WYOBIRDS
Received From Subject
5/28/17 12:21 pm Rich Weaver <popeyeweaver...> Life bird
5/26/17 4:16 pm Chuck Seniawski <000000156665bc53-dmarc-request...> Cheyenne Country Club
5/26/17 2:40 pm Susan Patla <susan_patla...> Possible Fork-tailed Flycatcher Cody
5/25/17 5:02 pm Fern Linton <flinton...> Birds Green River
5/23/17 3:45 pm Zachariah Hutchinson <zachsbirdnerds...> White-winged Dove
5/23/17 3:21 pm Valerie Frokjer <frgnbrd...> Rock Springs area
5/22/17 2:29 pm Valerie Frokjer <frgnbrd...> Re: Best Places to Bird in Yellowstone-area?
5/22/17 11:10 am Gary Lefko <000003881d93609c-dmarc-request...> Best Places to Bird in Yellowstone-area?
5/22/17 9:03 am Cody Porter <empidonaxdvg...> Black-throated Green Warbler -- Laramie
5/21/17 9:13 pm Zachariah Hutchinson <zachsbirdnerds...> Short-billed Dowitcher
5/21/17 7:23 pm Rich Weaver <popeyeweaver...> Egret correction
5/21/17 7:23 pm Jason Beason <aeronautes.saxatalis...> Goldeneye Reservoir - Natrona - May 21
5/21/17 1:16 pm Rich Weaver <popeyeweaver...> Great egret in Casper
5/21/17 12:52 pm Kendra David <000004ea7a81524d-dmarc-request...> eBird Report - Burlington Lake, May 21, 2017
5/20/17 5:17 pm Zachariah Hutchinson <zachsbirdnerds...> Tricolored Heron
5/19/17 6:45 pm Ann Hines <annhines12...> EKW
5/19/17 5:10 pm Greg Johnson <gjohnson...> Cheyenne Christmas Bird Count cancelled!
5/19/17 3:33 pm Chris Michelson <0000001af3511208-dmarc-request...> additions to Zack's list
5/19/17 11:34 am Grant Frost <frostgrant2...> curlew observations
5/19/17 10:09 am Zachariah Hutchinson <zachsbirdnerds...> Natrona County Birds
5/19/17 6:52 am Barb GORGES <bgorges4...> Snowbirds, Cheyenne Big Day Bird Count tomorrow
5/18/17 4:47 pm dt <000000605737ba0c-dmarc-request...> Blackbirds, Blackbirds, Blackbirds, and Black-headed Grosbeak-Laramie
5/18/17 4:08 pm Cody Porter <empidonaxdvg...> Snowstorm Birds -- Laramie
5/18/17 2:25 pm Jim Greaves <lbviman...> Re: Population trends among species
5/18/17 2:08 pm Jim Greaves <lbviman...> Re: Addendum to my last comment - Citizen science
5/18/17 12:08 pm Barb GORGES <bgorges4...> Re: Bird Banter for May 2017: Citizen science makes difference
5/18/17 11:40 am Matthew D. Carling <mcarling...> Re: Bird Banter for May 2017: Citizen science makes difference
5/18/17 11:24 am Jim Greaves <lbviman...> Re: Bird Banter for May 2017: Citizen science makes difference
5/17/17 9:14 pm Bryan Bedrosian TRC <bryan...> Re: Bird Banter for May 2017: Citizen science makes difference
5/17/17 5:00 pm Jim Greaves <lbviman...> Re: Bird Banter for May 2017: Citizen science makes difference
5/17/17 4:54 pm Jim Greaves <lbviman...> Re: Bird Banter for May 2017: Citizen science makes difference
5/17/17 3:10 pm Barb GORGES <bgorges4...> Bird Banter for May 2017: Citizen science makes difference
5/17/17 2:08 pm Jackie Canterbury <jackie.canterbury...> Ibis
5/16/17 8:54 am Jason Beason <aeronautes.saxatalis...> Morad Park - Natrona - May 16
5/15/17 9:46 pm Rich Weaver <popeyeweaver...> EKW & Bar Nunn
5/15/17 9:40 am Chris Michelson <0000001af3511208-dmarc-request...> EKW this morning
5/15/17 7:13 am Matt Fraker <0000022256054407-dmarc-request...> Re: More early dates?
5/14/17 7:59 pm Hustace Scott <hustace...>
5/14/17 7:27 pm Hustace Scott <hustace...> Re: White-crowned sparrows
5/14/17 7:14 pm George Jones <jonesgp...> White-crowned sparrows
5/14/17 1:21 pm Chris Michelson <0000001af3511208-dmarc-request...> eastern phoebe
5/14/17 10:46 am Matt Fraker <0000022256054407-dmarc-request...> Re: Western Tanager early dates
5/14/17 10:37 am Matt Fraker <0000022256054407-dmarc-request...> Re: SW Casper and Gray Catbird early arrival dates.
5/14/17 6:52 am Cody Porter <empidonaxdvg...> Southeastern Wyoming Big Day
5/13/17 6:44 pm Ted Floyd <tedfloyd57...> Wyoming Hereford Ranch, Laramie County, May 13
5/13/17 2:24 pm Jim Greaves <lbviman...> Re: Scope recommendation
5/13/17 1:33 pm Valerie Frokjer <frgnbrd...> Re: Scope recommendation
5/13/17 1:32 pm Valerie Frokjer <frgnbrd...> Re: Scope recommendation
5/13/17 1:08 pm David McDonald <DBMcD...> Scope recommendation
5/13/17 9:56 am <jgwindsong...> Keyhole, and scope request
5/12/17 6:33 pm Rich Weaver <popeyeweaver...> Eagles nest in Casper
5/12/17 3:09 pm Cody Porter <empidonaxdvg...> Rock Creek Canyon -- Carbon County
5/11/17 6:55 pm Ted Floyd <tedfloyd57...> Wyoming Hereford Ranch, Laramie County, May 11
5/11/17 9:41 am Chuck Seniawski <000000156665bc53-dmarc-request...> Cheyenne Back Yard
5/10/17 8:03 pm dt <000000605737ba0c-dmarc-request...> A few FOYs in Pinedale Area
5/10/17 4:27 pm CJ Grimes <cjgrimes...> SW Casper
5/10/17 9:24 am Chuck Seniawski <000000156665bc53-dmarc-request...> Wyoming Hereford Ranch
5/10/17 8:20 am Railer Sixtyeight <railer68...> Re: Western Tanager
5/10/17 8:04 am Dave Mead <0000035082ac4fbf-dmarc-request...> Western Tanager
5/9/17 8:23 am Zachariah Hutchinson <zachsbirdnerds...> Northern Waterthrush
5/9/17 7:33 am Jan Hoar <hoarwest...> 6 miles east of Cody
5/9/17 7:24 am CJ Grimes <cjgrimes...> Western Tanager
5/8/17 8:40 pm CJ Grimes <cjgrimes...> POORWILL
5/8/17 7:25 pm Zachariah Hutchinson <zachsbirdnerds...> Re: Red Shouldered Hawk and Sundance Pond Birds
5/8/17 2:37 pm Chris Michelson <0000001af3511208-dmarc-request...> New at EKW
5/8/17 7:47 am Deibert, Pat <pat_deibert...> Towhees! lots and lots of towhees!
5/8/17 5:41 am Gary & Judi Ogle <wypafl...> FOS
5/7/17 8:25 pm rtcox <birder1...> Gillette
5/7/17 5:56 pm Zachariah Hutchinson <zachsbirdnerds...> Red-Shouldered Hawk
5/7/17 1:43 pm Nathaniel Behl <behlx008...> Rawhide birds
5/7/17 1:20 pm Bruce Walgren <piranga...> Western Kingbird in Casper
5/6/17 10:01 pm claylenef <claylenef...> Torrington
5/6/17 7:27 pm CJ Grimes <cjgrimes...> good start to May
5/6/17 1:30 pm Bob & Suzanne Hargis <bhargis...> New ones last 2 days
5/6/17 11:19 am Cody Porter <empidonaxdvg...> Greenbelt Birds -- Laramie
5/5/17 4:46 pm Tina Payton <rainofautumn...> Blue-winged & Cinnamon Teal in Cheyenne
5/4/17 11:04 pm Chuck Seniawski <000000156665bc53-dmarc-request...> Wyoming Hereford Ranch and Reservoir 1
5/4/17 10:28 pm Cody Porter <empidonaxdvg...> Nothern Saw-whets -- Albany Co.
5/4/17 6:40 pm Zachariah Hutchinson <zachsbirdnerds...> The Birds Keep Rolling In
5/4/17 6:00 am Zachariah Hutchinson <zachsbirdnerds...> Lesser Black-backed Gull
5/3/17 3:15 pm Chris Michelson <0000001af3511208-dmarc-request...> Casper area
5/2/17 5:51 pm Bob & Suzanne Hargis <bhargis...> First oriole today
5/2/17 2:20 pm <jgwindsong...> Keyhole, /Sunday 4/30
5/2/17 10:23 am Barb GORGES <bgorges4...> Cheyenne Big Day Bird Count May 20
5/2/17 10:04 am Zachariah Hutchinson <zachsbirdnerds...> JTL Gravel Ponds
5/2/17 9:35 am Sarah Dominic <000004e044780be3-dmarc-request...> Correction. Herring Gull not Thayer's Gull.
5/2/17 9:14 am Sarah Dominic <000004e044780be3-dmarc-request...> JTL pond Thayer's Gull
5/2/17 6:03 am Kendra David <000004ea7a81524d-dmarc-request...> McDonald Reservoir, May 1, 2017
5/1/17 4:26 pm Zachariah Hutchinson <zachsbirdnerds...> EKW Warbler Walks
5/1/17 1:00 pm Zachariah Hutchinson <zachsbirdnerds...> A Couple of Rarities at Goldeneye - 4/30
5/1/17 12:16 pm Rich Weaver <popeyeweaver...> Blue grey gnatcatcher
5/1/17 10:44 am Jacqueline M Hauptman <jhauptma...> cedar waxwings in Guernsey
5/1/17 10:14 am SUBSCRIBE WYOBIRDS Anonymous <wyncoop1...> White Crowned Sparrows
4/30/17 2:54 pm Barb GORGES <bgorges4...> Re: Better link for Bird Banter column on California birding
4/30/17 2:51 pm Barb GORGES <bgorges4...> Better link for Bird Banter column on California birding
4/30/17 1:36 pm Barb GORGES <bgorges4...> Bird Banter, April 30, 2017: California birding
4/30/17 11:42 am Bob & Suzanne Hargis <bhargis...> Black scoter
4/30/17 6:28 am Bob & Suzanne Hargis <bhargis...> Fwd: eBird Report - ST STEPHENS POND, Apr 29, 2017
4/30/17 6:21 am Bob & Suzanne Hargis <bhargis...> Black Scoter
4/30/17 5:19 am Lewis Hein <lhein...> Mystery raptor
4/29/17 5:15 pm Hustace Scott <hustace...>
4/29/17 4:23 pm Kathy Adams <0000023cfbb53607-dmarc-request...> lesser goldfinch & white-winged dove - Casper
4/29/17 12:14 pm Bill Vetter <wm_vetter...> Re: Gillette
4/29/17 11:32 am rtcox <birder1...> Gillette
4/29/17 7:56 am rtcox <birder1...> Re: migrants in Gillette
 
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Date: 5/28/17 12:21 pm
From: Rich Weaver <popeyeweaver...>
Subject: Life bird
Hi wyoming birders,

This last week I was taking photos of birds at jtl ponds in Casper. I took
a series of photos of what I thought was a Western Grebe and thought off
handedly that I ought to look it up. After submitting it to Matt Fraker, I
was informed I had a Clark's Grebe. This is a life bird which apparently
is uncommon for the area. Funny part is that I was lucky enough to have a
barn swallow fly through the frame in one of the series of photos upon
review and editorial process.

I have to get out there and see what else is out there before life passes
me by. Best wishes, Rich
 

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Date: 5/26/17 4:16 pm
From: Chuck Seniawski <000000156665bc53-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Cheyenne Country Club
The best item of the day was a really close-up look at an adult Black-Crowned Night Heron, which was so intent in its hunting that it ignored our presence.

23 species

Gadwall 2
Mallard 13
Ruddy Duck 6
American White Pelican 1
Black-crowned Night-Heron 3
American Coot 5
Forster's Tern 5
Eurasian Collared-Dove 1
Northern Flicker (Red-shafted) 3
Black-billed Magpie 3
American Crow 14
Barn Swallow 2
Cliff Swallow 2
Red-breasted Nuthatch 1
White-breasted Nuthatch 1
Swainson's Thrush 3
American Robin 1
Common Yellowthroat 2
Yellow Warbler 2 Pair, foraging together
Red-winged Blackbird 22
Yellow-headed Blackbird 13
Great-tailed Grackle 10
House Sparrow 3

Chuck Seniawski
Cheyenne
 

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Date: 5/26/17 2:40 pm
From: Susan Patla <susan_patla...>
Subject: Possible Fork-tailed Flycatcher Cody
Jay Carlisle of Intermountain Bird Observatory is in Cody this weekend, tagging some Long-billed Curlews for a regional Intermountain study on this species which is being funded by BLM and WGFD.


He reported that while doing fieldwork on Heart Mountain, they had a "pretty torturous sighting" of a juvenile Fork-tailed Flycatcher that flew north over them and continued zooming away in that direction out of sight.


Jay's description:


Was longer and less compact than an Eastern Kingbird (to the point that I considered a cuckoo by shape even though I knew it was a Tyrannus), we did not see the white tail tips. I thought I saw a paler gray upperside. It was a brief sighting and no chance for a photo but I wanted to get the word out to Wyoming birders.


My note: if you don't know Jay he is an exceptional field ornithologist/birder.


Happy holidays..sounds like lots of migrants pouring through now.


Cheers, Susan
 

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Date: 5/25/17 5:02 pm
From: Fern Linton <flinton...>
Subject: Birds Green River
very windy yesterday in the Green River/ Rock Springs area. I remarked to my birding friend that I had not seen many new birds in my yard. the birds had to show off , Today I had a Swainsons Thrush, Orange Crowned Warbler, Wilson's Warbler, Ruby Crowned Kinglet, Dusky Flycatcher.Yellow Warbler. and perhaps another warbler. They must have come in with the cold front that blew in yesterday.
 

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Date: 5/23/17 3:45 pm
From: Zachariah Hutchinson <zachsbirdnerds...>
Subject: White-winged Dove
Hey All,

Today while banding, I had a White-winged Dove fly over at Edness K Wilkins
State Park. This has been a WY nemesis bird for me. So *frigate *frustrating
until now!

Woo hoo!

Zach
Casper

--
Zach Hutchinson
President
Murie Audubon Society
murieaudubon.org <http://www.murieaudubon.org>
Community Naturalist
Audubon Rockies
rockies.audubon.org <http://www.rockies.audubon.org>
 

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Date: 5/23/17 3:21 pm
From: Valerie Frokjer <frgnbrd...>
Subject: Rock Springs area
Hi. I am in the rock springs area for the next couple of weeks. Are there any local birders that would like to meet up and show us (myself plus 1) where to find some birds? We are free most evenings. Going home over memorial but will be back the following week and weekend. So lots of time. 😀😀

Thanks
Valerie
801-510-2108

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/22/17 2:29 pm
From: Valerie Frokjer <frgnbrd...>
Subject: Re: Best Places to Bird in Yellowstone-area?
Hi.

Yellowstone doesn't have any great birding spots. Hardy rapids you can get Harlequin ducks and sometime dippers. Any area where there are people eating, picnic areas or visitor center parking you can find grey jays. There are trumpeter swans usually in Hayden valley area. Of course there are tweeties everywhere if you get off the path and go for a walk.

I hope that helps
Valerie

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 22, 2017, at 12:09 PM, Gary Lefko <000003881d93609c-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> Hi all
>
> I have friend heading that way in three weeks looking for hot spots to bird.
>
> Thanks Gary Lefko, Nunn
> http://coloradobirder.club/
 

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Date: 5/22/17 11:10 am
From: Gary Lefko <000003881d93609c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Best Places to Bird in Yellowstone-area?
Hi all

I have friend heading that way in three weeks looking for hot spots to bird.

Thanks Gary Lefko, Nunn
http://coloradobirder.club/
 

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Date: 5/22/17 9:03 am
From: Cody Porter <empidonaxdvg...>
Subject: Black-throated Green Warbler -- Laramie
All,

Nate Behl and I just had a Black-throated Green Warbler at the Greenhill Cemetery in Laramie.

Good birding,
Cody Porter

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/21/17 9:13 pm
From: Zachariah Hutchinson <zachsbirdnerds...>
Subject: Short-billed Dowitcher
Hello from the sunburnt side!

I found a Short-billed Dowitcher today at Goldeneye. I haven't gone too
deep into the photos I took to see which subspecies. They will be on eBird
eventually, along with additional photos of the tricolored heron.

Use sunblock!

Zach
Casper
--
Zach Hutchinson
President
Murie Audubon Society
murieaudubon.org <http://www.murieaudubon.org>
Community Naturalist
Audubon Rockies
rockies.audubon.org <http://www.rockies.audubon.org>
 

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Date: 5/21/17 7:23 pm
From: Rich Weaver <popeyeweaver...>
Subject: Egret correction
Hello Wyoming birding community,

I had a snowy egret not a great egret. My apologies for the error. I have
some great photographs of it if you would like to see them later on this
week. Thank you rich
 

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Date: 5/21/17 7:23 pm
From: Jason Beason <aeronautes.saxatalis...>
Subject: Goldeneye Reservoir - Natrona - May 21
I also looked for Tricolored Heron early this morning but had no success.
First time here for me and it was great nonetheless!

Burlington Lake, Natrona, Wyoming, US
May 21, 2017 6:07 AM - 7:48 AM
Protocol: Stationary
42 species (+2 other taxa)

Canada Goose X
American Wigeon 5
Mallard 6
Blue-winged Teal 4
Cinnamon Teal 2
Northern Shoveler X
Northern Pintail 1
Green-winged Teal 4
Greater/Lesser Scaup 6
Ruddy Duck 5
Common Loon 1
Eared Grebe X
Western Grebe X
Clark's Grebe 1
Double-crested Cormorant 9
American White Pelican X
Black-crowned Night-Heron 1
White-faced Ibis 6
Northern Harrier 1
American Coot X
Black-necked Stilt 4
American Avocet 9
Killdeer 6
Long-billed Dowitcher X
Wilson's Phalarope 13
Red-necked Phalarope 1
Franklin's Gull X
Ring-billed Gull X
gull sp. X
Forster's Tern 5
Common Raven 3
Horned Lark 6
Violet-green Swallow X
Bank Swallow X
Barn Swallow X
Cliff Swallow X
Chipping Sparrow 1
Lark Sparrow 2
Lark Bunting 6
Red-winged Blackbird 12
Western Meadowlark 6
Yellow-headed Blackbird 2
Common Grackle 6
Brown-headed Cowbird 4

--
Jason Beason
Casper, WY
 

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Date: 5/21/17 1:16 pm
From: Rich Weaver <popeyeweaver...>
Subject: Great egret in Casper
Hello Wyoming birding community

I found a great egret on the Bryan stock Trail bridge looking West. I took
some photographs with my camera and was able to shoot closer.

According to second-hand reports from a fisherman there were three great
egrets in this tip of the island.

Best wishes rich
 

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Date: 5/21/17 12:52 pm
From: Kendra David <000004ea7a81524d-dmarc-request...>
Subject: eBird Report - Burlington Lake, May 21, 2017
Unfortunately, I didn't see the tricolored heron, but it was a good day of birding. Some pictures on ebird. 
Burlington Lake, Natrona, Wyoming, US
May 21, 2017 8:33 AM - 10:03 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)
33 species (+2 other taxa)

Canada Goose  3
Gadwall  1
Mallard  6
Blue-winged Teal  1
Cinnamon Teal  3
Northern Shoveler  4
Northern Pintail  2
Ruddy Duck  3
Common Loon  1
Eared Grebe  15
Western Grebe  8
Double-crested Cormorant  3
American White Pelican  23
Snowy Egret  1
Black-crowned Night-Heron  1
American Coot  40
Black-necked Stilt  3
American Avocet  4
Long-billed Dowitcher  1
Wilson's Phalarope  7
Franklin's Gull  10
gull sp.  4
Forster's Tern  1
Common Raven  1
Horned Lark  5
Violet-green Swallow  3
Cliff Swallow  21
swallow sp.  120
Yellow Warbler  1
Chipping Sparrow  1
Red-winged Blackbird  16
Western Meadowlark  2
Yellow-headed Blackbird  2
Common Grackle  1
Brown-headed Cowbird  7

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37039862

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



 

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Date: 5/20/17 5:17 pm
From: Zachariah Hutchinson <zachsbirdnerds...>
Subject: Tricolored Heron
There is a tricolored heron at goldeneye in Natrona county.

Zach
--
Zach Hutchinson
President
Murie Audubon Society
murieaudubon.org <http://www.murieaudubon.org>
Community Naturalist
Audubon Rockies
rockies.audubon.org <http://www.rockies.audubon.org>
 

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Date: 5/19/17 6:45 pm
From: Ann Hines <annhines12...>
Subject: EKW
I'd like to add Northern Mocking Bird to Chris and Zack's list for EKW
today.

Ann in Casper
 

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Date: 5/19/17 5:10 pm
From: Greg Johnson <gjohnson...>
Subject: Cheyenne Christmas Bird Count cancelled!
Oops, I meant our Spring Big Day count. The 14" of snow on the ground had
me confused. The City of Cheyenne has told residents to avoid city parks
all weekend due to falling tree hazards. Similar hazards would be
associated with the Wyoming Hereford Ranch and High Plains Research
Station. In the interest of safety we are cancelling tomorrow's Big Day
count. I think this is a first. We plan to reschedule everything to next
weekend (Big Day count Saturday; potluck Sunday). Stay safe out there!
 

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Date: 5/19/17 3:33 pm
From: Chris Michelson <0000001af3511208-dmarc-request...>
Subject: additions to Zack's list
Greetings birders
A couple of additions to Zack's list from this morning. This afternoon
at Goldeneye Reservoir I found at least 2 common terns. They were perched
on the bollards boat ramp. At EKW this afternoon I foud the blackpoll
warbler which was heard this morning in the snow. Good birding to all.
Chris Michelson
Casper, WY
 

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Date: 5/19/17 11:34 am
From: Grant Frost <frostgrant2...>
Subject: curlew observations
The Wyoming Game and Fish Department is looking to expand a project into
the eastern half of the state. Curlews will be captured and have satellite
transmitters placed on them to follow their migrations. This is an
extension of the project that can be seen here:
https://wgfd.wyo.gov/Regional-Offices/Pinedale-Region/Pinedale-Regional-News/Game-and-Fish-Resumes-Long-billed-Curlew-Research
What I'm asking for here is curlew observations that might allow this work
to expand into eastern Wyoming. Coordinates or an easily identifiable
location, plus a note about the land status (public or private) will be
very helpful. Thanks in advance! Grant Frost
 

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Date: 5/19/17 10:09 am
From: Zachariah Hutchinson <zachsbirdnerds...>
Subject: Natrona County Birds
Hello WyoBirders!

We had a few unusual birds this morning around the Casper area after we
finished our early morning Warbler walk.

At the JTL Ponds, Semipalmated Plover, 5 Sanderlings, and a Lesser
Black-backed Gull were hanging around. Loitering if you ask me.

At Reshaw Park, a singing Bobolink made itself known. While not a rare
bird, seeing it in the top of a tree singing, is pretty neat.

Put on warm socks!

Zach


--
Zach Hutchinson
President
Murie Audubon Society
murieaudubon.org <http://www.murieaudubon.org>
Community Naturalist
Audubon Rockies
rockies.audubon.org <http://www.rockies.audubon.org>
 

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Date: 5/19/17 6:52 am
From: Barb GORGES <bgorges4...>
Subject: Snowbirds, Cheyenne Big Day Bird Count tomorrow
Dear Wyobirders,
It's time to return to the main reason all of us subscribe to Wyobirds: sharing our joy in birds and birdwatching.
The snow is 11 inches deep in my backyard this morning-and no, that's not a drift. And it is still snowing.
Though I was not glued to the kitchen window watching birds at our feeders yesterday, I was surprised at how few migrants joined the throng of resident house finches and house sparrows.
A typical May storm, like Mother's Day the last two years, is colorful. Yesterday we saw a black-headed grosbeak and a lazuli bunting briefly, and a Swainson's thrush, plus a couple goldfinches. Normally we would see them all day, and more of them, plus indigo buntings, rose-breasted grosbeaks and lesser goldfinches if lucky, and white-crowned sparrows, Lincoln's sparrows and orioles. The feeders were not refilled while we were away May 8-16, so maybe the birds gave up on us.
Tomorrow is Cheyenne's Big Day Bird Count and conditions don't look good for a large turnout of migrants-or birdwatchers! Last Saturday one of our favorite places for spring migration, Wyoming Hereford Ranch, was thoroughly searched by expert birders from Boulder and Laramie and the number of species reported was lower than I would expect if the peak of migration was then. For instance, Laramie Audubon reported only two warbler species, no blue-gray gnatcatchers.
However, when we (Cheyenne - High Plains Audubon Society) add up the species on our Big Day spring counts, we include the species we see at WHR Reservoir #1. Typically, it's about 80 species for WHR total, of the 100-150 species we see for the day.
Anyone who wants to join us trudging around in the snow tomorrow can meet us at Lions Park at 6 a.m. in the parking lot south of the Children's Village on South Lions Park Drive. If you want to join us later, please call Mark Gorges, 307-287-4953, to find out where we are.
We will bird Lions Park first, then WHR, then the High Plains Grasslands Research Station. Pack your lunch or pick something up as we pass through town.
You can also call Mark, or email him at <mgorges...><mailto:<mgorges...>, if you bird on your own in the Cheyenne area tomorrow and want to share your list. And you are invited to join us for the tally party potluck Sunday evening. Ask Mark for the details.
Thanks,
Barb Gorges
Cheyenne
 

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Date: 5/18/17 4:47 pm
From: dt <000000605737ba0c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Blackbirds, Blackbirds, Blackbirds, and Black-headed Grosbeak-Laramie
 Hi all,It feels like I have the corner on the blackbirds in southeastern Wyoming this past few days.  Highs of approximately 30 yellow-headed blackbirds, up to 50 red-winged blackbirds, and more than 50 brown-headed cowbirds at the feeders in the back yard, all at the same time, with numbers varying based on whether my dog and I are out, and what the weather is doing.  Unfortunately, they tend to shove aside the house finches, siskins, chickadees, etc., which are relegated to the front yard thistle feeders while their larger, more pugnacious brethren feast. On the plus side, they also push out the house sparrows and Eurasian collared doves, and a few intrepid mourning doves have found that they can safely feed beneath the park bench and feeders at seed scattered by the blackbirds.  I did not hear my territorial house wren this morning, though I see he has built a nest in a wren house in my back yard.  But looking out amongst all the blackbirds just now, I see a single male black-headed grosbeak.  A reminder that spring is still here, just buried under a temporary layer of winter's last gasp.
Good birding to all!Diane T in Laramie
 

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Date: 5/18/17 4:08 pm
From: Cody Porter <empidonaxdvg...>
Subject: Snowstorm Birds -- Laramie
All,

Nate Behl and I drove the roads north and west of Laramie in an attempt to salvage road-killed birds for the museum. We were quite successful.

Tons of Horned Larks, Vesper Sparrows, McCown's Longspurs and more coming to the roadsides. Over the course of the morning, we easily saw over 2,000 McCown's Longspurs. The highlight of the day was a Mountain Plover that we saw on the north end of Old Laramie River Rd. I don't recommend driving that road for some time...

Good birding,
Cody Porter

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/18/17 2:25 pm
From: Jim Greaves <lbviman...>
Subject: Re: Population trends among species
All the below included - or aside - I am reminded of a paper I read
30 years ago that showed an increase in several forest species (eg,
Red-eyed vireo) with the increase in suburban growth and its
plantings of trees and shrubs. Whether this could be shown to be
neutral, positive, or negative to the species today would be another,
much more intense and widespread study to undertake, and I do not
think eBird would actually be a source to prove or disprove any
thesis related to it. Meanwhile, "citizens" (and non-citizens) could
and would be out and about making notes and lists and reporting to
eBird what they found. eBird is a tool. It does NOT reflect the
"impressions" from MANY birders with whom I am in touch, or whose
reports I read "online", that migration is down or up this year
"compared" to last or previous years. All seems to me to be
subjective. Not the stuff of science or the scientific method for
which the nomiker "citizen scientist" has been VERY recently invented
- respectfully, Jim Greaves, MT

At 03:05 PM 5/18/2017, Jim Greaves wrote:
>To all, with respect, and for the purpose of perspective in the
>interest of valid "scientific data collection". First, coming to
>"conclusions" about fluid natural phenomena should not be the
>purpose for scientific studies nor the method. That implies
>"finality", which I think all would agree is not the purpose of "study".
>
>Of course, the entire problem I see with the issue of using eBird
>reports during a two-year period is that MANY (if not most) birders
>did not and still do not use eBird, and only those reports submitted
>during that time frame were used for the analysis that Barb
>mentioned - for example, I had not yet submitted anything to eBird,
>but when I did I added nearly 30 species to my county's "confirmed
>list", even though I KNOW I have a couple dozen NOT on the county's
>list because I have not waded through my notes to post them, yet.
>So, if the reviewers who analyzed a 22 month period of "eBird
>submissions" compared this relatively new reporting medium to
>reports from, for example 1944, I'd have to argue that it is
>extremely unlikely that anyone reporting birds west of Buellton
>California that year is reporting to eBird today, and anyone else
>doing so would have to be privy to their notes. In addition, in
>"those days" people were more interested in behavior and not so much
>in distribution - kind of like even today!
>
>I use Buellton CA as example because it has been suggested that
>Grinnell and Miller (1944) who wrote the definitive first compendium
>of "information" about birds of California, never travelled west of
>what is not Buellton (at the US 101 highway). Examples of two
>species, with which I have intimate experience could be instructive
>here - Bell's Vireo and Willow Flycatcher, both of which were, by
>1950's purported to have either been in decline or extirpated in
>Santa Barbara County. Remember, that was in "the day", when there
>might have been perhaps half a dozen "hard core birders" out and
>about, some perhaps faculty on university staffs... Yet, when
>hundreds of birders began exploring nooks and crannies, in the
>1970's and beyond, we all of a sudden discover that neither species
>was "not found" west of Buellton (I and several others have notes to
>substantiate this, and there are numerous agency and other reports
>to confirm what I say).
>
>So, is it the increased birding by "citizen scientists", that has
>shown that the "almost extirpation" of Bell's vireo and the "virtual
>extirpation" of Willow flycatcher, is wrong, OR (and I do not
>suggest this as my "conclusion") have both species miraculously
>increased in the past 6 decades? Until ALL the notes of ALL the
>"early" bird watchers and scientists are posted to eBird by ALL
>possible sources, it is my opinion that it would be wrong to make
>any "conclusion" (scientific or otherwise) about "population trends"
>of, for example these two species or any other species that may have
>even NOT been noted in CA prior to the beginning of the
>hyper-birding that began in the 1970's. Someone, I forget who it
>was, told me that (and I forget who it was to whom he alluded)
>"eventually every species in North America will be found to have
>been in California" - so, it seems premature, in my opinion, to make
>conclusions about populations of any species or associations or
>communities or guilds of birds - bearing in mind that "evolution"
>has not ended simply because we have breat binos and excellent
>cameras and thousands upon thousands of people around to document
>"in time" observations of species, abundant or extremely rare. With
>faith that we all do enjoy birding and cataloguing in notes and with
>cameras whatever we can.
>
>And, of course, with all due respect to everyone! - Jim Greaves,
>Thompson Falls MT
>
>Jim Greaves wrote, 12:23 pm, 5/18/2017:
>>Thanks Barb and Bryan - We are better informed about the data
>>mentioned during the 22 months. It was data "posted" and not
>>"collected" during the time mentioned. Did not intend to start an
>>argument, and happy for the clarification, since I have also posted
>>"older data" collected outside the study's time frame of 22 months
>>- I was confused by which were the apples.... :-) Jim, Thompson Falls MT
>
>At 08:55 PM 5/17/2017, Barb Gorges wrote:
>>Jim,
>> The 22 months refers to the range of time the CLO folks
>> counted how many entities used eBird data for researching
>> management decisions. The entities using the eBird data might be
>> looking at changes at a particular location over time and although
>> eBird has only been around for 10-12 years, historic data has also
>> been uploaded. Land and wildlife managers might also be looking at
>> whether a particular species shows up in an area of concern, and
>> maybe perhaps what time of year, among other questions. Please
>> read the study:
>> http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320716301689.
>>Barb
>
>At 10:14 PM 5/17/2017, Bryan Bedrosian TRC wrote:
>>Hi Jim,
>>I feel the need to weigh in on your last quibble on behalf of Barb
>>and eBird. As a professional ornithologist that believes in and
>>relies on citizen science for many of our research projects, I need
>>point out an oversight in your recent argument. The point in the
>>articles referring to the last 22 months was not of entered data to
>>detect population trends, but rather inquiries of the data over the
>>past 22 months of eBird data that do not specify the years of
>>observations used. I have used inquiries of eBird to help inform
>>conservation planning in Wyoming and Montana within the past two
>>months, but through requests of all historical data. I think
>>everyone would agree that population trend analyses take more than
>>two years to draw conclusions.
>>
>>Best,
>>Bryan Bedrosian
>>Jackson, WY
>>
>>On May 17, 2017, at 5:59 PM, Jim Greaves
>><<mailto:<lbviman...><lbviman...> wrote:
>>
>>>I guess I have another quibble. 22 months is not "long term"
>>>enough to detect ANY "downturn in population" that cannot be
>>>explained by weather, higher predation locally, etc. Predator-Prey
>>>models have been used for nearly (or more than) a century, and
>>>show, for example that prey populations decline before predators,
>>>and then the cycle reverses, as prey increase, predators increase.
>>>I would NEVER think it remotely "wise" (the wisdom of nature's
>>>design - Audubon creed) to make any kind of statement of
>>>"scientific certainty" nor of "settled science" based on such a
>>>short-term (less than 2 years') study! Any person claiming to be a
>>>scientist - whether or not "citizen" - should not either - Jim Greaves, MT
>>>
>>>At 05:54 PM 5/17/2017, Jim Greaves wrote:
>>>>To: Barb GORGES <<mailto:<bgorges4...><bgorges4...>,
>>>><mailto:<WYOBIRDS...><WYOBIRDS...>
>>>>From: Jim Greaves <<mailto:<lbviman...><lbviman...>
>>>>Subject: Re: Bird Banter for May 2017: Citizen science makes difference
>>>>In-Reply-To:
>>>><<mailto:<BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...><BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...>
>>>>References:
>>>><<mailto:<BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...><BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...>
>>>>
>>>>I understand your points but quibble with only one part.
>>>>Hypotheses are (I think) designed to prove "nullity", resulting
>>>>in disproving a hypothesis, if disprovable. The scientific method
>>>>was never supposed to "find data to support the hypotheses", but
>>>>rather, through the use of statistical tests, to show that at
>>>>least the hypotheses are "not wrong". But, the tests are not
>>>>designed to prove hypotheses "correct". That is too much like
>>>>religion, and we all know the story of Galileo and some of his
>>>>famous predecessors... if she floats, she's a witch; if she
>>>>drowns, she's not (the Salem "citizen scientific method"...
>>>>;-) - Jim Greaves, Thompson Falls MT
>>>>
>>>>At 04:09 PM 5/17/2017, Barb GORGES wrote:
>>>>>Dear Wyobirders,
>>>>> Here's the latest Bird Banter column, published
>>>>> in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle May 14, 2017. More reasons to post
>>>>> your bird observations on eBird--to benefit the birds. The
>>>>> column is also available online:
>>>>> <https://cheyennebirdbanter.wordpress.com/>https://cheyennebirdbanter.wordpress.com/.
>>>>>Barb Gorges
>>>>>Cheyenne
>>>>>Published May 14, 2017, in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle, "Citizen
>>>>>science meets the test of making a difference"
>>>>>By Barb Gorges
>>>>> Birdwatchers have been at the forefront of citizen
>>>>> science for a long time, starting with the Christmas Bird Count in 1900.
>>>>> Today, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology is leading the
>>>>> way in using technology to expand bird counting around the
>>>>> globe. Meanwhile, other citizen science projects collect
>>>>> information on a variety of phenomena.
>>>>> But is citizen science really science? This question
>>>>> was asked last December at the first Wyoming Citizen Science Conference.
>>>>> The way science works is a scientist poses a
>>>>> question in the form of a hypothesis. For instance, do robins
>>>>> lay more eggs at lower elevations than at higher elevations?
>>>>> The scientist and his assistants can go out and find nests and
>>>>> count eggs to get an answer [and no, I don't know if anyone has studied this].
>>>>> However, there are hypotheses that would be more
>>>>> difficult to prove without a reservoir of data that was
>>>>> collected without a research question in mind. For instance,
>>>>> Elizabeth Wommack, curator and collections manager of
>>>>> vertebrates at the University of Wyoming Museum of Vertebrates,
>>>>> studied the variation in the number of white markings on the
>>>>> outer tail feathers of male kestrels. She visited collections
>>>>> of bird specimens at museums all over the country to gather data.
>>>>>Some kestrels have lots of white spots, some have none. Are the
>>>>>differences caused by geography? [Many animal traits are
>>>>>selected for (meaning because of the trait, the animal survives
>>>>>and passes on the trait to more offspring) on a continuum. It
>>>>>could be north to south or dry to wet habitat or some other
>>>>>geographic feature.]
>>>>>Or perhaps it was sexual selection-females preferred spottier
>>>>>male tail feathers. Or did the amount of spotting lead directly
>>>>>to improved survival?
>>>>>Wommack discovered none of her hypotheses could show statistical
>>>>>significance, information just as important as proving the
>>>>>hypotheses true. But at least Wommack learned something without
>>>>>having to "collect" or kill more kestrels.
>>>>> Some citizen science projects collect data to test
>>>>> specific hypotheses. However, others, like eBird and
>>>>> iNaturalist collect data without a hypothesis in mind, akin to
>>>>> putting specimens in museum drawers like those kestrels. The
>>>>> data is just waiting for someone to ask a question.
>>>>>I know I've gone to eBird with my own questions such as when and
>>>>>where sandhill cranes are seen in Wyoming. Or when the last time
>>>>>was I reported blue jays in our yard.
>>>>> To some scientists, data like eBird's, collected by
>>>>> the public, might be suspect. How can they trust lay people to
>>>>> report accurately? At this point, so many people are reporting
>>>>> the birds they see to eBird that statistical credibility is
>>>>> high. (However, eBird still does not know a lot about birds in
>>>>> Wyoming and we need more of you to report your sightings at
>>>>> <http://ebird.org>http://ebird.org.)
>>>>> Are scientists using eBird data? They are, and
>>>>> papers are being published. CLO itself recently published a
>>>>> study in Biological Conservation, an international journal for
>>>>> the discipline of conservation biology. [See
>>>>> <http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320716301689>http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320716301689.
>>>>> ] Their study tracked requests for raw data from eBird for 22
>>>>> months, 2012 through 2014.
>>>>>They found that the data was used in 159 direct conservation
>>>>>actions. That means no waiting years for papers to be published
>>>>>before identifying problems like downturns in population. These
>>>>>actions affected birds through management of habitat, siting of
>>>>>disturbances like power plants, decisions about listing as
>>>>>threatened or endangered. CLO also discovered citizens were
>>>>>using the data to discuss development and land use issues in
>>>>>their own neighborhoods.
>>>>> CLO's eBird data is what is called open access data.
>>>>> No one pays to access it. None of us get paid to contribute it.
>>>>> Our payment is the knowledge that we are helping land and
>>>>> wildlife managers make better decisions. There's a lot "crowd
>>>>> sourced" abundance and distribution numbers can tell them.
>>>>> Citizen science isn't often couched in terms of
>>>>> staving off extinction. Recently I read "Citizen Scientist,
>>>>> Searching for Heroes and Hope in an Age of Extinction," by Mary
>>>>> Ellen Hannibal, published in 2016. She gave me a new view.
>>>>>Based in California, Hannibal uses examples of citizen science
>>>>>projects there that have made a difference. She looks back at
>>>>>the early non-scientists like Ed Ricketts and John Steinbeck who
>>>>>sampled the Pacific Coast, leaving a trail of data collection
>>>>>sites that were re-sampled 85 years later. She also looks to
>>>>>Pulitzer Prize-winning biologist E.O. Wilson, who gives citizen
>>>>>science his blessing. At age 87, he continues to share his
>>>>>message that we should leave half the biosphere to nature-for our own good.
>>>>>Enjoy spring bird migration. Share your bird observations. The
>>>>>species you save may be the one to visit you in your own backyard again.
>>>
>>>
>>>---
>>>This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
>>><https://www.avast.com/antivirus>https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

Back to top
Date: 5/18/17 2:08 pm
From: Jim Greaves <lbviman...>
Subject: Re: Addendum to my last comment - Citizen science
To all, with respect, and for the purpose of perspective in the
interest of valid "scientific data collection". First, coming to
"conclusions" about fluid natural phenomena should not be the purpose
for scientific studies nor the method. That implies "finality", which
I think all would agree is not the purpose of "study".

Of course, the entire problem I see with the issue of using eBird
reports during a two-year period is that MANY (if not most) birders
did not and still do not use eBird, and only those reports submitted
during that time frame were used for the analysis that Barb mentioned
- for example, I had not yet submitted anything to eBird, but when I
did I added nearly 30 species to my county's "confirmed list", even
though I KNOW I have a couple dozen NOT on the county's list because
I have not waded through my notes to post them, yet. So, if the
reviewers who analyzed a 22 month period of "eBird submissions"
compared this relatively new reporting medium to reports from, for
example 1944, I'd have to argue that it is extremely unlikely that
anyone reporting birds west of Buellton California that year is
reporting to eBird today, and anyone else doing so would have to be
privy to their notes. In addition, in "those days" people were more
interested in behavior and not so much in distribution - kind of like
even today!

I use Buellton CA as example because it has been suggested that
Grinnell and Miller (1944) who wrote the definitive first compendium
of "information" about birds of California, never travelled west of
what is not Buellton (at the US 101 highway). Examples of two
species, with which I have intimate experience could be instructive
here - Bell's Vireo and Willow Flycatcher, both of which were, by
1950's purported to have either been in decline or extirpated in
Santa Barbara County. Remember, that was in "the day", when there
might have been perhaps half a dozen "hard core birders" out and
about, some perhaps faculty on university staffs... Yet, when
hundreds of birders began exploring nooks and crannies, in the 1970's
and beyond, we all of a sudden discover that neither species was "not
found" west of Buellton (I and several others have notes to
substantiate this, and there are numerous agency and other reports to
confirm what I say).

So, is it the increased birding by "citizen scientists", that has
shown that the "almost extirpation" of Bell's vireo and the "virtual
extirpation" of Willow flycatcher, is wrong, OR (and I do not suggest
this as my "conclusion") have both species miraculously increased in
the past 6 decades? Until ALL the notes of ALL the "early" bird
watchers and scientists are posted to eBird by ALL possible sources,
it is my opinion that it would be wrong to make any "conclusion"
(scientific or otherwise) about "population trends" of, for example
these two species or any other species that may have even NOT been
noted in CA prior to the beginning of the hyper-birding that began in
the 1970's. Someone, I forget who it was, told me that (and I forget
who it was to whom he alluded) "eventually every species in North
America will be found to have been in California" - so, it seems
premature, in my opinion, to make conclusions about populations of
any species or associations or communities or guilds of birds -
bearing in mind that "evolution" has not ended simply because we have
breat binos and excellent cameras and thousands upon thousands of
people around to document "in time" observations of species, abundant
or extremely rare. With faith that we all do enjoy birding and
cataloguing in notes and with cameras whatever we can.

And, of course, with all due respect to everyone! - Jim Greaves,
Thompson Falls MT

Jim Greaves wrote, 12:23 pm, 5/18/2017:
>Thanks Barb and Bryan - We are better informed about the data
>mentioned during the 22 months. It was data "posted" and not
>"collected" during the time mentioned. Did not intend to start an
>argument, and happy for the clarification, since I have also posted
>"older data" collected outside the study's time frame of 22 months -
>I was confused by which were the apples.... :-) Jim, Thompson Falls MT

At 08:55 PM 5/17/2017, Barb Gorges wrote:
>Jim,
> The 22 months refers to the range of time the CLO folks
> counted how many entities used eBird data for researching
> management decisions. The entities using the eBird data might be
> looking at changes at a particular location over time and although
> eBird has only been around for 10-12 years, historic data has also
> been uploaded. Land and wildlife managers might also be looking at
> whether a particular species shows up in an area of concern, and
> maybe perhaps what time of year, among other questions. Please read
> the study: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320716301689.
>Barb

At 10:14 PM 5/17/2017, Bryan Bedrosian TRC wrote:
>Hi Jim,
>I feel the need to weigh in on your last quibble on behalf of Barb
>and eBird. As a professional ornithologist that believes in and
>relies on citizen science for many of our research projects, I need
>point out an oversight in your recent argument. The point in the
>articles referring to the last 22 months was not of entered data to
>detect population trends, but rather inquiries of the data over the
>past 22 months of eBird data that do not specify the years of
>observations used. I have used inquiries of eBird to help inform
>conservation planning in Wyoming and Montana within the past two
>months, but through requests of all historical data. I think
>everyone would agree that population trend analyses take more than
>two years to draw conclusions.
>
>Best,
>Bryan Bedrosian
>Jackson, WY
>
>On May 17, 2017, at 5:59 PM, Jim Greaves
><<mailto:<lbviman...><lbviman...> wrote:
>
>>I guess I have another quibble. 22 months is not "long term" enough
>>to detect ANY "downturn in population" that cannot be explained by
>>weather, higher predation locally, etc. Predator-Prey models have
>>been used for nearly (or more than) a century, and show, for
>>example that prey populations decline before predators, and then
>>the cycle reverses, as prey increase, predators increase. I would
>>NEVER think it remotely "wise" (the wisdom of nature's design -
>>Audubon creed) to make any kind of statement of "scientific
>>certainty" nor of "settled science" based on such a short-term
>>(less than 2 years') study! Any person claiming to be a scientist -
>>whether or not "citizen" - should not either - Jim Greaves, MT
>>
>>At 05:54 PM 5/17/2017, Jim Greaves wrote:
>>>To: Barb GORGES <<mailto:<bgorges4...><bgorges4...>,
>>><mailto:<WYOBIRDS...><WYOBIRDS...>
>>>From: Jim Greaves <<mailto:<lbviman...><lbviman...>
>>>Subject: Re: Bird Banter for May 2017: Citizen science makes difference
>>>In-Reply-To:
>>><<mailto:<BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...><BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...>
>>>References:
>>><<mailto:<BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...><BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...>
>>>
>>>I understand your points but quibble with only one part.
>>>Hypotheses are (I think) designed to prove "nullity", resulting in
>>>disproving a hypothesis, if disprovable. The scientific method was
>>>never supposed to "find data to support the hypotheses", but
>>>rather, through the use of statistical tests, to show that at
>>>least the hypotheses are "not wrong". But, the tests are not
>>>designed to prove hypotheses "correct". That is too much like
>>>religion, and we all know the story of Galileo and some of his
>>>famous predecessors... if she floats, she's a witch; if she
>>>drowns, she's not (the Salem "citizen scientific method"... ;-) -
>>>Jim Greaves, Thompson Falls MT
>>>
>>>At 04:09 PM 5/17/2017, Barb GORGES wrote:
>>>>Dear Wyobirders,
>>>> Here's the latest Bird Banter column, published
>>>> in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle May 14, 2017. More reasons to post
>>>> your bird observations on eBird--to benefit the birds. The
>>>> column is also available online:
>>>> <https://cheyennebirdbanter.wordpress.com/>https://cheyennebirdbanter.wordpress.com/.
>>>>Barb Gorges
>>>>Cheyenne
>>>>Published May 14, 2017, in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle, "Citizen
>>>>science meets the test of making a difference"
>>>>By Barb Gorges
>>>> Birdwatchers have been at the forefront of citizen
>>>> science for a long time, starting with the Christmas Bird Count in 1900.
>>>> Today, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology is leading the
>>>> way in using technology to expand bird counting around the
>>>> globe. Meanwhile, other citizen science projects collect
>>>> information on a variety of phenomena.
>>>> But is citizen science really science? This question
>>>> was asked last December at the first Wyoming Citizen Science Conference.
>>>> The way science works is a scientist poses a question
>>>> in the form of a hypothesis. For instance, do robins lay more
>>>> eggs at lower elevations than at higher elevations? The
>>>> scientist and his assistants can go out and find nests and count
>>>> eggs to get an answer [and no, I don't know if anyone has studied this].
>>>> However, there are hypotheses that would be more
>>>> difficult to prove without a reservoir of data that was
>>>> collected without a research question in mind. For instance,
>>>> Elizabeth Wommack, curator and collections manager of
>>>> vertebrates at the University of Wyoming Museum of Vertebrates,
>>>> studied the variation in the number of white markings on the
>>>> outer tail feathers of male kestrels. She visited collections of
>>>> bird specimens at museums all over the country to gather data.
>>>>Some kestrels have lots of white spots, some have none. Are the
>>>>differences caused by geography? [Many animal traits are selected
>>>>for (meaning because of the trait, the animal survives and passes
>>>>on the trait to more offspring) on a continuum. It could be north
>>>>to south or dry to wet habitat or some other geographic feature.]
>>>>Or perhaps it was sexual selection-females preferred spottier
>>>>male tail feathers. Or did the amount of spotting lead directly
>>>>to improved survival?
>>>>Wommack discovered none of her hypotheses could show statistical
>>>>significance, information just as important as proving the
>>>>hypotheses true. But at least Wommack learned something without
>>>>having to "collect" or kill more kestrels.
>>>> Some citizen science projects collect data to test
>>>> specific hypotheses. However, others, like eBird and iNaturalist
>>>> collect data without a hypothesis in mind, akin to putting
>>>> specimens in museum drawers like those kestrels. The data is
>>>> just waiting for someone to ask a question.
>>>>I know I've gone to eBird with my own questions such as when and
>>>>where sandhill cranes are seen in Wyoming. Or when the last time
>>>>was I reported blue jays in our yard.
>>>> To some scientists, data like eBird's, collected by
>>>> the public, might be suspect. How can they trust lay people to
>>>> report accurately? At this point, so many people are reporting
>>>> the birds they see to eBird that statistical credibility is
>>>> high. (However, eBird still does not know a lot about birds in
>>>> Wyoming and we need more of you to report your sightings at
>>>> <http://ebird.org>http://ebird.org.)
>>>> Are scientists using eBird data? They are, and papers
>>>> are being published. CLO itself recently published a study in
>>>> Biological Conservation, an international journal for the
>>>> discipline of conservation biology. [See
>>>> <http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320716301689>http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320716301689.
>>>> ] Their study tracked requests for raw data from eBird for 22
>>>> months, 2012 through 2014.
>>>>They found that the data was used in 159 direct conservation
>>>>actions. That means no waiting years for papers to be published
>>>>before identifying problems like downturns in population. These
>>>>actions affected birds through management of habitat, siting of
>>>>disturbances like power plants, decisions about listing as
>>>>threatened or endangered. CLO also discovered citizens were using
>>>>the data to discuss development and land use issues in their own neighborhoods.
>>>> CLO's eBird data is what is called open access data.
>>>> No one pays to access it. None of us get paid to contribute it.
>>>> Our payment is the knowledge that we are helping land and
>>>> wildlife managers make better decisions. There's a lot "crowd
>>>> sourced" abundance and distribution numbers can tell them.
>>>> Citizen science isn't often couched in terms of
>>>> staving off extinction. Recently I read "Citizen Scientist,
>>>> Searching for Heroes and Hope in an Age of Extinction," by Mary
>>>> Ellen Hannibal, published in 2016. She gave me a new view.
>>>>Based in California, Hannibal uses examples of citizen science
>>>>projects there that have made a difference. She looks back at the
>>>>early non-scientists like Ed Ricketts and John Steinbeck who
>>>>sampled the Pacific Coast, leaving a trail of data collection
>>>>sites that were re-sampled 85 years later. She also looks to
>>>>Pulitzer Prize-winning biologist E.O. Wilson, who gives citizen
>>>>science his blessing. At age 87, he continues to share his
>>>>message that we should leave half the biosphere to nature-for our own good.
>>>>Enjoy spring bird migration. Share your bird observations. The
>>>>species you save may be the one to visit you in your own backyard again.
>>
>>
>>---
>>This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
>><https://www.avast.com/antivirus>https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

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Date: 5/18/17 12:08 pm
From: Barb GORGES <bgorges4...>
Subject: Re: Bird Banter for May 2017: Citizen science makes difference
Hmm. I think I found the link to the study on eBird or the CLO e-newsletter and did not encounter a paywall when I went to read it. But now the website does show one. So take Matt up on his offer!
Barb Gorges

-----Original Message-----
From: Wyoming's Birder List [mailto:<WYOBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Matthew D. Carling
Sent: Thursday, May 18, 2017 12:40 PM
To: <WYOBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: Bird Banter for May 2017: Citizen science makes difference

Hi All,

Not to beat a dead horse, but the 22 month period Barb highlighted (Nov 2012 to Aug 2014) was for data requests, which is what Barb wrote in her original piece. It was not for data posted. These requests are simply a researcher asking the eBird folks for access to data. Within that 22 month window, 2000+ researchers requested access to the database. A researcher could ask for access to the entire eBird database or just a subset. As many of you know, the earliest date for which observation can be entered into eBird is 1 January 1800 (that’s not a typo). This means it’s possible for a researcher to try to investigate changes in distributions, timing of arrival/departure, etc. over a period of up to 217 years. The 22 months period was a basically arbitrary window to come up with a manageable number of researchers to query. Furthermore, what Barb didn’t mention is that the authors also surveyed the 2100+ researchers who actually downloaded data between November 2012 and April 2015.

I completely recognize that I’m being nit-picky here, but having a dialogue about the value of citizen science should be based on being on the same page with respect to what the authors did.

Lastly, I am happy to send a copy of the paper to anyone who wants it. I believe that it is behind a paywall.

Happy birding!!

Matt

Matt Carling
Asst. Professor
Department of Zoology & Physiology
Berry Biodiversity Conservation Center
University of Wyoming

www.carlinglab.com<http://www.carlinglab.com>
307.223.1762
<mcarling...><mailto:<mcarling...>

On May 18, 2017, at 12:23 PM, Jim Greaves <lbviman...><mailto:<lbviman...>> wrote:

Thanks Barb and Bryan - We are better informed about the data mentioned during the 22 months. It was data "posted" and not "collected" during the time mentioned. Did not intend to start an argument, and happy for the clarification, since I have also posted "older data" collected outside the study's time frame of 22 months - I was confused by which were the apples.... :-) Jim, Thompson Falls MT

At 08:55 PM 5/17/2017, Barb Gorges wrote:
Jim,
The 22 months refers to the range of time the CLO folks counted how many entities used eBird data for researching management decisions. The entities using the eBird data might be looking at changes at a particular location over time and although eBird has only been around for 10-12 years, historic data has also been uploaded. Land and wildlife managers might also be looking at whether a particular species shows up in an area of concern, and maybe perhaps what time of year, among other questions. Please read the study: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320716301689.
Barb

At 10:14 PM 5/17/2017, Bryan Bedrosian TRC wrote:
Hi Jim,
I feel the need to weigh in on your last quibble on behalf of Barb and eBird. As a professional ornithologist that believes in and relies on citizen science for many of our research projects, I need point out an oversight in your recent argument. The point in the articles referring to the last 22 months was not of entered data to detect population trends, but rather inquiries of the data over the past 22 months of eBird data that do not specify the years of observations used. I have used inquiries of eBird to help inform conservation planning in Wyoming and Montana within the past two months, but through requests of all historical data. I think everyone would agree that population trend analyses take more than two years to draw conclusions.

Best,
Bryan Bedrosian
Jackson, WY

On May 17, 2017, at 5:59 PM, Jim Greaves <<mailto:<lbviman...><lbviman...><mailto:<lbviman...>> wrote:

I guess I have another quibble. 22 months is not "long term" enough to detect ANY "downturn in population" that cannot be explained by weather, higher predation locally, etc. Predator-Prey models have been used for nearly (or more than) a century, and show, for example that prey populations decline before predators, and then the cycle reverses, as prey increase, predators increase. I would NEVER think it remotely "wise" (the wisdom of nature's design - Audubon creed) to make any kind of statement of "scientific certainty" nor of "settled science" based on such a short-term (less than 2 years') study! Any person claiming to be a scientist - whether or not "citizen" - should not either - Jim Greaves, MT

At 05:54 PM 5/17/2017, Jim Greaves wrote:
To: Barb GORGES <<mailto:<bgorges4...><bgorges4...><mailto:<bgorges4...>>, <mailto:<WYOBIRDS...><WYOBIRDS...><mailto:<WYOBIRDS...>
From: Jim Greaves <<mailto:<lbviman...><lbviman...><mailto:<lbviman...>>
Subject: Re: Bird Banter for May 2017: Citizen science makes difference
In-Reply-To: <<mailto:<BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...><BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...><mailto:<BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...>>
References: <<mailto:<BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...><BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...><mailto:<BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...>>

I understand your points but quibble with only one part. Hypotheses are (I think) designed to prove "nullity", resulting in disproving a hypothesis, if disprovable. The scientific method was never supposed to "find data to support the hypotheses", but rather, through the use of statistical tests, to show that at least the hypotheses are "not wrong". But, the tests are not designed to prove hypotheses "correct". That is too much like religion, and we all know the story of Galileo and some of his famous predecessors... if she floats, she's a witch; if she drowns, she's not (the Salem "citizen scientific method"... ;-) - Jim Greaves, Thompson Falls MT

At 04:09 PM 5/17/2017, Barb GORGES wrote:
Dear Wyobirders,
Here's the latest Bird Banter column, published in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle May 14, 2017. More reasons to post your bird observations on eBird--to benefit the birds. The column is also available online: <https://cheyennebirdbanter.wordpress.com/>https://cheyennebirdbanter.wordpress.com/.
Barb Gorges
Cheyenne
Published May 14, 2017, in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle, "Citizen science meets the test of making a difference"
By Barb Gorges
Birdwatchers have been at the forefront of citizen science for a long time, starting with the Christmas Bird Count in 1900.
Today, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology is leading the way in using technology to expand bird counting around the globe. Meanwhile, other citizen science projects collect information on a variety of phenomena.
But is citizen science really science? This question was asked last December at the first Wyoming Citizen Science Conference.
The way science works is a scientist poses a question in the form of a hypothesis. For instance, do robins lay more eggs at lower elevations than at higher elevations? The scientist and his assistants can go out and find nests and count eggs to get an answer [and no, I don't know if anyone has studied this].
However, there are hypotheses that would be more difficult to prove without a reservoir of data that was collected without a research question in mind. For instance, Elizabeth Wommack, curator and collections manager of vertebrates at the University of Wyoming Museum of Vertebrates, studied the variation in the number of white markings on the outer tail feathers of male kestrels. She visited collections of bird specimens at museums all over the country to gather data.
Some kestrels have lots of white spots, some have none. Are the differences caused by geography? [Many animal traits are selected for (meaning because of the trait, the animal survives and passes on the trait to more offspring) on a continuum. It could be north to south or dry to wet habitat or some other geographic feature.] Or perhaps it was sexual selection-females preferred spottier male tail feathers. Or did the amount of spotting lead directly to improved survival?
Wommack discovered none of her hypotheses could show statistical significance, information just as important as proving the hypotheses true. But at least Wommack learned something without having to "collect" or kill more kestrels.
Some citizen science projects collect data to test specific hypotheses. However, others, like eBird and iNaturalist collect data without a hypothesis in mind, akin to putting specimens in museum drawers like those kestrels. The data is just waiting for someone to ask a question.
I know I've gone to eBird with my own questions such as when and where sandhill cranes are seen in Wyoming. Or when the last time was I reported blue jays in our yard.
To some scientists, data like eBird's, collected by the public, might be suspect. How can they trust lay people to report accurately? At this point, so many people are reporting the birds they see to eBird that statistical credibility is high. (However, eBird still does not know a lot about birds in Wyoming and we need more of you to report your sightings at <http://ebird.org>http://ebird.org.)
Are scientists using eBird data? They are, and papers are being published. CLO itself recently published a study in Biological Conservation, an international journal for the discipline of conservation biology. [See <http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320716301689>http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320716301689. ] Their study tracked requests for raw data from eBird for 22 months, 2012 through 2014.
They found that the data was used in 159 direct conservation actions. That means no waiting years for papers to be published before identifying problems like downturns in population. These actions affected birds through management of habitat, siting of disturbances like power plants, decisions about listing as threatened or endangered. CLO also discovered citizens were using the data to discuss development and land use issues in their own neighborhoods.
CLO's eBird data is what is called open access data. No one pays to access it. None of us get paid to contribute it. Our payment is the knowledge that we are helping land and wildlife managers make better decisions. There's a lot "crowd sourced" abundance and distribution numbers can tell them.
Citizen science isn't often couched in terms of staving off extinction. Recently I read "Citizen Scientist, Searching for Heroes and Hope in an Age of Extinction," by Mary Ellen Hannibal, published in 2016. She gave me a new view.
Based in California, Hannibal uses examples of citizen science projects there that have made a difference. She looks back at the early non-scientists like Ed Ricketts and John Steinbeck who sampled the Pacific Coast, leaving a trail of data collection sites that were re-sampled 85 years later. She also looks to Pulitzer Prize-winning biologist E.O. Wilson, who gives citizen science his blessing. At age 87, he continues to share his message that we should leave half the biosphere to nature-for our own good.
Enjoy spring bird migration. Share your bird observations. The species you save may be the one to visit you in your own backyard again.


---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
<https://www.avast.com/antivirus>https://www.avast.com/antivirus

 

Back to top
Date: 5/18/17 11:40 am
From: Matthew D. Carling <mcarling...>
Subject: Re: Bird Banter for May 2017: Citizen science makes difference
Hi All,

Not to beat a dead horse, but the 22 month period Barb highlighted (Nov 2012 to Aug 2014) was for data requests, which is what Barb wrote in her original piece. It was not for data posted. These requests are simply a researcher asking the eBird folks for access to data. Within that 22 month window, 2000+ researchers requested access to the database. A researcher could ask for access to the entire eBird database or just a subset. As many of you know, the earliest date for which observation can be entered into eBird is 1 January 1800 (that’s not a typo). This means it’s possible for a researcher to try to investigate changes in distributions, timing of arrival/departure, etc. over a period of up to 217 years. The 22 months period was a basically arbitrary window to come up with a manageable number of researchers to query. Furthermore, what Barb didn’t mention is that the authors also surveyed the 2100+ researchers who actually downloaded data between November 2012 and April 2015.

I completely recognize that I’m being nit-picky here, but having a dialogue about the value of citizen science should be based on being on the same page with respect to what the authors did.

Lastly, I am happy to send a copy of the paper to anyone who wants it. I believe that it is behind a paywall.

Happy birding!!

Matt

Matt Carling
Asst. Professor
Department of Zoology & Physiology
Berry Biodiversity Conservation Center
University of Wyoming

www.carlinglab.com<http://www.carlinglab.com>
307.223.1762
<mcarling...><mailto:<mcarling...>

On May 18, 2017, at 12:23 PM, Jim Greaves <lbviman...><mailto:<lbviman...>> wrote:

Thanks Barb and Bryan - We are better informed about the data mentioned during the 22 months. It was data "posted" and not "collected" during the time mentioned. Did not intend to start an argument, and happy for the clarification, since I have also posted "older data" collected outside the study's time frame of 22 months - I was confused by which were the apples.... :-) Jim, Thompson Falls MT

At 08:55 PM 5/17/2017, Barb Gorges wrote:
Jim,
The 22 months refers to the range of time the CLO folks counted how many entities used eBird data for researching management decisions. The entities using the eBird data might be looking at changes at a particular location over time and although eBird has only been around for 10-12 years, historic data has also been uploaded. Land and wildlife managers might also be looking at whether a particular species shows up in an area of concern, and maybe perhaps what time of year, among other questions. Please read the study: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320716301689.
Barb

At 10:14 PM 5/17/2017, Bryan Bedrosian TRC wrote:
Hi Jim,
I feel the need to weigh in on your last quibble on behalf of Barb and eBird. As a professional ornithologist that believes in and relies on citizen science for many of our research projects, I need point out an oversight in your recent argument. The point in the articles referring to the last 22 months was not of entered data to detect population trends, but rather inquiries of the data over the past 22 months of eBird data that do not specify the years of observations used. I have used inquiries of eBird to help inform conservation planning in Wyoming and Montana within the past two months, but through requests of all historical data. I think everyone would agree that population trend analyses take more than two years to draw conclusions.

Best,
Bryan Bedrosian
Jackson, WY

On May 17, 2017, at 5:59 PM, Jim Greaves <<mailto:<lbviman...><lbviman...><mailto:<lbviman...>> wrote:

I guess I have another quibble. 22 months is not "long term" enough to detect ANY "downturn in population" that cannot be explained by weather, higher predation locally, etc. Predator-Prey models have been used for nearly (or more than) a century, and show, for example that prey populations decline before predators, and then the cycle reverses, as prey increase, predators increase. I would NEVER think it remotely "wise" (the wisdom of nature's design - Audubon creed) to make any kind of statement of "scientific certainty" nor of "settled science" based on such a short-term (less than 2 years') study! Any person claiming to be a scientist - whether or not "citizen" - should not either - Jim Greaves, MT

At 05:54 PM 5/17/2017, Jim Greaves wrote:
To: Barb GORGES <<mailto:<bgorges4...><bgorges4...><mailto:<bgorges4...>>, <mailto:<WYOBIRDS...><WYOBIRDS...><mailto:<WYOBIRDS...>
From: Jim Greaves <<mailto:<lbviman...><lbviman...><mailto:<lbviman...>>
Subject: Re: Bird Banter for May 2017: Citizen science makes difference
In-Reply-To: <<mailto:<BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...><BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...><mailto:<BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...>>
References: <<mailto:<BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...><BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...><mailto:<BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...>>

I understand your points but quibble with only one part. Hypotheses are (I think) designed to prove "nullity", resulting in disproving a hypothesis, if disprovable. The scientific method was never supposed to "find data to support the hypotheses", but rather, through the use of statistical tests, to show that at least the hypotheses are "not wrong". But, the tests are not designed to prove hypotheses "correct". That is too much like religion, and we all know the story of Galileo and some of his famous predecessors... if she floats, she's a witch; if she drowns, she's not (the Salem "citizen scientific method"... ;-) - Jim Greaves, Thompson Falls MT

At 04:09 PM 5/17/2017, Barb GORGES wrote:
Dear Wyobirders,
Here's the latest Bird Banter column, published in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle May 14, 2017. More reasons to post your bird observations on eBird--to benefit the birds. The column is also available online: <https://cheyennebirdbanter.wordpress.com/>https://cheyennebirdbanter.wordpress.com/.
Barb Gorges
Cheyenne
Published May 14, 2017, in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle, "Citizen science meets the test of making a difference"
By Barb Gorges
Birdwatchers have been at the forefront of citizen science for a long time, starting with the Christmas Bird Count in 1900.
Today, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology is leading the way in using technology to expand bird counting around the globe. Meanwhile, other citizen science projects collect information on a variety of phenomena.
But is citizen science really science? This question was asked last December at the first Wyoming Citizen Science Conference.
The way science works is a scientist poses a question in the form of a hypothesis. For instance, do robins lay more eggs at lower elevations than at higher elevations? The scientist and his assistants can go out and find nests and count eggs to get an answer [and no, I don't know if anyone has studied this].
However, there are hypotheses that would be more difficult to prove without a reservoir of data that was collected without a research question in mind. For instance, Elizabeth Wommack, curator and collections manager of vertebrates at the University of Wyoming Museum of Vertebrates, studied the variation in the number of white markings on the outer tail feathers of male kestrels. She visited collections of bird specimens at museums all over the country to gather data.
Some kestrels have lots of white spots, some have none. Are the differences caused by geography? [Many animal traits are selected for (meaning because of the trait, the animal survives and passes on the trait to more offspring) on a continuum. It could be north to south or dry to wet habitat or some other geographic feature.]
Or perhaps it was sexual selection-females preferred spottier male tail feathers. Or did the amount of spotting lead directly to improved survival?
Wommack discovered none of her hypotheses could show statistical significance, information just as important as proving the hypotheses true. But at least Wommack learned something without having to "collect" or kill more kestrels.
Some citizen science projects collect data to test specific hypotheses. However, others, like eBird and iNaturalist collect data without a hypothesis in mind, akin to putting specimens in museum drawers like those kestrels. The data is just waiting for someone to ask a question.
I know I've gone to eBird with my own questions such as when and where sandhill cranes are seen in Wyoming. Or when the last time was I reported blue jays in our yard.
To some scientists, data like eBird's, collected by the public, might be suspect. How can they trust lay people to report accurately? At this point, so many people are reporting the birds they see to eBird that statistical credibility is high. (However, eBird still does not know a lot about birds in Wyoming and we need more of you to report your sightings at <http://ebird.org>http://ebird.org.)
Are scientists using eBird data? They are, and papers are being published. CLO itself recently published a study in Biological Conservation, an international journal for the discipline of conservation biology. [See <http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320716301689>http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320716301689. ] Their study tracked requests for raw data from eBird for 22 months, 2012 through 2014.
They found that the data was used in 159 direct conservation actions. That means no waiting years for papers to be published before identifying problems like downturns in population. These actions affected birds through management of habitat, siting of disturbances like power plants, decisions about listing as threatened or endangered. CLO also discovered citizens were using the data to discuss development and land use issues in their own neighborhoods.
CLO's eBird data is what is called open access data. No one pays to access it. None of us get paid to contribute it. Our payment is the knowledge that we are helping land and wildlife managers make better decisions. There's a lot "crowd sourced" abundance and distribution numbers can tell them.
Citizen science isn't often couched in terms of staving off extinction. Recently I read "Citizen Scientist, Searching for Heroes and Hope in an Age of Extinction," by Mary Ellen Hannibal, published in 2016. She gave me a new view.
Based in California, Hannibal uses examples of citizen science projects there that have made a difference. She looks back at the early non-scientists like Ed Ricketts and John Steinbeck who sampled the Pacific Coast, leaving a trail of data collection sites that were re-sampled 85 years later. She also looks to Pulitzer Prize-winning biologist E.O. Wilson, who gives citizen science his blessing. At age 87, he continues to share his message that we should leave half the biosphere to nature-for our own good.
Enjoy spring bird migration. Share your bird observations. The species you save may be the one to visit you in your own backyard again.


---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
<https://www.avast.com/antivirus>https://www.avast.com/antivirus

 

Back to top
Date: 5/18/17 11:24 am
From: Jim Greaves <lbviman...>
Subject: Re: Bird Banter for May 2017: Citizen science makes difference
Thanks Barb and Bryan - We are better informed about the data
mentioned during the 22 months. It was data "posted" and not
"collected" during the time mentioned. Did not intend to start an
argument, and happy for the clarification, since I have also posted
"older data" collected outside the study's time frame of 22 months -
I was confused by which were the apples.... :-) Jim, Thompson Falls MT

At 08:55 PM 5/17/2017, Barb Gorges wrote:
>Jim,
> The 22 months refers to the range of time the CLO folks
> counted how many entities used eBird data for researching
> management decisions. The entities using the eBird data might be
> looking at changes at a particular location over time and although
> eBird has only been around for 10-12 years, historic data has also
> been uploaded. Land and wildlife managers might also be looking at
> whether a particular species shows up in an area of concern, and
> maybe perhaps what time of year, among other questions. Please read
> the study: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320716301689.
>Barb

At 10:14 PM 5/17/2017, Bryan Bedrosian TRC wrote:
>Hi Jim,
>I feel the need to weigh in on your last quibble on behalf of Barb
>and eBird. As a professional ornithologist that believes in and
>relies on citizen science for many of our research projects, I need
>point out an oversight in your recent argument. The point in the
>articles referring to the last 22 months was not of entered data to
>detect population trends, but rather inquiries of the data over the
>past 22 months of eBird data that do not specify the years of
>observations used. I have used inquiries of eBird to help inform
>conservation planning in Wyoming and Montana within the past two
>months, but through requests of all historical data. I think
>everyone would agree that population trend analyses take more than
>two years to draw conclusions.
>
>Best,
>Bryan Bedrosian
>Jackson, WY
>
>On May 17, 2017, at 5:59 PM, Jim Greaves
><<mailto:<lbviman...><lbviman...> wrote:
>
>>I guess I have another quibble. 22 months is not "long term" enough
>>to detect ANY "downturn in population" that cannot be explained by
>>weather, higher predation locally, etc. Predator-Prey models have
>>been used for nearly (or more than) a century, and show, for
>>example that prey populations decline before predators, and then
>>the cycle reverses, as prey increase, predators increase. I would
>>NEVER think it remotely "wise" (the wisdom of nature's design -
>>Audubon creed) to make any kind of statement of "scientific
>>certainty" nor of "settled science" based on such a short-term
>>(less than 2 years') study! Any person claiming to be a scientist -
>>whether or not "citizen" - should not either - Jim Greaves, MT
>>
>>At 05:54 PM 5/17/2017, Jim Greaves wrote:
>>>To: Barb GORGES <<mailto:<bgorges4...><bgorges4...>,
>>><mailto:<WYOBIRDS...><WYOBIRDS...>
>>>From: Jim Greaves <<mailto:<lbviman...><lbviman...>
>>>Subject: Re: Bird Banter for May 2017: Citizen science makes difference
>>>In-Reply-To:
>>><<mailto:<BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...><BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...>
>>>References:
>>><<mailto:<BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...><BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...>
>>>
>>>I understand your points but quibble with only one part.
>>>Hypotheses are (I think) designed to prove "nullity", resulting in
>>>disproving a hypothesis, if disprovable. The scientific method was
>>>never supposed to "find data to support the hypotheses", but
>>>rather, through the use of statistical tests, to show that at
>>>least the hypotheses are "not wrong". But, the tests are not
>>>designed to prove hypotheses "correct". That is too much like
>>>religion, and we all know the story of Galileo and some of his
>>>famous predecessors... if she floats, she's a witch; if she
>>>drowns, she's not (the Salem "citizen scientific method"... ;-) -
>>>Jim Greaves, Thompson Falls MT
>>>
>>>At 04:09 PM 5/17/2017, Barb GORGES wrote:
>>>>Dear Wyobirders,
>>>> Here's the latest Bird Banter column, published
>>>> in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle May 14, 2017. More reasons to post
>>>> your bird observations on eBird--to benefit the birds. The
>>>> column is also available online:
>>>> <https://cheyennebirdbanter.wordpress.com/>https://cheyennebirdbanter.wordpress.com/.
>>>>Barb Gorges
>>>>Cheyenne
>>>>Published May 14, 2017, in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle, "Citizen
>>>>science meets the test of making a difference"
>>>>By Barb Gorges
>>>> Birdwatchers have been at the forefront of citizen
>>>> science for a long time, starting with the Christmas Bird Count in 1900.
>>>> Today, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology is leading the
>>>> way in using technology to expand bird counting around the
>>>> globe. Meanwhile, other citizen science projects collect
>>>> information on a variety of phenomena.
>>>> But is citizen science really science? This question
>>>> was asked last December at the first Wyoming Citizen Science Conference.
>>>> The way science works is a scientist poses a question
>>>> in the form of a hypothesis. For instance, do robins lay more
>>>> eggs at lower elevations than at higher elevations? The
>>>> scientist and his assistants can go out and find nests and count
>>>> eggs to get an answer [and no, I don't know if anyone has studied this].
>>>> However, there are hypotheses that would be more
>>>> difficult to prove without a reservoir of data that was
>>>> collected without a research question in mind. For instance,
>>>> Elizabeth Wommack, curator and collections manager of
>>>> vertebrates at the University of Wyoming Museum of Vertebrates,
>>>> studied the variation in the number of white markings on the
>>>> outer tail feathers of male kestrels. She visited collections of
>>>> bird specimens at museums all over the country to gather data.
>>>>Some kestrels have lots of white spots, some have none. Are the
>>>>differences caused by geography? [Many animal traits are selected
>>>>for (meaning because of the trait, the animal survives and passes
>>>>on the trait to more offspring) on a continuum. It could be north
>>>>to south or dry to wet habitat or some other geographic feature.]
>>>>Or perhaps it was sexual selection-females preferred spottier
>>>>male tail feathers. Or did the amount of spotting lead directly
>>>>to improved survival?
>>>>Wommack discovered none of her hypotheses could show statistical
>>>>significance, information just as important as proving the
>>>>hypotheses true. But at least Wommack learned something without
>>>>having to "collect" or kill more kestrels.
>>>> Some citizen science projects collect data to test
>>>> specific hypotheses. However, others, like eBird and iNaturalist
>>>> collect data without a hypothesis in mind, akin to putting
>>>> specimens in museum drawers like those kestrels. The data is
>>>> just waiting for someone to ask a question.
>>>>I know I've gone to eBird with my own questions such as when and
>>>>where sandhill cranes are seen in Wyoming. Or when the last time
>>>>was I reported blue jays in our yard.
>>>> To some scientists, data like eBird's, collected by
>>>> the public, might be suspect. How can they trust lay people to
>>>> report accurately? At this point, so many people are reporting
>>>> the birds they see to eBird that statistical credibility is
>>>> high. (However, eBird still does not know a lot about birds in
>>>> Wyoming and we need more of you to report your sightings at
>>>> <http://ebird.org>http://ebird.org.)
>>>> Are scientists using eBird data? They are, and papers
>>>> are being published. CLO itself recently published a study in
>>>> Biological Conservation, an international journal for the
>>>> discipline of conservation biology. [See
>>>> <http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320716301689>http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320716301689.
>>>> ] Their study tracked requests for raw data from eBird for 22
>>>> months, 2012 through 2014.
>>>>They found that the data was used in 159 direct conservation
>>>>actions. That means no waiting years for papers to be published
>>>>before identifying problems like downturns in population. These
>>>>actions affected birds through management of habitat, siting of
>>>>disturbances like power plants, decisions about listing as
>>>>threatened or endangered. CLO also discovered citizens were using
>>>>the data to discuss development and land use issues in their own neighborhoods.
>>>> CLO's eBird data is what is called open access data.
>>>> No one pays to access it. None of us get paid to contribute it.
>>>> Our payment is the knowledge that we are helping land and
>>>> wildlife managers make better decisions. There's a lot "crowd
>>>> sourced" abundance and distribution numbers can tell them.
>>>> Citizen science isn't often couched in terms of
>>>> staving off extinction. Recently I read "Citizen Scientist,
>>>> Searching for Heroes and Hope in an Age of Extinction," by Mary
>>>> Ellen Hannibal, published in 2016. She gave me a new view.
>>>>Based in California, Hannibal uses examples of citizen science
>>>>projects there that have made a difference. She looks back at the
>>>>early non-scientists like Ed Ricketts and John Steinbeck who
>>>>sampled the Pacific Coast, leaving a trail of data collection
>>>>sites that were re-sampled 85 years later. She also looks to
>>>>Pulitzer Prize-winning biologist E.O. Wilson, who gives citizen
>>>>science his blessing. At age 87, he continues to share his
>>>>message that we should leave half the biosphere to nature-for our own good.
>>>>Enjoy spring bird migration. Share your bird observations. The
>>>>species you save may be the one to visit you in your own backyard again.
>>
>>
>>---
>>This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
>><https://www.avast.com/antivirus>https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

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Date: 5/17/17 9:14 pm
From: Bryan Bedrosian TRC <bryan...>
Subject: Re: Bird Banter for May 2017: Citizen science makes difference
Hi Jim,
I feel the need to weigh in on your last quibble on behalf of Barb and eBird. As a professional ornithologist that believes in and relies on citizen science for many of our research projects, I need point out an oversight in your recent argument. The point in the articles referring to the last 22 months was not of entered data to detect population trends, but rather inquiries of the data over the past 22 months of eBird data that do not specify the years of observations used. I have used inquiries of eBird to help inform conservation planning in Wyoming and Montana within the past two months, but through requests of all historical data. I think everyone would agree that population trend analyses take more than two years to draw conclusions.

Best,
Bryan Bedrosian
Jackson, WY

> On May 17, 2017, at 5:59 PM, Jim Greaves <lbviman...> wrote:
>
> I guess I have another quibble. 22 months is not "long term" enough to detect ANY "downturn in population" that cannot be explained by weather, higher predation locally, etc. Predator-Prey models have been used for nearly (or more than) a century, and show, for example that prey populations decline before predators, and then the cycle reverses, as prey increase, predators increase. I would NEVER think it remotely "wise" (the wisdom of nature's design - Audubon creed) to make any kind of statement of "scientific certainty" nor of "settled science" based on such a short-term (less than 2 years') study! Any person claiming to be a scientist - whether or not "citizen" - should not either - Jim Greaves, MT
>
> At 05:54 PM 5/17/2017, Jim Greaves wrote:
>> To: Barb GORGES <bgorges4...>, <WYOBIRDS...>
>> From: Jim Greaves <lbviman...>
>> Subject: Re: Bird Banter for May 2017: Citizen science makes difference
>> In-Reply-To: <BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...>
>> References: <BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...>
>>
>> I understand your points but quibble with only one part. Hypotheses are (I think) designed to prove "nullity", resulting in disproving a hypothesis, if disprovable. The scientific method was never supposed to "find data to support the hypotheses", but rather, through the use of statistical tests, to show that at least the hypotheses are "not wrong". But, the tests are not designed to prove hypotheses "correct". That is too much like religion, and we all know the story of Galileo and some of his famous predecessors... if she floats, she's a witch; if she drowns, she's not (the Salem "citizen scientific method"... ;-) - Jim Greaves, Thompson Falls MT
>>
>> At 04:09 PM 5/17/2017, Barb GORGES wrote:
>>> Dear Wyobirders,
>>> Here's the latest Bird Banter column, published in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle May 14, 2017. More reasons to post your bird observations on eBird--to benefit the birds. The column is also available online: https://cheyennebirdbanter.wordpress.com/.
>>> Barb Gorges
>>> Cheyenne
>>> Published May 14, 2017, in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle, "Citizen science meets the test of making a difference"
>>> By Barb Gorges
>>> Birdwatchers have been at the forefront of citizen science for a long time, starting with the Christmas Bird Count in 1900.
>>> Today, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology is leading the way in using technology to expand bird counting around the globe. Meanwhile, other citizen science projects collect information on a variety of phenomena.
>>> But is citizen science really science? This question was asked last December at the first Wyoming Citizen Science Conference.
>>> The way science works is a scientist poses a question in the form of a hypothesis. For instance, do robins lay more eggs at lower elevations than at higher elevations? The scientist and his assistants can go out and find nests and count eggs to get an answer [and no, I don't know if anyone has studied this].
>>> However, there are hypotheses that would be more difficult to prove without a reservoir of data that was collected without a research question in mind. For instance, Elizabeth Wommack, curator and collections manager of vertebrates at the University of Wyoming Museum of Vertebrates, studied the variation in the number of white markings on the outer tail feathers of male kestrels. She visited collections of bird specimens at museums all over the country to gather data.
>>> Some kestrels have lots of white spots, some have none. Are the differences caused by geography? [Many animal traits are selected for (meaning because of the trait, the animal survives and passes on the trait to more offspring) on a continuum. It could be north to south or dry to wet habitat or some other geographic feature.]
>>> Or perhaps it was sexual selection-females preferred spottier male tail feathers. Or did the amount of spotting lead directly to improved survival?
>>> Wommack discovered none of her hypotheses could show statistical significance, information just as important as proving the hypotheses true. But at least Wommack learned something without having to "collect" or kill more kestrels.
>>> Some citizen science projects collect data to test specific hypotheses. However, others, like eBird and iNaturalist collect data without a hypothesis in mind, akin to putting specimens in museum drawers like those kestrels. The data is just waiting for someone to ask a question.
>>> I know I've gone to eBird with my own questions such as when and where sandhill cranes are seen in Wyoming. Or when the last time was I reported blue jays in our yard.
>>> To some scientists, data like eBird's, collected by the public, might be suspect. How can they trust lay people to report accurately? At this point, so many people are reporting the birds they see to eBird that statistical credibility is high. (However, eBird still does not know a lot about birds in Wyoming and we need more of you to report your sightings at http://ebird.org.)
>>> Are scientists using eBird data? They are, and papers are being published. CLO itself recently published a study in Biological Conservation, an international journal for the discipline of conservation biology. [See http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320716301689. ] Their study tracked requests for raw data from eBird for 22 months, 2012 through 2014.
>>> They found that the data was used in 159 direct conservation actions. That means no waiting years for papers to be published before identifying problems like downturns in population. These actions affected birds through management of habitat, siting of disturbances like power plants, decisions about listing as threatened or endangered. CLO also discovered citizens were using the data to discuss development and land use issues in their own neighborhoods.
>>> CLO's eBird data is what is called open access data. No one pays to access it. None of us get paid to contribute it. Our payment is the knowledge that we are helping land and wildlife managers make better decisions. There's a lot "crowd sourced" abundance and distribution numbers can tell them.
>>> Citizen science isn't often couched in terms of staving off extinction. Recently I read "Citizen Scientist, Searching for Heroes and Hope in an Age of Extinction," by Mary Ellen Hannibal, published in 2016. She gave me a new view.
>>> Based in California, Hannibal uses examples of citizen science projects there that have made a difference. She looks back at the early non-scientists like Ed Ricketts and John Steinbeck who sampled the Pacific Coast, leaving a trail of data collection sites that were re-sampled 85 years later. She also looks to Pulitzer Prize-winning biologist E.O. Wilson, who gives citizen science his blessing. At age 87, he continues to share his message that we should leave half the biosphere to nature-for our own good.
>>> Enjoy spring bird migration. Share your bird observations. The species you save may be the one to visit you in your own backyard again.
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

Back to top
Date: 5/17/17 5:00 pm
From: Jim Greaves <lbviman...>
Subject: Re: Bird Banter for May 2017: Citizen science makes difference
I guess I have another quibble. 22 months is not "long term" enough
to detect ANY "downturn in population" that cannot be explained by
weather, higher predation locally, etc. Predator-Prey models have
been used for nearly (or more than) a century, and show, for example
that prey populations decline before predators, and then the cycle
reverses, as prey increase, predators increase. I would NEVER think
it remotely "wise" (the wisdom of nature's design - Audubon creed) to
make any kind of statement of "scientific certainty" nor of "settled
science" based on such a short-term (less than 2 years') study! Any
person claiming to be a scientist - whether or not "citizen" - should
not either - Jim Greaves, MT

At 05:54 PM 5/17/2017, Jim Greaves wrote:
>To: Barb GORGES <bgorges4...>, <WYOBIRDS...>
>From: Jim Greaves <lbviman...>
>Subject: Re: Bird Banter for May 2017: Citizen science makes difference
>In-Reply-To:
><BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...>
>References:
><BLUPR10MB0433A8EE06A975FDC0618DBE98E70...>
>
>I understand your points but quibble with only one part. Hypotheses
>are (I think) designed to prove "nullity", resulting in disproving a
>hypothesis, if disprovable. The scientific method was never supposed
>to "find data to support the hypotheses", but rather, through the
>use of statistical tests, to show that at least the hypotheses are
>"not wrong". But, the tests are not designed to prove hypotheses
>"correct". That is too much like religion, and we all know the story
>of Galileo and some of his famous predecessors... if she floats,
>she's a witch; if she drowns, she's not (the Salem "citizen
>scientific method"... ;-) - Jim Greaves, Thompson Falls MT
>
>At 04:09 PM 5/17/2017, Barb GORGES wrote:
>>Dear Wyobirders,
>> Here's the latest Bird Banter column, published in
>> the Wyoming Tribune Eagle May 14, 2017. More reasons to post your
>> bird observations on eBird--to benefit the birds. The column is
>> also available online: https://cheyennebirdbanter.wordpress.com/.
>>Barb Gorges
>>Cheyenne
>>Published May 14, 2017, in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle, "Citizen
>>science meets the test of making a difference"
>>By Barb Gorges
>> Birdwatchers have been at the forefront of citizen
>> science for a long time, starting with the Christmas Bird Count in 1900.
>> Today, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology is leading the
>> way in using technology to expand bird counting around the globe.
>> Meanwhile, other citizen science projects collect information on a
>> variety of phenomena.
>> But is citizen science really science? This question
>> was asked last December at the first Wyoming Citizen Science Conference.
>> The way science works is a scientist poses a question
>> in the form of a hypothesis. For instance, do robins lay more eggs
>> at lower elevations than at higher elevations? The scientist and
>> his assistants can go out and find nests and count eggs to get an
>> answer [and no, I don't know if anyone has studied this].
>> However, there are hypotheses that would be more
>> difficult to prove without a reservoir of data that was collected
>> without a research question in mind. For instance, Elizabeth
>> Wommack, curator and collections manager of vertebrates at the
>> University of Wyoming Museum of Vertebrates, studied the variation
>> in the number of white markings on the outer tail feathers of male
>> kestrels. She visited collections of bird specimens at museums all
>> over the country to gather data.
>>Some kestrels have lots of white spots, some have none. Are the
>>differences caused by geography? [Many animal traits are selected
>>for (meaning because of the trait, the animal survives and passes
>>on the trait to more offspring) on a continuum. It could be north
>>to south or dry to wet habitat or some other geographic feature.]
>>Or perhaps it was sexual selection-females preferred spottier male
>>tail feathers. Or did the amount of spotting lead directly to
>>improved survival?
>>Wommack discovered none of her hypotheses could show statistical
>>significance, information just as important as proving the
>>hypotheses true. But at least Wommack learned something without
>>having to "collect" or kill more kestrels.
>> Some citizen science projects collect data to test
>> specific hypotheses. However, others, like eBird and iNaturalist
>> collect data without a hypothesis in mind, akin to putting
>> specimens in museum drawers like those kestrels. The data is just
>> waiting for someone to ask a question.
>>I know I've gone to eBird with my own questions such as when and
>>where sandhill cranes are seen in Wyoming. Or when the last time
>>was I reported blue jays in our yard.
>> To some scientists, data like eBird's, collected by
>> the public, might be suspect. How can they trust lay people to
>> report accurately? At this point, so many people are reporting the
>> birds they see to eBird that statistical credibility is high.
>> (However, eBird still does not know a lot about birds in Wyoming
>> and we need more of you to report your sightings at http://ebird.org.)
>> Are scientists using eBird data? They are, and papers
>> are being published. CLO itself recently published a study in
>> Biological Conservation, an international journal for the
>> discipline of conservation biology. [See
>> http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320716301689.
>> ] Their study tracked requests for raw data from eBird for 22
>> months, 2012 through 2014.
>>They found that the data was used in 159 direct conservation
>>actions. That means no waiting years for papers to be published
>>before identifying problems like downturns in population. These
>>actions affected birds through management of habitat, siting of
>>disturbances like power plants, decisions about listing as
>>threatened or endangered. CLO also discovered citizens were using
>>the data to discuss development and land use issues in their own neighborhoods.
>> CLO's eBird data is what is called open access data.
>> No one pays to access it. None of us get paid to contribute it.
>> Our payment is the knowledge that we are helping land and wildlife
>> managers make better decisions. There's a lot "crowd sourced"
>> abundance and distribution numbers can tell them.
>> Citizen science isn't often couched in terms of
>> staving off extinction. Recently I read "Citizen Scientist,
>> Searching for Heroes and Hope in an Age of Extinction," by Mary
>> Ellen Hannibal, published in 2016. She gave me a new view.
>>Based in California, Hannibal uses examples of citizen science
>>projects there that have made a difference. She looks back at the
>>early non-scientists like Ed Ricketts and John Steinbeck who
>>sampled the Pacific Coast, leaving a trail of data collection sites
>>that were re-sampled 85 years later. She also looks to Pulitzer
>>Prize-winning biologist E.O. Wilson, who gives citizen science his
>>blessing. At age 87, he continues to share his message that we
>>should leave half the biosphere to nature-for our own good.
>>Enjoy spring bird migration. Share your bird observations. The
>>species you save may be the one to visit you in your own backyard again.


---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

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Date: 5/17/17 4:54 pm
From: Jim Greaves <lbviman...>
Subject: Re: Bird Banter for May 2017: Citizen science makes difference
I understand your points but quibble with only one part. Hypotheses
are (I think) designed to prove "nullity", resulting in disproving a
hypothesis, if disprovable. The scientific method was never supposed
to "find data to support the hypotheses", but rather, through the use
of statistical tests, to show that at least the hypotheses are "not
wrong". But, the tests are not designed to prove hypotheses
"correct". That is too much like religion, and we all know the story
of Galileo and some of his famous predecessors... if she floats,
she's a witch; if she drowns, she's not (the Salem "citizen
scientific method"... ;-) - Jim Greaves, Thompson Falls MT

At 04:09 PM 5/17/2017, Barb GORGES wrote:
>Dear Wyobirders,
> Here's the latest Bird Banter column, published in
> the Wyoming Tribune Eagle May 14, 2017. More reasons to post your
> bird observations on eBird--to benefit the birds. The column is
> also available online: https://cheyennebirdbanter.wordpress.com/.
>Barb Gorges
>Cheyenne
>Published May 14, 2017, in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle, "Citizen
>science meets the test of making a difference"
>By Barb Gorges
> Birdwatchers have been at the forefront of citizen
> science for a long time, starting with the Christmas Bird Count in 1900.
> Today, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology is leading the
> way in using technology to expand bird counting around the globe.
> Meanwhile, other citizen science projects collect information on a
> variety of phenomena.
> But is citizen science really science? This question
> was asked last December at the first Wyoming Citizen Science Conference.
> The way science works is a scientist poses a question
> in the form of a hypothesis. For instance, do robins lay more eggs
> at lower elevations than at higher elevations? The scientist and
> his assistants can go out and find nests and count eggs to get an
> answer [and no, I don't know if anyone has studied this].
> However, there are hypotheses that would be more
> difficult to prove without a reservoir of data that was collected
> without a research question in mind. For instance, Elizabeth
> Wommack, curator and collections manager of vertebrates at the
> University of Wyoming Museum of Vertebrates, studied the variation
> in the number of white markings on the outer tail feathers of male
> kestrels. She visited collections of bird specimens at museums all
> over the country to gather data.
>Some kestrels have lots of white spots, some have none. Are the
>differences caused by geography? [Many animal traits are selected
>for (meaning because of the trait, the animal survives and passes on
>the trait to more offspring) on a continuum. It could be north to
>south or dry to wet habitat or some other geographic feature.]
>Or perhaps it was sexual selection-females preferred spottier male
>tail feathers. Or did the amount of spotting lead directly to
>improved survival?
>Wommack discovered none of her hypotheses could show statistical
>significance, information just as important as proving the
>hypotheses true. But at least Wommack learned something without
>having to "collect" or kill more kestrels.
> Some citizen science projects collect data to test
> specific hypotheses. However, others, like eBird and iNaturalist
> collect data without a hypothesis in mind, akin to putting
> specimens in museum drawers like those kestrels. The data is just
> waiting for someone to ask a question.
>I know I've gone to eBird with my own questions such as when and
>where sandhill cranes are seen in Wyoming. Or when the last time was
>I reported blue jays in our yard.
> To some scientists, data like eBird's, collected by the
> public, might be suspect. How can they trust lay people to report
> accurately? At this point, so many people are reporting the birds
> they see to eBird that statistical credibility is high. (However,
> eBird still does not know a lot about birds in Wyoming and we need
> more of you to report your sightings at http://ebird.org.)
> Are scientists using eBird data? They are, and papers
> are being published. CLO itself recently published a study in
> Biological Conservation, an international journal for the
> discipline of conservation biology. [See
> http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320716301689.]
> Their study tracked requests for raw data from eBird for 22
> months, 2012 through 2014.
>They found that the data was used in 159 direct conservation
>actions. That means no waiting years for papers to be published
>before identifying problems like downturns in population. These
>actions affected birds through management of habitat, siting of
>disturbances like power plants, decisions about listing as
>threatened or endangered. CLO also discovered citizens were using
>the data to discuss development and land use issues in their own neighborhoods.
> CLO's eBird data is what is called open access data. No
> one pays to access it. None of us get paid to contribute it. Our
> payment is the knowledge that we are helping land and wildlife
> managers make better decisions. There's a lot "crowd sourced"
> abundance and distribution numbers can tell them.
> Citizen science isn't often couched in terms of staving
> off extinction. Recently I read "Citizen Scientist, Searching for
> Heroes and Hope in an Age of Extinction," by Mary Ellen Hannibal,
> published in 2016. She gave me a new view.
>Based in California, Hannibal uses examples of citizen science
>projects there that have made a difference. She looks back at the
>early non-scientists like Ed Ricketts and John Steinbeck who sampled
>the Pacific Coast, leaving a trail of data collection sites that
>were re-sampled 85 years later. She also looks to Pulitzer
>Prize-winning biologist E.O. Wilson, who gives citizen science his
>blessing. At age 87, he continues to share his message that we
>should leave half the biosphere to nature-for our own good.
>Enjoy spring bird migration. Share your bird observations. The
>species you save may be the one to visit you in your own backyard again.


---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

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Date: 5/17/17 3:10 pm
From: Barb GORGES <bgorges4...>
Subject: Bird Banter for May 2017: Citizen science makes difference
Dear Wyobirders,
Here's the latest Bird Banter column, published in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle May 14, 2017. More reasons to post your bird observations on eBird--to benefit the birds. The column is also available online: https://cheyennebirdbanter.wordpress.com/.
Barb Gorges
Cheyenne
Published May 14, 2017, in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle, "Citizen science meets the test of making a difference"
By Barb Gorges
Birdwatchers have been at the forefront of citizen science for a long time, starting with the Christmas Bird Count in 1900.
Today, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology is leading the way in using technology to expand bird counting around the globe. Meanwhile, other citizen science projects collect information on a variety of phenomena.
But is citizen science really science? This question was asked last December at the first Wyoming Citizen Science Conference.
The way science works is a scientist poses a question in the form of a hypothesis. For instance, do robins lay more eggs at lower elevations than at higher elevations? The scientist and his assistants can go out and find nests and count eggs to get an answer [and no, I don't know if anyone has studied this].
However, there are hypotheses that would be more difficult to prove without a reservoir of data that was collected without a research question in mind. For instance, Elizabeth Wommack, curator and collections manager of vertebrates at the University of Wyoming Museum of Vertebrates, studied the variation in the number of white markings on the outer tail feathers of male kestrels. She visited collections of bird specimens at museums all over the country to gather data.
Some kestrels have lots of white spots, some have none. Are the differences caused by geography? [Many animal traits are selected for (meaning because of the trait, the animal survives and passes on the trait to more offspring) on a continuum. It could be north to south or dry to wet habitat or some other geographic feature.]
Or perhaps it was sexual selection-females preferred spottier male tail feathers. Or did the amount of spotting lead directly to improved survival?
Wommack discovered none of her hypotheses could show statistical significance, information just as important as proving the hypotheses true. But at least Wommack learned something without having to "collect" or kill more kestrels.
Some citizen science projects collect data to test specific hypotheses. However, others, like eBird and iNaturalist collect data without a hypothesis in mind, akin to putting specimens in museum drawers like those kestrels. The data is just waiting for someone to ask a question.
I know I've gone to eBird with my own questions such as when and where sandhill cranes are seen in Wyoming. Or when the last time was I reported blue jays in our yard.
To some scientists, data like eBird's, collected by the public, might be suspect. How can they trust lay people to report accurately? At this point, so many people are reporting the birds they see to eBird that statistical credibility is high. (However, eBird still does not know a lot about birds in Wyoming and we need more of you to report your sightings at http://ebird.org.)
Are scientists using eBird data? They are, and papers are being published. CLO itself recently published a study in Biological Conservation, an international journal for the discipline of conservation biology. [See http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320716301689.] Their study tracked requests for raw data from eBird for 22 months, 2012 through 2014.
They found that the data was used in 159 direct conservation actions. That means no waiting years for papers to be published before identifying problems like downturns in population. These actions affected birds through management of habitat, siting of disturbances like power plants, decisions about listing as threatened or endangered. CLO also discovered citizens were using the data to discuss development and land use issues in their own neighborhoods.
CLO's eBird data is what is called open access data. No one pays to access it. None of us get paid to contribute it. Our payment is the knowledge that we are helping land and wildlife managers make better decisions. There's a lot "crowd sourced" abundance and distribution numbers can tell them.
Citizen science isn't often couched in terms of staving off extinction. Recently I read "Citizen Scientist, Searching for Heroes and Hope in an Age of Extinction," by Mary Ellen Hannibal, published in 2016. She gave me a new view.
Based in California, Hannibal uses examples of citizen science projects there that have made a difference. She looks back at the early non-scientists like Ed Ricketts and John Steinbeck who sampled the Pacific Coast, leaving a trail of data collection sites that were re-sampled 85 years later. She also looks to Pulitzer Prize-winning biologist E.O. Wilson, who gives citizen science his blessing. At age 87, he continues to share his message that we should leave half the biosphere to nature-for our own good.
Enjoy spring bird migration. Share your bird observations. The species you save may be the one to visit you in your own backyard again.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/17/17 2:08 pm
From: Jackie Canterbury <jackie.canterbury...>
Subject: Ibis
During the Spring Bird count, we found over 20 White-faced Ibis south of
Wyarno on HY
151
 

Back to top
Date: 5/16/17 8:54 am
From: Jason Beason <aeronautes.saxatalis...>
Subject: Morad Park - Natrona - May 16
Birded around Morad Park this morning. Gray Catbirds were easy to find
along with Common Yellowthroats and many Yellow Warblers. One singing Least
Flycatcher was new for me this year.

27 species (+1 other taxa)

Canada Goose 5
Wood Duck 1
Killdeer 3
Spotted Sandpiper 3
Ring-billed Gull 5
Eurasian Collared-Dove 3
Mourning Dove 5
Least Flycatcher 1
Empidonax sp. 1
Blue Jay 1
Common Raven 3
Tree Swallow 1
Barn Swallow 9
House Wren 3
American Robin 6
Gray Catbird 6
European Starling 7
Common Yellowthroat 5
Yellow Warbler 16
Lincoln's Sparrow 1
Black-headed Grosbeak 2
Red-winged Blackbird 6
Western Meadowlark 2
Common Grackle 7
Brown-headed Cowbird 6
Bullock's Oriole 1
House Finch 2
American Goldfinch 6

--
Jason Beason
Avian Field Technician
SWCA Environmental Consulting
Casper, Wyoming
 

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Date: 5/15/17 9:46 pm
From: Rich Weaver <popeyeweaver...>
Subject: EKW & Bar Nunn
Hello birding enthusiasts,

This evening I had a catbird and Western Kingbird at edness K Wilkins State
Park. these were first of the year Birds. also at bar Nunn I am served a
pair of burrowing owls. Hopefully I'll see some baby owls like last year
from this location.

On another area I am getting some photographs of bald eagles in the nest.
this is an exciting time to be outside. I wish everyone well in your
Pursuits of birds. Rich
 

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Date: 5/15/17 9:40 am
From: Chris Michelson <0000001af3511208-dmarc-request...>
Subject: EKW this morning
Greetings birders
The weather overnight brought us some new birds at Edness Kimbal Wilkins
State Park. This morning early I had 6 species of warbler: yellow, common
yellowthroat, yellow-rumped, Wilson's, American redstart(nice male) and
yellow breasted chat. All were singing except the restart. Also present
were a number of warbling vireos which were quite vocal. Much bird song
early. Other species present were several black-headed grosbeaks and Bullock's
orioles. One Lincoln's sparrow. Good birding to all.
Chris Michelson
Casper, WY

 

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Date: 5/15/17 7:13 am
From: Matt Fraker <0000022256054407-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: More early dates?
Ok, CJ -- the Black-throated Gray Warbler on 23 Apr is a winner!!


In spring of 2015, Sherri Hansen had one on 24 Apr (north of Shoshoni in Fremont) which was a new early date for the state by three days.


And your Blue-gray Gnatcatcher comes in at second place to the Faulkner-sourced record of one at Green River, Sweetwater on 14 Apr, 1929. The next earliest dates had been two records (three birds) from 28 Apr -- a single in 2002 per Faulkner, and then two birds at WHR in 2012.


Matt Fraker



-----Original Message-----
From: CJ Grimes <cjgrimes...>
To: WYOBIRDS <WYOBIRDS...>
Sent: Sun, Apr 23, 2017 11:26 am
Subject: More early dates?

On my last post I forgot to mention the Osprey and Spotted Towhee on Tuesday 4/18. Yesterday (4/22) was a new early date for Blue-gray Gnatcatcher in my yard. Peregrine Falcons were vocalizing all afternoon.

And today (4/23) I heard my first Black-throated Gray Warbler of the spring, which beats last year's by a week.

CJ Grimes
Ten Sleep
 

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Date: 5/14/17 7:59 pm
From: Hustace Scott <hustace...>
Subject:
About 5:30 this afternoon, Rich Weaver and I had a Wimbrel at Goldeneye.
We were just about to leave when it and a Willet flew in. The Willet was
calling, but the bird I could see was the Wimbrel. That made me question
my hearing for a few seconds. Mostly, there are very few shore birds
anywhere. Goldeneye has gone down so the water is beyond the picnic
tables, and there really isn't any shore. We did find White-faced Ibis,
and had over a 100 in the air at once. I also found some Bank Swallows,
and far out in the lake we found some Red-necked Phalaropes. Bellow is our
list.

Goldeneye

Eared Grebes
Western Grebes
White-faced Ibis
White Pelican
Double-crested Cormorant
Canada Goose
Mallard
Pintail
Blue-Winged Teal
Cinnamon Teal
Shoveler
Gadwall
Canvasback
Lesser Scaup
Rudy Duck
Killdeer
Avocet
Willet
Wimbrel
Wilson's Phalarope
Red-necked Phalarope
Franklin's Gull
Gull (probably California, but too far to see the bill)
Forster's Tern (one of the terns seemed to have darker ends to the wings)
Cliff Swallows
Violet-green Swallows
Bank Swallows
Horned Lark
Raven
Loggerhead Shrike
Savannah Sparrow
Brewer's Blackbird
Red-winged Blackbird

On the Way to 123 Rd and 123 Road
Mallard
Cinnamon Teal
Green-winged Teal
Pintail
Shoveler
Gadwall
Golden Eagle
Marsh Hawk
Killdeer
Avocets
Wilson's Phalarope
Red-necked Phalarope (much better views)
Horned Larks
Raven
Loggerhead Shrike
Lark Buntings
Yellow-headed Blackbird
Red-winged Blackbird
Great-tailed Grackle

Stacey Scott
SW of Casper
 

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Date: 5/14/17 7:27 pm
From: Hustace Scott <hustace...>
Subject: Re: White-crowned sparrows
I agree completely with George on the scopes and tripods.

Stacey Scott
SW of Casper

On Sun, May 14, 2017 at 8:14 PM, George Jones <jonesgp...> wrote:

> White-crowned sparrows are setting up territories in our neighborhood (SW
> Laramie).
>
> Jean, re: scopes. Since you already owned a scope you probably know
> this: buy as sturdy a tripod as you can afford. I have an old Bushell
> scope that’s nothing to shout about, but it has always worked well because
> it’s on a sturdy scope. And if you visit local shops to learn about scopes
> and tripods, buy from them. If you use their customer service and then buy
> on the internet because it’s cheaper, you’re taking advantage of them and
> weakening the local economy.
>
> George Jones
 

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Date: 5/14/17 7:14 pm
From: George Jones <jonesgp...>
Subject: White-crowned sparrows
White-crowned sparrows are setting up territories in our neighborhood (SW Laramie).

Jean, re: scopes. Since you already owned a scope you probably know this: buy as sturdy a tripod as you can afford. I have an old Bushell scope that’s nothing to shout about, but it has always worked well because it’s on a sturdy scope. And if you visit local shops to learn about scopes and tripods, buy from them. If you use their customer service and then buy on the internet because it’s cheaper, you’re taking advantage of them and weakening the local economy.

George Jones
 

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Date: 5/14/17 1:21 pm
From: Chris Michelson <0000001af3511208-dmarc-request...>
Subject: eastern phoebe
Greetings birders
I should have read my e-mail before I ventured out very early this
morning to head down to the Torrington area. I also found very few migrants as
did the gentlemen from Laramie. I did find chimney swift in Guernsey, WY.
Rawhide was flooded so I did not venture far down the trail. There were
the usual brown thrashers, blue jays and a good number of western
tanagers(all male). The only warbler was a calling common yellowthroat. Bad when
you can't produce a yellow warbler. Water levels in ponds south of
Torrington were very low so very few waterfowl or shorebirds. The Yoder ponds on 85
did have a few long-billed dowitchers and Wilson's phalaropes. All was
not a total failure when I found an eastern phoebe flycatching from a fence
post along the road into Table Mountain. I don't see this species too
often. Good birding to all.
Chris Michelson
Casper, WY
 

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Date: 5/14/17 10:46 am
From: Matt Fraker <0000022256054407-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Western Tanager early dates
Hi again --


Clearly way behind on my emails here...


So in Spring of 2014, a Western Tanager showed-up in Granger, Sweetwater County on May 9th (W.Smith).


Then last year, Francis and Janice Berquist moved this date all the way up to May 1 when a Western Tanager showed up in their Saratoga yard in Carbon Co. Knowing the history of that yard, it was probably feeding right between a Brambling and a Bay-breasted Warbler!!


Matt Fraker



-----Original Message-----
From: CJ Grimes <cjgrimes...>
To: WYOBIRDS <WYOBIRDS...>
Sent: Tue, May 9, 2017 9:24 am
Subject: Western Tanager

And a House Wren, both singing in my yard. Wyoming Birds says May 10 for early date for tanager.

CJ Grimes
Ten Sleep
 

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Date: 5/14/17 10:37 am
From: Matt Fraker <0000022256054407-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: SW Casper and Gray Catbird early arrival dates.
Hi everyone --


In the spring of 2014, we actually had three Gray Catbird reports involving five birds that pre-dated the previous record early date of 11 May noted in Faulkner, with the earliest of these reports dating 5 May.


As an FYI, I and my dog will be roaming all over Wyoming from 5 - 20 June doing breeding bird surveys (and a week with family in Jackson Hole).


So if you see a big black GMC Yukon with the head of a happy blonde dog hanging out of one of the windows, feel free to flag me down and say "hi"!


Matt Fraker



-----Original Message-----
From: CJ Grimes <cjgrimes...>
To: WYOBIRDS <WYOBIRDS...>
Sent: Wed, May 10, 2017 6:27 pm
Subject: SW Casper

Went to Casper yesterday and visited the Squaw Creek area (state land off Coates Road) and found a male Broad-tailed Hummingbird, along with a good number of Spotted Towhees and Vesper Sparrows. At my friends' place on the river there was a Gray Catbird (new early date?) and Black-headed Grosbeak singing.

This morning we visited the first fishing access past the 487 junction (can't remember name). Right before the turn were 3 Sawinson's Hawks, and just a short way down the gravel road a Ferruginous Hawk let us have a few minutes to look at it on a fence post. A dozen or so Lark Buntings were buzzing around in the sagebrush, as were Horned Larks and Western Meadowlarks. Down by the river there were several Barn and Violet-green Swallows, and one each of Song, Lark and Vesper Sparrows. A Spotted Sandpiper flew down river.

At the Lusby boat ramp, there was a Savannah Sparrow on the way in, a large flock of Cliff Swallows with some already checking out nests, a Yellow and a Yellow-rumped (Audubon's) Warbler. Also a pair of American Kestrels, Western Kingbird, Belted Kingfisher, Golden Eagle on the nest had blood on its bill and appeared to be feeding a nestling.

Pretty good weather too!

CJ Grimes
Ten Sleep
 

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Date: 5/14/17 6:52 am
From: Cody Porter <empidonaxdvg...>
Subject: Southeastern Wyoming Big Day
All,

Nate Behl and I decided to try our hand at a big day across southeast Wyoming yesterday. From 4 am to 9:30 pm, we birded Rawhide WHMA, Hereford Ranch, the Laramie Range Old Laramie River Road, the plains lakes west of Laramie, and the Snowy Range.

Despite little sleep, extremely windy weather, and generally poor luck at migrant traps, we managed to find 131 species (see list below).

Nothing too rare was found. The undisputed highlight was a singing Boreal Owl along the road to Brooklyn Lake in the Snowies. We have been trying for this species a lot this spring and to a lesser degree since spring of 2015, making this a fantastic way to end a somewhat grueling day.

Good birding,
Cody Porter

Wilson's Snipe
Great Horned Owl
Mallard
Mourning Dove
Canada Goose
Common Merganser
Cliff Swallow
American Robin
American Crow
Brewer's Blackbird
Western Meadowlark
Red-tailed Hawk
European Starling
Common Grackle
Yellow-headed Blackbird
Western Kingbird
Eurasian Collared-Dove
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Great-tailed Grackle
Rock Pigeon
House Sparrow
Swainson's Hawk
Chipping Sparrow
American Kestrel
Killdeer
Red-winged Blackbird
Black-billed Magpie
Common Yellowthroat
Blue Jay
House Wren
Downy Woodpecker
American Goldfinch
Bank Swallow
Northern Flicker
Western Tanager
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Yellow-breasted Chat
Brown Thrasher
Swainson's thrush
Brown-headed Cowbird
Bullock's Oriole
Wood Duck
Eastern Bluebird
Spotted Towhee
Ring-necked Pheasant
Black-headed Grosbeak
Hairy Woodpecker
Least Flycatcher
Wilson's Warbler
Warbling Vireo
Western Wood-pewee
Great Blue Heron
Barn Swallow
White-crowned Sparrow
Horned Lark
Lark Bunting
Northern Pintail
Loggerhead Shrike
Common Raven
Western Grebe
Gadwall
House Finch
Song Sparrow
Yellow Warbler
Turkey Vulture
Green-tailed Towhee
Macgillivray's Warbler
Spotted Sandpiper
Rough-winged Swallow
Belted Kingfisher
Savannah Sparrow
Clay-colored Sparrow
American Redstart
Red-breasted Nuthatch
Violet-green Swallow
Hermit Thrush
Say's Phoebe
Lark Sparrow
Mountain Chickadee
Mountain Bluebird
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Cassin's Finch
Pygmy Nuthatch
Pine Siskin
Broad-tailed Hummingbird
Clark's Nutcracker
Townsend's Solitaire
White-breasted Nuthatch
Red-naped Sapsucker
Gray-headed Junco
Steller's Jay
American Three-toed Woodpecker
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Dusky Flycatcher
Lincoln's Sparrow
California Gull
American Avocet
McCown's Longspur
Wilson's Phalarope
Willet
Cinnamon Teal
Northern Shoveler
Canvasback
Brewer's Sparrow
Prairie Falcon
Vesper Sparrow
Chestnut-collared Longspur
Ferruginous Hawk
Tree Swallow
Pied-billed Grebe
Eared Grebe
American Coot
Northern Harrier
Ruddy Duck
Forster's Tern
Marsh Wren
Lesser Scaup
Green-winged Teal
Lesser Yellowleg
Horned Grebe
Redhead
Greater Scaup
Golden Eagle
Eastern Kingbird
Sage Thrasher
White-faced Ibis
Bald Eagle
Double-crested Cormorant
American White Pelican
Ring-necked Duck
Boreal Owl




Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/13/17 6:44 pm
From: Ted Floyd <tedfloyd57...>
Subject: Wyoming Hereford Ranch, Laramie County, May 13
Hello, Wyoming birders.


I went back up to the Wyoming Hereford Ranch, Laramie County, this sunny Saturday morning, May 13, this time accompanied by a dozen birders with the Boulder County Audubon Society. As was the case on May 11, the weather was "too nice," but the birding was steady all morning. Highlights for our group included Black-chinned Hummingbird, Northern Waterthrush, American Redstart, Clay-colored Sparrow, White-throated Sparrow, and Lesser Goldfinch. Other birds at the ranch included Ferruginous Hawk, Western Wood-Pewee, Least Flycatcher, Plumbeous Vireo, Warbling Vireo, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Swainson's Thrush, Gray Catbird, MacGillivray's Warbler, Audubon's Warbler, Brewer's Sparrow, Lark Sparrow, Lincoln's Sparrow, Spotted Towhee, Black-headed Grosbeak, Yellow-headed Blackbird, and Bullock's Oriole.


Over at nearby Lions Park, the temperature was in the 80s and a bit of a breeze was kicking in, with the result that the birding was quite slow. Nevertheless, a Ruby-crowned Kinglet put on an amazing nonstop vocal performance the entire time we were there. Also 4 Western Grebes on the lake, a lovely hybrid Northern Flicker, a Mountain Chickadee, and only two warblers (1 Audubon's, 1 Myrtle).


Checklists, including photos and audio, here:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36814674 (Wyoming Hereford Ranch)


http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36817812 (Lions Park)


Ted Floyd

Lafayette, Boulder County, Colorado
 

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Date: 5/13/17 2:24 pm
From: Jim Greaves <lbviman...>
Subject: Re: Scope recommendation
Don't know if this gets to the whole group, so at least to Valerie....

I bought a Cabela's scope 15 years ago, and its
covering came loose at the eye-piece end. They
replaced it, but the "new" one also has same issue.

Also, I bought a Swarovski 80HD through Cabela's.
Way over hyped. Its 20-60 zoom does NOT stay
in-focus through the entire cycle, and at higher
power, is, to my eyes, not as good as about 40x.
BEST to buy with a fixed 35x wide angle eye-piece
if going for that high end stuff. I use mine, but
only because I already sunk more than I should
have into it... I was going to attempt
"digi-scoping", but at the time it was not as
well-done as today. I would NOT have spent the
money otherwise. I use, for photography my 40, 30
and 20 year old lenses, all manually operated on
relatively newer cameras (one is 15 or so years old).

Tamron, Sigma lenses for telephoto work for me.
My 300 5.6 and 500 mirror (both Tamron) are
closing in on 40 years and still "tack sharp". My
Sigma 400 5.6 macro is over a decade since
purchase, also tack sharp. Lastly, my Nikon 600
5.6 EDIF manual lens on digital is tack sharp
despite having a crack across the entire width of
the prime objective. I often use IT as my
"telephoto" of birds half a mile away, when I
cannot lug a scope and camera-lens combo at one time.

I would suggest, as Valerie does, to go to a shop
and check out the products, focusing on objects
the size of a dollar bill at least a hundred feet
away. Spend less, and sometimes one gets a good product.

All the above said, I do NOT recommend the
Cabela's brand 20-60 scope as its eye-piece is
dark and the attachment for camera does NOT
provide the sharpest of images. If one is
interested in photos... And if one IS so
interested, I do NOT recommend the various
attachments for scopes that barely increase the
mm of the scope beyond what one could obtain with a "prime" lens.

Ask me at my email if you have any questions. I
am NOT denigrating any product but merely passing
along my experiences... MY lenses are ALL out of
production, and I will NOT buy a motor-driven style focuser...

Jim Greaves
Thompson Falls MT

At 02:23 PM 5/13/2017, Valerie Frokjer wrote:
>I meant to also say. Go visit sportsman, cabelas
>and play with all the scopes to see what you
>like, make, models etc? Then I recommend you
>find it cheaper online somewhere. 😀
>Valerie
>
>Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On May 13, 2017, at 2:08 PM, David McDonald <DBMcD...> wrote:
> >
> > Jean:
> >
> > Personally, my favorite optics store, by far,
> is Eagle Optics in WI. Even if you don’t buy
> from them (and again, I don’t mind paying a
> wee bit extra vs, say, Cabela’s because their
> service is so good), they have really good
> reviews of many options at all price
> ranges. Their salespeople by phone are also very knowledgeable.
> >
> > Good birding to all, Dave McD
> >
> > *************************************************
> > David B. McDonald <dbmcd...>
> > Dept. Zoology & Physiology, Dept. 3166
> > 1000 E. University Ave.
> > Laramie, WY 82071
> >
> > cell (307)-760-9360
> > Office: BioSci 415; Lab. BioSci 441
> > http://www.uwyo.edu/dbmcd/mcd.html
> > *************************************************


---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/17 1:33 pm
From: Valerie Frokjer <frgnbrd...>
Subject: Re: Scope recommendation
I meant to also say. Go visit sportsman, cabelas and play with all the scopes to see what you like, make, models etc? Then I recommend you find it cheaper online somewhere. 😀
Valerie

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 13, 2017, at 2:08 PM, David McDonald <DBMcD...> wrote:
>
> Jean:
>
> Personally, my favorite optics store, by far, is Eagle Optics in WI. Even if you don’t buy from them (and again, I don’t mind paying a wee bit extra vs, say, Cabela’s because their service is so good), they have really good reviews of many options at all price ranges. Their salespeople by phone are also very knowledgeable.
>
> Good birding to all, Dave McD
>
> *************************************************
> David B. McDonald <dbmcd...>
> Dept. Zoology & Physiology, Dept. 3166
> 1000 E. University Ave.
> Laramie, WY 82071
>
> cell (307)-760-9360
> Office: BioSci 415; Lab. BioSci 441
> http://www.uwyo.edu/dbmcd/mcd.html
> *************************************************
 

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Date: 5/13/17 1:32 pm
From: Valerie Frokjer <frgnbrd...>
Subject: Re: Scope recommendation
Hi David.

I have had a vortex scope for a year now and LOVE it.

Valerie

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 13, 2017, at 2:08 PM, David McDonald <DBMcD...> wrote:
>
> Jean:
>
> Personally, my favorite optics store, by far, is Eagle Optics in WI. Even if you don’t buy from them (and again, I don’t mind paying a wee bit extra vs, say, Cabela’s because their service is so good), they have really good reviews of many options at all price ranges. Their salespeople by phone are also very knowledgeable.
>
> Good birding to all, Dave McD
>
> *************************************************
> David B. McDonald <dbmcd...>
> Dept. Zoology & Physiology, Dept. 3166
> 1000 E. University Ave.
> Laramie, WY 82071
>
> cell (307)-760-9360
> Office: BioSci 415; Lab. BioSci 441
> http://www.uwyo.edu/dbmcd/mcd.html
> *************************************************
 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/17 1:08 pm
From: David McDonald <DBMcD...>
Subject: Scope recommendation
Jean:

Personally, my favorite optics store, by far, is Eagle Optics in WI. Even if you don’t buy from them (and again, I don’t mind paying a wee bit extra vs, say, Cabela’s because their service is so good), they have really good reviews of many options at all price ranges. Their salespeople by phone are also very knowledgeable.

Good birding to all, Dave McD

*************************************************
David B. McDonald <dbmcd...>
Dept. Zoology & Physiology, Dept. 3166
1000 E. University Ave.
Laramie, WY 82071

cell (307)-760-9360
Office: BioSci 415; Lab. BioSci 441
http://www.uwyo.edu/dbmcd/mcd.html
*************************************************
 

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Date: 5/13/17 9:56 am
From: <jgwindsong...>
Subject: Keyhole, and scope request
Same birds at Kehole, but only flock of Willetsfor shore birds. Can
anyone suggest a scope as mine has bit the dust after being dropped on the
cement. Also a store in Rapid that might have scopes. Thanks, Jean
 

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Date: 5/12/17 6:33 pm
From: Rich Weaver <popeyeweaver...>
Subject: Eagles nest in Casper
Hello Birders,

There's a eagle's nest at Paradise Valley Robertson Road public-access area
off of Robertson Road. The Nest is located across the river from the access
area in a southeasterly Direction. I had some photographs of a mother and
two eaglets. The best time for viewing the nest is in the evening after 6
p.m. when the light is much better. best birding wishes rich
 

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Date: 5/12/17 3:09 pm
From: Cody Porter <empidonaxdvg...>
Subject: Rock Creek Canyon -- Carbon County
All,

This morning Nate Behl and I explored my absolute favorite place in the Snowies, Rock Creek Canyon.

A lot of summer breeders have yet to arrive, but we had lots of good stuff including:

At least 10 Broad-tailed Hummingbirds -- tons of males displaying

2 Red-naped Sapsuckers, including one drumming male

6 Dusky Flycatchers singing everywhere

1 Northern Waterthrush singing

1 MacGillivray's Warbler singing

2 Fox Sparrows countersinging in suitable breeding habitat (dense willows along beaver ponds)

8 Evening Grosbeaks, including at least 3 obvious breeding pairs

Fantastic wildflower and butterfly diversity, too.

Good birding,
Cody Porter
 

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Date: 5/11/17 6:55 pm
From: Ted Floyd <tedfloyd57...>
Subject: Wyoming Hereford Ranch, Laramie County, May 11
Hello, Wyoming birders.


Highlights for Andrew Floyd and me at the Wyoming Hereford Ranch, Laramie County, this Thursday Morning, May 11, were Gray Flycatcher, Northern Waterthrush, and White-throated Sparrow. We also saw 1 Broad-tailed Hummingbird, 1 Western Wood-Pewee, 2 Red-breasted Nuthatches, 5 Blue-gray Gnatcatchers, 2 Swainson's Thrushes, 2 Orange-crowned Warblers, 9 Myrtle Warblers, 5 Audubon's Warblers, 2 Myrtle x Audubon's Warblers, 2 Wilson's Warblers, 50+ Chipping Sparrows, 5 Clay-colored Sparrows, 1 Lark Sparrow, 9 White-crowned Sparrows, 1 Green-tailed Towhee, 1 Pheucticus grosbeak, 1 Passerina bunting, and 1 Bullock's Oriole.


So it was a kinda slow day by the Wyoming Hereford Ranch's exalted standards, but we had a very pleasant morning nonetheless. Here's our eBird checklist with photos and audio:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36743444


Ted Floyd

Lafayette, Boulder County, Colorado
 

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Date: 5/11/17 9:41 am
From: Chuck Seniawski <000000156665bc53-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Cheyenne Back Yard
I'm excited! This morning (almost) made up for the dearth of previous activity. In less than three hours, in the sunlight following our streak of dreary days:

Yellow-rumped Warbler (Audubon) 5
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) 4
Warbling Vireo 1
Plumbeous Vireo 2
Western Tanager 1 brightly colored male
Orange-crowned Warbler 1
Least Flycatcher 1

plus some of the usual:
Mourning Dove 2
House Finch 1
American Robin 1
Common Grackle 2
Eurasian Collared Dove 1

Chuck Seniawski
Cheyenne
 

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Date: 5/10/17 8:03 pm
From: dt <000000605737ba0c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: A few FOYs in Pinedale Area
 Hi all,South of Pinedale I have had a few first of the year birds:
Lark Bunting (2 days ago)Eastern Kingbird and Western Kingbird (today)
Good birding!
Diane T in Laramie
 

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Date: 5/10/17 4:27 pm
From: CJ Grimes <cjgrimes...>
Subject: SW Casper
Went to Casper yesterday and visited the Squaw Creek area (state land off Coates Road) and found a male Broad-tailed Hummingbird, along with a good number of Spotted Towhees and Vesper Sparrows. At my friends' place on the river there was a Gray Catbird (new early date?) and Black-headed Grosbeak singing.

This morning we visited the first fishing access past the 487 junction (can't remember name). Right before the turn were 3 Sawinson's Hawks, and just a short way down the gravel road a Ferruginous Hawk let us have a few minutes to look at it on a fence post. A dozen or so Lark Buntings were buzzing around in the sagebrush, as were Horned Larks and Western Meadowlarks. Down by the river there were several Barn and Violet-green Swallows, and one each of Song, Lark and Vesper Sparrows. A Spotted Sandpiper flew down river.

At the Lusby boat ramp, there was a Savannah Sparrow on the way in, a large flock of Cliff Swallows with some already checking out nests, a Yellow and a Yellow-rumped (Audubon's) Warbler. Also a pair of American Kestrels, Western Kingbird, Belted Kingfisher, Golden Eagle on the nest had blood on its bill and appeared to be feeding a nestling.

Pretty good weather too!

CJ Grimes
Ten Sleep
 

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Date: 5/10/17 9:24 am
From: Chuck Seniawski <000000156665bc53-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Wyoming Hereford Ranch
From a visit late yesterday afternoon, highlights were a male Western Tanager (looks like they are popping up across the state, based on recent wyoBirds postings), Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, three species of swallows, Yellow-rumped (Myrtle) and Yellow Warblers, Lark and White-crowned Sparrows and, oh yes, a Great Egret.

Mallard 5
Great Blue Heron 3
Great Egret 1 Large bird, larger than Snowy Egret. All white. Long black legs, including feet.
Sharp-shinned Hawk 1
Swainson's Hawk 1
Red-tailed Hawk 2
Eurasian Collared-Dove 14
Mourning Dove 10
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 4
Barn Swallow 3
Cliff Swallow 5
House Wren 1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 2
American Robin 33
European Starling 13
Yellow Warbler 3
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) 2
Chipping Sparrow 2
Lark Sparrow 5
White-crowned Sparrow 5
Song Sparrow 1
Western Tanager 1
Red-winged Blackbird 6
Western Meadowlark 4
Common Grackle 24
Brown-headed Cowbird 1
House Finch 14
American Goldfinch 3
House Sparrow 27

Migrating visitors have been sparse in the Cheyenne Back Yard so far -- only a couple Chipping Sparrows and White-crowned Sparrows and two Swainson's Thrush the past week. Mourning Doves have been showing up in numbers at my feeders - as many as 9 at one time.

Chuck Seniawski
Cheyenne
 

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Date: 5/10/17 8:20 am
From: Railer Sixtyeight <railer68...>
Subject: Re: Western Tanager
First Bullock's oriole and black-headed grosbeak Monday May 8 on the
feeders!

Carol in Saratoga

On Wed, May 10, 2017 at 9:04 AM, Dave Mead <
<0000035082ac4fbf-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> I saw a male Western Tanager in our city park on Monday, May 8. He was
> singing in a crab apple tree, between bouts of rain and sleet. Tough little
> guy!
>
> Dave MeadGreen River, WY
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> Date: Tue, 9 May 2017 10:23:35 -0400
> From: CJ Grimes <cjgrimes...>
> Subject: Western Tanager
>
> And a House Wren, both singing in my yard. Wyoming Birds says May 10 for
> early date for tanager.
>
> CJ Grimes
> Ten Sleep
>
 

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Date: 5/10/17 8:04 am
From: Dave Mead <0000035082ac4fbf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Western Tanager
I saw a male Western Tanager in our city park on Monday, May 8. He was singing in a crab apple tree, between bouts of rain and sleet. Tough little guy!

Dave MeadGreen River, WY

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Date:    Tue, 9 May 2017 10:23:35 -0400
From:    CJ Grimes <cjgrimes...>
Subject: Western Tanager

And a House Wren, both singing in my yard. Wyoming Birds says May 10 for early date for tanager.

CJ Grimes
Ten Sleep
 

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Date: 5/9/17 8:23 am
From: Zachariah Hutchinson <zachsbirdnerds...>
Subject: Northern Waterthrush
There's a Northern Waterthrush in Reshaw Park in Evansville, currently.

Zach
Casper
--
Zach Hutchinson
President
Murie Audubon Society
murieaudubon.org <http://www.murieaudubon.org>
Community Naturalist
Audubon Rockies
rockies.audubon.org <http://www.rockies.audubon.org>
 

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Date: 5/9/17 7:33 am
From: Jan Hoar <hoarwest...>
Subject: 6 miles east of Cody
Monday, 5-8-17, in my back yard and field:

2 White Crowned Sparrows-FOY



Saturday, 5-6-17:

1 Say's Phoebe-FOY



Jan Hoar

East of Cody






 

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Date: 5/9/17 7:24 am
From: CJ Grimes <cjgrimes...>
Subject: Western Tanager
And a House Wren, both singing in my yard. Wyoming Birds says May 10 for early date for tanager.

CJ Grimes
Ten Sleep
 

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Date: 5/8/17 8:40 pm
From: CJ Grimes <cjgrimes...>
Subject: POORWILL
Yahoo! That is all.

CJ Grimes
Ten Sleep
 

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Date: 5/8/17 7:25 pm
From: Zachariah Hutchinson <zachsbirdnerds...>
Subject: Re: Red Shouldered Hawk and Sundance Pond Birds
Hey all!

I forgot to state which side of the road, thanks Jean! We were traveling to
Sundance, and it was on our right, so it would be the south side of the
road. It was in one of the draws that lead up to forested area of the
adjacent foothill. It likely would not stray out into the open prairie too
often. I do not know if that area has any public access but south into the
forest would likely be the best bet to find it.

I am going to attempt to put together a field trip for Saturday, and we
will likely attempt to find it.

Zach
Casper


On Mon, May 8, 2017 at 8:00 PM <jgwindsong...> wrote:

> I looked for the Red shouldered Hawk reported at mile marker 181 which is
> just West of Sundance on I90. I only found a rapter sitting on a nest
> just West of Sundance. I thought it was a red tail but only found it on
> the nest with just the head showing. It is not near the mile marker
> reported and is on the north side of the Hwy. Sundance pond had a Spotted
> sandpiper, Kingfisher, Caspian Tern and 2 C. geese with young. Took a
> ride to Whitelaw Creek in the hills but only heard a Townsend Sol. and
> Chickadees. Have more birds than that at my feeders at home. Also saw a
> Red-tailed Hawk on top of Bear Lodge. Jean, Sundance.
>
--
Zach Hutchinson
President
Murie Audubon Society
murieaudubon.org <http://www.murieaudubon.org>
Community Naturalist
Audubon Rockies
rockies.audubon.org <http://www.rockies.audubon.org>
 

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Date: 5/8/17 2:37 pm
From: Chris Michelson <0000001af3511208-dmarc-request...>
Subject: New at EKW
Greetings birders
A couple of new birds showed up at Edness Kimbal Wilkins State Park
today. This morning beforre the rain there were several Bullock's orioles.
This afternoon there was a brown thrasher. Yellow warblers are singing now
as are western kingbirds. Good birding to all.
Chris Michelson
Casper, WY
 

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Date: 5/8/17 7:47 am
From: Deibert, Pat <pat_deibert...>
Subject: Towhees! lots and lots of towhees!
I took Friday off and the dogs and I enjoyed a long walk in the teaser of
summer weather. The field just south of the house was bursting with
singing green-tailed towhees! We managed to glimpse a few furtively
dashing between shrubs, and even discovered the beginnings of a nest bowl.
On the other side of the house all was quiet - and then a sudden burst of
chipping as about 8 tree swallows literally swooped in, dancing amongst the
aspen announcing their return. One promptly claimed the nest box there,
taunting the others when they made exploratory advances. The a house wren
burst into its explosive song and a chipping sparrow found abandoned seed
below an abandoned feeder. Loggerhead shrikes dot the fence posts along the
county road. Mountain bluebirds have become recluses - likely incubating
and defending their nest sites from the exuberant swallows. The resident
red-tailed hawk has begun its sentinel duties, perching on a favored power
pole while scanning for the careless rodent. At one point I watched a
large, completely white bird soar against the turquoise sky from one
horizon to the other never flapping once. It was too far high in the sky
to identify, but that hardly seemed relevant at the time as I reveled in
its freedom. I need to take more days off......

Courtship is in full swing now that female broad-tailed hummingbirds are
back. Swooping, diving, sashaying and chasing are now the norm and I swear
I hear the trilling in my sleep. My dogs actually check out to see if the
feeder outside our back door is occupied before they venture out - you can
see the resignation in their eyes. I have 5 feeders currently and keep
adding more as the females hover where the feeders hung last year. Who
needs a GPS when you have a memory like that? I only wish they could tell
me of their amazing journey.

Now I hear lark buntings have returned east of me - perhaps "real" summer
is on its way?! But not for two weeks though, as I have two more outside
track meets to attend.....

Hard not to smile when I read all the bird reports, and then step outside
to the songs of spring. happy birding!!!

pat, in the burbs of Buford


-
 

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Date: 5/8/17 5:41 am
From: Gary & Judi Ogle <wypafl...>
Subject: FOS
I finally saw flocks of lark buntings and my first Western kingbird on Saturday. I think Spring is really here!

Judi Ogle
N of Burns
 

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Date: 5/7/17 8:25 pm
From: rtcox <birder1...>
Subject: Gillette
The snow melted off, the White-crowned Sparrows and most of the Spotted
Towhees and Yellow-rumped Warblers left. Friday and Saturday very quiet in
my neighborhood (SW Gillette) and McManamen Park.



Today there was a mixed flock of Clay-colored, Lark and Chipping Sparrows at
McManamen. A few Yellow-rumps were around. No flycatchers. Geese had a
few small broods, smaller broods than I saw a few days ago. No stilts, no
sandpipers other than Killdeer, no avocets; very quiet on the flats.
Yellow-shafted N. Flicker pair, unusual? One Tree Swallow. Lots of
grackles. Geese and mallards everywhere, but not many other ducks.



In my yard (lots of elms, spruces, ash, cottonwoods) one Spotted Towhee, two
House Wrens, one Yellow-rumped, nesting Mourning Doves and probably nesting
Eurasian Collared-Doves. Pewee heard this morning.



75 degrees, partly cloudy, light breeze.



RT Cox

Gillette Wyoming

307.299.2814

<mailto:<birder1...> <birder1...>

<https://500px.com/RTCox/sets> https://500px.com/RTCox/galleries


 

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Date: 5/7/17 5:56 pm
From: Zachariah Hutchinson <zachsbirdnerds...>
Subject: Red-Shouldered Hawk
Hey WyoBirders,

Today, four intrepid birders birded the northeast corner of the state. We
saw MANY great birds, that I will report later. However, near mile marker
181 east of Sundance on I90, we saw a Red-shouldered Hawk. (I'm willing to
bet my first-born against anyone who doubts it.) Being on the interstate,
we couldn't just flip around and grab pictures. We found the first
turnaround we could, but the bird had disappeared by the time we returned.
If you live near, do your best to grab some photos! We failed in that
department, but we did our best.

Good luck!

Zach, Ann, Sarah, Tel
Casper
--
Zach Hutchinson
President
Murie Audubon Society
murieaudubon.org <http://www.murieaudubon.org>
Community Naturalist
Audubon Rockies
rockies.audubon.org <http://www.rockies.audubon.org>
 

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Date: 5/7/17 1:43 pm
From: Nathaniel Behl <behlx008...>
Subject: Rawhide birds
Hey Everyone,
Libby Megna and I led a group of students from the UW ornithology class out
to Rawhide SWMA this morning where we had number of good "eastern" birds
and spring arrivals. Highlights included a fair number of Western
Kingbirds, Red-headed Woodpeckers, Brown Thrashers, a female Eastern
Bluebird, Harris's Sparrow, Swainson's Thrush, Bullock's Oriole, and a
bunch of singing House Wrens. A pretty good morning all in all!

Good birding y'all!

Nate
 

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Date: 5/7/17 1:20 pm
From: Bruce Walgren <piranga...>
Subject: Western Kingbird in Casper
We heard a Western Kingbird in our neighborhood of south central Casper this
morning.



Bruce & Donna Walgren

Casper, WY


 

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Date: 5/6/17 10:01 pm
From: claylenef <claylenef...>
Subject: Torrington
Hello Birders. Today at 8:35 am, I  had my first of the year, pretty boy! (Bullocks Oriole) make his appearance in my back yard. Last year the 1st Bullocks Oriole appeared on May 6th too!  Also I had one Western Kingbird. Love this time of year!


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 

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Date: 5/6/17 7:27 pm
From: CJ Grimes <cjgrimes...>
Subject: good start to May
Earlier this week in the badlands SW of Ten Sleep there were several new arrivals, including Vesper and Brewer's Sparrows, Gray Flycatcher, Tree and Violet-green Swallows, Cinnamon Teal and Willet.

Yesterday along Spring Creek Road there were 3 White-faced Ibis and 5-6 Wilson's Phalaropes along with an assortment of waterfowl in a large marsh on the Spring Creek Ranch. Orange-crowned Warblers were singing on Otter Creek.

Today in the foothills I saw my first Virginia's Warbler of 2017 along with Lark Sparrow.

Wind out of the south again tonight, probably time to start listening for my favorite little night bird....

CJ Grimes
Ten Sleep
 

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Date: 5/6/17 1:30 pm
From: Bob & Suzanne Hargis <bhargis...>
Subject: New ones last 2 days
Hello
Lazuli bunting males showed up yesterday at 7 am at feeders.. 2 birds. Exact date as last year, 2014 and 2010.. within 3 days over last 12 years
Western Kingbird. 5/6/17 same day as last year
Spotted sandpiper 5/6/17 same general date.. our record early date is 4/10/04

Warblers slow here west of Riverton.. Go you Casper guys..
Vesper, Lark and Savannah too here

more soon
Bob Hargis
Riverton west of town
 

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Date: 5/6/17 11:19 am
From: Cody Porter <empidonaxdvg...>
Subject: Greenbelt Birds -- Laramie
All,

Nate Behl and I had a few nice birds along the Greenbelt this morning, including a tan morph White-throated Sparrow and a Northern Waterthrush.

Good birding,
Cody Porter

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/5/17 4:46 pm
From: Tina Payton <rainofautumn...>
Subject: Blue-winged & Cinnamon Teal in Cheyenne
Hello fellow birders!

Today on my way back from a doctors appointment I stopped on Fox Farm road here in Cheyenne to check out if anything new has shown up on the pond. Present today:
Blue-winged Teal
Cinnamon Teal
Red heads
Coots
Possible Gadwalls
Red-winged blackbirds (all males?)
Yellow headed blackbirds (females were visible today - I think)
Common Grackle

2 weeks ago we saw a Great-Tailed Grackle and some Killdeer.

Happy birding to all.
Tina Payton
Cheyenne

Get Outlook for Android<https://aka.ms/ghei36>
 

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Date: 5/4/17 11:04 pm
From: Chuck Seniawski <000000156665bc53-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Wyoming Hereford Ranch and Reservoir 1
Quite a bit of activity this very pleasant afternoon.

At the reservoir...

29 species (+2 other taxa)

Canada Goose 2
Gadwall 8
American Wigeon 6
Mallard 33
Blue-winged Teal 45
Cinnamon Teal 2
Northern Shoveler 14
Redhead 1
Lesser Scaup 9
Bufflehead 2
Common Merganser 9
Ruddy Duck 25
Eared Grebe 10
Western Grebe 68
Double-crested Cormorant 12
Great Blue Heron 1
Swainson's Hawk 1
American Coot 14
American Avocet 4
Franklin's Gull 4
Ring-billed Gull 25
Forster's Tern 5
Mourning Dove 3
Barn Swallow 1
American Robin 2
Yellow-rumped Warbler 1
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) 3
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Audubon's) 1
Red-winged Blackbird 10
Western Meadowlark 6
Common Grackle 8

At the ranch...

26 species (+1 other taxa)

Canada Goose 2
Mallard 6
Black-crowned Night-Heron 1
Northern Harrier 1
Swainson's Hawk 1
Red-tailed Hawk 1
Solitary Sandpiper 1
American Kestrel 1
Eurasian Collared-Dove 5
Mourning Dove 4
Northern Flicker (Red-shafted) 2
Say's Phoebe 1
Barn Swallow 3
Swainson's Thrush 1
Hermit Thrush 1
American Robin 25
European Starling 8
Yellow-rumped Warbler 2
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) 4
Grasshopper Sparrow 2
Chipping Sparrow 26
Green-tailed Towhee 1
Red-winged Blackbird 2
Western Meadowlark 2
Common Grackle 33
Brown-headed Cowbird 1
House Finch 7

Chuck Seniawski
Cheyenne
 

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Date: 5/4/17 10:28 pm
From: Cody Porter <empidonaxdvg...>
Subject: Nothern Saw-whets -- Albany Co.
All,

Nate Behl and I just returned from an owling trip to the Laramie Range where we had at least 2 saw-whets singing at the Happy Jack parking lot. Several snipe were displaying and we also heard a distant Great Horned Owl.

Good birding,
Cody Porter

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/4/17 6:40 pm
From: Zachariah Hutchinson <zachsbirdnerds...>
Subject: The Birds Keep Rolling In
Hey WyoBirders,

I didn't send out a second email this morning, but I had a Field Sparrow in
Reshaw Park in Casper.

This afternoon, while traveling to Douglas for work, I saw a chick in the
Golden Eagle nest at the Natural Bridge exit. It gave me warm, fuzzy
feelings.... annnnnnnd then I witnessed several white-tailed prairie dogs
eating one of their road splattered comrades. That's probably a better
representation of nature...

Finally, as I returned from Douglas this evening, I found an adult
Broad-winged Hawk. It appears to be roosting overnight at the park in
Glenrock. I will take a wild guess and say it may appear over Casper
tomorrow between 9 & 11 AM.

The birds are moving, and so should we!

Zach
Casper
--
Zach Hutchinson
President
Murie Audubon Society
murieaudubon.org <http://www.murieaudubon.org>
Community Naturalist
Audubon Rockies
rockies.audubon.org <http://www.rockies.audubon.org>
 

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Date: 5/4/17 6:00 am
From: Zachariah Hutchinson <zachsbirdnerds...>
Subject: Lesser Black-backed Gull
There is a 3rd cycle Lesser Blacked-back Gull on the Evansville JTL Pond
currently. Pictures will be on eBird.com.

Zach
Casper
--
Zach Hutchinson
President
Murie Audubon Society
murieaudubon.org <http://www.murieaudubon.org>
Community Naturalist
Audubon Rockies
rockies.audubon.org <http://www.rockies.audubon.org>
 

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Date: 5/3/17 3:15 pm
From: Chris Michelson <0000001af3511208-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Casper area
Greetings birders
This afternoon I visited Goldeneye Reservoir and parts between. At
Goldeneye Reservoir there were a selection of shorebirds. The water level has
risen to the point that leaving the parking lot will require waders. The
water is in the parking lot and under two of the three picnic tables. As
with last year the high water seems to attract the shorebirds to the parking
lot. Today there were 20+ willets(both eastern and western), 4 marbled
godwits, 3 avocets, 1 greater yellowlegs and one lesser yellowlegs. Both
yellowlegs were in good breeding plumage and standing next to each other. Also
present were some peep sandpipers: least, Baird's and western. There was
one ibis across the lake and one killdeer in the parking lot.
On the return trip there was a McCown's longspur about 2 miles up
Bucknum road and one prairie falcon at the intersection. A quick stop at Reshaw
Park in Evansville,WY produced the best bird of the day, a palm warbler.
All in all a rather good afternoon. Good birding to all.
Chris Michelson
Casper, WY
 

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Date: 5/2/17 5:51 pm
From: Bob & Suzanne Hargis <bhargis...>
Subject: First oriole today
First Bullock's oriole today at 12pm east of Riverton
matches date from 2014 and 4 days earlier than last 2 years

Bob Hargis
 

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Date: 5/2/17 2:20 pm
From: <jgwindsong...>
Subject: Keyhole, /Sunday 4/30
The Bald Eagles were still on the nest as well as the Great Blue Herons.
The 2 Common Loons were still off the point at the marina. Other birds
seen were Horned, Pied-billed.Western, and Eared Grebes.W. Pelicans,DC
Cormorants, C. Geese, Snow Geese, Wood, Mallards, N. Pintail, N.
Shovelers, A. Wigeon, Redhead, Ducks and C.Mergansers, andGadwall and
Ruddys. Turkey Vultures. N. Harrier, Osprey, Swainson,RT. Hawk, G. Eagle,
A. Kestrel. Also, Jen saw a Peregrine Falcon on the way home on Old
Sundance Rd.Other birds at the lake were Coot,Kildeer, Willets, Wimbrels,
Long-billed CurlewsMarbled Godwits at the bridge on Hwy. 16.Ring-billed
and Franklins Gulls. Rock Doves, Kingfishers, Downey and Hairy
Woodpeckers and N. Flickers, Red-naped Sapsuckers. . Horned Larks,
B.-billed Magpies, A. crow, B.C. Chickadees, R. B. Nuthatch,M. Bluebirds,
Robins, Yellow Rumped Warblers, and Vesper, Song, White-crowned Sparrows.
Juncos, Red-winged, Yellow-Headed, Brewers Blackbirds. C. Grackles ended
the list. Hope I got them all as Jen has the list. I still have the
Evening Grosbeaks at my feeders. Jean, Sundance, Wy.
 

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Date: 5/2/17 10:23 am
From: Barb GORGES <bgorges4...>
Subject: Cheyenne Big Day Bird Count May 20
Dear Wyobirders,
You are all invited to join us May 20. How many warbler species will we see this year? Could be anything from three to 17, based on past years.
Barb Gorges
Cheyenne

The Cheyenne - High Plains Audubon Society's annual Big Day Bird Count will be held at the height of the spring bird migration May 20. The event is free and the public is welcome to attend all or part of the day.
The count begins at 6 a.m. in Lions Park at South Lions Park Drive, in the parking lot between the Children's Village, the beach and the newly renovated restrooms. After birding the park, the group will visit the Wyoming Hereford Ranch and the High Plains Grasslands Research Station.
If you want to join the group later than 6 a.m., please call Mark, 307-287-4953, to find out where the group is. Dress for changing weather conditions and bring water and lunch if spending the day. A tally party potluck will be held May 21 at 5 p.m. Results of your independent bird counts in the Cheyenne area can also be called in to Mark or emailed, <mgorges...><mailto:<mgorges...>?subject=Big%20Day%20Bird%20Count>.
See the chapter's May newsletter posted at https://cheyenneaudubon.wordpress.com<https://cheyenneaudubon.wordpress.com/> for details or contact Mark.
xxx
 

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Date: 5/2/17 10:04 am
From: Zachariah Hutchinson <zachsbirdnerds...>
Subject: JTL Gravel Ponds
Hey Everybody!

I must have just missed Sarah at the JTL Ponds here in Casper. I've added
my checklist below from eBird. My most notable bird was a Redhead hybrid.
Possibly a hybrid with a scaup or Ring-necked Duck (pictures are in eBird).
In Edness K. Wilkins State Park this morning, I had an FOY Hermit Thrush,
singing Lincoln's Sparrows, and Yellow-rumped and Orange-crowned Warblers.
We also had about 5 Blue-gray Gnatcatchers and a single Red-naped
Sapsucker. With the Yellow-rumped Warblers, several have been a hybrid
between the Audubon and Myrtle subspecies. I've never paid attention to
them in such detail before, but with there being few birds right now, why
not?

JTL Gravel Ponds, Natrona, Wyoming, US
May 2, 2017 8:59 AM - 9:28 AM
Protocol: Stationary
21 species (+2 other taxa)

Canada Goose 2
Gadwall 8
American Wigeon 14
Northern Shoveler 23
Ring-necked Duck 6
Redhead x Ring-necked Duck (hybrid) 1 So here goes. I used REDH x RNDU
as a placeholder. This is clearly a REDH hybrid, but as to the other
species, can we truly tell? It is definitely from the Scaup/Ring-necked
group. Anything after that is gravy. Libby, do you or Tony have a
suggestion as to how to enter this guy? The photos are not great, but it
was typical REDH appearance with a purpleish, iridescent cast to the head.
Obviously, the two-toned body also is a trait from the hybrid parentage.
Thoughts? I used RNDU simply because that is who he was associating with.
He also seemed very friendly with a certain RNDU female. In the photos, it
is the two-toned bird, giving a side profile.
Greater/Lesser Scaup 13
Bufflehead 2
Ruddy Duck 143 Exact count. Have pictures
Eared Grebe 236
Western Grebe 42
Clark's Grebe 1
American Avocet 12
Willet 5
Ring-billed Gull 8
California Gull 4
Herring Gull 5 Picture shows 3 HERG with 1 RBGU. None of these are in
definitive plumage. I might try to come back and provide ages later. The
middle one has a yellowish tinge to the legs. I'm going to check out other
pictures to make sure something awesome didn't sneak in.
Caspian Tern 4 Exact count. No pictures, but not uncommon during
migration.
Forster's Tern 1
Tree Swallow 2
European Starling 2
White-crowned Sparrow 2
House Sparrow 20

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/
checklist/S36483089

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

--
Zach Hutchinson
President
Murie Audubon Society
murieaudubon.org <http://www.murieaudubon.org>
Community Naturalist
Audubon Rockies
rockies.audubon.org <http://www.rockies.audubon.org>
 

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Date: 5/2/17 9:35 am
From: Sarah Dominic <000004e044780be3-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Correction. Herring Gull not Thayer's Gull.
The gull on the JTL pond is a SY Herring Gull.


Sarah Baird
Evansville, WY
 

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Date: 5/2/17 9:14 am
From: Sarah Dominic <000004e044780be3-dmarc-request...>
Subject: JTL pond Thayer's Gull
There is a lot of activity on JLT pond this morning. Including the possible Thayer's gull that has been periodically seen earlier this year.

50 Western/Clark's grebes
100 Eared grebes
80 Ruddy ducks
1 cormorant
3 ring-Billed ducks
2 mallards
12 northern shovelers
2 American avocets
1 Thayer's Gull (overall brownish gull with pink legs and a black bill)
12 ring-billed gulls
 

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Date: 5/2/17 6:03 am
From: Kendra David <000004ea7a81524d-dmarc-request...>
Subject: McDonald Reservoir, May 1, 2017

McDonald Reservoir, Natrona, Wyoming, US
May 1, 2017 6:05 PM - 6:35 PM
Protocol: Stationary
14 species

Gadwall  1
Mallard  2
Canvasback  2
Redhead  2
Ring-necked Duck  1
Ruddy Duck  2
American Coot  23
Franklin's Gull  1
Tree Swallow  5
Barn Swallow  1
Red-winged Blackbird  34    22 of them females
Western Meadowlark  1
Yellow-headed Blackbird  6
Brewer's Blackbird  2

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36469130

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



 

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Date: 5/1/17 4:26 pm
From: Zachariah Hutchinson <zachsbirdnerds...>
Subject: EKW Warbler Walks
Greetings WyoBirders,


I wanted to share an opportunity that Audubon Rockies and the WY State Park
group is offering, a daily Warbler Walk. If you are in the Casper area,
feel free to join!


*Details:*


*Where*: Edness K. Wilkins State Park – Platte River
Shelter Parking (where the road turns to the east)



*Dates*: May 2-6th

May 9-13th

May 16-20th



*Time*: 6:00 AM – 7:30 AM (if enough people request an
evening walk, I can add that in)



*Cost*: Program – FREE

Park entry - $4 per day (or buy the annual pass)



*What* *to* *bring*: Comfortable, sturdy, water resistant shoes/boots,
binoculars, camera, warm clothes, rain jacket


--
Zach Hutchinson
President
Murie Audubon Society
murieaudubon.org <http://www.murieaudubon.org>
Community Naturalist
Audubon Rockies
rockies.audubon.org <http://www.rockies.audubon.org>
 

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Date: 5/1/17 1:00 pm
From: Zachariah Hutchinson <zachsbirdnerds...>
Subject: A Couple of Rarities at Goldeneye - 4/30
Sorry for the day old report. I had a Glossy Ibis and a Rusty Blackbird
yesterday at Goldeneye. It was a productive day at the lake! The Rusty was
heard, possibly seen. I caught a glimpse of an "angry looking" Brewers, but
it was brief. The Glossy I have photos up on eBird, along with my notes.
Those strong eastern winds have brought in a variety of good birds
including that awesome Black Scoter (Riverton area) and Sprague's Pipit
(Lake DeSmet). Big spring!

Burlington Lake, Natrona, Wyoming, US
Apr 30, 2017 2:34 PM - 4:48 PM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
51 species (+3 other taxa)

Canada Goose 12
Gadwall 80
American Wigeon 40
Mallard 25
Blue-winged Teal 10
Cinnamon Teal 16
Northern Shoveler 120
Northern Pintail 4
Green-winged Teal 40
Redhead 4
Lesser Scaup 12
Bufflehead 1
Common Merganser 3
Ruddy Duck 2
Common Loon 8
Eared Grebe 4
Western Grebe 40
Double-crested Cormorant 30
American White Pelican 20
Glossy Ibis 1 First photo: Glossy ibis has head raised, looking at
camera. Note the thinner white around the facial skin, this is usually more
extensive in a WFIB showing DA plumage. Note the eye that is clearly dark
and not reddish or pinkish. This was more prominent in the field, but
digiscoping has limitations. The most notable things about the first photo
are: (1) the grayish to bluish skin. It is clearly not red or pink. Also,
the white feathering thins at the back of the eye. In the WFIB this
typically is still quite extensive behind the eye. The white line is not as
blue as one might like to see, but this varies with timing of the DPA molt.

Second photo: This photo shows an adjacent WFIB. Even at this distance, the
very subtle pinkish skin is visible, showing the pale grayish to bluish
skin is not a trick of the optics, but true as viewed in the field.

The photos are very useful, but my notes will also help. I noticed this
bird immediately. Having lived on the Texas coast for multiple years, I saw
these two species together multiple times. While they do look similar, the
GLIB always appeared colder (or darker-ish) than the White-faced. I think
this is more of a perspective than an in-hand observation. With the paler
face, the whole bird appears less bright to me. Usually aiding me in
picking out these two species when mixed. This bird gave that feeling.
There was a second bird that also gave the feeling, but was an SY bird, and
could be a potential hybrid. Pure speculation there, I did not get photos.
It went into the "/" category. I do not have side profiles of this bird,
they were quite busy feeding or spooking from 50+ yards away. A Peregrine
has feasted upon one of them, and I'm sure that is why they were feeling
uneasy.
White-faced Ibis 25
Glossy/White-faced Ibis 1
Northern Harrier 1
American Coot 250
Black-necked Stilt 12 Exact count. Many pairs. This is a good number,
but the recent weather system pushed in a lot of birds
American Avocet 28
Killdeer 30 Again, likely to be a result of the storm system.
Marbled Godwit 8
Short-billed/Long-billed Dowitcher 1
Wilson's Snipe 1
Wilson's Phalarope 4
Willet 5
Willet (Western) 3
Lesser Yellowlegs 4
Bonaparte's Gull 1
Franklin's Gull 60
Ring-billed Gull 12
Forster's Tern 1 Early? Small tern. Too small for CATE, too light
bodied for COTE.
Loggerhead Shrike 2 Exact count. They are returning to this area. Not
the first birds I've seen. Possibly a small adjustment to the filter for
this?
Horned Lark 20
Barn Swallow 2
Sage Thrasher 2
American Pipit 2
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Audubon's) 1
Chipping Sparrow 1
White-crowned Sparrow 6
Vesper Sparrow 14
Savannah Sparrow 28
Red-winged Blackbird 90
Western Meadowlark 12
Yellow-headed Blackbird 6
Rusty Blackbird 1 This bird was giving a partial song. Mixed in with
the 100+ RWBL and BRBL. I would not have registered it, if not for it's
obvious song. The rusty hinge sound that is cleaner and sweeter (to me)
than BRBL and lacks the buzzy quality. Not easy to distinguish separately,
but it stands out when multiple BRBL are singing/calling with it. The
gurgles that also help in distinguishing the song, could not be heard over
the other birds.
Brewer's Blackbird 20
Brown-headed Cowbird 6

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/
checklist/S36445595

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

--
Zach Hutchinson
President
Murie Audubon Society
murieaudubon.org <http://www.murieaudubon.org>
Community Naturalist
Audubon Rockies
rockies.audubon.org <http://www.rockies.audubon.org>
 

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Date: 5/1/17 12:16 pm
From: Rich Weaver <popeyeweaver...>
Subject: Blue grey gnatcatcher
Hi Birders,

I have a blue-gray gnatcatcher for first of the year at Edness K Wilkins
State Park in natrona county observed 30 minutes ago at approximately 12:30
p.m. . It is a great day. best wishes rich
 

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Date: 5/1/17 10:44 am
From: Jacqueline M Hauptman <jhauptma...>
Subject: cedar waxwings in Guernsey
Arrived home on a cool rainy afternoon in Guernsey (in town) to see a flock of about 20-25 cedar waxwings thoroughly enjoying the rain showers and the bird bath. They stayed very high in the leafless black walnut tree vigorously bathing in light rain, but once one went to the bird bath, a ring of wax wings would form. Very gregarious at this point in the season.

Also noticed tree swallows in and defending blue bird boxes at Guernsey SP. Blue birds were trying to gain access.

Sorry, this is more observation than list.


J. M. Hauptman
University of Wyoming
Anthropology Dept. 3431
1000 E. University Ave.
Laramie WY 82071

307-766-6920
 

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Date: 5/1/17 10:14 am
From: SUBSCRIBE WYOBIRDS Anonymous <wyncoop1...>
Subject: White Crowned Sparrows
This morning in my yard in Cheyenne have White Crowned Sparrows, Collared Dove feeding two fledged babies.
 

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Date: 4/30/17 2:54 pm
From: Barb GORGES <bgorges4...>
Subject: Re: Better link for Bird Banter column on California birding
OK--the secret is, don't type in web addresses starting with www. Just go to the website you want to share the address of and copy and paste!
Barb

-----Original Message-----
From: Wyoming's Birder List [mailto:<WYOBIRDS...>] On Behalf Of Barb GORGES
Sent: Sunday, April 30, 2017 3:51 PM
To: <WYOBIRDS...>
Subject: Better link for Bird Banter column on California birding

Dear Wyobirders,
The link to my column on California birding I just posted was garbled in at least one subscriber's email. I'm sure you'll want to go see Mark's photos there.
The link should be just "Cheyenne Bird Banter dot Wordpress dot com." Let's see what happens this time!
Try www.CheyenneBirdBanter.wordpress.com<http://www.CheyenneBirdBanter.wordpress.com> or https://cheyennebirdbanter.wordpress.com/.
Thanks,
Barb Gorges
Cheyenne
 

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Date: 4/30/17 2:51 pm
From: Barb GORGES <bgorges4...>
Subject: Better link for Bird Banter column on California birding
Dear Wyobirders,
The link to my column on California birding I just posted was garbled in at least one subscriber's email. I'm sure you'll want to go see Mark's photos there.
The link should be just "Cheyenne Bird Banter dot Wordpress dot com." Let's see what happens this time!
Try www.CheyenneBirdBanter.wordpress.com<http://www.CheyenneBirdBanter.wordpress.com> or https://cheyennebirdbanter.wordpress.com/.
Thanks,
Barb Gorges
Cheyenne
 

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Date: 4/30/17 1:36 pm
From: Barb GORGES <bgorges4...>
Subject: Bird Banter, April 30, 2017: California birding
This edition of Bird Banter, about birding in central California, was published in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle April 30, 2017. To see it with photos, go to www.CheyenneBirdBanter.wordpress.com<http://www.CheyenneBirdBanter.wordpress.com>. To reprint this column digitally or in hard copy, please contact me, the author, <bgorges4...><mailto:<bgorges4...>. You must mention first publication's location and date.
Barb
Published April 30, 2017, in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle, "Coast comes through with great birds"
By Barb Gorges
If I added these bird species to my life list last month [March], where would you say I'd been?
Surf scoter, pelagic cormorant, western gull, band-tailed pigeon, Anna's hummingbird, Allen's hummingbird, Nuttall's woodpecker, California (formerly western) scrub-jay, California towhee, golden-crowned sparrow.
If you guessed California, you would be right. But it isn't the birds with "California" in their names that is the best clue. That would be the Nuttall's woodpecker, found entirely in the state and the northern tip of Baja California. We saw ours in the arboretum at the University of California Davis.
Five of the species new to me-the hummingbirds, pigeon, towhee and scrub-jay-were in the backyard of the bed and breakfast we stayed at in Olema, California. The host fills the feeders every morning at 8:15 a.m. just before serving breakfast and his guests are treated to a flurry that also includes numerous California quail, white-crowned sparrows and, just like home, Eurasian collared-doves.
The pelagic cormorant would tell you that we spent time at the ocean. Despite the "pelagic" part of its name, which should indicate it is found far offshore, this cormorant is a shore dweller. Mark and I saw it way below us, in the rocks, at the lighthouse at Point Reyes National Seashore.
At Point Reyes Beach North, we encountered signs warning us about the protected nesting area for the federally designated threatened western population of snowy plovers. The area of the beach to be avoided was clearly marked with 4-foot white poles and white rope. Mark and I, and our Sacramento friends, formerly of Casper, dutifully gave it a wide berth.
And then the birds flew up in front of us anyway. We watched as five or six of the little white-faced sand-colored shorebirds fluttered away and settled down again nearby-in human footprint depressions.
The American Birding Association's "Field Guide to the Birds of California" says that the snowy plovers breeding on beaches like to find depressions so they don't cast as much of a shadow to avoid detection by predators. They like the depressions for nesting too. Makes me think someone should walk once or twice through the official nesting area to make some, but who wants to pay the fine for trespassing? Besides, human activity and loose dogs scare the birds and prevent them from breeding.
Snowy plover was not a lifer for us-our first ones were at Caladesi Island State Park, Florida [managed at the time by Bill Gruber, former Wyoming Tribune Eagle Outdoors editor]. There too, their nesting area was delineated and protected, though in Florida they are only on the state-level threatened species list.
Snowy plovers are more than oceanic beach birds. You might find nesting populations across the southwestern U.S. at shallow lakes with sand or dried mud.
One bird I wanted to see was the wrentit. California, western Oregon and northern Baja California are the only places to see it. At the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge, I found two cute little birds that seemed to match the field guide. Another visitor noticed them popping in and out of a two-foot-long hanging sack made of bits of vegetation woven together and a red flag went up in my mind.
Didn't this hanging nest remind me of one I'd seen before in Seattle? Made by bushtits? Well darn, those were bushtits. They are only 4.5 inches long, whereas wrentits are 6.5 inches long, and wrentits build cup-shaped nests instead. If you were to draw a line from Seattle to Houston, bushtits can be found south of it, anywhere brushy and woodsy.
This was our first trip to California as eBirders, recording birds we saw at eBird.org. As usual, it came about as the result of a family commitment, which almost all our traveling does. We might have seen more species had we been on a birding tour, like we've done in Texas and Florida, but I think we did well at 86 species. The birds just seemed to pop out and give us a good look. Or maybe you could say they took a good look at us. [Have you ever been scrutinized by three turkey vultures on three adjoining fence posts next to a trail?]
We'll have to make a point of visiting our family and friends in California more often. There are 571 bird species left to see-and half would be life birds.
 

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Date: 4/30/17 11:42 am
From: Bob & Suzanne Hargis <bhargis...>
Subject: Black scoter
Hello birders
Of course this bird was a male black scoter, Sorry.. see what happens when an old guy opens his new Sibley and fails to note the fact that is a first winter Male and not female... forgot to put on the readers.
Better photos just taken today and will be available to those who wish to see them
Bob Hargis
Riverton
Wy
 

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Date: 4/30/17 6:28 am
From: Bob & Suzanne Hargis <bhargis...>
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - ST STEPHENS POND, Apr 29, 2017
Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) 15
Gadwall (Anas strepera) 6
Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) 4
Ring-necked Duck (Aythya collaris) 16
Black Scoter (Melanitta americana) 1 this bird observed on return from Lander at 1150 am.. Suzanne and Bob Hargis. we called others who joined with cameras.. Del Nelson should have better photos to display interesting .. This may be the second spring record .. interesting as this bird is a pelagic bird ocean.. female with a bill showing first winter moving to 1st spring with noticeable white/grey cheeks to back of neck
Pied-billed Grebe (Podilymbus podiceps) 3
White-faced Ibis (Plegadis chihi) 1 at 505pm found by Dr. Candy Turner
Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura) 2 over Riverton at 3pm on way home the first time
Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) 2 seen south of St Stephens on the nesting platform near the Little Wind River bridge
Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) 1
American Coot (Fulica americana) 17
Sandhill Crane (Antigone canadensis) 2 heard calling across pond
Ring-billed Gull (Larus delawarensis) 4
California Gull (Larus californicus) 1
Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) 2
American Kestrel (Falco sparverius) 1
Black-billed Magpie (Pica hudsonia) 1
American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) 1
Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) 2
chickadee sp. (Poecile sp.) 1
American Robin (Turdus migratorius) 4
Sage Thrasher (Oreoscoptes montanus) 1 heard at pond
Orange-crowned Warbler (Oreothlypis celata) 1
Savannah Sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis) 1
Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) 3
Western/Eastern Meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta/magna) 1
Yellow-headed Blackbird (Xanthocephalus xanthocephalus) 15
Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula) 1

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36406527

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
 

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Date: 4/30/17 6:21 am
From: Bob & Suzanne Hargis <bhargis...>
Subject: Black Scoter
Hello Birders
Yesterday morning while returning from Lander Swim Meet, Suzanne and
I stopped at the ponds 1/2 mile toward Riverton from the St/ Stephens
Mission at about 1150 am.

Among a bunch of Ring-necked ducks, Am wigeon and some Pied billed
grebes and others, was a single dark duck with a yellow orange upper
mandible, and white/grey wash on cheeks to back of neck
This is a Black scoter female in plumage change from 1st winter to
first spring attire..
good bird for sure and called other birders who screeched to a halt
upon calls.. Del Nelson, Wanda Major and later in the afternoon about
505 pm
My lousy photos, and notes on each, are on an eBird report filed by
me, this pm and I am sure that Del Nelson got better ones on his
file this early afternoon.
Not many spring reports historically for this most oceanic related of
the Scoters
good luck finding this bird.. it feeds actively diving and hangs out
on other side of the little islet on the far side of the pond but it
will pop out hopefully for you all
Bob Hargis
 

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Date: 4/30/17 5:19 am
From: Lewis Hein <lhein...>
Subject: Mystery raptor
Dear Wyobirders,

I am confused. Two weeks ago, up in the Ferris mountains, I saw a
raptor unlike anything I have ever seen before. It was light gray on
top with black wing tips, and pretty much all white underneath except
for black wing tips. The wings were very, very pointed.

I saw it a long, long way from water, cruizing low over the prairie in
the foothills of the Ferris mountains.

What can this possibly be? The only ID I can come up with is some kind
of kite, but this seems a little unlikely, to say the least.

Lewis
 

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Date: 4/29/17 5:15 pm
From: Hustace Scott <hustace...>
Subject:
I finally found Yellow-rumped Warblers at my place. I had one Myrtle, and
all the rest I saw were Audubon's, including one female Audubon's. This is
a late date for the first warbler here. Below is the full list of an
hour's birding around the house.

White Pelican
Canada Goose
Mallard
Common Merganser
Golden Eagle (2)
Killdeer
Gull flying overhead, unidentified but probably California
Eurasian Collared-Dove
Belted Kingfisher
Flicker
Downy Woodpecker (pair, the first male I have seen this year)
Magpie
Clark's Nutchracker
Black-capped Chickadee
Rock Wren
Starling
Spotted Towhees
Vesper Sparrow
Song Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Meadowlark
Red-winged Blackbird
Cassin's Finch
House Finch
American Goldfinch (well over 50)
House Sparrow (1)

Stacey Scott
SW of Casper
 

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Date: 4/29/17 4:23 pm
From: Kathy Adams <0000023cfbb53607-dmarc-request...>
Subject: lesser goldfinch & white-winged dove - Casper
Today was the 8th day to have a single male Lesser Goldfinch show up with the American Goldfinches at the feeders in the yard. American Goldfinch are not common in my yard, but they have been regulars this spring with counts as high as 16 one morning this week.

This is the 3rd day for a single white-winged dove.

Evening Grosbeaks have also been visiting, usually 4 or 5, but today there were 9.

Other birds in the yard are the usual.
Downy woodpeckers
red-shafted flickers
Blue Jays
House finches
Mourning doves
rock doves
house sparrows
starlings
grackles

Kathy
Casper
 

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Date: 4/29/17 12:14 pm
From: Bill Vetter <wm_vetter...>
Subject: Re: Gillette
Also hit these spots around Gillette today, but later in the morning - didn't see you out there RT! :)

With all the snow melt, there is some great shorebird habitat out there now. The Kluver slough was especially bountiful with 5 whimbrels, 2 willets, 2 black-necked stilts, 1 Franklin's gull, 1 marbled godwit, 1 snipe, and loads of avocets, killdeer, and waterfowl.

Also saw 4 willets at the Fishing Lake.
 

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Date: 4/29/17 11:32 am
From: rtcox <birder1...>
Subject: Gillette
We had close to 10 inches of snow; today is sunny but cool (13 F at 7 am).
This morning's report:



McManamen Park had too much snow on trails to move around down by Burlington
Lake, so I did not stay long.



Red-winged Blackbird

Grackle

Meadowlark

Robin

Canada Geese

Assorted ducks



Slough on Kluver Road is shallow but submerged.



Turkey Vultures (six in a tree, several feeding on a carcass)

Shovelers courting

GW Teal pair

Mallards

Killdeer

Canada Geese





Camplex Park



Cedar Waxwing

Townsend's Solitaire

Robins gathering nest material

Mourning Doves

E-c Doves nesting

C Grackle

R-w Blackbird

Red-breasted Nuthatch

Chipping Sparrows in small groups

Spotted Towhee

Meadowlarks







RT Cox

Gillette Wyoming

307.299.2814

<mailto:<birder1...> <birder1...>

<https://500px.com/RTCox/sets> https://500px.com/RTCox/galleries


 

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Date: 4/29/17 7:56 am
From: rtcox <birder1...>
Subject: Re: migrants in Gillette
I picked the wrong park. While Melanie was seeing so many birds at McManamen Park, I was seeing only a few at Dalbey Park (Fishing Lake) in Gillette. One Barn Swallow, one Coot, one Great Blue Heron, several Canada Geese and two Mallards, one Myrtle Warbler and a bunch of Red-winged Blackbirds.

At home in Gillette today (Saturday) I have FOY Lincoln's Sparrow and a dozen White-crowned Sparrows, a few Juncos and a dozen House Finches eating bird seed under the bushes.


RT Cox
Gillette Wyoming
307.299.2814
<birder1...>
https://500px.com/RTCox/galleries
 

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