php


Neil Zimmerman

Brier, WA


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Date: 10/9/17 1:25 pm
From: Kevin Lucas <vikingcove...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Re: Black-headed Grosbeak at Poppoff
I saw the Black-headed Grosbeak there again today, once the Red-tailed &
sharpie finally left, getting decent photos and great views. Thanks to
Joshua Glant for great advice and tips and photos on how to distinguish
Black-headed from Rose-breasted Grosbeaks. I'll attach photos to my
checklist. Since I really appreciate the work of eBird reviewers and their
help, and I disagree with a local lister who told me they shouldn't
question his finds, I work hard to get photos and audio recordings when
birds I've seen and heard are flagged by eBird as rare.

It was a gorgeous morning at Poppoff. I'm glad to be out there.

Good birding,
Kevin Lucas
Selah, WA

Sent with AquaMail for Android
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On October 9, 2017 8:41:09 AM Kevin Lucas <vikingcove...> wrote:

> Yesterday afternoon I saw a Black-headed Grosbeak off the Yakima Greenway
> Path, on the Eagle Path in the Poppoff Trail area, right by the south pond
> platform. It's later than I've ever seen one, and flagged as late by eBird.
> It was in a Russian Olive then flew up a bit to a Cottonwood. I missed
> getting photos. I know it's not a sought-after rarity, so likely won't draw
> any interest, but if anyone is in the area, I'd appreciate it if you'd keep
> an eye out for it and try to get photos. I flubbed my photos yesterday, so
> I'm heading back over there shortly to try again. eBird would like provable
> documentation. I recently was able to relocate a late Western Tanager the
> next day for better photos, even though the odds seemed slim. Yesterday the
> "Poppoff" area was loaded with Yellow-rumped Warblers (mostly Audubon's),
> kinglets, Zonotrichia sparrows, and many more. There's plenty to see. A
> Merlin frequents the spot, and yesterday a pair of Greater Yellowlegs fed,
> preened and rested close by. I've not yet started hauling in seed this
> season to the "Poppoff sparrow patch" north of here, but that location is
> where I'd found White-throated sparrows before I set up the patch, and why
> I made it there -- finding Harris's and White-throated Sparrows there each
> winter since, and Bohemian Waxwings most winters. Four Great Egrets have
> been feeding and roosting in the area.
>
> The grosbeak spot is an easy one-third mile flat walk. The sparrow patch is
> about three-quarters of a mile, also easy and flat. Both walks are part
> paved and part packed gravel/dirt.
>
> Google Maps links:
>
> Parking (Don't leave valuables in your car.):
> https://www.google.com/maps/place/46%C2%B033'49.5%22N+120%C2%B028'16.3%22W/@46.5637625,-120.4721029,265m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m6!3m5!1s0x0:0x0!7e2!8m2!3d46.5637608!4d-120.4711832
>
> Black-headed Grosbeak:
> https://www.google.com/maps/place/46%C2%B033'42.1%22N+120%C2%B028'00.5%22W/@46.5616849,-120.4673462,158m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m6!3m5!1s0x0:0x0!7e2!8m2!3d46.5616839!4d-120.466799
>
> Poppoff sparrow patch:
> https://www.google.com/maps/place/46%C2%B034'07.5%22N+120%C2%B028'04.5%22W/@46.5687499,-120.4684502,158m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m6!3m5!1s0x0:0x0!7e2!8m2!3d46.5687494!4d-120.4679033
>
> Good Birding,
> Kevin Lucas
> Selah, WA
> https://www.aba.org/about/ethics.html

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Date: 10/9/17 1:12 pm
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Edmonds marsh sharp-tailed(?) and least sandpipers, 10-8-17
I have received one vote for a pair of sharp-tailed sandpipers.  I was down at the marsh shortly after noon today (Monday 10/9) and saw nothing other than the usual killdeer and great blue herons.  The water level was and more mud exposed when I saw the birds yesterday.

Here is the link to my photos from yesterday if more of you want to take a look. Scroll down page 24:
Wildlife of Edmonds, WA. 2017 - Page 24


|
| |
Wildlife of Edmonds, WA. 2017 - Page 24
Dexter, my backyard Anna's hummingbird, welcomed in the new year. He continues to keep vigilance over "... | |

|



Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA
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Date: 10/9/17 12:49 pm
From: <whitney.n.k...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Barred owl behavior
Hi, Tweeters! Yesterday morning, Andy Jacobson and I were at Discovery Park and had the great fortune of encountering a Barred Owl. After about 5 minutes of us watching it, the owl began to open its mouth and bend its head backwards. Repeatedly. Andy caught this on video with his iPhone and scope (quick thinking!) which is here:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=2rPGrhUdEck

Does anyone know what this owl is doing? We kind of expected a pellet to come up, but we never saw one. Is it a food-in-crop manipulation to help with digestion? Or...?

Thanks for your ideas,
Whitney Neufeld-Kaiser
Seattle
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Date: 10/9/17 10:26 am
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Edmonds marsh pectoral(?) and least sandpipers, 10-8-17
Three sandpipers were at the marsh Sunday (10/8) shortly before sunset.  One looked like a mini-me version of the other two. All three had yellow legs, so I believe the smaller one was a least and the larger two were pectorals.  A sharp-tailed sandpiper was recently been reported on Tweeters. I wish I could chalk up another rare bird sighting for Edmonds this year, but believe the two I photographed were pectorals  and not their look alike Asian cousin.

Scroll down page 24 for photos.  As usual, comments about the ID's of the birds are welcome.http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum/showthread.php?14796-Wildlife-of-Edmonds-WA-2017/page24

Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA
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Date: 10/9/17 8:44 am
From: Kevin Lucas <vikingcove...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Black-headed Grosbeak at Poppoff
Yesterday afternoon I saw a Black-headed Grosbeak off the Yakima Greenway
Path, on the Eagle Path in the Poppoff Trail area, right by the south pond
platform. It's later than I've ever seen one, and flagged as late by eBird.
It was in a Russian Olive then flew up a bit to a Cottonwood. I missed
getting photos. I know it's not a sought-after rarity, so likely won't draw
any interest, but if anyone is in the area, I'd appreciate it if you'd keep
an eye out for it and try to get photos. I flubbed my photos yesterday, so
I'm heading back over there shortly to try again. eBird would like provable
documentation. I recently was able to relocate a late Western Tanager the
next day for better photos, even though the odds seemed slim. Yesterday the
"Poppoff" area was loaded with Yellow-rumped Warblers (mostly Audubon's),
kinglets, Zonotrichia sparrows, and many more. There's plenty to see. A
Merlin frequents the spot, and yesterday a pair of Greater Yellowlegs fed,
preened and rested close by. I've not yet started hauling in seed this
season to the "Poppoff sparrow patch" north of here, but that location is
where I'd found White-throated sparrows before I set up the patch, and why
I made it there -- finding Harris's and White-throated Sparrows there each
winter since, and Bohemian Waxwings most winters. Four Great Egrets have
been feeding and roosting in the area.

The grosbeak spot is an easy one-third mile flat walk. The sparrow patch is
about three-quarters of a mile, also easy and flat. Both walks are part
paved and part packed gravel/dirt.

Google Maps links:

Parking (Don't leave valuables in your car.):
https://www.google.com/maps/place/46%C2%B033'49.5%22N+120%C2%B028'16.3%22W/@46.5637625,-120.4721029,265m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m6!3m5!1s0x0:0x0!7e2!8m2!3d46.5637608!4d-120.4711832

Black-headed Grosbeak:
https://www.google.com/maps/place/46%C2%B033'42.1%22N+120%C2%B028'00.5%22W/@46.5616849,-120.4673462,158m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m6!3m5!1s0x0:0x0!7e2!8m2!3d46.5616839!4d-120.466799

Poppoff sparrow patch:
https://www.google.com/maps/place/46%C2%B034'07.5%22N+120%C2%B028'04.5%22W/@46.5687499,-120.4684502,158m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m6!3m5!1s0x0:0x0!7e2!8m2!3d46.5687494!4d-120.4679033

Good Birding,
Kevin Lucas
Selah, WA
https://www.aba.org/about/ethics.html

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Date: 10/9/17 5:43 am
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Sunday [10/9] birding in Jefferson & Island Co
Hi Tweets -
I birded a bit in Jefferson and then Island Co this Sunday, and some good birds popped up:

Fort Flagler:
Horned Lark - one along the start of the spit, white one, with no trace of yellow on the throat

Mystery Bay State Park:
White-throated Sparrow - one tan-striped bird, among the Golden-crowned Sparrows

Port Townsend - Food Co-op at the far end of Kah Tai Lagoon -
California Scrub-Jays - 4 or more? - as reported the day before on eBird, these were feeding in the trees above the Co-op.

Ft. Worden SP -
Pacific-Golden Plover - one on the beach
Ancient Murrelet - several far out on the water

Over on Whidbey Island I ran into Carol Riddell and we walked the area across from Crockett Lake between the beach and SR 20 , looking for longspurs and Horned Larks - last weekend, three cooperative LALO were present [and at least 1 more was heard distantly] — after a lot of walking, a cooperative Lapland Longspur popped up and posed for a bit on a log.

On Crockett Lake, 5 Snow Geese were a surprise.
and late in the wandering, I finally relocated the lingering golden-plovers. One Pacific, one American, huddled by a log across from the raised viewing platform, roughly.

Add to this a couple easy ferry crossings [no waits!] and it was a good day

Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA_______________________________________________
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Date: 10/8/17 11:04 pm
From: Mary Bond <marybond11...>
Subject: [Tweeters] UBNA Bittern, Green Heron
Tweeters, At sunset-dusk on Sunday 10/8, I saw a green heron along the east
shore of the main pond, and I flushed the american bittern from the
shoreline behind the UW baseball/soccer fields.
Also: Two bald eagles sharing a fish carcass on the logs facing Union Bay,
flyovers by a peregrine falcon and a merlin, and three western grebes near
Canoe Island. None seemed bothered by the excellent drum line supporting
the Husky Soccer Team!
Mary Bond, Seattle

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Date: 10/8/17 10:08 pm
From: <heapbigdoc...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch
Cheryl and I saw a Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch feeding with a small flock of American Goldfinches along Road C Rex off China Creek Road in the Big Bend Wildlife Area in NE Douglas County at 12:35 this afternoon, 10/8/17. Elevation at that spot is only about 1400 ft, but we have had two days of strong winds.

Roy Myers Electric City, WA

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Date: 10/8/17 4:01 pm
From: James P. Beneteau <beneteau...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Nuthatch visit
Taking a break on my covered patio behind my house after window
replacement yesterday; sitting with legs crossed enjoying watching my
feeders when one of the red-breasted nuthatches flew over and landed
on my foot! He looked around for a second, then flew away.
While I've had chickadees land on me before, I was usually luring
them with seeds. This was a pleasant first (I hope, that is, for repeats).

Jim Beneteau
Arlington, Wa

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Date: 10/8/17 1:38 pm
From: Hans-Joachim Feddern <thefedderns...>
Subject: Fwd: [Tweeters] Dash Point Park. Franklin's Gull
Still present as of 1:00 pm, flying around Dash Point Dock as well
described by Carol Riddell. Thank you Carol!


Tweeters,

Continues flying around the pier this morning. This is a Pierce County
park, not the state park. 10:00 am.

Bill Boyington
Shoreline , WA

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--
*Hans Feddern*
Twin Lakes/Federal Way, WA
<thefedderns...>

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Date: 10/8/17 1:21 pm
From: Jack Falskow <cjfalskow...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Western Scrub Jay
I saw a Western Scrub Jay among three Stellar's Jays in my backyard at Franke Tobey Jones in Tacoma.  This was either ate the week before last or early last week.
Jack Falskow
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Date: 10/8/17 1:05 pm
From: Kevin Lucas <vikingcove...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Bald Eagle in our tree! / Caryn / Wedgwood
Caryn,

We get to see lots of California Quail near where I live in Selah -- on our
neighborhood dog walk, on the Yakima Greenway Path near the Poppoff Trail,
heading out to the Wenas area, etc., but I've only once seen a quail with a
full double top knot. I've seen a couple with a less distinct two parted
knot. I've been bird watching for 6 years. I'm curious what others have
seen.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/58148027@N07/14437203846/in/photolist-nZLrHG

Good Birding,
Kevin Lucas
Selah, WA

On Sun, Oct 8, 2017 at 12:49 PM, Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1...>
wrote:

> Hello Birders!!
>
> We have just been spending the last (about 11:45-12:15 or so) 1/2 hour to
> 45 minutes watching a gorgeous adult bald eagle perched in our front Doug
> fir! As far as I’m concerned, it’s a first for our yard!
> But have seen them soar overhead, kindly captured once by Larry Hubbell
> when here to see our bushtit nest.
>
> Luckily, I was able to get a few nice shots (photos!) of it (I rushed out
> with my camera, decked out in my owl pjs!!), sometimes gazing down at us. A
> crow even came and lit on the same branch, seemingly unaware of the bird
> since none of its fellow cohorts came in to harrass it.
>
> When it eventually flew, off, we saw it finally circling, higher and
> higher into the clouds. What a thrill!
>
> We had gotten back from a quick trip to Wenatchee where we got to see some
> CA quail - one mail even had a double “bobber”! Bad hair day or is that an
> anomaly? Quite comical either way. We also saw a possible Merlin. Not sure.
> It wasn’t a kestrel, or a sharpie or coopers. My raptor id sadly still
> suffers.
>
> I don’t know how or why that eagle chose to sit in our tree (nest site
> survey?? one can only hope…), but what an honor!!
>
> Caryn / Wedgwood
>
>
>
>
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> <Tweeters...>
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Date: 10/8/17 12:51 pm
From: Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bald Eagle in our tree! / Caryn / Wedgwood
Hello Birders!!

We have just been spending the last (about 11:45-12:15 or so) 1/2 hour to 45 minutes watching a gorgeous adult bald eagle perched in our front Doug fir! As far as I’m concerned, it’s a first for our yard!
But have seen them soar overhead, kindly captured once by Larry Hubbell when here to see our bushtit nest.

Luckily, I was able to get a few nice shots (photos!) of it (I rushed out with my camera, decked out in my owl pjs!!), sometimes gazing down at us. A crow even came and lit on the same branch, seemingly unaware of the bird since none of its fellow cohorts came in to harrass it.

When it eventually flew, off, we saw it finally circling, higher and higher into the clouds. What a thrill!

We had gotten back from a quick trip to Wenatchee where we got to see some CA quail - one mail even had a double “bobber”! Bad hair day or is that an anomaly? Quite comical either way. We also saw a possible Merlin. Not sure. It wasn’t a kestrel, or a sharpie or coopers. My raptor id sadly still suffers.

I don’t know how or why that eagle chose to sit in our tree (nest site survey?? one can only hope…), but what an honor!!

Caryn / Wedgwood




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Date: 10/8/17 10:10 am
From: William <wrboyington...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Dash Point Park. Franklin's Gull
Tweeters,

Continues flying around the pier this morning. This is a Pierce County park, not the state park. 10:00 am.

Bill Boyington
Shoreline , WA

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Date: 10/7/17 5:11 pm
From: Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Pierce County Lesser Black-backed Gull Status
The Lesser Black-backed Gull did not put in an appearance at any of the gull bathing spots on the Puyallup River today. Consolation prize was the continuing Franklin’s Gull at Tacoma’s Dash Point Park (not Dash Point State Park in King County). It continues to fly vigorously around the pier at this park. It would be difficult to miss.

Carol Riddell
Edmonds_______________________________________________
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Date: 10/7/17 2:53 pm
From: Richard Wright <rjw103146...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Early Pine Siskins
Thursday a group of 10 to 12 Pine Siskins visited my thistle feeder near Point No Point.
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Date: 10/7/17 2:27 pm
From: Hubbell <ldhubbell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } It Takes A Village
Tweeters,

This week’s post concerns the ongoing effort to build and install wood duck boxes around Union Bay.

A Special Thanks to: Dave Galvin, Chris Kessler, Kathy Hartman and Tiffany Lloyd - The Box Building Team!

Come spring it will be fun to watch and see how and if the wood ducks take to the boxes. In the meantime, you may want to challenge yourself to try and locate the new boxes. Learn more in the post:

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2017/10/it-takes-village.html <https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2017/10/it-takes-village.html>

By the way, today’s Going Native section documents a brief encounter between a hawk and a squirrel.

Have a great day on Union Bay, where nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net
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Date: 10/7/17 12:25 pm
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl...>
Subject: [Tweeters] birds seen or heard near my yard recently
Out in last week's sun, I was hearing Varied Thrush, Pacific Wren, Bewick's Wren, Northern Flicker, Pileated Woodpecker, Red-breasted Sapsucker, D-E Junco, Anna's Hummingbird, Belted Kingfisher, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Canada Geese. The sapsucker appeared, poked and pranced on the same pine tree as others have during most winters - yay, some things stay the same. Now I'm awaiting something new, like maybe a CA Scrubjay (they've been seen in the neighborhood).

Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
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Date: 10/7/17 12:05 pm
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...>
Subject: [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Oct. 8, 2017
Hello, Tweets,

Here are the BirdNote stories from last week:
* Rufous-collared Sparrow - Tico-Tico
http://bit.ly/2x3nxcD
* Time to Clean Out Your Nestboxes
http://bit.ly/2fYd5ZH
* Purple Martins Head South to the Amazon
http://bit.ly/2x4cA5P
* Here Come the Merlins
http://bit.ly/2xN0aD1
* The Moon of Falling Leaves - Harvest and Hunter's
http://bit.ly/2wpV5gY
* Woodpeckers Carve Out Roost Cavities, Too
http://bit.ly/2woQCLv
* Cacklers and Canadas
http://bit.ly/2yyGDnz
———————————————
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2yv9MUx
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:<info...>
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org
You'll find nearly 1500 episodes and nearly 1000 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
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Date: 10/7/17 10:09 am
From: Sammy Catiis <Hikersammy...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Leque Is. restoration
Just an FYI.. this opens up or scheduled to open on the 15th of this month:


There will be no pheasants released on Eide/Leque this year. Following the construction of the tidal channels for the first phase of the restoration there is limited cover for the birds and so we will not be release any. There are also concerns about the ability of people to move about and hunt the site with the limited channel crossing and dead ends. We are scheduled to open in the next few weeks hopefully with plenty of maps and signs to help people learn how to move around.


Thought this might answer a few questions..


Sammy




________________________________
From: <tweeters-bounces...> <tweeters-bounces...> on behalf of Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl...>
Sent: Friday, October 6, 2017 5:21 PM
To: <Tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Leque Is. restoration

Phase One of the Leque Is. renovation project is almost complete (mid-October is the projected date, after which people will be allowed in - not sure what this means as far as the birds go. Phase 2 will be the breaching of the levees. Read more at this link and others having to do with this project :

http://www.scnews.com/news/article_93cc6bd4-8c3f-11e7-be5a-5748a6c0f006.html

[https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/scnews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/ef/0efcc3d8-8c38-11e7-9ba0-07b1e36dbc89/59a48b5d8b0b5.image.jpg?resize=1200%2C900]<http://www.scnews.com/news/article_93cc6bd4-8c3f-11e7-be5a-5748a6c0f006.html>

First phase Leque Island restoration nears finish line ...<http://www.scnews.com/news/article_93cc6bd4-8c3f-11e7-be5a-5748a6c0f006.html>
www.scnews.com
As part of the restoration of Leque Island, the state Department of Fish and Wildlife is excavating new channels on the island, filling some of the straight ditches ...




Guess the levees aren't yet breached, nor is funding or permitting certain yet to finish the Phase 2 part of the project, which COULD be finished in either 2018 or 2019. Guess hearsay caused me to jump to conclusions...

Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
<barbdeihl...>
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<Tweeters...>
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Tweeters Info Page - UW Mailman Listserver - Gateway<http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters>
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Tweeters Northwest birders e-mail serves the University of Washington, Washington State, and the Cascadia region as a public service and scientific research tool.




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Date: 10/6/17 5:45 pm
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bob Kothenbeutel's response and update to the Leque Is. issue
Thanks to Bob for chiming in.

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Date: 10/6/17 5:25 pm
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Leque Is. restoration
Phase One of the Leque Is. renovation project is almost complete (mid-October is the projected date, after which people will be allowed in - not sure what this means as far as the birds go. Phase 2 will be the breaching of the levees. Read more at this link and others having to do with this project :

http://www.scnews.com/news/article_93cc6bd4-8c3f-11e7-be5a-5748a6c0f006.html

Guess the levees aren't yet breached, nor is funding or permitting certain yet to finish the Phase 2 part of the project, which COULD be finished in either 2018 or 2019. Guess hearsay caused me to jump to conclusions...

Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
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Date: 10/6/17 5:14 pm
From: <viper.bob...> <viper.bob...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] RFI - Eide Rd/Leque Is mitigation situation/closure
I now live on Camano Island and thus drive past Eide road frequently. Based on what I have observed and what I have been told by people who claim to have spoken with the foreman of the contractor, the construction (destruction?) will end at the end of October (due to lack of funds I am told) at which time it will again be open for access by birders, hunters, etc. Until then the road is closed at the bottom of the hill near the bridge with a barricade and "no trespassing" signs. From the highway it looks as though all of the trees, shrubs and grass have been scraped from the 2 large fields and put into scattered piles. Dirt was hauled over to fill in the small pond on the west side of the road near the entrance. I can see a straight channel which appears to separate the 2 west fields and it contains water. The fields west of the road before you get to the parking lot still appear to be intact. Whether that will remain is hard to gauge.
One of the main reasons that I moved to Camano was to be near this rich wildlife area. I have gotten many of my best photos there over the years. It is sad to see it altered so drastically. We will see what it brings through this fall and winter. I anticipate more hunting since Ducks Unlimited was a major financial contributor.

Bob KothenbeutelCamano Islandviperdotbobatfrontier.com
visit my website: www.rlkimages.photoshelter.com


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Wildlife photographer based in Washington state | Bob Kothenbeutel
Bob Kothenbeutel is a Washington state-based wildlife photographer specializing in images of birds in flight and... | |

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On Friday, October 6, 2017 4:08 PM, Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl...> wrote:


Tweets -

I know there had been plans to breach the dikes and flood the area, ostensibly for salmon, and other reasons.  There were community mtgs for a few years running and finally, decisions made, but, like everything else, action was a long time coming, so I decided to live with my memories of years gone by, and wait to hear from area residents and/or birding friends that things are in motion.  That time seems to have arrived.

If any of you know a bit about this and could do a 'simple' summary  and/or send a link or two to some documents,  I'm sure others as well as I would certainly appreciate it, and will pass it on to other, non-Tweeters nature lovers.  I've already gotten a few responses to my oblique comment in today's post - those folks were surprised to hear the news.  We wonder if the owls, hawks, falcons, blackbirds, shorebirds, shrikes, wrens, etc., that have wintered in that once-gem of an area, will show up elsewhere.  And the hunters, where will they be hunting?

Perhaps some unexpectedly good things will come of this loss...

Thanks,

Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
<barbdeihl...> _______________________________________________
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Date: 10/6/17 4:17 pm
From: Dan Victor <dvictor06...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Oceans shores this weekend?

> From: "Robert C. Faucett" <rfaucett...>
> Subject: Oceans shores this weekend?
> Date: October 6, 2017 at 12:08:23 PM PDT
> To: "<tweeters-bounces...>" <tweeters-bounces...>
> Cc: "Robert C. Faucett" <rfaucett...>
>
> Hi Folks – I have a bird in a freezer in Ocean Shores. Anybody happen to be head out there any time soon? I’d appreciate the help.
>
> Thanks
> Rob
>
>
> --
> Robert C. Faucett
> Collections Manager
> Ornithology
> Burke Museum
> Box 353010
> University of Washington
> Seattle, WA 98195-3010
> Office: 206-543-1668
> Cell: 206-619-5569
> Fax: 206-685-3039
> <rfaucett...>
> www.washington.edu/burkemuseum
> http://www.washington.edu/burkemuseum/collections/ornithology/index.php
> http://www.washington.edu/burkemuseum/collections/genetic/index.php
>


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Date: 10/6/17 4:09 pm
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl...>
Subject: [Tweeters] RFI - Eide Rd/Leque Is mitigation situation/closure
Tweets -

I know there had been plans to breach the dikes and flood the area, ostensibly for salmon, and other reasons. There were community mtgs for a few years running and finally, decisions made, but, like everything else, action was a long time coming, so I decided to live with my memories of years gone by, and wait to hear from area residents and/or birding friends that things are in motion. That time seems to have arrived.

If any of you know a bit about this and could do a 'simple' summary and/or send a link or two to some documents, I'm sure others as well as I would certainly appreciate it, and will pass it on to other, non-Tweeters nature lovers. I've already gotten a few responses to my oblique comment in today's post - those folks were surprised to hear the news. We wonder if the owls, hawks, falcons, blackbirds, shorebirds, shrikes, wrens, etc., that have wintered in that once-gem of an area, will show up elsewhere. And the hunters, where will they be hunting?

Perhaps some unexpectedly good things will come of this loss...

Thanks,

Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
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Date: 10/6/17 3:47 pm
From: Robert C. Faucett <rfaucett...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Where to post Swarovski Binocs for sale
I would assume that’s perfectly OK here.

--
Robert C. Faucett
Collections Manager
Ornithology
Burke Museum
Box 353010
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195-3010
Office: 206-543-1668
Cell: 206-619-5569
Fax: 206-685-3039
<rfaucett...><mailto:<rfaucett...>
www.washington.edu/burkemuseum<http://www.washington.edu/burkemuseum>
http://www.washington.edu/burkemuseum/collections/ornithology/index.php
http://www.washington.edu/burkemuseum/collections/genetic/index.php

On Oct 6, 2017, at 3:43 PM, <ehagstrom13...><mailto:<ehagstrom13...> wrote:

I’m looking for suggestions on where to post a pair of 8.5x42 Swarovski Binoculars I wish to sell. I’d like to sell to a local birder (I am in the Seattle area-eastside). I’d rather not go through eBay or Craig’s list if possible.

Erik Hagstrom
Ehagstrom at G mail dot com

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Date: 10/6/17 3:45 pm
From: <ehagstrom13...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Where to post Swarovski Binocs for sale
I'm looking for suggestions on where to post a pair of 8.5x42 Swarovski
Binoculars I wish to sell. I'd like to sell to a local birder (I am in the
Seattle area-eastside). I'd rather not go through eBay or Craig's list if
possible.



Erik Hagstrom

Ehagstrom at G mail dot com




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Date: 10/6/17 2:02 pm
From: H Heiberg <h.heiberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Golden-Plovers @ Crockett Lake
The American & Pacific Golden-Plovers were still at Crockett Lake on Whidbey at 1:00 today. They were at the south end of the lake near the arched driftwood where the Red-necked Stint hung out earlier this year.

Hank Heiberg
Lake Joy
NE of Carnation, WA

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Date: 10/6/17 12:37 pm
From: Bruce <blabar...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Lesser black-backed Gull, Tacoma
Re-found north of the 11 street bridge on the Puyallup river. Best viewing spot is on the north side of river off Stuart St. across from Gog-le-hi-tee wetlands. Low tide is the best.
Look for large group of Gulls bathing or sleeping. Walking the Levee often helps.
Bruce LaBar
Tacoma
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Date: 10/6/17 12:10 pm
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx...>
Subject: RE: [Tweeters] Early Pine Siskins
Hello Tweets,
I noticed what I perceived as a larger number of Pine Siskins than
usual in September. Mostly one or two birds flying over. I checked
eBird maps and noticed a lot of other September sightings compared to
other years. This, however, can be misleading since eBird
participation has seemed to increase over time (I just ran the
numbers, and the number of complete checklists have roughly doubled
between 2012 and 2016 in Washington).

After reading this thread I looked a little closer at my own sightings
a little closer. Years where I've seen good number of lowland Pine
Siskins in the fall have been followed by winters with irruptions of
Common Redpoll's in the Puget Sound basin. I'm crossing my fingers
that perhaps that will continue this year.

Josh Adams
Cathcart, WA
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Date: 10/6/17 12:09 pm
From: LARRY BAXTER <natural.world.explorer...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Varied Thrush arrive on Camano
I walked the road into my place at early light this morning and saw several
Varied Thrush. Their early morning ethereal whistles are so beautiful.

Larry Baxter
<Mthiker57...>

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Date: 10/6/17 9:25 am
From: Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...>
Subject: RE: [Tweeters] Early Pine Siskins
Interesting - here in Roy I've had up to 25 all summer, including fledglings, but only about a half dozen at most since about two weeks ago.

May all your birds be identified,
Denis DeSilvis
<avnacrs4birds...>


Sent from my Windows Phone
________________________________
From: Linda Phillips<mailto:<linda_phillips1252...>
Sent: 10/5/2017 20:06
To: <tweeters...><mailto:<tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Early Pine Siskins

This afternoon I had two Pine Siskins feeding with other finches in my back yard.
This is EXTREMELY early for me to see them. I dont usually find them until December sometimes even January.
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39574804

Linda Phillips
Kenmore

Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10


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Date: 10/6/17 9:05 am
From: AnnMarie Wood <amw.5737...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Lesser Black-Backed Gull?
I was too late yesterday, hope the LBBG is still around today, and would
appreciate any updates.

Thanks,
Ann Marie Wood
Mountlake Terrace, WA
<annmariewood...>
206-915-2920 cell

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Date: 10/5/17 10:45 pm
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Skagit Snow Geese, Corn & Full Moon - 10/4/17
The drive up was nice but birdless. Nevertheless, it was a swell afternoon/evening, especially after I had an ice cream cone at the "Snow Goose" stand on Fir Island and then slipped into the Hayton Reserve and let the goose show begin - it was great - the vocals and the skeins of geese (some Canadas and lots of Snows) rising and falling and mostly heading north - saw no eagles causing the geese to lift. Took a quick look at Wylie Rd. and then headed toward Stanwood, stopping for some ears of fresh corn on the way. Was enveloped in sadness passing the Eide Rd. area. Will any of the Short-eared Owls come by for a look this year? :-(

link to photos: https://flic.kr/s/aHsm3WmpTo

Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
<barbdeihl...>

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Date: 10/5/17 10:39 pm
From: Michael Fleming <michaelfleming01...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Discovery Park Produces Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Hello All;

This Morning (not so early), I arrived at the West Point Lighthouse in
Discovery Park (at 9:15 am) to try and relocate the PALM WARBLER which has
been seen there recently (with No Success!)..........But that does not mean
the birding was not good.....First bird seen was a LINCOLN'S SPARROW - not
bad in my opinion......So I looked harder and out popped a SLATE-COLORED
JUNCO (CASSIAR), a very striking bird in the sunlight, which stayed around
for a while, a Discovery Park first for me - off to a Very Good start.
Then a new Park bird for me showed up CALIFORNIA SCURB JAY and while I was
looking at it in the poplars another bird flew over me and landed in one of
the nearby shrubs...First very quick glance either a Sparrow or
Grosbeak..... Second and a little closer look - definitely a Grosbeak, but
this one looked different....Heavy streaking on the breast, Very Pale
Pink-Reddish Bill, no coloration (just brown and white).......Female
non-breeding ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK (Thanks to Ryan M. for confirming my ID
based on description) -- Nice....The bird did not stick around for very
long moving south further into the park, but I had a spot on 30 second
look at it perched near me ......I also had both a YELLOW WARBLER and an
ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER in the shrubs near the Poplars.....
I spent the entire time (two plus hours) just birding this area around
the lighthouse - in particular the poplar trees and surrounding shrubs
where the bird activity was amazing with Sparrows all over the place. This
might be a good place to check tomorrow morning (and maybe even earlier
than the time that I arrived)............You will need to get a pass as
they are monitoring parking here.....(Visitors Center opens at 8:30 am) or
walk down to the Lighthouse (a bit of a hike)...

Bonus Birds seen (since my Scope is being repaired - dropped it at
Nisqually)... Rhinoceros Auklet and White-winged Scoter..........


Cheers and Good Birding;


Michael Fleming
Ballard, Washington
michaelfleming01 AT gmail.com

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Date: 10/5/17 9:21 pm
From: Teresa Michelsen <teresa...>
Subject: RE: [Tweeters] Early Pine Siskins
I had a flock in the forest behind my home on Snoqualmie Ridge about a week ago – probably 20 or so



Teresa Michelsen

Snoqualmie



From: <tweeters-bounces...> [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Tom and Carol Stoner
Sent: October 5, 2017 8:50 PM
To: Linda Phillips <linda_phillips1252...>; <Tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Early Pine Siskins



I, too, was surprised to see a small flock (8 - 10) of Pine Siskins feeding in an alder on the Nisqually River side of the Refuge today (Thursday).



Carol Stoner

West Seattle



On Thu, Oct 5, 2017 at 8:04 PM, Linda Phillips <linda_phillips1252...> <mailto:<linda_phillips1252...> > wrote:

This afternoon I had two Pine Siskins feeding with other finches in my back yard.

This is EXTREMELY early for me to see them. I don’t usually find them until December sometimes even January.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39574804



Linda Phillips

Kenmore



Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10




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Date: 10/5/17 8:53 pm
From: Tom and Carol Stoner <tcstonefam...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Early Pine Siskins
I, too, was surprised to see a small flock (8 - 10) of Pine Siskins feeding
in an alder on the Nisqually River side of the Refuge today (Thursday).

Carol Stoner
West Seattle

On Thu, Oct 5, 2017 at 8:04 PM, Linda Phillips <linda_phillips1252...>
wrote:

> This afternoon I had two Pine Siskins feeding with other finches in my
> back yard.
>
> This is EXTREMELY early for me to see them. I don’t usually find them
> until December sometimes even January.
>
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39574804
>
>
>
> Linda Phillips
>
> Kenmore
>
>
>
> Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for
> Windows 10
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
>

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Date: 10/5/17 8:07 pm
From: Linda Phillips <linda_phillips1252...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Early Pine Siskins
This afternoon I had two Pine Siskins feeding with other finches in my back yard.
This is EXTREMELY early for me to see them. I dont usually find them until December sometimes even January.
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39574804

Linda Phillips
Kenmore

Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10


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Date: 10/5/17 6:01 pm
From: Paul Webster <paul.webster...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Whidbey Island, October 4
Hi Tweets,

Barbara and I took advantage of a good weather forecast to spend a day
birding Whidbey Island yesterday October 4. We had mid-day temps in the
60s and clear skies all day. Starting at Deer Lake, we found the small
passerines and a couple of jays vigorously flitting about and calling
repeatedly. We searched the bushes but found no hidden raptors. In the
process we got looks at 15 standard yard birds, though a glimpse of a
departing HUTTON’S VIREO was a modest surprise.


At Dave Mackie Park in Maxwelton we found low tide with the tidelands
covered with resting and feeding dabbling ducks, while SURF- and
WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS foraged offshore, in the company of HORNED,
RED-NECKED, and WESTERN GREBES, COMMON and PACIFIC LOONS, the latter still
in their stunning alternate plumage. Of interest were around 200 or more
COMMON MURRES, swimming and drifting southward between Indian Point near
Maxwelton and Point No Point across Admiralty Inlet.


At 11:30 Deer Lagoon was only just starting to refill from low tide, but we
found lots of RING-BILLED GULLS looking sharp in their fresh seasonal
plumage, and a few GREEN-WINGED TEAL and 10 HOODED MERGANSERS explored the
tidal channels. We walked the east dike trail, watching mainly for
SAVANNAH, SONG, WHITE- and GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROWS. I glanced down to the
east at the small farm with llamas and a nice gravel driveway with the
grass on either side cut short. Barbara spotted a suspicious sparrow in the
short grass that turned out to be a Code 5 VESPER SPARROW.


After a lunch break we walked the dike at the west side of Deer Lagoon,
hoping for, but not finding Lapland Longspurs that had been present there
last week. A foraging NORTHERN HARRIER scared up a few smaller birds, but a
BALD EAGLE scared up hundreds of ducks. There wasn’t a lot going on
otherwise, though we spotted a lingering COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, two
LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERS, and a VIRGINIA RAIL, though hidden in the reeds,
sounded its “Kiddick” call.


At Crockett Lake we found the AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVER, unfortunately with a
damaged wing that will probably keep it from traveling further south. It
was joined for a time by a PACIFIC GOLDEN-PLOVER, close enough to observe
both together in the scope. Then two larger BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS made an
appearance, and about a dozen LEAST SANDPIPERS dropped in, keeping a
respectful distance from the larger birds. After a stop at the Keystone
Ferry Terminal for cormorants, gulls, and a Pigeon Guillemot, we headed
back to the Clinton Ferry Terminal, where we checked the list and
discovered we’d seen 72 species on a relatively short day in the field.


Best Wishes and Good Birding!

Paul Webster, Seattle

<paul.webster...>

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Date: 10/5/17 4:45 pm
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Re: Odd hummer behavior?
It might be the autumn recrudescence.https://christineelder.com/autumnal-recrudescence/


 Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA

From: Carla Corin <cw_corin...>
To: "<tweeters...>" <tweeters...>
Sent: Thursday, October 5, 2017 2:18 PM
Subject: [Tweeters] Re: Odd hummer behavior?

We had a maleAnna's doing his display a couple of days ago. Maybe the temperature and a,punt of daylight is he same as it would be when they are breeding in the spring?

Sent from my iPad

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Date: 10/5/17 3:49 pm
From: Dave Slager <dave.slager...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] status of Sandwich Tern change to Cabot's Tern?
The AOU voted on (and rejected) a proposal to split
<http://www.aou.org/committees/nacc/proposals/2013-A.pdf> in 2013, and the
voting comments can be found here
<http://www.aou.org/committees/nacc/proposals/2013_A_votes_web.php#2013-A-3>
.

Dave Slager
Seattle, WA

On Thu, Oct 5, 2017 at 3:33 PM, Ed Swan <Edswan2...> wrote:

> Does anyone know if the AOU is thinking about splitting the North American
> Sandwich terns to Cabot’s Tern? I was just in Portugal and the guide there
> said the International Ornithologists' Union had made the split for
> Europe.
>
>
>
> Ed
>
> Ed Swan
>
> Nature writer and guide
>
> <edswan2...>
>
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Date: 10/5/17 3:35 pm
From: Ed Swan <Edswan2...>
Subject: [Tweeters] status of Sandwich Tern change to Cabot's Tern?
Does anyone know if the AOU is thinking about splitting the North American
Sandwich terns to Cabot's Tern? I was just in Portugal and the guide there
said the International Ornithologists' Union had made the split for Europe.



Ed

Ed Swan

Nature writer and guide

<edswan2...> <mailto:<edswan2...>

206.949.3545

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Date: 10/5/17 2:28 pm
From: Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2017-10-05
Tweets – A gorgeous fall morning, with a full moon being replaced by a brilliant sun. Several of us were unprepared for the 37 degree start temperature, but it fairly quickly warmed up, reaching 60 by the time we left. We had to detour, as the trail was closed from the lake platform east to the south end of the East Meadow so that they can remove the crumbled pavement from the path. It will become (at least for now) a crushed gravel trail. The day was pretty birdy, though we didn’t have anything really rare, just a pretty complete set of what might typically be present.

Highlights:
a.. Cackling Goose – flock of about 25 landed near Teatro Zinzanni
b.. Horned Grebe – late stop at lake verified presence of 4
c.. Western Grebe – 6+ on lake
d.. Ring-billed Gull – confirmed from late view – First of Fall (FOF)
e.. California Gull – also confirmed from late lake view
f.. Northern Harrier – one over Dog Meadow
g.. Sharp-shinned Hawk – several views
h.. Cooper’s Hawk – several views
i.. -All 5 common woodpeckers-
j.. Merlin – several quick or distant views
k.. Pacific Wren – Just one, near dog swim beach #2. FOF
l.. American Pipit – at least one from Viewing Mound around 7am
m.. Orange-crowned Warbler – 2
n.. Common Yellowthroat – 2
o.. Yellow-rumped Warbler – a couple of dozen, both Audubon’s and Myrtle’s
p.. Townsend’s Warbler – one NE of mansion
The only notable misses for the day were Hooded Merganser and Glaucous-winged Gull. Alas, we had no owls either. And no bunnies.

For the day, 63 species.

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== <BirdMarymoor...>
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Date: 10/5/17 2:21 pm
From: Carla Corin <cw_corin...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Re: Odd hummer behavior?
We had a maleAnna's doing his display a couple of days ago. Maybe the temperature and a,punt of daylight is he same as it would be when they are breeding in the spring?

Sent from my iPad

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Date: 10/5/17 2:21 pm
From: Mitch <biglou22...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Sparrow solved
Well thats embarassing, I wasn't right on either guess. I saw lots of
immature Golden-crowned and one or two White-crowned, but didnt even think
of a young WCSP. Thanks for the help and now I get to go try again and hope
it sticks around!


Mitchell
woodinville

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Date: 10/5/17 2:01 pm
From: Mitch <biglou22...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Montlake Sparrow ID help
I tried for the Clay-colored Sparrow this morning (10/5) around 0730-0830
and found this guy and a Lincoln's as the only 2 that seemed a bit out of
place. I at first thought I had found the Clay but after looking at my apps
started leaning to a young Chipping based on a lack of cheek 'design'. I
saw no reports of either a Chipping or Lincoln's Sparrow on any of the
recent reports and no photos of the Clay from the UW Fields. I read that a
good mark is the presence of or lack of dark lores (which the Chipping does
have) and this guy doesnt have those and it also has a brown rump versus a
grey Chipping rump area but I cant say for sure as it would be my first
Clay-colored. I will try and paste the link to a Flickr album and I welcome
thoughts and inputs either on the Flickr comments, or offline or whichever
works best. Thanks and good birding!!


https://www.flickr.com/photos/129160593@N03/albums/72157686962967060


Mitchell Von Rotz
Woodinville

biglou22 at gmail

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Date: 10/5/17 1:14 pm
From: pat.mary.taylor <pat.mary.taylor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Black Vulture Vancouver Island

The Black Vulture continues in Metchosin, photographed Oct 5 sitting in a fir opposite 4760 Lisandra in Metchosin from at least 7:30-8:30 am. The bird has been present here for 3 days. However, the road-killed deer it was feeding on was buried on Oct 4. It will likely remain in the area as both species of vulture were seen feeding on a road-killed rabbit on nearby Tiswilde Road.

A Black Vulture was released from a rehabilitation Center on Vancouver Island in June. At this time it is not known how such a bird ended up in a rehab on the island, what dates it was at the site, and at what town the centre is located. The first sighting on September 5, 18 Kilometers off Port Hardy then September 27-Oct 5 in Metchosin correlate with a migration pattern while a bird released in June would likely have been seen at an earlier date.

Keith Taylor
Victoria BC

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Date: 10/5/17 12:26 pm
From: Scuderi, Michael R CIV USARMY CENWS (US) <Michael.R.Scuderi...>
Subject: RE: [Tweeters] Browns Point Caspian Tern
There are still about 20 Caspian terns at the north end of Kellogg Island on the Duwamish (down from a mid-summer high of about 200).

Mike Scuderi
<Cotinga777...>
Seattle, WA

-----Original Message-----
From: Hans-Joachim Feddern [mailto:<thefedderns...>]
Sent: Wednesday, October 04, 2017 9:38 PM
To: Tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Browns Point Caspian Tern

Yesterday afternoon (10/3) a seemingly late Caspian Tern was fishing off the Browns Point Lighthouse.
Also yesterday evening, 19 Cackling Geese were feeding with local Canada Geese on the lawn of Treasure Island Park, Twin Lakes, Federal Way. This was first-of-season for this location.


--

Hans Feddern
Twin Lakes/Federal Way, WA
<thefedderns...> <mailto:<thefedderns...>

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Date: 10/5/17 12:17 pm
From: Will Brooks <willjaponicus...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Lesser Black-backed Gull - Tacoma
Hey All,
This morning I found a third cycle LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL on the puyallup river at the 11th st bridge. Also present was an apparent KUMLIENS ICELAND GULL. While the low tide lasts it will likely stick around, after that it will be significantly more difficult to find.
Lesser Black-backed Gull Photos:https://flic.kr/p/Z66HNQ
https://flic.kr/p/Y9dEUB
https://flic.kr/p/Zam7o2

eBird checklist:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39567424

Will BrooksTacoma, WA
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Date: 10/5/17 9:09 am
From: Byers <byers345...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Robins migrating
Hello Tweeters,

From our perch on the hill top above downtown Edmonds we are
seeing a variety of birds in the late afternoon. On Monday afternoon we had
a sizable flock of Red Crossbills moving around through the treetops, for
instance. Yesterday afternoon we watched as about 200 American Robins
heading south. For about 15 minutes they flew, almost continually, in
bunches of 15-20 moving from tree to tree. The afternoon sun was catching
their red breast and turning them into little torches as they flew by,
calling and singing. I'm assuming they were migrating. But were they
migrating from? Canada? Or our nearby mountains?

Charlotte Byers, Edmonds


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Date: 10/4/17 10:57 pm
From: Donna Koerker <djkoerk...>
Subject: [Tweeters] brown booby?
This afternoon while cruising from Gig Harbor back to Tacoma's Foss Water
way I spotted an unexpectedly large brown bird flying away from us (NE)
from the area of Pt Defiance park toward Maury Island. Long narrow wings, a
bit longer than the body appeared. I didn't see any white underparts but it
was going away from us. Could this have been the brown booby that has been
reported in that area? It might be worth more looking.

Donna Koerker

Des Moines, WA




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Date: 10/4/17 10:45 pm
From: Gene Beall <gene.beall...>
Subject: [Tweeters] radar images
Interesting story and radar images of what was initially thought to be
migrating birds but turned out to be butterflies:

http://www.kiro7.com/news/massive-wave-of-butterflies-lights-up-denver-weath
er-radar/619704149



Gene Beall

Sammamish, WA




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Date: 10/4/17 9:41 pm
From: Hans-Joachim Feddern <thefedderns...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Browns Point Caspian Tern
Yesterday afternoon (10/3) a seemingly late Caspian Tern was fishing off the
Browns Point Lighthouse.
Also yesterday evening, 19 Cackling Geese were feeding with local Canada
Geese on the lawn of Treasure Island Park, Twin Lakes, Federal Way. This
was first-of-season for this location.

--
*Hans Feddern*
Twin Lakes/Federal Way, WA
<thefedderns...>

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Date: 10/4/17 6:01 pm
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Cowlitz County vulture watching
Tweeters,

To feed my unnatural desire to see migrating vultures, I left Clark County
and headed to the north end of Woodland Bottoms (Cowlitz County - accessed
via heading West on Dike Access Road from I-5, go straight past Walmart and
the school and then bear right at the T intersection and stop at the
pullout on the left side of the road after the 2nd farm on the right). It
was worthwhile. My 4.5 hours was interrupted only when Russ Koppendrayer
called to let me know about a Surf Scoter and a Red-necked Grebe that he
had found about 1.5 miles south of my location. Totals:

Turkey Vulture: 188
Red-tailed Hawk: 8
Sharp-shinned Hawk: 4
Cooper's Hawk: 3
Merlin: 2
Bald Eagle: 4

There was one Snow Goose in a flock of 250 Cackling Geese near this
location. Sandhill Cranes were bugling in the background.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward.

Jim
--
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
<jdanzenbaker...>

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Date: 10/4/17 2:28 pm
From: Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Odd hummer behavior? / Caryn / Wedgwood
Hi again, birders,

Just now, my husband saw one of the resident Anna’s collecting fluff from our nesting material fluff ball! Do hummers ever sleep in old nests? If so, it’s adding some additional layers!

Could this be a sign of a mild winter? A bit late/early to begin nesting!! Or did it just miss the feeder!! ;-))

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Date: 10/4/17 1:49 pm
From: Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] White Throated Sparrow / Caryn Wedgwood
Hi Birders,

Just this afternoon saw a White Throated Sparrow (had been seeing a Golden Crowned too the last couple of days). Last year was the first time we’d noticed one in our yard before.

Indeed, the “sparrows are coming…”

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Date: 10/4/17 12:38 pm
From: Jim Ullrich <jimullrich...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Ridgefield NWR "Birds n' Blues" Festival
Hello Tweets:
If you have no plans at this time, consider a fun drive down to the
Ridgefield NWR Birds n' Blues" festival this weekend, 10/6-8.
Visit www.ridgefieldfriends.org for festival details.
Jim Ullrich
360-908-0817

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Date: 10/3/17 6:57 pm
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Larch Mountain, Clark County birding
Tweeters,

With a forecast of a northeast wind, I headed up to Larch Mountain. Clark
County today in hopes of witnessing a decent passerine migration with a
raptor passage following. My results were reasonable given my 4.5 hour
visit. Highlights were:

NORTHERN GOSHAWK: 1
Cooper's Hawk: 1
Sharp-shinned Hawk: 6
Merlin: 2
Red-tailed Hawk: 2
Northern Harrier: 1

Varied Thrush: 142 in 90 minutes (last week, we saw 256 in 3 hours)
Townsend's Solitaire: 13 (my highest daily count in Clark County)

Keep your eyes and ears skyward.

Jim
--
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
<jdanzenbaker...>

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Date: 10/3/17 6:45 pm
From: Dee Dee <deedeeknit...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Sparrows coming (as well as those who’ve been here)
I found the recent posts regarding the arrival of White-crowned Sparrows in our Puget Sound area yards interesting, simply because we have had an embarrassment of them living year-round in our yard/neighborhood for the past 7 years we’ve been here near Lynnwood/Edmonds (approx 1 block away from the Sound). I just assumed they were common all over the region now, but apparently only area-specific?—it’s nice to learn things from what is posted here. Lots of juvies in our area Spring through Fall, creating families in waves.
I was born/grew up here (Vashon Island/West Seattle) and don’t recall seeing them at all when I was younger.
They sort of “rule” the yard and we joked about them literally lining up for our birdbath this summer, like cars at the car wash. (We don’t have feeders out, but several neighbors do.) Kept me on my toes trying to keep water in it, with all the splashing. Facing each other down across the basin, occasionally tussling, and I cheer when a Towhee wins the right to use it for a change. One day I noticed 6 post-bath birds hunkered down/sprawled out in the sun drying off, around the base of a low azalea bush, while several more still contested to be next to bathe.
They and many of the other birds have also been very busy harvesting from the bumper crop of berries on my two native Evergreen Huckleberry bushes for a few weeks now—a shrub I can highly recommend as bird-friendly, easy care, and attractive.

Dee Warnock
Edmonds

.
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Date: 10/3/17 5:04 pm
From: Christopher Clark <cjbirdmanclark...>
Subject: [Tweeters] No Brown Booby today
Hello tweets, so I was unsuccessful in finding the Brown Booby today, and
based on ebird reports it looks as if no one else has seen it either. I
checked Point Defiance, including Owens Beach, and Ruston Way. Others did
check Brown's and Dash Points, again without success. It's possible it may
have gone up to Gig Harbor or Vashon Island, and since those areas aren't
heavily birded I could see it easily escaping notice. Hopefully it is
refound though!

Christopher Clark
Sumner, WA

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Date: 10/3/17 3:58 pm
From: Cara Borre <cmborre1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Westport Seabirds Trip Report Saturday 9-30-17
Westport Seabirds enjoyed another great trip on Saturday, 9-30-17. Bruce
LaBar, Gene Revelas and I joined Phil and Chris Anderson on one of the last
pelagics out of Westport for 2017. While the weather forecast seemed to
indicate a bit of wind, rain and cold was in store for us, we were
pleasantly surprised to find excellent weather and sea conditions.

Captain Phil had learned that several fishing boats were working in Pacific
County, so the Monte Carlo headed south after an easy bar crossing due to
favorable tidal conditions. We came across some fishing boats after a good
2 hours of cruising. Phil tossed out chum in several places where boats
were attracting good numbers of birds.

By far the most numerous bird of the day was Northern Fulmar. We also
enjoyed good numbers of Black-footed Albatross, and several great views of
as many as 20 Buller’s Shearwater. California Gulls always take advantage
of a good chum opportunity, but today they were joined by a couple
Black-legged Kittiwakes, our first sighting of the season for this
species. This is also a good time of year to closely examine all dark
shearwaters hoping to pick out a Short-tailed Shearwater. We were able to
confirm a sighting in a slightly smaller bird, with a noticeably smaller
bill and a rounded forehead. We were fortunate to have nearby Sooty
Shearwaters to compare this bird to.

Sea mammals for the day included nice, close encounters with Humpback
Whale, Dall’s Porpoise, and Northern Fur Seal. Those on the bow of the
boat also got good looks at a Blue Shark and a small Ocean Sunfish.

We enjoyed a pleasant trip back to Westport, shedding layers of clothing in
what seemed to us as balmy conditions. We were able to add a final rarity
to our trip list by picking out a Bar-tailed Godwit among the Marbled
Godwits at the marina.

We will round out a great year of sea birding Saturday, October 7th with
our last trip of 2017. There are still a few spots remaining on this trip
for those wishing to add new pelagic species to their year or life lists.
How about a nice Laysan Albatross? The odds seem pretty good this year,
though one can never guarantee.


Hope to sea you out there!


Cara Borre

Gig Harbor

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Date: 10/3/17 12:49 pm
From: Phil Wegener <WEGENER2511...>
Subject: [Tweeters] sagebrush sparrow
Have there been any reports today about this bird being seen at Hayton Reserve? Some northern birders would like to know.

Phil Wegener
Sudden Valley, WA


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Date: 10/3/17 12:06 pm
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Re: The sparrows are coming!
I have been seeing Savannah sparrows at various locations along the Edmonds waterfront.  Scroll down page 23 to post 224 for photos from last Friday (9/29) at Brackett's Landing.
http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum/showthread.php?14796-Wildlife-of-Edmonds-WA-2017/page23

Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA

From: Joan Miller <jemskink...>
To: <tweeters...>
Sent: Tuesday, October 3, 2017 8:45 AM
Subject: [Tweeters] Re: The sparrows are coming!

Hi Tweets,
Yes, as Dennis Paulson said, the sparrows are here! Fox sparrows showed up in my yard at least a week or two ago. Last week there was a White-Crowned, and this morning, my first sighting of a Golden-crowned for the season! Juncos have been everywhere. Chickadees have been eating the niger.
Joan MillerWest Seattlejemskink at gmail dot com
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Date: 10/3/17 10:38 am
From: Steve Loitz <steveloitz...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Northeast Seattle Rough-legged Hawk
Cool, John. The Rough-legged Hawk migration is happening over her E 'o
crest. I've seen two in the past week

On Tue, Oct 3, 2017 at 10:13 AM, John Puschock <g_g_allin...>
wrote:

> Around 10 AM today (Oct 3, 2017), I saw a Rough-legged Hawk from my
> backyard. I first saw it soaring, and then it headed east. It flew more or
> less directly over Meadowbrook Pond.
>
>
> John Puschock
>
> Matthews Beach, Seattle
>
> _______________________________________________
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> <Tweeters...>
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>


--
Steve Loitz
Ellensburg, WA
<steveloitz...>

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Date: 10/3/17 10:33 am
From: Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Brown Booby Status Tuesday?
Does anyone know if the Pierce County Brown Booby is being seen this morning? I don't see any eBird reports.

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Date: 10/3/17 10:17 am
From: John Puschock <g_g_allin...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Northeast Seattle Rough-legged Hawk
Around 10 AM today (Oct 3, 2017), I saw a Rough-legged Hawk from my backyard. I first saw it soaring, and then it headed east. It flew more or less directly over Meadowbrook Pond.


John Puschock

Matthews Beach, Seattle

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Date: 10/3/17 8:49 am
From: Joan Miller <jemskink...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Re: The sparrows are coming!
Hi Tweets,

Yes, as Dennis Paulson said, the sparrows are here! Fox sparrows showed up
in my yard at least a week or two ago. Last week there was a White-Crowned,
and this morning, my first sighting of a Golden-crowned for the season!
Juncos have been everywhere. Chickadees have been eating the niger.

Joan Miller
West Seattle
jemskink at gmail dot com

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Date: 10/2/17 7:45 pm
From: Kristin <KristinStewart01...>
Subject: [Tweeters] TVs
Saw at least 30 roosting along Hood Canal just south of the Skok river on October 1st. (Hard to count at 60mph in trees). Two more individuals also roosting a few miles further north. Probably about 9:45 am.

Kristin Stewart
Olympia

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Date: 10/2/17 5:49 pm
From: <amk17...>
Subject: [Tweeters] northern harrier over Phinney, Seattle
Most unexpected bird of the day, a northern harrier flying into my yard and then over the house in Phinney Ridge, Seattle around 530pm.

AKopitov
Seattle, WA
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Date: 10/2/17 5:45 pm
From: <amk17...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Skagit Preserve sage sparrow and sharp-tailed sandpiper
Thanks for sharing your birds today and thanks Marv Breece for posting these yesterday.

Observed today at 12ish to 350ish, sage sparrow and around 355pm a sharp-tailed sandpiper and earlier a pectoral sandpiper (observed and photographed by many).

Other species observed included greater yellowlegs, common yellowthroat, long-billed dowitcher, cackling and Canada geese, snow geese, green-winged teal, northern pintail, mallards, least and western sandpipers, Lincoln's sparrows, savannah sparrows, golden and white-crowned sparrows, song sparrows, ring-billed gulls, gull sp.

AKopitov
Seattle, WA

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Date: 10/2/17 5:17 pm
From: Will Brooks <willjaponicus...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Brown Booby
Being seen now from Owen beach at point defiance.
Will BrooksTacoma WA


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone


On Monday, October 2, 2017, 1:03 PM, Bruce <blabar...> wrote:

Check Delco lookout first , then drive a little ways to the Point where the bathrooms are . There is a fenced area . View from here or be careful going around fence for viewing. This on the five mile drive at Point Defiance.

> On Oct 2, 2017, at 12:37 PM, Charles Desilets <csdesilets...> wrote:
>
> Which point are you referring to?
>
> Charlie Desilets
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: <tweeters-bounces...>
> [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Bruce
> Sent: Monday, October 02, 2017 12:18 PM
> To: Tweeters
> Subject: [Tweeters] Brown Booby
>
> Hanging around the Point now looking out towards Gig Harbor. On water,
> photos
>
> _______________________________________________
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Date: 10/2/17 4:28 pm
From: BRAD <bradliljequist...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Just to pile on with TVs
We had a kettle of about 80-100 swirling over the house yesterday on W. Phinney Ridge. It was pretty cool. The day before, a line of about 10 headed straight south over Ballard.


Brad Liljequist

Phinney Ridge

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Date: 10/2/17 3:54 pm
From: Jon Sieker <jon.sieker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Barn Owl Denny Park
Hey Everyone,

I have been lurking in this group since about April (just before moving up
from San Francisco) and following along. Really enjoying some of the
exciting birds coming through even though I don't have a car to chase.

I live across from Denny Park and am trying to get the species count up
there. I caught the tail end of Spring Migration and am enjoying Fall
Migration. Last night I saw my first *Barn Owl *for the state, county and
hot spot. It was the first eBird recorded *Barn Owl* at that hot spot
too. Fun!

Good Birding,

Jon Sieker - Seattle

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Date: 10/2/17 3:41 pm
From: Constance Sidles <constancesidles...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fantastic Fill
Hey tweets, Montlake Fill has been fantastic the past few days. Well, it's always fantastic, I must say, but these past days it has exceeded all expectations.

Today, I found a CLAY-COLORED SPARROW and a CHIPPING SPARROW at the Youth Farm (now called the UW Farm). They were foraging among a huge flock of Savannahs, White-crowned and Golden-crowned Sparrows, Lincoln's, Song Sparrows, Red-winged Blackbirds, and American Goldfinches, who have been harvesting a large crop of sunflower seeds and other farm goodies. A couple days ago, this same farm produced a VESPER SPARROW and a CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEE (rare at the Fill). Meanwhile, today we were also graced by a TURKEY VULTURE, which was circling overhead checking for animation. I made sure to get up off my stool and walk up and down a bit, so as not to give the vulture any false hopes.

Also present over the past couple days: a NORTHERN SHRIKE around Canoe Island and Hoyt Meadow; and a WHITE-THROATED SPARROW at the entrance to Yesler Swamp. Two WESTERN GREBES have been fishing near the crewhouse, joined from time to time by two more. I've never seen so many Western Grebes at the Fill before. Also, an AMERICAN BITTERN has been entrancing birders by coming out onto the lily pads at Canoe Island, and parading up and down for long periods of time. This bittern is completely indifferent to people - canoeists paddle by and this bird doesn't even raise its bill skyward, much less retreat into the bushes.

it's still a little tough for me to visit the Fill, on account of the awful, awful mitigation boondoggle. But the birds are as beautiful as they have always been, and they remind me that nature is resilient, at least up to a point. Most of the plants WSDOT planted have died, replaced by weeds both native and non, but the seed-eating birds seem to find plenty of food to eat. That is good to see during migration, when the migrants are already out of their accustomed habitat and perhaps more willing to eat "exotic" foods. I'm glad the Fill has been able to supply them with a little something to go on, as they work their way south.

So far this year, there have been 155 species seen at the Fill. - Connie, Seattle

<constancesidles...> <mailto:<constancesidles...>
<csidles...> <mailto:<csidles...>


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Date: 10/2/17 3:05 pm
From: Dayna yalowicki <dlwicki...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Brown Pelicans
I have recently returned from a week's stay in Depoe Bay, Ore, where I have gone two or three times a year, during different seasons for nearly 20 years and have thoroughly enjoyed the flocks of Brown Pelicans skimming the water both morning and evening. There are usually several flocks, but this trip, NONE. I saw a single bird on seagull rock, along with a smattering of cormorants, which also used to number in the thousands. I am curious whether the recent culling of Cormorants may have affected the Cormorants traveling past Depoe Bay, and if the drop in Pelicans now is due to the sardine crash a few years ago. Or are the two population decreases related in some way?

Dayna Yalowicki
Bothell, Wa



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Date: 10/2/17 1:06 pm
From: Bruce <blabar...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Brown Booby
Check Delco lookout first , then drive a little ways to the Point where the bathrooms are . There is a fenced area . View from here or be careful going around fence for viewing. This on the five mile drive at Point Defiance.

> On Oct 2, 2017, at 12:37 PM, Charles Desilets <csdesilets...> wrote:
>
> Which point are you referring to?
>
> Charlie Desilets
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: <tweeters-bounces...>
> [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Bruce
> Sent: Monday, October 02, 2017 12:18 PM
> To: Tweeters
> Subject: [Tweeters] Brown Booby
>
> Hanging around the Point now looking out towards Gig Harbor. On water,
> photos
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
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Date: 10/2/17 12:21 pm
From: Bruce <blabar...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Brown Booby
Hanging around the Point now looking out towards Gig Harbor. On water, photos

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Date: 10/2/17 11:49 am
From: Bruce <blabar...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Brown Booby
Just had a adult Brown Booby circling by and evidently flying away towards Vashon Island heading northeast. Viewed from the Delco passage viewpoint at Point Defiance, Tacoma. Large group of 600 plus Bonapart's Gulls and one Parasitic Jaeger also.

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Date: 10/2/17 11:42 am
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Snohomish/Skagit birding; SAGEBRUSH SPARROW



I began my birding day looking for Maxine Reid's golden-plovers at Tulalip, Snohomish County. No luck. Did see 30 BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS and a couple of flyover SNOW GOOSE flocks.


Along Boe Road was a single WESTERN MEADOWLARK and an AMERICAN KESTREL.


The Skagit Game Range (Wylie Slough) was a bit slow. Between my morning visit and a later afternoon visit:
TAIGA MERLIN - my first taiga of the season; a male
PEREGRINE FALCON - immature
COOPER'S HAWK - adult female
WILSON'S SNIPE - 1
LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER - 13 10 juv & 3 in basic
GREATER YELLOWLEGS - 10
VIOLENT-GREEN SWALLOW - 2


Amazing bird activity at the Hayton Preserve more than made up for the slowness at the Game Range. Odd birds included Bob Kuntz, Gary Bletsch, Phil Wegener and Steve Giles. The 5 of us assembled without design within a short period of time, and together, we enjoyed the following:


Snow Goose
Cackling Goose
Canada Goose
Greater White-fronted Goose
Osprey
Merlin - black
Peregrine - immature different from Game Range bird
Black-bellied Plover
Wilson's Snipe
Long-billed Dowitcher
Greater Yellowlegs
Lesser Yellowlegs - 1
Sanderling - 1 juv
Western Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Dunlin - 3
Pectoral Sandpiper - 15 or more
SHARP-TAILED SANDPIPER - 1
SAGEBRUSH SPARROW - along the gravel trail; may be a Skagit County first record
LAPLAND LONGSPUR - 2 heard and seen


No doubt I have forgotten something.
Sagebrush Sparrow images and videos at:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/138163614@N02/
http://www.pbase.com/marvbreece/new_images


It was a very good day!



Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>

Concepts shape our world.
Concepts are not hard wired.




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Date: 10/2/17 10:28 am
From: Buchanan, Joseph B (DFW) <Joseph.Buchanan...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Turkey Vultures
Yesterday at 4:40 I saw a group of 16 Turkeys Vultures flying south directly over my house (near Watershed Park in Olympia). They disappeared to the south, heading on a bearing toward the Olympia Airport. Flight was very direct. At 4:45 I saw a group that totaled 313 Turkey Vultures that passed directly overhead on the same flight line as the earlier group. Three separate parts of this group, involving nearly all 313 birds, stopped to circle in 3 different areas before continuing on. When not circling the birds in the large group had a very direct flight and were easily tallied.

Joe Buchanan
<Joseph.Buchanan...>

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Date: 10/2/17 10:14 am
From: Tom Leschine <tml...>
Subject: [Tweeters] TUVUs over West Queen Anne
I spotted a kettle of 11 TUVUs out my window this morning at about 9:40, with a 12th straggler coming by a few minutes later. They were passing directly over the top of the hill and moving south.

Tom Leschine




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Date: 10/2/17 8:44 am
From: Jim Lawrence <jlmotmot...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Black Phoebe
This morning we had a Black Phoebe on Whalen Road in the Woodland Bottoms. Lots of Sandhill Cranes, Canada/Cacklin Geese and Snow Geese. Also lots of Golden-crowned Sparrows.
Jim & Gloria LawrenceWoodland, WA
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Date: 10/1/17 11:09 pm
From: <notcalm...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Red-breasted Sapsuckers- Mercer Island
Red-breasted Sapsuckers create and maintain new wells in our large birch tree each year in the Fall.
In past years, one usually arrived at the end of October and stayed for 2-3 weeks.
I was surprised to find two working on the tree today. They called and chased each other around the truck and limbs for about an hour. One remained later in the day.
One of our resident female Anna's quickly found it and watched it from eight feet away.
Always nice to have one working in our yard. It is fun and easy to make frequent observations of it and other birds at the wells.
Dan Reiff

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Date: 10/1/17 10:49 pm
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Skagit Sagebrush Sparrow


This afternoon there was a Sagebrush Sparrow at Hayton Preserve on Fir Island. Five of us watched this bird as it foraged along the gravel path inside the fenced area. It was still there when we left late afternoon.


https://www.flickr.com/photos/138163614@N02/37414842712/in/datetaken-public/lightbox/


Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>

Concepts shape our world.
Concepts are not hard wired.




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Date: 10/1/17 10:45 pm
From: <notcalm...>
Subject: Re: Mercer Island Scrubs--Re: [Tweeters] Re: Wandering Scrub Jays in Seattle
Tweeters,
We had a Scrub Jay at our suet feeder for about 20 minutes-a few days ago-September 29th, 2017, on Mercer Island.
All the regulars, including Stellar's Jays, appeared wary and did not approach any of the feeders until it left.
Dan Reiff
Mercer Island

----- Original Message -----

From: "Dan Reiff, PhD" <notcalm...>
To: "Stewart Wechsler" <ecostewart...>
Cc: "Tweeters" <tweeters...>
Sent: Sunday, October 2, 2016 1:40:59 PM
Subject: Mercer Island Scrubs--Re: [Tweeters] Re: Wandering Scrub Jays in Seattle

Stewart and all,
No, I am not referring to the intensive cleaning of my car following recent trips to beautiful, dusty Chelan and Bethel Ridges.

We had an adult Scrub Jay feeding on our deck, Mercer Island, Monday, September 12th at 2:25 PM for about five minutes.
In the past five years, we have had one sighting each year in the spring and four one day/year sightings in the fall.
They always seem to be stopping by for a few bites, a chat and a "look around" before moving on.
We usually hear them before we see them. Have not seen them have any interactions with our resident Steller's jays. Always neat!

Dan Reiff
MI

Sent from my iPhone

On Oct 2, 2016, at 12:51 PM, Stewart Wechsler < <ecostewart...> > wrote:




With the Scrub Jays increasingly being seen in Seattle, I wasn't sure if my sighting of another Scrub Jay in Seattle was worth a posting, but since Dennis started the discussion, I will add my sighting. On Friday, September 30th in the late afternoon I saw my first Scrub Jay, within a block of my apartment (we could call it a new "yard bird" for me) in West Seattle at 42nd Ave SW and SW Edmunds St.. The bird I saw was also an immature and I too suspected it was in a dispersal wandering mode. I know that Scrub Jays are now a regular feature nesting in Georgetown, at the south end of Seattle, north of Boeing Field, and I have had recent reports of them in White Center, at the south end of West Seattle. I would be interested in knowing where else they are now being seen within Seattle and to the north of Seattle.

Stewart Wechsler
West Seattle
www.stewardshipadventures.com



<blockquote>
Date: Sun, 2 Oct 2016 10:17:00 -0700
From: Dennis Paulson < <dennispaulson...> >
Subject: [Tweeters] wandering scrub-jay in Maple Leaf
To: TWEETERS tweeters < <tweeters...> >
Message-ID: < <7D7104B3-EBCF-4EBC-9050-C3D3A86CED99...> >
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252"

Hello, tweets.

Yesterday (10/1) a California Scrub-Jay spent about an hour in our yard, fed from a seed feeder and took away a few peanuts that we threw to it, presumably to eat rather than cache. It must have been used to that, as it didn’t flinch when we opened the window and tossed out the peanuts. The only thing that flinched was the Steller’s Jay that hangs around constantly, and the two had a little tiff. But the scrub-jay got the peanut and came back later and got another one, so it wasn’t totally intimidated. It hasn’t been back, and I presume it is an immature in dispersal mode for the fall, perhaps seeking other scrub-jays. Anyway, it was a long-expected but no less exciting new bird for the yard.
-----
Dennis Paulson
1724 NE 98 St.
Seattle, WA 98115



</blockquote>

<blockquote>

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</blockquote>



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Date: 10/1/17 9:03 pm
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Snohomish Turkey Vultures, WTSP, etc.
Hello Tweets,
Turkey Vulture migration is one of my favorite events in birding, and
I've been trying to spend as much time outside in the afternoons as I
could this week in hopes of catching some good movement. I have had
TUVU's around all week, but they were gorging themselves on salmon
along the Snohomish River and I only saw one or two long birds headed
south over many hours spent watching. Today I was stuck inside all day
doing chores and lamenting not being able to spend a few hours out on
the porch. Late in the afternoon, a distant bird caught my eye. When I
got my binoculars up I was astounded to see the largest group of
Turkey Vultures I've ever seen flying south over Lord Hill Park. I
counted at least 44, but I'm not even sure I caught the entire flock.
Earlier I had at least 5 feeding by the river, so my total for the day
was 49. Not quite the 300 that Phil had, but a new high count on eBird
for the county.

The other nice bird for the day was a White-Throated Sparrow
underneath my feeders feeding alongside a Golden-Crowned. I had
another White-Throated Sparrow on Thursday, but that was a bright
white-striped individual and this one was a tan-striped so apparently
a different bird. Golden-Crowned and White-Crowned sparrows have been
relatively scarce in my yard, but the wooded habitat better fits
White-Throated.

Geese came back with a vengeance. I had my first Cackling on 9/19 and
the flocks I've seen hanging around are roughly 500 birds. After a big
rush of Canada Geese last week, their numbers have thinned a bit. No
Snow yet, and I've searched in vain for a Greater White-Fronted.

Josh Adams
Cathcart, WA
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Date: 10/1/17 6:02 pm
From: Abbi Gomersall <adgomersall...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] California Scrub-Jay Occurrence in Marysville
I had one in the neighbors tree 2 days ago between 76th pl ne and 77th pl ne. And a few days before that, saw one on a power line around 47th and 80th.

Regards,

Abbi G.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 1, 2017, at 17:05, Philip Dickinson <pdickins...> wrote:
>
> I have seen one in the area of 47th Ave. and 3rd St. on multiple times. The last two times were this summer between 47th and Allen's Creek on 3rd.
>
> Phil Dickinson
>
>> On Sun, Oct 1, 2017 at 6:36 PM, Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...> wrote:
>> California Scrub-Jays have been present in Marysville for at least 12 years that I know of. I used to assist with the Marysville area of the North County (Snohomish) CBC. There was a house on the south side of Jennings Park with feeders. The owners said they regularly had scrub-jays. After they sold their house, the feeders were taken down and we were not able to find the scrub-jays in that particular neighborhood in subsequent years. It has been quite a few years since I have participated in that CBC area, but I’m not surprised to hear that the scrub-jays are still being seen around Jennings Park neighborhoods. If I recall correctly, we never counted more than two.
>>
>> Carol Riddell
>> Edmonds
>>
>>
>> I just saw 2 in my Marysville yard ten minutes ago.
>>
>> Pam Myers
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Josh Adams <xjoshx at gmail.com>
>> To: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
>> Sent: Thu, Sep 28, 2017 10:00 pm
>> Subject: [Tweeters] California Scrub-Jay Occurrence
>>
>> California Scrub-Jays (previously Western Scrub-Jay) seem to be
>> continuing their slow march northward. They seem to wander a bit in
>> the August-December time period after breeding and I'm not surprised
>> to see a flurry of reports from new locations. They are now locally
>> common at least to Marysville, with reports as far north as Vancouver
>> BC. They seem to older neighborhoods in cities and small towns,
>> especially in locations which have planted oak trees which provide
>> acorns in the fall. Perhaps there are fewer Steller's Jays in these
>> locations to compete with. It will be interesting to see how they
>> expand in the years to come.
>>
>> Josh Adams
>> Cathcart, WA
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>>
>
> _______________________________________________
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Date: 10/1/17 5:29 pm
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Battle Ground Turkey Vultures
Hi Tweeters,

It was a fun day of looking skyward from my Battle Ground Clark County
yard. It started with a flock of 6 Great Egrets which is only the 6th time
I've ever recorded them from the yard.

After the sun and clouds waged war against each other this morning, the sun
finally gained the upper hand and the vultures started flying. 10 kettles
for the afternoon totaling 164 birds was my highest daily count from my
back yard. Additionally, one Peregrine, several Red-tails and one Cooper's
and one Sharp-shinned Hawk rounded out the show.

I'm now recovering from vulture neck.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward.

Jim
--
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
<jdanzenbaker...>

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Date: 10/1/17 5:21 pm
From: Byers <byers345...>
Subject: [Tweeters] One more factoid about TVs
Hi again Tweeters,

In reading recent Tweeter reports, it seems that everyone is
seeing flocks of Turkey Vulture go over. I forgot to say that we saw our
flock about 4:15 pm this afternoon.

Cheers, Charlotte Byers, Edmonds


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Date: 10/1/17 5:09 pm
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] California Scrub-Jay Occurrence in Marysville
I have seen one in the area of 47th Ave. and 3rd St. on multiple times. The
last two times were this summer between 47th and Allen's Creek on 3rd.

Phil Dickinson

On Sun, Oct 1, 2017 at 6:36 PM, Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...> wrote:

> California Scrub-Jays have been present in Marysville for at least 12
> years that I know of. I used to assist with the Marysville area of the
> North County (Snohomish) CBC. There was a house on the south side of
> Jennings Park with feeders. The owners said they regularly had scrub-jays.
> After they sold their house, the feeders were taken down and we were not
> able to find the scrub-jays in that particular neighborhood in subsequent
> years. It has been quite a few years since I have participated in that CBC
> area, but I’m not surprised to hear that the scrub-jays are still being
> seen around Jennings Park neighborhoods. If I recall correctly, we never
> counted more than two.
>
> Carol Riddell
> Edmonds
>
>
> I just saw 2 in my Marysville yard ten minutes ago.
>
> Pam Myers
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Josh Adams <xjoshx at gmail.com
> <http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters>>
> To: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu
> <http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters>>
> Sent: Thu, Sep 28, 2017 10:00 pm
> Subject: [Tweeters] California Scrub-Jay Occurrence
>
> California Scrub-Jays (previously Western Scrub-Jay) seem to be
> continuing their slow march northward. They seem to wander a bit in
> the August-December time period after breeding and I'm not surprised
> to see a flurry of reports from new locations. They are now locally
> common at least to Marysville, with reports as far north as Vancouver
> BC. They seem to older neighborhoods in cities and small towns,
> especially in locations which have planted oak trees which provide
> acorns in the fall. Perhaps there are fewer Steller's Jays in these
> locations to compete with. It will be interesting to see how they
> expand in the years to come.
>
> Josh Adams
> Cathcart, WA
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
>

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Date: 10/1/17 5:09 pm
From: Byers <byers345...>
Subject: [Tweeters] forgot to sign
Hi Tweeters,

I forgot to sign my previous message: Charlotte Byers,
Edmonds




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Date: 10/1/17 5:07 pm
From: Byers <byers345...>
Subject: [Tweeters] TVs in Edmonds
Hi Tweeters,

Bill and I recently moved to Edmonds, where we have a proper
bird viewing area-a nice open back yard surrounded by lots of fir trees and
other shrubby plants. We have a large flock of Chestnut-backed Chickadees
as regular visitors to our feeders as well as Golden-crowned, White-crowned,
and Song Sparrows. I'm hoping we'll see Fox and Lincoln's Sparrows during
the winter. A star bird two days ago was a beautiful Townsend's Warbler.
One type of bird has been missing. Until today we had seen no raptors.
This afternoon Bill spotted a kettle of 16 Turkey Vultures spiraling around
in the sky not too far above our house. We have seen this kind of thing
before in Seattle. Now we're hoping for more observations like this!


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Date: 10/1/17 4:49 pm
From: Pamela Myers <pamelapiwo6813...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] California Scrub-Jay Occurrence in Marysville
I have to amend my last message. At the present moment, I have 3 California Scrub Jays in my Marysville yard.







-----Original Message-----
From: Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...>
To: Tweeters <Tweeters...>
Sent: Sun, Oct 1, 2017 4:37 pm
Subject: [Tweeters] California Scrub-Jay Occurrence in Marysville



California Scrub-Jays have been present in Marysville for at least 12 years that I know of. I used to assist with the Marysville area of the North County (Snohomish) CBC. There was a house on the south side of Jennings Park with feeders. The owners said they regularly had scrub-jays. After they sold their house, the feeders were taken down and we were not able to find the scrub-jays in that particular neighborhood in subsequent years. It has been quite a few years since I have participated in that CBC area, but I’m not surprised to hear that the scrub-jays are still being seen around Jennings Park neighborhoods. If I recall correctly, we never counted more than two.


Carol Riddell
Edmonds




I just saw 2 in my Marysville yard ten minutes ago.

Pam Myers







-----Original Message-----
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx at gmail.com>
To: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Sent: Thu, Sep 28, 2017 10:00 pm
Subject: [Tweeters] California Scrub-Jay Occurrence

California Scrub-Jays (previously Western Scrub-Jay) seem to be
continuing their slow march northward. They seem to wander a bit in
the August-December time period after breeding and I'm not surprised
to see a flurry of reports from new locations. They are now locally
common at least to Marysville, with reports as far north as Vancouver
BC. They seem to older neighborhoods in cities and small towns,
especially in locations which have planted oak trees which provide
acorns in the fall. Perhaps there are fewer Steller's Jays in these
locations to compete with. It will be interesting to see how they
expand in the years to come.

Josh Adams
Cathcart, WA

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Date: 10/1/17 4:45 pm
From: <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Hayton Sagebrush Sparrow
On dike near first inert sign where pvmt turns to gravel...found by Marv Breece

Sent from my iPhone

.
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Date: 10/1/17 4:38 pm
From: Carol Riddell <cariddellwa...>
Subject: [Tweeters] California Scrub-Jay Occurrence in Marysville
California Scrub-Jays have been present in Marysville for at least 12 years that I know of. I used to assist with the Marysville area of the North County (Snohomish) CBC. There was a house on the south side of Jennings Park with feeders. The owners said they regularly had scrub-jays. After they sold their house, the feeders were taken down and we were not able to find the scrub-jays in that particular neighborhood in subsequent years. It has been quite a few years since I have participated in that CBC area, but I’m not surprised to hear that the scrub-jays are still being seen around Jennings Park neighborhoods. If I recall correctly, we never counted more than two.

Carol Riddell
Edmonds


I just saw 2 in my Marysville yard ten minutes ago.

Pam Myers







-----Original Message-----
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx at gmail.com <http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters>>
To: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu <http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters>>
Sent: Thu, Sep 28, 2017 10:00 pm
Subject: [Tweeters] California Scrub-Jay Occurrence

California Scrub-Jays (previously Western Scrub-Jay) seem to be
continuing their slow march northward. They seem to wander a bit in
the August-December time period after breeding and I'm not surprised
to see a flurry of reports from new locations. They are now locally
common at least to Marysville, with reports as far north as Vancouver
BC. They seem to older neighborhoods in cities and small towns,
especially in locations which have planted oak trees which provide
acorns in the fall. Perhaps there are fewer Steller's Jays in these
locations to compete with. It will be interesting to see how they
expand in the years to come.

Josh Adams
Cathcart, WA
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Date: 10/1/17 3:09 pm
From: Phil Kelley <scrubjay323...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fall Migration
Tweets,

300+ Turkey Vultures just flew over Gold Mountain golf complex heading
south. They were in along line that took over a minute to pass. More are
passing overhead right now.

Phil Kelley

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Date: 10/1/17 2:54 pm
From: Diann MacRae <tvulture...>
Subject: [Tweeters] varied thrush
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Date: 10/1/17 2:22 pm
From: Hank H <h.heiberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Stilt Sandpiper @ Redmond Retention Ponds

> Here is a video of the Stilt Sandpiper found yesterday by Gregg Thompson at the Redmond Retention Ponds. At 12:30 today it was in the main pond.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/37390433706/in/photostream/
>
> Here is a link to an album of photos of the Stilt Sandpiper.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/sets/72157687343505574
>
> Thanks to Tom Mansfield for his Tweeters post which alerted us to this bird. We were out the door in under 5 minutes.
>
> Hank & Karen Heiberg
> Lake Joy
> N.E. of Carnation, WA
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPad
> .

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Date: 10/1/17 2:12 pm
From: Pamela Myers <pamelapiwo6813...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] California Scrub-Jay Occurrence
I just saw 2 in my Marysville yard ten minutes ago.

Pam Myers







-----Original Message-----
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx...>
To: Tweeters <tweeters...>
Sent: Thu, Sep 28, 2017 10:00 pm
Subject: [Tweeters] California Scrub-Jay Occurrence

California Scrub-Jays (previously Western Scrub-Jay) seem to be
continuing their slow march northward. They seem to wander a bit in
the August-December time period after breeding and I'm not surprised
to see a flurry of reports from new locations. They are now locally
common at least to Marysville, with reports as far north as Vancouver
BC. They seem to older neighborhoods in cities and small towns,
especially in locations which have planted oak trees which provide
acorns in the fall. Perhaps there are fewer Steller's Jays in these
locations to compete with. It will be interesting to see how they
expand in the years to come.

Josh Adams
Cathcart, WA
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Date: 10/1/17 1:59 pm
From: Jim Lawrence <jlmotmot...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Red-shouldered Hawk
We had a Red-Shouldered Hawk on Whalen Road in the Woodland bottoms between 12:30 and 1:30 today.
Jim LawrenceWoodland, WA
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Date: 10/1/17 12:45 pm
From: Ed Swan <edswan2...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] the sparrows are coming, the sparrows are coming








A tan-striped White-throated Sparrow joined our flock of Golden-crowned, Song, and Fox Sparrows in West Seattle this morning. All three species were singing pretty vigorously last week, is that the first year birds practicing for next spring?Ed


Ed Swan
Nature writer and guide
www.theswancompany.com
<edswan2...>
206.949.3545






On Sun, Oct 1, 2017 at 11:45 AM -0700, "Dennis Paulson" <dennispaulson...> wrote:










Hello, tweets.

Yesterday (9/30) an immature Golden-crowned Sparrow and immature White-crowned Sparrow both paid a visit to our backyard pond, both foraging on what were presumably tiny seeds floating on the surface among all the duckweed and water fern. The day before (9/29) a Fox Sparrow came to the nearby fountain for a drink and bath. These are the first migrant sparrows I’ve seen this fall. Also a lot of juncos have moved into our yard in the past few days.

Dennis Paulson
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Date: 10/1/17 12:33 pm
From: H Heiberg <h.heiberg...>
Subject: Fwd: [Tweeters] Re: Redmond Stilt Sandpiper
Still there at 12:30.

Hank Heiberg

Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Tom Mansfield <birds...>
> Date: October 1, 2017 at 10:14:57 AM PDT
> To: Tweeters <tweeters...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Re: Redmond Stilt Sandpiper
>
> iPhone problem. That's Bear Creek Preschool on NE 95th and 195th NE in Redmond. Tough Code 4 for King.
>
> Tom Mansfield
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Oct 1, 2017, at 10:12 AM, Tom Mansfield <birds...> wrote:
>>
>> As of the time of this post (Sunday 10 am) the Stilt found yesterday by Gregg T continues at the Redmond retention ponds across from Besr Creek Preschool on
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

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Date: 10/1/17 12:28 pm
From: Carol Schulz <carol.schulz50...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Turkey Vulture migrants in Des Moines - Sun, Oct 1.
Hi Tweets:

A kettle of 42 Turkey Vultures just rose up and flew across the north part
of Des Moines. There are lots of tall-looking clouds here now, w/ dark
underneath, and the birds were flying between them and over to the blue sky
that was a little to the east.

The kettle flew through here at about 12:05pm.

Yours, Carol Schulz

Des Moines, WA


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Date: 10/1/17 12:10 pm
From: Ian Paulsen <birdbooker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] The Birdbooker Report
HI ALL:
This week's titles are:

1) National Geographic Field Guide to the Birds of North America, 7th
Edition

https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/2017/09/new-title_27.html

2) The Rise of Marine Mammals

https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/2017/09/new-title_28.html

sincerely
--

Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/
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Date: 10/1/17 11:43 am
From: Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson...>
Subject: [Tweeters] the sparrows are coming, the sparrows are coming
Hello, tweets.

Yesterday (9/30) an immature Golden-crowned Sparrow and immature White-crowned Sparrow both paid a visit to our backyard pond, both foraging on what were presumably tiny seeds floating on the surface among all the duckweed and water fern. The day before (9/29) a Fox Sparrow came to the nearby fountain for a drink and bath. These are the first migrant sparrows Ive seen this fall. Also a lot of juncos have moved into our yard in the past few days.

Dennis Paulson
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Date: 10/1/17 11:43 am
From: Matt Dufort <matt.dufort...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Discovery Park Palm Warbler continues
Hi tweets,

At least one Palm Warbler is still hanging around near the lighthouse this
morning. It was moving around, spending more time in the poplars and
nearby bushes on the east edge of the lighthouse lawn. Also a late Yellow
Warbler in the same area.

A Horned Lark made a brief stop on south beach, but flew off over the sound
out of sight.

There was a great southbound flight of waterbirds as well, with large
numbers Of scoters, teal, and Rhinoceros Auklets.

No sign of the Baird's Sandpiper this morning.

A great day to be out birding!

Matt Dufort
Seattle

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Date: 10/1/17 10:17 am
From: Tom Mansfield <birds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Re: Redmond Stilt Sandpiper
iPhone problem. That's Bear Creek Preschool on NE 95th and 195th NE in Redmond. Tough Code 4 for King.

Tom Mansfield

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 1, 2017, at 10:12 AM, Tom Mansfield <birds...> wrote:
>
> As of the time of this post (Sunday 10 am) the Stilt found yesterday by Gregg T continues at the Redmond retention ponds across from Besr Creek Preschool on
>
> Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 10/1/17 10:15 am
From: Tom Mansfield <birds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Redmond Stilt Sandpiper
As of the time of this post (Sunday 10 am) the Stilt found yesterday by Gregg T continues at the Redmond retention ponds across from Besr Creek Preschool on

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 10/1/17 6:59 am
From: Gene Revelas <grevelas...>
Subject: [Tweeters] September 23rd Westport Seabirds Pelagic Trip - Laysan Albatross, Flesh-footed Shearwater, and Marine Mammals
Hi Tweets -



Apologies for this belated Westport Seabirds trip from last Saturday, September 23. The conditions were comfortable as we made our way past the tip of the Westport Jetty around 6:45 am. There was a little swell that decreased over the course of the day, but light to calm winds for the entire day and little to no spray. As has been the pattern throughout late August and September this year, bird numbers and activity on the continental shelf were low, but we did pick up seven Common Terns, one Pomarine Jaeger, Common Murres, Rhinoceros and Cassin's Auklets, Sooty and Pink-footed Shearwaters, Northern Fulmars, and on the outer shelf, a few Fort-tailed Storm-petrels. A couple hours into our transit due west towards our planned destination, Grays Canyon, Skipper Phil Anderson noticed that a Whiting Boat was fishing at the edge of Willapa Canyon to our southwest, so we redirected our run that way and spent much of the day in Pacific County. The decision was a good one as the Whiting Boat had the most of the birds we would see offshore. This included about 60 Black-footed Albatross, one cooperative Laysan Albatross, a species we have seen on nearly all of our September trips this year, about 200 Pink-foots, 350+ Northern Fulmar, three Buller's Shearwaters, one Short-tailed Shearwater, and one Flesh-footed Shearwater seen briefly but well by folks on the stern. On transit home mostly in Pacific County, we added good looks at a couple of South Polar Skua.



The marine mammal diversity and viewing on this trip was incredible, particularly on the transit out. We ended up with six cetacean species for the day. This included the regular species that we often see, like Harbor and Dall's Porpoise, and six Humpback Whales. One Humpback breached in out in front us for many to see, and one entertained us with repeated fin slapping. Several groups of Pacific White-sided Dolphins were seen, and we estimated a total of 70 animals for the day. A couple of Northern Right-whale Dolphins with their distinctive dorsal finless, black torpedo-like appearance were mixed in one group of the White-sides. Finally, a pod of nine, blunt-headed Risso's Dolphins was seen at the surface close to the boat while many White-sides splashed in the distance. Once again, we ended the trip with a great look at a Bar-tailed Godwit roosting in Westport Marina with the Marbled Godwit flock.


The final numbers and a complete species list have been posted on Westport Seabirds.com and on ebird. Spotters for the trip were Bill Tweit and Gene Revelas. Skipper Phil Anderson and Chris Anderson made sure the trip was a success. There is only one more trip left for 2017, next Saturday, October 7th. But there are spots available on that trip, please check http://westportseabirds.com/ if you are interested in signing up or for more information.

Gene Revelas
Olympia, WA


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Date: 9/30/17 10:40 pm
From: Nagi Aboulenein <nagi.aboulenein...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Red-breasted Sapsucker
Hi Linda - your question about well clustering prompted me to do some modern-style research (aka googling 😊). I came across an article by Laurie Eberhardt at Valparaiso University, that stated that sapsuckers tend to drill their holes one at a time with about 3 days between holes, at about 7 meters high, and within about 1 meter of a branch. They drill the holes in a vertical sequence starting at the bottom of a vertical string, working their way upwards one hole at a time, shifting over to a new vertical sequence at some point. The reason for drilling in that order, as speculated/hypothesized by the author, seems to be that sap dripping from the newest hole then tends to be captured by bark and older holes underneath the current hole, making it easier for the bird to catch it on a later visit.

Given that the holes in the cluster seem to get drilled over quite an extended period (about 1 new hole every 3.1 days), it may take weeks or even months for a full new cluster with a few dozen holes. That would makes it less likely in my mind for it to be related to a reaction of the tree to the drilling of a hole or holes.

But I'm no biologist or sapsucker expert, so take my musings with a big sack of salt 😊.

Good birding.

--
Nagi Aboulenein


On Sep 30, 2017, 22:02 -0700, Linda Phillips <linda_phillips1252...>, wrote:
> I had a 4 woodpecker day Saturday at Wallace Swamp Creek Park in Kenmore.
> RB-Sapsucker was the one I missed but I’ve seen them occasionally over the past few weeks and there are freshly dug wells on one of their favorite trees.
> I was asked recently why they cluster the wells so densely  on the tree, rather than a random well here and there. I had no answer but an idea came to me that I want to check with my fellow Tweeters to see if anyone can confirm or give a reason against my hypothesis.
> The reason the sapsuckers clusters the wells is because damage to the tree makes it send more sap to that area in an attempt to heal, so a new well near the old one will yields more sap than an isolated one. Similar to when humans have an injury the area is red and swollen because blood rushes to the area.
> What do you think?
>
> Linda Phillips
> Kenmore
>
> Sent from Mail for Windows 10
>

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Date: 9/30/17 10:03 pm
From: Linda Phillips <linda_phillips1252...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Red-breasted Sapsucker
I had a 4 woodpecker day Saturday at Wallace Swamp Creek Park in Kenmore.
RB-Sapsucker was the one I missed but Ive seen them occasionally over the past few weeks and there are freshly dug wells on one of their favorite trees.
I was asked recently why they cluster the wells so densely on the tree, rather than a random well here and there. I had no answer but an idea came to me that I want to check with my fellow Tweeters to see if anyone can confirm or give a reason against my hypothesis.
The reason the sapsuckers clusters the wells is because damage to the tree makes it send more sap to that area in an attempt to heal, so a new well near the old one will yields more sap than an isolated one. Similar to when humans have an injury the area is red and swollen because blood rushes to the area.
What do you think?

Linda Phillips
Kenmore

Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10


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Date: 9/30/17 6:09 pm
From: Kristi Hein <khc...>
Subject: [Tweeters] migrating geese over Samish Flats -- and Varied Thrush
Hi Tweeters,

This afternoon as we were driving north on Bayview-Edison Road, we
spotted a large (hundreds) flock of geese flying southward, very high.
Probably Snow Geese, from the formation (or rather thestreaming, fluid
lack of formation), but too high to tell. First big migration we've seen
this fall.

In other news (sad), an Anacortes friend sent photos of a Varied Thrush
killed in a windowstrike. Sad-- and early for a VATH arrival. I hope
it's a sign that we'll have here them again this winter, because we had
/none/ last winter.

Good birding,
Kristi Hein

Anacortes
khc
at
picturesandwords.com


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Date: 9/30/17 5:24 pm
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Battle Ground, Clark County yard birding
Tweeters,

I had a relaxing day at home with my eyes to the sky from my Battle Ground,
Clark County today:

Greater-white-fronted Goose - 1350 (all flying high and in a straight line
heading south. I was able to scope most of them and all the ones that I
saw were Greater white-fronted although I wouldn't rule out the possibility
that there were other species (Cackling, maybe a few Snow) mixed in. All
geese were in about a 1/3-1/2 mile wide band so I was lucky that they chose
to line up over my house!- FOY for county and yard
Turkey Vulture - 51
Hairy Woodpecker - 1 (FOY - yard)
Common Bushtit - 42 (in one flock!)
Golden-crowned Kinglet - 2 (FOY - yard)
Swainson's Thrush - 3 (2 nocturnal migrants)
Black-throated Gray Warbler - 1
Orange-crowned Warbler - 1
Warbling Vireo - 1
Western Tanager - 1
American Pipit - 2 (FOY - yard)

Hoping for more magic tomorrow.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward.

Jim

--
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
<jdanzenbaker...>

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Date: 9/30/17 4:13 pm
From: Hubbell <ldhubbell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Beauty and The Beast - Update

Tweeters,

Thanks to Eric Kowalczyk for pointing out the eyestripe on the beautiful little bird in my post. My apologies to all my readers. I am now of the opinion that the bird is actually the yellow, Pacific Coast version of an orange-crowned warbler. Please excuse my error.

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2017/09/beauty-and-beast.html <https://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2017/09/beauty-and-beast.html>

Thank you for your patience!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net
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Date: 9/30/17 3:33 pm
From: Maxine Reid <max2012mike...>
Subject: [Tweeters] 1 Mute swan at stanwood STPond,30 sept.2017
Seen today at the east end of the pond.
Large swan with orange bill and black knob at end.
Also, a female yellow headed blackbird seen with a flock of red winged blackbirds
At hayton farms wildlife area,skagit county
Cheer,Maxine Reid

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Date: 9/30/17 3:21 pm
From: <notcalm...>
Subject: [Tweeters] “Bold Eagles: Angry Birds Are Ripping Drones Out of the Sky “
Tweeters,
Front page article in Wall Street Journal today, Saturday:



“Bold Eagles: Angry Birds Are Ripping Drones Out of the Sky “



Interesting, includes a Wedge-tailed eagle in Australia punching out of the sky an $80,000 drone.



Dan Reiff

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Date: 9/30/17 1:45 pm
From: Louis Kreemer <lpkreemer...>
Subject: [Tweeters] PAWA and BASA still at Discovery
Hi Tweeters,

There were two Palm Warblers and the Baird's Sandpiper still at Discovery
Park this morning. Also a California Scrub-Jay.

Louis Kreemer
Seattle

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Date: 9/30/17 1:08 pm
From: Hubbell <ldhubbell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Beauty and The Beast
Tweeters,

This week I happened across a yellow warbler and a river otter both of which were eating. I suspect you will find one a bit more beautiful and attractive than the other. I hope you enjoy the post!

http://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2017/09/beauty-and-beast.html <http://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2017/09/beauty-and-beast.html>

Have a great day on Union Bay, where nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net
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Date: 9/30/17 12:31 pm
From: ck park <travelgirl.fics...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Birds of the Camargue and northern Pyrenees--out of area bird trip report
i was in that area about a year ago, and thoroughly enjoyed the sites, the
birds, the people, and the food... i can also heartily recommend the B&B i
stayed at as well, about as nice an experience as one could have...

00 caren
ParkGallery.org
george davis creek, north fork

On Fri, Sep 29, 2017 at 9:13 PM, Byers <byers345...> wrote:

> Hello Tweeters,
>
> Earlier this month Bill and I spent about 10 days in
> France. At first we were based near Arles and birded in the
> Camargue—places like Salin de Giraud and Etang de Vaccarayes. North of
> there we spent time looking at an interesting wasteland that used to be the
> delta of the river Durance. Now it is a stony plain. After a few days we
> decamped and moved to the northern Pyrenees to the village of Gèdre. From
> there we birded up the valley, reaching heights above 6000 ft on a day we
> hiked a trail that took us over the Pyrenees and into Spain. Most of the
> birds we saw, about 130 in all, were not new to us because we had birded in
> Europe before. But it was wonderful to be in France and see the area
> around Arles and Gèdre, places we had not visited before. Two of the new
> birds for us were Eurasian Dotterel in the Crau and Alpine Accenor high in
> the Pyrenees. The link below is just the birds we got pictures of—only
> about 38.
>
>
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/29258421@N07/albums/72157688949289116
>
>
>
> The next set of pictures is just scenic shots and a few mammals. There
> are a few pictures of bikers racing up the Col du Tourmalet, one of the
> hard parts of the Tour de France:
>
>
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/29258421@N07/albums/72157686483200831
>
>
>
> The season was quickly turning from summer into fall there. When we
> arrived, it was quite warm, but the Pyrenees were much cooler. In
> Toulouse, when we left, it was raining.
>
>
>
> I hope you enjoy a look at some of these photos. Charlotte Byers, now in
> Edmonds
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
>

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Date: 9/30/17 12:05 pm
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...>
Subject: [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Oct. 1, 2017
Hey, Tweeters,

Here are the BirdNote stories from last week:
* How Similar Is Birdsong to Human Music?
http://bit.ly/2yNt4By
* Bird in Flight, Strong but Light
http://bit.ly/15Bm6JM
* Great Horned Owl Family in Autumn
http://bit.ly/2xJmhIS
* What in the World Is a Hoopoe?
http://bit.ly/2wGUOtX
* Celebrating Service on Nat’l Public Lands Day
http://bit.ly/16034mf
* Fastest Bird on Two Legs - What Is It?
http://bit.ly/2hBdW5X
* Birding Trails - and National Public Lands Day
http://bit.ly/P8lfvd
———————————————
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2xMSOQ2
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:<info...>
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org
You'll find nearly 1500 episodes and nearly 1000 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote _______________________________________________
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Date: 9/29/17 9:18 pm
From: Byers <byers345...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Birds of the Camargue and northern Pyrenees--out of area bird trip report
Hello Tweeters,

Earlier this month Bill and I spent about 10 days in France.
At first we were based near Arles and birded in the Camargueplaces like
Salin de Giraud and Etang de Vaccarayes. North of there we spent time
looking at an interesting wasteland that used to be the delta of the river
Durance. Now it is a stony plain. After a few days we decamped and moved
to the northern Pyrenees to the village of Gdre. From there we birded up
the valley, reaching heights above 6000 ft on a day we hiked a trail that
took us over the Pyrenees and into Spain. Most of the birds we saw, about
130 in all, were not new to us because we had birded in Europe before. But
it was wonderful to be in France and see the area around Arles and Gdre,
places we had not visited before. Two of the new birds for us were Eurasian
Dotterel in the Crau and Alpine Accenor high in the Pyrenees. The link
below is just the birds we got pictures ofonly about 38.



https://www.flickr.com/photos/29258421@N07/albums/72157688949289116



The next set of pictures is just scenic shots and a few mammals. There are
a few pictures of bikers racing up the Col du Tourmalet, one of the hard
parts of the Tour de France:



https://www.flickr.com/photos/29258421@N07/albums/72157686483200831



The season was quickly turning from summer into fall there. When we
arrived, it was quite warm, but the Pyrenees were much cooler. In Toulouse,
when we left, it was raining.



I hope you enjoy a look at some of these photos. Charlotte Byers, now in
Edmonds


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Date: 9/29/17 7:21 pm
From: Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Field guides
In 1975, my dad gave me Peterson's Field Guide to Western Birds (copyright 1961).  It got me through college Ornithology, and has been a constant companion for decades.  Today, I bought the 2016 edition of Sibley Birds West.  I feel a bit like a traitor, but am willing to try something new!  Heading to Yellowstone on Saturday, taking both the new Sibley and the old Peterson stand by.  :-)
Peggy MundyBothell, WA
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Date: 9/29/17 4:16 pm
From: Roger Moyer <rogermoyer1...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Re: Thoughts on Skamania County Jay and Lewis's Woodpecker migration
I have not observed the migration spoken of here. However, in March about 15-20 years ago my brother and I were up into the foothills on the east side of Mt. Hood and I saw well over 1000 Lewis's Woodpeckers in an area of maybe 5 square miles. There were groups of 15-20 in almost every small stand of oak trees. I have never seen woodpeckers gather together like that to spend the winter.

Roger Moyer


________________________________
From: <tweeters-bounces...> <tweeters-bounces...> on behalf of Bob Hansen <bobhansen...>
Sent: Friday, September 29, 2017 3:36 PM
To: Wilson Cady
Cc: Jan Bragg; <obol...>; Tweeters Posting; John Davis; Cathy Flick
Subject: [Tweeters] Re: Thoughts on Skamania County Jay and Lewis's Woodpecker migration

Wilson and others,

I have observed this Fall jay migration on at least two separate times and places in Klickitat County.

The first observation by Stuart Johnston and I being in the Fall about 5 to 10 years ago along Old Highway 8 near my Lyle home. with the Stellar's Jays flying singularly west to east about 100 meters apart. In many, if not most or all cases, stopping at the same trees about 100-200 meters apart. In other words.. it was not a continuous flight pattern, but an intermittent one.

The second observation of this phenomena was with Jan Bragg along Rock Creek Road in east-central Klickitat County on this years September 16th Fall Migration Count. This time it was a mixed flock of Stellars and California Scrub-Jays It seems to me the Stellars Jays out numbered the California Scrub-Jays two or three to one. There were also Lewiss Woodpeckers in the area, but I dont think we associated them with the jay migration phenomena. This section of Rock Creek is mostly north-south and the jays were flying/migrating from south to north.

I am not sure how many birds were involved in either case,,, as I am not sure we were there when they migration started and I am not sure we waited until it abated. I think I have I also observed smaller versions of the same phenomena but they were orders of magnitude less.

Hope this helps,
Bob

On Sep 29, 2017, at 1:49 PM, Wilson Cady <gorgebirds...><mailto:<gorgebirds...>> wrote:


After looking at the recent reports from three different days at the St. Cloud Recreation Area in Skamania County, I decided to voice some thoughts on the amazing movement of jays and Lewis's Woodpeckers seen there. The reports came from Sept. 24, 26, and 27th when a total of 87 LEWIS'S WOODPECKERS, 1,226 STELLER'S JAYS, and 230 CALIFORNIA SCRUB-JAYS were counted flying east up the Columbia River Gorge. I have seen migrant flocks of Steller's Jays in several spots including at our place in Skamania County and Vancouver Lake, but never in the numbers at St. Cloud. I cannot attribute the jay movement to the still smoldering fires in the Columbia Gorge, as in one hour on Oct. 1, 2015, Les Carlson and I counted 336 Steller's Jays flying east over St. Cloud. The strange thing is that these migrant birds are always silent, I only heard a couple of Scrub-Jays chattering at St. Cloud but they might be a resident pair. I have no idea where these birds are coming from, the Steller's Jays could be from anywhere, but my question is where are all of the Scrub-Jays and Lewis's Woodpeckers coming from? Since that is a lot of Scrub-Jays for Washington and Lewis's Woodpeckers are rare in Western Washington, I can only surmise that they are coming north up the Willamette Valley and then perhaps up the Gorge to the oak forests around Klickitat and Hood River Counties. And as the woodpeckers are traveling with the jays I would assume that the other jays are also coming from the south. I need to find out what the acorn crop is like up there this year and if that might be drawing them. Does anyone else have any ideas or opinions on this movement of birds?


Wilson Cady
Columbia River Gorge, WA


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Date: 9/29/17 3:38 pm
From: Bob Hansen <bobhansen...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Re: Thoughts on Skamania County Jay and Lewis's Woodpecker migration
Wilson and others,

I have observed this Fall jay migration on at least two separate times and places in Klickitat County.

The first observation by Stuart Johnston and I being in the Fall about 5 to 10 years ago along Old Highway 8 near my Lyle home. … with the Stellar's Jays flying singularly west to east about 100 meters apart. In many, if not most or all cases, stopping at the same trees about 100-200 meters apart. In other words.. it was not a continuous flight pattern, but an intermittent one.

The second observation of this phenomena was with Jan Bragg along Rock Creek Road in east-central Klickitat County on this year’s September 16th Fall Migration Count. This time it was a mixed flock of Stellar’s and California Scrub-Jays… It seems to me the Stellar’s Jays out numbered the California Scrub-Jays two or three to one. There were also Lewis’s Woodpeckers in the area, but I don’t think we associated them with the jay migration phenomena. This section of Rock Creek is mostly north-south and the jays were flying/migrating from south to north.

I am not sure how many birds were involved in either case,,, as I am not sure we were there when they migration started and I am not sure we waited until it abated. I think I have I also observed smaller versions of the same phenomena… but they were orders of magnitude less.

Hope this helps,
Bob

> On Sep 29, 2017, at 1:49 PM, Wilson Cady <gorgebirds...> wrote:
>
>
> After looking at the recent reports from three different days at the St. Cloud Recreation Area in Skamania County, I decided to voice some thoughts on the amazing movement of jays and Lewis's Woodpeckers seen there. The reports came from Sept. 24, 26, and 27th when a total of 87 LEWIS'S WOODPECKERS, 1,226 STELLER'S JAYS, and 230 CALIFORNIA SCRUB-JAYS were counted flying east up the Columbia River Gorge. I have seen migrant flocks of Steller's Jays in several spots including at our place in Skamania County and Vancouver Lake, but never in the numbers at St. Cloud. I cannot attribute the jay movement to the still smoldering fires in the Columbia Gorge, as in one hour on Oct. 1, 2015, Les Carlson and I counted 336 Steller's Jays flying east over St. Cloud. The strange thing is that these migrant birds are always silent, I only heard a couple of Scrub-Jays chattering at St. Cloud but they might be a resident pair. I have no idea where these birds are coming from, the Steller's Jays could be from anywhere, but my question is where are all of the Scrub-Jays and Lewis's Woodpeckers coming from? Since that is a lot of Scrub-Jays for Washington and Lewis's Woodpeckers are rare in Western Washington, I can only surmise that they are coming north up the Willamette Valley and then perhaps up the Gorge to the oak forests around Klickitat and Hood River Counties. And as the woodpeckers are traveling with the jays I would assume that the other jays are also coming from the south. I need to find out what the acorn crop is like up there this year and if that might be drawing them. Does anyone else have any ideas or opinions on this movement of birds?
>
>
> Wilson Cady
> Columbia River Gorge, WA


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Date: 9/29/17 2:13 pm
From: Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Say's Phoebe in Beacon Hill yesterday
Hi Jeff - Your sighting of Say's Phoebe on Beacon Hill is worth posting
and thanks for doing so. Say's Phoebes are by no means a dime a dozen on
the west side of the Cascades!

There are a couple of places where you can easily check to see the
seasonal abundance/frequency of bird species in Washington State:

1.  eBird: Go to http://eBird.org and click on "Explore Data" and then
click on "Bar Charts."  Pick Washington State and then King County and
you will be shown a bar chart showing the frequency by month of all the
species seen in King County.


2. The annotated checklist found in A Birder's Guide to Washington,
Second Edition.  Here is what it says about Say's Phoebe west of the
Cascades:

"Rare but regular in spring migration west of Cascades, casual in winter."

You can view this annotated checklist at:
http://wabirdguide.org/annotated-checklist/


3. The bar graphs of seasonal abundance found also in A Birder's Guide
to Washington, Second Edition. These are based on years of record
keeping maintained by Washington Ornithological Society (WOS). These
records are currently maintained for WOS by Ryan Merrill.

You can view these bar graphs at: http://wabirdguide.org/bar-graphs/


4. Birdweb. This is a rich trove of information about the state's
species created by Seattle Audubon Society.

You can see this at: http://www.birdweb.org/Birdweb/bird/says_phoebe

You might start by clicking on the "Status" and "Find in Washington"
tabs of this page.  BirdWeb calls Say's Phoebe "rare" in March and April
in the Puget Trough and generally not present other months of the year.
Just based on my general impression, I believe Say's Phoebe has become
more common -- not common certainly but more common than in the past --
during migration.

Jane Hadley

Seattle, WA





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Date: 9/29/17 1:53 pm
From: Wilson Cady <gorgebirds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Thoughts on Skamania County Jay and Lewis's Woodpecker migration
After looking at the recent reports from three different days at the St. Cloud Recreation Area in Skamania County, I decided to voice some thoughts on the amazing movement of jays and Lewis's Woodpeckers seen there. The reports came from Sept. 24, 26, and 27th when a total of 87 LEWIS'S WOODPECKERS, 1,226 STELLER'S JAYS, and 230 CALIFORNIA SCRUB-JAYS were counted flying east up the Columbia River Gorge. I have seen migrant flocks of Steller's Jays in several spots including at our place in Skamania County and Vancouver Lake, but never in the numbers at St. Cloud. I cannot attribute the jay movement to the still smoldering fires in the Columbia Gorge, as in one hour on Oct. 1, 2015, Les Carlson and I counted 336 Steller's Jays flying east over St. Cloud. The strange thing is that these migrant birds are always silent, I only heard a couple of Scrub-Jays chattering at St. Cloud but they might be a resident pair. I have no idea where these birds are coming from, the Steller's Jays could be from anywhere, but my question is where are all of the Scrub-Jays and Lewis's Woodpeckers coming from? Since that is a lot of Scrub-Jays for Washington and Lewis's Woodpeckers are rare in Western Washington, I can only surmise that they are coming north up the Willamette Valley and then perhaps up the Gorge to the oak forests around Klickitat and Hood River Counties. And as the woodpeckers are traveling with the jays I would assume that the other jays are also coming from the south. I need to find out what the acorn crop is like up there this year and if that might be drawing them. Does anyone else have any ideas or opinions on this movement of birds? Wilson Cady
Columbia River Gorge, WA
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Date: 9/29/17 12:48 pm
From: James Rufo Hill <rufo.hill...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Say's Phoebe in Beacon Hill yesterday
Glad you shared the info, Jeff. I watched a Say's Phoebe cross Central
Puget Sound the other morning. It landed atop an eastbound ferry somewhere
around Bainbridge Island's Eagle Harbor, started calling halfway through
the journey, and then took off in the direction of Duwamish Head (once it
looked to be in range, apparently). Never know what you'll find out there.
~ James

On Fri, Sep 29, 2017 at 10:35 AM, Jeff Birek <jeff.birek...> wrote:

> Apologize if this is not worthy of posting. I moved from Colorado this
> summer and I'm still getting a bearing on what is interesting around here!
> Also, sorry this is late. I had trouble getting setup on the list serve
> yesterday.
>
> Yesterday afternoon I saw a Say's Phoebe on the alley south of S Atlantic
> St between 13th Ave S and 12th Ave S. I believe I heard this bird call a
> couple days before but I had written it off as the local starlings. Here's
> the checklist with photo http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39446575
>
> Happy birding!
>
> Jeff Birek
> North Beacon Hill
> Seattle
>
> Jeff Birek
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
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Date: 9/29/17 10:38 am
From: Jeff Birek <jeff.birek...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Say's Phoebe in Beacon Hill yesterday
Apologize if this is not worthy of posting. I moved from Colorado this
summer and I'm still getting a bearing on what is interesting around here!
Also, sorry this is late. I had trouble getting setup on the list serve
yesterday.

Yesterday afternoon I saw a Say's Phoebe on the alley south of S Atlantic
St between 13th Ave S and 12th Ave S. I believe I heard this bird call a
couple days before but I had written it off as the local starlings. Here's
the checklist with photo http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39446575

Happy birding!

Jeff Birek
North Beacon Hill
Seattle

Jeff Birek

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Date: 9/29/17 10:37 am
From: Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Palm Warbler at Discovery Park
A few minutes ago, I was fondly recalling the Palm Warbler that I had found at Discovery Park 3 years ago today, in the exact same spot on West Point -- what a coincidence!

Happy birding, Joshua Glant
Mercer Island, WA

> On Sep 29, 2017, at 9:49 AM, Matt Dufort <matt.dufort...> wrote:
>
> Hi tweets,
>
> There's a Palm Warbler at Discovery Park, foraging among the rocks and lawn near the lighthouse.
>
> Also a Baird's Sandpiper on north beach, hanging out with the Killdeer.
>
> Don't let the rain get you down!
>
> Good birding,
> Matt Dufort
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
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Date: 9/29/17 9:51 am
From: Matt Dufort <matt.dufort...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Palm Warbler at Discovery Park
Hi tweets,

There's a Palm Warbler at Discovery Park, foraging among the rocks and lawn
near the lighthouse.

Also a Baird's Sandpiper on north beach, hanging out with the Killdeer.

Don't let the rain get you down!

Good birding,
Matt Dufort

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Date: 9/29/17 8:29 am
From: Stewart Wechsler <ecostewart...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Might someone want to map our expanding Scrub Jay population?
Thank you Ryan!

I had a suspicion that there was already a system out there that I wasn't
using. I find the Scrub Jay especially interesting now because it is one
that is still becoming more common, and being sighted in more places, and
more times, in the area where I live, and where I roughly keep track of
what is being seen. While their range and population expansion is still
interesting, those Anna's Hummers are old history for me and my area. It
seems like a long time ago, when they seem to have pretty much filled up
all of the territories in Seattle, where I spend most of my time.

-Stewart

On Wed, Sep 27, 2017 at 8:37 AM, Ryan Merrill <rjm284...> wrote:

> This is easy to do in eBird and I don't believe you need an account to
> look at the maps. This link should go to a map of area sightings for
> California Scrub-Jay in 2016. You can adjust the date range or species at
> the top of the page.
>
> http://ebird.org/ebird/map/cowscj1?neg=true&env.minX=-124.
> 91801257343752&env.minY=47.01197890796433&env.maxX=-118.
> 46903796406252&env.maxY=49.14027872848674&zh=true&gp=true
> &ev=Z&mr=1-12&bmo=1&emo=12&yr=range&byr=2016&eyr=2016
>
> Anna's Hummingbird is another species that is interesting to look at the
> changes in range over the years as they have been expanding.
>
> Good birding,
> Ryan Merrill
> Seattle
>
>
>
>> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
>> From: Stewart Wechsler <ecostewart...>
>> Date: Wed, Sep 27, 2017 at 8:19 AM
>> Subject: [Tweeters] Might someone want to map our expanding Scrub Jay
>> population?
>> To: <tweeters...>
>>
>>
>> Has anyone mapped the sightings of Scrub Jays in Washington and British
>> Columbia? While I no longer count Scrub Jays in Seattle as rarities, I
>> still count sightings, in areas I don't regularly see them, as notable, and
>> a possible indication of a continuing expansion of their population, and
>> possible range. I would love to see a map of area sightings, where I could
>> click and see where they were seen one year, then click again to see where
>> they were seen the next year. (I realize that as the Scrub Jays become
>> more common, fewer people would add their sightings to such a map, so
>> people looking at such a map would have to account for that.)
>>
>> I will add that here in Seattle, I have been regularly able to see them
>> and hear them for a number of years, in Georgetown, south of Boeing Field.
>> Also, just 2 or 3 days ago, I had, what I call a "notable sighting" a block
>> from my apartment, near the West Seattle "Junction" (by California Ave SW &
>> SW Alaska), an area I may, or may not, have seen them once before.
>>
>> After repeatedly seeing them in Georgetown, I came to see that
>> neighborhood, in a flat flood plain of the Duwamish River, with sandier
>> soils than most of Seattle, as more like some scrub-lands of California,
>> where this species has been spreading north from over recent decades.
>>
>> -Stewart
>> www.stewardshipadventures.com
>> 206 932-7225 <%28206%29%20932-7225>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>>
>>
>>
>

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Date: 9/29/17 4:36 am
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2017-09-28
Tweeters -

The last warm day before the rains at Marymoor turned out to be birdy, but a little lackluster — none of the craziness of last week’s show — we were missing Michael, and it seems he took the rarities with him. Nevertheless, we had a lot of birds flying most all day - nothing like the quiet days of earlier in the month.

Highlights:

Western Grebe - 2 on lake
Mourning Dove - 1 in fields offering good views
Wilson’s Snipe - a few flying and grunting pre-dawn — our first of the fall
Virginia Rail - 5 — including one that came out for brief views at the lake viewing platform
Steller’s Jay - 30+ - we seemed to have a steady movement that was more than our usual fall movement of Steller’s gathering nuts.
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - several back, including at least attempts at song
Orange-crowned Warbler - 2-3
Yellow-rumped Warblers - many many moving through
Black-throated Gray Warbler - 2-3

Missing today , many species — no swallows, no gulls, not many ducks, and no solid pipits [or larks or longspurs], despite quite a bit of effort.

For the day, we came up with 49 species [down 27 from last week's total!]

Good birding,

Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA

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Date: 9/28/17 10:01 pm
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx...>
Subject: [Tweeters] California Scrub-Jay Occurrence
California Scrub-Jays (previously Western Scrub-Jay) seem to be
continuing their slow march northward. They seem to wander a bit in
the August-December time period after breeding and I'm not surprised
to see a flurry of reports from new locations. They are now locally
common at least to Marysville, with reports as far north as Vancouver
BC. They seem to older neighborhoods in cities and small towns,
especially in locations which have planted oak trees which provide
acorns in the fall. Perhaps there are fewer Steller's Jays in these
locations to compete with. It will be interesting to see how they
expand in the years to come.

Josh Adams
Cathcart, WA
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Date: 9/28/17 6:47 pm
From: <festuca...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Nisqually eBird Report for 27th Sept.
Hi all - I have been contacted by a couple birders, and apparently had some issues with "sharing" the eBird report with those who were on this Wednesday's weekly Nisqually NWR bird walk.

If you were on the walk, and haven't received the eBird sharing request, please let me know and I will re-send it. I apologize for any delay.

Thanks again for a fun day birding,
Jon. Anderson
OlyWA
festuca At comcast dit net

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Date: 9/28/17 5:57 pm
From: Maxine Reid <baconmf...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Re : 3 golden plovers at Tulalip
Hi tweets
With further discussion and analysis,
I'm fairly confident of 1 adult pacific golden plover and 2 juvenile American
Golden plovers.
Pictures are on ebird .(Snohomish county reports.)
Comments welcomed.
Cheers,Maxine Reid

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Date: 9/28/17 4:05 pm
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] 3 golden plovers at Tulalip today
wow! so you roll out of bed and see golden plovers???

On Thu, Sep 28, 2017 at 3:41 PM, Maxine Reid <baconmf...> wrote:

> Hi tweets
> Today I discovered 3 of these on the mini spit about 150 yards from our
> house.
> There was a huge flock of black bellied plovers who were spoked from the
> main
> Spit earlier by some people.Some retreated to the closer spit.
> Pictures of the golden state were taken.There was 1 adult and 2 juveniles .
> These will be on ebird later today.
> Dennis Paulson kindly examined the pictures and confirmed at least 1
> juvenile
> To be an American golden plover. Photo was inadequate for ID of the adult.
> THIS IS A DEFNITE high count for golden plovers at Tulalip. On September
> 17,
> 2015 there were 2 American golden plovers for a previous high count.
> Cheers and good birding,
> Maxine Reid
> Ps,2 red knots on the spit yesterday
>
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPad
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Date: 9/28/17 3:44 pm
From: Maxine Reid <baconmf...>
Subject: [Tweeters] 3 golden plovers at Tulalip today
Hi tweets
Today I discovered 3 of these on the mini spit about 150 yards from our house.
There was a huge flock of black bellied plovers who were spoked from the main
Spit earlier by some people.Some retreated to the closer spit.
Pictures of the golden state were taken.There was 1 adult and 2 juveniles .
These will be on ebird later today.
Dennis Paulson kindly examined the pictures and confirmed at least 1 juvenile
To be an American golden plover. Photo was inadequate for ID of the adult.
THIS IS A DEFNITE high count for golden plovers at Tulalip. On September 17,
2015 there were 2 American golden plovers for a previous high count.
Cheers and good birding,
Maxine Reid
Ps,2 red knots on the spit yesterday




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Date: 9/28/17 8:05 am
From: <festuca...>
Subject: [Tweeters] eBird Report - Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually NWR, Sep 27, 2017
Hi all - Following up on Phil Kelley's post, here's the final eBird report from the weekly Wednesday bird walk at Nisqually Refuge. We had a high slack tide as we walked out the estuary boardwalk, but didn't pick up too many new species.

All-in-all, it was a beautiful early Autumn day; a time well-spent with birds and birders.

Jon. Anderson
OIyWA

----- Original Message -----

From: <ebird-checklist...>
Sent: Wednesday, September 27, 2017 5:40:03 PM
Subject: eBird Report - Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually NWR, Sep 27, 2017

Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually NWR, Thurston, Washington, US
Sep 27, 2017 8:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling - 4.0 mile(s)
Comments:
Wednesday walk on a beautiful clear & sunny early Autumn day. There was a little smoke over the refuge first thing in the morning, but it dissipated. Mostly calm with a light 3-5 knot northerly breeze, 50-80 °F. There was a 11.54-foot high tide at 12:18 p.m. Mammals seen included a Coyote, River Otter, an Eastern Grey Squirrel carrying a mouthful of Bigleaf maple seeds, Townsend's Chipmunk, and Harbor Seals.
73 species (+14 other taxa)

Cackling Goose (Branta hutchinsii) 80
Cackling Goose (minima) (Branta hutchinsii minima) 160
Canada Goose (moffitti/maxima) (Branta canadensis moffitti/maxima) 70
Northern Shoveler (Spatula clypeata) 1
Gadwall (Mareca strepera) 2
American Wigeon (Mareca americana) 175
Mallard (Northern) (Anas platyrhynchos platyrhynchos/conboschas) 275
Northern Pintail (Anas acuta) 115
Green-winged Teal (Anas crecca) 15
dabbling duck sp. (Anas sp.) 225 Flushed from near mouth of river; too far to identify
Hooded Merganser (Lophodytes cucullatus) 2
Common Merganser (Mergus merganser) 32
Pied-billed Grebe (Podilymbus podiceps) 1
Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) 125
cormorant sp. (Phalacrocoracidae sp.) 50
American Bittern (Botaurus lentiginosus) 1 In cattail marsh
Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) 30
Northern Harrier (Circus hudsonius) 1
Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) 1
Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) 4
Red-tailed Hawk (calurus/alascensis) (Buteo jamaicensis calurus/alascensis) 2
Sora (Porzana carolina) 1 Cattail marsh near base of estuary boardwalk
Black-bellied Plover (Pluvialis squatarola) 17 * Flagged as high count. Counted in one flock north of the dike in the surge plain
Killdeer (Charadrius vociferus) 2
Least Sandpiper (Calidris minutilla) 12
Pectoral Sandpiper (Calidris melanotos) 3
Western Sandpiper (Calidris mauri) 6
peep sp. (Calidris sp. (peep sp.)) 45
Short-billed Dowitcher (Limnodromus griseus) 3
Wilson's Snipe (Gallinago delicata) 3
Spotted Sandpiper (Actitis macularius) 1 West bank of McAllister Creek
Greater Yellowlegs (Tringa melanoleuca) 7
Ring-billed Gull (Larus delawarensis) 145
California Gull (Larus californicus) 6
Glaucous-winged Gull (Larus glaucescens) 8
Western/Glaucous-winged Gull (Larus occidentalis/glaucescens) 10
gull sp. (Larinae sp.) 150
Caspian Tern (Hydroprogne caspia) 4
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) (Columba livia (Feral Pigeon)) 2
Band-tailed Pigeon (Patagioenas fasciata) 6 Flying up McAllister Creek
Anna's Hummingbird (Calypte anna) 1
hummingbird sp. (Trochilidae sp.) 1
Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) 3
Red-breasted Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus ruber) 1
Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens) 1
Downy Woodpecker (Pacific) (Picoides pubescens gairdnerii/turati) 1
Hairy Woodpecker (Pacific) (Picoides villosus [harrisi Group]) 1
Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus) 1
Northern Flicker (Red-shafted) (Colaptes auratus [cafer Group]) 5
Pileated Woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus) 1
American Kestrel (Falco sparverius) 1 Female in usual snag north of the dike
Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) 1
diurnal raptor sp. (Accipitriformes/Falconiformes sp.) 1 Accipiter? Went into woods north of Visitors' Center pond
Steller's Jay (Coastal) (Cyanocitta stelleri [stelleri Group]) 3
American/Northwestern Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos/caurinus) 6
Common Raven (Corvus corax) 1
Violet-green Swallow (Tachycineta thalassina) 2
Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica) 105
Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) 18
Chestnut-backed Chickadee (Poecile rufescens) 6
Brown Creeper (Certhia americana) 3
Pacific Wren (Troglodytes pacificus) 4
Bewick's Wren (Thryomanes bewickii) 6
Golden-crowned Kinglet (Regulus satrapa) 5
Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula) 2
American Robin (Turdus migratorius) 36
Varied Thrush (Ixoreus naevius) 1 Vocalized along slough on service road west of orchard
European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) 120
American Pipit (Anthus rubescens) 6
Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum) 5
Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas) 24
Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia) 1
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Setophaga coronata) 12
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) (Setophaga coronata coronata) 2
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Audubon's) (Setophaga coronata auduboni) 2
warbler sp. (Parulidae sp.) (Parulidae sp.) 6 In mixed flocks
Fox Sparrow (Sooty) (Passerella iliaca [unalaschcensis Group]) 2
Dark-eyed Junco (Oregon) (Junco hyemalis [oreganus Group]) 5
White-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys) 3 Immatures
Golden-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia atricapilla) 20
Savannah Sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis) 16 Most along dike and estuary boardwalk
Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) 35
Lincoln's Sparrow (Melospiza lincolnii) 3
Spotted Towhee (oregonus Group) (Pipilo maculatus [oregonus Group]) 4
Western Meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta) 2 Near Dike at Leschi slough
Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) 36
American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis) 22

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/pnw/view/checklist/S39437261

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (/content/nw)



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Date: 9/27/17 9:17 pm
From: Matt Dufort <matt.dufort...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Black Vulture on Vancouver Island
Hi tweets,

Just a heads-up, especially to folks on the Olympic Peninsula, that a Black
Vulture was seen with Turkey Vultures at the south tip of Vancouver Island
today. This bird will very likely migrate through Washington, probably in
the next several days. It would be a good idea to check those Turkey
Vulture kettles!

This species is not on the Washington state checklist, and I don't believe
there are any reports for the state.

Good birding,
Matt Dufort.

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Date: 9/27/17 8:04 pm
From: Phil Kelley <scrubjay323...>
Subject: [Tweeters] NIsqually NWR 9/27/17
Tweets,

Today 25 of us had a nice day at Nisqually. It was cool and smoky at
the start but soon cleared and turned out clear and warm. We had a
11.06 high tide at 12:15 and there was water in some of the interior
ponds so waterfowl are coming back.

We got off to a great start with a RIVER OTTER in the pond at the
visitor center.

Other highlights included a flock of BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS, a first of
the year, and some peeps out on the surge plane. We also had good
looks at a PILIATED WOODPECKER in the orchard and some CANADA GEESE
and CACKLING GEESE on the pond across from the orchard and on the pond
along the maintenance road. There was a COYOTE working the tree line
behind the second pond.

There were lots of CHICKADEES and SPARROW activity along the trees
near the ed center and we had 2 WILSON'S SNIPE along the slough on the
way to the twin barns.

For the day I had 42 species with the BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER being the
only new species for the year, giving me 130 species.

Jon Anderson led the charge out to the end of the estuary boardwalk
and his ebird report will add species to this report.

Until next week....

Phil Kelley
<scrubjay323...>
Lacey, WA
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Date: 9/27/17 6:02 pm
From: Hank H <h.heiberg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Woodpecker magnet at Lake Joy

> A recent Tweeters topic was "What plantings are best for attracting birds?". In response I posted a video of a Hairy Woodpecker pecking at apples on a tree in our yard. Today we had a Northern Flicker, a Pileated Woodpecker and 2 Red-breasted Sapsuckers visit the same tree.
>
> Video of the Pileated Woodpecker:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/37314009466/in/dateposted/
>
> Photo of one sapsucker feeding apple to another:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/37104473230/in/photostream/
>
> Photo of the flicker eyeing an apple:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/37064109470/in/photostream/
>
> Deer get into the action also. Here is a video of a deer walking on its hind legs to get at the low hanging apples.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/36964132981/in/dateposted/
>
> Hank Heiberg
> Lake Joy
> NE of Carnation, WA
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPad

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Date: 9/27/17 4:23 pm
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Cackling Goose Lynnwood 9/26/17
A single cackling goose was present among the Canada geese today at Mini Park/Sprague pond in Lynnwood.  Photos  can be seen by scrolling down page 23.http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum/showthread.php?14796-Wildlife-of-Edmonds-WA-2017/page23

Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA
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Date: 9/27/17 1:45 pm
From: Wilson Cady <gorgebirds...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Jay Migration at St. Cloud on Sept. 24th
I went back up to St. Cloud this morning, arriving just before 9am. Either I was too late for the main movement of birds or the east wind slowed down the movement as it does at our place.In the two hours that I was there I counted: 1 Lewis's Woodpecker111 Steller's Jays28 Scrub-Jays38 Yellow-rumped Warblers Wilson Cady
Columbia River Gorge, WA

---------- Original Message ----------
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...>
To: cjflick <flick...>
Cc: tweeters tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Jay Migration at St. Cloud on Sept. 24th
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2017 11:27:03 -0700


Tweeters, Spurred on by the report of migrating jays and other species at St. Cloud Recreation Area, Skamania County, I headed over to try my luck. Like the previous report, I saw many, many jays moving west to east. Most were about a quarter mile north of the river but one group flew overhead. My numbers follow: 7:18am - 7:45am: 252 (included one flock of 158 over an 8 minute period) Steller's Jays7:46am - 8am: 120 Steller's Jays and 20 Scrub Jays and one Lewis's Woodpecker8:01am - 8:15am: 41 Steller's Jays and 24 Scrub Jays8:16am - 8:30am: 40 Steller's Jays8:31am - 8:45am: 60 Steller's Jays and 8 Scrub Jays. Total: Steller's Jay: 515C. Scrub Jay: 52Lewis's Woodpecker: 1 There were also: 150+ Yellow-rumped Warbler20 White-crowned Sparrow15 Golden-croned Sparrow50 Cedar Waxwing45 American Robin5 Varied Thrushand miscellaneous kinglets, RB Sapsuckers, N. Flickers, D. Woodpeckers, and a few blackbirds. A rather amazing spot! Keep your eyes and ears skyward. Jim DanzenbakerBattle Ground, WA
On Mon, Sep 25, 2017 at 5:39 PM, cjflick <flick...> wrote:
Jay migration was streaming-screaming during the day (Sept 24) at St. Cloud, Skamania Co., moving from west-to-east.

During a 3 hr, 19 min visit & walk-about, John and Mary Davis counted an eastward movement of 240 Steller&rsquo;s jays, 84 California scrub-jays, and 58 Lewis&rsquo;s woodpeckers, which flew over with the jays.

Another group (CJ Flick with two others) at St. Cloud was out bird banding along the Columbia River at St. Cloud. During a 3-minute count at 8:20 a.m., three persons counted a fly-over of 51 jays (STJA & CASJ) &ndash; they just kept streaming. This group (here for 6 hours+) thought that the jays had the top numbers today, followed by yellow-rumped warblers, and lastly, golden-crowned sparrows. Certainly, the group&rsquo;s estimate of >600 jays moving during these field hours is NO under estimation.

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Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
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Date: 9/27/17 12:41 pm
From: Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] did anyone figure out the subspecies of the Horned Larks at Sandy Pt. in Whatcom County?
Ed, I saw and photographed only one, a female, and I would call it either arcticola (the Arctic subspecies) or alpina (the Cascades-breeding subspecies). I think the former is more likely. Mine wasnt with the longspurs, but maybe you just mean in the same area.

Dennis Paulson
Seattle


On Sep 27, 2017, at 12:00 PM, <tweeters-request...> wrote:

> Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2017 16:12:46 -0700
> From: "Ed Swan" <Edswan2...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] did anyone figure out the subspecies of the Horned
> Larks at Sandy Pt. in Whatcom County?
> To: <tweeters...>, <whatcombirds...>
> Message-ID: <01a101d3371c$f7534d80$e5f9e880$@comcast.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
> I was wondering if anyone had opinions on the subspecies of the Horned Larks
> that were with the Lapland Longspurs at Sandy Point last weekend?
>
>
>
> Ed
>
> Ed Swan
>
> Nature writer and guide
>
> <edswan2...> <mailto:<edswan2...>
>
> 206.949.3545
>
> www.theswancompany.com


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Date: 9/27/17 8:41 am
From: Ryan Merrill <rjm284...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Might someone want to map our expanding Scrub Jay population?
This is easy to do in eBird and I don't believe you need an account to look
at the maps. This link should go to a map of area sightings for California
Scrub-Jay in 2016. You can adjust the date range or species at the top of
the page.

http://ebird.org/ebird/map/cowscj1?neg=true&env.minX=-
124.91801257343752&env.minY=47.01197890796433&env.maxX=-
118.46903796406252&env.maxY=49.14027872848674&zh=true&gp=
true&ev=Z&mr=1-12&bmo=1&emo=12&yr=range&byr=2016&eyr=2016

Anna's Hummingbird is another species that is interesting to look at the
changes in range over the years as they have been expanding.

Good birding,
Ryan Merrill
Seattle



> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: Stewart Wechsler <ecostewart...>
> Date: Wed, Sep 27, 2017 at 8:19 AM
> Subject: [Tweeters] Might someone want to map our expanding Scrub Jay
> population?
> To: <tweeters...>
>
>
> Has anyone mapped the sightings of Scrub Jays in Washington and British
> Columbia? While I no longer count Scrub Jays in Seattle as rarities, I
> still count sightings, in areas I don't regularly see them, as notable, and
> a possible indication of a continuing expansion of their population, and
> possible range. I would love to see a map of area sightings, where I could
> click and see where they were seen one year, then click again to see where
> they were seen the next year. (I realize that as the Scrub Jays become
> more common, fewer people would add their sightings to such a map, so
> people looking at such a map would have to account for that.)
>
> I will add that here in Seattle, I have been regularly able to see them
> and hear them for a number of years, in Georgetown, south of Boeing Field.
> Also, just 2 or 3 days ago, I had, what I call a "notable sighting" a block
> from my apartment, near the West Seattle "Junction" (by California Ave SW &
> SW Alaska), an area I may, or may not, have seen them once before.
>
> After repeatedly seeing them in Georgetown, I came to see that
> neighborhood, in a flat flood plain of the Duwamish River, with sandier
> soils than most of Seattle, as more like some scrub-lands of California,
> where this species has been spreading north from over recent decades.
>
> -Stewart
> www.stewardshipadventures.com
> 206 932-7225 <%28206%29%20932-7225>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
>
>

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Date: 9/27/17 8:21 am
From: Stewart Wechsler <ecostewart...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Might someone want to map our expanding Scrub Jay population?
Has anyone mapped the sightings of Scrub Jays in Washington and British
Columbia? While I no longer count Scrub Jays in Seattle as rarities, I
still count sightings, in areas I don't regularly see them, as notable, and
a possible indication of a continuing expansion of their population, and
possible range. I would love to see a map of area sightings, where I could
click and see where they were seen one year, then click again to see where
they were seen the next year. (I realize that as the Scrub Jays become
more common, fewer people would add their sightings to such a map, so
people looking at such a map would have to account for that.)

I will add that here in Seattle, I have been regularly able to see them and
hear them for a number of years, in Georgetown, south of Boeing Field.
Also, just 2 or 3 days ago, I had, what I call a "notable sighting" a block
from my apartment, near the West Seattle "Junction" (by California Ave SW &
SW Alaska), an area I may, or may not, have seen them once before.

After repeatedly seeing them in Georgetown, I came to see that
neighborhood, in a flat flood plain of the Duwamish River, with sandier
soils than most of Seattle, as more like some scrub-lands of California,
where this species has been spreading north from over recent decades.

-Stewart
www.stewardshipadventures.com
206 932-7225

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Date: 9/27/17 7:36 am
From: Louise Rutter <louise.rutter...>
Subject: RE: [Tweeters] did anyone figure out the subspecies of the Horned Larks at Sandy Pt. in Whatcom County?
We didn't get super close looks at the Sandy Point horned larks. We did get
great looks on Sunday at 7 horned larks at Lummi flats, which fed on the
trail 6 feet from us. They were similarly pale and washed out birds, but in
full sun and that close, around half of them had a very obvious pink wash in
the shoulder region, if that helps narrow it down in any way. But I
understand that, like gulls, there are issues with intermediates as well as
the sheer number of subspecies when it comes to horned larks.



Louise Rutter

Kirkland



From: <tweeters-bounces...>
[mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Wayne Weber
Sent: 26 September 2017 21:05
To: TWEETERS <tweeters...>
Subject: RE: [Tweeters] did anyone figure out the subspecies of the Horned
Larks at Sandy Pt. in Whatcom County?



Tweeters,



I would caution anyone who tries to answer Ed's question that there are 21
subspecies of Horned Lark in North America, several of which are possible in
our area. This is one of the most variable of all species of North American
birds.



The one Horned Lark which my group saw at Sandy Point on Saturday was so
dull and washed-out that it would be very tough to assign to subspecies.
However, I think it is safe to say that it was not the local breeding
subspecies strigata, which is one of the more colourful subspecies, but
which to my knowledge has never been recorded at Sandy Point, at least not
for decades.



Wayne C. Weber

Delta, BC

<Contopus...> <mailto:<Contopus...>







From: <tweeters-bounces...>
<mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>
[mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Ed Swan
Sent: Tuesday, September 26, 2017 4:13 PM
To: <tweeters...> <mailto:<tweeters...> ;
<whatcombirds...> <mailto:<whatcombirds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] did anyone figure out the subspecies of the Horned Larks
at Sandy Pt. in Whatcom County?



I was wondering if anyone had opinions on the subspecies of the Horned Larks
that were with the Lapland Longspurs at Sandy Point last weekend?



Ed

Ed Swan

Nature writer and guide

<edswan2...> <mailto:<edswan2...>

206.949.3545

www.theswancompany.com <http://www.theswancompany.com>






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Date: 9/26/17 9:08 pm
From: Wayne Weber <contopus...>
Subject: RE: [Tweeters] did anyone figure out the subspecies of the Horned Larks at Sandy Pt. in Whatcom County?
Tweeters,



I would caution anyone who tries to answer Ed's question that there are 21
subspecies of Horned Lark in North America, several of which are possible in
our area. This is one of the most variable of all species of North American
birds.



The one Horned Lark which my group saw at Sandy Point on Saturday was so
dull and washed-out that it would be very tough to assign to subspecies.
However, I think it is safe to say that it was not the local breeding
subspecies strigata, which is one of the more colourful subspecies, but
which to my knowledge has never been recorded at Sandy Point, at least not
for decades.



Wayne C. Weber

Delta, BC

<Contopus...>







From: <tweeters-bounces...>
[mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Ed Swan
Sent: Tuesday, September 26, 2017 4:13 PM
To: <tweeters...>; <whatcombirds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] did anyone figure out the subspecies of the Horned Larks
at Sandy Pt. in Whatcom County?



I was wondering if anyone had opinions on the subspecies of the Horned Larks
that were with the Lapland Longspurs at Sandy Point last weekend?



Ed

Ed Swan

Nature writer and guide

<edswan2...>

206.949.3545

www.theswancompany.com






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Date: 9/26/17 4:18 pm
From: Ed Swan <Edswan2...>
Subject: [Tweeters] did anyone figure out the subspecies of the Horned Larks at Sandy Pt. in Whatcom County?
I was wondering if anyone had opinions on the subspecies of the Horned Larks
that were with the Lapland Longspurs at Sandy Point last weekend?



Ed

Ed Swan

Nature writer and guide

<edswan2...> <mailto:<edswan2...>

206.949.3545

www.theswancompany.com






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Date: 9/26/17 3:33 pm
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Norther Shrike
A Northern Shrike was a nice early fall surprise this morning. Along the Snohomish River at the Fobes Road dike.

Phil Dickinson
Lake Stevens

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Date: 9/26/17 3:24 pm
From: Wilson Cady <gorgebirds...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Jay Migration at St. Cloud on Sept. 24th
Susan and I didn't stop at St. Cloud on Sunday morning due to smoke but we saw the same jay movement as reported by John Davis in other spots east of there. On Oct. 1, 2015, Les Carlson and I counted 336 Steller's Jays but only 2 Scrub-Jays heading east while we were at St. Cloud over a period of one hour. Wilson Cady
Columbia River Gorge, WA

---------- Original Message ----------
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...>
To: cjflick <flick...>
Cc: tweeters tweeters <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Jay Migration at St. Cloud on Sept. 24th
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2017 11:27:03 -0700


Tweeters, Spurred on by the report of migrating jays and other species at St. Cloud Recreation Area, Skamania County, I headed over to try my luck. Like the previous report, I saw many, many jays moving west to east. Most were about a quarter mile north of the river but one group flew overhead. My numbers follow: 7:18am - 7:45am: 252 (included one flock of 158 over an 8 minute period) Steller's Jays7:46am - 8am: 120 Steller's Jays and 20 Scrub Jays and one Lewis's Woodpecker8:01am - 8:15am: 41 Steller's Jays and 24 Scrub Jays8:16am - 8:30am: 40 Steller's Jays8:31am - 8:45am: 60 Steller's Jays and 8 Scrub Jays. Total: Steller's Jay: 515C. Scrub Jay: 52Lewis's Woodpecker: 1 There were also: 150+ Yellow-rumped Warbler20 White-crowned Sparrow15 Golden-croned Sparrow50 Cedar Waxwing45 American Robin5 Varied Thrushand miscellaneous kinglets, RB Sapsuckers, N. Flickers, D. Woodpeckers, and a few blackbirds. A rather amazing spot! Keep your eyes and ears skyward. Jim DanzenbakerBattle Ground, WA
On Mon, Sep 25, 2017 at 5:39 PM, cjflick <flick...> wrote:
Jay migration was streaming-screaming during the day (Sept 24) at St. Cloud, Skamania Co., moving from west-to-east.

During a 3 hr, 19 min visit & walk-about, John and Mary Davis counted an eastward movement of 240 Steller&rsquo;s jays, 84 California scrub-jays, and 58 Lewis&rsquo;s woodpeckers, which flew over with the jays.

Another group (CJ Flick with two others) at St. Cloud was out bird banding along the Columbia River at St. Cloud. During a 3-minute count at 8:20 a.m., three persons counted a fly-over of 51 jays (STJA & CASJ) &ndash; they just kept streaming. This group (here for 6 hours+) thought that the jays had the top numbers today, followed by yellow-rumped warblers, and lastly, golden-crowned sparrows. Certainly, the group&rsquo;s estimate of >600 jays moving during these field hours is NO under estimation.

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360-702-9395
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Date: 9/26/17 1:31 pm
From: Maxine Reid <baconmf...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Red Knot.,Tulalip bay spit,26 September 2017
Hi tweets
A single non breeding plumage REKN was present at 12:45pm
With about 80 Black bellied Plovers and 2 dozen short billed dowitchers.
The tide level was about 8.5 feet. And receding.
Cheers,Maxine Reid


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Date: 9/26/17 12:49 pm
From: David Hutchinson <florafaunabooks...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Latest National Geographic F.G.
Just received copies of the latest, 7th Edtn, of the Nat Geo Field Guide to the Birds of North America, fully revised & updated. The question is - who wants this book?

It seems like everyone has a copy around the fireplace, under the front seat of their car or in a backpack. I have had a few edtns myself, usually ending up falling into a pond or gathering moss in the car. I took to using the Western version, if only for the larger, regional maps.


Certainly if you don't have a copy, that might be a good reason to buy one. But the 1023 species, the 700 new maps and the fact that the books weighs in at nearly three pounds and could induce carpal tunnel are considerations. While there are new regional inclusions in the AOU area, Hawaii, Greenland and all of Central America are not included. So what is included?


Well, if you were, say a new or middling birder, you might find that there are a lot of teaching moments in this new version. There is a much newer sequence of bird family order and also species taxonomy, provided by the suspiciously sounding North American Classification Cttee. Of more interest still to me are a whole series of range maps at the back of the book of well delineated subspecies, taken from the 1957 AOU Checklist. It seems funny now, to look back to when nobody wanted that book. Beyond that one can just pick and choose. The editors seem on the point of lumping Cordilleran Flycatcher; Olive Warbler is hovering in its own family, although it always seemed to hang out with warblers in the Mexican Highlands. A dozen or more Mexican species are included and pleasingly their range maps are centered on their major Mexican habitat, rather than only being important for Arizona and Texas.


Beyond these items, I noted eight Albatrosses, eighteen Terns and birds I had never heard of like Barolo Shearwater and Zina's Petrel. I'll swear that one of these is a terrific Italian red wine. Anyway, I shall bring one to the next WOS meeting, but don't drop it on your toe.


David Hutchinson

Flora & Fauna Books

206-282-0093

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Date: 9/26/17 11:29 am
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Jay Migration at St. Cloud on Sept. 24th
Tweeters,

Spurred on by the report of migrating jays and other species at St. Cloud
Recreation Area, Skamania County, I headed over to try my luck. Like the
previous report, I saw many, many jays moving west to east. Most were
about a quarter mile north of the river but one group flew overhead. My
numbers follow:

7:18am - 7:45am: 252 (included one flock of 158 over an 8 minute period)
Steller's Jays
7:46am - 8am: 120 Steller's Jays and 20 Scrub Jays and one Lewis's
Woodpecker
8:01am - 8:15am: 41 Steller's Jays and 24 Scrub Jays
8:16am - 8:30am: 40 Steller's Jays
8:31am - 8:45am: 60 Steller's Jays and 8 Scrub Jays.

Total:

Steller's Jay: 515
C. Scrub Jay: 52
Lewis's Woodpecker: 1

There were also:

150+ Yellow-rumped Warbler
20 White-crowned Sparrow
15 Golden-croned Sparrow
50 Cedar Waxwing
45 American Robin
5 Varied Thrush
and miscellaneous kinglets, RB Sapsuckers, N. Flickers, D. Woodpeckers, and
a few blackbirds.

A rather amazing spot!

Keep your eyes and ears skyward.

Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA

On Mon, Sep 25, 2017 at 5:39 PM, cjflick <flick...> wrote:

> Jay migration was *streaming-screaming* during the day (*Sept 24*) at St.
> Cloud, Skamania Co., moving from west-to-east.
>
>
>
> During a 3 hr, 19 min visit & walk-about, John and Mary Davis counted an
> eastward movement of 240 Steller’s jays, 84 California scrub-jays, and 58
> Lewis’s woodpeckers, *which flew over with the jays*.
>
>
>
> Another group (*CJ Flick with two others*) at St. Cloud was out bird
> banding along the Columbia River at St. Cloud. During a 3-minute count at
> 8:20 a.m., three persons counted a fly-over of 51 jays (*STJA & CASJ*) –
> they just kept streaming. This group (*here for 6 hours+*) thought that
> the jays had the top numbers today, followed by yellow-rumped warblers, and
> lastly, golden-crowned sparrows. Certainly, the group’s estimate of >600
> jays moving during these field hours is NO under estimation.
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
>


--
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
<jdanzenbaker...>

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Date: 9/26/17 10:41 am
From: John Puschock <g_g_allin...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Scrub-Jays in northeast Seattle
I just saw SIX California Scrub-Jays flying north over my yard a few blocks south of Meadowbrook Pond in northeast Seattle. They stopped briefly in trees ~100 yards north of my yard, and I got photos of three of them before they continued on. This is only the second time I've seen them in this area over the past decade, the first being a single bird in the summer of 2016.


John Puschock

Matthews Beach, Seattle

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Date: 9/25/17 10:27 pm
From: Ed Newbold <ednewbold1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Mama told me not to brag: Butyl Creek Blackpoll gone with the rest
Hi all,
The Creek goes on forever and the party never ends, according to my boastful blog....but it sure can slow way down in a hurry!

It's hard to say for sure something isn't around but most of the migrants were gone today except for a couple Yellow-rumped Warblers. I should say, we do miss quite a few birds as we often just don't happen to be looking out when a bird comes by, so nothing is known for sure (many Warblers seem clearly to stick around for quite some time.)

Adrian Lee and his Dad were the last to see the Blackpoll Warbler at I think 1:30 yesterday.
I did get a Red-breasted Nuthatch sitting in the flow at the bottom of Butyl Falls, which they and Hummingbirds like to do,  with a Hermit Thrush looking on.  here's a link to that and the Blackpoll shots :
.Ed Newbold | The Party Never Ends! (at Butyl Creek)


|
|
|
| | |

|

|
|
| |
Ed Newbold | The Party Never Ends! (at Butyl Creek)


|

|

|



 I heard from a friend this doesn't work. If not  It's at   www.ednewbold.com at         "Sightings"

Thanks all,
Ed Newbold ( and Delia Scholes)





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Date: 9/25/17 8:34 pm
From: Michael Donahue <bfalbatross...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Westport Seabirds trip report, Sunday, September 24, 2017
One of the last trips of the pelagic season featured the usual suspects:
Black-footed Albatross, Pink-footed Shearwater, Buller’s Shearwater,
Sabine’s Gull, Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel, Pomarine and Parasitic Jaegers,
South Polar Skua, and Cassin’s Auklet. Most of the auklets were flying by
in groups of 4-6, most likely migrants from farther north.

Species counts will be posted at www.westportseabirds.com soon.



The marine mammal show was excellent, as it has been for much of the
season, with Risso’s Dolphin, Pacific White-sided Dolphin, and Northern
Right Whale Dolphin. The latter is a species we don’t see every year, and
this was the fifth trip this year that we’ve recorded them. Of the 10
Humpback Whales, several were very close to the boat. I’ve posted some
photos of the whales on the Westport Seabirds Facebook page.

Probably the highlight of the trip wasn’t a pelagic bird at all, but a
Bar-tailed Godwit roosting with a flock of Marbleds in the marina.



The crew for the day was Scott Mills, Bill Shelmerdine, and Phil and Chris
Anderson, and myself. There are still spaces available on the October 7
trip, the last trip of the season.

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Date: 9/25/17 8:14 pm
From: Linda Talman <linda.talman...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Night Migration
Passing over the Swinomish Channel in La Conner tonight were thousands(?)
of snow geese (?) heading towards Fir Island. Lots of assumptions here
(number and species) - but it was a grand sight. It would make their
arrival a week earlier than I have noticed before. I always wondered how
people could observe a night migration - but it was quite visible - even
from town waterfront.

Will check Tuesday.

--
Linda Z. Talman
PO Box 392
La Conner, WA

360 840 1714

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Date: 9/25/17 7:21 pm
From: <dlmoor2...>
Subject: [Tweeters] birding Long Beach link
Hey Tweets....It doesn't work every time for some reason, but I am able
to access the Long Beach Birding site at this link:

http://discoverycoastrealestate.com/birdinglongbeachwa/

Dianna Moore

Ocean Shores
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Date: 9/25/17 6:21 pm
From: Kelly McAllister <mcallisters4...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Brandt's Cormorants nesting on human-made structures
I did a little internet searching, a year or two ago, to try to determine
how often Brandt's Cormorants had been documented using human-made
structures. This was prompted by the realization that Brandt's Cormorants
were nesting on a tower in Grays Harbor, along with Pelagic and
Double-crested Cormorants. I didn't find much, one location in California if
I remember correctly. The note, below, describes Brandt's Cormorants nesting
on the Astoria-Megler bridge. Double-crested Cormorants nesting on the Lewis
and Clark bridge is a relatively new phenomenon. Cormorants are hard on
bridges, contributing to more rapid deterioration and the need for more
frequent painting. Perhaps some non-metal structures built for the
cormorants, in places where endangered salmon stocks are less accessible,
would be worth the investment. Now, what to do about the much maligned
Caspian Terns..



Kelly McAllister




Estuary Cormorants Nesting In Low Numbers; Corps Unsure If Culling Will
Resume Before Season Ends
Posted on Friday, September 22, 2017 (PST)


About 200 double-crested cormorants are nesting on East Sand Island, some or
all with 7- to 10-day old chicks, far fewer of the birds than would be
expected at what Portland Audubon had deemed the largest colony of
double-crested cormorants in the world.



Instead, at this point in September, the several thousand double-crested
cormorants in the lower Columbia River estuary are queueing up for their
migration, according to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineer's cormorant
management team that is overseeing culling operations in the lower river.



"We'll continue monitoring the island to determine the fate of the active
nests and chicks," the management team says.



The Corps is using aerial imagery to get an accurate count of active nests
on East Sand Island and adding ground surveys from a blind in order to
monitor the age of the chicks.



In its last posted management timeline update (
<http://www.nwp.usace.army.mil/environment/cormorants/timeline>
www.nwp.usace.army.mil/environment/cormorants/timeline), September 1, the
Corps said it observed about 7,000 cormorants. Some 4,000 were
double-crested, while the remaining 3,000 were Brandt's cormorants. At that
time, the nest estimates stood at just 30 double-crested nests and about 200
Brandt's nests, but the management team's more recent survey found up to 200
nesting birds. That's because during the September 1 survey the island was
inaccessible due to birds "loafing" on the beach. Follow-up aerial imagery
has been more accurate.



Culling, harassing and egg oiling of the birds and their nests was suspended
by Wildlife Services, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' contractor, April 27
and has not resumed because the cormorants have yet to settle down to
significant nesting activity.



In June, the Corps said that as many as 40 eagles harassed the sea birds,
keeping them from nesting on the island and driving them to other areas,
such as local bridges, as well as Willapa Bay and Grays Harbor.



The final survey at the Astoria-Megler Bridge, upstream of East Sand Island,
found the lowest number of cormorants there since April. Many of the birds
observed were juveniles and both double-crested cormorant and Brandt's
cormorant chicks were observed under the main portion of the bridge
supports, according to the management timeline. Morning survey totals were
very similar to totals recorded the previous evening (August 26), with the
lowest number of departing birds this season. About 1,400 double-crested
cormorants roosted on the bridge overnight.



A count August 17 of cormorants at the Lewis and Clark Bridge in Youngs Bay
near Astoria, found 53 nests (there were 147 nests July 20). The management
timeline said that most of the chicks had fledged from nests but some
juveniles remained.



This is the third year of culling for the Corps and the second year in a row
that the birds have been late to nesting, requiring the Corps to suspend its
operations designed to reduce the number of breeding pairs in the lower
river. Cormorants feed on juvenile salmon and steelhead, some of which are
listed under the federal Endangered Species Act.



Last year culling was suspended in mid-May and Wildlife Services didn't
resume until October 3. By mid-July last year some 15,300 cormorants were
seen "loafing" on the island. By August about 23,000 were on the island and
by September many were rebuilding nests and laying eggs. Still, the agency
managed to cull nearly 3,000 of the cormorants in 2016, almost all of those
by the end of October.



This year, however, Wildlife Services has culled just 248 double-crested
cormorants and no nests have been destroyed. At this point, the Corps is
unsure when or if it will resume culling before the season is over.



"We are waiting for further information from our field crew and coordination
with the adaptive management team - including biologists with U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service - before drawing conclusions about the fate of the colony
and any potential management actions that could occur later this season,"
the management team says. "As detailed in our management plan, we will adapt
our management actions to the best and most current information available to
us and we are monitoring the existing nests and chicks to determine their
fate and status of birds in the estuary."



The Corps was permitted in 2017 by the Service to cull 2,408 double-crested
cormorants and destroy up to 4,058 of the cormorants' nests in order to
"reduce the overall population of the colony to a number that represents an
acceptable level of predation on juvenile salmonids," the management team
says. "We continue to manage within the bounds of what was permitted by
USFWS."



Beyond 2018, the goal is to support a local colony of double-crested
cormorants while minimizing the potential for expansion to levels that would
hurt the chances of survival for salmonids protected under the Endangered
Species Act.



That would mean a cormorant colony at East Sand Island of between 5,380 and
5,939 breeding pairs, while modifying the island so that it would support
the smaller colony.






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Date: 9/25/17 5:47 pm
From: cjflick <flick...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Jay Migration at St. Cloud on Sept. 24th
Jay migration was streaming-screaming during the day (Sept 24) at St. Cloud,
Skamania Co., moving from west-to-east.



During a 3 hr, 19 min visit & walk-about, John and Mary Davis counted an
eastward movement of 240 Steller's jays, 84 California scrub-jays, and 58
Lewis's woodpeckers, which flew over with the jays.



Another group (CJ Flick with two others) at St. Cloud was out bird banding
along the Columbia River at St. Cloud. During a 3-minute count at 8:20
a.m., three persons counted a fly-over of 51 jays (STJA & CASJ) - they just
kept streaming. This group (here for 6 hours+) thought that the jays had
the top numbers today, followed by yellow-rumped warblers, and lastly,
golden-crowned sparrows. Certainly, the group's estimate of >600 jays
moving during these field hours is NO under estimation.


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Date: 9/25/17 5:14 pm
From: Matt Dufort <matt.dufort...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Western Scrub-Jays
Devon et al.,

There's a really informative article on Scrub-Jays in Washington and the
rest of the Pacific NW by Bill Tweit here:
http://ebird.org/content/nw/news/the-scrub-jay-world-just-became-more-complicated-and-interesting/
.

The short version is that essentially all Scrub-Jays in Washington are
California Scrub-Jay, whether west or east of the Cascades. There is one
accepted record for Woodhouse's Scrub-Jay, from the far southeast corner of
the state in 2002.

Matt Dufort
Seattle

On Mon, Sep 25, 2017 at 15:48 Devon Comstock <devonc78...> wrote:

> So I was aware that AOU split Western scrub jay into two species, a
> California and Woodhouse scrub jay, but their range map seems to leave
> interior scrub jays in no man's land, so is any scrub jay in Washington or
> Oregon a California scrub jay now? I personally have a hard time keeping up
> with all this splitting and lumping.
>
>
> http://www.audubon.org/news/here-are-biggest-changes-aou-checklist-north-american-birds
>
> Thanks
> Devon Comstock
> Wenatchee
>
>
> On Sep 25, 2017 2:35 PM, "Hugh" <h2ouzel...> wrote:
>
>> Tom Munsch led an Eastside Audubon trip starting at the Three Friends
>> Fishing Hole on the Green R. A little ways south of that park we saw 3 or 4
>> Western Scrub-Jays in the area, just across (west) from many storage
>> buildings.
>>
>> Hugh Jennings
>> h2ouzel AT comcast.net
>>
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>>
>> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
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Date: 9/25/17 4:55 pm
From: Hugh <h2ouzel...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Western Scrub-Jays
Yes, I guess our scrub-jays are now California Scrub-Jays. The checklist we use doesn’t have that change yet.

Hugh

From: Devon Comstock
Sent: Monday, September 25, 2017 3:47 PM
To: Hugh
Cc: Tom Munsch ; <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Western Scrub-Jays

So I was aware that AOU split Western scrub jay into two species, a California and Woodhouse scrub jay, but their range map seems to leave interior scrub jays in no man's land, so is any scrub jay in Washington or Oregon a California scrub jay now? I personally have a hard time keeping up with all this splitting and lumping.

http://www.audubon.org/news/here-are-biggest-changes-aou-checklist-north-american-birds

Thanks
Devon Comstock
Wenatchee


On Sep 25, 2017 2:35 PM, "Hugh" <h2ouzel...> wrote:

Tom Munsch led an Eastside Audubon trip starting at the Three Friends Fishing Hole on the Green R. A little ways south of that park we saw 3 or 4 Western Scrub-Jays in the area, just across (west) from many storage buildings.

Hugh Jennings
h2ouzel AT comcast.net



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Date: 9/25/17 4:02 pm
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Edmonds parasitic Jaeger 9-25-17
The parasitic Jaeger was off Sunset Ave. again Monday (9/25/17) around noon.  I accidentally got some photos of it as I was shooting flocks of Bonaparte's gulls.  Scroll down page 23 for photos.

http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum/showthread.php?14796-Wildlife-of-Edmonds-WA-2017/page23
Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA

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Date: 9/25/17 3:49 pm
From: Devon Comstock <devonc78...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Western Scrub-Jays
So I was aware that AOU split Western scrub jay into two species, a
California and Woodhouse scrub jay, but their range map seems to leave
interior scrub jays in no man's land, so is any scrub jay in Washington or
Oregon a California scrub jay now? I personally have a hard time keeping up
with all this splitting and lumping.

http://www.audubon.org/news/here-are-biggest-changes-aou-checklist-north-american-birds

Thanks
Devon Comstock
Wenatchee


On Sep 25, 2017 2:35 PM, "Hugh" <h2ouzel...> wrote:

> Tom Munsch led an Eastside Audubon trip starting at the Three Friends
> Fishing Hole on the Green R. A little ways south of that park we saw 3 or 4
> Western Scrub-Jays in the area, just across (west) from many storage
> buildings.
>
> Hugh Jennings
> h2ouzel AT comcast.net
>
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Date: 9/25/17 2:37 pm
From: Hugh <h2ouzel...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Western Scrub-Jays
Tom Munsch led an Eastside Audubon trip starting at the Three Friends Fishing Hole on the Green R. A little ways south of that park we saw 3 or 4 Western Scrub-Jays in the area, just across (west) from many storage buildings.

Hugh Jennings
h2ouzel AT comcast.net


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Date: 9/25/17 2:14 pm
From: Louise Rutter <louise.rutter...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Blackpoll warbler not this morning
I spent three hours this morning at Whitehorn Point Marine Reserve in
Whatcom and didn't find the blackpoll. Two other people were also looking
for some of that time. BUT it was raining this morning, and I was with a
group of 6 people who searched for it yesterday late morning and failed to
find it, and then the bird reappeared and was seen by several people later
on. So I'm not saying it's not still there, who knows.



Louise Rutter

Kirkland


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Date: 9/25/17 1:26 pm
From: Hubbell <ldhubbell...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Gone Wild
Tweeters,

This week’s post focuses on the life of Foster Island, which includes a glimpse of a warbling vireo. No doubt the the little bird is headed to a place where the sunshine will match its breast.

http://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2017/09/gone-wild.html <http://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2017/09/gone-wild.html>

I hope you enjoy this post even though birds are not the primary focus.

Have a great day on Union Bay!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net
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Date: 9/25/17 12:39 pm
From: Dayna yalowicki <dlwicki...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Scrub Jay in Edmonds
A Scrub Jay was seen in Edmonds, off 220th on my mother-in-law's seed feeder.

Dayna Yalowicki
Bothell, Wa

Buy Free Range
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Date: 9/25/17 11:38 am
From: Qinglin Ma <qinglineric...>
Subject: [Tweeters] American White Pelican at Crockett Lake
Hi Tweets,

Yesterday I saw a group of about 30 American White Pelicans at the Crockett
Lake on the east west side. They were sleeping in the lake off shore. Also
next and back to the restaurant by the lake there were many kinds of
sparrows: song, white-crowned, golden-crowned, Lincoln, Savanna.

At the Dugualla Bay there were Horned Grebe, American Wigeon, Cinnamon
Teal, Bufflehead and several large groups of Canada and Cackling Goose
flying over. The fall is here.

When I got home at later afternoon, A Purple Finch was on the feeder. It
was the first sight in my yard. He was there again this morning before any
other birds showed up.

Good birding,

Qinglin Ma
Kirkland, WA

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Date: 9/25/17 9:11 am
From: <amk17...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Hoquiam STP
Thanks to all that replied to the Westport RFI. I did take the shorter, quicker route to coast.

Highlights for the day were at the Hoquiam STP where I believe a sharp-tailed sandpiper was with a flock of least sandpipers. I'd be interested in any opinions of the very poor photo on my ebird report at

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39384330

Missed the pecs. There were more than 100 or so peeps (mostly least) but very few landing for more than a few seconds during the time I was there.

Thanks.

AKopitov
Seattle, WA
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Date: 9/25/17 7:13 am
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Washington Ornithological Society monthly meetings
Hi Tweeters,


We're happy to announce that we open our 2017-18 monthly meeting season
with Washington's top Naturalist, Dennis Paulson. WOS members know Dennis
as their teacher and mentor through his long career at the Slater Museum,
the Master Birder program, and his field guides on shorebirds,
dragonflies. On Monday, October 2 his focus will be Florida.


" It's not winter yet, but as the days shorten and the temperature drops,
our thoughts turn toward lower latitudes. Join Dennis Paulson on a trip he
and his wife made to southern Florida last December. Birds were abundant,
not surprisingly, as were so many other forms of wildlife—lizards and
turtles and butterflies and dragonflies—that disappear from our state in
winter. Enjoy a photo-illustrated tour of Florida, from manatees and
dolphins at Crystal River to Great White Herons and White-crowned Pigeons
in the Florida Keys"


WOS meetings are the first Monday of months Oct.-June at the Center For
Urban Horticulture 3501 NE 41st St, Seattle
<https://maps.google.com/?q=3501+NE+41st+St,+Seattle&entry=gmail&source=g>.
Social time begins at 7 pm, formal program begins at 7:30. All are
welcome. (January Meeting conflicts with New Year's and will be
rescheduled with early notice).



Jean Trent WOS

--
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
<jdanzenbaker...>

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Date: 9/25/17 1:45 am
From: J. Acker <owler...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Northern Saw-whet Owls
.Are back! In a big way.



Based on reports of an earlier than usual migration from my nearest banding
station in BC, which banded more owls in their opening week than they had
the entire season last year, I opened up my banding station this evening.
Owling results on Saturday morning indicated that the owls had not yet made
it to the Bainbridge Island. In the five hours I was open, I banded two
saw-whets and heard probably another half dozen. This is my earliest arrival
record of saw-whets in the 20+ years I have kept records.



This year's numbers may be unprecedented.



J. Acker

<owler...> <mailto:<owler...>

Bainbridge Island, WA




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Date: 9/24/17 8:21 pm
From: BRAD <bradliljequist...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Perhaps not quite Tweeters worthy, but of note - Hermit and Varied Thrush on Phinney Ridge
Lower West Phinney. The last couple of days, we've had both in the yard - enjoying the Serviceberries. I highly recommend a Serviceberry tree - they are native, beautiful, and the birds really go for the berries. There's been a fun mixed posse of the thrushes, RCK's, Varied Thrushes, Chickadees, Song Sparrows, and RBN's enjoying it. Very curious and responsive to pishing too.


Brad Liljequist

Phinney Ridge, Seattle

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Date: 9/24/17 7:09 pm
From: Richard Wright <rjw103146...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Western Scrub Jays in Lake Forest Park
I believe the name has been changed to California Scrub-Jays. We saw a pair in the vicinity of the Point No Point Light House in December 2016 and several times after that. Since then they have become regular, if infrequent, visitors to our suet feeder about a half mile from the light house. I saw 3 in the yard yesterday. We rarely see Steller's Jays here.
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Date: 9/24/17 4:27 pm
From: Isaiah n <isaiahn0919...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Blackpoll Warbler still at Point Whitehorn
I just briefly saw the Blackpoll Warbler at the 4th viewpoint at Point
Whitehorn Marine Reserve.

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Date: 9/24/17 3:43 pm
From: Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Scrub Jay in Kenmore
I've never seen a scrub jay in this area (I live just outside Kenmore).  I grew up in Oregon (near Portland) and scrub jays were the common jay there.  Will keep an eye out.  Have only been seeing Steller's.
Peggy MundyBothell, WA


From: Linda Phillips <linda_phillips1252...>
To: "<tweeters...>" <tweeters...>
Sent: Sunday, September 24, 2017 3:05 PM
Subject: [Tweeters] Scrub Jay in Kenmore

<!--#yiv9527755784 _filtered #yiv9527755784 {font-family:"Cambria Math";panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4;} _filtered #yiv9527755784 {font-family:Calibri;panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;}#yiv9527755784 #yiv9527755784 p.yiv9527755784MsoNormal, #yiv9527755784 li.yiv9527755784MsoNormal, #yiv9527755784 div.yiv9527755784MsoNormal {margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri", sans-serif;}#yiv9527755784 a:link, #yiv9527755784 span.yiv9527755784MsoHyperlink {color:blue;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv9527755784 a:visited, #yiv9527755784 span.yiv9527755784MsoHyperlinkFollowed {color:#954F72;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv9527755784 .yiv9527755784MsoChpDefault {} _filtered #yiv9527755784 {margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}#yiv9527755784 div.yiv9527755784WordSection1 {}-->20 years ago when I first started feeding wild birds I had a Scrub Jay make one visit to my back yard.Yesterday morning I had my first of fall White-crowned Sparrow, Varied Thrush and a pair of Scrub Jays in the company of a Steller’s Jay. I assume this is the same pair that Martin saw in Lake Forest Park. Just now a Steller’s showed up with his California cousin again (only one Scrub Jay today)   Linda Phillips Kenmore WA   Sent from Mail for Windows 10   _______________________________________________
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Date: 9/24/17 3:09 pm
From: Linda Phillips <linda_phillips1252...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Scrub Jay in Kenmore
20 years ago when I first started feeding wild birds I had a Scrub Jay make one visit to my back yard.
Yesterday morning I had my first of fall White-crowned Sparrow, Varied Thrush and a pair of Scrub Jays in the company of a Stellers Jay. I assume this is the same pair that Martin saw in Lake Forest Park. Just now a Stellers showed up with his California cousin again (only one Scrub Jay today)

Linda Phillips
Kenmore WA

Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10


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Date: 9/24/17 12:53 pm
From: <dlmoor2...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Long Beach peninsula birding
Hey Tweets....an acquaintance of mine has just realized a dream by
starting a new birding website for her area. I am passing it along for
those who are interested.

Announcing a new Birding Webpage: birdinglongbeachwa.com

Check it out!

Dianna Moore

Ocean Shores
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Date: 9/24/17 11:33 am
From: Ed Newbold <ednewbold1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Butyl Creek record so far (27) Blackpoll shots
Hi all,
I've been trying to get these shots up but since I last posted tweeters we've had a Warbling Vireo dive-bathe and a MacGillivray's Warbler bathing and posing beautifully, but still eluding my miserable photographic skills, bringing us up to 27 yardbirds, 24 of which bathed (Bushtits got scared off, the Violet-green Swallow wasn't interested, and the Bewick's Wrens only rarely bathe.  What's that about?)
Anyway, here are the shots of the Blackpoll from this am around 9:05.  It has not come back so far.


Ed Newbold | The Party Never Ends! (at Butyl Creek)


|
|
|
| | |

|

|
|
| |
Ed Newbold | The Party Never Ends! (at Butyl Creek)


|

|

|



Thanks all,
Ed Newbold ( and Delia Scholes) residential Beacon Hill




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Date: 9/24/17 11:25 am
From: Gudalewicz Dasha <dasha...>
Subject: [Tweeters] 3 Pectoral Sandpipers at Hoquiam STP
Tried to turn one of them into Sharp-tailed, but not likely. The sun is blinding, will look at my photos more closely later.

Dasha Gudalewicz
Sammamish, WA

Sent from my iPhone


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Date: 9/24/17 10:53 am
From: Jeremy Schwartz <jschwartz1124...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bird's Eye View
Hello tweeters!

A bird in my yard this morning made me think of *Jurassic Park.*

The scene: the warden character is sharing his thoughts on the velociraptor
pack the park has bred. He's discussing how dangerous they are and how
they've been testing the electric fences for weaknesses. "They remember,"
he says to the newly arrived Sam Niel and Laura Dern characters. He then
describes what's it like to catch the gaze of the pack's leader.

"When she looks at you, you can tell she's working things out," he says.

I had this experience with a Steller's jay this morning. No, my life wasn't
in danger. And no, I had no fear of this crow-sized bird figuring a way
into my house and wreaking havoc.

Rather, it was a feeling of mutual knowledge; mutual acceptance of the
other that made me stop in my tracks. I had just refilled one of our
feeders with whole, un-shelled peanuts, which jays go mad for. As in, a
tray full of four or five handfuls of peanuts was empty in three hours,
thanks to two or three jays.

As I was walking back to the back door after refilling the feeder, I looked
up at the jay, just to watch it. I initially spooked it when I first came
out, but it didn't go far.

Now it sat only 15 or so feet above me in a tree, watching me. It knew what
I was doing, and that I was no threat. It cocked its head down specifically
to look at me, to meet my gaze. It knew where my eyes were and what it
means to look at another thinking creature.

I have no idea what it was thinking about me, but that's just it. It was
thinking about me. I could tell it was working things out.

Keep watching the skies,

Jeremy Schwartz
Lake Forest Park
jschwartz1124 at gmail for com

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Date: 9/24/17 10:29 am
From: Eric Heisey <magicman32...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Gray's Harbor Clay-colored Sparrow
Hey all,

I just found a Clay-colored Sparrow at Griffiths-Priday State Park in Gray's Harbor county. A quick glance at eBird reveals this to be about the 9th Gray's Harbor county record, and only the second fall record. Most records appear to be from the Chehalis River Valley area in the winter, with one October record from Hoquiam STP. Keep in mind this is just from a quick search on my phone, so I could have missed something. The bird was closely associating with a Savannah Sparrow around the picnic tables by the main parking area.

Eric Heisey

Sent from my iPhone

.
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Date: 9/24/17 9:43 am
From: Ed Newbold <ednewbold1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] This must be the fires; Blackpoll at Butyl Creek
Hi all,
Delia and I have experienced a brisk morning on Butyl Creek here with 23 species so far, by far the most unusual has been a Blackpoll Warbler.  I'll post up my shots as soon as I can get that done--We're pretty sure it's not a Bay-breasted or anything but it's always good to have the experts take a look.
This must be the fires, there's a dark lining to every silver cloud.
We also had our first Ruby-crowned Kinglet of the fall.

Best,
Ed Newbold  residential Beacon Hill




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Date: 9/23/17 10:12 pm
From: Rocky <wrockwel01...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Yellow-bellied sapsucker
The female yellow-bellied sapsucker was at Juanita Bay Park again today, drawing small crowds of birders. She's been hanging out in the poplars on the west side of the park, south of the intersection where the paved pathway splits to go to the west boardwalk. Photos here:https://www.flickr.com/photos/28105164@N02/37020717560/in/dateposted-public/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/28105164@N02/37020724600/in/dateposted-public/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/28105164@N02/37020720720/in/dateposted-public/


Winston "Rocky" Rockwell
Everett, WAwww.northwestnaturalimagery.com


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Date: 9/23/17 8:29 pm
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Skagit Game Range N Waterthrush
Dear Tweeters,
Today (Saturday, 23 September 2017) there was a Northern Waterthrush at the Fir Island Game Range (AKA Wylie Slough). This was near the pump station by the boat-launch parking lot. If you see a little cottage on the dike, and there is an American flag on the cottage, then you are in the right spot.
Seeing the Waterthrush was sweet for me, as I had spent a lot of hours standing around listening for longspurs and not hearing any, at Hayton Reserve and Jensen Access.
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch
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Date: 9/23/17 6:13 pm
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Blackpoll re-found Whitehorn Point Marine Reserve, Blaine.
Hi Tweets,
Cindy McCormack's Field trip relocated the Blackpoll Warbler originally found by Jim Danzenbaker and Co. earlier in the morning, at 4pm at the Third Overlook on the Whitehorn Point Marine Reserve Trail today. Fall plumage, two white wing bars, yellow olive head breast and sides, dark eyeline, split light eye arcs. Bird seen in mixed flock of warblers and kinglets on slope just west of area by 50 feet in Alder Tree. Thanks Jim and Cindy!
Shep

Shep Thorp, VMD
Emergency Clinician, Medical Director
BluePearl Veterinary Partners
253.370.3742 mobile
253.474.0791 Tacoma
bluepearlvet.com




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Date: 9/23/17 5:48 pm
From: Kevin Lucas <vikingcove...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Nighthawk
A Common Nighthawk flew over at 5:10 p.m. as I was sitting in my
yard. I don't recall seeing one this late in the year. Earlier a group of
13 Turkey Vultures glided over, heading south. It was a beautiful,
clear 70 degree day here.

Kevin Lucas
Selah, WA
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Date: 9/23/17 5:46 pm
From: Blake Hough <evergreenthinker...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Black-and-white Warbler at Montlake Fill
I was birding the Montlake Fill this morning and found a male
Black-and-white Warbler foraging in the tall trees (I think they are
cottonwoods?) directly east of Shovelers Pond. At first glance I assumed
it was a Black-throated Gray, but it had a streaky back, no yellow on the
face, and much more black/white streaking on the head/face/throat (vs. the
strong, thick black stripes of a Black-throated Gray). When I found it it
was feeding with a mixed flock of Chickadees and Orange Crowned Warblers.

I sent a note to Ryan Merrill, who forwarded it to Adrian Lee and he was
able to re-find it this afternoon.

Best,
Blake Hough
>


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Date: 9/23/17 4:47 pm
From: Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Swallow-tailed Gull article
Nice article.  Thanks again to Ryan for the initial find and id, and to all of the others who helped track this beautiful bird during it's visit.  The past few years with "The Blob" and a very strong El Nino event have certainly triggered some unusual distributions of marine species, and perhaps birds as well.
Peggy MundyBothell, WA

From: Ryan Merrill <rjm284...>
To: Tweeters (E-mail) <tweeters...>
Sent: Saturday, September 23, 2017 4:23 PM
Subject: [Tweeters] Swallow-tailed Gull article

It was recently brought to my attention that people may not have seen the article that Bill Tweit and I wrote about the recent Swallow tailed Gull. It can be found on the eBird NW site at this link:
http://ebird.org/content/nw/news/swallow-tailed-gull-appears-in-puget-sound/

I also wrote an article about the discovery that will be in the upcoming WOSNews newsletter.
Good birding,Ryan MerrillSeattle_______________________________________________
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Date: 9/23/17 4:25 pm
From: Ryan Merrill <rjm284...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Swallow-tailed Gull article
It was recently brought to my attention that people may not have seen the
article that Bill Tweit and I wrote about the recent Swallow tailed Gull.
It can be found on the eBird NW site at this link:

http://ebird.org/content/nw/news/swallow-tailed-gull-appears-in-puget-sound/

I also wrote an article about the discovery that will be in the upcoming
WOSNews newsletter.

Good birding,
Ryan Merrill
Seattle

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Date: 9/23/17 2:58 pm
From: Lyn Topinka <pointers...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Lewiss WP Beacon Eock SP


2:30 ... 3 birds hawking bugs ... seen from asphalt path looking towards  cow pasture west side of park.
NEW County bird for us !! ... thanks to the ebird poster who found them yesterday ... 
Lyn


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Date: 9/23/17 1:21 pm
From: Spencer Hildie <shildie...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Horned Lark at Marymoor Park
Just had a Horned Lark with a large flock of pipits on Marybelle Meadow by Fields 6, 7, and 8 at Marymoor Park.

Also an early juvenile Northern Shrike in the East Meadow.

Spencer Hildie
Seattle
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Date: 9/23/17 12:54 pm
From: Louis Kreemer <lpkreemer...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Rare Sapsucker False Alarm
Hi Tweeters,

I'm sorry to report that the possibility of a rare sapsucker at Green Lake
is not so. Evidently my angle (Looking up) and the lighting made me think
there was more white on the lores of the bird than there actually was. I
later got good looks at the bird, which was only a Red-breasted. Still a
good day at the lake, with warbler migration, Warbling Vireo, Vaux's Swift
and Savannah Sparrow. The immature Green Heron was still about.

Louis Kreemer
Seattle

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Date: 9/23/17 12:21 pm
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fir Island birding, Skagit County
A few arbitrary highlights from birding Fir Island yesterday (9.22.17)


Skagit Game Range (Wylie Slough):
Turkey Vulture - 1
Peregrine Falcon
Short-billed Dowitcher - only 1; a juv
Long-billed Dowitcher - 40 plus, most if not all juv
Lesser Yellowlegs
Greater Yellowlegs
Pectoral Sandpiper - 11
Mourning Dove - 1
Vaux's Swift - 1
Violet-green Swallow - 20
Barn Swallow - many
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 1
Dark-eyed Junco - 1


Hayton Preserve:
Snow Goose - 6
Merlin - 1 black
Peregrine Falcon - 2 perched
Black-bellied Plover - a few
Killdeer
Wilson's Snipe - 1
Long-billed Dowitcher - 6
Greater Yellowlegs
Sanderling - 1 juv
Western Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper - 2
Vaux's Swift - 5
American Pipit - 12
Orange-crowned Warbler - 1
Sooty Fox Sparrow - 1
Lapland Longspur - 1 well seen; 2 or 3 more seen or heard in fight


It was a good day.



Images: http://www.pbase.com/marvbreece/new_images
Videos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/138163614@N02/


Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>

Concepts shape our world.
Concepts are not hard wired.




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Date: 9/23/17 12:09 pm
From: <amk17...>
Subject: [Tweeters] RFI Day trip Seattle to Westport
Tweeters, I am going to attempt a day trip from Seattle to Westport and wondering if it made more birding sense to catch the ferry from Edmonds or from Seattle? Also, if anyone is up for such a long day of birding, drop me a note directly. It's last minute but since I flaked on the Westport pelagic logistics for tomorrow - I thought it might still be worthwhile to make a day trip.

Yes, for tomorrow Sunday, leaving early.

Thanks
AKopitov
Seattle
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Date: 9/23/17 12:05 pm
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen...>
Subject: [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Sep. 24, 2017
Hey there, Tweeters,

Here are the BirdNote stories from last week:
* Love and Risk Are Inseparable, With Gordon Hempton
http://bit.ly/1aU8NbJ
* Barred Owlets Nap
http://bit.ly/R9RWdz
* Jaegers Give Chase in September
http://bit.ly/1iWw99E
* Emperor Penguins Launch from the Ocean
http://bit.ly/2jzgpP2
* Bee Hummingbird, The Tiny One
http://bit.ly/2f1XY07
* Autumnal Equinox - South American Myth
http://bit.ly/Uykzjv
* Spectacle in Swakane Canyon
http://bit.ly/PGTxTB
———————————————
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2yjKXXy
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:<info...>
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org
You'll find nearly 1500 episodes and nearly 1000 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
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Date: 9/23/17 11:26 am
From: Sammy Catiis <Hikersammy...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Morning Breakfast with a Pygmy
Had breakfast with a Pygmy Owl.. what a surprise that was.. Stayed for about 20 min being harassed by the Finches and 2 very angry hummingbirds. It was the Hummingbirds that finally made him leave.. and then chased him all the way to where you couldn't see him anymore. Still a fun new bird for my yard list.. I'm up to 66 species 😊


Just had to share my joy..


Sammy

In Arlington (not really.. half way between Arlington and Lake Stevens 😉 )
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Date: 9/23/17 10:57 am
From: Louis Kreemer <lpkreemer...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Red-naped/Yellow-bellied Sapsucker at Green Lake?
Hey Tweeters,

Believe I had a Red-naped or Yellow-bellied Sapsucker at Green Lake this
morning. Flew to Duck Island at 9:30, I think I saw it later with a Downy
on the island. Heading back to the lake with a camera. Listen for Downy
calling, as it was hanging out with one.


Louis Kreemer,
Seattle

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Date: 9/23/17 9:57 am
From: Ryan Merrill <rjm284...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Chestnut-sided Warbler at Neah Bay
There's a Chestnut-sided Warbler by the greenhouse today. It's inside the
loop in the group of alders, by itself initially and then again with some
Yellow Warblers.

Ryan

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Date: 9/23/17 9:23 am
From: <kayliningalls...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Yellow-bellied Sapsucker still at Juanita
The Yellow-bellied Sapsucker is still frequenting the stand of poplar trees south of the westernmost Boardwalk. It's being seen intermittently, but good views have been had! Also in the park are a Lesser Yellowlegs and a (new park bird for me) Savannah Sparrow.
Good luck chasing!
-Kaylin ingalls
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Date: 9/23/17 5:37 am
From: Jon Houghton <jon.houghton...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Re: Fine Friday for Heading West!
Make that the Hoquiam STP ponds. For some reason, my phone didn't like to write Hoquiam!? Jon Houghton

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
On Sep 22, 2017 9:15 PM, Jon Houghton <jon.houghton...> wrote:
Hi Tweets - I justvmade the cut for the Westport pelagic trip tomorrow, and we just made the 0755 Edmonds ferry this morning. On the far side of the Sound, I got a nice look at a light phase Parasitic Jaeger sitting on a floating log, which was subsequently joined by another in harassing a flock of Bonaparte's Gulls just off Appletree Point. Next stop was at the STP ponds where we were fortunate to spot a super specimen of a juv Sharptailed SP shining amongst several Pectoral s. Always great to have the opportunity to get some fellow birders on this - a lifer for both!! On to Bottle Beach which was a bit disappointing - just a few Black bellied Plovers, nothing Golden, but the pair of Ruddy Turnstone s was nice. At the Westport Marina, the horde​ of several hundred Marbled Godwits managed to successfully hide any Bar-tailed that might have been in there. We hit the beach at Midway about mid afternoon and before even turning to head south, were stopped in our tracks by a super cute Snowy Plover, AND a nice Lapland Longspur, both hoped-for FOY. About a dozen more Snowys seen along the beach, either up in the car tracks or along the surf line, playing with the Sanderlings. All in all, a pretty good day (despite a needed moment of silence in honor of a dead Humpback) with an unexpected 10 FOY, and we haven't even left the Harbor!! Happy Birding! - Jon Houghton, Edmonds

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Date: 9/22/17 11:35 pm
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Edmonds Sunset Ave. 9-22-17
Fittingly enough, the first day of autumn saw a lot of winter migrants in Puget Sound off Sunset Ave.  Scroll down page 22 and continue on to page 23 for photos, including some of a parasitic Jaeger.

http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum/showthread.php?14796-Wildlife-of-Edmonds-WA-2017/page22Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA
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Date: 9/22/17 9:18 pm
From: Jon Houghton <jon.houghton...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fine Friday for Heading West!
Hi Tweets - I justvmade the cut for the Westport pelagic trip tomorrow, and we just made the 0755 Edmonds ferry this morning. On the far side of the Sound, I got a nice look at a light phase Parasitic Jaeger sitting on a floating log, which was subsequently joined by another in harassing a flock of Bonaparte's Gulls just off Appletree Point. Next stop was at the STP ponds where we were fortunate to spot a super specimen of a juv Sharptailed SP shining amongst several Pectoral s. Always great to have the opportunity to get some fellow birders on this - a lifer for both!! On to Bottle Beach which was a bit disappointing - just a few Black bellied Plovers, nothing Golden, but the pair of Ruddy Turnstone s was nice. At the Westport Marina, the horde​ of several hundred Marbled Godwits managed to successfully hide any Bar-tailed that might have been in there. We hit the beach at Midway about mid afternoon and before even turning to head south, were stopped in our tracks by a super cute Snowy Plover, AND a nice Lapland Longspur, both hoped-for FOY. About a dozen more Snowys seen along the beach, either up in the car tracks or along the surf line, playing with the Sanderlings. All in all, a pretty good day (despite a needed moment of silence in honor of a dead Humpback) with an unexpected 10 FOY, and we haven't even left the Harbor!! Happy Birding! - Jon Houghton, Edmonds

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Date: 9/22/17 8:17 pm
From: <johntubbs...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Changes (not good for birding) at Hawks Prairie Settling Ponds (HPP)
Hi folks,

When we moved to the South Sound in 2014, I spent the majority of my initial birding time at the Hawks Prairie Settling Ponds (eBird's terminology - they are part of Lacey's LOTT water agency - and the ponds are part of an aquifer recharge project). Since 2014, I've birded the location probably 200 times, with a bit over a third of those visits resulting in eBird checklist submissions, and my personal species list for the location is 107 - a number that surpassed my expectations from first seeing the area.

Unfortunately, the prospects of adding more species to the location's list has taken a couple significant hits recently, and for those that don't get down this way frequently, I thought an update of the changes might be of interest.

Previously, there was a large open field to the north of the complex - it was one of the few meadows in this area that was not overrun with Scotch Broom. As a result, it added to the bird species here - the reason my location list includes California Quail, American Kestrel and Northern Harrier. Each spring it hosted many breeding Savannah Sparrows, and Chipping Sparrows sang along the woods edge to the west of the meadow. That west woodlot, mostly conifers, was a nice patch of relatively undisturbed forest and marsh between the meadow and Marvin Road, and was one of two places (the other being the woodlot that is actually part of the complex just to the right of the Hogum Bay Road parking lot entrance) where I found families of Great Horned Owls in two separate years.

The large meadow is in an area that is designated for industrial development - specifically distribution centers - so it was apparent that at some point development would happen, but that doesn't make it any easier to see. Last year, a for sale sign showed up along Hogum Bay Road at a woods road leading back to the meadow. Then earlier this year, some soil sampling was done. Over the last couple of months, the fate of the meadow, and a significant piece of the west woodlot has become apparent. The meadow has been cleared and flattened, almost all the vegetation has disappeared in the process, a big chunk of the west woodlot has been logged and two more access roads - one each from Marvin and Hogum Bay Roads - are being constructed. Both new roads run through the part of the woods where I found the Great Horned Owl families. The city began a major expansion project on Hogum Bay Road earlier this year to service some existing distribution centers along Marvin and Hogum Bay Roads (Trader Joe's, Target, and Medline are the major ones) and general growth in the area, including new DC's. I imagine the former meadow area will host one or more major DC's as well at some point soon. Even though I knew this was inevitable, I was hoping it was further away in time, as there are some spec DC's already built in the area that are standing empty.

Of course, with the increasing population in this area, there will always be more development. And ironically, HPP wouldn't be the wonderful birding location it has been if development in the area hadn't created the need for water treatment (thus the ponds).

Other issues at HPP are related to the weather. Two hot and dry summers (this one of course in particular) have resulted in a lot of trees dying at HPP. The row of conifers between the two main east and west ponds is about 50% dead or dying, as are a smattering of conifers in the two woodlots. The LOTT personnel typically cut down dead trees pretty quickly for safety reasons, so it's unlikely the dead trees will be useful for woodpeckers. Even a few of the smaller Garry Oaks, which are supposedly highly drought tolerant, have not survived. Finally, the ponds themselves have basically no open water at this point - the duckweed and/or algae blankets the entire surface. On the main east pond, some type of vegetation has taken over so that the pond looks like marshy ground rather than a pond. The small north pond is completely dry, perhaps purposely drained for some reason.

Of course I'll continue to bird HPP and (at least when the ponds have open water) there will still be a good number of species to be found. But the possibilities are going to be reduced as a result of these changes.

John Tubbs
Lacey, WA
johntubbs AT comcast DOT net




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Date: 9/22/17 7:44 pm
From: Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Fox Sparrows Arrive
I am wondering if what I have been id-ing as song sparrows are actually fox sparrows.  Any tips for separating the two species in our area?
Peggy MundyBothell, WA

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On Fri, Sep 22, 2017 at 4:37 PM, Joan Miller<jemskink...> wrote: H Tweets,
I mean to post this the other day. Fox Sparrows have returned to my yard!
Joan MillerWest Seattlejemskink at gmail dot com
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Date: 9/22/17 4:46 pm
From: Brien Meilleur <brienm...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Black Scoters at Edmonds ferry
Hi Tweets,
There are 3 adult male Black Scoters with a small flock of Surf Scoters right now north of the ferry terminal.
Brien Meilleur
Lake Forest Park, WA

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Date: 9/22/17 4:40 pm
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Lapland Longspur on Boe Rd.
This morning, Joanne Dial and I got a brief look at the Lapland Longspur at
the end of Boe Rd. near Stanwood. Good enough for an ID, but no chance for
a photo before it flew from the berry brambles near the road to the area
about 30 yards to the south. Huge wave of migrating Violet-green Swallows,
some Vaux Swifts, Merlin, American Kestrel, young Northern Harrier, a group
of six Common Ravens, lots of Savannah Sparrows. I got a good look at only
one American Pipit. Other sparrows were Song, Lincoln's, White-crowned,
Golden-crowned.

Phil Dickinson

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Date: 9/22/17 4:37 pm
From: Joan Miller <jemskink...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fox Sparrows Arrive
H Tweets,

I mean to post this the other day. Fox Sparrows have returned to my yard!

Joan Miller
West Seattle
jemskink at gmail dot com

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Date: 9/22/17 4:21 pm
From: Chris <christopherwarlow...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Brown Booby San Juan Island.
Melisa Pinnow just sent me a fantastic photo of a Brown Booby that she found this morning.

She saw it feeding on a bait ball and being chased by gulls near Hannah Heights on the west side of San Juan.

Chris Warlow
Olympia

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Date: 9/22/17 4:13 pm
From: Adam Crutcher <acrut44...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Juanita Bay Park 9/22
Hello Tweets,

I spent most of the morning with Adrian Lee at Juanita Bay Park. There was
a nice mix of summer and winter birds that combined for an incredible day.

Highlights:
Greater White-fronted Goose - flock of 25 headed north
Eurasian Wigeon - Very orangy individual with large coot flock
Ruddy Duck - 7 with small group of coots out in lake
Sora - Juvenile off of East Boardwalk
Pectoral Sandpiper - One in small cove between boardwalks
Wilson's Snipe - 11 on north side but a couple near Pectoral
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - Female feeding on western side of park in
poplars just south of the farthest west boardwalk.
Willow Flycatcher - 1 in shrubs with Hammonds and Pacific-slope at start of
East Boardwalk
Varied Thrush - 3 throughout park
Macgillivray's Warbler - giving chips near YBSA spot
Fox Sparrow - 8 including flock of 7 at south end of park
Lincoln's Sparrow - 12 with most in brushy area next to East Boardwalk
White-throated Sparrow - One at south end with sizable zono flock and Fox
Sparrows
Western Tanager - Female at south end along with a heard only bird

Unfortunately the Saspucker seemed to disappear around 11:15. There was a
decent number of people looking when I left at 1:20 so hopefully it can be
seen again.

Easily my best day at Juanita with 5 new park birds and 86 species in
total. Hopefully the fall can continue to crank out great days!

Ebird Checklist
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39335008

Adam Crutcher

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Date: 9/22/17 3:53 pm
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Western Scrub Jays in Lake Forest Park
One Western Scrub Jay at Marymoor this afternoon.

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On Fri, Sep 22, 2017 at 12:27 PM, Brien Meilleur<brienm...> wrote: <!--#yiv2961090447 P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;}-->
Hi Tweets,

I just had two Western Scrub Jays on my suet feeder in Lake Forest Park west of Bothell Way near 156th and 36th NE...second time seen in my yard in 15 years.

Brien Meilleur




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Date: 9/22/17 3:48 pm
From: David Poortinga <dpoortinga...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Juanita Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - yes
After 3+ hours with no sightings, the YBSA reappeared at about 3:15 at the poplar stand where found by Adrian Lee and Adam Crutcher.

David Poortinga
Arlington WA
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Date: 9/22/17 3:21 pm
From: Margaret Sandelin <msand47...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Pacific wren
Thank you all in Seattle who verified for me my sighting in my QA yard
the Pacific wren (my older books and older memory still think of it as
the winter wren but will now transition). In retrospect I have heard it
call in my yard but wasn't thinking this bird was in such urban areas so
thought it must be someone else esp. since I am not very good with bird
sounds.
Margaret Sandelin
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Date: 9/22/17 12:33 pm
From: Ned McGarry <ned_mcgarry...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Brown Booby / San Juan Island
Didn't see this on Tweeters, so figured many would like to know . . .



Western WA Birders (Melisa Pinnow originator) and subsequently ABA Rare Bird
Alert has this report.



"BROWN BOOBY at San Juan Island. Photos taken at 9:21 AM this morning very
close to shore near Hannah Heights on the west side of the island. Was being
chased by gulls. It did also feed at an active bait ball before being chased
off again. watched it for less than 5 mins. Last seen flying north up Haro
Strait."

-------------------------





Ned McGarry

Sammamish, WA


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Date: 9/22/17 12:29 pm
From: Brien Meilleur <brienm...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Western Scrub Jays in Lake Forest Park
Hi Tweets,

I just had two Western Scrub Jays on my suet feeder in Lake Forest Park west of Bothell Way near 156th and 36th NE...second time seen in my yard in 15 years.

Brien Meilleur


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Date: 9/22/17 12:27 pm
From: Sam G Terry <sgt3...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Alki Point Sabine's Gull
Hi tweeters,

This morning (9/22) at around 9am I saw a juvenile Sabine's Gull from Alki
Point in West Seattle. The bird was flying around out in the mouth of
Elliott Bay and I eventually lost it as it headed north towards Discovery
Park.

Also present was an adult Parasitic Jaeger sitting on a log not far off the
point.

At the Cedar River Mouth in Renton there were two Pectoral Sandpipers and
four adult Thayer's Gulls - which seems a little early.

Good birding,

Sam Terry
Seattle

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Date: 9/22/17 12:18 pm
From: Linda Talman <linda.talman...>
Subject: [Tweeters] .


Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 9/22/17 11:45 am
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Edmonds marsh mystery duck 9-21-17

Thursday afternoon two of us noticed a mystery duck with a long, slim, blue-gray bill at the Edmonds marsh. Northern pintail?
Photos can be seen by scrolling down to post #218 on page 22 of this thread:
Wildlife of Edmonds, WA. 2017 - Page 22

| |

Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA
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Date: 9/22/17 10:50 am
From: Patti Loesche <loes...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Winter wren in Seattle?
“...a common, permanent resident in all forested habitats of western Washington, including large, forested city parks."
http://www.birdweb.org/birdweb/bird/pacific_wren

In October 2006 a Pacific wren got entangled in my hair while I was walking near Woodland Park Zoo.

Patti Loesche
Seattle


> On Sep 22, 2017, at 9:09 AM, Margaret Sandelin <msand47...> wrote:
>
> Has anyone ID-ed Winter Wrens in Seattle. I live on Queen Anne and yesterday morning in the Pieris Japonica outside my window in the shade I saw a very small round dark brown bird with no clear markings and a very very short tale flitting rapidly around the bush before disappearing. i had very little time to get a good look, but the very short tail seems to eliminate any of the other small birds. When I first saw it I thought it was my Bewick's Wren by the movement but then saw no white eyebrow and almost no tail. Bushtits are lighter and have long tail and are usually in groups. Too brown, no white eye ring or wing bar and again no tail to be a Ruby-Crowned Kinglet that I have also seen in my yard. So back to the Winter Wren that I don't think of being in urban areas.
> Margaret Sandelin
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Date: 9/22/17 10:01 am
From: Adam Crutcher <acrut44...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Yellow-bellied sapsucker @ Juanita
Currently looking at yellow-bellied sapsucker in poplars south of west
boardwalk.

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Date: 9/22/17 9:13 am
From: Margaret Sandelin <msand47...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Winter wren in Seattle?
Has anyone ID-ed Winter Wrens in Seattle. I live on Queen Anne and
yesterday morning in the Pieris Japonica outside my window in the shade
I saw a very small round dark brown bird with no clear markings and a
very very short tale flitting rapidly around the bush before
disappearing. i had very little time to get a good look, but the very
short tail seems to eliminate any of the other small birds. When I first
saw it I thought it was my Bewick's Wren by the movement but then saw no
white eyebrow and almost no tail. Bushtits are lighter and have long
tail and are usually in groups. Too brown, no white eye ring or wing
bar and again no tail to be a Ruby-Crowned Kinglet that I have also seen
in my yard. So back to the Winter Wren that I don't think of being in
urban areas.
Margaret Sandelin
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Date: 9/21/17 10:13 pm
From: B B <birder4184...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Visit to Coast this Morning
Some notes from my quick trip to the coast this morning.  
First stop around 8:30 was the Hoquiam STP.  Two SB Dowitchers and a single Pectoral Sandpiper.  Water in ponds was very high with little mud.  Various ducks but very few gulls and no Kittiwakes.
Next I went to Float 21 at Westport.  With some diligence I found and photographed the Bar Tailed Godwit in the flock of 300+ Marbled Godwits. I checked the groins for Rockpipers and found none.
I hurried over to Bottle Beach to be there 3 hours before high tide which was scheduled for about 2:00 p.m.  When I got there there was plenty of mud and hundreds of shorebirds far out. Included were a single Semipalmated Plover and Two Golden Plovers among the 150+ Black Bellied Plovers.  I could ID one as Pacific but not sure of the other.  There were also several hundred peeps.  Approximately two or three times as many Westerns compared to Least.  There were also some Sanderlings but not a single Dowitcher, Knot, Whimbrel or Godwit.  I had expected the flock from Westport to come but they never did. 
A Peregrine strafed the mud and 90 percent of the peeps and  all of the plovers flew west and did not  return. The tide came in very quickly (it was a high tide) and essentially all birds were gone by noon except some gulls.  There had  been 150 plus mostly Ringed Bills.  I was going to drive the beach south of Westport.  I went out at Bonge Road, but the tide was in so much that there was little sand.
I made another stop at the Hoquiam STP.  There were hundreds of gulls...Ringed Bills and California.  The dowitchers and pectoral were gone but a small flock (+/- 75) were in the mud at the north side of the Easternmost pond.  Lots of ducks.
I was really struck by how quickly the mud at Bottle Beach disappeared.  I think it is going to be a relatively high tide again Friday, so keep that in mind if you visit.
Blair Bernson
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Date: 9/21/17 9:33 pm
From: Scott Ramos <lsr...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Magnuson Park, 21 September 2017
From the very start this morning, it seemed like a mini fallout. Based on this and other reports, there is some serious movement going on. How long will it last? Although the clouds looked threatening, it never rained but it never got very bright either. Which hampered the birding a little, but there was so much activity, it was hard to focus anyway. Due to a conflict tomorrow, did an abbreviated walk this morning instead, but I couldn’t get very far anyway, what with all the avian distractions! Some notables:

Cackling Geese - one V flock of 30-40 birds; heard, but did not see, another
Northern Harrier - when I got to Promontory Point, the small passerines were going crazy so I assumed a raptor was nearby. Never saw one, but after about 15 minutes cataloging all the activity, the Harrier flew across the top of the point, heading south.
Cooper’s Hawk - 3 immature birds, Central Meadow
4 Thrushes - AMRO, plus a whitting Swainson’s, several vocalizing Hermit and even more Varied Thrush, doing their churrs and soft songs.
6 Warblers - many Orange-crowned, including at least one gray-headed; several Common Yellowthroat, a Wilson’s, a couple of Yellow and many Yellow-rumped and Black-throated Gray, the latter on Promontory Point, all others in the meadows
8 Sparrows - many Fox, White-crowned and Golden-crowned, Savannah and Lincoln’s, in addition to the regulars
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - first of fall
Warbling Vireo - mixed in with the rest

For the morning, 43 species.
Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39314447 <http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39314447>
Scott Ramos
Seattle



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Date: 9/21/17 9:29 pm
From: <mgfrrstr...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Where are the female flickers?
I have one that comes regularly to my feeders in Mountlake Terrace -- but I haven't seen a male for quite a while.

Mary Forrester

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Date: 9/21/17 7:57 pm
From: Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Sharp-shinned Hawk at Roy (Avian Acres) gets no respect
Tweeters,

I was eating an early dinner, glancing out back at the group of 8-10 Steller's Jays gathering black oil sunflower seeds from the ground (they've been doing this for a couple of weeks), when a quick flash of another bird chasing a jay caught my eye. The jay continued on to the ground to poke in some seeds, but the chasing bird flared up and into a Douglas-fir. I kept watching, and -- what turned out to be a Sharp-shinned Hawk -- chased another jay. Then another. And another... . Each time a chased jay would fly off, but the other jays merely kept on gathering seeds. Several times, a chased jay would land on the lawn, and the sharpie landed nearby. I watched this activity for nearly a half-hour (meanwhile, dinner getting cold!). Once, when a rabbit hopped through, the hawk chased IT.


At first, I thought the Sharp-shinned Hawk was an immature, not knowing what it was getting into. The only jays that were "bothered" were those individuals being chased. The others just kept about their business, not even flying up when the hawk chased a jay past them. NO respect! I did get several scope views, and it was definitely an adult bird (red eye, maroonish chest markings, blue-gray back).


After all this back-and-forth across the yard, suddenly everything scattered: the jays, the sharpie, and even the rabbit: Big Momma flew in. This is one of the largest Cooper's Hawks I've seen on our property -- an immature bird (I'm assuming a female) that's been picking off lots of different birds here since early August. It didn't get any of the jays or the sharpie (or even the rather smallish rabbit), but made a quick circle of the feeders and headed out to feeding stations out front, where I lost track of it.


Definitely better than watching TV during dinner!


May all your birds be identified,

Denis DeSilvis

<avnacrs4birds...>



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Date: 9/21/17 7:29 pm
From: Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course monthly bird walk - 9-21-2017
A dozen of us walked around the Eagles Pride GC today. About 50degF, warming to somewhere in the mid-50's; sporadic rain showers, mostly in the first hour or so; almost no wind. The first bird I ID'd after arriving well before the main group of birders was a VARIED THRUSH. A nice start for the birding day. Seasonal firsts include CACKLING GOOSE; WOOD DUCK; HUTTON'S VIREO; RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET; the aforementioned VARIED THRUSH; FOX SPARROW; and GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW. Several swallow species (NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED, BARN, and VIOLET-GREEN), the Wood Ducks, and PIED-BILLED GREBES (an adult and two immature) were at Hodge Lake. Warblers included ORANGE-CROWNED, YELLOW-RUMPED, and BLACK-THROATED GRAY.

Mammals: a black-tailed deer; a Townsend's chipmunk; and a young coyote.

The JBLM Eagles Pride GC birders meet the third Thursday of each month at 8:00AM. Starting point is Bldg # 1514, Driving Range Tee, Eagles Pride Golf Course, I-5 Exit 116, Mounts Road Exit. Upcoming walks include the following:
October 19
November 16
December 21
Anyone is welcome to join us!

35 species (+1 other taxa)

Cackling Goose 12 Two small flocks of Cackling geese flew over. ID'd by all in the party by voice and body-to-neck length. In addition, compared with another flock of Canada geese that flew over, the body-to-neck length difference was readily apparent. (Note: Cackling geese have been seen within the last week at the nearby Billy Frank, Jr., Nisqually Wildlife Refuge. The fact that eBird even questioned this sighting seems bizarre to me.)
Canada Goose 4
Wood Duck 4
Hooded Merganser 2 On the "maintenance" pond near the driving range.
Pied-billed Grebe 3
Red-tailed Hawk 1
Downy Woodpecker 1
Northern Flicker 5
Pileated Woodpecker 1
Hutton's Vireo 2
Steller's Jay 3
American/Northwestern Crow 2
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 2 Three of us ID'd this species by the overall dusky gray/brown color, whitish underbelly, short, squared-off tail, and gray/brown throat.
Violet-green Swallow 2
Barn Swallow 20
Black-capped Chickadee 7
Chestnut-backed Chickadee 17
Bushtit 24 Two distinct flocks in widely separated area.
Red-breasted Nuthatch 5
Brown Creeper 3
Bewick's Wren 1
Golden-crowned Kinglet 10
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 5
American Robin 4
Varied Thrush 7
European Starling 4
Orange-crowned Warbler 1
Yellow-rumped Warbler 1
Black-throated Gray Warbler 1
Fox Sparrow 4
Dark-eyed Junco 62
White-crowned Sparrow 8
Golden-crowned Sparrow 16
Song Sparrow 14
Spotted Towhee 12
Pine Siskin 6

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39323559

May all your birds be identified,
Denis DeSilvis
<avnacrs4birds...>


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Date: 9/21/17 2:53 pm
From: Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2017-09-21
Tweets – arguably the best day birding at Marymoor ever. No, really. The place was just dripping with birds. The weather cooperated by hardly dripping at all. Week 38 is often a pretty special week during fall migration, but it really outdid itself this time.

Highlights:
a.. Cackling Goose – two or three flocks – First of Fall (FOF)
b.. Western Grebe – one on lake
c.. Virginia Rail – one heard spontaneously calling near Lake Platform
d.. DOWITCHERS – four, presumed LONG-BILLED, in flight with ~8 other shorebirds (Pectorals?)
e.. Glaucous-winged Gull – long overdue FOF
f.. Double-crested Cormorant – at least 2; FOF
g.. TURKEY VULTURE – a tight kettle of TWENTY-ONE, moving south
h.. Northern Harrier – probably at least 6 birds; all the ones seen well juveniles
i.. Sharp-shinned Hawk – one – FOF
j.. Barn Owl – one at south end of East Meadow, 6:32 am. First in 5 weeks
k.. Hairy Woodpecker – one across the slough
l.. Pileated Woodpecker – one seen distantly in flight
m.. AMERICAN KESTREL – beautiful adult male – First for 2017
n.. MERLIN – chased Kestrel, as well as many other birds
o.. Western Wood-Pewee – 2
p.. Willow Flycatcher – 1
q.. Warbling Vireo – 1 at Rowing Club
r.. Violet-green Swallow – everywhere; probably 120+
s.. Barn Swallow – at least 10
t.. Ruby-crowned Kinglet – perhaps 4; FOF
u.. Varied Thrush – perhaps 4; FOF
v.. LAPLAND LONGSPUR – at least 3, East Meadow & Dog Meadow
w.. Orange-crowned warbler – in the ballpark of 40 birds!
x.. Common Yellowthroat – numbers down, but still a dozen or so
y.. Yellow Warbler – perhaps 10
z.. Yellow-rumped Warbler – drab Audubon’s type – about 15
aa.. Black-throated Gray Warbler – ~4
ab.. Townsends’s Warbler – 1 or 2 at Rowing Club
ac.. Savannah Sparrow – maybe 50
ad.. CLAY-COLORED SPARROW – almost positive of ID (will look at photos later). 1 at Pea Patch
ae.. Fox Sparrow – 25, many singing; FOF
af.. LINCOLN’S SPARROW – at least 20, with one singing
ag.. Western Tanager – at least 4; FOF
ah.. Western Meadowlark – at least 2
I’m pretty certain we set high counts for Dowitcher, Turkey Vulture, Northern Harrier, Orange-crowned Warbler, Savannah Sparrow, Fox Sparrow, and Lincoln’s Sparrow

Our total for the day, at 76 species, is almost certainly a high count for fall, and very close to our all-time high species count over the last 23 years!

I didn’t want to leave; I’m pretty sure with more time we could have topped 80 species. But I’m leading a field trip tomorrow morning at the WOS conference in Whatcom Co., so I had to race home to head north.

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== <BirdMarymoor...>
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Date: 9/21/17 1:17 pm
From: Hal Michael <ucd880...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] spotted towhees and their spots
The subspecies of Spotted Towhees have various amounts of spotting.

Hal Michael
Science Outreach Director, Sustainable Fisheries Foundation
Olympia WA
360-459-4005
360-791-7702 (C)
<ucd880...>

----- Original Message -----

I've been enjoying the arrival of migrants in my yard this morning. Among the Townsend's and orange-crowned warblers, golden-crowned and fox sparrows, there were three towhees that popped up onto the telephone wires from the forsythia. Two clearly displayed their spots but one did not.

Question, can spotted towhees hide their spots?

This 'spotless' towhee was an adult male with no sign of white spots or any white otherwise on the wings. It was quite dark on the body but for the usual coloration (rufous sides, white belly). I did view them from my porch with binoculars and examined the sides/wings in detail. By the time I got my camera, they flew off across the street (Francis Ave between N 64th and N 65th).

Cheers,
AKopitov
Seattle, WA
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Date: 9/21/17 12:41 pm
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] cacklers
A flock of over 100 Cackling Geese flew over Fir Island yesterday.


Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>

Concepts shape our world.
Concepts are not hard wired.




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Date: 9/21/17 12:01 pm
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Snohomish & Skagit birding 9.20.17

Very chilly in the AM. Later, it was a coat off, coat on day. Warm in the sun; cold in the wind. No rain all day.
Many birds were on the move yesterday. Highlights:


Boe Road, south of Stanwood, Snohomish County:
Lapland Longspur - 1 on the gravel just outside the Nature Conservancy Gate - photos
American Kestrel - 2
bushes and fields full of various sparrows


Stanwood:
Killdeer - a flock of easily 100 birds landed in a field just north of town


Jensen Access, Fir Island, Skagit County:
Savannah Sparrow - everywhere!
Western Meadowlark - 2 in the fields. my FOS in the area
American Pipit - 1 seen; probably more


Hayton Preserve, Fir Island, Skagit County:
Lincoln's Sparrow - a few
Barn Swallow
Violet-green Swallow - several
Merlin
Peregrine Falcon
Cooper's Hawk


Game Range (Wylie Slough), Skagit County:
Osprey
Merlin
Peregrine Falcon
Cooper's Hawk
Black-bellied Plover - 6, unusual for this species at this specific location
Wilson's Snipe - 4
Short-billed Dowitcher - 3 juv, no adults
Long-billed Dowitcher - 15 juv, no adults
Greater Yellowlegs - several
Lesser Yellowlegs - several
Least Sandpiper - 5
Western Sandpiper - 6
Pectoral Sandpiper - 6
Dunlin - 1 in basic, on the early side
Yellow-rumped Warbler - several
Dark-eyed Junco - 1


Images: http://www.pbase.com/marvbreece/new_images
Videos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/138163614@N02/

It was a good day.


Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
<marvbreece...>

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Date: 9/21/17 11:57 am
From: <amk17...>
Subject: [Tweeters] spotted towhees and their spots
I've been enjoying the arrival of migrants in my yard this morning. Among the Townsend's and orange-crowned warblers, golden-crowned and fox sparrows, there were three towhees that popped up onto the telephone wires from the forsythia. Two clearly displayed their spots but one did not.

Question, can spotted towhees hide their spots?

This 'spotless' towhee was an adult male with no sign of white spots or any white otherwise on the wings. It was quite dark on the body but for the usual coloration (rufous sides, white belly). I did view them from my porch with binoculars and examined the sides/wings in detail. By the time I got my camera, they flew off across the street (Francis Ave between N 64th and N 65th).

Cheers,
AKopitov
Seattle, WA
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Date: 9/21/17 6:00 am
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Nisqually NWR Wednesday Walk 9/20/17
Hi Tweets,

twenty of us enjoyed a wet morning at Nisqually with light rain and
temperatures in the 60's degrees Fahrenheit. There was a Low 0.86ft Tide
at 12:24pm. I had an abbreviated walk because I needed to pick up my
mother at SeaTac flying in for the WOS Conference in Blaine, but despite
the weather and the short walk we had a birdy morning with good numbers of
Cackling Geese, FOS Greater-white Fronted Geese, lots of American Pipits,
and large mixed flocks of primarily Warblers (Yellow Warbler and
Orange-crowned Warbler). Ken, Bill, Carol, Richard, Mary, Anders and Kyle
proceeded further out towards the boardwalk and picked up additional
species. Here is my eBird report from the Visitor Center to the Twin Barns
Overlook.
Good birding,

Shep Thorp

--
Shep Thorp
Browns Point
253-370-3742

Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually NWR, Thurston, Washington, US
Sep 20, 2017 7:16 AM - 10:16 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)
Comments: Wednesday Walk. Light rain with temperatures in the 60's
degrees Fahrenheit. A Low 0.86ft Tide at 12:24pm. Mammals seen include
Columbia Black-tailed Deer and River Otter. Return of Cackling and Greater
White-fronted Geese, many migrating American Pipits and Warblers (mostly
Yellow Warbler and Orange-crowned Warbler).
47 species (+2 other taxa)

Greater White-fronted Goose 6
Cackling Goose (minima) 200
Canada Goose (moffitti/maxima) 100
Wood Duck 1
Mallard 75
Common Merganser 1
Great Blue Heron 6
Northern Harrier 2
Sharp-shinned Hawk 1
Bald Eagle 1
Red-tailed Hawk 1
Virginia Rail 1
Wilson's Snipe 4
Glaucous-winged Gull 5
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 2
Vaux's Swift 40
Anna's Hummingbird 1
Northern Flicker 1
Willow Flycatcher 1
American/Northwestern Crow 2
Violet-green Swallow 100
Tree/Violet-green Swallow 4
Barn Swallow 50
Cliff Swallow 1
Black-capped Chickadee 20
Bushtit 30
Red-breasted Nuthatch 1
Brown Creeper 3
Golden-crowned Kinglet 1
Swainson's Thrush 1
American Robin 15
European Starling 15
American Pipit 75
Cedar Waxwing 5
Orange-crowned Warbler 10
Common Yellowthroat 10
Yellow Warbler 20
Yellow-rumped Warbler 1
Black-throated Gray Warbler 1
Wilson's Warbler 2
Dark-eyed Junco (Oregon) 3
White-crowned Sparrow 10
Golden-crowned Sparrow 10
Savannah Sparrow 10
Song Sparrow 20
Lincoln's Sparrow 3
Spotted Towhee 5
Western Tanager 1
Red-winged Blackbird 5

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch
ecklist/S39311497

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Date: 9/20/17 8:00 pm
From: Betty <bettinab39...>
Subject: RE: [Tweeters] Where are the female flickers?
At my house!

I have had a few of each. Today there was a pair…

Betty

Chimacum





From: <tweeters-bounces...> [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Philip Dickinson
Sent: Wednesday, September 20, 2017 1:37 PM
To: Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...>
Cc: Tweeters Message <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Where are the female flickers?



Female at my feeder several times this morning in Lake Stevens.

Phil Dickinson



On Wed, Sep 20, 2017 at 1:22 PM, Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...> <mailto:<peggy_busby...> > wrote:

I am sure there is a simple explanation for this, hoping someone can enlighten me.



I have flickers in my yard year-round. It suddenly occurred to me that every flicker I have seen at my feeders recently (i.e., for at least the past couple of weeks) has been male, based on the red "moustache." Where have the female flickers gone? I had both males and females earlier in the summer. Thanks. (Murphy's law dictates that within moments of me sending this message, female flickers will return to the feeders, I'll risk it. Hahaha).



Peggy Mundy

Bothell, WA

peggy_busbyATyahooDOTcom


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Date: 9/20/17 7:13 pm
From: Ed Newbold <ednewbold1...>
Subject: [Tweeters] four firsts-of-fall at Butyl Creek today
Hi all,
Delia and I had four first-of-fall birds come to bathe at Butyl Creek, our 15 ft. recirculating creek on residential Beacon Hill, Seattle.
They were Golden-crowned Sparrow, Lincoln's Sparrow, Yellow-rumped Warbler and Hermit Thrush.  We also had continuing Yellow Warbler, an Orange-crowned Warbler and a pair of Red-breasted Nuthatches that bathe every day. Fox Sparrows arrived last week but didn't show up today.

We had Western-Scrub and no Stellers Jay today.  I figure that here in the city is ground zero if this aggressive southerner is going to push out the Stellers.  Delia noticed a Steller's bathing the other day in silence. Silence from a Steller's Jay?  Uh-oh!
Best,
Ed Newbold

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Date: 9/20/17 5:57 pm
From: Jeffrey Bryant <jbryant_68...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Re: Migrating geese
Though I saw zero geese at Ocean Shores this past weekend, I DID have 41 Greater White-fronted Geese fly over my Seattle yard today.
Ocean Shores shorebirding was slow ver the weekend, with no golden-plovers despite diligent searching in the game range and base of Damon Point.
Highlights were Friday morning at the game range: juvy Sharp-tailed Sandpiper with single Pectoral in tow, and a likely Buff-breasted Sandpiper that flushed from the dune grass with 9 Killdeer. NOT a good look, but it was about 20% smaller and paler than Killdeer, and gave the proper squeaky call. Killdeer settled back quickly, sandpiper continued toward STP.
Saturday morning brought a single Baird's Sandpiper on the outer beach between Damon Point and the game range. On my return walk, I refound it with a lone Sanderling at the wrack line. Also a dozen or so each Greater Yellowlegs and Semipalmated Plovers, plus Leasts, Westerns, Killdeer though in unexpectedly low numbers at high tide.
Also checked STP and Midway ponds at high tide on successive days, finding NO shorebirds at the former, and only a snipe at the latter.

Jeff bryant
Seattle
Jbryant_68 at yahoo

Sent from my iPad

.
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Date: 9/20/17 3:19 pm
From: <dlmoor2...>
Subject: [Tweeters] O.S. migrating geese correction
Based on Bob Sundstrom's Tweeters post I will have to correct my "first
of the fall migration" post from Greater White-fronted Geese to Cackling
Geese. Too much time sitting and not enough time birding!

Dianna Moore

Ocean Shores
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Date: 9/20/17 1:57 pm
From: Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Where are the female flickers?
Good to hear.  I will keep looking for them.
Peggy

From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins...>
To: Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...>
Cc: Tweeters Message <tweeters...>
Sent: Wednesday, September 20, 2017 1:37 PM
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Where are the female flickers?

Female at my feeder several times this morning in Lake Stevens.

Phil Dickinson

On Wed, Sep 20, 2017 at 1:22 PM, Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...> wrote:

I am sure there is a simple explanation for this, hoping someone can enlighten me.
I have flickers in my yard year-round.  It suddenly occurred to me that every flicker I have seen at my feeders recently (i.e., for at least the past couple of weeks) has been male, based on the red "moustache."  Where have the female flickers gone?  I had both males and females earlier in the summer.  Thanks.  (Murphy's law dictates that within moments of me sending this message, female flickers will return to the feeders, I'll risk it. Hahaha).
Peggy MundyBothell, WApeggy_busbyATyahooDOTcom
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Date: 9/20/17 1:40 pm
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Where are the female flickers?
Female at my feeder several times this morning in Lake Stevens.

Phil Dickinson

On Wed, Sep 20, 2017 at 1:22 PM, Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...> wrote:

> I am sure there is a simple explanation for this, hoping someone can
> enlighten me.
>
> I have flickers in my yard year-round. It suddenly occurred to me that
> every flicker I have seen at my feeders recently (i.e., for at least the
> past couple of weeks) has been male, based on the red "moustache." Where
> have the female flickers gone? I had both males and females earlier in the
> summer. Thanks. (Murphy's law dictates that within moments of me sending
> this message, female flickers will return to the feeders, I'll risk it.
> Hahaha).
>
> Peggy Mundy
> Bothell, WA
> peggy_busbyATyahooDOTcom
>
> _______________________________________________
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> <Tweeters...>
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>
>

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Date: 9/20/17 1:25 pm
From: Peggy Mundy <peggy_busby...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Where are the female flickers?
I am sure there is a simple explanation for this, hoping someone can enlighten me.
I have flickers in my yard year-round.  It suddenly occurred to me that every flicker I have seen at my feeders recently (i.e., for at least the past couple of weeks) has been male, based on the red "moustache."  Where have the female flickers gone?  I had both males and females earlier in the summer.  Thanks.  (Murphy's law dictates that within moments of me sending this message, female flickers will return to the feeders, I'll risk it. Hahaha).
Peggy MundyBothell, WApeggy_busbyATyahooDOTcom
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Date: 9/20/17 1:03 pm
From: Bob Sundstrom <ixoreus...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Black-legged Kittiwake at Hoquiam ponds
There was a fresh plumage first fall kittiwake on the east pond this morning. Pectoral Sandpipers, Long-billed Dowitchers, American Pipits too. Lots of migrant waterfowl flying past Pt Brown jetty, including one flock of about 120 Cackling Geese.

Bob Sundstrom

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 9/20/17 11:57 am
From: <dlmoor2...>
Subject: [Tweeters] migrating geese
The first skein of south-bound migrants just passed overhead; looked and
sounded like Greater White-fronted geese, approx. 150 geese. Fall is on
it's way!

Dianna Moore

Ocean Shores
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Date: 9/20/17 10:13 am
From: Pam Cahn <puc...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Red-Necked Phalarope at Lake Sammamish
Red-necked Phalarope seen at Sunset Beach by Eastside Audubon Lake Sammamish bird walk this morning at 10:00. Flew away over the lake. In non-breeding plumage.

Pam Cahn
Seattle


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Date: 9/19/17 8:37 pm
From: Mary Bond <marybond11...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Western Grebe pair at UBNA
Hi all, On Monday 9/18 at dusk I saw a pair of Western Grebes swimming and
diving, just to the west and north of Canoe Island at the Union Bay Natural
Area. -Mary Bond, Seattle

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Date: 9/19/17 8:25 pm
From: Eric Ellingson <abriteway...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Parasitic Jaegers continue at Point Roberts
Despite the rain and generally poor lighting for photos, I did pull off a few shots while watching a pair of Parasitic Jaegers harass mostly Bonaparte's Gulls who were actively feeding in loose flocks at the water's surface.


I've couple photos showing the top and bottom sides of the jaeger, one chasing a gull with a fish, and another where two jaegers are chasing a gull that has dropped its fish with one jaeger about to catch it. Good fun and maybe a new county bird or at least the best viewing I've ever had.


Viewed from the Lighthouse Marine Park, Point Roberts, WA.


Click the link and scroll thru the four jaeger photos described above.


https://flic.kr/p/YC6PUf

[X]Parasitic Jaeger<https://flic.kr/p/YC6PUf>
Top side. I watched the jaegers for about 2 hours on and off chasing mostly Bonaparte's Gulls who were actively feeding off the water in a rather tight flock.

[https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4420/37164509562_22f010c830_b.jpg] <https://www.flickr.com/photos/ericellingson/37164509562/>
[https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4420/37164509562_22f010c830_b.jpg]






Eric Ellingson

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Date: 9/19/17 5:09 pm
From: Tucker, Trileigh <TRI...>
Subject: [Tweeters] 3-woodpecker *minute*
Hi again Tweets,

Well, the day has turned out to be full of avian excitement. After I
posted my earlier announcement below, I was sitting in my living room
looking out toward our woods. Id been laughing because a squirrel pair
has started moving into the box we put up a couple of years ago, hoping
for an owl. Squirrel disappeared. Then a flicker started checking out the
nest box, only to be run off by the returning squirrel:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/trileigh/36497197144/in/dateposted-public/

[Cant seem to embed links within text, sorry listserv bounces HTML
messages back as too big?]

Seven minutes later, I saw a blur arrive to the side of a big fir holy
moly, a Red-breasted Sapsucker! First time at this house since we moved in
3 years ago. New yard bird!

https://www.flickr.com/photos/trileigh/37162024432/in/dateposted-public/

Then moments later, a flicker returned to the tree near the nest box and
the sapsucker, got them both in one view! Then the flicker flew up at the
sapsucker, who vamoosed.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/trileigh/37335134275/in/dateposted-public/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/trileigh/37335140225/in/dateposted-public/

And as the sapsucker disappeared behind the foliage, instantly a Downy
Woodpecker flew in, arousing much interest on the part of the flicker.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/trileigh/37191766521/in/dateposted-public/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/trileigh/37335136365/in/dateposted-public/

The Downy stayed only a few seconds, then followed in the sapsuckers
general direction.

I checked the time stamp on the photos: all three woodpecker species had
appeared within a single minute. How cool is that?

All this was followed by much posturing among 4 flickers and two robins,
all hanging around the same section of the fir trunk. Wonder if the rain
has gotten everyone suddenly concerned about shelter? And Im thinking of
this seasons juveniles, who probably have no memory of heavy wet stuff
descending from the sky: a sudden mystery in their young lives

Cheers,
Trileigh

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Trileigh Tucker
Pelly Valley, West Seattle
Natural Presence Arts website <https://naturalpresencearts.com/>
Photography
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/trileigh/albums/72157661836833455>









From: Trileigh Tucker <tri...>
Date: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 at 12:43 PM
To: "<tweeters...>" <tweeters...>
Subject: Arrivals: Varied Thrush pair, goldfinches


Hi Tweets,

Yesterday I was returning home from a walk to Lowman Beach (West Seattle)
and came upon a Varied Thrush pair bathing in a puddle. Then just now at
my sunflower-seed feeder, at least three juvenile/female goldfinches
showed up. I didnt have optics handy
so couldnt get a great look at them, but two looked scruffy (juveniles?)
and one looked more polished (female?). First-of-season for both species!

Good birding to all,
Trileigh

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Trileigh Tucker
Pelly Valley, West Seattle
Website:
<applewebdata://695DA9EC-2C49-4A1D-A921-52BE30A76434/Naturalpresence.wordpr
ess.com>h <https://naturalpresencearts.com/>ere
<https://naturalpresencearts.com/>
Photo Galleries: ImageBrief
<http://www.imagebrief.com/photographers/trileigh#/marketplace> and Flickr
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/trileigh/albums/72157661836833455>



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Date: 9/19/17 3:46 pm
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...>
Subject: [Tweeters] gull search 9-19-19
About 3:15pm three of us checked out the old marina at Haines Wharf Park in Edmonds.  Lots of gulls present, but not the swallow-tailed.

Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA
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Date: 9/19/17 12:45 pm
From: Tucker, Trileigh <TRI...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Arrivals: Varied Thrush pair, goldfinches
Hi Tweets,

Yesterday I was returning home from a walk to Lowman Beach (West Seattle) and came upon a Varied Thrush pair bathing in a puddle. Then just now at my sunflower-seed feeder, at least three juvenile/female goldfinches showed up. I didnt have optics handy so couldnt get a great look at them, but two looked scruffy (juveniles?) and one looked more polished (female?). First-of-season for both species!

Good birding to all,
Trileigh

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Trileigh Tucker
Pelly Valley, West Seattle
Website: <applewebdata://695DA9EC-2C49-4A1D-A921-52BE30A76434/Naturalpresence.wordpress.com> h<https://naturalpresencearts.com/>ere<https://naturalpresencearts.com/>
Photo Galleries: ImageBrief<http://www.imagebrief.com/photographers/trileigh#/marketplace> and Flickr<https://www.flickr.com/photos/trileigh/albums/72157661836833455>


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Date: 9/19/17 11:06 am
From: Bob Pearson <rrpearson...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Owl Attack
A few things to add about the “owl attack.” This kind of thing is open to discussion and is mainly conjecture as to the cause, based on anecdotal evidence and association. I’ve seen or heard an adult Barred Owl close to 3,000 times from about 600 different territories during my research and have been hit or swooped on from Spring through Fall, all times of year, by different owls and in different places. I’ve heard and felt an owl zoom past my head in total dark, obviously maneuvering to miss, both amazing and also worrying in a problematic way, with any contact out of my control to prevent. The behavior is not exclusive to this time of year but may increase to some degree. An owl will also “attack” an inanimate object pulled along the ground by a fishing line. I’ve had owls “attack” my watch thinking it was a prey to be taken and swoop toward something thrown through the air.

This behavior may be heightened somewhat this time of year according to the factors Paul raises as well as some other possibilities. When the juveniles leave, the adults, having spent an entire summer feeding a family, suddenly have a lot of extra time to do things other than feed their young. The local cupboard may be getting a little bare, causing the owls to explore a wider area. It may be this extra time is used to revisit and renegotiate territorial boundaries. The dispersing juveniles need to learn where they can go and which areas are off limits, to them a total unknown. A territorial vocal adult is a good way to let juveniles know where they shouldn’t go. There is a lot of activity this time of year and it might put the territorial adults a little bit on edge.

There are also factors such as individual personality and mistaken interpretation. Some owls are naturally more aggressive or energetic than others and may explain why this happens in some places while not in others. Owls are opportunists and likely to pounce upon any opportunity that presents itself. Something about a person moving through a territory might suggest what appears to be a prey opportunity and it’s worthwhile for the owl to make mistakes if some of them result in a prize. Owls are very keen on movement and sound, not so much on exact identification, which is why they will not take a dead small mammal that makes no sound or has no movement, but will chase a ball of fiber at the end of a pulled string. If a person moving past an owl makes a sound that is suggestive of a prey opportunity, or has something that looks like prey, that may be enough to trigger action. If the person running had a headlamp snatched, it seems possible it was mistaken for prey, or there may have been something else suggestive and the headlamp was incidental. A territorial action is possible and would make sense if many people were getting hit or swooped by the same owl. It could be a combination of any of these factors.

I’m not a supporter of the hormone idea based on similar time frames for light because different owl species nest at different times but all have this increased Fall activity at the same time. The Fall behavior is not staggered in time according to species as far as I can tell.

A possibility to prevent contact would be to change apparel, hair, or anything obvious like a headlamp, and see what happens. Or simply go somewhere else, as was suggested, since owl talons are extremely sharp and strong, eyes are obviously vulnerable, and contact is usually not anticipated before it happens. As to the reasons why this might happen, it would need some structured experimentation to bring it out of the realm of conjecture.

Bob Pearson
Packwood, WA


Date: Sun, 17 Sep 2017 10:50:24 -0700
From: Paul Bannick <paul.bannick...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Owl Attack
To: Steve Loitz <steveloitz...>
Cc: TWEETERS <tweeters...>
Message-ID:
<CAAb_2hjh+<8mvhdofsLdeQqunJNEhVmBX2FBpLwFCQpWVagNF7Q...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

Hi Tweets,

Jamie Acker and I had have discussed these "encounters" at length. I prefer
not use the work "attack" as most of the these encounters are brief bumps
on the head, although sometimes talons are extended.

These encounters happen when many large owls are on the move and are more
likely to encounter one another. It is also possible that the length of
the day at this time of the year (the photo-period is the same as it is
during spring breeding) may trigger hormones and make the owls more
aggressive and reactive.

In the fall and early winter young owls are dispersing from their natal
territories, and adult owls are moving beyond boundaries of the nesting
territories as they utilize more of their home ranges. These things are
happening at the same time with Barred Owls and Great Horned Owls, making
owl encounters between large owls more likely. The adults that occupy the
territory, perhaps the males in particular, are more focused on enforcing
boundaries, resulting in encounters among owls and between owls and large
animals, including humans.

The best advice as Christina suggested is to avoid those areas as this time
of the year or heed the owl warning and move on.

Paul


On Fri, Sep 15, 2017 at 12:40 PM, Steve Loitz <steveloitz...> wrote:

> In the past 25 years of running trails at Tiger Mtn., several individuals
> in my party have been bonked in the head by Barred Owls. All of them had a
> pretty good head of hair. OTOH, I am bald and thus immune to such attacks.
>
> My favorite owl episode at Tiger Mtn. occurred 20+ years ago when I went
> off the trail into the woods to relieve myself and found myself
> face-to-face 3 feet away from a curious Northern Pygmy-Owl.
>
> Steve Loitz
> Ellensburg WA
> <steveloitz...>
>
> On Fri, Sep 15, 2017 at 12:19 PM, Nadine Drisseq <bearsmartwa...>
> wrote:
>
>> HI Jeremy,
>>
>> 14th Pl NE and NE Falls Dr. is just one of several areas in Issaquah
>> Highlands where a number of people experienced owl attacks on or around
>> this date last year. Is it possible that Barred Owlets are starting to
>> leave the parental home range, so that parents might be acting extra
>> protective at this time of year? I posted the warning of early morning
>> attacks on the Issaquah Highlands FB Group, advising people to wear hats at
>> that time since I do Bear Smart and wildlife educational outreach in the
>> community. So, thanks for sharing your post. Perhaps we'll get some
>> responses with owl ID's.
>>
>>
>> *Nadine Drisseq*
>> *Biologist, **Bear Smart WA*
>>
>> *PO Box 152*
>> *Issaquah, WA. 98027*
>>
>> Tel: (530) 628-7787 (call / text)
>> <bearsmartwa...>
>> https://www.facebook.com/BearSmartWA/
>>
>> On Sat, Sep 9, 2017 at 9:44 AM, Jeremy Davis <davisjp23...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Hey all,
>>>
>>> I was sent this from a buddy of mine who saw it on the Facebook page for
>>> the Seattle Mountain Running Group. Be careful out there!
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>> Jeremy Davis
>>> Kenmore, WA
>>>
>>> ~~~~~~~
>>>
>>> Jeff Ziegler > Seattle Mountain Running Group
>>>
>>> Around 5:50 this morning, I was running behind Issaquah High School and
>>> had just turned onto the High School Trail to head up to the Lake Tradition
>>> Plateau, when I was hit on the back of the head. I turned around to see if
>>> someone had snuck up behind me or if I had hit a low branch. Seeing
>>> nothing, I again faced forward and saw what I thought was a reflection of
>>> an eyeball from my hand lamp moving up the trail around the corner. I
>>> followed around the corner, shined my light up the trail and saw an owl
>>> sitting on a branch about 100 feet ahead. Deciding it would be best to not
>>> continue up the trail, I turned around and headed back the way I had come.
>>> I had traveled maybe 30-40 feet when I was again struck on the back of the
>>> head. This time I backed up the trail towards the high school parking lot
>>> as the owl watched from a branch.
>>>
>>> At this point I was a little spooked, so I decided to run around in town
>>> for a while. As it started to get light and I turned off my hand lamp, I
>>> realized I wasn’t wearing my headlamp anymore. What I had thought had been
>>> the reflection of light from the owls eye, was actually my headlamp the owl
>>> was carrying up the trail after picking it off my head.
>>>
>>> I then headed to Grand Ridge. Around 7:15as I was heading down the
>>> Grand Ridge Trail, a commotion stirred about 10 feet in front of me as an
>>> owl took flight from a stump, and took up watch perched on a branch above
>>> the trail in front of me. Learning my lesson from earlier, I picked up a
>>> stick and started back pedaling back up the trail. I took a quick look
>>> behind me to check out where I was going, and when I turned back forward, I
>>> saw the owl had swooped down towards me. I started waving the stick in
>>> front of me and over my head. The owl put the brakes on mid-air,
>>> momentarily hovered over me, and then retreated to a branch a couple of
>>> dozen feet in front of me. Without taking my eye off the owl, I reached
>>> down, picked up a rock, and threw it off the trunk of the tree the owl was
>>> on, and it retreated to another tree farther down the trail. I continued
>>> back pedaling up the trail until the owl was well out of site.
>>>
>>> I then headed back across I-90 to the Lake Tradition Plateau. Around
>>> 8:00 I picked up a stick at the top of the High School Trail and headed
>>> down with the intent to look for my headlamp. About half way down I had
>>> second thoughts and decided I would detour onto what I think is the
>>> Boundary Trail through Park Pointe. Just as I made that decision, I was
>>> nailed on the back of the head for the third time this morning. I’m not
>>> sure if it was the same owl as from the first attack, but I was probably
>>> still .4 of mile up the trail from where the first attacked had occurred.
>>> Once again I back pedaled up the trail until the owl was well out of site.
>>> I probably look pretty stupid the last couple of miles back to my car
>>> waving a stick in the air, and my head on a swivel.
>>>
>>> I’m not sure what the deal is. I’ve run hundreds of miles on Grand Ridge
>>> and Tiger Mountain, including a few dozen in the dark, and never been
>>> attacked or buzzed by an owl, much less three times in one morning. I’m now
>>> in the market for a new headlamp, and maybe a helmet and body armor.
>>>
>>> ~~~~~~~
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone


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Date: 9/19/17 11:02 am
From: Charles Easterberg <easterbg...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Gull Update

Just returned (10:30 am Tuesday) from Edmonds fishing dock & Richmond Beach Park; no STG gull and few gulls in general, mostly Heermann's. Nine days ago had a pomarine jaeger, 5 r-n phalaropes and 1 sooty shearwater from the bow of the Edmonds-Kingston ferry.

No common terns at all this year; have I missed them?

Charles


Charles

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________________________________

________________________________


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Date: 9/19/17 9:13 am
From: Mason Flint <masonflint...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Ride available for Ocean Shores birding on Saturday, Westport Pelagic on Sunday
Hi Tweets,

I'm going on the Sunday pelagic trip out of Westport on Sunday. I'm planning to leave the Seattle area early Saturday and drive out to Ocean Shores for birding Saturday before heading to Westport for the night and the pelagic trip the next morning.

If anyone is planning to go on the pelagic trip on Sunday and wants to join me for birding on Saturday I'm happy to drive and have the company.

Drop me a line if you're interested.

Cheers,

Mason Flint
Bellevue

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Date: 9/18/17 11:40 pm
From: Gene Beall <gene.beall...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Shorebirds at Ocean Shores
I spent a couple hours this morning at the Oyhut Wildlife Recreation Area at
Ocean Shores. Not huge numbers of birds but thoroughly enjoyable.
Highlights included:
- A Long-billed Dowitcher and a Short-billed Dowitcher feeding
side-by-side. See photos and video at the link below. I believe they are a
juvenile Long-billed and non-breeding Short-billed. I'll appreciate being
corrected/educated if anyone thinks otherwise.
- 1 Pectoral Sandpiper
- 2 Least Sandpipers
- 2 Western Sandpipers
- 18 Greater Yellowlegs
- 2 Semipalmated Plovers
- 1 Bonaparte's Gull
- at least 6 Killdeer
- both male and female Northern Harriers

Here's the link to the photos and videos on Flickr:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/gene-s_photos/

Enjoy,

Gene Beall
Sammamish, WA

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Date: 9/18/17 11:12 pm
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx...>
Subject: RE: [Tweeters] Gull hunting
Hello all,
I've made a couple visits to the areas between Edmonds and Mukilteo in
the last week with a special eye out for our Swallow-Tailed visitor,
but no luck. As is typical in September, there are huge numbers of
gulls out feeding in what I think of as the triangle between the south
tip of Whidbey Island, Point No Point, and Edmonds. It's hard to
estimate, given the great distances and constant movement, but I'd say
I've seen close to a thousand gulls in this area.in most years. During
slack tides the birds often disperse to roosts throughout the area. I
would imagine the STGU's diet overlaps with whatever these birds are
eating so it should've had no trouble finding food at night with less
competition.

Along with the gulls, Jaegers (almost all Parasitic) can often be
found in the area as well. I had at least three on Friday. Today, I
stopped by, but the rough conditions made birding difficult.
Truthfully I was there to see Orcas that had been reported, however,
and I did get some very long looks at over a dozen of them as they
headed south.

Josh Adams
Cathcart, WA
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Date: 9/18/17 7:43 pm
From: Jennifer DeSelle <jendeselle...>
Subject: [Tweeters] re: seeking swifts
Some members of Black Hills Audubon headed down to the Chapman School in Portland on Saturday and enjoyed the amazing show of over 8,000 swifts and a hungry Merlin! 
--Jen
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Date: 9/18/17 5:01 pm
From: Michelle Maani <lamoustique...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Chicken at Ridgefield NWR?
Yesterday I heard and recorded what sounded to me like a chicken on the River S unit, between Markers 5 and 6, at the right hand side of the road. I could not see anything because of the high vegetation.  What do you think?   Are we getting feral chickens?https://www.facebook.com/michelle.maani/videos/10214010491405263/

Michelle MaaniSalmon Creek, Vancouver, Washington

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Date: 9/18/17 4:17 pm
From: John Puschock <g_g_allin...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Gull hunting
Howdy all,


I did a final(?) effort to refind the Swallow-tailed Gull this morning. No luck -- hence my reluctance to put the species name in the subject line, lest I get someone's hopes up too much.


I looked at Point Wells, Edmonds Marina, and Carkeek Park. Gull numbers overall seem to be down over the past week, particularly at Point Wells. If any of you are still seeing good gull numbers in the south Sound or elsewhere, it might still be worth looking.


John Puschock

Matthews Beach, Seattle

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Date: 9/18/17 10:53 am
From: Russ Koppendrayer <russkope...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Sabine's Gull at Woodland Bottoms
Hi Tweeters,

The Sabine's Gull was just seen in flight at10:45 along the waterfront
between Martin's Bar and the RV park in the Woodland Bottoms.

Russ Koppendrayer
Longview, WA

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Date: 9/18/17 10:08 am
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Seeking swifts
If you had gone to Monroe Wagner the last two nights seeking a spectacular wildlife encounter you would have been disappointed. We documented six both nights and it’s most likely not going to get any better. JBLM had 13,000 but it can be difficult to get past security. Go a little farther south and the swifts at the Chehalis Odd Fellows Hall would have given you a good show. Go a lot farther south to North San Francisco Bay’s McNear Brick yard you would have been entertained by 40,000 aerobatic wee birds.

Our Audubon’s Vaux’s Happening project keeps close records of how many swifts we can count Saturdays roosting along the Pacific Flyway and 9/16/17 was our second best ever, ever, 80,579.

Larry Schwitters
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Date: 9/18/17 7:36 am
From: Mary klein <marytweetz...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Turkey Vultures
On Saturday I saw three turkey vultures on the tide flats at the end of
Sinclair Inlet, Gorst, Kitsap County. They were together, investigating
the mud for food (I assume).

Mary

Mary Klein
Kitsap County, WA
marytweetz at gmail dot com

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Date: 9/17/17 10:09 pm
From: Wayne Weber <contopus...>
Subject: RE: [Tweeters] CORRECTION: Curlew Sandpiper at BOUNDARY BAY, not Point Roberts
Birders,



I would NOT recommend looking for the Curlew Sandpiper at Semiahmoo Spit. The Curlew Sandpiper, both at Reifel on Sept. 10 and at Boundary Bay today, was associating with Western Sandpipers, not with plovers. Few if any Western Sandpipers roost with the plovers on Semiahmoo Spit at or near high tide. Case in point: when I visited Semiahmoo Spit on September 14, there were about 800 Black-bellies there along with a scattering of other shorebirds, but only one Western Sandpiper.



However, a visit to Semiahmoo Spit may be worthwhile if you are looking for godwits. All 3 species (Marbled, Hudsonian, and Bar-tailed) were seen there today, and a Willet has been with them on at least a couple of days recently.



Please be aware that the number of shorebirds roosting on Semiahmoo Spit varies greatly, and most days there are few to none there. On a visit about 10 days ago, there was only one Black-bellied Plover on the spit. There were far more birders there that day than there were shorebirds!



All the best,



Wayne Weber

Delta, BC

<contopus...>









From: <tweeters-bounces...> [mailto:<tweeters-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Stephen
Sent: Sunday, September 17, 2017 9:00 PM
To: <tweeters...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] CORRECTION: Curlew Sandpiper at BOUNDARY BAY, not Point Roberts



For those hoping to see the Curlew Sandpiper in WA, watch for the large flock of BB Plovers and other rarities which have made frequent trips to Semiahmoo Spit in the past few weeks. If the Curlew Sandpiper continues to follow the coast as it is currently doing, and if the plovers continue to show up at Semiahmoo, that may be the place to be tomorrow. All sid