wisbirdn
Received From Subject
4/9/21 4:40 pm Margaret Amato <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender momamato for DMARC) [wisb] Re: Red-necked Grebes in Ozaukee County today, 4-9-2021
4/9/21 12:24 pm Thomas Wood <tcwood729...> [wisb] Red-necked Grebes in Ozaukee County today, 4-9-2021
4/9/21 10:25 am Jim and Julie Hess <jrhbird...> [wisb] First Eastern Towhee of year in Sheboygan
4/9/21 9:42 am CHARLES HAGNER <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender c_hagner for DMARC) [wisb] Fwd: eBird Report - Estabrook Park, Apr 9, 2021
4/9/21 8:47 am Joe Luedtke <onaturalist...> [wisb] Question on the Johnson Creek Heron Rookery Access?
4/7/21 7:08 pm Mariette Nowak <nowakmariette70...> [wisb] Re: Pileated question
4/7/21 7:03 pm John Kaspar <jdkaspar...> [wisb] Re: Pileated question
4/7/21 7:00 pm Mary Korkor <marykorkor...> [wisb] Re: Pileated question
4/7/21 6:50 pm Betsy Abert <betsyacorn...> [wisb] Pileated question
4/7/21 2:17 pm Thomas Wood <tcwood729...> [wisb] Purple Martins back at Marsh Haven Nature Center (Fond du Lac County)
4/6/21 7:01 pm Mariette Nowak <nowakmariette70...> [wisb] Pine Siskins- East Troy
4/6/21 2:41 pm Thomas Wood <tcwood729...> [wisb] Cinnamon Teal in Sauk County
4/6/21 12:07 pm Deborah Turski <dlturski...> [wisb] Re: Pine Siskins
4/6/21 12:06 pm Dennis Kirschbaum <kad9801...> [wisb] Pine siskins
4/6/21 11:18 am Jim Freiberg <jfreiberg80...> [wisb] Re: Pine Siskins
4/6/21 5:19 am Alan & Joan Linquist <linquists...> [wisb] Re: Pine Siskins
4/6/21 4:51 am Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...> [wisb] Pine Siskins
4/5/21 7:02 pm kevin seidel <seidelkevin25...> [wisb] Re: Warbler ID Quiz ~ Species seen in Wisconsin
4/5/21 6:11 pm Jim Edlhuber <jimedlhuber...> [wisb] Warbler ID Quiz ~ Species seen in Wisconsin
4/5/21 2:31 pm Thomas Wood <tcwood729...> [wisb] Columbia County Eurasian Wigeon continues ,but difficult to see
4/5/21 5:49 am Dennis Kirschbaum <kad9801...> [wisb] Sap sippers
4/4/21 4:24 pm Daryl Tessen <bhaunts...> [wisb] Sunday birding
4/4/21 11:12 am CHARLES HAGNER <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender c_hagner for DMARC) [wisb] Yellow-rumped Warbler - Estabrook Park, Apr 4, 2021
4/4/21 5:48 am Judy Ettenhofer <judyett...> [wisb] Re: Sapsuckers
4/4/21 5:14 am Jody Kuchar <jody.kuch.r...> [wisb] night birding
4/3/21 6:56 pm Mitchell Nussbaum <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender acornwithteeth for DMARC) [wisb] Ruddy Duck
4/3/21 1:34 pm Thomas Wood <tcwood729...> [wisb] Re: Yellow-rumped Warbler
4/3/21 1:32 pm Thomas Wood <tcwood729...> [wisb] Re: Yellow-rumped Warbler
4/3/21 7:22 am B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...> [wisb] Re: Sapsuckers
4/3/21 7:06 am Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...> [wisb] Sapsuckers
4/3/21 5:30 am Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...> [wisb] Yellow-rumped Warbler
4/2/21 3:39 pm Laura Mattek <lauramattek74...> [wisb] Stevens Point area
4/2/21 10:42 am Heidi Cox <almightyheidi...> [wisb] McFarland Virtual Bird Fest - No sightings
4/2/21 10:26 am Patricia Keuck <prkeuck...> [wisb] Annual Midwest Crane Count
4/2/21 9:15 am Steve <sthiessen1115...> [wisb] Eurasian Wigeon, Horicon Auto Tour
4/2/21 6:16 am Ted Golos <tgolos...> [wisb] goldfinches!
4/2/21 4:54 am Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...> [wisb] Early Migrants
4/1/21 7:50 pm Dennis Casper <denncasp.wisbirder...> [wisb] Urban Ecology Center Bird Walk, April 1, 2021
4/1/21 1:03 pm <wilmoss...> [wisb] FOW - Winter Wren - Winnebago Cty
4/1/21 8:29 am Spence Stehno <pensacola634...> [wisb] Milwaukee Surf Scoter Continues
3/30/21 7:00 pm Mark Wallner <wingitwildlife...> [wisb] Cranes, Kenosha County
3/30/21 8:51 am <wilmoss...> [wisb] FOY - Fox Sparrow Winnebago Cty
3/30/21 6:28 am Laura Mattek <lauramattek74...> [wisb]
3/29/21 11:30 am Jim Edlhuber <jimedlhuber...> [wisb] Sparrow ID Quiz ~ Species seen in Wisconsin
3/28/21 10:33 am Katherine Frisk <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender chkafrisk for DMARC) [wisb] Re: Manitowoc
3/28/21 4:47 am Alan & Joan Linquist <linquists...> [wisb] Manitowoc
3/27/21 8:09 pm Seegert Greg <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender gseegert for DMARC) [wisb] Fly
3/27/21 6:20 am Dave & Margaret Brasser <2shebbirders...> [wisb] Harlequin in Sheboygan River
3/25/21 7:29 am Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...> [wisb] Shorebird Presentation
3/24/21 1:43 pm Thomas Wood <tcwood729...> [wisb] Re: Franklin's gull (relocated at different spot)
3/24/21 7:45 am Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...> [wisb] Re: Pine Siskins question
3/24/21 7:37 am Timothy Baker <timothybaker1978...> [wisb] Re: Pine Siskins question
3/24/21 7:13 am Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...> [wisb] Re: Pine Siskins question
3/24/21 5:23 am Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...> [wisb] Re: Pine Siskins question
3/24/21 5:05 am Mark Korducki <mark.korducki...> [wisb] Re: Pine Siskins question
3/23/21 9:04 pm Bob Matyas <bobmatyas...> [wisb] Pine Siskins question
3/23/21 2:41 pm David Schrab <davidschrab...> [wisb] Franklin's gull
3/23/21 1:06 pm Thomas Wood <tcwood729...> [wisb] Re: Shorebird ID Quiz ~ Species seen in Wisconsin
3/23/21 7:44 am <tschmidtkunz...> [wisb] Re: Shorebird ID Quiz ~ Species seen in Wisconsin
3/22/21 8:07 pm Jody Kuchar <jody.kuch.r...> [wisb] today
3/22/21 6:26 pm Jim Edlhuber <jimedlhuber...> [wisb] Shorebird ID Quiz ~ Species seen in Wisconsin
3/22/21 5:40 pm Dave & Margaret Brasser <2shebbirders...> [wisb] Sheboygan south side on Monday afternoon March 22
3/22/21 4:08 pm Hyndla Kensdottir <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender hyndla53704 for DMARC) [wisb] Re: Black Vulture
3/22/21 12:32 pm James Schwarz <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender jfschwar for DMARC) [wisb] Lapland Longspures CTN K Ashton
3/21/21 2:58 pm Thomas Wood <tcwood729...> [wisb] Re: Black Vulture
3/21/21 2:31 pm Alan & Joan Linquist <linquists...> [wisb] Horicon NWR
3/21/21 2:21 pm Thomas Wood <tcwood729...> [wisb] Horicon NWR this morning, 3/21
3/21/21 12:52 pm Hyndla Kensdottir <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender hyndla53704 for DMARC) [wisb] Re: Black Vulture
3/21/21 12:29 pm B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...> [wisb] Re: Black Vulture
3/21/21 12:05 pm Donald Maum <dgmaum...> [wisb] Re: Black Vulture
3/21/21 10:58 am Victoria Sokolowski <vasladyvet...> [wisb] Re: Love nest is in the trees
3/21/21 7:48 am Lyle Drier <ddrier1...> [wisb] goose pond
3/21/21 6:39 am Seegert Greg <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender gseegert for DMARC) [wisb] Waterfowl
3/20/21 8:52 pm Wayne Kuhn <waylin98...> [wisb] Buena Vista on Saturday
3/20/21 5:31 pm Victoria Sokolowski <vasladyvet...> [wisb] Love is in the trees
3/20/21 5:28 pm Victoria Sokolowski <vasladyvet...> [wisb] Love is in the trees!
3/20/21 3:01 pm Ted Golos <tgolos...> [wisb] picnic point 3/20
3/20/21 1:25 pm Daryl Tessen <bhaunts...> [wisb] Saturday birding
3/20/21 5:59 am Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...> [wisb] Wisconsin Public Radio bird show
3/19/21 9:16 am Dennis Casper <denncasp.wisbirder...> [wisb] Urban Ecology Center Bird Walk, March 18, 2021
3/17/21 10:02 am Jim Edlhuber <jimedlhuber...> [wisb] Duck, Geese and Grebe ID Quiz ~ Species seen in Wisconsin
3/16/21 6:18 am Jeff Bahls <jbahls1266...> [wisb] Program Nest boxes- Bluebirds Thursday March 18 7PM- Zoom
3/15/21 2:48 pm Seegert Greg <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender gseegert for DMARC) [wisb] Waterfowl part 2
3/15/21 10:06 am Katherine Frisk <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender chkafrisk for DMARC) [wisb] Re: Sandhill Crane migration
3/15/21 7:18 am Jeff Kaczmarski <jeffkaz...> [wisb] Re: Sandhill Crane migration
3/15/21 5:16 am Judith Huf <judith_huf...> [wisb] Re: Birds today in Bayside Wis
3/15/21 4:22 am Alan & Joan Linquist <linquists...> [wisb] Sandhill Crane migration
3/14/21 7:29 pm Tom Schmidtkunz <tschmidtkunz...> [wisb] Birds today in Bayside Wis
3/14/21 6:02 pm Mark & Susan Foote-Martin <marksuemartin...> [wisb] Sandhill Crane Migration March 13 and 14th - Rio Wi
3/14/21 4:41 pm Seegert Greg <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender gseegert for DMARC) [wisb] waterfowl
3/14/21 3:24 pm Dave & Margaret Brasser <2shebbirders...> [wisb] Sheboygan Cty flooded fields
3/14/21 1:58 pm Thomas Erdman <ErdT4...> [wisb] Tundra Swans Oconto county.
3/14/21 11:00 am Ted Golos <tgolos...> [wisb] herons at the rookery
3/13/21 7:57 pm Ken Damro <traditionalnesters...> [wisb] Northern Waterthrush
3/13/21 6:33 pm Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...> [wisb] Tree Swallow
3/13/21 6:33 pm Hephziabah Beulah <hephziabahb...> [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
3/13/21 6:23 pm Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...> [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
3/13/21 6:09 pm Chuck Stebelton <cstebelton...> [wisb] Re: UNSUBSCRIBE
3/13/21 5:28 pm Scott Pudwell <pudwellphoto...> [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
3/13/21 4:06 pm Hephziabah Beulah <hephziabahb...> [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
3/13/21 10:18 am hephziabahb <hephziabahb...> [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
3/13/21 10:12 am Drew Cashman <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender drcashman11 for DMARC) [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
3/12/21 8:12 pm Tom Koch <helpmerhonda1...> [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
3/12/21 6:35 pm Drew Cashman <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender drcashman11 for DMARC) [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
3/12/21 3:09 pm Peter Hinow <peter.hinow...> [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
3/12/21 3:03 pm Thomas Wood <tcwood729...> [wisb] White Geese in Sheboygan County this morning (3-12)
3/12/21 1:57 pm Tom Sykes <sykes...> [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
3/12/21 12:42 pm Brian <courthousehollow...> [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
3/12/21 11:25 am Dennis Casper <denncasp.wisbirder...> [wisb] Urban Ecology Center Bird Walk, March 11, 2021
3/11/21 4:30 pm Bill Stout <stoutw...> [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
3/11/21 1:25 pm Hephziabah Beulah <hephziabahb...> [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
3/11/21 1:06 pm Hephziabah Beulah <hephziabahb...> [wisb] Eagle/Owl Nests Re: Nest locations
3/11/21 6:28 am Dennis Kirschbaum <kad9801...> [wisb] Bald Eagle count today - Crawford County
 
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Date: 4/9/21 4:40 pm
From: Margaret Amato <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender momamato for DMARC)
Subject: [wisb] Re: Red-necked Grebes in Ozaukee County today, 4-9-2021
There were a couple of wood ducks at Virmond Park in the wetland between the bluff path and the picnic shelter this afternoon
Margie Amato
On Friday, April 9, 2021, 02:24:12 PM CDT, Thomas Wood <tcwood729...> wrote:

This morning I decided to go Virmond Park to see if I could find the Red-necked Grebes that stage at the park in April. When I got there, the lake was fogged over, so I thought, this is not the day.
I started birding the perimeter of the park and found my FOY Ruby-crowned Kinglet and Eastern Phoebe. There were several Northern Flickers and way too many Brown-headed Cowbirds. It was over an hour-and-a-half before I got back to the lake (I bird slowly!), and I was pleased to see the fog had lifted. It didn’t take long for me to spot a raft of Red-necked Grebes, then another, and then a few scattered individuals, over 40 altogether, I’m sure.
The grebes were very far out and most of the time I was using 60X on my scope. Those of you not familiar with the park should know that viewing is from a high bluff, and more often than not, most of the birds are distant, so it may not be worth a visit if you don’t have a spotting scope.
Before I left, a large flock of Red-breasted Mergansers and gulls flew in very close to shore, and a couple of Red-necked Grebes flew into investigate, but they did not stay.
Thomas Wood, Menomonee Falls, Waukesha County####################
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Date: 4/9/21 12:24 pm
From: Thomas Wood <tcwood729...>
Subject: [wisb] Red-necked Grebes in Ozaukee County today, 4-9-2021
This morning I decided to go Virmond Park to see if I could find the Red-necked Grebes that stage at the park in April. When I got there, the lake was fogged over, so I thought, this is not the day.
I started birding the perimeter of the park and found my FOY Ruby-crowned Kinglet and Eastern Phoebe. There were several Northern Flickers and way too many Brown-headed Cowbirds. It was over an hour-and-a-half before I got back to the lake (I bird slowly!), and I was pleased to see the fog had lifted. It didn’t take long for me to spot a raft of Red-necked Grebes, then another, and then a few scattered individuals, over 40 altogether, I’m sure.
The grebes were very far out and most of the time I was using 60X on my scope. Those of you not familiar with the park should know that viewing is from a high bluff, and more often than not, most of the birds are distant, so it may not be worth a visit if you don’t have a spotting scope.
Before I left, a large flock of Red-breasted Mergansers and gulls flew in very close to shore, and a couple of Red-necked Grebes flew into investigate, but they did not stay.
Thomas Wood, Menomonee Falls, Waukesha County####################
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Date: 4/9/21 10:25 am
From: Jim and Julie Hess <jrhbird...>
Subject: [wisb] First Eastern Towhee of year in Sheboygan
Greetings all,
One of my favorite birds had been scratching around in my backyard here on the northeast side of Sheboygan this a.m. I am very happy to see my first Towhee of this spring, a beautiful male in my own yard! Earlier this week, I saw my first Yellow- bellied Sapsuckers and Fox Sparrows of the year, both in the area of Vollrath Park.
Great birding all,
Jim Hess
Sheboygan, WI
Sheboygan County####################
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Date: 4/9/21 9:42 am
From: CHARLES HAGNER <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender c_hagner for DMARC)
Subject: [wisb] Fwd: eBird Report - Estabrook Park, Apr 9, 2021
For the first time this spring, I spotted (and heard) more Ruby-crowned than Golden-crowned Kinglets in Estabrook Park, Milwaukee Co., this morning. Brown-headed Cowbirds were displaying high in trees from one end of the park to the other.
—Chuck


Chuck Hagner
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Editor | writer
Author of American Birding Association Field Guide to Birds of Wisconsin <https://www.amazon.com/American-Birding-Association-Field-Wisconsin/dp/1935622692/ref_1_1?keywordserican+Birding+Association+Field+Guide+to+Birds+of+Wisconsin&qid76287896&soks&sr1> | View my portfolio <https://www.clippings.me/chuckhagner>.



> Begin forwarded message:
>
> From: <ebird-checklist...>
> Subject: eBird Report - Estabrook Park, Apr 9, 2021
> Date: April 9, 2021 at 11:34:52 AM CDT
> To: <c_hagner...>
>
> Estabrook Park, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, US
> Apr 9, 2021 7:00 AM - 10:00 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 3.0 mile(s)
> 31 species (+1 other taxa)
>
> Canada Goose 27
> Wood Duck 6 Observed two ducks in flight and four on lagoon.
> Gadwall 1
> Mallard 20
> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 14
> Mourning Dove 5
> Killdeer 1
> Ring-billed Gull 1
> gull sp. 7
> Belted Kingfisher 1
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 1
> Red-bellied Woodpecker 7 Observed male fly to and enter nest cavity in tree trunk.
> Downy Woodpecker 2
> Northern Flicker 1
> Eastern Phoebe 1
> Blue Jay 2
> American Crow 2
> Black-capped Chickadee 11 Observed chickadee excavating a cavity in a trunk. Bird repeatedly flew from nest site carrying wood bits in its bill, perched on a nearby branch, dropped the shavings, and returned to nest site.
> Golden-crowned Kinglet 2
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet 11
> White-breasted Nuthatch 2
> Brown Creeper 5
> American Robin 15
> House Sparrow 4
> House Finch 2
> American Goldfinch 9
> Dark-eyed Junco 4
> Song Sparrow 1
> Red-winged Blackbird 18
> Brown-headed Cowbird 12 Observed males displaying throughout park.
> Common Grackle 14
> Northern Cardinal 12
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S85161191
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)


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Date: 4/9/21 8:47 am
From: Joe Luedtke <onaturalist...>
Subject: [wisb] Question on the Johnson Creek Heron Rookery Access?
All,
Im sure if you live in SE Wisconsin youve seen the Great Blue Heron Rookery off of 94 just east of the Johnson Creek exit. Id like to try and photograph them. Is there any access points to the rookery? It seems to be next to or in the Johnson Creek Landfill.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Sincerely,

Joe Luedtke
Wauwatosa, WI
Milwaukee Country




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Date: 4/7/21 7:08 pm
From: Mariette Nowak <nowakmariette70...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Pileated question
I hear and see Pileated woodpeckers in my yard and neighborhood near East Troy, in Walworth County. They are increasing in my area, perhaps because of all the dead trees caused by flooding and, as Mary Korkor suggests, dead ash trees. All breeding woodpeckers (Downy, Hairy, Red-bellied, Flicker) are common here, except for Red-headed Woodpeckers.
Mariette Nowak
Walworth county




> On Apr 7, 2021, at 8:50 PM, Betsy Abert <betsyacorn...> wrote:
>
> The question was posed the other day about the apparent lack of Pileated
> Woodpeckers in the SE sector of the state, particularly in the Milwaukee
> County area. I too am curious, having seen them in adjacent Ozaukee and
> Waukesha counties, and wonder, given their relative abundance in the
> central and northern parts of the state, if it is due to habitat issues?
> Lack of Oak trees? Urbanization? Thanks in advance for any
> thoughts/explanations. Betsy Abert, South Milwaukee
>
> ####################
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>
>


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Date: 4/7/21 7:03 pm
From: John Kaspar <jdkaspar...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Pileated question
I was hiking near the tower at Lapham Peak Monday evening, and I heard one
very close to where I was, although I never did find it.
On Wed, Apr 7, 2021 at 9:00 PM Mary Korkor <marykorkor...> wrote:

> I am hearing and seeing Pileated Woodpeckers regularly in northwest
> Waukesha County, including on my property and on the Monches Segment of the
> Ice Age Trail. In Chenequa they are demonstrating their presence with their
> signature oval holes and impressive tree shredding. Perhaps it is all the
> Ash trees and oak wilt that has created a welcoming environment for them as
> this area is heavily wooded. I heard a Red-shouldered Hawk yesterday, which
> is also taking advantage of this wooded area.
> Mary Korkor
> Waukesha County
>
>
>
> > On Apr 7, 2021, at 8:50 PM, Betsy Abert <betsyacorn...> wrote:
> >
> > The question was posed the other day about the apparent lack of Pileated
> > Woodpeckers in the SE sector of the state, particularly in the Milwaukee
> > County area. I too am curious, having seen them in adjacent Ozaukee and
> > Waukesha counties, and wonder, given their relative abundance in the
> > central and northern parts of the state, if it is due to habitat issues?
> > Lack of Oak trees? Urbanization? Thanks in advance for any
> > thoughts/explanations. Betsy Abert, South Milwaukee
> >
> > ####################
> > You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
> Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
> > To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
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> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> > Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn
> >
> >
>
> ####################
> You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
> Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
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Date: 4/7/21 7:00 pm
From: Mary Korkor <marykorkor...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Pileated question
I am hearing and seeing Pileated Woodpeckers regularly in northwest Waukesha County, including on my property and on the Monches Segment of the Ice Age Trail. In Chenequa they are demonstrating their presence with their signature oval holes and impressive tree shredding. Perhaps it is all the Ash trees and oak wilt that has created a welcoming environment for them as this area is heavily wooded. I heard a Red-shouldered Hawk yesterday, which is also taking advantage of this wooded area.
Mary Korkor
Waukesha County



> On Apr 7, 2021, at 8:50 PM, Betsy Abert <betsyacorn...> wrote:
>
> The question was posed the other day about the apparent lack of Pileated
> Woodpeckers in the SE sector of the state, particularly in the Milwaukee
> County area. I too am curious, having seen them in adjacent Ozaukee and
> Waukesha counties, and wonder, given their relative abundance in the
> central and northern parts of the state, if it is due to habitat issues?
> Lack of Oak trees? Urbanization? Thanks in advance for any
> thoughts/explanations. Betsy Abert, South Milwaukee
>
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Date: 4/7/21 6:50 pm
From: Betsy Abert <betsyacorn...>
Subject: [wisb] Pileated question
The question was posed the other day about the apparent lack of Pileated
Woodpeckers in the SE sector of the state, particularly in the Milwaukee
County area. I too am curious, having seen them in adjacent Ozaukee and
Waukesha counties, and wonder, given their relative abundance in the
central and northern parts of the state, if it is due to habitat issues?
Lack of Oak trees? Urbanization? Thanks in advance for any
thoughts/explanations. Betsy Abert, South Milwaukee

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Date: 4/7/21 2:17 pm
From: Thomas Wood <tcwood729...>
Subject: [wisb] Purple Martins back at Marsh Haven Nature Center (Fond du Lac County)
Today, April 7, the same date I first saw them there last year, I saw 3 Purple Martins on or near the nesting boxes at the nature center. The sign in front of the driveway to the nature center says it is closed until mid-April, but the nesting boxes can easily be seen from the shoulder of STH 49.
Other FOY birds seen at Horicon NWR today were a Great Egret on the south side of STH 49 (gone by afternoon when I left), and a somewhat early Least Sandpiper in with the Pectoral Sandpiper flock on the mudflats west of the autotour road past the boardwalk loop.
Thomas Wood, Menomonee Falls, Waukesha County####################
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Date: 4/6/21 7:01 pm
From: Mariette Nowak <nowakmariette70...>
Subject: [wisb] Pine Siskins- East Troy
I’ve had a few siskins most of the winter: average 4; high number 10. On March 27 , when I did a more careful look for Project Feederwatch, I had only 2. However, I still hear their “zreeeet” calls often. I, too, think I’m getting migrants from the south, but haven’t carefully counted them in April.
Mariette Nowak
East Troy





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Date: 4/6/21 2:41 pm
From: Thomas Wood <tcwood729...>
Subject: [wisb] Cinnamon Teal in Sauk County
Yesterday, when I was at Lake Wisconsin, i met a gentleman who informed me that on Sunday he had found a pair of Cinnamon Teal at Bakken’s Pond in Sauk County. He said they were the closest birds to the viewing area at the boat launch.
In the evening, after I got home I checked eBird alerts, and sure enough, there were many reports.
Today, when I arrived, as advertised, the beautiful drake Cinnamon Teal was with the closest group of birds. He and a female Blue-winged Teal were obviously taken with each other since they kept company all the time I was there. Perhaps the finder thought the female was a Cinnamon Teal and that is why he said there was a pair. This female had the smaller bill of a Blue-winged Teal, and there was no obvious difference in plumage color to the Blue-winged Teal females.
To get to this location, drive west from Spring Green on STH 14. There are several roads going south from STH 14 that intersect with Kennedy Road; I took Pearl Road. Drive west on Kennedy until you see the sign for Bakken’s Pond. Immediately west of the sign is a short gravel road which leads to a small parking lot. Park here and walk down to the pond.
At one point, something spooked the birds and they flew to the back of the pond, but it didn’t take long for them to return to an area in front of the boat launch where binocular views were sufficient.
Thanks to the eBird report from Spence S., I was able to easily find this location, an area that I had never before visited.
Thomas Wood, Menomonee Falls, Waukesha County

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Date: 4/6/21 12:07 pm
From: Deborah Turski <dlturski...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Pine Siskins
We continue to have 6 Pine Siskins at our nyger feeders daily, range
throughout winter til now has been 6-12 birds/ day. (Common Redpolls, 2-3/
day, last seen Mar 15)
Deb Turski
Middleton

On Tue, Apr 6, 2021 at 6:51 AM Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...> wrote:

> Last fall, as the pine siskins were passing through southern Wisconsin I
> did not have any stop at my feeders in spite of the large numbers
> others were reporting. However, yesterday I had at least 4 and it seems
> that those birds that headed farther south over the winter are now
> returning. I wonder if anyone else is seeing a return or increase in pine
> siskins recently.
> Bill Volkert
> FdL Co
>
> --
> Bill Volkert
> Naturalist
> www.billvolkert.com
>
>
> ####################
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Date: 4/6/21 12:06 pm
From: Dennis Kirschbaum <kad9801...>
Subject: [wisb] Pine siskins
Had a lot of siskins in the fall like lot of others.  None in the
winter.  Last week I had one show up and today I have several more. 
More to come?

--
Dennis and Alice Kirschbaum
1505 E. Parrish St.
Prairie du Chien, Wi 53821
608-326-2718

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Date: 4/6/21 11:18 am
From: Jim Freiberg <jfreiberg80...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Pine Siskins
I live in Southern Fdl Co and I have not seen a Pine Siskin in over 2
years, Jim Friberg St. Kilian
On Tue, Apr 6, 2021 at 7:19 AM Alan & Joan Linquist <linquists...>
wrote:

> d stored them for now. During the short time that we had pine siskins,
> they pretty much ignored our feeders and spent their time picking through
> our birch catkins. Once they were done with those, they left, and we never
> saw them again. Alan LinquistWashington County
> On Tuesday, April 6, 2021, 06:51:35 AM CDT, Bill Volkert <
> <billvolkert11...> wrote:
>
> Last fall, as the pine siskins were passing through southern Wisconsin I
> did not have any stop at my feeders in spite of the large numbers
> others were reporting. However, yesterday I had at least 4 and it seems
> that those birds that headed farther south over the winter are now
> returning. I wonder if anyone else is seeing a return or increase in pine
> siskins recently.
> Bill Volkert
> FdL Co
> --
> Bill Volkert
> Naturalist
> www.billvolkert.com
>
>
> ####################
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> Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
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> ####################
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Date: 4/6/21 5:19 am
From: Alan & Joan Linquist <linquists...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Pine Siskins
d stored them for now. During the short time that we had pine siskins, they pretty much ignored our feeders and spent their time picking through our birch catkins.  Once they were done with those, they left, and we never saw them again. Alan LinquistWashington County
On Tuesday, April 6, 2021, 06:51:35 AM CDT, Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...> wrote:

Last fall, as the pine siskins were passing through southern Wisconsin I
did not have any stop at my feeders in spite of the large numbers
others were reporting.  However, yesterday I had at least 4 and it seems
that those birds that headed farther south over the winter are now
returning.  I wonder if anyone else is seeing a return or increase in pine
siskins recently.
Bill Volkert
FdL Co
--
Bill Volkert
Naturalist
www.billvolkert.com


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Date: 4/6/21 4:51 am
From: Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...>
Subject: [wisb] Pine Siskins
Last fall, as the pine siskins were passing through southern Wisconsin I
did not have any stop at my feeders in spite of the large numbers
others were reporting. However, yesterday I had at least 4 and it seems
that those birds that headed farther south over the winter are now
returning. I wonder if anyone else is seeing a return or increase in pine
siskins recently.
Bill Volkert
FdL Co

--
Bill Volkert
Naturalist
www.billvolkert.com


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Date: 4/5/21 7:02 pm
From: kevin seidel <seidelkevin25...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Warbler ID Quiz ~ Species seen in Wisconsin
Thanks Jim
I love love your quizzes even if I’m not so good at them - yet. 😊👍
Kevin Seidel
LaCrosse co

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 5, 2021, at 8:11 PM, Jim Edlhuber <jimedlhuber...> wrote:
>
> It is that time of the year, warblers are starting to come through the
> state of Wisconsin. Can you ID them all? I have put together a little quiz
> for anyone who wants to see how many they can ID with species I have
> photographed in Wisconsin.
>
> The quiz is on my blog windowtowildlife at the link below. Good luck if you
> try!
>
> *http://www.windowtowildlife.com/warbler-quiz-at-wisconsin-on-march-20-2019/
> <http://www.windowtowildlife.com/warbler-quiz-at-wisconsin-on-march-20-2019/>*
>
> Thank you,
>
> Jim Edlhuber
> Town of Genesee Waukesha Co.
> windowtowildlife.com
>
>
> ####################
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>
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Date: 4/5/21 6:11 pm
From: Jim Edlhuber <jimedlhuber...>
Subject: [wisb] Warbler ID Quiz ~ Species seen in Wisconsin
It is that time of the year, warblers are starting to come through the
state of Wisconsin. Can you ID them all? I have put together a little quiz
for anyone who wants to see how many they can ID with species I have
photographed in Wisconsin.

The quiz is on my blog windowtowildlife at the link below. Good luck if you
try!

*http://www.windowtowildlife.com/warbler-quiz-at-wisconsin-on-march-20-2019/
<http://www.windowtowildlife.com/warbler-quiz-at-wisconsin-on-march-20-2019/>*

Thank you,

Jim Edlhuber
Town of Genesee Waukesha Co.
windowtowildlife.com


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Date: 4/5/21 2:31 pm
From: Thomas Wood <tcwood729...>
Subject: [wisb] Columbia County Eurasian Wigeon continues ,but difficult to see
I spent nearly 3 1/2 hours enjoying the birds from the Lake Wisconsin causeway this morning, 4/5. Viewing conditions were very poor due to poor lighting and the distance of most of the birds. I eventually saw the Eurasian Wigeon for about a minute, but when I went to attach my iPod Touch to the spotting scope in an attempt to get a documentatation photo, I lost the bird and I couldn’t find it again until the sun came out and lighting improved. Unfortunately, heat shimmer then became a factor, so the sighting wasn’t as good as many others I have had, but I was still excited to see it.
Other interesting birds besides the great variety of ducks were Greater White-fronted Geese, White Pelicans, a Common Loon, Horned Grebes, and very vocal Bonaparte’s Gulls.
Thomas Wood, Menomonee Falls, Waukesha County

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Date: 4/5/21 5:49 am
From: Dennis Kirschbaum <kad9801...>
Subject: [wisb] Sap sippers
I think a lot of birds will take sap.  I currently have a flock of Cedar
Waxwings taking sap from the winter trimmed end of branches of a river
birch in my front yard.

--
Dennis and Alice Kirschbaum
1505 E. Parrish St.
Prairie du Chien, Wi 53821
608-326-2718

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Date: 4/4/21 4:24 pm
From: Daryl Tessen <bhaunts...>
Subject: [wisb] Sunday birding
I spent about 9 hours birding around several spots today. I started at the Auto Tour loop at Horicon Marsh. The first surprise of the early day was a Whooping Crane feeding on the south end of the board walk pond (viewed from the road); Next the red boulder pond is being drawn down resulting in good shorebird habitat. Present were 20 Greater and 4 Lesser Yellowlegs, 11 Pectoral Sandpipers and 2 Killdeer. Various puddle and diving ducks were seen on several of the auto tour ponds but no Eurasian Wigeon. Water is dropping in various Dodge and Columbia ponds. The Jersey pond had about 10 White-fronted Geese along with about 399 Pintails (the most of have seen at one spot in a long time). No swans, or Snow, Ross’s and Cackling Geese.
Goose Pond had some White-fronted Geese and various ducks. Harvey/Wagness pond had 12 Pectoral Sandpipers, about 500 White-fronted and about 10 Cackling Geese. Various ducks were present plus a fair number of Bonaparte’s Gulls, etc.

At Whalen Grade I joined two other birders looking for the Eurasian Wigeon. One of them, a young birder from Madison found out that it had been seen early this morning on the north end of the pond. We moved to view that area and immediately found the bird.

Real spring weather with temp getting to 74 degrees. Second straight day in the 70s. Enjoy and good birding.
Daryl Tessen
Appleton, WI





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Date: 4/4/21 11:12 am
From: CHARLES HAGNER <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender c_hagner for DMARC)
Subject: [wisb] Yellow-rumped Warbler - Estabrook Park, Apr 4, 2021
An adult male YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER, the first of the year for me, was in Estabrook Park, Milwaukee Co., Wis., this morning. I also got to listen to Red-breasted and White-breasted Nuthatches singing at the same time (I can't remember ever doing that before), and I recorded five woodpeckers (Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Red-bellied Woodpecker, Downy Woodpecker, and Hairy Woodpecker, and Northern Flicker). Happy Easter!
—Chuck


Chuck Hagner
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Editor | writer
Author of American Birding Association Field Guide to Birds of Wisconsin <https://www.amazon.com/American-Birding-Association-Field-Wisconsin/dp/1935622692/ref_1_1?keywordserican+Birding+Association+Field+Guide+to+Birds+of+Wisconsin&qid76287896&soks&sr1> | View my portfolio <https://www.clippings.me/chuckhagner>.



> Begin forwarded message:
>
> From: <ebird-checklist...>
> Subject: eBird Report - Estabrook Park, Apr 4, 2021
> Date: April 4, 2021 at 12:28:52 PM CDT
> To: <c_hagner...>
>
> Estabrook Park, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, US
> Apr 4, 2021 7:00 AM - 10:30 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 3.0 mile(s)
> 40 species (+1 other taxa)
>
> Canada Goose 29
> Wood Duck 2 Observed in flight.
> Mallard 15
> Bufflehead 2
> Common Goldeneye 1
> Pied-billed Grebe 1
> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 5
> Mourning Dove 2
> Killdeer 1
> Herring Gull 1
> gull sp. 6
> Belted Kingfisher 2
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 4
> Red-bellied Woodpecker 7
> Downy Woodpecker 6
> Hairy Woodpecker 4
> Northern Flicker 2
> Blue Jay 1
> American Crow 2
> Black-capped Chickadee 16
> Tree Swallow 2
> Golden-crowned Kinglet 23
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet 2
> Red-breasted Nuthatch 2
> White-breasted Nuthatch 5
> Brown Creeper 2
> American Robin 32
> House Sparrow 3
> House Finch 2
> American Goldfinch 9
> Chipping Sparrow 1
> Field Sparrow 1
> Fox Sparrow 6
> Dark-eyed Junco 24
> White-throated Sparrow 1
> Song Sparrow 8
> Red-winged Blackbird 4
> Brown-headed Cowbird 4
> Common Grackle 12
> Yellow-rumped Warbler 1
> Northern Cardinal 13
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S84770253
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)


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Date: 4/4/21 5:48 am
From: Judy Ettenhofer <judyett...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Sapsuckers
We used to tap the sugar and silver maples in our yard when we lived in Sun
Prairie. The sugar maples definitely gave the sweetest sap. Perhaps the
sapsuckers know their maple species and which has the best sap ...
Judy Ettenhofer
Spring Green (where we are sadly without any large maples but have plenty
of oaks)

On Sat, Apr 3, 2021, 9:22 AM B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...> wrote:

> I have a sugar maple that the sapsuckers hit hard. They seem to ignore
> nearby norway maples...
> On Sat, Apr 3, 2021 at 10:06 AM Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...>
> wrote:
>
> > Since the first sapsucker arrived on Wednesday it has been joined by
> > several others. Yesterday I had two in the same tree along with a
> > red-bellied and hairy woodpecker. One of the sapsuckers is already
> getting
> > down to business as I saw him starting to excavate the first cavity in an
> > aspen this morning.
> > Over the years I have kept watch on several large basswood trees and am
> > impressed how heavily they are drilled for sap. Some of these trees have
> > been used for many years and bare the scars of repeated drilling for sap
> > wells.
> >
> > Basswood has a thin bark and is easy to peck into, but so are several
> other
> > species of trees. Maples have a similar bark and produce an abundant
> > quantity of sweet sap which humans have known about for a very long time.
> > But is it simply that the maple sap has largely stopped flowing by the
> time
> > sapsuckers arrive that they seek out other trees?
> >
> > I also have seen sapsuckers tap ironwood trees. These produce a vivid
> pink
> > to orange sap that clearly indicates that they have been drilled into. I
> > know that at times fruit trees and even some evergreens are tapped by
> > sapsuckers, but there seems to be a preference for a select variety of
> > hardwoods at this time of year.
> >
> > Bill Volkert
> > FdL Co
> >
> > --
> > Bill Volkert
> > Naturalist
> > www.billvolkert.com
> >
> >
> > ####################
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> > Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
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> >
> >
> >
>
>
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Date: 4/4/21 5:14 am
From: Jody Kuchar <jody.kuch.r...>
Subject: [wisb] night birding
Saturday night ride/walk in Point Beach SP yielded wood frogs in abundance
as well as spring peepers. LOTS of moths. Waiting for whip-poor-wills.
Jody Kuchar, Manitowoc city

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Date: 4/3/21 6:56 pm
From: Mitchell Nussbaum <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender acornwithteeth for DMARC)
Subject: [wisb] Ruddy Duck
My husband and I saw a very small diving duck in the Arboretum pond on Monroe St. It was tiny, mostly grey, with a big white spot on the cheeks. I looked it up and it appears to be a non-breeding Ruddy Duck.  Very exciting to see.
- Genie OgdenMadison
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Date: 4/3/21 1:34 pm
From: Thomas Wood <tcwood729...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Yellow-rumped Warbler
Correction- first 2021 warbler sighting. Guess I’m living in the past!
Thomas Wood, Menomonee Falls, Waukesha County

> On Apr 3, 2021, at 3:32 PM, Thomas Wood <tcwood729...> wrote:
>
> I saw my FOY Yellow-rumped Warbler today at Veteran’s Park in Milwaukee. It was in a sapling next to the paved trail on the east side of the lagoon, then flew down to the paved trail. Since this is a busy park, it was only a few seconds until a jogger came along, and that was the end of my first 2001 warbler sighting!
> Thomas Wood, Menomonee Falls, Waukesha County
>
>
>> On Apr 3, 2021, at 7:30 AM, Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...> wrote:
>>
>> I had my first yellow-rump yesterday. I first identified it by its call
>> notes - the distinct "pttt, pttt" kind of sound. This caught my attention
>> so I started to pish in order to get a look. It flew in briefly, and
>> perched overhead, and headed on although I didn't have my binoculars with
>> me.
>> Later in the afternoon I again heard but did not see it as it moved
>> through the woods. Same bird or another individual - but the first one(s)
>> arrived with more to come very soon - likely with the predicted south winds
>> last night and over the next few days. I always like to hear this call
>> note that is different from other warblers in spring before they begin to
>> sing and again in fall when they are coming through.
>>
>> Bill Volkert
>> FdL Co
>>
>> --
>> Bill Volkert
>> Naturalist
>> www.billvolkert.com
>>
>>
>> ####################
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>>
>>
>

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Date: 4/3/21 1:32 pm
From: Thomas Wood <tcwood729...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Yellow-rumped Warbler
I saw my FOY Yellow-rumped Warbler today at Veteran’s Park in Milwaukee. It was in a sapling next to the paved trail on the east side of the lagoon, then flew down to the paved trail. Since this is a busy park, it was only a few seconds until a jogger came along, and that was the end of my first 2001 warbler sighting!
Thomas Wood, Menomonee Falls, Waukesha County


> On Apr 3, 2021, at 7:30 AM, Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...> wrote:
>
> I had my first yellow-rump yesterday. I first identified it by its call
> notes - the distinct "pttt, pttt" kind of sound. This caught my attention
> so I started to pish in order to get a look. It flew in briefly, and
> perched overhead, and headed on although I didn't have my binoculars with
> me.
> Later in the afternoon I again heard but did not see it as it moved
> through the woods. Same bird or another individual - but the first one(s)
> arrived with more to come very soon - likely with the predicted south winds
> last night and over the next few days. I always like to hear this call
> note that is different from other warblers in spring before they begin to
> sing and again in fall when they are coming through.
>
> Bill Volkert
> FdL Co
>
> --
> Bill Volkert
> Naturalist
> www.billvolkert.com
>
>
> ####################
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>

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Date: 4/3/21 7:22 am
From: B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Sapsuckers
I have a sugar maple that the sapsuckers hit hard. They seem to ignore
nearby norway maples...
On Sat, Apr 3, 2021 at 10:06 AM Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...>
wrote:

> Since the first sapsucker arrived on Wednesday it has been joined by
> several others. Yesterday I had two in the same tree along with a
> red-bellied and hairy woodpecker. One of the sapsuckers is already getting
> down to business as I saw him starting to excavate the first cavity in an
> aspen this morning.
> Over the years I have kept watch on several large basswood trees and am
> impressed how heavily they are drilled for sap. Some of these trees have
> been used for many years and bare the scars of repeated drilling for sap
> wells.
>
> Basswood has a thin bark and is easy to peck into, but so are several other
> species of trees. Maples have a similar bark and produce an abundant
> quantity of sweet sap which humans have known about for a very long time.
> But is it simply that the maple sap has largely stopped flowing by the time
> sapsuckers arrive that they seek out other trees?
>
> I also have seen sapsuckers tap ironwood trees. These produce a vivid pink
> to orange sap that clearly indicates that they have been drilled into. I
> know that at times fruit trees and even some evergreens are tapped by
> sapsuckers, but there seems to be a preference for a select variety of
> hardwoods at this time of year.
>
> Bill Volkert
> FdL Co
>
> --
> Bill Volkert
> Naturalist
> www.billvolkert.com
>
>
> ####################
> You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
> Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
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> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
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>
>
>


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Date: 4/3/21 7:06 am
From: Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...>
Subject: [wisb] Sapsuckers
Since the first sapsucker arrived on Wednesday it has been joined by
several others. Yesterday I had two in the same tree along with a
red-bellied and hairy woodpecker. One of the sapsuckers is already getting
down to business as I saw him starting to excavate the first cavity in an
aspen this morning.
Over the years I have kept watch on several large basswood trees and am
impressed how heavily they are drilled for sap. Some of these trees have
been used for many years and bare the scars of repeated drilling for sap
wells.

Basswood has a thin bark and is easy to peck into, but so are several other
species of trees. Maples have a similar bark and produce an abundant
quantity of sweet sap which humans have known about for a very long time.
But is it simply that the maple sap has largely stopped flowing by the time
sapsuckers arrive that they seek out other trees?

I also have seen sapsuckers tap ironwood trees. These produce a vivid pink
to orange sap that clearly indicates that they have been drilled into. I
know that at times fruit trees and even some evergreens are tapped by
sapsuckers, but there seems to be a preference for a select variety of
hardwoods at this time of year.

Bill Volkert
FdL Co

--
Bill Volkert
Naturalist
www.billvolkert.com


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Date: 4/3/21 5:30 am
From: Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...>
Subject: [wisb] Yellow-rumped Warbler
I had my first yellow-rump yesterday. I first identified it by its call
notes - the distinct "pttt, pttt" kind of sound. This caught my attention
so I started to pish in order to get a look. It flew in briefly, and
perched overhead, and headed on although I didn't have my binoculars with
me.
Later in the afternoon I again heard but did not see it as it moved
through the woods. Same bird or another individual - but the first one(s)
arrived with more to come very soon - likely with the predicted south winds
last night and over the next few days. I always like to hear this call
note that is different from other warblers in spring before they begin to
sing and again in fall when they are coming through.

Bill Volkert
FdL Co

--
Bill Volkert
Naturalist
www.billvolkert.com


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Date: 4/2/21 3:39 pm
From: Laura Mattek <lauramattek74...>
Subject: [wisb] Stevens Point area
Saw our first Fox Sparrows in our woods and a Turkey Vulture soaring
overhead.

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Date: 4/2/21 10:42 am
From: Heidi Cox <almightyheidi...>
Subject: [wisb] McFarland Virtual Bird Fest - No sightings
Hello,
The McFarland Library is hosting a virtual bird fest this year. We have 3
programs scheduled for early April on owls, Birding the Horicon Marsh, and
Planting for wildlife. All of the information can be found on our
website (including registration information)
https://www.mcfarlandlibrary.org/mcfarland-bird-festival


Thanks,

Heidi Cox (Dane Co.)


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Date: 4/2/21 10:26 am
From: Patricia Keuck <prkeuck...>
Subject: [wisb] Annual Midwest Crane Count
Is it appropriate to remind birders that the Annual Midwest Crane Count is Saturday April 17th this year? Last year’s count was cancelled due to Covid19. Each of the 72 counties in Wisconsin participate in the event. Most counties always appreciate extra volunteers. It only requires a passion to protect Sandhills (and, if you are lucky, perhaps a Whooping Crane or two!) and the willingness to be an early riser to get to a designated site from 5:30 am to 7:30 am. Observations are then uploaded to The International Crane Foundation. If you are interested in participating, please go to www.savingcranes.org <http://www.savingcranes.org/>. It will provide information and the contact person for each county in Wisconsin and other counties in Illinois, Minnesota, Michigan and Iowa. You are welcome to contact me if you would like a personal contact too. Thank you for your time and interest.
Kind Regards,
Patty Keuck
<prkeuck...>
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Date: 4/2/21 9:15 am
From: Steve <sthiessen1115...>
Subject: [wisb] Eurasian Wigeon, Horicon Auto Tour

=





I went to check on an Eurasi= an Wigeon, which has been ebirded. I found the
male Eurasian Wigeon in the = last (north) pond on the auto tour. It was
still there at 8:30, when I left= . It was staying alone and was working
it=E2=80=99s way north. I saw that i= t was seen , yesterday, at the pond on
the westside of the road, just past = the red rock.

Steve Thiessen Stoughton, Dane Co.



Sent from = Mail[1] for W= indows 10

=

--- Links ---
1 3D"https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=3D550986"
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Date: 4/2/21 6:16 am
From: Ted Golos <tgolos...>
Subject: [wisb] goldfinches!
Heard (but did not see) a couple American Goldfinches this morning on the west side of Madison a few blocks from Owen Park. Very cheerful!
Ted Golos
Dane County

------- Ted Golos Madison, WI <tgolos...> -------

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Date: 4/2/21 4:54 am
From: Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...>
Subject: [wisb] Early Migrants
I expect that with the weekend's warm temperatures and southerly winds that
more early migrants will be arriving. So far I have only seen one fox
sparrow and the first sapsucker around my home and the phoebe's haven't
arrived here yet.
I had not seen a sapsucker until Wednesday when I first heard its rhythmic
tapping like Morse Code. Later I heard it call a few times and yesterday
it was very vocal. It repeatedly gave its shrill "reet, reet" call that
always reminds me of the eerie music in Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho.

Sapsuckers first attempted to nest around my home in 2009 and raised their
first family the following year. They are now a regular nesting species
here, although still quite rare in the rest of Fond du Lac County.

Bill Volkert
FdL Co
--
Bill Volkert
Naturalist
www.billvolkert.com


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Date: 4/1/21 7:50 pm
From: Dennis Casper <denncasp.wisbirder...>
Subject: [wisb] Urban Ecology Center Bird Walk, April 1, 2021
Urban Ecology Center, Riverside Park
1500 East Park Place, Milwaukee, WI 53211
414-964-8505, www.UrbanEcologyCenter.org
BIRD WALK
Thursdays, 8:00 am—10:00 am year round.
Free, Open to the Public, All Ages Welcome [Register at
urbanecologycenter.org]

Thursday, April 1, 2021
27 degrees
Sunny
8 birders

Total Species: 29

3 Canada Goose
26 Mallard
2 Red-breasted Merganser
3 Mourning Dove
2 Herring Gull
2 Cooper’s Hawk
1 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
2 Red-bellied Woodpecker
4 Downy Woodpecker
1 Northern Flicker

1 American Kestrel
2 American Crow
6 Black-capped Chickadee
3 White-breasted Nuthatch
1 Brown Creeper
45 American Robin
2 House Sparrow
1 House Finch
3 American Goldfinch
4 Field Sparrow

1 American Tree Sparrow
6 Dark-eyed Junco
1 White-throated Sparrow
9 Song Sparrow
1 Eastern Towhee
18 Red-winged Blackbird
1 Brown-headed Cowbird
7 Common Grackle
5 Northern Cardinal

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Date: 4/1/21 1:03 pm
From: <wilmoss...>
Subject: [wisb] FOW - Winter Wren - Winnebago Cty
Found a Winter Wren when walking the Wiouwash Trail going from the G
Parking area toward the Oshkosh Larsen Prairie SNA. Like normal,
hiding around a fallen tree with water underneath. It was making no
sounds but luckily moved as we were walking by. At the SNA there was a
FOY - Turkey Vulture. The DNR burned two segments of SNA last weekend,
you can keep track of the work on the SNA on Facebook (Oshkosh Larsen
Trail Prairies State Natural Area Volunteers). A few Fox Sparrows,
Tree Sparrows and Brewer's Blackbirds on the trail before the SNA.
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Date: 4/1/21 8:29 am
From: Spence Stehno <pensacola634...>
Subject: [wisb] Milwaukee Surf Scoter Continues
There's a very pretty Surf Scoter hanging around the bay in front of the
Milwaukee Art Museum. It's been particularly in the NW corner of this
area, sort of close to the museum and NW corner walls, to the north towards
the Juneau Lagoon flagpoles. It's been diving, swimming, eating, and
posing with a Scaup M/F pair.
Seen today Thursday, at 9:39 AM.
Spence
Spence Stehno - Waukesha

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Date: 3/30/21 7:00 pm
From: Mark Wallner <wingitwildlife...>
Subject: [wisb] Cranes, Kenosha County
Three pairs of Sandhill Cranes were taking a break at the Chiwaukee Prairie
West in Pleasant Prairie as they've been seen feeding at the newly sprouted
prairie that's still a work in progress by The Nature Conservancy.
Mark Wallner, Pleasant Prairie, WI
wingitwildlife.com


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Date: 3/30/21 8:51 am
From: <wilmoss...>
Subject: [wisb] FOY - Fox Sparrow Winnebago Cty
Went out specifically to find a Fox Sparrow (and hopefully a winters
wren). Found quite a few Fox sparrows. Also FOY Flicker, Eastern
Phoebe, Tree Swallow, and Yellow Bellied Sapsucker. Did not see the
winters wren. My total for the last two days was 47 species in about
four hours of bird watching along the west shore of Lake Winnebago.
Of note were a flock of Red Breasted Mergansers at the Asylum Bay
area. There were 12 yesterday in one flock. Today there was a lot of
excitement among the flock as six more came to join them. Yesterday
the flock included all three species of mergansers, the commons were
not present today.
I was able to get some nice pictures of golden crowned kinglets and
one jake turkey who came quite a distance to find me, gobbling the
whole way.
Rory Williams
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Date: 3/30/21 6:28 am
From: Laura Mattek <lauramattek74...>
Subject: [wisb]
Heard our first Eastern Phoebe in our woods near Stevens Point. Sure sign
of Spring for us.

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Date: 3/29/21 11:30 am
From: Jim Edlhuber <jimedlhuber...>
Subject: [wisb] Sparrow ID Quiz ~ Species seen in Wisconsin
It is that time of the year, sparrows are starting to come through the
state of Wisconsin. Can you ID them all? I have put together a little quiz
for anyone who wants to see how many they can ID with species I have
photographed in Wisconsin.

The quiz is on my blog windowtowildlife at the link below. Good luck if you
try!

*http://www.windowtowildlife.com/sparrow-id-quiz-test-your-yourself-on-these-beautiful-birds-here-in-wisconsin/
<http://www.windowtowildlife.com/sparrow-id-quiz-test-your-yourself-on-these-beautiful-birds-here-in-wisconsin/>*

Thank you,

Jim Edlhuber
Town of Genesee Waukesha Co.
windowtowildlife.com


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Date: 3/28/21 10:33 am
From: Katherine Frisk <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender chkafrisk for DMARC)
Subject: [wisb] Re: Manitowoc
enway today, (3-28).  I last saw them in late November.  A few stick around all winter every year, but I didn't see any this winter.Charlie
On Sunday, March 28, 2021, 06:47:33 AM CDT, Alan & Joan Linquist <linquists...> wrote:

We had a sparse but interesting time when we birded in Manitowoc yesterday.  The steady rain kept a lot of bird under wraps, but in Shuette Park, there were a few interesting things.  A pair of common mergansers floated along one edge of the river, while across the stream, we could spot a Great Horned Owl, steady and quiet in a tree.  My wife saw a large white march bird, which could either have been a swan or an egret.       While we were downtown in the rain, we spotted a woodcock on the sidewalk, very still and unconscious, but sitting in an upright position.  Our best guess is that it was migrating and ran into one of the buildings.  No one seemed to know whether the area had a wildlife rescue facility, so the police were called to find someone to pick up the bird.  We think it was dead, but I hope things turned out better than that.       This was my first sighting of a woodcock, so sad that it was dead, and the second ever of a great horned owl, although I've h
e
ard them a number of times.  Alan Linquist    Washington County (but in Manitowoc County)
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Date: 3/28/21 4:47 am
From: Alan & Joan Linquist <linquists...>
Subject: [wisb] Manitowoc
We had a sparse but interesting time when we birded in Manitowoc yesterday.  The steady rain kept a lot of bird under wraps, but in Shuette Park, there were a few interesting things.  A pair of common mergansers floated along one edge of the river, while across the stream, we could spot a Great Horned Owl, steady and quiet in a tree.  My wife saw a large white march bird, which could either have been a swan or an egret.       While we were downtown in the rain, we spotted a woodcock on the sidewalk, very still and unconscious, but sitting in an upright position.  Our best guess is that it was migrating and ran into one of the buildings.  No one seemed to know whether the area had a wildlife rescue facility, so the police were called to find someone to pick up the bird.  We think it was dead, but I hope things turned out better than that.       This was my first sighting of a woodcock, so sad that it was dead, and the second ever of a great horned owl, although I've he
ard them a number of times.  Alan Linquist    Washington County (but in Manitowoc County)
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Date: 3/27/21 8:09 pm
From: Seegert Greg <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender gseegert for DMARC)
Subject: [wisb] Fly
All

Had 3 FOY today.....TV, and my first 2 shorebirds that were not killdeer....snipe and greater yellowlegs. The 2 shorebirds were at the pond at the intersection of CTH A and 151 in Dodge Co.

Greg Seegert
Beaver Dam

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Date: 3/27/21 6:20 am
From: Dave & Margaret Brasser <2shebbirders...>
Subject: [wisb] Harlequin in Sheboygan River
Thanks to eBird posts by others, we began our Friday afternoon of birding
viewing the Sheboygan River on the west side of the 8th Street bridge. Sure
enough: There was the beautiful Harlequin Duck! We checked the marina and
lakefront before driving west to the Sheboygan Marsh area. On Hulls
Crossing Road we found the Osprey on the nesting platform north of Cty Tk C,
where Hulls Crossing Road bends from north to west. There's a large pond at
the north end of School Road that was loaded with ducks and geese. Viewing
the marsh waters from the parking lot by the Marsh Tower, we found 3
Pied-billed Grebes floating together. Thanks to another eBird post, we
found the Common Loon on the west end of Elkhart Lake, viewing it from the
public boat landing. In the village of Elkhart Lake, at the south end of
The Osthoff Resort, there is a large woodlot across the street from the
resort. As we drove past, we spotted 10 very large black birds hunkered
down in 2 tall deciduous trees. It was overcast, cold, and damp; the
temperature was 37*. There were probably no thermals for the vultures to
soar on, so they were spending the afternoon perched as a group in the
trees. They looked grim and despondent (kind of like Snoopy in the Peanuts
cartoon where he pretends to be a vulture). Driving east across the county
on MM, the next "hotspot" was the intersection with Rangeline Road. Among
the many birds in the area we spotted our FOY Rusty Blackbirds in the large
Cottonwoods by the bridge over the stream. And finally, the pond at the
intersection of Rowe Road and Brookdale Road produced numerous ducks and
geese, and north beyond the pond we found 4 Great Blue Herons on nests on
top of tall skinny trees beyond the northeast side of the pond. So comical
to see these huge birds perched on the very tops of the tallest trees! "Oh,
the weather outside was frightful, but birding was so delightful, and since
we've nothing else to do, let it rain, let it snow, let it blow!"
--Margaret & Dave Brasser
Sheboygan
Sheboygan County


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Date: 3/25/21 7:29 am
From: Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...>
Subject: [wisb] Shorebird Presentation
I mentioned a few weeks ago that I would be making a presentation on
shorebird migration, ecology and management for the Wisconsin Water Week
conference. There were other bird-related presentations on trumpeter
swans, white pelicans and cranes among the many other topics included in
this conference.
They are still working to post all of the presentations but I believe that
the bird topics have been uploaded. I am providing a link to my shorebird
presentation if anyone is interested. You can find this at:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uJGn_vIWoMc&list=PL6aVQYpBMBW8dE9nfoH04wOF3UrS88JMO&index=33

Bill Volkert
FdL Co

--
Bill Volkert
Naturalist
www.billvolkert.com


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Date: 3/24/21 1:43 pm
From: Thomas Wood <tcwood729...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Franklin's gull (relocated at different spot)
This afternoon I checked the Birch Road Pond and did not see the Franklin’s Gull. I drove southwest about a mile-and-a-half to CTH J near Elm Shade Rd. and quickly found the Lesser Black-backed Gull that Dave Schrab reported.
The Franklin’s Gull was much more difficult to find. As Dave mentioned there are many, many gulls (on both sides of the road) to sort through and the rain made for poor viewing conditions. I eventually spotted a Franklin’s Gull which most certainly must be the same bird Dave found yesterday at the Birch Road pond. It was one of the more active birds, feeding at one spot for a few minutes and then flying to a different location in the field, so it was easy to lose.
Thomas Wood, Menomonee Falls, Waukesha County

> On Mar 23, 2021, at 4:41 PM, David Schrab <davidschrab...> wrote:
>
> At 4:00 this afternoon, Tuesday, I had a Franklin's gull on Birch Rd,
> Dodge County. About mile west on Hwy J several thousand gulls are splitting
> time between two spots half mile apart. Had a lesser black-backed gull
> there this afternoon. Couple days ago had an Iceland gull and two glaucous
> gulls there. Good luck!
> Dave Schrab
> Hustisford Dodge CO
>
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Date: 3/24/21 7:45 am
From: Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Pine Siskins question
Chuck:
I often discussed this other myth about not touching bird eggs on my field
trips at Horicon Marsh. While most birds have a poor sense of smell and
touching eggs will not cause birds to abandon a nest, it does have a valid
point. If inspecting a nest or touching eggs was a problem, then the
bluebird monitoring program would never have been successful. However, I
am sure it is more the curiosity that children might have to check on the
progress of a nest repeatedly and return so often that birds may abandon
their nest as a result. So they are told not to touch a nest and keep
their distance to reduce unnecessary disturbance. Of course, mammals will
at times abandon their young if they are handled and this may have been the
reason for believing that birds will do the same.

Bill Volkert

On Wed, Mar 24, 2021 at 9:35 AM Chuck Stebelton <cstebelton...>
wrote:

> I had that thought as well. Just as an aside, it brings to mind my older
> relatives telling me the myth not to touch a nest or egg, because the
> mother bird would smell the human touch and abandon her young. That story
> worked on me, where a more technical explanation might have gone out the
> other ear.
>
> On Wed, Mar 24, 2021 at 9:13 AM Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...>
> wrote:
>
>> Bob:
>> Just a follow-up to your question. I was just talking to a friend who
>> also
>> lives in South Carolina and he mentioned that they are experiencing some
>> local salmonella outbreaks. Perhaps the suggestion to shut down feeders
>> is
>> in response to disease concerns and is being confused with this
>> long-standing myth about feeders keeping birds from migrating.
>>
>> Bill Volkert
>>
>> On Tue, Mar 23, 2021 at 11:04 PM Bob Matyas <bobmatyas...>
>> wrote:
>>
>> > Hello,
>> > Lu Ann and I have relatives that live in South Carolina and they are
>> > currently hosting a lot of Pine Siskins which surprised me. I guess
>> that
>> > is where some of my Fall Pine Siskins went. They told us that they
>> were
>> > told that everyone should stop bird feeding down in South Carolina so
>> that
>> > the numerous Pine Siskins can feel free to migrate north again, and
>> resume
>> > feeding once the Pine Siskins return to the north. This does not
>> sound
>> > right to me but I could be wrong. Anyone know the proper answer, I
>> know
>> > most birds migrate based on the hours of sunlight but I assume there
>> may be
>> > exceptions and lack of food may sound like one.
>> > Good Birding,
>> > Bob and Lu Ann Matyas
>> > Franklin, WI.
>> > ####################
>> > You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
>> > Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
>> > To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
>> > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
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>> > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
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>> >
>> >
>> >
>>
>> --
>> Bill Volkert
>> Naturalist
>> www.billvolkert.com
>>
>>
>> ####################
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>> Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
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>>
>>
>>

--
Bill Volkert
Naturalist
www.billvolkert.com


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Date: 3/24/21 7:37 am
From: Timothy Baker <timothybaker1978...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Pine Siskins question
I'd like to add that there are year-round populations of Pine Siskin in the
Appalachians, as far South as North Carolina, so a winter irruption into
South Carolina isn't as strange as it first seems to us here.
An Audubon group in SC/GA that I am part of has been buzzing about
salmonella outbreaks lately, which supports Bill Volkert's suggestion that
disease concerns might be driving confusion about feeders in the area.

Timothy Baker, Madison

On Wed, Mar 24, 2021 at 9:14 AM Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...>
wrote:

> Bob:
> Just a follow-up to your question. I was just talking to a friend who also
> lives in South Carolina and he mentioned that they are experiencing some
> local salmonella outbreaks. Perhaps the suggestion to shut down feeders is
> in response to disease concerns and is being confused with this
> long-standing myth about feeders keeping birds from migrating.
>
> Bill Volkert
>
> On Tue, Mar 23, 2021 at 11:04 PM Bob Matyas <bobmatyas...>
> wrote:
>
> > Hello,
> > Lu Ann and I have relatives that live in South Carolina and they are
> > currently hosting a lot of Pine Siskins which surprised me. I guess that
> > is where some of my Fall Pine Siskins went. They told us that they were
> > told that everyone should stop bird feeding down in South Carolina so
> that
> > the numerous Pine Siskins can feel free to migrate north again, and
> resume
> > feeding once the Pine Siskins return to the north. This does not sound
> > right to me but I could be wrong. Anyone know the proper answer, I know
> > most birds migrate based on the hours of sunlight but I assume there may
> be
> > exceptions and lack of food may sound like one.
> > Good Birding,
> > Bob and Lu Ann Matyas
> > Franklin, WI.
> > ####################
> > You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
> > Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
> > To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
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> > Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn
> >
> >
> >
>
> --
> Bill Volkert
> Naturalist
> www.billvolkert.com
>
>
> ####################
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> Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
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>
>


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Date: 3/24/21 7:13 am
From: Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Pine Siskins question
Bob:
Just a follow-up to your question. I was just talking to a friend who also
lives in South Carolina and he mentioned that they are experiencing some
local salmonella outbreaks. Perhaps the suggestion to shut down feeders is
in response to disease concerns and is being confused with this
long-standing myth about feeders keeping birds from migrating.

Bill Volkert

On Tue, Mar 23, 2021 at 11:04 PM Bob Matyas <bobmatyas...>
wrote:

> Hello,
> Lu Ann and I have relatives that live in South Carolina and they are
> currently hosting a lot of Pine Siskins which surprised me. I guess that
> is where some of my Fall Pine Siskins went. They told us that they were
> told that everyone should stop bird feeding down in South Carolina so that
> the numerous Pine Siskins can feel free to migrate north again, and resume
> feeding once the Pine Siskins return to the north. This does not sound
> right to me but I could be wrong. Anyone know the proper answer, I know
> most birds migrate based on the hours of sunlight but I assume there may be
> exceptions and lack of food may sound like one.
> Good Birding,
> Bob and Lu Ann Matyas
> Franklin, WI.
> ####################
> You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
> Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
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> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
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>
>
>

--
Bill Volkert
Naturalist
www.billvolkert.com


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Date: 3/24/21 5:23 am
From: Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Pine Siskins question
Bob:
This is the same myth that circulates during fall in regards to
hummingbirds. You are correct that birds migrate in response to the length
of daylight which tells them what time of year they should prepare to
depart and actually fly on days of favorable weather. Yes, food does wane
quickly in fall so birds need to leave before it's gone and they return as
food becomes available again in spring. However, the artificial feeding
stations that we provide do not influence this cycle nor does it interfere
with migration.

There occasionally are birds that fail to migrate for some reason or
another in autumn and they will take advantage of feeders to get them by,
but it isn't the feeder that kept them from leaving. One of the best
examples I can think of is watching swallows in fall. They will congregate
in large flocks in late August and early September before departing. When
they leave there are still plenty of insects flying about, but since this
is their only food source they need to leave while it is still available
since one single severe frost will kill or drive their entire food supply
into dormancy.

I am sure we have all experienced a fall season when mosquitos can be
bothersome well into October before we ever have the first frost and people
might then wish that the birds were still around to eat them. However,
insectivores like swallows can't wait until all of their food is gone,
which can happen overnight. So they need to leave while there still is
food available and migrate in anticipation of eventual food shortages, and
this is true of other birds as well.

Thanks for asking. Please help to extinguish this myth. Birds face a lot
more serious problems in this world than people who feed them and actually
enjoy birds.

Bill Volkert
FdL Co.

On Tue, Mar 23, 2021 at 11:04 PM Bob Matyas <bobmatyas...>
wrote:

> Hello,
> Lu Ann and I have relatives that live in South Carolina and they are
> currently hosting a lot of Pine Siskins which surprised me. I guess that
> is where some of my Fall Pine Siskins went. They told us that they were
> told that everyone should stop bird feeding down in South Carolina so that
> the numerous Pine Siskins can feel free to migrate north again, and resume
> feeding once the Pine Siskins return to the north. This does not sound
> right to me but I could be wrong. Anyone know the proper answer, I know
> most birds migrate based on the hours of sunlight but I assume there may be
> exceptions and lack of food may sound like one.
> Good Birding,
> Bob and Lu Ann Matyas
> Franklin, WI.
> ####################
> You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
> Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
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>
>
>

--
Bill Volkert
Naturalist
www.billvolkert.com


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Date: 3/24/21 5:05 am
From: Mark Korducki <mark.korducki...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Pine Siskins question
You are correct Bob. Birds will typically move based on seasonal timing. This is similar to the notion up here that we should take our hummingbird feeders down Labor Day weekend so that we don't force them to stay longer. As we have seen, the Ruby-throated Hummingbirds will leave on their own by early October even with a well stocked feeder.

During irruptive winters it is not unusual for large numbers of siskins to move quite far south. I have had them throughout Texas on winter and even April trips.

So have them keep feeding.

Mark Korducki
Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 23, 2021, at 11:04 PM, Bob Matyas <bobmatyas...> wrote:
>
>  Hello,
> Lu Ann and I have relatives that live in South Carolina and they are currently hosting a lot of Pine Siskins which surprised me. I guess that is where some of my Fall Pine Siskins went. They told us that they were told that everyone should stop bird feeding down in South Carolina so that the numerous Pine Siskins can feel free to migrate north again, and resume feeding once the Pine Siskins return to the north. This does not sound right to me but I could be wrong. Anyone know the proper answer, I know most birds migrate based on the hours of sunlight but I assume there may be exceptions and lack of food may sound like one.
> Good Birding,
> Bob and Lu Ann Matyas
> Franklin, WI.
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Date: 3/23/21 9:04 pm
From: Bob Matyas <bobmatyas...>
Subject: [wisb] Pine Siskins question
Hello,
Lu Ann and I have relatives that live in South Carolina and they are currently hosting a lot of Pine Siskins which surprised me. I guess that is where some of my Fall Pine Siskins went. They told us that they were told that everyone should stop bird feeding down in South Carolina so that the numerous Pine Siskins can feel free to migrate north again, and resume feeding once the Pine Siskins return to the north. This does not sound right to me but I could be wrong. Anyone know the proper answer, I know most birds migrate based on the hours of sunlight but I assume there may be exceptions and lack of food may sound like one.
Good Birding,
Bob and Lu Ann Matyas
Franklin, WI.
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Date: 3/23/21 2:41 pm
From: David Schrab <davidschrab...>
Subject: [wisb] Franklin's gull
At 4:00 this afternoon, Tuesday, I had a Franklin's gull on Birch Rd,
Dodge County. About mile west on Hwy J several thousand gulls are splitting
time between two spots half mile apart. Had a lesser black-backed gull
there this afternoon. Couple days ago had an Iceland gull and two glaucous
gulls there. Good luck!
Dave Schrab
Hustisford Dodge CO

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Date: 3/23/21 1:06 pm
From: Thomas Wood <tcwood729...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Shorebird ID Quiz ~ Species seen in Wisconsin
Yes, it was great to see Jim get the recognition for the enjoyment he has provided to many of us on Wisbirdnet. Paul Smith’s work as outdoor editor is also appreciated since he covers a great range of outdoor activities, not just hunting and fishing. He has certainly contributed a wealth of bird and birding articles, and since I have met Jim a number of times in the field and always enjoy his excellent photography, I was pleased that Paul chose to let newspaper readers in on Jim’s great work!
Thomas Wood, Menomonee Falls, Waukesha County

> On Mar 23, 2021, at 9:44 AM, <tschmidtkunz...> wrote:
>
> Jim: Neat to read the story about you in the Milwaukee Journal this Sunday. Great that someone can find something interesting to do like birding,
> and really run with it, as you have. Regards, Tom,
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From:Jim Edlhuber
> To:wisbirdn
> Sent:Monday, March 22, 2021 7:26:01 PM
> Subject:[wisb] Shorebird ID Quiz ~ Species seen in Wisconsin
>
>
> It is that time of the year, shorebirds are starting to come through the
> state of Wisconsin. Can you ID them all? I have put together a little quiz
> for anyone who wants to see how many they can ID with species I have
> photographed in Wisconsin.
>
> The quiz is on my blog windowtowildlife at the link below. Good luck if you
> try!
>
> *http://www.windowtowildlife.com/shorebird-id-quiz-test-your-yourself-before-these-beautiful-birds-arrive-here-in-wisconsin-this-spring/
> &lt;http://www.windowtowildlife.com/shorebird-id-quiz-test-your-yourself-before-these-beautiful-birds-arrive-here-in-wisconsin-this-spring/&gt;*
>
> Thank you,
>
> Jim Edlhuber
> Town of Genesee Waukesha Co.
> windowtowildlife.com
>
>
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Date: 3/23/21 7:44 am
From: <tschmidtkunz...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Shorebird ID Quiz ~ Species seen in Wisconsin
Jim: Neat to read the story about you in the Milwaukee Journal this Sunday. Great that someone can find something interesting to do like birding,
and really run with it, as you have. Regards, Tom,

----- Original Message -----
From:Jim Edlhuber
To:wisbirdn
Sent:Monday, March 22, 2021 7:26:01 PM
Subject:[wisb] Shorebird ID Quiz ~ Species seen in Wisconsin


It is that time of the year, shorebirds are starting to come through the
state of Wisconsin. Can you ID them all? I have put together a little quiz
for anyone who wants to see how many they can ID with species I have
photographed in Wisconsin.

The quiz is on my blog windowtowildlife at the link below. Good luck if you
try!

*http://www.windowtowildlife.com/shorebird-id-quiz-test-your-yourself-before-these-beautiful-birds-arrive-here-in-wisconsin-this-spring/
&lt;http://www.windowtowildlife.com/shorebird-id-quiz-test-your-yourself-before-these-beautiful-birds-arrive-here-in-wisconsin-this-spring/&gt;*

Thank you,

Jim Edlhuber
Town of Genesee Waukesha Co.
windowtowildlife.com


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Date: 3/22/21 8:07 pm
From: Jody Kuchar <jody.kuch.r...>
Subject: [wisb] today
Today's firsts: song sparrow, eastern meadowlark, turkey vulture (
typical), and two cliche driven boxing March hares. Collins marsh area.
Jody Kuchar, Manitowoc Cnty

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Date: 3/22/21 6:26 pm
From: Jim Edlhuber <jimedlhuber...>
Subject: [wisb] Shorebird ID Quiz ~ Species seen in Wisconsin
It is that time of the year, shorebirds are starting to come through the
state of Wisconsin. Can you ID them all? I have put together a little quiz
for anyone who wants to see how many they can ID with species I have
photographed in Wisconsin.

The quiz is on my blog windowtowildlife at the link below. Good luck if you
try!

*http://www.windowtowildlife.com/shorebird-id-quiz-test-your-yourself-before-these-beautiful-birds-arrive-here-in-wisconsin-this-spring/
<http://www.windowtowildlife.com/shorebird-id-quiz-test-your-yourself-before-these-beautiful-birds-arrive-here-in-wisconsin-this-spring/>*

Thank you,

Jim Edlhuber
Town of Genesee Waukesha Co.
windowtowildlife.com


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Date: 3/22/21 5:40 pm
From: Dave & Margaret Brasser <2shebbirders...>
Subject: [wisb] Sheboygan south side on Monday afternoon March 22
This afternoon we birded the far south side of Sheboygan: 45 minutes on S.
8th Street south of Panther Avenue, and 30 minutes at nearby Sheboygan
Indian Mound Park. A surprising number of birds (20 species) of which the
highlights were 1 Pileated Woodpecker, 2 Golden-crowned Kinglets (FOY), 2
Wood Ducks (FOY), 1 Great Horned Owl (calling), and 1 beautiful Great Tit
(not countable).
--Dave & Margaret Brasser
Sheboygan
Sheboygan County

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Date: 3/22/21 4:08 pm
From: Hyndla Kensdottir <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender hyndla53704 for DMARC)
Subject: [wisb] Re: Black Vulture




I saw a Black Vulture today at Yahara Heights/Cherokee Marsh and reported it on ebird.  It's probably the same bird.
Pam SkaarMadison
On Sunday, March 21, 2021, 04:58:47 PM CDT, Thomas Wood <tcwood729...> wrote:

According to “Birds of the World” (formerly Birds of North America),  the juvenile has a gray head with a black beak tip, but by its first spring the head should be pinkish-red.
I would think that on a soaring bird, the field marks mentioned by Pam Skaar would be more useful.
Although it is unlikely, I hope the Black Vulture found by Donald remains in the area. That would be a new “state bird" for me!
Thomas Wood, Menomonee Falls, Waukesha County

> On Mar 21, 2021, at 2:29 PM, B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...> wrote:
>
> Immature Turkey Vultures have dark heads?
> On Sun, Mar 21, 2021 at 3:05 PM Donald Maum <dgmaum...> wrote:
>
>> Goose Pond did not disappoint this morning. Tundra swans, Canada geese,
>> White fronted geese and lots of redheads. A pair of trumpeter swans were
>> along Hwy 49 in Horicon Marsh yesterday. The biggest surprise this morning
>> was a black vulture soaring above Hwy 60 just east of Sauk City...near
>> Crystal Lake or Fish Lake.  I’ve  seen plenty of both being from Louisiana,
>> and there was a turkey vulture nearby, so no mistaken identity.
>>
>> Donald Maum
>> Sauk City, WI
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>> On Mar 21, 2021, at 8:39 AM, Seegert Greg <dmarc-noreply...>
>> wrote:
>>>
>>> All
>>>
>>> I checked out the pond on Jersey road yesterday.  There were 300 or so
>> tundra swans, perhaps 500 WF geese, both morphs of snow geese, and of
>> course lots of Canada geese.  Ducks were still dominated by mallards, but
>> quite a few pintails were also present along with a few ring necked ducks.
>>>
>>> Greg Seegert
>>> Beaver Dam
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone####################
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>>
>
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Date: 3/22/21 12:32 pm
From: James Schwarz <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender jfschwar for DMARC)
Subject: [wisb] Lapland Longspures CTN K Ashton
There around 100 Lapland Longspures at the County K pond at Ashton in the stubble near end of pond.

Jim Schwarz
Madison
Dane County
Sent from my U.S.Cellular Smartphone
Get Outlook for Android<https://aka.ms/AAb9ysg>

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Date: 3/21/21 2:58 pm
From: Thomas Wood <tcwood729...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Black Vulture
According to “Birds of the World” (formerly Birds of North America), the juvenile has a gray head with a black beak tip, but by its first spring the head should be pinkish-red.
I would think that on a soaring bird, the field marks mentioned by Pam Skaar would be more useful.
Although it is unlikely, I hope the Black Vulture found by Donald remains in the area. That would be a new “state bird" for me!
Thomas Wood, Menomonee Falls, Waukesha County

> On Mar 21, 2021, at 2:29 PM, B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...> wrote:
>
> Immature Turkey Vultures have dark heads?
> On Sun, Mar 21, 2021 at 3:05 PM Donald Maum <dgmaum...> wrote:
>
>> Goose Pond did not disappoint this morning. Tundra swans, Canada geese,
>> White fronted geese and lots of redheads. A pair of trumpeter swans were
>> along Hwy 49 in Horicon Marsh yesterday. The biggest surprise this morning
>> was a black vulture soaring above Hwy 60 just east of Sauk City...near
>> Crystal Lake or Fish Lake. I’ve seen plenty of both being from Louisiana,
>> and there was a turkey vulture nearby, so no mistaken identity.
>>
>> Donald Maum
>> Sauk City, WI
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>> On Mar 21, 2021, at 8:39 AM, Seegert Greg <dmarc-noreply...>
>> wrote:
>>>
>>> All
>>>
>>> I checked out the pond on Jersey road yesterday. There were 300 or so
>> tundra swans, perhaps 500 WF geese, both morphs of snow geese, and of
>> course lots of Canada geese. Ducks were still dominated by mallards, but
>> quite a few pintails were also present along with a few ring necked ducks.
>>>
>>> Greg Seegert
>>> Beaver Dam
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone####################
>>> You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
>> Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
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>>>
>> ####################
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>
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Date: 3/21/21 2:31 pm
From: Alan & Joan Linquist <linquists...>
Subject: [wisb] Horicon NWR
I passed by the north end ponds of Horicon earlier this week.  I, too, didn't see anything unusual or very many birds.  I did see two Mute Swans, and what had to have been around two hundred Lesser Scaups.  One of the road ponds had several Common Mergansers, and there were the Canada Geese, a f ew Mallards, and Red Winged Blackbirds.  That was about it.Alan LinquistWashington County
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Date: 3/21/21 2:21 pm
From: Thomas Wood <tcwood729...>
Subject: [wisb] Horicon NWR this morning, 3/21
The autotour is now open, Main Dike Road is still closed, and the ponds are nearly ice free. I didn’t see anything too unusual, but it was nice to see a half-dozen Blue-winged Teal (FOY) in the pond on the west side of the auto tour road past the boardwalk area. A few American White Pelicans were in the last pond of the autotour. The highlight for me was actually just east of the NWR on Ledge Road east of CTH Z where a huge flock of Lapland Longspurs foraged on the roadside and in the fields. I am not good at sizing large flocks, but my “guesstimate” was about 250 when they all took to the air in a huge cloud.
The numbers of waterfowl were lower than expected, but I didn’t spend much time on STH 49, so there may have been more to see if I had scoped the ponds.
Thomas Wood, Menomonee Falls, Waukesha County####################
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Date: 3/21/21 12:52 pm
From: Hyndla Kensdottir <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender hyndla53704 for DMARC)
Subject: [wisb] Re: Black Vulture



The black vulture has a shorter tails and different underwing pattern, which you should recognize from living in the south.  I don't know how dark the heads are on the young turkey vultures at this time but their head are dark when they fledge in the summer.
Pam SkaarMadison. WI  (also lived in TX, KY, and NC)
On Sunday, March 21, 2021, 02:29:40 PM CDT, B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...> wrote:

Immature Turkey Vultures have dark heads?
On Sun, Mar 21, 2021 at 3:05 PM Donald Maum <dgmaum...> wrote:

> Goose Pond did not disappoint this morning. Tundra swans, Canada geese,
> White fronted geese and lots of redheads. A pair of trumpeter swans were
> along Hwy 49 in Horicon Marsh yesterday. The biggest surprise this morning
> was a black vulture soaring above Hwy 60 just east of Sauk City...near
> Crystal Lake or Fish Lake.  I’ve  seen plenty of both being from Louisiana,
> and there was a turkey vulture nearby, so no mistaken identity.
>
> Donald Maum
> Sauk City, WI
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Mar 21, 2021, at 8:39 AM, Seegert Greg <dmarc-noreply...>
> wrote:
> >
> > All
> >
> > I checked out the pond on Jersey road yesterday.  There were 300 or so
> tundra swans, perhaps 500 WF geese, both morphs of snow geese, and of
> course lots of Canada geese.  Ducks were still dominated by mallards, but
> quite a few pintails were also present along with a few ring necked ducks.
> >
> > Greg Seegert
> > Beaver Dam
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone####################
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> Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
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Date: 3/21/21 12:29 pm
From: B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Black Vulture
Immature Turkey Vultures have dark heads?
On Sun, Mar 21, 2021 at 3:05 PM Donald Maum <dgmaum...> wrote:

> Goose Pond did not disappoint this morning. Tundra swans, Canada geese,
> White fronted geese and lots of redheads. A pair of trumpeter swans were
> along Hwy 49 in Horicon Marsh yesterday. The biggest surprise this morning
> was a black vulture soaring above Hwy 60 just east of Sauk City...near
> Crystal Lake or Fish Lake. I’ve seen plenty of both being from Louisiana,
> and there was a turkey vulture nearby, so no mistaken identity.
>
> Donald Maum
> Sauk City, WI
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Mar 21, 2021, at 8:39 AM, Seegert Greg <dmarc-noreply...>
> wrote:
> >
> > All
> >
> > I checked out the pond on Jersey road yesterday. There were 300 or so
> tundra swans, perhaps 500 WF geese, both morphs of snow geese, and of
> course lots of Canada geese. Ducks were still dominated by mallards, but
> quite a few pintails were also present along with a few ring necked ducks.
> >
> > Greg Seegert
> > Beaver Dam
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone####################
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Date: 3/21/21 12:05 pm
From: Donald Maum <dgmaum...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Black Vulture
Goose Pond did not disappoint this morning. Tundra swans, Canada geese, White fronted geese and lots of redheads. A pair of trumpeter swans were along Hwy 49 in Horicon Marsh yesterday. The biggest surprise this morning was a black vulture soaring above Hwy 60 just east of Sauk City...near Crystal Lake or Fish Lake. I’ve seen plenty of both being from Louisiana, and there was a turkey vulture nearby, so no mistaken identity.

Donald Maum
Sauk City, WI

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 21, 2021, at 8:39 AM, Seegert Greg <dmarc-noreply...> wrote:
>
> All
>
> I checked out the pond on Jersey road yesterday. There were 300 or so tundra swans, perhaps 500 WF geese, both morphs of snow geese, and of course lots of Canada geese. Ducks were still dominated by mallards, but quite a few pintails were also present along with a few ring necked ducks.
>
> Greg Seegert
> Beaver Dam
>
> Sent from my iPhone####################
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Date: 3/21/21 10:58 am
From: Victoria Sokolowski <vasladyvet...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Love nest is in the trees
As I looked where I saw the Red-Tail Hawks enjoying their sunset yesterday on my way to the office today , I realized that they are nesting in that very tree! She is actually sitting on the nest already. There was a Great Horned Owl in the same nest last year. I will get to check on them daily as I go to work. Something to look forward to each day.

Vicki Sokolowski
Rusk County
Ladysmith, WI

> On Mar 20, 2021, at 7:31 PM, Victoria Sokolowski <vasladyvet...> wrote:
>
> As I was driving home from work tonight, I noticed a Red-Tailed Hawk sitting in a tree bordering a pasture. I stopped to Ebird her, and suddenly another Red-Tailed Hawk, which had been on the ground unnoticed by me , flew up to the hawk in the tree and without any fanfare he landed on the back of his cooperative mate to start the next generation. I saw more than I bargained for! It was over just as quick as that, and then they enjoyed the sunset together.
>
> Vicki Sokolowski
> Rusk County
> Ladysmith, WI

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Date: 3/21/21 7:48 am
From: Lyle Drier <ddrier1...>
Subject: [wisb] goose pond
Yesterday 3 of us ventured up to Goose Pond. We had very good luck...hundreds of tundra swans and Canada geese. Cackling, white fronted and snow geese were also seen. Duck species included canvasback, red head, bufflehead, ring neck, scaup, goldeneye, and mallards. There were killdeer along the edges of every pond we visited. We then drove south on Hwy I and found another 500 tundra swans in several fields along the way down to the DM ponds. There we found a white fronted geese, goldeneye, a widgeon, and a shoveler. It was windy, but sunny.
While we were at the goose ponds a gray ghost harrier flew right in front of and along side the car. Wonderful views of a very handsome bird.

Lyle Drier
Oconomowoc

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Date: 3/21/21 6:39 am
From: Seegert Greg <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender gseegert for DMARC)
Subject: [wisb] Waterfowl
All

I checked out the pond on Jersey road yesterday. There were 300 or so tundra swans, perhaps 500 WF geese, both morphs of snow geese, and of course lots of Canada geese. Ducks were still dominated by mallards, but quite a few pintails were also present along with a few ring necked ducks.

Greg Seegert
Beaver Dam

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Date: 3/20/21 8:52 pm
From: Wayne Kuhn <waylin98...>
Subject: [wisb] Buena Vista on Saturday
Every year I have a booth at the Wisconsin Association of Campground Owners
(WACO) convention in Stevens Point. Last year it was the last show I did
before everything closed down. This year it is the first show I have been to
since then and hopefully a sign of good things to come.


I stay at a motel Friday night and since the show doesn't start until 9:00
am on Saturday I take a short trip to Buena Vista to look for rare birds. I
hadn't gotten the Greater Prairie Chickens for three years but today was my
lucky day. While traveling down Mill Road I saw several take flight and fly
to the back of the agricultural field they were in. I counted nine and I had
some good distant looks while they were on the ground.



That was enough to make the trip a success by itself but as I traveled down
Swamp Road I saw a Meadowlark fly over it. I got out of the car and right
away heard it singing from a fence post - it was a Western Meadowlark! And
just 5 posts down from him was a shrike. I could not tell if it was a
Northern or Loggerhead but he and the Meadowlark tangled once in mid-flight
and settled back on the fence posts. I also saw/heard another Western
Meadowlark - no Eastern Meadowlarks to be found, which makes finding the
Western easier.



My show ended at 4:30 pm and I headed back to Green Bay via Highway 54. I
stopped at Van Patton Road for ducks and geese but there weren't many. I did
get a FOY Norther Harrier though.



Wayne Kuhn

Green Bay

Brown County



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Date: 3/20/21 5:31 pm
From: Victoria Sokolowski <vasladyvet...>
Subject: [wisb] Love is in the trees
As I was driving home from work tonight, I noticed a Red-Tailed Hawk sitting in a tree bordering a pasture. I stopped to Ebird her, and suddenly another Red-Tailed Hawk, which had been on the ground unnoticed by me , flew up to the hawk in the tree and without any fanfare he landed on the back of his cooperative mate to start the next generation. I saw more than I bargained for! It was over just as quick as that, and then they enjoyed the sunset together.

Vicki Sokolowski
Rusk County
Ladysmith, WI####################
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Date: 3/20/21 5:28 pm
From: Victoria Sokolowski <vasladyvet...>
Subject: [wisb] Love is in the trees!
As I was driving home from work tonight, I noticed a Red-Tailed Hawk sitting in a tree bordering a pasture. I stopped to Ebird her, and suddenly another Red-Tailed Hawk, which had been on the ground unnoticed by me , flew up to the hawk in the tree and without any fanfare he landed on the back of his cooperative mate to start the next generation. I saw more than I bargained for! It was over just as quick as that, and then they enjoyed the sunset together.

Vicki Sokolowski
Rusk County
Ladysmith, WI ####################
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Date: 3/20/21 3:01 pm
From: Ted Golos <tgolos...>
Subject: [wisb] picnic point 3/20
A few interesting birds today. A handful of buffleheads were north of Picnic Point on Lake Mendota this afternoon, a pair of wood ducks (male and female) were in the slough on the point, and a pair of common goldeneyes (male and female) were to the south of picnic point in University Bay.
Ted Golos
Dane County

------- Ted Golos Madison, WI <tgolos...> -------

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Date: 3/20/21 1:25 pm
From: Daryl Tessen <bhaunts...>
Subject: [wisb] Saturday birding
I spent the morning into the early afternoon checking out waterfowl spots in Dodge, Columbia and Dane counties. The best spots were the east side of Goose Pond and the Jersey pond (in Columbia and Dodge cos respectively). The surprise was a Blue-winged Teal at Harvey/DM pond, a Tree Swallow at the junction of Breezy Pt and 151, Several goose species were present in impressive numbers. The best was the White-fronted Goose where 5500+ were at the Jersey pond, plus another 1000+ elsewhere. 350 Snow Geese were tallied total from several spots with the best at Goose Pond. Also there were 3 Ross’s Geese and 25+ Cackling also there. 10 White Pelicans were present at Whalen Grade along with a variety of ducks.Good luck!
Daryl Tessen
Appleton, WI




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Date: 3/20/21 5:59 am
From: Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...>
Subject: [wisb] Wisconsin Public Radio bird show
I just wanted to let everyone know that I will once again be a guest on the
Larry Meiller show on the WPR statewide network to talk about birds and
bird migration. The program is scheduled for Wednesday, March 24 from
11:00 am to 12:30 pm.
You can simply listen in or call in (or email) during the show to share
your recent bird sightings.

Bill Volkert
FdL Co.

--
Bill Volkert
Naturalist
www.billvolkert.com


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Date: 3/19/21 9:16 am
From: Dennis Casper <denncasp.wisbirder...>
Subject: [wisb] Urban Ecology Center Bird Walk, March 18, 2021
Urban Ecology Center, Riverside Park
1500 East Park Place, Milwaukee, WI 53211
414-964-8505, www.UrbanEcologyCenter.org
BIRD WALK
Thursdays, 8:00 am—10:00 am year round.
Free and Open to the Public, All Ages Welcome [NOTE: The walks are now
again open to the general public, but pre-registration is required. Do so
at urbanecologycenter.org.]


Thursday, March 18, 2021
40 degrees
Partly cloudy, very windy
9 birders

Total Species: 21

4 Canada Goose
40 Mallard
2 Common Goldeneye
1 Red-breasted Merganser
1 Mourning Dove
1 Herring Gull
2 Cooper’s Hawk
1 Red-bellied Woodpecker
5 Downy Woodpecker
2 Hairy Woodpecker

12 American Crow
7 Black-capped Chickadee
2 White-breasted Nuthatch
3 European Starling
4 American Robin
2 House Finch
3 American Goldfinch
3 American Tree Sparrow
2 Dark-eyed Junco
20 Red-winged Blackbird

3 Northern Cardinal

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Date: 3/17/21 10:02 am
From: Jim Edlhuber <jimedlhuber...>
Subject: [wisb] Duck, Geese and Grebe ID Quiz ~ Species seen in Wisconsin
Hi all,
It is that time of the year, ducks, geese and grebes are starting to come
through the state of Wisconsin. Can you ID them all? I have put together a
little quiz for anyone who wants to see how many they can ID with species I
have photographed in Wisconsin.

The quiz is on my blog windowtowildlife at the link below. Good luck if you
try!

*http://www.windowtowildlife.com/ducks-geese-and-grebes-id-quiz-test-your-yourself-on-these-beautiful-birds-here-in-wisconsin/
<http://www.windowtowildlife.com/ducks-geese-and-grebes-id-quiz-test-your-yourself-on-these-beautiful-birds-here-in-wisconsin/>*

Thank you,

Jim Edlhuber
Town of Genesee Waukesha Co.
windowtowildlife.com


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Date: 3/16/21 6:18 am
From: Jeff Bahls <jbahls1266...>
Subject: [wisb] Program Nest boxes- Bluebirds Thursday March 18 7PM- Zoom
Bluebirds have always been one of the most sought after cavity nesting
species. The flash of blue and “cheer cheerful charmer” call are flashes of
spring after a long winter. Join DNR Wildlife Educator, Liz Herzmann, as we
delve into the lives of bluebirds. From birth to courting, building a home
and home protection, we’ll discuss the life of a bluebird and what you can
do to create a quality habitat for them. We’ll talk about the proper boxes,
placement and monitoring to hopefully attract these blue beauties to your
yard.
You are invited to a Zoom meeting.
When: Mar 18, 2021 07:00 PM Central Time (US and Canada)

Register in advance for this meeting:
https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZ0ofuGgrDIsGNc1rYE3gVuTAVdfVVIEOM91

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing
information about joining the meeting.

Jeff Bahls
Lowell Wi

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Date: 3/15/21 2:48 pm
From: Seegert Greg <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender gseegert for DMARC)
Subject: [wisb] Waterfowl part 2
All
I went back to the 2 places I visited yesterday. At the pond at the intersection of CTH A and 151 there were 8 tundra swans, a bunch of Canada geese and a few white-fronted geese. Besides mallards there were a few shovelers and one pintail. At the small pond on Jersey Rd closest to CTH A there were 20-30 WF geese. At the larger pond to the N of Mr Bird’s house there were roughly a bajillion Canada geese, about a hundred WF geese, 30-40 snow geese (both morphs), and a couple of 100 tundra swans. The only ducks were mallards. I couldn’t find any Ross’s geese but there were so many birds that I could have missed them.

Greg Seegert
Beaver Dam

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Date: 3/15/21 10:06 am
From: Katherine Frisk <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender chkafrisk for DMARC)
Subject: [wisb] Re: Sandhill Crane migration
  Both a visual and an audial delight!!  The tundra swans are coming through NE WI as well now.Charlie Frisk
On Monday, March 15, 2021, 06:22:35 AM CDT, Alan & Joan Linquist <linquists...> wrote:

I took a neighborhood walk on Saturday morning,  and besides the robins, the downy, the house finches, the Canada geese, the cardinals, the red wing blackbirds the calls of the neighborhood sandhill cranes, , (and the lone bald eagle), I saw a dozen sandhill cranes fly over in a group.  It really picks your spirits up.  Alan LinquistWashington County
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Date: 3/15/21 7:18 am
From: Jeff Kaczmarski <jeffkaz...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Sandhill Crane migration
Last Saturday (3/13) in the later afternoon I saw 2 large flocks of
sandhill cranes flying north over Oconomowoc. The flocks were separate but
relatively close, maybe .5 km. apart. The first flock had a little over 50
birds and the second over 30. I took phone video. Beautiful to see. Jeff
On Mon, Mar 15, 2021 at 6:22 AM Alan & Joan Linquist <linquists...>
wrote:

> I took a neighborhood walk on Saturday morning, and besides the robins,
> the downy, the house finches, the Canada geese, the cardinals, the red wing
> blackbirds the calls of the neighborhood sandhill cranes, , (and the lone
> bald eagle), I saw a dozen sandhill cranes fly over in a group. It really
> picks your spirits up. Alan LinquistWashington County
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Date: 3/15/21 5:16 am
From: Judith Huf <judith_huf...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Birds today in Bayside Wis
Lovely photos Tom. The correct name for the woodpecker is, “Red-bellied Woodpecker”. There is a bird called the “Yellow-bellied Sapsucker”, which is also a woodpecker and will be seen soon as they are now migrating northward.
Welcome to the wonderful world of bird watching.

Judith Huf
Milwaukee

> On Mar 14, 2021, at 9:29 PM, Tom Schmidtkunz <tschmidtkunz...> wrote:
>
> Wisbird Friends: Got over to Schlitz Audubon Nature Center today;
> first visit in a while.
> Got close to a white breasted nuthatch and a yellow bellied woodpecker.
>
> Heard a lot of red winged black birds. A great new birding season is
> about to begin.
>
> 4 latest pictures in this album are from today.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/tjsimage/albums/72157717987270723
>
> Regards, Tom Schmidtkunz, Bayside Wisconsin.
>
>
>
>
>
>
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>

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Date: 3/15/21 4:22 am
From: Alan & Joan Linquist <linquists...>
Subject: [wisb] Sandhill Crane migration
I took a neighborhood walk on Saturday morning,  and besides the robins, the downy, the house finches, the Canada geese, the cardinals, the red wing blackbirds the calls of the neighborhood sandhill cranes, , (and the lone bald eagle), I saw a dozen sandhill cranes fly over in a group.  It really picks your spirits up.  Alan LinquistWashington County
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Date: 3/14/21 7:29 pm
From: Tom Schmidtkunz <tschmidtkunz...>
Subject: [wisb] Birds today in Bayside Wis
Wisbird Friends:   Got over to Schlitz Audubon Nature Center today;
first visit in a while.
Got close to a white breasted nuthatch and a yellow bellied woodpecker.

Heard a lot of red winged black birds.  A great new birding season is
about to begin.

4 latest pictures in this album are from today.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/tjsimage/albums/72157717987270723

Regards, Tom Schmidtkunz,  Bayside Wisconsin.






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Date: 3/14/21 6:02 pm
From: Mark & Susan Foote-Martin <marksuemartin...>
Subject: [wisb] Sandhill Crane Migration March 13 and 14th - Rio Wi
Hi

We noticed that there was a crane migration on both March 13th and 14th.. We
were at our cabin near Rio days boiling sap for maple syrup. We were
joined by Curt and Arlys Caslavka, from Middleton and at least two of us
were outside all the time. We believe few if any flocks that were in our
area were missed. It was interesting that all flocks were taking the same
route north.


The cranes were just east of Rio and and when we looked at a larger map it
appears they were in a line from about the Marshall area in northeast Dane
County to Montello in Marquette County. They were high and sometimes
would break into two or three smaller flocks and then would regroup into
the original flock. It looked like they were enjoying the day.


Saturday, 237 migrating cranes. Flocks heading north from about 10:00 a.m.
to 2:00 p.m. Flock numbers 12, 9, 48, 9, 9, 21, 16, 14, 9, 23, 26, 28 and
14. We also had our local birds and small numbers flying around = 2, 4, 4,
and 5.


Sunday, 219 migrating cranes Flocks heading north from about 10:30 to
3:00 p.m. Flock numbers of 10, 5, 4, 25, 18, 22, 6, 53, 17,20,19, and 30.

*Mark and Susan Foote-Martin*
*W7503 Kampen Road*
*Arlington, WI 53911*
*Home phone 608-635-4160*
*Mark's cell 608-333-9645*


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Date: 3/14/21 4:41 pm
From: Seegert Greg <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender gseegert for DMARC)
Subject: [wisb] waterfowl
All
Today I checked out the Jersey Rd pond off CTH A in Dodge Co and the pond that is at the SW corner of the intersection of A and US 151. The Jersey Rd pond was more interesting. It had 50 or so tundra swans, hundreds of Canada geese, 20-30 snow geese (both white and blue morphs), and 2 smaller white geese that I think were Ross's geese. My ID of Ross's was based solely on size because of how far away they were and the wind shaking my scope so I couldn't get anything on their bills. The ducks were almost exclusively mallards. The pond by 151 had a better variety of ducks....redhead, N shoveler, wood, and of course mallards. Several killdeer were working the mud flats.

Greg Seegert
Beaver Dam




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Date: 3/14/21 3:24 pm
From: Dave & Margaret Brasser <2shebbirders...>
Subject: [wisb] Sheboygan Cty flooded fields
Late Friday afternoon we checked the huge flooded field "pond" that is on
the south side of Cty Tk V, 7/10-mi west of Hwy 32, and just east of
Whitetail Road. Best (and safest) viewing is from Whitetail Road. Scope
necessary. Birds seen were: hundreds of Tundra Swans, Canada Geese, and
Snow Geese; a dozen Sandhill Cranes; and a wide variety of ducks - Mallards,
American Wigeons, Northern Pintails, Green-winged Teal, Redheads, and
Ring-necked Ducks. Hundreds more Tundra Swans and Canada Geese were in the
corn stubble field on the north side of Cty Tk V. Red-winged Blackbirds and
Killdeer were calling. Yaaaayyyy: Spring has arrived at last!!! : )
--margaret and dave brasser
sheboygan
sheboygan county


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Date: 3/14/21 1:58 pm
From: Thomas Erdman <ErdT4...>
Subject: [wisb] Tundra Swans Oconto county.
The first Tundra Swans first heard and seen off Little Suamico, on the bay. Open water present yesterday is rapidly closing as floating ice is moving westward with strong winds. Lots of waterfowl too.
Tom Erdman, Oconto, WI

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Date: 3/14/21 11:00 am
From: Ted Golos <tgolos...>
Subject: [wisb] herons at the rookery
Some great blue herons are now on nests at the rookery east of the Johnson Creek landfill. I don't get out much so not sure how long they've been there, but I don't think this has been reported yet.
Ted Golos
Dane County

------- Ted Golos Madison, WI <tgolos...> -------

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Date: 3/13/21 7:57 pm
From: Ken Damro <traditionalnesters...>
Subject: [wisb] Northern Waterthrush
I heard a Northern Waterthrush today in western Vernon County.

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Date: 3/13/21 6:33 pm
From: Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...>
Subject: [wisb] Tree Swallow
As I was sitting outside this afternoon I had a tree swallow fly overhead.
I recognized it immediately but still grabbed for my binoculars which were
right next to me. These early swallows and phoebes always concern me with
what seems to me like risky behavior. I can only hope he finds enough food
to get by until more reliable weather sets in.
Bill Volkert
FdL Co

--
Bill Volkert
Naturalist
www.billvolkert.com


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Date: 3/13/21 6:33 pm
From: Hephziabah Beulah <hephziabahb...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
Thank you very much Bill.
I agree with Scott, lets keep it to strictly Birds Seen.

Hep
Brookfield, WI

On Saturday, March 13, 2021, Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...> wrote:

> Hep:
>
> I realize that watching a bird banding operation can seem stressful to
> some of us, but as in medicine we attempt to do no harm. It is our concern
> for birds that drives our need to learn more about them. Watching and
> listening to birds still remains one of the best methods we have to
> understand their occurrence, distribution and relative abundance, but it
> also has its limitations. There are many things about birds that we simply
> cannot learn without capturing and marking individuals so that we can
> identify them and follow them to some varying degree. Through the art of
> bird banding we have learned and continue to learn about birds in a way
> that would never be possible if we didn't undertake this. Since the
> welfare and care of all captured birds is a top priority this is the very
> reason why it is so difficult to obtain a federal bird banding permit. For
> me, bird banding has been one of many avenues I have relied upon to learn
> about birds and it has taught me things I could not have learned otherwise.
>
> In the spring of 1988 I captured a female yellow warbler at my banding
> site at Horicon Marsh that I used for over 25 years. In May of 1997 I
> recaptured the same bird at the same clump of bushes. She was obviously an
> adult when I first caught her, as it was prior to that year's breeding
> season. This meant that this bird was at least 10 years old when I
> recaptured her! Of all of the yellow warblers that I have sighted in this
> particular area over so many years, I never would have known who was who or
> how long a bird of this species could possibly live if I wouldn't have
> banded hundreds of yellow warblers only to have one return, survive this
> long, and reveal this to me.
>
> This bird migrated each year to its wintering grounds in Central America
> or northern South America. It traveled at least 2,000 to 2,500 miles each
> way adding up to 40,000 or 50,000 miles of travel between there and Horicon
> Marsh over that period. If this bird or other banded birds were so
> traumatized or encumbered as a result of my attaching a leg band to it, a
> banded bird would never live to 10 years.
>
> I also had a chickadee which I banded at my home. Over its lifetime it
> was recaptured 33 times during a period of 4 years and 3 months - its
> minimum longevity. I am sure that it was agitated with me (or at least my
> banding efforts) and felt "frustrated" by being captured in a mist net so
> many times, but again it never would have made it that long if this was in
> some major way interfering with its survival. Of course, I felt bad for
> its inability to avoid my nets over several years but I doubt it was
> harmed, albeit inconvenienced.
>
> As a result of modern technology and the development of increasingly
> smaller radio tags, geotags, and MOTUS tags we are learning about birds in
> a way that wasn't possible only a decade or so ago. We are now learning
> that birds don't just go south, or fly to the neotropics, but for many
> species distinct populations migrate to different wintering grounds. This
> could never have been discovered without banding and also can be a
> significant driver for conservation.
>
> We are discovering that Wisconsin's wood thrushes appear to migrate to
> southern Mexico and Belize rather than the South Carolina population that
> winters in El Salvador and southern Guatemala; or the Pennsylvania, Ohio,
> southern Ontario population that winters in Nicaragua and Costa Rica. This
> kind of information can only be obtained by tracking a marked bird - one
> that has been captured, tagged, and released back into the wild. If any
> sort of band or tag that we affix to a bird were to interfere with its
> behavior, then the information we would obtain would be biased and rather
> useless.
>
> I have had my federal banding permit since 1982. I have captured and
> tagged (banded or ringed) over 10,000 birds which isn't even that
> considerable compared to other banders who have worked for an equal amount
> of time. I have devoted my life to birds; enjoying birds, and learning
> about birds. I would have given up banding birds a long time ago if I
> thought that I was unduly harming the very subject I love so much. If
> there were nothing more to learn about birds that we can only discover
> through banding, then we certainly would have ceased this a long time ago.
>
> Bill Volkert
> FdL Co.
>
>
>
> On Sat, Mar 13, 2021 at 6:06 PM Hephziabah Beulah <hephziabahb...>
> wrote:
>
>> > You got my blood boiling and my heart pumping and I have been silent too
>> > long. Well said Brian and I am in 100% agreement.
>> >
>> > I've seen bird banding with the River edge group and at the Zoo. I
>> > observed birds trapped in a net trying to free themselves, taken out
>> > carefully, (not always cuz some are trapped into the net deep) placed
>> in a
>> > sack that gets tied at the top and placed off to the side until it's
>> time
>> > for it to go through the testing to which the bird is stuffed into a
>> toliet
>> > paper roll head first and placed on a scale for weight. In the meantime
>> as
>> > the wings are looked at for age, wear and tear, a band is then chosen to
>> > put on it's leg for the rest of it's life. What does the bird do when
>> it is
>> > in the nest with babies, that chunk of metal has got to be
>> uncomfortable.
>> > Plus, now the bird has to adjust it's flying due to the handcuff on it.
>> > Okay, if the bird does not respond to a release from all the trauma it
>> > experienced, there is a box with a warmer inside a glove to which the
>> > bird is placed upon and the box is closed. I have seen both a joyful
>> > release and birds that have perished, sick!!! A Free bird trapped in a
>> net
>> > to put a stupid band on it ruins it's Free Spirit. Has anyone followed
>> it
>> > to see if it continues to sing. In my strong opinion, it is cruel
>> trapping
>> > a free bird into a net and Yes, banding is OVERDONE!!! It needs to
>> stop! I
>> > agree we have enough data, we've done radar chips in the back of birds
>> > (Nexrad) to follow them from here to over the ocean, etc. We learn from
>> > nature and technology is overrated and ruining the earth.
>> >
>> > (I request you do not back channel me about this text because I will
>> > exploit you)
>> >
>> > Hep
>> > Brookfield, WI
>> >
>> > I now know why it came out as gibberish. Thank you.
>> >
>> > -------- Original message --------
>> > From: Brian <courthousehollow...>
>> > Date: 3/12/21 2:41 PM (GMT-06:00)
>> > To:
>> > Cc: wisbirdn <wisbirdn...>
>> > Subject: [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
>> >
>> > Hello everyone,
>> > First off, this is LONG and a bit of a rant, so don���t read this if
>> that
>> > bothers you. Before posting I reread the WisBird rules, and yes, I���d
>> be
>> > ok
>> > with my mother reading this ���� But my ultimate goal is to get people
>> > thinking so that birds can thrive.
>> >
>> > I'm wondering if there's a pink elephant in the room in this
>> conversation?
>> > Are all banding ���studies��� self-justifying? I have a question for the
>> > forum
>> > if people would be so kind. I'm curious if anyone could summarize for me
>> > how most of the bird banding that is done is anything but HARASSMENT to
>> > them? I am honestly sending this out of genuine curiosity, have no
>> > mal-intentions, and am not being derogatory towards anyone's interest in
>> > banding. I really do want to understand.
>> >
>> > I've been birding for 15 years or so now and in my quest to wrap my head
>> > around banding: I have helped with bird banding multiple times over
>> > multiple years for grad students in the UW system and elsewhere, read
>> many,
>> > many articles by professionals, USGS, as well as lay folks perspectives
>> via
>> > articles and on forums, yet I could only come up with 4 examples of how
>> > banding could ACTUALLY benefit birds.
>> >
>> > The 1st, is using banding for translocating, ex. to determine which
>> males
>> > are which in order to move some of the younger ones in the interest of
>> > populating other areas due to habitat loss, etc. The 2nd, involves
>> > endangered species or soon to be endangered, ex. using banding for the
>> > purpose of knowing who���s who, where they go, how many successfully
>> > fledge,
>> > etc. The 3rd, is to assist with game bird hunting regulations. The 4th,
>> is
>> > determining survival rates after oil spills or for toxicology in
>> general.
>> > But
>> > all 4 examples don't seem to justify the majority of banding.
>> >
>> > With the exception of those uses, every example I've ever seen/heard as
>> to
>> > the "benefits" of what we have learned/learn from banding could be
>> > distilled down to "satisfying human curiosity" or worse, giving humans
>> > doing these projects "something fun to do" with a carte blanche
>> > psychological safety net, say, when they stuff a passerine headfirst
>> into a
>> > pill bottle to weigh them, that, "I'm doing this to help birds!" Some
>> > examples of what I've come across of how banding "helps" birds are:
>> > learning that certain birds move here or there in their lifetimes, fly
>> in
>> > one stretch over the gulf, live for X amount of years, territorial
>> > behavior, territory size and fidelity, mate fidelity, reproductive
>> behavior
>> > (which bird builds the nest or feeds the young and how often), etc.
>> Again,
>> > satisfying human curiosity....
>> >
>> > To me, learning that a bird uses this or that summer/winter site, with
>> the
>> > exception of not destroying existing habitats (...but, really, where a
>> few
>> > recaptured birds go isn't much help to the THOUSANDS and THOUSANDS of
>> > others of that species that go elsewhere), is more or less irrelevant to
>> > conservation efforts in 2021. We've known for 60 years minimum that
>> birds
>> > need habitat in general and they generally need most varieties of
>> habitat.
>> > So, in my mind, learning a certain Warbler passing through Wisconsin (or
>> > anywhere) winters in X particular patch of forest in Venezuela is
>> > questionable conservation at best, and most likely, just
>> > harassment/wasteful. Perhaps it could generate local interest during
>> > fundraising, but so could MANY other things. And wouldn't birds be
>> BETTER
>> > served by using those funds for protecting/acquiring as much quality
>> > habitat with as much habitat diversity as possible?
>> >
>> > It appears scientists need to be reminded that in their vigor and
>> eagerness
>> > for "data", publications, career cache, tenure, job security, a raise,
>> etc,
>> > that they might be forgetting to consider just how "essential" an
>> invasive
>> > study (banding) is to the population���s (or individual���s) future
>> > survival,
>> > short and long term. And that needs to be asked for EVERY "study" using
>> > bands/transmitters. The problem is... it appears to rarely be asked.
>> > "Banding is good", is the inculcated mantra....and "the more the
>> better"!
>> >
>> > I can't help but think that most efforts by concerned birders,
>> especially
>> > banding, are beating a dead horse, or worse, diluting resources for
>> > conservation that could be better spent by giving birds a greater
>> chance at
>> > living LIFE. Knowing any of the aforementioned things we learn from
>> banding
>> > (aside from my first 4 examples) seems a stretch that it���s helping
>> birds
>> > any. It's been long established that birds decline without habitat in
>> which
>> > they can thrive, and we know enough (and have known enough for a LONG
>> time)
>> > to assist most of them with that. Banding just seems like a bizarre
>> thing
>> > to do to another creature so we can "learn" about them. An antiquated
>> and
>> > insensitive holdover that appears to be kept around because "it's what
>> we
>> > do". I would guess eBird provides FAR more useful data without harassing
>> > the birds (with the exception of a few knuckleheads ���gathering��� data
>> > for
>> > eBird).
>> >
>> > But what COULD benefit birds, and benefit them in a BIG way, is if
>> everyone
>> > who has ever banded (or many other data collection methods) took ALL the
>> > costs over the years associated with such efforts (gas, equipment, time,
>> > funding/grants, etc, etc) and pooled those resources to buy/restore
>> habitat
>> > globally; critical areas being of 1st concern. Birds, and Nature in
>> > general, would be FAR better off than the "value" of the reams of data
>> that
>> > was/is/will be collected or the costs of the tremendous resources used
>> > worldwide to further such endeavors.
>> >
>> > Essentially, I���m wondering if our efforts are truly making any
>> difference
>> > or if we're just swimming in interesting but ultimately useless data
>> about
>> > birds.
>> >
>> > Any feedback contrary to my view is much appreciated.
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > Thank you!
>> >
>> > Brian Pierce, Green Bay, Brown County
>> >
>> > On Thu, Mar 11, 2021 at 6:30 PM Bill Stout <stoutw...> wrote:
>> >
>> > > Hi Tom,
>> > > I decided to forward my email to you to the entire group because I
>> > believe
>> > > that a good number of people do not understand the perspective of a
>> > > researcher. In fact, some even may be considered hypocritical (e.g.,
>> > > Madison Eagle Nest Watch seems to depend on volunteers to REPORT and
>> > > MONITOR eagle NEST LOCATIONS for them, but they are dead set against
>> > anyone
>> > > reporting nests to anyone else). I have read several other viewpoints
>> > that
>> > > also seem one-sided or perhaps uninformed. It is certainly not my
>> intent
>> > > here to offend anyone; however, I am not so naive as to think that
>> this
>> > > won't happen. Nevertheless, it is not my intent.
>> > >
>> > > Most Sincerely,
>> > > Bill Stout
>> > > Ashippun, USA
>> > >
>> > > My email to Tom on Wednesday in response to his post:
>> > >
>> > > Thanks for your insights, Tom, as I greatly appreciate them. I just
>> > wanted
>> > > you to know that I am very conservative in my work when it comes to
>> > > alerting others of nest sights. I do not list locations such as on
>> eBird
>> > or
>> > > report locations to anyone. However, as an educator, if someone is
>> very
>> > > interested in the birds or if a nest is in the immediate vicinity of
>> > their
>> > > home, I work to provide them with a "one of a kind" educational
>> > experience.
>> > >
>> > > Last year I did not accommodate the general public and followed the
>> North
>> > > American Bird Banding Council recommendations for bird banding in the
>> > time
>> > > of a COVID-19 pandemic (with the exception of one of the fist Great
>> > Horned
>> > > Owl sites as it was before recommendations were out). This year will
>> be
>> > > more complicated as we try to move back to a new normal during this
>> time.
>> > > Nevertheless, I will be very cautious.
>> > >
>> > > Thanks again for your post.
>> > >
>> > > Sincerely,
>> > > Bill Stout
>> > > Ashippun, USA
>> > >
>> > > William E. Stout
>> > >
>> > > ________________________________
>> > > From: Bill Stout <stoutw...>
>> > > Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 12:58 PM
>> > > To: <sykes...> <sykes...>
>> > > Subject: Re: [wisb] Reporting nest sites
>> > >
>> > > Thanks for your insights, Tom, as I greatly appreciate them. I just
>> > wanted
>> > > you to know that I am very conservative in my work when it comes to
>> > > alerting others of nest sights. I do not list locations such as eBird
>> or
>> > > report locations to anyone. However, as an educator, if someone is
>> very
>> > > interested in the birds or if a nest is in the immediate vicinity of
>> > their
>> > > home, I work to provide them with a "one of a kind" educational
>> > experience.
>> > >
>> > > Last year I did not accommodate the general public and followed the
>> North
>> > > American Bird Banding Council recommendations for bird banding in the
>> > time
>> > > of a COVID-19 pandemic (with the exception of one of the fist Great
>> > Horned
>> > > Owl sites as it was before recommendations were out). This year will
>> be
>> > > more complicated as we try to move back to a new normal during this
>> time.
>> > > Nevertheless, I will be very cautious.
>> > >
>> > > Thanks again for your post.
>> > >
>> > > Sincerely,
>> > > Bill Stout
>> > > Ashippun, USA
>> > >
>> > > William E. Stout
>> > >
>> > > ________________________________
>> > > From: <wisbirdn-bounce...> <wisbirdn-bounce...>
>> on
>> > > behalf of Tom Sykes <sykes...>
>> > > Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 10:43 AM
>> > > To: Wisbirdn <wisbirdn...>
>> > > Subject: [wisb] Reporting nest sites
>> > >
>> > > From time to time the issue of reporting bird nests appears on the
>> list.
>> > > And while there is some disagreement about whether or not a nest site
>> is
>> > or
>> > > is not being disturbed by human presence, I would direct you to both
>> the
>> > > ABA Birding Ethics and WSO Birding Ethics sites as a reminder for
>> those
>> > > wondering about the ethics of reporting a nest site. WISBIRDN
>> subscribes
>> > to
>> > > following both.
>> > >
>> > > https://wsobirds.org/about-wso/code-of-ethics
>> > >
>> > > https://www.aba.org/aba-code-of-birding-ethics/
>> > >
>> > > It is true that many reports of nesting raptors appear on eBird as
>> well
>> > as
>> > > many other listservs and Facebook pages. Citizen Science is a great
>> tool
>> > > but it is also used by a few unethical people. People who don���t care
>> > about
>> > > disturbing birds in order to get ���the perfect shot���, or, people
>> who
>> > would
>> > > traffic in birds. Even curious onlookers. Fortunately, these people
>> are
>> > in
>> > > a minority. But they are out there.
>> > >
>> > > It���s also one thing for one or two people to observe a nest but
>> > consider a
>> > > report in an urban area when many people arrive at the same time - as
>> > with
>> > > the eagle nest recently reported in Walworth city. Birds may be
>> > > intimidated. Or not. The problem is, it���s usually too late to
>> reverse
>> > the
>> > > damage when it���s found to be they are disturbed.
>> > >
>> > > Some years ago an eagle nest was reported in Horicon Marsh. Fish and
>> > > Wildlife staff closed off the immediate area although the nest could
>> be
>> > > observed at some distance. The eagles were successful. There have been
>> > > eagle nests up and down the Fox River near Appleton easily seen by
>> anyone
>> > > who wishes to observe at a safe distance. The same with many lakes in
>> the
>> > > northern part of the state.
>> > >
>> > > I happened to volunteer at a wildlife refuge in Florida for five
>> months
>> > > where a Bald Eagle had set up a nest and produced young. Although the
>> > nest
>> > > was quite high, we roped off the area to prevent disturbing the nest
>> > site.
>> > > These birds were quite skittish whenever anyone approached the base of
>> > the
>> > > tree. A local member of the Audubon Society objected claiming the
>> birds
>> > > were not at all disturbed and was subsequently banned from the refuge
>> > when
>> > > he ignored the roped off area and had gone so far as to fly a drone
>> > toward
>> > > the nest to get video. And this was the local president of an Audubon
>> > > chapter!
>> > >
>> > > It all boils down to using common sense and taking into consideration
>> the
>> > > particular situation. Just because one raptor nest doesn���t appear
>> to be
>> > > troubled by human activity, doesn���t necessarily apply to another
>> raptor
>> > > nest. Great care should be taken when reporting a sighting. If in
>> doubt,
>> > > don���t report.
>> > >
>> > > Tom Sykes
>> > > Wisbirdn List Owner
>> > > <sykes...>
>> > >
>> > >
>> > >
>> > >
>> > > ####################
>> > > You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
>> > > Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
>> > > To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
>> > > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
>> > > To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
>> > > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
>> > > Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/
>> archives/wisbirdn
>> > >
>> > >
>> > >
>> > > ####################
>> > > You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
>> > > Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
>> > > To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
>> > > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
>> > > To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
>> > > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
>> > > Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/
>> archives/wisbirdn
>> > >
>> > >
>> > >
>> >
>> > ####################
>> > You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
>> > Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
>> > To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
>> > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
>> > To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
>> > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
>> > Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> ####################
>> You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
>> Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
>> To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
>> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
>> To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
>> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
>> Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn
>>
>>
>>
>
> --
> Bill Volkert
> Naturalist
> www.billvolkert.com
>

####################
You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at: http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at: http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
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Back to top
Date: 3/13/21 6:23 pm
From: Bill Volkert <billvolkert11...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
Hep:
I realize that watching a bird banding operation can seem stressful to some
of us, but as in medicine we attempt to do no harm. It is our concern for
birds that drives our need to learn more about them. Watching and
listening to birds still remains one of the best methods we have to
understand their occurrence, distribution and relative abundance, but it
also has its limitations. There are many things about birds that we simply
cannot learn without capturing and marking individuals so that we can
identify them and follow them to some varying degree. Through the art of
bird banding we have learned and continue to learn about birds in a way
that would never be possible if we didn't undertake this. Since the
welfare and care of all captured birds is a top priority this is the very
reason why it is so difficult to obtain a federal bird banding permit. For
me, bird banding has been one of many avenues I have relied upon to learn
about birds and it has taught me things I could not have learned otherwise.

In the spring of 1988 I captured a female yellow warbler at my banding site
at Horicon Marsh that I used for over 25 years. In May of 1997 I
recaptured the same bird at the same clump of bushes. She was obviously an
adult when I first caught her, as it was prior to that year's breeding
season. This meant that this bird was at least 10 years old when I
recaptured her! Of all of the yellow warblers that I have sighted in this
particular area over so many years, I never would have known who was who or
how long a bird of this species could possibly live if I wouldn't have
banded hundreds of yellow warblers only to have one return, survive this
long, and reveal this to me.

This bird migrated each year to its wintering grounds in Central America or
northern South America. It traveled at least 2,000 to 2,500 miles each way
adding up to 40,000 or 50,000 miles of travel between there and Horicon
Marsh over that period. If this bird or other banded birds were so
traumatized or encumbered as a result of my attaching a leg band to it, a
banded bird would never live to 10 years.

I also had a chickadee which I banded at my home. Over its lifetime it was
recaptured 33 times during a period of 4 years and 3 months - its minimum
longevity. I am sure that it was agitated with me (or at least my banding
efforts) and felt "frustrated" by being captured in a mist net so
many times, but again it never would have made it that long if this was in
some major way interfering with its survival. Of course, I felt bad for
its inability to avoid my nets over several years but I doubt it was
harmed, albeit inconvenienced.

As a result of modern technology and the development of increasingly
smaller radio tags, geotags, and MOTUS tags we are learning about birds in
a way that wasn't possible only a decade or so ago. We are now learning
that birds don't just go south, or fly to the neotropics, but for many
species distinct populations migrate to different wintering grounds. This
could never have been discovered without banding and also can be a
significant driver for conservation.

We are discovering that Wisconsin's wood thrushes appear to migrate to
southern Mexico and Belize rather than the South Carolina population that
winters in El Salvador and southern Guatemala; or the Pennsylvania, Ohio,
southern Ontario population that winters in Nicaragua and Costa Rica. This
kind of information can only be obtained by tracking a marked bird - one
that has been captured, tagged, and released back into the wild. If any
sort of band or tag that we affix to a bird were to interfere with its
behavior, then the information we would obtain would be biased and rather
useless.

I have had my federal banding permit since 1982. I have captured and
tagged (banded or ringed) over 10,000 birds which isn't even that
considerable compared to other banders who have worked for an equal amount
of time. I have devoted my life to birds; enjoying birds, and learning
about birds. I would have given up banding birds a long time ago if I
thought that I was unduly harming the very subject I love so much. If
there were nothing more to learn about birds that we can only discover
through banding, then we certainly would have ceased this a long time ago.

Bill Volkert
FdL Co.



On Sat, Mar 13, 2021 at 6:06 PM Hephziabah Beulah <hephziabahb...>
wrote:

> > You got my blood boiling and my heart pumping and I have been silent too
> > long. Well said Brian and I am in 100% agreement.
> >
> > I've seen bird banding with the River edge group and at the Zoo. I
> > observed birds trapped in a net trying to free themselves, taken out
> > carefully, (not always cuz some are trapped into the net deep) placed in
> a
> > sack that gets tied at the top and placed off to the side until it's time
> > for it to go through the testing to which the bird is stuffed into a
> toliet
> > paper roll head first and placed on a scale for weight. In the meantime
> as
> > the wings are looked at for age, wear and tear, a band is then chosen to
> > put on it's leg for the rest of it's life. What does the bird do when it
> is
> > in the nest with babies, that chunk of metal has got to be uncomfortable.
> > Plus, now the bird has to adjust it's flying due to the handcuff on it.
> > Okay, if the bird does not respond to a release from all the trauma it
> > experienced, there is a box with a warmer inside a glove to which the
> > bird is placed upon and the box is closed. I have seen both a joyful
> > release and birds that have perished, sick!!! A Free bird trapped in a
> net
> > to put a stupid band on it ruins it's Free Spirit. Has anyone followed it
> > to see if it continues to sing. In my strong opinion, it is cruel
> trapping
> > a free bird into a net and Yes, banding is OVERDONE!!! It needs to stop!
> I
> > agree we have enough data, we've done radar chips in the back of birds
> > (Nexrad) to follow them from here to over the ocean, etc. We learn from
> > nature and technology is overrated and ruining the earth.
> >
> > (I request you do not back channel me about this text because I will
> > exploit you)
> >
> > Hep
> > Brookfield, WI
> >
> > I now know why it came out as gibberish. Thank you.
> >
> > -------- Original message --------
> > From: Brian <courthousehollow...>
> > Date: 3/12/21 2:41 PM (GMT-06:00)
> > To:
> > Cc: wisbirdn <wisbirdn...>
> > Subject: [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
> >
> > Hello everyone,
> > First off, this is LONG and a bit of a rant, so don���t read this if that
> > bothers you. Before posting I reread the WisBird rules, and yes, I���d be
> > ok
> > with my mother reading this ���� But my ultimate goal is to get people
> > thinking so that birds can thrive.
> >
> > I'm wondering if there's a pink elephant in the room in this
> conversation?
> > Are all banding ���studies��� self-justifying? I have a question for the
> > forum
> > if people would be so kind. I'm curious if anyone could summarize for me
> > how most of the bird banding that is done is anything but HARASSMENT to
> > them? I am honestly sending this out of genuine curiosity, have no
> > mal-intentions, and am not being derogatory towards anyone's interest in
> > banding. I really do want to understand.
> >
> > I've been birding for 15 years or so now and in my quest to wrap my head
> > around banding: I have helped with bird banding multiple times over
> > multiple years for grad students in the UW system and elsewhere, read
> many,
> > many articles by professionals, USGS, as well as lay folks perspectives
> via
> > articles and on forums, yet I could only come up with 4 examples of how
> > banding could ACTUALLY benefit birds.
> >
> > The 1st, is using banding for translocating, ex. to determine which males
> > are which in order to move some of the younger ones in the interest of
> > populating other areas due to habitat loss, etc. The 2nd, involves
> > endangered species or soon to be endangered, ex. using banding for the
> > purpose of knowing who���s who, where they go, how many successfully
> > fledge,
> > etc. The 3rd, is to assist with game bird hunting regulations. The 4th,
> is
> > determining survival rates after oil spills or for toxicology in general.
> > But
> > all 4 examples don't seem to justify the majority of banding.
> >
> > With the exception of those uses, every example I've ever seen/heard as
> to
> > the "benefits" of what we have learned/learn from banding could be
> > distilled down to "satisfying human curiosity" or worse, giving humans
> > doing these projects "something fun to do" with a carte blanche
> > psychological safety net, say, when they stuff a passerine headfirst
> into a
> > pill bottle to weigh them, that, "I'm doing this to help birds!" Some
> > examples of what I've come across of how banding "helps" birds are:
> > learning that certain birds move here or there in their lifetimes, fly in
> > one stretch over the gulf, live for X amount of years, territorial
> > behavior, territory size and fidelity, mate fidelity, reproductive
> behavior
> > (which bird builds the nest or feeds the young and how often), etc.
> Again,
> > satisfying human curiosity....
> >
> > To me, learning that a bird uses this or that summer/winter site, with
> the
> > exception of not destroying existing habitats (...but, really, where a
> few
> > recaptured birds go isn't much help to the THOUSANDS and THOUSANDS of
> > others of that species that go elsewhere), is more or less irrelevant to
> > conservation efforts in 2021. We've known for 60 years minimum that birds
> > need habitat in general and they generally need most varieties of
> habitat.
> > So, in my mind, learning a certain Warbler passing through Wisconsin (or
> > anywhere) winters in X particular patch of forest in Venezuela is
> > questionable conservation at best, and most likely, just
> > harassment/wasteful. Perhaps it could generate local interest during
> > fundraising, but so could MANY other things. And wouldn't birds be BETTER
> > served by using those funds for protecting/acquiring as much quality
> > habitat with as much habitat diversity as possible?
> >
> > It appears scientists need to be reminded that in their vigor and
> eagerness
> > for "data", publications, career cache, tenure, job security, a raise,
> etc,
> > that they might be forgetting to consider just how "essential" an
> invasive
> > study (banding) is to the population���s (or individual���s) future
> > survival,
> > short and long term. And that needs to be asked for EVERY "study" using
> > bands/transmitters. The problem is... it appears to rarely be asked.
> > "Banding is good", is the inculcated mantra....and "the more the better"!
> >
> > I can't help but think that most efforts by concerned birders, especially
> > banding, are beating a dead horse, or worse, diluting resources for
> > conservation that could be better spent by giving birds a greater chance
> at
> > living LIFE. Knowing any of the aforementioned things we learn from
> banding
> > (aside from my first 4 examples) seems a stretch that it���s helping
> birds
> > any. It's been long established that birds decline without habitat in
> which
> > they can thrive, and we know enough (and have known enough for a LONG
> time)
> > to assist most of them with that. Banding just seems like a bizarre thing
> > to do to another creature so we can "learn" about them. An antiquated and
> > insensitive holdover that appears to be kept around because "it's what we
> > do". I would guess eBird provides FAR more useful data without harassing
> > the birds (with the exception of a few knuckleheads ���gathering��� data
> > for
> > eBird).
> >
> > But what COULD benefit birds, and benefit them in a BIG way, is if
> everyone
> > who has ever banded (or many other data collection methods) took ALL the
> > costs over the years associated with such efforts (gas, equipment, time,
> > funding/grants, etc, etc) and pooled those resources to buy/restore
> habitat
> > globally; critical areas being of 1st concern. Birds, and Nature in
> > general, would be FAR better off than the "value" of the reams of data
> that
> > was/is/will be collected or the costs of the tremendous resources used
> > worldwide to further such endeavors.
> >
> > Essentially, I���m wondering if our efforts are truly making any
> difference
> > or if we're just swimming in interesting but ultimately useless data
> about
> > birds.
> >
> > Any feedback contrary to my view is much appreciated.
> >
> >
> >
> > Thank you!
> >
> > Brian Pierce, Green Bay, Brown County
> >
> > On Thu, Mar 11, 2021 at 6:30 PM Bill Stout <stoutw...> wrote:
> >
> > > Hi Tom,
> > > I decided to forward my email to you to the entire group because I
> > believe
> > > that a good number of people do not understand the perspective of a
> > > researcher. In fact, some even may be considered hypocritical (e.g.,
> > > Madison Eagle Nest Watch seems to depend on volunteers to REPORT and
> > > MONITOR eagle NEST LOCATIONS for them, but they are dead set against
> > anyone
> > > reporting nests to anyone else). I have read several other viewpoints
> > that
> > > also seem one-sided or perhaps uninformed. It is certainly not my
> intent
> > > here to offend anyone; however, I am not so naive as to think that this
> > > won't happen. Nevertheless, it is not my intent.
> > >
> > > Most Sincerely,
> > > Bill Stout
> > > Ashippun, USA
> > >
> > > My email to Tom on Wednesday in response to his post:
> > >
> > > Thanks for your insights, Tom, as I greatly appreciate them. I just
> > wanted
> > > you to know that I am very conservative in my work when it comes to
> > > alerting others of nest sights. I do not list locations such as on
> eBird
> > or
> > > report locations to anyone. However, as an educator, if someone is very
> > > interested in the birds or if a nest is in the immediate vicinity of
> > their
> > > home, I work to provide them with a "one of a kind" educational
> > experience.
> > >
> > > Last year I did not accommodate the general public and followed the
> North
> > > American Bird Banding Council recommendations for bird banding in the
> > time
> > > of a COVID-19 pandemic (with the exception of one of the fist Great
> > Horned
> > > Owl sites as it was before recommendations were out). This year will be
> > > more complicated as we try to move back to a new normal during this
> time.
> > > Nevertheless, I will be very cautious.
> > >
> > > Thanks again for your post.
> > >
> > > Sincerely,
> > > Bill Stout
> > > Ashippun, USA
> > >
> > > William E. Stout
> > >
> > > ________________________________
> > > From: Bill Stout <stoutw...>
> > > Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 12:58 PM
> > > To: <sykes...> <sykes...>
> > > Subject: Re: [wisb] Reporting nest sites
> > >
> > > Thanks for your insights, Tom, as I greatly appreciate them. I just
> > wanted
> > > you to know that I am very conservative in my work when it comes to
> > > alerting others of nest sights. I do not list locations such as eBird
> or
> > > report locations to anyone. However, as an educator, if someone is very
> > > interested in the birds or if a nest is in the immediate vicinity of
> > their
> > > home, I work to provide them with a "one of a kind" educational
> > experience.
> > >
> > > Last year I did not accommodate the general public and followed the
> North
> > > American Bird Banding Council recommendations for bird banding in the
> > time
> > > of a COVID-19 pandemic (with the exception of one of the fist Great
> > Horned
> > > Owl sites as it was before recommendations were out). This year will be
> > > more complicated as we try to move back to a new normal during this
> time.
> > > Nevertheless, I will be very cautious.
> > >
> > > Thanks again for your post.
> > >
> > > Sincerely,
> > > Bill Stout
> > > Ashippun, USA
> > >
> > > William E. Stout
> > >
> > > ________________________________
> > > From: <wisbirdn-bounce...> <wisbirdn-bounce...> on
> > > behalf of Tom Sykes <sykes...>
> > > Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 10:43 AM
> > > To: Wisbirdn <wisbirdn...>
> > > Subject: [wisb] Reporting nest sites
> > >
> > > From time to time the issue of reporting bird nests appears on the
> list.
> > > And while there is some disagreement about whether or not a nest site
> is
> > or
> > > is not being disturbed by human presence, I would direct you to both
> the
> > > ABA Birding Ethics and WSO Birding Ethics sites as a reminder for those
> > > wondering about the ethics of reporting a nest site. WISBIRDN
> subscribes
> > to
> > > following both.
> > >
> > > https://wsobirds.org/about-wso/code-of-ethics
> > >
> > > https://www.aba.org/aba-code-of-birding-ethics/
> > >
> > > It is true that many reports of nesting raptors appear on eBird as well
> > as
> > > many other listservs and Facebook pages. Citizen Science is a great
> tool
> > > but it is also used by a few unethical people. People who don���t care
> > about
> > > disturbing birds in order to get ���the perfect shot���, or, people who
> > would
> > > traffic in birds. Even curious onlookers. Fortunately, these people are
> > in
> > > a minority. But they are out there.
> > >
> > > It���s also one thing for one or two people to observe a nest but
> > consider a
> > > report in an urban area when many people arrive at the same time - as
> > with
> > > the eagle nest recently reported in Walworth city. Birds may be
> > > intimidated. Or not. The problem is, it���s usually too late to reverse
> > the
> > > damage when it���s found to be they are disturbed.
> > >
> > > Some years ago an eagle nest was reported in Horicon Marsh. Fish and
> > > Wildlife staff closed off the immediate area although the nest could be
> > > observed at some distance. The eagles were successful. There have been
> > > eagle nests up and down the Fox River near Appleton easily seen by
> anyone
> > > who wishes to observe at a safe distance. The same with many lakes in
> the
> > > northern part of the state.
> > >
> > > I happened to volunteer at a wildlife refuge in Florida for five months
> > > where a Bald Eagle had set up a nest and produced young. Although the
> > nest
> > > was quite high, we roped off the area to prevent disturbing the nest
> > site.
> > > These birds were quite skittish whenever anyone approached the base of
> > the
> > > tree. A local member of the Audubon Society objected claiming the birds
> > > were not at all disturbed and was subsequently banned from the refuge
> > when
> > > he ignored the roped off area and had gone so far as to fly a drone
> > toward
> > > the nest to get video. And this was the local president of an Audubon
> > > chapter!
> > >
> > > It all boils down to using common sense and taking into consideration
> the
> > > particular situation. Just because one raptor nest doesn���t appear to
> be
> > > troubled by human activity, doesn���t necessarily apply to another
> raptor
> > > nest. Great care should be taken when reporting a sighting. If in
> doubt,
> > > don���t report.
> > >
> > > Tom Sykes
> > > Wisbirdn List Owner
> > > <sykes...>
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > ####################
> > > You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
> > > Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
> > > To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> > > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> > > To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> > > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> > > Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > ####################
> > > You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
> > > Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
> > > To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> > > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> > > To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> > > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> > > Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn
> > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> > ####################
> > You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
> > Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
> > To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> > To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> > Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn
> >
> >
> >
> ####################
> You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
> Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
> To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
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>
>
>

--
Bill Volkert
Naturalist
www.billvolkert.com

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Back to top
Date: 3/13/21 6:09 pm
From: Chuck Stebelton <cstebelton...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: UNSUBSCRIBE
On Sat, Mar 13, 2021 at 6:06 PM Hephziabah Beulah <hephziabahb...>
wrote:
> > You got my blood boiling and my heart pumping and I have been silent too
> > long. Well said Brian and I am in 100% agreement.
> >
> > I've seen bird banding with the River edge group and at the Zoo. I
> > observed birds trapped in a net trying to free themselves, taken out
> > carefully, (not always cuz some are trapped into the net deep) placed in
> a
> > sack that gets tied at the top and placed off to the side until it's time
> > for it to go through the testing to which the bird is stuffed into a
> toliet
> > paper roll head first and placed on a scale for weight. In the meantime
> as
> > the wings are looked at for age, wear and tear, a band is then chosen to
> > put on it's leg for the rest of it's life. What does the bird do when it
> is
> > in the nest with babies, that chunk of metal has got to be uncomfortable.
> > Plus, now the bird has to adjust it's flying due to the handcuff on it.
> > Okay, if the bird does not respond to a release from all the trauma it
> > experienced, there is a box with a warmer inside a glove to which the
> > bird is placed upon and the box is closed. I have seen both a joyful
> > release and birds that have perished, sick!!! A Free bird trapped in a
> net
> > to put a stupid band on it ruins it's Free Spirit. Has anyone followed it
> > to see if it continues to sing. In my strong opinion, it is cruel
> trapping
> > a free bird into a net and Yes, banding is OVERDONE!!! It needs to stop!
> I
> > agree we have enough data, we've done radar chips in the back of birds
> > (Nexrad) to follow them from here to over the ocean, etc. We learn from
> > nature and technology is overrated and ruining the earth.
> >
> > (I request you do not back channel me about this text because I will
> > exploit you)
> >
> > Hep
> > Brookfield, WI
> >
> > I now know why it came out as gibberish. Thank you.
> >
> > -------- Original message --------
> > From: Brian <courthousehollow...>
> > Date: 3/12/21 2:41 PM (GMT-06:00)
> > To:
> > Cc: wisbirdn <wisbirdn...>
> > Subject: [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
> >
> > Hello everyone,
> > First off, this is LONG and a bit of a rant, so don���t read this if that
> > bothers you. Before posting I reread the WisBird rules, and yes, I���d be
> > ok
> > with my mother reading this ���� But my ultimate goal is to get people
> > thinking so that birds can thrive.
> >
> > I'm wondering if there's a pink elephant in the room in this
> conversation?
> > Are all banding ���studies��� self-justifying? I have a question for the
> > forum
> > if people would be so kind. I'm curious if anyone could summarize for me
> > how most of the bird banding that is done is anything but HARASSMENT to
> > them? I am honestly sending this out of genuine curiosity, have no
> > mal-intentions, and am not being derogatory towards anyone's interest in
> > banding. I really do want to understand.
> >
> > I've been birding for 15 years or so now and in my quest to wrap my head
> > around banding: I have helped with bird banding multiple times over
> > multiple years for grad students in the UW system and elsewhere, read
> many,
> > many articles by professionals, USGS, as well as lay folks perspectives
> via
> > articles and on forums, yet I could only come up with 4 examples of how
> > banding could ACTUALLY benefit birds.
> >
> > The 1st, is using banding for translocating, ex. to determine which males
> > are which in order to move some of the younger ones in the interest of
> > populating other areas due to habitat loss, etc. The 2nd, involves
> > endangered species or soon to be endangered, ex. using banding for the
> > purpose of knowing who���s who, where they go, how many successfully
> > fledge,
> > etc. The 3rd, is to assist with game bird hunting regulations. The 4th,
> is
> > determining survival rates after oil spills or for toxicology in general.
> > But
> > all 4 examples don't seem to justify the majority of banding.
> >
> > With the exception of those uses, every example I've ever seen/heard as
> to
> > the "benefits" of what we have learned/learn from banding could be
> > distilled down to "satisfying human curiosity" or worse, giving humans
> > doing these projects "something fun to do" with a carte blanche
> > psychological safety net, say, when they stuff a passerine headfirst
> into a
> > pill bottle to weigh them, that, "I'm doing this to help birds!" Some
> > examples of what I've come across of how banding "helps" birds are:
> > learning that certain birds move here or there in their lifetimes, fly in
> > one stretch over the gulf, live for X amount of years, territorial
> > behavior, territory size and fidelity, mate fidelity, reproductive
> behavior
> > (which bird builds the nest or feeds the young and how often), etc.
> Again,
> > satisfying human curiosity....
> >
> > To me, learning that a bird uses this or that summer/winter site, with
> the
> > exception of not destroying existing habitats (...but, really, where a
> few
> > recaptured birds go isn't much help to the THOUSANDS and THOUSANDS of
> > others of that species that go elsewhere), is more or less irrelevant to
> > conservation efforts in 2021. We've known for 60 years minimum that birds
> > need habitat in general and they generally need most varieties of
> habitat.
> > So, in my mind, learning a certain Warbler passing through Wisconsin (or
> > anywhere) winters in X particular patch of forest in Venezuela is
> > questionable conservation at best, and most likely, just
> > harassment/wasteful. Perhaps it could generate local interest during
> > fundraising, but so could MANY other things. And wouldn't birds be BETTER
> > served by using those funds for protecting/acquiring as much quality
> > habitat with as much habitat diversity as possible?
> >
> > It appears scientists need to be reminded that in their vigor and
> eagerness
> > for "data", publications, career cache, tenure, job security, a raise,
> etc,
> > that they might be forgetting to consider just how "essential" an
> invasive
> > study (banding) is to the population���s (or individual���s) future
> > survival,
> > short and long term. And that needs to be asked for EVERY "study" using
> > bands/transmitters. The problem is... it appears to rarely be asked.
> > "Banding is good", is the inculcated mantra....and "the more the better"!
> >
> > I can't help but think that most efforts by concerned birders, especially
> > banding, are beating a dead horse, or worse, diluting resources for
> > conservation that could be better spent by giving birds a greater chance
> at
> > living LIFE. Knowing any of the aforementioned things we learn from
> banding
> > (aside from my first 4 examples) seems a stretch that it���s helping
> birds
> > any. It's been long established that birds decline without habitat in
> which
> > they can thrive, and we know enough (and have known enough for a LONG
> time)
> > to assist most of them with that. Banding just seems like a bizarre thing
> > to do to another creature so we can "learn" about them. An antiquated and
> > insensitive holdover that appears to be kept around because "it's what we
> > do". I would guess eBird provides FAR more useful data without harassing
> > the birds (with the exception of a few knuckleheads ���gathering��� data
> > for
> > eBird).
> >
> > But what COULD benefit birds, and benefit them in a BIG way, is if
> everyone
> > who has ever banded (or many other data collection methods) took ALL the
> > costs over the years associated with such efforts (gas, equipment, time,
> > funding/grants, etc, etc) and pooled those resources to buy/restore
> habitat
> > globally; critical areas being of 1st concern. Birds, and Nature in
> > general, would be FAR better off than the "value" of the reams of data
> that
> > was/is/will be collected or the costs of the tremendous resources used
> > worldwide to further such endeavors.
> >
> > Essentially, I���m wondering if our efforts are truly making any
> difference
> > or if we're just swimming in interesting but ultimately useless data
> about
> > birds.
> >
> > Any feedback contrary to my view is much appreciated.
> >
> >
> >
> > Thank you!
> >
> > Brian Pierce, Green Bay, Brown County
> >
> > On Thu, Mar 11, 2021 at 6:30 PM Bill Stout <stoutw...> wrote:
> >
> > > Hi Tom,
> > > I decided to forward my email to you to the entire group because I
> > believe
> > > that a good number of people do not understand the perspective of a
> > > researcher. In fact, some even may be considered hypocritical (e.g.,
> > > Madison Eagle Nest Watch seems to depend on volunteers to REPORT and
> > > MONITOR eagle NEST LOCATIONS for them, but they are dead set against
> > anyone
> > > reporting nests to anyone else). I have read several other viewpoints
> > that
> > > also seem one-sided or perhaps uninformed. It is certainly not my
> intent
> > > here to offend anyone; however, I am not so naive as to think that this
> > > won't happen. Nevertheless, it is not my intent.
> > >
> > > Most Sincerely,
> > > Bill Stout
> > > Ashippun, USA
> > >
> > > My email to Tom on Wednesday in response to his post:
> > >
> > > Thanks for your insights, Tom, as I greatly appreciate them. I just
> > wanted
> > > you to know that I am very conservative in my work when it comes to
> > > alerting others of nest sights. I do not list locations such as on
> eBird
> > or
> > > report locations to anyone. However, as an educator, if someone is very
> > > interested in the birds or if a nest is in the immediate vicinity of
> > their
> > > home, I work to provide them with a "one of a kind" educational
> > experience.
> > >
> > > Last year I did not accommodate the general public and followed the
> North
> > > American Bird Banding Council recommendations for bird banding in the
> > time
> > > of a COVID-19 pandemic (with the exception of one of the fist Great
> > Horned
> > > Owl sites as it was before recommendations were out). This year will be
> > > more complicated as we try to move back to a new normal during this
> time.
> > > Nevertheless, I will be very cautious.
> > >
> > > Thanks again for your post.
> > >
> > > Sincerely,
> > > Bill Stout
> > > Ashippun, USA
> > >
> > > William E. Stout
> > >
> > > ________________________________
> > > From: Bill Stout <stoutw...>
> > > Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 12:58 PM
> > > To: <sykes...> <sykes...>
> > > Subject: Re: [wisb] Reporting nest sites
> > >
> > > Thanks for your insights, Tom, as I greatly appreciate them. I just
> > wanted
> > > you to know that I am very conservative in my work when it comes to
> > > alerting others of nest sights. I do not list locations such as eBird
> or
> > > report locations to anyone. However, as an educator, if someone is very
> > > interested in the birds or if a nest is in the immediate vicinity of
> > their
> > > home, I work to provide them with a "one of a kind" educational
> > experience.
> > >
> > > Last year I did not accommodate the general public and followed the
> North
> > > American Bird Banding Council recommendations for bird banding in the
> > time
> > > of a COVID-19 pandemic (with the exception of one of the fist Great
> > Horned
> > > Owl sites as it was before recommendations were out). This year will be
> > > more complicated as we try to move back to a new normal during this
> time.
> > > Nevertheless, I will be very cautious.
> > >
> > > Thanks again for your post.
> > >
> > > Sincerely,
> > > Bill Stout
> > > Ashippun, USA
> > >
> > > William E. Stout
> > >
> > > ________________________________
> > > From: <wisbirdn-bounce...> <wisbirdn-bounce...> on
> > > behalf of Tom Sykes <sykes...>
> > > Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 10:43 AM
> > > To: Wisbirdn <wisbirdn...>
> > > Subject: [wisb] Reporting nest sites
> > >
> > > From time to time the issue of reporting bird nests appears on the
> list.
> > > And while there is some disagreement about whether or not a nest site
> is
> > or
> > > is not being disturbed by human presence, I would direct you to both
> the
> > > ABA Birding Ethics and WSO Birding Ethics sites as a reminder for those
> > > wondering about the ethics of reporting a nest site. WISBIRDN
> subscribes
> > to
> > > following both.
> > >
> > > https://wsobirds.org/about-wso/code-of-ethics
> > >
> > > https://www.aba.org/aba-code-of-birding-ethics/
> > >
> > > It is true that many reports of nesting raptors appear on eBird as well
> > as
> > > many other listservs and Facebook pages. Citizen Science is a great
> tool
> > > but it is also used by a few unethical people. People who don���t care
> > about
> > > disturbing birds in order to get ���the perfect shot���, or, people who
> > would
> > > traffic in birds. Even curious onlookers. Fortunately, these people are
> > in
> > > a minority. But they are out there.
> > >
> > > It���s also one thing for one or two people to observe a nest but
> > consider a
> > > report in an urban area when many people arrive at the same time - as
> > with
> > > the eagle nest recently reported in Walworth city. Birds may be
> > > intimidated. Or not. The problem is, it���s usually too late to reverse
> > the
> > > damage when it���s found to be they are disturbed.
> > >
> > > Some years ago an eagle nest was reported in Horicon Marsh. Fish and
> > > Wildlife staff closed off the immediate area although the nest could be
> > > observed at some distance. The eagles were successful. There have been
> > > eagle nests up and down the Fox River near Appleton easily seen by
> anyone
> > > who wishes to observe at a safe distance. The same with many lakes in
> the
> > > northern part of the state.
> > >
> > > I happened to volunteer at a wildlife refuge in Florida for five months
> > > where a Bald Eagle had set up a nest and produced young. Although the
> > nest
> > > was quite high, we roped off the area to prevent disturbing the nest
> > site.
> > > These birds were quite skittish whenever anyone approached the base of
> > the
> > > tree. A local member of the Audubon Society objected claiming the birds
> > > were not at all disturbed and was subsequently banned from the refuge
> > when
> > > he ignored the roped off area and had gone so far as to fly a drone
> > toward
> > > the nest to get video. And this was the local president of an Audubon
> > > chapter!
> > >
> > > It all boils down to using common sense and taking into consideration
> the
> > > particular situation. Just because one raptor nest doesn���t appear to
> be
> > > troubled by human activity, doesn���t necessarily apply to another
> raptor
> > > nest. Great care should be taken when reporting a sighting. If in
> doubt,
> > > don���t report.
> > >
> > > Tom Sykes
> > > Wisbirdn List Owner
> > > <sykes...>
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > ####################
> > > You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
> > > Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
> > > To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> > > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> > > To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> > > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> > > Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > ####################
> > > You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
> > > Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
> > > To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> > > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> > > To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> > > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> > > Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn
> > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> > ####################
> > You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
> > Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
> > To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> > To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> > Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn
> >
> >
> >
> ####################
> You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
> Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
> To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
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>
>
>

####################
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To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at: http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at: http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn


 

Back to top
Date: 3/13/21 5:28 pm
From: Scott Pudwell <pudwellphoto...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
Wasn’t this email distribution list to report unique bird sightings? This is no better than the Facebook group ramblings and arguments now. Let’s get back to reporting what we see. The majority of the group is getting fed up with the back and forth. Everyone has made their points. Enough please.
Thanks,
Scott



Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 13, 2021, at 6:06 PM, Hephziabah Beulah <hephziabahb...> wrote:
>
> 
>>
>> You got my blood boiling and my heart pumping and I have been silent too
>> long. Well said Brian and I am in 100% agreement.
>>
>> I've seen bird banding with the River edge group and at the Zoo. I
>> observed birds trapped in a net trying to free themselves, taken out
>> carefully, (not always cuz some are trapped into the net deep) placed in a
>> sack that gets tied at the top and placed off to the side until it's time
>> for it to go through the testing to which the bird is stuffed into a toliet
>> paper roll head first and placed on a scale for weight. In the meantime as
>> the wings are looked at for age, wear and tear, a band is then chosen to
>> put on it's leg for the rest of it's life. What does the bird do when it is
>> in the nest with babies, that chunk of metal has got to be uncomfortable.
>> Plus, now the bird has to adjust it's flying due to the handcuff on it.
>> Okay, if the bird does not respond to a release from all the trauma it
>> experienced, there is a box with a warmer inside a glove to which the
>> bird is placed upon and the box is closed. I have seen both a joyful
>> release and birds that have perished, sick!!! A Free bird trapped in a net
>> to put a stupid band on it ruins it's Free Spirit. Has anyone followed it
>> to see if it continues to sing. In my strong opinion, it is cruel trapping
>> a free bird into a net and Yes, banding is OVERDONE!!! It needs to stop! I
>> agree we have enough data, we've done radar chips in the back of birds
>> (Nexrad) to follow them from here to over the ocean, etc. We learn from
>> nature and technology is overrated and ruining the earth.
>>
>> (I request you do not back channel me about this text because I will
>> exploit you)
>>
>> Hep
>> Brookfield, WI
>>
>> I now know why it came out as gibberish. Thank you.
>>
>> -------- Original message --------
>> From: Brian <courthousehollow...>
>> Date: 3/12/21 2:41 PM (GMT-06:00)
>> To:
>> Cc: wisbirdn <wisbirdn...>
>> Subject: [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
>>
>> Hello everyone,
>> First off, this is LONG and a bit of a rant, so don���t read this if that
>> bothers you. Before posting I reread the WisBird rules, and yes, I���d be
>> ok
>> with my mother reading this ���� But my ultimate goal is to get people
>> thinking so that birds can thrive.
>>
>> I'm wondering if there's a pink elephant in the room in this conversation?
>> Are all banding ���studies��� self-justifying? I have a question for the
>> forum
>> if people would be so kind. I'm curious if anyone could summarize for me
>> how most of the bird banding that is done is anything but HARASSMENT to
>> them? I am honestly sending this out of genuine curiosity, have no
>> mal-intentions, and am not being derogatory towards anyone's interest in
>> banding. I really do want to understand.
>>
>> I've been birding for 15 years or so now and in my quest to wrap my head
>> around banding: I have helped with bird banding multiple times over
>> multiple years for grad students in the UW system and elsewhere, read many,
>> many articles by professionals, USGS, as well as lay folks perspectives via
>> articles and on forums, yet I could only come up with 4 examples of how
>> banding could ACTUALLY benefit birds.
>>
>> The 1st, is using banding for translocating, ex. to determine which males
>> are which in order to move some of the younger ones in the interest of
>> populating other areas due to habitat loss, etc. The 2nd, involves
>> endangered species or soon to be endangered, ex. using banding for the
>> purpose of knowing who���s who, where they go, how many successfully
>> fledge,
>> etc. The 3rd, is to assist with game bird hunting regulations. The 4th, is
>> determining survival rates after oil spills or for toxicology in general.
>> But
>> all 4 examples don't seem to justify the majority of banding.
>>
>> With the exception of those uses, every example I've ever seen/heard as to
>> the "benefits" of what we have learned/learn from banding could be
>> distilled down to "satisfying human curiosity" or worse, giving humans
>> doing these projects "something fun to do" with a carte blanche
>> psychological safety net, say, when they stuff a passerine headfirst into a
>> pill bottle to weigh them, that, "I'm doing this to help birds!" Some
>> examples of what I've come across of how banding "helps" birds are:
>> learning that certain birds move here or there in their lifetimes, fly in
>> one stretch over the gulf, live for X amount of years, territorial
>> behavior, territory size and fidelity, mate fidelity, reproductive behavior
>> (which bird builds the nest or feeds the young and how often), etc. Again,
>> satisfying human curiosity....
>>
>> To me, learning that a bird uses this or that summer/winter site, with the
>> exception of not destroying existing habitats (...but, really, where a few
>> recaptured birds go isn't much help to the THOUSANDS and THOUSANDS of
>> others of that species that go elsewhere), is more or less irrelevant to
>> conservation efforts in 2021. We've known for 60 years minimum that birds
>> need habitat in general and they generally need most varieties of habitat.
>> So, in my mind, learning a certain Warbler passing through Wisconsin (or
>> anywhere) winters in X particular patch of forest in Venezuela is
>> questionable conservation at best, and most likely, just
>> harassment/wasteful. Perhaps it could generate local interest during
>> fundraising, but so could MANY other things. And wouldn't birds be BETTER
>> served by using those funds for protecting/acquiring as much quality
>> habitat with as much habitat diversity as possible?
>>
>> It appears scientists need to be reminded that in their vigor and eagerness
>> for "data", publications, career cache, tenure, job security, a raise, etc,
>> that they might be forgetting to consider just how "essential" an invasive
>> study (banding) is to the population���s (or individual���s) future
>> survival,
>> short and long term. And that needs to be asked for EVERY "study" using
>> bands/transmitters. The problem is... it appears to rarely be asked.
>> "Banding is good", is the inculcated mantra....and "the more the better"!
>>
>> I can't help but think that most efforts by concerned birders, especially
>> banding, are beating a dead horse, or worse, diluting resources for
>> conservation that could be better spent by giving birds a greater chance at
>> living LIFE. Knowing any of the aforementioned things we learn from banding
>> (aside from my first 4 examples) seems a stretch that it���s helping birds
>> any. It's been long established that birds decline without habitat in which
>> they can thrive, and we know enough (and have known enough for a LONG time)
>> to assist most of them with that. Banding just seems like a bizarre thing
>> to do to another creature so we can "learn" about them. An antiquated and
>> insensitive holdover that appears to be kept around because "it's what we
>> do". I would guess eBird provides FAR more useful data without harassing
>> the birds (with the exception of a few knuckleheads ���gathering��� data
>> for
>> eBird).
>>
>> But what COULD benefit birds, and benefit them in a BIG way, is if everyone
>> who has ever banded (or many other data collection methods) took ALL the
>> costs over the years associated with such efforts (gas, equipment, time,
>> funding/grants, etc, etc) and pooled those resources to buy/restore habitat
>> globally; critical areas being of 1st concern. Birds, and Nature in
>> general, would be FAR better off than the "value" of the reams of data that
>> was/is/will be collected or the costs of the tremendous resources used
>> worldwide to further such endeavors.
>>
>> Essentially, I���m wondering if our efforts are truly making any difference
>> or if we're just swimming in interesting but ultimately useless data about
>> birds.
>>
>> Any feedback contrary to my view is much appreciated.
>>
>>
>>
>> Thank you!
>>
>> Brian Pierce, Green Bay, Brown County
>>
>>> On Thu, Mar 11, 2021 at 6:30 PM Bill Stout <stoutw...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Hi Tom,
>>> I decided to forward my email to you to the entire group because I
>> believe
>>> that a good number of people do not understand the perspective of a
>>> researcher. In fact, some even may be considered hypocritical (e.g.,
>>> Madison Eagle Nest Watch seems to depend on volunteers to REPORT and
>>> MONITOR eagle NEST LOCATIONS for them, but they are dead set against
>> anyone
>>> reporting nests to anyone else). I have read several other viewpoints
>> that
>>> also seem one-sided or perhaps uninformed. It is certainly not my intent
>>> here to offend anyone; however, I am not so naive as to think that this
>>> won't happen. Nevertheless, it is not my intent.
>>>
>>> Most Sincerely,
>>> Bill Stout
>>> Ashippun, USA
>>>
>>> My email to Tom on Wednesday in response to his post:
>>>
>>> Thanks for your insights, Tom, as I greatly appreciate them. I just
>> wanted
>>> you to know that I am very conservative in my work when it comes to
>>> alerting others of nest sights. I do not list locations such as on eBird
>> or
>>> report locations to anyone. However, as an educator, if someone is very
>>> interested in the birds or if a nest is in the immediate vicinity of
>> their
>>> home, I work to provide them with a "one of a kind" educational
>> experience.
>>>
>>> Last year I did not accommodate the general public and followed the North
>>> American Bird Banding Council recommendations for bird banding in the
>> time
>>> of a COVID-19 pandemic (with the exception of one of the fist Great
>> Horned
>>> Owl sites as it was before recommendations were out). This year will be
>>> more complicated as we try to move back to a new normal during this time.
>>> Nevertheless, I will be very cautious.
>>>
>>> Thanks again for your post.
>>>
>>> Sincerely,
>>> Bill Stout
>>> Ashippun, USA
>>>
>>> William E. Stout
>>>
>>> ________________________________
>>> From: Bill Stout <stoutw...>
>>> Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 12:58 PM
>>> To: <sykes...> <sykes...>
>>> Subject: Re: [wisb] Reporting nest sites
>>>
>>> Thanks for your insights, Tom, as I greatly appreciate them. I just
>> wanted
>>> you to know that I am very conservative in my work when it comes to
>>> alerting others of nest sights. I do not list locations such as eBird or
>>> report locations to anyone. However, as an educator, if someone is very
>>> interested in the birds or if a nest is in the immediate vicinity of
>> their
>>> home, I work to provide them with a "one of a kind" educational
>> experience.
>>>
>>> Last year I did not accommodate the general public and followed the North
>>> American Bird Banding Council recommendations for bird banding in the
>> time
>>> of a COVID-19 pandemic (with the exception of one of the fist Great
>> Horned
>>> Owl sites as it was before recommendations were out). This year will be
>>> more complicated as we try to move back to a new normal during this time.
>>> Nevertheless, I will be very cautious.
>>>
>>> Thanks again for your post.
>>>
>>> Sincerely,
>>> Bill Stout
>>> Ashippun, USA
>>>
>>> William E. Stout
>>>
>>> ________________________________
>>> From: <wisbirdn-bounce...> <wisbirdn-bounce...> on
>>> behalf of Tom Sykes <sykes...>
>>> Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 10:43 AM
>>> To: Wisbirdn <wisbirdn...>
>>> Subject: [wisb] Reporting nest sites
>>>
>>> From time to time the issue of reporting bird nests appears on the list.
>>> And while there is some disagreement about whether or not a nest site is
>> or
>>> is not being disturbed by human presence, I would direct you to both the
>>> ABA Birding Ethics and WSO Birding Ethics sites as a reminder for those
>>> wondering about the ethics of reporting a nest site. WISBIRDN subscribes
>> to
>>> following both.
>>>
>>> https://wsobirds.org/about-wso/code-of-ethics
>>>
>>> https://www.aba.org/aba-code-of-birding-ethics/
>>>
>>> It is true that many reports of nesting raptors appear on eBird as well
>> as
>>> many other listservs and Facebook pages. Citizen Science is a great tool
>>> but it is also used by a few unethical people. People who don���t care
>> about
>>> disturbing birds in order to get ���the perfect shot���, or, people who
>> would
>>> traffic in birds. Even curious onlookers. Fortunately, these people are
>> in
>>> a minority. But they are out there.
>>>
>>> It���s also one thing for one or two people to observe a nest but
>> consider a
>>> report in an urban area when many people arrive at the same time - as
>> with
>>> the eagle nest recently reported in Walworth city. Birds may be
>>> intimidated. Or not. The problem is, it���s usually too late to reverse
>> the
>>> damage when it���s found to be they are disturbed.
>>>
>>> Some years ago an eagle nest was reported in Horicon Marsh. Fish and
>>> Wildlife staff closed off the immediate area although the nest could be
>>> observed at some distance. The eagles were successful. There have been
>>> eagle nests up and down the Fox River near Appleton easily seen by anyone
>>> who wishes to observe at a safe distance. The same with many lakes in the
>>> northern part of the state.
>>>
>>> I happened to volunteer at a wildlife refuge in Florida for five months
>>> where a Bald Eagle had set up a nest and produced young. Although the
>> nest
>>> was quite high, we roped off the area to prevent disturbing the nest
>> site.
>>> These birds were quite skittish whenever anyone approached the base of
>> the
>>> tree. A local member of the Audubon Society objected claiming the birds
>>> were not at all disturbed and was subsequently banned from the refuge
>> when
>>> he ignored the roped off area and had gone so far as to fly a drone
>> toward
>>> the nest to get video. And this was the local president of an Audubon
>>> chapter!
>>>
>>> It all boils down to using common sense and taking into consideration the
>>> particular situation. Just because one raptor nest doesn���t appear to be
>>> troubled by human activity, doesn���t necessarily apply to another raptor
>>> nest. Great care should be taken when reporting a sighting. If in doubt,
>>> don���t report.
>>>
>>> Tom Sykes
>>> Wisbirdn List Owner
>>> <sykes...>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> ####################
>>> You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
>>> Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
>>> To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
>>> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
>>> To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
>>> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
>>> Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> ####################
>>> You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
>>> Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
>>> To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
>>> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
>>> To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
>>> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
>>> Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>> ####################
>> You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
>> Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
>> To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
>> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
>> To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
>> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
>> Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn
>>
>>
>>
> ####################
> You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
> To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at: http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at: http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn
>
>
####################
You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at: http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at: http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
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Date: 3/13/21 4:06 pm
From: Hephziabah Beulah <hephziabahb...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
> You got my blood boiling and my heart pumping and I have been silent too
> long. Well said Brian and I am in 100% agreement.
>
> I've seen bird banding with the River edge group and at the Zoo. I
> observed birds trapped in a net trying to free themselves, taken out
> carefully, (not always cuz some are trapped into the net deep) placed in a
> sack that gets tied at the top and placed off to the side until it's time
> for it to go through the testing to which the bird is stuffed into a toliet
> paper roll head first and placed on a scale for weight. In the meantime as
> the wings are looked at for age, wear and tear, a band is then chosen to
> put on it's leg for the rest of it's life. What does the bird do when it is
> in the nest with babies, that chunk of metal has got to be uncomfortable.
> Plus, now the bird has to adjust it's flying due to the handcuff on it.
> Okay, if the bird does not respond to a release from all the trauma it
> experienced, there is a box with a warmer inside a glove to which the
> bird is placed upon and the box is closed. I have seen both a joyful
> release and birds that have perished, sick!!! A Free bird trapped in a net
> to put a stupid band on it ruins it's Free Spirit. Has anyone followed it
> to see if it continues to sing. In my strong opinion, it is cruel trapping
> a free bird into a net and Yes, banding is OVERDONE!!! It needs to stop! I
> agree we have enough data, we've done radar chips in the back of birds
> (Nexrad) to follow them from here to over the ocean, etc. We learn from
> nature and technology is overrated and ruining the earth.
>
> (I request you do not back channel me about this text because I will
> exploit you)
>
> Hep
> Brookfield, WI
>
> I now know why it came out as gibberish. Thank you.
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Brian <courthousehollow...>
> Date: 3/12/21 2:41 PM (GMT-06:00)
> To:
> Cc: wisbirdn <wisbirdn...>
> Subject: [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
>
> Hello everyone,
> First off, this is LONG and a bit of a rant, so don���t read this if that
> bothers you. Before posting I reread the WisBird rules, and yes, I���d be
> ok
> with my mother reading this ���� But my ultimate goal is to get people
> thinking so that birds can thrive.
>
> I'm wondering if there's a pink elephant in the room in this conversation?
> Are all banding ���studies��� self-justifying? I have a question for the
> forum
> if people would be so kind. I'm curious if anyone could summarize for me
> how most of the bird banding that is done is anything but HARASSMENT to
> them? I am honestly sending this out of genuine curiosity, have no
> mal-intentions, and am not being derogatory towards anyone's interest in
> banding. I really do want to understand.
>
> I've been birding for 15 years or so now and in my quest to wrap my head
> around banding: I have helped with bird banding multiple times over
> multiple years for grad students in the UW system and elsewhere, read many,
> many articles by professionals, USGS, as well as lay folks perspectives via
> articles and on forums, yet I could only come up with 4 examples of how
> banding could ACTUALLY benefit birds.
>
> The 1st, is using banding for translocating, ex. to determine which males
> are which in order to move some of the younger ones in the interest of
> populating other areas due to habitat loss, etc. The 2nd, involves
> endangered species or soon to be endangered, ex. using banding for the
> purpose of knowing who���s who, where they go, how many successfully
> fledge,
> etc. The 3rd, is to assist with game bird hunting regulations. The 4th, is
> determining survival rates after oil spills or for toxicology in general.
> But
> all 4 examples don't seem to justify the majority of banding.
>
> With the exception of those uses, every example I've ever seen/heard as to
> the "benefits" of what we have learned/learn from banding could be
> distilled down to "satisfying human curiosity" or worse, giving humans
> doing these projects "something fun to do" with a carte blanche
> psychological safety net, say, when they stuff a passerine headfirst into a
> pill bottle to weigh them, that, "I'm doing this to help birds!" Some
> examples of what I've come across of how banding "helps" birds are:
> learning that certain birds move here or there in their lifetimes, fly in
> one stretch over the gulf, live for X amount of years, territorial
> behavior, territory size and fidelity, mate fidelity, reproductive behavior
> (which bird builds the nest or feeds the young and how often), etc. Again,
> satisfying human curiosity....
>
> To me, learning that a bird uses this or that summer/winter site, with the
> exception of not destroying existing habitats (...but, really, where a few
> recaptured birds go isn't much help to the THOUSANDS and THOUSANDS of
> others of that species that go elsewhere), is more or less irrelevant to
> conservation efforts in 2021. We've known for 60 years minimum that birds
> need habitat in general and they generally need most varieties of habitat.
> So, in my mind, learning a certain Warbler passing through Wisconsin (or
> anywhere) winters in X particular patch of forest in Venezuela is
> questionable conservation at best, and most likely, just
> harassment/wasteful. Perhaps it could generate local interest during
> fundraising, but so could MANY other things. And wouldn't birds be BETTER
> served by using those funds for protecting/acquiring as much quality
> habitat with as much habitat diversity as possible?
>
> It appears scientists need to be reminded that in their vigor and eagerness
> for "data", publications, career cache, tenure, job security, a raise, etc,
> that they might be forgetting to consider just how "essential" an invasive
> study (banding) is to the population���s (or individual���s) future
> survival,
> short and long term. And that needs to be asked for EVERY "study" using
> bands/transmitters. The problem is... it appears to rarely be asked.
> "Banding is good", is the inculcated mantra....and "the more the better"!
>
> I can't help but think that most efforts by concerned birders, especially
> banding, are beating a dead horse, or worse, diluting resources for
> conservation that could be better spent by giving birds a greater chance at
> living LIFE. Knowing any of the aforementioned things we learn from banding
> (aside from my first 4 examples) seems a stretch that it���s helping birds
> any. It's been long established that birds decline without habitat in which
> they can thrive, and we know enough (and have known enough for a LONG time)
> to assist most of them with that. Banding just seems like a bizarre thing
> to do to another creature so we can "learn" about them. An antiquated and
> insensitive holdover that appears to be kept around because "it's what we
> do". I would guess eBird provides FAR more useful data without harassing
> the birds (with the exception of a few knuckleheads ���gathering��� data
> for
> eBird).
>
> But what COULD benefit birds, and benefit them in a BIG way, is if everyone
> who has ever banded (or many other data collection methods) took ALL the
> costs over the years associated with such efforts (gas, equipment, time,
> funding/grants, etc, etc) and pooled those resources to buy/restore habitat
> globally; critical areas being of 1st concern. Birds, and Nature in
> general, would be FAR better off than the "value" of the reams of data that
> was/is/will be collected or the costs of the tremendous resources used
> worldwide to further such endeavors.
>
> Essentially, I���m wondering if our efforts are truly making any difference
> or if we're just swimming in interesting but ultimately useless data about
> birds.
>
> Any feedback contrary to my view is much appreciated.
>
>
>
> Thank you!
>
> Brian Pierce, Green Bay, Brown County
>
> On Thu, Mar 11, 2021 at 6:30 PM Bill Stout <stoutw...> wrote:
>
> > Hi Tom,
> > I decided to forward my email to you to the entire group because I
> believe
> > that a good number of people do not understand the perspective of a
> > researcher. In fact, some even may be considered hypocritical (e.g.,
> > Madison Eagle Nest Watch seems to depend on volunteers to REPORT and
> > MONITOR eagle NEST LOCATIONS for them, but they are dead set against
> anyone
> > reporting nests to anyone else). I have read several other viewpoints
> that
> > also seem one-sided or perhaps uninformed. It is certainly not my intent
> > here to offend anyone; however, I am not so naive as to think that this
> > won't happen. Nevertheless, it is not my intent.
> >
> > Most Sincerely,
> > Bill Stout
> > Ashippun, USA
> >
> > My email to Tom on Wednesday in response to his post:
> >
> > Thanks for your insights, Tom, as I greatly appreciate them. I just
> wanted
> > you to know that I am very conservative in my work when it comes to
> > alerting others of nest sights. I do not list locations such as on eBird
> or
> > report locations to anyone. However, as an educator, if someone is very
> > interested in the birds or if a nest is in the immediate vicinity of
> their
> > home, I work to provide them with a "one of a kind" educational
> experience.
> >
> > Last year I did not accommodate the general public and followed the North
> > American Bird Banding Council recommendations for bird banding in the
> time
> > of a COVID-19 pandemic (with the exception of one of the fist Great
> Horned
> > Owl sites as it was before recommendations were out). This year will be
> > more complicated as we try to move back to a new normal during this time.
> > Nevertheless, I will be very cautious.
> >
> > Thanks again for your post.
> >
> > Sincerely,
> > Bill Stout
> > Ashippun, USA
> >
> > William E. Stout
> >
> > ________________________________
> > From: Bill Stout <stoutw...>
> > Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 12:58 PM
> > To: <sykes...> <sykes...>
> > Subject: Re: [wisb] Reporting nest sites
> >
> > Thanks for your insights, Tom, as I greatly appreciate them. I just
> wanted
> > you to know that I am very conservative in my work when it comes to
> > alerting others of nest sights. I do not list locations such as eBird or
> > report locations to anyone. However, as an educator, if someone is very
> > interested in the birds or if a nest is in the immediate vicinity of
> their
> > home, I work to provide them with a "one of a kind" educational
> experience.
> >
> > Last year I did not accommodate the general public and followed the North
> > American Bird Banding Council recommendations for bird banding in the
> time
> > of a COVID-19 pandemic (with the exception of one of the fist Great
> Horned
> > Owl sites as it was before recommendations were out). This year will be
> > more complicated as we try to move back to a new normal during this time.
> > Nevertheless, I will be very cautious.
> >
> > Thanks again for your post.
> >
> > Sincerely,
> > Bill Stout
> > Ashippun, USA
> >
> > William E. Stout
> >
> > ________________________________
> > From: <wisbirdn-bounce...> <wisbirdn-bounce...> on
> > behalf of Tom Sykes <sykes...>
> > Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 10:43 AM
> > To: Wisbirdn <wisbirdn...>
> > Subject: [wisb] Reporting nest sites
> >
> > From time to time the issue of reporting bird nests appears on the list.
> > And while there is some disagreement about whether or not a nest site is
> or
> > is not being disturbed by human presence, I would direct you to both the
> > ABA Birding Ethics and WSO Birding Ethics sites as a reminder for those
> > wondering about the ethics of reporting a nest site. WISBIRDN subscribes
> to
> > following both.
> >
> > https://wsobirds.org/about-wso/code-of-ethics
> >
> > https://www.aba.org/aba-code-of-birding-ethics/
> >
> > It is true that many reports of nesting raptors appear on eBird as well
> as
> > many other listservs and Facebook pages. Citizen Science is a great tool
> > but it is also used by a few unethical people. People who don���t care
> about
> > disturbing birds in order to get ���the perfect shot���, or, people who
> would
> > traffic in birds. Even curious onlookers. Fortunately, these people are
> in
> > a minority. But they are out there.
> >
> > It���s also one thing for one or two people to observe a nest but
> consider a
> > report in an urban area when many people arrive at the same time - as
> with
> > the eagle nest recently reported in Walworth city. Birds may be
> > intimidated. Or not. The problem is, it���s usually too late to reverse
> the
> > damage when it���s found to be they are disturbed.
> >
> > Some years ago an eagle nest was reported in Horicon Marsh. Fish and
> > Wildlife staff closed off the immediate area although the nest could be
> > observed at some distance. The eagles were successful. There have been
> > eagle nests up and down the Fox River near Appleton easily seen by anyone
> > who wishes to observe at a safe distance. The same with many lakes in the
> > northern part of the state.
> >
> > I happened to volunteer at a wildlife refuge in Florida for five months
> > where a Bald Eagle had set up a nest and produced young. Although the
> nest
> > was quite high, we roped off the area to prevent disturbing the nest
> site.
> > These birds were quite skittish whenever anyone approached the base of
> the
> > tree. A local member of the Audubon Society objected claiming the birds
> > were not at all disturbed and was subsequently banned from the refuge
> when
> > he ignored the roped off area and had gone so far as to fly a drone
> toward
> > the nest to get video. And this was the local president of an Audubon
> > chapter!
> >
> > It all boils down to using common sense and taking into consideration the
> > particular situation. Just because one raptor nest doesn���t appear to be
> > troubled by human activity, doesn���t necessarily apply to another raptor
> > nest. Great care should be taken when reporting a sighting. If in doubt,
> > don���t report.
> >
> > Tom Sykes
> > Wisbirdn List Owner
> > <sykes...>
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > ####################
> > You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
> > Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
> > To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> > To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> > Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn
> >
> >
> >
> > ####################
> > You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
> > Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
> > To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> > To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> > Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn
> >
> >
> >
>
> ####################
> You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
> Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
> To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn
>
>
>
####################
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To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at: http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
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Back to top
Date: 3/13/21 10:18 am
From: hephziabahb <hephziabahb...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
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Date: 3/13/21 10:12 am
From: Drew Cashman <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender drcashman11 for DMARC)
Subject: [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
determine what is going on in the nest from nest building, to copulation, to incubating, to brooding, to of course when the eaglets are visible, to fledging.  If you know the signs and what to look for you don't need to be right in the nests like the eagle cams around the country to know what is going on.  
All of the eagles pair are different and each have a different tolerance for human activity. The list of types of human disturbances is a long one but the most common can range from getting too close to nest with a barking dog, to heavy machinery at nearby constructions.  When I lived out in the Colorado, I witnessed a landowner blasting prairie dogs with his 22 right under the nest.  That is probably the most extreme disturbance I have heard of or witnessed. I know of at least two nests in Dane County that were so overrun with human visitors that the pairs abandoned their nests and moved out of that area to build somewhere with less access.  
Thanks
DrewDane County
On Friday, March 12, 2021, 10:12:16 PM CST, Tom Koch <helpmerhonda1...> wrote:

How do you document the activity- in a nest 50+ feet  in the air? What types of things do people do to disturb a nest 50+ feet up?
I don’t believe that this is a group that has people in it that would disturb a nest to the extent that a bird would abandon, but it is good there are people that feel that strongly to protect them.
....speaking of a birds well-being.....I have been meaning to tell this story.....last year my family was taking a walk just on the outskirts of downtown Milwaukee last year when we came across a house finch on the sidewalk, obviously on the verge of death. My 23 year old daughter bent down to take a look, and was obviously upset. We continued on to the grocery store. On the way back , the bird was still there and she couldn’t pass it up. I sighed and said let’s get going. She asked my wife if she could drive her and the dying bird down to her place of work- the Milwaukee Humane Society- so that they could put the bird down and end its suffering. And that’s what they did. If any of you visit the Milwaukee Humane Society, and you admire what she did, say ‘hi’ to my daughter Lainey. Though I don’t think I would go to the extent she went to, I am very proud of my daughters passion for animals.

Tom Koch.............
Sent from my iPad

> On Mar 12, 2021, at 8:35 PM, Drew Cashman <dmarc-noreply...> wrote:
>
> 
> As a volunteer for Madison Audubon and one of the coordinators for the Bald Eagle Nest Program, I want to clarify the claim that Bill made about the program.
> We have partnered closely with the DNR on this program since 2018 to get permission on nest locations and share with the DNR the results of whether the eagle nests are successful. We and our volunteers do not share nest locations with anyone outside of the DNR not to be difficult, but because it is important for the birds' nesting success to not be disturbed -- inadvertently or intentionally -- by human activity. It is well known that eagles can and will abandon a nest if harassed, and the goal of our program is to help advocate for successful bald eagle reproduction. Our program involves trained volunteers making a weekly visit to document activity.
>
> If you have any questions, feel free to contact me (<drcashman11...>) or Brenna at Madison Audubon (<bmarsicek...>), as we coordinate the Bald Eagle Nest Watch program together.
>
> Thank you,Drew CashmanDane County
>
>
>    On Thursday, March 11, 2021, 06:30:29 PM CST, Bill Stout <stoutw...> wrote: 
>
> Hi Tom,
> I decided to forward my email to you to the entire group because I believe that a good number of people do not understand the perspective of a researcher. In fact, some even may be considered hypocritical (e.g., Madison Eagle Nest Watch seems to depend on volunteers to REPORT and MONITOR eagle NEST LOCATIONS for them, but they are dead set against anyone reporting nests to anyone else). I have read several other viewpoints that also seem one-sided or perhaps uninformed. It is certainly not my intent here to offend anyone; however, I am not so naive as to think that this won't happen. Nevertheless, it is not my intent.
>
> Most Sincerely,
> Bill Stout
> Ashippun, USA
>
> My email to Tom on Wednesday in response to his post:
>
> Thanks for your insights, Tom, as I greatly appreciate them. I just wanted you to know that I am very conservative in my work when it comes to alerting others of nest sights. I do not list locations such as on eBird or report locations to anyone. However, as an educator, if someone is very interested in the birds or if a nest is in the immediate vicinity of their home, I work to provide them with a "one of a kind" educational experience.
>
> Last year I did not accommodate the general public and followed the North American Bird Banding Council recommendations for bird banding in the time of a COVID-19 pandemic (with the exception of one of the fist Great Horned Owl sites as it was before recommendations were out). This year will be more complicated as we try to move back to a new normal during this time. Nevertheless, I will be very cautious.
>
> Thanks again for your post.
>
> Sincerely,
> Bill Stout
> Ashippun, USA
>
> William E. Stout
>
> ________________________________
> From: Bill Stout <stoutw...>
> Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 12:58 PM
> To: <sykes...> <sykes...>
> Subject: Re: [wisb] Reporting nest sites
>
> Thanks for your insights, Tom, as I greatly appreciate them. I just wanted you to know that I am very conservative in my work when it comes to alerting others of nest sights. I do not list locations such as eBird or report locations to anyone. However, as an educator, if someone is very interested in the birds or if a nest is in the immediate vicinity of their home, I work to provide them with a "one of a kind" educational experience.
>
> Last year I did not accommodate the general public and followed the North American Bird Banding Council recommendations for bird banding in the time of a COVID-19 pandemic (with the exception of one of the fist Great Horned Owl sites as it was before recommendations were out). This year will be more complicated as we try to move back to a new normal during this time. Nevertheless, I will be very cautious.
>
> Thanks again for your post.
>
> Sincerely,
> Bill Stout
> Ashippun, USA
>
> William E. Stout
>
> ________________________________
> From: <wisbirdn-bounce...> <wisbirdn-bounce...> on behalf of Tom Sykes <sykes...>
> Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 10:43 AM
> To: Wisbirdn <wisbirdn...>
> Subject: [wisb] Reporting nest sites
>
> From time to time the issue of reporting bird nests appears on the list. And while there is some disagreement about whether or not a nest site is or is not being disturbed by human presence, I would direct you to both the ABA Birding Ethics and WSO Birding Ethics sites as a reminder for those wondering about the ethics of reporting a nest site. WISBIRDN subscribes to following both.
>
> https://wsobirds.org/about-wso/code-of-ethics
>
> https://www.aba.org/aba-code-of-birding-ethics/
>
> It is true that many reports of nesting raptors appear on eBird as well as many other listservs and Facebook pages. Citizen Science is a great tool but it is also used by a few unethical people. People who don’t care about disturbing birds in order to get “the perfect shot”, or, people who would traffic in birds. Even curious onlookers. Fortunately, these people are in a minority. But they are out there.
>
> It’s also one thing for one or two people to observe a nest but consider a report in an urban area when many people arrive at the same time - as with the eagle nest recently reported in Walworth city. Birds may be intimidated. Or not. The problem is, it’s usually too late to reverse the damage when it’s found to be they are disturbed.
>
> Some years ago an eagle nest was reported in Horicon Marsh. Fish and Wildlife staff closed off the immediate area although the nest could be observed at some distance. The eagles were successful. There have been eagle nests up and down the Fox River near Appleton easily seen by anyone who wishes to observe at a safe distance. The same with many lakes in the northern part of the state.
>
> I happened to volunteer at a wildlife refuge in Florida for five months where a Bald Eagle had set up a nest and produced young. Although the nest was quite high, we roped off the area to prevent disturbing the nest site. These birds were quite skittish whenever anyone approached the base of the tree. A local member of the Audubon Society objected claiming the birds were not at all disturbed and was subsequently banned from the refuge when he ignored the roped off area and had gone so far as to fly a drone toward the nest to get video. And this was the local president of an Audubon chapter!
>
> It all boils down to using common sense and taking into consideration the particular situation. Just because one raptor nest doesn’t appear to be troubled by human activity, doesn’t necessarily apply to another raptor nest. Great care should be taken when reporting a sighting. If in doubt, don’t report.
>
> Tom Sykes
> Wisbirdn List Owner
> <sykes...>
>
>
>
>
> ####################
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>
>
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>
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Date: 3/12/21 8:12 pm
From: Tom Koch <helpmerhonda1...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
How do you document the activity- in a nest 50+ feet in the air? What types of things do people do to disturb a nest 50+ feet up?
I don’t believe that this is a group that has people in it that would disturb a nest to the extent that a bird would abandon, but it is good there are people that feel that strongly to protect them.
....speaking of a birds well-being.....I have been meaning to tell this story.....last year my family was taking a walk just on the outskirts of downtown Milwaukee last year when we came across a house finch on the sidewalk, obviously on the verge of death. My 23 year old daughter bent down to take a look, and was obviously upset. We continued on to the grocery store. On the way back , the bird was still there and she couldn’t pass it up. I sighed and said let’s get going. She asked my wife if she could drive her and the dying bird down to her place of work- the Milwaukee Humane Society- so that they could put the bird down and end its suffering. And that’s what they did. If any of you visit the Milwaukee Humane Society, and you admire what she did, say ‘hi’ to my daughter Lainey. Though I don’t think I would go to the extent she went to, I am very proud of my daughters passion for animals.

Tom Koch.............
Sent from my iPad

> On Mar 12, 2021, at 8:35 PM, Drew Cashman <dmarc-noreply...> wrote:
>
> 
> As a volunteer for Madison Audubon and one of the coordinators for the Bald Eagle Nest Program, I want to clarify the claim that Bill made about the program.
> We have partnered closely with the DNR on this program since 2018 to get permission on nest locations and share with the DNR the results of whether the eagle nests are successful. We and our volunteers do not share nest locations with anyone outside of the DNR not to be difficult, but because it is important for the birds' nesting success to not be disturbed -- inadvertently or intentionally -- by human activity. It is well known that eagles can and will abandon a nest if harassed, and the goal of our program is to help advocate for successful bald eagle reproduction. Our program involves trained volunteers making a weekly visit to document activity.
>
> If you have any questions, feel free to contact me (<drcashman11...>) or Brenna at Madison Audubon (<bmarsicek...>), as we coordinate the Bald Eagle Nest Watch program together.
>
> Thank you,Drew CashmanDane County
>
>
> On Thursday, March 11, 2021, 06:30:29 PM CST, Bill Stout <stoutw...> wrote:
>
> Hi Tom,
> I decided to forward my email to you to the entire group because I believe that a good number of people do not understand the perspective of a researcher. In fact, some even may be considered hypocritical (e.g., Madison Eagle Nest Watch seems to depend on volunteers to REPORT and MONITOR eagle NEST LOCATIONS for them, but they are dead set against anyone reporting nests to anyone else). I have read several other viewpoints that also seem one-sided or perhaps uninformed. It is certainly not my intent here to offend anyone; however, I am not so naive as to think that this won't happen. Nevertheless, it is not my intent.
>
> Most Sincerely,
> Bill Stout
> Ashippun, USA
>
> My email to Tom on Wednesday in response to his post:
>
> Thanks for your insights, Tom, as I greatly appreciate them. I just wanted you to know that I am very conservative in my work when it comes to alerting others of nest sights. I do not list locations such as on eBird or report locations to anyone. However, as an educator, if someone is very interested in the birds or if a nest is in the immediate vicinity of their home, I work to provide them with a "one of a kind" educational experience.
>
> Last year I did not accommodate the general public and followed the North American Bird Banding Council recommendations for bird banding in the time of a COVID-19 pandemic (with the exception of one of the fist Great Horned Owl sites as it was before recommendations were out). This year will be more complicated as we try to move back to a new normal during this time. Nevertheless, I will be very cautious.
>
> Thanks again for your post.
>
> Sincerely,
> Bill Stout
> Ashippun, USA
>
> William E. Stout
>
> ________________________________
> From: Bill Stout <stoutw...>
> Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 12:58 PM
> To: <sykes...> <sykes...>
> Subject: Re: [wisb] Reporting nest sites
>
> Thanks for your insights, Tom, as I greatly appreciate them. I just wanted you to know that I am very conservative in my work when it comes to alerting others of nest sights. I do not list locations such as eBird or report locations to anyone. However, as an educator, if someone is very interested in the birds or if a nest is in the immediate vicinity of their home, I work to provide them with a "one of a kind" educational experience.
>
> Last year I did not accommodate the general public and followed the North American Bird Banding Council recommendations for bird banding in the time of a COVID-19 pandemic (with the exception of one of the fist Great Horned Owl sites as it was before recommendations were out). This year will be more complicated as we try to move back to a new normal during this time. Nevertheless, I will be very cautious.
>
> Thanks again for your post.
>
> Sincerely,
> Bill Stout
> Ashippun, USA
>
> William E. Stout
>
> ________________________________
> From: <wisbirdn-bounce...> <wisbirdn-bounce...> on behalf of Tom Sykes <sykes...>
> Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 10:43 AM
> To: Wisbirdn <wisbirdn...>
> Subject: [wisb] Reporting nest sites
>
> From time to time the issue of reporting bird nests appears on the list. And while there is some disagreement about whether or not a nest site is or is not being disturbed by human presence, I would direct you to both the ABA Birding Ethics and WSO Birding Ethics sites as a reminder for those wondering about the ethics of reporting a nest site. WISBIRDN subscribes to following both.
>
> https://wsobirds.org/about-wso/code-of-ethics
>
> https://www.aba.org/aba-code-of-birding-ethics/
>
> It is true that many reports of nesting raptors appear on eBird as well as many other listservs and Facebook pages. Citizen Science is a great tool but it is also used by a few unethical people. People who don’t care about disturbing birds in order to get “the perfect shot”, or, people who would traffic in birds. Even curious onlookers. Fortunately, these people are in a minority. But they are out there.
>
> It’s also one thing for one or two people to observe a nest but consider a report in an urban area when many people arrive at the same time - as with the eagle nest recently reported in Walworth city. Birds may be intimidated. Or not. The problem is, it’s usually too late to reverse the damage when it’s found to be they are disturbed.
>
> Some years ago an eagle nest was reported in Horicon Marsh. Fish and Wildlife staff closed off the immediate area although the nest could be observed at some distance. The eagles were successful. There have been eagle nests up and down the Fox River near Appleton easily seen by anyone who wishes to observe at a safe distance. The same with many lakes in the northern part of the state.
>
> I happened to volunteer at a wildlife refuge in Florida for five months where a Bald Eagle had set up a nest and produced young. Although the nest was quite high, we roped off the area to prevent disturbing the nest site. These birds were quite skittish whenever anyone approached the base of the tree. A local member of the Audubon Society objected claiming the birds were not at all disturbed and was subsequently banned from the refuge when he ignored the roped off area and had gone so far as to fly a drone toward the nest to get video. And this was the local president of an Audubon chapter!
>
> It all boils down to using common sense and taking into consideration the particular situation. Just because one raptor nest doesn’t appear to be troubled by human activity, doesn’t necessarily apply to another raptor nest. Great care should be taken when reporting a sighting. If in doubt, don’t report.
>
> Tom Sykes
> Wisbirdn List Owner
> <sykes...>
>
>
>
>
> ####################
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>
>
>
> ####################
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>
>
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Date: 3/12/21 6:35 pm
From: Drew Cashman <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender drcashman11 for DMARC)
Subject: [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites

As a volunteer for Madison Audubon and one of the coordinators for the Bald Eagle Nest Program, I want to clarify the claim that Bill made about the program.
We have partnered closely with the DNR on this program since 2018 to get permission on nest locations and share with the DNR the results of whether the eagle nests are successful. We and our volunteers do not share nest locations with anyone outside of the DNR not to be difficult, but because it is important for the birds' nesting success to not be disturbed -- inadvertently or intentionally -- by human activity. It is well known that eagles can and will abandon a nest if harassed, and the goal of our program is to help advocate for successful bald eagle reproduction. Our program involves trained volunteers making a weekly visit to document activity.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact me (<drcashman11...>) or Brenna at Madison Audubon (<bmarsicek...>), as we coordinate the Bald Eagle Nest Watch program together.

Thank you,Drew CashmanDane County


On Thursday, March 11, 2021, 06:30:29 PM CST, Bill Stout <stoutw...> wrote:

Hi Tom,
I decided to forward my email to you to the entire group because I believe that a good number of people do not understand the perspective of a researcher. In fact, some even may be considered hypocritical (e.g., Madison Eagle Nest Watch seems to depend on volunteers to REPORT and MONITOR eagle NEST LOCATIONS for them, but they are dead set against anyone reporting nests to anyone else). I have read several other viewpoints that also seem one-sided or perhaps uninformed. It is certainly not my intent here to offend anyone; however, I am not so naive as to think that this won't happen. Nevertheless, it is not my intent.

Most Sincerely,
Bill Stout
Ashippun, USA

My email to Tom on Wednesday in response to his post:

Thanks for your insights, Tom, as I greatly appreciate them. I just wanted you to know that I am very conservative in my work when it comes to alerting others of nest sights. I do not list locations such as on eBird or report locations to anyone. However, as an educator, if someone is very interested in the birds or if a nest is in the immediate vicinity of their home, I work to provide them with a "one of a kind" educational experience.

Last year I did not accommodate the general public and followed the North American Bird Banding Council recommendations for bird banding in the time of a COVID-19 pandemic (with the exception of one of the fist Great Horned Owl sites as it was before recommendations were out). This year will be more complicated as we try to move back to a new normal during this time. Nevertheless, I will be very cautious.

Thanks again for your post.

Sincerely,
Bill Stout
Ashippun, USA

William E. Stout

________________________________
From: Bill Stout <stoutw...>
Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 12:58 PM
To: <sykes...> <sykes...>
Subject: Re: [wisb] Reporting nest sites

Thanks for your insights, Tom, as I greatly appreciate them. I just wanted you to know that I am very conservative in my work when it comes to alerting others of nest sights. I do not list locations such as eBird or report locations to anyone. However, as an educator, if someone is very interested in the birds or if a nest is in the immediate vicinity of their home, I work to provide them with a "one of a kind" educational experience.

Last year I did not accommodate the general public and followed the North American Bird Banding Council recommendations for bird banding in the time of a COVID-19 pandemic (with the exception of one of the fist Great Horned Owl sites as it was before recommendations were out). This year will be more complicated as we try to move back to a new normal during this time. Nevertheless, I will be very cautious.

Thanks again for your post.

Sincerely,
Bill Stout
Ashippun, USA

William E. Stout

________________________________
From: <wisbirdn-bounce...> <wisbirdn-bounce...> on behalf of Tom Sykes <sykes...>
Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 10:43 AM
To: Wisbirdn <wisbirdn...>
Subject: [wisb] Reporting nest sites

From time to time the issue of reporting bird nests appears on the list. And while there is some disagreement about whether or not a nest site is or is not being disturbed by human presence, I would direct you to both the ABA Birding Ethics and WSO Birding Ethics sites as a reminder for those wondering about the ethics of reporting a nest site. WISBIRDN subscribes to following both.

https://wsobirds.org/about-wso/code-of-ethics

https://www.aba.org/aba-code-of-birding-ethics/

It is true that many reports of nesting raptors appear on eBird as well as many other listservs and Facebook pages. Citizen Science is a great tool but it is also used by a few unethical people. People who don’t care about disturbing birds in order to get “the perfect shot”, or, people who would traffic in birds. Even curious onlookers. Fortunately, these people are in a minority. But they are out there.

It’s also one thing for one or two people to observe a nest but consider a report in an urban area when many people arrive at the same time - as with the eagle nest recently reported in Walworth city. Birds may be intimidated. Or not. The problem is, it’s usually too late to reverse the damage when it’s found to be they are disturbed.

Some years ago an eagle nest was reported in Horicon Marsh. Fish and Wildlife staff closed off the immediate area although the nest could be observed at some distance. The eagles were successful. There have been eagle nests up and down the Fox River near Appleton easily seen by anyone who wishes to observe at a safe distance. The same with many lakes in the northern part of the state.

I happened to volunteer at a wildlife refuge in Florida for five months where a Bald Eagle had set up a nest and produced young. Although the nest was quite high, we roped off the area to prevent disturbing the nest site. These birds were quite skittish whenever anyone approached the base of the tree. A local member of the Audubon Society objected claiming the birds were not at all disturbed and was subsequently banned from the refuge when he ignored the roped off area and had gone so far as to fly a drone toward the nest to get video. And this was the local president of an Audubon chapter!

It all boils down to using common sense and taking into consideration the particular situation. Just because one raptor nest doesn’t appear to be troubled by human activity, doesn’t necessarily apply to another raptor nest. Great care should be taken when reporting a sighting. If in doubt, don’t report.

Tom Sykes
Wisbirdn List Owner
<sykes...>




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Date: 3/12/21 3:09 pm
From: Peter Hinow <peter.hinow...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
I would assume that ornithologists are responsible scientists and that they
do really spend some time thinking about their optimal research methods. I
don't know what the rules are for obtaining a banding permit, since it is
not exactly experimentation "on" animals. But I do think one has to be
trained and passed a certain amount of certification. Here is what is on
the top of the google list
https://www.usgs.gov/faqs/how-do-i-obtain-a-federal-bird-banding-permit?qt-news_science_productsqt-news_science_products
Being a scientist myself, I would like to say something in favor of
research "out of curiosity". Moreover, just a few reliable observations
allow a large number of facts to be deduced from them.
Happy weekend,
Peter Hinow (UWM, Mathematical Sciences)
Milwaukee
On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 2:42 PM Brian <courthousehollow...> wrote:

> Hello everyone,
> First off, this is LONG and a bit of a rant, so don’t read this if that
> bothers you. Before posting I reread the WisBird rules, and yes, I’d be ok
> with my mother reading this 😊 But my ultimate goal is to get people
> thinking so that birds can thrive.
>
> I'm wondering if there's a pink elephant in the room in this conversation?
> Are all banding “studies” self-justifying? I have a question for the forum
> if people would be so kind. I'm curious if anyone could summarize for me
> how most of the bird banding that is done is anything but HARASSMENT to
> them? I am honestly sending this out of genuine curiosity, have no
> mal-intentions, and am not being derogatory towards anyone's interest in
> banding. I really do want to understand.
>
> I've been birding for 15 years or so now and in my quest to wrap my head
> around banding: I have helped with bird banding multiple times over
> multiple years for grad students in the UW system and elsewhere, read many,
> many articles by professionals, USGS, as well as lay folks perspectives via
> articles and on forums, yet I could only come up with 4 examples of how
> banding could ACTUALLY benefit birds.
>
> The 1st, is using banding for translocating, ex. to determine which males
> are which in order to move some of the younger ones in the interest of
> populating other areas due to habitat loss, etc. The 2nd, involves
> endangered species or soon to be endangered, ex. using banding for the
> purpose of knowing who’s who, where they go, how many successfully fledge,
> etc. The 3rd, is to assist with game bird hunting regulations. The 4th, is
> determining survival rates after oil spills or for toxicology in general.
> But
> all 4 examples don't seem to justify the majority of banding.
>
> With the exception of those uses, every example I've ever seen/heard as to
> the "benefits" of what we have learned/learn from banding could be
> distilled down to "satisfying human curiosity" or worse, giving humans
> doing these projects "something fun to do" with a carte blanche
> psychological safety net, say, when they stuff a passerine headfirst into a
> pill bottle to weigh them, that, "I'm doing this to help birds!" Some
> examples of what I've come across of how banding "helps" birds are:
> learning that certain birds move here or there in their lifetimes, fly in
> one stretch over the gulf, live for X amount of years, territorial
> behavior, territory size and fidelity, mate fidelity, reproductive behavior
> (which bird builds the nest or feeds the young and how often), etc. Again,
> satisfying human curiosity....
>
> To me, learning that a bird uses this or that summer/winter site, with the
> exception of not destroying existing habitats (...but, really, where a few
> recaptured birds go isn't much help to the THOUSANDS and THOUSANDS of
> others of that species that go elsewhere), is more or less irrelevant to
> conservation efforts in 2021. We've known for 60 years minimum that birds
> need habitat in general and they generally need most varieties of habitat.
> So, in my mind, learning a certain Warbler passing through Wisconsin (or
> anywhere) winters in X particular patch of forest in Venezuela is
> questionable conservation at best, and most likely, just
> harassment/wasteful. Perhaps it could generate local interest during
> fundraising, but so could MANY other things. And wouldn't birds be BETTER
> served by using those funds for protecting/acquiring as much quality
> habitat with as much habitat diversity as possible?
>
> It appears scientists need to be reminded that in their vigor and eagerness
> for "data", publications, career cache, tenure, job security, a raise, etc,
> that they might be forgetting to consider just how "essential" an invasive
> study (banding) is to the population’s (or individual’s) future survival,
> short and long term. And that needs to be asked for EVERY "study" using
> bands/transmitters. The problem is... it appears to rarely be asked.
> "Banding is good", is the inculcated mantra....and "the more the better"!
>
> I can't help but think that most efforts by concerned birders, especially
> banding, are beating a dead horse, or worse, diluting resources for
> conservation that could be better spent by giving birds a greater chance at
> living LIFE. Knowing any of the aforementioned things we learn from banding
> (aside from my first 4 examples) seems a stretch that it’s helping birds
> any. It's been long established that birds decline without habitat in which
> they can thrive, and we know enough (and have known enough for a LONG time)
> to assist most of them with that. Banding just seems like a bizarre thing
> to do to another creature so we can "learn" about them. An antiquated and
> insensitive holdover that appears to be kept around because "it's what we
> do". I would guess eBird provides FAR more useful data without harassing
> the birds (with the exception of a few knuckleheads “gathering” data for
> eBird).
>
> But what COULD benefit birds, and benefit them in a BIG way, is if everyone
> who has ever banded (or many other data collection methods) took ALL the
> costs over the years associated with such efforts (gas, equipment, time,
> funding/grants, etc, etc) and pooled those resources to buy/restore habitat
> globally; critical areas being of 1st concern. Birds, and Nature in
> general, would be FAR better off than the "value" of the reams of data that
> was/is/will be collected or the costs of the tremendous resources used
> worldwide to further such endeavors.
>
> Essentially, I’m wondering if our efforts are truly making any difference
> or if we're just swimming in interesting but ultimately useless data about
> birds.
>
> Any feedback contrary to my view is much appreciated.
>
>
>
> Thank you!
>
> Brian Pierce, Green Bay, Brown County
>
> On Thu, Mar 11, 2021 at 6:30 PM Bill Stout <stoutw...> wrote:
>
> > Hi Tom,
> > I decided to forward my email to you to the entire group because I
> believe
> > that a good number of people do not understand the perspective of a
> > researcher. In fact, some even may be considered hypocritical (e.g.,
> > Madison Eagle Nest Watch seems to depend on volunteers to REPORT and
> > MONITOR eagle NEST LOCATIONS for them, but they are dead set against
> anyone
> > reporting nests to anyone else). I have read several other viewpoints
> that
> > also seem one-sided or perhaps uninformed. It is certainly not my intent
> > here to offend anyone; however, I am not so naive as to think that this
> > won't happen. Nevertheless, it is not my intent.
> >
> > Most Sincerely,
> > Bill Stout
> > Ashippun, USA
> >
> > My email to Tom on Wednesday in response to his post:
> >
> > Thanks for your insights, Tom, as I greatly appreciate them. I just
> wanted
> > you to know that I am very conservative in my work when it comes to
> > alerting others of nest sights. I do not list locations such as on eBird
> or
> > report locations to anyone. However, as an educator, if someone is very
> > interested in the birds or if a nest is in the immediate vicinity of
> their
> > home, I work to provide them with a "one of a kind" educational
> experience.
> >
> > Last year I did not accommodate the general public and followed the North
> > American Bird Banding Council recommendations for bird banding in the
> time
> > of a COVID-19 pandemic (with the exception of one of the fist Great
> Horned
> > Owl sites as it was before recommendations were out). This year will be
> > more complicated as we try to move back to a new normal during this time.
> > Nevertheless, I will be very cautious.
> >
> > Thanks again for your post.
> >
> > Sincerely,
> > Bill Stout
> > Ashippun, USA
> >
> > William E. Stout
> >
> > ________________________________
> > From: Bill Stout <stoutw...>
> > Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 12:58 PM
> > To: <sykes...> <sykes...>
> > Subject: Re: [wisb] Reporting nest sites
> >
> > Thanks for your insights, Tom, as I greatly appreciate them. I just
> wanted
> > you to know that I am very conservative in my work when it comes to
> > alerting others of nest sights. I do not list locations such as eBird or
> > report locations to anyone. However, as an educator, if someone is very
> > interested in the birds or if a nest is in the immediate vicinity of
> their
> > home, I work to provide them with a "one of a kind" educational
> experience.
> >
> > Last year I did not accommodate the general public and followed the North
> > American Bird Banding Council recommendations for bird banding in the
> time
> > of a COVID-19 pandemic (with the exception of one of the fist Great
> Horned
> > Owl sites as it was before recommendations were out). This year will be
> > more complicated as we try to move back to a new normal during this time.
> > Nevertheless, I will be very cautious.
> >
> > Thanks again for your post.
> >
> > Sincerely,
> > Bill Stout
> > Ashippun, USA
> >
> > William E. Stout
> >
> > ________________________________
> > From: <wisbirdn-bounce...> <wisbirdn-bounce...> on
> > behalf of Tom Sykes <sykes...>
> > Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 10:43 AM
> > To: Wisbirdn <wisbirdn...>
> > Subject: [wisb] Reporting nest sites
> >
> > From time to time the issue of reporting bird nests appears on the list.
> > And while there is some disagreement about whether or not a nest site is
> or
> > is not being disturbed by human presence, I would direct you to both the
> > ABA Birding Ethics and WSO Birding Ethics sites as a reminder for those
> > wondering about the ethics of reporting a nest site. WISBIRDN subscribes
> to
> > following both.
> >
> > https://wsobirds.org/about-wso/code-of-ethics
> >
> > https://www.aba.org/aba-code-of-birding-ethics/
> >
> > It is true that many reports of nesting raptors appear on eBird as well
> as
> > many other listservs and Facebook pages. Citizen Science is a great tool
> > but it is also used by a few unethical people. People who don’t care
> about
> > disturbing birds in order to get “the perfect shot”, or, people who would
> > traffic in birds. Even curious onlookers. Fortunately, these people are
> in
> > a minority. But they are out there.
> >
> > It’s also one thing for one or two people to observe a nest but consider
> a
> > report in an urban area when many people arrive at the same time - as
> with
> > the eagle nest recently reported in Walworth city. Birds may be
> > intimidated. Or not. The problem is, it’s usually too late to reverse the
> > damage when it’s found to be they are disturbed.
> >
> > Some years ago an eagle nest was reported in Horicon Marsh. Fish and
> > Wildlife staff closed off the immediate area although the nest could be
> > observed at some distance. The eagles were successful. There have been
> > eagle nests up and down the Fox River near Appleton easily seen by anyone
> > who wishes to observe at a safe distance. The same with many lakes in the
> > northern part of the state.
> >
> > I happened to volunteer at a wildlife refuge in Florida for five months
> > where a Bald Eagle had set up a nest and produced young. Although the
> nest
> > was quite high, we roped off the area to prevent disturbing the nest
> site.
> > These birds were quite skittish whenever anyone approached the base of
> the
> > tree. A local member of the Audubon Society objected claiming the birds
> > were not at all disturbed and was subsequently banned from the refuge
> when
> > he ignored the roped off area and had gone so far as to fly a drone
> toward
> > the nest to get video. And this was the local president of an Audubon
> > chapter!
> >
> > It all boils down to using common sense and taking into consideration the
> > particular situation. Just because one raptor nest doesn’t appear to be
> > troubled by human activity, doesn’t necessarily apply to another raptor
> > nest. Great care should be taken when reporting a sighting. If in doubt,
> > don’t report.
> >
> > Tom Sykes
> > Wisbirdn List Owner
> > <sykes...>
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > ####################
> > You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
> > Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
> > To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> > To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> > Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn
> >
> >
> >
> > ####################
> > You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
> > Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
> > To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> > To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> > http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> > Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn
> >
> >
> >
>
> ####################
> You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
> Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
> To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
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>
>
>

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Date: 3/12/21 3:03 pm
From: Thomas Wood <tcwood729...>
Subject: [wisb] White Geese in Sheboygan County this morning (3-12)
Yesterday, I saw an eBird report from Steve M. which included large numbers of Snow and Ross’s Geese. He saw them just south of CTH MM along Rangeline Road (northwest of Sheboygan). I hoped they might remain overnight, and when I arrived this morning, I was not disappointed.
I saw 80 Snow Geese (fairly close count- mixture of white and blue morphs) and 14(!) Ross’s Geese. I surmised that among some of the sleeping white morph birds, I may have counted even more Ross’s Geese as Snow Geese but due to the difficulty of identification without seeing the head, I have no way of knowing.
Since these birds were quite close to the road, daytime traffic might have caused them to leave. Two other birders were there this morning and when they got out of their car, even at a respectable distance, the birds were on high alert, shuffling farther back in the pond with heads raised. I feared they might fly, but the other birders got back in the car and left, so all birds remained and were there when I left. If they are still there, I suggest viewing from the car.
Thomas Wood, Menomonee Falls, Waukesha County####################
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Date: 3/12/21 1:57 pm
From: Tom Sykes <sykes...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
Very quickly in response to Brian’s self-proclaimed rant.

Brian clearly has an axe to grind with bird banding. And that’s fine as that’s his opinion. As is the opinion of others who would disagree.

However, going forward I am asking to keep any responses to Brian’s back channel. For now the subject of bird banding is off limits.

Tom Sykes
Wisbirdn List Owner
<sykes...>




> On Mar 12, 2021, at 1:41 PM, Brian <courthousehollow...> wrote:
>
> Hello everyone,
> First off, this is LONG and a bit of a rant, so don’t read this if that
> bothers you. Before posting I reread the WisBird rules, and yes, I’d be ok
> with my mother reading this 😊 But my ultimate goal is to get people
> thinking so that birds can thrive.
>
> I'm wondering if there's a pink elephant in the room in this conversation?
> Are all banding “studies” self-justifying? I have a question for the forum
> if people would be so kind. I'm curious if anyone could summarize for me
> how most of the bird banding that is done is anything but HARASSMENT to
> them? I am honestly sending this out of genuine curiosity, have no
> mal-intentions, and am not being derogatory towards anyone's interest in
> banding. I really do want to understand.
>
> I've been birding for 15 years or so now and in my quest to wrap my head
> around banding: I have helped with bird banding multiple times over
> multiple years for grad students in the UW system and elsewhere, read many,
> many articles by professionals, USGS, as well as lay folks perspectives via
> articles and on forums, yet I could only come up with 4 examples of how
> banding could ACTUALLY benefit birds.
>
> The 1st, is using banding for translocating, ex. to determine which males
> are which in order to move some of the younger ones in the interest of
> populating other areas due to habitat loss, etc. The 2nd, involves
> endangered species or soon to be endangered, ex. using banding for the
> purpose of knowing who’s who, where they go, how many successfully fledge,
> etc. The 3rd, is to assist with game bird hunting regulations. The 4th, is
> determining survival rates after oil spills or for toxicology in general. But
> all 4 examples don't seem to justify the majority of banding.
>
> With the exception of those uses, every example I've ever seen/heard as to
> the "benefits" of what we have learned/learn from banding could be
> distilled down to "satisfying human curiosity" or worse, giving humans
> doing these projects "something fun to do" with a carte blanche
> psychological safety net, say, when they stuff a passerine headfirst into a
> pill bottle to weigh them, that, "I'm doing this to help birds!" Some
> examples of what I've come across of how banding "helps" birds are:
> learning that certain birds move here or there in their lifetimes, fly in
> one stretch over the gulf, live for X amount of years, territorial
> behavior, territory size and fidelity, mate fidelity, reproductive behavior
> (which bird builds the nest or feeds the young and how often), etc. Again,
> satisfying human curiosity....
>
> To me, learning that a bird uses this or that summer/winter site, with the
> exception of not destroying existing habitats (...but, really, where a few
> recaptured birds go isn't much help to the THOUSANDS and THOUSANDS of
> others of that species that go elsewhere), is more or less irrelevant to
> conservation efforts in 2021. We've known for 60 years minimum that birds
> need habitat in general and they generally need most varieties of habitat.
> So, in my mind, learning a certain Warbler passing through Wisconsin (or
> anywhere) winters in X particular patch of forest in Venezuela is
> questionable conservation at best, and most likely, just
> harassment/wasteful. Perhaps it could generate local interest during
> fundraising, but so could MANY other things. And wouldn't birds be BETTER
> served by using those funds for protecting/acquiring as much quality
> habitat with as much habitat diversity as possible?
>
> It appears scientists need to be reminded that in their vigor and eagerness
> for "data", publications, career cache, tenure, job security, a raise, etc,
> that they might be forgetting to consider just how "essential" an invasive
> study (banding) is to the population’s (or individual’s) future survival,
> short and long term. And that needs to be asked for EVERY "study" using
> bands/transmitters. The problem is... it appears to rarely be asked.
> "Banding is good", is the inculcated mantra....and "the more the better"!
>
> I can't help but think that most efforts by concerned birders, especially
> banding, are beating a dead horse, or worse, diluting resources for
> conservation that could be better spent by giving birds a greater chance at
> living LIFE. Knowing any of the aforementioned things we learn from banding
> (aside from my first 4 examples) seems a stretch that it’s helping birds
> any. It's been long established that birds decline without habitat in which
> they can thrive, and we know enough (and have known enough for a LONG time)
> to assist most of them with that. Banding just seems like a bizarre thing
> to do to another creature so we can "learn" about them. An antiquated and
> insensitive holdover that appears to be kept around because "it's what we
> do". I would guess eBird provides FAR more useful data without harassing
> the birds (with the exception of a few knuckleheads “gathering” data for
> eBird).
>
> But what COULD benefit birds, and benefit them in a BIG way, is if everyone
> who has ever banded (or many other data collection methods) took ALL the
> costs over the years associated with such efforts (gas, equipment, time,
> funding/grants, etc, etc) and pooled those resources to buy/restore habitat
> globally; critical areas being of 1st concern. Birds, and Nature in
> general, would be FAR better off than the "value" of the reams of data that
> was/is/will be collected or the costs of the tremendous resources used
> worldwide to further such endeavors.
>
> Essentially, I’m wondering if our efforts are truly making any difference
> or if we're just swimming in interesting but ultimately useless data about
> birds.
>
> Any feedback contrary to my view is much appreciated.
>
>
>
> Thank you!
>
> Brian Pierce, Green Bay, Brown County
>
> On Thu, Mar 11, 2021 at 6:30 PM Bill Stout <stoutw...> wrote:
>
>> Hi Tom,
>> I decided to forward my email to you to the entire group because I believe
>> that a good number of people do not understand the perspective of a
>> researcher. In fact, some even may be considered hypocritical (e.g.,
>> Madison Eagle Nest Watch seems to depend on volunteers to REPORT and
>> MONITOR eagle NEST LOCATIONS for them, but they are dead set against anyone
>> reporting nests to anyone else). I have read several other viewpoints that
>> also seem one-sided or perhaps uninformed. It is certainly not my intent
>> here to offend anyone; however, I am not so naive as to think that this
>> won't happen. Nevertheless, it is not my intent.
>>
>> Most Sincerely,
>> Bill Stout
>> Ashippun, USA
>>
>> My email to Tom on Wednesday in response to his post:
>>
>> Thanks for your insights, Tom, as I greatly appreciate them. I just wanted
>> you to know that I am very conservative in my work when it comes to
>> alerting others of nest sights. I do not list locations such as on eBird or
>> report locations to anyone. However, as an educator, if someone is very
>> interested in the birds or if a nest is in the immediate vicinity of their
>> home, I work to provide them with a "one of a kind" educational experience.
>>
>> Last year I did not accommodate the general public and followed the North
>> American Bird Banding Council recommendations for bird banding in the time
>> of a COVID-19 pandemic (with the exception of one of the fist Great Horned
>> Owl sites as it was before recommendations were out). This year will be
>> more complicated as we try to move back to a new normal during this time.
>> Nevertheless, I will be very cautious.
>>
>> Thanks again for your post.
>>
>> Sincerely,
>> Bill Stout
>> Ashippun, USA
>>
>> William E. Stout
>>
>> ________________________________
>> From: Bill Stout <stoutw...>
>> Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 12:58 PM
>> To: <sykes...> <sykes...>
>> Subject: Re: [wisb] Reporting nest sites
>>
>> Thanks for your insights, Tom, as I greatly appreciate them. I just wanted
>> you to know that I am very conservative in my work when it comes to
>> alerting others of nest sights. I do not list locations such as eBird or
>> report locations to anyone. However, as an educator, if someone is very
>> interested in the birds or if a nest is in the immediate vicinity of their
>> home, I work to provide them with a "one of a kind" educational experience.
>>
>> Last year I did not accommodate the general public and followed the North
>> American Bird Banding Council recommendations for bird banding in the time
>> of a COVID-19 pandemic (with the exception of one of the fist Great Horned
>> Owl sites as it was before recommendations were out). This year will be
>> more complicated as we try to move back to a new normal during this time.
>> Nevertheless, I will be very cautious.
>>
>> Thanks again for your post.
>>
>> Sincerely,
>> Bill Stout
>> Ashippun, USA
>>
>> William E. Stout
>>
>> ________________________________
>> From: <wisbirdn-bounce...> <wisbirdn-bounce...> on
>> behalf of Tom Sykes <sykes...>
>> Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 10:43 AM
>> To: Wisbirdn <wisbirdn...>
>> Subject: [wisb] Reporting nest sites
>>
>> From time to time the issue of reporting bird nests appears on the list.
>> And while there is some disagreement about whether or not a nest site is or
>> is not being disturbed by human presence, I would direct you to both the
>> ABA Birding Ethics and WSO Birding Ethics sites as a reminder for those
>> wondering about the ethics of reporting a nest site. WISBIRDN subscribes to
>> following both.
>>
>> https://wsobirds.org/about-wso/code-of-ethics
>>
>> https://www.aba.org/aba-code-of-birding-ethics/
>>
>> It is true that many reports of nesting raptors appear on eBird as well as
>> many other listservs and Facebook pages. Citizen Science is a great tool
>> but it is also used by a few unethical people. People who don’t care about
>> disturbing birds in order to get “the perfect shot”, or, people who would
>> traffic in birds. Even curious onlookers. Fortunately, these people are in
>> a minority. But they are out there.
>>
>> It’s also one thing for one or two people to observe a nest but consider a
>> report in an urban area when many people arrive at the same time - as with
>> the eagle nest recently reported in Walworth city. Birds may be
>> intimidated. Or not. The problem is, it’s usually too late to reverse the
>> damage when it’s found to be they are disturbed.
>>
>> Some years ago an eagle nest was reported in Horicon Marsh. Fish and
>> Wildlife staff closed off the immediate area although the nest could be
>> observed at some distance. The eagles were successful. There have been
>> eagle nests up and down the Fox River near Appleton easily seen by anyone
>> who wishes to observe at a safe distance. The same with many lakes in the
>> northern part of the state.
>>
>> I happened to volunteer at a wildlife refuge in Florida for five months
>> where a Bald Eagle had set up a nest and produced young. Although the nest
>> was quite high, we roped off the area to prevent disturbing the nest site.
>> These birds were quite skittish whenever anyone approached the base of the
>> tree. A local member of the Audubon Society objected claiming the birds
>> were not at all disturbed and was subsequently banned from the refuge when
>> he ignored the roped off area and had gone so far as to fly a drone toward
>> the nest to get video. And this was the local president of an Audubon
>> chapter!
>>
>> It all boils down to using common sense and taking into consideration the
>> particular situation. Just because one raptor nest doesn’t appear to be
>> troubled by human activity, doesn’t necessarily apply to another raptor
>> nest. Great care should be taken when reporting a sighting. If in doubt,
>> don’t report.
>>
>> Tom Sykes
>> Wisbirdn List Owner
>> <sykes...>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ####################
>> You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
>> Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
>> To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
>> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
>> To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
>> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
>> Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn
>>
>>
>>
>> ####################
>> You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
>> Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
>> To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
>> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
>> To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
>> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
>> Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn
>>
>>
>>
>
> ####################
> You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
> To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at: http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at: http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn
>
>

####################
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Back to top
Date: 3/12/21 12:42 pm
From: Brian <courthousehollow...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
Hello everyone,
First off, this is LONG and a bit of a rant, so don’t read this if that
bothers you. Before posting I reread the WisBird rules, and yes, I’d be ok
with my mother reading this 😊 But my ultimate goal is to get people
thinking so that birds can thrive.

I'm wondering if there's a pink elephant in the room in this conversation?
Are all banding “studies” self-justifying? I have a question for the forum
if people would be so kind. I'm curious if anyone could summarize for me
how most of the bird banding that is done is anything but HARASSMENT to
them? I am honestly sending this out of genuine curiosity, have no
mal-intentions, and am not being derogatory towards anyone's interest in
banding. I really do want to understand.

I've been birding for 15 years or so now and in my quest to wrap my head
around banding: I have helped with bird banding multiple times over
multiple years for grad students in the UW system and elsewhere, read many,
many articles by professionals, USGS, as well as lay folks perspectives via
articles and on forums, yet I could only come up with 4 examples of how
banding could ACTUALLY benefit birds.

The 1st, is using banding for translocating, ex. to determine which males
are which in order to move some of the younger ones in the interest of
populating other areas due to habitat loss, etc. The 2nd, involves
endangered species or soon to be endangered, ex. using banding for the
purpose of knowing who’s who, where they go, how many successfully fledge,
etc. The 3rd, is to assist with game bird hunting regulations. The 4th, is
determining survival rates after oil spills or for toxicology in general. But
all 4 examples don't seem to justify the majority of banding.

With the exception of those uses, every example I've ever seen/heard as to
the "benefits" of what we have learned/learn from banding could be
distilled down to "satisfying human curiosity" or worse, giving humans
doing these projects "something fun to do" with a carte blanche
psychological safety net, say, when they stuff a passerine headfirst into a
pill bottle to weigh them, that, "I'm doing this to help birds!" Some
examples of what I've come across of how banding "helps" birds are:
learning that certain birds move here or there in their lifetimes, fly in
one stretch over the gulf, live for X amount of years, territorial
behavior, territory size and fidelity, mate fidelity, reproductive behavior
(which bird builds the nest or feeds the young and how often), etc. Again,
satisfying human curiosity....

To me, learning that a bird uses this or that summer/winter site, with the
exception of not destroying existing habitats (...but, really, where a few
recaptured birds go isn't much help to the THOUSANDS and THOUSANDS of
others of that species that go elsewhere), is more or less irrelevant to
conservation efforts in 2021. We've known for 60 years minimum that birds
need habitat in general and they generally need most varieties of habitat.
So, in my mind, learning a certain Warbler passing through Wisconsin (or
anywhere) winters in X particular patch of forest in Venezuela is
questionable conservation at best, and most likely, just
harassment/wasteful. Perhaps it could generate local interest during
fundraising, but so could MANY other things. And wouldn't birds be BETTER
served by using those funds for protecting/acquiring as much quality
habitat with as much habitat diversity as possible?

It appears scientists need to be reminded that in their vigor and eagerness
for "data", publications, career cache, tenure, job security, a raise, etc,
that they might be forgetting to consider just how "essential" an invasive
study (banding) is to the population’s (or individual’s) future survival,
short and long term. And that needs to be asked for EVERY "study" using
bands/transmitters. The problem is... it appears to rarely be asked.
"Banding is good", is the inculcated mantra....and "the more the better"!

I can't help but think that most efforts by concerned birders, especially
banding, are beating a dead horse, or worse, diluting resources for
conservation that could be better spent by giving birds a greater chance at
living LIFE. Knowing any of the aforementioned things we learn from banding
(aside from my first 4 examples) seems a stretch that it’s helping birds
any. It's been long established that birds decline without habitat in which
they can thrive, and we know enough (and have known enough for a LONG time)
to assist most of them with that. Banding just seems like a bizarre thing
to do to another creature so we can "learn" about them. An antiquated and
insensitive holdover that appears to be kept around because "it's what we
do". I would guess eBird provides FAR more useful data without harassing
the birds (with the exception of a few knuckleheads “gathering” data for
eBird).

But what COULD benefit birds, and benefit them in a BIG way, is if everyone
who has ever banded (or many other data collection methods) took ALL the
costs over the years associated with such efforts (gas, equipment, time,
funding/grants, etc, etc) and pooled those resources to buy/restore habitat
globally; critical areas being of 1st concern. Birds, and Nature in
general, would be FAR better off than the "value" of the reams of data that
was/is/will be collected or the costs of the tremendous resources used
worldwide to further such endeavors.

Essentially, I’m wondering if our efforts are truly making any difference
or if we're just swimming in interesting but ultimately useless data about
birds.

Any feedback contrary to my view is much appreciated.



Thank you!

Brian Pierce, Green Bay, Brown County

On Thu, Mar 11, 2021 at 6:30 PM Bill Stout <stoutw...> wrote:

> Hi Tom,
> I decided to forward my email to you to the entire group because I believe
> that a good number of people do not understand the perspective of a
> researcher. In fact, some even may be considered hypocritical (e.g.,
> Madison Eagle Nest Watch seems to depend on volunteers to REPORT and
> MONITOR eagle NEST LOCATIONS for them, but they are dead set against anyone
> reporting nests to anyone else). I have read several other viewpoints that
> also seem one-sided or perhaps uninformed. It is certainly not my intent
> here to offend anyone; however, I am not so naive as to think that this
> won't happen. Nevertheless, it is not my intent.
>
> Most Sincerely,
> Bill Stout
> Ashippun, USA
>
> My email to Tom on Wednesday in response to his post:
>
> Thanks for your insights, Tom, as I greatly appreciate them. I just wanted
> you to know that I am very conservative in my work when it comes to
> alerting others of nest sights. I do not list locations such as on eBird or
> report locations to anyone. However, as an educator, if someone is very
> interested in the birds or if a nest is in the immediate vicinity of their
> home, I work to provide them with a "one of a kind" educational experience.
>
> Last year I did not accommodate the general public and followed the North
> American Bird Banding Council recommendations for bird banding in the time
> of a COVID-19 pandemic (with the exception of one of the fist Great Horned
> Owl sites as it was before recommendations were out). This year will be
> more complicated as we try to move back to a new normal during this time.
> Nevertheless, I will be very cautious.
>
> Thanks again for your post.
>
> Sincerely,
> Bill Stout
> Ashippun, USA
>
> William E. Stout
>
> ________________________________
> From: Bill Stout <stoutw...>
> Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 12:58 PM
> To: <sykes...> <sykes...>
> Subject: Re: [wisb] Reporting nest sites
>
> Thanks for your insights, Tom, as I greatly appreciate them. I just wanted
> you to know that I am very conservative in my work when it comes to
> alerting others of nest sights. I do not list locations such as eBird or
> report locations to anyone. However, as an educator, if someone is very
> interested in the birds or if a nest is in the immediate vicinity of their
> home, I work to provide them with a "one of a kind" educational experience.
>
> Last year I did not accommodate the general public and followed the North
> American Bird Banding Council recommendations for bird banding in the time
> of a COVID-19 pandemic (with the exception of one of the fist Great Horned
> Owl sites as it was before recommendations were out). This year will be
> more complicated as we try to move back to a new normal during this time.
> Nevertheless, I will be very cautious.
>
> Thanks again for your post.
>
> Sincerely,
> Bill Stout
> Ashippun, USA
>
> William E. Stout
>
> ________________________________
> From: <wisbirdn-bounce...> <wisbirdn-bounce...> on
> behalf of Tom Sykes <sykes...>
> Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 10:43 AM
> To: Wisbirdn <wisbirdn...>
> Subject: [wisb] Reporting nest sites
>
> From time to time the issue of reporting bird nests appears on the list.
> And while there is some disagreement about whether or not a nest site is or
> is not being disturbed by human presence, I would direct you to both the
> ABA Birding Ethics and WSO Birding Ethics sites as a reminder for those
> wondering about the ethics of reporting a nest site. WISBIRDN subscribes to
> following both.
>
> https://wsobirds.org/about-wso/code-of-ethics
>
> https://www.aba.org/aba-code-of-birding-ethics/
>
> It is true that many reports of nesting raptors appear on eBird as well as
> many other listservs and Facebook pages. Citizen Science is a great tool
> but it is also used by a few unethical people. People who don’t care about
> disturbing birds in order to get “the perfect shot”, or, people who would
> traffic in birds. Even curious onlookers. Fortunately, these people are in
> a minority. But they are out there.
>
> It’s also one thing for one or two people to observe a nest but consider a
> report in an urban area when many people arrive at the same time - as with
> the eagle nest recently reported in Walworth city. Birds may be
> intimidated. Or not. The problem is, it’s usually too late to reverse the
> damage when it’s found to be they are disturbed.
>
> Some years ago an eagle nest was reported in Horicon Marsh. Fish and
> Wildlife staff closed off the immediate area although the nest could be
> observed at some distance. The eagles were successful. There have been
> eagle nests up and down the Fox River near Appleton easily seen by anyone
> who wishes to observe at a safe distance. The same with many lakes in the
> northern part of the state.
>
> I happened to volunteer at a wildlife refuge in Florida for five months
> where a Bald Eagle had set up a nest and produced young. Although the nest
> was quite high, we roped off the area to prevent disturbing the nest site.
> These birds were quite skittish whenever anyone approached the base of the
> tree. A local member of the Audubon Society objected claiming the birds
> were not at all disturbed and was subsequently banned from the refuge when
> he ignored the roped off area and had gone so far as to fly a drone toward
> the nest to get video. And this was the local president of an Audubon
> chapter!
>
> It all boils down to using common sense and taking into consideration the
> particular situation. Just because one raptor nest doesn’t appear to be
> troubled by human activity, doesn’t necessarily apply to another raptor
> nest. Great care should be taken when reporting a sighting. If in doubt,
> don’t report.
>
> Tom Sykes
> Wisbirdn List Owner
> <sykes...>
>
>
>
>
> ####################
> You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
> Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
> To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn
>
>
>
> ####################
> You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
> Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
> To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn
>
>
>

####################
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Back to top
Date: 3/12/21 11:25 am
From: Dennis Casper <denncasp.wisbirder...>
Subject: [wisb] Urban Ecology Center Bird Walk, March 11, 2021
Urban Ecology Center, Riverside Park
1500 East Park Place, Milwaukee, WI 53211
414-964-8505, www.UrbanEcologyCenter.org
BIRD WALK
Thursdays, 8:00 am—10:00 am year round.
Free and Open to the Public, All Ages Welcome [NOTE: The walks are now
again open to the general public, but pre-registration is required. Do so
at urbanecologycenter.org.]


Thursday, March 11, 2021
41 degrees
Sunny, windy, river free of ice
9 birders

Total Species: 24

20 Canada Goose
2 Wood Duck
19 Mallard
2 Red-breasted Merganser
4 Rock Pigeon
1 Herring Gull
2 Turkey Vulture
2 Cooper’s Hawk
1 Red-bellied Woodpecker
2 Downy Woodpecker

1 Hairy Woodpecker
9 American Crow
3 Black-capped Chickadee
3 White-breasted Nuthatch
6 European Starling
2 American Robin
3 House Sparrow
1 House Finch
1 American Goldfinch
1 Dark-eyed Junco

2 Song Sparrow
15 Red-winged Blackbird
5 Common Grackle
2 Northern Cardinal

####################
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Back to top
Date: 3/11/21 4:30 pm
From: Bill Stout <stoutw...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
Hi Tom,
I decided to forward my email to you to the entire group because I believe that a good number of people do not understand the perspective of a researcher. In fact, some even may be considered hypocritical (e.g., Madison Eagle Nest Watch seems to depend on volunteers to REPORT and MONITOR eagle NEST LOCATIONS for them, but they are dead set against anyone reporting nests to anyone else). I have read several other viewpoints that also seem one-sided or perhaps uninformed. It is certainly not my intent here to offend anyone; however, I am not so naive as to think that this won't happen. Nevertheless, it is not my intent.

Most Sincerely,
Bill Stout
Ashippun, USA

My email to Tom on Wednesday in response to his post:

Thanks for your insights, Tom, as I greatly appreciate them. I just wanted you to know that I am very conservative in my work when it comes to alerting others of nest sights. I do not list locations such as on eBird or report locations to anyone. However, as an educator, if someone is very interested in the birds or if a nest is in the immediate vicinity of their home, I work to provide them with a "one of a kind" educational experience.

Last year I did not accommodate the general public and followed the North American Bird Banding Council recommendations for bird banding in the time of a COVID-19 pandemic (with the exception of one of the fist Great Horned Owl sites as it was before recommendations were out). This year will be more complicated as we try to move back to a new normal during this time. Nevertheless, I will be very cautious.

Thanks again for your post.

Sincerely,
Bill Stout
Ashippun, USA

William E. Stout

________________________________
From: Bill Stout <stoutw...>
Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 12:58 PM
To: <sykes...> <sykes...>
Subject: Re: [wisb] Reporting nest sites

Thanks for your insights, Tom, as I greatly appreciate them. I just wanted you to know that I am very conservative in my work when it comes to alerting others of nest sights. I do not list locations such as eBird or report locations to anyone. However, as an educator, if someone is very interested in the birds or if a nest is in the immediate vicinity of their home, I work to provide them with a "one of a kind" educational experience.

Last year I did not accommodate the general public and followed the North American Bird Banding Council recommendations for bird banding in the time of a COVID-19 pandemic (with the exception of one of the fist Great Horned Owl sites as it was before recommendations were out). This year will be more complicated as we try to move back to a new normal during this time. Nevertheless, I will be very cautious.

Thanks again for your post.

Sincerely,
Bill Stout
Ashippun, USA

William E. Stout

________________________________
From: <wisbirdn-bounce...> <wisbirdn-bounce...> on behalf of Tom Sykes <sykes...>
Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 10:43 AM
To: Wisbirdn <wisbirdn...>
Subject: [wisb] Reporting nest sites

From time to time the issue of reporting bird nests appears on the list. And while there is some disagreement about whether or not a nest site is or is not being disturbed by human presence, I would direct you to both the ABA Birding Ethics and WSO Birding Ethics sites as a reminder for those wondering about the ethics of reporting a nest site. WISBIRDN subscribes to following both.

https://wsobirds.org/about-wso/code-of-ethics

https://www.aba.org/aba-code-of-birding-ethics/

It is true that many reports of nesting raptors appear on eBird as well as many other listservs and Facebook pages. Citizen Science is a great tool but it is also used by a few unethical people. People who dont care about disturbing birds in order to get the perfect shot, or, people who would traffic in birds. Even curious onlookers. Fortunately, these people are in a minority. But they are out there.

Its also one thing for one or two people to observe a nest but consider a report in an urban area when many people arrive at the same time - as with the eagle nest recently reported in Walworth city. Birds may be intimidated. Or not. The problem is, its usually too late to reverse the damage when its found to be they are disturbed.

Some years ago an eagle nest was reported in Horicon Marsh. Fish and Wildlife staff closed off the immediate area although the nest could be observed at some distance. The eagles were successful. There have been eagle nests up and down the Fox River near Appleton easily seen by anyone who wishes to observe at a safe distance. The same with many lakes in the northern part of the state.

I happened to volunteer at a wildlife refuge in Florida for five months where a Bald Eagle had set up a nest and produced young. Although the nest was quite high, we roped off the area to prevent disturbing the nest site. These birds were quite skittish whenever anyone approached the base of the tree. A local member of the Audubon Society objected claiming the birds were not at all disturbed and was subsequently banned from the refuge when he ignored the roped off area and had gone so far as to fly a drone toward the nest to get video. And this was the local president of an Audubon chapter!

It all boils down to using common sense and taking into consideration the particular situation. Just because one raptor nest doesnt appear to be troubled by human activity, doesnt necessarily apply to another raptor nest. Great care should be taken when reporting a sighting. If in doubt, dont report.

Tom Sykes
Wisbirdn List Owner
<sykes...>




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Date: 3/11/21 1:25 pm
From: Hephziabah Beulah <hephziabahb...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
Very well said Tom.
Hep
Brookfield, WI

On Wed, Mar 10, 2021, 10:43 AM Tom Sykes <sykes...> wrote:

> From time to time the issue of reporting bird nests appears on the list.
> And while there is some disagreement about whether or not a nest site is or
> is not being disturbed by human presence, I would direct you to both the
> ABA Birding Ethics and WSO Birding Ethics sites as a reminder for those
> wondering about the ethics of reporting a nest site. WISBIRDN subscribes to
> following both.
>
> https://wsobirds.org/about-wso/code-of-ethics
>
> https://www.aba.org/aba-code-of-birding-ethics/
>
> It is true that many reports of nesting raptors appear on eBird as well as
> many other listservs and Facebook pages. Citizen Science is a great tool
> but it is also used by a few unethical people. People who don’t care about
> disturbing birds in order to get “the perfect shot”, or, people who would
> traffic in birds. Even curious onlookers. Fortunately, these people are in
> a minority. But they are out there.
>
> It’s also one thing for one or two people to observe a nest but consider a
> report in an urban area when many people arrive at the same time - as with
> the eagle nest recently reported in Walworth city. Birds may be
> intimidated. Or not. The problem is, it’s usually too late to reverse the
> damage when it’s found to be they are disturbed.
>
> Some years ago an eagle nest was reported in Horicon Marsh. Fish and
> Wildlife staff closed off the immediate area although the nest could be
> observed at some distance. The eagles were successful. There have been
> eagle nests up and down the Fox River near Appleton easily seen by anyone
> who wishes to observe at a safe distance. The same with many lakes in the
> northern part of the state.
>
> I happened to volunteer at a wildlife refuge in Florida for five months
> where a Bald Eagle had set up a nest and produced young. Although the nest
> was quite high, we roped off the area to prevent disturbing the nest site.
> These birds were quite skittish whenever anyone approached the base of the
> tree. A local member of the Audubon Society objected claiming the birds
> were not at all disturbed and was subsequently banned from the refuge when
> he ignored the roped off area and had gone so far as to fly a drone toward
> the nest to get video. And this was the local president of an Audubon
> chapter!
>
> It all boils down to using common sense and taking into consideration the
> particular situation. Just because one raptor nest doesn’t appear to be
> troubled by human activity, doesn’t necessarily apply to another raptor
> nest. Great care should be taken when reporting a sighting. If in doubt,
> don’t report.
>
> Tom Sykes
> Wisbirdn List Owner
> <sykes...>
>
>
>
>
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>
>

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Date: 3/11/21 1:06 pm
From: Hephziabah Beulah <hephziabahb...>
Subject: [wisb] Eagle/Owl Nests Re: Nest locations
Hi, I did back channel an individual about posting exact locations and
followed up w/Tom Sykes. Peter Fissel absolutely forbid posting exact
locations of Owls, I believe it would include Eagles as well.
The DNR has 2 live Eagle nests in Decorah, Iowa. We know one is near a
farmer and the other a fish hatchery, that is it.

I agree, for the protection of the species, do not post exact locations.

Hep
Brookfield, WI

On Sun, Mar 7, 2021, 5:29 PM Sandy Petersen <buboarcto2...> wrote:

> Hi all!
> I love reading everyone's observations but
> I question the wisdom of providing exact locations
> of raptor and other nests. What does everyone think?
>
> Thanks.
>
> Sandy Petersen, north of Stoughton
> Owls calling in the vicinity
>
>
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Date: 3/11/21 6:28 am
From: Dennis Kirschbaum <kad9801...>
Subject: [wisb] Bald Eagle count today - Crawford County
Today's Bald Eagle count from the Campion Boat Landing to Gremore Lake
came in at 374.  Most eagles were sitting on the ice of Gremore Lake. 
Best spots to see the birds is from the parking lot at the Crooked Oar
Bar and Restaurant or south of the bar along the roadway in the seasonal
mobile home park.  The Crooked Oar is north of Prairie du Chien on
County Road K.  N. Main St. in Prairie du Chien becomes Cty Rd K when
leaving the city.  Another 35-40 eagles were seen flying overhead on my
return trip to town but not counted as they may have already been counted.

--
Dennis and Alice Kirschbaum
1505 E. Parrish St.
Prairie du Chien, Wi 53821
608-326-2718

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