WYOBIRDS
Received From Subject
3/26/17 2:17 pm Ann Hines <annhines12...> grackle
3/26/17 7:27 am Chuck Seniawski <000000156665bc53-dmarc-request...> Cheyenne Back Yard
3/25/17 8:55 pm Chuck Seniawski <000000156665bc53-dmarc-request...> WHR Reservoir #1
3/25/17 10:26 am Susan Patla <susan_patla...> Alpine wetland
3/24/17 8:15 am Dave Mead <0000035082ac4fbf-dmarc-request...> Say's Phoebe says Spring has sprung!
3/23/17 1:11 pm Nathaniel Behl <behlx008...> Even more evidence of spring
3/22/17 2:28 pm Chuck Seniawski <000000156665bc53-dmarc-request...> northwest Cheyenne
3/20/17 9:30 pm Nathaniel Behl <behlx008...> More evidence of spring
3/20/17 4:48 pm Chuck Seniawski <000000156665bc53-dmarc-request...> A day later but not a dollar short
3/20/17 11:05 am Ann Hines <annhines12...> birding
3/20/17 7:26 am Barb GORGES <bgorges4...>
3/20/17 6:04 am Hustace Scott <hustace...>
3/19/17 3:44 pm <mgorges...> <mgorges...> Cheyenne-High Plains Audubon Chapter Trip 18 March
3/18/17 10:42 pm Chuck Seniawski <000000156665bc53-dmarc-request...> Wyoming Hereford Ranch Reservoir 1
3/18/17 9:17 pm Gary & Judi Ogle <wypafl...> first of season birds
3/18/17 6:00 am Chuck Seniawski <000000156665bc53-dmarc-request...> Great Blue Herons and butterflies
3/17/17 2:37 pm Cody Porter <empidonaxdvg...> Snowy Range -- Albany County
3/17/17 10:25 am Kendra David <000004ea7a81524d-dmarc-request...> eBird Report - US. -Alcova Lake -Lakeshore Dr, Mar 17, 2017
3/16/17 12:46 pm Kendra David <000004ea7a81524d-dmarc-request...> eBird Report - Burlington Lake, Mar 16, 2017
3/16/17 9:04 am Deibert, Pat <pat_deibert...> on the topic of early arrivals
3/16/17 8:50 am Grant Frost <frostgrant2...> Mourning dove
3/16/17 8:07 am Chuck Seniawski <000000156665bc53-dmarc-request...> Turkey Vulture
3/16/17 6:48 am Hustace Scott <hustace...>
3/15/17 3:47 pm Barb GORGES <bgorges4...> Bird Banter for March 2017: Bird book reviews
3/15/17 10:04 am debbie wagner <dwagner...> Good weather birding
3/10/17 9:14 am Gary Lefko <000003881d93609c-dmarc-request...> "Nunn Guy" Birding Trip to Larimer and Weld County Waterfowl Hotspots
3/9/17 2:46 pm Ann Hines <annhines12...> 9th
3/6/17 6:20 pm Hustace Scott <hustace...>
3/6/17 1:23 pm Deibert, Pat <pat_deibert...> eagle nests and others...
3/5/17 10:25 am Chris Michelson <0000001af3511208-dmarc-request...> EKW this morning
3/3/17 12:03 pm Barb GORGES <bgorges4...> Cheyenne Audubon Mar. 21 lecture: plumage color and birds of prey
3/3/17 11:57 am Barb GORGES <bgorges4...> Cheyenne Audubon field trip Mar. 18: Goshen Hole
3/3/17 11:42 am Cheyenne - High Plains Audubon Society <bgorges4...> Cheyenne Audubon Mar. 18 field trip: Goshen Hole
3/3/17 11:26 am Cheyenne - High Plains Audubon Society <bgorges4...> Cheyenne Audubon Mar. 21 lecture: birds of prey plumage color
3/3/17 10:00 am Deibert, Pat <pat_deibert...> thoughts of spring (and you thought I was exaggerating about hummingbirds....)
3/2/17 6:25 am Hustace Scott <hustace...>
2/25/17 1:32 pm Cody Porter <empidonaxdvg...> Rusty Blackbird -- Laramie
2/24/17 8:31 am Cody Porter <empidonaxdvg...> A few odds and ends -- Laramie
 
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Date: 3/26/17 2:17 pm
From: Ann Hines <annhines12...>
Subject: grackle
Great-tailed Grackle is at the wetland on the road going to the event
center.

Ann in Casper
 

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Date: 3/26/17 7:27 am
From: Chuck Seniawski <000000156665bc53-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Cheyenne Back Yard
The first Mourning Dove of the Spring (in the yard) this morning. Some quick research showed that my earliest in the past few years was April 1st and, last year, it was as late as April 21st.

I have had the pleasure of Mourning Doves nesting in the area and spending time in the yard for years now.

Chuck Seniawski
Cheyenne
 

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Date: 3/25/17 8:55 pm
From: Chuck Seniawski <000000156665bc53-dmarc-request...>
Subject: WHR Reservoir #1
No Redheads or Northern Pintails today. But there were two Forster's Terns and an Eared Grebe, my first of the year.

Details...

17 species

Canada Goose 24
Mallard 47
Green-winged Teal 12
Ring-necked Duck 2
Lesser Scaup 32
Bufflehead 1
Common Goldeneye 1
Common Merganser 10
Ruddy Duck 11
Eared Grebe 1
Red-tailed Hawk 1
Killdeer 1
Forster's Tern 2
Eurasian Collared-Dove 1
American Robin 2
Red-winged Blackbird 9
Western Meadowlark 1

Chuck Seniawski
Cheyenne
 

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Date: 3/25/17 10:26 am
From: Susan Patla <susan_patla...>
Subject: Alpine wetland
Friday, March 24


I spent a few hours at the Alpine wetland south end of Palisades Reservoir in Lincoln County yesterday, refurbishing a Trumpeter Swan nesting platform.


Bird life has certainly picked up over the past week although the number of waterfowl was quite low and the group of swans that was there last week has gone.


Marsh Wren--1 chattering away FOY

Double-crested Cormorant 1 FOY

Great Blue Heron-3

Song Sparrows-some singing and others skulking around the willows

Red-winged Blackbirds many more males singing on territory

Canada Goose--20+ pairs

Mallard-6 pairs

Barrow's Goldeneye 1 pair, female with brilliant orange bill

American Coot 1

Bufflehead- 5 pairs

European Starlings 10

Bald Eagle-2 young from last year, chasing each other

Red-tailed Hawk 1


Most of the Bald Eagles along the Snake River south of Jackson are now incubating. Pairs of Red-tailed hawks in active courtship and territorial defense mode.


Spring seems especially precious this year. Enjoy.


Susan Jackson, WY
 

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Date: 3/24/17 8:15 am
From: Dave Mead <0000035082ac4fbf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Say's Phoebe says Spring has sprung!
Heard a Say's Phoebe this morning in Green River, WY.
Happy Spring birding!Dave Mead
 

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Date: 3/23/17 1:11 pm
From: Nathaniel Behl <behlx008...>
Subject: Even more evidence of spring
Hey everyone,
After the success I had on Monday at the Plains Lakes around Laramie I
headed out there again yesterday for an hour or two and got even more
confirmation that spring is here. In addition to more pelicans hanging
around I also found my personal first of the year cormorants, meadowlarks,
and a pair of Ruddys. Given all this, I'd expect lots of other good stuff
to start showing up soon... Maybe even some herons or Say's Phoebes!

Best,
Nate
 

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Date: 3/22/17 2:28 pm
From: Chuck Seniawski <000000156665bc53-dmarc-request...>
Subject: northwest Cheyenne
Yesterday, a first-of-year (for me) Mourning Dove at the High Plains Grassland Research Station and a FOY Pied-billed Grebe on the Air Force base.

Lots of migrating ducks in addition.

Chuck Seniawski
Cheyenne
 

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Date: 3/20/17 9:30 pm
From: Nathaniel Behl <behlx008...>
Subject: More evidence of spring
Hey Everyone,
I headed out to the plains lakes outside of Laramie this evening and saw
yet more new spring arrivals including lots of personal firsts for the
year.

After getting distracted by a flock of bluebirds along the road, I headed
for Blake's Pond where the waterfowl diversity was good, though abundance
was low. I was happy to finally turn one of those pesky scaup into a
Greater and see a small flock of pelicans on the beach, but the main
highlight happened as I was getting ready to leave.

A passing Golden Eagle flushed up a flock of geese and with it, the
unmistakable trumpeting of a few Sandhills. Fortunately they didn't fly far
before landing and I followed them north to Gelattt only to discover a
flock of coots and with it, a Marsh Wren singing in front of the parking
lot. My attempt to leave was interrupted a second time by a few ravens
harassing a Bald Eagle in the distance, and a nice adult male Northern
Harrier that flew in close and nabbed a vole beside the road.

It sounds like there's lots of other good stuff moving in too, so good
birding everyone.

Nate Behl
 

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Date: 3/20/17 4:48 pm
From: Chuck Seniawski <000000156665bc53-dmarc-request...>
Subject: A day later but not a dollar short
My wife and I took a Sunday drive up north, covering some of the same area covered on Saturday by Cheyenne Audubon at Springer and Bump/Sullivan. The weather was not nearly so nice, with a constant heavy breeze, but the birding was fine.

19 species

Snow Goose 2001 [An estimated 2000 flew up as we watched from some distance. Later, a single individual remained in a group of Canada Geese]
Canada Goose 28
American Wigeon 4
Mallard 47
Green-winged Teal 13
Canvasback 16
Redhead 24
Ring-necked Duck 35
Lesser Scaup 18
Common Goldeneye 1
Double-crested Cormorant 4
Red-tailed Hawk 1 [on nest]
American Coot 1
Killdeer 1
Ring-billed Gull 2
American Kestrel 1
Black-billed Magpie 1
American Robin 7
European Starling 4

Chuck Seniawski
Cheyenne
 

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Date: 3/20/17 11:05 am
From: Ann Hines <annhines12...>
Subject: birding
NO WIND IN CASPER. We took advantage of it and birded.



Goldeneye

Red-tail Hawk

N. Harrier

Horned Lark

W. Meadowlark

American Wigeon

Coots

Red-head

Canvasback

Shoveler

Lesser Scaup

Common Meganser

Gadwall

Mallard

Red-wing Blackbird



On to the are near the airport

33mile rd....123 area

W, Meadowlark

Red-wing Blackbird

Red-tail Hawk

Gadwall

N. Shoveler

Mallard

California Gull

House Sparrow

N. Harrier

Killdeer

Sandhill Crane



SPRING IS COMING



Ann in Casper
 

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Date: 3/20/17 7:26 am
From: Barb GORGES <bgorges4...>
Subject:
Hi Stacey,
We had a Franklin's Gull Saturday at Springer in Goshen County.
I'm sorry Mark's bird list from the field trip turned into one long string of names. I don't know why that happens on Wyobirds sometimes.
Barb

-----Original Message-----
From: Wyoming's Birder List [mailto:<WYOBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Hustace Scott
Sent: Monday, March 20, 2017 7:04 AM
To: <WYOBIRDS...>
Subject:

My ranch hand had a gull with a black head on Saturday. We are renewing a field in Bessemer Bend, and the gulls will come in in numbers when we are disking the field. I looked on Sunday, but did not see that gull. I think this is early for any of the black-headed gulls. About 90% of the gulls were California Gulls, and the rest Ring-billed Gulls.

Stacey Scott
SW of Casper
 

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Date: 3/20/17 6:04 am
From: Hustace Scott <hustace...>
Subject:
My ranch hand had a gull with a black head on Saturday. We are renewing a
field in Bessemer Bend, and the gulls will come in in numbers when we are
disking the field. I looked on Sunday, but did not see that gull. I think
this is early for any of the black-headed gulls. About 90% of the gulls
were California Gulls, and the rest Ring-billed Gulls.

Stacey Scott
SW of Casper
 

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Date: 3/19/17 3:44 pm
From: <mgorges...> <mgorges...>
Subject: Cheyenne-High Plains Audubon Chapter Trip 18 March
12 people traveled to Goshen County to Hawk Springs Reservoir, Table Mountain, and Springer and the roads between. We saw the following 32 species, including about 1,000 Sandhill Cranes at Table Mountain and between 5,000 and 10,000 Snow Geese at Springer: Snow GooseCanada GooseGadwallAmerican WidgeonMallardNorthern ShovelerNorthern PintailGreen-winged TealCanvasbackRedheadRing-necked DuckLesser ScaupBuffleheadRing-necked PheasantAmerican White PelicanNorthern HarrierGolden EagleBald EagleRed-tailed HawkFerruginous HawkAmerican CootSandhill CraneKilldeerEurasian Collard-DoveFlickerAmerican KestrelBlue JayCrowRobinRed-winged BlackbirdWestern MeadowlarkHouse Finch
____________________________________________________________
Sasha Obama's IQ Will Make You Laugh Out Loud
likeitviral.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/58cf09d1291b9d03c12st03duc
 

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Date: 3/18/17 10:42 pm
From: Chuck Seniawski <000000156665bc53-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Wyoming Hereford Ranch Reservoir 1
From the 17th:

Canada Goose 20
Gadwall 9
American Wigeon 6
Mallard 15
Northern Pintail 3
Canvasback 16
Redhead 85
Ring-necked Duck 6
Lesser Scaup 245
Bufflehead 1
Common Goldeneye 20
Common Merganser 23
Ruddy Duck 10
Red-tailed Hawk 1
Ring-billed Gull 1
Northern Flicker (Red-shafted) 1
American Crow 2
American Robin 1
American Tree Sparrow 1
Song Sparrow 1
Red-winged Blackbird 33
Western Meadowlark 1

Beautiful day. The surface was like glass.

Chuck Seniawski
Cheyenne
 

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Date: 3/18/17 9:17 pm
From: Gary & Judi Ogle <wypafl...>
Subject: first of season birds
Spring is definitely in the air as I have seen red winged blackbirds, meadowlarks, robins and this morning, early, I heard my first killdeer!

Judi Ogle
Burns
 

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Date: 3/18/17 6:00 am
From: Chuck Seniawski <000000156665bc53-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Great Blue Herons and butterflies
At least three Great Blue Herons were at the Campstool Road rookery and one at the Wyoming Hereford Ranch yesterday. Also my first Wyoming meadowlarks.

And flying about at the Ranch were a beautiful Milbert's Tortoiseshell and several Mourning Cloak butterflies.

I will be sending a full report later.

Chuck Seniawski
Cheyenne
 

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Date: 3/17/17 2:37 pm
From: Cody Porter <empidonaxdvg...>
Subject: Snowy Range -- Albany County
All,

Craig Benkman and I spent a few hours hiking around the Snowy Range this morning. Red Crossbills, Pine Grosbeaks, and Pine Siskins are in great numbers and at various stages of breeding. We also had a few Cassin's Finches and heard at least one Bohemian Waxwing along Sand Creek Rd.

Good birding,
Cody Porter


Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 3/17/17 10:25 am
From: Kendra David <000004ea7a81524d-dmarc-request...>
Subject: eBird Report - US. -Alcova Lake -Lakeshore Dr, Mar 17, 2017
Pictures of the Yellow-bellied Sapsucker are on the ebird check list.


US. -Alcova Lake -Lakeshore Dr, Natrona, Wyoming, US
Mar 17, 2017 9:35 AM - 10:25 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)
Comments:    Beautiful day. No wind. Sunny and warm.
7 species

Canada Goose  14
Common Goldeneye  3
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1    Referenced Red-naped sapsucker but the bird sighted is lacking the red patch on the back of the head. Red forecrown and red throat, suggests male yellow bellied sapsucker. Under parts are yellow.
Common Raven  2
Mountain Bluebird  1
American Robin  4
European Starling  5

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35234243

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



 

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Date: 3/16/17 12:46 pm
From: Kendra David <000004ea7a81524d-dmarc-request...>
Subject: eBird Report - Burlington Lake, Mar 16, 2017


Burlington Lake, Natrona, Wyoming, US
Mar 16, 2017 9:13 AM - 9:58 AM
Protocol: Traveling
0.5 mile(s)
Comments:    Open water. No ice. Windy and warm 65F. Lots of birds on the water, some too far off to identify.
18 species

Canada Goose  2
Gadwall  81
American Wigeon  7
Mallard  4
Northern Shoveler  2
Green-winged Teal  2
Canvasback  9
Redhead  64    Male and Female. Majority of ducks on the water were redheads and gadwalls. 
Ring-necked Duck  4
Bufflehead  3
Common Goldeneye  7
Barrow's Goldeneye  4
Common Merganser  6
American Coot  12
Ring-billed Gull  3
Horned Lark  11
Red-winged Blackbird  13
Western Meadowlark  1

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35215025

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



 

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Date: 3/16/17 9:04 am
From: Deibert, Pat <pat_deibert...>
Subject: on the topic of early arrivals
Kestrels top my list - I saw 2 on Monday - maybe they hitched a ride with
Chuck's vulture as they were in Cheyenne? Mountain bluebirds are
increasing in abundance with at least 3 of my bluebird houses already
"rented". another fleeting glimpse of spring came with the yellow-headed
blackbird in a growing cluster of red-wings. It fled my feeders quickly,
as if embarrassed to be seen with its less flamboyant cousins.

given the cacophony of hoots last night I believe the nesting great-horned
owls who haunt the woods around my house have fledged their young.

hopeful for spring, fear Grant is correct.

Pat, in the burbs of Buford
--
 

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Date: 3/16/17 8:50 am
From: Grant Frost <frostgrant2...>
Subject: Mourning dove
Just had a Mourning dove visit the habitat area behind the Game and Fish
office here in Cheyenne. Seems very early for that. Hope she has a
dove-down parka for the next storm. Grant
 

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Date: 3/16/17 8:07 am
From: Chuck Seniawski <000000156665bc53-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Turkey Vulture
Turkey Vulture (single bird) was soaring over I-25 in Cheyenne this past Sunday.

Sorry for the late report. For some reason, I have not been able to get into wyobirds until today.

Chuck Seniawski
 

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Date: 3/16/17 6:48 am
From: Hustace Scott <hustace...>
Subject:
On Tuesday afternoon, I had 3 Sandhill Cranes fly by me on the bypass
between Wyo 220 and 20/26. On Monday, I was looking at some fences just
north of Coal Mountain Rd. I had a flock of Pinyon Jays feeding in the
junipers, and later came on a flock of Cassin's finches. There were at
least 3 singing males and at least that many females. I also had 2
Stellar's Jays, a pair of Mountain Chickadees, an Oregon Junco,
Goldfinches, House Finches, Hairy Woodpeckers, Flickers, Clark's
Nutcrackers, Ravens, Magpies and a Golden Eagle. Nothing special, but over
a couple of hours at least some birds to look at.

Stacey Scott
SW of Casper
 

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Date: 3/15/17 3:47 pm
From: Barb GORGES <bgorges4...>
Subject: Bird Banter for March 2017: Bird book reviews
This edition of Bird Banter, reviewing five bird books, was first published March 12, 2017, in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle. Please mention the first publication and credit the author if you republish this.
You can see the full-color cover shots, and look up previous Bird Banter columns, at https://cheyennebirdbanter.wordpress.com/.
Thanks,
Barb
Bird books worth reading
By Barb Gorges
If you are the books you read, here is what I've been this winter.
"The Genius of Birds" by Jennifer Ackerman, c. 2016, Penguin Press
This was a Christmas present from my daughter-in-law, Madeleine, who teaches cognitive psychology. It's an enthralling overview of the latest studies that show how much smarter birds are than we thought, sometimes smarter than us in particular ways. They can navigate extreme distances, find home, find food stashed six months earlier, solve puzzles, use tools, sing hundreds of complex songs, remember unique relationships with each flock member, engineer nests, adapt to new foods and situations. They can even communicate with us.
"Good Birders Still Don't Wear White, Passionate Birders Share the Joys of Watching Birds," edited by Lisa A. White and Jeffrey A. Gordon, c. 2017, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
The previous volume, in 2007, was "Good Birders Don't Wear White, 50 Tips from North America's Top Birders."
One of my favorite essays is by our Colorado friend Ted Floyd, "Go Birding with (Young, Really Young) Children." Having frequently accompanied him and his children, I can say he does a terrific job of making birdwatching appealing.
Many of the essays start out with "Why I Love..." and move on to different aspects of birding people love (seabirds, drawing birds, my yard, spectrograms, "because it gets me closer to tacos"), followed by tips should you want to follow their passions.
"Field Guide to the Birds of California" by Alvaro Jaramillo, c. 2015
This is part of the American Birding Association State Field Guide Series published by Scott & Nix Inc. The series so far also includes Arizona, the Carolinas, Colorado, Florida, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania and Texas.
Each author writes their own invitation to the beginning birdwatcher or the birder new to their state.
While a few birding hotspots may be mentioned, the real service these books provide is an overview of the state's ecological regions and what kind of habitats to find each species in, not to mention large photos of each. I'll probably still pack my Sibley's, just in case we see a bird rare to California.
"Peterson Field Guide to the Bird Sounds of Eastern North America" by Nathan Pieplow, c. 2017, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
While including the usual bird pictures and range maps, this book is about learning to identify birds by sound and corresponding audio files can be found at www.petersonbirdsounds.com<http://www.petersonbirdsounds.com>.
Bird songs are charted using spectrograms, graphic representations of sound recordings.
You can think of spectrograms as musical notation. They read from left to right. A low black mark indicates a low-pitched frequency. A thin, short line higher up indicates a clear sound with few overtones, higher pitched and short-lived. But most bird sounds are more complex, some filling the spectrogram from top to bottom.
Pieplow explains how to read spectrograms, the basic patterns, the variations, the none-vocal sounds like wing-clapping, and the biology of bird sounds.
Once you can visualize what you are hearing, Pieplow provides a visual index to bird sounds to help you try to match a bird with what you heard.
Taking a call note I'm familiar with in my neighborhood, the one note the Townsend's solitaire gives from the top of a tree in winter, I find that Pieplow categorizes it as "cheep," higher than a "chirp" and more complex than "peep." It's going to take a while to train our ears to distinguish differences.
"The Warbler Guide" by Tom Stephenson and Scott White, c. 2015, Princeton University Press and The Warbler Guide App.
Spectrograms are a part of the 500 pages devoted to the 56 species of warblers in the U.S. and Canada.
The yellow warbler, whose song we hear along willow-choked streams in the mountains in summer, gets 10 pages.
Icons show its silhouette (sometimes it can be diagnostic), color impression (as it flies by in a blur), tail pattern (the usual underside view of a bird above your head), range generalization, habitat (what part of the tree it prefers) and behavioral (hover, creep, sally, walk).
Then there's the spectrogram comparing it to other species and maps show migration routes and timing, both spring and fall. We can see the yellow warbler spends the winter as far south as Peru.
Forty-one photographs show all angles, similar species, and both sexes at various ages.
The companion app, an additional $13, has most of the book's content, and lets you rotate to compare 3-D versions of two warblers at a time, filter identification clues and listen to song recordings.
This is a good investment for birding in Cheyenne where we have seen 32 warbler species over the last 20 springs.

xxx
 

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Date: 3/15/17 10:04 am
From: debbie wagner <dwagner...>
Subject: Good weather birding
Hello Birders!
Yesterday Bob Hargis, Wanda Major, and I went birding on 17 Mile Rd, Ethete Goose Ponds, Ethete Marsh, and Ocean Lake. The weather was great! There was still some frozen areas but we did find some open areas too. List follows.

Eurasian collared dove
Starlings
House finches
Canada geese
Red winged blackbirds
Robins
Pheasants
Common mergansers
Mallards
Ravens
Northern harriers (2)
Common goldeneyes
Rough legged hawks (10)
Horned larks
Canvasbacks
Gadwalls
California gulls
Ring billed gulls
Barrows goldeneyes
Wigeons
Red tailed hawks (5)
Ferruginous hawks (2)
Kestrels (2)
Ring necked ducks
Sandhill cranes ( 2 doing courting dance)
Magpies
Redheads
Trumpeter swans (2)
Northern shovelers
Lesser scaups
Coots
House sparrows
Tree sparrows
Cinnamon teals
Northern flickers
Crows
Bufflehead
Greenwinged teal
Prairie falcons (1 being buzzed by a Kestrel)

Good birding to all!
Bob Hargis, Wanda Major, and Debbie Wagner
Riverton
 

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Date: 3/10/17 9:14 am
From: Gary Lefko <000003881d93609c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: "Nunn Guy" Birding Trip to Larimer and Weld County Waterfowl Hotspots
Hi all

Just over the southern border of WY (Cheyenne) I am leading tour of Northern Colorado "hot spring lakes" (of late) on Saturday. Details here:
http://coloradobirder.club/m/events/view/Birding-Trip-to-Larimer-and-Weld-County-Waterfowl-Hotspots

Your are welcomed to join us!

Thanks Gary Lefko, Nunn (CO)
http://coloradobirder.club/
 

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Date: 3/9/17 2:46 pm
From: Ann Hines <annhines12...>
Subject: 9th
Tired of being sick and house bound



EKW

Magpie

Mt. Blue Bird

Canada Goose

Junco

Song Sparrow



Hat 6 Road

Mt. Blue Bird

Golden Eagle

Magpie

Scaup

Common Golden-eye

Mallard



Reshaw

Red-wing Blackbird

House Finch

Robin

Mallard

Canada Goose

Bufflehead

Common Golden-eye



Ann in Casper
 

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Date: 3/6/17 6:20 pm
From: Hustace Scott <hustace...>
Subject:
With the snow this morning, my small birds came back. It was fun to see
all the birds, even if it did mean an extra 3 pound can of sunflower
seeds. I added 2 new birds to my yard list, 3 Red-winged Blackbirds and 5
Mountain Bluebirds. Below is the full list seen from my window.

Great-horned Owl - I heard one at sundown
Downy Woodpecker - 1 female
Flicker - at least 1, probably more
Raven - 2
Magpie - 2
Black-capped Chickadee - 1
Mountain Bluebird - 5 males
Junco - about 15 (mostly Slate-colored, with a couple each of Oregon and
Pink-sided)
Red-winged Blackbird - 3
Cassin's Finch - 1 male
House Finch - 70 or more
American Goldfinch - probably more than 70
House Sparrow -1 (I usually have half a dozen, but only saw one today)

I missed the Song Sparrow today. There are 2, and I usually see at least
one every day. I probably just missed it with all the other birds I saw.

Stacey Scott
SW of Casper
 

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Date: 3/6/17 1:23 pm
From: Deibert, Pat <pat_deibert...>
Subject: eagle nests and others...
hello all!

I had the opportunity this weekend to introduce a new co-worker, and avid
birder, to Curt Gowdy State Park and other wonderful surrounds of my
suburban Buford home. We had a spectacular morning with little wind - and
almost no birds!. Ravens and mountain chickadees were common, with a
smattering of juncos. Canada geese were present in low numbers (7) on the
open water of Crystal Reservoir and occasionally a small group would take
to the air, announcing their departure and return with great enthusiasm.
But there were two notable highlights - a northern goshawk - or at least
what we think was a northern goshawk. Definitely a very large accipter
with light undersides. It perched in a tree about 1/4 mile away and then
resolutely refused to move except for the occasional disparaging look over
its shoulder to see if we had left (you could almost hear it sigh in
exasperation). Our doubts were raised by the overly dark head and habitat
- very open country with only small copses of pines. Of course, we were
standing at the edge of the largest stand of ponderosas around - no wonder
the bird was frustrated. I have observed goshawks nearly every year near
my home, which as the goshawk flies is only about 2 miles up one of the
plentiful crow creek drainages.

The second treat was a pair of adult bald eagles! Our first hike wrapped
up rather quickly, and wanting to pretend that it spring despite the
increasing winds and darkening clouds we decided to see if we could find
the eagle nest I spotted last year while hiking another trail in the park.
The balds were riding thermals above our heads the entire trail.
Unfortunately we couldn't finish the trail due to the deep snow (not to
mention the approximately 200 foot drop if you slipped off the trail -
oops), but did see the nest. Actually 5 of them. Only one was truly big
enough to support an eagle - but the others had clearly been used by
raptors at some point in the past few years. The eagle nest was atypical
for a bald eagle - high on the side of a cliff - but only 100 yards from
the reservoir. And perhaps the bald eagles circling haven't read the bird
books describing where they should be nesting. Golden eagles are rare
sightings there but possible.

All the nests were inactive except for the rock dove that perched in the
eagle nest. Yes, you read that correctly - a single rock dove way off the
trail in Curt Gowdy perched in an eagle nest. We couldn't decide if it was
incredibly brave, or stupid, but were disappointed nonetheless. Ravens
were dancing on the winds above the nest, somersaulting and diving, making
the eagles look clumsy, yet regal. It was almost being in a medieval court
- with the jesters entertaining the common folk while the royalty looked
on. Then my child decided to "call" the ravens, and all wildlife, and most
people, vacated the area within a 5 mile radius.

At my home I still have a few (15) gray-crowned rosy finches that drop by
when its cold, lots of pygmy and white-breasted nuthatches, Stellar's jays,
and goldfinches. Cassin's finches, hairy woodpeckers, mountain bluebirds
and magpies wander in for variety. One of goldfinches is about half molted
so spring must surely be on its way? And then the collared doves showed up
to eat the seed. Made me sad so I wandered away to actually do the
parental things I should have been doing all weekend....

I'm going to track the eagle nest (assuming wildlife every comes back after
the echoing raven impression shared by my child. oh darn - will have to go
outside and bird.... I wish all of you the same fate (sans raven-like
child)!

happy birding!

pat, in the burbs of Buford
 

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Date: 3/5/17 10:25 am
From: Chris Michelson <0000001af3511208-dmarc-request...>
Subject: EKW this morning
Greetings birders
I visited Edness Kimbal Wilkins State Park this morning under partly
cloudy skies with a temperature of 58 and wind of 40+ mph. Despite the
conditions there were a few birds about. Most uncommon on this date was a tree
swallow. I have no clue what it will find to eat since it is due to snow
again tonight. There was also a flock of 6 ring-billed gulls flying through.
Others present included an adult bald eagle, several robins and mallards
and Canada geese. One black-capped chickadee was singing which was the
only bird calling. Good birding to all.
Chris Michelson
Casper, WY
.
 

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Date: 3/3/17 12:03 pm
From: Barb GORGES <bgorges4...>
Subject: Cheyenne Audubon Mar. 21 lecture: plumage color and birds of prey
Hello Wyobirders,
The March Cheyenne - High Plains Audubon Society lecture will feature the plumage variation of birds of prey, including our local species. Guest speaker Elizabeth Wommack is staff curator and manager of vertebrates for the University of Wyoming Museum of Vertebrates.
The lecture is 7 p.m., March 21, in the Cottonwood Room of the Laramie County Public Library, 2200 Pioneer Ave. See https://cheyenneaudubon.wordpress.com/ for more information or call Mark, 307-287-4953.
Wommack received her PhD at UC Berkeley, where she wrote her dissertation on the range and use of plumage variation in the American Kestrel.
Birds of prey display highly varied color and patterns of plumage. From Gyrfalcons in the artic to Black Sparrowhawks in Africa, diversification in plumage is a common feature for many hawks, falcons, and owls. Come explore the range of plumage variation across these groups, delve into research on color variability in raptors, and learn about local highly variable species.
Thanks,
Barb
P.S. The no-host dinner with Elizabeth will be at 5 p.m. at The Albany, 1506 Capitol. Please call me, 307-634-0463, if you plan to join us.
 

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Date: 3/3/17 11:57 am
From: Barb GORGES <bgorges4...>
Subject: Cheyenne Audubon field trip Mar. 18: Goshen Hole
Hello Wyobirders,
You are invited to join Cheyenne - High Plains Audubon Society members Mar. 18 to bird Goshen Hole.
We will leave at 8 a.m. from the Lions Park parking lot between the Old Community House restroom and Children's Village (south side of the Children's Village). Carpooling may be available. Bring a lunch since we will not get back to Cheyenne till between 3 and 5 p.m., though you are welcome to return to town at any time. Dress for the weather.
Contact Mark Gorges, 287-4953, or by email at <mgorges...>, if you plan to come and want to be notified of any changes in plans due to weather.
Goshen Hole refers to an area of Goshen County, Wyoming, on the state's eastern border. Just south of Yoder, about 80 miles north of Cheyenne, there is a series of reservoirs included in the Springer/Bump Sullivan Wildlife Management Area.
Farther north, towards Torrington and Lingle is more wetland bird habitat: Rawhide and Table Mountain Wildlife Management Areas and Hawk Springs Reservoir.
Road conditions will determine where we go.
Barb Gorges
 

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Date: 3/3/17 11:42 am
From: Cheyenne - High Plains Audubon Society <bgorges4...>
Subject: Cheyenne Audubon Mar. 18 field trip: Goshen Hole
Contact: Barb Gorges, 307-634-0463
Cheyenne – High Plains Audubon Society

For immediate release, Mar. 3, 2017

Cheyenne Audubon field trip Mar. 18: Goshen Hole
Cheyenne - High Plains Audubon Society invites the public on a free, day-long birdwatching field trip to the Goshen Hole, Goshen County, Wyoming.
Participants will leave at 8 a.m. from the Lions Park parking lot on the south side of the Children's Village and return between 3 and 5 p.m., though participants may return at their convenience. Carpooling may be available. Bring lunch and dress for the weather.
Please register with Mark Gorges, 287-4953, or <mgorges...> (mailto:<mgorges...>) , to be notified of any changes in plans. For information, see www.CheyenneAudubon.wordpress.com.
Goshen Hole refers to an area of Goshen County on the state's eastern border. Just south of Yoder, about 80 miles north of Cheyenne, there is a series of reservoirs included in the Springer/Bump Sullivan Wildlife Management Area.
Farther north, towards Torrington and Lingle there is more wetland bird habitat: Rawhide and Table Mountain Wildlife Management Areas and Hawk Springs Reservoir.
Road conditions will determine which areas will be visited.

============================================================
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PO Box 2502
Cheyenne, WY 82003
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Date: 3/3/17 11:26 am
From: Cheyenne - High Plains Audubon Society <bgorges4...>
Subject: Cheyenne Audubon Mar. 21 lecture: birds of prey plumage color
Contact: Barb Gorges, 307-634-0463
Cheyenne – High Plains Audubon Society

For immediate release, Mar. 3, 2017

Cheyenne Audubon lecture Mar. 21 to feature birds of prey plumage color study
The March Cheyenne – High Plains Audubon Society lecture will feature the plumage variation of birds of prey, including our local species. Guest speaker Elizabeth Wommack is staff curator and manager of vertebrates for the University of Wyoming Museum of Vertebrates.
The lecture is 7 p.m., March 21, in the Cottonwood Room of the Laramie County Public Library, 2200 Pioneer Ave. See http://lonetree.us8.list-manage.com/track/click?u=badc6a2cbafa66e1bf1a64290&id=489f7c2058&e=b1348bdd7a for more information or call Mark, 307-287-4953.
Wommack received her PhD at UC Berkeley, where she wrote her dissertation on the range and use of plumage variation in the American Kestrel.
Birds of prey display highly varied color and patterns of plumage. From Gyrfalcons in the artic to Black Sparrowhawks in Africa, diversification in plumage is a common feature for many hawks, falcons, and owls. Come explore the range of plumage variation across these groups, delve into research on color variability in raptors, and learn about local highly variable species.
xxx

============================================================
Copyright © 2017 Cheyenne - High Plains Audubon Society, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because you are interested in helping promote activities of the Cheyenne - High Plains Audubon Society.

Our mailing address is:
Cheyenne - High Plains Audubon Society
PO Box 2502
Cheyenne, WY 82003
USA
Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can ** update your preferences (http://lonetree.us8.list-manage.com/profile?u=badc6a2cbafa66e1bf1a64290&id=341b734fca&e=b1348bdd7a)
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Date: 3/3/17 10:00 am
From: Deibert, Pat <pat_deibert...>
Subject: thoughts of spring (and you thought I was exaggerating about hummingbirds....)
hello all -

no observations to share, but I have many thoughts of spring as the bright
sun and lack of wind provide a brief respite from winter. I came across
this today and thought I'd share. Its a fascinating and short read about
the Aztec culture who revered hummingbirds as their god of war. You will
see that I am right to be intimidated by the little beasts. Enjoy!

http://www.slate.com/blogs/wild_things/2015/08/19/hummingbird_aggression_fierce_deadly_fights_for_territory_nectar_feeders.html

Another sign of spring is the gathering of sage-grouse on leks to continue
their ancient instinctive mating ritual (which many native american
cultures also highly revere - so many lessons to be learned there). On
March 20 a lek cam hosted by the nature conservancy will be online every
day from 6 to 10 a.m. for your viewing pleasure. The camera is at ground
level and has audio so you can "bird" by ear as well as enjoy the show. I
am one of about 4 folks who gets to "drive" the camera - it is truly a
privilege (and also feels exceedingly decadent - I mean I'm controlling the
camera from inside a warm house, with a ready supply of freshly brewed
coffee and at least one if not two dogs at my slippered feet. My indoor
kitties can also enjoy - and their attacks on the computer screen harm
nothing). Why am I telling you now? because I am likely to forget so
welcome a "gentle" reminder by any of you with better memories to make sure
I share the link.

While watching a lek in your home is awesome, its no substitute for getting
out to see an actual lek. The early rise, patient approach and wait for
the sun, chilled fingers, and brisk wind only enhances the amazing
experience of watching and hearing these fascinating birds. Knowing I am
seeing the same dance observed by human inhabitants a few hundred years ago
sends chills down my spine (that cannot be attributed to the snow coming in
the truck window). Powdered sugar donuts and strong coffee aren't bad
additions either....

Cannot wait!!! Happy birding - Pat, in the burbs of Buford.
 

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Date: 3/2/17 6:25 am
From: Hustace Scott <hustace...>
Subject:
February was a slow month for new birds for me. I only had one bird trip
in February, and didn't add any birds to my 2017 list on that trip. I
found a Hairy Woodpecker in the middle of the month at the house, and saw 2
Mountain Bluebirds in Bessemer Bend on 2/24/17.

However, March is starting much better. Yesterday, I had a Downy
Woodpecker getting sunflower seeds at the feeder, and this morning I had a
male Cassin's Finch at the feeder. Both are new birds for the year for me.

I did get really good views of a Northern Shrike and an adult Cooper's Hawk
at the feeder. I saw both several times in February. From the amount of
seeds being eaten, they were here many times when I didn't see them.
Between those two and a Sharp-shinned Hawk in January, I think they have
saved me several bags of sunflower seeds this winter.

Stacey Scott
SW of Casper
 

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Date: 2/25/17 1:32 pm
From: Cody Porter <empidonaxdvg...>
Subject: Rusty Blackbird -- Laramie
All,

Nate Behl, Jimena Golcher, and I relocated the blackbird flock east of town and got great looks and pictures of the previously mentioned rusty/brewer's blackbird. The bill shape (thin and slightly decurved), rusty flanks, rusty throat, and rusty edging to tertials/wing coverts all point to this being a Rusty Blackbird.

We observed the bird in the pasture at the corner of Sweetwater Rd. and Cottonwood Drive. It is associating with a flock of Great-tailed Grackles.

Tons of Lapland Longspurs in the pastures and fields around town. We came across several flocks associating with Horned Larks throughout the day.

Pictures are in the eBird checklist below.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34793815

Good birding,
Cody Porter
 

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Date: 2/24/17 8:31 am
From: Cody Porter <empidonaxdvg...>
Subject: A few odds and ends -- Laramie
All,

The snow over the past few days has stirred up bird activity on the high plains. Here are a few highlights:

Wednesday:

1 Swamp Sparrow on UW campus, right in front of the Ag Building. Presumably the same bird Don Jones had a couple months ago?

10 Great-tailed Grackles with a few Red-winged Blackbirds near the Laramie River west of town. There was also one male blackbird in the flock that I originally called a Rusty, given extensive brown coloration on the head, nape, and mantle. Sibley indicates that some male Brewer's will show this, and the wings appeared jet black, so I started to lean more towards Brewer's. Later, a few pictures gave some indication of a thin, decurved bill, a pro-Rusty feature. Subsequent attempts to find the bird have been unsuccessful, so the ID is still very much in the air.

Thursday:

A trickle of juncos have started to make their way into town, with 1 Oregon seen on campus by Doug Eddy and 1 Pink-sided at my feeders.

This morning:

As I walked out to my car, a large mixed flock of Horned Larks and Snow Buntings flew over.

Good birding,
Cody Porter



Sent from my iPhone
 

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